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Sample records for line active fault

  1. Deep geometry and evolution of the northern part of Itoigwa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line active fault system, Central Japan, revealed by Seismic profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Iwasaki, T.; Matsuta, N.; Takeda, T.; Kawasaki, S.; Kozawa, T.; Elouai, D.; Hirata, N.; Kawanaka, T.

    2003-12-01

    The northern Fossa Magna (NFM) is a Miocene rift system produced in the final stages of the opening of the Sea of Japan. It divides the major structure of Japan into SW and NE portions. The Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line (ISTL) bounds the western part of the northern Fossa Magna and forms an active fault system showing the one of the largest slip rates in the Japanese islands. Based on the paleo-seismological data, the ISTL active fault system was evaluated to have the highest seismic risk among active faults within inland Japan. A quantitative understanding of active tectonic processes, including crustal deformation and related destructive earthquakes, is important in reducing seismic hazards through precise estimation of strong ground motions. The structure of the crust, especially the deep geometry of active fault systems, is the most important piece information required to construct such a dynamic model. In this context, the seismic reflection profiling was performed across the northern part of the ISTL active fault system by three seismic lines. Obtained seismic sections are interpreted based on the pattern of reflectors, surface geology and velocity model by refraction analysis, using the balanced cross section technique. The 68-km-long Itoshizu 2002 seismic section across the northern middle part of the ISTL active fault system suggest that the Miocene NFM basin was formed by an east dipping normal fault with shallow flat (6 km), deeper ramp (6 15 km) and deeper flat at 15 km in depth. This unique geometry is interpreted that this low-angle normal fault was produced by Miocene high thermal regime, estimated from the thick volcanic rocks at the base of the basin fill. Namely, the normal fault reflects the brittle-ductile boundary in Miocene. Consequently, since the Pliocene, the basin fill was strongly folded by the reverse faulting along the pre-existing normal faults in the Pre-Neogene rocks. The reverse faults in the basin fill produced fault

  2. A neural network approach for on-line fault detection of nitrogen sensors in alternated active sludge treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Caccavale, F; Digiulio, P; Iamarino, M; Masi, S; Pierri, F

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, an effective strategy for fault detection of nitrogen sensors in alternated active sludge treatment plants is proposed and tested on a simulated set-up. It is based on two predictive neural networks, which are trained using a historical set of data collected during fault-free operation of a wastewater treatment plant and their ability to predict reduced (ammonium) and oxidized (nitrates and nitrites) nitrogen is tested. The neural networks are also characterized by good generalization ability and robustness with respect to the influent variability with time and weather conditions. Then, simulations have been carried out imposing different kinds of fault on both sensors, as isolated spikes, abrupt bias and increased noise. Processing of residuals, based on the difference between measured concentration values and neural networks predictions, allows a quick revealing of the fault as well as the isolation of the corrupted sensor. PMID:21123904

  3. On-line diagnosis of unrestricted faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, J. F.; Sundstrom, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A formal model for the study of on-line diagnosis is introduced and used to investigate the diagnosis of unrestricted faults. A fault of a system S is considered to be a transformation of S into another system S' at some time tau. The resulting faulty system is taken to be the system which looks like S up to time tau, and like S' thereafter. Notions of fault tolerance error are defined in terms of the resulting system being able to mimic some desired behavior as specified by a system similar to S. A notion of on-line diagnosis is formulated which involves an external detector and a maximum time delay within which every error caused by a fault in a prescribed set must be detected. It is shown that if a system is on-line diagnosable for the unrestricted set of faults then the detector is at least as complex, in terms of state set size, as the specification. The use of inverse systems for the diagnosis of unrestricted faults is considered. A partial characterization of those inverses which can be used for unrestricted fault diagnosis is obtained.

  4. On-line diagnosis of unrestricted faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, J. F.; Sundstrom, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Attention is given to the formal development of the notion of a discrete-time system and the associated concepts of fault, result of a fault, and error. The considered concept of on-line diagnosis is formalized and a diagnosis using inverse machines is discussed. The case of an inverse which is lossless is investigated. It is found that in such a case the class of unrestricted faults can be diagnosed with a delay equal to the delay of losslessness of the inverse system.

  5. University Autonomy: Two Fault-Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, G. R.

    2010-01-01

    The doctrine of university autonomy in the UK contains a least two major "fault-lines" where the structure is inherently weak and there is danger of functional breakdown. The first occurs at the junction between the institution and the state, the second within the institution, where the unity in policy-making between academic and…

  6. Active strike-slip faulting history inferred from offsets of topographic features and basement rocks: a case study of the Arima Takatsuki Tectonic Line, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Tadashi; Lin, Aiming

    2002-01-01

    Geological, geomorphological and geophysical data have been used to determine the total displacement, slip rates and age of formation of the Arima-Takatsuki Tectonic Line (ATTL) in southwest Japan. The ATTL is an ENE-WSW-trending dextral strike-slip fault zone that extends for about 60 km from northwest of the Rokko Mountains to southwest of the Kyoto Basin. The ATTL marks a distinct topographic boundary between mountainous regions and basin regions. Tectonic landforms typically associated with active strike-slip faults, such as systematically-deflected stream channels, offset ridges and fault scarps, are recognized along the ATTL. The Quaternary drainage system shows progressive displacement along the fault traces: the greater the magnitude of stream channel, the larger the amount of offset. The maximum dextral deflection of stream channels is 600-700 m. The field data and detailed topographic analyses, however, show that pre-Neogene basement rocks on both sides of the ATTL are displaced by about 16-18 km dextrally and pre-Mio-Pliocene elevated peneplains are also offset 16-17 km in dextral along the ATTL. This suggests that the ATTL formed in the period between the development of the pre-Mio-Pliocene peneplains and deflection of the Quaternary stream channels. The geological, geomorphological and geophysical evidence presented in this study indicates that (1) the ATTL formed after the mid-Miocene, (2) the ATTL has moved as a dextral strike-slip fault with minor vertical component since its formation to late Holocene and (3) the ATTL is presently active with dextral slip rates of 1-3 mm/year and a vertical component of >0.3 mm/year. The formation of the ATTL was probably related to the opening of the Japan Sea, which is the dominant tectonic event around Japan since mid-Miocene. The case study of the ATTL provides insight into understanding the tectonic history and relationship between tectonic landforms and structures in active strike-slip faults.

  7. Central Asia Active Fault Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohadjer, Solmaz; Ehlers, Todd A.; Kakar, Najibullah

    2014-05-01

    The ongoing collision of the Indian subcontinent with Asia controls active tectonics and seismicity in Central Asia. This motion is accommodated by faults that have historically caused devastating earthquakes and continue to pose serious threats to the population at risk. Despite international and regional efforts to assess seismic hazards in Central Asia, little attention has been given to development of a comprehensive database for active faults in the region. To address this issue and to better understand the distribution and level of seismic hazard in Central Asia, we are developing a publically available database for active faults of Central Asia (including but not limited to Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, northern Pakistan and western China) using ArcGIS. The database is designed to allow users to store, map and query important fault parameters such as fault location, displacement history, rate of movement, and other data relevant to seismic hazard studies including fault trench locations, geochronology constraints, and seismic studies. Data sources integrated into the database include previously published maps and scientific investigations as well as strain rate measurements and historic and recent seismicity. In addition, high resolution Quickbird, Spot, and Aster imagery are used for selected features to locate and measure offset of landforms associated with Quaternary faulting. These features are individually digitized and linked to attribute tables that provide a description for each feature. Preliminary observations include inconsistent and sometimes inaccurate information for faults documented in different studies. For example, the Darvaz-Karakul fault which roughly defines the western margin of the Pamir, has been mapped with differences in location of up to 12 kilometers. The sense of motion for this fault ranges from unknown to thrust and strike-slip in three different studies despite documented left-lateral displacements of Holocene and late

  8. Structural analysis, clay mineralogy and K-Ar dating of fault gouges from Centovalli Line (Central Alps) for reconstruction of their recent activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surace, Ivan R.; Clauer, Norbert; Thélin, Philippe; Pfeifer, Hans-Rudolf

    2011-09-01

    Between the cities of Domodossola and Locarno, the complex "Centovalli Line" tectonic zone of the Central Alps outlines deformation phases over a long period of time (probably starting ~ 30 Ma ago) and under variable P-T conditions. The last deformation phases developed gouge-bearing faults with a general E-W trend that crosscuts the roots of the Alpine Canavese zone and the Finero ultramafic body. Kinematic indicators show that the general motion was mainly dextral associated with back thrusting towards the S. The < 2 μm clay fractions of fault gouges from Centovalli Line consist mainly of illite, smectite and chlorite with varied illite-smectite, chlorite-smectite and chlorite-serpentine mixed-layers. Constrained with the illite crystallinity index, the thermal conditions induced by the tectonic activity show a gradual trend from anchizonal to diagenetic conditions. The < 2 and < 0.2 μm clay fractions, and hydrothermal K-feldspar separates all provide K-Ar ages between 14.2 ± 2.9 Ma and roughly 0 Ma, with major episodes at about 12, 8, 6 and close to 0 Ma. These ages set the recurrent tectonic activity and the associated fluid circulations between Upper Miocene and Recent. On the basis of the K-Ar ages and with a thermal gradient of 25-30 °C/km, the studied fault zones were located at a depth of 4-7 km. If they were active until now as observed in field, the exhumation was approximately 2.5-3.0 km for the last 12 Ma with a mean velocity of 0.4 mm/y. Comparison with available models on the recent Alpine evolution shows that the tectonic activity in the area relates to a continuum of the back-thrusting movements of the Canavese Line, and/or to several late-extensional phases of the Rhône-Simplon Line. The Centovalli-Val Vigezzo zone therefore represents a major tectonic zone of the Central-Western Alps resulting from different interacting tectonic events.

  9. MER Surface Phase; Blurring the Line Between Fault Protection and What is Supposed to Happen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, Glenn E.

    2008-01-01

    An assessment on the limitations of communication with MER rovers and how such constraints drove the system design, flight software and fault protection architecture, blurring the line between traditional fault protection and expected nominal behavior, and requiring the most novel autonomous and semi-autonomous elements of the vehicle software including communication, surface mobility, attitude knowledge acquisition, fault protection, and the activity arbitration service.

  10. Packaged Fault Model for Geometric Segmentation of Active Faults Into Earthquake Source Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, T.; Kumamoto, T.

    2004-12-01

    In Japan, the empirical formula proposed by Matsuda (1975) mainly based on the length of the historical surface fault ruptures and magnitude, is generally applied to estimate the size of future earthquakes from the extent of existing active faults for seismic hazard assessment. Therefore validity of the active fault length and defining individual segment boundaries where propagating ruptures terminate are essential and crucial to the reliability for the accurate assessments. It is, however, not likely for us to clearly identify the behavioral earthquake segments from observation of surface faulting during the historical period, because most of the active faults have longer recurrence intervals than 1000 years in Japan. Besides uncertainties of the datasets obtained mainly from fault trenching studies are quite large for fault grouping/segmentation. This is why new methods or criteria should be applied for active fault grouping/segmentation, and one of the candidates may be geometric criterion of active faults. Matsuda (1990) used _gfive kilometer_h as a critical distance for grouping and separation of neighboring active faults. On the other hand, Nakata and Goto (1998) proposed the geometric criteria such as (1) branching features of active fault traces and (2) characteristic pattern of vertical-slip distribution along the fault traces as tools to predict rupture length of future earthquakes. The branching during the fault rupture propagation is regarded as an effective energy dissipation process and could result in final rupture termination. With respect to the characteristic pattern of vertical-slip distribution, especially with strike-slip components, the up-thrown sides along the faults are, in general, located on the fault blocks in the direction of relative strike-slip. Applying these new geometric criteria to the high-resolution active fault distribution maps, the fault grouping/segmentation could be more practically conducted. We tested this model

  11. Fault Segmentation and its Implication to the Evaluation of Future Earthquakes from Active Faults in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awata, Y.; Yoshioka, T.

    2005-12-01

    segment in average and 15 in maximum. That average number of behavioral segment in a single earthquake segment best estimated is similar to that number of the Japanese historical earthquakes. The longest ?gseismogenic fault?h, the Median Tectonic Line Active Fault System of 350 km-long, was probably ruptured during the 16th century, in a series of large earthquakes, and the second longest Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line Active Fault System of 145 km-long was also ruptured between the 8th and 9th centuries. These historical and paleoseimological events support the usefulness of the "seismogenic faults"-idea for the best estimation of earthquake segment.

  12. Characterizing the Iron Wash fault: A fault line scarp in Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozaci, O.; Ostenaa, D.; Goodman, J.; Zellman, M.; Hoeft, J.; Sowers, J. M.; Retson, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Iron Wash fault (IWF) is an approximately 30 mile-long, NW-SE trending structure, oriented perpendicular to the San Rafael Monocline near Green River in Utah. IWF exhibits well-expressed geomorphic features such as a linear escarpment with consistently north side down displacement. The fault coincides with an abrupt change in San Rafael Monocline dip angle along its eastern margin. The IWF is exposed in incised drainages where Jurassic Navajo sandstone (oldest) and Lower Carmel Formation (old), are juxtaposed against Jurassic Entrada sandstone (younger) and Quaternary alluvium (youngest). To assess the recency of activity of the IWF we performed detailed geomorphic mapping and a paleoseismic trenching investigation. A benched trench was excavated across a Quaternary fluvial terrace remnant across the mapped trace of the IWF. The uppermost gravel units and overlying colluvium are exposed in the trench across the projection of the fault. In addition, we mapped the basal contact of the Quaternary gravel deposit in relation to the adjacent fault exposures in detail to show the geometry of the basal contact near and across the fault. We find no evidence of vertical displacement of these Quaternary gravels. A preliminary U-series date of calcite cementing unfaulted fluvial gravels and OSL dating of a sand lens within the unfaulted fluvial gravels yielded approximately 304,000 years and 78,000 years, respectively. These preliminary results of independent dating methods constrains the timing of last activity of the IWF to greater than 78,000 years before present suggesting that IWF not an active structure. Its distinct geomorphic expression is most likely the result of differential erosion, forming a fault-line scarp.

  13. Strike-slip movements and thrusting along a transpressive fault zone: The North Giudicarie line (Insubric line, northern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosser, Giacomo

    1998-12-01

    This paper analyzes the kinematic evolution and the deformation partitioning within an important transpressive fault zone located in the central part of the Alpine chain. The North Giudicarie line is a NNE trending fault which offsets the dextral Insubric line with an apparent left-lateral displacement of about 70 km. The main fault plane of the North Giudicarie line dips about 35°-45° to the NW. The footwall is characterized by N-S striking strike-slip faults, which reactivate extensional faults of Early Jurassic to Late Cretaceous age. The early deformation history of the North Giudicarie line is revealed by basement-and limestone-mylonites. Shear sense of mylonites indicates on average top-to-the-east thrusting. These movements took place during the late Oligocene-early Miocene, when the Insubric line was active as a right-lateral strike-slip fault. Therefore, in this time span the North Giudicarie line can be interpreted as a dextral transpressive bend of the Insubric line. Mylonites have later been overprinted by brittle faults related to top-to-the-SE thrusting of middle-late Miocene age. During this event the shape of the Insubric line was strongly modified by left-lateral transpression along the Giudicarie fault zone. Deformation was partitioned between prevailing compression along the Giudicarie line and left-lateral strike-slip movements along the N-S striking faults. These faults transferred the strike-slip component of the Giudicarie line into a wider area of the central southern Alps.

  14. The property of fault zone and fault activity of Shionohira Fault, Fukushima, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshimo, K.; Aoki, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Niwa, M.; Kametaka, M.; Sakai, T.; Tanaka, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The April 11, 2011 Fukushima-ken Hamadori Earthquake (hereafter the 4.11 earthquake) formed co-seismic surface ruptures trending in the NNW-SSE direction in Iwaki City, Fukushima Prefecture, which were newly named as the Shionohira Fault by Ishiyama et al. (2011). This earthquake was characterized by a westward dipping normal slip faulting, with a maximum displacement of about 2 m (e.g., Kurosawa et al., 2012). To the south of the area, the same trending lineaments were recognized to exist even though no surface ruptures occurred by the earthquake. In an attempt to elucidate the differences of active and non-active segments of the fault, this report discusses the results of observation of fault outcrops along the Shionohira Fault as well as the Coulomb stress calculations. Only a few outcrops have basement rocks of both the hanging-wall and foot-wall of the fault plane. Three of these outcrops (Kyodo-gawa, Shionohira and Betto) were selected for investigation. In addition, a fault outcrop (Nameishi-minami) located about 300 m south of the southern tip of the surface ruptures was investigated. The authors carried out observations of outcrops, polished slabs and thin sections, and performed X-ray diffraction (XRD) to fault materials. As a result, the fault zones originating from schists were investigated at Kyodo-gawa and Betto. A thick fault gouge was cut by a fault plane of the 4.11 earthquake in each outcrop. The fault materials originating from schists were fault bounded with (possibly Neogene) weakly deformed sandstone at Shionohira. A thin fault gouge was found along the fault plane of 4.11 earthquake. A small-scale fault zone with thin fault gouge was observed in Nameishi-minami. According to XRD analysis, smectite was detected in the gouges from Kyodo-gawa, Shionohira and Betto, while not in the gouge from Nameishi-minami.

  15. A review of recently active faults in Taiwan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonilla, Manuel G.

    1975-01-01

    Six faults associated with five large earthquakes produced surface displacements ranging from 1 to 3 m in the period 1906 through 1951. Four of the ruptures occurred in the western coastal plain and foothills, and two occurred in the Longitudinal Valley of eastern Taiwan. Maps are included showing the locations and dimensions of the displacements. The published geological literature probably would not lead one to infer the existence of a fault along most of the 1906 rupture, except for descriptions of the rupture itself. Over most of its length the 1935 rupture on the Chihhu fault is parallel to but more than 0.5 km from nearby faults shown on geologic maps published in 1969 and 1971; only about 1.5 km of its 15 km length coincides with a mapped fault. The coastal plain part of the Tuntzuchio fault which ruptured in 1935 is apparently not revealed by landforms, and only suggested by other data. Part of the 1946 Hsinhua faulting coincides with a fault identified in the subsurface by seismic work but surface indications of the fault are obscure. The 1951 Meilun faulting occurred along a conspicuous pre-1951 scarp and the 1951 Yuli faulting occurred near or in line with pre-1951 scarps. More than 40 faults which, according to the published literature, have had Pleistocene or later movement are shown on a small-scale map. Most of these faults are in the densely-populated western part of Taiwan. The map and text calls attention to faults that may be active and therefore may be significant in planning important structures. Equivocal evidence suggestive of fault creep was found on the Yuli fault and the Hsinhua fault. Fault creep was not found at several places examined along the 1906 fault trace. Tectonic uplift has occurred in Taiwan in the last 10,000 years and application of eustatic sea level curves to published radiocarbon dates shows that the minimum rate of uplift is considerably different in different parts of the island. Incomplete data indicate that the rate is

  16. Hydrogen Gas Emissions from Active Faults and Identification of Flow Pathway in a Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimaru, T.; Niwa, M.; Kurosawa, H.; Shimada, K.

    2010-12-01

    It has been observed that hydrogen gas emissions from the subsurface along active faults exceed atmospheric concentrations (e.g. Sugisaki et. al., 1983). Experimental studies have shown that hydrogen gas is generated in a radical reaction of water with fractured silicate minerals due to rock fracturing caused by fault movement (e.g. Kita et al., 1982). Based on such research, we are studying an investigation method for an assessment of fault activity using hydrogen gas emissions from fracture zones. To start, we have devised portable equipment for rapid and simple in situ measurement of hydrogen gas emissions (Shimada et al., 2008). The key component of this equipment is a commercially available and compact hydrogen gas sensor with an integral data logger operable at atmospheric pressure. In the field, we have drilled shallow boreholes into incohesive fault rocks to depths ranging from 15 to 45 cm using a hand-operated drill with a 9mm drill-bit. Then, we have measured the hydrogen gas concentrations in emissions from active faults such as: the western part of the Atotsugawa fault zone, the Atera fault zone and the Neodani fault in central Japan; the Yamasaki fault zone in southwest Japan; and the Yamagata fault zone in northeast Japan. In addition, we have investigated the hydrogen gas concentrations in emissions from other major geological features such as tectonic lines: the Butsuzo Tectonic Line in the eastern Kii Peninsula and the Atokura Nappe in the Northeastern Kanto Mountains. As a result of the investigations, hydrogen gas concentration in emissions from the active faults was measured to be in the approximate range from 6,000 ppm to 26,000 ppm in two to three hours after drilling. A tendency for high concentrations of hydrogen gas in active faults was recognized, in contrast with low concentrations in emissions from tectonic lines that were observed to be in the range from 730 ppm to 2,000 ppm. It is inferred that the hydrogen gas migrates to ground

  17. A High-Resolution Seismic Survey Across the State Line fault, NV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beachly, M.; Cox, C. M.; Saldana, S. C.; Snelson, C. M.; Taylor, W. J.; Robins, C.; Davis, R.; Stropky, M.; Phillips, R.; Cothrun, C.

    2007-12-01

    During the summer of 2007, an investigation of the faulting in Stewart Valley was under taken, located within the central Basin and Range province ~90 km west of Las Vegas, Nevada. The goal of this study was to resolve the seismic hazard potential of the State Line fault, a right-lateral strike-slip fault that runs the length of Stewart Valley. Four seismic reflection lines were acquired, two perpendicular and two parallel to the State Line fault. What is presented is an analysis of the western and eastern seismic lines parallel to the State Line fault. The western line was acquired utilizing a 144-channel geode system with each of the 4.5 Hz vertical geophones set out at 5 m intervals to form a 715 m long profile. The eastern line employed 120 of these geophones in a 595 m long profile. A mini-vibroseis served as the seismic source every ten meters, between geophones. The vibroseis was programmed to produce an 8 s linear sweep from 20-160 Hz. Three sweeps were recorded at each shot location without acquisition filters at a sampling rate of 0.5 ms. The three shot gathers were then stacked at each location to reduce noise. The data collected had minimal noise, although; during the processing of the eastern line a notch filtered was used to remove the 60 Hz noise created by adjacent power line. These lines, acquired parallel to the State Line fault, contain matching features that serve to determine how much lateral displacement the fault has undergone. The amount of the displacement can indicate how active the fault is, and thus, what magnitude of earthquake can be expected in the future. This will in turn contribute to determining the seismic hazard potential for southern Nevada. A preliminary interpretation of the seismic reflection sections indicates an average displacement of about 20 - 38 m with greater displacement in the deeper sections of the image. The shallow depth displacement calculations are consistent with previous work in the area. The State Line fault

  18. Illuminating Northern California's Active Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, Carol S.; Crosby, Christopher J.; Whitehill, Caroline S.; Arrowsmith, J. Ramón; Furlong, Kevin P.; Phillips, David A.

    2009-02-01

    Newly acquired light detection and ranging (lidar) topographic data provide a powerful community resource for the study of landforms associated with the plate boundary faults of northern California (Figure 1). In the spring of 2007, GeoEarthScope, a component of the EarthScope Facility construction project funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation, acquired approximately 2000 square kilometers of airborne lidar topographic data along major active fault zones of northern California. These data are now freely available in point cloud (x, y, z coordinate data for every laser return), digital elevation model (DEM), and KMZ (zipped Keyhole Markup Language, for use in Google Earth™ and other similar software) formats through the GEON OpenTopography Portal (http://www.OpenTopography.org/data). Importantly, vegetation can be digitally removed from lidar data, producing high-resolution images (0.5- or 1.0-meter DEMs) of the ground surface beneath forested regions that reveal landforms typically obscured by vegetation canopy (Figure 2).

  19. Spatial distribution of microfractures in damage zone along active faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, K.; Ueta, K.

    2011-12-01

    For basement faults without overlying quaternary sediments, there are few methods to determine whether the fault is active or not. Recently, we focus on microfracture characteristics of damage zone along active faults as used for the assessment of seismic activity of basement faults. In this study, we examined a newly-found active fault (Sasaki et al., 2011) located to the east of the epicentral area of 1943 Tottori earthquake, southwest Japan. The fault zone consists of the 75 cm thick fault core of the purple-colored clayey fault gouge and the fault breccia with cataclastic foliation, and the surrounding damage zone developed in Cretaceous Kyushozan granite. A subsidiary fault accompanying a fault core of white clayey fault gouge that ranges from 3 to 5 mm thickness is located at about 110 m from the main fault. We collected ten orientated samples 9 m to 180 m from the main fault. The samples were coated with epoxy and then thin sections were cut perpendicular to the fault plane and parallel to a horizontal plane because the slip direction is unknown. Microfracture density data were collected from 40 quartz grains per thin section (per sample). A thin section is marked with a square grid at 3 mm intervals and we picked one grain up in each square of the grid marked on the thin section to reduce operator sampling bias resulting from the selection of quartz grains. Quartz is suitable to estimate the damage that the rock sample has sustained because quartz without cleavage acts as an isotropic medium for fracturing and it is physically and chemically resistant to weathering than other minerals constituting the granite. We counted the number of microfractures that intersected a line which was drawn from the edge of each quartz grain, through the center point, to the other edge of the grain. The linear microfracture density for each sample is calculated to be the total number of microfractures intersecting the lines divided by the total counting line length. Under the

  20. Faulting processes in active faults - Evidences from TCDP and SAFOD drill core samples

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, C.; Wirth, R.; Wenk, H. -R.; Morales, L.; Naumann, R.; Kienast, M.; Song, S. -R.; Dresen, G.

    2014-08-20

    The microstructures, mineralogy and chemistry of representative samples collected from the cores of the San Andreas Fault drill hole (SAFOD) and the Taiwan Chelungpu-Fault Drilling project (TCDP) have been studied using optical microscopy, TEM, SEM, XRD and XRF analyses. SAFOD samples provide a transect across undeformed host rock, the fault damage zone and currently active deforming zones of the San Andreas Fault. TCDP samples are retrieved from the principal slip zone (PSZ) and from the surrounding damage zone of the Chelungpu Fault. Substantial differences exist in the clay mineralogy of SAFOD and TCDP fault gouge samples. Amorphous material has been observed in SAFOD as well as TCDP samples. In line with previous publications, we propose that melt, observed in TCDP black gouge samples, was produced by seismic slip (melt origin) whereas amorphous material in SAFOD samples was formed by comminution of grains (crush origin) rather than by melting. Dauphiné twins in quartz grains of SAFOD and TCDP samples may indicate high seismic stress. The differences in the crystallographic preferred orientation of calcite between SAFOD and TCDP samples are significant. Microstructures resulting from dissolution–precipitation processes were observed in both faults but are more frequently found in SAFOD samples than in TCDP fault rocks. As already described for many other fault zones clay-gouge fabrics are quite weak in SAFOD and TCDP samples. Clay-clast aggregates (CCAs), proposed to indicate frictional heating and thermal pressurization, occur in material taken from the PSZ of the Chelungpu Fault, as well as within and outside of the SAFOD deforming zones, indicating that these microstructures were formed over a wide range of slip rates.

  1. Active Fault Topography and Fault Outcrops in the Central Part of the Nukumi fault, the 1891 Nobi Earthquake Fault System, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, T.; Ueta, K.; Inoue, D.; Aoyagi, Y.; Yanagida, M.; Ichikawa, K.; Goto, N.

    2010-12-01

    It is important to evaluate the magnitude of earthquake caused by multiple active faults, taking into account the simultaneous effects. The simultaneity of adjacent active faults are often decided on the basis of geometric distances except for known these paleoseismic records. We have been studied the step area between the Nukumi fault and the Neodani fault, which appeared as consecutive ruptures in the 1891 Nobi earthquake, since 2009. The purpose of this study is to establish innovation in valuation technique of the simultaneity of adjacent active faults in addition to the paleoseismic record and the geometric distance. Geomorphological, geological and reconnaissance microearthquake surveys are concluded. The present work is intended to clarify the distribution of tectonic geomorphology along the Nukumi fault and the Neodani fault by high-resolution interpretations of airborne LiDAR DEM and aerial photograph, and the field survey of outcrops and location survey. The study area of this work is the southeastern Nukumi fault and the northwestern Neodani fault. We interpret DEM using shaded relief map and stereoscopic bird's-eye view made from 2m mesh DEM data which is obtained by airborne laser scanner of Kokusai Kogyo Co., Ltd. Aerial photographic survey is for confirmation of DEM interpretation using 1/16,000 scale photo. As a result of topographic survey, we found consecutive tectonic topography which is left lateral displacement of ridge and valley lines and reverse scarplets along the Nukumi fault and the Neodani fault . From Ogotani 2km southeastern of Nukumi pass which is located at the southeastern end of surface rupture along the Nukumi fault by previous study to Neooppa 9km southeastern of Nukumi pass, we can interpret left lateral topographies and small uphill-facing fault scarps on the terrace surface by detail DEM investigation. These topographies are unrecognized by aerial photographic survey because of heavy vegetation. We have found several new

  2. Fault Lines in American Culture: The Case for Civic Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartoonian, H. Michael; Van Scotter, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    The social landscape of the United States can be mapped by using a series of cultural fault lines. This topography portrays conditions that descriptions of the surface fail to illuminate. Many of these schisms are the by-product of ideological positions that diminish personal responsibility and thoughtful civic discourse. If left unattended, these…

  3. Is the Lishan fault of Taiwan active?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo-Chen, Hao; Wu, Francis; Chang, Wu-Lung; Chang, Chih-Yu; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Hirata, Naoshi

    2015-10-01

    The Lishan fault has been characterized alternately as a major discontinuity in stratigraphy, structures and metamorphism, a ductile shear zone, a tectonic suture or non-existent. In addition to being a geological boundary, it also marks transitions in subsurface structures. Thus, the seismicity to the west of the fault permeates through the upper and mid-crust while beneath the Central Range it is noticeably less and largely concentrated in the upper 12 km. A prominent west-dipping conductive zone extends upward to meet the Lishan fault. Also, the eastward increase of crust thickness from ~ 30 km in the Taiwan Strait quickens under the Lishan fault to form a root of over 50 km under the Central Range. In the past, the small magnitude seismicity along the Lishan fault has been noticed but is too diffuse for definitive association with the fault. Recent processing of aftershock records of the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake using Central Weather Bureau data and, especially, data from three post-Chi-Chi deployments of seismic stations across central Taiwan yielded hypocenters that appear to link directly to the Lishan structure. The presence of a near 4-km-long vertical seismic zone directly under the surface trace of the Lishan fault indicates that it is an active structure from the surface down to about 35 km, and the variety of focal mechanisms indicates that the fault motion can be complex and depth-dependent.

  4. Evaluation of Characteristics of Lightning Faults on 275kV Transmission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Hironao; Itamoto, Naoki; Shinjo, Kazuo; Ishii, Masaru

    It is effective to design the lightning protection of transmission lines by employing simulation to be able to reproduce conditions of experienced lightning faults. As a result of the lightning faults on 275kV transmission lines in Hokuriku area, the frequency of only one-ground fault of upper or middle lines is higher. Especially, the frequency of one-ground faults of the middle lines in summer is the highest. It is thought that many one-ground faults in summer are caused by direct lightning strokes to phase conductors. Moreover, multi-ground faults caused by lightning strokes to tower tops or overhead ground wires also include many ground faults of the middle lines. In this paper, the experienced lightning faults on the 275kV transmission lines are reproduced by EMTP calculations and the characteristics of the ground-fault lines are examined.

  5. New GPS Network on the Active Fault System in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, C.; Chen, Y.; Hu, J.; Lin, C.; Chen, C.; Wang, J.; Chung, L.; Chung, W.; Hsieh, C.; Chen, Y.

    2004-12-01

    According to the historical records, disastrous earthquakes occurred in Taiwan were caused by reactivations of active faults. In last century, there were five with the surface rupture: 1906 Meishan Eq. (the Meishan F.), 1935 Hsihchu Eq. (the Shihtan and the Tuntzuchiao F.), 1946 Hsinhua Eq. (Hsinhua F.), 1951 Hualien-Taitung Eq. (Longitudinal Valley F.), and 1999 Chi-Chi Eq. (the Chelungpu F.). In order to identify earthquake associated surface rupture and further to mitigate potential hazards, the investigation and monitoring on the active fault system are of great urgency. Central Geological Survey (CGS) of Taiwan is currently executing a 5-year (2002-2006) project, integrating geological and geodetic data to better characterize short-term and long-term spatial and temporal variations in deformation across major already-known active faults of Taiwan. For the former, we use field survey, drilling, geophysical exploration, and trenching to recognize the long-term slip rate and recurrence interval of each fault. For the latter, we deploy near-fault campaign-style GPS and leveling monitoring networks. Here we further combine the result of other GPS networks including continuous-mode. This project is actually concentrated on fault-specific investigation.. Until Dec. 2004, we have set up 756 GPS stations and 27 precise leveling lines including 1024 leveling benchmarks. For the purpose of understanding temporal variability and receive continuous record, the CGS began to deploy 6~10 new GPS stations of continuous mode since 2004. Upon the completion of the geodetic project, we are supposed to provide information on short-term slip rates of major active faults. By integrating other geological datasets we will also evaluate the short-term and long-term behavior of the active faults, and further offer insight into spatial and temporal variability in deformation processes.

  6. Active faulting in the Walker Lane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesnousky, Steven G.

    2005-06-01

    Deformation across the San Andreas and Walker Lane fault systems accounts for most relative Pacific-North American transform plate motion. The Walker Lane is composed of discontinuous sets of right-slip faults that are located to the east and strike approximately parallel to the San Andreas fault system. Mapping of active faults in the central Walker Lane shows that right-lateral shear is locally accommodated by rotation of crustal blocks bounded by steep-dipping east striking left-slip faults. The left slip and clockwise rotation of crustal blocks bounded by the east striking faults has produced major basins in the area, including Rattlesnake and Garfield flats; Teels, Columbus and Rhodes salt marshes; and Queen Valley. The Benton Springs and Petrified Springs faults are the major northwest striking structures currently accommodating transform motion in the central Walker Lane. Right-lateral offsets of late Pleistocene surfaces along the two faults point to slip rates of at least 1 mm/yr. The northern limit of northwest trending strike-slip faults in the central Walker Lane is abrupt and reflects transfer of strike-slip to dip-slip deformation in the western Basin and Range and transformation of right slip into rotation of crustal blocks to the north. The transfer of strike slip in the central Walker Lane to dip slip in the western Basin and Range correlates to a northward broadening of the modern strain field suggested by geodesy and appears to be a long-lived feature of the deformation field. The complexity of faulting and apparent rotation of crustal blocks within the Walker Lane is consistent with the concept of a partially detached and elastic-brittle crust that is being transported on a continuously deforming layer below. The regional pattern of faulting within the Walker Lane is more complex than observed along the San Andreas fault system to the west. The difference is attributed to the relatively less cumulative slip that has occurred across the Walker

  7. Active, capable, and potentially active faults - a paleoseismic perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Machette, M.N.

    2000-01-01

    Maps of faults (geologically defined source zones) may portray seismic hazards in a wide range of completeness depending on which types of faults are shown. Three fault terms - active, capable, and potential - are used in a variety of ways for different reasons or applications. Nevertheless, to be useful for seismic-hazards analysis, fault maps should encompass a time interval that includes several earthquake cycles. For example, if the common recurrence in an area is 20,000-50,000 years, then maps should include faults that are 50,000-100,000 years old (two to five typical earthquake cycles), thus allowing for temporal variability in slip rate and recurrence intervals. Conversely, in more active areas such as plate boundaries, maps showing faults that are <10,000 years old should include those with at least 2 to as many as 20 paleoearthquakes. For the International Lithosphere Programs' Task Group II-2 Project on Major Active Faults of the World our maps and database will show five age categories and four slip rate categories that allow one to select differing time spans and activity rates for seismic-hazard analysis depending on tectonic regime. The maps are accompanied by a database that describes evidence for Quaternary faulting, geomorphic expression, and paleoseismic parameters (slip rate, recurrence interval and time of most recent surface faulting). These maps and databases provide an inventory of faults that would be defined as active, capable, and potentially active for seismic-hazard assessments.

  8. Fault activation due to glacially induced stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, R.; Lund, B.; Wu, P. P.

    2013-12-01

    Melting glaciers worldwide have an effect on sea level, but also on the stability of pre-existing faults. The load due to continental ice sheets or glaciers depresses the surface below, leading to changes in the lithospheric stresses. The accumulation of ice mass increases the vertical stress, and the horizontal stresses increase due to the accompanying flexure of the lithosphere. During deglaciation, ice-mass loss causes a simultaneous decrease in vertical stress; however, horizontal stresses decrease only slowly due to the slow readjusting of the Earth. After the end of deglaciation, only the induced horizontal stresses remain as the process of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) proceeds visco-elastically. The modelling of this process and the estimation of fault slip is enabled by a new GIA-fault model. However, this finite-element model is only available in two dimensions, and the extension to three dimensions is a necessary step further to allow the comparison of obtained fault slips to observations of glacially induced faults in Europe and North America. The model has several input parameters, which affect the activation time of faults and their resulting slip (e.g. ice history, rheology of the Earth, frictional properties, pore-fluid pressure). We will present the results of the new 3D model and show the sensitivity of faults with respect to modelling parameters. Furthermore, a comparison to observations will be presented.

  9. Fault activation due to glacially induced stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Rebekka; Lund, Björn

    2014-05-01

    Melting glaciers worldwide have an effect on sea level, but also on the stability of pre-existing faults. The load due to continental ice sheets or glaciers depresses the surface below, leading to changes in the lithospheric stresses. The accumulation of ice mass increases the vertical stress, and the horizontal stresses increase due to the accompanying flexure of the lithosphere. During deglaciation, ice-mass loss causes a simultaneous decrease in vertical stress; however, horizontal stresses decrease only slowly due to the slow readjusting of the Earth. After the end of deglaciation, only the induced horizontal stresses remain as the process of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) proceeds visco-elastically. The modelling of this process and the estimation of fault slip is enabled by a new GIA-fault model. However, this finite-element model is only available in two dimensions, and the extension to three dimensions is a necessary step further to allow the comparison of obtained fault slips to observations of glacially induced faults in Europe and North America. The model has several input parameters, which affect the activation time of faults and their resulting slip (e.g. ice history, rheology of the Earth, frictional properties, pore-fluid pressure). We will present the results of the new 3D model and show the sensitivity of faults with respect to modelling parameters. Furthermore, a comparison to observations will be presented.

  10. Fuzzy logic based on-line fault detection and classification in transmission line.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Shuma; Sinha, Nidul; Dorendrajit, Thingam

    2016-01-01

    This study presents fuzzy logic based online fault detection and classification of transmission line using Programmable Automation and Control technology based National Instrument Compact Reconfigurable i/o (CRIO) devices. The LabVIEW software combined with CRIO can perform real time data acquisition of transmission line. When fault occurs in the system current waveforms are distorted due to transients and their pattern changes according to the type of fault in the system. The three phase alternating current, zero sequence and positive sequence current data generated by LabVIEW through CRIO-9067 are processed directly for relaying. The result shows that proposed technique is capable of right tripping action and classification of type of fault at high speed therefore can be employed in practical application. PMID:27398278

  11. InSAR measurements around active faults: creeping Philippine Fault and un-creeping Alpine Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time-series analyses have been frequently applied to measure the time-series of small and quasi-steady displacements in wide areas. Large efforts in the methodological developments have been made to pursue higher temporal and spatial resolutions by using frequently acquired SAR images and detecting more pixels that exhibit phase stability. While such a high resolution is indispensable for tracking displacements of man-made and other small-scale structures, it is not necessarily needed and can be unnecessarily computer-intensive for measuring the crustal deformation associated with active faults and volcanic activities. I apply a simple and efficient method to measure the deformation around the Alpine Fault in the South Island of New Zealand, and the Philippine Fault in the Leyte Island. I use a small-baseline subset (SBAS) analysis approach (Berardino, et al., 2002). Generally, the more we average the pixel values, the more coherent the signals are. Considering that, for the deformation around active faults, the spatial resolution can be as coarse as a few hundred meters, we can severely 'multi-look' the interferograms. The two applied cases in this study benefited from this approach; I could obtain the mean velocity maps on practically the entire area without discarding decorrelated areas. The signals could have been only partially obtained by standard persistent scatterer or single-look small-baseline approaches that are much more computer-intensive. In order to further increase the signal detection capability, it is sometimes effective to introduce a processing algorithm adapted to the signal of interest. In an InSAR time-series processing, one usually needs to set the reference point because interferograms are all relative measurements. It is difficult, however, to fix the reference point when one aims to measure long-wavelength deformation signals that span the whole analysis area. This problem can be

  12. Deformation Monitoring of AN Active Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostapchuk, A.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of low frequency earthquakes, slow slip events and other deformation phenomena, new for geophysics, change our understanding of how the energy accumulated in the Earth's crust do release. The new geophysical data make one revise the underlying mechanism of geomechanical processes taking place in fault zones. Conditions for generating different slip modes are still unclear. The most vital question is whether a certain slip mode is intrinsic for a fault or may be controlled by external factors. This work presents the results of two and a half year deformation monitoring of a discontinuity in the zone of the Main Sayanskiy Fault. Main Sayanskiy Fault is right-lateral strike-slip fault. Observations were performed in the tunnel of Talaya seismic station (TLY), Irkutsk region, Russia. Measurements were carried out 70 m away from the entrance of the tunnel, the thickness of overlying rock was about 30 m. Inductive sensors of displacement were mounted at the both sides of a discontinuity, which recorded three components of relative fault side displacement with the accuracy of 0.2 mcm. Temperature variation inside the tunnel didn't exceed 0.5oC during the all period of observations. Important information about deformation properties of an active fault was obtained. A pronounced seasonality of deformation characteristics of discontinuity is observed in the investigated segment of rock. A great number of slow slip events with durations from several hours to several weeks were registered. Besides that alterations of fault deformation characteristics before the megathrust earthquake M9.0 Tohoku Oki 11 March 2011 and reaction to the event itself were detected. The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (grant no. 14-17-00719).

  13. Active and inactive faults in southern California viewed from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merifield, P. M.; Lamar, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    The application is discussed of Skylab imagery along with larger scale photography and field investigations in preparing fault maps of California for use in land use planning. The images were used to assist in distinguishing active from inactive faults (by recognizing indications of recent displacement), determining the length of potentially active faults, identifying previously unmapped faults, and gaining additional information on regional tectonic history.

  14. Active fault traces along Bhuj Fault and Katrol Hill Fault, and trenching survey at Wandhay, Kachchh, Gujarat, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morino, Michio; Malik, Javed N.; Mishra, Prashant; Bhuiyan, Chandrashekhar; Kaneko, Fumio

    2008-06-01

    Several new active fault traces were identified along Katrol Hill Fault (KHF). A new fault (named as Bhuj Fault, BF) that extends into the Bhuj Plain was also identified. These fault traces were identified based on satellite photo interpretation and field survey. Trenches were excavated to identify the paleoseismic events, pattern of faulting and the nature of deformation. New active fault traces were recognized about 1km north of the topographic boundary between the Katrol Hill and the plain area. The fault exposure along the left bank of Khari River with 10m wide shear zone in the Mesozoic rocks and showing displacement of the overlying Quaternary deposits is indicative of continued tectonic activity along the ancient fault. The E-W trending active fault traces along the KHF in the western part changes to NE-SW or ENE-WSW near Wandhay village. Trenching survey across a low scarp near Wandhay village reveals three major fault strands F1, F2, and F3. These fault strands displaced the older terrace deposits comprising Sand, Silt and Gravel units along with overlying younger deposits from units 1 to 5 made of gravel, sand and silt. Stratigraphic relationship indicates at least three large magnitude earthquakes along KHF during Late Holocene or recent historic past.

  15. Lateral migration of fault activity in Weihe basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xi-Jie; Dai, Wang-Qiang

    2004-03-01

    Lateral migration of fault activity in Weihe basin is a popular phenomenon and its characteristics are also typical. Taking the activity migrations of Wangshun Mountain piedmont fault toward Lishan piedmont fault and Weinan platform front fault, Dabaopi-Niujiaojian fault toward Shenyusi-Xiaojiazhai fault, among a serial of NE-trending faults from Baoji city to Jingyang County as examples, their migration time and process are analyzed and discussed in the present paper. It is useful for further understanding the structure development and physiognomy evolution history of Weihe basin.

  16. Development of an accurate transmission line fault locator using the global positioning system satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Harry

    1994-01-01

    A highly accurate transmission line fault locator based on the traveling-wave principle was developed and successfully operated within B.C. Hydro. A transmission line fault produces a fast-risetime traveling wave at the fault point which propagates along the transmission line. This fault locator system consists of traveling wave detectors located at key substations which detect and time tag the leading edge of the fault-generated traveling wave as if passes through. A master station gathers the time-tagged information from the remote detectors and determines the location of the fault. Precise time is a key element to the success of this system. This fault locator system derives its timing from the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. System tests confirmed the accuracy of locating faults to within the design objective of +/-300 meters.

  17. Geophysical characterization of buried active faults: the Concud Fault (Iberian Chain, NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueyo Anchuela, Óscar; Lafuente, Paloma; Arlegui, Luis; Liesa, Carlos L.; Simón, José L.

    2015-12-01

    The Concud Fault is a ~14-km-long active fault that extends close to Teruel, a city with about 35,000 inhabitants in the Iberian Range (NE Spain). It shows evidence of recurrent activity during Late Pleistocene time, posing a significant seismic hazard in an area of moderate-to-low tectonic rates. A geophysical survey was carried out along the mapped trace of the southern branch of the Concud Fault to evaluate the geophysical signature from the fault and the location of paleoseismic trenches. The survey identified a lineation of inverse magnetic dipoles at residual and vertical magnetic gradient, a local increase in apparent conductivity, and interruptions of the underground sediment structure along GPR profiles. The origin of these anomalies is due to lateral contrast between both fault blocks and the geophysical signature of Quaternary materials located above and directly south of the fault. The spatial distribution of anomalies was successfully used to locate suitable trench sites and to map non-exposed segments of the fault. The geophysical anomalies are related to the sedimentological characteristics and permeability differences of the deposits and to deformation related to fault activity. The results illustrate the usefulness of geophysics to detect and map non-exposed faults in areas of moderate-to-low tectonic activity where faults are often covered by recent pediments that obscure geological evidence of the most recent earthquakes. The results also highlight the importance of applying multiple geophysical techniques in defining the location of buried faults.

  18. A distributed fault-detection and diagnosis system using on-line parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, T.-H.; Merrill, W.; Duyar, A.

    1991-01-01

    The development of a model-based fault-detection and diagnosis system (FDD) is reviewed. The system can be used as an integral part of an intelligent control system. It determines the faults of a system from comparison of the measurements of the system with a priori information represented by the model of the system. The method of modeling a complex system is described and a description of diagnosis models which include process faults is presented. There are three distinct classes of fault modes covered by the system performance model equation: actuator faults, sensor faults, and performance degradation. A system equation for a complete model that describes all three classes of faults is given. The strategy for detecting the fault and estimating the fault parameters using a distributed on-line parameter identification scheme is presented. A two-step approach is proposed. The first step is composed of a group of hypothesis testing modules, (HTM) in parallel processing to test each class of faults. The second step is the fault diagnosis module which checks all the information obtained from the HTM level, isolates the fault, and determines its magnitude. The proposed FDD system was demonstrated by applying it to detect actuator and sensor faults added to a simulation of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The simulation results show that the proposed FDD system can adequately detect the faults and estimate their magnitudes.

  19. Quaternary Geology and Surface Faulting Hazard: Active and Capable Faults in Central Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcucci, E.; Gori, S.

    2015-12-01

    The 2009 L'Aquila earthquake (Mw 6.1), in central Italy, raised the issue of surface faulting hazard in Italy, since large urban areas were affected by surface displacement along the causative structure, the Paganica fault. Since then, guidelines for microzonation were drew up that take into consideration the problem of surface faulting in Italy, and laying the bases for future regulations about related hazard, similarly to other countries (e.g. USA). More specific guidelines on the management of areas affected by active and capable faults (i.e. able to produce surface faulting) are going to be released by National Department of Civil Protection; these would define zonation of areas affected by active and capable faults, with prescriptions for land use planning. As such, the guidelines arise the problem of the time interval and general operational criteria to asses fault capability for the Italian territory. As for the chronology, the review of the international literature and regulatory allowed Galadini et al. (2012) to propose different time intervals depending on the ongoing tectonic regime - compressive or extensional - which encompass the Quaternary. As for the operational criteria, the detailed analysis of the large amount of works dealing with active faulting in Italy shows that investigations exclusively based on surface morphological features (e.g. fault planes exposition) or on indirect investigations (geophysical data), are not sufficient or even unreliable to define the presence of an active and capable fault; instead, more accurate geological information on the Quaternary space-time evolution of the areas affected by such tectonic structures is needed. A test area for which active and capable faults can be first mapped based on such a classical but still effective methodological approach can be the central Apennines. Reference Galadini F., Falcucci E., Galli P., Giaccio B., Gori S., Messina P., Moro M., Saroli M., Scardia G., Sposato A. (2012). Time

  20. Is There any Relationship Between Active Tabriz Fault Zone and Bozkush Fault Zones, NW Iran?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ISIK, V.; Saber, R.; Caglayan, A.

    2012-12-01

    Tectonic plate motions and consequent earthquakes can be actively observed along the northwestern Iran. The Tabriz fault zone (TFZ), also called the North Tabriz fault, active right-lateral strike-slip fault zone with slip rates estimated as ~8 mm/yr, has been vigorously deforming much of northwestern Iran for over the past several million years. Historical earthquakes on the TFZ consist of large magnitude, complimentary rupture length and changed the landscape of regions surrounding the fault zone. The TFZ in the city of Bostanabad is more segmented with several strands and joined by a series of WNW-ESE trending faults, called the Bozkush fault zones. The Bozkush fault zones (BFZ's) (south and north), bounding arch-shaped Bozkush mountains, generates not only hundreds of small earthquakes each year but also has provided significant earthquakes that have been historically documented. The rock units deformed within the BFZ's include Eocene-Oligocene volcanic rocks with intercalation limestone, Oligo-Miocene clastic rocks with intercalation gypsiferous marl and Plio-Quaternary volcano-sedimentary rocks, travertine and alluvium. The North and South Bozkush fault zones are characterized by development of structures typically associated with transpression. These include right-lateral strike-slip faults, thrust faults and foldings. Our field studies indicate that these zones include step to sub-vertical fault surfaces trending NW and NE with slickenlines. Slickensides preserve brittle kinematic indicators (e.g., Riedel shear patterns, slickenside marks) suggesting both dextral displacements and top-to-the-NE/NW and-SE/SW sense of shearing. Besides, mesoscopic and microscopic ductile kinematic indicators (e.g., asymmetric porphyroclasts, C/S fabrics) within Miocene gypsum marl show dextral displacements. Fault rocks along most of these faults consist of incohesive fault breccia and gauge. Adjacent to the fault contact evidence of bedding in Oligo-Miocene and Plio

  1. Mapping Active Fault Zones in Southern California Using Master Multispectral Imagery Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. C.; Peltzer, G. F.; Hook, S. J.; Alley, R.; Myers, J.; Coffland, B.; Dominguez, R.; Fitzgerald, M.

    2004-12-01

    Recent studies of active fault zones using the GPS and InSAR techniques have revealed slip rates that often differ from the slip rates determined from geological observations. This discrepancy is principally due to the different time windows over which surface movements are integrated in both approaches. If surface velocities near faults vary over cycles of several hundreds of years, it becomes important to document the slip history along faults over various time scales as it has been recorded in the Quaternary deposits along the fault. To this endeavor, we have acquired sets of images of the major active faults in Southern California using the MODIS/ASTER airborne simulator (MASTER) instrument. The lines are flown at low altitude above the ground to provide 4 to 5 m spatial resolution in the 50 spectral bands (0.5 to 13 microns) of the instrument. A preliminary set of data was acquired in the summer 2003 over the Garlock and the Blackwater faults in the Mojave. A more extensive campaign carried out in September 2004 covered more than 1000 km of fault lines from the central section of the San Andreas fault to the Salton Sea area. The data are being processed to extract reflectance and emissivity information. Preliminary analysis of the 2003 data confirmed the strong potential of the MASTER thermal bands to identify changes in surface emissivity due to subtle variations of the mineral composition of the deposits. Additional information on the near surface structure of the fault zones can be obtained by combining day and night surface temperature maps, as buried sections of faults are revealed by thermal capacity contrasts between the two sides of a given fault. The paper will present the data set acquired during the 2003 and 2004 campaigns and the status of the raw data processing into geo-referenced emissivity and reflectivity maps of the fault zones.

  2. Development of rules for single-line fault diagnosis in delta-delta connected distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    Momoh, J.A.; Dias, L.G.; Thor, T.; Laird, D.N.

    1994-12-31

    Single-line fault diagnosis in delta-delta connected distribution systems suffers due to the low fault currents associated with such faults. Simulation tests on this type of system reveals that rule based decision support can be used of such diagnosis. This paper describes the development of rules for single-line fault diagnosis utilizing simulation test results. The key parameters used are the voltage magnitude of each phase at the bus bar and the currents on the feeders including their sequence components.

  3. On the application of a machine learning technique to fault diagnosis of power distribution lines

    SciTech Connect

    Togami, Masato; Abe, Norihiro; Kitahashi, T.; Ogawa, Harunao

    1995-10-01

    This paper presents one method for fault diagnosis of power distribution lines by using a decision tree. The conventional method, using a decision tree, applies only to discrete attribute values. To apply it to fault diagnosis of power distribution lines, in practice it must be revised in order to treat attributes whose values range over certain widths. This is because the sensor value or attribute value varies owing to the resistance of the fault point or is influenced by noise. The proposed method is useful when the attribute value has such a property, and it takes into consideration the cost of acquiring the information and the probability of the occurrence of a fault.

  4. Active Fault Characterization in the Urban Area of Vienna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Kurt; Grupe, Sabine; Hintersberger, Esther

    2016-04-01

    The identification of active faults that lie beneath a city is of key importance for seismic hazard assessment. Fault mapping and characterization in built-up areas with strong anthropogenic overprint is, however, a challenging task. Our study of Quaternary faults in the city of Vienna starts from the re-assessment of a borehole database of the municipality containing several tens of thousands of shallow boreholes. Data provide tight constraints on the geometry of Quaternary deposits and highlight several locations with fault-delimited Middle to Late Pleistocene terrace sediments of the Danube River. Additional information is obtained from geological descriptions of historical outcrops which partly date back to about 1900. The latter were found to be particularly valuable by providing unprejudiced descriptions of Quaternary faults, sometimes with stunning detail. The along-strike continuations of some of the identified faults are further imaged by industrial 2D/3D seismic acquired outside the city limits. The interpretation and the assessment of faults identified within the city benefit from a very well constrained tectonic model of the active Vienna Basin fault system which derived from data obtained outside the city limits. This data suggests that the urban faults are part of a system of normal faults compensating fault-normal extension at a releasing bend of the sinistral Vienna Basin Transfer Fault. Slip rates estimated for the faults in the city are in the range of several hundredths of millimetres per year and match the slip rates of normal faults that were trenched outside the city. The lengths/areas of individual faults estimated from maps and seismic reach up to almost 700 km² suggesting that all of the identified faults are capable of producing earthquakes with magnitudes M>6, some with magnitudes up to M~6.7.

  5. Fault zone structure and inferences on past activities of the active Shanchiao Fault in the Taipei metropolis, northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Lee, J.; Chan, Y.; Lu, C.

    2010-12-01

    The Taipei Metropolis, home to around 10 million people, is subject to seismic hazard originated from not only distant faults or sources scattered throughout the Taiwan region, but also active fault lain directly underneath. Northern Taiwan including the Taipei region is currently affected by post-orogenic (Penglai arc-continent collision) processes related to backarc extension of the Ryukyu subduction system. The Shanchiao Fault, an active normal fault outcropping along the western boundary of the Taipei Basin and dipping to the east, is investigated here for its subsurface structure and activities. Boreholes records in the central portion of the fault were analyzed to document the stacking of post- Last Glacial Maximum growth sediments, and a tulip flower structure is illuminated with averaged vertical slip rate of about 3 mm/yr. Similar fault zone architecture and post-LGM tectonic subsidence rate is also found in the northern portion of the fault. A correlation between geomorphology and structural geology in the Shanchiao Fault zone demonstrates an array of subtle geomorphic scarps corresponds to the branch fault while the surface trace of the main fault seems to be completely erased by erosion and sedimentation. Such constraints and knowledge are crucial in earthquake hazard evaluation and mitigation in the Taipei Metropolis, and in understanding the kinematics of transtensional tectonics in northern Taiwan. Schematic 3D diagram of the fault zone in the central portion of the Shanchiao Fault, displaying regional subsurface geology and its relation to topographic features.

  6. Illuminating Northern California’s Active Faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prentice, Carol S.; Crosby, Christopher J.; Whitehill, Caroline S.; Arrowsmith, J. Ramon; Furlong, Kevin P.; Philips, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Newly acquired light detection and ranging (lidar) topographic data provide a powerful community resource for the study of landforms associated with the plate boundary faults of northern California (Figure 1). In the spring of 2007, GeoEarthScope, a component of the EarthScope Facility construction project funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation, acquired approximately 2000 square kilometers of airborne lidar topographic data along major active fault zones of northern California. These data are now freely available in point cloud (x, y, z coordinate data for every laser return), digital elevation model (DEM), and KMZ (zipped Keyhole Markup Language, for use in Google EarthTM and other similar software) formats through the GEON OpenTopography Portal (http://www.OpenTopography.org/data). Importantly, vegetation can be digitally removed from lidar data, producing high-resolution images (0.5- or 1.0-meter DEMs) of the ground surface beneath forested regions that reveal landforms typically obscured by vegetation canopy (Figure 2)

  7. Off-Line Testing for Bridge Faults in CMOS Domino Logic Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, K.; Lala, P. K.; Busaba, F.

    1997-01-01

    Bridge faults, especially in CMOS circuits, have unique characteristics which make them difficult to detect during testing. This paper presents a technique for detecting bridge faults which have an effect on the output of CMOS Domino logic circuits. The faults are modeled at the transistor level and this technique is based on analyzing the off-set of the function during off-line testing.

  8. Active faults of the Baikal depression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levi, K.G.; Miroshnichenko, A.I.; San'kov, V. A.; Babushkin, S.M.; Larkin, G.V.; Badardinov, A.A.; Wong, H.K.; Colman, S.; Delvaux, D.

    1997-01-01

    The Baikal depression occupies a central position in the system of the basins of the Baikal Rift Zone and corresponds to the nucleus from which the continental lithosphere began to open. For different reasons, the internal structure of the Lake Baikal basin remained unknown for a long time. In this article, we present for the first time a synthesis of the data concerning the structure of the sedimentary section beneath Lake Baikal, which were obtained by complex seismic and structural investigations, conducted mainly from 1989 to 1992. We make a brief description of the most interesting seismic profiles which provide a rough idea of a sedimentary unit structure, present a detailed structural interpretation and show the relationship between active faults in the lake, heat flow anomalies and recent hydrothermalism.

  9. Extreme Hydrothermal Conditions Near an Active Geological Fault, DFDP-2B Borehole, Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, R.; Townend, J.; Toy, V.; Allen, M.; Baratin, L. M.; Barth, N. C.; Beacroft, L.; Benson, A.; Boese, C. M.; Boles, A.; Boulton, C. J.; Capova, L.; Carpenter, B. M.; Celerier, B. P.; Chamberlain, C. J.; Conze, R.; Cooper, A.; Coussens, J.; Coutts, A.; Cox, S.; Craw, L.; Doan, M. L.; Eccles, J. D.; Faulkner, D.; Grieve, J.; Grochowski, J.; Gulley, A.; Henry, G.; Howarth, J. D.; Jacobs, K. M.; Jeppson, T.; Kato, N.; Keys, S.; Kirilova, M.; Kometani, Y.; Lukács, A.; Langridge, R.; Lin, W.; Little, T.; Mallyon, D.; Mariani, E.; Marx, R.; Massiot, C.; Mathewson, L.; Melosh, B.; Menzies, C. D.; Moore, J.; Morales, L. F. G.; Morgan, C.; Mori, H.; Niemeijer, A. R.; Nishikawa, O.; Nitsch, O.; Paris Cavailhes, J.; Pooley, B.; Prior, D. J.; Pyne, A.; Sauer, K. M.; Savage, M. K.; Schleicher, A.; Schmitt, D. R.; Shigematsu, N.; Taylor-Offord, S.; Tobin, H. J.; Upton, P.; Valdez, R. D.; Weaver, K.; Wiersberg, T.; Williams, J. N.; Yeo, S.; Zimmer, M.; Broderick, N.

    2015-12-01

    The DFDP-2B borehole sampled rocks above and within the upper part of the Alpine Fault, New Zealand, to a depth of 893 m in late 2014. The experiment was the first to drill a major geological fault zone that is active and late in its earthquake cycle. We determined ambient fluid pressures 8-10% above hydrostatic and a geothermal gradient of 130-150 °C/km in rocks above the fault. These unusual ambient conditions can be explained by a combination of: rock advection that transports heat from depth by uplift and oblique slip on the fault; and fluid advection through fractured rock, driven by topographic forcing, which concentrates heat and causes fluid over-pressure in the valley. Highly-anomalous ambient conditions can exist in the vicinity of active faults, and earthquake and mineralization processes occur within these zones.

  10. Fault mirrors in seismically active fault zones: A fossil of small earthquakes at shallow depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Li-Wei; Song, Sheng-Rong; Suppe, John; Yeh, En-Chao

    2016-03-01

    Fault mirrors (FMs) are naturally polished and glossy fault slip surfaces that can record seismic deformation at shallow depths. They are important for investigating the processes controlling dynamic fault slip. We characterize FMs in borehole samples from the hanging wall damage zone of the active Hsiaotungshi reverse fault, Taiwan. Here we report the first documented occurrence of the combination of silica gel and melt patches coating FMs, with the silica gel resembling those observed on experimentally formed FMs that were cataclastically generated. In addition, the melt patches, which are unambiguous indicators of coseismic slip, suggest that the natural FMs were produced at seismic rates, presumably resulting from flash heating at asperities on the slip surfaces. Since flash heating is efficient at small slip, we propose that these natural FMs represent fossils of small earthquakes, formed in either coseismic faulting and folding or aftershock deformation in the active Taiwan fold-and-thrust belt.

  11. Preliminary Pseudo 3-D Imagery of the State Line Fault, Stewart Valley, Nevada Using Seismic Reflection Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldaña, S. C.; Snelson, C. M.; Taylor, W. J.; Beachly, M.; Cox, C. M.; Davis, R.; Stropky, M.; Phillips, R.; Robins, C.; Cothrun, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Pahrump Fault system is located in the central Basin and Range region and consists of three main fault zones: the Nopah range front fault zone, the State Line fault zone and the Spring Mountains range fault zone. The State Line fault zone is made up north-west trending dextral strike-slip faults that run parallel to the Nevada- California border. Previous geologic and geophysical studies conducted in and around Stewart Valley, located ~90 km from Las Vegas, Nevada, have constrained the location of the State Line fault zone to within a few kilometers. The goals of this project were to use seismic methods to definitively locate the northwestern most trace of the State Line fault and produce pseudo 3-D seismic cross-sections that can then be used to characterize the subsurface geometry and determine the slip of the State Line fault. During July 2007, four seismic lines were acquired in Stewart Valley: two normal and two parallel to the mapped traces of the State Line fault. Presented here are preliminary results from the two seismic lines acquired normal to the fault. These lines were acquired utilizing a 144-channel geode system with each of the 4.5 Hz vertical geophones set out at 5 m intervals to produce a 595 m long profile to the north and a 715 m long profile to the south. The vibroseis was programmed to produce an 8 s linear sweep from 20-160 Hz. These data returned excellent signal to noise and reveal subsurface lithology that will subsequently be used to resolve the subsurface geometry of the State Line fault. This knowledge will then enhance our understanding of the evolution of the State Line fault. Knowing how the State Line fault has evolved gives insight into the stick-slip fault evolution for the region and may improve understanding of how stress has been partitioned from larger strike-slip systems such as the San Andreas fault.

  12. Map showing recently active breaks along the San Andreas Fault between Pt. Delgada and Bolinas Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Robert D., Jr.; Wolfe, Edward W.

    1970-01-01

    This strip map is one of a series of maps showing recently active fault breaks along the San Andreas and other active faults in California. It is designed to inform persons who are concerned with land use near the fault of the location of those fault breaks that have moved recently. The lines on the map are lines of rupture and creep that can be identified by field evidence and that clearly affect the present surface of the land. Map users should keep in mind that these lines are intended primarily as guides to help locate the fault; the mapped lines are not necessarily shown with the precision demanded by some engineering or land utilization needs.

  13. Fault recovery characteristics of the fault tolerant multi-processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, Peter A.

    1990-01-01

    The fault handling performance of the fault tolerant multiprocessor (FTMP) was investigated. Fault handling errors detected during fault injection experiments were characterized. In these fault injection experiments, the FTMP disabled a working unit instead of the faulted unit once every 500 faults, on the average. System design weaknesses allow active faults to exercise a part of the fault management software that handles byzantine or lying faults. It is pointed out that these weak areas in the FTMP's design increase the probability that, for any hardware fault, a good LRU (line replaceable unit) is mistakenly disabled by the fault management software. It is concluded that fault injection can help detect and analyze the behavior of a system in the ultra-reliable regime. Although fault injection testing cannot be exhaustive, it has been demonstrated that it provides a unique capability to unmask problems and to characterize the behavior of a fault-tolerant system.

  14. Assessing active faulting by hydrogeological modeling and superconducting gravimetry: A case study for Hsinchu Fault, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, Tzuyi; Cheng, Ching-Chung; Hwang, Cheinway; Crossley, David

    2014-09-01

    We develop a new hydrology and gravimetry-based method to assess whether or not a local fault may be active. We take advantage of an existing superconducting gravimeter (SG) station and a comprehensive groundwater network in Hsinchu to apply the method to the Hsinchu Fault (HF) across the Hsinchu Science Park, whose industrial output accounts for 10% of Taiwan's gross domestic product. The HF is suspected to pose seismic hazards to the park, but its existence and structure are not clear. The a priori geometry of the HF is translated into boundary conditions imposed in the hydrodynamic model. By varying the fault's location, depth, and including a secondary wrench fault, we construct five hydrodynamic models to estimate groundwater variations, which are evaluated by comparing groundwater levels and SG observations. The results reveal that the HF contains a low hydraulic conductivity core and significantly impacts groundwater flows in the aquifers. Imposing the fault boundary conditions leads to about 63-77% reduction in the differences between modeled and observed values (both water level and gravity). The test with fault depth shows that the HF's most recent slip occurred in the beginning of Holocene, supplying a necessary (but not sufficient) condition that the HF is currently active. A portable SG can act as a virtual borehole well for model assessment at critical locations of a suspected active fault.

  15. Fiber Bragg Grating sensor for fault detection in radial and network transmission lines.

    PubMed

    Moghadas, Amin A; Shadaram, Mehdi

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a fiber optic based sensor capable of fault detection in both radial and network overhead transmission power line systems is investigated. Bragg wavelength shift is used to measure the fault current and detect fault in power systems. Magnetic fields generated by currents in the overhead transmission lines cause a strain in magnetostrictive material which is then detected by Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG). The Fiber Bragg interrogator senses the reflected FBG signals, and the Bragg wavelength shift is calculated and the signals are processed. A broadband light source in the control room scans the shift in the reflected signal. Any surge in the magnetic field relates to an increased fault current at a certain location. Also, fault location can be precisely defined with an artificial neural network (ANN) algorithm. This algorithm can be easily coordinated with other protective devices. It is shown that the faults in the overhead transmission line cause a detectable wavelength shift on the reflected signal of FBG and can be used to detect and classify different kind of faults. The proposed method has been extensively tested by simulation and results confirm that the proposed scheme is able to detect different kinds of fault in both radial and network system. PMID:22163416

  16. Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor for Fault Detection in Radial and Network Transmission Lines

    PubMed Central

    Moghadas, Amin A.; Shadaram, Mehdi

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a fiber optic based sensor capable of fault detection in both radial and network overhead transmission power line systems is investigated. Bragg wavelength shift is used to measure the fault current and detect fault in power systems. Magnetic fields generated by currents in the overhead transmission lines cause a strain in magnetostrictive material which is then detected by Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG). The Fiber Bragg interrogator senses the reflected FBG signals, and the Bragg wavelength shift is calculated and the signals are processed. A broadband light source in the control room scans the shift in the reflected signal. Any surge in the magnetic field relates to an increased fault current at a certain location. Also, fault location can be precisely defined with an artificial neural network (ANN) algorithm. This algorithm can be easily coordinated with other protective devices. It is shown that the faults in the overhead transmission line cause a detectable wavelength shift on the reflected signal of FBG and can be used to detect and classify different kind of faults. The proposed method has been extensively tested by simulation and results confirm that the proposed scheme is able to detect different kinds of fault in both radial and network system. PMID:22163416

  17. Fiber Bragg grating sensor for fault detection in high voltage overhead transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadas, Amin

    2011-12-01

    A fiber optic based sensor capable of fault detection in both radial and network overhead transmission power line systems is investigated. Bragg wavelength shift is used to measure the fault current and detect fault in power systems. Magnetic fields generated by currents in the overhead transmission lines cause a strain in magnetostrictive material which is then detected by fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. The Fiber Bragg interrogator senses the reflected FBG signals, and the Bragg wavelength shift is calculated and the signals are processed. A broadband light source in the control room scans the shift in the reflected signals. Any surge in the magnetic field relates to an increased fault current at a certain location. Also, fault location can be precisely defined with an artificial neural network (ANN) algorithm. This algorithm can be easily coordinated with other protective devices. It is shown that the faults in the overhead transmission line cause a detectable wavelength shift on the reflected signal of FBG sensors and can be used to detect and classify different kind of faults. The proposed method has been extensively tested by simulation and results confirm that the proposed scheme is able to detect different kinds of fault in both radial and network system.

  18. Near-Surface Seismic Reflection and GPR Imaging of the Active Emigrant Peak Fault, Fish Lake Valley, NV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, R. A.; Christie, M. W.; Tsoflias, G. P.; Stockli, D. F.

    2007-12-01

    Multifaceted near-surface geophysical studies of active faulting in the Eastern California Shear Zone are being conducted at the University of Kansas. During the summer of 2006 shallow seismic reflection and GPR data sets were acquired across the active Emigrant Peak fault on the east side of Fish Lake Valley, Nevada. This fault is a normal fault that aids in the transfer of regional right-lateral deformation associated with the Death Valley/Fish Lake Valley fault zone. Locally a 20 m high scarp marks the trace of the main fault across a large, active alluvial fan. The GPR experiment produced a pseudo-3D image approximately 500m by 115m in size with a bin size of 1m by 5m. Depth penetration was dependent on antenna frequency, but reached approximately 25m in the dry alluvial fan sediments. Two 2-D seismic lines were acquired with a depth penetration of approximately 200m using a 30.06 caliber rifle source. The main line was over 400m in length and the cross line over 150m in length. CMP bins were 0.25m in size. Both data types were processed to migrated images and imported into an industry-standard reflection interpretation package. Analysis of the GPR volume allowed the interpretation of numerous normal faults parallel to the main Emigrant fault both near the main scarp and as 'off-fault' deformation. Some are down-to-the-basin 'growth faults' and some are antithetic in nature. Faults were only mapped if they were continuous across many x-lines. The migrated seismic images contain numerous reflections, grouped in packages of short reflectors of different amplitudes and dip orientations. The GPR fault planes were transferred onto the seismic data and correlated with obvious breaks in dip and amplitude between the reflection packages. After basic interpretation of the faults the stratigraphic changes across the fault planes were analyzed on the seismic data to estimate offsets at different depths for each fault. Currently, we are working to estimate a quantitative

  19. Weakness and mechanical anisotropy of phyllosilicate-rich cataclasites developed after mylonites of a low-angle normal fault (Simplon Line, Western Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolognesi, Francesca; Bistacchi, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    The Simplon Fault Zone is a late-collisional low-angle normal fault (LANF) of the Western Alps. The hanging wall shows evidence of brittle deformation only, while the footwall is characterized by a c. 1 km-thick shear zone (the Simplon Fault Zone), which continuously evolved, during exhumation and cooling, from amphibolite facies conditions to brittle-cataclastic deformations. Due to progressive localization of the active section of the shear zone, the thermal-rheological evolution of the footwall resulted in a layered structure, with higher temperature mylonites preserved at the periphery of the shear zone, and cataclasites occurring at the core (indicated as the Simplon Line). In order to investigate the weakness of the Simplon Line, we studied the evolution of brittle/cataclastic fault rocks, from nucleation to the most mature ones. Cataclasites are superposed on greenschist facies mylonites, and their nucleation can be studied at the periphery of the brittle fault zone. This is characterized by fractures, micro-faults and foliated ultracataclasite seams that develop along the mylonitic SCC‧ fabric, exploiting the weak phases mainly represented by muscovite and chlorite. Approaching the fault core, both the thickness and frequency of cataclasite horizons increase, and, as their thickness increases, they become less and less foliated. The fault core itself is represented by a thicker non-foliated cataclasite horizon. No Andersonian faults or fractures can be found in the footwall damage zone and core zone, whilst they are present in the hanging wall and in the footwall further from the fault. Applying a stress model based on slip tendency, we have been able to calculate that the friction coefficient of the Simplon Line cataclasites was <0.25, hence this fault zone is absolutely weak. In contrast with other fault zones, the weakening effect of fluids was of secondary importance, since they accessed the fault zone only after an interconnected fracture network

  20. Active and inactive faults in southern California viewed from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merifield, P. M.; Lamar, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    A number of prominent linears in basement terrane of the Peninsular Ranges appeared on Skylab images. In most cases, they were represented by straight or gently curved valleys; however, detailed field investigations have shown that several of these linears mark previously unmapped faults which form two distinct fault sets; one set trends northeast, the other west-northwest. No indications of recent movement were present on these faults which were truncated by seismically active, northwest trending fault zones such as the Elsinore and San Jacinto. Right-lateral separation is demonstrable on the northeast trending set.

  1. Fault segmentation and seismic potential of the Median Tectonic Line in Shikoku, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, M.; Ikeda, M.; Zhao, D.; Ohno, Y.

    2001-12-01

    The Median Tectonic Line (MTL) is one of the most active fault system in Japan, which is an east-west trending, 190 km-long fault system and consists of several rupture segments in Shikoku. A long active fault system such as the MTL may not rupture along its entire length in a single earthquake but instead consists of multiple seismic segments that rupture independently of one another. Dominant factors controlling the dynamic behavior of the MTL may be the structure and processes in the deep crust or even down to the uppermost mantle, hence we need to consider a segmentation model taking into account the heterogeneous structure of the crust and upper mantle. We conducted seismic tomography inversions to estimate the crustal structure beneath the MTL in Shikoku. We collected 83875 P and 34106 S wave arrival times from 4374 local earthquakes that occurred from 1985 to 1993 from the Japan University Network Earthquake Catalog (EPDC, 1997). We used the tomographic method of Zhao et al. (1992). A 3-D grid net was set up in the study area with a grid spacing of about 30 km in the horizontal direction and 10-20 km in depth. Strong heterogeneities are revealed in the crust and uppermost mantle beneath the MTL in Shikoku. A prominent feature of the obtained tomographic results is that the three segments proposed by Goto et al.(2001) exhibit different velocity patterns. A prominent low-V zone is visible at depths of 15-30 km under the Central-East Shikoku segment. As the low-V zones may represent weak sections of the fault zone and it may influence the generation of large crustal earthquakes (e.g., Zhao et al., 2000), this feature may indicate that fault activity is different in the three segments of MTL. GPS observations for the MTL in eastern Shikoku indicate that the upper crust (0-15 km depths) of the MTL locks and steady slip occurs in the lower crust (Tabei et al., 2000). This steady slip zone coincides with the low-V zone revealed by our tomographic imaging in the

  2. Ground fault location on a transmission line using high frequency transient voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almteiri, Haifaa Abdulla

    This thesis addresses two different problems in the location of ground faults on transmission lines. The first problem is related to the reflected waves which arise for near faults to the busses. The second problem is utilizing wavelet in some special studies that required the manual measurement for determining the time difference between two consecutives signals of initial waves. Novel method is presented by using traveling wave approach with no exploiting of reflected waves to overcome the aforementioned difficulties. A simple effective approach to accurately and rapidly obtain the ground fault location along a transmission line during fault transients is presented. The objective of the presented method is to eliminate the need to use the reflected in ground fault measurement especially for a case of one-end measurement where there is no synchronization required for initial signals at both sides. This is accomplished by developing a new automatic technique for the time measurement to determine the time difference between the initial waves of ground and aerial mode voltages. Proposed approach is implemented in different environments such as electromagnetic Transients Program ATP/EMTP and MATLAB. High voltage transmission system will be modeled and different ground faults will be generated at different locations in the entire length of the transmission line. Further, a study of different factors that may have a remarkable effect to the accuracy is obtained such as the fault resistance and fault type. Simulation results and further statistical analysis show high correlation between the actual and estimated fault locations for all the studied cases. An extended comparative study between former method of fault location and the proposed method is obtained for better understanding and pinpointing the difficulties concerning the accuracy and rapid fault computations. The proposed approach has added a main advantage of requiring high frequency transient fault signals only

  3. Insurance Applications of Active Fault Maps Showing Epistemic Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, G.

    2005-12-01

    Insurance loss modeling for earthquakes utilizes available maps of active faulting produced by geoscientists. All such maps are subject to uncertainty, arising from lack of knowledge of fault geometry and rupture history. Field work to undertake geological fault investigations drains human and monetary resources, and this inevitably limits the resolution of fault parameters. Some areas are more accessible than others; some may be of greater social or economic importance than others; some areas may be investigated more rapidly or diligently than others; or funding restrictions may have curtailed the extent of the fault mapping program. In contrast with the aleatory uncertainty associated with the inherent variability in the dynamics of earthquake fault rupture, uncertainty associated with lack of knowledge of fault geometry and rupture history is epistemic. The extent of this epistemic uncertainty may vary substantially from one regional or national fault map to another. However aware the local cartographer may be, this uncertainty is generally not conveyed in detail to the international map user. For example, an area may be left blank for a variety of reasons, ranging from lack of sufficient investigation of a fault to lack of convincing evidence of activity. Epistemic uncertainty in fault parameters is of concern in any probabilistic assessment of seismic hazard, not least in insurance earthquake risk applications. A logic-tree framework is appropriate for incorporating epistemic uncertainty. Some insurance contracts cover specific high-value properties or transport infrastructure, and therefore are extremely sensitive to the geometry of active faulting. Alternative Risk Transfer (ART) to the capital markets may also be considered. In order for such insurance or ART contracts to be properly priced, uncertainty should be taken into account. Accordingly, an estimate is needed for the likelihood of surface rupture capable of causing severe damage. Especially where a

  4. Improved Fault Classification in Series Compensated Transmission Line: Comparative Evaluation of Chebyshev Neural Network Training Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Bhargav Y; Das, Biswarup; Maheshwari, Rudra Prakash

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the Chebyshev neural network (ChNN) as an improved artificial intelligence technique for power system protection studies and examines the performances of two ChNN learning algorithms for fault classification of series compensated transmission line. The training algorithms are least-square Levenberg-Marquardt (LSLM) and recursive least-square algorithm with forgetting factor (RLSFF). The performances of these algorithms are assessed based on their generalization capability in relating the fault current parameters with an event of fault in the transmission line. The proposed algorithm is fast in response as it utilizes postfault samples of three phase currents measured at the relaying end corresponding to half-cycle duration only. After being trained with only a small part of the generated fault data, the algorithms have been tested over a large number of fault cases with wide variation of system and fault parameters. Based on the studies carried out in this paper, it has been found that although the RLSFF algorithm is faster for training the ChNN in the fault classification application for series compensated transmission lines, the LSLM algorithm has the best accuracy in testing. The results prove that the proposed ChNN-based method is accurate, fast, easy to design, and immune to the level of compensations. Thus, it is suitable for digital relaying applications. PMID:25314714

  5. Fuzzy Inference System Approach for Locating Series, Shunt, and Simultaneous Series-Shunt Faults in Double Circuit Transmission Lines

    PubMed Central

    Swetapadma, Aleena; Yadav, Anamika

    2015-01-01

    Many schemes are reported for shunt fault location estimation, but fault location estimation of series or open conductor faults has not been dealt with so far. The existing numerical relays only detect the open conductor (series) fault and give the indication of the faulty phase(s), but they are unable to locate the series fault. The repair crew needs to patrol the complete line to find the location of series fault. In this paper fuzzy based fault detection/classification and location schemes in time domain are proposed for both series faults, shunt faults, and simultaneous series and shunt faults. The fault simulation studies and fault location algorithm have been developed using Matlab/Simulink. Synchronized phasors of voltage and current signals of both the ends of the line have been used as input to the proposed fuzzy based fault location scheme. Percentage of error in location of series fault is within 1% and shunt fault is 5% for all the tested fault cases. Validation of percentage of error in location estimation is done using Chi square test with both 1% and 5% level of significance. PMID:26413088

  6. Dynamic rupture activation of backthrust fault branching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shiqing; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Ampuero, Jean-Paul

    2015-03-01

    We perform dynamic rupture simulations to investigate the possible reactivation of backthrust branches triggered by ruptures along a main thrust fault. Simulations with slip-weakening fault friction and uniform initial stress show that fast propagation speed or long propagation distance of the main rupture promotes reactivation of backthrust over a range of branch angles. The latter condition may occur separately from the former if rupture speed is limited by an increasing slip-weakening distance towards the junction direction. The results suggest a trade-off between the amplitude and duration of the dynamic stress near the main rupture front for backthrust reactivation. Termination of the main rupture by a barrier can provide enhanced loading amplitude and duration along a backthrust rooted near the barrier, facilitating its reactivation especially with a high frictional resistance. The free surface and depth-dependent initial stress can have several additional effects. The sign of the triggered motion along the backthrust can be reversed from thrust to normal if a deeply nucleated main rupture breaks the free surface, while it is preserved as thrust if the main rupture is terminated by a barrier at depth. The numerical results are discussed in relation to several recent megathrust earthquakes in Sumatra, Chile, and Japan, and related topics such as branch feedbacks to the main fault. The dynamic view on backthrust fault branching provided by the study fills a gap not covered by quasi-static models or observations. A specific examined case of antithetic fault branching may be useful for indicating a barrier-like behavior along the main fault.

  7. Evidence against Late Quaternary activity along the Northern Karakoram Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, A. C.; Owen, L. A.; Hedrick, K.; Blisniuk, K.; Sharp, W. D.; Chen, J.; Schoenbohm, L. M.; Imrecke, D. B.; Yuan, Z.; Li, W.

    2012-12-01

    Although the entire 1000 km long Karakoram fault has long been interpreted to be active, recent work based primarily on interpretation of satellite imagery suggests that the northern end of the fault, where it enters the Pamir mountains, is inactive. We present field observations and geochronologic data from the southern end of the Tashkurgan valley, in the Pamir, on the Karakoram fault where it splits into two identifiable strands; an eastern strand which is the main trace of the Karakoram fault, and a western strand called the Achiehkopai fault. These results support the interpretation that the northern Karakoram fault is currently inactive, and has been for at least 200 ka: 1) Near the village of Dabudaer in the southern Tashkurgan valley the main trace of the Karakoram fault is orthogonally cut by a narrow incised valley with no observed lateral offset across the fault. Within this valley, a strath terrace ~50 m above the active drainage which overlies the main trace of the Karakoram fault which is capped by a carbonate cemented conglomerate. U-series analyses of carbonate cement from a correlative deposit located several km away yields a minimum depositional age of 76±12 ka. This age is coeval with the local Tashkurgan glacial stage we dated using Be-10 surface exposure dating (66±10 ka; Owen et al., 2012, Quaternary Science Reviews) suggesting both the conglomerate and strath terrace formed during this glacial stage. 2) ~25 km south of Dabudar, the main trace of the Karakoram projects beneath Tashkurgan glacial stage moraine and fluvial-glacial deposits which similarly show no evidence of disturbance by strike-slip deformation. Both of the above results demonstrate the main trace of the Karakoram fault has been inactive since at least ~70 ka. 3) Both the Karakoram and Achiehkopai faults are overlain by older Dabudaer glacial stage moraine deposits which are interpreted to be at least as old as the penultimate glacial, but may be >200 ka based on our Be-10

  8. Development of fault section detecting system for gas insulated transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, E.; Uchida, K.; Koshilishi, M.; Mitsui, T.; Miyamoto, S.; Nakamura, K.; Itaka, K.; Hara, T.; Yoda, T.

    1986-01-01

    A fault section detecting system using optical magnetic field sensors developed for gas insulated transmission lines (GIL) is reported. A bismuth silicon oxide (Bi/sub 12/SiO/sub 20/, or BSO) single crystal was adopted for the optical magnetic field sensor. A method of mounting the sensors to GIL which enables the sensors to detect the conductor current from outside the enclosure was developed. With the developed fault detector, faults occurring inside a section of GIL between sensors are detected by discriminating the phases of conductor currents detected by the sensors. The system was confirmed to have sufficient performance for application to commerical GILS.

  9. Development of Fault Point Locating System for Underground Transmission Lines using Optical Fiber Current Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosawa, Kiyoshi; Kondo, Reishi; Nasukawa, Shinsuke; Yamaguchi, Tatsushi; Amano, Kazuo

    Fault point locating systems based on surge current detection have recently been used for fast recovery of underground transmission line from the fault. Electromagnetic induction type sensors have mainly been used for detection of the surge current. However they are susceptible to electromagnetic noise which causes unstable system operation. To solve this problem, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Toko Electric Corporation and Fujikura Ltd., by a joint research, have developed a new system that applies optical fiber current sensors.

  10. Anatomy of a microearthquake sequence on an active normal fault.

    PubMed

    Stabile, T A; Satriano, C; Orefice, A; Festa, G; Zollo, A

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of similar earthquakes, such as events in a seismic sequence, is an effective tool with which to monitor and study source processes and to understand the mechanical and dynamic states of active fault systems. We are observing seismicity that is primarily concentrated in very limited regions along the 1980 Irpinia earthquake fault zone in Southern Italy, which is a complex system characterised by extensional stress regime. These zones of weakness produce repeated earthquakes and swarm-like microearthquake sequences, which are concentrated in a few specific zones of the fault system. In this study, we focused on a sequence that occurred along the main fault segment of the 1980 Irpinia earthquake to understand its characteristics and its relation to the loading-unloading mechanisms of the fault system. PMID:22606366

  11. Anatomy of a microearthquake sequence on an active normal fault

    PubMed Central

    Stabile, T. A.; Satriano, C.; Orefice, A.; Festa, G.; Zollo, A.

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of similar earthquakes, such as events in a seismic sequence, is an effective tool with which to monitor and study source processes and to understand the mechanical and dynamic states of active fault systems. We are observing seismicity that is primarily concentrated in very limited regions along the 1980 Irpinia earthquake fault zone in Southern Italy, which is a complex system characterised by extensional stress regime. These zones of weakness produce repeated earthquakes and swarm-like microearthquake sequences, which are concentrated in a few specific zones of the fault system. In this study, we focused on a sequence that occurred along the main fault segment of the 1980 Irpinia earthquake to understand its characteristics and its relation to the loading-unloading mechanisms of the fault system. PMID:22606366

  12. Active faults and minor plates in NE Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhurin, Andrey I.; Zelenin, Egor A.

    2014-05-01

    Stated nearly 40 yr ago the uncertainty with plate boundaries location in NE Asia (Chapman, Solomon, 1976) still remains unresolved. Based on the prepositions that a plate boundary must, first, reveal itself in linear sets of active structures, and, second, be continuous and closed, we have undertaken interpretation of medium-resolution KH-9 Hexagon satellite imageries, mostly in stereoscopic regime, for nearly the entire region of NE Asia. Main findings are as follows. There are two major active fault zones in the region north of the Bering Sea. One of them, the Khatyrka-Vyvenka zone, stretches NE to ENE skirting the Bering Sea from the Kamchatka isthmus to the Navarin Cape. Judging by the kinematics of the Olyutorsky 2006 earthquake fault, the fault zones move both right-laterally and reversely. The second active fault zone, the Lankovaya-Omolon zone, starts close to the NE margin of the Okhotsk Sea and extends NE up to nearly the margin of the Chukcha Sea. The fault zone is mostly right-lateral, with topographically expressed cumulative horizontal offsets amounting to 2.5-2.6 km. There may be a third NE-SW zone between the major two coinciding with the Penzhina Range as several active faults found in the southern termination of the Range indicate. The two active fault zones divide the NE Asia area into two large domains, which both could be parts of the Bering Sea plate internally broken and with uncertain western limit. Another variant implies the Khatyrka-Vyvenka zone as the Bering Sea plate northern limit, and the Lankovaya-Omolon zone as separating an additional minor plate from the North-American plate. The choice is actually not crucial, and more important is that both variants leave the question of where the Bering Sea plate boundary is in Alaska. The Lankovaya-Omolon zone stretches just across the proposed northern boundary of the Okhorsk Sea plate. NW of the zone, there is a prominent left-lateral Ulakhan fault, which is commonly interpreted to be a

  13. Geodynamics of the Dead Sea Fault: Do active faulting and past earthquakes determine the seismic gaps?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meghraoui, Mustapha

    2014-05-01

    The ~1000-km-long North-South trending Dead Sea transform fault (DSF) presents structural discontinuities and includes segments that experienced large earthquakes (Mw>7) in historical times. The Wadi Araba and Jordan Valley, the Lebanese restraining bend, the Missyaf and Ghab fault segments in Syria and the Ziyaret Fault segment in Turkey display geometrical complexities made of step overs, restraining and releasing bends that may constitute major obstacles to earthquake rupture propagation. Using active tectonics, GPS measurements and paleoseismology we investigate the kinematics and long-term/short term slip rates along the DSF. Tectonic geomorphology with paleoseismic trenching and archeoseismic investigations indicate repeated faulting events and left-lateral slip rate ranging from 4 mm/yr in the southern fault section to 6 mm/yr in the northern fault section. Except for the northernmost DSF section, these estimates of fault slip rate are consistent with GPS measurements that show 4 to 5 mm/yr deformation rate across the plate boundary. However, recent GPS results showing ~2.5 mm/yr velocity rate of the northern DSF appears to be quite different than the ~6 mm/yr paleoseismic slip rate. The kinematic modeling that combines GPS and seismotectonic results implies a complex geodynamic pattern where the DSF transforms the Cyprus arc subduction zone into transpressive tectonics on the East Anatolian fault. The timing of past earthquake ruptures shows the occurrence of seismic sequences and a southward migration of large earthquakes, with the existence of major seismic gaps along strike. In this paper, we discuss the role of the DSF in the regional geodynamics and its implication on the identification of seismic gaps.

  14. Wavelet transform-based fault diagnosis and line selection method of small current grounding system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ni; Zhang, Shuqing; Zhang, Liguo; Zhang, Kexin; Sun, Lingyun

    2008-12-01

    Small current grounding system is the system that the neutral point doesn't ground or grounds across the arc suppressing coils, which has been applied commonly in distribution system of many countries. As the grounding fault occurs, current is the one caused by capacity of circuit to ground only and it is rather small. The status of fault is complexity, e.g., the electromagnet interferes together with the amplified impact of zero-order loops to high-order singularity waves and various temporary variables. All these result in the lower ratio of the fault element signal to noise caused by zero-order current. In this paper, the position of signal singularity and the magnitude of the singularity degree are analyzed based on the variable focus character of wavelet, and the time fault occurs is then determined. The series db wavelet with close sustain is adopted, and the line selection is according to the zero-order voltage of the generatrix and the current of various outlet line. It is proved by the experiment that the fault circuit diagnosis method based on wavelet analysis to the character of temporary status of single-phase grounding fault plays an important role to a finer line selection.

  15. Wireless power transfer and fault diagnosis of high-voltage power line via robotic bird

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunhua; Chau, K. T.; Zhang, Zhen; Qiu, Chun; Li, Wenlong; Ching, T. W.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a new idea of wireless power transfer (WPT) and fault diagnosis (FD) of high-voltage power line via robotic bird. The key is to present the conceptual robotic bird with WPT coupling coil for detecting and capturing the energy from the high-voltage power line. If the power line works in normal condition, the robotic bird is able to stand on the power line and extract energy from it. If fault occurs on the power line, the corresponding magnetic field distribution will become different from that in the normal situation. By analyzing the magnetic field distribution of the power line, the WPT to the robotic bird and the FD by the robotic bird are performed and verified.

  16. A compilation of major active faults for parts of Montana and Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, K.M.; Dart, R.L. ); Stickney, M.C. )

    1993-04-01

    The area covered by Montana and Idaho was used as a prototypical test for developing and applying criteria with which to select and present data on Quaternary faults for the US contribution to the World Map of Active Faults (International Lithosphere Program Project II-2, see Machette and others, this session). The prototype is successful in part because the test area contains a large number of Quaternary faults of differing age and the present level of scientific knowledge of these faults is quite variable. As such, active faults in Montana and Idaho provide an excellent representative population from which to formulate database criteria. The compilation consists of a digital map and supporting relational database. Fault traces were compiled on 1:250,000-scale topographic maps and digitized using Geographic Information System software to permit output at State-map scales of 1:500,000 or 1:750,000. The timing of the most recent event and slip rates of the faults are shown by different line colors and thicknesses, according to the convention established for the US and World Map. Five age categories defined by color include historic, Holocene and latest Pleistocene (< [approximately]15 ka), late Quaternary (< [approximately]130 ka), late and middle Quaternary (< [approximately]750 ka), and undifferentiated Quaternary (< 1.6 Ma). Three slip-rate categories defined by line thickness include high (> 5 mm/yr), moderate (1--5 mm/yr), and low slip rates (< 1 mm/yr). The accompanying database provides supporting evidence for age of faulting and slip rates shown on the map as well as details of segmentation, location of exploratory trenches, recurrence intervals, and references to published studies.

  17. Challenges and perspectives in the geological study of active faults.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizza, M.

    2011-12-01

    Identification of active faults is important for understanding regional seismicity and seismic hazard. A large part of the world's population lives in areas where destructive earthquakes or tsunamis were recorded in the past. Most of the difficulties in estimating seismic hazard and anticipating earthquakes are due to a lack of knowledge about the location of active faults and their seismic history. Even where active faults are known the characteristics of past earthquakes and the seismic cycle are uncertain and subject to discussion. Investigations carried out on active faults during the past decade, however, have provided new high-quality data and powerful tools to better understand crustal deformation and the recurrence of earthquakes. In morphotectonic studies, the ever-improving resolution of satellites images allows geologists to identify with more certainty the traces of active faults and even earthquake surface ruptures of the past. The advantage of satellite imagery for identifying neotectonic features is it gives access to large areas, sometimes difficult to reach in the field and provides synoptic views. Using the potential of high-resolution imagery and digital elevation models, geologists can produce detailed 3D reconstructions of fault morphology and geometry, including the kinematics of repeated slip. The development of new dating techniques, coupled with paleoseismology and quantitative geomorphology, now allows bracketing the occurrence of paleoearthquakes back to several thousand years, as well as analyzing long time sequences of events. Despite such wealth of new data, however, the work remaining to do is huge. Earthquake forecast (location, timing, magnitude) remains an unsolved problem for the earthquake community at large (seismologists, geodesists, paleoseismologists and modelers). The most important challenges in the next decade will be to increase the efficiency of neotectonic studies to create more complete active fault databases and

  18. Multiwavelet packet entropy and its application in transmission line fault recognition and classification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhigang; Han, Zhiwei; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Qiaoge

    2014-11-01

    Multiwavelets possess better properties than traditional wavelets. Multiwavelet packet transformation has more high-frequency information. Spectral entropy can be applied as an analysis index to the complexity or uncertainty of a signal. This paper tries to define four multiwavelet packet entropies to extract the features of different transmission line faults, and uses a radial basis function (RBF) neural network to recognize and classify 10 fault types of power transmission lines. First, the preprocessing and postprocessing problems of multiwavelets are presented. Shannon entropy and Tsallis entropy are introduced, and their difference is discussed. Second, multiwavelet packet energy entropy, time entropy, Shannon singular entropy, and Tsallis singular entropy are defined as the feature extraction methods of transmission line fault signals. Third, the plan of transmission line fault recognition using multiwavelet packet entropies and an RBF neural network is proposed. Finally, the experimental results show that the plan with the four multiwavelet packet energy entropies defined in this paper achieves better performance in fault recognition. The performance with SA4 (symmetric antisymmetric) multiwavelet packet Tsallis singular entropy is the best among the combinations of different multiwavelet packets and the four multiwavelet packet entropies. PMID:25330427

  19. Connecting the Yakima fold and thrust belt to active faults in the Puget Lowland, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, R.J.; Sherrod, B.L.; Weaver, C.S.; Wells, R.E.; Rohay, A.C.; Barnett, E.A.; Knepprath, N.E.

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution aeromagnetic surveys of the Cascade Range and Yakima fold and thrust belt (YFTB), Washington, provide insights on tectonic connections between forearc and back-arc regions of the Cascadia convergent margin. Magnetic surveys were measured at a nominal altitude of 250 m above terrain and along flight lines spaced 400 m apart. Upper crustal rocks in this region have diverse magnetic properties, ranging from highly magnetic rocks of the Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group to weakly magnetic sedimentary rocks of various ages. These distinctive magnetic properties permit mapping of important faults and folds from exposures to covered areas. Magnetic lineaments correspond with mapped Quaternary faults and with scarps identified in lidar (light detection and ranging) topographic data and aerial photography. A two-dimensional model of the northwest striking Umtanum Ridge fault zone, based on magnetic and gravity data and constrained by geologic mapping and three deep wells, suggests that thrust faults extend through the Tertiary section and into underlying pre-Tertiary basement. Excavation of two trenches across a prominent scarp at the base of Umtanum Ridge uncovered evidence for bending moment faulting possibly caused by a blind thrust. Using aeromagnetic, gravity, and paleoseismic evidence, we postulate possible tectonic connections between the YFTB in eastern Washington and active faults of the Puget Lowland. We suggest that faults and folds of Umtanum Ridge extend northwestward through the Cascade Range and merge with the Southern Whidbey Island and Seattle faults near Snoqualmie Pass 35 km east of Seattle. Recent earthquakes (MW ≤ 5.3) suggest that this confluence of faults may be seismically active today.

  20. Connecting the Yakima fold and thrust belt to active faults in the Puget Lowland, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakely, Richard J.; Sherrod, Brian L.; Weaver, Craig S.; Wells, Ray E.; Rohay, Alan C.; Barnett, Elizabeth A.; Knepprath, Nichole E.

    2011-07-01

    High-resolution aeromagnetic surveys of the Cascade Range and Yakima fold and thrust belt (YFTB), Washington, provide insights on tectonic connections between forearc and back-arc regions of the Cascadia convergent margin. Magnetic surveys were measured at a nominal altitude of 250 m above terrain and along flight lines spaced 400 m apart. Upper crustal rocks in this region have diverse magnetic properties, ranging from highly magnetic rocks of the Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group to weakly magnetic sedimentary rocks of various ages. These distinctive magnetic properties permit mapping of important faults and folds from exposures to covered areas. Magnetic lineaments correspond with mapped Quaternary faults and with scarps identified in lidar (light detection and ranging) topographic data and aerial photography. A two-dimensional model of the northwest striking Umtanum Ridge fault zone, based on magnetic and gravity data and constrained by geologic mapping and three deep wells, suggests that thrust faults extend through the Tertiary section and into underlying pre-Tertiary basement. Excavation of two trenches across a prominent scarp at the base of Umtanum Ridge uncovered evidence for bending moment faulting possibly caused by a blind thrust. Using aeromagnetic, gravity, and paleoseismic evidence, we postulate possible tectonic connections between the YFTB in eastern Washington and active faults of the Puget Lowland. We suggest that faults and folds of Umtanum Ridge extend northwestward through the Cascade Range and merge with the Southern Whidbey Island and Seattle faults near Snoqualmie Pass 35 km east of Seattle. Recent earthquakes (MW ≤ 5.3) suggest that this confluence of faults may be seismically active today.

  1. Fault-slip accumulation in an active rift over thousands to millions of years and the importance of paleoearthquake sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouslopoulou, Vasiliki; Nicol, Andrew; Walsh, John; Begg, John; Townsend, Dougal; Hristopulos, Dionissios

    2013-04-01

    The catastrophic earthquakes that recently (September 4th, 2010 and February 22nd, 2011) hit Christchurch, New Zealand, show that active faults, capable of generating large-magnitude earthquakes, can be hidden beneath the Earth's surface. In this study we combine near-surface paleoseismic data with deep (<5 km) onshore seismic-reflection lines to explore the growth of normal faults over short (<27 kyr) and long (>1 Ma) timescales in the Taranaki Rift, New Zealand. Our analysis shows that the integration of different timescale datasets provides a basis for identifying active faults not observed at the ground surface, estimating maximum fault-rupture lengths, inferring maximum short-term displacement rates and improving earthquake hazard assessment. We find that fault displacement rates become increasingly irregular (both faster and slower) on shorter timescales, leading to incomplete sampling of the active-fault population. Surface traces have been recognised for <50% of the active faults and along ∼50% of their lengths. The similarity of along-strike displacement profiles for short and long time intervals suggests that fault lengths and maximum single-event displacements have not changed over the last 3.6 Ma. Therefore, rate changes are likely to reflect temporal adjustments in earthquake recurrence intervals due to fault interactions and associated migration of earthquake activity within the rift.

  2. Fault-slip accumulation in an active rift over thousands to millions of years and the importance of paleoearthquake sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouslopoulou, Vasiliki; Nicol, Andrew; Walsh, John J.; Begg, John G.; Townsend, Dougal B.; Hristopulos, Dionissios T.

    2012-03-01

    The catastrophic earthquakes that recently (September 4th, 2010 and February 22nd, 2011) hit Christchurch, New Zealand, show that active faults, capable of generating large-magnitude earthquakes, can be hidden beneath the Earth's surface. In this article we combine near-surface paleoseismic data with deep (<5 km) onshore seismic-reflection lines to explore the growth of normal faults over short (<27 kyr) and long (>1 Ma) timescales in the Taranaki Rift, New Zealand. Our analysis shows that the integration of different timescale datasets provides a basis for identifying active faults not observed at the ground surface, estimating maximum fault-rupture lengths, inferring maximum short-term displacement rates and improving earthquake hazard assessment. We find that fault displacement rates become increasingly irregular (both faster and slower) on shorter timescales, leading to incomplete sampling of the active-fault population. Surface traces have been recognised for <50% of the active faults and along ≤50% of their lengths. The similarity of along-strike displacement profiles for short and long time intervals suggests that fault lengths and maximum single-event displacements have not changed over the last 3.6 Ma. Therefore, rate changes are likely to reflect temporal adjustments in earthquake recurrence intervals due to fault interactions and associated migration of earthquake activity within the rift.

  3. Erosion influences the seismicity of active thrust faults.

    PubMed

    Steer, Philippe; Simoes, Martine; Cattin, Rodolphe; Shyu, J Bruce H

    2014-01-01

    Assessing seismic hazards remains one of the most challenging scientific issues in Earth sciences. Deep tectonic processes are classically considered as the only persistent mechanism driving the stress loading of active faults over a seismic cycle. Here we show via a mechanical model that erosion also significantly influences the stress loading of thrust faults at the timescale of a seismic cycle. Indeed, erosion rates of about ~0.1-20 mm yr(-1), as documented in Taiwan and in other active compressional orogens, can raise the Coulomb stress by ~0.1-10 bar on the nearby thrust faults over the inter-seismic phase. Mass transfers induced by surface processes in general, during continuous or short-lived and intense events, represent a prominent mechanism for inter-seismic stress loading of faults near the surface. Such stresses are probably sufficient to trigger shallow seismicity or promote the rupture of deep continental earthquakes up to the surface. PMID:25412707

  4. Fault and partial discharge location systems for gas-insulated transmission lines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boggs, S.A.; Ford, G.L.; Fujimoto, N.; Stone, G.C.

    1983-12-01

    Partial discharge and faults in gas-insulated transmission line (GITL) can be difficult to locate. This report describes the development, testing, and application of systems for fault and partial discharge location in GITL. Both systems are based on timing of electromagnetic transients generated by a fault/partial discharge source. Both systems employ microcomputers to facilitate automated data acquisition and analysis. The major problems solved in developing the fault location system were coupling of high frequency signals from and between phases and isolation of high voltage short risetime signals from high speed digital logic. The problems addressed in the partial discharge location project include handling a large number of pulses which may include noise, the large dynamic range of partial discharge induced transients (> 80 dB), and achieving an accurate correlation resolution of 2 ns.

  5. On-line fault diagnosis of power substation using connectionist expert system

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H.T.; Chang, W.Y.; Huang, C.L.

    1995-02-01

    This paper proposes a new connectionist (or neural network) expert system for on-line fault diagnosis of a power substation. The Connectionist Expert Diagnosis System has similar profile of an expert system, but can be constructed much more easily from elemental samples. These samples associate the faults with their protective relays and breakers as well as the bus voltages and feeder currents. Through an elaborately designed structure, alarm signals are processed by different connectionist models. The output of the connectionist models is then integrated to provide the final conclusion with a confidence level. The proposed approach has been practically verified by testing on a typical Taiwan Power (Taipower) secondary substation. The test results show that rapid and exactly correct diagnosis is obtained even for the fault conditions involving multiple faults or failure operation of protective relay and circuit breaker. Moreover, the system can be transplanted into various substations with little additional implementation effort.

  6. Activity of faults observed in caves of the Eastern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroň, Ivo; Plan, Lukas; Grasemann, Bernhard; Mitrovič, Ivanka; Stemberk, Josef

    2015-04-01

    Major recent tectonic process in the Eastern Alps involves the Neogene and Quaternary lateral extrusion of parts of the Eastern Alps towards the Pannonian Basin coeval with north-south shortening of the collision realm between the Adriatic Plate and the Bohemian Massif (European Plate). Within the framework of the FWF project "Speleotect" (2013-2017), we observe recent activity of the major fault systems of the Eastern Alps, such as the (1) Salzach-Ennstal-Mariazell-Puchberg (SEMP), (2) Mur-Mürz, (3) Periadriatic, (4) Lavanttal, and (5) Vienna Basin marginal Faults. Totally seven high-accuracy 3D crack-gauges TM71 with automated reading devices were installed in five selected karst caves with faults younger than the particular caves and correlated to one of these fault zones. The recorded micro-displacement events have been compared to known regional fault kinematics and to regional seismic activity (seismic data provided by the ZAMG). Already within the first year of observation, several micro displacement events were registered; these events sometimes revealed the same mechanisms as the geologically documented kinematics of the particular active faults, but in some cases performed completely opposite kinematics. These micro displacement events occurred in seismically rather quiet periods, however, usually about 1 - 10 days prior to local seismic events of different magnitudes (varying between ML 0.1 and 3.3). Further, in some caves gravitational mass movements were recorded that accompanied the tectonic moments.

  7. Mesoscopic structure of the Punchbowl Fault, Southern California and the geologic and geophysical structure of active strike-slip faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Steven E.; Evans, James P.

    2000-07-01

    We examine the distribution, density, and orientation of outcrop-scale structures related to the Punchbowl Fault, an exhumed ancient trace of the San Andreas Fault, southern California, in order to determine the structure of the fault zone. The Punchbowl Fault has 44 km of right-lateral slip, and cuts the Cretaceous Pelona Schist in the study area. The mesoscopic structures examined include fractures, small faults, and veins; they were inventoried using scan lines at closely spaced stations along three strike-perpendicular traverses 200-250 m long across the fault. The fault zone thickness is a function of the type of structure measured. Slip along narrow (<2 m wide) ultracataclasite cores of the faults results in foliation reorientation over a distance of 50 m from the cores: fracture and fault densities appear to increase 50-80 m from the fault cores, and vein densities are highly variable across the fault zone. Fractures and faults in the damaged zone have a variety of orientations, but most are at high angles to the main fault zone. When coupled with previous geochemical and microstructural data, these data show that large-displacement faults of the San Andreas system, are up to 200-250 m thick, and enclose zones of mineralogic and geochemical alteration that are 20-30 m thick. Extreme slip localization occurs over zones 1-5 m thick. When reconciled with geophysical imaging, our data suggest that trapped headwaves travel in the damaged zone, and that some aftershock events produce slip on faults and fractures, which often have orientations very different from the principal slip surfaces.

  8. Fault mirrors of seismically active faults: A fossil of small earthquakes at shallow depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, L.; Song, S.; Suppe, J.

    2013-12-01

    Many faults are decorated with naturally polished and glossy surfaces named fault mirrors (FMs) formed during slips. The characterization of FMs is of paramount importance to investigate physico-chemical processes controlling dynamic fault mechanics during earthquakes. Here we present detailed microstructural and mineralogical observations of the FMs from borehole cores of seismically active faults. The borehole cores were recovered from 600 to 800 m depth located in the hanging wall of the Hsiaotungshi fault in Taiwan which ruptured during 1935 Mw7.1 Hsinchu-Taichung earthquake. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of FMs show that two distinct textural domains, fault gouge and coated materials (nanograins, melt patchs, and graphite), were cut by a well-defined boundary. Melt patches and graphite, determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscope (TEM), and SEM-EDS analysis, were found to be distributed heterogeneously on the slip surfaces. On the basis of the current kinematic cross section of the Hsiaotungshi fault, all the FMs were exhumed less than 5 km, where ambient temperatures are less than 150°C. It seems that the amorphous materials on the FMs were generated by seismic slips. The sintering nanograins coating the slip surfaces was also suggested to be produced at high slip rates from both natural observation and recent rock deformation experiments. In addition, graphite could be produced by seismic slips and lubricate the fault based on the rock deformation experiments. Our observation suggests that the FMs were composed of several indicators of coseismic events (melt patches, sintering nanograins, and graphite) corresponding to small thermal perturbation generated by seismic slips. Although the contribution of these coseismic indicators on frictional behavior remains largely unknown, it suggests that multiple dynamic weakening mechanisms such as flash heating, powder lubrication and graphitization may be involved during

  9. Shallow Seismic Reflection Study of Recently Active Fault Scarps, Mina Deflection, Western Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, R. A.; Christie, M.; Tsoflias, G. P.; Stockli, D. F.

    2006-12-01

    During the spring and summer of 2006 University of Kansas geophysics students and faculty acquired shallow, high resolution seismic reflection data over actively deforming alluvial fans developing across the Emmigrant Peak (in Fish Lake Valley) and Queen Valley Faults in western Nevada. These normal faults represent a portion of the transition from the right-lateral deformation associated with the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone to the normal and left-lateral faulting of the Mina Deflection. Data were gathered over areas of recent high resolution geological mapping and limited trenching by KU students. An extensive GPR data grid was also acquired. The GPR results are reported in Christie, et al., 2006. The seismic data gathered in the spring included both walkaway tests and a short CMP test line. These data indicated that a very near-surface P-wave to S-wave conversion was taking place and that very high quality S-wave reflections were probably dominating shot records to over one second in time. CMP lines acquired during the summer utilized a 144 channel networked Geode system, single 28 hz geophones, and a 30.06 downhole rifle source. Receiver spacing was 0.5 m, source spacing 1.0m and CMP bin spacings were 0.25m for all lines. Surveying was performed using an RTK system which was also used to develop a concurrent high resolution DEM. A dip line of over 400m and a strike line over 100m in length were shot across the active fan scarp in Fish Lake Valley. Data processing is still underway. However, preliminary interpretation of common-offset gathers and brute stacks indicates very complex faulting and detailed stratigraphic information to depths of over 125m. Depth of information was actually limited by the 1024ms recording time. Several west-dipping normal faults downstep towards the basin. East-dipping antithetic normal faulting is extensive. Several distinctive stratigraphic packages are bound by the faults and apparent unconformitites. A CMP dip line

  10. An active footwall shortcut thrust revealed by seismic reflection profiling: a case study of the Futaba fault, northern Honshu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Kato, Naoko; Higashinaka, Motonori; Kurashimo, Eiji; Iwasaki, Takaya; Abe, Susumu

    2013-04-01

    The Futaba fault is located along the Pacific cast of southern part of Northern Honshu and continues at least 100 km. Based on tectonic morphological research, its central part show the active tectonic features. Due to the effect of M9 Tohoku Oki earthquake 2011, the evaluation of Coulomb stress changes on the fault surface is concerned for the assess of seismic hazards. To investigate the deep geometry of seismogenic source fault and basic crustal structure, we performed deep seismic reflection profiling along the 58-km-long seismic line across the Futaba fault. The seismic data were obtained using four vibroseis trucks and 1164 channel recorders. The seismic section portrays the half graben filled by 1000-m-thick lower Miocene fluvial sediments, suggesting that the Futaba fault reactivated as a west dipping normal fault during the early Miocene associated with opening of the Sea of Japan. On the hanging wall of the Miocene normal fault, Mesozoic metamorphic rocks are cropping out forming a narrow range parallel to the fault. On the footwall of this range, footwall shortcut thrust is clearly identified by the deformation of Plio-Pleistocene sediments on the seismic section. The deeper extension of the Futaba fault can be traced down to 4.5 seconds (TWT) and sub-horizontal reflectors are developed around 6-7 seconds (TWT). The dip angle of the Futaba fault in the seismogenic zone is about 45 degrees. The footwall shortcut thrust was formed at the shallow high-angle part of the Futaba fault as a low-angle (30 degrees) reverse fault. The formation of half graben is limited along the northern part of this fault system. The footwall shortcut thrust was developed along a 40-km-long segment only accompanied with the Miocene half graben. The southern segment of the surface trace of the Futaba fault suggests a straight geometry may represent a change in dip angle.

  11. Contradicting Estimates of Location, Geometry, and Rupture History of Highly Active Faults in Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, K.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate location and geometry of seismic sources are critical to estimate strong ground motion. Complete and precise rupture history is also critical to estimate the probability of the future events. In order to better forecast future earthquakes and to reduce seismic hazards, we should consider over all options and choose the most likely parameter. Multiple options for logic trees are acceptable only after thorough examination of contradicting estimates and should not be a result from easy compromise or epoche. In the process of preparation and revisions of Japanese probabilistic and deterministic earthquake hazard maps by Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion since 1996, many decisions were made to select plausible parameters, but many contradicting estimates have been left without thorough examinations. There are several highly-active faults in central Japan such as Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line active fault system (ISTL), West Nagano Basin fault system (WNBF), Inadani fault system (INFS), and Atera fault system (ATFS). The highest slip rate and the shortest recurrence interval are respectively ~1 cm/yr and 500 to 800 years, and estimated maximum magnitude is 7.5 to 8.5. Those faults are very hazardous because almost entire population and industries are located above the fault within tectonic depressions. As to the fault location, most uncertainties arises from interpretation of geomorphic features. Geomorphological interpretation without geological and structural insight often leads to wrong mapping. Though non-existent longer fault may be a safer estimate, incorrectness harm reliability of the forecast. Also this does not greatly affect strong motion estimates, but misleading to surface displacement issues. Fault geometry, on the other hand, is very important to estimate intensity distribution. For the middle portion of the ISTL, fast-moving left-lateral strike-slip up to 1 cm/yr is obvious. Recent seismicity possibly induced by 2011 Tohoku

  12. Theory of reliable systems. [reliability analysis and on-line fault diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    Research is reported in the program to refine the current notion of system reliability by identifying and investigating attributes of a system which are important to reliability considerations, and to develop techniques which facilitate analysis of system reliability. Reliability analysis, and on-line fault diagnosis are discussed.

  13. Fault Lines in Our Democracy: Civic Knowledge, Voting Behavior, and Civic Engagement in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coley, Richard J.; Sum, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    As the 21st century unfolds, the United States faces historic challenges, including a struggling economy, an aging infrastructure and global terrorism. Solutions will have to come from educated, skilled citizens who understand and believe in our democratic system and are civically engaged. This incisive new report examines these fault lines and…

  14. Study on the Late Quaternary Activity of Niyang River Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fangtou, T.

    2015-12-01

    Niyang River fault with north-west trending is located on the west side of the Eastern Himalayan Syntaxis. It dislocated the eastern segment of Brahmaputra fault zone. We study the late Quaternary activity of the Niyang River fault by the high-resolution image data in combination with detailed field investigation, GPS observation, trenching and radiocarbon dating of charcoal samples. The GPS observation data shows that the movement characteristics of Niyang River fault is dextral strike-slip with extrusion at present, its strike-slip rate is 3~4mm/a and its extrusion rate is 2~3mm/a. The trench at Bayi town revealed that the first terraces of Niyang River was dislocated 50cm by the fault and it is dated to be 1220±40cal.a BP.. We found that third Lake terraces of the Linzhi ancient lakes was dislocated about 1.5m at Mirui town and it is dated to be 18060±60cal.a BP.. By the fault influence, there are different elevations at the same level terraces of Niyang river and the Linzhi ancient lakes both sides of Niyang river near Bayi town. The altitude of the second terraces of Niyang River is about 20 meters at eastern side higher than western side and it is dated to be between 8860±40cal.a BP. and 9870±50cal.a BP., the altitude of the third lake terraces of the Linzhi ancient lakes is about 60 meters at eastern side higher than western side. So, the average vertical slip rate of Niyang River fault was about 2mm/a since Holocene and its average vertical slip rate was about 3mm/a since late period of the late Pleistocene. This is consistent with GPS observation data. All these data suggest that Niyang River fault is active since Holocene. So further detailed research will be necessary to determine the range of the latest activity of this fault, movement characteristics and velocity and recurrence intervals of major earthquakes. These data will be a great significance for earthquake zonation and assessment of seismic risk in this region. Keywords:Niyang River fault

  15. Active fault database of Japan: Its construction and search system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, T.; Miyamoto, F.

    2011-12-01

    The Active fault database of Japan was constructed by the Active Fault and Earthquake Research Center, GSJ/AIST and opened to the public on the Internet from 2005 to make a probabilistic evaluation of the future faulting event and earthquake occurrence on major active faults in Japan. The database consists of three sub-database, 1) sub-database on individual site, which includes long-term slip data and paleoseismicity data with error range and reliability, 2) sub-database on details of paleoseismicity, which includes the excavated geological units and faulting event horizons with age-control, 3) sub-database on characteristics of behavioral segments, which includes the fault-length, long-term slip-rate, recurrence intervals, most-recent-event, slip per event and best-estimate of cascade earthquake. Major seismogenic faults, those are approximately the best-estimate segments of cascade earthquake, each has a length of 20 km or longer and slip-rate of 0.1m/ky or larger and is composed from about two behavioral segments in average, are included in the database. This database contains information of active faults in Japan, sorted by the concept of "behavioral segments" (McCalpin, 1996). Each fault is subdivided into 550 behavioral segments based on surface trace geometry and rupture history revealed by paleoseismic studies. Behavioral segments can be searched on the Google Maps. You can select one behavioral segment directly or search segments in a rectangle area on the map. The result of search is shown on a fixed map or the Google Maps with information of geologic and paleoseismic parameters including slip rate, slip per event, recurrence interval, and calculated rupture probability in the future. Behavioral segments can be searched also by name or combination of fault parameters. All those data are compiled from journal articles, theses, and other documents. We are currently developing a revised edition, which is based on an improved database system. More than ten

  16. Active faulting in apparently stable peninsular India: Rift inversion and a Holocene-age great earthquake on the Tapti Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copley, Alex; Mitra, Supriyo; Sloan, R. Alastair; Gaonkar, Sharad; Reynolds, Kirsty

    2014-08-01

    We present observations of active faulting within peninsular India, far from the surrounding plate boundaries. Offset alluvial fan surfaces indicate one or more magnitude 7.6-8.4 thrust-faulting earthquakes on the Tapti Fault (Maharashtra, western India) during the Holocene. The high ratio of fault displacement to length on the alluvial fan offsets implies high stress-drop faulting, as has been observed elsewhere in the peninsula. The along-strike extent of the fan offsets is similar to the thickness of the seismogenic layer, suggesting a roughly equidimensional fault rupture. The subsiding footwall of the fault is likely to have been responsible for altering the continental-scale drainage pattern in central India and creating the large west flowing catchment of the Tapti river. A preexisting sedimentary basin in the uplifting hanging wall implies that the Tapti Fault was active as a normal fault during the Mesozoic and has been reactivated as a thrust, highlighting the role of preexisting structures in determining the rheology and deformation of the lithosphere. The slip sense of faults and earthquakes in India suggests that deformation south of the Ganges foreland basin is driven by the compressive force transmitted between India and the Tibetan Plateau. The along-strike continuation of faulting to the east of the Holocene ruptures we have studied represents a significant seismic hazard in central India.

  17. Active tectonics west of New Zealand's Alpine Fault: South Westland Fault Zone activity shows Australian Plate instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pascale, Gregory P.; Chandler-Yates, Nicholas; Dela Pena, Federico; Wilson, Pam; May, Elijah; Twiss, Amber; Cheng, Che

    2016-04-01

    The 300 km long South Westland Fault Zone (SWFZ) is within the footwall of the Central Alpine Fault (<20 km away) and has 3500 m of dip-slip displacement, but it has been unknown if the fault is active. Here the first evidence for SWFZ thrust faulting in the "stable" Australian Plate is shown with cumulative dip-slip displacements up to 5.9 m (with 3 m throw) on Pleistocene and Holocene sediments and gentle hanging wall anticlinal folding. Cone penetration test (CPT) stratigraphy shows repeated sequences within the fault scarp (consistent with thrusting). Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating constrains the most recent rupture post-12.1 ± 1.7 ka with evidence for three to four events during earthquakes of at least Mw 6.8. This study shows significant deformation is accommodated on poorly characterized Australian Plate structures northwest of the Alpine Fault and demonstrates that major active and seismogenic structures remain uncharacterized in densely forested regions on Earth.

  18. Active faulting on the Wallula fault within the Olympic-Wallowa Lineament (OWL), eastern Washington State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrod, B. L.; Lasher, J. P.; Barnett, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    Several studies over the last 40 years focused on a segment of the Wallula fault exposed in a quarry at Finley, Washington. The Wallula fault is important because it is part of the Olympic-Wallowa lineament (OWL), a ~500-km-long topographic and structural lineament extending from Vancouver Island, British Columbia to Walla Walla, Washington that accommodates Basin and Range extension. The origin and nature of the OWL is of interest because it contains potentially active faults that are within 50 km of high-level nuclear waste facilities at the Hanford Site. Mapping in the 1970's and 1980's suggested the Wallula fault did not offset Holocene and late Pleistocene deposits and is therefore inactive. New exposures of the Finley quarry wall studied here suggest otherwise. We map three main packages of rocks and sediments in a ~10 m high quarry exposure. The oldest rocks are very fine grained basalts of the Columbia River Basalt Group (~13.5 Ma). The next youngest deposits include a thin layer of vesicular basalt, white volcaniclastic deposits, colluvium containing clasts of vesicular basalt, and indurated paleosols. A distinct angular unconformity separates these vesicular basalt-bearing units from overlying late Pleistocene flood deposits, two colluvium layers containing angular clasts of basalt, and Holocene tephra-bearing loess. A tephra within the loess likely correlates to nearby outcrops of Mazama ash. We recognize three styles of faults: 1) a near vertical master reverse or oblique fault juxtaposing very fine grained basalt against late Tertiary-Holocene deposits, and marked by a thick (~40 cm) vertical seam of carbonate cemented breccia; 2) subvertical faults that flatten upwards and displace late Tertiary(?) to Quaternary(?) soils, colluvium, and volcaniclastic deposits; and 3) flexural slip faults along bedding planes in folded deposits in the footwall. We infer at least two Holocene earthquakes from the quarry exposure. The first Holocene earthquake deformed

  19. Efficiency Evaluation of Lightning Fault Inspection in 66kV Transmission Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Tomomi; Yamaguchi, Setsuo

    Transmission line must be immediately inspected when it was struck by lightning. It is necessary to find and change the damaged part promptly in case the damage is serious. Such case, however, is actually hardly seen due to the fact that the lightning protection system is well designed recently. Therefore, it is important to compare the data of past lightnings and of the transmission line, and make criteria for deciding more precisely in which case the actual inspection should be carried out. The criteria would be as follows: (1) Insulator voltage exceeds critical voltage. (2) Arc current and arc duration exceed characteristic of insulator destruction. (3) Accident phase exceeds 3 line ground fault. (4) Tower foot resistance is up to 10ohm or more. (5) Lightning current is positive characteristic. By using this criteria, the number of lightning fault inspection was reduced by 34%.

  20. Sliding mode fault detection and fault-tolerant control of smart dampers in semi-active control of building structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeganeh Fallah, Arash; Taghikhany, Touraj

    2015-12-01

    Recent decades have witnessed much interest in the application of active and semi-active control strategies for seismic protection of civil infrastructures. However, the reliability of these systems is still in doubt as there remains the possibility of malfunctioning of their critical components (i.e. actuators and sensors) during an earthquake. This paper focuses on the application of the sliding mode method due to the inherent robustness of its fault detection observer and fault-tolerant control. The robust sliding mode observer estimates the state of the system and reconstructs the actuators’ faults which are used for calculating a fault distribution matrix. Then the fault-tolerant sliding mode controller reconfigures itself by the fault distribution matrix and accommodates the fault effect on the system. Numerical simulation of a three-story structure with magneto-rheological dampers demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed fault-tolerant control system. It was shown that the fault-tolerant control system maintains the performance of the structure at an acceptable level in the post-fault case.

  1. Identification of recently active faults and folds in Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marliyani, G. I.; Arrowsmith, R.; Helmi, H.

    2013-12-01

    We analyze the spatial pattern of active deformation in Java, Indonesia with the aim of characterizing the deformation of the upper plate of the subduction zone in this region. The lack of detailed neotectonic studies in Java is mostly because of its relatively low rate of deformation in spite of significant historical seismic activity. In addition, the abundance of young volcanic materials as well as the region's high precipitation rate and vegetation cover obscure structural relationships and prevent reliable estimates of offset along active faults as well as exhumed intra-arc faults. Detailed maps of active faults derived from satellite and field-based neotectonic mapping, paleoseismic data, as well as new data on the fault kinematics and estimates of orientation of principal stresses from volcano morphology characterize recently active faults and folds. The structures in West Java are dominated by strike-slip faulting, while Central and northern part of East Java are dominated by folds and thrusting with minor normal faulting. The structures vary in length from hundreds meters to tens of kilometers and mainly trend N75°E, N8°E with some minor N45°W. Our preliminary mapping indicates that there are no large scale continuous structures in Java, and that instead deformation is distributed over wide areas along small structures. We established several paleoseismic sites along some of the identified structures. We excavated two shallow trenches along the Pasuruan fault, a normal fault striking NW-SE that forms a straight 13 km scarp cutting Pleistocene deltaic deposits of the north shore of East Java. The trenches exposed faulted and folded fluvial, alluvial and colluvial strata that record at least four ground-rupturing earthquakes since the Pleistocene. The Pasuruan site proves its potential to provide a paleoseismic record rarely found in Java. Abundant Quaternary volcanoes are emplaced throughout Java; most of the volcanoes show elongation in N100°E and N20

  2. Abnormal fault-recovery characteristics of the fault-tolerant multiprocessor uncovered using a new fault-injection methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Peter A.

    1991-03-01

    An investigation was made in AIRLAB of the fault handling performance of the Fault Tolerant MultiProcessor (FTMP). Fault handling errors detected during fault injection experiments were characterized. In these fault injection experiments, the FTMP disabled a working unit instead of the faulted unit once in every 500 faults, on the average. System design weaknesses allow active faults to exercise a part of the fault management software that handles Byzantine or lying faults. Byzantine faults behave such that the faulted unit points to a working unit as the source of errors. The design's problems involve: (1) the design and interface between the simplex error detection hardware and the error processing software, (2) the functional capabilities of the FTMP system bus, and (3) the communication requirements of a multiprocessor architecture. These weak areas in the FTMP's design increase the probability that, for any hardware fault, a good line replacement unit (LRU) is mistakenly disabled by the fault management software.

  3. Abnormal fault-recovery characteristics of the fault-tolerant multiprocessor uncovered using a new fault-injection methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, Peter A.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation was made in AIRLAB of the fault handling performance of the Fault Tolerant MultiProcessor (FTMP). Fault handling errors detected during fault injection experiments were characterized. In these fault injection experiments, the FTMP disabled a working unit instead of the faulted unit once in every 500 faults, on the average. System design weaknesses allow active faults to exercise a part of the fault management software that handles Byzantine or lying faults. Byzantine faults behave such that the faulted unit points to a working unit as the source of errors. The design's problems involve: (1) the design and interface between the simplex error detection hardware and the error processing software, (2) the functional capabilities of the FTMP system bus, and (3) the communication requirements of a multiprocessor architecture. These weak areas in the FTMP's design increase the probability that, for any hardware fault, a good line replacement unit (LRU) is mistakenly disabled by the fault management software.

  4. Water-rock interactions in the Median Tectonic Line fault zone, SW Japan revealed by core sample analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, K.; Tanaka, N.; Shigematsu, N.

    2012-12-01

    Alteration minerals along the fault zone of the Median Tectonic Line (MTL), the Japan's largest onshore fault, are characterized to understand the crustal faulting at various depth conditions by describing a borehole penetrating the MTL. The borehole was drilled by the Geological Survey of Japan, AIST (GSJ, AIST) to predict the forthcoming Nankai-Tonankai Earthquake at Matsusaka-Iitaka (ITA), SW Japan. The drilling length is 600m. It penetrates the MTL at the depth of 473.9m. The fault plane has an almost E-W strike and dips at 56° to the north. Hangingwall of the MTL consists of Ryoke-derived tonalitic mylonite and footwall of the MTL consists of fractured rocks derived from Sanbagawa metamorphic rocks. Ryoke-derived tonalitic mylonite in the hangingwall suffered more or less later cataclastic deformations. X-ray diffraction patterns of powdered samples derived from ITA borehole were obtained to identify alteration mineral assemblages and estimate alteration conditions. Chlorite, laumontite, white-mica, prehnite and calcite are main alteration minerals in the Ryoke belt above 400m depth, while analcine and stilbite occur as zeolite minerals instead of laumontite between 400m and 473.9m depth. Laumontite is preferentially occurred in the cataclastically deformed zones and calcite often fills fractures and cavities. The fault plane and fractures in the fault zone provide fluid conduit. The presence of laumontite and prehnite indicates that the alteration temperature was more than 200°C, while analcime and stilbite formed at lower temperature than laumontite. These suggest that the zone of hydrothermal alteration less than 200°C was restricted below 400m depth in the ITA borehole. We also applied chlorite geothermometry (Inoue et al., 2009), which yeileds temperatures of about 300°C for mylonitic rocks and those of about 200°C for cataclastic rocks. Immediately beneath the MTL, approximately 40m thick fractured rocks form the major strand of the MTL fault zone

  5. High Frequency Monitoring of the Aigion Fault Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, Francois; Bourouis, Seid

    2013-04-01

    In 2007, a high frequency monitoring system was deployed in the 1000 m deep AIG10 well that intersects the Aigion fault at a depth of 760 m. This active 15 km long fault is located on the south shore of the Corinth rift, some 40 km east from Patras, in western central Greece. The borehole intersects quaternary sediments down to 495 m, then cretaceous and tertiary heavily tectonized deposits from the Pindos nappe. Below the fault encountered at 760 m, the borehole remains within karstic limestone of the Gavrovo Tripolitza nappe. The monitoring system involved two geophones located some 15 m above the fault, and two hydrophones located respectively at depths equal to 500 m and 250 m. The frequency domain for the data acquisition system ranged from a few Hz to 2500 Hz. The seismic velocity structure close to the borehole was determined through both sonic logs and vertical seismic profiles. This monitoring system has been active during slightly over six months and has recorded signals from microseismic events that occurred in the rift, the location of which was determined thanks to the local 11 stations, three components, short period (2 Hz), monitoring system. In addition, the borehole monitoring system has recorded more than 1000 events not identified with the regional network. Events were precisely correlated with pressure variations associated with two human interventions. These extremely low magnitude events occurred at distances that reached at least up to 1500 m from the well. They were associated, some ten days later, with some local rift activity. A tentative model is proposed that associates local short slip instabilities in the upper part of the fault close to the well, with a longer duration pore pressure diffusion process. Results demonstrate that the Aigion fault is continuously creeping down to a depth at least equal to 5 km but probably deeper.

  6. Structural Analysis of Active North Bozgush Fault Zone (NW Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saber, R.; Isik, V.; Caglayan, A.

    2013-12-01

    NW Iran is one of the seismically active regions between Zagros Thrust Belt at the south and Caucasus at the north. Not only large magnitude historical earthquakes (Ms>7), but also 1987 Bozgush, 1997 Ardebil (Mw 6.1) and 2012 Ahar-Varzagan (Mw 6.4) earthquakes reveal that the region is seismically active. The North Bozgush Fault Zone (NBFZ) in this region has tens of kilometers in length and hundreds of meters in width. The zone has produced some large and destructive earthquakes (1593 M:6.1 and 1883 M:6.2). The NBFZ affects the Cenozoic units and along this zone Eocene units thrusted over Miocene and/or Plio-Quaternary sedimentary units. Together with morphologic features (stream offsets and alluvial fan movements) affecting the young unites reveal that the zone is active. The zone is mainly characterized by strike-slip faults with reverse component and reverse faults. Reverse faults striking N55°-85°E and dip of 40°-50° to the SW while strike-slip faults show right lateral slip with N60°-85°W and N60°-80°E directions. Our structural data analysis in NBFZ indicates that the axis direction of σ2 principal stress is vertical and the stress ratio (R) is 0.12. These results suggest that the tectonic regime along the North Bozgush Fault Zone is transpressive. Obtained other principal stresses (σ1, σ3) results are compatible with stress directions and GPS velocity suggested for NW Iran.

  7. Fault Activity, Seismicity and GPS Deformation of the Seismic Gap along the Red River Fault Zone (RRFZ) in Yunnan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue-Ze, Wen; Shengli, Ma; Fang, Du; Feng, Long

    2016-04-01

    Along the middle segment of the NW-trending and dextral-slip Red River fault zone (RRFZ), also the Honghe fault zone, Yunnan, China, there has been little of modern seismicity since the 1970's. Some Chinese researchers believed that this fault segment is inactive in the late Quaternary. However, more and more evidence shows that the middle segment of RRFZ is geologically-active in the late Quaternary, even is a Holocene-active one with evidence of paleo-earthquakes occurring. Our study suggests that along the fault segment there has been no any major earthquake occurring for over 500 years at least, and a large-scale seismic gap, the Honghe seismic gap, have formed there. On the modern seismicity, the middle segment of RRFZ has presented as a fault portion without or with very few small earthquakes occurring since the 1980's, but surrounded by several areas with low b-values, suggesting relatively high stress having built-up there. Also, GPS deformation analysis suggests that this fault segment has tightly locked already. Such tight locking would be associated with the fault geometry: A large-scale restraining bend of about 30°over a distance of ~100 km exists along the main fault trace along RRFZ between Yuanjiang and Yuanyang. However, how such a restraining bend makes the middle segment of RRFZ have tightly locked? How much strain has built up there? Moreover, how about the long-term seismic potential of major earthquake on the middle segment of RRFZ, and on some secondary active faults of the two sides of the segment, especially on the parallel faults Chuxiong, Qujiang and Shiping. All these are issues we want to study further. Keywords: Red River Fault Zone, Seismic Gap, Fault Activity, Seismicity, GPS Deformation

  8. Structure of a seismogenic fault zone in dolostones: the Foiana Line (Italian Southern Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Toro, G.; Fondriest, M.; Smith, S. A.; Aretusini, S.

    2012-12-01

    Fault zones in carbonate rocks (limestones and dolostones) represent significant upper crustal seismogenic sources in several areas worldwide (e.g. L'Aquila 2009 Mw = 6.3 in central Italy). Here we describe an exhumed example of a regionally-significant fault zone cutting dolostones. The Foiana Line (FL) is a major NNE-SSW-trending sinistral transpressive fault cutting sedimentary Triassic dolostones in the Italian Southern Alps. The FL has a cumulative vertical throw of 1.5-2 km that reduces toward its southern termination. The fault zone is 50-300 m wide and is exposed for ~ 10 km along strike within several outcrops exhumed from increasing depths from the south (1 km) to the north (2.5 km). The southern portion of the FL consists of heavily fractured (shattered) dolostones, with particles of a few millimeters in size (exposed in badlands topography over an area of 6 km2), cut by a dense network of 1-20 m long mirror-like fault surfaces with dispersed attitudes. The mirror-like faults have mainly dip-slip reverse kinematics and displacements ranging between 0.04 m and 0.5 m. The northern portion of the FL consists of sub-parallel fault strands spaced 2-5 m apart, surrounded by 2-3 m thick bands of shattered dolostones. The fault strands are characterized by smooth to mirror-like sub-vertical slip surfaces with dominant strike-slip kinematics. Overall, deformation is more localized moving from South to North along the FL. Mirror-like fault surfaces similar to those found in the FL were produced in friction experiments at the deformation conditions expected during seismic slip along the FL (Fondriest et al., this meeting). Scanning Electron Microscope investigations of the natural shattered dolostones beneath the mirror-like fault surfaces show: 1) lack of significant shear strain (even at a few micrometers from the slip surface), 2) pervasive extensional fracturing down to the micrometer scale, 3) exploded clasts with radial fractures, and 4) chains of split

  9. Gas Path On-line Fault Diagnostics Using a Nonlinear Integrated Model for Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Feng; Huang, Jin-quan; Ji, Chun-sheng; Zhang, Dong-dong; Jiao, Hua-bin

    2014-08-01

    Gas turbine engine gas path fault diagnosis is closely related technology that assists operators in managing the engine units. However, the performance gradual degradation is inevitable due to the usage, and it result in the model mismatch and then misdiagnosis by the popular model-based approach. In this paper, an on-line integrated architecture based on nonlinear model is developed for gas turbine engine anomaly detection and fault diagnosis over the course of the engine's life. These two engine models have different performance parameter update rate. One is the nonlinear real-time adaptive performance model with the spherical square-root unscented Kalman filter (SSR-UKF) producing performance estimates, and the other is a nonlinear baseline model for the measurement estimates. The fault detection and diagnosis logic is designed to discriminate sensor fault and component fault. This integration architecture is not only aware of long-term engine health degradation but also effective to detect gas path performance anomaly shifts while the engine continues to degrade. Compared to the existing architecture, the proposed approach has its benefit investigated in the experiment and analysis.

  10. A Novel Transient Fault Current Sensor Based on the PCB Rogowski Coil for Overhead Transmission Lines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yadong; Xie, Xiaolei; Hu, Yue; Qian, Yong; Sheng, Gehao; Jiang, Xiuchen

    2016-01-01

    The accurate detection of high-frequency transient fault currents in overhead transmission lines is the basis of malfunction detection and diagnosis. This paper proposes a novel differential winding printed circuit board (PCB) Rogowski coil for the detection of transient fault currents in overhead transmission lines. The interference mechanism of the sensor surrounding the overhead transmission line is analyzed and the guideline for the interference elimination is obtained, and then a differential winding printed circuit board (PCB) Rogowski coil is proposed, where the branch and return line of the PCB coil were designed to be strictly symmetrical by using a joining structure of two semi-rings and collinear twisted pair differential windings in each semi-ring. A serial test is conducted, including the frequency response, linearity, and anti-interference performance as well as a comparison with commercial sensors. Results show that a PCB Rogowski coil has good linearity and resistance to various external magnetic field interferences, thus enabling it to be widely applied in fault-current-collecting devices. PMID:27213402

  11. A Novel Transient Fault Current Sensor Based on the PCB Rogowski Coil for Overhead Transmission Lines

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yadong; Xie, Xiaolei; Hu, Yue; Qian, Yong; Sheng, Gehao; Jiang, Xiuchen

    2016-01-01

    The accurate detection of high-frequency transient fault currents in overhead transmission lines is the basis of malfunction detection and diagnosis. This paper proposes a novel differential winding printed circuit board (PCB) Rogowski coil for the detection of transient fault currents in overhead transmission lines. The interference mechanism of the sensor surrounding the overhead transmission line is analyzed and the guideline for the interference elimination is obtained, and then a differential winding printed circuit board (PCB) Rogowski coil is proposed, where the branch and return line of the PCB coil were designed to be strictly symmetrical by using a joining structure of two semi-rings and collinear twisted pair differential windings in each semi-ring. A serial test is conducted, including the frequency response, linearity, and anti-interference performance as well as a comparison with commercial sensors. Results show that a PCB Rogowski coil has good linearity and resistance to various external magnetic field interferences, thus enabling it to be widely applied in fault-current-collecting devices. PMID:27213402

  12. Testing Damage Scenarios. From Historical Earthquakes To Silent Active Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, P.; Orsini, G.; Bosi, V.; di Pasquale, G.; Galadini, F.

    Italy is rich with historical scenarios of disruption and death that arrived up to us through the insight descriptions of hundreds of manuscripts, reports, treatises, letters and epigraphs. All these historical data constitute today one of the most powerful data-base of earthquake-induced effects. Moreover, it is now possible to relate many of these earthquakes to geological structures, the seismogenetic behavior of which has been investigated by means of paleoseismological studies. On the basis of these information and of those gathered through the national census (performed on popu- lation and dwellings by ISTAT, Italian Institute of Statistics in 1991) we developed a methodology (FaCES, Fault-Controlled Earthquake Scenario) which reproduce the damage scenario caused by the rupture of a defined fault, providing an estimate of the losses in terms of damages to building and consequences to population. The reliabil- ity of scenarios has been tested by comparing the historical damage distribution of an earthquake with that obtained applying FaCES to the responsible fault. Finally, we hypothesize the scenario related to three historically-silent faults of central Apennines (Mt. Vettore, Mt. Gorzano and Gran Sasso faults), the Holocene activity of which has been recently ascertained though paleoseimological analyses.

  13. On-line continuous monitoring of groundwater radon levels at L’Aquila fault, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsabaris, C.; Lampousis, A.

    2009-12-01

    This work describes in situ radon progeny measurements in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of L’Aquila region, located 60 miles north-east of Rome, Italy, conducted in December 2007. The marine radon progeny monitor KATERINA (i.e., Hellenic Centre for Marine Research patent July 2008) was submerged inside a tank filled with groundwater from the Gran Sasso Mountain. The measured spectra obtained through KATERINA exhibited photopeaks of the main gamma emitters (214Pb and 214Bi) of the primordial nucleus 238U (222Rn). High background levels of radionuclides (i.e., inside the mountain) emitting high energy gamma rays affected the measurement. In order to correct and deduce the final volumetric activities of radon progenies (214Pb and 214Bi) the system was calibrated using the simulation tool GEANT4. The first day of deployment an averaged value of radon progenies amounted to a value of (3.1 ± 0.3) Bq/l. The second day the averaged values of radon progenies were reduced by 30% due to the loss of noble gas radon from the tank. Additional spectra were recorded successfully after removing background airborne radon present in the LNGS laboratory. KATERINA operated reliably during its in situ radon monitoring. This was confirmed by further calibration using off line measurements performed in collaboration with the Marine Environmental Laboratory of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Future work includes the development of a continuous radon monitoring tool to further study the L’Aquila fault. By implementing a continuous inflow and outflow system and by controlling the radon levels both inside and outside the water tank, radon variations will be correlated with other geophysical/geochemical parameters like microseismicity, slip rates, pH, H2S, CO2, and He. Additional contributions include an increased understanding of the correlations between radon levels in the proximity of active faults and regional seismic activity. If indeed this proves to be an

  14. Inferring Earthquake Physics from Deep Drilling Projects of Active Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Toro, G.; Smith, S. A. F.; Kuo, L. W.; Mittempergher, S.; Remitti, F.; Spagnuolo, E.; Mitchell, T. M.; Gualtieri, A.; Hadizadeh, J.; Carpenter, B. M.

    2014-12-01

    Deep drilling projects of active faults offer the opportunity to correlate physical and chemical processes identified in core samples with experiments reproducing the seismic cycle in the laboratory and with high-resolution seismological and geophysical data. Here we discuss the constraints about earthquakes source processes at depth gained by fault cores retrieved from the deep drilling projects SAFOD (2.7 km depth, San Andreas Fault), J-FAST (0.9 km depth, following the Mw 9.0 Tohoku 2011 earthquake), TCDP (1.1 km depth, following the Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi 1999 earthquake) and WFSD (1.2 km depth, following the Mw 7.9 Wenchuan 2008 earthquake). Recovered samples were tested at room temperature with the rotary shear apparatus SHIVA installed in Rome (INGV, Italy). All the tested samples were made by clay-rich gouges (usually including smectite/illite), though their bulk mineralogy and modal composition were different (e.g., SAFOD samples included saponite, WFSD carbonaceous materials). The gouges were investigated before and after the experiments with scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-Ray diffraction, micro-Raman spectroscopy, etc. A common behavior of all the tested gouges was that their friction coefficient was low (often less than 0.1) under room-humidity and wet conditions when sheared at slip rates of ca. 1 m/s (seismic deformation conditions). Moreover, when the natural fault rocks next to the principal slipping zones were sheared from sub-seismic (few micrometers/s) to seismic slip rates, the experimental products had similar microstructures to those found in the principal slipping zones of the drilled faults. This included the formation of mirror-like surfaces, graphite-rich materials, foliated gouges, nanograins, amorphous materials, etc. In most cases the mechanical data were consistent with several seismological (> 50 m of seismic slip for the fault zone drilled by J-FAST) and geophysical observations (absence of a thermal anomaly in the fault

  15. Active faults crossing trunk pipeline routes: some important steps to avoid disaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besstrashnov, V. M.; Strom, A. L.

    2011-05-01

    Assessment of seismic strong motion hazard produced by earthquakes originating within causative fault zones allows rather low accuracy of localisation of these structures that can be provided by indirect evidence of fault activity. In contrast, the relevant accuracy of localisation and characterisation of active faults, capable of surface rupturing, can be achieved solely by the use of direct evidence of fault activity. This differentiation requires strict definition of what can be classified as "active fault" and the normalisation of methods used for identification and localisation of active faults crossing oil and natural gas trunk pipelines.

  16. Evaluation of feasibility of mapping seismically active faults in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedney, L. D. (Principal Investigator); Vanwormer, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 imagery is proving to be exceptionally useful in delineating structural features in Alaska which have never been recognized on the ground. Previously unmapped features such as seismically active faults and major structural lineaments are especially evident. Among the more significant results of this investigation is the discovery of an active strand of the Denali fault. The new fault has a history of scattered activity and was the scene of a magnitude 4.8 earthquake on October 1, 1972. Of greater significance is the disclosure of a large scale conjugate fracture system north of the Alaska Range. This fracture system appears to result from compressive stress radiating outward from around Mt. McKinley. One member of the system was the scene of a magnitude 6.5 earthquake in 1968. The potential value of ERTS-1 imagery to land use planning is reflected in the fact that this earthquake occurred within 10 km of the site which was proposed for the Rampart Dam, and the fault on which it occurred passes very near the proposed site for the bridge and oil pipeline crossing of the Yukon River.

  17. Remarkably low-energy one-dimensional fault line defects in single-layered phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Woosun; Kang, Kisung; Soon, Aloysius

    2015-11-01

    Systematic engineering of atomic-scale low-dimensional defects in two-dimensional nanomaterials is a promising method to modulate the electronic properties of these nanomaterials. Defects at interfaces such as grain boundaries and line defects can often be detrimental to technologically important nanodevice operations and thus a fundamental understanding of how such one-dimensional defects may have an influence on their physio-chemical properties is pivotal for optimizing their device performance. Of late, two-dimensional phosphorene has attracted much attention due to its high carrier mobility and good mechanical flexibility. In this study, using density-functional theory, we have investigated the temperature-dependent energetics and electronic structure of single-layered phosphorene with various fault line defects. We have generated different line defect models based on a fault method, rather than the conventional rotation method. This has allowed us to study and identify new low-energy line defects, and we show how these low-energy line defects could well modulate the electronic band gap energies of single-layered two-dimensional phosphorene - offering a range of metallic to semiconducting properties in these newly proposed low-energy line defects in phosphorene.

  18. Remarkably low-energy one-dimensional fault line defects in single-layered phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soon, Aloysius; Jang, Woosun; Kang, Kisung

    Systematic engineering of atomic-scale low-dimensional defects in two-dimensional nanomaterials is a promising way to modulate the electronic properties of these nanomaterials. Defects at interfaces such as grain boundaries and line defects can often be detrimental to technologically important nanodevice operations and thus a fundamental understanding of how such one-dimensional defects may have an influence on its physio-chemical properties is pivotal to optimizing their device performance. In this study, using density-functional theory, we investigate the temperature-dependent energetics and electronic structure of a single-layered phosphorene with various fault line defects. We have generated different line defect models based on a fault method, rather than the conventional rotation method. This has allowed us to study and identify new low-energy line defects, and we show how these low-energy line defects could well modulate the electronic band gap energies of single-layered two-dimensional phosphorene - offering a range of metallic to semiconducting properties in these newly proposed low-energy line defects in phosphorene

  19. Frictional properties of the active San Andreas Fault at SAFOD: Implications for fault strength and slip behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, B. M.; Saffer, D. M.; Marone, C.

    2015-07-01

    We present results from a comprehensive laboratory study of the frictional strength and constitutive properties for all three active strands of the San Andreas Fault penetrated in the San Andreas Observatory at Depth (SAFOD). The SAFOD borehole penetrated the Southwest Deforming Zone (SDZ), the Central Deforming Zone (CDZ), both of which are actively creeping, and the Northeast Boundary Fault (NBF). Our results include measurements of the frictional properties of cuttings and core samples recovered at depths of ~2.7 km. We find that materials from the two actively creeping faults exhibit low frictional strengths (μ = ~0.1), velocity-strengthening friction behavior, and near-zero or negative rates of frictional healing. Our experimental data set shows that the center of the CDZ is the weakest section of the San Andreas Fault, with μ = ~0.10. Fault weakness is highly localized and likely caused by abundant magnesium-rich clays. In contrast, serpentine from within the SDZ, and wall rock of both the SDZ and CDZ, exhibits velocity-weakening friction behavior and positive healing rates, consistent with nearby repeating microearthquakes. Finally, we document higher friction coefficients (μ > 0.4) and complex rate-dependent behavior for samples recovered across the NBF. In total, our data provide an integrated view of fault behavior for the three active fault strands encountered at SAFOD and offer a consistent explanation for observations of creep and microearthquakes along weak fault zones within a strong crust.

  20. Exhumation history of an active fault to constrain a fault-based seismic hazard scenario: the Pizzalto fault (central Apennines, Italy) example.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesson, Jim; Pace, Bruno; Benedetti, Lucilla; Visini, Francesco; Delli Rocioli, Mattia; Didier, Bourles; Karim, keddadouche; Gorges, Aumaitre

    2016-04-01

    A prerequisite to constrain fault-based and time-dependent earthquake rupture forecast models is to acquire data on the past large earthquake frequency on an individual seismogenic source and to compare all the recorded occurrences in the active fault-system. We investigated the Holocene seismic history of the Pizzalto normal fault, a 13 km long fault segment belonging to the Pizzalto-Rotella-Aremogna fault system in the Apennines (Italy). We collected 44 samples on the Holocene exhumed Pizzalto fault plane and analyzed their 36Cl and rare earth elements content. Conjointly used, the 36Cl and REE concentrations show that at least 6 events have exhumed 4.4 m of the fault scarp between 3 and 1 ka BP, the slip per event ranging from 0.3 to 1.2 m. No major events have been detected over the last 1 ka. The Rotella-Aremogna-Pizzalto fault system has a clustered earthquake behaviour with a mean recurrence time of 1.2 ka and a low to moderate probability (ranging from 4% to 26%) of earthquake occurrence over the next 50 years. We observed similarities between seismic histories of several faults belonging to two adjacent fault systems. This could again attest that non-random processes occurring in the release of the strain accumulated on faults, commonly referred to as fault interactions and leading to apparent synchronization. If these processes were determined as being the main parameter controlling the occurrence of earthquakes, it would be crucial to take them into account in seismic hazard models.

  1. CRAFT: On-line expert system for customer restoration and fault testing

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.-C.; Damborg, M.J. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1990-03-01

    The purpose of the rule-based expert system, CRAFT (Customer Restoration And Fault Testing) is to assist power dispatchers with fault isolation and customer restoration in multi-tapped transmission lines equipped with automatic switches. CRAFT is able to perform reasoning to derive the status of unsupervised automatic switches. The CRAFT system is operating on-line at the control center of Puget Sound Power and Light Company (Puget Power). The expert system was developed by the University of Washington (UW) under the sponsorship of EPRI with cofunding from the National Science Foundation and Puget Power. The on-line CRAFT system is implemented on an expert system computer data-linked to the SCADA computer in the control center. In Puget Power's control center, a Micro VAX II computer is linked to the MODCOMP CLASSIC II SCADA computer to perform the functions of fault testing and substation restoration. The CRAFT system contains approximately 450 rules written in the rule-based language, OPS83. The typical response time of CRAFT is approximately 13 seconds. 15 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Erosion influence the seismicity of active thrust faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, Philippe; Simoes, Martine; Cattin, Rodolphe; Shyu, J. Bruce H.

    2016-04-01

    Assessing seismic hazards remains one of the most challenging scientific issue in Earth sciences. Deep tectonic processes are classically considered as the only persistent mechanism driving the stress loading of active faults over a seismic cycle. Here we show with a mechanical model that erosion also significantly influences the stress loading of thrust faults at the timescale of a seismic cycle. Indeed, erosion rates of about ˜0.1 to 20 mm/yr, as documented in Taiwan and in other active compressional orogens, can raise the Coulomb stress by ˜0.1 to ˜10 bar on the nearby thrust faults over the inter-seismic phase. Mass transfers induced by surface processes in general, during continuous or short-lived and intense events, represent a prominent mechanism for inter-seismic stress loading of faults near the surface. Such stresses are probably sufficient to promote the rupture of deep continental earthquakes up to the surface or to trigger shallow seismicity. We illustrate this last point by identifying seismic events in Taiwan, by the mean of a coupled statistical and mechanical approach, that were induced by intense erosional events.

  3. Erosion influence the seismicity of active thrust faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, Philippe; Simoes, Martine; Cattin, Rodolphe; Shyu, J. Bruce H.

    2015-04-01

    Assessing seismic hazards remains one of the most challenging scientific issue in Earth sciences. Deep tectonic processes are classically considered as the only persistent mechanism driving the stress loading of active faults over a seismic cycle. Here we show with a mechanical model that erosion also significantly influences the stress loading of thrust faults at the timescale of a seismic cycle. Indeed, erosion rates of about ~0.1 to 20 mm/yr, as documented in Taiwan and in other active compressional orogens, can raise the Coulomb stress by ~0.1 to ~10 bar on the nearby thrust faults over the inter-seismic phase. Mass transfers induced by surface processes in general, during continuous or short-lived and intense events, represent a prominent mechanism for inter-seismic stress loading of faults near the surface. Such stresses are probably sufficient to promote the rupture of deep continental earthquakes up to the surface or to trigger shallow seismicity. We illustrate this last point by identifying seismic events in Taiwan, by the mean of a coupled statistical and mechanical approach, that were induced by intense erosional events.

  4. Finding Active Faults in a Glaciated and Forested Landscape: the Southern Whidbey Island Fault, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakely, R. J.; Sherrod, B. L.; Wells, R. E.; Weaver, C. S.

    2004-12-01

    The Puget Lowland, Washington, lies within the Cascadia forearc and is underlain by at least six seismically active and regionally significant crustal faults that together accommodate several mm/yr of net north-south shortening. The surface expression of pre-15-ka slip on Puget Lowland faults has been largely scoured away or covered by glacial deposits, and younger fault geomorphology is often concealed by vegetation and urban development. High-resolution aeromagnetic and lidar surveys, followed by geologic site investigations, have identified and confirmed late Holocene deformation on each of these mostly concealed but potentially hazardous faults. Most geomorphic features identified in lidar data are closely associated with linear magnetic anomalies that reflect the underlying basement structure of the fault and help map its full extent. The southern Whidbey Island fault (SWIF) is a case in point. The northwest-striking SWIF was mapped previously using borehole data and potential-field anomalies on Whidbey Island and marine seismic-reflection surveys beneath surrounding waterways. Gravity inversions and aeromagnetic mapping suggest that the SWIF extends at least 50 km southeast, from Vancouver Island to the Washington mainland, and transitions along its length from northeast-side-down beneath Puget Sound to northeast-side-up on the mainland. Abrupt subsidence at a coastal marsh on south-central Whidbey Island suggests that the SWIF experienced a MW 6.5 to 7.0 earthquake about 3 ka. Southeast of Whidbey Island, a hypothesized southeastward projection of the SWIF makes landfall between the cities of Seattle and Everett. Linear, northwest-striking magnetic anomalies in this mainland region do coincide with this hypothesized projection, are low in amplitude, and are best illuminated in residual magnetic fields. The most prominent of the residual magnetic anomalies extends at least 16 km, lies approximately on strike with the SWIF on Whidbey Island, and passes within

  5. Fault Mechanics and Active Strain Along the Garlock Fault in SE California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittase, W.; Walker, D.; Taylor, M.; Kirby, E.

    2008-12-01

    We report here results from new geologic mapping along a 38 km segment of the Garlock Fault (GF) between US 395 and the Slate Range, and an 8 km segment at the northern terminus of the Blackwater- Calico fault (BCF) in the Lava Mountains. This study area lies within the ENE-striking central segment of the sinistral GF. NNW-striking faults of the dextral Eastern California shear zone approach the GF, but do not offset it: exact mechanisms of strain transfer across the GF from the Mojave Desert to the Basin and Range is enigmatic. Field mapping reveals that the GF is complex with numerous sub-parallel strands both north and south of the mapped fault. Holocene slip on the GF is dominantly sinistral, but a major zone to the north adjacent to the bedrock of the southern Slate Range is dip-slip. The mapped portion of the northern BCF is expressed as a bedrock scarp and does not cut Holocene sediments. Significant N-S shortening is superimposed along the GF adjacent to the southern Slate Range, in the Christmas Canyon area, and the Lava Mountains. Pliocene- Pleistocene sediments are uplifted and deformed into E-W open to chevron folds in the Christmas Canyon and Slate Range areas. Cretaceous quartz-monzonite and overlying Miocene strata are deformed by similar structures in the northern Lava Mountains. In general, areas of topographic uplifts are disjointed and spatially restrictive in comparison to the more continuous GF and the BCF. These observations suggest several possibilities for the region. (1) Active slip on the GF and the Eastern California shear zone are driven by a single, Mojave-wide stress field with sigma-1 oriented roughly N-S. (2) The GF may be a weak zone in the lithosphere and crust with sigma-1 oriented nearly perpendicular to strike as evidenced by ENE- to East-trending fold hinges in Pliocene-Pleistocene sediments. (3) The continuous trace of the GF rupture through the 38-km-long study area suggests that it, at least locally, poses a mechanical

  6. Palaeoseismology of the L'Aquila faults (central Italy, 2009, Mw 6.3 earthquake): implications for active fault linkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Paolo A. C.; Giaccio, Biagio; Messina, Paolo; Peronace, Edoardo; Zuppi, Giovanni Maria

    2011-12-01

    Urgent urban-planning problems related to the 2009 April, Mw 6.3, L'Aquila earthquake prompted immediate excavation of palaeoseismological trenches across the active faults bordering the Aterno river valley; namely, the Mt. Marine, Mt. Pettino and Paganica faults. Cross-cutting correlations amongst existing and new trenches that were strengthened by radiocarbon ages and archaeological constraints show unambiguously that these three investigated structures have been active since the Last Glacial Maximum period, as seen by the metric offset that affected the whole slope/alluvial sedimentary succession up to the historical deposits. Moreover, in agreement with both 18th century accounts and previous palaeoseismological data, we can affirm now that these faults were responsible for the catastrophic 1703 February 2, earthquake (Mw 6.7). The data indicate that the Paganica-San Demetrio fault system has ruptured in the past both together with the conterminous Mt. Pettino-Mt. Marine fault system, along more than 30 km and causing an Mw 6.7 earthquake, and on its own, along ca. 19 km, as in the recent 2009 event and in the similar 1461 AD event. This behaviour of the L'Aquila faults has important implications in terms of seismic hazard assessment, while it also casts new light on the ongoing fault linkage processes amongst these L'Aquila faults.

  7. Active faulting in the Inner California Borderlands: new constraints from high-resolution multichannel seismic and multibeam bathymetric data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, J. M.; Holmes, J. J.; Sahakian, V. J.; Klotsko, S.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N. W.; Harding, A. J.; Wesnousky, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Geodetic data indicate that faults offshore of Southern California accommodate 6-8 mm/yr of dextral Pacific-North American relative plate motion. In the Inner California Borderlands (ICB), modern strike-slip deformation is overprinted on topography formed during plate boundary reorganization 30-15 Ma. Despite its proximity to urban Southern California, the hazard posed by active faults in the ICB remains poorly understood. We acquired a 4000-line-km regional grid of high-resolution, 2D multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection data and multibeam bathymetry to examine the fault architecture and tectonic evolution of the ICB. We interpret the MCS data using a sequence stratigraphic approach to establish a chronostratigraphy and identify discrete episodes of deformation. We present our results in a regional fault model that distinguishes active deformation from older structures. Significant differences exist between our model of ICB deformation and existing models. Mounting evidence suggests a westward temporal migration of slip between faults in the ICB. In the eastern ICB, slip on the Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon fault and the neighboring Coronado Bank fault (CBF) diminishes to the north and appears to decrease over time. Undeformed Late Pliocene sediments overlie the northern extent of the CBF and the breakaway zone of the purported Oceanside Blind Thrust. Therefore, CBF slip rate estimates based on linkage with the Palos Verdes fault to the north are unwarranted. Deformation along the San Mateo, San Onofre, and Carlsbad trends is best explained as localized deformation resulting from geometrical complexities in a dextral strike-slip fault system. In the western ICB, the San Diego Trough fault (SDTF) offsets young sediments between the US/Mexico border and the eastern margin of Avalon Knoll, where the fault is spatially coincident with the San Pedro Basin fault (SPBF). Farther west, the San Clemente fault (SCF) has a strong linear bathymetric expression. The length

  8. Planning a Preliminary program for Earthquake Loss Estimation and Emergency Operation by Three-dimensional Structural Model of Active Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    Large scale earthquakes often cause serious economic losses and a lot of deaths. Because the seismic magnitude, the occurring time and the occurring location of earthquakes are still unable to predict now. The pre-disaster risk modeling and post-disaster operation are really important works of reducing earthquake damages. In order to understanding disaster risk of earthquakes, people usually use the technology of Earthquake simulation to build the earthquake scenarios. Therefore, Point source, fault line source and fault plane source are the models which often are used as a seismic source of scenarios. The assessment results made from different models used on risk assessment and emergency operation of earthquakes are well, but the accuracy of the assessment results could still be upgrade. This program invites experts and scholars from Taiwan University, National Central University, and National Cheng Kung University, and tries using historical records of earthquakes, geological data and geophysical data to build underground three-dimensional structure planes of active faults. It is a purpose to replace projection fault planes by underground fault planes as similar true. The analysis accuracy of earthquake prevention efforts can be upgraded by this database. Then these three-dimensional data will be applied to different stages of disaster prevention. For pre-disaster, results of earthquake risk analysis obtained by the three-dimensional data of the fault plane are closer to real damage. For disaster, three-dimensional data of the fault plane can be help to speculate that aftershocks distributed and serious damage area. The program has been used 14 geological profiles to build the three dimensional data of Hsinchu fault and HisnCheng faults in 2015. Other active faults will be completed in 2018 and be actually applied on earthquake disaster prevention.

  9. Active tectonics of the Seattle fault and central Puget sound, Washington - Implications for earthquake hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, S.Y.; Dadisman, S.V.; Childs, J. R.; Stanley, W.D.

    1999-01-01

    We use an extensive network of marine high-resolution and conventional industry seismic-reflection data to constrain the location, shallow structure, and displacement rates of the Seattle fault zone and crosscutting high-angle faults in the Puget Lowland of western Washington. Analysis of seismic profiles extending 50 km across the Puget Lowland from Lake Washington to Hood Canal indicates that the west-trending Seattle fault comprises a broad (4-6 km) zone of three or more south-dipping reverse faults. Quaternary sediment has been folded and faulted along all faults in the zone but is clearly most pronounced along fault A, the northernmost fault, which forms the boundary between the Seattle uplift and Seattle basin. Analysis of growth strata deposited across fault A indicate minimum Quaternary slip rates of about 0.6 mm/yr. Slip rates across the entire zone are estimated to be 0.7-1.1 mm/yr. The Seattle fault is cut into two main segments by an active, north-trending, high-angle, strike-slip fault zone with cumulative dextral displacement of about 2.4 km. Faults in this zone truncate and warp reflections in Tertiary and Quaternary strata and locally coincide with bathymetric lineaments. Cumulative slip rates on these faults may exceed 0.2 mm/yr. Assuming no other crosscutting faults, this north-trending fault zone divides the Seattle fault into 30-40-km-long western and eastern segments. Although this geometry could limit the area ruptured in some Seattle fault earthquakes, a large event ca. A.D. 900 appears to have involved both segments. Regional seismic-hazard assessments must (1) incorporate new information on fault length, geometry, and displacement rates on the Seattle fault, and (2) consider the hazard presented by the previously unrecognized, north-trending fault zone.

  10. Mapping of active faults based on the analysis of high-resolution seismic reflection profiles in offshore Montenegro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vucic, Ljiljana; Glavatovic, Branislav

    2014-05-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection data analysis is considered as important tool for mapping of active tectonic faults, since seismic exploration methods on varied scales can image subsurface structures of different depth ranges. Mapping of active faults for the offshore area of Montenegro is performed in Petrel software, using reflection database consist of 2D profiles in length of about 3.500 kilometers and 311 square kilometers of 3D seismics, acquired from 1979 to 2003. Montenegro offshore area is influenced by recent tectonic activity with numerous faults, folded faults and over trusts. Based on reflection profiles analysis, the trust fault system offshore Montenegro is reveled, parallel to the coast and extending up to 15 kilometers from the offshore line. Then, the system of normal top carbonate fault planes is mapped and characterized on the southern Adriatic, with NE trending. The tectonic interpretation of the seismic reflection profiles in Montenegro point toward the existence of principally reverse tectonic forms in the carbonate sediments, covered by young Quaternary sandy sediments of thickness 1-3 kilometers. Also, reflective seismic data indicate the active uplifting of evaporite dome on about 10 kilometers of coastline.

  11. Growth and interaction of active faults within a nascent shear zone, central Mojave Desert, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskin, M.; Strane, M.

    2006-12-01

    Compilation of new slip-distribution and slip-rate data from the Mojave Desert portion of the Eastern California shear zone (ECSZ) lends insight into the role of fault growth and interaction of conjugate fault systems in accommodating shear. Dextral faults of the Mojave Desert ECSZ approach but do not appear to cut the bounding ENE-striking sinistral Pinto Mountain and Garlock faults. Differing styles of accommodation of these bounding faults occur at opposite ends of the 140 km-long NW-striking Hidalgo-Calico-Blackwater dextral fault system. Total slip and slip rate of the Blackwater fault gradually diminish northward. The fault terminates as a single strand with a zero-slip fault tip before intersecting the Garlock fault. In contrast, the Calico and Hidalgo faults spread displacement southward onto multiple fault strands spaced several kilometers apart. Active folding further distributes displacement onto the adjacent Bullion and Mesquite Lake faults. These mechanisms appear to maintain a uniform gradient of displacement approaching the Pinto Mountain fault. The highest displacement (9.8 ± 0.2 km) and slip rate (1.8 ± 0.3 mm/yr) occur in the central part of the Hidalgo-Calico-Blackwater fault system where strain is concentrated onto a single fault strand. A significant drop in total displacement and slip rate occurs along the northern Calico fault. Strain appears to be transferred here onto ENE-striking sinistral faults that separate domains of clockwise rotation in the central Mojave Desert. The kinematically incompatible intersection of sinistral and dextral faults is accommodated, at least in part, by active folding and uplift of the Calico Mountains and Mud Hills. Total slip and slip rate are not correlative for dextral faults of the Mojave ECSZ, indicating ongoing evolution of the fault network. For example, the Lenwood fault is a highly segmented, immature dextral fault with only 1.0 ± 0.1 km of total displacement yet its slip rate (1.5 ± 0.4 mm/yr) is

  12. Tectonic activity and structural features of active intracontinental normal faults in the Weihe Graben, central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Gang; Lin, Aiming; Yan, Bing; Jia, Dong; Wu, Xiaojun

    2014-12-01

    This study examines the tectonic activity and structural features of active normal faults in the Weihe Graben, central China. The Weihe Graben is an area with a high level of historic seismicity, and it is one of the intracontinental systems that developed since Tertiary in the extensional environment around the Ordos Block. Analysis of high-resolution remote-sensing imagery data, field observations, and radiocarbon dating results reveal the following: i) active normal faults are mainly developed within a zone < 500 m wide along the southern border of the eastern part of the Weihe Graben; ii) the active faults that have been identified are characterized by stepwise fault scarps dipping into the graben at angles of 40°-71°; iii) there are numerous discontinuous individual fault traces, ranging in length from a few tens of meters to 450 m (generally < 200 m); iv) fault zone structures, topographic features, and fault striations on the main fault planes indicate almost pure normal-slip; and v) late Pleistocene-Holocene terrace risers, loess, and alluvial deposits have been vertically offset by up to ~ 80 m, with a non-uniform dip-slip rate (throw-rates) ranging from ~ 2.1 to 5.7 mm/yr, mostly 2-3 mm/yr. Our results reveal that active normal faults have been developing in the Weihe Graben under an ongoing extensional environment, probably associated with the pre-existing graben and spreading of the continental crust, and this is in contrast with the Ordos Block and neighboring orogenic regions. These results provide new insights into the nature of extensional tectonic deformation in intracontinental graben systems.

  13. Pattern Recognition Application of Support Vector Machine for Fault Classification of Thyristor Controlled Series Compensated Transmission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashvantrai Vyas, Bhargav; Maheshwari, Rudra Prakash; Das, Biswarup

    2015-10-01

    Application of series compensation in extra high voltage (EHV) transmission line makes the protection job difficult for engineers, due to alteration in system parameters and measurements. The problem amplifies with inclusion of electronically controlled compensation like thyristor controlled series compensation (TCSC) as it produce harmonics and rapid change in system parameters during fault associated with TCSC control. This paper presents a pattern recognition based fault type identification approach with support vector machine. The scheme uses only half cycle post fault data of three phase currents to accomplish the task. The change in current signal features during fault has been considered as discriminatory measure. The developed scheme in this paper is tested over a large set of fault data with variation in system and fault parameters. These fault cases have been generated with PSCAD/EMTDC on a 400 kV, 300 km transmission line model. The developed algorithm has proved better for implementation on TCSC compensated line with its improved accuracy and speed.

  14. Pattern Recognition Application of Support Vector Machine for Fault Classification of Thyristor Controlled Series Compensated Transmission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashvantrai Vyas, Bhargav; Maheshwari, Rudra Prakash; Das, Biswarup

    2016-06-01

    Application of series compensation in extra high voltage (EHV) transmission line makes the protection job difficult for engineers, due to alteration in system parameters and measurements. The problem amplifies with inclusion of electronically controlled compensation like thyristor controlled series compensation (TCSC) as it produce harmonics and rapid change in system parameters during fault associated with TCSC control. This paper presents a pattern recognition based fault type identification approach with support vector machine. The scheme uses only half cycle post fault data of three phase currents to accomplish the task. The change in current signal features during fault has been considered as discriminatory measure. The developed scheme in this paper is tested over a large set of fault data with variation in system and fault parameters. These fault cases have been generated with PSCAD/EMTDC on a 400 kV, 300 km transmission line model. The developed algorithm has proved better for implementation on TCSC compensated line with its improved accuracy and speed.

  15. Distributed intrusion monitoring system with fiber link backup and on-line fault diagnosis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiwei; Wu, Huijuan; Xiao, Shunkun

    2014-12-01

    A novel multi-channel distributed optical fiber intrusion monitoring system with smart fiber link backup and on-line fault diagnosis functions was proposed. A 1× N optical switch was intelligently controlled by a peripheral interface controller (PIC) to expand the fiber link from one channel to several ones to lower the cost of the long or ultra-long distance intrusion monitoring system and also to strengthen the intelligent monitoring link backup function. At the same time, a sliding window auto-correlation method was presented to identify and locate the broken or fault point of the cable. The experimental results showed that the proposed multi-channel system performed well especially whenever any a broken cable was detected. It could locate the broken or fault point by itself accurately and switch to its backup sensing link immediately to ensure the security system to operate stably without a minute idling. And it was successfully applied in a field test for security monitoring of the 220-km-length national borderline in China.

  16. Searching for Seismically Active Faults in the Gulf of Cadiz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custodio, S.; Antunes, V.; Arroucau, P.

    2015-12-01

    The repeated occurrence of large magnitude earthquakes in southwest Iberia in historical and instrumental times suggests the presence of active fault segments in the region. However, due to an apparently diffuse seismicity pattern defining a broad region of distributed deformation west of Gibraltar Strait, the question of the location, dimension and geometry of such structures is still open to debate. We recently developed a new algorithm for earthquake location in 3D complex media with laterally varying interface depths, which allowed us to relocate 2363 events having occurred from 2007 to 2013, using P- and S-wave catalog arrival times obtained from the Portuguese Meteorological Institute (IPMA, Instituto Portugues do Mar e da Atmosfera), for a study area lying between 8.5˚W and 5˚W in longitude and 36˚ and 37.5˚ in latitude. The most remarkable change in the seismicity pattern after relocation is an apparent concentration of events, in the North of the Gulf of Cadiz, along a low angle northward-dipping plane rooted at the base of the crust, which could indicate the presence of a major fault. If confirmed, this would be the first structure clearly illuminated by seismicity in a region that has unleashed large magnitude earthquakes. Here, we present results from the joint analysis of focal mechanism solutions and waveform similarity between neighboring events from waveform cross-correlation in order to assess whether those earthquakes occur on the same fault plane.

  17. Active Fault Tolerant Control for Ultrasonic Piezoelectric Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukhnifer, Moussa

    2012-07-01

    Ultrasonic piezoelectric motor technology is an important system component in integrated mechatronics devices working on extreme operating conditions. Due to these constraints, robustness and performance of the control interfaces should be taken into account in the motor design. In this paper, we apply a new architecture for a fault tolerant control using Youla parameterization for an ultrasonic piezoelectric motor. The distinguished feature of proposed controller architecture is that it shows structurally how the controller design for performance and robustness may be done separately which has the potential to overcome the conflict between performance and robustness in the traditional feedback framework. A fault tolerant control architecture includes two parts: one part for performance and the other part for robustness. The controller design works in such a way that the feedback control system will be solely controlled by the proportional plus double-integral PI2 performance controller for a nominal model without disturbances and H∞ robustification controller will only be activated in the presence of the uncertainties or an external disturbances. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed fault tolerant control architecture.

  18. Safety enhancement of oil trunk pipeline crossing active faults on Sakhalin Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tishkina, E.; Antropova, N.; Korotchenko, T.

    2015-11-01

    The article explores the issues concerning safety enhancement of pipeline active fault crossing on Sakhalin Island. Based on the complexity and analysis results, all the faults crossed by pipeline system are classified into five categories - from very simple faults to extremely complex ones. The pipeline fault crossing design is developed in accordance with the fault category. To enhance pipeline safety at fault crossing, a set of methods should be applied: use of pipes of different safety classes and special trench design in accordance with soil permeability characteristics.

  19. Continuous monitoring of an active fault in a plate suture zone: a creepmeter study of the Chihshang Fault, eastern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.-C.; Angelier, J.; Chu, H.-T.; Hu, J.-C.; Jeng, F.-S.

    2001-04-01

    Data from continuously monitored creepmeters across the active Chihshang Fault in eastern Taiwan are presented. The Chihshang Fault is an active segment of the Longitudinal Valley Fault, the main suture between the converging Philippine and Eurasian plates in Taiwan. Since the 1951 earthquake (Mw=7.0), no earthquake larger than magnitude 6.0 occurred in the Chihshang area. At least during the last 20 years, the Chihshang Fault underwent a steady creep movement, resulting in numerous fractures at the surface. Five creepmeters were installed in 1998 at two sites, Tapo and Chinyuan, within the Chihshang active fault zone. One-year results (from August 1998 to July 1999) show a horizontal shortening of 19.4±0.3 mm and 17.3±0.7 mm, at Tapo and Chinyuan, respectively. These annual shortening rates are in a good agreement with other estimates of strain rate independently obtained from geodetic measurements and geological site investigation. The creepmeter measurements were made on a daily basis, providing accurate information on the previously unknown evolution of creep during the year. The records of fault creep at the Tapo site thus revealed close seasonal correlation with average rainfall: the period of high creep rate coincides with the wet season, whereas that of low creep rate coincides with the dry season. Also, in comparison with the Tapo site, the creep behaviour as a function of time is complex at the Chinyuan site. Possible factors of irregularity are under investigation (thermal effect acting on the concrete basement of the creepmeters, earth tide effect, water table variations in a nearby rice field, and rainfall). The comparison between GPS measurements across the Longitudinal Valley (31 mm/year of horizontal displacement) and the creepmeter measurement across the Chihshang Fault zone (17-19 mm/year of horizontal displacement) suggests that there exists other shortening deformation across the active fault zone in addition to those we have measured from the

  20. Offshore active faults of the Mikata fault zone in Fukui, Japan, revealed by high-resolution seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Sugiyama, Y.; Sakamoto, I.; Takino, Y.; Murakami, F.; Hosoya, T.; Usami, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Mikata fault zone are located in coastal and shallow sea area off Fukui Prefecture, West Japan. National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) and Tokai University conducted, as part of MEXT 2013 nearshore active fault survey project, a high-resolution multi-channel seismic survey using Boomer and a 12-channel streamer cable, acoustic profiling survey using parametric sub-bottom profiler and shallow-sea offshore drilling, in order to clarify distribution and activity of the Mikata fault zone. The seismic reflection surveys identified four reflection surfaces as vertical displacement markers in the post-glacial deposits at a depth ranging from ca. 4.5m to ca. 17m below the sea bottom on the downthrown side. We estimated the age of each marker reflection surface by using the C14 age and others from 4m-long core obtained on the downthrown side of fault and the sea level change in the latest Pleistocene and early Holocene around Japan. The results of these surveys have revealed that the fault system was reactivated three times since the latest Pleistocene. The vertical slip rate and average recurrence interval of the fault system are estimated at ca. 0.8-1.0 m/ky and 2,000-3,800 years, respectively.

  1. Aftershocks illuninate the 2011 Mineral, Virginia, earthquake causative fault zone and nearby active faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horton, Jr., J. Wright; Shah, Anjana K.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Snyder, Stephen L.; Carter, Aina M

    2015-01-01

    Deployment of temporary seismic stations after the 2011 Mineral, Virginia (USA), earthquake produced a well-recorded aftershock sequence. The majority of aftershocks are in a tabular cluster that delineates the previously unknown Quail fault zone. Quail fault zone aftershocks range from ~3 to 8 km in depth and are in a 1-km-thick zone striking ~036° and dipping ~50°SE, consistent with a 028°, 50°SE main-shock nodal plane having mostly reverse slip. This cluster extends ~10 km along strike. The Quail fault zone projects to the surface in gneiss of the Ordovician Chopawamsic Formation just southeast of the Ordovician–Silurian Ellisville Granodiorite pluton tail. The following three clusters of shallow (<3 km) aftershocks illuminate other faults. (1) An elongate cluster of early aftershocks, ~10 km east of the Quail fault zone, extends 8 km from Fredericks Hall, strikes ~035°–039°, and appears to be roughly vertical. The Fredericks Hall fault may be a strand or splay of the older Lakeside fault zone, which to the south spans a width of several kilometers. (2) A cluster of later aftershocks ~3 km northeast of Cuckoo delineates a fault near the eastern contact of the Ordovician Quantico Formation. (3) An elongate cluster of late aftershocks ~1 km northwest of the Quail fault zone aftershock cluster delineates the northwest fault (described herein), which is temporally distinct, dips more steeply, and has a more northeastward strike. Some aftershock-illuminated faults coincide with preexisting units or structures evident from radiometric anomalies, suggesting tectonic inheritance or reactivation.

  2. Fault detection and isolation for an active wheelset control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzapour, Mohammad; Mei, T. X.; Xuesong, Jin

    2014-05-01

    Active control for railway wheelsets in the primary suspension has been shown to offer a number of performance gains, and especially it can be used to stabilise the wheelsets without compromising the vehicle's performance on curves. However, the use of actuators, sensors and data processors to replace the traditional passive suspension raises the issue of system safety in the event of a failure of the active control, which could result in the loss of stability (i.e. wheelset hunting), and in more severe cases, derailment. This paper studies the key issue of condition monitoring for an actively controlled railway system, with a focus on actuator failures to detect and isolate failure modes in such a system. It seeks to establish the necessary basis for fault detection to ensure system reliability in the event of malfunction in one of the two actuators. Computer simulations are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method.

  3. Fault kinematics and active tectonics at the southeastern boundary of the eastern Alborz (Abr and Khij fault zones): Geodynamic implications for NNE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javidfakhr, Bita; Bellier, Olivier; Shabanian, Esmaeil; Siame, Lionel; Léanni, Laëtitia; Bourlès, Didier; Ahmadian, Seiran

    2011-10-01

    The Alborz is a region of active deformation within the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone. The Abr and the Khij Faults are two NE-trending left-lateral strike-slip faults in the eastern Alborz that correspond to the Shahrud fault system extended through an area of about 95 km × 55 km. Tectonic landforms typically associated with active strike-slip faults, such as deflected stream channels, offset ridges and fault scarps are documented along the mentioned faults. Detailed analyses of satellite images and digital topographic data accompanied by field surveys allowed us to measure horizontal offsets of about 420 ± 50 m and 400 ± 50 m for the Abr and Khij Faults, respectively. A total of 8 quartz-rich samples were sampled and dated from two different fan surfaces using in situ-produced 10Be cosmogenic dating method. Minimum exposure ages for the abandonment of the alluvial fan surfaces of 115 ± 14 kyr along the Abr Fault and of 230 ± 16 kyr along the Khij Fault imply that both faults are active with slip rates of about 3-4 mm yr -1 and 1-3 mm yr -1, respectively. The results of our study provide the first direct quantitative geological estimates of slip rate along these two active faults and place a new constraint on slip distribution between the faults in the eastern Alborz. Fault kinematic studies (from fault slip data) indicate a N35°E-trending maximum stress axis comprising a dominant strike-slip regime in agreement with the geomorphological analyses. The left-lateral strike-slip faulting along the Abr and Khij Faults and their associated fault zones in the eastern Alborz can be due to the westward component of motion of the South Caspian Basin with respect to Eurasia and Central Iran.

  4. The Lawanopo Fault, central Sulawesi, East Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natawidjaja, Danny Hilman; Daryono, Mudrik R.

    2015-04-01

    The dominant tectonic-force factor in the Sulawesi Island is the westward Bangga-Sula microplate tectonic intrusion, driven by the 12 mm/year westward motion of the Pacific Plate relative to Eurasia. This tectonic intrusion are accommodated by a series of major left-lateral strike-slip fault zones including Sorong Fault, Sula-Sorong Fault, Matano Fault, Palukoro Fault, and Lawanopo Fault zones. The Lawanopo fault has been considered as an active left-lateral strike-slip fault. The natural exposures of the Lawanopo Fault are clear, marked by the breaks and liniemants of topography along the fault line, and also it serves as a tectonic boundary between the different rock assemblages. Inpections of IFSAR 5m-grid DEM and field checks show that the fault traces are visible by lineaments of topographical slope breaks, linear ridges and stream valleys, ridge neckings, and they are also associated with hydrothermal deposits and hot springs. These are characteristics of young fault, so their morphological expressions can be seen still. However, fault scarps and other morpho-tectonic features appear to have been diffused by erosions and young sediment depositions. No fresh fault scarps, stream deflections or offsets, or any influences of fault movements on recent landscapes are observed associated with fault traces. Hence, the faults do not show any evidence of recent activity. This is consistent with lack of seismicity on the fault.

  5. Reclosing operation characteristics of the flux-coupling type SFCL in a single-line-to ground fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, B. I.; Cho, Y. S.; Choi, H. S.; Ha, K. H.; Choi, S. G.; Chul, D. C.; Sung, T. H.

    2011-11-01

    The recloser that is used in distribution systems is a relay system that behaves sequentially to protect power systems from transient and continuous faults. This reclosing operation of the recloser can improve the reliability and stability of the power supply. For cooperation with this recloser, the superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) must properly perform the reclosing operation. This paper analyzed the reclosing operation characteristics of the three-phase flux-coupling type SFCL in the event of a ground fault. The fault current limiting characteristics according to the changing number of turns of the primary and secondary coils were examined. As the number of turns of the first coil increased, the first maximum fault current decreased. Furthermore, the voltage of the quenched superconducting element also decreased. This means that the power burden of the superconducting element decreases based on the increasing number of turns of the primary coil. The fault current limiting characteristic of the SFCL according to the reclosing time limited the fault current within a 0.5 cycles (8 ms), which is shorter than the closing time of the recloser. In other words, the superconducting element returned to the superconducting state before the second fault and normally performed the fault current limiting operation. If the SFCL did not recover before the recloser reclosing time, the normal current that was flowing in the transmission line after the recovery of the SFCL from the fault would have been limited and would have caused losses. Therefore, the fast recovery time of a SFCL is critical to its cooperation with the protection system.

  6. The northwest trending north Boquerón Bay-Punta Montalva Fault Zone; A through going active fault system in southwestern Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roig‐Silva, Coral Marie; Asencio, Eugenio; Joyce, James

    2013-01-01

    The North Boquerón Bay–Punta Montalva fault zone has been mapped crossing the Lajas Valley in southwest Puerto Rico. Identification of the fault was based upon detailed analysis of geophysical data, satellite images, and field mapping. The fault zone consists of a series of Cretaceous bedrock faults that reactivated and deformed Miocene limestone and Quaternary alluvial fan sediments. The fault zone is seismically active (local magnitude greater than 5.0) with numerous locally felt earthquakes. Focal mechanism solutions suggest strain partitioning with predominantly east–west left-lateral displacements with small normal faults striking mostly toward the northeast. Northeast-trending fractures and normal faults can be found in intermittent streams that cut through the Quaternary alluvial fan deposits along the southern margin of the Lajas Valley, an east–west-trending 30-km-long fault-controlled depression. Areas of preferred erosion within the alluvial fan trend toward the west-northwest parallel to the onland projection of the North Boquerón Bay fault. The North Boquerón Bay fault aligns with the Punta Montalva fault southeast of the Lajas Valley. Both faults show strong southward tilting of Miocene strata. On the western end, the Northern Boquerón Bay fault is covered with flat-lying Holocene sediments, whereas at the southern end the Punta Montalva fault shows left-lateral displacement of stream drainage on the order of a few hundred meters.

  7. Tsunamigenic potential of Mediterranean fault systems and active subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petricca, Patrizio; Babeyko, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Since the North East Atlantic and Mediterranean Tsunami Warning System (NEAMTWS) is under development by the European scientific community, it becomes necessary to define guidelines for the characterization of the numerous parameters must be taken into account in a fair assessment of the risk. Definition of possible tectonic sources and evaluation of their potential is one of the principal issues. In this study we systematically evaluate tsunamigenic potential of up-to-now known real fault systems and active subduction interfaces in the NEAMTWS region. The task is accomplished by means of numerical modeling of tsunami generation and propagation. We have simulated all possible uniform-slip ruptures populating fault and subduction interfaces with magnitudes ranging from 6.5 up to expected Mmax. A total of 15810 individual ruptures were processed. For each rupture, a tsunami propagation scenario was computed in linear shallow-water approximation on 1-arc minute bathymetric grid (Gebco_08) implying normal reflection boundary conditions. Maximum wave heights at coastal positions (totally - 23236 points of interest) were recorded for four hours of simulation and then classified according to currently adopted warning level thresholds. The resulting dataset allowed us to classify the sources in terms of their tsunamigenic potential as well as to estimate their minimum tsunamigenic magnitude. Our analysis shows that almost every source in the Mediterranean Sea is capable to produce local tsunami at the advisory level (i.e., wave height > 20 cm) starting from magnitude values of Mw=6.6. In respect to the watch level (wave height > 50 cm), the picture is less homogeneous: crustal sources in south-west Mediterranean as well as East-Hellenic arc need larger magnitudes (around Mw=7.0) to trigger watch levels even at the nearby coasts. In the context of the regional warning (i.e., source-to-coast distance > 100 km) faults also behave more heterogeneously in respect to the minimum

  8. Estimation of active faulting in a slow deformation area: Culoz fault as a case study (Jura-Western Alps junction).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Taille, Camille; Jouanne, Francois; Crouzet, Christian; Jomard, Hervé; Beck, Christian; de Rycker, Koen; van Daele, Maarten; Lebourg, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The north-western Alps foreland is considered as still experiencing distal effects of Alpine collision, resulting in both horizontal and vertical relative displacements. Based on seismological and geodetic surveys, detailed patterns of active faulting (including subsurface décollements, blind ramps and deeper crustal thrusts have been proposed (Thouvenot et al., 1998), underlining the importance of NW-SE left-lateral strike-slip offsets as along the Vuache and Culoz faults (cf. the 1996 Epagny event: M=5.4; Thouvenot et al., 1998 and the 1822 Culoz event I=VII-VIII; Vogt, 1979). In parallel to this tectonic evolution, the last glaciation-deglaciation cycles contributed to develop large and over-deepened lacustrine basins, such as Lake Le Bourget (Perrier, 1980). The fine grain, post LGM (ie post 18 ky), sedimentary infill gives a good opportunity to evidence late quaternary tectonic deformations. This study focuses on the Culoz fault, extending from the Jura to the West, to the Chautagne swamp and through the Lake Le Bourget to the East. Historical earthquakes are known nearby this fault as ie the 1822 Culoz event. The precise location and geometry of the main fault is illustrated but its Eastern termination still needs to be determined. High resolution seismic sections and side-scan sonar images performed in the 90's (Chapron et al., 1996) showed that the Col du Chat and Culoz faults have locally deformed the quaternary sedimentary infill of the lake. These studies, mainly devoted to paleo-climate analysis were not able to determine neither the geometry of the fault, or to quantify the observed deformations. A new campaign devoted to highlight the fault geometry and associated deformation, has been performed in October 2013. Very tight profiles were performed during this high resolution seismic survey using seistec boomer and sparker sources. In several places the rupture reaches the most recent seismic reflectors underlying that these faults were active during

  9. Strike-slip fault geometry in Turkey and its influence on earthquake activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barka, A. A.; Kadinsky-Cade, K.

    1988-01-01

    The geometry of Turkish strike-slip faults is reviewed, showing that fault geometry plays an important role in controlling the location of large earthquake rupture segments along the fault zones. It is found that large earthquake ruptures generally do not propagate past individual stepovers that are wider than 5 km or bends that have angles greater than about 30 degrees. It is suggested that certain geometric patterns are responsible for strain accumulation along portions of the fault zone. It is shown that fault geometry plays a role in the characteristics of earthquake behavior and that aftershocks and swarm activity are often associated with releasing areas.

  10. Bering Sea earthquake of February 21, 1991: Active faulting along the Bering shelf edge

    SciTech Connect

    Abers, G.A. ); Ekstroem, G. ); Marlow, M.S.; Geist, E.L. )

    1993-02-10

    On February 21, 1991, an M[sub S] = 6.8 shallow earthquake occurred in the eastern Bering Sea in an area which previously has shown no significant seismic activity. The earthquake was located on the Bering Shelf close to the shelf edge, near one of the elongate basins (Zhemchun Basin) that follow the outer shelf. To better understand the causes of this unusual event, we relocated the earthquake and its aftershocks, determined its source mechanism and depth, and examined multichannel seismic observations of structures near the epicenter. The event was relocated from regional and teleseismic P and S arrival times using a nonlinear inverse technique, as were the 19 previous well-recorded Bering Sea earthquakes in global catalogs (1964-1987). The 1991 mainshock epicenter was located on the western flank of Zhemchug Basin. The only four previous events with small (< 1[degrees]) location errors relocated at the outer shelf near the Pribilof Islands. The focal mechanism for the 1991 event, determined by inversion of teleseismic, broadband body waves and centroid-moment tensor data, shows oblique normal faulting with the T-axis, oriented north-south. One nodal plane dips steeply to the northeast and strikes parallel to the basin axis, subparallel to faults that bound Zhemchug Basin. This earthquake may be due to slip on one of these normal faults, several of which are seen to offset young strata on a multichannel seismic line 30 km south of the earthquake. It has previously been suggested that the large canyons that cut the Bering Shelf and the adjacent outer-shelf basins are fault controlled, but this event and its aftershocks provide the first strong evidence to support the hypothesis that these structures are currently active and produce earthquakes. 34 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Structural and Lithologic Characteristics of the Wenchuan Earthquake Fault Zone and its Relationship with Seismic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Li, H.; Pei, J.; Li, T.; Huang, Y.; Zhao, Z.

    2010-12-01

    the older earthquake, but rather along the edge of the gouge. According to the gouge statistics of the whole fault zone, seismic events have the obvious tendency towards the foot wall, and the thickness of gouge is proportional to the activity of the fault, indicating that the width of fault zone is directly related to the number and evolution history of earthquakes . Repeated earthquakes maybe the main cause for the formation of the Longmenshan Moutains

  12. Recovery characteristics of matrix-type SFCL with 2 × 3 matrixes under the triple lines-to-ground fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, D. C.; Choi, H. S.; Cho, Y. S.; Jung, B. I.; Kwak, M. H.; Kang, S. B.; Oh, H. W.; Han, H. S.; Sung, T. H.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we analyzed recovery characteristics of matrix-type SFCLs (MFCL) with 2 × 3 matrixes when triple lines-to-ground fault occurred. MFCLs used in this work consist of 18 superconductors, six reactors for induction of magnetic field and several parallel impedances for bypassing fault currents. Also we analyzed recovery characteristics of resistive-type SFCLs of which 18 superconductors are connected in series and parallel, without reactors and parallel impedances, for the purpose of comparison, under the same experimental conditions of MFCLs. Experimental results were reported in terms of recovery characteristics for individual superconductors in an R phase, dependency of faults cycles and applied fault voltages in each phase. We confirmed that recovery characteristics of MFCLs were more excellent than those of resistive-type SFCLs.

  13. Relative tectonic activity assessment along the East Anatolian strike-slip fault, Eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Abdelrahman

    2016-04-01

    The East Anatolian transform fault is a morphologically distinct and seismically active left-lateral strike-slip fault that extends for ~ 500 km from Karlıova to the Maraş defining the boundary between the Anatolian Block and Syrian Foreland. Deformed landforms along the East Anatolian fault provide important insights into the nature of landscape development within an intra-continental strike-slip fault system. Geomorphic analysis of the East Anatolian fault using geomorphic indices including mountain front sinuosity, stream length-gradient index, drainage density, hypsometric integral, and the valley-width to valley height ratio helped differentiate the faulting into segments of differing degrees of the tectonic and geomorphic activity. Watershed maps for the East Anatolian fault showing the relative relief, incision, and maturity of basins along the fault zone help define segments of the higher seismic risk and help evaluate the regional seismic hazard. The results of the geomorphic indices show a high degree of activity, reveal each segment along the fault is active and represent a higher seismic hazard along the entire fault.

  14. Imaging the complexity of an active normal fault system: The 1997 Colfiorito (central Italy) case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiaraluce, L.; Ellsworth, W.L.; Chiarabba, C.; Cocco, M.

    2003-01-01

    Six moderate magnitude earthquakes (5 < Mw < 6) ruptured normal fault segments of the southern sector of the North Apennine belt (central Italy) in the 1997 Colfiorito earthquake sequence. We study the progressive activation of adjacent and nearby parallel faults of this complex normal fault system using ???1650 earthquake locations obtained by applying a double-difference location method, using travel time picks and waveform cross-correlation measurements. The lateral extent of the fault segments range from 5 to 10 km and make up a broad, ???45 km long, NW trending fault system. The geometry of each segment is quite simple and consists of planar faults gently dipping toward SW with an average dip of 40??-45??. The fault planes are not listric but maintain a constant dip through the entire seismogenic volume, down to 8 km depth. We observe the activation of faults on the hanging wall and the absence of seismicity in the footwall of the structure. The observed fault segmentation appears to be due to the lateral heterogeneity of the upper crust: preexisting thrusts inherited from Neogene's compressional tectonic intersect the active normal faults and control their maximum length. The stress tensor obtained by inverting the six main shock focal mechanisms of the sequence is in agreement with the tectonic stress active in the inner chain of the Apennine, revealing a clear NE trending extension direction. Aftershock focal mechanisms show a consistent extensional kinematics, 70% of which are mechanically consistent with the main shock stress field.

  15. Fault Population Analyses in the Eastern California Shear Zone: Insights into the Development of Young, Actively Evolving Plate Boundary Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Dawers, N. H.; Amer, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Relationships between cumulative fault displacement, slip rate and length, along with fault population statistics are analyzed for faults located within the Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ), focusing on areas north of the Garlock fault. Here many faults are geologically young and in an early stage of evolution, while many older and larger faults are also still active. We analyze scaling relationships for both strike-slip and normal faults in order to determine whether the two fault populations share the same properties or not. Cumulative displacement, slip rate and length data are collected from published maps and literature sources. The dataset spans fault lengths from tens of meters to hundreds of kilometers. Results of fault scaling analyses indicate that displacement has a linear relationship with fault length for normal faults in this area over the entire length span, whereas strike-slip faults do not have a clear displacement-length scaling relation. For a given length, the subset of strike-slip faults typically exhibits a much larger displacement than that for the normal faults. The slip rate versus length trends are similar but are considerably more scattered. In addition, we define a subpopulation of normal faults that are kinematically related to the right-lateral strike-slip faults; these have a maximum length set by the spacing between the right-lateral faults. Fault size-frequency distributions also indicate differences between the normal and strike-slip fault populations. Overall, the normal faults have higher ratios of cumulative number to fault length than the strike-slip population does, which we relate to different patterns of localization of faulting. We interpret these trends as reflecting different tectonic histories, with the majority of normal faults being intraplate faults associated with Basin and Range extension and the strike-slip faults being kinematically connected with plate boundary.

  16. Late Quaternary tectonic activity and paleoseismicity of the Eastern Messinia Fault Zone, SW Peloponessus (Messinia, Greece).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkaniotis, Sotirios; Betzelou, Konstantina; Zygouri, Vassiliki; Koukouvelas, Ioannis; Ganas, Athanassios

    2015-04-01

    The southwestern part of Peloponnesus, Messinia and Laconia, is an area of significant tectonic activity situated near the Hellenic trench. Most of the deformation in this area is accommodated by the Eastern Messinia Fault Zone, bordering the western part of Taygetos Mt range and the west coast of Mani peninsula. The Eastern Messinia Fault Zone (EMFZ) is a complex system of primarily normal faults dipping westwards with a strike of NNW-SSE to N-S direction attaining a total length of more than 100 km from the northern Messinia plain in the north to the southern part of Mani peninsula in the south. The continuity of the EMFZ is disrupted by overlapping faults and relay ramp structures. The central part of the EMFZ, from the town of Oichalia to the city of Kalamata, was investigated by detailed field mapping of fault structures and post-alpine sediment formations together with re-evaluation of historical and modern seismicity. Several fault segments with lengths of 6 to 10 km were mapped, defined and evaluated according to their state of activity and age. Analysis of fault striation measurements along fault planes of the fault zone shows a present regime of WSW-ENE extension, in accordance with focal mechanisms from modern seismicity. Known faults like the Katsareika and Verga faults near the city of Kalamata are interpreted as older-generation faults that are re-activated (e.g. the 1986 Ms 6.0 Kalamata earthquake on Verga Fault) as part of a system of distributed deformation. New fault segments, some of them previously unmapped like the Asprohoma fault to the west of Kalamata, and offshore faults like Kitries and Kourtissa, are being assigned to the EMFZ. Moreover, a paleoseismological trench was excavated in the northern part of Pidima fault segment, one of the most prominent active segments of the central part of the EMFZ, in order to examine the paleoearthquake record of the fault system. A significant number of historical and instrumental earthquakes in the area

  17. Slip sense inversion on active strike-slip faults in southwest Japan and its implications for Cenozoic tectonic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Tadashi; Lin, Aiming

    2004-05-01

    Analyses of deflected river channels, offset of basement rocks, and fault rock structures reveal that slip sense inversion occurred on major active strike-slip faults in southwest Japan such as the Yamasaki and Mitoke fault zones and the Median Tectonic Line (MTL). Along the Yamasaki and Mitoke fault zones, small-size rivers cutting shallowly mountain slopes and Quaternary terraces have been deflected sinistrally, whereas large-size rivers which deeply incised into the Mio-Pliocene elevated peneplains show no systematically sinistral offset or complicated hairpin-shaped deflection. When the sinistral offsets accumulated on the small-size rivers are restored, the large-size rivers show residual dextral deflections. This dextral offset sense is consistent with that recorded in the pre-Cenozoic basement rocks. S-C fabrics of fault gouge and breccia zone developed in the active fault zones show sinistral shear sense compatible with earthquake focal mechanisms, whereas those of the foliated cataclasite indicate a dextral shear sense. These observations show that the sinistral strike-slip shear fabrics were overprinted on dextral ones which formed during a previous deformation phase. Similar topographic and geologic features are observed along the MTL in the central-eastern part of the Kii Peninsula. Based on these geomorphological and geological data, we infer that the slip sense inversion occurred in the period between the late Tertiary and mid-Quaternary period. This strike-slip inversion might result from the plate rearrangement consequent to the mid-Miocene Japan Sea opening event. This multidisciplinary study gives insight into how active strike-slip fault might evolves with time.

  18. Contribution of high resolution PLEIADES imagery to active faults analysis. Case study of the Longriba Fault System, eastern Tibet.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansberque, Claire; Bellier, Olivier; Godard, Vincent; Lasserre, Cécile; Wang, Mingming; Xu, Xiwei; Tan, Xibin

    2015-04-01

    High resolution imagery has largely developed during those two last decades allowing the possibility to observe and quantify geological and geomorphological features ranging from meter to few centimeters. Active tectonic and geomorphological studies have greatly benefited from the systematic use of such data. For that reason, we tested the contribution of PLEAIDES images to the analysis of an active strike-slip fault system in eastern Tibet. We used 50 cm resolution panchromatic PLEIADES images in order to map active fault segmentation, localize offsets of geomorphic markers and quantify vertical and horizontal displacements. We propose a preliminary study using PLEIADES images along the Longriba Fault System (LFS). The LFS, located at the eastern Tibetan Plateau margin, is constituted of two NW-SE dextral strike-slip and parallel fault zones: Longriqu and Maoergai, 80 and 120 km-long, respectively. It accommodates ~4 mm/yr dextral slip and very few vertical motion. We used stereo-pairs to build relative Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) (without ground control points) with a horizontal resolution ranging from 2 to 5 m, in order to understand the geometry of the system. We measured fault segments with lengths ranging from a hundred meters to several kilometers which are relatively close from each others, and several offsets of geomorphic markers (alluvial fans, ridges, rivers) ranging from a few meters to ~40 m. According to the segmentation deduced from those results we suggest that the fault has a high seismic potential (>Mw7.0) and that probably many surface rupturing earthquakes occurred along the LFS over the Holocene.

  19. Active faults crossing trunk pipeline routes: some important steps to avoid the disaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besstrashnov, Vladimir; Strom, Alexander

    2010-05-01

    Trunk pipelines that pass through tectonically active areas connecting oil and gas reservoirs with terminals and refineries cross active faults that can produce large earthquakes. Besides strong motion affecting vast areas, these earthquakes are often associated with surface faulting that provides additional hazard to pipelines. To avoid significant economic losses and environmental pollution, pipelines should be designed to sustain both effects (shaking and direct rupturing) without pipe damage and spill. Special studies aimed to provide necessary input data for the designers should be performed in the course of engineering survey. However, our experience on conducting and review of such studies for several oil and gas trunk pipelines in Russia show urgent need of more strict definition of basic conceptions and approaches used for identification and localization of these potentially hazardous tectonic features. Identification of active faults (fault zones) considered as causative faults - sources of strong motion caused by seismic waves that affect dozens kilometers of pipeline route can be done by use of both direct and indirect evidence of Late Pleistocene - Holocene activity of faults and fault zones. Since strong motion parameters can be considered as constant within the near-field zone, which width in case of large earthquake is up to dozens kilometers, accuracy of active fault location is not so critical and ±1-2 km precision provided by use of indirect evidence is acceptable. In contrast, if one have to identify and characterize zones of potential surface rupturing that require special design of the endangered pipeline section, only direct evidence of such activity can provide reliable input data for crossing design with relevant accuracy of fault location, amount and direction of displacement. Only traces of surface faults displacing Late Pleistocene - Holocene sediments and/or geomorphic features are considered as direct evidence of fault activity. Just

  20. Relationship between normal faulting and volcanic activity in the Taranaki backarc basin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giba, M.; Walsh, J. J.; Nicol, A.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanoes and normal faults are, by definition, both present within volcanic rifts. Despite this association the causal relationships between volcanism and normal faulting can be unclear and are poorly understood. One of the principal challenges for investigations of the links between faulting and volcanic activity, is the definition of the detailed temporal relationships between these two processes. The northern Taranaki Basin, which benefits from excellent seismic (2D and 3D) and drillhole coverage, provides the basis for a detailed study of volcanism and faulting over the last ca 15 Myr. Most of the basin is characterised by sedimentation rates which exceed fault displacement rates, a condition which permits displacement backstripping of these syn-sedimentary growth faults. The timing of a suite of mostly andesitic submarine volcanoes has been constrained by interdigitation of the volcanic cones with basinal sedimentary rocks. Eleven dated horizons within the ca 15 Myr and younger stratigraphy together with mapping provide a means of examining the temporal and spatial links between fault and volcanic activity within the basin. The northern Taranaki Basin has a multiphase deformation history, with extension during the Late Cretaceous to Mid Eocene (ca 80-45 Ma), followed by contraction in the Late Eocene to Early Miocene (ca 40-18 Ma) and then by Mid Miocene to recent back arc extension (ca 15-0 Ma). The youngest phase of extensional faulting initiated in the north and west of the basin and migrated to the southeast where present activity is focused. Volcanic activity also commenced in the north during the Mid Miocene and migrated towards the south and east. Volcanism and backarc extension are driven by subduction of the Pacific plate along the Hikurangi margin. The southward and eastward migration of both faulting and volcanic activity is attributed to the steepening and rotation of the subducting slab beneath the Taranaki Basin. Despite the common origin of

  1. Ground Motion Simulation for a Large Active Fault System using Empirical Green's Function Method and the Strong Motion Prediction Recipe - a Case Study of the Noubi Fault Zone -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuriyama, M.; Kumamoto, T.; Fujita, M.

    2005-12-01

    propagation. Moreover, it was clarified that the horizontal velocities by assuming the cascade model was underestimated more than one standard deviation of empirical relation by Si and Midorikawa (1999). The scaling and cascade models showed an approximately 6.4-fold difference for the case, in which the rupture started along the southeastern edge of the Umehara Fault at observation point GIF020. This difference is significantly large in comparison with the effect of different rupture starting points, and shows that it is important to base scenario earthquake assumptions on active fault datasets before establishing the source characterization model. The distribution map of seismic intensity for the 1891 Noubi Earthquake also suggests that the synthetic waveforms in the southeastern Noubi Fault zone may be underestimated. Our results indicate that outer fault parameters (e.g., earthquake moment) related to the construction of scenario earthquakes influence strong motion prediction, rather than inner fault parameters such as the rupture starting point. Based on these methods, we will predict strong motion for approximately 140 to 150 km of the Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line.

  2. Evolution and dynamics of active faults in southeastern Egyptian Western Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeen, Mamdouh

    2016-07-01

    Remote sensing data processing and analysis together with interpretation of earthquake data that are followed by extensive field studies on some of the prevailing NS and EW striking faults indicate that these faults have an intimate relationship and were formed synchronously as a conjugate Riedel shears. Parallel to the NS and the EW faults open fractures filled with blown sand dominate the area of study. The Quaternary terraces adjacent to these faults are offset by the faults. Kinematic indicators on the NS striking faults indicate major sinistral (left-lateral) strike slip and minor dip-slip (normal) movement. On the other hand, kinematic indicators on the EW striking faults indicate major dextral (right-lateral) strike slip and minor dip-slip (normal) movement. Paleo-stress analysis of the fault striae measured on the NS and EW faults indicate that these faults were formed under NNE-SSW oriented extension. Instrumental earthquake data analysis shows a comparable extension direction to that derived from field measurements of slickenlineation. These observations indicate that the NS- and EW-striking faults are contemporaneous and are related to the Red Sea rifting that is currently active.

  3. Geological and tectonic implications obtained from first seismic activity investigation around Lembang fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afnimar; Yulianto, Eko; Rasmid

    2015-12-01

    The Lembang fault located at northern part of populated Bandung basin is the most conspicuous fault that potentially capable in generating earthquakes. The first seismic investigation around Lembang fault has been done by deploying a seismic network from May 2010 till December 2011 to estimate the seismic activities around that fault. Nine events were recorded and distributed around the fault. Seven events were likely to be generated by the Lembang fault and two events were not. The events related to the Lembang fault strongly suggest that this fault has left-lateral kinematic. It shows vector movement of Australian plate toward NNE might have been responsible for the Lembang fault kinematic following its initial vertical gravitational movement. The 1-D velocity model obtained from inversion indicates the stratigraphy configuration around the fault composed at least three layers of low Vp/Vs at the top, high Vp/Vs at the middle layer and moderate Vp/Vs at the bottom. In comparison with general geology of the area, top, mid and bottom layers may consecutively represent Quaternary volcanic layer, pre-Quaternary water-filled sedimentary layer and pre-Quaternary basement. Two eastern events related to minor faults and were caused by a gravitational collapse.

  4. Fault Lines in Our Democracy: Civic Knowledge, Voting Behavior, and Civic Engagement in the United States. Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coley, Richard J.; Sum, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    As the 21st century unfolds, the United States faces historic challenges, including a struggling economy, an aging infrastructure and global terrorism. Solutions will have to come from educated, skilled citizens who understand and believe in our democratic system and are civically engaged. This incisive new report examines these fault lines and…

  5. Fault finder

    DOEpatents

    Bunch, Richard H.

    1986-01-01

    A fault finder for locating faults along a high voltage electrical transmission line. Real time monitoring of background noise and improved filtering of input signals is used to identify the occurrence of a fault. A fault is detected at both a master and remote unit spaced along the line. A master clock synchronizes operation of a similar clock at the remote unit. Both units include modulator and demodulator circuits for transmission of clock signals and data. All data is received at the master unit for processing to determine an accurate fault distance calculation.

  6. Improvement in operational characteristics of KEPCO’s line-commutation-type superconducting hybrid fault current limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, S.-W.; Park, B.-C.; Jeong, Y.-T.; Kim, Y.-J.; Yang, S.-E.; Kim, W.-S.; Kim, H.-R.; Du, H.-I.

    2013-01-01

    A 22.9 kV class hybrid fault current limiter (FCL) developed by Korea Electric Power Corporation and LS Industrial Systems in 2006 operates using the line commutation mechanism and begins to limit the fault current after the first half-cycle. The first peak of the fault current is available for protective coordination in the power system. However, it also produces a large electromagnetic force and imposes a huge stress on power facilities such as the main transformer and gas-insulated switchgear. In this study, we improved the operational characteristics of the hybrid FCL in order to reduce the first peak of the fault current. While maintaining the structure of the hybrid FCL system, we developed a superconducting module that detects and limits the fault current during the first half-cycle. To maintain the protective coordination capacity, the hybrid FCL was designed to reduce the first peak value of the fault current by up to approximately 30%. The superconducting module was also designed to produce a minimum AC loss, generating a small, uniform magnetic field distribution during normal operation. Performance tests confirmed that when applied to the hybrid FCL, the superconducting module showed successful current limiting operation without any damage.

  7. 15 years of zooming in and zooming out: Developing a new single scale national active fault database of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, William; Langridge, Robert; Villamor, Pilar; Litchfield, Nicola; Van Dissen, Russ; Townsend, Dougal; Lee, Julie; Heron, David; Lukovic, Biljana

    2014-05-01

    In New Zealand, we are currently reconciling multiple digital coverages of mapped active faults into a national coverage at a single scale (1:250,000). This seems at first glance to be a relatively simple task. However, methods used to capture data, the scale of capture, and the initial purpose of the fault mapping, has produced datasets that have very different characteristics. The New Zealand digital active fault database (AFDB) was initially developed as a way of managing active fault locations and fault-related features within a computer-based spatial framework. The data contained within the AFDB comes from a wide range of studies, from plate tectonic (1:500,000) to cadastral (1:2,000) scale. The database was designed to allow capture of field observations and remotely sourced data without a loss in data resolution. This approach has worked well as a method for compiling a centralised database for fault information but not for providing a complete national coverage at a single scale. During the last 15 years other complementary projects have used and also contributed data to the AFDB, most notably the QMAP project (a national series of geological maps completed over 19 years that include coverage of active and inactive faults at 1:250,000). AFDB linework and attributes was incorporated into this series but simplification of linework and attributes has occurred to maintain map clarity at 1:250,000 scale. Also, during this period on-going mapping of active faults has improved upon these data. Other projects of note that have used data from the AFDB include the National Seismic Hazard Model of New Zealand and the Global Earthquake Model (GEM). The main goal of the current project has been to provide the best digital spatial representation of a fault trace at 1:250,000 scale and combine this with the most up to date attributes. In some areas this has required a simplification of very fine detailed data and in some cases new mapping to provide a complete coverage

  8. Active tectonics of the Ganzi-Yushu fault in the southeastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Feng; He, Honglin; Densmore, Alexander L.; Li, An; Yang, Xiaoping; Xu, Xiwei

    2016-04-01

    The ongoing convergence between India and Eurasia apparently is accommodated not merely by crustal shortening in Tibet, instead also by motions along strike slip faults which are usually boundaries between tectonic blocks, especially in the Tibetan Plateau. Quantification of this strike slip faulting is fundamental for understanding the collision between India and Eurasia. Here, we use a variety of geomorphic observations to place constraints on the late Quaternary kinematics and slip rates of the Ganzi-Yushu fault, one of the significant strike-slip faults in eastern Tibet. The Ganzi-Yushu fault is an active, dominantly left-lateral strike-slip structure that can be traced continuously for up to 500 km along the northern boundary of the clockwise-rotating southeastern block of the Tibetan Plateau. We analyse geomorphic evidence for deformation, and calculate the late Quaternary slip rates at four sites along the eastern portion of the fault trace. The latest Quaternary apparent throw rates are variable along strike but are typically ~ 1 mm/a. Rates of strike-slip displacement are likely to be an order of magnitude higher, 8-11 mm/a. Trenching at two locations suggests that the active fault behaviour is dominated by strike-slip faulting and reveals several earthquake events with refined information of timing. The 2010 Mw 6.9 Yushu earthquake, which occurred on the northwestern segment of the Ganzi-Yushu fault zone, provides additional evidence for fault activity. These observations agree with GPS-derived estimates, and show that late Quaternary slip rates on the Ganzi-Yushu fault are comparable to those on other major active strike-slip faults in the eastern Tibetan Plateau.

  9. Faults and associated landslides on the Torrey Pines mesa, an expression of the active Rose Canyon fault zone, La Jolla, California

    SciTech Connect

    Rindell, A.K. )

    1993-04-01

    The Rose Canyon fault zone (RCFZ), San Diego's active NW striking right-lateral wrench, bends to the left at La Jolla, creating a poorly understood zone of transpression. North of La Jolla, continuing investigations along seacliffs and road-cuts have exposed a number of en echelon, NE striking antithetic faults previously interpreted as either E-W striking faults, landslides, and/or Eocene soft-sediment deformations. However, thrust faulting and left-lateral movement, in addition to antithetic strikes, indicates that at least one of these, the Marine Fisheries fault, is associated with the RCFZ. A graben formed by a left-step along this fault has led to land subsidence and engineering problems for the National Marine Fisheries building. In addition, progressive seacliff retreat here and at other locations is partly controlled by fault associated fractures. A cliff-face exposure of the Salk fault reveals diverging fault splays flattening to the near horizontal with movement occurring along bedding planes within the sedimentary section, creating the appearance of landsliding. Classic flower structures have also been found up to 5 km inland, along NE strikes to the shoreline exposures of the Salk and Scripps faults. Faults traces are generally obscured by urbanization and numerous ancient and/or presently active coherent landslides. Although these faults are classified as only potentially active, timing and risk of seismic movement are not well constrained. In addition, record rainfalls in San Diego County have dramatically increased landsliding potential. A well exposed dike, dated at 11 Ma (older than the Pliocene age of the RCFZ), is exposed from the seacliffs offshore towards the RCFZ. It has a significant magnetic anomaly ranging up to 450 gammas and appears to be offset by the Marine Fisheries and Scripps faults. Measuring offsets of this and other reported and suspected offshore dikes may better define total offset from both the RCFZ and antithetic faulting.

  10. Upper Pleistocene - Holocene activity of the Carrascoy Fault (Murcia, SE Spain): preliminary results from paleoseismological research.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Banda, Raquel; Garcia-Mayordomo, Julian; Insua-Arevalo, Juan M.; Salazar, Angel; Rodriguez-Escudero, Emilio; Alvarez-Gomez, Jose A.; Martinez-Diaz, Jose J.; Herrero, Maria J.; Medialdea, Alicia

    2014-05-01

    The Carrascoy Fault is located in the Internal Zones of the Betic Cordillera (Southern Spain). In particular, the Carrascoy Fault is one of the major faults forming the Eastern Betic Shear Zone, the main structure accommodating the convergence between Nubian and Eurasian plates in the westernmost Mediterranean. So far, the Carrascoy Fault has been defined as a left-lateral strike-slip fault. It extends for at least 31 km in a NE-SW trend from the village of Zeneta (Murcia) at its northeastern tip, to the Cañaricos village, controlling the northern edge of the Carrascoy Range and its linkage to the Guadalentin Depression towards the southwest. This is an area of moderate seismic activity, but densely populated, the capital of the region, Murcia, being settled very close to the fault. Hence, the knowledge of the structure and kinematics of the Carrascoy Fault is essential for assessing reliably the seismic hazard of the region. We present a detailed-scale geological and geomorphological map along the fault zone created from a LIDAR DEM combined with fieldwork, and geological and geophysical information. Furthermore, a number of trenches have been dug across the fault at different locations providing insights in the fault most recent activity as well as paleoseismic data. Preliminary results suggest that the Cararscoy Fault has recently changed its kinematic showing a near pure reverse motion. According to this, the fault can be divided into two distinct segments, the eastern one: Zeneta - Fuensanta, and the western one: Fuensanta - Cañaricos, each one having its own characteristic style and geodynamics. Some new active strands of the fault locate at the foot of the very first relief towards the North of the older strand, forming the current southern border of the Guadalentin Depression. These new faults show an increasingly reverse component westwards, so that the Fuensanta - Cañaricos segment is constituted by thrusts, which are blind at its western end

  11. 3D Geometry of Active Shortening, Uplift and Subsidence West of the Alpine Fault (South Island, New Zealand)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisetti, F.; Sibson, R. H.; Hamling, I. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Alpine Fault is the principal component of the transform boundary between the Australian and Pacific plates across the South Island of New Zealand, linking the opposite dipping Hikurangi and Puysegur subduction zones. In the northern South Island, the transition from the subducted W-dipping Pacific slab of the Hikurangi margin to the intra-continental transform margin is defined by earthquake foci from 350 to 100 km deep. West of the Alpine Fault the Australian crust above the slab has been incorporated into the collisional plate boundary and uplifted in a compressional belt up to 100 km wide. Retro-deformation and back-stripping of 10 regional transects utilising surface geology, seismic reflection lines and exploration wells define the progressive deformation of the Australian crust since 35 Ma along the collisional margin. The reconstructed geometry of faulted basement blocks is tied to localisation and evolution of overlying sedimentary basins, coeval with displacement on the Alpine Fault. Amounts of shortening, uplift and subsidence and fault activity are heterogeneous in space and time across the margin, and are controlled by compressional reactivation of inherited high-angle, N-S Paleogene normal faults oblique to the margin. However, significant differences also occur along the strike of the collisional margin, with major contrasts in uplift and subsidence north and south of lat. 41°.7, i.e. the region overlying the southern termination of the Hikurangi slab. These differences are highlighted by present day hydrographic anomalies in the Buller region, and by the pattern of filtered topography at > 75 km wavelength. Our data show that the 3D geometry of the Australian plate cannot be entirely attributed to inherited crustal heterogeneity of a flexured "retro-foreland" domain in the footwall of the Alpine Fault, and suggest the need of deeper dynamic interaction between the Pacific and Australian lithosphere along the subduction-collision margin.

  12. Digital Database of Recently Active Traces of the Hayward Fault, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lienkaemper, James J.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this map is to show the location of and evidence for recent movement on active fault traces within the Hayward Fault Zone, California. The mapped traces represent the integration of the following three different types of data: (1) geomorphic expression, (2) creep (aseismic fault slip),and (3) trench exposures. This publication is a major revision of an earlier map (Lienkaemper, 1992), which both brings up to date the evidence for faulting and makes it available formatted both as a digital database for use within a geographic information system (GIS) and for broader public access interactively using widely available viewing software. The pamphlet describes in detail the types of scientific observations used to make the map, gives references pertaining to the fault and the evidence of faulting, and provides guidance for use of and limitations of the map. [Last revised Nov. 2008, a minor update for 2007 LiDAR and recent trench investigations; see version history below.

  13. A new neural networks approach to on-line fault section estimation using information of protective relays and circuit breakers

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H.T.; Chang, W.Y.; Huang, C.L. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    This paper proposes a new Neural Networks Diagnostic System for on-line fault section estimation using information of relays and circuit breakers. This system has similar profile of an expert system, but can be constructed much more easily from elemental samples. These samples associate fault section with its primary, local and/or remote protective relays and breakers. The diagnostic system can be applicable to the power system control center for single or multiple fault sections estimation, even in the cases of failure operation of relay and breaker, or error-existent data transmission. The proposed approach has been practically verified by testing on a model power system. The test results, although preliminary, suggest the system can be implemented by various electric utilities with relatively low customization effort.

  14. Epistemic fault lines in biomedical and social approaches to HIV prevention

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This paper raises the question of how knowledge creation is organized in the area of HIV prevention and how this concatenation of expertise, resources, at-risk people and viruses shapes the knowledge used to impede the epidemic. It also seeks to trouble the discourses of biomedical pre-eminence in the field of HIV prevention by examining the claim for treatment as prevention, looking at evidence constructed through the biomedical frame and through the lens of the sociology of science. These questions lie within a larger socio-historical context of lagging worldwide attention and funding to prevention in the HIV area and, in particular, neglect of populations at greatest risk. Much contemporary HIV prevention research relies on a population science divided over an epistemic fault line from the communities and individuals who must make sense of the intrusion of a life-threatening disease into their pursuit of pleasure and intimacy. There are, nevertheless, lessons to be learned from prevention success stories among sex workers, injection drug users, and gay and bisexual men. The success stories point to a need for a robust social science agenda that examines: the ways that people are socially organized and networked; the popular strategies and folk wisdoms developed in the face of HIV risk; socio-historical movement of sexual and drug cultures; the dynamics of popular mobilization to advance health; the institutional sources of HIV discourses; and popular understandings of HIV technologies and messages. PMID:21968038

  15. The mechanism of post-rift fault activities in Baiyun sag, Pearl River Mouth basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhen; Xu, Ziying; Sun, Longtao; Pang, Xiong; Yan, Chengzhi; Li, Yuanping; Zhao, Zhongxian; Wang, Zhangwen; Zhang, Cuimei

    2014-08-01

    Post-rift fault activities were often observed in deepwater basins, which have great contributions to oil and gas migration and accumulation. The main causes for post-rift fault activities include tectonic events, mud or salt diapirs, and gravitational collapse. In the South China Sea continental margin, post-rift fault activities are widely distributed, especially in Baiyun sag, one of the largest deepwater sag with its main body located beneath present continental slope. During the post-rift stage, large population of faults kept active for a long time from 32 Ma (T70) till 5.5 Ma (T10). Seismic interpretation, fault analysis and analogue modeling experiments indicate that the post-rift fault activities in Baiyun sag between 32 Ma (T70) and 13.8 Ma (T30) was mainly controlled by gravity pointing to the Main Baiyun sag, which caused the faults extensive on the side facing Main Baiyun sag and the back side compressive. Around 32 Ma (T70), the breakup of the continental margin and the spreading of the South China Sea shed a combined effect of weak compression toward Baiyun sag. The gravity during post-rift stage might be caused by discrepant subsidence and sedimentation between strongly thinned sag center and wing areas. This is supported by positive relationship between sedimentation rate and fault growth index. After 13.8 Ma (T30), fault activity shows negative relationship with sedimentation rate. Compressive uplift and erosion in seismic profiles as well as negative tectonic subsiding rates suggest that the fault activity from 13.8 Ma (T30) to 5.5 Ma (T10) might be controlled by the subductive compression from the Philippine plate in the east.

  16. Paleoseismology of latest Pleistocene and Holocene fault activity in central Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Pezzopane, S.K.; Weldon, R.J. II . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Latest Pleistocene and Holocene fault activity in Oregon concentrates along four zones that splay northward from seismically active faults along the Central Nevada and Eastern California seismic zones. The Central Oregon fault zone is one of these zones, which splays northward from dextral faults of the Walker Lane, stretching across the flanks of several ranges in south-central Oregon along a N20[degree]W trend, and ultimately merges with the Cascade volcanic arc near Newberry volcano. Aerial-photo interpretations and field investigations reveal fault scarps with, on average about 4 m, but in places as much as [approximately]10 m of vertical expression across latest Pleistocene pluvial lake deposits and geomorphic surfaces. Trenches across three different faults in the Central Oregon zone reveal evidence for multiple episodes of faulting in the form of fault-related colluvial deposits and deformed horizons which have been cut by younger fault movements. Trench exposures reveal faults with relatively steep dips and anastomosing traces, which are interpreted locally as evidence for a small oblique-slip component. Vertical offsets measured in the trenches are [approximately]2 m or more for each event. Radiocarbon analyses and preliminary tephra correlations indicate that the exposed deposits are [approximately]30,000 yr in age and younger, and record the decline of latest Pleistocene pluvial lakes. Commonly, reworked or deformed lacustrine deposits and interlayered and faulted colluvial deposits mark the second and third events back, which probably occurred in the Latest Pleistocene, at a time during low to moderate lake levels. If offsets of the past 18,000 yr are representative of the long-term average, then faults along this zone have slip rates of from 0.2 mm/yr to 0.6 mm/yr and recurrence intervals that range from [approximately]4,000 yr to 11,000 yr.

  17. Architectural evolution of the Nojima fault and identification of the activated slip layer by Kobe earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hidemi; Omura, Kentaro; Matsuda, Tatsuo; Ikeda, Ryuji; Kobayashi, Kenta; Murakami, Masaki; Shimada, Koji

    2007-07-01

    Evolutionary history of Nojima Fault zone is clarified by comprehensive examinations of petrological, geophysical, and geochemical characterizations on a fault zone in deep-drilled core penetrating the Nojima Fault. On the basis of the results, we reconstruct a whole depth profile of the architecture of the Nojima Fault and identify the primal slip layer activated by 1995 Kobe earthquake. The deepest part (8- to 12-km depth) of the fault zone is composed of thin slip layers of pseudotachylite (5 to 10 mm thick each, 10 cm in total). Middle depth (4- to 8-km depth) of the fault zone is composed of fault core (6 to 10 m thick), surrounded by thick (100 m thick) damage zone, characterized by zeolite precipitation. The shallow part of the fault zone (1- to 4-km depth) is composed of distributed narrow shear zones, which are characterized by combination of thin (0.5 cm thick each, 10 cm in total) ultracataclasite layers at the core of shear zones, surrounded by thicker (1 to 3 m thick) damage zones associated with carbonate precipitation. An extremely thin ultracataclasite layer (7 mm thick), activated by the 1995 Kobe earthquake, is clearly identified from numerous past slip layers, overprinting one of the shear zones, as evidenced by conspicuous geological and geophysical anomalies. The Nojima Fault zone was 10 to 100 times thicker at middle depth than that of shallower and deeper depths. The thickening would be explained as a combination of physical and chemical effects as follows. (1) Thickening of "fault core" at middle depth would be attributed to normal stress dependence on thickness of the shear zone and (2) an extreme thickening of "damage zone" in middle depth of the crust would result from the weakening of the fault zone due to super hydrostatic fluid pressure at middle depths. The high fluid pressure would result from faster sealing with low-temperature carbonate at the shallower fault zone.

  18. Determination of paleoseismic activity over a large time-scale: Fault scarp dating with 36Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozafari Amiri, Nasim; Tikhomirov, Dmitry; Sümer, Ökmen; Özkaymak, Çaǧlar; Uzel, Bora; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Vockenhuber, Christof; Sözbilir, Hasan; Akçar, Naki

    2016-04-01

    Bedrock fault scarps are the most direct evidence of past earthquakes to reconstruct seismic activity in a large time-scale using cosmogenic 36Cl dating if built in carbonates. For this method, a surface along the fault scarp with a minimum amount of erosion is required to be chosen as an ideal target point. The section of the fault selected for sampling should cover at least two meters of the fault surface from the lower part of the scarp, where intersects with colluvium wedge. Ideally, sampling should be performed on a continuous strip along the direction of the fault slip direction. First, samples of 10 cm high and 15 cm wide are marked on the fault surface. Then, they are collected using cutters, hammer and chisel in a thickness of 3 cm. The main geometrical factors of scarp dip, scarp height, top surface dip and colluvium dip are also measured. Topographic shielding in the sampling spot is important to be estimated as well. Moreover, density of the fault scarp and colluvium are calculated. The physical and chemical preparations are carried in laboratory for AMS and chemical analysis of the samples. A Matlab® code is used for modelling of seismically active periods based on increasing production rate of 36Cl following each rupture, when a buried section of a fault is exposed. Therefore, by measuring the amount of cosmogenic 36Cl versus height, the timing of major ruptures and their offsets are determined. In our study, Manastır, Mugırtepe and Rahmiye faults in Gediz graben, Priene-Sazlı, Kalafat and Yavansu faults in Büyük Menderes graben and Ören fault in Gökava half-graben have been examined in the seismically active region of Western Turkey. Our results reconstruct at least five periods of high seismic activity during the Holocene time, three of which reveal seismic ruptures beyond the historical pre-existing data.

  19. Active emergent thrust associated with a detachment fold: A case study of the eastern boundary fault of Takada plain, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, N.; Ishiyama, T.; Sato, H.; Saito, H.; Kurashimo, E.; Abe, S.

    2012-04-01

    To estimate seismic hazards, understanding the relationship between active fault and seismic source fault is crucial. Along the Japan Sea coast of Northern Honshu, Japan, thick sediments, deposited in the Miocene rift-grabens, formed fold-and-thrust belt, due to the shortening deformation since the Pliocene time. Most of the thrusts are active and show clear geomorphological evidences. Some of the thrusts are secondary faults, produced by the folding of competent layers. To elucidate the relationship between an emergent thrust and deep-sited seismogenic source fault, we performed shallow high-resolution seismic reflection profiling across the eastern boundary fault of the Takada plain, central Japan. Based on the moropho-tectonic data, the vertical slip rate of the Eastern boundary fault of the Takada plain is 0.9 mm/y and has potential to produce M7.2 earthquake (AIST, 2006). For shallow structure, we obtained CMP-seismic reflection data from a 7-km-long seismic line, using 541 channels of off-line recorders. Seismic source was an Envirovibe (IVI). Receiver and shot intervals are 12.5 m and seismic signals were recorded by fixed channels. Shallow seismic data were acquired as a piggy-bag project of 70 km-long onshore-offshore deep seismic profiling. High-resolution seismic section portrays the emergent thrust, dipping to the east at about 30 degrees. The hanging wall consist Pliocene interbedded mudstone and sandstone and deeper extension of the thrust can be traced down to the Miocene mudstone of the Teradoamri Formation as a low-angle fault. In the Niigata basin, the lower part of the Teradomari Formation is known as over pressured mudstone and shallow detachments are commonly developed in this unit. Based on the deep seismic section, including velocity profile obtained by refraction tomography, deep sited fault does not connect to the shallow active fault directly.

  20. Finding concealed active faults: Extending the southern Whidbey Island fault across the Puget Lowland, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrod, Brian L.; Blakely, Richard J.; Weaver, Craig S.; Kelsey, Harvey M.; Barnett, Elizabeth; Liberty, Lee; Meagher, Karen L.; Pape, Kristin

    2008-05-01

    The southern Whidbey Island fault zone (SWIF), as previously mapped using borehole data, potential field anomalies, and marine seismic reflection surveys, consists of three subparallel, northwest trending strands extending ˜100 km from near Vancouver Island to the northern Puget Lowland. East of Puget Sound, the SWIF makes landfall between the cities of Seattle and Everett but is concealed beneath a thick mantle of young glacial deposits and vegetation. A ˜20-km-wide, northwest trending swath of subparallel, low-amplitude aeromagnetic anomalies crosses this region of the Puget Lowland and is on strike with the SWIF. The most prominent aeromagnetic anomaly, the Cottage Lake lineament, extends at least 18 km and lies approximately on strike with the SWIF on Whidbey Island. Subtle scarps and topographic lineaments on Pleistocene surfaces, visible on high-resolution lidar topography at a number of locations along the SWIF, lie on or near these magnetic anomalies. In the field, scarps exhibit northeast-side-up and vertical relief of 1 to 5 m. Excavations across several lidar scarps lying on or near magnetic anomalies show evidence for multiple folding and faulting events since deglaciation, most likely above buried reverse/oblique faults. Excavations in areas away from magnetic anomalies do not show evidence of tectonic deformation. In total, paleoseismological evidence suggests that the SWIF produced at least four earthquakes since deglaciation about 16,400 years ago, the most recent less than 2700 years ago.

  1. Geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of fault gouge in the Median Tectonic Line, Japan: evidence for earthquake slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Hirono, Tetsuro; Matsuta, Noriko; Kawamoto, Kazuro; Fujimoto, Koichiro; Kameda, Jun; Nishio, Yoshiro; Maekawa, Yuka; Honda, Go

    2014-12-01

    We carried out geochemical and mineralogical analyses on fault-zone rocks from the Anko section of the Median Tectonic Line in Nagano Prefecture, Japan, to investigate coseismic physicochemical processes in the fault zone. The latest fault zone in the Anko section contains cataclasite, fault breccia, and fault gouge of granitic composition, and brecciated basic schist. Protoliths of the granitic composition are from the Ryoke metamorphic belt and those of the basic schist from the Sambagawa metamorphic belt. X-ray diffraction analyses show a selective decrease of clay minerals coupled with an increase of amorphous phase in an intensely deformed layer of black gouge (5- to 10-cm thick). SEM observation reveals that the black gouge is characterized by a drastic reduction of grain size and abundant ultrafine particles of submicrometer to several tens of nanometers with well-rounded spheroidal shapes. These observations for the black gouge are indicative of strong mineral lattice distortion and granulation associated with earthquake slip. Geochemically, the black gouge is characterized by distinctly higher Li content and 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratio than surrounding cataclasites, breccias, and gouges, which have similar major element compositions. Model analysis reveals that the trace element composition of the black gouge is consistent with high-temperature (up to 250°C) coseismic fluid-rock interactions. Thermal and kinetic constraints indicate that there have been repeated slips on the fault at moderate depths (e.g., 600 m), although the tectonic process by which the fault zone has been uplifted and exposed in this area is not well understood.

  2. Late Quaternary Activity on the Cerro Goden Fault, Puerto Rico and Limitations of High-resolution Seismic Reflection/refraction Data for Trench-scale Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachariasen, J.; Prentice, C. S.; Schweig, E.; Abreu, R.; Rymer, M. J.; Catchings, R. D.

    2005-12-01

    The Cerro Goden Fault runs along the base of the La Cadena de San Francisco range north of Añasco in western Puerto Rico, and joins with the Great Southern Puerto Rico Fault zone. This fault zone disrupts Eocene and older rocks but its Quaternary history is unclear. It bounds the northern Añasco Valley, which is seismically active. Offshore investigations suggest the fault cuts the sea floor (Grindlay et al., 2005) and an onshore reconnaissance study by Mann et al. (2005) found geomorphic evidence of Quaternary displacement. We gathered high-resolution seismic reflection/refraction data along two lines that crossed the projection of the fault in the Añasco Valley to help identify possible fault strands in the near subsurface. The seismic data were gathered using a shoot-through acquisition method with a BETSY-Seisgun shooting source consisting of 8-gauge, 400 grain shotgun blanks set in holes drilled about 30 cm below the ground surface. Both lines had shot and geophone spacings of 5 m. Common Depth Point (CDP) spacings for both lines were 2.5 m in the shallow section of the profiles. We used the results from the seismic lines to site six trenches where the data revealed discontinuities, possibly attributable to faulting, within the upper 2-3 meters. Our trenches ranged in depth from 2 - 5 meters, but in none of the trenches did we find evidence of surface faulting. A mountain-front-facing subsurface scarp, which may have been produced by older Quaternary faulting, appeared in several trenches. Holocene fluvial sediments have been deposited against this scarp and have buried it, but are unfaulted. Our results suggest either that the Cerro Goden Fault has not been active since the deposition of the Holocene fluvial sediments or that the high-resolution seismic data were not adequate to define the location of fault traces to the precision necessary for trench investigations. Both the seismic data and the buried scarps suggest there may be faults at depth, but

  3. High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Studies of Active Faults: a Case Study from Washington State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberty, L. M.; Pratt, T. L.

    2007-12-01

    In the past five years, new high-resolution seismic surveys have filled in gaps in our understanding of active structures beneath the Puget Lowland region of Washington State. The extensive forests have made recognition of active faults difficult, but new Light Distance and Ranging (LIDAR) detailed topographic data have made a major breakthrough in mapping active faults. Extensive regional and high-resolution marine seismic surveys have been fundamental to understanding the tectonic framework of the area. These marine profiles, however, lack coverage beneath water bodies that large ships cannot navigate and beneath city streets underlain by late Pleistocene glacial deposits that are missing from the waterways. Recent land surveys and profiles in restricted waterways can therefore bridge the gap between paleoseismic and marine geophysical studies, and test elements of models proposed by regional-scale geophysical studies. We have also been venturing into more congested areas to seismically image faults in key urban locations. Results from recent surveys have: 1) documented new faults that had long been suspected in the Olympia area; 2) clarified the relationship between the LIDAR scarps and observed structures across the Tacoma fault zone; 3) provided a window into structures beneath the north and eastern portions of the western Tacoma fault zone; 4) documented deformation along the Seattle fault near a paleoseismic trench; 5) mapped the eastern part the Seattle fault zone beyond its previously mapped limits; and 6) documented multiple fault strands in the Seattle fault zone in the cities of Bellevue and Seattle. The results better constrain interpretations of paleoseismic data collected on these faults, and provide targets for future paleoseismic studies.

  4. Structure and paleoearthquake records of active submarine faults, Cook Strait, New Zealand: Implications for fault interactions, stress loading, and seismic hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pondard, Nicolas; Barnes, Philip M.

    2010-12-01

    A new interpretation of active faulting in central Cook Strait, New Zealand, reveals tectonic structures associated with the spatial transition from subduction to continental transform faulting. Marine seismic reflection profiles and multibeam bathymetric data indicate that there are no throughgoing crustal faults connecting the North Island Dextral Fault Belt and the Marlborough Fault System in South Island. The major faults terminate offshore, associated with 5-20 km wide step-overs and a change in regional fault strike. This structure implies that propagation of strike-slip earthquake ruptures across the strait is not probable. Faulted sedimentary sequences in the Wairau Basin (Marlborough shelf), correlated to glacioeustatic sea level cycles, provide a stratigraphic framework for fault analysis. A high-resolution study of the postglacial (<20 ka) vertical displacement history of the Cloudy and Vernon faults reveals up to six and five paleoearthquakes since 18 ka, respectively. These long-timescale records indicate variable recurrence intervals and possibly variable stress drop, thus conforming to the variable slip model of earthquake behavior. Integration of these data with other submarine and terrestrial paleoearthquake records indicates the presence of clustered earthquake sequences involving multiple faults. Different sequences do not always involve the same faults. It appears that earthquake clustering is driven by fault interactions that lead to specific loading conditions favoring the triggering of earthquakes on major faults in relatively short time intervals. Present-day regional Coulomb stress distribution has been calculated in two scenarios considered to represent minimum and maximum loading conditions. The models, incorporating secular tectonic loading and stress changes associated with major crustal earthquakes, indicate high stress loading in a large part of central Cook Strait. These conditions may favor the triggering of future damaging

  5. Study of Stand-Alone Microgrid under Condition of Faults on Distribution Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malla, S. G.; Bhende, C. N.

    2014-10-01

    The behavior of stand-alone microgrid is analyzed under the condition of faults on distribution feeders. During fault since battery is not able to maintain dc-link voltage within limit, the resistive dump load control is presented to do so. An inverter control is proposed to maintain balanced voltages at PCC under the unbalanced load condition and to reduce voltage unbalance factor (VUF) at load points. The proposed inverter control also has facility to protect itself from high fault current. Existing maximum power point tracker (MPPT) algorithm is modified to limit the speed of generator during fault. Extensive simulation results using MATLAB/SIMULINK established that the performance of the controllers is quite satisfactory under different fault conditions as well as unbalanced load conditions.

  6. Active displacements recorded along major fault systems in caves (Eastern Alps, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrovic, Ivanka; Plan, Lukas; Baron, Ivo; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Seismic data and GPS observations suggest that several major tectonic fault systems in the Eastern Alps are still active. However, direct geological evidences for recent movements along individual fault systems are rather scarce and limited to local observations in the Vienna Basin. Recently, tectonically damaged speleothems have been described from a cave close to the Salzach Ennstal Mariazeller Puchberger (SEMP) strike-slip fault, which accommodated the lateral extrusion of the Eastern Alps towards the Pannonian Basin. The project SPELEOTECT investigates the Quaternary tectonic activity and recent dynamics of micro-displacements along major fault systems of the Eastern Alps recorded in caves. The work focuses on cave passages, which have been displaced by active faulting and on speleothems, which have been damaged by fault movements. In order to bracket the tectonic events, flowstones, which have grown before and after the tectonic event are dated using the U-series disequilibrium method. For the reconstruction of the local stress field during (re)activation of the faults, the paleostress and the active stress field will be calculated from the fault-slip data of the recent micro-dislocations monitored with high-accuracy 3D crack-gauges. Cataclasites and fault gouges from sheared flowstones are investigated with high-resolution electron beam analytical techniques in order to characterize the microstructures caused by various deformation mechanisms within principal slip surfaces. Cathodoluminescense images are combined with electron backscattered diffraction maps in order to discriminating between fault displacements caused by seismic slip or aseismic creep. The major aim of SPELEOTECT is the record of a solid and broad data base of the paleoseismic record of the Eastern Alps for regional earthquake hazard assessment.

  7. Fault and graben growth along active magmatic divergent plate boundaries in Iceland and Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippanera, D.; Acocella, V.; Ruch, J.; Abebe, B.

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies highlight the importance of annual-scale dike-induced rifting episodes in developing normal faults and graben along the active axis of magmatic divergent plate boundaries (MDPB). However, the longer-term (102-105 years) role of diking on the cumulative surface deformation and evolution of MDPB is not yet well understood. To better understand the longer-term normal faults and graben along the axis of MDPB, we analyze fissure swarms in Iceland and Ethiopia. We first focus on the simplest case of immature fissure swarms, with single dike-fed eruptive fissures; these consist of a <1 km wide graben bordered by normal faults with displacement up to a few meters, consistent with theoretical models and geodetic data. A similar structural pattern is found, with asymmetric and multiple graben, within wider mature fissure swarms, formed by several dike-fed eruptive fissures. We then consider the lateral termination of normal faults along these grabens to detect their upward or downward propagation. Most faults terminate as open fractures on flat surface, suggesting downward fault propagation; this is consistent with recent experiments showing dike-induced normal faults propagating downward from the surface. However, some normal faults also terminate as open fractures on monoclines, which resemble fault propagation folds; this suggests upward propagation of reactivated buried faults, promoted by diking. These results suggest that fault growth and graben development, as well as the longer-term evolution of the axis of MDPB, may be explained only through dike emplacement and that any amagmatic faulting is not necessary.

  8. Geomorphic features of active faults around the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, and no evidence of surface rupture associated with the 2015 Gorkha earthquake along the faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumahara, Yasuhiro; Chamlagain, Deepak; Upreti, Bishal Nath

    2016-04-01

    The M7.8 April 25, 2015, Gorkha earthquake in Nepal was produced by a slip on the low-angle Main Himalayan Thrust, a décollement below the Himalaya that emerges at the surface in the south as the Himalayan Frontal Thrust (HFT). The analysis of the SAR interferograms led to the interpretations that the event was a blind thrust and did not produce surface ruptures associated with the seismogenic fault. We conducted a quick field survey along four active faults near the epicentral area around the Kathmandu Valley (the Jhiku Khola fault, Chitlang fault, Kulekhani fault, Malagiri fault and Kolphu Khola fault) from July 18-22, 2015. Those faults are located in the Lesser Himalaya on the hanging side of the HFT. Based on our field survey carried out in the area where most typical tectonic landforms are developed, we confirmed with local inhabitants the lack of any new surface ruptures along these faults. Our observations along the Jhiku Khola fault showed that the fault had some definite activities during the Holocene times. Though in the past it was recognized as a low-activity thrust fault, our present survey has revealed that it has been active with a predominantly right-lateral strike-slip with thrust component. A stream dissecting a talus surface shows approximately 7-m right-lateral offset, and a charcoal sample collected from the upper part of the talus deposit yielded an age of 870 ± 30 y.B.P, implying that the talus surface formed close to 870 y.B.P. Accordingly, a single or multiple events of the fault must have occurred during the last 900 years, and the slip rate we estimate roughly is around 8 mm/year. The fault may play a role to recent right-lateral strike-slip tectonic zone across the Himalayan range. Since none of the above faults showed any relationship corresponding to the April 25 Gorkha earthquake, it is possibility that a potential risk of occurrence of large earthquakes does exist close to the Kathmandu Valley due to movements of these active

  9. Active fault tolerant control of a flexible beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yuanqiang; Grigoriadis, Karolos M.; Song, Gangbing

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents the development and application of an H∞ fault detection and isolation (FDI) filter and fault tolerant controller (FTC) for smart structures. A linear matrix inequality (LMI) formulation is obtained to design the full order robust H∞ filter to estimate the faulty input signals. A fault tolerant H∞ controller is designed for the combined system of plant and filter which minimizes the control objective selected in the presence of disturbances and faults. A cantilevered flexible beam bonded with piezoceramic smart materials, in particular the PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate), in the form of a patch is used in the validation of the FDI filter and FTC controller design. These PZT patches are surface-bonded on the beam and perform as actuators and sensors. A real-time data acquisition and control system is used to record the experimental data and to implement the designed FDI filter and FTC. To assist the control system design, system identification is conducted for the first mode of the smart structural system. The state space model from system identification is used for the H∞ FDI filter design. The controller was designed based on minimization of the control effort and displacement of the beam. The residuals obtained from the filter through experiments clearly identify the fault signals. The experimental results of the proposed FTC controller show its e effectiveness for the vibration suppression of the beam for the faulty system when the piezoceramic actuator has a partial failure.

  10. Results From NICLAKES Survey of Active Faulting Beneath Lake Nicaragua, Central American Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, J.; Mann, P.; McIntosh, K.; Wulf, S.; Dull, R.; Perez, P.; Strauch, W.

    2006-12-01

    In May of 2006 we used a chartered ferry boat to collect 520 km of seismic data, 886 km of 3.5 kHz subbottom profiler data, and 35 cores from Lake Nicaragua. The lake covers an area of 7700 km2 within the active Central American volcanic arc, forms the largest lake in Central America, ranks as the twentieth largest freshwater lake in the world, and has never been previously surveyed or cored in a systematic manner. Two large stratovolcanoes occupy the central part of the lake: Concepcion is presently active, Maderas was last active less than 2000 years ago. Four zones of active faulting and doming of the lake floor were mapped with seismic and 3.5 kHz subbottom profiling. Two of the zones consist of 3-5-km-wide, 20-30-km-long asymmetric rift structures that trend towards the inactive cone of Maderas Volcano in a radial manner. The northeastern rift forms a 20-27-m deep depression on the lake bottom that is controlled by a north-dipping normal fault. The southwestern rift forms a 25-35-m deep depression controlled by a northeast-dipping normal fault. Both depressions contain mound-like features inferred to be hydrothermal deposits. Two zones of active faulting are associated with the active Concepcion stratovolcano. A 600-m-wide and 6-km-long fault bounded horst block extends westward beneath the lake from a promontory on the west side of the volcano. Like the two radial rift features of Maderas, the horst points roughly towards the active caldera of Concepcion. A second north-south zone of active faulting, which also forms a high, extends off the north coast of Concepcion and corresponds to a localized zone of folding and faulting mapped by previous workers and inferred by them to have formed by gravitational spreading of the flank of the volcano. The close spatial relation of these faults to the two volcanic cones in the lake suggests that the mechanism for faulting is a result of either crustal movements related to magma intrusion or gravitational sliding and is

  11. Mapping Active Faults and Tectonic Geomorphology offshore central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. Y.; Watt, J. T.; Hart, P. E.; Sliter, R. W.; Wong, F. L.

    2009-12-01

    In June 2008, and July 2009, the USGS conducted two high-resolution, marine, seismic-reflection surveys across the continental shelf and upper slope between Piedras Blancas and Point Sal, central California, in order to better characterize regional earthquake sources. More than 1,300 km of single-channel seismic data were acquired aboard the USGS R/V Parke Snavely using a 500-joule mini-sparker source fired at a 0.5-second shot interval and recorded with a 15-meter streamer. Most tracklines were run perpendicular to the coast at 800-meter spacing, extending from the nearshore (~ 10-15 m water depth) to as far as 20 km offshore. Sub-bottom imaging varies with substrate, ranging from outstanding (100 to 150 m of penetration) in inferred Quaternary shallow marine, shelf and upper slope deposits to poor (0 to 10 m) in the Mesozoic basement rocks. Marine magnetic data were collected simultaneously on this survey, and both data sets are being integrated with new aeromagnetic data, publicly available industry seismic-reflection data, onshore geology, seismicity, and high-resolution bathymetry. Goals of the study are to map geology, structure, and sediment distribution; to document fault location, length, segmentation, shallow geometry and structure; and to identify possible sampling targets for constraining fault slip rates, earthquake recurrence, and tsunami hazard potential. The structure and tectonic geomorphology of the >100-km-long, right-lateral, Hosgri fault zone and its connections to the Los Osos, Pecho, Oceano and other northwest-trending inboard faults are the focus of this ongoing work. The Hosgri fault forms the eastern margin of the offshore Santa Maria basin and coincides in places with the outer edge of the narrow (5- to 15-km-wide), structurally complex continental shelf. The Hosgri is imaged as a relatively continuous, vertical fault zone that extends upward to the seafloor; varies significantly and rapidly along strike; and incorporates numerous

  12. Distribution of fault activity in the early stages of continental breakup: an analysis of faults and volcanic products of the Natron Basin, East African Rift, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muirhead, J. D.; Kattenhorn, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Recent magmatic-tectonic crises in Ethiopia (e.g. 2005 Dabbahu rifting episode, Afar) have informed our understanding of the spatial and temporal distribution of strain in magmatic rifts transitioning to sea-floor spreading. However, the evolving contributions of magmatic and tectonic processes during the initial stages of rifting, is a subject of ongoing debate. The <5 Ma northern Tanzania and southern Kenya sectors of the East Africa Rift provide ideal locations to address this problem. We present preliminary findings from an investigation of fault structures utilizing aerial photography and satellite imagery of the ~35 km wide Natron rift-basin in northern Tanzania. Broad-scale structural mapping will be supplemented by field observations and 40Ar-39Ar dating of lava flows cut by faults to address three major aspects of magma-assisted rifting: (1) the relative timing of activity between the border fault and smaller faults distributed across the width of the rift; (2) time-averaged slip rates along rift-zone faults; and (3) the spatial distribution of faults and volcanic products, and their relative contributions to strain accommodation. Preliminary field observations suggest that the ~500 m high border fault system along the western edge of the Natron basin is either inactive or has experienced a reduced slip rate and higher recurrence interval between surface-breaking events, as evidence by a lack of recent surface-rupture along the main fault escarpments. An exception is an isolated, ~2 km-long segment of the Natron border fault, which is located in close proximity (< 5km) to the active Oldoinyo Lengai volcano. Here, ~10 m of seemingly recent throw is observed in volcaniclastic deposits. The proximity of the fault segment to Oldoinyo Lengai volcano and the localized distribution of fault-slip are consistent with magma-assisted faulting. Faults observed within the Natron basin and on the flanks of Gelai volcano, located on the eastern side of the rift, have

  13. Intracontinental active normal faulting and paleoseismicity in the eastern Weihe Graben, central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, G.; Lin, A.; Yan, B.; Jia, D.; Wu, X.

    2012-12-01

    During the past decades, tectonic deformation and seismogenic behavior of active strike-slip and thrust faults have been well investigated, due to the high-frequent occurrence of large-magnitude strike-slip and thrust-type earthquakes. In contrast, normal-faulting earthquakes of M≥7 scarcely occurred, and the rupture process and deformation features of seismogenic normal-faults are still not clear. The intracontinental graben systems around the stable Ordos Block, central China, experienced extension over the past ~50 Ma, which are ideal places to study the extensional tectonic deformation. As well, these regions with high historical seismicity including 3 large earthquakes of M≥8, provide a good chance to learn the rupture mechanism of large intracontinental normal-faulting earthquakes. Based on the 3D analysis of high-resolution remote-sensing images (0.5-m WorldView and 1-m IKONOS images) and field investigations, active normal faults are mainly distributed along the margin zones of the uplifted mountainous blocks (e.g., Weinan Loess Tableland and Huashan Mountains), characterized by the distributed fault scarps. Striations and scratch steps observed on the main fault planes, reveal a normal slip-sense of active faults in study area. In combination with the 14C age dating, the vertical offset amount of ~30 m during the past 14,050-16,270 years was observed, yielding an average vertical displacement-rate of ~1.8-2.1 mm/a, which is consistent with previous estimation in the Weihe Graben. According to the field observations of fault outcrops and the exposed trench walls, the offset strata, scarp-derived colluvial deposits and in-filled fissures generally can be observed, indicating the occurrence of paleoearthquakes. Together with the 14C ages, the late Pleistocene-Holocene activity of normal faults was demonstrated. Especially, it is concluded that at least 3 strong earthquakes associated with surface-faulting in the past 2600 years, including the most recent

  14. On-line early fault detection and diagnosis of municipal solid waste incinerators.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinsong; Huang, Jianchao; Sun, Wei

    2008-11-01

    A fault detection and diagnosis framework is proposed in this paper for early fault detection and diagnosis (FDD) of municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs) in order to improve the safety and continuity of production. In this framework, principal component analysis (PCA), one of the multivariate statistical technologies, is used for detecting abnormal events, while rule-based reasoning performs the fault diagnosis and consequence prediction, and also generates recommendations for fault mitigation once an abnormal event is detected. A software package, SWIFT, is developed based on the proposed framework, and has been applied in an actual industrial MSWI. The application shows that automated real-time abnormal situation management (ASM) of the MSWI can be achieved by using SWIFT, resulting in an industrially acceptable low rate of wrong diagnosis, which has resulted in improved process continuity and environmental performance of the MSWI. PMID:18255276

  15. On-line early fault detection and diagnosis of municipal solid waste incinerators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Jinsong Huang Jianchao; Sun Wei

    2008-11-15

    A fault detection and diagnosis framework is proposed in this paper for early fault detection and diagnosis (FDD) of municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs) in order to improve the safety and continuity of production. In this framework, principal component analysis (PCA), one of the multivariate statistical technologies, is used for detecting abnormal events, while rule-based reasoning performs the fault diagnosis and consequence prediction, and also generates recommendations for fault mitigation once an abnormal event is detected. A software package, SWIFT, is developed based on the proposed framework, and has been applied in an actual industrial MSWI. The application shows that automated real-time abnormal situation management (ASM) of the MSWI can be achieved by using SWIFT, resulting in an industrially acceptable low rate of wrong diagnosis, which has resulted in improved process continuity and environmental performance of the MSWI.

  16. Earthquake mechanism studies by active-fault drilling: Chi-Chi Taiwan to Wenchuan earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togo, T.; Shimamoto, T.; Ma, S.; Noda, H.; Hirose, T.; Tanikawa, W.

    2010-12-01

    Why drill into active faults? How can such big projects be justified to society? We believe that a very important task for such projects is to understand earthquake mechanisms, i.e., to reproduce big earthquakes just occurred based on measured fault-zone properties. Post-earthquake fault-zone drilling provides rare opportunities for seeing and analyzing fault zones with minimum changes as “RAPID” group summarized its merits. Shallow and deep drilling into Chelungpu fault, that caused the 1999 Chi-Chi Taiwan earthquake, has demonstrated that reproducing an earthquake based on measured properties is becoming possible (Tanikawa and Shimamoto, 2009, JGR; Noda and Lapusta, 2009, JpGU). Another important outcome from Chelungpu drilling is finding of numerous changes in a fault zone during seismic fault motion (e.g., decomposition due to frictional heating), as highlighted by “black gouge” (many papers). Those changes can be reproduced now by high-velocity friction experiments. No so long ago, a renown geologist expressed his feeling that faults will not preserve a record of seismic slip, except for pseudotachylite (Cowan, 1999, JSG). In other words, seismic slip is of such a short duration that important changes, other than shearing deformation, will not occur in fault zones. Nojima and Chelungpu drilling has shown that this is not the case. On the other hand, seismic fault motion has been reproduced in laboratory for the last twenty years, demonstrating dramatic weakening of many natural fault gouges. We report here a set of data using fault gouge from Hongkou outcrop of Longmenshan fault system, very close to the first drilling site, under a constant slip rate and variable slip histories. Slip and velocity weakening behavior depends on slip history and can be described by an empirical equation. Importance of such experiments can be justified only by confirmation that the same processes indeed occur in natural fault zones. Integrated field and laboratory studies

  17. Recent high-resolution seismic reflection studies of active faults in the Puget Lowland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberty, L. M.; Pratt, T. L.

    2005-12-01

    In the past four years, new high-resolution seismic surveys have filled in key gaps in our understanding of active structures beneath the Puget Lowland, western Washington State. Although extensive regional and high-resolution marine seismic surveys have been fundamental to understanding the tectonic framework of the area, these marine profiles lack coverage on land and in shallow or restricted waterways. The recent high-resolution seismic surveys have targeted key structures beneath water bodies that large ships cannot navigate, and beneath city streets underlain by late Pleistocene glacial deposits that are missing from the waterways. The surveys can therefore bridge the gap between paleoseismic and marine geophysical studies, and test key elements of models proposed by regional-scale geophysical studies. Results from these surveys have: 1) documented several meters of vertical displacement on at least two separate faults in the Olympia area; 2) clarified the relationship between the Catfish Lake scarp and the underlying kink band in the Tacoma fault zone; 3) provided a first look at the structures beneath the north portion of the western Tacoma fault zone, north of previous marine profiles; 4) documented that deformation along the Seattle fault extends well east of Lake Sammamish; 5) imaged the Seattle fault beneath the Vasa Park trench; and 6) documented multiple fault strands in and south of the Seattle fault zone south of Bellevue. The results better constrain interpretations of paleoseismic investigations of past earthquakes on these faults, and provide targets for future paleoseismic studies.

  18. Active normal faulting along the Mt. Morrone south-western slopes (central Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, Stefano; Giaccio, Biagio; Galadini, Fabrizio; Falcucci, Emanuela; Messina, Paolo; Sposato, Andrea; Dramis, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    In the present work we analyse one of the active normal faults affecting the central Apennines, i.e. the Mt. Morrone normal fault system. This tectonic structure, which comprises two parallel, NW-SE trending fault segments, is considered as potentially responsible for earthquakes of magnitude ≥ 6.5 and its last activation probably occurred during the second century AD. Structural observations performed along the fault planes have allowed to define the mainly normal kinematics of the tectonic structure, fitting an approximately N 20° trending extensional deformation. Geological and geomorphological investigations performed along the whole Mt. Morrone south-western slopes permitted us to identify the displacement of alluvial fans, attributed to Middle and Late Pleistocene by means of tephro-stratigraphic analyses and geomorphological correlations with dated lacustrine sequences, along the western fault branch. This allowed to evaluate in 0.4 ± 0.07 mm/year the slip rate of this segment. On the other hand, the lack of synchronous landforms and/or deposits that can be correlated across the eastern fault segment prevented the definition of the slip rate related to this fault branch. Nevertheless, basing on a critical review of the available literature dealing with normal fault systems evolution, we hypothesised a total slip rate of the fault system in the range of 0.4 ± 0.07 to 0.8 ± 0.09 mm/year. Moreover, basing on the length at surface of the Mt. Morrone fault system (i.e. 22-23 km) we estimated the maximum expected magnitude of an earthquake that might originate along this tectonic structure in the order of 6.6-6.7.

  19. Geomorphological observations of active faults in the epicentral region of the Huaxian large earthquake in 1556 in Shaanxi Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jian-Jun; Han, Mu-Kang; Chai, Bao-Long; Han, Heng-Yue

    1998-05-01

    The Huaxian magnitude 8 great earthquake of January 23, 1556, is the largest one recorded in the Weihe basin, Shaanxi Province, China and caused 830,000 people either injury or death. The epicenter is located in the southeastern part of the Weihe basin, around Huaxian City. Earthquakes are closely related to active faults and active faults are well developed in the epicentral area of the Huaxian large earthquake. Thus we will discuss the activity of the major faults in the epicentral area by geomorphological observations. There are three major fault sets in the study area: striking approximately east-west, northeast and northwest. These are inhomogeneous in spatial distribution, rates and manners of faulting, as shown by geomorphological observations such as faulted fluvial terraces and alluvial fans. The ages of the second and first terraces are around 20,000 and 5,000 years B.P. by thermoluminescent dating, Carbon-14 dating and archeology. The terraces were faulted by the North Huashan fault (F 1), the main boundary fault of Weihe basin and the Piedmont fault (F 2) after the second and the first terraces formed. The distribution of the displacement shows that the intersections of the North Huashan fault and the Chishui fault (F 4) striking northwest, and the western margin fault (F 5) of Tongguan loess tableland, have the largest in offsets in the area. Perhaps the Huanxian great earthquake in 1556 A.D. had a close relation to the North Huashan fault. The Weihe fault (F 3) striking east-west is also an active fault by analysis of the flood plain structure. Thus we should pay attention to the activities of the faults to take precautions against another possible large earthquake in this region.

  20. Assessing fault activity in intracontinental settings: paleoseismology and geomorphology in SE Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grützner, Christoph; Carson, Emily; Mackenzie, David; Elliott, Austin; Campbell, Grace; Walker, Richard; Abdrakhmatov, Kanatbek

    2016-04-01

    Earthquake recurrence intervals of active faults often exceed the time span covered by instrumental, historical, and archaeological earthquake records in continental interiors. The identification of active faults then often relies on finding the geomorphological expression of surface faulting preserved in the landscape. In rather arid areas, single earthquake scarps can be preserved for thousands of years, but erosional and depositional processes will eventually obliterate features such as fault scarps and offset geological markers. Active faults with very long intervals between surface ruptures might therefore remain undetected, which constitutes a major problem for tectonic studies and seismic hazard assessment. Here we present data from the 50 km-long 'Charyn Canyon' thrust fault in the northern Tien Shan (SE Kazakhstan). Remote sensing, Structure-from-Motion (SfM), differential GPS, field mapping, and paleoseismic trenching were used to reveal the earthquake history of this fault. Radiocarbon dating, infra-red stimulated luminescence (IRSL), and scarp diffusion modelling were used for bracketing the occurrence of paleo-earthquakes. In the paleoseismological trenches we identified two surface rupturing events within the last ~37 ka BP. The most recent earthquake took place between 3.5 - 7.3 ka BP, the penultimate event occurred between ~17-37 ka BP. We estimate magnitudes of ~MW6.5-7.3. Only the younger event has a morphological expression as a 25 km-long fault scarp of ~2 m height. This implicates that a major landscape reset occurred between these two earthquakes, most likely related to the significant climatic change that marked the end of the last glacial maximum. Similar observations from other paleoseismic investigation sites in this area support this interpretation. Our study shows that faults in the northern Tien Shan tend to break in strong earthquakes with very long recurrence intervals. As a consequence, morphological evidence for the most recent

  1. Research program on Indonesian active faults to support the national earthquake hazard assesments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natawidjaja, D. H.

    2012-12-01

    In mid 2010 an Indonesian team of earthquake scientists published the new Indonesian probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) map. The new PSHA map replaced the previous version that is published in 2002. One of the major challenges in developing the new map is that data for many active fault zones in Indonesia is sparse and mapped only at regional scale, thus the input fault parameters for the PSHA introduce unavoidably large uncertainties. Despite the fact that most Indonesian islands are torn by active faults, only Sumatra has been mapped and studied in sufficient details. In other areas, such as Java and Bali, the most populated regions as well as in the east Indonesian region, where tectonic plate configurations are far more complex and relative plate motions are generally higher, many major active faults and plate boundaries are not well mapped and studied. In early 2011, we have initiated a research program to study major active faults in Indonesia together with starting a new graduate study program, GREAT (Graduate Research for Earthquake and Active Tectonics), hosted by ITB (Institute of Technology bandung) and LIPI (Indonesian Institute of Sciences) in partnership with the Australia-Indonesia Facility for Disaster Reduction (AIFDR). The program include acquisition of high-resolution topography and images required for detailed fault mapping, measuring geological slip rates and locating good sites for paleoseismological studies. It is also coupled by seismological study and GPS surveys to measure geodetic slip rates. To study submarine active faults, we collect and incorporate bathymetry and marine geophysical data. The research will be carried out, in part, through masters and Ph.D student theses. in the first four year of program we select several sites for active fault studies, particulary the ones that pose greater risks to society.

  2. Zipper Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, J. P.; Passchier, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    Intersecting simultaneously active pairs of faults with different orientations and opposing slip sense ("conjugate faults") present geometrical and kinematic problems. Such faults rarely offset each other, even when they have displacements of many km. A simple solution to the problem is that the two faults merge, either zippering up or unzippering, depending on the relationship between the angle of intersection and the slip senses. A widely recognized example of this is the so-called blind front developed in some thrust belts, where a backthrust branches off a decollement surface at depth. The decollement progressively unzippers, so that its hanging wall becomes the hanging wall of the backthrust, and its footwall becomes the footwall of the active decollement. The opposite situation commonly arises in core complexes, where conjugate low-angle normal faults merge to form a single detachment; in this case the two faults zipper up. Analogous situations may arise for conjugate pairs of strike-slip faults. We present kinematic and geometrical analyses of the Garlock and San Andreas faults in California, the Najd fault system in Saudi Arabia, the North and East Anatolian faults, the Karakoram and Altyn Tagh faults in Tibet, and the Tonale and Guidicarie faults in the southern Alps, all of which appear to have undergone zippering over distances of several tens to hundreds of km. The zippering process may produce complex and significant patterns of strain and rotation in the surrounding rocks, particularly if the angle between the zippered faults is large. A zippering fault may be inactive during active movement on the intersecting faults, or it may have a slip rate that differs from either fault. Intersecting conjugate ductile shear zones behave in the same way on outcrop and micro-scales.

  3. Late quaternary active characteristics and slip-rate of Pingding-Huama Fault, the eastern segment of Guanggaishan-Dieshan Fault zone ( West Qinlin Mountain )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jingxing, Y.; Wenjun, Z.; Daoyang, Y.; Jianzhang, P.; Xingwang, L.; Baiyun, L.

    2012-12-01

    Stretching along the west QinlinShan in the north Tibet, the Guanggaishan-Dieshanfaultis composed of three sub-parallel faults among which the major one is a fault named Pingding-Huama fault. The Pingding-Huama fault can be further defined as a combination of a western segment and an eastern segment separated by Minjiang river at Dangchang. Along the western segment of the Pingding-Huama fault, significant linear characteristics, scars, and fault scarps cutting several alluvial fans can be easily distinguished, indicating that the western segment is active since the late Quatenary and the elapsed time of the last event should be less than 1ka B.P.. We estimated the slip rates of the western segment through geomorphology analysis and dating the age of the top surface of terraces and the deformed strata (OSL, 14C). The results show that its reverse slip rate ranges from 0.69±0.16 to 1.15±0.28mm/a and the sinistral slip rate is 0.51±0.13mm/a. In contrast to the simple structure of the western segment, the eastern segment consists of several sub-parallel faults as well as oblique intersected faults. On all faults of the eastern segment, no sign of recent movement was discovered. Along these faults, the tectonic topography features a sequence of linear valleys in the west and dominant folds in the east. Only striations in bedrock and geomorphology show that the eastern segment was reversely slipping on the whole with sinistral component. In summary, at present the Pingding-Huama fault is active along its western segment while shows very weak deformation along the eastern segment.

  4. Active fault creep variations at Chihshang, Taiwan, revealed by creep meter monitoring, 1998-2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jian-Cheng; Angelier, Jacques; Chu, Hao-Tsu; Hu, Jyr-Ching; Jeng, Fu-Shu; Rau, Ruey-Juin

    2003-11-01

    The daily creep meter data recorded at Chihshang in 1998-2001 are presented. The Chihshang creep meter experiment was set up across the Chihshang thrust fault, the most active segment of the Longitudinal Valley Fault, which is the present-day plate suture between the Eurasian and the Philippine Sea plates in eastern Taiwan. Near-continuous data recording at two sites revealed different surface fault motions yet similar annual shortening rates: 16.2 mm at the Tapo site (comprising two connected creep meters) and 15.0 mm at the Chinyuan site (three creep meters straddling parallel fault branches). Four of the five creep meters showed a seasonal variation, with the fault moving steadily during the rainy season from April to October, and remaining quiescent during the rest of the year. The only exception was recorded by the creep meter located on a mélange-composed hillslope, where local gravitational landsliding played an additional role other than tectonic faulting. Through comparison with daily precipitation data, we inferred that moderate rainfall suffices to trigger or facilitate slippage on the surface fault, during the transition period of the dry/wet season. During the observation period from 1998 to 2001, the subsurface seismicity exhibited clusters of microearthquakes on the Chihshang Fault at depths of 10-25 km. Recurrent earthquakes occurred regardless of whether the season was wet or dry, indicating that the stress relaxation associated with seismicity in the seismogenic zone did not transfer immediately up to the surface. The accumulated strain on the Chihshang Fault at shallow surface levels was released through creep during the wet season. In addition to these short-term seasonal variations, an apparent decrease in the annual slipping rate on the Chihshang Fault during the last few years deserves further investigation in order to mitigate against seismic hazard.

  5. Evidence of a major fault zone along the California-Nevada state line 35 deg 30 min to 36 deg 30 min north latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liggett, M. A.; Childs, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Geologic reconnaissance guided by analysis of ERTS-1 and Apollo-9 satellite imagery and intermediate scale photography from X-15 and U-2 aircraft has confirmed the presence of a major fault zone along the California-Nevada state line, between 35 deg 30 min and 36 deg 30 min north latitude. The name Pahrump Fault Zone has been suggested for this feature after the valley in which it is best exposed. Field reconnaissance has indicated the existence of previously unreported faults cutting bedrock along range fronts, and displacing Tertiary and Quaternary basin sediments. Gravity data support the interpretation of regional structural discontinuity along this zone. Individual fault traces within the Pahrump Fault Zone form generally left-stepping en echelon patterns. These fault patterns, the apparent offset of a Laramide age thrust fault, and possible drag folding along a major fault break suggest a component of right lateral displacement. The trend and postulated movement of the Pahrump Fault Zone are similar to the adjacent Las Vegas Shear Zone and Death Valley-Furnace Creek Faults, which are parts of a regional strike slip system in the southern Basin-Range Province.

  6. Structure and evolution of the seismically active Ostler Fault Zone (New Zealand) based on interpretations of multiple high resolution seismic reflection profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Fiona M.; Ghisetti, Francesca; Kaiser, Anna E.; Green, Alan G.; Horstmeyer, Heinrich; Gorman, Andrew R.

    2010-12-01

    To improve our understanding of active faulting away from the main plate boundary on New Zealand's South Island, we have acquired high resolution seismic data across the Ostler Fault Zone Twelve 1.2 km long lines perpendicular to fault strike and a 1.6 km long crossline were collected in a region of the MacKenzie Basin where surface mapping delineates significant complexity in the form of two non-overlapping reverse fault strands separated by a transfer zone characterised by multiple smaller strands and increased folding. Interpretation of the resultant images includes a 45-55° west-dipping principal fault and two 25-30° west-dipping subsidiary faults, one in the hanging wall and one in the footwall of the principal fault. The geologically mapped complexities are shown to be caused by shallow variations in the structure of the principal fault, which breaks the surface in the north and south but not within the transfer zone, where it forms a triangle zone with associated backthrusting and minor faulting. These complexities only extend to ~ 300 m depth. Structures below this level are markedly simpler and much more 2D in nature, with the principal fault strand extending over a much longer distance than the individual strands observed at the surface. Since longer faults are susceptible to larger earthquakes than shorter ones, seismic hazard at the study site may be higher than previously thought. Multiple surface fault strands that give way to a single more major stand at relatively shallow depths may be a common feature of segmented fault systems. The deepest layered reflections at our site are consistent with the presence of a Late Cretaceous (?)-Tertiary basin underlying the present-day MacKenzie Basin. Structural restoration of the seismic images back to the base of Quaternary fluvioglacial terraces and back to the top of a Late Pliocene-Pleistocene fluviolacustrine unit indicate that compression was initiated prior to the Late Pliocene and that it has continued

  7. Model-based fault detection and isolation for intermittently active faults with application to motion-based thruster fault detection and isolation for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Edward (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention is a method for detecting and isolating fault modes in a system having a model describing its behavior and regularly sampled measurements. The models are used to calculate past and present deviations from measurements that would result with no faults present, as well as with one or more potential fault modes present. Algorithms that calculate and store these deviations, along with memory of when said faults, if present, would have an effect on the said actual measurements, are used to detect when a fault is present. Related algorithms are used to exonerate false fault modes and finally to isolate the true fault mode. This invention is presented with application to detection and isolation of thruster faults for a thruster-controlled spacecraft. As a supporting aspect of the invention, a novel, effective, and efficient filtering method for estimating the derivative of a noisy signal is presented.

  8. The Eastern Lower Tagus Valley Fault Zone in central Portugal: Active faulting in a low-deformation region within a major river environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canora, Carolina; Vilanova, Susana P.; Besana-Ostman, Glenda M.; Carvalho, João; Heleno, Sandra; Fonseca, Joao

    2015-10-01

    Active faulting in the Lower Tagus Valley, Central Portugal, poses a significant seismic hazard that is not well understood. Although the area has been affected by damaging earthquakes during historical times, only recently has definitive evidence of Quaternary surface faulting been found along the western side of the Tagus River. The location, geometry and kinematics of active faults along the eastern side of the Tagus valley have not been previously studied. We present the first results of mapping and paleoseismic analysis of the eastern strand of the Lower Tagus Valley Fault Zone (LTVFZ). Geomorphological, paleoseismological, and seismic reflection studies indicate that the Eastern LTVFZ is a left-lateral strike-slip fault. The detailed mapping of geomorphic features and studies in two paleoseismic trenches show that surface fault rupture has occurred at least six times during the past 10 ka. The river offsets indicate a minimum slip rate on the order of 0.14-0.24 mm/yr for the fault zone. Fault trace mapping, geomorphic analysis, and paleoseismic studies suggest a maximum magnitude for the Eastern LTVFZ of Mw ~ 7.3 with a recurrence interval for surface ruptures ~ 1.7 ka. At least two events occurred after 1175 ± 95 cal yr BP. Single-event displacements are unlikely to be resolved in the paleoseismic trenches, thus our observations most probably represent the minimum number of events identified in the trenches.

  9. Triggered tremors beneath the seismogenic zone of an active fault zone, Kyushu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Non-volcanic tremors were induced by the surface waves of the 2012 Sumatra earthquake around the Hinagu fault zone in Kyushu, Japan. We inferred from dense seismic observation data that the hypocenters of these tremors were located beneath the seismogenic zone of the Hinagu fault. Focal mechanisms of the tremors were estimated using S-wave polarization angles. The estimated focal mechanisms show similarities to those of shallow earthquakes in this region. In addition, one of the nodal planes of the focal mechanisms is almost parallel to the strike direction of the Hinagu fault. These observations suggest that the tremors were triggered at the deeper extension of the active fault zone under stress conditions similar to those in the shallower seismogenic region. A low-velocity anomaly beneath the hypocentral area of the tremors might be related to the tremor activity.

  10. Active Fault Near-Source Zones Within and Bordering the State of California for the 1997 Uniform Building Code

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, M.D.; Toppozada, Tousson R.; Cao, T.; Cramer, C.H.; Reichle, M.S.; Bryant, W.A.

    2000-01-01

    The fault sources in the Project 97 probabilistic seismic hazard maps for the state of California were used to construct maps for defining near-source seismic coefficients, Na and Nv, incorporated in the 1997 Uniform Building Code (ICBO 1997). The near-source factors are based on the distance from a known active fault that is classified as either Type A or Type B. To determine the near-source factor, four pieces of geologic information are required: (1) recognizing a fault and determining whether or not the fault has been active during the Holocene, (2) identifying the location of the fault at or beneath the ground surface, (3) estimating the slip rate of the fault, and (4) estimating the maximum earthquake magnitude for each fault segment. This paper describes the information used to produce the fault classifications and distances.

  11. Coseismic fault zone deformation caused by the 2014 Mw=6.2 Nagano-ken-hokubu, Japan, earthquake on the Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line revealed with differential LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, S.; Ishimura, D.; Homma, S.; Mukoyama, S.; Niwa, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Mw = 6.2 Nagano-ken-hokubu earthquake struck northern Nagano, central Japan, on November 22, 2014, and accompanied a 9-km-long surface rupture mostly along the previously mapped N-NW trending Kamishiro fault, one of the segments of the 150-km-long Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line active fault system. While we mapped the rupture and measured vertical displacement of up to 80 cm at the field, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) shows densely spaced fringes on the hanging wall side, suggesting westward or uplift movement associated with thrust faulting. The mainshock focal mechanism and aftershock hypocenters indicate the source fault dips to the east but the InSAR images cannot exactly differentiate between horizontal and vertical movements and also lose coherence within and near the fault zone itself. To reveal near-field deformation and shallow fault slip, here we demonstrate a differential LiDAR analysis using a pair of 1 m-resolution pre-event and post-event bare Earth digital terrain models (DTMs) obtained from commercial LiDAR provider. We applied particle image velocity (PIV) method incorporating elevation change to obtain 3-D vectors of coseismic displacements (Mukoyama, 2011, J. Mt. Sci). Despite sporadic noises mostly due to local landslides, we detected up to 1.5 m net movement at the tip of the hanging wall, more than the field measurement of 80 cm. Our result implies that a 9-km-long rupture zone is not a single continuous fault but composed of two bow-shaped fault strands, suggesting a combination of shallow fault dip and modest amount (< 1.5 m) of slip. Eastward movement without notable subsidence on the footwall also supports the low angle fault dip near the surface, and significant fault normal contraction, observed as buckled cultural features across the fault zone. Secondary features, such as subsidiary back-thrust faults confirmed at the field, are also visible as a significant contrast of vector directions and slip amounts.

  12. Analysis of Landsat TM data for active tectonics: the case of the Big Chino Fault, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, Stefano

    1994-12-01

    The Big Chino Valley is a 50 km-long tectonic depression of the Basin and Range province of the South- western United States. It is bordered on the NE side by an important normal fault, the Big Chino Fault. The activity of the latter has been hypothesised on the basis of the presence of a 20 m-high fault scarp and on local geomorphological studies. Moreover, a magnitude 4.9 earthquake occurred in southern Arizona in 1976 has been attributed to this fault. The climate in the Big Chino Valley is semi-arid with average rainfall of about 400 mm per year; a very sparse vegetation cover is present, yielding a good possibility for the geo-lithologic application of remote sensing data. The analysis of the TM spectral bands shows, in the short wave infrared, a clear variation in the reflected radiance across the fault scarp. Also the available radar (SLAR) images show a marked difference in response between the two sides of the fault. An explanation of this phenomena has been found in the interaction between the geomorphic evolution, the pedological composition, and the periodic occurrence of coseismic deformation along the fault. Other effects of the latter process have been investigated on colour D- stretched images whose interpretation allowed to detect two paleoseismic events of the Big Chino Fault. This work demonstrates that important information on the seismological parameters of active faults in arid and semiarid climates can be extracted from the analysis of satellite spectral data in the visible and near -infrared.

  13. UAV's for active tectonics : case example from the Longitudinal Valley and the Chishan Faults (Southern Taiwan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deffontaines, Benoit; Chang, Kuo-Jen; Chan, Yu-Chang; Chen, Rou-Fei; Hsieh, Yu-Chung

    2015-04-01

    Taiwan is a case example to study active tectonics due to the active NW-SE collision of the Philippine and Eurasian Sea Plates as the whole convergence reaches 10cm/y. In order to decipher the structural active tectonics geometry, we used herein UAV's to get high resolution Digital Terrain Model (DTM) in local active tectonics key areas. Classical photo-interpretation where then developped in order to structurally interprete these data, confirmed by field studies. Two location had first been choosen in order to highlight the contribution of such high resolution DTM in SW Taiwan on the Longitudinal Valley Fault (SE Taiwan) on its southern branch from Pinting to Luyeh terraces (Pinanshan) where UAV's lead to better interprete the location of the outcropping active deformations. Combined with available GPS data and PALSAR interferometry (Deffontaines et Champenois et al., submitted) it is then possible to reconstruct the way of the present deformation in this local area. In the Pinting terraces, If the western branch of the fault correspond to an outcroping thrust fault, the eastern branch act as a a growing active anticline that may be characterized and quantified independantly. The interpretation of the UAV's high resolution DTM data on the Chishan Fault (SW Taiwan) reveals also the geometry of the outcropping active faults complex structural behaviour. If the Chishan Fault act as a thrusting in its northern tip (close to Chishan city), it acts as a right lateral strike-slip fault north of Chaoshan (Kaohsiung city) as described by Deffontaines et al. 2014. Therefore UAV's are a so useful tool to get very high resolution topographic data in Taiwan that are of great help to get the geometry of the active neotectonic structures in Taiwan.

  14. Identification of active faults in enlarged stereo models of Skylab S-190B photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merifield, P. M.

    1983-01-01

    Most of the physiographic indicators of recent movement known to be present along the Indio Hills segment of the San Andreas fault zone can be identified on enlarged Skylab S-190B stereo photographs. These include offset streams, beheaded streams, offset fans, shutter ridges, linear valleys, scarps and vegetation anomalies. Where physiographic indicators of recent movement are present, the S-190B system affords the necessary resolution and stereoscopy for distinguishing activate from inactive faults.

  15. Active Crustal Faults in the Forearc Region, Guerrero Sector of the Mexican Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidzik, Krzysztof; Ramírez-Herrera, Maria Teresa; Kostoglodov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    This work explores the characteristics and the seismogenic potential of crustal faults on the overriding plate in an area of high seismic hazard associated with the occurrence of subduction earthquakes and shallow earthquakes of the overriding plate. We present the results of geomorphic, structural, and fault kinematic analyses conducted on the convergent margin between the Cocos plate and the forearc region of the overriding North American plate, within the Guerrero sector of the Mexican subduction zone. We aim to determine the active tectonic processes in the forearc region of the subduction zone, using the river network pattern, topography, and structural data. We suggest that in the studied forearc region, both strike-slip and normal crustal faults sub-parallel to the subduction zone show evidence of activity. The left-lateral offsets of the main stream courses of the largest river basins, GPS measurements, and obliquity of plate convergence along the Cocos subduction zone in the Guerrero sector suggest the activity of sub-latitudinal left-lateral strike-slip faults. Notably, the regional left-lateral strike-slip fault that offsets the Papagayo River near the town of La Venta named "La Venta Fault" shows evidence of recent activity, corroborated also by GPS measurements (4-5 mm/year of sinistral motion). Assuming that during a probable earthquake the whole mapped length of this fault would rupture, it would produce an event of maximum moment magnitude Mw = 7.7. Even though only a few focal mechanism solutions indicate a stress regime relevant for reactivation of these strike-slip structures, we hypothesize that these faults are active and suggest two probable explanations: (1) these faults are characterized by long recurrence period, i.e., beyond the instrumental record, or (2) they experience slow slip events and/or associated fault creep. The analysis of focal mechanism solutions of small magnitude earthquakes in the upper plate, for the period between 1995

  16. Eocene activity on the Western Sierra Fault System and its role incising Kings Canyon, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Francis J.; Farley, Kenneth A.; Saleeby, Jason; Clark, Marin

    2016-04-01

    Combining new and published apatite (U-Th)/He and apatite 4He/3He data from along the Kings River canyon, California we rediscover a west-down normal fault on the western slope of the southern Sierra Nevada, one of a series of scarps initially described by Hake (1928) which we call the Western Sierra Fault System. Integrating field observations with apatite (U-Th)/He data, we infer a single fault trace 30 km long, and constrain the vertical offset across this fault to be roughly a kilometer. Thermal modeling of apatite 4He/3He data documents a pulse of footwall cooling near the fault and upstream in the footwall at circa 45-40 Ma, which we infer to be the timing of a kilometer-scale incision pulse resulting from the fault activity. In the context of published data from the subsurface of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys, our data from the Western Sierra Fault System suggests an Eocene tectonic regime dominated by low-to-moderate magnitude extension, surface uplift, and internal structural deformation of the southern Sierra Nevada and proximal Great Valley forearc.

  17. Southern San Andreas Fault evaluation field activity: approaches to measuring small geomorphic offsets--challenges and recommendations for active fault studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scharer, Katherine M.; Salisbury, J. Barrett; Arrowsmith, J. Ramon; Rockwell, Thomas K.

    2014-01-01

    In southern California, where fast slip rates and sparse vegetation contribute to crisp expression of faults and microtopography, field and high‐resolution topographic data (<1  m/pixel) increasingly are used to investigate the mark left by large earthquakes on the landscape (e.g., Zielke et al., 2010; Zielke et al., 2012; Salisbury, Rockwell, et al., 2012, Madden et al., 2013). These studies measure offset streams or other geomorphic features along a stretch of a fault, analyze the offset values for concentrations or trends along strike, and infer that the common magnitudes reflect successive surface‐rupturing earthquakes along that fault section. Wallace (1968) introduced the use of such offsets, and the challenges in interpreting their “unique complex history” with offsets on the Carrizo section of the San Andreas fault; these were more fully mapped by Sieh (1978) and followed by similar field studies along other faults (e.g., Lindvall et al., 1989; McGill and Sieh, 1991). Results from such compilations spurred the development of classic fault behavior models, notably the characteristic earthquake and slip‐patch models, and thus constitute an important component of the long‐standing contrast between magnitude–frequency models (Schwartz and Coppersmith, 1984; Sieh, 1996; Hecker et al., 2013). The proliferation of offset datasets has led earthquake geologists to examine the methods and approaches for measuring these offsets, uncertainties associated with measurement of such features, and quality ranking schemes (Arrowsmith and Rockwell, 2012; Salisbury, Arrowsmith, et al., 2012; Gold et al., 2013; Madden et al., 2013). In light of this, the Southern San Andreas Fault Evaluation (SoSAFE) project at the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) organized a combined field activity and workshop (the “Fieldshop”) to measure offsets, compare techniques, and explore differences in interpretation. A thorough analysis of the measurements from the

  18. Modeling of fault activation and seismicity by injection directly into a fault zone associated with hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Cappa, Frédéric; Moridis, George J.

    2015-03-01

    We conducted three-dimensional coupled fluid-flow and geomechanical modeling of fault activation and seismicity associated with hydraulic fracturing stimulation of a shale-gas reservoir. We simulated a case in which a horizontal injection well intersects a steeply dip- ping fault, with hydraulic fracturing channeled within the fault, during a 3-hour hydraulic fracturing stage. Consistent with field observations, the simulation results show that shale-gas hydraulic fracturing along faults does not likely induce seismic events that could be felt on the ground surface, but rather results in numerous small microseismic events, as well as aseismic deformations along with the fracture propagation. The calculated seismic moment magnitudes ranged from about -2.0 to 0.5, except for one case assuming a very brittle fault with low residual shear strength, for which the magnitude was 2.3, an event that would likely go unnoticed or might be barely felt by humans at its epicenter. The calculated moment magnitudes showed a dependency on injection depth and fault dip. We attribute such dependency to variation in shear stress on the fault plane and associated variation in stress drop upon reactivation. Our simulations showed that at the end of the 3-hour injection, the rupture zone associated with tensile and shear failure extended to a maximum radius of about 200 m from the injection well. The results of this modeling study for steeply dipping faults at 1000 to 2500 m depth is in agreement with earlier studies and field observations showing that it is very unlikely that activation of a fault by shale-gas hydraulic fracturing at great depth (thousands of meters) could cause felt seismicity or create a new flow path (through fault rupture) that could reach shallow groundwater resources.

  19. Modeling of fault activation and seismicity by injection directly into a fault zone associated with hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Cappa, Frédéric; Moridis, George J.

    2015-03-01

    We conducted three-dimensional coupled fluid-flow and geomechanical modeling of fault activation and seismicity associated with hydraulic fracturing stimulation of a shale-gas reservoir. We simulated a case in which a horizontal injection well intersects a steeply dip- ping fault, with hydraulic fracturing channeled within the fault, during a 3-hour hydraulic fracturing stage. Consistent with field observations, the simulation results show that shale-gas hydraulic fracturing along faults does not likely induce seismic events that could be felt on the ground surface, but rather results in numerous small microseismic events, as well as aseismic deformations along with the fracture propagation. The calculated seismicmore » moment magnitudes ranged from about -2.0 to 0.5, except for one case assuming a very brittle fault with low residual shear strength, for which the magnitude was 2.3, an event that would likely go unnoticed or might be barely felt by humans at its epicenter. The calculated moment magnitudes showed a dependency on injection depth and fault dip. We attribute such dependency to variation in shear stress on the fault plane and associated variation in stress drop upon reactivation. Our simulations showed that at the end of the 3-hour injection, the rupture zone associated with tensile and shear failure extended to a maximum radius of about 200 m from the injection well. The results of this modeling study for steeply dipping faults at 1000 to 2500 m depth is in agreement with earlier studies and field observations showing that it is very unlikely that activation of a fault by shale-gas hydraulic fracturing at great depth (thousands of meters) could cause felt seismicity or create a new flow path (through fault rupture) that could reach shallow groundwater resources.« less

  20. Paper 58714 - Exploring activated faults hydromechanical processes from semi-controled field injection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmi, Y.; Cappa, F.; Nussbaum, C.

    2015-12-01

    The appreciation of the sensitivity of fractures and fault zones to fluid-induced-deformations in the subsurface is a key question in predicting the reservoir/caprock system integrity around fluid manipulations with applications to reservoir leakage and induced seismicity. It is also a question of interest in understanding earthquakes source, and recently the hydraulic behavior of clay faults under a potential reactivation around nuclear underground depository sites. Fault and fractures dynamics studies face two key problems (1) the up-scaling of laboratory determined properties and constitutive laws to the reservoir scale which is not straightforward when considering faults and fractures heterogeneities, (2) the difficulties to control both the induced seismicity and the stimulated zone geometry when a fault is reactivated. Using instruments dedicated to measuring coupled pore pressures and deformations downhole, we conducted field academic experiments to characterize fractures and fault zones hydromechanical properties as a function of their multi-scale architecture, and to monitor their dynamic behavior during the earthquake nucleation process. We show experiments on reservoir or cover rocks analogues in underground research laboratories where experimental conditions can be optimized. Key result of these experiments is to highlight how important the aseismic fault activation is compared to the induced seismicity. We show that about 80% of the fault kinematic moment is aseismic and discuss the complex associated fault friction coefficient variations. We identify that the slip stability and the slip velocity are mainly controlled by the rate of the permeability/porosity increase, and discuss the conditions for slip nucleation leading to seismic instability.

  1. Active faults and seismogenic models for the Urumqi city, Xinjiang Autonomous Region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingzhen; Yu, Yang; Shen, Jun; Shao, Bo; Qi, Gao; Deng, Mei

    2016-06-01

    We have studied the characteristics of the active faults and seismicity in the vicinity of Urumqi city, the capital of Xinjiang Autonomous Region, China, and have proposed a seismogenic model for the assessment of earthquake hazard in this area. Our work is based on an integrated analysis of data from investigations of active faults at the surface, deep seismic reflection soundings, seismic profiles from petroleum exploration, observations of temporal seismic stations, and the precise location of small earthquakes. We have made a comparative study of typical seismogenic structures in the frontal area of the North Tianshan Mountains, where Urumqi city is situated, and have revealed the primary features of the thrust-fold-nappe structure there. We suggest that Urumqi city is comprised two zones of seismotectonics which are interpreted as thrust-nappe structures. The first is the thrust nappe of the North Tianshan Mountains in the west, consisting of the lower (root) thrust fault, middle detachment, and upper fold-uplift at the front. Faults active in the Pleistocene are present in the lower and upper parts of this structure, and the detachment in the middle spreads toward the north. In the future, M7 earthquakes may occur at the root thrust fault, while the seismic risk of frontal fold-uplift at the front will not exceed M6.5. The second structure is the western flank of the arc-like Bogda nappe in the east, which is also comprised a root thrust fault, middle detachment, and upper fold-uplift at the front, of which the nappe stretches toward the north; several active faults are also developed in it. The fault active in the Holocene is called the South Fukang fault. It is not in the urban area of Urumqi city. The other three faults are located in the urban area and were active in the late Pleistocene. In these cases, this section of the nappe structure near the city has an earthquake risk of M6.5-7. An earthquake M S6.6, 60 km east to Urumqi city occurred along the

  2. Seismic sequence near Zakynthos Island, Greece, April 2006: Identification of the activated fault plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpetsidaki, A.; Sokos, E.; Tselentis, G.-A.; Zahradnik, J.

    2010-01-01

    The April 2006 earthquake sequence near Zakynthos (Western Greece) is analysed to identify the fault plane(-s). The sequence (33 events) was relocated to assess physical insight into the hypocenter uncertainty. Moment tensor solution of three major events was performed, simultaneously with the determination of the centroid position. Joint analysis of the hypocenter position, centroid position and nodal planes indicated sub-horizontal fault planes. Moment tensor solutions of 15 smaller events were performed under assumption that the source positions are those of the hypocenters (without seeking centroids). Their focal mechanisms are highly similar and agree with the analysis of the three major events. The preferable seismotectonic interpretation is that the whole sequence activated a single sub-horizontal fault zone at a depth of about 13 km, corresponding to the interplate subduction boundary. Considering that the Ionian Sea is a high-seismicity area, the identification of the seismic fault is significant for the seismic hazard investigation of the region.

  3. Active faulting in northern Chile: ramp stacking and lateral decoupling along a subduction plate boundary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armijo, Rolando; Thiele, Ricardo

    1990-04-01

    Two large features parallel to the coastline of northern Chile have long been suspected to be the sites of young or active deformation: (1) The 700-km long Coastal Scarp, with average height (above sea level) of about 1000 m; (2) The Atacama Fault zone, that stretches linearly for about 1100 km at an average distance of 30-50 km from the coastline. New field observations combined with extensive analysis of aerial photographs demonstrate that both the Coastal Scarp and the Atacama Fault are zones of Quaternary and current fault activity. Little-degraded surface breaks observed in the field indicate that these fault zones have recently generated large earthquakes ( M = 7-8). Normal fault offsets observed in marine terraces in the Coastal Scarp (at Mejillones Peninsula) require tectonic extension roughly orthogonal to the compressional plate boundary. Strike-slip offsets of drainage observed along the Salar del Carmen and Cerro Moreno faults (Atacama Fault system) imply left-lateral displacements nearly parallel to the plate boundary. The left-lateral movement observed along the Atacama Fault zone may be a local consequence of E-W extension along the Coastal Scarp. But if also found everywhere along strike, left-lateral decoupling along the Atacama Fault zone would be in contradiction with the right lateral component of Nazca-South America motion predicted by models of present plate kinematics. Clockwise rotation with left-lateral slicing of the Andean orogen south of the Arica bend is one way to resolve this contradiction. The Coastal Scarp and the Atacama Fault zone are the most prominent features with clear traces of activity within the leading edge of continental South America. The great length and parallelism of these features with the subduction zone suggest that they may interact with the subduction interface at depth. We interpret the Coastal Scarp to be a west-dipping normal fault or flexure and propose that it is located over an east-dipping ramp stack at

  4. Unravelling the competing influence of regional uplift and active normal faulting in SW Calabria, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Alex; Roda Boluda, Duna; Boulton, Sarah; Erhardt, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    The Neogene geological and geomorphological evolution of Southern Italy is complex and is fundamentally controlled by the subduction of the Ionian slab along the Apennine belt from the Calabrian Arc, and back-arc extension driven by trench rollback. In the area of Calabria and the Straits of Messina the presence of (i) uplifted, deformed and dissected basin sediments and marine terraces, ranging in age from the early to mid-Pleistocene and (ii) seismicity associated with NE-SW normal faults that have well-developed footwall topography and triangular facets have led workers to suggest that both significant regional uplift and extensional faulting in SW Calabria have played a role in generating relief in the area since the mid Pleistocene. However, there is considerable uncertainty in the rates of total surface uplift relative to sea level in both time and space, and the relative partitioning of this uplift between a mantle-driven regional signal, potentially related to a slab tear, and the active extensional structures. Additionally, despite the widespread recognition of normal faults in Calabria to which historical earthquakes are often linked, there is much less agreement on (i) which ones are active and for what length of time; (ii) how the faults interact; and (iii) what their throw and throw rates are. In particular, the ability to resolve both regional uplift and normal faulting in SW Calabria is essential in order to fully understand the tectonic history of the region, while an understanding of location and slip rate of active faults, in an area where the population numbers more than two million people, is essential to assess regional seismic hazards. Here we address these important questions using a combination of tectonic geomorphology and structural geology. We critically examine existing constraints on the rates and distribution of active normal faulting and regional uplift in the area, and we derive new constraints on the along-strike variation in throw

  5. Exhumed analogues of seismically active carbonate-bearing thrusts: fault architecture and deformation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesei, T.; Collettini, C.; Viti, C.; Barchi, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    In May 2012 a M = 5.9 earthquake followed by a long aftershock sequence struck the Northern Italy. The sequence occurred at 4-10 km depth within the active front of Northern Apennines Prism and the major events nucleate within, or propagate through, a thick sequence of carbonates. In an inner sector of the Northern Apennines, ancient carbonate-bearing thrusts exposed at the surface, represent exhumed analogues of structures generating seismicity in the active front. Here we document fault architecture and deformation mechanisms of three regional carbonate bearing thrusts with displacement of several kilometers and exhumation in the range of 1-4 km. Fault zone structure and deformation mechanisms are controlled by the lithology of the faulted rocks. In layered limestones and marly-limestones the fault zone is up to 200 m thick and is characterized by intense pressure solution. In massive limestones the deformation generally occurs along thin and sharp slip planes that are in contact with fault portions affected by either cataclasis or pressure solution. SEM and TEM observations show that pressure solution surfaces, made of smectite lamellae, with time tend to form an interconnected network affected by frictional sliding. Sharp slipping planes along massive limestones show localization along Y shear planes that separate an extremely comminuted cataclasites from an almost undeformed protolith. The comparison of the three shear zones depicts a fault zone structure extremely heterogeneous as the result of protolith lithology, geometrical complexities and the presence of inherited structures. We observe the competition between brittle (cataclasis, distributed frictional sliding along phyllosilicates and extremely localized slip within carbonates) and pressure solution processes, that suggest a multi-mode of slip behaviour. Extreme localization along carbonate-bearing Y shear planes is our favorite fault zone feature representing past seismic ruptures along the studied

  6. Natural Radiation for Identification and Evaluation of Risk Zones for Affectation of Activated Faults in Aquifer Overexploited.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Leal, J.; Lopez-Loera, H.; Carbajal-Perez, N.

    2007-05-01

    In basins as Mexico, Michoacán, Guanajuato, Queretaro, Aguascalientes and San Luis Potosi, the existence of faults and fractures have affected the urban infrastructure, lines of conduction of drinkable water, pipelines, etc., that when not being identified and considered, they don't reflect the real impact that these cause also to the aquifer system, modifying the permeability of the means and in occasions they work as preferential conduits that communicate hydraulically potentially to the aquifer with substances pollutants (metals, fertilizers, hydrocarbons, waste waters, etc.) located in the surface. In the Valley of San Luis Potosi, Villa of Reyes, Arista, Ahualulco and recently The Huizache-Matehuala is being strongly affected by faulting and supposedly due cracking to subsidence, however, the regional tectonic could also be the origin of this phenomenon. To know the origin of the faults and affectation to the vulnerability of the aquifer few works they have been carried out in the area. A preliminary analysis indicates that it is possible that a tectonic component is affecting the area and that the vulnerability of the aquifer in that area you this increasing. Before such a situation, it is necessary to carry out the isotopic study of the same one, for this way to know among other things, isotopic characterization, recharge places and addresses of flow of the groundwater; quality of waters and the behavior hydrochemistry with relationship to the faults. High radon values were measured in San Luis Potosi Valley, the natural source of radon could be the riolites and however, these are located to almost a once thousand meters deep for what the migration of the gas is not very probable. The anomalies radiometrics was not correlation with the faults in this case. In some areas like the Valley of Celaya, the origin of the structures and the tectonic activity in the area was confirmed, identifying the structural arrangement of the faulting, the space relationships

  7. On-line and Mobil Learning Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, S. A.; Whittaker, T. M.; Jasmin, T.; Mooney, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    Introductory college-level science courses for non-majors are critical gateways to imparting not only discipline-specific information, but also the basics of the scientific method and how science influences society. They are also indispensable for student success to degree. On-line, web-based homework (whether on computers or mobile devices) is a rapidly growing use of the Internet and is becoming a major component of instruction in science, replacing delayed feedback from a few major exams. Web delivery and grading of traditional textbook-type questions is equally effective as having students write them out for hand grading, as measured by student performance on conceptual and problem solving exams. During this presentation we will demonstrate some of the interactive on-line activities used to teach concepts and how scientists approach problem solving, and how these activities have impacted student learning. Evaluation of the activities, including formative and summative, will be discussed and provide evidence that these interactive activities significantly enhance understanding of introductory meteorological concepts in a college-level science course. More advanced interactive activities are also used in our courses for department majors, some of these will be discussed and demonstrated. Bring your mobile devices to play along! Here is an example on teaching contouring: http://profhorn.aos.wisc.edu/wxwise/contour/index.html

  8. Slip Rates of Main Active Fault Zones Through Turkey Inferred From GPS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozener, H.; Aktug, B.; Dogru, A.; Tasci, L.; Acar, M.; Emre, O.; Yilmaz, O.; Turgut, B.; Halicioglu, K.; Sabuncu, A.; Bal, O.; Eraslan, A.

    2015-12-01

    Active Fault Map of Turkey was revised and published by General Directorate of Mineral Research and Exploration in 2012. This map reveals that there are about 500 faults can generate earthquakes.In order to understand the earthquake potential of these faults, it is needed to determine the slip rates. Although many regional and local studies were performed in the past, the slip rates of the active faults in Turkey have not been determined. In this study, the block modelling, which is the most common method to produce slip rates, will be done. GPS velocities required for block modeling is being compiled from the published studies and the raw data provided then velocity field is combined. To form a homogeneous velocity field, different stochastic models will be used and the optimal velocity field will be achieved. In literature, GPS site velocities, which are computed for different purposes and published, are combined globally and this combined velocity field are used in the analysis of strain accumulation. It is also aimed to develop optimal stochastic models to combine the velocity data. Real time, survey mode and published GPS observations is being combined in this study. We also perform new GPS observations. Furthermore, micro blocks and main fault zones from Active Fault Map Turkey will be determined and homogeneous velocity field will be used to infer slip rates of these active faults. Here, we present the result of first year of the study. This study is being supported by THE SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNOLOGICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL OF TURKEY (TUBITAK)-CAYDAG with grant no. 113Y430.

  9. Antioxidant activities from different rosemary clonal lines.

    PubMed

    Ban, Lan; Narasimhamoorthy, Brindha; Zhao, Liuqing; Greaves, John A; Schroeder, William D

    2016-06-15

    Rosemary extract is widely used in food industry and carnosic acid is reported to be the major component that is responsible for its antioxidant activities. However, it is unclear how the numerous plant metabolites interact and contribute to the overall antioxidant activity. In this study, with poultry fat as the model food system, rosemary extract from six clonal lines were evaluated that each represented a different genetic variant. As expected, rosemary extract with higher carnosic acid content had higher antioxidant activity. However, rosemary extract which had carnosic acid removed retained a significant amount of activity. Furthermore, when the individual contributions of carnosic acid and the portion without carnosic acid were evaluated separately, neither was shown to be responsible for the overall level of its stabilization effect from rosemary extract as a whole entity. The interactions among different plant metabolites have a major impact on the overall antioxidant capabilities of rosemary extract. PMID:26868574

  10. Distribution and structure of active strike-slip faults in the Enshu forearc basin of the eastern Nankai subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojima, T.; Ashi, J.; Nakamura, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Accretionary prisms and forearc basins are developed in the Nankai Trough, SW Japan. Many active faults are recognized and classified into five fault systems in the eastern Nankai Trough. The Enshu Faults System, the most landward one, runs over 200 km along the northern edge of the Tokai, Enshu and Kumano forearc basins. Swath bathymetry and side-scan sonar surveys indicate a general fault trend of ENE-WSW and dextral displacement of submarine canyons across the landward-most fault. Seismic reflection profiles partly exhibit landward dipping fault planes and flower structures suggesting that the Enshu fault system is affected by oblique subduction of the Philippines Sea Plate. Structural investigation of this area is important for earthquake disaster mitigation as well as understanding of oblique subduction tectonics. However, activity of faults has not been clarified. Japan Oil, Gas and Metal National Corporation (JOGMEC) conducted dense seismic reflection survey at the Tokai-Kumano area in 2001. Seismic reflection profiles clearly show depositional sequences and deformation structures such as faults and folds. This study examined deformation styles and fault activities based on detailed interpretation of seismic reflection profiles. Sediment thickness mapped from seismic profiles clearly changes with age. Sediment thickness is almost homogeneous from the acoustic basement (probably Paleogene Shimanto Complex) to a Pliocene horizon in the survey area. In contrast, thickness between a Pliocene horizon and present seafloor shows large variations from east to west. It is suggested that sedimentary environments change drastically at this period. There are also small-scale variations in sediment thickness for all horizons. Some distinct changes are distributed along linear boundaries. It seems that they correspond to the faults recognized as lineaments on the sidescan sonar images. We estimated activities of faulting based on such sediment thickness changes and their

  11. Multilayer stress from gravity and its tectonic implications in urban active fault zone: A case study in Shenzhen, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chuang; Wang, Hai-hong; Luo, Zhi-cai; Ning, Jin-sheng; Liu, Hua-liang

    2015-03-01

    It is significant to identify urban active faults for human life and social sustainable development. The ordinary methods to detect active faults, such as geological survey, artificial seismic exploration, and electromagnetic exploration, are not convenient to be carried out in urban area with dense buildings. It is also difficult to supply information about vertical extension of the deeper faults by these methods. Gravity, reflecting the mass distribution of the Earth's interior, provides an alternative way to detect faults, which is more efficient and convenient for urban active fault detection than the aforementioned techniques. Based on the multi-scale decomposition of gravity anomalies, a novel method to invert multilayer horizontal tectonic stresses is proposed. The inverted multilayer stress fields are further used to infer the distribution and stability of the main faults. In order to validate our method, the multilayer stress fields in the Shenzhen fault zone are calculated as a case study. The calculated stress fields show that their distribution is controlled significantly by the strike of the main faults and can be used to derive depths of the faults. The main faults in Shenzhen may range from 4 km to 20 km in the depth. Each layer of the crust is nearly equipressure since the horizontal tectonic stress has small amplitude. It indicates that the main faults in Shenzhen are relatively stable and have no serious impact on planning and construction of the city.

  12. Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission: Fault Management Design Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meakin, Peter; Weitl, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    As a general trend, the complexities of modern spacecraft are increasing to include more ambitious mission goals with tighter timing requirements and on-board autonomy. As a byproduct, the protective features that monitor the performance of these systems have also increased in scope and complexity. Given cost and schedule pressures, there is an increasing emphasis on understanding the behavior of the system at design time. Formal test-driven verification and validation (V&V) is rarely able to test the significant combinatorics of states, and often finds problems late in the development cycle forcing design changes that can be costly. This paper describes the approach the SMAP Fault Protection team has taken to address some of the above-mentioned issues.

  13. Activation of Fault Structures South of the La Habra Earthquake Rupture As Evidenced By UAVSAR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnellan, A.; Parker, J. W.; Grant Ludwig, L.; Hauksson, E.

    2014-12-01

    The 28 March, 2014 M 5.2 La Habra earthquake occurred on a northeast striking, northwest dipping left-lateral oblique thrust fault at the northeastern margin of the LA Basin, where regional right-lateral shear is accommodated by major northwest trending faults of the Peninsular Ranges, and north-south shortening is accommodated by north-dipping thrust faults and east-west trending folds of the Transverse Ranges. The La Habra mainshock location and focal mechanism is northwest of but sub-parallel to the Puente Hills thrust fault. Relocated seismicity highlights a northeast-trending rupture plane consistent with the magnitude and focal mechanism of the event. NASA's UAVSAR L-Band radar instrument was flown for north and south looking lines before the earthquake on 22 January 2014. The north looking line was reflown three days after the earthquake on 31 March, 2014, and the south looking line was reflown a week later on 4 April 2014. The UAVSAR Repeat Pass Interferogram (RPI) products show deformation consistent with the location of the mainshock beneath the town of La Habra. The results also show considerable aseismic northward horizontal deformation with minor uplift in the West Coyote Hills, south of the relocated seismicity. Inversion of the combined interferograms is consistent with south dipping low-angle (7°) shallow slip that corresponds to bedding plane attitudes and a mapped unconformity. The entire West Coyote Hills show 37 mm of modeled northward slip with an additional 34 mm of modeled slip concentrated near the Coyote Hills Park northeast of the intersection of Rosecrans Avenue and North Gilbert Street. A narrow band of shortening was also observed with UAVSAR, and confirmed with on-the-ground field observations, at the Trojan Way Kink Band, nearly one fault dimension southwest of the main rupture.

  14. Assessment of the geodynamical setting around the main active faults at Aswan area, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Radwan; Hosny, Ahmed; Kotb, Ahmed; Khalil, Ahmed; Azza, Abed; Rayan, Ali

    2013-04-01

    The proper evaluation of crustal deformations in the Aswan region especially around the main active faults is crucial due to the existence of one major artificial structure: the Aswan High Dam. This construction created one of the major artificial lakes: Lake Nasser. The Aswan area is considered as an active seismic area in Egypt since many recent and historical felted earthquakes occurred such as the impressive earthquake occurred on November 14, 1981 at Kalabsha fault with a local magnitude ML=5.7. Lately, on 26 December 2011, a moderate earthquake with a local magnitude Ml=4.1 occurred at Kalabsha area too. The main target of this study is to evaluate the active geological structures that can potentially affect the Aswan High Dam and that are being monitored in detail. For implementing this objective, two different geophysical tools (magnetic, seismic) in addition to the Global Positioning System (GPS) have been utilized. Detailed land magnetic survey was carried out for the total component of geomagnetic field using two proton magnetometers. The obtained magnetic results reveal that there are three major faults parallel {F1 (Kalabsha), F2 (Seiyal) and F3} affecting the area. The most dominant magnetic trend strikes those faults in the WNW-ESE direction. The seismicity and fault plain solutions of the 26 December 2011 earthquake and its two aftershocks have been investigated. The source mechanisms of those events delineate two nodal plains. The trending ENE-WSW to E-W is consistent with the direction of Kalabsha fault and its extension towards east for the events located over it. The trending NNW-SSE to N-S is consistent with the N-S fault trending. The movement along the ENE-WSW plain is right lateral, but it is left lateral along the NNW-SSE plain. Based on the estimated relative motions using GPS, dextral strike-slip motion at the Kalabsha and Seiyal fault systems is clearly identified by changing in the velocity gradient between south and north stations

  15. Evaluating knickpoint recession along an active fault for paleoseismological analysis: The Huoshan Piedmont, Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhanyu; Bi, Lisi; Xu, Yueren; He, Honglin

    2015-04-01

    Ground-rupturing earthquakes can generate tectonic knickpoints within upstream reaches of streams across active fault zones. These knickpoints are characteristic of upstream propagation of time-related process once generated by an earthquake, so analysis of knickpoint series in streams which cross fault zones can be used to infer paleoearthquake events. We studied the knickpoints along the Huoshan Piedmont Fault (HPF), which is an active normal fault in the Shanxi Faulted Basin zone, China, and demonstrate that analysis of knickpoints shows evidence for two paleoearthquakes in the HPF. First, we identified knickpoints in bedrock reaches upstream of the HPF using high-resolution DEMs derived from IRS-P5 stereo images and the stream-gradient method. After excluding non-faulting knickpoints, 47 knickpoints were identified in 23 bedrock reaches upstream from the HPF. Analysis of the most recent knickpoints caused by the 1303 CE Hongdong Earthquake allowed for local calibration of the retreat rates. Applying these retreat rates across the study area allows for the estimation of the age of other knickpoints, and constrains the age ranges of two knickpoint groups to be 2269-3336 a BP and 4504-5618 a BP. These ages constrain the ages of two paleoearthquake events at 2710 ± 102 and 4980 ± 646 a BP. The knickpoints along the HPF obey the parallel retreating model in which knickpoint morphology was roughly maintained during retreat, so the heights of knickpoints represent the coseismic vertical displacements generated by the earthquakes along the HPF. The vertical offsets for these three earthquake events are similar and are approximately 4 m, which indicates that the ruptures on the HPF obey a characteristic slip model with a similar slip distribution for several successive earthquakes. These results provide additional evidence of paleoearthquakes on the HPF and show that analysis of knickpoint recession along an active fault is a valuable tool for paleoseismology.

  16. Low resistivity and permeability in actively deforming shear zones on the San Andreas Fault at SAFOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, C.; Lockner, D. A.; Hickman, S.

    2015-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) scientific drill hole near Parkfield, California, crosses the San Andreas Fault at a depth of 2.7 km. Downhole measurements and analysis of core retrieved from Phase 3 drilling reveal two narrow, actively deforming zones of smectite-clay gouge within a roughly 200 m wide fault damage zone of sandstones, siltstones, and mudstones. Here we report electrical resistivity and permeability measurements on core samples from all of these structural units at effective confining pressures up to 120 MPa. Electrical resistivity (~10 Ω-m) and permeability (10-21 to 10-22 m2) in the actively deforming zones were 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower than the surrounding damage zone material, consistent with broader-scale observations from the downhole resistivity and seismic velocity logs. The higher porosity of the clay gouge, 2 to 8 times greater than that in the damage zone rocks, along with surface conduction were the principal factors contributing to the observed low resistivities. The high percentage of fine-grained clay in the deforming zones also greatly reduced permeability to values low enough to create a barrier to fluid flow across the fault. Together, resistivity and permeability data can be used to assess the hydrogeologic characteristics of the fault, key to understanding fault structure and strength. The low resistivities and strength measurements of the SAFOD core are consistent with observations of low resistivity clays that are often found in the principal slip zones of other active faults making resistivity logs a valuable tool for identifying these zones.

  17. Characterising Active Fault Earthquake Sources Beneath the Coastal Environments of Christchurch and Wellington Cities, New Zealand, Using Seismic Reflection Profiles and Fault Displacement Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, P.; Nodder, S.; Gorman, A. R.; Woelz, S.; Orpin, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The coastal cities of Christchurch and Wellington, New Zealand, lie in different tectonic settings within the obliquely convergent Pacific-Australian plate boundary zone. Both cities have experienced damaging earthquakes in the last three years, which highlight the importance of locating and characterising hidden active faults close to urban areas. The devastating and geologically complex Canterbury earthquake sequence of 2010-2012 developed on the periphery of the plate boundary, and reactivated several previously unidentified strike-slip and reverse faults. Major aftershocks initially beneath land, generally migrated eastward over time, and finally advanced offshore into Pegasus Bay. A study of active submarine faulting beneath the bay highlights the role of inherited crustal structure and inversion tectonics. Marine seismic reflection data reveals that faults have very low slip rate and negligible post-glacial (<15 ka) deformation, which is consistent with inferred long recurrence intervals between large magnitude (Mw>6) earthquakes. Wellington City is surrounded by numerous high-slip rate strike-slip faults overlying the Hikurangi subduction zone. A dense network of secondary basement structures previously recognised throughout the region, mainly from tectonic geomorphology, have, until recently, been considered mostly inactive and excluded from seismic hazard models. We used high-resolution geophysical, bathymetric and sediment-core data to determine the structure, earthquake history and earthquake potential of a newly discovered active reverse fault beneath the inner reaches of Wellington Harbour. The fault has a slip rate of ~0.6 ± 0.3 mm/y, and a vertical displacement history indicating at least two large magnitude (Mw 6.3-7.1), surface-rupturing earthquakes in the last 10 ka. We infer that the fault extends southwards onshore beneath the city and potentially into Cook Strait, and represents a significant previously unrecognised seismic hazard.

  18. Numerical simulation of coastal flooding after potential reactivation of an active normal fault in northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Yu-Chang; Kuo, Chih-Yu; Chang, Kuo-Jen; Chen, Rou-Fei; Hsieh, Yu-Chung

    2016-04-01

    Rapid coastal flooding from seawards may be resulted from storm surge, tsunamis, and sudden land subsidence due to fault activities. Many observations and numerical modeling of flooding have been made for cases resulted from storm surge and tsunami events; however, coastal flooding caused by a potential normal faulting event nearby coastal areas is rarely reported. In addition to the earthquake hazards from fault rupturing and ground shaking, the accompanied hazards of earthquake-induced flooding is also important to be investigated. The Jinshan area in northern Taiwan was reported to have been flooded by a tsunami event in the year of 1867 possibly resulted from the reactivation of the Shanchiao normal fault offshore. Historical records have shown that the Shanchiao Fault that extends from Shulin along the western edge of the Taipei Basin to the town of Jinshan may have also ruptured in the year of 1694. The rupturing event has created a depression on the western side of the Taipei Basin that was later filled by sea water called the Taipei Lake. The geological conditions in northern Taiwan provide an opportunity for numerically simulating the dynamic processes of sea water flooding nearby the coastal area immediately after an earthquake-induced normal faulting event. In this study, we focused on the potential active normal faulting that may occur and result in an expected catastrophic flooding in lowland area of Jinshan in northern Taiwan. We applied the continuum shallow water equation to evaluate the unknown inundation processes including location, extent, velocity and water depths after the flooding initiated and the final state of the flooding event. The modeling results were well compared with borehole observations of the extent of previous flooding events possibly due to tsunami events. In addition, the modeling results may provide a future basis for safety evaluation of the two nuclear power plants nearby the region.

  19. Geodetic Network Design and Optimization on the Active Tuzla Fault (Izmir, Turkey) for Disaster Management

    PubMed Central

    Halicioglu, Kerem; Ozener, Haluk

    2008-01-01

    Both seismological and geodynamic research emphasize that the Aegean Region, which comprises the Hellenic Arc, the Greek mainland and Western Turkey is the most seismically active region in Western Eurasia. The convergence of the Eurasian and African lithospheric plates forces a westward motion on the Anatolian plate relative to the Eurasian one. Western Anatolia is a valuable laboratory for Earth Science research because of its complex geological structure. Izmir is a large city in Turkey with a population of about 2.5 million that is at great risk from big earthquakes. Unfortunately, previous geodynamics studies performed in this region are insufficient or cover large areas instead of specific faults. The Tuzla Fault, which is aligned trending NE–SW between the town of Menderes and Cape Doganbey, is an important fault in terms of seismic activity and its proximity to the city of Izmir. This study aims to perform a large scale investigation focusing on the Tuzla Fault and its vicinity for better understanding of the region's tectonics. In order to investigate the crustal deformation along the Tuzla Fault and Izmir Bay, a geodetic network has been designed and optimizations were performed. This paper suggests a schedule for a crustal deformation monitoring study which includes research on the tectonics of the region, network design and optimization strategies, theory and practice of processing. The study is also open for extension in terms of monitoring different types of fault characteristics. A one-dimensional fault model with two parameters – standard strike-slip model of dislocation theory in an elastic half-space – is formulated in order to determine which sites are suitable for the campaign based geodetic GPS measurements. Geodetic results can be used as a background data for disaster management systems.

  20. High resolution seismic imaging of an active normal fault in the Agri Valley, Southern Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Improta, L.; Bruno, P.; di Fiore, V.; Mariani, S.

    2004-12-01

    The Agri Valley is an intermontane basin located in the Southern Apennine seismic belt (Italy) whose formation in tied to large NW-trending trastensional and extensional faults active since Early Pleistocene. Recent faulting activity in the area is documented by faulted paleosoils and suggested by a M7 earthquake that struck the basin in 1857. On the contrary, present-day background seismicity in the area is extremely low. Despite intense geomorphic investigations, the identification of the source responsible for this historical event and of further large seismogenic faults in the area is still a matter of debate. A new NW trending normal faulting system has been recently recognized based on subtle geomorphic expressions on the ridge bounding the basin westward. Recent faulting activity along this structure is locally documented by a trench. Aimed at yielding new information about the shallow structure of the fault, we conducted a high resolution seismic experiment in a small lacustrine basin, located 4 km south of the trench, in which the presence of the fault is inferred by a linear surface warping but trench excavation is impractical. Both multi-fold wide-angle data and multichannel near vertical reflection data have been collected along a 220-m-long profile in order to obtain an accurate model of the basin combining seismic velocity and reflectivity images. About 3600 first arrival traveltimes picked on 36 wide-angle record sections have been inverted by a non-linear tomographic technique that is specially designed to image complex structures. The tomographic inversion provides a high-resolution velocity model of the basin down to 60 m depth. The model is strongly heterogeneous and displays sharp lateral velocity variations. Seismic reflection processing has been applied to both data sets. Data have been edited for trace quality and first (refracted and direct) arrivals have been muted. A following FK dip filtering on the shot gathers reduced the energy

  1. Seismic Reflection Images of Deep Lithospheric Faults and Thin Crust at the Actively Deforming Indo-Australian Plate Boundary in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. C.; Carton, H.; Chauhan, A.; Dyment, J.; Cannat, M.; Hananto, N.; Hartoyo, D.; Tapponnier, P.; Davaille, A.

    2007-12-01

    Recently, we acquired deep seismic reflection data using a state-of-the-art technology of Schlumberger having a powerful source (10,000 cubic inch) and a 12 km long streamer along a 250 km long trench parallel line offshore Sumatra in the Indian Ocean deformation zone that provides seismic reflection image down to 40 km depth over the old oceanic lithosphere formed at Wharton spreading centre about 55-57 Ma ago. We observe deep penetrating faults that go down to 37 km depth (~24 km in the oceanic mantle), providing the first direct evidence for full lithospheric-scale deformation in an intra-plate oceanic domain. These faults dip NE and have dips between 25 and 40 degrees. The majority of faults are present in the mantle and are spaced at about 5 km, and do not seem cut through the Moho. We have also imaged active strike-slip fault zones that seem to be associated with the re-activation of ancient fracture zones, which is consistent with previous seismological and seafloor observations. The geometries of the deep penetrating faults neither seem to correspond to faulting associated with the plate bending at the subduction front nor with the re-activation of fracture zone that initiated about 7.5 Ma ago, and therefore, we suggest that these deep mantle faults were formed due to compressive stress at the beginning of the hard collision between India and Eurasia, soon after the cessation of seafloor spreading in the Wharton basin. We also find that the crust generated at the fast Wharton spreading centre 55-57 Ma ago is only 3.5-4.5 km thick, the thinnest crust ever observed in a fast spreading environment. We suggest that this extremely thin crust is due to 40-50°C lower than normal mantle temperature in this part of the Indian Ocean during its formation.

  2. Crossing Active Faults on the Sakhalin II Onshore Pipeline Route: Analysis Methodology and Basic Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitali, Luigino; Mattiozzi, Pierpaolo

    2008-07-01

    Twin oil (20 & 24 inch) and gas (20 & 48 inch) pipeline systems stretching 800 km are being constructed to connect offshore hydrocarbon deposits from the Sakhalin II concession in the North to an LNG plant and oil export terminal in the South of Sakhalin island. The onshore pipeline route follows a regional fault zone and crosses individual active faults at 19 locations. Sakhalin Energy, Design and Construction companies took significant care to ensure the integrity of the pipelines, should large seismic induced ground movements occur during the Operational life of the facilities. Complex investigations including the identification of the active faults, their precise location, their particular displacement values and assessment of the fault kinematics were carried out to provide input data for unique design solutions. Lateral and reverse offset displacements of 5.5 and 4.5 m respectively were determined as the single-event values for the design level earthquake (DLE)—the 1000-year return period event. Within the constraints of a pipeline route largely fixed, the underground pipeline fault crossing design was developed to define the optimum routing which would minimize stresses and strain using linepipe materials which had been ordered prior to the completion of detailed design, and to specify requirements for pipe trenching shape, materials, drainage system, etc. This Paper describes the steps followed to formulate the concept of the special trenches and the analytical characteristics of the Model.

  3. Crossing Active Faults on the Sakhalin II Onshore Pipeline Route: Pipeline Design and Risk Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattiozzi, Pierpaolo; Strom, Alexander

    2008-07-01

    Twin oil (20 & 24 inch) and gas (20 & 48 inch) pipeline systems stretching 800 km are being constructed to connect offshore hydrocarbon deposits from the Sakhalin II concession in the North to an LNG plant and oil export terminal in the South of Sakhalin island. The onshore pipeline route follows a regional fault zone and crosses individual active faults at 19 locations. Sakhalin Energy, Design and Construction companies took significant care to ensure the integrity of the pipelines, should large seismic induced ground movements occur during the Operational life of the facilities. Complex investigations including the identification of the active faults, their precise location, their particular displacement values and assessment of the fault kinematics were carried out to provide input data for unique design solutions. Lateral and reverse offset displacements of 5.5 and 4.5 m respectively were determined as the single-event values for the design level earthquake (DLE)—the 1000-year return period event. Within the constraints of a pipeline route largely fixed, the underground pipeline fault crossing design was developed to define the optimum routing which would minimize stresses and strain using linepipe materials which had been ordered prior to the completion of detailed design, and to specify requirements for pipe trenching shape, materials, drainage system, etc. Detailed Design was performed with due regard to actual topography and to avoid the possibility of the trenches freezing in winter, the implementation of specific drainage solutions and thermal protection measures.

  4. Geomorphological markers of faulting and neotectonic activity along the western Andean margin, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audin, Laurence; Herail, Gérard; Riquelme, Rodrigo; Darrozes, José; Martinod, Joseph; Font, Eric

    2003-12-01

    In the Atacama Desert, northern Chile, some ephemeral channels are developed in the Plio-Quaternary alluvial sequence that caps the Neogene Atacama Gravels Formation. Geomorphological studies and high-resolution digital elevation data (GPS) along a structural transect in the Central Depression are used to document modern growth history of subtle folding and faulting in the fore-arc region. Outcrop data of the most recent deposits are combined with observations of warped and faulted late Quaternary pediments, alluvial fans and terrace surfaces to propose unsuspected neotectonic processes on the western flank of the Domeyko Cordillera. Neotectonic process recognition is here based largely upon the interpretation of alluvial landforms, drainage organisation and evolution as the intermittent river network shows systematic patterns of course deflections, successive incisions or deposition processes as it encounters the fault scarps or folds in the superficial deposits. This area presents both N-S-trending active vertical faults in the topographically higher pampas, and N-S-trending active folding in the lower pampas. These faults seem to accommodate E-W extension and compression that could be related to uplift of the western Andean margin within a compressive context. Uplift may have taken place unevenly over the past few million years after the deposition of the superficial alluvial surfaces that cap the Neogene Atacama Gravels. Copyright

  5. Crossing Active Faults on the Sakhalin II Onshore Pipeline Route: Analysis Methodology and Basic Design

    SciTech Connect

    Vitali, Luigino; Mattiozzi, Pierpaolo

    2008-07-08

    Twin oil (20 and 24 inch) and gas (20 and 48 inch) pipeline systems stretching 800 km are being constructed to connect offshore hydrocarbon deposits from the Sakhalin II concession in the North to an LNG plant and oil export terminal in the South of Sakhalin island. The onshore pipeline route follows a regional fault zone and crosses individual active faults at 19 locations. Sakhalin Energy, Design and Construction companies took significant care to ensure the integrity of the pipelines, should large seismic induced ground movements occur during the Operational life of the facilities. Complex investigations including the identification of the active faults, their precise location, their particular displacement values and assessment of the fault kinematics were carried out to provide input data for unique design solutions. Lateral and reverse offset displacements of 5.5 and 4.5 m respectively were determined as the single-event values for the design level earthquake (DLE)--the 1000-year return period event. Within the constraints of a pipeline route largely fixed, the underground pipeline fault crossing design was developed to define the optimum routing which would minimize stresses and strain using linepipe materials which had been ordered prior to the completion of detailed design, and to specify requirements for pipe trenching shape, materials, drainage system, etc. This Paper describes the steps followed to formulate the concept of the special trenches and the analytical characteristics of the Model.

  6. Crossing Active Faults on the Sakhalin II Onshore Pipeline Route: Pipeline Design and Risk Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mattiozzi, Pierpaolo; Strom, Alexander

    2008-07-08

    Twin oil (20 and 24 inch) and gas (20 and 48 inch) pipeline systems stretching 800 km are being constructed to connect offshore hydrocarbon deposits from the Sakhalin II concession in the North to an LNG plant and oil export terminal in the South of Sakhalin island. The onshore pipeline route follows a regional fault zone and crosses individual active faults at 19 locations. Sakhalin Energy, Design and Construction companies took significant care to ensure the integrity of the pipelines, should large seismic induced ground movements occur during the Operational life of the facilities. Complex investigations including the identification of the active faults, their precise location, their particular displacement values and assessment of the fault kinematics were carried out to provide input data for unique design solutions. Lateral and reverse offset displacements of 5.5 and 4.5 m respectively were determined as the single-event values for the design level earthquake (DLE) - the 1000-year return period event. Within the constraints of a pipeline route largely fixed, the underground pipeline fault crossing design was developed to define the optimum routing which would minimize stresses and strain using linepipe materials which had been ordered prior to the completion of detailed design, and to specify requirements for pipe trenching shape, materials, drainage system, etc. Detailed Design was performed with due regard to actual topography and to avoid the possibility of the trenches freezing in winter, the implementation of specific drainage solutions and thermal protection measures.

  7. Geodetic evidence for continuing tectonic activity of the Carboneras fault (SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeverria, Anna; Khazaradze, Giorgi; Asensio, Eva; Masana, Eulalia

    2015-11-01

    The Carboneras fault zone (CFZ) is a prominent onshore-offshore strike-slip fault that forms part of the Eastern Betic Shear Zone (EBSZ), located in SE Spain. In this work, we show for the first time, the continuing tectonic activity of the CFZ and quantify its geodetic slip-rates using continuous and campaign GPS observations conducted during the last decade. We find that the left-lateral motion dominates the kinematics of the CFZ, with a strike-slip rate of 1.3 ± 0.2 mm/yr along the N48° direction. The shortening component is significantly lower and poorly constrained. Recent onshore and offshore paleoseismic and geomorphic results across the CFZ suggest a minimum Late Pleistocene to present-day strike-slip rate of 1.1 mm/yr. Considering the similarity of the geologic and geodetic slip rates measured at different points along the fault, the northern segment of the CFZ must have been slipping approximately at a constant rate during the Quaternary. Regarding the eastern Alpujarras fault zone corridor (AFZ), located to the north of the CFZ, our GPS measurements corroborate that this zone is active and exhibits a right-lateral motion. These opposite type strike-slip motion across the AFZ and CFZ is a result of a push-type force due to Nubia and Eurasia plate convergence, which, in turn, causes the westward escape of the block bounded by these two fault zones.

  8. Paleoseismic and geomorphologic evidence of recent tectonic activity of the Pozohondo Fault (Betic Cordillera, SE Spain)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodríguez-Pascua, M.A.; Pérez-López, R.; Garduño-Monroy, V.H.; Giner-Robles, J.L.; Silva, P.G.; Perucha-Atienza, M.A.; Hernández-Madrigal, V.M.; Bischoff, J.

    2012-01-01

    Instrumental and historical seismicity in the Albacete province (External Prebetic Zone) has been scarcely recorded. However, major strike-slip faults showing NW-SE trending provide geomorphologic and paleoseismic evidence of recent tectonic activity (Late Pleistocene to Present). Moreover, these faults are consistently well oriented under the present stress tensor and therefore, they can trigger earthquakes of magnitude greater than M6, according to the lengths of surface ruptures and active segments recognized in fieldwork. Present landscape nearby the village of Hellin (SE of Albacete) is determined by the recent activity of the Pozohondo Fault (FPH), a NW-SE right-lateral fault with 90 km in length. In this study, we have calculated the Late Quaternary tectonic sliprate of the FPH from geomorphological, sedimentological, archaeoseimological, and paleoseismological approaches. All of these data suggest that the FPH runs with a minimum slip-rate of 0.1 mm/yr during the last 100 kyrs (Upper Pleistocene-Holocene). In addition, we have recognized the last two major paleoearthquakes associated to this fault. Magnitudes of these paleoearthquakes were gretarer than M6 and their recurrence intervals ranged from 6600 to 8600 yrs for the seismic cycle of FPH. The last earthquake was dated between the 1st and 6th centuries, though two earthquakes could be interpreted in this wide time interval, one at the FPH and other from a far field source. Results obtained here, suggest an increasing of the tectonic activity of the Pozohondo Fault during the last 10,000 yrs.

  9. The Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse hydrothermal field: A hydrothermal system on an active detachment fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphris, Susan E.; Tivey, Margaret K.; Tivey, Maurice A.

    2015-11-01

    Over the last ten years, geophysical studies have revealed that the Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse (TAG) hydrothermal field (26°08‧N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge) is located on the hanging wall of an active detachment fault. This is particularly important in light of the recognition that detachment faulting accounts for crustal accretion/extension along a significant portion of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and that the majority of confirmed vent sites on this slow-spreading ridge are hosted on detachment faults. The TAG hydrothermal field is one of the largest sites of high-temperature hydrothermal activity and mineralization found to date on the seafloor, and is comprised of active and relict deposits in different stages of evolution. The episodic nature of hydrothermal activity over the last 140 ka provides strong evidence that the complex shape and geological structure of the active detachment fault system exerts first order, but poorly understood, influences on the hydrothermal circulation patterns, fluid chemistry, and mineral deposition. While hydrothermal circulation extracts heat from a deep source region, the location of the source region at TAG is unknown. Hydrothermal upflow is likely focused along the relatively permeable detachment fault interface at depth, and then the high temperature fluids leave the low-angle portion of the detachment fault and rise vertically through the highly fissured hanging wall to the seafloor. The presence of abundant anhydrite in the cone on the summit of the TAG active mound and in veins in the crust beneath provides evidence for a fluid circulation system that entrains significant amounts of seawater into the shallow parts of the mound and stockwork. Given the importance of detachment faulting for crustal extension at slow spreading ridges, the fundamental question that still needs to be addressed is: How do detachment fault systems, and the structure at depth associated with these systems (e.g., presence of plutons and/or high

  10. Using fluvial channel morphology to obtain the neotectonic characteristics of the Liuchia fault, an important active structure in southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyu, J. H.; Du, K.

    2013-12-01

    The Liuchia fault in southwestern Taiwan has been considered as one of the major active faults in the active Taiwan orogen. It is identified by its clear geomorphic features, and forms a major geologic boundary of Taiwan's Western Foothills. No unanimous historical evidence for seismic activity of the Liuchia fault exists, thus the fault poses large earthquake hazard potentials for the populous southwestern Taiwan. Here we attempted to analyze the characteristics of the fault from fluvial channel morphology of the Kueichung River that flows across the fault. We also calculated actual river incision rates from the age of river terraces along the river to obtain the rock uplift rates of the hanging-wall block of the fault. We have obtained a detailed river long profile of the Kueichung River from surveys using RTK-GPS, and a channel width profile from actual field measurements using a Laser Rangefinder. The fluvial channel morphology of the Kueichung River appears to have been affected by active folding in the hanging-wall block of the Liuchia fault. Such active deformation pattern is also evident from river incision rate patterns. Combining these different datasets, we constructed a realistic model of the subsurface geometry of the Liuchia fault in southwestern Taiwan, and calculated the long-term slip rates of this important active structure in southwestern Taiwan.