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Sample records for line edge roughness

  1. Diffusion-induced line-edge roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Michael D.; Schmid, Gerard M.; Goldfarb, Dario L.; Angelopoulos, Marie; Willson, C. Grant

    2003-06-01

    As feature dimensions shrink, line edge roughness has become an increasing concern in semiconductor fabrication. There are numerous potential contributors to line edge roughness throughout the lithographic process and any measured roughness value on a printed device feature is, like the feature itself, a convolved function of every processing step. When the full lithographic process is used to study line edge roughness, it can be difficult to isolate the contribution to final roughness from any individual processing step or factor. To gain a more fundamental understanding of roughness generation that is specifically related to photoresist chemistry and formulation it is necessary to design experiments that separate out exposure related issues like mask dimension variation or local dose variation ("shot noise"). This can be accomplished using previously reported experimental protocols for bilayer film stack creation. The bilayer experimental approach has been used to study the effect of variations in such factors as post exposure bake time, photoacid generator loading, and developer concentration on roughness generation. Surface roughness of the developed film stacks is measured via atomic force microscopy. Surface roughness of developed bilayer film stacks may be considered analogous to sidewall roughness of printed features. An acrylate-based 193nm photoresist resin and an APEX-type resin are used in these experiments. In addition to experimental results, results from mesoscale lithographic simulations are used to gain further insight into diffusion induced roughness and how roughness in the latent image is modified during the development step.

  2. Scaling law governing the roughness of the swash edge line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormashenko, E.; Musin, A.; Grynyov, R.

    2014-09-01

    The paper is devoted to the analysis of the shape of the swash edge line. Formation of the swash boundary is treated as an interfacial phenomenon. The simplest quantitative characteristic of the roughness of interface is its width w, defined as the root-mean-square fluctuation around the average position. For rough interfaces, the scaling with size of the system L is observed in the form w(L)~Lζ. The concept of scaling supplies a simple framework for classifying interfaces. It is suggested that the fine structure of the swash boundary results from the combined action of the pinning force applied by random defects of the beach and elasticity of distorted swash boundary. The roughness of the swash front was studied at the Mediterranean Sea coast for uprush and backwash flows. Value of exponent ζ for receding swash front line was 0.64 +/- 0.02, when in the case of advancing swash the value 0.73 +/- 0.03 was calculated. The scaling exponent established for the receding phase of the swash is very close to the values of the exponent established for the roughness of the triple line for water droplets deposited on rough surfaces, crack propagation front in Plexiglas, and for the motion of a magnetic domain walls.

  3. Does line-edge roughness matter?: FEOL and BEOL perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qinghuang; Black, Charles T.; Detavernier, Christophe; Gignac, Lynne; Guarini, Kathryn; Herbst, Brian; Kim, Hyungjun; Oldiges, Philip; Petrillo, Karen E.; Sanchez, Martha I.

    2003-06-01

    Line edge roughness (LER) has been widely perceived to be one of the roadblocks to the continuing scaling of semiconductor devices. However, little evidence has been published on the impact of LER on device performance, particularly on the performance and the reliability of advanced interconnects. In this paper, we present such evidence from both the Front-End-Of-Line (FEOL) and Back-End-Of-Line (BEOL) standpoints. In the FEOL, we employed computer simulations to estimate the effects of LER on a number of performance parameters of sub-100nm transistors based on 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional device models. LER has been shown to affect both the average value and the variance of key device performance parameters for sub-100nm transistors. In the BEOL, we investigated the impact of LER on the performance of barrier layers in dual damascene copper interconnects. To this end, we emulated LER by roughening Si surfaces with controlled patterning by self-assembled diblock copolymers and reactive ion etching. In-situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction was used to study Cu diffusion through about 5nm Ta and TaN barrier layers deposited by plasma enhanced-atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) on both smooth and rough surfaces. The X-ray diffraction results indicated that the surface roughness does not degrade barrier performance of the ALD Cu barriers. Mechanism of the roughness effects is also discussed. Line edge roughness is, however, expected to degrade copper interconnect performance by increasing copper electrical resistivity through enhanced electron surface scattering.

  4. Modeling Line Edge Roughness in Lamellar Block Copolymer Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrone, Paul; Gallatin, Gregg

    2012-02-01

    Block copolymers offer an appealing alternative to current lithographic techniques with regard to fabrication of the next generation microprocessors. However, if copolymers are to be useful on an industrial manufacturing scale, they must meet or exceed lithography specifications for placement and line edge roughness (LER) of resist features. Here we discuss a field theoretic approach to modeling the LER in the lamellar phase of a strongly segregated block copolymer system. Our model is based on the Leibler-Ohta-Kawasaki free energy functional, which takes the Flory-Huggins parameter and index of polymerization as inputs. We consider a domain with a finite number of phase separated microdomains; at the system boundary, we apply conditions akin to a chemical pinning field. Using a path integral formalism, we determine how fluctuations of the microdomain boundaries depend on distance from the system boundary, number of microdomains, the Flory-Huggins parameter, and index of polymerization.

  5. Modeling line-edge roughness in lamellar block copolymer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrone, Paul N.; Gallatin, Gregg M.

    2012-03-01

    Block copolymers oer an appealing alternative to current lithographic techniques with regard to fabrication of the next generation micro-processors. However, if copolymers are to be useful on an industrial manufacturing scale, they must meet or exceed lithography specications for placement and line edge roughness (LER) of resist features. Here we discuss a eld theoretic approach to modeling the LER of lamellar microdomain interfaces in a strongly segregated block copolymer system; specically, we derive a formula for the LER as a functions of the Flory Huggins parameter and the index of polymerization N. Our model is based on the Leibler-Ohta-Kawasaki energy functional. We consider a system with a nite number of phase separated microdomains and also show how the LER depends on distance of the microdomain interface from the system boundary. Our results suggest that in order to meet target LER goals at the 15 nm, 11 nm, and 6 nm nodes, must be increased by a factor of at least 5 above currently attainable values.

  6. Multiscale characterization method for line edge roughness based on redundant second generation wavelet transform

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Fei; Zhao Xuezeng; Li Ning

    2010-10-15

    We introduce a multiscale characterization method for line edge roughness (LER) based on redundant second generation wavelet transform. This method involves decomposing LER characteristics into independent bands with different spatial frequency components at different scales, and analyzing the reconstructed signals to work out the roughness exponent, the spatial frequency distribution characteristics, as well as the rms value. The effect of noise can be predicted using detailed signals in the minimum space of scale. This method was applied to numerical profiles for validation. Results show that according to the line edge profiles with similar amplitudes, the roughness exponent R can effectively reflect the degree of irregularity of LER and intuitively provide information on LER spatial frequency distribution.

  7. Implications of image plane line-edge roughness requirements on extreme ultraviolet mask specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, P. P.; George, Simi A.

    2009-02-13

    Line-edge roughness (LER) and the related effect of contact size variation remain as significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. LER is typically viewed as a resist problem; however, recent simulation results have shown that the mask can indeed be an important contributor. Problems arise from both mask absorber LER as well as mask multilayer roughness leading to random phase variations in the reflected beam (see Fig. 1). The latter effect is especially important as higher coherence off-axis illumination conditions are used and defocus is considered. Here we describe these effect in detail and explore how they will impact EUV mask requirements for the 22-nm half-pitch node and beyond. Figure 2 shows modeling results for 22-nm lines printed in a 0.32-numerical aperture system with 100-nm defocus assuming a mask with 0.24-nm rms multilayer roughness and no absorber edge roughness (unlike the example in Fig. 1). The impact of the phase roughness on the printed line-edge roughness is clearly evident and demonstrates the basic problem with mask roughness. The more detailed modeling-based analysis to be presented will account for performance throughout the process window as well as non-stochastic resist effects. We note that the mean-field resist effect is important to consider because, in practice, the resist is the limiting resolution element in the system and therefore dominates the mask-error enhancement factor (MEEF). As is typically the case with projection-optic-induced MEEF, the resist-induced MEEF will lead to even tighter mask requirements. Note that we do not consider resist stochastic effects since the purpose of this study is isolate mask-induced sources of image-plane roughness.

  8. Replicated mask surface roughness effects on EUV lithographic patterning and line edge roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Simi A.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Mochi, Iacopo; Salmassi, Farhad; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Anderson, Erik H.

    2011-04-01

    To quantify the roughness contributions to speckle, a programmed roughness substrate was fabricated with a number of areas having different roughness magnitudes. The substrate was then multilayer coated. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) surface maps were collected before and after multilayer deposition. At-wavelength reflectance and total integrated scattering measurements were also completed. Angle resolved scattering based power spectral densities are directly compared to the AFM based power spectra. We show that AFM overpredicts the roughness in the picometer measurements range. The mask was then imaged at-wavelength for the direct characterization of the aerial image speckle using the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT). Modeling was used to test the effectiveness of the different metrologies in predicting the measured aerial-image speckle. AIT measured contrast values are 25% or more than the calculated image contrast values obtained using the measured rms roughness input. The extent to which the various metrologies can be utilized for specifying tolerable roughness limits on EUV masks is still to be determined. Further modeling and measurements are being planned.

  9. Replicated mask surface roughness effects on EUV lithographic pattering and line edge roughness

    SciTech Connect

    George, Simi A.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Mochi, Iacopo; Salmassi, Farhad; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Anderson, Erik H.

    2011-03-11

    To quantify the roughness contributions to speckle, a programmed roughness substrate was fabricated with a number of areas having different roughness magnitudes. The substrate was then multilayer coated. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) surface maps were collected before and after multilayer deposition. At-wavelength reflectance and total integrated scattering measurements were also completed. Angle resolved scattering based power spectral densities are directly compared to the AFM based power spectra. We show that AFM overpredicts the roughness in the picometer measurements range. The mask was then imaged at-wavelength for the direct characterization of the aerial image speckle using the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT). Modeling was used to test the effectiveness of the different metrologies in predicting the measured aerial-image speckle. AIT measured contrast values are 25% or more than the calculated image contrast values obtained using the measured rms roughness input. The extent to which the various metrologies can be utilized for specifying tolerable roughness limits on EUV masks is still to be determined. Further modeling and measurements are being planned.

  10. The effect of sidewall roughness on line edge roughness in top-down scanning electron microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verduin, T.; Lokhorst, S. R.; Kruit, P.; Hagen, C. W.

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated in a numerical study the determination of sidewall roughness (SWR) from top down scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. In a typical metrology application, top-down SEM images are acquired in a (critical-dimension) SEM and the roughness is analyzed. However, the true size, shape and roughness characteristics of resist features are not fully investigated in the analysis of top-down SEM images. In reality, rough resist features are complex three-dimensional structures and the characterization naturally extends to the analysis of SWR. In this study we randomly generate images of rough lines and spaces, where the lines are made of PMMA on a silicon substrate. The lines that we study have a length of 2 µm, a width of 32nm and a height of 32 nm. The SWR is modeled by using the power spectral density (PSD) function of Palasantzas, which characterizes roughness by the standard deviation σ, correlation length ξ and roughness exponent α . The actual roughness is generated by application of the method of Thorsos in two dimensions. The images are constructed by using a home-built program for simulating electron-specimen interactions. The program that we have developed is optimized for complex arbitrary geometries and large number of incident low energy primary electrons by using multi-core CPUs and GPUs. The program uses the dielectric function model for inelastic scattering events and has an implementation specifically for low energy electrons. A satisfactory comparison is made between the secondary electron yields from the home-built program and another program found in literature. In order to reduce the risk of shrinkage, we use a beam energy of 300 eV and a spot size of 3 nm. Each pixel is exposed with 20 electrons on average (≍ 276 µC/cm2), following the Poisson distribution to account for illumination shot noise. We have assumed that the detection of electrons is perfect and does not introduce additional noise. We measure line edge

  11. System-level line-edge roughness limits in extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Juanita; Naulleau, Patrick P; Niakoula, Dimitra; Zhang, Guojing

    2008-02-13

    As critical dimensions shrink, line edge and width roughness (LER and LWR) become of increasing concern. Traditionally LER is viewed as a resist-limited effect; however, as critical dimensions shrink and LER requirements become proportionally more stringent, system-level effects begin to play an important role. Recent advanced EUV resist testing results have demonstrated lower bounds on achievable LER at the level of approximately 2 to 3 nm. Here we use modeling to demonstrate that a significant portion of this low bound may in fact be do to system-level effects and in particular the mask. Of concern are both LER on the mask as well as roughness of the multilayer reflector. Modeling also shows roughness (flare) in the projection optics not to be of concern.

  12. Surface and line-edge roughness in acid-breakable resin-based positive resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamizu, Toshio; Shiraishi, Hiroshi

    2003-06-01

    A positive chemical amplification resist based on acid-catalyzed fragmentation of acetal groups in its main-chain has been developed as a means for reducing line-edge roughness. The resist consists of an acid-generator, an acid-diffusion controller and an acid-breakable (AB) resin that is synthesized through a co-condensation reaction between polyphenol and aromatic multi-functional vinylether compound. The effects of the fractionation of AB resins on resin properties and line-edge roughness (LER) are evaluated. Although AB resins have wide molecular-weight distributions, the density of acetal groups in this AB resin is found to be almost constant except in the lower molecular-weight components. The resist with a fractionated resin from which such components removed provides the high resolution of 60-nm line-and-space (L/S) patterns with fairly low LER. AFM analysis shows the surface roughness (SR) for the resist with the fractionated resin is smaller than that for a resist using non-fractionated AB resin, and that the SR value is not altered throughout the range of exposure doses up to just below the beginning of dissolution. By using the fractionated AB resin, the AB resin-based resist (ABR) is capable of forming sub-100 nm L/S patterns with less than 5 nm of LER (3σ).

  13. Determination of line edge roughness in low dose top-down scanning electron microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verduin, T.; Kruit, P.; Hagen, C. W.

    2014-04-01

    We investigated off-line metrology for LER determination in low-dose SEM images to reduce the acquisition time and the risk of shrinkage. Our first attempts are based on filtering noisy (experimental) SEM images and use peak detection to measure the edge displacements and calculating the discrete PSD. However, the result of the filtering is that the power spectrum of the filter leaks into the PSD. So it is better to avoid a filter at all. We subsequently developed a method to detect edge displacements without the use of a filter. This method considers the signal profile of a SEM by integrating an experimental image of lines in the direction of the edges. The signal profile of an isolated edge is modeled as two merged Gaussians. This signal profile is then fitted against the raw (unfiltered) data of the edge pattern using an interior trust-region-reflective minimization procedure. This gives the edge displacements without the use of a filter and a filter-free version of the discrete PSD is obtained. The determination of edge displacements without the use of a filter, enables us to study how much noise is acceptable and still determine LER. To answer this question we generate random lines using the model of Palasantzas and the algorithm of Thorsos. This gives random generated edge displacements for typical values of experimental lines for the parameters of the model: 2 μm long lines (256 pixels), a correlation length ξ of 25 nm and a roughness exponent of 0.75. A noise-free top-down SEM-like image of lines is created by shifting the profile signal according to the random generated edge displacements. The image is further processed by adding Poisson-distributed noise. We consider three noise cases where the average electron density is about 2, 20 and 200 electrons per pixel. This corresponds to a charge density of (in respective order) 10 μC/cm2, 100 μC/cm2 and 1000 μC/cm2. The edge displacements of the random generated images are determined using our new

  14. Gate line edge roughness amplitude and frequency variation effects on intra die MOS device characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamadeh, Emad; Gunther, Norman G.; Niemann, Darrell; Rahman, Mahmud

    2006-06-01

    Random fluctuations in fabrication process outcomes such as gate line edge roughness (LER) give rise to corresponding fluctuations in scaled down MOS device characteristics. A thermodynamic-variational model is presented to study the effects of LER on threshold voltage and capacitance of sub-50 nm MOS devices. Conceptually, we treat the geometric definition of the MOS devices on a die as consisting of a collection of gates. In turn, each of these gates has an area, A, and a perimeter, P, defined by nominally straight lines subject to random process outcomes producing roughness. We treat roughness as being deviations from straightness consisting of both transverse amplitude and longitudinal wavelength each having lognormal distribution. We obtain closed-form expressions for variance of threshold voltage ( Vth), and device capacitance ( C) at Onset of Strong Inversion (OSI) for a small device. Using our variational model, we characterized the device electrical properties such as σ and σC in terms of the statistical parameters of the roughness amplitude and spatial frequency, i.e., inverse roughness wavelength. We then verified our model with numerical analysis of Vth roll-off for small devices and σ due to dopant fluctuation. Our model was also benchmarked against TCAD of σ as a function of LER. We then extended our analysis to predict variations in σ and σC versus average LER spatial frequency and amplitude, and oxide-thickness. Given the intuitive expectation that LER of very short wavelengths must also have small amplitude, we have investigated the case in which the amplitude mean is inversely related to the frequency mean. We compare with the situation in which amplitude and frequency mean are unrelated. Given also that the gate perimeter may consist of different LER signature for each side, we have extended our analysis to the case when the LER statistical difference between gate sides is moderate, as well as when it is significantly large.

  15. Line-edge roughness induced single event transient variation in SOI FinFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weikang, Wu; Xia, An; Xiaobo, Jiang; Yehua, Chen; Jingjing, Liu; Xing, Zhang; Ru, Huang

    2015-11-01

    The impact of process induced variation on the response of SOI FinFET to heavy ion irradiation is studied through 3-D TCAD simulation for the first time. When FinFET biased at OFF state configuration (Vgs = 0, Vds = Vdd) is struck by a heavy ion, the drain collects ionizing charges under the electric field and a current pulse (single event transient, SET) is consequently formed. The results reveal that with the presence of line-edge roughness (LER), which is one of the major variation sources in nano-scale FinFETs, the device-to-device variation in terms of SET is observed. In this study, three types of LER are considered: type A has symmetric fin edges, type B has irrelevant fin edges and type C has parallel fin edges. The results show that type A devices have the largest SET variation while type C devices have the smallest variation. Further, the impact of the two main LER parameters, correlation length and root mean square amplitude, on SET variation is discussed as well. The results indicate that variation may be a concern in radiation effects with the down scaling of feature size.

  16. Improvement of polymer type EB resist sensitivity and line edge roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otani, Makoto; Asada, Hironori; Tsunoda, Hosei; Kunitake, Masashi; Ishizaki, Takehiko; Miyagawa, Ryuji

    2011-05-01

    In order to improve sensitivity and line edge roughness (LER) for electron beam (EB) lithography, the positive-type polymer resists with various molecular weights and controlled dispersion were newly synthesized and examined. The synthesized resists have the same composition as ZEP520A (Nippon Zeon). With the low molecular and the narrow dispersion resist, improvements of both the sensitivity and LER are confirmed by obtaining the SEM images of line and space resist patterns exposed by EB writing system at an acceleration voltage of 100 kV. The polymer resist with molecular weight (Mw: 30k) and dispersion (1.4) exhibited 22 nm hp resolution, 20% improved LER and 15 % improved sensitivity compared with original ZEP520A.

  17. Application of Mueller matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry to determine line edge roughness on photomasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, A.; Dirnstorfer, I.; Bischoff, J.; Richter, U.; Ketelson, H.; Meiner, K.; Mikolajick, T.

    2013-10-01

    We report on Mueller Matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry (MM-SE) to examine undesired asymmetries in structural parameters, i.e. line edge roughness (LER). The investigation was done on a photomask containing line space arrays with intentionally modulated line edges. The Mueller Matrix (MM) elements were measured within the complete azimuth angle range (0 - 360°) and a wavelength range from 300 nm to 980 nm. The results are presented in polar coordinates with the azimuth angle and wavelength as the angular and radial coordinate, respectively. It was found that LER significantly impacts the MM elements, which is indicated by the increase of the isotropic character of the array. The experimental data are confirmed by Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) simulations on perturbed arrays. Based on RCWA the impact of LER amplitudes in the nm range is determined. It was found that both deviation of critical dimension (CD) and LER amplitude impact the MM elements. Based on the intensity ratios of the elements and their spectral distribution both errors create a characteristic finger print, which allows to separate them. Finally, the required measurement precision for LER in the nm range is estimated at 0.001. This precision is challenging but achievable with today's metrology.

  18. Impact of mask line edge roughness and statistical noise on next generation mask making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byung Gook; Choi, Jin; Lee, Sang Hee; Jeon, Chan Uk

    2012-06-01

    As extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) moves toward high volume manufacturing and pushes to increasingly smaller critical dimensions, achieving the stringent requirements for line edge roughness (LER) is increasingly challenging. For the 22 nm half-pitch node and beyond, the International Roadmap for Semiconductors requires less than 1.6 nm of line width roughness (LWR) on the wafer. The major contributor of this tight LWR is wafer resist LER and mask LER. However, in current ITRS, there is no guideline for mask LER. While significant progress has been made to reduce the resist of the LER on the wafer, it is not yet clear how much the mask LER should be improved for a 22 nm half-pitch node application. Additionally, there are various approaches to obtaining a smaller LER on the mask. It could be improved either by reducing well-known statistical noise or manipulating some process condition or material. Both approaches are effective in improving the LER, however, they shows a different result in mask CD uniformity itself. In this paper, in addition to setting the criteria of the mask LER, we will discuss how tight the mask LER is required to be and what kind of approach is desirable with regards to the LER and CD uniformity. Finally, an analysis of the LER and CD variation provides some insights into the impact of the next generation mask infrastructure.

  19. Influence of line edge roughness (LER) on angular resolved and on spectroscopic scatterometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Thomas; Rafler, Stephan; Frenner, Karsten; Osten, Wolfgang

    2008-09-01

    Scatterometry or optical CD metrology (OCD) has become one of the most common techniques in quantitative wafer metrology within the recent years. Different tool configurations are either available in commercial inspection tools or subject of recent and present research activities. Among these are normal incidence reflectometry, 2-θ scatterometry, spectroscopic ellipsometry and angle resolved Fourier scatterometry. The two latter techniques appear to be promising for future use in semiconductor fabs. Spectroscopic ellipsometry is well established, and Fourier scatterometry has become of increasing interest within the recent time. Line edge roughness, i.e. an edge position variation of printed lines in lithography, has been of less importance up to now, as its amplitude could largely be neglected with respect to the feature dimensions. This will, however, not be the case for future nodes, as on the one hand CDs are getting smaller and smaller, and on the other hand, even the absolute amplitude is expected to increase due to the higher complexity of lithography and etch processes. In this paper a comparison of scatterometric reconstructions in both spectroscopic and angle resolved techniques considering LER afflicted samples is presented. The validity and benefit of a simple effective medium model is investigated.

  20. Low-line edge roughness extreme ultraviolet photoresists of organotin carboxylates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Re, Ryan; Passarelli, James; Sortland, Miriam; Cardineau, Brian; Ekinci, Yasin; Buitrago, Elizabeth; Neisser, Mark; Freedman, Daniel A.; Brainard, Robert L.

    2015-10-01

    Pure thin films of organotin compounds have been lithographically evaluated using extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL, 13.5 nm). Twenty compounds of the type R2Sn) were spin-coated from solutions in toluene, exposed to EUV light, and developed in organic solvents. Exposures produced negative-tone contrast curves and dense-line patterns using interference lithography. Contrast-curve studies indicated that the photosensitivity is linearly related to the molecular weight of the carboxylate group bound to tin. Additionally, photosensitivity was found to be linearly related to free radical stability of the hydrocarbon group bound directly to tin (R=phenyl, butyl, and benzyl). Dense-line patterning capabilities varied, but two resists in particular show exceptionally good line edge roughness (LER). A resist composed of an amorphous film of )SnCC)2 (1) achieved 1.4 nm LER at 22-nm half-pitch patterning and a resist composed of )Sn) (2) achieved 1.1 nm LER at 35-nm half-pitch at high exposure doses (600 mJ/cm2). Two photoresists that use olefin-based carboxylates, )SnCCH (3) and )SnCC (4), demonstrated better photospeeds (5 mJ/cm2 and 27 mJ/cm2) but worse LER.

  1. Scanning-electron-microscope image processing for accurate analysis of line-edge and line-width roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraiwa, Atsushi; Nishida, Akio

    2012-03-01

    The control of line-edge or line-width roughness (LER/LWR) is a challenge especially for future devices that are fabricated using extreme-ultraviolet lithography. Accurate analysis of the LER/LWR plays an essential role in this challenge and requires the noise involved in scanning-electron-microscope (SEM) images to be reduced by appropriate image processing prior to analyses. In order to achieve this, the authors simulated SEM images using the Monte-Carlo method and detected line edges in experimental and these theoretical images after noise filtering using new imageanalysis software. The validity of these simulation and software was confirmed by a good agreement between the experimental and theoretical results. In the case when the image pixels aligned perpendicular (crosswise) to line edges were averaged, the variance var(φ) that was additionally induced by the image noise decreased with the number NPIX,X of averaged pixels but turned to increase for relatively large NPIX,X's. Real LER/LWR, however, remained unaffected. On the other hand, averaging image pixels aligned parallel (longitudinal) to line edges not only reduced var(φ) but smoothed the real LER/LWR. As a result, the nominal variance of the real LWR, obtained using simple arithmetic, monotonically decreased with the number NPIX,L of averaged pixels. Artifactual oscillations were additionally observed in power spectral densities. var(φ) in this case decreased in an inverse proportion to the square root of NPIX,L according to the statistical mechanism clarified here. In this way, image processing has a marked effect on the LER/LWR analysis and needs to be much more cared and appropriately applied. All the aforementioned results not only constitute a solid basis of but improve previous empirical instructions for accurate analyses. The most important instruction is to avoid the longitudinal averaging and to crosswise average an optimized number of image pixels consulting the equation derived in this

  2. An atomic force microscopy-based method for line edge roughness measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouchier, M.; Pargon, E.; Bardet, B.

    2013-03-01

    With the constant decrease of semiconductor device dimensions, line edge roughness (LER) becomes one of the most important sources of device variability and needs to be controlled below 2 nm for the future technological nodes of the semiconductor roadmap. LER control at the nanometer scale requires accurate measurements. We introduce a technique for LER measurement based upon the atomic force microscope (AFM). In this technique, the sample is tilted at about 45° and feature sidewalls are scanned along their length with the AFM tip to obtain three-dimensional images. The small radius of curvature of the tip together with the low noise level of a laboratory AFM result in high resolution images. Half profiles and LER values on all the height of the sidewalls are extracted from the 3D images using a procedure that we developed. The influence of sample angle variations on the measurements is shown to be small. The technique is applied to the study of a full pattern transfer into a simplified gate stack. The images obtained are qualitatively consistent with cross-section scanning electron microscopy images and the average LER values agree with that obtained by critical dimension scanning electron microscopy. In addition to its high resolution, this technique presents several advantages such as the ability to image the foot of photoresist lines, complex multi-layer stacks regardless of the materials, and deep re-entrant profiles.

  3. Noise filtering of scanning-electron-microscope images for accurate analysis of line-edge and line-width roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraiwa, Atsushi; Nishida, Akio

    2012-10-01

    The control of line-edge or line-width roughness (LER/LWR) is a challenge, especially for future devices that are fabricated using extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Accurate analysis of the LER/LWR plays an essential role in this challenge and requires the noise involved in scanning-electron-microscope (SEM) images to be reduced by appropriate noise filtering prior to analysis. To achieve this, we simulated the SEM images using a Monte Carlo method, and detected line edges in both experimental and theoretical images after noise filtering using new image-analysis software. The validity of this software and these simulations was confirmed by a good agreement between the experimental and theoretical results. In the case when the image pixels aligned perpendicular (crosswise) to line edges were averaged, the variance var(φ) that was additionally induced by the image noise decreased with a number N of averaged pixels, with exceptions when N was relatively large, whereupon the variance increased. The optimal N to minimize var(φ) was formulated based on a statistical mechanism of this change. LER/LWR statistics estimated using the crosswise filtering remained unaffected when N was smaller than the aforementioned optimal value, but monotonically changed when N was larger contrary to expectations. This change was possibly caused by an asymmetric scan-signal profile at edges. On the other hand, averaging image pixels aligned parallel (longitudinal) to line edges not only reduced var(φ) but smoothed real LER/LWR. As a result, the nominal variance of real LWR, obtained using simple arithmetic, monotonically decreased with a number N of averaged pixels. Artifactual oscillations were additionally observed in power spectral densities. Var(φ) in this case decreased in inverse proportion to the square root of N according to the statistical mechanism clarified here. In this way, the noise filtering has a marked effect on the LER/LWR analysis and needs to be appropriately

  4. Controlling line-edge roughness and reactive ion etch lag in sub-150 nm features in borophosphosilicate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatnagar, Parijat; Panda, Siddhartha; Edleman, Nikki L.; Allen, Scott D.; Wise, Richard; Mahorowala, Arpan

    2007-04-01

    We have developed a reactive ion etch (RIE) process in borophosphosilicate glass (BPSG) for 150 nm line-and-space features, where line-edge roughness (LER) complemented with RIE lag becomes a major issue. Effect of flow rates and carbon-to-fluorine atomic ratio of fluorohydrocarbon gases was utilized to achieve acceptable process window allowing lower radio frequency powers therefore obtaining acceptable LER and RIE lag in the high-resolution features etched into BPSG.

  5. Correlation method for the measure of mask-induced line-edge roughness in extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick

    2009-05-25

    As critical dimensions for leading-edge semiconductor devices shrink, line-edge roughness (LER) requirements are pushing well into the single digit nanometer regime. At these scales many new sources of LER must be considered. In the case of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, modeling has shown the lithographic mask to be a source of significant concern. Here we present a correlation-based methodology for experimentally measuring the magnitude of mask contributors to printed LER. The method is applied to recent printing results from a 0.3 numerical aperture EUV microfield exposure tool. The measurements demonstrate that such effects are indeed present and of significant magnitude. The method is also used to explore the effects of illumination coherence and defocus and has been used to verify model-based predictions of mask-induced LER.

  6. Line-edge roughness transfer function and its application to determining mask effects in EUV resist characterization.

    PubMed

    Naulleau, Patrick P; Gallatin, Gregg M

    2003-06-10

    The control of line-edge roughness (LER) of features printed in photoresist poses significant challenges to next-generation lithography techniques such as extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Achieving adequately low LER levels will require accurate resist characterization as well as the ability to separate resist effects from other potential contributors to LER. One significant potential contributor is LER on the mask. Here we explicitly study the mask to resist LER coupling using both analytical and computer-simulation methods. We present what is to our knowledge a new imaging transfer function referred to as the LER transfer function (LTF), which fundamentally differs from both the conventional modulation transfer function and the optical transfer function. Moreover, we present experimental results demonstrating the impact of current EUV masks on projection-lithography-based LER experiments. PMID:12816326

  7. Line Edge Roughness and Cross Sectional Characterization of Sub-50 nm Structures Using Critical Dimension Small Angle X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Chengqing; Jones, Ronald L.; Lin, Eric K.; Wu Wenli; Ho, Derek L.; Villarrubia, John S.; Choi, Kwang-Woo; Clarke, James S.; Roberts, Jeanette; Bristol, Robert; Bunday, Benjamin

    2007-09-26

    The need to characterize line edge and line width roughness in patterns with sub-50 nm critical dimensions challenges existing platforms based on electron microscopy and optical scatterometry. The development of x-ray based metrology platforms provides a potential route to characterize a variety of parameters related to line edge roughness by analyzing the diffracted intensity from a periodic array of test patterns. In this study, data from a series of photoresist line/space patterns featuring programmed line width roughness are measured by critical dimension small angle x-ray scattering (CD-SAXS). For samples with designed periodic roughness, CD-SAXS provides the wavelength and amplitude of the periodic roughness through satellite diffraction peaks. For real world applications, the rate of decay of intensity, termed an effective 'Debye-Waller' factor in CD-SAXS, provides an overall measure of the defects of the patterns. CD-SAXS data are compared to values obtained from critical dimension scanning electron microscopy (CD-SEM). Correlations between the techniques exist, however significant differences are observed for the current samples. A tapered cross sectional profile provides a likely explanation for the observed differences between CD-SEM and CD-SAXS measurements.

  8. Simulating photomask edge roughness and corner rounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Konstantinos; Socha, Robert J.; Pistor, Thomas V.; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    1997-07-01

    Corner rounding and edge roughness of a rectangular opening at a glass-chrome mask are simulated with TEMPEST. The intensity patterns on the image plane are extracted and compared for these defects at several degrees of fabrication-induced imperfection. A 4X - DUV lithography printing system is assumed with NA equals 0.6 and (sigma) equals 0.5. The prototypical geometry simulate was a 4 micrometers X 1 micrometers line on the mask. The results indicate that the rounding of the corners does not decrease the printed area by more than 2 percent for a 0.4 micrometers radius corner rounding and that roughness should not be a concern, at least in DUV, since it does not crucially affect the linewidth of the printed area.

  9. Fresnel diffraction of aperture with rough edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yuwei; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Junhong; Zhang, Meina; Teng, Shuyun

    2015-06-01

    The Fresnel diffraction of an aperture with a rough edge is studied in this paper. Circular and elliptical apertures with sinusoidal and random edges are chosen as examples to investigate the influence of the aperture edge on the diffraction. The numerical calculation results indicate intuitively the variations of the transverse and longitude diffraction intensity distributions with the edge parameters of the aperture. The data files of aperture models are obtained through the numerical calculations, and the aperture samples are obtained with the help of a liquid crystal light modulator (LCLM). Thus, the practical experiments of the diffractions of apertures with rough edges are carried out. The measured results are consistent with the calculated ones. The approximate analytic expressions of the diffraction by the modified aperture are deduced on the basis of the Fresnel diffraction theory and the statistic optics, and the reasonable explanations for the influence of edge parameters on the diffraction are given through the theoretical analysis.

  10. Reducing Line Edge Roughness of PS-b-PMMA pattern by inducing hydrogen bonding at the interface of the block copolymer microdomains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyu Seong; Han, Sung Hyun; Jang, Sangshin; Park, Jicheol; Kwak, Jongheon; Kim, Jin Kon

    Sharp interface between two blocks in block copolymer nano pattern is one of the important issues in industrial applications to nano-patterning. We utilized hydrogen bonding between N-(4-aminomethyl-benzyl)-4-hydroxymethyl-bezamide (BA) and urea (U) at the interface of polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) copolymer (PS-PMMA). For this purpose, we first synthesized PS by ATRP, then the end group was converted to amino group. Next, it was reacted with BA, followed by reaction with 4-pentynoic acid, resulting in alkyne-terminated group (PS-U-BA-alkyne). Also, azide-terminated PMMA was prepared by anionic polymerization followed by end functionalization. Finally, by the azide-alkyne click reaction between PS-U-BA-alkyne and PMMA-azide, PS-U-BA-PMMA was synthesized. We prepared vertical oriented lamellar nanopatterns on pre-patterned wafers and investigated line edge roughness (LER) after removing PMMA block by dry etching process. We found that LER was reduced compared with PS-PMMA without hydrogen bonding.

  11. Characteristics of surface roughness associated with leading edge ice accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jaiwon

    1994-01-01

    Detailed size measurements of surface roughness associated with leading edge ice accretions are presented to provide information on characteristics of roughness and trends of roughness development with various icing parameters. Data was obtained from icing tests conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) using a NACA 0012 airfoil. Measurements include diameters, heights, and spacing of roughness elements along with chordwise icing limits. Results confirm the existence of smooth and rough ice zones and that the boundary between the two zones (surface roughness transition region) moves upstream towards stagnation region with time. The height of roughness grows as the air temperature and the liquid water content increase, however, the airspeed has little effect on the roughness height. Results also show that the roughness in the surface roughness transition region grows during a very early stage of accretion but reaches a critical height and then remains fairly constant. Results also indicate that a uniformly distributed roughness model is only valid at a very initial stage of the ice accretion process.

  12. Dissipative transport in rough edge graphene nanoribbon tunnel transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Youngki; Salahuddin, Sayeef

    2012-12-01

    We have studied quantum transport in graphene nanoribbon tunnel field-effect transistors. Unlike other studies on similar structures, we have included dissipative processes induced by inelastic electron-phonon scattering and edge roughness in the nanoribbon self-consistently within a non-equilibrium transport simulation. Our results show that the dissipative scattering imposes a limit to the minimum OFF current and a minimum subthreshold swing that can be obtained even for long channel lengths where direct source-drain tunneling is inhibited. The edge roughness, in the presence of dissipative scattering, somewhat surprisingly, shows a classical behavior where it mostly reduces the maximum ON current achievable in this structure.

  13. Anisotropy and edge roughness scattering in the thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksamija, Zlatan; Knezevic, Irena

    2011-03-01

    We present a calculation of the thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbons, based on solving the Boltzmann transport equation with the full phonon dispersions, a momentum-dependent model for edge roughness scattering, as well as three-phonon and isotope scattering. The interplay between strong edge roughness scattering and the anisotropy of the phonon dispersions results in thermal conduction that strongly depends on the chiral angle of the nanoribbon. A minimum occurs in the armchair direction and a maximum is attained in zig-zag nanoribbons. We also show that both the thermal conductivity and the amount of armchair/zig-zag anisotropy depend strongly on the width of the nanoribbon and the rms height of the edge roughness, with smallest and most anisotropic thermal conductivities occuring in narrow GNRs with rough edges. We conclude that physical width of the nanoribbon and the rms roughness of its line edges can be used along with angular direction as parameters to tailor the value of the thermal conductivity. This work has been supported by the Computing Innovation Fellows Project (NSF award No. 0937060 to the Computing Research Association, sub-award CIF-146 to the University of Wisconsin) and by the AFOSR YIP program (award No. FA9550-09-1-0230).

  14. On universality of scaling law describing roughness of triple line.

    PubMed

    Bormashenko, Edward; Musin, Albina; Whyman, Gene; Barkay, Zahava; Zinigrad, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The fine structure of the three-phase (triple) line was studied for different liquids, various topographies of micro-rough substrates and various wetting regimes. Wetting of porous and pillar-based micro-scaled polymer surfaces was investigated. The triple line was visualized with the environmental scanning electron microscope and scanning electron microscope for the "frozen" triple lines. The value of the roughness exponent ζ for water (ice)/rough polymer systems was located within 0.55-0.63. For epoxy glue/rough polymer systems somewhat lower values of the exponent, 0.42 < ζ < 0.54, were established. The obtained values of ζ were close for the Cassie and Wenzel wetting regimes, different liquids, and different substrates' topographies. Thus, the above values of the exponent are to a great extent universal. The switch of the exponent, when the roughness size approaches to the correlation length of the defects, is also universal. PMID:25618613

  15. Optimization of electron beam patterned hydrogen silsesquioxane mask edge roughness for low-loss silicon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Michael G.; Chen, Li; Burr, Justin R.; Reano, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    We carried out a multiparameter fabrication study designed to reduce the line edge roughness (LER) of electron beam (e-beam) patterned hydrogen silsesquioxane resist for the purpose of producing low-loss silicon strip waveguides. Reduced mask roughness was achieved for 50°C pre-exposure baking, 5000 μC/cm2 dose with a beam spot size more than twice as large as the electron beam step size, development in 25% tetramethylammonium hydroxide and postdevelopment baking with rapid thermal annealing in an O2 ambient at 1000°C. The LER caused by pattern fracturing and stage stitches was reduced with multipass writing and per-pass linear and rotational offsets. Si strip waveguides patterned with the optimized mask have root-mean-square sidewall roughness of 2.1 nm with a correlation length of 94 nm, as measured by three-dimensional atomic force microscopy. Measured optical propagation losses of these waveguides across the telecommunications C-band were 2.5 and 2.8 dB/cm for the transverse magnetic and transverse electric modes, respectively. These reduced loss waveguides enable the fabrication of advanced planar lightwave circuit topologies.

  16. Comparative study of line roughness metrics of chemically amplified and inorganic resists for EUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallica, Roberto; Buitrago, Elizabeth; Ekinci, Yasin

    2016-03-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the roughness metrics of different resists. Dense line/space (L/S) images of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ), different chemically amplified resists (CARs), and metal oxide based resists have been patterned by extreme ultraviolet interference lithography (EUV-IL). The three line width roughness metrics: r.m.s. value σLWR, correlation length ξ and roughness exponent α, were measured by metrological analysis of top down SEM images and compared for the different resists imaged here. It was found, that all metrics are required to fully describe the roughness of each resist. Our measurements indicate that few of the state-of-the- art resists tested here can meet the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) requirements for σLWR. The correlation length ξ has been found to be considerably higher in polymer-based materials in comparison to non-polymers. The roughness exponent α, interpreted using the concept of fractal geometry, is mainly affected by acid diffusion in CARs where it produces line edges with a higher complexity than in non-CAR resists. These results indicate that different resists platforms show very different LWR resist metrics and roughness is not only manifested in the σLWR but in all parameters. Therefore, all roughness metrics should be taken into account in the performance comparison of the resist, since they can have a substantial impact on the device performance.

  17. Investigation of Surface Roughness Effect on Transition Edge Sensor Microcalorimeters Using Multilayer Readout Wiring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuromaru, G.; Kuwabara, K.; Miyazaki, N.; Suzuki, S.; Hosoya, S.; Koizumi, Y.; Ohashi, T.; Ishisaki, Y.; Ezoe, Y.; Yamada, S.; Mitsuda, K.; Hidaka, M.; Satoh, T.

    2016-02-01

    We are developing a transition edge sensor (TES) using multilayer readout wiring for future X-ray astronomy satellites. Although we fabricated a first full 20 × 20 pixels TES array, we could not confirm transition of the TES. Considering possible causes, we focused on surface roughness of the TES film. We checked the fabrication process steps that can influence the surface roughness step by step, and changed wiring material (Al to Nb) and also a process condition of an ion milling. As a result, we succeeded to reduce the surface roughness from 4.5 to 2.5 nm rms at 1 \\upmu m scale. However, the transition was not observed probably because the TES films in our samples with surface roughness more than {˜ }1 nm rms tend not to show the transition. Therefore, to suppress the surface roughness even more, we discuss possible process effects and mitigations.

  18. Investigation of Surface Roughness Effect on Transition Edge Sensor Microcalorimeters Using Multilayer Readout Wiring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuromaru, G.; Kuwabara, K.; Miyazaki, N.; Suzuki, S.; Hosoya, S.; Koizumi, Y.; Ohashi, T.; Ishisaki, Y.; Ezoe, Y.; Yamada, S.; Mitsuda, K.; Hidaka, M.; Satoh, T.

    2016-07-01

    We are developing a transition edge sensor (TES) using multilayer readout wiring for future X-ray astronomy satellites. Although we fabricated a first full 20 × 20 pixels TES array, we could not confirm transition of the TES. Considering possible causes, we focused on surface roughness of the TES film. We checked the fabrication process steps that can influence the surface roughness step by step, and changed wiring material (Al to Nb) and also a process condition of an ion milling. As a result, we succeeded to reduce the surface roughness from 4.5 to 2.5 nm rms at 1 \\upmu m scale. However, the transition was not observed probably because the TES films in our samples with surface roughness more than {˜ }1 nm rms tend not to show the transition. Therefore, to suppress the surface roughness even more, we discuss possible process effects and mitigations.

  19. Size and edge roughness effects on thermal conductivity of pristine antimonene allotropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanjeev K.; Sonvane, Yogesh; Wang, Gaoxue; Pandey, Ravindra

    2015-11-01

    Novel two-dimensional antimonene, is recently reported to be stable by first principles calculations Wang et al. [35]. Its thermal properties are now investigated using the phonon Boltzmann transport method. Specifically, the size and edge roughness effects on the thermal conductivity of antimonene allotropes, namely α-Sb and β-Sb are determined. The semiconducting α-Sb and β-Sb have the rectangular and hexagonal unit cells, respectively. We find that thermal conductivity increases with size, and decreases with the edge roughness of the antimonene allotropes. Higher thermal conductivity occurs for α-Sb, and its distinct characteristics in the in-plane acoustic branches are found to be associated with the anisotropic nature of the 2D lattice.

  20. Size and edge roughness dependence of thermal conductivity for vacancy-defective graphene ribbons.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guofeng; Shen, Yulu

    2015-04-14

    By incorporating the phonon-phonon scattering, phonon-boundary scattering and phonon-vacancy scattering into the linearized Boltzmann transport equation, we theoretically investigate the effects of size and edge roughness on thermal conductivity of single vacancy-defective graphene ribbons. Due to the severe suppression of high-frequency phonons by phonon-vacancy scattering which includes the impacts of missing mass and linkages, as well as the variation of the force constant of bonds associated with vacancies, the low-frequency ballistic phonons have a higher contribution to the thermal conductivity, which results in the stronger length, weaker width and weaker edge roughness dependence on thermal conductivity of vacancy-defective graphene ribbons than that of pristine ones. Our findings are helpful to understand and manipulate thermal conductivity of graphene by phononic engineering. PMID:25743638

  1. A numerical and experimental study of the effects of dynamic roughness on laminar leading edge separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Peter D.

    The aircraft industry, as a whole, has been deeply concerned with improving the aerodynamic efficiency of current and future flight vehicles, particularly in the commercial and military markets. However, of particular interest to the field of aerodynamics is the elusive concept of a workable flow control mechanism. Effective flow control is a concept which if properly applied can increase aerodynamic efficiency. Various concepts and ideas to obtain successful flow control have been studied in an attempt to reap these rewards. Some examples include boundary layer blowing (steady and periodic), suction, and compliant walls for laminar flow control. The overall goal of flow control is to increase performance by increasing lift, reducing drag, and delaying or eliminating leading edge separation. The specific objectives of flow control are to (1) delay or eliminate flow separation, (2) delay boundary layer transition, and (3) and reduce skin friction drag. The purpose of this research is to investigate dynamic roughness as a novel method of flow control technology for external boundary layer flows. As opposed to standard surface roughness, dynamic roughness incorporates small time dependent perturbations to the surface of the airfoil. These surface perturbations are actual humps and/or ridges on the surface of the airfoil that are on the scale of the laminar boundary, and oscillate with an unsteady motion. Research has shown that this can provide a means to modify the instantaneous and mean velocity profile near the wall and favorably control the existing state of the boundary layer. Several flow control parameters were studied including dynamic roughness frequency, amplitude, and geometry. The results of this study have shown, both numerically and experimentally, that dynamic roughness can provide an effective means for eliminating both a short and long laminar separation bubble and possibly prove a viable alternative in effective flow control, hence reaping some of

  2. Effects of image noise on contact edge roughness and critical dimension uniformity measurement in synthesized scanning electron microscope images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantoudis, Vassilios; Kuppuswamy, Vijaya-Kumar Murugesan; Gogolides, Evangelos

    2013-01-01

    We study the effects of noise in scanning electron microscope (SEM) images on the size and roughness of contact holes when they are measured using top-down SEM images. The applied methodology is based on the generation of synthesized top-down SEM images, including several model contact edges with controlled roughness, critical dimension (CD) uniformity, and noise. The sources of image noise can be the shot noise of SEM electron beams and microscope electronics. The results show that noise reduces CD and correlation length while it increases the rms value of contact edge roughness (CER). CD variation is increased with noise in images with smooth and identical contacts, whereas it remains almost unaltered in images including rough contacts with CD nonuniformity. Furthermore, we find that the application of a noise-smoothing filter before image analysis rectifies the values of CD (at small filter parameter) and of rms and correlation length (at larger filter parameters), whereas it leads to marginally larger deviations from the true values of CD variation. Quantitative assessment of the model predictions reveals that the noise-induced variations of CD and CER values are less important compared with those caused by process stochasticity and material inhomogeneities.

  3. Contact line stability at edges: Comments on Gibbs's inequalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyson, D. C.

    1988-02-01

    In his discussion of contact line equilibrium for a system comprising two liquids and a solid, Gibbs [Scientific Papers (Dover, New York, 1961), Vol. 1, p. 326] used an argument that resulted in two inequalities he claimed to be applicable when the three-phase contact line coincides with an edge on the solid surface. A simple counterexample is given that shows Gibbs's inequalities lack universal applicability. A serious objection to Gibbs's argument is noted and his discussion is altered to remove the objectionable feature. This leads to modified inequalities, which surprisingly are known and have been attributed to Gibbs by recent authors.

  4. Aerial imaging study of the mask-induced line-width roughness of EUV lithography masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojdyla, Antoine; Donoghue, Alexander; Benk, Markus P.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2016-03-01

    EUV lithography uses reflective photomasks to print features on a wafer through the formation of an aerial image. The aerial image is influenced by the mask's substrate and pattern roughness and by photon shot noise, which collectively affect the line-width on wafer prints, with an impact on local critical dimension uniformity (LCDU). We have used SHARP, an actinic mask-imaging microscope, to study line-width roughness (LWR) in aerial images at sub-nanometer resolution. We studied the impact of photon density and the illumination partial coherence on recorded images, and found that at low coherence settings, the line-width roughness is dominated by photon noise, while at high coherence setting, the effect of speckle becomes more prominent, dominating photon noise for exposure levels of 4 photons/nm2 at threshold on the mask size.

  5. High-Speed Edge-Detecting Line Scan Smart Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokop, Norman F.

    2012-01-01

    A high-speed edge-detecting line scan smart camera was developed. The camera is designed to operate as a component in a NASA Glenn Research Center developed inlet shock detection system. The inlet shock is detected by projecting a laser sheet through the airflow. The shock within the airflow is the densest part and refracts the laser sheet the most in its vicinity, leaving a dark spot or shadowgraph. These spots show up as a dip or negative peak within the pixel intensity profile of an image of the projected laser sheet. The smart camera acquires and processes in real-time the linear image containing the shock shadowgraph and outputting the shock location. Previously a high-speed camera and personal computer would perform the image capture and processing to determine the shock location. This innovation consists of a linear image sensor, analog signal processing circuit, and a digital circuit that provides a numerical digital output of the shock or negative edge location. The smart camera is capable of capturing and processing linear images at over 1,000 frames per second. The edges are identified as numeric pixel values within the linear array of pixels, and the edge location information can be sent out from the circuit in a variety of ways, such as by using a microcontroller and onboard or external digital interface to include serial data such as RS-232/485, USB, Ethernet, or CAN BUS; parallel digital data; or an analog signal. The smart camera system can be integrated into a small package with a relatively small number of parts, reducing size and increasing reliability over the previous imaging system..

  6. Reaction of sorghum lines to zonate leaf spot and rough leaf spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abundant, frequent rains, along with humid and cloudy conditions during the early part of the 2015 growing season, provided conducive conditions for an unusually severe outbreak of zonate leaf spot and rough leaf spot in a block of sorghum lines at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research Farm, Burleson Coun...

  7. Development of a laser-scattering-based probe for on-line measurement of surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shihua; Tian, Yunhui; Tay, Cho Jui; Quan, Chenggen

    2003-03-01

    The design and properties of an optical probe for on-line measurement of surface roughness are discussed. Based on light scattering, a probe that consists of a laser diode, a measuring lens, and a linear photodiode array was designed to detect surface roughness, in which the light scattered from a test surface at a relatively large scattering angle phi (=28 degrees) can be collected to enhance measuring range and repeatability. A coaxial design that incorporates a dual-laser probe and compressed air makes the proposed system insensitive to the position of the test surface and to surface conditions such as the presence of debris, vibration, and lubricants that result from machining. The results from measurements of several sets of specimens have demonstrated the feasibility of measuring surface roughness by using light scattering. On-line measurement on a diamond-turning lathe has shown that the proposed technique is stable and compact enough to be applicable to on-line measurement of surface roughness of an engineering surface. PMID:12638888

  8. In-line digital holography with double knife edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Claudio; Iemmi, Claudio; Campos, Juan

    2015-06-01

    We study and test a new technique for in-line digital holography which avoids the formation of the conjugate images. Inline digital holography is based in a common path configuration. In this case, the hologram is produced by the interference between the reference wave front and the diffracted wave front by an almost transparent object. Twin images are obtained with obscured rings that difficult the determination of the best focusing plane. To avoid the conjugated image, the information of the magnitude and phase of the wave front are needed. In a recent work a new in-line digital holography technique was proposed. In this method the object is illuminated with a collimated wave front. A plane, close to the particles distribution is imaged onto a CCD by means of a convergent lens and at the same time, a knife edge is placed in the focal plane of the lens in order to block half of spatial frequency spectrum. In this way, by means of a numerical processing performed on the Fourier plane, it is possible to eliminate one of the components (real or conjugate) of the reconstructed images nevertheless it is observed a tiny deformation of the resulting hologram image. To compensate this effect, we propose a new configuration in which we implement the knife edge technique on both parts of the spectrum at the same time. Finally in the computer, we process the holograms to build one complete without deformation. This hologram is used to recover the wave front at different planes without the influence of the conjugate image.

  9. Effect of Wall Temperature on Roughness Induced Attachment-Line Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, Anthony; Coleman, Colin; Laub, Jim; Poll, D. I. A.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    An experiment on a cooled swept cylinder in a low-disturbance Mach 1.6 wind tunnel is described. The flow attachment line is disturbed by trip wires of varying size and the laminar/turbulent state of the downstream boundary layer is determined with a hot wire. The results demonstrate that although cooling the wall increases the stability of the boundary layer, it promotes roughness induced transition. Analysis of the data suggests that the attachment- line Reynolds number can account for the effect of wall cooling if the viscosity is evaluated at a particular reference temperature.

  10. Phase-field simulations of contact-line dynamics on rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fengchao; Yue, Pengtao; Chen, Xiaopeng

    2015-11-01

    Wetting of solid surfaces is ubiquitous in nature, and in most cases the surfaces are not smooth. In this work, we will investigate how surface roughness influences contact-line dynamics by simulating the forced wetting in a capillary tube with microposts or microgrooves on its wall. A phase-field method is used to capture fluid interfaces as well as moving contact lines. The governing equations are solved by an implicit finite-element method on an adaptive triangular mesh, which conforms to the topological patterns on the tube wall and also refines at the fluid interface. With our computational setup, we can capture the advancing and receding contact angles. As the contact line moves, it jumps from one pillar to the next; consequently, the apparent contact angle exhibits a periodic behavior. By comparing with the result on a smooth surface, we will explain how surface roughness affects contact-line dynamics by modifying the effective contact angle and slip length. Numerical results on different arrangements and shapes of microposts will be presented.

  11. Line Edge Detection and Characterization in SEM Images using Wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, W; Romagnoli, J A; Tringe, J W; L?tant, S E; Stroeve, P; Palazoglu, A

    2008-10-07

    Edge characterization has become increasingly important in nanotechnology due to the growing demand for precise nanoscale structure fabrication and assembly. Edge detection is often performed by thresholding the spatial information of a top-down image obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) or other surface characterization techniques. Results are highly dependent on an arbitrary threshold value, which makes it difficult to reveal the nature of the real surface and to compare results among images. In this paper, we present an alternative edge boundary detection technique based on the wavelet framework. Our results indicate that the method facilitates nano-scale edge detection and characterization, by providing a systematic threshold determination step.

  12. Effect of surface roughness on contact pressure of static seals (Sealing characteristics of knife-edge seals)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Yoshio; Hosokawa, Kazuo; Funabashi, Koichi

    1992-09-01

    The sealing mechanism of knife-edge seals was investigated experimentally by varying the width of the flat area on the apex of the knife edge. The most suitable shape of the knife edge with the lowest compressive force for sealing was determined, and a new type of knife edge was developed.

  13. Distance-based standard deviation analysis method for line width roughness data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzik, Thomas J.; Rao, Madhukar B.; Zhang, Peng

    2005-05-01

    Linewidth roughness (LWR) is a major challenge for 90nm node and below. As feature sizes decrease, the reliable measurement, statistical comparison and interpretation of LWR data become increasingly important. The reliability of all LWR statistical analysis methods are strongly impacted by the architecture of LWR data being analyzed. Some of the key structural aspects of the collected data include: measurement box size, distance between neighboring measurements and whether measurement boxes have been "stitched" together for analysis. Additionally, the true nature of underlying line width variation, including both cyclical and non-cyclical trends, impacts how reliable a given interpretation will be. Current statistical methodologies for linewidth data are oriented at estimation of the frequency and scale of cyclical variation in linewidth components. Fourier analysis is traditionally applied for this purpose. Such analyses assume both that there is a cyclical component (e.g., sinusoidal) or components in the data to be modeled, as well as implicitly assuming a Gaussian error distribution for the linewidth variation that remains after modeling. The assumption that Fourier analysis is appropriate for LWR data often not met in practice by the LWR data undergoing analysis. A more model-independent approach, distance-based standard deviations, is proposed for use as part of an LWR statistical analysis methodology. It is based on the calculation of local standard deviations of linewidth for all possible distances between measured points. This methodology permits the statistical comparison of linewidth roughness over any distance of interest and makes efficient use of all data for a given measurement box length. It can determine the minimum measurement box length required to capture all linewidth variation. In addition, the method can confirm the validity of line stitching to increase measurement box size, and locate the sources of variance in the overall LWR value (e

  14. Reduction of line edge roughness (ler) in interference-like large field lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Richard Craddock

    The Mississippi Lime play is an important recent oil and gas development in the midcontinent of the United States. In April of 2007, Chesapeake Energy Corporation used horizontal drilling and multistage fracing to bring the Howell 1-33H well online. This well revitalized the Mississippi Lime play, expanding exploration with potential Mississippian reservoirs. The Mississippian section is a complex carbonate reservoir containing several distinct lithologies. An important Mississippian lithology known from outcrops in Arkansas and Missouri is tripolitic chert, or tripolite; a bleached, highly diagenetically altered, silica rock with high porosity, low density, and high permeability. Tripolite is an important reservoir target with the broader Mississippi dense lime play, but should not be confused with Mississippi Chat reservoirs found in Kansas or Oklahoma which commonly are described as cherty paleosols, chert breccia or conglomerates. Acoustic impedance of tripolite is quite low, leading to a characteristic strong negative amplitude anomaly in 3D seismic data (i.e., a lithology bright spot). This study presents techniques and results for seismic mapping of probable tripolite occurrences in the Wild Creek 3D seismic survey of Osage County, Oklahoma. Resolution estimates are also presented, along with preliminary reflection coefficient calculations indicating observed amplitude anomalies represent tripolite embedded in dense Mississippian limestone, a stratigraphic relationship in agreement with recent outcrop observations.

  15. Virtual Sensors for On-line Wheel Wear and Part Roughness Measurement in the Grinding Process

    PubMed Central

    Arriandiaga, Ander; Portillo, Eva; Sánchez, Jose A.; Cabanes, Itziar; Pombo, Iñigo

    2014-01-01

    Grinding is an advanced machining process for the manufacturing of valuable complex and accurate parts for high added value sectors such as aerospace, wind generation, etc. Due to the extremely severe conditions inside grinding machines, critical process variables such as part surface finish or grinding wheel wear cannot be easily and cheaply measured on-line. In this paper a virtual sensor for on-line monitoring of those variables is presented. The sensor is based on the modelling ability of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) for stochastic and non-linear processes such as grinding; the selected architecture is the Layer-Recurrent neural network. The sensor makes use of the relation between the variables to be measured and power consumption in the wheel spindle, which can be easily measured. A sensor calibration methodology is presented, and the levels of error that can be expected are discussed. Validation of the new sensor is carried out by comparing the sensor's results with actual measurements carried out in an industrial grinding machine. Results show excellent estimation performance for both wheel wear and surface roughness. In the case of wheel wear, the absolute error is within the range of microns (average value 32 μm). In the case of surface finish, the absolute error is well below Ra 1 μm (average value 0.32 μm). The present approach can be easily generalized to other grinding operations. PMID:24854055

  16. X-ray K-edge analysis of drain lines in Wilhelm Hall, Ames Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, T.; Whitmore, C. |

    1999-01-05

    From August 12--27, 1998 X-ray K-edge measurements were made on drain lines in seven rooms in Wilhelm Hall, Ames Laboratory. The purpose of these measurements was to determine the extent of thorium (and other heavy metal) contamination inside these pipes. The K-edge method is a noninvasive inspection technique that can provide accurate quantification of heavy metal contamination interior to an object. Of the seven drain lines inspected, one was found to have no significant contamination, three showed significant thorium deposits, two showed mercury contamination, and one line was found to contain mercury, thorium and uranium. The K-edge measurements were found to be consistent with readings from hand-held survey meters, and provided much greater detail on the location and amount of heavy metal contamination.

  17. Dynamics of contact line motion during the wetting of rough surfaces and correlation with topographical surface parameters.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, K J; Wilson, M C T; Mathia, T G; Carras, S

    2011-01-01

    Dynamics of contact line motion and wettability is essential in many industrial applications such as liquid coating, lubrication, printing, painting, condensation, etc. However, the wettability of surfaces depends not only on liquid-solid chemical properties but also can be strongly affected by surface roughness. As a practical application of controlled wettability, we can mention the self-cleaning surfaces, protective clothing, microfluidics devices, electro wetting, etc. In this article, we experimentally investigate the spreading of droplets deposited onto rough surfaces. Anisotropic surfaces were prepared by abrasive polishing on the following materials: aluminium alloy AA7064, titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V, steel AISI 8630, copper alloy UNS C17000, machinable glass ceramic, and poly-methylmethacrylate. Topographical 2D parameters were calculated according to the following standards, defining Geometrical Product Specifications (GPS): ISO 4287, ISO 12085, ISO 13565, ISO 12780, and ISO 12181. The influence of topographical parameters on wettability and spreading phenomenon has been evaluated by statistical covariance analysis. The following parameters have strong influence on fluid spreading on rough surfaces: R(mr) is the relative material ratio of the roughness profile, T(rc) is the microgeometric material ratio, P(mr) is the relative material ratio of the raw profile, K(r) is the mean slope of the roughness motifs, RON(t) is the peak to valley roundness deviation, and P(sk) is the Skewness of the raw profile. The physical meaning of selected parameters is discussed, and K(r) (the mean slope of the roughness motifs) is selected as the most important and physically meaningful parameter. It has been found that for all tested materials, fluid spreading shows increasing tendency when mean slope of the roughness motifs (K(r) ) increases. PMID:21938731

  18. When Smoothening Makes It Rough: Unhindered Step-Edge Diffusion and the Meandering Instability on Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Nita, F.; Pimpinelli, A.

    2005-09-02

    The precise microscopic origin of step meandering is not known in many real situations. A detailed study of this instability has been made for copper, and none of the microscopic mechanisms proposed until now is able to describe all of the observed characteristic features of the instability, in particular, its dependence on the crystallographic orientations of steps. We propose a novel scenario, and using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations we show that essentially all features of step meandering of copper can be explained, if atoms diffuse along step edges and freely turn around the kinks they encounter along the ledge. Then, in a rather counterintuitive way, step meandering appears due to the very mechanism -step-edge diffusion - that may be expected to oppose it.

  19. Warm Comptonization in AGN: Effect on the iron Kα line and the Lyman edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrassart, A.; Dumont, A. M.

    2001-12-01

    It has been suggested that the broad fluorescent X-ray Iron line profile observed in Seyfert 1 galaxies could be explained by Compton scattering in a hot Thomson thick medium, either by reflection (Abrassart 99) or by transmission (Misra and Kembhavi 1998). Here, using our transfer codes TITAN and NOAR (Dumont et al. 1999), we show that for the latter, the iron line and edge can be made consistent with the observed ones, provided the ionization parameter ξ exceeds 106 erg.cm.s-1, and the incident spectra has a low enough Compton temperature. This model implies a small black hole mass and an accretion rate close to the Eddington value. A very important effect of such a medium on the line of sight of the central UV/X-ray source is to smooth any intrinsic Lyman edge, thus solving a long standing puzzle. .

  20. Unbiased line width roughness measurements with critical dimension scanning electron microscopy and critical dimension atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarnouche, L.; Pargon, E.; Menguelti, K.; Fouchier, M.; Fuard, D.; Gouraud, P.; Verove, C.; Joubert, O.

    2012-04-01

    With the constant decrease of semiconductor device dimensions, line width roughness (LWR) becomes one of the most important sources of device variability and thus needs to be controlled below 2 nm for the future technological nodes of the semiconductor roadmap. The LWR control at the nanometer scale requires accurate measurements, which are inevitably impacted by the noise level of the equipment that causes bias from true LWR values. In this article, we compare the capability of two metrology tools, the critical dimension scanning electron microscopy (CD-SEM) and critical dimension atomic force microscopy (CD-AFM) to measure the true line width roughness of silicon and photoresist lines. For this purpose, we propose several methods based on previous works to estimate the noise level of those two equipments and thus extract the true LWR. One of the developed methods for the CD-SEM technique generalizes the power spectral densities (PSD) fitting method proposed by Hiraiwa and Nishida with a more universal autocorrelation function, which includes both correlation length and roughness exponent. However, PSD fitting method could not be used with CD-AFM due to the time consuming character of this technique. Hence, other experimental protocols have been set up for CD-AFM in order to accurately characterize the LWR. Our study shows that the CD-SEM technique combined with our PSD fitting method is much more powerful than CD-AFM to get all roughness information (true LWR, correlation length, and roughness exponent) with a good accuracy and efficiency on hard materials such as silicon. Concerning materials degradable under electron beam exposure such as photoresist, the choice is more disputable, since ultimately they are impacted by the electrons. Fortunately, our PSD fitting method allows working with low number of integration frames, which limits the resist degradation. Besides, we have highlighted some limitations of the CD-AFM technique due to the tip diameter. This

  1. Numerical lifting line theory applied to drooped leading-edge wings below and above stall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. D., Jr.; Corda, S.; Van Wie, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical iterative solution to the classical Prandtl lifting-line theory, suitably modified for poststall behavior, is used to study the aerodynamic characteristics of straight rectangular finite wings with and without leading-edge droop. This study is prompted by the use of such leading-edge modifications to inhibit stall/spins in light general aviation aircraft. The results indicate that lifting-line solutions at high angle of attack can be obtained that agree with experimental data to within 20%, and much closer for many cases. Therefore, such solutions give reasonable preliminary engineering results for both drooped and undrooped wings in the poststall region. However, as predicted by von Karman, the lifting-line solutions are not unique when sectional negative lift slopes are encountered. In addition, the present numerical results always yield symmetrical lift distributions along the span, in contrast to the asymmetrical solutions observed by Schairer in the late 1930's. Finally, a series of parametric tests at low angle of attack indicate that the effect of drooped leading edges on aircraft cruise performance is minimal.

  2. Attachment-Line Transition Due to Roughness on a 76 Degree Swept Cylinder at Mach 1.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Colin P.; Poll, D. I. A.

    1998-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on a 76 deg. swept cylinder to establish the conditions for the attachment-line transition process with, and without, surface roughness in a low-disturbance ("quiet"), Mach number 1.6 flow. Local flow parameters were estimated from pressure measurements. These were in good agreement with predictions from an Euler code (CFL3D) and a boundary layer code (BL3D). Hot-wires and Schlieren photography were used to determine the state of the boundary layer. It was found that, for a near-adiabatic wall condition and a smooth surface, the attachment-line, boundary-layer remained laminar up to the highest attainable Reynolds number (R-bar of 790). Transition under the influence of trip wires was found to depend on wind-tunnel disturbance levels and the onset conditions have been established. Results suggest that current design practice, which is based upon data from conventional ("noisy") tunnels, may be highly conservative.

  3. Edge enhancement to improve visualizations of tube/line placement in x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong; Nodine, Calvin F.; Miller, Wallace T., Jr.

    1995-05-01

    A nonlinear unsharp masking algorithm designed specifically to improve visualization of tube and line placements in chest x-ray imaging is presented in this paper. This algorithm was incorporated as an on-demand button in the design of a PACS display console. To address the concerns of radiologists about the artifacts accompanying image processing operations, we utilized a window-shade display scheme that shows both processed and unprocessed images simultaneously in the same display window at full resolution. We have found that the new algorithm enhances more details in low contrast areas without more over-shootings at high contrast edges. This algorithm is beneficial to tube/line placement examinations since the tips of tubes and lines are typically located in the areas of high brightness and low contrast. Preliminary results indicate that our modified unsharp masking algorithm as an option in a PACS workstation leads to better visualizations of tube-placement position for MICU physicians.

  4. Edge pinning and transformation of defect lines induced by faceted colloidal rings in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Liu, Qingkun; Yuan, Ye; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-06-01

    Nematic colloids exhibit a large diversity of topological defects and structures induced by colloidal particles in the orientationally ordered liquid crystal host fluids. These defects and field configurations define elastic interactions and medium-mediated self-assembly, as well as serve as model systems in exploiting the richness of interactions between topologies and geometries of colloidal surfaces, nematic fields, and topological singularities induced by particles in the nematic bulk and at nematic-colloidal interfaces. Here we demonstrate formation of quarter-strength surface-pinned disclinations, as well as a large variety of director field configurations with splitting and reconnections of singular defect lines, prompted by colloidal particles with sharp edges and size large enough to define strong boundary conditions. Using examples of faceted ring-shaped particles of genus g =1 , we explore transformation of defect lines as they migrate between locations in the bulk of the nematic host to edge-pinned locations at the surfaces of particles and vice versa, showing that this behavior is compliant with topological constraints defined by mathematical theorems. We discuss how transformation of bulk and surface defect lines induced by faceted colloids can enrich the diversity of elasticity-mediated colloidal interactions and how these findings may impinge on prospects of their controlled reconfigurable self-assembly in nematic hosts.

  5. Edge pinning and transformation of defect lines induced by faceted colloidal rings in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Liu, Qingkun; Yuan, Ye; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2016-06-01

    Nematic colloids exhibit a large diversity of topological defects and structures induced by colloidal particles in the orientationally ordered liquid crystal host fluids. These defects and field configurations define elastic interactions and medium-mediated self-assembly, as well as serve as model systems in exploiting the richness of interactions between topologies and geometries of colloidal surfaces, nematic fields, and topological singularities induced by particles in the nematic bulk and at nematic-colloidal interfaces. Here we demonstrate formation of quarter-strength surface-pinned disclinations, as well as a large variety of director field configurations with splitting and reconnections of singular defect lines, prompted by colloidal particles with sharp edges and size large enough to define strong boundary conditions. Using examples of faceted ring-shaped particles of genus g=1, we explore transformation of defect lines as they migrate between locations in the bulk of the nematic host to edge-pinned locations at the surfaces of particles and vice versa, showing that this behavior is compliant with topological constraints defined by mathematical theorems. We discuss how transformation of bulk and surface defect lines induced by faceted colloids can enrich the diversity of elasticity-mediated colloidal interactions and how these findings may impinge on prospects of their controlled reconfigurable self-assembly in nematic hosts. PMID:27415331

  6. Electron-beam lithography with character projection exposure for throughput enhancement with line-edge quality optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeno, Rimon; Maruyama, Satoshi; Mita, Yoshio; Ikeda, Makoto; Asada, Kunihiro

    2016-03-01

    Among various electron-beam lithography (EBL) techniques, variable-shaped beam (VSB) and character projection (CP) methods have attracted many EBL users for their high-throughput feature, but they are considered to be more suited to small-featured VLSI fabrication with regularly-arranged layouts like standard-cell logics and memory arrays. On the other hand, non-VLSI applications like photonics, MEMS, MOEMS, and so on, have not been fully utilized the benefit of CP method due to their wide variety of layout patterns. In addition, the stepwise edge shapes by VSB method often causes intolerable edge roughness to degrade device characteristics from its intended performance with smooth edges. We proposed an overall EBL methodology applicable to wade-variety of EBL applications utilizing VSB and CP methods. Its key idea is in our layout data conversion algorithm that decomposes curved or oblique edges of arbitrary layout patterns into CP shots. We expect significant reduction in EB shot count with a CP-bordered exposure data compared to the corresponding VSB-alone conversion result. Several CP conversion parameters are used to optimize EB exposure throughput, edge quality, and resultant device characteristics. We demonstrated out methodology using the leading-edge VSB/CP EBL tool, ADVANTEST F7000S-VD02, with high resolution Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) resist. Through our experiments of curved and oblique edge lithography under various data conversion conditions, we learned correspondence of the conversion parameters to the resultant edge roughness and other conditions. They will be utilized as the fundamental data for further enhancement of our EBL strategy for optimized EB exposure.

  7. Sharp edges in solar microwave spectra - Neutral current sheets or cyclotron lines?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, E. J.; Kundu, M. R.; Shevgaonkar, R. K.; Mcconnell, D.

    1984-01-01

    Two solar active regions have been mapped using the VLA at three closely spaced frequencies (4496, 4716, and 4996 MHz) in an attempt to determine the origin of the steep spectra (index gamma equal to about -5 to -8) sometimes observed with large single telescopes. One of the regions observed indeed shows an anomalously large slope (gamma equal to about -6) compared to the usual (gamma equal to about -2 to -2.5). The other region shows a similar slope (gamma equal to about -5) but with a larger range of statistical error. Two possible explanations for such steep edges in solar spectra are (1) transmission effects of neutral current sheets, and (2) the appearance of cyclotron lines. The internal evidence of the microwave maps and simultaneous optical observations favor an explanation in terms of cyclotron lines.

  8. Semi-contact-writing of polymer molds for prototyping PDMS chips with low surface roughness, sharp edges and locally varying channel heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutzweiler, Ludwig; Stumpf, Fabian; Tanguy, Laurent; Roth, Guenter; Koltay, Peter; Zengerle, Roland; Riegger, Lutz

    2016-04-01

    Microfluidic systems fabricated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) enable a broad variety of applications and are widespread in the field of Lab-on-a-Chip. Here we demonstrate semi-contact-writing, a novel method for fabrication of polymer based molds for casting microfluidic PDMS chips in a highly flexible, time and cost-efficient manner. The method is related to direct-writing of an aqueous polymer solution on a planar glass substrate and substitutes conventional, time- and cost-consuming UV-lithography. This technique facilitates on-demand prototyping in a low-cost manner and is therefore ideally suited for rapid chip layout iterations. No cleanroom facilities and less expertise are required. Fabrication time from scratch to ready-to-use PDMS-chip is less than 5 h. This polymer writing method enables structure widths down to 140 μm and controllable structure heights ranging from 5.5 μm for writing single layers up to 98 μm by stacking. As a unique property, freely selectable height variations across a substrate can be achieved by application of local stacking. Furthermore, the molds exhibit low surface roughness (R a   =  24 nm, R RMS  =  28 nm) and high fidelity edge sharpness. We validated the method by fabrication of molds to cast PDMS chips for droplet based flow-through PCR with single-cell sensitivity.

  9. Field line reconstruction for edge transport modeling in non-axisymmetric tokamaks configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frerichs, Heinke; Schmitz, Oliver; Waters, Ian; Evans, Todd; Feng, Yuhe; Soukhanovskii, Vlad

    2015-11-01

    Symmetry breaking effects such as resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) present a challenge for the numerical analysis of divertor operation, because they require three dimensional models. One such model is provided by the EMC3-EIRENE code, which is based on a finite flux tube grid for field line reconstruction that allows to account for realistic, three dimensional configurations. We present the Field Line Analysis and Reconstruction Environment (FLARE) - a collection of tools for the analysis of the magnetic field structure. It includes a flexible grid generator which allows to set up plasma transport simulations for single and double null configurations (both disconnected and connected). This includes the ``snowflake minus'' topology, and we present an application for a ``near-exact snowflake'' configuration at NSTX-U. Recent edge plasma simulations for DIII-D and ITER include plasma response effects as calculated by the M3D-C1 code, and it is found that these configurations require a local adjustment of radial/poloidal resolution in order to maintain a reasonable level of magnetic flux conservation. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy under DE-SC0012315 and DE-FC02-04ER54698, and by Start-Up Funds of the University of Wisconsin - Madison.

  10. Numerical analyses of elastohydrodynamically lubricated line and point contacts with rough surfaces by using semi-system and multigrid methods (volumes 1 and 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Xiaolan

    Surface topography has long been recognized to have a significant influence on lubricated contacts. This thesis deals with the subject of elastohydrodynamic lubricated line and point contacts with rough surfaces (rough EHL contacts). As an introduction to this subject, a brief historical review is provided, followed by the mathematical descriptions of the rough EHL contacts for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian lubricants. On the basis of the merits of presently used numerical algorithms, two numerical methods, the semi-system method and the multigrid method, were adopted for developing fast numerical solvers to simulate the rough EHL contact problems. For line contact geometry, numerical simulations were performed for both steady and transient conditions. The surface irregularities examined range from single transverse bump or groove to random surface roughness. Based on the simulation results, an empirical formula for pressure fluctuations was regressed, and a fast pressure calculation model for EHL contact with arbitrary surface profiles was developed. As an extension to the 2-D surface irregularities, the problems of 3-D surface irregularities in line contact geometry were also examined. Parallel simulations were performed for point contact geometry. The types of surface irregularities studied included single asperity, dent, bump, multiple asperities, waviness, and random surface roughness. The orientation of the surface irregularities varies from transverse to striated to longitudinal. The simulation results reveal the fundamental fact that under heavily loaded conditions the domination of pressure flow yields to the unidirectional shear flow in the EHL conjunction. Lubricant passes though the EHL conjunction at approximately the rolling speed. For sliding contact with moving surface roughness, the rolling speed transport behavior leads to an induced transient image. This transient phenomena will be fully developed under steady-state conditions; and, as a

  11. Simplified models for mask roughness induced LER

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany; Naulleau, Patrick

    2011-02-21

    The ITRS requires < 1.2nm line-edge roughness (LER) for the 22nm half-pitch node. Currently, we can consistently achieve only about 3nm LER. Further progress requires understanding the principle causes of LER. Much work has already been done on how both the resist and LER on the mask effect the final printed LER. What is poorly understood, however, is the extent to which system-level effects such as mask surface roughness, illumination conditions, and defocus couple to speckle at the image plane, and factor into LER limits. Presently, mask-roughness induced LER is studied via full 2D aerial image modeling and subsequent analysis of the resulting image. This method is time consuming and cumbersome. It is, therefore, the goal of this research to develop a useful 'rule-of-thumb' analytic model for mask roughness induced LER to expedite learning and understanding.

  12. Numerical Predictions of Sonic Boom Signatures for a Straight Line Segmented Leading Edge Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmiligui, Alaa A.; Wilcox, Floyd J.; Cliff, Susan; Thomas, Scott

    2012-01-01

    A sonic boom wind tunnel test was conducted on a straight-line segmented leading edge (SLSLE) model in the NASA Langley 4- by 4- Foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT). The purpose of the test was to determine whether accurate sonic boom measurements could be obtained while continuously moving the SLSLE model past a conical pressure probe. Sonic boom signatures were also obtained using the conventional move-pause data acquisition method for comparison. The continuous data acquisition approach allows for accurate signatures approximately 15 times faster than a move-pause technique. These successful results provide an incentive for future testing with greatly increased efficiency using the continuous model translation technique with the single probe to measure sonic boom signatures. Two widely used NASA codes, USM3D (Navier-Stokes) and CART3D-AERO (Euler, adjoint-based adaptive mesh), were used to compute off-body sonic boom pressure signatures of the SLSLE model at several different altitudes below the model at Mach 2.0. The computed pressure signatures compared well with wind tunnel data. The effect of the different altitude for signature extraction was evaluated by extrapolating the near field signatures to the ground and comparing pressure signatures and sonic boom loudness levels.

  13. On Production Mechanisms For Balmer Line Radiation From 'Cold' Atomic Hydrogen and Deuterium In Fusion Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, John Douglas

    2010-10-29

    Published arguments, which assign dominant roles to atomic metastability and molecular ion dissociation in the production of 'narrow' Zeeman component Balmer line radiation from the tokamak edge plasma, have been examined critically in relation to: l-redistribution by proton collisions, molecular ion-proton equipartition, and ion acceleration by the plasma sheath (scrape-off layer) potential. These processes are found to constrain the contributions from metastable atoms and from dissociative excitation of molecular ions to 'narrow' Balmer spectra emitted from the plasma edge, in relation to the corresponding contributions from electron impact-induced dissociative excitation of neutral molecules.

  14. Near-coincident K-line and K-edge energies as ionization diagnostics for some high atomic number plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, N. R.; Weber, B. V.; Phipps, D. G.; Schumer, J. W.; Seely, J. F.; Carroll, J. J.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Slabkowska, K.; Polasik, M.

    2012-10-15

    For some high atomic number atoms, the energy of the K-edge is tens of eVs higher than the K-line energy of another atom, so that a few eV increase in the line's energy results in a decreasing transmission of the x-ray through a filter of the matching material. The transmission of cold iridium's Asymptotically-Equal-To 63.287 keV K{alpha}{sub 2} line through a lutetium filter is 7% lower when emitted by ionized iridium, consistent with an energy increase of {Delta}{epsilon} Asymptotically-Equal-To 10{+-}1 eV associated with the ionization. Likewise, the transmission of the K{beta}{sub 1} line of ytterbium through a near-coincident K-edge filter changes depending on plasma parameters that should affect the ionization. Systematic exploration of filter-line pairs like these could become a unique tool for diagnostics of suitable high energy density plasmas.

  15. Mask roughness induced LER: a rule of thumb -- paper

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany; Naulleau, Patrick

    2010-03-12

    Much work has already been done on how both the resist and line-edge roughness (LER) on the mask affect the final printed LER. What is poorly understood, however, is the extent to which system-level effects such as mask surface roughness, illumination conditions, and defocus couple to speckle at the image plane, and currently factor into LER limits. Here, we propose a 'rule-of-thumb' simplified solution that provides a fast and powerful method to obtain mask roughness induced LER. We present modeling data on an older generation mask with a roughness of 230 pm as well as the ultimate target roughness of 50 pm. Moreover, we consider feature sizes of 50 nm and 22 nm, and show that as a function of correlation length, the LER peaks at the condition that the correlation length is approximately equal to the resolution of the imaging optic.

  16. Oxide Wizard: an EELS application to characterize the white lines of transition metal edges.

    PubMed

    Yedra, Lluís; Xuriguera, Elena; Estrader, Marta; López-Ortega, Alberto; Baró, Maria D; Nogués, Josep; Roldan, Manuel; Varela, Maria; Estradé, Sònia; Peiró, Francesca

    2014-06-01

    Physicochemical properties of transition metal oxides are directly determined by the oxidation state of the metallic cations. To address the increasing need to accurately evaluate the oxidation states of transition metal oxide systems at the nanoscale, here we present "Oxide Wizard." This script for Digital Micrograph characterizes the energy-loss near-edge structure and the position of the transition metal edges in the electron energy-loss spectrum. These characteristics of the edges can be linked to the oxidation states of transition metals with high spatial resolution. The power of the script is demonstrated by mapping manganese oxidation states in Fe3O4/Mn3O4 core/shell nanoparticles with sub-nanometer resolution in real space. PMID:24750576

  17. A study on plasma edge boundary in ergodic layer of LHD based on radial profile measurement of impurity line emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Chunfeng; Wang Erhui; Morita, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Goto, Motoshi; Masuzaki, Suguru; Morisaki, Tomohiro

    2011-08-15

    Vertical profiles of edge impurity emissions have been measured in upper half region of elliptical plasmas at horizontally elongated plasma cross section in large helical device (LHD). The vertical profiles near upper O-point located just below helical coil are analyzed to study the plasma edge boundary of the ergodic layer consisting of stochastic magnetic field lines with connection lengths of 30 {<=} L{sub c} {<=} 2000 m. As a result, C{sup 3+} ion emitting CIV spectrum is identified as the ion existing in the farthest edge of the ergodic layer. The peak position of CIV (312.4 A: 1s{sup 2}3p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2}-1s{sup 2}2s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}) vertical profile does not change at all in a wide temperature range of 150 {<=} T{sub e}({rho} = 1) {<=} 400 eV, whereas it moves inside the ergodic layer when T{sub e}({rho} = 1) is reduced below a threshold temperature, e.g., 130 eV at R{sub ax} = 3.75 m configuration. It is found that the C{sup 3+} ion exists at the boundary between ergodic layer and open magnetic filed layer at which the L{sub c} distributes in lengths of 5 to 30 m. The result indicates that the edge boundary near the O-point in LHD is determined by a starting point of the open filed layer, where a tokamak-like steeper edge temperature gradient is formed, although the edge boundary is quite obscure at the X-point region. Any plasma does not exist between the edge boundary and the vacuum vessel. The CIV profile at the O-point is simulated using a three-dimensional edge transport code of EMC3-EIRENE in which the magnetic field structure in vacuum is used for the ergodic layer. A clear discrepancy of 8 mm is found in the peak positions of CIV between measurement and simulation for magnetic configurations with thick ergodic layer, i.e., R{sub ax}=3.90 m, while only a small discrepancy of 3 mm is observed for those with relatively thin ergodic layer, i.e., R{sub ax} = 3.75 m. It suggests that the discrepancy is caused by a modification of the magnetic filed

  18. Equations and charts for the rapid estimation of hinge-moment and effectiveness parameters for trailing-edge controls having leading and trailing edges swept ahead of the Mach lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goin, Kennith L

    1951-01-01

    Existing conical-flow solutions have been used to calculate the hinge-moments and effectiveness parameters of trailing-edge controls having leading and trailing edges swept ahead of the Mach lines and having streamwise root and tip chords. Equations and detailed charts are presented for the rapid estimation of these parameters. Also included is an approximate method by which these parameters may be corrected for airfoil-section thickness.

  19. Radial profile measurement of electron temperature in edge stochastic magnetic field layer of LHD using intensity ratio of extreme ultraviolet line emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Erhui; Morita, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Masahiko; Murakami, Izumi; Goto, Motoshi; Dong Chunfeng

    2012-10-15

    Vertical profile of neon line emissions in 30-650 A wavelength range has been observed in horizontally elongated plasma cross section of Large Helical Device (LHD). Intensity ratio between the neon line emissions is studied to measure the radial profile of electron temperature in the edge stochastic magnetic field layer of LHD. The edge temperature profile successfully obtained from the line ratio of NeVIII 2s-3p to 2p-3s transitions is compared with the simulation based on three-dimensional edge transport code. The result shows a reasonably good agreement with the edge temperature profile analyzed from atomic data and analysis structure code. The electron temperature at last closed flux surface measured from the intensity ratio is also in good agreement with that measured from Thomson scattering.

  20. A possible edge effect in enhanced network. [solar K-line observations by multichannel spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, H. P.; Brown, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    K-line observations of enhanced network taken with the NASA/SPO Multichannel Spectrometer on September 28, 1975, in support of OSO-8 are discussed. The data show a correlation between core brightness and asymmetry for spatial scans which cross enhanced network boundaries. The implications of this result concerning mass flow in and near supergranule boundaries are discussed.

  1. The Line Motion Illusion: The Detection of Counterchanging Edge and Surface Contrast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hock, Howard S.; Nichols, David F.

    2010-01-01

    A version of the line motion illusion (LMI) occurs when one of two adjacent surfaces changes in luminance; a new surface is perceived sliding in front of the initially presented surface. Previous research has implicated high-level mechanisms that can create or modulate LMI motion via feedback to lower-level motion detectors. It is shown here that…

  2. Fabrication of conductive metal lines by plate-to-roll pattern transfer utilizing edge dewetting and flexographic printing.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Moon Kyu; Shin, Kyu Ho; Yoon, Eung Yeoul; Suh, Kahp Y

    2010-03-01

    We present a simple flexographic printing method mediated by edge dewetting for potential applications to roll-to-roll or plate-to-roll pattern transfer. By controlling dewetting of a thin, conductive ink material under conformal contact with a patterned elastomeric mold (e.g., polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS), the liquid ink layer is broken and then selectively wets the protruding part of the mold with high fidelity. Subsequently, a thin photoresist layer that is coated on 300 mm-diameter aluminum cylinder is brought in contact with the ink-coated PDMS mold, resulting in a plate-to-roll pattern transfer without collapse or merging of neighboring features. Using this method, conductive silver lines are fabricated on the cylindrical surface with the resolution of approximately 20 microm and the sheet resistance less than approximately 4.3 ohms after 10 repeated transfer cycles. PMID:19959177

  3. Dynamical K Edge and Line Variations in the X-ray Spectrum of the Ultra-compact Binary 4U 0614+091

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, N. S.; Nowak, M. A.; Chakrabarty, D.; Canizares, C. R.

    2010-12-01

    We observed the ultra-compact binary candidate 4U 0614+091 for a total of 200 ks with the high-energy transmission gratings on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The source is found at various intensity levels with spectral variations present. X-ray luminosities vary between 2.0 × 1036 erg s-1 and 3.5 × 1036 erg s-1. Continuum variations are present at all times and spectra can be fit well with a power-law component, a high kT blackbody component, and a broad line component near oxygen. The spectra require adjustments to the Ne K edge and in some occasions also to the Mg K edge. Once further resolved, the Ne K edge region appears variable in terms of optical depths and morphology. The edge vicinity reveals an average velocity smear of ~3500 km s-1 implying a characteristic radius of the order of <109 cm consistent with an ultra-compact binary nature. The variability proves that the excess is intrinsic to the source. The data seem to indicate excess column densities of up to several 1018 cm-2. However, there are some serious problems with an Ne I interpretation in ultra-compact disks and we need to consider alternative interpretations, which include a variable O VIII ionization edge, as likely candidates. We test such possibilities with existing observations. The prominent soft emission line complex near the O VIII Lyα position appears extremely broad and relativistic effects from near the innermost disk have to be included. Gravitationally broadened line fits also provide nearly edge-on angles of inclination consistent with the observed high dynamics near the Ne K edge. The emissions appear consistent with an ionized disk with ionization parameters of the order of 104 at radii of a few 107 cm. The line wavelengths with respect to O VIII Lyα are found variably blueshifted indicating more complex inner disk dynamics.

  4. Search for ultraviolet emission lines from a hot gaseous halo in the edge-on galaxy NGC 4244

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deharveng, J.-M.; Joubert, M.; Bixler, J.; Bowyer, S.; Malina, R.

    1986-01-01

    Short and long wavelength IUE spectra of the halo region in the edge-on galaxy NGC 4244 are analyzed in order to identify evidence of line emission at the level of 0.000001 ergs per cu cm sr/s. Features are found at 1245 A and 1402 A, having peaks four times greater than the rms intensity fluctuations of nearby spectra. The spectral features are identified with semi-forbidden N V, semi-forbidden S IV at 1240 A, and Si IV and semi-forbidden O IV multiplets at 1400 A, respectively. The appearance of high-peak features and the lack of astrophysically important lines in the sample are evidence of a gas near T = 10 exp 5.2 and emission measure (EM) equal to about 0.000001 pc. However, the case for the existence of such a gas is weakened due to the existence of two other similarly sized features with no identifiable astrophysical origin and the extremely faint nature of the candidate features. The assumed upper limit for the line intensities in NGC 4244 leads to the conclusion that at T less than 100,000 K any emitting gas is either highly clumped or has a p/k value of less than 1000 per cu cm K. It is suggested that if the observed low level features in the short wavelength spectrum are real, the temperature and emission measures allow for a single component gas in the halo of NGC 4244, and are in agreement with those derived by Paresce et al. (1983).

  5. MGDS: Free, on-line, cutting-edge tools to enable the democratisation of geoscience data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwillie, A. M.; Ryan, W. B.; O'Hara, S.; Ferrini, V.; Arko, R. A.; Coplan, J.; Chan, S.; Carbotte, S. M.; Nitsche, F. O.; Bonczkowski, J.; Morton, J. J.; Weissel, R.; Leung, A.

    2010-12-01

    The availability of user-friendly, effective cyber-information resources for accessing and manipulating geoscience data has grown rapidly in recent years. Based at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory the MGDS group has developed a number of free tools that have wide application across the geosciences for both educators and researchers. A simple web page (http://www.marine-geo.org/) allows users to search for and download many types of data by key word, geographical region, or published citation. The popular Create Maps and Grids function and the downloadable Google Earth-compatible KML files appeal to a wide user base. MGDS MediaBank galleries (http://media.marine-geo.org/) enable users to view and download compelling images that are purposefully selected for their educational value from NSF-funded field programs. GeoMapApp (http://www.geomapapp.org), a free map-based interactive tool that works on any machine, is increasingly being adopted across a broad suite of users from middle school students to university researchers. GeoMapApp allows users to plot, manipulate and present data in an intuitive geographical reference frame. GeoMapApp offers a convenient way to explore the wide range of built-in data sets, to quickly generate maps and images that aid visualisation and, when importing their own gridded and tabular data sets, to access the same rich built-in functionality. A user guide, short multi-media tutorials, and webinar are available on-line. The regularly-updated Global Multi-Resolution Topography (GMRT) Synthesis is used as the default GeoMapApp base map and is an increasingly popular means to rapidly create location maps. Additionally, the layer manager offers a fast way to overlay and compare multiple data sets and is augmented by the ability to alter layer transparency so that underlying layers become visible. Examples of GeoMapApp built-in data sets include high-resolution land topography and ocean floor bathymetry derived from satellite and multi

  6. Formulas for the Supersonic Loading, Lift, and Drag of Flat Swept-Back Wings with Leading Edges Behind the Mach Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Doris

    1951-01-01

    The method of superposition of linearized conical flows has been applied to the calculation of the aerodynamic properties, in supersonic flight, of thin flat, swept-back wings at an angle of attack. The wings are assumed to have rectilinear plan forms, with tips parallel to the stream, and to taper in the conventional sense. The investigation covers the moderately supersonic speed range where the Mach lines from the leading-edge apex lie ahead of the wing. The trailing edge may lie ahead of or behind the Mach lines from its apex. The case in which the Mach cone from one tip intersects the other tip is not treated. Formulas are obtained for the load distribution, the total lift, and the drag due to lift. For the cases in which the trailing edge is outside the Mach cone from its apex the formulas are complete. For wings with both leading and trailing edges behind their respective Mach lines, a degree of approximation is necessary. Charts of some of the functions derived are included to facilitate computing, and several examples are worked out in outline.

  7. Advanced CD-SEM metrology for pattern roughness and local placement of lamellar DSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takeshi; Sugiyama, Akiyuki; Ueda, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Shinji; Tsutsumi, Tomohiko; Kim, JiHoon; Cao, Yi; Lin, Guanyang

    2014-04-01

    Directed self-assembly (DSA) applying chemical epitaxy is one of the promising lithographic solutions for next generation semiconductor device manufacturing. We introduced Fingerprint Edge Roughness (FER) as an index to evaluate edge roughness of non-guided lamella finger print pattern, and found its correlation with the Line Edge Roughness (LER) of the lines assembled on the chemical guiding patterns. In this work, we have evaluated both FER and LER at each process steps of the LiNe DSA flow utilizing PS-b-PMMA block copolymers (BCP) assembled on chemical template wafers fabricated with Focus Exposure Matrix (FEM). As a result, we found the followings. (1) Line widths and space distances of the DSA patterns slightly differ to each other depending on their relative position against the chemical guide patterns. Appropriate condition that all lines are in the same dimensions exists, but the condition is not always same for the spaces. (2) LER and LWR (Line Width Roughness) of DSA patterns neither depend on width nor LER of the guide patterns. (3) LWR of DSA patterns are proportional to the width roughness of fingerprint pattern. (4) FER is influenced not only by the BCP formulation, but also by its film thickness. We introduced new methods to optimize the BCP formulation and process conditions by using FER measurement and local CD valuation measurement. Publisher's Note: This paper, originally published on 2 April 2014, was replaced with a corrected/revised version on 14 May 2014. If you downloaded the original PDF but are unable to access the revision, please contact SPIE Digital Library Customer Service for assistance.

  8. Edge detection: a tutorial review

    SciTech Connect

    Kunt, M.

    1982-01-01

    Major edge detection methods are reviewed from the signal processing and artificial intelligence point of views. In the first class, images are processed first to enhance edges. Then a decision is made to label each picture point as edge or not edge. In the second class edges are viewed as the border-lines of regions whose points share a common property. 21 references.

  9. Metrology, origins, and control of sidewall roughness in chemically amplified resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Geoffrey William

    1999-11-01

    With the advances in microelectronics that continuously require shrinking photoresist features, sidewall roughness of resist features will become increasingly important, and properly measuring and describing the roughness with appropriate parameters also becomes vitally important. To this end, three metrology methods have been compared: top-down scanning electron microscopy measurements that provide fast measurements of the profile roughness but are dependent on the sample configuration; an atomic force microscopy technique measures only the top edge of the resist line; and another atomic force microscopy technique that provides roughness data over the entire depth of the sidewall surface. A comparison of these methods, using a common sample, is presented. Factors contributing to the roughness of four chemically amplified resists are estimated by systematically varying processing conditions for each resist. For the negative-tone resist Shipley SAL 605, the extent of linking and development conditions have the greatest effect on the top surface roughness. The observed sidewall roughness of 5.2 nm RMS (root-mean-square), however, is independent of these processing variables. The positive-tone resist Shipley APEX-E has a sidewall roughness of 3.1 nm RMS and is most affected by the development condition, the quality of the x-ray mask, and by pattern-specific parameters. APEX-E also demonstrates depth-dependent roughness, as the resist closest to the substrate is smoother than resist near the top of the feature. The sidewall roughness of the positive-tone resist Shipley UV5 is around 2.7 nm RMS and also shows depth-dependent roughness. Experiments determining the contribution of roughness transferred via the aerial image from the x-ray mask into UV5 indicate that only low frequency roughness less than 2.0 mum -1 is transferred. Higher frequency roughness is due to factors in the photoresist. The sidewall roughness of an experimental bilayer resist is about 5 to 7 nm RMS

  10. Mask roughness induced LER: geometric model at long correlation lengths

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany M.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2011-02-11

    Collective understanding of how both the resist and line-edge roughness (LER) on the mask affect the final printed LER has made significant advances. What is poorly understood, however, is the extent to which mask surface roughness couples to image plane LER as a function of illumination conditions, NA, and defocus. Recently, progress has been made in formulating a simplified solution for mask roughness induced LER. Here, we investigate the LER behavior at long correlation lengths of surface roughness on the mask. We find that for correlation lengths greater than 3/NA in wafer dimensions and CDs greater than approximately 0.75/NA, the previously described simplified model, which remains based on physical optics, converges to a 'geometric regime' which is based on ray optics and is independent of partial coherence. In this 'geometric regime', the LER is proportional to the mask slope error as it propagates through focus, and provides a faster alternative to calculating LER in contrast to either full 2D aerial image simulation modeling or the newly proposed physical optics model. Data is presented for both an NA = 0.32 and an NA = 0.5 imaging system for CDs of 22-nm and 50-nm horizontal-line-dense structures.

  11. Mask roughness and its implications for LER at the 22- and 16-nm nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick; George, Simi A.; McClinton, Brittany M.

    2010-02-16

    Line-edge roughness (LER) remains the most significant challenge facing the development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) resist. The mask, however, has been found to be a significant contributor to image-plane LER. This has long been expected based on modeling and has more recently been demonstrated experimentally. Problems arise from both mask-absorber LER as well as mask multilayer roughness leading to random phase variations in the reflected beam and consequently speckle. Understanding the implications this has on mask requirements for the 22-nm half pitch node and below is crucial. Modeling results indicate a replicated surface roughness (RSR) specification of 50 pm and a ruthenium capping layer roughness specification of 440 pm. Moreover, modeling indicates that it is crucial to achieve the current ITRS specifications for mask absorber LER which is significantly smaller than current capabilities.

  12. High frequency edge enhancement in the detection of fine pulmonary lines. Parity between storage phosphor digital images and conventional chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Oestmann, J W; Greene, R; Rubens, J R; Pile-Spellman, E; Hall, D; Robertson, C; Llewellyn, H J; McCarthy, K A; Potsaid, M; White, G

    1989-09-01

    Fine linear structures represent a severe test of the minimum spatial resolution that is needed for digital chest imaging. We studied the comparative observer performance of storage phosphor digital imaging (1760 X 2140 pixel matrix, 10 bits deep), and conventional radiography (Lanex medium screen, Ortho C film) in the detection of simulated fine pulmonary lines superimposed on the normal chest when exposure factors were identical (20mR skin entrance dose at 141 kVp). Receiver operating characteristics analysis of 2160 observations by six readers found that high frequency edge-enhanced digital images (ROC area: 0.78 +/- 0.06) performed better than unenhanced digital images (ROC area: 0.70 +/- 0.07) (P less than 0.01 for paired t-test), and that edge enhanced digital images performed on a par with conventional radiography (ROC area: 0.78 +/- 0.09). We conclude that for the detection of fine linear structures, storage phosphor digital images can perform on a par with higher resolution conventional chest radiographs when a high frequency edge-enhancement algorithm is employed. PMID:2807816

  13. A possibility of avoiding surface roughness due to insects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wortmann, F. X.

    1984-01-01

    Discussion of a method for eliminating turbulence caused by the formation of insect roughness upon the leading edges and fuselage, particularly in aircraft using BLC. The proposed technique foresees the use of elastic surfaces on which insect roughness cannot form. The operational characteristics of highly elastic rubber surface fastened to the wing leading edges and fuselage edges are examined. Some preliminary test results are presented. The technique is seen to be advantageous primarily for short-haul operations.

  14. Fluids confined in wedges and by edges: Virial series for the line-thermodynamic properties of hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, Ignacio

    2014-12-01

    This work is devoted to analyze the relation between the thermodynamic properties of a confined fluid and the shape of its confining vessel. Recently, new insights in this topic were found through the study of cluster integrals for inhomogeneous fluids that revealed the dependence on the vessel shape of the low density behavior of the system. Here, the statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of fluids confined in wedges or by edges is revisited, focusing on their cluster integrals. In particular, the well known hard sphere fluid, which was not studied in this framework so far, is analyzed under confinement and its thermodynamic properties are analytically studied up to order two in the density. Furthermore, the analysis is extended to the confinement produced by a corrugated wall. These results rely on the obtained analytic expression for the second cluster integral of the confined hard sphere system as a function of the opening dihedral angle 0 < β < 2π. It enables a unified approach to both wedges and edges.

  15. Fluids confined in wedges and by edges: Virial series for the line-thermodynamic properties of hard spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Urrutia, Ignacio

    2014-12-28

    This work is devoted to analyze the relation between the thermodynamic properties of a confined fluid and the shape of its confining vessel. Recently, new insights in this topic were found through the study of cluster integrals for inhomogeneous fluids that revealed the dependence on the vessel shape of the low density behavior of the system. Here, the statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of fluids confined in wedges or by edges is revisited, focusing on their cluster integrals. In particular, the well known hard sphere fluid, which was not studied in this framework so far, is analyzed under confinement and its thermodynamic properties are analytically studied up to order two in the density. Furthermore, the analysis is extended to the confinement produced by a corrugated wall. These results rely on the obtained analytic expression for the second cluster integral of the confined hard sphere system as a function of the opening dihedral angle 0 < β < 2π. It enables a unified approach to both wedges and edges.

  16. Fluids confined in wedges and by edges: virial series for the line-thermodynamic properties of hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, Ignacio

    2014-12-28

    This work is devoted to analyze the relation between the thermodynamic properties of a confined fluid and the shape of its confining vessel. Recently, new insights in this topic were found through the study of cluster integrals for inhomogeneous fluids that revealed the dependence on the vessel shape of the low density behavior of the system. Here, the statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of fluids confined in wedges or by edges is revisited, focusing on their cluster integrals. In particular, the well known hard sphere fluid, which was not studied in this framework so far, is analyzed under confinement and its thermodynamic properties are analytically studied up to order two in the density. Furthermore, the analysis is extended to the confinement produced by a corrugated wall. These results rely on the obtained analytic expression for the second cluster integral of the confined hard sphere system as a function of the opening dihedral angle 0 < β < 2π. It enables a unified approach to both wedges and edges. PMID:25554179

  17. The broad emission-line region: the confluence of the outer accretion disc with the inner edge of the dusty torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goad, M. R.; Korista, K. T.; Ruff, A. J.

    2012-11-01

    We have investigated the observational characteristics of a class of broad emission line region (BLR) geometries that connect the outer accretion disc with the inner edge of the dusty toroidal obscuring region (TOR). We suggest that the BLR consists of photoionized gas of densities which allow for efficient cooling by ultraviolet (UV)/optical emission lines and of incident continuum fluxes which discourage the formation of grains, and that such gas occupies the range of distance and scale height between the continuum-emitting accretion disc and the dusty TOR. As a first approximation, we assume a population of clouds illuminated by ionizing photons from the central source, with the scale height of the illuminated clouds growing with increasing radial distance, forming an effective surface of a 'bowl'. Observer lines of sight which peer into the bowl lead to a Type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGN) spectrum. We assume that the gas dynamics are dominated by gravity, and we include in this model the effects of transverse Doppler shift (TDS), gravitational redshift (GR) and scale-height-dependent macroturbulence. Our simple model reproduces many of the commonly observed phenomena associated with the central regions of AGN, including (i) the shorter than expected continuum-dust delays (geometry), (ii) the absence of response in the core of the optical recombination lines on short time-scales (geometry/photoionization), (iii) an enhanced redwing response on short time-scales (GR and TDS), (iv) the observed differences between the delays for high- and low-ionization lines (photoionization), (v) identifying one of the possible primary contributors to the observed line widths for near face-on systems even for purely transverse motion (GR and TDS), (vi) a mechanism responsible for producing Lorentzian profiles (especially in the Balmer and Mg II emission lines) in low-inclination systems (turbulence), (vii) the absence of significant continuum-emission-line delays between the

  18. A multi-directional and multi-scale roughness filter to detect lineament segments on digital elevation models - analyzing spatial objects in R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Sebastian; Robl, Jörg; Wendt, Lorenz; Willingshofer, Ernst; Hilberg, Sylke

    2016-04-01

    Automated lineament analysis on remotely sensed data requires two general process steps: The identification of neighboring pixels showing high contrast and the conversion of these domains into lines. The target output is the lineaments' position, extent and orientation. We developed a lineament extraction tool programmed in R using digital elevation models as input data to generate morphological lineaments defined as follows: A morphological lineament represents a zone of high relief roughness, whose length significantly exceeds the width. As relief roughness any deviation from a flat plane, defined by a roughness threshold, is considered. In our novel approach a multi-directional and multi-scale roughness filter uses moving windows of different neighborhood sizes to identify threshold limited rough domains on digital elevation models. Surface roughness is calculated as the vertical elevation difference between the center cell and the different orientated straight lines connecting two edge cells of a neighborhood, divided by the horizontal distance of the edge cells. Thus multiple roughness values depending on the neighborhood sizes and orientations of the edge connecting lines are generated for each cell and their maximum and minimum values are extracted. Thereby negative signs of the roughness parameter represent concave relief structures as valleys, positive signs convex relief structures as ridges. A threshold defines domains of high relief roughness. These domains are thinned to a representative point pattern by a 3x3 neighborhood filter, highlighting maximum and minimum roughness peaks, and representing the center points of lineament segments. The orientation and extent of the lineament segments are calculated within the roughness domains, generating a straight line segment in the direction of least roughness differences. We tested our algorithm on digital elevation models of multiple sources and scales and compared the results visually with shaded relief map

  19. Emission-Line Ratios and Variations in Temperature and Ionization State in the Diffuse Ionized Gas of Five Edge-on Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otte, B.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Reynolds, R. J.

    2002-06-01

    We present spectroscopic observations of ionized gas in the disk-halo regions of five edge-on galaxies, covering a wavelength range from [O II] 3727 Å to [S II] 6716.4 Å. The inclusion of the [O II] emission provides additional constraints on the properties of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG), in particular, the origin of the observed spatial variations in the line intensity ratios. We have derived electron temperatures, ionization fractions, and abundances along the slit. Our data include slit positions both parallel and perpendicular to the galactic disks. This allowed us to examine variations in the line intensity ratios with height above the midplane, as well as with distance from the galactic centers. The observed increase in the [O II]/Hα line ratio toward the halo seems to require an increase in electron temperature caused by a nonionizing heating mechanism. We conclude that gradients in the electron temperature can play a significant role in the observed variations in the optical emission-line ratios from extraplanar DIG.

  20. Evaluation and Implementation of Helium Line Ratio Technique for Measurement of Edge Density and Temperature on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurd, L.; Brooks, N. H.; Unterberg, E. A.; Schmitz, O.

    2009-11-01

    The electron density and temperature in the scrape-off layer of DIII-D have been determined in pure helium plasmas by the helium line ratio technique [1] employing spectral line monitors and an intensified fast-framing CCD camera. Both diagnostics viewed the plasma tangentially on the midplane of the vessel. Three visible He I transitions, one triplet (3^3S->2^3P) and two singlets (3^1D->2^1P and 3^1S->2^1P), were measured simultaneously --- along a single spatial chord with the line monitors and over a 2D region of the outer midplane with the intensified camera. Column brightnesses through the emission shell recorded with the camera were Abel-inverted to yield local intensities with a spatial resolution of a few millimeters. The electron densities and temperatures deduced by the helium line ratio method are compared with results from the Thomson scattering diagnostic on DIII-D. 8pt [1] O. Schmitz et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 (2008) 115004.

  1. High-throughput and non-destructive sidewall roughness measurement using 3-dimensional atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Yueming; Buenviaje-Coggins, Cynthia; Lee, Yong-ha; Park, Sang-il

    2012-03-01

    As the feature size of the semiconductor device is becoming increasingly smaller and the transistor has become three-dimensional (e.g. Fin-FET structure), a simple Line Edge Roughness (LER) is no longer sufficient for characterizing these devices. Sidewall Roughness (SWR) is now the more proper metric for these metrology applications. However, current metrology technologies, such as SEM and OCD, provide limited information on the sidewall of such small structures. The subject of this study is the sidewall roughness measurement with a three-dimensional Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) using tilted Z scanner. This 3D AFM is based on a decoupled XY and Z scanning configuration, in which the Z scanner can be intentionally tilted to the side. A sharp conical tip is typically used for imaging, which provides high resolution capability on both the flat surfaces (top and bottom) and the steep sidewalls.

  2. Validity of the thin mask approximation in extreme ultraviolet mask roughness simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick; George, Simi

    2011-01-26

    In the case of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, modeling has shown that reflector phase roughness on the lithographic mask is a significant concern due to the image plan speckle it causes and the resulting line-edge roughness on imaged features. Modeling results have recently been used to determine the requirements for future production worthy masks yielding the extremely stringent specification of 50 pm rms roughness. Owing to the scale of the problem in terms of memory requirements, past modeling results have all been based on the thin mask approximation. EUV masks, however, are inherently three dimensional in nature and thus the question arises as to the validity of the thin mask approximation. Here we directly compare image plane speckle calculation results using the fast two dimensional thin mask model to rigorous finite-difference time-domain results and find the two methods to be comparable.

  3. Analysis of a two row hydrostatic journal bearing with variable properties, inertia effects and surface roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. J.; Adams, M. L.; Mullen, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    A computer algorithm for simulation of hydrostatic journal bearing pressure-flow behavior has been generated. The effects taken into account are inertia, cavitation, variable properties (isothermal bearing) and roughness. The program has been specifically tailored for simulation of the hybrid bearing of the cryogenic turbopumps of the main shuttle engine. Due to the high pressure (515 psia) of the supply line no cavitation has been found. The influence of the roughness effects have been found to become important only when the surface-roughness order of magnitude is comparable with that of the bearing clearance itself. Pocket edge inertia and variable properties have been found to have quite an important influence upon the pocket pressure, field pressure distribution and lubricant mass flow.

  4. Transgenic cry1C(⁎) gene rough rice line T1C-19 does not change the host preferences of the non-target stored product pest, Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae), and its parasitoid wasp, Anisopteromalus calandrae (Howard) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao; Yan, Miao-Jun; Zhang, Aijun; Wang, Man-Qun

    2015-10-01

    Rough rice grains are often stored for extended periods before they are used or consumed. However, during storage, the rough rice is vulnerable to insect infestation, resulting in significant economic loss. Previous studies have shown that volatiles cues, physical characteristics, and taste chemicals on the grains could be the important key behavior factors for storage insect pests to locate the hosts and select oviposition sites. It is also well known that the transgenic Bt rough rice line T1C-19, which expresses a cry1C(⁎) gene has a high resistance to Lepidoptera pests. However, there were no evidences to show the consequences of host preference for non-target insect pests after growing Bt transgenic rice. In this study, the potential key factors of Bt rough rice were investigated for their impacts on the behaviors of non-target pest lesser grain borer Rhyzopertha dominica, the main weevil pest of grain and its parasitic wasps Anisopteromalus calandrae, the natural enemy of the beetle. Both electronic nose and electronic tongue analyses showed that the parameters of Bt rough rice were analogous to those of the non-Bt rough rice. The volatile profiles of Bt and non-Bt rough rice examined by gas chromatographic mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were similar. For most volatile compounds, there were no significantly quantitative differences in compound quantities between Bt and non-Bt rough rice. The densities of sclereids and trichomes on the rough rice husk surface were statistically equal in Bt and non-Bt rough rice. The non-target pest, R. dominica, and its parasitoid wasp, A. calandrae, were attracted to both rough rice and could not distinguish the transgenic T1C-19 from the isogenic rough rice. These results demonstrated that Bt rough rice has no negative impacts on the host preference behaviors of non-target stored product pest R. dominica and its parasitoid A. calandrae. PMID:26150137

  5. A Minor Modification of Leading Edge Discriminator Circuitry with a Delay Line for Baseline Restoration of Scintillation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N

    2003-05-27

    Multi-channel neutron time-of-flight detector arrays LaNSA, T-ion, Medusa, and Mandala, have been used for neutron spectroscopy in inertial confinement fusion experiments. These multi-channel neutron detector arrays consist of many identical scintillation detectors (842 {approx} 1024 channel), data acquisition electronics (discriminators, time-to digital converters, and controller). Each detector element is operated in neutron counting mode. Time-of-flight of individual detected neutrons are recorded by time to digital converters. The energy of each detected neutrons is determined from its time-of-flight. The accurate time measurement ({Delta}t {approx} 0.5 ns) and straightforward statistical features of the data obtained with these systems provides good integrity and reliability. The elements detector used in these systems are organic scintillators coupled with photo multiplier tubes. A scintillation detector operated in particle-counting mode requires finite recovery time after each detection event. The recovery time is determined by the time responses of scintillators, photo multiplier tubes, and the dead times of following discriminators and time-to digital converters. The harsh gamma ray background environment of fast ignitor experiments requires detectors that have fast recovery times. In high intensity laser experiments (I > 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}), strong gamma ray bursts are produced by relativistic laser plasma interactions. Prior to the neutron signal, these strong gamma ray bursts hit the detectors and interfere with the detection of following neutron signals. In these situations, the recovery time of the system after preceding gamma ray bursts is determined mainly by the base line shift of the PMT signal (due to slower decay components of scintillators ''after glow''). Discriminators cannot detect following signal pulses until the proceeding burst decays below its threshold voltage. The base line shift caused by the after glow prolongs the recovery

  6. Effectiveness and tolerability of second-line therapy with vildagliptin vs. other oral agents in type 2 diabetes: A real-life worldwide observational study (EDGE)

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, C; Barnett, A H; Brath, H; Conget, I; de Castro, J J; Göke, R; Márquez Rodriguez, E; Nilsson, P M; Pagkalos, E; Penfornis, A; Schaper, NC; Wangnoo, S K; Kothny, W; Bader, G

    2013-01-01

    Aim Real-life studies are needed to confirm the clinical relevance of findings from randomised controlled trials (RCTs). This study aimed to assess the effectiveness and tolerability of vildagliptin add-on vs. other oral antihyperglycaemic drugs (OADs) added to OAD monotherapy in a real-life setting, and to explore the advantages and limitations of large-scale ‘pragmatic’ trials. Methods EDGE was a prospective, 1-year, worldwide, real-life observational study in which 2957 physicians reported on the effects of second-line OADs in 45,868 patients with T2DM not reaching glycaemic targets with monotherapy. Physicians could add any OAD, and patients entered either vildagliptin or (pooled) comparator cohort. The primary effectiveness and tolerability end-point (PEP) evaluated proportions of patients decreasing HbA1c > 0.3%, without hypoglycaemia, weight gain, peripheral oedema or gastrointestinal side effects. The most clinically relevant secondary end-point (SEP 3) was attainment of end-point HbA1c < 7% without hypoglycaemia or ≥ 3% increase in body weight. Results In this large group of T2DM patients, a second OAD was added at mean HbA1c of 8.2 ± 1.3%, with no baseline HbA1c difference between cohorts. Second-line OAD therapy attained the PEP in the majority of patients, with higher attainment in those prescribed a vildagliptin-based regimen. The adjusted odds ratio was 1.49 (95% CI: 1.42, 1.55; p < 0.001). In patients with baseline HbA1c ≥ 7%, SEP 3 was achieved by 35% of patients on a vildagliptin-based combination and by 23% of those receiving comparator combinations. The adjusted odds ratio was 1.96 (95% CI: 1.85, 2.07; p < 0.001). Safety events were reported infrequently and safety profiles of vildagliptin and other OADs were consistent with previous data. Conclusion EDGE demonstrates that in a ‘real-life’ setting, vildagliptin as second OAD can lower HbA1c to target without well-recognised OAD side effects, more frequently than

  7. Unified EDGE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-06-18

    UEDGE is an interactive suite of physics packages using the Python or BASIS scripting systems. The plasma is described by time-dependent 2D plasma fluid equations that include equations for density, velocity, ion temperature, electron temperature, electrostatic potential, and gas density in the edge region of a magnetic fusion energy confinement device. Slab, cylindrical, and toroidal geometries are allowed, and closed and open magnetic field-line regions are included. Classical transport is assumed along magnetic field lines,more » and anomalous transport is assumed across field lines. Multi-charge state impurities can be included with the corresponding line-radiation energy loss. Although UEDGE is written in Fortran, for efficient execution and analysis of results, it utilizes either Python or BASIS scripting shells. Python is easily available for many platforms (http://www.Python.org/). The features and availability of BASIS are described in “Basis Manual Set” by P.F. Dubois, Z.C. Motteler, et al., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory report UCRL-MA-1 18541, June, 2002 and http://basis.llnl.gov. BASIS has been reviewed and released by LLNL for unlimited distribution. The Python version utilizes PYBASIS scripts developed by D.P. Grote, LLNL. The Python version also uses MPPL code and MAC Perl script, available from the public-domain BASIS source above. The Forthon version of UEDGE uses the same source files, but utilizes Forthon to produce a Python-compatible source. Forthon has been developed by D.P. Grote at LBL (see http://hifweb.lbl.gov/Forthon/ and Grote et al. in the references below), and it is freely available. The graphics can be performed by any package importable to Python, such as PYGIST.« less

  8. Unified EDGE

    SciTech Connect

    2007-06-18

    UEDGE is an interactive suite of physics packages using the Python or BASIS scripting systems. The plasma is described by time-dependent 2D plasma fluid equations that include equations for density, velocity, ion temperature, electron temperature, electrostatic potential, and gas density in the edge region of a magnetic fusion energy confinement device. Slab, cylindrical, and toroidal geometries are allowed, and closed and open magnetic field-line regions are included. Classical transport is assumed along magnetic field lines, and anomalous transport is assumed across field lines. Multi-charge state impurities can be included with the corresponding line-radiation energy loss. Although UEDGE is written in Fortran, for efficient execution and analysis of results, it utilizes either Python or BASIS scripting shells. Python is easily available for many platforms (http://www.Python.org/). The features and availability of BASIS are described in “Basis Manual Set” by P.F. Dubois, Z.C. Motteler, et al., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory report UCRL-MA-1 18541, June, 2002 and http://basis.llnl.gov. BASIS has been reviewed and released by LLNL for unlimited distribution. The Python version utilizes PYBASIS scripts developed by D.P. Grote, LLNL. The Python version also uses MPPL code and MAC Perl script, available from the public-domain BASIS source above. The Forthon version of UEDGE uses the same source files, but utilizes Forthon to produce a Python-compatible source. Forthon has been developed by D.P. Grote at LBL (see http://hifweb.lbl.gov/Forthon/ and Grote et al. in the references below), and it is freely available. The graphics can be performed by any package importable to Python, such as PYGIST.

  9. Effective field model of roughness in magnetic nano-structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lepadatu, Serban

    2015-12-28

    An effective field model is introduced here within the micromagnetics formulation, to study roughness in magnetic structures, by considering sub-exchange length roughness levels as a perturbation on a smooth structure. This allows the roughness contribution to be separated, which is found to give rise to an effective configurational anisotropy for both edge and surface roughness, and accurately model its effects with fine control over the roughness depth without the explicit need to refine the computational cell size to accommodate the roughness profile. The model is validated by comparisons with directly roughened structures for a series of magnetization switching and domain wall velocity simulations and found to be in excellent agreement for roughness levels up to the exchange length. The model is further applied to vortex domain wall velocity simulations with surface roughness, which is shown to significantly modify domain wall movement and result in dynamic pinning and stochastic creep effects.

  10. Understanding EUV mask blank surface roughness induced LWR and associated roughness requirement

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Pei-Yang; Zhang, Guojing; Gullickson, Eric M.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Benk, Markus P.

    2015-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask multi-layer (ML) blank surface roughness specification historically comes from blank defect inspection tool requirement. Later, new concerns on ML surface roughness induced wafer pattern line width roughness (LWR) arise. In this paper, we have studied wafer level pattern LWR as a function of EUVL mask surface roughness via High-NA Actinic Reticle Review Tool. We found that the blank surface roughness induced LWR at current blank roughness level is in the order of 0.5nm 3σ for NA=0.42 at the best focus. At defocus of ±40nm, the corresponding LWR will be 0.2nm higher. Further reducing EUVL mask blank surface roughness will increase the blank cost with limited benefit in improving the pattern LWR, provided that the intrinsic resist LWR is in the order of 1nm and above.

  11. Edge detection by nonlinear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Yiu-fai

    1994-07-01

    We demonstrate how the formulation of a nonlinear scale-space filter can be used for edge detection and junction analysis. By casting edge-preserving filtering in terms of maximizing information content subject to an average cost function, the computed cost at each pixel location becomes a local measure of edgeness. This computation depends on a single scale parameter and the given image data. Unlike previous approaches which require careful tuning of the filter kernels for various types of edges, our scheme is general enough to be able to handle different edges, such as lines, step-edges, corners and junctions. Anisotropy in the data is handled automatically by the nonlinear dynamics.

  12. LER control and mitigation: mask roughness induced LER

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany; Naulleau, Patrick

    2011-02-21

    In the push towards commercialization of extreme-ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), meeting the stringent requirements for line-edge roughness (LER) is increasingly challenging. For the 22-nm half-pitch node and below, the ITRS requires under 1.2 nm LER. Much of this LER is thought to arise from three significant contributors: LER on the mask absorber pattern, LER from the resist, and LER from mask roughness induced speckle. The physical mechanism behind the last contributor is becoming clearer, but how it is affected by the presence of aberrations is less well understood. Here, we conduct a full 2D aerial image simulation analysis of aberrations sensitivities of mask roughness induced LER for the first 37 fringe zernikes. These results serve as a guideline for future LER aberrations control. In examining how to mitigate mask roughness induced LER, we next consider an alternate illumination scheme whereby a traditional dipole's angular spectrum is extended in the direction parallel to the line-and-space mask absorber pattern to represent a 'strip'. While this illumination surprisingly provides merely minimal improvement to the LER as several alternate illumination schemes, overall imaging quality in terms of ILS, NILS, and contrast is improved. While the 22-nm half-pitch node can tolerate significant aberrations from a mask roughness induced LER perspective, total aberration levels for the 16-nm half-pitch node need to be strictly capped at 0.25nm rms to meet the ITRS guidelines. An individual aberrations study for the first 37 fringe zernikes on the 16-nm half-pitch node at the 0.25nm rms level reveals a sensitivity to various forms of spherical aberrations (Z9 & Z25) and quadrafoil (Z28) in particular, under conventional crosspole illumination ({sigma} = 0.10). Compared to conventional dipole or crosspole illuminations, an extended dipole 'strip' illumination scheme offers a way to mitigate mask roughness induced LER, while still maintaining high imaging quality for

  13. Mask roughness induced LER control and mitigation: aberrations sensitivity study and alternate illumination scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClinton, Brittany M.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2011-04-01

    Here we conduct a mask-roughness-induced line-edge-roughness (LER) aberrations sensitivity study both as a random distribution amongst the first 16 Fringe Zernikes (for overall aberration levels of 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75nm rms) as well as an individual aberrations sensitivity matrix over the first 37 Fringe Zernikes. Full 2D aerial image modeling for an imaging system with NA = 0.32 was done for both the 22-nm and 16-nm half-pitch nodes on a rough mask with a replicated surface roughness (RSR) of 100 pm and a correlation length of 32 nm at the nominal extreme-ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) wavelength of 13.5nm. As the ideal RSR value for commercialization of EUVL is 50 pm and under, and furthermore as has been shown elsewhere, a correlation length of 32 nm of roughness on the mask sits on the peak LER value for an NA = 0.32 imaging optic, these mask roughness values and consequently the aberration sensitivity study presented here, represent a worst-case scenario. The illumination conditions were chosen based on the possible candidates for the 22-nm and 16-nm half-pitch nodes, respectively. In the 22-nm case, a disk illumination setting of σ = 0.50 was used, and for the 16-nm case, crosspole illumination with σ = 0.10 at an optimum offset of dx = 0 and dy = .67 in sigma space. In examining how to mitigate mask roughness induced LER, we considered an alternate illumination scheme whereby a traditional dipole's angular spectrum is extended in the direction parallel to the line-and-space mask absorber pattern to represent a "strip". While this illumination surprisingly provides minimal improvement to the LER as compared to several alternate illumination schemes, the overall imaging quality in terms of image-log-slope (ILS) and contrast is improved.

  14. Mask roughness induced LER control and mitigation: aberrations sensitivity study and alternate illumination scheme

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany M.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2011-03-11

    Here we conduct a mask-roughness-induced line-edge-roughness (LER) aberrations sensitivity study both as a random distribution amongst the first 16 Fringe Zernikes (for overall aberration levels of 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75nm rms) as well as an individual aberrations sensitivity matrix over the first 37 Fringe Zernikes. Full 2D aerial image modeling for an imaging system with NA = 0.32 was done for both the 22-nm and 16-nm half-pitch nodes on a rough mask with a replicated surface roughness (RSR) of 100 pm and a correlation length of 32 nm at the nominal extreme-ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) wavelength of 13.5nm. As the ideal RSR value for commercialization of EUVL is 50 pm and under, and furthermore as has been shown elsewhere, a correlation length of 32 nm of roughness on the mask sits on the peak LER value for an NA = 0.32 imaging optic, these mask roughness values and consequently the aberration sensitivity study presented here, represent a worst-case scenario. The illumination conditions were chosen based on the possible candidates for the 22-nm and 16-nm half-pitch nodes, respectively. In the 22-nm case, a disk illumination setting of {sigma} = 0.50 was used, and for the 16-nm case, crosspole illumination with {sigma} = 0.10 at an optimum offset of dx = 0 and dy = .67 in sigma space. In examining how to mitigate mask roughness induced LER, we considered an alternate illumination scheme whereby a traditional dipole's angular spectrum is extended in the direction parallel to the line-and-space mask absorber pattern to represent a 'strip'. While this illumination surprisingly provides minimal improvement to the LER as compared to several alternate illumination schemes, the overall imaging quality in terms of image-log-slope (ILS) and contrast is improved.

  15. Giant edge state splitting at atomically precise graphene zigzag edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiyong; Talirz, Leopold; Pignedoli, Carlo A.; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Fasel, Roman; Ruffieux, Pascal

    2016-05-01

    Zigzag edges of graphene nanostructures host localized electronic states that are predicted to be spin-polarized. However, these edge states are highly susceptible to edge roughness and interaction with a supporting substrate, complicating the study of their intrinsic electronic and magnetic structure. Here, we focus on atomically precise graphene nanoribbons whose two short zigzag edges host exactly one localized electron each. Using the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope, the graphene nanoribbons are transferred from the metallic growth substrate onto insulating islands of NaCl in order to decouple their electronic structure from the metal. The absence of charge transfer and hybridization with the substrate is confirmed by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy, which reveals a pair of occupied/unoccupied edge states. Their large energy splitting of 1.9 eV is in accordance with ab initio many-body perturbation theory calculations and reflects the dominant role of electron-electron interactions in these localized states.

  16. Giant edge state splitting at atomically precise graphene zigzag edges

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiyong; Talirz, Leopold; Pignedoli, Carlo A.; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Fasel, Roman; Ruffieux, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Zigzag edges of graphene nanostructures host localized electronic states that are predicted to be spin-polarized. However, these edge states are highly susceptible to edge roughness and interaction with a supporting substrate, complicating the study of their intrinsic electronic and magnetic structure. Here, we focus on atomically precise graphene nanoribbons whose two short zigzag edges host exactly one localized electron each. Using the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope, the graphene nanoribbons are transferred from the metallic growth substrate onto insulating islands of NaCl in order to decouple their electronic structure from the metal. The absence of charge transfer and hybridization with the substrate is confirmed by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy, which reveals a pair of occupied/unoccupied edge states. Their large energy splitting of 1.9 eV is in accordance with ab initio many-body perturbation theory calculations and reflects the dominant role of electron–electron interactions in these localized states. PMID:27181701

  17. Giant edge state splitting at atomically precise graphene zigzag edges.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiyong; Talirz, Leopold; Pignedoli, Carlo A; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Fasel, Roman; Ruffieux, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Zigzag edges of graphene nanostructures host localized electronic states that are predicted to be spin-polarized. However, these edge states are highly susceptible to edge roughness and interaction with a supporting substrate, complicating the study of their intrinsic electronic and magnetic structure. Here, we focus on atomically precise graphene nanoribbons whose two short zigzag edges host exactly one localized electron each. Using the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope, the graphene nanoribbons are transferred from the metallic growth substrate onto insulating islands of NaCl in order to decouple their electronic structure from the metal. The absence of charge transfer and hybridization with the substrate is confirmed by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy, which reveals a pair of occupied/unoccupied edge states. Their large energy splitting of 1.9 eV is in accordance with ab initio many-body perturbation theory calculations and reflects the dominant role of electron-electron interactions in these localized states. PMID:27181701

  18. Roughness and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, T. R.

    2014-01-01

    A function map is used to locate applications of roughness in separation-velocity space. The importance of roughness in contact mechanics is demonstrated and versions of the plasticity index are introduced and compared. Case studies of roughness and function are presented from tribology and the life sciences. Tribological examples are taken from the automotive industry and include the manufacture of vehicle bodies, and drive train tribology, particularly cylinder liner, cam and gearbox friction and wear. From the life sciences, problems of prosthetic fixation and tribology are shown to depend on roughness. The interaction of haptics and surface finish is described and illustrated. A number of other areas of application are listed. Finally the likely future importance of structured surfaces is discussed.

  19. Smoothed Two-Dimensional Edges for Laminar Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, B. J.; Liu, C. H.; Martin, G. L.; Domack, C. S.; Obara, C. J.; Hassan, A.; Gunzburger, M. D.; Nicolaides, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    New concept allows passive method for installing flaps, slats, iceprotection equipment, and other leading-edge devices on natural-laminar-flow (NLF) wings without causing loss of laminar flow. Two-dimensional roughness elements in laminar boundary layers strategically shaped to increase critical (allowable) height of roughness. Facilitates installation of leading-edge devices by practical manufacturing methods.

  20. Discrete Roughness Transition for Hypersonic Flight Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    The importance of discrete roughness and the correlations developed to predict the onset of boundary layer transition on hypersonic flight vehicles are discussed. The paper is organized by hypersonic vehicle applications characterized in a general sense by the boundary layer: slender with hypersonic conditions at the edge of the boundary layer, moderately blunt with supersonic, and blunt with subsonic. This paper is intended to be a review of recent discrete roughness transition work completed at NASA Langley Research Center in support of agency flight test programs. First, a review is provided of discrete roughness wind tunnel data and the resulting correlations that were developed. Then, results obtained from flight vehicles, in particular the recently flown Hyper-X and Shuttle missions, are discussed and compared to the ground-based correlations.

  1. Measurement and Correlation of Ice Accretion Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David N.; Hentschel, Daniel B.; Ruff, Gary A.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements were taken of the roughness characteristics of ice accreted on NACA 0012 airfoils in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). Tests were conducted with size scaled, using models with chords of 26.7, 53.3, and 80.0 cm, and with liquid-water content scaled, both according to previously-tested scaling methods. The width of the smooth zone which forms on either side of the leading edge of the airfoil and the diameter of the roughness elements are presented in non-dimensional form as functions of the accumulation parameter. The smooth-zone width was found to decrease with increasing accumulation parameter. The roughness-element diameter increased with accumulation parameter until a plateau was reached. This maximum diameter was about 0.06 times twice the model leading-edge radius. Neither smooth-zone width nor element diameter were affected by a change in freezing fraction from 0.2 to 0.4. Both roughness characteristics appeared to scale with model size and with liquid-water content.

  2. Hybrid time dependent/independent solution for the He I line ratio temperature and density diagnostic for a thermal helium beam with applications in the scrape-off layer-edge regions in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz Burgos, J. M.; Schmitz, O.; Loch, S. D.; Ballance, C. P.

    2012-01-15

    Spectroscopic studies of line emission intensities and ratios offer an attractive option in the development of non-invasive plasma diagnostics. Evaluating ratios of selected He I line emission profiles from the singlet and triplet neutral helium spin systems allows for simultaneous measurement of electron density (n{sub e}) and temperature (T{sub e}) profiles. Typically, this powerful diagnostic tool is limited by the relatively long relaxation times of the {sup 3}S metastable term of helium that populates the triplet spin system, and on which electron temperature sensitive lines are based. By developing a time dependent analytical solution, we model the time evolution of the two spin systems. We present a hybrid time dependent/independent line ratio solution that improves the range of application of this diagnostic technique in the scrape-off layer (SOL) and edge plasma regions when comparing it against the current equilibrium line ratio helium model used at TEXTOR.

  3. Fault Roughness Records Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, E. E.; Candela, T.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Fault roughness is commonly ~0.1-1% at the outcrop exposure scale. More mature faults are smoother than less mature ones, but the overall range of roughness is surprisingly limited which suggests dynamic control. In addition, the power spectra of many exposed fault surfaces follow a single power law over scales from millimeters to 10's of meters. This is another surprising observation as distinct structures such as slickenlines and mullions are clearly visible on the same surfaces at well-defined scales. We can reconcile both observations by suggesting that the roughness of fault surfaces is controlled by the maximum strain that can be supported elastically in the wallrock. If the fault surface topography requires more than 0.1-1% strain, it fails. Invoking wallrock strength explains two additional observations on the Corona Heights fault for which we have extensive roughness data. Firstly, the surface is isotropic below a scale of 30 microns and has grooves at larger scales. Samples from at least three other faults (Dixie Valley, Mount St. Helens and San Andreas) also are isotropic at scales below 10's of microns. If grooves can only persist when the walls of the grooves have a sufficiently low slope to maintain the shape, this scale of isotropy can be predicted based on the measured slip perpendicular roughness data. The observed 30 micron scale at Corona Heights is consistent with an elastic strain of 0.01 estimated from the observed slip perpendicular roughness with a Hurst exponent of 0.8. The second observation at Corona Heights is that slickenlines are not deflected around meter-scale mullions. Yielding of these mullions at centimeter to meter scale is predicted from the slip parallel roughness as measured here. The success of the strain criterion for Corona Heights supports it as the appropriate control on fault roughness. Micromechanically, the criterion implies that failure of the fault surface is a continual process during slip. Macroscopically, the

  4. Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mires, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    National Geography Standards for the middle school years generally stress the teaching of latitude and longitude. There are many creative ways to explain the great grid that encircles our planet, but the author has found that students in his college-level geography courses especially enjoy human-interest stories associated with lines of latitude…

  5. Influence of mask manufacturing process on printing behavior of angled line structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teuber, Silvio; Dürr, Arndt C.; Herguth, Holger; Kunkel, Gerhard; Wandel, Timo; Zell, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    For the successful reduction of chip production costs, the usage of more advanced designs with lower area consumption by manufacturing angled line structures is one possibility. The usage of conventional vector shaped electron beam writers does only allow writing Manhattan-like structures as well as 45 degree angled structures. There are several approximation possibilities for writing any angled lines, e.g. they could be approximated by writing only small rectangles or small rectangles in combination with small 45 degree triangles. This method introduces a very pronounced line edge roughness due to the written uneven edges. The critical dimension uniformity on the mask and the printing behavior are directly influenced by this synthesized line edge roughness. This paper addresses the investigation of critical dimension of the angled mask structures as well as the influence on the printing behavior. The different masks used in the experiment were patterned at the Advanced Mask Technology Center (AMTC). Measurements of pattern line widths were performed by using scanning electron microscopy techniques. The printing behavior of different structures was investigated by running AIMS measurements and performing exposure experiments. Comparing the mask structures and the final printed wafer structures, estimations on the transfer function of the synthesized line edge roughness could be performed.

  6. Mesoscale roughness of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, J. B.; Frawley, James J.

    1994-01-01

    The global distribution of multi-kilometer (approx. 9 km) length scale 'roughness' (hereafter mesoscale roughness or MR) on Venus can be estimated from the Magellan global altimetry dataset (GxDR) and then compared with MR data derived for Earth from 5' ETOP5 data and for Mars (from USGS Mars DTM dataset). The mesoscale roughness parameter (MR) represents the RMS variance in meters of the actual planetary surface topography relative to the best fitting tangent plane defined on the basis of a 3x3 pixel sliding window. The best-fit plane was computed using a least-squares solution which minimizes delta H, the sum of the squares of the differences between the 9 local elevation values (H(sub i)), and the elevation of best-fit plane at the same grid location. Using the best-fit plane and delta H, we have computed the RMS 'roughness' var(delta R), where this parameter is always minimized on the basis of its calculation using least squares. We have called this 'ruggedness' parameter the Mesoscale Roughness (MR) because it is directly related to the high-frequency variance of topography after mesoscale slopes and tilts (i.e., for Venus, the baseline over which MR is computed (dx) is approx. 8.8 km and dx for Earth is approx. 9.3 km) are removed. As such, MR represents the degree to which a planetary surface is more rugged than approximately 10 km scale facets or tilts. It should not be confused with the radar 'RMS Roughness' parameter computed at 0.1 to 10 m length scales on the basis of the Magellan radar altimeter echo. We will use our MR parameter to investigate the global ruggedness properties of Venus as they relate to geological provinces and in comparison with the spatial pattern of MR for Earth and Mars.

  7. Edge Bioinformatics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-08-03

    Edge Bioinformatics is a developmental bioinformatics and data management platform which seeks to supply laboratories with bioinformatics pipelines for analyzing data associated with common samples case goals. Edge Bioinformatics enables sequencing as a solution and forward-deployed situations where human-resources, space, bandwidth, and time are limited. The Edge bioinformatics pipeline was designed based on following USE CASES and specific to illumina sequencing reads. 1. Assay performance adjudication (PCR): Analysis of an existing PCR assay in amore » genomic context, and automated design of a new assay to resolve conflicting results; 2. Clinical presentation with extreme symptoms: Characterization of a known pathogen or co-infection with a. Novel emerging disease outbreak or b. Environmental surveillance« less

  8. Edge Bioinformatics

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Chien-Chi

    2015-08-03

    Edge Bioinformatics is a developmental bioinformatics and data management platform which seeks to supply laboratories with bioinformatics pipelines for analyzing data associated with common samples case goals. Edge Bioinformatics enables sequencing as a solution and forward-deployed situations where human-resources, space, bandwidth, and time are limited. The Edge bioinformatics pipeline was designed based on following USE CASES and specific to illumina sequencing reads. 1. Assay performance adjudication (PCR): Analysis of an existing PCR assay in a genomic context, and automated design of a new assay to resolve conflicting results; 2. Clinical presentation with extreme symptoms: Characterization of a known pathogen or co-infection with a. Novel emerging disease outbreak or b. Environmental surveillance

  9. Zigzag faceting and width refinement of graphene nanoribbons and nanoperforations via catalyzed edge-annealing on Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safron, Nathaniel S.; Choi, Jonathan W.; Kim, Myungwoong; Shin, Naechul; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S.

    2015-12-01

    Top-down subtractive lithography has previously been used to pattern graphene nanostructures which lack ideal properties due to (1) limited resolution and (2) disordered edges. Here, we introduce a method to convert such disordered edges into relatively smooth zigzag edges via annealing on a Cu(111) substrate at ~950 °C. The Cu catalyzes the re-arrangement of graphene edge atoms to energetically favorable sites, inducing zigzag edge faceting. The dimensions of the graphene nanostructures can be increased, decreased, or held constant during the annealing by tuning the relative balance between growth and etching reactions, described by a fundamental growth rate equation. To demonstrate the flexibility of this method, we lithographically pattern graphene nanoribbons with zigzag or armchair orientations, or alternatively perforate graphene with circular holes, and then anneal these nanostructures to realize zigzag edge termination in each case, with nanostructure feature size tailored from 8 to 80 nm. The annealed nanostructures have smoother zigzag edges (~40% reduction in 1σ line edge roughness), and Raman spectroscopy confirms that they have lower edge disorder than top-down patterned samples.

  10. Random rough surface photofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissonneau, Vincent; Escoubas, Ludovic; Flory, François; Berginc, Gérard

    2011-10-01

    Random rough surfaces are of primary interest for their optical properties: reducing reflection at the interface or obtaining specific scattering diagram for example. Thus controlling surface statistics during the fabrication process paves the way to original and specific behaviors of reflected optical waves. We detail an experimental method allowing the fabrication of random rough surfaces showing tuned statistical properties. A two-step photoresist exposure process was developed. In order to initiate photoresist polymerization, an energy threshold needs to be reached by light exposure. This energy is brought by a uniform exposure equipment comprising UV-LEDs. This pre-exposure is studied by varying parameters such as optical power and exposure time. The second step consists in an exposure based on the Gray method.1 The speckle pattern of an enlarged scattered laser beam is used to insolate the photoresist. A specific photofabrication bench using an argon ion laser was implemented. Parameters such as exposure time and distances between optical components are discussed. Then, we describe how we modify the speckle-based exposure bench to include a spatial light modulator (SLM). The SLM used is a micromirror matrix known as Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) which allows spatial modulation by displaying binary images. Thus, the spatial beam shape can be tuned and so the speckle pattern on the photoresist is modified. As the photoresist photofabricated surface is correlated to the speckle pattern used to insolate, the roughness parameters can be adjusted.

  11. Surface roughness effects in elastohydrodynamic contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, J. H.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    Surface roughness effects in full-film EHL contacts were studied. A flow factor modification to the Reynolds equation was applied to piezoviscous-elastic line contacts. Results for ensemble-averaged film shape, pressure distribution, and other mechanical quantities were obtained. Asperities elongated in the flow direction by a factor exceeding two decreased both film shape and pressure extrema at constant load; isotropic or transverse asperities increased these extrema. The largest effects are displayed by traction, which increased by over 5% for isotropic or transverse asperities and by slightly less for longitudinal roughness.

  12. Determination of Joint Roughness Coefficients Using Roughness Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyun-Sic; Kang, Seong-Seung; Jang, Bo-An

    2014-11-01

    This study used precisely digitized standard roughness profiles to determine roughness parameters such as statistical and 2D discontinuity roughness, and fractal dimensions. Our methods were based on the relationship between the joint roughness coefficient (JRC) values and roughness parameters calculated using power law equations. Statistical and 2D roughness parameters, and fractal dimensions correlated well with JRC values, and had correlation coefficients of over 0.96. However, all of these relationships have a 4th profile (JRC 6-8) that deviates by more than ±5 % from the JRC values given in the standard roughness profiles. This indicates that this profile is statistically different than the others. We suggest that fractal dimensions should be measured within the entire range of the divider, instead of merely measuring values within a suitable range. Normalized intercept values also correlated with the JRC values, similarly to the fractal dimension values discussed above. The root mean square first derivative values, roughness profile indexes, 2D roughness parameter, and fractal dimension values decreased as the sampling interval increased. However, the structure function values increased very rapidly with increasing sampling intervals. This indicates that the roughness parameters are not independent of the sampling interval, and that the different relationships between the JRC values and these roughness parameters are dependent on the sampling interval.

  13. Saddle-node dynamics for edge detection

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Y.F.

    1994-09-01

    The author demonstrates how the formulation of a nonlinear scale-space filter can be used for edge detection and junction analysis. By casting edge-preserving filtering in terms of maximizing information content subject to an average cost function, the computed cost at each pixel location becomes a local measure of edgeness. This computation depends on a single scale parameter and the given image data. Unlike previous approaches which require careful tuning of the filter kernels for various types of edges, this scheme is general enough to be able to handle different edges, such as lines, step edges, corners and junctions. Anisotropy in the data is handled automatically by the nonlinear dynamics.

  14. 36. INTERIOR VIEW, NORTON GRINDER, TYPES USED TO GRIND ROUGH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. INTERIOR VIEW, NORTON GRINDER, TYPE-S USED TO GRIND ROUGH EDGES OFF THE FORGED TOOLS; NOTE OPERATOR IS FINISH GRINDING BLADE END OF A POST HOLE DIGGER AND TAMPING BAR - Warwood Tool Company, Foot of Nineteenth Street, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  15. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE AERODYNAMIC ROUGHNESS LENGTH AND THE ROUGHNESS DENSITY IN CASES OF LOW ROUGHNESS DENSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents measurements of roughness length performed in a wind tunnel for low roughness density. The experiments were performed with both compact and porous obstacles (clusters), in order to simulate the behavior of sparsely vegetated surfaces.

  16. Discrete Roughness Effects on Shuttle Orbiter at Mach 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Hamilton, H. Harris, II

    2002-01-01

    Discrete roughness boundary layer transition results on a Shuttle Orbiter model in the NASA Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel have been reanalyzed with new boundary layer calculations to provide consistency for comparison to other published results. The experimental results were previously obtained utilizing the phosphor thermography system to monitor the status of the boundary layer via global heat transfer images of the Orbiter windward surface. The size and location of discrete roughness elements were systematically varied along the centerline of the 0.0075-scale model at an angle of attack of 40 deg and the boundary layer response recorded. Various correlative approaches were attempted, with the roughness transition correlations based on edge properties providing the most reliable results. When a consistent computational method is used to compute edge conditions, transition datasets for different configurations at several angles of attack have been shown to collapse to a well-behaved correlation.

  17. Edge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildreth, E. C.

    1985-09-01

    For both biological systems and machines, vision begins with a large and unwieldly array of measurements of the amount of light reflected from surfaces in the environment. The goal of vision is to recover physical properties of objects in the scene such as the location of object boundaries and the structure, color and texture of object surfaces, from the two-dimensional image that is projected onto the eye or camera. This goal is not achieved in a single step: vision proceeds in stages, with each stage producing increasingly more useful descriptions of the image and then the scene. The first clues about the physical properties of the scene are provided by the changes of intensity in the image. The importance of intensity changes and edges in early visual processing has led to extensive research on their detection, description and use, both in computer and biological vision systems. This article reviews some of the theory that underlies the detection of edges, and the methods used to carry out this analysis.

  18. Edge equilibrium code for tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xujing; Drozdov, Vladimir V.

    2014-01-15

    The edge equilibrium code (EEC) described in this paper is developed for simulations of the near edge plasma using the finite element method. It solves the Grad-Shafranov equation in toroidal coordinate and uses adaptive grids aligned with magnetic field lines. Hermite finite elements are chosen for the numerical scheme. A fast Newton scheme which is the same as implemented in the equilibrium and stability code (ESC) is applied here to adjust the grids.

  19. Optical roughness measurements on specially designed roughness standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danzl, R.; Helmli, F.; Rubert, P.; Prantl, M.

    2008-09-01

    The measurement of surface texture is one of the most common and important ways to judge the quality of a technical surface. In order to verify whether a metrology device is able to measure certain types of roughness accurately, various roughness standards with calibrated roughness values are available. While almost all roughness standards produced so far have been designed for tactile systems we demonstrate how the optical metrology device InfiniteFocus can be applied to special roughness standards that have been artificially roughened. Experiments are performed on standards with periodic structure and the results of the optical system are compared to the calibrated values obtained by tactile systems with different tip radius. Additionally the profile-based measurements are compared to area-based measurements conform to a recently developed ISO standard draft. Finally roughness measurements on real surfaces are presented.

  20. Laser Roughing of PCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Christian; Emonts, Michael; Hermani, Jan-Patrick; Storms, Thomas

    Polycrystalline diamond (PCD) has become an indispensable tool material for efficient machining of various materials. In manufacturing of PCD tools the finishing process in order to obtain the required surface and edge quality is mostly done by grinding. Due to the high hardness and wear resistance of PCD grinding is characterized by low material removal rates and high wear of the grinding wheel. The Fraunhofer IPT has developed a novel finishing method for PCD cutting tools, which combines laser processing and grinding. Short pulse laser ablation is used to completely remove a PCD surface layer of about 180 μm. To achieve the required tool quality the remaining 20 μm are removed by subsequent grinding. The obtained results demonstrate that the combination allows reducing the finishing time by more than 50%. Therefore, laser technology has a high potential to make the finishing process more efficient and significantly lower manufacturing costs.

  1. Roughness characteristics of natural channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Harry Hawthorne

    1967-01-01

    Color photographs and descriptive data are presented for 50 stream channels for which roughness coefficients have been determined. All hydraulic computations involving flow in open channels require an evaluation of the roughness characteristics of the channel. In the absence of a satisfactory quantitative procedure this evaluation remains chiefly an art. The ability to evaluate roughness coefficients must be developed through experience. One means of gaining this experience is by examining and becoming acquainted with the appearance of some typical channels whose roughness coefficients are known. The photographs and data contained in this report represent a wide range of channel conditions. Familiarity with the appearance, geometry, and roughness characteristics of these channels will improve the engineer's ability to select roughness coefficients for other channels .

  2. Solvation forces between rough surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Frink, L.J.; van Swol, F.

    1998-04-01

    We investigate the role of surface roughness on solvation forces and solvation free energies. Roughness is introduced by dividing a surface into an array of square tiles that are then randomly displaced in the direction perpendicular to the wall. The integrated wall strength of these tiled surfaces is independent of the surface roughness and hence this class of rough walls is ideally suited for isolating roughness effects. We use grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of a Lennard-Jones fluid confined in a slit pore with rough walls to generate the solvation interactions as a function of roughness, tile size, and surface area. The simulation data are compared to a simple superposition approximation of smooth wall solvation interactions (obtained from simulation or density functional theory), based on a distribution of wall separations. We find that this approximation provides a surprisingly accurate route to the solvation interaction of rough surfaces. In general, increased roughness leads to a reduction of oscillations in the solvation forces and surface free energies. However, nonmonotonic behavior of the oscillation amplitude with roughness can be observed for finite surfaces. The washing out of the oscillations found for large surface roughness produces a solvation force that exhibits a broad repulsive peak with separation. The broad repulsion is a consequence of the resistance to squeezing out fluid from the smallest gaps between two opposing rough surfaces. It is as much a reflection of packing effects as are the solvation oscillations for perfectly smooth pores. In addition, we present results for patterned and undulating surfaces produced by an analogous modification of the one-body external field for smooth walls. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for a number of experimental systems including self-assembled monolayers, microporous materials, protein solutions, and DNA crystals. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Roughness Measurement of Dental Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulev, Assen; Roussev, Ilia; Karpuzov, Simeon; Stoilov, Georgi; Ignatova, Detelina; See, Constantin von; Mitov, Gergo

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a roughness measurement of zirconia ceramics, widely used for dental applications. Surface roughness variations caused by the most commonly used dental instruments for intraoral grinding and polishing are estimated. The applied technique is simple and utilizes the speckle properties of the scattered laser light. It could be easily implemented even in dental clinic environment. The main criteria for roughness estimation is the average speckle size, which varies with the roughness of zirconia. The algorithm used for the speckle size estimation is based on the normalized autocorrelation approach.

  4. Simulation study of the effect of molar mass dispersity on domain interfacial roughness in lamellae forming block copolymers for directed self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Peters, Andrew J; Lawson, Richard A; Nation, Benjamin D; Ludovice, Peter J; Henderson, Clifford L

    2015-09-25

    A coarse-grained molecular dynamics model was used to study the thin film self-assembly and resulting pattern properties of block copolymer (BCP) systems with various molar mass dispersities. Diblock copolymers (i.e. A-b-B type) were simulated in an aligned lamellar state, which is one of the most common patterns of potential use for integrated circuit fabrication via directed self-assembly of BCPs. Effects of the molar mass dispersity (Ð) on feature pitch and interfacial roughness, which are critical lithographic parameters that have a direct impact on integrated circuit performance, were simulated. It was found that for a realistic distribution of polymer molecular weights, modeled by a Wesslau distribution, both line edge roughness (LER) and line width roughness (LWR) increase approximately linearly with increasing Ð, up to ∼45% of the monodisperse value at Р= 1.5. Mechanisms of compensation for increased A-A and B-B roughness were considered. It was found that long and short chain positions were not correlated, and that long chains were significantly deformed in shape. The increase in LWR was due to the increase in LER and a constant correlation between the line edges. Unaligned systems show a correlation between domain width and local molecular weight, while systems aligned on an alternating pattern of A and B lines did not show any correlation. When the volume fraction of individual chains was allowed to vary, similar results were found when considering the Ð of the block as opposed to the Ð of the entire system. PMID:26335174

  5. Challenges in LER/CDU metrology in DSA: placement error and cross-line correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantoudis, Vassilios; Kuppuswamy, Vijaya-Kumar M.; Gogolides, Evangelos; Pret, Alessandro V.; Pathangi, Hari; Gronheid, Roel

    2016-03-01

    DSA lithography poses new challenges in LER/LWR metrology due to its self-organized and pitch-based nature. To cope with these challenges, a novel characterization approach with new metrics and updating the older ones is required. To this end, we focus on two specific challenges of DSA line patterns: a) the large correlations between the left and right edges of a line (line wiggling, rms(LWR)line correlations, i.e. the resemblance of wiggling fluctuations of nearby lines. The first is quantified by the Line Center Roughness whose low-frequency part is related to the local placement errors of device structures. For the second, we propose the c-factor correlation function which quantifies the strength of the correlations between lines versus their horizontal distance in pitches. Also, we define roughness and uniformity parameters for the pitch changes along and across lines. The proposed characterization approach is applied to the analysis of line/space patterns obtained with the Liu-Nealey (LiNe) flow (post PMMA removal and pattern transfer) revealing the effects of pattern transfer on roughness and uniformity. Finally, we calculate the cfactor function of various Next-Generation Lithography techniques and reveal their distinct footprint on the extent of cross-line correlations.

  6. The Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    6 April 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the edge (running diagonally from the lower left to the upper right) of a trough, which is part of a large pit crater complex in Noachis Terra. This type of trough forms through the collapse of surface materials into the subsurface, and often begins as a series of individual pit craters. Over time, continued collapse increases the diameter of individual pits until finally, adjacent pits merge to form a trough such as the one captured in this image. The deep shadowed area is caused in part by an overhang; layered rock beneath this overhang is less resistant to erosion, and thus has retreated tens of meters backward, beneath the overhang. A person could walk up inside this 'cave' formed by the overhanging layered material.

    Location near: 47.0oS, 355.7oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  7. Extraction of edge feature in cardiovascular image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jianrong; Chen, Dongqing; Yu, Daoyin; Liu, Xiaojun

    2001-09-01

    Extraction of edge feature and accurate measurement of vascular diameter in cardiovascular image are the bases for labeling the coronary hierarchy, 3D refined reconstruction of the coronary arterial tree and accurate fusion between the calculated 3D vascular trees and other views. In order to extract vessels from the image, the grayscale minimization of the circle template and differential edge detection are put forward. Edge pixels of the coronary artery are set according to maximization of the differential value. The edge lines are determined after the edge pixels are smoothed by B-Spline function. The assessment of feature extraction is demonstrated by the excellent performance in computer simulation and actual application.

  8. Preliminary optical design of a varied line-space spectrograph for the multi-channel detection of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra in the 280-550 eV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, B.S.; McKinney, W.R.; Hussain, Z.; Padmore, H.

    1996-07-01

    The optical design of a varied line-space spectrograph for the multi-channel recording of NEXAFS spectra in a single {open_quotes}snapshot{close_quotes} is proposed. The spectrograph is to be used with a bending magnet source on beamline 7.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). Approximately 20 volts of spectra are simultaneously imaged across a small square of material sample at each respective K absorption edge of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. Photoelectrons emitted from the material sample will be collected by an electron imaging microscope, the view field of which determines the sampling size. The sample also forms the exit slit of the optical system. This dispersive method of NEXAFS data acquisition is three to four orders of magnitude faster than the conventional method of taking data point-to-point using scanning of the grating. The proposed design is presented along with the design method and supporting SHADOW raytrace analysis.

  9. Roughness and waviness requirements for laminar flow surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obara, Clifford J.; Holmes, Bruce J.

    1986-01-01

    Many modern metal and composite airframe manufacturing techniques can provide surface smoothness which is compatible with natural laminar flow (NLF) requirements. An important consideration is manufacturing roughness of the surface in the form of steps and gaps perpendicular to the freestream. The principal challenge to the design and manufacture of laminar flow surfaces today appears to be in the installation of leading-edge panels on wing, nacelle, and empennage surfaces. A similar challenge is in the installation of access panels, doors, windows, fuselage noses, and engine nacelles. Past work on roughness and waviness manufacturing tolerances and comparisons with more recent experiments are reviewed.

  10. On the role of atomic metastability in the production of Balmer line radiation from ‘cold’ atomic hydrogen, deuterium and hydrogenic ion impurities in fusion edge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, J. D.

    2012-03-01

    Published arguments, which assign an important role to atomic metastability in the production of ‘narrow’ Zeeman component radiation from the boundary region of fusion plasmas, are examined critically in relation to l-redistribution by proton and electron collisions, and mixing of unperturbed atomic states by the ion microfield and microfield gradient. It is concluded that these important processes indeed severely constrain the contribution from ‘metastable’ states to the generation of the hydrogen Balmer spectra, for electron concentrations above 1012 cm-3, as pointed out before by the present author (Hey et al 1999 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 32 3555). The analysis of collision-induced l-redistribution represents an extension of that used previously (Hey et al 1996 Contrib. Plasma Phys. 36 583), applicable up to higher electron densities. For comparison purposes, we also consider the question of metastability of ionized helium in a low-temperature plasma, and that of some common hydrogenic impurities (C5+ and Ne9+) in a hydrogen (deuterium) fusion plasma. While for low nuclear charge Z the metastability of 2s1/2 levels is quenched by the plasma environment, it is much reduced in high-Z ions owing to the rapid increase with Z of the two-photon electric dipole (2E1) and magnetic dipole (M1) spontaneous transition rates to the ground state, whereas the role of the plasma in these cases is less important. The main new principle elaborated in this work is the sensitivity of atomic line strengths, and hence collision strengths, to perturbation by the plasma environment for transitions between fine-structure sublevels of the same principal quantum number. As the plasma microfield strength grows, ‘allowed’ transitions diminish in strength, while ‘forbidden’ transitions grow. However, owing to violation of the parity selection rule, there is an overall loss of collision strength available to transitions, resulting from the appearance of significant

  11. An edge index for topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prodan, Emil

    2009-03-01

    Topological insulators display dissipationless currents flowing at the edges of the samples. These currents are associated to chiral edge modes, whose existence is intrinsically linked to the topology of the electronic states of the bulk. The edge modes can be easily investigated when the edges are smooth and have a periodicity, but as soon as the periodicity is absent, the problem becomes un-traceable by purely theoretical means. In my talk I will exemplify the use of non-commutative calculus to explore the properties, especially the stability of the edge modes. For example, using such techniques one can give a fairly elementary proof that the edge modes in Chern insulators survive even for a rough (random) edge. Similarly, for the Spin-Hall effect, one can define an observable and its associated current whose conductance remains quantized during various deformations of the Hamiltonian system. It turns out that in all cases, the edge conductance is given by the index of a Fredholm operator, which provides a new topological invariant linked directly to the edge rather than the bulk.

  12. Generalizing roughness: experiments with flow-oriented roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisani, Sebastiano

    2015-04-01

    Surface texture analysis applied to High Resolution Digital Terrain Models (HRDTMs) improves the capability to characterize fine-scale morphology and permits the derivation of useful morphometric indexes. An important indicator to be taken into account in surface texture analysis is surface roughness, which can have a discriminant role in the detection of different geomorphic processes and factors. The evaluation of surface roughness is generally performed considering it as an isotropic surface parameter (e.g., Cavalli, 2008; Grohmann, 2011). However, surface texture has often an anisotropic character, which means that surface roughness could change according to the considered direction. In some applications, for example involving surface flow processes, the anisotropy of roughness should be taken into account (e.g., Trevisani, 2012; Smith, 2014). Accordingly, we test the application of a flow-oriented directional measure of roughness, computed considering surface gravity-driven flow. For the calculation of flow-oriented roughness we use both classical variogram-based roughness (e.g., Herzfeld,1996; Atkinson, 2000) as well as an ad-hoc developed robust modification of variogram (i.e. MAD, Trevisani, 2014). The presented approach, based on a D8 algorithm, shows the potential impact of considering directionality in the calculation of roughness indexes. The use of flow-oriented roughness could improve the definition of effective proxies of impedance to flow. Preliminary results on the integration of directional roughness operators with morphometric-based models, are promising and can be extended to more complex approaches. Atkinson, P.M., Lewis, P., 2000. Geostatistical classification for remote sensing: an introduction. Computers & Geosciences 26, 361-371. Cavalli, M. & Marchi, L. 2008, "Characterization of the surface morphology of an alpine alluvial fan using airborne LiDAR", Natural Hazards and Earth System Science, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 323-333. Grohmann, C

  13. Wetting failure of hydrophilic surfaces promoted by surface roughness

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Meng-Hua; Chen, Xiao-Peng; Wang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Wetting failure is of vital importance to many physical phenomena, such as industrial coating and drop emission. Here we show when and how the surface roughness promotes the destabilization of a moving contact line on a hydrophilic surface. Beyond the balance of the driving force and viscous resistance where a stable wetting interface is sustained, wetting failure occurs and is modified by the roughness of the surface. The promoting effect arises only when the wetting velocity is high enough to create a gas-liquid-solid composite interface in the vicinity of the moving contact line, and it is a function of the intrinsic contact angle and proportion of solid tops. We propose a model to explain splashes of rough solid spheres impacting into liquids. It reveals a novel concept that dynamic wetting on hydrophilic rough surfaces can be similar to that on hydrophobic surfaces, and brings a new way to design surfaces with specific wetting properties. PMID:24948390

  14. Wind tunnel model surface gauge for measuring roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorburger, T. V.; Gilsinn, D. E.; Teague, E. C.; Giauque, C. H. W.; Scire, F. E.; Cao, L. X.

    1987-01-01

    The optical inspection of surface roughness research has proceeded along two different lines. First, research into a quantitative understanding of light scattering from metal surfaces and into the appropriate models to describe the surfaces themselves. Second, the development of a practical instrument for the measurement of rms roughness of high performance wind tunnel models with smooth finishes. The research is summarized, with emphasis on the second avenue of research.

  15. A second harmonic geomagnetic field line resonance at the inner edge of the plasma sheet - GEOS 1, ISEE 1, and ISEE 2 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, W. J.; Grard, R. J. L.

    1984-01-01

    A description is provided of observations made by GEOS 1, ISEE 1, and ISEE 2 of a hydromagnetic wave with a period approximately 90 s observed near 0200 LT between L = 9 and L = 6, close to the measured inner boundary of the plasma sheet. The wave magnetic oscillations perpendicular to and along the ambient field had similar amplitudes. Using primarily the transverse magnetic components, it is shown that the wave is a second harmonic resonance of the local geomagnetic field lines. ISEE 1 and 2 observed the opposite sense of polarization for about 30 min, although the spacecraft were separated by only 9 min in their orbit; this remarkable feature cannot be explained by either a stationary spatial boundary or a simple temporal boundary but could result from a rapid movement of the resonant region. It is argued that the most likely energy source is bounce resonance with medium energy (approximately 5 keV) ions. Calculations of the wave Poynting vector at ISEE 1 support this conclusion.

  16. Gliding swifts attain laminar flow over rough wings.

    PubMed

    Lentink, David; de Kat, Roeland

    2014-01-01

    Swifts are among the most aerodynamically refined gliding birds. However, the overlapping vanes and protruding shafts of their primary feathers make swift wings remarkably rough for their size. Wing roughness height is 1-2% of chord length on the upper surface--10,000 times rougher than sailplane wings. Sailplanes depend on extreme wing smoothness to increase the area of laminar flow on the wing surface and minimize drag for extended glides. To understand why the swift does not rely on smooth wings, we used a stethoscope to map laminar flow over preserved wings in a low-turbulence wind tunnel. By combining laminar area, lift, and drag measurements, we show that average area of laminar flow on swift wings is 69% (n = 3; std 13%) of their total area during glides that maximize flight distance and duration--similar to high-performance sailplanes. Our aerodynamic analysis indicates that swifts attain laminar flow over their rough wings because their wing size is comparable to the distance the air travels (after a roughness-induced perturbation) before it transitions from laminar to turbulent. To interpret the function of swift wing roughness, we simulated its effect on smooth model wings using physical models. This manipulation shows that laminar flow is reduced and drag increased at high speeds. At the speeds at which swifts cruise, however, swift-like roughness prolongs laminar flow and reduces drag. This feature gives small birds with rudimentary wings an edge during the evolution of glide performance. PMID:24964089

  17. Gliding Swifts Attain Laminar Flow over Rough Wings

    PubMed Central

    Lentink, David; de Kat, Roeland

    2014-01-01

    Swifts are among the most aerodynamically refined gliding birds. However, the overlapping vanes and protruding shafts of their primary feathers make swift wings remarkably rough for their size. Wing roughness height is 1–2% of chord length on the upper surface—10,000 times rougher than sailplane wings. Sailplanes depend on extreme wing smoothness to increase the area of laminar flow on the wing surface and minimize drag for extended glides. To understand why the swift does not rely on smooth wings, we used a stethoscope to map laminar flow over preserved wings in a low-turbulence wind tunnel. By combining laminar area, lift, and drag measurements, we show that average area of laminar flow on swift wings is 69% (n = 3; std 13%) of their total area during glides that maximize flight distance and duration—similar to high-performance sailplanes. Our aerodynamic analysis indicates that swifts attain laminar flow over their rough wings because their wing size is comparable to the distance the air travels (after a roughness-induced perturbation) before it transitions from laminar to turbulent. To interpret the function of swift wing roughness, we simulated its effect on smooth model wings using physical models. This manipulation shows that laminar flow is reduced and drag increased at high speeds. At the speeds at which swifts cruise, however, swift-like roughness prolongs laminar flow and reduces drag. This feature gives small birds with rudimentary wings an edge during the evolution of glide performance. PMID:24964089

  18. Effects of surface roughness and vortex generators on the LS(1)-0417MOD airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Reuss, R.L.; Hoffman, M.J.; Gregorek, G.M.

    1995-12-01

    An 18-inch constant-chord model of the LS(l)-0417MOD airfoil section was tested under two dimensional steady state conditions ate University 7{times}10 Subsonic Wind Tunnel. The objective was to document section lift and moment characteristics model and air flow conditions. Surface pressure data was acquired at {minus}60{degrees} through + 230{degrees} geometric angles of attack, at a nominal 1 million Reynolds number. Cases with and without leading edge grit roughness were investigated. The leading edge mulated blade conditions in the field. Additionally, surface pressure data were acquired for Reynolds numbers of 1.5 and 2.0 million, with and without leading edge grit roughness; the angle of attack was limited to a {minus}20{degrees} to 40{degrees} range. In general, results showed lift curve slope sensitivities to Reynolds number and roughness. The maximum lift coefficient was reduced as much as 29% by leading edge roughness. Moment coefficient showed little sensitivity to roughness beyond 50{degrees} angle of attack, but the expected decambering effect of a thicker boundary layer with roughness did show at lower angles. Tests were also conducted with vortex generators located at the 30% chord location on the upper surface only, at 1 and 1.5 million Reynolds numbers, with and without leading edge grit roughness. In general, with leading edge grit roughness applied, the vortex generators restored 85 percent of the baseline level of maximum lift coefficient but with a more sudden stall break and at a higher angle of attack than the baseline.

  19. Parametric Flow Visualization of Dynamic Roughness Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakkali, Vinay

    The ever growing need in the aircraft industry to enhance the performance of a flight vehicle has led to active areas of research which focus on the control of the local boundary layer by both passive and active methods. An effective flow control mechanism can improve the performance of a flight vehicle in various ways, one of which is eliminating boundary layer separation. To be effective the mechanism not only needs to control the boundary layer as desired, but also use less energy than the resulting energy savings. In this study, the effectiveness of an active flow control technique known as dynamic roughness (DR) has been explored to eliminate the laminar separation bubble near the leading edge and also to eliminate the stall on a NACA 0012 airfoil wing. As opposed to static roughness, dynamic roughness utilizes small time-dependent deforming elements or humps with displacement amplitudes that are on the order of the local boundary layer height to energize the local boundary layer. DR is primarily characterized by the maximum amplitude and operating frequency. A flow visualization study was conducted on a 2D NACA 0012 airfoil model at different angles of attack, and also varying the Reynolds number and DR actuation frequency with fixed maximum DR amplitude. The experimental results from this study suggests that DR is an effective method of reattaching a totally separated boundary layer. In addition, this study discusses some of the fundamental physics behind the working of DR and proposes some non-dimensional terms that may help to explain the driving force behind the mechanism.

  20. Does surface roughness amplify wetting?

    SciTech Connect

    Malijevský, Alexandr

    2014-11-14

    Any solid surface is intrinsically rough on the microscopic scale. In this paper, we study the effect of this roughness on the wetting properties of hydrophilic substrates. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to the well-known Wenzel's law, predict that surface roughness should amplify the wetting properties of such adsorbents. We use a fundamental measure density functional theory to demonstrate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., wetting is hindered. Based on three independent analyses we show that microscopic surface corrugation increases the wetting temperature or even makes the surface hydrophobic. Since for macroscopically corrugated surfaces the solid texture does indeed amplify wetting there must exist a crossover between two length-scale regimes that are distinguished by opposite response on surface roughening. This demonstrates how deceptive can be efforts to extend the thermodynamical laws beyond their macroscopic territory.

  1. Measuring Roughnesses Of Optical Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulter, Daniel R.; Al-Jumaily, Gahnim A.; Raouf, Nasrat A.; Anderson, Mark S.

    1994-01-01

    Report discusses use of scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy to measure roughnesses of optical surfaces. These techniques offer greater spatial resolution than other techniques. Report notes scanning tunneling microscopes and atomic force microscopes resolve down to 1 nm.

  2. Radar-aeolian roughness project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Dobrovolskis, A.; Gaddis, L.; Iversen, J. D.; Lancaster, N.; Leach, Rodman N.; Rasnussen, K.; Saunders, S.; Vanzyl, J.; Wall, S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to establish an empirical relationship between measurements of radar, aeolian, and surface roughness on a variety of natural surfaces and to understand the underlying physical causes. This relationship will form the basis for developing a predictive equation to derive aeolian roughness from radar backscatter. Results are given from investigations carried out in 1989 on the principal elements of the project, with separate sections on field studies, radar data analysis, laboratory simulations, and development of theory for planetary applications.

  3. Linewidth roughness in nanowire-mask-based graphene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Guangyu; Torres, Carlos M. Jr.; Tang Jianshi; Wang, Kang L.; Bai Jingwei; Huang Yu; Yu Tao; Duan Xiangfeng; Zhang Yuegang

    2011-06-13

    We present the analysis of linewidth roughness (LWR) in nanowire-mask-based graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) and evaluate its impact on the device performance. The data show that the LWR amplitude decreases with the GNR width, possibly due to the etching undercut near the edge of a nanowire-mask. We further discuss the large variation in GNR devices in the presence of LWR by analyzing the measured transport properties and on/off ratios.

  4. Audiotactile interactions in roughness perception.

    PubMed

    Guest, Steve; Catmur, Caroline; Lloyd, Donna; Spence, Charles

    2002-09-01

    The sounds produced when we touch textured surfaces frequently provide information regarding the structure of those surfaces. It has recently been demonstrated that the perception of the texture of the hands can be modified simply by manipulating the frequency content of such touch-related sounds. We investigated whether similar auditory manipulations change people's perception of the roughness of abrasive surfaces (experiment 1). Participants were required to make speeded, forced-choice discrimination responses regarding the roughness of a series of abrasive samples which they touched briefly. Analysis of discrimination errors verified that tactile roughness perception was modulated by the frequency content of the auditory feedback. Specifically, attenuating high frequencies led to a bias towards an increased perception of tactile smoothness. In experiment 2, we replicated the rubbing-hands manipulation of previous experimenters while participants rated either the perceived roughness or wetness of their hands. The wetness scale data replicated the results in the literature, while the roughness scale data replicated the result from experiment 1. A final experiment showed that delaying the auditory feedback from the hand-rubbing reduced the magnitude of this parchment-skin illusion. These experiments demonstrate the dramatic effect that auditory frequency manipulations can have on the perceived tactile roughness and moistness of surfaces, and are consistent with the proposal that different auditory perceptual dimensions may have varying salience for different surfaces. PMID:12195518

  5. Roughness reduction on aspheric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiontke, S.; Kokot, Sebastian

    2015-02-01

    For a lot of applications like spectrometer and high power laser roughness as an important parameter has been discussed over and over again. Especially for high power systems the surface quality is crucial for determining the damage threshold and therefore the field of application. Above that, it has often been difficult to compare roughness measurements because of different measurement methods and the usage of filters and surface fits. Measurement results differ significantly depending on filters and especially on the measured surface size. Insights will be given how values behave depending on the quality of surface and the size of measured area. Many applications require a high quality of roughness in order to reduce scattering. Some of them in order to prevent from damage like high power laser applications. Others like spectrometers seek to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Most of them have already been built with spherical surfaces. With higher demands on efficiency and more sophisticated versions aspherical surfaces need to be employed. Therefore, the high requirement in roughness known from spherical surfaces is also needed on aspherical surfaces. For one thing, the constant change of curvature of an aspherical surface accounts for the superior performance, for another thing, it prevents from using classical polishing technics, which guarantied this low roughness. New methods need to be qualified. In addition, also results of a new manufacturing process will be shown allowing low roughness on aspheric even with remarkable departure from the best fit sphere.

  6. The Aerodynamic Characteristics of Airfoils as Affected by Surface Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    HOCKER RAY W

    1933-01-01

    The effect on airfoil characteristics of surface roughness of varying degrees and types at different locations on an airfoil was investigated at high values of the Reynolds number in a variable density wind tunnel. Tests were made on a number of National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) 0012 airfoil models on which the nature of the surface was varied from a rough to a very smooth finish. The effect on the airfoil characteristics of varying the location of a rough area in the region of the leading edge was also investigated. Airfoils with surfaces simulating lap joints were also tested. Measurable adverse effects were found to be caused by small irregularities in airfoil surfaces which might ordinarily be overlooked. The flow is sensitive to small irregularities of approximately 0.0002c in depth near the leading edge. The tests made on the surfaces simulating lap joints indicated that such surfaces cause small adverse effects. Additional data from earlier tests of another symmetrical airfoil are also included to indicate the variation of the maximum lift coefficient with the Reynolds number for an airfoil with a polished surface and with a very rough one.

  7. Algorithm of weak edge detection based on the Nilpotent minimum fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Genyun; Zhang, Aizhu; Han, Xujun

    2011-11-01

    To overcome the shortcoming in traditional edge detection, such as the losing of weak edges and the too rough detected edges, a new edge detection method is proposed in this paper. The new algorithm is based on the Nilpotent minimum fusion. First of all, based on the space fuzzy relation of weak edges, the algorithm makes decision fusion to improve the structure of weak edges by using the Nilpotent minimum operator. Secondly, detect edges based on the fusion results. As a result, the weak edges are detected. Experiments on a variety of weak edge images show that the new algorithm can actually overcome the shortcoming in traditional edge detection, for the results are much better than traditional methods. On one hand, some of the weak edges of complex images, such as medical images, are detected. On the other hand, the edges detected by the new algorithm are thinner.

  8. A Controlled Trial to Determine the Efficacy of Red and Near-Infrared Light Treatment in Patient Satisfaction, Reduction of Fine Lines, Wrinkles, Skin Roughness, and Intradermal Collagen Density Increase

    PubMed Central

    Matuschka, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety and efficacy of two novel light sources for large area and full body application, providing polychromatic, non-thermal photobiomodulation (PBM) for improving skin feeling and appearance. Background data: For non-thermal photorejuvenation, laser and LED light sources have been demonstrated to be safe and effective. However, lasers and LEDs may offer some disadvantages because of dot-shaped (punctiform) emission characteristics and their narrow spectral bandwidths. Because the action spectra for tissue regeneration and repair consist of more than one wavelength, we investigated if it is favorable to apply a polychromatic spectrum covering a broader spectral region for skin rejuvenation and repair. Materials and methods: A total of 136 volunteers participated in this prospective, randomized, and controlled study. Of these volunteers, 113 subjects randomly assigned into four treatment groups were treated twice a week with either 611–650 or 570–850 nm polychromatic light (normalized to ∼9 J/cm2 in the range of 611–650 nm) and were compared with controls (n=23). Irradiances and treatment durations varied in all treatment groups. The data collected at baseline and after 30 sessions included blinded evaluations of clinical photography, ultrasonographic collagen density measurements, computerized digital profilometry, and an assessment of patient satisfaction. Results: The treated subjects experienced significantly improved skin complexion and skin feeling, profilometrically assessed skin roughness, and ultrasonographically measured collagen density. The blinded clinical evaluation of photographs confirmed significant improvement in the intervention groups compared with the control. Conclusions: Broadband polychromatic PBM showed no advantage over the red-light-only spectrum. However, both novel light sources that have not been previously used for PBM have demonstrated efficacy and

  9. Transition in a Supersonic Boundary-Layer Due to Roughness and Acoustic Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.

    2003-01-01

    The transition process induced by the interaction of an isolated roughness with acoustic disturbances in the free stream is numerically investigated for a boundary layer over a flat plate with a blunted leading edge at a free stream Mach number of 3.5. The roughness is assumed to be of Gaussian shape and the acoustic disturbances are introduced as boundary condition at the outer field. The governing equations are solved using the 5'h-rder accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third- order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge- Kutta scheme for time integration. The steady field induced by the two and three-dimensional roughness is also computed. The flow field induced by two-dimensional roughness exhibits different characteristics depending on the roughness heights. At small roughness heights the flow passes smoothly over the roughness, at moderate heights the flow separates downstream of the roughness and at larger roughness heights the flow separates upstream and downstream of the roughness. Computations also show that disturbances inside the boundary layer is due to the direct interaction of the acoustic waves and isolated roughness plays a minor role in generating instability waves.

  10. Roughness effects in uncompensated antiferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Charilaou, M.; Hellman, F.

    2015-02-28

    Monte Carlo simulations show that roughness in uncompensated antiferromagnets decreases not just the surface magnetization but also the net magnetization and particularly strongly affects the temperature dependence. In films with step-type roughness, each step creates a new compensation front that decreases the global net magnetization. The saturation magnetization decreases non-monotonically with increasing roughness and does not scale with the surface area. Roughness in the form of surface vacancies changes the temperature-dependence of the magnetization; when only one surface has vacancies, the saturation magnetization will decrease linearly with surface occupancy, whereas when both surfaces have vacancies, the magnetization is negative and exhibits a compensation point at finite temperature, which can be tuned by controlling the occupancy. Roughness also affects the spin-texture of the surfaces due to long-range dipolar interactions and generates non-collinear spin configurations that could be used in devices to produce locally modified exchange bias. These results explain the strongly reduced magnetization found in magnetometry experiments and furthers our understanding of the temperature-dependence of exchange bias.

  11. Spectral Analysis and Experimental Modeling of Ice Accretion Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, D. J.; Breuer, K. S.; Torres, B. E.; Hansman, R. J., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    A self-consistent scheme for relating wind tunnel ice accretion roughness to the resulting enhancement of heat transfer is described. First, a spectral technique of quantitative analysis of early ice roughness images is reviewed. The image processing scheme uses a spectral estimation technique (SET) which extracts physically descriptive parameters by comparing scan lines from the experimentally-obtained accretion images to a prescribed test function. Analysis using this technique for both streamwise and spanwise directions of data from the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) are presented. An experimental technique is then presented for constructing physical roughness models suitable for wind tunnel testing that match the SET parameters extracted from the IRT images. The icing castings and modeled roughness are tested for enhancement of boundary layer heat transfer using infrared techniques in a "dry" wind tunnel.

  12. Mechanism for low-etching resistance and surface roughness of ArF photoresist during plasma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jinnai, Butsurin; Koyama, Koji; Kato, Keisuke; Yasuda, Atsushi; Momose, Hikaru; Samukawa, Seiji

    2009-03-01

    ArF excimer laser lithography was introduced to fabricate nanometer-scale devices and uses chemically amplified photoresist polymers including photoacid generators (PAGs). Because plasma-etching processes cause serious problems related to the use of ArF photoresists, such as line-edge roughness and low etching selectivity, we have to understand the interaction between plasma and ArF photoresist polymers. Investigating the effects of surface temperature and the irradiation species from plasma, we have found that ion irradiation by itself did not drastically increase the roughness or etching rate of ArF photoresist films unless it was combined with ultraviolet/vacuum ultraviolet (UV/VUV) photon irradiation. The structures of ArF photoresist polymers were largely unchanged by ion irradiation alone but were destroyed by combinations of ion and UV/VUV-photon irradiation. Our results suggested that PAG-mediated deprotection induced by UV/VUV-photon irradiation was amplified at surface temperatures above 100 deg. C. The etching rate and surface roughness of plasma-etched ArF photoresists are affected by the irradiation species and surface temperature during plasma etching. UV/VUV-photon irradiation plays a particularly important role in the interaction between plasma and ArF photoresist polymers.

  13. Recent Studies of Runway Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Garland; Hall, Albert W.

    1965-01-01

    Recent studies of NASA research related to aircraft operating problems on rough runways are presented. Some of these investigations were conducted cooperatively with the airport operators, with the Federal Aviation Agency, and with the U.S. Air Force. The studies show that criteria based on power spectral levels of runway-profile data are not sufficient to define acceptable levels of runway roughness from the piloting viewpoint. Because of the large variation in response characteristics between various types of aircraft, a runway may be acceptable for some aircraft and unacceptable for others. A criterion for roughness, therefore, should be expressed in terms of aircraft response - preferably, cockpit acceleration. A criterion suggested is that the maximum vertical acceleration in the cockpit should not exceed +/- 0.4 g for sections of the runway where precise aircraft control is required.

  14. Wetting phenomena on rough substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Kardar, Mehran

    1990-10-01

    We consider wetting phenomena in the vicinity of rough substrates. The quenched random geometry of the substrate is assumed to be a self-affine fractal with a roughness exponent of ζS. Asymptotic critical properties on approaching complete and critical wetting transitions are studied by combining the replica method with scaling and renormalization-group arguments. We find new critical behavior, controlled by a zero-temperature fixed point, when ζS exceeds the thermal roughness exponent of the emerging wetting layer. The possibility of an effective dimensional reduction due to randomness is considered. In two dimensions a number of exact results are obtained by using a many-body transfer-matrix technique.

  15. Advanced CD-SEM metrology for qualification of DSA patterns using coordinated line epitaxy (COOL) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takeshi; Konishi, Junko; Ikota, Masami; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Seino, Yuriko; Sato, Hironobu; Kasahara, Yusuke; Azuma, Tsukasa

    2016-03-01

    Directed self-assembly (DSA) applying chemical epitaxy is one of the promising lithographic solutions for next generation semiconductor device manufacturing. Especially, DSA lithography using coordinated line epitaxy (COOL) process is obviously one of candidates which could be the first generation of DSA applying PS-b-PMMA block copolymer (BCP) for sub-15nm dense line patterning . DSA can enhance the pitch resolutions, and can mitigate CD errors to the values much smaller than those of the originally exposed guiding patterns. On the other hand, local line placement error often results in a worse value, with distinctive trends depending on the process conditions. To address this issue, we introduce an enhanced measurement technology of DSA line patterns with distinguishing their locations in order to evaluate nature of edge placement and roughness corresponding to individual pattern locations by using images of CD-SEM. Additionally correlations among edge roughness of each line and each space are evaluated and discussed. This method can visualize features of complicated roughness easily to control COOL process. As a result, we found the followings. (1) Line placement error and line placement roughness of DSA were slightly different each other depending on their relative position to the chemical guide patterns. (2) In middle frequency area of PSD (Power Spectral Density) analysis graphs, it was observed that shapes were sensitively changed by process conditions of chemical stripe guide size and anneals temperature. (3) Correlation coefficient analysis using PSD was able to clarify characteristics of latent defect corresponding to physical and chemical property of BCP materials.

  16. Edge Turbulence Imaging in the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Zweben; D.P. Stotler; J.L. Terry; B. LaBombard; M. Greenwald; M. Muterspaugh; C.S. Pitcher; the Alcator C-Mod Group; K. Hallatschek; R.J. Maqueda; B. Rogers; J.L. Lowrance; V.J. Mastrocola; G.F. Renda

    2001-11-26

    The 2-D radial vs. poloidal structure of edge turbulence in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak [I.H. Hutchinson, R. Boivin, P.T. Bonoli et al., Nuclear Fusion 41(2001) 1391] was measured using fast cameras and compared with 3-D numerical simulations of edge plasma turbulence. The main diagnostic is Gas Puff Imaging (GPI), in which the visible D(subscript alpha) emission from a localized D(subscript 2) gas puff is viewed along a local magnetic field line. The observed D(subscript alpha) fluctuations have a typical radial and poloidal scale of approximately 1 cm, and often have strong local maxima (''blobs'') in the scrape-off layer. The motion of this 2-D structure motion has also been measured using an ultra-fast framing camera with 12 frames taken at 250,000 frames/sec. Numerical simulations produce turbulent structures with roughly similar spatial and temporal scales and transport levels as that observed in the experiment; however, some differences are also noted, perhaps requiring diagnostic improvement and/or additional physics in the numerical model.

  17. Effect of two-scale roughness on boundary layer transition over a heated flat plate: Part 1 -- Surface heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Pinson, M.W.; Wang, T.

    2000-04-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate surface heat transfer and boundary layer development associated with flow over a flat test surface covered with two roughness scales. Two-scale roughness was used because in-service aeroengines commonly display larger roughness concentrated at the leading edge with smaller roughness distributed downstream. The first scale, covering up to the first 5 cm of the test surface, was in the form of a sandpaper strip, an aluminum strip, or a cylinder. The second roughness scale covered the remainder of the test surface (2 m) in the form of sandpaper or a smooth surface. In Part 1, the surface heat transfer results are examined. Even though the roughness scales were hydraulically smooth, they induced significantly earlier transition onset, with the two-dimensional roughness causing earlier transition than three-dimensional roughness. All of the rough/smooth cases unexpectedly triggered earlier transition than rough/rough cases. This indicated that the scale of the step-change at the joint between two roughness scales was predominant over the downstream roughness on inducing early transition. Reducing the overall height of the step change was shown to have a greater effect on transition than the specific geometry of the roughness scale.

  18. The edges of graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuyun; Xin, John; Ding, Feng

    2013-04-01

    The edge of two dimensional (2D) graphene, as the surface of a three dimensional (3D) crystal, plays a crucial role in the determination of its physical, electronic and chemical properties and thus has been extensively studied recently. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the study of graphene edges, including edge formation energy, edge reconstruction, method of graphene edge synthesis and the recent progress on metal-passivated graphene edges and the role of edges in graphene CVD growth. We expect this review to provide a guideline for readers to gain a clear picture of graphene edges from several aspects, especially the catalyst-passivated graphene edges and their role in graphene CVD growth. PMID:23420074

  19. The edges of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiuyun; Xin, John; Ding, Feng

    2013-03-01

    The edge of two dimensional (2D) graphene, as the surface of a three dimensional (3D) crystal, plays a crucial role in the determination of its physical, electronic and chemical properties and thus has been extensively studied recently. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the study of graphene edges, including edge formation energy, edge reconstruction, method of graphene edge synthesis and the recent progress on metal-passivated graphene edges and the role of edges in graphene CVD growth. We expect this review to provide a guideline for readers to gain a clear picture of graphene edges from several aspects, especially the catalyst-passivated graphene edges and their role in graphene CVD growth.

  20. Sorption selectivity of birnessite particle edges: a d-PDF analysis of Cd(ii) and Pb(ii) sorption by δ-MnO2 and ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    van Genuchten, Case M; Peña, Jasquelin

    2016-08-10

    Birnessite minerals (layer-type MnO2), which bear both internal (cation vacancies) and external (particle edges) metal sorption sites, are important sinks of contaminants in soils and sediments. Although the particle edges of birnessite minerals often dominate the total reactive surface area, especially in the case of nanoscale crystallites, the metal sorption reactivity of birnessite particle edges remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the sorption selectivity of birnessite particle edges by combining Cd(ii) and Pb(ii) adsorption isotherms at pH 5.5 with surface structural characterization by differential pair distribution function (d-PDF) analysis. We compared the sorption reactivity of δ-MnO2 to that of the nanomineral, 2-line ferrihydrite, which exhibits only external surface sites. Our results show that, whereas Cd(ii) and Pb(ii) both bind to birnessite layer vacancies, only Pb(ii) binds extensively to birnessite particle edges. For ferrihydrite, significant Pb(ii) adsorption to external sites was observed (roughly 20 mol%), whereas Cd(ii) sorption was negligible. These results are supported by bond valence calculations that show comparable degrees of saturation of oxygen atoms on birnessite and ferrihydrite particle edges. Therefore, we propose that the sorption selectivity of birnessite edges follows the same order of that reported previously for ferrihydrite: Ca(ii) < Cd(ii) < Ni(ii) < Zn(ii) < Cu(ii) < Pb(ii). PMID:27183472

  1. Nanowetting of rough superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Lamb, R. N.; Cookson, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    Small angle x-ray scattering has been used to investigate the in situ immersive wetting of ultrarough surfaces which exhibit superhydrophobicity with extreme water contact angle (θA=169°). Reduced scattering contrast observed from rough surfaces when partially or totally wetted reveals significant physical differences between superhydrophobic surfaces not otherwise apparent from conventional contact angle measurements.

  2. Plant Communities of Rough Rock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Linda

    A unit of study on plants grown in the Navajo community of Rough Rock, Arizona, is presented in sketches providing the common Navajo name for the plant, a literal English translation, the English name of the plant, and the Latin name. A brief description of each plant includes where the plant grows, how the Navajos use the plant, and the color and…

  3. Estimating surface roughness using stereophotogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, V.; Krasa, J.

    2009-04-01

    At the Department of Drainage, Irrigation and Landscape Engineering (CTU Prague) we use several mathematical models for soil erosion, sediment transport and surface runoff assessment. Here we continuously struggle for successful models parameterizations. One of the typical coefficients usually taken from literature instead of measurements is surface roughness, eg. Manning roughness (Maidment, 1993). Roughness is a key to surface runoff velocity and surface runoff depth estimation but often it is very roughly estimated. Within the COST 22 Action research we focused on estimating actual surface roughness using stereophotogrammetry. Our aim was to set up a simple low cost system useful for roughness measurements in nature conditions - mainly on agricultural fields. Our system consists of Canon EOS 400 digital camera with angle viewfinder, two robust tripods and a horizontal bar with sliding 3D tripod head. We tested different camera heights and focal distances as well as various parallaxes to obtain reasonable results. Finally we shot the surfaces from 1600 millimeters with 24 and 35 mm lens and parallaxes close to 100 mm. For 3D scene development we use Geomatica 10 GIS and its OrthoEngine module. Testing the proper system and many variables of the 3D scene modelling was an important part of the first year of the project. For these purposes we first prepared a calibrated and known 3D surface consisting of 70 by 70 cm grid and several geometrical objects of different sizes and shapes. Preparing the correct lighting conditions, finding the resolving power of the system and solving the problems with low contrast areas of measured surfaces was a time consuming but interesting task. After the system calibration we started with the actual terrain measurements. Our setup, system testing and preliminary results of the roughness computations are presented on the poster. Acknowledgement This research was acomplished within national COST project OC189 „Flood risk and its

  4. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  5. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  6. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  7. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  8. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply...

  9. Roughness of stable, armored gravel beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Basil

    1993-11-01

    The grain roughness of stable armored beds that formed in a laboratory flume under a range of steady flow conditions on rounded, flat and angular gravel is analyzed. Gravel roughness geometry is determined from bed surface profiles and vertical photographs. These techniques have been employed in field situations. Thus the methodology is potentially applicable to the analysis of grain roughness in natural gravel bed channels. The description of representative roughness geometry is also analogous to that used to characterize artificial roughness arrays. Armor roughness increases with increasing flow. Armored surfaces composed of angular gravel are roughest, and surfaces formed of flat gravel offer least resistance to the flow. Stable armored beds may exhibit a tendency to maximize the ratio of the shear due to drag on representative roughness elements to total shear. Roughness concentration is strongly correlated with the energy slope, and there is a linear increase in equivalent roughness height with increasing roughness concentration. The friction factor for an armored surface varies in a linear manner with representative roughness geometry. The equation defining this relation is probably similar to that used to characterize variations in the friction factor with artificial roughness geometry at low roughness concentrations. However, to reconcile the relations for artificial and natural roughness completely, it may be necessary to explicitly consider the contribution to flow resistance made by roughness shape, background roughness, and blocking in shallow flows.

  10. Influence Of Runout On The Surface Roughness Obtained In Side Milling Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Rojas, H.; Buj Corral, I.; Vivancos Calvet, J.

    2009-11-01

    In this paper a numerical model was used to predict the surface roughness of parts machined by contour milling processes, taking into account the runout of the tool as differences in the tool edge radii. The computational model allows determining the value of both average roughness Ra and peak-to-valley roughness Rt, and is based on the geometric tool-part intersection. 8000 runs were performed for each fz value using a random runout in each run in order to get simulated roughness values. Several graphics were obtained with the maximum and minimum value of average roughness Ra and of peak-to-valley roughness Rt for each value of feed per tooth and per turn fz, as well as the theoretical or geometric upper and lower reference limits. In addition, frequency histograms were obtained for Ra and Rt. For low feed values, the median of the roughness values is quite similar to the upper limit, which corresponds to the effect of one tool teeth having a higher radius than other radii. For higher feed values, the median of the roughness values remains between the lower and the upper limit. It was observed that the obtained values of average roughness Ra and peak-to-valley roughness Rt do not follow a normal distribution even though the values of the radii were randomly taken according to a normal law.

  11. Modeling of the ``death-ray'' phenomenon in tokamak edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umansky, M. V.; Brunner, D.; Labombard, B.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2012-03-01

    In the ``death-ray'' regime often seen in tokamak edge plasma experiments, the downstream electron pressure, as measured by Langmuir probes at the divertor plate, exceeds the upstream values by nearly a factor of 2 over a narrow radial region at the strike point [1,2]. However, recent studies on Alcator C-Mod indicate that the death-ray over-pressure may be a result of local plasma perturbation by the negative probe bias [3]. We investigate the effects of probe perturbation of the plasma using the tokamak edge fluid code UEDGE. The code models a slab-like configuration roughly matching the basic dimensions and characteristics of edge plasma in Alcator C-Mod near detachment, where the death-ray is often observed. In the code setup, a small axisymmetric segment of target plate is biased, which mimics a plate-mounted Langmuir probe. It is observed in the simulations that at sufficiently large negative bias voltage the probe substantially modifies the local plasma characteristics. Moreover, the simulations reproduce the overpressure along the field line, similar to the experimental death-ray; pointing to the interplay of ion-neutral momentum exchange and the sheath boundary conditions [4].[4pt] [1] D. Brunner et al., APS DPP 2010, poster TP9.00069;[0pt] [2] B. LaBombard et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 241-243, 149-166 (1997);[0pt] [3] A. Loarte et al., Nucl. Fusion 38, 331 (1998);[0pt] [4] M.V. Umansky et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys., accepted (2011).

  12. Polymer Transport Near Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, Moses; Whitmer, Jonathan; Luijten, Erik

    2011-03-01

    The rheology of dilute polymer solutions under confinement is important in biology, medicine, microfluidic device design, synthetic polymer processing, and even geologic porous media. However, the solution's specific interactions with the confining surface are poorly understood. This situation is exacerbated for composite nanoparticles, such as polymer/metallic hybrids. Using multi-particle collision dynamics, we find a rich array of transport regimes depending on small-scale surface roughness and the specific surface/solute interactions. These factors couple to hydrodynamic conditions, including flow strength and confinement geometry in unexpected ways. Our findings may be relevant to transport phenomena in certain rough-walled capillaries, such as the distribution of various nanoconjugates in vivo.

  13. Sensing roughness and polish direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, M. L.; Olesen, A. S.; Larsen, H. E.; Stubager, J.; Hanson, S. G.; Pedersen, T. F.; Pedersen, H. C.

    2016-04-01

    As a part of the work carried out on a project supported by the Danish council for technology and innovation, we have investigated the option of smoothing standard CNC machined surfaces. In the process of constructing optical prototypes, involving custom-designed optics, the development cost and time consumption can become relatively large numbers in a research budget. Machining the optical surfaces directly is expensive and time consuming. Alternatively, a more standardized and cheaper machining method can be used, but then the object needs to be manually polished. During the polishing process the operator needs information about the RMS-value of the surface roughness and the current direction of the scratches introduces by the polishing process. The RMS-value indicates to the operator how far he is from the final finish, and the scratch orientation is often specified by the customer in order to avoid complications during the casting process. In this work we present a method for measuring the RMS-values of the surface roughness while simultaneously determining the polishing direction. We are mainly interested in the RMS-values in the range from 0 - 100 nm, which corresponds to the finish categories of A1, A2 and A3. Based on simple intensity measurements we estimates the RMS-value of the surface roughness, and by using a sectioned annual photo-detector to collect the scattered light we can determine the direction of polishing and distinguish light scattered from random structures and light scattered from scratches.

  14. Resist roughness improvement by a chemical shrink process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagahara, Tatsuro; Sekito, Takashi; Matsuura, Yuriko

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we will discuss the improvement of resist pattern roughness on NTD (Negative Tone Development) resist by chemical shrink process. Chemical shrink process is one of the most practical approaches to achieve small feature size CH (Contact Hole) or trench with ArF immersion lithography. We found that this shrink material has not only general benefits of shrink process like DOF (Depth of Focus) margin improvement, but also demonstrates a pattern smoothing effect through observation of the surface of shrink layer using SPM (Scanning Probe Microscope). Additionally, an improvement of LWR (Line Width Roughness) over 16% and an improvement of LCDU (Local Critical Dimension Uniformity) around 60% were observed.

  15. Surface roughness effects with solid lubricants dispersed in mineral oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cusano, C.; Goglia, P. R.; Sliney, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    The lubricating effectiveness of solid-lubricant dispersions are investigated in both point and line contacts using surfaces with both random and directional roughness characteristics. Friction and wear data obtained at relatively low speeds and at room temperature, indicate that the existence of solid lubricants such as graphite, MoS2, and PTFE in a plain mineral oil generally will not improve the effectiveness of the oil as a lubricant for such surfaces. Under boundary lubrication conditions, the friction force, as a function of time, initially depends upon the directional roughness properties of the contacting surfaces irrespective of whether the base oil or dispersions are used as lubricants.

  16. The Long Range Persistence of Wakes Behind a Row of Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Sescu, Adrian; Duck, Peter W.; Choudhari, Meelan

    2010-01-01

    We consider a periodic array of relatively small roughness elements whose spanwise separation is of the order of the local boundary-layer thickness and construct a local asymptotic high-Reynolds-number solution that is valid in the vicinity of the roughness. The resulting flow decays on the very short streamwise length scale of the roughness, but the solution eventually becomes invalid at large downstream distances and a new solution has to be constructed in the downstream region. This latter result shows that the roughness-generated wakes can persist over very long streamwise distances, which are much longer than the distance between the roughness elements and the leading edge. Detailed numerical results are given for the far wake structure.

  17. Characterization of the cutting edge of glass and diamond knives for ultramicrotomy by scanning force microscopy using cantilevers with a defined tip geometry. Part II.

    PubMed

    Matzelle, T R; Gnaegi, H; Ricker, A; Reichelt, R

    2003-02-01

    The cutting edge of glass as well as diamond knives was studied at high resolution using a scanning force microscope (SFM). The local shape of the cutting edge was estimated from single line profiles of the SFM topographs taking into account the exact shape of the probing tip estimated by a high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). The glass knives were prepared by 'balanced breaking'. The radius of the investigated cutting edges was found to be 3.2-4.4 nm and 4.3-6.0 nm for the 35 degrees and 45 degrees diamond knife, respectively, and 3.4-4.3 nm for the glass knives. Besides the opening angle and the cutting edge radius, the friction of a knife during sectioning represents a significant factor influencing the quality of sections. Thus, the roughness of both the diamond clearance angle side and the back side was characterized as well. Corresponding RMS values of the roughness were found to be smaller on the back side (approximately 0.14 nm) than on the clearance angle side (approximately 0.26 nm). PMID:12588528

  18. Edge Equilibrium Code (EEC) For Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xujling

    2014-02-24

    The edge equilibrium code (EEC) described in this paper is developed for simulations of the near edge plasma using the finite element method. It solves the Grad-Shafranov equation in toroidal coordinate and uses adaptive grids aligned with magnetic field lines. Hermite finite elements are chosen for the numerical scheme. A fast Newton scheme which is the same as implemented in the equilibrium and stability code (ESC) is applied here to adjust the grids

  19. Edge-on!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-08-01

    Peering at Uranus's Rings as they Swing Edge-on to Earth for the First Time Since their Discovery in 1977 As Uranus coasts through a brief window of time when its rings are edge-on to Earth - a view of the planet we get only once every 42 years - astronomers peering at the rings with ESO's Very Large Telescope and other space or ground-based telescopes are getting an unprecedented view of the fine dust in the system, free from the glare of the bright rocky rings. They may even find a new moon or two. ESO PR Photo 37/07 ESO PR Photo 37/07 The Uranus System "ESO's VLT took data at the precise moment when the rings were edge-on to Earth," said Imke de Pater, of University of California, Berkeley who coordinated the worldwide campaign. She worked with two team members observing in Chile: Daphne Stam of the Technical University Delft in the Netherlands and Markus Hartung of ESO. The observations were done with NACO, one of the adaptive optics instruments installed at the VLT. With adaptive optics, it is possible to obtain images almost free from the blurring effect of the atmosphere. It is as if the 8.2-m telescope were observing from space. Observations were also done with the Keck telescope in Hawaii, the Hubble Space Telescope, and at the Palomar Observatory. "Using different telescopes around the world allows us to observe as much of the changes during the ring-plane crossing as possible: when Uranus sets as seen from the VLT, it can still be observed by the Keck," emphasised Stam. Uranus orbits the Sun in 84 years. Twice during a Uranian year, the rings appear edge-on to Earth for a brief period. The rings were discovered in 1977, so this is the first time for a Uranus ring-crossing to be observed from Earth. The advantage of observations at a ring-plane crossing is that it becomes possible to look at the rings from the shadowed or dark side. From that vantage point, the normally bright outer rings grow fainter because their centimetre- to metre-sized rocks obscure

  20. Optical receivers using rough reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V. A.

    1985-01-01

    This report examines the possible use of rough, or nondiffraction-limited, reflectors for collecting optical signals. It is shown that in the absence of background radiation, the reflector's surface quality has little effect on the performance of a properly designed receiver, but that the presence of even small amounts of background radiation can lead to severe performance degradation. Techniques are suggested for improving receiver performance in high-background environments, and bounds and approximations to the exact error-probability expressions are derived.

  1. Intelligent System Development Using a Rough Sets Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Gray T.; Shelton, Robert O.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the potential of the rough sets technique for developing intelligent models of complex systems from limited information. Rough sets a simple but promising technology to extract easily understood rules from data. The rough set methodology has been shown to perform well when used with a large set of exemplars, but its performance with sparse data sets is less certain. The difficulty is that rules will be developed based on just a few examples, each of which might have a large amount of noise associated with them. The question then becomes, what is the probability of a useful rule being developed from such limited information? One nice feature of rough sets is that in unusual situations, the technique can give an answer of 'I don't know'. That is, if a case arises that is different from the cases the rough set rules were developed on, the methodology can recognize this and alert human operators of it. It can also be trained to do this when the desired action is unknown because conflicting examples apply to the same set of inputs. This summer's project was to look at combining rough set theory with statistical theory to develop confidence limits in rules developed by rough sets. Often it is important not to make a certain type of mistake (e.g., false positives or false negatives), so the rules must be biased toward preventing a catastrophic error, rather than giving the most likely course of action. A method to determine the best course of action in the light of such constraints was examined. The resulting technique was tested with files containing electrical power line 'signatures' from the space shuttle and with decompression sickness data.

  2. Parameterized Spectral Bathymetric Roughness Using the Nonequispaced Fast Fourier Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabre, David Hanks

    The ocean and acoustic modeling community has specifically asked for roughness from bathymetry. An effort has been undertaken to provide what can be thought of as the high frequency content of bathymetry. By contrast, the low frequency content of bathymetry is the set of contours. The two-dimensional amplitude spectrum calculated with the nonequispaced fast Fourier transform (Kunis, 2006) is exploited as the statistic to provide several parameters of roughness following the method of Fox (1996). When an area is uniformly rough, it is termed isotropically rough. When an area exhibits lineation effects (like in a trough or a ridge line in the bathymetry), the term anisotropically rough is used. A predominant spatial azimuth of lineation summarizes anisotropic roughness. The power law model fit produces a roll-off parameter that also provides insight into the roughness of the area. These four parameters give rise to several derived parameters. Algorithmic accomplishments include reviving Fox's method (1985, 1996) and improving the method with the possibly geophysically more appropriate nonequispaced fast Fourier transform. A new composite parameter, simply the overall integral length of the nonlinear parameterizing function, is used to make within-dataset comparisons. A synthetic dataset and six multibeam datasets covering practically all depth regimes have been analyzed with the tools that have been developed. Data specific contributions include possibly discovering an aspect ratio isotropic cutoff level (less than 1.2), showing a range of spectral fall-off values between about -0.5 for a sandybottomed Gulf of Mexico area, to about -1.8 for a coral reef area just outside of the Saipan harbor. We also rank the targeted type of dataset, the best resolution gridded datasets, from smoothest to roughest using a factor based on the kernel dimensions, a percentage from the windowing operation, all multiplied by the overall integration length.

  3. PVMaT cost reductions in the EFG high volume PV manufacturing line: Annual report, 5 August 1998--4 August 1999[PhotoVoltaic Manufacturing Technology, Edge-defined Film-fed Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Bathey, B.; Brown, B.; Cao, J.; Ebers, S.; Gonsiorawski, R.; Heath, B.; Kalejs, J.; Kardauskas, M.; Mackintosh, B.; Ouellette, M.; Piwczyk, B.; Rosenblum, M.; Southimath, B.

    1999-11-16

    This report describes work performed by ASE Americas researchers during the first year of this Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology 5A2 program. Significant accomplishments in each of three task are as follows. Task 1--Manufacturing Systems: Researchers completed key node analysis, started statistical process control (SPC) charting, carried out design-of-experiment (DoE) matrices on the cell line to optimize efficiencies, performed a capacity and bottleneck study, prepared a baseline chemical waste analysis report, and completed writing of more than 50% of documentation and statistical sections of ISO 9000 procedures. A highlight of this task is that cell efficiencies in manufacturing were increased by 0.4%--0.5% absolute, to an average in excess of 14.2%, with the help of DoE and SPC methods. Task 2--Low-Cost Processes: Researchers designed, constructed, and tested a 50-cm-diameter, edge-defined, film-fed growth (EFG) cylinder crystal growth system to successfully produce thin cylinders up to 1.2 meters in length; completed a model for heat transfer; successfully deployed new nozzle designs and used them with a laser wafer-cutting system with the potential to decrease cutting labor costs by 75% and capital costs by 2X; achieved laser-cutting speeds of up to 8X and evaluation of this system is proceeding in production; identified laser-cutting conditions that reduce damage for both Q-switched Nd:YAG and copper-vapor lasers with the help of a breakthrough in fundamental understanding of cutting with these short-pulse-length lasers; and found that bulk EFG material lifetimes are optimized when co-firing of silicon nitride and aluminum is carried out with rapid thermal processing (RTP). Task 3--Flexible Manufacturing: Researchers improved large-volume manufacturing of 10-cm {times} 15-cm EFG wafers by developing laser-cutting fixtures, adapting carriers and fabricating adjustable racks for etching and rinsing facilities, and installing a high-speed data collection

  4. Intelligent Information Retrieval Using Rough Set Approximations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, Padmini

    1989-01-01

    Describes rough sets theory and discusses the advantages it offers for information retrieval, including the implicit inclusion of Boolean logic, term weighting, ranked retrieval output, and relevance feedback. Rough set formalism is compared to Boolean, vector, and fuzzy models of information retrieval and a small scale evaluation of rough sets is…

  5. Electrokinetic transport in microchannels with random roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Moran; Kang, Qinjun

    2008-01-01

    We present a numerical framework to model the electrokinetic transport in microchannels with random roughness. The three-dimensional microstructure of the rough channel is generated by a random generation-growth method with three statistical parameters to control the number density, the total volume fraction, and the anisotropy characteristics of roughness elements. The governing equations for the electrokinetic transport are solved by a high-efficiency lattice Poisson?Boltzmann method in complex geometries. The effects from the geometric characteristics of roughness on the electrokinetic transport in microchannels are therefore modeled and analyzed. For a given total roughness volume fraction, a higher number density leads to a lower fluctuation because of the random factors. The electroosmotic flow rate increases with the roughness number density nearly logarithmically for a given volume fraction of roughness but decreases with the volume fraction for a given roughness number density. When both the volume fraction and the number density of roughness are given, the electroosmotic flow rate is enhanced by the increase of the characteristic length along the external electric field direction but is reduced by that in the direction across the channel. For a given microstructure of the rough microchannel, the electroosmotic flow rate decreases with the Debye length. It is found that the shape resistance of roughness is responsible for the flow rate reduction in the rough channel compared to the smooth channel even for very thin double layers, and hence plays an important role in microchannel electroosmotic flows.

  6. Calibration of surface roughness standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmann, R.; Nicolet, A.; Meli, F.; Picotto, G. B.; Matus, M.; Carcedo, L.; Hemming, B.; Ganioglu, O.; De Chiffre, L.; Saraiva, F.; Bergstrand, S.; Zelenika, S.; Tonmueanwai, A.; Tsai, C.-L.; Shihua, W.; Kruger, O.; de Souza, M. M.; Salgado, J. A.; Ramotowski, Z.

    2016-01-01

    The key comparison EURAMET.L-K8.2013 on roughness was carried out in the framework of a EURAMET project starting in 2013 and ending in 2015. It involved the participation of 17 National Metrology Institutes from Europe, Asia, South America and Africa representing four regional metrology organisations. Five surface texture standards of different type were circulated and on each of the standards several roughness parameters according to the standard ISO 4287 had to be determined. 32 out of 395 individual results were not consistent with the reference value. After some corrective actions the number of inconsistent results could be reduced to 20, which correspond to about 5% of the total and can statistically be expected. In addition to the material standards, two softgauges were circulated, which allow to test the software of the instruments used in the comparison. The comparison results help to support the calibraton and measurement capabilities (CMCs) of the laboratories involved in the CIPM MRA. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCL, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  7. Extensive wetting due to roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, F.G.; Michael, J.R.; Eisenmann, E.T. . Center for Solder Science and Technology)

    1995-01-01

    Typically, a small mass of eutectic Sn-Pb solder wets a copper surface and flows radially outward to form a hemispherical shape with a contact angle of approx. 15--20 deg. When a similar mass of solder wets and thick electroless copper coated substrate, rapid radial flow commences and surprising new effects occur. Thick coats of electroless copper have a nodular surface structure and spreading on it does not subside until all solder is consumed. When the nodular structure is wetted by solder a coastline'' with many nearby islands'' are defined. Photos of regions at the wetting front were taken in the backscatter imaging mode of an SEM. These images show that solder wets the valleys between the surface nodules forming a delicate, lacy arrangement. The geometry of this coastal'' solder structure is described as fractal-like having a dimension D = 1.38 making it similar to drying fronts and cloud configurations. The importance of surface roughness in wetting phenomena is discussed in the light of an extensive history on the subject. It is shown that for spontaneous flow, assisted by roughness, the surface geometry must consist of local angles that are larger than the equilibrium contact angle. Kinetics of the wetting process are demonstrated by image analysis of wetted area taken from videotaped experiments. These experimental kinetics are shown to be similar in form to flow in open channel capillaries.

  8. PICNIC PAVILION JUST BEYOND THE WESTERN EDGE OF THE BOTANIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PICNIC PAVILION JUST BEYOND THE WESTERN EDGE OF THE BOTANIC GARDEN. THIS PAVILION IS ROUGHLY LOCATED ON THE SITE OF "BARTRAM HALL," ANDREW EASTLAKE'S ITALIANATE VILLA DESIGNED BY NOTED PHILADELPHIA ARCHITECT SAMUEL SLOAN AND CONSTRUCTED IN 1850-1851 - John Bartram House & Garden, 54th Street & Lindbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  9. Characterization of Ice Roughness From Simulated Icing Encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David N.; Shin, Jaiwon

    1997-01-01

    Detailed measurements of the size of roughness elements on ice accreted on models in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) were made in a previous study. Only limited data from that study have been published, but included were the roughness element height, diameter and spacing. In the present study, the height and spacing data were found to correlate with the element diameter, and the diameter was found to be a function primarily of the non-dimensional parameters freezing fraction and accumulation parameter. The width of the smooth zone which forms at the leading edge of the model was found to decrease with increasing accumulation parameter. Although preliminary, the success of these correlations suggests that it may be possible to develop simple relationships between ice roughness and icing conditions for use in ice-accretion-prediction codes. These codes now require an ice-roughness estimate to determine convective heat transfer. Studies using a 7.6-cm-diameter cylinder and a 53.3-cm-chord NACA 0012 airfoil were also performed in which a 1/2-min icing spray at an initial set of conditions was followed by a 9-1/2-min spray at a second set of conditions. The resulting ice shape was compared with that from a full 10-min spray at the second set of conditions. The initial ice accumulation appeared to have no effect on the final ice shape. From this result, it would appear the accreting ice is affected very little by the initial roughness or shape features.

  10. Simultaneous measurement of the root-mean-square roughness and autocorrelation length by optical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dalwoo; Oh, Ki-Jang; Lim, Choong-Soo

    1998-12-01

    We developed an on-line measurement system for the simultaneous measurement of the root-mean-square roughness and autocorrelation length which are the parameters of surface roughness. The measurement is based on the scattering theory of light on the rough surface. Computer simulation shows that the measurement range depends on the wavelength of the light source, and this is verified with the experiment. We installed the measurement system at the finishing line of a cold-rolling steel work, and measured the two parameters in situ. The rms roughness and autocorrelation length are measured and transformed in the average surface roughness and then umber of peaks per inch, respectively. The measured data for both of the parameters are compared with those of stylus method, an the optical method is well coincided with the conventional stylus method.

  11. Supersonic Leading Edge Receptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslov, Anatoly A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes experimental studies of leading edge boundary layer receptivity for imposed stream disturbances. Studies were conducted in the supersonic T-325 facility at ITAM and include data for both sharp and blunt leading edges. The data are in agreement with existing theory and should provide guidance for the development of more complete theories and numerical computations of this phenomena.

  12. The Edge, Fall 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, 1999

    1999-01-01

    "The Edge" is a Canadian publication for youth. The mandate of the Edge is to support and celebrate all career journeys embraced by youth. This issue contains career profile articles covering three jobs: crane operator, indoor climbing instructor, and product certification tester. Career trends and the state of today's workplace are also…

  13. Flap-edge aeroacoustic measurements and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.

    2003-03-01

    the noise radiation. Significantly, for each edge configuration, the spectra for different flow speeds, flap angles, and surface roughness were successfully scaled by utilizing aerodynamic performance and boundary-layer scaling methods developed herein.

  14. Miniature Trailing Edge Effector for Aerodynamic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Hak-Tae (Inventor); Bieniawski, Stefan R. (Inventor); Kroo, Ilan M. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Improved miniature trailing edge effectors for aerodynamic control are provided. Three types of devices having aerodynamic housings integrated to the trailing edge of an aerodynamic shape are presented, which vary in details of how the control surface can move. A bucket type device has a control surface which is the back part of a C-shaped member having two arms connected by the back section. The C-shaped section is attached to a housing at the ends of the arms, and is rotatable about an axis parallel to the wing trailing edge to provide up, down and neutral states. A flip-up type device has a control surface which rotates about an axis parallel to the wing trailing edge to provide up, down, neutral and brake states. A rotating type device has a control surface which rotates about an axis parallel to the chord line to provide up, down and neutral states.

  15. Front-end-of-line process development using 193-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollentier, Ivan K.; Ercken, Monique; Eliat, Astrid; Delvaux, Christie; Jaenen, Patrick; Ronse, Kurt G.

    2001-04-01

    It is expected that 193nm lithography will be introduced in front-end-of-line processing for all critical layers at the 100nm node, and possibly also for some layers at the 130nm node, where critical layers are required to have the lowest mask cost. These processes are currently being investigated at IMEC for CMOS logic applications. While the lithographic performance of 193 nm resists has improved significantly in the last year, most materials still have important processing issues that need further improvement. On one hand, the resists material itself suffers from for example poor dry etch resistance and SEM CD shrinkage. On the other hand, interaction with other materials such as SiON inorganic ARCs becomes more challenging in terms of footing behavior, adhesion, and line edge roughness. In this paper, the 193nm processing experience gained at IMEC will be outlined, as well as solutions for manufacturability. Front- end-of-line integration results will also be shown, mainly for gate applications. It will be demonstrated that currently several commercial resist are capable of printing 130nm gates within the +/- 10 percent CD tolerance, even after gate etch. The impact of line edge roughness will also be discussed. Finally, the feasibility of printing 100nm logic patterns using only binary masks has been demonstrated, including gate etch.

  16. Agile robotic edge finishing

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.

    1996-08-01

    Edge finishing processes have seemed like ideal candidates for automation. Most edge finishing processes are unpleasant, dangerous, tedious, expensive, not repeatable and labor intensive. Estimates place the cost of manual edge finishing processes at 12% of the total cost of fabricating precision parts. For small, high precision parts, the cost of hand finishing may be as high as 305 of the total part cost. Up to 50% of this cost could be saved through automation. This cost estimate includes the direct costs of edge finishing: the machining hours required and the 30% scrap and rework rate after manual finishing. Not included in these estimates are the indirect costs resulting from cumulative trauma disorders and retraining costs caused by the high turnover rate for finishing jobs.. Despite the apparent economic advantages, edge finishing has proven difficult to automate except in low precision and/or high volume production environments. Finishing automation systems have not been deployed successfully in Department of Energy defense programs (DOE/DP) production, A few systems have been attempted but have been subsequently abandoned for traditional edge finishing approaches: scraping, grinding, and filing the edges using modified dental tools and hand held power tools. Edge finishing automation has been an elusive but potentially lucrative production enhancement. The amount of time required for reconfiguring workcells for new parts, the time required to reprogram the workcells to finish new parts, and automation equipment to respond to fixturing errors and part tolerances are the most common reasons cited for eliminating automation as an option for DOE/DP edge finishing applications. Existing automated finishing systems have proven to be economically viable only where setup and reprogramming costs are a negligible fraction of overall production costs.

  17. Martian surface roughness and stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Ross Alan

    2004-12-01

    Orbital datasets can be combined and manipulated to learn about the three- dimensional structure of planetary surfaces, and the processes that have acted on them. The Mars Orbital Camera (MOC) is providing high-resolution images. These images allow qualitative inspection of features, and contain quantitative information about the shape of the surface. Using a photoclinometry technique derived from a lunar-Lambert photometric function, I am able to obtain estimates of the down-sun slope of each pixel in an image. This technique was calibrated against synthetic topography, compared to an area photoclinometry technique, and applied to the Viking and Pathfinder landing sites. It is a robust technique for obtaining the roughness and slope characteristics of large areas. It was applied to the potential landing sites for the Mars Exploration Rovers to evaluate site safety. The slopes from this point photoclinometry technique can be used to obtain a rough estimate of topography, which I used in a number of studies where topographic information was crucial. MOC images have shown that layering is pervasive on the martian surface. Mars Orbital Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data can be registered to MOC images to provide elevation constraints on layer outcrops. Such layers are observed in eastern Coprates Chasma both in the chasma rim and in a flat-topped massif. Observations indicate that the chasma stratigraphy consists of thin sequences of resistant layers and intervening thicker sequences of relatively less resistant layers. More resistant units cap the massif against erosion and result in steeper slopes than the weaker units would otherwise allow. These resistant layers can be used as stratigraphic markers which have allowed me to measure the subsidence and tilting of the massif relative to the chasma walls, providing evidence for tectonic motion in this portion of the Valles Marineris. These outcrops indicate that some of these layers may be analogus to terristrial flood

  18. Equivalent impedance of a rough interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuk, N. P.; Tret'iakov, O. A.

    1987-10-01

    An equivalent-impedance (EI) dyad is constructed for a rough and plane (on the average) interface dividing two plane-stratified magnetodielectric media. Its characteristics are related to those of a smooth surface and to the scattering properties of the roughnesses. It is shown that the Hermitian part of an EI dyad is formed through field scattering by roughnesses into the propagating natural modes of the regular medium.

  19. Feather roughness reduces flow separation during low Reynolds number glides of swifts.

    PubMed

    van Bokhorst, Evelien; de Kat, Roeland; Elsinga, Gerrit E; Lentink, David

    2015-10-01

    Swifts are aerodynamically sophisticated birds with a small arm and large hand wing that provides them with exquisite control over their glide performance. However, their hand wings have a seemingly unsophisticated surface roughness that is poised to disturb flow. This roughness of about 2% chord length is formed by the valleys and ridges of overlapping primary feathers with thick protruding rachides, which make the wing stiffer. An earlier flow study of laminar-turbulent boundary layer transition over prepared swift wings suggested that swifts can attain laminar flow at a low angle of attack. In contrast, aerodynamic design theory suggests that airfoils must be extremely smooth to attain such laminar flow. In hummingbirds, which have similarly rough wings, flow measurements on a 3D printed model suggest that the flow separates at the leading edge and becomes turbulent well above the rachis bumps in a detached shear layer. The aerodynamic function of wing roughness in small birds is, therefore, not fully understood. Here, we performed particle image velocimetry and force measurements to compare smooth versus rough 3D-printed models of the swift hand wing. The high-resolution boundary layer measurements show that the flow over rough wings is indeed laminar at a low angle of attack and a low Reynolds number, but becomes turbulent at higher values. In contrast, the boundary layer over the smooth wing forms open laminar separation bubbles that extend beyond the trailing edge. The boundary layer dynamics of the smooth surface varies non-linearly as a function of angle of attack and Reynolds number, whereas the rough surface boasts more consistent turbulent boundary layer dynamics. Comparison of the corresponding drag values, lift values and glide ratios suggests, however, that glide performance is equivalent. The increased structural performance, boundary layer robustness and equivalent aerodynamic performance of rough wings might have provided small (proto) birds with

  20. Simplified Approach to Predicting Rough Surface Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R. J.; Stripf, M.

    2009-01-01

    Turbine vane heat transfer predictions are given for smooth and rough vanes where the experimental data show transition moving forward on the vane as the surface roughness physical height increases. Consistent with smooth vane heat transfer, the transition moves forward for a fixed roughness height as the Reynolds number increases. Comparisons are presented with published experimental data. Some of the data are for a regular roughness geometry with a range of roughness heights, Reynolds numbers, and inlet turbulence intensities. The approach taken in this analysis is to treat the roughness in a statistical sense, consistent with what would be obtained from blades measured after exposure to actual engine environments. An approach is given to determine the equivalent sand grain roughness from the statistics of the regular geometry. This approach is guided by the experimental data. A roughness transition criterion is developed, and comparisons are made with experimental data over the entire range of experimental test conditions. Additional comparisons are made with experimental heat transfer data, where the roughness geometries are both regular and statistical. Using the developed analysis, heat transfer calculations are presented for the second stage vane of a high pressure turbine at hypothetical engine conditions.

  1. Simplified Approach to Predicting Rough Surface Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Robert J.; Stripf, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Turbine vane heat transfer predictions are given for smooth and rough vanes where the experimental data show transition moving forward on the vane as the surface roughness physical height increases. Consiste nt with smooth vane heat transfer, the transition moves forward for a fixed roughness height as the Reynolds number increases. Comparison s are presented with published experimental data. Some of the data ar e for a regular roughness geometry with a range of roughness heights, Reynolds numbers, and inlet turbulence intensities. The approach ta ken in this analysis is to treat the roughness in a statistical sense , consistent with what would be obtained from blades measured after e xposure to actual engine environments. An approach is given to determ ine the equivalent sand grain roughness from the statistics of the re gular geometry. This approach is guided by the experimental data. A roughness transition criterion is developed, and comparisons are made with experimental data over the entire range of experimental test co nditions. Additional comparisons are made with experimental heat tran sfer data, where the roughness geometries are both regular as well a s statistical. Using the developed analysis, heat transfer calculatio ns are presented for the second stage vane of a high pressure turbine at hypothetical engine conditions.

  2. Rough set models of Physarum machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancerz, Krzysztof; Schumann, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we consider transition system models of behaviour of Physarum machines in terms of rough set theory. A Physarum machine, a biological computing device implemented in the plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum (true slime mould), is a natural transition system. In the behaviour of Physarum machines, one can notice some ambiguity in Physarum motions that influences exact anticipation of states of machines in time. To model this ambiguity, we propose to use rough set models created over transition systems. Rough sets are an appropriate tool to deal with rough (ambiguous, imprecise) concepts in the universe of discourse.

  3. Flap Edge Aeroacoustic Measurements and Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An aeroacoustic model test has been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation on high-lift wing configurations. This paper presents an analysis of flap side-edge noise, which is often the most dominant source. A model of a main element wing section with a half-span flap was tested at low speeds of up to a Mach number of 0.17, corresponding to a wing chord Reynolds number of approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for flat (or blunt), flanged, and round flap-edge geometries, with and without boundary-layer tripping, deployed at both moderate and high flap angles. The acoustic database is obtained from a Small Aperture Directional Array (SADA) of microphones, which was constructed to electronically steer to different regions of the model and to obtain farfield noise spectra and directivity from these regions. The basic flap-edge aerodynamics is established by static surface pressure data, as well as by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations and simplified edge flow analyses. Distributions of unsteady pressure sensors over the flap allow the noise source regions to be defined and quantified via cross-spectral diagnostics using the SADA output. It is found that shear layer instability and related pressure scatter is the primary noise mechanism. For the flat edge flap, two noise prediction methods based on unsteady surface pressure measurements are evaluated and compared to measured noise. One is a new causality spectral approach developed here. The other is a new application of an edge-noise scatter prediction method. The good comparisons for both approaches suggest that much of the physics is captured by the prediction models. Areas of disagreement appear to reveal when the assumed edge noise mechanism does not fully define the noise production. For the different edge conditions, extensive spectra and directivity are presented. Significantly, for each edge configuration, the spectra for different flow speeds, flap angles, and

  4. Flap Edge Aeroacoustic Measurements and Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An aeroacoustic model test has been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation on high-lift wing configurations. This paper presents an analysis of flap side-edge noise, which is often the most dominant source. A model of a main element wing section with a half-span flap was tested at low speeds of up to a Mach number of 0.17, corresponding to a wing chord Reynolds number of approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for flat (or blunt), flanged, and round flap-edge geometries, with and without boundary-layer tripping, deployed at both moderate and high flap angles. The acoustic database is obtained from a Small Aperture Directional Array (SADA) of microphones, which was constructed to electronically steer to different regions of the model and to obtain farfield noise spectra and directivity from these regions. The basic flap-edge aerodynamics is established by static surface pressure data, as well as by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations and simplified edge flow analyses. Distributions of unsteady pressure sensors over the flap allow the noise source regions to be defined and quantified via cross-spectral diagnostics using the SADA output. It is found that shear layer instability and related pressure scatter is the primary noise mechanism. For the flat edge flap, two noise prediction methods based on unsteady-surface-pressure measurements are evaluated and compared to measured noise. One is a new causality spectral approach developed here. The other is a new application of an edge-noise scatter prediction method. The good comparisons for both approaches suggest that much of the physics is captured by the prediction models. Areas of disagreement appear to reveal when the assumed edge noise mechanism does not fully define, the noise production. For the different edge conditions, extensive spectra and directivity are presented. Significantly, for each edge configuration, the spectra for different flow speeds, flap angles, and

  5. Influence of pitch, twist, and taper on a blade`s performance loss due to roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of blade geometric parameters such as pitch, twist, and taper on a blade`s sensitivity to leading edge roughness. The approach began with an evaluation of available test data of performance degradation due to roughness effects for several rotors. In addition to airfoil geometry, this evaluation suggested that a rotor`s sensitivity to roughness was also influenced by the blade geometric parameters. Parametric studies were conducted using the PROP computer code with wind-tunnel airfoil characteristics for smooth and rough surface conditions to quantify the performance loss due to roughness for tapered and twisted blades relative to a constant-chord, non-twisted blade at several blade pitch angles. The results indicate that a constant-chord, non-twisted blade pitched toward stall will have the greatest losses due to roughness. The use of twist, taper, and positive blade pitch angles all help reduce the angle-of-attack distribution along the blade for a given wind speed and the associated performance degradation due to roughness. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Sliding mean edge estimation. [in digital image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, G. E.

    1978-01-01

    A method for determining the locations of the major edges of objects in digital images is presented. The method is based on an algorithm utilizing maximum likelihood concepts. An image line-scan interval is processed to determine if an edge exists within the interval and its location. The proposed algorithm has demonstrated good results even in noisy images.

  7. The Edge supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agosta, Roxana; Bilbija, Dushan; Deutsch, Marc; Gallant, David; Rose, Don; Shreve, Gene; Smario, David; Suffredini, Brian

    1992-01-01

    As intercontinental business and tourism volumes continue their rapid expansion, the need to reduce travel times becomes increasingly acute. The Edge Supersonic Transport Aircraft is designed to meet this demand by the year 2015. With a maximum range of 5750 nm, a payload of 294 passengers and a cruising speed of M = 2.4, The Edge will cut current international flight durations in half, while maintaining competitive first class, business class, and economy class comfort levels. Moreover, this transport will render a minimal impact upon the environment, and will meet all Federal Aviation Administration Part 36, Stage III noise requirements. The cornerstone of The Edge's superior flight performance is its aerodynamically efficient, dual-configuration design incorporating variable-geometry wingtips. This arrangement combines the benefits of a high aspect ratio wing at takeoff and low cruising speeds with the high performance of an arrow-wing in supersonic cruise. And while the structural weight concerns relating to swinging wingtips are substantial, The Edge looks to ever-advancing material technologies to further increase its viability. Heeding well the lessons of the past, The Edge design holds economic feasibility as its primary focus. Therefore, in addition to its inherently superior aerodynamic performance, The Edge uses a lightweight, largely windowless configuration, relying on a synthetic vision system for outside viewing by both pilot and passengers. Additionally, a fly-by-light flight control system is incorporated to address aircraft supersonic cruise instability. The Edge will be produced at an estimated volume of 400 aircraft and will be offered to airlines in 2015 at $167 million per transport (1992 dollars).

  8. Wetting properties of molecularly rough surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Svoboda, Martin; Lísal, Martin; Malijevský, Alexandr

    2015-09-14

    We employ molecular dynamics simulations to study the wettability of nanoscale rough surfaces in systems governed by Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions. We consider both smooth and molecularly rough planar surfaces. Solid substrates are modeled as a static collection of LJ particles arranged in a face-centered cubic lattice with the (100) surface exposed to the LJ fluid. Molecularly rough solid surfaces are prepared by removing several strips of LJ atoms from the external layers of the substrate, i.e., forming parallel nanogrooves on the surface. We vary the solid-fluid interactions to investigate strongly and weakly wettable surfaces. We determine the wetting properties by measuring the equilibrium droplet profiles that are in turn used to evaluate the contact angles. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to Wenzel’s law, suggest that surface roughness always amplifies the wetting properties of a lyophilic surface. However, our results indicate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., surface roughness deteriorates the substrate wettability. Adding the roughness to a strongly wettable surface shrinks the surface area wet with the liquid, and it either increases or only marginally affects the contact angle, depending on the degree of liquid adsorption into the nanogrooves. For a weakly wettable surface, the roughness changes the surface character from lyophilic to lyophobic due to a weakening of the solid-fluid interactions by the presence of the nanogrooves and the weaker adsorption of the liquid into the nanogrooves.

  9. Optical methods for cylindrical rough surface testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Quintian, F.; Rebollo, Maria A.; Gaggioli, Nestor G.; Raffo, C. A.

    1999-07-01

    This work studies theoretically the scattering of light from cylindrical rough surfaces. It is shown, for the conical diffraction configuration, that the mean intensity on an observation plane perpendicular to the cylinder longitudinal axis, is related to the statistical parameters that characterize the surface: the roughness (sigma) and the correlation length T.

  10. Roughness configuration matters for aeolian sediment flux

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The parameterisation of surface roughness effects on aeolian sediment transport is a key source of uncertainty in wind erosion models. Roughness effects are typically represented by bulk drag-partitioning schemes that scale the threshold friction velocity (u*t) for soil entrainment by the ratio of s...

  11. Wetting properties of molecularly rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, Martin; Malijevský, Alexandr; Lísal, Martin

    2015-09-14

    We employ molecular dynamics simulations to study the wettability of nanoscale rough surfaces in systems governed by Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions. We consider both smooth and molecularly rough planar surfaces. Solid substrates are modeled as a static collection of LJ particles arranged in a face-centered cubic lattice with the (100) surface exposed to the LJ fluid. Molecularly rough solid surfaces are prepared by removing several strips of LJ atoms from the external layers of the substrate, i.e., forming parallel nanogrooves on the surface. We vary the solid-fluid interactions to investigate strongly and weakly wettable surfaces. We determine the wetting properties by measuring the equilibrium droplet profiles that are in turn used to evaluate the contact angles. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to Wenzel's law, suggest that surface roughness always amplifies the wetting properties of a lyophilic surface. However, our results indicate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., surface roughness deteriorates the substrate wettability. Adding the roughness to a strongly wettable surface shrinks the surface area wet with the liquid, and it either increases or only marginally affects the contact angle, depending on the degree of liquid adsorption into the nanogrooves. For a weakly wettable surface, the roughness changes the surface character from lyophilic to lyophobic due to a weakening of the solid-fluid interactions by the presence of the nanogrooves and the weaker adsorption of the liquid into the nanogrooves. PMID:26374050

  12. Computational Methods for Rough Classification and Discovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, D. A.; Guan, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    Rough set theory is a new mathematical tool to deal with vagueness and uncertainty. Computational methods are presented for using rough sets to identify classes in datasets, finding dependencies in relations, and discovering rules which are hidden in databases. The methods are illustrated with a running example from a database of car test results.…

  13. Casimir effect with rough metallic mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Neto, Paulo A. Maia; Lambrecht, Astrid; Reynaud, Serge

    2005-07-15

    We calculate the second-order roughness correction to the Casimir energy for two parallel metallic mirrors. Our results may also be applied to the plane-sphere geometry used in most experiments. The metallic mirrors are described by the plasma model, with arbitrary values for the plasma wavelength, the mirror separation, and the roughness correlation length, with the roughness amplitude remaining the smallest length scale for perturbation theory to hold. From the analysis of the intracavity field fluctuations, we obtain the Casimir energy correction in terms of generalized reflection operators, which account for diffraction and polarization coupling in the scattering by the rough surfaces. We present simple analytical expressions for several limiting cases, as well as numerical results that allow for a reliable calculation of the roughness correction in real experiments. The correction is larger than the result of the proximity force approximation, which is obtained from our theory as a limiting case (very smooth surfaces)

  14. Modeling surface roughness scattering in metallic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Moors, Kristof; Sorée, Bart; Magnus, Wim

    2015-09-28

    Ando's model provides a rigorous quantum-mechanical framework for electron-surface roughness scattering, based on the detailed roughness structure. We apply this method to metallic nanowires and improve the model introducing surface roughness distribution functions on a finite domain with analytical expressions for the average surface roughness matrix elements. This approach is valid for any roughness size and extends beyond the commonly used Prange-Nee approximation. The resistivity scaling is obtained from the self-consistent relaxation time solution of the Boltzmann transport equation and is compared to Prange-Nee's approach and other known methods. The results show that a substantial drop in resistivity can be obtained for certain diameters by achieving a large momentum gap between Fermi level states with positive and negative momentum in the transport direction.

  15. Camera Edge Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zisk, Stanley H.; Wittels, Norman

    1988-02-01

    Edge location is an important machine vision task. Machine vision systems perform mathematical operations on rectangular arrays of numbers that are intended to faithfully represent the spatial distribution of scene luminance. The numbers are produced by periodic sampling and quantization of the camera's video output. This sequence can cause artifacts to appear in the data with a noise spectrum that is high in power at high spatial frequencies. This is a problem because most edge detection algorithms are preferentially sensitive to the high-frequency content in an image. Solid state cameras can introduce errors because of the spatial periodicity of their sensor elements. This can result in problems when image edges are aligned with camera pixel boundaries: (a) some cameras introduce transients into the video signal while switching between sensor elements; (b) most cameras use analog low-pass filters to minimize sampling artifacts and these introduce video phase delays that shift the locations of edges. The problems compound when the vision system samples asynchronously with the camera's pixel rate. Moire patterns (analogous to beat frequencies) can result. In this paper, we examine and model quantization effects in a machine vision system with particular emphasis on edge detection performance. We also compare our models with experimental measurements.

  16. Updated Model of Radar Backscatter for Rough Lunar Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Thomas W.; Ustinov, Eugene A.

    2013-01-01

    We reexamined our radar scattering model for young, rough craters [1] based on unpublished data from the 1980's [2]. Our model for scattering from the lunar surface is a mixing model consisting of varying amounts of diffuse and specular components as shown in Figure 1. The specular component, which consists of only opposite-sense circular (OC) echoes, results from the mirror-like surface and sub-surface layers that are smooth to a tenth of a radar wavelength for large (>10 wavelengths) areas oriented perpendicular to the radar's line-ofsight. The diffuse component, which has both OC and same sense (SC) circular echoes, is associated with either surface roughness (wavelength-sized rocks) or ice, and is assumed to be uniformly bright, with backscatter being proportional to the cosine of the incidence angle. Only diffuse scattering contributes to the SC echoes.

  17. Effects of Airfoil Thickness and Maximum Lift Coefficient on Roughness Sensitivity: 1997--1998

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D. M.

    2005-01-01

    A matrix of airfoils has been developed to determine the effects of airfoil thickness and the maximum lift to leading-edge roughness. The matrix consists of three natural-laminar-flow airfoils, the S901, S902, and S903, for wind turbine applications. The airfoils have been designed and analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally in the Pennsylvania State University low-speed, low-turbulence wind tunnel. The effect of roughness on the maximum life increases with increasing airfoil thickness and decreases slightly with increasing maximum lift. Comparisons of the theoretical and experimental results generally show good agreement.

  18. The effect of adding roughness and thickness to a transonic axial compressor rotor

    SciTech Connect

    Suder, K.L.; Chima, R.V.; Strazisar, A.J.; Roberts, W.B.

    1995-10-01

    The performance deterioration of a high-speed axial compressor rotor due to surface roughness and airfoil thickness variations is reported. A 0.025 mm (0.001 in.) thick rough coating with a surface finish of 2.54--3.18 rms {micro}m (100--125 rms {micro}in.) is applied to the pressure and suction surface of the rotor blades. Coating both surfaces increases the leading edge thickness by 10% at the hub and 20% at the tip. Application of this coating results in a loss in efficiency of 6 points and a 9% reduction in the pressure ratio across the rotor at an operating condition near the design point. To separate the effects of thickness and roughness, a smooth coating of equal thickness is also applied to the blade. The smooth coating surface finish is 0.254--0.508 rms {micro} (10--20 rms {micro}in.), compared to the bare metal blade surface finish of 0.508 rms {micro}m (20 rms {micro}in.). The smooth coating results in approximately half of the performance deterioration found from the rough coating. Both coatings are then applied to different portions of the blade surface to determine which portions of the airfoil are most sensitive to thickness/roughness variations. Aerodynamic performance measurements are presented for a number of coating configurations at 60, 80, and 100% of design speed. The results indicate that thickness/roughness over the first 2% of blade chord accounts for virtually all of the observed performance degradation for the smooth coating, compared to about 70% of the observed performance degradation for the rough coating. The performance deterioration is investigated in more detail at design speed using laser anemometer measurements as well as predictions generated by a quasi-three-dimensional Navier-Stokes flow solver, which includes a surface roughness model. Measurements and analysis are performed on the baseline blade and the full-coverage smooth and rough coatings.

  19. High Speed Edge Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokop, Norman F (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Analog circuits for detecting edges in pixel arrays are disclosed. A comparator may be configured to receive an all pass signal and a low pass signal for a pixel intensity in an array of pixels. A latch may be configured to receive a counter signal and a latching signal from the comparator. The comparator may be configured to send the latching signal to the latch when the all pass signal is below the low pass signal minus an offset. The latch may be configured to hold a last negative edge location when the latching signal is received from the comparator.

  20. High Speed Edge Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokop, Norman F (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Analog circuits for detecting edges in pixel arrays are disclosed. A comparator may be configured to receive an all pass signal and a low pass signal for a pixel intensity in an array of pixels. A latch may be configured to receive a counter signal and a latching signal from the comparator. The comparator may be configured to send the latching signal to the latch when the all pass signal is below the low pass signal minus an offset. The latch may be configured to hold a last negative edge location when the latching signal is received from the comparator.

  1. Simulation of shotnoise induced side-wall roughness in electron lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verduin, T.; Lokhorst, S. R.; Hagen, C. W.; Kruit, P.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a fast three dimensional Monte-Carlo framework for the investigation of shotnoise induced side-wall roughness (SWR) formation. The calculation outline is demonstrated by an example for an exposure of a 100nm thick layer of negative tone resist (NTR) resist on top of an infinitely thick silicon substrate. We use our home built Monte-Carlo simulator for electron-matter interaction for the purpose of lithography. A pattern of an isolated line is written into the resist layer by scanning a beam with 20 keV electrons over an area of 32nm×1μm (width and length). During the exposure, we use a spot size of 20 nm, beam step size of 4nm and a Poisson distributed exposure dose of 80 μC/cm2, 60 μC/cm2 and 40 μC/cm2. During the exposure of the sample, we record the locations of the inelastic events within the resist layer. The distribution of released acids is determined under the simplified assumption that every inelastic event corresponds to a release. We now construct a three dimensional image of the (in)solubility of the resist layer within a cuboid of 128 nm(256px) wide, 800 nm(1024px) in length and 100 nm(128px) in height. It is obtained by summing the contribution of all acids to every voxel in the three dimensional image. We have used a three dimensional Gaussian with σx,y,z = rd =5nm for the diffusion of the acid. The boundary between exposed and unexposed resist is determined by a threshold. The resulting image of the (in)solubility is analyzed in different ways by considering slices and three dimensional views of the border. The average line edge roughness (LER) is obtained by calculating the standard deviation (one-sigma) of the left and right border from yz-slices. By considering all slices, ranging from the top of the resist layer to the bottom of the substrate, the average LER as a function of the depth from the top surface of the resist layer is obtained. Shotnoise effects are observed as we decrease the exposure dose. An increased effect

  2. A threshold selection method based on edge preserving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Liantang; Dan, Wei; Chen, Jiaqi

    2015-12-01

    A method of automatic threshold selection for image segmentation is presented. An optimal threshold is selected in order to preserve edge of image perfectly in image segmentation. The shortcoming of Otsu's method based on gray-level histograms is analyzed. The edge energy function of bivariate continuous function is expressed as the line integral while the edge energy function of image is simulated by discretizing the integral. An optimal threshold method by maximizing the edge energy function is given. Several experimental results are also presented to compare with the Otsu's method.

  3. The Lyman edge test of the quasar emission mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonucci, R. R. J.; Kinney, A. L.; Ford, H. C.

    1989-01-01

    The Lyman edge region in the spectra of 11 high-redshift quasars is studied using data designed to detect broadened Lyman edge absorption predicted by thermal models of the 'big blue bump' continuum component, especially thin accretion disks. Three objects have broadened, partial edges near the systemic redshifts, as expected for thermal models. In two cases, however, narrow Lyamn lines with the edge absorption, ruling out the disk interpretation. Thus, the data are negative for thermal models, at least for opaque thin accretion disks.

  4. a Fast and Robust Algorithm for Road Edges Extraction from LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Kaijin; Sun, Kai; Ding, Kou; Shu, Zhen

    2016-06-01

    Fast mapping of roads plays an important role in many geospatial applications, such as infrastructure planning, traffic monitoring, and driver assistance. How to extract various road edges fast and robustly is a challenging task. In this paper, we present a fast and robust algorithm for the automatic road edges extraction from terrestrial mobile LiDAR data. The algorithm is based on a key observation: most roads around edges have difference in elevation and road edges with pavement are seen in two different planes. In our algorithm, we firstly extract a rough plane based on RANSAC algorithm, and then multiple refined planes which only contains pavement are extracted from the rough plane. The road edges are extracted based on these refined planes. In practice, there is a serious problem that the rough and refined planes usually extracted badly due to rough roads and different density of point cloud. To eliminate the influence of rough roads, the technology which is similar with the difference of DSM (digital surface model) and DTM (digital terrain model) is used, and we also propose a method which adjust the point clouds to a similar density to eliminate the influence of different density. Experiments show the validities of the proposed method with multiple datasets (e.g. urban road, highway, and some rural road). We use the same parameters through the experiments and our algorithm can achieve real-time processing speeds.

  5. On the roughness measurement on knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Sami Abdel; Ruggiero, Alessandro; Battaglia, Santina; Affatato, Saverio

    2015-01-01

    The majority of total knee replacements currently implanted present an articulation composed of two metal parts, femoral and tibial components, between which there is a polyethylene insert serving as a bearing surface. The finishing surface of the metal components is a very important factor in minimizing the polyethylene wear rate and, later, the gradual production of metal and plastic debris. Considering the role of surface roughness on volumetric wear rates, the purpose of this study is to develop a protocol for the roughness characterization of total knee prosthesis (TKP) metal components, taking into consideration a limited number of points on each surface. Six mobile TKP of different sizes (three size 2 and three size 6) were tested on a knee joint simulator to compare the wear behavior of each group. After 2 million cycles the weight loss by the polyethylene inserts was measured with gravimetric method and the surface roughness of the metallic components was assessed in terms of average surface roughness, Ra, skewness, Rsk, and total roughness, Rt. Roughness measurement involved 29 points on each femoral condyle and 26 points on each metal tibial plate. The data collected has shown an increased roughness upon wear testing for both the investigated TKP sizes. No statistical differences were observed between the two groups for both the parameters Ra, Rsk, and Rt. The surface of all metallic components became more negatively skewed, indicating diminishing peaks. The various parameters were correlated to the volumetric loss using a linear regression analysis. PMID:25588764

  6. Thermal contact conductance of spherical, rough metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, M.A.; Fletcher, L.S.

    1996-12-31

    Junction thermal conductance is an important consideration in such applications as thermally induced stresses in supersonic and hypersonic flight vehicles, nuclear reactor cooling, electronics packaging, spacecraft thermal control, gas turbine and internal combustion engine cooling, and cryogenic liquid storage. A fundamental problem in analyzing and predicting junction thermal conductance is thermal contact conductance of non-flat, rough metals. Workable models have been previously derived for the limiting idealized cases of flat, rough and spherical, smooth surfaces. However, until now, no tractable models have been advanced for non-flat, rough surfaces (so called engineering surfaces) which are much more commonly dealt with in practice. The present investigation details the synthesis of previously derived models for macroscopically non-uniform thermal contact conductance and contact of non-flat, rough spheres, into a thermo-mechanical model, its refinement, and its presentation in an easily applied format. The present model is compared to representative experimental conductance results form the literature for stainless steel 304 with widely varying flatness deviation and roughness. Also included in the comparisons is a previous, often cited model for flat, rough metals to which the present model reduces in the limit of flat surfaces. The present model agrees well with the experimental results over the wide ranges of flatness deviation and roughness for which data was available. Conversely, the previous, well known model becomes increasingly overpredictive with increasing flatness deviation.

  7. Turbulent flow in smooth and rough pipes.

    PubMed

    Allen, J J; Shockling, M A; Kunkel, G J; Smits, A J

    2007-03-15

    Recent experiments at Princeton University have revealed aspects of smooth pipe flow behaviour that suggest a more complex scaling than previously noted. In particular, the pressure gradient results yield a new friction factor relationship for smooth pipes, and the velocity profiles indicate the presence of a power-law region near the wall and, for Reynolds numbers greater than about 400x103 (R+>9x103), a logarithmic region further out. New experiments on a rough pipe with a honed surface finish with krms/D=19.4x10-6, over a Reynolds number range of 57x103-21x106, show that in the transitionally rough regime this surface follows an inflectional friction factor relationship rather than the monotonic relationship given in the Moody diagram. Outer-layer scaling of the mean velocity data and streamwise turbulence intensities for the rough pipe show excellent collapse and provide strong support for Townsend's outer-layer similarity hypothesis for rough-walled flows. The streamwise rough-wall spectra also agree well with the corresponding smooth-wall data. The pipe exhibited smooth behaviour for ks+ < or =3.5, which supports the suggestion that the original smooth pipe was indeed hydraulically smooth for ReD< or =24x106. The relationship between the velocity shift, DeltaU/utau, and the roughness Reynolds number, ks+, has been used to generalize the form of the transition from smooth to fully rough flow for an arbitrary relative roughness krms/D. These predictions apply for honed pipes when the separation of pipe diameter to roughness height is large, and they differ significantly from the traditional Moody curves. PMID:17244585

  8. Layering of ionic liquids on rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, Alexis; Jurado, L. Andres; Ramakrishna, Shivaprakash N.; Arcifa, Andrea; Rossi, Antonella; Spencer, Nicholas D.; Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the behavior of ionic liquids (ILs) either confined between rough surfaces or in rough nanoscale pores is of great relevance to extend studies performed on ideally flat surfaces to real applications. In this work we have performed an extensive investigation of the structural forces between two surfaces with well-defined roughness (<9 nm RMS) in 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide by atomic force microscopy. Statistical studies of the measured layer thicknesses, layering force, and layering frequency reveal the ordered structure of the rough IL-solid interface. Our work shows that the equilibrium structure of the interfacial IL strongly depends on the topography of the contact.Understanding the behavior of ionic liquids (ILs) either confined between rough surfaces or in rough nanoscale pores is of great relevance to extend studies performed on ideally flat surfaces to real applications. In this work we have performed an extensive investigation of the structural forces between two surfaces with well-defined roughness (<9 nm RMS) in 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide by atomic force microscopy. Statistical studies of the measured layer thicknesses, layering force, and layering frequency reveal the ordered structure of the rough IL-solid interface. Our work shows that the equilibrium structure of the interfacial IL strongly depends on the topography of the contact. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Optimized geometries and sizes for [HMIM] Ntf2, SEM images of the smooth and rough colloids, frequency of occurrence of layering in the resolved force-distance curves for all investigated systems with [HMIM] Ntf2, layer size and layering force measured with a sharp tip on mica for the same IL, and results of the kinetics experiments. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07805a

  9. Edge effects in composites by moire interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czarnek, R.; Post, D.; Herakovich, C.

    1983-01-01

    The very high sensitivity of moire interferometry has permitted the present edge effect experiments to be conducted at a low average stress and strain level, assuring linear and elastic behavior in the composite material samples tested. Sensitivity corresponding to 2450 line/mm moire was achieved with a 0.408 micron/fringe. Simultaneous observations of the specimen face and edge displacement fields showed good fringe definition despite the 1-mm thickness of the specimens and the high gradients, and it is noted that the use of a carrier pattern and optical filtering was effective in even these conditions. Edge effects and dramatic displacement gradients were confirmed in angle-ply composite laminates.

  10. Numerical Schemes for Rough Parabolic Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Deya, Aurelien

    2012-04-15

    This paper is devoted to the study of numerical approximation schemes for a class of parabolic equations on (0,1) perturbed by a non-linear rough signal. It is the continuation of Deya (Electron. J. Probab. 16:1489-1518, 2011) and Deya et al. (Probab. Theory Relat. Fields, to appear), where the existence and uniqueness of a solution has been established. The approach combines rough paths methods with standard considerations on discretizing stochastic PDEs. The results apply to a geometric 2-rough path, which covers the case of the multidimensional fractional Brownian motion with Hurst index H>1/3.

  11. Giant persistent photoconductivity in rough silicon nanomembranes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ping; Mönch, Ingolf; Harazim, Stefan; Huang, Gaoshan; Mei, Yongfeng; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2009-10-01

    This paper reports the observation of giant persistent photoconductivity from rough Si nanomembranes. When exposed to light, the current in p-type Si nanomembranes is enhanced by roughly 3 orders of magnitude in comparison with that in the dark and can persist for days at a high conductive state after the light is switched off. An applied gate voltage can tune the persistent photocurrent and accelerate the response to light. By analyzing the band structure of the devices and the surfaces through various coatings, we attribute the observed effect to hole-localized regions in Si nanomembranes due to the rough surfaces, where light can activate the confined holes. PMID:19637888

  12. Nanoscale roughness micromilled silica evanescent refractometer.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Lewis G; Cooper, Peter A; Holmes, Christopher; Gawith, Corin B E; Gates, James C; Smith, Peter G R

    2015-01-26

    We demonstrate machining of precision slots in silica with nanoscale roughness for applications in photonics. Using our in-house developed milling system we have achieved machined slots with surface roughness of 3.0 nm (Sa) and 17 µm depth of cut. This result represents eight times improvement in surface roughness and forty times increase in depth of cut than previously reported. We also demonstrate integration of these milled slots with UV-written waveguides and Bragg gratings to create optical refractometers, based on monitoring Fabry-Pérot spectral fringe changes. PMID:25835860

  13. Swords with Blunt Edges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popham, W. James

    2004-01-01

    Many U.S. educators now wonder whether they're teachers or targets. This mentality stems from the specter of their school being sanctioned for failing the state accountability tests mandated under No Child Left Behind (NCLB). According to this author, most of those tests are like blunt-edged swords: They function badly in two directions. While…

  14. Oscillating edge-flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckmaster, J.; Zhang, Yi

    1999-09-01

    It has been known for some years that when a near-limit flame spreads over a liquid pool of fuel, the edge of the flame can oscillate. It is also known that when a near-asphyxiated candle-flame burns in zero gravity, the edge of the (hemispherical) flame can oscillate violently prior to extinction. We propose that these oscillations are nothing more than a manifestation of the large Lewis number instability well known in chemical reactor studies and in combustion studies, one that is exacerbated by heat losses. As evidence of this we examine an edge-flame confined within a fuel-supply boundary and an oxygen-supply boundary, anchored by a discontinuity in data at the fuel-supply boundary. We show that when the Lewis number of the fuel is 2, and the Lewis number of the oxidizer is 1, oscillations of the edge occur when the Damköhler number is reduced below a critical value. During a single oscillation period there is a short premixed propagation stage and a long diffusion stage, behaviour that has been observed in flame spread experiments. Oscillations do not occur when both Lewis numbers are equal to 1.

  15. The Inner Urban Edge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferebee, Ann; Carpenter, Edward K.

    1974-01-01

    In this article, renewal of the inner urban edge is discussed. Norfolk (Virginia) is attempting to blur the difference between old and new neighbor hoods through zoning and architectural controls. Cincinnati (Ohio) is developing an environmentally sound hillside design. Reading (Pennsylvania) is utilizing old railyards for greenbelts of hiking and…

  16. Effect of Surface Roughness on Hydrodynamic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. C.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical analysis on the performance of hydrodynamic oil bearings is made considering surface roughness effect. The hydrodynamic as well as asperity contact load is found. The contact pressure was calculated with the assumption that the surface height distribution was Gaussian. The average Reynolds equation of partially lubricated surface was used to calculate hydrodynamic load. An analytical expression for average gap was found and was introduced to modify the average Reynolds equation. The resulting boundary value problem was then solved numerically by finite difference methods using the method of successive over relaxation. The pressure distribution and hydrodynamic load capacity of plane slider and journal bearings were calculated for various design data. The effects of attitude and roughness of surface on the bearing performance were shown. The results are compared with similar available solution of rough surface bearings. It is shown that: (1) the contribution of contact load is not significant; and (2) the hydrodynamic and contact load increase with surface roughness.

  17. Surface roughness effects on bidirectional reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, T. F.; Hering, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental study of surface roughness effects on bidirectional reflectance of metallic surfaces is presented. A facility capable of irradiating a sample from normal to grazing incidence and recording plane of incidence bidirectional reflectance measurements was developed. Samples consisting of glass, aluminum alloy, and stainless steel materials were selected for examination. Samples were roughened using standard grinding techniques and coated with a radiatively opaque layer of pure aluminum. Mechanical surface roughness parameters, rms heights and rms slopes, evaluated from digitized surface profile measurements are less than 1.0 micrometers and 0.28, respectively. Rough surface specular, bidirectional, and directional reflectance measurements for selected values of polar angle of incidence and wavelength of incident energy within the spectral range of 1 to 14 micrometers are reported. The Beckmann bidirectional reflectance model is compared with reflectance measurements to establish its usefulness in describing the magnitude and spatial distribution of energy reflected from rough surfaces.

  18. Image sharpness function based on edge feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Ni

    2009-11-01

    Autofocus technique has been widely used in optical tracking and measure system, but it has problem that when the autofocus device should to work. So, no-reference image sharpness assessment has become an important issue. A new Sharpness Function that can estimate current frame image be in focus or not is proposed in this paper. According to current image whether in focus or not and choose the time of auto focus automatism. The algorithm measures object typical edge and edge direction, and then get image local kurtosis information to determine the degree of image sharpness. It firstly select several grads points cross the edge line, secondly calculates edge sharpness value and get the cure of the kurtosis, according the measure precision of optical-equipment, a threshold value will be set beforehand. If edge kurtosis value is more than threshold, it can conclude current frame image is in focus. Otherwise, it is out of focus. If image is out of focus, optics system then takes autofocus program. This algorithm test several thousands of digital images captured from optical tracking and measure system. The results show high correlation with subjective sharpness assessment for s images of sky object.

  19. How supercontinents and superoceans affect seafloor roughness.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Joanne M; Müller, R Dietmar; Roest, Walter R; Wessel, Paul; Smith, Walter H F

    2008-12-18

    Seafloor roughness varies considerably across the world's ocean basins and is fundamental to controlling the circulation and mixing of heat in the ocean and dissipating eddy kinetic energy. Models derived from analyses of active mid-ocean ridges suggest that ocean floor roughness depends on seafloor spreading rates, with rougher basement forming below a half-spreading rate threshold of 30-35 mm yr(-1) (refs 4, 5), as well as on the local interaction of mid-ocean ridges with mantle plumes or cold-spots. Here we present a global analysis of marine gravity-derived roughness, sediment thickness, seafloor isochrons and palaeo-spreading rates of Cretaceous to Cenozoic ridge flanks. Our analysis reveals that, after eliminating effects related to spreading rate and sediment thickness, residual roughness anomalies of 5-20 mGal remain over large swaths of ocean floor. We found that the roughness as a function of palaeo-spreading directions and isochron orientations indicates that most of the observed excess roughness is not related to spreading obliquity, as this effect is restricted to relatively rare occurrences of very high obliquity angles (>45 degrees ). Cretaceous Atlantic ocean floor, formed over mantle previously overlain by the Pangaea supercontinent, displays anomalously low roughness away from mantle plumes and is independent of spreading rates. We attribute this observation to a sub-Pangaean supercontinental mantle temperature anomaly leading to slightly thicker than normal Late Jurassic and Cretaceous Atlantic crust, reduced brittle fracturing and smoother basement relief. In contrast, ocean crust formed above Pacific superswells, probably reflecting metasomatized lithosphere underlain by mantle at only slightly elevated temperatures, is not associated with basement roughness anomalies. These results highlight a fundamental difference in the nature of large-scale mantle upwellings below supercontinents and superoceans, and their impact on oceanic crustal

  20. Initiative learning algorithm based on rough set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guoyin; He, Xiao

    2003-03-01

    Rough set theory is emerging as a new tool for dealing with fuzzy and uncertain data. In this paper, a theory is developed to express, measure and process uncertain information and uncertain knowledge based on our result about the uncertainty measure of decision tables and decision rule systems. Based on Skowron"s propositional default rule generation algorithm, we develop an initiative learning model with rough set based initiative rule generation algorithm. Simulation results illustrate its efficiency.

  1. Superpixel edges for boundary detection

    DOEpatents

    Moya, Mary M.; Koch, Mark W.

    2016-07-12

    Various embodiments presented herein relate to identifying one or more edges in a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image comprising a plurality of superpixels. Superpixels sharing an edge (or boundary) can be identified and one or more properties of the shared superpixels can be compared to determine whether the superpixels form the same or two different features. Where the superpixels form the same feature the edge is identified as an internal edge. Where the superpixels form two different features, the edge is identified as an external edge. Based upon classification of the superpixels, the external edge can be further determined to form part of a roof, wall, etc. The superpixels can be formed from a speckle-reduced SAR image product formed from a registered stack of SAR images, which is further segmented into a plurality of superpixels. The edge identification process is applied to the SAR image comprising the superpixels and edges.

  2. Current standings in diagnostic management of acute venous thromboembolism: Still rough around the edges.

    PubMed

    van der Hulle, T; Dronkers, C E A; Huisman, M V; Klok, F A

    2016-01-01

    Signs and symptoms of acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) are notoriously non-specific. Therefore, diagnostic management algorithms have been developed, consisting of a clinical decision rule (CDR), D-dimer testing and an imaging test, that allow safe diagnostic management and the exclusion of VTE in clinical practice. However, several challenges still remain: adherence to the diagnostic algorithms, accurate diagnosis of recurrent VTE and reducing the radiation exposure associated with computed tomography pulmonary angiography for suspected PE. In this clinically oriented review, we will provide an overview of current diagnostic algorithms for suspected DVT and PE and focus on recent advances including strategies to improve adherence to recommended algorithms, age-dependent D-dimer threshold and novel imaging techniques. PMID:26233662

  3. Rough surface reconstruction for ultrasonic NDE simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Wonjae; Shi, Fan; Lowe, Michael J. S.; Skelton, Elizabeth A.; Craster, Richard V.

    2014-02-18

    The reflection of ultrasound from rough surfaces is an important topic for the NDE of safety-critical components, such as pressure-containing components in power stations. The specular reflection from a rough surface of a defect is normally lower than it would be from a flat surface, so it is typical to apply a safety factor in order that justification cases for inspection planning are conservative. The study of the statistics of the rough surfaces that might be expected in candidate defects according to materials and loading, and the reflections from them, can be useful to develop arguments for realistic safety factors. This paper presents a study of real rough crack surfaces that are representative of the potential defects in pressure-containing power plant. Two-dimensional (area) values of the height of the roughness have been measured and their statistics analysed. Then a means to reconstruct model cases with similar statistics, so as to enable the creation of multiple realistic realizations of the surfaces, has been investigated, using random field theory. Rough surfaces are reconstructed, based on a real surface, and results for these two-dimensional descriptions of the original surface have been compared with those from the conventional model based on a one-dimensional correlation coefficient function. In addition, ultrasonic reflections from them are simulated using a finite element method.

  4. Influence law of structural characteristics on the surface roughness of a magnetorheological-finished KDP crystal.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaoshan; Li, Shengyi; Hu, Hao; Li, Qi; Tie, Guipeng

    2014-11-01

    A new nonaqueous and abrasive-free magnetorheological finishing (MRF) method is adopted for processing potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystal due to its low hardness, high brittleness, temperature sensitivity, and water solubility. This paper researches the influence of structural characteristics on the surface roughness of MRF-finished KDP crystal. The material removal by dissolution is uniform layer by layer when the polishing parameters are stable. The angle between the direction of the polishing wheel's linear velocity and the initial turning lines will affect the surface roughness. If the direction is perpendicular to the initial turning lines, the polishing can remove the lines. If the direction is parallel to the initial turning lines, the polishing can achieve better surface roughness. The structural characteristic of KDP crystal is related to its internal chemical bonds due to its anisotropy. During the MRF finishing process, surface roughness will be improved if the structural characteristics of the KDP crystal are the same on both sides of the wheel. The processing results of (001) plane crystal show we can get the best surface roughness (RMS of 0.809 nm) if the directions of cutting and MRF polishing are along the (110) direction. PMID:25402879

  5. Receptivity to Roughness, Acoustic, and Vortical Disturbances in Supersonic Boundary Layers Over Swept Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam; King, Rudolph A.

    2011-01-01

    The receptivity and interaction of stationary and traveling crossflow instability of three-dimensional supersonic boundary layers over a swept biconvex wing with a blunt leading edge are numerically investigated for a freestream Mach number of 3. The steady and unsteady flow fields are obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations. The receptivity of the boundary layer to surface roughness, freestream acoustic waves, and freestream vorticity waves are numerically investigated. The initial amplitudes of the stationary vortices generated by 1 micron roughness elements is about 2000 times larger than the initial amplitudes of the traveling disturbances generated by vortical disturbances. The interaction of stationary and traveling disturbances was investigated by solving the equations with both surface roughness and vortical disturbances. When the initial amplitudes of the stationary disturbances are large compared to the traveling disturbances, the stationary vortex dominates the perturbation field. When the amplitudes are comparable, the traveling vortex prevails and the stationary vortex is suppressed.

  6. Receptivity of Hypersonic Boundary Layers to Distributed Roughness and Acoustic Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.

    2013-01-01

    Boundary-layer receptivity and stability of Mach 6 flows over smooth and rough seven-degree half-angle sharp-tipped cones are numerically investigated. The receptivity of the boundary layer to slow acoustic disturbances, fast acoustic disturbances, and vortical disturbances is considered. The effects of three-dimensional isolated roughness on the receptivity and stability are also simulated. The results for the smooth cone show that the instability waves are generated in the leading edge region and that the boundary layer is much more receptive to slow acoustic waves than to the fast acoustic waves. Vortical disturbances also generate unstable second modes, however the receptivity coefficients are smaller than that of the slow acoustic wave. Distributed roughness elements located near the nose region decreased the receptivity of the second mode generated by the slow acoustic wave by a small amount. Roughness elements distributed across the continuous spectrum increased the receptivity of the second mode generated by the slow and fast acoustic waves and the vorticity wave. The largest increase occurred for the vorticity wave. Roughness elements distributed across the synchronization point did not change the receptivity of the second modes generated by the acoustic waves. The receptivity of the second mode generated by the vorticity wave increased in this case, but the increase is lower than that occurred with the roughness elements located across the continuous spectrum. The simulations with an isolated roughness element showed that the second mode waves generated by the acoustic disturbances are not influenced by the small roughness element. Due to the interaction, a three-dimensional wave is generated. However, the amplitude is orders of magnitude smaller than the two-dimensional wave.

  7. Activating without Inhibiting: Left-Edge Boundary Tones and Syntactic Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roll, Mikael; Horne, Merle; Lindgren, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Right-edge boundary tones have earlier been found to restrict syntactic processing by closing a clause for further integration of incoming words. The role of left-edge intonation, however, has received little attention to date. We show that Swedish left-edge boundary tones selectively facilitate the on-line processing of main clauses, the…

  8. Fault slip distribution and fault roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candela, Thibault; Renard, François; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Bouchon, Michel; Brodsky, Emily E.

    2011-11-01

    We present analysis of the spatial correlations of seismological slip maps and fault topography roughness, illuminating their identical self-affine exponent. Though the complexity of the coseismic spatial slip distribution can be intuitively associated with geometrical or stress heterogeneities along the fault surface, this has never been demonstrated. Based on new measurements of fault surface topography and on statistical analyses of kinematic inversions of slip maps, we propose a model, which quantitatively characterizes the link between slip distribution and fault surface roughness. Our approach can be divided into two complementary steps: (i) Using a numerical computation, we estimate the influence of fault roughness on the frictional strength (pre-stress). We model a fault as a rough interface where elastic asperities are squeezed. The Hurst exponent ?, characterizing the self-affinity of the frictional strength field, approaches ?, where ? is the roughness exponent of the fault surface in the direction of slip. (ii) Using a quasi-static model of fault propagation, which includes the effect of long-range elastic interactions and spatial correlations in the frictional strength, the spatial slip correlation is observed to scale as ?, where ? represents the Hurst exponent of the slip distribution. Under the assumption that the origin of the spatial fluctuations in frictional strength along faults is the elastic squeeze of fault asperities, we show that self-affine geometrical properties of fault surface roughness control slip correlations and that ?. Given that ? for a wide range of faults (various accumulated displacement, host rock and slip movement), we predict that ?. Even if our quasi-static fault model is more relevant for creeping faults, the spatial slip correlations observed are consistent with those of seismological slip maps. A consequence is that the self-affinity property of slip roughness may be explained by fault geometry without considering

  9. The work budget of rough faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Patrick J.; Ashley Griffith, W.

    2014-12-01

    Faults in nature have measurable roughness at many scales and are not planar as generally idealized. We utilize the boundary element method to model the geomechanical response of synthetic rough faults in an isotropic, linear elastic continuum to external tectonic loading in terms of the work budget. Faults are generated with known fractal roughness parameters, including the root mean square slope (β), a measure of roughness amplitude, and the Hurst exponent (H), a measure of geometric self-similarity. Energy within the fault models is partitioned into external work (Wext), internal elastic strain energy (Wint), gravitational work (Wgrav), frictional work (Wfric), and seismic energy (Wseis). Results confirm that Wext, or work done on the external model boundaries, is smallest for a perfectly planar fault, and steadily increases with increasing β. This pattern is also observed in Wint, the energy expended in deforming the host rock. The opposite is true for gravitational work, or work done against gravity in uplifting host rock, as well as with frictional work, or energy dissipated with frictional slip on the fault, and Wseis, or seismic energy released during slip events. Effects of variation in H are not as large as for β, but Wgrav, Wfric, and Wseis increase with increasing H, with Wint and Wext decreasing across the same range. Remarkably, however, for a narrow range of roughness amplitudes which are commonly observed along natural faults, the total work of the system remains approximately constant, while slightly larger than the total work of a planar fault. Faults evolve toward the most mechanically efficient configuration; therefore we argue that this range of roughness amplitudes may represent an energy barrier, preventing faults from removing asperities and evolving to smooth, planar discontinuities. A similar conclusion is drawn from simulations at relatively shallow depths, with results showing that shallower faults have larger energy barriers, and can

  10. Experimental Investigation on Near-wall Turbulent Flow Structures over Deformable Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloui, Mostafa; John, Nolan; Hong, Jiarong

    2015-11-01

    Wall-bounded turbulent flows over rough surfaces have been studied for almost a century. However, in most of the prior studies, little attention has been paid to the role of roughness mechanical properties, e.g. deformability, in altering the flow characteristics including both general turbulent statistics and near-wall flow structures. In this study, high resolution time-resolved digital in-line holographic PIV is employed to investigate the near-wall turbulent structures as well as turbulent statistics around and above deforming roughness structures. The rough wall samples consisting of tapered cylinders of size 0.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in height are manufactured from transparent PDMS with similar geometrical features but various deformability levels. The experiments are conducted within an optically index-matched facility (using NaI solution) operating with different Reynolds numbers where roughness samples of different deformability are placed downstream of a 1.2 m long acrylic channel of 50 mm square cross section. The follow-up research envisions a large dataset including various Reynolds numbers and deformability to elucidate the role of roughness deformability on near-wall coherent structures and turbulent energy transport within and above the roughness sublayer. This work is supported by the startup package of Jiarong Hong and the MnDrive Fellowship of Mostafa Toloui from University of Minnesota.

  11. Hypersonic Viscous Flow Over Large Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2009-01-01

    Viscous flow over discrete or distributed surface roughness has great implications for hypersonic flight due to aerothermodynamic considerations related to laminar-turbulent transition. Current prediction capability is greatly hampered by the limited knowledge base for such flows. To help fill that gap, numerical computations are used to investigate the intricate flow physics involved. An unstructured mesh, compressible Navier-Stokes code based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for two roughness shapes investigated in wind tunnel experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. It was found through 2D parametric study that at subcritical Reynolds numbers, spontaneous absolute instability accompanying by sustained vortex shedding downstream of the roughness is likely to take place at subsonic free-stream conditions. On the other hand, convective instability may be the dominant mechanism for supersonic boundary layers. Three-dimensional calculations for both a rectangular and a cylindrical roughness element at post-shock Mach numbers of 4.1 and 6.5 also confirm that no self-sustained vortex generation from the top face of the roughness is observed, despite the presence of flow unsteadiness for the smaller post-shock Mach number case.

  12. Correlation of Windspeed and Antarctic Surface Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockham, Mark; Anita Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    When electromagnetic waves interact with a media interface the transmitted and reflected portions of the incoming wave depend on the incident angle of the wave and wavelength (as well as the material properties of the media). The roughness of the surface of Antarctica affects the radio frequency signals received by airborne experiments, such as the balloon-borne experiment ANITA (ANtarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna) which observes the reflected radio waves from cosmic ray-induced extensive air showers (EAS). Roughness of a given scale can cause decoherence of the reflected signal and is an important effect to understand when estimating the amplitude of the incoming wave based on the reflected wave. It is challenging to get a survey of surface roughness over many of the areas that these experiments are likely to pass over. Correlating historical wind speed records with statistical roughness as observed by the backscatter of satellite [Rémy F, Parouty S. Remote Sensing. 2009] and airborne experiments operating at different frequencies can possibly be used to predict time-dependent surface roughness with surface wind speed as the input. These correlations will be presented for a variety of areas on the Antarctic ice shelf. NASA Grant NNX11AC47G.

  13. Interfacial roughness in ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jero, P.D.; Parthasarathy, T.A.; Kerans, R.J.

    1992-08-01

    Recent work using push-out and push-back tests has shown that interfacial roughness contributes substantially to the sliding friction in at least some ceramic matrix composites (CMC's). Other work examining frictional heating of CMC's during cyclic fatigue has shown the important role that interfacial friction plays, and further that the interface is degraded upon extended cycling. From this it is apparent that interfacial roughness may play a key role in determining composite behavior. Although the observation of a seating drop during fiber push-back gives some information about the amplitude and spatial extent of the interfacial roughness, actual measurement of the roughness has proven difficult due to its extremely fine scale. In the present work, a laser interferometer has been used to examine the roughness of composite interfaces (both fiber and matrix) as well as virgin fibers. In addition, long range (mm scale) push-out tests have been followed by interferometric characterization to examine the severity and rate of interfacial degradation associated with fiber sliding. 4 refs.

  14. Search for partial systemic Lyman edges in nearby quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koratkar, A. P.; Kinney, A. L.; Bohlin, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    IUE archival spectra of nearby quasars with redshifts in the range 0.4-2.3 were searched for changes in the continuum at the systemic Lyman edge positions. Thirty-nine percent of the sample do not show any discontinuities. Twenty-nine percent of the sample show complete Lyman edges at redshifts less than the quasar redshift. These objects have associated narrow absorption lines; hence the intervening gas responsible for the absorption is extrinsic to the quasar and its environment. Twenty-two percent of the sample show Lyman edges at the quasar redshift with associated narrow absorption lines. In these objects the gas is associated with the AGN or its host galaxy. Ten percent of the sample have Lyman edges with no known associated absorption lines. If Lyman edge discontinuities are due to optically thick, geometrically thin accretion disks, which are randomly oriented to the line of sight, these results indicate that the Lyman edge discontinuity, either in emission or absorption, has to be not more than 15 percent in most quasars.

  15. On roughness-induced transition - Facts, views, and speculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morkovin, Mark V.

    1990-01-01

    Roughness is considered as a steady passive device, and it is shown that roughness-induced separation is specifically sensitive to unsteady environmental forcing. The two-dimensional isolated roughness causing local upstream and downstream separations is considered, along with flows associated with the two-dimensional roughness and their relevance to the problem of distributed roughness. The difference between the two-dimensional isolated roughness and a three-dimensional isolated roughness at all Reynolds numbers is underlined, and the mechanisms and parameter conditions of a sudden breakdown of hairpin eddies are discussed, as well as flows over distributed roughness.

  16. Liver ultrasound image classification by using fractal dimension of edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovanu, Simona; Bibicu, Dorin; Moraru, Luminita

    2012-08-01

    Medical ultrasound image edge detection is an important component in increasing the number of application of segmentation, and hence it has been subject of many studies in the literature. In this study, we have classified the liver ultrasound images (US) combining Canny and Sobel edge detectors with fractal analysis in order to provide an indicator about of the US images roughness. We intend to provide a classification rule of the focal liver lesions as: cirrhotic liver, liver hemangioma and healthy liver. For edges detection the Canny and Sobel operators were used. Fractal analyses have been applied for texture analysis and classification of focal liver lesions according to fractal dimension (FD) determined by using the Box Counting method. To assess the performance and accuracy rate of the proposed method the contrast-to-noise (CNR) is analyzed.

  17. Edge extraction of optical subaperture based on fractal dimension method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunqi; Hui, Mei; Liu, Ming; Dong, Liquan; Liu, Xiaohua; Zhao, Yuejin

    2015-09-01

    Optical synthetic aperture imaging technology is an effective approach to increase the aperture diameter of optical system for purpose of improving resolution. In optical synthetic aperture imaging system, the edge is more complex than that of traditional optical imaging system, and the relatively large size of the gaps between the subapertures makes cophasing a difficult problem. So it is significant to extract edge phase of each subaperture for achieving phase stitching and avoiding the loss of effective frequency. Fractal dimension as a measure feature of image surface irregularities can statistically evaluate the complexity which is consistent with human visual image perception of rough surface texture. Therefore, fractal dimension provides a powerful tool to describe surface characteristics of image and can be applied to edge extraction. In our research, the box-counting dimension was used to calculate fractal dimension of the whole image. Then the calculated fractal dimension is mapped to grayscale image. The region with large fractal dimension represents a sharper change of the gray scale in original image, which was accurately extracted as the edge region. Subaperture region and interference fringe edge was extracted from interference pattern of optical subaperture, which has laid the foundation for the subaperture edge phase detection in the future work.

  18. Development of X-43A Mach 10 Leading Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Glass, David E.; Bruce, Walter E., III; Lindell, Michael C.; Vaughn, Wallace L.; Dirling, R. B., Jr.; Hogenson, P. A.; Nichols, J. M.; Risner, N. W.; Thompson, D. R.

    2005-01-01

    The nose leading edge of the Hyper-X Mach 10 vehicle was orginally anticipated to reach temperatures near 4000 F at the leading-edge stagnation line. A SiC coated carbon/carbon (C/C) leading-edge material will not survive that extreme temperature for even a short duration single flight. To identify a suitable leading edge for the Mach 10 vehicle, arc-jet testing was performed on thirteen leading-edge segments fabricated from different material systems to evaluate their performance in a simulated flight environment. Hf, Zr, Si, and Ir based materials, in most cases as a coating on C/C, were included in the evaluation. Afterwards, MER, Tucson, AZ was selected as the supplier of the flight vehicle leading edges. The nose and the vertical and horizontal tail leading edges were fabricated out of a 3:1 biased high thermal conductivity C/C. The leading edges were coated with a three layer coating comprised of a SiC conversion of the top surface of the C/C, followed by a chemical vapor deposited layer of SiC, followed by a thin chemical vapor deposited layer of HfC. This paper will describe the fabrication of the Mach 10 C/C leading edges and the testing performed to validate performance.

  19. The geological interpretation of photometric surface roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfenstein, Paul

    1988-01-01

    A computer-generated km-scale relief map, whose topographic facets on scales of less than a few m are assumed to have smooth particulate surfaces, is the basis of the present investigation of the relationship between photometrically-derived values of Hapke's (1984) roughness parameter theta and topographic scale. The addition of m-km scale-range relief to the otherwise smooth surface alters integral photometric behavior in a way that is consistent with Hapke's equation; the roughness characterized by theta is an integral property over all scales up to the resolution limit of the photometric data used in its determination. With sufficient phase angle coverage, theta can distinguish terrains with very different integral roughnesses.

  20. Surface roughness effects on equilibrium temperature.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houchens, A. F.; Hering, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis is presented for evaluation of equilibrium temperature distribution on radiatively adiabatic, adjoint planes which are uniformly irradiated by a collimated solar flux. The analysis employs a semigrey spectral model. Radiation properties for surface emitted radiation are obtained from the expressions of electromagnetic theory for smooth surfaces. Rough surface properties for solar radiation are given by the Beckmann bidirectional reflectance model. Numerical solutions to the governing equations yield equilibrium temperature distributions for a range of the influencing parameters. Surface roughness has little influence on equilibrium temperature for materials with high values for solar absorptance. However, for low or intermediate values of solar absorptance, roughness effects on the spatial distribution of reflected solar radiation can significantly alter equilibrium temperature particularly at surface elements where radiant interaction is small.

  1. Wetting on rough self-affine surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palasantzas, George

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, we present a general investigation of the effective potential for complete wetting on self-affine rough surfaces. The roughness effect is investigated by means of the height-height correlation model in Fourier space ~(1+aξ2q2)-1-H. The parameters H and ξ are, respectively, the roughness exponent and the substrate in-plane correlation length. It is observed that the effect of H on the free interface profile is significant for ξ>ξ) regime is characterized by a power-law scaling ~Y-2.

  2. Effects of Yb:KYW thin-disk femtosecond laser ablation on enamel surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong; Lü, Peijun

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to quantitatively evaluate the surface roughness of enamel following ablation with a Yb:KYW thin-disk femtosecond pulsed laser at different fluences (F), scanning speeds and scanning line spacings. Thirty human extracted teeth were sectioned into crowns and roots along the cementum-enamel junction, and then the crowns were cut longitudinally into sheets about 1.5 mm thick. The samples were randomly divided into ten groups (n=3). Samples of groups 1-8 were irradiated with a femtosecond pulsed laser. These enamel samples were fixed on a stage at focus plane, and a laser beam irradiated onto the samples through a galvanometric scanning system, with which rectangular movement could be achieved. Samples of groups 9 and 10 were prepared with grinding instruments. Following ablation and preparation, the samples were examined for surface roughness with a three-dimensional laser profile measurement microscope. The results showed that scanning speed and scanning line spacing had little influence on the surface roughness of femtosecond pulsed laser-ablated enamel, except when F=4 J/cm2. When a lower fluence was used, the enamel surface roughness was higher, and vice versa. This study showed that various laser fluences, scanning speeds and scanning line spacings can affect and alter enamel surface roughness. Therefore, adequate parameters should be chosen to achieve the proper therapeutic benefits.

  3. Edge features extraction from 3D laser point cloud based on corresponding images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-feng; Zhao, Zi-ming; Xu, Guo-qing; Geng, Yan-long

    2013-09-01

    An extraction method of edge features from 3D laser point cloud based on corresponding images was proposed. After the registration of point cloud and corresponding image, the sub-pixel edge can be extracted from the image using gray moment algorithm. Then project the sub-pixel edge to the point cloud in fitting scan-lines. At last the edge features were achieved by linking the crossing points. The experimental results demonstrate that the method guarantees accurate fine extraction.

  4. Competing edge networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Mark; Grindrod, Peter

    2012-06-01

    We introduce a model for a pair of nonlinear evolving networks, defined over a common set of vertices, subject to edgewise competition. Each network may grow new edges spontaneously or through triad closure. Both networks inhibit the other's growth and encourage the other's demise. These nonlinear stochastic competition equations yield to a mean field analysis resulting in a nonlinear deterministic system. There may be multiple equilibria; and bifurcations of different types are shown to occur within a reduced parameter space. This situation models competitive communication networks such as BlackBerry Messenger displacing SMS; or instant messaging displacing emails.

  5. The cutting edge.

    PubMed

    Hagland, M; Lumsdon, K; Montague, J; Serb, C

    1995-08-01

    With managed care payment becoming the norm, employers actively pursuing keener benefits management, health care markets evolving at warp speed, and clinical and information technologies spawning new capabilities every day, the cutting edge in health care keeps slicing ever-deeper. With that in mind, we at Hospitals & Health Networks have developed a browser's compendium of some of the leading people, places (organizations and programs) and technologies that are helping move the field forward into the next stage. Each entry is unique; what they all share is an innovative quality that others will emulate. PMID:7627230

  6. Polymer waveguide end facet roughness and optical input/output coupling loss for OPCB applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghsiahi, Hadi; Wang, Kai; Pitwon, Richard; Selviah, David R.

    2014-03-01

    Electro-optical printed circuit board technology (EOCB) based on integrated planar polymer optical waveguides has been the subject of research and development for many years to provide a cost viable, fully integrated system embedded optical interconnect solution, however a number of constraints of this technology have yet to be overcome. Optical coupling loss at the input and output of the waveguides is one of the major issues and waveguide end facet roughness is one of the main sources of the coupling loss which is investigated in this paper. The results of a comprehensive investigation of the end facet roughness of multimode polymer waveguides, fabricated on FR4 printed circuit boards, PCBs, and its effect of optical loss are presented theoretically and experimentally. The waveguide end facet roughness was measured using an atomic force microscope, AFM, when the waveguides were cut using a milling router with various numbers of cutting edges called flutes. The optimized cutting parameters are derived and the optical coupling loss, between the laser source and the waveguide, due to the different roughness magnitudes is measured by experiment for the first time. To improve the surface quality and decrease the waveguide optical loss, a new fabrication technique for reducing the end facet roughness after cutting is proposed and demonstrated. The insertion loss was reduced by 2.60 dB +/- 1.3 dB which is more than that achieved by other conventional methods such as index matching fluid.

  7. Effect of shadowing on electromagnetic scattering from rough ocean wavelike surfaces at small grazing angles

    SciTech Connect

    West, J.C.

    1997-03-01

    A hybrid moment-method/geometrical-theory-of-diffraction technique (MM/GTD) has been implemented to numerically calculate the electromagnetic scattering from one-dimensionally rough surfaces at extreme illumination angles (down to 0{degree} grazing). The hybrid approach allows the extension of the modeled scattering surface to infinity, avoiding the artificial edge diffraction that prevents use of the standard moment method at the smallest grazing angles. Numerical calculation of the backscattering from slightly rough large-scale surfaces approximating ocean wave features shows that roughness in strongly shadowed regions can contribute significantly to the total backscatter at vertical polarization. This is observed when the shadowing obstacle is several wavelengths high, and the magnitude of the shadow-region contribution does not depend on the radius-of-curvature of the shadowing feature. Strongly shadowed roughness does not significantly contribute to the backscatter at horizontal polarization, although weakly shadowed roughness near the incidence shadow boundary does. The calculations indicate that a shadowing-corrected two-scale model may be able to predict the distributed-surface portion of the sea-surface scattering from the ocean surface at grazing angles down to about 15{degree}, but at lower grazing the shadowing and large-scale curvature of the surface prevent the establishment of a Bragg resonance and invalidate the model.

  8. Robust design optimization method for centrifugal impellers under surface roughness uncertainties due to blade fouling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Yaping; Zhang, Chuhua

    2016-03-01

    Blade fouling has been proved to be a great threat to compressor performance in operating stage. The current researches on fouling-induced performance degradations of centrifugal compressors are based mainly on simplified roughness models without taking into account the realistic factors such as spatial non-uniformity and randomness of the fouling-induced surface roughness. Moreover, little attention has been paid to the robust design optimization of centrifugal compressor impellers with considerations of blade fouling. In this paper, a multi-objective robust design optimization method is developed for centrifugal impellers under surface roughness uncertainties due to blade fouling. A three-dimensional surface roughness map is proposed to describe the nonuniformity and randomness of realistic fouling accumulations on blades. To lower computational cost in robust design optimization, the support vector regression (SVR) metamodel is combined with the Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) method to conduct the uncertainty analysis of fouled impeller performance. The analyzed results show that the critical fouled region associated with impeller performance degradations lies at the leading edge of blade tip. The SVR metamodel has been proved to be an efficient and accurate means in the detection of impeller performance variations caused by roughness uncertainties. After design optimization, the robust optimal design is found to be more efficient and less sensitive to fouling uncertainties while maintaining good impeller performance in the clean condition. This research proposes a systematic design optimization method for centrifugal compressors with considerations of blade fouling, providing a practical guidance to the design of advanced centrifugal compressors.

  9. Measurement and simulation of surface roughness noise using phased microphone arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Dowling, A. P.; Shin, H.-C.

    2008-07-01

    A turbulent boundary-layer flow over a rough wall generates a dipole sound field as the near-field hydrodynamic disturbances in the turbulent boundary-layer scatter into radiated sound at small surface irregularities. In this paper, phased microphone arrays are applied to the measurement and simulation of surface roughness noise. The radiated sound from two rough plates and one smooth plate in an open jet is measured at three streamwise locations, and the beamforming source maps demonstrate the dipole directivity. Higher source strengths can be observed on the rough plates which also enhance the trailing-edge noise. A prediction scheme in previous theoretical work is used to describe the strength of a distribution of incoherent dipoles and to simulate the sound detected by the microphone array. Source maps of measurement and simulation exhibit satisfactory similarities in both source pattern and source strength, which confirms the dipole nature and the predicted magnitude of roughness noise. However, the simulations underestimate the streamwise gradient of the source strengths and overestimate the source strengths at the highest frequency.

  10. Partnership for Edge Physics Simulation (EPSI)

    SciTech Connect

    Schroder, Peter

    2015-02-11

    We propose to develop advanced simulation codes, based upon an extreme parallelism, first principles kinetic approach, to address the challenges associated with the edge region of magnetically confined plasmas. This work is relevant to both existing magnetic fusion facilities and essential for next-generation burning plasma experiments, such as ITER where success is critically dependent upon H-mode operation achieving an edge pedestal of sufficient height for good core plasma performance without producing deleterious large scale edge localized instabilities. The plasma edge presents a well-known set of multi-physics, multi-scale problems involving complex 3D magnetic geometry. Perhaps the greatest computational challenge is the lack of scale separation – temporal scales for drift waves, Alfven waves, ELM dynamics for example have strong overlap. Similar overlap occurs on the spatial scales for the ion poloidal gyro-radius, drift wave and pedestal width. The traditional approach of separating fusion problems into weakly interacting spatial or temporal domains clearly breaks down in the edge. A full kinetic model (full-f model) must be solved to understand and predict the edge physics including non-equilibrium thermodynamic issues arising from the magnetic topology (the open field lines producing a spatially sensitive velocity hole), plasma wall interactions, neutral and atomic physics. The plan here is to model these phenomena within a comprehensive first principles set of equations without the need for the insurmountable multiple-codes coupling issues by building on the XGC1 code developed under the SciDAC Proto-FSP Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES). This proposal includes the critical participants in the XGC1 development. We propose enhancing the capability of XGC1 by including all the important turbulence physics contained in kinetic ion and electron electromagnetic dynamics, by extending the PIC technology to incorporate several positive features found

  11. X-point position dependence of edge intrinsic toroidal rotation on the Tokamak à Configuration Variable

    SciTech Connect

    Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; Karpushov, A. N.; Sauter, O.; Duval, B. P.; Labit, B.; Reimerdes, H.; Vijvers, W. A. J.; Camenen, Y.

    2015-05-15

    Recent theoretical work predicts intrinsic toroidal rotation in the tokamak edge to depend strongly on the normalized major radial position of the X-point. With this motivation, we conducted a series of Ohmic L-mode shots on the Tokamak à Configuration Variable, moving the X-point from the inboard to the outboard edge of the last closed flux surface in both lower and upper single null configurations. The edge toroidal rotation evolved from strongly co-current for an inboard X-point to either vanishing or counter-current for an outboard X-point, in agreement with the theoretical expectations. The whole rotation profile shifted roughly rigidly with the edge rotation, resulting in variation of the peak core rotation by more than a factor of two. Core rotation reversals had little effect on the edge rotation. Edge rotation was slightly more counter-current for unfavorable than favorable ∇B drift discharges.

  12. X-point position dependence of edge intrinsic toroidal rotation on the Tokamak à Configuration Variablea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; Karpushov, A. N.; Sauter, O.; Duval, B. P.; Labit, B.; Reimerdes, H.; Vijvers, W. A. J.; Camenen, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Recent theoretical work predicts intrinsic toroidal rotation in the tokamak edge to depend strongly on the normalized major radial position of the X-point. With this motivation, we conducted a series of Ohmic L-mode shots on the Tokamak à Configuration Variable, moving the X-point from the inboard to the outboard edge of the last closed flux surface in both lower and upper single null configurations. The edge toroidal rotation evolved from strongly co-current for an inboard X-point to either vanishing or counter-current for an outboard X-point, in agreement with the theoretical expectations. The whole rotation profile shifted roughly rigidly with the edge rotation, resulting in variation of the peak core rotation by more than a factor of two. Core rotation reversals had little effect on the edge rotation. Edge rotation was slightly more counter-current for unfavorable than favorable ∇B drift discharges.

  13. Topological number of edge states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Kimura, Taro

    2016-05-01

    We show that the edge states of the four-dimensional class A system can have topological charges, which are characterized by Abelian/non-Abelian monopoles. The edge topological charges are a new feature of relations among theories with different dimensions. From this novel viewpoint, we provide a non-Abelian analog of the TKNN number as an edge topological charge, which is defined by an SU(2) 't Hooft-Polyakov BPS monopole through an equivalence to Nahm construction. Furthermore, putting a constant magnetic field yields an edge monopole in a noncommutative momentum space, where D-brane methods in string theory facilitate study of edge fermions.

  14. ROUGHNESS LENGTHS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, C.

    2012-03-28

    Surface roughness values for the areas surrounding the H, D and N-Area meteorological towers were computed from archived 2010 meteorological data. These 15-minute-averaged data were measured with cup anemometers and bidirectional wind vanes (bivanes) 61 m above the surface. The results of the roughness calculation using the standard deviation of elevation angle {sigma}{sub E}, and applying the simple formula based on tree canopy height, gave consistent estimates for roughness around the H-Area tower in the range of 1.76 to 1.86 m (95% confidence interval) with a mean value of 1.81 m. Application of the {sigma}{sub E} method for the 61-m level at D and N-Areas gave mean values of 1.71 and 1.81 with confidence ranges of 1.62-1.81 and 1.73-1.88 meters, respectively. Roughness results are azimuth dependent, and thus are presented as averages over compass sectors spanning 22.5 degrees. Calculated values were compared to other methods of determining roughness, including the standard deviation of the azimuth direction, {sigma}{sub A}, and standard deviation of the wind speed, {sigma}{sub U}. Additional data was obtained from a sonic anemometer at 61-m on the H-Area tower during a period of a few weeks in 2010. Results from the sonic anemometer support our use of {sigma}{sub E} to calculate roughness. Based on the H-Area tower results, a surface roughness of 1.8 m using is recommended for use in dispersion modeling applications that consider the impacts of a contaminant release to individuals along the Site boundary. The canopy surrounding the H-Area tower is relatively uniform (i.e., little variance in roughness by upwind direction), and data supplied by the U.S. Forest Service at Savannah River show that the canopy height and composition surrounding the H-Area tower is reasonably representative of forested areas throughout the SRS reservation. For dispersion modeling analyses requiring assessments of a co-located worker within the respective operations area, recommended

  15. Laws of Flow in Rough Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikuradse, J

    1950-01-01

    An experimental investigation is made of the turbulent flow of water in pipes with various degrees of relative roughness. The pipes range in size from 25 to 100 millimeters in diameter and from 1800 to 7050 millimeters in length. Flow velocities permitted Reynolds numbers from about 10 (sup. 4) to 10 (sup. 6). The laws of resistance and velocity distributions were obtained as a function of relative roughness and Reynolds number. Mixing length, as described by Prandtl's mixing-length formula, is discussed in relation to the experimental results.

  16. Rough and Steep Terrain Lunar Surface Mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian

    2005-01-01

    In the summer of 2004, the NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate conducted an open call for projects relevant to human and robotic exploration of the Earth-Moon and Mars systems. A project entitled 'Rough and Steep Terrain Lunar Surface Mobility' was submitted by JPL and accepted by NASA. The principal investigator of this project describes the robotic vehicle being developed for this effort, which includes six 'wheels-on-legs' so that it can roll efficiently on relatively smooth terrain but walk (using locked wheels as footpads) when "the going gets rough".

  17. Roughness Perception of Haptically Displayed Fractal Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, Michael A.; Cutkosky, Mark R.; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Surface profiles were generated by a fractal algorithm and haptically rendered on a force feedback joystick, Subjects were asked to use the joystick to explore pairs of surfaces and report to the experimenter which of the surfaces they felt was rougher. Surfaces were characterized by their root mean square (RMS) amplitude and their fractal dimension. The most important factor affecting the perceived roughness of the fractal surfaces was the RMS amplitude of the surface. When comparing surfaces of fractal dimension 1.2-1.35 it was found that the fractal dimension was negatively correlated with perceived roughness.

  18. Rough Fresnel zone plates over metallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Remacha, Francisco Javier; Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel; Alvarez-Rios, Francisco Javier; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    2010-04-01

    We analyze the focusing properties of Fresnel zone plates fabricated over steel tapes using laser ablation. Our intention is to implement the use of micro-optical elements when the use of conventional chrome-glass elements is not indicated. Because of the manufacture process, the surface presents a certain anisotropic roughness, which reduces the focusing properties. First, we develop numerical simulations by means of the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld approach, showing how roughness in both levels of the Fresnel zone plate affects the focalization of the lens. We also manufacture Fresnel zone plates over steel tape, and perform experimental verification that corroborates the numerical results. PMID:20357856

  19. Evaluation of Dry, Rough Vacuum Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Brian

    2006-01-01

    This document provides information on the testing and evaluation of thirteen dry rough vacuum pumps of various designs and from various manufacturers. Several types of rough vacuum pumps were evaluated, including scroll, roots, and diaphragm pumps. Tests included long term testing, speed curve generation, voltage variance, vibrations emissions and susceptibility, electromagnetic interference emissions and susceptibility, static leak rate, exhaust restriction, response/recovery time tests, and a contamination analysis for scroll pumps. Parameters were found for operation with helium, which often is not provided from the manufacturer

  20. Fused silica fine grinding with low roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lei; Gu, Yongqiang; Wu, Di

    2014-08-01

    Lithography-optics is one of the most complex optical systems. The fine grinding process is the most important step before polishing. Roughness and sub-surface damage (SSD) are essential outputs of fine grinding. We demonstrate the method that use fix abrasive cup tool with CNC grinding machine to complete the fine grinding process, even instead of lapping process. And experiment sample roughness can reach 23.40nm rms and Ra 18.554nm. The SSD estimate is about 2 μm which is also smaller than commercial lapping process. The fine grinding output can satisfy the lithography optic fabrication demands and efficiently reduce the polishing time.

  1. Elastoplastic deformation of a roughness element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashov, M. V.; Kornev, Yu. V.

    2014-03-01

    The problem of using the mechanical properties determined in a macroexperiment in contact models for micron-sized roughness elements is considered. For a sample of commercial-purity AD1 aluminum, the penetration depths of an indenter into a rough surface element that are determined in a physical experiment and in a three-dimensional finite element simulation are compared. It is found that, with allowance for certain assumptions, the application of the properties determined in a macroexperiment requires their correction to take into account the cold work hardening of the surface layer in the sample material and the size effect.

  2. Surface roughness evolution of nanocomposite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Turkin, A. A.; Pei, Y. T.; Shaha, K. P.; Chen, C. Q.; Vainshtein, D. I.; Hosson, J. Th. M. de

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of dynamic roughening and smoothening mechanisms of thin films grown with pulsed-dc magnetron sputtering is presented. The roughness evolution has been described by a linear stochastic equation, which contains the second- and fourth-order gradient terms. Dynamic smoothening of the growing interface is explained by ballistic effects resulting from impingements of ions to the growing thin film. These ballistic effects are sensitive to the flux and energy of impinging ions. The predictions of the model are compared with experimental data, and it is concluded that the thin film roughness can be further controlled by adjusting waveform, frequency, and width of dc pulses.

  3. Venus surface roughness and Magellan stereo data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurice, Kelly E.; Leberl, Franz W.; Norikane, L.; Hensley, Scott

    1994-01-01

    Presented are results of some studies to develop tools useful for the analysis of Venus surface shape and its roughness. Actual work was focused on Maxwell Montes. The analyses employ data acquired by means of NASA's Magellan satellite. The work is primarily concerned with deriving measurements of the Venusian surface using Magellan stereo SAR. Roughness was considered by means of a theoretical analyses based on digital elevation models (DEM's), on single Magellan radar images combined with radiometer data, and on the use of multiple overlapping Magellan radar images from cycles 1, 2, and 3, again combined with collateral radiometer data.

  4. Sub-14 nm HSQ line patterning by e-beam dose proximity effect correction assisted with designed line CD/pitch split

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Su; Yang, Chu-Ya; Lo, Chiung Yu; Wei, Hung-Wen; Chen, Frederick T.; Ku, Tzu-Kun

    2013-03-01

    New applications on memory and logic devices need to form line shape pattern below 20 nm. Most of the prior articles for studying HSQ line CD resolution applied hot or cold (non-room temperature (RT)) development, salty development, KOH-based development or high concentration TMAH developer (like 25%) to push CD resolution to below 10 nm but these methods are not standard IC process compatible with 2.38% TMAH development at RT. E-beam lithography processes are applied to investigate CD resolution on RRAM film stacking of TiN/Ti/HfOx with or without proximity effect correction (PEC). Both dose and shape (line CD and pitch) modulations are applied in this study to obtain finest line width resolution using IC process compatible 2.38% TMAH developer at RT. Experimental results are summarized below. Lowest base dose of HSQ for pattern to be resolvable is larger than 1,000 (μC/cm2). Smallest line CD of 13.1 nm for designed CD of 5 nm (G4) is resolved to 2 separate lines on R1st dense-line pattern with e-beam dose of 5,000 (μC/cm2) assisted by dose PEC. Two lines of R1st dense-pattern is merged to single line of 14.7 nm at 10,000 (μC/cm2). 2lines dense-line pattern is clearly resolved to 2 separate lines at 1,500 (μC/cm2) but merged to one line at 2,000 (μC/cm2). Iso-line on the right of two dense-lines of 2lines pattern contributes backscattered dose which increases the line width. 5lines dense-line pattern could only resolve to 18.3 nm. Iso-line R1st_1L is resolvable to 18.5 nm with uniform distribution of CD across the line and 13.6 nm is also resolved with more rough line edge. In summary, sub-14 nm line width of HSQ could be resolved by the combination of e-beam dose and shape modulations using standard 2.38% TAMH developer. This process is suitable for applications using metal oxide films.

  5. Comparison of Predicted and Measured Turbine Vane Rough Surface Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R. J.; Spuckler, C. M.; Lucci, B. L.

    2000-01-01

    The proposed paper compares predicted turbine vane heat transfer for a rough surface over a wide range of test conditions with experimental data. Predictions were made for the entire vane surface. However, measurements were made only over the suction surface of the vane, and the leading edge region of the pressure surface. Comparisons are shown for a wide range of test conditions. Inlet pressures varied between 3 and 15 psia, and exit Mach numbers ranged between 0.3 and 0.9. Thus, while a single roughened vane was used for the tests, the effective rougness,(k(sup +)), varied by more than a factor of ten. Results were obtained for freestream turbulence levels of 1 and 10%. Heat transfer predictions were obtained using the Navier-Stokes computer code RVCQ3D. Two turbulence models, suitable for rough surface analysis, are incorporated in this code. The Cebeci-Chang roughness model is part of the algebraic turbulence model. The k-omega turbulence model accounts for the effect of roughness in the application of the boundary condition. Roughness causes turbulent flow over the vane surface. Even after accounting for transition, surface roughness significantly increased heat transfer compared to a smooth surface. The k-omega results agreed better with the data than the Cebeci-Chang model. However, the low Reynolds number k-omega model did not accurately account for roughness when the freestream turbulence level was low. The high Reynolds number version of this model was more suitable when the freestream turbulence was low.

  6. Surface roughness scattering in multisubband accumulation layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Han; Reich, K. V.; Shklovskii, B. I.

    2016-06-01

    Accumulation layers with very large concentrations of electrons where many subbands are filled became recently available due to ionic liquid and other new methods of gating. The low-temperature mobility in such layers is limited by the surface roughness scattering. However, theories of roughness scattering so far dealt only with the small-density single subband two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). Here we develop a theory of roughness-scattering limited mobility for the multisubband large concentration case. We show that with growing 2D electron concentration n the surface dimensionless conductivity σ /(2 e2/h ) first decreases as ∝n-6 /5 and then saturates as ˜(d aB/Δ2)≫1 , where d and Δ are the characteristic length and height of the surface roughness and aB is the effective Bohr radius. This means that in spite of the shrinkage of the 2DEG thickness and the related increase of the scattering rate the 2DEG remains a good metal.

  7. Surface roughness modulations by submesoscale currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rascle, Nicolas; Chapron, Bertrand; Nouguier, Frederic; Ponte, Aurelien; Mouche, Alexis; Molemaker, Jeroen

    2016-04-01

    At times, high resolution images of sea surface roughness can provide stunning details of submesoscale upper ocean dynamics. As interpreted, transformations of short scale wind waves by horizontal current gradients are responsible for those spectacular observations. Here we present two major advances towards the quantitative interpretation of those observations. First, we show that surface roughness variations mainly trace two particular characteristics of the current gradient tensor, the divergence and the strain in the wind direction. Local vorticity and shear in the wind direction should not affect short scale roughness distribution and would not be detectable. Second, we discuss the effect of the viewing direction using sets of quasi-simultaneous sun glitter images, taken from different satellites to provide different viewing configurations. We show that upwind and crosswind viewing observations can be markedly different. As further confirmed with idealized numerical simulations, this anisotropy well traces surface current strain area, while more isotropic contrasts likely trace areas dominated by surface divergence conditions. These findings suggest the potential to directly observe surface currents at submesoscale by using surface roughness observations at multiple azimuth viewing angles. They also pave the way towards a better understanding of the coupling between ocean, waves and atmosphere at high resolution.

  8. Thermal smoothing of rough surfaces in vacuo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahl, G.

    1986-01-01

    The derivation of equations governing the smoothing of rough surfaces, based on Mullins' (1957, 1960, and 1963) theories of thermal grooving and of capillarity-governed solid surface morphology is presented. As an example, the smoothing of a one-dimensional sine-shaped surface is discussed.

  9. Particle Sliding on a Rough Incline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurcher, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    We study a particle sliding on a rough inclined plane as an example of a mechanical problem with nonholonomic constraint. The particle is launched in an arbitrary direction so that its motion has both a horizontal and a "vertical" (i.e., up- and downhill) direction. The friction force acts along the instantaneous velocity, so that the horizontal…

  10. Three-tier rough superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuanzhi; Yuan, Longyan; Hu, Bin; Zhou, Jun

    2015-08-01

    A three-tier rough superhydrophobic surface was fabricated by growing hydrophobic modified (fluorinated silane) zinc oxide (ZnO)/copper oxide (CuO) hetero-hierarchical structures on silicon (Si) micro-pillar arrays. Compared with the other three control samples with a less rough tier, the three-tier surface exhibits the best water repellency with the largest contact angle 161° and the lowest sliding angle 0.5°. It also shows a robust Cassie state which enables the water to flow with a speed over 2 m s(-1). In addition, it could prevent itself from being wetted by the droplet with low surface tension (mixed water and ethanol 1:1 in volume) which reveals a flow speed of 0.6 m s(-1) (dropped from the height of 2 cm). All these features prove that adding another rough tier on a two-tier rough surface could futher improve its water-repellent properties. PMID:26184512

  11. Dynamic Stall Characteristics of Drooped Leading Edge Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankar, Lakshmi N.; Sahin, Mehmet; Gopal, Naveen

    2000-01-01

    Helicopters in high-speed forward flight usually experience large regions of dynamic stall over the retreating side of the rotor disk. The rapid variations in the lift and pitching moments associated with the stall process can result in vibratory loads, and can cause fatigue and failure of pitch links. In some instances, the large time lag between the aerodynamic forces and the blade motion can trigger stall flutter. A number of techniques for the alleviation of dynamic stall have been proposed and studied by researchers. Passive and active control techniques have both been explored. Passive techniques include the use of high solidity rotors that reduce the lift coefficients of individual blades, leading edge slots and leading edge slats. Active control techniques include steady and unsteady blowing, and dynamically deformable leading edge (DDLE) airfoils. Considerable amount of experimental and numerical data has been collected on the effectiveness of these concepts. One concept that has not received as much attention is the drooped-leading edge airfoil idea. It has been observed in wind tunnel studies and flight tests that drooped leading edge airfoils can have a milder dynamic stall, with a significantly milder load hysteresis. Drooped leading edge airfoils may not, however, be suitable at other conditions, e.g. in hover, or in transonic flow. Work needs to be done on the analysis and design of drooped leading edge airfoils for efficient operation in a variety of flight regimes (hover, dynamic stall, and transonic flow). One concept that is worthy of investigation is the dynamically drooping airfoil, where the leading edge shape is changed roughly once-per-rev to mitigate the dynamic stall.

  12. Slip due to surface roughness for a Newtonian liquid in a viscous microscale disk pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligrani, Phil; Blanchard, Danny; Gale, Bruce

    2010-05-01

    In the present study, hydrophobic roughness is used to induce near-wall slip in a single rotating-disk micropump operating with Newtonian water. The amount of induced slip is altered by employing different sizes of surface roughness on the rotating disk. The magnitudes of slip length and slip velocities increase as the average size of the surface roughness becomes larger. In the present study, increased slip magnitudes from roughness are then associated with reduced pressure rise through the pump and lower radial-line-averaged shear stress magnitudes (determined within slip planes). Such shear stress and pressure rise variations are similar to those which would be present if the slip is induced by the intermolecular interactions which are associated with near-wall microscale effects. The present slip-roughness effects are quantified experimentally over rotational speeds from 50 to 1200 rpm, pressure increases from 0 to 312 kPa, net flow rates of 0-100 μl/min, and fluid chamber heights from 6.85 to 29.2 μm. Verification is provided by comparisons with analytic results determined from the rotating Couette flow forms of the Navier-Stokes equations, with different disk rotational speeds, disk roughness levels, and fluid chamber heights. These data show that slip length magnitudes show significant dependence on radial-line-averaged shear stress for average disk roughness heights of 404 and 770 nm. These slip length data additionally show a high degree of organization when normalized using by either the average roughness height or the fluid chamber height. For the latter case, such behavior provides evidence that the flow over a significant portion of the passage height is affected by the roughness, and near-wall slip velocities, especially when the average roughness height amounts to 11% of the h =6.86 μm passage height of the channel. Such scaling of the disk slip length bdisk with fluid chamber height h is consistent with d-type roughness scaling in macroscale

  13. Improvement of the edge rotation diagnostic spectrum analysis via simulation.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Zhuang, G; Cheng, Z F; Zhang, X L; Hou, S Y; Cheng, C

    2014-11-01

    The edge rotation diagnostic (ERD) system has been developed on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak to measure the edge toroidal rotation velocity by observing the shifted wavelength of carbon V (C V 227.09 nm). Since the measured spectrum is an integrated result along the viewing line from the plasma core to the edge, a method via simulation has been developed to analyze the ERD spectrum. With the necessary parameters such as C V radiation profile and the ion temperature profile, a local rotation profile at the normalized minor radius of 0.5-1 is obtained. PMID:25430334

  14. Improvement of the edge rotation diagnostic spectrum analysis via simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.; Zhuang, G. Cheng, Z. F.; Zhang, X. L.; Hou, S. Y.; Cheng, C.

    2014-11-15

    The edge rotation diagnostic (ERD) system has been developed on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak to measure the edge toroidal rotation velocity by observing the shifted wavelength of carbon V (C V 227.09 nm). Since the measured spectrum is an integrated result along the viewing line from the plasma core to the edge, a method via simulation has been developed to analyze the ERD spectrum. With the necessary parameters such as C V radiation profile and the ion temperature profile, a local rotation profile at the normalized minor radius of 0.5-1 is obtained.

  15. Improvement of the edge rotation diagnostic spectrum analysis via simulationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, J.; Zhuang, G.; Cheng, Z. F.; Zhang, X. L.; Hou, S. Y.; Cheng, C.

    2014-11-01

    The edge rotation diagnostic (ERD) system has been developed on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak to measure the edge toroidal rotation velocity by observing the shifted wavelength of carbon V (C V 227.09 nm). Since the measured spectrum is an integrated result along the viewing line from the plasma core to the edge, a method via simulation has been developed to analyze the ERD spectrum. With the necessary parameters such as C V radiation profile and the ion temperature profile, a local rotation profile at the normalized minor radius of 0.5-1 is obtained.

  16. 14 CFR 25.1517 - Rough air speed, VRA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rough air speed, VRA. 25.1517 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1517 Rough air speed, VRA. A rough air speed, VRA, for use as the recommended turbulence... rough air encounters will not cause the overspeed warning to operate too frequently. In the absence of...

  17. 14 CFR 25.1517 - Rough air speed, VRA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rough air speed, VRA. 25.1517 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1517 Rough air speed, VRA. A rough air speed, VRA, for use as the recommended turbulence... rough air encounters will not cause the overspeed warning to operate too frequently. In the absence of...

  18. 7 CFR 51.707 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Other Than Florida, California, and Arizona) Definitions § 51.707 Slightly rough texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin is not smooth or fairly smooth but is not excessively rough or excessively... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Slightly rough texture. 51.707 Section...

  19. 7 CFR 51.707 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Other Than Florida, California, and Arizona) Definitions § 51.707 Slightly rough texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin is not smooth or fairly smooth but is not excessively rough or excessively... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Slightly rough texture. 51.707 Section...

  20. 7 CFR 51.645 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., and Arizona) Definitions § 51.645 Slightly rough texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin is not smooth or fairly smooth but is not excessively rough or excessively thick, or materially... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Slightly rough texture. 51.645 Section...

  1. 7 CFR 51.707 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., and Arizona) Definitions § 51.707 Slightly rough texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin is not smooth or fairly smooth but is not excessively rough or excessively thick, or materially... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Slightly rough texture. 51.707 Section...

  2. 7 CFR 51.707 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., and Arizona) Definitions § 51.707 Slightly rough texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin is not smooth or fairly smooth but is not excessively rough or excessively thick, or materially... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Slightly rough texture. 51.707 Section...

  3. 7 CFR 51.645 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., and Arizona) Definitions § 51.645 Slightly rough texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin is not smooth or fairly smooth but is not excessively rough or excessively thick, or materially... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Slightly rough texture. 51.645 Section...

  4. 7 CFR 51.645 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Other Than Florida, California, and Arizona) Definitions § 51.645 Slightly rough texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin is not smooth or fairly smooth but is not excessively rough or excessively... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Slightly rough texture. 51.645 Section...

  5. 7 CFR 51.645 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Other Than Florida, California, and Arizona) Definitions § 51.645 Slightly rough texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin is not smooth or fairly smooth but is not excessively rough or excessively... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Slightly rough texture. 51.645 Section...

  6. 7 CFR 51.645 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., and Arizona) Definitions § 51.645 Slightly rough texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin is not smooth or fairly smooth but is not excessively rough or excessively thick, or materially... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Slightly rough texture. 51.645 Section...

  7. 7 CFR 51.707 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., and Arizona) Definitions § 51.707 Slightly rough texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin is not smooth or fairly smooth but is not excessively rough or excessively thick, or materially... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Slightly rough texture. 51.707 Section...

  8. Understanding of Edge Plasmas in Magnetic Fusion Energy Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rognlien, T

    2004-11-01

    A limited overview is given of the theoretical understanding of edge plasmas in fusion devices. This plasma occupies the thin region between the hot core plasma and material walls in magnetically confinement configurations. The region is often formed by a change in magnetic topology from close magnetic field lines (i.e., the core region) and open field lines that contact material surfaces (i.e., the scrape-off layer [SOL]), with the most common example being magnetically diverted tokamaks. The physics of this region is determined by the interaction of plasma with neutral gas in the presence of plasma turbulence, with impurity radiation being an important component. Recent advances in modeling strong, intermittent micro-turbulent edge-plasma transport is given, and the closely coupled self-consistent evolution of the edge-plasma profiles in tokamaks. In addition, selected new results are given for the characterization of edge-plasmas behavior in the areas of edge-pedestal relaxation and SOL transport via Edge-Localize Modes (ELMs), impurity formation including dust, and magnetic field-line stochasticity in tokamaks.

  9. Development of second mode instability in a Mach 6 flat-plate boundarylayer with two-dimensional roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qing; Zhang, Chuanhong; Lee, Cunbiao

    2014-11-01

    The PCB pressure sensors and particle image velocimetry (PIV) are used to study the development of the second mode instability in a Mach 6 flow over a flat plate with two-dimensional roughness. A two-dimensional transverse wall blowing is used to enhance the second mode instability in the boundary layer and seeding tracer particles for PIV measurement. Three roughness elements with different heights are mounted at 125mm downstream the leading edge of the flat plate. It is proved that two-dimensional roughness could enhance the second mode fluctuation upstream the roughness. The second mode instability waves in flat-plate boundary layer are clearly shown by PIV and the boundary layer separation zone upstream the roughness is carefully measured. The boundary layer then reattaches the wall and the second mode instability waves are found damping downstream the roughness. It is also proved that the amplification and damping effect of the second mode instability waves depend on the height of the roughness.

  10. Experimental Investigation of the Problem of Surface Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlichting, H

    1937-01-01

    Based on the universal laws of turbulent velocity distribution at rough and smooth walls, there is in the present work presented a method that allows surface roughness tests and in particular, measurements on the roughness of ship surfaces to be carried out in a much simpler manner. The types of roughness investigated were in the form of flat, rough plates installed in a square-section rectangular channel, the other three walls always being smooth. Twenty-one plates of various roughness were investigated, the roughness elements being the following: spheres of diameter 0.41 and 0.21, respectively, spherical segments, cones, and "short" and "long" angles.

  11. Edge remap for solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, James R.; Love, Edward; Robinson, Allen C.; Young, Joseph G.; Ridzal, Denis

    2013-12-01

    We review the edge element formulation for describing the kinematics of hyperelastic solids. This approach is used to frame the problem of remapping the inverse deformation gradient for Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) simulations of solid dynamics. For hyperelastic materials, the stress state is completely determined by the deformation gradient, so remapping this quantity effectively updates the stress state of the material. A method, inspired by the constrained transport remap in electromagnetics, is reviewed, according to which the zero-curl constraint on the inverse deformation gradient is implicitly satisfied. Open issues related to the accuracy of this approach are identified. An optimization-based approach is implemented to enforce positivity of the determinant of the deformation gradient. The efficacy of this approach is illustrated with numerical examples.

  12. Rough-wall turbulent boundary layers in the transition regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation of turbulent boundary layers over two-dimensional spanwise groove and three-dimensional sandgrain roughnesses in the transition regime between hydraulically smooth and fully rough conditions is presented. It is found that a self-preserving state can be reached in boundary layers developing over both d-type groove and sandgrain roughnesses, and that the drag of a k-type rough wall can be reduced by lowering the spanwise aspect ratio of the roughness elements. The two roughness Reynolds numbers defining the boundaries of the transition regime of the k-type roughnesses are shown to decrease with increasing roughness-element spanwise aspect ratio, and the upper critical transition Reynolds number is shown to determine the roughness behavior in both the transition and fully rough regime.

  13. X-ray fluorescence from rough rocky surfaces of asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, T.

    2014-07-01

    (AMPTEK XR-100CR). The sample is in the He-filled atmosphere. X-ray spectrum is measured from 1 to 10 keV. We analyze the XRF spectrum to obtain the major elemental ratios as customary, but this time we just compare the intensity ratios of each XRF line peak characteristic of the element. Our preliminary experiments for the rocky samples show the roughness effects similar to those of powdery surfaces, but the effects are slightly weaker (almost by one half or less). This is probably due to the smaller depth-width ratio and less porous structure of the rocks relative to that of powders. Further information will be given in the presentation.

  14. Physically-based Ice Thickness and Surface Roughness Retrievals over Rough Deformed Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Gaiser, Peter; Allard, Richard; Posey, Pamela; Hebert, David; Richter-Menge, Jacqueline; Polashenski, Christopher; Claffey, Keran

    2016-04-01

    The observations of sea ice thickness and ice surface roughness are critical for our understanding of the state of the changing Arctic. Currently, the Radar and/or LiDAR data of sea ice freeboard are used to infer sea ice thickness via isostasy. The underlying assumption is that the LiDAR signal returns at the air/snow interface and radar signal at the snow/ice interface. The elevations of these interfaces are determined based on LiDAR/Radar return waveforms. However, the commonly used threshold-based surface detection techniques are empirical in nature and work well only over level/smooth sea ice. Rough sea ice surfaces can modify the return waveforms, resulting in significant Electromagnetic (EM) bias in the estimated surface elevations, and thus large errors in the ice thickness retrievals. To understand and quantify such sea ice surface roughness effects, a combined EM rough surface and volume scattering model was developed to simulate radar returns from the rough sea ice 'layer cake' structure. A waveform matching technique was also developed to fit observed waveforms to a physically-based waveform model and subsequently correct the roughness induced EM bias in the estimated freeboard. This new EM Bias Corrected (EMBC) algorithm was able to better retrieve surface elevations and estimate the surface roughness parameter simultaneously. Both the ice thickness and surface roughness retrievals are validated using in-situ data. For the surface roughness retrievals, we applied this EMBC algorithm to co-incident LiDAR/Radar measurements collected during a Cryosat-2 under-flight by the NASA IceBridge missions. Results show that not only does the waveform model fit very well to the measured radar waveform, but also the roughness parameters derived independently from the LiDAR and radar data agree very well for both level and deformed sea ice. For sea ice thickness retrievals, validation based on in-situ data from the coordinated CRREL/NRL field campaign demonstrates

  15. Modeling Radar Scatter from Icy and Young Rough Lunar Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Thomas (Tommy); Ustinov, Eugene; Spudis, Paul; Fessler, Brian

    2012-01-01

    For lunar orbital synthetic aperture radars, such as the Chandrayaan Mini-RF operating at S- band (13-cm) wavelength and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Mini-RF operating at S- band and X-band (3-cm) wavelengths, it is important to understand the radar backscattering characteristics of the icy and young, rough craters. Assuming a mixing model consisting of diffuse and quasi-specular scattering components, we have modeled the opposite-sense circular (OC) and same-sense circular (SC) backscattering characteristics. The specular component, consisting of only OC echoes, represents the echoes from the surface and subsurface layers that are oriented perpendicular to the radar's line-of-sight. The diffuse component, consisting of both SC and OC echoes, represents the echoes associated with either rocks or ice. Also, diffuse echoes have backscatter that is proportional to the cosine of the incidence angle. We modeled how these two (specular and diffuse) radar scattering components could be modulated by factors such as surface roughness associated with young craters. We also modeled how ice radar scattering components could be modulated by a thin regolith covering, and/or by the situation where ice occupies small patches within a larger radar pixel. We tested this modeling by examining 4 nonpolar craters and 12 polar craters using LRO Mini-RF data. Results indicate that icy and young rough craters can be distinguished based upon their SC enhancements (Alpha) and OC enhancements (Gamma). In addition, we also examined the craters that have unusual circular polarization ratios (CPRs) that likely result from a double bounce mode of scattering. Blocky fresh craters, icy craters, and craters exhibiting double bounce scattering can be separated based on the values of Alpha, Gamma, the ratio of Alpha/Gamma and the weighted sum of Alpha and Gamma.

  16. Edge phonons in black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, H. B.; Villegas, C. E. P.; Bahamon, D. A.; Muraca, D.; Castro Neto, A. H.; de Souza, E. A. T.; Rocha, A. R.; Pimenta, M. A.; de Matos, C. J. S.

    2016-07-01

    Black phosphorus has recently emerged as a new layered crystal that, due to its peculiar and anisotropic crystalline and electronic band structures, may have important applications in electronics, optoelectronics and photonics. Despite the fact that the edges of layered crystals host a range of singular properties whose characterization and exploitation are of utmost importance for device development, the edges of black phosphorus remain poorly characterized. In this work, the atomic structure and behaviour of phonons near different black phosphorus edges are experimentally and theoretically studied using Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Polarized Raman results show the appearance of new modes at the edges of the sample, and their spectra depend on the atomic structure of the edges (zigzag or armchair). Theoretical simulations confirm that the new modes are due to edge phonon states that are forbidden in the bulk, and originated from the lattice termination rearrangements.

  17. Edge phonons in black phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, H B; Villegas, C E P; Bahamon, D A; Muraca, D; Castro Neto, A H; de Souza, E A T; Rocha, A R; Pimenta, M A; de Matos, C J S

    2016-01-01

    Black phosphorus has recently emerged as a new layered crystal that, due to its peculiar and anisotropic crystalline and electronic band structures, may have important applications in electronics, optoelectronics and photonics. Despite the fact that the edges of layered crystals host a range of singular properties whose characterization and exploitation are of utmost importance for device development, the edges of black phosphorus remain poorly characterized. In this work, the atomic structure and behaviour of phonons near different black phosphorus edges are experimentally and theoretically studied using Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Polarized Raman results show the appearance of new modes at the edges of the sample, and their spectra depend on the atomic structure of the edges (zigzag or armchair). Theoretical simulations confirm that the new modes are due to edge phonon states that are forbidden in the bulk, and originated from the lattice termination rearrangements. PMID:27412813

  18. Edge phonons in black phosphorus

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, H. B.; Villegas, C. E. P.; Bahamon, D. A.; Muraca, D.; Castro Neto, A. H.; de Souza, E. A. T.; Rocha, A. R.; Pimenta, M. A.; de Matos, C. J. S.

    2016-01-01

    Black phosphorus has recently emerged as a new layered crystal that, due to its peculiar and anisotropic crystalline and electronic band structures, may have important applications in electronics, optoelectronics and photonics. Despite the fact that the edges of layered crystals host a range of singular properties whose characterization and exploitation are of utmost importance for device development, the edges of black phosphorus remain poorly characterized. In this work, the atomic structure and behaviour of phonons near different black phosphorus edges are experimentally and theoretically studied using Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Polarized Raman results show the appearance of new modes at the edges of the sample, and their spectra depend on the atomic structure of the edges (zigzag or armchair). Theoretical simulations confirm that the new modes are due to edge phonon states that are forbidden in the bulk, and originated from the lattice termination rearrangements. PMID:27412813

  19. Experimental analysis of the surface roughness evolution of etched glass for micro/nanofluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, J.; Ganapathysubramanian, B.; Sundararajan, S.

    2011-02-01

    Roughness of channel surfaces, both deterministic and random, is known to affect the fluid flow behavior in micro/nanoscale fluidic devices. This has relevance particularly for applications involving non-Newtonian fluids, such as in biomedical lab-on-chip devices. While several studies have investigated effects of relative large, deterministic surface structures on fluid flow, the effect of random roughness on microfluidic flow remains relatively unexplored. In this study, the effects of processing conditions for wet etching of glass including etching time and etching orientation on centre-line average (Ra) and the autocorrelation length (ACL) were investigated. Statistical distribution of the roughness was also studied. Results indicated that ACL can be tailored in the range of 1-4 µm by changing etching time in horizontal etching while Ra was found to increase weakly with etching time in all three etching orientations. Analysis of the experimental data using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit hypothesis test shows that the glass surface roughness does not follow a Gaussian distribution, as is typically assumed in the literature. Instead, the T location-scale distribution fits the roughness data with 1.11% error. These results provide promising insights into tailoring surface roughness for improving microfluidic devices.

  20. Combinatorial Block Copolymer Ordering on Tunable Rough

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni M. M.; Yager K.; Sharma, A.; Karim, A.

    2012-05-01

    Morphology control of block copolymer (BCP) thin films through substrate interaction via controlled roughness parameters is of significant interest for numerous high-tech applications ranging from solar cells to high-density storage media. While effects of substrate surface energy (SE) and roughness (R) on BCP morphology have been individually investigated, their synergistic effects have not been explored in any systematic manner. Interestingly, orientation response of BCP to changes in SE can be similar to what can be accomplished with variations in R. Here we present a novel approach for orienting lamellar BCP films of poly(styrene)-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS-PMMA) on spin-coated xerogel (a dried gel of silica nanoparticle network) substrate with simultaneously tunable surface energy, {gamma}{sub s} {approx} 29-53 mJ/m{sup 2}, by UVO exposure and roughness, R{sub rms} {approx} 0.5-30 nm, by sol-gel processing steps of regulating the catalyst concentration and sol aging time. As in previous BCP orientation studies on 20 nm diameter monodisperse silica nanoparticle coated surface, we find a similar but broadened oscillatory BCP orientation behavior with film thickness due to the random rather than periodic rough surfaces. We also find that higher random roughness amplitude is not the necessary criteria for obtaining a vertical orientation of BCP lamellae. Rather, a high surface fractal dimension (D{sub f} > 2.4) of the rough substrate in conjunction with an optimal substrate surface energy {gamma}{sub s} 29 mJ/m{sup 2} results in 100% vertically oriented lamellar microdomains. The AFM measured film surface microstructure correlates well with the internal 3D BCP film structure probed by grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and rotational small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). In contrast to tunable self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-coated substrates, the xerogel films are very durable and retain their chemical properties over period of

  1. Adaptive detection of microvascular edge in microcirculatory images for auto-tracking measurement of spontaneous vasomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Xiaoyou; Bao, Yongjian; Xiu, Rui-juan; Karras, Matti

    1994-05-01

    We developed a dynamic microvascular edge detection method which is based on an adaptive thresholding and multijudgmental criteria. To realize the on-line measurement with video rate, we first set changeable measuring lines which are perpendicular to a microvessel axis and cover the possible edge location at a cross- section of the microvessel as a sampling window. A dynamic threshold, which can frame-by-frame automatically adapt to the change of light intensity in the sampling window, will be generated based on the on-line analysis of light intensity distribution along the measuring lines. The judgment of microvascular edges is based on the pattern characteristics of the light intensity distribution curve in the microvascular edge areas and the possible range of the microvascular diameters. Multiple criteria for the edge detection were set for accurately detecting the edges and skipping the non-edge zones to speed the edge recognizing procedure. To further improve reliability of this edge detection, a dynamic graphic indicator can be generated according to the detected vessel edge location, and simultaneously displayed with the original image. This algorithm has been successfully applied for autotracking measurement of spontaneous vasomotion in microcirculation, even when the microcirculatory image had complex background and low contrast.

  2. Edge-based image restoration.

    PubMed

    Rareş, Andrei; Reinders, Marcel J T; Biemond, Jan

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a new image inpainting algorithm that relies on explicit edge information. The edge information is used both for the reconstruction of a skeleton image structure in the missing areas, as well as for guiding the interpolation that follows. The structure reconstruction part exploits different properties of the edges, such as the colors of the objects they separate, an estimate of how well one edge continues into another one, and the spatial order of the edges with respect to each other. In order to preserve both sharp and smooth edges, the areas delimited by the recovered structure are interpolated independently, and the process is guided by the direction of the nearby edges. The novelty of our approach lies primarily in exploiting explicitly the constraint enforced by the numerical interpretation of the sequential order of edges, as well as in the pixel filling method which takes into account the proximity and direction of edges. Extensive experiments are carried out in order to validate and compare the algorithm both quantitatively and qualitatively. They show the advantages of our algorithm and its readily application to real world cases. PMID:16238052

  3. Edge conduction in vacuum glazing

    SciTech Connect

    Simko, T.M.; Collins, R.E.; Beck, F.A.; Arasteh, D.

    1995-03-01

    Vacuum glazing is a form of low-conductance double glazing using in internal vacuum between the two glass sheets to eliminate heat transport by gas conduction and convection. An array of small support pillars separates the sheets; fused solder glass forms the edge seal. Heat transfer through the glazing occurs by radiation across the vacuum gap, conduction through the support pillars, and conduction through the bonded edge seal. Edge conduction is problematic because it affects stresses in the edge region, leading to possible failure of the glazing; in addition, excessive heat transfer because of thermal bridging in the edge region can lower overall window thermal performance and decrease resistance to condensation. Infrared thermography was used to analyze the thermal performance of prototype vacuum glazings, and, for comparison, atmospheric pressure superwindows. Research focused on mitigating the edge effects of vacuum glazings through the use of insulating trim, recessed edges, and framing materials. Experimentally validated finite-element and finite-difference modeling tools were used for thermal analysis of prototype vacuum glazing units and complete windows. Experimental measurements of edge conduction using infrared imaging were found to be in good agreement with finite-element modeling results for a given set of conditions. Finite-element modeling validates an analytic model developed for edge conduction.

  4. Observations on the Growth of Roughness Elements Into Icing Feathers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Tsao, Jen, Ching

    2007-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experiment conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center to understand the process by which icing feathers are formed in the initial stages of ice accretion formation on swept wings. Close-up photographic data were taken on an aluminum NACA 0012 swept wing tip airfoil. Two types of photographic data were obtained: time sequence close-up photographic data during the run and close-up photographic data of the ice accretion at the end of each run. Icing runs were conducted for short ice accretion times from 10 to 180 sec. The time sequence close-up photographic data was used to study the process frame by frame and to create movies of how the process developed. The movies confirmed that at glaze icing conditions in the attachment line area icing feathers develop from roughness elements. The close-up photographic data at the end of each run showed that roughness elements change into a pointed shape with an upstream facet and join on the side with other elements having the same change to form ridges with pointed shape and upstream facet. The ridges develop into feathers when the upstream facet grows away to form the stem of the feather. The ridges and their growth into feathers were observed to form the initial scallop tips present in complete scallops.

  5. The Facilitator's Edge: Group Sessions for Edge-ucators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handcock, Helen

    The Facilitator's Edge is a workshop series based on the life/work messages of The Edge magazine. The workshops are deigned to help educators, youth workers, and their career practitioners facilitate conscious career building. This manual consists of five group sessions, each focusing on a different career-building theme. "Megatrends and Making it…

  6. Measurement and calculation of surface roughness effects on turbulent flow and heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosni, Mohammad Hosein

    Fluid dynamics and heat transfer data for turbulent boundary layer flow of air over a smooth surface and three well-defined rough surfaces were taken in the Turbulent Heat Transfer Test Facility (THTTF) for x-Reynolds numbers ranging up to 10,000,000. The smooth wall data provided base line data for comparison with the data from rough surfaces. The three rough surfaces were composed of 1.27 mm diameter hemispheres spaced 2, 4, and 10 diameters apart, respectively, in staggered arrays on otherwise smooth flat plates. Skin friction coefficient distributions and boundary layer profiles of mean velocity and Reynolds stresses were obtained using hot-wire anemometry. The THTTF heat transfer data taken in aerodynamically smooth, transitionally rough, and fully rough flow regimes over the three well-defined rough surfaces for freestream velocities of 6, 12, 28, 43, 58, and 67 m/s were compared with the data sets taken at Stanford University using a single well-defined rough surface. It was observed that the Stanton numbers for a given surface collapse together in x-Reynolds number coordinates as the freestream velocity increases, with the Stanton number level being larger for rougher surfaces. The THTTF heat transfer data and the Stanford data were used to modify the roughness energy transport model in the discrete element prediction method. This method was used in calculation of the fluid dynamics and heat transfer for the THTTF and Stanford surfaces. The predictions were in excellent agreement with all data sets within the data uncertainty.

  7. Surface Roughness Reduction on Divinylbenzene Foam Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streit, Jon; Karnes, John; Motta, Brian; Petta, Nicole

    2009-11-01

    Inertial fusion energy targets for the Naval Research Laboratory's High Average Power Laser Program require millimeter-scale, low density foam capsules with a gas permeation barrier and an outer surface roughness less than 50 nm RMS. Divinylbenzene (DVB) foam is a candidate for the capsule wall material, but its porous, open celled surface has been both too rough and difficult to seal. To overcome this difficulty we have repurposed a previously reported dual stage initiator emulsion microencapsulation method, adding an additional step that enhances the surface of the foam capsules. Using both low and high temperature initiators allows the DVB foam to gel in the low temperature stage and a water soluble monomer to be added and polymerized during the high temperature stage without breaking down the emulsion. This method forms a submicron skin that covers the open celled DVB foam surface, resulting in a superior substrate for gas permeation barrier deposition.

  8. Boltzmann active walkers and rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochy, R. D.; Kayser, D. R.; Aberle, L. K.; Lam, L.

    1993-06-01

    An active walker model (AWM) was recently proposed by Freimuth and Lam for the generation of various filamentary patterns. In an AWM, the walker changes the landscape as it walks, and its steps are in turn influenced by the changing landscape. The landscape so obtained is a rough surface. In this paper, the properties of such a rough surface (with average height conserved) generated by a Boltzmann active walker in 1 + 1 dimensions is investigated in detail. The scaling properties of the surface thickness σ T is found to belong to a new class quite different from other types of fractal surfaces. For example, σ T is independent of the system size L, but is a function of the “temperature” T. Soliton propagation is found when T = 0.

  9. Edge-edge interactions in stacked graphene nanoplatelets

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz Silva, Eduardo; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto; Terrones Maldonado, Mauricio; Jia, Xiaoting; Sumpter, Bobby G; Dresselhaus, M; Meunier, V.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) studies show the dynamics of small graphene platelets on larger graphene layers. The platelets move nearly freely to eventually lock in at well-defined positions close to the edges of the larger underlying graphene sheet. While such movement is driven by a shallow potential energy surface described by an interplane interaction, the lock-in position occurs by via edge-edge interactions of the platelet and the graphene surface located underneath. Here we quantitatively study this behavior using van der Waals density functional calculations. Local interactions at the open edges are found to dictate stacking configurations that are different from Bernal (AB) stacking. These stacking configurations are known to be otherwise absent in edge-free two-dimensional (2D) graphene. The results explain the experimentally observed platelet dynamics and provide a detailed account of the new electronic properties of these combined systems.

  10. Recovery of ribophorins and ribosomes in "inverted rough" vesicles derived from rat liver rough microsomes

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Treatment of rat liver rough microsomes (3.5 mg of protein/ml) with sublytical concentrations (0.08%) of the neutral detergent Triton X-100 caused a lateral displacement of bound ribosomes and the formation of ribosomal aggregates on the microsomal surface. At slightly higher detergent concentrations (0.12-0.16%) membrane areas bearing ribosomal aggregates invaginated into the microsomal lumen and separated from the rest of the membrane. Two distinct classes of vesicles could be isolated by density gradient centrifugation from microsomes treated with 0.16% Triton X-100: one with ribosomes bound to the inner membrane surfaces ("inverted rough" vesicles) and another with no ribosomes attached to the membranes. Analysis of the fractions showed that approximately 30% of the phospholipids and 20-30% of the total membrane protein were released from the membranes by this treatment. Labeling with avidin-ferritin conjugates demonstrated that concanavalin A binding sites, which in native rough microsomes are found in the luminal face of the membranes, were present on the outer surface of the inverted rough vesicles. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy showed that both fracture faces had similar concentrations of intramembrane particles. SDS PAGE analysis of the two vesicle subfractions demonstrated that, of all the integral microsomal membrane proteins, only ribophorins I and II were found exclusively in the inverted rough vesicles bearing ribosomes. These observations are consistent with the proposal that ribophorins are associated with the ribosomal binding sites characteristic of rough microsomal membranes. PMID:7068749

  11. Rough primes and rough conversations: evidence for a modality-specific basis to mental metaphors

    PubMed Central

    Denke, Claudia; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Rotte, Michael

    2014-01-01

    How does our brain organize knowledge? Traditional theories assume that our knowledge is represented abstractly in an amodal conceptual network of formal logic symbols. The theory of embodied cognition challenges this view and argues that conceptual representations that constitute our knowledge are grounded in sensory and motor experiences. We tested this hypothesis by examining how the concept of social coordination is grounded metaphorically in the tactile sensation of roughness. Participants experienced rough or smooth touch before being asked to judge an ambiguous social interaction. Results revealed that rough touch made social interactions appear more difficult and adversarial, consistent with the rough metaphor. This impact of tactile cues on social impressions was accompanied by a network including primary and secondary somatosensory cortices, amygdala, hippocampus and inferior prefrontal cortex. Thus, the roughness of tactile stimulation affected metaphor-relevant (but not metaphor-irrelevant) behavioral and neural responses. Receiving touch from a rough object seems to trigger the application of associated ontological concepts (or scaffolds) even for unrelated people and situations (but not to unrelated or more general feelings). Since this priming was based on somatosensory brain areas, our results provide support for the theory that sensorimotor grounding is intrinsic to cognitive processes. PMID:24097375

  12. Mimas - Photometric roughness and albedo map

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verbiscer, Anne J.; Veverka, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    The backscattering phase function asssociated with bright icy satellites may render Hapke's (1986) isotropic approximation to multiple scattering inadequate. A reanalysis is accordingly conducted here of the Voyager observations of Mimas, using a modification to Hapke's equation that accommodates anisotropic multiple scattering, in order to characterize the physical and photometric properties of the heavily cratered icy surface. The roughness parameter of Mimas is in this way redefined, and an accurate albedo map is obtained which deminstrates small latitudinal and longitudinal albedo variations.

  13. Radiative transfer model for contaminated rough slabs.

    PubMed

    Andrieu, François; Douté, Sylvain; Schmidt, Frédéric; Schmitt, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    We present a semi-analytical model to simulate the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of a rough slab layer containing impurities. This model has been optimized for fast computation in order to analyze massive hyperspectral data by a Bayesian approach. We designed it for planetary surface ice studies but it could be used for other purposes. It estimates the bidirectional reflectance of a rough slab of material containing inclusions, overlaying an optically thick media (semi-infinite media or stratified media, for instance granular material). The inclusions are assumed to be close to spherical and constituted of any type of material other than the ice matrix. It can be any other type of ice, mineral, or even bubbles defined by their optical constants. We assume a low roughness and we consider the geometrical optics conditions. This model is thus applicable for inclusions larger than the considered wavelength. The scattering on the inclusions is assumed to be isotropic. This model has a fast computation implementation and thus is suitable for high-resolution hyperspectral data analysis. PMID:26560577

  14. Wenzel Wetting on Slippery Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stogin, Birgitt; Dai, Xianming; Wong, Tak-Sing

    2015-11-01

    Liquid repellency is an important surface property used in a wide range of applications including self-cleaning, anti-icing, anti-biofouling, and condensation heat transfer, and is characterized by apparent contact angle (θ*) and contact angle hysteresis (Δθ*). The Wenzel equation (1936) predicts θ* of liquids in the Wenzel state, and is one of the most fundamental equations in the wetting field. However, droplets in the Wenzel state on conventional rough surfaces exhibit large Δθ* , making it difficult to experimentally verify the model with precision. As a result, precise verification of the Wenzel wetting model has remained an open scientific question for the past 79 years. Here we introduce a new class of liquid-infused surfaces called slippery rough surfaces -- surfaces with significantly reduced Δθ* compared to conventional rough surfaces--and use them to experimentally assess the Wenzel equation with the highest precision to date. We acknowledge the funding support by National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award #: 1351462 and Office of Navy Research MURI Award #: N00014-12-1-0875. Stogin acknowledges the support from the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship (Grant No. DGE1255832).

  15. Hypersonic Viscous Flow Over Large Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2009-01-01

    Viscous flow over discrete or distributed surface roughness has great implications for hypersonic flight due to aerothermodynamic considerations related to laminar-turbulent transition. Current prediction capability is greatly hampered by the limited knowledge base for such flows. To help fill that gap, numerical computations are used to investigate the intricate flow physics involved. An unstructured mesh, compressible Navier-Stokes code based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for two roughness shapes investigated in wind tunnel experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. It was found through 2D parametric study that at subcritical Reynolds numbers of the boundary layers, absolute instability resulting in vortex shedding downstream, is likely to weaken at supersonic free-stream conditions. On the other hand, convective instability may be the dominant mechanism for supersonic boundary layers. Three-dimensional calculations for a rectangular or cylindrical roughness element at post-shock Mach numbers of 4.1 and 6.5 also confirm that no self-sustained vortex generation is present.

  16. Soil Surface Roughness through Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarquis, A. M.; Saa-Requejo, A.; Valencia, J. L.; Moratiel, R.; Paz-Gonzalez, A.; Agro-Environmental Modeling

    2011-12-01

    Soil erosion is a complex phenomenon involving the detachment and transport of soil particles, storage and runoff of rainwater, and infiltration. The relative magnitude and importance of these processes depends on several factors being one of them surface micro-topography, usually quantified trough soil surface roughness (SSR). SSR greatly affects surface sealing and runoff generation, yet little information is available about the effect of roughness on the spatial distribution of runoff and on flow concentration. The methods commonly used to measure SSR involve measuring point elevation using a pin roughness meter or laser, both of which are labor intensive and expensive. Lately a simple and inexpensive technique based on percentage of shadow in soil surface image has been developed to determine SSR in the field in order to obtain measurement for wide spread application. One of the first steps in this technique is image de-noising and thresholding to estimate the percentage of black pixels in the studied area. In this work, a series of soil surface images have been analyzed applying several de-noising wavelet analysis and thresholding algorithms to study the variation in percentage of shadows and the shadows size distribution. Funding provided by Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (MICINN) through project no. AGL2010- 21501/AGR and by Xunta de Galicia through project no INCITE08PXIB1621 are greatly appreciated.

  17. Modeling superhydrophobic surfaces comprised of random roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaha, M. A.; Vahedi Tafreshi, H.; Gad-El-Hak, M.

    2011-11-01

    We model the performance of superhydrophobic surfaces comprised of randomly distributed roughness that resembles natural surfaces, or those produced via random deposition of hydrophobic particles. Such a fabrication method is far less expensive than ordered-microstructured fabrication. The present numerical simulations are aimed at improving our understanding of the drag reduction effect and the stability of the air-water interface in terms of the microstructure parameters. For comparison and validation, we have also simulated the flow over superhydrophobic surfaces made up of aligned or staggered microposts for channel flows as well as streamwise or spanwise ridge configurations for pipe flows. The present results are compared with other theoretical and experimental studies. The numerical simulations indicate that the random distribution of surface roughness has a favorable effect on drag reduction, as long as the gas fraction is kept the same. The stability of the meniscus, however, is strongly influenced by the average spacing between the roughness peaks, which needs to be carefully examined before a surface can be recommended for fabrication. Financial support from DARPA, contract number W91CRB-10-1-0003, is acknowledged.

  18. Flow over a Biomimetic Surface Roughness Microgeometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warncke Lang, Amy; Hidalgo, Pablo; Westcott, Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Certain species of sharks (e.g. shortfin mako and common hammerhead) have a skin structure that could result in a bristling of their denticles (scales) during increased swimming speeds (Bechert, D. W., Bruse, M., Hage, W. and Meyer, R. 2000, Fluid mechanics of biological surfaces and their technological application. Naturwissenschaften 80:157-171). This unique surface geometry results in a three-dimensional array of cavities* (d-type roughness geometry) forming within the surface and has been given the acronym MAKO (Micro-roughness Array for Kinematic Optimization). Possible mechanisms leading to drag reduction over the shark's body by this unique roughness geometry include separation control thereby reducing pressure drag, skin friction reduction (via the `micro-air bearing' effect first proposed by Bushnell (AIAA 83-0227)), as well as possible transition delay in the boundary layer. Initial work is confined to scaling up the geometry from 0.2 mm on the shark skin to 2 cm, with a scaling down in characteristic velocity from 10 - 20 m/s to 10 - 20 cm/s for laminar flow boundary layer water tunnel studies. Support for this research by NSF SGER grant CTS-0630489 and a University of Alabama RAC grant is gratefully acknowledged. * Patent pending.

  19. The effect of adding roughness and thickness to a transonic axial compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, Kenneth L.; Chima, Rodrick V.; Strazisar, Anthony J.; Roberts, William B.

    1995-01-01

    The performance deterioration of a high speed axial compressor rotor due to surface roughness and airfoil thickness variations is reported. A 0.025 mm (0.001 in.) thick rough coating with a surface finish of 2.54-3.18 RMS microns (100-125 RMS microinches) is applied to the pressure and suction surface of the rotor blades. Coating both surfaces increases the leading edge thickness by 10% at the hub and 20% at the tip. Application of this coating results in a loss in efficiency of 6 points and a 9% reduction in the pressure ratio across the rotor at an operating condition near the design point. To separate the effect of thickness and roughness, a smooth coating of equal thickness is also applied to the blade. The smooth coating surface finish is 0.254-0.508 RMS microns (10-20 RMS microinches), compared to the bare metal blade surface finish of 0.508 RMS microns (20 RMS microinches). The smooth coating results in approximately half of the performance deterioration found from the rough coating. Both coatings are then applied to different portions of the blade surface to determine which portions of the airfoil are most sensitive to thickness/roughness variations. Aerodynamic performance measurements are presented for a number of coating configurations at 60%, 80%, and 100% of design speed. The results indicate that thickness/roughness over the first 10% of blade chord accounts for virtually all of the observed performance degradation for the smooth coating, compared to about 70% of the observed performance degradation for the rough coating. The performance deterioration is investigated in more detail at design speed using laser anemometer measurements as well as predictions generated by a quasi-3D Navier-Stokes flow solver which includes a surface roughness model. Measurements and analysis are performed on the baseline blade and the full-coverage smooth and rough coatings. The results indicate that coating the blade causes a thickening of the blade boundary layers. The

  20. Swept-Wing Receptivity Studies Using Distributed Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saric, William S.

    1999-01-01

    Transition to turbulence in swept-wing flows has resisted correlation with linear theory because of its sensitivity to freestream conditions and 3-D roughness and because one of the principal instability modes quickly 'becomes nonlinear. In the face of such a formidable problem, two rather long-term fundamental efforts have been underway at DLR Gottinberg and Arizona State University that address swept-wing transition. These efforts have been recently reviewed by Bippes (1997) and Reibert and Saric (1997). Thus, the present work is a continuation of a series of studies on swept-wing boundary layers which have led to a better understanding of the transition process. In particular, we have taken advantage of the sensitivity to 3-D roughness and the modal nature of the instability in order to propose a particular control strategy. Complementing the two aforementioned reviews, general reviews of the swept-wing transition problem are found in Arnal (1997) and Kachanov (1996). Other recent reviews include Reshotko (t997), Crouch (1997), and Herbert (1997a,b). The failure of linear theory is discussed in Reed et al. (1996). The historical work is found in Reed and Sar-ic (1989). The basic idea is that the combination of sweep and chordwise pressure gradient within the boundary layer creates a velocity component perpendicular to the inviscid streamline. This crossflow profile is inflectional and exhibits both traveling and stationary unstable waves called crossflow vortices that are (approximately) aligned along the inviscid streamlines. Under conditions of low freestream turbulence levels, the dominant crossflow wave is stationary (Reibert and Saric t997) while moderate to high turbulence levels initiate dominant traveling waves (Dehle and Bippes 1996; Bippes 1997). 'Me mechanism is relatively insensitive to sound and 2-D surface roughness (Radeztsky et al. 1993) but very sensitive to 3-D roughness near the attachment line. We concentrate our work on low

  1. The EDGE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Stephan S.; Cheng, Edward S.; Cottingham, David A.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Knox, Lloyd; Silverberg, Robert F.; Timbie, Peter T.; Wilson, Grant

    2003-02-01

    EDGE is a Long Duration Balloon (LDB) borne instrument designed to measure the large-scale anisotropy of the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB). The goal is to use this signal as a new observational tool to measure the character of the spatial distribution of galaxies at the largest spatial scales. With a 6\\arcmin\\ beam mapping more than 400 square degrees of sky at 8 frequency bands between 250GHz and 1.5 THz the experiment can determine the variation of galaxy density on spatial scales ranging from >200h-1 Mpc, where dark matter variations are determined directly from Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) anisotropy, to <5h-1 Mpc where the distribution of dark matter and galaxies is determined from galaxy redshift surveys and the underlying dynamics of structure growth is non-linear. The instrument consists of a 1-meter class off-axis telescope and a Frequency Selective Bolometer (FSB) array radiometer. The FSB design provides the compact, multi-chromatic, high sensitivity focal plane needed for this measurement.

  2. Viscosity in the edge of tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacey, W. M.

    1993-05-01

    A fluid representation of viscosity has been incorporated into a set of fluid equations that are maximally ordered in the 'short radial gradient scale length' (srgsl) ordering that is appropriate for the edge of tokamak plasmas. The srgsl ordering raises viscous drifts and other viscous terms to leading order and fundamentally alters the character of the fluid equations. A leasing order viscous drift is identified. Viscous-driven radial particle and energy fluxes in the scrape-off layer and divertor channel are estimated to have an order unity effect in reducing radial peaking of energy fluxes transported along the field lines to divertor collector plates.

  3. Fault zone roughness controls slip stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbord, Christopher; Nielsen, Stefan; De Paola, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Fault roughness is an important control factor in the mechanical behaviour of fault zones, in particular the frictional slip stability and subsequent earthquake nucleation. Despite this, there is little experimental quantification as to the effects of varying roughness upon rate- and state-dependant friction (RSF). Utilising a triaxial deformation apparatus and a novel adaptation of the direct shear methodology to simulate initially bare faults in Westerly Granite, we performed a series of velocity step frictional sliding experiments. Initial root mean square roughnesses (Sq) was varied in the range 6x10‑7 ‑ 2.4x10‑5 m. We also investigated the effects upon slip stability of normal stress variation in the range σn = 30 ‑ 200 MPa, and slip velocity between 0.1 ‑ 10 μm s‑1. A transition from stable sliding to unstable slip (manifested by stick-slip and slow slip events) was observed, depending on the parameter combination, thus covering the full spectrum of fault slip behaviours. At low normal stress (σn = 30MPa) smooth faults (Sq< 1x10‑6 m) are conditional unstable (stress drops on slow slip events upon velocity increase), with strongly velocity weakening friction. When normal stress is increased to intermediate values (σn = 100 ‑ 150 MPa), smooth faults (Sq< 1x10‑6 m) are fully unstable and generate seismic stick-slip behaviour. However at higher normal stress (σn = 200 MPa) a transition from unstable to stable sliding is observed for smooth faults, which is not expected using RSF stability criteria. At all conditions sliding is stable for rough faults (Sq> 1x10‑6 m). We find that instability can develop when the ratio of fault to critical stiffness kf kc > 10, or, alternatively, even when a ‑ b > 0 at σn = 150MPa, suggesting that bare surfaces may not strictly obey the R+S stability condition. Additionally we present white light interferometry and SEM analysis of experimentally deformed samples which provide information about the

  4. Different Effects of Roughness (Granularity) and Hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirtcliffe, Neil; McHale, Glen; Hamlett, Christopher; Newton, Michael

    2010-05-01

    With thanks to Stefan Doerr and Jorge Mataix-Solera for their invitation Superhydrophobicity is an interesting effect that appears to be simple on the outset; increased surface area from roughness increases interfacial area and therefore energy loss or gain. More extreme roughness prevents total wetting, resulting in gas pockets present at the surface and a drastic change in the properties of the system. Increases in complexity of the system, by adding porosity (granularity), allowing the structures to move, varying the shape of the roughness or the composition of the liquid used often has unexpected effects. Here we will consider a few of these related to complex topography. Overhanging features are commonly used in test samples as they perform better in some tests than simple roughness. It has been shown to be a prerequisite for superoleophobic surfaces as it allows liquids to be suspended for contact angles considerably below 90°. It also allows trapping of gas in lower layers even if the first layer is flooded. This is important in soils as a fixed bed of granules behaves just like a surface with overhanging roughness. Using simple geometry it is possible to predict at what contact angle penetration will occur. Plants have some structured superhydrophobic surfaces and we have shown that some use them in conjunction with other structured surfaces to control water flows. This allows some plants to survive in difficult environments and shows us how subtly different structures interact completely differently with water. Long fibres can either cause water droplets to roll over a plant surface or halt it in its tracks. Implications of this in soils include predicting when particles will adhere more strongly to water drops and why organic fibrous material may play a greater role in the behaviour of water in soils than may be expected from the amount present. The garden snail uses a biosurfactant that is very effective at wetting surfaces and can crawl over most

  5. Characterization of surface roughness effects on pressure drop in single-phase flow in minichannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandlikar, Satish G.; Schmitt, Derek; Carrano, Andres L.; Taylor, James B.

    2005-10-01

    Roughness features on the walls of a channel wall affect the pressure drop of a fluid flowing through that channel. This roughness effect can be described by (i) flow area constriction and (ii) increase in the wall shear stress. Replotting the Moody's friction factor chart with the constricted flow diameter results in a simplified plot and yields a single asymptotic value of friction factor for relative roughness values of ɛ /D>0.03 in the fully developed turbulent region. After reviewing the literature, three new roughness parameters are proposed (maximum profile peak height Rp, mean spacing of profile irregularities RSm, and floor distance to mean line Fp). Three additional parameters are presented to consider the localized hydraulic diameter variation (maximum, minimum, and average) in future work. The roughness ɛ is then defined as Rp+Fp. This definition yields the same value of roughness as obtained from the sand-grain roughness [H. Darcy, Recherches Experimentales Relatives au Mouvement de L'Eau dans les Tuyaux (Mallet-Bachelier, Paris, France, 1857); J. T. Fanning, A Practical Treatise on Hydraulic and Water Supply Engineering (Van Nostrand, New York, 1877, revised ed. 1886); J. Nikuradse, "Laws of flow in rough pipes" ["Stromungsgesetze in Rauen Rohren," VDI-Forschungsheft 361 (1933)]; Beilage zu "Forschung auf dem Gebiete des Ingenieurwesens," Ausgabe B Band 4, English translation NACA Tech. Mem. 1292 (1937)]. Specific experiments are conducted using parallel sawtooth ridge elements, placed normal to the flow direction, in aligned and offset configurations in a 10.03mm wide rectangular channel with variable gap (resulting hydraulic diameters of 325μm-1819μm with Reynolds numbers ranging from 200 to 7200 for air and 200 to 5700 for water). The use of constricted flow diameter extends the applicability of the laminar friction factor equations to relative roughness values (sawtooth height) up to 14%. In the turbulent region, the aligned and offset

  6. Rock Segmentation through Edge Regrouping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burl, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Rockster is an algorithm that automatically identifies the locations and boundaries of rocks imaged by the rover hazard cameras (hazcams), navigation cameras (navcams), or panoramic cameras (pancams). The software uses edge detection and edge regrouping to identify closed contours that separate the rocks from the background.

  7. Multilayer X-ray mirrors - Interfacial roughness, scattering, and image quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiller, Eberhard; Stearns, Daniel; Krumrey, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Scattering of the multilayer coatings used for our normal incidence soft X-ray telescope at a wavelength of 63.5 A has been measured at 1.54 A and grazing angles of incidence and at soft X-rays near normal incidence. Furthermore, the edge of the moon is used as a known test target to estimate the amount of scattering in the arcsec range from images obtained on the date of the solar eclipse on July 11, 1991. The internal surfaces of the coating are inspected by high-resolution electron microscopy. A theoretical model describing the evolution and replication of roughness from layer to layer throughout the structure, which is in agreement with all experimental data, is presented. We find that practically all roughness caused by the growth of the multilayer structure occurs at spatial frequencies which are too high to produce scattering. The substrate roughness is replicated at lower spatial frequencies which might produce scattering within the field of view of an instrument. However, roughness in this range is below the 0.5 A level, again resulting in insignificant amounts of scatter.

  8. Receptivity of Hypersonic Boundary Layers to Distributed Roughness and Acoustic Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam

    2012-01-01

    Boundary-layer receptivity and stability of Mach 6 flow over smooth and rough 7 half-angle sharp-tipped cones are numerically investigated. The receptivity of the boundary layer to slow acoustic disturbances, fast acoustic disturbances, and vortical disturbances are considered. The effects of two-dimensional isolated and distributed roughness on the receptivity and stability are also simulated. The results show that the instability waves are generated in the leading edge region and that the boundary layer is much more receptive to slow acoustic waves than to the fast waves. Vortical disturbances also generate unstable second modes, however the receptivity coefficients are smaller than that of the slow acoustic wave. An isolated two-dimensional roughness element of height h/delta =1/4 did not produce any difference in the receptivity or in the stability of the boundary layer. Distributed roughness elements produced a small decrease in the receptivity coefficient and also stabilized the boundary layer by small amounts.

  9. The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, C.S.; Selleck, C.B.

    1990-08-01

    The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories is developing four areas of technology required for automated deburring, chamfering, and blending of machined edges: (1) the automatic programming of robot trajectories and deburring processes using information derived from a CAD database, (2) the use of machine vision for locating the workpiece coupled with force control to ensure proper tool contact, (3) robotic deburring, blending, and machining of precision chamfered edges, and (4) in-process automated inspection of the formed edge. The Laboratory, its components, integration, and results from edge finishing experiments to date are described here. Also included is a discussion of the issues regarding implementation of the technology in a production environment. 24 refs., 17 figs.

  10. Pattern characterization and connectivity analysis for edge feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bo

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of detecting sharp changes in image brightness is to capture important events and changes in properties of the world. The accuracy of edge detection methods in image processing determines the eventual success or failure of computerized analysis procedures which follow the initial edge detection determinations such as object recognition. Generally, edge detectors have been designed to capture simple ideal step functions in image data, but real image signal discontinuities deviate from this ideal form. Another three types of deviations from the step function which relate to real distortions occurring in natural images are examined according to their characteristics. These types are impulse, ramp, and sigmoid functions which respectively represent narrow line signals, simplified blur effects, and more accurate blur modeling. General rules for edge pattern characterization based upon the classification of edge types into four categories-ramp, impulse, step, and sigmoid (RISS) are developed from this analysis. Additionally, the proposed algorithm performs connectivity analysis on edge map to ensure that small, disconnected edges are removed. The performance analysis on experiments supports that the proposed edge detection algorithm with edge pattern analysis and characterization does lead to more effective edge detection and localization with improved accuracies. To expand the proposed algorithm into real-time applications, a parallel implementation on a graphics processing unit (GPU) is presented in this paper. For the various configurations in our test, the GPU implementation shows a scalable speedup as the resolution of an image increases. We also achieved 14 frames per second in real-time processing (1280×720).

  11. Full-waveform data for building roof step edge localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słota, Małgorzata

    2015-08-01

    Airborne laser scanning data perfectly represent flat or gently sloped areas; to date, however, accurate breakline detection is the main drawback of this technique. This issue becomes particularly important in the case of modeling buildings, where accuracy higher than the footprint size is often required. This article covers several issues related to full-waveform data registered on building step edges. First, the full-waveform data simulator was developed and presented in this paper. Second, this article provides a full description of the changes in echo amplitude, echo width and returned power caused by the presence of edges within the laser footprint. Additionally, two important properties of step edge echoes, peak shift and echo asymmetry, were noted and described. It was shown that these properties lead to incorrect echo positioning along the laser center line and can significantly reduce the edge points' accuracy. For these reasons and because all points are aligned with the center of the beam, regardless of the actual target position within the beam footprint, we can state that step edge points require geometric corrections. This article presents a novel algorithm for the refinement of step edge points. The main distinguishing advantage of the developed algorithm is the fact that none of the additional data, such as emitted signal parameters, beam divergence, approximate edge geometry or scanning settings, are required. The proposed algorithm works only on georeferenced profiles of reflected laser energy. Another major advantage is the simplicity of the calculation, allowing for very efficient data processing. Additionally, the developed method of point correction allows for the accurate determination of points lying on edges and edge point densification. For this reason, fully automatic localization of building roof step edges based on LiDAR full-waveform data with higher accuracy than the size of the lidar footprint is feasible.

  12. Towards transition modelling for supersonic laminar flow control based on spanwise periodic roughness elements.

    PubMed

    Choudhari, Meelan; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Jiang, Li

    2005-05-15

    Laminar flow control (LFC) is one of the key enabling technologies for quiet and efficient supersonic aircraft. Recent work at Arizona State University (ASU) has led to a novel concept for passive LFC, which employs distributed leading edge roughness to limit the growth of naturally dominant crossflow instabilities in a swept-wing boundary layer. Predicated on nonlinear modification of the mean boundary-layer flow via controlled receptivity, the ASU concept requires a holistic prediction approach that accounts for all major stages within transition in an integrated manner. As a first step in developing an engineering methodology for the design and optimization of roughness-based supersonic LFC, this paper reports on canonical findings related to receptivity plus linear and nonlinear development of stationary crossflow instabilities on a Mach 2.4, 73 degrees swept airfoil with a chord Reynolds number of 16.3 million. PMID:16105770

  13. Edge-on Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has imaged an unusual edge-on galaxy, revealing remarkable details of its warped dusty disc and showing how colliding galaxies trigger the birth of new stars.

    The image, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), is online at http://heritage.stsci.edu and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc. The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. During observations of the galaxy, the camera passed a milestone, taking its 100,000th image since shuttle astronauts installed it in Hubble in 1993.

    The dust and spiral arms of normal spiral galaxies, like our Milky Way, look flat when seen edge- on. The new image of the galaxy ESO 510-G13 shows an unusual twisted disc structure, first seen in ground-based photographs taken at the European Southern Observatory in Chile. ESO 510-G13 lies in the southern constellation Hydra, some 150 million light-years from Earth. Details of the galaxy's structure are visible because interstellar dust clouds that trace its disc are silhouetted from behind by light from the galaxy's bright, smooth central bulge.

    The strong warping of the disc indicates that ESO 510-G13 has recently collided with a nearby galaxy and is in the process of swallowing it. Gravitational forces distort galaxies as their stars, gas, and dust merge over millions of years. When the disturbances die out, ESO 510-G13 will be a single galaxy.

    The galaxy's outer regions, especially on the right side of the image, show dark dust and bright clouds of blue stars. This indicates that hot, young stars are forming in the twisted disc. Astronomers believe star formation may be triggered when galaxies collide and their interstellar clouds are compressed.

    The Hubble Heritage Team used WFPC2 to observe ESO 510-G13 in April 2001. Pictures obtained through blue, green, and red filters were combined to make this color-composite image, which emphasizes the contrast between the dusty

  14. Issues in Kinetic Edge Turbulence Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, S. E.; Chen, Y.; Lang, J.

    2006-10-01

    Simulations of trapped electron modes are underway using GEM [1,2], a global electromagnetic gyrokinetic delta-f simulation with collisions. We report results with no temperature gradient so that ITG and ETG instabilities are not present. For typical weak density gradient core values, the CTEM is dominant. However, for steeper density gradient edge values, higher k drift-waves are most unstable [J. Lang this mtg.]. For the weaker density gradient core case, nonlinear simulations using GEM are routine. For the steeper gradient edge case, the nonlinear fluctuations are very high and a stationary state has not been obtained. More physics, e.g. profile variation and equilibrium ExB shear flow should be significantly stabilizing, and may make such simulations feasible using standard delta-f techniques. These features are fully implemented in GEM and research is ongoing. One approach to addressing the high fluctuation levels in the edge turbulence regime is the particle-continuum method [3]. A new scheme that periodically resets the particle weights, using a Maxwellian particle load is being tested in GEM [Y. Chen this mtg.] and will be discussed. [1] Y. Chen, S. Parker, J. Comput. Phys. 189 463 (2003). [2] Y. Chen, S. Parker, accepted, available on-line, J. Comput. Phys. (2006). [4] S. Vadlamani, S. Parker, Y. Chen and C. Kim, Comput. Phys. Comm. 164 209 (2004).

  15. Tunneling into and between helical edge states: Fermionic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristov, D. N.; Niyazov, R. A.

    2016-07-01

    We study the four-terminal junction of spinless Luttinger liquid wires, which describes either a corner junction of two helical edge states of topological insulators or the tunneling from the spinful wire into the helical edge state. We use the fermionic representation and the scattering state formalism, in order to compute the renormalization group (RG) equations for the linear response conductances. We establish our approach by considering a junction between two possibly nonequivalent helical edge states and find an agreement with the earlier analysis of this situation. Tunneling from the tip of the spinful wire to the edge state is further analyzed which requires some modification of our formalism. In the latter case we demonstrate (i) the existence of both fixed lines and conventional fixed points of RG equations, and (ii) certain proportionality relations holding for conductances during renormalization. The scaling exponents and phase portraits are obtained in all cases.

  16. Hip Abduction Can Prevent Posterior Edge Loading of Hip Replacements

    PubMed Central

    van Arkel, Richard J; Modenese, Luca; Phillips, Andrew TM; Jeffers, Jonathan RT

    2013-01-01

    Edge loading causes clinical problems for hard-on-hard hip replacements, and edge loading wear scars are present on the majority of retrieved components. We asked the question: are the lines of action of hip joint muscles such that edge loading can occur in a well-designed, well-positioned acetabular cup? A musculoskeletal model, based on cadaveric lower limb geometry, was used to calculate for each muscle, in every position within the complete range of motion, whether its contraction would safely pull the femoral head into the cup or contribute to edge loading. The results show that all the muscles that insert into the distal femur, patella, or tibia could cause edge loading of a well-positioned cup when the hip is in deep flexion. Patients frequently use distally inserting muscles for movements requiring deep hip flexion, such as sit-to-stand. Importantly, the results, which are supported by in vivo data and clinical findings, also show that risk of edge loading is dramatically reduced by combining deep hip flexion with hip abduction. Patients, including those with sub-optimally positioned cups, may be able to reduce the prevalence of edge loading by rising from chairs or stooping with the hip abducted. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 31:1172–1179, 2013. PMID:23575923

  17. Rough Evaluation Structure: Application of Rough Set Theory to Generate Simple Rules for Inconsistent Preference Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrmann, Andreas; Nagai, Yoshimitsu; Yoshida, Osamu; Ishizu, Syohei

    Since management decision-making becomes complex and preferences of the decision-maker frequently becomes inconsistent, multi-attribute decision-making problems were studied. To represent inconsistent preference relation, the concept of evaluation structure was introduced. We can generate simple rules to represent inconsistent preference relation by the evaluation structures. Further rough set theory for the preference relation was studied and the concept of approximation was introduced. One of our main aims of this paper is to introduce a concept of rough evaluation structure for representing inconsistent preference relation. We apply rough set theory to the evaluation structure, and develop a method for generating simple rules for inconsistent preference relations. In this paper, we introduce concepts of totally ordered information system, similarity class of preference relation, upper and lower approximation of preference relations. We also show the properties of rough evaluation structure and provide a simple example. As an application of rough evaluation structure, we analyze questionnaire survey of customer preferences about audio players.

  18. Effect of surface morphology on drag and roughness sublayer in flows over regular roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, Marco; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2014-11-01

    The effects of systematically varied roughness morphology on bulk drag and on the spatial structure of turbulent boundary layers are examined by performing a series of wind tunnel experiments. In this study, rough surfaces consisting of regularly and uniformly distributed LEGO™ bricks are employed. Twelve different patterns are adopted in order to methodically examine the individual effects of frontal solidity (λF, frontal area of the roughness elements per unit wall-parallel area) and plan solidity (λP, plan area of roughness elements per unit wall-parallel area), on both the bulk drag and the turbulence structure. A floating element friction balance based on Krogstad & Efros (2010) was designed and manufactured to measure the drag generated by the different surfaces. In parallel, high resolution planar and stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was applied to investigate the flow features. This talk will focus on the effects of each solidity parameter on the bulk drag and attempt to relate the observed trends to the flow structures in the roughness sublayer. Currently at City University London.

  19. Scanning tunneling microscope with three-dimensional interferometer for surface roughness measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Toru; Yamaguchi, Masataka; Suzuki, Masatoshi

    1995-03-01

    The scanning tunneling microscope (STM) has been known for its high lateral resolution, but its unreliable vertical accuracy has prevented it from being widely used as a profiler for roughness and step height measurements. An STM equipped with an optical interferometer to calibrate STM tip feedback controlled motion in the Z direction along with interferometers for monitoring X and Y raster scanning has been developed. The resolution of the interferometer was 0.12 nm rms. Maximum line scanning distance is 250 μm and the motion in this direction is secured by a parallel spring mechanism. Step height and pitch measurements on a surface topography standard agree in nanometer scale with the certified value of the standard. The result of high accuracy roughness measurement with the STM supports the common observation that STM measurement gives larger roughness than interferometric measurement.

  20. Edge Localised Modes (ELMs): Experiments and Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, J. W.; Kirk, A.

    2008-05-14

    Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) are periodic disturbances of the plasma periphery occurring in tokamaks with an H-mode edge transport barrier. As a result, a fraction of the plasma energy present in the confined hot edge plasma is transferred to the open field lines in the divertor region, ultimately appearing at the divertor target plates. These events can result in high transient heat loads being deposited on the divertor target plates in large tokamaks, potentially causing damage in devices such as ITER. Consequently it is important to find means to mitigate their effects, either avoiding them or, at least, controlling them. This in turn means it is essential to understand the physics causing ELMs so that appropriate steps can be taken. It is generally agreed that ELMs originate as MHD instability caused by the steep plasma pressure gradients or edge plasma current present in H-mode, the so-called 'peeling-ballooning' model. Normally this is considered to be an ideal MHD instability but resistivity may be involved. Much less clear is the non-linear evolution of these instabilities and the mechanisms by which the confined edge plasma is transferred to the divertor plasma. There is evidence for the non-linear development of 'filamentary' structures predicted by theory, but the reconnection processes by which these are detached from the plasma core remain uncertain. In this paper the experimental and theoretical evidence for the peeling-ballooning model is presented, drawing data from a number of tokamaks, e.g. JET, DIII-D, ASDEX-Upgrade, MAST etc. Some theoretical models for the non-linear evolution of ELMs are discussed; as well as ones related to the 'peeling-ballooning' model, other candidate models for the ELM cycle are mentioned. The consequential heat loads on divertor target plates are discussed. Based on our current understanding of the physics of ELMs, means to avoid them, or mitigate their consequences, are described, e.g. the use of plasma shaping or

  1. Roughness characterization of the galling of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, C.; Marteau, J.; Deltombe, R.; Chen, Y. M.; Bigerelle, M.

    2014-09-01

    Several kinds of tests exist to characterize the galling of metals, such as that specified in ASTM Standard G98. While the testing procedure is accurate and robust, the analysis of the specimen's surfaces (area=1.2 cm) for the determination of the critical pressure of galling remains subject to operator judgment. Based on the surface's topography analyses, we propose a methodology to express the probability of galling according to the macroscopic pressure load. After performing galling tests on 304L stainless steel, a two-step segmentation of the S q parameter (root mean square of surface amplitude) computed from local roughness maps (100 μ m× 100 μ m) enables us to distinguish two tribological processes. The first step represents the abrasive wear (erosion) and the second one the adhesive wear (galling). The total areas of both regions are highly relevant to quantify galling and erosion processes. Then, a one-parameter phenomenological model is proposed to objectively determine the evolution of non-galled relative area A e versus the pressure load P, with high accuracy ({{A}e}=100/(1+a{{P}2}) with a={{0.54}+/- 0.07}× {{10}-3} M P{{a}-2} and with {{R}2}=0.98). From this model, the critical pressure of galling is found to be equal to 43MPa. The {{S}5 V} roughness parameter (the five deepest valleys in the galled region's surface) is the most relevant roughness parameter for the quantification of damages in the ‘galling region’. The significant valleys’ depths increase from 10 μm-250 μm when the pressure increases from 11-350 MPa, according to a power law ({{S}5 V}=4.2{{P}0.75}, with {{R}2}=0.93).

  2. Quantifying surface roughness over debris covered ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quincey, Duncan; Rounce, David; Ross, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Aerodynamic roughness length (z0) remains a major uncertainty when determining turbulent heat fluxes over glacier surfaces, and can vary by an order of magnitude even within a small area and through the melt season. Defining z0 over debris-covered ice is particularly complex, because the surface may comprise clasts of greatly varying size, and the broader-scale surface relief can be similarly heterogeneous. Several recent studies have used Structure from Motion to data model debris-covered surfaces at the centimetric scale and calculate z0 based on measurements of surface microtopography. However, few have validated these measurements with independent vertical wind profile measurements, or considered how the measurements vary over a range of different surface types or scales of analysis. Here, we present the results of a field investigation conducted on the debris covered Khumbu Glacier during the post-monsoon season of 2015. We focus on two sites. The first is characterised by gravels and cobbles supported by a fine sandy matrix. The second comprises cobbles and boulders separated by voids. Vertical profiles of wind speed measured over both sites enable us to derive measurements of aerodynamic roughness that are similar in magnitude, with z0 at the second site exceeding that at the first by < 1 cm. During our observation period, snow covered the second site for three days, but the impact on z0 is small, implying that roughness is predominantly determined by major rock size obstacles rather than the general form of the surface. To complement these aerodynamic measurements we also conducted a Structure from Motion survey across each patch and calculated z0 using microtopographic methods published in a range of recent studies. We compare the outputs of each of these algorithms with each other and with the aerodynamic measurements, assess how they perform over a range of scales, and evaluate the validity of using microtopographic methods where aerodynamic measurements

  3. 7 CFR 51.776 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Definitions § 51.776 Slightly rough texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin may be slightly thick but not excessively thick, materially ridged or grooved. “Slightly thick” means that the...

  4. 7 CFR 51.776 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Definitions § 51.776 Slightly rough texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin may be slightly thick but not excessively thick, materially ridged or grooved. “Slightly thick” means that the...

  5. An edge-magnetoplasmon Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiyama, N.; Hashisaka, M.; Fujisawa, T.

    2015-10-01

    We report an edge-magnetoplasmon (EMP) Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometer in a quantum Hall system. The MZ interferometer, which is based on the interference of two EMP beams traveling in chiral one-dimensional edge channels, is constructed by tailoring edge channels with functional devices such as splitters and delay lines. We measured 1 GHz EMP beams transmitted through the interferometer while tuning the phase evolution along two interference paths using tunable delay lines. Clear interference patterns as a function of the phase difference ensure the MZ interference. Moreover, the MZ interferometry is applied to evaluate the EMP transport through an attenuator interposed in one of the paths. This technique will be useful for investigating the functionalities of devices in plasmonics.

  6. Correlation between roughness and porosity in rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebollo, M. A.; Hogert, E. N.; Albano, J.; Raffo, C. A.; Gaggioli, N. G.

    1996-02-01

    The porosity of rocks is a very important parameter in the determination of the performance of oil wells. Optical methods allow us to study surface roughness and different materials that have surface properties with random characteristics. Therefore, we have extended these applications to porosity analysis. In our method, we have used the speckle produced by the scattered light from a porous rock, illuminated by a laser beam, and found a linear relationship between the decorrelation of the speckle intensity distribution and the porosity magnitude. In this paper we present the results for samples extracted from oil wells in Argentina.

  7. Protein Translocation across the Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Mandon, Elisabet C.; Trueman, Steven F.; Gilmore, Reid

    2013-01-01

    The rough endoplasmic reticulum is a major site of protein biosynthesis in all eukaryotic cells, serving as the entry point for the secretory pathway and as the initial integration site for the majority of cellular integral membrane proteins. The core components of the protein translocation machinery have been identified, and high-resolution structures of the targeting components and the transport channel have been obtained. Research in this area is now focused on obtaining a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of protein translocation and membrane protein integration. PMID:23251026

  8. Polarimetric thermal emission from rough surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. T.; Kong, J. A.; Shin, R. T.; Staelin, D. H.; Yueh, S. H.; Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Oneill, K.; Lohanick, A.

    1993-01-01

    Recent theoretical works have suggested the potential of passive polarimetry in the remote sensing of geophysical media. It was shown that the third Stokes parameter U of the thermal emission may become larger for azimuthally asymmetric fields of observation. In order to investigate the potential applicability of passive polarimetry to the remote sensing of ocean surface, measurements of the polarimetric thermal emission from a sinusoidal water surface and a numerical study of the polarimetric thermal emission from randomly rough ocean surfaces were performed. Measurements of sinusoidal water surface thermal emission were performed using a sinusoidal water surface which was created by placing a thin sheet of fiberglass with a sinusoidal profile in two dimensions extended infinitely in the third dimension onto a water surface. The theory of thermal emission from a 'two-layer' periodic surface is derived and the exact solution is performed using both the extended boundary condition method (EBC) and the method of moments (MOM). The theoretical predictions are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results once the effects of the radiometer antenna pattern are included and the contribution of background noise to the measurements is modeled. The experimental results show that the U parameter indicates the direction of periodicity of the water surface and can approach values of up to 30 K for the surface observed. Next, a numerical study of polarimetric thermal emission from randomly rough surfaces was performed. A Monte Carlo technique utilizing an exact method for calculating thermal emission was chosen for the study to avoid any of the limitations of the commonly used approximate methods in rough surface scattering. In this Monte Carlo technique, a set of finite rough surface profiles in two dimensions with desired statistics was generated and extended periodically. The polarimetric thermal emission from each surface of the set was then calculated using

  9. Mold Cavity Roughness vs. Flow of Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanek, Michal; Manas, Miroslav; Manas, David

    2009-07-01

    Injection molding represents such a way of polymer processing that requires injection of polymer melt into the mold cavity with very high injection rate. The fluidity of polymers is affected by many parameters (mold design, melt temperature, injection rate and pressure). The main objective of this paper is the study of influence of surface roughness of mold cavity of the polymer melts flow. Evaluation of set of data obtained by experiments where the testing conditions were widely changed shows that quality of cavity surface affects on the length of flow.

  10. MOLA Global roughness map of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The median of slopes in 35-km windows indicate the typical roughness on 300-meter baselines. The rougher nature of the heavily cratered terrain in the Southern Hemisphere is apparent, as well as that of Valles Marineris (12S, 289E) canyon walls and the Olympus Mons (18N, 227E) aureole deposits. The Northern Lowlands are smooth, especially Amazonis Planitia (16N, 202E), a region to the west of Olympus Mons, were typical median slopes on these baselines are often smaller than 0.1 degree. A shaded relief map of the topography is overlaid is monochrome.

  11. Investigations of Titan's topography and surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Priyanka

    Saturn's moon, Titan is a geomorphologically active planetary object, and its surface is influenced by multiple processes like impact cratering, fluvial and aeolian erosion, lacustrine processes, tectonics, cryovolcanism and mantling. Disentangling the processes that compete to shape Titan's landscape is difficult in the absence of global topography data. In this thesis, I utilize techniques in topographic statistics, fractal theory, study of terrestrial analogs and landscape evolution modeling to characterize Titan's topography and surface roughness and investigate the relative roles of surface processes in sculpting its landscape. I mapped the shorelines of 290 North Polar Titanian lakes using the Cassini Synthetic Aperture Radar dataset. The fractal dimensions of the shorelines were calculated via the divider/ruler method and box-counting method, at length scales of (1--10) km and found to average 1.27 and 1.32, respectively. The inferred power-spectral exponent of Titan's topography was found to be ≤ 2, which is lower than the values obtained from the global topography of the Earth or Venus. In order to interpret fractal dimensions of Titan's shorelines in terms of the surficial processes at work, I repeated a similar statistical analysis with 114 terrestrial analogous lakes formed by different processes, using C-band radar backscatter data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). I found different lake generation mechanisms on Earth produce 'statistically different' shorelines; however, no specific set of processes could be identified for forming Titanian lake basins. Using the Cassini RADAR altimetry data, I investigated Titan's global surface roughness and calculated median absolute slopes, average relief and Hurst exponent (H) for the surface of Titan. I detected a clear trend with latitude in these roughness parameters. Equatorial regions had the smallest slopes, lowest values of H and smallest intra-footprint relief, compared to the mid

  12. Impact of Endothelium Roughness on Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sangwoo; Intaglietta, Marcos; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Cell free layer (CFL), a plasma layer bounded by the red blood cell (RBC) core and the endothelium, plays an important physiological role. Its width affects the effective blood viscosity as well as the scavenging and production of nitric oxide (NO). Measurements of the CFL and its spatio-temporal variability are highly uncertain, exhibiting random fluctuations. Yet traditional models of blood flow and NO scavenging treat the CFL’s bounding surfaces as deterministic and smooth. We investigate the effects of the endothelium roughness and uncertain (random) spatial variability on blood flow and estimates of effective blood viscosity. PMID:22300799

  13. Robust surface roughness indices and morphological interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisani, Sebastiano; Rocca, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Geostatistical-based image/surface texture indices based on variogram (Atkison and Lewis, 2000; Herzfeld and Higginson, 1996; Trevisani et al., 2012) and on its robust variant MAD (median absolute differences, Trevisani and Rocca, 2015) offer powerful tools for the analysis and interpretation of surface morphology (potentially not limited to solid earth). In particular, the proposed robust index (Trevisani and Rocca, 2015) with its implementation based on local kernels permits the derivation of a wide set of robust and customizable geomorphometric indices capable to outline specific aspects of surface texture. The stability of MAD in presence of signal noise and abrupt changes in spatial variability is well suited for the analysis of high-resolution digital terrain models. Moreover, the implementation of MAD by means of a pixel-centered perspective based on local kernels, with some analogies to the local binary pattern approach (Lucieer and Stein, 2005; Ojala et al., 2002), permits to create custom roughness indices capable to outline different aspects of surface roughness (Grohmann et al., 2011; Smith, 2015). In the proposed poster, some potentialities of the new indices in the context of geomorphometry and landscape analysis will be presented. At same time, challenges and future developments related to the proposed indices will be outlined. Atkinson, P.M., Lewis, P., 2000. Geostatistical classification for remote sensing: an introduction. Computers & Geosciences 26, 361-371. Grohmann, C.H., Smith, M.J., Riccomini, C., 2011. Multiscale Analysis of Topographic Surface Roughness in the Midland Valley, Scotland. IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing 49, 1220-1213. Herzfeld, U.C., Higginson, C.A., 1996. Automated geostatistical seafloor classification - Principles, parameters, feature vectors, and discrimination criteria. Computers and Geosciences, 22 (1), pp. 35-52. Lucieer, A., Stein, A., 2005. Texture-based landform segmentation of LiDAR imagery

  14. Helicopter rotor trailing edge noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to assess the importance of trailing edge noise as a helicopter main rotor broadband noise source. The noise mechanism was isolated by testing a rotor blade segment in an open jet acoustic wind tunnel at close to full scale Reynolds numbers. Boundary layer data and acoustic data were used to develop scaling laws and assess a first principles trailing edge noise theory. Conclusions from the isolated blade study were analytically transformed to the rotating frame coordinate system to develop a generalized rotor noise prediction. Trailing edge noise was found to contribute significantly to the total helicopter noise spectrum at high frequencies.

  15. Helicopter rotor trailing edge noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1981-10-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to assess the importance of trailing edge noise as a helicopter main rotor broadband noise source. The noise mechanism was isolated by testing a rotor blade segment in an open jet acoustic wind tunnel at close to full scale Reynolds numbers. Boundary layer data and acoustic data were used to develop scaling laws and assess a first principles trailing edge noise theory. Conclusions from the isolated blade study were analytically transformed to the rotating frame coordinate system to develop a generalized rotor noise prediction. Trailing edge noise was found to contribute significantly to the total helicopter noise spectrum at high frequencies.

  16. Speckle pattern texture analysis method to measure surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, I.; Sadovoy, A.; Doronin, A.; Meglinski, I.

    2013-02-01

    Speckle pattern texture analysis method is applied to measure surface roughness of human skin. The method is based on analyzing of a gray level co-occurrence matrix occurred from a speckle image of a rough surface. Paper with different surface roughness is used as a skin phantom. The roughness is controlled by profilometry measurements. The developed methodology could find wide application in dermatology and tissue diagnostics.

  17. Application of rough set for medical images data mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuyan; Wang, Chunmei; Chen, Yan

    2010-08-01

    To study the application of Rough set algorithm for diagnosis breast cancer, attribute reduction strategies of rough set are applied to the data mining of the mammography classification, proposes a medical images classifier based on association rules. Attribute reduction strategies of rough set for medical image data mining are realized. The experiment results are given. The experimental results show that the system performs well in accuracy, verified the great potential of rough set in assistant medical treatment.

  18. Reduction of airfoil trailing edge noise by trailing edge blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, T.; Erbslöh, S.; Carolus, T.

    2014-06-01

    The paper deals with airfoil trailing edge noise and its reduction by trailing edge blowing. A Somers S834 airfoil section which originally was designed for small wind turbines is investigated. To mimic realistic Reynolds numbers the boundary layer is tripped on pressure and suction side. The chordwise position of the blowing slot is varied. The acoustic sources, i.e. the unsteady flow quantities in the turbulent boundary layer in the vicinity of the trailing edge, are quantified for the airfoil without and with trailing edge blowing by means of a large eddy simulation and complementary measurements. Eventually the far field airfoil noise is measured by a two-microphone filtering and correlation and a 40 microphone array technique. Both, LES-prediction and measurements showed that a suitable blowing jet on the airfoil suction side is able to reduce significantly the turbulence intensity and the induced surface pressure fluctuations in the trailing edge region. As a consequence, trailing edge noise associated with a spectral hump around 500 Hz could be reduced by 3 dB. For that a jet velocity of 50% of the free field velocity was sufficient. The most favourable slot position was at 90% chord length.

  19. Edge-following algorithm for tracking geological features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tietz, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    Sequential edge-tracking algorithm employs circular scanning to point permit effective real-time tracking of coastlines and rivers from earth resources satellites. Technique eliminates expensive high-resolution cameras. System might also be adaptable for application in monitoring automated assembly lines, inspecting conveyor belts, or analyzing thermographs, or x ray images.

  20. 7 CFR 51.1014 - Excessively rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Excessively rough texture. 51.1014 Section 51.1014 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....1014 Excessively rough texture. Excessively rough texture means that the skin is badly ridged or...

  1. 7 CFR 51.1014 - Excessively rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Excessively rough texture. 51.1014 Section 51.1014 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....1014 Excessively rough texture. Excessively rough texture means that the skin is badly ridged or...

  2. 7 CFR 51.1169 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... rough texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin is not of smooth texture but is not materially... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Slightly rough texture. 51.1169 Section 51.1169 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE...

  3. 7 CFR 51.1169 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... rough texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin is not of smooth texture but is not materially... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Slightly rough texture. 51.1169 Section 51.1169 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE...

  4. 7 CFR 51.1169 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Definitions § 51.1169 Slightly rough texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin is not of smooth... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Slightly rough texture. 51.1169 Section 51.1169 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE...

  5. 7 CFR 51.1169 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Definitions § 51.1169 Slightly rough texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin is not of smooth... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Slightly rough texture. 51.1169 Section 51.1169 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE...

  6. 7 CFR 51.1169 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... rough texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin is not of smooth texture but is not materially... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Slightly rough texture. 51.1169 Section 51.1169 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE...

  7. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201... FOR CERTAIN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which consists of 50 percent or more of paddy kernels...

  8. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201... FOR CERTAIN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which consists of 50 percent or more of paddy kernels...

  9. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201... FOR CERTAIN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which consists of 50 percent or more of paddy kernels...

  10. 14 CFR 25.1517 - Rough air speed, VRA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rough air speed, VRA. 25.1517 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1517 Rough air speed, VRA. A rough air speed, VRA, for use as the recommended turbulence... specified in § 25.335(d); and (3) Is sufficiently less than VMO to ensure that likely speed variation...

  11. Moisture diffusivity of rough rice under infrared radiation drying

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To design efficient infrared (IR) dryers for rough rice, it is important to understand the drying behavior of rough rice under IR heating. The objective of this study was to determine the moisture diffusivity of rough rice under IR heating followed by cooling. The effects of initial moisture content...

  12. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201... FOR CERTAIN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which consists of 50 percent or more of paddy kernels...

  13. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201... FOR CERTAIN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which consists of 50 percent or more of paddy kernels...

  14. 14 CFR 25.1517 - Rough air speed, VRA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rough air speed, VRA. 25.1517 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1517 Rough air speed, VRA. A rough air speed, VRA, for use as the recommended turbulence... specified in § 25.335(d); and (3) Is sufficiently less than VMO to ensure that likely speed variation...

  15. 14 CFR 25.1517 - Rough air speed, VRA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rough air speed, VRA. 25.1517 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1517 Rough air speed, VRA. A rough air speed, VRA, for use as the recommended turbulence... specified in § 25.335(d); and (3) Is sufficiently less than VMO to ensure that likely speed variation...

  16. Investigation of the Attenuation of Plane Shock Waves Moving over very Rough Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Paul W.; McFarland, Donald R.; Levine, Philip

    1953-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the attenuation of plane shock waves moving over rough walls have been made in a shock tube. Measurements of the boundary-layer characteristics, including thickness and velocity distribution behind the shock, have also been made with the aid of new cal techniques which provide direct information on the local boundary-layer conditions at the rough walls. Measurements of shock speed and shock pressure ratio are presented for both smooth-wall and rough-wall flow over lengths of machined-smooth and rough strips which lined all four walls of the shock tube. A simplified theory based on Von Karman's expression for skin-friction coefficient for flow over rough walls, along with a wave-model concept and extensions to include time effects, is presented. In this theory, the shock-tube flow is assumed to be one-dimensional at all times and the wave-model concept is used to relate the local layer growth to decreases in shock strength. This concept assumes that local boundary-layer growths act as local mass-flow sinks, which give rise to expansion waves which, in turn, overtake the shock and lower its mass flow accordingly.

  17. Distributed-Roughness Effects on Stability and Transition In Swept-Wing Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrillo, Ruben B., Jr.; Reibert, Mark S.; Saric, William S.

    1997-01-01

    Boundary-layer stability experiments are conducted in the Arizona State University Unsteady Wind Tunnel on a 45 deg swept airfoil. The pressure distribution and test conditions are designed to suppress Tollmien-Schlichting disturbances and provide crossflow-dominated transition. The surface of the airfoil is finely polished to a near mirror finish. Under these conditions, submicron surface irregularities cause the naturally occurring stationary crossflow waves to grow to nonuniform amplitudes. Spanwise-uniform stationary crossflow disturbances are generated through careful control of the initial conditions with full-span arrays of micron-high roughness elements near the attachment line. Detailed hot-wire measurements are taken to document the stationary crossflow structure and determine growth rates for the total and individual-mode disturbances. Naphthalene flow visualization provides transition location information. Roughness spacing and roughness height are varied to examine the effects on transition location and all amplified wavelengths. The measurements show that roughness spacings that do not contain harmonics equal to the most unstable wavelength as computed by linear stability theory effectively suppress the most unstable mode. Under certain conditions, subcritical roughness spacing delays transition past that of the corresponding smooth surface.

  18. Manipulating edge transport in quantum anomalous Hall insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandala, Abhinav

    The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect provides a path to obtain dissipation-less, one-dimensional (1D) edge states at zero magnetic field. It's recent experimental realization in magnetic topological insulator thin films lies at the overlap of several areas of condensed matter physics: dilute magnetic semiconductors, low dimensional electron transport and topologically non-trivial material systems. In this talk, we demonstrate how careful compositional and electrical tuning of epitaxial films of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 enables access to a robust zero-field quantized Hall effect, despite sample roughness and low carrier mobility. In samples that show near-dissipation-less transport, we manipulate the intermixing between edge states and dissipative channels via a tilted-field crossover from ballistic 1D edge transport to diffusive transport. This crossover manifests in a gate-tunable giant anisotropic magneto-resistance effect that we use as a quantitative probe of dissipation in our systems. Finally, we discuss experiments with mesoscopic channels of QAH insulator thin films, and discuss the effect of their modified magnetic anisotropy on edge transport. This work was carried out in collaboration with A. Richardella, C-X Liu, M. Liu, W. Wang, N. P. Ong, and N. Samarth. Funded by ARO/MURI, DARPA and ONR.

  19. Rough viscoelastic sliding contact: Theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, G.; Putignano, C.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we show how the numerical theory introduced by the authors [Carbone and Putignano, J. Mech. Phys. Solids 61, 1822 (2013), 10.1016/j.jmps.2013.03.005] can be effectively employed to study the contact between viscoelastic rough solids. The huge numerical complexity is successfully faced up by employing the adaptive nonuniform mesh developed by the authors in Putignano et al. [J. Mech. Phys. Solids 60, 973 (2012), 10.1016/j.jmps.2012.01.006]. Results mark the importance of accounting for viscoelastic effects to correctly simulate the sliding rough contact. In detail, attention is, first, paid to evaluate the viscoelastic dissipation, i.e., the viscoelastic friction. Fixed the sliding speed and the normal load, friction is completely determined. Furthermore, since the methodology employed in the work allows to study contact between real materials, a comparison between experimental outcomes and numerical prediction in terms of viscoelastic friction is shown. The good agreement seems to validate—at least partially—the presented methodology. Finally, it is shown that viscoelasticity entails not only the dissipative effects previously outlined, but is also strictly related to the anisotropy of the contact solution. Indeed, a marked anisotropy is present in the contact region, which results stretched in the direction perpendicular to the sliding speed. In the paper, the anisotropy of the deformed surface and of the contact area is investigated and quantified.

  20. How Tongue Size and Roughness Affect Lapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, M. J.; Hay, K. M.

    2012-10-01

    The biomechanics of domestic cat lapping (Felis catus) and domestic dog lapping (Canis familiaris) is currently under debate. Lapping mechanics in vertebrates with incomplete cheeks, such as cats and dogs, is a balance of inertia and the force of gravity likely optimized for ingestion and physical necessities. Physiology dictates vertebrate mass, which dictates vertebrate tongue size, which dictates lapping mechanics to achieve optimum liquid ingestion; with either touch lapping, scooping, or a hybrid lapping method. The physics of this optimized system then determines how high a column of liquid can be raised before it collapses due to gravity, and therefore, lapping frequency. Through tongue roughness model variation experiments it was found that pore-scale geometrical roughness does not appear to affect lapping or liquid uptake. Through tongue size model variation experiments it was found that there is a critical tongue radius in the range of 25 mm to 35 mm above which touch lapping is no longer an efficient way to uptake liquid. Vertebrates with incomplete cheeks may use a touch lapping method to ingest water if their tongue radius is less than this critical radius and use an alternative ingestion method if their tongue radius is larger.

  1. Roughness tolerances for Cherenkov telescope mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayabaly, K.; Spiga, D.; Canestrari, R.; Bonnoli, G.; Lavagna, M.; Pareschi, G.

    2015-09-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a forthcoming international ground-based observatory for very high-energy gamma rays. Its goal is to reach sensitivity five to ten times better than existing Cherenkov telescopes such as VERITAS, H.E.S.S. or MAGIC and extend the range of observation to energies down to few tens of GeV and beyond 100 TeV. To achieve this goal, an array of about 100 telescopes is required, meaning a total reflective surface of several thousands of square meters. Thence, the optimal technology used for CTA mirrors' manufacture should be both low-cost (~1000 euros/m2) and allow high optical performances over the 300-550 nm wavelength range. More exactly, a reflectivity higher than 85% and a PSF (Point Spread Function) diameter smaller than 1 mrad. Surface roughness can significantly contribute to PSF broadening and limit telescope performances. Fortunately, manufacturing techniques for mirrors are now available to keep the optical scattering well below the geometrically-predictable effect of figure errors. This paper determines first order surface finish tolerances based on a surface microroughness characterization campaign, using Phase Shift Interferometry. That allows us to compute the roughness contribution to Cherenkov telescope PSF. This study is performed for diverse mirror candidates (MAGIC-I and II, ASTRI, MST) varying in manufacture technologies, selected coating materials and taking into account the degradation over time due to environmental hazards.

  2. Enhancing capillary rise on a rough surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Melissa; Wexler, Jason; Jacobi, Ian; Stone, Howard

    2014-11-01

    Liquid-infused surfaces have been proposed as a robust alternative to traditional air-cushioned superhydrophobic surfaces. However, if these surfaces are held vertically the lubricating oil can drain from the surface, and cause the surface to lose its novel properties. To examine this failure mode, we measure the drainage from a surface with model roughness that is scaled-up to allow for detailed measurements. We confirm that the bulk fluid drains from the surface until it reaches the level of the capillary rise height, although the detailed dynamics vary even in simple surface geometries. We then test different substrate architectures to explore how the roughness can be designed to retain greater amounts of oil. Supported under MRSEC NSF DMR 0819860 (PI: Prof. N. Phuan Ong) REU Site Grant: NSF DMR-1156422 (PI: Prof. Mikko Haataja), PREM CSUN Prime # NSF 1205734 and ONR MURI Grants N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 (Program Manager Dr. Ki-Han Kim).

  3. Fast tracking using edge histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokita, Przemyslaw

    1997-04-01

    This paper proposes a new algorithm for tracking objects and objects boundaries. This algorithm was developed and applied in a system used for compositing computer generated images and real world video sequences, but can be applied in general in all tracking systems where accuracy and high processing speed are required. The algorithm is based on analysis of histograms obtained by summing along chosen axles pixels of edge segmented images. Edge segmentation is done by spatial convolution using gradient operator. The advantage of such an approach is that it can be performed in real-time using available on the market hardware convolution filters. After edge extraction and histograms computation, respective positions of maximums in edge intensity histograms, in current and previous frame, are compared and matched. Obtained this way information about displacement of histograms maximums, can be directly converted into information about changes of target boundaries positions along chosen axles.

  4. Soil surface roughness characterization for microwave remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzahn, P.; Rieke-Zapp, D.; Ludwig, R.

    2012-04-01

    With this poster we present a simple and efficient method to measure soil surface roughness in an agricultural environment. Micro scale soil surface roughness is a crucial parameter in many environmental applications. In recent studies it is strongly recognized that soil surface roughness significantly influences the backscatter of agricultural surface, especially on bare fields. Indeed, while different roughness indices depend on their measurement length, no satisfying roughness parametrization and measurement technique has been found yet, introducing large uncertainty in the interpretation of the radar backscattering. In this study, we introduce a photogrammetric system which consists of a customized consumer grade Canon EOS 5d camera and a reference frame providing ground control points. With the system one can generate digital surface models (DSM) with a minimum size of 1 x 2.5 m2, extendable to any desired size, with a ground x,y- resolution of 2 mm. Using this approach, we generated a set of DSM with sizes ranging from 2.5 m2 to 22 m2, acquired over different roughness conditions representing ploughed, harrowed as well as crusted fields on different test sites. For roughness characterization we calculated in microwave remote sensing common roughness indices such as the RMS- height s and the autocorrelation length l. In an extensive statistical investigation we show the behavior of the roughness indices for different acquisition sizes of the proposed method. Results indicate, compared to results from profiles generated out of the dataset, that using a three dimensional measuring device, the calculated roughness indices are more robust in their estimation. In addition, a strong directional dependency of the proposed roughness indices was observed which could be related to the orientation of the seedbed rows to the acqusition direction. In a geostatistical analysis, we decomposed the acquired roughness indices into different scales, yielding a roughness quantity

  5. Edge instabilities of topological superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Johannes S.; Assaad, Fakher F.; Schnyder, Andreas P.

    2016-05-01

    Nodal topological superconductors display zero-energy Majorana flat bands at generic edges. The flatness of these edge bands, which is protected by time-reversal and translation symmetry, gives rise to an extensive ground-state degeneracy. Therefore, even arbitrarily weak interactions lead to an instability of the flat-band edge states towards time-reversal and translation-symmetry-broken phases, which lift the ground-state degeneracy. We examine the instabilities of the flat-band edge states of dx y-wave superconductors by performing a mean-field analysis in the Majorana basis of the edge states. The leading instabilities are Majorana mass terms, which correspond to coherent superpositions of particle-particle and particle-hole channels in the fermionic language. We find that attractive interactions induce three different mass terms. One is a coherent superposition of imaginary s -wave pairing and current order, and another combines a charge-density-wave and finite-momentum singlet pairing. Repulsive interactions, on the other hand, lead to ferromagnetism together with spin-triplet pairing at the edge. Our quantum Monte Carlo simulations confirm these findings and demonstrate that these instabilities occur even in the presence of strong quantum fluctuations. We discuss the implications of our results for experiments on cuprate high-temperature superconductors.

  6. Edge of polar cap patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, K.; Taguchi, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2016-04-01

    On the night of 4 December 2013, a sequence of polar cap patches was captured by an all-sky airglow imager (ASI) in Longyearbyen, Norway (78.1°N, 15.5°E). The 630.0 nm airglow images from the ASI of 4 second exposure time, oversampled the emission of natural lifetime (with quenching) of at least ˜30 sec, introduce no observational blurring effects. By using such high-quality ASI images, we succeeded in visualizing an asymmetry in the gradients between the leading/trailing edges of the patches in a 2-D fashion. The gradient in the leading edge was found to be 2-3 times steeper than that in the trailing edge. We also identified fingerlike structures, appearing only along the trailing edge of the patches, whose horizontal scale size ranged from 55 to 210 km. These fingers are considered to be manifestations of plasma structuring through the gradient-drift instability (GDI), which is known to occur only along the trailing edge of patches. That is, the current 2-D observations visualized, for the first time, how GDI stirs the patch plasma and such a mixing process makes the trailing edge more gradual. This result strongly implies a close connection between the GDI-driven plasma stirring and the asymmetry in the large-scale shape of patches and then suggests that the fingerlike structures can be used as markers to estimate the fine-scale structure in the plasma flow within patches.

  7. Theoretical study of fabrication of line-and-space patterns with 7 nm quarter-pitch using electron beam lithography with chemically amplified resist process: IV. Comparison with experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozawa, Takahiro

    2016-05-01

    Electron beam (EB) lithography is a key technology for nanofabrication. We have investigated the feasibility of the fabrication of line-and-space patterns with a 7 nm quarter-pitch (7 nm space width and 21 nm line width), using the simulation based on the sensitization and reaction mechanisms of chemically amplified EB resists. In this study, simulation results were compared with experimental results to check the validity of the simulation model used in previous studies. 3:1 [on the computer-aided design (CAD)] line-and-space patterns were fabricated on quartz masks for different pitches and exposure doses. The measured space width and line edge roughness were well reproduced by the simulation.

  8. Adjustment of roughness sublayer in turbulent flows over two-dimensional idealised roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HO, Yat-Kiu; LIU, Chun-Ho

    2015-04-01

    The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) immediately above the urban canopy is the roughness sublayer (RSL). In this layer, flows and turbulence are strongly affected by the roughness elements beneath, e.g. building obstacles. The wind flows over urban areas could be represented by conventional logarithmic law of the wall (log-law) in the neutrally stratified ABL. However, in the RSL region, the vertical wind profile deviates from that predicted from log-law and the effect could be extended from ground level up to several canopy heights. As a result, the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) fails and an additional length scale is required to describe the flows. The key aim of this study is to introduce a simple wind profile model which accounts for the effect of the RSL in neutral stratification using wind tunnel experiments. Profile measurements of wind speeds and turbulence quantities over various two-dimensional (2D) idealised roughness elements are carried out in an open-circuit wind tunnel with test section of size 560 mm (width) × 560 mm (height) × 6 m (length). The separation between the roughness elements is varied systematically so that ten different types of surface forms are adopted. The velocity measurements are obtained by hot-wire anemometry using X-probe design (for UW- measurements) with a constant temperature anemometer. For each configuration, eight vertical profiles are collected over the canopy, including solid boundaries and cavities of the roughness elements. Firstly, we compute the measurement results using conventional MOST to determine different roughness parameters. Afterwards, we derive the RSL height from the Reynolds stress profiles. Since the profiles taken from different locations of the canopy are eventually converged with increasing height, we use this 'congregated height' to define the RSL height. Next, we introduce an alternative function, i.e. power-law function, instead of MOST, to describe the velocity profile in attempt to

  9. Topography-based flow-directional roughness: potential and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisani, Sebastiano; Cavalli, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Surface texture analysis applied to high-resolution digital terrain models (HRDTMs) is a promising approach for extracting useful fine-scale morphological information. Surface roughness, considered here as a synonym of surface texture, can have a discriminant role in the detection of different geomorphic processes and factors. Very often, the local morphology presents, at different scales, anisotropic characteristics that could be taken into account when calculating or measuring surface roughness. The high morphological detail of HRDTMs permits the description of different aspects of surface roughness, beyond an evaluation limited to isotropic measures of surface roughness. The generalization of the concept of roughness implies the need to refer to a family of specific roughness indices capable of capturing specific multiscale and anisotropic aspects of surface morphology. An interesting set of roughness indices is represented by directional measures of roughness that can be meaningful in the context of analyzed and modeled flow processes. Accordingly, we test the application of a flow-oriented directional measure of roughness based on the geostatistical bivariate index MAD (median of absolute directional differences), which is computed considering surface gravity-driven flow direction. MAD is derived from a modification of a variogram and is specifically designed for the geomorphometric analysis of HRDTMs. The presented approach shows the potential impact of considering directionality in the calculation of roughness indices. The results demonstrate that the use of flow-directional roughness can improve geomorphometric modeling (e.g., sediment connectivity and surface texture modeling) and the interpretation of landscape morphology.

  10. Topography-based flow-directional roughness: potential and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisani, S.; Cavalli, M.

    2015-12-01

    Surface texture analysis applied to High Resolution Digital Terrain Models (HRDTMs) is a promising approach for extracting useful fine-scale morphological information. Surface roughness, considered here as a synonym of surface texture, can have a discriminant role in the detection of different geomorphic processes and factors. Very often, the local morphology presents, at different scales, anisotropic characteristics that could be taken into account when calculating or measuring surface roughness. The high morphological detail of HRDTMs permits the description of different aspects of surface roughness, beyond an evaluation limited to isotropic measures of surface roughness. The generalization of the concept of roughness implies the need to refer to a family of specific roughness indices capable of capturing specific multi-scale and anisotropic aspects of surface morphology. An interesting set of roughness indices is represented by directional measures of roughness that can be meaningful in the context of analyzed and modeled flow processes. Accordingly, we test the application of a flow-oriented directional measure of roughness based on the geostatistical bivariate index MAD (median of absolute directional differences), which is computed considering surface gravity-driven flow direction. MAD is derived from a modification of a variogram and is specifically designed for the geomorphometric analysis of HRDTMs. The presented approach shows the potential impact of considering directionality in the calculation of roughness indices. The results demonstrate that the use of flow directional roughness can improve geomorphometric modeling (e.g., sediment connectivity and surface texture modeling) and the interpretation of landscape morphology.

  11. Roughness Induced Transition in a Supersonic Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam; Kergerise, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation is used to investigate the transition induced by threedimensional isolated roughness elements in a supersonic boundary layer at a free stream Mach number of 3.5. Simulations are performed for two different configurations: one is a square planform roughness and the other is a diamond planform roughness. The mean-flow calculations show that the roughness induces counter rotating streamwise vortices downstream of the roughness. These vortices persist for a long distance downstream and lift the low momentum fluid from the near wall region and place it near the outer part of the boundary layer. This forms highly inflectional boundary layer profiles. These observations agree with recent experimental observations. The receptivity calculations showed that the amplitudes of the mass-flux fluctuations near the neutral point for the diamond shape roughness are the same as the amplitude of the acoustic disturbances. They are three times smaller for the square shape roughness.

  12. Scanning tunneling microscopy on rough surfaces: Tip-shape-limited resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, G.; Vancea, J.; Wittmann, H.; Zweck, J.; Hoffmann, H.

    1990-02-01

    This paper discusses the reliability of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of mesoscopically rough surfaces. The specific structure of these images represents a convolution between the real surface topography and the shape of the tip. In order to interpret these images quantitatively, the line scans of steep and high steps can be used to obtain an image of the tip itself. This image shows tip radii ranging typically from 5 to 15 nm and cone angles of about 30° over a length of 80 nm, and can in turn be used to recognize the limits of STM resolution on a rough surface: High-resolution transmission electron microscopy cross-section images of Au island films on a Au-Nb double layer are convoluted with the experimentally observed tip shape; the resulting line scans correspond very well with STM graphs of the same samples. Finally an overall criterion for the resolution of the STM on such surfaces is proposed.

  13. Automatic comic page image understanding based on edge segment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Wang, Yongtao; Tang, Zhi; Li, Luyuan; Gao, Liangcai

    2013-12-01

    Comic page image understanding aims to analyse the layout of the comic page images by detecting the storyboards and identifying the reading order automatically. It is the key technique to produce the digital comic documents suitable for reading on mobile devices. In this paper, we propose a novel comic page image understanding method based on edge segment analysis. First, we propose an efficient edge point chaining method to extract Canny edge segments (i.e., contiguous chains of Canny edge points) from the input comic page image; second, we propose a top-down scheme to detect line segments within each obtained edge segment; third, we develop a novel method to detect the storyboards by selecting the border lines and further identify the reading order of these storyboards. The proposed method is performed on a data set consisting of 2000 comic page images from ten printed comic series. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method achieves satisfactory results on different comics and outperforms the existing methods.

  14. Light depolarization in off-specular reflection on submicro rough metal surfaces with imperfectly random roughness.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linsheng; Li, Xuefeng; Nonaka, Kazuhiro

    2015-02-01

    Depolarization at a rough surface relates to its roughness and irregularity (e.g., sags and crests) besides the material property. However, there is still lack of general theory to clearly describe the relationship between depolarization ratios and surface conditions, and one important reason is that the mechanism of depolarization relates to geometric parameters such as microcosmic height/particle distributions of sub-micro to nm levels. To study the mechanism in more detail, a compact laser instrument is developed, and depolarization information of a linearly polarized incident light is used for analyzing the roughness, during which a He-Ne laser source (λ = 632.8 nm) is used. Three nickel specimens with RMS roughness (Rq) less than λ/4 are fabricated and tested. Six different areas in each specimen are characterized in detail using an AFM. Rq are in the range of 34.1-155.0 nm, and the heights are non-Gaussian distribution in the first specimen and near-Gaussian distribution in the others. Off-specular inspection is carried out exactly on these 18 characterized areas, and results show that the cross-polarization ratios match quite well with Rq values of the first sample that has Rq ≤ λ/10 (or Rt ≤ λ), while they match well with maximum height, Rt, values of the other two that have Rt > λ (the maximum derivation is 11%). In addition, since this instrument is simple, portable, stable, and low-cost, it has great potential for practical online roughness testing after a linear calibration. PMID:25725823

  15. Surface roughness of anodized titanium coatings.

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, Michael Thomas; Chinn, Douglas Alan

    2010-10-01

    Samples of grade five 6Al4V titanium alloy were coated with two commercial fluoropolymer anodizations (Tiodize and Canadize) and compared. Neither coating demonstrates significant outgassing. The coatings show very similar elemental analysis, except for the presence of lead in the Canadize coating, which may account for its lower surface friction in humid environments. Surface roughness has been compared by SEM, contact profilometry, optical profilometry, power spectral density and bidirectional scattering distribution function (BSDF). The Tiodize film is slightly smoother by all measurement methods, but the Canadize film shows slightly less scatter at all angles of incidence. Both films exhibited initial friction coefficients of 0.2 to 0.4, increasing to 0.4 to 0.8 after 1000 cycles of sliding due to wear of the coating and ball. The coatings are very similar and should behave identically in most applications.

  16. Manning's roughness coefficient for Illinois streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soong, David T.; Prater, Crystal D.; Halfar, Teresa M.; Wobig, Loren A.

    2012-01-01

    Manning's roughness coefficients for 43 natural and constructed streams in Illinois are reported and displayed on a U.S. Geological Survey Web site. At a majority of the sites, discharge and stage were measured, and corresponding Manning's coefficients—the n-values—were determined at more than one river discharge. The n-values discussed in this report are computed from data representing the stream reach studied and, therefore, are reachwise values. Presentation of the resulting n-values takes a visual-comparison approach similar to the previously published Barnes report (1967), in which photographs of channel conditions, description of the site, and the resulting n-values are organized for each site. The Web site where the data can be accessed and are displayed is at URL http://il.water.usgs.gov/proj/nvalues/.

  17. Meaningful surface roughness and quality tolerances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikens, David M.

    2010-08-01

    Most tolerances on optical elements can be derived or calculated from the application requirements using computeraided optical design programs. For surface quality and surface roughness, however, there are few guidelines or tools for calculating appropriate tolerances. Typically, we simply use a legacy specification (e.g. 60-40 and 3 A RMS) with little thought for either the cost of achieving the specification or the penalty for failing to achieve it. Often these legacy specifications are ambiguous, unnecessarily costly and in some cases completely meaningless. This paper provides some basic rules and equations for calculation of the real or perceived impact of these specifications, and some guidelines for the initiate (and for some of us veterans as well) as to how to compose a meaningful tolerance.

  18. Theory of adhesion: Role of surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, B. N. J.; Scaraggi, M.

    2014-09-01

    We discuss how surface roughness influences the adhesion between elastic solids. We introduce a Tabor number which depends on the length scale or magnification, and which gives information about the nature of the adhesion at different length scales. We consider two limiting cases relevant for (a) elastically hard solids with weak (or long ranged) adhesive interaction (DMT-limit) and (b) elastically soft solids with strong (or short ranged) adhesive interaction (JKR-limit). For the former cases we study the nature of the adhesion using different adhesive force laws (F ˜ u-n, n = 1.5-4, where u is the wall-wall separation). In general, adhesion may switch from DMT-like at short length scales to JKR-like at large (macroscopic) length scale. We compare the theory predictions to results of exact numerical simulations and find good agreement between theory and simulation results.

  19. Enhanced thermoelectric performance of rough silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Hochbaum, Allon I; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz; Liang, Wenjie; Garnett, Erik C; Najarian, Mark; Majumdar, Arun; Yang, Peidong

    2008-01-10

    Approximately 90 per cent of the world's power is generated by heat engines that use fossil fuel combustion as a heat source and typically operate at 30-40 per cent efficiency, such that roughly 15 terawatts of heat is lost to the environment. Thermoelectric modules could potentially convert part of this low-grade waste heat to electricity. Their efficiency depends on the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT of their material components, which is a function of the Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and absolute temperature. Over the past five decades it has been challenging to increase ZT > 1, since the parameters of ZT are generally interdependent. While nanostructured thermoelectric materials can increase ZT > 1 (refs 2-4), the materials (Bi, Te, Pb, Sb, and Ag) and processes used are not often easy to scale to practically useful dimensions. Here we report the electrochemical synthesis of large-area, wafer-scale arrays of rough Si nanowires that are 20-300 nm in diameter. These nanowires have Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity values that are the same as doped bulk Si, but those with diameters of about 50 nm exhibit 100-fold reduction in thermal conductivity, yielding ZT = 0.6 at room temperature. For such nanowires, the lattice contribution to thermal conductivity approaches the amorphous limit for Si, which cannot be explained by current theories. Although bulk Si is a poor thermoelectric material, by greatly reducing thermal conductivity without much affecting the Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity, Si nanowire arrays show promise as high-performance, scalable thermoelectric materials. PMID:18185582

  20. Accurate electrical prediction of memory array through SEM-based edge-contour extraction using SPICE simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shauly, Eitan; Rotstein, Israel; Peltinov, Ram; Latinski, Sergei; Adan, Ofer; Levi, Shimon; Menadeva, Ovadya

    2009-03-01

    The continues transistors scaling efforts, for smaller devices, similar (or larger) drive current/um and faster devices, increase the challenge to predict and to control the transistor off-state current. Typically, electrical simulators like SPICE, are using the design intent (as-drawn GDS data). At more sophisticated cases, the simulators are fed with the pattern after lithography and etch process simulations. As the importance of electrical simulation accuracy is increasing and leakage is becoming more dominant, there is a need to feed these simulators, with more accurate information extracted from physical on-silicon transistors. Our methodology to predict changes in device performances due to systematic lithography and etch effects was used in this paper. In general, the methodology consists on using the OPCCmaxTM for systematic Edge-Contour-Extraction (ECE) from transistors, taking along the manufacturing and includes any image distortions like line-end shortening, corner rounding and line-edge roughness. These measurements are used for SPICE modeling. Possible application of this new metrology is to provide a-head of time, physical and electrical statistical data improving time to market. In this work, we applied our methodology to analyze a small and large array's of 2.14um2 6T-SRAM, manufactured using Tower Standard Logic for General Purposes Platform. 4 out of the 6 transistors used "U-Shape AA", known to have higher variability. The predicted electrical performances of the transistors drive current and leakage current, in terms of nominal values and variability are presented. We also used the methodology to analyze an entire SRAM Block array. Study of an isolation leakage and variability are presented.

  1. Graphene quantum dots: localized states, edges and bilayer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensslin, Klaus

    2014-03-01

    Graphene quantum dots show Coulomb blockade, excited states and their orbital and spin properties have been investigated in high magnetic fields. Most quantum dots fabricated to date are fabricated with electron beam lithography and dry etching which generally leads to uncontrolled and probably rough edges. We demonstrate that devices with reduced bulk disorder fabricated on BN substrates display similar localized states as those fabricated on the more standard SiO2 substrates. For a highly symmetric quantum dot with short tunnel barriers the experimentally detected transport features can be explained by three localized states, 1 in the dot and 2 in the constrictions. A way to overcome edge roughness and the localized states related to this are bilayer devices where a band gap can be induced by suitable top and back gate voltages. By placing bilayer graphene between two BN layers high electronic quality can be achieved as documented by the observation of broken symmetry states in the quantum Hall regime. We discuss how this method can be exploited to achieve smoother and better tunable graphene quantum devices. This work was done in collaboration with D. Bischoff, P. Simonet, A. Varlet, Y. Tian, and T. Ihn.

  2. Computational theory of line drawing interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witkin, A. P.

    1981-01-01

    The recovery of the three dimensional structure of visible surfaces depicted in an image by emphasizing the role of geometric cues present in line drawings, was studied. Three key components are line classification, line interpretation, and surface interpolation. A model for three dimensional line interpretation and surface orientation was refined and a theory for the recovery of surface shape from surface marking geometry was developed. A new approach to the classification of edges was developed and implemented signatures were deduced for each of several edge types, expressed in terms of correlational properties of the image intensities in the vicinity of the edge. A computer program was developed that evaluates image edges as compared with these prototype signatures.

  3. A Thermostructural Analysis of a Diboride Composite Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, Tom; Buesking, Kent; Kolodziej, Paul; Bull, Jeff

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to support the design of zirconium diboride composite leading edges for hypersonic vehicles, a finite element model (FEM) of a prototype leading edge was created and finite element analysis (FEA) was employed to assess its thermal and structural response to aerothermal boundary conditions. Unidirectional material properties for the structural components of the leading edge, a continuous fiber reinforced diboride composite, were computed with COSTAR. These properties agree well with those experimentally measured. To verify the analytical approach taken with COSMOS/M, an independent FEA of one of the leading edge assembly components was also done with COSTAR. Good agreement was obtained between the two codes. Both showed that a unidirectional lay-up had the best margin of safety for a simple loading case. Both located the maximum stress in the same region and ply. The magnitudes agreed within 4 percent. Trajectory based aerothermal heating was then applied to the leading edge assembly FEM created with COSMOS/M to determine steady state temperature response, displacement, stresses, and contact forces due to thermal expansion and thermal strains. Results show that the leading edge stagnation line temperature reached 4700 F. The maximum computed failure index for the laminated composite components peaks at 4.2, and is located at the bolt flange in layer 2 of the side bracket. The temperature gradient in the tip causes a compressive stress of 279 ksi along its width and substantial tensile stresses within its depth.

  4. Decay patterns of edge states at reconstructed armchair graphene edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Changwon; Ihm, Jisoon; Kim, Gunn

    Density functional theory calculations are used to investigate the electronic structures of localized states at reconstructed armchair graphene edges. We consider graphene nanoribbons with two different edge types and obtain the energy band structures and charge densities of the edge states. By examining the imaginary part of the wave vector in the forbidden energy region, we reveal the decay behavior of the wave functions in graphene. The complex band structures of graphene in the armchair and zigzag directions are presented in the first-principles framework. G.K. acknowledges the support of the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the Ministry of Education (Grant No. 2013R1A1A2009131) and the Priority Research Center Program (Grant No. 2010-0020207).

  5. On the Edge: Haptic Discrimination of Edge Sharpness

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Andy L.; Kent, Christopher; Rossiter, Jonathan M.; Benton, Christopher P.; Groen, Martin G. M.; Noyes, Jan M.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing ubiquity of haptic displays (e.g., smart phones and tablets) necessitates a better understanding of the perceptual capabilities of the human haptic system. Haptic displays will soon be capable of locally deforming to create simple 3D shapes. This study investigated the sensitivity of our haptic system to a fundamental component of shapes: edges. A novel set of eight high quality shape stimuli with test edges that varied in sharpness were fabricated in a 3D printer. In a two alternative, forced choice task, blindfolded participants were presented with two of these shapes side by side (one the reference, the other selected randomly from the remaining set of seven) and after actively exploring the test edge of each shape with the tip of their index finger, reported which shape had the sharper edge. We used a model selection approach to fit optimal psychometric functions to performance data, and from these obtained just noticeable differences and Weber fractions. In Experiment 1, participants performed the task with four different references. With sharpness defined as the angle at which one surface meets the horizontal plane, the four JNDs closely followed Weber’s Law, giving a Weber fraction of 0.11. Comparisons to previously reported Weber fractions from other haptic manipulations (e.g. amplitude of vibration) suggests we are sufficiently sensitive to changes in edge sharpness for this to be of potential utility in the design of future haptic displays. In Experiment 2, two groups of participants performed the task with a single reference but different exploration strategies; one was limited to a single touch, the other unconstrained and free to explore as they wished. As predicted, the JND in the free exploration condition was lower than that in the single touch condition, indicating exploration strategy affects sensitivity to edge sharpness. PMID:24023852

  6. Surface roughness prediction from combination of cutting forces, turning vibrations and machining conditions using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morala-Argüello, P.; Barreiro, J.; Alegre, E.; García-Ordás, M.; García-Olalla, Oscar; González-Madruga, D.

    2012-04-01

    Nowadays the evaluation of surface quality of manufactured products continues being a very important task for the industry. One of the lines of research associated to this subject tries to predict the surface roughness using signal analysis, such as vibrations, in the machining process. Many researchers have proposed models for determining the roughness based on the cutting conditions or the cutting forces. As the surface roughness depends on many variables, in this work different statistical values of cutting forces, tool vibration values and machining conditions are considered together for predicting surface roughness of turned metallic parts using artificial neural networks. We have notice the best predictions have been obtained when force and cutting conditions were combined together. The absolute error values obtained have been always below to 1.28 and 1.11 μm when using the median and root mean square (RMS) as descriptors, respectively.

  7. Reflectance for an approximately one-dimensional rough surface that has rms roughness greater than a wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendeleev, Vladimir Y.; Skovorod'ko, Sergey N.

    2004-02-01

    A relation between the intensity reflectances of approximately one-dimensional and one-dimensional rough surfaces within the diffraction solid angle in the specular direction for normal incidence is derived for an rms roughness greater than a wavelength. The relation shows that the reflectance of an approximately one-dimensional rough surface is proportional to the reflectance of a one-dimension rough surface. The validity of the derived relation is studied for an approximately one-dimensional rough steel surface with an rms roughness of 1.3 μm and a correlation length of 15.2 μm. The wavelength was 0.6328 μm and the angle of incidence was 4°. The reflectance of the rough steel surface was measured and estimated from the derived relation. Satisfactory agreement was found between the estimated and measured reflectance values.

  8. Spatially Developing Secondary Instabilities and Attachment Line Instability in Supersonic Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on progress towards developing a spatial stability code for compressible shear flows with two inhomogeneous directions, such as crossflow dominated swept-wing boundary layers and attachment line flows. Certain unique aspects of formulating a spatial, two-dimensional eigenvalue problem for the secondary instability of finite amplitude crossflow vortices are discussed. A primary test case used for parameter study corresponds to the low-speed, NLF-0415(b) airfoil configuration as tested in the ASU Unsteady Wind Tunnel, wherein a spanwise periodic array of roughness elements was placed near the leading edge in order to excite stationary crossflow modes with a specified fundamental wavelength. The two classes of flow conditions selected for this analysis include those for which the roughness array spacing corresponds to either the naturally dominant crossflow wavelength, or a subcritical wavelength that serves to reduce the growth of the naturally excited dominant crossflow modes. Numerical predictions are compared with the measured database, both as indirect validation for the spatial instability analysis and to provide a basis for comparison with a higher Reynolds number, supersonic swept-wing configuration. Application of the eigenvalue analysis to the supersonic configuration reveals that a broad spectrum of stationary crossflow modes can sustain sufficiently strong secondary instabilities as to potentially cause transition over this configuration. Implications of this finding for transition control in swept wing boundary layers are examined. Finally, extension of the spatial stability analysis to supersonic attachment line flows is also considered.

  9. Edge effects in the magnetic interference pattern of a ballistic SNS junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Hendrik; Fal'ko, Vladimir I.; Glazman, Leonid I.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the Josephson critical current Ic(Φ ) of a wide superconductor-normal metal-superconductor (SNS) junction as a function of the magnetic flux Φ threading it. Electronic trajectories reflected from the side edges alter the function Ic(Φ ) as compared to the conventional Fraunhofer-type dependence. At weak magnetic fields, B ≲Φ0/d2 , the edge effect lifts zeros in Ic(Φ ) and gradually shifts the minima of that function toward half-integer multiples of the flux quantum. At B >Φ0/d2 , the edge effect leads to an accelerated decay of the critical current Ic(Φ ) with increasing Φ . At larger fields, eventually, the system is expected to cross into a regime of "classical" mesoscopic fluctuations that is specific for wide ballistic SNS junctions with rough edges.

  10. Challenges in the areal measurement of surface roughness and shape at the micro and nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, P. C.; Guellil, M.; Pfeiffer, P.; Serio, B.; Anstotz, F.; Pramatarova, L.; Roques, S.

    2014-12-01

    Measuring surface roughness accurately at the micro and nano scale presents several challenges. While optical techniques can be used to rapidly measure large areas, significant variations can be found between results from different techniques on similar samples. In the present work, a comparison has been made between the results of two different systems using interference microscopy and AFM to make measurements at the same place on the same sample. Two samples were prepared on silicon wafers by marking them with a multi-scale pattern using a photoresist process of lithography from an optical mask, followed by reactive ion etching. One was left bare and the other was prepared with a rough layer of hydroxyapatite before measuring at the chosen positions. Comparison of the results showed that while the general shapes of the measured surface microstructures were similar, several differences were found. For example, there was a variation of up to 7% between techniques in the measurement of the depths of the etched features and artefacts were also visible at square edges. These results show the need to pay careful attention to instrument calibration and probe/surface interactions in order to improve the accuracy of surface characterization of surface roughness and topography.

  11. Effect of Freestream Turbulence over Rough, Favorable Pressure Gradient Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Nieves, Sheilla; Lebron-Bosques, Jose; Brzek, Brian; Castillo, Luciano; Bayoan Cal, Raul; Meneveau, Charles

    2007-11-01

    Laser Doppler anemometry measurements are performed downstream of an active grid in the Corrsin wind tunnel at The Johns Hopkins University to study the effect of freestream turbulence (Tu<=7%), surface roughness and external favorable pressure gradient. Overall, the effect of freestream turbulence has proven to be dominant over pressure gradient and roughness. Mean profiles show that freestream turbulence effects alter the entire boundary layer including the inner flow. A reduction in the wake is also seen. Moreover, freestream turbulence increases the Reynolds stresses, making the values near the edge of the boundary layer to be non-zero. For the streamwise fluctuations, turbulence intensity affects the inner and outer regions, while the wall-normal and shear stress only change in the outer flow. Also, it is seen that roughness prevents the streamwise fluctuations from increasing near the wall, mainly because of the destruction of the viscous regions. Furthermore, a 20% increase in the skin friction is reported, 25% more than the increase obtained over smooth surfaces.

  12. Changing summer sea ice roughness modifies momentum transfer into the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Torge; Tsamados, Michel; Feltham, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    The current shrinking of Arctic sea ice affects the transfer of momentum from the atmosphere into the ocean. While in winter a thinner and thus weaker sea ice cover enables a greater ocean surface stress than in previous decades, the enormous retreat of sea ice in recent summers reduced the surface roughness of the Arctic Ocean and hence causes a negative ocean surface stress trend in this season. The latter is related to a generally enhanced surface drag in the presence of sea ice. Martin et al. (2014, JGR) suggested that such amplification of momentum transfer by ice floes peaks at an optimal ice concentration of 80-90% -- since higher concentrations damp momentum transfer due to ice internal stresses. However, this model study only considered a constant sea ice roughness in the calculation of the surface stress. Tsamados et al. (2014, JPO) recently implemented complex variable sea-ice drag coefficients into the sea ice model CICE also distinguishing between skin and form drag. They showed in stand-alone sea ice simulations that varying sea ice roughness due to, amongst others, pressure ridges and floe edges significantly impacts sea ice motion likely with implications for the ocean circulation underneath. Here, we present the effect of variable sea ice drag on the ocean surface stress. A comparison of the CICE results with Martin et al. (2014, JGR) shows that on basin-wide average the ice concentration-ocean stress relationship still peaks at about 80-90% but stress increases more rapidly with increasing ice concentration forming a "plateau" at 40-70%. We find that pressure ridges contribute more to the 80-90% peak whereas floe edges and skin drag shape the plateau. Further, Tsamados et al. (2014, JPO) found for the summer season that floe edges dominate the ice-water drag magnitude and that an increase in the floe edge form drag dominates the overall ice-water drag trend over the past two decades. This hints at the possibility that a favorable floe size

  13. Effects of grit roughness and pitch oscillations on the S814 airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Janiszewska, J.M.; Ramsay, R.R.; Hoffmann, M.J.; Gregorek, G.M.

    1996-07-01

    Horizontal-axis wind turbine rotors experience unsteady aerodynamics when the rotor is yawed, when rotor blades pass through the support tower wake, and when the wind is gusting. An understanding of this unsteady behavior is necessary to assist in the design of new rotor airfoils. The rotors also experience performance degradation due to surface roughness. These surface irregularities are due to the accumulation of insect debris, ice, and/or the aging process. Wind tunnel studies that examine both the steady and unsteady behavior of airfoils can help define pertinent flow phenomena, and the resultant data can also be used to validate analytical computer codes. An S814 airfoil model was tested in The Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory (OSU/AARL) 3 X 5 subsonic wind tunnel (3 X 5) under steady flow with both stationary model conditions and pitch oscillations. To study the extent of performance loss due to surface roughness, a leading edge grit roughness pattern (LEGR) was used to simulate leading edge contamination. After baseline cases were completed, the LEGR was applied for both steady state and model pitch oscillation cases. The Reynolds numbers for steady state conditions were 0.75, 1, 1.25 and 1.5 million, while the angle of attack ranged from -20{degrees} to +40{degrees}. While the model underwent pitch oscillations, data were acquired at Reynolds numbers of 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 million, at frequencies of 0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 Hz. Two sine wave forcing functions {+-}5.5{degrees} and {+-}10{degrees}, were used; at mean angles of attack of 8{degrees}, 14{degrees}, and 20{degrees}. For purposes herein, any reference to unsteady conditions means the model was in pitch oscillation.

  14. Continued Growth on Graphene Edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhengtang

    Previously, we have shown that the large-size single crystal graphene can be obtained by suppressing the nucleation density during Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) growth. Here we demonstrate that the graphene single crystal can be amplified by a continued growth method. In this process, we used a mild oxidation step after the first-growth, which lead to the observed fromation of oxides at the vicinity of graphene edges, which allows the graphene growth at seed edges due to reduced activation energy. Consequently, we successful grown a secondary single-crystal graphene structures with the same lattice structure, orientation on the graphene edges. This amplification method would enable the production of graphene electronics with controlled properties.

  15. Edges and Corners With Shearlets.

    PubMed

    Duval-Poo, Miguel A; Odone, Francesca; De Vito, Ernesto

    2015-11-01

    Shearlets are a relatively new and very effective multi-scale framework for signal analysis. Contrary to the traditional wavelets, shearlets are capable to efficiently capture the anisotropic information in multivariate problem classes. Therefore, shearlets can be seen as the valid choice for multi-scale analysis and detection of directional sensitive visual features like edges and corners. In this paper, we start by reviewing the main properties of shearlets that are important for edge and corner detection. Then, we study algorithms for multi-scale edge and corner detection based on the shearlet representation. We provide an extensive experimental assessment on benchmark data sets which empirically confirms the potential of shearlets feature detection. PMID:26353351

  16. Spectral quantification of Southern Baltic seabed roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szefler, K.; Tegowski, J.; Nowak, J.

    2012-12-01

    The work presents the fast and efficient tool for seafloor classification, where scales and shapes of geomorphological forms were taken into account. The precise bathymetry and seafloor texture was developed with multibeam echosounder at six different areas of size up to 10 by 20 km. This areas demonstrate typical geomorphological seafloor features of bottom relief at the southern Baltic Sea coastal waters. The acoustical measurements were accompanied by geological sampling and video inspection. High resolution mosaic maps were obtained as a result of multi-survey measurements with maximal spatial resolution of 0.05m. Such accuracy of the measurements allows to observe small geomorphologic forms as ripplemarks or pebbles. The most investigated polygons have bottom relief of polygenetic origin with relicts of periglacial forms together with contemporary forms of marine origin. In the studied areas different forms of sand accumulation were found, beginning with small ripplemarks ending at big sandy waves. In the seabed erosion zones the bottom surface is rough and varied with clearly formed embankments, abrasive platforms, inselbergs and stony gravely abrasive pavements on the bottom surface. Such geomorphic diversity of the bottom surface has allowed for development of consistent geomorphological classification system based mainly on spectral properties of seafloor roughness. Each analysed area was divided into squares (200 by 200 m) with an overlap between adjacent subareas of 75% a square size. Next, subdivided areas were spectrally transformed using a two dimensional fast Fourier transform (2D FFT). The spectral parameters as maximal value of spectral density function, spectral exponent and strength, spectral moments, mean frequency, spectral width and skewness for each characteristic type of bottom surface were determined relaying on the calculated 2D spectra. Moreover, other features characterised the corrugated surface as fractal dimension, radius of

  17. Edge cladding gain media according to IL-11317

    SciTech Connect

    Soules, T

    2005-02-10

    In this patent application we wish to claim the following approach to ameliorating spontaneous amplified emission (ASE) that occurs in a laser amplifier slab. There are two important elements of our approach. We wish to claim the application of both together but not either one alone. (1) The first element of the invention is to roughen the edge surfaces of the amplifier slab. A rough surface with random planar features larger than the wavelength of light will reflect and refract incident light rays at angles different than the median plane of the surface. The rough surface can then be characterized by two parameters. First there is a distribution of heights about the zero mean plane of the surface. If normal this distribution is characterized by a standard deviation. The second parameter is the correlation distance that describes how close together on average are the peaks and valleys. The ratio of these two numbers determines the spread of light reflected off the surface of the edge of the slab. (2) The second element in our invention is to bond the roughened edges of the gain medium to an ASE absorbing media using a suitable bonding agent. In order for the ASE to leave the gain medium crystal there must be minimal reflection and maximum transmission at the interface. This requires having a near match of the index of refraction of the bonding medium and the amplifier slab material at the wavelength of the ASE. Further if the index of refraction of the bonding agent is less than that of the amplifier there will be some total internal reflection even if the surface is roughened. The index of refraction of GGG is {approx} 1.92 and that of YAG is {approx} 1.84. There are no suitable bonding agents with indices of refraction this high.

  18. Modified slanted-edge method and multidirectional modulation transfer function estimation.

    PubMed

    Masaoka, Kenichiro; Yamashita, Takayuki; Nishida, Yukihiro; Sugawara, Masayuki

    2014-03-10

    The slanted-edge method specified in ISO Standard 12233, which measures the modulation transfer function (MTF) by analyzing an image of a slightly slanted knife-edge target, is not robust against noise because it takes the derivative of each data line in the edge-angle estimation. We propose here a modified method that estimates the edge angle by fitting a two-dimensional function to the image data. The method has a higher accuracy, precision, and robustness against noise than the ISO 12233 method and is applicable to any arbitrary pixel array, enabling a multidirectional MTF estimate in a single measurement of a starburst image. PMID:24663939

  19. Wetting, spreading, and adsorption on randomly rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Herminghaus, S

    2012-06-01

    The wetting properties of solid substrates with customary (i.e., macroscopic) random roughness are considered as a function of the microscopic contact angle of the wetting liquid and its partial pressure in the surrounding gas phase. Analytic expressions are derived which allow for any given lateral correlation function and height distribution of the roughness to calculate the wetting phase diagram, the adsorption isotherms, and to locate the percolation transition in the adsorbed liquid film. Most features turn out to depend only on a few key parameters of the roughness, which can be clearly identified. It is shown that a first-order transition in the adsorbed film thickness, which we term "Wenzel prewetting", occurs generically on typical roughness topographies, but is absent on purely Gaussian roughness. It is thereby shown that even subtle deviations from Gaussian roughness characteristics may be essential for correctly predicting even qualitative aspects of wetting. PMID:22661267

  20. Effect of surface roughness on flexural strength of veneer ceramics.

    PubMed

    Fischer, H; Schäfer, M; Marx, R

    2003-12-01

    The strength of ceramic restorations depends on the occlusal surface roughness of the veneering porcelain, which is influenced by the final preparation. The hypothesis of the study was that roughnesses below a critical microscopic defect size--based only on fracture mechanics considerations--also affect flexural strength. The bending failure stress was evaluated on standard specimens of 4 veneer ceramics with 4 different surfaces of defined roughnesses, respectively. A linear correlation was found between roughness and failure stress. A "roughness-free" failure stress value was predicted for each tested material. This theoretical value can represent the "true" strength of the respective ceramic material. We conclude from our results that the final preparation of a ceramic restoration is critical to the strength of the material, and that ceramic veneering materials can be compared more objectively with respect to their strength by means of roughness-free strength values. PMID:14630897

  1. Extreme ultraviolet mask substrate surface roughness effects on lithography patterning

    SciTech Connect

    George, Simi; Naulleau, Patrick; Salmassi, Farhad; Mochi, Iacopo; Gullikson, Eric; Goldberg, Kenneth; Anderson, Erik

    2010-06-21

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography exposure systems, mask substrate roughness induced scatter contributes to LER at the image plane. In this paper, the impact of mask substrate roughness on image plane speckle is explicitly evaluated. A programmed roughness mask was used to study the correlation between mask roughness metrics and wafer plane aerial image inspection. We find that the roughness measurements by top surface topography profile do not provide complete information on the scatter related speckle that leads to LER at the image plane. We suggest at wavelength characterization by imaging and/or scatter measurements into different frequencies as an alternative for a more comprehensive metrology of the mask substrate/multilayer roughness effects.

  2. Fine tuning the roughness of powder blasted surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wensink, Henk; Schlautmann, Stefan; Goedbloed, Martijn H.; Elwenspoek, Miko C.

    2002-09-01

    Powder blasting (abrasive jet machining) has recently been introduced as a bulk-micromachining technique for brittle materials. The surface roughness that is created with this technique is much higher (with a value of Ra between 1-2.5 μm) compared to general micromachining techniques. In this paper we study the roughness of powder blasted glass surfaces, and show how it depends on the process parameters. The roughness can also be changed after blasting by HF etching or by using a high-temperature anneal step. Roughness measurements and scanning electron microscopy images show the quantitative and qualitative changes in roughness. These post-processes will allow us to investigate the influence of surface roughness on the microsystem performance in future research.

  3. Edge Currents and Stability in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D M; Fenstermacher, M E; Finkenthal, D K; Groebner, R J; Lao, L L; Leonard, A W; Mueller, H W; Osborne, T H; Snyder, P B

    2004-12-01

    Understanding the stability physics of the H-mode pedestal in tokamak devices requires an accurate measurement of plasma current in the pedestal region with good spatial resolution. Theoretically, the high pressure gradients achieved in the edge of H-mode plasmas should lead to generation of a significant edge current density peak through bootstrap and Pfirsh-Schl{umlt u}ter effects. This edge current is important for the achievement of second stability in the context of coupled magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) modes which are both pressure (ballooning) and current (peeling) driven. Many aspects of edge localized mode (ELM) behavior can be accounted for in terms of an edge current density peak, with the identification of Type 1 ELMs as intermediate-n toroidal mode number MHD modes being a natural feature of this model. The development of a edge localized instabilities in tokamak experiments code (ELITE) based on this model allows one to efficiently calculate the stability and growth of the relevant modes for a broad range of plasma parameters and thus provides a framework for understanding the limits on pedestal height. This however requires an accurate assessment of the edge current. While estimates of j{sub edge} can be made based on specific bootstrap models, their validity may be limited in the edge (gradient scalelengths comparable to orbit size, large changes in collisionality, etc.). Therefore it is highly desirable to have an actual measurement. Such measurements have been made on the DIII-D tokamak using combined polarimetry and spectroscopy of an injected lithium beam. By analyzing one of the Zeeman-split 2S-2P lithium resonance line components, one can obtain direct information on the local magnetic field components. These values allow one to infer details of the edge current density. Because of the negligible Stark mixing of the relevant atomic levels in lithium, this method of determining j(r) is insensitive to the large local electric fields typically found

  4. Edge shape and comfort of rigid lenses.

    PubMed

    La Hood, D

    1988-08-01

    One of the main factors determining the comfort of a rigid contact lens is the shape of the edge. The comfort of four different contact lens edge shapes was assessed with four unadapted subjects in a randomized masked trial. Lenses with well rounded anterior edge profiles were found to be significantly more comfortable than lenses with square anterior edges. There was no significant difference in subjective comfort between a rounded and square posterior edge profile. The results suggest that the interaction of the edge with the eyelid is more important in determining comfort than edge effects on the cornea, when lenses are fitted according to a corneal alignment philosophy. PMID:3177585

  5. Shape, Topography and Roughness of 25143 Itokawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, A. F.; Barnouin-Jha, O. S.

    2007-12-01

    The recent visit of the Hayabusa spacecraft to the small near-Earth asteroid (NEA) 25143 Itokawa yielded the surprising discovery that Itokawa was not an intact object but a low density, gravitationally accumulated, rubble pile. This contrasts with the finding, from the only other NEA visited by an asteroid lander, that 433 Eros was an intact object and not a rubble pile. Eros was visited by the NEAR Shoemaker spacecraft which landed in 2001. Accurately co-registered, high resolution imager and lidar data from NEAR Shoemaker have demonstrated the fractal properties of small scale surface topography on Eros, where boulders tend to be found on the tops of long ridges, consistent with the presence of an underlying globally coherent structure. However, Itokawa is a rubble pile with a fundamentally different collisional history. Here we analyze co-registered, high resolution lidar and imager data from Itokawa, obtained by Hayabusa, to explore fractal properties and surface roughness distributions on Itokawa for comparison with the results from Eros.

  6. Thermodynamics of capillary adhesion between rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    de Boer, M P; de Boer, P C T

    2007-07-01

    According to the Dupré equation, the work of adhesion is equal to the surface energy difference in the separated versus the joined materials minus an interfacial energy term. However, if a liquid is at the interface between two solid materials, evaporation or condensation takes place under equilibrium conditions. The resulting matter exchange is accompanied by heat flow, and can reduce or increase the work of adhesion. Accounting for the energies requires an open-system control volume analysis based on the first law of thermodynamics. Depending on whether evaporation or condensation occurs during separation, a work term that is negative or positive must be added to the surface energy term to calculate the work of adhesion. We develop and apply this energy balance to several different interface geometries and compare the work of adhesion to the surface energy created. The model geometries include a sphere on a flat with limiting approximations and also with an exact solution, a circular disc, and a combination of these representing a rough interface. For the sphere on a flat, the work of adhesion is one half the surface energy created if equilibrium is maintained during the pull-off process. PMID:17368659

  7. Terahertz NDE for Metallic Surface Roughness Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madaras, Eric I.; Anastasi, Robert F.

    2006-01-01

    Metallic surface roughness in a nominally smooth surface is a potential indication of material degradation or damage. When the surface is coated or covered with an opaque dielectric material, such as paint or insulation, then inspecting for surface changes becomes almost impossible. Terahertz NDE is a method capable of penetrating the coating and inspecting the metallic surface. The terahertz frequency regime is between 100 GHz and 10 THz and has a free space wavelength of 300 micrometers at 1 THz. Pulsed terahertz radiation, can be generated and detected using optical excitation of biased semiconductors with femtosecond laser pulses. The resulting time domain signal is 320 picoseconds in duration. In this application, samples are inspected with a commercial terahertz NDE system that scans the sample and generates a set of time-domain signals that are a function of the backscatter from the metallic surface. Post processing is then performed in the time and frequency domains to generate C-scan type images that show scattering effects due to surface non-uniformity.

  8. Intrusion detection using rough set classification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lian-hua; Zhang, Guan-hua; Zhang, Jie; Bai, Ying-cai

    2004-09-01

    Recently machine learning-based intrusion detection approaches have been subjected to extensive researches because they can detect both misuse and anomaly. In this paper, rough set classification (RSC), a modern learning algorithm, is used to rank the features extracted for detecting intrusions and generate intrusion detection models. Feature ranking is a very critical step when building the model. RSC performs feature ranking before generating rules, and converts the feature ranking to minimal hitting set problem addressed by using genetic algorithm (GA). This is done in classical approaches using Support Vector Machine (SVM) by executing many iterations, each of which removes one useless feature. Compared with those methods, our method can avoid many iterations. In addition, a hybrid genetic algorithm is proposed to increase the convergence speed and decrease the training time of RSC. The models generated by RSC take the form of "IF-THEN" rules, which have the advantage of explication. Tests and comparison of RSC with SVM on DARPA benchmark data showed that for Probe and DoS attacks both RSC and SVM yielded highly accurate results (greater than 99% accuracy on testing set). PMID:15323002

  9. Backscatter from a periodic rough surface at near grazing incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominek, A. K.; Shamansky, H. T.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of periodic surface roughness on the radar cross section (RCS) was studied. The surface roughness was formed by a small sinusoidal variation in a planar surface. RCS measurements were obtained for two different sinusoidal variations near grazing incidence for both principle polarizations. Significant grating lobes were observed in the measurements which directly correspond to the roughness characteristics. A physical optics solution was generated and compared to the measurements with reasonable agreement.

  10. Incorporating Skew into RMS Surface Roughness Probability Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, Mark T.; Stahl, H. Philip.

    2013-01-01

    The standard treatment of RMS surface roughness data is the application of a Gaussian probability distribution. This handling of surface roughness ignores the skew present in the surface and overestimates the most probable RMS of the surface, the mode. Using experimental data we confirm the Gaussian distribution overestimates the mode and application of an asymmetric distribution provides a better fit. Implementing the proposed asymmetric distribution into the optical manufacturing process would reduce the polishing time required to meet surface roughness specifications.

  11. Summary of section data on trailing-edge high-lift devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahill, Jones F

    1949-01-01

    A summary has been made of available data on the characteristics of airfoil sections with trailing-edge high-lift devices. Data for plain, split, and slotted flaps are collected and analyzed. The effects of each of the variables involved in the design of the various types of flap are examined and, in cases where sufficient data are given, optimum configurations are deduced. Wherever possible, the effects of airfoil section, Reynolds number, and leading-edge roughness are shown. For single and double slotted flaps, where a large amount of unrelated data are available, maximum lift coefficients of many configurations are presented in tables.

  12. Summary of Section Data on Trailing-Edge High-Lift Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1948-01-01

    A summary has been made of available data on the characteristics of airfoil sections with trailing-edge high-lift devices. Data for plain, split, and slotted flaps are collected and analyzed. The effects of each of the variables involved in the design of the various types of flap are examined and, in cases where sufficient data are given, optimum configurations are deduced. Wherever possible, the effects of airfoil section, Reynolds number, and leading-edge roughness are shown. For single and double slotted flaps, where a great mass of unrelated date are available, maximum lift coefficients of a large number of configurations are presented in tables.

  13. Estimating Shear Velocity and Roughness Length From Velocity Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Normand E.; Abrahams, Athol D.

    1992-08-01

    In turbulent boundary layer flows, shear velocity u*, and roughness length z0 are commonly derived from semilogarithmic flow velocity profiles by fitting a straight line by ordinary least squares regression to the profile and calculating estimates of u*, and z0 from the slope and intercept of the computed regression equation. However, it is not clear from the literature whether the appropriate regression is of flow velocity u on the logarithm of height above the bed In z or of ln z on u. In order to calculate estimates of u* and z0, the true or structural relation between u and In z must be established. Because u is generally observed with much greater error than is In z, the structural relation may be estimated by regressing u on ln z; regressing ln z on u is incorrect. An analysis of 24 stream channel flow velocity profiles indicates that even in situations where the correlation between u and ln z exceeds 0.9, performing the incorrect regression can result in the considerable overestimation of u* and z0.

  14. MODELING OF STOCHASTIC MAGNETIC FLUX LOSS FROM THE EDGE OF A POOIDALLY DIVERTED TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect

    EVANS, TE,; MOYER, RA; MONAT, P

    2002-06-01

    OAK A271 MODELING OF STOCHASTIC MAGNETIC FLUX LOSS FROM THE EDGE OF A POOIDALLY DIVERTED TOKAMAK. A field line integration code is used to study the loss of edge poloidal magnetic flux due to stochastic magnetic fields produced by an error field correction coil (C-coil) in DIII-D for various plasma shapes, coil currents and edge magnetic shear profiles. The authors find that the boundary of a diverted tokamak is more sensitive to stochastic flux loss than a nondiverted tokamak. The C-coil has been used to produce a stochastic layer in an ohmic diverted discharge with characteristics similar to those seen in stochastic boundary experiments in circular limiter ohmic plasmas, including: (1) an overall increase in recycling, (2) a broadening of the recycling profile at the divertor, and (3) a flattening of the boundary profiles over the extent of the stochastic layer predicted by the field line integration code. Profile flattening consistent with field line integration results is also seen in some high performance discharges with edge transport barriers. The prediction of a significant edge stochastic layer even in discharges with high performance and edge radial transport barriers indicates that either the self-consistent plasma response heals the stochastic layer or that edge stochastic layers are compatible with edge radial transport barriers.

  15. Conservative interpolation of edge and face data on n dimensional structured grids using differential forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletzer, Alexander; Fillmore, David

    2015-12-01

    Interpolation methods for edge and face centered data are described, which preserve line and area integrals under regridding. These interpolation methods complement the multilinear nodal and conservative interpolation methods, which are widely used in climate data processing and other areas. The presented interpolation schemes ensure that curl-free and divergence-free fields remain so after regridding. These edge and face conservative interpolation methods are suitable for general curvilinear structured grids, including those with singular points (poles). Support for masked (invalid) regions is implicitly provided by attaching (partial) line/surface integral field values to cell edges/faces.

  16. Shape-dependent canny edge detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panetta, Karen A.; Agaian, Sos S.; Nercessian, Shahan C.; Almunstashri, Ali A.

    2011-08-01

    Edges characterize the boundaries of objects in images and are informative structural cues for computer vision and target/object detection and recognition systems. The Canny edge detector is widely regarded as the edge detection standard. It is fairly adaptable to different environments, as its parametric nature attempts to tailor the detection of edges based on image-dependent characteristics or the particular requirements of a given implementation. Though it has been used in a myriad of image processing tasks, the Canny edge detector is still vulnerable to edge losses, localization errors, and noise sensitivity. These issues are largely due to the key tradeoff made in the scale and size of the edge detection filters used by the algorithm. Small-scaled filters are sensitive to edges but also to noise, whereas large-scaled filters are robust to noise but could filter out fine details. In this paper, novel edge detection kernel generalizations and a shape-dependent edge detector are introduced to alleviate these shortcomings. While most standard edge detection algorithms are based on convolving the input image with fixed size square kernels, this paper will illustrate the benefits of different filter sizes, and more importantly, different kernel shapes for edge detection. Moreover, new edge fusion methods are introduced to more effectively combine the individual edge responses. Existing edge detectors, including the Canny edge detector, can be obtained from the generalized edge detector by specifying corresponding parameters and kernel shapes. The proposed representations and edge detector have been qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated on several different types of image data. Computer simulations demonstrate that nonsquare kernel approaches can outperform square kernel approaches such as Canny, Sobel, Prewitt, Roberts, and others, providing better tradeoffs between noise rejection, accurate edge localization, and resolution. Where possible, Pratt's figure of

  17. Heat Transfer Variation on Protuberances and Surface Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Robert C.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    1995-01-01

    In order to determine the effect of surface irregularities on local convective heat transfer, the variation in heat transfer coefficients on small (2-6 mm diam) hemispherical roughness elements on a flat plate has been studied in a wind funnel using IR techniques. Heat transfer enhancement was observed to vary over the roughness elements with the maximum heat transfer on the upstream face. This heat transfer enhancement increased strongly with roughness size and velocity when there was a laminar boundary layer on the plate. For a turbulent boundary layer, the heat transfer enhancement was relatively constant with velocity, but did increase with element size. When multiple roughness elements were studied, no influence of adjacent roughness elements on heat transfer was observed if the roughness separation was greater than approximately one roughness element radius. As roughness separation was reduced, less variation in heat transfer was observed on the downstream elements. Implications of the observed roughness enhanced heat transfer on ice accretion modeling are discussed.

  18. Prediction of Frictional Drag over Rough Walls using Surface Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, Karen; Schultz, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Although the frictional drag of rough-wall-bounded flows has been studied extensively, several practical questions remain largely unresolved. First, the relationship between the shape of the roughness function in transitionally-rough regime and the surface topography which gives rise to it are not well understood. Second, it is not completely clear which textural parameters best describe a rough surface in a hydraulic sense. Furthermore, the range of roughness wavelengths that influence the skin-friction is not well established. The focus of the present work is to attempt to address these questions with a systematic study of the skin-friction of fifteen rough surfaces that were generated by grit blasting. The hydrodynamic tests were carried out over a large Reynolds number range. Five surfaces were prepared by grit blasting with a single scale blast media. These underwent hydrodynamic testing and were subsequently blasted with secondary and tertiary scale media in order to investigate the role that the incorporation of additional roughness length scales plays in determining the shape of the roughness function and the resulting hydraulic length scale. The presentation will focus on the appropriate statistical scales for prediction of the roughness function. Spatial filtering prior to the calculation of surface statistics will also be discussed. Work supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  19. Dynamic evolution of interface roughness during friction and wear processes.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, K J; Bigerelle, M; Mathia, T G; Dubois, A; Dubar, L

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic evolution of surface roughness and influence of initial roughness (S(a) = 0.282-6.73 µm) during friction and wear processes has been analyzed experimentally. The mirror polished and rough surfaces (28 samples in total) have been prepared by surface polishing on Ti-6Al-4V and AISI 1045 samples. Friction and wear have been tested in classical sphere/plane configuration using linear reciprocating tribometer with very small displacement from 130 to 200 µm. After an initial period of rapid degradation, dynamic evolution of surface roughness converges to certain level specific to a given tribosystem. However, roughness at such dynamic interface is still increasing and analysis of initial roughness influence revealed that to certain extent, a rheology effect of interface can be observed and dynamic evolution of roughness will depend on initial condition and history of interface roughness evolution. Multiscale analysis shows that morphology created in wear process is composed from nano, micro, and macro scale roughness. Therefore, mechanical parts working under very severe contact conditions, like rotor/blade contact, screws, clutch, etc. with poor initial surface finishing are susceptible to have much shorter lifetime than a quality finished parts. PMID:23440686

  20. Accurate in-line CD metrology for nanometer semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perng, Baw-Ching; Shieh, Jyu-Horng; Jang, S.-M.; Liang, M.-S.; Huang, Renee; Chen, Li-Chien; Hwang, Ruey-Lian; Hsu, Joe; Fong, David

    2006-03-01

    The need for absolute accuracy is increasing as semiconductor-manufacturing technologies advance to sub-65nm nodes, since device sizes are reducing to sub-50nm but offsets ranging from 5nm to 20nm are often encountered. While TEM is well-recognized as the most accurate CD metrology, direct comparison between the TEM data and in-line CD data might be misleading sometimes due to different statistical sampling and interferences from sidewall roughness. In this work we explore the capability of CD-AFM as an accurate in-line CD reference metrology. Being a member of scanning profiling metrology, CD-AFM has the advantages of avoiding e-beam damage and minimum sample damage induced CD changes, in addition to the capability of more statistical sampling than typical cross section metrologies. While AFM has already gained its reputation on the accuracy of depth measurement, not much data was reported on the accuracy of CD-AFM for CD measurement. Our main focus here is to prove the accuracy of CD-AFM and show its measuring capability for semiconductor related materials and patterns. In addition to the typical precision check, we spent an intensive effort on examining the bias performance of this CD metrology, which is defined as the difference between CD-AFM data and the best-known CD value of the prepared samples. We first examine line edge roughness (LER) behavior for line patterns of various materials, including polysilicon, photoresist, and a porous low k material. Based on the LER characteristics of each patterning, a method is proposed to reduce its influence on CD measurement. Application of our method to a VLSI nanoCD standard is then performed, and agreement of less than 1nm bias is achieved between the CD-AFM data and the standard's value. With very careful sample preparations and TEM tool calibration, we also obtained excellent correlation between CD-AFM and TEM for poly-CDs ranging from 70nm to 400nm. CD measurements of poly ADI and low k trenches are also

  1. The Problem of the Edge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faatz, Judith A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a field study in a local ecosystem which allows high school students to investigate the edge effect, where a meadow and a forest meet. Students measure soil moisture content, soil temperature, air temperature, relative humidity, wind intensity, and illumination level. Teachers can help students apply their findings to understand problems…

  2. Helicopter rotor trailing edge noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amier, R. K.

    1981-11-01

    A two dimensional section of a helicopter main rotor blade was tested in an acoustic wind tunnel at close to full-scale Reynolds numbers to obtain boundary layer data and acoustic data for use in developing an acoustic scaling law and testing a first principles trailing edge noise theory. Results were extended to the rotating frame coordinate system to develop a helicopter rotor trailing edge noise prediction. Comparisons of the calculated noise levels with helicopter flyover spectra demonstrate that trailing edge noise contributes significantly to the total helicopter noise spectrum at high frequencies. This noise mechanism is expected to control the minimum rotor noise. In the case of noise radiation from a local blade segment, the acoustic directivity pattern is predicted by the first principles trailing edge noise theory. Acoustic spectra are predicted by a scaling law which includes Mach number, boundary layer thickness and observer position. Spectrum shape and sound pressure level are also predicted by the first principles theory but the analysis does not predict the Strouhal value identifying the spectrum peak.

  3. A valuable method for online wire quality control: light scattering from cylindrical rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Quintian, Fernando; Rebollo, Maria A.; Berlasso, Ricardo G.; Gaggioli, Nestor G.

    2003-05-01

    In several applications, it is necessary to measure the surface characteristics of a wire so, it is important to do it during the manufacturing process. This work presents two main results: First, an analytical expression for the angular distribution of the mean scattered intensity from cylindrical rough surfaces as a function of the characteristic statistical parameters of the heights. This expression allows to measure the ratio T/σ between the correlation length and the roughness. Second, a quantitative relationship between the size and shape of the speckle grains in the Fraunhofer zone and the statistical properties of the cylindrical rough surface. In the first case, it is shown that the scanning process inherent to usual detection systems can be replaced by single step detection using a screen and a CCD camera. Therefore, this method can be applied to on line wire surface testing where conventional procedures are inadequate. In the second one, the experimental autocorrelation functions at different angles gives another method for measuring the parameter T/σ. Then, the study of the light scattered from cylindrical rough surfaces seem to be of great interest because of its potential application in NDT of manufacturing and finishing processes of components like pipes, junctions, wires and bearings.

  4. Determination of hydrological roughness by means of close range remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, A.; Neugirg, F.; Haas, F.; Schmidt, J.; Becht, M.; Schindewolf, M.

    2015-09-01

    The objective of the presented work was to develop a method to acquire Manning's n by creating very high-resolution surface models with structure-from-motion methods. As hydraulic roughness is an essential parameter for physically based erosion models, a practical measuring technique is valuable during field work. Data acquisition took place during several field experiments in the Lainbach valley, southern Germany, and on agricultural sites in Saxony, eastern Germany, and in central Brazil. Rill and interrill conditions were simulated by flow experiments. In order to validate our findings stream velocity was measured with colour tracers. Grain sizes were derived by measuring distances from a best fit line to the reconstructed soil surface. Several diameters from D50 to D90 were tested with D90 showing best correlation between tracer experiments and photogrammetrically acquired data. Several roughness parameters were tested (standard deviation, random roughness, Garbrecht's n and D90). Best agreement in between the grain size and the hydraulic roughness was achieved with a non-linear sigmoid function and D90 rather than with the Garbrecht equation or statistical parameters.

  5. Determination of hydrological roughness by means of close range remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, A.; Neugirg, F.; Haas, F.; Schmidt, J.; Becht, M.; Schindewolf, M.

    2015-05-01

    The objective of the presented work was to develop a method to acquire Manning's n by creating very high resolution surface models with Structure from Motion-methods. As hydraulic roughness is an essential parameter for physically based erosion models, a practical measuring technique is valuable during field work. Data acquisition took place during several field experiments in the Lainbach valley, southern Germany and on agricultural sites in Saxony, eastern Germany and in central Brazil. Rill and interrill conditions were simulated by flow experiments. In order to validate our findings stream velocity was measured with colour tracers. Grain sizes were derived by measuring distances from a best fit line to the reconstructed soil surface. Several diameters from D50 to D90 were tested with D90 showing best correlation between tracer experiments and photogrammetrically acquired data. Several roughness parameters were tested (standard deviation, random roughness, Garbrechts n and D90). Best agreement in between the grain size and the hydraulic roughness was achieved with a non-linear sigmoid function and D90 rather than with the Garbrecht equation or statistical parameters.

  6. Plasma etch patterning of EUV lithography: balancing roughness and selectivity trade off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Vinayak; Beique, Genevieve; Sun, Lei; Cottle, Hongyun; Feurprier, Yannick; Metz, Andrew; Kumar, Kaushik; Labelle, Cathy; Arnold, John; Colburn, Matthew; Ranjan, Alok

    2016-03-01

    EUV based patterning is one of the frontrunner candidates enabling scaling for future technology nodes. However it poses the common challenges of `pattern roughness' and `etch resistance' aspect which are getting even more critical as we work on smaller dimension features. Continuous efforts are ongoing to improve resist materials and lithography process but the industry is slowly moving to introduce it at high volume manufacturing. Plasma Etch processes have the potential to improvise upon the incoming pattern roughness and provide improved LER/LWR downstream to expedite EUV progress. In this work we demonstrate the specific role of passivation control in the dualfrequency Capacitively Coupled Plasma (CCP) for EUV patterning process with regards to improving LER/LWR, resist selectivity and CD tunability for line/space patterns. We draw the implicit commonalities between different passivation chemistry and their effectiveness for roughness improvement. The effect of relative C:F and C:H ratio in feed gas on CFx and CHx plasma species and in turn the evolution of pattern roughness is drawn. Data that shows the role of plasma etch parameters impacting the key patterning metrics of CD, resist selectivity and LER/LWR is presented.

  7. Exploration strategies and possible submarine fan complexes in the Rough Creek Graben, western Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Drahovzal, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    The Rough Creek Graben is a deep, east-west-oriented rift basin more than 160 km long and 40 to 70 km wide in western Kentucky. It is a north-dipping half graben bounded on the north by the Rough Creek Fault Zone and on the east by a presumed tectonic inversion structure associated with reactivation of the East Continent Rift Basin. The half graben is filled with up to 5.5 km of dominantly marine sediments of the Cambrian pre-Knox Group that thin away from the Rough Creek Fault Zone. Most of the pre-Knox oil and gas exploration in the graben has taken place near the Rough Creek Fault Zone. The boundary fault has a polyphase movement history and is characterized by extensive fracturing in and near the fault zone. Both the mechanical drilling problems and the lack of exploration success that have marked past exploration attempts are likely related to the high degree of fracturing associated with the northern edge of the graben. The pre-Knox rocks south of the boundary-fault zone are virtually untested and include viable exploration targets. Recent investigations using limited seismic reflection data provide strong evidence for the presence of basin-floor submarine fan deposition at least in the western, basal part of the graben. Several fan complexes up to 2 km in aggregate thickness have been interpreted in the northern part of the basin. To the south, thinner, less continuous fan deposits are inferred. If confirmed by drilling, these fan complexes could represent important future hydrocarbon reservoirs in many areas of the graben.

  8. Comparing Experiment and Computation of Hypersonic Laminar Boundary Layers with Isolated Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Iyer, Prahladh S.; Mahesh, Krishnan; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Johansen, Craig T.

    2014-01-01

    Streamwise velocity profile behavior in a hypersonic laminar boundary layer in the presence of an isolated roughness element is presented for an edge Mach number of 8.2. Two different roughness element types are considered: a 2-mm tall, 4-mm diameter cylinder, and a 2-mm radius hemisphere. Measurements of the streamwise velocity behavior using nitric oxide (NO) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV) have been performed on a 20-degree wedge model. The top surface of this model acts as a flat-plate and is oriented at 5 degrees with respect to the freestream flow. Computations using direct numerical simulation (DNS) of these flows have been performed and are compared to the measured velocity profiles. Particular attention is given to the characteristics of velocity profiles immediately upstream and downstream of the roughness elements. In these regions, the streamwise flow can experience strong deceleration or acceleration. An analysis in which experimentally measured MTV profile displacements are compared with DNS particle displacements is performed to determine if the assumption of constant velocity over the duration of the MTV measurement is valid. This assumption is typically made when reporting MTV-measured velocity profiles, and may result in significant errors when comparing MTV measurements to computations in regions with strong deceleration or acceleration. The DNS computations with the cylindrical roughness element presented in this paper were performed with and without air injection from a rectangular slot upstream of the cylinder. This was done to determine the extent to which gas seeding in the MTV measurements perturbs the boundary layer flowfield.

  9. Towards identifying the mechanisms underlying field-aligned edge-loss of HHFW power on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R. J.; Bell, R. E.; Bertelli, N.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S.; Hosea, J. C.; Jaworski, M. A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Kramer, G. J.; Maingi, R.; Phillips, C. K.; Podestà, M.; Roquemore, L.; Scotti, F.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.; Ahn, J-W.; Gray, T. K.; Green, D. L.; McLean, A.; and others

    2014-02-12

    Fast-wave heating will be a major heating scheme on ITER, as it can heat ions directly and is relatively unaffected by the large machine size unlike neutral beams. However, fast-wave interactions with the plasma edge can lead to deleterious effects such as, in the case of the high-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) system on NSTX, large losses of fast-wave power in the scrape off layer (SOL) under certain conditions. In such scenarios, a large fraction of the lost HHFW power is deposited on the upper and lower divertors in bright spiral shapes. The responsible mechanism(s) has not yet been identified but may include fast-wave propagation in the scrape off layer, parametric decay instability, and RF currents driven by the antenna reactive fields. Understanding and mitigating these losses is important not only for improving the heating and current-drive on NSTX-Upgrade but also for understanding fast-wave propagation across the SOL in any fast-wave system. This talk summarizes experimental results demonstrating that the flow of lost HHFW power to the divertor regions largely follows the open SOL magnetic field lines. This lost power flux is relatively large close to both the antenna and the last closed flux surface with a reduced level in between, so the loss mechanism cannot be localized to the antenna. At the same time, significant losses also occur along field lines connected to the inboard edge of the bottom antenna plate. The power lost within the spirals is roughly estimated, showing that these field-aligned losses to the divertor are significant but may not account for the total HHFW loss. To elucidate the role of the onset layer for perpendicular fast-wave propagation with regards to fast-wave propagation in the SOL, a cylindrical cold-plasma model is being developed. This model, in addition to advanced RF codes such as TORIC and AORSA, is aimed at identifying the underlying mechanism(s) behind these SOL losses, to minimize their effects in NSTX-U, and to predict

  10. Towards identifying the mechanisms underlying field-aligned edge-loss of HHFW power on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R. J.; Ahn, Joonwook; Bell, R. E.; Bertelli, Nicola; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S.; Gray, T. K.; Green, David L; Jaeger, E. F.; Hosea, J.; Jaworski, M. A.; LeBlanc, B; Kramer, G.; McLean, Adam G; Maingi, Rajesh; Phillips, C. K.; Podesta, M.; Ryan, Philip Michael; Sabbagh, S. A.; Scotti, F.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    Fast-wave heating will be a major heating scheme on ITER, as it can heat ions directly and is relatively unaffected by the large machine size unlike neutral beams. However, fast-wave interactions with the plasma edge can lead to deleterious effects such as, in the case of the high-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) system on NSTX, large losses of fast-wave power in the scrape off layer (SOL) under certain conditions. In such scenarios, a large fraction of the lost HHFW power is deposited on the upper and lower divertors in bright spiral shapes. The responsible mechanism(s) has not yet been identified but may include fast-wave propagation in the scrape off layer, parametric decay instability, and RF currents driven by the antenna reactive fields. Understanding and mitigating these losses is important not only for improving the heating and current-drive on NSTX-Upgrade but also for understanding fast-wave propagation across the SOL in any fast-wave system. This talk summarizes experimental results demonstrating that the flow of lost HHFW power to the divertor regions largely follows the open SOL magnetic field lines. This lost power flux is relatively large close to both the antenna and the last closed flux surface with a reduced level in between, so the loss mechanism cannot be localized to the antenna. At the same time, significant losses also occur along field lines connected to the inboard edge of the bottom antenna plate. The power lost within the spirals is roughly estimated, showing that these field-aligned losses to the divertor are significant but may not account for the total HHFW loss. To elucidate the role of the onset layer for perpendicular fast-wave propagation with regards to fast-wave propagation in the SOL, a cylindrical cold-plasma model is being developed. This model, in addition to advanced RF codes such as TORIC and AORSA, is aimed at identifying the underlying mechanism(s) behind these SOL losses, to minimize their effects in NSTX-U, and to predict

  11. Development of edge effects around experimental ecosystem hotspots is affected by edge density and matrix type

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecological edge effects are sensitive to landscape context. In particular, edge effects can be altered by matrix type and by the presence of other nearby edges. We experimentally altered patch configurations in an African savanna to determine how edge density and matrix type influence edge effect de...

  12. Effect of Deuterium Gas Puff On The Edge Plasma In NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S. J.

    2014-02-20

    This paper describes a detailed examination of the effects of a relatively small pulsed deuterium gas puff on the edge plasma and edge turbulence in NSTX. This gas puff caused little or no change in the line-averaged plasma density or total stored energy, or in the edge density and electron temperature up to the time of the peak of the gas puff. The radial profile of the Dα light emission and the edge turbulence within this gas puff did not vary significantly over its rise and fall, implying that these gas puffs did not significantly perturb the local edge plasma or edge turbulence. These measurements are compared with modeling by DEGAS 2, UEDGE, and with simplified estimates for the expected effects of this gas puff.

  13. Simultaneous laser cutting and welding of metal foil to edge of a plate

    DOEpatents

    Pernicka, John C.; Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1996-01-01

    A method of welding an ultra-thin foil to the edge of a thicker sheet to form a vacuum insulation panel comprising the steps of providing an ultra-thin foil having a thickness less than 0.002, providing a top plate having an edge and a bottom plate having an edge, clamping the foil to the edge of the plate wherein the clamps act as heat sinks to distribute heat through the foil, providing a laser, moving the laser relative to the foil and the plate edges to form overlapping weld beads to weld the foil to the plate edges while simultaneously cutting the foil along the weld line formed by the overlapping beads.

  14. Simultaneous laser cutting and welding of metal foil to edge of a plate

    DOEpatents

    Pernicka, J.C.; Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1996-03-19

    A method is described for welding an ultra-thin foil to the edge of a thicker sheet to form a vacuum insulation panel comprising the steps of providing an ultra-thin foil having a thickness less than 0.002, providing a top plate having an edge and a bottom plate having an edge, clamping the foil to the edge of the plate wherein the clamps act as heat sinks to distribute heat through the foil, providing a laser, moving the laser relative to the foil and the plate edges to form overlapping weld beads to weld the foil to the plate edges while simultaneously cutting the foil along the weld line formed by the overlapping beads. 7 figs.

  15. Continuous gutter lining

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, R.W.

    1988-05-03

    An apparatus for lining a gutter having a downspout and horizontal support members is described comprising: a strip of waterproof, normally flat, resilient material of substantially uniform cross section having a drain hole therein; the strip being deformed out of its flat shape to a U-shaped transverse cross-section and being located within the gutter beneath the horizontal support members, having a width dimension sufficient to traverse a cross-section of the gutter underneath the horizontal members having a first edge of the strip contacting a back wall of the gutter, a second edge of the strip contacting a front wall of the gutter and forming a U-shaped cross section; and the drain hole being located above the gutter downspout to facilitate draining.

  16. Shear Stress Partitioning in Airflow over Rough Surfaces: Roughness Form Effects and Influence on the Distribution of Shear Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, J. A.; Nickling, W. G.; King, J.

    2004-12-01

    Roughness elements distributed across a surface can significantly decrease the entrainment and transport of underlying fine-grained sediments by wind. The parameterization of roughness effects on wind erosion thresholds and sediment transport is critical to the development of models that can provide realistic predictions of sediment thresholds and fluxes due to wind erosion. Raupach et al. (1993) present a model for predicting the protective role of roughness elements in terms of a threshold friction velocity ratio as a function of the roughness geometry and the aerodynamic properties of the surface and roughness elements. The predictive capacity of this model remains uncertain and the work presented here represents part of an on-going effort of our group to improve the parameterization of the Raupach et al. (1993) model. To gain additional understanding of how roughness elements influence the magnitude and nature of the shear stress acting on the surface among the elements and evaluate strength and weaknesses of the roughness density parameter to characterize these effects, a wind tunnel study using model roughness arrays of similar roughness density composed of cube-shaped elements of different length dimensions was undertaken. Roughness density is defined as the total frontal area of all the elements to the total surface area that they occupy. Shear stress in the above element air flow was determined from vertical wind speed profile measurements. Point measurements of near surface shear stresses within the roughness array were made with simple omni-directional skin friction meters in order to investigate the partitioning of shear stress to the intervening surface. The results suggest that the roughness density parameter has severe limitations in describing the shear stress partitioning for these regularly arrayed rough surfaces. For surfaces with identical roughness densities, the surface composed of more and smaller elements was observed to have average and

  17. Turbulent electromagnetic filaments in actively modulated toroidal plasma edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spolaore, M.; Agostini, M.; Momo, B.; Rea, C.; Vianello, N.; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; De Masi, G.; Innocente, P.; Marrelli, L.; Martines, E.; Mazzi, A.; Puiatti, M. E.; Spagnolo, S.; Spizzo, G.; Scarin, P.; Terranova, D.; Zanca, P.

    2015-06-01

    Filament or blob structures have been observed in all magnetic configurations with very similar features despite the difference in the magnetic geometry, and are believed to play an important role in convecting particles and energy towards the wall. Despite their different generation mechanism, turbulent structures and edge-localized mode (ELM) filaments share some common physical features. The electromagnetic effects on filament structures deserve particular interest, among others reasons for the implication they could have for ELM, related for instance to their dynamics in the transition region between closed and open field lines or to the possibility, at high beta regimes, of causing line bending which could enhance the interaction of blobs with the first wall. A direct characterization of the effects of active modification of the edge topology on EM turbulent filament structures is presented, comparing reversed field pinch and tokamak configurations. Measurements are obtained in the RFX-mod device, which allows operation in both configurations and with different equilibria. The RFX-mod experiment versatility is exploited also from the point of view of the active control of the edge magnetic topology, equipped with an advanced system for edge boundary feedback control. Three different case studies of actively controlled magnetic perturbations are shown, focusing on the filament interaction with local magnetic islands. High-frequency fluctuations, characterizing electrostatic and magnetic filament features, and the associated transport coefficients have been observed to be strongly affected by the island proximity and topology.

  18. Localization of tumors in various organs, using edge detection algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Vélez, Felipe

    2015-09-01

    The edge of an image is a set of points organized in a curved line, where in each of these points the brightness of the image changes abruptly, or has discontinuities, in order to find these edges there will be five different mathematical methods to be used and later on compared with its peers, this is with the aim of finding which of the methods is the one that can find the edges of any given image. In this paper these five methods will be used for medical purposes in order to find which one is capable of finding the edges of a scanned image more accurately than the others. The problem consists in analyzing the following two biomedicals images. One of them represents a brain tumor and the other one a liver tumor. These images will be analyzed with the help of the five methods described and the results will be compared in order to determine the best method to be used. It was decided to use different algorithms of edge detection in order to obtain the results shown below; Bessel algorithm, Morse algorithm, Hermite algorithm, Weibull algorithm and Sobel algorithm. After analyzing the appliance of each of the methods to both images it's impossible to determine the most accurate method for tumor detection due to the fact that in each case the best method changed, i.e., for the brain tumor image it can be noticed that the Morse method was the best at finding the edges of the image but for the liver tumor image it was the Hermite method. Making further observations it is found that Hermite and Morse have for these two cases the lowest standard deviations, concluding that these two are the most accurate method to find the edges in analysis of biomedical images.

  19. Status of edge gyrokinetic turbulence simulation in XGC1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Seung-Hoe; Chang, C. S.; Zorin, D.; Greengard, L.; Adams, M.; Cummings, J.; Worley, P.; D'Azevedo, E.; Lee, W.; Parker, S.; Chen, Y.; Lin, Z.

    2007-11-01

    Gyrokinetic simulation of a tokamak edge plasma is one of the highest priority research items for ITER and the magnetic fusion program. Due to the complex physical modeling required in the edge plasma (closed and open magnetic field lines with the magnetic separatrix in between, the importance of neoclassical physics, the material wall boundary, steep pressure gradients, a non-Maxwellian distribution function, and the neutral particle physics), most of the gyrokinetic simulation activities have so far been focused on the core plasmas. The status of the gyrokinetic edge turbulence simulation in the XGC1 particle code in the SciDAC Prototype FSP Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES) will be reported. XGC1 includes the above mentioned edge complexities with full- f/delta-f particle technology on an unstructured mesh. Special physics/math/CS features will be discussed. Our current electrostatic turbulence/neoclassical capabilities will be presented and verified. Plans for incorporating full electromagnetic turbulence will also be discussed.

  20. Edge-Preserving PET Image Reconstruction Using Trust Optimization Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guobao; Qi, Jinyi

    2014-01-01

    Iterative image reconstruction for positron emission tomography (PET) can improve image quality by using spatial regularization. The most commonly used quadratic penalty often over-smoothes sharp edges and fine features in reconstructed images, while non-quadratic penalties can preserve edges and achieve higher contrast recovery. Existing optimization algorithms such as the expectation maximization (EM) and preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) algorithms work well for the quadratic penalty, but are less efficient for high-curvature or non-smooth edge-preserving regularizations. This paper proposes a new algorithm to accelerate edge-preserving image reconstruction by using two strategies: trust surrogate and optimization transfer descent. Trust surrogate approximates the original penalty by a smoother function at each iteration, but guarantees the algorithm to descend monotonically; Optimization transfer descent accelerates a conventional optimization transfer algorithm by using conjugate gradient and line search. Results of computer simulations and real 3D data show that the proposed algorithm converges much faster than the conventional EM and PCG for smooth edge-preserving regularization and can also be more efficient than the current state-of-art algorithms for the non-smooth ℓ1 regularization. PMID:25438302