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Sample records for line emission models

  1. MODELING MOLECULAR HYPERFINE LINE EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Keto, Eric; Rybicki, George

    2010-06-20

    In this paper, we discuss two approximate methods previously suggested for modeling hyperfine spectral line emission for molecules whose collisional transition rates between hyperfine levels are unknown. Hyperfine structure is seen in the rotational spectra of many commonly observed molecules such as HCN, HNC, NH{sub 3}, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and C{sup 17}O. The intensities of these spectral lines can be modeled by numerical techniques such as {Lambda}-iteration that alternately solve the equations of statistical equilibrium and the equation of radiative transfer. However, these calculations require knowledge of both the radiative and collisional rates for all transitions. For most commonly observed radio frequency spectral lines, only the net collisional rates between rotational levels are known. For such cases, two approximate methods have been suggested. The first method, hyperfine statistical equilibrium, distributes the hyperfine level populations according to their statistical weight, but allows the population of the rotational states to depart from local thermal equilibrium (LTE). The second method, the proportional method, approximates the collision rates between the hyperfine levels as fractions of the net rotational rates apportioned according to the statistical degeneracy of the final hyperfine levels. The second method is able to model non-LTE hyperfine emission. We compare simulations of N{sub 2}H{sup +} hyperfine lines made with approximate and more exact rates and find that satisfactory results are obtained.

  2. Line emission from H II blister models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    Numerical techniques to calculate the thermal and geometric properties of line emission from H II 'blister' regions are presented. It is assumed that the density distributions of the H II regions are a function of two dimensions, with rotational symmetry specifying the shape in three-dimensions. The thermal and ionization equilibrium equations of the problem are solved by spherical modeling, and a spherical sector approximation is used to simplify the three-dimensional treatment of diffuse ionizing radiation. The global properties of H II 'blister' regions near the edges of a molecular cloud are simulated by means of the geometry/density distribution, and the results are compared with observational data. It is shown that there is a monotonic increase of peak surface brightness from the i = 0 deg (pole-on) observational position to the i = 90 deg (edge-on) position. The enhancement of the line peak intensity from the edge-on to the pole-on positions is found to depend on the density, stratification, ionization, and electron temperature weighting. It is found that as i increases, the position of peak line brightness of the lower excitation species is displaced to the high-density side of the high excitation species.

  3. Model for the intense molecular line emission from OMC-1

    SciTech Connect

    Draine, B.T.; Roberge, W.G.

    1982-08-15

    We present a model which attributes the observed H/sub 2/ and CO line emission OMC-1 to a magnetohydrodynamic shock propagating into magnetized molecular gas. By requiring the shock to reporoduce the observed line intensities, we determine the shock speed to be v/sub s/roughly-equal38 km s/sup -1/ and the preshock density and (transverse) magnetic field to be n/sub H/roughly-equal7 x 10/sup 5/ cm/sup -3/, B/sub O/roughly-equal1.5 milligauss. The model is compared to observations of H/sub 2/, CO, OH, O I, and C I in emission and of CO in absorption. The shock gas may be detectible in H I 21 cm emission.

  4. Spectropolarimetric test of the relativistic disk model for the broad emission lines of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Kaiyou; Halpern, Jules P.

    1990-01-01

    Previously, it was claimed that the broad emission lines of the radio galaxy Arp 102B can be fitted by the line profile from a simple relativistic Keplerian thin disk. It was argued that the lines originating from the relativistic accretion disk could be polarized due to electron scattering, which is likely to be the dominant opacity in the line-emitting region of Arp 102B. In the present work, the expected polarization properties of these broad emission lines are calculated. The percentage of polarization depends strongly on the inclination angle. For some angles, the red peak of the polarized, double-peaked line profile can be higher than the blue peak. This is in contrast to the total line profile, in which the blue peak is always higher than the red one. Spectropolarimetric observations could, therefore, provide an independent test of the relativistic disk model for the broad emission lines of Arp 102B and other active galactic nuclei.

  5. Theoretical quasar emission-line ratios. VII - Energy-balance models for finite hydrogen slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, E. N.; Puetter, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The present energy balance calculations for finite, isobaric, hydrogen-slab quasar emission line clouds incorporate probabilistic radiative transfer (RT) in all lines and bound-free continua of a five-level continuum model hydrogen atom. Attention is given to the line ratios, line formation regions, level populations and model applicability results obtained. H lines and a variety of other considerations suggest the possibility of emission line cloud densities in excess of 10 to the 10th/cu cm. Lyman-beta/Lyman-alpha line ratios that are in agreement with observed values are obtained by the models. The observed Lyman/Balmer ratios can be achieved with clouds whose column depths are about 10 to the 22nd/sq cm.

  6. SIMPLE MODELS OF METAL-LINE ABSORPTION AND EMISSION FROM COOL GAS OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Prochaska, J. Xavier; Rubin, Kate

    2011-06-10

    We analyze the absorption and emission-line profiles produced by a set of simple, cool gas wind models motivated by galactic-scale outflow observations. We implement Monte Carlo radiative transfer techniques that track the propagation of scattered and fluorescent photons to generate one-dimensional spectra and two-dimensional spectral images. We focus on the Mg II {lambda}{lambda}2796, 2803 doublet and Fe II UV1 multiplet at {lambda} {approx} 2600 A, but the results are applicable to other transitions that trace outflows (e.g., Na I, H I Ly{alpha}, Si II). By design, the resonance transitions show blueshifted absorption but one also predicts strong resonance and fine-structure line emission at roughly the systemic velocity. This line-emission 'fills in' the absorption, reducing the equivalent width by up to 50%, shifting the absorption-line centroid by tens of km s{sup -1}, and reducing the effective opacity near systemic. Analysis of cool gas outflows that ignores this line emission may incorrectly infer that the gas is partially covered, measure a significantly lower peak optical depth, and/or conclude that gas at systemic velocity is absent (e.g., an interstellar or slowly infalling component). Because the Fe II lines are connected by optically thin transitions to fine-structure levels, their profiles more closely reproduce the intrinsic opacity of the wind. Together these results naturally explain the absorption and emission-line characteristics observed for star-forming galaxies at z < 1. We also study a scenario promoted to describe the outflows of z {approx} 3 Lyman break galaxies and find profiles inconsistent with the observations due to scattered photon emission. Although line emission complicates the analysis of absorption-line profiles, the surface brightness profiles offer a unique means of assessing the morphology and size of galactic-scale winds. Furthermore, the kinematics and line ratios offer powerful diagnostics of outflows, motivating deep

  7. Simple Models of Metal-line Absorption and Emission from Cool Gas Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, J. Xavier; Kasen, Daniel; Rubin, Kate

    2011-06-01

    We analyze the absorption and emission-line profiles produced by a set of simple, cool gas wind models motivated by galactic-scale outflow observations. We implement Monte Carlo radiative transfer techniques that track the propagation of scattered and fluorescent photons to generate one-dimensional spectra and two-dimensional spectral images. We focus on the Mg II λλ2796, 2803 doublet and Fe II UV1 multiplet at λ ≈ 2600 Å, but the results are applicable to other transitions that trace outflows (e.g., Na I, H I Lyα, Si II). By design, the resonance transitions show blueshifted absorption but one also predicts strong resonance and fine-structure line emission at roughly the systemic velocity. This line-emission "fills in" the absorption, reducing the equivalent width by up to 50%, shifting the absorption-line centroid by tens of km s-1, and reducing the effective opacity near systemic. Analysis of cool gas outflows that ignores this line emission may incorrectly infer that the gas is partially covered, measure a significantly lower peak optical depth, and/or conclude that gas at systemic velocity is absent (e.g., an interstellar or slowly infalling component). Because the Fe II lines are connected by optically thin transitions to fine-structure levels, their profiles more closely reproduce the intrinsic opacity of the wind. Together these results naturally explain the absorption and emission-line characteristics observed for star-forming galaxies at z < 1. We also study a scenario promoted to describe the outflows of z ~ 3 Lyman break galaxies and find profiles inconsistent with the observations due to scattered photon emission. Although line emission complicates the analysis of absorption-line profiles, the surface brightness profiles offer a unique means of assessing the morphology and size of galactic-scale winds. Furthermore, the kinematics and line ratios offer powerful diagnostics of outflows, motivating deep, spatially extended spectroscopic

  8. Modeling X-ray emission line profiles from massive star winds - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignace, Richard

    2016-09-01

    The Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray telescopes have led to numerous advances in the study and understanding of astrophysical X-ray sources. Particularly important has been the much increased spectral resolution of modern X-ray instrumentation. Wind-broadened emission lines have been spectroscopically resolved for many massive stars. This contribution reviews approaches to the modeling of X-ray emission line profile shapes from single stars, including smooth winds, winds with clumping, optically thin versus thick lines, and the effect of a radius-dependent photoabsorption coefficient.

  9. Database of emission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binette, L.; Ortiz, P.; Joguet, B.; Rola, C.

    1998-11-01

    A widely accessible data bank (available through Netscape) and consiting of all (or most) of the emission lines reported in the litterature is being built. It will comprise objects as diverse as HII regions, PN, AGN, HHO. One of its use will be to define/refine existing diagnostic emission line diagrams.

  10. Comparison of Fe XVIII and Fe XIX Line Emissions with Spectral Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, P.; Brickhouse, N. S.; Drake, J. J.; Edgar, R. J.; Hoogerwerf, R.; Kashyap, V.; Wargelin, B. J.; Smith, R. K.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Liedahl, D. A.

    2005-06-01

    We discuss here the observations of Fe XVIII and XIX emission lines and compare the X-ray, EUV and FUV lines with the spectral codes widely used today (e.g. FAC and APEC). We assess the relative accuracy of these spectral models and try to identify the critical atomic data and processes. Capella with a narrow enhancement in its emission measure distribution at 6 MK provides a unique opportunity to test the Fe XVIII and Fe XIX model emissivities which peak from 6 to 8 MK. We use the summed spectra from Chandra HETG/ACIS-S and LETG/HRC-S, as well as contemporaneous EUVE and FUSE observations, to measure line ratios for comparison with predictions.

  11. Time-dependent modelling of the molecular line emission from shock waves in outflow sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, D. R.; Pineau des Forêts, G.

    2012-04-01

    We have developed further the technique of time-dependent modelling of magnetohydrodynamic shock waves, with a view to interpreting the molecular line emission from outflow sources. The extensively observed source L1157 B1 was chosen as an exemplar of the application of this technique. The dynamical age of the shock wave model was varied in the range 500 ≤t≤ 5000 yr, with the best fit to the observed line intensities being obtained for t= 1000 yr; this is of the same order as the dynamical age derived by Gueth, Guilloteau & Bachiller from their observations of L1157 B1. The emission line spectra of H2, CO, SiO, ortho- and para-H2O, ortho- and para-NH3, and A- and E-type CH3OH were calculated in parallel with the dynamical and chemical parameters of the model, using the 'large velocity gradient' (LVG) approximation to the line transfer problem. We compared the predictions of the models with the observed intensities of emission lines of H2, CO, SiO, ortho-H2O, ortho-NH3 and CH3OH, which include recent Herschel satellite measurements. In the case of SiO, we show (in Appendix A) that extrapolations of the collisional rate coefficients beyond the range of kinetic temperature for which they were originally calculated lead to spurious rotational line intensities and profiles. The computed emission-line spectra of SiO, NH3 and CH3OH are shown to depend on the assumed initial composition of the grain mantles, from whence they are released, by sputtering in the shock wave, into the gas phase. The dependence of the model predictions on the adopted form of the grain-size distribution is investigated in Appendix B; the corresponding integral line intensities are given in tabular form, for a range of C-type shock speeds, in the online Supporting Information.

  12. The Binary Black Hole Model for Mrk 231 Can Not Explain the Observed Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighly, Karen; Terndrup, Donald M.; Gallagher, Sarah; Lucy, Adrian B.

    2016-01-01

    Quasars are known for their strong, broad emission lines and their broad-band continua peaking in the extreme UV. While there are observable and interesting differences from object to object, the emission-line equivalent widths and ratios are, overall, quite uniform over a broad range of luminosity. This result is consistent with photoionization of the broad-line region by continuum emission from an accretion disk, where the luminosity and number of photoionizing photons generally scale with the black hole mass and accretion rate.Mrk 231 is a nearby quasar with an unusually red continuum, generally explained by heavy reddening from dust (e.g., Veilleux et al. 2013, Leighly et al. 2014). Yan et al. 2015 recently proposed that Mrk 231 is a black-hole binary system with very little intrinsic reddening, in which the large black hole experiences advection dominated accretion, emitting little continuum, while the accretion disk of the small black hole emits as an ordinary quasar, dominating the observed weak UV continuum and the photoionizing flux.Using Cloudy photo-ionization modeling, recombination broad lines in the relatively unreddened near-IR, and CIV and CIII] lines in the reddened UV, we show that the observed line emission is not consistent with the binary black hole hypothesis. The observed near-IR recombination line flux is too strong to be produced by the weak continuum of the putative small black hole. Moreover, the lack of intrinsic reddening in the binary model implies a small intrinsic CIV/IR line ratio from the observed lines, which would in turn require a very low ionization parameter that would under-predict the observed near-IR recombination line flux.

  13. A Binary Model for the Emission Line Star FX Velorum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, M.; Hunter, M.

    2015-06-01

    FX Vel is a southern, young variable star which shows large variations in brightness. In examining the environments where planets may form, disks around young stars provide important clues as to how long such disks might last. We discuss several possible scenarios for the structure of FX Vel, including a binary model similar to EE Cep and the possibility that FX Vel may be a UXor variable, a class of young stars with disks. This could also explain the colors and irregular variation in brightness of the star. We suggest FX Vel may be a blue straggler member of the open cluster ASCC48 based upon its position on the cluster CMD and proper motions. More data is required examine the alternate possibility of FX Vel being a member of Teutsch 101. A spectroscopic study of FX Vel would be valuable.

  14. Chemo-population multizone models for emission line evolution of star forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle, G.; Shore, S. N.

    2007-02-01

    Aims:We apply the nonlinear chemo-population (CP) models for galactic star formation and abundance evolution to the prediction of emission line diagnostics. Methods: We interfaced the CP code with the photoionization code Cloudy. Using the self-consistently generated star forming rates and abundance histories we predict the time dependences of the nebular line emissivities from model H II regions. We also simulated some effects of collisions, stripping, and accretion events on the emission line diagnostics. Results: We find, despite using extremely simplified input fluxes (i.e. blackbodies scaled to a range of effective temperatures but without detailed model atmospheres or population synthesis), the models reproduce many features of the observations. In particular, we suggest that the line ratios for highly ionized species (e.g. [O III] vs. [N II]) are more sensitive to the galactic history, while the exclusively ionization diagnostics (e.g. [O II] vs. [O I]) are more sensitive to the underlying stellar population and the composite ultraviolet flux distribution. We discuss some reasons for this and conclude that a coupled treatment of the galactic population and chemical evolution is essential for interpretation of the data. We also find that collisional and stripped models cover a wider range in the diagnostic diagrams that provide clues to the environmental effects.

  15. 2D-photochemical model for forbidden oxygen line emission for comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cessateur, G.; De Keyser, J.; Maggiolo, R.; Rubin, M.; Gronoff, G.; Gibbons, A.; Jehin, E.; Dhooghe, F.; Gunell, H.; Vaeck, N.; Loreau, J.

    2016-08-01

    We present here a 2D-model of photochemistry for computing the production and loss mechanisms of the O(1S) and O(1D) states, which are responsible for the emission lines at 577.7 nm, 630 nm, and 636.4 nm, in case of the comet 1P/Halley. The presence of O2 within cometary atmospheres, measured by the in-situ ROSETTA and GIOTTO missions, necessitates a revision of the usual photochemical models. Indeed, the photodissociation of molecular oxygen also leads to a significant production of oxygen in excited electronic states. In order to correctly model the solar UV flux absorption, we consider here a 2D configuration. While the green to red-doublet ratio is not affected by the solar UV flux absorption, estimates of the red-doublet and green lines emissions are, however, overestimated by a factor of two in the 1D model compared to the 2D model. Considering a spherical symmetry, emission maps can be deduced from the 2D model in order to be directly compared to ground and/or in-situ observations.

  16. Models and observations of the millimeter and submillimeter molecular line emission of bright-rimmed clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Christopher Hugh

    2003-07-01

    We present the results of a comparison of new millimeter and submillimeter molecular line survey of bright-rimmed clouds, observed at FCRAO in the CO (J = 1 → 0), C18O (J = 1 → 0), HCO+ (J = 1 → 0), H 13CO+ (J = 1 → 0), and N 2H+ (J = 1 → 0) transitions, at the HHT in the CO (J = 2 → 1), HCO+ ( J = 3 → 2), HCO+ (J = 4 → 3), H13CO+ (J = 3 → 2), and H13CO+ (J = 4 → 3), and at the CSO in the HCO+ (J = 4 → 3) and H13CO+ (J = 4 → 3) molecular line transitions with synthetic observations of a hydrodynamic shock driven triggered star formation model. We also present observations of three Bok globules done for comparison with the bright- rimmed clouds. We find that the appearance of the millimeter CO and HCO+ emission is dominated by the morphology of the shock front in the bright-rimmed clouds. The HCO + (J = 1 → 0) emission tends to trace the swept up gas ridge and overdense regions which may be triggered to collapse as a result of sequential star formation. The morphologies of the observed bright-rimmed cloud are in good agreement with the our modeled emission. Five of the seven bright-rimmed clouds we observe seem to have an outflow, however only one shows the spectral line blue-asymmetric signature that is indicative of infall, in the optically thick HCO+ emission. We also present evidence that in bright-rimmed clouds the nearby shock front may heat the core from outside-in thereby washing out the normally observed line infall signatures seen in isolated star forming regions. We find that the derived core masses of these bright-rimmed clouds are similar to other low and intermediate mass star forming regions.

  17. EVOLVING STARBURST MODELING OF FAR-INFRARED/SUBMILLIMETER/MILLIMETER LINE EMISSION. II. APPLICATION TO M 82

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Lihong

    2009-11-01

    We present starburst models for far-infrared/sub-millimeter/millimeter line emission of molecular and atomic gas in an evolving starburst region, which is treated as an ensemble of noninteracting hot bubbles that drive spherical shells of swept-up gas into a surrounding uniform gas medium. These bubbles and shells are driven by stellar winds and supernovae within massive star clusters formed during an instantaneous starburst. The underlying stellar radiation from the evolving clusters affects the properties and structure of photodissociation regions (PDRs) in the shells, and hence the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the molecular and atomic line emission from these swept-up shells and the associated parent giant molecular clouds contain a signature of the stage of evolution of the starburst. The physical and chemical properties of the shells and their structure are computed using a simple, well-known similarity solution for the shell expansion, a stellar population synthesis code, and a time-dependent PDR chemistry model. The SEDs for several molecular and atomic lines ({sup 12}CO and its isotope {sup 13}CO, HCN, HCO{sup +}, C, O, and C{sup +}) are computed using a nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium line radiative transfer model. By comparing our models with the available observed data of nearby infrared bright galaxies, especially M 82, we constrain the models and in the case of M 82, we provide estimates for the ages (5-6 Myr, 10 Myr) of recent starburst activity. We also derive a total H{sub 2} gas mass of approx(2-3.4) x 10{sup 8} M {sub sun} for the observed regions of the central 1 kpc starburst disk of M 82.

  18. CORONAL EMISSION LINES AS THERMOMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Judge, Philip G.

    2010-01-10

    Coronal emission-line intensities are commonly used to measure electron temperatures using emission measure and/or line ratio methods. In the presence of systematic errors in atomic excitation calculations and data noise, the information on underlying temperature distributions is fundamentally limited. Increasing the number of emission lines used does not necessarily improve the ability to discriminate between different kinds of temperature distributions.

  19. Photoionization Models of the H_2 Emission of the Narrow Line Region of AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleman, I.; Gruenwald, R.

    2011-05-01

    The excitation mechanism of the narrow line region (NLR) of AGNs is still an open question. Excitation by UV radiation from O and B stars, x-rays from the central black hole, shock from supernovae or jets, or a combination of these mechanisms have been suggested. In the present work, we use photoionization models to study the excitation mechanisms of the H_2 infrared emission lines in the NLR. In the literature, analyzes of the H_2 emission have been done assuming that the molecules is present only in neutral regions (photodissociation regions, x-ray-dominated regions, or shocks; Veilleux et al. 1997, Krabbe et al. 2000, Rigopoulou et al. 2002, Rodriguez-Ardila et al. 2004, 2005, and Davies et al. 2005). However, they are not conclusive. In previous work (Aleman & Gruenwald 2004, 2011), we show that the H_2 emission from the ionized region of PNe can be significant for planetary nebulae (PNe) with hot central stars (T⋆ > 150000 K). Such stars produce copious amounts of high energy photons, which create an extended partially ionized region that favors the H_2 survival. The conditions in the NLR are similar to those in PNe with hot central stars, so we can expect that the H_2 emission might also be important. We obtain and analyze a grid of photoionization models for different NRL parameters. We study the resulting H_2 density and emission, as well as, the formation, destruction, excitation, and de-excitation mechanisms. The higher values observed for the H_2 1-0 S(1)/Brγ ratio cannot be reproduced by our models. The calculated ratios are between 10^-8 and 10^-1, while the observational ration can be as high as 10. The calculated ratio is strongly anti-correlated with the ionization parameter (U) and only models with U<10-3 result in ratios inside the observational range. We show that the NLR is an environment more hostile to the H_2 molecule than the ionized region of PNe. Another interesting result of our calculations is that the H_2 formation on grain surfaces

  20. PEARS Emission Line Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzkal, Nor; Rothberg, Barry; Ly, Chun; Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Grogin, Norman A.; Dahlen, Tomas; Meurer, Gerhardt R.; Walsh, Jeremy; Hathi, Nimish P.; Cohen, Seth; Belini, Andrea; Holwerda, Benne W.; Straughn, Amber; Mechtley, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    We present a full analysis of the Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) slitless grism spectroscopic data obtained vl'ith the Advanced Camera for Surveys on HST. PEARS covers fields within both the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) North and South fields, making it ideal as a random surveY of galaxies, as well as the availability of a wide variety of ancillary observations to support the spectroscopic results. Using the PEARS data we are able to identify star forming galaxies within the redshift volume 0 < z < 1.5. Star forming regions in the PEARS survey are pinpointed independently of the host galaxy. This method allOW8 us to detect the presence of multiple emission line regions (ELRs) within a single galaxy. 1162 [OII], [OIII] and/or H-alpha emission lines have been identified in the PEARS sample of approx 906 galaxies down to a limiting flux of approx 10 - 18 erg/s/sq cm . The ELRs have also been compared to the properties of the host galaxy, including morphology, luminosity, and mass. From this analysis we find three key results: 1) The computed line luminosities show evidence of a flattening in the luminosity function with increasing redshift; 2) The star forming systems show evidence of disturbed morphologies, with star formation occurring predominantly within one effective (half-light) radius. However, the morphologies show no correlation with host stellar mass; and 3) The number density of star forming galaxies with M(*) >= 10(exp 9) Solar M decreases by an order of magnitude at z<=0.5 relative to the number at 0.5 < z < 0.9 in support of the argument for galaxy downsizing.

  1. 3D Modeling of Forbidden Line Emission in the Binary Wind Interaction Region of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madura, Thomas; Gull, T. R.; Owocki, S.; Okazaki, A. T.; Russell, C. M. P.

    2010-01-01

    We present recent work using three-dimensional (3D) Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations to model the high ([Fe III], [Ar III], [Ne III] and [S III]) and low ([Fe II], [Ni II]) ionization forbidden emission lines observed in Eta Carinae using the HST/STIS. These structures are interpreted as the time-averaged, outer extensions of the primary wind and the wind-wind interaction region directly excited by the FUV of the hot companion star of this massive binary system. We discuss how analyzing the results of the 3D SPH simulations and synthetic slit spectra and comparing them to the spectra obtained with the HST/STIS helps us determine the absolute orientation of the binary orbit and helps remove the degeneracy inherent to models based solely on the observed RXTE X-ray light curve. A key point of this work is that spatially resolved observations like those with HST/STIS and comparison to 3D models are necessary to determine the alignment or misalignment of the orbital angular momentum axis with the Homunculus, or correspondingly, the alignment of the orbital plane with the Homunculus skirt.

  2. MODELING THE LINE-OF-SIGHT INTEGRATED EMISSION IN THE CORONA: IMPLICATIONS FOR CORONAL HEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Viall, Nicholeen M.; Klimchuk, James A.

    2013-07-10

    One of the outstanding problems in all of space science is uncovering how the solar corona is heated to temperatures greater than 1 MK. Though studied for decades, one of the major difficulties in solving this problem has been unraveling the line-of-sight (LOS) effects in the observations. The corona is optically thin, so a single pixel measures counts from an indeterminate number (perhaps tens of thousands) of independently heated flux tubes, all along that pixel's LOS. In this paper we model the emission in individual pixels imaging the active region corona in the extreme ultraviolet. If LOS effects are not properly taken into account, erroneous conclusions regarding both coronal heating and coronal dynamics may be reached. We model the corona as an LOS integration of many thousands of completely independently heated flux tubes. We demonstrate that despite the superposition of randomly heated flux tubes, nanoflares leave distinct signatures in light curves observed with multi-wavelength and high time cadence data, such as those data taken with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. These signatures are readily detected with the time-lag analysis technique of Viall and Klimchuk in 2012. Steady coronal heating leaves a different and equally distinct signature that is also revealed by the technique.

  3. Development of a composite line source emission model for traffic interrupted microenvironments and its application in particle number emissions at a bus station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lina; Jayaratne, Rohan; Heuff, Darlene; Morawska, Lidia

    A composite line source emission (CLSE) model was developed to specifically quantify exposure levels and describe the spatial variability of vehicle emissions in traffic interrupted microenvironments. This model took into account the complexity of vehicle movements in the queue, as well as different emission rates relevant to various driving conditions (cruise, decelerate, idle and accelerate), and it utilised multi-representative segments to capture the accurate emission distribution for real vehicle flow. Hence, this model was able to quickly quantify the time spent in each segment within the considered zone, as well as the composition and position of the requisite segments based on the vehicle fleet information, which not only helped to quantify the enhanced emissions at critical locations, but it also helped to define the emission source distribution of the disrupted steady flow for further dispersion modelling. The model then was applied to estimate particle number emissions at a bi-directional bus station used by diesel and compressed natural gas fuelled buses. It was found that the acceleration distance was of critical importance when estimating particle number emission, since the highest emissions occurred in sections where most of the buses were accelerating and no significant increases were observed at locations where they idled. It was also shown that emissions at the front end of the platform were 43 times greater than at the rear of the platform. Although the CLSE model is intended to be applied in traffic management and transport analysis systems for the evaluation of exposure, as well as the simulation of vehicle emissions in traffic interrupted microenvironments, the bus station model can also be used for the input of initial source definitions in future dispersion models.

  4. Rotational Sweepback of Magnetic Field Lines in Geometrical Models of Pulsar Radio Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyks, J.; Harding, Alice K.

    2004-01-01

    We study the rotational distortions of the vacuum dipole magnetic field in the context of geometrical models of the radio emission from pulsars. We find that at low altitudes the rotation deflects the local direction of the magnetic field by at most an angle of the order of r(sup 2 sub n), where r(sub n) = r/R(sub lc), r is the radial distance and R(sub lc) is the light cylinder radius. To the lowest (i.e. second) order in r(sub n) this distortion is symmetrical with respect to the plane containing the dipole axis and the rotation axis ((Omega, mu) plane). The lowest order distortion which is asymmetrical with respect to the (Omega, mu) plane is third order in r(sub n). These results confirm the common assumption that the rotational sweepback has negligible effect on the position angle (PA) curve. We show, however, that the influence of the sweep back on the outer boundary of the open field line region (open volume) is a much larger effect, of the order of r(sup 1/2 sub n). The open volume is shifted backwards with respect to the rotation direction by an angle delta(sub o nu) approx. 0.2 sin alpha r(sup 1/2 sub n) where alpha is the dipole inclination with respect to the rotation axis. The associated phase shift of the pulse profile Delta phi(sub o nu) approx. 0.2 r(sup 1/2 sub n) can easily exceed the shift due to combined effects of aberration and propagation time delays (approx. 2r(sub n)). This strongly affects the misalignment of the center of the PA curve and the center of the pulse profile, thereby modifying the delay radius relation. Contrary to intuition, the effect of sweepback dominates over other effects when emission occurs at low altitudes. For r(sub n) < or approx. 3 x 10(exp -3) the shift becomes negative, i.e. the center of the position angle curve precedes the profile center. With the sweepback effect included, the modified delay-radius relation predicts larger emission radii and is in much better agreement with the other methods of determining r

  5. Constraining UV continuum slopes of active galactic nuclei with cloudy models of broad-line region extreme-ultraviolet emission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Moloney, Joshua; Michael Shull, J. E-mail: michael.shull@colorado.edu

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the composition and structure of the broad-line region (BLR) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is important for answering many outstanding questions in supermassive black hole evolution, galaxy evolution, and ionization of the intergalactic medium. We used single-epoch UV spectra from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope to measure EUV emission-line fluxes from four individual AGNs with 0.49 ≤ z ≤ 0.64, two AGNs with 0.32 ≤ z ≤ 0.40, and a composite of 159 AGNs. With the CLOUDY photoionization code, we calculated emission-line fluxes from BLR clouds with a range of density, hydrogen ionizing flux, and incident continuum spectral indices. The photoionization grids were fit to the observations using single-component and locally optimally emitting cloud (LOC) models. The LOC models provide good fits to the measured fluxes, while the single-component models do not. The UV spectral indices preferred by our LOC models are consistent with those measured from COS spectra. EUV emission lines such as N IV λ765, O II λ833, and O III λ834 originate primarily from gas with electron temperatures between 37,000 K and 55,000 K. This gas is found in BLR clouds with high hydrogen densities (n {sub H} ≥ 10{sup 12} cm{sup –3}) and hydrogen ionizing photon fluxes (Φ{sub H} ≥ 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}).

  6. New observations and models of circumstellar CO line emission of AGB stars in the Herschel SUCCESS programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilovich, T.; Teyssier, D.; Justtanont, K.; Olofsson, H.; Cerrigone, L.; Bujarrabal, V.; Alcolea, J.; Cernicharo, J.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; García-Lario, P.; Marston, A.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are in one of the latest evolutionary stages of low to intermediate-mass stars. Their vigorous mass loss has a significant effect on the stellar evolution, and is a significant source of heavy elements and dust grains for the interstellar medium. The mass-loss rate can be well traced by carbon monoxide (CO) line emission. Aims: We present new Herschel/HIFI and IRAM 30 m telescope CO line data for a sample of 53 galactic AGB stars. The lines cover a fairly large range of excitation energy from the J = 1 → 0 line to the J = 9 → 8 line, and even the J = 14 → 13 line in a few cases. We perform radiative transfer modelling for 38 of these sources to estimate their mass-loss rates. Methods: We used a radiative transfer code based on the Monte Carlo method to model the CO line emission. We assume spherically symmetric circumstellar envelopes that are formed by a constant mass-loss rate through a smoothly accelerating wind. Results: We find models that are consistent across a broad range of CO lines for most of the stars in our sample, i.e., a large number of the circumstellar envelopes can be described with a constant mass-loss rate. We also find that an accelerating wind is required to fit, in particular, the higher-J lines and that a velocity law will have a significant effect on the model line intensities. The results cover a wide range of mass-loss rates (~10-8 to 2 × 10-5 M⊙ yr-1) and gas expansion velocities (2 to 21.5 km s-1) , and include M-, S-, and C-type AGB stars. Our results generally agree with those of earlier studies, although we tend to find slightly lower mass-loss rates by about 40%, on average. We also present "bonus" lines detected during our CO observations. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope. IRAM is

  7. Theoretical quasar emission-line ratios. V - Balmer continuum emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puetter, R. C.; Levan, P. D.

    1982-01-01

    Isothermal, isobaric models of quasar emission line regions are presented which include an improved treatment of radiative transfer in the bound-free continua, based on a generalization of frequency-integrated line transfer techniques and on the use of a probabilistic radiative transfer equation which explicitly distinguishes between the flux divergence coefficient and the photon escape probability. It is found that Balmer continuum emission can be obtained without compromising observed line ratios. It is also established that optically thin or thick Balmer continuum emission models with blended Fe II line are consistent with 4000-2000 A 'blue bump' observations, and that the improved radiative transfer treatment makes order-of-magnitude corrections to level populations and local cooling rates calculated with past techniques.

  8. Investigating Starburst Galaxy Emission Line Equivalent Widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meskhidze, Helen; Richardson, Chris T.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling star forming galaxies with spectral synthesis codes allows us to study the gas conditions and excitation mechanisms that are necessary to reproduce high ionization emission lines in both local and high-z galaxies. Our study uses the locally optimally-emitting clouds model to develop an atlas of starburst galaxy emission line equivalent widths. Specifically, we address the following question: What physical conditions are necessary to produce strong high ionization emission lines assuming photoionization via starlight? Here we present the results of our photoionization simulations: an atlas spanning 15 orders of magnitude in ionizing flux and 10 orders of magnitude in hydrogen density that tracks over 150 emission lines ranging from the UV to the near IR. Each simulation grid contains ~1.5x104 photoionization models calculated by supplying a spectral energy distribution, grain content, and chemical abundances. Specifically, we will be discussing the effects on the emission line equivalent widths of varying the metallicity of the cloud, Z = 0.2 Z⊙ to Z = 5.0 Z⊙, and varying the star-formation history, using the instantaneous and continuous evolution tracks and the newly released Starburst99 Geneva rotation tracks.

  9. Modelling the Pan-Spectral Energy Distribution of Starburst Galaxies: III. Emission Line Diagnostics of Ensembles of H II Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Dopita, M A; Fischera, J; Sutherland, R S; Kewley, L J; Leitherer, C; Tuffs, R J; Popescu, C C; van Breugel, W; Groves, B A

    2006-05-10

    We have built, as far as possible, fully self-consistent models of H II regions around aging clusters of stars. These produce strong emission line diagnostics applicable to either individual H II regions in galaxies, or to the integrated emission line spectra of disk or starburst galaxies. The models assume that the expansion and internal pressure of individual H II regions is driven by the net input of mechanical energy from the central cluster, be it through winds or supernova events. This eliminates the ionization parameter as a free variable, replacing it with a parameter which depends on the ratio of the cluster mass to the pressure in the surrounding interstellar medium. These models explain why H II regions with low abundances have high excitation, and demonstrate that at least part of the warm ionized medium is the result of overlapping faint, old, large, and low pressure H II regions. We present a number of line ratios (at both optical and IR wavelengths) that provide reliable abundance diagnostics for either single H II regions or for integrated galaxy spectra, and others that are sensitive to the age of the cluster stars exciting individual H II regions.

  10. Detection of Formaldehyde Emission in Comet C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) at Infrared Wavelengths: Line-by-Line Validation of Modeled Fluorescent Intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiSanti, M. A.; Bonev, B. P.; Magee-Sauer, K.; Dello Russo, N.; Mumma, M. J.; Reuter, D. C.; Villanueva, G. L.

    2006-10-01

    Formaldehyde (H2CO) was observed in comet C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) with spectral resolving power λ/Δλ~2.5×104 using the Cryogenic Echelle Spectrometer (CSHELL) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, on UT 2004 May 5, 7, and 9. The observations, which sampled emission in the ν1 and ν5 rovibrational bands between 3.53 and 3.62 μm, represent the first spectrally resolved detection, at infrared wavelengths, of monomeric H2CO spanning a range of rotational energies. A comparison of measured line intensities with an existing fluorescence model permitted extraction of rotational temperatures and production rates. Two complementary approaches were used: (1) a correlation analysis that provided a direct global comparison of the observed cometary emissions with the model and (2) an excitation analysis that provided a robust line-by-line comparison. Our results validate the fluorescence model. The overall correlation coefficient was near or above 0.9 in our two principal grating settings. The excitation analysis provided accurate measures of rotational excitation (rotational temperature) on all three dates, with retrieved values of Trot clustering near 100 K. Through simultaneous measurement of OH prompt emission, which we use as a proxy for H2O, we obtained native production rates and mixing ratios for H2CO. The native production of H2CO varied from day to day, but its abundance relative to H2O, Xnative, remained approximately constant within the errors, which may suggest an overall homogeneous composition of the nucleus. We measured a mean mixing ratio Xnative= (0.79+/-0.09) × 10-2 for the three dates.

  11. Emission lines from hot astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, John C.

    The spectral lines which dominate the X-ray emission of hot, optically thin astrophysical plasmas reflect the elemental abundances, temperature distribution, and other physical parameters of the emitting gas. The accuracy and level of detail with which these parameters can be inferred are limited by the measurement uncertainties and uncertainties in atomic rates used to compute the model spectrum. This paper discusses the relative importance and the likely uncertainties in the various atomic rates and the likely uncertainties in the overall ionization balance and spectral line emissivities predicted by the computer codes currently used to fit X-ray spectral data.

  12. Emission Lines and the High Energy Continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Paul

    1998-01-01

    Quasars show many striking relationships between line and continuum radiation whose origins remain a mystery. FeII, [OIII], Hbeta, and HeII emission line properties correlate with high energy continuum properties such as the relative strength of X-ray emission, and X-ray continuum slope. At the same time, the shape of the high energy continuum may vary with luminosity. An important tool for studying global properties of Quasi Stellar Objects (QSOs) is the co-addition of data for samples of QSOS. We use this to show that X-ray bright (XB) QSOs show stronger emission lines in general, but particularly from the narrow line region. The difference in the [OIII]/Hbeta ratio is particularly striking, and even more so when blended FeII emission is properly subtracted. Weaker narrow forbidden lines ([OII] and NeV) are enhanced by factors of 2 to 3 in both UV and optical XB composite spectra. The physical origin of these diverse and interrelated correlations has yet to be determined. Unfortunately, many physically informative trends intrinsic to QSOs may be masked by dispersion in the data due to either low signal-to-noise or variability. An important tool for studying global properties of QSOs is the co-addition of data for samples of QSOS. We use this to show that X-ray bright (XB) QSOs show stronger emission lines in general, but particularly from the narrow line region. The difference in the [OIII]/Hbeta ratio is particularly striking, and even more so when blended Fell emission is properly subtracted. Weaker narrow forbidden lines ([OII] and NeV) are enhanced by factors of 2 to 3 in both UV and optical XB composite spectra. We describe a large-scale effort now underway to probe these effects in large samples, using both data and analysis as homogeneous as possible. Using an HST FOS Atlas of QSO spectra, with primary comparison to ROSAT PSPC spectral constraints, we will model the Big Blue Bump, its relationship to luminosity and QSO type, and we will analyze and

  13. Of narrow lines and beaming in the strong-field SSC emission model. [synchrotron self-Compton for gamma ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preece, Robert D.

    1992-01-01

    The synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission model for gamma-ray bursts is capable of producing narrow line features for a variety of modelled field strengths, primary electron injection distributions and burst luminosities. Multiple resonant scattering with synchrotron continuum photons efficiently traps and cools pairs in the ground state to an average energy where the Compton energy loss rate is zero. Annihilation between pairs in these cooled distributions can be very efficient. For isotropic injection of primary electrons, there is an anti-correlation of the intensity of the angular-binned emission between the portions of the continuum spectrum below the cyclotron peak and above the annihilation line feature. Small-angle emission dominates the continuum above the annihilation line feature and is smooth through the line up to the pair production cut-off, which can be above several MeV for small enough angles. The angle-averaged annihilation line is made of components which can have peak emission centered at energies away from 511 keV, due to Doppler shifting. For beamed injection,the annihilation line breaks up into relatively narrow components in the angular emission, which sum into a broad feature in the angle-averaged emission.

  14. Detailed modelling of the circumstellar molecular line emission of the S-type AGB star W Aquilae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilovich, T.; Bergman, P.; Justtanont, K.; Lombaert, R.; Maercker, M.; Olofsson, H.; Ramstedt, S.; Royer, P.

    2014-09-01

    Context. S-type AGB stars have a C/O ratio which suggests that they are transition objects between oxygen-rich M-type stars and carbon-rich C-type stars. As such, their circumstellar compositions of gas and dust are thought to be sensitive to their precise C/O ratio, and it is therefore of particular interest to examine their circumstellar properties. Aims: We present new Herschel HIFI and PACS sub-millimetre and far-infrared line observations of several molecular species towards the S-type AGB star W Aql. We use these observations, which probe a wide range of gas temperatures, to constrain the circumstellar properties of W Aql, including mass-loss rate and molecular abundances. Methods: We used radiative transfer codes to model the circumstellar dust and molecular line emission to determine circumstellar properties and molecular abundances. We assumed a spherically symmetric envelope formed by a constant mass-loss rate driven by an accelerating wind. Our model includes fully integrated H2O line cooling as part of the solution of the energy balance. Results: We detect circumstellar molecular lines from CO, H2O, SiO, HCN, and, for the first time in an S-type AGB star, NH3. The radiative transfer calculations result in an estimated mass-loss rate for W Aql of 4.0 × 10-6 M⊙ yr-1 based on the 12CO lines. The estimated 12CO/13CO ratio is 29, which is in line with ratios previously derived for S-type AGB stars. We find an H2O abundance of 1.5 × 10-5, which is intermediate to the abundances expected for M and C stars, and an ortho/para ratio for H2O that is consistent with formation at warm temperatures. We find an HCN abundance of 3 × 10-6, and, although no CN lines are detected using HIFI, we are able to put some constraints on the abundance, 6 × 10-6, and distribution of CN in W Aql's circumstellar envelopeusing ground-based data. We find an SiO abundance of 3 × 10-6, and an NH3 abundance of 1.7 × 10-5, confined to a small envelope. If we include uncertainties

  15. Hydrogen line and continuum emission in young stellar objects. I - Excitation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwan, John; Alonso-Costa, Jose L.

    1988-01-01

    Two mechanisms that populate the n = 2 level of hydrogen after the Lyman continuum is depleted are identified. They are ionization of N I from its excited states, followed by charge-exchange between N II and H I, and Ly-beta line wing absorption. Both processes involve absorption of the sub-Lyman continuum between 11 and 13.6 eV. With population in level n = 2 thus maintained, the strong Brackett line fluxes observed are then produced as a result of Balmer photoionization. The magnitude of the sub-Lyman continuum dictates the fraction of Balmer continuum that will be absorbed. Numerical calculations for four young stellar objects with luminosity ranging from 10 to 10,000 solar are performed, and it is concluded that this two-step process of sub-Lyman continuum absorption followed by Balmer photoionization can account for the great majority of observed Brackett line fluxes. The location and mass of the emitting as as determined from the Brackett line fluxes are reported. The Br-alpha luminosity is calculated as a function of the mass loss rate.

  16. Laser optogalvanic spectroscopy of neon in a discharge plasma and modeling and analysis of rocket plume RF-line emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogungbemi, Kayode I.

    databases (e.g. JPL/NASA and Cologne), together with other appropriate spectroscopic data. Hydrazine fuel was selected as the rocket propellant of choice and the plume codes were run by the JHU-APL research group. A representative monopropellant hydrazine plume has been determined to provide exhaust temperature, pressure, velocity, and species number density inputs for model development. A MATLAB code has been developed for computing broadside line-of-sight (LOS) intensities due to line emissions involving ammonia and other plume species. Initially, we assumed Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) and included self-absorption contributions due to plume opacity, together with collisional and Doppler broadening, as well as the Doppler shift due to the plume radial velocity towards and away from a stationary detector. The recorded code output was MATLAB coded and an assortment of plume parameters computed, such as the volume emission rate, the absorption coefficient, optical depth and species radiance line-by-line. These parameters were computed both manually utilizing a spread sheet and then automated using the Matlab code. The volume emissions, along with other plume properties, were plotted as a function of the axial distance in the plume for several Radio Frequency (RF) transitions involving various significant plume species. Plume properties, such as the temperature, pressure, number density, and plume particulate speed emanating from the nozzle where analyzed and modeled as the plume drifts away from the rocket nozzle. Both the axial and radial distance dependences were investigated with respect to the various plume properties and parameters. Population distribution of the species (number density) dependence on the plume temperature was investigated and modeled line-by-line for each of the plume species studied at the nozzle exit plane and beyond. In addition, volume emission and absorption coefficients have been analyzed and modeled and solutions to the Radiative

  17. Molecular Emission Line Formation in Prestellar Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlyuchenkov, Ya.; Wiebe, D.; Shustov, B.; Henning, Th.; Launhardt, R.; Semenov, D.

    2008-12-01

    We investigate general aspects of molecular line formation under conditions typical of prestellar cores. Focusing on simple linear molecules, we study the formation of their rotational lines with radiative transfer simulations. We present a thermalization diagram to show the effects of collisions and radiation on the level excitation. We construct a detailed scheme (contribution chart) to illustrate the formation of emission-line profiles. This chart can be used as an efficient tool to identify which parts of the cloud contribute to a specific line profile. We show how molecular line characteristics for uniform model clouds depend on hydrogen density, molecular column density, and kinetic temperature. The results are presented in a two-dimensional plane to illustrate mutual effects of the physical factors. We also use a core model with a nonuniform density distribution and chemical stratification to study the effects of cloud contraction and rotation on spectral line maps. We discuss the main issues that should be taken into account when dealing with interpretation and simulation of observed molecular lines.

  18. The emission line - continuum connection in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodre, Laerte; Albernaz-Sirico, Ana Carolina

    2015-08-01

    Star-forming galaxies with a blue continuum tend to present prominent emission lines, whereas in red galaxies emission lines are associated mostly to nuclear activity or to certain stellar populations, like post-AGB stars. In this work we have used tools of machine learning to investigate how theemission line equivalent widths of galaxies are related to their optical continuum. From the analysis of a sample of high S/N spectra of SDSS/DR9 we show that indeed it is possible to estimate with good accuracy the equivalent width of the most intense emission lines from galaxy continuum information only for star-forming galaxies and AGNs (LINERS and Seyfer 2 emitters) by using simple relationships (linear and/or polynomial models) between the EWs and the relative flux at certain wavelengths. An important motivation for this work is to produce realistic spectra to test the data reduction pipelines of the new generation of galaxy surveys, like J-PAS and PFS/SuMIRe.

  19. Modeling magnetohydrodynamics and non-equilibrium SoHO/UVCS line emission of CME shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, P.; Raymond, J. C.; Reale, F.

    The Coronal Mass Ejections are plasma clouds expelled from the Sun into the interplanetary medium. We study the propagation of shock waves in the solar corona generated during Coronal Mass Ejections by means of a numerical multi-dimensional MHD model. The model describes the MHD evolution of a compressible plasma in an ambient magnetic field including tensor thermal conduction, radiative losses as main physical effects. We use the MHD version of the FLASH parallel hydrodynamic code with adaptive mesh refinement, originally developed at the University of Chicago USA). The code is highly modular and made efficiently parallel with the Message Passing Interface library. We analyze the diagnostic signatures of shock fronts generated by supersonic CME fragments detectable with the UltraViolet Coronagraphic Spectrometer on board the SoHO mission. To this aim we perform 3D MHD simulations of the shock propagation for the time it takes to cross the UVCS slit positioned at a distance of a few solar radii from the solar surface. In the presence of highly effective thermal conduction the simulation takes 200000 time steps to cover 1000 s of evolution. Considering a 3-D domain of 256x256x512 grid cells this kind of simulations requires thousands of hours of computer time and therefore high performance computing (HPC) systems. The simulations were run on the CINECA IBM/SP5 HPC cluster within the INAF/CINECA agreement. We show simulation results and some implications for UVCS observations.

  20. Iron Line Diagnostics of Narrow Emission Line Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nousek, John A.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the activities at Penn State University supported by NASA Grant NAG5-2528, 'Iron Line Diagnostics of Narrow Emission Line Galaxies'. The aim of this investigation was to accurately measure the iron (Fe K) line emission in two X-ray selected Seyfert 2 galaxies (NGC 2992 and MCG-5-23-16). The astrophysics being probed was to determine whether the Fe line was narrow, broad or both. The broad line component is very important as a probe of the nature of the innermost accretion onto the central engine in AGN's.

  1. CORA: Emission Line Fitting with Maximum Likelihood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, Jan-Uwe; Wichmann, Rainer

    2011-12-01

    The advent of pipeline-processed data both from space- and ground-based observatories often disposes of the need of full-fledged data reduction software with its associated steep learning curve. In many cases, a simple tool doing just one task, and doing it right, is all one wishes. In this spirit we introduce CORA, a line fitting tool based on the maximum likelihood technique, which has been developed for the analysis of emission line spectra with low count numbers and has successfully been used in several publications. CORA uses a rigorous application of Poisson statistics. From the assumption of Poissonian noise we derive the probability for a model of the emission line spectrum to represent the measured spectrum. The likelihood function is used as a criterion for optimizing the parameters of the theoretical spectrum and a fixed point equation is derived allowing an efficient way to obtain line fluxes. As an example we demonstrate the functionality of the program with an X-ray spectrum of Capella obtained with the Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (LETGS) on board the Chandra observatory and choose the analysis of the Ne IX triplet around 13.5 Å.

  2. CORA - emission line fitting with Maximum Likelihood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, J.-U.; Wichmann, R.

    2002-07-01

    The advent of pipeline-processed data both from space- and ground-based observatories often disposes of the need of full-fledged data reduction software with its associated steep learning curve. In many cases, a simple tool doing just one task, and doing it right, is all one wishes. In this spirit we introduce CORA, a line fitting tool based on the maximum likelihood technique, which has been developed for the analysis of emission line spectra with low count numbers and has successfully been used in several publications. CORA uses a rigorous application of Poisson statistics. From the assumption of Poissonian noise we derive the probability for a model of the emission line spectrum to represent the measured spectrum. The likelihood function is used as a criterion for optimizing the parameters of the theoretical spectrum and a fixed point equation is derived allowing an efficient way to obtain line fluxes. As an example we demonstrate the functionality of the program with an X-ray spectrum of Capella obtained with the Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (LETGS) on board the Chandra observatory and choose the analysis of the Ne IX triplet around 13.5 Å.

  3. Emission line spectropolarimetry and circumstellar structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vink, Jorick S.

    2015-10-01

    We discuss the role of linear emission-line polarimetry in a wide set of stellar environments, involving the accretion disks around young pre-main sequence stars, to the aspherical outflows from O stars, luminous blue variables and Wolf-Rayet stars, just prior to explosion as a supernova or a gamma-ray burst. We predict subtle QU line signatures, such as single/double QU loops for un/disrupted disks. Whilst there is plenty of evidence for single QU loops, suggesting the presence of disrupted disks around young stars, current sensitivity (with S/N of order 1000) is typically not sufficient to allow for quantitative 3D Monte Carlo modeling. However, the detection of our predicted signatures is expected to become feasible with the massive improvement in sensitivity of extremely large mirrors.

  4. Observations of emission lines in M supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Copernicus observations of Mg 2 h and k emission lines from M giants and supergiants are described. Supergiants with extensive circumstellar gas shells show an asymmetric k line. The asymmetry is ascribed to superimposed lines of Fe 1 and Mn 1. The Mg 2 line width fit the Wilson-Bappu relation derived from observations of G and K Stars. Results of correlated ground-based observations include (1) the discovery of K 1 fluorescent emission from the Betelgeuse shell; (2) extimates of the mass-loss rates; and (3) the proposal that silicate dust grains must account for the major fraction of the Si atoms in the Betelgeuse shell.

  5. Radiative Transfer Models of Tidal Disruption Events: What Sets their Emission Line Strengths and Total Optical Flux?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Nathaniel; Kasen, Daniel; Guillochon, James; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Given the recent influx of observational data and theoretical investigation into the nature of the tidal disruption of stars by super-massive black holes (TDEs), a full radiative transfer calculation applicable to an optically thick, electron scattering-dominated reprocessing region can provide valuable insight. Such a calculation can help address puzzles such as the lack of hydrogen emission lines in the optical spectra some TDEs, the origin of the optical and UV flux, and the simultaneous observation of x-rays along with the optical emission. In this talk I will discuss such a calculation performed with my collaborators as part of my dissertation. We track the reprocessing of accretion luminosity from a supermassive black hole as the light travels through an extended, spherical envelope composed of hydrogen, helium, and oxygen from the disrupted star. The steady-state radiative transfer equation is coupled to a solver for the atomic level populations and ionization states that does not assume local thermodynamic equilibrium. Our calculations show how the hydrogen optical emission lines can become more effectively optically thick than their helium counterparts, causing them to remain hidden even in the disruption of a hydrogen-rich star. More generally, variations in the structure of the reprocessing material can give rise to a variety of hydrogen-to-helium line ratios, as has been seen in recent observations. We also determine the amount of material necessary to transfer enough radiative energy from x-ray to optical wavelengths to match what is observed, and we demonstrate how the partial absorption of ionizing radiation can give rise to events simultaneously observed in x-rays and in the optical.

  6. PROFIT: Emission-line PROfile FITting routine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffel, Rogemar A.

    2012-04-01

    The PROFIT is an IDL routine to do automated fitting of emission-line profiles by Gaussian curves or Gauss-Hermite series otimized for use in Integral Field and Fabry-Perot data cubes. As output PROFIT gives two-dimensional FITS files for the emission-line flux distribution, centroid velocity, velocity dispersion and higher order Gauss-Hermite moments (h3 and h4).

  7. PDR MODEL MAPPING OF OBSCURED H{sub 2} EMISSION AND THE LINE-OF-SIGHT STRUCTURE OF M17-SW

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffer, Y.; Wolfire, M. G.

    2013-09-01

    We observed H{sub 2} line emission with Spitzer-IRS toward M17-SW and modeled the data with our photon-dominated region (PDR) code. Derived gas density values of up to few times 10{sup 7} cm{sup -3} indicate that H{sub 2} emission originates in high-density clumps. We discover that the PDR code can be utilized to map the amount of intervening extinction obscuring the H{sub 2} emission layers, and thus we obtain the radial profile of A{sub V} relative to the central ionizing cluster NGC 6618. The extinction has a positive radial gradient, varying between 15-47 mag over the projected distance of 0.9-2.5 pc from the primary ionizer, CEN 1. These high extinction values are in good agreement with previous studies of A{sub V} toward stellar targets in M17-SW. The ratio of data to PDR model values is used to infer the global line-of-sight structure of the PDR surface, which is revealed to resemble a concave surface relative to NGC 6618. Such a configuration confirms that this PDR can be described as a bowl-shaped boundary of the central H II region in M17. The derived structure and physical conditions are important for interpreting the fine-structure and rotational line emission from the PDR.

  8. Local Group Galaxy Emission-line Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaha, Cindy; Baildon, Taylor; Mehta, Shail; Garcia, Edgar; Massey, Philip; Hodge, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of the Local Group Galaxy Emission-line Survey of Hα emission regions in M31, M33 and seven dwarf galaxies in (NGC6822, IC10, WLM, Sextans A and B, Phoenix and Pegasus). Using data from the Local Group Galaxy Survey (LGGS - see Massey et al, 2006), we used continuum-subtracted Ha emission line images to define emission regions with a faint flux limit of 10 -17 ergs-sec-1-cm-2above the background. We have obtained photometric measurements for roughly 7450 Hα emission regions in M31, M33 and five of the seven dwarf galaxies (no regions for Phoenix or Pegasus). Using these regions, with boundaries defined by Hα-emission flux limits, we also measured fluxes for the continuum-subtracted [OIII] and [SII] images and constructed a catalog of Hα fluxes, region sizes and [OIII]/ Hα and [SII]/ Hα line ratios. The HII region luminosity functions and size distributions for the spiral galaxies M31 and M33 are compared with those of the dwarf galaxies NGC 6822 and IC10. For M31 and M33, the average [SII]/ Hα and [OIII]/ Hα line ratios, plotted as a function of galactocentric radius, display a linear trend with shallow slopes consistent with other studies of metallicity gradients in these galaxies. The galaxy-wide averages of [SII]/ Hα line ratios correlate with the masses of the dwarf galaxies following the previously established dwarf galaxy mass-metallicity relationship. The slope of the luminosity functions for the dwarf galaxies varies with galaxy mass. The Carleton Catalog of this Local Group Emission-line Survey will be made available on-line.

  9. Modelling the VUV emission spectrum of N2: preliminary results on the effects of rotational interactions on line intensities.

    PubMed

    Edwards, S A; Tchang-Brillet, W U; Roncin, J Y; Launay, F; Rostas, F

    1995-01-01

    A theoretical model of the excited singlet ungerade electronic states of the nitrogen molecule is presented. This work is an extension of a previous study (D. Stahel, M. Leoni and K. Dressler, J. Chem. Phys. 79, 2541-2558, 1983) with the addition of rotational interactions between states of different symmetry. These rotational interactions together with the homogeneous couplings frequently lead to extreme mixing of the states. This model is being used to analyse the high resolution vacuum ultraviolet emission spectrum which is currently being recorded photoelectrically. The ultimate goal of this work is the reliable interpretation of the low resolution emission spectra observed from planetary atmospheres, notably that of Titan, and the transitions assigned as being important in the Voyager 1 spectra of Titan are discussed in detail. PMID:11538439

  10. A Solar-pumped Fluorescence Model for Line-by-line Emission Intensities in the B–X, A–X, and X–X Band Systems of 12C14N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paganini, L.; Mumma, M. J.

    2016-09-01

    We present a new quantitative model for detailed solar-pumped fluorescent emission of the main isotopologue of CN. The derived fluorescence efficiencies permit estimation and interpretation of ro-vibrational infrared line intensities of CN in exospheres exposed to solar (or stellar) radiation. Our g-factors are applicable to astronomical observations of CN extending from infrared to optical wavelengths, and we compare them with previous calculations in the literature. The new model enables extraction of rotational temperature, column abundance, and production rate from astronomical observations of CN in the inner coma of comets. Our model accounts for excitation and de-excitation of rotational levels in the ground vibrational state by collisions, solar excitation to the {A}2{{{\\Pi }}}{{i}} and {B}2{{{Σ }}}+ electronically excited states followed by cascade to ro-vibrational levels of {X}2{{{Σ }}}+, and direct solar infrared pumping of ro-vibrational levels in the {X}2{{{Σ }}}+ state. The model uses advanced solar spectra acquired at high spectral resolution at the relevant infrared and optical wavelengths and considers the heliocentric radial velocity of the comet (the Swings effect) when assessing the exciting solar flux for a given transition. We present model predictions for the variation of fluorescence rates with rotational temperature and heliocentric radial velocity. Furthermore, we test our fluorescence model by comparing predicted and measured line-by-line intensities for {X}2{{{Σ }}}+ (1–0) in comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy), thereby identifying multiple emission lines observed at IR wavelengths.

  11. Assessment of Microphysical Models in the National Combustion Code (NCC) for Aircraft Particulate Emissions: Particle Loss in Sampling Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Thomas; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2008-01-01

    This paper at first describes the fluid network approach recently implemented into the National Combustion Code (NCC) for the simulation of transport of aerosols (volatile particles and soot) in the particulate sampling systems. This network-based approach complements the other two approaches already in the NCC, namely, the lower-order temporal approach and the CFD-based approach. The accuracy and the computational costs of these three approaches are then investigated in terms of their application to the prediction of particle losses through sample transmission and distribution lines. Their predictive capabilities are assessed by comparing the computed results with the experimental data. The present work will help establish standard methodologies for measuring the size and concentration of particles in high-temperature, high-velocity jet engine exhaust. Furthermore, the present work also represents the first step of a long term effort of validating physics-based tools for the prediction of aircraft particulate emissions.

  12. Bright emission lines in new Seyfert galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasev, V.L.; Denisiuk, E.K.; Lipovetskii, V.A.; Shapovalova, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    Observational data are given on bright emission lines (H-alpha, H-beta, and forbidden N II, S II, and O III) for 14 recently discovered Seyfert galaxies. The investigated objects can be divided into three groups, which correspond approximately to the first (5 objects), the intermediate (4 objects), and the second (4 objects) Seyfert types. Attention is drawn to the properties of the galaxy Markaryan 1018, which has features of both the first and the second type and is distinguished by the weakness of its emission lines, which is probably due to a gas deficit. 7 references.

  13. Molecular Hydrogen Line Emission from Photodissociation Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysostomou, Antonio

    1993-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis is dedicated to the study of the physical properties of photodissociation regions (PDRs), the surface layers of molecular clouds which are irradiated by ultraviolet radiation. The structure of PDRs is investigated with the development of an anlytical model which incorporates the essential heating and cooling mechanisms in a PDR. The main parameters in the model are the density and the incident ulttraviolet radiation field (G0) impinging on the surface which dissociates the molecules in the PDR. It is demonstrated that when the ratio (n / G0) is high (> 100 cm-3) the attenuation of ultraviolet photons is dominated by H2 self shielding, which brings the Hi/H2 transition zone close to the surface of the cloud (Av < 1). When the ratio is of order unity then the attenuation of ultraviolet photons is dominated by dust grains in the PDR. In this case, the Hi / H2 transition zone occurs at a depth of Av ~2-3. Images of the PDR in the northern bar of M17 show that there is a spatial coincidence, accurate to ~1 arcsec, of the H2 and 3.28 micron emission regions (the 3.28 micron emission being a tracer of the hot edge of the PDR delineated by the Hii / Hi transition) placing a lower limit to the density in the clumps of 105 cm-3. This coincidence is also observed in other PDR sources (eg. NGC 2023) and can be readily explained if the sources are clumpy. It is not clear in the northern bar of M17, where G0 ~104, whether shielding by dust or H2 molecules is dominated the attenuation of ultraviolet photons. A uniform, high density PDR model is sufficient to reproduce the observed H2 line intensity, however the images clearly reveal structures at the 2 arcsec level suggesting that a clumpy model is a realistic solution. Long slit K band spectroscopy measurements were taken in the northern bar of M17, where up to 16 H2 lines were identified. Analysis of the data suggests that the emission can only be explained if the H2 molecules are being excited

  14. Significant contribution of the Cerenkov line-like radiation to the broad emission lines of quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D. B.; You, J. H.; Chen, W. P.; Chen, L. E-mail: dliu@cfa.Harvard.edu

    2014-01-01

    The Cerenkov line-like radiation in a dense gas (N {sub H} > 10{sup 13} cm{sup –3}) is potentially important in the exploration of the optical broad emission lines of quasars and Seyfert 1 galaxies. With this quasi-line emission mechanism, some long standing puzzles in the study of quasars could be resolved. In this paper, we calculate the power of the Cerenkov line-like radiation in dense gas and compare with the powers of other radiation mechanisms by a fast electron to confirm its importance. From the observed gamma-ray luminosity of 3C 279, we show that the total number of fast electrons is sufficiently high to allow effective operation of the quasi-line emission. We present a model calculation for the luminosity of the Cerenkov Lyα line of 3C 279, which is high enough to compare with observations. We therefore conclude that the broad line of quasars may be a blend of the Cerenkov emission line with the real line produced by the bound-bound transition. A new approach to the absorption of the Cerenkov line is presented with the method of escape probability, which markedly simplifies the computation in the optically thick case. The revised set of formulae for the Cerenkov line-like radiation is more convenient in applications.

  15. Quantifying correlations between galaxy emission lines and stellar continua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Róbert; Dobos, László; Yip, Ching-Wa; Szalay, Alexander S.; Csabai, István

    2016-03-01

    We analyse the correlations between continuum properties and emission line equivalent widths of star-forming and active galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Since upcoming large sky surveys will make broad-band observations only, including strong emission lines into theoretical modelling of spectra will be essential to estimate physical properties of photometric galaxies. We show that emission line equivalent widths can be fairly well reconstructed from the stellar continuum using local multiple linear regression in the continuum principal component analysis (PCA) space. Line reconstruction is good for star-forming galaxies and reasonable for galaxies with active nuclei. We propose a practical method to combine stellar population synthesis models with empirical modelling of emission lines. The technique will help generate more accurate model spectra and mock catalogues of galaxies to fit observations of the new surveys. More accurate modelling of emission lines is also expected to improve template-based photometric redshift estimation methods. We also show that, by combining PCA coefficients from the pure continuum and the emission lines, automatic distinction between hosts of weak active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and quiescent star-forming galaxies can be made. The classification method is based on a training set consisting of high-confidence starburst galaxies and AGNs, and allows for the similar separation of active and star-forming galaxies as the empirical curve found by Kauffmann et al. We demonstrate the use of three important machine learning algorithms in the paper: k-nearest neighbour finding, k-means clustering and support vector machines.

  16. Line Emission from Optically Thick RelativisticAccretion Tori

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerst, Steven V.; Wu, Kinwah; /Mullard Space Sci. Lab.

    2007-09-14

    We calculate line emission from relativistic accretion tori around Kerr black holes and investigate how the line profiles depend on the viewing inclination, spin of the central black hole, parameters describing the shape of the tori, and spatial distribution of line emissivity on the torus surface. We also compare the lines with those from thin accretion disks. Our calculations show that lines from tori and lines from thin disks share several common features. In particular, at low and moderate viewing inclination angles they both have asymmetric double-peaked profiles with a tall, sharp blue peak and a shorter red peak which has an extensive red wing. At high viewing inclination angles they both have very broad, asymmetric lines which can be roughly considered as single-peaked. Torus and disk lines may show very different red and blue line wings, but the differences are due to the models for relativistic tori and disks having differing inner boundary radii. Self-eclipse and lensing play some role in shaping the torus lines, but they are effective only at high inclination angles. If inner and outer radii of an accretion torus are the same as those of an accretion disk, their line profiles show substantial differences only when inclination angles are close to 90{sup o}, and those differences are manifested mostly at the central regions of the lines instead of the wings.

  17. Constraints on Porosity and Mass Loss in O-star Winds from the Modeling of X-ray Emission Line Profile Shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Cohen, David H.; Sundqvist, Jon O.; Owocki, Stanley P.

    2013-01-01

    We fit X-ray emission line profiles in high resolution XMM-Newton and Chandra grating spectra of the early O supergiant Zeta Pup with models that include the effects of porosity in the stellar wind. We explore the effects of porosity due to both spherical and flattened clumps. We find that porosity models with flattened clumps oriented parallel to the photosphere provide poor fits to observed line shapes. However, porosity models with isotropic clumps can provide acceptable fits to observed line shapes, but only if the porosity effect is moderate. We quantify the degeneracy between porosity effects from isotropic clumps and the mass-loss rate inferred from the X-ray line shapes, and we show that only modest increases in the mass-loss rate (40%) are allowed if moderate porosity effects (h(sub infinity) less than approximately R(sub *)) are assumed to be important. Large porosity lengths, and thus strong porosity effects, are ruled out regardless of assumptions about clump shape. Thus, X-ray mass-loss rate estimates are relatively insensitive to both optically thin and optically thick clumping. This supports the use of X-ray spectroscopy as a mass-loss rate calibration for bright, nearby O stars

  18. Spectral classification of emission-line galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessauges-Zavadsky, M.; Pindao, M.; Maeder, A.; Kunth, D.

    2000-03-01

    The main goal of this work is to further investigate the classification of emission-line galaxies from the ``Spectrophotometric Catalogue of H II galaxies'' by Terlevich et al. (1991) in a homogeneous and objective way, using the three line-ratio diagrams, called diagnostic diagrams, of Veilleux & Osterbrock (1987). On the basis of the resulting catalogue, we critically discuss the classification methods in the optical range. In particular we compare our classification scheme to the one done by Rola et al. (1997) which is efficient for the classification of redshifted galaxies. We also propose a new diagnostic diagram involving the known intensity ratio R23=([O II],l 3727+[O III] l 4959+{[O III] l 5007)/Hb which appears to be a very good criterion allowing to discriminate the Seyfert 2 from H ii galaxies. The revised catalogue including 314 narrow-emission-line galaxies contains H II galaxies, Seyfert 2 galaxies, Low Ionization Nuclear Emission-Line Regions (hereafter LINERs) galaxies and some particular types of galaxies with the most intriguing ones, called ``ambiguous'', due to the ambiguity of their location in the diagnostic diagrams. These galaxies appear as H II galaxies and as active galactic nuclei (hereafter AGNs) in different diagrams of Veilleux & Osterbrock and constitute certainly a sample of particularly interesting candidates for a thorough study of connections between starbursts and AGNs. Available in electronic form only via anonymous ftp 130.79.128.5 or http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

  19. MICROLENSING OF QUASAR BROAD EMISSION LINES: CONSTRAINTS ON BROAD LINE REGION SIZE

    SciTech Connect

    Guerras, E.; Mediavilla, E.; Kochanek, C. S.; Munoz, J. A.; Falco, E.; Motta, V.

    2013-02-20

    We measure the differential microlensing of the broad emission lines between 18 quasar image pairs in 16 gravitational lenses. We find that the broad emission lines are in general weakly microlensed. The results show, at a modest level of confidence (1.8{sigma}), that high ionization lines such as C IV are more strongly microlensed than low ionization lines such as H{beta}, indicating that the high ionization line emission regions are more compact. If we statistically model the distribution of microlensing magnifications, we obtain estimates for the broad line region size of r{sub s} = 24{sup +22} {sub -15} and r{sub s} = 55{sup +150} {sub -35} lt-day (90% confidence) for the high and low ionization lines, respectively. When the samples are divided into higher and lower luminosity quasars, we find that the line emission regions of more luminous quasars are larger, with a slope consistent with the expected scaling from photoionization models. Our estimates also agree well with the results from local reveberation mapping studies.

  20. Erratum: ``The Pure Rotational Line Emission of Ortho-Water Vapor in Comets. I. Radiative Transfer Model'' (ApJ, 615, 531 [2004])

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensch, F.; Bergin, E. A.

    2007-04-01

    The comet model presented in the paper is based on the radiation transfer code ratran (M. R. Hogerheijde & F. F. S. van der Tak, ApJ, 615, 531 [2004]), an accelerated Monte Carlo code to calculate the line excitation and the emerging line intensities. For a given density profile, ratran determines the level population and, in a second step, calculates the spectral line emission for a given telescope beam, source distance, and velocity resolution. The numerical simulations for water-line emission in cometary coma show that the line excitation varies considerably on radii smaller than the projected telescope beam at the source distance for the models and telescope parameter considered in the paper. Thus, in our calculation, the water excitation in the second step was incorrectly sampled and the emission predictions were inexact, particularly for weak, optically thin lines.4 This problem also resulted from a limitation of the ratran version with respect to the spatial sampling of the intensity distribution for a convolution with a telescope beam. The relevant part of the ratran code was corrected by the authors with the May 2003 release of their software (F. F. S. van der Tak 2006, private communication). To correct this issue, we redid the numerical models presented in the original paper using the May 2003 release of the ratran software and made tests to ensure that the spatial intensity distribution used to calculate the emission detected by a given telescope beam is sampled with a sufficient spatial resolution. The corrected version of the radiation transfer model does not affect the first step, where the level population is calculated; however, the beam-averaged line intensities calculated from the level populations are generally lower than quoted in the original paper. The impact is moderate for the ground-state transitions and for the models with a water production rate of Q29=1 (M1, M6, M7), but can be substantial for the emission in weak comets and the H218O

  1. Infrared [Fe II] Emission Lines from Radiative Atomic Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Raymond, John C.; Kim, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-06-01

    [Fe II] emission lines are prominent in the infrared (IR) and important as diagnostic tools for radiative atomic shocks. We investigate the emission characteristics of [Fe II] lines using a shock code developed by te{raymond1979} with updated atomic parameters. We first review general characteristics of the IR [Fe II] emission lines from shocked gas, and derive their fluxes as a function of shock speed and ambient density. We have compiled available IR [Fe II] line observations of interstellar shocks and compare them to the ratios predicted from our model. The sample includes both young and old supernova remnants in the Galaxy and the Large Magellanic Cloud and several Herbig-Haro objects. We find that the observed ratios of the IR [Fe II] lines generally fall on our grid of shock models, but the ratios of some mid-IR lines, e.g., fethreefive/fetwofive, fefive/fetwofive, and fefive/feoneseven, are significantly offset from our model grid. We discuss possible explanations and conclude that while uncertainties in the shock modeling and the observations certainly exist, the uncertainty in atomic rates appears to be the major source of discrepancy.

  2. Millimeter emission lines in Orion A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovas, F. J.; Johnson, D. R.; Buhl, D.; Snyder, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    During the course of a search of Orion A for signals from three large organic molecules, several millimeter-wave lines from known interstellar molecules were observed. Results are reported for observations of methanol (CH3OH), methyl cyanide (CH3CN), methyl acetylene (CH3CCH), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) and (Si-29)O. Emission signals from two hydrogen recombination lines (H41-alpha and H42-alpha) detected from the H II region of Orion A are also reported. Negative results were obtained for several millimeter-wave transitions of ethylene oxide, acetone, and cyclopropenone.

  3. UV resonance line dayglow emissions on earth and Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladstone, G. Randall

    1988-01-01

    The similarities and differnces between atomic resonance line emissions on earth and Jupiter are studied. For earth, the scattering of the conservative atomic oxygen triplet transition at 1304 A and the nonconservative atomic oxygen sextuplet at 989 A is considered. For Jupiter, the scattering of the conservative atomic hydrogen doublet at 1216 A and the nonconservative atomic hydrogen doublet at 1026 A are addressed. Models are presented for the intensities of the emission features as seen from a distance of several planetary radii, using the same observational geometry for both earth and Jupiter. Variations of the line-integrated emissions across the disk and near the limb of each planet are examined in detail. Line profiles for the emission near the limb and at disk-center are also studied. The models reveal the importance of including inhomogeneities and temperature variations of the atmosphere in scattering models, and indicate that outer planet emissions previously interpreted as 'electroglow' may be solely due to resonant scattering of solar emissions.

  4. Linear Polarization Measurements of Chromospheric Emission Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Keller, C. U.

    2003-01-01

    We have used the Zurich Imaging Stokes Polarimeter (ZIMPOL I) with the McMath-Pierce 1.5 m main telescope on Kitt Peak to obtain linear polarization measurements of the off-limb chromosphere with a sensitivity better than 1 x 10(exp -5). We found that the off-disk observations require a combination of good seeing (to show the emission lines) and a clean heliostat (to avoid contamination by scattered light from the Sun's disk). When these conditions were met, we obtained the following principal results: 1. Sometimes self-reversed emission lines of neutral and singly ionized metals showed linear polarization caused by the transverse Zeeman effect or by instrumental cross talk from the longitudinal Zeeman effect in chromospheric magnetic fields. Otherwise, these lines tended to depolarize the scattered continuum radiation by amounts that ranged up to 0.2%. 2. Lines previously known to show scattering polarization just inside the limb (such as the Na I lambda5889 D2 and the He I lambda5876 D3 lines) showed even more polarization above the Sun's limb, with values approaching 0.7%. 3. The O I triplet at lambda7772, lambda7774, and lambda7775 showed a range of polarizations. The lambda7775 line, whose maximum intrinsic polarizability, P(sub max), is less than 1%, revealed mainly Zeeman contributions from chromospheric magnetic fields. However, the more sensitive lambda7772 (P(sub max) = 19%) and lambda7774 (P(sub max) = 29%) lines had relatively strong scattering polarizations of approximately 0.3% in addition to their Zeeman polarizations. At times of good seeing, the polarization spectra resolve into fine structures that seem to be chromospheric spicules.

  5. Newly Identified Rydberg Emission Lines in Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, David K.; Rudy, R. J.; Bernstein, L. S.

    2008-09-01

    Newly Identified Rydberg Emission Lines in Novae David K. Lynch, Richard. J. Rudy (The Aerospace Corporation) & Lawrence S. Bernstein (Spectral Sciences, Inc.) Novae spectra in the near infrared frequently show a set of six emission lines that have not been positively identified (Williams, Longmore, & Geballe 1996, MNRAS, 279, 804; Lynch et al. 2001, AJ, 122, 2013; Rudy et al. 2002 ApJ, 573, 794; Lynch et al. 2004 Astron. J. 127, 1089-1097). These lines are at 0.8926, 1.1114, 1.1901, 1.5545, 2.0996 and 2.425 µm ± 0.005 µm. Krautter et al. (1984 A&A 137, 304) suggested that three of the lines were due to rydberg (hydrogenic) transitions in an unspecified atomic species that was in the 4th or 5th ionization stage (core charge = 4 & 5). We believe that Krautter et al.'s explanation is correct based on 4 additional lines that we have identified in the visible and near infrared spectrum of V723 Cassiopeiae. The observed Rydberg lines appear to originate from high angular momentum states with negligible quantum defects. The species cannot be determined with any certainty because in rydberg states, the outer electron sees a nucleus shielded by the inner electrons and together the inner atom appears to have a charge of +1, like hydrogen. As a result, the atom looks hydrogenic and species such as CV, NV, OV, MgV, SiV, etc. have their rydberg transitions at very similar wavelengths. All the lines represent permitted transitions, most likely formed by recombination. Atoms with core charges 4, 5 & 6 are rarely seen in the astrophysical environment because an extremely hot radiation field is necessary to ionize them. Thermonuclear runaways on the surface of a white dwarf can reach millions of degrees K, and thus there are enough X-ray photons available to achieve the necessary high ionization levels.

  6. Observations of southern emission-line stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henize, K. G.

    1976-01-01

    A catalog of 1929 stars showing H-alpha emission on photographic plates is presented which covers the entire southern sky south of declination -25 deg to a red limiting magnitude of about 11.0. The catalog provides previous designations of known emission-line stars equatorial (1900) and galactic coordinates, visual and photographic magnitudes, H-alpha emission parameters, spectral types, and notes on unusual spectral features. The objects listed include 16 M stars, 25 S stars, 37 carbon stars, 20 symbiotic stars, 40 confirmed or suspected T Tauri stars, 16 novae, 14 planetary nebulae, 11 P Cygni stars, 9 Bep stars, 87 confirmed or suspected Wolf-Rayet stars, and 26 'peculiar' stars. Two new T associations are discovered, one in Lupus and one in Chamaeleon. Objects with variations in continuum or H-alpha intensity are noted, and the distribution by spectral type is analyzed. It is found that the sky distribution of these emission-line stars shows significant concentrations in the region of the small Sagittarius cloud and in the Carina region.

  7. Spectropolarimetry of the molecular hydrogen line emission from OMC-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Michael G.; Hough, J. H.; Axon, David J.; Hasegawa, T.; Tamura, M.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of the H2 v = 1-0 S(1) line at 35 km/s velocity resolution were obtained at several locations within OMC-1, including the molecular hydrogen reflection nebula. All line profiles are smooth and show no evidence for being composed of discrete components. The data are discussed with respect to a model for the H2 line formation in which the emission originates in discrete clumps moving at different velocities. It is suggested that the extended blue wing may come from fast-moving clumps embedded in a wind.

  8. SED and Emission Line Properties of Red 2MASS AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuraszkiewicz, Joanna; Wilkes, Belinda J.; Schmidt, Gary; Ghosh, Himel

    2009-09-01

    Radio and far-IR surveys, and modeling of the cosmic X-ray background suggest that a large population of obscured AGN has been missed by traditional, optical surveys. The Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) has revealed a large population (surface density comparable to that of optically selected AGN with Ks<14.5mag) of mostly nearby (median z=0.25), red, moderately obscured AGN, among which 75% are previously unidentified emission-line AGN, with 85% showing broad emission lines. We present the SED and emission line properties of 44 such red (J-Ks>2) 2MASS AGN observed with Chandra. They lie at z<0.37, span a full range of spectral types (Type 1, intermediate, Type 2),Ks-to-X-ray slopes, and polarization (<13%). Their IR-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are red in the near-IR/opt/UV showing little or no blue bump. The optical colors are affected by reddening, host galaxy emission, redshift, and in few, highly polarized objects, also by scattered AGN light. The levels of obscuration obtained from optical, X-rays, and far-IR imply N_H emission line equivalent widths, suggest a predominance of inclined objects in which obscuration/inclination allows us to see and study weaker emission components which are generally swamped by the direct AGN light. PCA analysis of the IR-X-ray SED and emission line properties shows that, while obscuration/inclination is important, the dominant cause of variance in the sample (eigenvector 1) is the L/L_{edd} ratio (perhaps because the red near-IR selection limits the range of inclination/obscuration values in our sample). This analysis also distinguishes two sources of obscuration: the host galaxy and circumnuclear absorption.

  9. EVOLUTION OF [O III] {lambda}5007 EMISSION-LINE PROFILES IN NARROW EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Mao, Y. F.; Wei, J. Y.

    2011-11-01

    The active galactic nucleus (AGN)-host co-evolution issue is investigated here by focusing on the evolution of the [O III] {lambda}5007 emission-line profile. A large sample of narrow emission-line galaxies is selected from the Max-Planck Institute for Astrophysics/Johns Hopkins University Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 catalog to simultaneously measure both the [O III] line profile and circumnuclear stellar population in an individual spectrum. By requiring that (1) the [O III] line signal-to-noise ratio is larger than 30 and (2) the [O III] line width is larger than the instrumental resolution by a factor of two, our sample is narrowed down to 2333 Seyfert galaxies/LINERs (AGNs), 793 transition galaxies, and 190 star-forming galaxies. In addition to the commonly used profile parameters (i.e., line centroid, relative velocity shift, and velocity dispersion), two dimensionless shape parameters, skewness and kurtosis, are used to quantify the line shape deviation from a pure Gaussian function. We show that the transition galaxies are systematically associated with narrower line widths and weaker [O III] broad wings than the AGNs, which implies that the kinematics of emission-line gas are different in the two kinds of objects. By combining the measured host properties and line shape parameters, we find that the AGNs with stronger blue asymmetries tend to be associated with younger stellar populations. However, a similar trend is not identified in the transition galaxies. The failure likely results from a selection effect in which the transition galaxies are systematically associated with younger stellar populations than the AGNs. The evolutionary significance revealed here suggests that both narrow-line region kinematics and outflow feedback in AGNs co-evolve with their host galaxies.

  10. Evolution of [O III] λ5007 Emission-line Profiles in Narrow Emission-line Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Mao, Y. F.; Wei, J. Y.

    2011-11-01

    The active galactic nucleus (AGN)-host co-evolution issue is investigated here by focusing on the evolution of the [O III] λ5007 emission-line profile. A large sample of narrow emission-line galaxies is selected from the Max-Planck Institute for Astrophysics/Johns Hopkins University Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 catalog to simultaneously measure both the [O III] line profile and circumnuclear stellar population in an individual spectrum. By requiring that (1) the [O III] line signal-to-noise ratio is larger than 30 and (2) the [O III] line width is larger than the instrumental resolution by a factor of two, our sample is narrowed down to 2333 Seyfert galaxies/LINERs (AGNs), 793 transition galaxies, and 190 star-forming galaxies. In addition to the commonly used profile parameters (i.e., line centroid, relative velocity shift, and velocity dispersion), two dimensionless shape parameters, skewness and kurtosis, are used to quantify the line shape deviation from a pure Gaussian function. We show that the transition galaxies are systematically associated with narrower line widths and weaker [O III] broad wings than the AGNs, which implies that the kinematics of emission-line gas are different in the two kinds of objects. By combining the measured host properties and line shape parameters, we find that the AGNs with stronger blue asymmetries tend to be associated with younger stellar populations. However, a similar trend is not identified in the transition galaxies. The failure likely results from a selection effect in which the transition galaxies are systematically associated with younger stellar populations than the AGNs. The evolutionary significance revealed here suggests that both narrow-line region kinematics and outflow feedback in AGNs co-evolve with their host galaxies.

  11. Spectral classification of emission-line galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Veilleux, S.; Osterbrock, D.E.

    1987-02-01

    A revised method of classification of narrow-line active galaxies and H II region-like galaxies is proposed. It involves the line ratios which take full advantage of the physical distinction between the two types of objects and minimize the effects of reddening correction and errors in the flux calibration. Large sets of internally consistent data are used, including new, previously unpublished measurements. Predictions of recent photoionization models by power-law spectra and by hot stars are compared with the observations. The classification is based on the observational data interpreted on the basis of these models. 63 references.

  12. Spectral classification of emission-line galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain; Osterbrock, Donald E.

    1987-01-01

    A revised method of classification of narrow line active galaxies and H II region-like galaxies is proposed. It involves the line ratios (O III) lambda 5007/H beta, (N II) lambda 6583/H alpha, (S II) (lambda lambda 6716 = 6731)/H alpha, and (O I) lambda 6300/H alpha. These line ratios take full advantage of the physical distinction between the two types of objects and minimize the effects of reddening correction and errors in the flux calibration. Large sets of internally consistent data are used including new previously unpublished measurements. Prediction of recent photoionization models by power law spectra and by hot stars are compared with the observations. The classification is based on the observational data interpreted on the basis of these models.

  13. Spectrophotometry of emission-line stars in the magellanic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohannan, Bruce

    1990-01-01

    The strong emission lines in the most luminous stars in the Magellanic Clouds indicate that these stars have such strong stellar winds that their photospheres are so masked that optical absorption lines do not provide an accurate measure of photospheric conditions. In the research funded by this grant, temperatures and gravities of emission-line stars both in the Large (LMC) and Small Magellanic Clouds (SMC) have been measured by fitting of continuum ultraviolet-optical fluxes observed with IUE with theoretical model atmospheres. Preliminary results from this work formed a major part of an invited review 'The Distribution of Types of Luminous Blue Variables'. Interpretation of the IUE observations obtained in this grant and archive data were also included in a talk at the First Boulder-Munich Hot Stars Workshop. Final results of these studies are now being completed for publication in refereed journals.

  14. Infrared emission-line spectrum of Gamma Cassiopeiae

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, F.; Simon, M.

    1987-07-01

    The near-IR spectrum of Gamma Cas contains emission lines of H I, He I, and Mg II. No lines of low-excitation species, such as are found in cool and dense environments, are detected. At the time of the observations,the observed Br-alpha and Br-gamma profiles were double-peaked, with V/R roughly 0.5 and FWHM roughly 260 km/s. The Br-gamma line profile varied significantly over the 4.5 month interval between the observations and those published by Chabaev and Maillard in 1985. The IR hydrogen line fluxes indicate that these lines are formed in a small, dense, optically thick region where the density of ionized gas declines sharply with distance from the star. Both the line profiles and fluxes are shown to be inconsistent with the predictions of standard stellar wind theory, but are in qualitative agreement with a rotating disk model such as was proposed in 1978 by Poeckert and Marlborough. The observations are discussed briefly in terms of their similarities and differences with the IR emission-line spectra of luminous young stellar objects. 40 references.

  15. The infrared emission-line spectrum of Gamma Cassiopeiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, F.; Simon, M.

    1987-07-01

    The near-IR spectrum of Gamma Cas contains emission lines of H I, He I, and Mg II. No lines of low-excitation species, such as are found in cool and dense environments, are detected. At the time of the observations,the observed Br-alpha and Br-gamma profiles were double-peaked, with V/R roughly 0.5 and FWHM roughly 260 km/s. The Br-gamma line profile varied significantly over the 4.5 month interval between the observations and those published by Chabaev and Maillard in 1985. The IR hydrogen line fluxes indicate that these lines are formed in a small, dense, optically thick region where the density of ionized gas declines sharply with distance from the star. Both the line profiles and fluxes are shown to be inconsistent with the predictions of standard stellar wind theory, but are in qualitative agreement with a rotating disk model such as was proposed in 1978 by Poeckert and Marlborough. The observations are discussed briefly in terms of their similarities and differences with the IR emission-line spectra of luminous young stellar objects.

  16. Do the Line Widths of Coronal Emission Lines Increase with Height above the Limb?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jagdev; Sakurai, Takashi; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi

    2006-03-01

    In our earlier studies we obtained off-the-limb spectroscopic observations in a number of forbidden emission lines ([Fe X-XIV]) to study the physical properties and their temporal variations in steady coronal structures. Short exposure times adopted in those observations permitted us to study the variation in line widths up to about 150" above the limb. With a view to investigating the variations in the parameters of coronal emission lines up to about 500", we made raster scans with exposure times that are longer than the earlier exposure times by a factor of about 10. We find that the FWHM of the [Fe XIV] 5303 Å line decreases up to 300''+/-50'' and then remains more or less the same up to 500", while that of the [Fe X] 6374 Å line increases up to about 250" and subsequently remains unchanged. The FWHMs of the [Fe XI] 7892 Å and [Fe XIII] 10747 Å lines show an intermediate behavior. Furthermore, the ratio of the FWHM of 6374 to 5303 Å increases from 0.93 at the limb to 1.18 at 200" above the limb. The nonvariability in the FWHM of emission lines after about 300" above the limb in steady coronal structures does not support the prevailing view that the nonthermal velocity increases with height due to either the coronal waves or the high-velocity solar wind. The present results indicate the inadequacy of the earlier coronal loop models. The observed variations in FWHM of the coronal emission lines with height above the limb can be explained by assuming the recent model of coronal loops proposed by Akiyama et al.

  17. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-05-08

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using, a metal hydride.

  18. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-03-30

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

  19. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

  20. Cloudy 94 and Applications to Quasar Emission Line Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferland, Gary J.

    2000-01-01

    This review discusses the most recent developments of the plasma simulation code Cloudy and its application to the, emission-line regions of quasars. The longterm goal is to develop the tools needed to determine the chemical composition of the emitting gas and the luminosity of the central engine for any emission line source. Emission lines and the underlying thermal continuum are formed in plasmas that are far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Their thermal and ionization states are the result of a balance of a vast set of microphysical processes. Once produced, radiation must, propagate out of the (usually) optically thick source. No analytic solutions are possible, and recourse to numerical simulations is necessary. I am developing the large-scale plasma simulation code Cloudy as an investigative tool for this work, much as an observer might build a spectrometer. This review describes the current version of Cloudy, version 94. It describes improvements made since the, release of the previous version, C90. The major recent, application has been the development of the "Locally Optimally-Emitting Cloud" (LOC) model of AGN emission line regions. Powerful selection effects, introduced by the atomic physics and line formation process, permit individual lines to form most efficiently only near certain selected parameters. These selection effects, together with the presence of gas with a wide range of conditions, are enough to reproduce the spectrum of a typical quasar with little dependence on details. The spectrum actually carries little information to the identity of the emitters. I view this as a major step forward since it provides a method to handle accidental details at the source, so that we can concentrate on essential information such as the luminosity or chemical composition of the quasar.

  1. Emission lines and shock waves in RR Lyrae stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillet, D.; Fokin, A. B.

    2014-05-01

    Context. Emission lines observed in radially pulsating stars are thought to be produced by atoms de-exciting after being excited by a shock wave that is traveling into and then compressing, heating, and accelerating the atmospheric gas. Aims: With the help of recent observations, we examine the origin of all the different types of emission lines of hydrogen and helium that appear during a pulsation cycle. Methods: To analyze the physical origin of emission lines, we used the different models of atmospheric dynamics of RR Lyrae stars that have been calculated so far. Results: In contrast to a recent explanation, we propose that the redshifted emission component of Hα, which occurs near the pulsation phase 0.3, is produced by the main shock. In this case, the emission is the natural consequence of the large extension of the expanding atmosphere. Therefore, this (weak) emission should only be observed in RR Lyrae stars for which the main shock will propagate far enough from the photosphere. It appears as a P-Cygni type profile. We estimate the shock front velocity during the shock propagation in the atmosphere and show that it decreases by 40% when the Hα emitting-shock passes from the photospheric level to the upper atmosphere. The Hα P-Cygni profile observed in long-period Cepheids also seems to be caused by the main shock wave. Although to date He II has only been detected in some Blazhko stars, a comprehensive survey of RR Lyrae stars is necessary to confirm this trend, so we can say that the most intense shocks will only be observed in Blazhko stars. Conclusions: The development of a model of atmospheric pulsation that takes the effects of 2D and 3D convection into account, seems to be a necessary step to fully quantify the effects of shock waves on the atmospheric dynamics of radially pulsating stars.

  2. Emission Line Profiles of Warped Disks in a Kerr Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. L.; Wang, J. C.

    2013-11-01

    The computations of emission line profiles of a warped disk around a Kerr black hole are discussed in this paper, which can be divided into two parts. In the first part, the geodesic motion in a Kerr spacetime and its equations with integral forms are presented. The equations are solved with the Weierstrass' elliptic functions and integrals. Making use of the elliptic functions, the Boyer-Lindquist (B-L) coordinates and the affine parameter σ are expressed semi-analytically as the functions of the parameter p. Then a code named ynogk (Yunnan Observatory Geodesic Kerr) is introduced based on the above discussions to calculate the null geodesics fast in a Kerr spacetime. In the second part of the paper, as an application of ynogk, the emission line profiles of a warped disk are investigated in detail. Here the structure model of the disk is specified according to the results of Bardeen and Petterson in 1975, and the line profiles are computed with the ray-tracing method. Finally, the discussions and conclusions of the computing results are presented, which indicate that the line profiles are dependent mainly on the inclination and azimuthal angles of the observer and the index of emissivity, and have the three-horn even multiple-horn structures comparing to those of a standard thin accretion disk.

  3. Plasma simulations of emission line regions in high energy environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Chris T.

    This dissertation focuses on understanding two different, but in each case extreme, astrophysical environments: the Crab Nebula and emission line galaxies. These relatively local objects are well constrained by observations and are test cases of phenomena seen at high-z where detailed observations are rare. The tool used to study these objects is the plasma simulation code known as Cloudy. The introduction provides a brief summary of relevant physical concepts in nebular astrophysics and presents the basic features and assumptions of Cloudy. The first object investigated with Cloudy, the Crab Nebula, is a nearby supernova remnant that previously has been subject to photoionization modeling to reproduce the ionized emission seen in the nebula's filamentary structure. However, there are still several unanswered questions: (1) What excites the H2 emitting gas? (2) How much mass is in the molecular component? (3) How did the H2 form? (4) What is nature of the dust grains? A large suite of observations including long slit optical and NIR spectra over ionized, neutral and molecular gas in addition to HST and NIR ground based images constrain a particularly bright region of H2 emission, Knot 51, which exhibits a high excitation temperature of ˜3000 K. Simulations of K51 revealed that only a trace amount of H2 is needed to reproduce the observed emission and that H2 forms through an uncommon nebular process known as associative detachment. The final chapters of this dissertation focus on interpreting the narrow line region (NLR) in low-z emission line galaxies selected by a novel technique known as mean field independent component analysis (MFICA). A mixture of starlight and radiation from an AGN excites the gas present in galaxies. MFICA separates galaxies over a wide range of ionization into subsets of pure AGN and pure star forming galaxies allowing simulations to reveal the properties responsible for their observed variation in ionization. Emission line ratios can

  4. Line Emission from Radiation-pressurized H II Regions. I. Internal Structure and Line Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Sherry C. C.; Verdolini, Silvia; Krumholz, Mark R.; Matzner, Christopher D.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    2013-05-01

    The emission line ratios [O III] λ5007/Hβ and [N II] λ6584/Hα have been adopted as an empirical way to distinguish between the fundamentally different mechanisms of ionization in emission-line galaxies. However, detailed interpretation of these diagnostics requires calculations of the internal structure of the emitting H II regions, and these calculations depend on the assumptions one makes about the relative importance of radiation pressure and stellar winds. In this paper, we construct a grid of quasi-static H II region models to explore how choices about these parameters alter H II regions' emission line ratios. We find that when radiation pressure is included in our models, H II regions reach a saturation point beyond which further increase in the luminosity of the driving stars does not produce any further increase in effective ionization parameter, and thus does not yield any further alteration in an H II region's line ratio. We also show that if stellar winds are assumed to be strong, the maximum possible ionization parameter is quite low. As a result of this effect, it is inconsistent to simultaneously assume that H II regions are wind-blown bubbles and that they have high ionization parameters; some popular H II region models suffer from this inconsistency. Our work in this paper provides a foundation for a companion paper in which we embed the model grids we compute here within a population synthesis code that enables us to compute the integrated line emission from galactic populations of H II regions.

  5. SHAPEMOL: a 3D code for calculating CO line emission in planetary and protoplanetary nebulae. Detailed model-fitting of the complex nebula NGC 6302

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santander-García, M.; Bujarrabal, V.; Koning, N.; Steffen, W.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Modern instrumentation in radioastronomy constitutes a valuable tool for studying the Universe: ALMA has reached unprecedented sensitivities and spatial resolution, while Herschel/HIFI has opened a new window (most of the sub-mm and far-infrared ranges are only accessible from space) for probing molecular warm gas (~50-1000 K). On the other hand, the software SHAPE has emerged in the past few years as a standard tool for determining the morphology and velocity field of different kinds of gaseous emission nebulae via spatio-kinematical modelling. Standard SHAPE implements radiative transfer solving, but it is only available for atomic species and not for molecules. Aims: Being aware of the growing importance of the development of tools for simplifying the analyses of molecular data from new-era observatories, we introduce the computer code shapemol, a complement to SHAPE, with which we intend to fill the so-far under-developed molecular niche. Methods: shapemol enables user-friendly, spatio-kinematic modelling with accurate non-LTE calculations of excitation and radiative transfer in CO lines. Currently, it allows radiative transfer solving in the 12CO and 13CO J = 1-0 to J = 17-16 lines, but its implementation permits easily extending the code to different transitions and other molecular species, either by the code developers or by the user. Used along SHAPE, shapemol allows easily generating synthetic maps to test against interferometric observations, as well as synthetic line profiles to match single-dish observations. Results: We give a full description of how shapemol works, and we discuss its limitations and the sources of uncertainty to be expected in the final synthetic profiles or maps. As an example of the power and versatility of shapemol, we build a model of the molecular envelope of the planetary nebula NGC 6302 and compare it with 12CO and 13CO J = 2-1 interferometric maps from SMA and high-J transitions from Herschel/HIFI. We find the

  6. An objective prism survey of emission line galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.-Y.; Huang, Y.-W.; Feng, X.-C.

    1986-09-01

    The first list of emission line objects detected as part of an object prism survey of emission line galaxies begun in China in 1981 is presented. The instrument and observations are described, and the identification of emission-line galaxies is discussed. The spectral structural classification of the presented objects is addressed. On a dozen plates covering some 220 square degrees of sky, 50 emission line objects were detected, 47 of which are galaxies and the other three of which are planetary nebulae. Finding charts of the objects are presented.

  7. ESTIMATION OF RELATIVISTIC ACCRETION DISK PARAMETERS FROM IRON LINE EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    V. PARIEV; B. BROMLEY; W. MILLER

    2001-03-01

    The observed iron K{alpha} fluorescence lines in Seyfert I galaxies provide strong evidence for an accretion disk near a supermassive black hole as a source of the emission. Here we present an analysis of the geometrical and kinematic properties of the disk based on the extreme frequency shifts of a line profile as determined by measurable flux in both the red and blue wings. The edges of the line are insensitive to the distribution of the X-ray flux over the disk, and hence provide a robust alternative to profile fitting of disk parameters. Our approach yields new, strong bounds on the inclination angle of the disk and the location of the emitting region. We apply our method to interpret observational data from MCG-6-30-15 and find that the commonly assumed inclination 30{degree} for the accretion disk in MCG-6-30-15 is inconsistent with the position of the blue edge of the line at a 3{sigma} level. A thick turbulent disk model or the presence of highly ionized iron may reconcile the bounds on inclination from the line edges with the full line profile fits based on simple, geometrically thin disk models. The bounds on the innermost radius of disk emission indicate that the black hole in MCG-6-30-15 is rotating faster than 30% of theoretical maximum. When applied to data from NGC 4151, our method gives bounds on the inclination angle of the X-ray emitting inner disk of 50 {+-} 10{degree}, consistent with the presence of an ionization cone grazing the disk as proposed by Pedlar et al. (1993). The frequency extrema analysis also provides limits to the innermost disk radius in another Seyfert 1 galaxy, NGC 3516, and is suggestive of a thick disk model.

  8. Polarization diagnostics for cool core cluster emission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, W. B.; Pringle, J. E.; Cracraft, M.; Meyer, E. T.; Carswell, R. F.; Voit, G. M.; Donahue, M.; Hough, J. H.; Manset, N.

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the interaction between low-excitation gas filaments at ∼10{sup 4} K, seen in optical line emission, and diffuse X-ray emitting coronal gas at ∼10{sup 7} K in the centers of galaxy clusters remains a puzzle. The presence of a strong, empirical correlation between the two gas phases is indicative of a fundamental relationship between them, though as yet of undetermined cause. The cooler filaments, originally thought to have condensed from the hot gas, could also arise from a merger or the disturbance of cool circumnuclear gas by nuclear activity. Here, we have searched for intrinsic line emission polarization in cool core galaxy clusters as a diagnostic of fundamental transport processes. Drawing on developments in solar astrophysics, direct energetic particle impact induced polarization holds the promise to definitively determine the role of collisional processes such as thermal conduction in the ISM physics of galaxy clusters, while providing insight into other highly anisotropic excitation mechanisms such as shocks, intense radiation fields, and suprathermal particles. Under certain physical conditions, theoretical calculations predict of the order of 10% polarization. Our observations of the filaments in four nearby cool core clusters place stringent upper limits (≲ 0.1%) on the presence of emission line polarization, requiring that if thermal conduction is operative, the thermal gradients are not in the saturated regime. This limit is consistent with theoretical models of the thermal structure of filament interfaces.

  9. Sodium D-line emission from Io - Comparison of observed and theoretical line profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Matson, D. L.; Johnson, T. V.; Bergstralh, J. T.

    1978-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of the D-line profiles have been obtained for Io's sodium emission cloud. These lines, which are produced through resonance scattering of sunlight, are broad and asymmetric and can be used to infer source and dynamical properties of the sodium cloud. In this paper we compare line profile data with theoretical line shapes computed for several assumed initial velocity distributions corresponding to various source mechanisms. We also examine the consequences of source distributions which are nonuniform over the surface of Io. It is found that the experimental data are compatible with escape of sodium atoms from the leading hemisphere of Io and with velocity distributions characteristic of sputtering processes. Thermal escape and simple models of plasma sweeping are found to be incompatible with the observations.

  10. Infrared coronal emission lines and the possibility of their maser emission in Seyfert nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Feldman, Uri; Smith, Howard A.; Klapisch, Marcel; Bhatia, Anand K.; Bar-Shalom, Abi

    1993-01-01

    Energetic emitting regions have traditionally been studied via x-ray, UV and optical emission lines of highly ionized intermediate mass elements. Such lines are often referred to as 'coronal lines' since the ions, when produced by collisional ionization, reach maximum abundance at electron temperatures of approx. 10(exp 5) - 10(exp 6) K typical of the sun's upper atmosphere. However, optical and UV coronal lines are also observed in a wide variety of Galactic and extragalactic sources including the Galactic interstellar medium, nova shells, supernova remnants, galaxies and QSOs. Infrared coronal lines are providing a new window for observation of energetic emitting regions in heavily dust obscured sources such as infrared bright merging galaxies and Seyfert nuclei and new opportunities for model constraints on physical conditions in these sources. Unlike their UV and optical counterparts, infrared coronal lines can be primary coolants of collisionally ionized plasmas with 10(exp 4) less than T(sub e)(K) less than 10(exp 6) which produce little or no optical or shorter wavelength coronal line emission. In addition, they provide a means to probe heavily dust obscured emitting regions which are often inaccessible to optical or UV line studies. In this poster, we provide results from new model calculations to support upcoming Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and current ground-based observing programs involving infrared coronal emission lines in AGN. We present a complete list of infrared (lambda greater than 1 micron) lines due to transitions within the ground configurations 2s(2)2p(k) and 3s(2)3p(k) (k = 1 to 5) or the first excited configurations 2s2p and 3s3p of highly ionized (x greater than or equal to 100 eV) astrophysically abundant (n(X)/n(H) greater than or equal to 10(exp -6)) elements. Included are approximately 74 lines in ions of O, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Fe, and Ni spanning a wavelength range of approximately 1 - 280 microns. We present new

  11. Enhanced line emission from laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timmer, C.; Srivastava, S. K.; Hall, T. E.; Fucaloro, A. F.

    1991-01-01

    This communication reports the first systematic study on background gas-induced spectral-line-emission enhancement from laser-produced plasmas. Line emission from aluminum plasmas was enhanced by factors of up to 35 by the introduction of He, Ne, Xe, or N2. The enhancement has been attributed to three-body recombination.

  12. Far-Infrared Water Line Emissions from Circumstellar Outflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wesley; Neufeld, David A.

    1995-01-01

    We have modeled the far-infrared water line emission expected from circumstellar outflows from oxygen-rich late-type stars, as a function of the mass-loss rate and the terminal outflow velocity. For each mass-loss rate and terminal outflow velocity considered, we computed self-consistently the gas density, temperature, outflow velocity, and water abundance as a function of distance from the star. We then used an escape probability method to solve for the equilibrium level populations of 80 rotational states of water and thereby obtained predictions for the luminosity of a large number of far-infrared rotational transitions of water. In common with previous models, our model predicts that water will be copiously produced in the warm circumstellar gas and that water rotational emission will dominate the radiative cooling. However, our use of a realistic radiative cooling function for water leads to a lower gas temperature than that predicted in previous models. Our predictions for the far-infrared water line luminosities are consequently significantly smaller than those obtained in previous studies. Observations to be carried out by the Infrared Space Observatory will provide a crucial test of the models presented here.

  13. The nature of faint emission-line galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smetanka, John J.

    1993-01-01

    One of the results of faint galaxy redshift surveys is the increased fraction of galaxies which have strong emission-line spectra. These faint surveys find that roughly 50 percent of the galaxies have an equivalent width of (OII), W sub 3727, greater than 20 A while this fraction is less than 20 percent in the DARS survey. This has been interpreted as evidence for strong evolution in the galaxy population at redshifts less than 0.5. In order to further investigate the properties of the galaxies in faint redshift surveys, two important factors must be addressed. The first is the observed correlation between color, luminosity, and W sub 3727. There is a correlation between color and the strength of emission lines, bluer galaxies having stronger emission features, as evident for Markarian galaxies and for galaxies in Kennicutt's spectrophotometric atlas. This correlation also applies galaxies in faint redshift surveys. In addition, low luminosity galaxies have a larger average W sub 3727 (and bluer colors) than higher luminosity galaxies. This is illustrated for Kennicutt's low z late-type galaxies, for the Durham Faint Surveys, and for galaxies in SA68. The second factor which must be incorporated into any interpretation of the faint emission galaxies is the different luminosity functions for galaxies depending on color. This is usually modeled by varying M* for different color classes (or morphological types); however, the shape of the luminosity function is different for galaxies with different colors. Low luminosity, blue galaxies have a much larger number density than low luminosity, red galaxies. Furthermore, the low luminosity end of the blue galaxy luminosity function is not well fit by a Schechter function. These two factors have been included in a very simple, no-evolution, model for the galaxy population. This model uses the luminosity functions from Shanks (1990) and spectral energy distributions (SED's) from Bruzual (1988). W sub 3727 is predicted using

  14. Narrowband emission line imaging spectrometry using Savart plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maione, Bryan; Brickson, Leandra; Kudenov, Michael; Escuti, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Polarization spatial heterodyne interferometry (PSHI) allows for the development of compact, vibration insensitive, high spectral resolution sensors. Introducing the imaging qualities of a lenslet array extends the advantages of PSHI to imaging interferometers. The use of Savart plates enables a birefringent interferometer that obtains higher spectral resolution with fewer optical aberrations when compared to alternative designs. In this paper, we describe the design, construction, calibration and validation of a narrowband emission line imaging spectrometer (NELIS), based on Savart plates and liquid crystal polarization gratings, along with its associated theoretical model. This sensor is advantageous for spectral imaging in the areas of remote sensing, biomedical imaging and machine vision.

  15. Detection of 15NNH+ in L1544: non-LTE modelling of dyazenilium hyperfine line emission and accurate 14N/15N values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzocchi, L.; Caselli, P.; Leonardo, E.; Dore, L.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Samples of pristine solar system material found in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles are highly enriched in 15N. Conspicuous nitrogen isotopic anomalies have also been measured in comets, and the 14N/15N abundance ratio of the Earth is itself higher than the recognised presolar value by almost a factor of two. Low-temperature ion/molecule reactions in the proto-solar nebula have been repeatedly indicated as being responsible for these 15N-enhancements. Aims: We have searched for 15N variants of the N2H+ ion in L1544, a prototypical starless cloud core that is one of the best candidate sources for detection owing to its low central core temperature and high CO depletion. The goal is to evaluate accurate and reliable 14N/15N ratio values for this species in the interstellar gas. Methods: A deep integration of the 15NNH+(1-0) line at 90.4 GHz was obtained with the IRAM 30 m telescope. Non-LTE radiative transfer modelling was performed on the J = 1-0 emissions of the parent and 15N-containing dyazenilium ions, using a Bonnor-Ebert sphere as a model for the source. Results: A high-quality fit of the N2H+(1-0) hyperfine spectrum has allowed us to derive a revised value of the N2H+ column density in L1544. Analysis of the observed N15NH+ and 15NNH+ spectra yielded an abundance ratio N(N15NH+)/N(15NNH+) = 1.1 ± 0.3. The obtained 14N/15N isotopic ratio is ~1000 ± 200, suggestive of a sizeable 15N depletion in this molecular ion. Such a result is not consistent with the prediction of the current nitrogen chemical models. Conclusions: Since chemical models predict high 15N fractionation of N2H+, we suggest that 15N14N, or 15N in some other molecular form, tends to deplete onto dust grains. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).Full Tables B.1-B.6 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http

  16. Cosmic rays and the emission line regions of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferland, G. J.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    The effects that the synchrotron emitting relativistic electrons could have on the emission line regions which characterize active nuclei are discussed. Detailed models of both the inner, dense, broad line region and the outer, lower density, narrow line region are presented, together with the first models of the optically emitting gas often found within extended radio lobes. If the relativistic gas which produces the synchrotron radio emission is mixed with the emission line region gas then significant changes in the emission line spectrum will result. The effects of the synchrotron emitting electrons on filaments in the Crab Nebula are discussed in an appendix, along with a comparison between the experimental calculations, which employ the mean escape probability formalism, and recent Hubbard and Puetter models.

  17. Iron emission line from the spiral galaxy M 101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Shigeo

    2016-06-01

    Archival Suzaku data of the face-on spiral galaxy M 101 were analyzed. An intense emission line at 6.72^{+0.10}_{-0.12}keV was detected in the central region. This line is identified with a K-line from He-like iron, which indicates the existence of a thin thermal plasma with a temperature of several keV. The iron line luminosity within the central 5'-radius region is estimated to be (2-12) × 1037 erg s-1. The origin of the iron emission line is discussed.

  18. Infrared coronal emission lines and the possibility of their laser emission in Seyfert nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Feldman, Uri; Smith, Howard A.; Klapisch, Marcel; Bhatia, Anand K.; Bar-Shalom, Avi

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented from detailed balance calculations, and a compilation of atomic data and other model calculations designed to support upcoming ISO and current observing programs involving IR coronal emission lines, together with a table with a complete line list of infrared transitions within the ground configurations 2s2 2p(k), 3s2 3p(k), and the first excited configurations 2s 2p and 3s 3p of highly ionized astrophysically abundant elements. The temperature and density parameter space for dominant cooling via IR coronal lines is presented, and the relationship of IR and optical coronal lines is discussed. It is found that, under physical conditions found in Seyfert nuclei, 14 of 70 transitions examined have significant population inversions in levels that give rise to IR coronal lines. Several IR coronal line transitions were found to have laser gain lengths that correspond to column densities of 10 exp 24-25/sq cm which are modeled to exist in Seyfert nuclei. Observations that can reveal inverted level populations and laser gain in IR coronal lines are suggested.

  19. Optical emission line monitor with background observation and cancellation

    DOEpatents

    Goff, David R.; Notestein, John E.

    1986-01-01

    A fiber optics based optical emission line monitoring system is provided in which selected spectral emission lines, such as the sodium D-line emission in coal combustion, may be detected in the presence of interferring background or blackbody radiation with emissions much greater in intensity than that of the emission line being detected. A bifurcated fiber optic light guide is adapted at the end of one branch to view the combustion light which is guided to a first bandpass filter, adapted to the common trunk end of the fiber. A portion of the light is reflected back through the common trunk portion of the fiber to a second bandpass filter adapted to the end of the other branch of the fiber. The first filter bandpass is centered at a wavelength corresponding to the emission line to be detected with a bandwidth of about three nanometers (nm). The second filter is centered at the same wavelength but having a width of about 10 nm. First and second light detectors are located to view the light passing through the first and second filters respectively. Thus, the second detector is blind to the light corresponding to the emission line of interest detected by the first detector and the difference between the two detector outputs is uniquely indicative of the intensity of only the combustion flame emission of interest. This instrument can reduce the effects of interferring blackbody radiation by greater than 20 dB.

  20. Optical emission line monitor with background observation and cancellation

    DOEpatents

    Goff, D.R.; Notestein, J.E.

    1985-01-04

    A fiber optics based optical emission line monitoring system is provided in which selected spectral emission lines, such as the sodium D-line emission in coal combustion, may be detected in the presence of interferring background or blackbody radiation with emissions much greater in intensity than that of the emission line being detected. A bifurcated fiber optic light guide is adapted at the end of one branch to view the combustion light which is guided to a first bandpass filter, adapted to the common trunk end of the fiber. A portion of the light is reflected back through the common trunk portion of the fiber to a second bandpass filter adapted to the end of the other branch of the fiber. The first filter bandpass is centered at a wavelength corresponding to the emission line to be detected with a bandwidth of about three nanometers (nm). The second filter is centered at the same wavelength but having a width of about 10 nm. First and second light detectors are located to view the light passing through the first and second filters respectively. Thus, the second detector is blind to the light corresponding to the emission line of interest detected by the first detector and the difference between the two detector outputs is uniquely indicative of the intensity of only the combustion flame emission of interest. This instrument can reduce the effects of interfering blackbody radiation by greater than 20 dB.

  1. Emission lines in the long period Cepheid l Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika; Love, Stanley G.

    1991-01-01

    For the Cepheid (l) Carinae with a pulsation period of 35.5 days we have studied the emission line fluxes as a function of pulsational phase in order to find out whether we see chromosphere and transition layer emission or whether we see emission due to an outward moving shock. All emission lines show a steep increase in flux shortly before maximum light suggestive of a shock moving through the surface layers. The large ratio of the C IV to C II line fluxes shows that these are not transition layer lines. During maximum light the large ratio of the C IV to C II line fluxes also suggests that we see emission from a shock with velocities greater than 100 km/sec such that C IV emission can be excited. With such velocities mass outflow appears possible. The variations seen in the Mg II line profiles show that there is an internal absorption over a broad velocity band independent of the pulsational phase. We attribute this absorption to a circumstellar 'shell'. This 'shell' appears to be seen also as spatially extended emission in the O I line at 1300 angstrom, which is probably excited by resonance with Ly beta.

  2. The stability of QSO/AGN broad emission line clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krinsky, I. S.; Puetter, R. C.

    1992-08-01

    Results of a numerical linear stability analysis of QSO/AGN emission-line clouds (ELCs) embedded within a confining hot intercloud medium (HIM) are reported. A first-order linear perturbation analysis reveals two important ionstabilities. The first instability is thermal in nature and arises in the interface region between the HIM and the ELC where thermal convection dominates gas heating; the growth time of the instability is approximately 1000 s, resulting in an ELC evaporation time of about 10 yr. The second instability is dynamic in nature, with the sound wave amplitude growing in response to radiative forces. The growth time of this instability is about 10 exp 6 s and essentially independent of the wavelength. The results suggest that if QSO/AGN ELCs have properties similar to those of the standard ELC model, then the broad-line region is in a constant state of flux in which ELCs continually form, are destroyed, and then re-formed.

  3. CO line emission from shock waves in molecular clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Draine, B.T.; Roberge, W.G.

    1984-07-15

    Calculations are presented of the emission spectrum of rotationally and vibrationally excited carbon monoxide in shocked interstellar molecular clouds. The calculations are based upon hydrodynamical shock models that include the effects of magnetically driven ion-neutral streaming. They incorporate a variety of collision processes that produce excited CO molecules, including H/sub 2/--CO collisions. The effects of photon trapping on the emission and excitation are included by means of a Sobolev-like approximation. Intensities are given for lines emitted from levels with J< or =60, for C-type shocks with speeds v/sub s/ from 5 to 50 km s/sup -1/, in clouds with densities n/sub H/ between 10/sup 2/ and 10/sup 6/ H nuclei per cm/sup 3/. Population inversions are found amongst the lowest levels of CO for a range of shock speeds and preshock conditions. Maser emission may be observable in favorable cases. Emission from vibrationally excited levels of CO may be detectable from v/sub s/> or approx. =35 km s/sup -1/ shocks in n/sub d/H = 10/sup 6/ cm/sup -3/ clouds.

  4. Emission lines in the long-period Cepheid l Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, Erika; Love, Stanley G.

    1994-01-01

    For the Cepheid l Carinae, with a pulsation period of 35.5 days, we have studied the emission-line fluxes as a function of pulsational phase in order to find out whether we see chromospheric and transition-layer emission due to an outward-moving shock. All emission lines show a steep increase in flux shortly before maximum light, suggestive of a shock moving through the surface layers. The large ratio of C IV to C II line fluxes shows that these are not transition-layer lines. During maximum light the large ratio of the large ratio of the C IV to C II line fluxes also suggests that we see emission from a shock with velocities greater than 100 km/s such that C IV emission can be excited. With such velocities mass outflow appears possible. The variations seen in the MG II line profiles show that there is an external absorption over a broad velocity band independent of the pulsation phase. We attribute this absorption to a circumstellar 'shell.' This 'shell' appears to be seen also as spatially extended emission in the O I line at 1300 A, which is probably excited by resonance with Ly beta.

  5. Fine structure line emission from supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Michael R.; Glassgold, Alfred E.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    1995-01-01

    We have detected (O I) 63 micron and (Si II) 35 micron emission from the oxygen-rich, M supergiants alpha Orionis (Betelgeuse), alpha Scorpii (Antares), and alpha Herculis (Rasalgethi). The measured fluxes indicate that the emission originates in dense, warm gas in the inner envelope or transition region where molecules and dust are expected to form and the acceleration of the wind occurs. Mass-loss rates are derived, evidence for time variability is presented, and results for other evolved stars are included.

  6. Fine structure line emission from supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Michael R.; Glassgold, Alfred E.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    We have detected (O I) 63 micron and (Si II) 35 micron emission from the oxygen-rich, M supergiants alpha Orionis (Betelgeuse), alpha Scorpii (Antares), and alpha Herculis (Rasalgethi). The measured fluxes indicate that the emission originates in dense, warm gas in the inner envelope or transition region where molecules and dust are expected to form and the acceleration of the wind occurs. Mass-loss rates are derived, evidence for time variability is presented, and results for other evolved stars are included.

  7. NIR spectroscopy of Palomar emission-line galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Rachel; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Bluck, Asa; Colina, Luis; Diaz, Ruben; Diaz-Santos, Tanio; Flohic, Helene; Gomez, Percy; Gonzalez-Martin, Omaira; Ho, Luis; Jorgensen, Inger; Lemoine-Busserolle, Marie; Levenson, Nancy; Lira, Paulina; McDermid, Richard; Perlman, Eric; Rodriguez-Ardila, Alberto; Riffel, Rogerio; Schiavon, Ricardo; Ramos Almeida, Cristina; Thanjavur, Karun; Winge, Claudia

    2012-02-01

    We propose GNIRS cross-dispersed spectroscopy of 60 Seyferts and LINERs from the Palomar galaxy sample. The spectra will advance our knowledge of AGN physics and lifecycles by demonstrating whether the accretion disk and nuclear dust properties change as a function of accretion rate, as predicted by theoretical models. They will be used to investigate the contribution of evolved stars to the line emission in LINERs, with implications for AGN demographics, and to make new stellar kinematic measurements for black hole mass estimates. The number and variety of spectral features that will appear in the data are expected to enable a wide range of science besides that highlighted in this proposal. For this reason, we plan a reduced proprietary period and to make the reduced spectra available to the community. We anticipate applying for time to observe the remaining emission-line galaxies in the (near-complete) Palomar sample over the next few semesters. The targets are distributed throughout the northern sky, making Gemini's queue mode ideal for this work. The fairly short observations are easily scheduled and can be carried out in suboptimal observing conditions.

  8. Modeling of radio emissions from Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Curran, D. B.

    We have developed a plasma model of the Neptunian magnetosphere that includes a density cavity centered on the L=6 magnetic field line. Assuming the O8 magnetic field model, we have performed ray tracing of smooth radio emission from Neptune, and the results generally support the findings of Ladreiter et al. (1991), but differ in details of the source locations. In addition, we have examined source locations of bursty radio emission that are consistent with propagation at small wave normal angles as hypothesized for the temperature anisotropic beam instability (TABI) (Winglee et al., 1992). The source locations are adjacent (complementary) to the sources of the smooth radio emission. Using previously developed plasma and magnetic field models for Uranus, we have performed a similar study of bursty radio emissions. Again the source locations appear to be adjacent to the source regions of smooth radio emission, consistent with the TABI.

  9. EMPIRICAL MODEL OF VEHICLE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An empirical model that characterizes the relationship between equilibrium vehicle emission distributions and malfunction, repair, and replacement rates by splitting vehicles into two emission categories has been developed. ross emitters and clean vehicles are defined by the magn...

  10. ACCRETION DISK TEMPERATURES OF QSOs: CONSTRAINTS FROM THE EMISSION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Bonning, E. W.; Shields, G. A.; Stevens, A. C.; Salviander, S. E-mail: shields@astro.as.utexas.edu E-mail: triples@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2013-06-10

    We compare QSO emission-line spectra to predictions based on theoretical ionizing continua of accretion disks. The observed line intensities do not show the expected trend of higher ionization with theoretical accretion disk temperature as predicted from the black hole mass and accretion rate. Consistent with earlier studies, this suggests that the inner disk does not reach temperatures as high as expected from standard disk theory. Modified radial temperature profiles, taking account of winds or advection in the inner disk, achieve better agreement with observation. The emission lines of radio-detected and radio-undetected sources show different trends as a function of the theoretically predicted disk temperature.

  11. The optical emission line spectrum of Mark 110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Véron-Cetty, M.-P.; Véron, P.; Joly, M.; Kollatschny, W.

    2007-11-01

    Aims:We analyse in detail the rich emission line spectrum of Mark 110 to determine the physical conditions in the nucleus of this object, a peculiar NLS1 without any detectable Fe II emission associated with the broad line region and with a λ5007/Hβ line ratio unusually large for a NLS1. Methods: We use 24 spectra obtained with the Marcario Low Resolution Spectrograph attached at the prime focus of the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly telescope at the McDonald observatory. We fitted the spectrum by identifying all the emission lines (about 220) detected in the wavelength range 4200-6900 Å (at rest). Results: The narrow emission lines are probably produced in a region with a density gradient in the range 103-106 cm-3 with a rather high column density (5×1021 cm-2). In addition to a narrow line system, three major broad line systems with different line velocity and width are required. We confirm the absence of broad Fe II emission lines. We speculate that Mark 110 is in fact a BLS1 with relatively “narrow” broad lines but with a BH mass large enough compared to its luminosity to have a lower than Eddington luminosity. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen. Table A.1 is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. Atomic Data and Emission Line Intensities for CA VII

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landi, E.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2003-01-01

    In the present work we calculate energy levels, transition probabilities and electron-ion collisional excitation rates for the 3s(sup 2)3p(sup 2), 3s3p(sup 3) and 3s(sup 2)3p3d configurations of the silicon-like ion Ca VII. The total number of intermediate coupling levels considered is 27. Collision strengths are calculated at seven incident electron energies: 8, 10, 15, 20, 30,40 and 60 Ry, using the Distorted Wave approximation and a 5-configuration model. Excitation rate coefficients are calculated by assuming a Maxwellian distribution of velocities and are used to calculate level populations and line emissivities under the assumption of statistical equilibrium. Line intensity ratios are calculated and compared with observed values measured from SERTS and SOHO/CDS spectra. The diagnostic potential of Ca VII is demonstrated, with particular emphasis on the possibility to measure the Ne/Ca relative abundance through simultaneous observations of Ca VII and N VI lines. Ca VII proves to be an excellent tool for the study of the FIP effect in the solar transition region.

  13. Helium shells and faint emission lines from slitless flash spectra.

    PubMed

    Bazin, Cyril; Koutchmy, Serge

    2013-05-01

    At the time of the two last solar total eclipses of August 1st, 2008 in Siberia and July 11th, 2010 in French Polynesia, high frame rate CCD flash spectra were obtained. These eclipses occurred in quiet Sun period and after. The slitless flash spectra show two helium shells, in the weak Paschen α 4686 Å line of the ionized helium HeII and in the neutral helium HeI line at 4713 Å. The extensions of these helium shells are typically 3 Mm. In prominences, the extension of the interface with the corona is much more extended. The observations and analysis of these lines can properly be done only in eclipse conditions, when the intensity threshold reaches the coronal level, and the parasitic scattered light is virtually zero. Under the layers of 1 Mm above the limb, many faint low FIP lines were also seen in emission. These emission lines are superposed on the continuum containing absorption lines. The solar limb can be defined using the weak continuum appearing between the emission lines at the time of the second and third contact. The variations of the singly ionized iron line, the HeI and HeII lines and the continuum intensity are analyzed. The intensity ratio of ionized to neutral helium is studied for evaluating the ionization rate in low layers up to 2 Mm and also around a prominence. PMID:25685435

  14. Helium shells and faint emission lines from slitless flash spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, Cyril; Koutchmy, Serge

    2013-05-01

    At the time of the two last solar total eclipses of August 1st, 2008 in Siberia and July 11th, 2010 in French Polynesia, high frame rate CCD flash spectra were obtained. These eclipses occurred in quiet Sun period and after. The slitless flash spectra show two helium shells, in the weak Paschen α 4686 Å line of the ionized helium HeII and in the neutral helium HeI line at 4713 Å. The extensions of these helium shells are typically 3 Mm. In prominences, the extension of the interface with the corona is much more extended. The observations and analysis of these lines can properly be done only in eclipse conditions, when the intensity threshold reaches the coronal level, and the parasitic scattered light is virtually zero. Under the layers of 1 Mm above the limb, many faint low FIP lines were also seen in emission. These emission lines are superposed on the continuum containing absorption lines. The solar limb can be defined using the weak continuum appearing between the emission lines at the time of the second and third contact. The variations of the singly ionized iron line, the HeI and HeII lines and the continuum intensity are analyzed. The intensity ratio of ionized to neutral helium is studied for evaluating the ionization rate in low layers up to 2 Mm and also around a prominence.

  15. Helium shells and faint emission lines from slitless flash spectra

    PubMed Central

    Bazin, Cyril; Koutchmy, Serge

    2013-01-01

    At the time of the two last solar total eclipses of August 1st, 2008 in Siberia and July 11th, 2010 in French Polynesia, high frame rate CCD flash spectra were obtained. These eclipses occurred in quiet Sun period and after. The slitless flash spectra show two helium shells, in the weak Paschen α 4686 Å line of the ionized helium HeII and in the neutral helium HeI line at 4713 Å. The extensions of these helium shells are typically 3 Mm. In prominences, the extension of the interface with the corona is much more extended. The observations and analysis of these lines can properly be done only in eclipse conditions, when the intensity threshold reaches the coronal level, and the parasitic scattered light is virtually zero. Under the layers of 1 Mm above the limb, many faint low FIP lines were also seen in emission. These emission lines are superposed on the continuum containing absorption lines. The solar limb can be defined using the weak continuum appearing between the emission lines at the time of the second and third contact. The variations of the singly ionized iron line, the HeI and HeII lines and the continuum intensity are analyzed. The intensity ratio of ionized to neutral helium is studied for evaluating the ionization rate in low layers up to 2 Mm and also around a prominence. PMID:25685435

  16. Hα Monitoring of Early-Type Emission Line Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Steven P.; Boettcher, E.; Wilson, S.; Hosek, M.

    2011-05-01

    We have begun a narrowband imaging program to monitor Hα emission in early-type stars in young open clusters and associations. A minority of early-type stars, particularly Be stars, show Hα in emission due to extended atmospheres and non-equilibrium conditions. Emission features commonly vary irregularly over a range of timescales (Porter, J.M. & Rivinus, T., P.A.S.P. 115:1153-1170, 2003). Some of the brightest such stars, e.g. γ Cas, have been spectroscopically monitored for Hα variability to help constrain models of the unstable disk, but there is relatively little ongoing monitoring in samples including fainter stars (Peters, G., Be Star Newsletter 39:3, 2009). Our program uses matched 5nm-wide on-band (656nm) and off-band (645nm) filters, in conjunction with the Hopkins Observatory 0.6-m telescope and CCD camera. Aperture photometry is done on all early-type stars in each frame, and results expressed as on-band to off-band ratios. Though wavelength-dependent information is lost compared with spectroscopy, imaging allows us to observe much fainter (and therefore many more) objects. Observing young clusters, rather than individual target stars, allows us to record multiple known and candidate emission line stars per frame, and provides multiple "normal" reference stars of similar spectral type. Observations began in the summer of 2010. This project has the potential to produce significant amounts of raw data, so a semi-automated data reduction process has been developed, including astrometric and photometric tasks. Early results, including some preliminary light curves and recovery of known Be stars at least as faint as R=13.9, are presented. We gratefully acknowledge support for student research through an REU grant to the Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium from the National Science Foundation, and from the Division III Research Funding Committee of Williams College.

  17. A Suzaku search for dark matter emission lines in the X-ray brightest galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, O.; Werner, N.; Allen, S. W.; Simionescu, A.; Kaastra, J. S.; Strigari, L. E.

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of a search for unidentified emission lines in deep Suzaku X-ray spectra of the central regions of the X-ray brightest galaxy clusters: Perseus, Coma, Virgo and Ophiuchus. We analyse an optimized energy range (3.2-5.3 keV) that is relatively free of instrumental features, and a plasma emission model incorporating the abundances of elements with the strongest expected emission lines at these energies (S, Ar, Ca) as free parameters. For the Perseus Cluster core, employing this model, we find evidence for an additional emission feature at an energy E=3.51^{+0.02}_{-0.01} keV with a flux of 2.87_{-0.38}^{+0.33}× 10^{-7} photons s^{-1} cm^{-2} arcmin^{-2}. At slightly larger radii, we detect an emission line at 3.59 ± 0.02 keV with a flux of 4.8_{-1.4}^{+1.7}× 10^{-8} photons s^{-1} cm^{-2} arcmin^{-2}. The properties of these features are broadly consistent with previous claims, although the radial variation of the line strength appears in tension with dark matter (DM) decay model predictions. Assuming a decaying DM origin for these features allows us to predict the energies and detected line fluxes for the other clusters. We do not detect an emission feature at the predicted energy and line flux in the Coma, Virgo and Ophiuchus clusters. The formal 99.5 per cent upper limits on the line strengths in each cluster are well below the decaying DM model predictions, disfavouring a decaying DM interpretation. The results of further analysis suggest that systematic effects associated with modelling the spectra for the Perseus Cluster, details of the assumed ionization balance and errors in the predicted spectral line emissivities may be largely responsible for the ˜3.55 keV feature.

  18. Iron and helium emission lines in classical T Tauri stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Georgina

    Results are presented for the He emission in 31 CTTS from the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud spanning two orders of magnitude in the mass accretion rate, and for the Fe emission in DR Tau, based on a series of high resolution echelle spectra. The He lines admit a description in terms of a narrow component ( NC) and a broad component (BC). The NC has FWHM between 32-55 km/s and centroid velocities near zero km/s or moderately redshifted, consistent with an origin in the postshock region of the magnetospheric accretion model. The BC, with FWHM between 128 and 287 km/s and centroid velocities between -93 and +35 km/s, includes a wind and an accretion component; we argue the BC is predominantly formed in the wind. Estimates of the wind and accretion component equivalent widths are oppositely related to the NC, so the NC equivalent width increases with the accretion component but decreases as the wind component increases. The NC is undetectable where profiles appear dominated by the wind, requiring a source of veiling other than the accretion shock to account for the observed continuum excess. Intensity ratios indicate that physical conditions are nearly uniform in the NC but span a range in the BC. For DR Tau, the range of morphologies in 62 unblended Fe I and Fe II lines can be resolved in terms of a narrow component (NC) that dominates the weakest lines, and a broad component (BC) that dominates the strongest lines. The (NC) has FWHM ~20 km/s and centroid velocity near zero km/s. The (BC) has FWHM ~100 km/s, and a tendency to be blueshifted by <=10 km/s. Estimates of iron line opacities τ and column densities N yield τNC ~ 3 × τBC, NFeI >~ 1017 - 1018 cm-2 , and NFeII >~ 1018 - 1019 cm-2 for the BC. Estimates of kinetic temperature for iron suggest that the NC gas is hotter than the BC by several thousand degrees. For iron, the NC is consistent with an origin in the postshock gas while the BC may originate in the inner accretion disk close to the corotation radius.

  19. Profiles of emission lines in Be stars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the broadening functions resulting from a gaseous ring in circular motion around a star according to Kepler's law. When the distribution in the gaseous ring has a circular symmetry in the equatorial plane, the broadening profile is related to the surface density distribution along the radius by an integral equation which can be transformed into the Abel integral equation and solved analytically. Profiles corresponding to gaseous rings with a uniform density distribution but different widths are used to illustrate the general properties of the profile broadened by the gaseous ring in circular motion. The emission profile has also been studied for cases in which the circular motion does not follow Kepler's law.

  20. Far-Infrared Line Emission from High Redshift Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, D. J.; Cox, P.; Hunter, T. R.; Malhotra, S.; Phillips, T. G.; Yun, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    Recent millimeter and submillimeter detections of line emission in high redshift objects have yielded new information and constraints on star formation at early epochs. Only CO transitions and atomic carbon transitions have been detected from these objects, yet bright far-infrared lines such as C+ at 158 microns and N+ at 205 microns should be fairly readily detectable when redshifted into a submillimeter atmospheric window. We have obtained upper limits for C+ emission &om two high redshift quasars, BR1202-0725 at z=4.69 and BRI1335-0415 at z=4.41. These limits show that the ratio of the C+ line luminosity to the total far-infrared luminosity is less than 0.0l%, ten times smaller than has been observed locally. Additionally, we have searched for emission in the N+ 205 micron line from the Cloverleaf quasar, H1413+117, and detected emission in CO J=7-6. The N+ emission is found to be below the amount predicted based on comparison to the only previous detection of this line, in the starburst galaxy M82.

  1. Package for Interactive Analysis of Line Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashyap, Vinay; Hunter, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    PINTofALE is an IDL based package to analyze high-resolution grating spectra. The first version was made available to the public on 3 February 2001. Since then we have carried out numerous changes and subsidiary releases. The current release is version 2.0 (released 6 Apr 2004), and we are preparing to release v2.1 within the next month. The changes include bug fixes, upgrades to handle higher versions of IDL and the CHIANTI database, enhancements in user-friendliness, handling of instrument response matrices, and the release of a Markov Chain Monte Carlo based DEM fitting routines. A detailed description of the package, together with fairly detailed documentation, example walk-throughs, and downloadable tar files, are available on-line from http://hea.harvard.edu/PINTofALE/ The website also lists papers that have used PINTofALE in their analysis.

  2. Emission lines in the optical spectrum of 3 Cen A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlgren, G. M.; Hubrig, S.

    2004-05-01

    Previously, weak emission lines had been detected at red wavelengths in the spectra of a limited sample of mid to late B type main sequence stars. A fuller description of the occurrence and origins of these lines has yet to be forwarded, in part due to the lack of observations detailing the spectral transitions involved. To address this deficiency, we present a line list of weak emission features found in the optical and near infrared spectral region of the chemically peculiar He-weak star 3 Cen A (HD 120709). Nearly 350 features, mostly associated with allowed transitions from high-excitation states of first ions, are catalogued along with identifications. Prominent among the emission lines are the spectra P II, Mn II, Fe II, Ni II and Cu II. Emission lines from Ca II, Si II and Hg II are also evident. Abundances are determined for several elements from synthetic spectrum fitting, with anomalies detected for the ions O I/II, P II/III and Si II/III. The LTE synthetic spectrum fitting also revealed that the low excitation 4s-4p transitions of Fe II predict an abundance that is greater than that determined from higher excitation 4d-4f transitions. Several of these latter transitions have upper energy levels that are found to be associated with emission lines. We also present empirical considerations for the excitation processes leading to the weak emission lines. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile, No. 65.L-0316 and Paranal, Chile No. 266.D-5655. Tables 2 and 3 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/418/1073

  3. Galaxy evolution across the optical emission-line diagnostic diagrams?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, M.; Fuhrmann, L.; García-Marín, M.; Eckart, A.; Zuther, J.; Hopkins, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Context. The discovery of the M - σ relation, the local galaxy bimodality, and the link between black-hole and host-galaxy properties have raised the question of whether active galactic nuclei (AGN) play a role in galaxy evolution. AGN feedback is one of the biggest observational challenges of modern extragalactic astrophysics. Several theoretical models implement AGN feedback to explain the observed galaxy luminosity function and, possibly, the color and morphological transformation of spiral galaxies into passive ellipticals. Aims: For understanding the importance of AGN feedback, a study of the AGN populations in the radio-optical domain is crucial. A mass sequence linking star-forming galaxies and AGN has already been noted in previous works, and it is now investigated as a possible evolutionary sequence. Methods: We observed a sample of 119 intermediate-redshift (0.04 ≤ z< 0.4) SDSS-FIRST radio emitters with the Effelsberg 100-m telescope at 4.85 and 10.45 GHz and obtained spectral indices. The sample includes star-forming galaxies, composite galaxies (with mixed contribution to line emission from star formation and AGN activity), Seyferts, and low ionization narrow emission region (LINER) galaxies. With these sources we search for possible evidence of spectral evolution and a link between optical and radio emission in intermediate-redshift galaxies. Results: We find indications of spectral index flattening in high-metallicity star-forming galaxies, composite galaxies, and Seyferts. This "flattening sequence" along the [NII]-based emission-line diagnostic diagram is consistent with the hardening of galaxy ionizing field, thanks to nuclear activity. After combining our data with FIRST measurements at 1.4 GHz, we find that the three-point radio spectra of Seyferts and LINERs show substantial differences, which are attributable to small radio core components and larger (arcsecond sized) jet/lobe components, respectively. A visual inspection of FIRST images

  4. Near-Infrared Emission Lines of Nova Cassiopeiae 1995

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudy, R. J.; Lynch, D. K.; Mazuk, S. M.; Venturini, C. C.; Puetter, R. C.

    2000-12-01

    The slow nova V 723 Cas (Nova Cas 1995) exhibits comparatively narrow emission features (FWHM 500 km sec-1) that make it ideal for classifying weak lines and lines blended with stronger features. We present spectra from 0.8-2.5 microns that track the gradual incrase in excitation of Nova Cas and discuss the emission lines that were present. During the period encompassed by these observations Nova Cas reached only moderate excitation-the most energetic coronal lines were [S VIII] 9913 and [Al IX] 20444; lines such as [S IX] 12523 that are prominent in some novae were not detected. Additional coronal lines present include [Si VI] 19641, [Ca VIII] 23205, and [Si VII] 24807. New lines identified include features of [Fe V], [Fe VI]. These iron features are not coronal lines, arising from transitions among low-lying terms rather than within the ground term itself. Also detected was [Ti VI] 17151 that was first identified in V1974 Cygni (Nova Cyg 1992), and possibly [Ti VII] 22050. Accurate wavelengths for a number of unidentified lines are also presented. These unidentified features are discussed with regard to their likely level of excitation and their presence in other novae. This work was supported by the IR&D program of the Aerospace Corporation. RCP acknowledges support from NASA.

  5. Searching for emission-line galaxies: The UCM survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallego, J.; Zamorano, J.; Rego, M.; Vitores, A.

    1993-01-01

    We are carrying out a long-term project with the main purposes of finding and analyzing low metallicity galaxies. A very small number of very low metallicity galaxies is known up to now. However these ojbects are particularly interesting since they are excellent candidates to 'young galaxies' in evolutionary sense as POX186 (Kunth, Maurogordato & Vigroux, 1988). Since the interstellar matter in these objects is only weakly contaminated by stellar evolution, their study could provide valuable information about the primordial helium abundance and therefore it could place constraints on the different Big-Bang models. The instrumental set up of our survey is an objective-prism used with the Schmidt telescope at Calar Alto Observatory. By using hypersensitized IIIaF emulsion and RG630 filter low resolution spectra in the H alpha region of objects in a wide field is obtained (Rego et al. 1989, Zamorano et al. 1990). Surveys carried out in the past two decades at optical blue wavelengths have also produced large samples of emission-line galaxies (ELGs), for example MacAlpine & Willians 1981 and reference therein, Wasilewski 1983, Salzer and MacAlpine 1988, or Smith et al. 1976. Relying primarily on objective-prism plates taken in the blue, these surveys have found over 3000 blue/emission-line galaxies so far. A significant number of star-forming galaxies are missed by optical surveys in the blue because of their low-excitation spectra (MacAlpine and Willians 1981, Markarian et al. 1981 and references therein) or their low metallicity (Kunth and Sargent, 1986).

  6. Measurement of coronal X-ray emission lines from Capella

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedder, P. W.; Canizares, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The Einstein Observatory's Focal Plane Crystal Spectrometer has detected X-ray emission lines due to O VIII, Fe XVII, and Fe XX, from the binary star system Capella. Line luminosities are well fitted by an emitting plasma at a single temperature of 6.29 + or - 0.01 - 0.03 million K, and a volume emission measure of about 8.6 x 10 to the 52nd/cu cm, corresponding to the low temperature component previously observed. A high temperature component is undetectable, since the observed lines are not produced in plasma at temperatures above about 20 million K. Nearly isothermal plasma would be expected if many of the magnetically confined coronal loops have similar sizes and pressures, and a second population of longer loops would be required to account for the hotter component. An alternative interpretation of the observed X-ray line emission and upper limit is that the plasma contains a continuous distribution of emission measure versus temperature that rises sharply to 3 million K and then falls by nearly a decade to 16 million. An extrapolation of the loop sizes suggested by this alternative to hotter, longer loops may also account for the higher temperature emission.

  7. Impurity Line Emissions in VUV Region of TCABR Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, M.; Daltrini, A. M.; Severo, J. H. F.; Nascimento, I. C.; Sanada, E. K.; Elizondo, J. I.; Kuznetsov, Y. K.; Galvao, R. M. O.

    2008-04-07

    Spectral emissions in the vacuum ultraviolet region from 50 nm to 320 nm have been measured on TCABR tokamak using an one meter VUV spectrometer and a MCP coupled to a CCD detector. Among the 98 emissions classified, 37 are from first order diffraction, 29 are from second order, 24 are from third order, 7 from fourth order, and one from fifth order diffraction. Main impurity lines are OII to OVII, CII to CIV, NIII to N V, FVII, besides working gas plasma hydrogen Lyman lines.

  8. The formation of emission lines in quasars and Seyfert nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwan, J.; Krolik, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    The photoionization and heating throughout a quasar emission-line cloud optically thick at the Lyman edge are calculated. Photoionization and collisional ionization from excited states of hydrogen are included, which maintain a substantial electron fraction after the exhaustion of Lyman continuum photons halts ground-state photoionization. Observed values are explained for Ly-alpha/H-beta, H-alpha/H-beta, P-alpha/H-alpha, He I 5876/H-beta, O I 8446/H-alpha, and Mg II 2798/H-beta. The dependence of line strengths on physical conditions is discussed, and plotting Fe II/4570/H-beta versus Balmer continuum/H-beta is suggested. Other observations are also suggested, and the degree of asymmetry is given between the forward and backward emission of lines from a finite slab to make possible the use of comparative line profile studies to elucidate cloud kinematics.

  9. Excitation of emission lines by fluorescence and recombination in IC 418

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escalante, Vladimir; Morisset, Cristophe; Georgiev, Leonid

    2012-08-01

    We predict intensities of lines of CII, NI, NII, OI and OII and compare them with a deep spectroscopic survey of IC 418 to test the effect of excitation of nebular emission lines by continuum fluorescence of starlight. Our calculations use a nebular model and a synthetic spectrum of its central star to take into account excitation of the lines by continuum fluorescence and recombination. The NII spectrum is mostly produced by fluorescence due to the low excitation conditions of the nebula, but many CII and OII lines have more excitation by fluorescence than recombination. In the neutral envelope, the NI permitted lines are excited by fluorescence, and almost all the OI lines are excited by recombination. Electron excitation produces the forbidden optical lines of OI, but continuum fluorescence excites most of the NI forbidden line intensities. Lines excited by fluorescence of light below the Lyman limit thus suggest a new diagnostic to explore the photodissociation region of a nebula.

  10. Diagnostic of the self-healing of metallized polypropylene film by modeling of the broadening emission lines of aluminum emitted by plasma discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Tortai, J.-H.; Bonifaci, N.; Denat, A.; Trassy, C.

    2005-03-01

    Metallized-film capacitors have the property, even under high continuous voltage, to self-heal i.e., to clear a defect in the dielectric. The self-healing process is a consequence of a transient arc discharge. It has been previously shown that during the discharge, due to Joule effect, the metal is vaporized until the arc extinguishes. The discharge duration has been found to be inversely proportional to the mechanical pressure applied on the layers of metallized films making up a capacitor. The aim of this study is to understand the physical processes involved in this spontaneous extinction of the arc discharge. Emission spectroscopy has been used to provide information about the physical properties (temperatures, electronic and neutral particles densities, etc.) of the plasma induces by a self-healing. An analysis, based on the broadenings and shifts of Al atomic lines, of the experimental light spectra obtained has shown that the self-healing process leads to the generation, from the vaporized metal, of a high-density and relatively weakly ionized aluminum plasma. The plasma density increases with the pressure applied on the film layers and, consequently, the density power needed to extend the plasma zone increases as well and the arc discharge goes out faster as experimentally observed.

  11. SOFT X-RAY EMISSION LINES OF S VII-S XIV IN PROCYON

    SciTech Connect

    Li, F.; Liang, G. Y.; Zhao, G. E-mail: gzhao@bao.ac.cn

    2013-01-01

    Observational data for cool star Procyon available from the Chandra Data Public Archive are co-added and analyzed with as high a signal-to-noise ratio as possible. The soft X-ray emission lines of highly charged sulfur ions (S VII-S XV) are investigated in the 30-80 A range. A collisional-radiative model is constructed to predict line emissivities of sulfur ions using updated excitation data from the R-matrix method. Theoretical line fluxes and line intensity ratios are calculated, and theoretical spectra are constructed with a Gaussian profile with a line width of 0.06 A. By comparing predicted emission lines with observed ones, several strong emission lines are identified for the first time. Some misassignments of lines in previous works are also corrected. By comparing our results with those from the Chianti (v6) model, this work provides insight into the completeness and accuracy of the atomic data of sulfur ions in the Chianti (v6) database.

  12. Coronal Physics and the Chandra Emission Line Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy

    1999-01-01

    With the launch of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, high resolution X-ray spectroscopy of cosmic sources has begun. Early, deep observations of three stellar coronal sources will provide not only invaluable calibration data, but will also give us benchmarks for plasma spectral modeling codes. These codes are to interpret data from stellar coronae, galaxies and clusters of galaxies. supernova remnants and other astrophysical sources, but they have been called into question in recent years as problems with understanding moderate resolution ASCA and EUVE data have arisen. The Emission Line Project is a collaborative effort to improve the models, with Phase 1 being the comparison of models with observed spectra of Capella, Procyon, and HR, 1099. Goals of these comparisons are (1) to determine and verify accurate and robust diagnostics and (2) to identify and prioritize issues in fundamental spectroscopy which will require further theoretical and/or laboratory work. A critical issue in exploiting the coronal data for these purposes is to understand the extent to which common simplifying assumptions (coronal equilibrium, time-independence, negligible optical depth) apply. We will discuss recent advances in our understanding of stellar coronae in this context.

  13. The Subaru FMOS galaxy redshift survey (FastSound). II. The emission line catalog and properties of emission line galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Totani, Tomonori; Tonegawa, Motonari; Akiyama, Masayuki; Dalton, Gavin; Glazebrook, Karl; Iwamuro, Fumihide; Ohta, Kouji; Takato, Naruhisa; Tamura, Naoyuki; Yabe, Kiyoto; Bunker, Andrew J.; Goto, Tomotsugu; Hikage, Chiaki; Ishikawa, Takashi; Okumura, Teppei; Shimizu, Ikkoh

    2016-06-01

    We present basic properties of ˜3300 emission line galaxies detected by the FastSound survey, which are mostly Hα emitters at z ˜ 1.2-1.5 in the total area of about 20 deg2, with the Hα flux sensitivity limit of ˜1.6 × 10-16 erg cm-2 s-1 at 4.5 σ. This paper presents the catalog of the FastSound emission lines and galaxies, which is open to the public. We also present basic properties of typical FastSound Hα emitters, which have Hα luminosities of 1041.8-1043.3 erg s-1, star formation rates (SFRs) of 20-500 M⊙ yr-1, and stellar masses of 1010.0-1011.3 M⊙. The 3D distribution maps for the four fields of Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) W1-4 are presented, clearly showing large scale clustering of galaxies at the scale of ˜100-600 comoving Mpc. Based on 1105 galaxies with detections of multiple emission lines, we estimate that the contamination of non-Hα lines is about 4% in the single-line emission galaxies, which is mostly [O III]λ5007. This contamination fraction is also confirmed by the stacked spectrum of all the FastSound spectra, in which Hα, [N II]λλ6548,6583, [S II]λλ6717,6731, and [O I]λλ6300,6364 are seen.

  14. PHYSICAL CONDITIONS IN THE X-RAY EMISSION-LINE GAS IN NGC 1068

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, S. B.; Sharma, N.; Turner, T. J.; George, Ian M.; Crenshaw, D. Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed, photoionization modeling analysis of XMM-Newton/Reflection Grating Spectrometer observations of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068. The spectrum, previously analyzed by Kinkhabwala et al., reveals a myriad of soft X-ray emission lines, including those from H- and He-like carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and neon, and M- and L-shell iron. As noted in the earlier analysis, based on the narrowness of the radiative recombination continua, the electron temperatures in the emission-line gas are consistent with photoionization, rather than collisional ionization. The strengths of the carbon and nitrogen emission lines, relative to those of oxygen, suggest unusual elemental abundances, which we attribute to the star formation history of the host galaxy. Overall, the emission lines are blueshifted with respect to systemic, with radial velocities ∼160 km s{sup –1}, similar to that of [O III] λ5007, and thus consistent with the kinematics and orientation of the optical emission-line gas and, hence, likely part of an active galactic nucleus driven outflow. We were able to achieve an acceptable fit to most of the strong emission lines with a two-component photoionization model, generated with CLOUDY. The two components have ionization parameters and column densities of logU = –0.05 and 1.22 and logN {sub H} = 20.85 and 21.2 and covering factors of 0.35 and 0.84, respectively. The total mass of the X-ray gas is roughly an order of magnitude greater than the mass of ionized gas determined from optical and near-IR spectroscopy, which indicates that it may be the dominant component of the narrow-line region. Furthermore, we suggest that the medium that produces the scattered/polarized optical emission in NGC 1068 possesses similar physical characteristics to those of the more highly ionized of the X-ray model components.

  15. EQUIB: Atomic level populations and line emissivities calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, I. D.; Adams, S.; Clegg, R. E. S.; Ruffle, D. P.; Liu, X.-W.; Pritchet, C. J.; Ercolano, B.

    2016-03-01

    The Fortran program EQUIB solves the statistical equilibrium equation for each ion and yields atomic level populations and line emissivities for given physical conditions, namely electron temperature and electron density, appropriate to the zones in an ionized nebula where the ions are expected to exist.

  16. Fe L-Shell Emission Lines at 7 - 9 Angstroms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Greg; Behar, Edhud

    Fe L-shell emission lines at wavelengths less than 10 angstroms come from n to 2 (n = 4 5 6..) transitions. These lines embed information such as electron density and/or temperature that is of fundamental importance to understanding the physics of astrophysical objects. Unresolved by previous x-ray observatories these low wavelength Fe lines are clearly observable by Chandra and XMM x-ray satellites. To meet the needs of using these lines as diagnostics we have studied the n to 2 transitions (n = 4 5 6..) Fe L-shell lines using the LLNL electron beam ion trap following our Fe L-shell emission line measurements for the 3-2 transitions (Brown et al APJ supp. 2002). Our measurement and its comparison with code simulations will be reported together with a discussion of the possible use of these lines as diagnostics for astrophysics. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48 and supported by NASA SARA grants to LLNL GSFC and Columbia University.

  17. Ethylene line emission from the North Pole of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostiuk, Theodor; Espenak, F.; Romani, P.; Goldstein, J.

    1991-01-01

    A significant enhancement in infrared emission from hydrocarbon constituents of Jupiter's stratosphere was observed at a north polar hot spot (60 degrees latitude, 180 degrees longitude). A unique probe of this phenomena is ethylene (C2H4), which has not been observed previously from the ground. The profile of the emission line from ethylene at 951.742 cm-1, measured near the north pole of Jupiter, was analyzed to determine the morphology of the enhancement, the increase in C2H4 abundance and local temperature, as well as possible information on the altitude (pressure regions) where the increased emission is formed. Measurements were made using infrared heterodyne spectroscopy at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea, Hawaii in December 1989. At 181 degrees longitude a very strong emission line was seen, which corresponds to a 13-fold increase in C2H4 abundance or a 115K increase in temperature in the upper stratosphere, compared to values outside the hot spot. The hot spot was found to be localized to approx. 10 degrees in longitude; the line shape (width) implied that the enhanced emission originated very high in the stratosphere.

  18. On the sodium D line emission in the terrestrial nightglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plane, John; Oetjen, Hilke; de Miranda, Marcelo; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Gausa, Michael; Williams, Bifford

    2012-01-01

    Emission from atomic Na, consisting of a doublet of lines at 589.0 and 589.6 nm, is a prominent feature of the earth’s nightglow. A large data-base of measurements of the relative intensities of the D lines (RD) was gathered at three locations: the ALOMAR observatory, Andenes (Norway, 69°N), Kuujjuarapik (Canada, 55°N) and the Danum Valley (Borneo, 8°N). RD varies between 1.5 and 2.0, with an average value of 1.67. These results were interpreted using a theoretical model of the Na nightglow which involves initial production of electronically excited NaO(A2Σ) from the reaction between Na and O3, followed either by reaction with O to generate Na(2PJ) with a branching ratio of 1/6 and a J=3/2 to 1/2 propensity of 2.0, or quenching of NaO(A) to NaO(X2Π) by O2. The resulting NaO(X) then reacts with O to generate Na(2PJ) with a branching ratio of 1/6 and a J=3/2 to 1/2 propensity of 1.5. These branching ratios and spin-orbit propensities are derived from statistical correlation of the electronic potential energy surfaces connecting the reactants NaO(A)+O and NaO(X)+O with the products Na+O2, through the Na+O2- ion-pair intermediate. A fit of this statistical model to the results of an earlier laboratory study (Slanger et al., 2005), where RD was measured as a function of the ratio [O]/[O2], indicates that the rate coefficient for the quenching of NaO(A) by O2 is around 1×10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The statistical model is also in good accord with recent high resolution observations of the Na D line widths (Harrell et al., 2010). An atmospheric model is then used to show that gravity wave-driven perturbations to the Na layer can account for the observed variability of RD.

  19. Electromagnetic plasma wave emissions from the auroral field lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    The most important types of auroral radio emissions are reviewed, both from a historical perspective as well as considering the latest results. Particular emphasis is placed on four types of electromagnetic emissions which are directly associated with the plasma on the auroral field lines. These emissions are (1) auroral hiss, (2) saucers, (3) ELF noise bands, and (4) auroral kilometric radiation. Ray tracing and radio direction finding measurements indicate that both the auroral hiss and auroral kilometric radiation are generated along the auroral field lines relatively close to the earth, at radial distances from about 2.5 to 5 R sub e. For the auroral hiss the favored mechanism appears to be amplified Cerenkov radiation. For the auroral kilometric radiation several mechanisms have been proposed, usually involving the intermediate generation of electrostatic waves by the precipitating electrons.

  20. RELATIVISTIC BROADENING OF IRON EMISSION LINES IN A SAMPLE OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Brenneman, Laura W.; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2009-09-10

    We present a uniform X-ray spectral analysis of eight type-1 active galactic nuclei that have been previously observed with relativistically broadened iron emission lines. Utilizing data from the XMM-Newton European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC-pn) we carefully model the spectral continuum, taking complex intrinsic absorption and emission into account. We then proceed to model the broad Fe K{alpha} feature in each source with two different accretion disk emission line codes, as well as a self-consistent, ionized accretion disk spectrum convolved with relativistic smearing from the inner disk. Comparing the results, we show that relativistic blurring of the disk emission is required to explain the spectrum in most sources, even when one models the full reflection spectrum from the photoionized disk.

  1. Emission-Line Eclipse Mapping of Velocity Fields in a Dwarf-Nova Accretion Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makita, Makoto; Mineshige, Shin

    2002-06-01

    We propose a new method, emission-line eclipse mapping, to map the velocity fields of an accretion disk in position space. Quiescent dwarf novae usually exhibit double-peaked emission-line profiles because of disk rotation. Since a part of a disk having a different line-of-sight velocity is successively obscured by a companion in eclipsing systems, they show time-varying line profiles. We calculated the time changes of the emission-line profiles, assuming Keplerian rotation fields (vφ ~ r-1/2 with r being the distance from the disk center) and an emissivity distribution of j ~ r-3/2. We, then, applied the usual eclipse mapping technique to the light curves at each of 12-24 wavelengths across the line center to map the region with the same line-of-sight velocity. The reconstructed images typically exhibit a `two-eye' pattern for high line-of-sight velocities, and we can recover the relation, vφ ~ d-1/2, on the assumption of an axisymmetric disk, where d is the separation between the two `eyes'. We will be able to probe the Keplerian rotation law, the most fundamental assumption adopted in many disk models, by high-speed spectroscopic observations with 8-m class telescopes.

  2. Extreme Ultraviolet Emission Lines of Iron Fe XI-XIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepson, Jaan; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Liedahl, D. A.; Brickhouse, N. S.; Dupree, A. K.

    2013-04-01

    The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral region (ca. 20--300 Å) is rich in emission lines from low- to mid-Z ions, particularly from the middle charge states of iron. Many of these emission lines are important diagnostics for astrophysical plasmas, providing information on properties such as elemental abundance, temperature, density, and even magnetic field strength. In recent years, strides have been made to understand the complexity of the atomic levels of the ions that emit the lines that contribute to the richness of the EUV region. Laboratory measurements have been made to verify and benchmark the lines. Here, we present laboratory measurements of Fe XI, Fe XII, and Fe XIII between 40-140 Å. The measurements were made at the Lawrence Livermore electron beam ion trap (EBIT) facility, which has been optimized for laboratory astrophysics, and which allows us to select specific charge states of iron to help line identification. We also present new calculations by the Hebrew University - Lawrence Livermore Atomic Code (HULLAC), which we also utilized for line identification. We found that HULLAC does a creditable job of reproducing the forest of lines we observed in the EBIT spectra, although line positions are in need of adjustment, and line intensities often differed from those observed. We identify or confirm a number of new lines for these charge states. This work was supported by the NASA Solar and Heliospheric Program under Contract NNH10AN31I and the DOE General Plasma Science program. Work was performed in part under the auspices of the Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DEAC52-07NA27344.

  3. Model to Design Drip Hose Lateral Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Rafael; Cury Saad, João Carlos

    2014-05-01

    with the dripper; and roughness coefficient for the Hazen-Williams equation. The program allows calculate the lateral line length with three possibilities: selecting two spacing between emitters and defining the exchange point; using two pre-established spacing between emitters and calculating the length of each section with different spacing; using one emitter spacing. Results Results showed that the use of two sections with different spacing between drippers in the lateral line didn't allow longer length but got better uniformity when compared with lateral line with one spacing between emitters. The adoption of two spacing increased the flow rate per meter in the final section which represented approximately 80% of the lateral line total length and this justifies their use. The software allowed DU above 90% with pressure head variation of 40% and the use of two spacing between emitters. Conclusions The developed model/software showed to be accurate, easy to handle and useful for lateral line design using non-pressure compensating drip hose. References [1] ANDRADE, L. A. D. Estudo de uniformidade de emissão de água utilizando diferentes espaçamentos entre gotejadores na linha lateral. 2009. 87 f. Tese (Doutorado em Agronomia/Irigação e Drenagem) - Faculdade de Ciências Agronômicas, Universidade Estadual Paulista 'Julio de Mesquita Filho', Botucatu, (2009). [2] KELLER, J.; BLIESNER, R. D. Sprinkle and trickle irrigation. Caldwell: Blackburn Press, (1990). 652 p. [3] TALENS, J. A. M. Riego localizado y fertirrigacion. Madrid: Mundi-Prensa, (2002). 533 p. [4] WU, I. P. An assessment of hydraulic design of micro-irrigation systems. Agricultural Water Management, Amsterdan, v. 32, n. 3

  4. The Far-Infrared Emission Line and Continuum Spectrum of the Seyfert Galaxy NGC 1068

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinoglio, Luigi; Smith, Howard A.; Gonzalez-Alfonso, Eduardo; Fisher, Jacqueline

    2005-01-01

    We report on the analysis of the first complete far-infrared spectrum (43-197 microns) of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 as observed with the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) onboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). In addition to the 7 expected ionic fine structure emission lines, the OH rotational lines at 79, 119 and 163 microns were all detected in emission, which is unique among galaxies with full LWS spectra, where the 119 micron line, where detected, is always in absorption. The observed line intensities were modelled together with IS0 Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) and optical and ultraviolet line intensities from the literature, considering two independent emission components: the AGN component and the starburst component in the circumnuclear ring of approximately 3kpc in size. Using the UV to mid-IR emission line spectrum to constrain the nuclear ionizing continuum, we have confirmed previous results: a canonical power-law ionizing spectrum is a poorer fit than one with a deep absorption trough, while the presence of a big blue bump is ruled out. Based on the instantaneous starburst age of 5 Myr constrained by the Br gamma equivalent width in the starburst ring, and starburst synthesis models of the mid- and far-infrared fine-structure line emission, a low ionization parameter (U=10(exp -3.5)) and low densities (n=100 cm (exp -3)) are derived. Combining the AGN and starburst components, we succeed in modeling the overall UV to far-IR atomic spectrum of SGC 1068, reproducing the line fluxes to within a factor 2.0 on average with a standard deviation of 1.4. The OH 119 micron emission indicates that the line is collisionally excited, and arises in a warm and dense region. The OH emission has been modeled using spherically symmetric, non-local, non-LTE radiative transfer models. The models indicate that the bulk of the emission arises from the nuclear region, although some extended contribution from the starburst is not ruled out. The OH abundance

  5. K alpha line emission during solar X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Neupert, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    Calculations of K alpha line emission from S, Ar, Ca and Fe are presented. It is reported that on the basis of data for hard X-ray bursts, the flux during most impulsive, non-thermal events is likely to be weak, though for a few strong bursts, a flux of approximately 100 photons/cm/s may be expected. The amount of S K alpha emission particularly is sensitively dependent on the value of the lower energy bound of the non-thermal electron distribution, offering a possible means of determining this. Thermal K alpha emission is only significant for Fe ions. The calculated thermal K alpha radiation is much less than that observed during an intense soft X-ray burst. It is concluded that a detailed temperature structure for the emission source is required in order to explain the discrepancy.

  6. Nuclear activity versus star formation: emission-line diagnostics at ultraviolet and optical wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltre, A.; Charlot, S.; Gutkin, J.

    2016-03-01

    In the context of observations of the rest-frame ultraviolet and optical emission from distant galaxies, we explore the emission-line properties of photoionization models of active and inactive galaxies. Our aim is to identify new line-ratio diagnostics to discriminate between gas photoionization by active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star formation. We use a standard photoionization code to compute the emission from AGN narrow-line regions and compare this with calculations of the nebular emission from star-forming galaxies achieved using the same code. We confirm the appropriateness of widely used optical spectral diagnostics of nuclear activity versus star formation and explore new diagnostics at ultraviolet wavelengths. We find that combinations of a collisionally excited metal line or line multiplet, such as C IV λλ1548, 1551, O III] λλ1661, 1666, N III] λ1750, [Si III] λ1883+Si III] λ1892 and [C III] λ1907+C III] λ1909, with the He II λ1640 recombination line are individually good discriminants of the nature of the ionizing source. Diagrams involving at least three of these lines allow an even more stringent distinction between active and inactive galaxies, as well as valuable constraints on interstellar gas parameters and the shape of the ionizing radiation. Several line ratios involving Ne-based emission lines, such as [Ne IV] λ2424, [Ne III] λ3343 and [Ne V] λ3426, are also good diagnostics of nuclear activity. Our results provide a comprehensive framework to identify the sources of photoionization and physical conditions of the ionized gas from the ultraviolet and optical nebular emission from galaxies. This will be particularly useful to interpret observations of high-redshift galaxies with future facilities, such as the James Webb Space Telescope and extremely large ground-based telescopes.

  7. X-RAY EMISSION LINE PROFILES FROM WIND CLUMP BOW SHOCKS IN MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ignace, R.; Waldron, W. L.; Cassinelli, J. P.; Burke, A. E. E-mail: wwaldron@satx.rr.com E-mail: burke.alexander@gmail.com

    2012-05-01

    The consequences of structured flows continue to be a pressing topic in relating spectral data to physical processes occurring in massive star winds. In a preceding paper, our group reported on hydrodynamic simulations of hypersonic flow past a rigid spherical clump to explore the structure of bow shocks that can form around wind clumps. Here we report on profiles of emission lines that arise from such bow shock morphologies. To compute emission line profiles, we adopt a two-component flow structure of wind and clumps using two 'beta' velocity laws. While individual bow shocks tend to generate double-horned emission line profiles, a group of bow shocks can lead to line profiles with a range of shapes with blueshifted peak emission that depends on the degree of X-ray photoabsorption by the interclump wind medium, the number of clump structures in the flow, and the radial distribution of the clumps. Using the two beta law prescription, the theoretical emission measure and temperature distribution throughout the wind can be derived. The emission measure tends to be power law, and the temperature distribution is broad in terms of wind velocity. Although restricted to the case of adiabatic cooling, our models highlight the influence of bow shock effects for hot plasma temperature and emission measure distributions in stellar winds and their impact on X-ray line profile shapes. Previous models have focused on geometrical considerations of the clumps and their distribution in the wind. Our results represent the first time that the temperature distribution of wind clump structures are explicitly and self-consistently accounted for in modeling X-ray line profile shapes for massive stars.

  8. Rotation and emission lines in stars and accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Keith; Saar, Steven H.

    1991-01-01

    In the accretion disks of quiescent dwarf novae, Doppler mapping studies reveal that Balmer emission lines increase sharply toward the center of the disk, with surface brightnesses scaling roughly as R exp -3/2 varies as Omega(Kep). Similarly, among chromospherically active stars the H-alpha and Ca II H and K emission cores are stronger in the more rapidly rotating stars, with surface brightnesses scaling again roughly as Omega(rot). Since in both cases the emission lines scale linearly with the rotation frequency, it is proposed that the mechanism powering the emission lines in quiescent accretion disks is the same as that in chromospherically active stars, namely, the emergence of magnetic flux generated by the action of a dynamo, and its interaction with the atmosphere. If this empirical connection between disks and stars is in fact due to magnetic dynamos, the range of rotation rates available for testing dynamo theories expands from a factor of 1000 to 10 to the 7th.

  9. Phenomenology of Broad Emission Lines in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulentic, J. W.; Marziani, P.; Dultzin-Hacyan, D.

    Broad emission lines hold fundamental clues about the kinematics and structure of the central regions in AGN. In this article we review the most robust line profile properties and correlations emerging from the best data available. We identify fundamental differences between the profiles of radio-quiet and radio-loud sources as well as differences between the high- and low-ionization lines, especially in the radio-quiet majority of AGN. An Eigenvector 1 correlation space involving FWHM Hβ, W(FeIIopt)/W(Hβ), and the soft X-ray spectral index provides optimal discrimination between all principal AGN types (from narrow-line Seyfert 1 to radio galaxies). Both optical and radio continuum luminosities appear to be uncorrelated with the E1 parameters. We identify two populations of radio-quiet AGN: Population A sources (with FWHM(Hβ) <~ 4000 km s-1, generally strong FeII emission and a soft X-ray excess) show almost no parameter space overlap with radio-loud sources. Population B shows optical properties largely indistinguishable from radio-loud sources, including usually weak FeII emission, FWHM(Hβ) >~ 4000 km s-1 and lack of a soft X-ray excess. There is growing evidence that a fundamental parameter underlying Eigenvector 1 may be the luminosity-to-mass ratio of the active nucleus (L/M), with source orientation playing a concomitant role.

  10. Discovery of Polarized Line Emission in SN 1006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, W. B.; Pringle, J. E.; Carswell, R. F.; Long, K. S.; Cracraft, M.

    2015-12-01

    Laming predicted that the narrow Balmer line core of the ∼3000 km s‑1 shock in the SN 1006 remnant would be significantly polarized due to electron and proton impact polarization. Here, based on deep spectrally resolved polarimetry obtained with the European Southern Observatory (ESO)’s Very Large Telescope (VLT), we report the discovery of polarized line emission with a polarization degree of 1.3% and position angle orthogonal to the SNR filament. Correcting for an unpolarized broad line component, the implied narrow line polarization is ≈2.0%, close to the predictions of Laming. The predicted polarization is primarily sensitive to shock velocity and post-shock temperature equilibration. By measuring polarization for the SN 1006 remnant, we validate and enable a new diagnostic that has important applications in a wide variety of astrophysical situations, such as shocks, intense radiation fields, high energy particle streams, and conductive interfaces.

  11. Anisotropic alpha emission from on-line separated isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.; Vandeplassche, D.; van Walle, E.; Severijns, N.; Vanneste, L.

    1986-05-05

    A systematic on-line nuclear-orientation study of heavy isotopes using anisotropic ..cap alpha.. emission is reported for the first time. The anisotrophies recorded for /sup 199/At, /sup 201/At, and /sup 203/At are remarkably pronounced and strongly varying. At lower neutron number the ..cap alpha.. particles are more preferentially emitted perpendicularly to the nuclear-spin direction. This may be interpreted in terms of the high sensitivity of the ..cap alpha..-emission probability to changes in the nuclear shape.

  12. Electromagnetic plasma wave emissions from the auroral field lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The most important types of auroral radio emissions are reviewed. Particular attention is given to the following four types of electromagnetic emissions: auroral hiss, saucers, ELF noise bands, and auroral kilometric radiation. It is shown that the auroral hiss and auroral kilometric radiation are generated along the auroral field lines relatively close to the earth, at radial distances in the range of 2.5-5 earth radii, probably in direct association with auroral-particle acceleration by parallel electric fields. The auroral hiss appears to be generated by amplified Cerenkov radiation. Several mechanisms are proposed for the auroral kilometric radiation, usually involving the intermediate generation of electrostatic waves by the precipitating electrons.

  13. Time Variability of Molecular Line Emission in IRC +10216

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssier, D.; Cernicharo, J.; Quintana-Lacaci, G.; Agúndez, M.; Barlow, M. J.; Daniel, F.; De Beck, E.; Decin, L.; Garcia Lario, P.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Neufeld, D. A.; Pearson, J. C.

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of monitoring the molecular emission of the C-rich AGB star IRC+10216 over 3 years with the Herschel Space Observatory. Observations of rotational transitions of various vibrational levels of CO, 13CO, CS, CCH, H2O, SiO, SiS, SiC2, HCN and HNC have been collected with the HIFI, PACS and SPIRE instruments over multiple epochs. The intensity monitoring shows strong and periodic variations of most of the observed molecules, often with differential behavior depending on the transition level (larger variation at higher J), and generally enhanced modulations in the vibrational modes of some of these molecules (e.g. HCN). These results show that the effect of IR pumping through the different vibrational levels on the emergent line profiles of a given transition can be really significant. This implies that the IR radiation field of the circumstellar envelope and its time variation has to be taken into account in any radiative transfer model in order to derive accurately the physico-chemical structure of the envelope.

  14. B Stars with and without emission lines, parts 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underhill, A. (Editor); Doazan, V. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The spectra for B stars for which emission lines occur not on the main sequence, but only among the supergiants, and those B stars for which the presence of emission in H ahlpa is considered to be a significant factor in delineating atmospheric structure are examined. The development of models that are compatible with all known facts about a star and with the laws of physics is also discussed.

  15. Line Emission from Radiation-pressurized H II Regions. II. Dynamics and Population Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdolini, Silvia; Yeh, Sherry C. C.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Matzner, Christopher D.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    2013-05-01

    Optical and infrared emission lines from H II regions are an important diagnostic used to study galaxies, but interpretation of these lines requires significant modeling of both the internal structure and dynamical evolution of the emitting regions. Most of the models in common use today assume that H II region dynamics are dominated by the expansion of stellar wind bubbles, and have neglected the contribution of radiation pressure to the dynamics, and in some cases also to the internal structure. However, recent observations of nearby galaxies suggest that neither assumption is justified, motivating us to revisit the question of how H II region line emission depends on the physics of winds and radiation pressure. In a companion paper we construct models of single H II regions including and excluding radiation pressure and winds, and in this paper we describe a population synthesis code that uses these models to simulate galactic collections of H II regions with varying physical parameters. We show that the choice of physical parameters has significant effects on galactic emission line ratios, and that in some cases the line ratios can exceed previously claimed theoretical limits. Our results suggest that the recently reported offset in line ratio values between high-redshift star-forming galaxies and those in the local universe may be partially explained by the presence of large numbers of radiation-pressure-dominated H II regions within them.

  16. Line integration effects on ion temperatures in tokamak plasmas measured with neutron emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ognissanto, F.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Albergante, M.; Ballabio, L.; Conroy, S.; Kaellne, J.

    2008-10-15

    The line integrated line emission measured by neutron spectrometers at JET along sight lines in the vertical and horizontal planes has been simulated in Monte Carlo calculations to determine the relationship between the measured (effective) ion temperature (T{sub eff}) relative to the peak value of the profile (T{sub 0}). The general sight line dependence of (T{sub eff}) was expressed analytically for circular plasmas which was used to explain the simulated results for the actual JET sight lines. The analytical model with parametrization of sight lines and plasma profiles is described and the results are used to discuss dual sight line measurements that can be tested at JET and its forward implications for study burning (nearly thermal) plasmas of ITER.

  17. TYPING SUPERNOVA REMNANTS USING X-RAY LINE EMISSION MORPHOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, L. A.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Badenes, C.; Huppenkothen, D.; Jeltema, T. E.

    2009-11-20

    We present a new observational method to type the explosions of young supernova remnants (SNRs). By measuring the morphology of the Chandra X-ray line emission in 17 Galactic and Large Magellanic Cloud SNRs with a multipole expansion analysis (using power ratios), we find that the core-collapse SNRs are statistically more asymmetric than the Type Ia SNRs. We show that the two classes of supernovae can be separated naturally using this technique because X-ray line morphologies reflect the distinct explosion mechanisms and structure of the circumstellar material. These findings are consistent with recent spectropolarimetry results showing that core-collapse supernovae explosions are intrinsically more asymmetric.

  18. Emission line eclipse phenomena in nova DQ Herculis /1934/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, P.; Schneider, D. P.

    1980-06-01

    H-gamma, He II 4686 A, and H-beta emission lines were observed in DQ Her through an eclipse (phases 0.80-0.15). A total of 14 spectra with exposure times of 300 seconds were used to investigate phenomena in the eclispe of the emitting region by the red companion. The classical rotational disturbance of the He II 4686 A line is observed; it changes its velocity by over 600 km/s in 25 minutes during the eclipse. The eclipse duration is very long (0.11 of a cycle) and indicates a mass ratio near unity.

  19. Study on modeling of multispectral emissivity and optimization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunling; Yu, Yong; Zhao, Dongyang; Zhao, Guoliang

    2006-01-01

    Target's spectral emissivity changes variously, and how to obtain target's continuous spectral emissivity is a difficult problem to be well solved nowadays. In this letter, an activation-function-tunable neural network is established, and a multistep searching method which can be used to train the model is proposed. The proposed method can effectively calculate the object's continuous spectral emissivity from the multispectral radiation information. It is a universal method, which can be used to realize on-line emissivity demarcation. PMID:16526491

  20. K alpha line emission during solar X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Neupert, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    The expected flux of K alpha line emission from sulfur, argon, calcium, and iron is calculated during both thermal and nonthermal solar X-ray events. Such emission is shown to be weak during the course of most of the nonthermal hard X-ray bursts that Kane and Anderson (1970) have observed. If Compton backscattering is significant at high energies, the flux is reduced still further for disk flares, but it is noted that the strong, near-limb burst of June 26 would have produced about 100 photons /sq cm/sec of sulfur and iron K alpha emission. The impulsive hard X-ray bursts may in general be too short-lived for much K alpha emission. It may be noted that sulfur K alpha emission in particular depends sensitively on the lower-energy limit of the nonthermal electron spectrum, assuming such a sharply defined boundary exists. During soft X-ray bursts, when temperatures of a few 10 to the 7th power K are obtained, K alpha emission from certain iron ions, specifically Fe XVIII-XXIII, may be important.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Nebular emission lines towards NGC3372 center (Damiani+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiani, F.; Bonito, R.; Magrini, L.; Prisinzano, L.; Mapelli, M.; Micela, G.; Kalari, V.; Maiz Apellaniz, J.; Gilmore, G.; Randich, S.; Alfaro, E.; Flaccomio, E.; Koposov, S.; Klutsch, A.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Pancino, E.; Sacco, G. G.; Bayo, A.; Carraro, G.; Casey, A. R.; Costado, M. T.; Franciosini, E.; Hourihane, A.; Lardo, C.; Lewis, J.; Monaco, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Worley, C.; Zaggia, S.; Zwitter, T.; Dorda, R.

    2016-04-01

    Nebular emission lines of H-alpha, [NII] 6584Å, HeI 6678Å, [SII] 6717Å, [SII] 6731Å, towards the center of Carina nebula, are modeled with two gaussians each ('blue' and 'red' components). Best-fit parameters are given in the table. Line widths include the instrumental width of the Giraffe spectrograph (7km/s). Radial velocities are heliocentric. (1 data file).

  2. Low Luminosity Cataclysmic Variables and Fe Emission Lines of Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaojie; Wang, Q. Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Cataclysmic variables (CVs) has been proposed to be one of the main contributors of the Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE). However, previous studies on the spectra of local CVs suggested that the I6.7keV/I7.0keV line intensity ratios of CVs are not consistent with that of GRXE. Utilizing the archival Suzaku observations on local CVs, we confirm that luminous local CVs like intermediate polars, symbiotic stars and polars have lower I6.7keV/I7.0keV values, thus are unable to explain the Fe emission line ratios of GRXE. On the other hand, dimmer CVs like dwarf novae (DNe) have I6.7keV/I7.0keV values consitent with that of GRXE. Given the potential huge population, DNe could be one of the main resources of GRXE Fe line emission.

  3. Modeling of SAW Delay Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Atkinson, Gary M.

    2007-01-01

    Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring (IVHM) of aerospace vehicles requires rugged sensors having reduced volume, mass, and power that can be used to measure a variety of phenomena. Wireless systems are preferred when retro-fitting sensors onto existing vehicles. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices are capable of sensing: temperature, pressure, strain, chemical species, mass loading, acceleration, and shear stress. SAW technology is low cost, rugged, lightweight, and extremely low power. To aid in the development of SAW sensors for IVHM applications, a first order model of a SAW Delay line has been created.

  4. Accretion disk corona line emission from X0614+091

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, D. J.; White, N. E.; Swank, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    The low-mass X-ray binary X0614+091 was observed on 3 days in 1979 with the Einstein Observatory solid state spectrometer and the monitor proportional counter. During the observation with the highest measured flux, corresponding to an X-ray luminosity of 8 x 10(exp 36) erg/s (in the 0.5-20 keV band for an assumed distance of 5 kpc), significant low-energy emission was detected, centered at 0.77 keV, possibly due to line emission for O VII-O VIII and Fe XVII-Fe XIX. The other observations, which were at fluxes lower by a factor of 2, are consistent with the presence of the emission feature. The equivalent width of the feature, 37 +/- 6 eV, is of the same order as equivalent widths previously reported for more luminous low-mass X-ray binaries using grating spectrometer data. The soft X-ray lines could be emitted by gas expected to arise in an accretion disk corona excited by the central source. But to explain the observed feature, most of the corona needs to contribute, or other sources of emission are required.

  5. On the Thermal Line Emission from the Outflows in Ultraluminous X-Ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ya-Di; Cao, Xinwu

    2016-08-01

    The atomic features in the X-ray spectra of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) may be associated with the outflow, which may provide a way to explore the physics of the ULXs. We construct a conical outflow model and calculate the thermal X-ray Fe emission lines from the outflows. Our results show that thermal line luminosity decreases with increasing outflow velocity and/or opening angle of the outflow for a fixed kinetic power of the outflows. Assuming the kinetic power of the outflows to be comparable with the accretion power in the ULXs, we find that the equivalent width can be several eV for the thermal X-ray Fe emission line from the outflows in the ULXs with stellar-mass black holes. The thermal line luminosity is proportional to 1/M bh (M bh is the black hole mass of the ULX). The equivalent width decreases with the black hole mass, which implies that the Fe line emission from the outflows can hardly be detected if the ULXs contain intermediate-mass black holes. Our results suggest that the thermal X-ray Fe line emission should be preferentially be detected in the ULXs with high kinetic power slowly moving outflows from the accretion disks surrounding stellar-mass black holes/neutron stars. The recently observed X-ray atomic features of the outflows in a ULX may imply that it contains a stellar-mass black hole.

  6. Mid Infrared Hydrogen Recombination Line Emission from the Maser Star MWC 349A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Howard A.; Strelnitski, V.; Miles, J. W.; Kelly, D. M.; Lacy, J. H.

    1997-01-01

    We have detected and spectrally resolved the mid-IR hydrogen recombination lines H6(alpha)(12.372 micrometers), H7(alpha)(19.062 micrometers), H7(beta)(l1.309 micrometers) and H8(gamma)(12.385 micrometers) from the star MWC349A. This object has strong hydrogen maser emission (reported in the millimeter and submillimeter hydrogen recombination lines from H36(alpha) to H21(alpha)) and laser emission (reported in the H15(alpha), H12(alpha) and H10(alpha) lines). The lasers/masers are thought to arise predominantly in a Keplerian disk around the star. The mid-IR lines do not show evident signs of lasing, and can be well modeled as arising from the strong stellar wind, with a component arising from a quasi-static atmosphere around the disk, similar to what is hypothesized for the near IR (less than or equal to 4 micrometers) recombination lines. Since populations inversions in the levels producing these mid-IR transitions are expected at densities up to approximately 10(exp 11)/cu cm, these results imply either that the disk does not contain high-density ionized gas over long enough path lengths to produce a gain approximately 1, and/or that any laser emission from such regions is small compared to the spontaneous background emission from the rest of the source as observed with a large beam. The results reinforce the interpretation of the far-IR lines as true lasers.

  7. Stability of narrow emission line clouds in active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, W.G.; Veilleux, S.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of the lateral flow and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities on clouds in the narrow-line region of active galaxies are considered using cloud densities and velocities based on observations. A simplified model for the lateral flow instability governed only by overpressures is discussed. The associated radiative acceleration is considered, and parameters describing the narrow-line region and the central nonstellar continuum are presented. It is shown that many otherwise acceptable narrow-line clouds are unstable to lateral flows, particularly if their column depths are small. It is argued that the most likely narrow-line clouds have column densities of about 10 to the 23rd/sq cm and that these clouds are accelerated by winds in the intercloud medium. Arguments are made against models in which narrow-line clouds move inward. 22 references.

  8. Emission line shape of B850 band of light-harvesting complex II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Praveen; Jang, Seogjoo

    2011-03-01

    A theoretical framework is developed for the emission line shape of the single complex spectroscopy (SCS). The quantum mechanical characteristics of the single complex emission line shapes for the model B850 band of the light harvesting complex 2 of purple bacteria are studied including both static and quasi-static disorders within the exciton Hamiltonian. The bath is modeled as an infinite sum of harmonic oscillators. For the Gaussian type of disorder, we examined the dependencies of the spectral line shapes on the temperature, polarization of the radiation, and on the type of exciton-bath coupling. Theoretically obtained emission profile is also compared with the absorption profile in the frequency domain. It is observed that emission profile contains an extra inhomogeneous term coming from the entanglement of the system and bath degrees of freedom in the initial equilibrium density operator. Contribution of this term to the overall emission line shape is studied in detail. This research was supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  9. Errors associated with fitting Gaussian profiles to noisy emission-line spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenz, Dawn D.; Ayres, Thomas R.

    1992-01-01

    Landman et al. (1982) developed prescriptions to predict profile fitting errors for Gaussian emission lines perturbed by white noise. We show that their scaling laws can be generalized to more complicated signal-dependent 'noise models' of common astronomical detector systems.

  10. Shock-induced polarized hydrogen emission lines in omicron Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabas, N.; Lèbre, A.; Gillet, D.

    2012-05-01

    Hydrogen emission lines in Mira variable stars are a well-known phenomenon whose origin has been established as related to the propagation of radiative hypersonic shock waves throughout the stellar atmosphere. A polarimetric observation by McLean and Coyne [1] made on omicron Ceti (the prototype of Mira variable stars) has revealed the existence of linear polarization signatures associated with Balmer emission lines. However, the polarizing mechanism has never been properly explained so far. The study presented here is the first of its kind since it displays the results of a spectropolarimetric survey of omicron Ceti in the Balmer lines. The survey was made with the NARVAL spectropolarimeter (Telescope Bernard Lyot, France) in full Stokes mode. We did not just confirm the appearance of this polarization but we also and above all showed the temporal variation of the linear polarization in the lines. We conclude that the polarizing mechanism is definitely intrinsic to the shock wave propagation throughout the stellar atmosphere of Mira and give some leads about the nature of this mechanism.

  11. Search for an emission line of a gravitational wave background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, Atsushi; Seto, Naoki

    2015-06-01

    In light of the history of research on an electromagnetic wave spectrum, a sharp emission line of gravitational wave background (GWB) would be an interesting observational target. Here we study an efficient method to detect a line GWB by correlating data of multiple ground-based detectors. We find that the width of frequency bin for coarse graining is a critical parameter, and, with the commonly used value 0.25 Hz, the signal-to-noise ratio could be decreased by up to a factor of 6.6, compared with a finer width of 0.02 Hz. By reanalyzing the existing data with a smaller bin width, we might detect a precious line signal from the early Universe.

  12. Continuum and line emission of flares on red dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morchenko, E.; Bychkov, K.; Livshits, M.

    2015-06-01

    The emission spectrum has been calculated of a homogeneous pure hydrogen layer, which parameters are typical for a flare on a red dwarf. The ionization and excitation states were determined by the solution of steady-state equations taking into account the continuum and all discrete hydrogen levels. We consider the following elementary processes: electron-impact transitions, spontaneous and induced radiative transitions, and ionization by the bremsstrahlung and recombination radiation of the layer itself. The Biberman-Holstein approximation was used to calculate the scattering of line radiation. Asymptotic formulae for the escape probability are obtained for a symmetric line profile taking into account the Stark and Doppler effects. The approximation for the core of the H- α line by a Gaussian curve has been substantiated.

  13. KPC-Scale Properties of Emission-line Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Mobasher, Bahram; Candels

    2015-01-01

    We perform a detailed -combined spectroscopic and photometric- study of resolved properties of galaxies at kpc scale and investigate how small-scale and global properties of galaxies are related. The sample consists of 119 galaxies to z~1.3 with the unique feature of having very high-resolution spectroscopic data from long exposure observations with the KECK/DEIMOS. Using HST/ACS and WFC3 data taken as part of the CANDELS project, we produce resolved rest-frame (U-V) color, stellar mass and star formation surface densities, stellar age and extinction maps and profiles along the galaxies rotation axes. We model the optical nebular emission lines using the high-resolution DEIMOS spectra and construct the optical line ratio profiles diagnostic of metallicity (R23) and nebular extinction (Ha/Hb). We find that the nebular dust extinction profile, inferred from Balmer decrement, is in agreement with the average extinction derived from the resolved SED modeling. Using the R23 metallicity profiles we examine, for the first time, the mass metallicity relation across galaxies and explore how this relation changes as a function of spatial position. We identify red and blue 'regions' of statistical significance within individual galaxies, using their rest-frame color maps. As expected, for any given galaxy, the red regions are found to have higher stellar mass surface densities and older ages compared to the blue regions. Furthermore, we quantify the spatial distribution of red and blue regions with respect to both redshift and stellar mass, finding that the stronger concentration of red regions toward the centers of galaxies is not a significant function of either redshift or stellar mass. We find that the 'main sequence' of star forming galaxies exists among both red and blue regions inside galaxies, with the median of blue regions forming a tighter relation with a slope of 1.1±0.1 and a scatter of ˜ 0.2 dex compared to red regions with a slope of 1.3 ± 0.1 and a scatter

  14. Composition of an emission line system in black hole host globular cluster RZ2109

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, Matthew M.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Kundu, Arunav; Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John J.

    2014-04-20

    We present an analysis of optical spectra from the globular cluster RZ2109 in NGC 4472, which hosts the first unambiguous globular cluster black hole. We use these spectra to determine the elemental composition of the emission line system associated with this source, and to constrain the age and metallicity of the host globular cluster. For the emission line system of RZ2109, our analysis indicates the [O III] λ5007 equivalent width is 33.82 ± 0.39 Å and the Hβ equivalent width is 0.32 ± 0.32 Å, producing a formal [O III] λ5007/Hβ emission line ratio of 106 for a 3200 km s{sup –1} measurement aperture covering the full velocity width of the [O III] λ5007 line. Within a narrower 600 km s{sup –1} aperture covering the highest luminosity velocity structure in the line complex, we find [O III] λ5007/Hβ = 62. The measured [O III] λ5007/Hβ ratios are significantly higher than can be produced in radiative models of the emission line region with solar composition, and the confidence interval limits exclude all but models which have gas masses much larger than those for a single star. Therefore, we conclude that the region from which the [O III] λ5007 emission originates is hydrogen-depleted relative to solar composition gas. This finding is consistent with emission from an accretion-powered outflow driven by a hydrogen-depleted donor star, such as a white dwarf, being accreted onto a black hole.

  15. Emission Signatures from Sub-parsec Binary Supermassive Black Holes. I. Diagnostic Power of Broad Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Khai; Bogdanović, Tamara

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by advances in observational searches for sub-parsec supermassive black hole binaries (SBHBs) made in the past few years, we develop a semi-analytic model to describe spectral emission-line signatures of these systems. The goal of this study is to aid the interpretation of spectroscopic searches for binaries and to help test one of the leading models of binary accretion flows in the literature: SBHB in a circumbinary disk. In this work, we present the methodology and a comparison of the preliminary model with the data. We model SBHB accretion flows as a set of three accretion disks: two mini-disks that are gravitationally bound to the individual black holes and a circumbinary disk. Given a physically motivated parameter space occupied by sub-parsec SBHBs, we calculate a synthetic database of nearly 15 million broad optical emission-line profiles and explore the dependence of the profile shapes on characteristic properties of SBHBs. We find that the modeled profiles show distinct statistical properties as a function of the semimajor axis, mass ratio, eccentricity of the binary, and the degree of alignment of the triple disk system. This suggests that the broad emission-line profiles from SBHB systems can in principle be used to infer the distribution of these parameters and as such merit further investigation. Calculated profiles are more morphologically heterogeneous than the broad emission lines in observed SBHB candidates and we discuss improved treatment of radiative transfer effects, which will allow a direct statistical comparison of the two groups.

  16. Understanding the Physical Conditions that Drive Line Emission in Nebular Regions of High-Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeimann, Gregory; Gebhardt, H.; Ciardullo, R.; Gronwall, C.; Hagen, A.

    2014-01-01

    We use the 3D-HST near-IR grism survey to study the physical conditions of the nebular regions within a statistically complete sample of ~ 300 emission-line selected star forming galaxies in the redshift range of 2.0 < z < 2.3. These spectra include the emission lines of oxygen ([O II] 3727, [O III] 5007), neon ([Ne III] 3869), and hydrogen (H-beta, H-gamma); when coupled with constraints on reddening and stellar mass derived from the objects' spectral energy distributions, these data allow us to explore parameters such as the systems' alpha-element abundances and ionization parameters. We try to reproduce these line ratios using theoretical models, such as CLOUDY, and compare line ratios with that of possible local analogs like Green Pea galaxies and Blue Compact Dwarfs. With our sample we can study any possible evolution in the physical conditions of star formation regions.

  17. NEW BIOGENIC VOC EMISSIONS MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    We intend to develop new prognostic models for the prediction of biogenic volatile organic compound emissions from forest ecosystems in the face of possible future changes in the climate and the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. These models will b...

  18. PROBING THE FLARE ATMOSPHERES OF M DWARFS USING INFRARED EMISSION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Sarah J.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hilton, Eric J.; Wisniewski, John P.; Tofflemire, Benjamin M.

    2012-01-20

    We present the results of a campaign to monitor active M dwarfs using infrared spectroscopy, supplemented with optical photometry and spectroscopy. We detected 16 flares during nearly 50 hr of observations on EV Lac, AD Leo, YZ CMi, and VB 8. The three most energetic flares also showed infrared emission, including the first reported detections of P{beta}, P{gamma}, He I {lambda}10830, and Br{gamma} during an M dwarf flare. The strongest flare ({Delta}u = 4.02 on EV Lac) showed emission from H{gamma}, H{delta}, He I {lambda}4471, and Ca II K in the UV/blue and P{beta}, P{gamma}, P{delta}, Br{gamma}, and He I {lambda}10830 in the infrared. The weaker flares ({Delta}u = 1.68 on EV Lac and {Delta}U = 1.38 on YZ CMi) were only observed with photometry and infrared spectroscopy; both showed emission from P{beta}, P{gamma}, and He I {lambda}10830. The strongest infrared emission line, P{beta}, occurred in the active mid-M dwarfs with a duty cycle of {approx}3%-4%. To examine the most energetic flare, we used the static NLTE radiative transfer code RH to produce model spectra based on a suite of one-dimensional model atmospheres. Using a hotter chromosphere than previous one-dimensional atmospheric models, we obtain line ratios that match most of the observed emission lines.

  19. Probing the Flare Atmospheres of M Dwarfs Using Infrared Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Sarah J.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hilton, Eric J.; Wisniewski, John P.; Tofflemire, Benjamin M.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a campaign to monitor active M dwarfs using infrared spectroscopy, supplemented with optical photometry and spectroscopy. We detected 16 flares during nearly 50 hr of observations on EV Lac, AD Leo, YZ CMi, and VB 8. The three most energetic flares also showed infrared emission, including the first reported detections of Pβ, Pγ, He I λ10830, and Brγ during an M dwarf flare. The strongest flare (Δu = 4.02 on EV Lac) showed emission from Hγ, Hδ, He I λ4471, and Ca II K in the UV/blue and Pβ, Pγ, Pδ, Brγ, and He I λ10830 in the infrared. The weaker flares (Δu = 1.68 on EV Lac and ΔU = 1.38 on YZ CMi) were only observed with photometry and infrared spectroscopy; both showed emission from Pβ, Pγ, and He I λ10830. The strongest infrared emission line, Pβ, occurred in the active mid-M dwarfs with a duty cycle of ~3%-4%. To examine the most energetic flare, we used the static NLTE radiative transfer code RH to produce model spectra based on a suite of one-dimensional model atmospheres. Using a hotter chromosphere than previous one-dimensional atmospheric models, we obtain line ratios that match most of the observed emission lines. Based on observations obtained with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium.

  20. Emission-line objects projected upon the galactic bulge.

    PubMed

    Herbig, G H

    1969-08-01

    Low-dispersion slit spectrograms have been obtained of 34 faint objects that lie in the direction of the galactic bulge and have the Halpha line in emission upon a detectable continuum. Eleven of these are certain or probable symbiotic stars. A rough comparison with R CrB stars in the same area suggests that these brightest symbiotics in the bulge have in the mean M(v) approximately -3 to -4, which suggest Population II red giants rather than conventional Population I M-type objects. The sample also contains a number of hot stars having H and [O II] or [O III] in emission, as well as four conventional Be stars, and six certain or possible planetary nebulae. PMID:16578699

  1. Measuring Redshifts of Emission-line Galaxies Using Ramp Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesser, Ryan William; Bohman, John; McNeff, Mathew; Holden, Marcus; Moody, Joseph; Joner, Michael D.; Barnes, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Photometric redshifts are routinely obtained for galaxies without emission using broadband photometry. It is possible in theory to derive reasonably accurate (< 200 km/sec) photometric redshift values for emission-line objects using "ramp" filters with a linearly increasing/decreasing transmission through the bandpass. To test this idea we have obtained a set of filters tuned for isolating H-alpha at a redshift range of 0-10,000 km/sec. These filters consist of two that vary close to linearly in transmission, have opposite slope, and cover the wavelength range from 655nm - 685nm, plus a Stromgren y and 697nm filter to measure the continuum. Redshifts are derived from the ratio of the ramp filters indices after the continuum has been subtracted out. We are finishing the process of obtaining photometric data on a set of about 100 galaxies with known redshift to calibrate the technique and will report on our results.

  2. Emission Line Assimetry in Active Galaxies: Mrk 533 and Mrk 110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilovic, N.

    2009-09-01

    In this work emission line asymmetries detected in two different types of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) - Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 110 and Seyfert 2 galaxy Mrk 533 were analyzed. Since emission lines in two galaxies arise in different emitting regions, detailed spectrum analysis gave the insight into kinematical properties of the Narrow Line and the Broad Line region (NLR and BLR) of this galaxies. We used several methods in the analysis procedure: (a) in order to analyse line profiles we performed profile decomposition into Gaussian components, (b) to study kinematical properties of the gas in the stellar disk, we used the model of "tilted-rings" (Begeman 1989), (c) to determine the sources of ionization of emitting region, we used the Veilleux and Osterbrock diagnostic diagram (Veilleux and Osterbrock 1987), (d) thermodynamical properties of the BLR were determined using the Boltzman plot method (Popović 2003). We showed that the red-shift and asymmetry of emission lines in Mrk 110 are probable caused by the strong gravitational field of the super massive black hole in the center of this galaxy. On the other hand, detailed analysis of 3D spectrophotometric observation of Mrk 533 made possible to map the outflow velocities from the very center of this galaxy, as well as shock waves in the circum-nuclear region, and to analyse the increase of the blue asymmetry with the increase of the outflow velocity (in more details see Smirnova et al. 2007).

  3. Locally Optimally Emitting Clouds and the Variable Broad Emission Line Spectrum of NGC 5548

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korista, Kirk T.; Goad, Michael R.

    2000-06-01

    In recent work Baldwin et al. proposed that in the geometrically extended broad-line regions (BLRs) of quasars and active galactic nuclei, a range in line-emitting gas properties (e.g., density, column density) might exist at each radius and showed that under these conditions the broad emission line spectra of these objects may be dominated by selection effects introduced by the atomic physics and general radiative transfer within the large pool of line-emitting entities. In this picture, the light we see originates in a vast amalgam of emitters but is dominated by those emitters best able to reprocess the incident continuum into a particular emission line. We test this ``locally optimally emitting clouds'' (LOC) model against the extensive spectroscopic database of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548. The time-averaged, integrated-light UV broad emission line spectrum from the 1993 Hubble Space Telescope (HST) monitoring campaign is reproduced via the optimization of three global geometric parameters: the outer radius, the index controlling the radial cloud covering fraction of the continuum source, and the integrated cloud covering fraction. We make an ad hoc selection from the range of successful models, and for a simple spherical BLR geometry we simulate the emission-line light curves for the 1989 IUE and 1993 HST campaigns, using the respective observed UV continuum light curves as drivers. We find good agreement between the predicted and observed light curves and lags-a demonstration of the LOC picture's viability as a means to understanding the BLR environment. Finally, we discuss the next step in developing the LOC picture, which involves the marriage of echo-mapping techniques with spectral simulation grids such as those presented here, using the constraints provided by a high-quality, temporally well-sampled spectroscopic data set.

  4. First Detection of Near-infrared Line Emission from Organics in Young Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandell, Avi M.; Bast, Jeanette; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Salyk, Colette; Mumma, Michael J.; Villanueva, Geronimo

    2012-03-01

    We present an analysis of high-resolution spectroscopy of several bright T Tauri stars using the CRIRES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope and NIRSPEC spectrograph on the Keck Telescope, revealing the first detections of emission from HCN and C2H2 in circumstellar disks at near-infrared wavelengths. Using advanced data reduction techniques, we achieve a dynamic range with respect to the disk continuum of ~500 at 3 μm, revealing multiple emission features of H2O, OH, HCN, and C2H2. We also present stringent upper limits for two other molecules thought to be abundant in the inner disk, CH4 and NH3. Line profiles for the different detected molecules are broad but centrally peaked in most cases, even for disks with previously determined inclinations of greater than 20°, suggesting that the emission has both a Keplerian and non-Keplerian component as observed previously for CO emission. We apply two different modeling strategies to constrain the molecular abundances and temperatures: we use a simplified single-temperature local thermal equilibrium (LTE) slab model with a Gaussian line profile to make line identifications and determine a best-fit temperature and initial abundance ratios, and we compare these values with constraints derived from a detailed disk radiative transfer model assuming LTE excitation but utilizing a realistic temperature and density structure. Abundance ratios from both sets of models are consistent with each other and consistent with expected values from theoretical chemical models, and analysis of the line shapes suggests that the molecular emission originates from within a narrow region in the inner disk (R < 1 AU). Based partially on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope under program ID 179.C-0151, program ID 283.C-5016, and program ID 082.C-0432 (P.I.: Pontopiddan).

  5. FIRST DETECTION OF NEAR-INFRARED LINE EMISSION FROM ORGANICS IN YOUNG CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, Avi M.; Mumma, Michael J.; Villanueva, Geronimo; Bast, Jeanette; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Salyk, Colette

    2012-03-10

    We present an analysis of high-resolution spectroscopy of several bright T Tauri stars using the CRIRES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope and NIRSPEC spectrograph on the Keck Telescope, revealing the first detections of emission from HCN and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} in circumstellar disks at near-infrared wavelengths. Using advanced data reduction techniques, we achieve a dynamic range with respect to the disk continuum of {approx}500 at 3 {mu}m, revealing multiple emission features of H{sub 2}O, OH, HCN, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. We also present stringent upper limits for two other molecules thought to be abundant in the inner disk, CH{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}. Line profiles for the different detected molecules are broad but centrally peaked in most cases, even for disks with previously determined inclinations of greater than 20 Degree-Sign , suggesting that the emission has both a Keplerian and non-Keplerian component as observed previously for CO emission. We apply two different modeling strategies to constrain the molecular abundances and temperatures: we use a simplified single-temperature local thermal equilibrium (LTE) slab model with a Gaussian line profile to make line identifications and determine a best-fit temperature and initial abundance ratios, and we compare these values with constraints derived from a detailed disk radiative transfer model assuming LTE excitation but utilizing a realistic temperature and density structure. Abundance ratios from both sets of models are consistent with each other and consistent with expected values from theoretical chemical models, and analysis of the line shapes suggests that the molecular emission originates from within a narrow region in the inner disk (R < 1 AU).

  6. Exceptional X-ray Weak Quasars: Implications for Accretion Flows and Emission-Line Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, W. Niel; Luo, Bin; Hall, Patrick B.; Wu, Jianfeng; Anderson, Scott F.; Garmire, Gordon; Gibson, Robert; Plotkin, Richard; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shemmer, Ohad; Shen, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Actively accreting supermassive black holes are found, nearly universally, to create luminous X-ray emission, and this point underlies the utility of X-ray surveys for finding active galactic nuclei throughout the Universe. However, there are apparent X-ray weak exceptions to this rule that are now providing novel insights, including weak-line quasars (WLQs) and especially analogs of the extreme WLQ, PHL 1811. We have been systematically studying such X-ray weak quasars with Chandra and near-infrared spectroscopy, and I will report results on their remarkable properties and describe implications for models of the accretion disk/corona and emission-line formation. We have found evidence that many of these quasars may have geometrically thick inner accretion disks, likely due to high accretion rates, that shield the high-ionization broad line region from the relevant ionizing continuum. This model can explain, in a simple and unified manner, their weak lines and diverse X-ray properties. Such shielding may, more generally, play a role in shaping the broad distributions of quasar emission-line equivalent widths and blueshifts.

  7. Model assessment of fumigant emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simulation models are useful for estimating the environmental fate and transport of pesticides. Soil fumigants such as methyl bromide are a special group of pesticides with high vapor pressure values. A main concern with fumigants is the large potential for atmospheric emissions. Because of the l...

  8. XMM study of the emission lines of the Z-Source GX 349+2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iaria, Rosario

    2006-10-01

    We propose a 40 ks XMM observation of the Z source GX 349+2, to perform a detailed study of the iron K-shell features and other low energy features in this source. In particular this source is known to show a broad (0.7 keV FWHM) iron K_a line: several hypothesis were proposed to explain the width of these lines (relativistic and Doppler effects in an accretion disk, Compton scattering, line-blending), and we expect that the good energy resolution of XMM will be able to resolve the complex line shape and to constrain the various models proposed. Furthermore, since some emission lines were already observed in GX 349+2 with BeppoSAX below 3 keV, a proper study of these low energy features are an important diagnostic tool for the physical conditions of the emitting regions.

  9. Silicon X-ray line emission from solar flares and active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, J. H.; Wolff, R. S.; Kestenbaum, H. L.; Ku, W. H.-M.; Lemen, J. R.; Long, K. S.; Novick, R.; Suozzo, R. J.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    1978-01-01

    New observations of solar flare and active region X-ray spectra obtained with the Columbia University instrument on OSO-8 are presented and discussed. The high sensitivity of the graphite crystal panel has allowed both line and continuum spectra to be served with moderate spectral resolution. Observations with higher spectral resolution have been made with a panel of pentaerythritol crystals. Twenty-nine lines between 1.5 and 7.0 A have been resolved and identified, including several dielectronic recombination satellite lines to Si XIV and Si XIII lines which have been observed for the first time. It has been found that thermal continuum models specified by single values of temperature and emission measure have fitted the data adequately, there being good agreement with the values of these parameters derived from line intensity ratios.

  10. Global O VI line emission from the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant and direct kinematic measurement of the associated shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, Andrew; Martin, Christopher

    1992-01-01

    A far-ultraviolet spectrophotometric emission-line mapping of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant is presented. These are results from the first flight of the rocket-borne, High Resolution Emission Line Spectrometer. The spatial distribution of the emission is that of a limb-brightened shell, and similar to soft X-ray maps. The emission-line profiles, which are broader than the instrument resolution, were consistent with uniformly expanding shell models. Best-fit values give a radial expansion velocity to the emissive region of 185(+/-19) km/s and a reddening-corrected average surface brightness of 8.8(+/-3.6) x 10 exp -6 ergs/sq cm s sr in the doublet. Comparison of the observed brightness with predictions of both radiative and nonradiative shock models provides constraints for the global blast wave ram pressure as well as a "covering factor" of the intermediate velocity shock.

  11. Solar flare line emission between 6 A and 25 A. [using crystal spectrometer onboard OSO-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neupert, W. M.; Swartz, M.; Kastner, S. O.

    1973-01-01

    A list of emission lines in the spectra of solar flares between 6 and 25 A has been compiled using data obtained with a KAP crystal spectrometer on the OSO-5 satellite. The emission lines have been classified according to their sensitivity to flare activity. This classification provides a method for discriminating between iron in high stages of ionization (Fe XX-Fe XXV) and lower stages (Fe XVII-Fe XIX), the lines of which are both present in the same spectral region during flares. Identifications consistent with these classifications are proposed. Anomalous intensities in the spectra of Fe XVII and Fe XX are pointed out, and implications of the observations for models of the X-ray emitting regions are discussed.

  12. Compartmental Modeling in Emission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammertsma, Adriaan A.

    This chapter provides an overview of the basic principles of compartmental modeling as it is being applied to the quantitative analysis of positron emission tomography (PET) studies. Measurement of blood flow (perfusion) is used as an example of a single tissue compartment model and receptor studies are discussed in relation to a two tissue compartment model. Emphasis is placed on the accurate measurement of both arterial whole blood and metabolite-corrected plasma input functions. Reference tissue models are introduced as a noninvasive tool to investigate neuroreceptor studies. Finally, parametric methods are introduced in which calculations are performed at a voxel level.

  13. Asymmetries in coronal spectral lines and emission measure distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Durgesh; Klimchuk, James A.

    2013-12-10

    It has previously been argued that (1) spicules do not provide enough pre-heated plasma to fill the corona, and (2) even if they did, additional heating would be required to keep the plasma hot as it expands upward. Here we address whether spicules play an important role by injecting plasma at cooler temperatures (<2 MK), which then gets heated to coronal values at higher altitudes. We measure red-blue asymmetries in line profiles formed over a wide range of temperatures in the bright moss areas of two active regions. We derive emission measure distributions from the excess wing emission. We find that the asymmetries and emission measures are small and conclude that spicules do not inject an important (dominant) mass flux into the cores of active regions at temperatures >0.6 MK (log T > 5.8). These conclusions apply not only to spicules but also to any process that suddenly heats and accelerates chromospheric plasma (e.g., a chromospheric nanoflare). The traditional picture of coronal heating and chromospheric evaporation appears to remain the most likely explanation of the active region corona.

  14. Investigation of Nuclear Gamma Ray Line Emission Associated with Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, S. E.; Millan, R. M.; Eack, K.; Aulich, G. D.

    2005-12-01

    The first conclusive observations of X-rays associated with thunderstorm activity were made in the 1980's and the prompt emission has been interpreted as bremsstrahlung produced by lightning-accelerated electrons. In 2004, Greenfield et al. reported the first detection of delayed gamma ray emission, with flux peaking 70 minutes after a lightning stroke and decaying exponentially over 50 minutes. They suggested the delayed gamma rays are a result of nuclear reactions in the atmosphere, creating excited Chlorine-39 and decaying with a 56-minute half-life. These results are compelling, but inconclusive; instrumentation capable of measuring the energy spectrum with high precision is necessary to confirm the existence of nuclear line emission associated with lightning. During June-September 2005, we used a spare RHESSI 7 cm-diameter segmented coaxial germanium spectrometer to continuously monitor gamma radiation on South Baldy Peak (10,800 ft) in New Mexico. The detector monitors gamma rays between ~18 keV-10 MeV with an energy resolution of ~2 keV@835 keV. South Baldy is the site of Langmuir Lab and was chosen to take advantage of other lightning research instrumentation located there, including New Mexico Tech's 3D Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) which can determine the location of a lightning stroke to within about 50m. We describe the experiment and present the initial results.

  15. Outflow and hot dust emission in broad absorption line quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shaohua; Zhou, Hongyan; Wang, Huiyuan; Wang, Tinggui; Xing, Feijun; Jiang, Peng; Zhang, Kai E-mail: whywang@mail.ustc.edu.cn

    2014-05-01

    We have investigated a sample of 2099 broad absorption line (BAL) quasars with z = 1.7-2.2 built from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Seven and the Wide-field Infrared Survey. This sample is collected from two BAL quasar samples in the literature and is refined by our new algorithm. Correlations of outflow velocity and strength with a hot dust indicator (β{sub NIR}) and other quasar physical parameters—such as an Eddington ratio, luminosity, and a UV continuum slope—are explored in order to figure out which parameters drive outflows. Here β{sub NIR} is the near-infrared continuum slope, which is a good indicator of the amount of hot dust emission relative to the accretion disk emission. We confirm previous findings that outflow properties moderately or weakly depend on the Eddington ratio, UV slope, and luminosity. For the first time, we report moderate and significant correlations of outflow strength and velocity with β{sub NIR} in BAL quasars. It is consistent with the behavior of blueshifted broad emission lines in non-BAL quasars. The statistical analysis and composite spectra study both reveal that outflow strength and velocity are more strongly correlated with β{sub NIR} than the Eddington ratio, luminosity, and UV slope. In particular, the composites show that the entire C IV absorption profile shifts blueward and broadens as β{sub NIR} increases, while the Eddington ratio and UV slope only affect the high and low velocity part of outflows, respectively. We discuss several potential processes and suggest that the dusty outflow scenario, i.e., that dust is intrinsic to outflows and may contribute to the outflow acceleration, is most likely.

  16. The Importance of Nebular Continuum and Line Emission in Observations of Young Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reines, Amy E.; Nidever, David L.; Whelan, David G.; Johnson, Kelsey E.

    2010-01-01

    In this spectroscopic study of infant massive star clusters, we find that continuum emission from ionized gas rivals the stellar luminosity at optical wavelengths. In addition, we find that nebular line emission is significant in many commonly used broadband Hubble Space Telescope (HST) filters including the F814W I-band, the F555W V-band, and the F435W B-band. Two young massive clusters (YMCs) in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 4449 were targeted for follow-up spectroscopic observations after Reines et al. discovered an F814W I-band excess in their photometric study of radio-detected clusters in the galaxy. The spectra were obtained with the Dual Imaging Spectrograph (DIS) on the 3.5 m Apache Point Observatory (APO) telescope and have a spectral range of ~3800-9800 Å. We supplement these data with HST and Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry of the clusters. By comparing our data to the Starburst99 and GALEV evolutionary synthesis models, we find that nebular continuum emission competes with the stellar light in our observations and that the relative contribution from the nebular continuum is largest in the U- and I-bands, where the Balmer (3646 Å) and Paschen jumps (8207 Å) are located. The spectra also exhibit strong line emission including the [S III] λλ9069, 9532 lines in the HST F814W I-band. We find that the combination of nebular continuum and line emission can account for the F814W I-band excess previously found by Reines et al. In an effort to provide a benchmark for estimating the impact of ionized gas emission on photometric observations of young massive stellar populations, we compute the relative contributions of the stellar continuum, nebular continuum, and emission lines to the total observed flux of a 3 Myr old cluster through various HST filter/instrument combinations, including filters in the Wide Field Camera 3. We urge caution when comparing observations of YMCs to evolutionary synthesis models since nebular continuum and line emission can

  17. ALMA WILL DETERMINE THE SPECTROSCOPIC REDSHIFT z > 8 WITH FIR [O III] EMISSION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, A. K.; Shimizu, I.; Tamura, Y.; Matsuo, H.; Okamoto, T.; Yoshida, N.

    2014-01-10

    We investigate the potential use of nebular emission lines in the rest-frame far-infrared (FIR) for determining spectroscopic redshift of z > 8 galaxies with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). After making a line emissivity model as a function of metallicity, especially for the [O III] 88 μm line which is likely to be the strongest FIR line from H II regions, we predict the line fluxes from high-z galaxies based on a cosmological hydrodynamics simulation of galaxy formation. Since the metallicity of galaxies reaches at ∼0.2 Z {sub ☉} even at z > 8 in our simulation, we expect the [O III] 88 μm line as strong as 1.3 mJy for 27 AB objects, which is detectable at a high significance by <1 hr integration with ALMA. Therefore, the [O III] 88 μm line would be the best tool to confirm the spectroscopic redshifts beyond z = 8.

  18. Fe X Emission Lines in Solar and Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, V. J.; Mathioudakis, M.; Keenan, F. P.; Drake, J. J.; Widing, K. G.

    1996-12-01

    Theoretical electron density sensitive emission line ratios involving Fe X 3s23p5-3s23p43d transitions in the 170-190 Å wavelength range are compared with observational data for a solar active region and flares, obtained during the Skylab mission, and Cen and Procyon observations from the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite. Electron densities derived from the majority of the ratios are consistent for the events but are in poor agreement with the values of Ne estimated from diagnostic lines in other species observed in the spectra, casting doubt on the accuracy of the theoretical line ratio calculations and, hence, the atomic data of Mohan et al. used in their derivation. At low Ne, the present ratios are significantly different from those of Young et al., while the latter imply densities that are in somewhat better agreement with densities derived from other diagnostics. This would appear to indicate that the electron impact excitation rates of Bhatia & Doschek adopted by Young et al. are to be preferred over the Mohan et al. results.

  19. Molecular line emission in asymmetric envelopes of evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Andres Felipe Perez

    2014-06-01

    . Part of the research on this thesis is dedicated to radiative transfer modelling of CO emission towards asymmetric AGB sources. Radio observations of CO emission are commonly used to probe the mass loss rates and the kinematics of the CSEs. However, in most cases the observed sources are assumed spherically symmetric. Here I present the results of simulated observations towards oblate CSEs. The aim of this study is to identify the effects induced by the asymmetries on the observed spectral features, and consequently, on the physical parameters of the CSEs derived assuming the sources spherically symmetric.

  20. 40 CFR 1060.515 - How do I test EPA Nonroad Fuel Lines and EPA Cold-Weather Fuel Lines for permeation emissions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and EPA Cold-Weather Fuel Lines for permeation emissions? 1060.515 Section 1060.515 Protection of... Nonroad Fuel Lines and EPA Cold-Weather Fuel Lines for permeation emissions? Measure emission as follows for EPA Nonroad Fuel Lines and EPA Cold-Weather Fuel Lines: (a) Prior to permeation testing, use...

  1. 40 CFR 1060.515 - How do I test EPA Nonroad Fuel Lines and EPA Cold-Weather Fuel Lines for permeation emissions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and EPA Cold-Weather Fuel Lines for permeation emissions? 1060.515 Section 1060.515 Protection of... Nonroad Fuel Lines and EPA Cold-Weather Fuel Lines for permeation emissions? Measure emission as follows for EPA Nonroad Fuel Lines and EPA Cold-Weather Fuel Lines: (a) Prior to permeation testing, use...

  2. 40 CFR 1060.515 - How do I test EPA Nonroad Fuel Lines and EPA Cold-Weather Fuel Lines for permeation emissions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and EPA Cold-Weather Fuel Lines for permeation emissions? 1060.515 Section 1060.515 Protection of... Nonroad Fuel Lines and EPA Cold-Weather Fuel Lines for permeation emissions? Measure emission as follows for EPA Nonroad Fuel Lines and EPA Cold-Weather Fuel Lines: (a) Prior to permeation testing, use...

  3. 40 CFR 1060.515 - How do I test EPA Nonroad Fuel Lines and EPA Cold-Weather Fuel Lines for permeation emissions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and EPA Cold-Weather Fuel Lines for permeation emissions? 1060.515 Section 1060.515 Protection of... Nonroad Fuel Lines and EPA Cold-Weather Fuel Lines for permeation emissions? Measure emission as follows for EPA Nonroad Fuel Lines and EPA Cold-Weather Fuel Lines: (a) Prior to permeation testing, use...

  4. 40 CFR 1060.515 - How do I test EPA Nonroad Fuel Lines and EPA Cold-Weather Fuel Lines for permeation emissions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and EPA Cold-Weather Fuel Lines for permeation emissions? 1060.515 Section 1060.515 Protection of... Nonroad Fuel Lines and EPA Cold-Weather Fuel Lines for permeation emissions? Measure emission as follows for EPA Nonroad Fuel Lines and EPA Cold-Weather Fuel Lines: (a) Prior to permeation testing, use...

  5. A z ∼ 5.7 Lyα emission line with an ultrabroad red wing

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Huan; Wang, JunXian; Zheng, Zhen-Ya; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Infante, Leopoldo E-mail: jxw@mail.ustc.edu.cn E-mail: smalhotr@asu.edu E-mail: linfante@astro.puc.cl

    2014-03-20

    Using the Lyα emission line as a tracer of high-redshift, star-forming galaxies, hundreds of Lyα emission line galaxies (LAEs) at z > 5 have been detected. These LAEs are considered to be low-mass young galaxies, critical to the re-ionization of the universe and the metal enrichment of the circumgalactic medium (CGM) and the intergalactic medium (IGM). It is assumed that outflows in LAEs can help both ionizing photons and Lyα photons escape from galaxies. However, we still know little about the outflows in high-redshift LAEs due to observational difficulties, especially at redshift >5. Models of Lyα radiative transfer predict asymmetric Lyα line profiles with broad red wings in LAEs with outflows. Here, we report a z ∼ 5.7 Lyα emission line with a broad red wing extending to >1000 km s{sup –1} relative to the peak of Lyα line, which has been detected in only a couple of z > 5 LAEs until now. If the broad red wing is ascribed to gas outflow instead of active galactic nucleus activity, the outflow velocity could be larger than the escape velocity (∼500 km s{sup –1}) of a typical halo mass of z ∼ 5.7 LAEs, which is consistent with the idea that outflows in LAEs disperse metals to CGM and IGM.

  6. A New Interpretation for the Variation in Starburst Galaxy Emission Line Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Chris T.; Allen, James T.; Baldwin, Jack A.; Hewett, Paul C.; Ferland, Gary J.; Meskhidze, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Starburst galaxies have been easily distinguished from AGN using diagnostic emission line ratio diagrams constraining their excitation mechanism. Previous modeling of the star forming (SF) galaxy sequence outlined on the BPT diagram has led to the interpretation that high metallicity SF galaxies and low ionization SF galaxies are synonymous. Here, we present a new interpretation. Using a large sample of low-z SDSS galaxies, we co-added similar spectra of pure star forming galaxies allowing many weaker emission lines to act as consistency checks on strong line diagnostics. For the first time, we applied a locally optimally-emitting cloud (LOC) model to understand the physical reason for the variation in starburst galaxy emission line spectra. We fit over twenty diagnostic diagrams constraining the excitation mechanism, SED, temperature, density, metallicity, and grain content, making this work far more constrained than previous studies. Our results indicate that low luminosity SF galaxies could simply have less concentrated regions of ionized gas compared to their high luminosity counterparts, but have similar metallicities, thus requiring reevaluation about underlying nature of star forming galaxies.

  7. Carbon and oxygen X-ray line emission from the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnopper, H. W.; Delvaille, J. P.; Rocchia, R.; Blondel, C.; Cheron, C.; Christy, J. C.; Ducros, R.; Koch, L.; Rothenflug, R.

    1982-01-01

    A soft X-ray, 0.3-1.0 keV spectrum from a 1 sr region which includes a portion of the North Polar Spur, obtained by three rocketborne lithium-drifted silicon detectors, shows the C V, C VI, O VII and O VIII emission lines. The spectrum is well fitted by a two-component, modified Kato (1976) model, where the coronal emission is in collisional equilibrium, with interstellar medium and North Polar Spur temperatures of 1.1 and 3.8 million K, respectively.

  8. The optical emission lines of type 1 X-ray bright Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Mura, G.; Berton, M.; Ciroi, S.; Cracco, V.; Di Mille, F.; Rafanelli, P.

    2014-10-01

    A strong X-ray emission is one of the defining signatures of nuclear activity in galaxies. According to the Unified Model for Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), both the X-ray radiation and the prominent broad emission lines, characterizing the optical and UV spectra of Type 1 AGNs, are originated in the innermost regions of the sources, close to the Super Massive Black Holes (SMBH), which power the central engine. Since the emission is concentrated in a very compact region (with typical size r⩽0.1 pc) and it is not possible to obtain resolved images of the source, spectroscopic studies of this radiation represent the only valuable key to constrain the physical properties of matter and its structure in the center of active galaxies. Based on previous studies on the physics of the Broad Line Region (BLR) and on the X-ray spectra of broad (FWHMHβ ⩾ 2000 km s-1) and narrow line (1000 km s-1 ⩽FWHMHβ ⩽ 2000 km s-1) emitting objects, it has been observed that the kinematic and ionization properties of matter close to the SMBHs are related together, and, in particular, that ionization is higher in narrow line sources. Here we report on the study of the optical and X-ray spectra of a sample of Type 1 AGNs, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database, within an upper redshift limit of z=0.35, and detected at X-ray energies. We present analysis of the broad emission line fluxes and profiles, as well as the properties of the X-ray continuum and Fe Kα emission and we use these parameters to assess the consistency of our current AGN understanding.

  9. Detection of emission lines from z ˜ 3 DLAs towards the QSO J2358+0149

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srianand, Raghunathan; Hussain, Tanvir; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Petitjean, Patrick; Krühler, Thomas; Japelj, Jure; Pâris, Isabelle; Kashikawa, Nobunari

    2016-04-01

    Using VLT/X-shooter we searched for emission line galaxies associated to four damped Lyman-α systems (DLAs) and one sub-DLA at 2.73≤z ≤3.25 towards QSO J2358+0149. We detect [O III] emission from a "low-cool" DLA at zabs= 2.9791 (having log N(H I) = 21.69 ± 0.10, [Zn/H] = -1.83 ± 0.18) at an impact parameter of, ρ ˜ 12 kpc. The associated galaxy is compact with a dynamical mass of (1 - 6) × 109 M⊙, very high excitation ([O III]/[O II] and [O III]/[Hβ] both greater than 10), 12+[O/H]≤8.5 and moderate star formation rate (SFR≤2 M⊙ yr-1). Such properties are typically seen in the low-z extreme blue compact dwarf galaxies. The kinematics of the gas is inconsistent with that of an extended disk and the gas is part of either a large scale wind or cold accretion. We detect Lyα emission from the zabs= 3.2477 DLA (having log N(H I)=21.12±0.10 and [Zn/H]=-0.97 ± 0.13). The Lyα emission is redshifted with respect to the metal absorption lines by 320 km s-1, consistent with the location of the red hump expected in radiative transport models. We derive SFR˜0.2-1.7 M⊙ yr-1 and Lyα escape fraction of ≥10 per cent. No other emission line is detected from this system. Because the DLA has a small velocity separation from the quasar (˜500 km s-1) and the DLA emission is located within a small projected distance (ρ < 5 kpc), we also explore the possibility that the Lyα emission is being induced by the QSO itself. QSO induced Lyα fluorescence is possible if the DLA is within a physical separation of 340 kpc to the QSO. Detection of stellar continuum light and/or the oxygen emission lines would disfavor this possibility. We do not detect any emission line from the remaining three systems.

  10. Detection of emission lines from z ˜ 3 DLAs towards the QSO J2358+0149

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srianand, Raghunathan; Hussain, Tanvir; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Petitjean, Patrick; Krühler, Thomas; Japelj, Jure; Pâris, Isabelle; Kashikawa, Nobunari

    2016-07-01

    Using VLT/X-shooter, we searched for emission line galaxies associated with four damped Lyman α systems (DLAs) and one sub-DLA at 2.73 ≤z ≤3.25 towards QSO J2358+0149. We detect [O III] emission from a `low-cool' DLA at zabs = 2.9791 (having log N(H I) = 21.69 ± 0.10, [Zn/H] = -1.83 ± 0.18) at an impact parameter of, ρ ˜ 12 kpc. The associated galaxy is compact with a dynamical mass of (1-6) × 109 M⊙, very high excitation ([O III]/[O II] and [O III]/[Hβ] both greater than 10), 12+[O/H]≤8.5 and moderate star formation rate (SFR ≤2 M⊙ yr-1). Such properties are typically seen in the low-z extreme blue compact dwarf galaxies. The kinematics of the gas is inconsistent with that of an extended disc and the gas is part of either a large scale wind or cold accretion. We detect Lyα emission from the zabs = 3.2477 DLA [having log N(H I) = 21.12 ± 0.10 and [Zn/H] = -0.97 ± 0.13]. The Lyα emission is redshifted with respect to the metal absorption lines by 320 km s-1, consistent with the location of the red hump expected in radiative transport models. We derive SFR ˜0.2-1.7 M⊙ yr-1 and Lyα escape fraction of ≥10 per cent. No other emission line is detected from this system. Because the DLA has a small velocity separation from the quasar (˜500 km s-1) and the DLA emission is located within a small projected distance (ρ < 5 kpc), we also explore the possibility that the Lyα emission is being induced by the QSO itself. QSO-induced Lyα fluorescence is possible if the DLA is within a physical separation of 340 kpc to the QSO. Detection of stellar continuum light and/or the oxygen emission lines would disfavour this possibility. We do not detect any emission line from the remaining three systems.

  11. EFFECTS OF AN ACCRETION DISK WIND ON THE PROFILE OF THE BALMER EMISSION LINES FROM ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Flohic, Helene M. L. G.; Eracleous, Michael; Bogdanovic, Tamara E-mail: mce@astro.psu.edu

    2012-07-10

    We explore the connection between active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with single- and double-peaked broad Balmer emission lines by using models dealing with radiative transfer effects through a disk wind. Our primary goal is to assess the applicability of the Murray and Chiang model by making an extensive and systematic comparison of the model predictions with data. In the process, we also verify the original derivation and evaluate the importance of general relativistic effects. As the optical depth through the emission layer increases, the peaks of a double-peaked profile move closer and eventually merge, producing a single peak. The properties of the emission line profile depend as sensitively on the geometric parameters of the line-emitting portion of the disk as they do on the disk-wind parameters. Using a parameter range that encompasses the expected characteristics of the broad-line regions in AGNs, we construct a database of model profiles and measure a set of diagnostic properties. Comparisons of the model profiles with emission lines from a subset of Sloan digital Sky Survey quasars show that observed lines are consistent with moderately large optical depth in the disk wind and a range of disk inclinations i {approx}< 45 Degree-Sign . Including relativistic effects is necessary to produce the asymmetries of observed line profiles.

  12. 40 CFR 1060.510 - How do I test EPA Low-Emission Fuel Lines for permeation emissions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Lines for permeation emissions? 1060.510 Section 1060.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... NONROAD AND STATIONARY EQUIPMENT Test Procedures § 1060.510 How do I test EPA Low-Emission Fuel Lines for... incorporated by reference in § 1060.810....

  13. A versatile apparatus for on-line emission channeling experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, M. R.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.; Unidade de Física e Aceleradores, IST Amorim, L. M.; Pereira, L. M. C.

    2013-07-15

    The concept and functionality of an apparatus dedicated to emission channeling experiments using short-lived isotopes on-line at ISOLDE/CERN is described. The setup is assembled in two functional blocks – (a) base stand including beam collimation, implantation and measurement chamber, cryogenic extension, and vacuum control system and (b) Panmure goniometer extension including maneuvering cradle and sample heating furnace. This setup allows for in situ implantation and sample analysis in the as-implanted state and upon cooling down to 50 K and during annealing up to 1200 K. The functionality of the setup will be illustrated with the example of establishing the lattice location of {sup 56}Mn probes implanted into GaAs.

  14. Analysis of the variability of the luminous emission line star MWC 314

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratorio, G.; Rossi, C.; Friedjung, M.

    2008-08-01

    Context: We investigated the surroundings of MWC 314 in the framework of the study of hot emission line star environments using the SAC method. This star is either a B[e] supergiant or a luminous blue variable and appears to be extremely luminous and massive. Aims: We determine the structure and physical conditions of the emitting region and study the possible variations. Methods: We measured the absorption and emission line radial velocities and the emission line fluxes on high-resolution spectra obtained with Aurelie at the 1.52 m OHP telescope in July 1998, with Elodie at the 1.93 m OHP telescope at various epochs, and with echelle spectrographs of the Asiago and Loiano observatories (Italy) in 2006. We used the statistical approach of the self-absorption curve method (SAC) to derive physical parameters of the line-emitting region. Results: We detected drastic variations of the photospheric absorption line radial velocities with time, while the emission line velocities appear to be stable. The Cr II, Ti II, and Fe II emission lines have a complex structure. They are double-peaked, and each of these two 60 km s-1 separated components, is composed of a narrow and a broad component, while the [Fe II] line components are narrower. The fit of the various components of the Fe II lines to a SAC curve indicates that their intensities are affected by some self absorption. We obtained a Boltzmann-type population law whose mean excitation temperature is 6500-1000+1500 K for the narrow component lower and upper levels. We obtained a higher Boltzmann-type population law of 10 500-2000+3000 K for the forbidden transition upper levels. Conclusions: From the absorption lines we confirm the binarity for MWC 314. The periodicity has nevertheless to be improved with a higher sampling frequency. Our results from the emission lines are consistent with line formation in a rotating disk around a star. The typical minimum radius of the line emitting region obtained from the SAC study

  15. Development of On-line Wildfire Emissions for the Operational Canadian Air Quality Forecast System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, R.; Menard, S.; Chen, J.; Anselmo, D.; Paul-Andre, B.; Gravel, S.; Moran, M. D.; Davignon, D.

    2013-12-01

    An emissions processing system has been developed to incorporate near-real-time emissions from wildfires and large prescribed burns into Environment Canada's real-time GEM-MACH air quality (AQ) forecast system. Since the GEM-MACH forecast domain covers Canada and most of the USA, including Alaska, fire location information is needed for both of these large countries. Near-real-time satellite data are obtained and processed separately for the two countries for organizational reasons. Fire location and fuel consumption data for Canada are provided by the Canadian Forest Service's Canadian Wild Fire Information System (CWFIS) while fire location and emissions data for the U.S. are provided by the SMARTFIRE (Satellite Mapping Automated Reanalysis Tool for Fire Incident Reconciliation) system via the on-line BlueSky Gateway. During AQ model runs, emissions from individual fire sources are injected into elevated model layers based on plume-rise calculations and then transport and chemistry calculations are performed. This 'on the fly' approach to the insertion of emissions provides greater flexibility since on-line meteorology is used and reduces computational overhead in emission pre-processing. An experimental wildfire version of GEM-MACH was run in real-time mode for the summers of 2012 and 2013. 48-hour forecasts were generated every 12 hours (at 00 and 12 UTC). Noticeable improvements in the AQ forecasts for PM2.5 were seen in numerous regions where fire activity was high. Case studies evaluating model performance for specific regions, computed objective scores, and subjective evaluations by AQ forecasters will be included in this presentation. Using the lessons learned from the last two summers, Environment Canada will continue to work towards the goal of incorporating near-real-time intermittent wildfire emissions within the operational air quality forecast system.

  16. Strong Field Effects on Emission Line Profiles: Kerr Black Holes and Warped Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2012-01-01

    If an accretion disk around a black hole is illuminated by hard X-rays from non-thermal coronae, fluorescent iron lines will be emitted from the inner region of the accretion disk. The emission line profiles will show a variety of strong field effects, which may be used as a probe of the spin parameter of the black hole and the structure of the accretion disk. In this paper, we generalize the previous relativistic line profile models by including both the black hole spinning effects and the non-axisymmetries of warped accretion disks. Our results show different features from the conventional calculations for either a flat disk around a Kerr black hole or a warped disk around a Schwarzschild black hole by presenting, at the same time, multiple peaks, rather long red tails, and time variations of line profiles with the precession of the disk. We show disk images as seen by a distant observer, which are distorted by the strong gravity. Although we are primarily concerned with the iron K-shell lines in this paper, the calculation is general and is valid for any emission lines produced from a warped accretion disk around a black hole.

  17. Strong Field Effects On Emission Line Profiles: Kerr Black Holes And Warped Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Li, X.

    2012-01-01

    If an accretion disk around a black hole is illuminated by hard X-rays from non-thermal coronae, fluorescent iron lines will be emitted from the inner region of the accretion disk. The emission line profiles will show a variety of strong field effects, which may be used as a probe of the spin parameter of the black hole and the structure of the accretion disk. In this paper we generalize the previous relativistic line profile models by including both the black hole spinning effects and the non-axisymmetry of warped accretion disks. Our results show different features from the conventional calculations for either a flat disk around a Kerr black hole or a warped disk around a Schwarzschild black hole by presenting, at the same time, multiple peaks, rather long red tails and time variations of line profiles with the precession of the disk. We show disk images as seen by a distant observer, which are distorted by the strong gravity. Although we are primarily concerned with the iron K-shell lines in this paper, the calculation is general and is valid for any emission lines produced from a warped accretion disk around a black hole. This work was supported by the Natural Science Foundation of China (under grant number 10873008), and the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program 2009CB824800).

  18. STRONG FIELD EFFECTS ON EMISSION LINE PROFILES: KERR BLACK HOLES AND WARPED ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yan; Li Xiangdong

    2012-01-10

    If an accretion disk around a black hole is illuminated by hard X-rays from non-thermal coronae, fluorescent iron lines will be emitted from the inner region of the accretion disk. The emission line profiles will show a variety of strong field effects, which may be used as a probe of the spin parameter of the black hole and the structure of the accretion disk. In this paper, we generalize the previous relativistic line profile models by including both the black hole spinning effects and the non-axisymmetries of warped accretion disks. Our results show different features from the conventional calculations for either a flat disk around a Kerr black hole or a warped disk around a Schwarzschild black hole by presenting, at the same time, multiple peaks, rather long red tails, and time variations of line profiles with the precession of the disk. We show disk images as seen by a distant observer, which are distorted by the strong gravity. Although we are primarily concerned with the iron K-shell lines in this paper, the calculation is general and is valid for any emission lines produced from a warped accretion disk around a black hole.

  19. Massive Emission-Line Stars in Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, P. L.; Holtzman, J. A.; Walterbos, R. A. M.

    2003-12-01

    The evolution of massive stars is still poorly understood because of critical effects of mass loss during the post-main sequence phase. Of particular relevance is the Luminous Blue Variable phase, during which high mass loss may occur over a brief period. It would be useful to know the mass range of stars that enter this phase, and the life time of the phase. For that, better estimates of the numbers of LBVs in different environments is crucial. In a study of M31, we detected candidate LBVs as luminous stars with strong Hα emission-lines and no nebular [SII] emission. (King, N.L., Walterbos, R.A.M., & Braun, R., 1998, ApJ, 507:210-220). HST's sensitivity offers the capability to identify these candidate LBVs in galaxies beyond the Local Group. We identify massive Hα emmision-line stars in nearby spiral galaxies within 10 Mpc, using data from the HST WFPC2 archive. We obtained stellar photometry in Hα (F656N) and various broadband filters, with methods developed for the HST Local Group Stellar Photometry archive (Holtzman, J., Afonso, C., & Dolphin, A., 2003, ApJS, submitted). We identify candidates based on the amount of Hα excess in two-color plots. We also require an absolute magnitude MV ≤ -5, and photometry fit parameters consistent with point source characteristics. Candidates are inspected visually on the images for verification purpose. We find promising candidates in several nearby galaxies. We will present a catalog of the objects, and discuss their properties and the environments in which they are found. Support for this work was provided by NASA through grant numbers AR-08372.01-97A and HST-AR-08749.01-A from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc. under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  20. Quasar emission lines, radio structures and radio unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Neal; Browne, I. W. A.

    2013-02-01

    Unified schemes of radio sources, which account for different types of radio active galactic nucleus in terms of anisotropic radio and optical emission, together with different orientations of the ejection axis to the line of sight, have been invoked for many years. Recently, large samples of optical quasars, mainly from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), together with large radio samples, such as Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm (FIRST), have become available. These hold the promise of providing more stringent tests of unified schemes but, compared to previous samples, lack high-resolution radio maps. Nevertheless, they have been used to investigate unified schemes, in some cases yielding results which appear inconsistent with such theories. Here we investigate using simulations how the selection effects to which such investigations are subject can influence the conclusions drawn. In particular, we find that the effects of limited resolution do not allow core-dominated radio sources to be fully represented in the samples, that the effects of limited sensitivity systematically exclude some classes of sources and the lack of deep radio data make it difficult to decide to what extent closely separated radio sources are associated. Nevertheless, we conclude that relativistic unified schemes are entirely compatible with the current observational data. For a sample selected from SDSS and FIRST which includes weak-cored triples we find that the equivalent width of the [O III] emission line decreases as core dominance increases, as expected, and also that core-dominated quasars are optically brighter than weak-cored quasars.

  1. Cataloguing Emission Line Spectra from Fe VII-Fe XXIV in the Extreme Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepson, J. K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Kahn, D. A.; Liedahl, D. A.; Mauche, C. W.; Utter, S. B.

    2000-01-01

    Detailed laboratory astrophysics measurements are, in progress to produce spectral tables for the Fe VII Fe XXIV line emission in the EUV wavelength band. Results for Fe XIII are presented that update line lists used in the Chandra Emission Line Project.

  2. 40 CFR 1060.510 - How do I test EPA Low-Emission Fuel Lines for permeation emissions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How do I test EPA Low-Emission Fuel Lines for permeation emissions? 1060.510 Section 1060.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EVAPORATIVE EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND...

  3. 40 CFR 1060.510 - How do I test EPA Low-Emission Fuel Lines for permeation emissions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How do I test EPA Low-Emission Fuel Lines for permeation emissions? 1060.510 Section 1060.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EVAPORATIVE EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND...

  4. 40 CFR 1060.510 - How do I test EPA Low-Emission Fuel Lines for permeation emissions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I test EPA Low-Emission Fuel Lines for permeation emissions? 1060.510 Section 1060.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EVAPORATIVE EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND...

  5. 40 CFR 1060.510 - How do I test EPA Low-Emission Fuel Lines for permeation emissions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How do I test EPA Low-Emission Fuel Lines for permeation emissions? 1060.510 Section 1060.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EVAPORATIVE EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND...

  6. Detection of an unidentified emission line in the stacked X-ray spectrum of galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Bulbul, Esra; Foster, Adam; Smith, Randall K.; Randall, Scott W.; Markevitch, Maxim; Loewenstein, Michael

    2014-07-01

    We detect a weak unidentified emission line at E = (3.55-3.57) ± 0.03 keV in a stacked XMM-Newton spectrum of 73 galaxy clusters spanning a redshift range 0.01-0.35. When the full sample is divided into three subsamples (Perseus, Centaurus+Ophiuchus+Coma, and all others), the line is seen at >3σ statistical significance in all three independent MOS spectra and the PN 'all others' spectrum. It is also detected in the Chandra spectra of the Perseus Cluster. However, it is very weak and located within 50-110 eV of several known lines. The detection is at the limit of the current instrument capabilities. We argue that there should be no atomic transitions in thermal plasma at this energy. An intriguing possibility is the decay of sterile neutrino, a long-sought dark matter particle candidate. Assuming that all dark matter is in sterile neutrinos with m{sub s} = 2E = 7.1 keV, our detection corresponds to a neutrino decay rate consistent with previous upper limits. However, based on the cluster masses and distances, the line in Perseus is much brighter than expected in this model, significantly deviating from other subsamples. This appears to be because of an anomalously bright line at E = 3.62 keV in Perseus, which could be an Ar XVII dielectronic recombination line, although its emissivity would have to be 30 times the expected value and physically difficult to understand. Another alternative is the above anomaly in the Ar line combined with the nearby 3.51 keV K line also exceeding expectation by a factor of 10-20. Confirmation with Astro-H will be critical to determine the nature of this new line.

  7. Far-infrared emission lines of CO and OH in the Orion-KL molecular shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, D. M.; Genzel, R.; Townes, C. H.; Storey, J. M. V.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of far infrared rotational emission lines which arise in the shocked gas associated with Orion-Kl are presented, including detections of the CO J = 34 yields 33, J = 31 yields 30, J = 26 yields 25, and OH sup 2 PI sub (3/2) J sup P = 7/2(-) yields 5/2(+) emission lines, as well as improved measurements of the CO J = 22 yields 21 and OH sup 2 PI sub (3/2) J = 5/2 yields 3/2 lines. These lines are observed to have velocity widths of Del V approx. 20 to 30 km/sec, somewhat less than either the 2 micro H sub 2 lines or the high velocity plateau component of the millimeter wave CO lines seen in this object. An H sub 2 column density of approx. 3 x 10 to the 21st power, a total mass of approx. 1 solar mass and characteristic temperature and density T approx. 750 K and approx. 2 x 10 to the 6th power per cu cm can be derived from the CO intensities. The density is too low by at least an order of magnitude for the observed infrared H sub 2 and far infrared CO emission to be accounted for by a purely hydrodynamic shock, and support is lent to hydromagnetic shock models. From the present measurements, the relative abundance of CO is estimated to be CO H sub 2 = 1.2 x .0001, corresponding to 20% of the cosmic abundance of C existing in the form of CO. The average relative abundance of OH in the shocked gas is O/H sub 2 or = 5 x 10 to the -7th power. An upper limit to the intensity of the HD J = 1 yields 0 line is used to derive an upper limit of tau or = 3 for the D/H relative abundance in the Orion cloud core.

  8. Emission-Line Variability in the Iron Star XX Orphiuchus Over the Past Decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, Bryan; Walter, D. K.; Howell, S. B.; Cash, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of nine years of spectra taken with the Coudé Feed telescope at KPNO of the Iron Star XX Oph. In addition to numerous iron lines, other metals such as Ti and the hydrogen Balmer series are seen in emission, while still others such as the H and K lines of Ca II are in absorption. Our study covers the years 2003 to 2012 and includes an episode in 2004 where photometry from the AAVSO shows a 1.5 magnitude drop in brightness as discussed in Cool et.al. (2005, PASP, 117, 462). Beginning in 2005 and continuing to the present, our data show Balmer lines with P-Cygni profiles , where the strength of the absorption components generally increase over time while the emission components are diminished. We discuss our results in comparison to the model of Howell et.al. (2009 PASAP, 121, 16) of AS 325, a similar iron emission-line star in a binary system. Support for this work was provided by the NSF PAARE program to South Carolina State University under award AST-0750814. We thank the director of KPNO for his generous allocation of telescope time to this project over the years.

  9. Line emission of sodium and hydroxyl radicals in single-bubble sonoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Julia; Pflieger, Rachel; Nikitenko, Sergey I; Shchukin, Dmitry; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2011-01-20

    Spectroscopic studies of single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) in water and aqueous sodium chloride solutions with a defined concentration of argon were performed as a function of the driving acoustic pressure. The broad-band continuum ranging from 200 to 700 nm is characterized by fits using Planck's law of blackbody radiation. The obtained blackbody temperatures are in the range of 10(4) K and are revealed to be independent of the presence of a salt and the acoustic pressure, whereas the SL intensity increases by a factor of more than 10 within the studied acoustic pressure range. The different trends followed by SL intensity and blackbody temperatures question the blackbody model. In solutions with 70 mbar of argon, line emissions of OH(•) radicals and Na* are observed. The shape of the OH(•) radical emission spectrum is very similar to that in MBSL spectra, indicating the strong similarity of intrabubble conditions. An increase of the acoustic pressure causes the continuum to overlap the lines until they become indistinguishable. The emission line of Na* in NaCl is observed only at high NaCl concentrations. When sodium dodecylsulfate is used a pronounced Na* line is already observed in a 1 mM solution thanks to enrichment of sodium ions at the interface. The results presented in this work reveal the strong similarity of SBSL and MBSL under certain experimental conditions. PMID:21166432

  10. Hydrogen transport diagnostics by atomic and molecular emission line profiles simultaneously measured for large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K.; Shikama, T.; Hasuo, M.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.

    2013-01-15

    We observe the Balmer-{alpha}, -{beta}, and -{gamma} lines of hydrogen atoms and Q branches of the Fulcher-{alpha} band of hydrogen molecules simultaneously with their polarization resolved for large helical device. From the fit including the line splits and the polarization dependences by the Zeeman effect, the emission locations, intensities, and the temperatures of the atoms and molecules are determined. The emission locations of the hydrogen atoms are determined outside but close to the last closed flux surface (LCFS). The results are consistent with a previous work (Phys. Plasmas 12, 042501 (2005)). On the other hand, the emission locations of the molecules are determined to be in the divertor legs, which is farer from those of the atoms. The kinetic energy of the atoms is 1 {approx} 20 eV, while the rotational temperature of molecules is {approx}0.04 eV. Additionally, substantial wings, which originate from high velocity atoms and are not reproduced by the conventional spectral analysis, are observed in the Balmer line profiles. We develop a one-dimensional model to simulate the transport of the atoms and molecules. The model reproduces the differences of the emission locations of the atoms and molecules when their initial temperatures are assumed to be 3 eV and 0.04 eV, respectively. From the model, the wings of the Balmer-{alpha} line is attributed to the high velocity atoms exist deep inside the LCFS, which are generated by the charge exchange collisions with hot protons there.

  11. Interpreting broad emission-line variations - II. Tensions between luminosity, characteristic size, and responsivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goad, M. R.; Korista, K. T.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the variability behaviour of the broad H β emission-line to driving continuum variations in the best-studied AGN NGC 5548. For a particular choice of broad emission-line region (BLR) geometry, H β surface emissivity based on photoionization models, and using a scaled version of the 13-yr optical continuum light-curve as a proxy for the driving ionizing continuum, we explore several key factors that determine the broad emission-line luminosity L, characteristic size RRW, and variability amplitude (i.e. responsivity) η, as well as the interplay between them. For fixed boundary models which extend as far as the hot dust the predicted delays for H β are on average too long. However, the predicted variability amplitude of H β provides a remarkably good match to observations except during low-continuum states. We suggest that the continuum flux variations which drive the redistribution in H β surface emissivity F(r) do not on their own lead to large enough changes in RRW or ηeff. We thus investigate dust-bounded BLRs for which the location of the effective outer boundary is modulated by the continuum level and the dust-sublimation and dust-condensation time-scales. We find that in order to match the observed variability amplitude of broad H β in NGC 5548 a rather static outer boundary is preferred. Intriguingly, we show that the most effective way of reducing the H β delay, while preserving its responsivity and equivalent width, is to invoke a smaller value in the incident ionizing photon flux ΦH for a given ionizing source-cloud radial distance r, than is normally inferred from the observed UV continuum flux and typical models of the continuum spectral energy distribution.

  12. Red Fluorescent Line Emission from Hydrogen Molecules in Diffuse Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Spaans, Marco

    1996-01-01

    We have modeled the fluorescent pumping of electronic and vibrational emissions of molecular hydrogen (H2) within diffuse molecular clouds that are illuminated by ultraviolet continuum radiation. Fluorescent line intensities are predicted for transitions at ultraviolet, infrared, and red visible wavelengths as functions of the gas density, the visual extinction through the cloud, and the intensity of the incident UV continuum radiation. The observed intensity in each fluorescent transition is roughly proportional to the integrated rate of H2 photodissociation along the line of sight. Although the most luminous fluorescent emissions detectable from ground-based observatories lie at near-infrared wavelengths, we argue that the lower sky brightness at visible wavelengths makes the red fluorescent transitions a particularly sensitive probe. Fabry-Perot spectrographs of the type that have been designed to observe very faint diffuse Ha emissions are soon expected to yield sensitivities that will be adequate to detect H2 vibrational emissions from molecular clouds that are exposed to ultraviolet radiation no stronger than the mean radiation field within the Galaxy. Observations of red H2 fluorescent emission together with cospatial 21 cm H I observations could serve as a valuable probe of the gas density in diffuse molecular clouds.

  13. Validating TRANSP simulations using neutron emission spectroscopy with dual sight lines

    SciTech Connect

    Hellesen, C.; Sunden, E. A.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Giacomelli, L.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Johnsson, M. G.; Kaellne, J.; Ronchi, E.; Weiszflog, M.; Ballabio, L.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Voitsekhovitch, I.

    2008-10-15

    A method to generate modeled neutron spectra from bulk and fast ion distributions simulated by TRANSP has been developed. In this paper, modeled data generated from fuel ion distributions modeled with TRANSP is compared to measured data from two neutron spectrometers with different lines of sight; TOFOR with a radial one and the MPRu with a tangential one. The information obtained from the analysis of the measured neutron spectra such as the relative intensity of the emission from different ion populations places additional constraints on the simulation and can be used to adjust the parameters of the simulation.

  14. A catalog of early-type emission-line stars and Hα line profiles from LAMOST DR2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Wen; Luo, A.-Li; Hu, Jing-Yao; Yang, Hai-Feng; Du, Chang-De; Liu, Chao; Lee, Chien-De; Lin, Chien-Cheng; Wang, Yue-Fei; Zhang, Yong; Cao, Zi-Huang; Hou, Yong-Hui

    2016-09-01

    We present a catalog including 11 204 spectra of 10 436 early-type emission-line stars from LAMOST DR2, among which 9752 early-type emission-line spectra are newly discovered. For these early-type emission-line stars, we discuss the morphological and physical properties of their low-resolution spectra. In this spectral sample, the Hα emission profiles display a wide variety of shapes. Based on the Hα line profiles, these spectra are categorized into five distinct classes: single-peak emission, single-peak emission in absorption, double-peak emission, double-peak emission in absorption, and P-Cygni profiles. To better understand what causes the Hα line profiles, we divide these objects into four types from the perspective of physical classification, which include classical Be stars, Herbig Ae/Be stars, close binaries and spectra contaminated by HΠ regions. The majority of Herbig Ae/Be stars and classical Be stars are identified and separated using a (H-K, K-W1) color-color diagram. We also discuss 31 binary systems that are listed in the SIMBAD on-line catalog and identify 3600 spectra contaminated by HΠ regions after cross-matching with positions in the Dubout-Crillon catalog. A statistical analysis of line profiles versus classifications is then conducted in order to understand the distribution of Hα profiles for each type in our sample. Finally, we also provide a table of 172 spectra with Fe Π emission lines and roughly calculate stellar wind velocities for seven spectra with P-Cygni profiles.

  15. Modelling of Nonthermal Microwave Emission from Twisted Magnetic Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharykin, I. N.; Kuznetsov, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    Microwave gyrosynchrotron radio emission generated by nonthermal electrons in twisted magnetic loops is modelled using the recently developed simulation tool GX Simulator. We consider isotropic and anisotropic pitch-angle distributions. The main scope of the work is to understand the impact of a twisted magnetic field topology on radio emission maps. We have found that nonthermal electrons inside twisted magnetic loops produce gyrosynchrotron radio emission with a particular polarisation distribution. The polarisation sign inversion line is inclined relatively to the axis of the loop. The radio emission source is more compact in the case of a less twisted loop, assuming an anisotropic pitch-angle distribution of nonthermal electrons.

  16. Modelling of Nonthermal Microwave Emission from Twisted Magnetic Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharykin, I. N.; Kuznetsov, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Microwave gyrosynchrotron radio emission generated by nonthermal electrons in twisted magnetic loops is modelled using the recently developed simulation tool GX Simulator. We consider isotropic and anisotropic pitch-angle distributions. The main scope of the work is to understand the impact of a twisted magnetic field topology on radio emission maps. We have found that nonthermal electrons inside twisted magnetic loops produce gyrosynchrotron radio emission with a particular polarisation distribution. The polarisation sign inversion line is inclined relatively to the axis of the loop. The radio emission source is more compact in the case of a less twisted loop, assuming an anisotropic pitch-angle distribution of nonthermal electrons.

  17. TIME VARIABLE BROAD-LINE EMISSION IN NGC 4203: EVIDENCE FOR STELLAR CONTRAILS

    SciTech Connect

    Devereux, Nick

    2011-12-10

    Dual epoch spectroscopy of the lenticular galaxy, NGC 4203, obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope has revealed that the double-peaked component of the broad H{alpha} emission line is time variable, increasing by a factor of 2.2 in brightness between 1999 and 2010. Modeling the gas distribution responsible for the double-peaked profiles indicates that a ring is a more appropriate description than a disk and most likely represents the contrail of a red supergiant star that is being tidally disrupted at a distance of {approx}1500 AU from the central black hole. There is also a bright core of broad H{alpha} line emission that is not time variable and identified with a large-scale inflow from an outer radius of {approx}1 pc. If the gas number density is {>=}10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}, as suggested by the absence of similarly broad [O I] and [O III] emission lines, then the steady state inflow rate is {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, which exceeds the inflow requirement to explain the X-ray luminosity in terms of radiatively inefficient accretion by a factor of {approx}6. The central active galactic nucleus (AGN) is unable to sustain ionization of the broad-line region; the discrepancy is particularly acute in 2010 when the broad H{alpha} emission line is dominated by the contrail of the infalling supergiant star. However, ram pressure shock ionization produced by the interaction of the infalling supergiant with the ambient interstellar medium may help alleviate the ionizing deficit by generating a mechanical source of ionization supplementing the photoionization provided by the AGN.

  18. Time Variable Broad Line Emission in NGC 4203: Evidence for Stellar Contrails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devereux, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    Dual epoch spectroscopy of the lenticular galaxy, NGC 4203, obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope has revealed that the double-peaked component of the broad Hα emission line is time variable, increasing by a factor of 2.2 in brightness between 1999 and 2010. Modeling the gas distribution responsible for the double-peaked profiles indicates that a ring is a more appropriate description than a disk and most likely represents the contrail of a red supergiant star that is being tidally disrupted at a distance of 1500 AU from the central black hole. There is also a bright core of broad Hα line emission that is not time variable and identified with a large scale inflow from an outer radius 1 pc. If the gas number density is ≥ 106 cm-3, as suggested by the absence of similarly broad [O I] and [O III] emission lines, then the steady state inflow rate is 2 × 10-2 M⊙/yr which exceeds the inflow requirement to explain the X-ray luminosity in terms of radiatively inefficient accretion by a factor of 6. The central AGN is unable to sustain ionization of the broad line region, the discrepancy is particularly acute in 2010 when the broad Hα emission line is dominated by the contrail of the in-falling supergiant star. However, ram pressure shock ionization produced by the interaction of the in-falling supergiant with the ambient interstellar medium may help alleviate the ionizing deficit by generating a mechanical source of ionization supplementing the photoionization provided by the AGN. Support for Program number HST AR-11752.01-A was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, incorporated, under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  19. Search for Gamma Ray Line Emission from SS433 in the SMM GRS Data Base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, H. A.; Geldzahler, B. J.

    1992-05-01

    Gamma ray spectra of SS433 obtained by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer aboard the Solar Maximum Mission satellite during 1980-1989 were examined for evidence of Doppler shifted line emission. The main emphasis, using both 3-day and 9-day integrations, was on the 1.368 MeV magnesium-24 line suggested by Lamb et al. (1983, Nature, 305,37). This work completes the examination of the SMM data base on SS433, augmenting and extending the study of Geldzahler et al. (1989, Ap.J., 342, 1123). The results are examined in the context of the models of gamma ray emission from SS433 published by Ramaty et al. (1984, Ap.J., 283, L13) and Boyd et al. (1984, Ap.J.,276, L9). This work was supported by NASA grant NAS 5-26954 at the Institute for Computational Sciences and Informatics, George Mason University.

  20. Hot surface ionic line emission and cold K-inner shell emission from petawatt-laser irradiated Cu foil targets

    SciTech Connect

    Theobald, W; Akli, K; Clarke, R; Delettrez, J A; Freeman, R R; Glenzer, S; Green, J; Gregori, G; Heathcote, R; Izumi, N; King, J A; Koch, J A; Kuba, J; Lancaster, K; MacKinnon, A J; Key, M; Mileham, C; Myatt, J; Neely, D; Norreys, P A; Park, H; Pasely, J; Patel, P; Regan, S P; Sawada, H; Shepherd, R; Snavely, R; Stephens, R B; Stoeckl, C; Storm, M; Zhang, B; Sangster, T C

    2005-12-13

    A hot, T{sub e} {approx} 2- to 3-keV surface plasma was observed in the interaction of a 0.7-ps petawatt laser beam with solid copper-foil targets at intensities >10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. Copper K-shell spectra were measured in the range of 8 to 9 keV using a single-photon-counting x-ray CCD camera. In addition to K{sub {alpha}} and K{sub {beta}} inner-shell lines, the emission contained the Cu He{sub {alpha}} and Ly{sub {alpha}} lines, allowing the temperature to be inferred. These lines have not been observed previously with ultrafast laser pulses. For intensities less than 3 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, only the K{sub {alpha}} and K{sub {beta}} inner-shell emissions are detected. Measurements of the absolute K{sub {alpha}} yield as a function of the laser intensity are in agreement with a model that includes refluxing and confinement of the suprathermal electrons in the target volume.

  1. Modeling Ultraviolet Emissions Near Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linker, Jon A.

    2000-10-01

    In this report, we describe work awarded to Science Applications International Corporation, for the period 6/l/99 to 5/31/00. During this time period, we have investigated the interaction of Io, Jupiter's innermost Galilean satellite, with the Io plasma torus, and the role this interaction plays in producing ultraviolet (UV) emissions from neutral oxygen and sulfur. Io, the innermost of Jupiter's Galilean satellites, plays a unique role in the jovian magnetosphere. Neutral material that escapes from Io is ionized to form the lo torus, a dense, heavy-ion plasma that corotates with Jupiter and interacts with Io. Io supplies not only the torus, but is a major source of plasma for the entire magnetosphere. Ionization and charge-exchange of neutrals near lo strongly influences the plasma interaction, and Io's neutral atmosphere plays an important role in the generation of currents that couple Io to Jupiter. There have been no in situ measurements of the neutral density near Io, but remote observations of neutrals near lo have been performed for many years. Recent observations from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have shown detailed structure in UV emissions from neutral species near Io. Electron-impact of the neutrals by the Io torus plasma is the primary mechanism responsible for exciting these emissions. Previously, we have modeled the Io plasma environment using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, and we have shown that the interaction between Io and the plasma torus plays an important role in producing the morphology of the observed emissions. In the past year, we have extended these studies to use both UV observations and Galileo particle and field measurements to investigate the Io interaction.

  2. Fluid-line math model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandelman, A.; Nelson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    Simplified mathematical model simulates large hydraulic systems on either analog or digital computers. Models of pumps, servoactuators, reservoirs, accumulators, and valves are connected generating systems containing six hundred elements.

  3. Modelling Ar II spectral emission from the ASTRAL helicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz Burgos, Jorge; Boivin, Robert; Loch, Stuart; Kamar, Ola; Ballance, Connor; Pindzola, Mitch

    2008-11-01

    We describe our spectral modeling of ArII emission from the ASTRAL helicon plasma at Auburn University. Collisional-radiative theory is used to model the emitted spectrum, with account being taken for the density and temperature variation along the line of sight. This study has two main aims. Firstly to test the atomic data used in the model and secondly to identify spectral line ratios in the 200 nm - 1000 nm range that could be used as temperature diagnostics. Using the temperature at which Ar II emission starts to be seen we have been able to test recent ionization and recombination data. Using selected spectral lines we were then able to test the importance of the continuum-coupling effects included in the most recent Ar+ electron impact excitation data. Selected spectral line ratios have been identified that show a strong temperature variation and have potential as a temperature diagnostic.

  4. Double-peaked Broad Emission Lines in NGC 4450 and Other LINERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Luis C.; Rudnick, Greg; Rix, Hans-Walter; Shields, Joseph C.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Sargent, Wallace L. W.; Eracleous, Michael

    2000-09-01

    Spectra taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) reveal that NGC 4450 emits Balmer emission lines with displaced double peaks and extremely high velocity wings. This characteristic line profile, previously seen in a few nearby LINERs and in a small fraction of broad-line radio galaxies, can be interpreted as a kinematic signature of a relativistic accretion disk. We can reproduce the observed profile with a model for a disk with a radial range of 1000-2000 gravitational radii and inclined by 27° along the line of sight. The small-aperture HST data also allow us to detect, for the first time, the featureless continuum at optical wavelengths in NGC 4450; the nonstellar nucleus is intrinsically very faint, with MB=-11.2 mag for D=16.8 Mpc. We have examined the multiwavelength properties of NGC 4450 collectively with those of other low-luminosity active nuclei that possess double-peaked broad lines and find a number of common features. These objects are all classified spectroscopically as ``type 1'' LINERs or closely related objects. The nuclear luminosities are low, both in absolute terms and relative to the Eddington rates. All of them have compact radio cores, whose strength relative to the optical nuclear emission places them in the league of radio-loud active nuclei. The broadband spectral energy distributions of these sources are most notable for their deficit of ultraviolet emission compared to those observed in luminous Seyfert 1 nuclei and quasars. The double-peaked broad-line radio galaxies Arp 102B and Pictor A have very similar attributes. We discuss how these characteristics can be understood in the context of advection-dominated accretion onto massive black holes. Based on observations with the Hubble Space Telescope, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  5. The nature of the [O III] emission line system in the black hole hosting globular cluster RZ2109

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Matthew M.

    This work, focused on the description and understanding of the nature of a [O III] emission line source associated with an accreting stellar mass black hole in a globlar cluster, is comprised of three papers. In the first paper, we present a multi-facility study of the optical spectrum of the extra- galactic globular cluster RZ2109, which hosts a bright black hole X-ray source. The optical spectrum of RZ2109 shows strong and very broad [O III]lambdalambda4959,5007 emission in addition to the stellar absorption lines typical of a globular cluster. We use observations over an extended period of time to constrain the variability of these [O III] emission lines. We find that the equivalent width of the lines is similar in all of the datasets; the change in L[O III]lambda5007 is ≤ 10% between the first and last observations, which were separated by 467 days. The velocity profile of the line also shows no significant variability over this interval. Using a simple geometric model we demonstrate that the observed [O III]lambda5007 line velocity structure can be described by a two component model with most of the flux contributed by a bipolar conical outflow of about 1,600 km s -1 , and the remainder from a Gaussian component with a FWHM of several hundred km s-1 . In the second paper, we present an analysis of the elemental composition of the emission line system associated with the black hole hosting globular cluster RZ2109 located in NGC4472. From medium resolution GMOS optical spectroscopy we find a [O III]lambda5007/Hbeta emission line ratio of 106 for a 3200 km s-1 measurement aperture covering the full velocity width of the [O III]lambda5007 line, with a 95% confidence level lower and upper limits of [O III]lambda5007/Hbeta > 35.7 and < -110 (Hbeta absorption). For a narrower 600 km s-1 aperture covering the highest luminosity velocity structure in the line complex, we find [O III]lambda5007/Hbeta = 62, with corresponding 95% confidence lower and upper limits of

  6. HIGH-RESOLUTION NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF HD 100546. II. ANALYSIS OF VARIABLE ROVIBRATIONAL CO EMISSION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Brittain, Sean D.; Liskowsky, Joseph; Najita, Joan R.; Carr, John S.; Troutman, Matthew R.; Doppmann, Greg W. E-mail: jliskow@clemson.edu E-mail: carr@nrl.navy.mil E-mail: gdoppmann@keck.hawaii.edu

    2013-04-20

    We present observations of rovibrational CO in HD 100546 from four epochs spanning 2003 January through 2010 December. We show that the equivalent widths of the CO lines vary during this time period with the v = 1-0 CO lines brightening more than the UV fluoresced lines from the higher vibrational states. While the spectroastrometric signal of the hot band lines remains constant during this period, the spectroastrometric signal of the v = 1-0 lines varies substantially. At all epochs, the spectroastrometric signals of the UV fluoresced lines are consistent with the signal one would expect from gas in an axisymmetric disk. In 2003, the spectroastrometric signal of the v = 1-0 P26 line was symmetric and consistent with emission from an axisymmetric disk. However, in 2006 there was no spatial offset of the signal detected on the red side of the profile, and in 2010 the spectroastrometric offset was yet more strongly reduced toward zero velocity. A model is presented that can explain the evolution of the equivalent width of the v = 1-0 P26 line and its spectroastrometric signal by adding to the system a compact source of CO emission that orbits the star near the inner edge of the disk. We hypothesize that such emission may arise from a circumplanetary disk orbiting a gas giant planet near the inner edge of the circumstellar disk. We discuss how this idea can be tested observationally and be distinguished from an alternative interpretation of random fluctuations in the disk emission.

  7. Emission intensities and line ratios from a fast neutral helium beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, J.-W.; Craig, D.; Fiksel, G.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Anderson, J. K.; O'Mullane, M. G.

    2007-08-01

    The emission intensities and line ratios from a fast neutral helium beam is investigated in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) [R. N. Dexter, D. W. Kerst, T. W. Lovell, S. C. Prager, and J. C. Sprott, Fusion Technol. 19, 131 1991]. Predicted He I line intensities and line ratios from a recently developed collisional-radiative model are compared with experiment. The intensity of singlet lines comes mostly (>95%) from the contribution of the ground state population and is very weakly dependent on the initial metastable fraction at the observation point in the plasma core. On the other hand, the intensity of triplet lines is strongly affected by the local metastable state (21S and 23S) populations and the initial metastable fraction plays an important role in determining line intensities. The fraction of local metastable states can only be estimated by making use of electron temperature (Te), electron density (ne), and effective ion charge (Zeff) profiles as inputs to the population balance equations. This leads triplet lines to be unusable for the investigation of their local plasma parameter dependence. The ratio of singlet lines at 667.8nm and 492.2nm (I667/I492) as well as the ratio of 667.8nm and 501.6nm lines (I667/I501) has been investigated for the dependence on Te and ne both theoretically and experimentally. I667/I492 shows strong dependence on ne with weak sensitivity to Te. Measurements and predictions agree quantitatively within a factor of 2. There has been no ratio of singlet lines identified to have strong enough Te dependence yet. The ratios are expected to be reasonably insensitive to the variation of Zeff.

  8. Emission intensities and line ratios from a fast neutral helium beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, J-W.; Craig, D.; Fiksel, G.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Anderson, J. K.; O'Mullane, M. G.

    2007-08-15

    The emission intensities and line ratios from a fast neutral helium beam is investigated in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) [R. N. Dexter, D. W. Kerst, T. W. Lovell, S. C. Prager, and J. C. Sprott, Fusion Technol. 19, 131 1991]. Predicted He I line intensities and line ratios from a recently developed collisional-radiative model are compared with experiment. The intensity of singlet lines comes mostly (>95%) from the contribution of the ground state population and is very weakly dependent on the initial metastable fraction at the observation point in the plasma core. On the other hand, the intensity of triplet lines is strongly affected by the local metastable state (2{sup 1}S and 2{sup 3}S) populations and the initial metastable fraction plays an important role in determining line intensities. The fraction of local metastable states can only be estimated by making use of electron temperature (T{sub e}), electron density (n{sub e}), and effective ion charge (Z{sub eff}) profiles as inputs to the population balance equations. This leads triplet lines to be unusable for the investigation of their local plasma parameter dependence. The ratio of singlet lines at 667.8 nm and 492.2 nm (I{sub 667}/I{sub 492}) as well as the ratio of 667.8 nm and 501.6 nm lines (I{sub 667}/I{sub 501}) has been investigated for the dependence on T{sub e} and n{sub e} both theoretically and experimentally. I{sub 667}/I{sub 492} shows strong dependence on n{sub e} with weak sensitivity to T{sub e}. Measurements and predictions agree quantitatively within a factor of 2. There has been no ratio of singlet lines identified to have strong enough T{sub e} dependence yet. The ratios are expected to be reasonably insensitive to the variation of Z{sub eff}.

  9. Emission Lines from the Gas Disk around TW Hydra and the Origin of the Inner Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorti, U.; Hollenbach, D.; Najita, J.; Pascucci, I.

    2011-07-01

    We compare line emission calculated from theoretical disk models with optical to submillimeter wavelength observational data of the gas disk surrounding TW Hya and infer the spatial distribution of mass in the gas disk. The model disk that best matches observations has a gas mass ranging from ~10-4 to 10-5 M sun for 0.06 AU < r < 3.5 AU and ~0.06 M sun for 3.5 AU < r < 200 AU. We find that the inner dust hole (r < 3.5 AU) in the disk must be depleted of gas by ~1-2 orders of magnitude compared with the extrapolated surface density distribution of the outer disk. Grain growth alone is therefore not a viable explanation for the dust hole. CO vibrational emission arises within r ~ 0.5 AU from thermal excitation of gas. [O I] 6300 Å and 5577 Å forbidden lines and OH mid-infrared emission are mainly due to prompt emission following UV photodissociation of OH and water at r <~ 0.1 AU and at r ~ 4 AU. [Ne II] emission is consistent with an origin in X-ray heated neutral gas at r <~ 10 AU, and may not require the presence of a significant extreme-ultraviolet (hν > 13.6 eV) flux from TW Hya. H2 pure rotational line emission comes primarily from r ~ 1 to 30 AU. [O I] 63 μm, HCO+, and CO pure rotational lines all arise from the outer disk at r ~ 30-120 AU. We discuss planet formation and photoevaporation as causes for the decrease in surface density of gas and dust inside 4 AU. If a planet is present, our results suggest a planet mass ~4-7 MJ situated at ~3 AU. Using our photoevaporation models and the best surface density profile match to observations, we estimate a current photoevaporative mass loss rate of 4 × 10-9 M sun yr-1 and a remaining disk lifetime of ~5 million years.

  10. EMISSION LINES FROM THE GAS DISK AROUND TW HYDRA AND THE ORIGIN OF THE INNER HOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Gorti, U.; Hollenbach, D.; Najita, J.; Pascucci, I.

    2011-07-10

    We compare line emission calculated from theoretical disk models with optical to submillimeter wavelength observational data of the gas disk surrounding TW Hya and infer the spatial distribution of mass in the gas disk. The model disk that best matches observations has a gas mass ranging from {approx}10{sup -4} to 10{sup -5} M{sub sun} for 0.06 AU < r < 3.5 AU and {approx}0.06 M{sub sun} for 3.5 AU < r < 200 AU. We find that the inner dust hole (r < 3.5 AU) in the disk must be depleted of gas by {approx}1-2 orders of magnitude compared with the extrapolated surface density distribution of the outer disk. Grain growth alone is therefore not a viable explanation for the dust hole. CO vibrational emission arises within r {approx} 0.5 AU from thermal excitation of gas. [O I] 6300 A and 5577 A forbidden lines and OH mid-infrared emission are mainly due to prompt emission following UV photodissociation of OH and water at r {approx}< 0.1 AU and at r {approx} 4 AU. [Ne II] emission is consistent with an origin in X-ray heated neutral gas at r {approx}< 10 AU, and may not require the presence of a significant extreme-ultraviolet (h{nu} > 13.6 eV) flux from TW Hya. H{sub 2} pure rotational line emission comes primarily from r {approx} 1 to 30 AU. [O I] 63 {mu}m, HCO{sup +}, and CO pure rotational lines all arise from the outer disk at r {approx} 30-120 AU. We discuss planet formation and photoevaporation as causes for the decrease in surface density of gas and dust inside 4 AU. If a planet is present, our results suggest a planet mass {approx}4-7 M{sub J} situated at {approx}3 AU. Using our photoevaporation models and the best surface density profile match to observations, we estimate a current photoevaporative mass loss rate of 4 x 10{sup -9} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and a remaining disk lifetime of {approx}5 million years.