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Sample records for linear enamel hypolasias

  1. Missing defects? A comparison of microscopic and macroscopic approaches to identifying linear enamel hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Hassett, Brenna R

    2014-03-01

    Linear enamel hypoplasia (LEH), the presence of linear defects of dental enamel formed during periods of growth disruption, is frequently analyzed in physical anthropology as evidence for childhood health in the past. However, a wide variety of methods for identifying and interpreting these defects in archaeological remains exists, preventing easy cross-comparison of results from disparate studies. This article compares a standard approach to identifying LEH using the naked eye to the evidence of growth disruption observed microscopically from the enamel surface. This comparison demonstrates that what is interpreted as evidence of growth disruption microscopically is not uniformly identified with the naked eye, and provides a reference for the level of consistency between the number and timing of defects identified using microscopic versus macroscopic approaches. This is done for different tooth types using a large sample of unworn permanent teeth drawn from several post-medieval London burial assemblages. The resulting schematic diagrams showing where macroscopic methods achieve more or less similar results to microscopic methods are presented here and clearly demonstrate that "naked-eye" methods of identifying growth disruptions do not identify LEH as often as microscopic methods in areas where perikymata are more densely packed. PMID:24323494

  2. Australopithecine enamel prism patterns.

    PubMed

    Vrba, E S; Grine, F E

    1978-11-24

    Following a recent suggestion that tooth enamel prism shape differs within Hominoidea, the teeth of a number of extinct and extant hominoid species were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The enamel prism patterns of some gracile and robust australopithecine specimens from Sterkfontein, Swartkrans, and Kromdraai are recorded. The characteristic arrangements of enamel prisms in all modern and extinct hominoid species were found to be essentially similar. The implications of enamel prisms for phylogenetic deduction in Hominoidea are discussed. PMID:102032

  3. Amelogenin and Enamel Biomimetics

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Qichao; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Mature tooth enamel is acellular and does not regenerate itself. Developing technologies that rebuild tooth enamel and preserve tooth structure is therefore of great interest. Considering the importance of amelogenin protein in dental enamel formation, its ability to control apatite mineralization in vitro, and its potential to be applied in fabrication of future bio-inspired dental material this review focuses on two major subjects: amelogenin and enamel biomimetics. We review the most recent findings on amelogenin secondary and tertiary structural properties with a focus on its interactions with different targets including other enamel proteins, apatite mineral, and phospholipids. Following a brief overview of enamel hierarchical structure and its mechanical properties we will present the state-of-the-art strategies in the biomimetic reconstruction of human enamel. PMID:26251723

  4. Human enamel thickness and ENAM polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Daubert, Diane M; Kelley, Joanna L; Udod, Yuriy G; Habor, Carolina; Kleist, Chris G; Furman, Ilona K; Tikonov, Igor N; Swanson, Willie J; Roberts, Frank A

    2016-01-01

    The tooth enamel development gene, enamelin (ENAM), showed evidence of positive selection during a genome-wide scan of human and primate DNA for signs of adaptive evolution. The current study examined the hypothesis that a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) C14625T (rs7671281) in the ENAM gene identified in the genome-wide scan is associated with a change in enamel phenotype. African Americans were selected as the target population, as they have been reported to have a target SNP frequency of approximately 50%, whereas non-Africans are predicted to have a 96% SNP frequency. Digital radiographs and DNA samples from 244 teeth in 133 subjects were analysed, and enamel thickness was assessed in relation to SNP status, controlling for age, sex, tooth number and crown length. Crown length was found to increase with molar number, and females were found to have thicker enamel. Teeth with larger crowns also had thicker enamel, and older subjects had thinner enamel. Linear regression and generalized estimating equations were used to investigate the relationship between enamel thickness of the mandibular molars and ENAM SNP status; enamel in subjects with the derived allele was significantly thinner (P=0.040) when the results were controlled for sex, age, tooth number and crown length. The derived allele demonstrated a recessive effect on the phenotype. The data indicate that thinner dental enamel is associated with the derived ENAM genotype. This is the first direct evidence of a dental gene implicated in human adaptive evolution as having a phenotypic effect on an oral structure. PMID:27357321

  5. Human enamel thickness and ENAM polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Daubert, Diane M; Kelley, Joanna L; Udod, Yuriy G; Habor, Carolina; Kleist, Chris G; Furman, Ilona K; Tikonov, Igor N; Swanson, Willie J; Roberts, Frank A

    2016-01-01

    The tooth enamel development gene, enamelin (ENAM), showed evidence of positive selection during a genome-wide scan of human and primate DNA for signs of adaptive evolution. The current study examined the hypothesis that a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) C14625T (rs7671281) in the ENAM gene identified in the genome-wide scan is associated with a change in enamel phenotype. African Americans were selected as the target population, as they have been reported to have a target SNP frequency of approximately 50%, whereas non-Africans are predicted to have a 96% SNP frequency. Digital radiographs and DNA samples from 244 teeth in 133 subjects were analysed, and enamel thickness was assessed in relation to SNP status, controlling for age, sex, tooth number and crown length. Crown length was found to increase with molar number, and females were found to have thicker enamel. Teeth with larger crowns also had thicker enamel, and older subjects had thinner enamel. Linear regression and generalized estimating equations were used to investigate the relationship between enamel thickness of the mandibular molars and ENAM SNP status; enamel in subjects with the derived allele was significantly thinner (P=0.040) when the results were controlled for sex, age, tooth number and crown length. The derived allele demonstrated a recessive effect on the phenotype. The data indicate that thinner dental enamel is associated with the derived ENAM genotype. This is the first direct evidence of a dental gene implicated in human adaptive evolution as having a phenotypic effect on an oral structure. PMID:27357321

  6. Liquid White Enamel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widmar, Marge

    1985-01-01

    A secondary teacher describes how she has her students use liquid white enamel. With the enameling process, students can create lasting, exciting artwork. They can exercise an understanding of design and color while learning the value of careful, sustained craft skills. (RM)

  7. Enamel thickness and development in a third permanent molar of Gigantopithecus blacki.

    PubMed

    Dean, M Christopher; Schrenk, Friedemann

    2003-11-01

    A ground section was prepared from a lower right M3 attributed to Gigantopithecus blacki as close as possible to axial plane of the mesial cusps. Daily cross striations were imaged, measured and counted in each cusp using polarised light microscopy. Long-period striae of Retzius were counted in the lateral enamel and their periodicity determined from counts and measurements of daily cross striations between adjacent striae. Cross striation spacings in the cusps were between 3.8 microm at the enamel dentine junction and 6 microm close to the enamel surface. Cuspal enamel formation times were long (800 days in the protoconid and 620 days in the metaconid). Linear enamel thickness was as much as 3.75 mm in the protoconid. There were 63 and 61 long-period striae of Retzius in the mesial aspects of the lateral enamel and the periodicity was 11 days. Lateral enamel formation took 1493 and 1291 days and when summed with cuspal enamel formation times totalled 4 years in the protoconid and 3.5 in the metaconid. Relative enamel thickness was 23, calculated through the mesial cusps. This falls short of that in the so-called 'thick hyper-thick' enamel described in 'robust' australopithecines to which Gigantopithecus blacki has previously been compared in both its dental and mandibular morphology. With respect to enamel thickness, therefore, Gigantopithecus blacki falls squarely among an increasingly large number of Miocene hominoids that can all be described as having 'thick enamel'. PMID:14624748

  8. Monitoring remineralization of enamel subsurface lesions by optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Mandurah, Mona M; Sadr, Alireza; Shimada, Yasushi; Kitasako, Yuichi; Nakashima, Syozi; Bakhsh, Turki A; Tagami, Junji; Sumi, Yasunori

    2013-04-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a potential clinical tool for enamel lesion monitoring. Swept-source OCT findings were compared with cross-sectional nanohardness findings of enamel. Subsurface bovine enamel lesions in three groups were subjected to (1) deionized water (control), (2) phosphoryl oligosaccharide of calcium (POs-Ca) or (3) POs-Ca with 1 ppm fluoride for 14 days. B-scans images were obtained at 1310-nm center wavelength on sound, demineralized and remineralized areas after 4, 7, and 14 days. The specimens were processed for cross-sectional nanoindentation. Reflectivity from enamel that had increased with demineralization decreased with remineralization. An OCT attenuation coefficient parameter (μt), derived based on the Beer-Lambert law as a function of backscatter signal slope, showed a strong linear regression with integrated nanohardness of all regions (p<0.001, r=-0.97). Sound enamel showed the smallest, while demineralized enamel showed the highest μt. In group three, μt was significantly lower at four days than baseline, but remained constant afterwards. In group two, the changes were rather gradual. There was no significant difference between groups two and three at 14 days in nanohardness or μt POs-Ca with fluoride-enhanced nanohardness of the superficial zone. OCT signal attenuation demonstrated a capability for monitoring changes of enamel lesions during remineralization. PMID:23563920

  9. Monitoring remineralization of enamel subsurface lesions by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandurah, Mona M.; Sadr, Alireza; Shimada, Yasushi; Kitasako, Yuichi; Nakashima, Syozi; Bakhsh, Turki A.; Tagami, Junji; Sumi, Yasunori

    2013-04-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a potential clinical tool for enamel lesion monitoring. Swept-source OCT findings were compared with cross-sectional nanohardness findings of enamel. Subsurface bovine enamel lesions in three groups were subjected to (1) deionized water (control), (2) phosphoryl oligosaccharide of calcium (POs-Ca) or (3) POs-Ca with 1 ppm fluoride for 14 days. B-scans images were obtained at 1310-nm center wavelength on sound, demineralized and remineralized areas after 4, 7, and 14 days. The specimens were processed for cross-sectional nanoindentation. Reflectivity from enamel that had increased with demineralization decreased with remineralization. An OCT attenuation coefficient parameter (μt), derived based on the Beer-Lambert law as a function of backscatter signal slope, showed a strong linear regression with integrated nanohardness of all regions (p<0.001, r=-0.97). Sound enamel showed the smallest, while demineralized enamel showed the highest μt. In group three, μt was significantly lower at four days than baseline, but remained constant afterwards. In group two, the changes were rather gradual. There was no significant difference between groups two and three at 14 days in nanohardness or μt POs-Ca with fluoride-enhanced nanohardness of the superficial zone. OCT signal attenuation demonstrated a capability for monitoring changes of enamel lesions during remineralization.

  10. Amelogenin-chitosan matrix promotes assembly of an enamel-like layer with a dense interface

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Qichao; Zhang, Yuzheng; Yang, Xiudong; Nutt, Steven; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2013-01-01

    Biomimetic reconstruction of tooth enamel is a significant topic of study in material science and dentistry as a novel approach for prevention, restoration, and treatment of defective enamel. We developed a new amelogenin-containing chitosan hydrogel for enamel reconstruction that works through amelogenin supramolecular assembly, stabilizing Ca-P clusters and guiding their arrangement into linear chains. These amelogenin Ca-P composite chains further fuse with enamel crystals and eventually evolve into enamel-like co-aligned crystals, anchoring to the natural enamel substrate through a cluster growth process. A dense interface between the newly-grown layer and natural enamel was formed and the enamel-like layer had improved hardness and elastic modulus compared to etched enamel. We anticipate that chitosan hydrogel will provide effective protection against secondary caries because of its pH-responsive and antimicrobial properties. Our studies introduce amelogenin-containing chitosan hydrogel as a promising biomaterial for enamel repair and demonstrate the potential of applying protein-directed assembly to biomimetic reconstruction of complex biomaterials. PMID:23571002

  11. Dental Enamel Defects and Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nutrition Home : Dental Enamel Defects and Celiac Disease Dental Enamel Defects and Celiac Disease Celiac disease manifestations ... affecting any organ or body system. One manifestation—dental enamel defects—can help dentists and other health ...

  12. Stress and strain distribution in demineralized enamel: A micro-CT based finite element study.

    PubMed

    Neves, Aline Almeida; Coutinho, Eduardo; Alves, Haimon Diniz Lopes; de Assis, Joaquim Teixeira

    2015-10-01

    Physiological oral mechanical forces may play a role on the progression of enamel carious lesions to cavitation. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe, by 3D finite element analysis, stress, and strain patterns in sound and carious enamel after a simulated occlusal load. Micro-CT based models were created and meshed with tetrahedral elements (based on an extracted third molar), namely: a sound (ST) and a carious tooth (CT). For the CT, enamel material properties were assigned according to the micro-CT gray values. Below the threshold corresponding to the enamel lesion (2.5 g/cm(3) ) lower and isotropic elastic modulus was assigned (E = 18 GPa against E1  = 80 GPa, E2  = E3  = 20 GPa for sound enamel). Both models were imported into a FE solver where boundary conditions were assigned and a pressure load (500 MPa) was applied at the occlusal surface. A linear static analysis was performed, considering anisotropy in sound enamel. ST showed a more efficient transfer of maximum principal stress from enamel to the dentin layer, while for the CT, enamel layer was subjected to higher and concentrated loads. Maximum principal strain distributions were seen at the carious enamel surface, especially at the central fossa, correlating to the enamel cavity seen at the original micro-CT model. It is possible to conclude that demineralized enamel compromises appropriate stress transfer from enamel to dentin, contributing to the odds of fracture and cavitation. Enamel fracture over a dentin lesion may happen as one of the normal pathways to caries progression and may act as a confounding factor during clinical diagnostic decisions. PMID:26240030

  13. Enamel thickness and the topography of the enamel-dentine junction in South African Plio-Pleistocene hominids with special reference to the Carabelli trait.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, G T; Thackeray, J F; Reid, C; van Reenan, J F

    1998-01-01

    This study explores the internal morphology of early hominid teeth using high-resolution computed tomography. Data on Carabelli feature size, enamel thickness, and the topography of the enamel-dentine junction are considered together in order to examine the relationship among these variables in the maxillary molars of gracile and robust australopithecines from South Africa. In particular, one aim is to investigate the degree to which Carabelli feature size influences enamel thickness in the plane of the mesial cusps. The results demonstrate that maxillary molars attributed to Australopithecus africanus from Sterkfontein, Taung and Makapansgat possess larger Carabelli features and thinner enamel along the lingual wall of the protocone than do specimens attributed to Paranthropus robustus from Swartkrans and Kromdraai. Distinct differences in the position of the Carabelli feature at the level of both the enamel-dentine junction and tooth crown surface between early hominid species may help explain the observed disparity in enamel thickness at that region of the tooth crown as well as offer clues to the functional role of Carabelli's cusp. As the size and position of the Carabelli feature affects the linear thickness of enamel at this one particular region of the tooth crown, future comparative studies focusing on taxa that possess moderate to strong development of the Carabelli complex should use the linear thickness of enamel taken close to the protoconal dentine horn or at the maximum projection of the Carabelli's cusp. PMID:9774509

  14. Dental Enamel Development: Proteinases and Their Enamel Matrix Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, John D.

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on recent discoveries and delves in detail about what is known about each of the proteins (amelogenin, ameloblastin, and enamelin) and proteinases (matrix metalloproteinase-20 and kallikrein-related peptidase-4) that are secreted into the enamel matrix. After an overview of enamel development, this review focuses on these enamel proteins by describing their nomenclature, tissue expression, functions, proteinase activation, and proteinase substrate specificity. These proteins and their respective null mice and human mutations are also evaluated to shed light on the mechanisms that cause nonsyndromic enamel malformations termed amelogenesis imperfecta. Pertinent controversies are addressed. For example, do any of these proteins have a critical function in addition to their role in enamel development? Does amelogenin initiate crystallite growth, does it inhibit crystallite growth in width and thickness, or does it do neither? Detailed examination of the null mouse literature provides unmistakable clues and/or answers to these questions, and this data is thoroughly analyzed. Striking conclusions from this analysis reveal that widely held paradigms of enamel formation are inadequate. The final section of this review weaves the recent data into a plausible new mechanism by which these enamel matrix proteins support and promote enamel development. PMID:24159389

  15. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, D.C.

    1987-11-20

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compound of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved. 2 figs.

  16. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, Daniel C.

    1990-01-01

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

  17. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, Daniel C.

    1990-02-06

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

  18. Amelogenin in Enamel Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter the basic premises, the recent findings and the future challenges in the use of amelogenin for enamel tissue engineering are being discoursed on. Results emerging from the experiments performed to assess the fundamental physicochemical mechanisms of the interaction of amelogenin, the main protein of the enamel matrix, and the growing crystals of apatite, are mentioned, alongside a moderately comprehensive literature review of the subject at hand. The clinical importance of understanding this protein/mineral interaction at the nanoscale are highlighted as well as the potential for tooth enamel to act as an excellent model system for studying some of the essential aspects of biomineralization processes in general. The dominant paradigm stating that amelogenin directs the uniaxial growth of apatite crystals in enamel by slowing down the growth of (hk0) faces on which it adheres is being questioned based on the results demonstrating the ability of amelogenin to promote the nucleation and crystal growth of apatite under constant titration conditions designed to mimic those present in the developing enamel matrix. The role of numerous minor components of the enamel matrix is being highlighted as essential and impossible to compensate for by utilizing its more abundant ingredients only. It is concluded that the three major aspects of amelogenesis outlined hereby – (1) the assembly of amelogenin and other enamel matrix proteins, (2) the proteolytic activity, and (3) crystallization – need to be in precise synergy with each other in order for the grounds for the proper imitation of amelogenesis in the lab to be created. PMID:26545753

  19. Amelogenin in Enamel Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Uskoković, Vuk

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter the basic premises, the recent findings and the future challenges in the use of amelogenin for enamel tissue engineering are being discoursed on. Results emerging from the experiments performed to assess the fundamental physicochemical mechanisms of the interaction of amelogenin, the main protein of the enamel matrix, and the growing crystals of apatite, are mentioned, alongside a moderately comprehensive literature review of the subject at hand. The clinical importance of understanding this protein/mineral interaction at the nanoscale are highlighted as well as the potential for tooth enamel to act as an excellent model system for studying some of the essential aspects of biomineralization processes in general. The dominant paradigm stating that amelogenin directs the uniaxial growth of apatite crystals in enamel by slowing down the growth of (hk0) faces on which it adheres is being questioned based on the results demonstrating the ability of amelogenin to promote the nucleation and crystal growth of apatite under constant titration conditions designed to mimic those present in the developing enamel matrix. The role of numerous minor components of the enamel matrix is being highlighted as essential and impossible to compensate for by utilizing its more abundant ingredients only. It is concluded that the three major aspects of amelogenesis outlined hereby--(1) the assembly of amelogenin and other enamel matrix proteins, (2) the proteolytic activity, and (3) crystallization--need to be in precise synergy with each other in order for the grounds for the proper imitation of amelogenesis in the lab to be created. PMID:26545753

  20. Clinical assessment of enamel wear caused by monolithic zirconia crowns.

    PubMed

    Stober, T; Bermejo, J L; Schwindling, F S; Schmitter, M

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure enamel wear caused by antagonistic monolithic zirconia crowns and to compare this with enamel wear caused by contralateral natural antagonists. Twenty monolithic zirconia full molar crowns were placed in 20 patients. Patients with high activity of the masseter muscle at night (bruxism) were excluded. For analysis of wear, vinylpolysiloxane impressions were prepared after crown incorporation and at 6-, 12-, and 24-month follow-up. Wear of the occlusal contact areas of the crowns, of their natural antagonists, and of two contralateral natural antagonists (control teeth) was measured by use of plaster replicas and a 3D laser-scanning device. Differences of wear between the zirconia crown antagonists and the control teeth were investigated by means of two-sided paired Student's t-tests and linear regression analysis. After 2 years, mean vertical loss was 46 μm for enamel opposed to zirconia, 19-26 μm for contralateral control teeth and 14 μm for zirconia crowns. Maximum vertical loss was 151 μm for enamel opposed to zirconia, 75-115 μm for control teeth and 60 μm for zirconia crowns. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between wear of enamel by zirconia-opposed teeth and by control teeth. Gender, which significantly affected wear, was identified as a possible confounder. Monolithic zirconia crowns generated more wear of opposed enamel than did natural teeth. Because of the greater wear caused by other dental ceramics, the use of monolithic zirconia crowns may be justified. PMID:27198539

  1. Matrix--mineral relationships in enamel tissues.

    PubMed

    Fearnhead, R W

    1979-03-01

    A personal view of vertebrate enamels and their matrix-mineral relationships is given by first considering enamel types and speculating on the nature, distribution, formation and role of enamel protein. Not all the work consulted is mentioned in the text. The additional works are, however, included in the list of references. PMID:283133

  2. Taxonomic and functional aspects of the patterning of enamel thickness distribution in extant large-bodied hominoids.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, G T

    2000-02-01

    One of the few uncontested viewpoints in studies of enamel thickness is that the molars of the African apes, Pan and Gorilla, possess "thin" enamel, while Pongo and modern humans possess varying degrees of "thick" enamel, even when interspecific differences in overall body or tooth size are taken into account. Such studies focus primarily on estimates of the total volume of enamel relative to tooth size (i.e., "relative" enamel thickness), as this is thought to bear directly on questions concerning dietary proclivities and phylogenetic relationships. Only recently have studies shifted focus to examining differences in the distribution of enamel across the tooth crown, i.e., the patterning of enamel thickness, as this may contribute to more refined models of tooth function and dietary adaptations in extant hominoids. Additionally, this feature has been suggested to be a reliable indicator of taxonomic affinity in early hominins, though no study has specifically addressed whether species-specific patterns exist among known phena. The aims of this paper were to test more explicitly whether enamel thickness patterning provides valuable taxonomic, functional, and/or phylogenetic information for maxillary molars of large-bodied extant hominoids. A series of seven linear enamel thickness measurements was recorded in the plane of the mesial cusps in cross sections of a total of 62 maxillary molars of P. troglodytes, G. gorilla, P. pygmaeus, and H. sapiens to estimate the patterning of enamel thickness distribution. Results from a discriminant function analysis reveal that, overall, this trait reclassifies extant hominoid maxillary molars with 90% accuracy: 100% of extant Homo, 75. 0% of Pongo, 83.3% of Pan, and 66.7% of Gorilla are reclassified correctly, indicating that this feature possesses a strong taxonomic signal. Furthermore, differences in the structure of the enamel cap are evident among hominoids: modern humans differ from Pongo in possessing proportionally

  3. Subpicosecond laser ablation of dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, A. V.; Gamaly, E. G.; Luther-Davies, B.; Taylor, B. T.; Dawes, J.; Chan, A.; Lowe, R. M.; Hannaford, P.

    2002-08-01

    Laser ablation of dental enamel with subpicosecond laser pulses has been studied over the intensity range of (0.1-1.4) x1014 W/cm2 using 95 and 150 fs pulses at a pulse repetition rate of 1 kHz. The experimentally determined ablation threshold of 2.2plus-or-minus0.1 J/cm2 was in good agreement with theoretical predictions based on an electrostatic ablation model. The ablation rate increased linearly with the laser fluence for up to 15 times the ablation threshold. The absence of collateral damage was observed using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Pulpal temperature measurements showed an increase of about 10 degC during the 200 s course of ablation. However, air cooling at a rate of 5 l/min resulted in the intrapulpal temperature being maintained below the pulpal damage threshhold of 5.5 degC. The material removal rates for subpicosecond precision laser ablation of dental enamel are compared with other techniques.

  4. The effect of enamel proteins on erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, T.; Carvalho, T. S.; Lussi, A.

    2015-10-01

    Enamel proteins form a scaffold for growing hydroxyapatite crystals during enamel formation. They are then almost completely degraded during enamel maturation, resulting in a protein content of only 1% (w/v) in mature enamel. Nevertheless, this small amount of remaining proteins has important effects on the mechanical and structural properties of enamel and on the electrostatic properties of its surface. To analyze how enamel proteins affect tooth erosion, human enamel specimens were deproteinated. Surface microhardness (SMH), surface reflection intensity (SRI) and calcium release of both deproteinated and control specimens were monitored while continuously eroding them. The deproteination itself already reduced the initial SMH and SRI of the enamel significantly (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01). During the course of erosion, the progression of all three evaluated parameters differed significantly between the two groups (p < 0.001 for each). The deproteinated enamel lost its SMH and SRI faster, and released more calcium than the control group, but these differences were only significant at later stages of erosion, where not only surface softening but surface loss can be observed. We conclude that enamel proteins have a significant effect on erosion, protecting the enamel and slowing down the progression of erosion when irreversible surface loss starts to occur.

  5. The effect of enamel proteins on erosion

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, T.; Carvalho, T. S.; Lussi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Enamel proteins form a scaffold for growing hydroxyapatite crystals during enamel formation. They are then almost completely degraded during enamel maturation, resulting in a protein content of only 1% (w/v) in mature enamel. Nevertheless, this small amount of remaining proteins has important effects on the mechanical and structural properties of enamel and on the electrostatic properties of its surface. To analyze how enamel proteins affect tooth erosion, human enamel specimens were deproteinated. Surface microhardness (SMH), surface reflection intensity (SRI) and calcium release of both deproteinated and control specimens were monitored while continuously eroding them. The deproteination itself already reduced the initial SMH and SRI of the enamel significantly (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01). During the course of erosion, the progression of all three evaluated parameters differed significantly between the two groups (p < 0.001 for each). The deproteinated enamel lost its SMH and SRI faster, and released more calcium than the control group, but these differences were only significant at later stages of erosion, where not only surface softening but surface loss can be observed. We conclude that enamel proteins have a significant effect on erosion, protecting the enamel and slowing down the progression of erosion when irreversible surface loss starts to occur. PMID:26468660

  6. Transparent acrylic enamel slide holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce-Lee, E. L.; Olivares Pérez, A.; Ruiz-Limón, B.; Hernández-Garay, M. P.; Toxqui-López, S.

    2006-02-01

    We present holograms generated in a computer to an acrylic enamel slide (Comex (R)), getting phase holograms. The information in the mask is transferred to the material by temperature gradients generated by rubbing. The refraction index is transformed at each material point by the temperature changes, thus the film is recorded and developed by itself. this material can be used for soft lithography.

  7. Demineralization of enamel in primary second molars related to properties of the enamel.

    PubMed

    Sabel, N; Robertson, A; Nietzsche, S; Norén, J G

    2012-01-01

    Enamel structure is of importance in demineralization. Differences in porosity in enamel effect the rate of demineralization, seen between permanent and deciduous teeth. Individual differences have been shown in the mean mineral concentration values in enamel, the role of this in demineralization is not thoroughly investigated. The aim of this study was to study variations of depths of artificial lesions of demineralization and to analyze the depth in relation to variations in the chemical and mineral composition of the enamel. A demineralized lesion was created in second primary molars from 18 individuals. Depths of lesions were then related to individual chemical content of the enamel. Enamel responded to demineralization with different lesion depths and this was correlated to the chemical composition. The carbon content in sound enamel was shown to be higher where lesions developed deeper. The lesion was deeper when the degree of porosity of the enamel was higher. PMID:22629152

  8. Demineralization of Enamel in Primary Second Molars Related to Properties of the Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Sabel, N.; Robertson, A.; Nietzsche, S.; Norén, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    Enamel structure is of importance in demineralization. Differences in porosity in enamel effect the rate of demineralization, seen between permanent and deciduous teeth. Individual differences have been shown in the mean mineral concentration values in enamel, the role of this in demineralization is not thoroughly investigated. The aim of this study was to study variations of depths of artificial lesions of demineralization and to analyze the depth in relation to variations in the chemical and mineral composition of the enamel. A demineralized lesion was created in second primary molars from 18 individuals. Depths of lesions were then related to individual chemical content of the enamel. Enamel responded to demineralization with different lesion depths and this was correlated to the chemical composition. The carbon content in sound enamel was shown to be higher where lesions developed deeper. The lesion was deeper when the degree of porosity of the enamel was higher. PMID:22629152

  9. Mineral density of hypomineralised and sound enamel.

    PubMed

    Garot, Elsa; Rouas, Patrick; D'Incau, Emmanuel; Lenoir, Nicolas; Manton, David; Couture-Veschambre, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Molar Incisor Hypomineralisation (MIH) is a structural anomaly that affects the quality of tooth enamel and has important consequences for oral health. The developmentally hypomineralised enamel has normal thickness and can range in colour from white to yellow or brown. The purpose of the present study is to compare the mineral density of hypomineralised and normal enamel. The sample included eight MIH teeth from seven patients. MIH teeth were scanned using high resolution microtomography. Non-parametric statistical tests (Wilcoxon test for paired samples) were carried out. Hypomineralised enamel has decreased mineral density (mean 19%; p < 0.0001) compared to normal enamel. This weak enamel has implications in clinical management of MIH lesions. PMID:27352426

  10. Enamel proteins mitigate mechanical and structural degradations in mature human enamel during acid attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubarsky, Gennady V.; Lemoine, Patrick; Meenan, Brian J.; Deb, Sanjukta; Mutreja, Isha; Carolan, Patrick; Petkov, Nikolay

    2014-04-01

    A hydrazine deproteination process was used to investigate the role of enamel proteins in the acid erosion of mature human dental enamel. Bright field high resolution transmission electron micrographs and x-ray diffraction analysis show no crystallographic changes after the hydrazine treatment with similar nanoscale hydroxyapatite crystallite size and orientation for sound and de-proteinated enamel. However, the presence of enamel proteins reduces the erosion depth, the loss of hardness and the loss of structural order in enamel, following exposure to citric acid. Nanoindentation creep is larger for sound enamel than for deproteinated enamel but it reduces in sound enamel after acid attack. These novel results are consistent with calcium ion-mediated visco-elasticty in enamel matrix proteins as described previously for nacre, bone and dental proteins. They are also in good agreement with a previous double layer force spectroscopy study by the authors which found that the proteins electrochemically buffer enamel against acid attack. Finally, this suggests that acid attack, and more specifically dental erosion, is influenced by ionic permeation through the enamel layer and that it is mitigated by the enamel protein matrix.

  11. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  12. Dental enamel cells express functional SOCE channels

    PubMed Central

    Nurbaeva, Meerim K.; Eckstein, Miriam; Concepcion, Axel R.; Smith, Charles E.; Srikanth, Sonal; Paine, Michael L.; Gwack, Yousang; Hubbard, Michael J.; Feske, Stefan; Lacruz, Rodrigo S.

    2015-01-01

    Dental enamel formation requires large quantities of Ca2+ yet the mechanisms mediating Ca2+ dynamics in enamel cells are unclear. Store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) channels are important Ca2+ influx mechanisms in many cells. SOCE involves release of Ca2+ from intracellular pools followed by Ca2+ entry. The best-characterized SOCE channels are the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels. As patients with mutations in the CRAC channel genes STIM1 and ORAI1 show abnormal enamel mineralization, we hypothesized that CRAC channels might be an important Ca2+ uptake mechanism in enamel cells. Investigating primary murine enamel cells, we found that key components of CRAC channels (ORAI1, ORAI2, ORAI3, STIM1, STIM2) were expressed and most abundant during the maturation stage of enamel development. Furthermore, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) but not ryanodine receptor (RyR) expression was high in enamel cells suggesting that IP3Rs are the main ER Ca2+ release mechanism. Passive depletion of ER Ca2+ stores with thapsigargin resulted in a significant raise in [Ca2+]i consistent with SOCE. In cells pre-treated with the CRAC channel blocker Synta-66 Ca2+ entry was significantly inhibited. These data demonstrate that enamel cells have SOCE mediated by CRAC channels and implicate them as a mechanism for Ca2+ uptake in enamel formation. PMID:26515404

  13. CURRENT STUDY OF MOTTLED ENAMEL IN TEXAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enamel mottling is strongly associated with the water fluoride level of the community water supply. About 32% of the variation in the mottled enamel scores of subjects aged 7 to 12 was attributable to their community's water fluoride level. Objectionable mottling (moderate mottli...

  14. Enamel Regeneration - Current Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Baswaraj; H.K, Navin; K.B, Prasanna

    2014-01-01

    Dental Enamel is the outermost covering of teeth. It is hardest mineralized tissue present in the human body. Enamel faces the challenge of maintaining its integrity in a constant demineralization and remineralization within the oral environment and it is vulnerable to wear, damage, and decay. It cannot regenerate itself, because it is formed by a layer of cells that are lost after the tooth eruption. Conventional treatment relies on synthetic materials to restore lost enamel that cannot mimic natural enamel. With advances in material science and understanding of basic principles of organic matrix mediated mineralization paves a way for formation of synthetic enamel. The knowledge of enamel formation and understanding of protein interactions and their gene products function along with the isolation of postnatal stem cells from various sources in the oral cavity, and the development of smart materials for cell and growth factor delivery, makes possibility for biological based enamel regeneration. This article will review the recent endeavor on biomimetic synthesis and cell based strategies for enamel regeneration. PMID:25386548

  15. Accelerated enamel mineralization in Dspp mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Verdelis, Kostas; Szabo-Rogers, Heather L; Xu, Yang; Chong, Rong; Kang, Ryan; Cusack, Brian J; Jani, Priyam; Boskey, Adele L; Qin, Chunlin; Beniash, Elia

    2016-01-01

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) is one of the major non-collagenous proteins present in dentin, cementum and alveolar bone; it is also transiently expressed by ameloblasts. In humans many mutations have been found in DSPP and are associated with two autosomal-dominant genetic diseases - dentinogenesis imperfecta II (DGI-II) and dentin dysplasia (DD). Both disorders result in the development of hypomineralized and mechanically compromised teeth. The erupted mature molars of Dspp(-/-) mice have a severe hypomineralized dentin phenotype. Since dentin and enamel formations are interdependent, we decided to investigate the process of enamel onset mineralization in young Dspp(-/-) animals. We focused our analysis on the constantly erupting mouse incisor, to capture all of the stages of odontogenesis in one tooth, and the unerupted first molars. Using high-resolution microCT, we revealed that the onset of enamel matrix deposition occurs closer to the cervical loop and both secretion and maturation of enamel are accelerated in Dspp(-/-) incisors compared to the Dspp(+/-) control. Importantly, these differences did not translate into major phenotypic differences in mature enamel in terms of the structural organization, mineral density or hardness. The only observable difference was the reduction in thickness of the outer enamel layer, while the total enamel thickness remained unchanged. We also observed a compromised dentin-enamel junction, leading to delamination between the dentin and enamel layers. The odontoblast processes were widened and lacked branching near the DEJ. Finally, for the first time we demonstrate expression of Dspp mRNA in secretory ameloblasts. In summary, our data show that DSPP is important for normal mineralization of both dentin and enamel. PMID:26780724

  16. Comparison of reflectance spectra of sound and carious enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Analoui, Mostafa; Ando, Masatoshi; Stookey, George K.

    2000-03-01

    Development of dental caries is associated with the loss of minerals and change in the enamel structure. In this study, we have measured and compared reflectance spectra of sound and carious enamel, to investigate its utility in detection and analysis of dental caries. One hundred twenty, 3-mm diameter human enamel cores, with no sign of fluorosis, tetracycline stain, hypoplasia, fracture and restorations, were prepared. The enamel surfaces then were ground and polished. Specimens were placed on a fitted holder with either black or white color for background, with no fluorescence. The baseline spectra were measured using a spectrophotometer with enclosed diffused illumination. Spectra measured from 380 to 780 nm at 5 nm intervals. All measurements were corrected to compensate for the spectrum of illumination. The specimens were divided into two groups and exposed to a demineralizing solution, for 48 and 96 hours, respectively. Reflectance spectra of specimens were measured following lesion induction. All specimens were sectioned and analyzed by transverse microradiography (TMR), where lesion depth and mineral loss ((Delta) Z) were measured. Dimensionality of multi-spectral data was reduced through its conversion to L*a*b* color coordinates and principal component analysis (PCA). Multiple linear regression analysis showed low correlation between L*a*b* and lesion depth and mineral loss. PCA analysis showed higher correlation coefficient, compared to L*a*b*. Preliminary results of this study suggest that multi-spectral measurement and analysis of the tooth surface could be useful in predicting the depth and severity of an early carious lesion.

  17. Enamel hypoplasia in the middle pleistocene hominids from Atapuerca (Spain).

    PubMed

    Bermúdez de Castro, J M; Pérez, P J

    1995-03-01

    The prevalence and chronology of enamel hypoplasias were studied in a hominid dental sample from the Sima de los Huesos (SH) Middle Pleistocene site at the Sierra de Atapuerca (Burgos, northern Spain). A total of 89 permanent maxillary teeth, 143 permanent mandibular teeth, and one deciduous lower canine, belonging to a minimum of 29 individuals, were examined. Excluding the antimeres (16 maxillary and 37 mandibular cases) from the sample, the prevalence of hypoplasias in the permanent dentition is 12.8% (23/179), whereas the deciduous tooth also showed an enamel defect. No statistically significant differences were found between both arcades and between the anterior and postcanine teeth for the prevalence of hypoplasias. In both the maxilla and the mandible the highest frequency of enamel hypoplasias was recorded in the canines. Only one tooth (a permanent upper canine) showed two different enamel defects, and most of the hypoplasias were expressed as faint linear horizontal defects. Taking into account the limitations that the incompleteness of virtually all permanent dentitions imposes, we have estimated that the frequency by individual in the SH hominid sample was not greater than 40%. Most of the hypoplasias occurred between birth and 7 years (N = 18, X = 3.5, SD = 1.3). Both the prevalence and severity of the hypoplasias of the SH hominid sample are significantly less than those of a large Neandertal sample. Furthermore, prehistoric hunter-gatherers and historic agricultural and industrial populations exhibit a prevalence of hypoplasias generally higher than that of the SH hominids. Implications for the survival strategies and life quality of the SH hominids are also discussed. PMID:7785727

  18. In vitro wear of four ceramic materials and human enamel on enamel antagonist.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Jun; Taira, Yohsuke; Sawase, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the wear of four different ceramics and human enamel. The ceramics used were lithium disilicate glass (e.max Press), leucite-reinforced glass (GN-Ceram), yttria-stabilized zirconia (Aadva Zr), and feldspathic porcelain (Porcelain AAA). Hemispherical styli were fabricated with these ceramics and with tooth enamel. Flattened enamel was used for antagonistic specimens. After 100,000 wear cycles of a two-body wear test, the height and volume losses of the styli and enamel antagonists were determined. The mean and standard deviation for eight specimens were calculated and statistically analyzed using a non-parametric (Steel-Dwass) test (α = 0.05). GN-Ceram exhibited greater stylus height and volume losses than did Porcelain AAA. E.max Press, Porcelain AAA, and enamel styli showed no significant differences, and Aadva Zr exhibited the smallest stylus height and volume losses. The wear of the enamel antagonist was not significantly different among GN-Ceram, e.max Press, Porcelain AAA, and enamel styli. Aadva Zr resulted in significantly lower wear values of the enamel antagonist than did GN-Ceram, Porcelain AAA, and enamel styli. In conclusion, leucite-reinforced glass, lithium disilicate glass, and feldspathic porcelain showed wear values closer to those for human enamel than did yttria-stabilized zirconia. PMID:27059093

  19. Immediate bonding to bleached enamel.

    PubMed

    Nour El-din, Amal K; Miller, Barbara H; Griggs, Jason A; Wakefield, Charles

    2006-01-01

    This research sought to determine the shear bond strength, degree of resin infiltration and failure mode when organic solvent-based adhesives (acetone or ethanol) were used in immediate bonding to enamel bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide or 38% hydrogen peroxide systems. Seventy-two non-carious bovine incisors were randomly assigned to three groups of 24 specimens each-control group (deionized water), 38% hydrogen peroxide bleach group and 10% carbamide peroxide bleach group. Each group was further subdivided into two subgroups of 12 specimens each according to the adhesive system used to bond the resin composite to enamel surfaces. The two adhesive systems used were Single Bond, an ethanol-based adhesive, and One Step, an acetone-based adhesive. The shear bond strengths of 38% hydrogen peroxide and 10% carbamide peroxide were significantly lower compared to the non-bleached controls. Fractography revealed an adhesive failure mode in all specimens. Qualitative comparisons of resin tags present in the bleached and unbleached specimens using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed few, thin and fragmented resin tags when 38% hydrogen peroxide and 10% carbamide peroxide were used. PMID:16536201

  20. Studies on root enamel. (I). Some historical notes on cervical enamel projections.

    PubMed

    Moskow, B S; Canut, P M

    1990-01-01

    This is the first in a series of papers dealing with root enamel. An historical study of cervical enamel projections revealed that they were described as early as the 1st half of the 19th century, while numerous more detailed studies employing microscopy were published in the 1920s. The possible association of cervical enamel extensions and furcation involvements, which had been credited to Masters and Hoskins, was found to be clearly stated by Watson and Woods. PMID:2404032

  1. Prevention of enamel demineralization with a novel fluoride strip: enamel surface composition and depth profile

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bor-Shiunn; Chou, Po-Hung; Chen, Shu-Yu; Liao, Hua-Yang; Chang, Che-Chen

    2015-01-01

    There is no topically applicable low concentration fluoride delivery device available for caries prevention. This study was aimed to assess the use of a low concentration (1450 ppm) fluoride strip as an effective fluoride delivery system against enamel demineralization. The enamel surface composition and calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite or toothpaste treatments were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In vitro enamel demineralization was assayed using a pH cycling model and the dissolution of calcium ions from the treated specimens was quantified using ion chromatography. After 24-hr fluoride-strip treatment, the enamel was covered with a CaF2 layer which showed a granular morphology of 1 μm in size. Below the CaF2 layer was a region of mixed fluorapatite and CaF2. Fluoride infiltrated extensively in enamel to produce highly fluorinated fluorohydroxyapatite. In comparison, low-fluoride-level fluorinated fluorohydroxyapatite was formed on the enamel specimen exposed to toothpaste. The treatments with the fluoride strip as short as 1 hr significantly inhibited enamel demineralization. The fluoride strip was effective for topical fluoride delivery and inhibited in vitro demineralization of enamel by forming CaF2 and fluoride-containing apatites at the enamel surface. It exhibited the potential as an effective fluoride delivery device for general use in prevention of caries. PMID:26293361

  2. Gross enamel hypoplasia in molars from subadults in a 16th-18th century London graveyard.

    PubMed

    Ogden, A R; Pinhasi, R; White, W J

    2007-07-01

    Dental Enamel Hypoplasia has long been used as a common nonspecific stress indicator in teeth from archaeological samples. Most researchers report relatively minor linear and pitted hypoplastic defects on tooth crown surfaces. In this work we report a high prevalence and early age of onset of extensive enamel defects in deciduous and permanent molars in the subadults from the post-medieval cemetery of Broadgate, east central London. Analysis of the dentition of all 45 subadults from the cemetery, using both macroscopic and microscopic methods, reveals disturbed cusp patterns and pitted, abnormal and arrested enamel formation. Forty-one individuals from this group (93.2%) showed some evidence of enamel hypoplasia, 28 of them showing moderate or extensive lesions of molars, deciduous or permanent (63.6% of the sample). Scanning Electron Microscope images reveal many molars with grossly deformed cuspal architecture, multiple extra cusps and large areas of exposed Tomes' process pits, where the ameloblasts have abruptly ceased matrix production, well before normal completion. This indented, rough and poorly mineralized surface facilitates both bacterial adhesion and tooth wear, and when such teeth erupt fully into the mouth they are likely to wear and decay rapidly. We suggest that this complex combination of pitted and plane-form lesions, combined with disruption of cusp pattern and the formation of multiple small cusps, should henceforth be identified as "Cuspal Enamel Hypoplasia." PMID:17492667

  3. Effective property of tooth enamel: monoclinic behavior.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cunyou; Nakamura, Toshio; Korach, Chad S

    2012-05-11

    Human tooth enamel possesses a unique morphology characterized by a repeated cell arrangement, which is composed of varying orientations of hydroxyapatite crystals. In the past, various investigators have reported diverse mechanical properties based on isotropic or orthotropic mechanical models in their experimental and numerical studies. However, these models are insufficient to capture the accurate microstructural effects on the enamel mechanical response. In this paper, a monoclinic anisotropic model, which offers correct descriptions of enamel deformation behaviors, is introduced. The model takes into account the 3D orientation changes of the hydroxyapatite crystals and their spatial elastic property variations. The proposed approach is based on a unit-cell and periodic boundary conditions, and it utilizes the collective deformation characteristics of many rods to determine 13 independent material constants required for the monoclinic model. These constants are necessary to utilize the effective property model to study various mechanical conditions such as abrasion, erosion, wear and fracture of whole tooth enamel. PMID:22405497

  4. Dentine and enamel bonding agents.

    PubMed

    Bowen, R L; Tung, M S; Blosser, R L; Asmussen, E

    1987-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that sequential use of aqueous FO (ferric oxalate containing a small concentration of HNO3), acetone solutions of NPG (N-phenylglycine), and PMDM (the reaction product of pyromellitic dianhydride and 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) yields strong adhesive bonding of composite resins to both dentine and enamel. The purpose of this study was to determine if aluminum ions could be substituted for ferric ions and if the procedure could be simplified. Aqueous solutions containing aluminum oxalate and aluminum nitrate, followed in sequence by acetone solutions of NPG and PMDM, gave strong tensile adhesive bond strengths between a composite and extracted human teeth. Comparable values have been obtained with FO, NPG and PMDM. Aluminum oxalate solutions containing no nitrate gave lower bond strengths, as was the case with FO. Aqueous solutions of acidified aluminum oxalate can dissolve NPG, thereby allowing a simplification of the procedure. Tested for comparison, commercially available dentine bonding agents gave lower average bond strengths on dentine than did some of the experimental materials. PMID:3316044

  5. Enamel wear caused by monolithic zirconia crowns after 6 months of clinical use.

    PubMed

    Stober, T; Bermejo, J L; Rammelsberg, P; Schmitter, M

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate enamel wear caused by monolithic zirconia crowns and to compare this with enamel wear caused by contralateral natural antagonists. Twenty monolithic zirconia crowns were placed in 20 patients requiring full molar crowns. For measurement of wear, impressions of both jaws were made at baseline after crown cementation and at 6-month follow-up. Mean and maximum wear of the occlusal contact areas of the crowns, of their natural antagonists and of the two contralateral natural antagonists were measured by the use of plaster replicas and 3D laser scanning methods. Wear differences were investigated by the use of two-sided paired Student's t-tests and by linear regression analysis. Mean vertical loss (maximum vertical loss in parentheses) was 10 (43) μm for the zirconia crowns, 33 (112) μm for the opposing enamel, 10 (58) μm for the contralateral teeth and 10 (46) μm for the contralateral antagonists. Both mean and maximum enamel wear were significantly different between the antagonists of the zirconia crowns and the contralateral antagonists. Gender and activity of the masseter muscle at night (bruxism) were identified as possible confounders which significantly affected wear. Under clinical conditions, monolithic zirconia crowns seem to be associated with more wear of opposed enamel than are natural teeth. With regard to wear behaviour, clinical application of monolithic zirconia crowns is justifiable because the amount of antagonistic enamel wear after 6 months is comparable with, or even lower than, that caused by other ceramic materials in previous studies. PMID:24447258

  6. Enamel surface changes caused by hydrogen sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Takao; Hanabusa, Masao; Hosoya, Noriyasu; Chiba, Toshie; Yoshida, Takumasa; Morito, Akiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) produced inside the mouth are a well-known cause of halitosis. Recent studies have suggested that VSCs modify the pathology of periodontitis by encouraging the migration of bacterial toxins associated with increased permeability of gingival epithelia, and enhancing the production of matrix metalloproteinases in gingival connective tissue. Nonetheless, the effects on the enamel of direct exposure to VSCs within the oral cavity remain unclear. In the present study, we observed the effects of VSCs in the form of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on enamel surfaces and determined their effects on restorations. Materials and Methods: Extracted human tooth and bovine tooth samples were divided into the H2S experimental side and the control side. We observed the effects of H2S on enamel surfaces using electron microscopy and conducted a shear test. Results: We found that exposure to H2S obscured the enamel surface's crystal structure. The surface also exhibited coarseness and reticular changes. Shear testing did not reveal any differences in bond strength. Conclusions: Our findings suggested that H2S occurring inside the mouth causes changes to the crystal structure of the enamel surface that can lead to tooth wear, but that it does not diminish the effects of dental bonding in adhesive restorations. PMID:26752833

  7. Enamel thickness trends in Plio-Pleistocene hominin mandibular molars.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Matthew M; Alemseged, Zeresenay; Gaunitz, Charleen; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2015-08-01

    Enamel thickness continues to be an important morphological character in hominin systematics and is frequently invoked in dietary reconstructions of Plio-Pleistocene hominin taxa. However, to date, the majority of published data on molar enamel thickness of Pliocene and early Pleistocene hominins derive from naturally fractured random surfaces of a small number of specimens. In this study we systematically analyze enamel thickness in a large sample of Plio-Pleistocene fossil hominins (n = 99), extant hominoids (n = 57), and modern humans (n = 30). Based on analysis of 2D mesial planes of section derived from microtomography, we examine both average and relative enamel thickness, and the distribution of enamel across buccal, occlusal, and lingual components of mandibular molars. Our results confirm the trend of increasing enamel thickness during the Pliocene that culminates in the thick enamel of the robust Australopithecus species, and then decreases from early Homo to recent modern humans. All hominin taxa share a regional average enamel thickness pattern of thick occlusal enamel and greater buccal than lingual enamel thickness. Pan is unique in exhibiting the thinnest average enamel thickness in the occlusal basin. Statistical analysis indicates that among Pliocene hominins enamel thickness is a weak taxonomic discriminator. The data underlying these results are included in a table in the Supplementary Online Material. PMID:26024565

  8. To What Extent is Primate Second Molar Enamel Occlusal Morphology Shaped by the Enamel-Dentine Junction?

    PubMed Central

    Gilissen, Emmanuel; Thiery, Ghislain

    2015-01-01

    The form of two hard tissues of the mammalian tooth, dentine and enamel, is the result of a combination of the phylogenetic inheritance of dental traits and the adaptive selection of these traits during evolution. Recent decades have been significant in unveiling developmental processes controlling tooth morphogenesis, dental variation and the origination of dental novelties. The enamel-dentine junction constitutes a precursor for the morphology of the outer enamel surface through growth of the enamel cap which may go along with the addition of original features. The relative contribution of these two tooth components to morphological variation and their respective response to natural selection is a major issue in paleoanthropology. This study will determine how much enamel morphology relies on the form of the enamel-dentine junction. The outer occlusal enamel surface and the enamel-dentine junction surface of 76 primate second upper molars are represented by polygonal meshes and investigated using tridimensional topometrical analysis. Quantitative criteria (elevation, inclination, orientation, curvature and occlusal patch count) are introduced to show that the enamel-dentine junction significantly constrains the topographical properties of the outer enamel surface. Our results show a significant correlation for elevation, orientation, inclination, curvature and occlusal complexity between the outer enamel surface and the enamel dentine junction for all studied primate taxa with the exception of four modern humans for curvature (p<0.05). Moreover, we show that, for all selected topometrical parameters apart from occlusal patch count, the recorded correlations significantly decrease along with enamel thickening in our sample. While preserving tooth integrity by providing resistance to wear and fractures, the variation of enamel thickness may modify the curvature present at the occlusal enamel surface in relation to enamel-dentine junction, potentially modifying

  9. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution. PMID:25885796

  10. Enamel hypoplasia: challenges of esthetic restorative treatment.

    PubMed

    Ruschel, Vanessa Carla; Araújo, Élito; Bernardon, Jussara Karina; Lopes, Guilherme Carpena

    2016-01-01

    Enamel defects, such as white or yellow-brown spots, usually cause problems that are more esthetic than functional. Enamel hypoplasia may be the result of hereditary, systemic, or local factors. Dental trauma is a local etiologic factor. It is relatively common in the primary dentition and can cause defects on the surface of permanent successors. Treatment for such defects can differ, depending on the depth of the spots. For deeper white-spot lesions, a composite resin restoration may be necessary. This is an excellent mode of treatment, due to both its low cost and its conservation of healthy tooth structure. The objective of this case report is to describe composite resin restoration of a maxillary central incisor affected by enamel hypoplasia. PMID:27599287

  11. Powder electrostatic enamelling of household appliances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragina, L.; Shalygina, O.; Kuryakin, N.; Annenkov, V.; Guzenko, N.; Kupriyanenko, K.; Hudyakov, V.; Landik, A.

    2011-12-01

    Principles and practices of contemporary resource and energy saving technology of powder electrostatic application (POESTA)of vitreous enamel coatings are described. Its technological, economic and ecological advantages over slip enamelling in household appliances manufacture are discussed. We develop the principles of synthesis of special glass frits with high electric resistivity for POESTA and discuss the results of studies aimed at the development and industrial implementation of ground, direct-on and coloured cover enamels for household appliances and direct-on thermally resistant chemically durable coatings with antibacterial effect for protection of inner tanks of water heaters. Finally, we describe the development of compositions for easy-to-clean, catalytic and pyrolytic coatings.

  12. Enamel of primary teeth--morphological and chemical aspects.

    PubMed

    Sabel, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Enamel is one of the most important structures of the tooth, both from a functional and esthetic point of view. Primary enamel carries registered information regarding metabolic and physiological events that occurred during the period around birth and the first year of life. Detailed knowledge of normal development and the structure of enamel is important for the assessment of mineralization defects. The aim of the thesis is to add more detailed information regarding the structure of primary enamel. The structural appearance of the neonatal line and the quantitative developmental enamel defect, enamel hypoplasia, was thoroughly investigated with a polarized light microscope, microradiography and scanning electron microscope. X-ray microanalysis of some elements was also performed across the enamel and the neonatal line. Postnatal mineralization of enamel at different ages and from different individuals was studied regarding the chemical content, by using secondary ion mass spectrometry. The enamel's response to demineralization was investigated in relation to the individual chemical content and the degree of mineralization of the enamel, by using polarized light microscope, microradiography, scanning electron microscope and X-ray microanalysis. The neonatal line is a hypomineralized structure seen as a step-like rupture in the enamel matrix. The neonatal line is due to disturbances in the enamel secretion stage. The enamel prisms in the postnatal enamel appeared to be smaller than the prenatal prisms. The hypoplasias showed a rough surface at the base and no aprismatic surface layer was seen in the defect. The enamel of the rounded border of hypoplasia appeared to be hypomineralized, with the bent prisms not being densely packed. Mineralization of enamel is a gradual process, still continuous at 6 months postnatally in the primary mandibular incisors. The thickness of the buccal enamel is reached at 3-4 months of age. Demineralization of enamel depends on the

  13. Effect of fluoride toothpastes on enamel demineralization

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Wolfgang H; Dorow, Andreas; Langenhorst, Stephanie; Gintner, Zeno; Bánóczy, Jolan; Gaengler, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Background It was the aim of this study to investigate the effect of four different toothpastes with differing fluoride compounds on enamel remineralization. Methods A 3 × 3 mm window on the enamel surface of 90 human premolars was demineralized in a hydroxyethylcellulose solution at pH 4.8. The teeth were divided into 6 groups and the lower half of the window was covered with varnish serving as control. The teeth were immersed in a toothpaste slurry containing: placebo tooth paste (group 1); remineralization solution (group 2); Elmex Anticaries (group 3); Elmex Sensitive (group 4); Blend-a-med Complete (group 5) and Colgate GRF (group 6). Ten teeth of each group were used for the determination of the F- content in the superficial enamel layer and acid solubility of enamel expressed in soluble phosphorus. Of 6 teeth of each group serial sections were cut and investigated with polarization light microscopy (PLM) and quantitative energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Results The PLM results showed an increased remineralization of the lesion body in the Elmex Anticaries, Elmex Sensitive and Colgate GRF group but not in the Blend-a-med group. A statistically significant higher Ca content was found in the Elmex Anticaries group. The fluoride content in the superficial enamel layer was significantly increased in both Elmex groups and the Blend-a-med group. Phosphorus solubility was significantly decreased in both Elmex groups and the Blend-a-med group. Conclusion It can be concluded that amine fluoride compounds in toothpastes result in a clearly marked remineralization of caries like enamel lesions followed by sodium fluoride and sodium monofluorophosphate formulations. PMID:16776820

  14. Enamel alteration following tooth bleaching and remineralization.

    PubMed

    Coceska, Emilija; Gjorgievska, Elizabeta; Coleman, Nichola J; Gabric, Dragana; Slipper, Ian J; Stevanovic, Marija; Nicholson, John W

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of professional tooth whitening agents containing highly concentrated hydrogen peroxide (with and without laser activation), on the enamel surface; and the potential of four different toothpastes to remineralize any alterations. The study was performed on 50 human molars, divided in two groups: treated with Opalescence(®) Boost and Mirawhite(®) Laser Bleaching. Furthermore, each group was divided into five subgroups, a control one and 4 subgroups remineralized with: Mirasensitive(®) hap+, Mirawhite(®) Gelleѐ, GC Tooth Mousse™ and Mirafluor(®) C. The samples were analysed by SEM/3D-SEM-micrographs, SEM/EDX-qualitative analysis and SEM/EDX-semiquantitative analysis. The microphotographs show that both types of bleaching cause alterations: emphasized perikymata, erosions, loss of interprizmatic substance; the laser treatment is more aggressive and loss of integrity of the enamel is determined by shearing off the enamel rods. In all samples undergoing remineralization deposits were observed, those of toothpastes based on calcium phosphate technologies seem to merge with each other and cover almost the entire surface of the enamel. Loss of integrity and minerals were detected only in the line-scans of the sample remineralized with GC Tooth Mousse™. The semiquantitative EDX analysis of individual elements in the surface layer of the enamel indicates that during tooth-bleaching with HP statistically significant loss of Na and Mg occurs, whereas the bleaching in combination with a laser leads to statistically significant loss of Ca and P. The results undoubtedly confirm that teeth whitening procedures lead to enamel alterations. In this context, it must be noted that laser bleaching is more aggressive for dental substances. However, these changes are reversible and can be repaired by application of remineralization toothpastes. PMID:27197087

  15. Rugometric and microtopographic inspection of teeth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Manuel F.; Pereira, Pedro B.

    2013-06-01

    The roughness of teeth' enamel is an important parameter in orthodontics. One example is the application in the process of decreasing tooth-size by reducing the interproximal enamel surfaces (stripping) of teeth. In order to achieve smooth surfaces clinicians have been testing various methods and progressively improved this therapeutic technique. The evaluation the surface roughness following teeth interproximal reduction is fundamental in the process. In general tooth' surface is not flat presenting a variety of complex geometries. In this communication we will report on the metrological procedure employed on the rugometric and microtopographic inspection by optical active triangulation of raw and processed (interproximal stripping) tooth surfaces.

  16. Enamel Hypomineralization and Structural Defects in Amelotin-deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Y; Holcroft, J; Ganss, B

    2015-05-01

    Amelotin (AMTN) is a relatively recently discovered enamel protein that is predominantly expressed by ameloblasts during the maturation stage of amelogenesis and is present at lower levels in the junctional epithelium of erupted teeth. Previous studies have suggested a function of this protein in enamel mineralization and cell attachment. Genetic mouse models have been instrumental in defining the role of many enamel-related proteins, but a genetic mouse model lacking the Amtn gene has not been reported. Here, we describe the generation of amelotin-deficient mice and the analysis of their enamel phenotype in comparison with that of wild-type animals. Ablation of AMTN expression resulted in mechanically inferior enamel of mandibular incisors that showed chipping and fractures at the incisal edge. Enamel mineralization was delayed, resulting in hypomineralized inner enamel and structural defects in the outer enamel. Erupted enamel close to the gingival margin showed increased surface roughness. The expression levels of the enamel matrix proteins AMEL, AMBN, ENAM, and ODAM and the enamel proteases MMP-20 and KLK-4 were not significantly altered, although the expression of KLK-4 was delayed. The morphology of ameloblasts showing prominent Tomes' processes during the secretory stage was not altered, and there was no indication of disruption of cell structures or activities, but a residual layer, presumably consisting of organic material, remained at the enamel surface close to the gingival margin. The integrity of the dentogingival attachment at the junctional epithelium appeared unaffected by AMTN deficiency. These observations indicate that AMTN plays a subtle yet critical role in enamel biomineralization, particularly during the establishment of the outer and surface enamel layers. This role appears to be largely independent of other enamel proteins. PMID:25715379

  17. Porcelain enamelled absorbers, coated by spectral selective tin oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Simonis, F.; Faber, A.J.; Hoogendoorn, C.J.

    1987-02-01

    The use of porcelain enamelled absorbers in flat plate collectors features longevity thanks to the durability and thermal stability of the enamel finish. The porcelain enamel can be made spectral selective by coating with doped tin oxide or indium oxide. The application procedure involves an enamelling step followed by a pyrosol process with tin or indium compounds. The optical properties of tin oxide coated enamel yield values of 0.90-0.92 absorptance and 0.13-0.18 hemispherical emittance. The temperature dependence of the emittance is very small. The thermal stability has been proved up to 400/sup 0/C in air.

  18. The origin of remarkable resilience of human tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaoli; O'Brien, Simona; Shaw, Jeremy; Abbott, Paul; Munroe, Paul; Habibi, Daryoush; Xie, Zonghan

    2013-12-01

    The mechanical properties of human tooth enamel depend not only on test locations but also on the indentation depth. However, it remains uncertain what roles the depth-dependant properties play in mechanical performance of enamel. Here we reveal that a change in the mechanical properties of enamel, in particular its strength, with increasing indentation depth promotes inelastic deformation in material. In doing so, the severity and extent of stress concentration is reduced. Furthermore, we observed that following unloading, self-recovery occurs in enamel. These findings improve our understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for the remarkable resilience of enamel.

  19. Survey of coatings for solar collectors. [ceramic enamels and chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. E.

    1974-01-01

    Ceramic enamel is found to be more solar selective, (i.e., has high solar absorptance in combination with low infrared emittance) than organic enamel, but neither is as solar selective as black chrome, black copper, black zinc, or black nickel. Ceramic enamel is matched only by black chrome in durability and wide availability. Ceramic enamel and organic enamel have approximately the same cost, and both are currently slightly lower in cost than black chrome, black copper, or black zinc. Black nickel is relatively unavailable and, because of that, realistic cost comparisons are not possible.

  20. Nature of light scattering in dental enamel and dentin at visible and near-infrared wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Daniel; Glena, Richard E.; Featherstone, John D. B.; Seka, Wolf

    1995-03-01

    The light-scattering properties of dental enamel and dentin were measured at 543, 632, and 1053 nm. Angularly resolved scattering distributions for these materials were measured from 0 deg to 180 deg using a rotating goniometer. Surface scattering was minimized by immersing the samples in an index-matching bath. The scattering and absorption coefficients and the scattering phase function were deduced by comparing the measured scattering data with angularly resolved Monte Carlo light-scattering simulations. Enamel and dentin were best represented by a linear combination of a highly forward-peaked Henyey-Greenstein (HG) phase function and an isotropic phase function. Enamel weakly scatters light between 543 nm and 1.06 mu m, with the scattering coefficient ( mu s) ranging from mu s = 15 to 105 cm-1. The phase function is a combination of a HG function with g = 0.96 and a 30-60% isotropic phase function. For enamel, absorption is negligible. Dentin scatters strongly in the visible and near IR ( mu s approximately equals 260 cm-1) and absorbs weakly ( mu a approximately equals 4 cm-1). The scattering phase function for dentin is described by a HG function with g = 0.93 and a very weak isotropic scattering component ( approximately 2%).

  1. Towards enamel biomimetics: Structure, mechanical properties and biomineralization of dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Hanson Kwok

    Dental enamel is the most mineralized tissue in the human body. This bioceramic, composed largely of hydroxyapatite (HAp), is also one of the most durable tissues despite a lifetime of masticatory loading and bacterial attack. The biosynthesis of enamel, which occurs in physiological conditions is a complex orchestration of protein assembly and mineral formation. The resulting product is the hardest tissue in the vertebrate body with the longest and most organized arrangement of hydroxyapatite crystals known to biomineralizing systems. Detail understanding of the structure of enamel in relationship to its mechanical function and the biomineralization process will provide a framework for enamel regeneration as well as potential lessons in the design of engineering materials. The objective of this study, therefore, is twofold: (1) establish the structure-function relationship of enamel as well as the dentine-enamel junction (DEJ) and (2) determine the effect of proteins on the enamel biomineralization process. A hierarchy in the enamel structure was established by means of various microscopy techniques (e.g. SEM, TEM, AFM). Mechanical properties (hardness and elastic modulus) associated with the microstructural features were also determined by nanoindentation. Furthermore, the DEJ was found to have a width in the range of micrometers to 10s of micrometers with continuous change in structure and mechanical properties. Indentation tests and contact fatigue tests using a spherical indenter have revealed that the structural features in the enamel and the DEJ played important roles in containing crack propagation emanating from the enamel tissue. To further understand the effect of this protein on the biominerailzation process, we have studied genetically engineered animals that express altered amelogenin which lack the known self-assembly properties. This in vivo study has revealed that, without the proper self-assembly of the amelogenin protein as demonstrated by the

  2. Amyloid-like ribbons of amelogenins in enamel mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Karina M. M.; Zhai, Halei; Zhu, Li; Horst, Jeremy A.; Sitlin, Melody; Nguyen, Mychi; Wagner, Martin; Simpliciano, Cheryl; Milder, Melissa; Chen, Chun-Long; Ashby, Paul; Bonde, Johan; Li, Wu; Habelitz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Enamel, the outermost layer of teeth, is an acellular mineralized tissue that cannot regenerate; the mature tissue is composed of high aspect ratio apatite nanocrystals organized into rods and inter-rod regions. Amelogenin constitutes 90% of the protein matrix in developing enamel and plays a central role in guiding the hierarchical organization of apatite crystals observed in mature enamel. To date, a convincing link between amelogenin supramolecular structures and mature enamel has yet to be described, in part because the protein matrix is degraded during tissue maturation. Here we show compelling evidence that amelogenin self-assembles into an amyloid-like structure in vitro and in vivo. We show that enamel matrices stain positive for amyloids and we identify a specific region within amelogenin that self-assembles into β-sheets. We propose that amelogenin nanoribbons template the growth of apatite mineral in human enamel. This is a paradigm shift from the current model of enamel development. PMID:27009419

  3. Amyloid-like ribbons of amelogenins in enamel mineralization.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Karina M M; Zhai, Halei; Zhu, Li; Horst, Jeremy A; Sitlin, Melody; Nguyen, Mychi; Wagner, Martin; Simpliciano, Cheryl; Milder, Melissa; Chen, Chun-Long; Ashby, Paul; Bonde, Johan; Li, Wu; Habelitz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Enamel, the outermost layer of teeth, is an acellular mineralized tissue that cannot regenerate; the mature tissue is composed of high aspect ratio apatite nanocrystals organized into rods and inter-rod regions. Amelogenin constitutes 90% of the protein matrix in developing enamel and plays a central role in guiding the hierarchical organization of apatite crystals observed in mature enamel. To date, a convincing link between amelogenin supramolecular structures and mature enamel has yet to be described, in part because the protein matrix is degraded during tissue maturation. Here we show compelling evidence that amelogenin self-assembles into an amyloid-like structure in vitro and in vivo. We show that enamel matrices stain positive for amyloids and we identify a specific region within amelogenin that self-assembles into β-sheets. We propose that amelogenin nanoribbons template the growth of apatite mineral in human enamel. This is a paradigm shift from the current model of enamel development. PMID:27009419

  4. Enamel Formation Genes Influence Enamel Microhardness Before and After Cariogenic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Takehiko; Ho, Bao; Deeley, Kathleen; Briseño-Ruiz, Jessica; Faraco, Italo M.; Schupack, Brett I.; Brancher, João A.; Pecharki, Giovana D.; Küchler, Erika C.; Tannure, Patricia N.; Lips, Andrea; Vieira, Thays C. S.; Patir, Asli; Yildirim, Mine; Poletta, Fernando A.; Mereb, Juan C.; Resick, Judith M.; Brandon, Carla A.; Orioli, Iêda M.; Castilla, Eduardo E.; Marazita, Mary L.; Seymen, Figen; Costa, Marcelo C.; Granjeiro, José M.; Trevilatto, Paula C.; Vieira, Alexandre R.

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence for a genetic component in caries susceptibility, and studies in humans have suggested that variation in enamel formation genes may contribute to caries. For the present study, we used DNA samples collected from 1,831 individuals from various population data sets. Single nucleotide polymorphism markers were genotyped in selected genes (ameloblastin, amelogenin, enamelin, tuftelin, and tuftelin interacting protein 11) that influence enamel formation. Allele and genotype frequencies were compared between groups with distinct caries experience. Associations with caries experience can be detected but they are not necessarily replicated in all population groups and the most expressive results was for a marker in AMELX (p = 0.0007). To help interpret these results, we evaluated if enamel microhardness changes under simulated cariogenic challenges are associated with genetic variations in these same genes. After creating an artificial caries lesion, associations could be seen between genetic variation in TUFT1 (p = 0.006) and TUIP11 (p = 0.0006) with enamel microhardness. Our results suggest that the influence of genetic variation of enamel formation genes may influence the dynamic interactions between the enamel surface and the oral cavity. PMID:23028741

  5. Amelogenin-Ameloblastin Spatial Interaction around Maturing Enamel Rods.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, P; Prajapati, S; Bapat, R; Moradian-Oldak, J

    2016-08-01

    Amelogenin and ameloblastin are 2 extracellular matrix proteins that are essential for the proper development of enamel. We recently reported that amelogenin and ameloblastin colocalized during the secretory stage of enamel formation when nucleation of enamel crystallites occurs. Direct interactions between the 2 proteins have been also demonstrated in our in vitro studies. Here, we explore interactions between their fragments during enamel maturation. We applied in vivo immunofluorescence imaging, quantitative co-localization analysis, and a new FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) technique to demonstrate ameloblastin and amelogenin interaction in the maturing mouse enamel. Using immunochemical analysis of protein samples extracted from 8-d-old (P8) first molars from mice as a model for maturation-stage enamel, we identified the ~17-kDa ameloblastin (Ambn-N) and the TRAP (tyrosine-rich amelogenin peptide) fragments. We used Ambn-N18 and Ambn-M300 antibodies raised against the N-terminal and C-terminal segments of ameloblastin, as well as Amel-FL and Amel-C19 antibodies against full-length recombinant mouse amelogenin (rM179) and C-terminal amelogenin, respectively. In transverse sections, co-localization images of N-terminal fragments of amelogenin and ameloblastin around the prism boundary revealed the "fish net" pattern of the enamel matrix. Using in vivo FRET microscopy, we further demonstrated spatial interactions between amelogenin and ameloblastin N-terminal fragments. In the maturing mouse enamel, the association of these residual protein fragments created a discontinuity between enamel rods, which we suggest is important for support and maintenance of enamel rods and eventual contribution to unique enamel mechanical properties. We present data that support cooperative functions of enamel matrix proteins in mediating the structural hierarchy of enamel and that contribute to our efforts to design and develop enamel biomimetic material. PMID

  6. Enamel for high-temperature superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, H.; Lent, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    Desired optical and high temperature enamel properties are obtained with glasses prepared from the system Li2O-ZrO2-nSiO2. Molar compositions range from n=4 to n=1.3, to which are added minor amounts in varying combinations of alumina, alkali fluorides, boric oxide, alkali oxides, and akaline earth oxides.

  7. Exon4 Amelogenin Transcripts in Enamel Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, J.; Nakano, Y.; Horst, J.; Zhu, L.; Le, M.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, H.; Li, W.

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenins are proteins formed by alternative splicing of the amelogenin gene, and are essential for tooth enamel formation. However, the unique functions of various alternatively spliced amelogenins in enamel formation are not well understood. In this study, we determined the spatiotemporal location of amelogenins derived from transcripts containing exon4 (AMG+4) in the enamel matrix, and the relative binding of recombinant AMG+4 to hydroxyapatite (HAP). Immunohistochemistry and mass spectrometry analyses showed that AMG+4 proteins were secreted into the enamel matrix at the early maturation stage. A stage-specific increase in the synthesis of AMG+4 was further supported by our observation that in mice overexpressing leucine-rich amelogenin peptide (TgLRAP), in which ameloblasts differentiate earlier, AMG+4 transcripts were also upregulated earlier. In vitro binding studies, supported by in silico modeling of protein binding to calcium and phosphate, showed that more recombinant AMG+4 bound to hydroxyapatite (HAP) as compared with recombinant AMG-4. The temporal and spatial localization of amelogenins containing exon4 peptide, and their functional differences in HAP binding, suggests that the unique properties of amelogenins containing exon4 cause a specific enhancement of biomineralization related to stabilization of early-formed HAP at the maturation stage. PMID:25792521

  8. Exon4 amelogenin transcripts in enamel biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Stahl, J; Nakano, Y; Horst, J; Zhu, L; Le, M; Zhang, Y; Liu, H; Li, W; Den Besten, P K

    2015-06-01

    Amelogenins are proteins formed by alternative splicing of the amelogenin gene, and are essential for tooth enamel formation. However, the unique functions of various alternatively spliced amelogenins in enamel formation are not well understood. In this study, we determined the spatiotemporal location of amelogenins derived from transcripts containing exon4 (AMG+4) in the enamel matrix, and the relative binding of recombinant AMG+4 to hydroxyapatite (HAP). Immunohistochemistry and mass spectrometry analyses showed that AMG+4 proteins were secreted into the enamel matrix at the early maturation stage. A stage-specific increase in the synthesis of AMG+4 was further supported by our observation that in mice overexpressing leucine-rich amelogenin peptide (TgLRAP), in which ameloblasts differentiate earlier, AMG+4 transcripts were also upregulated earlier. In vitro binding studies, supported by in silico modeling of protein binding to calcium and phosphate, showed that more recombinant AMG+4 bound to hydroxyapatite (HAP) as compared with recombinant AMG-4. The temporal and spatial localization of amelogenins containing exon4 peptide, and their functional differences in HAP binding, suggests that the unique properties of amelogenins containing exon4 cause a specific enhancement of biomineralization related to stabilization of early-formed HAP at the maturation stage. PMID:25792521

  9. Kinetics of enamel demineralization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Margolis, H C; Zhang, Y P; Lee, C Y; Kent, R L; Moreno, E C

    1999-07-01

    Previously, we reported that the rate (R) of hydroxyapatite dissolution in acetic, lactic, and phosphoric acid solutions is a function of the degree of saturation with respect to the dissolving mineral, DS (defined as the ratio of the mean ionic activity product for hydroxyapatite [Ca5OH(PO4)3] in solution to its solubility product constant), and the sum of the acid activities (sumBiH) in solution: R = K(1-DS)m(sumBiH)n. The present study was undertaken to explore the general validity of this model in describing the kinetics of enamel demineralization. Thin sections of human enamel were exposed to partially saturated 0.1 mol/L lactic acid solutions, at two different DS levels, and at pH values of 4.3 to 6.0. Thin sections of human enamel were also exposed to solutions with four different concentrations of acetic and lactic acids (pH 4.3) with three different DS values and, at one DS value, to solutions of propionic acid. Mineral loss was monitored by quantitative microradiography. In solutions with pH values of 4.3 and 5.0, "lesions" were formed with well-defined surface layers, whereas, in solutions with pH 6.0, "lesions" were produced with no apparent surface layers. The formation of relatively intact surface layers was consistent with predicted phase transformations. Rates of mineral loss were found to be inversely proportional to both the degree of saturation with respect to enamel mineral, DS(En), and the pH of the solution and increased with increased activities of each organic acid, consistent with the proposed model. However, at the same DS(En) and acid activity, rates of demineralization were the same in the acetic and propionic acid solutions, whereas rates of demineralization in lactic acid were greater. It is suggested that specific interactions of acid species with enamel mineral may modify the rate of enamel demineralization. These in vitro findings suggest that relatively small differences in DS(En) values found in plaque fluid may result in very

  10. Studies on root enamel (2). Enamel pearls. A review of their morphology, localization, nomenclature, occurrence, classification, histogenesis and incidence.

    PubMed

    Moskow, B S; Canut, P M

    1990-05-01

    Enamel pearls are one of a number of different enamel structures that can be found on the roots of deciduous and permanent teeth. They have a distinct predilection for the furcation areas of molar teeth, particularly the maxillary third and second molars. They can consist primarily of enamel, but in most instances, a core of dentin is contained within them. On rare occasions, even pulpal tissues can be found. Enamel pearls usually occur singularly, but up to 4 enamel pearls have been observed on the same tooth. Depending on the study, enamel pearls on permanent molar teeth have an incidence rate of between 1.1%-9.7% with distinct differences among racial and national groups. The incidence of enamel pearls increases greatly in histological studies, suggesting that they are often obscured by a covering of cementum. PMID:2191975

  11. Enamelin Directs Crystallite Organization at the Enamel-Dentine Junction.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, S; Al-Jawad, M

    2016-05-01

    Enamel is an acellular material formed by the intricate process of amelogenesis. Disruption caused at the initial stages of development, by means of mutations in theENAMgene encoding the enamelin protein, results in enamel hypoplasia. Little is known about the consequence ofENAMmutation on the enamel structure at a crystallographic level. The aim of this study was to characterize the structure ofENAM-mutated enamel to develop a deeper understanding of the role of enamelin protein during formation with regard to crystal organization. Synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction (SXRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been used to measure and correlate enamel crystallography and microstructure in hypoplastic and healthy enamel. Rietveld refinement carried out on 2-dimensional diffraction patterns, collected from the Advanced Photon Source, were used to quantify changes in the preferred orientation (crystallographic texture) within the labial regions of each tooth slice and then correlated with the local microstructure. In general, healthy deciduous incisors displayed a higher degree of crystal organization across the labial surface in comparison with the hypoplastic enamel.ENAMplays the greatest functional role at the enamel-dentine junction (EDJ), as it was the region that exhibited lowest texture relative to unaffected controls. Other areas within the tooth, however, such as the cusp tip, displayed greater organization in line with healthy enamel, suggesting its effects are restricted to the early stages of enamel secretion. Observed clinically, the surface ofENAM-mutated hypoplastic enamel can appear to be normal, yet severe sub-nano and microstructural defects appear beneath the subsurface layer. Quantitative characterization of the crystallographic properties from enamel with known genotype expands the understanding of enamel formation processes and can aid better clinical diagnosis and tailor-made treatment. PMID:26912218

  12. The Molecular Basis of Hereditary Enamel Defects in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Carrion, I.A.; Morris, C.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of human enamel is highly regulated at the molecular level and involves thousands of genes. Requisites for development of this highly mineralized tissue include cell differentiation; production of a unique extracellular matrix; processing of the extracellular matrix; altering of cell function during different stages of enamel formation; cell movement and attachment; regulation of ion and protein movement; and regulation of hydration, pH, and other conditions of the microenvironment, to name just a few. Not surprising, there is a plethora of hereditary conditions with an enamel phenotype. The objective of this review was to identify the hereditary conditions listed on Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) that have an associated enamel phenotype and whether a causative gene has been identified. The OMIM database was searched with the terms amelogenesis, enamel, dental, and tooth, and all results were screened by 2 individuals to determine if an enamel phenotype was identified. Gene and gene product function was reviewed on OMIM and from publications identified in PubMed. The search strategy revealed 91 conditions listed in OMIM as having an enamel phenotype, and of those, 71 have a known molecular etiology or linked genetic loci. The purported protein function of those conditions with a known genetic basis included enzymes, regulatory proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, transcription factors, and transmembrane proteins. The most common enamel phenotype was a deficient amount of enamel, or enamel hypoplasia, with hypomineralization defects being reported less frequently. Knowing these molecular defects allows an initial cataloging of molecular pathways that lead to hereditary enamel defects in humans. This knowledge provides insight into the diverse molecular pathways involved in enamel formation and can be useful when searching for the genetic etiology of hereditary conditions that involve enamel. PMID:25389004

  13. Laser fluorescence quantification of remineralisation in situ of incipient enamel lesions: influence of fluoride supplements.

    PubMed

    al-Khateeb, S; Oliveby, A; de Josselin de Jong, E; Angmar-Månsson, B

    1997-01-01

    The aims of this study were to test the laser fluorescence method for quantification of remineralisation in situ of enamel with incipient lesions and to evaluate the enhancement of remineralisation by fluoride (F) supplements when a F dentifrice was used on a regular basis by healthy young subjects. Enamel samples were cut from extracted premolar teeth with the natural surface kept intact, and subjected to a pH-cycling system to produce subsurface demineralisation in vitro. The enamel blocks were then inserted into composite holders bonded to the buccal surfaces of both upper first molars of 12 panelists. Each panelist participated in 3 separate experiments in a randomised order; each lasted for 5 weeks with washout intervals of 2 weeks between experiments; experiment 1: F dentifrice (0.145% F as NaF) only; experiment 2: F dentrifice + F lozenges (0.25 mg F x 6/day); experiment 3: F dentifrice + F chewing-gum (0.25 mg F x 6/day). Fluorescence radiance was measured before, during, and after in vitro demineralisation, and once a week during the in situ experimental periods. The enamel samples were then sectioned and analysed with transverse microradiography (TMR). Anova and Pearson correlation coefficient were used for the statistical analysis. At the end of the 5-week in situ periods, fluorescence radiance had been regained to a level of 80-100% of the value before in vitro demineralisation, indicating remineralisation of the enamel samples. There were no differences in the fluorescence radiance gain between the 3 different F exposures. However, there was a statistically significant time trend (p < 0.001), and a highly significant linear dependence (p < 0.001) between the final measurements obtained with the laser fluorescence method (LAF) and the data obtained from TMR, r = 0.76. It was concluded that: (1) with the sensitive LAF method it was possible to register the small changes in the enamel week by week during in situ remineralisation: (2) when F dentrifice was

  14. Effects of Ion-Releasing Tooth-Coating Material on Demineralization of Bovine Tooth Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Koji; Kambara, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    We compared the effect of a novel ion-releasing tooth-coating material that contained S-PRG (surface-reaction type prereacted glass-ionomer) filler to that of non-S-PRG filler and nail varnish on the demineralization of bovine enamel subsurface lesions. The demineralization process of bovine enamel was examined using quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) and electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) measurement. Ion concentrations in demineralizing solution were measured using inductively coupled plasma atomic (ICP) emission spectrometry and an ion electrode. The nail varnish group and the non-S-PRG filler group showed linear demineralization. Although the nail varnish group and the non-S-PRG filler group showed linear demineralization, the S-PRG filler group did not. Further, plane-scanning by EPMA analysis in the S-PRG filler group showed no changes in Ca ion distribution, and F ions showed peak levels on the surface of enamel specimens. Most ions in the demineralizing solution were present at higher concentrations in the S-PRG filler group than in the other two groups. In conclusion, only the S-PRG filler-containing tooth-coating material released ions and inhibited demineralization around the coating. PMID:24578706

  15. Amelogenin Evolution and Tetrapod Enamel Structure

    PubMed Central

    Diekwisch, Thomas G.H.; Jin, Tianquan; Wang, Xinping; Ito, Yoshihiro; Schmidt, Marcella; Druzinsky, Robert; Yamane, Akira; Luan, Xianghong

    2009-01-01

    Amelogenins are the major proteins involved in tooth enamel formation. In the present study we have cloned and sequenced four novel amelogenins from three amphibian species in order to analyze similarities and differences between mammalian and non-mammalian amelogenins. The newly sequenced amphibian amelogenin sequences were from a Red-eyed tree frog (Litoria chloris) and a Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum). We identified two amelogenin isoforms in the Eastern Red-backed Salamander (Plethodon cinereus). Sequence comparisons confirmed that non-mammalian amelogenins are overall shorter than their mammalian counterparts, contain less proline and less glutamine, and feature shorter polyproline tripeptide repeat stretches than mammalian amelogenins. We propose that unique sequence parameters of mammalian amelogenins might be a pre-requisite for complex mammalian enamel prism architecture. PMID:19828974

  16. Amelogenin evolution and tetrapod enamel structure.

    PubMed

    Diekwisch, Thomas G H; Jin, Tianquan; Wang, Xinping; Ito, Yoshihiro; Schmidt, Marcella; Druzinsky, Robert; Yamane, Akira; Luan, Xianghong

    2009-01-01

    Amelogenins are the major proteins involved in tooth enamel formation. In the present study, we have cloned and sequenced four novel amelogenins from three amphibian species in order to analyze similarities and differences between mammalian and non-mammalian amelogenins. The newly sequenced amphibian amelogenin sequences were from a red-eyed tree frog (Litoria chloris) and a Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum). We identified two amelogenin isoforms in the Eastern red-backed salamander (Plethodon cinereus). Sequence comparisons confirmed that non-mammalian amelogenins are overall shorter than their mammalian counterparts, contain less proline and less glutamine, and feature shorter polyproline tripeptide repeat stretches than mammalian amelogenins. We propose that unique sequence parameters of mammalian amelogenins might be a pre-requisite for complex mammalian enamel prism architecture. PMID:19828974

  17. Evolutionary and functional significance of hominoid tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Gantt, D G; Rafter, J A

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate enamel thickness in extant and extinct hominoids. The material used in this study spans the evolutionary history of this group, from 20 million years ago to the present. The objectives of this investigation are to test three hypotheses: (1) the Loading Hypothesis: loading areas of the crown have thicker enamel than non-loading areas; (2) the Phyletic Hypothesis: differences in enamel thickness provide a basis for determining evolutionary relationships; and (3) the Functional Hypothesis: differences among hominoids result from adaptations to differing dietary and ecological habitats, that is from folivory to frugivory to hard object feeding and from tropical to forest to savanna habitats. Thin sections were prepared and polished to approximately 100 microm in thickness. Each section was then enlarged and digitally captured to the computer. Image processing and analysis software, SigmaImage (was used to measure the sections. Subsequent statistical analysis was conducted with SigmaStat and SPSS statistical software programs. The data provides statistical support for all hypotheses. In particular, the data support the proposal that "thick" enamel is the ancestral condition for the great apes and human clade. Therefore, Pongo would have retained its enamel thickness from the common ancestor of the great apes and Gorilla and Pan would have secondarily reduced enamel thickness to "thin." The common ancestor of the hominids, the australopithecines, would have "thick" enamel. The "hyper-thick" enamel of the australopithecines would be a derived character for this clade due to increased crushing and grinding and adaptation to savanna habitat. Homo would have secondarily reduced enamel thickness to "thick." Evolutionary biology of enamel differs markedly in hominids from that found in other hominoids and primates. Increased enamel thickness involved both increases in absolute thickness of enamel and crown size in response to

  18. Investigation of EPR signals on tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenko, A.; Mironova-Ulmane, N.; Polakov, M.; Riekstina, D.

    2007-12-01

    Calcified tissues are involved in continues metabolic process in human organism exchanging a number of chemical elements with environment. The rate of biochemical reactions is tissue dependent and the slowest one at the tooth enamel, the most mineralized tissue of human organism. The long time stability and unique chemical composition make tooth enamel suitable for number of application. The assessment of individual radiation dose by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and evaluations of elemental composition by Instrumentation Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) are the well known procedures where properties of tooth enamel intensively used. The current work is focused on investigation of EPR signals and determination of chemical composition on several teeth samples having different origin. The EPR spectra and INAA element content of milk tooth, caries tooth, and paradantose tooth have been compared to each other. The results showed that the intensity of EPR signal is much higher for the caries tooth than the for paradantose tooth that is in agreement with depleted Ca content.

  19. Enamel Pearls Implications on Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zenóbio, Elton Gonçalves; Vieira, Thaís Ribeiral; Bustamante, Roberta Paula Colen; Gomes, Hayder Egg; Shibli, Jamil Awad; Soares, Rodrigo Villamarin

    2015-01-01

    Dental anatomy is quite complex and diverse factors must be taken into account in its analysis. Teeth with anatomical variations present an increase in the rate of severity periodontal tissue destruction and therefore a higher risk of developing periodontal disease. In this context, this paper reviews the literature regarding enamel pearls and their implications in the development of severe localized periodontal disease as well as in the prognosis of periodontal therapy. Radiographic examination of a patient complaining of pain in the right side of the mandible revealed the presence of a radiopaque structure around the cervical region of lower right first premolar. Periodontal examination revealed extensive bone loss since probing depths ranged from 7.0 mm to 9.0 mm and additionally intense bleeding and suppuration. Surgical exploration detected the presence of an enamel pearl, which was removed. Assessment of the remaining supporting tissues led to the extraction of tooth 44. Local factors such as enamel pearls can lead to inadequate removal of the subgingival biofilm, thus favoring the establishment and progression of periodontal diseases. PMID:26491574

  20. Hair keratin mutations in tooth enamel increase dental decay risk

    PubMed Central

    Duverger, Olivier; Ohara, Takahiro; Shaffer, John R.; Donahue, Danielle; Zerfas, Patricia; Dullnig, Andrew; Crecelius, Christopher; Beniash, Elia; Marazita, Mary L.; Morasso, Maria I.

    2014-01-01

    Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body and has a unique combination of hardness and fracture toughness that protects teeth from dental caries, the most common chronic disease worldwide. In addition to a high mineral content, tooth enamel comprises organic material that is important for mechanical performance and influences the initiation and progression of caries; however, the protein composition of tooth enamel has not been fully characterized. Here, we determined that epithelial hair keratins, which are crucial for maintaining the integrity of the sheaths that support the hair shaft, are expressed in the enamel organ and are essential organic components of mature enamel. Using genetic and intraoral examination data from 386 children and 706 adults, we found that individuals harboring known hair disorder–associated polymorphisms in the gene encoding keratin 75 (KRT75), KRT75A161T and KRT75E337K, are prone to increased dental caries. Analysis of teeth from individuals carrying the KRT75A161T variant revealed an altered enamel structure and a marked reduction of enamel hardness, suggesting that a functional keratin network is required for the mechanical stability of tooth enamel. Taken together, our results identify a genetic locus that influences enamel structure and establish a connection between hair disorders and susceptibility to dental caries. PMID:25347471

  1. The mineral composition and enamel ultrastructure of hypocalcified amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Wright, J T; Duggal, M S; Robinson, C; Kirkham, J; Shore, R

    1993-01-01

    Hypocalcified amelogenesis imperfecta is characterized clinically by a yellow-brown colored enamel that is prone to severe attrition, often leading to rapid destruction of the crown. While the enamel is thought to be poorly mineralized few studies have evaluated the mineral content, or the histological or microradiographic features of this specific AI type. The purpose of this investigation was to examine teeth affected with autosomal dominant hypocalcified AI histologically using light microscopy (LM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and to evaluate the degree of enamel mineralization chemically and with microradiography. Four AI teeth were obtained from an affected individual for comparison with age-matched teeth from normal healthy individuals. Thin sections approximately 100 microns were cut with a diamond disc for examination by LM and microradiography. Using SEM, fractured enamel samples were examined either untreated or after removal of organic material using NaOCl or urea. Normal and AI enamel particles were dissected from thin sections to evaluate the mineral per volume and carbonate content. The enamel was not uniformly affected in all areas of the teeth with the lingual surfaces of the mandibular central incisors appearing clinically and histologically normal. The affected enamel was porous and appeared opaque with LM. Both SEM and LM showed the enamel to be prismatic with relatively normal prism morphology. However, the enamel crystallites were rough and granular compared with those of normal enamel. Extraction to remove organic material did not change the appearance of the crystallites indicating their granular appearance was due to mineral and not residual organic material such as enamel protein. Microradiography showed the enamel was less radiodense and therefore poorly mineralized compared with normal enamel. This was confirmed by chemical determination of the mineral per volume, which showed some areas of the AI enamel had as much as 30% less

  2. COMPOSITION OF MINERALIZING INCISOR ENAMEL IN CFTR-DEFICIENT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Bronckers, ALJJ; Lyaruu, DM; Guo, J; Bijvelds, MJC; Bervoets, TJM; Zandieh-Doulabi, B; Medina, JF; Li, Z; Zhang, Y; DenBesten, PK

    2014-01-01

    Formation of crystals in the enamel space releases protons that need to be buffered to sustain mineral accretion. We hypothesized that apical Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) in maturation ameloblasts transduces chloride into forming enamel as critical step to secrete bicarbonates. We tested this by determining the calcium, chloride and fluoride levels of developing enamel of Cftr-null mice by quantitative electron probe microanalysis. Maturation stage Cftr–null enamel contained less chloride and calcium than wild-type enamel, was more acidic when stained with pH dyes ex vivo and formed no fluorescent modulation bands after in vivo injection of the mice with calcein. To further acidify the enamel we exposed Cftr-null mice to fluoride in drinking water to stimulate proton release during formation of hypermineralized lines. In enamel of Cftr-deficient mice fluoride further lowered enamel calcium without further reducing chloride levels. The data support the view that apical Cftr in maturation ameloblasts transduces chloride into developing enamel as part of the machinery to buffer protons released during mineral accretion. PMID:25557910

  3. Barrier formation: potential molecular mechanism of enamel fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Lyaruu, D M; Medina, J F; Sarvide, S; Bervoets, T J M; Everts, V; Denbesten, P; Smith, C E; Bronckers, A L J J

    2014-01-01

    Enamel fluorosis is an irreversible structural enamel defect following exposure to supraoptimal levels of fluoride during amelogenesis. We hypothesized that fluorosis is associated with excess release of protons during formation of hypermineralized lines in the mineralizing enamel matrix. We tested this concept by analyzing fluorotic enamel defects in wild-type mice and mice deficient in anion exchanger-2a,b (Ae2a,b), a transmembrane protein in maturation ameloblasts that exchanges extracellular Cl(-) for bicarbonate. Defects were more pronounced in fluorotic Ae2a,b (-/-) mice than in fluorotic heterozygous or wild-type mice. Phenotypes included a hypermineralized surface, extensive subsurface hypomineralization, and multiple hypermineralized lines in deeper enamel. Mineral content decreased in all fluoride-exposed and Ae2a,b(-/-) mice and was strongly correlated with Cl(-). Exposure of enamel surfaces underlying maturation-stage ameloblasts to pH indicator dyes suggested the presence of diffusion barriers in fluorotic enamel. These results support the concept that fluoride stimulates hypermineralization at the mineralization front. This causes increased release of protons, which ameloblasts respond to by secreting more bicarbonates at the expense of Cl(-) levels in enamel. The fluoride-induced hypermineralized lines may form barriers that impede diffusion of proteins and mineral ions into the subsurface layers, thereby delaying biomineralization and causing retention of enamel matrix proteins. PMID:24170372

  4. Hair keratin mutations in tooth enamel increase dental decay risk.

    PubMed

    Duverger, Olivier; Ohara, Takahiro; Shaffer, John R; Donahue, Danielle; Zerfas, Patricia; Dullnig, Andrew; Crecelius, Christopher; Beniash, Elia; Marazita, Mary L; Morasso, Maria I

    2014-12-01

    Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body and has a unique combination of hardness and fracture toughness that protects teeth from dental caries, the most common chronic disease worldwide. In addition to a high mineral content, tooth enamel comprises organic material that is important for mechanical performance and influences the initiation and progression of caries; however, the protein composition of tooth enamel has not been fully characterized. Here, we determined that epithelial hair keratins, which are crucial for maintaining the integrity of the sheaths that support the hair shaft, are expressed in the enamel organ and are essential organic components of mature enamel. Using genetic and intraoral examination data from 386 children and 706 adults, we found that individuals harboring known hair disorder-associated polymorphisms in the gene encoding keratin 75 (KRT75), KRT75(A161T) and KRT75(E337K), are prone to increased dental caries. Analysis of teeth from individuals carrying the KRT75(A161T) variant revealed an altered enamel structure and a marked reduction of enamel hardness, suggesting that a functional keratin network is required for the mechanical stability of tooth enamel. Taken together, our results identify a genetic locus that influences enamel structure and establish a connection between hair disorders and susceptibility to dental caries. PMID:25347471

  5. Scanning Electron Microscope Characterization of Erosive Enamel in Human Teeth.

    PubMed

    Worawongvasu, Ratthapong

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the surface characteristics of erosive enamel in extracted human teeth by scanning electron microscopy. Morphologic changes in naturally eroded enamel depend on the stages of dental erosion. In its early stages, the enamel surfaces show a honeycomb appearance due to the dissolution of enamel rod ends. In its advanced stages, the erosive process involves the underlying dentin and the eroded dentin shows exposed dentinal tubules and the dentinal matrix may be exposed due to the dissolution of the peri- and intertubular dentin. Evidence of remineralization is seen at the early stage of natural dental erosion. PMID:26214120

  6. Microchemical and structural regular variability of apatites in “overbuilt” enamel and dentin of human molar teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuczumow, A.; Nowak, J.; ChaŁas, R.

    2011-10-01

    The aim of a recent paper was to recognize the chemical and structural changes in apatites, which form both the enamel and the dentin of the human tooth. The aim was achieved by scrutinizing the linear elemental profiles along the cross-sections of human molar teeth. Essentially, the task was accomplished with the application of the Electron Probe Microanalysis method and with some additional studies by Micro-Raman spectrometry. All the trends in linear profiles were strictly determined. In the enamel zone they were either increasing or decreasing curves of exponential character. The direction of the investigations was to start with the tooth surface and move towards the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ). The results of the elemental studies were more visible when the detected material was divided, in an arbitrary way, into the prevailing "core" enamel (˜93.5% of the total mass) and the remaining "overbuilt" enamel. The material in the "core" enamel was fully stable, with clearly determined chemical and mechanical features. However, the case was totally different in the "overbuilt enamel", with dynamic changes in the composition. In the "overbuilt" layer Ca, P, Cl and F profiles present the decaying distribution curves, whereas Mg, Na, K and CO 32- present the growing ones. Close to the surface of the tooth the mixture of hydroxy-, chlor- and fluor-apatite is formed, which is much more resistant than the rest of the enamel. On passing towards the DEJ, the apatite is enriched with Na, Mg and CO 32-. In this location, three of six phosphate groups were substituted with carbonate groups. Simultaneously, Mg is associated with the hydroxyl groups around the hexad axis. In this way, the mechanisms of exchange reactions were established. The crystallographic structures were proposed for new phases located close to DEJ. In the dentin zone, the variability of elemental profiles looks different, with the most characteristic changes occurring in Mg and Na concentrations. Mg

  7. Membranes, minerals, and proteins of developing vertebrate enamel.

    PubMed

    Diekwisch, Thomas G H; Berman, Brett J; Anderton, Xochitl; Gurinsky, Brian; Ortega, Adam J; Satchell, Paul G; Williams, Mia; Arumugham, Chithra; Luan, Xianghong; McIntosh, James E; Yamane, Akira; Carlson, David S; Sire, Jean-Yves; Shuler, Charles F

    2002-12-01

    Developing tooth enamel is formed as organized mineral in a specialized protein matrix. In order to analyze patterns of enamel mineralization and enamel protein expression in species representative of the main extant vertebrate lineages, we investigated developing teeth in a chondrichthyan, the horn shark, a teleost, the guppy, a urodele amphibian, the Mexican axolotl, an anuran amphibian, the leopard frog, two lepidosauria, a gecko and an iguana, and two mammals, a marsupial, the South American short-tailed gray opossum, and the house mouse. Electron microscopic analysis documented the presence of a distinct basal lamina in all species investigated. Subsequent stages of enamel biomineralization featured highly organized long and parallel enamel crystals in mammals, lepidosaurians, the frog, and the shark, while amorphous mineral deposits and/or randomly oriented crystals were observed in the guppy and the axolotl. In situ hybridization using a full-length mouse probe for amelogenin mRNA resulted in amelogenin specific signals in mouse, opossum, gecko, frog, axolotl, and shark. Using immunohistochemistry, amelogenin and tuftelin enamel proteins were detected in the enamel organ of many species investigated, but tuftelin epitopes were also found in other tissues. The anti-M179 antibody, however, did not react with the guppy and axolotl enameloid matrix. We conclude that basic features of vertebrate enamel/enameloid formation such as the presence of enamel proteins or the mineral deposition along the dentin-enamel junction were highly conserved in vertebrates. There were also differences in terms of enamel protein distribution and mineral organization between the vertebrates lineages. Our findings indicated a correlation between the presence of amelogenins and the presence of long and parallel hydroxyapatite crystals in tetrapods and shark. PMID:12430167

  8. On the relationship between enamel band complexity and occlusal surface area in Equids (Mammalia, Perissodactyla).

    PubMed

    Famoso, Nicholas A; Davis, Edward Byrd

    2016-01-01

    Enamel patterns on the occlusal surfaces of equid teeth are asserted to have tribal-level differences. The most notable example compares the Equini and Hipparionini, where Equini have higher crowned teeth with less enamel-band complexity and less total occlusal enamel than Hipparionini. Whereas previous work has successfully quantified differences in enamel band shape by dividing the length of enamel band by the square root of the occlusal surface area (Occlusal Enamel Index, OEI), it was clear that OEI only partially removes the effect of body size. Because enamel band length scales allometrically, body size still has an influence on OEI, with larger individuals having relatively longer enamel bands than smaller individuals. Fractal dimensionality (D) can be scaled to any level, so we have used it to quantify occlusal enamel complexity in a way that allows us to get at an accurate representation of the relationship between complexity and body size. To test the hypothesis of tribal-level complexity differences between Equini and Hipparionini, we digitally traced a sample of 98 teeth, one tooth per individual; 31 Hipparionini and 67 Equini. We restricted our sampling to the P3-M2 to reduce the effect of tooth position. After calculating the D of these teeth with the fractal box method which uses the number of boxes of various sizes to calculate the D of a line, we performed a t-test on the individual values of D for each specimen, comparing the means between the two tribes, and a phylogenetically informed generalized least squares regression (PGLS) for each tribe with occlusal surface area as the independent variable and D as the dependent variable. The slopes of both PGLS analyses were compared using a t-test to determine if the same linear relationship existed between the two tribes. The t-test between tribes was significant (p < 0.0001), suggesting different D populations for each lineage. The PGLS for Hipparionini was a positive but not significant (p = 0

  9. On the relationship between enamel band complexity and occlusal surface area in Equids (Mammalia, Perissodactyla)

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Edward Byrd

    2016-01-01

    Enamel patterns on the occlusal surfaces of equid teeth are asserted to have tribal-level differences. The most notable example compares the Equini and Hipparionini, where Equini have higher crowned teeth with less enamel-band complexity and less total occlusal enamel than Hipparionini. Whereas previous work has successfully quantified differences in enamel band shape by dividing the length of enamel band by the square root of the occlusal surface area (Occlusal Enamel Index, OEI), it was clear that OEI only partially removes the effect of body size. Because enamel band length scales allometrically, body size still has an influence on OEI, with larger individuals having relatively longer enamel bands than smaller individuals. Fractal dimensionality (D) can be scaled to any level, so we have used it to quantify occlusal enamel complexity in a way that allows us to get at an accurate representation of the relationship between complexity and body size. To test the hypothesis of tribal-level complexity differences between Equini and Hipparionini, we digitally traced a sample of 98 teeth, one tooth per individual; 31 Hipparionini and 67 Equini. We restricted our sampling to the P3-M2 to reduce the effect of tooth position. After calculating the D of these teeth with the fractal box method which uses the number of boxes of various sizes to calculate the D of a line, we performed a t-test on the individual values of D for each specimen, comparing the means between the two tribes, and a phylogenetically informed generalized least squares regression (PGLS) for each tribe with occlusal surface area as the independent variable and D as the dependent variable. The slopes of both PGLS analyses were compared using a t-test to determine if the same linear relationship existed between the two tribes. The t-test between tribes was significant (p < 0.0001), suggesting different D populations for each lineage. The PGLS for Hipparionini was a positive but not significant (p = 0

  10. Optical coherence tomography use in the diagnosis of enamel defects.

    PubMed

    Al-Azri, Khalifa; Melita, Lucia N; Strange, Adam P; Festy, Frederic; Al-Jawad, Maisoon; Cook, Richard; Parekh, Susan; Bozec, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) affects the permanent incisors and molars, whose undermineralized matrix is evidenced by lesions ranging from white to yellow/brown opacities to crumbling enamel lesions incapable of withstanding normal occlusal forces and function. Diagnosing the condition involves clinical and radiographic examination of these teeth, with known limitations in determining the depth extent of the enamel defects in particular. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging hard and soft tissue imaging technique, which was investigated as a new potential diagnostic method in dentistry. A comparison between the diagnostic potential of the conventional methods and OCT was conducted. Compared to conventional imaging methods, OCT gave more information on the structure of the enamel defects as well as the depth extent of the defects into the enamel structure. Different types of enamel defects were compared, each type presenting a unique identifiable pattern when imaged using OCT. Additionally, advanced methods of OCT image analysis including backscattered light intensity profile analysis and enface reconstruction were performed. Both methods confirmed the potential of OCT in enamel defects diagnosis. In conclusion, OCT imaging enabled the identification of the type of enamel defect and the determination of the extent of the enamel defects in MIH with the advantage of being a radiation free diagnostic technique. PMID:26968386

  11. Evolutionary aspects of reptilian and mammalian enamel structure.

    PubMed

    Sahni, A

    1987-12-01

    The evolution of enamel structure is dealt with here on the basis of fossil reptiles and mammals ranging from the Triassic to the present. The evidence suggests that prismatic enamel had developed in some therapsid reptiles and the mammal, Eozostrodon about 180 million years ago. For the next 100 million years, mammalian evolutionary history is sparingly documented and this is reflected in the poor record of enamel evolution during this period. The few Jurassic reptiles and mammals studied suggest a preprismatic structure. In the Late Cretaceous (80 to 65 million years ago) when the fossil record improves, mammalian enamel investigated from North American localities, are found to be prismatic; allotherian (multituberculate) and metatherian (marsupial) enamels are usually tubular, while eutherian (placental) ones are not. Prism structure in Tertiary mammals in general, conforms to that of their present day descendants, but there are discernible exceptions. The record of evolutionary change in Tertiary mammals is obscured by functional modifications related to biomechanical stresses. Enamel structure may be secondarily modified; similar in phylogenetically unrelated groups (eg., pauciserial enamel of early rodents) or dissimilar at the intra-familial level (eg., rodent families Ctenodactylidae and Ischryomyicae). Prismatic enamel is recorded from the tooth of a hatchling of the gavial, Gavialis gangeticus. PMID:3433070

  12. New genomic and fossil data illuminate the origin of enamel.

    PubMed

    Qu, Qingming; Haitina, Tatjana; Zhu, Min; Ahlberg, Per Erik

    2015-10-01

    Enamel, the hardest vertebrate tissue, covers the teeth of almost all sarcopterygians (lobe-finned bony fishes and tetrapods) as well as the scales and dermal bones of many fossil lobe-fins. Enamel deposition requires an organic matrix containing the unique enamel matrix proteins (EMPs) amelogenin (AMEL), enamelin (ENAM) and ameloblastin (AMBN). Chondrichthyans (cartilaginous fishes) lack both enamel and EMP genes. Many fossil and a few living non-teleost actinopterygians (ray-finned bony fishes) such as the gar, Lepisosteus, have scales and dermal bones covered with a proposed enamel homologue called ganoine. However, no gene or transcript data for EMPs have been described from actinopterygians. Here we show that Psarolepis romeri, a bony fish from the the Early Devonian period, combines enamel-covered dermal odontodes on scales and skull bones with teeth of naked dentine, and that Lepisosteus oculatus (the spotted gar) has enam and ambn genes that are expressed in the skin, probably associated with ganoine formation. The genetic evidence strengthens the hypothesis that ganoine is homologous with enamel. The fossil evidence, further supported by the Silurian bony fish Andreolepis, which has enamel-covered scales but teeth and odontodes on its dermal bones made of naked dentine, indicates that this tissue originated on the dermal skeleton, probably on the scales. It subsequently underwent heterotopic expansion across two highly conserved patterning boundaries (scales/head-shoulder and dermal/oral) within the odontode skeleton. PMID:26416752

  13. Optical coherence tomography use in the diagnosis of enamel defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Azri, Khalifa; Melita, Lucia N.; Strange, Adam P.; Festy, Frederic; Al-Jawad, Maisoon; Cook, Richard; Parekh, Susan; Bozec, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) affects the permanent incisors and molars, whose undermineralized matrix is evidenced by lesions ranging from white to yellow/brown opacities to crumbling enamel lesions incapable of withstanding normal occlusal forces and function. Diagnosing the condition involves clinical and radiographic examination of these teeth, with known limitations in determining the depth extent of the enamel defects in particular. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging hard and soft tissue imaging technique, which was investigated as a new potential diagnostic method in dentistry. A comparison between the diagnostic potential of the conventional methods and OCT was conducted. Compared to conventional imaging methods, OCT gave more information on the structure of the enamel defects as well as the depth extent of the defects into the enamel structure. Different types of enamel defects were compared, each type presenting a unique identifiable pattern when imaged using OCT. Additionally, advanced methods of OCT image analysis including backscattered light intensity profile analysis and enface reconstruction were performed. Both methods confirmed the potential of OCT in enamel defects diagnosis. In conclusion, OCT imaging enabled the identification of the type of enamel defect and the determination of the extent of the enamel defects in MIH with the advantage of being a radiation free diagnostic technique.

  14. Alterations in enamel remineralization in vitro induced by blue light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, I. T.; Zezell, D. M.; Mendes, F. M.; Wetter, N. U.

    2010-06-01

    Blue light, especially from LED devices, is a very frequently used tool in dental procedures. However, the investigations of its effects on dental enamel are focused primarily on enamel demineralization and fluoride retention. Despite the fact that this spectral region can inhibit enamel demineralization, the effects of the irradiation on demineralized enamel are not known. For this reason, we evaluated the effects of blue LED on remineralization of dental enamel. Artificial lesions were formed in bovine dental enamel blocks by immersing the samples in undersaturated acetate buffer. The lesions were irradiated with blue LED (455 nm, 1.38 W/cm2, 13.75 J/cm2, and 10 s) and remineralization was induced by pH-cycling process. Cross-sectional hardness was used to asses mineral changes after remineralization. Non-irradiated enamel lesions presented higher mineral content than irradiated ones. Furthermore, the mineral content of irradiated group was not significantly different from the lesion samples that were not submitted to the remineralization process. Results obtained in the present study show that the blue light is not innocuous for the dental enamel and inhibition of its remineralization can occur.

  15. Structural and functional characterization of enamel pigmentation in shrews.

    PubMed

    Dumont, M; Tütken, T; Kostka, A; Duarte, M J; Borodin, S

    2014-04-01

    Pigmented tooth enamel occurs in several vertebrate clades, ranging from mammals to fish. Although an iron compound is associated with this orange to red colored pigmentation, its chemical and structural organization within the enamel is unknown. To determine the nature of the iron compound, we investigated heavily pigmented teeth of the northern short-tailed shrew Blarina brevicauda using combined characterization techniques such as scanning and transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. We found that the pigmentation of the enamel with an iron content of around 8wt% results from a close to amorphous magnetite phase deposited around the nm-sized enamel crystals. Furthermore, the influence of the pigmentation on the enamel hardness was determined by nanoindentation measurements. Finally, the biomechanical function and biological context are discussed in light of the obtained results. PMID:24556576

  16. Uptake and retention of aluminum by dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Kleber, C J; Putt, M S

    1985-12-01

    The uptake, depth of penetration, and retention of aluminum (Al) in sound and acid-etched dental enamel were determined following in vitro applications of solutions containing 0.005 M or 0.037 M Al. Compared with controls, significant amounts of Al uptake (approximately 2000 to 6000 ppm) were detected in both sound and etched enamel, with significantly more Al deposited in the latter. Analysis of successive layers of treated enamel demonstrated that Al was located predominantly within the first 20 microns of surface enamel. Only slight reductions in Al retention occurred following one week of water-soaking or one minute of brushing with water or dentifrice, indicating that Al was firmly bound by enamel. PMID:3865947

  17. Insights from stable light isotopes on enamel defects and weaning in Pliocene herbivores.

    PubMed

    Franz-Odendaal, Tamara A; Lee-Thorp, Julia A; Chinsamy, Anusuya

    2003-12-01

    A high prevalence of enamel hypoplasia in several herbivores from the early Pliocene Langebaanweg locality, South Africa, indicates general systemic stress during the growing years of life. The presence of several linear enamel hypoplasias per tooth crown in many teeth further suggest that these stress events may be episodic. The delta18O values along tooth crowns of mandibular second molars of Sivatherium hendeyi (Artiodactyla, Giraffidae) were used to investigate the cause of the stress events in this tooth type. Results show that weaning in this fossil giraffid occurred at a similar ontogenetic age to that in extant giraffes, and that the observed enamel hypoplasia towards the base of this tooth type manifested post-weaning. Further, high-resolution oxygen isotope analyses across S. hendeyi third molars suggest that the entire development of defective tooth crowns occurred under conditions of increased aridity in which the cool, rainy part of the seasonal cycle was missing. The high prevalence of this defect in many herbivores suggests that climatic conditions were not favourable. This study reiterates the value of stable isotope analyses in determining both the behaviour of fossil animals and the environmental conditions that prevailed during tooth development. PMID:14660876

  18. Comparative analysis of optical coherence tomography signal and microhardness for demineralization evaluation of human tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cara, Ana Claudia Ballet; Zezell, Denise Maria; Ana, Patricia A.; Deana, Alessandro Melo; Amaral, Marcello Magri; Dias Vieira, Nilson, Jr.; de Freitas, Anderson Zanardi

    2012-06-01

    The diagnosis of dental caries at an early stage enables the implementation of conservative treatments based on dental preservation. Several diagnostic methods have been developed, like visual-tactile and radiographic are the most commons but are limited for this application. The Optical Coherence Tomography is a technique that provides information of optical properties of enamel, which may change due to the decay process. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of OCT to detect different stages of demineralization of tooth enamel during the development of artificial caries lesions, taking as a reference standard for comparison sectional microhardness testing. Different stages of caries lesions were simulated using the pH cycling model suggested Feathestone and modified by Argenta. The samples were exposed to 0 (control group), 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 days at a daily regimen of three hours demineralization followed by remineralization during 20 hours. It was used an OCT system with at 930nm. Sectional images were generated in all lesion region. The results obtained from the OCT technique presented similar behavior to microhardness, except for the group 25 days, due to inability to perform indentations reading in areas of more intense demineralization. A linear relationship was observed between the OCT and microhardness techniques for detection of demineralization in enamel. This relationship will allow the use of OCT technique in quantitative assessment of mineral loss and for the evaluation of incipient caries lesions.

  19. OSL and thermally assisted OSL response in dental enamel for its possible application in retrospective dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Soni, Anuj; Mishra, D R; Polymeris, G S; Bhatt, B C; Kulkarni, M S

    2014-11-01

    Dental enamel was studied for its thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) defects. The TL studies showed a wide glow curve with multiple peaks. The thermally assisted OSL (TA-OSL) studies showed that the integrated TA-OSL and thus OSL signal increases with readout temperature between 100 and 250 °C, due to the temperature dependence of OSL. The thermally assisted energy E A associated with this increase is found to be 0.21 ± 0.015 eV. On the other hand, the signal intensity decreases with temperature between 260 and 450 °C. This decrease could be due to depletion of OSL active traps or possible thermal quenching. The increase of the OSL signal at increased temperature can be used to enhance the sensitivity of dental enamel for ex vivo measurements in retrospective dosimetry. The emission and excitation spectra of its luminescence centers were studied by photoluminescence and were found to be at 412 and 324 nm, respectively. It was found to possess multiple OSL active traps having closely lying photoionization cross sections characterized by continuous wave OSL and nonlinear OSL methods. The investigated dental enamel samples showed a linear OSL dose response up to 500 Gy. The dose threshold was found to be 100 mGy using a highly sensitive compact OSL reader with blue LED (470 nm) stimulation. PMID:24929347

  20. Near-IR polarization imaging of sound and carious dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Cynthia L.; Jiao, Jane J.; Lee, Chulsung; Kang, Hobin; Fried, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    A thorough understanding of how polarized near-IR light propagates through sound and carious dental hard tissues is important for the development of dental optical imaging systems. New optical imaging tools for the detection and assessment of dental caries (dental decay) such as near-IR imaging and optical coherence tomography can exploit the enhanced contrast provided by polarization sensitivity. In this investigation, an automated system was developed to collect images for the full 16-element Mueller Matrix. The polarized light was controlled by linear polarizers and liquid crystal retarders and the 36 images were acquired as the polarized near-IR light propagates through the enamel of extracted human thin tooth sections. In previous work, we reported that polarized light is rapidly depolarized by demineralized enamel, and sound and demineralized dentin.1 The rapid depolarization of polarized light by dental caries in the near-IR provides high contrast for caries imaging and detection. In this initial study, major differences in the Mueller matrix elements were observed in both sound and demineralized enamel which supports this approach and warrants further investigation.

  1. Porcelain enamel passive thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leggett, H.; King, H. M.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the development and evaluation of a highly adherent, low solar absorptance, porcelain enamel thermal control coating applied to 6061 and 1100 aluminum for space vehicle use. The coating consists of a low index of refraction, transparent host frit and a high volume fraction of titania as rutile, crystallized in-situ, as the scattering medium. Solar absorptance is 0.21 at a coating thickness of 0.013 cm. Hemispherical emittance is 0.88. The change in solar absorptance is 0.03, as measured in-situ, after an exposure of 1000 equivalent sun hours in vacuum.

  2. Keratins as components of the enamel organic matrix.

    PubMed

    Duverger, Olivier; Beniash, Elia; Morasso, Maria I

    2016-01-01

    Dental enamel is the hardest tissue in the human body, and although it starts as a tissue rich in proteins, by the time of eruption of the tooth in the oral cavity only a small fraction of the protein remains. While this organic matrix of enamel represents less than 1% by weight it plays essential roles in improving both toughness and resilience to chemical attacks. Despite the fact that the first studies of the enamel matrix began in the 19th century, its exact composition and mechanisms of its function remain poorly understood. It was proposed that keratin or a keratin-like primitive epithelial component exists in mature enamel, however due to the extreme insolubility of its organic matrix the presence of keratins there was never clearly established. We have recently identified expression of a number of hair keratins in ameloblasts, the enamel secreting cells, and demonstrated their incorporation into mature enamel. Mutation in epithelial hair keratin KRT75 leads to a skin condition called pseudofollicularis barbae. Carriers of this mutation have an altered enamel structure and mechanical properties. Importantly, these individuals have a much higher prevalence of caries. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing a direct link between a mutation in a protein-coding region of a gene and increased caries rates. In this paper we present an overview of the evidence of keratin-like material in enamel that has accumulated over the last 150years. Furthermore, we propose potential mechanisms of action of KTR75 in enamel and highlight the clinical implications of the link between mutations in KRT75 and caries. Finally, we discuss the potential use of keratins for enamel repair. PMID:26709044

  3. Variation in enamel thickness within the genus Homo.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tanya M; Olejniczak, Anthony J; Zermeno, John P; Tafforeau, Paul; Skinner, Matthew M; Hoffmann, Almut; Radovčić, Jakov; Toussaint, Michel; Kruszynski, Robert; Menter, Colin; Moggi-Cecchi, Jacopo; Glasmacher, Ulrich A; Kullmer, Ottmar; Schrenk, Friedemann; Stringer, Chris; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2012-03-01

    Recent humans and their fossil relatives are classified as having thick molar enamel, one of very few dental traits that distinguish hominins from living African apes. However, little is known about enamel thickness in the earliest members of the genus Homo, and recent studies of later Homo report considerable intra- and inter-specific variation. In order to assess taxonomic, geographic, and temporal trends in enamel thickness, we applied micro-computed tomographic imaging to 150 fossil Homo teeth spanning two million years. Early Homo postcanine teeth from Africa and Asia show highly variable average and relative enamel thickness (AET and RET) values. Three molars from South Africa exceed Homo AET and RET ranges, resembling the hyper thick Paranthropus condition. Most later Homo groups (archaic European and north African Homo, and fossil and recent Homo sapiens) possess absolutely and relatively thick enamel across the entire dentition. In contrast, Neanderthals show relatively thin enamel in their incisors, canines, premolars, and molars, although incisor AET values are similar to H. sapiens. Comparisons of recent and fossil H. sapiens reveal that dental size reduction has led to a disproportionate decrease in coronal dentine compared with enamel (although both are reduced), leading to relatively thicker enamel in recent humans. General characterizations of hominins as having 'thick enamel' thus oversimplify a surprisingly variable craniodental trait with limited taxonomic utility within a genus. Moreover, estimates of dental attrition rates employed in paleodemographic reconstruction may be biased when this variation is not considered. Additional research is necessary to reconstruct hominin dietary ecology since thick enamel is not a prerequisite for hard-object feeding, and it is present in most later Homo species despite advances in technology and food processing. PMID:22361504

  4. Molar enamel thickness and dentine horn height in Gigantopithecus blacki.

    PubMed

    Olejniczak, A J; Smith, T M; Wang, W; Potts, R; Ciochon, R; Kullmer, O; Schrenk, F; Hublin, J-J

    2008-01-01

    Absolutely thick molar enamel is consistent with large body size estimates and dietary inferences about Gigantopithecus blacki, which focus on tough or fibrous vegetation. In this study, 10 G. blacki molars demonstrating various stages of attrition were imaged using high-resolution microtomography. Three-dimensional average enamel thickness and relative enamel thickness measurements were recorded on the least worn molars within the sample (n = 2). Seven molars were also virtually sectioned through the mesial cusps and two-dimensional enamel thickness and dentine horn height measurements were recorded. Gigantopithecus has the thickest enamel of any fossil or extant primate in terms of absolute thickness. Relative (size-scaled) measures of enamel thickness, however, support a thick characterization (i.e., not "hyper-thick"); G. blacki relative enamel thickness overlaps slightly with Pongo and completely with Homo. Gigantopithecus blacki dentine horns are relatively short, similar to (but shorter than) those of Pongo, which in turn are shorter than those of humans and African apes. Gigantopithecus blacki molar enamel (and to a lesser extent, that of Pongo pygmaeus) is distributed relatively evenly across the occlusal surface compared with the more complex distribution of enamel thickness in Homo sapiens. The combination of evenly distributed occlusal enamel and relatively short dentine horns in G. blacki results in a flat and low-cusped occlusal surface suitable to grinding tough or fibrous food objects. This suite of molar morphologies is also found to varying degrees in Pongo and Sivapithecus, but not in African apes and humans, and may be diagnostic of subfamily Ponginae. PMID:17941103

  5. Effectiveness of Combination of Dentin and Enamel Layers on the Masking Ability of Porcelain.

    PubMed

    Boscato, Noéli; Hauschild, Fernando Gabriel; Kaizer, Marina da Rosa; De Moraes, Rafael Ratto

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the masking ability of different porcelain thicknesses and combination of enamel and/or dentin porcelain layers over simulated background dental substrates with higher (A2) and lower (C4) color values. Combination of the enamel (E) and dentin (D) monolayer porcelain disks with different thicknesses (0.5 mm, 0.8 mm, and 1 mm) resulted in the following bilayer groups (n=10): D1E1, D1E0.8; D1E0.5; D0.8E0.8; D0.8E0.5, and D0.5E0.5. CIELAB color coordinates were measured with a spectrophotometer. The translucency parameter of mono and bilayer specimens and the masking ability estimated by color variation (ΔE*ab) of bilayer specimens over simulated dental substrates were evaluated. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate the relationships translucency parameter × ΔE*, translucency parameter × porcelain thickness, and ΔE* × porcelain thickness. Data were analyzed statistically (α= 0.05). Thinner porcelain disks were associated with higher translucency. Porcelain monolayers were considerably more translucent than bilayers (enamel + dentin). Dentin porcelain was less translucent than enamel porcelain with same thickness. ΔE* was always lower when measured over A2 background. Higher ΔE* was observed for the C4 background, indicating poorer masking ability. Increased ΔE* was significantly associated with increased translucency for both backgrounds. Decreased translucency and ΔE* were associated with increased total porcelain thickness or increased dentin thickness for both backgrounds. In conclusion, increased porcelain thickness (particularly increased dentin layer) and increased porcelain opacity resulted in better masking ability of the dental backgrounds. PMID:26963212

  6. Sea otter dental enamel is highly resistant to chipping due to its microstructure

    PubMed Central

    Ziscovici, Charles; Lucas, Peter W.; Constantino, Paul J.; Bromage, Timothy G.; van Casteren, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Dental enamel is prone to damage by chipping with large hard objects at forces that depend on chip size and enamel toughness. Experiments on modern human teeth have suggested that some ante-mortem chips on fossil hominin enamel were produced by bite forces near physiological maxima. Here, we show that equivalent chips in sea otter enamel require even higher forces than human enamel. Increased fracture resistance correlates with more intense enamel prism decussation, often seen also in some fossil hominins. It is possible therefore that enamel chips in such hominins may have formed at even greater forces than currently envisaged. PMID:25319817

  7. Sea otter dental enamel is highly resistant to chipping due to its microstructure.

    PubMed

    Ziscovici, Charles; Lucas, Peter W; Constantino, Paul J; Bromage, Timothy G; van Casteren, Adam

    2014-10-01

    Dental enamel is prone to damage by chipping with large hard objects at forces that depend on chip size and enamel toughness. Experiments on modern human teeth have suggested that some ante-mortem chips on fossil hominin enamel were produced by bite forces near physiological maxima. Here, we show that equivalent chips in sea otter enamel require even higher forces than human enamel. Increased fracture resistance correlates with more intense enamel prism decussation, often seen also in some fossil hominins. It is possible therefore that enamel chips in such hominins may have formed at even greater forces than currently envisaged. PMID:25319817

  8. Microhardness and Roughness of Enamel Bleached with 10% Carbamide Peroxide and Brushed with Different Toothpastes: An In Situ Study

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Carolina França de Medeiros; Manfroi, Fernanda Borguetti; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background: This in situ study evaluated the roughness and microhardness of enamel bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide (PC10) and brushed with different toothpastes. Materials and Methods: Two groups of volunteers received PC10 and placebo agents for 21 days in two phases in a crossover 2 × 3 study. Fragments of human enamel were distributed among intraoral removable appliances (IRA). Nine fragments, divided into three triplets, were used in each IRA, and these were brushed with toothpastes R (Colgate), W (Colgate Total 12 Whiteness Gel) or BS (Colgate Whitening Oxygen Bubbles Fluoride). Treatments agents were applied for 8 h overnight. After brushing, the volunteers used the IRA for about 16 h/day. After a washout period, new IRAs were distributed and the volunteers were crossed over to the alternate agent for 21 days. Roughness and microhardness were measured before and after each phase. Results: According to the paired Student’s t-test, roughness of enamel increased and microhardness decreased (P < 0.05). According to analysis of variance generalized linear models, only the toothpaste factor was significant (P = 0.037) for roughness. Conclusion: Enamel microhardness and surface roughness are altered when PC10 bleaching is associated with tooth brushing using toothpastes BS, R, and W. PMID:25214727

  9. Toothpaste Prevents Debonded Brackets on Erosive Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Érico Luiz Damasceno; Pinto, Shelon Cristina Souza; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Ellwood, Roger Phillip; Pretty, Ian; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of high fluoride dentifrice on the bond strength of brackets after erosive challenge. Eighty-four enamel specimens were divided into seven groups (n = 12): WN (distilled water/no acid challenge), W3C (distilled water/3 cycles of acid challenge), and W6C (distilled water/6 cycles of acid challenge) were not submitted to dentifrice treatment. Groups RF3C (regular fluoride dentifrice/3 cycles of acid challenge) and RF6C (regular fluoride dentifrice/6 cycles of acid challenge) were treated with dentifrices containing 1450 μg F−/g and HF3C (high fluoride dentifrice/3 cycles of acid challenge) and HF6C (high fluoride dentifrice/6 cycles of acid challenge) were with 5000 μg F−/g. Acid challenges were performed for seven days. After bond strength test, there was no significant difference among groups submitted to 3 cycles of acid challenge (P > 0.05). Statistically significant difference was found between the regular and high fluoride dentifrices after 6 cycles of acid challenge (<0.05). Similar areas of adhesive remaining were found among control groups and among groups W6C, RF3C, RF6C, HF3C, and HF6C. The high fluoride dentifrice was able to prevent the reduction of bond strength values of brackets submitted to acid challenge. Clinical relevance: the high fluoride toothpaste prevents debonded brackets on erosive enamel. PMID:25879058

  10. Mechanics of microwear traces in tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Borrero-Lopez, Oscar; Pajares, Antonia; Constantino, Paul J; Lawn, Brian R

    2015-03-01

    It is hypothesized that microwear traces in natural tooth enamel can be simulated and quantified using microindentation mechanics. Microcontacts associated with particulates in the oral wear medium are modeled as sharp indenters with fixed semi-apical angle. Distinction is made between markings from static contacts (pits) and translational contacts (scratches). Relations for the forces required to produce contacts of given dimensions are derived, with particle angularity and compliance specifically taken into account so as to distinguish between different abrasives in food sources. Images of patterns made on human enamel with sharp indenters in axial and sliding loading are correlated with theoretical predictions. Special attention is given to threshold conditions for transition from a microplasticity to a microcracking mode, corresponding to mild and severe wear domains. It is demonstrated that the typical microwear trace is generated at loads on the order of 1N - i.e. much less than the forces exerted in normal biting - attesting to the susceptibility of teeth to wear in everyday mastication, especially in diets with sharp, hard and large inclusive intrinsic or extraneous particulates. PMID:25484336

  11. Evolution of Klk4 and enamel maturation in eutherians.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Kazuhiko; Hu, Jan C-C; Simmer, James P

    2014-09-01

    Kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (KLK4) is a secreted serine protease that degrades residual enamel proteins to facilitate their removal by ameloblasts, which increases mineralization and hardens the enamel. Mutations in human KLK4 cause hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta. Enamel formed by Klk4 null mice is normal in thickness and prism structure, but the enamel layer retains proteins, is hypomineralized, and undergoes rapid attrition following tooth eruption. We searched multiple databases, retrieved Klk4 and Klk5 from various mammalian genomes, and identified Klk4 in 46 boreoeutherian genomes. In non-Boreoeutheria, Klk4 was detected in only one afrotherian genome (as a pseudogene), and not in the other six afrotherian, two xenarthran, or three marsupial genomes. In contrast, Klk5 was detected in both marsupial and eutherian mammals. Our phylogenetic and mutation rate analyses support the hypothesis that Klk4 arose from Klk5 by gene duplication near the divergence of Afrotheria, Xenarthra and Boreoeutheria, and that functionally-differentiated Klk4 survived only in Boreoeutheria. Afrotherian mammals share the feature of delayed dental eruption relative to boreoeutherian mammals. KLK4 shortens the time required for enamel maturation and could have alleviated negative selection following mutations that resulted in thicker enamel or earlier tooth eruption, without reducing enamel hardness or causing dental attrition. PMID:25153384

  12. Amyloid-like ribbons of amelogenins in enamel mineralization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carneiro, Karina M. M.; Zhai, Halei; Zhu, Li; Horst, Jeremy A.; Sitlin, Melody; Nguyen, Mychi; Wagner, Martin; Simpliciano, Cheryl; Milder, Melissa; Chen, Chun-Long; et al

    2016-03-24

    We report that enamel, the outermost layer of teeth, is an acellular mineralized tissue that cannot regenerate; the mature tissue is composed of high aspect ratio apatite nanocrystals organized into rods and inter-rod regions. Amelogenin constitutes 90% of the protein matrix in developing enamel and plays a central role in guiding the hierarchical organization of apatite crystals observed in mature enamel. To date, a convincing link between amelogenin supramolecular structures and mature enamel has yet to be described, in part because the protein matrix is degraded during tissue maturation. Here we show compelling evidence that amelogenin self-assembles into an amyloid-likemore » structure in vitro and in vivo. We show that enamel matrices stain positive for amyloids and we identify a specific region within amelogenin that self-assembles into β-sheets. Lastly, we propose that amelogenin nanoribbons template the growth of apatite mineral in human enamel. This is a paradigm shift from the current model of enamel development.« less

  13. Enamel microabrasion: An overview of clinical and scientific considerations.

    PubMed

    Pini, Núbia Inocencya Pavesi; Sundfeld-Neto, Daniel; Aguiar, Flavio Henrique Baggio; Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes; Lovadino, José Roberto; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite

    2015-01-16

    Superficial stains and irregularities of the enamel are generally what prompt patients to seek dental intervention to improve their smile. These stains or defects may be due to hypoplasia, amelogenesis imperfecta, mineralized white spots, or fluorosis, for which enamel microabrasion is primarily indicated. Enamel microabrasion involves the use of acidic and abrasive agents, such as with 37% phosphoric acid and pumice or 6% hydrochloric acid and silica, applied to the altered enamel surface with mechanical pressure from a rubber cup coupled to a rotatory mandrel of a low-rotation micromotor. If necessary, this treatment can be safely combined with bleaching for better esthetic results. Recent studies show that microabrasion is a conservative treatment when the enamel wear is minimal and clinically imperceptible. The most important factor contributing to the success of enamel microabrasion is the depth of the defect, as deeper, opaque stains, such as those resulting from hypoplasia, cannot be resolved with microabrasion, and require a restorative approach. Surface enamel alterations that result from microabrasion, such as roughness and microhardness, are easily restored by saliva. Clinical studies support the efficacy and longevity of this safe and minimally invasive treatment. The present article presents the clinical and scientific aspects concerning the microabrasion technique, and discusses the indications for and effects of the treatment, including recent works describing microscopic and clinical evaluations. PMID:25610848

  14. Enamel Defects Reflect Perinatal Exposure to Bisphenol A

    PubMed Central

    Jedeon, Katia; De la Dure-Molla, Muriel; Brookes, Steven J.; Loiodice, Sophia; Marciano, Clémence; Kirkham, Jennifer; Canivenc-Lavier, Marie-Chantal; Boudalia, Sofiane; Bergès, Raymond; Harada, Hidemitsu; Berdal, Ariane; Babajko, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), including bisphenol A (BPA), are environmental ubiquitous pollutants and associated with a growing health concern. Anecdotally, molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is increasing concurrently with EDC-related conditions, which has led us to investigate the effect of BPA on amelogenesis. Rats were exposed daily to BPA from conception until day 30 or 100. At day 30, BPA-affected enamel exhibited hypomineralization similar to human MIH. Scanning electron microscopy and elemental analysis revealed an abnormal accumulation of organic material in erupted enamel. BPA-affected enamel had an abnormal accumulation of exogenous albumin in the maturation stage. Quantitative real-timePCR, Western blotting, and luciferase reporter assays revealed increased expression of enamelin but decreased expression of kallikrein 4 (protease essential for removing enamel proteins) via transcriptional regulation. Data suggest that BPA exerts its effects on amelogenesis by disrupting normal protein removal from the enamel matrix. Interestingly, in 100-day-old rats, erupting incisor enamel was normal, suggesting amelogenesis is only sensitive to MIH-causing agents during a specific time window during development (as reported for human MIH). The present work documents the first experimental model that replicates MIH and presents BPA as a potential causative agent of MIH. Because human enamel defects are irreversible, MIH may provide an easily accessible marker for reporting early EDC exposure in humans. PMID:23764278

  15. Evolution of Klk4 and enamel maturation in eutherians

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Kazuhiko; Hu, Jan C.-C; Simmer, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (KLK4) is a secreted serine protease that degrades residual enamel proteins to facilitate their removal by ameloblasts, which increases mineralization and hardens the enamel. Mutations in human KLK4 cause hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta. Enamel formed by Klk4 null mice is normal in thickness and prism structure, but the enamel layer retains proteins, is hypomineralized, and undergoes rapid attrition following tooth eruption. We searched multiple databases, retrieved Klk4 and Klk5 from various mammalian genomes, and identified Klk4 in 47 boreoeutherian genomes. In non-Boreoeutheria, Klk4 was detected in only one afrotherian genome (as a pseudogene), and not in the other six afrotherian, two xenarthran, or three marsupial genomes. In contrast, Klk5 was detected in both marsupial and eutherian mammals. Our phylogenetic and mutation rate analyses support the hypothesis that Klk4 arose from Klk5 by gene duplication near the divergence of Afrotheria, Xenarthra and Boreoeutheria, and that functionally- differentiated Klk4 survived only in Boreoeutheria. Afrotherian mammals share the feature of delayed dental eruption relative to boreoeutherian mammals. KLK4 shortens the time required for enamel maturation and could have alleviated negative selection following mutations that resulted in thicker enamel or earlier tooth eruption, without reducing enamel hardness or causing dental attrition. PMID:25153384

  16. Enamel microabrasion: An overview of clinical and scientific considerations

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Núbia Inocencya Pavesi; Sundfeld-Neto, Daniel; Aguiar, Flavio Henrique Baggio; Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes; Lovadino, José Roberto; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite

    2015-01-01

    Superficial stains and irregularities of the enamel are generally what prompt patients to seek dental intervention to improve their smile. These stains or defects may be due to hypoplasia, amelogenesis imperfecta, mineralized white spots, or fluorosis, for which enamel microabrasion is primarily indicated. Enamel microabrasion involves the use of acidic and abrasive agents, such as with 37% phosphoric acid and pumice or 6% hydrochloric acid and silica, applied to the altered enamel surface with mechanical pressure from a rubber cup coupled to a rotatory mandrel of a low-rotation micromotor. If necessary, this treatment can be safely combined with bleaching for better esthetic results. Recent studies show that microabrasion is a conservative treatment when the enamel wear is minimal and clinically imperceptible. The most important factor contributing to the success of enamel microabrasion is the depth of the defect, as deeper, opaque stains, such as those resulting from hypoplasia, cannot be resolved with microabrasion, and require a restorative approach. Surface enamel alterations that result from microabrasion, such as roughness and microhardness, are easily restored by saliva. Clinical studies support the efficacy and longevity of this safe and minimally invasive treatment. The present article presents the clinical and scientific aspects concerning the microabrasion technique, and discusses the indications for and effects of the treatment, including recent works describing microscopic and clinical evaluations. PMID:25610848

  17. ON THE BRITTLENESS OF ENAMEL AND SELECTED DENTAL MATERIALS

    PubMed Central

    Park, S.; Quinn, J. B; Romberg, E.; Arola, D.

    2008-01-01

    Although brittle material behavior is often considered undesirable, a quantitative measure of “brittleness” is currently not used in assessing the clinical merits of dental materials. Objective To quantify and compare the brittleness of human enamel and common dental restorative materials used for crown replacement. Methods Specimens of human enamel were prepared from the 3rd molars of “young” (18≤age≤25) and “old” (50≤age) patients. The hardness, elastic modulus and apparent fracture toughness were characterized as a function of distance from the DEJ using indentation approaches. These properties were then used in estimating the brittleness according to a model that accounts for the competing dissipative processes of deformation and fracture. The brittleness of selected porcelain, ceramic and Micaceous Glass Ceramic (MGC) dental materials was estimated and compared with that of the enamel. Results The average brittleness of the young and old enamel increased with distance from the DEJ. For the old enamel the average brittleness increased from approximately 300 µm−1 at the DEJ to nearly 900 µm−1 at the occlusal surface. While there was no significant difference between the two age groups at the DEJ, the brittleness of the old enamel was significantly greater (and up to 4 times higher) than that of the young enamel near the occlusal surface. The brittleness numbers for the restorative materials were up to 90% lower than that of young occlusal enamel. Significance The brittleness index could serve as a useful scale in the design of materials used for crown replacement, as well as a quantitative tool for characterizing degradation in the mechanical behavior of enamel. PMID:18436299

  18. Effect of Kallikrein 4 Loss on Enamel Mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Charles E.; Richardson, Amelia S.; Hu, Yuanyuan; Bartlett, John D.; Hu, Jan C-C.; Simmer, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Enamel formation depends on a triad of tissue-specific matrix proteins (amelogenin, ameloblastin, and enamelin) to help initiate and stabilize progressively elongating, thin mineral ribbons of hydroxyapatite formed during an appositional growth phase. Subsequently, these proteins are eradicated to facilitate lateral expansion of the hydroxyapatite crystallites. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in enamel mineralization occurring in mice unable to produce kallikrein 4 (Klk4), a proteinase associated with terminal extracellular degradation of matrix proteins during the maturation stage. Mice lacking functional matrix metalloproteinase 20 (Mmp20), a proteinase associated with early cleavage of matrix proteins during the secretory stage, were also analyzed as a frame of reference. The results indicated that mice lacking Klk4 produce enamel that is normal in thickness and overall organization in terms of layers and rod/inter-rod structure, but there is a developmental defect in enamel rods where they first form near the dentinoenamel junction. Mineralization is normal up to early maturation after which the enamel both retains and gains additional proteins and is unable to mature beyond 85% mineral by weight. The outmost enamel is hard, but inner regions are soft and contain much more protein than normal. The rate of mineral acquisition overall is lower by 25%. Mice lacking functional Mmp20 produce enamel that is thin and structurally abnormal. Relatively high amounts of protein remain throughout maturation, but the enamel is able to change from 67 to 75% mineral by weight during maturation. These findings reaffirm the importance of secreted proteinases to enamel mineral acquisition. PMID:21454549

  19. ON THE R-CURVE BEHAVIOR OF HUMAN TOOTH ENAMEL

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Devendra; Arola, Dwayne

    2009-01-01

    In this study the crack growth resistance behavior and fracture toughness of human tooth enamel were quantified using incremental crack growth measures and conventional fracture mechanics. Results showed that enamel undergoes an increase in crack growth resistance (i.e. rising R-curve) with crack extension from the outer to the inner enamel, and that the rise in toughness is function of distance from the Dentin Enamel Junction (DEJ). The outer enamel exhibited the lowest apparent toughness (0.67 ± 0.12 MPa·m0.5), and the inner enamel exhibited a rise in the growth toughness from 1.13 MPa·m0.5/mm to 3.93 MPa·m0.5/mm. The maximum crack growth resistance at fracture (i.e. fracture toughness (Kc)) ranged from 1.79 to 2.37 MPa·m0.5. Crack growth in the inner enamel was accompanied by host of mechanisms operating from the micro- to the nano-scale. Decussation in the inner enamel promoted crack deflection and twist, resulting in a reduction of the local stress intensity at the crack tip. In addition, extrinsic mechanisms such as bridging by unbroken ligaments of the tissue and the organic matrix promoted crack closure. Microcracking due to loosening of prisms was also identified as an active source of energy dissipation. In summary, the unique microstructure of enamel in the decussated region promotes crack growth toughness that is approximately three times that of dentin and over ten times that of bone. PMID:19427691

  20. Development of Polyamide-imide / Silica Nanocomposite Enameled Wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Hideyuki; Hanawa, Hidehito; Honda, Yuki

    The nanocomposite material based on polyamide-imide was not able to prevent nano-particles from aggregating up to now, therefore the development of this material was extremely difficult. However we prevented aggregation of nano-particles by developing the hygroscopicity solvent and copolyamide-imide, and commercialized the new partial discharge resistant enameled wire with nanocomposite polyamide-imide insulating material in 2010. The lifetime of newly developed partial discharge resistant nanocomposite polyamide-imide enameled wire has 1000 or more times compared to general organic enameled wire. Moreover lifetime of new wire is also extremely excellent in the high temperature atmosphere.

  1. Insights from the inside: histological analysis of abnormal enamel microstructure associated with hypoplastic enamel defects in human teeth.

    PubMed

    Witzel, C; Kierdorf, U; Schultz, M; Kierdorf, H

    2008-08-01

    We studied the abnormalities in enamel microstructure associated with enamel hypoplasia in human teeth from the early medieval (5th-7th century AD) cemetery of Barbing, Germany, using light and scanning electron microscopy. The main aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that by analyzing the microstructure of fully formed enamel it is possible to reconstruct the reaction pattern of secretory ameloblasts to stress events leading to enamel hypoplasia. From the histological findings, a sequence of increasing impairment of secretory ameloblast function involving three thresholds was deduced. Surpassing of each of these thresholds is assumed to result in characteristic changes in enamel microstructure attributable to specific functional/morphological alterations of secretory ameloblasts. Based on our results we propose a model identifying the principal factors influencing the reaction of secretory ameloblasts to stress. The present study demonstrates that by including microscopic analysis in the study of enamel hypoplasia, it is possible to obtain a more complete picture of the formation of these developmental defects than is possible by inspection of crown surface features alone, and to draw more substantiated conclusions about the possible nature of developmental defects of enamel. PMID:18350581

  2. Enamel maturation: a brief background with implications for some enamel dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Colin

    2014-01-01

    The maturation stage of enamel development begins once the final tissue thickness has been laid down. Maturation includes an initial transitional pre-stage during which morphology and function of the enamel organ cells change. When this is complete, maturation proper begins. Fully functional maturation stage cells are concerned with final proteolytic degradation and removal of secretory matrix components which are replaced by tissue fluid. Crystals, initiated during the secretory stage, then grow replacing the tissue fluid. Crystals grow in both width and thickness until crystals abut each other occupying most of the tissue volume i.e. full maturation. If this is not complete at eruption, a further post eruptive maturation can occur via mineral ions from the saliva. During maturation calcium and phosphate enter the tissue to facilitate crystal growth. Whether transport is entirely active or not is unclear. Ion transport is also not unidirectional and phosphate, for example, can diffuse out again especially during transition and early maturation. Fluoride and magnesium, selectively taken up at this stage can also diffuse both in an out of the tissue. Crystal growth can be compromised by excessive fluoride and by ingress of other exogenous molecules such as albumin and tetracycline. This may be exacerbated by the relatively long duration of this stage, 10 days or so in a rat incisor and up to several years in human teeth rendering this stage particularly vulnerable to ingress of foreign materials, incompletely mature enamel being the result. PMID:25339913

  3. Enamel maturation: a brief background with implications for some enamel dysplasias

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Colin

    2014-01-01

    The maturation stage of enamel development begins once the final tissue thickness has been laid down. Maturation includes an initial transitional pre-stage during which morphology and function of the enamel organ cells change. When this is complete, maturation proper begins. Fully functional maturation stage cells are concerned with final proteolytic degradation and removal of secretory matrix components which are replaced by tissue fluid. Crystals, initiated during the secretory stage, then grow replacing the tissue fluid. Crystals grow in both width and thickness until crystals abut each other occupying most of the tissue volume i.e. full maturation. If this is not complete at eruption, a further post eruptive maturation can occur via mineral ions from the saliva. During maturation calcium and phosphate enter the tissue to facilitate crystal growth. Whether transport is entirely active or not is unclear. Ion transport is also not unidirectional and phosphate, for example, can diffuse out again especially during transition and early maturation. Fluoride and magnesium, selectively taken up at this stage can also diffuse both in an out of the tissue. Crystal growth can be compromised by excessive fluoride and by ingress of other exogenous molecules such as albumin and tetracycline. This may be exacerbated by the relatively long duration of this stage, 10 days or so in a rat incisor and up to several years in human teeth rendering this stage particularly vulnerable to ingress of foreign materials, incompletely mature enamel being the result. PMID:25339913

  4. Combined Tin-Containing Fluoride Solution and CO2 Laser Treatment Reduces Enamel Erosion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella; Witulski, Nadine; Hilgers, Ralf-Dieter; Apel, Christian; Meyer-Lueckel, Hendrik; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of combined CO2 laser and tin-containing fluoride treatment on the formation and progression of enamel erosive lesions. Ninety-six human enamel samples were obtained, stored in thymol solution and, after surface polishing, randomly divided into 6 different surface treatment groups (n = 16 in each group) as follows: no treatment, control (C); one CO2 laser irradiation (L1); two CO2 laser irradiations (L2); daily application of fluoride solution (F); combined daily fluoride solution + one CO2 laser irradiation (L1F), and combined daily fluoride solution + two CO2 laser irradiations (L2F). Laser irradiation was performed at 0.3 J/cm2 (5 µs/226 Hz/10.6 µm) on day 1 (L1) and day 6 (L2). The fluoride solution contained AmF/NaF (500 ppm F), and SnCl2 (800 ppm Sn) at pH 4.5. After surface treatment the samples were submitted to an erosive cycling over 10 days, including immersion in citric acid (2 min/0.05 M/pH = 2.3) 6 times daily and storage in remineralization solution (≥1 h) between erosive attacks. At the end of each cycling day, the enamel surface loss (micrometers) was measured using a 3D laser profilometer. Data were statistically analyzed by means of a 2-level mixed effects model and linear contrasts (α = 0.05). Group F (-3.3 ± 2.0 µm) showed significantly lower enamel surface loss than groups C (-27.22 ± 4.1 µm), L1 (-18.3 ± 4.4 µm) and L2 (-16.3 ± 5.3 µm) but higher than L1F (-1.0 ± 4.4 µm) and L2F (1.4 ± 3.2 µm, p < 0.05). Under the conditions of this in vitro study, the tin-containing fluoride solution caused 88% reduction of enamel surface loss, while its combination with CO2 laser irradiation at 0.3 J/cm2 hampered erosive loss almost completely. PMID:26418736

  5. Defective enamel ultrastructure in diabetic rodents.

    PubMed

    Atar, M; Atar-Zwillenberg, D R; Verry, P; Spornitz, U M

    2004-07-01

    We investigated six different types of diabetic rodents. Four expressed a genetic obesity resulting in diabetes. One developed diabetes induced by a diet-dependent obesity, and one with genetic diabetes received anti-diabetic medication. The tooth samples were examined under a scanning electron microscope and with an energy dispersive microanalysis (EDX). The electron micrographs showed severe, varying degrees of damage within the six different diabetic animal types, such as irregular crystallite deposition and prism perforations in genetically obese animals compared to less-disordered prism structures in diet-dependent obesity. Anti-diabetic medication resulted in normal enamel ultrastructure. The EDX analysis revealed a reduction in the amount of calcium and phosphorus in all regions affected by diabetes. Based on these animal studies, we suggest that both juvenile diabetes type I (in infants) and adult diabetes type II (in pregnant mothers, affecting the developing foetus) may affect the normal development of teeth in humans. PMID:15242388

  6. Higher temperature coal tar enamel fights corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.R.; Henegar, S.; Roder, B.

    1996-10-01

    High temperatures create new challenges for pipeline coatings. Cracking, adhesion breakdown and electrochemical corrosion are accelerated by higher service temperatures. A new epoxy primer/coal tar pipeline coating system utilizes the latent heat of the coal tar application to fully cure the newly developed primer to achieve outstanding bonding integrity and high temperature cathodic disbondment resistance. A key reason for this overall high performance is the marriage of a newly developed epoxy primer that provides outstanding adhesion with coal tar enamel, which provides excellent long-term water resistance. The paper describes experimental studies, pilot plant application, cathodic disbondment testing, and results from hot water soak tests and the low temperature cracking test.

  7. Biological synthesis of tooth enamel instructed by an artificial matrix

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Z.; Newcomb, C.J.; Bringas, P.; Stupp, S.I.; Snead, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    The regenerative capability of enamel, the hardest tissue in the vertebrate body, is fundamentally limited due to cell apoptosis following maturation of the tissue. Synthetic strategies to promote enamel formation have the potential to repair damage, increase the longevity of teeth and improve the understanding of the events leading to tissue formation. Using a self-assembling bioactive matrix, we demonstrate the ability to induce ectopic formation of enamel at chosen sites adjacent to a mouse incisor cultured in vivo under the kidney capsule. The resulting material reveals the highly organized, hierarchical structure of hydroxyapatite crystallites similar to native enamel. This artificially triggered formation of organized mineral demonstrates a pathway for developing cell fabricated materials for treatment of dental caries, the most ubiquitous disease in man. Additionally, the artificial matrix provides a unique tool to probe cellular mechanisms involved in tissue formation further enabling the development of tooth organ replacements. PMID:20869764

  8. Enamel structure in some therapsids and mesozoic mammals.

    PubMed

    Osborn, J W; Hillman, J

    1979-11-01

    The distribution of enamel tubules, the shapes and arrangements of prisms, and the orientation of crystals in ground sections from several therapsids and mesozoic mammals have been investigated by conventional and polarizing microscopy. Along each of three separate phylogenetic lines which evolved occluding teeth, there was a progressive increase in the numbers of enamel tubules. In the investigation, the arcade-shaped prisms typical of recent mammals were first seen in material from the Cretaceous period. All the enamels investigated from the Triassic contained columns of crystals, which were deduced as hexagonal. The inner ends of the crystals within each column deviated towards the center of the column. It is concluded that the existence of an interprismatic region provides the most important distinction between prismatic enamels and the hexagonal columns of crystals in the Triassic material. PMID:116744

  9. [Enamel: a unique self-assembling in mineral world].

    PubMed

    Lignon, Guilhem; de la Dure-Molla, Muriel; Dessombz, Arnaud; Berdal, Ariane; Babajko, Sylvie

    2015-05-01

    Enamel is a unique tissue in vertebrates, acellular, formed on a labile scaffolding matrix and hypermineralized. The ameloblasts are epithelial cells in charge of amelogenesis. They secrete a number of matrix proteins degraded by enzymes during enamel mineralization. This ordered cellular and extracellular events imply that any genetic or environmental perturbation will produce indelible and recognizable defects. The specificity of defects will indicate the affected cellular process. Thus, depending on the specificity of alterations, the teratogenic event can be retrospectively established. Advances in the field allow to use enamel defects as diagnostic tools for molecular disorders. The multifunctionality of enamel peptides is presently identified from their chemical roles in mineralization to cell signaling, constituting a source of concrete innovations in regenerative medicine. PMID:26059302

  10. Amorphous intergranular phases control the properties of rodent tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Lyle M.; Cohen, Michael J.; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Pasteris, Jill D.; Seda, Takele; Joester, Derk

    2015-02-01

    Dental enamel, a hierarchical material composed primarily of hydroxylapatite nanowires, is susceptible to degradation by plaque biofilm-derived acids. The solubility of enamel strongly depends on the presence of Mg2+, F-, and CO32-. However, determining the distribution of these minor ions is challenging. We show—using atom probe tomography, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and correlative techniques—that in unpigmented rodent enamel, Mg2+ is predominantly present at grain boundaries as an intergranular phase of Mg-substituted amorphous calcium phosphate (Mg-ACP). In the pigmented enamel, a mixture of ferrihydrite and amorphous iron-calcium phosphate replaces the more soluble Mg-ACP, rendering it both harder and more resistant to acid attack. These results demonstrate the presence of enduring amorphous phases with a dramatic influence on the physical and chemical properties of the mature mineralized tissue.

  11. Do pediatric medicines induce topographic changes in dental enamel?

    PubMed

    Alexandria, Adílis Kalina; Meckelburg, Nicolli de Araujo; Puetter, Ursula Tavares; Salles, Jordan Trugilho; Souza, Ivete Pomarico Ribeiro; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of common pediatric liquid medicines on surface roughness and tooth structure loss and to evaluate the pH values of these medicines at room and cold temperatures in vitro. Eighty-four bovine enamel blocks were divided into seven groups (n = 12): G1-Alivium®, G2-Novalgina®, G3-Betamox®, G4-Clavulin®, G5-Claritin®, G6-Polaramine® and G7-Milli-Q water (negative control). The pH was determined and the samples were immersed in each treatment 3x/day for 5 min. 3D non-contact profilometry was used to determine surface roughness (linear Ra, volumetric Sa) and the Gap formed between treated and control areas in each block. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) were also performed. The majority of liquid medicines had pH ≤ 5.50. G1, G4, and G5 showed alterations in Ra when compared with G7 (p < 0.05). According to Sa and Gap results, only G5 was different from G7 (p < 0.05). Alteration in surface was more evident in G5 SEM images. EDS revealed high concentrations of carbon, oxygen, phosphorus, and calcium in all tested groups. Despite the low pH values of all evaluated medicines, only Alivium®, Clavulin®, and Claritin® increased linear surface roughness, and only Claritin® demonstrated the in vitro capacity to produce significant tooth structure loss. PMID:26676189

  12. Functions of KLK4 and MMP-20 in dental enamel formation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuhe; Papagerakis, Petros; Yamakoshi, Yasuo; Hu, Jan C-C.; Bartlett, John D.; Simmer, James P.

    2009-01-01

    Two proteases are secreted into the enamel matrix of developing teeth. The early protease is enamelysin (MMP-20). The late protease is kallikrein 4 (KLK4). Mutations in MMP20 and KLK4 both cause autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta, a condition featuring soft, porous enamel containing residual protein. MMP-20 is secreted along with enamel proteins by secretory stage ameloblasts. Enamel protein cleavage products accumulate in the space between the crystal ribbons, helping to support them. MMP-20 steadily cleaves accumulated enamel proteins, so their concentration decreases with depth. Kallikrein 4 is secreted by transition and maturation stage ameloblasts. KLK4 aggressively degrades the retained organic matrix following the termination of enamel protein secretion. The principle functions of MMP-20 and KLK4 in dental enamel formation are to facilitate the orderly replacement of organic matrix with mineral, generating an enamel layer that is harder, less porous, and unstained by retained enamel proteins. PMID:18627287

  13. The enamel protein amelotin is a promoter of hydroxyapatite mineralization.

    PubMed

    Abbarin, Nastaran; San Miguel, Symone; Holcroft, James; Iwasaki, Kengo; Ganss, Bernhard

    2015-05-01

    Amelotin (AMTN) is a recently discovered protein that is specifically expressed during the maturation stage of dental enamel formation. It is localized at the interface between the enamel surface and the apical surface of ameloblasts. AMTN knock-out mice have hypomineralized enamel, whereas transgenic mice overexpressing AMTN have a compact but disorganized enamel hydroxyapatite (HA) microstructure, indicating a possible involvement of AMTN in regulating HA mineralization directly. In this study, we demonstrated that recombinant human (rh) AMTN dissolved in a metastable buffer system, based on light scattering measurements, promotes HA precipitation. The mineral precipitates were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. Colloidal gold immunolabeling of AMTN in the mineral deposits showed that protein molecules were associated with HA crystals. The binding affinity of rh-AMTN to HA was found to be comparable to that of amelogenin, the major protein of the forming enamel matrix. Overexpression of AMTN in mouse calvaria cells also increased the formation of calcium deposits in the culture medium. Overexpression of AMTN during the secretory stage of enamel formation in vivo resulted in rapid and uncontrolled enamel mineralization. Site-specific mutagenesis of the potential serine phosphorylation motif SSEEL reduced the in vitro mineral precipitation to less than 25%, revealing that this motif is important for the HA mineralizing function of the protein. A synthetic short peptide containing the SSEEL motif was only able to facilitate mineralization in its phosphorylated form ((P)S(P) SEEL), indicating that this motif is necessary but not sufficient for the mineralizing properties of AMTN. These findings demonstrate that AMTN has a direct influence on biomineralization by promoting HA mineralization and suggest a critical role for AMTN in the formation of the compact aprismatic enamel surface layer during the maturation

  14. Analysis of enamel development using murine model systems: approaches and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Pugach, Megan K.; Gibson, Carolyn W.

    2014-01-01

    A primary goal of enamel research is to understand and potentially treat or prevent enamel defects related to amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Rodents are ideal models to assist our understanding of how enamel is formed because they are easily genetically modified, and their continuously erupting incisors display all stages of enamel development and mineralization. While numerous methods have been developed to generate and analyze genetically modified rodent enamel, it is crucial to understand the limitations and challenges associated with these methods in order to draw appropriate conclusions that can be applied translationally, to AI patient care. We have highlighted methods involved in generating and analyzing rodent enamel and potential approaches to overcoming limitations of these methods: (1) generating transgenic, knockout, and knockin mouse models, and (2) analyzing rodent enamel mineral density and functional properties (structure and mechanics) of mature enamel. There is a need for a standardized workflow to analyze enamel phenotypes in rodent models so that investigators can compare data from different studies. These methods include analyses of gene and protein expression, developing enamel histology, enamel pigment, degree of mineralization, enamel structure, and mechanical properties. Standardization of these methods with regard to stage of enamel development and sample preparation is crucial, and ideally investigators can use correlative and complementary techniques with the understanding that developing mouse enamel is dynamic and complex. PMID:25278900

  15. Recovery and identification of mature enamel proteins in ancient teeth.

    PubMed

    Porto, Isabel M; Laure, Helen J; Tykot, Robert H; de Sousa, Frederico B; Rosa, Jose C; Gerlach, Raquel F

    2011-12-01

    Proteins in mineralized tissues provide a window to the past, and dental enamel is peculiar in being highly resistant to diagenesis and providing information on a very narrow window of time, such as the developing period; however, to date, complete proteins have not been extracted successfully from ancient teeth. In this work we tested the ability of a whole-crown micro-etch technique to obtain enamel protein samples from mature enamel of recently extracted (n = 2) and ancient (n = 2; ad 800 to 1100) third molars. Samples were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) mass spectrometry, and the resulting spectra were searched against the Swiss-Prot protein database using the Mascot software for protein identification. In our protocol, the separation of proteins in gel is not necessary. Successful identification of specific enamel proteins was obtained after whole-crown superficial enamel etching with 10% HCl. Most protein fragments recovered from dry teeth and mummy teeth contained amino-terminal amelogenin peptides. Only one peptide specific for the amelogenin X-isoform was identified. In conclusion, the reported techniques allowed the successful recovery of proteins specific to dental enamel from samples obtained in a very conservative manner, which may also be important in forensic and/or archeological science. PMID:22243232

  16. Correlated physiochemical and age changes in embryonic bovine enamel.

    PubMed

    Landis, W J; Navarro, M

    1983-01-01

    Whole enamel scrapings from unerupted teeth of embryonic calves have been separated into fractions of varying density by stepwise centrifugation in bromoform-toluene mixtures of increasing specific gravity. Partition of enamel in this manner yields individual fractions of increasing mineral phase age and maturation. Whole scrapings and isolated fractions of the fetal bovine enamel were examined by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic absorption and infrared spectroscopy to determine time-related changes in the physiochemical nature of the constituent mineral phase particles. These analyses showed poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite (HA) as the only detectable solid phase of calcium phosphate present in all fractions, its degree of crystallinity increasing with increasing density. Molar Ca/P ratios and magnesium content were highest in lowest density fractions. Carbonate vibration bands at 875 and 1420-1450 cm-1, common to mineralized tissue, were observed in intermediate and higher density fractions and in whole unfractionated enamel. Another carbonate band at approximately 705 cm-1, unusual to vertebrate calcified tissue, was detected in low density fractions and disappeared rapidly with increasing enamel maturation. Its precise relation with the enamel mineral phase has not been determined. PMID:6839190

  17. Influence of potentially remineralizing agents on bleached enamel microhardness.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alessandra Bühler; Samezima, Leticia Yumi; Fonseca, Léila Pereira; Yui, Karen Cristina Kazue; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of the addition of calcium and fluoride into a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel on enamel surface and subsurface microhardness. Twenty extracted human third molars were sectioned to obtain enamel fragments and they were divided into four groups (n = 20) according to the bleaching treatment. Group 1 received no bleaching procedure (control). Group 2 was treated with a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel (Total Bleach), Groups 3 and 4 were bleached with Total Bleach modified by the addition of sodium fluoride and calcium chloride, respectively. The microhardness of the enamel surface was assessed using a Vickers microdurometer immediately after the bleaching treatment. The specimens were sectioned in the central portion, polished and evaluated to determine the microhardness of the enamel subsurface to a depth of 125 microm, with an interval of 25 microm between measures. There were significant differences among the groups. In terms of surface microhardness, the bleached group exhibited the lowest means, and the calcium-modified bleached group exhibited the highest means. Regarding subsurface microhardness, there were no significant differences among the groups for the depth and interaction factors. The bleached group exhibited the lowest means, and the calcium-modified bleached group presented the highest means. It was concluded that the bleaching treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide significantly reduced the surface and subsurface microhardness of the enamel, and the addition of fluoride and calcium in the bleaching agent increased the microhardness means of the bleached enamel. PMID:19830975

  18. Conservation and variation in enamel protein distribution during vertebrate tooth development.

    PubMed

    Satchell, Paul G; Anderton, Xochitl; Ryu, Okhee H; Luan, Xianghong; Ortega, Adam J; Opamen, Rene; Berman, Brett J; Witherspoon, David E; Gutmann, James L; Yamane, Akira; Zeichner-David, Margerita; Simmer, James P; Shuler, Charles F; Diekwisch, Thomas G H

    2002-08-15

    Vertebrate enamel formation is a unique synthesis of the function of highly specialized enamel proteins and their effect on the growth and organization of apatite crystals. Among tetrapods, the physical structure of enamel is highly conserved, while there is a greater variety of enameloid tooth coverings in fish. In the present study, we postulated that in enamel microstructures of similar organization, the principle components of the enamel protein matrix would have to be highly conserved. In order to identify the enamel proteins that might be most highly conserved and thus potentially most essential to the process of mammalian enamel formation, we used immunoscreening with enamel protein antibodies as a means to assay for degrees of homology to mammalian enamel proteins. Enamel preparations from mouse, gecko, frog, lungfish, and shark were screened with mammalian enamel protein antibodies, including amelogenin, enamelin, tuftelin, MMP20, and EMSP1. Our results demonstrated that amelogenin was the most highly conserved enamel protein associated with the enamel organ, enamelin featured a distinct presence in shark enameloid but was also present in the enamel organ of other species, while the other enamel proteins, tuftelin, MMP20, and EMSP1, were detected in both in the enamel organ and in other tissues of all species investigated. We thus conclude that the investigated enamel proteins, amelogenin, enamelin, tuftelin, MMP20, and EMSP1, were highly conserved in a variety of vertebrate species. We speculate that there might be a unique correlation between amelogenin-rich tetrapod and lungfish enamel with long and parallel crystals and enamelin-rich basal vertebrate enameloid with diverse patterns of crystal organization. PMID:12210110

  19. Polarized light propagation through sound and carious enamel at 1310-nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2006-02-01

    A thorough understanding of how polarized near-IR light propagates through sound and carious dental hard tissues is important for the development of dental optical imaging systems. New optical imaging tools for the detection and assessment of dental caries (dental decay) such as near-IR imaging and optical coherence tomography can exploit the enhanced contrast provided by polarization sensitivity. Stokes polarimetry was used to monitor the state of polarization (SOP) and degree of polarization (DOP) of incident linearly and circularly polarized light as it propagates through extracted human whole teeth, thin tooth sections and single apatite crystals. These measurements at 1310-nm suggest that the DOP is maintained through sound tooth enamel and transparent dentin and that circularly polarized light is typically depolarized more rapidly than linearly light. Polarized light is rapidly depolarized by demineralized enamel and sound and demineralized dentin. The rapid depolarization of polarized light by dental caries in the near-IR provides high contrast for caries imaging and detection.

  20. Further morphological evidence on South African earliest Homo lower postcanine dentition: Enamel thickness and enamel dentine junction.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lei; Dumoncel, Jean; de Beer, Frikkie; Hoffman, Jakobus; Thackeray, John Francis; Duployer, Benjamin; Tenailleau, Christophe; Braga, José

    2016-07-01

    The appearance of the earliest members of the genus Homo in South Africa represents a key event in human evolution. Although enamel thickness and enamel dentine junction (EDJ) morphology preserve important information about hominin systematics and dietary adaptation, these features have not been sufficiently studied with regard to early Homo. We used micro-CT to compare enamel thickness and EDJ morphology among the mandibular postcanine dentitions of South African early hominins (N = 30) and extant Homo sapiens (N = 26), with special reference to early members of the genus Homo. We found that South African early Homo shows a similar enamel thickness distribution pattern to modern humans, although three-dimensional average and relative enamel thicknesses do not distinguish australopiths, early Homo, and modern humans particularly well. Based on enamel thickness distributions, our study suggests that a dietary shift occurred between australopiths and the origin of the Homo lineage. We also observed that South African early Homo postcanine EDJ combined primitive traits seen in australopith molars with derived features observed in modern human premolars. Our results confirm that some dental morphological patterns in later Homo actually occurred early in the Homo lineage, and highlight the taxonomic value of premolar EDJ morphology in hominin species. PMID:27343773

  1. Efficacy of New Adhesion Promoters on Compromised Hypocalcified Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Venkata, Kishore Mayakuntla Sai; Aileni, Kaladhar Reddy; Sashidhar, Nagam Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The amount of technological progress occurred in the last few years has brought an add up to the benefits of bonding in Orthodontics. Research-based findings have constantly led to the development of new materials that are aimed to simplify the clinical procedures like bonding of brackets to compromised enamel surfaces. Hence, the present study is aimed to assess the bond strength of orthodontic brackets on fluorosed enamel using adhesion promoters. Aim To evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded on fluorosed enamel using conventional Transbond XT and new adhesion promoters such as Enhance LC and All Bond 3. Materials and Methods The study involved 90 non carious, extracted teeth with mild to moderate fluorosis randomly divided into 3 Groups. In Group - I (control group) the teeth were bonded with conventional Transbond XT and cured with LED light. In Group - II Enhance LC was applied to fluorosed enamel before bonding and in Group - III All Bond 3 was used. Shear bond strength was tested by using Universal testing Instron machine. ANOVA and Post-Hoc Tukey’s tests were used to compare shear bond strength. Adhesive remnant on the tooth was assessed and scored using adhesive remnant index (ARI). Results Results showed a reduced SBS values (9.43MPa ±3.03) with conventional Transbond XT on fluorosed enamel. Among the adhesion boosters used Enhance LC illustrated lesser SBS values (12.03 MPa ± 4.42) compared with All Bond 3 (14.38MPa ±4.92). ARI showed bond failure at bracket resin interface in group I & group II and at enamel resin interface in group III although statistically insignificant. Conclusion It was concluded that using adhesion boosters on fluorosed enamel showed higher bond strength compared to the control group. Among the two adhesion promoters used All Bond 3 expressed highest bond strength compared to Enhance LC although statistically insignificant. PMID:26393196

  2. Erosive effects of different acids on bovine enamel: release of calcium and phosphate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hannig, Christian; Hamkens, Arne; Becker, Klaus; Attin, Rengin; Attin, Thomas

    2005-06-01

    The present study intended to investigate minimal erosive effects of different acids on enamel during short time incubation via determination of calcium and phosphate dissolution. Bovine enamel specimens were eroded for 1-5 min with eight different acids of pH 2, 2.3 and 3 (citric (CA), maleic (MA), lactic (LA), tartaric (TA), phosphoric (PA), oxalic (OA), acetic (AA) and hydrochloric acid (HCl)). Calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) release were determined photometrically using arsenazo III (calcium) and malachite green (phosphate) as substrates. Each subgroup contained eight enamel specimens. Amount of titratable acid was determined for all acidic solutions. MA, LA, TA, AA and HCl caused linear release of Ca and P, PA of Ca, CA of P. For CA, MA, LA, TA, AA, PA and HCl mineral loss was shown to be pH-dependent. Ca dissolution varied between 28.6+/-4.4 (LA, pH 2) and 2.4+/-0.7 nmol mm(-2)min(-1) (HCl, pH 3), P dissolution ranged between 17.2+/-2.6 (LA, pH 2) and 1.4+/-0.4 nmol mm(-2)min(-1) (HCl, pH 3). LA was one of the most erosive acids. AA was very erosive at pH 3. HCl and MA were shown to have the lowest erosive effects. There was only a weak correlation (r=0.28) between P and Ca release and the amount of titratable acid. The method of the present study allows investigation of minimal erosive effects via direct determination of P and Ca dissolution. During short time exposition at constant pH level, erosive effects mainly depend on pH and type of acid but not on amount of titratable acid. PMID:15848147

  3. Enamel fusion using a carbon dioxide laser: A technique for sealing pits and fissures

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, L.J.; Perham, S.J. )

    1991-05-01

    The well-established enhanced resistance of lased enamel to demineralization is the basis for clinical application of the carbon dioxide laser to caries prevention. This in vitro study examined the effect of focused infrared laser radiation on sound enamel and early pit and fissure caries. Low power levels (2-5 W) induced localized melting and resolidification of enamel with little surface destruction. For sound fissures, fusion of enamel from the lateral walls of the fissure eliminated the fissure space, providing a sealant effect; while in carious fissures, carious enamel was vaporized and adjacent sound enamel fused to partially eliminate the defect. The technique for enamel fusion using CO2 lasers has potential application for sealing pits and fissures and producing physicochemical alterations in enamel which may have preventive benefits.

  4. Influence of Photoactivation Source on Restorative Materials and Enamel Demineralization

    PubMed Central

    Popoff, Josiane Marques de Sena; Rodrigues, José Augusto; Aras, Wanessa Maria De Freitas

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of the photoactivation source on the polymerization depth of restorative materials and its effects on resistance to enamel demineralization. Background data: Argon-ion laser (AL) irradiation itself provides a reduced depth of caries lesions in sound enamel. Methods: Eighteen human teeth were sectioned into 36 blocks and distributed into two groups according to the respective restorative material: resin-modified glass ionomer material (RMGI) (Vitremer-3M ESPE; A3; n=18) and composite resin (CR) (Z350-3M ESPE; n=18). Each group was subdivided into three subgroups and activated by a quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) lamp, an AL, or a light-emitting diode (LED) (n=6). Knoop microhardness (KHN) analysis of the materials was evaluated at two different depths: 0 and 1.6 mm from the enamel surface. The blocks were thermocycled and submitted to five demineralization–remineralization cycles at 37°C. The KHN values of the enamel surface (0 mm) were evaluated. The specimens were longitudinally sectioned, and the restorative material was evaluated at a depth of 1.6 mm. Data were evaluated by two way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests (p<0.05). The evaluation of subsuperficial enamel demineralization by KHN analysis was conducted by seven indentations located at 100 μm from the restored cavity. Data were evaluated by three way ANOVA and Tukey tests (p<0.05). Results: Comparing the two restorative materials, the KHN values at the surface (0 mm) were greater for CR, whereas at 1.6 mm, they were greater for RMGI. In addition, there was less development of enamel demineralization around RMGI restorations than CR restorations. Moreover, there were statistically significant differences on subsuperficial enamel demineralization between the two restorative materials and between the three photoactivation methods (p<0.05); RMGI presented the highest KHN values, and QTH and AL presented the

  5. Enamel Quality after Debonding: Evaluation by Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Leão Filho, Jorge César Borges; Braz, Ana Karla Souza; de Araujo, Renato Evangelista; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro; Pithon, Matheus Melo

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate quantitatively the enamel fractures, adhesive remnants and bracket fragments on enamel after debonding of metal and ceramic brackets, and to quantify the layer of adhesive remnants in depth after two different cleanup procedures. Metal and ceramic brackets were bonded on 120 human incisors and then debonded using two different techniques with Side Cutter (SC) and Anterior Bracket Removal plier (ABR). After this, a high-speed tungsten carbide finishing bur or a low-speed tungsten carbide finishing bur was used. The debonded samples were submitted to enamel assessment with optical coherence tomography (OCT). In sequence, two different methods of removing the remaining adhesive (tungsten carbide burs at high and low speed) were performed and at the end of these procedures, the remaining adhesive layer was measured with OCT. The results demonstrated that enamel fractures were observed only in the samples bonded with ceramic brackets, and the type of pliers did not influence the incidence and extent of enamel damage. Moreover, the type of debonding technique (with side-cutting pliers or anterior bracket removal pliers) and the type of bracket did not influence the amount of adhesive remaining after debonding. The burs at low speed removed the remaining adhesive more effectively during cleanup procedures. PMID:26312977

  6. Effect of three nanobiomaterials on microhardness of bleached enamel

    PubMed Central

    Kaveh, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of incorporating three different nanobiomaterials into bleaching material on microhardness of bleached enamel. Materials and Methods The crowns of 24 extracted sound human molars were sectioned. Sixty enamel specimens (2 × 3 × 4 mm) were selected and divided into five groups (n = 12): Group 1 received no bleaching procedure (control); Group 2 underwent bleaching with a 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) gel; Groups 3, 4, and 5 were bleached with a 40% HP gel modified by incorporation of bioactive glass (BAG), amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and hydroxyapatite (HA), respectively. The enamel microhardness was evaluated. The differences in Knoop microhardness data of each group were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, followed by post hoc Tukey tests. Results Significant differences were observed between the study groups. The enamel microhardness changes in Groups 1, 3, 4, and 5 were significantly lower than that of Group 2 (p < 0.001). Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that incorporation of each one of the three tested biomaterials as remineralizing agents might be effective in decreasing enamel microhardness changes subsequent to in-office bleaching. PMID:27508161

  7. Year of Birth Determination Using Radiocarbon Dating of Dental Enamel

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B A; Spalding, K L

    2009-03-10

    Radiocarbon dating is typically an archaeological tool rather than a forensic one. Recently however, we have shown that the amount of radiocarbon present in tooth enamel, as a result of nuclear bomb testing during the cold war, is a remarkably accurate indicator of when a person is born. Enamel isolated from human teeth is processed to form graphite and carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) levels are measured using accelerator mass spectrometry. Since there is no turnover of enamel after it is formed, {sup 14}C levels in the enamel represent {sup 14}C levels in the atmosphere at the time of its formation. In this paper we describe the strategy used to determine the date of birth of an individual based on radiocarbon levels in tooth enamel, focusing on the methodology of this strategy. Year of birth information can significantly assist police investigators when the identity of a deceased individual is unknown. In such cases police will try to match particulars of the unidentified individual (which is often only gender and/or an estimate of age), with particulars from missing persons lists.

  8. Increased enamel hypoplasia and very low birthweight infants.

    PubMed

    Nelson, S; Albert, J M; Geng, C; Curtan, S; Lang, K; Miadich, S; Heima, M; Malik, A; Ferretti, G; Eggertsson, H; Slayton, R L; Milgrom, P

    2013-09-01

    Birth cohort studies of developmental defects of enamel (DDE) and early childhood caries (ECC) in very low birthweight (VLBW) and normal birthweight (NBW) infants are rare. In this birth cohort of 234 VLBW and 234 NBW infants, we report the incidence of ECC and DDE at 8 and 18-20 mos of corrected age. Infant medical and maternal socio-demographic data were abstracted from medical records at birth. Dental assessments for ECC and DDE (enamel hypoplasia, demarcated and diffuse opacities) were completed at 8 and 18-20 mos. The incidence of hypoplasia was significantly higher in VLBW compared with NBW infants (8 mos, 19% vs. 2%; 18 mos, 31% vs. 8%). The incidence of ECC (International Caries Detection and Assessment System: ICDAS ≥ 2) was 1.4% (8 mos) and 12% (18-20 mos) and was similar between the VLBW and NBW groups. At both ages, using a beta-binomial regression model to control for potential confounders (maternal and infant characteristics), we found increased risk for enamel hypoplasia among the VLBW infants compared with the NBW infants. African Americans had a lower risk for enamel hypoplasia at 18-20 mos. The VLBW infants should be monitored for ECC due to the presence of enamel hypoplasia. PMID:23857641

  9. Year of birth determination using radiocarbon dating of dental enamel

    PubMed Central

    Buchholz, B.A.; Spalding, K.L

    2010-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating is typically an archaeological tool rather than a forensic one. Recently however, we have shown that the amount of radiocarbon present in tooth enamel, as a result of nuclear bomb testing during the cold war, is a remarkably accurate indicator of when a person is born. Enamel isolated from human teeth is processed to form graphite and carbon-14 (14C) levels are measured using accelerator mass spectrometry. Since there is no turnover of enamel after it is formed, 14C levels in the enamel represent 14C levels in the atmosphere at the time of its formation. In this paper we describe the strategy used to determine the date of birth of an individual based on radiocarbon levels in tooth enamel, focusing on the methodology of this strategy. Year of birth information can significantly assist police investigators when the identity of a deceased individual is unknown. In such cases police will try to match particulars of the unidentified individual (which is often only gender and/or an estimate of age), with particulars from missing persons lists. PMID:20976120

  10. Enzyme replacement prevents enamel defects in hypophosphatasia mice.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Manisha C; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Cardoso; Foster, Brian L; Fong, Hanson; Cory, Esther; Narisawa, Sonoko; Sah, Robert L; Somerman, Martha; Whyte, Michael P; Millán, José Luis

    2012-08-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is the inborn error of metabolism characterized by deficiency of alkaline phosphatase activity, leading to rickets or osteomalacia and to dental defects. HPP occurs from loss-of-function mutations within the gene that encodes the tissue-nonspecific isozyme of alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). TNAP knockout (Alpl(-/-), aka Akp2(-/-)) mice closely phenocopy infantile HPP, including the rickets, vitamin B6-responsive seizures, improper dentin mineralization, and lack of acellular cementum. Here, we report that lack of TNAP in Alpl(-/-) mice also causes severe enamel defects, which are preventable by enzyme replacement with mineral-targeted TNAP (ENB-0040). Immunohistochemistry was used to map the spatiotemporal expression of TNAP in the tissues of the developing enamel organ of healthy mouse molars and incisors. We found strong, stage-specific expression of TNAP in ameloblasts. In the Alpl(-/-) mice, histological, µCT, and scanning electron microscopy analysis showed reduced mineralization and disrupted organization of the rods and inter-rod structures in enamel of both the molars and incisors. All of these abnormalities were prevented in mice receiving from birth daily subcutaneous injections of mineral-targeting, human TNAP at 8.2 mg/kg/day for up to 44 days. These data reveal an important role for TNAP in enamel mineralization and demonstrate the efficacy of mineral-targeted TNAP to prevent enamel defects in HPP. PMID:22461224

  11. Year of birth determination using radiocarbon dating of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, B A; Spalding, K L

    2010-05-01

    Radiocarbon dating is typically an archaeological tool rather than a forensic one. Recently however, we have shown that the amount of radiocarbon present in tooth enamel, as a result of nuclear bomb testing during the cold war, is a remarkably accurate indicator of when a person is born. Enamel isolated from human teeth is processed to form graphite and carbon-14 ((14)C) levels are measured using accelerator mass spectrometry. Since there is no turnover of enamel after it is formed, (14)C levels in the enamel represent (14)C levels in the atmosphere at the time of its formation. In this paper we describe the strategy used to determine the date of birth of an individual based on radiocarbon levels in tooth enamel, focusing on the methodology of this strategy. Year of birth information can significantly assist police investigators when the identity of a deceased individual is unknown. In such cases police will try to match particulars of the unidentified individual (which is often only gender and/or an estimate of age), with particulars from missing persons lists. PMID:20976120

  12. Indentation Damage and Crack Repair in Human Enamel*

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, C.; Arola, D.; Ossa, A.

    2013-01-01

    Tooth enamel is the hardest and most highly mineralized tissue in the human body. While there have been a number of studies aimed at understanding the hardness and crack growth resistance behavior of this tissue, no study has evaluated if cracks in this tissue undergo repair. In this investigation the crack repair characteristics of young human enamel were evaluated as a function of patient gender and as a function of the distance from the Dentin Enamel Junction (DEJ). Cracks were introduced via microindentation along the prism direction and evaluated as a function of time after the indentation. Microscopic observations indicated that the repair of cracks began immediately after crack initiation and reaches saturation after approximately 48 hours. During this process he crack length decreased up to 10% of the initial length, and the largest degree of reduction occurred in the deep enamel, nearest the DEJ. In addition, it was found that the degree of repair was significantly greater in the enamel of female patients. PMID:23541701

  13. Maturation stage enamel malformations in Amtn and Klk4 null mice.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Stephanie M; Chun, Yong-Hee P; Ganss, Bernhard; Hu, Yuanyuan; Richardson, Amelia S; Schmitz, James E; Fajardo, Roberto; Yang, Jie; Hu, Jan C-C; Simmer, James P

    2016-01-01

    Amelotin (AMTN) and kallikrein-4 (KLK4) are secreted proteins specialized for enamel biomineralization. We characterized enamel from wild-type, Amtn(-/-), Klk4(-/-), Amtn(+/-)Klk4(+/-) and Amtn(-/-)Klk4(-/-) mice to gain insights into AMTN and KLK4 functions during amelogenesis. All of the null mice were healthy and fertile. The mandibular incisors in Amtn(-/-), Klk4(-/-) and Amtn(-/-)Klk4(-/-) mice were chalky-white and chipped. No abnormalities except in enamel were observed, and no significant differences were detected in enamel thickness or volume, or in rod decussation. Micro-computed tomography (μCT) maximum intensity projections localized the onset of enamel maturation in wild-type incisors distal to the first molar, but mesial to this position in Amtn(-/-), Klk4(-/-) and Amtn(-/-)Klk4(-/-) mice, demonstrating a delay in enamel maturation in Amtn(-/-) incisors. Micro-CT detected significantly reduced enamel mineral density (2.5 and 2.4gHA/cm(3)) in the Klk4(-/-) and Amtn(-/-)Klk4(-/-) mice respectively, compared with wild-type enamel (3.1gHA/cm(3)). Backscatter scanning electron microscopy showed that mineral density progressively diminished with enamel depth in the Klk4(-/-) and Amtn(-/-)Klk4(-/-) mice. The Knoop hardness of the Amtn(-/-) outer enamel was significantly reduced relative to the wild-type and was not as hard as the middle or inner enamel. Klk4(-/-) enamel hardness was significantly reduced at all levels, but the outer enamel was significantly harder than the inner and middle enamel. Thus the hardness patterns of the Amtn(-/-) and Klk4(-/-) mice were distinctly different, while the Amtn(-/-)Klk4(-/-) outer enamel was not as hard as in the Amtn(-/-) and Klk4(-/-) mice. We conclude that AMTN and KLK4 function independently, but are both necessary for proper enamel maturation. PMID:26620968

  14. Type VII Collagen is Enriched in the Enamel Organic Matrix Associated with the Dentin-Enamel Junction of Mature Human Teeth

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Jacob D.; Walker, Mary P.; Mousa, Ahmad; Wang, Yong; Gorski, Jeff P.

    2014-01-01

    The inner enamel region of erupted teeth is known to exhibit higher fracture toughness and crack growth resistance than bulk phase enamel. However, an explanation for this behavior has been hampered by the lack of compositional information for the residual enamel organic matrix. Since enamel-forming ameloblasts are known to express type VII collagen and type VII collagen null mice display abnormal amelogenesis, the aim of this study was to determine whether type VII collagen is a component of the enamel organic matrix at the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) of mature human teeth. Immunofluorescent confocal microscopy of demineralized tooth sections localized type VII collagen to the organic matrix surrounding individual enamel rods near the DEJ. Morphologically, immunoreactive type VII collagen helical-bundles resembled the gnarled-pattern of enamel rods detected by Coomassie Blue staining. Western blotting of whole crown or enamel matrix extracts also identified characteristic Mr=280 and 230 kDa type VII dimeric forms, which resolved into 75 and 25 kDa bands upon reduction. As expected, the collagenous domain of type VII collagen was resistant to pepsin digestion, but was susceptible to purified bacterial collagenase. These results demonstrate the inner enamel organic matrix in mature teeth contains macromolecular type VII collagen. Based on its physical association with the DEJ and its well-appreciated capacity to complex with other collagens, we hypothesize that enamel embedded type VII collagen fibrils may contribute not only to the structural resilience of enamel, but may also play a role in bonding enamel to dentin. PMID:24594343

  15. Pb enamel biomarker: Deposition of pre- and postnatal Pb isotope injection in reconstructed time points along rat enamel transect

    SciTech Connect

    Rinderknecht, A.L.; Kleinman, M.T.; Ericson, J.E. . E-mail: jeericso@uci.edu

    2005-10-01

    Exposure to lead (Pb) as well as other heavy metals in the environment is still a matter of public health concern. The development of the enamel biomarker for heavy metal exposure assessment is designed to improve studies of dose-effect relationships to developmental anomalies, particularly embryonic dysfunctions, and to provide a time-specific recount of past exposures. The work presented in this paper demonstrates maternal transfer across the placental barrier of the enriched isotope {sup 206}Pb tracer to the enamel of the rat pup. Likewise, injections of {sup 204}Pb-enriched tracer in the neonate rat resulted in deposition of the tracer in the enamel histology as measured by secondary ion microprobe spectrometry. Through enamel, we were able to observe biological removal and assimilation of prenatal and postnatal tracers, respectively. This research demonstrates that enamel can be used as a biomarker of exposure to Pb and may illustrate the toxicokinetics of incorporating Pb into fetal and neonatal steady-state system processes. The biomarker technique, when completely developed, may be applied to cross-sectional and longitudinal epidemiological research.

  16. Precision ablation of dental enamel using a subpicosecond pulsed laser.

    PubMed

    Rode, A V; Gamaly, E G; Luther-Davies, B; Taylor, B T; Graessel, M; Dawes, J M; Chan, A; Lowe, R M; Hannaford, P

    2003-12-01

    In this study we report the use of ultra-short-pulsed near-infrared lasers for precision laser ablation of freshly extracted human teeth. The laser wavelength was approximately 800nm, with pulsewidths of 95 and 150fs, and pulse repetition rates of 1kHz. The laser beam was focused to an approximate diameter of 50microm and was scanned over the tooth surface. The rise in the intrapulpal temperature was monitored by embedded thermocouples, and was shown to remain below 5 degrees C when the tooth was air-cooled during laser treatment. The surface preparation of the ablated teeth, observed by optical and electron microscopy, showed no apparent cracking or heat effects, and the hardness and Raman spectra of the laser-treated enamel were not distinguishable from those of native enamel. This study indicates the potential for ultra-short-pulsed lasers to effect precision ablation of dental enamel. PMID:14738125

  17. Damage mechanisms in uniaxial compression of single enamel rods.

    PubMed

    An, Bingbing; Wang, Raorao; Arola, Dwayne; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2015-02-01

    Enamel possesses a complex hierarchical structure, which bestows this tissue with unique mechanical properties. In this study, the mechanical behavior of single enamel rods was investigated under uniaxial compression. Numerical simulations were also performed using micromechanics models for individual enamel rods to identify the damage mechanisms contributing to the constitutive behavior. Experimental results showed that the single rods exhibited an elastic modulus ranging from 10~31 GPa, and that they undergo post-yield strain-hardening. The primary damage mode consisted of delamination within the assembly of mineral crystals. Results from numerical simulations suggest that strain localization within individual rods is responsible for the observed delamination, which is believed to arise from the non-uniform arrangement of mineral crystals. This mechanism was independent of mineral morphology and properties. The non-uniform crystal arrangement results in friction between crystals with different inclination angles and is believed to be responsible for the post-yield strain hardening behavior. PMID:25460920

  18. Evaluating resin-enamel bonds by microshear and microtensile bond strength tests: effects of composite resin

    PubMed Central

    de ANDRADE, Andrea Mello; MOURA, Sandra Kiss; REIS, Alessandra; LOGUERCIO, Alessandro Dourado; GARCIA, Eugenio Jose; GRANDE, Rosa Helena Miranda

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of resin composite (Filtek Z250 and Filtek Flow Z350) and adhesive system [(Solobond Plus, Futurabond NR (VOCO) and Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE)] on the microtensile (µTBS) and microshear bond strength (µSBS) tests on enamel, and to correlate the bond strength means between them. Material and methods Thirty-six extracted human molars were sectioned to obtain two tooth halves: one for µTBS and the other one for µSBS. Adhesive systems and resin composites were applied to the enamel ground surfaces and light-cured. After storage (37ºC/24 h) specimens were stressed (0.5 mm/ min). Fracture modes were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Results The correlation between tests was estimated with Pearson's product-moment correlation statistics (α =0.05). For both tests only the main factor resin composite was statistically significant (p<0.05). The correlation test detected a positive (r=0.91) and significant (p=0.01) correlation between the tests. Conclusions The results were more influenced by the resin type than by the adhesives. Both microbond tests seem to be positive and linearly correlated and can therefore lead to similar conclusions. PMID:21308290

  19. Enamel hypoplasias and physiological stress in the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene hominins.

    PubMed

    Cunha, E; Rozzi, F Ramirez; Bermúdez de Castro, J M; Martinón-Torres, M; Wasterlain, S N; Sarmiento, S

    2004-11-01

    This study presents an analysis of linear enamel hypoplasias (LEH) and plane-form defects (PFD) in the hominine dental sample from the Sima de los Huesos (SH) Middle Pleistocene site in Atapuerca (Spain). The SH sample comprises 475 teeth, 467 permanent and 8 deciduous, belonging to a minimum of 28 individuals. The method for recording PFD and LEH is discussed, as well as the definition of LEH. The prevalence of LEH and PFD in SH permanent dentition (unilateral total count) is 4.6% (13/280). Only one deciduous tooth (lower dc) showed an enamel disruption. Prevalence by individual ranges from 18.7-30%. The most likely explanation for the relatively low LEH and PFD prevalence in the SH sample suggests that the SH population exhibited a low level of developmental stress. The age at occurrence of LEH and PFD was determined by counting the number of perikymata between each lesion and the cervix of the tooth. Assuming a periodicity of nine days for the incremental lines, the majority of LEH in the SH sample occurred during the third year of life and may be related to the metabolic stress associated with weaning. PMID:15386251

  20. CO₂ laser emission modes to control enamel erosion.

    PubMed

    Scatolin, Renata Siqueira; Alonso-Filho, Fernando Luiz; Galo, Rodrigo; Rios, Daniela; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2015-08-01

    Considering the importance and prevalence of dental erosion, the aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different modes of pulse emission of CO2 laser associated or not to acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) 1.23% gel, in controlling enamel erosion by profilometry. Ninety-six fragments of bovine enamel were flattened and polished, and the specimens were subjected to initial erosive challenge with hydrochloric acid (pH = 2). Specimens were randomly assigned according to surface treatment: APF 1.23% gel and gel without fluoride (control), and subdivided according to the modes of pulse CO2 laser irradiation: no irradiation (control), continuous, ultrapulse, and repeated pulse (n = 12). After surface treatment, further erosive challenges were performed for 5 days, 4 × 2 min/day. Enamel structure loss was quantitatively determined by a profilometer, after surface treatment and after 5 days of erosive challenges. Two-away ANOVA revealed a significant difference between the pulse emission mode of the CO2 laser and the presence of fluoride (P ≤ 0.05). The Duncan's test showed that CO2 laser irradiation in continuous mode and the specimens only received fluoride, promoted lower enamel loss than that other treatments. A lower dissolution of the enamel prisms was observed when it was irradiated with CO2 laser in continuous mode compared other groups. It can be concluded that CO2 laser irradiation in continuous mode was the most effective to control the enamel structure loss submitted to erosive challenges with hydrochloric acid. PMID:25988247

  1. Enamel Ultrastructure in Fossil Cetaceans (Cetacea: Archaeoceti and Odontoceti)

    PubMed Central

    Loch, Carolina; Fordyce, R. Ewan

    2015-01-01

    The transition from terrestrial ancestry to a fully pelagic life profoundly altered the body systems of cetaceans, with extreme morphological changes in the skull and feeding apparatus. The Oligocene Epoch was a crucial time in the evolution of cetaceans when the ancestors of modern whales and dolphins (Neoceti) underwent major diversification, but details of dental structure and evolution are poorly known for the archaeocete-neocete transition. We report the morphology of teeth and ultrastructure of enamel in archaeocetes, and fossil platanistoids and delphinoids, ranging from late Oligocene (Waitaki Valley, New Zealand) to Pliocene (Caldera, Chile). Teeth were embedded in epoxy resin, sectioned in cross and longitudinal planes, polished, etched, and coated with gold palladium for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation. SEM images showed that in archaeocetes, squalodontids and Prosqualodon (taxa with heterodont and nonpolydont/limited polydont teeth), the inner enamel was organized in Hunter-Schreger bands (HSB) with an outer layer of radial enamel. This is a common pattern in most large-bodied mammals and it is regarded as a biomechanical adaptation related to food processing and crack resistance. Fossil Otekaikea sp. and delphinoids, which were polydont and homodont, showed a simpler structure, with inner radial and outer prismless enamel. Radial enamel is regarded as more wear-resistant and has been retained in several mammalian taxa in which opposing tooth surfaces slide over each other. These observations suggest that the transition from a heterodont and nonpolydont/limited polydont dentition in archaeocetes and early odontocetes, to homodont and polydont teeth in crownward odontocetes, was also linked to a marked simplification in the enamel Schmelzmuster. These patterns probably reflect functional shifts in food processing from shear-and-mastication in archaeocetes and early odontocetes, to pierce-and-grasp occlusion in crownward odontocetes, with

  2. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT PROPHYLAXIS METHODS ON SOUND AND DEMINERALIZED ENAMEL

    PubMed Central

    Honório, Heitor Marques; Rios, Daniela; Abdo, Ruy César Camargo; Machado, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira

    2006-01-01

    Considering the importance of professional plaque control for caries prevention, this study comprised an in vitro evaluation of wear by two prophylaxis methods (sodium bicarbonate jet – Profident and pumice and brush) on sound bovine enamel and with artificial carious lesions. Sixty enamel fragments were employed (4x4mm), which were divided into 4 groups: GI – 15 sound blocks treated with pumice and brush; GII – 15 sound blocks treated with Profident; GIII – 15 demineralized blocks treated with pumice and brush, and GIV – 15 demineralized blocks treated with Profident. In the fragments of Groups III and IV, artificial carious lesions were simulated by immersion in 0.05M acetic acid solution 50% saturated with bovine enamel powder at 37oC for 16h. The specimens were submitted to the prophylactic treatments for 10 seconds. Wear analysis was performed by profilometer and revealed the following results: 0.91μm – GI; 0.42μm – GII; 1.6μm – GIII, and 0.94μm – GIV. The two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p<0.05) revealed significant difference between all groups. Scanning electron microscopy images were employed to illustrate the wear pattern, with observation of larger alteration on the demineralized enamel surface (GIII; GIV), round-shaped wear on GI and GIII and blasted aspect on GII and GIV. The study indicated that the demineralized enamel presented more wear than the sound enamel, and the brush led to larger wear when compared to Profident. PMID:19089042

  3. A model for predicting wear rates in tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Borrero-Lopez, Oscar; Pajares, Antonia; Constantino, Paul J; Lawn, Brian R

    2014-09-01

    It is hypothesized that wear of enamel is sensitive to the presence of sharp particulates in oral fluids and masticated foods. To this end, a generic model for predicting wear rates in brittle materials is developed, with specific application to tooth enamel. Wear is assumed to result from an accumulation of elastic-plastic micro-asperity events. Integration over all such events leads to a wear rate relation analogous to Archard׳s law, but with allowance for variation in asperity angle and compliance. The coefficient K in this relation quantifies the wear severity, with an arbitrary distinction between 'mild' wear (low K) and 'severe' wear (high K). Data from the literature and in-house wear-test experiments on enamel specimens in lubricant media (water, oil) with and without sharp third-body particulates (silica, diamond) are used to validate the model. Measured wear rates can vary over several orders of magnitude, depending on contact asperity conditions, accounting for the occurrence of severe enamel removal in some human patients (bruxing). Expressions for the depth removal rate and number of cycles to wear down occlusal enamel in the low-crowned tooth forms of some mammals are derived, with tooth size and enamel thickness as key variables. The role of 'hard' versus 'soft' food diets in determining evolutionary paths in different hominin species is briefly considered. A feature of the model is that it does not require recourse to specific material removal mechanisms, although processes involving microplastic extrusion and microcrack coalescence are indicated. PMID:24953823

  4. Enamel ultrastructure in fossil cetaceans (Cetacea: Archaeoceti and Odontoceti).

    PubMed

    Loch, Carolina; Kieser, Jules A; Fordyce, R Ewan

    2015-01-01

    The transition from terrestrial ancestry to a fully pelagic life profoundly altered the body systems of cetaceans, with extreme morphological changes in the skull and feeding apparatus. The Oligocene Epoch was a crucial time in the evolution of cetaceans when the ancestors of modern whales and dolphins (Neoceti) underwent major diversification, but details of dental structure and evolution are poorly known for the archaeocete-neocete transition. We report the morphology of teeth and ultrastructure of enamel in archaeocetes, and fossil platanistoids and delphinoids, ranging from late Oligocene (Waitaki Valley, New Zealand) to Pliocene (Caldera, Chile). Teeth were embedded in epoxy resin, sectioned in cross and longitudinal planes, polished, etched, and coated with gold palladium for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation. SEM images showed that in archaeocetes, squalodontids and Prosqualodon (taxa with heterodont and nonpolydont/limited polydont teeth), the inner enamel was organized in Hunter-Schreger bands (HSB) with an outer layer of radial enamel. This is a common pattern in most large-bodied mammals and it is regarded as a biomechanical adaptation related to food processing and crack resistance. Fossil Otekaikea sp. and delphinoids, which were polydont and homodont, showed a simpler structure, with inner radial and outer prismless enamel. Radial enamel is regarded as more wear-resistant and has been retained in several mammalian taxa in which opposing tooth surfaces slide over each other. These observations suggest that the transition from a heterodont and nonpolydont/limited polydont dentition in archaeocetes and early odontocetes, to homodont and polydont teeth in crownward odontocetes, was also linked to a marked simplification in the enamel Schmelzmuster. These patterns probably reflect functional shifts in food processing from shear-and-mastication in archaeocetes and early odontocetes, to pierce-and-grasp occlusion in crownward odontocetes, with

  5. Recovery of Crystallographic Texture in Remineralized Dental Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Samera; Anderson, Paul; Al-Jawad, Maisoon

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries is the most prevalent disease encountered by people of all ages around the world. Chemical changes occurring in the oral environment during the caries process alter the crystallography and microstructure of dental enamel resulting in loss of mechanical function. Little is known about the crystallographic effects of demineralization and remineralization. The motivation for this study was to develop understanding of the caries process at the crystallographic level in order to contribute towards a long term solution. In this study synchrotron X-ray diffraction combined with scanning electron microscopy and scanning microradiography have been used to correlate enamel crystallography, microstructure and mineral concentration respectively in enamel affected by natural caries and following artificial demineralization and remineralization regimes. In particular, the extent of destruction and re-formation of this complex structure has been measured. 2D diffraction patterns collected at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility were used to quantify changes in the preferred orientation (crystallographic texture) and position of the (002) Bragg reflection within selected regions of interest in each tooth slice, and then correlated with the microstructure and local mineral mass. The results revealed that caries and artificial demineralization cause a large reduction in crystallographic texture which is coupled with the loss of mineral mass. Remineralization restores the texture to the original level seen in healthy enamel and restores mineral density. The results also showed that remineralization promotes ordered formation of new crystallites and growth of pre-existing crystallites which match the preferred orientation of healthy enamel. Combining microstructural and crystallographic characterization aids the understanding of caries and erosion processes and assists in the progress towards developing therapeutic treatments to allow affected enamel to regain

  6. Mechanical behavior of enamel rods under micro-compression.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ezgi D; Schneider, Gerold A

    2016-10-01

    Exploring the structural strategies behind the optimized mechanical performance of hierarchical materials has been a focal point of extensive research over the past decades. Dental enamel is one such natural material, comprising a complicated hierarchical structure with a high level of mineral content. Bundles of hydroxyapatite nanofibers (level-1) Ø: 50nm form enamel rods (level-2) Ø: 5µm, which constitute bands (level-3) Ø: 50µm. While a number of studies in the last decade using advanced fracture mechanical methods have revealed an increasing trend in the fracture toughness of enamel with each additional level of hierarchy, there is still no general agreement on how hierarchical structuring affects the stiffness and strength of enamel. In this study, we identified the stiffness and strength values of the isolated rods (level-2) via micro-compression. The rods were tested in three different orientations with respect to the loading direction: parallel, perpendicular and oblique. The highest stress level withstood before catastrophic fracture was observed to be ~1500MPa in perpendicular orientation. In the oblique loading, the specimens failed by shearing and exhibited a damage-tolerant deformation behavior, which was attributed to the conjugation spots identified between the rods and interrod sheets. The elastic modulus was ~60GPa on average and similar in all orientations. The isotropy in stiffness was attributed to the mineral contacts residing between rods. This was verified by an analytical model derived for level-1 and extended over higher hierarchical levels. The experimental results obtained at level-2 were comparable to the compressive strength and stiffness values reported for level-1 and bulk enamel in the literature. In general, our results suggest that hierarchy has only a minor influence on the compressive properties of enamel. PMID:27415405

  7. Crystal structure of human tooth enamel studied by neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouladdiaf, Bachir; Rodriguez-Carvajal, Juan; Goutaudier, Christelle; Ouladdiaf, Selma; Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Pradelle, Nelly; Colon, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    Crystal structure of human tooth enamel was investigated using high-resolution neutron powder diffraction. Excellent agreement between observed and refined patterns is obtained, using the hexagonal hydroxyapatite model for the tooth enamel, where a large hydroxyl deficiency ˜70% is found in the 4e site. Rietveld refinements method combined with the difference Fourier maps have revealed, however, that the hydroxyl ions are not only disordered along the c-axis but also within the basal plane. Additional H ions located at the 6h site and forming HPO42- anions were found.

  8. Making human enamel and dentin surfaces superwetting for enhanced adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo, Chunlei

    2011-11-01

    Good wettability of enamel and dentin surfaces is an important factor in enhancing adhesion of restorative materials in dentistry. In this study, we developed a femtosecond laser surface texturing approach that makes both the enamel and dentine surfaces superwetting. In contrast to the traditional chemical etching that yields random surface structures, this approach produces engineered surface structures. The surface structure engineered and tested here is an array of parallel microgrooves that generates a strong capillary force. Due to the powerful capillary action, water is rapidly sucked into this engineered surface structure and spreads even on a vertical surface.

  9. Critical roles for WDR72 in calcium transport and matrix protein removal during enamel maturation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shih-Kai; Hu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Jie; Smith, Charles E; Nunez, Stephanie M; Richardson, Amelia S; Pal, Soumya; Samann, Andrew C; Hu, Jan C-C; Simmer, James P

    2015-01-01

    Defects in WDR72 (WD repeat-containing protein 72) cause autosomal recessive hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta. We generated and characterized Wdr72-knockout/lacZ-knockin mice to investigate the role of WDR72 in enamel formation. In all analyses, enamel formed by Wdr72 heterozygous mice was indistinguishable from wild-type enamel. Without WDR72, enamel mineral density increased early during the maturation stage but soon arrested. The null enamel layer was only a tenth as hard as wild-type enamel and underwent rapid attrition following eruption. Despite the failure to further mineralize enamel deposited during the secretory stage, ectopic mineral formed on the enamel surface and penetrated into the overlying soft tissue. While the proteins in the enamel matrix were successfully degraded, the digestion products remained inside the enamel. Interactome analysis of WDR72 protein revealed potential interactions with clathrin-associated proteins and involvement in ameloblastic endocytosis. The maturation stage mandibular incisor enamel did not stain with methyl red, indicating that the enamel did not acidify beneath ruffle-ended ameloblasts. Attachment of maturation ameloblasts to the enamel layer was weakened, and SLC24A4, a critical ameloblast calcium transporter, did not localize appropriately along the ameloblast distal membrane. Fewer blood vessels were observed in the papillary layer supporting ameloblasts. Specific WDR72 expression by maturation stage ameloblasts explained the observation that enamel thickness and rod decussation (established during the secretory stage) are normal in the Wdr72 null mice. We conclude that WDR72 serves critical functions specifically during the maturation stage of amelogenesis and is required for both protein removal and enamel mineralization. PMID:26247047

  10. Microabrasion in tooth enamel discoloration defects: three cases with long-term follow-ups

    PubMed Central

    SUNDFELD, Renato Herman; SUNDFELD-NETO, Daniel; MACHADO, Lucas Silveira; FRANCO, Laura Molinar; FAGUNDES, Ticiane Cestari; BRISO, André Luiz Fraga

    2014-01-01

    Superficial irregularities and certain intrinsic stains on the dental enamel surfaces can be resolved by enamel microabrasion, however, treatment for such defects need to be confined to the outermost regions of the enamel surface. Dental bleaching and resin-based composite repair are also often useful for certain situations for tooth color corrections. This article presented and discussed the indications and limitations of enamel microabrasion treatment. Three case reports treated by enamel microabrasion were also presented after 11, 20 and 23 years of follow-ups. PMID:25141208

  11. Distinguishing between enamel fluorosis and other enamel defects in permanent teeth of children.

    PubMed

    Sabokseir, Aira; Golkari, Ali; Sheiham, Aubrey

    2016-01-01

    Background. The inconsistent prevalence of fluorosis for a given level of fluoride in drinking water suggests developmental defects of enamel (DDEs) other than fluorosis were being misdiagnosed as fluorosis. The imprecise definition and subjective perception of fluorosis indices could result in misdiagnosis of dental fluorosis. This study was conducted to distinguish genuine fluorosis from fluorosis-resembling defects that could have adverse health-related events as a cause using Early Childhood Events Life-grid method (ECEL). Methods. A study was conducted on 400 9-year-old children from areas with high, optimal and low levels of fluoride in the drinking water of Fars province, Iran. Fluorosis cases were diagnosed on the standardized one view photographs of the anterior teeth using Dean's and TF (Thylstrup and Fejerskov) Indices by calibrated dentists. Agreements between examiners were tested. Early childhood health-related data collected retrospectively by ECEL method were matched with the position of enamel defects. Results. Using both Dean and TF indices three out of four dentists diagnosed that 31.3% (115) children had fluorosis, 58.0%, 29.1%, and 10.0% in high (2.12-2.85 ppm), optimal (0.62-1.22 ppm), and low (0.24-0.29 ppm) fluoride areas respectively (p < 0.001). After matching health-related events in the 115 (31.3%) of children diagnosed with fluorosis, 31 (8.4%) of children had fluorosis which could be matched with their adverse health-related events. This suggests that what was diagnosed as fluorosis were non-fluoride related DDEs that resemble fluorosis. Discussion. The frequently used measures of fluorosis appear to overscore fluorosis. Use of ECEL method to consider health related events relevant to DDEs could help to differentiate between genuine fluorosis and fluorosis-resembling defects. PMID:26966672

  12. Distinguishing between enamel fluorosis and other enamel defects in permanent teeth of children

    PubMed Central

    Sabokseir, Aira

    2016-01-01

    Background. The inconsistent prevalence of fluorosis for a given level of fluoride in drinking water suggests developmental defects of enamel (DDEs) other than fluorosis were being misdiagnosed as fluorosis. The imprecise definition and subjective perception of fluorosis indices could result in misdiagnosis of dental fluorosis. This study was conducted to distinguish genuine fluorosis from fluorosis-resembling defects that could have adverse health-related events as a cause using Early Childhood Events Life-grid method (ECEL). Methods. A study was conducted on 400 9-year-old children from areas with high, optimal and low levels of fluoride in the drinking water of Fars province, Iran. Fluorosis cases were diagnosed on the standardized one view photographs of the anterior teeth using Dean’s and TF (Thylstrup and Fejerskov) Indices by calibrated dentists. Agreements between examiners were tested. Early childhood health-related data collected retrospectively by ECEL method were matched with the position of enamel defects. Results. Using both Dean and TF indices three out of four dentists diagnosed that 31.3% (115) children had fluorosis, 58.0%, 29.1%, and 10.0% in high (2.12–2.85 ppm), optimal (0.62–1.22 ppm), and low (0.24–0.29 ppm) fluoride areas respectively (p < 0.001). After matching health-related events in the 115 (31.3%) of children diagnosed with fluorosis, 31 (8.4%) of children had fluorosis which could be matched with their adverse health-related events. This suggests that what was diagnosed as fluorosis were non-fluoride related DDEs that resemble fluorosis. Discussion. The frequently used measures of fluorosis appear to overscore fluorosis. Use of ECEL method to consider health related events relevant to DDEs could help to differentiate between genuine fluorosis and fluorosis-resembling defects. PMID:26966672

  13. Three-dimensional molar enamel distribution and thickness in Australopithecus and Paranthropus.

    PubMed

    Olejniczak, A J; Smith, T M; Skinner, M M; Grine, F E; Feeney, R N M; Thackeray, J F; Hublin, J-J

    2008-08-23

    Thick molar enamel is among the few diagnostic characters of hominins which are measurable in fossil specimens. Despite a long history of study and characterization of Paranthropus molars as relatively 'hyper-thick', only a few tooth fragments and controlled planes of section (designed to be proxies of whole-crown thickness) have been measured. Here, we measure molar enamel thickness in Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus using accurate microtomographic methods, recording the whole-crown distribution of enamel. Both taxa have relatively thick enamel, but are thinner than previously characterized based on two-dimensional measurements. Three-dimensional measurements show that P. robustus enamel is not hyper-thick, and A. africanus enamel is relatively thinner than that of recent humans. Interspecific differences in the whole-crown distribution of enamel thickness influence cross-sectional measurements such that enamel thickness is exaggerated in two-dimensional sections of A. africanus and P. robustus molars. As such, two-dimensional enamel thickness measurements in australopiths are not reliable proxies for the three-dimensional data they are meant to represent. The three-dimensional distribution of enamel thickness shows different patterns among species, and is more useful for the interpretation of functional adaptations than single summary measures of enamel thickness. PMID:18522924

  14. Evaluation of the Esthetic Properties of Developmental Defects of Enamel: A Spectrophotometric Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Fabrizio; Mazur, Marta; Corridore, Denise; Pasqualotto, Debora; Nardi, Gianna Maria; Ottolenghi, Livia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Detailed clinical quantification of optical properties of developmental defect of enamel is possible with spectrophotometric evaluation. Developmental defects of enamel (DDE) are daily encountered in clinical practice. DDE are an alteration in quality and quantity of the enamel, caused by disruption and/or damage to the enamel organ during amelogenesis. Methods. Several clinical indices have been developed to categorize enamel defects based on their nature, appearance, microscopic features, or cause. A sample of 39 permanent teeth presenting DDE on labial surface was examined using the DDE Modified Index and SpectroShade evaluation. The spectrophotometric approach quantifies L* (luminosity), a* (quantity of green-red), and b* (quantity of blue-yellow) of different DDE. Conclusions. SpectroShade evaluation of the optical properties of the enamel defect enhances clinical understanding of severity and extent of the defect and characterizes the enamel alteration in terms of color discrepancy and surface characterization. PMID:25874260

  15. Inhibition of enamel erosion by stannous fluoride containing rinsing solutions.

    PubMed

    Rakhmatullina, Ekaterina; Beyeler, Barbara; Lussi, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the erosion-inhibiting properties of dental rinses during erosion in the presence of the salivary pellicle. The erosion inhibition by a Sn/F containing dental rinse (800 ppm Sn2+, 500 ppm F –, pH = 4.5) was compared with a fluoridated solution (500 ppm F –, pH = 4.5) and water(control). Calcium release and enamel softening were significantly reduced among enamel samples exposed to the Sn/F rinse (group SF)compared to those treated with the fluoride solution (group F) and the control (p 0.05). SEM showed slightly etched enamel interfaces in group SF, whereas the erosion was more pronounced in group F and even more severe in the control group. In conclusion, the Sn/F combination provided the best inhibition of erosion among tested solutions. This study demonstrates the application of different analytical tools for comparative erosion quantification.A strong correlation (r2 ≥ 0.783) was shown between calcium release and enamel softening during demineralization. PMID:23781557

  16. Effects of chlorhexidine and fluoride on irradiated enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Soares, C J; Neiva, N A; Soares, P B F; Dechichi, P; Novais, V R; Naves, L Z; Marques, M R

    2011-05-01

    The effectiveness of mouthwash protocols in preventing gamma irradiation therapy damage to the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of enamel and dentin is unknown. It was hypothesized that the use of chlorhexidine and fluoride mouthwash would maintain the UTS of dental structures. One hundred and twenty teeth were divided into 2 groups: irradiated (subjected to 60 Gy of gamma irradiation in daily increments of 2 Gy) and non-irradiated. They were then subdivided into 2 mouthwash protocols used 3 times per day: 0.12% chlorhexidine, 0.05% sodium fluoride, and control group (n = 10). The specimens were evaluated by microtensile testing. The results of the Tukey test (p < 0.05) indicated that the gamma irradiation therapy significantly reduced the UTS of the enamel, crown, and root dentin. Macromolecular alterations were suggested by optical retardation data in dentin. Structural alterations, in both substrates, were detected by scanning electron microscopy analysis. Mouthwash with 0.12% chlorhexidine partially prevented the damage to the mechanical properties of the irradiated crown dentin, whereas the 0.05% sodium-fluoride-irradiated enamel showed UTS similar to that of non-irradiated enamel. PMID:21335538

  17. Evaluation of bond strength of orthodontic brackets without enamel etching

    PubMed Central

    Boruziniat, Alireza; Motaghi, Shiva; Moghaddas, Mohmmadjavad

    2015-01-01

    Background To compare the shear bond strength of brackets with and without enamel etching. Material and Methods In this study, 60 sound premolars were randomly divided into four different groups: 1- TXE group: Enamel etching+Transbond XT adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. 2- TXS group: Transbond plus self-etch adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. 3- PQ1E group: Enamel etching+ PQ1 adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. 4- PQ1 group: PQ1 adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. The shear bond strengths of brackets were evaluated using universal testing machine at cross head speed of 0.5 mm/min. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) was also measured. One-way ANOVA, Tukey’s post hoc, Kruskal-wallis and Mann-Witney U test were used for data analysis. Results There was a significant difference between etched and unetched groups respect to SBS and ARI (p<0.05), however; no significant difference was observed between unetched group and self-etch adhesive group (p>> 0.05). The shear bond strength of PQ1 group was the least but in acceptable range and its ARI was less than other groups. Conclusions PQ1 adhesive can be used for bracket bonding without enamel etching with adequate bond strength and minimal ARI. Key words:Bracket, shear bond strength, filled-adhesive, self-etch adhesive. PMID:26535100

  18. Composition of enamel pellicle from dental erosion patients.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, G; Cotroneo, E; Moazzez, R; Rojas-Serrano, M; Donaldson, N; Austin, R; Zaidel, L; Bartlett, D; Proctor, G

    2014-01-01

    Oral health is dependent upon a thin mobile film of saliva on soft and hard tissues. Salivary proteins adhere to teeth to form the acquired enamel pellicle which is believed to protect teeth from acid erosion. This study investigated whether patients suffering diet-induced dental erosion had altered enamel pellicles. Thirty patients suffering erosion were compared to healthy age-matched controls. Subjects wore a maxillary splint holding hydroxyapatite and human enamel blocks for 1 h. The acquired enamel pellicle was removed from the blocks and compared to the natural incisor pellicle. Basic Erosive Wear Examination scores confirmed that dental erosion was present in erosion patients and absent from healthy age-matched controls. Erosion patients had half the amount of proteins (BCA assay) within the acquired pellicle forming on splint blocks compared to normal controls (p < 0.05). In particular, statherin, a calcium-binding protein, was 35% less abundant (p < 0.05). Calcium concentration within the acquired pellicle was also reduced by 50% in erosion patients (p < 0.001). In contrast, the natural pellicle on the incisor had similar amounts of total protein in erosion patients and healthy controls. In summary, the formation of new acquired pellicles on surfaces was reduced in erosion patients, which may explain their greater susceptibility to acid erosion of teeth. PMID:24603346

  19. Spectrally enhanced image resolution of tooth enamel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Berg, Joel H.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Short-wavelength 405 nm laser illumination of surface dental enamel using an ultrathin scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) produced enhanced detail of dental topography. The surfaces of human extracted teeth and artificial erosions were imaged with 405 nm, 444 nm, 532 nm, or 635 nm illumination lasers. The obtained images were then processed offline to compensate for any differences in the illumination beam diameters between the different lasers. Scattering and absorption coefficients for a Monte Carlo model of light propagation in dental enamel for 405 nm were scaled from published data at 532 nm and 633 nm. The value of the scattering coefficient used in the model was scaled from the coefficients at 532 nm and 633 nm by the inverse third power of wavelength. Simulations showed that the penetration depth of short-wavelength illumination is localized close to the enamel surface, while long-wavelength illumination travels much further and is backscattered from greater depths. Therefore, images obtained using short wavelength laser are not contaminated by the superposition of light reflected from enamel tissue at greater depths. Hence, the SFE with short-wavelength illumination may make it possible to visualize surface manifestations of phenomena such as demineralization, thus better aiding the clinician in the detection of early caries.

  20. Nonlinear Simulation of the Tooth Enamel Spectrum for EPR Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, V. A.; Dubovsky, S. V.

    2016-07-01

    Software was developed where initial EPR spectra of tooth enamel were deconvoluted based on nonlinear simulation, line shapes and signal amplitudes in the model initial spectrum were calculated, the regression coefficient was evaluated, and individual spectra were summed. Software validation demonstrated that doses calculated using it agreed excellently with the applied radiation doses and the doses reconstructed by the method of additive doses.

  1. 41Ca - a possible neutron specific biomarker in tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, A.; Arazi, A.; Faestermann, T.; Knie, K.; Korschinek, G.; Maier, H. J.; Nakamura, N.; Rühm, W.; Rugel, G.

    2004-08-01

    The measurement of long-lived radionuclides, produced by neutrons originating from the atomic-bomb explosions, offers the possibility to reconstruct neutron fluences to which survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were exposed. The long-lived radionuclide, 41Ca (T1/2=103 000 years), is suggested here as a means for a retrospective determination of thermal neutron fluences, directly within the human body of a survivor. As proper material tooth enamel is proposed. The 41Ca signal in tooth enamel may be correlated with the exposure to A-bomb induced thermal neutron fluences, provided the natural background level of 41Ca/Ca is significantly lower. Therefore, tooth samples of unexposed survivors of the A-bomb explosions have been examined by means of accelerator mass spectrometry, in order to quantify the natural background level of 41Ca/Ca. Measured 41Ca/Ca ratios were confirmed to be as low as about 2 × 10-15. Thus, the A-bomb induced additional signal should be detectable for survivors at epidemiological relevant distances. Since tooth enamel had already been used as a dosemeter for gamma radiation from the A-bomb explosion, the detection of 41Ca in tooth enamel would allow, for the first time, an assessment of both, γ-ray and neutron exposures in the same biological material.

  2. Argon laser induced changes to the carbonate content of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziglo, M. J.; Nelson, A. E.; Heo, G.; Major, P. W.

    2009-05-01

    Argon laser irradiation can be used to cure orthodontic brackets onto teeth in significantly less time than conventional curing lights. In addition, it has been shown that the argon laser seems to impart a demineralization resistance to the enamel. The purpose of this study was to use surface science techniques to ascertain if this demineralization resistance is possibly a result of a decrease in the carbonate content of enamel. Eleven mandibular third molars previously scheduled for extraction were collected and used in the present study. The teeth were sectioned in two and randomly assigned to either the argon laser (457-502 nm; 250 mW cm -2) or the control (no treatment) group. The sections assigned to the argon laser group were cured for 10 s and analyzed. To exaggerate any potential changes the experimental sections were then exposed to a further 110 s of argon laser irradiation. Surface analysis was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The results showed no statistically significant change in the carbonate content of enamel after argon laser irradiation ( p > 0.05). Thus, it is suggested that any demineralization resistance imparted to the enamel surface by argon laser irradiation is not due to alterations in carbonate content.

  3. Contact fatigue of human enamel: Experiments, mechanisms and modeling.

    PubMed

    Gao, S S; An, B B; Yahyazadehfar, M; Zhang, D; Arola, D D

    2016-07-01

    Cyclic contact between natural tooth structure and engineered ceramics is increasingly common. Fatigue of the enamel due to cyclic contact is rarely considered. The objectives of this investigation were to evaluate the fatigue behavior of human enamel by cyclic contact, and to assess the extent of damage over clinically relevant conditions. Cyclic contact experiments were conducted using the crowns of caries-free molars obtained from young donors. The cuspal locations were polished flat and subjected to cyclic contact with a spherical indenter of alumina at 2Hz. The progression of damage was monitored through the evolution in contact displacement, changes in the contact hysteresis and characteristics of the fracture pattern. The contact fatigue life diagram exhibited a decrease in cycles to failure with increasing cyclic load magnitude. Two distinct trends were identified, which corresponded to the development and propagation of a combination of cylindrical and radial cracks. Under contact loads of less than 400N, enamel rod decussation resisted the growth of subsurface cracks. However, at greater loads the damage progressed rapidly and accelerated fatigue failure. Overall, cyclic contact between ceramic appliances and natural tooth structure causes fatigue of the enamel. The extent of damage is dependent on the magnitude of cyclic stress and the ability of the decussation to arrest the fatigue damage. PMID:26990072

  4. Nanobacteria's potential involvement in enamel repair in caries.

    PubMed

    Jing, Junjun; Lu, Junjun; Hao, Yuqing; Han, Yaolun

    2009-09-01

    Dental caries is the accumulation of numerous episodes of demineralization and remineralization, rather than a unidirectional demineralization process. Demineralization and remineralization occur constantly either simultaneously or alternately and whether a lesion will progress or be repaired depends upon the predominant process over periods. Even if fluoride has demonstrated the anti-caries effect by shifting the demineralization/remineralization balance favorably, little is known about non-fluoride action in favor of the balance and the effect of fluoride could not fully explain enamel repair in caries. Recently, in vitro experiments demonstrated enamel repair by synthetic apatite nanocrystals which showed the strong affinity, excellent biocompatibility, mechanical improvement, and a higher resistance to acids than apatite from teeth. This reminds us of a controversial microorganism called nanobacteria (NB) which form nanocrystalline apatite around themselves. Although NB have been detected in some pathological calcifications, epidemiologic literature suggests that they are widespread present in the healthy people blood. Considering the similarity of synthetic nanocrystalline apatite to that of NB and blood circulation communicating with saliva, we put forward a hypothesis that NB may act in enamel surface just like what the synthetic nanocrystalline apatite does in vitro to repair enamel in caries. PMID:19409717

  5. Do different bleaching protocols affect the enamel microhardness?

    PubMed Central

    Lia Mondelli, Rafael Francisco; Garrido Gabriel, Taisa R. Conti; Piola Rizzante, Fabio Antonio; Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Soares Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Tooth bleaching tends to increase enamel roughness and porosity, in addition to reducing surface microhardness. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of bleaching treatments using different hydrogen peroxide (HP) concentrations, with and without light activation on bovine enamel microhardness. Materials and Methods: The buccal surfaces of sixty bovine incisors were flattened and polished and the enamel specimens were divided into six groups: G1 : c0 ontrol, exposed to artificial saliva; G2: 35% HP applied in two sessions (45’ each); G3: 35% HP applied in two sessions (3 × 15’ each); G4: 35% HP applied in one session (3 × 7’30”) plus hybrid light (HL); G5: 25% HP applied in one session (3 × 7’30”) plus HL; and G6: 15% HP applied in one session (3 × 7’30”) plus HL. After the treatment, the enamel specimens were stored in artificial saliva. The surface microhardness (Knoop) was measured at the baseline, 24 h and 7 days after bleaching. The data was analyzed using the ANOVA test, followed by the Tukey–Krummer test (P < 0.05). Results: All bleaching procedures lead to a decrease in surface microhardness when compared with the control group after 24 h. The lowest change in surface microhardness was found in the specimens treated with 15% HP plus HL. However, 35% HP plus HL induced the highest decrease in surface microhardness. After 7 days of remineralization, the surface microhardness returned to normal levels for all bleached specimens. Conclusion: Therefore, it can be concluded that the bleaching protocols caused a slight enamel surface alteration. However, the remineralization process minimized these effects. PMID:25713480

  6. Preliminary surface analysis of etched, bleached, and normal bovine enamel

    SciTech Connect

    Ruse, N.D.; Smith, D.C.; Torneck, C.D.; Titley, K.C. )

    1990-09-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) and secondary ion-mass spectroscopic (SIMS) analyses were performed on unground un-pumiced, unground pumiced, and ground labial enamel surfaces of young bovine incisors exposed to four different treatments: (1) immersion in 35% H2O2 for 60 min; (2) immersion in 37% H3PO4 for 60 s; (3) immersion in 35% H2O2 for 60 min, in distilled water for two min, and in 37% H3PO4 for 60 s; (4) immersion in 37% H3PO4 for 60 s, in distilled water for two min, and in 35% H2O2 for 60 min. Untreated unground un-pumiced, unground pumiced, and ground enamel surfaces, as well as synthetic hydroxyapatite surfaces, served as controls for intra-tooth evaluations of the effects of different treatments. The analyses indicated that exposure to 35% H2O2 alone, besides increasing the nitrogen content, produced no other significant change in the elemental composition of any of the enamel surfaces investigated. Exposure to 37% H3PO4, however, produced a marked decrease in calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) concentrations and an increase in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) concentrations in unground un-pumiced specimens only, and a decrease in C concentration in ground specimens. These results suggest that the reported decrease in the adhesive bond strength of resin to 35% H2O2-treated enamel is not caused by a change in the elemental composition of treated enamel surfaces. They also suggest that an organic-rich layer, unaffected by acid-etching, may be present on the unground un-pumiced surface of young bovine incisors. This layer can be removed by thorough pumicing or by grinding. An awareness of its presence is important when young bovine teeth are used in a model system for evaluation of resin adhesiveness.

  7. Magnesium stable isotope ecology using mammal tooth enamel

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jeremy E.; Vance, Derek; Balter, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Geochemical inferences on ancient diet using bone and enamel apatite rely mainly on carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) and to a lesser extent on strontium/calcium (Sr/Ca) and barium/calcium (Ba/Ca) elemental ratios. Recent developments in nontraditional stable isotopes provide an unprecedented opportunity to use additional paleodietary proxies to disentangle complex diets such as omnivory. Of particular relevance for paleodietary reconstruction are metals present in large quantity in bone and enamel apatite, providing that biologically mediated fractionation processes are constrained. Calcium isotope ratios (δ44Ca) meet these criteria but exhibit complex ecological patterning. Stable magnesium isotope ratios (δ26Mg) also meet these criteria but a comprehensive understanding of its variability awaits new isotopic data. Here, 11 extant mammal species of known ecology from a single locality in equatorial Africa were sampled for tooth enamel and, together with vegetation and feces, analyzed for δ26Mg, δ13C, Sr/Ca, and Ba/Ca ratios. The results demonstrate that δ26Mg incorporated in tooth enamel becomes heavier from strict herbivores to omnivores/faunivores. Using data from experimentally raised sheep, we suggest that this 26Mg enrichment up the trophic chain is due to a 26Mg enrichment in muscle relative to bone. Notably, it is possible to distinguish omnivores from herbivores, using δ26Mg coupled to Ba/Ca ratios. The potential effects of metabolic and dietary changes on the enamel δ26Mg composition remain to be explored but, in the future, multiproxy approaches would permit a substantial refinement of dietary behaviors or enable accurate trophic reconstruction despite specimen-limited sampling, as is often the case for fossil assemblages. PMID:25535375

  8. Magnesium stable isotope ecology using mammal tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jeremy E; Vance, Derek; Balter, Vincent

    2015-01-13

    Geochemical inferences on ancient diet using bone and enamel apatite rely mainly on carbon isotope ratios (δ(13)C) and to a lesser extent on strontium/calcium (Sr/Ca) and barium/calcium (Ba/Ca) elemental ratios. Recent developments in nontraditional stable isotopes provide an unprecedented opportunity to use additional paleodietary proxies to disentangle complex diets such as omnivory. Of particular relevance for paleodietary reconstruction are metals present in large quantity in bone and enamel apatite, providing that biologically mediated fractionation processes are constrained. Calcium isotope ratios (δ(44)Ca) meet these criteria but exhibit complex ecological patterning. Stable magnesium isotope ratios (δ(26)Mg) also meet these criteria but a comprehensive understanding of its variability awaits new isotopic data. Here, 11 extant mammal species of known ecology from a single locality in equatorial Africa were sampled for tooth enamel and, together with vegetation and feces, analyzed for δ(26)Mg, δ(13)C, Sr/Ca, and Ba/Ca ratios. The results demonstrate that δ(26)Mg incorporated in tooth enamel becomes heavier from strict herbivores to omnivores/faunivores. Using data from experimentally raised sheep, we suggest that this (26)Mg enrichment up the trophic chain is due to a (26)Mg enrichment in muscle relative to bone. Notably, it is possible to distinguish omnivores from herbivores, using δ(26)Mg coupled to Ba/Ca ratios. The potential effects of metabolic and dietary changes on the enamel δ(26)Mg composition remain to be explored but, in the future, multiproxy approaches would permit a substantial refinement of dietary behaviors or enable accurate trophic reconstruction despite specimen-limited sampling, as is often the case for fossil assemblages. PMID:25535375

  9. Magnesium stable isotope ecology using mammal tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jeremy E.; Vance, Derek; Balter, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Geochemical inferences on ancient diet using bone and enamel apatite rely mainly on carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) and to a lesser extent on strontium/calcium (Sr/Ca) and barium/calcium (Ba/Ca) elemental ratios. Recent developments in nontraditional stable isotopes provide an unprecedented opportunity to use additional paleodietary proxies to disentangle complex diets such as omnivory. Of particular relevance for paleodietary reconstruction are metals present in large quantity in bone and enamel apatite, providing that biologically mediated fractionation processes are constrained. Calcium isotope ratios (δ44Ca) meet these criteria but exhibit complex ecological patterning. Stable magnesium isotope ratios (δ26Mg) also meet these criteria but a comprehensive understanding of its variability awaits new isotopic data. Here, 11 extant mammal species of known ecology from a single locality in equatorial Africa were sampled for tooth enamel and, together with vegetation and feces, analyzed for δ26Mg, δ13C, Sr/Ca, and Ba/Ca ratios. The results demonstrate that δ26Mg incorporated in tooth enamel becomes heavier from strict herbivores to omnivores/faunivores. Using data from experimentally raised sheep, we suggest that this 26Mg enrichment up the trophic chain is due to a 26Mg enrichment in muscle relative to bone. Notably, it is possible to distinguish omnivores from herbivores, using δ26Mg coupled to Ba/Ca ratios. The potential effects of metabolic and dietary changes on the enamel δ26Mg composition remain to be explored but, in the future, multiproxy approaches would permit a substantial refinement of dietary behaviors or enable accurate trophic reconstruction despite specimen-limited sampling, as is often the case for fossil assemblages.

  10. Protostylid expression at the enamel-dentine junction and enamel surface of mandibular molars of Paranthropus robustus and Australopithecus africanus.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Matthew M; Wood, Bernard A; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Distinctive expressions and incidences of discrete dental traits at the outer enamel surface (OES) contribute to the diagnoses of many early hominin taxa. Examination of the enamel-dentine junction (EDJ), imaged non-destructively using micro-computed tomography, has elucidated the morphological development of dental traits and improved interpretations of their variability within and among taxa. The OES expressions of one of these dental traits, the protostylid, have been found to differ among African Plio-Pleistocene fossil hominin taxa. In this study protostylid expression is examined at the OES and at the EDJ of Paranthropus robustus (n=23) and Australopithecus africanus (n=28) mandibular molars, with the goals of incorporating EDJ morphology into the definition of the protostylid and assessing the relative contribution of the EDJ and enamel cap to its expression in these taxa. The results provide evidence (a) of statistically significant taxon-specific patterns of protostylid morphology at the EDJ that are not evident at the OES; (b) that in P. robustus, thick enamel reduces the morphological correspondence between the form of the protostylid seen at the EDJ and the OES, and (c) that if EDJ images can be obtained, then the protostylid retains its taxonomic value even in worn teeth. PMID:18986683

  11. A comparison of terahertz-pulsed imaging with transverse microradiography and microhardness to measure mineral changes in enamel after treatment with fluoride dentifrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchley, David; Lippert, Frank; Lynch, Richard; Alton, Jesse; Gonzalez-Cabezas, C.; Eder, J.

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the ability of Terahertz Pulsed Imaging (TPI) to measure mineral changes in enamel lesions during de/remineralisation studies. A comparison was made between transverse microradiography (TMR) and microhardness measurements. Artificial lesions were formed in bovine enamel using a solution of 0.1 M lactic acid (pH 5.0) containing 0.2% Carbopol C907 and 50% saturated with hydroxyapatite. The 20 day experimental protocol consisted of four, one-minute treatment periods with dentifrices containing 10, 675, 1385 and 2700ppm fluoride, a 4 h/day acid challenge, and for the remaining time specimens were stored in a 50:50 pooled human / artificial saliva mixture. Terahertz images were generated by positioning the specimens at the focus of the beam and raster scanning the optics to collect the reflections from the air / enamel (AEI) and lesion / enamel (LEI) interface. Significant differences were observed in the intensity change from baseline of the AEI and LEI reflections upon treatment with the four dentifrices. A linear correlation was observed between ΔAEI vs ΔVHN (r2 = 0.997), ΔAEI vs ΔKHN (r2 =0.964), ΔII (ratio of LEI to AEI) vs ΔΔZ (r2 =0.875) and ΔLEI vs ΔΔZ (r2 =0.870). Statistically significant correlations (p<0.05 Pearson correlation coefficient) were also found between the TPI and microhardness / microradiography data. This study has demonstrated that TPI is a useful technology to measure in vitro (and possibly in situ) mineral changes in enamel and is sufficiently sensitive to discriminate between the levels of remineralization produced by the different dentifrices.

  12. Structural Morphology of Molars in Large Mammalian Herbivores: Enamel Content Varies between Tooth Positions

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Daniela E.; Kaiser, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of dental tissues in mammalian herbivores can be very different from taxon to taxon. While grazers tend to have more elaborated and complexly folded enamel ridges, browsers have less complex enamel ridges which can even be so far reduced that they are completely lost. The gradient in relative enamel content and complexity of structures has so far not been addressed within a single species. However, several studies have noted tooth position specific wear rates in small mammals (rabbits, guinea pigs) which may be related to individual tooth morphology. We investigate whether differentiated enamel content by tooth position is also to be found in large herbivores. We use CT-scanning techniques to quantify relative enamel content in upper and lower molar teeth of 21 large herbivorous mammal species. By using a broad approach and including both perissodactyls and artiodactyls, we address phylogenetic intraspecific differences in relative enamel content. We find that enamel is highly unevenly distributed among molars (upper M1, M2, M3 and lower m1, m2, m3) in most taxa and that relative enamel content is independent of phylogeny. Overall, relative enamel content increases along the molar tooth row and is significantly higher in lower molars compared to upper molars. We relate this differential enamel content to prolonged mineralisation in the posterior tooth positions and suggest a compensatory function of m3 and M3 for functional losses of anterior teeth. PMID:26313359

  13. Inter-comparison study between human and cow teeth enamel for low dose measurement using ESR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, G. M.; Aboelezz, E.; El-Khodary, A.; Eissa, H. M.

    2010-07-01

    Human and cow teeth enamel samples were separated and irradiated with γ-ray to study radiation-induced radicals as dosimetric material with electron spin resonance (ESR). The enamel spectrum is characterized by two main g-factors g|| = 1.9976 and g⊥ = 2.0019. The dosimetric signal for enamel at g = 2.0019 is ascribed to CO2- radicals. The dose response was studied in the range from 200 mGy to 2 Gy. Power dependence, energy dependence and thermal stability had been studied also to determine the optimum conditions for ESR measurements and stability of the signal at room temperature as well. Radical formation efficiency ( G-value) of 0.44 ± 0.09 and 0.65 ± 0.13 was obtained for human enamel and cow enamel, respectively. The life time for human enamel and cow enamel were estimated from Arrhenius plot to be 1.1 × 10 7 years and 7 × 10 6 years, respectively. The activation energy for human enamel and cow enamel were also calculated from Arrhenius plot to be 1.23 eV and 1.15 eV, respectively. The dose conversion factors for enamel in water and air were calculated to be 0.901 Dwater and 0.998 Dair. The combined and expanded uncertainties accompanying these measurements are ±5.79% and ±11.58%, respectively.

  14. Estimating mineral changes in enamel formation by ashing/BSE and microCT.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, J E; Teepe, J D; Hu, Y; Smith, C E; Fajardo, R J; Chun, Y-H P

    2014-03-01

    Enamel formation produces the most highly mineralized tissue in the human body. The growth of enamel crystallites is assisted by enamel proteins and proteinases. As enamel formation progresses from secretory to maturation stages, the composition of the matrix with its mineral and non-mineral components dynamically changes in an inverse fashion. We hypothesized that appropriately calibrated micro-computed tomography (µCT) technology is suitable to estimate the mineral content (weight and/or density) and volume comparable in accuracy with that for directly weighed and sectioned enamel. Different sets of mouse mandibular incisors of C57BL/6 mice were used for dissections and µCT reconstructions. Calibration phantoms corresponding to the range of enamel mineral densities were used. Secretory-stage enamel contained little mineral and was consequently too poor in contrast for enamel volumes to be accurately estimated by µCT. Maturation-stage enamel, however, showed remarkable correspondence for total mineral content per volume where comparisons were possible between and among the different analytical techniques used. The main advantages of the µCT approach are that it is non-destructive, time-efficient, and can monitor changes in mineral content of the most mature enamel, which is too physically hard to dissect away from the tooth. PMID:24470541

  15. Effects of continuous-wave CO2 laser on the ultrastructure of human dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, J M; Palamara, J; Phakey, P P; Rachinger, W A; Orams, H J

    1989-01-01

    Laser-induced changes in plano-parallel sections were examined by light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and correlated with ultrastructural changes as observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). LM and SEM revealed two different changes--extensive crazing, and crazing and cratering. Rough exposed enamel was commonly found, resulting from lifting off and removal of the top layer of crazed, or crazed and cratered, enamel. The type of induced change was mainly dependent on the energy density used (range approximately 0.8 to approximately 200 J cm-2) and on enamel prism orientation. Lased enamel was also softer than unlased enamel. TEM of both crazed enamel and rough exposed enamel revealed that most crystals generally resembled those of unlased enamel in size and shape, but that inter- and intra-crystalline voids were present in some areas. The crazed and cratered enamel had significant ultrastructural changes: new homogeneous and inhomogeneous crystals of apatite with a different shape and larger size than those of the original, and a loss of prismatic structure. The lack of uniformity of the laser effect on crazed and cratered enamel was shown by variation in crystal packing (from good to poor), variations in crystal size from area to area, and the presence of pockets of poorly packed homogeneous crystals alongside pockets of well-packed inhomogeneous crystals. The crazing, crazing and cratering, rough exposed enamel and the greater number of voids, as well as the relative softness of lased enamel do not indicate an overall ultrastructural improvement. However, the larger apatite crystal size and loss of prismatic structure in crazed and cratered areas may partly explain previous observations of reduced rates of subsurface demineralization in lased enamel. PMID:2512902

  16. Chemical composition of modern and fossil Hippopotamid teeth and implications for paleoenvironmental reconstructions and enamel formation - Part 1: Major and minor element variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brügmann, G.; Krause, J.; Brachert, T. C.; Kullmer, O.; Schrenk, F.; Ssemmanda, I.; Mertz, D. F.

    2012-01-01

    Bioapatite in mammalian teeth is readily preserved in continental sediments and represents a very important archive for reconstructions of environment and climate evolution. This project provides a comprehensive data base of major, minor and trace element and isotope tracers for tooth apatite using a variety of microanalytical techniques. The aim is to identify specific sedimentary environments and to improve our understanding on the interaction between internal metabolic processes during tooth formation and external nutritional control and secondary alteration effects. Here, we use the electron microprobe to determine the major and minor element contents of fossil and modern molar enamel, cement and dentin from Hippopotamids. Most of the studied specimens are from different ecosystems in Eastern Africa, representing modern and fossil lacustrine (Lake Kikorongo, Lake Albert, and Lake Malawi) and modern fluvial environments of the Nile River system. Secondary alteration effects - in particular FeO, MnO, SO3 and F concentrations - are 2 to 10 times higher in fossil than in modern enamel; the secondary enrichment of these components in fossil dentin and cement is even higher. In modern and fossil enamel, along sections perpendicular to the enamel-dentin junction (EDJ) or along cervix-apex profiles, P2O5 and CaO contents and the CaO/P2O5 ratios are very constant (StdDev ∼1%). Linear regression analysis reveals tight control of the MgO (R2∼0.6), Na2O and Cl variation (for both R2>0.84) along EDJ-outer enamel rim profiles, despite large concentration variations (40% to 300%) across the enamel. These minor elements show well defined distribution patterns in enamel, similar in all specimens regardless of their age and origin, as the concentration of MgO and Na2O decrease from the enamel-dentin junction (EDJ) towards the outer rim, whereas Cl displays the opposite trend. Fossil enamel from Hippopotamids which lived in the saline Lake Kikorongo have a much higher Mg

  17. Chemical composition of modern and fossil Hippopotamid teeth and implications for paleoenvironmental reconstructions and enamel formation: 1. major and minor element variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brügmann, G.; Krause, J.; Brachert, T. C.; Kullmer, O.; Schrenk, F.; Ssemmanda, I.; Mertz, D. F.

    2011-05-01

    Bioapatite in mammalian teeth is readily preserved in continental sediments and represents a very important archive for reconstructions of environment and climate evolution. This project intends to provide a detailed data base of major, minor and trace element and isotope tracers for tooth apatite using a variety of microanalytical techniques. The aim is to identify specific sedimentary environments and to improve our understanding on the interaction between internal metabolic processes during tooth formation and external nutritional control and secondary alteration effects. Here, we use the electron microprobe, to determine the major and minor element contents of fossil and modern molar enamel, cement and dentin from hippopotamids. Most of the studied specimens are from different ecosystems in Eastern Africa, representing modern and fossil lakustrine (Lake Kikorongo, Lake Albert, and Lake Malawi) and modern fluvial environments of the Nile River system. Secondary alteration effects in particular FeO, MnO, SO3 and F concentrations, which are 2 to 10 times higher in fossil than in modern enamel; secondary enrichments in fossil dentin and cement are even higher. In modern and fossil enamel, along sections perpendicular to the enamel-dentin junction (EDJ) or along cervix-apex profiles, P2O5 and CaO contents and the CaO/P2O5 ratios are very constant (StdDev ~1 %). Linear regression analysis reveals very tight control of the MgO (R2∼0.6), Na2O and Cl variation (for both R2>0.84) along EDJ-outer enamel rim profiles, despite large concentration variations (40 % to 300 %) across the enamel. These minor elements show well defined distribution patterns in enamel, similar in all specimens regardless of their age and origin, as the concentration of MgO and Na2O decrease from the enamel-dentin junction (EDJ) towards the outer rim, whereas Cl displays the opposite variation. Fossil enamel from hippopotamids which lived in the saline Lake Kikorongo have a much higher MgO/Na2O

  18. Chemical composition of modern and fossil Hippopotamid teeth and implications for paleoenvironmental reconstructions and enamel formation: 1. major and minor element variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brügmann, G.; Krause, J.; Brachert, T. C.; Kullmer, O.; Schrenk, F.; Ssemmanda, I.; Mertz, D. F.

    2011-05-01

    Bioapatite in mammalian teeth is readily preserved in continental sediments and represents a very important archive for reconstructions of environment and climate evolution. This project intends to provide a detailed data base of major, minor and trace element and isotope tracers for tooth apatite using a variety of microanalytical techniques. The aim is to identify specific sedimentary environments and to improve our understanding on the interaction between internal metabolic processes during tooth formation and external nutritional control and secondary alteration effects. Here, we use the electron microprobe, to determine the major and minor element contents of fossil and modern molar enamel, cement and dentin from hippopotamids. Most of the studied specimens are from different ecosystems in Eastern Africa, representing modern and fossil lakustrine (Lake Kikorongo, Lake Albert, and Lake Malawi) and modern fluvial environments of the Nile River system. Secondary alteration effects in particular FeO, MnO, SO3 and F concentrations, which are 2 to 10 times higher in fossil than in modern enamel; secondary enrichments in fossil dentin and cement are even higher. In modern and fossil enamel, along sections perpendicular to the enamel-dentin junction (EDJ) or along cervix-apex profiles, P2O5 and CaO contents and the CaO/P2O5 ratios are very constant (StdDev ~1 %). Linear regression analysis reveals very tight control of the MgO (R2∼0.6), Na2O and Cl variation (for both R2>0.84) along EDJ-outer enamel rim profiles, despite large concentration variations (40 % to 300 %) across the enamel. These minor elements show well defined distribution patterns in enamel, similar in all specimens regardless of their age and origin, as the concentration of MgO and Na2O decrease from the enamel-dentin junction (EDJ) towards the outer rim, whereas Cl displays the opposite variation. Fossil enamel from hippopotamids which lived in the saline Lake Kikorongo have a much higher MgO/Na2O

  19. Chemical composition of modern and fossil Hippopotamid teeth and implications for paleoenvironmental reconstructions and enamel formation - Part 1: Major and minor element variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brügmann, G.; Krause, J.; Brachert, T. C.; Kullmer, O.; Schrenk, F.; Ssemmanda, I.; Mertz, D. F.

    2012-01-01

    Bioapatite in mammalian teeth is readily preserved in continental sediments and represents a very important archive for reconstructions of environment and climate evolution. This project provides a comprehensive data base of major, minor and trace element and isotope tracers for tooth apatite using a variety of microanalytical techniques. The aim is to identify specific sedimentary environments and to improve our understanding on the interaction between internal metabolic processes during tooth formation and external nutritional control and secondary alteration effects. Here, we use the electron microprobe to determine the major and minor element contents of fossil and modern molar enamel, cement and dentin from Hippopotamids. Most of the studied specimens are from different ecosystems in Eastern Africa, representing modern and fossil lacustrine (Lake Kikorongo, Lake Albert, and Lake Malawi) and modern fluvial environments of the Nile River system. Secondary alteration effects - in particular FeO, MnO, SO3 and F concentrations - are 2 to 10 times higher in fossil than in modern enamel; the secondary enrichment of these components in fossil dentin and cement is even higher. In modern and fossil enamel, along sections perpendicular to the enamel-dentin junction (EDJ) or along cervix-apex profiles, P2O5 and CaO contents and the CaO/P2O5 ratios are very constant (StdDev ∼1%). Linear regression analysis reveals tight control of the MgO (R2∼0.6), Na2O and Cl variation (for both R2>0.84) along EDJ-outer enamel rim profiles, despite large concentration variations (40% to 300%) across the enamel. These minor elements show well defined distribution patterns in enamel, similar in all specimens regardless of their age and origin, as the concentration of MgO and Na2O decrease from the enamel-dentin junction (EDJ) towards the outer rim, whereas Cl displays the opposite trend. Fossil enamel from Hippopotamids which lived in the saline Lake Kikorongo have a much higher Mg

  20. Modelling of micromachining of human tooth enamel by erbium laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, A. V.; Skrypnik, A. V.; Shatilova, K. V.

    2014-08-01

    We consider a 3D cellular model of human tooth enamel and a photomechanical cellular model of enamel ablation by erbium laser radiation, taking into account the structural peculiarities of enamel, energy distribution in the laser beam cross section and attenuation of laser energy in biological tissue. The surface area of the texture in enamel is calculated after its micromachining by erbium laser radiation. The influence of the surface area on the bond strength of enamel with dental filling materials is discussed. A good correlation between the computer simulation of the total work of adhesion and experimentally measured bond strength between the dental filling material and the tooth enamel after its micromachining by means of YAG : Er laser radiation is attained.

  1. Modelling of micromachining of human tooth enamel by erbium laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Belikov, A V; Skrypnik, A V; Shatilova, K V

    2014-08-31

    We consider a 3D cellular model of human tooth enamel and a photomechanical cellular model of enamel ablation by erbium laser radiation, taking into account the structural peculiarities of enamel, energy distribution in the laser beam cross section and attenuation of laser energy in biological tissue. The surface area of the texture in enamel is calculated after its micromachining by erbium laser radiation. The influence of the surface area on the bond strength of enamel with dental filling materials is discussed. A good correlation between the computer simulation of the total work of adhesion and experimentally measured bond strength between the dental filling material and the tooth enamel after its micromachining by means of YAG : Er laser radiation is attained. (laser biophotonics)

  2. Enamel hypoplasia in a pliocene hominid from Chad.

    PubMed

    Brunet, Michel; Fronty, Pierre; Sapanet, Michel; de Bonis, Louis; Viriot, Laurent

    2002-01-01

    Abel is the first Australopithecine known west of the East African Rift Valley. The fossil finds include a perisymphyseal fragment of an adult mandible with well-preserved crowns of the right I2-P4 and the left C-P4. Abel's dentition displays many enamel defects, which are described in detail for each tooth. Pitting affected every tooth, while larger, shallow depressions were observed on the canines alone. From two to four pit bands occurred on the different teeth, each resulting from a separate hypoplastic episode. In modern humans, a large number of causes, both environmental and genetic, have been suggested for such enamel defects. It seems probable that Abel's pathology was systemic. However, the occurrence of a number of bands and the variable intensity of the attacks make it difficult to say whether there was a single, repetitive cause or different etiologies. Possible causes discussed here include recurrent fevers and seasonal nutritional deficiencies. PMID:12489142

  3. Optical coherence tomography for evaluation of enamel and protective coatings.

    PubMed

    Alsayed, Ehab Z; Hariri, Ilnaz; Sadr, Alireza; Nakashima, Syozi; Bakhsh, Turki A; Shimada, Yasushi; Sumi, Yasunori; Tagami, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an interferometric imaging technique. This study aimed to employ OCT to evaluate four different resin-based materials including a coating containing glass-ionomer filler and calcium, a giomer, and two fluoride-releasing self-etch resins. The coating and its underlying and adjacent enamel were monitored using swept-source OCT (center wavelength: 1330 nm) at baseline, after 5,000 thermal cycles, and after 1, 4 and 7 days of demineralization (pH 4.5). The coatings showed different thicknesses (60-250 micrometers) and various levels of structural and interfacial integrity. OCT could detect a demineralization inhibition zone adjacent to the edge of the fluoride- and calcium-releasing material. Localized demineralization was occasionally observed under thinner coatings. Protection of susceptible enamel surfaces by thin resin-based bioactive coatings provides protection from demineralization. OCT can be used to non-destructively monitor the integrity of such coatings, as well as enamel changes beneath and adjacent to them. PMID:25748465

  4. Enamel inspired nano-composite fabrication through amelogenin supramolecular assembly

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yuwei; Sun, Zhi; Wang, Rizhi; Abbott, Christopher; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2007-01-01

    Fabricating the structures similar to dental enamel through the in vitro preparation method is of great interest in the field of dentistry and material science. Developing enamel is composed of calcium phosphate mineral, water, and enamel matrix proteins, mainly amelogenins. To prepare a material mimicking such composition a novel approach of simultaneously assembling amelogenin and calcium phosphate precipitates by electrolytic deposition was established. It was found that recombinant full-length amelogenin (rP172) self-assembled into nanochain structures during electrolytic deposition (following increase in solution pH), and had significant effect on the induction of the parallel bundles of calcium phosphate nanocrystals, grown on semiconductive silicon wafer surface. When a truncated amelogenin (rP148) was used; no nano-chain assembly was observed, neither parallel bundles were formed. The coating obtained in the presence of rP172 had improved elastic modulus and hardness when compared to the coating incorporated with rP148. Our data suggest that the formation of organized bundles in amelogenin-apatite composites is mainly driven by amelogenin nanochain assembly and highlights the potential of such composite for future application as dental restorative materials. PMID:17382381

  5. Development of porcelain enamel passive thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, H.; Lent, W. E.; Buettner, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    A white porcelain enamel coating was developed for application to high temperature metallic alloy substrates on spacecraft. The coating consists of an optically opacifying zirconia pigment, a lithia-zirconia-silica frit, and an inorganic pigment dispersant. The coating is fired at 1000 to 1150 C to form the enamel. The coating has a solar absorptance of 0.22 and a total normal emittance of 0.82 for a 0.017 cm thick coating. The coating exhibits excellent adhesion, cleanability, and integrity and is thermal shock resistant to 900 C. Capability to coat large panels has been demonstrated by successful coating of 30 cm x 30 cm Hastelloy X alloy panels. Preliminary development of low temperature enamels for application to aluminum and titanium alloy substrates was initiated. It was determined that both leaded and leadless frits were feasible when applied with appropriate mill fluxes. Indications were that opacification could be achieved at firing temperatures below 540 C for extended periods of time.

  6. Continuum damage modeling and simulation of hierarchical dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Songyun; Scheider, Ingo; Bargmann, Swantje

    2016-05-01

    Dental enamel exhibits high fracture toughness and stiffness due to a complex hierarchical and graded microstructure, optimally organized from nano- to macro-scale. In this study, a 3D representative volume element (RVE) model is adopted to study the deformation and damage behavior of the fibrous microstructure. A continuum damage mechanics model coupled to hyperelasticity is developed for modeling the initiation and evolution of damage in the mineral fibers as well as protein matrix. Moreover, debonding of the interface between mineral fiber and protein is captured by employing a cohesive zone model. The dependence of the failure mechanism on the aspect ratio of the mineral fibers is investigated. In addition, the effect of the interface strength on the damage behavior is studied with respect to geometric features of enamel. Further, the effect of an initial flaw on the overall mechanical properties is analyzed to understand the superior damage tolerance of dental enamel. The simulation results are validated by comparison to experimental data from micro-cantilever beam testing at two hierarchical levels. The transition of the failure mechanism at different hierarchical levels is also well reproduced in the simulations.

  7. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina; Espejo, Luciana Cardoso; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Teixeira, Fernanda de Sa; Luz, Maria Aparecida A. Cerqueira; Garone-Netto, Narciso; Matos, Adriana Bona; Salvadori, Maria Cecilia Barbosa da Silveira

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm × 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  8. Effects of enamel matrix genes on dental caries are moderated by fluoride exposures

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, John R.; Carlson, Jenna C.; Stanley, Brooklyn O. C.; Feingold, Eleanor; Cooper, Margaret; Vanyukov, Michael M.; Maher, Brion S.; Slayton, Rebecca L.; Willing, Marcia C.; Reis, Steven E.; McNeil, Daniel W.; Crout, Richard J.; Weyant, Robert J.; Levy, Steven M.; Vieira, Alexandre R.; Marazita, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries (tooth decay) is the most common chronic disease, worldwide, affecting most children and adults. Though dental caries is highly heritable, few caries-related genes have been discovered. We investigated whether 18 genetic variants in the group of nonamelogenin enamel matrix genes (AMBN, ENAM, TUFT1, and TFIP11) were associated with dental caries experience in 13 age- and race-stratified samples from six parent studies (N=3,600). Linear regression was used to model genetic associations and test gene-byfluoride interaction effects for two sources of fluoride: daily tooth brushing and home water fluoride concentration. Meta-analysis was used to combine results across five child and eight adult samples. We observed the statistically significant association of rs2337359 upstream of TUFT1 with dental caries experience via meta-analysis across adult samples (p<0.002) and the suggestive association for multiple variants in TFIP11 across child samples (p<0.05). Moreover, we discovered two genetic variants (rs2337359 upstream of TUFT1 and missense rs7439186 in AMBN) involved in gene-by-fluoride interactions. For each interaction, participants with the risk allele/genotype exhibited greater dental caries experience only if they were not exposed to the source of fluoride. Altogether, these results confirm that variation in enamel matrix genes contributes to individual differences in dental caries liability, and demonstrate that the effects of these genes may be moderated by protective fluoride exposures. In short, genes may exert greater influence on dental caries in unprotected environments, or equivalently, the protective effects of fluoride may obviate the effects of genetic risk alleles. PMID:25373699

  9. Effects of enamel matrix genes on dental caries are moderated by fluoride exposures.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, John R; Carlson, Jenna C; Stanley, Brooklyn O C; Feingold, Eleanor; Cooper, Margaret; Vanyukov, Michael M; Maher, Brion S; Slayton, Rebecca L; Willing, Marcia C; Reis, Steven E; McNeil, Daniel W; Crout, Richard J; Weyant, Robert J; Levy, Steven M; Vieira, Alexandre R; Marazita, Mary L

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries (tooth decay) is the most common chronic disease, worldwide, affecting most children and adults. Though dental caries is highly heritable, few caries-related genes have been discovered. We investigated whether 18 genetic variants in the group of non-amelogenin enamel matrix genes (AMBN, ENAM, TUFT1, and TFIP11) were associated with dental caries experience in 13 age- and race-stratified samples from six parent studies (N = 3,600). Linear regression was used to model genetic associations and test gene-by-fluoride interaction effects for two sources of fluoride: daily tooth brushing and home water fluoride concentration. Meta-analysis was used to combine results across five child and eight adult samples. We observed the statistically significant association of rs2337359 upstream of TUFT1 with dental caries experience via meta-analysis across adult samples (p < 0.002) and the suggestive association for multiple variants in TFIP11 across child samples (p < 0.05). Moreover, we discovered two genetic variants (rs2337359 upstream of TUFT1 and missense rs7439186 in AMBN) involved in gene-by-fluoride interactions. For each interaction, participants with the risk allele/genotype exhibited greater dental caries experience only if they were not exposed to the source of fluoride. Altogether, these results confirm that variation in enamel matrix genes contributes to individual differences in dental caries liability, and demonstrate that the effects of these genes may be moderated by protective fluoride exposures. In short, genes may exert greater influence on dental caries in unprotected environments, or equivalently, the protective effects of fluoride may obviate the effects of genetic risk alleles. PMID:25373699

  10. Bmp2 Deletion Causes an Amelogenesis Imperfecta Phenotype Via Regulating Enamel Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    GUO, FENG; FENG, JUNSHENG; WANG, FENG; LI, WENTONG; GAO, QINGPING; CHEN, ZHUO; SHOFF, LISA; DONLY, KEVIN J.; GLUHAK-HEINRICH, JELICA; CHUN, YONG HEE PATRICIA; HARRIS, STEPHEN E.; MACDOUGALL, MARY; CHEN, SHUO

    2015-01-01

    Although Bmp2 is essential for tooth formation, the role of Bmp2 during enamel formation remains unknown in vivo. In this study, the role of Bmp2 in regulation of enamel formation was investigated by the Bmp2 conditional knock out (Bmp2 cKO) mice. Teeth of Bmp2 cKO mice displayed severe and profound phenotypes with asymmetric and misshaped incisors as well as abrasion of incisors and molars. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that the enamel layer was hypoplastic and enamel lacked a typical prismatic pattern. Teeth from null mice were much more brittle as tested by shear and compressive moduli. Expression of enamel matrix protein genes, amelogenin, enamelin, and enamel-processing proteases, Mmp-20 and Klk4 was reduced in the Bmp2 cKO teeth as reflected in a reduced enamel formation. Exogenous Bmp2 up-regulated those gene expressions in mouse enamel organ epithelial cells. This result for the first time indicates Bmp2 signaling is essential for proper enamel development and mineralization in vivo. PMID:25545831

  11. Circadian Rhythm Regulates Development of Enamel in Mouse Mandibular First Molar.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jiang; Zhai, Yue; Park, Hyun; Han, Junli; Dong, Jianhui; Xie, Ming; Gu, Ting; Lewi, Keidren; Ji, Fang; Jia, William

    2016-01-01

    Rhythmic incremental growth lines and the presence of melatonin receptors were discovered in tooth enamel, suggesting possible role of circadian rhythm. We therefore hypothesized that circadian rhythm may regulate enamel formation through melatonin receptors. To test this hypothesis, we examined expression of melatonin receptors (MTs) and amelogenin (AMELX), a maker of enamel formation, during tooth germ development in mouse. Using qRT-PCR and immunocytochemistry, we found that mRNA and protein levels of both MTs and AMELX in normal mandibular first molar tooth germs increased gradually after birth, peaked at 3 or 4 day postnatal, and then decreased. Expression of MTs and AMELX by immunocytochemistry was significantly delayed in neonatal mice raised in all-dark or all-light environment as well as the enamel development. Furthermore, development of tooth enamel was also delayed showing significant immature histology in those animals, especially for newborn mice raised in all daylight condition. Interestingly, disruption in circadian rhythm in pregnant mice also resulted in delayed enamel development in their babies. Treatment with melatonin receptor antagonist 4P-PDOT in pregnant mice caused underexpression of MTs and AMELX associated with long-lasting deficiency in baby enamel tissue. Electromicroscopic evidence demonstrated increased necrosis and poor enamel mineralization in ameloblasts. The above results suggest that circadian rhythm is important for normal enamel development at both pre- and postnatal stages. Melatonin receptors were partly responsible for the regulation. PMID:27494172

  12. Toothbrush resistance and fluoride retention of sound, etched, fluoridated, and remineralized bovine enamel.

    PubMed

    Valk, J W; Duijsters, P P; Davidson, C L

    1986-04-01

    The wear resistance of tooth enamel that had undergone eight different treatments regarding the bonding procedure has been investigated. In comparison to sound enamel, the outer 3 microns of the etched-surface enamel show a decreased wear resistance against toothbrushing in vitro. Remineralization, either direct or preceded by acidified phosphated fluoride (APF) application, did not improve the wear resistance. The prophylactic effect of the APF treatment of etched enamel is considerable and is not lost after the soft, outer surface layer has worn off. PMID:3457528

  13. Circadian Rhythm Regulates Development of Enamel in Mouse Mandibular First Molar

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jiang; Zhai, Yue; Park, Hyun; Han, Junli; Dong, Jianhui; Xie, Ming; Gu, Ting; Lewi, Keidren; Ji, Fang; Jia, William

    2016-01-01

    Rhythmic incremental growth lines and the presence of melatonin receptors were discovered in tooth enamel, suggesting possible role of circadian rhythm. We therefore hypothesized that circadian rhythm may regulate enamel formation through melatonin receptors. To test this hypothesis, we examined expression of melatonin receptors (MTs) and amelogenin (AMELX), a maker of enamel formation, during tooth germ development in mouse. Using qRT-PCR and immunocytochemistry, we found that mRNA and protein levels of both MTs and AMELX in normal mandibular first molar tooth germs increased gradually after birth, peaked at 3 or 4 day postnatal, and then decreased. Expression of MTs and AMELX by immunocytochemistry was significantly delayed in neonatal mice raised in all-dark or all-light environment as well as the enamel development. Furthermore, development of tooth enamel was also delayed showing significant immature histology in those animals, especially for newborn mice raised in all daylight condition. Interestingly, disruption in circadian rhythm in pregnant mice also resulted in delayed enamel development in their babies. Treatment with melatonin receptor antagonist 4P-PDOT in pregnant mice caused underexpression of MTs and AMELX associated with long-lasting deficiency in baby enamel tissue. Electromicroscopic evidence demonstrated increased necrosis and poor enamel mineralization in ameloblasts. The above results suggest that circadian rhythm is important for normal enamel development at both pre- and postnatal stages. Melatonin receptors were partly responsible for the regulation. PMID:27494172

  14. Near-surface structural examination of human tooth enamel subject to in vitro demineralization and remineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaines, Carmen Veronica

    The early stages of chemical tooth decay are governed by dynamic processes of demineralization and remineralization of dental enamel that initiates along the surface of the tooth. Conventional diagnostic techniques lack the spatial resolution required to analyze near-surface structural changes in enamel at the submicron level. In this study, slabs of highly-polished, decay-free human enamel were subjected to 0.12M EDTA and buffered lactic acid demineralizing agents and MI Paste(TM) and calcifying (0.1 ppm F) remineralizing treatments in vitro. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXD), a technique typically used for thin film analysis, provided depth profiles of crystallinity changes in surface enamel with a resolution better than 100 nm. In conjunction with nanoindentation, a technique gaining acceptance as a means of examining the mechanical properties of sound enamel, these results were corroborated with well-established microscopy and Raman techniques to assess the nanohardness, morphologies and chemical nature of treated enamel. Interestingly, the average crystallite size of surface enamel along its c-axis dimension increased by nearly 40% after a 60 min EDTA treatment as detected by GIXD. This result was in direct contrast to the obvious surface degradation observed by microscopic and confocal Raman imaging. A decrease in nanohardness from 4.86 +/- 0.44 GPa to 0.28 +/- 0.10 GPa was observed. Collective results suggest that mineral dissolution characteristics evident on the micron scale may not be fully translated to the nanoscale in assessing the integrity of chemically-modified tooth enamel. While an intuitive decrease in enamel crystallinity was observed with buffered lactic acid-treated samples, demineralization was too slow to adequately quantify the enamel property changes seen. MI Paste(TM) treatment of EDTA-demineralized enamel showed preferential growth along the a-axis direction. Calcifying solution treatments of both demineralized sample types

  15. Enamel structure and composition in the tricho-dento-osseous syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spangler, G S; Hall, K I; Kula, K; Hart, T C; Wright, J T

    1998-01-01

    Tricho-dento-osseous syndrome (TDO) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by curly hair, hypoplastic enamel, taurodontism, and dense bone. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the enamel defects in a TDO population in North Carolina. Twelve TDO teeth and 12 normal teeth were examined. The enamel thickness was decreased in all TDO teeth ranging from having no enamel to about 60% the thickness of normal teeth. Half of the TDO teeth had primarily prismless enamel while the remainder had at least occasional areas of prismatic enamel. TDO enamel crystallites appeared similar to normal crystallites with TEM. The mineral per volume of TDO enamel (n = 9) (68.5%) was significantly less, on average, compared with normal enamel (n = 8) (84.5). The genetic mutation responsible for the TDO phenotype results in alteration of a developmental pathway(s) common to hair, teeth and bone. This further illustrates that these embryologically diverse tissues share common developmental controls at the molecular level. PMID:11062998

  16. A new method of retrospective radiation dosimetry: Optically stimulated luminescence in dental enamel

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey-Smith, D.I.; Pass, B.

    1997-05-01

    Currently, retrospective biophysical radiation dosimetry lacks a technique that is sensitive, non-invasive, and portable. This has made reliable cause and effect relationships between radiation exposure and its outcomes in humans difficult to establish. Since optical technology is amenable to miniaturization, a search for optically stimulated luminescence in dental enamel was begun. The first successful detection of time dependent optically stimulated luminescence from {gamma} irradiated enamel was accomplished. This luminescence is absent in enamel that is not irradiated or that was heated following irradiation. Thermoluminescence observations were made concurrently with the optical measurements which clarified the role of the organic component of enamel. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  17. The effects of chronic high fluoride levels on forming enamel in the rat.

    PubMed

    DenBesten, P K; Crenshaw, M A

    1984-01-01

    Sixty-gramme rats were given either 0, 75, 100 or 150 parts/10(6) fluoride in their drinking water. After five weeks, the fluoride, the phosphorus and the protein contents of the enamel were compared in control and experimental animals at three stages of enamel development. The mineral content was reduced in pigmented enamel from animals given 75 parts/10(6) or more fluoride in their drinking water. The fluoride content was elevated in all stages of fluorosed enamel development. At the lowest fluoride level (75 parts/10(6], a larger proline content was found in the proteins of the maturing, fluorosed enamel but there was no increase in the protein content. In animals given 100 parts/10(6) fluoride in their drinking water, the proline content of the protein was greater in maturing, fluorosed enamel, and the total protein content of the post-secretory enamel (maturing and pigmented) was greater than in the controls. These observations indicate that, with increasing levels of fluoride in drinking water, there was an initial delay in the loss of the amelogenin proteins followed by a decreased removal of total protein from the enamel. These results indicate that fluoride interfered with the normal post-secretory, pre-eruptive development of enamel. PMID:6594099

  18. Bmp2 deletion causes an amelogenesis imperfecta phenotype via regulating enamel gene expression.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Feng, Junsheng; Wang, Feng; Li, Wentong; Gao, Qingping; Chen, Zhuo; Shoff, Lisa; Donly, Kevin J; Gluhak-Heinrich, Jelica; Chun, Yong Hee Patricia; Harris, Stephen E; MacDougall, Mary; Chen, Shuo

    2015-08-01

    Although Bmp2 is essential for tooth formation, the role of Bmp2 during enamel formation remains unknown in vivo. In this study, the role of Bmp2 in regulation of enamel formation was investigated by the Bmp2 conditional knock out (Bmp2 cKO) mice. Teeth of Bmp2 cKO mice displayed severe and profound phenotypes with asymmetric and misshaped incisors as well as abrasion of incisors and molars. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that the enamel layer was hypoplastic and enamel lacked a typical prismatic pattern. Teeth from null mice were much more brittle as tested by shear and compressive moduli. Expression of enamel matrix protein genes, amelogenin, enamelin, and enamel-processing proteases, Mmp-20 and Klk4 was reduced in the Bmp2 cKO teeth as reflected in a reduced enamel formation. Exogenous Bmp2 up-regulated those gene expressions in mouse enamel organ epithelial cells. This result for the first time indicates Bmp2 signaling is essential for proper enamel development and mineralization in vivo. PMID:25545831

  19. Comparative studies between mice molars and incisors are required to draw an overview of enamel structural complexity

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Michel; Kellermann, O.; Dimitrova-Nakov, S.; Harichane, Y.; Baudry, A.

    2014-01-01

    In the field of dentistry, the murine incisor has long been considered as an outstanding model to study amelogenesis. However, it clearly appears that enamel from wild type mouse incisors and molars presents several structural differences. In incisor, exclusively radial enamel is observed. In molars, enamel displays a high level of complexity since the inner part is lamellar whereas the outer enamel shows radial and tangential structures. Recently, the serotonin 2B receptor (5-HT2BR) was shown to be involved in ameloblast function and enamel mineralization. The incisors from 5HT2BR knockout (KO) mice exhibit mineralization defects mostly in the outer maturation zone and porous matrix network in the inner zone. In the molars, the mutation affects both secretory and maturation stages of amelogenesis since pronounced alterations concern overall enamel structures. Molars from 5HT2BR KO mice display reduction in enamel thickness, alterations of inner enamel architecture including defects in Hunter-Schreger Bands arrangements, and altered maturation of the outer radial enamel. Differences of enamel structure were also observed between incisor and molar from other KO mice depleted for genes encoding enamel extracellular matrix proteins. Thus, upon mutation, enamel analysis based exclusively on incisor defects would be biased. In view of the functional relationship between enamel structure and tooth morphogenesis, identification of molecular actors involved in amelogenesis requires comparative studies between mice molars and incisors. PMID:25285079

  20. In vitro re-hardening of artificial enamel caries lesions using enamel matrix proteins or self-assembling peptides.

    PubMed

    Schmidlin, Patrick; Zobrist, Katja; Attin, Thomas; Wegehaupt, Florian

    2016-02-01

    Objectives To assess the re-hardening potential of enamel matrix derivatives (EMD) and self-assembling peptides in vitro, hypothesizing that these materials may increase the mineralization of artificial carious lesions and improve hardness profiles. Material and Methods Forty-eight enamel samples were prepared from extracted bovine lower central incisors. After embedding and polishing, nail varnish was applied, leaving a defined test area. One third of this area was covered with a flowable composite (non-demineralized control). The remaining area was demineralized in an acidic buffer solution for 18 d to simulate a carious lesion. Half the demineralized area was then covered with composite (demineralized control), while the last third was left open for three test and one control treatments: (A) Application of enamel-matrix proteins (EMD - lyophilized protein fractions dissolved in acetic acid, Straumann), (B) self-assembling peptides (SAP, Curodont), or (C) amine fluoride solution (Am-F, GABA) for 5 min each. Untreated samples (D) served as control. After treatment, samples were immersed in artificial saliva for four weeks (remineralization phase) and microhardness (Knoop) depth profiles (25-300 µm) were obtained at sections. Two-way ANOVA was calculated to determine differences between the areas (re-hardening or softening). Results Decalcification resulted in significant softening of the subsurface enamel in all groups (A-D). A significant re-hardening up to 125 µm was observed in the EMD and SAP groups. Conclusions This study showed that EMD and SAP were able to improve the hardness profiles when applied to deep demineralized artificial lesions. However, further research is needed to verify and improve this observed effect. PMID:27008255

  1. In vitro re-hardening of artificial enamel caries lesions using enamel matrix proteins or self-assembling peptides

    PubMed Central

    Schmidlin, Patrick; Zobrist, Katja; Attin, Thomas; Wegehaupt, Florian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To assess the re-hardening potential of enamel matrix derivatives (EMD) and self-assembling peptides in vitro, hypothesizing that these materials may increase the mineralization of artificial carious lesions and improve hardness profiles. Material and Methods Forty-eight enamel samples were prepared from extracted bovine lower central incisors. After embedding and polishing, nail varnish was applied, leaving a defined test area. One third of this area was covered with a flowable composite (non-demineralized control). The remaining area was demineralized in an acidic buffer solution for 18 d to simulate a carious lesion. Half the demineralized area was then covered with composite (demineralized control), while the last third was left open for three test and one control treatments: (A) Application of enamel-matrix proteins (EMD - lyophilized protein fractions dissolved in acetic acid, Straumann), (B) self-assembling peptides (SAP, Curodont), or (C) amine fluoride solution (Am-F, GABA) for 5 min each. Untreated samples (D) served as control. After treatment, samples were immersed in artificial saliva for four weeks (remineralization phase) and microhardness (Knoop) depth profiles (25-300 µm) were obtained at sections. Two-way ANOVA was calculated to determine differences between the areas (re-hardening or softening). Results Decalcification resulted in significant softening of the subsurface enamel in all groups (A-D). A significant re-hardening up to 125 µm was observed in the EMD and SAP groups. Conclusions This study showed that EMD and SAP were able to improve the hardness profiles when applied to deep demineralized artificial lesions. However, further research is needed to verify and improve this observed effect. PMID:27008255

  2. Effect of enamel etching time on roughness and bond strength.

    PubMed

    Barkmeier, Wayne W; Erickson, Robert L; Kimmes, Nicole S; Latta, Mark A; Wilwerding, Terry M

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined the effect of different enamel conditioning times on surface roughness and bond strength using an etch-and-rinse system and four self-etch adhesives. Surface roughness (Ra) and composite to enamel shear bond strengths (SBS) were determined following the treatment of flat ground human enamel (4000 grit) with five adhesive systems: (1) Adper Single Bond Plus (SBP), (2) Adper Prompt L-Pop (PLP), (3) Clearfil SE Bond (CSE), (4) Clearfil S3 Bond (CS3) and (5) Xeno IV (X4), using recommended treatment times and an extended treatment time of 60 seconds (n = 10/group). Control groups were also included for Ra (4000 grit surface) and SBS (no enamel treatment and Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Adhesive). For surface roughness measurements, the phosphoric acid conditioner of the SBP etch-and-rinse system was rinsed from the surface with an air-water spray, and the other four self-etch adhesive agents were removed with alternating rinses of water and acetone. A Proscan 2000 non-contact profilometer was used to determine Ra values. Composite (Z100) to enamel bond strengths (24 hours) were determined using Ultradent fixtures and they were debonded with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. The data were analyzed with ANOVA and Fisher's LSD post-hoc test. The etch-and- rinse system (SBP) produced the highest Ra (microm) and SBS (MPa) using both the recommended treatment time (0.352 +/- 0.028 microm and 40.5 +/- 6.1 MPa) and the extended treatment time (0.733 +/- 0.122 microm and 44.2 +/- 8.2 MPa). The Ra and SBS of the etch-and-rinse system were significantly greater (p < 0.05) than all the self-etch systems and controls. Increasing the treatment time with phosphoric acid (SBP) and PLP produced greater surface roughness (p < 0.05) but did not result in significantly higher bond strengths (p > 0.05). PMID:19363978

  3. Microstructure and mechanical changes induced by Q-Switched pulse laser on human enamel with aim of caries prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apsari, R.; Pratomo, D. A.; Hikmawati, D.; Bidin, N.

    2016-03-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of Q-Switched Nd: YAG laser energy dose to human enamel caries. The specifications of Q-Switched Nd: YAG laser as followed: wavelength of 1064 nm and 6 ns pulse width. Caries enamel samples taken from human teeth molars of 17-35 ages and the type of media caries. Energy doses used in this study were 723.65 mJ/cm2, 767.72 mJ/cm2, and 1065.515 mJ/cm2; 5 Hz repetition rate, and 20 second exposure time. Samples characterized the surface morphology and the percentage of constituent elements, especially calcium/phosphorus (Ca/P) with FESEM-EDAX. The fraction volume and crystallinity percentage of hydroxyapatite (HA) with XRD and hardness value using Vickers Microhardness Test. The results indicated that exposure of Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser on enamel caries resulting cracks, holes, and melt due to plasma production effects in the surface. Plasma production effect also resulted in micro properties such as percentage of Ca/P was close to normal, the fraction volume and crystallinity percentage of HA went up but did not change the crystal structure (in terms of the lattice structure). The hardness value also rose as linear as exposure energy dose caused by phototermal effect. Based on the results, Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser can be used as contactless drill dental caries replacement candidate with the additional therapy effect such as localized caries in order to avoid the spread, the ratio of Ca/P approaching healthy teeth, the fraction volume and crystallinity percentage of HA rose and established stronger teeth with peak energy dose 1065.515 mJ/cm2.

  4. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  5. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  6. Impact wear behavior of human tooth enamel under simulated chewing conditions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jing; Zeng, Yangyang; Wen, Jian; Zheng, Liang; Zhou, Zhongrong

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies mostly focused on the sliding wear behavior of human teeth, and little effort has been made so far to study the impact wear of human teeth. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact wear process and mechanism of human tooth enamel and the influence of water content within enamel. In this paper, the impact wear behaviors of fresh and dried human tooth enamel against SiC ceramic have been investigated using a specially designed impact test machine. Tests lasting up to 5×10(3), 5×10(4), 2.5×10(5), 5.5×10(5), 8×10(5) and 1×10(6) cycles were conducted, respectively. Results showed that for the fresh enamel, the surface damage was dominated by plastic deformation at the early stage of impact wear. Iridescent rings appeared around the impact mark as a result of the accumulation and spread of plastic deformation. As the impact wear progressed, delamination occurred on the surface of enamel, and thus the iridescent rings gradually disappeared. Wear loss increased rapidly with the increase of impact cycles. When a wear particle layer was formed on the enamel surface, the wear rate decreased. It was found that the surface hardness of enamel increased with the impact cycles, and no cracks appeared on the cross section of wear scar. Compared with the fresh enamel, the fracture toughness of dried enamel decreased, and thus there were microcracks appearing on the cross section of wear scar. More obvious delamination occurred on the worn surface of dried enamel, and no iridescent rings were observed. The wear loss of dried enamel was higher than that of fresh enamel. In summary, the impact wear behavior of sound human tooth enamel was metal-like to some degree, and no subsurface cracking occurred. The water content within enamel could increase its fracture toughness and protect the surface from impact wear. The wear mechanism of human tooth enamel is determined by its microstructure. PMID:27183431

  7. Combining CPP-ACP with fluoride: a synergistic remineralization potential of artificially demineralized enamel or not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sayad, I. I.; Sakr, A. K.; Badr, Y. A.

    2008-08-01

    Background and objective: Minimal intervention dentistry (MID) calls for early detection and remineralization of initial demineralization. Laser fluorescence is efficient in detecting changes in mineral tooth content. Recaldent is a product of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP- ACP) which delivers calcium and phosphate ions to enamel. A new product which also contains fluoride is launched in United States. The remineralizing potential of CPP- ACP per se, or when combined with 0.22% Fl supplied in an oral care gel on artificially demineralised enamel using laser fluorescence was investigated. Methods: Fifteen sound human molars were selected. Mesial surfaces were tested using He-Cd laser beam at 441.5nm with 18mW power as excitation source on a suitable set-up based on Spex 750 M monochromator provided with PMT for detection of collected auto-fluorescence from sound enamel. Mesial surfaces were subjected to demineralization for ten days. The spectra from demineralized enamel were measured. Teeth were then divided according to the remineralizing regimen into three groups: group I recaldent per se, group II recaldent combined with fluoride gel and group III artificial saliva as a positive control. After following these protocols for three weeks, the spectra from remineralized enamel from the three groups were measured. The spectra of enamel auto-fluorescence were recorded and normalized to peak intensity at about 540 nm to compare between spectra from sound, demineralized and remineralized enamel surfaces. Results: A slight red shift was noticed in spectra from demineralized enamel, while a blue shift may occur in remineralized enamel. Group II showed the highest remineralizing potential. Conclusions: Combining fluoride with CPP-ACP had a synergistic effect on enamel remineralization. In addition, laser auto-fluorescence is an accurate technique for assessment of changes in tooth enamel minerals.

  8. Three years in vivo wear: core-ceramic, veneers, and enamel antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine F.; Rose, William F.; Barrett, Allyson A.; Oliveira, Erica R.; Yang, Mark C.K.; Clark, Arthur E.; Anusavice, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Test the hypotheses that there are equivalent wear rates for enamel-versus-enamel and ceramic-versus-enamel, analyzing the in vivo wear of crown ceramics, their natural enamel antagonists, and the corresponding two contralateral teeth; and, that bite force does not correlate with the wear. Methods A controlled, clinical trial was conducted involving patients needing full coverage crowns opposing enamel antagonists. Bite forces were measured using a bilateral gnathodynamometer. Single-unit restorations of metal/ceramic (Argedent 62, Argen Corp/IPS d.SIGN veneer); or, core-ceramic/veneer from either, Empress2/Eris, or e.maxPress core/e.maxCeram glaze (ceramics: Ivoclar Vivadent, USA) were randomly assigned, fabricated and cemented. Impressions were made of the ceramic crowns, as well as each maxillary and mandibular quadrant at one week (baseline) and one, two and three years. Resulting models were scanned (3D laser scanner). Maximum wear was calculated by superimposing baseline with annual images. Results There were a total of thirty-six crowns required for thirty-one patients. Each restoration had three associated enamel teeth; 1) crown, 2) antagonist, 3) contralateral, and 4) contralateral-antagonist. SAS PROC MIXED (α=0.05) indicated no statistical significance for mean maximum wear among crown ceramics, enamel antagonists and contralaterals. However, enamel wear was statistically significant in relation to intraoral location (p=0.04) and among years (p<0.02). Analyzed alone, the enamel contralateral-antagonist exhibited significantly greater wear (p<0.001). Considering all wear sites, there was no correlation with bite force (p=0.15). Significance The ceramics and their antagonists exhibited in vivo wear rates within the range of normal enamel. Future studies should examine the wear implications of the contralateral-antagonist enamel. PMID:22410113

  9. Comparison of mechanical property and role between enamel and dentin in the human teeth

    PubMed Central

    Choi, HH; Lee, JY

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical properties of enamel and dentin were studied using test specimens having the same shape and dimensions because these properties might vary with the experimental conditions and specimen shapes and dimensions. Healthy human teeth were used as specimens for mechanical tests. The stress (MPa), strain (%), and elastic modulus (E, MPa) of the specimens were obtained from compression tests. The maximum stresses of the enamel, dentin, and enamel–dentin specimens were 62.2 ± 23.8, 193.7 ± 30.6, and 126.1 ± 54.6 MPa, respectively. The maximum strains of the enamel, dentin, and enamel–dentin specimens were 4.5 ± 0.8%, 11.9 ± 0.1%, and 8.7 ± 2.7%, respectively. The elastic moduli of the enamel, dentin, and enamel–dentin specimens were 1338.2 ± 307.9, 1653.7 ± 277.9, and 1628.6 ± 482.7 MPa, respectively. The measured hardness value of enamel specimens (HV = 274.8 ± 18.1) was around 4.2 times higher than that of dentin specimens (HV = 65.6 ± 3.9). Judging from the measured values of the stress and strain of enamel specimens, enamel tended to fracture earlier than dentin; therefore, it was considered more brittle than dentin. However, judging from the measured hardness values, enamel was considered harder than dentin. Therefore, enamel has higher wear resistance, making it suitable for grinding and crushing foods, and dentin has higher force resistance, making it suitable for absorbing bite forces. The different mechanical roles of enamel and dentin may arise from their different compositions and internal structures, as revealed through scanning electron micrographs of enamel and dentin. PMID:24550998

  10. Enamel-based mark performance for marking Chinese mystery snail Bellamya chinensis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong, Alec; Allen, Craig R.; Hart, Noelle M.; Haak, Danielle M.; Pope, Kevin L.; Smeenk, Nicholas A.; Stephen, Bruce J.; Uden, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    The exoskeleton of gastropods provides a convenient surface for carrying marks, and i the interest of improving future marking methods our laboratory assessed the performance of an enamel paint. The endurance of the paint was also compared to other marking methods assessed in the past. We marked the shells of 30 adult Chinese mystery snails Bellamya chinensis and held them in an aquarium for 181 days. We observed no complete degradation of any enamel-paint mark during the 181 days. The enamel-paint mark was superior to a nai;-polish mark, which lasted a median of 100 days. Enamel-paint marks also have a lower rate of loss (0.00 month-1 181 days) than plastic bee tags (0.01 month-1, 57 days), gouache paint (0.07 month-1, 18.5 days), or car body paint from studies found in scientific literature. Legibility of enamel-paint marks had a median lifetime of 102 days. The use of enamel paint on the shells of gastropods is a viable option for studies lasting up to 6 months. Furthermore, visits to capture-mark-recapture site 1 year after application of enamel-paint marks on B. chinesnis shells produced several individuals on which the enamel paint was still visible, although further testing is required to clarify durability over longer periods.

  11. Epithelial-specific knockout of the Rac1 gene leads to enamel defects

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhan; Kim, Jieun; Lacruz, Rodrigo; Bringas, Pablo; Kaartinen, Vesa M.; Snead, Malcolm L.

    2015-01-01

    Rac1 encodes a 21kDa GTP-binding protein belonging to the RAS superfamily. RAS members play important roles in controlling focal adhesion complex formation and cytoskeleton contraction; activities with consequences to cell growth, adhesion, migration, and differentiation. To examine the role(s) played by Rac1 protein in cell-to-matrix interaction and in enamel matrix biomineralization we used the Cre/loxP binary recombination system to characterize enamel matrix proteins expression and enamel formation in Rac1 knockout mice. Mating between mice bearing the floxed Rac1 allele with mice bearing a keratin14-Cre transgene generate animals in which Rac1 is absent from epithelial organs. The enamel of Rac1 conditional knockout mouse was characterized by computerized tomography (microCT), light microscopy, histochemistry, and back-scatter electron microscopy. Enamel matrix protein expression was analyzed by Western blotting. Major findings showed that the Tomes’ processes of Rac1−/− ameloblasts loose contact with the forming enamel matrix in un-erupted teeth. The abundance of amelogenin and ameloblastin was reduced in the Rac1−/− ameloblasts. After eruption, the enamel from the Rac1−/− mice displayed severe structural defects with the complete loss of enamel. These results support an essential role for Rac1 function in the dental epithelium involving cell-matrix interaction and matrix biomineralization. PMID:22243243

  12. Refractory porcelain enamel passive-thermal-control coating for high-temperature superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, H.; Auker, B. H.; Gardos, M. N.

    1973-01-01

    Study was conducted to match thermal expansion coefficients thereby preventing enamels from cracking. Report discusses various enamel coatings that are applied to two different high-temperature superalloys. Study may be of interest to manufacturers of chemical equipment, furnaces, and metal components intended for high-temperature applications.

  13. The Impact of Fluoride on Ameloblasts and the Mechanisms of Enamel Fluorosis

    PubMed Central

    Bronckers, A.L.J.J.; Lyaruu, D.M.; DenBesten, P.K.

    2009-01-01

    Intake of excess amounts of fluoride during tooth development cause enamel fluorosis, a developmental disturbance that makes enamel more porous. In mild fluorosis, there are white opaque striations across the enamel surface, whereas in more severe cases, the porous regions increase in size, with enamel pitting, and secondary discoloration of the enamel surface. The effects of fluoride on enamel formation suggest that fluoride affects the enamel-forming cells, the ameloblasts. Studies investigating the effects of fluoride on ameloblasts and the mechanisms of fluorosis are based on in vitro cultures as well as animal models. The use of these model systems requires a biologically relevant fluoride dose, and must be carefully interpreted in relation to human tooth formation. Based on these studies, we propose that fluoride can directly affect the ameloblasts, particularly at high fluoride levels, while at lower fluoride levels, the ameloblasts may respond to local effects of fluoride on the mineralizing matrix. A new working model is presented, focused on the assumption that fluoride increases the rate of mineral formation, resulting in a greater release of protons into the forming enamel matrix. PMID:19783795

  14. Function and repair of dental enamel - Potential role of epithelial transport processes of ameloblasts.

    PubMed

    Varga, Gábor; Kerémi, Beáta; Bori, Erzsébet; Földes, Anna

    2015-07-01

    The hardest mammalian tissue, dental enamel is produced by ameloblasts, which are electrolyte-transporting epithelial cells. Although the end product is very different, they show many similarities to transporting epithelia of the pancreas, salivary glands and kidney. Enamel is produced in a multi-step epithelial secretory process that features biomineralization which is an interplay of secreted ameloblast specific proteins and the time-specific transport of minerals, protons and bicarbonate. First, "secretory" ameloblasts form the entire thickness of the enamel layer, but with low mineral content. Then they differentiate into "maturation" ameloblasts, which remove organic matrix from the enamel and in turn further build up hydroxyapatite crystals. The protons generated by hydroxyapatite formation need to be buffered, otherwise enamel will not attain full mineralization. Buffering requires a tight pH regulation and secretion of bicarbonate by ameloblasts. The whole process has been the focus of many immunohistochemical and gene knock-out studies, but, perhaps surprisingly, no functional data existed for mineral ion transport by ameloblasts. However, recent studies including ours provided a better insight for molecular mechanism of mineral formation. The secretory regulation is not completely known as yet, but its significance is crucial. Impairing regulation retards or prevents completion of enamel mineralization and results in the development of hypomineralized enamel that easily erodes after dental eruption. Factors that impair this function are fluoride and disruption of pH regulators. Revealing these factors may eventually lead to the treatment of enamel hypomineralization related to genetic or environmentally induced malformation. PMID:25747281

  15. Effect of 30 % hydrogen peroxide on mineral chemical composition and surface morphology of bovine enamel.

    PubMed

    González-López, Santiago; Torres-Rodríguez, Carolina; Bolaños-Carmona, Victoria; Sanchez-Sanchez, Purificación; Rodríguez-Navarro, Alejandro; Álvarez-Lloret, Pedro; Domingo Garcia, María

    2016-01-01

    A combination of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), and gas adsorption techniques was used to characterize the effect of 30 % hydrogen peroxide (HP) on enamel surface. To perform the analyses of AAS, 1 ml of 30 % HP was added to 30 mg of a bovine enamel powder sample (150-200 µm fractions) for times of 5, 20, 60, 90, and 120 min; then 5 ml of the solution was withdrawn after each time period to measure [Ca(2+)] ions. The remaining powder was recovered and analyzed by FTIR. For SEM and gas adsorption tests, 4 × 4 mm(2) enamel sectioned samples were polished and 30 % HP was applied on the surface for the same time periods. AAS data show that 30 % HP treatment mobilized calcium from the enamel at all times studied. FTIR spectra showed that the total amount of phosphate and carbonate mineral contents such as amide I decreased significantly. SEM revealed that randomly distributed areas throughout the smooth enamel surface treatment became rougher and more irregular. These alterations indicate that surface damage increases with increasing durations of HP treatment. Gas adsorption analysis proved that bleached enamel is a typically non-porous material with a small specific surface area which decreases slightly with the 30 % HP treatment. In sum, 30 % HP induced a significant alteration of the organic and mineral part of the enamel, leading to the release of calcium and a rougher, more irregular enamel surface on randomly distributed areas. PMID:25528151

  16. Matrix Metalloproteinase-20 Over-Expression Is Detrimental to Enamel Development: A Mus musculus Model

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Masashi; Hu, Yuanyuan; Tye, Coralee E.; Guan, Xiaomu; Deagle, Craig C.; Antone, Jerry V.; Smith, Charles E.; Simmer, James P.; Bartlett, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteinase-20 (Mmp20) ablated mice have enamel that is thin and soft with an abnormal rod pattern that abrades from the underlying dentin. We asked if introduction of transgenes expressing Mmp20 would revert this Mmp20 null phenotype back to normal. Unexpectedly, for transgenes expressing medium or high levels of Mmp20, we found opposite enamel phenotypes depending on the genetic background (Mmp20−/− or Mmp20+/+) in which the transgenes were expressed. Methodology/Principal Findings Amelx-promoter-Mmp20 transgenic founder mouse lines were assessed for transgene expression and those expressing low, medium or high levels of Mmp20 were selected for breeding into the Mmp20 null background. Regardless of expression level, each transgene brought the null enamel back to full thickness. However, the high and medium expressing Mmp20 transgenes in the Mmp20 null background had significantly harder more mineralized enamel than did the low transgene expresser. Strikingly, when the high and medium expressing Mmp20 transgenes were present in the wild-type background, the enamel was significantly less well mineralized than normal. Protein gel analysis of enamel matrix proteins from the high and medium expressing transgenes present in the wild-type background demonstrated that greater than normal amounts of cleavage products and smaller quantities of higher molecular weight proteins were present within their enamel matrices. Conclusions/Significance Mmp20 expression levels must be within a specific range for normal enamel development to occur. Creation of a normally thick enamel layer may occur over a wider range of Mmp20 expression levels, but acquisition of normal enamel hardness has a narrower range. Since over-expression of Mmp20 results in decreased enamel hardness, this suggests that a balance exists between cleaved and full-length enamel matrix proteins that are essential for formation of a properly hardened enamel layer. It also suggests that

  17. Mapping residual organics and carbonate at grain boundaries and the amorphous interphase in mouse incisor enamel

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Lyle M.; Joester, Derk

    2015-01-01

    Dental enamel has evolved to resist the most grueling conditions of mechanical stress, fatigue, and wear. Adding insult to injury, it is exposed to the frequently corrosive environment of the oral cavity. While its hierarchical structure is unrivaled in its mechanical resilience, heterogeneity in the distribution of magnesium ions and the presence of Mg-substituted amorphous calcium phosphate (Mg-ACP) as an intergranular phase have recently been shown to increase the susceptibility of mouse enamel to acid attack. Herein we investigate the distribution of two important constituents of enamel, residual organic matter and inorganic carbonate. We find that organics, carbonate, and possibly water show distinct distribution patterns in the mouse enamel crystallites, at simple grain boundaries, and in the amorphous interphase at multiple grain boundaries. This has implications for the resistance to acid corrosion, mechanical properties, and the mechanism by which enamel crystals grow during amelogenesis. PMID:25852562

  18. Remineralization of initial enamel caries in vitro using a novel peptide based on amelogenin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Danxue; Lv, Xueping; Tu, Huanxin; Zhou, Xuedong; Yu, Haiyang; Zhang, Linglin

    2015-09-01

    Dental caries is the most common oral disease with high incidence, widely spread and can seriously affect the health of oral cavity and the whole body. Current caries prevention measures such as fluoride treatment, antimicrobial agents, and traditional Chinese herbal, have limitations to some extent. Here we design and synthesize a novel peptide based on the amelogenin, and assess its ability to promote the remineralization of initial enamel caries lesions. We used enamel blocks to form initial lesions, and then subjected to 12-day pH cycling in the presence of peptide, NaF and HEPES buffer. Enamel treated with peptide or NaF had shallower, narrower lesions, thicker remineralized surfaces and less mineral loss than enamel treated with HEPES. This peptide can promote the remineralization of initial enamel caries and inhibit the progress of caries. It is a promising anti-caries agent with various research prospects and practical application value.

  19. Uneven distribution of enamel in the tooth crown of a Plains Zebra (Equus quagga).

    PubMed

    Winkler, Daniela E; Kaiser, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    Unworn teeth of herbivorous mammals are not immediately functional. They have to be partially worn to expose enamel ridges which can then act as shear-cutting blades to break the food down. We use the Plains Zebra (Equus quagga) as a hypsodont, herbivorous model organism to investigate how initial wear of the tooth crown is controlled by underlying structures. We find that the enamel proportion is smaller at the apical half of the tooth crown in all upper tooth positions and suggest that lower enamel content here could promote early wear. Besides this uneven enamel distribution, we note that the third molar has a higher overall enamel content than any other tooth position. The M3 is thus likely to have a slightly different functional trait in mastication, resisting highest bite forces along the tooth row and maintaining functionality when anterior teeth are already worn down. PMID:26082860

  20. An in vitro investigation of the effect of some analgesics on human enamel.

    PubMed

    McNally, L M; Barbour, M E; O'Sullivan, D J; Jagger, D C

    2006-07-01

    The sale of over-the-counter pain relief medication has increased dramatically in recent years, and typically amounts to several hundred thousands of pounds per year in the UK. Many soluble analgesic preparations contain citric acid, and it has been suggested that these formulations may cause dental erosion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of some over-the-counter analgesics on tooth surface loss from human enamel. Six commonly available analgesics were chosen for this study and the effect of immersing unerupted human enamel was examined using non-contact optical profilometry. Two of the six analgesics investigated caused no detectable erosion (Boots soluble aspirin and Anadin Extra). Three caused statistically significant enamel erosion, but this was very slight and is thought to be clinically insignificant (Alka Seltzer, Panadol and Solpadeine). Only one analgesic caused possible potentially clinical significant enamel erosion. Further studies are needed to determine whether Aspro causes clinically significant enamel erosion. PMID:16774512

  1. Uneven distribution of enamel in the tooth crown of a Plains Zebra (Equus quagga)

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Unworn teeth of herbivorous mammals are not immediately functional. They have to be partially worn to expose enamel ridges which can then act as shear-cutting blades to break the food down. We use the Plains Zebra (Equus quagga) as a hypsodont, herbivorous model organism to investigate how initial wear of the tooth crown is controlled by underlying structures. We find that the enamel proportion is smaller at the apical half of the tooth crown in all upper tooth positions and suggest that lower enamel content here could promote early wear. Besides this uneven enamel distribution, we note that the third molar has a higher overall enamel content than any other tooth position. The M3 is thus likely to have a slightly different functional trait in mastication, resisting highest bite forces along the tooth row and maintaining functionality when anterior teeth are already worn down. PMID:26082860

  2. Mapping residual organics and carbonate at grain boundaries and the amorphous interphase in mouse incisor enamel.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Lyle M; Joester, Derk

    2015-01-01

    Dental enamel has evolved to resist the most grueling conditions of mechanical stress, fatigue, and wear. Adding insult to injury, it is exposed to the frequently corrosive environment of the oral cavity. While its hierarchical structure is unrivaled in its mechanical resilience, heterogeneity in the distribution of magnesium ions and the presence of Mg-substituted amorphous calcium phosphate (Mg-ACP) as an intergranular phase have recently been shown to increase the susceptibility of mouse enamel to acid attack. Herein we investigate the distribution of two important constituents of enamel, residual organic matter and inorganic carbonate. We find that organics, carbonate, and possibly water show distinct distribution patterns in the mouse enamel crystallites, at simple grain boundaries, and in the amorphous interphase at multiple grain boundaries. This has implications for the resistance to acid corrosion, mechanical properties, and the mechanism by which enamel crystals grow during amelogenesis. PMID:25852562

  3. Enamel hypoplasia and its role in identification of individuals: A review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Kanchan, Tanuj; Machado, Meghna; Rao, Ashwin; Krishan, Kewal; Garg, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    Identification of individuals is the mainstay of any forensic investigation especially in cases of mass disasters when mutilated remains are brought for examination. Dental examination helps in establishing the identity of an individual and thus, has played a vital role in forensic investigation process since long. In this regard, description on the role of enamel hypoplasia is limited in the literature. The present article reviews the literature on the enamel hypoplasia and discusses its utility in forensic identification. Enamel hypoplasia is a surface defect of the tooth crown caused by disturbance of enamel matrix secretion. Enamel defects can be congenital or acquired. In cases of mass disasters, or when the body is completely charred, putrefied and mutilated beyond recognition, the unique dental features can help in identification of the victims. PMID:26097340

  4. Enamel hypoplasia and its role in identification of individuals: A review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kanchan, Tanuj; Machado, Meghna; Rao, Ashwin; Krishan, Kewal; Garg, Arun K

    2015-01-01

    Identification of individuals is the mainstay of any forensic investigation especially in cases of mass disasters when mutilated remains are brought for examination. Dental examination helps in establishing the identity of an individual and thus, has played a vital role in forensic investigation process since long. In this regard, description on the role of enamel hypoplasia is limited in the literature. The present article reviews the literature on the enamel hypoplasia and discusses its utility in forensic identification. Enamel hypoplasia is a surface defect of the tooth crown caused by disturbance of enamel matrix secretion. Enamel defects can be congenital or acquired. In cases of mass disasters, or when the body is completely charred, putrefied and mutilated beyond recognition, the unique dental features can help in identification of the victims. PMID:26097340

  5. Organ dose conversions from ESR measurements using tooth enamel of atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Sato, Kaoru

    2012-03-01

    Dose conversions were studied for dosimetry of atomic bomb survivors based upon electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements of tooth enamel. Previously analysed data had clarified that the tooth enamel dose could be much larger than other organ doses from a low-energy photon exposure. The radiation doses to other organs or whole-body doses, however, are assumed to be near the tooth enamel dose for photon energies which are dominant in the leakage spectrum of the Hiroshima atomic bomb assumed in DS02. In addition, the thyroid can be a candidate for a surrogate organ in cases where the tooth enamel dose is not available in organ dosimetry. This paper also suggests the application of new Japanese voxel phantoms to derive tooth enamel doses by numerical analyses. PMID:22128360

  6. On the mechanical properties of tooth enamel under spherical indentation.

    PubMed

    Chai, Herzl

    2014-11-01

    The mechanical properties of tooth enamel generally exhibit large variations, which reflect its structural and material complexity. Some key properties were evaluated under localized contact, simulating actual functioning conditions. Prominent cusps of extracted human molar teeth were polished down ~0.7 mm below the cusp tip and indented by tungsten carbide balls. The internal damage was assessed after unloading from longitudinal or transverse sections. The ultimate tensile stress (UTS) was determined using a novel bilayer specimen. The damage is characterized by penny-like radial cracks driven by hoop stresses and cylindrical cracks driven along protein-rich interrod materials by shear stresses. Shallow cone cracks typical of homogeneous materials which may cause rapid tooth wear under repeat contact are thus avoided. The mean stress vs. indentation strain curve is highly nonlinear, attributable to plastic shearing of protein between and within enamel rods. This curve is also affected by damage, especially radial cracks, the onset of which depends on ball radius. Several material properties were extracted from the tests, including shear strain at the onset of ring cracks γ(F) (=0.14), UTS (=119 MPa), toughness K(C) (=0.94 MPa m(1/2)), a crack propagation law and a constitutive response determined by trial and error with the aid of a finite-element analysis. These quantities, which are only slightly sensitive to anatomical location within the enamel region tested, facilitate a quantitative assessment of crown failure. Causes for variations in published UTS and K(C) values are discussed. PMID:25034644

  7. Comparative evaluation of the enamel bond strength of ‘etch-and-rinse’ and ‘all-in-one’ bonding agents on cut and uncut enamel surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Deepu; Singbal, Kiran Prabhakar; Kamat, Sharad

    2011-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: To compare tensile bond strength of an ‘etch-and-rinse’ bonding agent (Single bond,3M ESPE, MN, USA) with an ‘all-in-one’ bonding agent (iBond, Heraeus Kulzer, NY, USA) on cut and uncut enamel surfaces. The null hypothesis tested is that the ‘all-in-one’ bonding agent matches the ‘etch-and-rinse’ bonding agent in terms of tensile bond strength to enamel. Materials and Methods: Forty extracted human mandibular teeth were used for the study. Twenty teeth with intact enamel surfaces were divided into two groups of 10 teeth each. The enamel surfaces of the 20 teeth were prepared and assigned to two more groups of 10 teeth each. One group each of intact and prepared enamel surfaces were used to bond with the ‘etch-and-rinse’ bonding agent [Single bond (SB), 3M ESPE, MN, USA] and the other two groups one each of intact and prepared enamel surfaces were used to bond with the ‘all-in-one’ bonding agent [ iBond (IB), Heraeus Kulzer, NY, USA]. The tensile bond strength was measured on the universal testing machine (Unitek, 9450 PC, FIE, INDIA) at a cross head speed of 1 mm / minute. Results: The results were statistically analyzed using a one-way ANOVA and student ‘t’ test. The values for the ‘etch-and-rinse’ bonding agent SB were significantly higher for both the cut and uncut surfaces, compared to the ‘all-in-one’ bonding agent IB (P < 0.05). The all-in-one bonding agent resulted in a higher bond strength on the cut enamel surfaces. Conclusions: Based on the results, it is advisable to use the ‘etch-and-rinse system’ in a clinical situation requiring bonding on enamel alone. PMID:21814355

  8. Dental enamel growth, perikymata and hypoplasia in ancient tooth crowns.

    PubMed Central

    Hillson, S W

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the hypoplastic defects commonly seen on the surface of ancient human tooth crowns, excavated from archaeological sites, and presents a new method for estimating the ages at which these defects were initiated during life. The method is based upon examination of microscopic incremental structures on the enamel surface and it is possible also to apply it to reconstruction of the sequence and timing of dental crown development. The method of examination is non-destructive and allows full use to be made of the large numbers of complete, unworn dentitions which are found amongst archaeological remains. Images Figure 1. Figure 4. PMID:1404194

  9. Enamel microabrasion for aesthetic management of dental fluorosis

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Pallavi; Ansari, Afroz Alam; Moda, Preeti; Yadav, Madhulika

    2013-01-01

    Fluorosis has increased in recent times due to fluoridation of drinking water and addition of fluoride to various edible items, which leads to unaesthetic appearance of teeth visible at close quarters. The enamel microabrasion technique is a conservative method that improves the appearance of the teeth by restoring bright and superficial smoothness, without causing significant structural loss. The aim of this article is to describe an easy technique for managing mild to moderate dental fluorosis using Opalustre (Ultradent Products) microabrasion slurry. This conservative approach may be considered an interesting alternative to more invasive prosthetic techniques like composite resin restorations, ceramic veneers or crown fabrications. PMID:24121810

  10. Enamel microabrasion for aesthetic management of dental fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Pallavi; Ansari, Afroz Alam; Moda, Preeti; Yadav, Madhulika

    2013-01-01

    Fluorosis has increased in recent times due to fluoridation of drinking water and addition of fluoride to various edible items, which leads to unaesthetic appearance of teeth visible at close quarters. The enamel microabrasion technique is a conservative method that improves the appearance of the teeth by restoring bright and superficial smoothness, without causing significant structural loss. The aim of this article is to describe an easy technique for managing mild to moderate dental fluorosis using Opalustre (Ultradent Products) microabrasion slurry. This conservative approach may be considered an interesting alternative to more invasive prosthetic techniques like composite resin restorations, ceramic veneers or crown fabrications. PMID:24121810