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Sample records for linear impedance vibrator

  1. Digital synthetic impedance for application in vibration damping.

    PubMed

    Nečásek, J; Václavík, J; Marton, P

    2016-02-01

    In this work we present construction details of a precision, standalone, and compact digital synthetic impedance for application in the field of vibration damping. The presented device is based on an embedded ARM microcontroller with external AD and DA converters and a special analog front-end. The performance of the device is tested by comparing the actually synthesized impedance with several prescribed impedances and shows very good match. Fine-tuning ability of the device, which is crucial for the considered application, is also demonstrated and reaches as small step as 0.1% for the most complicated impedance structure and drops below the level of direct measurability with less complex structures. The real application in vibration damping is demonstrated on a simple and well understood case of a one-dimensional vibrating spring-mass system with piezoelectric actuator embedded as the interface between source of vibrations and vibrating mass. PMID:26931876

  2. Digital synthetic impedance for application in vibration damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nečásek, J.; Václavík, J.; Marton, P.

    2016-02-01

    In this work we present construction details of a precision, standalone, and compact digital synthetic impedance for application in the field of vibration damping. The presented device is based on an embedded ARM microcontroller with external AD and DA converters and a special analog front-end. The performance of the device is tested by comparing the actually synthesized impedance with several prescribed impedances and shows very good match. Fine-tuning ability of the device, which is crucial for the considered application, is also demonstrated and reaches as small step as 0.1% for the most complicated impedance structure and drops below the level of direct measurability with less complex structures. The real application in vibration damping is demonstrated on a simple and well understood case of a one-dimensional vibrating spring-mass system with piezoelectric actuator embedded as the interface between source of vibrations and vibrating mass.

  3. Development of linear and nonlinear hand-arm vibration models using optimization and linearization techniques.

    PubMed

    Rakheja, S; Gurram, R; Gouw, G J

    1993-10-01

    Hand-arm vibration (HAV) models serve as an effective tool to assess the vibration characteristics of the hand-tool system and to evaluate the attenuation performance of vibration isolation mechanisms. This paper describes a methodology to identify the parameters of HAV models, whether linear or nonlinear, using mechanical impedance data and a nonlinear programming based optimization technique. Three- and four-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) linear, piecewise linear and nonlinear HAV models are formulated and analyzed to yield impedance characteristics in the 5-1000 Hz frequency range. A local equivalent linearization algorithm, based upon the principle of energy similarity, is implemented to simulate the nonlinear HAV models. Optimization methods are employed to identify the model parameters, such that the magnitude and phase errors between the computed and measured impedance characteristics are minimum in the entire frequency range. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated through derivations of models that correlate with the measured X-axis impedance characteristics of the hand-arm system, proposed by ISO. The results of the study show that a linear model cannot predict the impedance characteristics in the entire frequency range, while a piecewise linear model yields an accurate estimation. PMID:8253830

  4. Lattice Vibrations in a Linear Triatomic Chain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kesavasamy, K.; Krishnamurthy, N.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the vibrations of a linear triatomic chain and shows that the addition of the third atom gives rise to an extra optical branch. The nature of the normal modes in ionic crystals and molecular crystals is also discussed. (GA)

  5. Dielectric loss analysis using linear resonators with different impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarabi, Bahman; Khalil, M. S.; Khasawneh, M. A.; Stoutimore, M. J. A.; Gladchenko, Sergiy; Wellstood, F. C.; Lobb, C. J.; Osborn, K. D.

    2012-02-01

    It is known that amorphous dielectrics are a major source of decoherence in superconducting qubits due to energy absorption by two-level systems coupled to the electric fields. Linear resonators have been applied extensively to study loss in different dielectrics used in qubit circuits due to their versatility and relative simplicity in design, fabrication and measurement. We have designed linear resonators with multi-turn inductors and parallel-plate capacitors with resonance frequencies of 4.8-6.4 GHz. We achieve substantially different L/C values and capacitor volumes by varying the number of inductance turns and the area of the capacitors. We will present results of continuous wave measurements with SiNx capacitors and show how loss tangent and phase noise are related to impedance and capacitor volume.

  6. Linear lateral vibration of axisymmetric liquid briges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrera, C.; Montanero, J. M.; Cabezas, M. G.

    A liquid bridge is a mass of liquid sustained by the action of the surface tension force between two parallel supporting disks Apart from their basic scientific interest a liquid bridge can be considered as the simplest idealization of the configuration appearing in the floating zone technique used for crystal growth and purification of high melting point materials footnote Messeguer et al emph Crystal Growth Res bf 5 27 1999 This has conferred considerable interest on the study of liquid bridges not only in fluid mechanics but also in the field of material engineering The axisymmetric dynamics of an isothermal liquid bridge has been frequently analysed over the past years The studies have considered different phenomena such as free oscillations footnote Montanero emph E J Mech B Fluids bf 22 169 2003 footnote Acero and Montanero emph Phys Fluids bf 17 078105 2005 forced vibrations footnote Perales and Messeguer emph Phys Fluids A bf 4 1110 1992 g-jitter effects footnote Messeguer and Perales emph Phys Fluids A bf 3 2332 1991 extensional deformation footnote Zhang et al emph J Fluid Mech bf 329 207 1996 and breakup process footnote Espino et al emph Phys Fluids bf 14 3710 2002 among others Works considering the nonaxisymmetric dynamical behaviour of a liquid bridge has been far less common footnote Sanz and Diez emph J Fluid Mech bf 205 503 1989 In the present study the linear vibration of an axisymmetric liquid

  7. Non-Linear Vibration Characteristics of Clamped Laminated Shallow Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ABE, A.; KOBAYASHI, Y.; YAMADA, G.

    2000-07-01

    This paper examines non-linear free vibration characteristics of first and second vibration modes of laminated shallow shells with rigidly clamped edges. Non-linear equations of motion for the shells based on the first order shear deformation and classical shell theories are derived by means of Hamilton's principle. We apply Galerkin's procedure to the equations of motion in which eigenvectors for first and second modes of linear vibration obtained by the Ritz method are employed as trial functions. Then simultaneous non-linear ordinary differential equations are derived in terms of amplitudes of the first and second vibration modes. Backbone curves for the first and second vibration modes are solved numerically by the Gauss-Legendre integration method and the shooting method respectively. The effects of lamination sequences and transverse shear deformation on the behavior are discussed. It is also shown that the motion of the first vibration mode affects the response for the second vibration mode.

  8. Theory of Linear and Nonlinear Surface-Enhanced Vibrational Spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Chulhai, Dhabih V; Hu, Zhongwei; Moore, Justin E; Chen, Xing; Jensen, Lasse

    2016-05-27

    The vibrational spectroscopy of molecules adsorbed on metal nanoparticles can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude so that the detection and identification of single molecules are possible. The enhancement of most linear and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopies has been demonstrated. In this review, we discuss theoretical approaches to understanding linear and nonlinear surface-enhanced vibrational spectroscopies. A unified description of enhancement mechanisms classified as either electromagnetic or chemical in nature is presented. Emphasis is placed on understanding the spectral changes necessary for interpretation of linear and nonlinear surface-enhanced vibrational spectroscopies. PMID:27090843

  9. Theory of Linear and Nonlinear Surface-Enhanced Vibrational Spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chulhai, Dhabih V.; Hu, Zhongwei; Moore, Justin E.; Chen, Xing; Jensen, Lasse

    2016-05-01

    The vibrational spectroscopy of molecules adsorbed on metal nanoparticles can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude so that the detection and identification of single molecules are possible. The enhancement of most linear and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopies has been demonstrated. In this review, we discuss theoretical approaches to understanding linear and nonlinear surface-enhanced vibrational spectroscopies. A unified description of enhancement mechanisms classified as either electromagnetic or chemical in nature is presented. Emphasis is placed on understanding the spectral changes necessary for interpretation of linear and nonlinear surface-enhanced vibrational spectroscopies.

  10. Measurement of cantilever vibration using impedance-loaded surface acoustic wave sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Masaki; Hamashima, Hiromitsu; Kondoh, Jun

    2016-07-01

    In this study, an impedance-loaded surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor was demonstrated to monitor the vibration frequency. Commercialized pressure sensors and a variable capacitor were chosen as external sensors, which were connected to a reflector on a SAW device. As the reflection coefficient of the reflector depended on the impedance, the echo amplitude was influenced by changes in the impedance of the external sensor. The vibration frequency of the cantilever was determined by monitoring the echo amplitude of the SAW device. Moreover, the attenuation constant of an envelope was estimated. The results of our feasibility study indicate that the impedance-loaded SAW sensor can be applied as a detector for structural health monitoring.

  11. LDV measurement of bird ear vibrations to determine inner ear impedance and middle ear power flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muyshondt, Pieter G. G.; Pires, Felipe; Dirckx, Joris J. J.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical behavior of the middle ear structures in birds and mammals is affected by the fluids in the inner ear (IE) that are present behind the oval window. In this study, the aim was to gather knowledge of the acoustic impedance of the IE in the ostrich, to be able to determine the effect on vibrations and power flow in the single-ossicle bird middle ear for future studies. To determine the IE impedance, vibrations of the ossicle were measured for both the quasi-static and acoustic stimulus frequencies. In the acoustic regime, vibrations were measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer and electromagnetic stimulation of the ossicle. The impedance of the inner ear could be determined by means of a simple RLC model in series, which resulted in a stiffness reactance of KIE = 0.20.1012 Pa/m3, an inertial impedance of MIE = 0.652.106 Pa s2/m3, and a resistance of RIE = 1.57.109 Pa s/m. The measured impedance is found to be considerably smaller than what is found for the human IE.

  12. Multiscale wireless sensor node for impedance-based SHM and low-frequency vibration data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Stuart G; Farinholt, Kevin M; Park, Gyuhae; Farrar, Charles R; Todd, Michael D

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents recent developments in an extremely compact, wireless impedance sensor node (WID3, Wireless Impedance Device) at Los Alamos National Laboratory for use in impedance-based structural health monitoring (SHM), Sensor diagnostics and low-frequency vibrational data acquisition. The current generation WID3 is equipped with an Analog Devices AD5933 impedance chip that can resolve measurements up to 100 kHz, a frequency range ideal for many SHM applications. An integrated set of multiplexers allows the end user to monitor seven piezoelectric sensors from a single sensor node. The WID3 combines on-board processing using an Atmega1281 microcontroller, data storage using flash memory, wireless communications capabilities, and a series of internal and external triggering options into a single package to realize a truly comprehensive, self-contained wireless active-sensor node for SHM applications. Furthermore, we recently extended the capability of this device by implementing low-frequency analog to digital and digital and analog converters so that the same device can measure structural vibration data. The WID3 requires less than 70 mW of power to operate, and it can operate in various wireless network paradigms. The performance of this miniaturized and portable device is compared to our previous results and its broader capabilities are demonstrated.

  13. Coupling analysis of linear vibration energy harvesting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu; Liang, Xingyu; Shu, Gequn; Watkins, Simon

    2016-03-01

    This paper has disclosed the relationship of vibration energy harvester performance with dimensionless force factor. Numerical ranges of the dimensionless force factor have been defined for cases of weak, moderate and strong coupling. The relationships of coupling loss factor, dimensionless force factor, critical coupling strength, coupling quotient, electro-mechanical coupling factor, damping loss factor and modal densities have been established in linear vibration energy harvester systems. The new contribution of this paper is to determine a frequency range where the vibration energy harvesting systems are in a weak coupling and the statistical energy analysis is applicable.

  14. Piezoelectric linear motor concepts based on coupling of longitudinal vibrations.

    PubMed

    Hemsel, T; Mracek, M; Twiefel, J; Vasiljev, P

    2006-12-22

    Classically, rotary motors with gears and spindle mechanisms are used to achieve translatory motion. In means of miniaturization and weight reduction piezoelectric linear motors are of interest. Several ultrasonic linear motors found in literature base on the use of two different vibration modes. Most often flexural and longitudinal modes are combined to achieve an elliptic micro-motion of surface points. This micro-motion is converted to direct linear (or translatory) motion of a driven slider. To gain high amplitudes of the micro-motion and thus having a powerful motor, the ultrasonic vibrator should be driven near the eigenfrequency of its modes. Additionally, low mechanical and electrical losses lead to increased efficiency and large amplitude magnification in resonance. This demands a geometrical design that fits the eigenfrequencies of the two different modes. A frequency-deviation of only a few percent leads to non-acceptable disturbance of the elliptical motion. Thus, the mechanical design of the vibrators has to be done very carefully. Within this contribution we discuss different motor designs based on the coupling of two the same longitudinal vibrations within one structure to generate an elliptic motion of surface points. Different concepts based on piezoelectric plates and Langevin transducers are compared. Benefits and drawbacks against the combination of longitudinal and bending modes will be discussed. Numerical results of the stator vibration as well as motor characteristics are validated by measurements on different prototypes. PMID:16782160

  15. Non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Kalibjian, R.

    1994-08-09

    A non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device including a photorefractive crystal and a laser is disclosed. The laser produces a coherent light beam which is split by a beam splitter into a first laser beam and a second laser beam. After passing through the crystal the first laser beam is counter-propagated back upon itself by a retro-mirror, creating a third laser beam. The laser beams are modulated, due to the mixing effect within the crystal by vibration of the crystal. In the third laser beam, modulation is stable and such modulation is converted by a photodetector into a usable electrical output, intensity modulated in accordance with vibration applied to the crystal. 3 figs.

  16. Non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Kalibjian, Ralph

    1994-01-11

    A non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device (10) including a photorefractive crystal (26) and a laser (12). The laser (12 ) produces a coherent light beam (14) which is split by a beam splitter (18) into a first laser beam (20) and a second laser beam (22). After passing through the crystal (26) the first laser beam (20) is counter-propagated back upon itself by a retro-mirror (32), creating a third laser beam (30). The laser beams (20, 22, 30) are modulated, due to the mixing effect within the crystal (26) by vibration of the crystal (30). In the third laser beam (30), modulation is stable and such modulation is converted by a photodetector (34) into a usable electrical output, intensity modulated in accordance with vibration applied to the crystal (26).

  17. An improved statistical model for linear antenna input impedance in an electrically large cavity.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, William Arthur; Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Lee, Kelvin S. H.

    2005-03-01

    This report presents a modification of a previous model for the statistical distribution of linear antenna impedance. With this modification a simple formula is determined which yields accurate results for all ratios of modal spectral width to spacing. It is shown that the reactance formula approaches the known unit Lorentzian in the lossless limit.

  18. Vibration power generator for a linear MR damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapiński, Bogdan

    2010-10-01

    The paper describes the structure and the results of numerical calculations and experimental tests of a newly developed vibration power generator for a linear magnetorheological (MR) damper. The generator consists of permanent magnets and coil with foil winding. The device produces electrical energy according to Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction. This energy is applied to vary the damping characteristics of the MR damper attached to the generator by the input current produced by the device. The objective of the numerical calculations was to determine the magnetic field distribution in the generator as well as the electric potential and current density in the generator's coil during the idle run and under the load applied to the MR damper control coil. The results of the calculations were used during the design and manufacturing stages of the device. The objective of the experimental tests carried out on a dynamic testing machine was to evaluate the generator's efficiency and to compare the experimental and predicted data. The experimental results demonstrate that the engineered device enables a change in the kinetic energy of the reciprocal motion of the MR damper which leads to variations in the damping characteristics. That is why the generator may be used to build up MR damper based vibration control systems which require no external power.

  19. Effect of impedance and higher order chromaticity on the measurement of linear chromaticity

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjbar, V.H.; Tan, C.Y.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    The combined effect of impedance and higher order chromaticity can act on the beam in a nontrivial manner which can cause a tune shift which depends on the relative momenta with respect to the 'on momentum' particle ({Delta}p/p). Experimentally, this tune shift affects the measurement of the linear chromaticity which is traditionally measured with a change of {Delta}p/p. The theory behind this effect will be derived in this paper. Computer simulations and experimental data from the Tevatron will be used to support the theory.

  20. Low-impedance internal linear inductive antenna for large-area flat panel display plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.N.; Jung, S.J.; Lee, Y.J.; Yeom, G.Y.; Lee, S.H.; Lee, J.K.

    2005-03-15

    An internal-type linear inductive antenna, that is, a double-comb-type antenna, was developed for a large-area plasma source having the size of 1020 mmx830 mm, and high density plasmas on the order of 2.3x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} were obtained with 15 mTorr Ar at 5000 W of inductive power with good plasma stability. This is higher than that for the conventional serpentine-type antenna, possibly due to the low impedance, resulting in high efficiency of power transfer for the double-comb antenna type. In addition, due to the remarkable reduction of the antenna length, a plasma uniformity of less than 8% was obtained within the substrate area of 880 mmx660 mm at 5000 W without having a standing-wave effect.

  1. Vibration Model Validation for Linear Collider Detector Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsche, Kirk; Amann, J.W.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Oriunno, M.; Weidemann, A.; White, G.; /SLAC

    2012-05-16

    The ILC and CLIC reference designs incorporate reinforced-concrete platforms underneath the detectors so that the two detectors can each be moved onto and off of the beamline in a Push-Pull configuration. These platforms could potentially amplify ground vibrations, which would reduce luminosity. In this paper we compare vibration models to experimental data on reinforced concrete structures, estimate the impact on luminosity, and summarize implications for the design of a reinforced concrete platform for the ILC or CLIC detectors.

  2. Response Characteristics of a Linear Rotorcraft Vibration Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunz, Donald L.

    1982-01-01

    A fully coupled vibration model, consisting of a rotor with only flapping degrees of freedom plus pylon and fuselage pitching motion, was used in a parametric study undertaken to investigate the response characteristics of a simplified helicopter. Among the parameters studied were uncoupled body frequency, blade stiffness, hinge offset, advance ratio, and mast height. Results from the harmonic balance solution of the equations of motion show how each of these quantities affects the response of the model. The results also indicate that there is a potential for reducing vibration response through the judicious definition of the design parameters.

  3. Adaptive PI control strategy for flat permanent magnet linear synchronous motor vibration suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fanwei; Liu, Chengying; Li, Zhijun; Wang, Liping

    2013-01-01

    Due to low damping ratio, flat permanent magnet linear synchronous motor's vibration is difficult to be damped and the accuracy is limited. The vibration suppressing results are not good enough in the existing research because only the longitudinal direction vibration is considered while the normal direction vibration is neglected. The parameters of the direct-axis current controller are set to be the same as those of the quadrature-axis current controller commonly. This causes contradiction between signal noise and response. To suppress the vibration, the electromagnetic force model of the flat permanent magnet synchronous linear motor is formulated first. Through the analysis of the effect that direct-axis current noise and quadrature-axis current noise have on both direction vibration, it can be declared that the conclusion that longitudinal direction vibration is only related to the quadrature-axis current noise while the normal direction vibration is related to both the quadrature-axis current noise and direct-axis current noise. Then, the simulation test on current loop with a low-pass filter is conducted and the results show that the low-pass filter can not suppress the vibration but makes the vibration more severe. So a vibration suppressing strategy that the proportional gain of direct-axis current controller adapted according to quadrature-axis reference current is proposed. This control strategy can suppress motor vibration by suppressing direct-axis current noise. The experiments results about the effect of K p and T i on normal direction vibration, longitudinal vibration and the position step response show that this strategy suppresses vibration effectively while the motor's motion performance is not affected. The maximum reduction of vibration can be up to 40%. In addition, current test under rated load condition is also conducted and the results show that the control strategy can avoid the conflict between the direct-axis current and the quadrature

  4. Mechanical impedance and acoustic mobility measurement techniques of specifying vibration environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, G. C.

    1973-01-01

    Method has been developed for predicting interaction between components and corresponding support structures subjected to acoustic excitations. Force environments determined in spectral form are called force spectra. Force-spectra equation is determined based on one-dimensional structural impedance model.

  5. Non-linear system identification in flow-induced vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Spanos, P.D.; Zeldin, B.A.; Lu, R.

    1996-12-31

    The paper introduces a method of identification of non-linear systems encountered in marine engineering applications. The non-linearity is accounted for by a combination of linear subsystems and known zero-memory non-linear transformations; an equivalent linear multi-input-single-output (MISO) system is developed for the identification problem. The unknown transfer functions of the MISO system are identified by assembling a system of linear equations in the frequency domain. This system is solved by performing the Cholesky decomposition of a related matrix. It is shown that the proposed identification method can be interpreted as a {open_quotes}Gram-Schmidt{close_quotes} type of orthogonal decomposition of the input-output quantities of the equivalent MISO system. A numerical example involving the identification of unknown parameters of flow (ocean wave) induced forces on offshore structures elucidates the applicability of the proposed method.

  6. Use of linear and nonlinear vibration absorbers for buffet alleviation of twin-tailed fighter aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Badawy, Ayman A.; Nayfeh, Ali H.

    2001-08-01

    We investigate theoretically and experimentally the performance of linear and nonlinear vibration absorbers to suppress high-amplitude vibrations of twin-tailed fighter aircraft when subjected to a primary resonance excitation. The tail section used in the experiments is a 1/16 dynamically scaled model fo the F-15 tail assembly. Both techniques (linear and nonlinear) are based on introducing an absorber and coupling it with the tails through a sensor and an actuator, where the control signals ae either linear or quadratic. For both cases, we develop the equations governing the response of the closed-loop system and use the method of multiple scales to obtain an approximate solution. We investigated both control strategies by studying their steady-state characteristics. In addition, we compare the power requirements of both techniques and show that the linear tuned vibration absorber uses less power than the nonlinear absorber.

  7. Ice-Induced Non-Linear Vibration of AN Offshore Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, D. P.; Hu, H. Y.

    1998-07-01

    The non-linear behavior of ice-induced vibration of an offshore platform with four legs is investigated in this paper. The equations of motion of the system are derived by using the Hamiltonian Principle. The force of moving ice based on the self-excitation and locking is used to model the phenomenon of contact between the ice and the platform. By using the approach of multiple scales, the primary resonance of the ice-induced vibration of the platform is analyzed. The numerical results show that there exist several kinds of combination resonances, including self-excited vibration and locking vibration. These results coincide with those observed from an offshore platform in the North China Sea, and hence enable one to gain insight into the ice-induced vibration of offshore platforms.

  8. Linearization of scan velocity of resonant vibrating-mirror beam deflectors

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Chen, S.L.

    1991-01-15

    A means and method for producing linearization of scan velocity of resonant vibrating-mirror beam deflectors in laser scanning system including presenting an elliptical convex surface to the scanning beam to reflect the scanning beam to the focal plane of the scanning line. The elliptical surface is shaped to produce linear velocity of the reflective scanning beam at the focal plane. Maximization of linearization is accomplished by considering sets of criteria for different scanning applications. 6 figures.

  9. A comparison of power output from linear and nonlinear kinetic energy harvesters using real vibration data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeby, Stephen P.; Wang, Leran; Zhu, Dibin; Weddell, Alex S.; Merrett, Geoff V.; Stark, Bernard; Szarka, Gyorgy; Al-Hashimi, Bashir M.

    2013-07-01

    The design of vibration energy harvesters (VEHs) is highly dependent upon the characteristics of the environmental vibrations present in the intended application. VEHs can be linear resonant systems tuned to particular frequencies or nonlinear systems with either bistable operation or a Duffing-type response. This paper provides detailed vibration data from a range of applications, which has been made freely available for download through the Energy Harvesting Network’s online data repository. In particular, this research shows that simulation is essential in designing and selecting the most suitable vibration energy harvester for particular applications. This is illustrated through C-based simulations of different types of VEHs, using real vibration data from a diesel ferry engine, a combined heat and power pump, a petrol car engine and a helicopter. The analysis shows that a bistable energy harvester only has a higher output power than a linear or Duffing-type nonlinear energy harvester with the same Q-factor when it is subjected to white noise vibration. The analysis also indicates that piezoelectric transduction mechanisms are more suitable for bistable energy harvesters than electromagnetic transduction. Furthermore, the linear energy harvester has a higher output power compared to the Duffing-type nonlinear energy harvester with the same Q factor in most cases. The Duffing-type nonlinear energy harvester can generate more power than the linear energy harvester only when it is excited at vibrations with multiple peaks and the frequencies of these peaks are within its bandwidth. Through these new observations, this paper illustrates the importance of simulation in the design of energy harvesting systems, with particular emphasis on the need to incorporate real vibration data.

  10. Non-linear dual-axis biodynamic response to vertical whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawayseh, N.; Griffin, M. J.

    2003-11-01

    Seated human subjects have been exposed to vertical whole-body vibration so as to investigate the non-linearity in their biodynamic responses and quantify the response in directions other than the direction of excitation. Twelve males were exposed to random vertical vibration in the frequency range 0.25-25 Hz at four vibration magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25 m s -2 r.m.s.). The subjects sat in four sitting postures having varying foot heights so as to produce differing thigh contact with the seat (feet hanging, feet supported with maximum thigh contact, feet supported with average thigh contact, and feet supported with minimum thigh contact). Forces were measured in the vertical, fore-and-aft, and lateral directions on the seat and in the vertical direction at the footrest. The characteristic non-linear response of the human body with reducing resonance frequency at increasing vibration magnitudes was seen in all postures, but to a lesser extent with minimum thigh contact. Appreciable forces in the fore-and-aft direction also showed non-linearity, while forces in the lateral direction were low and showed no consistent trend. Forces at the feet were non-linear with a multi-resonant behaviour and were affected by the position of the legs. The decreased non-linearity with the minimum thigh contact posture suggests the tissues of the buttocks affect the non-linearity of the body more than the tissues of the thighs. The forces in the fore-and-aft direction are consistent with the body moving in two directions when exposed to vertical vibration. The non-linear behaviour of the body, and the considerable forces in the fore-aft direction should be taken into account when optimizing vibration isolation devices.

  11. Coupling loss factor of linear vibration energy harvesting systems in a framework of statistical energy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu

    2016-02-01

    This paper establishes coupling loss factor of linear vibration energy harvesting systems in a framework of statistical energy analysis under parameter variations and random excitations. The new contributions of this paper are to define the numerical ranges of the dimensionless force factor for the weak, moderate and strong coupling and to study the connections of dimensionless force factor, coupling loss factor, coupling quotient, critical coupling strength, electro-mechanical coupling factor, damping loss factor and modal densities in linear vibration energy harvesting systems. The motivation of this paper is to enable statistical energy analysis of linear vibration energy harvesting systems for reliable performance predictions and design optimisation under parameter variations of materials and manufacturing processes and random ambient environmental excitations.

  12. a Body Mass Dependent Mechanical Impedance Model for Applications in Vibration Seat Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BOILEAU, P.-É.; RAKHEJA, S.; WU, X.

    2002-05-01

    A three degree-of-freedom model is proposed to predict the biodynamic responses of the seated human body of different masses. A baseline model is initially derived to satisfy both the mean apparent mass and seat-to-head transmissibility responses proposed in ISO/DIS 5982:2000 applicable for mean body mass of 75 kg. The validity of the resultant generic mass dependent model is verified by comparing the apparent mass and driving-point mechanical impedance responses computed for total body masses of 55, 75 and 90 kg with the range of idealized values proposed for body masses within the 49-93 kg range. Considering the lack of data that could be found to define the apparent mass/mechanical impedance of subjects with different body masses when applying the experimental conditions defined in ISO/DIS 5982:2000, an attempt is made to adapt the parameters of the base model to fit the measured apparent mass data applicable to groups of automobile occupants within different mass ranges. This is achieved through constrained parametric optimization which consists of minimizing the sum of squared errors between the computed response and the mean apparent mass data measured for automobile occupants within four mass groups: less than 60 kg, 60·5-70·5 kg, 70·5-80 kg and above 80 kg. The results show a reasonably good agreement between the model responses and the measured apparent mass data, particularly at frequencies below 10 Hz. The results suggest that the proposed mass dependent model can effectively predict the apparent mass responses of automobile occupants over a wide range of body masses and for two different postures: passenger (hands-in-lap) and driver (hands-on-steering wheel) postures.

  13. Powering pacemakers from heartbeat vibrations using linear and nonlinear energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin Karami, M.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear piezoelectric devices are introduced to continuously recharge the batteries of the pacemakers by converting the vibrations from the heartbeats to electrical energy. The power requirement of a pacemaker is very low. However, after few years, patients require another surgical operation just to replace their pacemaker battery. Linear low frequency and nonlinear mono-stable and bi-stable energy harvesters are designed according to the especial signature of heart vibrations. The proposed energy harvesters are robust to variation of heart rate and can meet the power requirement of pacemakers.

  14. H∞ optimization of dynamic vibration absorber variant for vibration control of damped linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Semin; Lee, Youngil; Kim, Tae-Hyoung

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the H∞ optimal design of a dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) variant for suppressing high-amplitude vibrations of damped primary systems. Unlike traditional DVA configurations, the damping element in this type of DVA is connected directly to the ground instead of the primary mass. First, a thorough graphical analysis of the variations in the maximum amplitude magnification factor depending on two design parameters, natural frequency and absorber damping ratios, is performed. The results of this analysis clearly show that any fixed-points-theory-based conventional method could provide, at best, only locally but not globally optimal parameters. Second, for directly handling the H∞ optimization for its optimal design, a novel meta-heuristic search engine, called the diversity-guided cyclic-network-topology-based constrained particle swarm optimization (Div-CNT-CPSO), is developed. The variant DVA system developed using the proposed Div-CNT-CPSO scheme is compared with those reported in the literature. The results of this comparison verified that the proposed system is better than the existing methods for suppressing the steady-state vibration amplitude of a controlled primary system.

  15. Characterization of linear viscoelastic anti-vibration rubber mounts

    SciTech Connect

    Lodhia, B.B.; Esat, I.I.

    1996-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify the dynamic characteristics that are evident in linear viscoelastic rubber mountings. The characteristics under consideration included the static and dynamic stiffnesses with the variation of amplitude and frequency of the sinusoidal excitation. Test samples of various rubber mix were tested and compared to reflect magnitude of dependency on composition. In the light of the results, the validity and effectiveness of a mathematical model was investigated and a suitable technique based on the Tschoegl and Emri Algorithm, was utilized to fit the model to the experimental data. The model which was chosen, was an extension of the basic Maxwell model, which is based on linear spring and dashpot elements in series and parallel called the Wiechert model. It was found that the extent to which the filler and vulcanisate was present in the rubber sample, did have a great effect on the static stiffness characteristics, and the storage and loss moduli. The Tschoegl and Emri Algorithm was successfully utilized in modelling the frequency response of the samples.

  16. Vibration Stabilization of a Mechanical Model of a X-Band Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, Josef; Chang, Allison; Decker, Valentin; Doyle, Eric; Eriksson, Leif; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Partridge, Richard; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2006-09-28

    The small beam sizes at the interaction point of a X-band linear collider require mechanical stabilization of the final focus magnets at the nanometer level. While passive systems provide adequate performance at many potential sites, active mechanical stabilization is useful if the natural or cultural ground vibration is higher than expected. A mechanical model of a room temperature linear collider final focus magnet has been constructed and actively stabilized with an accelerometer based system.

  17. A Simple Reduction Process for the Normal Vibrational Modes Occurring in Linear Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerny, William

    2005-01-01

    The students in molecular spectroscopy courses are often required to determine the permitted normal vibrations for linear molecules that belong to particular groups. The reducible group representations generated by the use of Cartesian coordinates can be reduced by the use of a simple algebraic process applied to the group representations. The…

  18. Towards more accurate numerical modeling of impedance based high frequency harmonic vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yee Yan; Kiong Soh, Chee

    2014-03-01

    The application of smart materials in various fields of engineering has recently become increasingly popular. For instance, the high frequency based electromechanical impedance (EMI) technique employing smart piezoelectric materials is found to be versatile in structural health monitoring (SHM). Thus far, considerable efforts have been made to study and improve the technique. Various theoretical models of the EMI technique have been proposed in an attempt to better understand its behavior. So far, the three-dimensional (3D) coupled field finite element (FE) model has proved to be the most accurate. However, large discrepancies between the results of the FE model and experimental tests, especially in terms of the slope and magnitude of the admittance signatures, continue to exist and are yet to be resolved. This paper presents a series of parametric studies using the 3D coupled field finite element method (FEM) on all properties of materials involved in the lead zirconate titanate (PZT) structure interaction of the EMI technique, to investigate their effect on the admittance signatures acquired. FE model updating is then performed by adjusting the parameters to match the experimental results. One of the main reasons for the lower accuracy, especially in terms of magnitude and slope, of previous FE models is the difficulty in determining the damping related coefficients and the stiffness of the bonding layer. In this study, using the hysteretic damping model in place of Rayleigh damping, which is used by most researchers in this field, and updated bonding stiffness, an improved and more accurate FE model is achieved. The results of this paper are expected to be useful for future study of the subject area in terms of research and application, such as modeling, design and optimization.

  19. Geometrically Non-Linear Free Vibration of Fully Clamped Symmetrically Laminated Rectangular Composite Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HARRAS, B.; BENAMAR, R.; WHITE, R. G.

    2002-04-01

    The geometrically non-linear free vibration of thin composite laminated plates is investigated by using a theoretical model based on Hamilton's principle and spectral analysis previously applied to obtain the non-linear mode shapes and resonance frequencies of thin straight structures, such as beams, plates and shells (Benamar et al. 1991Journal of Sound and Vibration149 , 179-195; 1993, 164, 295-316; 1990 Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Recent Advances in Structural Dynamics, Southampton; Moussaoui et al. 2000 Journal of Sound and Vibration232, 917-943 [1-4]). The von Kármán non-linear strain-displacement relationships have been employed. In the formulation, the transverse displacement W of the plate mid-plane has been taken into account and the in-plane displacements U and V have been neglected in the non-linear strain energy expressions. This assumption, quite often made in the literature has been adopted in reference [2] and (El Kadiri et al. 1999 Journal of Sound and Vibration228, 333-358 [5]), in the isotropic case and has been mentioned here because the results obtained have been found to be in very good agreement with those based on the hierarchical finite element method (HFEM). In a previous study, it was assumed, based on the analogy with the isotropic case, that the fundamental carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) plate non-linear mode shape could be well estimated, by using nine plate functions, obtained as products of clamped-clamped beam functions in the x and y directions, symmetric in both the length U001and width directions [3]. In the present work, a convergence study has been performed and has shown that, although such an assumption may yield a good estimate for the non-linear resonance frequency, 18 plate functions should be taken into account instead of nine in the first non-linear mode shape and associated bending stress patterns calculations. This allows the anisotropy induced by the fibre orientations to be taken

  20. Modeling and Simulation of Linear and Nonlinear MEMS Scale Electromagnetic Energy Harvesters for Random Vibration Environments

    PubMed Central

    Sassani, Farrokh

    2014-01-01

    The simulation results for electromagnetic energy harvesters (EMEHs) under broad band stationary Gaussian random excitations indicate the importance of both a high transformation factor and a high mechanical quality factor to achieve favourable mean power, mean square load voltage, and output spectral density. The optimum load is different for random vibrations and for sinusoidal vibration. Reducing the total damping ratio under band-limited random excitation yields a higher mean square load voltage. Reduced bandwidth resulting from decreased mechanical damping can be compensated by increasing the electrical damping (transformation factor) leading to a higher mean square load voltage and power. Nonlinear EMEHs with a Duffing spring and with linear plus cubic damping are modeled using the method of statistical linearization. These nonlinear EMEHs exhibit approximately linear behaviour under low levels of broadband stationary Gaussian random vibration; however, at higher levels of such excitation the central (resonant) frequency of the spectral density of the output voltage shifts due to the increased nonlinear stiffness and the bandwidth broadens slightly. Nonlinear EMEHs exhibit lower maximum output voltage and central frequency of the spectral density with nonlinear damping compared to linear damping. Stronger nonlinear damping yields broader bandwidths at stable resonant frequency. PMID:24605063

  1. Optical measurement of the weak non-linearity in the eardrum vibration response to auditory stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerts, Johan

    The mammalian hearing organ consists of the external ear (auricle and ear canal) followed by the middle ear (eardrum and ossicles) and the inner ear (cochlea). Its function is to convert the incoming sound waves and convert them into nerve pulses which are processed in the final stage by the brain. The main task of the external and middle ear is to concentrate the incoming sound waves on a smaller surface to reduce the loss that would normally occur in transmission from air to inner ear fluid. In the past it has been shown that this is a linear process, thus without serious distortions, for sound waves going up to pressures of 130 dB SPL (˜90 Pa). However, at large pressure changes up to several kPa, the middle ear movement clearly shows non-linear behaviour. Thus, it is possible that some small non-linear distortions are also present in the middle ear vibration at lower sound pressures. In this thesis a sensitive measurement set-up is presented to detect this weak non-linear behaviour. Essentially, this set-up consists of a loud-speaker which excites the middle ear, and the resulting vibration is measured with an heterodyne vibrometer. The use of specially designed acoustic excitation signals (odd random phase multisines) enables the separation of the linear and non-linear response. The application of this technique on the middle ear demonstrates that there are already non-linear distortions present in the vibration of the middle ear at a sound pressure of 93 dB SPL. This non-linear component also grows strongly with increasing sound pressure. Knowledge of this non-linear component can contribute to the improvement of modern hearing aids, which operate at higher sound pressures where the non-linearities could distort the signal considerably. It is also important to know the contribution of middle ear non-linearity to otoacoustic emissions. This are non-linearities caused by the active feedback amplifier in the inner ear, and can be detected in the external and

  2. Equivalent damping and frequency change for linear and nonlinear hybrid vibrational energy harvesting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, M. Amin; Inman, Daniel J.

    2011-11-01

    A unified approximation method is derived to illustrate the effect of electro-mechanical coupling on vibration-based energy harvesting systems caused by variations in damping ratio and excitation frequency of the mechanical subsystem. Vibrational energy harvesters are electro-mechanical systems that generate power from the ambient oscillations. Typically vibration-based energy harvesters employ a mechanical subsystem tuned to resonate with ambient oscillations. The piezoelectric or electromagnetic coupling mechanisms utilized in energy harvesters, transfers some energy from the mechanical subsystem and converts it to an electric energy. Recently the focus of energy harvesting community has shifted toward nonlinear energy harvesters that are less sensitive to the frequency of ambient vibrations. We consider the general class of hybrid energy harvesters that use both piezoelectric and electromagnetic energy harvesting mechanisms. Through using perturbation methods for low amplitude oscillations and numerical integration for large amplitude vibrations we establish a unified approximation method for linear, softly nonlinear, and bi-stable nonlinear energy harvesters. The method quantifies equivalent changes in damping and excitation frequency of the mechanical subsystem that resembles the backward coupling from energy harvesting. We investigate a novel nonlinear hybrid energy harvester as a case study of the proposed method. The approximation method is accurate, provides an intuitive explanation for backward coupling effects and in some cases reduces the computational efforts by an order of magnitude.

  3. A stabilization process applied to a hidden variables method for evaluating the uncertainties on foundation impedances and their effect on vibrations induced by railways in a building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ropars, Pierre; Bonnet, Guy; Jean, Philippe

    2014-03-01

    The paper is devoted to stochastic foundation impedance modeling for buildings submitted to vibrations. The hidden-variables method used in seismic engineering is revisited, due to a larger frequency range used in vibration prediction. Indeed, in this new context, instability of the solution and non-physical nature of mass and stiffness random matrices have been observed. The hidden variable method has been therefore implemented by enforcing explicitly the stability of the solution and the positiveness of mass and stiffness matrices. The effects of numerical parameters used throughout the process are shown and the improved hidden-variables method has been used for predicting the level of vibrations inside a building induced by railway sources. We present here steps of stabilization process, and then discuss on an example of application.

  4. Linearization of scan velocity of resonant vibrating-mirror beam deflectors

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chen, Shun-Le

    1991-01-15

    A means and method for producing linerization of scan velocity of resonant vibrating-mirror beam deflectors in laser scanning system including presenting an elliptical convex surface to the scanning beam to reflect the scanning beam to the focal plane of the scanning line. The elliptical surface is shaped to produce linear velocity of the reflective scanning beam at the focal plane. Maximization of linerization is accomplished by considering sets of criteria for different scanning applications.

  5. Linear stability analysis of self-excited vibrations in drilling using an infinite dimensional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarsnes, Ulf Jakob F.; Aamo, Ole Morten

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with predicting the occurrence of self-excited vibrations during drilling. Previous work postulates that these are due to the coupling between the distributed drill string system and the regenerative effect in the bit-rock interaction law. We use a previously developed distributed model and the linearized bit-rock interaction law to derive a graphical condition for stability based on the Nyquist stability criterion.

  6. Non-linear vibrations of laminated cylindrical shallow shells under thermomechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, P.; Jansen, E.

    2008-08-01

    The geometrically non-linear vibrations of linear elastic composite laminated shallow shells under the simultaneous action of thermal fields and mechanical excitations are analysed. For this purpose, a model based on a very efficient p-version first-order shear deformation finite element, with hierarchical basis functions, is employed. The equations of motion are solved in the time domain by a Newmark implicit time integration method. The model and code developed are partially validated by comparison with published data. Parametric studies are carried out in order to study the influence of temperature change, initial curvature, panel thickness and fibre orientation on the shells' dynamics.

  7. Development of a Non-Magnetic Inertial Sensor for Vibration Stabilization in a Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, Josef; Decker, Valentin; Doyle, Eric; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Seryi, Andrei; Chang, Allison; Partridge, Richard; /Brown U.

    2006-09-01

    One of the options for controlling vibration of the final focus magnets in a linear collider is to use active feedback based on accelerometers. While commercial geophysics sensors have noise performance that substantially exceeds the requirements for a linear collider, they are physically large, and cannot operate in the strong magnetic field of the detector. Conventional nonmagnetic sensors have excessive noise for this application. We report on the development of a non-magnetic inertial sensor, and on a novel commercial sensor both of which have demonstrated the required noise levels for this application.

  8. Vibrational spectra and non linear optical proprieties of L-histidine oxalate: DFT studies.

    PubMed

    Ben Ahmed, A; Elleuch, N; Feki, H; Abid, Y; Minot, C

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents the results of our calculations on the geometric parameters, vibrational spectra and hyperpolarizability of a nonlinear optical material L-histidine oxalate. Due to the lack of sufficiently precise information on geometric structure in literature, theoretical calculations were preceded by re-determination of the crystal X-ray structure. Single crystal of L-histidine oxalate has been growing by slow evaporation of an aqueous solution at room temperature. The compound crystallizes in the non-Centro symmetric space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) of orthorhombic system. The FT-IR and Raman spectra of L-histidine oxalate were recorded and analyzed. The vibrational wave numbers were examined theoretical with the aid of Gaussian98 package of programs using the DFT//B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory. The data obtained from vibrational wave number calculations are used to assign vibrational bands obtained in IR and Raman spectroscopy of the studied compound. The geometrical parameters of the title compound are in agreement with the values of similar structures. To investigate microscopic second order non-linear optical NLO behaviour of the examined complex, the electric dipole μ(tot), the polarizability α(tot) and the hyperpolarizability β(tot) were computed using DFT//B3LYP/6-31G(d) method. According to our calculation, the title compound exhibits non-zero β(tot) value revealing microscopic second order NLO behaviour. PMID:21530379

  9. Vibrational spectra and non linear optical proprieties of L-histidine oxalate: DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, A. Ben; Elleuch, N.; Feki, H.; Abid, Y.; Minot, C.

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents the results of our calculations on the geometric parameters, vibrational spectra and hyperpolarizability of a nonlinear optical material L-histidine oxalate. Due to the lack of sufficiently precise information on geometric structure in literature, theoretical calculations were preceded by re-determination of the crystal X-ray structure. Single crystal of L-histidine oxalate has been growing by slow evaporation of an aqueous solution at room temperature. The compound crystallizes in the non-Centro symmetric space group P2 12 12 1 of orthorhombic system. The FT-IR and Raman spectra of L-histidine oxalate were recorded and analyzed. The vibrational wave numbers were examined theoretical with the aid of Gaussian98 package of programs using the DFT//B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory. The data obtained from vibrational wave number calculations are used to assign vibrational bands obtained in IR and Raman spectroscopy of the studied compound. The geometrical parameters of the title compound are in agreement with the values of similar structures. To investigate microscopic second order non-linear optical NLO behaviour of the examined complex, the electric dipole μtot, the polarizability αtot and the hyperpolarizability βtot were computed using DFT//B3LYP/6-31G(d) method. According to our calculation, the title compound exhibits non-zero βtot value revealing microscopic second order NLO behaviour.

  10. Effective suppression of pneumatic vibration isolators by using input-output linearization and time delay control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Pyung-hun; Ki Han, Dong; Shin, Yun-ho; Kim, Kwang-joon

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a new state space representation of pneumatic vibration isolators (PVIs) and a design of a robust control, Time Delay Control (TDC), based on it. The new state space model, derived by using the input-output linearization method, is of the phase variable form with the air mass-flow as the control input. This model offers a framework that enables simultaneous suppression of both seismic vibration and direct disturbance (or payload disturbance) with an accelerometer only. Based on this model, TDC is designed and verified with experiments on a single chamber PVI with an accelerometer only. In the experiment, the PVI with TDC successfully suppresses seismic vibration and direct disturbance, both individually and simultaneously. Faced with seismic vibration, the transmissibility of the PVI with TDC has virtually no resonance peak at low frequency; under direct disturbance, the former achieves a 68 percent reduction in settling time of the latter. The final analysis of experimental result shows that TDC effectively estimates the modeling error along with other uncertainties and cancels them, while achieving desired closed-loop dynamics.

  11. Small strain vibration of a continuous, linearized viscoelastic rod of expanded polymer cushion material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batt, Gregory S.; Gibert, James M.; Daqaq, Mohammed

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the free and forced vibration response of a linearized, distributed-parameter model of a viscoelastic rod with an applied tip-mass is investigated. A nonlinear model is developed from constitutive relations and is linearized about a static equilibrium position for analysis. A classical Maxwell-Weichert model, represented via a Prony series, is used to model the viscoelastic system. The exact solution to both the free and forced vibration problem is derived and used to study the behavior of an idealized packaging system containing Nova Chemicals' Arcel® foam. It is observed that, although three Prony series terms are deemed sufficient to fit the static test data, convergence of the dynamic response and study of the storage and loss modulii necessitate the use of additional Prony series terms. It is also shown that the model is able to predict the modal frequencies and the primary resonance response at low acceleration excitation, both with reasonable accuracy given the non-homogeneity and density variation observed in the specimens. Higher acceleration inputs result in softening nonlinear responses highlighting the need for a nonlinear elastic model that extends beyond the scope of this work. Solution analysis and experimental data indicate little material vibration energy dissipation close to the first modal frequency of the mass/rod system.

  12. Decoherence of topological qubit in linear and circular motions: decoherence impedance, anti-Unruh and information backflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pei-Hua; Lin, Feng-Li

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we consider the decoherence patterns of a topological qubit made of two Majorana zero modes in the generic linear and circular motions in the Minkowski spacetime. We show that the reduced dynamics is exact without Markov approximation. Our results imply that the acceleration will cause thermalization as expected by Unruh effect. However, for the short-time scale, we find the rate of decoherence is anti-correlated with the acceleration, as kind of decoherence impedance. This is in fact related to the "anti-Unruh" phenomenon previously found by studying the transition probability of Unruh-DeWitt detector. We also obtain the information backflow by some time modulations of coupling constant or acceleration, which is a characteristic of the underlying non-Markovian reduced dynamics. Moreover, by exploiting the nonlocal nature of the topological qubit, we find that some incoherent accelerations of the constituent Majorana zero modes can preserve the coherence instead of thermalizing it.

  13. A New Stochastic Equivalent Linearization Implementation for Prediction of Geometrically Nonlinear Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muravyov, Alexander A.; Turner, Travis L.; Robinson, Jay H.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of random vibration of geometrically nonlinear MDOF structures is considered. The solutions obtained by application of two different versions of a stochastic linearization method are compared with exact (F-P-K) solutions. The formulation of a relatively new version of the stochastic linearization method (energy-based version) is generalized to the MDOF system case. Also, a new method for determination of nonlinear sti ness coefficients for MDOF structures is demonstrated. This method in combination with the equivalent linearization technique is implemented in a new computer program. Results in terms of root-mean-square (RMS) displacements obtained by using the new program and an existing in-house code are compared for two examples of beam-like structures.

  14. Geometrically non-linear vibration of spinning structures by finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, A. Y. T.; Fung, T. C.

    1990-05-01

    The geometrically non-linear steady state vibration of spinning structures is studied. Full flap-lag-torsional gyroscopic coupling effects are considered. The non-linearity arises mainly from the non-linear axial strain-displacement relation. The equations of motion are derived from Lagrangian equations. Spatial discretization is achieved by the finite element method and steady state nodal displacements are expanded into Fourier series. The harmonic balance method gives a set of non-linear algebraic equations with the Fourier coefficients of the nodal displacements as unknowns. The non-linear algebraic equations are solved by a Newtonian algorithm iteratively. The importance of the conditions of completeness and balanceability in choosing the number of harmonic terms to be used is discussed. General frame structures with arbitrary orientation in a rotating frame can be investigated by the present method. Rotating blades and shafts are treated as special cases. Examples of a rotating ring with different orientations are given. The non-linear amplitude-frequency relation can be constructed parametrically.

  15. Numerical Dimension-Reduction Methods for Non-Linear Shell Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foale, S.; Thompson, J. M. T.; McRobie, F. A.

    1998-08-01

    A number of methods are investigated for obtaining a low-dimensional dynamical system from a set of partial differential equations describing the non-linear vibrations of a shallow cylindrical panel under periodic axial forcing. In these approaches an initial (high-dimensional) spatial discretization of a (possibly irregular) domain is performed and a subsequent procedure is used to further reduce the resulting set of ordinary differential equations. In particular the results suggest that a numerical method based upon inertial manifold approximation is possible, but for the specific case studied, no advantage could be discerned over more direct dimension-reduction techniques.

  16. Vibrational spectra, conformational and normal coordinate analyses for polyaza-polyene linear chain molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougeard, D.; Brémard, C.; Segaut, E.

    1992-03-01

    The potential energy functions about the CC single bond for the ground state 2,3-butanedione-2,3-dioxime and 2,3-butanedione-2,3-dihydrazone have been derived from MNDO calculations. The s-trans conformation has been found to be stabilized in the solid state. The assignment of the infrared and Raman spectra was realized using normal coordinate analysis. The force field values were transferred to the polyaza-polyene macromolecule and the calculated vibrational frequencies were found to be in reasonable agreement with the experimental data of large polyaza-polyene linear oligomers.

  17. Optimal Vibration Estimation of a Non-Linear Flexible Beam Mounted on a Rotating Compliant Hub

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sinawi, A.; Hamdan, M. N.

    2003-01-01

    To eliminate the need for sensor placement on rotating flexible beams such as turbine blades, helicopter rotors and like applications, a new approach has been developed based on the linear quadratic estimator (LQE) technique for estimating the vibration of any point on the span of a rotating flexible beam mounted on a compliant hub ( plant) in the presence of process and measurements noise. A non-linear model of the plant is utilized in this study to mimic the actual plant behavior. The corresponding plant dynamics of the LQE are in the form of a reduced order linear model constructed from the eigenvalues and eigenfuctions of a finite element dynamic model of the plant formulated in the state space. A virtual hub deflection (that mimics the actual measurement of the vertical hub deflection needed by the estimation process) is generated by the non-linear model of the plant. The LQE reconstructs the states of the plant, including transverse deflection of the beam at any point, from the measurements of the vertical deflection of the hub, assuming that it is the most accessible state for measurement. Estimated beam tip deflection obtained by the proposed technique is then compared to the tip deflection generated by the non-linear model and the results show good agreement.

  18. A hybrid-stress finite element approach for stress and vibration analysis in linear anisotropic elasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. Tinsley; Fly, Gerald W.; Mahadevan, L.

    1987-01-01

    A hybrid stress finite element method is developed for accurate stress and vibration analysis of problems in linear anisotropic elasticity. A modified form of the Hellinger-Reissner principle is formulated for dynamic analysis and an algorithm for the determination of the anisotropic elastic and compliance constants from experimental data is developed. These schemes were implemented in a finite element program for static and dynamic analysis of linear anisotropic two dimensional elasticity problems. Specific numerical examples are considered to verify the accuracy of the hybrid stress approach and compare it with that of the standard displacement method, especially for highly anisotropic materials. It is that the hybrid stress approach gives much better results than the displacement method. Preliminary work on extensions of this method to three dimensional elasticity is discussed, and the stress shape functions necessary for this extension are included.

  19. Parameter-dependent vibration-attenuation controller design for electro-hydraulic actuated linear structural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Falu; Mao, Weijie

    2012-03-01

    The problem of robust active vibration control for a class of electro-hydraulic actuated structural systems with time-delay in the control input channel and parameter uncertainties appearing in all the mass, damping and stiffness matrices is investigated in this paper. First, by introducing a linear varying parameter, the nonlinear system is described as a linear parameter varying (LPV) model. Second, based on this LPV model, an LMI-based condition for the system to be asymptotically stabilized is deduced. By solving these LMIs, a parameter-dependent controller is established for the closedloop system to be stable with a prescribed level of disturbance attenuation. The condition is also extended to the uncertain case. Finally, some numerical simulations demonstrate the satisfying performance of the proposed controller.

  20. Active vibration control for nonlinear vehicle suspension with actuator delay via I/O feedback linearization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jing; Jiang, Zuo; Li, Ya-Li; Li, Wu-Xin

    2014-10-01

    The problem of nonlinear vibration control for active vehicle suspension systems with actuator delay is considered. Through feedback linearization, the open-loop nonlinearity is eliminated by the feedback nonlinear term. Based on the finite spectrum assignment, the quarter-car suspension system with actuator delay is converted into an equivalent delay-free one. The nonlinear control includes a linear feedback term, a feedforward compensator, and a control memory term, which can be derived from a Riccati equation and a Sylvester equation, so that the effects produced by the road disturbances and the actuator delay are compensated, respectively. A predictor is designed to implement the predictive state in the designed control. Moreover, a reduced-order observer is constructed to solve its physical unrealisability problem. The stability proofs for the zero dynamics and the closed-loop system are provided. Numerical simulations illustrate the effectiveness and the simplicity of the designed control.

  1. Linear stability of the Couette flow of a vibrationally excited gas. 2. viscous problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigor'ev, Yu. N.; Ershov, I. V.

    2016-03-01

    Based on the linear theory, stability of viscous disturbances in a supersonic plane Couette flow of a vibrationally excited gas described by a system of linearized equations of two-temperature gas dynamics including shear and bulk viscosity is studied. It is demonstrated that two sets are identified in the spectrum of the problem of stability of plane waves, similar to the case of a perfect gas. One set consists of viscous acoustic modes, which asymptotically converge to even and odd inviscid acoustic modes at high Reynolds numbers. The eigenvalues from the other set have no asymptotic relationship with the inviscid problem and are characterized by large damping decrements. Two most unstable viscous acoustic modes (I and II) are identified; the limits of these modes were considered previously in the inviscid approximation. It is shown that there are domains in the space of parameters for both modes, where the presence of viscosity induces appreciable destabilization of the flow. Moreover, the growth rates of disturbances are appreciably greater than the corresponding values for the inviscid flow, while thermal excitation in the entire considered range of parameters increases the stability of the viscous flow. For a vibrationally excited gas, the critical Reynolds number as a function of the thermal nonequilibrium degree is found to be greater by 12% than for a perfect gas.

  2. Crystal studies, vibrational spectra and non-linear optical properties of L-histidine chloride monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Ben Ahmed, A; Feki, H; Abid, Y; Boughzala, H; Minot, C

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of our calculations on the geometric parameters, vibrational spectra and hyperpolarizability of a non-linear optical material L-histidine chloride monohydrate. Due to the lack of sufficiently precise information on geometric parameters available in literature, theoretical calculations were preceded by re-determination of the crystal X-ray structure. Single crystal of L-histidine chloride monohydrate has been growing by slow evaporation of an aqueous solution at room temperature. The compound crystallizes in the non-Centro-symmetric space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) of orthorhombic system. IR spectrum has been recorded in the range [400-4000 cm(-1)]. All the experimental vibrational bands have been discussed and assigned to normal mode or to combinations on the basis of our calculations. The optimized geometric bond lengths and bond angles obtained by using DFT//B3LYP/6-31G (d) method show a good agreement with the experimental data. The calculated vibrational spectra are in well agreement with the experimental one. To investigate microscopic second-order non-linear optical NLO behavior of the examined complex, the electric dipole mu, the polarizability alpha and the hyperpolarizability beta were computed using DFT//B3LYP/6-31G (d) method. The time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) was employed to descript the molecular electron structure of the title compound using the B3LYP/6-31G (d) method. According to our calculations, L-histidine chloride monohydrate exhibits non-zero beta value revealing microscopic second-order NLO behavior. PMID:19926520

  3. Crystal studies, vibrational spectra and non-linear optical properties of L-histidine chloride monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, A. Ben; Feki, H.; Abid, Y.; Boughzala, H.; Minot, C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of our calculations on the geometric parameters, vibrational spectra and hyperpolarizability of a non-linear optical material L-histidine chloride monohydrate. Due to the lack of sufficiently precise information on geometric parameters available in literature, theoretical calculations were preceded by re-determination of the crystal X-ray structure. Single crystal of L-histidine chloride monohydrate has been growing by slow evaporation of an aqueous solution at room temperature. The compound crystallizes in the non-Centro-symmetric space group P2 12 12 1 of orthorhombic system. IR spectrum has been recorded in the range [400-4000 cm -1]. All the experimental vibrational bands have been discussed and assigned to normal mode or to combinations on the basis of our calculations. The optimized geometric bond lengths and bond angles obtained by using DFT//B3LYP/6-31G (d) method show a good agreement with the experimental data. The calculated vibrational spectra are in well agreement with the experimental one. To investigate microscopic second-order non-linear optical NLO behavior of the examined complex, the electric dipole μ, the polarizability α and the hyperpolarizability β were computed using DFT//B3LYP/6-31G (d) method. The time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) was employed to descript the molecular electron structure of the title compound using the B3LYP/6-31G (d) method. According to our calculations, L-histidine chloride monohydrate exhibits non-zero β value revealing microscopic second-order NLO behavior.

  4. Non-linear torsional vibration characteristics of an internal combustion engine crankshaft assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ying; Yang, Shouping; Zhang, Fujun; Zhao, Changlu; Ling, Qiang; Wang, Haiyan

    2012-07-01

    Crankshaft assembly failure is one of the main factors that affects the reliability and service life of engines. The linear lumped mass method, which has been universally applied to the dynamic modeling of engine crankshaft assembly, reveals obvious simulation errors. The nonlinear dynamic characteristics of a crankshaft assembly are instructionally significant to the improvement of modeling correctness. In this paper, a general expression for the non-constant inertia of a crankshaft assembly is derived based on the instantaneous kinetic energy equivalence method. The nonlinear dynamic equations of a multi-cylinder crankshaft assembly are established using the Lagrange rule considering nonlinear factors such as the non-constant inertia of reciprocating components and the structural damping of shaft segments. The natural frequency and mode shapes of a crankshaft assembly are investigated employing the eigenvector method. The forced vibration response of a diesel engine crankshaft assembly taking into account the non-constant inertia is studied using the numerical integral method. The simulation results are compared with a lumped mass model and a detailed model using the system matrix method. Results of non-linear torsional vibration analysis indicate that the additional excitation torque created by non-constant inertia activates the 2nd order rolling vibration, and the additional damping torque resulting from the non-constant inertia is the main nonlinear factor. The increased torsional angular displacement evoked by the high order excitation torque relates to the non-constant inertia. This research project is aimed at improving nonlinear dynamics theory, and the confirmed nonlinear parameters can be used for the structure design of a crankshaft assembly.

  5. Development, implementation, and characterization of a standalone embedded viscosity measurement system based on the impedance spectroscopy of a vibrating wire sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, José; Janeiro, Fernando M.; Ramos, Pedro M.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an embedded liquid viscosity measurement system based on a vibrating wire sensor. Although multiple viscometers based on different working principles are commercially available, there is still a market demand for a dedicated measurement system capable of performing accurate, fast measurements and requiring little or no operator training for simple systems and solution monitoring. The developed embedded system is based on a vibrating wire sensor that works by measuring the impedance response of the sensor, which depends on the viscosity and density of the liquid in which the sensor is immersed. The core of the embedded system is a digital signal processor (DSP) which controls the waveform generation and acquisitions for the measurement of the impedance frequency response. The DSP also processes the acquired waveforms and estimates the liquid viscosity. The user can interact with the measurement system through a keypad and an LCD or through a computer with a USB connection for data logging and processing. The presented system is tested on a set of viscosity standards and the estimated values are compared with the standard manufacturer specified viscosity values. A stability study of the measurement system is also performed.

  6. On vibrational imperfection sensitivity of Augusti's model structure in the vicinity of a non-linear static state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elishakoff, Isaac; Marcus, S.; Starnes, J. H., JR.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we present a closed-form solution for vibrational imperfection sensitivity the effect of small imperfections on the vibrational frequencies of perturbed motion around the static equilibrium state of Augusti's model Structure (a rigid link, pinned at one end to a rigid foundation and supported at the other by a linear extensional spring that retains its horizontality, as the system deflects). We also treat a modified version of that model with attendant slightly different dynamics. It is demonstrated that the vibrational frequencies decreases as the initial imperfections increase.

  7. Equivalent Linearization Analysis of Geometrically Nonlinear Random Vibrations Using Commercial Finite Element Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Muravyov, Alexander A.

    2002-01-01

    Two new equivalent linearization implementations for geometrically nonlinear random vibrations are presented. Both implementations are based upon a novel approach for evaluating the nonlinear stiffness within commercial finite element codes and are suitable for use with any finite element code having geometrically nonlinear static analysis capabilities. The formulation includes a traditional force-error minimization approach and a relatively new version of a potential energy-error minimization approach, which has been generalized for multiple degree-of-freedom systems. Results for a simply supported plate under random acoustic excitation are presented and comparisons of the displacement root-mean-square values and power spectral densities are made with results from a nonlinear time domain numerical simulation.

  8. Orientation Determination of Protein Helical Secondary Structure Using Linear and Nonlinear Vibrational Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Khoi Tan; Le Clair, Stéphanie V.; Ye, Shuji; Chen, Zhan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we systematically presented the orientation determination of protein helical secondary structures using vibrational spectroscopic methods, particularly the nonlinear Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, along with linear vibrational spectroscopic techniques such as infrared spectroscopy and Raman scattering. SFG amide I signals can be collected using different polarization combinations of the input laser beams and output signal beam to measure the second order nonlinear optical susceptibility components of the helical amide I modes, which are related to their molecular hyperpolarizability elements through the orientation distribution of these helices. The molecular hyperpolarizability elements of amide I modes of a helix can be calculated based on the infrared transition dipole moment and Raman polarizability tensor of the helix; these quantities are determined by using the bond additivity model to sum over the individual infrared dipole transition moments and Raman polarizability tensors, respectively, of the peptide units (or the amino acid residues). The computed overall infrared transition dipole moment and Raman polarizability tensor of a helix can be validated by experimental data using polarized infrared and polarized Raman spectroscopy on samples with well-aligned helical structures. From the deduced SFG hyperpolarizability elements and measured SFG second order nonlinear susceptibility components, orientation information regarding helical structures can be determined. Even though such orientation information can also be measured using polarized infrared or polarized Raman amide I signals, SFG has a much lower detection limit, which can be used to study the orientation of a helix when its surface coverage is much lower than a monolayer. In addition, the combination of different vibrational spectroscopic techniques, e.g., SFG and Attenuated Total Reflectance – Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, provides more

  9. On the particular importance of vibrational contributions to the static electrical properties of model linear molecules under spatial confinement.

    PubMed

    Zaleśny, Robert; Góra, Robert W; Luis, Josep M; Bartkowiak, Wojciech

    2015-09-14

    The influence of the spatial confinement on the electronic and vibrational contributions to longitudinal electric-dipole properties of model linear molecules including HCN, HCCH and CO2 is discussed. The effect of confinement is represented by two-dimensional harmonic oscillator potential of cylindrical symmetry, which mimics the key features of various types of trapping environments like, for instance, nanotubes or quantum well wires. Our results indicate that in general both (electronic and vibrational) contributions to (hyper)polarizabilities diminish upon spatial confinement. However, since the electronic term is particularly affected, the relative importance of vibrational contributions is larger for confined species. This effect increases also with the degree of anharmonicity of vibrational motion. PMID:26247540

  10. Improved assumed-stress hybrid shell element with drilling degrees of freedom for linear stress, buckling, and free vibration analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengarajan, Govind; Aminpour, Mohammad A.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    An improved four-node quadrilateral assumed-stress hybrid shell element with drilling degrees of freedom is presented. The formulation is based on Hellinger-Reissner variational principle and the shape functions are formulated directly for the four-node element. The element has 12 membrane degrees of freedom and 12 bending degrees of freedom. It has nine independent stress parameters to describe the membrane stress resultant field and 13 independent stress parameters to describe the moment and transverse shear stress resultant field. The formulation encompasses linear stress, linear buckling, and linear free vibration problems. The element is validated with standard tests cases and is shown to be robust. Numerical results are presented for linear stress, buckling, and free vibration analyses.

  11. a Geometrically Non-Linear Model of Rotating Shafts with Internal Resonance and Self-Excited Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łuczko, J.

    2002-08-01

    A geometrically non-linear model of the rotating shaft is introduced, which includes Kárman non-linearity, non-linear curvature effects, large displacements and rotations as well as gyroscopic effects. Through applying Timoshenko-type assumptions, the shear effects are also included in the model. Convenient matrix descriptions are used in order to facilitate the analysis based on Galerkin and continuation methods. The model is used to analyze the phenomenon of internal resonance. The influence of some of the system's parameters on the amplitude and frequency of self-excited vibration is investigated.

  12. Non-Linear Steady State Vibrations of Beams Excited by Vortex Shedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LEWANDOWSKI, R.

    2002-05-01

    In this paper the non-linear vibrations of beams excited by vortex-shedding are considered. In particular, the steady state responses of beams near the synchronization region are taken into account. The main aerodynamic properties of wind are described by using the semi-empirical model proposed by Hartlen and Currie. The finite element method and the strip method are used to formulate the equation of motion of the system treated. The harmonic balance method is adopted to derive the amplitude equations. These equations are solved with the help of the continuation method which is very convenient to perform the parametric studies of the problem and to determine the response curve in the synchronization region. Moreover, the equations of motion are also integrated using the Newmark method. The results of calculations of several example problems are also shown to confirm the efficiency and accuracy of the presented method. The results obtained by the harmonic balance method and by the Newmark methods are in good agreement with each other.

  13. Non-Linear Dynamics and Chaos Control of a Physical Pendulum with Vibrating and Rotating Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GE, Z.-M.; YANG, C.-H.; CHEN, H.-H.; LEE, S.-C.

    2001-04-01

    The dynamic behavior of a physical pendulum system of which the support is subjected to both rotation and vertical vibration are studied in this paper. Both analytical and computational results are employed to obtain the characteristics of the system. By using Lyapunov's direct method the conditions of stability of the relative equilibrium position can be determined. Melnikov's method is applied to identify the existence of chaotic motion. The incremental harmonic balance method is used to find the stable and unstable periodic solutions for the strong non-linear system. By applying various numerical results such as phase portrait, Pioncaré map, time history and power spectrum analysis, a variety of the periodic solutions and the phenomena of the chaotic motion can be presented. The effects of the changes of parameters in the system could be found in the bifurcation and parametric diagrams. Further, chaotic motion can be verified by using Lyapunov exponent and Lyapunov dimension. The global analysis of basin boundary and fractal structure are observed by the modified interpolated cell mapping method. Besides, non-feedback control, delayed feedback control, adaptive control, and variable structure control are used to control the chaos effectively.

  14. Efficiency improvement in a vibration power generator for a linear MR damper: numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapiński, Bogdan; Krupa, Stanisław

    2013-04-01

    This paper summarizes a numerical analysis of the electromagnetic field, voltage and circuit properties and the cogging force in a vibration power generator comprising permanent magnets and a coil with a foil winding. The device converts the energy harvested from vibrations into electrical energy which is next used to vary the damping characteristics of a linear MR damper attached to the generator. The objective of the study is to propose a sufficiently efficient generator whose finally developed (target) version could be integrated with a small-scale MR damper to build a single device. Two design options for the device are numerically studied, the previously engineered generator 1 and the newly devised generator 2. Generator 1 incorporates two magnet systems having four magnets each and a single-section coil, while generator 2 comprises three magnet systems with four magnets each and a two-section coil. Calculations were performed to determine the electromagnetic field, voltage and current properties and the cogging force in the generators. The electromagnetic field parameters include the distribution of the magnetic field, the electrical potential field and the current density in the open turn and closed turn of the generators’ coils. The voltage and current properties include electromotive force (emf) in the generators and the voltage, current, instantaneous power and energy of the magnetic field in the MR damper control coil which is represented by resistance parameter R and inductance parameter L. The cogging force expresses the magnetic interactions between the permanent magnet systems and ferromagnetic structural components of the generators. The occurrence of this force is very unfavourable and attempts should be made to reduce it through control of the parameters of the magnetic circuit components. On one hand, comparison of the numerical results for the electromagnetic field parameters and voltage and current properties revealed that for the

  15. Complex AC impedance, transference number and vibrational spectroscopy studies of proton conducting PVAc-NH 4SCN polymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvasekarapandian, S.; Baskaran, R.; Hema, M.

    2005-03-01

    The polymer electrolytes composed of poly (vinyl acetate) (PVAc) with various stoichiometric ratios of ammonium thiocyanate (NH 4SCN) salt have been prepared by solution casting method. The polymer-salt complex formation and the polymer-proton interactions have been analysed by FT-IR spectroscopy. The conductivity and dielectric measurements are carried out on these films as a function of frequency at various temperatures. The complex impedance spectroscopy results reveal that the high-frequency semicircle is due to the bulk effect of the material. The conductivity is found to increase in the order of 10 -8-10 -4 S cm -1 at 303 K with the increase in salt concentration. The ionic transference number of mobile ions has been estimated by Wagner's polarization method and the results reveal that the conducting species are predominantly due to ions. The transient ionic current (TIC) measurement technique has been used to detect the type of mobile species and to evaluate their mobilities. The dielectric spectra show the low-frequency dispersion, which is due to the space charge effects arising from the electrodes.

  16. Highly accurate quartic force fields, vibrational frequencies, and spectroscopic constants for cyclic and linear C3H3(+).

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinchuan; Taylor, Peter R; Lee, Timothy J

    2011-05-19

    High levels of theory have been used to compute quartic force fields (QFFs) for the cyclic and linear forms of the C(3)H(3)(+) molecular cation, referred to as c-C(3)H(3)(+) and l-C(3)H(3)(+). Specifically, the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), has been used in conjunction with extrapolation to the one-particle basis set limit, and corrections for scalar relativity and core correlation have been included. The QFFs have been used to compute highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and other spectroscopic constants by use of both vibrational second-order perturbation theory and variational methods to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Agreement between our best computed fundamental vibrational frequencies and recent infrared photodissociation experiments is reasonable for most bands, but there are a few exceptions. Possible sources for the discrepancies are discussed. We determine the energy difference between the cyclic and linear forms of C(3)H(3)(+), obtaining 27.9 kcal/mol at 0 K, which should be the most reliable available. It is expected that the fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants presented here for c-C(3)H(3)(+) and l-C(3)H(3)(+) are the most reliable available for the free gas-phase species, and it is hoped that these will be useful in the assignment of future high-resolution laboratory experiments or astronomical observations. PMID:21510653

  17. Highly Accurate Quartic Force Fields, Vibrational Frequencies, and Spectroscopic Constants for Cyclic and Linear C3H3(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xinchuan; Taylor, Peter R.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    High levels of theory have been used to compute quartic force fields (QFFs) for the cyclic and linear forms of the C H + molecular cation, referred to as c-C H + and I-C H +. Specifically the 33 3333 singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), has been used in conjunction with extrapolation to the one-particle basis set limit and corrections for scalar relativity and core correlation have been included. The QFFs have been used to compute highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and other spectroscopic constants using both vibrational 2nd-order perturbation theory and variational methods to solve the nuclear Schroedinger equation. Agreement between our best computed fundamental vibrational frequencies and recent infrared photodissociation experiments is reasonable for most bands, but there are a few exceptions. Possible sources for the discrepancies are discussed. We determine the energy difference between the cyclic and linear forms of C H +, 33 obtaining 27.9 kcal/mol at 0 K, which should be the most reliable available. It is expected that the fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants presented here for c-C H + 33 and I-C H + are the most reliable available for the free gas-phase species and it is hoped that 33 these will be useful in the assignment of future high-resolution laboratory experiments or astronomical observations.

  18. Preliminary results of vibrator-aided experiments in non-linear seismology conducted at Uetze, F.R.G.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriu, Petros P.

    1990-10-01

    Following acoustics and largely thanks to the pioneering work of a group of Soviet geophysicists, the study of non-linear elastic properties and their effects is becoming an active field of research in geophysics. The research so far has produced a substantial body of evidence indicating that earth materials, from soils to crystalline rocks, are much more non-linear than is commonly believed and certainly far more non-linear than the materials usually used and studied in acoustics. But although most of the evidence comes from vibrator-aided experiments, apparently best suited for investigating the non-linearity of the geophysical medium owing to the ability of modern vibrators to generate seismic signals of prescribed form, the absence of a standard experimental technique makes it difficult to estimate and compare the various results, particularly in view of the considerable non-linearity of the source (vibrator-ground system) itself. The aim of the present vibrator-aided experiments was to try to confirm certain results in non-linear seismology, particularly the effects of harmonic generation and non-linear interaction in vibrator-induced sinusoidal seismic waves, by using an experimental method designed to enable one to discriminate between source, near-field and far-field non-linear effects. In the experiments, two identical prospecting vibrators, installed on the ground surface some 16 m apart, were driven in the harmonic regime separately and simultaneously (tests on non-linear evolution and interaction), a wide range of excitation frequencies and amplitudes being covered, and the resulting ground-surface motion was picked up by an array consisting of 48 groups of 12 vertical geophones-velocimeters and recorded, in multiplex form, by a prospecting seismic station. Tests were made first for short and intermediate source-receiver distances (near field, distance range covered 0-200 m, 5-m spacing of geophone groups), then for large distances (far field, range 1

  19. An intelligent sensor array distributed system for vibration analysis and acoustic noise characterization of a linear switched reluctance actuator.

    PubMed

    Salvado, José; Espírito-Santo, António; Calado, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a distributed system for analysis and monitoring (DSAM) of vibrations and acoustic noise, which consists of an array of intelligent modules, sensor modules, communication bus and a host PC acting as data center. The main advantages of the DSAM are its modularity, scalability, and flexibility for use of different type of sensors/transducers, with analog or digital outputs, and for signals of different nature. Its final cost is also significantly lower than other available commercial solutions. The system is reconfigurable, can operate either with synchronous or asynchronous modes, with programmable sampling frequencies, 8-bit or 12-bit resolution and a memory buffer of 15 kbyte. It allows real-time data-acquisition for signals of different nature, in applications that require a large number of sensors, thus it is suited for monitoring of vibrations in Linear Switched Reluctance Actuators (LSRAs). The acquired data allows the full characterization of the LSRA in terms of its response to vibrations of structural origins, and the vibrations and acoustic noise emitted under normal operation. The DSAM can also be used for electrical machine condition monitoring, machine fault diagnosis, structural characterization and monitoring, among other applications. PMID:22969364

  20. An Intelligent Sensor Array Distributed System for Vibration Analysis and Acoustic Noise Characterization of a Linear Switched Reluctance Actuator

    PubMed Central

    Salvado, José; Espírito-Santo, António; Calado, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a distributed system for analysis and monitoring (DSAM) of vibrations and acoustic noise, which consists of an array of intelligent modules, sensor modules, communication bus and a host PC acting as data center. The main advantages of the DSAM are its modularity, scalability, and flexibility for use of different type of sensors/transducers, with analog or digital outputs, and for signals of different nature. Its final cost is also significantly lower than other available commercial solutions. The system is reconfigurable, can operate either with synchronous or asynchronous modes, with programmable sampling frequencies, 8-bit or 12-bit resolution and a memory buffer of 15 kbyte. It allows real-time data-acquisition for signals of different nature, in applications that require a large number of sensors, thus it is suited for monitoring of vibrations in Linear Switched Reluctance Actuators (LSRAs). The acquired data allows the full characterization of the LSRA in terms of its response to vibrations of structural origins, and the vibrations and acoustic noise emitted under normal operation. The DSAM can also be used for electrical machine condition monitoring, machine fault diagnosis, structural characterization and monitoring, among other applications. PMID:22969364

  1. Non-Linear Vibration and Thermal Buckling of AN Orthotropic Annular Plate with a Centric Rigid Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LI, S.-R.; ZHOU, Y.-H.; SONG, X.

    2002-03-01

    A computational analysis of the non-linear vibration and thermal post-buckling of a heated orthotropic annular plate with a central rigid mass is examined for the cases of immovably hinged as well as clamped constraint conditions of the outer edge. First, based on von Karman's plate theory and Hamilton's principles, the governing equations, in terms of the displacements of the middle plane, of the problem are derived. Then, upon assuming that harmonic responses of the system exist, the non-linear partial differential equations are converted into the corresponding non-linear ordinary differential equations through elimination of the time variable by using the Kantorovich time-averaging method. Finally, by applying a shooting method, the fundamental responses of the non-linear vibration and thermal post-buckling of the plate are numerically obtained. For some prescribed values of the parameters, such as the material rigidity ratio, temperature rise and so on, the curves of the fundamental frequency versus specified amplitude and the thermal post-buckled equilibrium paths of the plate are numerically presented.

  2. Non-linearities in the vibrations of elastic structures with a closing crack: A state of the art review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovsunovsky, A.; Surace, C.

    2015-10-01

    The main purpose of the present review paper is to illustrate the principal achievements of numerous researchers who have studied the non-linear effects caused by a closing crack in the most common types of structural elements such as beams, shafts and plates, the aim being to assess the potential and future prospects of using non-linear behaviour to detect damage. Indeed, for a wide range of practical applications, in order to avoid catastrophic failure, the development of diagnostics techniques which are sufficiently sensitive to incipient cracks in structures and machines is a crucial issue. The main potential advantage of using vibration diagnostics based on the use of non-linear effects is the relatively high sensitivity to the damage of the closing crack type, especially for application to beam-like structures and rotating shafts; instead the potential for application to plate-like structures has been found to be limited. After analysing the state-of-art on this subject in detail, a discussion of the respective merits, drawbacks and prospects of a range of non-linear vibration methods for structural damage detection is presented. The general conclusion which can be drawn from the highly encouraging results of recent research is that further development of these techniques for non-destructive testing of structures with closing cracks would be highly worthwhile.

  3. Ab initio investigation of electronic and vibrational contributions to linear and nonlinear dielectric properties of ice

    SciTech Connect

    Casassa, S.; Baima, J.; Mahmoud, A.; Kirtman, B.

    2014-06-14

    Electronic and vibrational contributions to the static and dynamic (hyper)polarizability tensors of ice XI and model structures of ordinary hexagonal ice have been theoretically investigated. Calculations were carried out by the finite field nuclear relaxation method for periodic systems (FF-NR) recently implemented in the CRYSTAL code, using the coupled-perturbed Kohn-Sham approach (CPKS) for evaluating the required electronic properties. The effect of structure on the static electronic polarizabilities (dielectric constants) and second-hyperpolarizabilities is minimal. On the other hand, the vibrational contributions to the polarizabilities were found to be significant. A reliable evaluation of these (ionic) contributions allows one to discriminate amongst ice phases characterized by different degrees of proton-order, primarily through differences caused by librational motions. Transverse static and dynamic vibrational (hyper)polarizabilities were found by extrapolating calculations for slabs of increasing size, in order to eliminate substantial surface contributions.

  4. Natural vibration response based damage detection for an operating wind turbine via Random Coefficient Linear Parameter Varying AR modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avendaño-Valencia, L. D.; Fassois, S. D.

    2015-07-01

    The problem of damage detection in an operating wind turbine under normal operating conditions is addressed. This is characterized by difficulties associated with the lack of measurable excitation(s), the vibration response non-stationary nature, and its dependence on various types of uncertainties. To overcome these difficulties a stochastic approach based on Random Coefficient (RC) Linear Parameter Varying (LPV) AutoRegressive (AR) models is postulated. These models may effectively represent the non-stationary random vibration response under healthy conditions and subsequently used for damage detection through hypothesis testing. The performance of the method for damage and fault detection in an operating wind turbine is subsequently assessed via Monte Carlo simulations using the FAST simulation package.

  5. Vibration transmissibility and damping behaviour for auxetic and conventional foams under linear and nonlinear regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Matteo; Scarpa, Fabrizio

    2013-08-01

    This work describes the vibration transmissibility behaviour in conventional and auxetic (negative Poisson’s ratio) foams under low and high amplitude vibrations. Auxetic foam pads were manufactured from conventional open cell PU-PE based blocks using an alternative manufacturing process to the one currently used in the mainstream literature. The dynamic behaviour of both conventional and auxetic porous materials was assessed within the frequency bandwidth 5-500 Hz using a base excitation technique with a calibrated seismic mass. The foam pads were subjected to white noise broadband excitation at low dynamic strain, followed by a sine sweep around the resonance of the foam-mass system. The experimental data have been used to perform an inverse identification of the nonlinear dependence of the foam permeability versus the amplitude and frequency of excitation using a single-degree-of-freedom poroelastic vibration model. The auxetic foam shows higher dynamic stiffness and enhanced viscous dissipation characteristics, in particular when subjected to nonlinear vibration loading.

  6. Vibrational spectroscopic and non-linear optical activity studies on nicotinanilide : A DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premkumar, S.; Jawahar, A.; Mathavan, T.; Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2015-06-01

    The molecular structure of nicotinanilide was optimized by the DFT/B3LYP method with cc-pVTZ basis set using Gaussian 09 program. The first order hyperpolarizability of the molecule was calculated, which exhibits the higher nonlinear optical activity. The natural bond orbital analysis confirms the presence of intramolecular charge transfer and the hydrogen bonding interaction, which leads to the higher nonlinear optical activity of the molecule. The Frontier molecular orbitals analysis of the molecule shows that the delocalization of electron density occurs within the molecule. The lower energy gap indicates that the hydrogen bond formation between the charged species. The vibrational frequencies were calculated and assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation using the VEDA 4.0 program and the corresponding vibrational spectra were simulated. Hence, the nicotinanilide molecule can be a good candidate for second-order NLO material.

  7. Vibrational spectroscopic and non-linear optical activity studies on nicotinanilide : A DFT approach

    SciTech Connect

    Premkumar, S.; Mathavan, T.; Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Jawahar, A.

    2015-06-24

    The molecular structure of nicotinanilide was optimized by the DFT/B3LYP method with cc-pVTZ basis set using Gaussian 09 program. The first order hyperpolarizability of the molecule was calculated, which exhibits the higher nonlinear optical activity. The natural bond orbital analysis confirms the presence of intramolecular charge transfer and the hydrogen bonding interaction, which leads to the higher nonlinear optical activity of the molecule. The Frontier molecular orbitals analysis of the molecule shows that the delocalization of electron density occurs within the molecule. The lower energy gap indicates that the hydrogen bond formation between the charged species. The vibrational frequencies were calculated and assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation using the VEDA 4.0 program and the corresponding vibrational spectra were simulated. Hence, the nicotinanilide molecule can be a good candidate for second-order NLO material.

  8. Random vibration of nonlinear beams by the new stochastic linearization technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, J.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, the beam under general time dependent stationary random excitation is investigated, when exact solution is unavailable. Numerical simulations are carried out to compare its results with those yielded by the conventional linearization techniques. It is found that the modified version of the stochastic linearization technique yields considerably more accurate results for the mean square displacement of the beam than the conventional equivalent linearization technique, especially in the case of large nonlinearity.

  9. Balancing Vibrations at Harmonic Frequencies by Injecting Harmonic Balancing Signals into the Armature of a Linear Motor/Alternator Coupled to a Stirling Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holliday, Ezekiel S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Vibrations at harmonic frequencies are reduced by injecting harmonic balancing signals into the armature of a linear motor/alternator coupled to a Stirling machine. The vibrations are sensed to provide a signal representing the mechanical vibrations. A harmonic balancing signal is generated for selected harmonics of the operating frequency by processing the sensed vibration signal with adaptive filter algorithms of adaptive filters for each harmonic. Reference inputs for each harmonic are applied to the adaptive filter algorithms at the frequency of the selected harmonic. The harmonic balancing signals for all of the harmonics are summed with a principal control signal. The harmonic balancing signals modify the principal electrical drive voltage and drive the motor/alternator with a drive voltage component in opposition to the vibration at each harmonic.

  10. Vibration generators

    SciTech Connect

    Lerwill, W.E.

    1980-09-16

    Apparatus for generating vibrations in a medium, such as the ground, comprises a first member which contacts the medium, means , preferably electromagnetic, which includes two relatively movable members for generating vibrations in the apparatus and means operatively connecting the said two members to said first member such that the relatively amplitudes of the movements of said three members can be adjusted to match the impedances of the apparatus and the medium.

  11. First-order optimal linear and nonlinear detuning of centrifugal pendulum vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayet, J.; Ulbrich, H.

    2015-01-01

    Centrifugal pendulum vibration absorbers are used to attenuate steady-state torsional vibrations in rotating and reciprocating machines. In most practical implementations, a set of multiple absorbers is symmetrically arranged on a rotor. Typically, each absorber mass is bifilar suspended, which allows the absorber mass to be moved along a prescribed path. Previous studies have considered how to determine absorber paths in order to obtain absorbers with amplitude-independent frequency known as tautochronic absorbers. It is known that a tautochronic absorber is highly desirable if only one absorber is installed on the rotor. However, in most applications multiple interacting absorbers are installed and as a result symmetry-induced nonlinear instabilities or localization caused by relative imperfections among the absorbers may occur. An effective strategy to avoid such situations is to perturb the tautochronic tuning which has been confirmed in practice and by previous theoretical investigations. This paper presents an approach for detuning a recently developed general tautochronic absorber design. The general design makes it possible to consider a wide class of tautochronic absorbers, e.g. absorbers without bifilar suspensions. The intent of this paper is to extend the existing tautochronic design guideline to non-tautochronic designs. As a result, different absorber designs can be addressed by one uniform theoretical approach, and existing absorber designs are included as special cases. Former studies on detuning of bifilar tautochronic absorbers use a one-parameter family of curves on which the absorber mass rides. Here, however, the detuning is not restricted to a one-parameter family of curves, which makes it possible to either optimize system performance or to avoid asynchronous absorber responses. In the case of synchronously responding equal absorbers, a necessary condition for optimal performance is derived analytically. Further, it is shown that asynchronous

  12. A fully consistent linearized model for vibration analysis of rotating beams in the framework of geometrically exact theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Invernizzi, Davide; Dozio, Lorenzo

    2016-05-01

    The equations of motions governing the free vibrations of prismatic slender beams rotating in a plane at constant angular velocity are derived according to a geometrically exact approach. Compared to other modeling methods, additional stiffening terms induced by pre-stress are found in the dynamic equations after fully consistent linearization about the deformed equilibrium configuration. These terms include axial, bending and torsional stiffening effects which arise when second-order generalized strains are retained. It is shown that their contribution becomes relevant at moderate to high angular speeds, where high means that the equilibrium state is subject to strains close to the limit where a physically linear constitutive law still applies. In particular, the importance of the axial stiffening is specifically investigated. The natural frequencies as a function of the angular velocity and other system parameters are computed and compared with benchmark cases available in the literature. Finally, the error on the modal characteristics of the rotating beam is evaluated when the linearization is carried out about the undeformed configuration.

  13. Adsorption of linear alkanes on Cu(111): Temperature and chain-length dependence of the softened vibrational mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosser, Kari A.; Kang, Joo H.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Wöll, Christof

    2007-05-01

    The vibrational spectra of linear alkanes, with lengths ranging from n-propane to n-octane, were examined on a copper surface by reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy. The appearance and frequency of the "soft mode," a feature routinely seen in studies of saturated hydrocarbons adsorbed on metals, were examined and compared between the different adsorbates. The frequency of the mode was found to be dependent on both the number of methylene units of each alkane as well as specific aspects of the order of the monolayer phase. Studies of monolayer coverages at different temperatures provide insights into the nature of the two-dimensional (2D) melting transitions of these adlayer structures, ones that can be inferred from observed shifts in the soft vibrational modes appearing in the C-H stretching region of the infrared spectrum. These studies support recently reported hypotheses as to the origins of such soft modes: the metal-hydrogen interactions that mediate them and the dynamics that underlay their pronounced temperature dependencies. The present data strongly support a model for the 2D to one-dimensional order-order phase transition arising via a continuous rather than discrete first-order process.

  14. Linear and third- and fifth-order nonlinear spectroscopies of a charge transfer system coupled to an underdamped vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Dijkstra, Arend G. E-mail: tanimura@kuchem.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Tanimura, Yoshitaka E-mail: tanimura@kuchem.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2015-06-07

    We study hole, electron, and exciton transports in a charge transfer system in the presence of underdamped vibrational motion. We analyze the signature of these processes in the linear and third-, and fifth-order nonlinear electronic spectra. Calculations are performed with a numerically exact hierarchical equations of motion method for an underdamped Brownian oscillator spectral density. We find that combining electron, hole, and exciton transfers can lead to non-trivial spectra with more structure than with excitonic coupling alone. Traces taken during the waiting time of a two-dimensional (2D) spectrum are dominated by vibrational motion and do not reflect the electron, hole, and exciton dynamics directly. We find that the fifth-order nonlinear response is particularly sensitive to the charge transfer process. While third-order 2D spectroscopy detects the correlation between two coherences, fifth-order 2D spectroscopy (2D population spectroscopy) is here designed to detect correlations between the excited states during two different time periods.

  15. Reprint of : Dynamics of coupled vibration modes in a quantum non-linear mechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labadze, G.; Dukalski, M.; Blanter, Ya. M.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the behaviour of two non-linearly coupled flexural modes of a doubly clamped suspended beam (nanomechanical resonator). One of the modes is externally driven. We demonstrate that classically, the behavior of the non-driven mode is reminiscent of that of a parametrically driven linear oscillator: it exhibits a threshold behavior, with the amplitude of this mode below the threshold being exactly zero. Quantum-mechanically, we were able to access the dynamics of this mode below the classical parametric threshold. We show that whereas the mean displacement of this mode is still zero, the mean squared displacement is finite and at the threshold corresponds to the occupation number of 1/2. This finite displacement of the non-driven mode can serve as an experimentally verifiable quantum signature of quantum motion.

  16. Alighment and Vibration Issues in TeV Linear Collider Design

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, G.E.; /SLAC

    2005-08-12

    The next generation of linear colliders will require alignment accuracies and stabilities of component placement at least one, perhaps two, orders of magnitude better than can be achieved by the conventional methods and procedures in practice today. The magnitudes of these component-placement tolerances for current designs of various linear collider subsystems are tabulated. In the micron range, long-term ground motion is sufficiently rapid that on-line reference and mechanical correction systems are called for. Some recent experiences with the upgraded SLAC laser alignment systems and examples of some conceivable solutions for the future are described. The so called ''girder'' problem is discussed in the light of ambient and vibratory disturbances. The importance of the quality of the underlying geology is stressed. The necessity and limitations of particle-beam-derived placement information are mentioned.

  17. Alignment and vibration issues in TeV linear collider design

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, G.E.

    1989-07-01

    The next generation of linear colliders will require alignment accuracies and stabilities of component placement at least one, perhaps two, orders of magnitude better than can be achieved by the conventional methods and procedures in practice today. The magnitudes of these component-placement tolerances for current designs of various linear collider subsystems are tabulated. In the micron range, long-term ground motion is sufficiently rapid that on-line reference and mechanical correction systems are called for. Some recent experiences with the upgraded SLAC laser alignment systems and examples of some conceivable solutions for the future are described. The so called ''girder'' problem is discussed in the light of ambient and vibratory disturbances. The importance of the quality of the underlying geology is stressed. The necessity and limitations of public-beam-derived placement information are mentioned. 40 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. VIBRA: An interactive computer program for steady-state vibration response analysis of linear damped structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    An interactive steady state frequency response computer program with graphics is documented. Single or multiple forces may be applied to the structure using a modal superposition approach to calculate response. The method can be reapplied to linear, proportionally damped structures in which the damping may be viscous or structural. The theoretical approach and program organization are described. Example problems, user instructions, and a sample interactive session are given to demonstate the program's capability in solving a variety of problems.

  19. Electron Impedances

    SciTech Connect

    P Cameron

    2011-12-31

    It is only recently, and particularly with the quantum Hall effect and the development of nanoelectronics, that impedances on the scale of molecules, atoms and single electrons have gained attention. In what follows the possibility that characteristic impedances might be defined for the photon and the single free electron is explored is some detail, the premise being that the concepts of electrical and mechanical impedances are relevant to the elementary particle. The scale invariant quantum Hall impedance is pivotal in this exploration, as is the two body problem and Mach's principle.

  20. An exact solution to a certain non-linear random vibration problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimentberg, M. F.

    A single-degree-of-freedom system with a special type of nonlinear damping and both external and parametric white-noise excitations is considered. For the special case, when the intensities of coordinates and velocity modulation satisfy a certain condition an exact analytical solution is obtained to the corresponding stationary Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov equation yielding an expression for joint probability density of coordinate and velocity. This solution is analyzed particularly in connection with stochastic stability problem for the corresponding linear system; certain implications are illustrated for the system, which is stable with respect to probability but unstable in the mean square. The solution obtained may be used to check different approximate methods for analysis of systems with randomly varying parameters.

  1. A finite element method for the statistics of non-linear random vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langley, R. S.

    1985-07-01

    The transitional probability density function for the random response of a certain class of non-linear system satisfies the Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov equation. This paper concerns the numerical solution of the stationary form of this equation, yielding the stationary probability density function of response. The weighted residual statement for the problem is integrated by parts to yield the weak form of the equations, which are then solved by the finite element method. The method is applied to a Duffing oscillator and good agreement is found with the exact result, and the method is compared favourably with a Galerkin solution method given by Bhandari and Sherrer [1]. Also, the method is applied to the ship rolling problem and good agreement is found with an approximate analytical result due to Roberts [2].

  2. A non-linear 3D printed electromagnetic vibration energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinou, P.; Roy, S.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a novel electromagnetic energy harvester that exploits the low flexural modulus of ABS and comprises of a nonlinear mechanism to enhance the generated power and bandwidth. The device is printed using desktop additive manufacturing techniques (3D printing) that use thermoplastics. It has a ‘V’ spring topology and exhibits a softening spring non-linearity introduced through the magnetic arrangement, which introduces a monostable potential well. A model is presented and measurements correspond favourably. The produced prototype generates a peak power of approximately 2.5mW at a frame acceleration of 1g and has a power bandwidth of approximately 1.2→1.5Hz and 3.5→3.9Hz during up and down sweeps respectively. The device has a power density of 0.4mW/cm3 at a frame acceleration of 1g and a density of 0.04mW/cm3 from a generated power of 25μW at 0.1g.

  3. Amplitude modulation drive to rectangular-plate linear ultrasonic motors with vibrators dimensions 8 mm x 2.16 mm X 1 mm.

    PubMed

    Ming, Yang; Hanson, Ben; Levesley, Martin C; Walker, Peter G; Watterson, Kevin G

    2006-12-01

    In this paper, to exploit the contribution from not only the stators but also from other parts of miniature ultrasonic motors, an amplitude modulation drive is proposed to drive a miniature linear ultrasonic motor consisting of two rectangular piezoelectric ceramic plates. Using finite-element software, the first longitudinal and second lateral-bending frequencies of the vibrator are shown to be very close when its dimensions are 8 mm x 2.16 mm x 1 mm. So one single frequency power should be able to drive the motor. However, in practice the motor is found to be hard to move with a single frequency power because of its small vibration amplitudes and big frequency difference between its longitudinal and bending resonance, which is induced by the boundary condition variation. To drive the motor effectively, an amplitude modulation drive is used by superimposing two signals with nearly the same frequencies, around the resonant frequency of the vibrators of the linear motor. When the amplitude modulation frequency is close to the resonant frequency of the vibrator's surroundings, experimental results show that the linear motor can move back and forward with a maximum thrust force (over 0.016 N) and a maximum velocity (over 50 mm/s). PMID:17186925

  4. Note: high frequency vibration rejection using a linear shaft actuator-based image stabilizing device via vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation control method.

    PubMed

    Koh, Doo-Yeol; Kim, Young-Kook; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2013-08-01

    In mobile robotics, obtaining stable image of a mounted camera is crucial for operating a mobile system to complete given tasks. This note presents the development of a high-speed image stabilizing device using linear shaft actuator, and a new image stabilization method inspired by human gaze stabilization process known as vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). In the proposed control, the reference is adaptively adjusted by the VOR adaptation control to reject residual vibration of a camera as the VOR gain converges to optimal state. Through experiments on a pneumatic vibrator, it will be shown that the proposed system is capable of stabilizing 10 Hz platform vibration, which shows potential applicability of the device to a high-speed mobile robot. PMID:24007125

  5. Note: High frequency vibration rejection using a linear shaft actuator-based image stabilizing device via vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation control method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Doo-Yeol; Kim, Young-Kook; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2013-08-01

    In mobile robotics, obtaining stable image of a mounted camera is crucial for operating a mobile system to complete given tasks. This note presents the development of a high-speed image stabilizing device using linear shaft actuator, and a new image stabilization method inspired by human gaze stabilization process known as vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). In the proposed control, the reference is adaptively adjusted by the VOR adaptation control to reject residual vibration of a camera as the VOR gain converges to optimal state. Through experiments on a pneumatic vibrator, it will be shown that the proposed system is capable of stabilizing 10 Hz platform vibration, which shows potential applicability of the device to a high-speed mobile robot.

  6. The vibrational studies and theoretical investigation of structure, electronic and non-linear optical properties of Sudan III [1-{[4-(phenylazo) phenyl]azo}-2-naphthalenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esme, Aslı; Sagdinc, Seda Gunesdogdu

    2013-09-01

    Sudan III [1-{[4-(phenylazo) phenyl]azo}-2-naphthalenol] is non-ionic fat-soluable dye used as an additive in gasoline, oils and plastics. The molecular structure, molecular electrostatic potential, NBO analysis, linear and non-linear optical properties of Sudan III have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculation with 6-311G(d,p) basis set. To investigate the tautomeric stability, optimization calculations at B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level were performed for the azo (OH) and hydrazo (NH) forms of the title compound. The calculated first-order hyperpolarizability value is comparable with the reported values and attractive object for future studies of non-linear optics. FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and FT-Raman (3500-50 cm-1) spectra of Sudan III have been recorded. The vibrational frequencies determined experimentally are compared with those obtained theoretically and a vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound is performed. The scaled frequencies resulted in good agreement with the observed spectral patterns.

  7. Experimental Study of Radiation Impedance with Effect of Reflected Wave from Sonar Dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungsoon Kim,; Moojoon Kim,; Kanglyeol Ha,; Heeseon Seo,; Cheeyong Joh,

    2010-07-01

    The radiation impedance of arrayed vibrators is analyzed experimentally when the array has a reflector. To verify the effect of the reflector, the radiation impedance with the reflector was calculated. To estimate the radiation impedance change, the input impedance of the vibrator was calculated using an equivalent circuit model. The input impedance was dependant on the location of the vibrators. The experimental results show a similar tendency to the theoretical results. It is noted that the equivalent circuit model for theoretical analysis is useful for estimating the radiation impedance change caused by the reflected wave.

  8. Impedance magnetocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Kandori, A; Miyashita, T; Suzuki, D; Yokosawa, K; Tsukada, K

    2001-02-01

    We have developed an impedance magnetocardiogram (IMCG) system to detect the change of magnetic field corresponding to changes in blood volume in the heart. A low magnetic field from the electrical activity of the human heart--the so-called magnetocardiogram (MCG)--can be simultaneously detected by using this system. Because the mechanical and electrical functions in the heart can be monitored by non-invasive and non-contact measurements, it is easy to observe the cardiovascular functions from an accurate sensor position. This system uses a technique to demodulate induced current in a subject. A flux-locked circuit of a superconducting quantum interference device has a wide frequency range (above 1 MHz) because a constant current (40 kHz) is fed through the subject. It is shown for the first time that the system could measure IMCG signals at the same time as MCG signals. PMID:11229740

  9. A wavelet-based method for the forced vibration analysis of piecewise linear single- and multi-DOF systems with application to cracked beam dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, D. M.; Mitra, M.

    2015-12-01

    The present investigation outlines a method based on the wavelet transform to analyze the vibration response of discrete piecewise linear oscillators, representative of beams with breathing cracks. The displacement and force variables in the governing differential equation are approximated using Daubechies compactly supported wavelets. An iterative scheme is developed to arrive at the optimum transform coefficients, which are back-transformed to obtain the time-domain response. A time-integration scheme, solving a linear complementarity problem at every time step, is devised to validate the proposed wavelet-based method. Applicability of the proposed solution technique is demonstrated by considering several test cases involving a cracked cantilever beam modeled as a bilinear SDOF system subjected to a harmonic excitation. In particular, the presence of higher-order harmonics, originating from the piecewise linear behavior, is confirmed in all the test cases. Parametric study involving the variations in the crack depth, and crack location is performed to bring out their effect on the relative strengths of higher-order harmonics. Versatility of the method is demonstrated by considering the cases such as mixed-frequency excitation and an MDOF oscillator with multiple bilinear springs. In addition to purporting the wavelet-based method as a viable alternative to analyze the response of piecewise linear oscillators, the proposed method can be easily extended to solve inverse problems unlike the other direct time integration schemes.

  10. Non-linear control logics for vibrations suppression: a comparison between model-based and non-model-based techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripamonti, Francesco; Orsini, Lorenzo; Resta, Ferruccio

    2015-04-01

    Non-linear behavior is present in many mechanical system operating conditions. In these cases, a common engineering practice is to linearize the equation of motion around a particular operating point, and to design a linear controller. The main disadvantage is that the stability properties and validity of the controller are local. In order to improve the controller performance, non-linear control techniques represent a very attractive solution for many smart structures. The aim of this paper is to compare non-linear model-based and non-model-based control techniques. In particular the model-based sliding-mode-control (SMC) technique is considered because of its easy implementation and the strong robustness of the controller even under heavy model uncertainties. Among the non-model-based control techniques, the fuzzy control (FC), allowing designing the controller according to if-then rules, has been considered. It defines the controller without a system reference model, offering many advantages such as an intrinsic robustness. These techniques have been tested on the pendulum nonlinear system.

  11. From linear to cyclic oligoparaphenylenes: electronic and molecular changes traced in the vibrational Raman spectra and reformulation of the bond length alternation pattern.

    PubMed

    Peña-Alvarez, Miriam; Qiu, Lili; Taravillo, Mercedes; Baonza, Valentín G; Delgado, M Carmen Ruiz; Yamago, Shigeru; Jasti, Ramesh; Navarrete, Juan T López; Casado, Juan; Kertesz, Miklos

    2016-04-28

    Cyclic paraphenylenes, [n]CPPs, and linear paraphenylenes, [n]LPPs, formed by n benzenes, are investigated by Raman spectroscopy for n = 5 to 12 and density functional theory (DFT) for n = 4 to 20. The information on the experimental Raman frequencies and intensities, combined with DFT computations and reported X-ray diffraction structures, provides a consistent interpretation of the Raman spectra and allows establishing relevant structure-property trends. Structural and electronic effects such as benzene ring bending, inter-ring torsions, π-conjugation (aromaticity) and orbital energy gaps as a function of the linear elongation in [n]LPPs versus the macrocyclic curvature in [n]CPPs and of the molecular size (i.e., polymer limit) are systematically analyzed on the basis of the vibrational Raman properties. Changes in the BLA as an indicator of the degree of quinonoid character are analyzed and linked to the Effective Conjugation Coordinate (ECC) model. The BLA patterns involved in twisted and non-twisted conformations and in different species (bipolarons, quinonoid tautomers, and ECC active modes) are compared and their differences are discussed. This paper offers a unified interpretation of structural and electronic aspects in relation to the evolution from linear 1D π-systems to cyclic 2D structures. PMID:26649442

  12. Generalized Vibrational Perturbation Theory for Rotovibrational Energies of Linear, Symmetric and Asymmetric Tops: Theory, Approximations, and Automated Approaches to Deal with Medium-to-Large Molecular Systems

    PubMed Central

    Piccardo, Matteo; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Models going beyond the rigid-rotor and the harmonic oscillator levels are mandatory for providing accurate theoretical predictions for several spectroscopic properties. Different strategies have been devised for this purpose. Among them, the treatment by perturbation theory of the molecular Hamiltonian after its expansion in power series of products of vibrational and rotational operators, also referred to as vibrational perturbation theory (VPT), is particularly appealing for its computational efficiency to treat medium-to-large systems. Moreover, generalized (GVPT) strategies combining the use of perturbative and variational formalisms can be adopted to further improve the accuracy of the results, with the first approach used for weakly coupled terms, and the second one to handle tightly coupled ones. In this context, the GVPT formulation for asymmetric, symmetric, and linear tops is revisited and fully generalized to both minima and first-order saddle points of the molecular potential energy surface. The computational strategies and approximations that can be adopted in dealing with GVPT computations are pointed out, with a particular attention devoted to the treatment of symmetry and degeneracies. A number of tests and applications are discussed, to show the possibilities of the developments, as regards both the variety of treatable systems and eligible methods. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26345131

  13. Crystal structure, vibrational spectra and non-linear optical properties of diethylenetriammonium hexabromobismuthate: C4H16N3BiBr6.

    PubMed

    Dammak, Hajer; Feki, Habib; Boughzala, Habib; Abid, Younes

    2015-02-25

    A new organic-inorganic material, diethylenetriammonium hexabromobismuthate (C4H16N3)BiBr6, was synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared absorption, Raman spectroscopy scattering and optical absorption. The crystal lattice is composed of discrete [BiBr6] anions surrounded by diethylenetriammonium cations. The title compound crystallizes in the non-centro-symmetric space group P212121 of orthorhombic system. Theoretical calculations were performed using density functional theory (DFT) at B3LYP/LanL2DZ level of theory for studying the molecular structure, vibrational spectra and non-linear optical (NLO) properties of the investigated molecule in the ground state. Good consistency is found between the calculated results and the experimental structure, IR, and Raman spectra. The results also show that the title compound might have important NLO behavior and can be a potential new nonlinear optical (NLO) material of interest. PMID:25305616

  14. On the separation of internal and boundary damage in slender bars using longitudinal vibration frequencies and equivalent linearization of damaged bolted joint response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argatov, Ivan; Butcher, Eric A.

    2011-06-01

    The problem of detecting localized large-scale internal damage in structures with imperfect bolted joints is considered. The proposed damage detection strategy utilizes the structural damping and an equivalent linearization of the bolted lap joint response to separate the combined boundary damage from localized large-scale internal damage. The frequencies are found approximately using asymptotic analysis and a perturbation technique. The proposed approach is illustrated on an example of longitudinal vibrations in a slender elastic bar with both ends clamped by bolted lap joints with different levels of damage. It is found that while the proposed method allows for the estimation of internal damage severity once the crack location is known, it gives multiple possible crack locations so that other methods (e.g., mode shapes) are required to obtain a unique crack location.

  15. ADVANCES IN IMPEDANCE THEORY

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2009-06-05

    We review recent progress in the following areas of the impedance theory: calculation of impedance of tapers and small angle collimators; optical approximation and parabolic equation for the high-frequency impedance; impedance due to resistive inserts in a perfectly conducting pipe.

  16. Inertial Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Darren

    1995-01-01

    Inertial linear actuators developed to suppress residual accelerations of nominally stationary or steadily moving platforms. Function like long-stroke version of voice coil in conventional loudspeaker, with superimposed linear variable-differential transformer. Basic concept also applicable to suppression of vibrations of terrestrial platforms. For example, laboratory table equipped with such actuators plus suitable vibration sensors and control circuits made to vibrate much less in presence of seismic, vehicular, and other environmental vibrational disturbances.

  17. Transient Vibration Prediction for Rotors on Ball Bearings Using Load-dependent Non-linear Bearing Stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David P.; Poplawski, J. V.

    2002-01-01

    Rolling-element bearing forces vary nonlinearly with bearing deflection. Thus an accurate rotordynamic transient analysis requires bearing forces to be determined at each step of the transient solution. Analyses have been carried out to show the effect of accurate bearing transient forces (accounting for non-linear speed and load dependent bearing stiffness) as compared to conventional use of average rolling-element bearing stiffness. Bearing forces were calculated by COBRA-AHS (Computer Optimized Ball and Roller Bearing Analysis - Advanced High Speed) and supplied to the rotordynamics code ARDS (Analysis of Rotor Dynamic Systems) for accurate simulation of rotor transient behavior. COBRA-AHS is a fast-running 5 degree-of-freedom computer code able to calculate high speed rolling-element bearing load-displacement data for radial and angular contact ball bearings and also for cylindrical and tapered roller beatings. Results show that use of nonlinear bearing characteristics is essential for accurate prediction of rotordynamic behavior.

  18. Noncontact scanning electrical impedance imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongze; Hawkins, Aaron; Schultz, Stephen; Oliphant, Travis E

    2004-01-01

    We are interested in applying electrical impedance imaging to a single cell because it has potential to reveal both cell anatomy and cell function. Unfortunately, classic impedance imaging techniques are not applicable to this small scale measurement due to their low resolution. In this paper, a different method of impedance imaging is developed based on a noncontact scanning system. In this system, the imaging sample is immersed in an aqueous solution allowing for the use of various probe designs. Among those designs, we discuss a novel shield-probe design that has the advantage of better signal-to-noise ratio with higher resolution compared to other probes. Images showing the magnitude of current for each scanned point were obtained using this configuration. A low-frequency linear physical model helps to relate the current to the conductivity at each point. Line-scan data of high impedance contrast structures can be shown to be a good fit to this model. The first two-dimensional impedance image of biological tissues generated by this technique is shown with resolution on the order of 100 mum. The image reveals details not present in the optical image. PMID:17271930

  19. Biodynamic response of the seated human body to single-axis and dual-axis vibration: effect of backrest and non-linearity.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yi; Griffin, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    The biodynamic responses to the human body give an understanding of why human responses to vibration (changes in health, comfort, and performance) vary with the frequency and direction of vibration. Studies have shown that biodynamic responses also vary with the magnitude of vibration and that the backrests of seats influence the transmission of vibration to the seated human body. There has been little study of the nonlinearity in the biodynamic responses of the body to dual-axis excitation and no study of the influence of backrests during dual-axis excitation. This study investigated the apparent mass and cross-axis apparent mass of the human body exposed to random vibration (0.2 to 20 Hz) in all 15 possible combinations of four magnitudes (0, 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 ms(-2) r.m.s.) of fore-and-aft vibration and the same four magnitudes of vertical vibration. Nonlinearity was evident, with the body softening with increasing magnitude of vibration when using a fixed magnitude of vibration in one direction and varying the magnitude of vibration in the other direction. The fore-and-aft apparent mass on the seat was greater without a backrest at the lower frequencies but greater with a backrest at the higher frequencies. The vertical apparent mass on the seat was decreased by the backrest at low frequencies. Cross-axis coupling was evident, with excitation in one axis producing a response in the other axis. It is concluded that the nonlinearity of the body evident during single-axis and multi-axis vibration, and the influence of backrests, should be taken into account when determining frequency weightings for predicting human responses to vibration and when optimising the dynamics of seating to minimise exposure to vibration. PMID:22146145

  20. Determination of in vivo mechanical properties of long bones from their impedance response curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borders, S. G.

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical model consisting of a uniform, linear, visco-elastic, Euler-Bernoulli beam to represent the ulna or tibia of the vibrating forearm or leg system is developed. The skin and tissue compressed between the probe and bone is represented by a spring in series with the beam. The remaining skin and tissue surrounding the bone is represented by a visco-elastic foundation with mass. An extensive parametric study is carried out to determine the effect of each parameter of the mathematical model on its impedance response. A system identification algorithm is developed and programmed on a digital computer to determine the parametric values of the model which best simulate the data obtained from an impedance test.

  1. Systematic studies of molecular vibrational anharmonicity and vibration-rotation interaction by self-consistent-field higher derivative methods: Applications to asymmetric and symmetric top and linear polyatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Clabo, D.A. Jr.

    1987-04-01

    Inclusion of the anharmonicity normal mode vibrations (i.e., the third and fourth (and higher) derivatives of a molecular Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface) is necessary in order to theoretically reproduce experimental fundamental vibrational frequencies of a molecule. Although ab initio determinations of harmonic vibrational frequencies may give errors of only a few percent by the inclusion of electron correlation within a large basis set for small molecules, in general, molecular fundamental vibrational frequencies are more often available from high resolution vibration-rotation spectra. Recently developed analytic third derivatives methods for self-consistent-field (SCF) wavefunctions have made it possible to examine with previously unavailable accuracy and computational efficiency the anharmonic force fields of small molecules.

  2. Vibration ride comfort criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, T. K.; Leatherwood, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study directed to derive equal vibration discomfort curves, to determine the influence of vibration masking in order to account for the total discomfort of any random vibration, and to develop a scale of total vibration discomfort in the case of human response to whole-body vertical vibration. Discomfort is referred to as a subjective discomfort associated with the acceleration level of a particular frequency band. It is shown that passenger discomfort to whole-body vibration increases linearly with acceleration level for each frequency. Empirical data provide a mechanism for determining the degree of masking (or summation) of the discomfort of multiple frequency vibration. A scale for the prediction of passenger discomfort is developed.

  3. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retter, Utz; Lohse, Heinz

    Non-steady-state measuring techniques are known to be extremely suitable for the investigation of the electrode kinetics of more complex electrochemical systems. Perturbation of the electrochemical system leads to a shift of the steady state. The rate at which it proceeds to a new steady state depends on characteristic parameters (reaction rate constants, diffusion coefficients, charge transfer resistance, double-layer capacity). Due to non-linearities caused by the electron transfer, low-amplitude perturbation signals are necessary. The small perturbation of the electrode state has the advantage that the solutions of relevant mathematical equations used are transformed in limiting forms that are normally linear. Impedance spectroscopy represents a powerful method for investigation of electrical properties of materials and interfaces of conducting electrodes. Relevant fields of application are the kinetics of charges in bulk or interfacial regions, the charge transfer of ionic or mixed ionic-ionic conductors, semiconducting electrodes, the corrosion inhibition of electrode processes, investigation of coatings on metals, characterisation of materials and solid electrolyte as well as solid-state devices.

  4. Characterising the interaction of individual-wheel drives with traction by linear parameter-varying model: a method for analysing the role of traction in torsional vibrations in wheel drives and active damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhun Yeap, Khang; Müller, Steffen

    2016-02-01

    A model-based approach for characterising the interaction of individual-wheel drives with traction is contributed in this article. The primary aim is to investigate the influence of traction on torsional vibration behaviour in the drive train. The essence of this approach lies in reformulating the nonlinear traction behaviour into its differential form, which enables an analytical description of this interaction in its linear parameter-varying model equivalence. Analytical statements on the vibration behaviour for different driving scenarios are inferred from this model and validated with measurement samples from a high-performance electric road vehicle. Subsequent influences of traction on the performance of active damping of torsional vibrations are derived from this model.

  5. Compact Vibration Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanco, Thomas G. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A vibration damper includes a rigid base with a mass coupled thereto for linear movement thereon. Springs coupled to the mass compress in response to the linear movement along either of two opposing directions. A converter coupled to the mass converts the linear movement to a corresponding rotational movement. A rotary damper coupled to the converter damps the rotational movement.

  6. Robust impedance shaping telemanipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, J.E.

    1993-08-01

    When a human operator performs a task via a bilateral manipulator, the feel of the task is embodied in the mechanical impedance of the manipulator. Traditionally, a bilateral manipulator is designed for transparency; i.e., so that the impedance reflected through the manipulator closely approximates that of the task. Impedance shaping bilateral control, introduced here, differs in that it treats the bilateral manipulator as a means of constructively altering the impedance of a task. This concept is particularly valuable if the characteristic dimensions (e.g., force, length, time) of the task impedance are very different from those of the human limb. It is shown that a general form of impedance shaping control consists of a conventional power-scaling bilateral controller augmented with a real-time interactive task simulation (i.e., a virtual environment). An approach to impedance shaping based on kinematic similarity between tasks of different scale is introduced and illustrated with an example. It is shown that an important consideration in impedance shaping controller design is robustness; i.e., guaranteeing the stability of the operator/manipulator/task system. A general condition for the robustness of a bilateral manipulator is derived. This condition is based on the structured singular value ({mu}). An example of robust impedance shaping bilateral control is presented and discussed.

  7. Change in resonance parameters of a linear molecule as it bends: Evidence in electron-impact vibrational transitions of hot COS and CO2 molecules*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Masamitsu; Ishijima, Yohei; Kato, Hidetoshi; Mogi, Daisuke; Takahashi, Yoshinao; Fukae, Katsuya; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Shimamura, Isao

    2016-05-01

    Inelastic and superelastic electron-impact vibrational excitation functions of hot carbonyl sulphide COS (and hot CO2) are measured for electron energies from 0.5 to 3.0 eV (1.5 to 6.0 eV) and at a scattering angle of 90°. Based on the vibrational populations and the principle of detailed balance, these excitation functions are decomposed into contributions from state-to-state vibrational transitions involving up to the second bending overtone (030) in the electronically ground state. Both the 2 Π resonance for COS around 1.2 eV and the 2 Π u resonance for CO2 around 3.8 eV are shifted to lower energies as the initial vibrational state is excited in the bending mode. The width of the resonance hump for COS changes only little as the molecule bends, whereas that of the overall boomerang resonance for CO2 becomes narrower. The angular distribution of the electrons resonantly scattered by hot COS and hot CO2 is also measured. The different shapes depending on the vibrational transitions and gas temperatures are discussed in terms of the symmetry of the vibrational wave functions.

  8. Impedance of a nanoantenna

    SciTech Connect

    Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Laroche, Marine; Marquier, Francois

    2009-10-07

    We introduce a generalized definition of the impedance of a nanoantenna that can be applied to any system. We also introduce a definition of the impedance of a two level system. Using this framework, we establish a link between the electrical engineering and the quantum optics picture of light emission.

  9. Vibration manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, C.

    1971-01-01

    Guidelines of the methods and applications used in vibration technology at the MSFC are presented. The purpose of the guidelines is to provide a practical tool for coordination and understanding between industry and government groups concerned with vibration of systems and equipments. Topics covered include measuring, reducing, analyzing, and methods for obtaining simulated environments and formulating vibration specifications. Methods for vibration and shock testing, theoretical aspects of data processing, vibration response analysis, and techniques of designing for vibration are also presented.

  10. Overview Of Impedance Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abele, John E.

    1989-08-01

    Electrical impedance has been one of the many "tools of great promise" that physicians have employed in their quest to measure and/or monitor body function or physiologic events. So far, the expectations for its success have always exceeded its performance. In simplistic terms, physiologic impedance is a measure of the resistance in the volume between electrodes which changes as a function of changes in that volume, the relative impedance of that volume, or a combination of these two. The history and principles of electrical impedance are very nicely reviewed by Geddes and Baker in their textbook "Principles of Applied Biomedical Instrumentation". It is humbling, however, to note that Cremer recorded variations in electrical impedance in frog hearts as early as 1907. The list of potential applications includes the measurement of thyroid function, estrogen activity, galvanic skin reflex, respiration, blood flow by conductivity dilution, nervous activity and eye movement. Commercial devices employing impedance have been and are being used to measure respiration (pneumographs and apneamonitors), pulse volume (impedance phlebographs) and even noninvasive cardiac output.

  11. Microfabricated AC impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter; Ackler, Harold D.; Becker, Frederick; Boser, Bernhard E.; Eldredge, Adam B.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Wang, Xiao-Bo

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated instrument for detecting and identifying cells and other particles based on alternating current (AC) impedance measurements. The microfabricated AC impedance sensor includes two critical elements: 1) a microfluidic chip, preferably of glass substrates, having at least one microchannel therein and with electrodes patterned on both substrates, and 2) electrical circuits that connect to the electrodes on the microfluidic chip and detect signals associated with particles traveling down the microchannels. These circuits enable multiple AC impedance measurements of individual particles at high throughput rates with sufficient resolution to identify different particle and cell types as appropriate for environmental detection and clinical diagnostic applications.

  12. Vibration control in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the vast majority of accelerator applications, ground vibration amplitudes are well below tolerable magnet jitter amplitudes. In these cases, it is necessary and sufficient to design a rigid magnet support structure that does not amplify ground vibration. Since accelerator beam lines are typically installed at an elevation of 1-2m above ground level, special care has to be taken in order to avoid designing a support structure that acts like an inverted pendulum with a low resonance frequency, resulting in untolerable lateral vibration amplitudes of the accelerator components when excited by either ambient ground motion or vibration sources within the accelerator itself, such as cooling water pumps or helium flow in superconducting magnets. In cases where ground motion amplitudes already exceed the required jiter tolerances, for instance in future linear colliders, passive vibration damping or active stabilization may be considered.

  13. Energy-storage of a prescribed impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. E.

    1969-01-01

    General mathematical expression found for energy storage shows that for linear, passive networks there is a minimum possible energy storage corresponding to a prescribed impedance. The electromagnetic energy storage is determined at different excitation frequencies through analysis of the networks terminal and reactance characteristics.

  14. Aircraft panel with sensorless active sound power reduction capabilities through virtual mechanical impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulandet, R.; Michau, M.; Micheau, P.; Berry, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with an active structural acoustic control approach to reduce the transmission of tonal noise in aircraft cabins. The focus is on the practical implementation of the virtual mechanical impedances method by using sensoriactuators instead of conventional control units composed of separate sensors and actuators. The experimental setup includes two sensoriactuators developed from the electrodynamic inertial exciter and distributed over an aircraft trim panel which is subject to a time-harmonic diffuse sound field. The target mechanical impedances are first defined by solving a linear optimization problem from sound power measurements before being applied to the test panel using a complex envelope controller. Measured data are compared to results obtained with sensor-actuator pairs consisting of an accelerometer and an inertial exciter, particularly as regards sound power reduction. It is shown that the two types of control unit provide similar performance, and that here virtual impedance control stands apart from conventional active damping. In particular, it is clear from this study that extra vibrational energy must be provided by the actuators for optimal sound power reduction, mainly due to the high structural damping in the aircraft trim panel. Concluding remarks on the benefits of using these electrodynamic sensoriactuators to control tonal disturbances are also provided.

  15. Time-Domain Impedance Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Auriault, Laurent

    1996-01-01

    It is an accepted practice in aeroacoustics to characterize the properties of an acoustically treated surface by a quantity known as impedance. Impedance is a complex quantity. As such, it is designed primarily for frequency-domain analysis. Time-domain boundary conditions that are the equivalent of the frequency-domain impedance boundary condition are proposed. Both single frequency and model broadband time-domain impedance boundary conditions are provided. It is shown that the proposed boundary conditions, together with the linearized Euler equations, form well-posed initial boundary value problems. Unlike ill-posed problems, they are free from spurious instabilities that would render time-marching computational solutions impossible.

  16. Impedance of accelerator components

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, J.N.

    1996-05-01

    As demands for high luminosity and low emittance particle beams increase, an understanding of the electromagnetic interaction of these beams with their vacuum chamber environment becomes more important in order to maintain the quality of the beam. This interaction is described in terms of the wake field in time domain, and the beam impedance in frequency domain. These concepts are introduced, and related quantities such as the loss factor are presented. The broadband Q = 1 resonator impedance model is discussed. Perturbation and coaxial wire methods of measurement of real components are reviewed.

  17. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

    1993-11-16

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductors allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology. 12 figures.

  18. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, David S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Martens, Jon S.

    1993-01-01

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductor allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology.

  19. Coal storage hopper with vibrating screen agitator

    DOEpatents

    Daw, Charles S.; Lackey, Mack E.; Sy, Ronald L.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a vibrating screen agitator in a coal storage hopper for assuring the uniform feed of coal having sufficient moisture content to effect agglomeration and bridging thereof in the coal hopper from the latter onto a conveyor mechanism. The vibrating screen agitator is provided by a plurality of transversely oriented and vertically spaced apart screens in the storage hopper with a plurality of vertically oriented rods attached to the screens. The rods are vibrated to effect the vibration of the screens and the breaking up of agglomerates in the coal which might impede the uniform flow of the coal from the hopper onto a conveyer.

  20. Force Limited Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry; Chang, Kurng Y.

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept and applications of Force Limited Vibration Testing. The goal of vibration testing of aerospace hardware is to identify problems that would result in flight failures. The commonly used aerospace vibration tests uses artificially high shaker forces and responses at the resonance frequencies of the test item. It has become common to limit the acceleration responses in the test to those predicted for the flight. This requires an analysis of the acceleration response, and requires placing accelerometers on the test item. With the advent of piezoelectric gages it has become possible to improve vibration testing. The basic equations have are reviewed. Force limits are analogous and complementary to the acceleration specifications used in conventional vibration testing. Just as the acceleration specification is the frequency spectrum envelope of the in-flight acceleration at the interface between the test item and flight mounting structure, the force limit is the envelope of the in-flight force at the interface . In force limited vibration tests, both the acceleration and force specifications are needed, and the force specification is generally based on and proportional to the acceleration specification. Therefore, force limiting does not compensate for errors in the development of the acceleration specification, e.g., too much conservatism or the lack thereof. These errors will carry over into the force specification. Since in-flight vibratory force data are scarce, force limits are often derived from coupled system analyses and impedance information obtained from measurements or finite element models (FEM). Fortunately, data on the interface forces between systems and components are now available from system acoustic and vibration tests of development test models and from a few flight experiments. Semi-empirical methods of predicting force limits are currently being developed on the basis of the limited flight and system test

  1. Mechanical impedances distributed at the fingers and palm of the human hand in three orthogonal directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ren G.; Welcome, Daniel E.; Xu, Xueyan S.; Warren, Christopher; McDowell, Thomas W.; Wu, John Z.; Rakheja, Subhash

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the basic characteristics of the three axis mechanical impedances distributed at the fingers and palm of the hand subjected to vibrations along three orthogonal directions ( xh, yh, and zh). Seven subjects participated in the experiment on a novel three-dimensional (3-D) hand-arm vibration test system equipped with a 3-D instrumented handle. The total impedance of the entire hand-arm system was obtained by performing a sum of the distributed impedances. Two major resonances were observed in the impedance data in each direction. For the hand forces (30 N grip and 50 N push) and body postures applied in this study, the first resonance was in the range of 20-40 Hz, and it was primarily observed in the impedance at the palm. The second resonance was generally observed in the impedance at the fingers, while the resonance frequency varied greatly with the subject and vibration direction, ranging from 100 to 200 Hz in the xh direction, 60 to 120 Hz in the yh direction, and 160 to 300 Hz in the zh direction. The impedance at the palm was greater than that at the fingers below a certain frequency in the range of 50-100 Hz, depending on the vibration direction. At higher frequencies, however, the impedance magnitude at the fingers either approached or exceeded that at the palm. The impedance in the zh direction was generally higher than those in the other directions, but it became comparable with that in the xh direction at frequencies above 250 Hz, while the impedance in the yh direction was the lowest. The frequency dependencies of the vibration power absorptions for the entire hand-arm system in the three directions were different, but their basic trends were similar to that of the frequency weighting defined in the current ISO standard. The implications of the results are discussed.

  2. Non-contact scanning electrical impedance imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongze; Hawkins, Aaron; Schultz, Stephen; Oliphant, Travis

    2004-01-01

    We are interested in applying electrical impedance imaging to a single cell because it has potential to reveal both cell anatomy and cell function. Unfortunately, classic impedance imaging techniques are not applicable to this small scale measurement due to their low resolution. In this paper, a different method of impedance imaging is developed based on a non-contact scanning system. In this system, the imaging sample is immersed in an aqueous solution allowing for the use of various probe designs. Among those designs, we discuss a novel shield-probe design that has the advantage of better signal-to-noise ratio with higher resolution compared to other probes. Images showing the magnitude of current for each scanned point were obtained using this configuration. A low-frequency linear physical model helps to relate the current to the conductivity at each point. Line-scan data of high impedance contrast structures can be shown to be a good fit to this model. The first two-dimensional impedance image of biological tissues generated by this technique is shown with resolution on the order of 100 mum. The image reveals details not present in the optical image. PMID:17271931

  3. Impedance cardiography: recent advancements.

    PubMed

    Cybulski, Gerard; Strasz, Anna; Niewiadomski, Wiktor; Gąsiorowska, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the presentation of recent advancements in impedance cardiography regarding methodical approach, applied equipment and clinical or research implementations. The review is limited to the papers which were published over last 17 months (dated 2011 and 2012) in well recognised scientific journals. PMID:23042327

  4. Impedances of Tevatron separators

    SciTech Connect

    K. Y. Ng

    2003-05-28

    The impedances of the Tevatron separators are revisited and are found to be negligibly small in the few hundred MHz region, except for resonances at 22.5 MHz. The later are contributions from the power cables which may drive head-tail instabilities if the bunch is long enough.

  5. Longitudinal impedance of RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Mernick, K.

    2015-05-03

    The longitudinal impedance of the two RHIC rings has been measured using the effect of potential well distortion on longitudinal Schottky measurements. For the blue RHIC ring Im(Z/n) = 1.5±0.2Ω. For the yellow ring Im(Z/n) = 5.4±1Ω.

  6. Smart mug to measure hand's geometrical mechanical impedance.

    PubMed

    Hondori, Hossein Mousavi; Tech, Ang Wei

    2011-01-01

    A novel device, which looks like a mug, has been proposed for measuring the impedance of human hand. The device is designed to have convenient size and light weight similar to an ordinary coffee mug. It contains a 2-axis inertia sensor to monitor vibration and a small motor to carry an eccentric mass (m=100 gr, r=2 cm, rpm=600). The centrifugal force due to the rotating mass applies a dynamic force to the hand that holds the mug. Correlation of the acceleration signals with the perturbing force gives the geometrical mechanical impedance. Experimental results on a healthy subject shows that impedance is posture dependant while it changes with the direction of the applied perturbing force. For nine postures the geometrical impedance is obtained all of which have elliptical shapes. The method can be used for assessment of spasticity and monitoring stability in patients with stroke or similar problems. PMID:22255230

  7. Recycler short kicker beam impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, Jim; Fellenz, Brian; /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    Measured longitudinal and calculated transverse beam impedance is presented for the short kicker magnets being installed in the Fermilab Recycler. Fermi drawing number ME-457159. The longitudinal impedance was measured with a stretched wire and the Panofsky equation was used to estimate the transverse impedance. The impedance of 3319 meters (the Recycler circumference) of stainless vacuum pipe is provided for comparison. Although measurements where done to 3GHz, impedance was negligible above 30MHz. The beam power lost to the kicker impedance is shown for a range of bunch lengths. The measurements are for one kicker assuming a rotation frequency of 90KHz. Seven of these kickers are being installed.

  8. Theoretical investigation on the non-linear optical properties, vibrational spectroscopy and frontier molecular orbital of (E)-2-cyano-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)acrylamide molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-Hong, Li; Hong-Ling, Cui; Rui-Zhou, Zhang; Xian-Zhou, Zhang

    2015-02-01

    The vibrational frequencies of (E)-2-cyano-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)acrylamide (HB-CA) in the ground state have been calculated using density functional method (B3LYP) with B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The analysis of natural bond orbital was also performed. The IR spectra were obtained and interpreted by means of potential energies distributions (PEDs) using MOLVIB program. In addition, the results show that there exists Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond in the title compound, which is confirmed by the natural bond orbital analysis. The predicted NLO properties show that the title compound is a good candidate as nonlinear optical material. The analysis of frontier molecular orbitals shows that HB-CA has high excitation energies, good stability and high chemical hardness. The analysis of MEP map shows the negative and the positive potential sites.

  9. Ground Vibration Measurements at LHC Point 4

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsche, Kirk; Gaddi, Andrea; /CERN

    2012-09-17

    Ground vibration was measured at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Point 4 during the winter shutdown in February 2012. This report contains the results, including power and coherence spectra. We plan to collect and analyze vibration data from representative collider halls to inform specifications for future linear colliders, such as ILC and CLIC. We are especially interested in vibration correlations between final focus lens locations.

  10. Non-Linear Dynamics and Stability of Circular Cylindrical Shells Containing Flowing Fluid. Part Iv: Large-Amplitude Vibrations with Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AMABILI, M.; PELLICANO, F.; PAÏDOUSSIS, M. P.

    2000-11-01

    The response of a shell conveying fluid to harmonic excitation, in the spectral neighbourhood of one of the lowest natural frequencies, is investigated for different flow velocities. The theoretical model has already been presented in Part I of the present study. Non-linearities due to moderately large-amplitude shell motion are considered by using Donnell's non-linear shallow-shell theory. Linear potential flow theory is applied to describe the fluid-structure interaction by using the model proposed by Paı̈doussis and Denise. For different amplitudes and frequencies of the excitation and for different flow velocities, the following are investigated numerically: (1) periodic response of the system; (2) unsteady and stochastic motion; (3) loss of stability by jumps to bifurcated branches. The effect of the flow velocity on the non-linear periodic response of the system has also been investigated. Poincaré maps and bifurcation diagrams are used to study the unsteady and stochastic dynamics of the system. Amplitude modulated motions, multi-periodic solutions, chaotic responses, cascades of bifurcations as the route to chaos and the so-called “blue sky catastrophe” phenomenon have all been observed for different values of the system parameters; the latter two have been predicted here probably for the first time for the dynamics of circular cylindrical shells.

  11. Impedance calculation for ferrite inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Breitzmann, S.C.; Lee, S.Y.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Passive ferrite inserts were used to compensate the space charge impedance in high intensity space charge dominated accelerators. They study the narrowband longitudinal impedance of these ferrite inserts. they find that the shunt impedance and the quality factor for ferrite inserts are inversely proportional to the imaginary part of the permeability of ferrite materials. They also provide a recipe for attaining a truly passive space charge impedance compensation and avoiding narrowband microwave instabilities.

  12. Vibrational ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borromeo, M.; Marchesoni, F.

    2006-01-01

    Transport in one-dimensional symmetric devices can be activated by the combination of thermal noise and a biharmonic drive. For the study case of an overdamped Brownian particle diffusing on a periodic one-dimensional substrate, we distinguish two apparently different biharmonic regimes: (i) Harmonic mixing, where the two drive frequencies are commensurate and of the order of some intrinsic relaxation rate. Earlier predictions based on perturbation expansions seem inadequate to interpret our simulation results; (ii) Vibrational mixing, where one harmonic drive component is characterized by high frequency but finite amplitude-to-frequency ratio. Its effect on the device response to either a static or a low-frequency additional input signal is accurately reproduced by rescaling each spatial Fourier component of the substrate potential, separately. Contrary to common wisdom, based on the linear response theory, we show that extremely high-frequency modulations can indeed influence the response of slowly (or dc) operated devices, with potential applications in sensor technology and cellular physiology. Finally, the mixing of two high-frequency beating signal is also investigated both numerically and analytically.

  13. Impedance Measurement Box

    ScienceCinema

    Christophersen, Jon

    2013-05-28

    Energy storage devices, primarily batteries, are now more important to consumers, industries and the military. With increasing technical complexity and higher user expectations, there is also a demand for highly accurate state-of-health battery assessment techniques. IMB incorporates patented, proprietary, and tested capabilities using control software and hardware that can be part of an embedded monitoring system. IMB directly measures the wideband impedance spectrum in seconds during battery operation with no significant impact on service life. It also can be applied to batteries prior to installation, confirming health before entering active service, as well as during regular maintenance. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/impedance-measurement-box/

  14. Impedance Measurement Box

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-11-20

    The IMB 50V software provides functionality for design of impedance measurement tests or sequences of tests, execution of these tests or sequences, processing measured responses and displaying and saving of the results. The software consists of a Graphical User Interface that allows configuration of measurement parameters and test sequencing, a core engine that controls test sequencing, execution of measurements, processing and storage of results and a hardware/software data acquisition interface with the IMB hardware system.

  15. Gynecologic electrical impedance tomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korjenevsky, A.; Cherepenin, V.; Trokhanova, O.; Tuykin, T.

    2010-04-01

    Electrical impedance tomography extends to the new and new areas of the medical diagnostics: lungs, breast, prostate, etc. The feedback from the doctors who use our breast EIT diagnostic system has induced us to develop the 3D electrical impedance imaging device for diagnostics of the cervix of the uterus - gynecologic impedance tomograph (GIT). The device uses the same measuring approach as the breast imaging system: 2D flat array of the electrodes arranged on the probe with handle is placed against the body. Each of the 32 electrodes of the array is connected in turn to the current source while the rest electrodes acquire the potentials on the surface. The current flows through the electrode of the array and returns through the remote electrode placed on the patient's limb. The voltages are measured relative to another remote electrode. The 3D backprojection along equipotential surfaces is used to reconstruct conductivity distribution up to approximately 1 cm in depth. Small number of electrodes enables us to implement real time imaging with a few frames per sec. rate. The device is under initial testing and evaluation of the imaging capabilities and suitability of usage.

  16. Acoustic ground impedance meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    A compact, portable instrument was developed to measure the acoustic impedance of the ground, or other surfaces, by direct pressure-volume velocity measurement. A Helmholz resonator, constructed of heavy-walled stainless steel but open at the bottom, is positioned over the surface having the unknown impedance. The sound source, a cam-driven piston of known stroke and thus known volume velocity, is located in the neck of the resonator. The cam speed is a variable up to a maximum 3600 rpm. The sound pressure at the test surface is measured by means of a microphone flush-mounted in the wall of the chamber. An optical monitor of the piston displacement permits measurement of the phase angle between the volume velocity and the sound pressure, from which the real and imaginary parts of the impedance can be evaluated. Measurements using a 5-lobed cam can be made up to 300 Hz. Detailed design criteria and results on a soil sample are presented.

  17. High input impedance amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L.

    1995-01-01

    High input impedance amplifiers are provided which reduce the input impedance solely to a capacitive reactance, or, in a somewhat more complex design, provide an extremely high essentially infinite, capacitive reactance. In one embodiment, where the input impedance is reduced in essence, to solely a capacitive reactance, an operational amplifier in a follower configuration is driven at its non-inverting input and a resistor with a predetermined magnitude is connected between the inverting and non-inverting inputs. A second embodiment eliminates the capacitance from the input by adding a second stage to the first embodiment. The second stage is a second operational amplifier in a non-inverting gain-stage configuration where the output of the first follower stage drives the non-inverting input of the second stage and the output of the second stage is fed back to the non-inverting input of the first stage through a capacitor of a predetermined magnitude. These amplifiers, while generally useful, are very useful as sensor buffer amplifiers that may eliminate significant sources of error.

  18. Coupled rotor/airframe vibration analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sopher, R.; Studwell, R. E.; Cassarino, S.; Kottapalli, S. B. R.

    1982-01-01

    A coupled rotor/airframe vibration analysis developed as a design tool for predicting helicopter vibrations and a research tool to quantify the effects of structural properties, aerodynamic interactions, and vibration reduction devices on vehicle vibration levels is described. The analysis consists of a base program utilizing an impedance matching technique to represent the coupled rotor/airframe dynamics of the system supported by inputs from several external programs supplying sophisticated rotor and airframe aerodynamic and structural dynamic representation. The theoretical background, computer program capabilities and limited correlation results are presented in this report. Correlation results using scale model wind tunnel results show that the analysis can adequately predict trends of vibration variations with airspeed and higher harmonic control effects. Predictions of absolute values of vibration levels were found to be very sensitive to modal characteristics and results were not representative of measured values.

  19. Computational study of the vibrational spectroscopic studies, natural bond orbital, frontier molecular orbital and second-order non-linear optical properties of acetophenone thiosemicarbazone molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Hong; Mei, Zheng; Zhang, Xian-Zhou

    2014-01-01

    The vibrational frequencies of acetophenone thiosemicarbazone in the ground state have been calculated using density functional method (B3LYP) with 6-31G(d), 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. The analysis of natural bond orbital was also performed. The IR spectra were obtained and interpreted by means of potential energies distributions (PEDs) using MOLVIB program. In addition, the results show that there exist Nsbnd H…N and Nsbnd H…S hydrogen bonds in the title compound, which play a major role in stabilizing the molecule and are confirmed by the natural bond orbital analysis. The predicted NLO properties show that the title compound is a good candidate as second-order NLO material. In addition, the frontier molecular orbitals were analyzed and the crystal structure obtained by molecular mechanics belongs to the Pbca space group, with lattice parameters Z = 8, a = 16.0735 Å, b = 7.1719 Å, c = 7.8725 Å, ρ = 0.808 g/cm3.

  20. Computational study of the vibrational spectroscopic studies, natural bond orbital, frontier molecular orbital and second-order non-linear optical properties of acetophenone thiosemicarbazone molecule.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Hong; Mei, Zheng; Zhang, Xian-Zhou

    2014-01-24

    The vibrational frequencies of acetophenone thiosemicarbazone in the ground state have been calculated using density functional method (B3LYP) with 6-31G(d), 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. The analysis of natural bond orbital was also performed. The IR spectra were obtained and interpreted by means of potential energies distributions (PEDs) using MOLVIB program. In addition, the results show that there exist N-H…N and N-H…S hydrogen bonds in the title compound, which play a major role in stabilizing the molecule and are confirmed by the natural bond orbital analysis. The predicted NLO properties show that the title compound is a good candidate as second-order NLO material. In addition, the frontier molecular orbitals were analyzed and the crystal structure obtained by molecular mechanics belongs to the Pbca space group, with lattice parameters Z=8, a=16.0735 Å, b=7.1719 Å, c=7.8725 Å, ρ=0.808 g/cm(3). PMID:24084483

  1. Non-Linear Dynamics and Stability of Circular Cylindrical Shells Containing Flowing Fluid, Part II: Large-Amplitude Vibrations Without Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AMABILI, M.; PELLICANO, F.; PAÏDOUSSIS, M. P.

    1999-12-01

    The non-linear response of empty and fluid-filled circular cylindrical shells to harmonic excitations is investigated. Both modal and point excitations have been considered. The model is suitable to study simply supported shells with and without axial constraints. Donnell's non-linear shallow-shell theory is used. The boundary conditions on radial displacement and the continuity of circumferential displacement are exactly satisfied. The radial deflection of the shell is expanded by using a basis of seven linear modes. The effect of internal quiescent, incompressible and inviscid fluid is investigated. The equations of motion, obtained in Part I of this study, are studied by using a code based on the collocation method. The validation of the present model is obtained by comparison with other authoritative results. The effect of the number of axisymmetric modes used in the expansion on the response of the shell is investigated, clarifying questions open for a long time. The results show the occurrence of travelling wave response in the proximity of the resonance frequency, the fundamental role of the first and third axisymmetric modes in the expansion of the radial deflection with one longitudinal half-wave, and limit cycle responses. Modes with two longitudinal half-waves are also investigated.

  2. Vibrational rainbows

    SciTech Connect

    Drolshagen, G.; Mayne, H.R.; Toennies, J.P.

    1981-07-01

    We extend the theory of inelastic rainbows to include vibrationally inelastic scattering, showing how the existence of vibrational rainbows can be deduced from collinear classical scattering theory. Exact close-coupling calculations are carried out for a breathing sphere potential, and rainbow structures are, in fact, observed. The location of the rainbows generally agrees well with the classical prediction. In addition, the sensitivity of the location of the rainbow to changes in the vibrational coupling has been investigated. It is shown that vibrational rainbows persist in the presence of anisotropy. Experimental results (R. David, M. Faubel, and J. P. Toennies, Chem. Phys. Lett. 18, 87 (1973)) are examined for evidence of vibrational rainbow structure, and it is shown that vibrational rainbow theory is not inconsistent with these results.

  3. Vibration isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on vibration isolation are presented. Techniques to control and isolate centrifuge disturbances were identified. Topics covered include: disturbance sources in the microgravity environment; microgravity assessment criteria; life sciences centrifuge; flight support equipment for launch; active vibration isolation system; active balancing system; and fuzzy logic control.

  4. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  5. Vibrational Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    By homing in on the distribution patterns of electrons around an atom, a team of scientists team with Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry showed how certain vibrations from benzene thiol cause electrical charge to "slosh" onto a gold surface (left), while others do not (right). The vibrations that cause this "sloshing" behavior yield a stronger SERS signal.

  6. Mechanical and electrical impedance matching in a piezoelectric beam for Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koszewnik, A.; Grześ, P.; Walendziuk, W.

    2015-11-01

    A piezoelectric beam is one of transducers for energy harvesting. It provides easy implementation and good performance in changing mechanical stress into electric voltage. In order to maximize output power, it is important to provide mechanical and electrical impedance matching. In the paper the authors proposed a methodology which allows to find values of lumped elements in an electromechanical model after completing appropriate measurements. Due to linear equations, it is possible to model a beam in both mechanical and electrical ways, and match the best load depending of frequency. The proposed model of a piezoelectric cantilever shows a potential use of these devices in micro scale as a cantilever which is a part of a silicon structure. Moreover, in the paper, the authors discuss mechanical aspects of using a weight as the way to tune the piezoelectric beam to a specific frequency. The electrical aspect of matching the source impedance with load, which is based on an electrical model of a piezoelectric transducer, is also presented. In the paper a mathematical model was verified by an experiment in which a laboratory stand equipped with a vibration generator, a piezoelectric energy harvester and acceleration sensors was used.

  7. Acoustic input impedance of the avian inner ear measured in ostrich (Struthio camelus).

    PubMed

    Muyshondt, Pieter G G; Aerts, Peter; Dirckx, Joris J J

    2016-09-01

    In both mammals and birds, the mechanical behavior of the middle ear structures is affected by the mechanical impedance of the inner ear. In this study, the aim was to quantify the acoustic impedance of the avian inner ear in the ostrich, which allows us to determine the effect on columellar vibrations and middle ear power flow in future studies. To determine the inner ear impedance, vibrations of the columella were measured for both the quasi-static and acoustic stimulus frequencies. In the frequency range of 0.3-4 kHz, we used electromagnetic stimulation of the ossicle and a laser Doppler vibrometer to measure the vibration response. At low frequencies, harmonic displacements were imposed on the columella using piezo stimulation and the resulting force response was measured with a force sensor. From these measurement data, the acoustic impedance of the inner ear could be determined. A simple RLC model in series of the impedance measurements resulted in a stiffness reactance of KIE = 0.20·10(12) Pa/m³, an inertial impedance of MIE = 0.652·10(6) Pa s(2)/m³, and a resistance of RIE = 1.57·10(9) Pa s/m. We found that values of the inner ear impedance in the ostrich are one to two orders in magnitude smaller than what is found in mammal ears. PMID:27473506

  8. Polyatomic molecule vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Polyatomic molecule vibrations are analyzed as harmonic vibrations along normal coordinates. The energy eigenvalues are found for linear and nonlinear symmetric triatomic molecules for valence bond models of the potential function with arbitrary coupling coefficients; such models can usually be fitted to observed energy levels with reasonably good accuracy. Approximate normal coordinates for the H2O molecule are discussed. Degenerate vibrational modes such as occur in CO2 are analyzed and expressions for Fermi resonance between close-lying states of the same symmetry are developed. The bending modes of linear triatomic molecules are expressed in terms of Laguerre polynomials in cylindrical coordinates as well as in terms of Hermite polynomials in Cartesian coordinates. The effects of large-amplitude bending such as occur in the C3 molecule are analyzed, along with anharmonic effects, which split the usually degenerate bending mode energy levels. Finally, the vibrational frequencies, degeneracies, and symmetry properties of XY3, X2Y2, and XY4 type molecules are discussed.

  9. Ionospheric effects to antenna impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bethke, K. H.

    1986-01-01

    The reciprocity between high power satellite antennas and the surrounding plasma are examined. The relevant plasma states for antenna impedance calculations are presented and plasma models, and hydrodynamic and kinetic theory, are discussed. A theory from which a variation in antenna impedance with regard to the radiated power can be calculated for a frequency range well above the plasma resonance frequency is give. The theory can include photo and secondary emission effects in antenna impedance calculations.

  10. Vibration damping using four-layer sandwich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Binod P.

    2008-11-01

    This paper discusses vibration damping using four-layer sandwich beam. The present work deals with the analysis of vibration of the primary system having a mass and rubber spring mounted on a four-layer viscoelastic simply supported symmetrically arranged sandwich beam. The equation of motion of a general four-layer with alternate elastic layer and viscoelastic layer simply supported sandwich beam is first derived using the method of equilibrium of forces and beam theory. The above differential equation has been solved for harmonically force excited sandwich beam by applying suitable boundary conditions to get the impedance of the sandwich beam. This impedance is then combined with the impedance of the primary system to obtain the expression for the response of harmonically excited mass and then the expression for transmissibility is obtained. The effectiveness of geometrical and physical parameters in minimizing response and transmissibility for central mounting of the primary system is evaluated.

  11. Optically stimulated differential impedance spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, Lonnie C; Parks, II, James E; Lewis, Sr., Samuel A; Partridge, Jr., William P

    2014-02-18

    Methods and apparatuses for evaluating a material are described. Embodiments typically involve use of an impedance measurement sensor to measure the impedance of a sample of the material under at least two different states of illumination. The states of illumination may include (a) substantially no optical stimulation, (b) substantial optical stimulation, (c) optical stimulation at a first wavelength of light, (d) optical stimulation at a second wavelength of light, (e) a first level of light intensity, and (f) a second level of light intensity. Typically a difference in impedance between the impedance of the sample at the two states of illumination is measured to determine a characteristic of the material.

  12. IMPEDANCE OF FINITE LENGTH RESISTOR

    SciTech Connect

    KRINSKY, S.; PODOBEDOV, B.; GLUCKSTERN, R.L.

    2005-05-15

    We determine the impedance of a cylindrical metal tube (resistor) of radius a, length g, and conductivity {sigma}, attached at each end to perfect conductors of semi-infinite length. Our main interest is in the asymptotic behavior of the impedance at high frequency, k >> 1/a. In the equilibrium regime, , the impedance per unit length is accurately described by the well-known result for an infinite length tube with conductivity {sigma}. In the transient regime, ka{sup 2} >> g, we derive analytic expressions for the impedance and wakefield.

  13. Monolithically compatible impedance measurement

    DOEpatents

    Ericson, Milton Nance; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2002-01-01

    A monolithic sensor includes a reference channel and at least one sensing channel. Each sensing channel has an oscillator and a counter driven by the oscillator. The reference channel and the at least one sensing channel being formed integrally with a substrate and intimately nested with one another on the substrate. Thus, the oscillator and the counter have matched component values and temperature coefficients. A frequency determining component of the sensing oscillator is formed integrally with the substrate and has an impedance parameter which varies with an environmental parameter to be measured by the sensor. A gating control is responsive to an output signal generated by the reference channel, for terminating counting in the at least one sensing channel at an output count, whereby the output count is indicative of the environmental parameter, and successive ones of the output counts are indicative of changes in the environmental parameter.

  14. Bioelectrical impedance analysis revisited.

    PubMed

    Mikes, D M; Cha, B A; Dym, C L; Baumgaertner, J; Hartzog, A G; Tacey, A D; Calabria, M R

    1999-12-01

    Although total limb volume measurements are used to track the progress of lymphedema and its treatment, these measurements can be confounded by changes other than fluid excess namely muscle or fat gain. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is a technique that specifically quantifies both total body fluid and extracellular fluid in extremities. Whereas BIA has potential as a quick, inexpensive, and quantitative technique to measure directly fluid gain or loss from lymphedema, it also has certain shortcomings that must be addressed before it can be validated. this paper examines the back-ground that explains why measuring total limb volume is insufficient to quantify the extent of peripheral lymphedema and explores the advantages and drawbacks of using BIA for this purpose. PMID:10652699

  15. Vibration-Response Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Dynamic behaviors of structures analyzed interactively. Interactive steadystate vibration-response program, VIBRA, developed. Frequency-response analyses commonly used in evaluating dynamic behaviors of structures subjected to cyclic external forces. VIBRA calculates frequency response using modalsuperposition approach. Method applicable to single or multiple forces applied to linear, proportionally damped structure in which damping is viscous or structural. VIBRA written in FORTRAN 77 for interactive execution.

  16. Development on electromagnetic impedance function modeling and its estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Sutarno, D.

    2015-09-30

    Today the Electromagnetic methods such as magnetotellurics (MT) and controlled sources audio MT (CSAMT) is used in a broad variety of applications. Its usefulness in poor seismic areas and its negligible environmental impact are integral parts of effective exploration at minimum cost. As exploration was forced into more difficult areas, the importance of MT and CSAMT, in conjunction with other techniques, has tended to grow continuously. However, there are obviously important and difficult problems remaining to be solved concerning our ability to collect process and interpret MT as well as CSAMT in complex 3D structural environments. This talk aim at reviewing and discussing the recent development on MT as well as CSAMT impedance functions modeling, and also some improvements on estimation procedures for the corresponding impedance functions. In MT impedance modeling, research efforts focus on developing numerical method for computing the impedance functions of three dimensionally (3-D) earth resistivity models. On that reason, 3-D finite elements numerical modeling for the impedances is developed based on edge element method. Whereas, in the CSAMT case, the efforts were focused to accomplish the non-plane wave problem in the corresponding impedance functions. Concerning estimation of MT and CSAMT impedance functions, researches were focused on improving quality of the estimates. On that objective, non-linear regression approach based on the robust M-estimators and the Hilbert transform operating on the causal transfer functions, were used to dealing with outliers (abnormal data) which are frequently superimposed on a normal ambient MT as well as CSAMT noise fields. As validated, the proposed MT impedance modeling method gives acceptable results for standard three dimensional resistivity models. Whilst, the full solution based modeling that accommodate the non-plane wave effect for CSAMT impedances is applied for all measurement zones, including near-, transition

  17. Development on electromagnetic impedance function modeling and its estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutarno, D.

    2015-09-01

    Today the Electromagnetic methods such as magnetotellurics (MT) and controlled sources audio MT (CSAMT) is used in a broad variety of applications. Its usefulness in poor seismic areas and its negligible environmental impact are integral parts of effective exploration at minimum cost. As exploration was forced into more difficult areas, the importance of MT and CSAMT, in conjunction with other techniques, has tended to grow continuously. However, there are obviously important and difficult problems remaining to be solved concerning our ability to collect process and interpret MT as well as CSAMT in complex 3D structural environments. This talk aim at reviewing and discussing the recent development on MT as well as CSAMT impedance functions modeling, and also some improvements on estimation procedures for the corresponding impedance functions. In MT impedance modeling, research efforts focus on developing numerical method for computing the impedance functions of three dimensionally (3-D) earth resistivity models. On that reason, 3-D finite elements numerical modeling for the impedances is developed based on edge element method. Whereas, in the CSAMT case, the efforts were focused to accomplish the non-plane wave problem in the corresponding impedance functions. Concerning estimation of MT and CSAMT impedance functions, researches were focused on improving quality of the estimates. On that objective, non-linear regression approach based on the robust M-estimators and the Hilbert transform operating on the causal transfer functions, were used to dealing with outliers (abnormal data) which are frequently superimposed on a normal ambient MT as well as CSAMT noise fields. As validated, the proposed MT impedance modeling method gives acceptable results for standard three dimensional resistivity models. Whilst, the full solution based modeling that accommodate the non-plane wave effect for CSAMT impedances is applied for all measurement zones, including near-, transition

  18. Vibration sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Amita; Singh, Ranvir; Ahmad, Amir; Kumar, Mahesh

    2003-10-01

    Today, vibration sensors with low and medium sensitivities are in great demand. Their applications include robotics, navigation, machine vibration monitoring, isolation of precision equipment & activation of safety systems e.g. airbags in automobiles. Vibration sensors have been developed at SSPL, using silicon micromachining to sense vibrations in a system in the 30 - 200 Hz frequency band. The sensing element in the silicon vibration sensor is a seismic mass suspended by thin silicon hinges mounted on a metallized glass plate forming a parallel plate capacitor. The movement of the seismic mass along the vertical axis is monitored to sense vibrations. This is obtained by measuring the change in capacitance. The movable plate of the parallel plate capacitor is formed by a block connected to a surrounding frame by four cantilever beams located on sides or corners of the seismic mass. This element is fabricated by silicon micromachining. Several sensors in the chip sizes 1.6 cm x 1.6 cm, 1 cm x 1 cm and 0.7 cm x 0.7 cm have been fabricated. Work done on these sensors, techniques used in processing and silicon to glass bonding are presented in the paper. Performance evaluation of these sensors is also discussed.

  19. Impedance spectroscopy for the detection and identification of unknown toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggs, B. C.; Plopper, G. E.; Paluh, J. L.; Phamduy, T. B.; Corr, D. T.; Chrisey, D. B.

    2012-06-01

    Advancements in biological and chemical warfare has allowed for the creation of novel toxins necessitating a universal, real-time sensor. We have used a function-based biosensor employing impedance spectroscopy using a low current density AC signal over a range of frequencies (62.5 Hz-64 kHz) to measure the electrical impedance of a confluent epithelial cell monolayer at 120 sec intervals. Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells were grown to confluence on thin film interdigitated gold electrodes. A stable impedance measurement of 2200 Ω was found after 24 hrs of growth. After exposure to cytotoxins anthrax lethal toxin and etoposide, the impedance decreased in a linear fashion resulting in a 50% drop in impedance over 50hrs showing significant difference from the control sample (~20% decrease). Immunofluorescent imaging showed that apoptosis was induced through the addition of toxins. Similarities of the impedance signal shows that the mechanism of cellular death was the same between ALT and etoposide. A revised equivalent circuit model was employed in order to quantify morphological changes in the cell monolayer such as tight junction integrity and cell surface area coverage. This model showed a faster response to cytotoxin (2 hrs) compared to raw measurements (20 hrs). We demonstrate that herein that impedance spectroscopy of epithelial monolayers serves as a real-time non-destructive sensor for unknown pathogens.

  20. Impedance in School Screening Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robarts, John T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper examines the controversy over use of impedance screening in public schools to identify students with hearing problems, including otitis media, a common ear condition in infants and young children. It cites research that questions the value of pure tone screening as a single test and raises critics' objections to the use of impedance,…

  1. Ultra-wideband impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks.

  2. Ultra-wideband impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1999-03-16

    The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks. 2 figs.

  3. Vibrational sensitivity of a measuring instrument and methods of increasing the accuracy of its determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mironov, Y. S.

    1973-01-01

    The properties and peculiarities of two groups of measuring systems reacting to vibrations are discussed. Specifically, results of the action of a three dimensional, cophasal, monoharmonic vibration on the linear system of a measuring instrument was analyzed. Data are also given on the connection between vibration sensitivity and vibration resistance for instruments, methods for estimating vibration resistance, and formulas for expressing test results of vibration resistance. Experimental data are also given for decreasing errors in nonlinear systems during vibrations.

  4. Electromagnetic scattering by impedance structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Griesser, Timothy

    1987-01-01

    The scattering of electromagnetic waves from impedance structures is investigated, and current work on antenna pattern calculation is presented. A general algorithm for determining radiation patterns from antennas mounted near or on polygonal plates is presented. These plates are assumed to be of a material which satisfies the Leontovich (or surface impedance) boundary condition. Calculated patterns including reflection and diffraction terms are presented for numerious geometries, and refinements are included for antennas mounted directly on impedance surfaces. For the case of a monopole mounted on a surface impedance ground plane, computed patterns are compared with experimental measurements. This work in antenna pattern prediction forms the basis of understanding of the complex scattering mechanisms from impedance surfaces. It provides the foundation for the analysis of backscattering patterns which, in general, are more problematic than calculation of antenna patterns. Further proposed study of related topics, including surface waves, corner diffractions, and multiple diffractions, is outlined.

  5. Chatter suppression through variable impedance and smart fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Segalman, D.; Redmond, J.

    1996-02-01

    A novel approach to mitigating chatter vibrations in machine tools is presented. Encountered in many types of metal removal processes, chatter is a dangerous condition which results from the interaction of the cutting dynamics with the modal characteristics of the machine-workpiece assembly. Tool vibrations are recored on the surface of the workpiece during metal removal, imposing a waviness which alters the chip thickness during subsequent cutting passes. Deviations from the nominal chip thickness effect changes in the cutting force which, under certain conditions, can further excite vibrations. The chatter mitigation strategy presented is based on periodically altering the impedance of the cutting tool assembly. A cyclic electric (or magnetic) field is applied to the spindle quill which contains an electro-rheological (or magneto-rheological) fluid. The variable yield stress in the fluid affects the coupling of the spindle to the machine tool structure, changing the natural frequency of oscillation. Altering the modal characteristics in this fashion disrupts the modulation of current tool vibrations with previous tool vibrations recorded on the workpiece surface. Results from a simulated milling process reveal that significant reductions in vibration amplitude can be achieved through proper selection of fluid and excitation frequency.

  6. Chatter supression through variable impedance and smart fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segalman, Daniel J.; Redmond, James M.

    1996-05-01

    A novel approach to mitigating chatter vibrations in machine tools is presented. Encountered in many types of metal removal processes, chatter is a dangerous condition which results from the interaction of the cutting dynamics with the modal characteristics of the machine- workpiece assembly. Tool vibrations are recorded on the surface of the workpiece during metal removal, imposing a waviness which alters the chip thickness during subsequent cutting passes. Deviations from the nominal chip thickness effect changes in the cutting force which, under certain conditions, can further excite vibrations. The chatter mitigation strategy presented is based on periodically altering the impedance of the cutting tool assembly. A cyclic electric (or magnetic) field is applied to the spindle quill which contains an electro- rheological (or magneto-rheological) fluid. The variable yield stress in the fluid affects the coupling of the spindle to the machine tool structure, changing the natural frequency of oscillation. Altering the modal characteristics in this fashion disrupts the modulation of current tool vibrations with previous tool vibrations recorded on the workpiece surface. Results from a simulated milling process reveal that significant reductions in vibration amplitude can be achieved through proper selection of fluid and excitation frequency.

  7. Random Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messaro. Semma; Harrison, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Ares I Zonal Random vibration environments due to acoustic impingement and combustion processes are develop for liftoff, ascent and reentry. Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components are developed by enveloping the applicable zonal environments where each component is located. Random vibration tests will be conducted to assure that these components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments. Methodology: Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components were desired that would envelope all the applicable environments where each component was located. Applicable Ares I Vehicle drawings and design information needed to be assessed to determine the location(s) for each component on the Ares I Upper Stage. Design and test criteria needed to be developed by plotting and enveloping the applicable environments using Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet Software and documenting them in a report Using Microsoft Word Processing Software. Conclusion: Random vibration liftoff, ascent, and green run design & test criteria for the Upper Stage Pyrotechnic Components were developed by using Microsoft Excel to envelope zonal environments applicable to each component. Results were transferred from Excel into a report using Microsoft Word. After the report is reviewed and edited by my mentor it will be submitted for publication as an attachment to a memorandum. Pyrotechnic component designers will extract criteria from my report for incorporation into the design and test specifications for components. Eventually the hardware will be tested to the environments I developed to assure that the components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments.

  8. Impedance-based damage detection for civil infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seunghee; Roh, YongRae; Yi, JinHak; Yun, Chung-Bang; Kwak, Hyo-Gyoung; Lee, SangHan

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of an impedance-based damage detection technique using piezoelectric (PZT) transducers for civil infrastructures such as steel bridges. The basic concept of the technique is to monitor the changes in the electrical impedance to detect structural damages. Those changes in the electrical impedance are due to the electro-mechanical coupling property of piezoelectric materials. The smart PZT transducers which act as both actuators and sensors in a self-analyzing manner are emerging to be effective in non-parametric health monitoring of structural systems. This health monitoring technique can be easily adapted to existing structures, since only a small number of PZT patches are needed for continuous monitoring of their structural integrity. This impedance-based method operates at high frequencies (above 100 kHz), which enables it to detect incipient-type damage. It is not interfered by normal operating conditions, vibrations of the host structure, and changes in the host external body. The results of the experimental study on three kinds of structural members indicate that cracks or loosened bolts/nuts near the PZT sensors may be effectively detected by monitoring the shifts of the resonant frequencies of the impedance functions.

  9. Coupling between plate vibration and acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1992-01-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of the coupling between the vibration of a flexible plate and the acoustic radiation is performed. The nonlinear Euler equations are used to describe the acoustic fluid while the nonlinear plate equation is used to describe the plate vibration. Linear, nonlinear, and quasi-periodic or chaotic vibrations and the resultant acoustic radiation are analyzed. We find that for the linear plate response, acoustic coupling is negligible. However, for the nonlinear and chaotic responses, acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the vibration level as the loading increases. The radiated pressure from a plate undergoing nonlinear or chaotic vibrations is found to propagate nonlinearly into the far-field. However, the nonlinearity due to wave propagation is much weaker than that due to the plate vibrations. As the acoustic wave propagates into the far-field, the relative difference in level between the fundamental and its harmonics and subharmonics decreases with distance.

  10. I/O impedance controller

    DOEpatents

    Ruesch, Rodney; Jenkins, Philip N.; Ma, Nan

    2004-03-09

    There is disclosed apparatus and apparatus for impedance control to provide for controlling the impedance of a communication circuit using an all-digital impedance control circuit wherein one or more control bits are used to tune the output impedance. In one example embodiment, the impedance control circuit is fabricated using circuit components found in a standard macro library of a computer aided design system. According to another example embodiment, there is provided a control for an output driver on an integrated circuit ("IC") device to provide for forming a resistor divider network with the output driver and a resistor off the IC device so that the divider network produces an output voltage, comparing the output voltage of the divider network with a reference voltage, and adjusting the output impedance of the output driver to attempt to match the output voltage of the divider network and the reference voltage. Also disclosed is over-sampling the divider network voltage, storing the results of the over sampling, repeating the over-sampling and storing, averaging the results of multiple over sampling operations, controlling the impedance with a plurality of bits forming a word, and updating the value of the word by only one least significant bit at a time.

  11. Impedance-estimation methods, modeling methods, articles of manufacture, impedance-modeling devices, and estimated-impedance monitoring systems

    DOEpatents

    Richardson, John G.

    2009-11-17

    An impedance estimation method includes measuring three or more impedances of an object having a periphery using three or more probes coupled to the periphery. The three or more impedance measurements are made at a first frequency. Three or more additional impedance measurements of the object are made using the three or more probes. The three or more additional impedance measurements are made at a second frequency different from the first frequency. An impedance of the object at a point within the periphery is estimated based on the impedance measurements and the additional impedance measurements.

  12. In Vivo Impedance of the Gerbil Cochlear Partition at Auditory Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wei; Olson, Elizabeth S.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The specific acoustic impedance of the cochlear partition was measured from 4 to 20 kHz in the basal turn of the gerbil cochlea, where the best frequency is ∼40 kHz. The acoustic impedance was found as the ratio of driving pressure to velocity response. It is the physical attribute that governs cochlear mechanics and has never before been directly measured, to our knowledge. The basilar membrane velocity was measured through the transparent round window membrane. Simultaneously, the intracochlear pressure was measured close to the stapes and quite close to the cochlear partition. The impedance phase was close to −90° and the magnitude decreased with frequency, consistent with stiffness-dominated impedance. The resistive component of the impedance was relatively small. Usually the resistance was negative at frequencies below 8 kHz; this unexpected finding might be due to other vibration modes within the cochlear partition. PMID:19720011

  13. IMPEDANCE ALARM SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Cowen, R.G.

    1959-09-29

    A description is given of electric protective systems and burglar alarm systems of the capacitance type in which the approach of an intruder at a place to be protected varies the capacitance in an electric circuit and the change is thereafter communicated to a remote point to actuate an alarm. According to the invention, an astable transitor multi-vibrator has the amplitude at its output voltage controlled by a change in the sensing capacitance. The sensing capacitance is effectively connected between collector and base of one stage of the multivibrator circuit through the detector-to-monitor line. The output of the detector is a small d-c voltage across the detector-to-monitor line. This d- c voltage is amplified and monitored at the other end of the line, where an appropriate alarm is actuated if a sudden change in the voltage occurs. The present system has a high degree of sensitivity and is very difficult to defeat by known techniques.

  14. The transmission of vertical vibration through seats: Influence of the characteristics of the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toward, Martin G. R.; Griffin, Michael J.

    2011-12-01

    The transmission of vibration through a seat depends on the impedance of the seat and the apparent mass of the seat occupant. This study was designed to determine how factors affecting the apparent mass of the body (age, gender, physical characteristics, backrest contact, and magnitude of vibration) affect seat transmissibility. The transmission of vertical vibration through a car seat was measured with 80 adults (41 males and 39 females aged 18-65) at frequencies between 0.6 and 20 Hz with two backrest conditions (no backrest and backrest), and with three magnitudes of random vibration (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 m s -2 rms). Linear regression models were used to study the effects of subject physical characteristics (age, gender, and anthropometry) and features of their apparent mass (resonance frequency, apparent mass at resonance and at 12 Hz) on the measured seat transmissibility. The strongest predictor of both the frequency of the principal resonance in seat transmissibility and the seat transmissibility at resonance was subject age, with other factors having only marginal effects. The transmissibility of the seat at 12 Hz depended on subject age, body mass index, and gender. Although subject weight was strongly associated with apparent mass, weight was not strongly associated with seat transmissibility. The resonance frequency of the seat decreased with increases in the magnitude of the vibration excitation and increased when subjects made contact with the backrest. Inter-subject variability in the resonance frequency and transmissibility at resonance was less with greater vibration excitation, but was largely unaffected by backrest contact. A lumped parameter seat-person model showed that changes in seat transmissibility with age can be predicted from changes in apparent mass with age, and that the dynamic stiffness of the seat appeared to increase with increased loading so as to compensate for increases in subject apparent mass associated with increased sitting

  15. Coal storage hopper with vibrating-screen agitator

    DOEpatents

    Daw, C.S.; Lackey, M.E.; Sy, R.L.

    1982-04-27

    The present invention is directed to a vibrating screen agitator in a coal storage hopper for assuring the uniform feed of coal having sufficient moisture content to effect agglomeration and bridging thereof in the coal hopper from the latter onto a conveyer mechanism. The vibrating scrren agitator is provided by a plurality of transversely oriented and vertically spaced apart screens in the storage hopper with a plurality of vertically oriented rods attached to the screens. The rods are vibrated to effect the vibration of the screens and the breaking up of agglomerates in the coal which might impede the uniform flow of the coal from the hopper onto a conveyer.

  16. Vibration analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The invention relates to monitoring circuitry for the real time detection of vibrations of a predetermined frequency and which are greater than a predetermined magnitude. The circuitry produces an instability signal in response to such detection. The circuitry is particularly adapted for detecting instabilities in rocket thrusters, but may find application with other machines such as expensive rotating machinery, or turbines. The monitoring circuitry identifies when vibration signals are present having a predetermined frequency of a multi-frequency vibration signal which has an RMS energy level greater than a predetermined magnitude. It generates an instability signal only if such a vibration signal is identified. The circuitry includes a delay circuit which responds with an alarm signal only if the instability signal continues for a predetermined time period. When used with a rocket thruster, the alarm signal may be used to cut off the thruster if such thruster is being used in flight. If the circuitry is monitoring tests of the thruster, it generates signals to change the thruster operation, for example, from pulse mode to continuous firing to determine if the instability of the thruster is sustained once it is detected.

  17. Clinical implementation of electrical impedance tomography with hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Moskowitz, M J; Ryan, T P; Paulsen, K D; Mitchell, S E

    1995-01-01

    We describe the use of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) for non-invasive thermal imaging in conjunction with a clinical treatment of a superficial scalp lesion utilizing a spiral microstrip antenna. This is our first reported use of EIT with a clinical hyperthermia treatment and perhaps the first world-wide. The thermal measurements recorded during treatment compare favourably with the images reconstructed from impedance data gathered during heating. A linear relation, measured in phantom material, between the change in temperature with the change in reconstructed impedance was assumed. The average discrepancy between the measured temperature changes with the temperatures reconstructed from the impedance changes was 1.4 degrees C, with the maximum being 8.9 degrees C. These preliminary data suggest that impedance changes can be measured during hyperthermia delivery and temperature estimates based on these observed changes are possible in the clinical setting. These findings also point to the complex, yet critical nature of the impedance versus temperature relationship for tissue in vivo. The reconstructed thermal images may provide complementary information about the overall thermal damage imposed during heating. Based on this initial clinical experience we feel that EIT has great potential as a viable clinical aid in imaging the temperature changes imposed during hyperthermia. PMID:7790730

  18. Coupling impedance for modern accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Heifets, S.A.; Kheifets, S.A. )

    1992-03-10

    A systematic review of theoretical results for the longitudinal and transverse impedances obtained by different methods is presented. The paper comprises definitions, general theorems, modal analysis, a diffraction model, and analytical results. Several new results are included. In particular, necessary and sufficient conditions are given for the independence of the impedance from the beam longitudinal direction. The impedances of two basic simple structures---that of a {ital cavity} and that of a {ital step}---are studied in detail. The transition from the regime of a cavity to the regime of a step is explained, an approximate formula describing this transition is given, and the criterion for determining the applicability of each regime is established. The asymptotic behavior of the impedance for a finite number {ital M} of periodically arranged cavities as a function of {ital M} is studied. The different behaviors of the impedance for a single cavity and that for an infinite number of cavities are explained as resulting from the interference of the diffracted waves. A criterion for determining the transition in the impedance behavior from small {ital M} to large {ital M} is presented.

  19. Uncertainty Analysis of the Grazing Flow Impedance Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Martha C.; Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines a methodology to identify the measurement uncertainty of NASA Langley s Grazing Flow Impedance Tube (GFIT) over its operating range, and to identify the parameters that most significantly contribute to the acoustic impedance prediction. Two acoustic liners are used for this study. The first is a single-layer, perforate-over-honeycomb liner that is nonlinear with respect to sound pressure level. The second consists of a wire-mesh facesheet and a honeycomb core, and is linear with respect to sound pressure level. These liners allow for evaluation of the effects of measurement uncertainty on impedances educed with linear and nonlinear liners. In general, the measurement uncertainty is observed to be larger for the nonlinear liners, with the largest uncertainty occurring near anti-resonance. A sensitivity analysis of the aerodynamic parameters (Mach number, static temperature, and static pressure) used in the impedance eduction process is also conducted using a Monte-Carlo approach. This sensitivity analysis demonstrates that the impedance eduction process is virtually insensitive to each of these parameters.

  20. Plasma Impedance Spectrum Analyzer (PISA): an advanced impedance probe for measuring plasma density and other parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, D. E.; Pfaff, R. F.; Uribe, P.; Burchill, J.

    2006-12-01

    as close as possible to the plasma potential, collapsing the ion sheath and minimizing sheath-induced errors in the measurement of the temperature-dependent series resonance frequency. In addition, by stepping the bias voltage through a range of values, we can measure the sheath capacitance as a function of voltage and get an independent measure of the Debye length. 3) Drive voltage amplitude stepping which allows the diagnosis of sheath rectification and non-linear effects that may drive harmonics of the plasma / upper hybrid frequency. By stepping the amplitude through a range, we can also find the optimal drive voltage which provides a reasonable SNR while minimizing the impedance probe's impact on other instruments, such as high frequency electric field probes. We present flight data from representative souding rocket flights of the Goddard Impedance Probe and discuss the instrument performance, error bars, and future improvements.

  1. Optical vibration measurement of mechatronics devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanabe, Shigeo

    1993-09-01

    An optical vibration measuring system which enables to detect both linear and angular displacement of 25 nm and 5 prad was developed. The system is mainly composed of a He-Ne laser, a displacement detecting photo-diode and lenses, and has linear and angular displacement magnification mechanism using two different principles of optical lever. The system was applied to measure vibrational characteristics of magnetic head slider of hard disk drives and to measure stator teeth driving velocities of ultrasonic motor.

  2. Vibrational soliton: an experimental overview

    SciTech Connect

    Bigio, I.J.

    1986-03-08

    To date the most convincing evidence of vibrational solitons in biopolymers has been found in two very disparate systems: Davydov-like excitations in hydrogen-bonded linear chains (acetanilide and N-methylacetamide) which are not biopolymers but plausible structural paradigms for biopolymers, and longitudinal accoustic modes of possibly nonlinear character in biologically viable DNA. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Evaluation of electrical impedance ratio measurements in accuracy of electronic apex locators

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Pil-Jong; Kim, Hong-Gee

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this paper was evaluating the ratios of electrical impedance measurements reported in previous studies through a correlation analysis in order to explicit it as the contributing factor to the accuracy of electronic apex locator (EAL). Materials and Methods The literature regarding electrical property measurements of EALs was screened using Medline and Embase. All data acquired were plotted to identify correlations between impedance and log-scaled frequency. The accuracy of the impedance ratio method used to detect the apical constriction (APC) in most EALs was evaluated using linear ramp function fitting. Changes of impedance ratios for various frequencies were evaluated for a variety of file positions. Results Among the ten papers selected in the search process, the first-order equations between log-scaled frequency and impedance were in the negative direction. When the model for the ratios was assumed to be a linear ramp function, the ratio values decreased if the file went deeper and the average ratio values of the left and right horizontal zones were significantly different in 8 out of 9 studies. The APC was located within the interval of linear relation between the left and right horizontal zones of the linear ramp model. Conclusions Using the ratio method, the APC was located within a linear interval. Therefore, using the impedance ratio between electrical impedance measurements at different frequencies was a robust method for detection of the APC. PMID:25984472

  4. Good Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) sponsorship from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, assisted MetroLaser, of Irvine, California, in the development of a self-aligned laser vibrometer system. VibroMet, capable of measuring surface vibrations in a variety of industries, provides information on the structural integrity and acoustical characteristics of manufactured products. This low-cost, easy-to-use sensor performs vibration measurement from distances of up to three meters without the need for adjustment. The laser beam is simply pointed at the target and the system then uses a compact laser diode to illuminate the surface and to subsequently analyze the reflected light. The motion of the surface results in a Doppler shift that is measured with very high precision. VibroMet is considered one of the many behind-the-scenes tools that can be relied on to assure the quality, reliability and safety of everything from airplane panels to disk brakes

  5. Semi-solid state adaptive impedance composites for HIRF protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramlette, Richard B.; Barrett, Ronald M.

    2010-04-01

    The feasibility of piezoelectric-based Adaptive-Impedance Composites (AIC) as a method of protecting aircraft equipment from lightning strike events and the resultant High-Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) was investigated. Classical Laminated Plate Theory (CLPT) and sheet vibration theory were applied to analytically derive the performance of the AIC. Multiple prototypes were built for high voltage testing which revealed closed- to open-circuit switching as fast as 77 μs. It was observed that slight geometric variations of the AIC strongly influenced the activation voltage. The voltage necessary to trigger the 85mm long, 3rd generation AIC's impedance could be set between 10 and 60 V. The test data and the analytical predictions were compared with the lightning strike data gathered by ONERA. The comparison indicated the AIC switching speed was over 30 times faster than the necessary minimum to shield typical avionics and flight control mechanisms from lightning-strike induced electrical eddy currents and HIRF.

  6. [Monitoring cervical dilatation by impedance].

    PubMed

    Salvat, J; Lassen, M; Sauze, C; Baud, S; Salvat, F

    1992-01-01

    Several different physics procedures have been tried to mechanize the recording of partograms. Can a measure of impedance of tissue Z using potential difference V, according to Ohm's law V = Z1, and 1 is a constant, be correlated with a measure of cervical dilatation using vaginal examination? This was our hypothesis. The tissue impedance meter was made to our design and applied according to a bipolar procedure. Our work was carried out on 28 patients. 10 patients were registered before labour started in order to test the apparatus and to record the impedance variations without labour taking place, and 18 patients were registered in labour to see whether there was any correlation. The level of impedance in the cervix without labour was 302.7 Ohms with a deviation of 8.2. Using student's t tests it was found that there was a significant correlation (p less than 0.001) in four measurements between the impedance measure and measures obtained by extrapolating the degrees of dilatation calculated from vaginal examination. This is a preliminary study in which we have defined the conditions that are necessary to confirm these first results and to further develop the method. PMID:1401774

  7. Biomolecular Imaging with Coherent Nonlinear Vibrational Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chao-Yu; Boik, John; Potma, Eric O.

    2014-01-01

    Optical imaging with spectroscopic vibrational contrast is a label-free solution for visualizing, identifying, and quantifying a wide range of biomolecular compounds in biological materials. Both linear and nonlinear vibrational microscopy techniques derive their imaging contrast from infrared active or Raman allowed molecular transitions, which provide a rich palette for interrogating chemical and structural details of the sample. Yet nonlinear optical methods, which include both second-order sum-frequency generation (SFG) and third-order coherent Raman scattering (CRS) techniques, offer several improved imaging capabilities over their linear precursors. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy features unprecedented vibrational imaging speeds, provides strategies for higher spatial resolution, and gives access to additional molecular parameters. These advances have turned vibrational microscopy into a premier tool for chemically dissecting live cells and tissues. This review discusses the molecular contrast of SFG and CRS microscopy and highlights several of the advanced imaging capabilities that have impacted biological and biomedical research. PMID:23245525

  8. Acoustic impedance of micro perforated membranes: Velocity continuity condition at the perforation boundary.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenxi; Cazzolato, Ben; Zander, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The classic analytical model for the sound absorption of micro perforated materials is well developed and is based on a boundary condition where the velocity of the material is assumed to be zero, which is accurate when the material vibration is negligible. This paper develops an analytical model for finite-sized circular micro perforated membranes (MPMs) by applying a boundary condition such that the velocity of air particles on the hole wall boundary is equal to the membrane vibration velocity (a zero-slip condition). The acoustic impedance of the perforation, which varies with its position, is investigated. A prediction method for the overall impedance of the holes and the combined impedance of the MPM is also provided. The experimental results for four different MPM configurations are used to validate the model and good agreement between the experimental and predicted results is achieved. PMID:26827008

  9. Passive and Active Vibration Control With Piezoelectric Fiber Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Vigier, Yves; Agbossou, Amen; Richard, Claude

    2002-07-01

    The possibility of dissipating mechanical energy with piezoelectric fiber composites (PFC) is investigated. The techniques for manufacturing an active beam with integrated (PFC) are presented and applied to a cantilevered beam experiment. We evaluated experimentally the performances of the active beam in passive energy dissipation. Three vibration cases were analysed: electrodes of the PFCs are (i) in open circuit, (ii) short circuit and (iii) shunted with electrical impedance designed to dissipate the electrical energy, which has been converted from the beam mechanical energy by the PFCs. Then we presented numerical models to analyze the vibration of active beams connect to electrical impedance. The proposed models point out with an accurate order of magnitude the change in vibration amplitude of the analysed beam. Hence we validate experimentally and numerically the concept of vibration control with PFCs and point out some new contributions of PFCs in active or passive damping. (authors)

  10. Vibrational Quantum Decoherence in Liquid Water.

    PubMed

    Joutsuka, Tatsuya; Thompson, Ward H; Laage, Damien

    2016-02-18

    Traditional descriptions of vibrational energy transfer consider a quantum oscillator interacting with a classical environment. However, a major limitation of this simplified description is the neglect of quantum decoherence induced by the different interactions between two distinct quantum states and their environment, which can strongly affect the predicted energy-transfer rate and vibrational spectra. Here, we use quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulations to determine the vibrational quantum decoherence time for an OH stretch vibration in liquid heavy water. We show that coherence is lost on a sub-100 fs time scale due to the different responses of the first shell neighbors to the ground and excited OH vibrational states. This ultrafast decoherence induces a strong homogeneous contribution to the linear infrared spectrum and suggests that resonant vibrational energy transfer in H2O may be more incoherent than previously thought. PMID:26807717

  11. Impedances of Laminated Vacuum Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A.; Lebedev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-22

    First publications on impedance of laminated vacuum chambers are related to early 70s: those are of S. C. Snowdon [1] and of A. G. Ruggiero [2]; fifteen years later, a revision paper of R. Gluckstern appeared [3]. All the publications were presented as Fermilab preprints, and there is no surprise in that: the Fermilab Booster has its laminated magnets open to the beam. Being in a reasonable mutual agreement, these publications were all devoted to the longitudinal impedance of round vacuum chambers. The transverse impedance and the flat geometry case were addressed in more recent paper of K. Y. Ng [4]. The latest calculations of A. Macridin et al. [5] revealed some disagreement with Ref. [4]; this fact stimulated us to get our own results on that matter. Longitudinal and transverse impendances are derived for round and flat laminated vacuum chambers. Results of this paper agree with Ref. [5].

  12. Active impedance metasurface with full 360° reflection phase tuning

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bo O.; Zhao, Junming; Feng, Yijun

    2013-01-01

    Impedance metasurface is composed of electrical small scatters in two dimensional plane, of which the surface impedance can be designed to produce desired reflection phase. Tunable reflection phase can be achieved by incorporating active element into the scatters, but the tuning range of the reflection phase is limited. In this paper, an active impedance metasurface with full 360° reflection phase control is presented to remove the phase tuning deficiency in conventional approach. The unit cell of the metasurface is a multiple resonance structure with two resonance poles and one resonance zero, capable of providing 360° reflection phase variation and active tuning within a finite frequency band. Linear reflection phase tuning can also be obtained. Theoretical analysis and simulation are presented and validated by experiment at microwave frequency. The proposed approach can be applied to many cases where fine and full phase tuning is needed, such as beam steering in reflectarray antennas. PMID:24162366

  13. Active impedance metasurface with full 360° reflection phase tuning.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bo O; Zhao, Junming; Feng, Yijun

    2013-01-01

    Impedance metasurface is composed of electrical small scatters in two dimensional plane, of which the surface impedance can be designed to produce desired reflection phase. Tunable reflection phase can be achieved by incorporating active element into the scatters, but the tuning range of the reflection phase is limited. In this paper, an active impedance metasurface with full 360° reflection phase control is presented to remove the phase tuning deficiency in conventional approach. The unit cell of the metasurface is a multiple resonance structure with two resonance poles and one resonance zero, capable of providing 360° reflection phase variation and active tuning within a finite frequency band. Linear reflection phase tuning can also be obtained. Theoretical analysis and simulation are presented and validated by experiment at microwave frequency. The proposed approach can be applied to many cases where fine and full phase tuning is needed, such as beam steering in reflectarray antennas. PMID:24162366

  14. Microfabricated Thin Film Impedance Sensor & AC Impedance Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jinsong; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2010-01-01

    Thin film microfabrication technique was employed to fabricate a platinum based parallel-electrode structured impedance sensor. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and equivalent circuit analysis of the small amplitude (±5 mV) AC impedance measurements (frequency range: 1 MHz to 0.1 Hz) at ambient temperature were carried out. Testing media include 0.001 M, 0.01 M, 0.1 M NaCl and KCl solutions, and alumina (∼3 μm) and sand (∼300 μm) particulate layers saturated with NaCl solutions with the thicknesses ranging from 0.6 mm to 8 mm in a testing cell, and the results were used to assess the effect of the thickness of the particulate layer on the conductivity of the testing solution. The calculated resistances were approximately around 20 MΩ, 4 MΩ, and 0.5 MΩ for 0.001 M, 0.01 M, and 0.1 M NaCl solutions, respectively. The presence of the sand particulates increased the impedance dramatically (6 times and 3 times for 0.001 M and 0.1 M NaCl solutions, respectively). A cell constant methodology was also developed to assess the measurement of the bulk conductivity of the electrolyte solution. The cell constant ranged from 1.2 to 0.8 and it decreased with the increase of the solution thickness. PMID:22219690

  15. Wide operation frequency band magnetostrictive vibration power generator using nonlinear spring constant by permanent magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furumachi, S.; Ueno, T.

    2016-04-01

    We study magnetostrictive vibration based power generator using iron-gallium alloy (Galfenol). The generator is advantages over conventional, such as piezoelectric material in the point of high efficiency highly robust and low electrical impedance. Generally, the generator exhibits maximum power when its resonant frequency matches the frequency of ambient vibration. In other words, the mismatch of these frequencies results in significant decrease of the output. One solution is making the spring characteristics nonlinear using magnetic force, which distorts the resonant peak toward higher or lower frequency side. In this paper, vibrational generator consisting of Galfenol plate of 6 by 0.5 by 13 mm wound with coil and U shape-frame accompanied with plates and pair of permanent magnets was investigated. The experimental results show that lean of resonant peak appears attributed on the non-linear spring characteristics, and half bandwidth with magnets is 1.2 times larger than that without. It was also demonstrated that the addition of proof mass is effective to increase the sensitivity but also the bandwidth. The generator with generating power of sub mW order is useful for power source of wireless heath monitoring for bridge and factory machine.

  16. Nonlinear feature identification of impedance-based structural health monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, A. C.; Park, G. H.; Sohn, H.; Farrar, C. R.

    2004-01-01

    The impedance-based structural health monitoring technique, which utilizes electromechanical coupling properties of piezoelectric materials, has shown feasibility for use in a variety of structural health monitoring applications. Relying on high frequency local excitations (typically > 30 kHz), this technique is very sensitive to minor changes in structural integrity in the near field of piezoelectric sensors. Several damage sensitive features have been identified and used coupled with the impedance methods. Most of these methods are, however, limited to linearity assumptions of a structure. This paper presents the use of experimentally identified nonlinear features, combined with impedance methods, for structural health monitoring. Their applicability to damage detection in various frequency ranges is demonstrated using actual impedance signals measured from a portal frame structure. The performance of the nonlinear feature is compared with those of conventional impedance methods. This paper reinforces the utility of nonlinear features in structural health monitoring and suggests that their varying sensitivity in different frequency ranges may be leveraged for certain applications.

  17. Algorithmic Error Correction of Impedance Measuring Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Starostenko, Oleg; Alarcon-Aquino, Vicente; Hernandez, Wilmar; Sergiyenko, Oleg; Tyrsa, Vira

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes novel design concepts and some advanced techniques proposed for increasing the accuracy of low cost impedance measuring devices without reduction of operational speed. The proposed structural method for algorithmic error correction and iterating correction method provide linearization of transfer functions of the measuring sensor and signal conditioning converter, which contribute the principal additive and relative measurement errors. Some measuring systems have been implemented in order to estimate in practice the performance of the proposed methods. Particularly, a measuring system for analysis of C-V, G-V characteristics has been designed and constructed. It has been tested during technological process control of charge-coupled device CCD manufacturing. The obtained results are discussed in order to define a reasonable range of applied methods, their utility, and performance. PMID:22303177

  18. KRAKEN, a numerical model of RHIC impedances

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, S.; Mane, V.

    1995-05-01

    The simulation code KRAKEN confirms analytical predictions of head-tail stability criteria, in the presence of momentum dependent linear coupling. It also confirms that resistive wall transverse wake fields are not a serious threat to strong head-tail stability in RHIC, at the vulnerable stage of proton injection. Equation 10, derived from the perspective of two macroparticles, potentially offers a very convenient seminumerical evaluation of the effects of arbitrary transverse wake potentials. It remains to be seen how well the two macroparticle results correlate with simulations using, say, 100 macroparticles. KRAKEN is still under rapid development. Future plans are to include resonant wakefields, multiple bunches, space charge wakefields, betatron detuning, and a connection to the detailed RHIC impedance database.

  19. Characteristic impedance of microstrip lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.; Deshpande, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    The dyadic Green's function for a current embedded in a grounded dielectric slab is used to analyze microstrip lines at millimeter wave frequencies. The dyadic Green's function accounts accurately for fringing fields and dielectric cover over the microstrip line. Using Rumsey's reaction concept, an expression for the characteristic impedance is obtained. The numerical results are compared with other reported results.

  20. The Aberdeen Impedance Imaging System.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, V; Hutchison, J M; Mallard, J R

    1989-01-01

    The Aberdeen Impedance Imaging System is designed to reconstruct 2 dimensional images of the average distribution of the amplitude and phase of the complex impedance within a 3 dimensional region. The system uses the four electrode technique in a 16 electrode split-array. The system hardware consists of task-orientated electronic modules for: driving a constant current, multiplexing the current drive, demultiplexing peripheral voltages, differential amplification, phase sensitive detection and low-pass filtration, digitisation with a 14 bit analog to digital converter (ADC), and -control logic for the ADC and multiplexors. A BBC microprocessor (Master series), initiates a controlled sequence for the collection of a number of data sets which are averaged and stored on disk. Image reconstruction is by a process of convolution-backprojection similar to the fan-beam reconstruction of computerised tomography and is also known as Equipotential Backprojection. In imaging impedance changes associated with fracture healing the changes may be large enough to allow retrieval of both the amplitude and phase of the complex impedance. Sequential imaging of these changes would necessitate monitoring electronic and electrode drift by imaging an equivalent region of the contralateral limb. Differential images could be retrieved when the image of the normal limb is the image template. Better characterisation of tissues would necessitate a cleaner retrieval of the quadrature signal. PMID:2742979

  1. Calibration of electrical impedance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W; Ramirez, A

    2000-05-01

    Over the past 10 years we have developed methods for imaging the electrical resistivity of soil and rock formations. These technologies have been called electrical resistance tomography of ERT (e.g. Daily and Owen, 1991). Recently we have been striving to extend this capability to include images of electric impedance--with a new nomenclature of electrical impedance tomography or EIT (Ramirez et al., 1999). Electrical impedance is simply a generalization of resistance. Whereas resistance is the zero frequency ratio of voltage and current, impedance includes both the magnitude and phase relationship between voltage and current at frequency. This phase and its frequency behavior is closely related to what in geophysics is called induced polarization or (Sumner, 1976). Why is this phase or IP important? IP is known to be related to many physical phenomena of importance so that image of IP will be maps of such things as mineralization and cation exchange IP (Marshall and Madden, 1959). Also, it is likely that IP, used in conjunction with resistivity, will yield information about the subsurface that can not be obtained by either piece of information separately. In order to define the accuracy of our technologies to image impedance we have constructed a physical model of known impedance that can be used as a calibration standard. It consists of 616 resistors, along with some capacitors to provide the reactive response, arranged in a three dimensional structure as in figure 1. Figure 2 shows the construction of the network and defines the coordinate system used to describe it. This network of components is a bounded and discrete version of the unbounded and continuous medium with which we normally work (the subsurface). The network has several desirable qualities: (1) The impedance values are known (to the accuracy of the component values). (2) The component values and their 3D distribution is easily controlled. (3) Error associated with electrode noise is eliminated. (4

  2. Vibration of structures containing compressible liquids with surface tension and sloshing effects. Reduced-order model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohayon, R.; Soize, C.

    2015-06-01

    This paper deals with the development of the linear vibration of a general viscoelastic structure, with a local wall acoustic impedance, containing an inviscid compressible liquid (but with an additional volume dissipative term), with surface tension (capillarity) and sloshing effects, and neglecting the effects of internal gravity waves and the elastogravity operator. The sloshing problems of incompressible liquids with capillarity effects in elastic structures exhibit a major difficulty induced by the boundary contact conditions on the triple line because the capillarity forces are forces per unit length while the elastic forces are forces per unit surface. The proposed framework has the following novel features: (i) introducing a new appropriate boundary condition for the contact angle condition compatible with a deformable structure considered here as viscoelastic, (ii) considering a compressible liquid while incompressibility hypothesis is generally used for FSI problems including capillarity phenomena, and (iii) constructing a reduced-order model for the computational coupled problem.

  3. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING AND CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Martin E. Cobern

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this program is to develop the Drilling Vibration Monitoring & Control System (DVMCS) to both record and reduce drilling vibrations in a ''smart'' drill string. It is composed of two main elements. The first is a multi-axis active vibration damper to minimize harmful axial, lateral and torsional vibrations, and thereby increase both rate of penetration (ROP) and bit life, as well that the life of other drillstring components. The hydraulic impedance (hardness) of this damper will be continuously adjusted using unique technology that is robust, fast-acting and reliable. The second component is a real-time system to monitor 3-axis drillstring vibration, and related parameters including weight- and torque-on-bit (TOB) and temperature. This monitor will determine the current vibration environment and adjust the damper accordingly. In some configurations, it may also send diagnostic information to the surface via real-time telemetry. Phase I of this program addresses an evaluation of the environment in which the DVMCS will operate; modeling of a drillstring response including the active damper; a top-level design of the mechanical and electronic systems; analyzing the anticipated performance of the damper by modeling and laboratory testing of small prototypes; and doing preliminary economic, market, environmental and financing analyses. This phase is scheduled to last fourteen months, until November 30, 2003. During this first quarter, significant progress was achieved on the first two objectives, and work was begun on several others. Initial designs of the DVMCS are underway.

  4. On Kinetics Modeling of Vibrational Energy Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmore, John O.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Cavolowsky, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Two models of vibrational energy exchange are compared at equilibrium to the elementary vibrational exchange reaction for a binary mixture. The first model, non-linear in the species vibrational energies, was derived by Schwartz, Slawsky, and Herzfeld (SSH) by considering the detailed kinetics of vibrational energy levels. This model recovers the result demanded at equilibrium by the elementary reaction. The second model is more recent, and is gaining use in certain areas of computational fluid dynamics. This model, linear in the species vibrational energies, is shown not to recover the required equilibrium result. Further, this more recent model is inconsistent with its suggested rate constants in that those rate constants were inferred from measurements by using the SSH model to reduce the data. The non-linear versus linear nature of these two models can lead to significant differences in vibrational energy coupling. Use of the contemporary model may lead to significant misconceptions, especially when integrated in computer codes considering multiple energy coupling mechanisms.

  5. Analysis of a disk-type piezoelectric ultrasonic motor using impedance matrices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young H; Ha, Sung K

    2003-12-01

    The dynamic behavior and the performance characteristics of the disk-type traveling wave piezoelectric ultrasonic motors (USM) are analyzed using impedance matrices. The stator is divided into three coupled subsystems: an inner metal disk, a piezoelectric annular actuator with segmented electrodes, and an outer metal disk with teeth. The effects of both shear deformation and rotary inertia are taken into account in deriving an impedance matrix for the piezoelectric actuator. The impedance matrices for each subsystem then are combined into a global impedance matrix using continuity conditions at the interfaces. A comparison is made between the impedance matrix model and the three-dimensional finite element model of the piezoelectric stator, obtaining the resonance and antiresonance frequencies and the effective electromechanical coupling factors versus circumferential mode numbers. Using the calculated resonance frequency and the vibration modes for the stator and a brush model with the Coulomb friction for the stator and rotor contact, stall torque, and no-load speed versus excitation frequencies are calculated at different preloads. Performance characteristics such as speed-torque curve and the output efficiency of the USM also are estimated using the current impedance matrix and the contact model. The present impedance model can be shown to be very effective in the design of the USM. PMID:14761037

  6. Passive damping and exact annihilation of vibrations of beams using shaped piezoelectric layers and tuned inductive networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeftner, J.; Irschik, H.

    2009-12-01

    The present paper is devoted to the development of an extended Bernoulli-Euler beam theory for passive piezoelectric composite structures which takes into account the presence of electric networks. The theory considers electromechanical coupling between the beam deformation and the electric circuit due to the piezoelectric effect that relates mechanical properties like displacement, strain and stress to electrical properties like electric field, voltage and current. Thereby, kinematic relations within the Bernoulli-Euler theory, a one-dimensional form of the constitutive relations for piezoelastic structures and a linear electric network, are presumed. Eventually, an adjusted one-dimensional formulation of a beam theory is obtained. It is shown that this formulation can be used for both power harvesting and passive shunt damping applications. Within the presented theory it is possible to analyse the influence of geometrical dimensions, piezoelectric constants and impedances of electric networks on the displacement field and on the energy flow between the mechanical and electrical parts. The second part of the paper is devoted to the concept of shape control and its application to passive damping and exact annihilation of vibrations of beams using shaped piezoelectric layers and tuned inductive networks. As a main result of the present paper, it is shown that, under certain conditions, concerning the shape of the piezoelastic material and the impedances of the electric circuits, exact annihilation of vibrations for a cantilever beam is possible.

  7. Smart Multi-Frequency Bioelectrical Impedance Spectrometer for BIA and BIVA Applications.

    PubMed

    Harder, Rene; Diedrich, Andre; Whitfield, Jonathan S; Buchowski, Macie S; Pietsch, John B; Baudenbacher, Franz J

    2016-08-01

    Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is a noninvasive and commonly used method for the assessment of body composition including body water. We designed a small, portable and wireless multi-frequency impedance spectrometer based on the 12 bit impedance network analyzer AD5933 and a precision wide-band constant current source for tetrapolar whole body impedance measurements. The impedance spectrometer communicates via Bluetooth with mobile devices (smart phone or tablet computer) that provide user interface for patient management and data visualization. The export of patient measurement results into a clinical research database facilitates the aggregation of bioelectrical impedance analysis and biolectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA) data across multiple subjects and/or studies. The performance of the spectrometer was evaluated using a passive tissue equivalent circuit model as well as a comparison of body composition changes assessed with bioelectrical impedance and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in healthy volunteers. Our results show an absolute error of 1% for resistance and 5% for reactance measurements in the frequency range of 3 kHz to 150 kHz. A linear regression of BIA and DXA fat mass estimations showed a strong correlation (r(2)=0.985) between measures with a maximum absolute error of 6.5%. The simplicity of BIA measurements, a cost effective design and the simple visual representation of impedance data enables patients to compare and determine body composition during the time course of a specific treatment plan in a clinical or home environment. PMID:26863670

  8. Electrical stimulation causes rapid changes in electrode impedance of cell-covered electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Newbold, Carrie; Richardson, Rachael; Millard, Rodney; Seligman, Peter; Cowan, Robert; Shepherd, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Animal and clinical observations of a reduction in electrode impedance following electrical stimulation encouraged the development of an in vitro model of the electrode-tissue interface. This model was used previously to show an increase in impedance with cell and protein cover over electrodes. In this paper, the model was used to assess the changes in electrode impedance and cell cover following application of a charge-balanced biphasic current pulse train. Following stimulation, a large and rapid drop in total impedance (Zt) and access resistance (Ra) occurred. The magnitude of this impedance change was dependent on the current amplitude used, with a linear relationship determined between Ra and the resulting cell cover over the electrodes. The changes in impedance due to stimulation were shown to be transitory, with impedance returning to pre-stimulation levels several hours after cessation of stimulation. A loss of cells over the electrode surface was observed immediately after stimulation suggesting that the level of stimulation applied was creating localised changes to cell adhesion. Similar changes in electrode impedance were observed for in vivo and in vitro work, thus helping to verify the in vitro model, although the underlying mechanisms may differ. A change in the porosity of the cellular layer was proposed to explain the alterations in electrode impedance in vitro. These in vitro studies provide insight into the possible mechanisms occurring at the electrode-tissue interface in association with electrical stimulation. PMID:21572219

  9. Vibration sensing with fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Nobuaki; Yoshimura, Kazuto; Takahashi, Sumio

    2001-08-01

    The intensity of laser light is modulated when reflecting back from a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) which is glued onto a PZT vibrator and expands/contracts as the vibrator vibrates. The wavelength of the laser light is tuned to the slope of the FBG reflectance curve as a function of optical wavelength. Measuring the modulation component of the detected signal, we can directly observe mechanical vibration of the vibrator. The output of the sensor is stable and the involved harmonic component is below the system noise level. It is then believed that the sensor operation is linear. The sensitivity depends on the slope of the FBG reflection spectrum curve at the operating wavelength and is higher for the larger slope. The minimum amplitude of the vibrator measured in the experiment is 4.5 nm, which corresponds to the strain of 2.14 μstrain. Since not only an FBG has little influence on the object under measurement because of its small size and light weight but also its frequency characteristics are thought to be better than a PZT vibration sensor, i.e., the sensor can be used in a wide range of vibration frequency, an FBG is expected to provide us with an important tool of practicality for measuring mechanical vibration.

  10. Modular Wideband Active Vibration Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David R.; Zewari, Wahid; Lee, Kenneth Y.

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of space experiments with previous missions shows a common theme. Some of the recent experiments are based on the scientific fundamentals of instruments of prior years. However, the main distinguishing characteristic is the embodiment of advances in engineering and manufacturing in order to extract clearer and sharper images and extend the limits of measurement. One area of importance to future missions is providing vibration free observation platforms at acceptable costs. It has been shown by researchers that vibration problems cannot be eliminated by passive isolation techniques alone. Therefore, various organizations have conducted research in the area of combining active and passive vibration control techniques. The essence of this paper is to present progress in what is believed to be a new concept in this arena. It is based on the notion that if one active element in a vibration transmission path can provide a reasonable vibration attenuation, two active elements in series may provide more control options and better results. The paper presents the functions of a modular split shaft linear actuator developed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and University of Massachusetts Lowell. It discusses some of the control possibilities facilitated by the device. Some preliminary findings and problems are also discussed.

  11. The quantum Hall impedance standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurr, J.; Kučera, J.; Pierz, K.; Kibble, B. P.

    2011-02-01

    Alternating current measurements of double-shielded quantum Hall devices have revealed a fascinating property of which only a quantum effect is capable: it can detect its own frequency dependence and convert it to a current dependence which can be used to eliminate both of them. According to an experimentally verified model, the residual frequency dependence is smaller than the measuring uncertainty of 1.3 × 10-9 kHz-1. In this way, a highly precise quantum standard of impedance can be established, without having to correct for any calculated frequency dependence and without the need for any artefact with a calculated frequency dependence. Nothing else like that is known to us and we hope that our results encourage other national metrology institutes to also apply it to impedance metrology and further explore its beautiful properties.

  12. FXR accelerator cavity impedance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Avalle, C.A.

    1998-01-05

    One of the goals of the present Flash X-Ray (FXR) accelerator upgrade effort [1][2] at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to reduce the cavity transverse impedance, since it has been shown that beam stability is significantly affected by this parameter [3]. Recently, we have evaluated various techniques and cell modifications to accomplish that, both through lab measurements and computer models. A spare cell, identical in every way to cells in the accelerator, was specially modified for the experiments. The impedance measurements were done without the beam, by applying twin-wire techniques. This report describes the results of these experiments and suggests possible cell modifications to improve their performance. The techniques and modifications which are suggested might also be applicable to AHF and DARHT-2 long-pulse accelerator development.

  13. Impedance based automatic electrode positioning.

    PubMed

    Miklody, Daniel; Hohne, Johannes

    2015-08-01

    The position of electrodes in electrical imaging and stimulation of the human brain is an important variable with vast influences on the precision in modeling approaches. Nevertheless, the exact position is obscured by many factors. 3-D Digitization devices can measure the distribution over the scalp surface but remain uncomfortable in application and often imprecise. We demonstrate a new approach that uses solely the impedance information between the electrodes to determine the geometric position. The algorithm involves multidimensional scaling to create a 3 dimensional space based on these impedances. The success is demonstrated in a simulation study. An average electrode position error of 1.67cm over all 6 subjects could be achieved. PMID:26736345

  14. Consideration of impedance matching techniques for efficient piezoelectric energy harvesting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeoungwoo; Priya, Shashank; Stephanou, Harry; Uchino, Kenji

    2007-09-01

    This study investigates multiple levels of impedance-matching methods for piezoelectric energy harvesting in order to enhance the conversion of mechanical to electrical energy. First, the transduction rate was improved by using a high piezoelectric voltage constant (g) ceramic material having a magnitude of g33 = 40 x 10(-3) V m/N. Second, a transducer structure, cymbal, was optimized and fabricated to match the mechanical impedance of vibration source to that of the piezoelectric transducer. The cymbal transducer was found to exhibit approximately 40 times higher effective strain coefficient than the piezoelectric ceramics. Third, the electrical impedance matching for the energy harvesting circuit was considered to allow the transfer of generated power to a storage media. It was found that, by using the 10-layer ceramics instead of the single layer, the output current can be increased by 10 times, and the output load can be reduced by 40 times. Furthermore, by using the multilayer ceramics the output power was found to increase by 100%. A direct current (DC)-DC buck converter was fabricated to transfer the accumulated electrical energy in a capacitor to a lower output load. The converter was optimized such that it required less than 5 mW for operation. PMID:17941391

  15. 21 CFR 870.2770 - Impedance plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Impedance plethysmograph. 870.2770 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2770 Impedance plethysmograph. (a) Identification. An impedance plethysmograph is a device used to estimate peripheral...

  16. 21 CFR 870.2750 - Impedance phlebograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Impedance phlebograph. 870.2750 Section 870.2750...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2750 Impedance phlebograph. (a) Identification. An impedance phlebograph is a device used to provide a visual display of...

  17. 21 CFR 870.2770 - Impedance plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Impedance plethysmograph. 870.2770 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2770 Impedance plethysmograph. (a) Identification. An impedance plethysmograph is a device used to estimate peripheral...

  18. 21 CFR 870.2750 - Impedance phlebograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Impedance phlebograph. 870.2750 Section 870.2750...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2750 Impedance phlebograph. (a) Identification. An impedance phlebograph is a device used to provide a visual display of...

  19. 21 CFR 870.2750 - Impedance phlebograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Impedance phlebograph. 870.2750 Section 870.2750...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2750 Impedance phlebograph. (a) Identification. An impedance phlebograph is a device used to provide a visual display of...

  20. 21 CFR 870.2750 - Impedance phlebograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Impedance phlebograph. 870.2750 Section 870.2750...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2750 Impedance phlebograph. (a) Identification. An impedance phlebograph is a device used to provide a visual display of...

  1. 21 CFR 870.2750 - Impedance phlebograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Impedance phlebograph. 870.2750 Section 870.2750...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2750 Impedance phlebograph. (a) Identification. An impedance phlebograph is a device used to provide a visual display of...

  2. 21 CFR 870.2770 - Impedance plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Impedance plethysmograph. 870.2770 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2770 Impedance plethysmograph. (a) Identification. An impedance plethysmograph is a device used to estimate peripheral...

  3. 21 CFR 870.2770 - Impedance plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Impedance plethysmograph. 870.2770 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2770 Impedance plethysmograph. (a) Identification. An impedance plethysmograph is a device used to estimate peripheral...

  4. 21 CFR 870.2770 - Impedance plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Impedance plethysmograph. 870.2770 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2770 Impedance plethysmograph. (a) Identification. An impedance plethysmograph is a device used to estimate peripheral...

  5. Impedance analysis of acupuncture points and pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplan, Michal; Kukučka, Marek; Ondrejkovičová, Alena

    2011-12-01

    Investigation of impedance characteristics of acupuncture points from acoustic to radio frequency range is addressed. Discernment and localization of acupuncture points in initial single subject study was unsuccessfully attempted by impedance map technique. Vector impedance analyses determined possible resonant zones in MHz region.

  6. Numerical Analysis of the Impedance of Fractal Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qi-Zhong

    The constant-phase-angle (CPA) impedance observed in electrochemical cells is often thought to be due to fractal roughness on the electrode surface. This idea was pursued by numerous theoretical and experimental studies in the last decade but there is no consensus on the quantitative relationship between the roughness and the impedance. In this study, we consider the partial differential equations that govern the electrostatic potential and the concentrations of anions and cations between two blocking electrodes which have no chemical reactions. We assume that diffusion and conduction are the only transport mechanisms and the Poisson -Boltzmann equation is obeyed. These equations are linearized and solved analytically in one dimension and numerically in two dimensions. For the latter, we used electrodes shaped like Koch curves and saw-tooth curves. A special grid was generated by conformal mapping to fit these boundaries with singularities and the equations are solved by finite -difference method on this grid. The numerical results are compared to the one-dimensional solution that give the behavior of the flat electrode. We find that the only observable effect of surface roughness is that it increases the interfacial capacitance due to the increased surface area. No evidence of the CPA impedance could be seen in our numerical data. We also studied the problem with the boundary-element method. It confirms that the numerical results are rigorously correct in the high and low frequency limit. Requiring the impedance in the intermediate frequency regime to match smoothly with these limits rule out the possibility of a CPA impedance. We suggest that the CPA impedance observed in many experiments is caused either by the adsorption and desorption of ions on the surface, or by oxidation and corrosion on the surface that changed the boundary conditions in the system.

  7. Active Vibration Damping of Solar Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinicke, Gunar; Baier, Horst; Grillebeck, Anton; Scharfeld, Frank; Hunger, Joseph; Abou-El-Ela, A.; Lohberg, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Current generations of large solar array panels are lightweight and flexible constructions to reduce net masses. They undergo strong vibrations during launch. The active vibration damping is one convenient option to reduce vibration responses and limit stresses in facesheets. In this study, two actuator concepts are used for vibration damping. A stack interface actuator replaces a panel hold down and is decoupled from bending moments and shear forces. Piezoelectric patch actuators are used as an alternative, where the number, position and size of actuators are mainly driven by controllability analyses. Linear Quadratic Gaussian control is used to attenuate vibrations of selected mode shapes with both actuators. Simulations as well as modal and acoustic tests show the feasibility of selected actuator concepts.

  8. Coupled rotor-body vibrations with inplane degrees of freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming-Sheng, H.; Peters, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    In an effort to understand the vibration mechanisms of helicopters, the following basic studies are considered. A coupled rotor-fuselage vibration analysis including inplane degrees of freedom of both rotor and airframe is performed by matching of rotor and fuselage impedances at the hub. A rigid blade model including hub motion is used to set up the rotor flaplag equations. For the airframe, 9 degrees of freedom and hub offsets are used. The equations are solved by harmonic balance. For a 4-bladed rotor, the coupled responses and hub loads are calculated for various parameters in forward flight. The results show that the addition of inplane degrees of freedom does not significantly affect the vertical vibrations for the cases considered, and that inplane vibrations have similar resonance trends as do flapping vibrations.

  9. Noncontact Electromagnetic Vibration Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Fulton, James P.; Wincheski, Buzz A.

    1994-01-01

    Metal aircraft skins scanned rapidly in vibration tests. Relatively simple combination of permanent magnets and electromagnet serves as noncontact vibration source for nondestructive testing of metal aircraft skins. In test, source excites vibrations, and vibration waveforms measured, then analyzed for changes in resonances signifying cracks and other flaws.

  10. Active Inertial Vibration Isolators And Dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Darren; Blackburn, John; Smith, Dennis

    1994-01-01

    Report describes development of active inertial vibration isolators and dampers in which actuators electromagnet coils moving linearly within permanent magnetic fields in housings, somewhat as though massive, low-frequency voice coils in loudspeakers. Discusses principle of operation, electrical and mechanical considerations in design of actuators, characteristics of accelerometers, and frequency responses of control systems. Describes design and performance of one- and three-degree-of-freedom vibration-suppressing system based on concept.

  11. Constant current loop impedance measuring system that is immune to the effects of parasitic impedances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Karl F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A constant current loop measuring system is provided for measuring a characteristic of an environment. The system comprises a first impedance positionable in the environment, a second impedance coupled in series with said first impedance and a parasitic impedance electrically coupled to the first and second impedances. A current generating device, electrically coupled in series with the first and second impedances, provides a constant current through the first and second impedances to produce first and second voltages across the first and second impedances, respectively, and a parasitic voltage across the parasitic impedance. A high impedance voltage measuring device measures a voltage difference between the first and second voltages independent of the parasitic voltage to produce a characteristic voltage representative of the characteristic of the environment.

  12. Flow-induced vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Blevins, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on dimensional analysis; ideal fluid models; vortex-induced vibration; galloping and flutter; instability of tube and cylinder arrays; vibrations induced by oscillating flow; vibration induced by turbulence and sound; damping of structures; sound induced by vortex shedding; vibrations of a pipe containing a fluid flow; indices. It covers the analysis of the vibrations of structures exposed to fluid flows; explores applications for offshore platforms and piping; wind-induced vibration of buildings, bridges, and towers; and acoustic and mechanical vibration of heat exchangers, power lines, and process ducting.

  13. Dielectric elastomers for active vibration control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, S.; Kaal, W.; Melz, T.

    2011-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DE) have proved to have high potential for smart actuator applications in many laboratory setups and also in first commercially available components. Because of their large deformation capability and the inherent fast response to external stimulation they proffer themselves to applications in the field of active vibration control, especially for lightweight structures. These structures typically tend to vibrate with large amplitudes even at low excitation forces. Here, DE actuators seem to be ideal components for setting up control loops to suppress unwanted vibrations. Due to the underlying physical effect DE actuators are generally non-linear elements with an approximately quadratic relationship between in- and output. Consequently, they automatically produce higher-order frequencies. This can cause harmful effects for vibration control on structures with high modal density. Therefore, a linearization technique is required to minimize parasitic effects. This paper shows and quantifies the nonlinearity of a commercial DE actuator and demonstrates the negative effects it can have in technical applications. For this purpose, two linearization methods are developed. Subsequently, the actuator is used to implement active vibration control for two different mechanical systems. In the first case a concentrated mass is driven with the controlled actuator resulting in a tunable oscillator. In the second case a more complex mechanical structure with multiple resonances is used. Different control approaches are applied likewise and their impact on the whole system is demonstrated. Thus, the potential of DE actuators for vibration control applications is highlighted.

  14. Joint Impedance Decreases during Movement Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Ludvig, Daniel; Antos, Stephen A.; Perreault, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the joint influence how we interact with our environment and hence are important in the control of both posture and movement. Many studies have investigated how the mechanical properties—specifically the impedance—of different joints vary with different postural tasks. However, studies on how joint impedance varies with movement remain limited. The few studies that have investigated how impedance varies with movement have found that impedance is lower during movement than during posture. In this study we investigated how impedance changed as people transitioned from a postural task to a movement task. We found that subjects’ joint impedances decreased at the initiation of movement, prior to increasing at the cessation of movement. This decrease in impedance occurred even though the subjects’ torque and EMG levels increased. These findings suggest that during movement the central nervous system may control joint impedance independently of muscle activation. PMID:23366632

  15. Tunable nanogap devices for ultra-sensitive electrochemical impedance biosensing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yong; Guo, Zheng; Song, Jing-Jing; Huang, Qin-An; Zhu, Si-Wei; Huang, Xing-Jiu; Wei, Yan

    2016-01-28

    A wealth of research has been available discussing nanogap devices for detecting very small quantities of biomolecules by observing their electrical behavior generally performed in dry conditions. We report that a gold nanogapped electrode with tunable gap length for ultra-sensitive detection of streptavidin based on electrochemical impedance technique. The gold nanogap is fabricated using simple monolayer film deposition and in-situ growth of gold nanoparticles in a traditional interdigitated array (IDA) microelectrode. The electrochemical impedance biosensor with a 25-nm nanogap is found to be ultra-sensitive to the specific binding of streptavidin to biotin. The binding of the streptavidin hinder the electron transfer between two electrodes, resulting in a large increase in electron-transfer resistance (Ret) for operating the impedance. A linear relation between the relative Ret and the logarithmic value of streptavidin concentration is observed in the concentration range from 1 pM (picomolar) to 100 nM (nanomolar). The lowest detectable concentration actually measured reaches 1 pM. We believe that such an electrochemical impedance nanogap biosensor provides a useful approach towards biomolecular detection that could be extended to a number of other systems. PMID:26755137

  16. Label-free impedance detection of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Venkatanarayanan, Anita; Keyes, Tia E; Forster, Robert J

    2013-02-19

    Ovarian cancer cells, SKOV3, have been immobilized onto platinum microelectrodes using anti-EPCAM capture antibodies and detected with high sensitivity using electrochemical impedance. The change in impedance following cell capture is strongly dependent on the supporting electrolyte concentration. By controlling the concentration of Dulbecco's phosphate buffered saline (DPBS) electrolyte, the double layer thickness can be manipulated so that the interfacial electric field interacts with the bound cells, rather than simply decaying across the antibody capture layer. Significantly, the impedance changes markedly upon cell capture over the frequency range from 3 Hz to 90 kHz. For example, using an alternating-current (ac) amplitude of 25 mV, a frequency of 81.3 kHz, and an open circuit potential (OCP) as the direct-current (dc) voltage, a detection limit of 4 captured cells was achieved. Assuming an average cell radius of 5 μm, the linear dynamic range is from 4 captured cells to 650 ± 2 captured cells, which is approximately equivalent to fractional coverages from 0.1% to 29%. An equivalent circuit that models the impedance response of the cell capture is discussed. PMID:23331159

  17. Multivariable Dynamic Ankle Mechanical Impedance With Active Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunglae; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2015-01-01

    Multivariable dynamic ankle mechanical impedance in two coupled degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) was quantified when muscles were active. Measurements were performed at five different target activation levels of tibialis anterior and soleus, from 10% to 30% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) with increments of 5% MVC. Interestingly, several ankle behaviors characterized in our previous study of the relaxed ankle were observed with muscles active: ankle mechanical impedance in joint coordinates showed responses largely consistent with a second-order system consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness; stiffness was greater in the sagittal plane than in the frontal plane at all activation conditions for all subjects; and the coupling between dorsiflexion–plantarflexion and inversion–eversion was small—the two DOF measurements were well explained by a strictly diagonal impedance matrix. In general, ankle stiffness increased linearly with muscle activation in all directions in the 2-D space formed by the sagittal and frontal planes, but more in the sagittal than in the frontal plane, resulting in an accentuated “peanut shape.” This characterization of young healthy subjects’ ankle mechanical impedance with active muscles will serve as a baseline to investigate pathophysiological ankle behaviors of biomechanically and/or neurologically impaired patients. PMID:25203497

  18. Instrumental noise estimates stabilize and quantify endothelial cell micro-impedance barrier function parameter estimates

    SciTech Connect

    English, Anthony E; Moy, Alan B; Kruse, Kara L; Ward, Richard C; Kirkpatrick, Stacy S; GoldmanM.D., Mitchell H

    2009-04-01

    A novel transcellular micro-impedance biosensor, referred to as the electric cell-substrate impedance sensor or ECIS, has become increasingly applied to the study and quantification of endothelial cell physiology. In principle, frequency dependent impedance measurements obtained from this sensor can be used to estimate the cell cell and cell matrix impedance components of endothelial cell barrier function based on simple geometric models. Few studies, however, have examined the numerical optimization of these barrier function parameters and established their error bounds. This study, therefore, illustrates the implementation of a multi-response Levenberg Marquardt algorithm that includes instrumental noise estimates and applies it to frequency dependent porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cell impedance measurements. The stability of cell cell, cell matrix and membrane impedance parameter estimates based on this approach is carefully examined, and several forms of parameter instability and refinement illustrated. Including frequency dependent noise variance estimates in the numerical optimization reduced the parameter value dependence on the frequency range of measured impedances. The increased stability provided by a multi-response non-linear fit over one-dimensional algorithms indicated that both real and imaginary data should be used in the parameter optimization. Error estimates based on single fits and Monte Carlo simulations showed that the model barrier parameters were often highly correlated with each other. Independently resolving the different parameters can, therefore, present a challenge to the experimentalist and demand the use of non-linear multivariate statistical methods when comparing different sets of parameters.

  19. Chromaticity and impedance effect on the transverse motion of longitunial bunch slices in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjbar, V.H.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The Transverse turn-by-turn evolution of a bunch slice is examined considering chromatic and impedance effects. A quasi-analytical approximation is developed using perturbative expansion of Hill's equation with a wake field. This approximation is compared to turn-by-turn measurements taken in the Tevatron and from this linear and second order chromaticity, and impedance are calculated as well as beam stability thresholds.

  20. DIFFERENTIAL SOIL IMPEDANCE OBSTACLE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Maximillian J. Kieba

    2002-08-30

    This project develops a new and unique obstacle detection sensor for horizontal directional drilling (HDD) equipment. The development of this new technology will greatly improve the reliability and safety of natural gas HDD construction practices. This sensor utilizes a differential soil impedance measurement technique that will be sensitive to the presence of plastic and ceramic, as well as metallic obstacles. The use of HDD equipment has risen significantly in the gas industry because HDD provides a much more cost-effective and less disruptive method for gas pipe installation than older, trenching methods. However, there have been isolated strikes of underground utilities by HDD equipment, which may have been avoided if methods were available to detect other underground obstacles when using HDD systems. GTI advisors from the gas industry have ranked the value of solving the obstacle detection problem as the most important research and development project for GTI to pursue using Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) funds available through its industry partner, GRI. GTI proposes to develop a prototype down-hole sensor system that is simple and compact. The sensor utilizes an impedance measurement technique that is sensitive to the presence of metallic or nonmetallic objects in the proximity of the HDD head. The system will use a thin film sensor conformal with the drill head. The impedance of the soil will be measured with a low frequency signal injected through the drill head itself. A pair of bridge type impedance sensors, mounted orthogonal to one another, is capacitively coupled to the soil. Inclusions in the soil will cause changes to the sensor balance distinguishable from homogeneous soil. The sensor will provide range and direction data for obstacles near the HDD head. The goal is to provide a simple, robust system that provides the information required to avoid obstacles. This must be done within the size and ruggedness constraints of the HDD

  1. DIFFERENTIAL SOIL IMPEDANCE OBSTACLE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Maximillian J. Kieba; Christopher J. Ziolkowski

    2004-10-29

    This project develops a new and unique obstacle detection sensor for horizontal directional drilling (HDD) equipment. The development of this new technology will greatly improve the reliability and safety of natural gas HDD construction practices. This sensor utilizes a differential soil impedance measurement technique that will be sensitive to the presence of plastic and ceramic, as well as metallic obstacles. The use of HDD equipment has risen significantly in the gas industry because HDD provides a much more cost-effective and less disruptive method for gas pipe installation than older, trenching methods. However, there have been isolated strikes of underground utilities by HDD equipment, which may have been avoided if methods were available to detect other underground obstacles when using HDD systems. GTI advisors from the gas industry have ranked the value of solving the obstacle detection problem as the most important research and development project for GTI to pursue using Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) funds available through its industry partner, GRI. GTI proposes to develop a prototype down-hole sensor system that is simple and compact. The sensor utilizes an impedance measurement technique that is sensitive to the presence of metallic or non-metallic objects in the proximity of the HDD head. The system will use a simple sensor incorporated into the drill head. The impedance of the soil will be measured with a low frequency signal injected through the drill head itself. A pair of bridge type impedance sensors, mounted orthogonal to one another, is coupled to the soil. Inclusions in the soil will cause changes to the sensor balance distinguishable from homogeneous soil. The sensor will provide range and direction data for obstacles near the HDD head. The goal is to provide a simple, robust system that provides the information required to avoid obstacles. This must be done within the size and ruggedness constraints of the HDD equipment. Imaging

  2. DIFFERENTIAL SOIL IMPEDANCE OBSTACLE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Maximillian J. Kieba

    2004-05-03

    This project develops a new and unique obstacle detection sensor for horizontal directional drilling (HDD) equipment. The development of this new technology will greatly improve the reliability and safety of natural gas HDD construction practices. This sensor utilizes a differential soil impedance measurement technique that will be sensitive to the presence of plastic and ceramic, as well as metallic obstacles. The use of HDD equipment has risen significantly in the gas industry because HDD provides a much more cost-effective and less disruptive method for gas pipe installation than older, trenching methods. However, there have been isolated strikes of underground utilities by HDD equipment, which may have been avoided if methods were available to detect other underground obstacles when using HDD systems. GTI advisors from the gas industry have ranked the value of solving the obstacle detection problem as the most important research and development project for GTI to pursue using Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) funds available through its industry partner, GRI. GTI proposes to develop a prototype down-hole sensor system that is simple and compact. The sensor utilizes an impedance measurement technique that is sensitive to the presence of metallic or nonmetallic objects in the proximity of the HDD head. The system will use a simple sensor incorporated into the drill head. The impedance of the soil will be measured with a low frequency signal injected through the drill head itself. A pair of bridge type impedance sensors, mounted orthogonal to one another, is coupled to the soil. Inclusions in the soil will cause changes to the sensor balance distinguishable from homogeneous soil. The sensor will provide range and direction data for obstacles near the HDD head. The goal is to provide a simple, robust system that provides the information required to avoid obstacles. This must be done within the size and ruggedness constraints of the HDD equipment. Imaging

  3. DIFFERENTIAL SOIL IMPEDANCE OBSTACLE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Maximillian J. Kieba

    2004-02-01

    This project develops a new and unique obstacle detection sensor for horizontal directional drilling (HDD) equipment. The development of this new technology will greatly improve the reliability and safety of natural gas HDD construction practices. This sensor utilizes a differential soil impedance measurement technique that will be sensitive to the presence of plastic and ceramic, as well as metallic obstacles. The use of HDD equipment has risen significantly in the gas industry because HDD provides a much more cost-effective and less disruptive method for gas pipe installation than older, trenching methods. However, there have been isolated strikes of underground utilities by HDD equipment, which may have been avoided if methods were available to detect other underground obstacles when using HDD systems. GTI advisors from the gas industry have ranked the value of solving the obstacle detection problem as the most important research and development project for GTI to pursue using Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) funds available through its industry partner, GRI. GTI proposes to develop a prototype down-hole sensor system that is simple and compact. The sensor utilizes an impedance measurement technique that is sensitive to the presence of metallic or nonmetallic objects in the proximity of the HDD head. The system will use a simple sensor incorporated into the drill head. The impedance of the soil will be measured with a low frequency signal injected through the drill head itself. A pair of bridge type impedance sensors, mounted orthogonal to one another, is coupled to the soil. Inclusions in the soil will cause changes to the sensor balance distinguishable from homogeneous soil. The sensor will provide range and direction data for obstacles near the HDD head. The goal is to provide a simple, robust system that provides the information required to avoid obstacles. This must be done within the size and ruggedness constraints of the HDD equipment. Imaging

  4. DIFFERENTIAL SOIL IMPEDANCE OBSTACLE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Maximillian J. Kieba; Christopher J. Ziolkowski

    2005-01-17

    This project aimed at developing a new and unique obstacle detection sensor for horizontal directional drilling (HDD) equipment. The development of this new technology will greatly improve the reliability and safety of natural gas HDD construction practices. This sensor utilizes a differential soil impedance measurement technique that will be sensitive to the presence of plastic and ceramic, as well as metallic obstacles. The use of HDD equipment has risen significantly in the gas industry because HDD provides a much more cost-effective and less disruptive method for gas pipe installation than older, trenching methods. However, there have been isolated strikes of underground utilities by HDD equipment, which may have been avoided if methods were available to detect other underground obstacles when using HDD systems. GTI advisors from the gas industry ranked the value of solving the obstacle detection problem as the most important research and development project for GTI to pursue using Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) funds available through its industry partner, GTI. GTI proposed to develop a prototype down-hole sensor system that is simple and compact. The sensor utilizes an impedance measurement technique that is sensitive to the presence of metallic or non-metallic objects in the proximity of the HDD head. The system will use a simple sensor incorporated into the drill head. The impedance of the soil will be measured with a low frequency signal injected through the drill head itself. A pair of bridge type impedance sensors, mounted orthogonal to one another, is coupled to the soil. Inclusions in the soil will cause changes to the sensor balance distinguishable from homogeneous soil. The sensor will provide range and direction data for obstacles near the HDD head. The goal is to provide a simple, robust system that provides the information required to avoid obstacles. This must be done within the size and ruggedness constraints of the HDD equipment

  5. DIFFERENTIAL SOIL IMPEDANCE OBSTACLE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Maximillian J. Kieba

    2003-10-01

    This project develops a new and unique obstacle detection sensor for horizontal directional drilling (HDD) equipment. The development of this new technology will greatly improve the reliability and safety of natural gas HDD construction practices. This sensor utilizes a differential soil impedance measurement technique that will be sensitive to the presence of plastic and ceramic, as well as metallic obstacles. The use of HDD equipment has risen significantly in the gas industry because HDD provides a much more cost-effective and less disruptive method for gas pipe installation than older, trenching methods. However, there have been isolated strikes of underground utilities by HDD equipment, which may have been avoided if methods were available to detect other underground obstacles when using HDD systems. GTI advisors from the gas industry have ranked the value of solving the obstacle detection problem as the most important research and development project for GTI to pursue using Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) funds available through its industry partner, GRI. GTI proposes to develop a prototype down-hole sensor system that is simple and compact. The sensor utilizes an impedance measurement technique that is sensitive to the presence of metallic or nonmetallic objects in the proximity of the HDD head. The system will use a simple sensor incorporated into the drill head. The impedance of the soil will be measured with a low frequency signal injected through the drill head itself. A pair of bridge type impedance sensors, mounted orthogonal to one another, is coupled to the soil. Inclusions in the soil will cause changes to the sensor balance distinguishable from homogeneous soil. The sensor will provide range and direction data for obstacles near the HDD head. The goal is to provide a simple, robust system that provides the information required to avoid obstacles. This must be done within the size and ruggedness constraints of the HDD equipment. Imaging

  6. Bilateral Impedance Control For Telemanipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Christopher L.

    1993-01-01

    Telemanipulator system includes master robot manipulated by human operator, and slave robot performing tasks at remote location. Two robots electronically coupled so slave robot moves in response to commands from master robot. Teleoperation greatly enhanced if forces acting on slave robot fed back to operator, giving operator feeling he or she manipulates remote environment directly. Main advantage of bilateral impedance control: enables arbitrary specification of desired performance characteristics for telemanipulator system. Relationship between force and position modulated at both ends of system to suit requirements of task.

  7. DIFFERENTIAL SOIL IMPEDANCE OBSTACLE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Maximillian J. Kieba; Christopher J. Ziolkowski

    2004-06-30

    This project develops a new and unique obstacle detection sensor for horizontal directional drilling (HDD) equipment. The development of this new technology will greatly improve the reliability and safety of natural gas HDD construction practices. This sensor utilizes a differential soil impedance measurement technique that will be sensitive to the presence of plastic and ceramic, as well as metallic obstacles. The use of HDD equipment has risen significantly in the gas industry because HDD provides a much more cost-effective and less disruptive method for gas pipe installation than older, trenching methods. However, there have been isolated strikes of underground utilities by HDD equipment, which may have been avoided if methods were available to detect other underground obstacles when using HDD systems. GTI advisors from the gas industry have ranked the value of solving the obstacle detection problem as the most important research and development project for GTI to pursue using Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) funds available through its industry partner, GRI. GTI proposes to develop a prototype down-hole sensor system that is simple and compact. The sensor utilizes an impedance measurement technique that is sensitive to the presence of metallic or nonmetallic objects in the proximity of the HDD head. The system will use a simple sensor incorporated into the drill head. The impedance of the soil will be measured with a low frequency signal injected through the drill head itself. A pair of bridge type impedance sensors, mounted orthogonal to one another, is coupled to the soil. Inclusions in the soil will cause changes to the sensor balance distinguishable from homogeneous soil. The sensor will provide range and direction data for obstacles near the HDD head. The goal is to provide a simple, robust system that provides the information required to avoid obstacles. This must be done within the size and ruggedness constraints of the HDD equipment. Imaging

  8. Impedance spectroscopy of food mycotoxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilyy, Oleksandr I.; Yaremyk, Roman Ya.; Kotsyumbas, Ihor Ya.; Kotsyumbas, Halyna I.

    2012-01-01

    A new analytical method of high-selective detection of mycotoxins in food and feed are considered. A method is based on optical registration the changes of conduct of the electric polarized bacterial agents in solution at the action of the external gradient electric fields. Measuring are conducted in integrated electrode-optical cuvette of the special construction, which provides the photometric analysis of forward motion of the objects registration in liquid solution under act of the enclosed electric field and simultaneous registration of kinetics of change of electrical impedance parameters solution and electrode system.

  9. Impedance of pistons on a two-layer medium in a planar infinite rigid baffle.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Scott E

    2007-07-01

    An integral transform technique is used to develop a general solution for the impedance of rigid pistons acting on a two-layer medium. The medium consists of a semi-infinite acoustic fluid on a viscoelastic thick plate in a rigid infinite baffle. The stresses acting on the planar baffle, as a result of piston motion, are determined using theory of linear elasticity and are therefore unrestricted in terms of applicable frequency range. The special case of a circular piston is considered and expressions for the self-and mutual impedances are developed and evaluated numerically. Numerical results are compared with classical piston impedance functions and finite-element model results. At low frequencies (k(0)a<1), the self-impedances vary significantly from the classical piston impedance functions due to the shear properties of the viscoelastic medium. In the midfrequency range (1impedances vary from the classical piston impedance functions for moderate viscoelastic layer thicknesses (0.5impedances associated with pistons on a two-layer medium generally exhibit an increased decay, as a function of separation distance, over the classical results. PMID:17614483

  10. ONERA-NASA Cooperative Effort on Liner Impedance Eduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primus, Julien; Piot, Estelle; Simon, Frank; Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R

    2013-01-01

    As part of a cooperation between ONERA and NASA, the liner impedance eduction methods developed by the two research centers are compared. The NASA technique relies on an objective function built on acoustic pressure measurements located on the wall opposite the test liner, and the propagation code solves the convected Helmholtz equation in uniform ow using a finite element method that implements a continuous Galerkin discretization. The ONERA method uses an objective function based either on wall acoustic pressure or on acoustic velocity acquired above the liner by Laser Doppler Anemometry, and the propagation code solves the linearized Euler equations by a discontinuous Galerkin discretization. Two acoustic liners are tested in both ONERA and NASA ow ducts and the measured data are treated with the corresponding impedance eduction method. The first liner is a wire mesh facesheet mounted onto a honeycomb core, designed to be linear with respect to incident sound pressure level and to grazing ow velocity. The second one is a conventional, nonlinear, perforate-over-honeycomb single layer liner. Configurations without and with ow are considered. For the nonlinear liner, the comparison of liner impedance educed by NASA and ONERA shows a sensitivity to the experimental conditions, namely to the nature of the source and to the sample width.

  11. Spheromak Impedance and Current Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T K; Hua, D D; Stallard, B W

    2002-01-31

    It is shown that high current amplification can be achieved only by injecting helicity on the timescale for reconnection, {tau}{sub REC}, which determines the effective impedance of the spheromak. An approximate equation for current amplification is: dI{sub TOR}{sup 2}/dt {approx} I{sup 2}/{tau}{sub REC} - I{sub TOR}{sup 2}/{tau}{sub closed} where I is the gun current, I{sub TOR} is the spheromak toroidal current and {tau}{sub CLOSED} is the ohmic decay time of the spheromak. Achieving high current amplification, I{sub TOR} >> I, requires {tau}{sub REC} <<{tau}{sub CLOSED}. For resistive reconnection, this requires reconnection in a cold zone feeding helicity into a hot zone. Here we propose an impedance model based on these ideas in a form that can be implemented in the Corsica-based helicity transport code. The most important feature of the model is the possibility that {tau}{sub REC} actually increases as the spheromak temperature increases, perhaps accounting for the ''voltage sag'' observed in some experiments, and a tendency toward a constant ratio of field to current, B {proportional_to} I, or I{sub TOR} {approx} I. Program implications are discussed.

  12. Soil amplification with a strong impedance contrast: Boston, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baise, Laurie G.; Kaklamanos, James; Berry, Bradford M; Thompson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluate the effect of strong sediment/bedrock impedance contrasts on soil amplification in Boston, Massachusetts, for typical sites along the Charles and Mystic Rivers. These sites can be characterized by artificial fill overlying marine sediments overlying glacial till and bedrock, where the depth to bedrock ranges from 20 to 80 m. The marine sediments generally consist of organic silts, sand, and Boston Blue Clay. We chose these sites because they represent typical foundation conditions in the city of Boston, and the soil conditions are similar to other high impedance contrast environments. The sediment/bedrock interface in this region results in an impedance ratio on the order of ten, which in turn results in a significant amplification of the ground motion. Using stratigraphic information derived from numerous boreholes across the region paired with geologic and geomorphologic constraints, we develop a depth-to-bedrock model for the greater Boston region. Using shear-wave velocity profiles from 30 locations, we develop average velocity profiles for sites mapped as artificial fill, glaciofluvial deposits, and bedrock. By pairing the depth-to-bedrock model with the surficial geology and the average shear-wave velocity profiles, we can predict soil amplification in Boston. We compare linear and equivalent-linear site response predictions for a soil layer of varying thickness over bedrock, and assess the effects of varying the bedrock shear-wave velocity (VSb) and quality factor (Q). In a moderate seismicity region like Boston, many earthquakes will result in ground motions that can be modeled with linear site response methods. We also assess the effect of bedrock depth on soil amplification for a generic soil profile in artificial fill, using both linear and equivalent-linear site response models. Finally, we assess the accuracy of the model results by comparing the predicted (linear site response) and observed site response at the Northeastern

  13. Impedance studies on Li-ion cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    NAGASUBRAMANIAN, GANESAN

    2000-04-17

    This paper describes the author's 2- and 3-electrode impedance results of metal oxide cathodes. These results were extracted from impedance data on 18650 Li-ion cells. The impedance results indicate that the ohmic resistance of the cell is very nearly constant with state-of-charge (SOC) and temperature. For example, the ohmic resistance of 18650 Li-ion cells is around 60 m{Omega} for different SOCS (4.1V to 3.0V) and temperatures from 35 C to {minus}20 C. However, the interfacial impedance shows a modest increase with SOC and a huge increase of between 10 and 100 times with decreasing temperature. For example, in the temperature regime (35 C down to {minus}20 C) the overall cell impedance has increased from nearly 200 m{Omega} to 8,000 m{Omega}. Most of the increase in cell impedance comes from the metal oxide cathode/electrolyte interface.

  14. Automated calculation of anharmonic vibrational contributions to first hyperpolarizabilities: Quadratic response functions from vibrational configuration interaction wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Mikkel Bo; Christiansen, Ove; Hättig, Christof

    2009-10-01

    Quadratic response functions are derived and implemented for a vibrational configuration interaction state. Combined electronic and vibrational quadratic response functions are derived using Born-Oppenheimer vibronic product wave functions. Computational tractable expressions are derived for determining the total quadratic response contribution as a sum of contributions involving both electronic and vibrational linear and quadratic response functions. In the general frequency-dependent case this includes a new and more troublesome type of electronic linear response function. Pilot calculations for the FH, H2O, CH2O, and pyrrole molecules demonstrate the importance of vibrational contributions for accurate comparison to experiment and that the vibrational contributions in some cases can be very large. The calculation of transition properties between vibrational states is combined with sum-over-states expressions for analysis purposes. On the basis of this some simple analysis methods are suggested. Also, a preliminary study of the effect of finite lifetimes on quadratic response functions is presented.

  15. A new approach to the study of impedance characteristics of tympanic membrane.

    PubMed

    Bogomolov, A V; Dragan, S P

    2015-01-01

    A new approach to studying the tympanic membrane impedance characteristics, based on the analysis of polyharmonic acoustic signals reflected by the tympanic membrane, is described. For this purpose, the acoustic pressure and the phase difference between the acoustic vibrations in two sections of a waveguide sealingly connecting the external auditory meatus and a generator of polyharmonic audio signals is measured. By processing the results of measurements, the estimates of the frequency-dependent reflection coefficients, absorption coefficients, and components of the acoustic impedance of the tympanic membrane are calculated. The features that principally distinguish the developed approach from other approaches are the absence of the necessity to create a positive pressure in the external auditory meatus, the absence of ultrasonic radiation into the external auditory meatus and a high-intensity sound, and the possibility of direct measurement of the tympanic membrane impedance in the audio frequency range with any step. PMID:26518544

  16. Vibration characterisation of cymbal transducers for power ultrasonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejarano, F.; Feeney, A.; Lucas, M.

    2012-08-01

    A Class V cymbal flextensional transducer is composed of a piezoceramic disc or ring sandwiched between two cymbal-shaped shell end-caps. These end-caps act as mechanical transformers to convert high impedance, low radial displacement of the piezoceramic into low impedance, large axial motion of the end-cap. The cymbal transducer was developed in the early 1990's at Penn State University, and is an improvement of the moonie transducer which has been in use since the 1980's. Despite the fact that cymbal transducers have been used in many fields, both as sensors and actuators, due to its physical limitations its use has been mainly at low power intensities. It is only very recently that its suitability for high amplitude and high power applications has been studied, and consequently implementation in this area of research remains undeveloped. This paper employs experimental modal analysis (EMA), vibration response measurements and electrical impedance measurements to characterise two variations of the cymbal transducer design, both aimed at incorporation in ultrasonic cutting devices. The transducers are fabricated using the commercial Eccobond 45LV epoxy adhesive as the bonding agent. The first cymbal transducer is of the classic design where the piezoceramic disc is bonded directly to the end-caps. The second cymbal transducer includes a metal ring bonded to the outer edge of the piezoceramic disc. The reason for the inclusion of this metal ring is to improve the mechanical coupling with the end-caps. This would therefore make this design particularly suitable for power ultrasonic applications, reducing the possibility of debonding at the higher ultrasonic amplitudes. The experimental results demonstrate that the second cymbal design is a significant improvement on the more classic design, allowing the transducer to operate at higher voltages and higher amplitudes, exhibiting a linear response over a practical power ultrasonic device driving voltage range. The

  17. Impedance adaptation methods of the piezoelectric energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyeoungwoo

    In this study, the important issues of energy recovery were addressed and a comprehensive investigation was performed on harvesting electrical power from an ambient mechanical vibration source. Also discussed are the impedance matching methods used to increase the efficiency of energy transfer from the environment to the application. Initially, the mechanical impedance matching method was investigated to increase mechanical energy transferred to the transducer from the environment. This was done by reducing the mechanical impedance such as damping factor and energy reflection ratio. The vibration source and the transducer were modeled by a two-degree-of-freedom dynamic system with mass, spring constant, and damper. The transmissibility employed to show how much mechanical energy that was transferred in this system was affected by the damping ratio and the stiffness of elastic materials. The mechanical impedance of the system was described by electrical system using analogy between the two systems in order to simply the total mechanical impedance. Secondly, the transduction rate of mechanical energy to electrical energy was improved by using a PZT material which has a high figure of merit and a high electromechanical coupling factor for electrical power generation, and a piezoelectric transducer which has a high transduction rate was designed and fabricated. The high g material (g33 = 40 [10-3Vm/N]) was developed to improve the figure of merit of the PZT ceramics. The cymbal composite transducer has been found as a promising structure for piezoelectric energy harvesting under high force at cyclic conditions (10--200 Hz), because it has almost 40 times higher effective strain coefficient than PZT ceramics. The endcap of cymbal also enhances the endurance of the ceramic to sustain ac load along with stress amplification. In addition, a macro fiber composite (MFC) was employed as a strain component because of its flexibility and the high electromechanical coupling

  18. TRANSVERSE IMPEDANCE MEASUREMENT AT THE RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG,S.Y.; HUANG,H.; CAMERON,P.; DREES,A.; FLILLER,R.; SATOGATA,T.

    2002-06-02

    The RHIC transverse impedance was measured during the last operation run. Measurement of the imaginary part of the broadband impedance was the main goal. No large difference between the two rings was found nor in either plane. The measured tune shift is larger than the expected by a factor of 2.5 to 3. Several other issues such as the real part impedance measurement are also presented.

  19. Transcranial Extracellular Impedance Control (tEIC) Modulates Behavioral Performances

    PubMed Central

    Matani, Ayumu; Nakayama, Masaaki; Watanabe, Mayumi; Furuyama, Yoshikazu; Hotta, Atsushi; Hoshino, Shotaro

    2014-01-01

    Electric brain stimulations such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS), and transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) electrophysiologically modulate brain activity and as a result sometimes modulate behavioral performances. These stimulations can be viewed from an engineering standpoint as involving an artificial electric source (DC, noise, or AC) attached to an impedance branch of a distributed parameter circuit. The distributed parameter circuit is an approximation of the brain and includes electric sources (neurons) and impedances (volume conductors). Such a brain model is linear, as is often the case with the electroencephalogram (EEG) forward model. Thus, the above-mentioned current stimulations change the current distribution in the brain depending on the locations of the electric sources in the brain. Now, if the attached artificial electric source were to be replaced with a resistor, or even a negative resistor, the resistor would also change the current distribution in the brain. In light of the superposition theorem, which holds for any linear electric circuit, attaching an electric source is different from attaching a resistor; the resistor affects each active electric source in the brain so as to increase (or decrease in some cases of a negative resistor) the current flowing out from each source. From an electrophysiological standpoint, the attached resistor can only control the extracellular impedance and never causes forced stimulation; we call this technique transcranial extracellular impedance control (tEIC). We conducted a behavioral experiment to evaluate tEIC and found evidence that it had real-time enhancement and depression effects on EEGs and a real-time facilitation effect on reaction times. Thus, tEIC could be another technique to modulate behavioral performance. PMID:25047913

  20. Adaptive Impedance Control Of Redundant Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun; Colbaugh, Richard D.; Glass, Kristin L.

    1994-01-01

    Improved method of controlling mechanical impedance of end effector of redundant robotic manipulator based on adaptive-control theory. Consists of two subsystems: adaptive impedance controller generating force-control inputs in Cartesian space of end effector to provide desired end-effector-impedance characteristics, and subsystem implementing algorithm that maps force-control inputs into torques applied to joints of manipulator. Accurate control of end effector and effective utilization of redundancy achieved simultaneously by use of method. Potential use to improve performance of such typical impedance-control tasks as deburring edges and accommodating transitions between unconstrained and constrained motions of end effectors.

  1. Low impedance printed circuit radiating element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahm, James K. (Inventor); Frankievich, Robert H. (Inventor); Martinko, John D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A printed circuit radiating element comprises a geometrically symmetric planar area of a conducting material separated from a ground plane by a dielectric medium. The driving point of the radiating element is at the base of a notch in one side thereof so that the driving impedance is reduced from that obtained when the element is driven at its edge. Symmetrically disposed on opposite sides of an axis of symmetry of the element along which the driving point lies are two notches which restore the electrical symmetry of the radiating element thereby to suppress higher order modes. The suppression of these higher order modes results in a radiation pattern with minimal cross-polarized energy in the principal planes and high port-to-port isolation which could not be achieved with an asymmetrical element. Two driving points may be employed with the radiating element to produce a dual linearly polarized antenna and a reactive combiner or hybrid may be employed to obtain circularly-polarized radiations. The shape of the radiating element may be square, rectangular or circular, for example, in accordance with the desired characteristics. A plurality of radiating elements may be interconnected via appropriate transmission paths to form an antenna array.

  2. Transmission Conditions of Vibration Stresses to Welding Specimens of Ultrasonic Plastic Welding using Various Two-Vibration-System Equipments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujino, Jiromaru; Uchida, Takako; Ohkusa, Kunifumi; Adachi, Tatsuya; Ueoka, Tetsugi

    1998-05-01

    Ultrasonic plastic welding is applied for welding various thermoplastic materials and is widely used in various industrial fields. The two-vibration-system welding method and a high frequency equipment are effective in improving the welding characteristics. A high frequency 90 kHz system can weld plastic sheets under a 1/3 velocity amplitude as compared with that of a low 27 kHz system, but it is difficult to weld large specimens successfully because a high frequency vibration stress cannot be transmitted uniformly due to the stress relaxation effect by the small vibration displacement. To improve the direct welding characteristics, three types of two-vibration-system ultrasonic welding equipments using linear vibration loci of (1) 90 kHz and 27 kHz longitudinal vibration systems, (2) 90 kHz longitudinal and 20 kHz torsional vibration systems, and elliptical vibration loci of (3) 27 kHz complex vibration systems are studied. Transmission conditions of the vibration stresses are measured by pressure sensitive films (Prescale) which are inserted between the plastic sheets. It was shown that a high frequency vibration stress with a small displacement amplitude may be induced uniformly in the welding specimens by combining a low frequency vibration with large displacement amplitude. These welding systems are effectively used to join plastic sheets successfully.

  3. Electrical Impedance Tomography of Electrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Arie; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of this study is to explore the hypothesis that changes in pH during electrolysis can be detected with Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). The study has relevance to real time control of minimally invasive surgery with electrolytic ablation. To investigate the hypothesis, we compare EIT reconstructed images to optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar gel phantom treated with electrolysis. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E.Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of EIT to image pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E.coli model. The results are promising, and invite further experimental explorations. PMID:26039686

  4. Impedance Spectroscopy of Human Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesa, Francisco; Bernal, José J.; Sosa, Modesto A.; Villagómez, Julio C.; Palomares, Pascual

    2004-09-01

    The blood is one of the corporal fluids more used with analytical purposes. When the blood is extracted, immediately it is affected by agents that act on it, producing transformations in its elements. Among the effects of these transformations the hemolysis phenomenon stands out, which consists of the membrane rupture and possible death of the red blood cells. The main purpose of this investigation was the quantification of this phenomenon. A Solartron SI-1260 Impedance Spectrometer was used, which covers a frequency range of work from 1 μHz to 10 MHz, and its accuracy has been tested in the accomplishment of several applications. Measurements were performed on 3 mL human blood samples, from healthy donors. Reactive strips for sugar test of 2 μL, from Bayer, were used as electrodes, which allow gathering a portion of the sample, to be analyzed by the spectrometer. Preliminary results of these measurements are presented.

  5. Evaluation of Wall Boundary Conditions for Impedance Eduction Using a Dual-Source Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, W. R.; Jones, M. G.

    2012-01-01

    The accuracy of the Ingard-Myers boundary condition and a recently proposed modified Ingard-Myers boundary condition is evaluated for use in impedance eduction under the assumption of uniform mean flow. The evaluation is performed at three centerline Mach numbers, using data acquired in a grazing flow impedance tube, using both upstream and downstream propagating sound sources, and on a database of test liners for which the expected behavior of the impedance spectra is known. The test liners are a hard-wall insert consisting of 12.6 mm thick aluminum, a linear liner without a facesheet consisting of a number of small diameter but long cylindrical channels embedded in a ceramic material, and two conventional nonlinear liners consisting of a perforated facesheet bonded to a honeycomb core. The study is restricted to a frequency range for which only plane waves are cut on in the hard-wall sections of the flow impedance tube. The metrics used to evaluate each boundary condition are 1) how well it educes the same impedance for upstream and downstream propagating sources, and 2) how well it predicts the expected behavior of the impedance spectra over the Mach number range. The primary conclusions of the study are that the same impedance is educed for upstream and downstream propagating sources except at the highest Mach number, that an effective impedance based on both the upstream and downstream measurements is more accurate than an impedance based on the upstream or downstream data alone, and that the Ingard-Myers boundary condition with an effective impedance produces results similar to that achieved with the modified Ingard-Myers boundary condition.

  6. Interdigitated microelectrode (IME) impedance sensor for the detection of viable Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liju; Li, Yanbin; Griffis, Carl L; Johnson, Michael G

    2004-05-15

    Interdigitated microelectrodes (IMEs) were used as impedance sensors for rapid detection of viable Salmonella typhimurium in a selective medium and milk samples. The impedance growth curves, impedance against bacterial growth time, were recorded at four frequencies (10Hz, 100Hz, 1kHz, and 10kHz) during the growth of S. typhimurium. The impedance did not change until the cell number reached 10(5)-10(6) CFUml(-1). The greatest change in impedance was observed at 10Hz. To better understand the mechanism of the IME impedance sensor, an equivalent electrical circuit, consisting of double layer capacitors, a dielectric capacitor, and a medium resistor, was introduced and used for interpreting the change in impedance during bacterial growth. Bacterial attachment to the electrode surface was observed with scanning electron microscopy, and it had effect on the impedance measurement. The detection time, t(D), defined as the time for the impedance to start change, was obtained from the impedance growth curve at 10Hz and had a linear relationship with the logarithmic value of the initial cell number of S. typhimurium in the medium and milk samples. The regression equations for the cell numbers between 4.8 and 5.4 x 10(5) CFUml(-1) were t(D) = -1.38 log N + 10.18 with R(2) = 0.99 in the pure medium and t(D) = -1.54 log N + 11.33 with R(2) = 0.98 in milk samples, respectively. The detection times for 4.8 and 5.4 x 10(5) CFUml(-1) initial cell numbers were 9.3 and 2.2 h, respectively, and the detection limit could be as low as 1 cell in a sample. PMID:15046744

  7. Development of an innovative device for ultrasonic elliptical vibration cutting.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; Hu, Linhua

    2015-07-01

    An innovative ultrasonic elliptical vibration cutting (UEVC) device with 1st resonant mode of longitudinal vibration and 3rd resonant mode of bending vibration was proposed in this paper, which can deliver higher output power compared to previous UEVC devices. Using finite element method (FEM), resonance frequencies of the longitudinal and bending vibrations were tuned to be as close as possible in order to excite these two vibrations using two-phase driving voltages at a single frequency, while wave nodes of the longitudinal and bending vibrations were also adjusted to be as coincident as possible for mounting the device at a single fixed point. Based on the simulation analysis results a prototype device was fabricated, then its vibration characteristics were evaluated by an impedance analyzer and a laser displacement sensor. With two-phase sinusoidal driving voltages both of 480 V(p-p) at an ultrasonic frequency of 20.1 kHz, the developed prototype device achieved an elliptical vibration with a longitudinal amplitude of 8.9 μm and a bending amplitude of 11.3 μm. The performance of the developed UEVC device is assessed by the cutting tests of hardened steel using single crystal diamond tools. Experimental results indicate that compared to ordinary cutting process, the tool wear is reduced significantly by using the proposed device. PMID:25769218

  8. Random Vibrations: Assessment of the State of the Art

    SciTech Connect

    Paez, T.L.

    1999-02-23

    Random vibration is the phenomenon wherein random excitation applied to a mechanical system induces random response. We summarize the state of the art in random vibration analysis and testing, commenting on history, linear and nonlinear analysis, the analysis of large-scale systems, and probabilistic structural testing.

  9. Fabrication of nano piezoelectric based vibration accelerometer for mechanical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, S.; Prasad, M. V. N.; Jayakumar, K.

    2016-05-01

    An electromechanical sensor unit has been fabricated using nano PZT embedded in PVDF polymer. Such a polymer nano composite has been used as vibration sensor element and sensitivity, detection of mechanical vibration, and linearity measurements have been investigated. It is found from its performance, that this nano composite sensor is suitable for mechanical sensing applications.

  10. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  11. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  12. RF discharge impedance measurements using a new method to determine the stray impedances

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, L.P.; Kroesen, G.M.W.; Hoog, F.J. de )

    1999-06-01

    The impedance of a capacitively coupled radio frequency discharge in a tubular fluorescent lamp filled with neon and mercury is measured. The stray impedances in the electrical network are determined using a new method that requires no extra instruments. The reflection of power is used to determine the stray impedances. Making use of a simple discharge impedance model, the electron density in the lamp is estimated.

  13. Motion and force controlled vibration testing. [of aerospace hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.; Boatman, David J.; Kern, Dennis L.

    1990-01-01

    A technique for controlling both the input acceleration and force in vibration tests is proposed to alleviate the overtesting risks and the problems associated with response limiting in conventional vibration tests of aerospace hardware. Previous research on impedance and force controlled vibration tests is reviewed and a simple equation governing the dual control of acceleration and force is derived. A practical method for implementing the dual control technique in random vibration tests has been demonstrated in JPL's environmental test facility using a conventional digital controller operating in the extremal mode. The dual control technique provides appropriate real-time notching of the input acceleration and a corresponding reduction of the test item response at resonances. Issues concerning the need for force and acceleration phase information, the adequacy of specifying the blocked force, and the derivation of the total force for multipoint supports are discussed.

  14. Low Dimensional Models of Shell Vibrations. Parametrically Excited Vibrations of Cylinder Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, A. A.; Thompson, J. M. T.; McRobie, F. A.

    1998-01-01

    Vibrations of cylindrical shells parametrically excited by axial forcing are considered. The governing system of two coupled non-linear partial differential equations is discretized by using Lagrange equations. The computation is simplified significantly by the application of computer algebra and as a result low dimensional models of shell vibrations are readily obtained. After applying numerical continuation techniques and ideas from dynamical systems theory, complete bifurcation diagrams are constructed. The principal aim is to investigate the interaction between different modes of shell vibration. Results for system models with two of the lowest modes are discussed.

  15. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 2; Advanced Treatment Impedance Models for High Frequency Ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.; Yu, J.; Kwan, H. W.

    1999-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to develop improved models for the acoustic impedance of treatment panels at high frequencies, for application to subscale treatment designs. Effects that cause significant deviation of the impedance from simple geometric scaling are examined in detail, an improved high-frequency impedance model is developed, and the improved model is correlated with high-frequency impedance measurements. Only single-degree-of-freedom honeycomb sandwich resonator panels with either perforated sheet or "linear" wiremesh faceplates are considered. The objective is to understand those effects that cause the simple single-degree-of- freedom resonator panels to deviate at the higher-scaled frequency from the impedance that would be obtained at the corresponding full-scale frequency. This will allow the subscale panel to be designed to achieve a specified impedance spectrum over at least a limited range of frequencies. An advanced impedance prediction model has been developed that accounts for some of the known effects at high frequency that have previously been ignored as a small source of error for full-scale frequency ranges.

  16. Far-infrared embedding impedance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neikirk, D. P.; Rutledge, D. B.

    1984-01-01

    A technique which allows the measurement of detector embedding impedance has been developed. By using a bismuth microbolometer as a variable resistance load the impedance of one element in a bow-tie antenna array operating at 94 GHz was inferred. The technique is frequency insensitive, and could be used throughout the far-infrared.

  17. How good is the impedance boundary condition?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Shung-Wu; Gee, W.

    1987-01-01

    The impedance boundary condition (IBC) is often used in scattering problems involving material-coated conducting bodies. It is shown that for some commonly encountered coating configurations, the value of the impedance varies significantly as functions of the incident angle and polarization. Hence, the use of IBC in a rigorously formulated problem may affect the accuracy of the final solution.

  18. FDTD modeling of thin impedance sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond J.; Kunz, Karl S.

    1991-01-01

    Thin sheets of resistive or dielectric material are commonly encountered in radar cross section calculations. Analysis of such sheets is simplified by using sheet impedances. In this paper it is shown that sheet impedances can be modeled easily and accurately using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) methods.

  19. Esophageal Impedance Monitoring: Clinical Pearls and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Karthik; Katzka, David A

    2016-09-01

    The development of intraluminal esophageal impedance monitoring has improved our ability to detect and measure gastroesophageal reflux without dependence on acid content. This ability to detect previously unrecognized weak or nonacid reflux episodes has had important clinical implications in the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In addition, with the ability to assess bolus transit within the esophageal lumen, impedance monitoring has enhanced the recognition and characterization of esophageal motility disorders in patients with nonobstructive dysphagia. The assessment of the intraluminal movement of gas and liquid has also been proven to be of diagnostic value in conditions such as rumination syndrome and excessive belching. Further, alternative applications of impedance monitoring, such as the measurement of mucosal impedance, have provided novel insights into assessing esophageal mucosal integrity changes as a consequence of inflammatory change. Future applications for esophageal impedance monitoring also hold promise in esophageal conditions other than GERD. However, despite all of the clinical benefits afforded by esophageal impedance monitoring, important clinical and technical shortcomings limit its diagnostic value and must be considered when interpreting study results. Overinterpretation of studies or application of impedance monitoring in patients can have deleterious clinical implications. This review will highlight the clinical benefits and limitations of esophageal impedance monitoring and provide clinical pearls and pitfalls associated with this technology. PMID:27325223

  20. Possibilities of electrical impedance tomography in gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    V, Trokhanova O.; A, Chijova Y.; B, Okhapkin M.; V, Korjenevsky A.; S, Tuykin T.

    2013-04-01

    The paper describes results of comprehensive EIT diagnostics of mammary glands and cervix. The data were obtained from examinations of 170 patients by EIT system MEM (multi-frequency electrical impedance mammograph) and EIT system GIT (gynecological impedance tomograph). Mutual dependence is discussed.

  1. Active impedance matching of complex structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macmartin, Douglas G.; Miller, David W.; Hall, Steven R.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on active impedance matching of complex structural systems are presented. Topics covered include: traveling wave model; dereverberated mobility model; computation of dereverberated mobility; control problem: optimal impedance matching; H2 optimal solution; statistical energy analysis (SEA) solution; experimental transfer functions; interferometer actuator and sensor locations; active strut configurations; power dual variables; dereverberation of complex structure; dereverberated transfer function; compensators; and relative power flow.

  2. Inhibiting multiple mode vibration in controlled flexible systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, James M.; Seering, Warren P.

    1991-01-01

    Prior research has led to the development of input command pre-shapers that can significantly reduce residual vibration. These shapers exhibit marked insensitivity to errors in natural frequency estimates and can be used to minimize vibration at more than one frequency. A method is outlined for the development of multiple mode input shapers. An examination is made of the results of shaper performance tests conducted on linear and non-linear computer models of MACE, an MIT/NASA experimental flexible structure.

  3. Impedance of finite length resistive cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krinsky, S.; Podobedov, B.; Gluckstern, R. L.

    2004-11-01

    We determine the impedance of a cylindrical metal tube (resistor) of radius a, length g, and conductivity σ attached at each end to perfect conductors of semi-infinite length. Our main interest is in the asymptotic behavior of the impedance at high frequency (k≫1/a). In the equilibrium regime, ka2≪g, the impedance per unit length is accurately described by the well-known result for an infinite length tube with conductivity σ. In the transient regime, ka2≫g, where the contribution of transition radiation arising from the discontinuity in conductivity is important, we derive an analytic expression for the impedance and compute the short-range wakefield. The analytic results are shown to agree with numerical evaluation of the impedance.

  4. Anti-vibration gloves?

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Sue; Dong, Ren G; Welcome, Daniel E; McDowell, Thomas W

    2015-03-01

    For exposure to hand-transmitted vibration (HTV), personal protective equipment is sold in the form of anti-vibration (AV) gloves, but it remains unclear how much these gloves actually reduce vibration exposure or prevent the development of hand-arm vibration syndrome in the workplace. This commentary describes some of the issues that surround the classification of AV gloves, the assessment of their effectiveness and their applicability in the workplace. The available information shows that AV gloves are unreliable as devices for controlling HTV exposures. Other means of vibration control, such as using alternative production techniques, low-vibration machinery, routine preventative maintenance regimes, and controlling exposure durations are far more likely to deliver effective vibration reductions and should be implemented. Furthermore, AV gloves may introduce some adverse effects such as increasing grip force and reducing manual dexterity. Therefore, one should balance the benefits of AV gloves and their potential adverse effects if their use is considered. PMID:25381184

  5. Electrical impedance tomography and the fast multipole method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikowski, Jutta; Mueller, Jennifer L.

    2004-10-01

    A 3-D linearization-based reconstruction algorithm for Electrical Impedance Tomography suitable for breast cancer detection using data collected on a rectangular array was introduced by Mueller et al. [IEEE Biomed. Eng., 46(11), 1999]. By considering the scenario as an electrostatic problem, it is possible to model the electrodes with various charges, facilitating the use of the Fast Multipole Method (FMM) for calculating particle interactions and also supporting the use of different electrode models. In this paper the use of FMM is explained and results in form of reconstructed images from experimental data show that this method is an improvement.

  6. Prediction of the acoustic impedance of duct liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, W. E.; Tester, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    Recent research which contributes to the prediction of the acoustic impedance of duct liners is reviewed. This review includes the linear and nonlinear properties of sheet and bulk type materials and methods for the measurement of these properties. It also includes the effect of grazing flow on the acoustic properties of materials. Methods for predicting the properties of single or multilayered, point reacting or extended reaction, and flat or curved liners are discussed. Based on this review, methods for predicting the properties of the duct liners which are typically used in aircraft engines are recommended. Some areas of needed research are discussed briefly.

  7. Design and performance evaluation of the NIST digital impedance bridge

    SciTech Connect

    Waltrip, B.C.; Oldham, N.M.

    1994-12-31

    An impedance bridge that compares two-terminal standard inductors to characterized resistors is described. A dual-channel digitally synthesized source and sampling digital multimeter are used to generate and measure relevant bridge signals. A linear interpolation algorithm is used to autocalibrate the bridge to a 1 nF air-dielectric capacitor An intercomparison of the new bridge with existing measurement standards in the low audio frequency range for inductors from 1 mH to 10 H will be reported.

  8. PREFACE: XV International Conference on Electrical Bio-Impedance (ICEBI) & XIV Conference on Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pliquett, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    . Structures down to sub-micrometer range and complex impedance measurements tools integrated at single chips are now affordable. Moreover, the introduction of alternative signals and data processing algorithms focuses on very fast and parallel electrical characterization which in turn pushes this technique to new applications and markets. Electrical impedance tomography today yields pictures in real time with a resolution that was impossible 10 years ago. The XVth International Conference on Electrical Bio-Impedance in conjunction with the XIVth Electrical Impedance Tomography ICEBI/EIT 2013 organized by the Institute for Bioprocessing and Analytical Measurement Techniques, Heilbad Heiligenstadt, Germany, together with the EIT-group at the University of Göttingen, Germany, brings world leading scientists in these fields together. It is a platform to present the latest developments in instrumentation and signal processing but also points to new applications, especially in the field of biosensors and non-linear phenomena. Two Keynote lectures will extend the view of the participants above the mainstream of bio-impedance measurement. Friederich Kremer (University of Leipzig) delivers the plenary lecture on broad bandwidth dielectric spectroscopy. New achievements in the research of ligand gated ionic channels will be presented by Klaus Benndorf (University of Jena). Leading scientists in the field of bio-impedance measurement, such as, Sverre Grimnes, Orjan Martinsen, Andrea Robitzki, Richard Bayford, Jan Gimsa and Mart Min will give lectures for students but also more experienced scientists in a pre-conference tutorial which is a good opportunity to learn or refresh the basics. List of committees Conference Chair Dr Uwe Pliquett Professor Dieter Beckmann Institut für Bioprozess- und Analysenmesstechnik eV, Rosenhof, Heilbad Heiligenstadt, Germany Technical Program Chair Maik Hiller Conventus Congressmanagement & Marketing GmbH, Carl-Pulfrich-Str. 1 - 07745 Jena Pre

  9. PREFACE: XV International Conference on Electrical Bio-Impedance (ICEBI) & XIV Conference on Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pliquett, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    . Structures down to sub-micrometer range and complex impedance measurements tools integrated at single chips are now affordable. Moreover, the introduction of alternative signals and data processing algorithms focuses on very fast and parallel electrical characterization which in turn pushes this technique to new applications and markets. Electrical impedance tomography today yields pictures in real time with a resolution that was impossible 10 years ago. The XVth International Conference on Electrical Bio-Impedance in conjunction with the XIVth Electrical Impedance Tomography ICEBI/EIT 2013 organized by the Institute for Bioprocessing and Analytical Measurement Techniques, Heilbad Heiligenstadt, Germany, together with the EIT-group at the University of Göttingen, Germany, brings world leading scientists in these fields together. It is a platform to present the latest developments in instrumentation and signal processing but also points to new applications, especially in the field of biosensors and non-linear phenomena. Two Keynote lectures will extend the view of the participants above the mainstream of bio-impedance measurement. Friederich Kremer (University of Leipzig) delivers the plenary lecture on broad bandwidth dielectric spectroscopy. New achievements in the research of ligand gated ionic channels will be presented by Klaus Benndorf (University of Jena). Leading scientists in the field of bio-impedance measurement, such as, Sverre Grimnes, Orjan Martinsen, Andrea Robitzki, Richard Bayford, Jan Gimsa and Mart Min will give lectures for students but also more experienced scientists in a pre-conference tutorial which is a good opportunity to learn or refresh the basics. List of committees Conference Chair Dr Uwe Pliquett Professor Dieter Beckmann Institut für Bioprozess- und Analysenmesstechnik eV, Rosenhof, Heilbad Heiligenstadt, Germany Technical Program Chair Maik Hiller Conventus Congressmanagement & Marketing GmbH, Carl-Pulfrich-Str. 1 - 07745 Jena Pre

  10. Rotor vibration caused by external excitation and rub

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsushita, O.; Takagi, M.; Kikuchi, K.; Kaga, M.

    1982-01-01

    For turbomachinery with low natural frequencies, considerations have been recently required for rotor vibrations caused by external forces except unbalance one, such as foundation motion, seismic wave, rub and so forth. Such a forced vibration is investigated analytically and experimentally in the present paper. Vibrations in a rotor-bearing system under a harmonic excitation are analyzed by the modal technique in the case of a linear system including gyroscopic effect. For a nonlinear system a new and powerful quasi-modal technique is developed and applied to the vibration caused by rub.

  11. Comparison of a Convected Helmholtz and Euler Model for Impedance Eduction in Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    2006-01-01

    Impedances educed from a well-tested convected Helmholtz model are compared to that of a recently developed linearized Euler model using two ceramic test liners under the assumed conditions or uniform flow and a plane wave source. The convected Helmholtz model is restricted to uniform mean flow whereas the linearized Euler model can account for the effect or the shear layer. Test data to educe the impedance is acquired from measurements obtained in the NASA Langley Research Center Grazing Incidence Tube for mean flow Mach numbers ranging from 0.0 to 0.5 and source frequencies ranging from 0.5 kHz to 3.0 kHz. The unknown impedance of the liner b educed by judiciously chooingth e impedance via an optimization method to match the measured acoustic pressure on the wall opposite the test liner. Results are presented on four spatial grids using three different optimization methods (contour deformation, Davidon-Fletcher Powell, and the Genetic Algorithm). All three optimization methods converge to the same impedance when used with the same model and to nearly identical impedances when used on different models. h anomaly was observed only at 0.5 kHz for high mean flow speeds. The anomaly is likely due to the use of measured data in a flow regime where shear layer effects are important but are neglected in the math models. Consistency between the impedances educed using the two models provides confidence that the linearized Euler model is ready For application to more realistic flows, such as those containing shear layers.

  12. Vibration and noise analysis of a gear transmission system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Qian, W.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Oswald, F. B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive procedure to predict both the vibration and noise generated by a gear transmission system under normal operating conditions. The gearbox vibrations were obtained from both numerical simulation and experimental studies using a gear noise test rig. In addition, the noise generated by the gearbox vibrations was recorded during the experimental testing. A numerical method was used to develop linear relationships between the gearbox vibration and the generated noise. The hypercoherence function is introduced to correlate the nonlinear relationship between the fundamental noise frequency and its harmonics. A numerical procedure was developed using both the linear and nonlinear relationships generated from the experimental data to predict noise resulting from the gearbox vibrations. The application of this methodology is demonstrated by comparing the numerical and experimental results from the gear noise test rig.

  13. Vibration damage mechanism analysis on rotor of diesel generating set with rigid coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bing; Shi, Weizhen; Hua, Chunrong; Liu, Jingming; Dong, Dawei; Chen, Jun

    2015-07-01

    The crankshaft output end is generally connected with generator rotor through the coupling in diesel generating set. When using rigid coupling, the attachments and connecting parts of generator rotor (especially at larger gyration radius) are vulnerable to fatigue damage even if the vibration level of the generating set does not exceed the acceptable “usual value”. In order to investigate the reasons, the torsional vibration of the rotor in the diesel generating set was calculated and measured in this paper, which shows that using high rigidity coupling would result in large torsional vibration on the generator rotor, and that the linear vibration (the tangential vibration) value induced by torsional vibration at larger gyration radius of generator motor is almost the same as the vibration level of the generating set. Then, the vibration level of generating set was obtained, and the maximum vibration velocities of the generator are below the permissible value regulated by ISO 8528-9. But the velocities of synthetic vibration of the generating set vibration and the linear vibration induced by torsional vibration at larger gyration radius are much higher than permissible value 2(28mm/s) regulated by ISO 8528-9, which may be the reason of the mechanical damage of the attachments and connecting parts at larger gyration radius of generator motor caused by exceeded vibration.

  14. Rotor damage detection by using piezoelectric impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Y.; Tao, Y.; Mao, Y. F.

    2016-04-01

    Rotor is a core component of rotary machinery. Once the rotor has the damage, it may lead to a major accident. Thus the quantitative rotor damage detection method based on piezoelectric impedance is studied in this paper. With the governing equation of piezoelectric transducer (PZT) in a cylindrical coordinate, the displacement along the radius direction is derived. The charge of PZT is calculated by the electric displacement. Then, by the use of the obtained displacement and charge, an analytic piezoelectric impedance model of the rotor is built. Given the circular boundary condition of a rotor, annular elements are used as the analyzed objects and spectral element method is used to set up the damage detection model. The Electro-Mechanical (E/M) coupled impedance expression of an undamaged rotor is deduced with the application of a low-cost impedance test circuit. A Taylor expansion method is used to obtain the approximate E/M coupled impedance expression for the damaged rotor. After obtaining the difference between the undamaged and damaged rotor impedance, a rotor damage detection method is proposed. This method can directly calculate the change of bending stiffness of the structural elements, it follows that the rotor damage can be effectively detected. Finally, a preset damage configuration is used for the numerical simulation. The result shows that the quantitative damage detection algorithm based on spectral element method and piezoelectric impedance proposed in this paper can identify the location and the severity of the damaged rotor accurately.

  15. Tracking of electrochemical impedance of batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piret, H.; Granjon, P.; Guillet, N.; Cattin, V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an evolutionary battery impedance estimation method, which can be easily embedded in vehicles or nomad devices. The proposed method not only allows an accurate frequency impedance estimation, but also a tracking of its temporal evolution contrary to classical electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods. Taking into account constraints of cost and complexity, we propose to use the existing electronics of current control to perform a frequency evolutionary estimation of the electrochemical impedance. The developed method uses a simple wideband input signal, and relies on a recursive local average of Fourier transforms. The averaging is controlled by a single parameter, managing a trade-off between tracking and estimation performance. This normalized parameter allows to correctly adapt the behavior of the proposed estimator to the variations of the impedance. The advantage of the proposed method is twofold: the method is easy to embed into a simple electronic circuit, and the battery impedance estimator is evolutionary. The ability of the method to monitor the impedance over time is demonstrated on a simulator, and on a real Lithium ion battery, on which a repeatability study is carried out. The experiments reveal good tracking results, and estimation performance as accurate as the usual laboratory approaches.

  16. Estimates of Acausal Joint Impedance Models

    PubMed Central

    Perreault, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Estimates of joint or limb impedance are commonly used in the study of how the nervous system controls posture and movement, and how that control is altered by injury to the neural or musculoskeletal systems. Impedance characterizes the dynamic relationship between an imposed perturbation of joint position and the torques generated in response. While there are many practical reasons for estimating impedance rather than its inverse, admittance, it is an acausal representation of the limb mechanics that can lead to difficulties in interpretation or use. The purpose of this study was to explore the acausal nature of nonparametric estimates of joint impedance representations to determine how they are influenced by common experimental and computational choices. This was accomplished by deriving discrete-time realizations of first-and second-order derivatives to illustrate two key difficulties in the physical interpretation of impedance impulse response functions. These illustrations were provided using both simulated and experimental data. It was found that the shape of the impedance impulse response depends critically on the selected sampling rate, and on the bandwidth and noise characteristics of the position perturbation used during the estimation process. These results provide important guidelines for designing experiments in which nonparametric estimates of impedance will be obtained, especially when those estimates are to be used in a multistep identification process. PMID:22907963

  17. Estimates of acausal joint impedance models.

    PubMed

    Westwick, David T; Perreault, Eric J

    2012-10-01

    Estimates of joint or limb impedance are commonly used in the study of how the nervous system controls posture and movement, and how that control is altered by injury to the neural or musculoskeletal systems. Impedance characterizes the dynamic relationship between an imposed perturbation of joint position and the torques generated in response. While there are many practical reasons for estimating impedance rather than its inverse, admittance, it is an acausal representation of the limb mechanics that can lead to difficulties in interpretation or use. The purpose of this study was to explore the acausal nature of nonparametric estimates of joint impedance representations to determine how they are influenced by common experimental and computational choices. This was accomplished by deriving discrete-time realizations of first- and second-order derivatives to illustrate two key difficulties in the physical interpretation of impedance impulse response functions. These illustrations were provided using both simulated and experimental data. It was found that the shape of the impedance impulse response depends critically on the selected sampling rate, and on the bandwidth and noise characteristics of the position perturbation used during the estimation process. These results provide important guidelines for designing experiments in which nonparametric estimates of impedance will be obtained, especially when those estimates are to be used in a multistep identification process. PMID:22907963

  18. Measurements of electrical impedance of biomedical objects.

    PubMed

    Frączek, Marcin; Kręcicki, Tomasz; Moron, Zbigniew; Krzywaźnia, Adam; Ociepka, Janusz; Rucki, Zbigniew; Szczepanik, Zdzisław

    2016-01-01

    Some basic problems related to measurements of electrical impedance of biological objects (bioimpedance) have been presented in this paper. Particularly problems arising from impedance occurring at the sensor-tissue interface (interfacial impedances) in contact measuring methods have been discussed. The influence of finite values of impedances of the current source and voltage measuring device has also been taken into consideration. A model of the impedance sensor for the four-electrode measurement method containing the interfacial, source and measuring device impedances has been given and its frequency characteristics obtained by the computer simulation have been presented. The influence of these impedances on the shape of frequency characteristic of the sensor model has been discussed. Measurements of bioimpedance of healthy and anomalous soft tissues have been described. Some experimental results, particularly the frequency characteristics of bioimpedance, have been shown. The presented results of measurement show that bioimpedance can be a valuable source of information about the tissues, so measurement of bioimpedance can be a useful supplement to other medical diagnostic methods. PMID:27151250

  19. Design of a non-traditional dynamic vibration absorber.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Y L; Wong, W O

    2009-08-01

    A non-traditional dynamic vibration absorber is proposed for the minimization of maximum vibration velocity response of a vibrating structure. Unlike the traditional damped absorber configuration, the proposed absorber has a linear viscous damper connecting the absorber mass directly to the ground instead of the main mass. Optimum parameters of the proposed absorber are derived based on the fixed-point theory for minimizing the maximum vibration velocity response of a single-degree-of-freedom system under harmonic excitation. The extent of reduction in maximum vibration velocity response of the primary system when using the traditional dynamic absorber is compared with that using the proposed one. Under the optimum tuning condition of the absorbers, it is proved analytically that the proposed absorber provides a greater reduction in maximum vibration velocity response of the primary system than the traditional absorber. PMID:19640019

  20. Linear Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walkiewicz, T. A.; Newby, N. D., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A discussion of linear collisions between two or three objects is related to a junior-level course in analytical mechanics. The theoretical discussion uses a geometrical approach that treats elastic and inelastic collisions from a unified point of view. Experiments with a linear air track are described. (Author/TS)

  1. Summary of the impedance working group

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.

    1995-05-01

    The impedance working group concentrated on the LHC design during the workshop. They look at the impedance contributions of liner, beam position monitors, shielded bellows, experimental chambers, superconducting cavities, recombination chambers, space charge, kickers, and the resistive wall. The group concluded that the impedance budgeting and the conceptual designs of the vacuum chamber components looked basically sound. It also noted, not surprisingly, that a large amount of studies are to be carried out further, and it ventured to give a partial list of these studies.

  2. FDTD modeling of thin impedance sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond; Kunz, Karl

    1991-01-01

    Thin sheets of resistive or dielectric material are commonly encountered in radar cross section calculations. Analysis of such sheets is simplified by using sheet impedances. It is shown that sheet impedances can be modeled easily and accurately using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) methods. These sheets are characterized by a discontinuity in the tangential magnetic field on either side of the sheet but no discontinuity in tangential electric field. This continuity, or single valued behavior of the electric field, allows the sheet current to be expressed in terms of an impedance multiplying this electric field.

  3. Koch fractal boundary patch over reactive impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy V, Venkateshwar; Sarma, N. V. S. N.

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes the enhancement of bandwidth and miniaturization for patch antennas. Introduction of fractal structure (Square Koch) over reactive impedance surface (RIS) is used to enhance impedance bandwidth while minimizing the patch size. Comparison has been made with those of a single-layer (sub1) antenna and the corresponding dual-layer (RIS) antenna. Approximately double the impedance bandwidth is achieved with the proposed RIS Square Koch antenna 1 when compared with Square Koch antenna 1without RIS. There is a 55 % reduction in the patch size. The simulated results indicate that the presented antennas provide gain of about 2.5dBi over the entire band of frequencies.

  4. RHIC ABORT KICKER WITH REDUCED COUPLING IMPEDANCE.

    SciTech Connect

    HAHN,H.; DAVINO,D.

    2002-06-02

    Kicker magnets typically represent the most important contributors to the transverse impedance budget of accelerators and storage rings. Methods of reducing the impedance value of the SNS extraction kicker presently under construction and, in view of a future performance upgrade, that of the RHIC abort kicker have been thoroughly studied at this laboratory. In this paper, the investigation of a potential improvement from using ferrite different from the BNL standard CMD5005 is reported. Permeability measurements of several ferrite types have been performed. Measurements on two kicker magnets using CMD5005 and C2050 suggest that the impedance of a magnet without external resistive damping, such as the RHIC abort kicker, would benefit.

  5. Prediction of Ground Vibration from Freight Trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. J. C.; Block, J. R.

    1996-05-01

    Heavy freight trains emit ground vibration with predominant frequency components in the range 4-30 Hz. If the amplitude is sufficient, this may be felt by lineside residents, giving rise to disturbance and concern over possible damage to their property. In order to establish the influence of parameters of the track and rolling stock and thereby enable the design of a low vibration railway, a theoretical model of both the generation and propagation of vibration is required. The vibration is generated as a combination of the effects of dynamic forces, due to the unevenness of the track, and the effects of the track deformation under successive axle loads. A prediction scheme, which combines these effects, has been produced. A vehicle model is used to predict the dynamic forces at the wheels. This includes the non-linear effects of friction damped suspensions. The loaded track profile is measured by using a track recording coach. The dynamic loading and the effects of the moving axles are combined in a track response model. The predicted track vibration is compared to measurements. The transfer functions from the track to a point in the ground can be calculated by using a coupled track and a three-dimensional layered ground model. The propagation effects of the ground layers are important but the computation of the transfer function from each sleeper, which would be required for a phase coherent summation of the vibration in the ground, would be prohibitive. A compromise summation is used and results are compared with measurements.

  6. Vibration balanced miniature loudspeaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, David E.; Jiles, Mekell; Miller, Thomas E.; Thompson, Stephen C.

    2002-11-01

    The vibration that is generated by the receiver (loudspeaker) in a hearing aid can be a cause of feedback oscillation. Oscillation can occur if the microphone senses the receiver vibration at sufficient amplitude and appropriate phase. Feedback oscillation from this and other causes is a major problem for those who manufacture, prescribe, and use hearing aids. The receivers normally used in hearing aids are of the balanced armature-type that has a significant moving mass. The reaction force from this moving mass is the source of the vibration. A modification of the balanced armature transducer has been developed that balances the vibration of its internal parts in a way that significantly reduces the vibration force transmitted outside of the receiver case. This transducer design concept, and some of its early prototype test data will be shown. The data indicate that it should be possible to manufacture transducers that generate less vibration than equivalent present models by 15-30 dB.

  7. Quantum Monte Carlo for vibrating molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.R. |

    1996-08-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) has successfully computed the total electronic energies of atoms and molecules. The main goal of this work is to use correlation function quantum Monte Carlo (CFQMC) to compute the vibrational state energies of molecules given a potential energy surface (PES). In CFQMC, an ensemble of random walkers simulate the diffusion and branching processes of the imaginary-time time dependent Schroedinger equation in order to evaluate the matrix elements. The program QMCVIB was written to perform multi-state VMC and CFQMC calculations and employed for several calculations of the H{sub 2}O and C{sub 3} vibrational states, using 7 PES`s, 3 trial wavefunction forms, two methods of non-linear basis function parameter optimization, and on both serial and parallel computers. In order to construct accurate trial wavefunctions different wavefunctions forms were required for H{sub 2}O and C{sub 3}. In order to construct accurate trial wavefunctions for C{sub 3}, the non-linear parameters were optimized with respect to the sum of the energies of several low-lying vibrational states. In order to stabilize the statistical error estimates for C{sub 3} the Monte Carlo data was collected into blocks. Accurate vibrational state energies were computed using both serial and parallel QMCVIB programs. Comparison of vibrational state energies computed from the three C{sub 3} PES`s suggested that a non-linear equilibrium geometry PES is the most accurate and that discrete potential representations may be used to conveniently determine vibrational state energies.

  8. Granular metamaterials for vibration mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantzounis, G.; Serra-Garcia, M.; Homma, K.; Mendoza, J. M.; Daraio, C.

    2013-09-01

    Acoustic metamaterials that allow low-frequency band gaps are interesting for many practical engineering applications, where vibration control and sound insulation are necessary. In most prior studies, the mechanical response of these structures has been described using linear continuum approximations. In this work, we experimentally and theoretically address the formation of low-frequency band gaps in locally resonant granular crystals, where the dynamics of the system is governed by discrete equations. We investigate the quasi-linear behavior of such structures. The analysis shows that a stopband can be introduced at about one octave lower frequency than in materials without local resonances. Broadband and multi-frequency stopband characteristics can also be achieved by strategically tailoring the non-uniform local resonance parameters.

  9. A Study of Vibration Control Systems for Superconducting Maglev Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Ken; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Erimitsu; Tohtake, Takayuki; Nagai, Masao

    To enhance ride comfort in the superconducting magnetically levitated transport (Maglev) system, vibrations were reduced by controlling the secondary suspension between the car body and bogie. To reduce vibrations at the relatively high characteristic frequencies of the primary suspension, attention has been directed toward control using damping forces output by a linear generator system integrated into a bogie for on-board power. Because this control can apply damping directly to the primary suspension, it is considered optimal in reducing high-frequency vibrations. Using a Maglev model focusing on vertical motions, this work describes the effectiveness of reducing vibrations using damping force control of the linear generator system for primary suspension and linear quadratic (LQ) control in the actuators for secondary suspension.

  10. Vibrating fuel grapple. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Chertock, A.J.; Fox, J.N.; Weissinger, R.B.

    A reactor refueling method is described which utilizes a vibrating fuel grapple for removing spent fuel assemblies from a reactor core. It incorporates a pneumatic vibrator in the grapple head which allows additional withdrawal capability without exceeding the allowable axial force limit. The only moving part in the vibrator is a steel ball, pneumatically driven by a gas, such as argon, around a track, with centrifugal force created by the ball being transmitted through the grapple to the assembly handling socket.

  11. Vibrating fuel grapple

    DOEpatents

    Chertock, deceased, Alan J.; Fox, Jack N.; Weissinger, Robert B.

    1982-01-01

    A reactor refueling method utilizing a vibrating fuel grapple for removing spent fuel assemblies from a reactor core which incorporates a pneumatic vibrator in the grapple head, enabling additional withdrawal capability without exceeding the allowable axial force limit. The only moving part in the vibrator is a steel ball, pneumatically driven by a gas, such as argon, around a track, with centrifugal force created by the ball being transmitted through the grapple to the assembly handling socket.

  12. Silicon Vibrating Wires at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin, Eddy; Filleau, Laure; Fournier, Thierry; Bunkov, Yuriy M.; Godfrin, Henri

    2008-03-01

    Nowadays microfabrication techniques originating from micro-electro nics enable to create mechanical objects of micron-size. The field of Micro-Electro-Mechanical devices (MEMs) is continuously expanding, with an amazingly broad range of applications at room temperature. Vibrating objects (torsional oscillators, vibrating wires) widely used at low temperatures to study quantum fluids, can be replaced advantageously by Silicon MEMs. In this letter we report on the study of Silicon vibrating wire devices. A goal-post structure covered with a metal layer is driven at resonance by the Laplace force acting on a current in a magnetic field, while the induced voltage arising from the cut magnetic flux allows to detect the motion. The characteristics of the resonance have been studied from 10 mK to 30 K, in vacuum and in 4He gas. In this article, we focus on the results obtained above 1.5 K, in vacuum and gas, and introduce some features observed at lower temperatures. The resonant properties can be quantitatively understood by means of simple models, from the linear regime to a highly non-linear response at strong drives. We demonstrate that the non-linearity is mostly due to the geometry of the vibrators. We also show that in our device the friction mechanisms originate in the metallic layers, and can be fully characterized. The interaction with 4He gas is fit to theory without adjustable parameters.

  13. Spatial feature tracking impedence sensor using multiple electric fields

    DOEpatents

    Novak, J.L.

    1998-08-11

    Linear and other features on a workpiece are tracked by measuring the fields generated between electrodes arrayed in pairs. One electrode in each pair operates as a transmitter and the other as a receiver, and both electrodes in a pair are arrayed on a carrier. By combining and subtracting fields between electrodes in one pair and between a transmitting electrode in one pair and a receiving electrode in another pair, information describing the location and orientation of the sensor relative to the workpiece in up to six degrees of freedom may be obtained. Typical applications will measure capacitance, but other impedance components may be measured as well. The sensor is designed to track a linear feature axis or a protrusion or pocket in a workpiece. Seams and ridges can be tracked by this non-contact sensor. The sensor output is useful for robotic applications. 10 figs.

  14. Spatial feature tracking impedence sensor using multiple electric fields

    DOEpatents

    Novak, James L.

    1998-01-01

    Linear and other features on a workpiece are tracked by measuring the fields generated between electrodes arrayed in pairs. One electrode in each pair operates as a transmitter and the other as a receiver, and both electrodes in a pair are arrayed on a carrier. By combining and subtracting fields between electrodes in one pair and between a transmitting electrode in one pair and a receiving electrode in another pair, information describing the location and orientation of the sensor relative to the workpiece in up to six degrees of freedom may be obtained. Typical applications will measure capacitance, but other impedance components may be measured as well. The sensor is designed to track a linear feature axis or a protrusion or pocket in a workpiece. Seams and ridges can be tracked by this non-contact sensor. The sensor output is useful for robotic applications.

  15. Adaptive vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Sam; Ward, John; Davidson, Josh

    2007-04-01

    By scavenging energy from their local environment, portable electronic devices such as mobile phones, radios and wireless sensors can achieve greater run-times with potentially lower weight. Vibration energy harvesting is one such approach where energy from parasitic vibrations can be converted into electrical energy, through the use of piezoelectric and electromagnetic transducers. Parasitic vibrations come from a range of sources such as wind, seismic forces and traffic. Existing approaches to vibration energy harvesting typically utilise a rectifier circuit, which is tuned to the resonant frequency of the harvesting structure and the dominant frequency of vibration. We have developed a novel approach to vibration energy harvesting, including adaption to non-periodic vibrations so as to extract the maximum amount of vibration energy available. Experimental results of an experimental apparatus using off-the-shelf transducer (i.e. speaker coil) show mechanical vibration to electrical energy conversion efficiencies of 27 - 34%. However, simulations of a more electro-mechanical efficient and lightly damped transducer show conversion efficiencies in excess of 80%.

  16. Enhanced vibration energy harvesting using nonlinear oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Emily; Wei, Jiaying; Lee, Christopher L.

    2015-05-01

    Results for the design and testing of an electromagnetic device that converts ambient mechanical vibration into electricity are presented. The design of the device is based on an L-shaped beam structure which is tuned so that the first two natural frequencies have a near two-to-one ratio which is referred to as an internal resonance or autoparametic condition. It is shown that in contrast to single degree-of-freedom, linear-dynamics-based vibration harvesters which convert energy in a very narrow frequency band the prototype can generate power over an extended frequency range when subject to harmonic, base displacement excitation.

  17. Propagation of sound through the Earth's atmosphere. 1: Measurement of sound absorption in the air: 2: Measurement of ground impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meredith, R. W.; Becher, J.

    1981-01-01

    Parts were fabricated for the acoustic ground impedance meter and the instrument was tested. A rubber hose was used to connect the resonator neck to the chamber in order to suppress vibration from the volume velocity source which caused chatter. An analog to digital converter was successfully hardwired to the computer detection system. The cooling system for the resonant tube was modified to use liquid nitrogen cooling. This produced the required temperature for the tube, but the temperature gradients within each of the four tube sections reached unacceptable levels. Final measurements of the deexcitation of nitrogen by water vapor indicate that the responsible physical process is not the direct vibration-translation energy transfer, but is a vibration-vibration energy transfer.

  18. Mutual impedance computation between printed dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexopoulos, N. G.; Rana, I. E.

    1981-01-01

    The mutual impedance between microstrip dipoles printed on a grounded substrate is computed. Results for the microstrip dipoles in broadside, collinear, and echelon arrangements are presented. The significance of surface wave to mutual coupling is discussed.

  19. Antenna pattern control using impedance surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Liu, Kefeng; Tirkas, Panayiotis A.

    1993-01-01

    During the period of this research project, a comprehensive study of pyramidal horn antennas was conducted. Full-wave analytical and numerical techniques were developed to analyze horn antennas with or without impedance surfaces. Based on these full-wave analytic techniques, research was conducted on the use of impedance surfaces on the walls of the horn antennas to control the antenna radiation patterns without a substantial loss of antenna gain. It was found that the use of impedance surfaces could modify the antenna radiation patterns. In addition to the analytical and numerical models, experimental models were also constructed and they were used to validate the predictions. Excellent agreement between theoretical predictions and the measured data was obtained for pyramidal horns with perfectly conducting surfaces. Very good comparisons between numerical and experimental models were also obtained for horns with impedance surfaces.

  20. Acoustic input impedance measurements on brass instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, Robert W., Jr.

    2002-11-01

    Measurement of the acoustic input impedance of a brass instrument can reveal something about the instrument's intonation, its reasonable playing range, its tone color, and perhaps whether the mouthpiece used for the impedance measurement is appropriate for the instrument. Such measurements are made at sound-presssure levels much lower than those encountered under playing conditions. Thus, impedance measurements may offer the only feasible way to infer something about the playing characteristics of instruments, typically museum specimens, that are too rare or too fragile to be played. In this paper the effects of some of the available choices of sound source and stimulus signal on measurement accuracy will be explored. Driver-transducer nonlinearity, source impedance, signal-to-noise ratio, and any necessary signal processing will be discussed.

  1. Impedance feedback control for scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Alpuche-Aviles, M A; Wipf, D O

    2001-10-15

    A new constant-distance imaging method based on the relationship between tip impedance and tip-substrate separation has been developed for the scanning electrochemical microscope. The tip impedance is monitored by application of a high-frequency ac voltage bias between the tip and auxiliary electrode. The high-frequency ac current is easily separated from the dc-level faradaic electrochemistry with a simple RC filter, which allows impedance measurements during feedback or generation/collection experiments. By employing a piezo-based feedback controller, we are able to maintain the impedance at a constant value and, thus, maintain a constant tip-substrate separation. Application of the method to feedback and generation/collection experiments with tip electrodes as small as 2 microm is presented. PMID:11681463

  2. Optimal design of a snubbed vibration isolator for vibration sensitive electrooptic payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veprik, Alexander; Djerassy, Shlomo; Babitsky, Vladimir

    2008-04-01

    Low frequency vibration isolation of airborne gyrostabilised electrooptic payloads is an ultimate and life proven solution aimed at improving their imagery performance primarily during relatively quiet cruise flight. This portion of airborne mission is characterised by rather moderate environmental conditions, under which the vibration mounts operate mostly in a linear working range within the predefined working rattle space thus delivering their best performance. Compliant snubbers are the indispensable emergency components in such vibration protection arrangements coming into play during exposure to environmental extremes typical for the relatively short periods of the airborne mission such as take-off, landing, weapon application, etc. Their primarily objective is to safely protect the above soft vibration mounts from bottoming and disintegration without developing ruining impulsive accelerations compromising the integrity of the payload frame and the internal fragile components mounted upon it. The optimal approach to designing such a snubbed vibration isolator delivering a fail-safe environment for both payload frame and critical components subject to the tight constraints imposed on size, weight and price does not seem to exist. It is the author's intention to devise such an optimal design approach and to demonstrate its application to low frequency vibration mounted electro-optic payload comprising the vibration sensitive Integrated Dewar-Detector-Cooler Assembly.

  3. Inversion of elastic impedance for unconsolidated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2006-01-01

    Elastic properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are important for quantifying gas hydrate amounts as well as discriminating the gas hydrate effect on velocity from free gas or pore pressure. This paper presents an elastic inversion method for estimating elastic properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments from angle stacks using sequential inversion of P-wave impedance from the zero-offset stack and S-wave impedance from the far-offset stack without assuming velocity ratio.

  4. CSR Impedance for Non-Ultrarelativistic Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Rui; Tsai, Cheng Y.

    2015-09-01

    For the analysis of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR)-induced microbunching gain in the low energy regime, such as when a high-brightness electron beam is transported through a low-energy merger in an energy-recovery linac (ERL) design, it is necessary to extend the CSR impedance expression in the ultrarelativistic limit to the non-ultrarelativistic regime. This paper presents our analysis of CSR impedance for general beam energies.

  5. Wave impedance of an atomically thin crystal.

    PubMed

    Merano, Michele

    2015-11-30

    I propose an expression for the electromagnetic wave impedance of a two-dimensional atomic crystal, and I deduce the Fresnel coefficients in terms of this quantity. It is widely known that a two-dimensional crystal can absorb light, if its conductivity is different from zero. It is less emphasized that they can also store a certain amount of electromagnetic energy. The concept of impedance is useful to quantify this point. PMID:26698783

  6. On Ultrafast Time-Domain TeraHertz Spectroscopy in the Condensed Phase: Linear Spectroscopic Measurements of Hydrogen-Bond Dynamics of Astrochemical Ice Analogs and Nonlinear TeraHertz Kerr Effect Measurements of Vibrational Quantum Beats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allodi, Marco A.

    . We tentatively observe a new feature in both amorphous solid water and crystalline water at 33 wavenumbers (1 THz). In addition, our studies of mixed and layered ices show how it is possible to identify the location of carbon dioxide as it segregates within the ice by observing its effect on the THz spectrum of water ice. The THz spectra of mixed and layered ices are further analyzed by fitting their spectra features to those of pure amorphous solid water and crystalline water ice to quantify the effects of temperature changes on structure. From the results of this work, it appears that THz spectroscopy is potentially well suited to study thermal transformations within the ice. To advance the study of liquids with THz spectroscopy, we developed a new ultrafast nonlinear THz spectroscopic technique: heterodyne-detected, ultrafast THz Kerr effect (TKE) spectroscopy. We implemented a heterodyne-detection scheme into a TKE spectrometer that uses a stilbazoium-based THz emitter, 4-N,N-dimethylamino-4-N-methyl-stilbazolium 2,4,6-trimethylbenzenesulfonate (DSTMS), and high numerical aperture optics which generates THz electric field in excess of 300 kV/cm, in the sample. This allows us to report the first measurement of quantum beats at terahertz (THz) frequencies that result from vibrational coherences initiated by the nonlinear, dipolar interaction of a broadband, high-energy, (sub)picosecond THz pulse with the sample. Our instrument improves on both the frequency coverage, and sensitivity previously reported; it also ensures a backgroundless measurement of the THz Kerr effect in pure liquids. For liquid diiodomethane, we observe a quantum beat at 3.66 THz (122 wavenumbers), in exact agreement with the fundamental transition frequency of the lowest energy vibration of the molecule. This result provides new insight into dipolar vs. Raman selection rules at terahertz frequencies. To conclude we discuss future directions for the nonlinear THz spectroscopy in the Blake lab

  7. Scattering from coated structures and antenna pattern control using impedance surfaces, part A/B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Polka, Lesley A.; Liu, Kefeng

    1990-01-01

    The scattering from coated, conducting structures, specifically the coated dihedral corner reflector configuration and the coated strip/plate configuration is examined. The formulation uses impedance-wedge Uniform Theory of Diffraction scattering coefficients to calculate the diffracted fields. A finite-thickness coating is approximated using the impedance boundary condition to arrive at an equivalent impedance for the coating. The formulation of the impedance wedge coefficients is outlined. Far-field, perfectly conducting approximations are discussed. Problems with the present dihedral corner reflector model for certain angles of incidence and observation are discussed along with a potentially rectifying modification. Also, the capacity to measure the electromagnetic properties of lossy materials was developed. The effects of using multiple material coatings on the radiation pattern of the horn antenna were studied. Numerous computations were devoted toward the inverse problem of synthesizing desired radiation patterns using the impedance surfaces. Stabilizing the equivalent sheet impedance using the linear control condition was attempted, and it was found to be a very difficult task.

  8. Acoustic impedance microscopy for biological tissue characterization.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yoshida, Sachiko; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Hozumi, Naohiro

    2014-09-01

    A new method for two-dimensional acoustic impedance imaging for biological tissue characterization with micro-scale resolution was proposed. A biological tissue was placed on a plastic substrate with a thickness of 0.5mm. A focused acoustic pulse with a wide frequency band was irradiated from the "rear side" of the substrate. In order to generate the acoustic wave, an electric pulse with two nanoseconds in width was applied to a PVDF-TrFE type transducer. The component of echo intensity at an appropriate frequency was extracted from the signal received at the same transducer, by performing a time-frequency domain analysis. The spectrum intensity was interpreted into local acoustic impedance of the target tissue. The acoustic impedance of the substrate was carefully assessed prior to the measurement, since it strongly affects the echo intensity. In addition, a calibration was performed using a reference material of which acoustic impedance was known. The reference material was attached on the same substrate at different position in the field of view. An acoustic impedance microscopy with 200×200 pixels, its typical field of view being 2×2 mm, was obtained by scanning the transducer. The development of parallel fiber in cerebella cultures was clearly observed as the contrast in acoustic impedance, without staining the specimen. The technique is believed to be a powerful tool for biological tissue characterization, as no staining nor slicing is required. PMID:24852259

  9. Modeling magnetically insulated devices using flow impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, C.W. Jr.; Rosenthal, S.E. )

    1995-04-01

    In modern pulsed power systems the electric field stresses at metal surfaces in vacuum transmission lines are so high that negative surfaces are space-charge-limited electron emitters. These electrons do not cause unacceptable losses because magnetic fields due to system currents result in net motion parallel to the electrodes. It has been known for several years that a parameter known as flow impedance is useful for describing these flows. Flow impedance is a measure of the separation between the anode and the mean position of the electron cloud, and it will be shown in this paper that in many situations flow impedance depends upon the geometry of the transmission line upstream of the point of interest. It can be remarkably independent of other considerations such as line currents and voltage. For this reason flow impedance is a valuable design parameter. Models of impedance transitions and voltage adders using flow impedance will be developed. Results of these models will be compared to two-dimensional, time-dependent, particle-in-cell simulations.

  10. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  11. Experimental study of coupling impedance: Part I longitudinal impedance measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.J.

    1991-10-22

    Beam coupling impedances for the 7-GeV APS storage ring have been numerically estimated. In order to confirm these calculations, measurements of the coupling impedance of various vacuum components around the main storage ring were done with a coaxial wire method. In this paper, the procedure of the longitudinal impedance measurement techniques will be described. As an example, sections of the Cu beam chamber, the Cu beam + antechambers, and the Al beam + antechambers were used as a device under test (DUT) to obtain the results. The transverse impedance measurements will be described in a separate paper.

  12. Force limited vibration testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.

    1991-01-01

    A new method of conducting lab vibration tests of spacecraft equipment was developed to more closely simulate the vibration environment experienced when the spacecraft is launched on a rocket. The improved tests are tailored to identify equipment design and workmanship problems without inducing artificial failures that would not have occurred at launch. These new, less destructive types of vibration tests are essential to JPL's protoflight test approach in which lab testing is conducted using the flight equipment, often one of a kind, to save time and money. In conventional vibration tests, only the input vibratory motion is specified; the feedback, or reaction force, between the test item and the vibration machine is ignored. Most test failures occur when the test item goes into resonance, and the reaction force becomes very large. It has long been recognized that the large reaction force is a test artifact which does not occur with the lightweight, flexible mounting structures characteristic of spacecraft and space vehicles. In new vibration tests, both the motion and the force provided to the test item by the vibration machine are controlled, so that the vibration ride experienced by the test item is as in flight.

  13. Multiple direction vibration fixture

    SciTech Connect

    Cericola, F.; Doggett, J.W.; Ernest, T.L.

    1991-08-27

    An apparatus is discussed for simulating a rocket launch environment on a test item undergoing centrifuge testing by subjecting the item simultaneously or separately to vibration along an axis of centripetal force and along an axis perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The apparatus includes a shaker motor supported by centrifuge arms and a right angle fixture pivotally connected to one of the shaker motor mounts. When the shaker motor vibrates along the centripetal force axis, the vibrations are imparted to a first side of the right angle fixture. The vibrations are transmitted 90 {degrees} around the pivot and are directed to a second side of the right angle fixture which imparts vibrations perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The test item is in contact with a third side of the right angle fixture and receives both centripetal-force-axis vibrations and perpendicular axis vibrations simultaneously. A test item can be attached to the third side near the flexible coupling or near the air bag to obtain vibrations along the centripetal force axis or transverse to the centripetal force axis.

  14. Multiple direction vibration fixture

    SciTech Connect

    Cericola, F.; Doggett, J.W.; Ernest, T.L.; Priddy, T.G.

    1990-03-21

    An apparatus for simulating a rocket launch environment on a test item undergoing centrifuge testing by subjecting the item simultaneously or separately to vibration along an axis of centripetal force and along an axis perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The apparatus includes a shaker motor supported by centrifuge arms and a right angle fixture pivotally connected to one of the shaker motor mounts. When the shaker motor vibrates along the centripetal force axis, the vibrations are imparted to a first side of the right angle fixture. The vibrations are transmitted 90 degrees around the pivot and are directed to a second side of the right angle fixture which imparts vibrations perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The test item is in contact with a third side of the right angle fixture and receives both centripetal-force-axis vibrations and perpendicular axis vibrations simultaneously. A test item can be attached to the third side near the flexible coupling or near the air bag to obtain vibrations along the centripetal force axis or transverse to the centripetal force axis. 1 fig.

  15. [Vibration on agricultural tractors].

    PubMed

    Peretti, Alessandro; Delvecchio, Simone; Bonomini, Francesco; di Bisceglie, Anita Pasqua; Colosio, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    In the article, details related to the diffusion of agricultural tractors in Italy are given and considerations about the effects of vibration on operators, the sources of vibration and suggestions to reduce them are presented. The acceleration values observed in Italy amongst 244 tractors and levels of worker exposure are shown by means of histograms. The relevant data variability is discussed. PMID:24303716

  16. Multiple direction vibration fixture

    DOEpatents

    Cericola, Fred; Doggett, James W.; Ernest, Terry L.; Priddy, Tommy G.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for simulating a rocket launch environment on a test item undergoing centrifuge testing by subjecting the item simultaneously or separately to vibration along an axis of centripetal force and along an axis perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The apparatus includes a shaker motor supported by centrifuge arms and a right angle fixture pivotally connected to one of the shaker motor mounts. When the shaker motor vibrates along the centripetal force axis, the vibrations are imparted to a first side of the right angle fixture. The vibrations are transmitted 90 degrees around the pivot and are directed to a second side of the right angle fixture which imparts vibrations perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The test item is in contact with a third side of the right angle fixture and receives both centripetal-force-axis vibrations and perpendicular axis vibrations simultaneously. A test item can be attached to the third side near the flexible coupling or near the air bag to obtain vibrations along the centripetal force axis or transverse to the centripetal force axis.

  17. Vibrational Schroedinger Cats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kis, Z.; Janszky, J.; Vinogradov, An. V.; Kobayashi, T.

    1996-01-01

    The optical Schroedinger cat states are simple realizations of quantum states having nonclassical features. It is shown that vibrational analogues of such states can be realized in an experiment of double pulse excitation of vibrionic transitions. To track the evolution of the vibrational wave packet we derive a non-unitary time evolution operator so that calculations are made in a quasi Heisenberg picture.

  18. Effects of ultrasonic vibrations in micro-groove turning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Guo, Ping; Ehmann, Kornel F; Li, Yingguang

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonic vibration cutting is an efficient cutting process for mechanical micro-machining. This process can generate intricate surface textures with different geometric characteristics. Micro-grooves/micro-channels are among the most frequently encountered micro-structures and, as such, are the focus of this paper. The effectiveness of both the linear and ultrasonic elliptical vibration-assisted machining technique in micro-groove turning is analyzed and discussed in the paper. The paper first investigates the mechanisms of micro-groove generation induced by the linear and elliptical vibration modes. A simplified cutting force analysis method is given to compare the effectiveness of the two modes in micro-groove turning. The surface roughness of the generated micro-grooves is analyzed next and theoretical expressions are given for the two cases. Finally, micro-groove turning experiments are conducted to compare the influences of the two vibration modes on the cutting forces and the surface roughness. The experimental results show that linear vibration-assisted micro-groove turning leads to better surface roughness as compared to the elliptical vibration-assisted case, while elliptical vibration-assisted micro-groove turning shows advantages in terms of decreasing the cutting forces. PMID:26773790

  19. Mechanical vibration to electrical energy converter

    DOEpatents

    Kellogg, Rick Allen; Brotz, Jay Kristoffer

    2009-03-03

    Electromechanical devices that generate an electrical signal in response to an external source of mechanical vibrations can operate as a sensor of vibrations and as an energy harvester for converting mechanical vibration to electrical energy. The devices incorporate a magnet that is movable through a gap in a ferromagnetic circuit, wherein a coil is wound around a portion of the ferromagnetic circuit. A flexible coupling is used to attach the magnet to a frame for providing alignment of the magnet as it moves or oscillates through the gap in the ferromagnetic circuit. The motion of the magnet can be constrained to occur within a substantially linear range of magnetostatic force that develops due to the motion of the magnet. The devices can have ferromagnetic circuits with multiple arms, an array of magnets having alternating polarity and, encompass micro-electromechanical (MEM) devices.

  20. Accelerator vibration issues

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Vibrations induced in accelerator structures can cause particle-beam jitter and alignment difficulties. Sources of these vibrations may include pump oscillations, cooling-water turbulence, and vibrations transmitted through the floor to the accelerator structure. Drift tubes (DT) in a drift tube linac (DTL) are components likely to affect beam jitter and alignment because they normally have a heavy magnet structure on the end of a long and relatively small support stem. The natural vibrational frequencies of a drift tube have been compared with theoretical predictions. In principle, by knowing natural frequencies of accelerator components and system vibrational frequncies, an accelerator can be designed that does not have these frequencies coinciding. 2 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. In situ anodization of aluminum surfaces studied by x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bertram, F. Evertsson, J.; Messing, M. E.; Mikkelsen, A.; Lundgren, E.; Zhang, F.; Pan, J.; Carlà, F.; Nilsson, J.-O.

    2014-07-21

    We present results from the anodization of an aluminum single crystal [Al(111)] and an aluminum alloy [Al 6060] studied by in situ x-ray reflectivity, in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and ex situ scanning electron microscopy. For both samples, a linear increase of oxide film thickness with increasing anodization voltage was found. However, the slope is much higher in the single crystal case, and the break-up of the oxide film grown on the alloy occurs at a lower anodization potential than on the single crystal. The reasons for these observations are discussed as are the measured differences observed for x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  2. In situ anodization of aluminum surfaces studied by x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, F.; Zhang, F.; Evertsson, J.; Carlà, F.; Pan, J.; Messing, M. E.; Mikkelsen, A.; Nilsson, J.-O.; Lundgren, E.

    2014-07-01

    We present results from the anodization of an aluminum single crystal [Al(111)] and an aluminum alloy [Al 6060] studied by in situ x-ray reflectivity, in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and ex situ scanning electron microscopy. For both samples, a linear increase of oxide film thickness with increasing anodization voltage was found. However, the slope is much higher in the single crystal case, and the break-up of the oxide film grown on the alloy occurs at a lower anodization potential than on the single crystal. The reasons for these observations are discussed as are the measured differences observed for x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  3. Influence of wall vibrations on the sound of brass wind instruments.

    PubMed

    Kausel, Wilfried; Zietlow, Daniel W; Moore, Thomas R

    2010-11-01

    The results of an experimental and theoretical investigation of the influence of wall vibrations on the sound of brass wind instruments are presented. Measurements of the transmission function and input impedance of a trumpet, with the bell both heavily damped and freely vibrating, are shown to be consistent with a theory that assumes that the internal pressure causes an oscillation of the diameter of the pipe enclosing the air column. These effects are shown to be most significant in sections where there are flaring walls, which explains why damping these vibrations in cylindrical pipes normally produces no measurable effects. PMID:21110611

  4. Design and performance analysis of a rotary traveling wave ultrasonic motor with double vibrators.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhaopeng; Yang, Ming; Chen, Zhangqi; Xu, Liang; Meng, Fan; Ou, Wenchu

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the development of a rotary traveling wave ultrasonic motor, in which a vibrating stator and vibrating rotor are combined in one motor. The stator and rotor are designed as similar structures an elastic body and a piezoelectric ceramic ring. In exciting of the piezoelectric ceramics, the elastic body of the stator and rotor will generate respective traveling waves, which force each other forward in the contact zone. Based on the elliptical rule of particle motion and matching principle of vibration, the design rules of two vibrators are determined. The finite element method is used to design the sizes of vibrators to ensure that they operate in resonance, and the simulation is verified by measuring the vibration with an impedance analyzer. It is found out that to maintain an appropriate contact between the stator and rotor, two vibrators need to be designed with close resonance frequencies, different vibration amplitudes, and be driven by an identical driving frequency. To analyze this innovative contact mechanism, particle velocity synthesis theory and contact force analysis using Hertz contact model are carried out. Finally, a prototype is fabricated and tested to verify the theoretical results. The test results show that the output performance of the motor driven by the two vibrators is significantly improved compared to the motor driven by a sole stator or rotor, which confirms the validity of the double-vibrator motor concept. PMID:27336793

  5. Effects of Liner Geometry on Acoustic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Tracy, Maureen B.; Watson, Willie R.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2002-01-01

    Current aircraft engine nacelles typically contain acoustic liners consisting of perforated sheets bonded onto honeycomb cavities. Numerous models have been developed to predict the acoustic impedance of these liners in the presence of grazing flow, and to use that information with aeroacoustic propagation codes to assess nacelle liner noise suppression. Recent efforts have provided advances in impedance education methodologies that offer more accurate determinations of acoustic liner properties in the presence of grazing flow. The current report provides the results of a parametric study, in which a finite element method was used to assess the effects of variations of the following geometric parameters on liner impedance, with and without the presence of grazing flow: percent open area, sheet thickness, sheet thickness-to-hole diameter ratio and cavity depth. Normal incidence acoustic impedances were determined for eight acoustic liners, consisting of punched aluminum facesheets bonded to hexcell honeycomb cavities. Similar liners were tested in the NASA Langley Research Center grazing incidence tube to determine their response in the presence of grazing flow. The resultant data provide a quantitative assessment of the effects of these perforate, single-layer liner parameters on the acoustic impedance of the liner.

  6. Vascular impedance analysis in human pulmonary circulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qinlian; Gao, Jian; Huang, Wei; Yen, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Vascular impedance is determined by morphometry and mechanical properties of the vascular system, as well as the rheology of the blood. The interactions between all these factors are complicated and difficult to investigate solely by experiments. A mathematical model representing the entire system of human pulmonary circulation was constructed based on experimentally measured morphometric and elasticity data of the vessels. The model consisted of 16 orders of arteries and 15 orders of veins. The pulmonary arteries and veins were considered as elastic tubes and their impedance was calculated based on Womersley's theory. The flow in capillaries was described by the "sheet-flow" theory. The model yielded an impedance modulus spectrum that fell steeply from a high value at 0 Hz to a minimum around 1.5 Hz. At about 4 Hz, it reached a second high and then oscillated around a relatively small value at higher frequencies. Characteristic impedance was 27.9 dyn-sec/cm5. Influence of variations in vessel geometry and elasticity on impedance spectra was analyzed. Simulation results showed good agreement with experimental measurements. PMID:16817653

  7. Next Generation Plasma Impedance Probe Instrumentation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, C. G.; Swenson, C. M.; Fish, C.

    2003-12-01

    Four Utah State University Plasma Impedance Probes (PIP) were part of NASA's Sequential Rocket Study of Descending Layers in the E-Region (E-Winds). The payloads were launched at 11:19 pm, 1:41 am, 2:50 am and 3:07 am on June 30 and July 1, 2003 from Wallops Island, Virginia into the nighttime D and E-regions. The PIP is a suite of instruments for observing relative and absolute electron densities, magnetic field strength, and electron-neutral collision frequency. The suite consists of a Plasma Frequency Probe, a Swept Impedance Probe, a Q probe, an experimental Ion Impedance probe, and a DC Langmuir probe. The first four instrument diagnostics are based on the impedance characteristics of an antenna immersed in plasma. Resonance effects at low frequencies (1-100 kHz) where ion dynamics become important were observed by the Ion Impedance Probe. This data set may lead to the first mid-latitude measurements of ion-neutral collision frequency and full conductivity measurements of the ionosphere. Preliminary analysis of flight data shows a considerable amount of sensitivity in all of the instruments that should allow for absolute electron density measurement in the 1 to 10 per cc range and comparable accuracy in electron neutral collision frequency. This paper presents the instrumentation techniques, calibrations and initial results for this flight.

  8. Antenna pattern control using impedence surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Liu, Kefeng

    1991-01-01

    During this research period, September 16, 1990 to March 15, 1991, a design method for selecting a low-loss impedance material coating for a horn antenna pattern control has been developed. This method and the stepped waveguide technique can be employed to accurately compute the electromagnetic wave phenomenon inside the transition region of the horn antenna, with or without the impedance surfaces, from the feed to the radiating aperture. For moment method solutions of the electric and magnetic current distributions on the radiating aperture and the outer surface of the horn antenna, triangular surface-patch modes are introduced to replace the sinusoidal surface-patch modes as expansion and testing functions to provide a more physical expansion of the current distributions. In the synthesis problem, a numerical optimization process is formulated to minimize the error function between the desired waveguide modes and the modes provided by the horn transition with impedance surfaces. Since the modes generated by the horn transition with impedance surface are computed by analytical techniques, the computational error involved in the synthesis of the antenna pattern is minimum. Therefore, the instability problem can be avoided. A preliminary implementation of the techniques has demonstrated that the developed theory of the horn antenna pattern control using the impedance surfaces is realizable.

  9. Elementary principles of linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loew, G. A.; Talman, R.

    1983-09-01

    A short chronology of important milestones in the field of linear accelerators is presented. Proton linacs are first discussed and elementary concepts such as transit time, shunt impedance, and Q are introduced. Critical issues such as phase stability and transverse forces are addressed. An elementary discussion of waveguide acclerating structures is also provided. Finally, electron accelerators addressed. Taking SLAC as an exmple, various topics are discussed such as structure design, choice of parameters, frequency optmization, beam current, emittance, bunch length and beam loading. Recent developments and future challenges are mentioned briefly.

  10. Electrorheological vibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobko, Evguenia V.; Shulman, Zinovy P.; Korobko, Yulia O.

    2001-07-01

    The present paper is devoted to de3velopment and testing of an active vibration system. The system is intended for providing efficient motion of a piston in a hydraulic channel for creation of shocks and periodic vibrations in a low frequency range by means of the ER-valves based on an electrosensitive working me dium, i.e. electrorheological fluids. The latter manifests the electrorheological (ER) effect, i.e. a reversible change in the rheological characteristics of weak-conducting disperse compositions in the presence of constant and alternating electric fields. As a result of the experimental study of the dependence of viscoelastic properties of the ER-fluid on the magnitude and type of an electric field, the optimum dimensions of the vibrator and the its valves characteristics of the optimal electrical signal are determined. For control of an ER- vibrator having several valves we have designed a special type of a high-voltage two-channel impulse generator. Experiments were conducted at the frequencies ranged from 1- 10 Hz. It has been shown, that a peak force made 70% of the static force exercised by the vibrator rod. A phase shift between the input voltage and the load acceleration was less than 45 degree(s)C which allowed servocontrol and use of the vibrator for attendant operations. It was noted that a response of the vibrator to a stepwise signal has a delay only of several milliseconds.

  11. Tunable microwave impedance matching to a high impedance source using a Josephson metamaterial

    SciTech Connect

    Altimiras, Carles Parlavecchio, Olivier; Joyez, Philippe; Vion, Denis; Roche, Patrice; Esteve, Daniel; Portier, Fabien

    2013-11-18

    We report the efficient coupling of a 50  Ω microwave circuit to a high impedance conductor. We use an impedance transformer consisting of a λ/4 co-planar resonator whose inner conductor contains an array of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), providing it with a tunable lineic inductance L∼80 μ{sub 0}, resulting in a characteristic impedance Z{sub C}∼1 kΩ. The impedance matching efficiency is characterized by measuring the shot noise power emitted by a dc biased tunnel junction connected to the resonator. We demonstrate matching to impedances in the 15 to 35 kΩ range with bandwidths above 100 MHz around a resonant frequency tunable between 4 and 6 GHz.

  12. Tunable microwave impedance matching to a high impedance source using a Josephson metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altimiras, Carles; Parlavecchio, Olivier; Joyez, Philippe; Vion, Denis; Roche, Patrice; Esteve, Daniel; Portier, Fabien

    2013-11-01

    We report the efficient coupling of a 50 Ω microwave circuit to a high impedance conductor. We use an impedance transformer consisting of a λ/4 co-planar resonator whose inner conductor contains an array of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), providing it with a tunable lineic inductance L ˜80 μ0, resulting in a characteristic impedance ZC˜1 k Ω. The impedance matching efficiency is characterized by measuring the shot noise power emitted by a dc biased tunnel junction connected to the resonator. We demonstrate matching to impedances in the 15 to 35 kΩ range with bandwidths above 100 MHz around a resonant frequency tunable between 4 and 6 GHz.

  13. Vibration suppression of advanced space cryocoolers: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.

    2003-07-01

    Mechanical cryocoolers represent a significant enabling technology for precision space instruments by providing cryogenic temperatures for sensitive infrared, gamma-ray, and x-ray detectors. However, the vibration generated by the cryocooler's refrigeration compressor has long been identified as a critical integration issue. The key sensitivity is the extent to which the cooler's vibration harmonics excite spacecraft resonances and prevent on-board sensors from achieving their operational goals with respect to resolution and pointing accuracy. To reduce the cryocooler's vibration signature to acceptable levels, a variety of active vibration suppression technologies have been developed and implemented over the past 15 years. At this point, nearly all space cryocoolers have active vibration suppression systems built into their drive electronics that reduce the peak unbalanced forces to less than 1% of their original levels. Typical systems of today individually control the vibration in each of the cryocoolers lowest drive harmonics, with some controlling as many as 16 harmonics. A second vibration issue associated with cryocoolers is surviving launch. Here the same pistons and coldfingers that generate vibration during operation are often the most critical elements in terms of surviving high input acceleration levels. Since electrical power is generally not available during launch, passive vibration suppression technologies have been developed. Common vibration damping techniques include electrodynamic braking via shorted motor coils and the use of particle dampers on sensitive cryogenic elements. This paper provides an overview of the vibration characteristics of typical linear-drive space cryocoolers, outlines their history of development, and presents typical performance of the various active and passive vibration suppression systems being used.

  14. Propagation of waves along an impedance boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the scalar wave field due to a point source above a plane impedance boundary is presented. A surface wave is found to be an essential component of the total wave field. It is shown that, as a result of ducting of energy by the surface wave, the amplitude of the total wave near the boundary can be greater than it would be if the boundary were perfectly reflecting. Asymptotic results, valid near the boundary, are obtained both for the case of finite impedance (the soft-boundary case) and for the limiting case in which the impedance becomes infinite (the hard-boundary case). In the latter, the wave amplitude in the farfield decreases essentially inversely as the horizontal propagation distance; in the former (if the surface-wave term is neglected), it decreases inversely as the square of the horizontal propagation distance.

  15. Ferrofluid Microwave Devices With Magnetically Controlled Impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fannin, P. C.; Stefu, N.; Marin, C. N.; Malaescu, I.; Totoreanu, R.

    2010-08-01

    Ferrofluid filled transmission lines are microwave electronic devices. The complex dielectric permittivity and the complex magnetic permeability of a kerosene based ferrofluid with magnetite nanoparticles, in the frequency range (0.5-6) GHz were measured, for several values of polarising field, H. Afterwards, the input impedance of a short-circuited transmission line filled with this ferrofluid was computed using the equation Z = Zc tanh(γl). Here Zc and l are the characteristic impedance and the length of the coaxial line and γ is the propagation constant, depending on the dielectric and magnetic parameters of the material within the line. It is demonstrated how the impedance displays a frequency and polarizing field dependence, which has application in the design of magnetically controlled microwave devices.

  16. Respiratory acoustic impedance in left ventricular failure.

    PubMed

    Depeursinge, F B; Feihl, F; Depeursinge, C; Perret, C H

    1989-12-01

    The measurement of respiratory acoustic impedance (Zrs) by forced pseudorandom noise provides a simple means of assessing respiratory mechanics in nonintubated intensive care patients. To characterize the lung mechanical alterations induced by acute vascular congestion of the lung, Zrs was measured in 14 spontaneously breathing patients hospitalized for acute left ventricular failure. The Zrs data in the cardiac patients were compared with those of 48 semirecumbent normal subjects and those of 23 sitting asthmatic patients during allergen-induced bronchospasm. In the patients with acute left ventricular failure, the Zrs abnormalities noted were an excessive frequency dependence of resistance from 10 to 20 Hz and an abnormally low reactance at all frequencies, abnormalities qualitatively similar to those observed in the asthmatic patients but of lesser magnitude. Acute lung vascular congestion modifies the acoustic impedance of the respiratory system. Reflex-induced bronchospasm might be the main mechanism altering respiratory acoustic impedance in acute left ventricular failure. PMID:2582846

  17. Plasma Diagnostics by Antenna Impedance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, C. M.; Baker, K. D.; Pound, E.; Jensen, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    The impedance of an electrically short antenna immersed in a plasma provides an excellent in situ diagnostic tool for electron density and other plasma parameters. By electrically short we mean that the wavelength of the free-space electromagnetic wave that would be excited at the driving frequency is much longer than the physical size of the antenna. Probes using this impedance technique have had a long history with sounding rockets and satellites, stretching back to the early 1960s. This active technique could provide information on composition and temperature of plasmas for comet or planetary missions. Advantages of the impedance probe technique are discussed and two classes of instruments built and flown by SDL-USU for determining electron density (the capacitance and plasma frequency probes) are described.

  18. Impedance properties of circular microstrip antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M. D.; Bailey, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    A moment method solution to the input impedance of a circular microstrip antenna excited by either a microstrip feed or a coaxial probe is presented. Using the exact dyadic Green's function and the Fourier transform the problem is formulated in terms of Richmond's reaction integral equation from which the unknown patch current can be solved for. The patch current is expanded in terms of regular surface patch modes and an attachment mode (for probe excited case) which insures continuity of the current at probe/patch junction, proper polarization and p-dependance of patch current in the vicinity of the probe. The input impedance of a circular microstrip antenna is computed and compared with earlier results. Effect of attachment mode on the input impedance is also discussed.

  19. Wavelet analysis of the impedance cardiogram waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podtaev, S.; Stepanov, R.; Dumler, A.; Chugainov, S.; Tziberkin, K.

    2012-12-01

    Impedance cardiography has been used for diagnosing atrial and ventricular dysfunctions, valve disorders, aortic stenosis, and vascular diseases. Almost all the applications of impedance cardiography require determination of some of the characteristic points of the ICG waveform. The ICG waveform has a set of characteristic points known as A, B, E ((dZ/dt)max) X, Y, O and Z. These points are related to distinct physiological events in the cardiac cycle. Objective of this work is an approbation of a new method of processing and interpretation of the impedance cardiogram waveforms using wavelet analysis. A method of computer thoracic tetrapolar polyrheocardiography is used for hemodynamic registrations. Use of original wavelet differentiation algorithm allows combining filtration and calculation of the derivatives of rheocardiogram. The proposed approach can be used in clinical practice for early diagnostics of cardiovascular system remodelling in the course of different pathologies.

  20. Impedance Characteristics of the Plasma Absorption Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazawa, Yohei

    2009-10-01

    The plasma absorption probe (PAP) is a diagnostics for determination of spatially resolved electron density.footnotetextH. Kokura, et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 38 5262 (1999). PAP has attracted considerable interest because of its applicability in a reactive plasma. The simple structure of the probe allows us a robust measurement while the mechanism of the absorption is complicated and there are still some uncertainty.footnotetextM. Lapke, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 90, 121502 (2007) In this study, we focus on the frequency characteristics of the impedance instead of the absorption spectrum. An electromagnetic field simulation reveals that there is only one parallel resonance in the impedance characteristics even in a case there are many peaks in absorption spectrum. Thus, the impedance characteristics provide a clue to understanding the mechanism.

  1. Effects of mass layer imperfect bonding on the electrical impedance of a quartz crystal microbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, YangYang; Wang, Ji; Du, JianKe; Yang, JiaShi

    2013-11-01

    We study electrically forced vibrations of a crystal plate of AT-cut quartz carrying a thin mass layer operating as a quartz crystal microbalance for mass sensing. The mass layer is imperfectly bonded to the crystal plate with their interface described by the so-called interface-slip model which allows a discontinuity of the tangential interface displacement. Mindlin's equations for piezoelectric plates are used. An analytical solution is obtained. The electrical impedance is calculated. The effects of an elastic interface and a viscoelastic interface are examined.

  2. Low-frequency vibration control of floating slab tracks using dynamic vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shengyang; Yang, Jizhong; Yan, Hua; Zhang, Longqing; Cai, Chengbiao

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to effectively and robustly suppress the low-frequency vibrations of floating slab tracks (FSTs) using dynamic vibration absorbers (DVAs). First, the optimal locations where the DVAs are attached are determined by modal analysis with a finite element model of the FST. Further, by identifying the equivalent mass of the concerned modes, the optimal stiffness and damping coefficient of each DVA are obtained to minimise the resonant vibration amplitudes based on fixed-point theory. Finally, a three-dimensional coupled dynamic model of a metro vehicle and the FST with the DVAs is developed based on the nonlinear Hertzian contact theory and the modified Kalker linear creep theory. The track irregularities are included and generated by means of a time-frequency transformation technique. The effect of the DVAs on the vibration absorption of the FST subjected to the vehicle dynamic loads is evaluated with the help of the insertion loss in one-third octave frequency bands. The sensitivities of the mass ratio of DVAs and the damping ratio of steel-springs under the floating slab are discussed as well, which provided engineers with the DVA's adjustable room for vibration mitigation. The numerical results show that the proposed DVAs could effectively suppress low-frequency vibrations of the FST when tuned correctly and attached properly. The insertion loss due to the attachment of DVAs increases as the mass ratio increases, whereas it decreases with the increase in the damping ratio of steel-springs.

  3. Vibration amplitude and induced temperature limitation of high power air-borne ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Saffar, Saber; Abdullah, Amir

    2014-01-01

    The acoustic impedances of matching layers, their internal loss and vibration amplitude are the most important and influential parameters in the performance of high power airborne ultrasonic transducers. In this paper, the optimum acoustic impedances of the transducer matching layers were determined by using a genetic algorithm, the powerful tool for optimizating domain. The analytical results showed that the vibration amplitude increases significantly for low acoustic impedance matching layers. This enhancement is maximum and approximately 200 times higher for the last matching layer where it has the same interface with the air than the vibration amplitude of the source, lead zirconate titanate-pizo electric while transferring the 1 kW is desirable. This large amplitude increases both mechanical failure and temperature of the matching layers due to the internal loss of the matching layers. It has analytically shown that the temperature in last matching layer with having the maximum vibration amplitude is high enough to melt or burn the matching layers. To verify suggested approach, the effect of the amplitude of vibration on the induced temperature has been investigated experimentally. The experimental results displayed good agreement with the theoretical predictions. PMID:23664304

  4. Observation and Analysis of N[subscript 2]O Rotation-Vibration Spectra: A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Mark S.; Reeve, Scott W.; Burns, William A.

    2008-01-01

    The linear molecule N[subscript 2]O is presented as an alternative gas-phase species for the ubiquitous undergraduate physical chemistry rotation-vibration spectroscopy experiment. Utilizing a 0.5 cm[superscript -1] resolution teaching grade FTIR spectrometer, 15 vibrational bands, corresponding to 1229 rotation-vibration transitions, have been…

  5. Vibration Control For Ultraprecision Motion Machineries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Akira; Miyashita, Masakazu; Yoshioka, Junichi; Hashimoto, Fukuo

    1987-08-01

    Development of ultraprecision machines requires motion mechanisms with dynamic characteristics being sufficiently resistive to environmental disturbances as well as vibration control devices isolating from them. In the paper active application of frictional forces to the machines are proposed in viewpoint of this point. Further, new strategies for various problems resulting from application of frictional forces are also proposed for linear feed mechanism and the test results are shown. They are load compensation unit, composite bearing guideway and force operation feed mechanism.

  6. On vibration control of tethered satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, D. M.; Misra, A. K.; Modi, V. J.

    1983-01-01

    The general dynamics of a shuttle supported tethered subsatellite system taking into account the longitudinal and three dimensional transverse vibrations is considered. It is noted that control of inherently unstable dynamics during retrieval of the subsatellite can be carried out by letting the rate of change length depend on the state variables in an appropriate manner. Control laws using linear feedback of inplane state variables and nonlinear feedback of out-of-plane state variables are proposed.

  7. Neural-Network Controller For Vibration Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boussalis, Dhemetrios; Wang, Shyh Jong

    1995-01-01

    Neural-network-based adaptive-control system proposed for vibration suppression of flexible space structures. Controller features three-layer neural network and utilizes output feedback. Measurements generated by various sensors on structure. Feed forward path also included to speed up response in case plant exhibits predominantly linear dynamic behavior. System applicable to single-input single-output systems. Work extended to multiple-input multiple-output systems as well.

  8. Optical input impedance of nanostrip antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ivan; Du, Ya-ping

    2012-05-01

    We conduct an investigation into optical nanoantennas in the form of a strip dipole made from aluminum. With the finite-difference time domain simulation both optical input impedance and radiation efficiency of nanostrip antennas are addressed. An equivalent circuit is presented as well for the nanostrip antennas at optical resonances. The optical input resistance can be adjusted by varying the geometric parameters of antenna strips. By changing both strip area and strip length simultaneously, optical input resistance can be adjusted for matching impedance with an external feeding or loading circuit. It is found that the optical radiation efficiency does not change significantly when the size of a nanostrip antenna varies moderately.

  9. Protein Aggregation Measurement through Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affanni, A.; Corazza, A.; Esposito, G.; Fogolari, F.; Polano, M.

    2013-09-01

    The paper presents a novel methodology to measure the fibril formation in protein solutions. We designed a bench consisting of a sensor having interdigitated electrodes, a PDMS hermetic reservoir and an impedance meter automatically driven by calculator. The impedance data are interpolated with a lumped elements model and their change over time can provide information on the aggregation process. Encouraging results have been obtained by testing the methodology on K-casein, a protein of milk, with and without the addition of a drug inhibiting the aggregation. The amount of sample needed to perform this measurement is by far lower than the amount needed by fluorescence analysis.

  10. Study of Body Composition by Impedance Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Solís, J. L.; Vargas-Luna, M.; Sosa-Aquino, M.; Bernal-Alvarado, J.; Gutiérrez-Juárez, G.; Huerta-Franco, R.; Sanchis-Sabater, A.

    2002-08-01

    This work presents a set of impedance measurements and preliminary results on the analysis of body composition using impedance spectroscopy. This study is made using a pork meat sample and spectra from fat and flesh region were independently obtained using the same electrodes array. From these measurements, and theoretical considerations, it is possible to explain the behavior of the composite sample flesh-fat-flesh and, fitting the electrical parameters of the model, it shows the plausibility of a physical and quantitative application to human corporal composition.

  11. Impedance spectra of polypyrrole coated platinum electrodes.

    PubMed

    Onnela, Niina; Savolainen, Virpi; Hiltunen, Maiju; Kellomäki, Minna; Hyttinen, Jari

    2013-01-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) coated electrodes may provide new solutions to increase the charge injection capacity and biocompatibility of metal electrodes in e.g., neural stimulus applications. In this study, electrical impedance spectra of PPy coated platinum (Pt) electrodes having three different coating thicknesses were measured and modeled. A suitable equivalent electrical circuit providing the material characteristics was chosen and the impedance data was analyzed using the model and data fitting. The modeled parameter values of different coating thicknesses were compared and our results demonstrated the changes in charge transfer properties and mechanisms of thin and thick PPy film coatings. PMID:24109743

  12. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy Of Metal Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdowell, L. G.; Calle, L. M.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to investigate resistances of 19 alloys to corrosion under conditions similar to those of corrosive, chloride-laden seaside environment of Space Transportation System launch site. Alloys investigated: Hastelloy C-4, C-22, C-276, and B-2; Inconel(R) 600, 625, and 825; Inco(R) G-3; Monel 400; Zirconium 702; Stainless Steel 304L, 304LN, 316L, 317L, and 904L; 20Cb-3; 7Mo+N; ES2205; and Ferralium 255. Results suggest electrochemical impedance spectroscopy used to predict corrosion performances of metal alloys.

  13. Hole-Impeded-Doping-Superlattice LWIR Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Hole-Impeded-Doping-Superlattice (HIDS) InAs devices proposed for use as photoconductive or photovoltaic detectors of radiation in long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) range of 8 to 17 micrometers. Array of HIDS devices fabricated on substrates GaAs or Si. Radiation incident on black surface, metal contacts for picture elements serve as reactors, effectively doubling optical path and thereby increasing absorption of photons. Photoconductive detector offers advantages of high gain and high impedance; photovoltaic detector offers lower noise and better interface to multiplexer readouts.

  14. Impedance Scaling for Small Angle Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; Bane, Karl; Zagorodnov, I.; /DESY

    2010-10-27

    Based on the parabolic equation approach to Maxwell's equations we have derived scaling properties of the high frequency impedance/short bunch wakefields of structures. For the special case of small angle transitions we have shown the scaling properties are valid for all frequencies. Using these scaling properties one can greatly reduce the calculation time of the wakefield/impedance of long, small angle, beam pipe transitions, like one often finds in insertion regions of storage rings. We have tested the scaling with wakefield simulations of 2D and 3D models of such transitions, and found that the scaling works well. In modern ring-based light sources one often finds insertion devices having extremely small vertical apertures (on the order of millimeters) to allow for maximal undulator fields reaching the beam. Such insertion devices require that there be beam pipe transitions from these small apertures to the larger cross-sections (normally on the order of centimeters) found in the rest of the ring. The fact that there may be many such transitions, and that these transitions introduce beam pipe discontinuities very close to the beam path, means that their impedance will be large and, in fact, may dominate the impedance budget of the entire ring. To reduce their impact on impedance, the transitions are normally tapered gradually over a long distance. The accurate calculation of the impedance or wakefield of these long transitions, which are typically 3D objects (i.e. they do not have cylindrical symmetry), can be quite a challenging numerical task. In this report we present a method of obtaining the impedance of a long, small angle transition from the calculation of a scaled, shorter one. Normally, the actual calculation is obtained from a time domain simulation of the wakefield in the structure, where the impedance can be obtained by performing a Fourier transform. We shall see that the scaled calculation reduces the computer time and memory requirements

  15. A modal impedance technique for mid and high frequency analysis of an uncertain stiffened composite plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seçgin, A.; Kara, M.; Ozankan, A.

    2016-03-01

    A modal impedance technique is introduced for mid frequency vibration analyses. The approach is mainly based on statistical energy analysis (SEA), however loss factors are determined by not only driving but also contributed by transfer mobilities. The mobilities are computed by finite element modal analysis. The technique takes geometrical complexity and boundary condition into account to handle their mid-frequency effects. It is applied to a stiffened composite plate having randomized mass, i.e., uncertain plate. For the verification, several numerical and experimental tests are performed. Internal damping of subsystems is evaluated using power injection and is then fed to finite element software to perform numerical analyses. Monte Carlo simulation is employed for the uncertainty analyses. To imitate plate mass heterogeneity, many small masses are used in both numerical and experimental analysis. It is shown that the proposed technique can reliably be used for vibration analyses of uncertain complex structures from mid to high frequency regions.

  16. PREFACE: Vibrations at surfaces Vibrations at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Talat S.

    2011-12-01

    This special issue is dedicated to the phenomenon of vibrations at surfaces—a topic that was indispensible a couple of decades ago, since it was one of the few phenomena capable of revealing the nature of binding at solid surfaces. For clean surfaces, the frequencies of modes with characteristic displacement patterns revealed how surface geometry, as well as the nature of binding between atoms in the surface layers, could be different from that in the bulk solid. Dispersion of the surface phonons provided further measures of interatomic interactions. For chemisorbed molecules on surfaces, frequencies and dispersion of the vibrational modes were also critical for determining adsorption sites. In other words, vibrations at surfaces served as a reliable means of extracting information about surface structure, chemisorption and overlayer formation. Experimental techniques, such as electron energy loss spectroscopy and helium-atom-surface scattering, coupled with infra-red spectroscopy, were continually refined and their resolutions enhanced to capture subtleties in the dynamics of atoms and molecules at surfaces. Theoretical methods, whether based on empirical and semi-empirical interatomic potential or on ab initio electronic structure calculations, helped decipher experimental observations and provide deeper insights into the nature of the bond between atoms and molecules in regions of reduced symmetry, as encountered on solid surfaces. Vibrations at surfaces were thus an integral part of the set of phenomena that characterized surface science. Dedicated workshops and conferences were held to explore the variety of interesting and puzzling features revealed in experimental and theoretical investigations of surface vibrational modes and their dispersion. One such conference, Vibrations at Surfaces, first organized by Harald Ibach in Juelich in 1980, continues to this day. The 13th International Conference on Vibrations at Surfaces was held at the University of

  17. Compressible turbulent channel flow with impedance boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalo, Carlo; Bodart, Julien; Lele, Sanjiva

    2014-11-01

    We have performed large-eddy simulations of compressible turbulent channel flow at one bulk Reynolds number, Reb = 6900, for bulk Mach numbers Mb = 0.05, 0.2, 0.5, with linear acoustic impedance boundary conditions (IBCs). The IBCs are formulated in the time domain following Fung and Ju (2004) and coupled with a Navier-Stokes solver. The impedance model adopted is a three-parameter Helmholtz oscillator with resonant frequency tuned to the outer layer eddies. The IBC's resistance, R, has been varied in the range, R = 0.01, 0.10, 1.00. Tuned IBCs result in a noticeable drag increase for sufficiently high Mb and/or low R, exceeding 300% for Mb = 0.5 and R = 0.01, and thus represents a promising passive control technique for delaying boundary layer separation and/or enhancing wall heat transfer. Alterations to the turbulent flow structure are confined to the first 15% of the boundary layer thickness where the classical buffer-layer coherent vortical structures are replaced by an array of Kelvin-Helmholtz-like rollers. The non-zero asymptotic value of the Reynolds shear stress gradient at the wall results in the disappearance of the viscous sublayer and very early departure of the mean velocity profiles from the law of the wall.

  18. Analysis of bio-anode performance through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    ter Heijne, Annemiek; Schaetzle, Olivier; Gimenez, Sixto; Navarro, Lucia; Hamelers, Bert; Fabregat-Santiago, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we studied the performance of bioanodes under different experimental conditions using polarization curves and impedance spectroscopy. We have identified that the large capacitances of up to 1 mF·cm(-2) for graphite anodes have their origin in the nature of the carbonaceous electrode, rather than the microbial culture. In some cases, the separate contributions of charge transfer and diffusion resistance were clearly visible, while in other cases their contribution was masked by the high capacitance of 1 mF·cm(-2). The impedance data were analyzed using the basic Randles model to analyze ohmic, charge transfer and diffusion resistances. Increasing buffer concentration from 0 to 50mM and increasing pH from 6 to 8 resulted in decreased charge transfer and diffusion resistances; lowest values being 144 Ω·cm(2) and 34 Ω·cm(2), respectively. At acetate concentrations below 1 mM, current generation was limited by acetate. We show a linear relationship between inverse charge transfer resistance at potentials close to open circuit and saturation (maximum) current, associated to the Butler-Volmer relationship that needs further exploration. PMID:25869113

  19. Modeling of low-frequency pulmonary impedance in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hantos, Z; Daróczy, B; Csendes, T; Suki, B; Nagy, S

    1990-03-01

    The mechanical impedance of the lungs (ZL) was measured in open-chest dogs with small-amplitude pseudorandom volume oscillations between 0.125 and 5 Hz, at mean transpulmonary pressures (Ptp) of 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 kPa. At the lowest frequencies, the pulmonary resistance showed a marked negative frequency dependence and mirrored the changes in the reactance with altered Ptp. The ZL data were evaluated on the basis of two models, each containing the same airway compartment with a resistance and an inertance. The tissue impedance (Zti) in model 1 was represented with two compliances and a resistance (L. E. Mount. J. Physiol. Lond. 127: 157-167, 1955), whereas in model 2 a two-parameter formulation implying rate-independent dissipated work and frequency-dependent elastance (J. Hildebrandt. J. Appl. Physiol. 28: 365-372, 1970) was employed. The estimation of model parameters showed that model 2 was superior to model 1 in both fitting performance and parameter insensitivity to weighting in the fitting criterion. The model 2 coefficients of damping and elastance, characterizing the real and imaginary parts of Zti, respectively, depended on the lung distension and were closely correlated. Although ZL exhibited a slight dependence on the peak-to-peak volume excursion, at a given oscillatory volume no inconsistency with linear tissue viscoelasticity was detected. PMID:2341352

  20. Damping Vibration at an Impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, J. A.; Rowan, B. F.

    1982-01-01

    Vibration of pump shaft is damped at impeller--where vibration-induced deflections are greatest--by shroud and seal. Damping reduces vibrational motion of shaft at bearings and load shaft places on them. Flow through clearance channel absorbs vibration energy.

  1. Vibration Analysis and the Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Have you ever put your hand on an electric motor or motor-driven electric appliance and felt it vibrate? Ever wonder why it vibrates? What is there about the operation of the motor, or the object to which it is attached, that causes the vibrations? Is there anything "regular" about the vibrations, or are they the result of random causes? In this…

  2. NIF Ambient Vibration Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, C.R.; Hoehler, M.S., S.C. Sommer

    1999-11-29

    LLNL has an ongoing research and development project that includes developing data acquisition systems with remote wireless communication for monitoring the vibrations of large civil engineering structures. In order to establish the capability of performing remote sensing over an extended period of time, the researchers needed to apply this technology to a real structure. The construction of the National Ignition Facility provided an opportunity to test the data acquisition system on a large structure to monitor whether the facility is remaining within the strict ambient vibration guidelines. This document will briefly discuss the NIF ambient vibration requirements and summarize the vibration measurements performed during the Spring and Summer of 1999. In addition, a brief description of the sensors and the data acquisition systems will be provided in Appendix B.

  3. Vibration-free stirling cryocooler for high definition microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riabzev, S. V.; Veprik, A. M.; Vilenchik, H. S.; Pundak, N.; Castiel, E.

    2009-12-01

    The normal operation of high definition Scanning Electronic and Helium Ion microscope tools often relies on maintaining particular components at cryogenic temperatures. This has traditionally been accomplished by using liquid coolants such as liquid Nitrogen. This inherently limits the useful temperature range to above 77 K, produces various operational hazards and typically involves elevated ownership costs, inconvenient logistics and maintenance. Mechanical coolers, over-performing the above traditional method and capable of delivering required (even below 77 K) cooling to the above cooled components, have been well-known elsewhere for many years, but their typical drawbacks, such as high purchasing cost, cooler size, low reliability and high power consumption have so far prevented their wide-spreading. Additional critical drawback is inevitable degradation of imagery performance originated from the wideband vibration export as typical for the operation of the mechanical cooler incorporating numerous movable components. Recent advances in the development of reliable, compact, reasonably priced and dynamically quiet linear cryogenic coolers gave rise to so-called "dry cooling" technologies aimed at eventually replacing the traditional use of outdated liquid Nitrogen cooling facilities. Although much improved these newer cryogenic coolers still produce relatively high vibration export which makes them incompatible with modern high definition microscopy tools. This has motivated further research activity towards developing a vibration free closed-cycle mechanical cryocooler. The authors have successfully adapted the standard low vibration Stirling cryogenic refrigerator (Ricor model K535-LV) delivering 5 W@40 K heat lift for use in vibration-sensitive high definition microscopy. This has been achieved by using passive mechanical counterbalancing of the main portion of the low frequency vibration export in combination with an active feed-forward multi

  4. Vibrational pooling and constrained equilibration on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boney, E. T. D.

    In this thesis, we provide a statistical theory for the vibrational pooling and fluorescence time dependence observed in infrared laser excitation of CO on an NaCl surface. The pooling is seen in experiment and in computer simulations. In the theory, we assume a rapid equilibration of the quanta in the substrate and minimize the free energy subject to the constraint at any time t of a fixed number of vibrational quanta N(t). At low incident intensity, the distribution is limited to one-quantum exchanges with the solid and so the Debye frequency of the solid plays a key role in limiting the range of this one-quantum domain. The resulting inverted vibrational equilibrium population depends only on fundamental parameters of the oscillator (oe and oeχe) and the surface (oD and T). Possible applications and relation to the Treanor gas phase treatment are discussed. Unlike the solid phase system, the gas phase system has no Debye-constraining maximum. We discuss the possible distributions for arbitrary N-conserving diatom-surface pairs, and include application to H:Si(111) as an example. Computations are presented to describe and analyze the high levels of infrared laser induced vibrational excitation of a monolayer of absorbed 13CO on a NaCl(100) surface. The calculations confirm that, for situations where the Debye frequency limited n domain restriction approximately holds, the vibrational state population deviates from a Boltzmann population linearly in n, a result that we have derived earlier theoretically for a domain of n restricted to one-phonon transfers. This theoretically understood term, linear in n, dominates the Boltzmann term and is responsible for the inversion of the population of vibrational states, Pn We discuss the one-to-one relationship between N and gamma and the examine the state space of the new distribution function for varied gamma. We derive the Free Energy and effective chemical potential for the vibrational pool. We also find the anti

  5. 2008 Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Philip J. Reid

    2009-09-21

    The conference focuses on using vibrational spectroscopy to probe structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and interfaces. The goal is to bring together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of systems.

  6. Vibration analysis of rotor blades with pendulum absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, V. R.; Hammond, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    A comprehensive vibration analysis of rotor blades with spherical pendulum absorbers is presented. Linearized equations of motion for small oscillations about the steady-state deflection of a spherical pendulum on elastic rotor blades undergoing coupled flapwise bending, chordwise bending, and torsional vibrations are obtained. A transmission matrix formulation is given to determine the natural vibrational characteristics of rotor blades with spherical or simple flapping pendulum absorbers. The natural frequencies and mode shapes of a hingeless rotor blade with a spherical pendulum are computed.

  7. Mechanisms of the Space Active Vibration Isolation (SAVI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Frank

    1992-01-01

    The Space Active Vibration Isolation (SAVI) is a concept for vibration isolation of one body from another with simultaneous precise control in 6 Degrees Of Freedom (DOF). SAVI achieves this using a combination of electromechanical linear actuators and magnetic actuators. Other mechanisms of interest include a structure for simulating the body being pointed, an apparatus to simulate the body that is the vibration source, and mechanisms to off-load the weight of each of these two bodies from the experiment to approximate a zero-g condition. A SAVI was built and tested to demonstrate these capabilities.

  8. Attenuation of cryocooler induced vibration in spaceborne infrared payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veprik, A.; Twitto, A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancement of operational responsive space programs calls for a development of compact, reliable, low power and vibration free cryogenic cooling for sophisticated infrared payloads. The refrigeration in a typical closed cycle split Stirling linear cryocooler is achieved by a cyclic compression and expansion of a gaseous working agent due to a synchronized reciprocation of electro-dynamically and pneumatically actuated compressor and expander pistons. Attenuation of the cryocooler induced vibration usually relies on the concept of actively assisted momentum cancellation. In a typical dual-piston compressor this objective is achieved by actively synchronizing the motion of oppositely moving piston assemblies; a typical single-piston expander may be counterbalanced by a motorized counter-balancer. The above approach produces complexity, weight, size, high incurred costs and affects reliability. The authors analyze the case of passive attenuation the vibration export induced by the split Stirling linear cryocooler comprised of inline mounted single-piston compressor and expander. Placement of all the moving components onto a common axis results in a single axis consolidation of vibration export and enables use of single tuned dynamic absorber and low frequency vibration mount. From theoretical analysis and full-scale testing, the performance of such vibration protection arrangement is similar to known systems of active vibration cancellation.

  9. Sound radiation by a moving line source above an impedance plane with frequency-dependent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragna, D.; Blanc-Benon, P.

    2015-08-01

    An analytic solution for the problem of sound radiation by a harmonic line source moving at a uniform subsonic speed parallel to an impedance plane is proposed. The main originality of this work is that the variation of the impedance with the frequency is taken into account. Compared to the case of a constant impedance, the reflection coefficient and the location of its poles in the complex plane are modified. A uniform asymptotic expression is then developed for moderate Mach numbers and a closed-form expression, corresponding to a Weyl-Van der Pol formula, is proposed for a grazing incidence for hard grounds and for low Mach numbers. Unlike previous analytical solutions derived in the literature for a point-source, the impedance is evaluated at the Doppler frequency instead of at the source frequency. The analytical solution and asymptotic expressions are then compared satisfactorily to a numerical solution obtained from a time-domain solver of the linearized Euler equations. Finally, a parametric study is carried out showing that the assumption of a constant impedance is valid if the source Mach number remains small, typically less than 0.2, and if the source is not too close to the ground.

  10. Time-invariant measurement of time-varying bioimpedance using vector impedance analysis.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, B; Louarroudi, E; Pintelon, R

    2015-03-01

    When stepped-sine impedance spectroscopy measurements are carried out on (periodically) time-varying bio-systems, the inherent time-variant (time-periodic) parts are traditionally ignored or mitigated by filtering. The latter, however, lacks theoretical foundation and, in this paper, it is shown that it only works under certain specific conditions. Besides, we propose an alternative method, based on multisine signals, that exploits the non-stationary nature in time-varying bio-systems with a dominant periodic character, such as cardiovascular and respiratory systems, or measurements interfered with by their physiological activities. The novel method extracts the best—in a mean square sense—linear time-invariant (BLTI) impedance approximation ZBLTI(jω) of a periodically time-varying (PTV) impedance ZPTV(jω, t) as well as its time-periodic part. Relying on the geometrical interpretation of the BLTI concept, a new impedance analysis tool, called vector impedance analysis (VIA), is also presented. The theoretical and practical aspects are validated through measurements performed on a PTV dummy circuit and on an in vivo myocardial tissue. PMID:25700023

  11. Crosstalk Compensation for a Rapid, Higher Resolution Impedance Spectrum Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Jon P. Christophersen; John L. Morrison; David M. Rose; William H. Morrison; Chester G. Motloch

    2012-03-01

    impedance at each frequency of interest can be calculated using simple linear algebra based on the error matrix and measured response from the energy storage device given the excitation signal. Analytical validation of CTC over a frequency range between 2000 and 0.1 Hz (i.e., a ten-second input signal duration) was performed using a standardized battery lumped parameter model. The results indicated that the CTC was able to successfully resolve more than 45 frequencies within a sum-of-sines excitation signal, whereas previous techniques could only resolve up to 15 frequencies. A simplified derivation of the CTC technique and its corresponding analytical validation studies using the lumped-parameter model will be presented.

  12. Method and apparatus for minimizing multiple degree of freedom vibration transmission between two regions of a structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, Richard J. (Inventor); Fuller, Chris R. (Inventor); Gibbs, Gary P. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Arrays of actuators are affixed to structural elements to impede the transmission of vibrational energy. A single pair is used to provide control of bending and extensional waves and two pairs are used to control torsional motion. The arrays are applied to a wide variety of structural elements such as a beam structure that is part of a larger framework that may or may not support a rigid or non-rigid skin. Electrical excitation is applied to the actuators that generate forces on the structure. These electrical inputs may be adjusted in their amplitude and phase by a controller in communication with appropriate vibrational wave sensors to impede the flow of vibrational power in all of the above mentioned wave forms beyond the actuator location. Additional sensor elements can be used to monitor the performance and adjust the electrical inputs to maximize the attenuation of vibrational energy.

  13. Implementation of Impedance Method in Syncope Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pęczalski, Kazimierz; Wojciechowski, Dariusz; Dunajski, Zbigniew; Pałko, Tadeusz

    2007-01-01

    Current syncope treatment by cardiac pacing is limited to patients developing cardiodepressive reaction. There is strong need to apply this method to other types of reaction. Presented method shows, that impedance method can be applied for early detection of vasodepressive syncope. Thus the method can be applied for antivasovagal pacing in syncopic patients.

  14. Acoustic grazing flow impedance using waveguide principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, D. L.

    1971-01-01

    A grazing flow apparatus was designed to measure the impedance of acoustic materials when installed in environments that subject the material to grazing airflow. The design of the apparatus and the data analysis technique is based on the solution of the convected wave equation in an infinite length waveguide.

  15. Electrical Impedance Tomography Technology (EITT) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J.

    2014-01-01

    Development of a portable, lightweight device providing two-dimensional tomographic imaging of the human body using impedance mapping. This technology can be developed to evaluate health risks and provide appropriate medical care on the ISS, during space travel and on the ground.

  16. Explicit Expressions of Impedances and Wake Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; Bane, K,; /SLAC

    2012-06-11

    Sections 3.2.4 and 3.2.5 of the Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering on Landau damping are combined and updated. The new addition includes impedances and wakes for multi-layer beam pipe, optical model, diffraction model, and cross-sectional transition.

  17. Explicit expressions of impedances and wake functions

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; Bane, K,; /SLAC

    2010-10-01

    Sections 3.2.4 and 3.2.5 of the Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering on Landau damping are combined and updated. The new addition includes impedances and wakes for multi-layer beam pipe, optical model, diffraction model, and cross-sectional transition.

  18. Bioelectrical Impedance and Body Composition Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martino, Mike

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses field tests that can be used in physical education programs. The most common field tests are anthropometric measurements, which include body mass index (BMI), girth measurements, and skinfold testing. Another field test that is gaining popularity is bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Each method has particular strengths…

  19. Impedance-matched drilling telemetry system

    DOEpatents

    Normann, Randy A.; Mansure, Arthur J.

    2008-04-22

    A downhole telemetry system that uses inductance or capacitance as a mode through which signal is communicated across joints between assembled lengths of pipe wherein efficiency of signal propagation through a drill string, for example, over multiple successive pipe segments is enhanced through matching impedances associated with the various telemetry system components.

  20. High Impedance Comparator for Monitoring Water Resistivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holewinski, Paul K.

    1984-01-01

    A high-impedance comparator suitable for monitoring the resistivity of a deionized or distilled water line supplying water in the 50 Kohm/cm-2 Mohm/cm range is described. Includes information on required circuits (with diagrams), sensor probe assembly, and calibration techniques. (JN)

  1. Experimental Analysis of a Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting System for Harmonic, Random, and Sine on Random Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Cryns, Jackson W.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Santiago-Rojas, Emiliano; Silvers, Kurt L.

    2013-07-01

    Formal journal article Experimental analysis of a piezoelectric energy harvesting system for harmonic, random, and sine on random vibration Abstract: Harvesting power with a piezoelectric vibration powered generator using a full-wave rectifier conditioning circuit is experimentally compared for varying sinusoidal, random and sine on random (SOR) input vibration scenarios. Additionally, the implications of source vibration characteristics on harvester design are discussed. Studies in vibration harvesting have yielded numerous alternatives for harvesting electrical energy from vibrations but piezoceramics arose as the most compact, energy dense means of energy transduction. The rise in popularity of harvesting energy from ambient vibrations has made piezoelectric generators commercially available. Much of the available literature focuses on maximizing harvested power through nonlinear processing circuits that require accurate knowledge of generator internal mechanical and electrical characteristics and idealization of the input vibration source, which cannot be assumed in general application. In this manuscript, variations in source vibration and load resistance are explored for a commercially available piezoelectric generator. We characterize the source vibration by its acceleration response for repeatability and transcription to general application. The results agree with numerical and theoretical predictions for in previous literature that load optimal resistance varies with transducer natural frequency and source type, and the findings demonstrate that significant gains are seen with lower tuned transducer natural frequencies for similar source amplitudes. Going beyond idealized steady state sinusoidal and simplified random vibration input, SOR testing allows for more accurate representation of real world ambient vibration. It is shown that characteristic interactions from more complex vibrational sources significantly alter power generation and power processing

  2. Correlation of the impedance and effective electrode area of doped PEDOT modified electrodes for brain-machine interfaces.

    PubMed

    Harris, Alexander R; Molino, Paul J; Kapsa, Robert M I; Clark, Graeme M; Paolini, Antonio G; Wallace, Gordon G

    2015-05-01

    Electrode impedance is used to assess the thermal noise and signal-to-noise ratio for brain-machine interfaces. An intermediate frequency of 1 kHz is typically measured, although other frequencies may be better predictors of device performance. PEDOT-PSS, PEDOT-DBSA and PEDOT-pTs conducting polymer modified electrodes have reduced impedance at 1 kHz compared to bare metal electrodes, but have no correlation with the effective electrode area. Analytical solutions to impedance indicate that all low-intermediate frequencies can be used to compare the electrode area at a series RC circuit, typical of an ideal metal electrode in a conductive solution. More complex equivalent circuits can be used for the modified electrodes, with a simplified Randles circuit applied to PEDOT-PSS and PEDOT-pTs and a Randles circuit including a Warburg impedance element for PEDOT-DBSA at 0 V. The impedance and phase angle at low frequencies using both equivalent circuit models is dependent on the electrode area. Low frequencies may therefore provide better predictions of the thermal noise and signal-to-noise ratio at modified electrodes. The coefficient of variation of the PEDOT-pTs impedance at low frequencies was lower than the other conducting polymers, consistent with linear and steady-state electroactive area measurements. There are poor correlations between the impedance and the charge density as they are not ideal metal electrodes. PMID:25773879

  3. Sensitivity of PZT Impedance Sensors for Damage Detection of Concrete Structures

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yaowen; Hu, Yuhang; Lu, Yong

    2008-01-01

    Piezoelectric ceramic Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) based electro-mechanical impedance (EMI) technique for structural health monitoring (SHM) has been successfully applied to various engineering systems. However, fundamental research work on the sensitivity of the PZT impedance sensors for damage detection is still in need. In the traditional EMI method, the PZT electro-mechanical (EM) admittance (inverse of the impedance) is used as damage indicator, which is difficult to specify the effect of damage on structural properties. This paper uses the structural mechanical impedance (SMI) extracted from the PZT EM admittance signature as the damage indicator. A comparison study on the sensitivity of the EM admittance and the structural mechanical impedance to the damages in a concrete structure is conducted. Results show that the SMI is more sensitive to the damage than the EM admittance thus a better indicator for damage detection. Furthermore, this paper proposes a dynamic system consisting of a number of single-degree-of-freedom elements with mass, spring and damper components to model the SMI. A genetic algorithm is employed to search for the optimal value of the unknown parameters in the dynamic system. An experiment is carried out on a two-storey concrete frame subjected to base vibrations that simulate earthquake. A number of PZT sensors are regularly arrayed and bonded to the frame structure to acquire PZT EM admittance signatures. The relationship between the damage index and the distance of the PZT sensor from the damage is studied. Consequently, the sensitivity of the PZT sensors is discussed and their sensing region in concrete is derived.

  4. Multivariate Analysis of Ladle Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yenus, Jaefer; Brooks, Geoffrey; Dunn, Michelle

    2016-05-01

    The homogeneity of composition and uniformity of temperature of the steel melt before it is transferred to the tundish are crucial in making high-quality steel product. The homogenization process is performed by stirring the melt using inert gas in ladles. Continuous monitoring of this process is important to make sure the action of stirring is constant throughout the ladle. Currently, the stirring process is monitored by process operators who largely rely on visual and acoustic phenomena from the ladle. However, due to lack of measurable signals, the accuracy and suitability of this manual monitoring are problematic. The actual flow of argon gas to the ladle may not be same as the flow gage reading due to leakage along the gas line components. As a result, the actual degree of stirring may not be correctly known. Various researchers have used one-dimensional vibration, and sound and image signals measured from the ladle to predict the degree of stirring inside. They developed online sensors which are indeed to monitor the online stirring phenomena. In this investigation, triaxial vibration signals have been measured from a cold water model which is a model of an industrial ladle. Three flow rate ranges and varying bath heights were used to collect vibration signals. The Fast Fourier Transform was applied to the dataset before it has been analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS). PCA was used to unveil the structure in the experimental data. PLS was mainly applied to predict the stirring from the vibration response. It was found that for each flow rate range considered in this study, the informative signals reside in different frequency ranges. The first latent variables in these frequency ranges explain more than 95 pct of the variation in the stirring process for the entire single layer and the double layer data collected from the cold model. PLS analysis in these identified frequency ranges demonstrated that the latent

  5. Multivariate Analysis of Ladle Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yenus, Jaefer; Brooks, Geoffrey; Dunn, Michelle

    2016-08-01

    The homogeneity of composition and uniformity of temperature of the steel melt before it is transferred to the tundish are crucial in making high-quality steel product. The homogenization process is performed by stirring the melt using inert gas in ladles. Continuous monitoring of this process is important to make sure the action of stirring is constant throughout the ladle. Currently, the stirring process is monitored by process operators who largely rely on visual and acoustic phenomena from the ladle. However, due to lack of measurable signals, the accuracy and suitability of this manual monitoring are problematic. The actual flow of argon gas to the ladle may not be same as the flow gage reading due to leakage along the gas line components. As a result, the actual degree of stirring may not be correctly known. Various researchers have used one-dimensional vibration, and sound and image signals measured from the ladle to predict the degree of stirring inside. They developed online sensors which are indeed to monitor the online stirring phenomena. In this investigation, triaxial vibration signals have been measured from a cold water model which is a model of an industrial ladle. Three flow rate ranges and varying bath heights were used to collect vibration signals. The Fast Fourier Transform was applied to the dataset before it has been analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS). PCA was used to unveil the structure in the experimental data. PLS was mainly applied to predict the stirring from the vibration response. It was found that for each flow rate range considered in this study, the informative signals reside in different frequency ranges. The first latent variables in these frequency ranges explain more than 95 pct of the variation in the stirring process for the entire single layer and the double layer data collected from the cold model. PLS analysis in these identified frequency ranges demonstrated that the latent

  6. Aortic Input Impedance during Nitroprusside Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Pepine, Carl J.; Nichols, W. W.; Curry, R. C.; Conti, C. Richard

    1979-01-01

    Beneficial effects of nitroprusside infusion in heart failure are purportedly a result of decreased afterload through “impedance” reduction. To study the effect of nitroprusside on vascular factors that determine the total load opposing left ventricular ejection, the total aortic input impedance spectrum was examined in 12 patients with heart failure (cardiac index <2.0 liters/min per m2 and left ventricular end diastolic pressure >20 mm Hg). This input impedance spectrum expresses both mean flow (resistance) and pulsatile flow (compliance and wave reflections) components of vascular load. Aortic root blood flow velocity and pressure were recorded continuously with a catheter-tip electromagnetic velocity probe in addition to left ventricular pressure. Small doses of nitroprusside (9-19 μg/min) altered the total aortic input impedance spectrum as significant (P < 0.05) reductions in both mean and pulsatile components were observed within 60-90 s. With these acute changes in vascular load, left ventricular end diastolic pressure declined (44%) and stroke volume increased (20%, both P < 0.05). Larger nitroprusside doses (20-38 μg/min) caused additional alteration in the aortic input impedance spectrum with further reduction in left ventricular end diastolic pressure and increase in stroke volume but no additional changes in the impedance spectrum or stroke volume occurred with 39-77 μg/min. Improved ventricular function persisted when aortic pressure was restored to control values with simultaneous phenylephrine infusion in three patients. These data indicate that nitroprusside acutely alters both the mean and pulsatile components of vascular load to effect improvement in ventricular function in patients with heart failure. The evidence presented suggests that it may be possible to reduce vascular load and improve ventricular function independent of aortic pressure reduction. PMID:457874

  7. Imaging photorefractive optical vibration measurement method and device

    DOEpatents

    Telschow, Kenneth L.; Deason, Vance A.; Hale, Thomas C.

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for characterizing a vibrating image of an object of interest. The method includes providing a sensing media having a detection resolution within a limited bandwidth and providing an object of interest having a vibrating medium. Two or more wavefronts are provided, with at least one of the wavefronts being modulated by interacting the one wavefront with the vibrating medium of the object of interest. The another wavefront is modulated such that the difference frequency between the one wavefront and the another wavefront is within a response range of the sensing media. The modulated one wavefront and another wavefront are combined in association with the sensing media to interfere and produce simultaneous vibration measurements that are distributed over the object so as to provide an image of the vibrating medium. The image has an output intensity that is substantially linear with small physical variations within the vibrating medium. Furthermore, the method includes detecting the image. In one implementation, the apparatus comprises a vibration spectrum analyzer having an emitter, a modulator, sensing media and a detector configured so as to realize such method. According to another implementation, the apparatus comprises a vibration imaging device.

  8. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  9. Effects of vibrations and shocks on lithium-ion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Martin J.; Schuster, Simon F.; Bach, Tobias; Fleder, Elena; Stelz, Manfred; Gläser, Simon; Müller, Jana; Sextl, Gerhard; Jossen, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are increasingly used in mobile applications where mechanical vibrations and shocks are a constant companion. This work shows how these mechanical loads affect lithium-ion cells. Therefore pouch and cylindrical cells are stressed with vibrational and shock profiles according to the UN 38.3 standard. Additionally, a vibration test is set up to reflect stress in real-world applications and is carried out for 186 days. The effects of the load profiles on the tested cells are investigated by capacity measurement, impedance spectroscopy, micro-X-ray computed tomography and post mortem analyses. The mechanical stress has no effect on the investigated pouch cells. Although all tested cylindrical cells would pass the standard tests, in certain cells stressed in a vertical position the mandrel dispatched itself and struck against internal components. This caused bruised active materials, short circuits, a damaged current collector and current interrupt device. The investigations are not directly transferrable to all pouch or cylindrical cells but show that the mechanical cell design, especially the fixation of the internal components, determines whether a cell withstands vibrations and shocks. Depending on the cell design and the loading direction, long-term vibrational loads can have additional detrimental effects on lithium-ion cells compared to standard tests.

  10. VIBRATIONALLY EXCITED C{sub 4}H

    SciTech Connect

    Cooksy, Andrew L.; Gottlieb, C. A.; Thaddeus, P.; Patel, Nimesh A.; Young, Ken H.; McCarthy, M. C.; Killian, T. C.

    2015-02-01

    Rotational spectra in four new excited vibrational levels of the linear carbon chain radical C{sub 4}H were observed in the millimeter band between 69 and 364 GHz in a low pressure glow discharge, and two of these were observed in a supersonic molecular beam between 19 and 38 GHz. All have rotational constants within 0.4% of the X{sup 2}Σ{sup +} ground vibrational state of C{sub 4}H and were assigned to new bending vibrational levels, two each with {sup 2}Σ and {sup 2}Π vibrational symmetry. The new levels are tentatively assigned to the 1ν{sub 6} and 1ν{sub 5} bending vibrational modes (both with {sup 2}Π symmetry), and the 1ν{sub 6}+1ν{sub 7} and 1ν{sub 5}+1ν{sub 6} combination levels ({sup 2}Σ symmetry) on the basis of the derived spectroscopic constants, relative intensities in our discharge source, and published laser spectroscopic and quantum calculations. Prior spectroscopic constants in the 1ν{sub 7} and 2ν{sub 7} levels were refined. Also presented are interferometric maps of the ground state and the 1ν{sub 7} level obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) near 257 GHz which show that C{sub 4}H is present near the central star in IRC+10216. We found no evidence with the SMA for the new vibrationally excited levels of C{sub 4}H at a peak flux density averaged over a 3{sup ′′} synthesized beam of ⩾0.15 Jy/beam in the 294–296 and 304–306 GHz range, but it is anticipated that rotational lines in the new levels might be observed in IRC+10216 when ALMA attains its full design capability.

  11. On the transmissibilities of nonlinear vibration isolation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zeqi; Brennan, Michael J.; Chen, Li-Qun

    2016-08-01

    Transmissibility is a key parameter to quantify the effectiveness of a vibration isolation system. Under harmonic excitation, the force transmissibility of a linear vibration isolation system is defined as the ratio between the amplitude of the force transmitted to the host structure and the excitation force amplitude, and the displacement transmissibility is the ratio between the displacement amplitude of the payload and that of the base. For a nonlinear vibration isolation system, the force or the displacement responses usually have more frequency components than the excitation. For a harmonic excitation, the response may be periodic, quasi-periodic or chaotic. Therefore, the amplitude ratio cannot well define the transmissibility. The root-mean-square ratio of the response to the excitation is suggested to define the transmissibility. The significance of the modified transmissibility is highlighted in a nonlinear two-stage vibration isolation system consisting of two linear spring connected linear vibration isolators with two additional horizontal linear springs. Harmonic balance method (HBM) is applied to determine the responses with the fundamental and third harmonic. Numerical simulations reveal that chaos may occur in the responses. In both cases, the modified transmissibility works while the original definition cannot be applied to chaotic response.

  12. Linear Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03667 Linear Clouds

    These clouds are located near the edge of the south polar region. The cloud tops are the puffy white features in the bottom half of the image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -80.1N, Longitude 52.1E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  13. Response of the seated human body to whole-body vertical vibration: discomfort caused by sinusoidal vibration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen; Griffin, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Frequency weightings for predicting vibration discomfort assume the same frequency-dependence at all magnitudes of vibration, whereas biodynamic studies show that the frequency-dependence of the human body depends on the magnitude of vibration. This study investigated how the frequency-dependence of vibration discomfort depends on the acceleration and the force at the subject-seat interface. Using magnitude estimation, 20 males and 20 females judged their discomfort caused by sinusoidal vertical acceleration at 13 frequencies (1-16 Hz) at magnitudes from 0.1 to 4.0 ms(-2) r.m.s. The frequency-dependence of their equivalent comfort contours depended on the magnitude of vibration, but was less dependent on the magnitude of dynamic force than the magnitude of acceleration, consistent with the biodynamic non-linearity of the body causing some of the magnitude-dependence of equivalent comfort contours. There were significant associations between the biodynamic responses and subjective responses at all frequencies in the range 1-16 Hz. Practitioner Summary: Vertical seat vibration causes discomfort in many forms of transport. This study provides the frequency-dependence of vibration discomfort over a range of vibration magnitudes and shows how the frequency weightings in the current standards can be improved. PMID:24730710

  14. Selecting RF Amplifiers for Impedance Controlled LLRF Systems - Nonlinear Effects and System Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, John D.; Mastorides, Themis; Rivetta, Claudio Hector; Van Winkle, Daniel; /SLAC

    2007-07-06

    Several high-current accelerators use feedback techniques in the accelerating RF systems to control the impedances seen by the circulating beam. These Direct and Comb Loop architectures put the high power klystron and LLRF signal processing components inside feedback loops, and the ultimate behavior of the systems depends on the individual sub-component properties. Imperfections and non-idealities in the signal processing leads to reduced effectiveness in the impedance control loops. In the PEP-II LLRF systems non-linear effects have been shown to reduce the achievable beam currents, increase low-mode longitudinal growth rates and reduce the margins and stability of the LLRF control loops. We present measurements of the driver amplifiers used in the PEP-II systems, and present measurement techniques needed to quantify the small-signal gain, linearity, transient response and image frequency generation of these amplifiers.

  15. Damage assessment in reinforced concrete using nonlinear vibration techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Den Abeele, K.; De Visscher, J.

    2000-07-01

    Reinforced concrete (RC) structures are subject to microcrack initiation and propagation at load levels far below the actual failure load. In this paper, nonlinear vibration techniques are applied to investigate stages of progressive damage in RC beams induced by static loading tests. At different levels of damage, a modal analysis is carried out, assuming the structure to behave linearly. At the same time, measurement of resonant frequencies and damping ratios as function of vibration amplitude are performed using a frequency domain technique as well as a time domain technique. We compare the results of the linear and nonlinear techniques, and value them against the visual damage evaluation.

  16. Identification and evaluation of linear damping models in beam vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boers, B. L.; Rosenberg, G. S.; Wambsganss, M. W., Jr.

    1969-01-01

    Sensitive method, identifying effective damping mechanisms, involves comparing experimentally determined ratio of first to second mode magnification factors related to common point on beam. Cluster size has little effect on frequencies of elements, magnification factor decreases with cluster size, and viscous and stress damping are dominant damping mechanisms.

  17. Interplay of Bias-Driven Charging and the Vibrational Stark Effect in Molecular Junctions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yajing; Zolotavin, Pavlo; Doak, Peter; Kronik, Leeor; Neaton, Jeffrey B; Natelson, Douglas

    2016-02-10

    We observe large, reversible, bias driven changes in the vibrational energies of PCBM based on simultaneous transport and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) measurements on PCBM-gold junctions. A combination of linear and quadratic shifts in vibrational energies with voltage is analyzed and compared with similar measurements involving C60-gold junctions. A theoretical model based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggests that both a vibrational Stark effect and bias-induced charging of the junction contribute to the shifts in vibrational energies. In the PCBM case, a linear vibrational Stark effect is observed due to the permanent electric dipole moment of PCBM. The vibrational Stark shifts shown here for PCBM junctions are comparable to or larger than the charging effects that dominate in C60 junctions. PMID:26814562

  18. Vibration control via stiffness switching of magnetostrictive transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidler, Justin J.; Asnani, Vivake M.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a computational study is presented of structural vibration control that is realized by switching a magneto-strictive transducer between high and low stiffness states. Switching is accomplished by either changing the applied magnetic field with a voltage excitation or changing the shunt impedance on the transducer's coil (i.e., the magneto-strictive material's magnetic boundary condition). Switched-stiffness vibration control is simulated using a lumped mass supported by a damper and the magneto-strictive transducer (mount), which is represented by a nonlinear, electromechanical model. Free vibration of the mass is calculated while varying the mount's stiffness according to a reference switched-stiffness vibration control law. The results reveal that switching the magnetic field produces the desired change in stiffness, but also an undesired actuation force that can significantly degrade the vibration control. Hence, a modified switched-stiffness control law that accounts for the actuation force is proposed and implemented for voltage-controlled stiffness switching. The influence of the magneto-mechanical bias condition is also discussed. Voltage-controlled stiffness switching is found to introduce damping equivalent to a viscous damping factor up to about 0.13; this is shown to primarily result from active vibration reduction caused by the actuation force. The merit of magneto-strictive switched-stiffness vibration control is then quantified by comparing the results of voltage- and shunt-controlled stiffness switching to the performance of optimal magneto-strictive shunt damping. For the cases considered, optimal resistive shunt damping performed considerably better than both voltage- and shunt-controlled stiffness switching.

  19. Vibration Control via Stiffness Switching of Magnetostrictive Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheidler, Justin J.; Asnani, Vivake M.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a computational study is presented of structural vibration control that is realized by switching a magnetostrictive transducer between high and low stiffness states. Switching is accomplished by either changing the applied magnetic field with a voltage excitation or changing the shunt impedance on the transducer's coil (i.e., the magnetostrictive material's magnetic boundary condition). Switched-stiffness vibration control is simulated using a lumped mass supported by a damper and the magnetostrictive transducer (mount), which is represented by a nonlinear, electromechanical model. Free vibration of the mass is calculated while varying the mount's stiffness according to a reference switched-stiffness vibration control law. The results reveal that switching the magnetic field produces the desired change in stiffness, but also an undesired actuation force that can significantly degrade the vibration control. Hence, a modified switched-stiffness control law that accounts for the actuation force is proposed and implemented for voltage-controlled stiffness switching. The influence of the magneto-mechanical bias condition is also discussed. Voltage-controlled stiffness switching is found to introduce damping equivalent to a viscous damping factor up to about 0.13; this is shown to primarily result from active vibration reduction caused by the actuation force. The merit of magnetostrictive switched-stiffness vibration control is then quantified by comparing the results of voltage- and shunt-controlled stiffness switching to the performance of optimal magnetostrictive shunt damping. For the cases considered, optimal resistive shunt damping performed considerably better than both voltage- and shunt-controlled stiffness switching.

  20. Scattering by a groove in an impedance plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindiganavale, Sunil; Volakis, John L.

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of two-dimensional scattering from a narrow groove in an impedance plane is presented. The groove is represented by a impedance surface and the problem reduces to that of scattering from an impedance strip in an otherwise uniform impedance plane. On the basis of this model, appropriate integral equations are constructed using a form of the impedance plane Green's functions involving rapidly convergent integrals. The integral equations are solved by introducing a single basis representation of the equivalent current on the narrow impedance insert. Both transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations are treated. The resulting solution is validated by comparison with results from the standard boundary integral method (BIM) and a high frequency solution. It is found that the presented solution for narrow impedance inserts can be used in conjunction with the high frequency solution for the characterization of impedance inserts of any given width.

  1. Inter-Changeability of Impedance Devices for Lymphedema Assessment.

    PubMed

    van Zanten, Malou; Piller, Neil; Ward, Leigh C

    2016-06-01

    Impedance technology is a popular technique for the early detection of lymphedema. The preferred approach is to use bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS), with measurements being made with the subject lying supine, although attempts have been made to use single or multiple frequency impedance measurements obtained while the subject is standing. The aim of the present study was to determine the equivalence of these different approaches. Impedance measurements of the individual limbs of 37 healthy individuals were determined using both a stand-on, multi-frequency impedance device and a supine impedance spectroscopy instrument. Significant differences were found between the instruments in both absolute impedance values and, importantly, inter-limb impedance ratios. Since impedance ratios in healthy individuals provide the reference standard for detection of lymphedema, these data indicate that the methods are not interchangeable. Consideration of the errors associated with each method indicates that the BIS remains the preferred method for lymphedema detection. PMID:26574711

  2. Analysis of real-time vibration data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, a few structures have been instrumented to provide continuous vibration data in real time, recording not only large-amplitude motions generated by extreme loads, but also small-amplitude motions generated by ambient loads. The main objective in continuous recording is to track any changes in structural characteristics, and to detect damage after an extreme event, such as an earthquake or explosion. The Fourier-based spectral analysis methods have been the primary tool to analyze vibration data from structures. In general, such methods do not work well for real-time data, because real-time data are mainly composed of ambient vibrations with very low amplitudes and signal-to-noise ratios. The long duration, linearity, and the stationarity of ambient data, however, allow us to utilize statistical signal processing tools, which can compensate for the adverse effects of low amplitudes and high noise. The analysis of real-time data requires tools and techniques that can be applied in real-time; i.e., data are processed and analyzed while being acquired. This paper presents some of the basic tools and techniques for processing and analyzing real-time vibration data. The topics discussed include utilization of running time windows, tracking mean and mean-square values, filtering, system identification, and damage detection.

  3. Control issues of microgravity vibration isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knospe, C. R.; Hampton, R. D.; Allaire, P. E.

    1991-01-01

    Active vibration isolation systems contemplated for microgravity space experiments may be designed to reach given performance requirements in a variety of ways. An analogy to passive isolation systems proves to be illustrative but lacks the flexibility as a design tool of a control systems approach and may lead to poor designs. For example, it is shown that a focus on equivalent stiffness in isolation system design leads to a controller that sacrifices robustness for performance. Control theory as applied to vibration isolation is reviewed and passive analogies are discussed. The loop shaping trade-off is introduced and used to design a single-degree-of-freedom fedback controller. An algebraic control design methodology is contrasted to loop shaping and critiqued. Multi-axis vibration isolation and the problems of decoupled single loop control are introduced through a two-degree-of-freedom example problem. It is shown that center of mass uncertainty may result in instability when decoupled single loop control is used. This results from the ill-conditioned nature of the feedback control design. The use of the Linear Quadratic Regulator synthesis procedure for vibration isolation controller design is discussed.

  4. Focal vibration in neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Murillo, N; Valls-Sole, J; Vidal, J; Opisso, E; Medina, J; Kumru, H

    2014-04-01

    During the last decade, many studies have been carried out to understand the effects of focal vibratory stimuli at various levels of the central nervous system and to study pathophysiological mechanisms of neurological disorders as well as the therapeutic effects of focal vibration in neurorehabilitation. This review aimed to describe the effects of focal vibratory stimuli in neurorehabilitation including the neurological diseases or disorders like stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's' disease and dystonia. In conclusion, focal vibration stimulation is well tolerated, effective and easy to use, and it could be used to reduce spasticity, to promote motor activity and motor learning within a functional activity, even in gait training, independent from etiology of neurological pathology. Further studies are needed in the future well-designed trials with bigger sample size to determine the most effective frequency, amplitude and duration of vibration application in the neurorehabilitation. PMID:24842220

  5. Cyclone vibration effects

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.C.; Tillery, M.I.

    1981-09-01

    A Government Accounting Office review of coal mine dust sampling procedures recommended studies be performed to determine accuracy and precision of dust measurements taken with current equipment. The effects of vibration on the 10-mm Dorr-Oliver nylon cyclone run at a flow rate of 2 L/min were investigated. A total of 271 samples were taken during 95 tests. All tests lasted about 7 h each and were performed inside a 19 l capacity aerosol chamber. Coal dust concentrations of about 2 mg/m/SUP/3 in air and a respirable fraction of 25-30% were used. The effects of a variety of vibration frequencies and stroke lengths were tested in two modes (horizontal and vertical). At most frequencies and stroke lengths, vibration was found to have an insignificant effect on cyclone performance.

  6. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  7. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, Joseph B.; Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Tobin, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  8. Digital vibration control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, P.; Kim, B. K.; Boctor, W.

    1974-01-01

    Analog vibration control techniques are reviewed and are compared with digital techniques. The advantages of the digital methods over the analog methods are demonstrated. The following topics are covered: (1) methods of computer-controlled random vibration and reverberation acoustic testing; (2) methods of computer-controlled sinewave vibration testing; and (3) methods of computer-controlled shock testing. Basic concepts are stressed rather than specific techniques or equipment. General algorithms are described in the form of block diagrams and flow diagrams. Specific problems and potential problems are discussed. The material is computer sciences oriented but is kept at a level that facilitates an understanding of the basic concepts of computer-controlled induced environmental test systems.

  9. Externally tuned vibration absorber

    DOEpatents

    Vincent, Ronald J.

    1987-09-22

    A vibration absorber unit or units are mounted on the exterior housing of a hydraulic drive system of the type that is powered from a pressure wave generated, e.g., by a Stirling engine. The hydraulic drive system employs a piston which is hydraulically driven to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the axis of the hydraulic drive system. The vibration absorbers each include a spring or other resilient member having one side affixed to the housing and another side to which an absorber mass is affixed. In a preferred embodiment, a pair of vibration absorbers is employed, each absorber being formed of a pair of leaf spring assemblies, between which the absorber mass is suspended.

  10. Internal resonance for nonlinear vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, D. X.; Leadenham, S.; Erturk, A.

    2015-11-01

    The transformation of waste vibration energy into low-power electricity has been heavily researched over the last decade to enable self-sustained wireless electronic components. Monostable and bistable nonlinear oscillators have been explored by several research groups in an effort to enhance the frequency bandwidth of operation. Linear two-degree-of-freedom (2-DOF) configurations as well as the combination of a nonlinear single-DOF harvester with a linear oscillator to constitute a nonlinear 2-DOF harvester have also been explored to develop broadband energy harvesters. In the present work, the concept of nonlinear internal resonance in a continuous frame structure is explored for broadband energy harvesting. The L-shaped beam-mass structure with quadratic nonlinearity was formerly studied in the nonlinear dynamics literature to demonstrate modal energy exchange and the saturation phenomenon when carefully tuned for two-to-one internal resonance. In the current effort, piezoelectric coupling and an electrical load are introduced, and electromechanical equations of the L-shaped energy harvester are employed to explore primary resonance behaviors around the first and the second linear natural frequencies for bandwidth enhancement. Simulations using approximate analytical frequency response equations as well as numerical solutions reveal significant bandwidth enhancement as compared to a typical linear 2-DOF counterpart. Vibration and voltage responses are explored, and the effects of various system parameters on the overall dynamics of the internal resonance-based energy harvesting system are reported.

  11. Modelling chaotic vibrations using NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheerer, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    Due to the unavailability and, later, prohibitive cost of the computational power required, many phenomena in nonlinear dynamic systems have in the past been addressed in terms of linear systems. Linear systems respond to periodic inputs with periodic outputs, and may be characterized in the time domain or in the frequency domain as convenient. Reduction to the frequency domain is frequently desireable to reduce the amount of computation required for solution. Nonlinear systems are only soluble in the time domain, and may exhibit a time history which is extremely sensitive to initial conditions. Such systems are termed chaotic. Dynamic buckling, aeroelasticity, fatigue analysis, control systems and electromechanical actuators are among the areas where chaotic vibrations have been observed. Direct transient analysis over a long time period presents a ready means of simulating the behavior of self-excited or externally excited nonlinear systems for a range of experimental parameters, either to characterize chaotic behavior for development of load spectra, or to define its envelope and preclude its occurrence.

  12. Modelling chaotic vibrations using NASTRAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheerer, T. J.

    1993-09-01

    Due to the unavailability and, later, prohibitive cost of the computational power required, many phenomena in nonlinear dynamic systems have in the past been addressed in terms of linear systems. Linear systems respond to periodic inputs with periodic outputs, and may be characterized in the time domain or in the frequency domain as convenient. Reduction to the frequency domain is frequently desireable to reduce the amount of computation required for solution. Nonlinear systems are only soluble in the time domain, and may exhibit a time history which is extremely sensitive to initial conditions. Such systems are termed chaotic. Dynamic buckling, aeroelasticity, fatigue analysis, control systems and electromechanical actuators are among the areas where chaotic vibrations have been observed. Direct transient analysis over a long time period presents a ready means of simulating the behavior of self-excited or externally excited nonlinear systems for a range of experimental parameters, either to characterize chaotic behavior for development of load spectra, or to define its envelope and preclude its occurrence.

  13. Stimuli dependent impedance of conductive magnetorheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Xuan, Shouhu; Dong, Bo; Xu, Feng; Gong, Xinglong

    2016-02-01

    The structure dependent impedance of conductive magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) under different loads and magnetic fields has been studied in this work. By increasing the weight fraction of iron particles, the conductivity of the MREs increased. Dynamic mechanical measurements and synchrotron radiation x-ray computed tomography (SR-CT) were used and they provided reasons for the electrical properties changing significantly under pressure and magnetic field stimulation. The high sensitivity of MREs to external stimuli renders them suitable for application in force or magnetic field sensors. The equivalent circuit model was proposed to analyze the impedance response of MREs and it fits the experimental results very well. Each circuit component reflected the change of the inner interface under different conditions, thus relative changes in the microstructure could be distinguished. This method could be used not only to detect the structural changes in the MRE but also to provide a great deal of valuable information for the further understanding of the MR mechanism.

  14. Readout electrode assembly for measuring biological impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, L. D.; Moody, D. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    The invention comprises of a pair of readout ring electrodes which are used in conjunction with apparatus for measuring the electrical impedance between different points in the body of a living animal to determine the amount of blood flow therebetween. The readout electrodes have independently adjustable diameters to permit attachment around different parts of the body between which it is desired to measure electric impedance. The axial spacing between the electrodes is adjusted by a pair of rods which have a first pair of ends fixedly attached to one electrode and a second pair of ends slidably attached to the other electrode. Indicia are provided on the outer surface of the ring electrodes and on the surface of the rods to permit measurement of the circumference and spacing between the ring electrodes.

  15. Impedance issues in the CERN SPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnecar, T.

    1999-12-01

    The future use of the CERN SPS accelerator as injector for the Large Hadron Collider, LHC, and the possible use of the SPS as a neutrino source for the Gran Sasso experiment are pushing the maximum intensity requirements of the accelerator much higher than achieved up to now. At the same time the requirements on beam quality are becoming far more stringent. The SPS machine, built in the 70's, is not a "smooth" machine. It contains many discontinuities in vacuum chamber cross-section and many cavity-like objects, as well as the 5 separate RF systems at present installed. All these lead to a high impedance, seen by the beam, spread over a wide frequency range. As a result there is a constant fight against instabilities, both single and multi bunch, as the intensity increases. A program of studies is under way in the SPS to identify, reduce, and remove where possible the sources of these impedances.

  16. Impedance of a beam tube with antechamber

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, W.; Lambertson, G.R.; Voelker, F.

    1986-08-01

    A beam vacuum chamber was proposed to allow synchrotron light to radiate from a circulating electron beam into an antechamber containing photon targets, pumps, etc. To determine the impedance such a geometry would present to the beam, electromagnetic measurements were carried out on a section of chamber using for low frequencies a current-carrying wire and for up to 16 GHz, a resonance perturbation method. Because the response of such a chamber would depend on upstream and downstream restrictions of aperture yet to be determined, the resonance studies were analyzed in some generality. The favorable conclusion of these studies is that the antechamber makes practically no contribution to either the longitudinal or the transverse impedances.

  17. Automatic digital-analog impedance plethysmograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goy, C. B.; Mauro, K. A.; Yanicelli, L. M.; Parodi, N. F.; Gómez López, M. A.; Herrera, M. C.

    2016-04-01

    Venous occlusion plethysmography (VOP) is a traditional method widely used to assess limb blood circulation. One common mode to record VOP is by means of evaluating limb volume changes using impedance plethysmography (IP). In this paper the design and implementation of an automatic digital-analog impedance plethysmograph (ADAIP) for VOP is presented. The system is tested using precision resistances in order to calculate its repeatability. Then its global performance is assessed by means of VOP recordings on the upper and me lower limb of a healthy volunteer. The obtained repeatability was very high (95%), and the VOP recordings where the expected ones. It can be concluded that the whole system performs well and that it is suitable for automatic VOP recording.

  18. Impedance characteristics of terawatt ion diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendel, C. W., Jr.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Pointon, T. D.; Quintenz, J. P.; Rosenthal, S. E.; Seidel, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.

    Light ion fusion research has developed ion diodes that have unique properties when compared to other ion diodes. These diodes involve relativistic electrons, ion beam stagnation pressures that compress the magnetic field to the order of 10 Tesla, and large space charge and particle current effects throughout the accelerating region. These diodes have required new theories and models to account for effects that previously were unimportant. One of the most important effects of the magnetic field compression and large space charge has been impedance collapse. The impedance collapse can lead to poor energy transfer efficiency, beam debunching, and rapid change of the beam focus. The current understanding of these effects is discussed including some of the methods used to ameliorate them, and the future directions the theory and modeling will take.

  19. Enhanced Method for Cavity Impedance Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Marhauser, Robert Rimmer, Kai Tian, Haipeng Wang

    2009-05-01

    With the proposal of medium to high average current accelerator facilities the demand for cavities with extremely low Higher Order Mode (HOM) impedances is increasing. Modern numerical tools are still under development to more thoroughly predict impedances that need to take into account complex absorbing boundaries and lossy materials. With the usually large problem size it is preferable to utilize massive parallel computing when applicable and available. Apart from such computational issues, we have developed methods using available computer resources to enhance the information that can be extracted from a cavities? wakefield computed in time domain. In particular this is helpful for a careful assessment of the extracted RF power and the mitigation of potential beam break-up or emittance diluting effects, a figure of merit for the cavity performance. The method is described as well as an example of its implementation.

  20. Nonlinear acoustic impedance of thermoacoustic stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Huan; Fan, Li; Xiao, Shu-yu; Tao, Sha; Qiu, Mei-chen; Zhang, Shu-yi; Zhang, Hui

    2012-09-01

    In order to optimize the performances of the thermoacoustic refrigerator working with the high sound pressure level, the nonlinear acoustic characteristics of the thermoacoustic stack in the resonant pipe are studied. The acoustic fluid impedance of the stack made of copper mesh and set up in a resonant pipe is measured in the acoustic fields with different intensities. It is found that when the sound pressure level in the pipe increases to a critical value, the resistance of the stack increases nonlinearly with the sound pressure, while the reactance of the stack keeps constant. Based on the experimental results, a theory model is set up to describe the acoustic characteristics of the stack, according to the rigid frame theory and Forchheimmer equation. Furthermore, the influences of the sound pressure level, operating frequency, volume porosity, and length of the stack on the nonlinear impedance of the stack are evaluated.

  1. Vibrational spectroscopy of resveratrol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billes, Ferenc; Mohammed-Ziegler, Ildikó; Mikosch, Hans; Tyihák, Ernő

    2007-11-01

    In this article the authors deal with the experimental and theoretical interpretation of the vibrational spectra of trans-resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy- trans-stilbene) of diverse beneficial biological activity. Infrared and Raman spectra of the compound were recorded; density functional calculations were carried out resulting in the optimized geometry and several properties of the molecule. Based on the calculated force constants, a normal coordinate analysis yielded the character of the vibrational modes and the assignment of the measured spectral bands.

  2. Superconducting surface impedance under radiofrequency field

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiao, Binping P.; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2013-04-26

    Based on BCS theory with moving Cooper pairs, the electron states distribution at 0K and the probability of electron occupation with finite temperature have been derived and applied to anomalous skin effect theory to obtain the surface impedance of a superconductor under radiofrequency (RF) field. We present the numerical results for Nb and compare these with representative RF field-dependent effective surface resistance measurements from a 1.5 GHz resonant structure.

  3. Equivalent impedance of a rough interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuk, N. P.; Tret'iakov, O. A.

    1987-10-01

    An equivalent-impedance (EI) dyad is constructed for a rough and plane (on the average) interface dividing two plane-stratified magnetodielectric media. Its characteristics are related to those of a smooth surface and to the scattering properties of the roughnesses. It is shown that the Hermitian part of an EI dyad is formed through field scattering by roughnesses into the propagating natural modes of the regular medium.

  4. Impedance analysis of nanocarbon DSSC electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, S.; Giorgi, L.; Giorgi, R.; Lisi, N.; Dikonimos Makris, Th.; Salernitano, E.; Rufoloni, A.

    2009-07-01

    Carbon nanoparticles and multiwall carbon nanotubes were deposited on an Optically Transparent Electrode (OTE) for application in Dye Sensitised Solar Cells (DSSCs) as counter electrode materials. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was used to evaluate the behaviour in a I3-/I electrolyte solution. Results were compared to commercial Pt catalysed OTE and polycrystalline graphite. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes show low series resistance and low charge transfer resistance promising an improved fill factor (and efficiency) in DSSCs assembled with such materials as counter electrodes.

  5. Impedance Matched Absorptive Thermal Blocking Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Chuss, D. T.; Rostem, K.; U-Yen, K.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized absorptive thermal blocking filters for cryogenic microwave applications. The transmission line filter's input characteristic impedance is designed to match 50O and its response has been validated from 0-to-50GHz. The observed return loss in the 0-to-20GHz design band is greater than 20 dB and shows graceful degradation with frequency. Design considerations and equations are provided that enable this approach to be scaled and modified for use in other applications.

  6. Impedance Matched Absorptive Thermal Blocking Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Chuss, D. T.; U-Yen, K.; Rostem, K.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized absorptive thermal blocking filters for cryogenic microwave applications. The transmission line filter's input characteristic impedance is designed to match 50 Omega and its response has been validated from 0-to-50GHz. The observed return loss in the 0-to-20GHz design band is greater than 20 dB and shows graceful degradation with frequency. Design considerations and equations are provided that enable this approach to be scaled and modified for use in other applications.

  7. Measurement of shear impedances of viscoelastic fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Chien, Hual-Te; Raptis, A.C.

    1996-12-31

    Shear-wave reflection coefficients from a solid/fluid interface are derived for non-Newtonian fluids that can be described by Maxwell, Voigt, and power-law fluid models. Based on model calculations, we have identified the measurable effects on the reflection coefficients due to fluid non-Newtonian behavior. The models are used to interpret the viscosity data obtained by a technique based on shear impedance measurement.

  8. A new method for estimating shear-wave velocity in marine sediments from radiation impedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Masao

    2005-11-01

    Shear-wave velocity is one of the important parameters that characterize the physical properties of marine sediments. In this study, a new method is proposed for measuring shear-wave velocity in marine sediments by using radiation impedance. Shear-wave velocities for three kinds of urethane rubber with different Japanese Industrial Standards hardness values were obtained by radiation impedance and time-of-flight measurement techniques. It was shown that the values of the shear-wave velocity measured by the radiation impedance method were consistent with those of time-of-flight measurements. It was then shown that the shear-wave velocities for air- and water-saturated beach sands are different. It was also found that the indicated shear-wave velocity is dependent on the vibrating plate radius because the instrument measures an average shear-wave velocity within a depth window beneath the plate; the larger the plate radius, the deeper the averaging window. Finally, measurements were made on two-layered media in which air-saturated beach sand or urethane rubber was covered with air-saturated clay, and the relationship between the thickness of the clay layer and the indicated shear-wave velocity was investigated.

  9. Ability of Impedance-Based Health Monitoring To Detect Structural Damage of Propulsion System Components Assessed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Richard E.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2005-01-01

    Impedance-based structural-health-monitoring uses piezoelectric (PZT) patches that are bonded onto or embedded in a structure. Each individual patch behaves as both an actuator of the surrounding structural area as well as a sensor of the structural response. The size of the excited area varies with the geometry and material composition of the structure, and an active patch is driven by a sinusoidal voltage sweep. When a PZT patch is subjected to an electric field, it produces a mechanical strain; and when it is stressed, it produces an electric charge. Since the patch is bonded to the structure, driving a patch deforms and vibrates the structure. The structure then produces a localized dynamic response. This structural system response is transferred back to the PZT patch, which in turn produces an electrical response. The electromechanical impedance method is based on the principle of electromechanical coupling between the active sensor and the structure, which allows researchers to assess local structural dynamics directly by interrogating a distributed sensor array. Because of mechanical coupling between the sensor and the host structure, this mechanical effect is picked up by the sensor and, through electromechanical coupling inside the active element, is reflected in electrical impedance measured at the sensor s terminals.

  10. Application of impedance spectroscopy to SOFC research

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, G.; Mason, T.O.; Pederson, L.R.

    1996-12-31

    With the resurgence of interest in solid oxide fuel cells and other solid state electrochemical devices, techniques originally developed for characterizing aqueous systems are being adapted and applied to solid state systems. One of these techniques, three-electrode impedance spectroscopy, is particularly powerful as it allows characterization of subcomponent and interfacial properties. Obtaining accurate impedance spectra, however, is difficult as reference electrode impedance is usually non-negligible and solid electrolytes typically have much lower conductance than aqueous solutions. Faidi et al and Chechirlian et al have both identified problems associated with low conductivity media. Other sources of error are still being uncovered. Ford et al identified resistive contacts with large time constants as a possibility, while Me et al showed that the small contact capacitance of the reference electrode was at fault. Still others show that instrument limitations play a role. Using the voltage divider concept, a simplified model that demonstrates the interplay of these various factors, predicts the form of possible distortions, and offers means to minimize errors is presented.

  11. Antenna pattern control using impedance surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Liu, Kefeng

    1992-09-01

    During this research period, we have effectively transferred existing computer codes from CRAY supercomputer to work station based systems. The work station based version of our code preserved the accuracy of the numerical computations while giving a much better turn-around time than the CRAY supercomputer. Such a task relieved us of the heavy dependence of the supercomputer account budget and made codes developed in this research project more feasible for applications. The analysis of pyramidal horns with impedance surfaces was our major focus during this research period. Three different modeling algorithms in analyzing lossy impedance surfaces were investigated and compared with measured data. Through this investigation, we discovered that a hybrid Fourier transform technique, which uses the eigen mode in the stepped waveguide section and the Fourier transformed field distributions across the stepped discontinuities for lossy impedances coating, gives a better accuracy in analyzing lossy coatings. After a further refinement of the present technique, we will perform an accurate radiation pattern synthesis in the coming reporting period.

  12. Bioelectrical impedance analysis of bovine milk fat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiga, E. A.; Bertemes-Filho, P.

    2012-12-01

    Three samples of 250ml at home temperature of 20°C were obtained from whole, low fat and fat free bovine UHT milk. They were analysed by measuring both impedance spectra and dc conductivity in order to establish the relationship between samples related to fat content. An impedance measuring system was developed, which is based on digital oscilloscope, a current source and a FPGA. Data was measured by the oscilloscope in the frequency 1 kHz to 100 kHz. It was showed that there is approximately 7.9% difference in the conductivity between whole and low fat milk whereas 15.9% between low fat and free fat one. The change of fatness in the milk can be significantly sensed by both impedance spectra measurements and dc conductivity. This result might be useful for detecting fat content of milk in a very simple way and also may help the development of sensors for measuring milk quality, as for example the detection of mastitis.

  13. On the directional symmetry of the impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Heifets, S.A.

    1990-03-01

    The independence of the impedance on the beam direction is an important feature of an accelerator structure, in particular, for the electron-positron storage rings where bunches of opposite charges travel through the same vacuum chamber in opposite directions. Recently Gluckstern and Zotter considered a cylindrically symmetric but longitudinally asymmetric cavity with side pipes of equal radii. They were able to prove that for a relativistic particle the longitudinal impedance of the cavity with an arbitrary shape is independent of the direction in which the beam travels through it. Their result corroborates numerical observations of the independence of the wakefield obtained with the code TBCI. Bisognano gave an elegant proof of the same statement. His approach is based on a reciprocity relation applied to the tensor Green's function. I follow here his idea in a somewhat simpler way to obtain more general and physically transparent proof of this property for both longitudinal and transverse impedances. The result is valid for a cavity with no azimuthal symmetry and for arbitrary particle velocity, as soon as it may be considered constant. At the same time the limits of its validity are shown.

  14. PEP-X IMPEDANCE AND INSTABILITY CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Lee, L.-Q.; Ng, C.; Stupakov, G.; au Wang, L.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    PEP-X, a next generation, ring-based light source is designed to run with beams of high current and low emittance. Important parameters are: energy 4.5 GeV, circumference 2.2 km, beam current 1.5 A, and horizontal and vertical emittances, 185 pm by 8 pm. In such a machine it is important that impedance driven instabilities not degrade the beam quality. In this report they study the strength of the impedance and its effects in PEP-X. For the present, lacking a detailed knowledge of the vacuum chamber shape, they create a straw man design comprising important vacuum chamber objects to be found in the ring, for which they then compute the wake functions. From the wake functions they generate an impedance budget and a pseudo-Green function wake representing the entire ring, which they, in turn, use for performing microwave instability calculations. In this report they, in addition, consider in PEP-X the transverse mode-coupling, multi-bunch transverse, and beam-ion instabilities.

  15. Analysis of Conductor Impedances Accounting for Skin Effect and Nonlinear Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, M P; Ong, M M; Brown, C G; Speer, R D

    2011-07-20

    It is often necessary to protect sensitive electrical equipment from pulsed electric and magnetic fields. To accomplish this electromagnetic shielding structures similar to Faraday Cages are often implemented. If the equipment is inside a facility that has been reinforced with rebar, the rebar can be used as part of a lighting protection system. Unfortunately, such shields are not perfect and allow electromagnetic fields to be created inside due to discontinuities in the structure, penetrations, and finite conductivity of the shield. In order to perform an analysis of such a structure it is important to first determine the effect of the finite impedance of the conductors used in the shield. In this paper we will discuss the impedances of different cylindrical conductors in the time domain. For a time varying pulse the currents created in the conductor will have different spectral components, which will affect the current density due to skin effects. Many construction materials use iron and different types of steels that have a nonlinear permeability. The nonlinear material can have an effect on the impedance of the conductor depending on the B-H curve. Although closed form solutions exist for the impedances of cylindrical conductors made of linear materials, computational techniques are needed for nonlinear materials. Simulations of such impedances are often technically challenging due to the need for a computational mesh to be able to resolve the skin depths for the different spectral components in the pulse. The results of such simulations in the time domain will be shown and used to determine the impedances of cylindrical conductors for lightning current pulses that have low frequency content.

  16. A new correction technique for measuring respiratory impedance through an endotracheal tube.

    PubMed

    Lorino, A M; Beydon, L; Mariette, C; Dahan, E; Lorino, H

    1996-05-01

    Measurement of respiratory impedance (Zrs) in intubated patients requires corrections for flow-dependent resistance and air compression inside the endotracheal tube (ET). The purpose of this study was to test a new correction technique for these effects. We therefore studied 110 patients in two conditions: breathing normally (C1), or breathing through an ET placed at the mouth (C2). In C1, we measured pressure and flow signals at the mouth, and in C2, at the ET inlet, during application of a pseudorandom forced excitation (4-32 Hz). In C1, respiratory impedance was calculated directly as Z1. In C2, pressure data were first corrected for the flow-dependent resistance of the ET, and respiratory impedance was then corrected both for gas compression inside the set-up and ET inertance (impedance Z2). Strong linear relationships were found between the reference and corrected estimates of the resistance at 6 Hz, the frequency dependence of resistance and the resonant frequency. The mean normalized distance between Z1 and Z2 observed in the patients over the 4-32 Hz frequency range was about 14% for resistance and 12% for reactance (-9% and -4%, respectively, when considering the algebraic value of the distance). This slight underestimation of both components of impedance might be due to an overcorrection of pressure for the flow-dependent resistance of the ET. We conclude that, in intubated patients, newly tested corrections for the mechanical contribution of the endotracheal tube may yield a fair estimate of respiratory impedance when pressure is measured at the inlet of the endotracheal tube. PMID:8793472

  17. Vibration Propagation in Spider Webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatton, Ross; Otto, Andrew; Elias, Damian

    Due to their poor eyesight, spiders rely on web vibrations for situational awareness. Web-borne vibrations are used to determine the location of prey, predators, and potential mates. The influence of web geometry and composition on web vibrations is important for understanding spider's behavior and ecology. Past studies on web vibrations have experimentally measured the frequency response of web geometries by removing threads from existing webs. The full influence of web structure and tension distribution on vibration transmission; however, has not been addressed in prior work. We have constructed physical artificial webs and computer models to better understand the effect of web structure on vibration transmission. These models provide insight into the propagation of vibrations through the webs, the frequency response of the bare web, and the influence of the spider's mass and stiffness on the vibration transmission patterns. Funded by NSF-1504428.

  18. A Linear Theory for Inflatable Plates of Arbitrary Shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McComb, Harvey G., Jr.

    1961-01-01

    A linear small-deflection theory is developed for the elastic behavior of inflatable plates of which Airmat is an example. Included in the theory are the effects of a small linear taper in the depth of the plate. Solutions are presented for some simple problems in the lateral deflection and vibration of constant-depth rectangular inflatable plates.

  19. Piezoelectric Power Requirements for Active Vibration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, Matthew C.; McGowan, Anna-Maria Rivas

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a method for predicting the power consumption of piezoelectric actuators utilized for active vibration control. Analytical developments and experimental tests show that the maximum power required to control a structure using surface-bonded piezoelectric actuators is independent of the dynamics between the piezoelectric actuator and the host structure. The results demonstrate that for a perfectly-controlled system, the power consumption is a function of the quantity and type of piezoelectric actuators and the voltage and frequency of the control law output signal. Furthermore, as control effectiveness decreases, the power consumption of the piezoelectric actuators decreases. In addition, experimental results revealed a non-linear behavior in the material properties of piezoelectric actuators. The material non- linearity displayed a significant increase in capacitance with an increase in excitation voltage. Tests show that if the non-linearity of the capacitance was accounted for, a conservative estimate of the power can easily be determined.

  20. Active balance system and vibration balanced machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Songgang (Inventor); Augenblick, John E. (Inventor); Peterson, Allen A. (Inventor); White, Maurice A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An active balance system is provided for counterbalancing vibrations of an axially reciprocating machine. The balance system includes a support member, a flexure assembly, a counterbalance mass, and a linear motor or an actuator. The support member is configured for attachment to the machine. The flexure assembly includes at least one flat spring having connections along a central portion and an outer peripheral portion. One of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion is fixedly mounted to the support member. The counterbalance mass is fixedly carried by the flexure assembly along another of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion. The linear motor has one of a stator and a mover fixedly mounted to the support member and another of the stator and the mover fixedly mounted to the counterbalance mass. The linear motor is operative to axially reciprocate the counterbalance mass.

  1. Circuit and Scattering Matrix Analysis of the Wire Measurement Method of Beam Impedance in Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Roger M

    2003-05-23

    In order to measure the wakefield left behind multiple bunches of energetic electrons we have previously used the ASSET facility in the SLC [1]. However, in order to produce a more rapid and cost-effective determination of the wakefields we have designed a wire experimental method to measure the beam impedance and from the Fourier transform thereof, the wakefields. In this paper we present studies of the wire effect on the properties of X-band structures in study for the JLC/NLC (Japanese Linear Collider/Next Linear Collider) project. Simulations are made on infinite and finite periodical structures. The results are discussed.

  2. Buckling and vibration of a rotating beam†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachman, A.

    1986-09-01

    The equations for the vibration of a rotating beam, such as a helicopter blade, are exhibited. The beam is elastic (in general non-linearly so), the description is geometrically exact, the axis of rotation does not necessarily pass through the beam's clamped end (precession) and cross-sectional shearing is accounted for by using a director theory. Particular attention is paid to the impossibility of vibration (or buckling) confined to a plane making an angle β to the axis of rotation unless β=π/2 (orπ/2 or 0) or rotatory inertia is neglected. For purposed of illustration the analysis is specialized to describe Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beams.

  3. Control of Drop Motion by Mechanical Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestehorn, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Since the first experimental observations of Michael Faraday in 1831 it is known that a vibrating liquid may show an instability of its flat free surface with respect to oscillating regular surface patterns. We study thin liquid films on a horizontal substrate in the long wave approximation. The films are parametrically excited by mechanical horizontal or inclined oscillations. Inertia effects are taken into account and the standard thin film formulation is extended by a second equation for the vertically averaged mass flux. The films can be additionally unstable by Van der Waals forces on a partially wetting substrate, leading to the formation of drops. These drops can be manipulated by the vibrations to move in a desired direction. Linear results based on a damped complex valued Mathieu equation as well as fully nonlinear results using a reduced model will be presented, for more details see.

  4. Vibrational Heat Transport in Molecular Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, Dvira; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar

    2016-05-01

    We review studies of vibrational energy transfer in a molecular junction geometry, consisting of a molecule bridging two heat reservoirs, solids or large chemical compounds. This setup is of interest for applications in molecular electronics, thermoelectrics, and nanophononics, and for addressing basic questions in the theory of classical and quantum transport. Calculations show that system size, disorder, structure, dimensionality, internal anharmonicities, contact interaction, and quantum coherent effects are factors that combine to determine the predominant mechanism (ballistic/diffusive), effectiveness (poor/good), and functionality (linear/nonlinear) of thermal conduction at the nanoscale. We review recent experiments and relevant calculations of quantum heat transfer in molecular junctions. We recount the Landauer approach, appropriate for the study of elastic (harmonic) phononic transport, and outline techniques that incorporate molecular anharmonicities. Theoretical methods are described along with examples illustrating the challenge of reaching control over vibrational heat conduction in molecules.

  5. Active control of vibration transmission through struts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelinescu, Ion; Balachandran, Balakumar

    1998-07-01

    In this work, analytical investigations into active control of longitudinal and flexural vibrations transmitted through a cylindrical strut are conducted. A mechanics based model for a strut fitted with a piezoelectric actuator is developed. For harmonic disturbances, a linear dynamic formulation describing the motion of the actuator is integrated with the formulation describing wave transmission through the strut, and the resulting system is studied in the frequency domain. Open-loop studies are conducted with the aid of numerical simulations, and the potential of active control schemes to attenuate the transmitted vibrations over the frequency range of 10 Hz to 6000 Hz is examined. The relevance of the current work to control of helicopter cabin interior noise is also discussed.

  6. Vibrational Heat Transport in Molecular Junctions.

    PubMed

    Segal, Dvira; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar

    2016-05-27

    We review studies of vibrational energy transfer in a molecular junction geometry, consisting of a molecule bridging two heat reservoirs, solids or large chemical compounds. This setup is of interest for applications in molecular electronics, thermoelectrics, and nanophononics, and for addressing basic questions in the theory of classical and quantum transport. Calculations show that system size, disorder, structure, dimensionality, internal anharmonicities, contact interaction, and quantum coherent effects are factors that combine to determine the predominant mechanism (ballistic/diffusive), effectiveness (poor/good), and functionality (linear/nonlinear) of thermal conduction at the nanoscale. We review recent experiments and relevant calculations of quantum heat transfer in molecular junctions. We recount the Landauer approach, appropriate for the study of elastic (harmonic) phononic transport, and outline techniques that incorporate molecular anharmonicities. Theoretical methods are described along with examples illustrating the challenge of reaching control over vibrational heat conduction in molecules. PMID:27215814

  7. Vibration of Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissa, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    The vibrational characteristics and mechanical properties of shell structures are discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) fundamental equations of thin shell theory, (2) characteristics of thin circular cylindrical shells, (3) complicating effects in circular cylindrical shells, (4) noncircular cylindrical shell properties, (5) characteristics of spherical shells, and (6) solution of three-dimensional equations of motion for cylinders.

  8. C0 Vibrational analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Craig D.; Johnson, Todd; Martens, Mike; Syphers, Mike; McCrory, E.; McGee, Mike; Reilly, Rob; /Fermilab

    1999-08-01

    This is an attempt to document some of the measurements and analysis relating to the modulation of the spill due to the vibration of the magnets in the new C0 area. Not all of the relevant graphs were saved at the time, however an attempt has been made to show representative illustrations albeit not in the proper chronological order.

  9. Blade Vibration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The Phase I project successfully demonstrated that an advanced noncontacting stress measurement system (NSMS) could improve classification of blade vibration response in terms of mistuning and closely spaced modes. The Phase II work confirmed the microwave sensor design process, modified the sensor so it is compatible as an upgrade to existing NSMS, and improved and finalized the NSMS software. The result will be stand-alone radar/tip timing radar signal conditioning for current conventional NSMS users (as an upgrade) and new users. The hybrid system will use frequency data and relative mode vibration levels from the radar sensor to provide substantially superior capabilities over current blade-vibration measurement technology. This frequency data, coupled with a reduced number of tip timing probes, will result in a system capable of detecting complex blade vibrations that would confound traditional NSMS systems. The hardware and software package was validated on a compressor rig at Mechanical Solutions, Inc. (MSI). Finally, the hybrid radar/tip timing NSMS software package and associated sensor hardware will be installed for use in the NASA Glenn spin pit test facility.

  10. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Holtom, Gary R.; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for microscopic vibrational imaging using coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering or Sum Frequency Generation. Microscopic imaging with a vibrational spectroscopic contrast is achieved by generating signals in a nonlinear optical process and spatially resolved detection of the signals. The spatial resolution is attained by minimizing the spot size of the optical interrogation beams on the sample. Minimizing the spot size relies upon a. directing at least two substantially co-axial laser beams (interrogation beams) through a microscope objective providing a focal spot on the sample; b. collecting a signal beam together with a residual beam from the at least two co-axial laser beams after passing through the sample; c. removing the residual beam; and d. detecting the signal beam thereby creating said pixel. The method has significantly higher spatial resolution then IR microscopy and higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman microscopy with much lower average excitation powers. CARS and SFG microscopy does not rely on the presence of fluorophores, but retains the resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Complementary to these techniques, CARS and SFG microscopy provides a contrast mechanism based on vibrational spectroscopy. This vibrational contrast mechanism, combined with an unprecedented high sensitivity at a tolerable laser power level, provides a new approach for microscopic investigations of chemical and biological samples.

  11. Oblique impacts into low impedance layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stickle, A. M.; Schultz, P. H.

    2009-12-01

    Planetary impacts occur indiscriminately, in all locations and materials. Varied geologic settings can have significant effects on the impact process, including the coupling between the projectile and target, the final damage patterns and modes of deformation that occur. For example, marine impact craters are not identical to impacts directly into bedrock or into sedimentary materials, though many of the same fundamental processes occur. It is therefore important, especially when considering terrestrial impacts, to understand how a low impedance sedimentary layer over bedrock affects the deformation process during and after a hypervelocity impact. As a first step, detailed comparisons between impacts and hydrocode models were performed. Experiments performed at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range of oblique impacts into polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) targets with low impedance layers were performed and compared to experiments of targets without low impedance layers, as well as to hydrocode models under identical conditions. Impact velocities ranged from 5 km/s to 5.6 km/s, with trajectories from 30 degrees to 90 degrees above the horizontal. High-speed imaging provided documentation of the sequence and location of failure due to impact, which was compared to theoretical models. Plasticine and ice were used to construct the low impedance layers. The combination of experiments and models reveals the modes of failure due to a hypervelocity impact. How such failure is manifested at large scales can present a challenge for hydrocodes. CTH models tend to overestimate the amount of damage occurring within the targets and have difficulties perfectly reproducing morphologies; nevertheless, they provide significant and useful information about the failure modes and style within the material. CTH models corresponding to the experiments allow interpretation of the underlying processes involved as well as provide a benchmark for the experimental analysis. The transparency of PMMA

  12. Rotorcraft Transmission Noise Path Model, Including Distributed Fluid Film Bearing Impedance Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambric, Stephen A.; Hanford, Amanda D.; Shepherd, Micah R.; Campbell, Robert L.; Smith, Edward C.

    2010-01-01

    A computational approach for simulating the effects of rolling element and journal bearings on the vibration and sound transmission through gearboxes has been demonstrated. The approach, using ARL/Penn State s CHAMP methodology, uses Component Mode Synthesis of housing and shafting modes computed using Finite Element (FE) models to allow for rapid adjustment of bearing impedances in gearbox models. The approach has been demonstrated on NASA GRC s test gearbox with three different bearing configurations: in the first condition, traditional rolling element (ball and roller) bearings were installed, and in the second and third conditions, the traditional bearings were replaced with journal and wave bearings (wave bearings are journal bearings with a multi-lobed wave pattern on the bearing surface). A methodology for computing the stiffnesses and damping in journal and wave bearings has been presented, and demonstrated for the journal and wave bearings used in the NASA GRC test gearbox. The FE model of the gearbox, along with the rolling element bearing coupling impedances, was analyzed to compute dynamic transfer functions between forces applied to the meshing gears and accelerations on the gearbox housing, including several locations near the bearings. A Boundary Element (BE) acoustic model was used to compute the sound radiated by the gearbox. Measurements of the Gear Mesh Frequency (GMF) tones were made by NASA GRC at several operational speeds for the rolling element and journal bearing gearbox configurations. Both the measurements and the CHAMP numerical model indicate that the journal bearings reduce vibration and noise for the second harmonic of the gear meshing tones, but show no clear benefit to using journal bearings to reduce the amplitudes of the fundamental gear meshing tones. Also, the numerical model shows that the gearbox vibrations and radiated sound are similar for journal and wave bearing configurations.

  13. The Influence of Segmental Impedance Analysis in Predicting Validity of Consumer Grade Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Andy; Heath, Jennifer; Peterson, Janet

    2008-05-01

    Consumer grade bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA) instruments measure the body's impedance at 50 kHz, and yield a quick estimate of percent body fat. The frequency dependence of the impedance gives more information about the current pathway and the response of different tissues. This study explores the impedance response of human tissue at a range of frequencies from 0.2 - 102 kHz using a four probe method and probe locations standard for segmental BIA research of the arm. The data at 50 kHz, for a 21 year old healthy Caucasian male (resistance of 180φ±10 and reactance of 33φ±2) is in agreement with previously reported values [1]. The frequency dependence is not consistent with simple circuit models commonly used in evaluating BIA data, and repeatability of measurements is problematic. This research will contribute to a better understanding of the inherent difficulties in estimating body fat using consumer grade BIA devices. [1] Chumlea, William C., Richard N. Baumgartner, and Alex F. Roche. ``Specific resistivity used to estimate fat-free mass from segmental body measures of bioelectrical impedance.'' Am J Clin Nutr 48 (1998): 7-15.

  14. Impedance analysis of fibroblastic cell layers measured by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Chun-Min; Ferrier, Jack

    1998-06-01

    Impedance measurements of cell layers cultured on gold electrode surfaces obtained by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing provide morphological information such as junctional resistance and cell-substrate separation. Previously, a model that assumes that cells have a disklike shape and that electric currents flow radially underneath the ventral cell surface and then through the paracellular space has been used to theoretically calculate the impedance of the cell-covered electrode. In this paper we propose an extended model of impedance analysis for cell layers where cellular shape is rectangular. This is especially appropriate for normal fibroblasts in culture. To verify the model, we analyze impedance data obtained from four different kinds of fibroblasts that display a long rectangular shape. In addition, we measure the average cell-substrate separation of human gingival fibroblasts at different temperatures. At temperatures of 37, 22, and 4 °C, the average separation between ventral cell surface and substratum are 46, 55, and 89 nm, respectively.

  15. A novel wireless and temperature-compensated SAW vibration sensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Xue, Xufeng; Huang, Yangqing; Liu, Xinlu

    2014-01-01

    A novel wireless and passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) based temperature-compensated vibration sensor utilizing a flexible Y-cut quartz cantilever beam with a relatively substantial proof mass and two one-port resonators is developed. One resonator acts as the sensing device adjacent to the clamped end for maximum strain sensitivity, and the other one is used as the reference located on clamped end for temperature compensation for vibration sensor through the differential approach. Vibration directed to the proof mass flex the cantilever, inducing relative changes in the acoustic propagation characteristics of the SAW travelling along the sensing device, and generated output signal varies in frequency as a function of vibration.  A theoretical mode using the Rayleigh method was established to determine the optimal dimensions of the cantilever beam. Coupling of Modes (COM) model was used to extract the optimal design parameters of the SAW devices prior to fabrication. The performance of the developed SAW sensor attached to an antenna towards applied vibration was evaluated wirelessly by using the precise vibration table, programmable incubator chamber, and reader unit.  High vibration sensitivity of ~10.4 kHz/g, good temperature stability, and excellent linearity were observed in the wireless measurements. PMID:25372617

  16. A Novel Wireless and Temperature-Compensated SAW Vibration Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Xue, Xufeng; Huang, Yangqing; Liu, Xinlu

    2014-01-01

    A novel wireless and passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) based temperature-compensated vibration sensor utilizing a flexible Y-cut quartz cantilever beam with a relatively substantial proof mass and two one-port resonators is developed. One resonator acts as the sensing device adjacent to the clamped end for maximum strain sensitivity, and the other one is used as the reference located on clamped end for temperature compensation for vibration sensor through the differential approach. Vibration directed to the proof mass flex the cantilever, inducing relative changes in the acoustic propagation characteristics of the SAW travelling along the sensing device, and generated output signal varies in frequency as a function of vibration. A theoretical mode using the Rayleigh method was established to determine the optimal dimensions of the cantilever beam. Coupling of Modes (COM) model was used to extract the optimal design parameters of the SAW devices prior to fabrication. The performance of the developed SAW sensor attached to an antenna towards applied vibration was evaluated wirelessly by using the precise vibration table, programmable incubator chamber, and reader unit. High vibration sensitivity of ∼10.4 kHz/g, good temperature stability, and excellent linearity were observed in the wireless measurements. PMID:25372617

  17. High-Temperature Vibration Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Alan; Litwin, Joel; Krauss, Harold

    1987-01-01

    Device for damping vibrations functions at temperatures up to 400 degrees F. Dampens vibrational torque loads as high as 1,000 lb-in. but compact enough to be part of helicopter rotor hub. Rotary damper absorbs energy from vibrating rod, dissipating it in turbulent motion of viscous hydraulic fluid forced by moving vanes through small orifices.

  18. Label-Free Impedance Biosensors: Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Jonathan S.; Pourmand, Nader

    2007-01-01

    Impedance biosensors are a class of electrical biosensors that show promise for point-of-care and other applications due to low cost, ease of miniaturization, and label-free operation. Unlabeled DNA and protein targets can be detected by monitoring changes in surface impedance when a target molecule binds to an immobilized probe. The affinity capture step leads to challenges shared by all label-free affinity biosensors; these challenges are discussed along with others unique to impedance readout. Various possible mechanisms for impedance change upon target binding are discussed. We critically summarize accomplishments of past label-free impedance biosensors and identify areas for future research. PMID:18176631

  19. Wakefield and impedance studies of a liner using MAFIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, W.; Barts, T.

    1993-12-01

    The liner is a perforated beam tube which is coaxial with an outer bore tube. The 3D code MAFIA version 3.1 is used to study the wakefields, impedances, and resonances of this structure. The short range wakes and low frequency (below the cutoff) impedances are in agreement with the theoretical model. The long range wakes and high frequency resonances are associated with the distribution of the holes (or slots). The dependence of the impedance on the size, shape, and pattern of the holes (or slots) is studied. The impact of the liner impedance on the SSC impedance budget is discussed.

  20. New Approaches in Force-Limited Vibration Testing of Flight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Kern, Dennis L.

    2012-01-01

    To qualify flight hardware for random vibration environments the following methods are used to limit the loads in the aerospace industry: (1) Response limiting and notching (2) Simple TDOF model (3) Semi-empirical force limits (4) Apparent mass, etc. and (5) Impedance method. In all these methods attempts are made to remove conservatism due to the mismatch in impedances between the test and the flight configurations of the hardware that are being qualified. Assumption is the hardware interfaces have correlated responses. A new method that takes into account the un-correlated hardware interface responses are described in this presentation.