Science.gov

Sample records for linear viscoelastic properties

  1. Dynamic linear viscoelastic properties and extensional failure of asphalt binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Yonghong

    Billions of dollars are spent annually in USA to maintain old pavements that are badly cracked. In order to reduce this expenditure, it is desirable to have criteria for selecting asphalts with superior cracking resistance that will provide pavements with longer durability. Literature reports indicate that the ductility of binders recovered from asphalt pavements correlates with cracking failure. However, ductility measurement is a time and material consuming process, and subject to reproducibility difficulties, as are all failure tests. In addition, ductility measurement does not belong to the currently used Superpave(TM) specification. Correlations between ductility and dynamic viscoelastic properties (measured with the dynamic shear rheometer, DSR), which are much easier and faster to perform and may be included into the Superpave(TM) system, are studied for both straight and modified binders. Ductility correlates quite well with G'/(eta '/G') for conventional asphalt binders aged at different conditions, especially when ductility is below 10 cm. However, for modified asphalts, there is no universal correlation between ductility and G'/(eta'/G'), even in the low ductility region. As far as the asphalt binder in pavement is concerned, the loss due to oxidative aging of its ductility is an important reason for pavement cracking. Polymer modification modifies the rheological and oxidative hardening properties of asphalt binders. The effect of polymeric modifiers on various properties of asphalt binders was investigated. Modifiers studied were diblock poly (styrene-b-butadiene) rubber (SBR), triblock poly (styrene-b-butadiene-b-styrene) (SBS), and tire rubber. Polymer modified binders have a lower hardening and oxidation rate than their corresponding base asphalts. In addition, modified binders have lower hardening susceptibility compared with their base materials and in some cases the results can be dramatic. Polymer modification improves asphalt binders' shear

  2. High bandwidth linear viscoelastic properties of complex fluids from the measurement of their free surface fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottier, Basile; Talini, Laurence; Frétigny, Christian

    2012-02-01

    We present a new optical method to measure the linear viscoelastic properties of materials, ranging from complex fluids to soft solids, within a large frequency range (about 0.1--10^4 Hz). The surface fluctuation specular reflection technique is based on the measurement of the thermal fluctuations of the free surfaces of materials at which a laser beam is specularly reflected. The propagation of the thermal surface waves depends on the surface tension, density, and complex viscoelastic modulus of the material. For known surface tension and density, we show that the frequency dependent elastic and loss moduli can be deduced from the fluctuation spectrum. Using a viscoelastic solid (a cross-linked PDMS), which linear viscoelastic properties are known in a large frequency range from rheometric measurements and the time--temperature superposition principle, we show that there is a good agreement between the rheological characterization provided by rheometric and fluctuation measurements. We also present measurements conducted with complex fluids that are supramolecular polymer solutions. The agreement with other low frequency and high frequency rheological measurements is again very good, and we discuss the sensitivity of the technique to surface viscoelasticity.

  3. Quasi-linear viscoelastic properties of the human medial patello-femoral ligament.

    PubMed

    Criscenti, G; De Maria, C; Sebastiani, E; Tei, M; Placella, G; Speziali, A; Vozzi, G; Cerulli, G

    2015-12-16

    The evaluation of viscoelastic properties of human medial patello-femoral ligament is fundamental to understand its physiological function and contribution as stabilizer for the selection of the methods of repair and reconstruction and for the development of scaffolds with adequate mechanical properties. In this work, 12 human specimens were tested to evaluate the time- and history-dependent non linear viscoelastic properties of human medial patello-femoral ligament using the quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) theory formulated by Fung et al. (1972) and modified by Abramowitch and Woo (2004). The five constant of the QLV theory, used to describe the instantaneous elastic response and the reduced relaxation function on stress relaxation experiments, were successfully evaluated. It was found that the constant A was 1.21±0.96MPa and the dimensionless constant B was 26.03±4.16. The magnitude of viscous response, the constant C, was 0.11±0.02 and the initial and late relaxation time constants τ1 and τ2 were 6.32±1.76s and 903.47±504.73s respectively. The total stress relaxation was 32.7±4.7%. To validate our results, the obtained constants were used to evaluate peak stresses from a cyclic stress relaxation test on three different specimens. The theoretically predicted values fit the experimental ones demonstrating that the QLV theory could be used to evaluate the viscoelastic properties of the human medial patello-femoral ligament. PMID:26573904

  4. Determination of linear viscoelastic properties of an entangled polymer melt by probe rheology simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Mir; Indei, Tsutomu; Schieber, Jay D.; Khare, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Particle rheology is used to extract the linear viscoelastic properties of an entangled polymer melt from molecular dynamics simulations. The motion of a stiff, approximately spherical particle is tracked in both passive and active modes. We demonstrate that the dynamic modulus of the melt can be extracted under certain limitations using this technique. As shown before for unentangled chains [Karim et al., Phys. Rev. E 86, 051501 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.051501], the frequency range of applicability is substantially expanded when both particle and medium inertia are properly accounted for by using our inertial version of the generalized Stokes-Einstein relation (IGSER). The system used here introduces an entanglement length dT, in addition to those length scales already relevant: monomer bead size d , probe size R , polymer radius of gyration Rg, simulation box size L , shear wave penetration length Δ , and wave period Λ . Previously, we demonstrated a number of restrictions necessary to obtain the relevant fluid properties: continuum approximation breaks down when d ≳Λ ; medium inertia is important and IGSER is required when R ≳Λ ; and the probe should not experience hydrodynamic interaction with its periodic images, L ≳Δ . These restrictions are also observed here. A simple scaling argument for entangled polymers shows that the simulation box size must scale with polymer molecular weight as Mw3. Continuum analysis requires the existence of an added mass to the probe particle from the entrained medium but was not observed in the earlier work for unentangled chains. We confirm here that this added mass is necessary only when the thickness LS of the shell around the particle that contains the added mass, LS>d . We also demonstrate that the IGSER can be used to predict particle displacement over a given timescale from knowledge of medium viscoelasticity; such ability will be of interest for designing nanoparticle-based drug delivery.

  5. Linear viscoelastic properties of transient networks formed by associating polymers with multiple stickers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indei, Tsutomu; Takimoto, Jun-ichi

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a single-chain theory that describes dynamics of associating polymer chains carrying multiple associative groups (or stickers) in the transient network formed by themselves and studied linear viscoelastic properties of this network. It is shown that if the average number N¯ of stickers associated with the network junction per chain is large, the terminal relaxation time τA that is proportional to τXN¯2 appears. The time τX is the interval during which an associated sticker goes back to its equilibrium position by one or more dissociation steps. In this lower frequency regime ω <1/τX, the moduli are well described in terms of the Rouse model with the longest relaxation time τA. The large value of N¯ is realized for chains carrying many stickers whose rate of association with the network junction is much larger than the dissociation rate. This associative Rouse behavior stems from the association/dissociation processes of stickers and is different from the ordinary Rouse behavior in the higher frequency regime, which is originated from the thermal segmental motion between stickers. If N¯ is not large, the dynamic shear moduli are well described in terms of the Maxwell model characterized by a single relaxation time τX in the moderate and lower frequency regimes. Thus, the transition occurs in the viscoelastic relaxation behavior from the Maxwell-type to the Rouse-type in ω <1/τX as N¯ increases. All these results are obtained under the affine deformation assumption for junction points. We also studied the effect of the junction fluctuations from the affine motion on the plateau modulus by introducing the virtual spring for bound stickers. It is shown that the plateau modulus is not affected by the junction fluctuations.

  6. The measurement of low-frequency linear viscoelastic properties of polyolefins using creeping squeeze flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cua, Edwin Matthew Chua

    The characterization of the low-frequency linear viscoelastic properties of polymers is a classical problem in rheometry, especially for broad molecular weight (MW), fractional melt-flow index (MFI) polyolefins with small time-temperature shift factors. By interconversion of high-temperature, low-shear steady-viscosity data in the terminal flow regime into low-frequency data using the Cox-Merz rule, the experimental window is expanded towards lower frequencies. A squeeze-flow apparatus using Newton interferometry as a drift-free transducer to measure the gap between a spherical lens and a flat glass plate with high spatial resolution was constructed. Trials with a Newtonian silicone oil and a viscoelastic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) gum were undertaken to examine the various experimental factors that might contribute to errors in the calculation of the viscosity. After taking into account those factors during the runs with PDMS gum, the squeeze-flow-derived viscosities at the terminal flow regime (at shear rates accessible to a commercial rheometer) were in good agreement with low frequency dynamic data. To achieve much lower shear rates for the runs with polyolefins, an increase in the working gap range was made by switching from Newton interferometry to Fizeau interferometry. A hermetically sealed high vacuum chamber was built to allow high-temperature runs with polyolefins with minimal degradation. Interconversion of the measured viscosities of a broad MW, 1.04 MFI high-density polyethylene (HDPE) with the squeeze flow apparatus resulted in complex viscosity data at ˜10-5 rad/s, expanding the experimental window by 2 decades. The squeeze-flow derived complex viscosity data was used to decide which of the two popular viscosity models was more accurate in predicting the zero-shear rate viscosity based on its fit to dynamic data limited to higher frequencies.

  7. The Physical and Linear Viscoelastic Properties of Fresh Wet Foams Based on Egg White Proteins and Selected Hydrocolloids.

    PubMed

    Ptaszek, Paweł; Zmudziński, Daniel; Kruk, Joanna; Kaczmarczyk, Kacper; Rożnowski, Wojciech; Berski, Wiktor

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the physicochemical properties of fresh foams based on egg white proteins, xanthan gum and gum Arabic. The distributions of the size of gas bubbles suspended in liquid were determined, as well as density and volume fraction of gas phase of the generated foams. Additionally, the viscoelastic properties in the linear range were measured, and the results were analyzed with the use of the fractional Zener model. It was shown, that foam supplementation with hydrocolloids considerably decreased their volume fraction of gas phase in comparison to pure egg white protein-based foams. Application of gum Arabic did not cause an increase in the size of foam bubbles when compared to pure white egg foam, whereas application of xanthan gum significantly decreased the size of the bubbles. Application of the fractional Zener model allowed to determine the relaxation times, their intensity in analyzed suspensions and also equilibrium module (G e ). The increase in the concentration of xanthan gum resulted in the prolongation of the relaxation time and increased its intensity. Gum Arabic, when added, weakened the viscoelastic properties of the mixture as a viscoelastic solid. PMID:24611034

  8. Dynamics of gas bubbles in viscoelastic fluids. I. Linear viscoelasticity

    PubMed

    Allen; Roy

    2000-06-01

    The nonlinear oscillations of spherical gas bubbles in linear viscoelastic fluids are studied. A novel approach is implemented to derive a governing system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The linear Maxwell and Jeffreys models are chosen as the fluid constitutive equations. An advantage of this new formulation is that, when compared with previous approaches, it facilitates perturbation methods and numerical investigations. Analytical solutions are obtained using a multiple scale perturbation method and compared with the Newtonian results for various Deborah numbers. Numerical analysis of the full equations supports the perturbation analysis, and further reveals significant differences between the viscoelastic and Newtonian cases. Differences in the oscillation phase and harmonic structure characterize some of the viscoelastic effects. Subharmonic excitations at particular fluid parameters lead to a discrete group modulation of the radial excursions; this appears to be a unique, previously undiscovered phenomenon. Implications for medical ultrasound applications are discussed in light of these current findings. PMID:10875361

  9. Viscoelastic properties of ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Chirikov, D N; Fedotov, S P; Iskakova, L Yu; Zubarev, A Yu

    2010-11-01

    The paper deals with theoretical study of non linear viscoelastic phenomena in ferrofluids placed in magnetic field. Our attention is focused on the study of nonstationary flow and Maxwell-like relaxation of the macroscopical viscous stress after alternation of the shear rate. We propose that these phenomena can be explained by finite rate of evolution of chainlike aggregates, consisting of the ferrofluid particles. Statistical model of the chains growth-disintegration is suggested. In this model the chain-single particle mechanism of the chains evolution is considered, the effects of the chain-chain interaction are ignored. The proposed model allows us to estimate the time-dependent function of distribution over number of particles in the chain. Having determined this function and using methods of hydromechanics of ferrofluids with chainlike aggregates, we have studied evolution of the ferrofluid viscosity after stepwise alternation of the fluid shear rate. The estimated time of relaxation is in a reasonable agreement with experimental results. Thus, our analysis shows that the observed macroscopical viscoelastic phenomena in ferrofluids can be provided by evolution of the chain ensemble. PMID:21230477

  10. Local linear viscoelasticity of confined fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J. S.; Daivis, P. J.; Todd, B. D.

    2007-04-01

    In this paper the authors propose a novel method to study the local linear viscoelasticity of fluids confined between two walls. The method is based on the linear constitutive equation and provides details about the real and imaginary parts of the local complex viscosity. They apply the method to a simple atomic fluid undergoing zero mean oscillatory flow using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The method shows that the viscoelastic properties of the fluid exhibit dramatic spatial changes near the wall-fluid boundary due to the high density in this region. It is also shown that the real part of the viscosity converges to the frequency dependent local shear viscosity sufficiently far away from the wall. This also provides valuable information about the transport properties in the fluid, in general. The viscosity is compared with predictions from the local average density model. The two methods disagree in that the local average density model predicts larger viscosity variations near the wall-fluid boundary than what is observed through the method presented here.

  11. A Thermodynamic Theory Of Solid Viscoelasticity. Part 1: Linear Viscoelasticity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Leonov, Arkady I.

    2002-01-01

    The present series of three consecutive papers develops a general theory for linear and finite solid viscoelasticity. Because the most important object for nonlinear studies are rubber-like materials, the general approach is specified in a form convenient for solving problems important for many industries that involve rubber-like materials. General linear and nonlinear theories for non-isothermal deformations of viscoelastic solids are developed based on the quasi-linear approach of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. In this, the first paper of the series, we analyze non-isothermal linear viscoelasticity, which is applicable in a range of small strains not only to all synthetic polymers and bio-polymers but also to some non-polymeric materials. Although the linear case seems to be well developed, there still are some reasons to implement a thermodynamic derivation of constitutive equations for solid-like, non-isothermal, linear viscoelasticity. The most important is the thermodynamic modeling of thermo-rheological complexity , i.e. different temperature dependences of relaxation parameters in various parts of relaxation spectrum. A special structure of interaction matrices is established for different physical mechanisms contributed to the normal relaxation modes. This structure seems to be in accord with observations, and creates a simple mathematical framework for both continuum and molecular theories of the thermo-rheological complex relaxation phenomena. Finally, a unified approach is briefly discussed that, in principle, allows combining both the long time (discrete) and short time (continuous) descriptions of relaxation behaviors for polymers in the rubbery and glassy regions.

  12. Viscoelastic Properties of Polymer Blends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, S. D.; Moacanin, J.; Soong, D.

    1982-01-01

    Viscosity, shear modulus and other viscoelastic properties of multicomponent polymer blends are predicted from behavior of individual components, using a mathematical model. Model is extension of two-component-blend model based on Rouse-Bueche-Zimm theory of polymer viscoelasticity. Extension assumes that probabilities of forming various possible intracomponent and intercomponent entanglements among polymer molecules are proportional to relative abundances of components.

  13. Viscoelastic properties of the false vocal fold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Roger W.

    2001-05-01

    The biomechanical properties of vocal fold tissues have been the focus of many previous studies, as vocal fold viscoelasticity critically dictates the acoustics and biomechanics of phonation. However, not much is known about the viscoelastic response of the ventricular fold or false vocal fold. It has been shown both clinically and in computer simulations that the false vocal fold may contribute significantly to the aerodynamics and sound generation processes of human voice production, with or without flow-induced oscillation of the false fold. To better understand the potential role of the false fold in phonation, this paper reports some preliminary measurements on the linear and nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of false vocal fold tissues. Linear viscoelastic shear properties of human false fold tissue samples were measured by a high-frequency controlled-strain rheometer as a function of frequency, and passive uniaxial tensile stress-strain response of the tissue samples was measured by a muscle lever system as a function of strain and loading rate. Elastic moduli (Young's modulus and shear modulus) of the false fold tissues were calculated from the measured data. [Work supported by NIH.

  14. Viscoelastic properties of cellular polypropylene ferroelectrets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaal, Mate; Bovtun, Viktor; Stark, Wolfgang; Erhard, Anton; Yakymenko, Yuriy; Kreutzbruck, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Viscoelastic properties of cellular polypropylene ferroelectrets (PP FEs) were studied at low frequencies (0.3-33 Hz) by dynamic mechanical analysis and at high frequencies (250 kHz) by laser Doppler vibrometry. Relaxation behavior of the in-plane Young's modulus ( Y11 ' ˜ 1500 MPa at room temperature) was observed and attributed to the viscoelastic response of polypropylene matrix. The out-of-plane Young's modulus is very small ( Y33 ' ≈ 0.1 MPa) at low frequencies, frequency- and stress-dependent, evidencing nonlinear viscoelastic response of PP FEs. The high-frequency mechanical response of PP FEs is shown to be linear viscoelastic with Y33 ' ≈ 0.8 MPa. It is described by thickness vibration mode and modeled as a damped harmonic oscillator with one degree of freedom. Frequency dependence of Y33 * in the large dynamic strain regime is described by the broad Cole-Cole relaxation with a mean frequency in kHz range attributed to the dynamics of the air flow between partially closed air-filled voids in PP FEs. Switching-off the relaxation contribution causes dynamic crossover from the nonlinear viscoelastic regime at low frequencies to the linear viscoelastic regime at high frequencies. In the small strain regime, contribution of the air flow seems to be insignificant and the power-law response, attributed to the mechanics of polypropylene cell walls and closed air voids, dominates in a broad frequency range. Mechanical relaxation caused by the air flow mechanism takes place in the sound and ultrasound frequency range (10 Hz-1 MHz) and, therefore, should be taken into account in ultrasonic applications of the PP FEs deal with strong exciting or receiving signals.

  15. Influence of composition fluctuations on the linear viscoelastic properties of symmetric diblock copolymers near the order-disorder transition

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, Robert J.; Gillard, Timothy M.; Lodge, Timothy P.; Bates, Frank S.

    2015-08-28

    Rheological evidence of composition fluctuations in disordered diblock copolymers near the order disorder transition (ODT) has been documented in the literature over the past three decades, characterized by a failure of time–temperature superposition (tTS) to reduce linear dynamic mechanical spectroscopy (DMS) data in the terminal viscoelastic regime to a temperature-independent form. However, for some materials, most notably poly(styrene-b-isoprene) (PS–PI), no signature of these rheological features has been found. We present small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) results on symmetric poly(cyclohexylethylene-b-ethylene) (PCHE–PE) diblock copolymers that confirm the presence of fluctuations in the disordered state and DMS measurements that also show no sign of the features ascribed to composition fluctuations. Assessment of DMS results published on five different diblock copolymer systems leads us to conclude that the effects of composition fluctuations can be masked by highly asymmetric block dynamics, thereby resolving a long-standing disagreement in the literature and reinforcing the importance of mechanical contrast in understanding the dynamics of ordered and disordered block polymers.

  16. Linear viscoelasticity of an inverse ferrofluid.

    PubMed

    de Gans, B J; Blom, C; Philipse, A P; Mellema, J

    1999-10-01

    A magnetorheological fluid consisting of colloidal silica spheres suspended in an organic ferrofluid is described. Its linear viscoelastic behavior as a function of frequency, magnetic field strength, and silica volume fraction was investigated with a specially designed magnetorheometer. The storage modulus G' is at least an order of magnitude larger than the loss modulus G" at all magnetic field strengths investigated. G' does depend only weakly on frequency, and linearly on volume fraction. A model is presented for the high frequency limit of the storage modulus G'(infinity). In the model our system is treated as a collection of single noninteracting chains of particles. Assuming a dipolar magnetic interaction, theory and experiment show reasonable agreement at high frequencies. PMID:11970308

  17. Viscoelastic properties of human tympanic membrane.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tao; Dai, Chenkai; Gan, Rong Z

    2007-02-01

    The tympanic membrane or eardrum of human ear transfers sound waves into mechanical vibration from the external ear canal into the middle ear and cochlea. Mechanical properties of the tympanic membrane (TM) play an important role in sound transmission through the ear. Although limited resources about linear elastic properties of the TM are available in literature, there is a lack of measurement or modeling of viscoelastic properties of the TM at low stress levels. In this study, the uniaxial tensile, stress relaxation, and failure tests were conducted on fresh human cadaver TM specimens to explore mechanical properties of the TM. The experimental results were analyzed using the hyperelastic Ogden model and digital image correlation method. The constitutive equation and non-linear elastic properties of the TM were presented by functions of the stress and strain at the stress range from 0 to 1 MPa. Viscoelastic properties of the TM were described by the stress relaxation function and hysteresis. The results show that the uniaxial tensile test with the aid of digital image correlation analysis is a reliable and useful approach for measuring mechanical properties of ear tissues. The data presented in this paper contribute to ear biomechanics in both experimental measurement and theoretical analysis of ear tissues. PMID:17160465

  18. Viscoelastic properties of oat ß-glucan-rich aqueous dispersions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    C-trim is a healthy food product containing the dietary of soluble fiber ß-glucan. The suspension of C-trim in water is a hydrocolloid biopolymer. The linear and non-linear rheological properties for suspensions of C-trim biopolymers were investigated. The linear viscoelastic behaviors for C-trim...

  19. Viscoelastic properties of Ionomer Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Monojoy; Kumar, Sanat

    2007-03-01

    Viscoelastic prperties of a model telechelic ionomer, i.e., a melt of non-polar polymers with a charge at each chain end along with neutralizing counterions, have been examined using molecular dynamics simulation. Equlibrium calculation of the loss modulus G^''(φ) and storage modulus G^'(φ) shows plateau at lower temperatures when the systems are not relaxed. In this situation the specific heat (Cv) peak corresponds to the self-assembly of the system, at lower temperatures the specific heat begins to plateau. Similarities of the dynamic features found for telechelic melts with those observed in glass-forming liquids and entangled polymers have been shown. Furthremore, using an athermal 'probe', the properties of these materials is being distinctly classified as 'strong' glass or physical gels.

  20. Viscoelastic properties of levan polysaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Kenneth; Rende, Deniz; Ozisik, Rahmi; Toksoy-Oner, Ebru

    2014-03-01

    Levan is a naturally occurring polysaccharide that is composed of β-D-fructofuranose units with β(2-6) linkages between fructose rings. It is synthesized by the action of a secreted levansucrase (EC 2.4.1.10) that converts sucrose into the levan externally (exopolysaccharide). Levan is a homopolysaccharide that is non-toxic, water soluble,, and has anti-tumor activity and low immunological response. Therefore, levan presents great potential to be used as a novel functional biopolymer in foods, feeds, cosmetics, pharmaceutical and chemical industries. Despite these favorable properties, levan has a moderately low mechanical properties and poor film forming capability. In the current study, the agglomeration behavior of levan in water and in saline solutions was investigated at 298 and 310 K by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The viscoelastic properties of neat and oxidized levan films were studied via nanoindentation experiments in the quasi-static and dynamic modes The material is partially based upon work supported by NSF under Grant Nos. 1200270 and 1003574, and TUBITAK 111M232.

  1. Semi-analytical computation of displacement in linear viscoelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinu, S.; Gradinaru, D.

    2015-11-01

    Prediction of mechanical contact performance based on elastic models is not accurate in case of viscoelastic materials; however, a closed-form description of the viscoelastic contact has yet to be found. This paper aims to advance a semi-analytical method for computation of displacement induced in viscoelastic materials by arbitrary surface tractions, as a prerequisite to a semi-analytical solution for the viscoelastic contact problem. The newly advanced model is expected to provide greater generality, allowing for arbitrary contact geometry and / or arbitrary loading history. While time-independent equations in the purely elastic model can be treated numerically by imposing a spatial discretization only, a viscoelastic constitutive law requires supplementary temporal discretization capable of simulating the memory effect specific to viscoelastic materials. By deriving new influence coefficients, computation of displacement induced in a viscoelastic material by a known but otherwise arbitrary history of surface tractions can be achieved via superposition authorized by the Boltzmann superposition theory applicable in the frame of linear viscoelasticity.

  2. Application of fractional derivative models in linear viscoelastic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasso, M.; Palmieri, G.; Amodio, D.

    2011-11-01

    Appropriate knowledge of viscoelastic properties of polymers and elastomers is of fundamental importance for a correct modelization and analysis of structures where such materials are present, especially when dealing with dynamic and vibration problems. In this paper experimental results of a series of compression and tension tests on specimens of styrene-butadiene rubber and polypropylene plastic are presented; tests consist of creep and relaxation tests, as well as cyclic loading at different frequencies. Experimental data are then used to calibrate some linear viscoelastic models; besides the classical approach based on a combination in series or parallel of standard mechanical elements as springs and dashpots, particular emphasis is given to the application of models whose constitutive equations are based on differential equations of fractional order (Fractional Derivative Model). The two approaches are compared analyzing their capability to reproduce all the experimental data for given materials; also, the main computational issues related with these models are addressed, and the advantage of using a limited number of parameters is demonstrated.

  3. Viscoelastic properties of human bladder tumours.

    PubMed

    Barnes, S C; Lawless, B M; Shepherd, D E T; Espino, D M; Bicknell, G R; Bryan, R T

    2016-08-01

    The urinary bladder is an organ which facilitates the storage and release of urine. The bladder can develop tumours and bladder cancer is a common malignancy throughout the world. There is a consensus that there are differences in the mechanical properties of normal and malignant tissues. However, the viscoelastic properties of human bladder tumours at the macro-scale have not been previously studied. This study investigated the viscoelastic properties of ten bladder tumours, which were tested using dynamic mechanical analysis at frequencies up to 30Hz. The storage modulus ranged between 0.052MPa and 0.085MPa while the loss modulus ranged between 0.019MPa and 0.043MPa. Both storage and loss moduli showed frequency dependent behaviour and the storage modulus was higher than the loss modulus for every frequency tested. Viscoelastic properties may be useful for the development of surgical trainers, surgical devices, computational models and diagnostic equipment. PMID:27082128

  4. Determination of the properties of viscoelastic materials using spherical nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynova, Elena

    2016-02-01

    The article is devoted to determining the properties of linearly viscoelastic isotropic materials from the experiment on the introduction of a spherical indenter at a constant-rate displacement in a viscoelastic sample. The results are based on the Lee-Radok (J. Appl. Mech. 27:438-444, 1960) solution of the viscoelastic contact problem. An exact formula is obtained for calculation of the relaxation function using indentation load-displacement data. To illustrate the application of this formula, it is used to find the relaxation function of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). The relaxation function found in the article is compared with data measured in a conventional test to evaluate the suitability of the proposed method.

  5. A geometrically nonlinear shell element for hygrothermorheologically simple linear viscoelastic composites

    SciTech Connect

    HAMMERAND,DANIEL C.; KAPANIA,RAKESH K.

    2000-05-01

    A triangular flat shell element for large deformation analysis of linear viscoelastic laminated composites is presented. Hygrothermorheologically simple materials are considered for which a change in the hygrothermal environment results in a horizontal shifting of the relaxation moduli curves on a log time scale, in addition to the usual hygrothermal loads. Recurrence relations are developed and implemented for the evaluation of the viscoelastic memory loads. The nonlinear deformation process is computed using an incremental/iterative approach with the Newton-Raphson Method used to find the incremental displacements in each step. The presented numerical examples consider the large deformation and stability of linear viscoelastic structures under deformation-independent mechanical loads, deformation-dependent pressure loads, and thermal loads. Unlike elastic structures that have a single critical load value associated with a given snapping of buckling instability phenomenon, viscoelastic structures will usually exhibit a particular instability for a range of applied loads over a range of critical times. Both creep buckling and snap-through examples are presented here. In some cases, viscoelastic results are also obtained using the quasielastic method in which load-history effects are ignored, and time-varying viscoelastic properties are simply used in a series of elastic problems. The presented numerical examples demonstrate the capability and accuracy of the formulation.

  6. Viscoelastic modelling of tennis ball properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sissler, L.; Jones, R.; Leaney, P. G.; Harland, A.

    2010-06-01

    An explicit finite element (FE) tennis ball model which illustrates the effects of the viscoelastic materials of a tennis ball on ball deformation and bounce during normal impacts is presented. A tennis ball is composed of a rubber core and a fabric cover comprised of a wool-nylon mix which exhibit non-linear strain rate properties during high velocity impacts. The rubber core model was developed and validated using low strain rate tensile tests on rubber samples as well as high velocity normal impacts of pressurised cores at velocities ranging from 15 m/s to 50 m/s. The impacts were recorded using a high speed video (HSV) camera to determine deformation, impact time and coefficient of restitution (COR). The material properties of the core model were tuned to match the HSV results. A two component anisotropic fabric model was created which included artificial Rayleigh damping to account for hysteresis effects, and the core model 'tuning' process was used to refine the cloth layer. The ball model's parameters were in good agreement with experimental data at all velocities for both cores and complete balls, and a time sequenced comparison of HSV ball motion and FE model confirmed the validity of the model.

  7. Anisotropy of bituminous mixture in the linear viscoelastic domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Benedetto, Hervé; Sauzéat, Cédric; Clec'h, Pauline

    2016-08-01

    Some anisotropic properties in the linear viscoelastic domain of bituminous mixtures compacted with a French LPC wheel compactor are highlighted in this paper. Bituminous mixture is generally considered as isotropic even if the compaction process on road or in laboratory induces anisotropic properties. Tension-compression complex modulus tests have been performed on parallelepipedic specimens in two directions: (i) direction of compactor wheel movement (direction I, which is horizontal) and (ii) direction of compaction (direction II, which is vertical). These tests consist in measuring sinusoidal axial and lateral strains as well as sinusoidal axial stress, when sinusoidal axial loading is applied on the specimen. Different loading frequencies and temperatures are applied. Two complex moduli, EI ^{*} and E_{II}^{*}, and four complex Poisson's ratios, ν_{{II-I}}^{*}, ν_{{III-I}}^{*}, ν_{{I-II}}^{*} and ν_{{III-II}}^{*}, were obtained. The vertical direction appears softer than the other ones for the highest frequencies. There are very few differences between the two directions I and II for parameters concerning viscous effects (phase angles φ(EI) and φ(E_{II}), and shift factors). The four Poisson's ratios reveal anisotropic properties but rheological tensor can be considered as symmetric when considering very similar values obtained for the two measured parameters (I-II and II-I)

  8. On nonlinear viscoelastic deformations: a reappraisal of Fung's quasi-linear viscoelastic model

    PubMed Central

    De Pascalis, Riccardo; Abrahams, I. David; Parnell, William J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper offers a reappraisal of Fung's model for quasi-linear viscoelasticity. It is shown that a number of negative features exhibited in other works, commonly attributed to the Fung approach, are merely a consequence of the way it has been applied. The approach outlined herein is shown to yield improved behaviour and offers a straightforward scheme for solving a wide range of models. Results from the new model are contrasted with those in the literature for the case of uniaxial elongation of a bar: for an imposed stretch of an incompressible bar and for an imposed load. In the latter case, a numerical solution to a Volterra integral equation is required to obtain the results. This is achieved by a high-order discretization scheme. Finally, the stretch of a compressible viscoelastic bar is determined for two distinct materials: Horgan–Murphy and Gent. PMID:24910527

  9. Anisotropy of bituminous mixture in the linear viscoelastic domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Benedetto, Hervé; Sauzéat, Cédric; Clec'h, Pauline

    2016-03-01

    Some anisotropic properties in the linear viscoelastic domain of bituminous mixtures compacted with a French LPC wheel compactor are highlighted in this paper. Bituminous mixture is generally considered as isotropic even if the compaction process on road or in laboratory induces anisotropic properties. Tension-compression complex modulus tests have been performed on parallelepipedic specimens in two directions: (i) direction of compactor wheel movement (direction I, which is horizontal) and (ii) direction of compaction (direction II, which is vertical). These tests consist in measuring sinusoidal axial and lateral strains as well as sinusoidal axial stress, when sinusoidal axial loading is applied on the specimen. Different loading frequencies and temperatures are applied. Two complex moduli, EI ^{*} and E_{II}^{*}, and four complex Poisson's ratios, ν_{II-I}^{*}, ν_{III-I}^{*}, ν_{I-II}^{*} and ν_{III-II}^{*}, were obtained. The vertical direction appears softer than the other ones for the highest frequencies. There are very few differences between the two directions I and II for parameters concerning viscous effects (phase angles \\varphi(EI) and \\varphi(E_{II}), and shift factors). The four Poisson's ratios reveal anisotropic properties but rheological tensor can be considered as symmetric when considering very similar values obtained for the two measured parameters (I-II and II-I) In addition, an anisotropic 3 dimensional version of the "2S2P1D" (2 springs, 2 parabolic creep elements and 1 dashpot) model, developed at the University of Lyon—ENTPE laboratory, is presented and used to simulate experimental results. The model simulation provides a good fit to the data. Stability of the material could also be investigated on the whole frequency-temperature range.

  10. Linear viscoelastic behaviour of oil-in-water food emulsions stabilised by tuna-protein isolates.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Márquez, D; Partal, P; Franco, Jm; Gallegos, C

    2013-02-01

    This work deals with the manufacture of oil-in-water food emulsions stabilised by tuna proteins. The influence of protein and oil concentrations on the linear viscoelastic properties and microstructure of these emulsions was analysed. Stable emulsions with suitable linear viscoelastic response and microstructural characteristics were formulated with 70 wt.% oil and, at least, 0.25 wt.% tuna protein. Similarly, emulsions with oil concentrations between 45 and 70 wt.% were prepared using 0.50 wt.% protein. All these emulsions showed a predominantly elastic response in the linear viscoelastic region and a well-developed plateau region in its mechanical spectrum. Rheological and droplet size distribution results pointed out an extensive droplet flocculation, due to interactions among emulsifier molecules located at the oil-water interface of adjacent droplets. As a result, the linear viscoelastic behaviour was controlled by protein-protein interactions, allowing the use of the plateau modulus to successfully normalise both the storage and loss moduli as a function of frequency onto a master curve, irrespective of the selected emulsion formulation. PMID:23239763

  11. Semigroup theory and numerical approximation for equations in linear viscoelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabiano, R. H.; Ito, K.

    1990-01-01

    A class of abstract integrodifferential equations used to model linear viscoelastic beams is investigated analytically, applying a Hilbert-space approach. The basic equation is rewritten as a Cauchy problem, and its well-posedness is demonstrated. Finite-dimensional subspaces of the state space and an estimate of the state operator are obtained; approximation schemes for the equations are constructed; and the convergence is proved using the Trotter-Kato theorem of linear semigroup theory. The actual convergence behavior of different approximations is demonstrated in numerical computations, and the results are presented in tables.

  12. Viscoelastic properties of entangled polymers - Ternary blends of monodisperse homopolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soong, D.; Shen, M.; Hong, S. D.; Moacanin, J.; Shyu, S. S.

    1979-01-01

    In a previous publication from this laboratory, the Rouse-Bueche-Zimm molecular theory of viscoelasticity has been extended by using a transient network model to apply to binary blends of monodisperse polymers with chain entanglements. The dynamics of the entanglements were modeled both by the enhanced frictional coefficients and by the additional elastic couplings. It was recognized that entanglements not only may form between chains of the same lengths (intracomponent entanglements) but also between those of different lengths (intercomponent entanglements). At a given intercomponent entanglement, the longer chain was assumed to have the frictional coefficient of the shorter chain. Similarly, for blends consisting of several monodisperse components with different molecular weights, such modifications are also required to predict their linear viscoelastic behavior. The frequency of these interactions is assumed to be proportional to the weight ratio of the respective component chains in the blend. Equations of motion are formulated for each component and solved numerically for the relaxation time spectra. Linear viscoelastic properties such as the dynamic mechanical moduli, stress relaxation moduli, and zero-shear viscosity can then be computed for these systems by linear summation of those of the components.

  13. Viscoelastic Properties of Vitreous Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirouz Kavehpour, H.; Sharif-Kashani, Pooria

    2010-11-01

    We studied the rheological properties of porcine vitreous humor using a stressed-control shear rheometer. All experiments were performed in a closed environment at body temperature to mimic in-vivo conditions. We modeled the creep deformation using a two-element retardation spectrum model. By associating each element of the model to an individual biopolymeric system in the vitreous gel, a separate response to the applied stress was obtained from each component. The short time scale was associated with the collagen structure, while the longer time scale was related to the microfibrilis and hyaluronan network. We were able to distinguish the role of each main component from the overall rheological properties. Knowledge of this correlation enables us to relate the physical properties of vitreous to its pathology, as well as optimize surgical procedures such as vitrectomy.

  14. Quasi-linear viscoelastic characterization of human hip ligaments.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Andrew R; McNally, Craig; Smith, Byron; Duma, Stefan M

    2007-01-01

    The object of this study was to develop a quasi-linear viscoelastic model for the iliofemoral and ischiofemoral hip ligaments. In order to accomplish this, a total of 56 axial tension tests were performed on 8 bone-ligament-bone specimens prepared from 4 fresh frozen male cadavers. Each specimen went through a battery of 7 tests including a series of step-and-hold tests and load-and-unload ramp tests. The bone-ligament-bone specimens were situated so that the load from a servo-hydraulic Material Testing System would be applied on the long axis of each ligament. The reduced relaxation data was fit to a two exponential damping function while the instantaneous elastic response was fit to a power-law function. These two constituents were then combined to create a single constitutive equation for each ligament. The quasi-linear viscoelastic model presented in this study can be used to improve the biofidelity of computational models of the human hip. PMID:17487102

  15. Viscoelastic Properties of Isolated Collagen Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhilei Liu; Kahn, Harold; Ballarini, Roberto; Eppell, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the viscoelastic behavior of collagenous tissues with complex hierarchical structures requires knowledge of the properties at each structural level. Whole tissues have been studied extensively, but less is known about the mechanical behavior at the submicron, fibrillar level. Using a microelectromechanical systems platform, in vitro coupled creep and stress relaxation tests were performed on collagen fibrils isolated from the sea cucumber dermis. Stress-strain-time data indicate that isolated fibrils exhibit viscoelastic behavior that could be fitted using the Maxwell-Weichert model. The fibrils showed an elastic modulus of 123 ± 46 MPa. The time-dependent behavior was well fit using the two-time-constant Maxwell-Weichert model with a fast time response of 7 ± 2 s and a slow time response of 102 ± 5 s. The fibrillar relaxation time was smaller than literature values for tissue-level relaxation time, suggesting that tissue relaxation is dominated by noncollagenous components (e.g., proteoglycans). Each specimen was tested three times, and the only statistically significant difference found was that the elastic modulus is larger in the first test than in the subsequent two tests, indicating that viscous properties of collagen fibrils are not sensitive to the history of previous tests. PMID:21689535

  16. Viscoelastic and elastomeric active matter: Linear instability and nonlinear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemingway, E. J.; Cates, M. E.; Fielding, S. M.

    2016-03-01

    We consider a continuum model of active viscoelastic matter, whereby an active nematic liquid crystal is coupled to a minimal model of polymer dynamics with a viscoelastic relaxation time τC. To explore the resulting interplay between active and polymeric dynamics, we first generalize a linear stability analysis (from earlier studies without polymer) to derive criteria for the onset of spontaneous heterogeneous flows (strain rate) and/or deformations (strain). We find two modes of instability. The first is a viscous mode, associated with strain rate perturbations. It dominates for relatively small values of τC and is a simple generalization of the instability known previously without polymer. The second is an elastomeric mode, associated with strain perturbations, which dominates at large τC and persists even as τC→∞ . We explore the dynamical states to which these instabilities lead by means of direct numerical simulations. These reveal oscillatory shear-banded states in one dimension and activity-driven turbulence in two dimensions even in the elastomeric limit τC→∞ . Adding polymer can also have calming effects, increasing the net throughput of spontaneous flow along a channel in a type of drag reduction. The effect of including strong antagonistic coupling between the nematic and polymer is examined numerically, revealing a rich array of spontaneously flowing states.

  17. Dynamic Spring Model of Rubber Bush Based on Linear Viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, Masaki; Sato, Masami; Kobayashi, Takaya

    A set of simplified formulae is proposed for estimating the dynamic spring constants of rubber bushes used in suspension systems. These formulae are structured by extending a set of elastic solutions[Editor2] proposed before to calculate the dynamic spring constants according to the associated law (pseudo-elasticity) of the linear viscoelasticity theory. A unique feature of this method is that it helps in the easy and quick evaluation of the dynamic behavior of rubber bushes for all the six degrees of freedom (axial loading, loading normal to an axis in two directions, wrench in two directions, and torsion[Editor3]) with no direct involvement of the FEM. In order to validate this method of calculation, the results obtained for all the degrees of freedom are compared with those obtained using the FEM. It is verified that this approach is capable of qualitatively reproducing the results obtained by using the FEM analysis.

  18. VISCOELASTIC PROPERTIES OF A BIOLOGICAL HYDROGEL PRODUCED FROM SOYBEAN OIL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrogels formed from biopolymers or natural sources have special advantages because of their biodegradable and biocompatible properties. The viscoelastic properties of a newly developed biological hydrogel made from modified vegetable oil, epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) were investigated. The mater...

  19. Measurement of the linear viscoelastic behavior of antimisting kerosene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferry, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of dynamic viscoelastic properties in very small oscillating shear deformations was made on solutions of a jet fuel, Jet A, containing an antimisting polymeric additive, FM-9. A few measurements were also made on solutions of FM-9 in a mixed solvent of mineral oil, Tetralin, and 0-terphenyl. Two samples of FM-9 had approximate number-average molecular weights of 12,000,000 and 8,100,000 as deduced from analysis of the measurements. The ranges of variables were 2.42 to 4.03 g/1 in concentration (0.3 to 0.5% by weight), 1 to 35 in temperature, 1.3 to 9.4 cp in solvent viscosity, and 103 to 6100 Hz in frequency. Measurements in the Jet A solvent were made both with and without a modifying carrier. The results were compared with the Zimm theory and the viscoelastic behavior was found to resemble rather closely that of ordinary non-polar polymers in theta solvents. The relation of the results to the antithixotropic behavior of such solutions a high shear rates is discussed in terms of intramolecular and intermolecular interactions.

  20. [Viscoelastic properties of relaxed papillary muscle at physiological hypertrophy].

    PubMed

    Smoliuk, L T; Lisin, R V; Kuznetsov, D A; Protsenko, Iu L

    2012-01-01

    Viscoelastic properties of relaxed rat papillary muscles at physiological hypertrophy (intensive swimming for 5 weeks) have been obtained. It has been ascertained that viscoelastic properties of hypertrophied muscles are not significantly distinguished from those of control papillary muscles. A three-dimensional model of myocardial fascicle has been verified in compliance with experimental data of biomechanical tests of hypertrophied muscles. Elastic and viscous parameters of structural elements of the model negligibly differ from the parameters of the model of a control muscle. It is shown that physiological hypertrophy has a slight influence on viscoelastic properties of papillary muscles. PMID:23035537

  1. Linear Viscoelastic Response of PBX-9501 Binder using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davande, Hemali

    2005-03-01

    Quantum-chemistry based force fields for Estane, bis-dinitropropyl formal (BDNPF) and bis dinitropropyl acetal (BDNPA) plasticizer have been developed, validated and utilized in atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a model PBX-9501 binder. The viscoelastic response of unentangled binder melt using MD simulations was studied. These results were then used in prediction of linear viscoelastic response of an entangled melt using theoretical models for viscoelastic response of block copolymers and compared with experiments.

  2. Characterization of linear viscoelastic anti-vibration rubber mounts

    SciTech Connect

    Lodhia, B.B.; Esat, I.I.

    1996-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify the dynamic characteristics that are evident in linear viscoelastic rubber mountings. The characteristics under consideration included the static and dynamic stiffnesses with the variation of amplitude and frequency of the sinusoidal excitation. Test samples of various rubber mix were tested and compared to reflect magnitude of dependency on composition. In the light of the results, the validity and effectiveness of a mathematical model was investigated and a suitable technique based on the Tschoegl and Emri Algorithm, was utilized to fit the model to the experimental data. The model which was chosen, was an extension of the basic Maxwell model, which is based on linear spring and dashpot elements in series and parallel called the Wiechert model. It was found that the extent to which the filler and vulcanisate was present in the rubber sample, did have a great effect on the static stiffness characteristics, and the storage and loss moduli. The Tschoegl and Emri Algorithm was successfully utilized in modelling the frequency response of the samples.

  3. Viscoelastic properties of skin in Mov-13 and Tsk mice.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Z; Antoniucci, S; Hoffman, A H; Grigg, P

    2004-10-01

    Viscoelastic properties of skin samples were measured in three types of mice (tight skin, Tsk, control and Mov-13), that are known to differ with regard to content of type I collagen. The experimental design used uniaxial stretching and measured the creep response and the complex compliance. The creep response was measured directly. The complex compliance was determined using a Wiener-Volterra constitutive model for each sample. The models were calculated from data obtained by applying a stress input having a pseudo-Gaussian waveform and measuring the strain response. The storage compliance of Mov-13 and control skin were similar and were greater than Tsk (p<0.001). The loss compliance of each group was significantly different (p<0.001) from each other group; Tsk had the lowest and control had the highest loss compliance. The phase angle of the Mov-13 and Tsk were similar and were less than the controls (p<0.001). The creep response was fit with a linear viscoelastic model. None of the parameters in the creep model differed between groups. The results indicate that gene-targeted and mutant animals have soft tissue mechanical phenotypes that differ in complex ways. Caution should be exercised when using such animals as models to explore the role of specific constituents on tissue properties. PMID:15336923

  4. Viscoelastic Properties of Hyaluronan in Physiological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cowman, Mary K.; Schmidt, Tannin A.; Raghavan, Preeti; Stecco, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a high molecular weight glycosaminoglycan of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is particularly abundant in soft connective tissues. Solutions of HA can be highly viscous with non-Newtonian flow properties. These properties affect the movement of HA-containing fluid layers within and underlying the deep fascia. Changes in the concentration, molecular weight, or even covalent modification of HA in inflammatory conditions, as well as changes in binding interactions with other macromolecules, can have dramatic effects on the sliding movement of fascia. The high molecular weight and the semi-flexible chain of HA are key factors leading to the high viscosity of dilute solutions, and real HA solutions show additional nonideality and greatly increased viscosity due to mutual macromolecular crowding. The shear rate dependence of the viscosity, and the viscoelasticity of HA solutions, depend on the relaxation time of the molecule, which in turn depends on the HA concentration and molecular weight. Temperature can also have an effect on these properties. High viscosity can additionally affect the lubricating function of HA solutions. Immobility can increase the concentration of HA, increase the viscosity, and reduce lubrication and gliding of the layers of connective tissue and muscle. Over time, these changes can alter both muscle structure and function. Inflammation can further increase the viscosity of HA-containing fluids if the HA is modified via covalent attachment of heavy chains derived from Inter-α-Inhibitor. Hyaluronidase hydrolyzes HA, thus reducing its molecular weight, lowering the viscosity of the extracellular matrix fluid and making outflow easier. It can also disrupt any aggregates or gel-like structures that result from HA being modified. Hyaluronidase is used medically primarily as a dispersion agent, but may also be useful in conditions where altered viscosity of the fascia is desired, such as in the treatment of muscle stiffness

  5. Viscoelastic effective properties of two types of heterogeneous materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, Jan; Dabrowski, Marcin; Schmid, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    In the past, a lot of efforts have been put to describe two end cases of rock behaviors: elasticity and viscosity. In recent years, more focus has been brought on the intermediate viscoelastic cases which describe better the rheology of rocks such as shales. Shales are typically heterogeneous and the question arises as to how to derive their effective properties so that they can be approximated as homogeneous media. This question has already been dealt with at the elastic and viscous limit but still remains for some cases in between. Using MILAMIN, a fast finite element solver for large problems, we numerically investigate different approaches to derive the effective properties of several viscoelastic media. Two types of geometries are considered: layered and inclusion based media. We focus on two dimensional plane strain problems considering two phase composites deformed under pure shear. We start by investigating the case of transversely isotropic layered media made of two Maxwell materials. Using the Backus averaging method we discuss the degree of relevance of this averaging by considering some parameters as: layer periodicity, layer thickness and layer interface roughness. Other averaging methods are also discussed which provide a broader perspective on the performances of Backus averaging. In a second part we move on to inclusion based models. The advantage of these models compared to the previous one is that they provide a better approximation to real microstructures in rocks. The setup we consider in this part is the following: some viscous circular inclusions are embedded in an elastic matrix. Both the inclusions and the matrix are homogeneous but the inclusions are purely isotropic while the matrix can also be anisotropic. In order to derive the effective viscoelastic properties of the medium we use two approaches: the self-consistent averaging and the differential effective medium theory. The idea behind self-consistency is to assume that the inclusions

  6. Viscoelastic properties and compaction behaviour of pharmaceutical particulate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsardaka, Ekaterini D.

    1990-01-01

    The viscoelastic behaviour of particulate solids is of major relevance in powder compaction. When designing a pharmaceutical tablet formulation, it is highly undesirable for the tablet properties to be markedly affected by changes in compaction rate on different tablet presses, if problems are to be avoided during scale-up and manufacture. In order to be able to predict and minimise the time-dependent deformation of pharmaceutical powders, a full understanding of such behaviour is needed. For comparative purposes, a range of materials with differing compaction properties were studied. Heckel plots were extended in order to study the consolidation behaviour of materials during compression, decompression and after ejection. A number of derived parameters were proposed as a useful means of assessing the viscoelastic characteristics of materials. The mechanical properties of the tablets produced were assessed by means of both a diametral loading test and a direct tension test, in order to study the homogeneity of tablets with respect to strength and toughness. Fitting stress relaxation data to a hyperbolic equation enabled the asymptotic value of relaxed stress and the rate of stress relaxation at short times to be determined. Creep analysis was found to be a most useful method in quantifying the viscoelastic properties of materials. Creep experiments were used to separately quantify the ability of a material to undergo elastic, viscoelastic and plastic deformation at constant stress. Analysis of the viscoelastic compliance provided a time constant and an equilibrium value. Spectral analysis of the creep data was an alternative method of studying viscoelastic behaviour, since analysis in the frequency domain revealed hidden periodicities of mechanisms possibly related to viscoelastic behaviour. A detailed study of several forms of modified starch addressed factors which may influence its viscoelastic behaviour, including manufacturing process variables such as particle

  7. Linear viscoelastic limits of asphalt concrete at low and intermediate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Yusuf A.

    valid for mixtures similar to the ones tested in this study. Different envelopes should be used in the case of mixtures containing a very soft or a very stiff polymer modified binder. At 4°C, the typical values of stresses and material properties of mixtures fell within the linear viscoelastic region, considering the typical shear creep compliance values at loading times and stresses experienced in the field. However, typical values at 20°C fell within a region in which some, but not all of the mixtures tested in this study behaved linearly. It is known that the behavior of asphalt concrete mixture changes from linear to nonlinear, depending on the temperature and loading conditions. However, this study is the first of its kind in which both the proportionality and the superposition condition were evaluated. The experimental design and the analysis procedures presented in this study can be applied to similar experiments that may be conducted in the future to evaluate linearity of different types of asphalt concrete mixtures.

  8. Analyzing and improving viscoelastic properties of high density polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Reaj Uddin

    2011-12-01

    High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) is closely packed, less branched polyethylene having higher mechanical properties, chemical resistance, and heat resistance than Low Density Polyentylene (LDPE). Better properties and cost effectiveness make it an important raw material over LDPE in packaging industries. Stacked containers made of HDPE experience static loading and deformation strain during their storage period in a warehouse. As HDPE is a viscoelastic material, dimensional stability of stacked HDPE containers depends on time dependent properties such as creep and stress relaxation. Now, light weighting is a driving force in packaging industries, which results in lower production costs but performance of the product becomes a challenge. Proper understanding of the viscoelastic properties of HDPE, with relevant FE simulation can facilitate improved designs. This research involves understanding and improving viscoelastic properties, creep behavior, and stress relaxation of HDPE. Different approaches were carried out to meet the objectives. Organic filler CaCO3 was added to HDPE at increasing weight fractions and corresponding property changes were investigated. Annealing heat treatments were also carried out for potential property improvements. The effect of ageing was also investigated on both annealed and non annealed HDPE. The related performance of different water bottles against squeeze pressure was also characterized. Both approaches, incorporation of CaCO3 and annealing, showed improvements in the properties of HDPE over neat HDPE. This research aids finding the optimum solution for improving viscoelastic properties, stress relaxation, and creep behavior of HDPE in manufacturing.

  9. Viscoelastic properties of healthy human artery measured in saline solution by AFM based indentation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lundkvist, A.; Lilleodden, E.; Sickhaus, W.; Kinney, J.; Pruitt, L.; Balooch, M.

    1998-02-09

    Using an Atomic Force Microscope with an attachment for indentation, we have measured local, in vitro mechanical properties of healthy femoral artery tissue held in saline solution. The elastic modulus (34. 3 kPa) and viscoelastic response ({tau}sub{epsilon} {equals} 16.9 s and {tau}sub{sigma} {equals} 29.3 s) of the unstretched,intimal vessel wall have been determined using Sneddon theory and a three element model(standard linear solid) for viscoelastic materials. The procedures necessary to employ the indenting attachment to detect elastic moduli in the kPa range in liquid are described.

  10. Viscoelastic properties of high solids softwood kraft black liquors

    SciTech Connect

    Zaman, A.A.; Fricke, A.L. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1995-01-01

    The linear viscoelastic functions of several softwood slash pine kraft black liquors from a two level, four variable factorially designed pulping experiment were determined for solids concentrations from 65% to 81% and temperatures from 40 to 85 C. At high solids and lower temperatures, black liquors behave like un-cross-linked polymers.The exact level of dynamic viscosity and storage modulus at any given condition is dependent upon the solids composition which will vary from liquor to liquor. The linear viscoelastic functions were described using Cross and Carreau-Yasuda models. Superposition principles developed for polymer melts and concentrated polymer solutions were applied to obtain reduced correlations for dynamic viscosity and storage modulus. The data for dynamic viscosity were shifted over the whole range of temperature, solids concentrations, and frequency, and a single curve for dynamic viscosity behavior of every liquor was obtained. The data for storage modulus did not superimpose into a single curve for the effects of solids concentration. The reduced correlations were used to estimate the viscoelasticity of the liquors near normal firing conditions and found that black liquors will not have any problem in droplet formation for concentrations up to 81% solids and temperatures above 120 C. The viscometric and linear viscoelastic functions of black liquors were compared (Cox-Merz rule), and it was shown that at sufficiently low shear rates and frequencies both shear viscosity and the magnitude of the complex viscosity approach zero shear rate viscosity.

  11. On the modal decoupling of linear mechanical systems with frequency-dependent viscoelastic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastroddi, Franco; Calore, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    Linear Multi-Degree of Freedom (MDOF) mechanical systems having frequency-dependent viscoelastic behaviors are often studied and modelled in frequency or Laplace domains. Indeed, once this modelling process is carried out, it is not generally possible to reduce the obtained MDOF damped mechanical system to a set of uncoupled damped modal oscillators apart from some special cases. In this paper a general procedure has been proposed to transform a coupled linear mechanical system having frequency-dependent viscoelastic characteristics to a set of independent damped modal oscillators. The procedure is based on a linear co-ordinate transformation procedure using matrices in real field only. The approach is exact and based on the solution of one associated eigenproblem for the case of linearly viscous damping. In the general case of frequency-dependent viscoelastic materials, the approach includes an iterative procedure solving local eigenproblems.Some numerical results are reported to show the capabilities of the proposed approach.

  12. Consistent linearization method for finite-element analysis of viscoelastic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.D.; Pelessone, D.

    1983-05-01

    A method of formulating material models for viscoelastic analysis using the finite-element method is presented. The method, named consistent linearization, includes the influence of creep in the material stiffness in a theoretically ideal manner. This method has been applied to the linear viscoelastic analysis of graphite subject to irradiation. Previously, using the initial strain method, short time steps had been required to avoid a numerical instability associated with the rapid transient creep. Using the consistent linearization method a factor of 15 reduction in computer time was achieved for the same accuracy.

  13. Linear and Nonlinear Viscoelastic Modeling of Aorta and Carotid Pressure-Area Dynamics under in vivo and ex vivo Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Valdez-Jasso, Daniela; Bia, Daniel; Zócalo, Yanina; Armentano, Ricardo L.; Haider, Mansoor A.; Olufsen, Mette S.

    2013-01-01

    A better understanding of the biomechanical properties of the arterial wall provides important insight into arterial vascular biology under normal (healthy) and pathological conditions. This insight has potential to improve tracking of disease progression and to aid in vascular graft design and implementation. In this study, we use linear and nonlinear viscoelastic models to predict biomechanical properties of the thoracic descending aorta and the carotid artery under ex vivo and in vivo conditions in ovine and human arteries. Models analyzed include a four-parameter (linear) Kelvin viscoelastic model and two five-parameter nonlinear viscoelastic models (an arctangent and a sigmoid model) that relate changes in arterial blood pressure to the vessel cross-sectional area (via estimation of vessel strain). These models were developed using the framework of Quasilinear Viscoelasticity (QLV) theory and were validated using measurements from the thoracic descending aorta and the carotid artery obtained from human and ovine arteries. In vivo measurements were obtained from ten ovine aortas and ten human carotid arteries. Ex vivo measurements (from both locations) were made in eleven male Merino sheep. Biomechanical properties were obtained through constrained estimation of model parameters. To further investigate the parameter estimates we computed standard errors and confidence intervals and we used analysis of variance to compare results within and between groups. Overall, our results indicate that optimal model selection depends on the arterial type. Results showed that for the thoracic descending aorta (under both experimental conditions) the best predictions were obtained with the nonlinear sigmoid model, while under healthy physiological pressure loading the carotid arteries nonlinear stiffening with increasing pressure is negligible, and consequently, the linear (Kelvin) viscoelastic model better describes the pressure-area dynamics in this vessel. Results

  14. Viscoelastic properties of a spinal posterior dynamic stabilisation device.

    PubMed

    Lawless, Bernard M; Barnes, Spencer C; Espino, Daniel M; Shepherd, Duncan E T

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of two types of spinal posterior dynamic stabilisation devices. In air at 37°C, the viscoelastic properties of six BDyn 1 level, six BDyn 2 level posterior dynamic stabilisation devices (S14 Implants, Pessac, France) and its elastomeric components (polycarbonate urethane and silicone) were measured using Dynamic Mechanical Analysis. The viscoelastic properties were measured over the frequency range 0.01-30Hz. The BDyn devices and its components were viscoelastic throughout the frequency range tested. The mean storage stiffness and mean loss stiffness of the BDyn 1 level device, BDyn 2 level device, silicone component and polycarbonate urethane component all presented a logarithmic relationship with respect to frequency. The storage stiffness of the BDyn 1 level device ranged from 95.56N/mm to 119.29N/mm, while the BDyn 2 level storage stiffness ranged from 39.41N/mm to 42.82N/mm. BDyn 1 level device and BDyn 2 level device loss stiffness ranged from 10.72N/mm to 23.42N/mm and 4.26N/mm to 9.57N/mm, respectively. No resonant frequencies were recorded for the devices or its components. The elastic property of BDyn 1 level device is influenced by the PCU and silicone components, in the physiological frequency range. The viscoelastic properties calculated in this study may be compared to spinal devices and spinal structures. PMID:27018832

  15. Flexible microfluidic device for mechanical property characterization of soft viscoelastic solids such as bacterial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Hohne, Danial N.; Younger, John G.; Solomon, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a flexible microfluidic device to characterize the mechanical properties of soft viscoelastic solids such as bacterial biofilms. In the device, stress is imposed on a test specimen by application of a fixed pressure to a thin, flexible poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) membrane that is in contact with the specimen. The stress is applied by pressurizing a microfabricated air channel located above the test area. The strain resulting from the applied stress is quantified by measuring the membrane deflection with a confocal laser-scanning microscope. The deflection is governed by the viscoelastic properties of the PDMS membrane and of the test specimen. The relative contributions of the membrane and test material to the measured deformation are quantified by comparing a finite element analysis and an independent (control) measurement of the PDMS membrane mechanical properties. The flexible microfluidic rheometer was used to characterize both the steady-state elastic modulus and transient strain recoil of two soft materials: gellan gums and bacterial biofilms. The measured linear elastic moduli and viscoelastic relaxation times of gellan gum solutions were in good agreement with the results of conventional mechanical rheometry. The linear Young’s moduli of biofilms of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Klebsiella pneumoniae, which could not be measured using conventional methods, were found to be 3.2 kPa and 1.1 kPa, respectively, and the relaxation time of the S. epidermidis biofilm was 13.8 s. Additionally, strain hardening was observed in all the biofilms studied. Finally, design parameters and detection limits of the method show that the device is capable of characterizing soft viscoelastic solids with elastic moduli in the range of 102 – 105 Pa. The flexible microfluidic rheometer addresses a need for mechanical property characterization of soft viscoelastic solids common in fields such as biomaterials, food and consumer products. It requires only ~ 200 p

  16. Flexible microfluidic device for mechanical property characterization of soft viscoelastic solids such as bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Hohne, Danial N; Younger, John G; Solomon, Michael J

    2009-07-01

    We introduce a flexible microfluidic device to characterize the mechanical properties of soft viscoelastic solids such as bacterial biofilms. In the device, stress is imposed on a test specimen by the application of a fixed pressure to a thin, flexible poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) membrane that is in contact with the specimen. The stress is applied by pressurizing a microfabricated air channel located above the test area. The strain resulting from the applied stress is quantified by measuring the membrane deflection with a confocal laser scanning microscope. The deflection is governed by the viscoelastic properties of the PDMS membrane and of the test specimen. The relative contributions of the membrane and test material to the measured deformation are quantified by comparing a finite element analysis with an independent (control) measurement of the PDMS membrane mechanical properties. The flexible microfluidic rheometer was used to characterize both the steady-state elastic modulus and the transient strain recoil of two soft materials: gellan gums and bacterial biofilms. The measured linear elastic moduli and viscoelastic relaxation times of gellan gum solutions were in good agreement with the results of conventional mechanical rheometry. The linear Young's moduli of biofilms of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Klebsiella pneumoniae, which could not be measured using conventional methods, were found to be 3.2 and 1.1 kPa, respectively, and the relaxation time of the S. epidermidis biofilm was 13.8 s. Additionally, strain hardening was observed in all the biofilms studied. Finally, design parameters and detection limits of the method show that the device is capable of characterizing soft viscoelastic solids with elastic moduli in the range of 102-105 Pa. The flexible microfluidic rheometer addresses the need for mechanical property characterization of soft viscoelastic solids common in fields such as biomaterials, food, and consumer products. It requires only 200 p

  17. Fractional characteristic times and dissipated energy in fractional linear viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colinas-Armijo, Natalia; Di Paola, Mario; Pinnola, Francesco P.

    2016-08-01

    In fractional viscoelasticity the stress-strain relation is a differential equation with non-integer operators (derivative or integral). Such constitutive law is able to describe the mechanical behavior of several materials, but when fractional operators appear, the elastic and the viscous contribution are inseparable and the characteristic times (relaxation and retardation time) cannot be defined. This paper aims to provide an approach to separate the elastic and the viscous phase in the fractional stress-strain relation with the aid of an equivalent classical model (Kelvin-Voigt or Maxwell). For such equivalent model the parameters are selected by an optimization procedure. Once the parameters of the equivalent model are defined, characteristic times of fractional viscoelasticity are readily defined as ratio between viscosity and stiffness. In the numerical applications, three kinds of different excitations are considered, that is, harmonic, periodic, and pseudo-stochastic. It is shown that, for any periodic excitation, the equivalent models have some important features: (i) the dissipated energy per cycle at steady-state coincides with the Staverman-Schwarzl formulation of the fractional model, (ii) the elastic and the viscous coefficients of the equivalent model are strictly related to the storage and the loss modulus, respectively.

  18. DEM Modelling of Non-linear Viscoelastic Stress Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenqiang; Tang, Zhiping; Horie, Yasuyuki

    2001-06-01

    A DEM(Discrete Element Method) simulation of nonlinear viscoelastic stress wave problems is carried out. The interaction forces among elements are described using a model in which neighbor elements are linked by a nonlinear spring and a certain number of Maxwell components in parallel. By making use of exponential relaxation moduli, it is shown that numerical computation of the convolution integral does not require storing and repeatedly calculating strain history, and can reduce the computational cost dramatically. To validate the viscoelastic DM2 code, stress wave propagation in a Maxwell rod with one end subjected to a constant stress loading is simulated. Results excellently fit those from the characteristics calculation. Satisfactory results are also obtained in the simulation of one-dimensional plane wave in a plastic bonded explosive. The code is then used to investigate the problem of meso-scale damage in this explosive under shock loading. Results not only show "compression damage", but also reveal a complex damage evolution. They demonstrate a unique capability of DEM in modeling heterogeneous materials.

  19. The analytical representation of viscoelastic material properties using optimization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents a technique to model viscoelastic material properties with a function of the form of the Prony series. Generally, the method employed to determine the function constants requires assuming values for the exponential constants of the function and then resolving the remaining constants through linear least-squares techniques. The technique presented here allows all the constants to be analytically determined through optimization techniques. This technique is employed in a computer program named PRONY and makes use of commercially available optimization tool developed by VMA Engineering, Inc. The PRONY program was utilized to compare the technique against previously determined models for solid rocket motor TP-H1148 propellant and V747-75 Viton fluoroelastomer. In both cases, the optimization technique generated functions that modeled the test data with at least an order of magnitude better correlation. This technique has demonstrated the capability to use small or large data sets and to use data sets that have uniformly or nonuniformly spaced data pairs. The reduction of experimental data to accurate mathematical models is a vital part of most scientific and engineering research. This technique of regression through optimization can be applied to other mathematical models that are difficult to fit to experimental data through traditional regression techniques.

  20. Analytical model for nanoscale viscoelastic properties characterization using dynamic nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuya, Philip A.; Patel, Nimitt G.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few decades, nanoindentation has gained widespread acceptance as a technique for materials properties characterization at micron and submicron length scales. Accurate and precise characterization of material properties with a nanoindenter is critically dependent on the ability to correctly model the response of the test equipment in contact with the material. In dynamic nanoindention analysis, a simple Kelvin-Voigt model is commonly used to capture the viscoelastic response. However, this model oversimplifies the response of real viscoelastic materials such as polymers. A model is developed that captures the dynamic nanoindentation response of a viscoelastic material. Indenter tip-sample contact forces are modelled using a generalized Maxwell model. The results on a silicon elastomer were analysed using conventional two element Kelvin-Voigt model and contrasted to analysis done using the Maxwell model. The results show that conventional Kelvin-Voigt model overestimates the storage modulus of the silicone elastomer by ~30%. Maxwell model represents a significant improvement in capturing the viscoelastic material behaviour over the Voigt model.

  1. Modelling the Non-Linear Viscoelastic and Viscoplastic Behaviour of Aramid Fibre Yarns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chailleux, E.; Davies, P.

    A non-linear viscoelastic viscoplastic model is proposed for the tensile behaviour of aramid fibres, based on an analysis of the deformation mechanisms of these materials. This model uses the macroscopic formulation developed by Schapery together with the plasticity concept of Perzyna. A simple identification procedure for the model parameters has been developed using creep/recovery cycles at different load levels. The identification reveals that two of the four parameters of the viscoelastic model (g1 and aσ) are independent of stress level. This may be due to the simple and regular nature of the fibre structure. The model enables the parameters which characterise the non-linear reversible viscoelasticity to be identified independently from those which characterise the viscoplasticity. The model predictions are compared to experimental data for a more complex load sequence and reasonable correlation is obtained.

  2. A new device for measuring the viscoelastic properties of hydrated matrix gels.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Jeffrey W; Coger, Robin N

    2002-04-01

    Determinations of the viscoelastic properties of extracellular matrices (ECMs) are becoming increasingly important for accurate predictive modeling of biological systems. Since the interactions of the cells with the ECM and surrounding fluid (e.g., blood, media) each affect cell behavior; it is advantageous to evaluate the ECM's material properties in the presence of the hydrating fluid. Conventional rheometry methods evaluate the bulk material properties of gel materials while displacing the hydrating liquid film. Such systems are therefore nonideal for testing materials such as ECMs, whose properties change with dehydration. The new patent pending, piezoelectrically actuated linear rheometer is designed to eliminate this problem. It uses a single cantilever to apply an oscillating load to the gel and to sense the gel's deflection. Composed of two thin film piezopolymer layers, the cantilever uses one layer as the actuator, and the second piezopolymer layer to measure the lateral movement of its attached probe. The viscoelastic nature of the ECM adds stiffness and damping to the system, resulting in the attenuation and phase shift of the sensor's output voltage. From these parameters, the ECM's shear storage and loss moduli are then determined. Initial tests on the BioMatrix I and type I collagen ECMs reveal that the first prototype of the piezoelectrically actuated linear rheometer is capable of accurately determining the trend and order of magnitude of an ECM's viscoelastic properties. In this paper, details of the rheometer's design and operating principles are described. PMID:12002123

  3. Liquid organic foams for formulation optimization : an assessment of foam linear viscoelasticity and its temporal dependence.

    SciTech Connect

    Kropka, Jamie Michael; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2010-03-01

    Liquid foams are viscoelastic liquids, exhibiting a fast relaxation attributed to local bubble motions and a slow response due to structural evolution of the intrinsically unstable system. In this work, these processes are examined in unique organic foams that differ from the typically investigated aqueous systems in two major ways: the organic foams (1) posses a much higher continuous phase viscosity and (2) exhibit a coarsening response that involves coalescence of cells. The transient and dynamic relaxation responses of the organic foams are evaluated and discussed in relation to the response of aqueous foams. The change in the foam response with increasing gas fraction, from that of a Newtonian liquid to one that is strongly viscoelastic, is also presented. In addition, the temporal dependencies of the linear viscoelastic response are assessed in the context of the foam structural evolution. These foams and characterization techniques provide a basis for testing stabilization mechanisms in epoxy-based foams for encapsulation applications.

  4. High-frequency viscoelastic shear properties of vocal fold tissues: implications for vocal fold tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Teller, Sean S; Farran, Alexandra J E; Xiao, Longxi; Jiao, Tong; Duncan, Randall L; Clifton, Rodney J; Jia, Xinqiao

    2012-10-01

    The biomechanical function of the vocal folds (VFs) depends on their viscoelastic properties. Many conditions can lead to VF scarring that compromises voice function and quality. To identify candidate replacement materials, the structure, composition, and mechanical properties of native tissues need to be understood at phonation frequencies. Previously, the authors developed the torsional wave experiment (TWE), a stress-wave-based experiment to determine the linear viscoelastic shear properties of small, soft samples. Here, the viscoelastic properties of porcine and human VFs were measured over a frequency range of 10-200 Hz. The TWE utilizes resonance phenomena to determine viscoelastic properties; therefore, the specimen test frequency is determined by the sample size and material properties. Viscoelastic moduli are reported at resonance frequencies. Structure and composition of the tissues were determined by histology and immunochemistry. Porcine data from the TWE are separated into two groups: a young group, consisting of fetal and newborn pigs, and an adult group, consisting of 6-9-month olds and 2+-year olds. Adult tissues had an average storage modulus of 2309±1394 Pa and a loss tangent of 0.38±0.10 at frequencies of 36-200 Hz. The VFs of young pigs were significantly more compliant, with a storage modulus of 394±142 Pa and a loss tangent of 0.40±0.14 between 14 and 30 Hz. No gender dependence was observed. Histological staining showed that adult porcine tissues had a more organized, layered structure than the fetal tissues, with a thicker epithelium and a more structured lamina propria. Elastin fibers in fetal VF tissues were immature compared to those in adult tissues. Together, these structural changes in the tissues most likely contributed to the change in viscoelastic properties. Adult human VF tissues, recovered postmortem from adult patients with a history of smoking or disease, had an average storage modulus of 756±439 Pa and a loss tangent of 0

  5. Relationships between tissue composition and viscoelastic properties in human trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Ojanen, X; Isaksson, H; Töyräs, J; Turunen, M J; Malo, M K H; Halvari, A; Jurvelin, J S

    2015-01-21

    Trabecular bone is a metabolically active tissue with a high surface to volume ratio. It exhibits viscoelastic properties that may change during aging. Changes in bone properties due to altered metabolism are sensitively revealed in trabecular bone. However, the relationships between material composition and viscoelastic properties of bone, and their changes during aging have not yet been elucidated. In this study, trabecular bone samples from the femoral neck of male cadavers (n=21) aged 17-82 years were collected and the tissue level composition and its associations with the tissue viscoelastic properties were evaluated by using Raman microspectroscopy and nanoindentation, respectively. For composition, collagen content, mineralization, carbonate substitution and mineral crystallinity were evaluated. The calculated mechanical properties included reduced modulus (Er), hardness (H) and the creep parameters (E1, E2, η1and η2), as obtained by fitting the experimental data to the Burgers model. The results indicated that the creep parameters, E1, E2, η1and η2, were linearly correlated with mineral crystallinity (r=0.769-0.924, p<0.001). Creep time constant (η2/E2) tended to increase with crystallinity (r=0.422, p=0.057). With age, the mineralization decreased (r=-0.587, p=0.005) while the carbonate substitution increased (r=0.728, p<0.001). Age showed no significant associations with nanoindentation parameters. The present findings suggest that, at the tissue-level, the viscoelastic properties of trabecular bone are related to the changes in characteristics of bone mineral. This association may be independent of human age. PMID:25498367

  6. [Viscoelastic behaviour of inlay waxes. (Part 2) Physical and dynamic viscoelastic properties for binary mixtures of waxes (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Katakura, N

    1981-01-01

    Binary mixtures of waxes added carnauba wax, beeswax or dammar to paraffin were investigated by measurements of X-ray diffraction, dilatometry, differential thermal analysis and dynamic viscoelasticity. The relationships between the viscoelastic behaviour and the physical properties of these waxes were discussed. Additions of carnauba wax to paraffin changed drastically viscoelastic properties of paraffin, that is, increased the dynamic modulus, G', and decreased the loss tangent, tan delta, in the region of higher temperatures including the crystal transition temperature region of paraffin. The possible explanation for this change of viscoelastic properties is that the presence of crystals of carnauba wax composed of longer chain molecules than that of paraffin rises interfacial interaction. The temperature dependence of viscoelastic properties for binary mixtures of paraffin and beeswax was approximately the same as that of paraffin. This is because paraffin and beeswax may form a sort of homogeneous phases. Additions of dammar to paraffin increased the elasticity of paraffin in the region of lower temperatures, but did not effected to change of G' and tan delta in the region of higher temperatures. Another effect of additions of dammar was to lower the thermal expansion of binary mixtures. PMID:6943233

  7. Characterization of Viscoelastic Properties of Polymeric Materials Through Nanoindentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, G. M.; Bandorawalla, T.; Herring, H. M.; Gates, T. S.

    2003-01-01

    Nanoindentation is used to determine the dynamic viscoelastic properties of six polymer materials. It is shown that varying the harmonic frequency of the nanoindentation does not have any significant effect on the measured storage and loss moduli of the polymers. Agreement is found between these results and data from DMA testing of the same materials. Varying the harmonic amplitude of the nanoindentation does not have a significant effect on the measured properties of the high performance resins, however, the storage modulus of the polyethylene decreases as the harmonic amplitude increases. Measured storage and loss moduli are also shown to depend on the density of the polyethylene.

  8. Computational Protocols for Viscoelastic Material Property Characterizations without the Use of Poisson's Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaeli, Michael; Shtark, Abraham; Grossbein, Hagay; Hilton, Harry H.

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this work is to present the numerical implementation for the alternative determination of vis-coelastic material properties without using Poisson's ratios as presented in [1]-[3]. The presented method is based on the 3-D generalized constitutive relations viscoelastic materials with hereditary integrals. The numerical procedures are based on experiments using photogrammetric and tensile testing instrumentation, which provide stress data in the 1-D loaded direction and strains in both longitudinal (loaded) and transverse directions. Measurements and data analyses include both starting transient and steady-state loading conditions. The paper presents the implementation of solutions for the linear case, where the relaxation time values are prescribed according to to the scheme presented in [1] and [3]. Convergence of the Prony series representations is evaluated.

  9. Linear viscoelasticity of sulfonated styrene oligomers near the sol-gel transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Quan; Colby, Ralph H.

    2014-08-01

    Linear viscoelastic complex modulus (reported by Weiss and Zhao, 2009) of three ionomers, obtained through random sulfonation of oligomeric styrene at low ionic contents, p = 2.5, 4.8, and 6.5mol%, were analyzed using mean-field gelation theory with the fraction of repeat units that are sulfonated the effective extent of reaction p. Oligomeric styrene with low M = 4000 g/mol, having N = 38 repeat units, ensures absence of entanglement effects. The dynamics change in a complicated way with ion content p because the gel point p c = 1/( N-1) = 2.7 mol%. For ionomers having p = 2.5 mol%, the system is below but quite close to the gel point. The terminal relaxation is governed by the effective breakup of large clusters into subclusters of comparable sizes, as anticipated by Rubinstein and Semenov. The samples with p = 4.8 mol% and 6.5 mol%, are beyond the gel point and exhibit properties of reversible gels.

  10. Structure-Dependent Viscoelastic Properties of C(9)-Alkanethiol Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Thomas M.; Michalske, Terry A.; Shinn, Neal D.

    1999-08-10

    Quartz crystal microbalance techniques and in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry are used to probe the structure-dependent intrinsic viscoelastic properties of self-assembled CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 8}SH alkanethiol monolayer adsorbed from the gas phase onto Au(111)-textured substrates. Physisorbed molecules, mixed chemisorbed-fluid/solid phases and solid-phase domain boundaries make sequentially dominant contributions to the measured energy dissipation in the growing monolayer. Deviations from Langmuir adsorption kinetics reveal a precursor-mediated adsorption channel. These studies reveal the impact of structural heterogeneity in tribological studies of monolayer lubricants.

  11. Investigation of multilayer printed circuit board (PCB) film warpage using viscoelastic properties measured by a vibration test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Sung-Jun; Park, Buhm; Kim, Do-Hyoung; Kwak, Dong-Ok; Song, In-Sang; Park, Junhong; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2015-03-01

    Woven glass fabric/BT (bismaleimide triazine) composite laminate (BT core), copper (Cu), and photoimageable solder resist (PSR) are the most widely used materials for semiconductors in electronic devices. Among these materials, BT core and PSR contain polymeric materials that exhibit viscoelastic behavior. For this reason, these materials are considered to have time- and temperature-dependent moduli during warpage analysis. However, the thin geometry of multilayer printed circuit board (PCB) film makes it difficult to identify viscoelastic characteristics. In this work, a vibration test method was proposed for measuring the viscoelastic properties of a multilayer PCB film at different temperatures. The beam-shaped specimens, composed of a BT core, Cu laminated on a BT core, and PSR and Cu laminated on a BT core, were used in the vibration test. The frequency-dependent variation of the complex bending stiffness was determined using a transfer function method. The storage modulus (E‧) of the BT core, Cu, and PSR as a function of temperature and frequency were obtained, and their temperature-dependent variation was identified. The obtained properties were fitted using a viscoelastic model for the BT core and the PSR, and a linear elastic model for the Cu. Warpage of a line pattern specimen due to temperature variation was measured using a shadow Moiré analysis and compared to predictions using a finite element model. The results provide information on the mechanism of warpage, especially warpage due to temperature-dependent variation in viscoelastic properties.

  12. Probing viscoelastic surfaces with bimodal tapping-mode atomic force microscopy: Underlying physics and observables for a standard linear solid model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary This paper presents computational simulations of single-mode and bimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM) with particular focus on the viscoelastic interactions occurring during tip–sample impact. The surface is modeled by using a standard linear solid model, which is the simplest system that can reproduce creep compliance and stress relaxation, which are fundamental behaviors exhibited by viscoelastic surfaces. The relaxation of the surface in combination with the complexities of bimodal tip–sample impacts gives rise to unique dynamic behaviors that have important consequences with regards to the acquisition of quantitative relationships between the sample properties and the AFM observables. The physics of the tip–sample interactions and its effect on the observables are illustrated and discussed, and a brief research outlook on viscoelasticity measurement with intermittent-contact AFM is provided. PMID:25383277

  13. Viscoelastic properties of electrochemically deposited protein/metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Elizabeth J; Mathew, Mathew T; Shull, Kenneth R

    2015-04-01

    The interfacial gelation of proteins at metallic surfaces was investigated with an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). When Cr electrodes were corroded in proteinaceous solutions, it was found that gels will form at the Cr surfaces if molybdate ions are also present in the solution. Gelation is reversible and can also be controlled with the electrochemical potential at the electrode. Further, a method was developed to characterize the viscoelastic properties of thin films in liquid media using the QCM as a high-frequency rheometer. By measuring the frequency and dissipation at multiple harmonics of the resonance frequency, the viscoelastic phase angle, density-modulus product, and areal mass of a film can be determined. The method was applied to characterize the protein films, demonstrating that they have a phase angle near 55° and a density-modulus product of ≈10(7) Pa·g/cm(3). Data imply that the gels are composed of a weakly cross-linked proteinaceous network with properties similar to albumin solutions with concentrations in the range of ≈40 wt %. PMID:25780816

  14. Linear oscillation of gas bubbles in a viscoelastic material under ultrasound irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Fumiya; Ando, Keita

    2015-11-01

    Acoustically forced oscillation of spherical gas bubbles in a viscoelastic material is studied through comparisons between experiments and linear theory. An experimental setup has been designed to visualize bubble dynamics in gelatin gels using a high-speed camera. A spherical gas bubble is created by focusing an infrared laser pulse into (gas-supersaturated) gelatin gels. The bubble radius (up to 150 μm) under mechanical equilibrium is controlled by gradual mass transfer of gases across the bubble interface. The linearized bubble dynamics are studied from the observation of spherical bubble oscillation driven by low-intensity, planar ultrasound driven at 28 kHz. It follows from the experiment for an isolated bubble that the frequency response in its volumetric oscillation was shifted to the high frequency side and its peak was suppressed as the gelatin concentration increases. The measurement is fitted to the linearized Rayleigh-Plesset equation coupled with the Voigt constitutive equation that models the behavior of linear viscoelastic solids; the fitting yields good agreement by tuning unknown values of the viscosity and rigidity, indicating that more complex phenomena including shear thinning, stress relaxation, and retardation do not play an important role for the small-amplitude oscillations. Moreover, the cases for bubble-bubble and bubble-wall systems are studied. The observed interaction effect on the linearized dynamics can be explained as well by a set of the Rayleigh-Plesset equations coupled through acoustic radiation among these systems. This suggests that this experimental setup can be applied to validate the model of bubble dynamics with more complex configuration such as a cloud of bubbles in viscoelastic materials.

  15. Linear oscillation of gas bubbles in a viscoelastic material under ultrasound irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaguchi, Fumiya; Ando, Keita

    2015-11-15

    Acoustically forced oscillation of spherical gas bubbles in a viscoelastic material is studied through comparisons between experiments and linear theory. An experimental setup has been designed to visualize bubble dynamics in gelatin gels using a high-speed camera. A spherical gas bubble is created by focusing an infrared laser pulse into (gas-supersaturated) gelatin gels. The bubble radius (up to 150 μm) under mechanical equilibrium is controlled by gradual mass transfer of gases across the bubble interface. The linearized bubble dynamics are studied from the observation of spherical bubble oscillation driven by low-intensity, planar ultrasound driven at 28 kHz. It follows from the experiment for an isolated bubble that the frequency response in its volumetric oscillation was shifted to the high frequency side and its peak was suppressed as the gelatin concentration increases. The measurement is fitted to the linearized Rayleigh–Plesset equation coupled with the Voigt constitutive equation that models the behavior of linear viscoelastic solids; the fitting yields good agreement by tuning unknown values of the viscosity and rigidity, indicating that more complex phenomena including shear thinning, stress relaxation, and retardation do not play an important role for the small-amplitude oscillations. Moreover, the cases for bubble-bubble and bubble-wall systems are studied. The observed interaction effect on the linearized dynamics can be explained as well by a set of the Rayleigh–Plesset equations coupled through acoustic radiation among these systems. This suggests that this experimental setup can be applied to validate the model of bubble dynamics with more complex configuration such as a cloud of bubbles in viscoelastic materials.

  16. Continuous Shear Wave Elastography: a New Method to Measure in-vivo Viscoelastic Properties of Tendons

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Daniel H.; Suydam, Stephen M.; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2015-01-01

    Viscoelastic mechanical properties are frequently altered after tendon injuries and during recovery. Therefore, non-invasive measurements of shear viscoelastic properties may help evaluate tendon recovery and compare the effectiveness of different therapies. The objectives of this study are to present an elastography method to measure localized viscoelastic properties of tendon and to present initial results in healthy and injured human Achilles and semitendinosus tendons. The technique used an external actuator to generate the shear waves in the tendon at different frequencies and plane wave imaging to measure shear wave displacements. For each of the excitation frequencies, maps of direction specific wave speeds were calculated using Local Frequency Estimation. Maps of viscoelastic properties were obtained using a pixel wise curve-fit of wave speed and frequency. The method was validated by comparing measurements of wave speed in agarose gels to those obtained using magnetic resonance elastography. Measurements in human healthy Achilles tendons revealed a pronounced increase in wave speed as function of frequency that highlights the importance of tendon viscoelasticity. Additionally, the viscoelastic properties of the Achilles tendon were larger than those reported for other tissues. Measurements in a tendinopathic Achilles tendon showed that it is feasible to quantify local viscoeasltic properties. Similarly, measurement in the semitendinosus tendon showed a substantial differences in viscoelastic properties between the healthy and contralateral tendons. Consequently, this technique has the potential of evaluating localized changes in tendon viscoelastic properties due to injury and during recovery in a clinical setting. PMID:25796414

  17. Viscoelastic Properties of Entangled DNA Solutions: Dependence on Molecular Length and Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Patrick; Dobrev, Veselin S.; Urbach, Jeff; Anderson, Rae

    2014-03-01

    We use macroscopic rheology to investigate the viscoelastic properties of solutions of monodisperse linear DNA, as a function of DNA length and concentration. We span from the unentangled to the entangled regime by using DNA lengths that vary from 11 to 115 kilobasepairs (3.7 to 39 μm) and solution concentrations that range between 0.5 and 4.0 mg/ml. We investigate the effects of oscillatory frequency on the linear elastic (G') and viscous (G'') moduli, with frequency values of 0.01 - 100 Hz. In addition, the dependence of viscosity on strain rate is studied with strain rates ranging from 0.01 to 100 Hz. Importantly, these studies are the first to examine the molecular length dependence of linear viscoelastic properties for concentrated DNA solutions. Results are compared to theoretical predictions based on the Rouse model and reptation model for unentangled and entangled polymer solutions, respectively. This research was funded by AFOSR YIP (Grant No. FA9550-12-1-0315) and NSF (Grant No. REU DMR-1004268).

  18. Viscoelastic properties of model segments of collagen molecules.

    PubMed

    Gautieri, Alfonso; Vesentini, Simone; Redaelli, Alberto; Buehler, Markus J

    2012-03-01

    Collagen is the prime construction material in vertebrate biology, determining the mechanical behavior of connective tissues such as tendon, bone and skin. Despite extensive efforts in the investigation of the origin of collagen unique mechanical properties, a deep understanding of the relationship between molecular structure and mechanical properties remains elusive, hindered by the complex hierarchical structure of collagen-based tissues. In particular, although extensive studies of viscoelastic properties have been pursued at the macroscopic (fiber/tissue) level, fewer investigations have been performed at the smaller scales, including in particular collagen molecules and fibrils. These scales are, however, important for a complete understanding of the role of collagen as an important constituent in the extracellular matrix. Here, using an atomistic modeling approach, we perform in silico creep tests of a collagen-like peptide, monitoring the strain-time response for different values of applied external load. The results show that individual collagen molecules exhibit a nonlinear viscoelastic behavior, with a Young's modulus increasing from 6 to 16GPa (for strains up to 20%), a viscosity of 3.84.±0.38Pa·s, and a relaxation time in the range of 0.24-0.64ns. The single molecule viscosity, for the first time reported here, is several orders of magnitude lower than the viscosity found for larger-scale single collagen fibrils, suggesting that the viscous behavior of collagen fibrils and fibers involves additional mechanisms, such as molecular sliding between collagen molecules within the fibril or the effect of relaxation of larger volumes of solvent. Based on our molecular modeling results we propose a simple structural model that describes collagen tissue as a hierarchical structure, providing a bottom-up description of elastic and viscous properties form the properties of the tissue basic building blocks. PMID:22204879

  19. Attenuation and Shock Waves in Linear Hereditary Viscoelastic Media; Strick-Mainardi, Jeffreys-Lomnitz-Strick and Andrade Creep Compliances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanyga, Andrzej

    2014-09-01

    Dispersion, attenuation and wavefronts in a class of linear viscoelastic media proposed by Strick and Mainardi (Geophys J R Astr Soc 69:415-429, 1982) and a related class of models due to Lomnitz, Jeffreys and Strick are studied by a new method due to the author. Unlike the previously studied explicit models of relaxation modulus or creep compliance, these two classes support propagation of discontinuities. Due to an extension made by Strick, either of these two classes of models comprise both viscoelastic solids and fluids. We also discuss the Andrade viscoelastic media. The Andrade media do not support discontinuity waves and exhibit the pedestal effect.

  20. Viscoelastic properties of sterically stabilised emulsions and their stability.

    PubMed

    Tadros, Tharwat

    2015-08-01

    The interaction forces between emulsion droplets containing adsorbed polymeric surfactants and the theory of steric stabilisation are briefly described. The results for the viscoelastic properties of O/W emulsions that are stabilised with partially hydrolysed poly(vinyl acetate) that is commonly referred to as poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with 4% vinyl acetate are given. The effect of the oil volume fraction, addition of electrolytes and increasing temperature is described. This allows one to obtain various parameters such as the adsorbed layer thickness, the critical flocculation concentration of electrolyte (CFC) and critical flocculation temperature (CFT) at constant electrolyte concentration. The viscoelastic properties of O/W emulsions stabilised with an A-B-A block copolymer of polyethylene oxide (A) and polypropylene oxide (B) are described. These emulsions behave as viscoelastic liquids showing a cross-over-point between G' (the elastic component of the complex modulus) and G″ (the viscous component of the complex modulus) at a characteristic frequency. Plots of G' and G″ versus oil volume fraction ϕ show the transition from predominantly viscous to predominantly elastic response at a critical volume fraction ϕ(c). The latter can be used to estimate the adsorbed layer thickness of the polymeric surfactants. Results are also shown for W/O emulsions stabilised with an A-B-A block copolymer of polyhydroxystearic acid (PHS, A) and polyethylene oxide (PEO, B). The viscosity volume fraction curves could be fitted to the Dougherty-Krieger equation for hard-spheres. The results could be applied to give an estimate of the adsorbed layer thickness Δ which shows a decrease with increase of the water volume fraction. This is due to the interpenetration and/or compression of the PHS layers on close approach of the water droplets on increasing the water volume fraction. The last section of the review gives an example of O/W emulsion stability using an AB(n) graft

  1. Frequency dispersion of the viscoelastic properties of solutions of electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odinaev, S.; Akdodov, D. M.; Sharifov, N. Sh.; Mirzoaminov, Kh.

    2010-06-01

    Analytical expressions obtained earlier are used to numerically calculate the dynamic coefficients of the bulk ην(ω) and shear η s (ω) viscosity and the corresponding modules of their bulk K(ω) and shear μ(ω) elasticity at a certain choice of the model of solution structure in an approximation of the osmotic solution theory. The potential energy of the interaction between ions Φ ab ( r) was taken as the sum of the Lennard-Jones potential and the generalized Debye potential, taking into account the configuration and size of ions. In this approximation, the viscoelastic properties of the NaCl water solution were numerically calculated over a wide interval of change in the thermodynamic parameters and frequency ranges. Satisfactory agreement with the literature experimental data was obtained.

  2. Non-linear analysis and the design of Pumpkin Balloons: stress, stability and viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, J. L.; Wakefield, D. S.

    Tensys have a long-established background in the shape generation and load analysis of architectural stressed membrane structures Founded upon their inTENS finite element analysis suite these activities have broadened to encompass lighter than air structures such as aerostats hybrid air-vehicles and stratospheric balloons Winzen Engineering couple many years of practical balloon design and fabrication experience with both academic and practical knowledge of the characterisation of the non-linear viscoelastic response of the polymeric films typically used for high-altitude scientific balloons Both companies have provided consulting services to the NASA Ultra Long Duration Balloon ULDB Program Early implementations of pumpkin balloons have shown problems of geometric instability characterised by improper deployment and these difficulties have been reproduced numerically using inTENS The solution lies in both the shapes of the membrane lobes and also the need to generate a biaxial stress field in order to mobilise in-plane shear stiffness Balloons undergo significant temperature and pressure variations in flight The different thermal characteristics between tendons and film can lead to significant meridional stress Fabrication tolerances can lead to significant local hoop stress concentrations particularly adjacent to the base and apex end fittings The non-linear viscoelastic response of the envelope film acts positively to help dissipate stress concentrations However creep over time may produce lobe geometry variations that may

  3. A linear viscoelastic biphasic model for soft tissues based on the Theory of Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, W; Markert, B

    2001-10-01

    Based on the Theory of Porous Media (mixture theories extended by the concept of volume fractions), a model describing the mechanical behavior of hydrated soft tissues such as articular cartilage is presented. As usual, the tissue will be modeled as a materially incompressible binary medium of one linear viscoelastic porous solid skeleton saturated by a single viscous pore-fluid. The contribution of this paper is to combine a descriptive representation of the linear viscoelasticity law for the organic solid matrix with an efficient numerical treatment of the strongly coupled solid-fluid problem. Furthermore, deformation-dependent permeability effects are considered. Within the finite element method (FEM), the weak forms of the governing model equations are set up in a system of differential algebraic equations (DAE) in time. Thus, appropriate embedded error-controlled time integration methods can be applied that allow for a reliable and efficient numerical treatment of complex initial boundary-value problems. The applicability and the efficiency of the presented model are demonstrated within canonical, numerical examples, which reveal the influence of the intrinsic dissipation on the general behavior of hydrated soft tissues, exemplarily on articular cartilage. PMID:11601726

  4. Small strain vibration of a continuous, linearized viscoelastic rod of expanded polymer cushion material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batt, Gregory S.; Gibert, James M.; Daqaq, Mohammed

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the free and forced vibration response of a linearized, distributed-parameter model of a viscoelastic rod with an applied tip-mass is investigated. A nonlinear model is developed from constitutive relations and is linearized about a static equilibrium position for analysis. A classical Maxwell-Weichert model, represented via a Prony series, is used to model the viscoelastic system. The exact solution to both the free and forced vibration problem is derived and used to study the behavior of an idealized packaging system containing Nova Chemicals' Arcel® foam. It is observed that, although three Prony series terms are deemed sufficient to fit the static test data, convergence of the dynamic response and study of the storage and loss modulii necessitate the use of additional Prony series terms. It is also shown that the model is able to predict the modal frequencies and the primary resonance response at low acceleration excitation, both with reasonable accuracy given the non-homogeneity and density variation observed in the specimens. Higher acceleration inputs result in softening nonlinear responses highlighting the need for a nonlinear elastic model that extends beyond the scope of this work. Solution analysis and experimental data indicate little material vibration energy dissipation close to the first modal frequency of the mass/rod system.

  5. Stem cell therapy restores viscoelastic properties of myocardium in rat model of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rubiano, Andres; Qi, Yanfei; Guzzo, Dominic; Rowe, Kyle; Pepine, Carl; Simmons, Chelsey

    2016-06-01

    Extensive remodeling of the myocardium is seen in a variety of cardiovascular diseases, including systemic hypertension. Stem cell therapy has been proposed to improve the clinical outcomes of hypertension, and we hypothesized that changes in mechanical properties of the myocardium would accompany the progression of disease and the results of treatment conditions. Using spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) as a model of hypertension, we treated 13-week-old hypertensive rats with a single injection of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC) isolated from a normotensive control. We indented the isolated ventricles of control, untreated sham-injected SHR, and ADSC-treated SHR hearts with a custom cantilever-based system and fit the resulting data to a standard linear solid model. SHR animals had higher blood pressure (198.4±25.9mmHg) and lower ejection fraction (69.9±4.2%) than age-matched control animals (109.0±1.6mmHg, 88.2±1.3%), and increased viscoelastic properties accompanied these clinical changes (right ventricle effective stiffness, SHR: 21.97±5.10kPa, Control: 13.14±3.48kPa). ADSC-treated animals saw improvement in clinical parameters compared to the untreated SHR group, which was also accompanied by a significant restoration of viscoelastic properties of the myocardium (ACSD-treated SHR: 9.77±6.96kPa). PMID:26748260

  6. Active microrheology reveals molecular-level variations in the viscoelastic properties of Chaetopterus mucus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, William; Messmore, Ashley; Anderson, Rae

    The sea annelid, Chaetopterus Variopedatus, secretes a bioluminescent mucus that also exhibits complex viscoelastic properties. The constituents of the mucus are relatively unknown but it does play an important role in the development of the worms' parchment-like housing tubes. In order to determine how and why this mucus can exhibit material properties ranging from fluidity to rigidity we perform microrheology experiments. We determine the microscale viscoelastic properties by using optical tweezers to produce small oscillations in the mucus which allow us to determine both the linear storage and loss moduli (G',G'') along with the viscosity of the fluid. By varying the size of the microspheres (2-10 µm) and oscillation amplitude (.5-10 µm) we are able to determine the dominant intrinsic length scales of the molecular mesh comprising the mucus. By varying the oscillation frequency (1-15Hz) we determine the crossover frequency at which G' surpasses G'', to quantify the longest relaxation time of the mesh network. Initial results show a strong dependence on bead size which indicate that the dominant entanglement lengthscale of the mucus mesh is ~5 um. Microspheres of this size exhibit a wide variety of stress responses in different regions of the mucus demonstrating the substantial microscale heterogeneity of the mucus. We carry out measurements on a population of worms of varying size and age to determine mucus variability between worms.

  7. [Viscoelastic behaviour of inlay waxes (part 1). Physical and dynamic viscoelastic properties of several raw material waxes (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Katakura, N

    1980-07-01

    Several raw material waxes used in the inlay waxes, such as paraffins, carnauba wax, beeswax and dammar were investigated by measurements of X-ray diffraction, dilatometry, differential thermal analysis and dynamic viscoelasticity. The relationships between the viscoelastic behaviour and the physical properties of these waxes were discussed. The solid-solid phase transition from orthorhombic to hexagonal occurred in paraffins and the difference of the crystal transition temperature was observed between the kinds of paraffins. The viscoelastic properties and the thermal expansion of paraffins changed considerably in the crystal transition temperature region. Carnauba wax was an orthorhombic material, but such a crystal transition as paraffins did not appear. The dynamic modules of carnauba wax was greater than that of paraffin and decreased slowly to 70 degrees C and the loss tangent was small in this region. It was found, therefore, that carnauba wax had an elastic property in the crystal transition region of paraffin. Beeswax was also an orthorhombic material. The dynamic modulus of this was smallest in these waxes and the loss tangent increased relatively slowly with increases in temperature. Dammar was an amorphous solid. The dynamic modulus and the loss tangent were approximately constant in the low temperature region and changed greatly in the glass transition region. The thermal expansion of dammar was smallest in these waxes. PMID:6934229

  8. Viscoelastic Properties of Poly[(butylene succinate)-co-adipate] Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Al-Thabaiti, Shaeel A; Ray, Suprakas Sinha; Basahell, Sulaiman Nassir; Mokhtar, Mohamed

    2015-03-01

    This article reports the viscoelastic properties of poly[(butylene succinate)-co-adipate] (PBSA) nanocomposites. The nanocomposites of PBSA with various loadings of organically modified clay were prepared by melt-mixing in a batch-mixer. The solid and melt-state viscoelastic properties of neat PBSA and various nanocomposites were studied in detail. The dynamic mechanical studies demonstrated an increase in the storage modulus of PBSA matrix with organoclay loading. Melt-state rheological properties were found to be modified with organoclay loading changing from liquid-like, to gel-like and then viscoelastic solid-like. Such changes in viscoelastic properties along with the improvements in thermomechanical properties are expected to open opportunities for the use of PBSA extending its applications from the classical field of packaging to new niches such as tissue-engineering. PMID:26413658

  9. Nonlinear viscoelastic properties of tissue assessed by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sinkus, Ralph; Bercoff, Jeremy; Tanter, Mickaël; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; El-Khoury, Carl; Servois, Vincent; Tardivon, Anne; Fink, Mathias

    2006-11-01

    A technique to assess qualitatively the presence of higher-order viscoelastic parameters is presented. Low-frequency, monochromatic elastic waves are emitted into the material via an external vibrator. The resulting steady-state motion is detected in real time via an ultra fast ultrasound system using classical, one-dimensional (1-D) ultrasound speckle correlation for motion estimation. Total data acquisition lasts only for about 250 ms. The spectrum of the temporal displacement data at each image point is used for analysis. The presence of nonlinear effects is detected by inspection of the ratio of the second harmonics amplitude with respect to the total amplitude summed up to the second harmonic. Results from a polyacrylamide-based phantom indicate a linear response (i.e., the absence of higher harmonics) for this type of material at 65 Hz mechanical vibration frequency and about 100 microm amplitude. A lesion, artificially created by injection of glutaraldehyde into a beef specimen, shows the development of higher harmonics at the location of injection as a function of time. The presence of upper harmonics is clearly evident at the location of a malignant lesion within a mastectomy. PMID:17091837

  10. Interrogating the viscoelastic properties of tissue using viscoelastic response (VISR) ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selzo, Mallory Renee

    Affecting approximately 1 in 3,500 newborn males, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic disorders in humans. Boys with DMD suffer progressive loss of muscle strength and function, leading to wheelchair dependence, cardiac and respiratory compromise, and death during young adulthood. There are currently no treatments that can halt or reverse the disease progression, and translating prospective treatments into clinical trials has been delayed by inadequate outcome measures. Current outcome measures, such as functional and muscle strength assessments, lack sensitivity to individual muscles, require subjective effort of the child, and are impacted by normal childhood growth and development. The goal of this research is to develop Viscoelastic Response (VisR) ultrasound which can be used to delineate compositional changes in muscle associated with DMD. In VisR, acoustic radiation force (ARF) is used to produce small, localized displacements within the muscle. Using conventional ultrasound to track the motion, the displacement response of the tissue can be evaluated against a mechanical model. In order to develop signal processing techniques and assess mechanical models, finite element method simulations are used to model the response of a viscoelastic material to ARF excitations. Results are then presented demonstrating VisR differentiation of viscoelastic changes with progressive dystrophic degeneration in a dog model of DMD. Finally, clinical feasibility of VisR imaging is demonstrated in two boys with DMD.

  11. Interplay between electrical and rheological properties of viscoelastic inks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Milim; Ahn, Kyung Hyun; Lee, Seung Jong

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the effect of the interaction between the electrical and rheological properties of the ink in electrodydrodynamic (EHD) printing process by designing model systems that control both the electrical conductivity and the viscoelasticity of the ink to observe how they affect the Taylor cone jet formation. The results demonstrate that the initial voltage at which the Taylor cone jet first appears and the final voltage at which the jet becomes unstable increase at higher electrical conductivity as the conical shape with large surface area is formed and grants stability at higher conductivity. Increased viscosity and elasticity also lead to the similar result: increase in the initial and final voltages, which can be attributed to the slower charge transport that minimizes the stabilizing effect of the inks' electrical conductivity. In addition, we use two dimensionless variables (dimensionless flow rate and dimensionless voltage) to make an operating window map of the EHD process. Through this map, the processing condition for the Taylor cone jet zone can be predicted with respect to the effect of the interplay between the electrical and rheological properties of the ink.

  12. Physical aging effects on the compressive linear viscoelastic creep of IM7/K3B composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veazie, David R.; Gates, Thomas S.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to establish the viscoelastic behavior of 1M7/K3B composite in compression at elevated temperature. Creep compliance, strain recovery and the effects of physical aging on the time dependent response was measured for uniaxial loading at several isothermal conditions below the glass transition temperature (T(g)). The IM7/K3B composite is a graphite reinforced thermoplastic polyimide with a T(g) of approximately 240 C. In a composite, the two matrix dominated compliance terms associated with time dependent behavior occur in the transverse and shear directions. Linear viscoelasticity was used to characterize the creep/recovery behavior and superposition techniques were used to establish the physical aging related material constants. Creep strain was converted to compliance and measured as a function of test time and aging time. Results included creep compliance master curves, physical aging shift factors and shift rates. The description of the unique experimental techniques required for compressive testing is also given.

  13. Comparative study of viscoelastic properties using virgin yogurt

    SciTech Connect

    Dimonte, G.; Nelson, D.; Weaver, S.; Schneider, M.; Flower-Maudlin, E.; Gore, R.; Baumgardner, J.R.; Sahota, M.S.

    1998-07-01

    We describe six different tests used to obtain a consistent set of viscoelastic properties for yogurt. Prior to yield, the shear modulus {mu} and viscosity {eta} are measured nondestructively using the speed and damping of elastic waves. Although new to foodstuffs, this technique has been applied to diverse materials from metals to the earth{close_quote}s crust. The resultant shear modulus agrees with {mu}{approximately}E/3 for incompressible materials, where the Young{close_quote}s modulus E is obtained from a stress{endash}strain curve in compression. The tensile yield stress {tau}{sub o} is measured in compression and tension, with good agreement. The conventional vane and cone/plate rheometers measured a shear stress yield {tau}{sub os}{approximately}{tau}{sub o}/{radical} (3) , as expected theoretically, but the inferred {open_quotes}apparent{close_quotes} viscosity from the cone/plate rheometer is much larger than the wave measurement due to the finite yield ({tau}{sub os}{ne}0). Finally, we inverted an open container of yogurt for 10{sup 6} s{gt}{eta}/{mu} and observed no motion. This demonstrates unequivocally that yogurt possesses a finite yield stress rather than a large viscosity. We present a constitutive model with a pre-yield viscosity to describe the damping of the elastic waves and use a simulation code to describe yielding in complex geometry. {copyright} {ital 1998 Society of Rheology.}

  14. Viscoelastic properties of blood studied through piezoresistance measurements.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yiyan; Turng, Lih-Sheng; Cui, Zhixiang; Woodson, Robert D; Li, Haimei; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2011-01-01

    Piezoresistance describes the change of electrical resistance in a material undergoing deformation. Heterogeneous materials having different resistivities of dispersed and continuous matrix phases, such as blood (comprised of red and white blood cells and platelets suspended in plasma), can exhibit the piezoresistance effect. For an initially isotropic material, two independent intrinsic material coefficients, λ1 and λ2, would uniquely describe the piezoresistance phenomenon. Materials undergoing deformation affect a material's resistivity in two ways: (a) by introducing anisotropy in the material, which is characterized by λ1 and (b) by changing the volume density of the inclusions, which is associated with (1/3 λ1+λ2). In this paper, the piezoresistance effect in bovine blood samples is studied under oscillatory shear flow with a planar sensor rosette. The first piezoresistance coefficient, λ1, was measured at various frequencies and shear rates in the blood flow and compared with cos δ (equal to G'/G*, where G' and G* are the storage and complex moduli, respectively), which reflects the degree of elasticity. The coefficient λ1 was found to have a trend similar to that of cos δ under all conditions tested. Thus λ1 might potentially be used to characterize the viscoelastic properties of blood and the deformability of red blood cells, thus clarifying pathophysiology and facilitating diagnosis. PMID:22156031

  15. Estimation of Linear Viscoelasticity of Polymer Melts in Molecular Dynamics Simulations Based on Relaxation Mode Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaoka, Nobuyuki; Hagita, Katsumi; Takano, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    On the basis of relaxation mode analysis (RMA), we present an efficient method to estimate the linear viscoelasticity of polymer melts in a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Slow relaxation phenomena appeared in polymer melts cause a problem that a calculation of the stress relaxation function in MD simulations, especially in the terminal time region, requires large computational efforts. Relaxation mode analysis is a method that systematically extracts slow relaxation modes and rates of the polymer chain from the time correlation of its conformations. We show the computational cost may be drastically reduced by combining a direct calculation of the stress relaxation function based on the Green-Kubo formula with the relaxation rates spectra estimated by RMA. N. I. acknowledges the Graduate School Doctoral Student Aid Program from Keio University.

  16. High Frequency Measurements of Viscoelastic Properties of Hydrogels for Vocal Fold Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jiao, T; Farran, A; Jia, X; Clifton, R J

    2009-01-01

    This report describes a torsional wave experiment used to measure the viscoelastic properties of vocal fold tissues and soft materials over the range of phonation frequencies. A thin cylindrical sample is mounted between two hexagonal plates. The assembly is enclosed in an environmental chamber to maintain the temperature and relative humidity at in vivo conditions. The bottom plate is subjected to small oscillations by means of a galvanometer driven by a frequency generator that steps through a sequence of frequencies. At each frequency, measured rotations of the top and bottom plates are used to determine the ratio of the amplitudes of the rotations of the two plates. Comparisons of the frequency dependence of this ratio with that predicted for torsional waves in a linear viscoelastic material allows the storage modulus and the loss angle, in shear, to be calculated by a best-fit procedure. Experimental results are presented for hydrogels that are being examined as potential materials for vocal fold regeneration. PMID:20300451

  17. Viscoelastic and fatigue properties of model methacrylate-based dentin adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Viraj; Misra, Anil; Marangos, Orestes; Park, Jonggu; Ye, Qiang; Kieweg, Sarah L.; Spencer, Paulette

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the current study is to characterize the viscoelastic and fatigue properties of model methacrylate-based dentin adhesives under dry and wet conditions. Static, creep, and fatigue tests were performed on cylindrical samples in a 3-point bending clamp. Static results showed that the apparent elastic modulus of the model adhesive varied from 2.56 to 3.53 GPa in the dry condition, and from 1.04 to 1.62 GPa in the wet condition, depending upon the rate of loading. Significant differences were also found for the creep behavior of the model adhesive under dry and wet conditions. A linear viscoelastic model was developed by fitting the adhesive creep behavior. The developed model with 5 Kelvin Voigt elements predicted the apparent elastic moduli measured in the static tests. The model was then utilized to interpret the fatigue test results. It was found that the failure under cyclic loading can be due to creep or fatigue, which has implications for the failure criterion that are applied for these types of tests. Finally, it was found that the adhesive samples tested under dry conditions were more durable than those tested under wet conditions. PMID:20848661

  18. Measurement of nonlinear viscoelastic properties of fluids using Dynamic Acoustoelastic Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trarieux, C.; Callé, S.; Poulin, A.; Tranchant, J.-F.; Moreschi, H.; Defontaine, M.

    2012-12-01

    A nonlinear ultrasound-based method called Dynamic Acoustoelastic Testing (DAET) is used to assess nonlinear viscoelastic properties of fluids. This method is based on the interaction between two elastic waves: a low-frequency (LF) sinusoidal wave (4 kHz) to successively compress and expand the liquid as a bulk stress, and ultrasound (US) pulses (1 MHz) to simultaneously probe the sample at different states of the quasi-hydrostatic pressure. The DAET method provides estimations of the elastic nonlinearities issued from the Time Of Flight Modulations (TOFM) of the US pulses. The TOFM is plotted as a function of the LF acoustic pressure, allowing an estimation of the nonlinear elastic parameter B/A. In this study, we first present the results obtained in Newtonian fluids such as water and silicone oils. Simple viscoelastic gels (Carbomers and Xanthan gums) have also been tested exhibiting the same behavior: TOFM linearly related to LF pressure amplitude corresponding to classical quadratic nonlinearity. Finally, preliminary DAET measurements have been performed in biphasic systems composed of hard glass beads in a gel-based matrix and in gelatin during a gelation process.

  19. Viscoelastic properties of graphene-based epoxy resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Fierro, Annalisa; Rosolia, Salvatore; Raimondo, Marialuigia; Lafdi, Khalid; Guadagno, Liberata

    2015-12-01

    In this paper the viscoelastic properties of an epoxy resin filled with graphene-based nanoparticles have been investigated in the liquid state, before curing, by means of a rotational rheometer equipped with a parallel plate geometry. Exfoliated graphite was prepared using traditional acid intercalation followed by a sudden treatment at high temperature (900°C). The percentage of exfoliated graphite was found to be 56%. The epoxy matrix was prepared by mixing a tetrafunctional precursor with a reactive diluent which produces a significant decrease in the viscosity of the epoxy precursor so that the dispersion step of nanofillers in the matrix can easily occur. The hardener agent, the 4,4-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS), was added at a stoichiometric concentration with respect to all the epoxy rings. The inclusion of the partially exfoliated graphite (pEG) in the formulated epoxy mixture significantly modifies the rheological behaviour of the mixture itself. The epoxy mixture, indeed, shows a Newtonian behaviour while, at 3 wt % pEG content, the complex viscosity of the nanocomposite clearly shows a shear thinning behaviour with η* values much higher at the lower frequencies. The increase in complex viscosity with the increasing of the partially exfoliated graphite content was mostly caused by a dramatic increase in the storage modulus. All the graphene-based epoxy mixtures were cured by a two-stage curing cycles: a first isothermal stage was carried out at the lower temperature of 125°C for 1 hour while the second isothermal stage was performed at the higher temperature of 200°C for 3 hours. The mechanical properties of the cured nanocomposites show high values in the storage modulus and glass transition temperature.

  20. Characterization of anisotropy in viscoelastic properties of intra-abdominal soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Deo, Dhanannjay; Singh, Tejinder Paul; Dunnican, Ward; De, Suvranu

    2009-01-01

    A portable instrumentation rig is presented for characterizing nonlinear viscoelastic anisotropic response of intra-abdominal organ-tissues. Two linearly independent in-situ experiments are performed at each indentation site on the intra-abdominal organ, by subjecting the organ to 1) normal and 2) tangential displacement stimuli using the above robotic device. For normal indentation experiments, the indenter is ramped into the tissue and held for 10 seconds before sinusoidal indentation stimuli are applied. For tangential (shear) loading, the indenter tip is rigidly glued to the soft tissue surface. Sinusoidal displacement stimuli are then applied laterally in the tangential plane and the force response is recorded. Tangential loading is repeated along orthogonal directions to measure in-plane mechanical properties. Combined analysis of both experiments leads to assessment of anisotropy. In situ experiments on fresh human cadavers are currently under way at the Albany Medical College. PMID:19377118

  1. A multiscale model for predicting the viscoelastic properties of asphalt concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Cucalon, Lorena; Rahmani, Eisa; Little, Dallas N.; Allen, David H.

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that the accurate prediction of long term performance of asphalt concrete pavement requires modeling to account for viscoelasticity within the mastic. However, accounting for viscoelasticity can be costly when the material properties are measured at the scale of asphalt concrete. This is due to the fact that the material testing protocols must be performed recursively for each mixture considered for use in the final design.

  2. Interface transferring mechanism and error modification of FRP-OFBG strain sensor based on standard linear viscoelastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jilong; Zhou, Zhi; Ou, Jinping

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents the interface transferring mechanism and error modification of the Fiber Reinforced Polymer-Optical Fiber Bragg Grating (FRP-OFBG) sensing tendons, which including GFRP (Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer) and CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer), using standard linear viscoelastic model. The optical fiber is made up of glass, quartz or plastic, et al, which creep strain is very small at room temperature. So the tensile creep compliance of optical fiber is independent of time at room temperature. On the other hand, the FRP (GFRP or CFRP) is composed of a kind of polymeric matrix (epoxy resins or the others) with glass, carbon or aramid fibers, which shear creep strain is dependent of time at room temperature. Hence, the standard linear viscoelastic model is employed to describe the shear creep compliance of FRP along the fiber direction. The expression of interface strain transferring mechanism of FRP-OFBG sensors is derived based on the linear viscoelastic theory and the analytic solution of the error rate is given by the inverse Laplace transform. The effects of FRP viscoelasticity on the error rate of FRP-OFBG sensing tendons are included in the above expression. And the transient and steady-state error modified coefficient of FRP-OFBG sensors are obtained using initial value and final value theorems. Finally, a calculated example is given to explain the correct of theoretical prediction.

  3. Intraluminal mapping of tissue viscoelastic properties using laser speckle rheology catheter (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Hosoda, Masaki; Tshikudi, Diane M.; Nadkarni, Seemantini K.

    2016-03-01

    A number of disease conditions including coronary atherosclerosis, peripheral artery disease and gastro-intestinal malignancies are associated with alterations in tissue mechanical properties. Laser speckle rheology (LSR) has been demonstrated to provide important information on tissue mechanical properties by analyzing the time scale of temporal speckle intensity fluctuations, which serves as an index of tissue viscoelasticity. In order to measure the mechanical properties of luminal organs in vivo, LSR must be conducted via a miniature endoscope or catheter. Here we demonstrate the capability of an omni-directional LSR catheter to quantify tissue mechanical properties over the entire luminal circumference without the need for rotational motion. Retracting the catheter using a motor-drive assembly enables the reconstruction of cylindrical maps of tissue mechanical properties. The performance of the LSR catheter is tested using a luminal phantom with mechanical moduli that vary in both circumferential and longitudinal directions. 2D cylindrical maps of phantom viscoelastic properties are reconstructed over four quadrants of the coronary circumference simultaneously during catheter pullback. The reconstructed cylindrical maps of the decorrelation time constants easily distinguish the different gel components of the phantom with different viscoelastic moduli. The average values of decorrelation times calculated for each gel component of the phantom show a strong correspondence with the viscoelastic moduli measured via standard mechanical rheometry. These results highlight the capability for cylindrical mapping of tissue viscoelastic properties using LSR in luminal organs using a miniature catheter, thus opening the opportunity for improved diagnosis of several disease conditions.

  4. On the influence of microscopic architecture elements to the global viscoelastic properties of soft biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posnansky, Oleg P.

    2014-12-01

    In this work we introduce a 2D minimal model of random scale-invariant network structures embedded in a matrix to study the influence of microscopic architecture elements on the viscoelastic behavior of soft biological tissue. Viscoelastic properties at a microscale are modeled by a cohort of basic elements with varying complexity integrated into multi-hierarchic lattice obeying self-similar geometry. It is found that this hierarchy of structure elements yields a global nonlinear frequency dependent complex-valued shear modulus. In the dynamic range of external frequency load, the modeled shear modulus proved sensitive to the network concentration and viscoelastic characteristics of basic elements. The proposed model provides a theoretical framework for the interpretation of dynamic viscoelastic parameters in the context of microstructural variations under different conditions.

  5. A self-consistent estimate for linear viscoelastic polycrystals with internal variables inferred from the collocation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Q. H.; Brenner, R.; Castelnau, O.; Moulinec, H.; Suquet, P.

    2012-03-01

    The correspondence principle is customarily used with the Laplace-Carson transform technique to tackle the homogenization of linear viscoelastic heterogeneous media. The main drawback of this method lies in the fact that the whole stress and strain histories have to be considered to compute the mechanical response of the material during a given macroscopic loading. Following a remark of Mandel (1966 Mécanique des Milieux Continus(Paris, France: Gauthier-Villars)), Ricaud and Masson (2009 Int. J. Solids Struct. 46 1599-1606) have shown the equivalence between the collocation method used to invert Laplace-Carson transforms and an internal variables formulation. In this paper, this new method is developed for the case of polycrystalline materials with general anisotropic properties for local and macroscopic behavior. Applications are provided for the case of constitutive relations accounting for glide of dislocations on particular slip systems. It is shown that the method yields accurate results that perfectly match the standard collocation method and reference full-field results obtained with a FFT numerical scheme. The formulation is then extended to the case of time- and strain-dependent viscous properties, leading to the incremental collocation method (ICM) that can be solved efficiently by a step-by-step procedure. Specifically, the introduction of isotropic and kinematic hardening at the slip system scale is considered.

  6. Atomic force microscopy indentation and inverse analysis for non-linear viscoelastic identification of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nhung; Shao, Yue; Wineman, Alan; Fu, Jianping; Waas, Anthony

    2016-07-01

    Breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MCF-10A) are studied through indentation with spherical borosilicate glass particles in atomic force microscopy (AFM) contact mode in fluid. Their mechanical properties are obtained by analyzing the recorded reaction force-time response. The analysis is based on comparing experimental data with predictions from finite element (FE) simulation. Here, FE modeling is employed to simulate the AFM indentation experiment which is neither a displacement nor a force controlled test. This approach is expected to overcome many underlying problems of the widely used models such as Hertz contact model due to its capability to capture the contact behaviors between the spherical indentor and the cell, account for cell geometry, and incorporate with large strain theory. In this work, a non-linear viscoelastic (NLV) model in which the viscoelastic part is described by Prony series terms is used for the constitutive model of the cells. The time-dependent material parameters are extracted through an inverse analysis with the use of a surrogate model based on a Kriging estimator. The purpose is to automatically extract the NLV properties of the cells with a more efficient process compared to the iterative inverse technique that has been mostly applied in the literature. The method also allows the use of FE modeling in the analysis of a large amount of experimental data. The NLV parameters are compared between MCF-7 and MCF-10A and MCF-10A treated and untreated with the drug Cytochalasin D to examine the possibility of using relaxation properties as biomarkers for distinguishing these types of breast cancer cells. The comparisons indicate that malignant cells (MCF-7) are softer and exhibit more relaxation than benign cells (MCF-10A). Disrupting the cytoskeleton using the drug Cytochalasin D also results in a larger amount of relaxation in the cell's response. In addition, relaxation properties indicate larger differences as compared to the elastic moduli

  7. How preconditioning affects the measurement of poro-viscoelastic mechanical properties in biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Sayyed Mohsen; Wilson, Wouter; Ito, Keita; van Donkelaar, Corrinus C

    2014-06-01

    It is known that initial loading curves of soft biological tissues are substantially different from subsequent loadings. The later loading curves are generally used for assessing the mechanical properties of a tissue, and the first loading cycles, referred to as preconditioning, are omitted. However, slow viscoelastic phenomena related to fluid flow or collagen viscoelasticity are initiated during these first preconditioning loading cycles and may persist during the actual data collection. When these data are subsequently used for fitting of material properties, the viscoelastic phenomena that occurred during the initial cycles are not accounted for. The aim of the present study is to explore whether the above phenomena are significant for articular cartilage, by evaluating the effect of such time-dependent phenomena by means of computational modeling. Results show that under indentation, collagen viscoelasticity dominates the time-dependent behavior. Under UC, fluid-dependent effects are more important. Interestingly, viscoelastic and poroelastic effects may act in opposite directions and may cancel each other out in a stress-strain curve. Therefore, equilibrium may be apparent in a stress-strain relationship, even though internally the tissue is not in equilibrium. Also, the time-dependent effects of viscoelasticity and poroelasticity may reinforce each other, resulting in a sustained effect that lasts longer than suggested by their individual effects. Finally, the results illustrate that data collected from a mechanical test may depend on the preconditioning protocol. In conclusion, preconditioning influences the mechanical response of articular cartilage significantly and therefore cannot be neglected when determining the mechanical properties. To determine the full viscoelastic and poroelastic properties of articular cartilage requires fitting to both preconditioning and post-preconditioned loading cycles. PMID:23864393

  8. The Viscoelastic Properties of Nematic Monodomains Containing Liquid Crystal Polymers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Dongfeng

    The work presented here investigates the viscoelastic properties of nematic materials containing liquid crystal polymers (LCP). We focus on how the elastic constants and the viscosity coefficients of the mixture systems are influenced by polymer architectures. In dynamic light scattering studies of the relaxation of the director orientation fluctuations for the splay, twist, and bend deformation modes, decrease of the relaxation rates was observed when LCPs were dissolved into low molar mass nematics (LMMN). For the side-chain LCPs, the slowing down in the bend mode is comparable to or larger than those of the splay and twist modes. For main-chain LCPs, the relative changes in the relaxation rates for the twist and splay modes are about one order of magnitude larger than that for the bend mode. The results of light scattering under an electric field show that the decrease in the twist relaxation rate is due to a large increase in the twist viscosity and a minor decrease in the twist elastic constant. These changes were found to increase with decrease of the spacer length, with increase of molecular weight, and with decrease of the backbone flexibility. In Freedericksz transition measurements, the splay and bend elastic constants and the dielectric anisotropies of the nematic mixtures were determined and the values are 5~15% lower than those of the pure solvent. From the analysis of the results of Freedericksz transition and light scattering experiments, a complete set of the elastic constants and viscosity coefficients corresponding to the three director deformation modes were obtained for the LCP mixtures. The changes in the viscosity coefficients due to addition of LCPs were analysed to estimate the anisotropic shapes of the polymer backbone via a hydrodynamic model. The results suggest that an oblate backbone configuration is maintained by the side-chain LCPs and a prolate chain configuration appears for the main-chain LCPs. The rheological behavior of a side

  9. Viscoelastic and dynamic nonlinear properties of airway smooth muscle tissue: roles of mechanical force and the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Ito, Satoru; Majumdar, Arnab; Kume, Hiroaki; Shimokata, Kaoru; Naruse, Keiji; Lutchen, Kenneth R; Stamenovic, Dimitrije; Suki, Béla

    2006-06-01

    The viscoelastic and dynamic nonlinear properties of guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle tissues were investigated by measuring the storage (G') and loss (G") moduli using pseudorandom small-amplitude length oscillations between 0.12 and 3.5 Hz superimposed on static strains of either 10 or 20% of initial length. The G" and G' spectra were interpreted using a linear viscoelastic model incorporating damping (G) and stiffness (H), respectively. Both G and H were elevated following an increase in strain from 10 to 20%. There was no change in harmonic distortion (K(d)), an index of dynamic nonlinearity, between 10 and 20% strains. Application of methacholine at 10% strain significantly increased G and H while it decreased K(d). Cytochalasin D, isoproterenol, and HA-1077, a Rho-kinase inhibitor, significantly decreased both G and H but increased K(d). Following cytochalasin D, G, H, and K(d) were all elevated when mean strain increased from 10 to 20%. There were no changes in hysteresivity, G/H, under any condition. We conclude that not all aspects of the viscoelastic properties of tracheal smooth muscle strips are similar to those previously observed in cultured cells. We attribute these differences to the contribution of the extracellular matrix. Additionally, using a network model, we show that the dynamic nonlinear behavior, which has not been observed in cell culture, is associated with the state of the contractile stress and may derive from active polymerization within the cytoskeleton. PMID:16414980

  10. Estimating material viscoelastic properties based on surface wave measurements: A comparison of techniques and modeling assumptions

    PubMed Central

    Royston, Thomas J.; Dai, Zoujun; Chaunsali, Rajesh; Liu, Yifei; Peng, Ying; Magin, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies of the first author and others have focused on low audible frequency (<1 kHz) shear and surface wave motion in and on a viscoelastic material comprised of or representative of soft biological tissue. A specific case considered has been surface (Rayleigh) wave motion caused by a circular disk located on the surface and oscillating normal to it. Different approaches to identifying the type and coefficients of a viscoelastic model of the material based on these measurements have been proposed. One approach has been to optimize coefficients in an assumed viscoelastic model type to match measurements of the frequency-dependent Rayleigh wave speed. Another approach has been to optimize coefficients in an assumed viscoelastic model type to match the complex-valued frequency response function (FRF) between the excitation location and points at known radial distances from it. In the present article, the relative merits of these approaches are explored theoretically, computationally, and experimentally. It is concluded that matching the complex-valued FRF may provide a better estimate of the viscoelastic model type and parameter values; though, as the studies herein show, there are inherent limitations to identifying viscoelastic properties based on surface wave measurements. PMID:22225067

  11. Lamb Wave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (LDUV) Method for Quantifying Mechanical Properties of Viscoelastic Solids

    PubMed Central

    Nenadic, Ivan Z.; Urban, Matthew W.; Mitchell, Scott A.; Greenleaf, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Diastolic dysfunction is the inability of the left ventricle to supply sufficient stroke volumes under normal physiological conditions and is often accompanied by stiffening of the left-ventricular myocardium. A noninvasive technique capable of quantifying viscoelasticity of the myocardium would be beneficial in clinical settings. Our group has been investigating the use of Shearwave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (SDUV), a noninvasive ultrasound based method for quantifying viscoelasticity of soft tissues. The primary motive of this study is the design and testing of viscoelastic materials suitable for validation of the Lamb wave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (LDUV), an SDUV-based technique for measuring viscoelasticity of tissues with plate-like geometry. We report the results of quantifying viscoelasticity of urethane rubber and gelatin samples using LDUV and an embedded sphere method. The LDUV method was used to excite antisymmetric Lamb waves and measure the dispersion in urethane rubber and gelatin plates. An antisymmetric Lamb wave model was fitted to the wave speed dispersion data to estimate elasticity and viscosity of the materials. A finite element model of a viscoelastic plate submerged in water was used to study the appropriateness of the Lamb wave dispersion equations. An embedded sphere method was used as an independent measurement of the viscoelasticity of the urethane rubber and gelatin. The FEM dispersion data were in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions. Viscoelasticity of the urethane rubber and gelatin obtained using the LDUV and embedded sphere methods agreed within one standard deviation. LDUV studies on excised porcine myocardium sample were performed to investigate the feasibility of the approach in preparation for open-chest in vivo studies. The results suggest that the LDUV technique can be used to quantify mechanical properties of soft tissues with a plate-like geometry. PMID:21403186

  12. Determination of Viscoelastic Property in Polyethylene Crystallization Using a Quartz Crystal Resonator

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Yong Kweon; Kim, Byoung Chul; Kim, Young Han

    2009-01-01

    A new generalized relationship between the viscoelastic properties of an overlayer placed on the electrode interface of a quartz crystal resonator and its resonant characteristic is developed from the mechanics of the quartz movement. The relationship is used to estimate the viscoelastic properties from the experimentally measured resonant characteristic. It is utilized in the estimation of viscosity and elastic shear modulus of a polyethylene overlayer during its crystallization. The measurements are compared with the viscosity and elastic shear modulus of a polyethylene melt measured using a rheometer. It is found that the development of this study is useful in the determination of viscoelastic property of polymer materials by measuring the resonant frequency and conductance of the polymer overlayer placed on the resonator electrode. PMID:22303138

  13. Rigid conformal polishing tool using non-linear visco-elastic effect.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Wook; Burge, James H

    2010-02-01

    Computer controlled optical surfacing (CCOS) relies on a stable and predictable tool influence function (TIF), which is the shape of the wear function created by the machine. For a polishing lap, which is stroked on the surface, both the TIF stability and surface finish rely on the polishing interface maintaining intimate contact with the workpiece. Pitch tools serve this function for surfaces that are near spherical, where the curvature has small variation across the part. The rigidity of such tools provides natural smoothing of the surface, but limits the application for aspheric surfaces. Highly flexible tools, such as those created with an air bonnet or magnetorheological fluid, conform to the surface, but lack intrinsic stiffness, so they provide little natural smoothing. We present a rigid conformal polishing tool that uses a non-linear visco-elastic medium (i.e. non-Newtonian fluid) that conforms to the aspheric shape, yet maintains stability to provide natural smoothing. The analysis, design, and performance of such a polishing tool is presented, showing TIF stability of <10% and providing surface finish with <10A roughness. PMID:20174053

  14. Simulation based estimation of dynamic mechanical properties for viscoelastic materials used for vocal fold models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupitsch, Stefan J.; Ilg, Jürgen; Sutor, Alexander; Lerch, Reinhard; Döllinger, Michael

    2011-08-01

    In order to obtain a deeper understanding of the human phonation process and the mechanisms generating sound, realistic setups are built up containing artificial vocal folds. Usually, these vocal folds consist of viscoelastic materials (e.g., polyurethane mixtures). Reliable simulation based studies on the setups require the mechanical properties of the utilized viscoelastic materials. The aim of this work is the identification of mechanical material parameters (Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and loss factor) for those materials. Therefore, we suggest a low-cost measurement setup, the so-called vibration transmission analyzer (VTA) enabling to analyze the transfer behavior of viscoelastic materials for propagating mechanical waves. With the aid of a mathematical Inverse Method, the material parameters are adjusted in a convenient way so that the simulation results coincide with the measurement results for the transfer behavior. Contrary to other works, we determine frequency dependent functions for the mechanical properties characterizing the viscoelastic material in the frequency range of human speech (100-250 Hz). The results for three different materials clearly show that the Poisson's ratio is close to 0.5 and that the Young's modulus increases with higher frequencies. For a frequency of 400 Hz, the Young's modulus of the investigated viscoelastic materials is approximately 80% higher than for the static case (0 Hz). We verify the identified mechanical properties with experiments on fabricated vocal fold models. Thereby, only small deviations between measurements and simulations occur.

  15. Non-linear joint dynamics and controls of jointed flexible structures with active and viscoelastic joint actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzou, H. S.

    1990-12-01

    Studies on joint dominated flexible space structures have attracted much interest recently due to the rapid developments in large deployable space systems. This paper describes a study of the non-linear structural dynamics of jointed flexible structures with initial joint clearance and subjected to external excitations. Methods of using viscoelastic and active vibration control technologies, joint actuators, to reduce dynamic contact force and to stabilize the systems are proposed and evaluated. System dynamic equations of a discretized multi-degrees-of-freedom flexible system with initial joint clearances and joint actuators (active and viscoelastic passive) are derived. Dynamic contacts in an elastic joint are simulated by a non-linear joint model comprised of a non-linear spring and damper. A pseudo-force approximation method is used in numerical time-domain integration. Dynamic responses of a jointed flexible structure with and without viscoelastic and active joint actuators are presented and compared. Effectiveness of active/passive joint actuators is demonstrated.

  16. Influence of viscoelastic property on laser-generated surface acoustic waves in coating-substrate systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Hongxiang; Zhang Shuyi; Xu Baiqiang

    2011-04-01

    Taking account of the viscoelasticity of materials, the pulsed laser generation of surface acoustic waves in coating-substrate systems has been investigated quantitatively by using the finite element method. The displacement spectra of the surface acoustic waves have been calculated in frequency domain for different coating-substrate systems, in which the viscoelastic properties of the coatings and substrates are considered separately. Meanwhile, the temporal displacement waveforms have been obtained by applying inverse fast Fourier transforms. The numerical results of the normal surface displacements are presented for different configurations: a single plate, a slow coating on a fast substrate, and a fast coating on a slow substrate. The influences of the viscoelastic properties of the coating and the substrate on the attenuation of the surface acoustic waves have been studied. In addition, the influence of the coating thickness on the attenuation of the surface acoustic waves has been also investigated in detail.

  17. Non-linear visco-elastic analysis and the design of super-pressure balloons : stress, strain and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakefield, David

    approach to stress and stability analysis inherent in inTENS, and focuses in particular on: Implementation of an alternative application of the Incremental Schapery Rand (ISR) representation of the non-linear visco-elastic response of the polyethylene balloon film. This is based upon the relaxation modulus, rather than the creep compliance, and as such fits more efficiently into the Dynamic Relaxation analysis procedure used within inTENS. Comparisons of results between the two approaches are given. Verification of the material model by comparison with material tests. Verification of the application to pumpkin balloon structures by comparison with scale model tests. Application of inTENS with ISR to time-stepping analyses of a balloon flight including diurnal variations of temperature and pressure. This includes the demonstration of a method for checking the likely hood of overall instability developing at any particular time in the flight as both balloon geometry and film properties change due to visco-elastic effects.

  18. Measuring cell viscoelastic properties using a force-spectrometer: influence of protein-cytoplasm interactions

    PubMed Central

    Canetta, Elisabetta; Duperray, Alain; Leyrat, Anne; Verdier, Claude

    2005-01-01

    Cell adhesive and rheological properties play a very important role in cell transmigration through the endothelial barrier, in particular in the case of inflammation (leukocytes) or cancer metastasis (cancer cells). In order to characterize cell viscoelastic properties, we have designed a force spectrometer (AFM) which can stretch cells thereby allowing measurement of their rheological properties. This custom-made force spectrometer allows two different visualizations, one lateral and one from below. It allows investigation of the effects of rheology involved during cell stretching. To test the ability of our system to characterize such viscoelastic properties, ICAM-1 transfected CHO cells were analyzed. Two forms of ICAM-1 were tested; wild type ICAM-1, which can interact with the cytoskeleton, and a mutant form which lacks the cytoplasmic domain, and is unable to associate with the cytoskeleton. Stretching experiments carried out on these cells show the formation of long filaments. Using a previous model of filament elongation, we could determine the viscoelastic properties of a single cell. As expected, different viscoelastic components were found between the wild type and the mutant, which reveal that the presence of interactions between ICAM-1 and the cytoskeleton increases the stiffness of the cell. PMID:16308464

  19. Viscoelastic Properties of Extracellular Polymeric Substances Can Strongly Affect Their Washing Efficiency from Reverse Osmosis Membranes.

    PubMed

    Ferrando Chavez, Diana Lila; Nejidat, Ali; Herzberg, Moshe

    2016-09-01

    The role of the viscoelastic properties of biofouling layers in their removal from the membrane was studied. Model fouling layers of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) originated from microbial biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 differentially expressing the Psl polysaccharide were used for controlled washing experiments of fouled RO membranes. In parallel, adsorption experiments and viscoelastic modeling of the EPS layers were conducted in a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). During the washing stage, as shear rate was elevated, significant differences in permeate flux recovery between the three different EPS layers were observed. According to the amount of organic carbon remained on the membrane after washing, the magnitude of Psl production provides elevated resistance of the EPS layer to shear stress. The highest flux recovery during the washing stage was observed for the EPS with no Psl. Psl was shown to elevate the layer's shear modulus and shear viscosity but had no effect on the EPS adhesion to the polyamide surface. We conclude that EPS retain on the membrane as a result of the layer viscoelastic properties. These results highlight an important relation between washing efficiency of fouling layers from membranes and their viscoelastic properties, in addition to their adhesion properties. PMID:27404109

  20. Effects of swelling on the viscoelastic properties of polyester films made from glycerol and glutaric acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viscoelastic properties have been determined for poly(glycerol-co-glutaric acid) films synthesized from Lewis acid-catalyzed polyesterifications. The polymers were prepared by synthesizing polymer gels that were subsequently cured at 125 degrees C to form polymer films. The polymers were evaluated ...

  1. Influence of jet-cooking Prowashonupana barley flour on phenolic composition, antioxidant activities, and viscoelastic properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of jet-cooking Prowashonupana barley flour on total phenolic contents, antioxidant activities, water holding capacities, and viscoelastic properties was studied. Barley flour was jet-cooked without or with pH adjustment at 7, 9, or 11. Generally, the free phenolic content and antioxi...

  2. Constitutive Equations: Plastic and Viscoelastic Properties. (Latest citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning analytical techniques using constitutive equations, applied to materials under stress. The properties explored with these techniques include viscoelasticity, thermoelasticity, and plasticity. While many of the references are general as to material type, most refer to specific metals or composites, or to specific shapes, such as flat plate or spherical vessels.

  3. A Rapid Small-Scale Method to Evaluate Dough Viscoelastic Properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dough viscoelastic properties are of special interest to bakers and wheat breeders. Dough extensibility (DE) and resistance to extension (RE) influence each step of the baking process as well as product end-use quality, and thus are important quality factors to consider in wheat breeding programs. T...

  4. Importance of Viscoelastic Property Measurement of a New Hydrogel for Health Care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Niladri; Saha, Nabanita; Kitano, Takeshi; Saha, Petr

    2009-07-01

    A simple technology based new hydrogel "PVP-CMC-BA" has been prepared by the scientists of Tomas Bata University in Zlin, Czech Republic. Its swelling property (in presence of water, human blood and different pH), antimicrobial property (in presence of skin infection causing agents like: Staphylococcus aureus; bacteria and Candida albicans; fungi) and viscoelastic properties such as storage modulus (G'), loss modulus (G") and complex viscosity (η*) were investigated at room temperature (25-28° C) which demonstrate that PVP-CMC-BA hydrogel is maintaining requisite properties for health care application, specially as a wound dressing material. The elasticity and antimicrobial property of PVP-CMC-BA is directly correlated with percentage of boric acid, an antiseptic agent. The consequential values of viscoelastic properties of the hydrogel (before drying) enable us to understand its specific flexible condition to apply on the surface of human body.

  5. Numerical conversion of transient to harmonic response functions for linear viscoelastic materials.

    PubMed

    Buschmann, M D

    1997-02-01

    Viscoelastic material behavior is often characterized using one of the three measurements: creep, stress-relaxation or dynamic sinusoidal tests. A two-stage numerical method was developed to allow representation of data from creep and stress-relaxation tests on the Fourier axis in the Laplace domain. The method assumes linear behavior and is theoretically applicable to any transient test which attains an equilibrium state. The first stage numerically resolves the Laplace integral to convert temporal stress and strain data, from creep or stress-relaxation, to the stiffness function, G(s), evaluated on the positive real axis in the Laplace domain. This numerical integration alone allows the direct comparison of data from transient experiments which attain a final equilibrium state, such as creep and stress relaxation, and allows such data to be fitted to models expressed in the Laplace domain. The second stage of this numerical procedure maps the stiffness function, G(s), from the positive real axis to the positive imaginary axis to reveal the harmonic response function, or dynamic stiffness, G(j omega). The mapping for each angular frequency, s, is accomplished by fitting a polynomial to a subset of G(s) centered around a particular value of s, substituting js for s and thereby evaluating G(j omega). This two-stage transformation circumvents previous numerical difficulties associated with obtaining Fourier transforms of the stress and strain time domain signals. The accuracy of these transforms is verified using model functions from poroelasticity, corresponding to uniaxial confined compression of an isotropic material and uniaxial unconfined compression of a transversely isotropic material. The addition of noise to the model data does not significantly deteriorate the transformed results and data points need not be equally spaced in time. To exemplify its potential utility, this two-stage transform is applied to experimental stress relaxation data to obtain the

  6. Indentation testing and optimized property identification for viscoelastic materials using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resapu, Rajeswara Reddy

    The most common approaches to determining mechanical material properties of materials are tension and compression tests. However, tension and compression testing cannot be implemented under certain loading conditions (immovable object, not enough space to hold object for testing, etc). Similarly, tensile and compression testing cannot be performed on certain types of materials (delicate, bulk, non-machinable, those that cannot be separated from a larger structure, etc). For such cases, other material testing methods need to be implemented. Indentation testing is one such method; this approach is often non-destructive and can be used to characterize regions that are not compatible with other testing methods. However, indentation testing typically leads to force-displacement data as opposed to the direct stress-strain data normally used for the mechanical characterization of materials; this data needs to be analyzed using a suitable approach to determine the associated material properties. As such, methods to establish material properties from force-displacement indentation data need to be identified. In this work, a finite element approach using parameter optimization is developed to determine the mechanical properties from the experimental indentation data. Polymers and tissues tend to have time-dependent mechanical behavior; this means that their mechanical response under load changes with time. This dissertation seeks to characterize the properties of these materials using indentation testing under the assumption that they are linear viscoelastic. An example of a material of interest is the polymer poly vinyl chloride (PVC) that is used as the insulation of some aircraft wiring. Changes in the mechanical properties of this material over years of service can indicate degradation and a potential hazard to continued use. To investigate the validity of using indentation testing to monitor polymer insulation degradation, PVC film and PVC-insulated aircraft wiring are

  7. Microscale characterization of the viscoelastic properties of hydrogel biomaterials using dual-mode ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xiaowei; Stegemann, Jan P; Deng, Cheri X

    2016-05-01

    Characterization of the microscale mechanical properties of biomaterials is a key challenge in the field of mechanobiology. Dual-mode ultrasound elastography (DUE) uses high frequency focused ultrasound to induce compression in a sample, combined with interleaved ultrasound imaging to measure the resulting deformation. This technique can be used to non-invasively perform creep testing on hydrogel biomaterials to characterize their viscoelastic properties. DUE was applied to a range of hydrogel constructs consisting of either hydroxyapatite (HA)-doped agarose, HA-collagen, HA-fibrin, or preosteoblast-seeded collagen constructs. DUE provided spatial and temporal mapping of local and bulk displacements and strains at high resolution. Hydrogel materials exhibited characteristic creep behavior, and the maximum strain and residual strain were both material- and concentration-dependent. Burger's viscoelastic model was used to extract characteristic parameters describing material behavior. Increased protein concentration resulted in greater stiffness and viscosity, but did not affect the viscoelastic time constant of acellular constructs. Collagen constructs exhibited significantly higher modulus and viscosity than fibrin constructs. Cell-seeded collagen constructs became stiffer with altered mechanical behavior as they developed over time. Importantly, DUE also provides insight into the spatial variation of viscoelastic properties at sub-millimeter resolution, allowing interrogation of the interior of constructs. DUE presents a novel technique for non-invasively characterizing hydrogel materials at the microscale, and therefore may have unique utility in the study of mechanobiology and the characterization of hydrogel biomaterials. PMID:26928595

  8. A non-linear viscoelastic characterisation method for matrix resin composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, C. C.; Brinson, H. F.; Cardon, A. H.

    1983-01-01

    Lifetime prediction of matrix resin composites is an important problem because of their viscoelastic character. If the Time-Temperature-Stress-Superposition principle is valid, results from short time tests at high stress levels can give the necessary information for the prediction of long time behavior. At such stress levels the viscoelastic response is nonlinear. In this contribution the basis of a computer routine is presented starting from a thermodynamical formulation given by Schapery. This method gives in an accurate way the different material parameters in that nonlinear constitutive equation for different stresses and temperatures.

  9. Viscoelastic properties of cell walls of single living plant cells determined by dynamic nanoindentation

    PubMed Central

    Hayot, Céline M.; Forouzesh, Elham; Goel, Ashwani; Avramova, Zoya; Turner, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Plant development results from controlled cell divisions, structural modifications, and reorganizations of the cell wall. Thereby, regulation of cell wall behaviour takes place at multiple length scales involving compositional and architectural aspects in addition to various developmental and/or environmental factors. The physical properties of the primary wall are largely determined by the nature of the complex polymer network, which exhibits time-dependent behaviour representative of viscoelastic materials. Here, a dynamic nanoindentation technique is used to measure the time-dependent response and the viscoelastic behaviour of the cell wall in single living cells at a micron or sub-micron scale. With this approach, significant changes in storage (stiffness) and loss (loss of energy) moduli are captured among the tested cells. The results reveal hitherto unknown differences in the viscoelastic parameters of the walls of same-age similarly positioned cells of the Arabidopsis ecotypes (Col 0 and Ws 2). The technique is also shown to be sensitive enough to detect changes in cell wall properties in cells deficient in the activity of the chromatin modifier ATX1. Extensive computational modelling of the experimental measurements (i.e. modelling the cell as a viscoelastic pressure vessel) is used to analyse the influence of the wall thickness, as well as the turgor pressure, at the positions of our measurements. By combining the nanoDMA technique with finite element simulations quantifiable measurements of the viscoelastic properties of plant cell walls are achieved. Such techniques are expected to find broader applications in quantifying the influence of genetic, biological, and environmental factors on the nanoscale mechanical properties of the cell wall. PMID:22291130

  10. Viscoelastic properties of cell walls of single living plant cells determined by dynamic nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Hayot, Céline M; Forouzesh, Elham; Goel, Ashwani; Avramova, Zoya; Turner, Joseph A

    2012-04-01

    Plant development results from controlled cell divisions, structural modifications, and reorganizations of the cell wall. Thereby, regulation of cell wall behaviour takes place at multiple length scales involving compositional and architectural aspects in addition to various developmental and/or environmental factors. The physical properties of the primary wall are largely determined by the nature of the complex polymer network, which exhibits time-dependent behaviour representative of viscoelastic materials. Here, a dynamic nanoindentation technique is used to measure the time-dependent response and the viscoelastic behaviour of the cell wall in single living cells at a micron or sub-micron scale. With this approach, significant changes in storage (stiffness) and loss (loss of energy) moduli are captured among the tested cells. The results reveal hitherto unknown differences in the viscoelastic parameters of the walls of same-age similarly positioned cells of the Arabidopsis ecotypes (Col 0 and Ws 2). The technique is also shown to be sensitive enough to detect changes in cell wall properties in cells deficient in the activity of the chromatin modifier ATX1. Extensive computational modelling of the experimental measurements (i.e. modelling the cell as a viscoelastic pressure vessel) is used to analyse the influence of the wall thickness, as well as the turgor pressure, at the positions of our measurements. By combining the nanoDMA technique with finite element simulations quantifiable measurements of the viscoelastic properties of plant cell walls are achieved. Such techniques are expected to find broader applications in quantifying the influence of genetic, biological, and environmental factors on the nanoscale mechanical properties of the cell wall. PMID:22291130

  11. Elastin-like recombinamer catalyst-free click gels: characterization of poroelastic and intrinsic viscoelastic properties.

    PubMed

    González de Torre, Israel; Santos, Mercedes; Quintanilla, Luis; Testera, Ana; Alonso, Matilde; Rodríguez Cabello, José Carlos

    2014-06-01

    Elastin-like recombinamer catalyst-free click gels (ELR-CFCGs) have been prepared and characterized by modifying both a structural ELR (VKVx24) and a biofunctionalized ELR-bearing RGD cell-adhesion sequence (HRGD6) to bear the reactive groups needed to form hydrogels via a click reaction. Prior to formation of the ELR-CFCGs, azide-bearing and cyclooctyne-modified ELRs were also synthesized. Subsequent covalent crosslinking was based on the reaction between these azide and cyclooctyne groups, which takes place under physiological conditions and without the need for a catalyst. The correlation among SEM micrographs, porosity, swelling ratio, and rheological measurements have been carried out. The storage and loss moduli at 1Hz are in the range 1-10kPa and 100-1000Pa, respectively. The linear dependence of |G∗| on f(½) and the peak value of tan δ were considered to be consistent with a poroelastic mechanism dominating the frequency range 0.3-70Hz. The discrete relaxation spectrum was obtained from stress relaxation measurements (t>5s). The good fit of the relaxation modulus to decrease exponential functions suggests that an intrinsic viscoelastic mechanism dominates the transients. Several recombinamer concentrations and temperatures were tested to obtain gels with fully tuneable properties that could find applications in the biomedical field. PMID:24530853

  12. Viscoelastic properties of polymer surfaces investigated by nanoscale dynamic mechanical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravartula, A.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2006-03-01

    The viscoelastic properties of polymer surfaces were investigated by nanoscale dynamic mechanical analysis (nano-DMA) involving contact force modulation in the frequency range of 10-200Hz. Nano-DMA experiments were performed with a Berkovich diamond tip of nominal radius of curvature equal to ˜100nm under a mean contact force of 8-10μN and alternating force equal to 2% of the mean force. Variations in the loss tangent, storage modulus, and loss modulus of low- and high-density polyethylene and ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene with the force frequency demonstrated significantly different viscoelastic behaviors for shallow depths (<40nm) than for relatively large depths (i.e., 75-100nm). The effects of alternating force frequency and indentation depth on the viscoelastic properties of the different polyethylene materials are interpreted in terms of the microstructure characteristics and the molecular chain mobility at the polymer surfaces. The results show that nano-DMA is an effective technique for nanoscale studies of the viscoelastic behavior of polymer surfaces.

  13. Viscoelastic Properties of a Hierarchical Model of Soft Biological Tissue: Two-Dimensional and Three-Dimensional Cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posnansky, Oleg

    2016-09-01

    The measuring of viscoelastic response is widely used for revealing information about soft matter and biological tissue noninvasively. This information encodes intrinsic dynamic correlations and depends on relations between macroscopic viscoelasticity and structure at the mesoscopic scale. Here we show numerically that the frequency dependent dynamical shear moduli distinguish between the mesoscopic architectural complexities and sensitive to the Euclidean dimensionality. Our approach enables the explanation of two- and three-dimensional viscoelastic experiments by objectively choosing and modeling the most relevant architectural features such as the concentration of compounds and intra-model hierarchical characteristics of physical parameters. Current work provides a link between the macroscopical effective viscoelastic properties to viscoelastic constants and network geometry on the mesoscale. Besides of this we also pay attention to the analytical properties of generalized susceptibility function of considered constitutive model accounting principles of causality.

  14. Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals: From viscoelastic properties to living liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shuang

    Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal (LCLC) represents a broad range of molecules, from organic dyes and drugs to DNA, that self-assemble into linear aggregates in water through face-to-face stacking. These linear aggregates of high aspect ratio are capable of orientational order, forming, for example nematic phase. Since the microscopic properties (such as length) of the chromonic aggregates are results of subtle balance between energy and entropy, the macroscopic viscoelastic properties of the nematic media are sensitive to change of external factors. In the first part of this thesis, by using dynamic light scattering and magnetic Frederiks transition techniques, we study the Frank elastic moduli and viscosity coefficients of LCLC disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) and sunset yellow (SSY) as functions of concentration c , temperature T and ionic contents. The elastic moduli of splay (K1) and bend (K3) are in the order of 10pN, about 10 times larger than the twist modulus (K2). The splay modulus K1 and the ratio K1/K3 both increase substantially as T decreases or c increases, which we attribute to the elongation of linear aggregates at lower T or higher c . The bend viscosity is comparable to that of thermotropic liquid crystals, while the splay and twist viscosities are several orders of magnitude larger, changing exponentially with T . Additional ionic additives into the system influence the viscoelastic properties of these systems in a dramatic and versatile way. For example, monovalent salt NaCl decreases bend modulus K3 and increases twist viscosity, while an elevated pH decreases all the parameters. We attribute these features to the ion-induced changes in length and flexibility of building units of LCLC, the chromonic aggregates, a property not found in conventional thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystals form by covalently bound units of fixed length. The second part of the thesis studies a new active bio-mechanical hybrid system called living liquid crystal

  15. Visco-Elastic Properties of Sodium Hyaluronate Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulicke, Werner-Michael; Meyer, Fabian; Bingöl, Ali Ö.; Lohmann, Derek

    2008-07-01

    Sodium Hyaluronate (NaHA) is a member of the glycosaminoglycans and is present in the human organism as part of the synovial fluid and the vitreous body. HA is mainly commercialized as sodium or potassium salt. It can be extracted from cockscombs or can be produced by bacterial fermentation ensuring a low protein content. Because of its natural origin and toxicological harmlessness, NaHA is used to a great extent for pharmaceutical and cosmetic products. In medical applications, NaHA is already being used as a component of flushing and stabilizing fluids in the treatment of eye cataract and as a surrogate for natural synovial fluid. Another growing domain in the commercial utilization of NaHA is the field of skin care products like dermal fillers or moisturizers. In this spectrum, NaHA is used in dilute over semidilute up to concentrated (0viscoelastic behavior. We therefore present in this contribution the results of a comprehensive investigation of the viscous and elastic material functions of different NaHA samples. This includes, besides shear flow and oscillatory experiments, the performance of rheo-optical measurements in order to determine the elastic component in the range of low shear rates and low concentrations.

  16. Viscoelastic properties of whole blood. Influence of fast sedimenting red blood cell aggregates.

    PubMed

    Schneditz, D; Rainer, F; Kenner, T

    1987-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) aggregation is known to be of deciding influence on erythrocyte sedimentation-rate (ESR) and on whole blood viscoelastic properties. The rheological behaviour of blood collected from a control-group with normal ESR is compared to the viscoelastic behaviour of blood collected from two groups with high to very high ESR, whose individuals are suffering from chronical polyarthritis and Morbus Bechterew, respectively. The rheological properties are evaluated by means of an oscillating-flow capillary-rheometer where the viscous (eta') and elastic (eta") component of the complex viscosity (eta) is measured at a constant frequency of 2 Hz. Correcting for the varying hematocrit of the different blood samples according to an exponential equation, the viscoelastic data are found to be elevated in the groups with high ESR. For the viscous properties this is only due to the increase of the plasma viscosity. A correction for the plasma viscosity, however, shows that the viscous properties at low shear- rates (2s-1) are significantly reduced, whereas elastic properties in a range of medium shear-rates (10s-1 to 50s-1) are significantly increased (P less than 0.001, t-test of Student). This result is discussed to be due to the high packing density of the RBC in fast sedimenting aggregates. High packing density reduces the effective volume of the RBC but increases the stiffness of the aggregates. PMID:3651579

  17. Non linear viscoelasticity applied for the study of durability of polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardon, A.; Brinson, H. F.; Hiel, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    A methodology is described for the durability analysis of polymer matrix composites, based on nonlinear viscoelasticity theory. The durability analysis is performed on the basis of a certain number of tests carried out on limited and, if possible, short time scale by the use of accelerating factors. The method was applied to thermomatrix composites under uniaxial and biaxial loadings, showing satisfactory agreement between the life-time predictions and the published data on real-time behavior.

  18. Numerical predictions of viscoelastic properties and dynamic moduli of innovative pothole patching materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, K. Y.; Yuan, W.; Ju, J. W.; Yang, J. M.; Kao, W.; Carlson, L.

    2013-04-01

    As asphalt pavements age and deteriorate, recurring pothole repair failures and propagating alligator cracks in the asphalt pavements have become a serious issue to our daily life and resulted in high repairing costs for pavement and vehicles. To solve this urgent issue, pothole repair materials with superior durability and long service life are needed. In the present work, revolutionary pothole patching materials with high toughness, high fatigue resistance that are reinforced with nano-molecular resins have been developed to enhance their resistance to traffic loads and service life of repaired potholes. In particular, DCPD resin (dicyclopentadiene, C10H12) with a Rhuthinium-based catalyst is employed to develop controlled properties that are compatible with aggregates and asphalt binders. In this paper, a multi-level numerical micromechanics-based model is developed to predict the viscoelastic properties and dynamic moduli of these innovative nano-molecular resin reinforced pothole patching materials. Irregular coarse aggregates in the finite element analysis are modeled as randomly-dispersed multi-layers coated particles. The effective properties of asphalt mastic, which consists of fine aggregates, tar, cured DCPD and air voids are theoretically estimated by the homogenization technique of micromechanics in conjunction with the elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle. Numerical predictions of homogenized viscoelastic properties and dynamic moduli are demonstrated.

  19. Effects of dehydration on the viscoelastic properties of vocal folds in large deformations.

    PubMed

    Miri, Amir K; Barthelat, François; Mongeau, Luc

    2012-11-01

    Dehydration may alter vocal fold viscoelastic properties, thereby hampering phonation. The effects of water loss induced by an osmotic pressure potential on vocal fold tissue viscoelastic properties were investigated. Porcine vocal folds were dehydrated by immersion in a hypertonic solution, and quasi-static and low-frequency dynamic traction tests were performed for elongations of up to 50%. Digital image correlation was used to determine local strains from surface deformations. The elastic modulus and the loss factor were then determined for normal and dehydrated tissues. An eight-chain hyperelastic model was used to describe the observed nonlinear stress-stretch behavior. Contrary to the expectations, the mass history indicated that the tissue absorbed water during cyclic extension when submerged in a hypertonic solution. During loading history, the elastic modulus was increased for dehydrated tissues as a function of strain. The response of dehydrated tissues was much less affected when the load was released. This observation suggests that hydration should be considered in micromechanical models of the vocal folds. The internal hysteresis, which is often linked to phonation effort, increased significantly with water loss. The effects of dehydration on the viscoelastic properties of vocal fold tissue were quantified in a systematic way. A better understanding of the role of hydration on the mechanical properties of vocal fold tissue may help to establish objective dehydration and phonotrauma criteria. PMID:22483778

  20. Comparison of the viscoelastic properties of cells from different kidney cancer phenotypes measured with atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebelo, L. M.; de Sousa, J. S.; Mendes Filho, J.; Radmacher, M.

    2013-02-01

    The viscoelastic properties of human kidney cell lines from different tumor types (carcinoma (A-498) and adenocarcinoma (ACHN)) are compared to a non-tumorigenic cell line (RC-124). Our methodology is based on the mapping of viscoelastic properties (elasticity modulus E and apparent viscosity η) over the surface of tens of individual cells with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The viscoelastic properties are averaged over datasets as large as 15000 data points per cell line. We also propose a model to estimate the apparent viscosity of soft materials using the hysteresis observed in conventional AFM deflection-displacement curves, without any modification to the standard AFM apparatus. The comparison of the three cell lines show that the non-tumorigenic cells are less deformable and more viscous than cancerous cells, and that cancer cell lines have distinctive viscoelastic properties. In particular, we obtained that ERC-124 > EA-498 > EACHN and ηRC-124 > ηA-498 > ηACHN.

  1. Measurement of Viscoelastic Properties of Condensed Matter using Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruwel, Marco L. H.; Latta, Peter; Matwiy, Brendon; Sboto-Frankenstein, Uta; Gervai, Patricia; Tomanek, Boguslaw

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a phase contrast technique that provides a non-invasive means of evaluating the viscoelastic properties of soft condensed matter. This has a profound bio-medical significance as it allows for the virtual palpation of areas of the body usually not accessible to the hands of a medical practitioner, such as the brain. Applications of MRE are not restricted to bio-medical applications, however, the viscoelastic properties of prepackaged food products can also non-invasively be determined. Here we describe the design and use of a modular MRE acoustic actuator that can be used for experiments ranging from the human brain to pre-packaged food products. The unique feature of the used actuator design is its simplicity and flexibility, which allows easy reconfiguration.

  2. The viscoelastic properties of chromatin and the nucleoplasm revealed by scale-dependent protein mobility.

    PubMed

    Erdel, Fabian; Baum, Michael; Rippe, Karsten

    2015-02-18

    The eukaryotic cell nucleus harbours the DNA genome that is organized in a dynamic chromatin network and embedded in a viscous crowded fluid. This environment directly affects enzymatic reactions and target search processes that access the DNA sequence information. However, its physical properties as a reaction medium are poorly understood. Here, we exploit mobility measurements of differently sized inert green fluorescent tracer proteins to characterize the viscoelastic properties of the nuclear interior of a living human cell. We find that it resembles a viscous fluid on small and large scales but appears viscoelastic on intermediate scales that change with protein size. Our results are consistent with simulations of diffusion through polymers and suggest that chromatin forms a random obstacle network rather than a self-similar structure with fixed fractal dimensions. By calculating how long molecules remember their previous position in dependence on their size, we evaluate how the nuclear environment affects search processes of chromatin targets. PMID:25563347

  3. Custom-Built Optical Tweezers for Locally Probing the Viscoelastic Properties of Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavano, Federica; Bonin, Serena; Pinato, Giulietta; Stanta, Giorgio; Cojoc, Dan

    2011-07-01

    We report a home built optical tweezers setup to investigate the mechanism of the membrane tether formation from single cells in vitro. Using an optically trapped microbead as probe, we have determined the force-elongation curve during tether formation and extracted several parameters characterizing the viscoelastic behavior of the cell membrane: tether stiffness, force, and viscosity. Breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells have been studied in two different conditions, at room and physiological temperatures, showing a strong temperature dependence of the visoelastic properties of the cell membrane. To get detailed inside information about the tether formation mechanism we have extended the analysis of the force-elongation curves fitting them with a Kelvin model. These preliminary results are part of a larger project of whose goal is to compare the viscoelastic properties of several types of cancer cell lines, characterized by different aggressiveness and metastatic potential.

  4. The viscoelastic properties of chromatin and the nucleoplasm revealed by scale-dependent protein mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdel, Fabian; Baum, Michael; Rippe, Karsten

    2015-02-01

    The eukaryotic cell nucleus harbours the DNA genome that is organized in a dynamic chromatin network and embedded in a viscous crowded fluid. This environment directly affects enzymatic reactions and target search processes that access the DNA sequence information. However, its physical properties as a reaction medium are poorly understood. Here, we exploit mobility measurements of differently sized inert green fluorescent tracer proteins to characterize the viscoelastic properties of the nuclear interior of a living human cell. We find that it resembles a viscous fluid on small and large scales but appears viscoelastic on intermediate scales that change with protein size. Our results are consistent with simulations of diffusion through polymers and suggest that chromatin forms a random obstacle network rather than a self-similar structure with fixed fractal dimensions. By calculating how long molecules remember their previous position in dependence on their size, we evaluate how the nuclear environment affects search processes of chromatin targets.

  5. Determination of the parameters of a linear-viscoelastic thin layer using the normally-incident ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Gui-Jin; Lü, Wei-Guo; Song, Ruo-Long; Cui, Zhi-Wen; Zhang, Xiang-Lin; Wang, Ke-Xie

    2010-07-01

    This paper proposes a method of simultaneous determination of the four layer parameters (mass density, longitudinal velocity, the thickness and attenuation) of an immersed linear-viscoelastic thin layer by using the normally-incident reflected and transmitted ultrasonic waves. The analytical formula of the layer thickness related to the measured transmitted transfer functions is derived. The two determination steps of the four layer parameters are developed, in which acoustic impedance, time-of-flight and attenuation are first determined by the reflected transfer functions. Using the derived formula, it successively calculates and determines the layer thickness, longitudinal velocity and mass density by the measured transmitted transfer functions. According to the two determination steps, a more feasible and simplified measurement setups is described. It is found that only three signals (the reference waves, the reflected and transmitted waves) need to be recorded in the whole measurement for the determination of the four layer parameters. A study of the stability of the determination method against the experimental noises and the error analysis of the four layer parameters are made. This study lays the theoretical foundation of the practical measurement of a linear-viscoelastic thin layer.

  6. Effect of γ-radiation on dynamic viscoelastic properties and thermal behavior for LDPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuzhong, Li; Zhongda, He; Wanxi, Zhang

    1993-07-01

    The effect of γ-radiation on dynamic viscoelastic properties and thermal behavior for low density polyethylene(LDPE)have been investigated. The store energy modulus (E) of the samples increased after radiation. The β and α transition temperature shifted to higher temperature with increasing irradiation dose. The results of thermal analysis show that crystal melting temperature(Tm), enthalpy(ΔHm) and crystal disapperance temperature(Td) for irradiated samples decreases with increasing of dose.

  7. Constitutive Equations: Plastic and Viscoelastic Properties. (Latest Citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning analytical techniques using constitutive equations, applied to materials under stress. The properties explored with these techniques include viscoelasticity, thermoelasticity, and plasticity. While many of the references are general as to material type, most refer to specific metals or composites, or to specific shapes, such as flat plate or spherical vessels. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. The viscoelastic properties of the vitreous humor measured using an optically trapped local probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Fiona; Tan, Lay Ean; Tassieri, Manlio; McAlinden, Niall; Wilson, Clive G.; Girkin, John M.; Wright, Amanda J.

    2011-10-01

    We present results demonstrating for the first time that an optically trapped bead can be used as a local probe to measure the variation in the viscoelastic properties of the vitreous humor of a rabbit eye. The Brownian motion of the optically trapped bead was monitored on a fast CCD camera on the millisecond timescale. Analysis of the bead trajectory provides local information about the viscoelastic properties of the medium surrounding the particle. Previous, bulk, methods for measuring the viscoelastic properties of the vitreous destroy the sample and allow only a single averaged measurement to be taken per eye. Whereas, with our approach, we were able to observe local behaviour typical of non-Newtonian and gel-like materials, along with the homogenous and in-homogeneous nature of different regions of the dissected vitreous humor. The motivation behind these measurements is to gain a better understanding of the structure of the vitreous humor in order to design effective drug delivery techniques. In particular, we are interested in methods for delivering drug to the retina of the eye in order to treat sight threatening diseases such as age related macular degeneration.

  9. Effects of Dehydration on the Viscoelastic Properties of Vocal Folds in Large Deformations

    PubMed Central

    Miri, Amir K.; Barthelat, François; Mongeau, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Summary Dehydration may alter vocal fold viscoelastic properties, which may hamper phonation. The effects of water loss induced by an osmotic-pressure potential on vocal fold tissue viscoelastic properties were investigated. Porcine vocal folds were dehydrated by immersion in a hypertonic solution, and quasi-static and low-frequency dynamic traction tests were performed for elongations of up to 50%. Digital image correlation was used to determine local strains from surface deformations. The elastic modulus and the loss factor were then determined for normal and dehydrated tissues. An eight-chain hyperelastic model was used to describe the observed nonlinear stress-stretch behavior. Contrary to expectations, the mass history indicated that the tissue absorbed water during cyclic extension when submerged in a hypertonic solution. During loading history, the elastic modulus was increased for dehydrated tissues as a function of strain. The response of dehydrated tissues was much less affected when the load was releasing. This calls more attention to the modeling of vocal folds in micromechanics modeling. The internal hysteresis, which is often linked to phonation effort, increased significantly with water loss. The effects of dehydration on the viscoelastic properties of vocal fold tissue were quantified in a systematic way. The results will contribute to a better understanding of the basic biomechanics of voice production and ultimately will help establish objective dehydration and phonotrauma criteria. PMID:22483778

  10. A multiscale model for predicting the viscoelastic properties of asphalt concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Cucalon, Lorena; Rahmani, Eisa; Little, Dallas N.; Allen, David H.

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that the accurate prediction of long term performance of asphalt concrete pavement requires modeling to account for viscoelasticity within the mastic. However, accounting for viscoelasticity can be costly when the material properties are measured at the scale of asphalt concrete. This is due to the fact that the material testing protocols must be performed recursively for each mixture considered for use in the final design. In this paper, a four level multiscale computational micromechanics methodology is utilized to determine the accuracy of micromechanics versus directly measured viscoelastic properties of asphalt concrete pavement. This is accomplished by first measuring the viscoelastic dynamic modulus of asphalt binder, as well as the elastic properties of the constituents, and this comprised the first scale analysis. In the second scale analysis, the finite element method is utilized to predict the effect of mineral fillers on the dynamic modulus. In the third scale analysis, the finite element method is again utilized to predict the effect of fine aggregates on the dynamic modulus. In the fourth and final scale analysis, the finite element method is utilized to predict the effect of large aggregates on the dynamic modulus of asphalt concrete. This final predicted result is then compared to the experimentally measured dynamic modulus of two different asphalt concretes for various volume fractions of the constituents. Results reveal that the errors in predictions are on the order of 60 %, while the ranking of the mixtures was consistent with experimental results. It should be noted that differences between the "final predicted results" and the experimental results can provide fruitful ground for understanding the effect of interactions not considered in the multiscale approach, most importantly, chemical interactions.

  11. Resolving the viscoelasticity and anisotropy dependence of the mechanical properties of skin from a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Wong, W L E; Joyce, T J; Goh, K L

    2016-04-01

    The mechanical response of skin to external loads is influenced by anisotropy and viscoelasticity of the tissue, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we report a study of the main effects of tissue orientation (TO, which is linked to anisotropy) and strain rate (SR, a measure of viscoelasticity), as well as the interaction effects between the two factors, on the tensile properties of skin from a porcine model. Tensile testing to rupture of porcine skin tissue was conducted to evaluate the sensitivity of the tissue modulus of elasticity (E) and fracture-related properties, namely maximum stress [Formula: see text] and strain [Formula: see text] at [Formula: see text], to varying SR and TO. Specimens were excised from the abdominal skin in two orientations, namely parallel (P) and right angle (R) to the torso midline. Each TO was investigated at three SR levels, namely 0.007-0.015 [Formula: see text] (low), 0.040 [Formula: see text] (mid) and 0.065 [Formula: see text] (high). Two-factor analysis of variance revealed that the respective parameters responded differently to varying SR and TO. Significant changes in the [Formula: see text] were observed with different TOs but not with SR. The [Formula: see text] decreased significantly with increasing SR, but no significant variation was observed for different TOs. Significant changes in E were observed with different TOs; E increased significantly with increasing SR. More importantly, the respective mechanical parameters were not significantly influenced by interactions between SR and TO. These findings suggest that the trends associated with the changes in the skin mechanical properties may be attributed partly to differences in the anisotropy and viscoelasticity but not through any interaction between viscoelasticity and anisotropy. PMID:26156308

  12. Soft viscoelastic properties of nuclear actin age oocytes due to gravitational creep.

    PubMed

    Feric, Marina; Broedersz, Chase P; Brangwynne, Clifford P

    2015-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton helps maintain structural organization within living cells. In large X. laevis oocytes, gravity becomes a dominant force and is countered by a nuclear actin network that prevents liquid-like nuclear bodies from immediate sedimentation and coalescence. However, nuclear actin's mechanical properties, and how they facilitate the stabilization of nuclear bodies, remain unknown. Using active microrheology, we find that nuclear actin forms a weak viscoelastic network, with a modulus of roughly 0.1 Pa. Embedded probe particles subjected to a constant force exhibit continuous displacement, due to viscoelastic creep. Gravitational forces also cause creep displacement of nuclear bodies, resulting in their asymmetric nuclear distribution. Thus, nuclear actin does not indefinitely support the emulsion of nuclear bodies, but only kinetically stabilizes them by slowing down gravitational creep to ~2 months. This is similar to the viability time of large oocytes, suggesting gravitational creep ages oocytes, with fatal consequences on long timescales. PMID:26577186

  13. Soft viscoelastic properties of nuclear actin age oocytes due to gravitational creep

    PubMed Central

    Feric, Marina; Broedersz, Chase P.; Brangwynne, Clifford P.

    2015-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton helps maintain structural organization within living cells. In large X. laevis oocytes, gravity becomes a dominant force and is countered by a nuclear actin network that prevents liquid-like nuclear bodies from immediate sedimentation and coalescence. However, nuclear actin’s mechanical properties, and how they facilitate the stabilization of nuclear bodies, remain unknown. Using active microrheology, we find that nuclear actin forms a weak viscoelastic network, with a modulus of roughly 0.1 Pa. Embedded probe particles subjected to a constant force exhibit continuous displacement, due to viscoelastic creep. Gravitational forces also cause creep displacement of nuclear bodies, resulting in their asymmetric nuclear distribution. Thus, nuclear actin does not indefinitely support the emulsion of nuclear bodies, but only kinetically stabilizes them by slowing down gravitational creep to ~2 months. This is similar to the viability time of large oocytes, suggesting gravitational creep ages oocytes, with fatal consequences on long timescales. PMID:26577186

  14. Effect of silver nanoparticles incorporation on viscoelastic properties of acrylic resin denture base material

    PubMed Central

    Mahross, Hamada Zaki; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to investigate the effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) incorporation on viscoelastic properties of acrylic resin denture base material. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 specimens (60 × 10 × 2 mm) of heat cured acrylic resin were constructed and divided into four groups (five for each), according to the concentration of AgNPs (1%, 2%, and 5% vol.) which incorporated into the liquid of acrylic resin material and one group without additives (control group). The dynamic viscoelastic test for the test specimens was performed using the computerized material testing system. The resulting deflection curves were analyzed by material testing software NEXYGEN MT. Results: The 5% nanoparticles of silver (NAg) had significantly highest mean storage modulus E’ and loss tangent Tan δ values followed by 2% NAg (P < 0.05). For 1% nanosilver incorporation (group B), there were no statistically significant differences in storage modulus E’, lost modulus E” or loss tangent Tan δ with other groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The AgNPs incorporation within the acrylic denture base material can improve its viscoelastic properties. PMID:26038651

  15. The effect of heart rate, preload, and afterload on the viscoelastic properties of the swine myocardium.

    PubMed

    Ewert, Dan; Wheeler, Bruce; Doetkott, Curt; Ionan, Constantine; Pantalos, George; Koenig, Steven C

    2004-09-01

    Experiments were performed to test the hypothesis that viscoelastic properties of the swine myocardium are independent of heart rate (HR), preload (PL), and afterload (AL). Left ventricular pressure and aortic flow (AoF) waveforms were recorded in 13 swine. At different paced heart rates, an inferior vena caval occlusion (IVC) was used to reduce PL, then the IVC was released and simultaneously the aorta was clamped to increase AL. Equivalent left ventricular pressure waveform pairs consisting of an ejecting waveform (denoted as LVP) and isovolumic waveform (denoted as hydromotive pressure, HMP) were selected according to specified criteria resulting in 371 equivalent waveform pairs. From the selected waveform pairs and corresponding aortic flow waveforms, the viscoelastic properties (k and epsilon1) were estimated by HMP = LVP + epsilon1 V(EJ) + k x LVP x AoF. Here epsilon1 is the parallel elastance, k is the myocardial friction, and V(EJ) is the integral of AoF over ejection. Next, using k, epsilon1, LVP, and AoF waveforms, HMP was estimated using the equation above. To validate the model, the measured HMP and model-calculated HMP were compared for 371 matched waveform pairs (R2 = 0.97, SEE = 3.7 mmHg). The viscoelastic parameters (k and epsilon1) did not exhibit any clear or predictable dependence on HR, PL, and AL. PMID:15493509

  16. Single-Specimen Technique to Establish the J-Resistance of Linear Viscoelastic Solids with Constant Poisson's Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez-Lemini, Danton; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A method is developed to establish the J-resistance function for an isotropic linear viscoelastic solid of constant Poisson's ratio using the single-specimen technique with constant-rate test data. The method is based on the fact that, for a test specimen of fixed crack size under constant rate, the initiation J-integral may be established from the crack size itself, the actual external load and load-point displacement at growth initiation, and the relaxation modulus of the viscoelastic solid, without knowledge of the complete test record. Since crack size alone, of the required data, would be unknown at each point of the load-vs-load-point displacement curve of a single-specimen test, an expression is derived to estimate it. With it, the physical J-integral at each point of the test record may be established. Because of its basis on single-specimen testing, not only does the method not require the use of multiple specimens with differing initial crack sizes, but avoids the need for tracking crack growth as well.

  17. Viscoelastic Properties and Morphology of Mumio-based Medicated Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandraa, Oyunchimeg; Jelínková, Lenka; Roy, Niladri; Sáha, Tomáš; Kitano, Takeshi; Saha, Nabanita

    2011-07-01

    Novel medicated hydrogels were prepared (by moist heat treatment) with PVA, agar, mumio, mare's milk (MM), seabuckthorn oil (SB oil) and salicylic acid (SA) for wound dressing/healing application. Scanning electron micrographs (SEM) show highly porous structure of these hydrogels. The swelling behaviour of the hydrogels in physiological solution displays remarkable liquid absorption property. The knowledge obtained from rheological investigations of these-systems may be highly useful for the characterization of the newly developed topical formulations. In the present study, an oscillation frequency sweep test was used for the evaluation of storage modulus (G'), loss modulus (G″), and complex viscosity (η*) of five different formulations, over an angular frequency range from 0.1 to 100 rad.s-1. The influence of healing agents and swelling effect on the rheological properties of mumio-based medicated hydrogels was investigated to judge its application on uneven surface of body.

  18. Viscoelastic Properties of Fluorinated Ethylene-Propylene (FEP) Random Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtin, Megan; Wright, Benjamin; Ozisik, Rahmi

    Florinated ethylene-propylene (FEP) random copolymers contain tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) and hexafluoropropylene (HFP) repeat units. FEP is an excellent alternative to poly(tetrafluoroethylene), PTFE, which cannot be melt processed due to its high molecular weight and extensive crystallinity. On the other hand, FEP is a melt processible polymer and offers similar if not the same properties as PTFE. Many studies have been performed on FEP over the years, however, the properties of these polymers strongly depend on the HFP concentration and molecular weight (distribution). Just like PTFE, FEP cannot be dissolved in many solvents, therefore, obtaining molecular weight distribution of these polymers is not possible with commonly used methods. In the current study, we perform rheological analysis of various FEPs and obtain their molecular weight distributions by employing the Tuminello method. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CMMI-1538730.

  19. Fully non-linear hyper-viscoelastic modeling of skeletal muscle in compression.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Benjamin B; Pietsch, Renée B; Haut Donahue, Tammy L; Williams, Lakiesha N

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the behavior of skeletal muscle is critical to implementing computational methods to study how the body responds to compressive loading. This work presents a novel approach to studying the fully nonlinear response of skeletal muscle in compression. Porcine muscle was compressed in both the longitudinal and transverse directions under five stress relaxation steps. Each step consisted of 5% engineering strain over 1 s followed by a relaxation period until equilibrium was reached at an observed change of 1 g/min. The resulting data were analyzed to identify the peak and equilibrium stresses as well as relaxation time for all samples. Additionally, a fully nonlinear strain energy density-based Prony series constitutive model was implemented and validated with independent constant rate compressive data. A nonlinear least squares optimization approach utilizing the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was implemented to fit model behavior to experimental data. The results suggested the time-dependent material response plays a key role in the anisotropy of skeletal muscle as increasing strain showed differences in peak stress and relaxation time (p < 0.05), but changes in equilibrium stress disappeared (p > 0.05). The optimizing procedure produced a single set of hyper-viscoelastic parameters which characterized compressive muscle behavior under stress relaxation conditions. The utilized constitutive model was the first orthotropic, fully nonlinear hyper-viscoelastic model of skeletal muscle in compression while maintaining agreement with constitutive physical boundaries. The model provided an excellent fit to experimental data and agreed well with the independent validation in the transverse direction. PMID:26652761

  20. Viscoelastic properties of magneto- and electro-rheological fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, K.D.; Carlson, J.D.; Nixon, D.A.

    1994-12-31

    This paper examines the transition area between elastic and viscous behavior for a conventional electrorheological (ER) fluid and a state-of-the-art magnetorheological (MR) fluid through the use of oscillatory rheometry techniques. A comparison between the yield behavior (strain and stress) measured for these two different types of controllable fluids is presented. The data obtained for MR fluids represents the initial characterization of the pre-yield properties exhibited by this type of material. Finally, a recommendation as to a key area for future R and D is highlighted.

  1. Thermoreversible gels of polyaniline: Viscoelastic and electrical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ikkala, O.T.; Vikki, T.; Ruokolainen, J.; Hiekkataipale, P.; Passiniemi, P.; Maekelae, T.; Isotalo, H.

    1998-07-01

    The authors demonstrate that polyaniline (PANI) dissolved in dodecyl benzene sulphonic acid (DBSA) shows thermoreversible gelation. The dissolution has been performed in formic acid which allows particle-free complexes according to optical microscopy. Below the gelation temperature the materials are rubber-elastic in compression experiments, the storage modulus G{prime} does not essentially depend on frequency, and the samples are electronically conductive. Above the gelation temperature, G{prime} indicates flow-like behavior and drastically lower ionic conductivity is observed. These results suggest reversible, i.e., fusible, network formation. The properties are compared with gels consisting of camphor sulphonic acid (CSA) doped PANI dissolved in m-cresol which are poorly thermoreversible.

  2. Viscoelastic properties of actin networks influence material transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stam, Samantha; Weirich, Kimberly; Gardel, Margaret

    2015-03-01

    Directed flows of cytoplasmic material are important in a variety of biological processes including assembly of a mitotic spindle, retraction of the cell rear during migration, and asymmetric cell division. Networks of cytoskeletal polymers and molecular motors are known to be involved in these events, but how the network mechanical properties are tuned to perform such functions is not understood. Here, we construct networks of either semiflexible actin filaments or rigid bundles with varying connectivity. We find that solutions of rigid rods, where unimpeded sliding of filaments may enhance transport in comparison to unmoving tracks, are the fastest at transporting network components. Entangled solutions of semiflexible actin filaments also transport material, but the entanglements provide resistance. Increasing the elasticity of the actin networks with crosslinking proteins slows network deformation further. However, the length scale of correlated transport in these networks is increased. Our results reveal how the rigidity and connectivity of biopolymers allows material transport to occur over time and length scales required for physiological processes. This work was supported by the U. Chicago MRSEC

  3. Viscoelastic properties of kenaf reinforced unsaturated polyester composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, Ekhlas A.; Mutasher, Saad A.

    2014-03-01

    In order to quantify the effect of temperature on the mechanical and dynamic properties of kenaf fiber unsaturated polyester composites, formulations containing 10 wt.% to 40 wt.% kenaf fiber were produced and tested at two representative temperatures of 30°C and 50°C. Dynamic mechanical analysis was performed, to obtain the strain and creep compliance for kenaf composites at various styrene concentrations. It is possible to obtain creep curves at different temperature levels which can be shifted along the time axis to generate a single curve known as a master curve. This technique is known as the time-temperature superposition principle. Shift factors conformed to a William-Landel-Ferry (WLF) equation. However, more long term creep data was needed in order to further validate the applicability of time-temperature superposition principle (TTSP) to this material. The primary creep strain model was fitted to 60 min creep data. The resulting equation was then extrapolated to 5.5 days; the creep strain model of power-law was successfully used to predict the long-term creep behavior of natural fiber/thermoset composites.

  4. Flow-Mediated Change in Viscoelastic Property of Radial Arterial Wall Measured by 22 MHz Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeshita, Kazuki; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2009-07-01

    The endothelial dysfunction is considered to be an initial step in atherosclerosis. Additionally, it was reported that the smooth muscle, which constructs the media of the artery, changes its characteristics owing to atherosclerosis. Therefore, it is essential to develop a method of assessing the regional endothelial function and mechanical properties of the arterial wall. To evaluate the endothelial function, a conventional technique of measuring the transient change in the diameter of the brachial artery caused by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) after the release of avascularization is used. However, this method can not evaluate the mechanical properties of the wall. We previously developed a method for the simultaneous measurements of waveforms of radial strain and blood pressure in the radial artery. In this study, the viscoelasticity of the arterial wall was estimated from the measured stress-strain relationship using the least-squares method and the transient changes in the mechanical properties of the arterial wall ware revealed. From in vivo experimental results, the stress-strain relationship showed a hysteresis loop and viscoelasticity was estimated by the proposed method. The slope of the loop decreased owing to FMD, which resulted in the decrease in estimated elastic modulus. The increase in the area of the loop occurred after recirculation, which corresponds to the increase in the ratio of the loss modulus (depends on viscosity) to the elastic modulus when the Voigt model is assumed. In this study, the variance in estimates was evaluated by in vivo measurement for 10 min. The temporal decrease in static elasticity after recirculation due to FMD was much larger than the evaluated variance. These results show a potential of the proposed method for the thorough analysis of the transient change in viscoelasticity due to FMD.

  5. Glass transitions and viscoelastic properties of carbopol and noveon compacts.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Carracedo, A; Alvarez-Lorenzo, C; Gómez-Amoza, J L; Concheiro, A

    2004-04-15

    higher Tg, and storage and loss moduli. This explains that despite sorbing similar amounts of water to carbopol, the changes on the mechanical properties of noveon compacts were much less important (i.e., G' and G" decreased up to one order of magnitude). PMID:15072799

  6. Novel nanobubble inflation method for determining the viscoelastic properties of ultrathin polymer films.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, P A; McKenna, G B

    2007-01-01

    We describe a novel experimental technique for measuring the viscoelastic properties of ultrathin polymer films. The method is based on the classic bubble inflation technique for measuring the biaxial creep compliance of films, reduced in size to measure films with thicknesses down to at least 13 nm. The method uses the imaging capabilities of the atomic force microscope to determine the time evolution of the geometry of nanobubbles. Using these data, along with the applied pressure, the absolute creep compliance of the films can be determined. PMID:17503927

  7. Prediction of fish body's passive visco-elastic properties and related muscle mechanical performance in vivo during steady swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Yu, YongLiang; Tong, BingGang

    2014-01-01

    For attaining the optimized locomotory performance of swimming fishes, both the passive visco-elastic properties of the fish body and the mechanical behavior of the active muscles should coordinate with the fish body's undulatory motion pattern. However, it is difficult to directly measure the visco-elastic constitutive relation and the muscular mechanical performance in vivo. In the present paper, a new approach based on the continuous beam model for steady swimming fish is proposed to predict the fish body's visco-elastic properties and the related muscle mechanical behavior in vivo. Given the lateral travelling-wave-like movement as the input condition, the required muscle force and the energy consumption are functions of the fish body's visco-elastic parameters, i.e. the Young's modulus E and the viscosity coefficient µ in the Kelvin model. After investigating the variations of the propagating speed of the required muscle force with the fish body's visco-elastic parameters, we analyze the impacts of the visco-elastic properties on the energy efficiencies, including the energy utilization ratios of each element of the kinematic chain in fish swimming and the overall efficiency. Under the constraints of reasonable wave speed of muscle activation and the physiological feasibility, the optimal design of the passive visco-elastic properties can be predicted aiming at maximizing the overall efficiency. The analysis is based on the small-amplitude steady swimming of the carangiform swimmer, with typical Reynolds number varying from 2.5×104 to 2.5×105, and the present results show that the non-dimensional Young's modulus is 112±34, and the non-dimensional viscosity coefficient is 13 approximately. In the present estimated ranges, the overall efficiency of the swimming fish is insensitive to the viscosity, and its magnitude is about 0.11±0.02, in the predicted range given by previous study.

  8. Corneal Viscoelastic Properties from Finite-Element Analysis of In Vivo Air-Puff Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Kling, Sabine; Bekesi, Nandor; Dorronsoro, Carlos; Pascual, Daniel; Marcos, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Biomechanical properties are an excellent health marker of biological tissues, however they are challenging to be measured in-vivo. Non-invasive approaches to assess tissue biomechanics have been suggested, but there is a clear need for more accurate techniques for diagnosis, surgical guidance and treatment evaluation. Recently air-puff systems have been developed to study the dynamic tissue response, nevertheless the experimental geometrical observations lack from an analysis that addresses specifically the inherent dynamic properties. In this study a viscoelastic finite element model was built that predicts the experimental corneal deformation response to an air-puff for different conditions. A sensitivity analysis reveals significant contributions to corneal deformation of intraocular pressure and corneal thickness, besides corneal biomechanical properties. The results show the capability of dynamic imaging to reveal inherent biomechanical properties in vivo. Estimates of corneal biomechanical parameters will contribute to the basic understanding of corneal structure, shape and integrity and increase the predictability of corneal surgery. PMID:25121496

  9. Viscoelastic Properties of Healthy Achilles Tendon are Independent of Isometric Plantar Flexion Strength and Cross-Sectional Area

    PubMed Central

    Suydam, Stephen M.; Soulas, Elizabeth M.; Elliott, Dawn M.; Silbernagel, Karin Gravare; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Cortes, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in tendon viscoelastic properties are observed after injuries and during healing as a product of altered composition and structure. Continuous Shear Wave Elastography is a new technique measuring viscoelastic properties of soft tissues using external shear waves. Tendon has not been studied with this technique, therefore, the aims of this study were to establish the range of shear and viscosity moduli in healthy Achilles tendons, determine bilateral differences of these parameters and explore correlations of viscoelasticity to plantar flexion strength and tendon area. Continuous Shear Wave Elastography was performed over the free portion of both Achilles tendons from 29 subjects. Isometric plantar flexion strength and cross sectional area were measured. The average shear and viscous moduli was 83.2kPa and 141.0Pa-s, respectively. No correlations existed between the shear or viscous modulus and area or strength. This indicates that viscoelastic properties can be considered novel, independent biomarkers. The shear and viscosity moduli were bilaterally equivalent (p=0.013,0.017) which allows determining pathologies through side-to-side deviations. The average bilateral coefficient of variation was 7.2% and 9.4% for shear and viscosity modulus, respectively. The viscoelastic properties of the Achilles tendon may provide an unbiased, non-subjective rating system of tendon recovery and optimizing treatment strategies. PMID:25882209

  10. Asphalt pavement aging and temperature dependent properties using functionally graded viscoelastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, Eshan V.

    Asphalt concrete pavements are inherently graded viscoelastic structures. Oxidative aging of asphalt binder and temperature cycling due to climatic conditions being the major cause of non-homogeneity. Current pavement analysis and simulation procedures dwell on the use of layered approach to account for these non-homogeneities. The conventional finite-element modeling (FEM) technique discretizes the problem domain into smaller elements, each with a unique constitutive property. However the assignment of unique material property description to an element in the FEM approach makes it an unattractive choice for simulation of problems with material non-homogeneities. Specialized elements such as "graded elements" allow for non-homogenous material property definitions within an element. This dissertation describes the development of graded viscoelastic finite element analysis method and its application for analysis of asphalt concrete pavements. Results show that the present research improves efficiency and accuracy of simulations for asphalt pavement systems. Some of the practical implications of this work include the new technique's capability for accurate analysis and design of asphalt pavements and overlay systems and for the determination of pavement performance with varying climatic conditions and amount of in-service age. Other application areas include simulation of functionally graded fiber-reinforced concrete, geotechnical materials, metal and metal composites at high temperatures, polymers, and several other naturally existing and engineered materials.

  11. Viscoelastic properties of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a self-similar, shear-thinning worm

    PubMed Central

    Backholm, Matilda; Ryu, William S.; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2013-01-01

    Undulatory motion is common to many creatures across many scales, from sperm to snakes. These organisms must push off against their external environment, such as a viscous medium, grains of sand, or a high-friction surface; additionally they must work to bend their own body. A full understanding of undulatory motion, and locomotion in general, requires the characterization of the material properties of the animal itself. The material properties of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans were studied with a micromechanical experiment used to carry out a three-point bending measurement of the worm. Worms at various developmental stages (including dauer) were measured and different positions along the worm were probed. From these experiments we calculated the viscoelastic properties of the worm, including the effective spring constant and damping coefficient of bending. C. elegans moves by propagating sinusoidal waves along its body. Whereas previous viscoelastic approaches to describe the undulatory motion have used a Kelvin–Voigt model, where the elastic and viscous components are connected in parallel, our measurements show that the Maxwell model, where the elastic and viscous components are in series, is more appropriate. The viscous component of the worm was shown to be consistent with a non-Newtonian, shear-thinning fluid. We find that as the worm matures it is well described as a self-similar elastic object with a shear-thinning damping term and a stiffness that becomes smaller as one approaches the tail. PMID:23460699

  12. Influence of the Viscoelastic Properties of the Polyimide Dielectric Coating on the Wafer Warpage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chunsheng; Ning, Wenguo; Xu, Gaowei; Luo, Le

    2014-09-01

    Polyimide is widely used as the dielectric material in wafer level packaging. One potential problem with its application is the warpage and stress generated in the curing process. This paper investigated the material properties of polyimide and its influence on the wafer warpage. The viscoelastic properties of polyimide film were measured and a mathematical model of the properties was developed. Finite element analysis of the wafer warpage was performed and this indicates that the viscoelastic material model gave the best prediction. To better understand the causation of the warpage, curvature evolution of the polyimide-coated silicon wafer during its curing process was measured by a multi-beam optical sensor system. It was found that the warpage was mainly induced by the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch and that the cure shrinkage of polyimide had little effect. Additionally, the effect of the cooling rate on the wafer warpage was also studied. Both simulation and experiment results showed that a slower cooling rate in the temperature range around the glass transition temperature ( T g) of polyimide will help to reduce the final wafer warpage.

  13. An improved method to analyze the stress relaxation of ligaments following a finite ramp time based on the quasi-linear viscoelastic theory.

    PubMed

    Abramowitch, Steven D; Woo, Savio L

    2004-02-01

    The quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) theory proposed by Fung (1972) has been frequently used to model the nonlinear time- and history-dependent viscoelastic behavior of many soft tissues. It is common to use five constants to describe the instantaneous elastic response (constants A and B) and reduced relaxation function (constants C, tau 1, and tau 2) on experiments with finite ramp times followed by stress relaxation to equilibrium. However, a limitation is that the theory is based on a step change in strain which is not possible to perform experimentally. Accounting for this limitation may result in regression algorithms that converge poorly and yield nonunique solutions with highly variable constants, especially for long ramp times (Kwan et al. 1993). The goal of the present study was to introduce an improved approach to obtain the constants for QLV theory that converges to a unique solution with minimal variability. Six goat femur-medial collateral ligament-tibia complexes were subjected to a uniaxial tension test (ramp time of 18.4 s) followed by one hour of stress relaxation. The convoluted QLV constitutive equation was simultaneously curve-fit to the ramping and relaxation portions of the data (r2 > 0.99). Confidence intervals of the constants were generated from a bootstrapping analysis and revealed that constants were distributed within 1% of their median values. For validation, the determined constants were used to predict peak stresses from a separate cyclic stress relaxation test with averaged errors across all specimens measuring less than 6.3 +/- 6.0% of the experimental values. For comparison, an analysis that assumed an instantaneous ramp time was also performed and the constants obtained for the two approaches were compared. Significant differences were observed for constants B, C, tau 1, and tau 2, with tau 1 differing by an order of magnitude. By taking into account the ramping phase of the experiment, the approach allows for viscoelastic

  14. OREGANO_VE: a new parallelised 3D solver for the general (non-)linear Maxwell visco-elastic problem: validation and application to the calculation of surface deformation in the earthquake cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Tadashi; Houseman, Gregory; Hamling, Ian; Postek, Elek

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a new parallelized 3-D numerical code, OREGANO_VE, for the solution of the general visco-elastic problem in a rectangular block domain. The mechanical equilibrium equation is solved using the finite element method for a (non-)linear Maxwell visco-elastic rheology. Time-dependent displacement and/or traction boundary conditions can be applied. Matrix assembly is based on a tetrahedral element defined by 4 vertex nodes and 6 nodes located at the midpoints of the edges, and within which displacement is described by a quadratic interpolation function. For evaluating viscoelastic relaxation, an explicit time-stepping algorithm (Zienkiewicz and Cormeau, Int. J. Num. Meth. Eng., 8, 821-845, 1974) is employed. We test the accurate implementation of the OREGANO_VE by comparing numerical and analytic (or semi-analytic half-space) solutions to different problems in a range of applications: (1) equilibration of stress in a constant density layer after gravity is switched on at t = 0 tests the implementation of spatially variable viscosity and non-Newtonian viscosity; (2) displacement of the welded interface between two blocks of differing viscosity tests the implementation of viscosity discontinuities, (3) displacement of the upper surface of a layer under applied normal load tests the implementation of time-dependent surface tractions (4) visco-elastic response to dyke intrusion (compared with the solution in a half-space) tests the implementation of all aspects. In each case, the accuracy of the code is validated subject to use of a sufficiently small time step, providing assurance that the OREGANO_VE code can be applied to a range of visco-elastic relaxation processes in three dimensions, including post-seismic deformation and post-glacial uplift. The OREGANO_VE code includes a capability for representation of prescribed fault slip on an internal fault. The surface displacement associated with large earthquakes can be detected by some geodetic observations

  15. Statistical mapping of the effect of knee extension on thigh muscle viscoelastic properties using magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Barnhill, Eric; Kennedy, Paul; Hammer, Steven; van Beek, Edwin J R; Brown, Colin; Roberts, Neil

    2013-12-01

    Skeletal muscle viscoelastic properties reflect muscle microstructure and neuromuscular activation. Elastographic methods, including magnetic resonance elastography, have been used to characterize muscle viscoelastic properties in terms of region of interest (ROI) measurements. The present study extended this approach to create thresholded pixel-by-pixel maps of viscoelastic properties of skeletal muscle during rest and knee extension in eleven subjects. ROI measurements were taken for individual quadricep muscles and the quadriceps region as a whole, and the viscoelastic parameter map pixels were statistically tested at positive false discovery rate q ≤ 0.25. ROI measurements showed significant (p ≤ 0.05) increase in storage modulus (G') and loss modulus (G″), with G″ increasing more than G', in agreement with previous findings. The q-value maps further identified the vastus intermedius as the primary driver of this change, with greater G″/G' increase than surrounding regions. Additionally, a cluster of significant decrease in G″/G' was found in the region of vastus lateralis below the fulcrum point of the lift. Viscoelastic parameter mapping of contracted muscle allows new insight into the relationship between physiology, neuromuscular activation, and human performance. PMID:24254405

  16. Numerical evaluation of implantable hearing devices using a finite element model of human ear considering viscoelastic properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Tian, Jiabin; Ta, Na; Huang, Xinsheng; Rao, Zhushi

    2016-08-01

    Finite element method was employed in this study to analyze the change in performance of implantable hearing devices due to the consideration of soft tissues' viscoelasticity. An integrated finite element model of human ear including the external ear, middle ear and inner ear was first developed via reverse engineering and analyzed by acoustic-structure-fluid coupling. Viscoelastic properties of soft tissues in the middle ear were taken into consideration in this model. The model-derived dynamic responses including middle ear and cochlea functions showed a better agreement with experimental data at high frequencies above 3000 Hz than the Rayleigh-type damping. On this basis, a coupled finite element model consisting of the human ear and a piezoelectric actuator attached to the long process of incus was further constructed. Based on the electromechanical coupling analysis, equivalent sound pressure and power consumption of the actuator corresponding to viscoelasticity and Rayleigh damping were calculated using this model. The analytical results showed that the implant performance of the actuator evaluated using a finite element model considering viscoelastic properties gives a lower output above about 3 kHz than does Rayleigh damping model. Finite element model considering viscoelastic properties was more accurate to numerically evaluate implantable hearing devices. PMID:27276992

  17. Measuring the compressive viscoelastic mechanical properties of human cervical tissue using indentation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Wang; Yoshida, Kyoko; Fernandez, Michael; Vink, Joy; Wapner, Ronald J; Ananth, Cande V; Oyen, Michelle L; Myers, Kristin M

    2014-06-01

    The human cervix is an important mechanical barrier in pregnancy which must withstand the compressive and tensile forces generated from the growing fetus. Premature cervical shortening resulting from premature cervical remodeling and alterations of cervical material properties are known to increase a woman׳s risk of preterm birth (PTB). To understand the mechanical role of the cervix during pregnancy and to potentially develop indentation techniques for in vivo diagnostics to identify women who are at risk for premature cervical remodeling and thus preterm birth, we developed a spherical indentation technique to measure the time-dependent material properties of human cervical tissue taken from patients undergoing hysterectomy. In this study we present an inverse finite element analysis (IFEA) that optimizes material parameters of a viscoelastic material model to fit the stress-relaxation response of excised tissue slices to spherical indentation. Here we detail our IFEA methodology, report compressive viscoelastic material parameters for cervical tissue slices from nonpregnant (NP) and pregnant (PG) hysterectomy patients, and report slice-by-slice data for whole cervical tissue specimens. The material parameters reported here for human cervical tissue can be used to model the compressive time-dependent behavior of the tissue within a small strain regime of 25%. PMID:24548950

  18. Influence of Chemical Heterogeneity on the Viscoelastic Properties of Polystyrene-b-Poly(alkyl methacrylate) Baroplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulahad, Asem; Ryu, Chang Y.

    2011-03-01

    The development of purification and fractionation techniques of block copolymers is important for overcoming the synthetic difficulty of preparing well-defined block copolymers using various living polymerization techniques. A large scale separation technique would lead us to obtaining sufficient amounts of homopolymer-free block copolymers for subsequent physical characterization. This can potentially aid in the elucidation of the role of chemical heterogeneity on the thermodynamic transitions and viscoelastic properties of block copolymer materials. Atom transfer radical polymerization by the activators regenerated by electron transfer method (ARGET-ATRP) was used to prepare a series of polystyrene-b-poly(alkyl methacrylate) copolymers that would inherently consist of homopolymers and a high polydispersity. Leveraging the understanding of polymer adsorption/desorption in solution onto silica and C18-modified silica surfaces during HPLC, we demonstrate how a large scale purification and fraction is achievable using flash chromatography. Finally, the viscoelastic properties of the purified, homopolymer-free block copolymers will be discussed. NSF PIRE Polymer Program.

  19. Modeling and Testing of the Viscoelastic Properties of a Graphite Nanoplatelet/Epoxy Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    In order to facilitate the interpretation of experimental data, a micromechanical modeling procedure is developed to predict the viscoelastic properties of a graphite nanoplatelet/epoxy composite as a function of volume fraction and nanoplatelet diameter. The predicted storage and loss moduli for the composite are compared to measured values from the same material using three test methods; Dynamical Mechanical Analysis, nanoindentation, and quasi-static tensile tests. In most cases, the model and experiments indicate that for increasing volume fractions of nanoplatelets, both the storage and loss moduli increase. Also, the results indicate that for nanoplatelet sizes above 15 microns, nanoindentation is capable of measuring properties of individual constituents of a composite system. Comparison of the predicted values to the measured data helps illustrate the relative similarities and differences between the bulk and local measurement techniques.

  20. Electrolytes based on alkoxysilyl-functionalized ionic liquids: viscoelastic properties and conductivity.

    PubMed

    Slemenik Perše, L; Colović, M; Hajzeri, M; Orel, B; Surca Vuk, A

    2014-08-14

    Ionic liquids can be successfully used as electrolytes in electrochemical devices when they are in their quasi-solid state. Among several methods of solidification, a sol-gel process was chosen and a set of alkoxysilyl-functionalized iodide imidazolium-based ionic liquids were synthesized. The electrolytes were prepared by mixing these ionic liquids with a non-polymerisable ionic liquid (1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium iodide (MPIm(+)I(-))). Iodine was dissolved in an electrolyte matrix in order to form an I3(-)/I(-) redox couple. The change of the structure from sol to gel was followed by rheological tests in order to show the effect of different rheological parameters on the gelation process. The solvolysis with glacial acetic acid and condensation were followed by rheological experiments on the samples taken from a batch, and in situ on the rheometer. The formed three-dimensional sol-gel networks of various alkoxysilyl-functionalized ionic liquids differed in their microstructures and viscoelastic properties that were correlated with conductivity. The results show that the conductivity of approximately 10(-3) S cm(-1) at room temperature was achieved for the gels with relatively high values of elastic modulus and noticeable viscous contribution. It is shown that not only the viscosity but also the viscoelastic behavior and especially the relationship between viscous and elastic moduli (phase shift) together with the time of gelation are essential for the high conductivity of electrolytes. PMID:24955729

  1. Viscoelastic properties of bovine orbital connective tissue and fat: constitutive models

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Lawrence; Gupta, Vijay; Lee, Choongyeop; Kavehpore, Pirouz

    2012-01-01

    Reported mechanical properties of orbital connective tissue and fat have been too sparse to model strain–stress relationships underlying biomechanical interactions in strabismus. We performed rheological tests to develop a multi-mode upper convected Maxwell (UCM) model of these tissues under shear loading. From 20 fresh bovine orbits, 30 samples of connective tissue were taken from rectus pulley regions and 30 samples of fatty tissues from the posterior orbit. Additional samples were defatted to determine connective tissue weight proportion, which was verified histologically. Mechanical testing in shear employed a triborheometer to perform: strain sweeps at 0.5–2.0 Hz; shear stress relaxation with 1% strain; viscometry at 0.01–0.5 s−1 strain rate; and shear oscillation at 1% strain. Average connective tissue weight proportion was 98% for predominantly connective tissue and 76% for fatty tissue. Connective tissue specimens reached a long-term relaxation modulus of 668 Pa after 1,500 s, while corresponding values for fatty tissue specimens were 290 Pa and 1,100 s. Shear stress magnitude for connective tissue exceeded that of fatty tissue by five-fold. Based on these data, we developed a multimode UCM model with variable viscosities and time constants, and a damped hyperelastic response that accurately described measured properties of both connective and fatty tissues. Model parameters differed significantly between the two tissues. Viscoelastic properties of predominantly connective orbital tissues under shear loading differ markedly from properties of orbital fat, but both are accurately reflected using UCM models. These viscoelastic models will facilitate realistic global modeling of EOM behavior in binocular alignment and strabismus. PMID:21207094

  2. Characterization of the elastic and viscoelastic properties of dentin by a nanoindentation creep test.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Shu-Fen; Lin, Shih-Yun; Wei, Pal-Jen; Han, Chang-Fu; Lin, Jen-Fin; Chang, Hsien-Chang

    2015-07-16

    Dentin is the main supporting structure of teeth, but its mechanical properties may be adversely affected by pathological demineralization. The purposes of this study were to develop a quantitative approach to characterize the viscoelastic properties of dentin after de- and re-mineralization, and to examine the elastic properties using a nanoindentation creep test. Dentin specimens were prepared to receive both micro- and nano-indentation tests at wet and dry states. These tests were repeatedly performed after demineralization (1% citric acid for 3 days) and remineralization (artificial saliva immersion for 28 days). The nanoindentation test was executed in a creep mode, and the resulting displacement-time responses were disintegrated into primary (transient) and secondary (viscous) creep. The structural changes and mineral densities of dentin were also examined under SEM and microCT, respectively. The results showed that demineralization removed superficial minerals of dentin to the depth of 400 μm, and affected its micro- and nano-hardness, especially in the hydrate state. Remineralization only repaired the minerals at the surface layer, and partially recovered the nanohardness. Both the primary the secondary creep increased in the demineralized dentin, while the hydration further enhanced creep deformation of untreated and remineralized dentin. Remineralization reduced the primary creep of dentin, but did not effectively increase the viscosity. In conclusion, water plasticization increases the transient and viscous creep strains of demineralized dentin and reduces load sustainability. The nanoindentation creep test is capable of analyzing the elastic and viscoelastic properties of dentin, and reveals crucial information about creep responses. PMID:25911251

  3. Resonance method of measuring shear viscoelastic properties of liquid media based on excitation of torsional oscillations in tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esipov, I. B.; Zozulya, O. M.; Fokin, A. V.

    2010-01-01

    Possibilities of using torsional oscillations for measuring viscoelastic properties of liquids are discussed. The theory of torsional oscillations of an elastic tube filled with the media to be investigated possessing viscosity and shear elasticity is developed. It is shown that to determine a complex shear modulus it is sufficient to determine the resonance frequency and Q-factor of torsional oscillations. An experimental installation and the results of measurements of viscoelastic modulus of glycerin and oil of one oilfield within the temperature range from -10° to 60°C are given. The experimental installation allows measuring a viscoelastic modulus within the range of acoustic logging frequencies (10-20 kHz). The obtained results are compared with the results of rheometric measurements.

  4. Viscoelastic properties of levan-DNA mixtures important in microbial biofilm formation as determined by micro- and macrorheology.

    PubMed

    Stojković, Biljana; Sretenovic, Simon; Dogsa, Iztok; Poberaj, Igor; Stopar, David

    2015-02-01

    We studied the viscoelastic properties of homogeneous and inhomogeneous levan-DNA mixtures using optical tweezers and a rotational rheometer. Levan and DNA are important components of the extracellular matrix of bacterial biofilms. Their viscoelastic properties influence the mechanical as well as molecular-transport properties of biofilm. Both macro- and microrheology measurements in homogeneous levan-DNA mixtures revealed pseudoplastic behavior. When the concentration of DNA reached a critical value, levan started to aggregate, forming clusters of a few microns in size. Microrheology using optical tweezers enabled us to measure local viscoelastic properties within the clusters as well as in the DNA phase surrounding the levan aggregates. In phase-separated levan-DNA mixtures, the results of macro- and microrheology differed significantly. The local viscosity and elasticity of levan increased, whereas the local viscosity of DNA decreased. On the other hand, the results of bulk viscosity measurements suggest that levan clusters do not interact strongly with DNA. Upon treatment with DNase, levan aggregates dispersed. These results demonstrate the advantages of microrheological measurements compared to bulk viscoelastic measurements when the materials under investigation are complex and inhomogeneous, as is often the case in biological samples. PMID:25650942

  5. Viscoelastic Properties of Levan-DNA Mixtures Important in Microbial Biofilm Formation as Determined by Micro- and Macrorheology

    PubMed Central

    Stojković, Biljana; Sretenovic, Simon; Dogsa, Iztok; Poberaj, Igor; Stopar, David

    2015-01-01

    We studied the viscoelastic properties of homogeneous and inhomogeneous levan-DNA mixtures using optical tweezers and a rotational rheometer. Levan and DNA are important components of the extracellular matrix of bacterial biofilms. Their viscoelastic properties influence the mechanical as well as molecular-transport properties of biofilm. Both macro- and microrheology measurements in homogeneous levan-DNA mixtures revealed pseudoplastic behavior. When the concentration of DNA reached a critical value, levan started to aggregate, forming clusters of a few microns in size. Microrheology using optical tweezers enabled us to measure local viscoelastic properties within the clusters as well as in the DNA phase surrounding the levan aggregates. In phase-separated levan-DNA mixtures, the results of macro- and microrheology differed significantly. The local viscosity and elasticity of levan increased, whereas the local viscosity of DNA decreased. On the other hand, the results of bulk viscosity measurements suggest that levan clusters do not interact strongly with DNA. Upon treatment with DNase, levan aggregates dispersed. These results demonstrate the advantages of microrheological measurements compared to bulk viscoelastic measurements when the materials under investigation are complex and inhomogeneous, as is often the case in biological samples. PMID:25650942

  6. VISCOELASTIC PROPERTIES OF NATURAL RUBBER COMPOSITES REINFORCED BY DEFATTED SOY FLOUR AND CARBON BLACK CO-FILLER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Filler mixtures of defatted soy flour (DSF) and carbon black (CB) were used to reinforce natural rubber (NR) composites and their viscoelastic properties were investigated. DSF is an abundant and renewable commodity and has a lower material cost than CB. Aqueous dispersions of DSF and CB were firs...

  7. Effect of sexual maturation on thermal stability, viscoelastic properties, and texture of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, fillets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nutrient and energy demand of sexual maturation in many fish cultivars causes structural change to key contractile proteins and thereby, affects fillet firmness. Thermal denaturation and viscoelastic properties of white muscle from diploid (2N; fertile) and triploid (3N; sterile) female rainbow...

  8. Studies of the viscoelastic properties of water confined between surfaces of specified chemical nature.

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, Jack E.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Moore, Nathan W.; Feibelman, Peter J.

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes the work completed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project 10-0973 of the same title. Understanding the molecular origin of the no-slip boundary condition remains vitally important for understanding molecular transport in biological, environmental and energy-related processes, with broad technological implications. Moreover, the viscoelastic properties of fluids in nanoconfinement or near surfaces are not well-understood. We have critically reviewed progress in this area, evaluated key experimental and theoretical methods, and made unique and important discoveries addressing these and related scientific questions. Thematically, the discoveries include insight into the orientation of water molecules on metal surfaces, the premelting of ice, the nucleation of water and alcohol vapors between surface asperities and the lubricity of these molecules when confined inside nanopores, the influence of water nucleation on adhesion to salts and silicates, and the growth and superplasticity of NaCl nanowires.

  9. Viscoelastic properties of stiff joints: a new approach in analyzing joint contracture.

    PubMed

    Akai, M; Shirasaki, Y; Tateishi, T

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the joint stiffness after immobilization in a rat's lower extremity model. Rat knee joints were surgically immobilized in a full flexed position for periods of up to 7 weeks with or without intra-articular intervention. The biomechanical analysis was assessed by measuring the bone-joint-bone sample as a cantilever. Measurement was performed with (a) knee flexion angle with gravity, (b) fast Fourier transform analysis of time-dependent mechanical noise with random frequencies, and (c) dynamic stiffness and loss tangent with sinusoidal vibration at a certain frequency. The results showed that the conventional static mechanical test could not detect the intraarticular changes of the whole knee joint. The measurement of the viscoelastic properties covering wide frequencies revealed that an accurate change occurred. PMID:8369728

  10. Viscoelastic, physical, and bio-degradable properties of dermal scaffolds and related cell behaviour.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vaibhav; Patel, Nimesha; Kohli, Nupur; Ravindran, Nivedita; Hook, Lilian; Mason, Chris; García-Gareta, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Dermal scaffolds promote healing of debilitating skin injuries caused by burns and chronic skin conditions. Currently available products present disadvantages and therefore, there is still a clinical need for developing new dermal substitutes. This study aimed at comparing the viscoelastic, physical and bio-degradable properties of two dermal scaffolds, the collagen-based and clinically well established Integra(®) and a novel fibrin-based dermal scaffold developed at our laboratory called Smart Matrix(®), to further evaluate our previous published findings that suggested a higher influx of cells, reduced wound contraction and less scarring for Smart Matrix(®) when used in vivo. Rheological results showed that Integra(®) (G'  =  313.74 kPa) is mechanically stronger than Smart Matrix(®) (G'  =  8.26 kPa), due to the presence of the silicone backing layer in Integra(®). Micro-pores were observed on both dermal scaffolds, although nano-pores as well as densely packed nano-fibres were only observed for Smart Matrix(®). Average surface roughness was higher for Smart Matrix(®) (Sa  =  114.776 nm) than for Integra(®) (Sa  =  75.565 nm). Both scaffolds possess a highly porous structure (80-90%) and display a range of pore micro-sizes that represent the actual in vivo scenario. In vitro proteolytic bio-degradation suggested that Smart Matrix(®) would degrade faster upon implantation in vivo than Integra(®). For both scaffolds, the enzymatic digestion occurs via bulk degradation. These observed differences could affect cell behaviour on both scaffolds. Our results suggest that fine-tuning of scaffolds' viscoelastic, physical and bio-degradable properties can maximise cell behaviour in terms of attachment, proliferation and infiltration, which are essential for tissue repair. PMID:27586397

  11. Analysis of viscoelastic properties of wrist joint for quantification of parkinsonian rigidity.

    PubMed

    Park, Byung Kyu; Kwon, Yuri; Kim, Ji-Won; Lee, Jae-Ho; Eom, Gwang-Moon; Koh, Seong-Beom; Jun, Jae-Hoon; Hong, Junghwa

    2011-04-01

    This study aims to analyze viscoelastic properties of the wrist in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) in comparison with the clinical score of severity. Forty-five patients with PD and 12 healthy volunteers participated in this study. Severity of rigidity at the wrist was rated by a neurologist just before the experiment. Wrist joint torque resistive to the imposed movement was measured. Three different models, (identical in structure, only different in the number of parameters for extension and flexion phases) were used in identification of viscoelastic properties: 1) one damping constant and one spring constant throughout all phases, 2) two damping constants for each phase and one spring constant throughout all phases, and 3) two damping constants and two spring constants for each phase. Normalized work and impulse suggested in the literature were also calculated. Spring constants of different models and phases showed comparable correlation with rigidity score ( r=0.68-0.73). In terms of the correlation of damping constant with clinical rigidity score, model 1 ( r = 0.90) was better than models 2 and 3 ( r=0.59 - 0.71). These results suggest that the clinical rigidity score is better represented by the mean viscosity during both flexion and extension. In models with two dampers (model 2 and 3), the damping constant was greater during extension than flexion in patients , in contrast that there was no phase difference in normal subjects. This suggests that in contrast with normal subjects, phase-dependent viscosity may be an inherent feature of PD. Although work and impulse were correlated with clinical rigidity score ( r = 0.11 - 0.84), they could not represent the phase-dependent rigidity inherent in PD. In conclusion, the viscosity of model 1 would be appropriate for quantification of clinical ratings of rigidity and that of model 2 for distinction of PD and also for investigation of phase-dependent characteristics in parkinsonian rigidity. PMID:21075739

  12. Estimation of mechanical properties of a viscoelastic medium using a laser-induced microbubble interrogated by an acoustic radiation force.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sangpil; Aglyamov, Salavat R; Karpiouk, Andrei B; Kim, Seungsoo; Emelianov, Stanislav Y

    2011-10-01

    An approach to assess the mechanical properties of a viscoelastic medium using laser-induced microbubbles is presented. To measure mechanical properties of the medium, dynamics of a laser-induced cavitation microbubble in viscoelastic medium under acoustic radiation force was investigated. An objective lens with a 1.13 numerical aperture and an 8.0 mm working distance was designed to focus a 532 nm wavelength nanosecond pulsed laser beam and to create a microbubble at the desired location. A 3.5 MHz ultrasound transducer was used to generate acoustic radiation force to excite a laser-induced microbubble. Motion of the microbubble was tracked using a 25 MHz imaging transducer. Agreement between a theoretical model of bubble motion in a viscoelastic medium and experimental measurements was demonstrated. Young's modulii reconstructed using the laser-induced microbubble approach were compared with those measured using a direct uniaxial method over the range from 0.8 to 13 kPa. The results indicate good agreement between methods. Thus, the proposed approach can be used to assess the mechanical properties of a viscoelastic medium. PMID:21973379

  13. Effects of multiwall carbon nanotubes on viscoelastic properties of magnetorheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Siti Aishah Abdul; Amri Mazlan, Saiful; Intan Nik Ismail, Nik; Ubaidillah, U.; Choi, Seung-Bok; Khairi, Muntaz Hana Ahmad; Azhani Yunus, Nurul

    2016-07-01

    The effect of different types of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the morphological, magnetic and viscoelastic properties of magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) are studied in this work. A series of natural rubber MRE are prepared by adding MWCNTs as a new additive in MRE. Effects of functionalized MWCNT namely carboxylated MWCNT (COOH-MWCNT) and hydroxylated MWCNT (OH-MWCNT) on the rheological properties of MREs are investigated and the pristine MWCNTs is referred as a control. Epoxidised palm oil (EPO) is used as a medium to disperse carbonyl iron particle (CIP) and sonicate the MWCNTs. Morphological and magnetic properties of MREs are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), respectively. Rheological properties under different magnetic field are evaluated by using parallel plate rheometer. From the results obtained, FESEM images indicate that COOH-MWCNT and CIP have better compatibility which leads to the formation of interconnected network in the matrix. In addition, by adding functionalized COOH-MWCNT, it is shown that the saturation magnetization is 5% higher than the pristine MWCNTs. It is also found that with the addition of COOH-MWCNT, the magnetic properties are improved parallel with enhancement of MR effect particularly at low strain amplitude. It is finally shown that the use of EPO also can contribute to the enhancement of MR performance.

  14. The Viscoelastic Properties of Passive Eye Muscle in Primates. I: Static Forces and Step Responses

    PubMed Central

    Quaia, Christian; Ying, Howard S.; Nichols, Altah M.; Optican, Lance M.

    2009-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of passive eye muscles are prime determinants of the deficits observed following eye muscle paralysis, the root cause of several types of strabismus. Our limited knowledge about such properties is hindering the ability of eye plant models to assist in formulating a patient's diagnosis and prognosis. To investigate these properties we conducted an extensive in vivo study of the mechanics of passive eye muscles in deeply anesthetized and paralyzed monkeys. We describe here the static length-tension relationship and the transient forces elicited by small step-like elongations. We found that the static force increases nonlinearly with length, as previously shown. As expected, an elongation step induces a fast rise in force, followed by a prolonged decay. The time course of the decay is however considerably more complex than previously thought, indicating the presence of several relaxation processes, with time constants ranging from 1 ms to at least 40 s. The mechanical properties of passive eye muscles are thus similar to those of many other biological passive tissues. Eye plant models, which for lack of data had to rely on (erroneous) assumptions, will have to be updated to incorporate these properties. PMID:19337381

  15. From Brittle to Pliant Viscoelastic Materials with Solid State Linear Polyphosphonium - Carboxylate Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Godeau, Guilhem; Navailles, Laurence; Nallet, Frédéric; Lin, Xinrong; McIntosh, Thomas J.; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    A polystyrenylphosphonium polymer was synthesized and complexed with various carboxylic acid derivatives to form new solid-state polyelectrolyte-surfactant assemblies. The properties of these ionic materials were highly dependent on the nature of the anion and included a brittle material, a rubbery ball that bounces, or a sticky fiber. The values for the equilibrium modulus, storage modulus, and loss modulus were dependent on the composition of the carboxylic acid and the number of electrostatic interactions. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies on the supramolecular assemblies confirmed a bilayer structure for two of the assemblies. PMID:24511156

  16. A model of weak viscoelastic nematodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, Arkady I.

    2008-03-01

    The paper develops a continuum theory of weak viscoelastic nematodynamics of Maxwell type. It can describe the molecular elasticity effects in mono-domain flows of liquid crystalline polymers as well as the viscoelastic effects in suspensions of uniaxially symmetric particles in polymer fluids. Along with viscoelastic and nematic kinematics, the theory employs a general form of weakly elastic thermodynamic potential and the Leslie Ericksen Parodi type constitutive equations for viscous nematic liquids, while ignoring inertia effects and the Frank (orientation) elasticity in liquid crystal polymers. In general case, even the simplest Maxwell model has many basic parameters. Nevertheless, recently discovered algebraic properties of nematic operations reveal a general structure of the theory and present it in a simple form. It is shown that the evolution equation for director is also viscoelastic. An example of magnetization exemplifies the action of non-symmetric stresses. When the magnetic field is absent, the theory is reduced to the symmetric, fluid mechanical case with relaxation properties for both the stress and director. Our recent analyses of elastic and viscous soft deformation modes are also extended to the viscoelastic case. The occurrence of possible soft modes minimizes both the free energy and dissipation, and also significantly decreases the number of material parameters. In symmetric linear case, the theory is explicitly presented in terms of anisotropic linear memory functionals. Several analytical results demonstrate a rich behavior predicted by the developed model for steady and unsteady flows in simple shearing and simple elongation.

  17. Morphology, absorptivity and viscoelastic properties of mineralized PVP-CMC hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Nabanita; Shah, Rushita; Vyroubal, Radek; Kitano, Takeshi; Saha, Petr

    2013-04-01

    A simple liquid diffusion mineralization technique was applied for the incorporation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in PVP-CMC hydrogel. The hydrogel was prepared 6.5 mm thick to achieve around 1 mm thick sample after mineralization of hydrogel matrix with calcite. The calcite crystals were round shaped and organized as building blocks inside the porous three dimensional cross linked structure of the PVP-CMC hydrogel. The present study was designed to evaluate the properties of mineralized (calcite) hydrogel with respect to freshly prepared hydrogel and those swelled in water (H2O) after drying. The viscoelastic properties of swelled and mineralized samples were reported though the dry PVP-CMC hydrogel were swelled and mineralized with calcite until 150 min. It is observed that there is not much difference in elastic property of fresh and 60 min mineralized hydrogels but the values of elastic property are decreased in the case of swelled hydrogels. It is interesting that in case of swelled samples the values of complex viscosity (η*) are increased with the increase of swelling time after 90 min but in case of calcite hydrogel the values (η*) are gradually decreased with the increase of time.

  18. Viscoelastic properties of addition-cured polyimides used in high temperature polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D; Malarik, Diane C.; Robaidek, Jerrold O.

    1991-01-01

    Viscoelastic properties of the addition cured polyimide, PMR-15, were studied using dynamic mechanical and stress relaxation tests. For temperatures below the glass transition temperature, T sub g, the dynamic mechanical properties measured using a temperature scan rate of 10 C/min were strongly affected by the presence of absorbed moisture in the resin. Dynamic mechanical properties measured as a function of time during an isothermal hold provided an indication of chemical changes occurring in the resin. For temperatures above (T sub g + 20 C), the storage modulus increased continuously as a function of time indicating that additional crosslinking is occurring in the resin. Because of these changes in chemical structures, the stress relaxation modulus could not be measured over any useful time interval for temperatures above T sub g. For temperatures below T sub g, dynamic mechanical properties appeared to be unaffected by chemical changes for times exceeding 1 hr. Since the duration of the stress relaxation tests was less than 1 hr, the stress relaxation modulus could be measured. As long as the moisture content of the resin was less than 2 pct, stress relaxation curves measured at different temperatures could be superimposed using horizontal shifts along the log(time) axis with only small shifts along the vertical axis.

  19. Mapping viscoelastic properties by multi-line (ML) acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomyo, Mikako; Kondo, Kengo; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2015-03-01

    In these days ultrasound studies of non-invasive diagnostic methods using the elastic property of tissue have showed very promising results. Biological soft tissues are viscoelastic in nature; therefore several recent studies have shown the feasibility of shear wave dispersion in order to express viscosity which is considered to be valid for early diagnoses. Shear wave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (SDUV) has been conducted under ex vivo and in vivo conditions, which could estimate the value of shear elasticity and viscosity from a 40 x 40 mm2 area. In this study, our proposed Multi-line (ML) acoustic radiation force method could map shear elasticity and viscosity at 0.2 x 0.2 mm2 pixel in 25.6 mm width and 29.6 mm depth area. ML uses seven focus points in depth to create much planar shear wave than ever, and twenty pushing line to obtain data such a broader area than ever. These sequences contribute to express precise values of shear elasticity and viscosity at each pixel. A 10% gelatin phantom with a 10% gelatin and 1% xanthan gum mixture inclusion was prepared for ML experiment, and one homogenous phantom made of the same concentrations as the background of ML experiments was for ML and SDUV experiments three times to validate. The ML measurement resulted μ1 = 1.129±0.118 kPa, μ2 = 0.893±0.090 Pa・s in the 10% gelatin background; their corresponding SDUV measurement were μ1 = 1.250±0.129 kPa, μ2 = 0.833±0.098 Pa・s in 10% gelatin phantom. Though further evaluations such as frequency and rheological model are required, the results could show the effectiveness of this proposed method in mapping viscoelasticity and the feasibility of in vivo and ex vivo experiments.

  20. Viscoelastic properties of human mesenchymally-derived stem cells and primary osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Eric M.; Topel, Matthew; Zauscher, Stefan; Vail, Thomas P.; Guilak, Farshid

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties of single cells play important roles in regulating cell-matrix interactions, potentially influencing the process of mechanotransduction. Recent studies also suggest that cellular mechanical properties may provide novel biological markers, or “biomarkers,” of cell phenotype, reflecting specific changes that occur with disease, differentiation, or cellular transformation. Of particular interest in recent years has been the identification of such biomarkers that can be used to determine specific phenotypic characteristics of stem cells that separate them from primary, differentiated cells. The goal of this study was to determine the elastic and viscoelastic properties of three primary cell types of mesenchymal lineage (chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and adipocytes) and to test the hypothesis that primary differentiated cells exhibit distinct mechanical properties compared to adult stem cells (adipose-derived or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells). In an adherent, spread configuration, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and adipocytes all exhibited significantly different mechanical properties, with osteoblasts being stiffer than chondrocytes and both being stiffer than adipocytes. Adipose-derived and mesenchymal stem cells exhibited similar properties to each other, but were mechanically distinct from primary cells, particularly when comparing a ratio of elastic to relaxed moduli. These findings will help more accurately model the cellular mechanical environment in mesenchymal tissues, which could assist in describing injury thresholds and disease progression or even determining the influence of mechanical loading for tissue engineering efforts. Furthermore, the identification of mechanical properties distinct to stem cells could result in more successful sorting procedures to enrich multipotent progenitor cell populations. PMID:17825308

  1. Characterizing the compression-dependent viscoelastic properties of human hepatic pathologies using dynamic compression testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWall, Ryan J.; Bharat, Shyam; Varghese, Tomy; Hanson, Meghan E.; Agni, Rashmi M.; Kliewer, Mark A.

    2012-04-01

    Recent advances in elastography have provided several imaging modalities capable of quantifying the elasticity of tissue, an intrinsic tissue property. This information is useful for determining tumour margins and may also be useful for diagnosing specific tumour types. In this study, we used dynamic compression testing to quantify the viscoelastic properties of 16 human hepatic primary and secondary malignancies and their corresponding background tissue obtained following surgical resection. Two additional backgrounds were also tested. An analysis of the background tissue showed that F4-graded fibrotic liver tissue was significantly stiffer than F0-graded tissue, with a modulus contrast of 4:1. Steatotic liver tissue was slightly stiffer than normal liver tissue, but not significantly so. The tumour-to-background storage modulus contrast of hepatocellular carcinomas, a primary tumour, was approximately 1:1, and the contrast decreased with increasing fibrosis grade of the background tissue. Ramp testing showed that the background stiffness increased faster than the malignant tissue. Conversely, secondary tumours were typically much stiffer than the surrounding background, with a tumour-to-background contrast of 10:1 for colon metastases and 10:1 for cholangiocarcinomas. Ramp testing showed that colon metastases stiffened faster than their corresponding backgrounds. These data have provided insights into the mechanical properties of specific tumour types, which may prove beneficial as the use of quantitative stiffness imaging increases.

  2. Viscoelastic Properties of Differentiating Blood Cells Are Fate- and Function-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Ekpenyong, Andrew E.; Whyte, Graeme; Chalut, Kevin; Pagliara, Stefano; Lautenschläger, Franziska; Fiddler, Christine; Paschke, Stephan; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Chilvers, Edwin R.; Guck, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Although cellular mechanical properties are known to alter during stem cell differentiation, understanding of the functional relevance of such alterations is incomplete. Here, we show that during the course of differentiation of human myeloid precursor cells into three different lineages, the cells alter their viscoelastic properties, measured using an optical stretcher, to suit their ultimate fate and function. Myeloid cells circulating in blood have to be advected through constrictions in blood vessels, engendering the need for compliance at short time-scales (minutes), compared to undifferentiated cells. These findings suggest that reduction in steady-state viscosity is a physiological adaptation for enhanced migration through tissues. Our results indicate that the material properties of cells define their function, can be used as a cell differentiation marker and could serve as target for novel therapies. PMID:23028868

  3. Viscoelastic Properties of Collagen-Adhesive Composites under Water Saturated and Dry Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Viraj; Misra, Anil; Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Ye, Qiang; Spencer, Paulette

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the time and rate dependent mechanical properties of collagen-adhesive composites, creep and monotonic experiments are performed under dry and wet conditions. The composites are prepared by infiltration of dentin adhesive into a demineralized bovine dentin. Experimental results show that for small stress level under dry conditions, both the composite and neat adhesive have similar behavior. On the other hand, in wet conditions, the composites are significantly soft and weak compared to the neat adhesives. The behavior in the wet condition is found to be affected by the hydrophilicity of both the adhesive and collagen. Since the adhesive-collagen composites area part of the complex construct that forms the adhesive-dentin interface, their presence will affect the overall performance of the restoration. We find that Kelvin-Voigt model with at least 4-elements is required to fit the creep compliance data, indicating that the adhesive-collagen composites are complex polymers with several characteristics time-scales whose mechanical behavior will be significantly affected by loading rates and frequencies. Such mechanical properties have not been investigated widely for these types of materials. The derived model provides an additional advantage that it can be exploited to extract other viscoelastic properties which are, generally, time consuming to obtain experimentally. The calibrated model is utilized to obtain stress relaxation function, frequency-dependent storage and loss modulus, and rate dependent elastic modulus. PMID:24753362

  4. Congruence of Imaging Estimators and Mechanical Measurements of Viscoelastic Properties of Soft Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Man; Castaneda, Benjamin; Wu, Zhe; Nigwekar, Priya; Joseph, Jean V.; Rubens, Deborah J.; Parker, Kevin J.

    2007-01-01

    Biomechanical properties of soft tissues are important for a wide range of medical applications, such as surgical simulation and planning and detection of lesions by elasticity imaging modalities. Currently, the data in the literature is limited and conflicting. Furthermore, to assess the biomechanical properties of living tissue in vivo, reliable imaging-based estimators must be developed and verified. For these reasons we developed and compared two independent quantitative methods – crawling wave estimator (CRE) and mechanical measurement (MM) for soft tissue characterization. The CRE method images shear wave interference patterns from which the shear wave velocity can be determined and hence the Young’s modulus can be obtained. The MM method provides the complex Young’s modulus of the soft tissue from which both elastic and viscous behavior can be extracted. This article presents the systematic comparison between these two techniques on the measurement of gelatin phantom, veal liver, thermal-treated veal liver, and human prostate. It was observed that the Young’s moduli of liver and prostate tissues slightly increase with frequency. The experimental results of the two methods are highly congruent, suggesting CRE and MM methods can be reliably used to investigate viscoelastic properties of other soft tissues, with CRE having the advantages of operating in nearly real time and in situ. PMID:17604902

  5. A micromechanical approach to elastic and viscoelastic properties of fiber reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Pasa Dutra, V.F.; Maghous, S. Campos Filho, A.; Pacheco, A.R.

    2010-03-15

    Some aspects of the constitutive behavior of fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) are investigated within a micromechanical framework. Special emphasis is put on the prediction of creep of such materials. The linear elastic behavior is first examined by implementation of a Mori-Tanaka homogenization scheme. The micromechanical predictions for the overall stiffness prove to be very close to finite element solutions obtained from the numerical analysis of a representative elementary volume of FRC modeled as a randomly heterogeneous medium. The validation of the micromechanical concepts based on comparison with a set of experiments, shows remarkable predictive capabilities of the micromechanical representation. The second part of the paper is devoted to non-ageing viscoelasticity of FRC. Adopting a Zener model for the behavior of the concrete matrix and making use of the correspondence principle, the homogenized relaxation moduli are derived analytically. The validity of the model is established by mean of comparison with available experiment measurements of creep strain of steel fiber reinforced concrete under compressive load. Finally, the model predictions are compared to those derived from analytical models formulated within a one-dimensional setting.

  6. Viscoelastic properties of individual glial cells and neurons in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yun-Bi; Franze, Kristian; Seifert, Gerald; Steinhäuser, Christian; Kirchhoff, Frank; Wolburg, Hartwig; Guck, Jochen; Janmey, Paul; Wei, Er-Qing; Käs, Josef; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2006-11-21

    One hundred fifty years ago glial cells were discovered as a second, non-neuronal, cell type in the central nervous system. To ascribe a function to these new, enigmatic cells, it was suggested that they either glue the neurons together (the Greek word "gammalambdaiotaalpha" means "glue") or provide a robust scaffold for them ("support cells"). Although both speculations are still widely accepted, they would actually require quite different mechanical cell properties, and neither one has ever been confirmed experimentally. We investigated the biomechanics of CNS tissue and acutely isolated individual neurons and glial cells from mammalian brain (hippocampus) and retina. Scanning force microscopy, bulk rheology, and optically induced deformation were used to determine their viscoelastic characteristics. We found that (i) in all CNS cells the elastic behavior dominates over the viscous behavior, (ii) in distinct cell compartments, such as soma and cell processes, the mechanical properties differ, most likely because of the unequal local distribution of cell organelles, (iii) in comparison to most other eukaryotic cells, both neurons and glial cells are very soft ("rubber elastic"), and (iv) intriguingly, glial cells are even softer than their neighboring neurons. Our results indicate that glial cells can neither serve as structural support cells (as they are too soft) nor as glue (because restoring forces are dominant) for neurons. Nevertheless, from a structural perspective they might act as soft, compliant embedding for neurons, protecting them in case of mechanical trauma, and also as a soft substrate required for neurite growth and facilitating neuronal plasticity. PMID:17093050

  7. Preparation and characterization of herbal creams for improvement of skin viscoelastic properties.

    PubMed

    Ahshawat, M S; Saraf, S; Saraf, S

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to formulate and evaluate herbal cosmetic creams for their improvement of skin viscoelastic and hydration properties. The cosmetic cream formulations were designed by using ethanolic extracts of Glycyrriza glabra, Curcuma longa (roots), seeds of Psorolea corlifolia, Cassia tora, Areca catechu, Punica granatum, fruits of Embelica officinale, leaves of Centella asiatica, dried bark of Cinnamon zeylanicum and fresh gel of Aloe vera in varied concentrations (0.12-0.9%w/w) and characterized using physicochemical and physiological measurements. The ethanolic extracts of herbs were incorporated in a cream base that is prepared by a phase inversion emulsification technique. The cream base was prepared by utilizing oil of Prunus amagdalus, Sesamum indicum, honey, cetyl alcohol, stearic acid, polysorbate monoleate, sorbitan monostearate, propylene glycol and glycerin. Physicochemical assessments and microbiological testing were completed for all formulations according to the methods of the Indian Standard Bureau. The studies were carried out for 6 weeks on normal subjects (6 males and 12 females, between 22 and 50 years) on the back of their volar forearm for evaluation of viscoelastic properties in terms of extensibility via a suction measurement, firmness using laboratory fabricated instruments such as ball bouncing and skin hydration using electric (resistance) measurement methods. The physicochemical parameters of formulations CAA1-CAA6, i.e. pH, acid value, saponification value, viscosity, spreadability, layer thickness microbial count and skin sensitivity were found to be in the range of 5.01 +/- 0.4-6.07 +/- 0.6, 3.3-5.1 +/- 0.2, 20-32, 5900-6755 cps, 60-99%, 25-50 mum, 31-46 colony-forming units (CFU) and a 0-1 erythema score. The formulations, CAA4 and CAA5, showed an increase in percentage extensibility (32.27 +/- 1.7% and 29.89 +/- 1.64%, respectively), firmness (28.86 +/- 0.86% and 29.89 +/- 2.8%, respectively) and improved skin

  8. RLC model of visco-elastic properties of the chest wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliverti, Andrea; Ferrigno, Giancarlo

    1996-04-01

    The quantification of the visco-elastic properties (resistance (R), inertia (L) and compliance (C)) of the different chest wall compartments (pulmonary rib cage,diaphragmatic rib cage and abdomen) is important to study the status of the passive components of the respiratory system, particularly in selected pathologies. Applying the viscoelastic-electrical analogy to the chest wall, we used an identification method in order to estimate the R, L and C parameters of the different parts of the chest, basing on different models; the input and output measured data were constituted by the volume variations of the different chest wall compartments and by the nasal pressure during controlled intermittent positive pressure ventilation by nasal mask, while the parameters of the system (R, L and C of the different compartments) were to be estimated. Volumes were measured with a new method, recently validated, based on an opto-electronic motion analyzer, able to compute with high accuracy and null invasivity the absolute values and the time variations of the volumes of each of the three compartments. The estimation of the R, L and C parameters has been based on a least-squared criterion, and the minimization has been based on a robustified iterative Gauss-Newton algorithm. The validation of the estimation procedure (fitting) has ben performed computing the percentage root mean square value of the error between the output real data and the output estimated data. The method has been applied to 2 healthy subjects. Also preliminary results have been obtained from 20 subjects affected by neuromuscular diseases (Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) and Spinal Muscle Atrophy (SMA)). The results show that: (a) the best-fitting electrical models of the respiratory system are made up by one or three parallel RLC branches supplied by a voltage generator (so considering inertial properties, particularly in the abdominal compartment, and not considering patient/machine connection); (b) there

  9. Determining the viscoelastic properties obtained by depth sensing microindentation of epoxy and polyester thermosets using a new phenomenological method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, James G.; Schwarzer, Norbert; Ngo, Truc T.; Favaro, Gregory; Rengnet, Eric; Bierwisch, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Epoxy and polyester thermosets are currently used as the polymer matrix material for many fiber-reinforced composite systems. The viscoelastic properties of these materials were investigated in this study by use of depth sensing microindentation. The microindentation tests performed had the load being applied at a rapid loading rate to a maximum load. This maximum load was held constant while the stylus continued to sink. It was then unloaded at a nominal rate. A new phenomenological model developed by Schwarzer in 2014 was used in this work to determine the viscoelastic properties. Two approaches or methods were used. The first method involved determining the three parameters by using hold time data combined with unloading data (this method is referred to in this work as ‘hold time method’). The second method used only the unloading data (this method is referred to in this work as ‘unloading method’). It was shown that the properties determined by the two methods are not the same but are dependent upon the strain rate behavior during the indentation test. Low load scratch tests were also performed. It was seen that as the sliding speed increased the depth of penetration decreased resulting in the coefficient of friction also decreasing. An understanding of the viscoelastic properties at the surface and how they affect friction are important in studying wear of these materials.

  10. The investigation of the viscoelastic properties of silica/PMMA nanocomposites as a function of silica surface chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Heather; Rende, Deniz; Ozisik, Rahmi

    2013-03-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA, has been used as an economic alternative to glass and polycarbonate in differing situations because of its lightweight, shatter resistance, and ease of processability. The uses of PMMA can be expanded if its weakness to impact force and its scratch resistance are improved. In the current study, viscoelastic properties of silica nanoparticle filled PMMA were investigated via nanoindentation experiments. Silica nanoparticles are known to increase the toughness of PMMA. In the current study, silica nanoparticles were chemically modified with fluorinated alkanes to alter nanofiller-polymer interactions. Results show that viscoelastic properties are strongly affected by silica surface chemistry and silica concentration. This work was partially supported by NSF CMMI-1200270 and DUE-1003574

  11. Postseismic Deformations of the Aceh, Nias and Benkulu Earthquakes and the Viscoelastic Properties of the Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleitout, L.; Garaud, J.; Cailletaud, G.; Vigny, C.; Simons, W. J.; Ambrosius, B. A.; Trisirisatayawong, I.; Satirapod, C.; Geotecdi Song

    2011-12-01

    The giant seism of Aceh (december 2004),followed by the Nias and Bengkulu earthquakes, broke a large portion of the boundary between the Indian ocean and the Sunda block. For the first time in history, the deformations associated with a very large earthquake can be followed by GPS, in particular by the SEAMERGE (far-field) and SUGAR (near-field) GPS networks. A 3D finite element code (Zebulon-Zset) is used to model both the cosismic and the postseismic deformations. The modeled zone is a large portion of spherical shell around Sumatra extanding over more than 60 degrees in latitude and longitude and from the Earth's surface to the core-mantle boundary. The mesh is refined close to the subduction zone. First, the inverted cosismic displacements on the subduction plane are inverted for and provide a very good fit to the GPS data for the three seisms. The observed postseismic displacements, non-dimensionalized by the cosismic displacements, present three very different patterns as function of time: For GPS stations in the far-field, the total horizontal post-seismic displacement after 4 years is as large as the cosismic displacement. The velocities vary slowly over 4 years. A large subsidence affects Thailand and Malaysia. In the near-field, the postseismic displacement reaches only some 15% of the cosismic displacement and it levels off after 2 years. In the middle-field (south-west coast of Sumatra), the postseismic displacement also levels-off with time but more slowly and it reaches more than 30% of the cosismic displacement after four years. In order to fit these three distinct displacement patterns, we need to invoke both viscoelastic deformation in the asthenosphere and a low-viscosity wedge: Neither the vertical subsidence nor the amplitude of the far-field horizontal velocities could be explained by postseismic sliding on the subduction interface. The low viscosity wedge permits to explain the large middle-field velocities. The viscoelastic properties of the

  12. Nano confinement effects on dynamic and viscoelastic properties of Selenium Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Heedong; McKenna, Gregory

    2015-03-01

    In current study, we use a novel nano bubble inflation technique to study nano confinement effects on the dynamic and viscoelastic properties of physical vapor deposited Selenium films. Film thicknesses ranged from 60 to 260 nm. Creep experiments were performed for the temperatures ranging from Tg,macroscopic-14 °C to Tg,\\ macroscopic + 19 °C. Time temperature superposition and time thickness superposition were applied to create reduced creep curves, and those were compared with macroscopic data [J. Non-Cryst. Solids. 2002, 307, 790-801]. The results showed that the time temperature superposition was applicable in the glassy relaxation regime to the steady-state plateau regime. However in the long time response of the creep compliance, time thickness superposition failed due to the thickness dependence on the steady-state plateau. It was observed that the steady state compliance increased with film thickness. The thickness dependence on the plateau stiffening followed a power law of DPlateau ~ h2.46, which is greater than observed in organic polymers where the exponents observed range from 0.83 to 2.0 [Macromolecules. 2012, 45 (5), 2453-2459]. National Science Foundation Grant No. CHE 1112416 and John R. Bradford Endowment at Texas Tech

  13. Technical advance: Inhibition of neutrophil chemotaxis by colchicine is modulated through viscoelastic properties of subcellular compartments.

    PubMed

    Paschke, Stephan; Weidner, Astrid Franziska; Paust, Tobias; Marti, Othmar; Beil, Michael; Ben-Chetrit, Eldad

    2013-11-01

    Colchicine is an efficient drug for the management of inflammatory diseases, such as gouty arthritis and familial Mediterranean fever. It affects neutrophil activity by interfering with the formation of microtubules. To test the hypothesis that therapeutic concentrations of colchicine modulate the mechanical properties of these cells, we applied a combination of biophysical techniques (optical stretching and microrheology) to analyze cellular deformability. The contribution of the subcellular compartments to the regulation of cell mechanics was determined by fitting a multicomponent model of cellular viscoelasticity to time-dependent deformation curves. Neutrophils were found to be less deformable in response to 10 ng/ml colchicine. The model-based analysis of cellular deformation revealed a decrease in cytoplasmatic elasticity and a substantial increase in both elasticity and viscosity of the cell membrane compartment in response to colchicine. These results correlate with a reduced number of cytoplasmatic microtubules and an increase in subcortical actin filaments. The latter finding was confirmed by microrheology and fluorescence microscopy. Neutrophil migration through small pores requiring substantial cellular deformations, but not through large pores, was significantly impaired by colchicine. These data demonstrate that colchicine determines mechanics of neutrophils and, thereby, motility in confined spaces, which is crucial during extravasation of neutrophils in response to inflammatory stimuli. PMID:23901122

  14. Cell adaptation to a physiologically relevant ECM mimic with different viscoelastic properties

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Kaustabh; Pan, Zhi; Guan, E; Ge, Shouren; Liu, Yajie; Nakamura, Toshio; Ren, Xiang-Dong; Rafailovich, Miriam; Clark, Richard A.F.

    2009-01-01

    To successfully induce tissue repair or regeneration in vivo, bioengineered constructs must possess both optimal bioactivity and mechanical strength. This is because cell interaction with the extracellular matrix (ECM) produces two different but concurrent signaling mechanisms: ligation-induced signaling, which depends on ECM biological stimuli, and traction-induced signaling, which depends on ECM mechanical stimuli. In this report, we provide a fundamental understanding of how alterations in mechanical stimuli alone, produced by varying the viscoelastic properties of our bioengineered construct, modulate phenotypic behavior at the whole-cell level. Using a physiologically-relevant ECM mimic composed of hyaluronan and fibronectin, we found that adult human dermal fibroblasts modify their mechanical response in order to match substrate stiffness. More specifically, the cells on stiffer substrates had higher modulus and a more stretched and organized actin cytoskeleton (and vice versa), which translated into larger traction forces exerted on the substrate. This modulation of cellular mechanics had contrasting effects on migration and proliferation, where cells migrated faster on softer substrates while proliferating preferentially on the stiffer ones. These findings implicate substrate rigidity as a critical design parameter in the development of bioengineered constructs aimed at eliciting maximal cell and tissue function. PMID:17049594

  15. Viscoelastic characteristics and phytochemical properties of purple-rice drinks following ultrahigh pressure and pasteurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worametrachanon, Srivilai; Apichartsrangkoon, Arunee

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated how pressure (500, 600 MPa/20 min) altered the viscoelastic characteristics and phytochemical properties of germinated and non-germinated purple-rice drinks in comparison with pasteurization. Accordingly, color parameters, storage and loss moduli, anthocyanin content, γ-oryzanol, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), total phenolic compounds and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylthydrazyl (DPPH) capacity of the processed drinks were determined. The finding showed that germinated and pressurized rice drink had lower Browning Index than the non-germinated and pasteurized rice drink. The plots of storage and loss moduli for processed rice drinks indicated that time of pressurization had greater impact on gel structural modification than the level of pressure used. The phytochemicals, including total phenolics, and DPPH capacity in pressurized rice drinks retained higher quantity than those in pasteurized drink, despite less treatment effects on anthocyanin. On the contrary, both γ-oryzanol and GABA were found in high amounts in germinated rice drink with little variation among processing effects.

  16. Viscoelastic properties of aqueous guar gum derivative solutions under large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS).

    PubMed

    Szopinski, Daniel; Luinstra, Gerrit A

    2016-11-20

    The industrial relevant nonlinear viscoelastic properties of aqueous carboxymethyl hydroxypropyl guar gum (CMHPG) and non-ionic hydroxypropyl guar gum (HPG) solutions between semi-dilute and concentrated solution state were investigated by large amplitude oscillatory shear flow (LAOS). Aqueous CMHPG and HPG solutions enter the nonlinear flow regime at deformations γ0>100%. The nonlinear stress waveforms were analyzed by FT-rheology and orthogonal stress decomposition along the MITlaos framework. A rheological fingerprint is generated (Pipkin space) showing that the guar gum derivative solutions undergo a shear-thinning at high strains, which is preceded by a thickening above a minimum strain rate at intermediate strains. The influence and breakup of superstructures/aggregates gives a "rheological fingerprint", a function of the applied deformation and time scale (Pipkin space). A characteristic process time was found that scales exponentially with the overlap parameter with an exponent of 4/2, and is proposed to represent the relaxation process of the superstructure in solution. PMID:27561501

  17. Interactions of glycosphingolipids and lipopolysaccharides with silica and polyamide surfaces: adsorption and viscoelastic properties.

    PubMed

    Gutman, Jenia; Kaufman, Yair; Kawahara, Kazuyoshi; Walker, Sharon L; Freger, Viatcheslav; Herzberg, Moshe

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial outer membrane components play a critical role in bacteria-surface interactions (adhesion and repulsion). Sphingomonas species (spp.) differ from other Gram-negative bacteria in that they lack lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) in their outer membrane. Instead, Sphingomonas spp. outer membrane consists of glycosphingolipids (GSLs). To delineate the properties of the outer membrane of Sphingomonas spp. and to explain the adhesion of these cells to surfaces, we employed a single-component-based approach of comparing GSL vesicles to LPS vesicles. This is the first study to report the formation of vesicles containing 100% GSL. Significant physicochemical differences between GSL and LPS vesicles are reported. Composition-dependent vesicle adherence to different surfaces using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) technology was observed, where higher GSL content resulted in higher mass accumulation on the sensor. Additionally, the presence of 10% GSL and above was found to promote the relative rigidity of the vesicle obtaining viscoelastic ratio of 30-70% higher than that of pure LPS vesicles. PMID:24835578

  18. Temperature Dependence of the Viscoelastic Properties of a Confined Liquid Polymer Measured by Using an Oscillating Optical Fiber Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Shintaro; Fukuzawa, Kenji; Hamamoto, Yuya; Zhang, Hedong

    2010-08-01

    We measured the temperature dependence of the viscoelastic properties of a liquid polymer confined and sheared within a nanometer-sized gap. In the viscoelastic measurements, we used the fiber wobbling method, a highly sensitive method that we have developed for measuring shear forces. As a liquid sample, we used the fluoropolyether lubricant Fomblin Zdol4000. Our experimental results showed that the temperature dependence of the viscosity was well expressed by the well-known Andrade equation, even in the confined state. The activation enthalpy was calculated by assuming that Eyring's theory of viscosity holds for gaps of a width ranging from 100 nm down to a few nanometers. We observed a significant decrease in the activation enthalpy for gaps smaller than 10 nm. Elasticity, which only appeared for confinement in gaps smaller than 10 nm, roughly decreased with increasing temperature.

  19. Impact of Texture Heterogeneity on Elastic and Viscoelastic Properties of Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ravi

    This thesis discusses the impacts of fabric heterogeneity, fluids and fluid saturations, effective pressures, and frequency of investigation on the elastic and viscoelastic properties of calcite-rich limestone and chalk formations. Carbonate reservoirs have been analyzed either with empirical relations and analogs from siliciclastic reservoirs or using simplistic models. However, under the varying parameters mentioned above, their seismic response can be very different. The primary reason is because these rocks of biochemical origins readily undergo textural changes and support heterogeneous distribution of fluid flow and elastic properties. Thus, many current rock physics models are unable to predict the time-lapse elastic response in these reservoirs. I have measured elastic properties of calcite rich rocks in the seismic frequency range of 2 to 2000 Hz and at the ultrasonic frequency of 800 kHz. The samples selected for this study represent the typical heterogeneities found in carbonate formations. These measurements covering a large frequency range provide an understanding of the dispersion and attenuation mechanisms during seismic wave propagation in the subsurface. I find that a heterogeneous formation shows significant velocity dispersion and attenuations when saturated with brine, and even more on saturation with CO2. I also show that the shear modulus of carbonate rocks changes significantly (from 8% for brine saturation to 70% for CO2 saturation) upon fluid saturation with polar fluids. I evaluated rock physics models, such as Gassmann's and with uniform and patchy fluid substitution, and Hashin-Shtrikman to predict saturated elastic properties in carbonates. Fluid sensitivity is directly related to the initial stiffness of the rock instead of porosity, as normally assumed. The Gassmann model can predict elastic properties for uniform saturations - mostly in homogenous rocks. Heterogeneous rocks, however, are better modeled using a patchy fluid saturation

  20. Viscoelastic properties of individual glial cells and neurons in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yun-Bi; Franze, Kristian; Seifert, Gerald; Steinhäuser, Christian; Kirchhoff, Frank; Wolburg, Hartwig; Guck, Jochen; Janmey, Paul; Wei, Er-Qing; Käs, Josef; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    One hundred fifty years ago glial cells were discovered as a second, non-neuronal, cell type in the central nervous system. To ascribe a function to these new, enigmatic cells, it was suggested that they either glue the neurons together (the Greek word “γλια” means “glue”) or provide a robust scaffold for them (“support cells”). Although both speculations are still widely accepted, they would actually require quite different mechanical cell properties, and neither one has ever been confirmed experimentally. We investigated the biomechanics of CNS tissue and acutely isolated individual neurons and glial cells from mammalian brain (hippocampus) and retina. Scanning force microscopy, bulk rheology, and optically induced deformation were used to determine their viscoelastic characteristics. We found that (i) in all CNS cells the elastic behavior dominates over the viscous behavior, (ii) in distinct cell compartments, such as soma and cell processes, the mechanical properties differ, most likely because of the unequal local distribution of cell organelles, (iii) in comparison to most other eukaryotic cells, both neurons and glial cells are very soft (“rubber elastic”), and (iv) intriguingly, glial cells are even softer than their neighboring neurons. Our results indicate that glial cells can neither serve as structural support cells (as they are too soft) nor as glue (because restoring forces are dominant) for neurons. Nevertheless, from a structural perspective they might act as soft, compliant embedding for neurons, protecting them in case of mechanical trauma, and also as a soft substrate required for neurite growth and facilitating neuronal plasticity. PMID:17093050

  1. Nanoscale effects in the characterization of viscoelastic materials with atomic force microscopy: coupling of a quasi-three-dimensional standard linear solid model with in-plane surface interactions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Significant progress has been accomplished in the development of experimental contact-mode and dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods designed to measure surface material properties. However, current methods are based on one-dimensional (1D) descriptions of the tip–sample interaction forces, thus neglecting the intricacies involved in the material behavior of complex samples (such as soft viscoelastic materials) as well as the differences in material response between the surface and the bulk. In order to begin to address this gap, a computational study is presented where the sample is simulated using an enhanced version of a recently introduced model that treats the surface as a collection of standard-linear-solid viscoelastic elements. The enhanced model introduces in-plane surface elastic forces that can be approximately related to a two-dimensional (2D) Young’s modulus. Relevant cases are discussed for single- and multifrequency intermittent-contact AFM imaging, with focus on the calculated surface indentation profiles and tip–sample interaction force curves, as well as their implications with regards to experimental interpretation. A variety of phenomena are examined in detail, which highlight the need for further development of more physically accurate sample models that are specifically designed for AFM simulation. A multifrequency AFM simulation tool based on the above sample model is provided as supporting information. PMID:27335746

  2. Nanoscale effects in the characterization of viscoelastic materials with atomic force microscopy: Coupling of a quasi-three-dimensional standard linear solid model with in-plane surface interactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2016-04-15

    Significant progress has been accomplished in the development of experimental contact-mode and dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods designed to measure surface material properties. However, current methods are based on one-dimensional (1D) descriptions of the tip-sample interaction forces, thus neglecting the intricacies involved in the material behavior of complex samples (such as soft viscoelastic materials) as well as the differences in material response between the surface and the bulk. In order to begin to address this gap, a computational study is presented where the sample is simulated using an enhanced version of a recently introduced model that treats the surfacemore » as a collection of standard-linear-solid viscoelastic elements. The enhanced model introduces in-plane surface elastic forces that can be approximately related to a two-dimensional (2D) Young's modulus. Relevant cases are discussed for single-and multifrequency intermittent-contact AFM imaging, with focus on the calculated surface indentation profiles and tip-sample interaction force curves, as well as their implications with regards to experimental interpretation. A variety of phenomena are examined in detail, which highlight the need for further development of more physically accurate sample models that are specifically designed for AFM simulation. As a result, a multifrequency AFM simulation tool based on the above sample model is provided as supporting information.« less

  3. Mechanical Signal Filtering by Viscoelastic Properties of Cuticle in a Wandering Spider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConney, Michael E.; Schaber, Clemens; Julian, Michael; Humphrey, Joseph A. C.; Barth, Friedrich; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.

    2009-03-01

    As recently found, in mechano-sensors of wandering spiders (Cupiennius salei) viscoelastic materials are important in signal filtering. We used atomic force microscopy to probe the time dependent mechanical behavior of these materials in live animals. We measured Young's modulus of a rubbery material located between a vibration receptor and the stimulus source. Earlier electrophysiological studies had demonstrated that the strain needed to elicit a sensory response (action potential) increased drastically as stimulus frequencies went below 10 Hz. Our surface force spectroscopy data similarly indicated a significant decrease in stiffness of the cuticular material and therefore less efficient energy transmission due to viscoelastic effects, as the frequency dropped to around 10 Hz. The stimulus transmitting cuticular material is acting as a high-pass filter for the mechanical stimulus on its way to the strain receptors. Again our results indicate that viscoelastic mechanical signal filtering is an important tool for arthropods to specifically respond to biologically relevant stimulus patterns.

  4. Hygrothermal characterization of the viscoelastic properties of Gore-Select® 57 proton exchange membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patankar, Kshitish A.; Dillard, David A.; Case, Scott W.; Ellis, Michael W.; Lai, Yeh-Hung; Budinski, Michael K.; Gittleman, Craig S.

    2008-09-01

    When a proton exchange membrane (PEM) based fuel cell is placed in service, hygrothermal stresses develop within the membrane and vary widely with internal operating environment. These hygrothermal stresses associated with hygral contraction and expansion at the operating conditions are believed to be critical in membrane mechanical integrity and durability. Understanding and accurately modeling the viscoelastic constitutive properties of a PEM is important for making hygrothermal stress predictions in the cyclic temperature and humidity environment of operating fuel cells. The tensile stress relaxation moduli of a commercially available PEM, Gore-Select® 57, were obtained over a range of humidities and temperatures. These tests were performed using TA Instruments 2980 and Q800 dynamic mechanical analyzers (DMA), which are capable of applying specified tensile loading conditions on small membrane samples at a given temperature. A special humidity chamber was built in the form of a cup that encloses tension clamps of the DMA. The chamber was inserted in the heating furnace of the DMA and connected to a gas humidification unit by means of plastic tubing through a slot in the chamber. Stress relaxation data over a temperature range of 40 90°C and relative humidity range of 30 90% were obtained. Thermal and hygral master curves were constructed using thermal and hygral shift factors and were used to form a hygrothermal master curve using the time temperature moisture superposition principle. The master curve was also constructed independently using just one shift factor. The hygrothermal master curve was fitted with a 10-term Prony series for use in finite element software. The hygrothermal master curve was then validated using longer term tests. The relaxation modulus from longer term data matches well with the hygrothermal master curve. The long term test showed a plateau at longer times, suggesting an equilibrium modulus.

  5. Viscoelastic properties of the pig temporomandibular joint articular soft tissues of the condyle and disc.

    PubMed

    Kuboki, T; Shinoda, M; Orsini, M G; Yamashita, A

    1997-11-01

    It has been suggested that a sustained loading condition such as clenching could compress the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) articular soft tissues. However, there is still no clear understanding of how the TM joint articular tissues respond under compression. To answer this question, we performed in vitro indentation tests on fresh articular discs and cartilage-bone systems of the condyles of 10 Yorkshire pigs (aged 7 months) using a self-developed indentation tester. The indenter was 5 mm in diameter and was controlled by means of a computer-aided feedback mechanism. Bilateral condyles from the same mandible were uniformly prepared; one was used for measurements under sustained compression (SC) and the other for measurements under intermittent compression (IC). The displacements of the indenter induced by a SC of 10, 20, and 30 Newtons (N, units of force) for 10 min and by an IC, also of 10, 20, and 30 N, with one-second duration and two-second intervals for 10 min were measured by means of a displacement sensor with a resolution of 0.001 mm. From these data, the indentation curves of the articular discs and the cartilage-bone systems were calculated. Both the disc and the articular cartilage showed characteristic displacement vs. time curves-namely, an instantaneous deformation upon load application, followed by a time-dependent creep phase of asymptotically increasing deformation under constant load. However, the indentation curves of the two tissues were not identical: The deformation of the articular cartilage was dose-dependent, but that of the disc was not. Moreover, the articular cartilage deformed significantly less under IC than under SC. This difference was not found in the disc. It can be concluded that both the disc and the articular cartilage of the pig temporomandibular joint have viscoelastic properties against compression; however, the disc is stiffer than the articular cartilage. PMID:9372793

  6. Effect of carbamazepine on viscoelastic properties and hot melt extrudability of Soluplus ®.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Simerdeep Singh; Parikh, Tapan; Meena, Anuprabha K; Mahajan, Nidhi; Vitez, Imre; Serajuddin, Abu T M

    2015-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to apply viscoelastic properties of polymer and drug-polymer mixtures to determine processing conditions for the preparation of amorphous solid dispersion by melt extrusion. A poorly water-soluble drug, carbamazepine (CBZ), was mixed with Soluplus(®) as the carrier. Torque analysis using a melt extruder was performed at 10, 20 and 30% w/w drug concentrations and the effect of barrel temperature was studied. Viscosity of the mixtures either at fixed temperatures with different angular frequencies or as a function of temperature with the same frequency was studied using a rheometer. The viscosity of Soluplus(®) and the torque exerted on the twin screws decreased with the increase in CBZ concentration. The viscosity versus temperature plots for different CBZ concentrations were parallel to each other, without the drug melting transition, indicating complete drug-polymer miscibility. Thus, the drug-polymer mixtures could be extruded at temperature as low as 140°C with 10% w/w drug load, 135°C with 20% w/w drug and 125°C with 30% w/w drug, which were, respectively, ∼ 50°C, 55°C and 65°C below the melting point of 191°C for CBZ. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses of the binary mixtures extruded at 125-150°C showed absence of crystalline drug. A systematic study of miscibility and extrudability of drug-polymer mixtures by rheological and torque analysis as a function of temperature will help formulators select optimal melt extrusion processing conditions to develop solid dispersions. PMID:25448585

  7. The role of alginate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa EPS adherence, viscoelastic properties and cell attachment.

    PubMed

    Orgad, Oded; Oren, Yoram; Walker, Sharon L; Herzberg, Moshe

    2011-08-01

    Among various functions, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) provide microbial biofilms with mechanical stability and affect initial cell attachment, the first stage in the biofilm formation process. The role of alginate, an abundant polysaccharide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms, in the viscoelastic properties and adhesion kinetics of EPS was analyzed using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) monitoring technology. EPS was extracted from two P. aeruginosa biofilms, a wild type strain, PAO1, and a mucoid strain, PAOmucA22 that over-expresses alginate production. The higher alginate content in the EPS originating from the mucoid biofilms was clearly shown to increase both the rate and the extent of attachment of the EPS, as well as the layer's thickness. Also, the presence of calcium and elevated ionic strength increased the thickness of the EPS layer. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that the presence of calcium and elevated ionic strength induced intermolecular attractive interactions in the mucoid EPS molecules. For the wild type EPS, in the presence of calcium, an elevated shift in the distribution of the diffusion coefficients was observed with DLS due to a more compacted conformation of the EPS molecules. Moreover, the alginate over-expression effect on EPS adherence was compared to the effect of alginate over-expression on P. aeruginosa cell attachment. In a parallel plate flow cell, under similar hydraulic and aquatic conditions as those applied for the EPS adsorption tests in the QCM-D flow cell, reduced adherence of the mucoid strain was clearly observed compared to the wild type isogenic bacteria. The results suggest that alginate contributes to steric hindrance and shielding of cell surface features and adhesins that are known to promote cell attachment. PMID:21797737

  8. Viscoelastic properties of pressure overload hypertrophied myocardium: effect of serine protease treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, Jason D.; Baicu, Catalin F.; Barnes, Mary A.; Spinale, Francis G.; Zile, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    To determine whether and to what extent one component of the extracellular matrix, fibrillar collagen, contributes causally to abnormalities in viscoelasticity, collagen was acutely degraded by activation of endogenous matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) with the serine protease plasmin. Papillary muscles were isolated from normal cats and cats with right ventricular pressure overload hypertrophy (POH) induced by pulmonary artery banding. Plasmin treatment caused MMP activation, collagen degradation, decreased the elastic stiffness constant, and decreased the viscosity constant in both normal and POH muscles. Thus, whereas many mechanisms may contribute to the abnormalities in myocardial viscoelasticity in the POH myocardium, changes in fibrillar collagen appear to play a predominant role.

  9. Nonlinear Viscoelastic Characterization of the Porcine Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Shetye, Snehal; Troyer, Kevin; Streijger, Femke; Lee, Jae H. T.; Kwon, Brian K.; Cripton, Peter; Puttlitz, Christian M.

    2014-01-01

    Although quasi-static and quasi-linear viscoelastic properties of the spinal cord have been reported previously, there are no published studies that have investigated the fully (strain-dependent) nonlinear viscoelastic properties of the spinal cord. In this study, stress relaxation experiments and dynamic cycling were performed on six fresh porcine lumbar cord specimens to examine their viscoelastic mechanical properties. The stress relaxation data were fitted to a modified superposition formulation and a novel finite ramp time correction technique was applied. The parameters obtained from this fitting methodology were used to predict the average dynamic cyclic viscoelastic behavior of the porcine cord. The data indicate that the porcine spinal cord exhibited fully nonlinear viscoelastic behavior. The average weighted RMSE for a Heaviside ramp fit was 2.8kPa, which was significantly greater (p < 0.001) than that of the nonlinear (comprehensive viscoelastic characterization (CVC) method) fit (0.365kPa). Further, the nonlinear mechanical parameters obtained were able to accurately predict the dynamic behavior, thus exemplifying the reliability of the obtained nonlinear parameters. These parameters will be important for future studies investigating various damage mechanisms of the spinal cord and studies developing high resolution finite elements models of the spine. PMID:24211612

  10. Asphalt Pavement Aging and Temperature Dependent Properties Using Functionally Graded Viscoelastic Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dave, Eshan V.

    2009-01-01

    Asphalt concrete pavements are inherently graded viscoelastic structures. Oxidative aging of asphalt binder and temperature cycling due to climatic conditions being the major cause of non-homogeneity. Current pavement analysis and simulation procedures dwell on the use of layered approach to account for these non-homogeneities. The conventional…

  11. Viscoelastic properties of a bio-hydrogel produced from soybean oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrogels are a class of viscoelastic materials that have many biomedical utilization potentials, such as drug delivery, wound care product, breast implant materials, and tissue engineering, etc. Hydrogels produced from biopolymers and/or natural sources have particular advantages in vivo applicati...

  12. Viscoelastic properties of thin films probed with a quartz-crystal resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannsmann, D.; Mathauer, K.; Wegner, G.; Knoll, W.

    1992-09-01

    We report on the application of piezoelectric quartz-crystal resonators to the viscoelastic characterization of thin organic layers. A passive measurement of the crystal's electrical impedance allows one to determine the frequencies of its resonances as well as the corresponding damping constants. The accessible resonances span a frequency range from about 4 MHz to about 100 MHz. A parallel ellipsometer setup is used for the simultaneous determination of optical thicknesses. When one side of the quartz plate is coated with a viscoelastic layer, the frequencies and the damping constants of the acoustic modes change. While in the limit of ultrathin films these changes depend only on the mass, thicker films show pronounced viscoelastic effects. We inverted these dependences to obtain the complex and anisotropic shear compliance of a film with a thickness of about 1.75 μm. Results are presented for a Langmuir-Bodgett-Kuhn film consisting of the molecular composite poly(γ-methyl-L-glutamate-co-γ-n-octadecyl-L-glutamate). These rodlike molecules have a rigid backbone and flexible side chains. With respect to its mechanical and rheological behavior the substance is frequently called a ``molecularly reinforced liquid.'' The results show that the large-scale viscoelastic behavior is not a liquidlike one, as would have been suggested by simple composite models. A possible interpretation is the existence of vitrified states in the side-chain regions.

  13. Water sorption, viscoelastic, and optical properties of thin NafionRTM films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrina, Stephanie Ann

    The hydrogen fuel cell industry continues to make strides in terms of improving device efficiency and performance, yet ion transport within the catalyst layer is not well understood. Thin ionomer films coating the catalytic particles are responsible for proton transport throughout the catalytic layer, yet the basic physical properties of these thin films, which interact with the catalyst surface, are widely unknown. Fundamentally, the material properties of thin polymer films are known to deviate from thick, free-standing membranes composed of the same material based on their interfacial interactions. The work in this dissertation seeks to uncover the properties of thin NafionRTM films to begin to understand their role in catalyst layer performance. By identifying the influence of processing conditions, polymer--substrate interaction, and thickness on water uptake characteristics of thin Nafion RTM films, the proton and oxygen transport parameters that are most relevant to performance in the catalyst layer can be understood. Since the hydration of NafionRTM is relevant for its proton conduction and performance in a fuel cell, water sorption of substrate--supported NafionRTM thin films was characterized via the change in sample mass and thickness as the relative humidity (RH) of the sample environment was varied. Monolithic thin NafionRTM films were characterized for a variety of sample preparation conditions and substrates to identify how processing conditions and other sample parameters may affect water uptake. Spin cast NafionRTM films exhibited low density and refractive index for very thin films due to the higher relative void fraction induced by rapid film formation. The density of hydrated films was observed to decrease beyond the volume additivity limit as RH increased, and the relationship between density and refractive index was confirmed with the Lorentz-Lorenz relationship. The complex refractive indices (N = n + ik) of substrate--supported Nafion RTM

  14. Effect of potting technique on the measurement of six degree-of-freedom viscoelastic properties of human lumbar spine segments.

    PubMed

    Amin, Dhara B; Lawless, Isaac M; Sommerfeld, Dana; Stanley, Richard M; Ding, Boyin; Costi, John J

    2015-05-01

    Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and Wood's Metal are fixation media for biomechanical testing; however, the effect of each potting medium on the measured six degree-of-freedom (DOF) mechanical properties of human lumbar intervertebral discs is unknown. The first aim of this study was to compare the measured 6DOF elastic and viscoelastic properties of the disc when embedded in PMMA compared to repotting in Wood's Metal. The second aim was to compare the surface temperature of the disc when potted with PMMA and Wood's Metal. Six human lumbar functional spinal units (FSUs) were first potted in PMMA, and subjected to overnight preload in a saline bath at 37 °C followed by five haversine loading cycles at 0.1 Hz in each of 6DOF loading directions (compression, left/right lateral bending, flexion, extension, left/right axial rotation, anterior/posterior, and lateral shear). Each specimen was then repotted in Wood's Metal and subjected to a 2-h re-equilibrating preload followed by repeating the same 6DOF tests. Outcome measures of stiffness and phase angle were calculated from the final loading cycle in each DOF and were expressed as normalized percentages relative to PMMA (100%). Disc surface temperatures (anterior, left/right lateral) were measured during potting. Paired t-tests (with alpha adjusted for multiple DOF) were conducted to compare the differences in each outcome parameter between PMMA and Wood's Metal. No significant differences in stiffness or phase angle were found between PMMA and Wood's Metal. On average, the largest trending differences were found in the shear DOFs for both stiffness (approximately 35% greater for Wood's Metal compared to PMMA) and phase angle (approximately 15% greater for Wood's Metal). A significant difference in disc temperature was found at the anterior surface after potting with Wood's Metal compared to PMMA, which did not exceed 26 °C. Wood's Metal is linear elastic, stiffer than PMMA and may reduce measurement artifact of

  15. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve: evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hua; Yang, Qi; Ji, Feng; Zhang, Ya-jie; Zhao, Yan; Luo, Min

    2015-01-01

    The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as embryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C6 root avulsion method. A suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was repeatedly injected over an area 4.0 mm lateral to the cephal and caudal ends of the C6 brachial plexus injury site (1 × 106 cells/mL, 3 μL/injection, 25 injections) immediately after the injury. The results showed that the decrease in stress and increase in strain at 7,200 seconds in the injured rabbit C6 brachial plexus nerve were mitigated by the cell transplantation, restoring the viscoelastic stress relaxation and creep properties of the brachial plexus nerve. The forepaw functions were also significantly improved at 26 weeks after injury. These data indicate that transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells can effectively restore the mechanical properties of the brachial plexus nerve after injury in rabbits and that viscoelasticity may be an important index for the evaluation of brachial plexus injury in animals. PMID:25883625

  16. Characterization of viscoelastic properties of molybdenum disulphide filled polyamide by indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, Felicia; Fetecau, Catalin

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, the creep behavior of molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) filled polyamide 66 composite was investigated through sharp indentation at room temperature. Two types of indentation creep test, the 3-step indentation test, and the 5-step indentation test were considered in order to explore whether the measured creep response is mainly viscoelastic or includes a significant contribution from the plastic deformation developed during the loading phase. The experimental indentation creep data were analyzed within an analytical framework based on the hereditary integral operator for the ramp creep and a viscoelastic-plastic (VEP) model in order to determine the indentation creep compliance function including the short- and long-time modulus. The equivalent shear modulus calculated from the creep compliance function was compared to the indentation plane strain modulus derived from the initial slope of the unloading curve in order to investigate the validity of the Oliver and Pharr method.

  17. Viscoelastic flow-focusing in microchannels: scaling properties of the particle radial distributions.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Giovanni; D'Avino, Gaetano; Greco, Francesco; Netti, Paolo A; Maffettone, Pier Luca

    2013-07-21

    Particles suspended in non-Newtonian liquids flowing in channels may migrate transversally to the main flow direction as a result of normal stress gradients. Viscoelasticity-induced migration has proven to be an efficient mechanism to promote 3D flow-focusing in cylindrical microchannels, avoiding the need for complex and expensive apparati. In this work, we demonstrate the existence of a single dimensionless number (Θ) that governs the migration dynamics of particles in viscoelastic liquids flowing in micropipes at low Deborah numbers (Deborah number is the ratio of fluid and flow characteristic times). The definition of Θ in terms of the relevant fluid, flow and geometrical quantities is obtained by generalizing the particle migration velocity expression given in previous asymptotic analytical theories through numerical simulations. An extensive experimental investigation quantitatively confirms the novel predictions: the experimental particle distributions along the channel axial direction collapse on a single curve when rescaled in terms of the proposed dimensionless number. The results reported in this work give a simple and general way to define the flow-focusing conditions promoted by viscoelastic effects. PMID:23670133

  18. Viscoelastic structures. [finite element computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, K. K.; Heer, E.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical analysis of viscoelastic problems may be achieved by either a step-by-step solution procedure or by the integral transform approach. However, for complicated loading and material property relationships, the latter method proves ineffective. Programs specifically developed for the analysis of viscoelastic structures are considered along with multipurpose programs with specific viscoelastic analysis capabilities.

  19. Variation in viscoelastic properties of bovine articular cartilage below, up to and above healthy gait-relevant loading frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Hamid; Shepherd, Duncan ET

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the variation in viscoelastic properties of femoral head bovine articular cartilage, on-bone, over five orders of magnitude of loading frequency. These frequencies ranged from below, up to and above healthy gait-relevant frequencies, using<1, 1–5 and 10 Hz, respectively. Dynamic mechanical analysis was used to measure storage and loss stiffness. A maximum compressive force of 36 N was applied through a chamfered-end, 5.2-mm-diameter, indenter. This induced a maximum nominal stress of 1.7 MPa. The ratio of storage to loss stiffness increased from near parity (2.5) at low frequencies to 11.4 at 10 Hz. This was the result of a significant logarithmic increase (p < 0.05) in storage stiffness with frequency, from 367 N/mm (0.001 Hz) up to 1460 N/mm (10 Hz). In contrast, the loss stiffness remained approximately constant. In conclusion, viscoelastic properties of articular cartilage measured at frequencies below those of gait activities are poor predictors of its relevant dynamic mechanical behaviour. PMID:25767149

  20. Insoluble elastin reduces collagen scaffold stiffness, improves viscoelastic properties, and induces a contractile phenotype in smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Alan J; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2015-12-01

    Biomaterials with the capacity to innately guide cell behaviour while also displaying suitable mechanical properties remain a challenge in tissue engineering. Our approach to this has been to utilise insoluble elastin in combination with collagen as the basis of a biomimetic scaffold for cardiovascular tissue engineering. Elastin was found to markedly alter the mechanical and biological response of these collagen-based scaffolds. Specifically, during extensive mechanical assessment elastin was found to reduce the specific tensile and compressive moduli of the scaffolds in a concentration dependant manner while having minimal effect on scaffold microarchitecture with both scaffold porosity and pore size still within the ideal ranges for tissue engineering applications. However, the viscoelastic properties were significantly improved with elastin addition with a 3.5-fold decrease in induced creep strain, a 6-fold increase in cyclical strain recovery, and with a four-parameter viscoelastic model confirming the ability of elastin to confer resistance to long term deformation/creep. Furthermore, elastin was found to result in the modulation of SMC phenotype towards a contractile state which was determined via reduced proliferation and significantly enhanced expression of early (α-SMA), mid (calponin), and late stage (SM-MHC) contractile proteins. This allows the ability to utilise extracellular matrix proteins alone to modulate SMC phenotype without any exogenous factors added. Taken together, the ability of elastin to alter the mechanical and biological response of collagen scaffolds has led to the development of a biomimetic biomaterial highly suitable for cardiovascular tissue engineering. PMID:26431909

  1. Variation in viscoelastic properties of bovine articular cartilage below, up to and above healthy gait-relevant loading frequencies.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Hamid; Espino, Daniel M; Shepherd, Duncan E T

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the variation in viscoelastic properties of femoral head bovine articular cartilage, on-bone, over five orders of magnitude of loading frequency. These frequencies ranged from below, up to and above healthy gait-relevant frequencies, using<1, 1-5 and 10 Hz, respectively. Dynamic mechanical analysis was used to measure storage and loss stiffness. A maximum compressive force of 36 N was applied through a chamfered-end, 5.2-mm-diameter, indenter. This induced a maximum nominal stress of 1.7 MPa. The ratio of storage to loss stiffness increased from near parity (2.5) at low frequencies to 11.4 at 10 Hz. This was the result of a significant logarithmic increase (p < 0.05) in storage stiffness with frequency, from 367 N/mm (0.001 Hz) up to 1460 N/mm (10 Hz). In contrast, the loss stiffness remained approximately constant. In conclusion, viscoelastic properties of articular cartilage measured at frequencies below those of gait activities are poor predictors of its relevant dynamic mechanical behaviour. PMID:25767149

  2. Viscoelastic Properties of Core-Shell-Structured, Hemicellulose-Rich Nanofibrillated Cellulose in Dispersion and Wet-Film States.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Reina; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Hänninen, Tuomas; Ono, Yuko; Hakalahti, Minna; Tammelin, Tekla; Isogai, Akira

    2016-06-13

    We report the viscoelastic properties of core-shell-structured, hemicellulose-rich nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) in dispersion and wet-film states. The hemicellulose-rich NFC (hemicellulose neutral sugars 23%, carboxylate 0.2 mmol g(-1)), prepared from Japanese persimmons, had a core crystallite thickness of 2.3 nm and unit fibril thickness of 4.2 nm. A carboxylate-rich NFC (hemicellulose neutral sugars 7%, carboxylate 0.9 mmol g(-1)) with crystallite and fibril widths of 2.5 and 3.3 nm, respectively, was used as a reference. The solid-concentration dependencies of the storage moduli of gel-like water dispersions of the hemicellulose-rich NFC were weaker than those of carboxylate-rich NFC, and the dispersions were loosely flocculated even at high salt concentrations and low pH values. The viscoelastic properties of wet NFC films were similar to those of their dispersions; the hemicellulose-rich NFC films were significantly less sensitive to salt concentration and pH and were soft and swollen at high salt concentrations and low pH values. PMID:27142723

  3. Linear and nonlinear mechanical properties of a series of epoxy resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curliss, D. B.; Caruthers, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    The linear viscoelastic properties have been measured for a series of bisphenol-A-based epoxy resins cured with the diamine DDS. The linear viscoelastic master curves were constructed via time-temperature superposition of frequency dependent G-prime and G-double-prime isotherms. The G-double-prime master curves exhibited two sub-Tg transitions. Superposition of isotherms in the glass-to-rubber transition (i.e., alpha) and the beta transition at -60 C was achieved by simple horizontal shifts in the log frequency axis; however, in the region between alpha and beta, superposition could not be effected by simple horizontal shifts along the log frequency axis. The different temperature dependency of the alpha and beta relaxation mechanisms causes a complex response of G-double-prime in the so called alpha-prime region. A novel numerical procedure has been developed to extract the complete relaxation spectra and its temperature dependence from the G-prime and G-double-prime isothermal data in the alpha-prime region.

  4. Viscoelasticity of silica gels

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, G.W.

    1995-12-01

    The response of silica gels to mechanical loads depends on the properties of the solid phase and the permeability of the network. Understanding this behavior is essential for modeling of stresses developed during drying or heating of gels. The permeability and the mechanical properties are readily determined from a simple beam-bending experiment, by measuring the load relaxation that occurs at constant deflection. Load decay results from movement of the liquid within the network; in addition, there may be viscoelastic relaxation of the network itself. Silica gel is viscoelastic in chemically aggressive media, but in inert liquids (such as ethanol or acetone) it is elastic. Experiments show that the viscoelastic relaxation time decreases as the concentration and pH of the water in the pore liquid increase. During drying, the permeability decreases and the viscosity increases, both exhibiting a power-law dependence on density of the gel network.

  5. Viscoelastic Properties of Polymers: A Comparison of Micro and Macro Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champhekar, Mangesh

    annealing time. The decreasing hardness and modulus of the samples with increasing contact depth or indentation depth (for rubbers) was attributed to interplay between the instrumental/analysis errors and material properties. Dynamic nanoindentation studies were also carried out on the three amorphous glassy materials (a-PS, HIPS, ABS), the four rubbers (SBR, NR, neoprene, PDMS) and the PLLA samples. The storage modulus (E') and loss modulus (E'') values obtained by dynamic nanoindentation were compared with those obtained from conventional DMA testing and a good level of agreement was observed, with the values obtained from nanoindentation ca. 2-3 times higher than those obtained from conventional DMA testing depending upon the material under consideration. The reason for this observation is currently unknown, as there is no physical basis available in the literature to compare the values on different length scales since the methods of analysis used to extract the values of E' and E'' and the mode of deformation used is different for both the methods. However, the level of agreement between the two methods shows that dynamic nanoindentation is a powerful tool to capture the viscoelastic properties of polymers on smaller length scales.

  6. Theoretical and experimental study of the effect of fluorine substitution on stability and viscoelastic properties of smectic phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, T.; Fouzai, M.; Dhaoudi, H.; Marcerou, J. P.; Othman, T.

    2016-06-01

    Some chiral series with benzoate cores (CnHH, CnF3 and CnF2) are reported. These series (hydrogenous, monofluoro-substituted in positions 2 and 3 of the first phenyl ring near the chiral chain) display very rich polymorphism, including SmC*, SmC*α, SmC*FI1, SmC*FI2 and SmC*A phases. Based on the theoretical Hammaneh-Taylor model, we analyze phase diagrams and physical properties, including spontaneous polarization, transverse dipole moment and torsion of the studied compounds. This description offers an insight into the factors that affect the stability of the intermediate smectic phases. The effect of fluoro substitution on the visco-elastic properties is investigated.

  7. The relationship between mechanical properties and ballistic penetration depth in a viscoelastic gel.

    PubMed

    Mrozek, Randy A; Leighliter, Brad; Gold, Christopher S; Beringer, Ian R; Yu, Jian H; VanLandingham, Mark R; Moy, Paul; Foster, Mark H; Lenhart, Joseph L

    2015-04-01

    The fundamental material response of a viscoelastic material when impacted by a ballistic projectile has important implication for the defense, law enforcement, and medical communities particularly for the evaluation of protective systems. In this paper, we systematically vary the modulus and toughness of a synthetic polymer gel to determine their respective influence on the velocity-dependent penetration of a spherical projectile. The polymer gels were characterized using tensile, compression, and rheological testing taking special care to address the unique challenges associated with obtaining high fidelity mechanical data on highly conformal materials. The depth of penetration data was accurately described using the elastic Froude number for viscoelastic gels ranging in Young's modulus from ~60 to 630 kPa. The minimum velocity of penetration was determined to scale with the gel toughness divided by the gel modulus, a qualitative estimate for the zone of deformation size scale upon impact. We anticipate that this work will provide insight into the critical material factors that control ballistic penetration behavior in soft materials and aid in the design and development of new ballistic testing media. PMID:25637822

  8. Mapping viscoelastic properties of healthy and pathological red blood cells at the nanoscale level.

    PubMed

    Ciasca, G; Papi, M; Di Claudio, S; Chiarpotto, M; Palmieri, V; Maulucci, G; Nocca, G; Rossi, C; De Spirito, M

    2015-10-28

    In order to pass through the microcirculation, red blood cells (RBCs) need to undergo extensive deformations and to recover the original shape. This extreme deformability is altered by various pathological conditions. On the other hand, an altered RBC deformability can have major effects on blood flow and can lead to pathological implications. The study of the viscoelastic response of red blood cells to mechanical stimuli is crucial to fully understand deformability changes under pathological conditions. However, the typical erythrocyte biconcave shape hints to a complex and intrinsically heterogeneous mechanical response that must be investigated by using probes at the nanoscale level. In this work, the local viscoelastic behaviour of healthy and pathological red blood cells was probed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Our results clearly show that the RBC stiffness is not spatially homogeneous, suggesting a strong correlation with the erythrocyte biconcave shape. Moreover, our nanoscale mapping highlights the key role played by viscous forces, demonstrating that RBCs do not behave as pure elastic bodies. The fundamental role played by viscous forces is further strengthened by the comparison between healthy and pathological (diabetes mellitus) RBCs. It is well known that pathological RBCs are usually stiffer than the healthy ones. Our measures unveil a more complex scenario according to which the difference between normal and pathological red blood cells does not merely lie in their stiffness but also in a different dynamical response to external stimuli that is governed by viscous forces. PMID:26415744

  9. Characterization of the dynamic properties of viscoelastic elements by the direct stiffness and master curve methodologies, part 1: design of load frame and fixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyadiji, S. O.; Tomlinson, G. R.

    1995-10-01

    The theoretical foundations and principles governing the design of the test fixtures, including the load frame, for use in conjunction with the direct complex stiffness test method for the characterization of the dynamic properties of viscoelastic elements are presented. A graphical approach for facilitating the design and/or evaluation of the static stiffness and fundamental resonance frequency characteristics of the load frame is developed and its use illustrated. Based on an approximate analytical model of the complex stiffness test system comprising the load frame, force transducer, test sample end plates, connecting rods and a viscoelastic element, expressions are derived for correcting the inherent systematic errors in the measured complex stiffness of the viscoelastic element arising from the stiffness and inertia of these fixtures. It is shown that, for errors of less than 5% between the true complex stiffness of a viscoelastic element and the uncorrected measured stiffness, the stiffness of any of the test fixtures should be greater than the highest stiffness of the viscoelastic element by a factor of about 100, over the test frequency range.

  10. Finite element analysis of the contact forces between viscoelastic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Q. J.; Zhu, H. P.; Yu, A. B.

    2013-06-01

    The normal and tangential force-displacement (NFD and TFD) relations as well as the rolling friction between viscoelastic particles are investigated by means of finite element method (FEM). A new set of semi-theoretical models are proposed for the NFD, TFD and rolling friction based on the contact mechanics and the FEM results. Compared with previous empirical models (e.g. Linear-Spring-Dashpot model), the new models have an advantage that all parameters can be directly determined from the material properties. Therefore they can eliminate the uncertainty in parameter selection and should be more effective in discrete element method (DEM) simulations of viscoelastic granular materials.

  11. Textural and cooking properties and viscoelastic changes on heating and cooling of Balkan cheeses.

    PubMed

    Guinee, T P; Pudja, P; Miočinović, J; Wiley, J; Mullins, C M

    2015-11-01

    The growth in food service and prepared consumer foods has led to increasing demand for cheese with customized textural and cooking characteristics. The current study evaluated Kačkavalj, Kačkavalj Krstaš, and Trappist cheeses procured from manufacturing plants in Serbia for texture profile characteristics, flow and extensibility of the heated cheese, and changes in viscoelasticity characteristics during heating and cooling. Measured viscoelastic parameters included elastic modulus, G', loss modulus, G″, and loss tangent, LT (G″/G'). The melting temperature and congealing temperature were defined as the temperature at which LT=1 during heating from 25 to 90°C and on cooling from 90 to 25°C. The maximum LT during heating was as an index of the maximum fluidity of the molten cheese. Significant variation was noted for the extent of flow and extensibility of the heated cheeses, with no trend of cheese type. As a group, the Kačkavalj cheeses had relatively high levels of salt-in-moisture and pH 4.6-soluble N and low protein-to-fat ratio and levels of αs1-CN (f24-199). They fractured during compression to 75%; had relatively low values of cohesiveness, chewiness, and springiness; melted at ~70 to 90°C; reached maximum LT at 90°C; and congealed at 58 to 63°C. Conversely, the Kačkavalj Krstaš and Trappist cheeses had low levels of primary proteolysis and salt-in-moisture content and a high protein-to-fat ratio. They did not fracture during compression, had high values for cohesiveness and chewiness, melted at lower temperatures (56-62°C), attained maximum fluidity at a lower temperature (72-78°C), and congealed at 54 to 69°C. There was a hysteretic dependence of G' and LT on temperature for all cheeses, with the LT during cooling being higher than that during heating, and G' during cooling being lower or higher than the equivalent values during heating depending on the cheese type. Monitoring the dynamic changes in viscoelasticity during heating and

  12. Viscoelastic properties of polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate) dispersions sterically stabilized by hydrophobically modified inulin (polyfructose) polymeric surfactant.

    PubMed

    Nestor, Jérémie; Obiols-Rabasa, Marc; Esquena, Jordi; Solans, Conxita; Levecke, Bart; Booten, Karl; Tadros, Tharwat F

    2008-03-01

    Recently, steric repulsive forces induced by a new graft copolymer surfactant, which is based in inulin (polyfructose), have been described. Previous investigations by atomic force microscopy between solid surfaces covered with adsorbed surfactant indicated strong repulsive forces even at high electrolyte concentration, due to the steric repulsion produced by the surfactant hydration. In the present paper, the colloidal stabilization provided by this surfactant is studied by rheology. The measurements were carried out on sterically stabilized polystyrene (PS) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) containing adsorbed surfactant (INUTEC SP1). Steady-state shear stress as a function of shear rate curves was established at various latex volume fractions. The viscosity volume fraction curves were compared with those calculated using the Doughtry-Krieger equation for hard sphere dispersions. From the experimental eta r-phi curves the effective volume fraction of the latex dispersions could be calculated and this was used to determine the adsorbed layer thickness Delta. The value obtained was 9.6 nm, which is in good agreement with that obtained using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Viscoelastic measurements of the various latex dispersions were carried out as a function of applied stress (to obtain the linear viscoelastic region) and frequency. The results showed a change from predominantly viscous to predominantly elastic response at a critical volume fraction (phi c). The effective critical volume fraction, phi eff, was calculated using the adsorbed layer thickness (Delta) obtained from steady-state measurements. For PS latex dispersions phi eff was found to be equal to 0.24 whereas for PMMA phi eff=0.12. These results indicated a much softer interaction between the latex dispersions containing hydrated polyfructose loops and tails when compared with latices containing poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) layers. The difference could be attributed to the stronger hydration of the

  13. Influence of different purification and drying methods on rheological properties and viscoelastic behaviour of durian seed gum.

    PubMed

    Amid, Bahareh Tabatabaee; Mirhosseini, Hamed

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of different purification and drying methods on the viscoelastic behaviour and rheological properties of durian seed gum. The results indicated that the purified gum A (using isopropanol and ethanol) and D (using hydrochloric acid and ethanol) showed the highest and lowest viscosity, respectively. Four drying techniques included oven drying (105 °C), freeze drying, spray drying and vacuum oven drying. In the present work, all purified gums exhibited more elastic (gel-like) behaviour than the viscous (liquid-like) behaviour (G″

  14. Physiology-based model of cell viscoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, José J; Albo, Santiago

    2013-07-01

    The measured viscoelastic properties of biological tissues is the result of the passive and active response of the cells. We propose an evolution law of the remodeling process in the cytoskeleton which is able to mimic the viscous properties of biological cellular tissues. Our model is based on dynamical changes of the resting length. We show that under the small strain regime, the linear rheology models are recovered, with the relaxation time being replaced by the cell resistance to remodel. We implement the one-dimensional model into network systems of two and three dimensions, and show that the same conclusions may be drawn for those systems. PMID:23944493

  15. Mapping viscoelastic properties of healthy and pathological red blood cells at the nanoscale level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciasca, G.; Papi, M.; di Claudio, S.; Chiarpotto, M.; Palmieri, V.; Maulucci, G.; Nocca, G.; Rossi, C.; de Spirito, M.

    2015-10-01

    In order to pass through the microcirculation, red blood cells (RBCs) need to undergo extensive deformations and to recover the original shape. This extreme deformability is altered by various pathological conditions. On the other hand, an altered RBC deformability can have major effects on blood flow and can lead to pathological implications. The study of the viscoelastic response of red blood cells to mechanical stimuli is crucial to fully understand deformability changes under pathological conditions. However, the typical erythrocyte biconcave shape hints to a complex and intrinsically heterogeneous mechanical response that must be investigated by using probes at the nanoscale level. In this work, the local viscoelastic behaviour of healthy and pathological red blood cells was probed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Our results clearly show that the RBC stiffness is not spatially homogeneous, suggesting a strong correlation with the erythrocyte biconcave shape. Moreover, our nanoscale mapping highlights the key role played by viscous forces, demonstrating that RBCs do not behave as pure elastic bodies. The fundamental role played by viscous forces is further strengthened by the comparison between healthy and pathological (diabetes mellitus) RBCs. It is well known that pathological RBCs are usually stiffer than the healthy ones. Our measures unveil a more complex scenario according to which the difference between normal and pathological red blood cells does not merely lie in their stiffness but also in a different dynamical response to external stimuli that is governed by viscous forces.In order to pass through the microcirculation, red blood cells (RBCs) need to undergo extensive deformations and to recover the original shape. This extreme deformability is altered by various pathological conditions. On the other hand, an altered RBC deformability can have major effects on blood flow and can lead to pathological implications. The study of the viscoelastic

  16. Composite propellant technology research: Mechanical property characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, Mark V.

    1991-01-01

    Proof for the existence of a single Poisson's ratio function in isotropic linear viscoelastic materials is presented. An in-depth discussion is given of three dimensional viscoelastic material properties and their relationships to linear isotropic and orthotropic viscoelastic materials. A discussion of the alternate invariant definition as used by Abaqus and how it relates to the form used by Dr. S. Peng is presented.

  17. Viscoelastic properties and adsorption behaviors of two kinds of pyridine insoluble fractions of coal extracts with different aggregated states

    SciTech Connect

    Hengfu Shui; Zhicai Wang

    2007-09-15

    Two kinds of pyridine insoluble fractions (PI) of coal extracts with different solubilities in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) were characterized in this paper. PI-0 was obtained by the pyridine fractionation of Upper Freeport coal extracts with a CS{sub 2}/NMP mixed solvent (1:1 by volume), and its solubility in NMP is 53 wt %. While PI-1, which was obtained by the removal of NMP and tetrabutylammonium acetate (TBAA) from a PI-0 solution in NMP containing TBAA, was almost completely soluble in NMP. Solid-state {sup 13}CNMR spectra indicated that the two PIs have the same chemical structure. The viscoelastic properties and methanol adsorption behaviors of the two PIs were measured. The dynamic viscoelasticities of the two PIs are similar, and the elastic modulus (G') of PI-1 is lower before the softening temperature than that of PI-0, suggesting that the macromolecular network of PI-1 is looser compared to that of PI-0. The methanol sorption behaviors of PI-0 and PI-1 are also similar, and lines curve-fitted with the Langmuir-Henry equation were in agreement with the experimental data, suggesting that the bulk structure of the two PIs is similar. The methanol sorption for PI-1 is larger than that for PI-0. The constants of the Langmuir-Henry equation obtained by successive fitting for the two PIs indicated that the microporosity of PI-1 is larger than that of PI-0. The results obtained here suggested that the dissociation of molecular interactions is responsible for the high solubility of PI-1. 20 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Viscoelastic Properties, Ionic Conductivity, and Materials Design Considerations for Poly(styrene-b-ethylene oxide-b-styrene)-Based Ion Gel Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Sipei; Lee, Keun Hyung; Sun, Jingru; Frisbie, C. Daniel; Lodge, Timothy P.

    2013-03-07

    The viscoelastic properties and ionic conductivity of ion gels based on the self-assembly of a poly(styrene-b-ethylene oxide-b-styrene) (SOS) triblock copolymer (M{sub n,S} = 3 kDa, M{sub n,O} = 35 kDa) in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ([EMI][TFSA]) were investigated over the composition range of 10-50 wt % SOS and the temperature range of 25-160 C. The poly(styrene) (PS) end-blocks associate into micelles, whereas the poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) midblocks are well-solvated by this ionic liquid. The ion gel with 10 wt % SOS melts at 54 C, with the longest relaxation time exhibiting a similar temperature dependence to that of the viscosity of bulk PS. However, the actual values of the gel relaxation time are more than 4 orders of magnitude larger than the relaxation time of bulk PS. This is attributed to the thermodynamic penalty of pulling PS end-blocks through the PEO/[EMI][TFSA] matrix. Ion gels with 20-50 wt % SOS do not melt and show two plateaus in the storage modulus over the temperature and frequency ranges measured. The one at higher frequencies is that of an entangled network of PEO strands with PS cross-links; the modulus displays a quadratic dependence on polymer weight fraction and agrees with the prediction of linear viscoelastic theory assuming half of the PEO chains are elastically effective. The frequency that separates the two plateaus, {omega}{sub c}, reflects the time scale of PS end-block pull-out. The other plateau at lower frequencies is that of a congested micelle solution with PS cores and PEO coronas, which has a power law dependence on domain spacing similar to diblock melts. The ionic conductivity of the ion gels is compared to PEO homopolymer solutions at similar polymer concentrations; the conductivity is reduced by a factor of 2.1 or less, decreases with increasing PS volume fraction, and follows predictions based on a simple obstruction model. Our collective results allow the formulation

  19. Influence of nanoparticle-ion and nanoparticle-polymer interactions on ion transport and viscoelastic properties of polymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogurampelly, Santosh; Sethuraman, Vaidyanathan; Pryamitsyn, Victor; Ganesan, Venkat

    2016-04-01

    We use atomistic simulations to probe the ion conductivities and mechanical properties of polyethylene oxide electrolytes containing Al2O3 nanoparticles. We specifically study the influence of repulsive polymer-nanoparticle and ion-nanoparticle interactions and compare the results with those reported for electrolytes containing the polymorph β-Al2O3 nanoparticles. We observe that incorporating repulsive nanoparticle interactions generally results in increased ionic mobilities and decreased elastic moduli for the electrolyte. Our results indicate that both ion transport and mechanical properties are influenced by the polymer segmental dynamics in the interfacial zones of the nanoparticle in the ion-doped systems. Such effects were seen to be determined by an interplay between the nanoparticle-polymer, nanoparticle-ion, and ion-polymer interactions. In addition, such interactions were also observed to influence the number of dissociated ions and the resulting conductivities. Within the perspective of the influence of nanoparticles on the polymer relaxation times in ion-doped systems, our results in the context of viscoelastic properties were consistent with the ionic mobilities. Overall, our results serve to highlight some issues that confront the efforts to use nanoparticle dispersions to simultaneously enhance the conductivity and the mechanical strength of polymer electrolyte.

  20. Viscoelasticity of biomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Glasser, W.G.; Hatakeyama, H.

    1992-01-01

    Viscoelasticity of Biomaterials is divided into three sections. The first offers a materials design lesson on the architectural arrangement of biopolymers in collagen. Included also are reviews on solution properties of polysacchardies, chiral and liquid crystalline solution characteristics of cellulose derivatives, and viscoelastic properties of wood and wood fiber reinforced thermoplastics. The second section, Biogels and Gelation, discusses the molecular arrangements of highly hydrated biomaterials such as mucus, gums, skinlike tissue, and silk fibroin. The physical effects that result from the transition from a liquid to a solid state are the subject of the third section, which focuses on relaxation phenomena. Gel formation, the conformation of domain structures, and motional aspects of complex biomaterials are described in terms of recent experimental advances in various fields. A relevant chapter on the effects of ionizing radiation on connective tissue is abstracted separately.

  1. Linear instability of the electrified free interface between two cylindrical shells of viscoelastic fluids through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirwah, Magdy A.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we have discussed the linear stability analysis of the electrified surface separating two coaxial Oldroyd-B fluid layers confined between two impermeable rigid cylinders in the presence of both interfacial insoluble surfactant and surface charge through porous media. The case of long waves interfacial stability has been studied. The dispersion relation is solved numerically and hence the effects of various parameters are illustrated graphically. Our results reveal that the influence of the physicochemical parameter β is to shrink the instability region of the surface and reduce the growth rate of the unstable normal modes. Such important effects of the surfactant on the shape of interfacial structures are more sensitive to the variation of the β corresponding to non-Newtonian fluids-model compared with the Newtonian fluids model. In the case of long wave limit, it is demonstrated that increasing β, has a dual role in-fluence (de-stabilizing effects) depending on the viscosity of the core fluid. It has a destabilizing effect at the large values of the core fluid viscosity coefficient, while this role is exchanged to a regularly stabilizing influence at small values of such coefficient.

  2. Viscoelasticity measurements inside liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu; Gibson, Lachlan; Preece, Daryl; Nieminen, Timo A.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2014-09-01

    Microrheology, the study of the behavior of fluids on the microscopic scale, has been and continues to be one of the most important subjects that can be applied to characterize the behavior of biological fluids. It is extremely difficult to make rapid measurement of the viscoelastic properties of the interior of living cells. Liposomes are widely used as model system for studying different aspects of cell biology. We propose to develop a microrheometer, based on real-time control of optical tweezers, in order to investigate the viscoelastic properties of the fluid inside liposomes. This will give greater understanding of the viscoelastic properties of the fluids inside cells. In our experiment, the liposomes are prepared by different methods to find out both a better way to make GUVs and achieve efficient encapsulation of particle. By rotating the vaterite inside a liposome via spin angular momentum, the optical torque can be measured by measuring the change of polarization of the transmitted light, which allows the direct measurement of viscous drag torque since the optical torque is balanced by the viscous drag. We present an initial feasibility demonstration of trapping and manipulation of a microscopic vaterite inside the liposome. The applied method is simple and can be extended to sensing within the living cells.

  3. The effect of water absorption on the viscoelastic properties of poly(styrene-block-isobutylene-block-styrene) for use in biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fittipaldi, Mauro; Rodriguez, Luis A.; Grace, Landon R.

    2015-05-01

    The decrease in glass transition temperature and change in creep compliance due to water diffusion in a biocompatible thermoplastic elastomer was studied and quantified. Knowledge of the mechanical and viscoelastic performance of the styrene-isobutylene-styrene block (SIBS) copolymer is important to determine the feasibility of certain in-vivo applications. Furthermore, the deterioration in these types of properties due to the plasticizing effect of water must be well understood for long term usage. Samples were formed with an injection molding press and fully dried prior to immersion in distilled water at 37°C. Water diffusion kinetics were studied for four different SIBS copolymers of varying molecular weight and styrene content by measuring weight changes as a function of time. These gravimetric diffusion studies showed an inverse relationship between diffusivity and styrene content and molecular weight for the first thousand hours of immersion. Measurements of storage modulus, loss modulus, tangent delta, strain recovery and creep compliance were performed using a dynamic mechanical analyzer for the high molecular weight, high styrene content SIBS version at different absorbed water contents. A measurable and nearly linear decrease of the glass transition temperature and creep recovery with respect to water content was observed for the samples tested even at relatively low water content: an increase in water content of 0.27% correlated to a decrease of 4°C in glass transition temperature while a 0.16% weight increase corresponded to a 12.5% decrease in creep recovery. These quantified material properties restrict the use of SIBS in certain implantable operations that undergo cyclic strains, and in sterilization techniques that require high temperatures. As such, they are important to understand in order to determine the viability of in vivo usage of this biocompatible polymer.

  4. Effect of the loading duration on the linear viscoelastic parameters of tropical wood: case of Tectona grandis L.f (Teak) and Diospyros mespiliformis (Ebony) of Benin Republic.

    PubMed

    Houanou, Agapi Kocouvi; Tchéhouali, Adolphe Dèfodji; Foudjet, Amos Erick

    2014-01-01

    Judicious and regulated use of wood as a building material is better than that of many other conventional materials in terms of environmental issues of this century. The study of the behavior of wood requires a better understanding of the characteristics in different possible cases of loading including loads applied instantly, loads applied for a short time and loads applied for a long time. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of the loading duration on the linear viscoelastic parameters of tropical wood in creep test. Creep tests conducted on two species of tropical wood, Tectona grandis L.f and Diospyros mespiliformis, were carried out for a total loading duration of 15 hours by subjecting samples to bending test through with equal strain in all sections. After measuring the instantaneous deflection, the other measurements were carried out at regular time each 30 minutes. Each recorded deflection was converted into longitudinal deformation and the data were analyzed by considering fourteen loading durations. Using the least squares method, the dynamic modulus of elasticity and the modulus of dynamic viscosity were determined for each loading time. The results showed that the loading time has no influence on the modulus of dynamic viscosity. On the other hand, the dynamic modulus of elasticity decreases and tends towards zero. Good agreement between creep test data and dynamic modulus of elasticity was found using mathematical function in power. Suitably, the "power" function established between the elastic dynamic modulus and the loading duration can be used to extrapolate deformations values. PMID:24567881

  5. Viscoelastic properties of single polysaccharide molecules determined by analysis of thermally driven oscillations of an atomic force microscope cantilever.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Masaru; Byrne, Katherine; Khatri, Bhavin; McLeish, Tom C B; Radford, Sheena E; Smith, D Alastair

    2004-10-12

    We report on single molecule measurements of the viscoelastic properties of the polysaccharide dextran using a new approach which involves acquiring the power spectral density of the thermal noise of an atomic force microscope cantilever while holding the single molecule of interest under force-clamp conditions. The attractiveness of this approach when compared with techniques which use forced oscillations under constant loading rate conditions is that it is a near-equilibrium measure of mechanical response which provides a more relevant probe of thermally driven biomolecular dynamics. Using a simple harmonic oscillator model of the cantilever-molecule system and by subtracting the response of the free cantilever taking into account hydrodynamic effects, the effective damping zetamol and elastic constant kmol of a single molecule are obtained. The molecular elasticity measured by this new technique shows a dependence on applied force that reflects the chair-boat conformational transition of the pyranose rings of the dextran molecule which is in good agreement with values obtained directly from the gradient of a conventional constant loading rate force-extension curve. The molecular damping is also seen to follow a nontrivial dependence on loading which we suggest indicates that it is internal friction and not work done on the solvent that is the dominant dissipative process. PMID:15461521

  6. The poro-viscoelastic properties of trabecular bone: a micro computed tomography-based finite element study.

    PubMed

    Sandino, Clara; McErlain, David D; Schipilow, John; Boyd, Steven K

    2015-04-01

    Bone is a porous structure with a solid phase that contains hydroxyapatite and collagen. Due to its composition, bone is often represented either as a poroelastic or as a viscoelastic material; however, the poro-viscoelastic formulation that allows integrating the effect of both the fluid flow and the collagen on the mechanical response of the tissue, has not been applied yet. The objective of this study was to develop a micro computed tomography (µCT)-based finite element (FE) model of trabecular bone that includes both the poroelastic and the viscoelastic nature of the tissue. Cubes of trabecular bone (N=25) from human distal tibia were scanned with µCT and stress relaxation experiments were conducted. The µCT images were the basis for sample specific FE models, and the stress relaxation experiments were simulated applying a poro-viscoelastic formulation. The model considers two scales of the tissue: the intertrabecular pore and the lacunar-canalicular pore scales. Independent viscoelastic and poroelastic models were also developed to determine their contribution to the poro-viscoelastic model. All the experiments exhibited a similar relaxation trend. The average reaction force before relaxation was 9.28 × 10(2)N (SD ± 5.11 × 10(2)N), and after relaxation was 4.69 × 10(2)N (SD ± 2.88 × 10(2)N). The slope of the regression line between the force before and after relaxation was 1.92 (R(2)=0.96). The poro-viscoelastic models captured 49% of the variability of the experimental data before relaxation and 33% after relaxation. The relaxation predicted with viscoelastic models was similar to the poro-viscoelastic ones; however, the poroelastic formulation underestimated the reaction force before relaxation. These data suggest that the contribution of viscoelasticity (fluid flow-independent mechanism) to the mechanical response of the tissue is significantly greater than the contribution of the poroelasticity (fluid flow-dependent mechanism). PMID:25591049

  7. Viscoelasticity of mono- and polydisperse inverse ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Saldivar-Guerrero, Ruben; Richter, Reinhard; Rehberg, Ingo; Aksel, Nuri; Heymann, Lutz; Rodriguez-Fernández, Oliverio S

    2006-08-28

    We report on measurements of a magnetorheological model fluid created by dispersing nonmagnetic microparticles of polystyrene in a commercial ferrofluid. The linear viscoelastic properties as a function of magnetic field strength, particle size, and particle size distribution are studied by oscillatory measurements. We compare the results with a magnetostatic theory proposed by De Gans et al. [Phys. Rev. E 60, 4518 (1999)] for the case of gap spanning chains of particles. We observe these chain structures via a long distance microscope. For monodisperse particles we find good agreement of the measured storage modulus with theory, even for an extended range, where the linear magnetization law is no longer strictly valid. Moreover we compare for the first time results for mono- and polydisperse particles. For the latter, we observe an enhanced storage modulus in the linear regime of the magnetization. PMID:16965057

  8. Topological properties of linear circuit lattices.

    PubMed

    Albert, Victor V; Glazman, Leonid I; Jiang, Liang

    2015-05-01

    Motivated by the topologically insulating circuit of capacitors and inductors proposed and tested by Jia et al. [arXiv:1309.0878], we present a related circuit with fewer elements per site. The normal mode frequency matrix of our circuit is unitarily equivalent to the hopping matrix of a quantum spin Hall insulator, and we identify perturbations that do not backscatter the circuit's edge modes. The idea behind these models is generalized, providing a platform to simulate tunable and locally accessible lattices with arbitrary complex spin-dependent hopping of any range. A simulation of a non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm effect using such linear circuit designs is discussed. PMID:25978235

  9. Linear electro-optical properties of zincite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaldin, Yu. V.

    2004-09-01

    Orientational, dispersion, and temperature dependences of electro-optical coefficients of Li-doped ZnO single crystals are investigated. According to the data on the orientational dependences obtained far from the electronic absorption band, the values of all linearly independent components of the Pockels tensor are specified. In the range from 2 eV to E g , at both 100 and 300 K, the dispersion obeys a power law with m=2, which indicates a two-dimensional character of the van Hove singularity. The anomalies in the temperature dependences in the range from 15 to 700 K are explained by the competing contributions of the anharmonicities of the electron and lattice subsystems, which lead to anomalous behavior of the coefficients at both low ( T < 100 K) and high ( T > 100 K) temperatures. In the low-temperature range, the identified anomalies correlate with data of independent measurements of birefringence, spontaneous polarization, and dilatometry.

  10. Viscoelasticity of reversibly crosslinked networks of semiflexible polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plagge, Jan; Fischer, Andreas; Heussinger, Claus

    2016-06-01

    We present a theoretical framework for the linear and nonlinear viscoelastic properties of reversibly crosslinked networks of semiflexible polymers. In contrast to affine models where network strain couples to the polymer end-to-end distance, in our model strain rather serves to locally distort the network structure. This induces bending modes in the polymer filaments, the properties of which are slaved to the surrounding network structure. Specifically, we investigate the frequency-dependent linear rheology, in particular in combination with crosslink binding-unbinding processes. We also develop schematic extensions to describe the nonlinear response during creep measurements as well as during constant strain-rate ramps.

  11. Linear viscoelasticity of colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cichocki, B.; Felderhof, B. U.

    1992-12-01

    We develop a phenomenological theory of the dynamic viscosity of colloidal suspensions, based on an extrapolation of the low-frequency behavior by use of a continued-fraction representation. In lowest approximation the dynamic viscosity depends on a small number of parameters, which may be determined experimentally. For semidilute suspensions the parameters may be found by theoretical calculation. The theory is tested by comparison with an exactly soluble model.

  12. Viscoelastic and aging characteristics of polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, W W

    1984-04-01

    This paper concerns the time dependent mechanical properties for incompressible polymer-like materials subjected to finite deformations. There are two parts: the viscoelastic effects and the aging characteristics. A method for determining these mechanical properties is presented in detail.

  13. Viscoelasticity Studies for Chrome-Free Leather

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chrome-free leather such as glutaraldehyde-tanned leather behaves very differently from chrome-tanned leather. Information regarding its viscoelasticity has not been reported. Hysteresis and stress relaxation are two essential properties associated with viscoelasticity. We have designed a cyclic ...

  14. Investigation of mechanisms of viscoelastic behavior of collagen molecule.

    PubMed

    Ghodsi, Hossein; Darvish, Kurosh

    2015-11-01

    Unique mechanical properties of collagen molecule make it one of the most important and abundant proteins in animals. Many tissues such as connective tissues rely on these properties to function properly. In the past decade, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been used extensively to study the mechanical behavior of molecules. For collagen, MD simulations were primarily used to determine its elastic properties. In this study, constant force steered MD simulations were used to perform creep tests on collagen molecule segments. The mechanical behavior of the segments, with lengths of approximately 20 (1X), 38 (2X), 74 (4X), and 290 nm (16X), was characterized using a quasi-linear model to describe the observed viscoelastic responses. To investigate the mechanisms of the viscoelastic behavior, hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) rupture/formation time history of the segments were analyzed and it was shown that the formation growth rate of H-bonds in the system is correlated with the creep growth rate of the segment (β=2.41βH). In addition, a linear relationship between H-bonds formation growth rate and the length of the segment was quantified. Based on these findings, a general viscoelastic model was developed and verified here, using the smallest segment as a building block, the viscoelastic properties of larger segments could be predicted. In addition, the effect of temperature control methods on the mechanical properties were studied, and it was shown that application of Langevin Dynamics had adverse effect on these properties while the Lowe-Anderson method was shown to be more appropriate for this application. This study provides information that is essential for multi-scale modeling of collagen fibrils using a bottom-up approach. PMID:26256473

  15. Effect of Hydrolyzed Wheat Gluten and Starch Ratio on the Viscoelastic Properties of Rubber Composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hydrolyzed wheat gluten (WG) and wheat starch (WS) showed substantial reinforcement effects in rubber composites. Due to different abilities of WG and WS to increase the modulus of rubber composites, the composite properties can be adjusted by varying the ratio of WG and WS as a co-filler. The...

  16. Viscoelastic Properties of Rubber Composites Reinforced by Wheat Gluten and Wheat Starch Co-filler

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to different abilities of wheat gluten (WG) and wheat starch (WS) to increase the modulus of rubber composites, the composite properties can be adjusted by varying the ratio of WG to WS as a co-filler. This study shows that the co-filler composites became more temperature dependent as the WG co...

  17. Viscoelastic properties of kenaf bast fiber in relation to stem age

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural fibers traditionally used for cordage are proving valuable for advanced industrial applications due in part to beneficial physical and chemical properties, but also because they are a renewable and biodegradable resource. Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L., Malvaceae) produces high yields of lig...

  18. A new soy-based hydrogels: development, viscoelastic properties, and application for controlled drug release

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrogels have been widely studied due to their potential application in drug delivery systems as they are capable of forming aggregates in aqueous solutions. Hydrogels formed from biopolymers or natural sources have special advantages because of their biodegradable and biocompatible properties. I...

  19. Viscoelastic Properties of Rubber Composites Reinforced by Wheat Gluten and Starch Co-filler

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to different abilities of wheat gluten (WG) and wheat starch (WS) to increase the modulus of rubber composites, the composite properties can be adjusted by varying the ratio of WG to WS as a co-filler. This study shows that the co-filler composites became more temperature dependent as the WG co...

  20. Shear small-angle light scattering studies of shear-induced concentration fluctuations and steady state viscoelastic properties.

    PubMed

    Endoh, Maya K; Takenaka, Mikihito; Inoue, Tadashi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Takeji

    2008-04-28

    We aimed at elucidating the influence of shear-induced structures (shear-enhanced concentration fluctuations and/or shear-induced phase separation), as observed by rheo-optical methods with small-angle light scattering under shear flow (shear-SALS) and shear-microscopy, on viscoelastic properties in semidilute polystyrene (PS) solutions of 6.0 wt % concentration using dioctyl phthalate (DOP) as a Theta solvent and tricresyl phosphate (TCP) as a good solvent. In order to quantify the effects of the shear-induced structures, we conducted a numerical analysis of rheological properties in a homogeneous solution based on the constitutive equation developed by Kaye-Bernstein, Kearsley, and Zapas (K-BKZ). In the low-to-intermediate shear rate gamma region between tau(w) (-1) and tau(e) (-1), where tau(w) and tau(e) are, respectively, terminal relaxation time and the relaxation time for chain stretching, the steady state rheological properties, such as shear stress sigma and the first normal stress difference N(1), for the PS/DOP and PS/TCP solutions are found to be almost same and also well predicted by the K-BKZ equation, in spite of the fact that there is a significant difference in the shear-induced structures as observed by shear-SALS and shear-microscopy. This implies that the contribution of the concentration fluctuations built up by shear flow to the rheological properties seems very small in this gamma region. On the other hand, once gamma exceeds tau(e) (-1), sigma and N(1) for both PS/DOP and PS/TCP start to deviate from the predicted values. Moreover, when gamma further increases and becomes higher than gamma(a,DOP) (sufficiently higher than tau(e) (-1)), above which rheological and scattering anomalies are observed for PS/DOP, sigma and N(1) for PS/DOP and PS/TCP are significantly larger than those predicted by K-BKZ. Particularly, a steep increase of sigma and N(1) for PS/DOP above gamma(a,DOP) is attributed to an excess free energy stored in the system via

  1. Influence of TESG layer viscoelasticity on the imaging properties of microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiljević, Darko; Murić, Branka; Pantelić, Dejan; Panić, Bratimir

    2012-05-01

    Microlenses were produced by the irradiation of a layer of tot'hema and eosin sensitized gelatin (TESG) with laser light (second harmonic Nd:YAG, 532 nm). For this research, eight microlenses were written on a dog-bone-shaped TESG layer. After production, microlenses were uniaxially stretched on a tensile testing machine. Each microlens had different amounts of strain (0, 30, 60, 80, 120, 140, 180 and 240% strain). The influence of TESG layer extensibility on the imaging properties of microlenses was characterized by calculating the root mean square wavefront aberration, the modulation transfer function and the geometrical spot diagram. All microlenses had very good imaging properties and the microlens with 0% strain had diffraction-limited performance.

  2. Linear and nonlinear magnetic properties of ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalai, I.; Nagy, S.; Dietrich, S.

    2015-10-01

    Within a high-magnetic-field approximation, employing Ruelle's algebraic perturbation theory, a field-dependent free-energy expression is proposed which allows one to determine the magnetic properties of ferrofluids modeled as dipolar hard-sphere systems. We compare the ensuing magnetization curves, following from this free energy, with those obtained by Ivanov and Kuznetsova [Phys. Rev. E 64, 041405 (2001), 10.1103/PhysRevE.64.041405] as well as with new corresponding Monte Carlo simulation data. Based on the power-series expansion of the magnetization, a closed expression for the magnetization is also proposed, which is a high-density extension of the corresponding equation of Ivanov and Kuznetsova. From both magnetization equations the zero-field susceptibility expression due to Tani et al. [Mol. Phys. 48, 863 (1983), 10.1080/00268978300100621] can be obtained, which is in good agreement with our MC simulation results. From the closed expression for the magnetization the second-order nonlinear magnetic susceptibility is also derived, which shows fair agreement with the corresponding MC simulation data.

  3. Linear and nonlinear magnetic properties of ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Szalai, I; Nagy, S; Dietrich, S

    2015-10-01

    Within a high-magnetic-field approximation, employing Ruelle's algebraic perturbation theory, a field-dependent free-energy expression is proposed which allows one to determine the magnetic properties of ferrofluids modeled as dipolar hard-sphere systems. We compare the ensuing magnetization curves, following from this free energy, with those obtained by Ivanov and Kuznetsova [Phys. Rev. E 64, 041405 (2001)] as well as with new corresponding Monte Carlo simulation data. Based on the power-series expansion of the magnetization, a closed expression for the magnetization is also proposed, which is a high-density extension of the corresponding equation of Ivanov and Kuznetsova. From both magnetization equations the zero-field susceptibility expression due to Tani et al. [Mol. Phys. 48, 863 (1983)] can be obtained, which is in good agreement with our MC simulation results. From the closed expression for the magnetization the second-order nonlinear magnetic susceptibility is also derived, which shows fair agreement with the corresponding MC simulation data. PMID:26565247

  4. Ultrasonic characterization of changes in viscoelastic properties of epoxy during cure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, W. P.; Parker, F. R.

    1985-01-01

    A technique for using the longitudinal velocity (LV) of an ultrasonic wave to monitor the extent of cross linking (CL) during the cure of thermosetting resins is described. The method was developed by monitoring the rate of change in LV during the cure of a bisphenol-A epoxy resin with an amine adduct. The experiment included variations in the temperature and stoichiometry in order to express the rate of change in terms of the reaction kinetics. The pulse-echo method was used with a single transducer operating at 20 MHz. Numerical models were defined to account for the acoustic response of a single layer, the attenuation and the reflection coefficient. A linear relationship was observed between the inverse of the temperature and the log of the rate of change in the velocity, supporting the theory that the velocity could be used to monitor the extent of the cross-linking reaction. An activation energy of 11.9 kcal/mole was calculated for the mixture being investigated.

  5. Viscoelastic and Mechanical Properties of Thermoset PMR-type Polyimide-Clay Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdalla, Mohamed O.; Dean, Derrick; Campbell, Sandi

    2002-01-01

    High temperature thermoset polyimide-clay nanocomposites were prepared by blending 2.5 and 5 wt% of an unmodified Na(+-) montmorillonite (PGV) and two organically modified FGV (PGVCl0COOH, PGVC12) with a methanol solution of PMR-15 precursor. The methanol facilitated the dispersal of the unmodified clay. Dynamic mechanical analysis results showed a significant increase in the thermomechanical properties (E' and E") of 2.5 wt% clay loaded nanocomposites in comparison with the neat polyimide. Higher glass transition temperatures were observed for 2.5 wt% nanocomposites compared to the neat polyimide. Flexural properties measurements for the 2.5 wt% nanocomposites showed a significant improvement in the modulus and strength, with no loss in elongation. This trend was not observed for the 5 wt% nanocomposites. An improvement in the CTE was observed for the PGV/PMR-15 nanocomposites, while a decrease was observed for the organically modified samples. This was attributed to potential variations in the interface caused by modifier degradation.

  6. Atomic force microscopy imaging of viscoelastic properties in toughened polypropylene resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nysten, Bernard; Legras, Roger; Costa, Jean-Louis

    1995-11-01

    The bulk morphology of two toughened polypropylene/(ethylene propylene)copolymer resins (PP/EP) presenting different impact resistances has been studied by means of different atomic force microscopy techniques: contact atomic force microscopy, lateral force microscopy (LFM), and force modulation microscopy (FMM). The three techniques reveal two different morphologies as observed in transmission electronic microscopy. In LFM, a higher friction force is observed on the rubbery phase which has the lower Young's modulus confirming the relationship between friction force and elastic properties. In force modulation, the elastic moduli is found to be much lower on the EP nodules in both resins. FMM also reveals that the difference of viscous response between the PP matrix and the EP nodules is much lower in the resin which is less impact resistant.

  7. Reversibility and Viscoelastic Properties of Micropillar Supported and Oriented Magnesium Bundled F-Actin

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Timo; Haraszti, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous actin is one of the most important cytoskeletal elements. Not only is it responsible for the elastic properties of many cell types, but it also plays a vital role in cellular adhesion and motility. Understanding the bundling kinetics of actin filaments is important in the formation of various cytoskeletal structures, such as filopodia and stress fibers. Utilizing a unique pillar-structured microfluidic device, we investigated the time dependence of bundling kinetics of pillar supported free-standing actin filaments. Microparticles attached to the filaments allowed the measurement of thermal motion, and we found that bundling takes place at lower concentrations than previously found in 3-dimensional actin gels, i.e. actin filaments formed bundles in the presence of 5–12 mM of magnesium chloride in a time-dependent manner. The filaments also displayed long term stability for up to hours after removing the magnesium ions from the buffer, which suggests that there is an extensive hysteresis between cation induced crosslinking and decrosslinking. PMID:26322783

  8. Impact of Simulated Microgravity on Cytoskeleton and Viscoelastic Properties of Endothelial Cell

    PubMed Central

    Janmaleki, M.; Pachenari, M.; Seyedpour, S. M.; Shahghadami, R.; Sanati-Nezhad, A.

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on the effects of simulated microgravity (s-μg) on mechanical properties, major cytoskeleton biopolymers, and morphology of endothelial cells (ECs). The structural and functional integrity of ECs are vital to regulate vascular homeostasis and prevent atherosclerosis. Furthermore, these highly gravity sensitive cells play a key role in pathogenesis of many diseases. In this research, impacts of s-μg on mechanical behavior of human umbilical vein endothelial cells were investigated by utilizing a three-dimensional random positioning machine (3D-RPM). Results revealed a considerable drop in cell stiffness and viscosity after 24 hrs of being subjected to weightlessness. Cortical rigidity experienced relatively immediate and significant decline comparing to the stiffness of whole cell body. The cells became rounded in morphology while western blot analysis showed reduction of the main cytoskeletal components. Moreover, fluorescence staining confirmed disorganization of both actin filaments and microtubules (MTs). The results were compared statistically among test and control groups and it was concluded that s-μg led to a significant alteration in mechanical behavior of ECs due to remodeling of cell cytoskeleton. PMID:27581365

  9. Rapamycin Attenuates Age-associated Changes in Tibialis Anterior Tendon Viscoelastic Properties.

    PubMed

    Zaseck, Lauren Wood; Miller, Richard A; Brooks, Susan V

    2016-07-01

    Rapamycin extends mouse life span, but the extent to which rapamycin prevents aging-associated changes in specific tissues remains unclear. Stiffness increases and collagen turnover decreases in mouse tendon with aging; thus, our aim was to determine the effect of long-term rapamycin treatment on the mechanical and structural properties of tendons from old mice. Tendons were harvested from female UM-HET3 mice maintained on a standard chow diet for 4 (adult) or 22 (old) months or fed chow containing polymer-encapsulated rapamycin (eRAPA) from 9 to 22 months of age (old RAPA). Stiffness was twofold higher for tendons of old compared with adult mice, but in old RAPA mice, tendon stiffness was maintained at a value not different from that of adults. Additionally, expression of collagen decreased, expression of matrix metalloproteinase-8 increased, and total hydroxyproline content trended toward decreased levels in tendons of old eRAPA-fed mice compared with controls. Finally, age-associated calcification of Achilles tendons and accompanying elevations in expression of chondrocyte and osteoblast markers were all lower in old eRAPA-fed mice. These results suggest that long-term administration of rapamycin alters the molecular pathways responsible for aging of tendon extracellular matrix, resulting in tissue that is structurally and mechanically similar to tendons in adult mice. PMID:26809496

  10. Viscoelastic properties and nanoscale structures of composite oligopeptide-polysaccharide hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Hyland, Laura L; Taraban, Marc B; Feng, Yue; Hammouda, Boualem; Yu, Y Bruce

    2012-03-01

    Biocompatible and biodegradable peptide hydrogels are drawing increasing attention as prospective materials for human soft tissue repair and replacement. To improve the rather unfavorable mechanical properties of our pure peptide hydrogels, in this work we examined the possibility of creating a double hydrogel network. This network was created by means of the coassembly of mutually attractive, but self-repulsive oligopeptides within an already-existing fibrous network formed by the charged, biocompatible polysaccharides chitosan, alginate, and chondroitin. Using dynamic oscillatory rheology experiments, it was found that the coassembly of the peptides within the existing polysaccharide network resulted in a less stiff material as compared to the pure peptide networks (the elastic modulus G' decreased from 90 to 10 kPa). However, these composite oligopeptide-polysaccharide hydrogels were characterized by a greater resistance to deformation (the yield strain γ grew from 4 to 100%). Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study the 2D cross-sectional shapes of the fibers, their dimensional characteristics, and the mesh sizes of the fibrous networks. Differences in material structures found with SANS experiments confirmed rheology data, showing that incorporation of the peptides dramatically changed the morphology of the polysaccharide network. The resulting fibers were structurally very similar to those forming the pure peptide networks, but formed less stiff gels because of their markedly greater mesh sizes. Together, these findings suggest an approach for the development of highly deformation-resistant biomaterials. PMID:21994046

  11. Effects of racing and gender on viscoelastic properties of horse blood.

    PubMed

    Wood, S C; Fedde, M R

    1997-02-01

    Splenic contraction in racing horses increases the hematocrit (hct), thereby increasing blood viscosity. We tested as to whether racing also affects the elastic properties of blood. Mares and geldings were studied for thus purpose. After racing, there was: (i) an increased erythrocyte count independent of gender and race distance (0.32 to 1.7 km): (ii) an increased mean erythrocyte volume in both sexes; (iii) an increased heterogeneity of RBC size in both sexes; (iv) an increased plasma fibrinogen concentration and erythrocyte sedimentation rate in both sexes; and (v) an increased elastic yield stress (EYS). When corrected to a constant hct of 65%, the blood of mares, but not geldings, had increased EYS after racing. Gender differences in fibrinogen response (p = 0.72) did not account for this and the mechanism is not known. Since EYS is analogous to the point at which ketchup starts to flow from a bottle, its increase could be deleterious in vascular beds characterized by pulsatile flow, e.g. the coronary circulation. PMID:9108630

  12. Dynamic viscoelastic properties of processed soft denture liners: Part II--Effect of aging.

    PubMed

    Wagner, W C; Kawano, F; Dootz, E R; Koran, A

    1995-09-01

    The proper functioning of soft denture liners depends to a great extent on their mechanical properties. As with many polymers these materials are affected by aging. Twelve soft denture liners were processed by a laboratory according to the manufacturers' directions. Five specimens of each material were tested without aging. Five additional specimens of each material were subjected to 900 hours of accelerated aging in a Weather-Ometer instrument. These were tested with a dynamic viscoelastometer at three frequencies and two temperatures, and data for 37 degrees C and 1 Hz was obtained. Two of the ethyl methacrylate resins demonstrated the largest increases in storage (E') and loss moduli (E") after aging. These materials also showed the greatest overall E' and E". One denture liner material exhibited 673% and 488% increases in E' and E", and other materials showed smaller increases. The effects of aging on the damping factor (tan delta) were varied and five materials showed increased tan delta. Only two ethyl methacrylate resins developed lower tan delta. All the silicone and polyphosphazine rubbers showed small changes after aging and had the lowest tan delta values. Significance of differences between materials and treatments was tested with ANOVA, Scheffé intervals, and t-tests at a = 0.05. The ethyl methacrylate soft denture liners were affected the most by accelerated aging, and the silicones and polyphosphazine were least affected. The ethyl methacrylate resins also had the greatest values of E', E", and tan delta after aging. PMID:7473285

  13. Viscoelastic Properties and Nano-scale Structures of Composite Oligopeptide-Polysaccharide Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Hyland, Laura L.; Taraban, Marc B.; Feng, Yue; Hammouda, Boualem; Yu, Y. Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Biocompatible and biodegradable peptide hydrogels are drawing increasing attention as prospective materials for human soft tissue repair and replacement. To improve the rather unfavorable mechanical properties of our pure peptide hydrogels, in this work we examined the possibility of creating a double hydrogel network. This network was created by means of the co-assembly of mutually attractive but self-repulsive oligopeptides within an already existing fibrous network formed by the charged, biocompatible polysaccharides chitosan, alginate, and chondroitin. Using dynamic oscillatory rheology experiments, it was found that the co-assembly of the peptides within the existing polysaccharide network resulted in a less stiff material as compared to the pure peptide networks (the elastic modulus G′ decreased from 90 kPa to 10 kPa). However, these composite oligopeptide-polysaccharide hydrogels were characterized by a greater resistance to deformation (the yield strain γ grew from 4 % to 100 %). Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study the 2D cross-sectional shapes of the fibers, their dimensional characteristics and the mesh sizes of the fibrous networks. Differences in material structures found with SANS experiments confirmed rheology data showing that incorporation of the peptides dramatically changed the morphology of the polysaccharide network. The resulting fibers were structurally very similar to those forming the pure peptide networks, but formedless stiff gels because of their markedly greater mesh sizes. Together, these findings suggest an approach for the development of highly deformation-resistant biomaterials. PMID:21994046

  14. Impact of Simulated Microgravity on Cytoskeleton and Viscoelastic Properties of Endothelial Cell.

    PubMed

    Janmaleki, M; Pachenari, M; Seyedpour, S M; Shahghadami, R; Sanati-Nezhad, A

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on the effects of simulated microgravity (s-μg) on mechanical properties, major cytoskeleton biopolymers, and morphology of endothelial cells (ECs). The structural and functional integrity of ECs are vital to regulate vascular homeostasis and prevent atherosclerosis. Furthermore, these highly gravity sensitive cells play a key role in pathogenesis of many diseases. In this research, impacts of s-μg on mechanical behavior of human umbilical vein endothelial cells were investigated by utilizing a three-dimensional random positioning machine (3D-RPM). Results revealed a considerable drop in cell stiffness and viscosity after 24 hrs of being subjected to weightlessness. Cortical rigidity experienced relatively immediate and significant decline comparing to the stiffness of whole cell body. The cells became rounded in morphology while western blot analysis showed reduction of the main cytoskeletal components. Moreover, fluorescence staining confirmed disorganization of both actin filaments and microtubules (MTs). The results were compared statistically among test and control groups and it was concluded that s-μg led to a significant alteration in mechanical behavior of ECs due to remodeling of cell cytoskeleton. PMID:27581365

  15. Dynamic viscoelastic models of human skin using optical elastography

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, Steven P.; Khan, Altaf; Dai, Zoujun; Royston, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    A novel technique for measuring in vivo human skin viscoelastic properties using optical elastography has been developed. The technique uses geometrically focused surface (GFS) waves that allow for wide bandwidth measurements of the wave field. An analytical solution for the case of a radiating annular disk surface source was fit to experimentally measured GFS waves, enabling an estimate of the frequency-dependent surface wavenumber, which can then be related to the dynamic shear modulus. Several viscoelastic models were then fit to the dynamic shear modulus dispersion curve. Viscoelastic models were evaluated based on their overall quality of fit and variability amongst healthy volunteers. An Ecoflex phantom was used to validate the procedure and results by comparison to similar studies using the same type of phantom. For skin results, it was found that the “α” parameters from the fractional models had the least variability, with coefficients of variability of 0.15, and 0.16. The best fitting models were the standard linear solid, and the fractional Voigt, with a mean fit correlation coefficient, R2, of 0.93, 0.89, respectively. This study has demonstrated the efficacy of this new method, and with larger studies the viscoelastic skin models could be used to identify various skin diseases and their response to treatment. PMID:26305137

  16. Dynamic viscoelastic models of human skin using optical elastography.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Steven P; Khan, Altaf; Dai, Zoujun; Royston, Thomas J

    2015-09-01

    A novel technique for measuring in vivo human skin viscoelastic properties using optical elastography has been developed. The technique uses geometrically focused surface (GFS) waves that allow for wide bandwidth measurements of the wave field. An analytical solution for the case of a radiating annular disk surface source was fit to experimentally measured GFS waves, enabling an estimate of the frequency-dependent surface wavenumber, which can then be related to the dynamic shear modulus. Several viscoelastic models were then fit to the dynamic shear modulus dispersion curve. Viscoelastic models were evaluated based on their overall quality of fit and variability amongst healthy volunteers. An Ecoflex phantom was used to validate the procedure and results by comparison to similar studies using the same type of phantom. For skin results, it was found that the 'α' parameters from the fractional models had the least variability, with coefficients of variability of 0.15, and 0.16. The best fitting models were the standard linear solid, and the fractional Voigt, with a mean fit correlation coefficient, R(2), of 0.93, 0.89, respectively. This study has demonstrated the efficacy of this new method, and with larger studies the viscoelastic skin models could be used to identify various skin diseases and their response to treatment. PMID:26305137

  17. Direct comparison of nanoindentation and macroscopic measurements of bone viscoelasticity

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Tara N.; Zhang, Jingzhou; Ovaert, Timothy C.; Roeder, Ryan K.; Niebur, Glen L.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoindentation has become a standard method for measuring mechanical properties of bone, especially within microstructural units such as individual osteons or trabeculae. The use of nanoindentation to measure elastic properties has been thoroughly studied and validated. However, it is also possible to assess time dependent properties of bone by nanoindentation. The goal of this study was to compare time dependent mechanical properties of bone measured at the macroscopic level with those measured by nanoindentation. Twelve samples were prepared from the posterior distal femoral cortex of young cows. Initially, dogbone samples were prepared and subjected to torsional stress relaxation in a saline bath at 37 C. A 5 mm thick disk was subsequently sectioned from the gage length, and subjected to nanoindentation. Nanoindentation was performed on hydrated samples using a standard protocol with 20 indents performed in 20 different osteons in each sample. Creep and stress relaxation data were fit to a Burgers four parameter rheological model, a five parameter generalized Maxwell model, and a three parameter standard linear solid. For Burgers viscoelastic model, the time constants measured by nanoindentation and torsion were weakly negatively correlated, while for the other two models the time constants were uncorrelated. The results support the notion that the viscoelastic behavior of bone at the macroscopic scale is primarily due to microstructural features, interfaces, or fluid flow, rather than viscous behavior of the bone tissue. As viscoelasticity affects the fatigue behavior of materials, the microscale properties may provide a measure of bone quality associated with initial damage formation. PMID:22098905

  18. Effects of temperature and dissolved lithium perchlorate on the viscoelastic and dynamic properties of poly(ethylene oxide), (PEO) melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoslovov, Radoslav B.

    Poly(ethylene oxide)/lithium perchlorate (PEO/LiClO4) complexes are widely studied as a prototype solid polymer electrolyte in rechargeable lithium-polymer batteries. Characterizing the structure and dynamics of the system in its molten state is important for understanding the role of the polymer environment in lithium ion transport and conductivity. A fiber-optic coupled Fabry-Perot interferometer is employed in the investigation of the electrolyte viscoelastic and dynamic properties, which are both related to the intrachain local mobility and therefore to ion diffusion. The properties of the system are studied as a function of composition, temperature, and frequency. Structural relaxation processes are observed both in the neat polymer melt and in the salt containing electrolytes. For the neat PEO-1K melt the relaxation is identified as Maxwell-Debye single-exponential relaxation (beta = 1). The relaxation time follows Arrhenius temperature dependence with activation energy of the order of 10-11 kJ/mol. Upon addition of salt, the character of the relaxation persists with beta = 1, while the characteristic relaxation time slows down and the activation energy increases slightly. The slowdown of the dynamics is more pronounced at lower temperatures. In addition, with increasing salt concentration the elastic modulus increases significantly making the system stiffer at all temperatures, while the maximum of the storage modulus is shifted to higher temperatures. These effects result in a decrease in polymer segmental mobility and consequently in reduction of lithium ion diffusivity, with increased salt concentration. A unique q-dependent measurement is performed, allowing the investigation of the Brillouin frequency and linewidth as a function of frequency. It revealed a double-step relaxation in the electrolyte. The two relaxations are identified as secondary relaxations with Maxwell-Debye character (beta=1). The lower-frequency relaxation is stronger and has

  19. Swimming & Propulsion in Viscoelastic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arratia, Paulo

    2012-02-01

    Many microorganisms have evolved within complex fluids, which include soil, intestinal fluid, and mucus. The material properties or rheology of such fluids can strongly affect an organism's swimming behavior. A major challenge is to understand the mechanism of propulsion in media that exhibit both solid- and fluid-like behavior, such as viscoelastic fluids. In this talk, we present experiments that explore the swimming behavior of biological organisms and artificial particles in viscoelastic media. The organism is the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a roundworm widely used for biological research that swims by generating traveling waves along its body. Overall, we find that fluid elasticity hinders self-propulsion compared to Newtonian fluids due to the enhanced resistance to flow near hyperbolic points for viscoelastic fluids. As fluid elasticity increases, the nematode's propulsion speed decreases. These results are consistent with recent theoretical models for undulating sheets and cylinders. In order to gain further understanding on propulsion in viscoelastic media, we perform experiments with simple reciprocal artificial `swimmers' (magnetic dumbbell particles) in polymeric and micellar solutions. We find that self-propulsion is possible in viscoelastic media even if the motion is reciprocal.

  20. Squirming propulsion in viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Corato, Marco; Greco, Francesco; Maffettone, Pier Luca

    2015-11-01

    The locomotion of organisms in Newtonian fluids at low-Reynolds numbers displays very different features from that at large Reynolds numbers; indeed, in this regime the viscous forces are dominant over the inertial ones and propulsion is possible only with non-time-reversible swimming strokes. In many situations of biological interest, however, small organisms are propelling themselves through non-Newtonian fluids such as mucus or biofilms, which display highly viscoelastic properties. Fluid viscoelasticity affects in a complex way both the micro-organisms' swimming velocity and dissipated power, possibly affecting their collective behavior. In our work, we employ the so called ``squirmer'' model to study the motion of spherical ciliated organisms in a viscoelastic fluid. We derive analytical formulas for the squirmer swimming velocity and dissipated power that show a complex interplay between the fluid constitutive behavior and the propulsion mechanism.

  1. A review on the systematic formulation of 3D multiparameter full waveform inversion in viscoelastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pengliang; Brossier, Romain; Métivier, Ludovic; Virieux, Jean

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we study 3D multiparameter full waveform inversion (FWI) in viscoelastic media based on the generalized Maxwell/Zener body (GMB/GZB) including arbitrary number of attenuation mechanisms. We present a frequency-domain energy analysis to establish the stability condition of a full anisotropic viscoelastic system, according to zero-valued boundary condition and the elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle: the real-valued stiffness matrix becomes a complex-valued one in Fourier domain when seismic attenuation is taken into account. We develop a least-squares optimization approach to linearly relate the quality factor with the anelastic coefficients by estimating a set of constants which are independent of the spatial coordinates, which supplies an explicit incorporation of the parameter Q in the general viscoelastic wave equation. By introducing the Lagrangian multipliers into the matrix expression of the wave equation with implicit time integration, we build a systematic formulation of multiparameter full waveform inversion for full anisotropic viscoelastic wave equation, while the equivalent form of the state and adjoint equation with explicit time integration is available to be resolved efficiently. In particular, this formulation lays the foundation for the inversion of the parameter Q in the time domain with full anisotropic viscoelastic properties. In the 3D isotropic viscoelastic settings, the anelastic coefficients and the quality factors using bulk and shear moduli parameterization can be related to the counterparts using P- and S- velocity. Gradients with respect to any other parameter of interest can be found by chain rule. Pioneering numerical validations as well as the real applications of this most generic framework will be carried out to disclose the potential of viscoelastic FWI when adequate high performance computing resources and the field data are available.

  2. Relativistic viscoelastic fluid mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sakatani, Yuho

    2011-08-15

    A detailed study is carried out for the relativistic theory of viscoelasticity which was recently constructed on the basis of Onsager's linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. After rederiving the theory using a local argument with the entropy current, we show that this theory universally reduces to the standard relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics in the long time limit. Since effects of elasticity are taken into account, the dynamics at short time scales is modified from that given by the Navier-Stokes equations, so that acausal problems intrinsic to relativistic Navier-Stokes fluids are significantly remedied. We in particular show that the wave equations for the propagation of disturbance around a hydrostatic equilibrium in Minkowski space-time become symmetric hyperbolic for some range of parameters, so that the model is free of acausality problems. This observation suggests that the relativistic viscoelastic model with such parameters can be regarded as a causal completion of relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics. By adjusting parameters to various values, this theory can treat a wide variety of materials including elastic materials, Maxwell materials, Kelvin-Voigt materials, and (a nonlinearly generalized version of) simplified Israel-Stewart fluids, and thus we expect the theory to be the most universal description of single-component relativistic continuum materials. We also show that the presence of strains and the corresponding change in temperature are naturally unified through the Tolman law in a generally covariant description of continuum mechanics.

  3. Absolute Quantitation of Bacterial Biofilm Adhesion and Viscoelasticity by Microbead Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Peter C.Y.; Dutcher, John R.; Beveridge, Terry J.; Lam, Joseph S.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are the most prevalent mode of bacterial growth in nature. Adhesive and viscoelastic properties of bacteria play important roles at different stages of biofilm development. Following irreversible attachment of bacterial cells onto a surface, a biofilm can grow in which its matrix viscoelasticity helps to maintain structural integrity, determine stress resistance, and control ease of dispersion. In this study, a novel application of force spectroscopy was developed to characterize the surface adhesion and viscoelasticity of bacterial cells in biofilms. By performing microbead force spectroscopy with a closed-loop atomic force microscope, we accurately quantified these properties over a defined contact area. Using the model gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we observed that the adhesive and viscoelastic properties of an isogenic lipopolysaccharide mutant wapR biofilm were significantly different from those measured for the wild-type strain PAO1 biofilm. Moreover, biofilm maturation in either strain also led to prominent changes in adhesion and viscoelasticity. To minimize variability in force measurements resulting from experimental parameter changes, we developed standardized conditions for microbead force spectroscopy to enable meaningful comparison of data obtained in different experiments. Force plots measured under standard conditions showed that the adhesive pressures of PAO1 and wapR early biofilms were 34 ± 15 Pa and 332 ± 47 Pa, respectively, whereas those of PAO1 and wapR mature biofilms were 19 ± 7 Pa and 80 ± 22 Pa, respectively. Fitting of creep data to a Voigt Standard Linear Solid viscoelasticity model revealed that the instantaneous and delayed elastic moduli in P. aeruginosa were drastically reduced by lipopolysaccharide deficiency and biofilm maturation, whereas viscosity was decreased only for biofilm maturation. In conclusion, we have introduced a direct biophysical method for simultaneously quantifying

  4. Linear contrail and contrail cirrus properties determined from satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minnis, Patrick; Bedka, Sarah T.; Duda, David P.; Bedka, Kristopher M.; Chee, Thad; Ayers, J. Kirk; Palikonda, Rabindra; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Khlopenkov, Konstantin V.; Boeke, Robyn

    2013-06-01

    properties of contrail cirrus clouds are retrieved through analysis of Terra and Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer data for 21 cases of spreading linear contrails. For these cases, contrail cirrus enhanced the linear contrail coverage by factors of 2.4-7.6 depending on the contrail mask sensitivity. In dense air traffic areas, linear contrail detection sensitivity is apparently reduced when older contrails overlap and thus is likely diminished during the afternoon. The mean optical depths and effective particle sizes of the contrail cirrus were 2-3 times and 20% greater, respectively, than the corresponding values retrieved for the adjacent linear contrails. When contrails form below, in, or above existing cirrus clouds, the column cloud optical depth is increased and particle size is decreased. Thus, even without increased cirrus coverage, contrails will affect the radiation balance. These results should be valuable for refining model characterizations of contrail cirrus needed to fully assess the climate impacts of contrails.

  5. Human Arm-Like Robot Control Based on Human Multi-Joint Arm Viscoelastic Properties and A Modified Forward Gaze Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Aihui; Deng, Mingcong

    In this paper, a human arm-like robot control scheme is proposed based on time-varying viscoelastic properties which consist of multi-joint stiffness and multi-joint viscosity during human arm movements and a modified forward gaze model. In general, in human multi-joint arm movements, the multi-joint torque is assumed to be a function of multi-joint stiffness matrix, multi-joint viscosity matrix, and motor command descending from central nervous system (CNS). In order to make the present human arm-like robot move like a human multi-joint arm, a feedback controller and a modified forward gaze model are presented in the human arm-like robot control system. That is, the feedback controller is designed to obtain desired motion mechanism based on real measured data from viscoelastic properties of human multi-joint arm, and the forward gaze model in which steering gains are modified using a cost function is used to compensate the term related to the effect of CNS. The effectiveness of the proposed method is confirmed by the simulation results based on experimental data.

  6. Fractional calculus in viscoelasticity: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meral, F. C.; Royston, T. J.; Magin, R.

    2010-04-01

    Viscoelastic properties of soft biological tissues provide information that may be useful in medical diagnosis. Noninvasive elasticity imaging techniques, such as Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE), reconstruct viscoelastic material properties from dynamic displacement images. The reconstruction algorithms employed in these techniques assume a certain viscoelastic material model and the results are sensitive to the model chosen. Developing a better model for the viscoelasticity of soft tissue-like materials could improve the diagnostic capability of MRE. The well known "integer derivative" viscoelastic models of Voigt and Kelvin, and variations of them, cannot represent the more complicated rate dependency of material behavior of biological tissues over a broad spectral range. Recently the "fractional derivative" models have been investigated by a number of researchers. Fractional order models approximate the viscoelastic material behavior of materials through the corresponding fractional differential equations. This paper focuses on the tissue mimicking materials CF-11 and gelatin, and compares fractional and integer order models to describe their behavior under harmonic mechanical loading. Specifically, Rayleigh (surface) waves on CF-11 and gelatin phantoms are studied, experimentally and theoretically, in order to develop an independent test bed for assessing viscoelastic material models that will ultimately be used in MRE reconstruction algorithms.

  7. Viscoelastic behavior of discrete human collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Svensson, René B; Hassenkam, Tue; Hansen, Philip; Peter Magnusson, S

    2010-01-01

    Whole tendon and fibril bundles display viscoelastic behavior, but to the best of our knowledge this property has not been directly measured in single human tendon fibrils. In the present work an atomic force microscopy (AFM) approach was used for tensile testing of two human patellar tendon fibrils. Fibrils were obtained from intact human fascicles, without any pre-treatment besides frozen storage. In the dry state a single isolated fibril was anchored to a substrate using epoxy glue, and the end of the fibril was glued on to an AFM cantilever for tensile testing. In phosphate buffered saline, cyclic testing was performed in the pre-yield region at different strain rates, and the elastic response was determined by a stepwise stress relaxation test. The elastic stress-strain response corresponded to a second-order polynomial fit, while the viscous response showed a linear dependence on the strain. The slope of the viscous response showed a strain rate dependence corresponding to a power function of powers 0.242 and 0.168 for the two patellar tendon fibrils, respectively. In conclusion, the present work provides direct evidence of viscoelastic behavior at the single fibril level, which has not been previously measured. PMID:19878908

  8. Effect of enzymatic hydrolysis of starch on pasting, rheological and viscoelastic properties of milk-barnyard millet (Echinochloa frumentacea) blends meant for spray drying.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P Arun; Pushpadass, Heartwin A; Franklin, Magdaline Eljeeva Emerald; Simha, H V Vikram; Nath, B Surendra

    2016-10-01

    The influence of enzymatic hydrolysis of starch on the pasting properties of barnyard millet was studied using a rheometer. The effects of blending hydrolyzed barnyard millet wort with milk at different ratios (0:1, 1:1, 1:1.5 and 1:2) on flow and viscoelastic behavior were investigated. From the pasting curves, it was evident that enzymatically-hydrolyzed starch did not exhibit typical pasting characteristics expected of normal starch. The Herschel-Bulkley model fitted well to the flow behaviour data, with coefficient of determination (R(2)) ranging from 0.942 to 0.988. All milk-wort blends demonstrated varying degree of shear thinning with flow behavior index (n) ranging from 0.252 to 0.647. Stress-strain data revealed that 1:1 blend of milk to wort had the highest storage modulus (7.09-20.06Pa) and an elastically-dominant behavior (phase angle <45°) over the tested frequency range. The crossover point of G' and G" shifted to higher frequencies with increasing wort content. From the flow and viscoelastic behavior, it was concluded that the 1:1 blend of milk to wort would have least phase separation and better flowability during spray drying. PMID:27296446

  9. Viscoelastic analyses of launch vehicle components

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, J.K.; Lin, S.R.

    1995-12-31

    Current analysis techniques for solid rocket propellant, and insulation used in space launch vehicles, have several shortcomings. The simplest linear elastic analysis method ignores the inherent viscoelastic behavior of these materials entirely. The relaxation modulus method commonly used to simulate time-dependent effects ignores the past loading history, while the rigorous viscoelastic finite-element analysis is often expensive and impractical. The response of viscoelastic materials is often characterized by the time-dependent relaxation moduli obtained from uniaxial relaxation tests. Since the relaxation moduli are functions of elapsed time, the viscoelastic analysis is not only dependent on the current stress or strain state but also the full loading history. As a preliminary step towards developing a procedure which will yield reasonably conservative results for analyzing the structural response of solid rocket motors, an equivalent-modulus approach was developed. To demonstrate its application, a viscoelastic thick-walled cylindrical material, confined by a stiff steel case and under an internal pressure condition, was analyzed using (1) the equivalent-modulus elastic quasi-static method, (2) an exact viscoelastic closed-form solution, and (3) the viscoelastic finite-element program. A combination of two springs and one viscous damper is used to represent the viscoelastic material with parameters obtained from stress-relaxation tests. The equivalent modulus is derived based on an accumulated quasi-static stress/strain state. The exact closed-form solution is obtained by the Laplace Transform method. The ABAQUS program is then used for the viscoelastic finite-element solution, where the loading-rate dependent moduli is represented by a Prony series expansion of the relaxation modulus. Additional analyses were performed for two space launch solid rocket motors for the purpose of comparing results from the equivalent-modulus approach and the ABAQUS program.

  10. Theory of reciprocating contact for viscoelastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putignano, Carmine; Carbone, Giuseppe; Dini, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    A theory of reciprocating contacts for linear viscoelastic materials is presented. Results are discussed for the case of a rigid sphere sinusoidally driven in sliding contact with a viscoelastic half-space. Depending on the size of the contact, the frequency and amplitude of the reciprocating motion, and on the relaxation time of the viscoelastic body, we establish that the contact behavior may range from the steady-state viscoelastic solution, in which traction forces always oppose the direction of the sliding rigid punch, to a more elaborate trend, which is due to the strong interaction between different regions of the path covered during the reciprocating motion. Practical implications span a number of applications, ranging from seismic engineering to biotechnology.

  11. Brillouin spectroscopy characterizes microscopic viscoelasticity associated with skin injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2015-03-01

    The viscoelasticity of skin is an important indicator of its healthy condition. However, monitoring the mechanical properties is usually invasive and destructive. In this report, we employed Brillouin microspectroscopy to assess changes of viscoelastic properties of various skin samples. To induce skin injuries, we used the high-power laser irradiation. Brillouin spectra were collected by an earlier developed background free virtually imaged phased array (VIPA) spectrometer. Raman spectroscopy measurements were used to supplement local viscoelastic assessment of skin injuries.

  12. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of chalcogenide microstructured optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trolès, Johann; Brilland, Laurent; Caillaud, Celine; Renversez, Gilles; Mechin, David; Adam, Jean-Luc

    2015-03-01

    Chalcogenide glasses are known for their large transparency in the mid-infrared and their high linear refractive index (>2). They present also a high non-linear coefficient (n2), 100 to 1000 times larger than for silica, depending on the composition. we have developed a casting method to prepare the microstructured chalcogenide preform. This method allows optical losses as low as 0.4 dB/m at 1.55 µm and less than 0.05 dB/m in the mid IR. Various chalcogenide MOFs operating in the IR range has been fabricated in order to associate the high non-linear properties of these glasses and the original MOF properties. For example, small core fibers have been drawn to enhance the non linearities for telecom applications such as signal regeneration and generation of supercontinuum sources. On another hand, in the 3-12 µm window, single mode fibers and exposed core fibers have been realized for Gaussian beams propagation and sensors applications respectively.

  13. Nonlinear viscoelasticity and shear localization at complex fluid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Erni, Philipp; Parker, Alan

    2012-05-22

    Foams and emulsions are often exposed to strong external fields, resulting in large interface deformations far beyond the linear viscoelastic regime. Here, we investigate the nonlinear and transient interfacial rheology of adsorption layers in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. As a prototypical material forming soft-solid-type interfacial adsorption layers, we use Acacia gum (i.e., gum arabic), a protein/polysaccharide hybrid. We quantify its nonlinear flow properties at the oil/water interface using a biconical disk interfacial rheometer and analyze the nonlinear stress response under forced strain oscillations. From the resulting Lissajous curves, we access quantitative measures recently introduced for nonlinear viscoelasticity, including the intracycle moduli for both the maximum and zero strains and the degree of plastic energy dissipation upon interfacial yielding. We demonstrate using in situ flow visualization that the onset of nonlinear viscoelasticity coincides with shear localization at the interface. Finally, we address the nonperiodic character of this flow transition using an experimental procedure based on opposing stress pulses, allowing us to extract additional interfacial properties such as the critical interfacial stress upon yielding and the permanent deformation. PMID:22563849

  14. Anisotropic linear elastic properties of fractal-like composites.

    PubMed

    Carpinteri, Alberto; Cornetti, Pietro; Pugno, Nicola; Sapora, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    In this work, the anisotropic linear elastic properties of two-phase composite materials, made up of square inclusions embedded in a matrix, are investigated. The inclusions present a fractal hierarchical distribution and are supposed to have the same Poisson's ratio as the matrix but a different Young's modulus. The effective elastic moduli of the medium are computed at each fractal iteration by coupling a position-space renormalization-group technique with a finite element analysis. The study allows to obtain and generalize some fundamental properties of fractal composite materials. PMID:21230552

  15. Response properties of pigeon otolith afferents to linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Si, X.; Angelaki, D. E.; Dickman, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, the sensitivity to sinusoidal linear accelerations in the plane of the utricular macula was tested in afferents. The head orientation relative to the translation axis was varied in order to determine the head position that elicited the maximal and minimal responses for each afferent. The response gain and phase values obtained to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz linear acceleration stimuli were then plotted as a function of head orientation and a modified cosine function was fit to the data. From the best-fit cosine function, the predicted head orientations that would produce the maximal and minimal response gains were estimated. The estimated maximum response gains to linear acceleration in the utricular plane for the afferents varied between 75 and 1420 spikes s-1 g-1. The mean maximal gains for all afferents to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz sinusoidal linear acceleration stimuli were 282 and 367 spikes s-1 g-1, respectively. The minimal response gains were essentially zero for most units. The response phases always led linear acceleration and remained constant for each afferent, regardless of head orientation. These response characteristics indicate that otolith afferents are cosine tuned and behave as one-dimensional linear accelerometers. The directions of maximal sensitivity to linear acceleration for the afferents varied throughout the plane of the utricle; however, most vectors were directed out of the opposite ear near the interaural axis. The response dynamics of the afferents were tested using stimulus frequencies ranging between 0.25 Hz and 10 Hz (0.1 g peak acceleration). Across stimulus frequencies, most afferents had increasing gains and constant phase values. These dynamic properties for individual afferents were fit with a simple transfer function that included three parameters: a mechanical time constant, a gain constant, and a fractional order distributed adaptation operator.

  16. Nano-scale temperature dependent visco-elastic properties of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) using atomic force microscope (AFM).

    PubMed

    Grant, Colin A; Alfouzan, Abdulrahman; Gough, Tim; Twigg, Peter C; Coates, Phil D

    2013-01-01

    Visco-elastic behaviour at the nano-level of a commonly used polymer (PET) is characterised using atomic force microscopy (AFM) at a range of temperatures. The modulus, indentation creep and relaxation time of the PET film (thickness=100 μm) is highly sensitive to temperature over an experimental temperature range of 22-175°C. The analysis showed a 40-fold increase in the amount of indentation creep on raising the temperature from 22°C to 100°C, with the most rapid rise occurring above the glass-to-rubber transition temperature (T(g)=77.1°C). At higher temperatures, close to the crystallisation temperature (T(c)=134.7°C), the indentation creep reduced to levels similar to those at temperatures below T(g). The calculated relaxation time showed a similar temperature dependence, rising from 0.6s below T(g) to 1.2s between T(g) and T(c) and falling back to 0.6s above T(c). Whereas, the recorded modulus of the thick polymer film decreases above T(g), subsequently increasing near T(c). These visco-elastic parameters are obtained via mechanical modelling of the creep curves and are correlated to the thermal phase changes that occur in PET, as revealed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). PMID:22750040

  17. A Thermodynamic Theory of Solid Viscoelasticity. Part II:; Nonlinear Thermo-viscoelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Leonov, Arkady I.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper, second in the series of three papers, develops a general, nonlinear, non-isothermal, compressible theory for finite rubber viscoelasticity and specifies it in a form convenient for solving problems important to the rubber, tire, automobile, and air-space industries, among others. Based on the quasi-linear approach of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, a general nonlinear theory of differential type has been developed for arbitrary non-isothermal deformations of viscoelastic solids. In this theory, the constitutive equations were presented as the sum of a rubber elastic (equilibrium) and a liquid type viscoelastic (non-equilibrium) terms. These equations have then been simplified using several modeling and simplicity arguments.

  18. Crustal deformation, the earthquake cycle, and models of viscoelastic flow in the asthenosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.; Kramer, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The crustal deformation patterns associated with the earthquake cycle can depend strongly on the rheological properties of subcrustal material. Substantial deviations from the simple patterns for a uniformly elastic earth are expected when viscoelastic flow of subcrustal material is considered. The detailed description of the deformation pattern and in particular the surface displacements, displacement rates, strains, and strain rates depend on the structure and geometry of the material near the seismogenic zone. The origin of some of these differences are resolved by analyzing several different linear viscoelastic models with a common finite element computational technique. The models involve strike-slip faulting and include a thin channel asthenosphere model, a model with a varying thickness lithosphere, and a model with a viscoelastic inclusion below the brittle slip plane. The calculations reveal that the surface deformation pattern is most sensitive to the rheology of the material that lies below the slip plane in a volume whose extent is a few times the fault depth. If this material is viscoelastic, the surface deformation pattern resembles that of an elastic layer lying over a viscoelastic half-space. When the thickness or breath of the viscoelastic material is less than a few times the fault depth, then the surface deformation pattern is altered and geodetic measurements are potentially useful for studying the details of subsurface geometry and structure. Distinguishing among the various models is best accomplished by making geodetic measurements not only near the fault but out to distances equal to several times the fault depth. This is where the model differences are greatest; these differences will be most readily detected shortly after an earthquake when viscoelastic effects are most pronounced.

  19. Crustal deformation, the earthquake cycle, and models of viscoelastic flow in the asthenosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.; Kramer, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    The crustal deformation patterns associated with the earthquake cycle can depend strongly on the rheological properties of subcrustal material. Substantial deviations from the simple patterns for a uniformly elastic earth are expected when viscoelastic flow of subcrustal material is considered. The detailed description of the deformation pattern and in particular the surface displacements, displacement rates, strains, and strain rates depend on the structure and geometry of the material near the seismogenic zone. The origin of some of these differences are resolved by analyzing several different linear viscoelastic models with a common finite element computational technique. The models involve strike-slip faulting and include a thin channel asthenosphere model, a model with a varying thickness lithosphere, and a model with a viscoelastic inclusion below the brittle slip plane. The calculations reveal that the surface deformation pattern is most sensitive to the rheology of the material that lies below the slip plane in a volume whose extent is a few times the fault depth. If this material is viscoelastic, the surface deformation pattern resembles that of an elastic layer lying over a viscoelastic half-space. When the thickness or breath of the viscoelastic material is less than a few times the fault depth, then the surface deformation pattern is altered and geodetic measurements are potentially useful for studying the details of subsurface geometry and structure. Distinguishing among the various models is best accomplished by making geodetic measurements not only near the fault but out to distances equal to several times the fault depth. This is where the model differences are greatest; these differences will be most readily detected shortly after an earthquake when viscoelastic effects are most pronounced.

  20. Method for characterizing viscoelasticity of human gluteal tissue.

    PubMed

    Then, C; Vogl, T J; Silber, G

    2012-04-30

    Characterizing compressive transient large deformation properties of biological tissue is becoming increasingly important in impact biomechanics and rehabilitation engineering, which includes devices interfacing with the human body and virtual surgical guidance simulation. Individual mechanical in vivo behaviour, specifically of human gluteal adipose and passive skeletal muscle tissue compressed with finite strain, has, however, been sparsely characterised. Employing a combined experimental and numerical approach, a method is presented to investigate the time-dependent properties of in vivo gluteal adipose and passive skeletal muscle tissue. Specifically, displacement-controlled ramp-and-hold indentation relaxation tests were performed and documented with magnetic resonance imaging. A time domain quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) formulation with Prony series valid for finite strains was used in conjunction with a hyperelastic model formulation for soft tissue constitutive model parameter identification and calibration of the relaxation test data. A finite element model of the indentation region was employed. Strong non-linear elastic but linear viscoelastic tissue material behaviour at finite strains was apparent for both adipose and passive skeletal muscle mechanical properties with orthogonal skin and transversal muscle fibre loading. Using a force-equilibrium assumption, the employed material model was well suited to fit the experimental data and derive viscoelastic model parameters by inverse finite element parameter estimation. An individual characterisation of in vivo gluteal adipose and muscle tissue could thus be established. Initial shear moduli were calculated from the long-term parameters for human gluteal skin/fat: G(∞,S/F)=1850 Pa and for cross-fibre gluteal muscle tissue: G(∞,M)=881 Pa. Instantaneous shear moduli were found at the employed ramp speed: G(0,S/F)=1920 Pa and G(0,M)=1032 Pa. PMID:22360834

  1. Linear and Branched PEIs (Polyethylenimines) and Their Property Space

    PubMed Central

    Lungu, Claudiu N.; Diudea, Mircea V.; Putz, Mihai V.; Grudziński, Ireneusz P.

    2016-01-01

    A chemical property space defines the adaptability of a molecule to changing conditions and its interaction with other molecular systems determining a pharmacological response. Within a congeneric molecular series (compounds with the same derivatization algorithm and thus the same brute formula) the chemical properties vary in a monotonic manner, i.e., congeneric compounds share the same chemical property space. The chemical property space is a key component in molecular design, where some building blocks are functionalized, i.e., derivatized, and eventually self-assembled in more complex systems, such as enzyme-ligand systems, of which (physico-chemical) properties/bioactivity may be predicted by QSPR/QSAR (quantitative structure-property/activity relationship) studies. The system structure is determined by the binding type (temporal/permanent; electrostatic/covalent) and is reflected in its local electronic (and/or magnetic) properties. Such nano-systems play the role of molecular devices, important in nano-medicine. In the present article, the behavior of polyethylenimine (PEI) macromolecules (linear LPEI and branched BPEI, respectively) with respect to the glucose oxidase enzyme GOx is described in terms of their (interacting) energy, geometry and topology, in an attempt to find the best shape and size of PEIs to be useful for a chosen (nanochemistry) purpose. PMID:27089324

  2. Linear and Branched PEIs (Polyethylenimines) and Their Property Space.

    PubMed

    Lungu, Claudiu N; Diudea, Mircea V; Putz, Mihai V; Grudziński, Ireneusz P

    2016-01-01

    A chemical property space defines the adaptability of a molecule to changing conditions and its interaction with other molecular systems determining a pharmacological response. Within a congeneric molecular series (compounds with the same derivatization algorithm and thus the same brute formula) the chemical properties vary in a monotonic manner, i.e., congeneric compounds share the same chemical property space. The chemical property space is a key component in molecular design, where some building blocks are functionalized, i.e., derivatized, and eventually self-assembled in more complex systems, such as enzyme-ligand systems, of which (physico-chemical) properties/bioactivity may be predicted by QSPR/QSAR (quantitative structure-property/activity relationship) studies. The system structure is determined by the binding type (temporal/permanent; electrostatic/covalent) and is reflected in its local electronic (and/or magnetic) properties. Such nano-systems play the role of molecular devices, important in nano-medicine. In the present article, the behavior of polyethylenimine (PEI) macromolecules (linear LPEI and branched BPEI, respectively) with respect to the glucose oxidase enzyme GOx is described in terms of their (interacting) energy, geometry and topology, in an attempt to find the best shape and size of PEIs to be useful for a chosen (nanochemistry) purpose. PMID:27089324

  3. Linear elastic properties derivation from microstructures representative of transport parameters.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Minh Tan; Bonnet, Guy; Tuan Luu, Hoang; Perrot, Camille

    2014-06-01

    It is shown that three-dimensional periodic unit cells (3D PUC) representative of transport parameters involved in the description of long wavelength acoustic wave propagation and dissipation through real foam samples may also be used as a standpoint to estimate their macroscopic linear elastic properties. Application of the model yields quantitative agreement between numerical homogenization results, available literature data, and experiments. Key contributions of this work include recognizing the importance of membranes and properties of the base material for the physics of elasticity. The results of this paper demonstrate that a 3D PUC may be used to understand and predict not only the sound absorbing properties of porous materials but also their transmission loss, which is critical for sound insulation problems. PMID:24907783

  4. Perturbation amplitude affects linearly estimated neuromechanical wrist joint properties.

    PubMed

    Klomp, Asbjorn; de Groot, Jurriaan H; de Vlugt, Erwin; Meskers, Carel G M; Arendzen, J Hans; van der Helm, Frans C T

    2014-04-01

    System identification techniques have been used to separate intrinsic muscular and reflexive contributions to joint impedance, which is an essential step in the proper choice of patient specific treatment. These techniques are, however, only well developed for linear systems. Assuming linearity prescribes the neuromuscular system to be perturbed only around predefined operating points. In this study, we test the validity of a commonly used linear model by analyzing the effects of flexion-extension displacement amplitude (2(°), 4(°), and 8(°)) on damping, stiffness, and reflex gain of the wrist joint, at different background torque levels (0, 1, and 2 N · m). With displacement amplitude, intrinsic damping increased, while intrinsic stiffness and reflex gains decreased. These changes were dependent on the level of wrist torque. The dependency of the neuromuscular system properties on even small variations in angular displacement is evident and has to be accounted for when comparing different studies and clinical interpretations using linear identification techniques. Knowledge of the behavior of the neuromuscular system around operating points is an essential step toward the development of nonlinear models that allow for discrimination between patients and controls in a larger range of loading conditions. PMID:24216632

  5. Hybrid-particulate composites based on an epoxy matrix, a reactive rubber, and glass beads: Morphology, viscoelastic, and mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Maazouz, A.; Sautereau, H.; Gerard, J.F. . Lab. des Materiaux Macromoleculaires)

    1993-10-20

    The deformation and fracture behaviors of hybrid-particulate epoxy composites have been examined. These materials were based on a DGEBA/DDA matrix with various volume fractions of glass beads and different rubber contents. Young's modulus, yield stress, dynamic mechanical spectra, and fracture energy have been determined at room temperature. The Kerner model fits well the Young's modulus for the hybrid complexes with various glass bead contents. The analysis of the relaxation peak recorded from viscoelastic measurements allow us to discuss the influence of the introduction of the glass beads on the mobility of macromolecular chains and the characteristics of the rubber-separated phase. The fracture energy displays a strong improvement and synergism effect due to the presence of both kinds of particles. The toughening mechanisms were discussed.

  6. Viscoelastic properties of soft gels: comparison of magnetic resonance elastography and dynamic shear testing in the shear wave regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, R. J.; Clayton, E. H.; Bayly, P. V.

    2011-10-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is used to quantify the viscoelastic shear modulus, G*, of human and animal tissues. Previously, values of G* determined by MRE have been compared to values from mechanical tests performed at lower frequencies. In this study, a novel dynamic shear test (DST) was used to measure G* of a tissue-mimicking material at higher frequencies for direct comparison to MRE. A closed-form solution, including inertial effects, was used to extract G* values from DST data obtained between 20 and 200 Hz. MRE was performed using cylindrical 'phantoms' of the same material in an overlapping frequency range of 100-400 Hz. Axial vibrations of a central rod caused radially propagating shear waves in the phantom. Displacement fields were fit to a viscoelastic form of Navier's equation using a total least-squares approach to obtain local estimates of G*. DST estimates of the storage G' (Re[G*]) and loss modulus G'' (Im[G*]) for the tissue-mimicking material increased with frequency from 0.86 to 0.97 kPa (20-200 Hz, n = 16), while MRE estimates of G' increased from 1.06 to 1.15 kPa (100-400 Hz, n = 6). The loss factor (Im[G*]/Re[G*]) also increased with frequency for both test methods: 0.06-0.14 (20-200 Hz, DST) and 0.11-0.23 (100-400 Hz, MRE). Close agreement between MRE and DST results at overlapping frequencies indicates that G* can be locally estimated with MRE over a wide frequency range. Low signal-to-noise ratio, long shear wavelengths and boundary effects were found to increase residual fitting error, reinforcing the use of an error metric to assess confidence in local parameter estimates obtained by MRE.

  7. Viscoelastic properties of soft gels: comparison of magnetic resonance elastography and dynamic shear testing in the shear wave regime.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, R J; Clayton, E H; Bayly, P V

    2011-10-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is used to quantify the viscoelastic shear modulus, G*, of human and animal tissues. Previously, values of G* determined by MRE have been compared to values from mechanical tests performed at lower frequencies. In this study, a novel dynamic shear test (DST) was used to measure G* of a tissue-mimicking material at higher frequencies for direct comparison to MRE. A closed-form solution, including inertial effects, was used to extract G* values from DST data obtained between 20 and 200 Hz. MRE was performed using cylindrical 'phantoms' of the same material in an overlapping frequency range of 100-400 Hz. Axial vibrations of a central rod caused radially propagating shear waves in the phantom. Displacement fields were fit to a viscoelastic form of Navier's equation using a total least-squares approach to obtain local estimates of G*. DST estimates of the storage G' (Re[G*]) and loss modulus G″ (Im[G*]) for the tissue-mimicking material increased with frequency from 0.86 to 0.97 kPa (20-200 Hz, n = 16), while MRE estimates of G' increased from 1.06 to 1.15 kPa (100-400 Hz, n = 6). The loss factor (Im[G*]/Re[G*]) also increased with frequency for both test methods: 0.06-0.14 (20-200 Hz, DST) and 0.11-0.23 (100-400 Hz, MRE). Close agreement between MRE and DST results at overlapping frequencies indicates that G* can be locally estimated with MRE over a wide frequency range. Low signal-to-noise ratio, long shear wavelengths and boundary effects were found to increase residual fitting error, reinforcing the use of an error metric to assess confidence in local parameter estimates obtained by MRE. PMID:21908903

  8. Viscoelastic properties of soft gels: a comparison of magnetic resonance elastography and dynamic shear testing in the shear wave regime

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, RJ; Clayton, EH; Bayly, PV

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is used to quantify the viscoelastic shear modulus, G*, of human and animal tissues. Previously, values of G* determined by MRE have been compared to values from mechanical tests performed at lower frequencies. In this study, a novel dynamic shear test (DST) was used to measure G* of a tissue-mimicking material at higher frequencies for direct comparison to MRE. A closed form solution, including inertial effects, was used to extract G* values from DST data obtained between 20 and 200 Hz. MRE was performed using cylindrical “phantoms” of the same material in an overlapping frequency range of 100 to 400 Hz. Axial vibrations of a central rod caused radially propagating shear waves in the phantom. Displacement fields were fit to a viscoelastic form of Navier’s equation using a total least squares approach to obtain local estimates of G*. DST estimates of the storage G′ (Re[G*]) and loss modulus, G″ (Im [G*]) for the tissue-mimicking material increased with frequency from 0.86 to 0.97 kPa (20 – 200 Hz, n = 16), while MRE estimates of G′ increased from 1.06 to 1.15 kPa (100–400 Hz, n=6). The loss factor (Im[G*]/Re[G*]) also increased with frequency for both test methods: 0.06 to 0.14 (20 – 200 Hz, DST) and 0.1 to 0.23 (100 – 400 Hz, MRE). Close agreement between MRE and DST results at overlapping frequencies indicates that G* can be locally estimated with MRE over a wide frequency range. Low signal-to-noise ratio, long shear wavelengths and boundary effects were found to increase residual fitting error, reinforcing the use of an error metric to assess confidence in local parameter estimates obtained by MRE. PMID:21908903

  9. Pseudospectral modeling and dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves in viscoelastic media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, K.; Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Chen, C.

    2011-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) is one of the most widely used techniques in environmental and engineering geophysics to determine shear-wave velocities and dynamic properties, which is based on the elastic layered system theory. Wave propagation in the Earth, however, has been recognized as viscoelastic and the propagation of Rayleigh waves presents substantial differences in viscoelastic media as compared with elastic media. Therefore, it is necessary to carry out numerical simulation and dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves in viscoelastic media to better understand Rayleigh-wave behaviors in the real world. We apply a pseudospectral method to the calculation of the spatial derivatives using a Chebyshev difference operator in the vertical direction and a Fourier difference operator in the horizontal direction based on the velocity-stress elastodynamic equations and relations of linear viscoelastic solids. This approach stretches the spatial discrete grid to have a minimum grid size near the free surface so that high accuracy and resolution are achieved at the free surface, which allows an effective incorporation of the free surface boundary conditions since the Chebyshev method is nonperiodic. We first use an elastic homogeneous half-space model to demonstrate the accuracy of the pseudospectral method comparing with the analytical solution, and verify the correctness of the numerical modeling results for a viscoelastic half-space comparing the phase velocities of Rayleigh wave between the theoretical values and the dispersive image generated by high-resolution linear Radon transform. We then simulate three types of two-layer models to analyze dispersive-energy characteristics for near-surface applications. Results demonstrate that the phase velocity of Rayleigh waves in viscoelastic media is relatively higher than in elastic media and the fundamental mode increases by 10-16% when the frequency is above 10. Hz due to the velocity dispersion of P

  10. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of some organoxenon derivatives.

    PubMed

    Avramopoulos, Aggelos; Serrano-Andrés, Luis; Li, Jiabo; Reis, Heribert; Papadopoulos, Manthos G

    2007-12-01

    We employ a series of state-of-the-art computational techniques to study the effect of inserting one or more Xe atoms in HC2H and HC4H, on the linear and nonlinear optical (L&NLO) properties of the resulting compounds. It has been found that the inserted Xe has a great effect on the L&NLO properties of the organoxenon derivatives. We analyze the bonding in HXeC2H, and the change of the electronic structure, which is induced by inserting Xe, in order to rationalize the observed extraordinary L&NLO properties. The derivatives, which are of interest in this work, have been synthesized in a Xe matrix. Thus the effect of the local field (LF), due to the Xe environment, on the properties of HXeC2H, has also been computed. It has been found that the LF effect on some properties is significant. The calculations have been performed by employing a hierarchy of basis sets and the techniques MP2 and CCSD(T) for taking into account correlation. For the interpretation of the results we have employed the complete active space valence bond and CASSCF/CASPT2 methods. PMID:18067344

  11. The influence of time dependent flight and maneuver velocities and elastic or viscoelastic flexibilities on aerodynamic and stability derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochrane, Alexander P.; Merrett, Craig G.; Hilton, Harry H.

    2014-12-01

    The advent of new structural concepts employing composites in primary load carrying aerospace structures in UAVs, MAVs, Boeing 787s, Airbus A380s, etc., necessitates the inclusion of flexibility as well as viscoelasticity in static structural and aero-viscoelastic analyses. Differences and similarities between aeroelasticity and aero-viscoelasticity have been investigated in [2]. An investigation is undertaken as to the dependence and sensitivity of aerodynamic and stability derivatives to elastic and viscoelastic structural flexibility and as to time dependent flight and maneuver velocities. Longitudinal, lateral and directional stabilities are investigated. It has been a well established fact that elastic lifting surfaces are subject to loss of control effectiveness and control reversal at certain flight speeds, which depend on aerodynamic, structural and material properties [5]. Such elastic analyses are extended to linear viscoelastic materials under quasi-static, dynamic, and sudden and gradual loading conditions. In elastic wings one of the critical static parameters is the velocity at which control reversal takes place (VREVE). Since elastic formulations constitute viscoelastic initial conditions, viscoelastic reversal may occur at speeds VREV<≧VREVE, but furthermore does so in time at 0 < tREV ≤ ∞. The influence of the twin effects of viscoelastic and elastic materials and of variable flight velocities on longitudinal, lateral, directional and spin stabilities are also investigated. It has been a well established fact that elastic lifting surfaces are subject to loss of control effectiveness and control reversal at certain flight speeds, which depend on aerodynamic, structural and material properties [5]. Such elastic analyses are here extended to linear viscoelastic materials under quasi-static, dynamic, and sudden and gradual loading conditions. In elastic wings the critical parameter is the velocity at which control reversal takes place (VREVE

  12. The influence of time dependent flight and maneuver velocities and elastic or viscoelastic flexibilities on aerodynamic and stability derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, Alexander P.; Merrett, Craig G.; Hilton, Harry H.

    2014-12-10

    The advent of new structural concepts employing composites in primary load carrying aerospace structures in UAVs, MAVs, Boeing 787s, Airbus A380s, etc., necessitates the inclusion of flexibility as well as viscoelasticity in static structural and aero-viscoelastic analyses. Differences and similarities between aeroelasticity and aero-viscoelasticity have been investigated in [2]. An investigation is undertaken as to the dependence and sensitivity of aerodynamic and stability derivatives to elastic and viscoelastic structural flexibility and as to time dependent flight and maneuver velocities. Longitudinal, lateral and directional stabilities are investigated. It has been a well established fact that elastic lifting surfaces are subject to loss of control effectiveness and control reversal at certain flight speeds, which depend on aerodynamic, structural and material properties [5]. Such elastic analyses are extended to linear viscoelastic materials under quasi-static, dynamic, and sudden and gradual loading conditions. In elastic wings one of the critical static parameters is the velocity at which control reversal takes place (V{sub REV}{sup E}). Since elastic formulations constitute viscoelastic initial conditions, viscoelastic reversal may occur at speeds V{sub REV<}{sup ≧}V{sub REV}{sup E}, but furthermore does so in time at 0 < t{sub REV} ≤ ∞. The influence of the twin effects of viscoelastic and elastic materials and of variable flight velocities on longitudinal, lateral, directional and spin stabilities are also investigated. It has been a well established fact that elastic lifting surfaces are subject to loss of control effectiveness and control reversal at certain flight speeds, which depend on aerodynamic, structural and material properties [5]. Such elastic analyses are here extended to linear viscoelastic materials under quasi-static, dynamic, and sudden and gradual loading conditions. In elastic wings the critical parameter is the velocity at

  13. Influence of chemical extraction on rheological behavior, viscoelastic properties and functional characteristics of natural heteropolysaccharide/protein polymer from Durio zibethinus seed.

    PubMed

    Amid, Bahareh Tabatabaee; Mirhosseini, Hamed

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the demand for a natural plant-based polymer with potential functions from plant sources has increased considerably. The main objective of the current study was to study the effect of chemical extraction conditions on the rheological and functional properties of the heteropolysaccharide/protein biopolymer from durian (Durio zibethinus) seed. The efficiency of different extraction conditions was determined by assessing the extraction yield, protein content, solubility, rheological properties and viscoelastic behavior of the natural polymer from durian seed. The present study revealed that the soaking process had a more significant (p < 0.05) effect than the decolorizing process on the rheological and functional properties of the natural polymer. The considerable changes in the rheological and functional properties of the natural polymer could be due to the significant (p < 0.05) effect of the chemical extraction variables on the protein fraction present in the molecular structure of the natural polymer from durian seed. The natural polymer from durian seed had a more elastic (or gel like) behavior compared to the viscous (liquid like) behavior at low frequency. The present study revealed that the natural heteropolysaccharide/protein polymer from durian seed had a relatively low solubility ranging from 9.1% to 36.0%. This might be due to the presence of impurities, insoluble matter and large particles present in the chemical structure of the natural polymer from durian seed. PMID:23203099

  14. Influence of Chemical Extraction on Rheological Behavior, Viscoelastic Properties and Functional Characteristics of Natural Heteropolysaccharide/Protein Polymer from Durio zibethinus Seed

    PubMed Central

    Amid, Bahareh Tabatabaee; Mirhosseini, Hamed

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the demand for a natural plant-based polymer with potential functions from plant sources has increased considerably. The main objective of the current study was to study the effect of chemical extraction conditions on the rheological and functional properties of the heteropolysaccharide/protein biopolymer from durian (Durio zibethinus) seed. The efficiency of different extraction conditions was determined by assessing the extraction yield, protein content, solubility, rheological properties and viscoelastic behavior of the natural polymer from durian seed. The present study revealed that the soaking process had a more significant (p < 0.05) effect than the decolorizing process on the rheological and functional properties of the natural polymer. The considerable changes in the rheological and functional properties of the natural polymer could be due to the significant (p < 0.05) effect of the chemical extraction variables on the protein fraction present in the molecular structure of the natural polymer from durian seed. The natural polymer from durian seed had a more elastic (or gel like) behavior compared to the viscous (liquid like) behavior at low frequency. The present study revealed that the natural heteropolysaccharide/protein polymer from durian seed had a relatively low solubility ranging from 9.1% to 36.0%. This might be due to the presence of impurities, insoluble matter and large particles present in the chemical structure of the natural polymer from durian seed. PMID:23203099

  15. Viscoelastic behavior of erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Tözeren, A; Skalak, R; Sung, K L; Chien, S

    1982-01-01

    A nonlinear viscoelastic relation is developed to describe the viscoelastic properties of erythrocyte membrane. This constitutive equation is used in the analysis of the time-dependent aspiration of an erythrocyte membrane into a micropipette. Equations governing this motion are reduced to a nonlinear integral equation of the Volterra type. A numerical procedure based on a finite difference scheme is used to solve the integral equation and to match the experimental data. The data, aspiration length vs. time, is used to determine the relaxation function at each time step. The inverse problem of obtaining the time dependence of the aspiration length from a given relaxation function is also solved. Analytical results obtained are applied to the experimental data of Chien et al. 1978. Biophys. J. 24:463-487. A relaxation function similar to that of a four-parameter solid with a shear-thinning viscous term is proposed. PMID:7104447

  16. Implementation of viscoelastic Hopkinson bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, R.; Cloete, T.; Govender, R.

    2012-08-01

    Knowledge of the properties of soft, viscoelastic materials at high strain rates are important in furthering our understanding of their role during blast or impact events. Testing these low impedance materials using a metallic split Hopkinson pressure bar setup results in poor signal to noise ratios due to impedance mismatching. These difficulties are overcome by using polymeric Hopkinson bars. Conventional Hopkinson bar analysis cannot be used on the polymeric bars due to the viscoelastic nature of the bar material. Implementing polymeric Hopkinson bars requires characterization of the viscoelastic properties of the material used. In this paper, 30 mm diameter Polymethyl Methacrylate bars are used as Hopkinson pressure bars. This testing technique is applied to polymeric foam called Divinycell H80 and H200. Although there is a large body of of literature containing compressive data, this rarely deals with strain rates above 250s-1 which becomes increasingly important when looking at the design of composite structures where energy absorption during impact events is high on the list of priorities. Testing of polymeric foams at high strain rates allows for the development of better constitutive models.

  17. The performance of steady-state harmonic magnetic resonance elastography when applied to viscoelastic materials

    PubMed Central

    Doyley, Marvin M.; Perreard, Irina; Patterson, Adam. J.; Weaver, John B.; Paulsen, Keith M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The clinical efficacy of breast elastography may be limited when the authors employ the assumption that soft tissues exhibit linear, frequency-independent isotropic mechanical properties during the recovery of shear modulus. Thus, the purpose of this research was to evaluate the degradation in performance incurred when linear-elastic MR reconstruction methods are applied to phantoms that are fabricated using viscoelastic materials. Methods: To develop phantoms with frequency-dependent mechanical properties, the authors measured the complex modulus of two groups of cylindrical-shaped gelatin samples over a wide frequency range (up to 1 kHz) with the established principles of time-temperature superposition (TTS). In one group of samples, the authors added varying amounts of agar (1%–4%); in the other group, the authors added varying amounts of sucrose (2.5%–20%). To study how viscosity affected the performance of the linear-elastic reconstruction method, the authors constructed an elastically heterogeneous MR phantom to simulate the case where small viscoelastic lesions were surrounded by relatively nonviscous breast tissue. The breast phantom contained four linear, viscoelastic spherical inclusions (10 mm diameter) that were embedded in normal gelatin. The authors imaged the breast phantom with a clinical prototype of a MRE system and recovered the shear-modulus distribution using the overlapping-subzone-linear-elastic image-reconstruction method. The authors compared the recovered shear modulus to that measured using the TTS method. Results: The authors demonstrated that viscoelastic phantoms could be fabricated by including sucrose in the gelation process and that small viscoelastic inclusions were visible in MR elastograms recovered using a linear-elastic MR reconstruction process; however, artifacts that degraded contrast and spatial resolution were more prominent in highly viscoelastic inclusions. The authors also established that the accuracy of

  18. MR elastography in a murine stroke model reveals correlation of macroscopic viscoelastic properties of the brain with neuronal density.

    PubMed

    Freimann, Florian Baptist; Müller, Susanne; Streitberger, Kaspar-Josche; Guo, Jing; Rot, Sergej; Ghori, Adnan; Vajkoczy, Peter; Reiter, Rolf; Sack, Ingolf; Braun, Jürgen

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of neuronal density on viscoelastic parameters of living brain tissue after ischemic infarction in the mouse using MR elastography (MRE). Transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in the left hemisphere was induced in 20 mice. In vivo 7-T MRE at a vibration frequency of 900 Hz was performed on days 3, 7, 14 and 28 (n = 5 per group) after MCAO, followed by the analysis of histological markers, such as neuron counts (NeuN). MCAO led to a significant reduction in the storage modulus in the left hemisphere relative to contralateral values (p = 0.03) without changes over time. A correlation between storage modulus and NeuN in both hemispheres was observed, with correlation coefficients of R = 0.648 (p = 0.002, left) and R = 0.622 (p = 0.003, right). The loss modulus was less sensitive to MCAO, but correlated with NeuN in the left hemisphere (R = 0.764, p = 0.0001). In agreement with the literature, these results suggest that the shear modulus in the brain is reduced after transient ischemic insult. Furthermore, our study provides evidence that the in vivo shear modulus of brain tissue correlates with neuronal density. In diagnostic applications, MRE may thus have diagnostic potential as a tool for image-based quantification of neurodegenerative processes. PMID:23784982

  19. The Role of Molecular Weight and Temperature on the Elastic and Viscoelastic Properties of a Glassy Thermoplastic Polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Lee M.; Whitley, Karen S.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2001-01-01

    Mechanical testing of the elastic and viscoelastic response of an advanced thermoplastic polyimide (LaRC-SI) with known variations in molecular weight was performed over a range of temperatures below the glass transition temperature. The notched tensile strength was shown to be a strong function of both molecular weight and temperature, whereas stiffness was only a strong function of temperature. A critical molecular weight was observed to occur at a weight average molecular weight of M, approx. 22,000 g/mol below which, the notched tensile strength decreases rapidly. This critical molecular weight transition is temperature-independent. Low, molecular weight materials tended to fail in a brittle manner, whereas high molecular weight materials exhibited ductile failure. Furthermore, low molecular weight materials have increased creep compliance and creep compliance rate, and are more sensitive to temperature than the high molecular weight materials. At long timescales (less than 1100 hours) physical aging serves to significantly decrease the creep compliance and creep rate of all the materials tested. Low molecular weight materials are less influenced by the effects of physical aging.

  20. Viscoelastic material inversion using Sierra-SD and ROL.

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Timothy; Aquino, Wilkins; Ridzal, Denis; Kouri, Drew Philip; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Urbina, Angel

    2014-11-01

    In this report we derive frequency-domain methods for inverse characterization of the constitutive parameters of viscoelastic materials. The inverse problem is cast in a PDE-constrained optimization framework with efficient computation of gradients and Hessian vector products through matrix free operations. The abstract optimization operators for first and second derivatives are derived from first principles. Various methods from the Rapid Optimization Library (ROL) are tested on the viscoelastic inversion problem. The methods described herein are applied to compute the viscoelastic bulk and shear moduli of a foam block model, which was recently used in experimental testing for viscoelastic property characterization.

  1. Passive vibration control in rotor dynamics: Optimization of composed support using viscoelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Eduardo Afonso; Pereira, Jucélio Tomás; Alberto Bavastri, Carlos

    2015-09-01

    One of the major reasons for inserting damping into bearings is that rotating machines are often requested in critical functioning conditions having sometimes to function under dynamic instability or close to critical speeds. Hydrodynamic and magnetic bearings have usually been used for this purpose, but they present limitations regarding costs and operation, rendering the use of viscoelastic supports a feasible solution for vibration control in rotating machines. Most papers in the area use simple analytic or single degree of freedom models for the rotor as well as classic mechanical models of linear viscoelasticity for the support - like Maxwell, Kelvin-Voigt, Zenner, four-element, GHM models and even frequency independent models - but they lack the accuracy of fractional models in a large range of frequency and temperature regarding the same number of coefficients. Even in those works, the need to consider the addition of degrees of freedom to the support is evident. However, so far no paper has been published focusing on a methodology to determine the optimal constructive form for any viscoelastic support in which the rotor is discretized by finite elements associated to an accurate model for characterizing the viscoelastic material. In general, the support is meant to be a simple isolation system, and the fact the stiffness matrix is complex and frequency-temperature dependent - due to its viscoelastic properties - forces the traditional methods to require an extremely long computing time, thus rendering them too time consuming in an optimization environment. The present work presents a robust methodology based mainly on generalized equivalent parameters (GEP) - for an optimal design of viscoelastic supports for rotating machinery - aiming at minimizing the unbalance frequency response of the system using a hybrid optimization technique (genetic algorithms and Nelder-Mead method). The rotor is modeled based on the finite element method using Timoshenko's thick

  2. Viscoelastic cationic polymers containing the urethane linkage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A. (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    A method for the synthesis and manufacturing of elastomeric compositions and articles containing quaternary nitrogen centers and condensation residues along the polymeric backbone of the centers is presented. Linear and cross-linked straight chain and block polymers having a wide damping temperature range were synthesized. Formulae for the viscoelastic cationic polymers are presented.

  3. A comparison of viscoelastic damping models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Joseph C.; Belvin, W. Keith; Inman, Daniel J.

    1993-01-01

    Modern finite element methods (FEM's) enable the precise modeling of mass and stiffness properties in what were in the past overwhelmingly large and complex structures. These models allow the accurate determination of natural frequencies and mode shapes. However, adequate methods for modeling highly damped and high frequency dependent structures did not exist until recently. The most commonly used method, Modal Strain Energy, does not correctly predict complex mode shapes since it is based on the assumption that the mode shapes of a structure are real. Recently, many techniques have been developed which allow the modeling of frequency dependent damping properties of materials in a finite element compatible form. Two of these methods, the Golla-Hughes-McTavish method and the Lesieutre-Mingori method, model the frequency dependent effects by adding coordinates to the existing system thus maintaining the linearity of the model. The third model, proposed by Bagley and Torvik, is based on the Fractional Calculus method and requires fewer empirical parameters to model the frequency dependence at the expense of linearity of the governing equations. This work examines the Modal Strain Energy, Golla-Hughes-McTavish and Bagley and Torvik models and compares them to determine the plausibility of using them for modeling viscoelastic damping in large structures.

  4. Detachment of stretched viscoelastic fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassmaker, N. J.; Hui, C. Y.; Yamaguchi, T.; Creton, C.

    2008-03-01

    New experimental results are presented about the final stage of failure of soft viscoelastic adhesives. A microscopic view of the detachment of the adhesive shows that after cavity growth and expansion, well adhered soft adhesives form a network of fibrils connected to expanded contacting feet which fail via a sliding mechanism, sensitive to interfacial shear stresses rather than by a fracture mechanism as sometimes suggested in earlier work. A mechanical model of this stretching and sliding failure phenomenon is presented which treats the fibril as a nonlinear elastic or viscoelastic rod and the foot as an elastic layer subject to a friction force proportional to the local displacement rate. The force on the stretched rod drives the sliding of the foot against the substrate. The main experimental parameter controlling the failure strain and stress during the sliding process is identified by the model as the normalized probe pull speed, which also depends on the magnitude of the friction and PSA modulus. In addition, the material properties, viscoelasticity and finite extensibility of the polymer chains, are shown to have an important effect on both the details of the sliding process and the ultimate failure strain and stress. Appendix B is only available in electronic form at 10.1140/epje/i2007-10287-y and are accessible for authorised users.

  5. RF properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    With the advent of the SLAC electron-positron linear collider (SLC) in the 100 GeV center-of-mass energy range, research and development work on even higher energy machines of this type has started in several laboratories in the United States, Europe, the Soviet Union and Japan. These linear colliders appear to provide the only promising approach to studying e/sup /plus//e/sup /minus// physics at center-of-mass energies approaching 1 TeV. This thesis concerns itself with the study of radio frequency properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders and their interaction with bunched beams. The topics that have been investigated are: experimental measurements of the energy loss of single bunches to longitudinal modes in two types of structures, using an equivalent signal on a coaxial wire to simulate the beam; a method of canceling the energy spread created within a single bunch by longitudinal wakefields, through appropriate shaping of the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch; derivation of the complete transient beam-loading equation for a train of bunches passing through a constant-gradient accelerator section, with application to the calculation and minimization of multi-bunch energy spread; detailed study of field emission and radio frequency breakdown in disk-loaded structures at S-, C- and X-band frequencies under extremely high-gradient conditions, with special attention to thermal effects, radiation, sparking, emission of gases, surface damage through explosive emission and its possible control through RF-gas processing. 53 refs., 49 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. Viscoelastic analysis of adhesively bonded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1981-01-01

    In this paper an adhesively bonded lap joint is analyzed by assuming that the adherends are elastic and the adhesive is linearly viscoelastic. After formulating the general problem a specific example for two identical adherends bonded through a three parameter viscoelastic solid adhesive is considered. The standard Laplace transform technique is used to solve the problem. The stress distribution in the adhesive layer is calculated for three different external loads namely, membrane loading, bending, and transverse shear loading. The results indicate that the peak value of the normal stress in the adhesive is not only consistently higher than the corresponding shear stress but also decays slower.

  7. Viscoelastic analysis of adhesively bonded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1980-01-01

    An adhesively bonded lap joint is analyzed by assuming that the adherends are elastic and the adhesive is linearly viscoelastic. After formulating the general problem a specific example for two identical adherends bonded through a three parameter viscoelastic solid adhesive is considered. The standard Laplace transform technique is used to solve the problem. The stress distribution in the adhesive layer is calculated for three different external loads, namely, membrane loading, bending, and transverse shear loading. The results indicate that the peak value of the normal stress in the adhesive is not only consistently higher than the corresponding shear stress but also decays slower.

  8. Linear processes in high dimensions: Phase space and critical properties.

    PubMed

    Mastromatteo, Iacopo; Bacry, Emmanuel; Muzy, Jean-François

    2015-04-01

    In this work we investigate the generic properties of a stochastic linear model in the regime of high dimensionality. We consider in particular the vector autoregressive (VAR) model and the multivariate Hawkes process. We analyze both deterministic and random versions of these models, showing the existence of a stable phase and an unstable phase. We find that along the transition region separating the two regimes the correlations of the process decay slowly, and we characterize the conditions under which these slow correlations are expected to become power laws. We check our findings with numerical simulations showing remarkable agreement with our predictions. We finally argue that real systems with a strong degree of self-interaction are naturally characterized by this type of slow relaxation of the correlations. PMID:25974473

  9. Linear processes in high dimensions: Phase space and critical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastromatteo, Iacopo; Bacry, Emmanuel; Muzy, Jean-François

    2015-04-01

    In this work we investigate the generic properties of a stochastic linear model in the regime of high dimensionality. We consider in particular the vector autoregressive (VAR) model and the multivariate Hawkes process. We analyze both deterministic and random versions of these models, showing the existence of a stable phase and an unstable phase. We find that along the transition region separating the two regimes the correlations of the process decay slowly, and we characterize the conditions under which these slow correlations are expected to become power laws. We check our findings with numerical simulations showing remarkable agreement with our predictions. We finally argue that real systems with a strong degree of self-interaction are naturally characterized by this type of slow relaxation of the correlations.

  10. Linear dispersion properties of ring velocity distribution functions

    SciTech Connect

    Vandas, Marek

    2015-06-15

    Linear properties of ring velocity distribution functions are investigated. The dispersion tensor in a form similar to the case of a Maxwellian distribution function, but for a general distribution function separable in velocities, is presented. Analytical forms of the dispersion tensor are derived for two cases of ring velocity distribution functions: one obtained from physical arguments and one for the usual, ad hoc ring distribution. The analytical expressions involve generalized hypergeometric, Kampé de Fériet functions of two arguments. For a set of plasma parameters, the two ring distribution functions are compared. At the parallel propagation with respect to the ambient magnetic field, the two ring distributions give the same results identical to the corresponding bi-Maxwellian distribution. At oblique propagation, the two ring distributions give similar results only for strong instabilities, whereas for weak growth rates their predictions are significantly different; the two ring distributions have different marginal stability conditions.

  11. Viscoelastic characterization of soft biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayar, Vinod Timothy

    Progressive and irreversible retinal diseases are among the primary causes of blindness in the United States, attacking the cells in the eye that transform environmental light into neural signals for the optic pathway. Medical implants designed to restore visual function to afflicted patients can cause mechanical stress and ultimately damage to the host tissues. Research shows that an accurate understanding of the mechanical properties of the biological tissues can reduce damage and lead to designs with improved safety and efficacy. Prior studies on the mechanical properties of biological tissues show characterization of these materials can be affected by environmental, length-scale, time, mounting, stiffness, size, viscoelastic, and methodological conditions. Using porcine sclera tissue, the effects of environmental, time, and mounting conditions are evaluated when using nanoindentation. Quasi-static tests are used to measure reduced modulus during extended exposure to phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), as well as the chemical and mechanical analysis of mounting the sample to a solid substrate using cyanoacrylate. The less destructive nature of nanoindentation tests allows for variance of tests within a single sample to be compared to the variance between samples. The results indicate that the environmental, time, and mounting conditions can be controlled for using modified nanoindentation procedures for biological samples and are in line with averages modulus values from previous studies but with increased precision. By using the quasi-static and dynamic characterization capabilities of the nanoindentation setup, the additional stiffness and viscoelastic variables are measured. Different quasi-static control methods were evaluated along with maximum load parameters and produced no significant difference in reported reduced modulus values. Dynamic characterization tests varied frequency and quasi-static load, showing that the agar could be modeled as a linearly

  12. Statistical modelling of the rheological and mucoadhesive properties of aqueous poly(methylvinylether-co-maleic acid) networks: Redefining biomedical applications and the relationship between viscoelasticity and mucoadhesion.

    PubMed

    Jones, David S; Laverty, Thomas P; Morris, Caoimhe; Andrews, Gavin P

    2016-08-01

    Poly(methylvinylether-co-maleic acid) (PMVE/MA) is commonly used as a component of pharmaceutical platforms, principally to enhance interactions with biological substrates (mucoadhesion). However, the limited knowledge on the rheological properties of this polymer and their relationships with mucoadhesion has negated the biomedical use of this polymer as a mono-component platform. This study presents a comprehensive study of the rheological properties of aqueous PMVE/MA platforms and defines their relationships with mucoadhesion using multiple regression analysis. Using dilute solution viscometry the intrinsic viscosities of un-neutralised PMVE/MA and PMVE/MA neutralised using NaOH or TEA were 22.32±0.89dLg(-1), 274.80±1.94dLg(-1) and 416.49±2.21dLg(-1) illustrating greater polymer chain expansion following neutralisation using Triethylamine (TEA). PMVE/MA platforms exhibited shear-thinning properties. Increasing polymer concentration increased the consistencies, zero shear rate (ZSR) viscosities (determined from flow rheometry), storage and loss moduli, dynamic viscosities (defined using oscillatory analysis) and mucoadhesive properties, yet decreased the loss tangents of the neutralised polymer platforms. TEA neutralised systems possessed significantly and substantially greater consistencies, ZSR and dynamic viscosities, storage and loss moduli, mucoadhesion and lower loss tangents than their NaOH counterparts. Multiple regression analysis enabled identification of the dominant role of polymer viscoelasticity on mucoadhesion (r>0.98). The mucoadhesive properties of PMVE/MA platforms were considerable and were greater than those of other platforms that have successfully been shown to enhance in vivo retention when applied to the oral cavity, indicating a positive role for PMVE/MA mono-component platforms for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. PMID:27085044

  13. Electrical analogous in viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ala, Guido; Di Paola, Mario; Francomano, Elisa; Li, Yan; Pinnola, Francesco P.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, electrical analogous models of fractional hereditary materials are introduced. Based on recent works by the authors, mechanical models of materials viscoelasticity behavior are firstly approached by using fractional mathematical operators. Viscoelastic models have elastic and viscous components which are obtained by combining springs and dashpots. Various arrangements of these elements can be used, and all of these viscoelastic models can be equivalently modeled as electrical circuits, where the spring and dashpot are analogous to the capacitance and resistance, respectively. The proposed models are validated by using modal analysis. Moreover, a comparison with numerical experiments based on finite difference time domain method shows that, for long time simulations, the correct time behavior can be obtained only with modal analysis. The use of electrical analogous in viscoelasticity can better reveal the real behavior of fractional hereditary materials.

  14. Approximations of thermoelastic and viscoelastic control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. A.; Liu, Z. Y.; Miller, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    Well-posed models and computational algorithms are developed and analyzed for control of a class of partial differential equations that describe the motions of thermo-viscoelastic structures. An abstract (state space) framework and a general well-posedness result are presented that can be applied to a large class of thermo-elastic and thermo-viscoelastic models. This state space framework is used in the development of a computational scheme to be used in the solution of a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) control problem. A detailed convergence proof is provided for the viscoelastic model and several numerical results are presented to illustrate the theory and to analyze problems for which the theory is incomplete.

  15. Collective motion of microswimmers in viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaojin; Ardekani, Arezoo

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics of suspension of self-propelled microorganisms show fascinating hydrodynamic phenomena, such as, large scale swarming motion, locally correlated motion, enhanced particle diffusion, and enhanced fluid mixing. Even though many studies have been conducted in a Newtonian fluid, the collective motion of microorganisms in non-Newtonian fluids is less understood. The non-Newtonian fluid rheological properties, such as viscoelasticity and shear-dependent viscosity in saliva, mucus and biofilm, significantly affect the swimming properties and hydrodynamic interaction of microorganisms. In this work, we use direct numerical simulation to investigate the collective motion of rod-like swimmers in viscoelastic fluids. Two swimming types, pusher and puller, are investigated. The background viscoelastic fluid is modeled using an Oldroyd-B constitutive equation. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1445955 and Indiana CTSI TR001108.

  16. The nematode C. elegans as a complex viscoelastic fluid.

    PubMed

    Backholm, Matilda; Ryu, William S; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2015-05-01

    The viscoelastic material properties of the model organism C. elegans were probed with a micropipette deflection technique and modelled with the standard linear solid model. Dynamic relaxation measurements were performed on the millimetric nematode to investigate its viscous characteristics in detail. We show that the internal properties of C. elegans can not be fully described by a simple Newtonian fluid. Instead, a power-law fluid model was implemented and shown to be in excellent agreement with experimental results. The nematode exhibits shear thinning properties and its complex fluid characteristics were quantified. The bending-rate dependence of the internal damping coefficient of C. elegans could affect its gait modulation in different external environments. PMID:25957177

  17. Preparation of bacterial cellulose based hydrogels and their viscoelastic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Rushita; Vyroubal, Radek; Fei, Haojei; Saha, Nabanita; Kitano, Takeshi; Saha, Petr

    2015-04-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) based hydrogels have been prepared in blended with carboxymethylcellulose and polyvinyl pyrrolidone by using heat treatment. The properties of BC-CMC and BC-PVP hydrogels were compared with pure BC, CMC and PVP hydrogels. These hydrogels were investigated by measuring their structural, morphological and viscoelastic properties. Through the morphological images, alignment of the porous flake like structures could be seen clearly within the inter-polymeric network of the hydrogels. Also, the detail structure analysis of the polymers blended during the hydrogel formation confirms their interactions with each other were studied. Further, the viscoelastic behavior of all the hydrogels in terms of elastic and viscous property was studied. It is observed that at 1% strain, including CMC and PVP hydrogels, all the BC based hydrogels exhibited the linear trend throughout. Also the elastic nature of the material remains high compared to viscous nature. Moreover, the changes could be noticed in case of blended polymer based hydrogels. The values of complex viscosity (η*) decreases with increase in angular frequency within the range of ω = 0.1-100 rad.s-1.

  18. Viscoelastic characterization of thin tissues using acoustic radiation force and model-based inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzina, Bojan B.; Tuleubekov, Kairat; Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2009-07-01

    By means of the viscoelastodynamic model for a two-layer solid-fluid system and a detailed account of the locally induced acoustic radiation force, a rational analytical and computational framework is established for the viscoelastic characterization of thin tissues from high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) measurements. For practical applications, the back-analysis is set up to interpret the frequency response function, signifying the tissue's axial displacement (captured by the imaging transducer) per squared voltage driving the 'pushing' transducer, as experimental input. On parametrizing the tissue's viscoelastic behavior in terms of the standard linear model, the proposed methodology is applied to a set of measurements performed on tissue-mimicking phantom constructs with thicknesses ranging from 0.5 to 4 mm. The results demonstrate that the model-based inversion, which carefully mimics the local boundary conditions and applied ultrasound excitation, yields viscoelastic properties for the phantom that are virtually invariant over the range of specimen thicknesses tested. Beyond its immediate application to in vitro viscoelastic characterization of thin excised tissues and tissue constructs, the proposed methodology may also find use in the characterization of skin or skin lesions over bone in vivo.

  19. Accurate Determination of Torsion and Pure Bending Moment for Viscoelastic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun-Che; Ko, Chih-Chin; Shiau, Li-Ming

    Measurements of time-dependent material properties in the context of linear viscoelasticity, at a given frequency and temperature, require accurate determination of both loading and deformation that are subjected to the testing materials. A pendulum-type viscoelastic spectroscopy is developed to experimentally measure loss tangent and the magnitude of dynamic modulus of solid materials. The mechanical system of the device is based on the behavior of the cantilever beam, and torsion and pure bending moment are generated from the interaction between a permanent magnet and the Helmholtz coils. The strength of the magnetic interactions may be determined with a material with known mechanical properties, such as aluminum 6061T4 alloy. The sensitivity of the torque measurement is on the order of one micro N-m level. With the high accurate torque measurement and deformation detection from a laser-based displacement measurement system, viscoelastic properties of materials can be experimentally measured in different frequency regimes. Sinusoidal driving signals are adopted for measuring complex modulus in the sub-resonant regime, and dc bias driving for creep tests in the low frequency limit. At structural resonant frequencies, the full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) method or Lorentzian curve fitting method is adopted to extract material properties. The completion of determining material properties in the wide frequency spectrum may help to identify the deformation mechanisms of the material and to create better models for simulation work.

  20. THE RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF WHEAT PROTEIN ISOLATE PROLITE TM 200 SUSPENSIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Linear and non-linear rheological properties of wheat protein isolate PROLITE TM 200 suspensions were investigated as a function of concentration and pH. Linear dynamic viscoelastic properties for PROLITE TM 200 were strongly dependent on concentration and pH. The higher the concentration, the str...

  1. Effects of viscoelasticity on droplet dynamics and break-up in microfluidic T-Junctions: a lattice Boltzmann study.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anupam; Sbragaglia, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    The effects of viscoelasticity on the dynamics and break-up of fluid threads in microfluidic T-junctions are investigated using numerical simulations of dilute polymer solutions at changing the Capillary number (Ca), i.e. at changing the balance between the viscous forces and the surface tension at the interface, up to Ca ≈ 3×10(-2). A Navier-Stokes (NS) description of the solvent based on the lattice Boltzmann models (LBM) is here coupled to constitutive equations for finite extensible non-linear elastic dumbbells with the closure proposed by Peterlin (FENE-P model). We present the results of three-dimensional simulations in a range of Ca which is broad enough to characterize all the three characteristic mechanisms of break-up in the confined T-junction, i.e. squeezing, dripping and jetting regimes. The various model parameters of the FENE-P constitutive equations, including the polymer relaxation time τP and the finite extensibility parameter L2, are changed to provide quantitative details on how the dynamics and break-up properties are affected by viscoelasticity. We will analyze cases with Droplet Viscoelasticity (DV), where viscoelastic properties are confined in the dispersed (d) phase, as well as cases with Matrix Viscoelasticity (MV), where viscoelastic properties are confined in the continuous (c) phase. Moderate flow-rate ratios Q ≈ O(1) of the two phases are considered in the present study. Overall, we find that the effects are more pronounced in the case with MV, as the flow driving the break-up process upstream of the emerging thread can be sensibly perturbed by the polymer stresses. PMID:26810396

  2. Mechanical Property and Microstructure of Linear Friction Welded WASPALOY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamanfar, A.; Jahazi, M.; Gholipour, J.; Wanjara, P.; Yue, S.

    2011-03-01

    The mechanical properties and microstructural evolution of WASPALOY joined by linear friction welding (LFW) were investigated in this study. In-situ temperature measurements using thermocouple probes indicated exposure of the weld area to a temperature of at least 1400 K (1126 °C). Based on electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) mapping of the weldments, up to 50 pct reduction in γ grain size occurred within 0.9 mm of the weld interface as a result of dynamic recrystallization (DRX). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies revealed that progressive dissolution of γ' precipitates took place from the base metal to the weld interface, where almost no γ' precipitates were observed. Within 3.3 mm of the weld interface, the γ' dissolution significantly influenced the hardness profile measured across the extended thermomechanically affected zones (TMAZs). Investigation of strain distributions during tensile testing using the optical Aramis system revealed weak bonding at the edge of the weld due to oxidation. To extrude out oxide layers into the flash, increasing the axial shortening to higher than 1.2 mm is recommended.

  3. Properties of linear microwave plasma sustained by coaxial TEM waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Moon-Ki; Seo, Kwon-Sang; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Hae June; Lee, Ho-Jun

    2013-09-01

    A linear 2.45GHz microwave plasma sustained by coaxial circular TEM waveguide has been developed for the low temperature large area plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition application. TE-TEM microwave power coupling was achieved by copper rod located at λg/4 from short-end of TE10 waveguide. TEM waveguide consists of quartz tube surrounded by plasma and copper rod electrode. TEM waveguide is 60 cm in length and 3 cm in diameter, which is terminated with shorted metal cap. For the operation condition of 300 W input power and Ar pressure of 200 mTorr, a clear standing wave pattern with wavelength of 10 cm was observed. Measured plasma density and temperature at 5 cm from quartz wall was 1.2 × 1017/cm3 and 1.7 eV respectively. Density non-uniformity was less than 6% along quartz tube in spite of standing wave set-up. In addition, properties of the microwave source are also investigated through electromagnetic field simulation coupled with drift-diffusion approximation of plasma. Calculated and measured standing wave pattern was almost identical. Electron density and temperature distribution show similar behavior with experimental results. S11 value of input port of TE10 waveguide was calculated as 17dB.

  4. Non-linear viscoelastic finite element analysis of the effect of the length of glass fiber posts on the biomechanical behaviour of directly restored incisors and surrounding alveolar bone.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Marco; Sorrentino, Roberto; Zarone, Fernando; Apicella, Davide; Aversa, Raffaella; Apicella, Antonio

    2008-07-01

    The study aimed at estimating the effect of insertion length of posts with composite restorations on stress and strain distributions in central incisors and surrounding bone. The typical, average geometries were generated in a FEA environment. Dentin was considered as an elastic orthotropic material, and periodontal ligament was coupled with nonlinear viscoelastic mechanical properties. The model was then validated with experimental data on displacement of incisors from published literature. Three post lengths were investigated in this study: root insertion of 5, 7, and 9 mm. For control, a sound incisor model was generated. Then, a tearing load of 50 N was applied to both sound tooth and simulation models. Post restorations did not seem to affect the strain distribution in bone when compared to the control. All simulated post restorations affected incisor biomechanics and reduced the root's deforming capability, while the composite crowns underwent a higher degree of deformation than the sound crown. No differences could be noticed in incisor stress and strain. As for the influence of post length, it was not shown to affect the biomechanics of restored teeth. PMID:18833761

  5. Microsurgery-aided in-situ force probing reveals extensibility and viscoelastic properties of individual stress fibers

    PubMed Central

    Labouesse, Céline; Gabella, Chiara; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Vianay, Benoît; Verkhovsky, Alexander B.

    2016-01-01

    Actin-myosin filament bundles (stress fibers) are critical for tension generation and cell shape, but their mechanical properties are difficult to access. Here we propose a novel approach to probe individual peripheral stress fibers in living cells through a microsurgically generated opening in the cytoplasm. By applying large deformations with a soft cantilever we were able to fully characterize the mechanical response of the fibers and evaluate their tension, extensibility, elastic and viscous properties. PMID:27025817

  6. Study of the interconversion between viscoelastic behaviour functions of PMMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, P.; Rodríguez, D.; Lamela, M. J.; Fernández-Canteli, A.

    2011-05-01

    The use of polymers and polymer-based composites in mechanical, civil and electronic engineering has been growing owing to advances in the technology of materials. The different applications and working conditions of these materials require knowledge about their viscoelastic material functions: relaxation modulus, compliance, complex modulus, etc. Interconversion between these functions may be required for different reasons such as the impossibility of direct experimentation under certain excitation conditions. In this work, a DMA is used to calculate the experimental viscoelastic functions of a linear viscoelastic material (PMMA). The same functions are estimated by interconversion methods and compared with experimental ones. The results show that the interconversion functions fit properly the experimental functions.

  7. Viscoelastic-injecting cystotome.

    PubMed

    Teus, M A; Fagúndez-Vargas, M A; Calvo, M A; Marcos, A

    1998-11-01

    This continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis (CCC) technique is for use in complicated surgical cases such as when the anterior chamber is shallow, the red reflex is not good, or eye movements are present. This technique is easier and safer in such cases because it uses a cystotome connected to a viscoelastic syringe. First, the anterior chamber is filled with viscoelastic material using a conventional cannula. The cannula is replaced with a bent needle (or cystotome), and the CCC is performed in the usual way. This instrument allows the surgeon to inject small amounts of viscoelastic material exactly where and when it is needed. The anterior chamber remains deep while the CCC is performed, and the anterior capsule tear is done in a more controlled fashion. PMID:9818330

  8. A detailed viscoelastic characterization of the P17 and adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Elkin, Benjamin S; Ilankovan, Ashok I; Morrison, Barclay

    2011-11-01

    Brain is a morphologically and mechanically heterogeneous organ. Although rat brain is commonly used as an experimental neurophysiological model for various in vivo biomechanical studies, little is known about its regional viscoelastic properties. To address this issue, we have generated viscoelastic mechanical property data for specific anatomical regions of the P17 and adult rat brain. These ages are commonly used in rat experimental models. We measured mechanical properties of both white and gray matter regions in coronal slices with a custom-designed microindentation device performing stress-relaxation indentations to 10% effective strain. Shear moduli calculated for short (100?ms), intermediate (1?sec), and long (20?sec) time points, ranged from ?1?kPa for short term moduli to ?0.4?kPa for long term moduli. Both age and anatomic region were significant factors affecting the time-dependent shear modulus. White matter regions and regions of the cerebellum were much more compliant than those of the hippocampus, cortex, and thalamus. Linear viscoelastic models (Prony series, continuous phase lag, and a power law model) were fit to the time-dependent shear modulus data. All models fit the data equally with no significant differences between them (F-test; p>0.05). The F-test was also used to statistically determine that a Prony series with three time-dependent parameters accurately fit the data with no added benefit from additional terms. The age- and region-dependent rat brain viscoelastic properties presented here will help inform future biomechanical models of the rat brain with specific and accurate regional mechanical property data. PMID:21341982

  9. Transient dynamics of a colloidal particle driven through a viscoelastic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruben Gomez-Solano, Juan; Bechinger, Clemens

    2015-10-01

    We study the transient motion of a colloidal particle actively dragged by an optical trap through different viscoelastic fluids (wormlike micelles, polymer solutions, and entangled λ-phage DNA). We observe that, after sudden removal of the moving trap, the particle recoils due to the recovery of the deformed fluid microstructure. We find that the transient dynamics of the particle proceeds via a double-exponential relaxation, whose relaxation times remain independent of the initial particle velocity whereas their amplitudes strongly depend on it. While the fastest relaxation mirrors the viscous damping of the particle by the solvent, the slow relaxation results from the recovery of the strained viscoelastic matrix. We show that this transient information, which has no counterpart in Newtonian fluids, can be exploited to investigate linear and nonlinear rheological properties of the embedding fluid, thus providing a novel method to perform transient rheology at the micron-scale.

  10. Effect of the Compounding Procedure on the Structure and Viscoelasticity of Polymer Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Capuano, G.; Filippone, G.; Romeo, G.; Acierno, D.

    2010-06-02

    We investigate the relation between the structure and the viscoelastic properties of a model polymer nanocomposite system based on a mixture of inorganic particles and poly(ethyleneoxide). Hydrophilic fumed silica nanoparticles were used as fillers and PEO-based nanocomposites were prepared by melt compounding and freeze-dryng. In both cases, dynamic oscillatory measurements in the melt state highlighted an increase of the frequency-dependent linear viscoelastic moduli with the filler content and a solid-like behaviour above a critical volume fraction. The freeze-dried samples exibhited a significant enhancement of the elasticity at lower filler contents as a result of the effect of particle dispersion on polymer chain dynamics.

  11. Effects of viscoelasticity on droplet dynamics and break-up in microchannels: a Lattice Boltzmann study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anupam

    2015-11-01

    The effects of viscoelasticity on the dynamics and break-up of liquid threads in microfluidic devices, i.e., T-junctions & Cross-Junction, are investigated using numerical simulations of dilute polymeric solutions for a wide range of Capillary numbers (Ca), i.e., changing the balance between the viscous forces and the surface tension at the interface. A Navier-Stokes (NS) description of the solvent based on the lattice Boltzmann models (LBM) is here coupled to constitutive equations for finite extensible non-linear elastic dumbbells with the closure proposed by Peterlin (FENE-P model). The various model parameters of the FENE-P constitutive equations, including the polymer relaxation time and the finite extensibility parameter, are changed to provide quantitative details on how the dynamics and break-up properties are affected by viscoelasticity. European Research Council under the Europeans Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013)/ERC Grant Agreement N. 297004.

  12. Hydration dependent viscoelastic tensile behavior of cornea.

    PubMed

    Hatami-Marbini, Hamed

    2014-08-01

    The cornea is a protective transparent connective tissue covering the front of the eye. The standard uniaxial tensile experiments are among the most popular techniques for investigating biomechanical properties of the cornea. This experimental method characterizes the stress-strain response of corneal strips immersed in a bathing solution. In the present study, the important roles of corneal hydration on tensile viscoelastic properties were investigated. The thickness was used as a surrogate for hydration and uniaxial tensile experiments were performed on bovine corneal samples with four different average thickness (hydration), i.e., 1100 μm (4.87 mg water/mg dry tissue), 900 μm (4.13 mg water/mg dry tissue), 700 μm (3.20 mg water/mg dry tissue), and 500 μm (1.95 mg water/mg dry tissue). The samples were immersed in mineral oil in order to prevent their swelling during the experiments. A quasilinear viscoelastic (QLV) model was used to analyze the experimental measurements and determine viscoelastic material constants. It was observed that both maximum and equilibrium (relaxed) stresses were exponentially increased with decreasing tissue thickness (hydration). Furthermore, the QLV model successfully captured the corneal viscoelastic response with an average R (2) value greater than 0.99. Additional experiments were conducted in OBSS in order to confirm that these significant changes in viscoelastic properties were because of corneal hydration and not the bathing solution. The findings of this study suggest that extra care must be taken in interpreting the results of earlier uniaxial tensile testings and their correspondence to the corneal biomechanical properties. PMID:24668183

  13. Nanoporous glass-ceramics transparent in infrared range to be used as optical sensor: Mechanical and viscoelastic properties of the TAS (tellurium-arsenic-selenium) glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaizir, Gaelle

    GeS2-Sb2S3-CsCl glass-ceramics with nanoporous surfaces were synthesized and tested as optical elements. The nanoporosity is obtained through a two-step process, including controlled nucleation of CsCl nuclei in the glass matrix followed by selective etching of the nuclei with an acid solution. The porous surface is several hundred nanometers thick and results in a surface area increase of almost four orders of magnitudes. The pores size is approximately 150 nm and can be tailored by controlling the nucleation process and the etching time. It is shown that the creation of the nanoporous surface does not critically affect the optical transmission of these infrared transparent glass-ceramics. These materials can therefore be used for the design of optical elements and an ATR (Attenuated Total Reflections) plate with nanoporous surface was fabricated and tested as an optical infrared sensor. The porous element shows higher detection sensitivity in initial experiments with a coating of silane molecules. The TAS (Te2As3Se5) infrared glass, used as optical sensor in many fields of applications (medicine, environment, etc), exhibits poor mechanical properties rapidly that enable it to be used. Its mechanical properties have been investigated as a function of time and environment. From a general observation, air and vacuum have dramatic effects on TAS fibers tensile strength. When ageing under static stress, they exhibit an increase of tensile strength. The structural relaxation phenomenon is hypothesized to explain these results. The coordination number, , which is a rough measure of the network rigidity, has an influence on the TAS mechanical properties. It is shown that the TAS glass exhibits photosensitive effects. This effect seems to be only a surface effect, not a volume effect in the sense that light has no influence on the kinetic of a stress relaxation experiment. Due to their low glass transition temperature, TAS fibers exhibit viscoelastic behavior at room

  14. Surface force spectroscopic point load measurements and viscoelastic modelling of the micromechanical properties of air flow sensitive hairs of a spider (Cupiennius salei)

    PubMed Central

    McConney, Michael E.; Schaber, Clemens F.; Julian, Michael D.; Eberhardt, William C.; Humphrey, Joseph A.C.; Barth, Friedrich G.; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.

    2009-01-01

    The micromechanical properties of spider air flow hair sensilla (trichobothria) were characterized with nanometre resolution using surface force spectroscopy (SFS) under conditions of different constant deflection angular velocities (rad s−1) for hairs 900–950 μm long prior to shortening for measurement purposes. In the range of angular velocities examined (4×10−4−2.6×10−1 rad s−1), the torque T (Nm) resisting hair motion and its time rate of change (Nm s−1) were found to vary with deflection velocity according to power functions. In this range of angular velocities, the motion of the hair is most accurately captured by a three-parameter solid model, which numerically describes the properties of the hair suspension. A fit of the three-parameter model (3p) to the experimental data yielded the two torsional restoring parameters, S 3p=2.91×10−11 Nm rad−1 and =2.77×10−11 Nm rad−1 and the damping parameter R 3p=1.46×10−12 Nm s rad−1. For angular velocities larger than 0.05 rad s−1, which are common under natural conditions, a more accurate angular momentum equation was found to be given by a two-parameter Kelvin solid model. For this case, the multiple regression fit yielded S 2p=4.89×10−11 Nm rad−1 and R 2p=2.83×10−14 Nm s rad−1 for the model parameters. While the two-parameter model has been used extensively in earlier work primarily at high hair angular velocities, to correctly capture the motion of the hair at both low and high angular velocities it is necessary to employ the three-parameter model. It is suggested that the viscoelastic mechanical properties of the hair suspension work to promote the phasic response behaviour of the sensilla. PMID:19091682

  15. Parametric vibrations and stability of viscoelastic shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyasov, M. H.

    2010-05-01

    The problem of dynamic stability of viscoelastic extremely shallow and circular cylindrical shells with any hereditary properties, including time-dependence of Poisson’s ratio, are reduced to the investigation of stability of the zero solution of an ordinary integro-differential equation with variable coefficients. Using the Laplace integral transform, an integro-differential equation is reduced to the new integro-differential one of which the main part coincides with the damped Hill equation and the integral part is proportional to the product of two small parameters. Changing this equation for the system of two linear equations of the first order and using the averaging method, the monodromy matrix of the obtained system is constructed. Considering the absolute value of the eigen-values of monodromy matrix is greater than unit, the condition for instability of zero solution is obtained in the three-dimensional space of parameters corresponding to the frequency, viscosity and amplitude of external action. Analysis of form and size of instability domains is carried out.

  16. Viscoelastic incremental formulation using creep and relaxation differential approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazal, Claude; Mouto Pitti, Rostand

    2010-05-01

    A new incremental formulation in the time domain for linear, non-ageing viscoelastic materials undergoing mechanical deformation is presented in this work. The formulation is derived from linear differential equations based on a discrete spectrum representation for the creep and relaxation tensors. The incremental constitutive equations are then obtained by finite difference integration. Thus the difficulty of retaining the stress and strain history in computer solutions is avoided. A complete general formulation of linear viscoelastic stress analysis is developed in terms of increments of strains and stresses in order to establish the constitutive stress-strain relationship. The presented method is validated using numerical simulations and reliable results are obtained.

  17. Viscoelastic coupling of nanoelectromechanical resonators.

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, Robert Joseph; Staton, Alan W.

    2009-09-01

    This report summarizes work to date on a new collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) to utilize nanoelectromechanical resonators designed at Caltech as platforms to measure the mechanical properties of polymeric materials at length scales on the order of 10-50 nm. Caltech has succeeded in reproducibly building cantilever resonators having major dimensions on the order of 2-5 microns. These devices are fabricated in pairs, with free ends separated by reproducible gaps having dimensions on the order of 10-50 nm. By controlled placement of materials that bridge the very small gap between resonators, the mechanical devices become coupled through the test material, and the transmission of energy between the devices can be monitored. This should allow for measurements of viscoelastic properties of polymeric materials at high frequency over short distances. Our work to date has been directed toward establishing this measurement capability at Sandia.

  18. Intelligent Viscoelastic Polyurethane Intrinsic Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilal Khan, M.

    2010-04-01

    Polyurethanes are multiphase systems comprising intrinsically variant nanodomains. The material properties can be tailored by adjusting the relative proportions and organizing the structure of the hard and soft segments akin to the spring-dashpot system in an automobile. This article describes how an intelligent polyurethane (PU) system is created to offer smart response to mechanical and vibration stimuli. In this work, unidirectional, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA), acoustic, and impact testing results are qualified with the unique viscoelastic character that determines the rate-temperature response of the nanocomposite. Attenuated total reflection- infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) and DMTA offer a logical explanation of the observed viscoelastic behavior in terms of the nanodomains. Enhanced nanophase segregation between the polymer building blocks (hard and soft segments) is the primary mechanism that leads to a higher loss tangent peak in DMTA at a lower glass transition temperature ( T g ) for greater energy dissipation in the polymer matrix. Acoustic and impact attenuation are correlated with the mechanical modulus and loss tangent of the polymer. Finally, autodyne simulation reveals the unique shock absorbent behavior of the material layer when retrofitted to concrete structure. Typically, shock overpressure spikes of the order of 9.97 × 104 MPa experienced by the unprotected surface are entirely evened out at a lower overpressure threshold.

  19. Optical tracking of local surface wave for skin viscoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yubo; Lu, Mingzhu; Shen, Zhilong; Wan, Mingxi

    2014-06-01

    Rapid and effective determination of biomechanical properties is important in examining and diagnosing skin thermal injury. Among the methods used, viscoelasticity quantification is one of the most effective methods in determining such properties. This study aims to rapidly determine skin viscoelasticity by optically tracking the local surface wave. New elastic and viscous coefficients were proposed to indicate skin viscoelasticity based on a single impulse response of the skin. Experiments were performed using fresh porcine skin samples. Surface wave was generated in a single impulse using a vibrator with a ball-tipped device and was detected using a laser Doppler vibrometer. The motions along the depth direction were monitored using an ultrasound system. The ultrasound monitoring results indicated the multi-layered viscoelasticity of the epidermis and dermis. The viscoelastic coefficients from four healthy samples show a potential viscoelasticity variation of porcine skin. In one sample, the two coefficients were evidently higher than those in a healthy area if the skin was slightly burned. These results indicate that the proposed method is sensitive, effective, and quick in determining skin viscoelasticity. PMID:24674744

  20. Frequency Response of Synthetic Vocal Fold Models with Linear and Nonlinear Material Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Stephanie M.; Thomson, Scott L.; Dromey, Christopher; Smith, Simeon

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to create synthetic vocal fold models with nonlinear stress-strain properties and to investigate the effect of linear versus nonlinear material properties on fundamental frequency (F[subscript 0]) during anterior-posterior stretching. Method: Three materially linear and 3 materially nonlinear models were…

  1. Poly(L-lactic acid)/poly(glycolic acid) microfibrillar polymer-polymer composites: Preparation and viscoelastic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimble, L. D.; Fakirov, S.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2015-05-01

    Microfibrillar composites (MFCs) from petrochemical-derived polymers have been investigated for several years and the technique can result in significant improvements in mechanical properties when compared with the neat matrix material of the respective composite. The current work applies the technique to biodegradable, biocompatible polymers for potential applications in bioabsorbable medical devices. MFCs were prepared from melt blended poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) via cold drawing then compression molding of extruded yarn. These MFCs were shown to have higher Young's moduli than that of neat PLLA but for load-bearing applications the creep characteristics are of interest. The MFC sheets resulting from compression molding were subjected to tensile relaxation tests at 37°C in the fiber orientation direction. Specimens were also tested via dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). Neat PLLA specimens were subjected to the same tests for comparison. Results indicate that at 37°C PLLA/PGA MFCs exhibit lower creep resistance than that of neat PLLA due to the more rapid relaxation of stress observed. DMTA results elucidate the loss modulus changes in PLLA/PGA MFCs which occur as the material approaches the glass transition temperature of PGA (˜45°C).

  2. Viscoelastic Flows in Simple Liquids Generated by Vibrating Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sader, John; Pelton, Matthew; Chakraborty, Debadi; Malachosky, Edward; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Newtonian fluid mechanics, in which the shear stress is proportional to the strain rate, is synonymous with the flow of simple liquids like water. We report the measurement and theoretical verification of non-Newtonian, viscoelastic flow phenomena produced by the high-frequency (>20 GHz) vibration of gold nanoparticles immersed in water-glycerol mixtures. The observed viscoelasticity is not due to molecular confinement, but is a bulk continuum effect arising from the short time scale of vibration. This represents the first direct mechanical measurement of the intrinsic viscoelastic properties of simple bulk liquids, and opens a new paradigm for understanding extremely high frequency fluid mechanics, nanoscale sensing technologies, and biophysical processes.

  3. Investigation of Thermal and Viscoelastic Properties of Polymers Relevant to Hot Melt Extrusion, IV: Affinisol™ HPMC HME Polymers.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Simerdeep Singh; Solanki, Nayan; Serajuddin, Abu T M

    2016-02-01

    Most cellulosic polymers cannot be used as carriers for preparing solid dispersion of drugs by hot melt extrusion (HME) due to their high melt viscosity and thermal degradation at high processing temperatures. Three HME-grade hydroxypropyl methylcelluloses, namely Affinisol™ HPMC HME 15 cP, Affinisol™ HPMC HME 100 cP, and Affinisol™ HPMC HME 4 M, have recently been introduced by The Dow Chemical Co. to enable the preparation of solid dispersion at lower and more acceptable processing temperatures. In the present investigation, physicochemical properties of the new polymers relevant to HME were determined and compared with that of Kollidon(®) VA 64. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), modulated differential scanning calorimetry (mDSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), moisture sorption, rheology, and torque analysis by melt extrusion were applied. PXRD and mDSC showed that the Affinisol™ polymers were amorphous in nature. According to TGA, the onset of degradation for all polymers was >220°C. The Affinisol™ polymers exhibited less hygroscopicity than Kollidon(®) VA 64 and another HPMC polymer, Methocel™ K100LV. The complex viscosity profiles of the Affinisol™ polymers as a function of temperature were similar. The viscosity of the Affinisol™ polymers was highly sensitive to the shear rate applied, and unlike Kollidon(®) VA 64, the viscosity decreased drastically when the angular frequency was increased. Because of the very high shear rate encountered during melt extrusion, Affinisol™ polymers showed capability of being extruded at larger windows of processing temperatures as compared to that of Kollidon(®) VA 64. PMID:26511936

  4. Nonlinear Viscoelastic Mechanics of Cross-linked Rubbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Leonov, Arkady I.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The paper develops a general theory for finite rubber viscoelasticity, and specifies it in the form, convenient for solving problems important for rubber, tire and space industries. Based on the quasi-linear approach of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, a general nonlinear theory has been developed for arbitrary nonisothermal deformations of viscoelastic solids. In this theory, the constitutive equations are presented as the sum of known equilibrium (rubber elastic) and non-equilibrium (liquid polymer viscoelastic) terms. These equations are then simplified using several modeling arguments. Stability constraints for the proposed constitutive equations are also discussed. It is shown that only strong ellipticity criteria are applicable for assessing stability of the equations governing viscoelastic solids.

  5. Afterslip Distribution of Large Earthquakes Using Viscoelastic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Higuchi, H.

    2009-12-01

    One of important parameters in simulations of earthquake generation is frictional properties of faults. To investigate the frictional properties, many authors studied coseismic slip and afterslip distribution of large plate interface earthquakes using coseismic and post seismic surface deformation by GPS data. Most of these studies used elastic media to get afterslip distribution. However, the effect of viscoelastic relaxation at the asthenosphere is important on post seismic surface deformation (Matsu’ura and Sato, GJI, 1989; Sato and Matsu’ura, GJI, 1992). Therefore, the studies using elastic media did not estimate correct afterslip distribution because they forced the cause of surface deformation on only afterslips at plate interface. We estimate afterslip distribution of large interplate earthquakes using viscoelastic media. We consider not only viscoelastic responses of coseismic slip but also viscoelastic responses of afterslips. Because many studies suggested that the magnitude of afterslips was comparable to that of coseismic slip, viscoelastic responses of afterslips can not be negligible. Therefore, surface displacement data include viscoelastic response of coseismic slip, viscoelastic response of afterslips which occurred just after coseismic period to just before the present, and elastic response of the present afterslip. We estimate afterslip distribution for the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake, Hokkaido, Japan using GPS data by GSI, Japan. We use CAMP model (Hashimoto et al, PAGEOPH, 2004) as a plate interface between the Pacific plate and the North American plate. The viscoelastic results show clearer that afterslips distribute on areaes where the coseismic slip does not occur. The viscoelastic results also show that the afterslips concentrate deeper parts of the plate interface at the eastern adjoining area of the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake.

  6. Measuring viscoelasticity of soft samples using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, S; Berger, E J

    2009-09-01

    Relaxation indentation experiments using atomic force microscopy (AFM) are used to obtain viscoelastic material properties of soft samples. The quasilinear viscoelastic (QLV) model formulated by Fung (1972, "Stress Strain History Relations of Soft Tissues in Simple Elongation," in Biomechanics, Its Foundation and Objectives, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, pp. 181-207) for uniaxial compression data was modified for the indentation test data in this study. Hertz contact mechanics was used for the instantaneous deformation, and a reduced relaxation function based on continuous spectrum is used for the time-dependent part in the model. The modified QLV indentation model presents a novel method to obtain viscoelastic properties from indentation data independent of relaxation times of the test. The major objective of the present study is to develop the QLV indentation model and implement the model on AFM indentation data for 1% agarose gel and a viscoelastic polymer using spherical indenter. PMID:19725704

  7. Viscoelastic interactions between polydeoxyribonucleotide and ophthalmic excipients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Iksoo; Kim, Hyeongmin; Park, Kyunghee; Karki, Sandeep; Khadka, Prakash; Jo, Kanghee; Kim, Seong Yeon; Ro, Jieun; Lee, Jaehwi

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the interaction between polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN) and several ionic and nonionic isotonic agents, thickeners and a preservative that were employed as excipients in ophthalmic preparations. Interaction of each individual excipient and PDRN aqueous solution was evaluated by analyzing their rheological properties. Rheological properties of PDRN solutions were evaluated by dynamic oscillatory shear tests and values of elastic modulus (G'), viscous modulus (G″) and loss tangent (tan δ) were used to assess the relative changes in viscoelastic properties. At given concentrations, sodium chloride was found to show alteration in viscoelastic properties of PDRN solution while nonionic isotonic agents like d-glucose and d-sorbitol did not alter them. Similarly, nonionic water soluble polymers like polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) also did not interact with PDRN to alter the viscoelastic properties. However, there were changes observed when carbopol 940 was used as a thickener. Therefore, PDRN was found to interact with ionic excipients and the interactions were negligible when nonionic materials were examined, which suggests that nonionic excipients are suitable to be formulated with PDRN. PMID:26023993

  8. Nonlinear viscoelasticity and relaxation phenomena of polymer solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, S. T. J.; Landel, R. F.; Valanis, K. C.

    1977-01-01

    In the light of a three-chain model of statistical network theories of rubberlike elastic models, it is assumed that the free energy function of incompressible viscoelastic polymer solids is a separable, symmetric function of the principle stretch ratios and the hidden thermodynamic coordinates along the same directions. This assumption leads to a characterization of those viscoelastic polymer solids which exhibit the property of factorizability between the time and strain functions.

  9. Rheological regional properties of brain tissue studied under cyclic creep/ recovery shear stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjema, F.; Lounis, M.; Khelidj, B.; Bessai, N.

    2015-04-01

    The rheological properties of brain tissue were studied by repeated creep-recovery shear tests under static conditions for different regions. Corpus callosum CC, Thalamus Th and Corona radiata CR. Non-linear viscoelastic model was also proposed to characterize the transient/steady states of shear creep results. From the creep-recovery data it was obvious that the brain tissues show high regional anisotropy. However. the both samples exhibit fluid viscoelastic properties in the first shear stress cycle of 100 Pa, while this behaviour evolutes to solid viscoelastic with cyclic effect.

  10. Viscoelastic behavior of stock indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gündüz, Güngör; Gündüz, Yalin

    2010-12-01

    The scattering diagram of a stock index results in a complex network structure, which can be used to analyze the viscoelastic properties of the index. The change along x- or y-direction of the diagram corresponds to purely elastic (or spring like) movement whereas the diagonal change at an angle of 45° corresponds to purely viscous (or dashpot like) movement. The viscous component pushes the price from its current value to any other value, while the elastic component acts like a restoring force. Four indices, namely, DJI, S&P-500, NASDAQ-100, and NASDAQ-composite were studied for the period of 2001-2009. NASDAQ-composite displayed very high elasticity while NASDAQ-100 displayed the highest fluidity in the time period considered. The fluidity of DJI and S&P-500 came out to be close to each other, and they are almost the same in the second half of the period.

  11. Dynamic wetting of viscoelastic droplets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuli; Minh, Do-Quang; Amberg, Gustav

    2015-10-01

    We conduct numerical experiments on spreading of viscoelastic droplets on a flat surface. Our work considers a Giesekus fluid characterized by a shear-thinning viscosity and an Oldroyd-B fluid, which is close to a Boger fluid with constant viscosity. Our results qualitatively agree with experimental observations in that both shear thinning and elasticity enhances contact line motion, and that the contact line motion of the Boger fluid obeys the Tanner-Voinov-Hoffman relation. Excluding inertia, the spreading speed shows strong dependence on rheological properties, such as the viscosity ratio between the solvent and the polymer suspension, and the polymeric relaxation time. We also discuss how elasticity can affect contact line motion. The molecular migration theory proposed in the literature is not able to explain the agreement between our simulations and experimental results. PMID:26565327

  12. Hydrodynamics of granular gases of viscoelastic particles.

    PubMed

    Brilliantov, Nikolai V; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2002-03-15

    Our study examines the long-time behaviour of a force-free granular gas of viscoelastic particles, for which the coefficient of restitution depends on the impact velocity, as it follows from the solution of the impact problem for viscoelastic spheres. Starting from the Boltzmann equation, we derived the hydrodynamic equations and obtained microscopic expressions for the transport coefficients in terms of the elastic and dissipative parameters of the particle material. We performed the stability analysis of the linearized set of equations and found that any inhomogeneities and vortices vanish after a long time and the system approaches the flow-free stage of homogeneous density. This behaviour is in contrast to that of a gas consisting of particles which interact via a (non-realistic) constant coefficient of restitution, for which inhomogeneities (clusters) and vortex patterns have been proven to arise and to continuously develop. PMID:16214686

  13. Viscoelasticity Using Reactive Constrained Solid Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a framework for viscoelasticity where the free energy density depends on the stored energy of intact strong and weak bonds, where weak bonds break and reform in response to loading. The stress is evaluated by differentiating the free energy density with respect to the deformation gradient, similar to the conventional approach for hyperelasticity. The breaking and reformation of weak bonds is treated as a reaction governed by the axiom of mass balance, where the constitutive relation for the mass supply governs the bond kinetics. The evolving mass contents of these weak bonds serve as observable state variables. Weak bonds reform in an energy-free and stress-free state, therefore their reference configuration is given by the current configuration at the time of their reformation. A principal advantage of this formulation is the availability of a strain energy density function that depends only on observable state variables, also allowing for a separation of the contributions of strong and weak bonds. The Clausius-Duhem inequality is satisfied by requiring that the net free energy from all breaking bonds must be decreasing at all times. In the limit of infinitesimal strains, linear stress-strain responses and first-order kinetics for breaking and reforming of weak bonds, the reactive framework reduces exactly to classical linear viscoelasticity. For large strains, the reactive and classical quasilinear viscoelasticity theories produce different equations, though responses to standard loading configurations behave similarly. This formulation complements existing tools for modeling the nonlinear viscoelastic response of biological soft tissues under large deformations. PMID:25757663

  14. Viscoelasticity using reactive constrained solid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ateshian, Gerard A

    2015-04-13

    This study presents a framework for viscoelasticity where the free energy density depends on the stored energy of intact strong and weak bonds, where weak bonds break and reform in response to loading. The stress is evaluated by differentiating the free energy density with respect to the deformation gradient, similar to the conventional approach for hyperelasticity. The breaking and reformation of weak bonds is treated as a reaction governed by the axiom of mass balance, where the constitutive relation for the mass supply governs the bond kinetics. The evolving mass contents of these weak bonds serve as observable state variables. Weak bonds reform in an energy-free and stress-free state, therefore their reference configuration is given by the current configuration at the time of their reformation. A principal advantage of this formulation is the availability of a strain energy density function that depends only on observable state variables, also allowing for a separation of the contributions of strong and weak bonds. The Clausius-Duhem inequality is satisfied by requiring that the net free energy from all breaking bonds must be decreasing at all times. In the limit of infinitesimal strains, linear stress-strain responses and first-order kinetics for breaking and reforming of weak bonds, the reactive framework reduces exactly to classical linear viscoelasticity. For large strains, the reactive and classical quasilinear viscoelasticity theories produce different equations, though responses to standard loading configurations behave similarly. This formulation complements existing tools for modeling the nonlinear viscoelastic response of biological soft tissues under large deformations. PMID:25757663

  15. Identification of the viscoelastic properties of soft materials at low frequency: performance, ill-conditioning and extrapolation capabilities of fractional and exponential models.

    PubMed

    Ciambella, J; Paolone, A; Vidoli, S

    2014-09-01

    We report about the experimental identification of viscoelastic constitutive models for frequencies ranging within 0-10Hz. Dynamic moduli data are fitted forseveral materials of interest to medical applications: liver tissue (Chatelin et al., 2011), bioadhesive gel (Andrews et al., 2005), spleen tissue (Nicolle et al., 2012) and synthetic elastomer (Osanaiye, 1996). These materials actually represent a rather wide class of soft viscoelastic materials which are usually subjected to low frequencies deformations. We also provide prescriptions for the correct extrapolation of the material behavior at higher frequencies. Indeed, while experimental tests are more easily carried out at low frequency, the identified viscoelastic models are often used outside the frequency range of the actual test. We consider two different classes of models according to their relaxation function: Debye models, whose kernel decays exponentially fast, and fractional models, including Cole-Cole, Davidson-Cole, Nutting and Havriliak-Negami, characterized by a slower decay rate of the material memory. Candidate constitutive models are hence rated according to the accurateness of the identification and to their robustness to extrapolation. It is shown that all kernels whose decay rate is too fast lead to a poor fitting and high errors when the material behavior is extrapolated to broader frequency ranges. PMID:24967977

  16. Viscoelastic Mapping of Living Cell Interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Doris; Sackmann, Erich; Koehler, Jana; Gerisch, Guenther

    2004-03-01

    We performed spatially resolved mapping of the viscoelastic properties of the cytoplasm of living cell interiors. A magnetic tweezer was applied as a local probe for the investigation of active and passive transport inside the slime mold cells Dictyostelium discoideum. Fluorescence labeled components, i.e. the microtubulins, the endoplasmatic reticulum or the core, allow for the determination of the interaction of the magnetic probes with the cytoplasm. By comparing the trajectories of the magnetic beads in the presence of an external magnetic force and in the absence of an external force, we can measure the viscosity at any given position within the cell. These experiments show that the cytoplasm consists of soft pathways (yield stress less or equal 10 Pa) and hard pathways (yield stress less or equal 500 Pa). Selective actin, myosin II or microtubulin network removal in the living cells allows for the determination of the influence of these cell parts on the viscoelastic properties.

  17. Properties of Interstellar Turbulence from Gradients of Linear Polarization Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, A.; Gaensler, B. M.

    2012-04-01

    Faraday rotation of linearly polarized radio signals provides a very sensitive probe of fluctuations in the interstellar magnetic field and ionized gas density resulting from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We used a set of statistical tools to analyze images of the spatial gradient of linearly polarized radio emission (|∇P|) for both observational data from a test image of the Southern Galactic Plane Survey (SGPS) and isothermal three-dimensional simulations of MHD turbulence. Visually, in both observations and simulations, a complex network of filamentary structures is seen. Our analysis shows that the filaments in |∇P| can be produced both by interacting shocks and random fluctuations characterizing the non-differentiable field of MHD turbulence. The latter dominates for subsonic turbulence, while the former is only present in supersonic turbulence. We show that supersonic and subsonic turbulence exhibit different distributions as well as different morphologies in the maps of |∇P|. Particularly, filaments produced by shocks show a characteristic "double jump" profile at the sites of shock fronts resulting from delta function-like increases in the density and/or magnetic field, while those produced by subsonic turbulence show a single jump profile. In order to quantitatively characterize these differences, we use the topology tool known as the genus curve as well as the probability distribution function moments of the image distribution. We find that higher values for the moments correspond to cases of |∇P| with larger sonic Mach numbers. The genus analysis of the supersonic simulations of |∇P| reveals a "swiss cheese" topology, while the subsonic cases have characteristics of a "clump" topology. Based on the analysis of the genus and the higher order moments, the SGPS test region data have a distribution and morphology that match subsonic- to transonic-type turbulence, which confirms what is now expected for the warm ionized medium.

  18. PROPERTIES OF INTERSTELLAR TURBULENCE FROM GRADIENTS OF LINEAR POLARIZATION MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, A.; Gaensler, B. M.

    2012-04-20

    Faraday rotation of linearly polarized radio signals provides a very sensitive probe of fluctuations in the interstellar magnetic field and ionized gas density resulting from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We used a set of statistical tools to analyze images of the spatial gradient of linearly polarized radio emission (|{nabla}P|) for both observational data from a test image of the Southern Galactic Plane Survey (SGPS) and isothermal three-dimensional simulations of MHD turbulence. Visually, in both observations and simulations, a complex network of filamentary structures is seen. Our analysis shows that the filaments in |{nabla}P| can be produced both by interacting shocks and random fluctuations characterizing the non-differentiable field of MHD turbulence. The latter dominates for subsonic turbulence, while the former is only present in supersonic turbulence. We show that supersonic and subsonic turbulence exhibit different distributions as well as different morphologies in the maps of |{nabla}P|. Particularly, filaments produced by shocks show a characteristic 'double jump' profile at the sites of shock fronts resulting from delta function-like increases in the density and/or magnetic field, while those produced by subsonic turbulence show a single jump profile. In order to quantitatively characterize these differences, we use the topology tool known as the genus curve as well as the probability distribution function moments of the image distribution. We find that higher values for the moments correspond to cases of |{nabla}P| with larger sonic Mach numbers. The genus analysis of the supersonic simulations of |{nabla}P| reveals a 'swiss cheese' topology, while the subsonic cases have characteristics of a 'clump' topology. Based on the analysis of the genus and the higher order moments, the SGPS test region data have a distribution and morphology that match subsonic- to transonic-type turbulence, which confirms what is now expected for the warm ionized

  19. Compressive viscoelasticity of freshly excised mouse skin is dependent on specimen thickness, strain level and rate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxiang; Marshall, Kara L; Baba, Yoshichika; Lumpkin, Ellen A; Gerling, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    Although the skin's mechanical properties are well characterized in tension, little work has been done in compression. Here, the viscoelastic properties of a population of mouse skin specimens (139 samples from 36 mice, aged 5 to 34 weeks) were characterized upon varying specimen thickness, as well as strain level and rate. Over the population, we observed the skin's viscoelasticity to be quite variable, yet found systematic correlation of residual stress ratio with skin thickness and strain, and of relaxation time constants with strain rates. In particular, as specimen thickness ranged from 211 to 671 μm, we observed significant variation in both quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) parameters, the relaxation time constant (τ1 = 0.19 ± 0.10 s) and steady-state residual stress ratio (G∞ = 0.28 ± 0.13). Moreover, when τ1 was decoupled and fixed, we observed that G∞ positively correlated with skin thickness. Second, as steady-state stretch was increased (λ∞ from 0.22 to 0.81), we observed significant variation in both QLV parameters (τ1 = 0.26 ± 0.14 s, G∞ = 0.47 ± 0.17), and when τ1 was fixed, G∞ positively correlated with stretch level. Third, as strain rate was increased from 0.06 to 22.88 s-1, the median time constant τ1 varied from 1.90 to 0.31 s, and thereby negatively correlated with strain rate. These findings indicate that the natural range of specimen thickness, as well as experimental controls of compression level and rate, significantly influence measurements of skin viscoelasticity. PMID:25803703

  20. Compressive Viscoelasticity of Freshly Excised Mouse Skin Is Dependent on Specimen Thickness, Strain Level and Rate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuxiang; Marshall, Kara L.; Baba, Yoshichika; Lumpkin, Ellen A.; Gerling, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Although the skin’s mechanical properties are well characterized in tension, little work has been done in compression. Here, the viscoelastic properties of a population of mouse skin specimens (139 samples from 36 mice, aged 5 to 34 weeks) were characterized upon varying specimen thickness, as well as strain level and rate. Over the population, we observed the skin’s viscoelasticity to be quite variable, yet found systematic correlation of residual stress ratio with skin thickness and strain, and of relaxation time constants with strain rates. In particular, as specimen thickness ranged from 211 to 671 μm, we observed significant variation in both quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) parameters, the relaxation time constant (τ1 = 0.19 ± 0.10 s) and steady-state residual stress ratio (G∞ = 0.28 ± 0.13). Moreover, when τ1 was decoupled and fixed, we observed that G∞ positively correlated with skin thickness. Second, as steady-state stretch was increased (λ∞ from 0.22 to 0.81), we observed significant variation in both QLV parameters (τ1 = 0.26 ± 0.14 s, G∞ = 0.47 ± 0.17), and when τ1 was fixed, G∞ positively correlated with stretch level. Third, as strain rate was increased from 0.06 to 22.88 s−1, the median time constant τ1 varied from 1.90 to 0.31 s, and thereby negatively correlated with strain rate. These findings indicate that the natural range of specimen thickness, as well as experimental controls of compression level and rate, significantly influence measurements of skin viscoelasticity. PMID:25803703

  1. Dynamic testing of regional viscoelastic behavior of canine sclera

    PubMed Central

    Palko, Joel R.; Pan, Xueliang; Liu, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Intraocular pressure (IOP) fluctuations have gained recent clinical interest and thus warrant an understanding of how the sclera responds to dynamic mechanical insults. The objective of this study was to characterize the regional dynamic viscoelastic properties of canine sclera under physiological cyclic loadings. Scleral strips were excised from the anterior, equatorial, and posterior sclera in ten canine eyes. The dimensions of each strip were measured using a high resolution ultrasound imaging system. The strips were tested in a humidity chamber at approximately 37°C using a Rheometrics Systems Analyzer. A cyclic strain input (0.25%, 1 Hz) was applied to the strips, superimposed upon pre-stresses corresponding to an IOP of 15, 25, and 45 mmHg. The cyclic stress output was recorded and the dynamic properties were calculated based on linear viscoelasticity. Uniaxial tensile tests were also performed on the same samples and the results were compared to those reported for human eyes. The results showed that the sclera’s resistance to dynamic loading increased significantly while the damping capability decreased significantly with increasing pre-stresses for all regions of sclera (P<0.001). Anterior sclera appeared to have a significantly higher damping capability than equatorial and posterior sclera (P=0.003 and 0.018, respectively). The secant modulus from uniaxial tensile tests showed a decreasing trend from anterior to posterior sclera, displaying a similar pattern as in the human eye. In conclusion, all scleral regions in the canine eyes exhibited an increased ability to resist and a decreased ability to dampen cyclic stress insults at increasing prestress (i.e., increasing steady-state IOP). The regional variation of the dynamic properties differed from those of uniaxial tensile tests. Dynamic testing may provide useful information to better understand the mechanical behavior of the sclera in response to dynamic IOP. PMID:21983041

  2. Linear center-of-mass dynamics emerge from non-linear leg-spring properties in human hopping.

    PubMed

    Riese, Sebastian; Seyfarth, Andre; Grimmer, Sten

    2013-09-01

    Given the almost linear relationship between ground-reaction force and leg length, bouncy gaits are commonly described using spring-mass models with constant leg-spring parameters. In biological systems, however, spring-like properties of limbs may change over time. Therefore, it was investigated how much variation of leg-spring parameters is present during vertical human hopping. In order to do so, rest-length and stiffness profiles were estimated from ground-reaction forces and center-of-mass dynamics measured in human hopping. Trials included five hopping frequencies ranging from 1.2 to 3.6 Hz. Results show that, even though stiffness and rest length vary during stance, for most frequencies the center-of-mass dynamics still resemble those of a linear spring-mass hopper. Rest-length and stiffness profiles differ for slow and fast hopping. Furthermore, at 1.2 Hz two distinct control schemes were observed. PMID:23880438

  3. A three-dimensional viscoelastic model for cell deformation with experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Karcher, Hélène; Lammerding, Jan; Huang, Hayden; Lee, Richard T; Kamm, Roger D; Kaazempur-Mofrad, Mohammad R

    2003-11-01

    A three-dimensional viscoelastic finite element model is developed for cell micromanipulation by magnetocytometry. The model provides a robust tool for analysis of detailed strain/stress fields induced in the cell monolayer produced by forcing one microbead attached atop a single cell or cell monolayer on a basal substrate. Both the membrane/cortex and the cytoskeleton are modeled as Maxwell viscoelastic materials, but the structural effect of the membrane/cortex was found to be negligible on the timescales corresponding to magnetocytometry. Numerical predictions are validated against experiments performed on NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and previous experimental work. The system proved to be linear with respect to cytoskeleton mechanical properties and bead forcing. Stress and strain patterns were highly localized, suggesting that the effects of magnetocytometry are confined to a region extending <10 microm from the bead. Modulation of cell height has little effect on the results, provided the monolayer is >5 micro m thick. NIH 3T3 fibroblasts exhibited a viscoelastic timescale of approximately 1 s and a shear modulus of approximately 1000 Pa. PMID:14581235

  4. Effect of electromagnetic field on the stability of viscoelastic fluid film flowing down an inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldar, Samadyuti

    2016-04-01

    The stability of thin electrically conducting viscoelastic fluid film flowing down on a non-conducting inclined plane in the presence of electromagnetic field is investigated under induction-free approximation. Surface evolution equation is derived by long-wave expansion method. The stabilizing role of Hartman number M (magnetic field) and the destabilizing role of the viscoelastic property {\\varGamma} and the electric parameter E on such fluid film are established through the linear stability analysis of the surface evolution equation. Investigation shows that at small values of Hartman number ( M), the influence of electric parameter ( E) on the viscoelastic parameter {(\\varGamma)} is insignificant, while for large values of M, E introduces more destabilizing effect at low values of {\\varGamma} than that at high values of {\\varGamma }. An interesting result also perceived from our analysis is that the stabilizing effect of Hartman number ( M) is decreasing with the increase of the values of {\\varGamma} and E, even it gives destabilizing effect after a certain high value of the electric field depending on the high value of {\\varGamma}. The weakly nonlinear study reveals that the increase of {\\varGamma} decreases the explosive and subcritical unstable zones but increases the supercritical stable zone keeping the unconditional zone almost constant.

  5. On the long-term deformation process in viscoelastic composites around an elliptical hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminsky, A. A.; Selivanov, M. F.; Chornoivan, Y. O.

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the dependence of stress redistribution around an elliptical hole in a composite on viscoelastic properties of the composite components. The results are obtained for composites with elastic and viscoelastic reinforcement. It is shown that the stress on a surface of the hole can change non-monotonically for the case of viscoelastic reinforcement, i.e., there can be maxima on the stress-time diagrams during the lifetime of the composite.

  6. Postseismic viscoelastic rebound.

    PubMed

    Nur, A; Mavko, G

    1974-01-18

    The sudden appearance of a dislocation, representing an earthquake, in an elastic layer (the lithosphere) overriding a viscoelastic half space (the asthenosphere) is followed by time-dependent surface deformation, which is very similar to in situ postseismic deformation. The spectacular postseismic deformation following the large Nankaido earthquake of 1946 yields for the asthenosphere a viscosity of 5 x 10(19) poise and a 50 percent relaxation of the shear modulus. Large thrust type earthquakes may provide, in the future, a new method for exploring the rheology of the earth's upper mantle. PMID:17777265

  7. Bounding solutions of geometrically nonlinear viscoelastic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubstad, J. M.; Simitses, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    Integral transform techniques, such as the Laplace transform, provide simple and direct methods for solving viscoelastic problems formulated within a context of linear material response and using linear measures for deformation. Application of the transform operator reduces the governing linear integro-differential equations to a set of algebraic relations between the transforms of the unknown functions, the viscoelastic operators, and the initial and boundary conditions. Inversion either directly or through the use of the appropriate convolution theorem, provides the time domain response once the unknown functions have been expressed in terms of sums, products or ratios of known transforms. When exact inversion is not possible approximate techniques may provide accurate results. The overall problem becomes substantially more complex when nonlinear effects must be included. Situations where a linear material constitutive law can still be productively employed but where the magnitude of the resulting time dependent deformations warrants the use of a nonlinear kinematic analysis are considered. The governing equations will be nonlinear integro-differential equations for this class of problems. Thus traditional as well as approximate techniques, such as cited above, cannot be employed since the transform of a nonlinear function is not explicitly expressible.

  8. Bounding solutions of geometrically nonlinear viscoelastic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubstad, J. M.; Simitses, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    Integral transform techniques, such as the Laplace transform, provide simple and direct methods for solving viscoelastic problems formulated within a context of linear material response and using linear measures for deformation. Application of the transform operator reduces the governing linear integro-differential equations to a set of algebraic relations between the transforms of the unknown functions, the viscoelastic operators, and the initial and boundary conditions. Inversion either directly or through the use of the appropriate convolution theorem, provides the time domain response once the unknown functions have been expressed in terms of sums, products or ratios of known transforms. When exact inversion is not possible approximate techniques may provide accurate results. The overall problem becomes substantially more complex when nonlinear effects must be included. Situations where a linear material constitutive law can still be productively employed but where the magnitude of the resulting time dependent deformations warrants the use of a nonlinear kinematic analysis are considered. The governing equations will be nonlinear integro-differential equations for this class of problems. Thus traditional as well as approximate techniques, such as cited above, cannot be employed since the transform of a nonlinear function is not explicitly expressible.

  9. Analyzing molecular static linear response properties with perturbed localized orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autschbach, Jochen; King, Harry F.

    2010-07-01

    Perturbed localized molecular orbitals (LMOs), correct to first order in an applied static perturbation and consistent with a chosen localization functional, are calculated using analytic derivative techniques. The formalism is outlined for a general static perturbation and variational localization functionals. Iterative and (formally) single-step approaches are compared. The implementation employs an iterative sequence of 2×2 orbital rotations. The procedure is verified by calculations of molecular electric-field perturbations. Boys LMO contributions to the electronic static polarizability and the electric-field perturbation of the ⟨r2⟩ expectation value are calculated and analyzed for ethene, ethyne, and fluoroethene (H2CCHF). For ethene, a comparison is made with results from a Pipek-Mezey localization. The calculations show that a chemically intuitive decomposition of the calculated properties is possible with the help of the LMO contributions and that the polarizability contributions in similar molecules are approximately transferable.

  10. Determination of physical properties of bitumens by use of near-infrared spectroscopy with neural networks. Joint modelling of linear and non-linear parameters.

    PubMed

    Blanco, M; Maspoch, S; Villarroya, I; Peralta, X; González, J M; Torres, J

    2001-03-01

    The fact that bitumens behave as non-Newtonian fluids results in non-linear relationships between their near-infrared (NIR) spectra and the physico-chemical properties that define their consistency (viz. penetration and viscosity). Determining such properties using linear calibration techniques [e.g. partial least-squares regression (PLSR)] entails the previous transformation of the original variables by use of non-linear functions and employing the transformed variables to construct the models. Other properties of bitumens such as density and composition exhibit linear relationships with their NIR spectra. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) enable modelling of systems with a non-linear property-spectrum relationship; also, they allow one to determine several properties of a sample with a single model, so they are effective alternatives to linear calibration methods. In this work, the ability of ANNs simultaneously to determine both linear and non-linear parameters for bitumens without the need previously to transform the original variables was assessed. Based on the results, ANNs allow the simultaneous determination of several linear and non-linear physical properties typical of bitumens. PMID:11284343

  11. Viscoelastic fluid flow in inhomogeneous porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Siginer, D.A.; Bakhtiyarov, S.I.

    1996-09-01

    The flow of inelastic and viscoelastic fluids in two porous media of different permeabilities and same priority arranged in series has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The fluids are an oil field spacer fluid and aqueous solutions of polyacrylamide. The porous medium is represented by a cylindrical tube randomly packed with glass spheres. Expressions for the friction factor and the resistance coefficient as a function of the Reynolds number have been developed both for shear thinning and viscoelastic fluids based on the linear fluidity and eight constant Oldroyd models, respectively. The authors show that the energy loss is higher if the viscoelastic fluid flows first through the porous medium with the smaller permeability rather than through the section of the cylinder with the larger permeability. This effect is not observed for Newtonian and shear thinning fluids flowing through the same configuration. Energy requirements for the same volume flow rate are much higher than a Newtonian fluid of the same zero shear viscosity as the polymeric solution. Energy loss increases with increasing Reynolds number at a fixed concentration. At a fixed Reynolds number, the loss is a strong function of the concentration and increases with increasing concentration. The behavior of all fluids is predicted qualitatively except the difference in energy requirements.

  12. Wideband MR elastography for viscoelasticity model identification.

    PubMed

    Yasar, Temel K; Royston, Thomas J; Magin, Richard L

    2013-08-01

    The growing clinical use of MR elastography requires the development of new quantitative standards for measuring tissue stiffness. Here, we examine a soft tissue mimicking phantom material (Ecoflex) over a wide frequency range (200 Hz to 7.75 kHz). The recorded data are fit to a cohort of viscoelastic models of varying complexity (integer and fractional order). This was accomplished using multiple sample sizes by employing geometric focusing of the shear wave front to compensate for the changes in wavelength and attenuation over this broad range of frequencies. The simple axisymmetric geometry and shear wave front of this experiment allows us to calculate the frequency-dependent complex-valued shear modulus of the material. The data were fit to several common models of linear viscoelasticity, including those with fractional derivative operators, and we identified the best possible matches over both a limited frequency band (often used in clinical studies) and over the entire frequency span considered. In addition to demonstrating the superior capability of the fractional order viscoelastic models, this study highlights the advantages of measuring the complex-valued shear modulus over as wide a range of frequencies as possible. PMID:23001852

  13. Wideband MR elastography for viscoelasticity model identification

    PubMed Central

    Yasar, Temel K.; Royston, Thomas J.; Magin, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    The growing clinical use of MR Elastography (MRE) requires the development of new quantitative standards for measuring tissue stiffness. Here, we examine a soft tissue mimicking phantom material (Ecoflex) over a wide frequency range (200 Hz to 7.75 kHz). The recorded data are fit to a cohort of viscoelastic models of varying complexity (integer and fractional order). This was accomplished using multiple sample sizes by employing geometric focusing of the shear wave front to compensate for the changes in wavelength and attenuation over this broad range of frequencies. The simple axisymmetric geometry and shear wave front of this experiment allows us to calculate the frequency-dependent complex-valued shear modulus of the material. The data were fit to several common models of linear viscoelasticity, including those with fractional derivative operators, and we identified the best possible matches over both a limited frequency band (often used in clinical studies) and over the entire frequency span considered. In addition to demonstrating the superior capability of the fractional order viscoelastic models, this study highlights the advantages of measuring the complex-valued shear modulus over as wide a range of frequencies as possible. PMID:23001852

  14. Effects of flow geometry on blood viscoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Thurston, George B; Henderson, Nancy M

    2006-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of blood are dominated by microstructures formed by red cells. The microstructures are of several types such as irregular aggregates, rouleaux, and layers of aligned cells. The dynamic deformability of the red cells, aggregation tendency, cell concentration, size of confining vessel and rate of flow are determining factors in the microstructure. Viscoelastic properties, viscosity and elasticity, relate to energy loss and storage in flowing blood while relaxation time and Weissenberg number play a role in assessing the importance of the elasticity relative to the viscosity. These effects are shown herein for flow in a large straight cylindrical tube, a small tube, and a porous medium. These cases approximate the geometries of the arterial system: large vessels, small vessels and vessels with many branches and bifurcations. In each case the viscosity, elasticity, relaxation time and Weissenberg number for normal human blood as well as blood with enhanced cell aggregation tendency and diminished cell deformability are given. In the smaller spaces of the microtubes and porous media, the diminished viscosity shows the possible influence of the Fåhraeus-Lindqvist effect and at high shear rates, the viscoelasticity of blood shows dilatancy. This is true for normal, aggregation enhanced and hardened cells. PMID:17148856

  15. Metal colloids and quantum dots: linear and nonlinear optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Don O.

    1997-05-12

    Nanophase materials have found a wide application in a variety of technological areas which include ultrafast optical switching high density information storage and retrieval, electronics, and catalysts, to mention a few. Nanocrystal science has also drawn considerable interest from the fundamental perspective engaging physicists, chemists, and material scientists into this area of rapidly expanding and challenging research. Basic questions concerning how matter evolves from atomic like behavior to molecular and onto bulk lie at the center nanocrystal research. In addition, because of the high surface to volume ratio of the nanocrystals, the interaction potential between a nanocrystal and its surrounding environment becomes an important issue in determining its properties. While significant progress has been made in nanocrystal research, there are many problems concerned with their fabrication. In particular, the difficulty of incorporating nanocrystals into a matrix that is appropriate for ultimate device development has hindered some aspects of nanocrystal research. Ion implantation is a method that is now established as a technique for fabricating metal and semiconductor nanocrystals. It is highly versatile in that one may select nearly any host material for incorporating the nanocrystals of interest. The flexibility of being able to select the host matrix is also interesting from the point of view that it opens the opportunity to investigate matrix-nanocrystal interactions. We summarize in the following sections results on metal and semiconductor nanocrystals formed by ion implantation into dielectric hosts.

  16. Linear and Nonlinear Ultrasonic Properties of Granular Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, B.; Berge, P.A.; Aracne-Ruddle, C.M.; Bertete-Auguirre, H.; Wildenschild, D.; Trombino, C.N.; Hardy, E.

    2000-04-20

    The ultrasonic pulse transmission method (100-500 kHz) was adapted to measure compressional (P) and shear (S) wave velocities for synthetic soils fabricated from quartz-clay and quartz-peat mixtures. Velocities were determined as samples were loaded by small (up to 0.1 MPa) uniaxial stress to determine how stress at grain contacts affects ave amplitudes, velocities, and frequency content. Samples were fabricated from quartz sand mixed with either a swelling clay or peat (natural cellulose). P velocities in these dry synthetic soil samples were low, ranging from about 230 to 430 m/s for pure sand, about 91 to 420 m/s for sand-peat mixtures, and about 230 to 470 m/s for dry sand-clay mixtures. S velocities were about half of the P velocity in most cases, about 130 to 250 m/s for pure sand, about 75-220 m/s for sand-peat mixtures, and about 88-220 m/s for dry sand-clay mixtures. These experiments demonstrate that P and S velocities are sensitive to the amount and type of admixed second phase at low concentrations. They found that dramatic increases in all velocities occur with small uniaxial loads, indicating strong nonlinearity of the acoustic properties. Composition and grain packing contribute to the mechanical response at grain contacts and the nonlinear response at low stresses.

  17. Stability of viscoelastic wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biancofiore, Luca; Brandt, Luca; Zaki, Tamer

    2014-11-01

    Theoretical and computational studies of synthetic wakes have explained the dynamics of several industrial and technological flows, for example mixing in fuel injection and papermaking, and the flow behind bluff bodies. Despite the industrial importance of complex non-Newtonian flow, previous work has focused on Newtonian fluids. Nonlinear simulations of viscoelastic, spatially-developing wakes are performed in order to analyze the influence of polymer additives on the behavior of the flow. Viscoelasticity is modeled using the FENE-P closure. A canonical wake profile (Monkewitz, Phys. Fluids, 88) is prescribed as an inflow condition, and the downstream evolution is computed using the full Navier-Stokes equations for a range of Reynolds and Weissenberg numbers. The simulations demonstrate that the influence of the polymer can be stabilizing or destabilizing, depending on the inlet velocity profile. Smooth profiles are stabilized by elasticity while sharp profiles are destabilized. The disturbance kinetic energy budget is examined in order to explain the difference in behavior and in particular the influence of the polymeric stresses on flow stability.

  18. Viscoelastic response of fibroblasts to tension transmitted through adherens junctions.

    PubMed Central

    Ragsdale, G K; Phelps, J; Luby-Phelps, K

    1997-01-01

    Cytoplasmic deformation was monitored by observing the displacements of 200-nm green fluorescent beads microinjected into the cytoplasm of Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. We noted a novel protrusion of nonruffling cell margins that was accompanied by axial flow of beads and cytoplasmic vesicles as far as 50 microm behind the protruding plasma membrane. Fluorescent analog cytochemistry and immunofluorescence localization of F-actin, alpha-actinin, N-cadherin, and beta-catenin showed that the protruding margins of deforming cells were mechanically coupled to neighboring cells by adherens junctions. Observations suggested that protrusion resulted from passive linear deformation in response to tensile stress exerted by centripetal contraction of the neighboring cell. The time dependence of cytoplasmic strain calculated from the displacements of beads and vesicles was fit quantitatively by a Kelvin-Voight model for a viscoelastic solid with a mean limiting strain of 0.58 and a mean strain rate of 4.3 x 10(-3) s(-1). In rare instances, the deforming cell and its neighbor spontaneously became uncoupled, and recoil of the protruding margin was observed. The time dependence of strain during recoil also fit a Kelvin-Voight model with similar parameters, suggesting that the kinetics of deformation primarily reflect the mechanical properties of the deformed cell rather than the contractile properties of its neighbor. The existence of mechanical coupling between adjacent fibroblasts through adherens junctions and the viscoelastic responses of cells to tension transmitted directly from cell to cell are factors that must be taken into account to fully understand the role of fibroblasts in such biological processes as wound closure and extracellular matrix remodeling during tissue development. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 PMID:9370474

  19. Probing of polymer surfaces in the viscoelastic regime.

    PubMed

    Chyasnavichyus, Marius; Young, Seth L; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2014-09-01

    In this Feature Article, we discussed the experimental and modeling methods and analyzed the limitations of the surface probing of nanomechanical properties of polymeric and biological materials in static and dynamic regimes with atomic force microscopy (AFM), which are widely utilized currently. To facilitate such measurements with minimized ambiguities, in this study we present a combined method to evaluate the viscoelastic properties of compliant polymeric materials. We collected force-distance data in the static regime for a benchmark polymer material (poly(n-butyl methacrylate)) with an easily accessible glass-transition temperature (about 25 °C) at different loading rates and different temperatures across the glassy state, glass-transition region, and rubbery state. For this analysis, we exploited a Johnson-modified Sneddon's approach in a combination with the standard linear solid model. Critical experimental steps suggested for robust probing are (i) the use of a tip with a well-characterized parabolic shape, (ii) probing in a liquid environment in order to reduce jump-in phenomenon, and (iii) minute indentations to ensure the absence of plastic deformation. Whereas the standard Sneddon's model generates quantitatively adequate elastic modulus values below and above the glass transition, this traditional approach can significantly underestimate actual modulus values in the vicinity of the glass-transition region (15 °C above or below Tg), with major deviations occurring at the loss tangent peak. The analysis of the experimental data with Sneddon's model for the elastic region (glassy and rubbery states) and Johnson's model for the viscoelastic region allowed for the restoration of the universal master curve and the evaluation of the storage modulus, loss modulus, loss tangent, relaxation times, and activation energies of the polymer surface across the glass-transition region and at relevant loading rates. PMID:24512573

  20. Piezoeletric and Mechanical properties of Non-linear Optical Manganese Mercury thiocyanate (MMTC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Santhosh R.; Korah, Ignatius; Chandralingam, S.; kumar, Binay; George, Sijosh; Joseph, Ginson P.

    2011-07-01

    Single crystasls of the coordination complex non-linear optical crystal material, MMTC with dimensions of 12×8×6 mm3 were grown from aqueous solutions by slow evaporation technique. The mechanical properties and piezoelectric properties of the crystals were studied.

  1. Dynamic finite element simulations of composite stiffened panels with a transverse-isotropic viscoelastic energy dissipation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Thomas; Doreille, Mathias; Merazzi, Silvio; Vescovini, Riccardo; Bisagni, Chiara

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a methodology for predicting the damped response and energy dissipation of laminated composite structures, subjected to dynamic loads. Starting from simple coupon tests to characterize the material, the numerical simulation of damping properties is made possible by a novel linear viscoelastic model that has been developed and implemented in the finite element code B2000++. A nonlinear optimization procedure is adopted to fit experimental data and define the exponential Maxwell parameter model. To illustrate the potentialities of the method, the post-buckling analysis of a relatively complex aeronautical panel is presented, accounting not only for geometric nonlinearities, but also for viscoelastic effects. The results illustrate the effects due to material dissipation, their relation to the effects of inertia, and the influence of geometric imperfections on the response of the panel.

  2. Identification of a Visco-Elastic Model for PET Near Tg Based on Uni and Biaxial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yun Mei; Chevalier, Luc; Monteiro, Eric

    2011-05-01

    The mechanical response of Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) in elongation is strongly dependent on temperature, strain and strain rate. Near the glass transition temperature Tg, the stress-strain curve presents a strain softening effect vs strain rate but a strain hardening effect vs strain under conditions of large deformations. The main goal of this work is to propose a viscoelastic model to predict the PET behaviour when subjected to large deformations and to determine the material properties from the experimental data. The viscoelastic model is written in a Leonov like way and the variational formulation is carried out for the numerical simulation using this model. To represent the non-linear effects, an elastic part depending on the elastic equivalent strain and a non-Newtonian viscous part depending on both viscous equivalent strain rate and cumulated viscous strain are tested. The model parameters can then be accurately obtained through the comparison with the experimental uniaxial and biaxial tests.

  3. Hydrodynamics and heat transfer in a laminar flow of viscoelastic fluid in a flat slot channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananyev, D. V.; Halitova, G. R.; Vachagina, E. K.

    2015-01-01

    Results of the numerical study of hydrodynamics and heat transfer in a laminar flow of viscoelastic fluid in a flat slot channel are presented in the present paper. The model of nonlinear viscoelastic fluid of Phan-Thien—Tanner is used to describe the viscoelastic properties of fluid. The solution to the stated problem by software package "COMSOL Multiphysics" is considered. The method of solution is verified, and results are compared with data of the other authors. It is determined that in the flow of viscoelastic fluid in a flat slot channel, the maximal contribution of heating due to dissipation is approximately 7-8 %.

  4. The viscoelasticity of curing thermosets

    SciTech Connect

    Adolf, D.; Martin, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    As a crosslinking polymer cures, dramatic changes in molecular architecture occur. These structural changes in turn affect the viscoelastic behavior of the material. At a critical extent of reaction (the gel point), the polymer undergoes a transition from a viscous liquid to an elastic solid. We have monitored the evolution of structure and viscoelasticity in an epoxy encapsulant used at Sandia, the diglycidyl ether of Bisphenol A (BADGE) cured with diethanolamine (DEA). The structure evolves according to percolation theory, and the viscoelasticity evolves according to out dynamic scaling theory for branched polymers. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  5. The nonlinear viscoelastic response of resin matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, C. C.; Brinson, H. F.; Cardon, A. H.

    1983-01-01

    The current paper describes the utilization of a thermodynamic based analytical nonlinear viscoelastic approach to represent lamina properties. Test data to verify the analysis for both transverse and shear properties of a T300/934 composite are presented. Master curves as a function of stress level and temperature are generated. Favorable comparisons between the traditional graphical and the current analytical approaches are shown.

  6. Viscoelastic analysis of high molecular weight, alkali-denatured DNA from mouse 3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Uhlenhopp, E L

    1975-01-01

    Alkaline lysates of mouse 3T3 cells showed viscoelastic properties characteristic of very large molecules of single-stranded DNA. The viscoelastic retardation time and the sensitivity to low doses of nitrogen mustard and of X-irradiation suggest a molecular weight in excess of 10-10 daltons. Contact-inhibited cells yielded larger single strands than actively growing cells. PMID:235335

  7. Functionally Graded Designer Viscoelastic Materials Tailored to Perform Prescribed Tasks with Probabilistic Failures and Lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Hilton, Harry H.

    2008-02-15

    Protocols are developed for formulating optimal viscoelastic designer functionally graded materials tailored to best respond to prescribed loading and boundary conditions. In essence, an inverse approach is adopted where material properties instead of structures per se are designed and then distributed throughout structural elements. The final measure of viscoelastic material efficacy is expressed in terms of failure probabilities vs. survival time000.

  8. Nonlinear viscoelastic characterization of polycarbonate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caplan, E. S.; Brinson, H. F.

    1982-01-01

    Uniaxial tensile creep and recovery data from polycarbonate at six temperatures and six stress levels are analyzed for nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive modeling. A theory to account for combined effects of two or more accelerating factors is presented.

  9. Viscoelastic Membrane Tectonics on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuthe, M.; Rivoldini, A.

    2014-12-01

    The surface of Europa is crisscrossed by tectonic features generally attributed to time-dependent tidal deformations. For a long time, the membrane theory of elastic shells (thin shell or flattening model) has been popular to predict tidal tectonic patterns because it provides simple analytical formulas for tidal stresses. More recently, the theory of viscoelastic-gravitational deformations (or thick shell model) was applied to tidal tectonics so as to include viscoelastic effects. This method, however, is not transparent to the user and relies on numerical algorithms that are not always publicly available or fully benchmarked. As an alternative, we propose here to extend membrane theory to viscoelastic shells with depth-dependent rheology. Viscoelasticity is taken into account by replacing elastic constants with effective viscoelastic parameters that are easily computed for a given rheology. The membrane approach thus leads to simple formulas for viscoelastic tidal stresses. Because of its formulation in terms of tidal Love numbers, the membrane approach has clear relationships with both thin and thick shell models. Benchmarking with the thick-shell software SatStress leads to the discovery of an error in that code that changes stress components by up to 40%. As an application, we show that different stress-free states account for the conflicting predictions of thin and thick shell models about the magnitude of tensile stresses due to nonsynchronous rotation.

  10. Instability of viscoelastic compound jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Han-Yu; Yang, Li-Jun; Fu, Qing-Fei

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the axisymmetric instability of a viscoelastic compound jet, for which the constitutive relation is described by the Oldroyd B model. It is found that a viscoelastic compound jet is more unstable than a Newtonian compound jet, regardless of whether the viscoelastic compound jet is inner-Newtonian-outer-viscoelastic, inner-viscoelastic-outer-Newtonian, or fully viscoelastic. It is also found that an increase in the stress relaxation time of the inner or outer fluid renders the jet more unstable, while an increase in the time constant ratio makes the jet less unstable. An analysis of the energy budget of the destabilization process is performed, in which a formulation using the relative rate of change of energy is adopted. The formulation is observed to provide a quantitative analysis of the contribution of each physical factor (e.g., release of surface energy and viscous dissipation) to the temporal growth rate. The energy analysis reveals the mechanisms of various trends in the temporal growth rate, including not only how the growth rate changes with the parameters, but also how the growth rate changes with the wavenumber. The phenomenon of the dispersion relation presenting two local maxima, which occurred in previous research, is explained by the present energy analysis.

  11. Nonlinear Dynamics in Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majmudar, Trushant; Varagnat, Matthieu; McKinley, Gareth

    2009-03-01

    Instabilities in free surface continuous jets of non-Newtonian fluids, although relevant for many industrial processes, remain poorly understood in terms of fundamental fluid dynamics. Inviscid, and viscous Newtonian jets have been studied in considerable detail, both theoretically and experimentally. Instability in viscous jets leads to regular periodic coiling of the jet, which exhibits a non-trivial frequency dependence with the height of the fall. Here we present a systematic study of the effect of viscoelasticity on the dynamics of continuous jets of worm-like micellar surfactant solutions of varying viscosities and elasticities. We observe complex nonlinear spatio-temporal dynamics of the jet, and uncover a transition from periodic to quasi-periodic to a multi-frequency, broad-spectrum dynamics. Beyond this regime, the jet dynamics smoothly crosses over to exhibit the ``leaping shampoo'' or the Kaye effect. We examine different dynamical regimes in terms of scaling variables, which depend on the geometry (dimensionless height), kinematics (dimensionless flow rate), and the fluid properties (elasto-gravity number) and present a regime map of the dynamics of the jet in terms of these dimensionless variables.

  12. Nonlinear Dynamics in Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majmudar, Trushant; Varagnat, Matthieu; McKinley, Gareth

    2008-11-01

    Instabilities in free surface continuous jets of non-Newtonian fluids, although relevant for many industrial processes, remain poorly understood in terms of fundamental fluid dynamics. Inviscid, and viscous Newtonian jets have been studied in considerable detail, both theoretically and experimentally. Instability in viscous jets leads to regular periodic coiling of the jet, which exhibits a non-trivial frequency dependence with the height of the fall. Here we present a systematic study of the effect of viscoelasticity on the dynamics of continuous jets of worm-like micellar surfactant solutions of varying viscosities and elasticities. We observe complex nonlinear spatio-temporal dynamics of the jet, and uncover a transition from periodic to quasi-periodic to a multi-frequency, broad-spectrum dynamics. Beyond this regime, the jet dynamics smoothly crosses over to exhibit the ``leaping shampoo'' or the Kaye effect. We examine different dynamical regimes in terms of scaling variables, which depend on the geometry (dimensionless height), kinematics (dimensionless flow rate), and the fluid properties (elasto-gravity number) and present a regime map of the dynamics of the jet in terms of these dimensionless variables.

  13. Frequency Response of Synthetic Vocal Fold Models with Linear and Nonlinear Material Properties

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Stephanie M.; Thomson, Scott L.; Dromey, Christopher; Smith, Simeon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to create synthetic vocal fold models with nonlinear stress-strain properties and to investigate the effect of linear versus nonlinear material properties on fundamental frequency during anterior-posterior stretching. Method Three materially linear and three materially nonlinear models were created and stretched up to 10 mm in 1 mm increments. Phonation onset pressure (Pon) and fundamental frequency (F0) at Pon were recorded for each length. Measurements were repeated as the models were relaxed in 1 mm increments back to their resting lengths, and tensile tests were conducted to determine the stress-strain responses of linear versus nonlinear models. Results Nonlinear models demonstrated a more substantial frequency response than did linear models and a more predictable pattern of F0 increase with respect to increasing length (although range was inconsistent across models). Pon generally increased with increasing vocal fold length for nonlinear models, whereas for linear models, Pon decreased with increasing length. Conclusions Nonlinear synthetic models appear to more accurately represent the human vocal folds than linear models, especially with respect to F0 response. PMID:22271874

  14. The Linear Stability Properties of Medium- to High- n TAEs in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelenkov, N N; Budny, R V; Kessel, C E; Kramer, G J; McCune, D; Manickam, J; Nazikian, R

    2008-02-14

    This document provides a detailed report on the successful completion of the DOE OFES Theory Milestone for FY2007: Improve the simulation resolution of linear stability properties of Toroidal Alfvén Eigenmodes (TAE) driven by energetic particles and neutral beams in ITER by increasing the numbers of toroidal modes used to 15.

  15. Nonlinear viscoelastic characterization of polymer materials using a dynamic-mechanical methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strganac, Thomas W.; Payne, Debbie Flowers; Biskup, Bruce A.; Letton, Alan

    1995-01-01

    Polymer materials retrieved from LDEF exhibit nonlinear constitutive behavior; thus the authors present a method to characterize nonlinear viscoelastic behavior using measurements from dynamic (oscillatory) mechanical tests. Frequency-derived measurements are transformed into time-domain properties providing the capability to predict long term material performance without a lengthy experimentation program. Results are presented for thin-film high-performance polymer materials used in the fabrication of high-altitude scientific balloons. Predictions based upon a linear test and analysis approach are shown to deteriorate for moderate to high stress levels expected for extended applications. Tests verify that nonlinear viscoelastic response is induced by large stresses. Hence, an approach is developed in which the stress-dependent behavior is examined in a manner analogous to modeling temperature-dependent behavior with time-temperature correspondence and superposition principles. The development leads to time-stress correspondence and superposition of measurements obtained through dynamic mechanical tests. Predictions of material behavior using measurements based upon linear and nonlinear approaches are compared with experimental results obtained from traditional creep tests. Excellent agreement is shown for the nonlinear model.

  16. Identification of the dynamic characteristics of a viscoelastic, nonlinear adhesive joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naraghi, T.; Nobari, A. S.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the nonlinear mechanical characteristics of an adhesive (Sikaflex-252) are identified over frequency range, using eigenvalues of nonlinear system and inverse eigen-sensitivity method and experimental data. Sikaflex-252 is selected as an adhesive which is mainly used as a joining medium (joint) in structural applications. In order to simulate the viscoelastic behaviour of the adhesive, the frequency dependent Young's modulus and damping coefficient are assumed in identification process leading to the updating process being repeated for different ranges of frequencies to identify stiffness and damping properties of the adhesive. Using the optimum equivalent linear frequency response function (OELF) concept, in order to realize the nonlinear nature of the adhesive, modal tests are performed under two different random excitation levels which illustrate the stiffness softening characteristic of adhesive which can have serious implications regarding dynamic stability of structures. Furthermore, based on the identified characteristics, the paper examines the possibility of tuning of the Standard Linear Solid model (SLS), in representing the adhesive viscoelastic behaviour. Results of this attempt proved that the S.L.S. model with tuned parameters significantly improves the fidelity of finite element (FE) model to experimental results.

  17. Postseismic viscoelastic surface deformation and stress. Part 1: Theoretical considerations, displacement and strain calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1979-01-01

    A model of viscoelastic deformations associated with earthquakes is presented. A strike-slip fault is represented by a rectangular dislocation in a viscoelastic layer (lithosphere) lying over a viscoelastic half-space (asthenosphere). Deformations occur on three time scales. The initial response is governed by the instantaneous elastic properties of the earth. A slower response is associated with viscoelastic relaxation of the lithosphere and a yet slower response is due to viscoelastic relaxation of the asthenosphere. The major conceptual contribution is the inclusion of lithospheric viscoelastic properties into a dislocation model of earthquake related deformations and stresses. Numerical calculations using typical fault parameters reveal that the postseismic displacements and strains are small compared to the coseismic ones near the fault, but become significant further away. Moreover, the directional sense of the deformations attributable to the elastic response, the lithospheric viscoelastic softening, and the asthenospheric viscoelastic flow may differ and depend on location and model details. The results and theoretical arguments suggest that the stress changes accompanying lithospheric relaxation may also be in a different sense than and be larger than the strain changes.

  18. Modeling of the Effect of Temperature, Frequency, and Phase Transformations on the Viscoelastic Properties of AA 7075-T6 and AA 2024-T3 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Jose I.; Crespo, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    The viscoelastic response of commercial aluminum alloys 7075-T6 and 2024-T3 as a function of temperature is presented. Experimental data are obtained with a dynamic-mechanical analyzer (DMA) at different loading frequencies and compared with the available transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) data. The effect of successive microstructural transformations (particle precipitation and redissolution) is revealed. An analytical model is developed, which fits the mechanical response up to 573 K (300 °C). The model takes into account the concentration of Guinier-Preston Zones (GPZ) and metastable precipitates ( η' in AA 7075-T6 and θ'/S' in AA 2024-T3), allowing us to determine the kinetic parameters of these transformations. The activation energies were previously obtained by several authors from DSC measurements and other techniques, showing considerable dispersion. The presented data, obtained with a completely different technique, allow us to reduce the uncertainty on these data and show the potential of DMA measurements in the study of microstructural transformations.

  19. Density and visco-elasticity of Natrosol 250 HH solutions: Determining their suitability for experimental tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutelier, D.; Cruden, A.; Saumur, B.

    2016-05-01

    Analogue models often require that materials with specific physical properties be engineered to satisfy scaling conditions. To achieve this goal we investigate the rheology of aqueous solutions of Natrosol 250 HH, a rheology modifier employed in various industries to thicken viscous solutions. We report the rheological properties as functions of the concentration and temperature and discuss the advantages and limitations of these materials in view of their use in analogue modelling experiments. The solutions are linear visco-elastic for low stresses (or strain-rates), becoming shear-thinning for larger stresses. For the typically slow analogue experiments of tectonics, the solutions can be considered linear visco-elastic with a Maxwell relaxation time much smaller than the characteristic observation time. This simplification is even more appropriate when the solutions are employed at temperatures higher than 20 °C, since the solutions then display a behaviour that is more viscous, less elastic at the same shear-rate, while the Newtonian viscosity reduces and the shear-rate limit between Newtonian and shear-thinning behaviours increases. The Newtonian viscosity is shown to increase non-linearly with concentration and decrease non-linearly with temperature. With concentrations between 0 and 3% and temperature between 20 and 40 °C, the viscosity varied between 10-1 and 4000 Pa s, while the density remained close to the density of water. Natrosol 250 HH thus offers the possibility to control the viscosity of a solution without significantly affecting the density, thereby facilitating the design and setup of analogue experiments.

  20. Dynamics of a polymer in an active and viscoelastic bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandebroek, Hans; Vanderzande, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    We study the dynamics of an ideal polymer chain in a viscoelastic medium and in the presence of active forces. The motion of the center of mass and of individual monomers is calculated. On time scales that are comparable to the persistence time of the active forces, monomers can move superdiffusively, while on larger time scales subdiffusive behavior occurs. The difference between this subdiffusion and that in the absence of active forces is quantified. We show that the polymer swells in response to active processes and determine how this swelling depends on the viscoelastic properties of the environment. Our results are compared to recent experiments on the motion of chromosomal loci in bacteria.

  1. Full dynamic homogenization of a unidirectional viscoelastic composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollette, M.; Lhémery, A.; Aristégui, C.

    2012-05-01

    The full homogenization of a unidirectional fiber-reinforced viscoelastic composite is proposed assuming transversely isotropic symmetry. It relies on two model-based inversion methods. The first considers bulk waves propagating normally to fibers and allows us to obtain three of the five independent Cij. The second method considers guided waves propagating in the fiber direction; it allows us to obtain the two remaining coefficients. Both methods account for multiple-scattering by fibers coupled to viscous losses in the matrix. They can deal with a variety of fiber volume fractions and fiber sizes and a variety of viscoelastic properties of the constituents.

  2. Influence of viscoelasticity on the nano-micromechanical behavior of latex films and pigmented coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Manish

    2001-09-01

    Nano to microscale deformation behavior of different carboxylated styrene-butadiene co-polymer Latexes were investigated using a commercial nanoindentation device. The latexes differed primarily in their glass transition temperature (T g). The bulk dynamic rheological properties, as determined from a rheometer, dictate the axismmetric deformation behavior of the latexes. Results from dynamic tests performed on latexes were analyzed using the theories in contact and fracture mechanics. Two theories of linear viscoelastic fracture mechanics (LVEFM) were employed to model the adhesion hysteresis (loading-unloading cycle) curves to obtain meaningful cohesive zone (fracture process zone) parameters and a stress intensity functional (K I(t)) for an entire cycle. The stress intensity functional, extracted from the deformation behavior, is independent of the loading history and was shown to depend only on the crack propagation velocity, (da/dt), for the entire cycle. The quantitative values of stress intensities were then discussed in the light of polymer molecular phenomenon's such as viscous chain desorption. Nanoindetation was developed as a tool for systematically investigating both the bulk as well as the cohesive zone properties of viscoelastic polymers. Effect of plastic deformation on the deformation behavior of high pigment volume concentration (PVC) coatings was also analyzed. Polystyrene plastic pigment, CaCO3 and Clay pigments were used to form the coatings layers. High PVC coatings are viscoelastic due to the latex present but also contain air, the third phase, which could explain the plastic deformation if a certain critical yield stress is exceeded. At PVC's greater than 70%, the coatings showed significant plastic (permanent) deformation, which has to be accounted for in modeling the hysteresis curves. The residual plastic deformation was confirmed by imaging the indent over a period of time. Modeling the curves resulted in a compressive yield stress (sigma

  3. Reusable antifouling viscoelastic adhesive with an elastic skin.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sandip; Malasi, Abhinav; Majumder, Abhijit; Ghatak, Animangsu; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2012-01-10

    Although the viscoelasticity or tackiness of a pressure-sensitive adhesive gives it strength owing to energy dissipation during peeling, it also renders it nonreusable because of structural changes such as the formation of fibrils, cohesive failure, and fouling. However, an elastic layer has good structural integrity and cohesive strength but low adhesive energy. We demonstrate an effective composite adhesive in which a soft viscoelastic bulk layer is imbedded in a largely elastic thin skin layer. The composite layer is able to meet the conflicting demands of the high peel strength comparable to the viscoelastic core and the structural integrity, reusability, and antifouling properties of the elastic skin. Our model adhesive is made of poly(dimethylsiloxane), where its core and skin are created by varying the cross-linking percentage from 2 to 10%. PMID:22201420

  4. Local viscoelasticity of living cells measured by rotational magnetic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Berret, J-F

    2016-01-01

    When submitted to a magnetic field, micron-size wires with superparamagnetic properties behave as embedded rheometers and represent interesting sensors for microrheology. Here we use rotational magnetic spectroscopy to measure the shear viscosity of the cytoplasm of living cells. We address the question of whether the cytoplasm is a viscoelastic liquid or an elastic gel. The main result of the study is the observation of a rotational instability between a synchronous and an asynchronous regime of rotation, found for murine fibroblasts and human cancer cells. For wires of susceptibility 3.6, the transition occurs in the range 0.01-1 rad s(-1). The determination of the shear viscosity (10-100 Pa s) and elastic modulus (5-20 Pa) confirms the viscoelastic character of the cytoplasm. In contrast to earlier studies, it is concluded that the interior of living cells can be described as a viscoelastic liquid, and not as an elastic gel. PMID:26729062

  5. Fractional modeling of Pasternak-type viscoelastic foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wei; Chen, Wen; Xu, Wenxiang

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a fractional Pasternak-type foundation model to characterize the time-dependent properties of the viscoelastic foundation. With varying fractional orders, the proposed model can govern the traditional Winkler model, Pasternak model, and viscoelastic model. We take the four-edge simply supported rectangular thin plate as an example to analyze the viscoelastic foundation reaction, and obtain the solution of the new governing equation. Theoretical results show that the fractional order has a dramatic influence on the deflection and bending moment. It can be further concluded that the softer foundation will become more time-dependent. Subsequently, the difference between fractional Pasternak-type and Winkler foundation model is presented in this work. The existence of constrained boundary is found to definitely affect deflection and bending moment. Such phenomenon, known as the wall effect, is deeply discussed.

  6. Local viscoelasticity of living cells measured by rotational magnetic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berret, J.-F.

    2016-01-01

    When submitted to a magnetic field, micron-size wires with superparamagnetic properties behave as embedded rheometers and represent interesting sensors for microrheology. Here we use rotational magnetic spectroscopy to measure the shear viscosity of the cytoplasm of living cells. We address the question of whether the cytoplasm is a viscoelastic liquid or an elastic gel. The main result of the study is the observation of a rotational instability between a synchronous and an asynchronous regime of rotation, found for murine fibroblasts and human cancer cells. For wires of susceptibility 3.6, the transition occurs in the range 0.01-1 rad s-1. The determination of the shear viscosity (10-100 Pa s) and elastic modulus (5-20 Pa) confirms the viscoelastic character of the cytoplasm. In contrast to earlier studies, it is concluded that the interior of living cells can be described as a viscoelastic liquid, and not as an elastic gel.

  7. Viscoelastic Flows in Simple Liquids Generated by Vibrating Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelton, Matthew; Chakraborty, Debadi; Malachosky, Edward; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe; Sader, John E.

    2013-12-01

    Newtonian fluid mechanics, in which the shear stress is proportional to the strain rate, is synonymous with the flow of simple liquids such as water. We report the measurement and theoretical verification of non-Newtonian, viscoelastic flow phenomena produced by the high-frequency (20 GHz) vibration of gold nanoparticles immersed in water-glycerol mixtures. The observed viscoelasticity is not due to molecular confinement, but is a bulk continuum effect arising from the short time scale of vibration. This represents the first direct mechanical measurement of the intrinsic viscoelastic properties of simple bulk liquids, and opens a new paradigm for understanding extremely high frequency fluid mechanics, nanoscale sensing technologies, and biophysical processes.

  8. Application of linear response theory to magnetotransport properties of dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J. R.; Redmer, R.; Reinholz, H.

    2010-03-15

    Linear response theory, as developed within the Zubarev formalism, is a quantum statistical approach for describing systems out of but close to equilibrium, which has been successfully applied to a wide variety of plasmas in an external electric field and/or containing a temperature gradient. We present here an extension of linear response theory to include the effects of an external magnetic field. General expressions for the complete set of relevant transport properties are given. In particular, the Hall effect and the influence of a magnetic field on the dc electrical conductivity are discussed. Low-density limits including electron-electron scattering are presented as well as results for arbitrary degeneracy.

  9. On linear structure and phase rotation invariant properties of block M-PSK modulation codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasami, Tadao; Takata, Toyoo; Fujiwara, Toru; Lin, Shu

    1991-01-01

    Two important structural properties of block M(=2')-ary PSK modulation codes, linear structure and phase symmetry, are investigated. An M-ary modulation code is first represented as a code with symbols from the integer group S(MPSK) = (0,1,2,...M-1) under modulo-M addition. Then the linear structure of block MPSK modulation codes over S(M-PSK) with respect to modulo-M vector addition is defined, and conditions are derived under which a block MPSK modulation code is linear. Once the linear structure is developed, the phase symmetry of block M-PSK modulation codes is studied. In particular, a necessary and sufficient condition for a block MPSK modulation code that is linear as a binary code to be invariant under 2 h 180 deg/M phase rotation (for h = 1 to l) is derived. Finally, a list of short 8PSK and 16PSK modulation codes is given, together with their linear structure and the smallest phase rotation for which a code is invariant.

  10. Viscoelastic/damage modeling of filament-wound spherical pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackett, Robert M.; Dozier, Jan D.

    1987-01-01

    A model of the viscoelastic/damage response of a filament-wound spherical vessel used for long-term pressure containment is developed. The matrix material of the composite system is assumed to be linearly viscoelastic. Internal accumulated damage based upon a quadratic relationship between transverse modulus and maximum circumferential strain is postulated. The resulting nonlinear problem is solved by an iterative routine. The elastic-viscoelastic correspondence is employed to produce, in the Laplace domain, the associated elastic solution for the maximum circumferential strain which is inverted by the method of collocation to yield the time-dependent solution. Results obtained with the model are compared to experimental observations.

  11. Viscoelastic Taylor-Couette instability as analog of the magnetorotational instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yang; Crumeyrolle, Olivier; Mutabazi, Innocent

    2015-09-01

    A linear stability analysis and an experimental study of a viscoelastic Taylor-Couette flow corotating in the Keplerian ratio allow us to elucidate the analogy between the viscoelastic instability and the magnetorotational instability (MRI). A generalized Rayleigh criterion allows us to determine the potentially unstable zone to pure-elasticity-driven perturbations. Experiments with a viscoelastic polymer solution yield four modes: one pure-elasticity mode and three elastorotational instability (ERI) modes that represent the MRI-analog modes. The destabilization by the polymer viscosity is evidenced for the ERI modes.

  12. Two-phase viscoelastic jetting

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J-D; Sakai, S.; Sethian, J.A.

    2008-12-10

    A coupled finite difference algorithm on rectangular grids is developed for viscoelastic ink ejection simulations. The ink is modeled by the Oldroyd-B viscoelastic fluid model. The coupled algorithm seamlessly incorporates several things: (1) a coupled level set-projection method for incompressible immiscible two-phase fluid flows; (2) a higher-order Godunov type algorithm for the convection terms in the momentum and level set equations; (3) a simple first-order upwind algorithm for the convection term in the viscoelastic stress equations; (4) central difference approximations for viscosity, surface tension, and upper-convected derivative terms; and (5) an equivalent circuit model to calculate the inflow pressure (or flow rate) from dynamic voltage.

  13. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of hybrid metallic–dielectric plasmonic nanoantennas

    PubMed Central

    Hentschel, Mario; Metzger, Bernd; Knabe, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    Summary We study the linear and nonlinear optical properties of hybrid metallic–dielectric plasmonic gap nanoantennas. Using a two-step-aligned electron beam lithography process, we demonstrate the ability to selectively and reproducibly fill the gap region of nanoantennas with dielectric nanoparticles made of lithium niobate (LiNbO3) with high efficiency. The linear optical properties of the antennas are modified due to the large refractive index of the material. This leads to a change in the coupling strength as well as an increase of the effective refractive index of the surrounding. The combination of these two effects causes a red- or blue-shift of the plasmonic modes, respectively. We find that the nonlinear optical properties of the combined system are only modified in the range of one order of magnitude. The observed changes in our experiments in the nonlinear emission can be traced to the changed dielectric environment and thus the modified linear optical properties. The intrinsic nonlinearity of the dielectric used is in fact small when compared to the nonlinearity of the metallic part of the hybrid antennas. Thus, the nonlinear signals generated by the antenna itself are dominant in our experiments. We demonstrate that the well-known nonlinear response of bulk dielectric materials cannot always straightforwardly be used to boost the nonlinear response of nanoscale antenna systems. Our results significantly deepen the understanding of these interesting hybrid systems and offer important guidelines for the design of nanoscale, nonlinear light sources. PMID:26925359

  14. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of hybrid metallic-dielectric plasmonic nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Hentschel, Mario; Metzger, Bernd; Knabe, Bastian; Buse, Karsten; Giessen, Harald

    2016-01-01

    We study the linear and nonlinear optical properties of hybrid metallic-dielectric plasmonic gap nanoantennas. Using a two-step-aligned electron beam lithography process, we demonstrate the ability to selectively and reproducibly fill the gap region of nanoantennas with dielectric nanoparticles made of lithium niobate (LiNbO3) with high efficiency. The linear optical properties of the antennas are modified due to the large refractive index of the material. This leads to a change in the coupling strength as well as an increase of the effective refractive index of the surrounding. The combination of these two effects causes a red- or blue-shift of the plasmonic modes, respectively. We find that the nonlinear optical properties of the combined system are only modified in the range of one order of magnitude. The observed changes in our experiments in the nonlinear emission can be traced to the changed dielectric environment and thus the modified linear optical properties. The intrinsic nonlinearity of the dielectric used is in fact small when compared to the nonlinearity of the metallic part of the hybrid antennas. Thus, the nonlinear signals generated by the antenna itself are dominant in our experiments. We demonstrate that the well-known nonlinear response of bulk dielectric materials cannot always straightforwardly be used to boost the nonlinear response of nanoscale antenna systems. Our results significantly deepen the understanding of these interesting hybrid systems and offer important guidelines for the design of nanoscale, nonlinear light sources. PMID:26925359

  15. In-vitro quantification of rat liver viscoelasticity with shear wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan-rong; Chen, Xin; Lin, Haoming; Zhang, Xinyu

    2013-01-01

    As a new imaging method for tissue mechanical properties, ultrasound elastography has always been the research focus in the field of medical ultrasound imaging ever since it has been proposed. This paper developed an ultrasound viscoelasticity measurement system based on shear wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry (SDUV). This system applied acoustic radiation force to excite harmonic vibration in soft tissue. The propagation of the shear wave induced by the vibration was detected and the tissue viscoelasticity properties were calculated. Based on this system, rat livers were measured in vitro. The results shows that the system can measure the viscoelasticity reliably, offering a potential alternative to diagnosis of liver fibrosis. PMID:24110087

  16. Linear and nonlinear quantitative structure-property relationship modelling of skin permeability.

    PubMed

    Khajeh, A; Modarress, H

    2014-01-01

    In this work, quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models were developed to estimate skin permeability based on theoretically derived molecular descriptors and a diverse set of experimental data. The newly developed method combining modified particle swarm optimization (MPSO) and multiple linear regression (MLR) was used to select important descriptors and develop the linear model using a training set of 225 compounds. The adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was used as an efficient nonlinear method to correlate the selected descriptors with experimental skin permeability data (log Kp). The linear and nonlinear models were assessed by internal and external validation. The obtained models with three descriptors show good predictive ability for the test set, with coefficients of determination for the MPSO-MLR and ANFIS models equal to 0.874 and 0.890, respectively. The QSPR study suggests that hydrophobicity (encoded as log P) is the most important factor in transdermal penetration. PMID:24090175

  17. A Computational Study of Viscoelastic Effects on Drop Dynamics in Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izbassarov, Daulet; Muradoglu, Metin

    2013-11-01

    A front-tracking method is developed and applied to study effects of viscoelasticity on drop dynamics in microchannels. The FENE-CR and Oldroyd-B models are employed to model the viscoelasticity. The viscoelastic model equations are solved fully coupled with the flow equations. An explicit semi-analytical time integration scheme is used for the viscoelastic model equations at low Deborah numbers and a log-conformation is used to alleviate the well-known difficulties at high Deborah numbers. The log-conformation is found to be stable and very robust for a wide range of Deborah numbers. The method is first validated for the benchmark single-phase viscoelastic flow through an axisymmetric channel with a 4:1 constriction and the results are found to be in a good agreement with earlier computational simulations. The algorithm is then used to study fluid dynamics of buoyancy-driven viscoelastic two-phase systems in a capillary tube. Extensive computations are performed to examine the effects of confinement and rheological properties of the phases on drop mobility and deformation. Finally, the method is applied to study the motion and deformation of a viscoelastic droplet in a pressure driven axisymmetric contraction/expansion micro-channel. Key Words:Viscoelastic fluid,FENE model. This work is supported by the Scientific and Technical Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK), Grant No. 112M181.

  18. Linear and non-linear dielectric properties of a short-pitch ferroelectric liquid crystal stabilized by a polymer network.

    PubMed

    Cherfi, Y; Hemine, J; Douali, R; Beldjoudi, N; Ismaili, M; Leblond, J M; Legrand, C; Daoudi, A

    2010-12-01

    Linear and non-linear dielectric measurements were carried out on a ferroelectric liquid crystal stabilized by an anisotropic polymer network. The polymerization process was achieved at room temperature. It was performed from an achiral monomer in the ferroelectric chiral smectic C phase, exhibiting a very short helical pitch and a large polarization. The linear and non-linear dielectric spectroscopy were also completed by textural morphology as well as structural and ferroelectric characterizations. All these measurements were carried out on a pure ferroelectric liquid crystal material and on composite films containing two polymer concentrations. The increase of the polymer network density leads to a decrease of the dielectric strength determined in the linear and non-linear dielectric spectroscopy. The complementarity between the linear and non-linear dielectric measurements and their confrontation with a theoretical model allowed the simultaneous determination of some physical parameters such as macroscopic polarization, rotational viscosity and twist elastic energy. We also discuss the effect of the polymer network density on the obtained physical parameters. PMID:21107879

  19. Linear Contrail Coverage and Cloud Property Retrievals from 2012 MODIS Imagery over the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duda, D. P.; Minnis, P.; Chee, T.; Khlopenkov, K. V.; Bedka, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    Observation of linear contrail cirrus coverage and retrieval of their optical properties are valuable data for validating atmospheric climate models that represent contrail formation explicitly. These data can reduce our uncertainty of the regional effects of contrail-generated cirrus on global radiative forcing, and thus improve our estimation of the impact of aviation on climate change. We continue our work to create a multi-year climatology of the physical properties of linear contrails from multi-spectral satellite observations. We use an automated contrail detection algorithm (CDA) to determine the coverage of linear persistent contrails over the Northern Hemisphere during 2012. The contrail detection algorithm is a modified form of the Mannstein et al. (1999) method, and uses several channels from thermal infrared MODIS data to reduce the occurrence of false positive detections. Global aircraft emissions waypoint data provided by FAA allow comparison of detected contrails with commercial aircraft flight tracks. A pixel-level product based on the advected flight tracks defined by the waypoint data and U-V wind component profiles from the NASA GMAO MERRA reanalyses has been developed to assign a confidence of contrail detection for the contrail mask. To account for possible contrail cirrus missed by the CDA, a post-processing method based on the assumption that pixels adjacent to detected linear contrails will have radiative signatures similar to those of the detected contrails is applied to the Northern Hemisphere data. Results from MODIS measurements during 2012 will be presented, representing a near-global climatology of contrail coverage. Linear contrail coverage will be compared with coverage estimates determined previously from 2006 MODIS data and with maps of potential persistent contrail formation derived from MERRA reanalysis data for both 2006 and 2012. In addition, contrail physical properties such as optical depth and particle size derived from the

  20. On the generation of atmospheric property Jacobians from the (V)LIDORT linearized radiative transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurr, Robert; Christi, Matt

    2014-07-01

    The linearized radiative transfer models VLIDORT and LIDORT will deliver profile weighting functions (Jacobians) with respect to layer optical properties. We derive transformation rules for the conversion of layer Jacobian output to weighting functions defined for level (layer boundary) quantities such as volume mixing ratio, temperature and pressure. In a related development, we discuss the derivation of bulk-property atmospheric Jacobians with respect to quantities such as the temperature shift, the surface pressure and scaling parameters for constituent profiles. We also present some rules for calculating Jacobians for parameters characterizing aerosol loading regimes. An appendix contains linearization (with respect to temperature and pressure) of the trace species cross-sections derived from the HITRAN line spectroscopy data base.

  1. Raman scattering and non-linear optical properties in Li2B4O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbelrhiti Elalaoui, A.; Maillard, A.; Fontana, M. D.

    2005-11-01

    A complete Raman scattering study on a lithium tetraborate single crystal is reported. The frequency and scattered intensity of Raman modes are carefully determined in the various geometrical configurations. These Raman data are then used to relate to the electro-optical and non-linear optical properties. Raman scattering efficiencies of A1(a), A1(b) and E phonons are consistent with the values of the EO coefficients r13, r33 and r51 respectively.

  2. Symmetry Lie algebras and properties of linear ordinary differential equations with maximal dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folly-Gbetoula, Mensah; Kara, A. H.

    2015-04-01

    Solutions of linear iterative equations and expressions for these solutions in terms of the parameters of the first-order source equation are obtained. Based on certain properties of iterative equations, finding the solutions is reduced to finding solutions of the second-order source equation. We have therefore found classes of solutions to the source equations by letting the parameters of the source equation be functions of a specific type such as monomials, functions of exponential and logarithmic type.

  3. Linear and Nonlinear Optical Properties in Spherical Quantum Dots: Generalized Hulthén Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onyeaju, M. C.; Idiodi, J. O. A.; Ikot, A. N.; Solaimani, M.; Hassanabadi, H.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we studied the optical properties of spherical quantum dots confined in Hulthén potential with the appropriate centrifugal term included. The approximate solution of the bound state and wave functions were obtained from the Schrödinger wave equation by applying the factorization method. Also, we have used the density matrix formalism to investigate the linear and third-order nonlinear absorption coefficient and refractive index changes.

  4. Spintronic and transport properties of linear atomic strings of transition metals (Fe, Co, Ni)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Neha; Jaiswal, Neeraj K.; Srivastava, Pankaj

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, first-principles investigations have been performed to study the spintronic and transport properties of linear atomic strings of Fe, Co and Ni. The structural stabilities of the considered strings were compared on the basis of binding energies which revealed that all the strings are energetically feasible to be achieved. Further, all the considered strings are found to be ferromagnetic and the observed magnetic moment ranges from 1.38 to 1.71 μB. The observed transport properties and high spin polarization points towards their potential for nano interconnects and spintronic applications.

  5. Medium modification of nucleon properties in a Walecka - Linear Sigma Model description

    SciTech Connect

    Alberto, P.; Fiolhais, M.; Bracco, M.E.; Chiapparini, M.

    2004-12-02

    Medium modification of nucleon properties are studied in the framework of the Linear Sigma Model (LSM). The nucleon is described as a chiral soliton with 3-quarks bounded due to their interactions with sigma and pion fields. Medium effects are introduced through the coupling of the quarks to sigma and omega fields, the strengths of which are determined self-consistently in a Walecka-like model, whose fermionic nucleon mass is calculated in the framework of the LSM. The nucleon properties are presented as functions of the nuclear density.

  6. Viscoelasticity of biofilms and their recalcitrance to mechanical and chemical challenges

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Brandon W.; He, Yan; Ren, Yijin; Zerdoum, Aidan; Libera, Matthew R.; Sharma, Prashant K.; van Winkelhoff, Arie-Jan; Neut, Danielle; Stoodley, Paul; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    We summarize different studies describing mechanisms through which bacteria in a biofilm mode of growth resist mechanical and chemical challenges. Acknowledging previous microscopic work describing voids and channels in biofilms that govern a biofilms response to such challenges, we advocate a more quantitative approach that builds on the relation between structure and composition of materials with their viscoelastic properties. Biofilms possess features of both viscoelastic solids and liquids, like skin or blood, and stress relaxation of biofilms has been found to be a corollary of their structure and composition, including the EPS matrix and bacterial interactions. Review of the literature on viscoelastic properties of biofilms in ancient and modern environments as well as of infectious biofilms reveals that the viscoelastic properties of a biofilm relate with antimicrobial penetration in a biofilm. In addition, also the removal of biofilm from surfaces appears governed by the viscoelasticity of a biofilm. Herewith, it is established that the viscoelasticity of biofilms, as a corollary of structure and composition, performs a role in their protection against mechanical and chemical challenges. Pathways are discussed to make biofilms more susceptible to antimicrobials by intervening with their viscoelasticity, as a quantifiable expression of their structure and composition. PMID:25725015

  7. Lattice model of linear telechelic polymer melts. II. Influence of chain stiffness on basic thermodynamic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wen-Sheng; Freed, Karl F.

    2015-07-14

    The lattice cluster theory (LCT) for semiflexible linear telechelic melts, developed in Paper I, is applied to examine the influence of chain stiffness on the average degree of self-assembly and the basic thermodynamic properties of linear telechelic polymer melts. Our calculations imply that chain stiffness promotes self-assembly of linear telechelic polymer melts that assemble on cooling when either polymer volume fraction ϕ or temperature T is high, but opposes self-assembly when both ϕ and T are sufficiently low. This allows us to identify a boundary line in the ϕ-T plane that separates two regions of qualitatively different influence of chain stiffness on self-assembly. The enthalpy and entropy of self-assembly are usually treated as adjustable parameters in classical Flory-Huggins type theories for the equilibrium self-assembly of polymers, but they are demonstrated here to strongly depend on chain stiffness. Moreover, illustrative calculations for the dependence of the entropy density of linear telechelic polymer melts on chain stiffness demonstrate the importance of including semiflexibility within the LCT when exploring the nature of glass formation in models of linear telechelic polymer melts.

  8. Spin Trapping and Cytoprotective Properties of Fluorinated Amphiphilic Carrier Conjugates of Cyclic versus Linear Nitrones

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Grégory; Prosak, Robert A.; Han, Yongbin; Ortial, Stéphanie; Rockenbauer, Antal; Pucci, Bernard; Villamena, Frederick A.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrone spin traps have been employed as pharmacological agent against neurodegenerative diseases and ischemia-reperfusion induced injury. The structure-activity relationship was explored for the two types of nitrones, i.e., cyclic (DMPO) and linear (PBN), which are conjugated to a fluorinated amphiphilic carrier (FAC) for their cytoprotective properties against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), 3-morpholinosynonimine hydrochloride (SIN-1) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) induced cell death on bovine aortic endothelial cells. The compound FAMPO was synthesized and characterized, and its physical-chemical and spin trapping properties were explored. Cytotoxicity and cytoprotective properties of various nitrones either conjugated and non-conjugated to FAC (i.e., AMPO, FAMPO, PBN and FAPBN) were assessed using 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT) reduction assay. Results show that of all the nitrones tested, FAPBN is the most protective against H2O2, but FAMPO and to a lesser extent its unconjugated form, AMPO, are more protective against SIN-1 induced cytotoxicity. However, none of the nitrones used protect the cells from HNE-induced cell death. The difference in the cytoprotective properties observed between the cyclic and linear nitrones may arise from the differences in their intrinsic antioxidant properties and localization in the cell. PMID:19678661

  9. Spin trapping and cytoprotective properties of fluorinated amphiphilic carrier conjugates of cyclic versus linear nitrones.

    PubMed

    Durand, Grégory; Prosak, Robert A; Han, Yongbin; Ortial, Stéphanie; Rockenbauer, Antal; Pucci, Bernard; Villamena, Frederick A

    2009-09-01

    Nitrones have been employed as spin trapping reagent as well as pharmacological agent against neurodegenerative diseases and ischemia-reperfusion induced injury. The structure-activity relationship was explored for the two types of nitrones, i.e., cyclic (DMPO) and linear (PBN), which are conjugated to a fluorinated amphiphilic carrier (FAC) for their cytoprotective properties against hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), 3-morpholinosynonimine hydrochloride (SIN-1), and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) induced cell death on bovine aortic endothelial cells. The compound FAMPO was synthesized and characterized, and its physical-chemical and spin trapping properties were explored. Cytotoxicity and cytoprotective properties of various nitrones either conjugated and nonconjugated to FAC (i.e., AMPO, FAMPO, PBN, and FAPBN) were assessed using a 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT) reduction assay. Results show that of all the nitrones tested, FAPBN is the most protective against H(2)O(2), but FAMPO and to a lesser extent its unconjugated form, AMPO, are more protective against SIN-1 induced cytotoxicity. However, none of the nitrones used protect the cells from HNE-induced cell death. The difference in the cytoprotective properties observed between the cyclic and linear nitrones may arise from the differences in their intrinsic antioxidant properties and localization in the cell. PMID:19678661

  10. Ultrasonic Characterization of the Linear Elastic Properties of Myocardium and Other Anisotropic Soft Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmeister, Brentley Keith

    1995-01-01

    This thesis seeks to contribute to a better understanding of the physics of interaction of ultrasonic waves with inhomogeneous and anisotropic media, one example of which is the human heart. The clinical success of echocardiography has generated a considerable interest in the development of ultrasonic techniques to measure the elastic properties of heart tissue. It is hypothesized that the elastic properties of myocardium are influenced by the interstitial content and organization of collagen. Collagen, which is the main component of tendon, interconnects the muscle cells of the heart to form locally unidirectional myofibers. This thesis therefore employs ultrasonic techniques to characterize the linear elastic properties of both heart and tendon. The linear elastic properties of tissues possessing a unidirectional arrangement of fibers may be described in terms of five independent elastic stiffness coefficients. Three of these coefficients were determined for formalin fixed specimens of bovine Achilles tendon and human myocardium by measuring the velocity of longitudinal mode ultrasonic pulses as a function of angle of propagation relative to the fiber axis of the tissue. The remaining two coefficients were determined by measuring the velocity of transverse mode ultrasonic waves through these tissues. To overcome technical difficulties associated with the extremely high attenuation of transverse mode waves at low megahertz frequencies, a novel measurement system was developed based on the sampled continuous wave technique. Results of these measurements were used to assess the influence of interstitial collagen, and to model the mechanical properties of heart wall.

  11. Prediction of the Viscoelastic Bulk Modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiaxi; Simon, Sindee

    2010-03-01

    The bulk and shear viscoelastic responses for several materials appear to arise from the same molecular mechanisms at short times, i.e., Andrade creep where the KWW beta parameter is approximately 0.3. If this is indeed the case, prediction and placement of the bulk viscoelastic response can be made simply by knowing the limiting elastic and rubbery bulk moduli and the viscoelastic shear response. The proposed methodology, which uses only easily measured functions, is considerably less time- and labor-intensive than direct measurement of the viscoelastic bulk modulus. Here we investigate this hypothesis and compare the calculated viscoelastic bulk responses for several materials to existing data in the literature.

  12. Consequences of interfacial viscoelasticity on thin film stability.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Liat; Fuller, Gerald G

    2012-10-01

    The phenomenon of dewetting is frequently observed in our everyday life. It is of central importance in many technological applications as well as in a variety of physical and biological systems. The presence of nonsoluble surfactants at an air/liquid interface may affect the dewetting properties of the aqueous layer. An important example is the tear film, which comprises an aqueous layer covered with a ∼100-nm-thick blanket of lipids, known as the meibomian lipids. Interfacial rheological measurements of meibomian lipids reveal that these films are remarkably viscoelastic. Tear film dewetting is of central importance to understanding tear film stability. To better understand the role of surface viscoelasticity in tear film stability, we have developed a methodology to systematically control interfacial rheology of thin aqueous layers at the onset of dewetting events. The apparatus allows control over the surface pressure of the monolayer, which is a key feature since this variable controls the surface viscoelasticity. Three insoluble monolayer materials were used: newtonian arachidyl alcohol (AA), DPPC, a phospholipid that is slightly viscoelastic, and meibum, which produces a strongly viscoelastic monolayer. It is reported that monolayers of viscoelastic surfactants are able to stabilize thin films against spontaneous dewetting. As the surface pressure of these layers is increased, their effectiveness is enhanced. Moreover, these surfactants are able to reduce the critical film thickness for dewetting. Meibum is particularly effective in stabilizing thin films. Our results suggest that the meibomian lipids play a vital role in maintaining tear film stability in addition to suppressing evaporation. PMID:22989061

  13. Nonlinear Viscoelastic Stress Transfer As a Possible Aftershock Triggering Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Shcherbakov, R.

    2014-12-01

    The earthquake dynamics can be modelled by employing the spring-block system [Burridge and Knopoff, 1967]. In this approach the earthquake fault is modelled by an array of blocks coupling the loading plate and the lower plate. The dynamics of the system is governed by the system of equations of motion for each block. It is possible to map this system into a cellular automata model, where the stress acting on each block is increased in each time step, and the failing process (frictional slip) is described by stress transfer rules [Olami et al, 1992]. The OFC model produces a power-law distribution for avalanche statistics but it is not capable of producing robust aftershock sequences which follow Omori's law.We propose a nonlinear viscoelastic stress transfer mechanism in the aftershock triggering. In a basic spring-block model setting, we introduce the nonlinear viscoelastic stress transfer between neighbouring blocks, as well as between blocks and the top loading plate. The shear stress of the viscous component is a power-law function of the velocity gradient with an exponent smaller or greater than 1 for the nonlinear viscoelasticity, or 1 for the linear case. The stress transfer function of this nonlinear viscoelastic model has a power-law time-dependent form. It features an instantaneous stress transmission triggering an instantaneous avalanche, which is the same as the original spring-block model; and a power-law relaxation term, which could trigger further aftershocks. We incorporate this nonlinear viscoelasticity mechanism in a lattice cellular automata model. The model could exhibit both the Gutenberg-Richter scaling for the frequency-magnitude distribution and a power-law time decay of aftershocks, which is in accordance with Omori's law. Our study suggests that the stress transfer function may play an important role in the aftershock triggering. We have found that the time decay curve of aftershocks is affected by the shape of the stress transfer function

  14. Viscoelastic behaviour of pumpkin balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerngross, T.; Xu, Y.; Pellegrino, S.

    2008-11-01

    The lobes of the NASA ULDB pumpkin-shaped super-pressure balloons are made of a thin polymeric film that shows considerable time-dependent behaviour. A nonlinear viscoelastic model based on experimental measurements has been recently established for this film. This paper presents a simulation of the viscoelastic behaviour of ULDB balloons with the finite element software ABAQUS. First, the standard viscoelastic modelling capabilities available in ABAQUS are examined, but are found of limited accuracy even for the case of simple uniaxial creep tests on ULDB films. Then, a nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive model is implemented by means of a user-defined subroutine. This approach is verified by means of biaxial creep experiments on pressurized cylinders and is found to be accurate provided that the film anisotropy is also included in the model. A preliminary set of predictions for a single lobe of a ULDB is presented at the end of the paper. It indicates that time-dependent effects in a balloon structure can lead to significant stress redistribution and large increases in the transverse strains in the lobes.

  15. Failure criteria for viscoelastic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauss, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    Research projects concerned with developing a theory of fracture of materials are discussed. The effects of the geometry of the structure and the loads acting on the structure as they influence the failure process are analyzed. The effects of the viscoelastic deformation characteristics of the bulk elastomer on failure behavior are examined. Additional material parameters which control the fracture process are identified.

  16. Standing shear waves in anisotropic viscoelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krit, T.; Golubkova, I.; Andreev, V.

    2015-10-01

    We studied standing shear waves in anisotropic resonator represented by a rectangular parallelepiped (layer) fixed without slipping between two wooden plates of finite mass. The viscoelastic layer with edges of 70 mm × 40 mm × 15 mm was made of a rubber-like polymer plastisol with rubber bands inside. The bands were placed vertical between the top and the bottom plate. Mechanical properties of the plastisol itself were carefully measured previously. It was found that plastisol shows a cubic nonlinear behavior, i.e. the stress-strain curve could be represented as: σ = μɛ + βμɛ3, where ɛ stands for shear strain and σ is an applied shear stress. The value of shear modulus μ depends on frequency and was found to be several kilopascals which is common for such soft solids. Nonlinear parameter β is frequency dependent too and varies in range from tenths to unity at 1-100 Hz frequency range, decreasing with frequency growth. Stretching the rubber bands inside the layer leads to change of elastic properties in resonator. Such effect could be noticed due to frequency response of the resonator. The numerical model of the resonator was based on finite elements method (FEM) and performed in MatLab. The resonator was cut in hundreds of right triangular prisms. Each prism was provided with viscoelastic properties of the layer except for the top prisms provided with the wooden plate properties and the prisms at the site of the rubber bands provided with the rubber properties. The boundary conditions on each prism satisfied the requirements that resonator is inseparable and all its boundaries but bottom are free. The bottom boundary was set to move horizontally with constant acceleration amplitude. It was shown numerically that the resonator shows anisotropic behavior expressed in different frequency response to oscillations applied to a bottom boundary in different directions.

  17. Identification of fractional-derivative-model parameters of viscoelastic materials from measured FRFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun-Yong; Lee, Doo-Ho

    2009-07-01

    The dynamic properties of viscoelastic damping materials are highly frequency- and temperature-dependent. Numerical methods of structural and acoustic systems require the mathematical model for these dependencies. The fractional-derivative model on damping material has become a powerful solution that describes the frequency-dependent dynamic characteristics of damping materials. The model parameters on a damping material are very important information both for describing the responses of damped structures and in the design of damped structures. The authors proposed an efficient identification method of the material parameters using an optimization technique, showing its applicability through numerical studies in a previous work. In this study, the proposed procedure is applied to a damping material to identify the fractional-derivative-model parameters of viscoelastic materials. In the proposed method, frequency response functions (FRFs) are measured via a cantilever beam impact test. The FRFs on the points identical to those measured are calculated using an FE model with the equivalent stiffness approach. The differences between the measured and the calculated FRFs are minimized using a gradient-based optimization algorithm in order to estimate the true values of the parameters. The FRFs of a damped beam structure are measured in an environmental chamber at different temperatures and used as reference responses. A light impact hammer and a laser vibrometer are used to measure the reference responses. Both linear and nonlinear relationships between the logarithmically scaled shift factors and temperatures are examined during the identification of the material parameters. The applied results show that the proposed method accurately identifies the fractional-derivative-model parameters of a viscoelastic material.

  18. New effective moduli of isotropic viscoelastic composites. Part I. Theoretical justification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetashkov, A. A.; Vakurov, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    According to the approach based on the commonality of problems of determining effective moduli of composites and viscoelastic solids, which properties are time-inhomogeneous, it is assumed that a viscoelastic solid is a two-component composite. One component displays temporal properties defined by a pair of Castiglianian-type effective moduli, and the other is defined by a pair of Lagrangian-type effective moduli. The Voigt and Reuss averaging is performed for the obtained two-composite solid with the introduction of a time function of volume fraction. In order to determine closer estimates, a method of iterative transformation of time effective moduli is applied to the viscoelastic Voigt-Reuss model. The physical justification of the method is provided. As a result, new time effective moduli of the viscoelastic solid are obtained which give a closer estimate of temporal properties as compared to the known models.

  19. Viscoelastic Flow Modelling for Polymer Flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Shauvik; Padding, Johan; Peters, Frank; Kuipers, Hans; Multi-scale Modelling of Multi-phase Flows Team

    2015-11-01

    Polymer liquids are used in the oil industry to improve the volumetric sweep and displacement efficiency of oil from a reservoir. Surprisingly, it is not only the viscosity but also the elasticity of the displacing fluid that determine the displacement efficiency. The main aim of our work is to obtain a fundamental understanding of the effect of fluid elasticity, by developing an advanced computer simulation methodology for the flow of non-Newtonian fluids through porous media. We simulate a 3D unsteady viscoelastic flow through a converging diverging geometry of realistic pore dimension using computational fluid dynamics (CFD).The primitive variables velocity, pressure and extra stresses are used in the formulation of models. The viscoelastic stress part is formulated using a FENE-P type of constitutive equation, which can predict both shear and elongational stress properties during this flow. A Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) approach using Finite volume method (FVM) with staggered grid has been applied. A novel second order Immersed boundary method (IBM) has been incorporated to mimic porous media. The effect of rheological parameters on flow characteristics has also been studied. The simulations provide an insight into 3D flow asymmetry at higher Deborah numbers. Micro-Particle Image Velocimetry experiments are carried out to obtain further insights. These simulations present, for the first time, a detailed computational study of the effects of fluid elasticity on the imbibition of an oil phase.

  20. Adhesive transfer of thin viscoelastic films.

    PubMed

    Shull, Kenneth R; Martin, Elizabeth F; Drzal, Peter L; Hersam, Mark C; Markowitz, Alison R; McSwain, Rachel L

    2005-01-01

    Micellar suspensions of acrylic diblock copolymers are excellent model materials for studying the adhesive transfer of viscoelastic solids. The micellar structure is maintained in films with a variety of thicknesses, giving films with a well-defined structure and viscoelastic character. Thin films were cast onto elastomeric silicone substrates from micellar suspensions in butanol, and the adhesive interactions between these coated elastomeric substrates and a rigid indenter were quantified. By controlling the adhesive properties of the film/indenter and film/substrate interfaces we were able to obtain very clean transfer of the film from the substrate to the portion of the glass indenter with which the film was in contact. Adhesive failure at the film/substrate interface occurs when the film/indenter interface is able to support an applied energy release rate that is sufficient to result in cavity nucleation at the film/substrate interface. Cavity formation is rapidly followed by delamination of the entire region under the indenter. The final stage in the transfer process involves the failure of the film that bridges the indenter and the elastomeric substrate. This film is remarkably robust and is extended to three times its original width prior to failure. Failure of this film occurs at the periphery of the indenter, giving a transferred film that conforms to the original contact area between the indenter and the coated substrate. PMID:15620300

  1. Viscoelastic damping in crystalline composites and alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranganathan, Raghavan; Ozisik, Rahmi; Keblinski, Pawel

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study viscoelastic behavior of model Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystalline composites subject to an oscillatory shear deformation. The two crystals, namely a soft and a stiff phase, individually show highly elastic behavior and a very small loss modulus. On the other hand, when the stiff phase is included within the soft matrix as a sphere, the composite exhibits significant viscoelastic damping and a large phase shift between stress and strain. In fact, the maximum loss modulus in these model composites was found to be about 20 times greater than that given by the theoretical Hashin-Shtrikman upper bound. We attribute this behavior to the fact that in composites shear strain is highly inhomogeneous and mostly accommodated by the soft phase, corroborated by frequency-dependent Grüneisen parameter analysis. Interestingly, the frequency at which the damping is greatest scales with the microstructural length scale of the composite. Finally, a critical comparison between damping properties of these composites with ordered and disordered alloys and superlattice structures is made.

  2. A generalized hydrodynamic model for acoustic mode stability in viscoelastic plasma fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borah, B.; Haloi, A.; Karmakar, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper a generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model to investigate acoustic-mode excitation and stability in simplified strongly coupled bi-component plasma is proposed. The goal is centered in seeing the viscoelasticity-influences on the instability properties. The dispersive and nondispersive features are methodologically explored followed by numerical illustrations. It is seen that, unlike usual plasma acoustic mode, here the mode stability is drastically modified due to the considered viscoelastic effects contributed from both the electronic and ionic fluids. For example, it is found that there exists an excitation threshold value on angular wavenumber, K ≈3 in the K-space on the Debye scale, beyond which only dispersive characteristic features prevail. Further, it is demonstrated that the viscoelastic relaxation time plays a stabilizing influential role on the wave dynamics. In contrast, it is just opposite for the effective viscoelastic relaxation effect. Consistency with the usual viscoelasticity-free situations, with and without plasma approximation taken into account, is also established and explained. It is identified and conjectured that the plasma fluid viscoelasticity acts as unavoidable dispersive agency in attributing several new characteristics to acoustic wave excitation and propagation. The analysis is also exploited to derive a quantitative glimpse on the various basic properties and dimensionless numbers of the viscoelastic plasma. Finally, extended implications of our results tentative to different cosmic, space and astrophysical situations, amid the entailed facts and faults, are highlighted together with indicated future directions.

  3. Contrasting roles of layered structures in the molecular assembly of liquid crystal matrices on the viscoelastic properties of microparticle/liquid crystal composite gels leading to rigidification and destabilization.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takahiro; Kawata, Yuki; Yoshida, Masaru

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the effects of the nematic and smectic A (SmA) phase structures of liquid crystalline matrices on the viscoelastic properties of microparticle/liquid-crystal composite gels. The storage (G') and loss (G″) moduli of the gels were largely increased in gels containing SmA matrices with a layered molecular assembly. However, the critical strain at which the gel state transformed into the sol state by the application of mechanical strain showed no significant changes with variation in the liquid crystal phase of the matrix. These results indicate that the introduction of a layered molecular assembly could be effective for rigidification of composite gels, while maintaining their critical strains. However, the composite gels tended to show a metastable state when SmA matrices were used because G' and G″ of the gels were close to each other in the entire frequency region. This behavior was in contrast to the gels with nematic matrices, which showed a larger value in G' than that in G″. The metastable state of gels with SmA matrices was also reflected in the frequency dependence of G' and in the deterioration of the recovery of the gel state after mechanical breakdown. PMID:23465188

  4. Minimal agent based model for financial markets II. Statistical properties of the linear and multiplicative dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfi, V.; Cristelli, M.; Pietronero, L.; Zaccaria, A.

    2009-02-01

    We present a detailed study of the statistical properties of the Agent Based Model introduced in paper I [Eur. Phys. J. B, DOI: 10.1140/epjb/e2009-00028-4] and of its generalization to the multiplicative dynamics. The aim of the model is to consider the minimal elements for the understanding of the origin of the stylized facts and their self-organization. The key elements are fundamentalist agents, chartist agents, herding dynamics and price behavior. The first two elements correspond to the competition between stability and instability tendencies in the market. The herding behavior governs the possibility of the agents to change strategy and it is a crucial element of this class of models. We consider a linear approximation for the price dynamics which permits a simple interpretation of the model dynamics and, for many properties, it is possible to derive analytical results. The generalized non linear dynamics results to be extremely more sensible to the parameter space and much more difficult to analyze and control. The main results for the nature and self-organization of the stylized facts are, however, very similar in the two cases. The main peculiarity of the non linear dynamics is an enhancement of the fluctuations and a more marked evidence of the stylized facts. We will also discuss some modifications of the model to introduce more realistic elements with respect to the real markets.

  5. Uniqueness of the interior plane strain time-harmonic viscoelastic inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yixiao; Barbone, Paul E.; Harari, Isaac; Oberai, Assad A.

    2016-07-01

    Elasticity imaging has emerged as a promising medical imaging technique with applications in the detection, diagnosis and treatment monitoring of several types of disease. In elasticity imaging measured displacement fields are used to generate images of elastic parameters of tissue by solving an inverse problem. When the tissue excitation, and the resulting tissue motion is time-harmonic, elasticity imaging can be extended to image the viscoelastic properties of the tissue. This leads to an inverse problem for the complex-valued shear modulus at a given frequency. In this manuscript we have considered the uniqueness of this inverse problem for an incompressible, isotropic linear viscoelastic solid in a state of plane strain. For a single measured displacement field we conclude that the solution is infinite dimensional, and the data required to render it unique is determined by the measured strain field. In contrast, for two independent displacement fields such that the principal directions of the resulting strain fields are different, the space of possible solutions is eight dimensional, and given additional data, like the value of the shear modulus at four locations, or over a calibration region, we may determine the shear modulus everywhere. We have also considered simple analytical examples that verify these results and offer additional insights. The results derived in this paper may be used as guidelines by the practitioners of elasticity imaging in designing more robust and accurate imaging protocols.

  6. A molecular theory of cartilage viscoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Kovach, I S

    1996-03-01

    Recent work on the subject of cartilage mechanics has begun to focus on the relationship between the microscopic structure of cartilage and its macroscopic mechanical properties (Bader et al., Biochem. Biophys. Acta, 1116 (1992) 147-154; Buschmann, PhD Thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1992; Kovach, Biophys. Chem., 53 (1995) 181-187; Lai et al., J. Biochem. Eng., 113 (1991) 245-248; Armstrong and Mow, J. Bone Jt. Surg., 64A (1982) 88; Jackson and James, Biorheology, 19 (1982) 317-330). This paper reviews recent theoretical developments and presents a comprehensive explanation of the viscoelastic properties of cartilage in terms of molecular structure. In doing this, a closed form hybrid solution to the non-linear, cylindrical Poisson-Boltzmann equation is developed to describe the charge-dependent component of the equilibrium elasticity arising from polysaccharide charge (Benham, J. Chem. Phys., 79 (4) (1983) 1969-1973; Einevoll and Hemmer, J. Phys. Chem., 89 (1) (1988) 474-484; Fixman, J. Chem. Phys., 70 (11) (1979) 4995-5001; Ramanathan and Woodburg, J. Chem. Phys., 82 (3) (1985) 1482-1491; Wennerstrom et al., J. Chem. Phys., 76 (9) (1982) 4665-4670). This solution agrees with numerical solutions found in the literature (Buschmann, PhD Thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1992). The charge-independent, entropic contribution to the equilibrium elasticity is explained in a manner similar to that recently presented for concentrated proteoglycan solution (Kovach, Biophys. Chem., 53 (1995) 181-187). This approach exploits a lattice model of the solution, subject to a Bragg-Williams type approximation to derive the volume dependence of polysaccharide configuration entropy (Flory, Principles of Polymer Chemistry, Cornell University Press, Ithaca, NY, 1953; Huggins, Some properties of Solutions of Long-chain Compounds, 1941, pp. 151-157; Stanley, Introduction to Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1971

  7. Effects of geometrical order on the linear and nonlinear optical properties of metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Matthew David

    This dissertation describes experimental and computational studies of the effects of ordered arrangement on the linear and nonlinear optical properties of metal nanoparticles. The principal result is that second-harmonic light may be generated and observed from nanoparticle gratings having maximum in-plane symmetry, provided that one looks at non-normal observation angles. These measurements are made possible by a custom-built variable-angle microscope, and enable a variety of studies of the second-order nonlinear response of nanoparticles that were not previously feasible. In addition, the surface plasmon resonance of metal nanoparticles is studied by linear spectroscopy. A comparison of experimental data with computational modeling shows that under normal ambient conditions, Ag nanoparticles tarnish by a sulfidation reaction more readily than bulk silver, and that even a very thin surface layer of corroded material (Ag2S) considerably redshifts and weakens the localized surface plasmon resonance of a nanoparticle.

  8. Synthesis, characterization and calculated non-linear optical properties of two new chalcones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashok Kumar; Saxena, Gunjan; Prasad, Rajendra; Kumar, Abhinav

    2012-06-01

    Two new chalcones viz 3-(4-(benzyloxy)phenyl)-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (1) and 3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (2) have been prepared and characterized by micro analyses, 1H NMR, IR, UV-Vis spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray. The first static hyperpolarizability (β) for both the compounds has been investigated by density functional theory (DFT). Also, the solvent-induced effects on the non-linear optical properties (NLO) were studied by using self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) method. As the solvent polarity increases, the β value increases monotonically. The electronic absorption bands of both 1 and 2 have been assigned by time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). Both the compounds displayed better non-linear optical (NLO) responses than the standard p-nitroaniline (pNA).

  9. Viscoelastic-gravitational deformation by a rectangular thrust fault in a layered earth

    SciTech Connect

    Rundle, J.B.

    1982-09-10

    Previous papers in this series have been concerned with developing the numerical techniques required for the evaluation of vertical displacements which are the result of thrust faulting in a layered, elastic-gravitational earth model. This paper extends these methods to the calculation of fully time-dependent vertical surface deformation from a rectangular, dipping thrust fault in an elastic-gravitational layer over a viscoelastic-gravitational half space. The elastic-gravitational solutions are used together with the correspondence principle of linear viscoelasticity to give the solution in the Laplace transform domain. The technique used here to invert the displacements into the time domain is the Prony series technique, wherein the transformed solution is fit to the transformed representation of a truncated series of decaying exponentials. Purely viscoelastic results obtained are checked against results found previously using a different inverse transform method, and agreement is excellent. A series of results are obtained for a rectangular, 30/sup 0/ dipping thrust fault in an elastic-gravitational layer over viscoelastic-gravitational half space. Time-dependent displacements are calculated out to 50 half space relaxation times tau/sub a/, or 100 Maxwell times 2tau/sub m/ = tau/sub a/. Significant effects due to gravity are shown to exist in the solutions as early as several tau/sub a/. The difference between the purely viscoelastic solution and the viscoelastic-gravitational solutions grows as time progresses. Typically, the solutions with gravity reach an equilibrium value after 10--20 relaxation times, when the purely viscoelastic solutions are still changing significantly. Additionally, the length scaling which was apparent in the purely viscoelastic problem breaks down in the viscoelastic-gravitational problem.

  10. Strong Dipolar Effects on an Octupolar Luminiscent Chromophore: Implications on their Linear and Nonlinear Optical Properties.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Sánchez, Arturo; Isunza-Manrique, Itzel; Ramos-Ortiz, Gabriel; Rodríguez-Romero, Jesús; Farfán, Norberto; Santillan, Rosa

    2016-06-30

    Design parameters derived from structure-property relationships play a very important role in the development of efficient molecular-based functional materials with optical properties. Here, we report on the linear and nonlinear optical properties of a fluorene-derived dipolar system (DS) and its octupolar analogue (OS), in which donor and acceptor groups are connected by a phenylacetylene linkage, as a strategy to increase the number of delocalized electrons in the π-conjugated system. The optical nonlinear response was analyzed in detail by experimental and theoretical methods, showing that, in the octupolar system OS, the dipolar effects induced a strong two-photon absorption process whose magnitude is as large as 2210 GM at infrared wavelengths. Solvatochromism studies were implemented to obtain further insight on the charge transfer process. We found that the triple bond plays a fundamental role in the linear and nonlinear optical responses. The strong solvatochromism behavior in DS and OS was analyzed by using four empirical solvent scales, namely Lippert-Mataga, Kamlet-Taft, Catalán, and the recently proposed scale of Laurence et al., finding consistent results of strong solvent polarizability and viscosity dependence. Finally, the role of the acceptor groups was further studied by synthesizing the analogous compound 2DS, having no acceptor group. PMID:27281172

  11. On The Inter-Conversion Between Viscoelastic Material Functions of Polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto; Verde, Pasquale

    2012-07-01

    Amorphous polymers show a time dependent response to an external solicitation. The time dependent response is usually measured in terms of shear response, whereas the bulk response is a more difficult to measure. In the framework of linear viscoelasticity at least two viscoelastic functions are needed in order to evaluate the mechanical behavior of viscoelastic amorphous polymers. Often the one of viscoelastic function is available in terms of creep compliance and the other one is available in terms of relaxation modulus: a reliable procedure for the inter-conversion is needed. Here the inter-conversions between relaxation moduli and creep compliances are described and a numerical method for the inter-conversion is presented. It is showed that the numerical solution lays on the analytical one and it is also less time consuming.

  12. The Component Slope Linear Model for Calculating Intensive Partial Molar Properties: Application to Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Jacob G.

    2013-01-11

    Partial molar properties are the changes occurring when the fraction of one component is varied while the fractions of all other component mole fractions change proportionally. They have many practical and theoretical applications in chemical thermodynamics. Partial molar properties of chemical mixtures are difficult to measure because the component mole fractions must sum to one, so a change in fraction of one component must be offset with a change in one or more other components. Given that more than one component fraction is changing at a time, it is difficult to assign a change in measured response to a change in a single component. In this study, the Component Slope Linear Model (CSLM), a model previously published in the statistics literature, is shown to have coefficients that correspond to the intensive partial molar properties. If a measured property is plotted against the mole fraction of a component while keeping the proportions of all other components constant, the slope at any given point on a graph of this curve is the partial molar property for that constituent. Actually plotting this graph has been used to determine partial molar properties for many years. The CSLM directly includes this slope in a model that predicts properties as a function of the component mole fractions. This model is demonstrated by applying it to the constant pressure heat capacity data from the NaOH-NaAl(OH{sub 4}H{sub 2}O system, a system that simplifies Hanford nuclear waste. The partial molar properties of H{sub 2}O, NaOH, and NaAl(OH){sub 4} are determined. The equivalence of the CSLM and the graphical method is verified by comparing results detennined by the two methods. The CSLM model has been previously used to predict the liquidus temperature of spinel crystals precipitated from Hanford waste glass. Those model coefficients are re-interpreted here as the partial molar spinel liquidus temperature of the glass components.

  13. Self-consistent modeling of visco-elastic polycrystals: Application to irradiation creep and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, P. A.; Tomé, C. N.

    1993-07-01

    w EPRESENT a model that permits the simulation of the transient response of polycrystalline aggregates to externally imposed loads and temperature gradients. The mechanical response of the constitutive grains includes elastic, Newtonian (linearly viscous), thermal and growth terms. The formulation explicitly accounts for the anisotropy in the elastic, creep, thermal and growth properties of both grains and polycrystals, and describes the time evolution of the overall visco-elastic moduli and of the internal stresses. It also provides, as limit cases, the correct overall elastic, thermal, creep and growth moduli of the polycrystal. The model is applied to analyse the characteristics of irradiation creep and growth in reactor tubes subjected to hydrostatic pressure. The influence of texture, grain anisotropy, grain shape and thermal stresses over the predicted polycrystal response, and expecially over the transient regime, is analysed in detail.

  14. Antenna Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) Controllers: Properties, Limits of Performance, and Tuning Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawronski, W.

    2004-01-01

    Wind gusts are the main disturbances that depreciate tracking precision of microwave antennas and radiotelescopes. The linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) controllers - as compared with the proportional-and-integral (PI) controllers significantly improve the tracking precision in wind disturbances. However, their properties have not been satisfactorily understood; consequently, their tuning is a trial-and-error process. A control engineer has two tools to tune an LQG controller: the choice of coordinate system of the controller model and the selection of weights of the LQG performance index. This article analyzes properties of an open- and closed-loop antenna. It shows that the proper choice of coordinates of the open-loop model simplifies the shaping of the closed-loop performance. The closed-loop properties are influenced by the LQG weights. The article shows the impact of the weights on the antenna closed-loop bandwidth, disturbance rejection properties, and antenna acceleration. The bandwidth and the disturbance rejection characterize the antenna performance, while the acceleration represents the performance limit set by the antenna hardware (motors). The article presents the controller tuning procedure, based on the coordinate selection and the weight properties. The procedure rationally shapes the closed-loop performance, as an alternative to the trial-and-error approach.

  15. Impact of a viscoelastic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhuissier, Henri; Néel, Baptiste; Limat, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    A jet of a Newtonian liquid impacting onto a wall at right angle spreads as a thin liquid sheet which preserves the radial symmetry of the jet. We observe that for a viscoelastic jet (solution of polyethylene glycol in water) this symmetry can break: close to the wall, the jet cross-section is faceted and radial steady liquid films (membranes) form, which connect the cross-section vertices to the sheet. The number of membranes increases with increasing viscoelastic relaxation time of the solution, but also with increasing jet velocity and decreasing distance from the jet nozzle to the wall. A mechanism for this surprising destabilization of the jet, which develops perpendicularly to the direction expected for a buckling mechanism, is presented that explains these dependences. The large-scale consequences of the jet destabilization on the sheet spreading and fragmentation, which show through the faceting of hydraulic jumps and suspended (Savart) sheets, will also be discussed.

  16. Viscoelastic behavior of dense microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cametti, C.; Codastefano, P.; D'arrigo, G.; Tartaglia, P.; Rouch, J.; Chen, S. H.

    1990-09-01

    We have performed extensive measurements of shear viscosity, ultrasonic absorption, and sound velocity in a ternary system consisting of water-decane-sodium di(2-ethylhexyl)sulfo- succinate(AOT), in the one-phase region where it forms a water-in-oil microemulsion. We observe a rapid increase of the static shear viscosity in the dense microemulsion region. Correspondingly the sound absorption shows unambiguous evidence of a viscoelastic behavior. The absorption data for various volume fractions and temperatures can be reduced to a universal curve by scaling both the absorption and the frequency by the measured static shear viscosity. The sound absorption can be interpreted as coming from the high-frequency tail of the viscoelastic relaxation, describable by a Cole-Cole relaxation formula with unusually small elastic moduli.

  17. Device and method for imaging of non-linear and linear properties of formations surrounding a borehole

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Paul A; Tencate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Guyer, Robert; Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher

    2013-11-05

    In some aspects of the disclosure, a method and an apparatus is disclosed for investigating material surrounding the borehole. The method includes generating a first low frequency acoustic wave within the borehole, wherein the first low frequency acoustic wave induces a linear and a nonlinear response in one or more features in the material that are substantially perpendicular to a radius of the borehole; directing a first sequence of high frequency pulses in a direction perpendicularly with respect to the longitudinal axis of the borehole into the material contemporaneously with the first acoustic wave; and receiving one or more second high frequency pulses at one or more receivers positionable in the borehole produced by an interaction between the first sequence of high frequency pulses and the one or more features undergoing linear and nonlinear elastic distortion due to the first low frequency acoustic wave to investigate the material surrounding the borehole.

  18. Influence analysis of structural parameters on electromagnetic properties of HTS linear induction motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Zheng, T. Q.; Zhang, W.; Fang, J.; Liu, Y. M.

    2011-11-01

    A new type high temperature superconductor linear induction motor is designed and analyzed as a prototype to ensure applicability aimed at industrial motors. Made of Bi-2223/Ag, primary windings are distributed with the double-layer concentrated structure. The motor is analyzed by 2D electromagnetic Finite Element Method to get magnetic field distribution, thrust force, vertical force and so on. The critical current of motor and the electromagnetic force are mostly decided by the leakage flux density of primary slot and by the main magnetic flux and eddy current respectively. The structural parameters of motor have a great influence on the distribution of magnetic field. Under constant currents, the properties of motor are analyzed with different slot widths, slot heights and winding turns. The properties of motor, such as the maximum slot leakage flux density, motor thrust and motor vertical force, are analyzed with different structural parameters.

  19. Effect of dehydrogenation/hydrogenation on the linear and nonlinear optical properties of Li@porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Heng-Qing; Sun, Shi-Ling; Zhong, Rong-Lin; Xu, Hong-Liang; Su, Zhong-Min

    2012-11-01

    In the present work, Li@porphyrins and their derivatives were designed in order to explore the effect of dehydrogenation/hydrogenation on linear and nonlinear optical properties. Their stable structures were obtained by the M06-2X method. Moreover, the M06-2X method showed that dehydrogenation/hydrogenation has greatly influences polarizabilities (α₀ values) and hyperpolarizabilities (β(tot) and γ(tot) values): α₀ values ranged from 331 to 389 au, β(tot) values from 0 to 2465 au, and γ(tot) values from -21.2 × 10⁴ to 21.4 × 10⁴ au. This new knowledge of the effect of dehydrogenation/hydrogenation on nonlinear optical properties may prove beneficial to the design and development of high-performance porphyrin materials. PMID:22722697

  20. Synthesis, crystal growth and studies on non-linear optical property of new chalcones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarojini, B. K.; Narayana, B.; Ashalatha, B. V.; Indira, J.; Lobo, K. G.

    2006-09-01

    The synthesis, crystal growth and non-linear optical (NLO) property of new chalcone derivatives are reported. 4-Propyloxy and 4-butoxy benzaldehydes were made to under go Claisen-Schmidt condensation with 4-methoxy, 4-nitro and 4-phenoxy acetophenones to form corresponding chalcones. The newly synthesized compounds were characterized by analytical and spectral data. The Second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of these compounds was measured by powder technique using Nd:YAG laser. Among tested compounds three chalcones showed NLO property. The chalcone 1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3-(4-propyloxy phenyl)-2-propen-1-one exhibited SHG conversion efficiency 2.7 times that of urea. The bulk crystal of 1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3-(4-butoxyphenyl)-2-propen-1-one (crystal size 65×28×15 mm 3) was grown by slow-evaporation technique from acetone. Microhardness of the crystal was tested by Vicker's microhardness method.