Science.gov

Sample records for liner multi-megabar shock

  1. Composite Liner, Multi-Megabar Shock Driver Development

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, J.C. Jr.; Bartsch, R.R.; Clark, D.A.; Morgan, D.V.; Anderson, W.E.; Lee, H.; Bowers, R.L.; Atchison, W.L.; Oona, H.; Stokes, J.L.; Veeser, L.R.; Broste, W.B.

    1998-10-18

    The multi-megabar shock driver development is a series of experiments in support of the Los Alamos High Energy Density Physics Experimental Program. Its purpose is to develop techniques to impact a uniform, stable, composite liner upon a high Z target to produce a multi-megabar shock for EOS studies. To date, experiments have been done on the Pegasus II capacitor bank with a current of {approximately}12MA driving the impactor liner. The driving field is {approximately}200 T at the target radius of 1cm. Data will be presented on the impactor liner. The driving field is {approximately}200 T at the target radius of 1 cm. Data will be presented on the stability and uniformity of the impactor liner when it impacts the target cylinder. Three experiments have been done with emphasis on liner development. Shock pressures greater than a megabar have been done with emphasis on liner development. Shock pressures greater than a megabar have been produced with an Al target cylinder. A Pt target cylinder should produce shock pressures in th e 5-megabar range.

  2. Composite liner, multi-megabar shock driver development

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch, R.R.; Clark, D.A.; Morgan, D.V.

    1998-12-31

    A magnetically imploded, cylindrical, multi-layer liner is under development for use as an equation of state shock driver using energetic, pulsed-power sources. The stability and uniformity of the imploding liner has been investigated on the Pegasus pulsed-power facility at liner velocities of >7 mm/usec. Using a thick aluminum driver layer to carry the current and a platinum impactor layer to generate the shock on impact with a target, the expected platinum-on-platinum shock level is 6 to 8 Mbar for operation of the Pegasus capacitor bank at the maximum charge voltage of 90 kV. The initial liner design utilized 8 grams of aluminum with a 1 gram (12-micron thick) layer of platinum on the inside. The inner surface was observed with flash radiography oriented transversely to the axis of the collapsing liner, and with fiber-optic time-of-arrival detectors on the target. Short wavelength perturbations of the inner surface along the axial direction were observed with amplitudes between 200 to 400 microns. A second liner was evaluated with increased aluminum mass and thickness to avoid drive current penetration and the resulting melting and susceptibility to Rayleigh Taylor instabilities. With 10 grams of aluminum at an initial radius of 2.5 cm, the initial liner thickness was almost 50% greater than for the first liner. This liner was observed to be more uniform at impact than the initial design, with perturbed amplitudes less than 100 to 200 microns at wavelengths of a few millimeters. Based on these results a third experiment is being prepared with the 10 gram aluminum liner of the second design and with a 1 gram, 15 micron platinum impactor layer. Liner stability measurements will be presented, application of this liner system to EOS measurement will be discussed, and the evolution to higher energy experiments on ATLAS will be presented.

  3. Solid liner implosions on Z for producing multi-megabar, shockless compressions

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M. R.; Lemke, R. W.; McBride, R. D.; Davis, J. P.; Dolan, D. H.; Knudson, M. D.; Sinars, D. B.; Smith, I. C.; Savage, M.; Stygar, W. A.; Flicker, D. G.; Herrmann, M. C.; Cochrane, K. R.; Killebrew, K.

    2012-05-15

    Current pulse shaping techniques, originally developed for planar dynamic material experiments on the Z-machine [M. K. Matzen et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 055503 (2005)], are adapted to the design of controlled cylindrical liner implosions. By driving these targets with a current pulse shape that prevents shock formation inside the liner, shock heating is avoided along with the corresponding decrease in electrical conductivity ahead of the magnetic diffusion wave penetrating the liner. This results in an imploding liner with a significant amount of its mass in the solid phase and at multi-megabar pressures. Pressures in the solid region of a shaped pulse driven beryllium liner fielded on the Z-machine are inferred to 5.5 Mbar, while simulations suggest implosion velocities greater than 50kms{sup -1}. These solid liner experiments are diagnosed with multi-frame monochromatic x-ray backlighting which is used to infer the material density and pressure. This work has led to a new platform on the Z-machine that can be used to perform off-Hugoniot measurements at higher pressures than are accessible through magnetically driven planar geometries.

  4. Solid Liner Implosions on Z for Producing Multi-Megabar, Shockless Compressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    Recent experiments with cylindrical liners on the Z-machine have utilized unshaped current drives where the early time drive pressure launches a shock into the initially solid liner. We explore the use of current pulse shaping techniques, originally developed for dynamic materials experiments on the Z-machine, to perform controlled cylindrical liner implosions. By driving the liner with a current pulse shape that prevents shock formation we avoid shock heating and melting the liner material and the corresponding decrease in electrical conductivity. This results in an imploding liner with a significant amount of its material in the solid phase and at multi-megabar pressures. Pressures in the solid region of a shaped pulse driven beryllium liner are expected to exceed 10 Mbar and have implosion velocities greater than 50 km/s. The solid liner experiments are diagnosed with multi-frame monochromatic X-ray backlighting which is used to infer the material density and pressure. These developments have lead to a new platform on the Z-machine that can be used to perform off-Hugoniot measurements at higher pressures than are accessible through magnetically driven planar geometries. This work was performed in collaboration with R.W. Lemke, R.D. McBride, M.D. Knudson, D.H. Dolan, and J P. Davis. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corp, a Lockheed-Martin company, for the US Dept of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Dynamic Shock Compression of Copper to Multi-Megabar Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haill, T. A.; Furnish, M. D.; Twyeffort, L. L.; Arrington, C. L.; Lemke, R. W.; Knudson, M. D.; Davis, J.-P.

    2015-11-01

    Copper is an important material for a variety of shock and high energy density applications and experiments. Copper is used as a standard reference material to determine the EOS properties of other materials. The high conductivity of copper makes it useful as an MHD driver layer in high current dynamic materials experiments on Sandia National Laboratories Z machine. Composite aluminum/copper flyer plates increase the dwell time in plate impact experiments by taking advantage of the slower wave speeds in copper. This presentation reports on recent efforts to reinstate a composite Al/Cu flyer capability on Z and to extend the range of equation-of-state shock compression data through the use of hyper-velocity composite flyers and symmetric planar impact with copper targets. We will present results from multi-dimensional ALEGRA MHD simulations, as well as experimental designs and methods of composite flyer fabrication. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Thermodynamics of hydrogen and helium plasmas in megabar and multi-megabar pressure range under strong shock and isentropic compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryaznov, V. K.; Iosilevskiy, I. L.; Fortov, V. E.

    2016-01-01

    An approach based on the chemical picture of plasma is proposed for the description of thermodynamics and the equation of the state of warm dense matter. Corresponding to this approach, the effects of Coulomb interaction, the short range repulsion of atoms and molecules, free electron degeneracy, and radiation pressure contributions are taken into account. A family of models based upon this approach is presented and discussed. The possibilities of these models for the description of strongly coupled plasma of hydrogen isotopes and noble gases under megabar and terapascal pressures under shock and isentropic compression are demonstrated. The asymptotic properties of the models at high temperatures are demonstrated, showing their application to the very accurate description of solar plasma.

  7. Shock wave absorber having a deformable liner

    DOEpatents

    Youngdahl, C.K.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Shin, Y.W.; Kot, C.A.; Ockert, C.E.

    1983-08-26

    This invention discloses a shock wave absorber for a piping system carrying liquid. The absorber has a plastically deformable liner defining the normal flow boundary for an axial segment of the piping system, and a nondeformable housing is spaced outwardly from the liner so as to define a gas-tight space therebetween. The flow capacity of the liner generally corresponds to the flow capacity of the piping system line, but the liner has a noncircular cross section and extends axially of the piping system line a distance between one and twenty times the diameter thereof. Gas pressurizes the gas-tight space equal to the normal liquid pressure in the piping system. The liner has sufficient structural capacity to withstand between one and one-half and two times this normal liquid pressures; but at greater pressures it begins to plastically deform initially with respect to shape to a more circular cross section, and then with respect to material extension by circumferentially stretching the wall of the liner. A high energy shock wave passing through the liner thus plastically deforms the liner radially into the gas space and progressively also as needed in the axial direction of the shock wave to minimize transmission of the shock wave beyond the absorber.

  8. Composite liner design to maximize the shock pressure beyond megabars

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.

    1996-09-01

    Among the solid liners made of a single material which are imploded onto a target under the same driving condition, the aluminum liner produces the highest shock pressure. The authors propose the composite liner design which can increase the shock pressure several times over the best performance obtainable from an aluminum liner. They have also developed a general formulation to optimize the composite liner design for any driving current, and derived a set of very useful scaling relations. Finally, the authors present some 1-D simulations of the optimal composite liners to be fielded at Pegasus and Procyon in the upcoming megabar experiments.

  9. Examination of shaped charge liner shock loading

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M.J.; Moore, T.W.; Lee, C.G.; Breithaupt, R.; Avara, G.R.

    1996-07-01

    A series of experiments was conducted for the purpose of achieving a more fundamental understanding of the shaped charge liner shock loading environment. The test configuration, representing the middle portion of a shaped charge, consists of a 50 mm deep, 100 mm tall, and 2 mm thick copper plate driven by 50 mm deep, 100 mm tall, tapered thickness wedge of LX-14. An electrically driven 50 mm square flyer is used to surface initiate the base of the LX-14 causing a plane detonation wave to propagate into the explosive wedge along the liner surface. Fabry-Perot laser velocimetry measures the particle velocity time history of the plate. The CTH and DYNA2D hydrocodes are used to simulate the experiments. Calculations of the velocity profiles are compared to the experimental results. The effects of mesh density, copper material failure and strength models, and explosive detonation models are discussed.

  10. Results from New Multi-Megabar Shockless Compression Experiments at the Z Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jean-Paul; Brown, Justin; Knudson, Marcus

    2015-06-01

    Quasi-isentropic, shockless ramp-wave experiments promise accurate equation-of-state (EOS) data in the solid phase at relatively low temperatures and multi-megabar pressures. In this range of pressure, isothermal diamond-anvil techniques have limited pressure accuracy due to reliance on theoretical EOS of calibration standards, thus accurate quasi-isentropic compression data would help immensely in constraining EOS models. Multi-megabar shockless compression experiments using the Z Machine at Sandia as a magnetic drive with stripline targets have recently been improved. New developments will be presented in the design and analysis of these experiments, including topics such as 2-D and magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) effects and the use of LiF windows. Results will be presented for selected metals, with comparisons to independently developed EOS. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Analysis of data from shockless compression experiments to multi-megabar pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jean-Paul; Brown, Justin; Lemke, Raymond; Martin, Matthew; Knudson, Marcus

    2013-06-01

    Quasi-isentropic, shockless ramp-wave experiments promise accurate equation-of-state (EOS) data in the solid phase at relatively low temperatures and multi-megabar pressures. In this range of pressure, isothermal diamond-anvil techniques have limited pressure accuracy due to reliance on theoretical EOS of calibration standards, thus accurate quasi-isentropic compression data would help immensely in constraining EOS models. Multi-megabar shockless compression experiments using the Z Machine at Sandia as a magnetic drive with stripline targets have been performed on a number of solids. New developments will be presented in the analysis of data from these experiments using the single-sample inverse Lagrangian approach, including topics such as 2-D and magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) effects and uncertainty quantification. Results will be presented for selected metals, with comparisons to independently developed EOS. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Quantitative Results from Shockless Compression Experiments on Solids to Multi-Megabar Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jean-Paul; Brown, Justin; Knudson, Marcus; Lemke, Raymond

    2015-03-01

    Quasi-isentropic, shockless ramp-wave experiments promise accurate equation-of-state (EOS) data in the solid phase at relatively low temperatures and multi-megabar pressures. In this range of pressure, isothermal diamond-anvil techniques have limited pressure accuracy due to reliance on theoretical EOS of calibration standards, thus accurate quasi-isentropic compression data would help immensely in constraining EOS models. Multi-megabar shockless compression experiments using the Z Machine at Sandia as a magnetic drive with stripline targets continue to be performed on a number of solids. New developments will be presented in the design and analysis of these experiments, including topics such as 2-D and magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) effects and the use of LiF windows. Results will be presented for tantalum and/or gold metals, with comparisons to independently developed EOS. * Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Analysis of shockless dynamic compression data on solids to multi-megabar pressures: Application to tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jean-Paul; Brown, Justin L.; Knudson, Marcus D.; Lemke, Raymond W.

    2014-11-28

    Magnetically-driven, planar shockless-compression experiments to multi-megabar pressures were performed on tantalum samples using a stripline target geometry. Free-surface velocity waveforms were measured in 15 cases; nine of these in a dual-sample configuration with two samples of different thicknesses on opposing electrodes, and six in a single-sample configuration with a bare electrode opposite the sample. Details are given on the application of inverse Lagrangian analysis (ILA) to these data, including potential sources of error. The most significant source of systematic error, particularly for single-sample experiments, was found to arise from the pulse-shape dependent free-surface reflected wave interactions with the deviatoric-stress response of tantalum. This could cause local, possibly temporary, unloading of material from a ramp compressed state, and thus multi-value response in wave speed that invalidates the free-surface to in-material velocity mapping step of ILA. By averaging all 15 data sets, a final result for the principal quasi-isentrope of tantalum in stress-strain was obtained to a peak longitudinal stress of 330 GPa with conservative uncertainty bounds of ±4.5% in stress. The result agrees well with a tabular equation of state developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  14. Analysis of shockless dynamic compression data on solids to multi-megabar pressures: Application to tantalum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Davis, Jean -Paul; Brown, Justin L.; Knudson, Marcus D.; Lemke, Raymond W.

    2014-11-26

    In this research, magnetically-driven, planar shockless-compression experiments to multi-megabar pressures were performed on tantalum samples using a stripline target geometry. Free-surface velocity waveforms were measured in 15 cases; nine of these in a dual-sample configuration with two samples of different thicknesses on opposing electrodes, and six in a single-sample configuration with a bare electrode opposite the sample. Details are given on the application of inverse Lagrangian analysis (ILA) to these data, including potential sources of error. The most significant source of systematic error, particularly for single-sample experiments, was found to arise from the pulse-shape dependent free-surface reflected wave interactions withmore » the deviatoric-stress response of tantalum. This could cause local, possibly temporary, unloading of material from a ramp compressed state, and thus multi-value response in wave speed that invalidates the free-surface to in-material velocity mapping step of ILA. By averaging all 15 data sets, a final result for the principal quasi-isentrope of tantalum in stress-strain was obtained to a peak longitudinal stress of 330 GPa with conservative uncertainty bounds of ±4.5% in stress. The result agrees well with a tabular equation of state developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory.« less

  15. Analysis of shockless dynamic compression data on solids to multi-megabar pressures: Application to tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jean -Paul; Brown, Justin L.; Knudson, Marcus D.; Lemke, Raymond W.

    2014-11-26

    In this research, magnetically-driven, planar shockless-compression experiments to multi-megabar pressures were performed on tantalum samples using a stripline target geometry. Free-surface velocity waveforms were measured in 15 cases; nine of these in a dual-sample configuration with two samples of different thicknesses on opposing electrodes, and six in a single-sample configuration with a bare electrode opposite the sample. Details are given on the application of inverse Lagrangian analysis (ILA) to these data, including potential sources of error. The most significant source of systematic error, particularly for single-sample experiments, was found to arise from the pulse-shape dependent free-surface reflected wave interactions with the deviatoric-stress response of tantalum. This could cause local, possibly temporary, unloading of material from a ramp compressed state, and thus multi-value response in wave speed that invalidates the free-surface to in-material velocity mapping step of ILA. By averaging all 15 data sets, a final result for the principal quasi-isentrope of tantalum in stress-strain was obtained to a peak longitudinal stress of 330 GPa with conservative uncertainty bounds of ±4.5% in stress. The result agrees well with a tabular equation of state developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  16. Principal Quasi-Isentropes of Several Materials to Multi-Megabar Pressure from Analysis of Magnetically Driven Ramp Compression Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jean-Paul; Martin, Matthew; Knudson, Marcus

    2011-06-01

    Quasi-isentropic ramp-wave experiments promise accurate equation-of-state (EOS) data in the solid phase at relatively low temperatures and multimegabar pressures. In this range of pressure, isothermal diamond-anvil techniques have limited pressure accuracy due to reliance on theoretical EOS of calibration standards, thus accurate quasi-isentropic compression data would help immensely in constraining EOS models. Multi-megabar ramp compression experiments using the Z Machine at Sandia as a magnetic drive with stripline targets have been performed on tantalum, copper, gold, beryllium, molybdenum, and aluminum metals as well as lithium fluoride crystal. Much of the data from these experiments are analyzed using a single-sample inverse Lagrangian approach. This technique, and the quantification of its uncertainties, will be described in detail. Results will be presented for selected materials, with comparisons to independently developed EOS. *Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. The LINER Nucleus of M87: A Shock-excited Dissipative Accretion Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopita, Michael A.; Koratkar, Anuradha P.; Allen, Mark G.; Tsvetanov, Zlatan I.; Ford, Holland C.; Bicknell, Geoffrey V.; Sutherland, Ralph S.

    1997-11-01

    We present long-baseline Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) spectra of the nuclear accretion disk in M87 (NGC 4486), offset from the nucleus by 0.6" (42.7 pc) in order to avoid the nuclear continuum. Even so close to the nucleus, the optical spectrum has the appearance of a normal LINER galaxy. We show that the presence of strong UV emission lines provides a definitive test of the excitation mechanism; the disk is shock excited, not photoionized by a UV continuum from the central source. The shock velocity inferred (265 km s-1) is about one-half of the Keplerian rotation velocity found earlier by Ford et al. Since shock dissipation appears to be the principal means of increasing the binding energy of the accreting gas, we can use the FOS data and the luminosity profile of the accretion disk to estimate the rate of mass accretion as a function of radius. We find that this rate decreases with decreasing distance from the nucleus, as the material becomes organized into a cool and thin classical accretion disk in the inner regions. In the outer disk, the accretion rate (~4 M⊙ yr-1) is comparable to that determined for the X-ray-emitting cooling flow, showing that a large fraction of the cooling gas can find its way into the nuclear regions. The accretion rate near the nucleus (~3 × 10-2 M⊙ yr-1) is consistent with the properties of the relativistic jet and its associated radio emission. Over the lifetime of the jets, about 107 M⊙ of cool material may have accumulated in the nuclear regions, allowing the formation of a disk that is optically thick to Thomson scattering where it becomes ionized close to the nucleus. We speculate that LINER emission is a general property of the shocked dissipative regions of accretion disks in active galaxies with strongly sub-Eddington accretion and may therefore be used as a diagnostic of these dissipative accretion flows.

  18. LINER-like Extended Nebulae in ULIRGs: Shocks Generated by Merger-Induced Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monreal-Ibero, A.; Arribas, S.; Colina, L.

    2006-01-01

    In this work we studied the two-dimensional ionization structure of the circumnuclear and extranuclear regions in a sample of six low-z ultraluminous infrared galaxies using integral field spectroscopy. The ionization conditions in the extranuclear regions of these galaxies (~5-15 kpc) are typical of LINERs as obtained from the Veilleux-Osterbrock line ratio diagnostic diagrams. The range of observed line ratios is best explained by the presence of fast shocks with velocities of 150-500 km s-1, while ionization by an AGN or nuclear starburst is in general less likely. The comparison of the two-dimensional ionization level and velocity dispersion in the extranuclear regions of these galaxies shows a positive correlation, further supporting the idea that shocks are indeed the main cause of ionization. The origin of these shocks is also investigated. Despite the likely presence of superwinds in the circumnuclear regions of these systems, no evidence for signatures of superwinds such as double velocity components is found in the extended extranuclear regions. We consider a more likely explanation for the presence of shocks, the existence of tidally induced large-scale gas flows caused by the merging process itself, as evidenced by the observed velocity fields characterized by peak-to-peak velocities of 400 km s-1 and velocity dispersions of up to 200 km s-1.

  19. Estimates of confinement time and energy gain for plasma liner driven magnetoinertial fusion using an analytic self-similar converging shock model

    SciTech Connect

    Cassibry, J. T.; Cortez, R. J.; Hsu, S. C.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    2009-11-15

    Plasma liner driven magnetoinertial fusion (PLMIF) is a fusion energy concept that utilizes an imploding plasma liner to shock heat and compress a magnetized target plasma to fusion conditions. The fusion burn fraction is linearly proportional to the confinement (or ''dwell'') time of the liner-target system at peak compression, and therefore it is important to estimate the dwell time accurately in order to assess the fusion energy yield and gain. In this work, the dwell time has been estimated using the exact solution to a self-similar converging shock model. The dwell time was found to be determined by the sum of the outgoing shock and rarefaction times through the plasma liner at peak compression, and for chosen PLMIF conditions the dwell time was on the order of 1 {mu}s. In addition, we show that the engineering gain, i.e., the total energy extracted as electricity (from fusion plus expanded liner energy) divided by the electrical energy required to implode the liner, exceeds unity for a wide range of liner thicknesses and specific heat ratios.

  20. Experimental and theoretical thermal equations of state of MgSiO3 post-perovskite at multi-megabar pressures

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Takeshi; Dekura, Haruhiko; Hirao, Naohisa

    2016-01-01

    The MgSiO3 post-perovskite phase is the most abundant silicate phase in a super-Earth’s mantle, although it only exists within the Earth’s lowermost mantle. In this study, we established the thermal equation of state (EoS) of the MgSiO3 post-perovskite phase, which were determined by using both laser-heated diamond anvil cell and density-functional theoretical techniques, within a multi-megabar pressure range, corresponding to the conditions of a super-Earth’s mantle. The Keane and AP2 EoS models were adopted for the first time to extract meaningful physical properties. The experimentally determined Grüneisen parameter, which is one of the thermal EoS parameters, and its volume dependence were found to be consistent with their theoretically obtained values. This reduced the previously reported discrepancy observed between experiment and theory. Both the experimental and theoretical EoS were also found to be in very good agreement for volumes at pressures and temperatures of up to 300 GPa and 5000 K, respectively. Our newly developed EoS should be applicable to a super-Earth’s mantle, as well as the Earth’s core-mantle boundary region. PMID:26948855

  1. Experimental and theoretical thermal equations of state of MgSiO3 post-perovskite at multi-megabar pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Takeshi; Dekura, Haruhiko; Hirao, Naohisa

    2016-03-01

    The MgSiO3 post-perovskite phase is the most abundant silicate phase in a super-Earth’s mantle, although it only exists within the Earth’s lowermost mantle. In this study, we established the thermal equation of state (EoS) of the MgSiO3 post-perovskite phase, which were determined by using both laser-heated diamond anvil cell and density-functional theoretical techniques, within a multi-megabar pressure range, corresponding to the conditions of a super-Earth’s mantle. The Keane and AP2 EoS models were adopted for the first time to extract meaningful physical properties. The experimentally determined Grüneisen parameter, which is one of the thermal EoS parameters, and its volume dependence were found to be consistent with their theoretically obtained values. This reduced the previously reported discrepancy observed between experiment and theory. Both the experimental and theoretical EoS were also found to be in very good agreement for volumes at pressures and temperatures of up to 300 GPa and 5000 K, respectively. Our newly developed EoS should be applicable to a super-Earth’s mantle, as well as the Earth’s core-mantle boundary region.

  2. Experimental and theoretical thermal equations of state of MgSiO3 post-perovskite at multi-megabar pressures.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Takeshi; Dekura, Haruhiko; Hirao, Naohisa

    2016-01-01

    The MgSiO3 post-perovskite phase is the most abundant silicate phase in a super-Earth's mantle, although it only exists within the Earth's lowermost mantle. In this study, we established the thermal equation of state (EoS) of the MgSiO3 post-perovskite phase, which were determined by using both laser-heated diamond anvil cell and density-functional theoretical techniques, within a multi-megabar pressure range, corresponding to the conditions of a super-Earth's mantle. The Keane and AP2 EoS models were adopted for the first time to extract meaningful physical properties. The experimentally determined Grüneisen parameter, which is one of the thermal EoS parameters, and its volume dependence were found to be consistent with their theoretically obtained values. This reduced the previously reported discrepancy observed between experiment and theory. Both the experimental and theoretical EoS were also found to be in very good agreement for volumes at pressures and temperatures of up to 300 GPa and 5000 K, respectively. Our newly developed EoS should be applicable to a super-Earth's mantle, as well as the Earth's core-mantle boundary region. PMID:26948855

  3. Probing the Release of Shocked Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polsin, D. N.; McCoy, C. A.; Gregor, M. C.; Boehly, T. R.; Sangster, T. C.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Celliers, P. M.

    2014-10-01

    The behavior of shocked material as it releases to lower pressures is important for equation-of-state experiments and inertial confinement fusion research. We present results of experiments that used a 10-ps, 266-nm probe beam to image the release plumes of various target materials shocked to multi-megabar pressures by the OMEGA EP laser. Simultaneous VISAR (velocity interferometer system for any reflector) measurements provide the initial shocked state from which these materials release. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  4. On the effect of conductivity of a shock-compressed gas on interferometric recording of parameters of motion of a liner

    SciTech Connect

    Ogorodnikov, V. A. Mikhailov, A. L.; Peshkov, V. V.; Bogdanov, E. N.; Rodionov, A. V.; Sedov, A. A.; Fedorov, A. V.; Nazarov, D. V.; Finyushin, S. A.; Dudoladov, V. I.; Erunov, S. V.; Blikov, A. O.

    2012-01-15

    We report on the results of a study of the acceleration dynamics of an aluminum liner to a velocity of 5.5 km/s using continuous recording of velocity (velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) and Fabry-Perot interferometer) and motion trajectory (radiointerferometer and resistive transducer) in air and in a helium atmosphere. It is found that for liner velocities exceeding 4.0 and 5.0 km/s, the displacement of the shock wave front is recorded by the radiointerferometer in air and helium, respectively. At these velocities, the conductivities of air and helium behind the shock wave front are estimated.

  5. Obtaining off-Hugoniot equation of state data on solid metals at extreme pressures via pulsed-power driven cylindrical liner implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, Raymond

    2015-06-01

    The focus of this talk is on magnetically driven, liner implosion experiments on the Z machine (Z) in which a solid, metal tube is shocklessly compressed to multi-megabar pressure. The goal of the experiments is to collect velocimetry data that can be used in conjunction with a new optimization based analysis technique to infer the principal isentrope of the tube material over a range of pressures. For the past decade, shock impact and ramp loading experiments on Z have used planar platforms exclusively. While producing state-of-the-art results for material science, it is difficult to produce drive pressures greater than 6 Mbar in the divergent planar geometry. In contrast, a cylindrical liner implosion is convergent; magnetic drive pressures approaching 50 Mbar are possible with the available current on Z (~ 20 MA). In our cylindrical experiments, the liner comprises an inner tube composed of the sample material (e.g., Ta) of unknown equation of state, and an outer tube composed of aluminum (Al) that serves as the current carrying cathode. Internal to the sample are fielded multiple PDV (Photonic Doppler Velocimetry) probes that measure velocity of the inner free surface of the imploding sample. External to the composite liner, at much larger radius, is an Al tube that is the return current anode. VISAR (velocity interferometry system for any reflector) probes measure free surface velocity of the exploding anode. Using the latter, MHD and optimization codes are employed to solve an inverse problem that yields the current driving the liner implosion. Then, the drive current, PDV velocity, MHD and optimization codes, are used to solve another inverse problem that yields pressure vs. density on approximately the principal isentrope of the sample material. Results for Ta, Re, and Cu compressed to ~ 10 Mbar are presented. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin

  6. Effect of axial B-field on shock structure within gas-filled liner z-pinch experiments performed on MAGPIE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdiak, Guy; Lebedev, Sergey; Suzuki-Vidal, Francisco; Swadling, George; Bland, Simon; Suttle, Lee; Bennet, Matthew; Hare, Jack

    2014-10-01

    Cylindrical liner z-pinches can be used to drive convergent shock waves through gas contained inside with a striking degree of azimuthal symmetry. Here we present data from gas-filled liner experiments that include an azimuthally anisotropic axial magnetic field. The 4-fold azimuthal symmetry of the magnetic field distribution imprints itself upon the shape of the convergent shocks. This occurs despite a ratio of shock ram pressure to magnetic pressure of order 100. Interferometry and emission imaging data that show the evolution of the shock structure as it converges are presented alongside potential explanations for the dynamics. These experiments provide a potential platform for studying magnetized plasma physics with relevance to magnetized fusion schemes. Experiments were performed on the 1.4 MA, 240 ns rise-time MAGPIE pulsed-power device at Imperial College London.

  7. Megabar liner experiments on Pegasus II

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Bartsch, R.R.; Bowers, R.L.

    1997-09-01

    Using pulsed power to implode a liner onto a target can produce high shock pressures for many interesting application experiments. With a Pegasus II facility in Los Alamos, a detailed theoretical analysis has indicated that the highest attainable pressure is around 2 Mbar for a best designed aluminum liner. Recently, an interesting composite liner design has been proposed which can boost the shock pressure performance by a factor 4 over the aluminum liner. This liner design was adopted in the first megabar (Megabar-1) liner experiment carried out on Pegasus last year to verify the design concept and to compare the effect of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities on liner integrity with the code simulations. We present briefly the physical considerations to explain why the composite liner provides the best shock pressure performance. The theoretical modeling and performance of Megabar-1 liner are discussed. Also presented are the first experimental results and the liner design modification for our next experiment.

  8. Probing the Physics of Narrow-line Regions in Active Galaxies. III. Accretion and Cocoon Shocks in the LINER NGC 1052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopita, Michael A.; Ho, I.-Ting; Dressel, Linda L.; Sutherland, Ralph; Kewley, Lisa; Davies, Rebecca; Hampton, Elise; Shastri, Prajval; Kharb, Preeti; Jose, Jessy; Bhatt, Harish; Ramya, S.; Scharwächter, Julia; Jin, Chichuan; Banfield, Julie; Zaw, Ingyin; James, Bethan; Juneau, Stéphanie; Srivastava, Shweta

    2015-03-01

    We present Wide Field Spectrograph integral field spectroscopy and Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph spectroscopy for the low-ionization nuclear emission line region (LINER) galaxy NGC 1052. We infer the presence of a turbulent accretion flow forming a small-scale accretion disk. We find a large-scale outflow and ionization cone along the minor axis of the galaxy. Part of this outflow region is photoionized by the active galactic nucleus and shares properties with the extended narrow-line region of Seyfert galaxies, but the inner (R≲ 1.0″) accretion disk and the region around the radio jet appear shock excited. The emission-line properties can be modeled by a “double-shock” model in which the accretion flow first passes through an accretion shock in the presence of a hard X-ray radiation, and the accretion disk is then processed through a cocoon shock driven by the overpressure of the radio jets. This model explains the observation of two distinct densities (˜104 and ˜106 cm-3) and provides a good fit to the observed emission-line spectrum. We derive estimates for the velocities of the two shock components and their mixing fractions, the black hole mass, and the accretion rate needed to sustain the LINER emission and derive an estimate for the jet power. Our emission-line model is remarkably robust against variation of input parameters and hence offers a generic explanation for the excitation of LINER galaxies, including those of spiral type such as NGC 3031 (M81).

  9. Probing the Release of Shocked Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polsin, D. N.; Boehly, T. R.; Ivancic, S.; Gregor, M. C.; McCoy, C. A.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Celliers, P. M.

    2015-11-01

    The behavior of shocked material as it releases to lower pressures is important for equation-of-state experiments and inertial confinement fusion research. We present results of experiments that used a 10-ps, 263-nm probe beam to image the release plumes of various target material shocked to multi-megabar pressures by the OMEGA EP laser. One-dimensional streaked x-ray radiography also provided a time-resolved trajectory of the release wave. Simultaneous VISAR (velocity interferometer system for any reflector) measurements provide the initial shocked state from which these materials release. Models for the optical properties of the released material is presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  10. Determination of pressure and density of shocklessly compressed beryllium through x-ray radiography of a magnetically driven cylindrical liner implosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, R. W.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Davis, J.-P.; Knudson, M. D.

    2011-06-01

    High current, pulsed-power driven liner implosions can be used to produce extreme pressure states in condensed matter for equation of state (EOS) studies. The Z accelerator can deliver a current pulse to a cylindrical liner (tubular shell) that rises to a peak current of ~20 MA in ~100 ns; at peak current the magnetic pressure is ~28 Mbar on the surface of a liner with radius 0.15 cm. We discuss a semi-empirical technique for obtaining EOS data for a metallic solid, quasi-isentropically (shocklessly) compressed to multi-megabar pressure, through x-ray radiography of a high current, magnetically driven, cylindrical liner implosion. Results are presented from experiments on Z in which a solid beryllium (Be) liner is quasi-isentropically compressed by magnetic pressure. Radiographs of the liner are used in conjunction with hydrodynamic equations to determine density and pressure on the principal quasi-isentrope of solid Be to a peak pressure of 2.4 Mbar. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-ACO4-94AL85000.

  11. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Eskridge, Richard; Smith, James; Lee, Michael; Richeson, Jeff; Schmidt, George; Knapp, Charles E.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Turchi, Peter J.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) attempts to combine the favorable attributes of magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) for energy confinement with the attributes of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for efficient compression heating and wall-free containment of the fusing plasma. It uses a material liner to compress and contain a magnetized plasma. For practical applications, standoff drivers to deliver the imploding momentum flux to the target plasma remotely are required. Spherically converging plasma jets have been proposed as standoff drivers for this purpose. The concept involves the dynamic formation of a spherical plasma liner by the merging of plasma jets, and the use of the liner so formed to compress a spheromak or a field reversed configuration (FRC). For the successful implementation of the scheme, plasma jets of the requisite momentum flux density need to be produced. Their transport over sufficiently large distances (a few meters) needs to be assured. When they collide and merge into a liner, relative differences in velocity, density and temperature of the jets could give rise to instabilities in the development of the liner. Variation in the jet properties must be controlled to ensure that the growth rate of the instabilities are not significant over the time scale of the liner formation before engaging with the target plasma. On impact with the target plasma, some plasma interpenetration might occur between the liner and the target. The operating parameter space needs to be identified to ensure that a reasonably robust and conducting contact surface is formed between the liner and the target. A mismatch in the "impedance" between the liner and the target plasma could give rise to undesirable shock heating of the liner leading to increased entropy (thermal losses) in the liner. Any irregularities in the liner will accentuate the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities during the compression of the target plasma by the liner.

  12. Liner target interaction experiments on Pegasus II

    SciTech Connect

    Hockaday, M.P.; Chrien, R.E.; Bartsch, R.

    1995-09-01

    The Los Alamos High Energy Density Physics program uses capacitively driven low voltage, inductive-storage pulse power to implode cylindrical targets for hydrodynamics experiments. Once a precision driver liner was characterized an experimental series characterizing the aluminum target dynamics was performed. The target was developed for shock-induced quasi-particle ejecta experiments including holography. The concept for the Liner shock experiment is that the driver liner is used to impact the target liner which then accelerates toward a collimator with a slit in it. A shock wave is set up in the target liner and as the shock emerges from the back side of the target liner, ejecta are generated. By taking a laser hologram the particle distribution of the ejecta are hoped to be determined. The goal for the second experimental series was to characterize the target dynamics and not to measure and generate the ejecta. Only the results from the third shot, Pegasus II-26 fired April 26th, 1994, from the series is discussed in detail. The second experimental series successfully characterized the target dynamics necessary to move forward towards the planned quasi-ejecta experiments.

  13. Shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergencies A-Z Share this! Home » Emergency 101 Shock Shock is a serious, often life-threatening medical condition ... of death for critically ill or injured people. Shock results when the body is not getting enough ...

  14. Shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems) Hypovolemic shock (caused by too little blood volume) Anaphylactic shock (caused by allergic reaction) Septic shock ( ... as heart attack or heart failure ) Low blood volume (as with heavy bleeding or dehydration ) Changes in ...

  15. Beryllium liner implosion experiments on the Z accelerator in preparation for magnetized liner inertial fusiona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, R. D.; Martin, M. R.; Lemke, R. W.; Greenly, J. B.; Jennings, C. A.; Rovang, D. C.; Sinars, D. B.; Cuneo, M. E.; Herrmann, M. C.; Slutz, S. A.; Nakhleh, C. W.; Ryutov, D. D.; Davis, J.-P.; Flicker, D. G.; Blue, B. E.; Tomlinson, K.; Schroen, D.; Stamm, R. M.; Smith, G. E.; Moore, J. K.; Rogers, T. J.; Robertson, G. K.; Kamm, R. J.; Smith, I. C.; Savage, M.; Stygar, W. A.; Rochau, G. A.; Jones, M.; Lopez, M. R.; Porter, J. L.; Matzen, M. K.

    2013-05-01

    Multiple experimental campaigns have been executed to study the implosions of initially solid beryllium (Be) liners (tubes) on the Z pulsed-power accelerator. The implosions were driven by current pulses that rose from 0 to 20 MA in either 100 or 200 ns (200 ns for pulse shaping experiments). These studies were conducted in support of the recently proposed Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)], as well as for exploring novel equation-of-state measurement techniques. The experiments used thick-walled liners that had an aspect ratio (initial outer radius divided by initial wall thickness) of either 3.2, 4, or 6. From these studies, we present three new primary results. First, we present radiographic images of imploding Be liners, where each liner contained a thin aluminum sleeve for enhancing the contrast and visibility of the liner's inner surface in the images. These images allow us to assess the stability of the liner's inner surface more accurately and more directly than was previously possible. Second, we present radiographic images taken early in the implosion (prior to any motion of the liner's inner surface) of a shockwave propagating radially inward through the liner wall. Radial mass density profiles from these shock compression experiments are contrasted with profiles from experiments where the Z accelerator's pulse shaping capabilities were used to achieve shockless ("quasi-isentropic") liner compression. Third, we present "micro-Ḃ" measurements of azimuthal magnetic field penetration into the initially vacuum-filled interior of a shocked liner. Our measurements and simulations reveal that the penetration commences shortly after the shockwave breaks out from the liner's inner surface. The field then accelerates this low-density "precursor" plasma to the axis of symmetry.

  16. Beryllium liner implosion experiments on the Z accelerator in preparation for magnetized liner inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, R. D.; Martin, M. R.; Lemke, R. W.; Jennings, C. A.; Rovang, D. C.; Sinars, D. B.; Cuneo, M. E.; Herrmann, M. C.; Slutz, S. A.; Nakhleh, C. W.; Davis, J.-P.; Flicker, D. G.; Rogers, T. J.; Robertson, G. K.; Kamm, R. J.; Smith, I. C.; Savage, M.; Stygar, W. A.; Rochau, G. A.; Jones, M.; and others

    2013-05-15

    Multiple experimental campaigns have been executed to study the implosions of initially solid beryllium (Be) liners (tubes) on the Z pulsed-power accelerator. The implosions were driven by current pulses that rose from 0 to 20 MA in either 100 or 200 ns (200 ns for pulse shaping experiments). These studies were conducted in support of the recently proposed Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)], as well as for exploring novel equation-of-state measurement techniques. The experiments used thick-walled liners that had an aspect ratio (initial outer radius divided by initial wall thickness) of either 3.2, 4, or 6. From these studies, we present three new primary results. First, we present radiographic images of imploding Be liners, where each liner contained a thin aluminum sleeve for enhancing the contrast and visibility of the liner's inner surface in the images. These images allow us to assess the stability of the liner's inner surface more accurately and more directly than was previously possible. Second, we present radiographic images taken early in the implosion (prior to any motion of the liner's inner surface) of a shockwave propagating radially inward through the liner wall. Radial mass density profiles from these shock compression experiments are contrasted with profiles from experiments where the Z accelerator's pulse shaping capabilities were used to achieve shockless (“quasi-isentropic”) liner compression. Third, we present “micro-B-dot ” measurements of azimuthal magnetic field penetration into the initially vacuum-filled interior of a shocked liner. Our measurements and simulations reveal that the penetration commences shortly after the shockwave breaks out from the liner's inner surface. The field then accelerates this low-density “precursor” plasma to the axis of symmetry.

  17. Accelerating Thick Aluminum Liners Using Pulsed Power

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrala, G.A.; Hammerburg, J.E.; Bowers, D.; Stokes, J.; Morgan, D.V.; Anderson, W.E.; Cochrane, J.C.

    1999-06-28

    The authors have investigated the acceleration of very thick cylindrical aluminum liners using the Pegasus II capacitory bank. These accelerated solid liners will be used to impact other objects at velocities below 1.5 km/sec, allowing one to generate and sustain shocks of a few 100 kilobar for a few microseconds. A cylindrical shell of 1100 series aluminum with an initial inner radius of 23.61 mm, an initial thickness of 3.0 mm, and a height of 20 mm, was accelerated using a current pulse of 7.15 MA peak current and a 7.4 microsecond quarter cycle time. The aluminum shell was imploded within confining copper glide planes with decreasing separation with an inward slope of 8 degrees. At impact with a cylindrical target of diameter 3-cm, the liner was moving at 1.4 km/sec and its thickness increased to 4.5 mm. Radial X-ray radiograms of the liner showed both the liner and the glide plane interface. The curvature of the inner surface of the liner was measured before impact with the 15-mm radius target. The radiograms also showed that the copper glide planes distorted as the liner radius decreased and that some axial stress is induced in the liner. The axial stresses did not affect the inner curvature significantly. Post-shot calculations of the liner behavior indicated that the thickness of the glide plane played a significant role in the distortion of the interface between the liner and the glide plane.

  18. Cylindrical Liner Z-pinch Experiments on the MAGPIE Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdiak, Guy; Lebedev, Sergey V.; Harvey-Thompson, Adam J.; Swadling, George F.; Suzuki-Vidal, Francisco; Skidmore, Jonathan; Suttle, Lee; Khoory, Essa; Pickworth, Louisa; de Grouchy, Philip; Hall, Gareth N.; Bland, Simon N.; Weinwurm, Marcus; Chittenden, Jeremy P.

    2012-10-01

    Experimental data from gas-filled cylindrical liner z-pinch experiments is presented. The MAGPIE current (1.4 MA, 240 ns) is applied to a thin walled (80um) Al tube with a static gas-fill inside. The system is diagnosed axially using interferometry, optical streak photography and optical spectroscopy. We observe a series of cylindrically converging shock waves driven into the gas-fill from the inside liner surface. No bulk motion of the liner occurs. The timing of the shocks and their trajectories provide information on the shock launching mechanisms. This in turn allows a study of the response of the liner to the current pulse. Shock wave timing is compared to measurements of the liner resistance and optical images of the liner's outside surface. The system provides a useful, essentially 1D problem for testing MagLIF relevant MHD codes, particularly with regards to EOS, strength and resistivity models. This work may also be relevant to the study of shocks in astrophysical plasmas. The shocks launched into the gas radiatiate strongly; spatially resolved optical spectroscopy data and radial electron density profiles from interferometry images provide evidence for a radiative precursor ahead of the first shock. Instabilities are seen to develop in the downstream regions.

  19. Slow liner fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, M.J.

    1997-08-01

    {open_quotes}Slow{close_quotes} liner fusion ({approximately}10 ms compression time) implosions are nondestructive and make repetitive ({approximately} 1 Hz) pulsed liner fusion reactors possible. This paper summarizes a General Atomics physics-based fusion reactor study that showed slow liner feasibility, even with conservative open-line axial magnetic field confinement and Bohm radial transport.

  20. Optimized multisectioned acoustic liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1979-01-01

    A critical examination is presented of the use of optimized axially segmented acoustic liners to increase the attenuation of a liner. New calculations show that segmenting is most efficient at high frequencies with relatively long duct lengths where the attenuation is low for both uniform and segmented liners. Statistical considerations indicate little advantage in using optimized liners with more than two segments while the bandwidth of an optimized two-segment liner is shown to be nearly equal to that of a uniform liner. Multielement liner calculations show a large degradation in performance due to changes in assumed input modal structure. Finally, in order to substantiate previous and future analytical results, in-house (finite difference) and contractor (mode matching) programs are used to generate theoretical attenuations for a number of liner configurations for liners in a rectangular duct with no mean flow. Overall, the use of optimized multisectioned liners (sometimes called phased liners) fails to offer sufficient advantage over a uniform liner to warrant their use except in low frequency single mode application.

  1. Liner mounting assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halila, Ely E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A mounting assembly includes an annular supporting flange disposed coaxially about a centerline axis which has a plurality of circumferentially spaced apart supporting holes therethrough. An annular liner is disposed coaxially with the supporting flange and includes a plurality of circumferentially spaced apart mounting holes aligned with respective ones of the supporting holes. Each of a plurality of mounting pins includes a proximal end fixedly joined to the supporting flange through a respective one of the supporting holes, and a distal end disposed through a respective one of the liner mounting holes for supporting the liner to the supporting flange while unrestrained differential thermal movement of the liner relative to the supporting flange.

  2. Shock.

    PubMed

    Wacker, David A; Winters, Michael E

    2014-11-01

    Critically ill patients with undifferentiated shock are complex and challenging cases in the ED. A systematic approach to assessment and management is essential to prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality. The simplified, systematic approach described in this article focuses on determining the presence of problems with cardiac function (the pump), intravascular volume (the tank), or systemic vascular resistance (the pipes). With this approach, the emergency physician can detect life-threatening conditions and implement time-sensitive therapy. PMID:25441032

  3. The Nature of the Energy Source in LINER's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colina, L.; Koratkar, Anuradha

    1996-01-01

    LINER's (low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions) are found in about 30% of all bright galaxies, including luminous infrared galaxies. They form a heterogeneous class powered by a variety of ionizing mechanisms such as low-luminosity AGNs (active galactic nuclei), starbursts, shocks, or any combination of these. In early-type spirals, LINER's are powered by a low-luminosity AGN, or by an AGN surrounded by circumnuclear star-forming regions. In luminous infrared galaxies, LINER's are powered by starbursts with associated wind-related extended shocks, and an AGN may play a minor role, if any. LINER's in some FR I radio galaxies show strong evidence for the presence of a massive central black hole, and there are indications for the existence of shocks in the nuclear disks of these galaxies. Yet, the dominant ionizing mechanism for LINER's in radio-quiet ellipticals and FR I host galaxies is still unclear. Multifrequency high spatial resolution imaging and spectroscopy are essential to discriminate among the different ionizing mechanisms present in LINER's.

  4. Cylindrical liner Z-pinch experiments for fusion research and high-energy-density physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdiak, G. C.; Lebedev, S. V.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Swadling, G. F.; Bland, S. N.; Niasse, N.; Suttle, L.; Bennet, M.; Hare, J.; Weinwurm, M.; Rodriguez, R.; Gil, J.; Espinosa, G.

    2015-06-01

    A gas-filled cylindrical liner z-pinch configuration has been used to drive convergent radiative shock waves into different gases at velocities of 20-50 km s-1. On application of the 1.4 MA, 240 ns rise-time current pulse produced by the Magpie generator at Imperial College London, a series of cylindrically convergent shock waves are sequentially launched into the gas-fill from the inner wall of the liner. This occurs without any bulk motion of the liner wall itself. The timing and trajectories of the shocks are used as a diagnostic tool for understanding the response of the liner z-pinch wall to a large pulsed current. This analysis provides useful data on the liner resistivity, and a means to test equation of state (EOS) and material strength models within MHD simulation codes. In addition to providing information on liner response, the convergent shocks are interesting to study in their own right. The shocks are strong enough for radiation transport to influence the shock wave structure. In particular, we see evidence for both radiative preheating of material ahead of the shockwaves and radiative cooling instabilities in the shocked gas. Some preliminary results from initial gas-filled liner experiments with an applied axial magnetic field are also discussed.

  5. Combustor liner cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Berkman, Mert Enis

    2013-08-06

    A combustor liner is disclosed. The combustor liner includes an upstream portion, a downstream end portion extending from the upstream portion along a generally longitudinal axis, and a cover layer associated with an inner surface of the downstream end portion. The downstream end portion includes the inner surface and an outer surface, the inner surface defining a plurality of microchannels. The downstream end portion further defines a plurality of passages extending between the inner surface and the outer surface. The plurality of microchannels are fluidly connected to the plurality of passages, and are configured to flow a cooling medium therethrough, cooling the combustor liner.

  6. On the structure of plasma liners for plasma jet induced magnetoinertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyoungkeun; Zhang, Lina; Samulyak, Roman; Parks, Paul

    2013-02-15

    The internal structure and self-collapse properties of plasma liners, formed by the merger of argon plasma jets, have been studied via 3-dimensional numerical simulations using the FronTier code. We have shown that the jets merger process is accomplished through a cascade of oblique shock waves that heat the liner and reduce its Mach number. Oblique shock waves and the adiabatic compression heating have led to the 10 times reduction of the self-collapse pressure of a 3-dimensional argon liner compared to a spherically symmetric liner with the same pressure and density profiles at the merging radius. We have also observed a factor of 10 variations of pressure and density in the leading edge of the liner along spherical surfaces close to the interaction with potential plasma targets. Such a non-uniformity of imploding plasma liners presents problems for the stability of targets during compression.

  7. Three LINERs Under the Hubble Spectral Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, Mallory; Eracleous, Michael; Barth, Aaron J.; Maoz, Dan; Walsh, Jonelle; Ho, Luis C.; Shields, Joseph C.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of low-ionization nuclear emission regions (LINERs) harbor supermassive black holes (SMBHs) with very low accretion rates. Since SMBHs spend most of their lifetimes in these low accretion-rate states, understanding LINERs is important for understanding active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the context of galaxy evolution. On scales of ~100 pc, the energy budget of LINERs appears to be deficient when the only source of power considered is the AGN. Thus, other energy sources are likely to contribute to the excitation of the emission-line gas. To probe these sources, we observed three nearby, bright, and representative LINERs with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We specifically looked at the 0.1-1 arcsecond scale (corresponding to ~5-50 pc) to find what these energy sources are and how far from the nucleus they take over the excitation of the gas. After subtracting both the unresolved nuclear light and the spatially-extended starlight, we measured a number of diagnostic emission line ratios. We find that within 10 pc, the observed line ratios of [O III]/[O II] vs [O IIII]/H-beta are consistent with AGN photoionization. The line ratios of [N II]/H-alpha vs [O III]/H-beta show that at larger distances, the excitation mechanism is most likely consistent with hot stars or shocks. Shocks are particularly appealing in the case of NGC 4278, which harbors a Gigahetz-Peaked radio source with small jets detected by the VLBA. If hot stars are the primary excitation mechanism, these are most likely post-AGB stars (from the old stellar population). We conclude from these representative cases that the characteristic LINER emission-line spectrum does not result from a single excitation mechanism, but rather from a combination of different mechanisms within the central 100 pc of each object that varies from object to object.

  8. Combustor liner durability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, V.

    1981-01-01

    An 18 month combustor liner durability analysis program was conducted to evaluate the use of advanced three dimensional transient heat transfer and nonlinear stress-strain analyses for modeling the cyclic thermomechanical response of a simulated combustor liner specimen. Cyclic life prediction technology for creep/fatigue interaction is evaluated for a variety of state-of-the-art tools for crack initiation and propagation. The sensitivity of the initiation models to a change in the operating conditions is also assessed.

  9. High energy imploding liner experiment HEL-1: Experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.A.; Anderson, B.G.; Ekdahl, C.A.

    1997-09-01

    Magnetically driven imploding liner systems can be used as a source of shock energy for materials equation of state studies, implosion driven magnetized plasma fusion experiments, and other similar applications. The imploding liner is a cylinder of conducting material through which a current is passed in the longitudinal direction. Interaction of the current with its own magnetic field causes the liner to implode. Sources of electrical energy for imploding liner systems are capacitor banks or explosive pulse power systems seeded by capacitor banks. In August, 1996, a high energy liner experiment (HEL-1) was conducted at the All-Russia Scientific Research Institute (VNIIEF) in Sarov, Russia. A 5 tier 1 meter diameter explosive disk generator provided electrical energy to drive a 48 cm outside diameter, 4 mm thick, aluminum alloy liner having a mass of about 11kg onto an 11 cm diameter diagnostic package. The purpose of the experiment was to measure performance of the explosive pulse power generator and the heavy imploding liner. Electrical performance diagnostics included inductive (B-dot) probes, Faraday Rotation current measurement, Rogowski total current measurement, and voltage probes. Flux loss and conductor motion diagnostics included current-joint voltage measurements and motion sensing contact pins. Optical and electrical impact pins, inductive (B-dot) probes, manganin pressure probes, and continuously recording resistance probes in the Central Measuring Unit (CMU) and Piezo and manganin pressure probes, optical beam breakers, and inductive probes located in the glide planes were used as liner symmetry and velocity diagnostics. Preliminary analysis of the data indicate that a peak current of more than 100 MA was attained and the liner velocity was between 6.7 km/sec and 7.5 km/sec. Liner kinetic energy was between 22 MJ and 35 MJ. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Precision solid liner experiments on Pegasus II

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, R.L.; Brownell, J.H.; Lee, H.

    1995-09-01

    Pulsed power systems have been used in the past to drive solid liner implosions for a variety of applications. In combination with a variety of target configurations, solid liner drivers can be used to compress working fluids, produce shock waves, and study material properties in convergent geometry. The utility of such a driver depends in part on how well-characterized the drive conditions are. This, in part, requires a pulsed power system with a well-characterized current wave form and well understood electrical parameters. At Los Alamos, the authors have developed a capacitively driven, inductive store pulsed power machine, Pegasus, which meets these needs. They have also developed an extensive suite of diagnostics which are capable of characterizing the performance of the system and of the imploding liners. Pegasus consists of a 4.3 MJ capacitor bank, with a capacitance of 850 {micro}f fired with a typical initial bank voltage of 90 kV or less. The bank resistance is about 0.5 m{Omega}, and bank plus power flow channel has a total inductance of about 24 nH. In this paper the authors consider the theory and modeling of the first precision solid liner driver fielded on the LANL Pegasus pulsed power facility.

  11. Mechanical behavior of tungsten shaped charge liner materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.

    1993-08-01

    Radiographs of jets produced by shaped charges with tungsten liners have documented both ductile and brittle breakup behavior. The relationships between the varying breakup behavior of tungsten shaped charge jets and metallurgical characteristics and/or mechanical behavior of the liner are not understood. In this paper the mechanical behavior of warm-forged and chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) tungsten is discussed relative to the typical deformation history of an element of liner material which becomes part of the jet. The analyses suggest the following: (1) tungsten liner material is damaged, or possibly pulverized, during shock loading at the high-explosive detonation front; (2) pulverized material is consolidated in the convergence zone under conditions of high pressure, and (3) variations in observed breakup behavior of tungsten may be related to high temperature embrittlement. The low temperature ductile-brittle transition temperature of tungsten (DBTT) is not believed to be directly related to observed variations in break-up behavior of jets.

  12. Investigation of HE driven cylindrical liner

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Tai-Ho

    1995-03-01

    We developed a technique that can compress most materials to densities much higher than their original values and shock them hard enough to undergo phase changes to various partially ionized states. The process involves using high explosives to drive a thin cylindrical liner so that it will progressively implode and converge along the axis at very high velocity. The device is simple yet versatile. Its configuration is ideally suited as a compact laboratory for the investigation of the behavior of dense media under extreme conditions. Code simulations show that liners made from most metals can be successfully imploded to converge on axis, producing over 10 MB pressure. For example, a 2D hydrocode calculation predicts that in a simple configuration where a hollow core PBX-9501 explosive cylinder is corner initiated to drive a thin seamless 304 SS tubing, the final convergence velocity can exceed 1 cm/[Ls to produce a 15 MB pressure at impact as the density increases to 19.5 g/cc. The temperature from shock heating rises rapidly above 8 eV, and the result is a combination of radiation and plasma emissions. We have carried out several experiments with a wide array of diagnostics to investigate the implosion dynamics and final state interaction phenomena, and the results are compared with the code predictions. Radiographs of the liner implosion strongly indicate that the hydrodynamic processes are well behaved and calculable. Temperature measurement from the optical radiation is generally consistent with the code prediction. The velocity of the plasma front is measured by using optical pins and fast framing photography, and is found to lie between 11--17 cm/{mu}s. Fast framing photographs were taken with the aid of self luminous light to observe the evacuated chamber inside the imploding liner. The experimental results and their comparison with the calculation are discussed.

  13. Ultraviolet spectrophotometry of three LINERs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, R. W.; Keel, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    Three galaxies known to be LINERs were observed spectroscopically in the ultraviolet in an attempt to detect the presumed nonthermal continuum source thought to be the source of photoionization in the nuclei. NGC 4501 was found to be too faint for study with the IUE spectrographs, while NGC 5005 had an extended ultraviolet light profile. Comparison with the optical light profile of NGC 5005 indicates that the ultraviolet source is distributed spatially in the same manner as the optical starlight, probably indicating that the ultraviolet excess is due to a component of hot stars in the nucleus. These stars contribute detectable absorption features longward of 2500 A; together with optical data, the IUE spectra suggest a burst of star formation about 1 billion yr ago, with a lower rate continuing to produce a few OB stars. In NGC 4579, a point source contributing most of the ultraviolet excess is found that is much different than the optical light distribution. Furthermore, the ultraviolet to X-ray spectral index in NGC 4579 is 1.4, compatible with the UV to X-ray indices found for samples of Seyfert galaxies. This provides compelling evidence for the detection of the photoionizing continuum in NGC 4579 and draws the research fields of normal galaxies and active galactic nuclei closer together. The emission-line spectrum of NGC 4579 is compared with calculations from a photoionization code, CLOUDY, and several shock models. The photoionization code is found to give superior results, adding to the increasing weight of evidence that the LINER phenomenon is essentially a scaled-down version of the Seyfert phenomenon.

  14. One-Liners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathaway, Nan

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an exercise appropriate for all grade levels. This exercise is based on a book of Picasso's contour drawings called "Picasso's One-Liners," which combines a delightful assortment of one-line drawings with accompanying one-line quotes. Students are given a stack of copy paper and a black fine-tip marker. Students then take…

  15. Unveiling the liner nature of NGC1052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniz, S. I. F.; Pastoriza, M. G.; Riffel, R.; Riffel, R. A.; Diniz, M. R.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.

    2014-10-01

    NGC 1052 is an E4 galaxy and classified as a typical LINER harboring a stellar rotating disk. However, the central region is spectroscopically unusual with broad optical emission lines, the nature of its emission line gas remains unclear. According to recent studies NGC 1052 exhibit Hα luminosities an order of magnitude above that estimated for an evolved population of extreme horizontal branch stars. Their Hα equivalent widths and optical-to-near infrared (NIR) spectral energy distributions are consistent with them being young stellar clusters aged < 7 Myr, and according to previous works, NGC 1052 may have experienced a merger event about 1 Gyr ago. There are mainly three possibilities to explain LINER's spectra: i) post asymptotic giant branch stars (post-AGB) that ionize their rapidly expanding shells, (ii) active galactic nuclei (AGNs) powered by the in fall of matter into an accretion disk, and (iii) shocks. The stellar population (SP) of AGNs shows an excess of intermediate age stars. Besides, NIR stellar population studies have revealed that the continuum of active galaxies is dominated by the contribution of intermediate age stellar populations. Hot dust emission unresolved is also commonly detected in NIR nuclear spectra of galaxies Seyfert and LINERs. Aimed to discriminate the dominant ionizing source of NGC 1052 we present preliminary results of high spatial resolution integral field spectroscopy, taken with gemini NIFS to map the dominant stellar population, as well as disentangling the featureless and hot dust components.

  16. Configuration Effects on Liner Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Brown, Martha C.; Jones, Michael G.; Howerton, Brian M.

    2012-01-01

    The acoustic performance of a duct liner depends not only on the intrinsic properties of the liner but also on the configuration of the duct in which it is used. A series of experiments is performed in the NASA Langley Research Center Curved Duct Test Rig (at Mach 0.275) to evaluate the effect of duct configuration on the acoustic performance of single degree of freedom perforate-over-honeycomb liners. The liners form the sidewalls of the duct's test section. Variations of duct configuration include: asymmetric (liner on one side and hard wall opposite) and symmetric (liner on both sides) wall treatment; inlet and exhaust orientation, in which the sound propagates either against or with the flow; and straight and curved flow path. The effect that duct configuration has on the overall acoustic performance, particularly the shift in frequency and magnitude of peak attenuation, is quantified. The redistribution of incident mode content is shown. The liners constitute the side walls of the liner test section and the scatter of incident horizontal order 1 mode by the asymmetric treatment and order 2 mode by the symmetric treatment into order 0 mode is shown. Scatter of order 0 incident modes into higher order modes is also shown. This redistribution of mode content is significant because it indicates that the liner design can be manipulated such that energy is scattered into more highly attenuated modes, thus enhancing liner performance.

  17. Preparations to ship EPICOR liners

    SciTech Connect

    Queen, S P

    1983-06-01

    The sampling and analysis of the hydrogen rich atmosphere of the 49 EPICOR II ion-exchange prefilter liners generated in the decontamination of radioactive water at TMI-2 will provide data to ensure safe storage and shipment of highly loaded ion-exchange media. This report discusses the prototype gas sampling tool used to breech the containment of the liners, the tool support equipment for sampling and inerting the liners, and the characterization program used for determining the radiolytic hydrogen generation rates in the liners.

  18. Manufacturing Complicated Shells And Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobol, Paul J.; Faucher, Joseph E.

    1993-01-01

    Explosive forming, wax filling, and any one of welding, diffusion bonding, or brazing used in method of manufacturing large, complicated shell-and-liner vessels or structures. Method conceived for manufacture of film-cooled rocket nozzles but applicable to joining large coaxial shells and liners in general.

  19. Exploring a Detonation Nature of Mesoscopic Perturbations and Ejecta Formation from the Mesoscale Probing of the PBX-driven Liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaksin, Igor; Guiruis, Raafat; Rodrigues, Luis; Mendes, Ricardo; Plaksin, Svyatoslav; Fernandes, Eduardo; Ferreira, Claudia

    2015-06-01

    Ejecting debris from free surface of liner is of considerable interest at optimization of explosive devices, in which the PBX-driven liner effects shock compression of gaseous matter. Following factors were historically considered as main drivers of material ejection: granular microstructure of liner material, roughness and surface defects of liner, and shock pressure time history in PBX-driven liner. In contrast to existing models, we are considering the small scale fluctuations of detonation flow as probable dominating factor of surface jetting in the PBX-driven collapsing liners. Obtained experimental evidence is indicative that jetting from the liners is caused by meso-scale perturbations of PBX detonations, which are identified as (1) ejecta of overdriven detonation products through detonation front, (2) ejecta-driven detonation cells, and (3) galloping detonation front motion. Spatially resolved scenarios of each of phenomena (1-3) were obtained in experiments with copper-liners and HMX-based PBXs fabricated on maximum packing density of crystalline constituents. Both the DRZ-induced perturbations translated to a PBX-driven liner and the ejected debris were recorded and quantitatively measured in the mesoscale range with application of the 96-channel optical analyzer MCOA-UC. Work was supported by the ONR and ONR Global Grants N00014-12-1-0477 and N62909-12-1-7131 with Drs. Clifford Bedford and John Zimmerman Program Managers.

  20. ACOUSTIC LINERS FOR TURBOFAN ENGINES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minner, G. L.

    1994-01-01

    This program was developed to design acoustic liners for turbofan engines. This program combines results from theoretical models of wave alternation in acoustically treated passages with experimental data from full-scale fan noise suppressors. By including experimentally obtained information, the program accounts for real effects such as wall boundary layers, duct terminations, and sound modal structure. The program has its greatest use in generating a number of design specifications to be used for evaluation of trade-offs. The program combines theoretical and empirical data in designing annular acoustic liners. First an estimate of the noise output of the fan is made based on basic fan aerodynamic design variables. Then, using a target noise spectrum after alternation and the estimated fan noise spectrum, a design spectrum is calculated as their difference. Next, the design spectrum is combined with knowledge of acoustic liner performance and the liner design variables to specify the acoustic design. Details of the liner design are calculated by combining the required acoustic impedance with a mathematical model relating acoustic impedance to the physical structure of the liner. Input to the noise prediction part of the program consists of basic fan operating parameters, distance that the target spectrum is to be measured and the target spectrum. The liner design portion of the program requires the required alternation spectrum, desired values of length to height and several option selection parameters. Output from the noise prediction portion is a noise spectrum consisting of discrete tones and broadband noise. This may be used as input to the liner design portion of the program. The liner design portion of the program produces backing depths, open area ratios, and face plate thicknesses. This program is written in FORTRAN V and has been implemented in batch mode on a UNIVAC 1100 series computer with a central memory requirement of 12K (decimal) of 36 bit words.

  1. Liner setting tool and method

    SciTech Connect

    Baugh, J.L.; Fraser, J.M. III; Melenyzer, G.J.

    1989-07-18

    This paper describes a liner setting apparatus for setting a liner suspended from a tubular string in a subterranean well and for releasing from a set liner hanger to permit retrieval of the liner setting apparatus and the tubular string. The liner hanger including gripping members for bitting engagement with side walls of the wellbore in response to axial movement of the tubular string, the liner setting apparatus, and the liner within the well bore, and interior threads for threaded engagement and disengagement with the liner setting apparatus. The liner setting apparatus comprising: a tubular mandrel; a nut positioned about the tubular mandrel; a setting ring assembly positioned about the tubular mandrel and axially spaced between the nut and the upper end of the tubular mandrel. The setting ring assembly including: an annular torque control ring, one or more fingers each axially movable with respect to the torque control ring; a plurality of sleeves each positioned about the tubular mandrel and axially movable with respect to the torque control ring and with respect to each other, an actuating member radially moveable from a lock position such that the actuating member is within one of the plurality of locking recesses and the locking sleeves are axially adjacent each other, to an unlock position such that the actuating member is moved radially outwardly by engagement with the ramp surface during axial movement of the annular setting ring assembly, such that the actuating member separates the sleeves axially during radially outward movement thereof and thereby axially moves each of the one or more fingers to the unlock position.

  2. Pulsed-Power Driven Liner-On-Target Hydrodynamics Experiments Diagnosed with Proton Radiography using PHELIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oro, D. M.; Rousculp, C. L.; Reass, W. A.; Griego, J. R.; Turchi, P. J.; Reinovsky, R. E.; Saunders, A.; Mariam, F. G.; Morris, C.

    2015-06-01

    The Precision High Energy-density Liner Implosion eXperiment, PHELIX, is a pulsed-power driver capable of delivering multi-mega-ampere currents to cylindrical loads. The pulsed-power system utilizes a high-efficiency transformer to couple a small capacitor bank (~400 kJ) to a ~5 cm diameter cylindrical Al liner. A peak current of ~4 MA causes the liner to implode in 20 - 30 μs and attain speeds of >1 km/s. The PHELIX system is designed to be compatible with the Los Alamos proton radiography facility. Initial experiments with PHELIX explore shocked-ejected particle transport into gas in converging geometries. For these experiments a liner-on-target configuration is employed. To control the initial conditions, micron-sized tungsten particles are used in place of shock-formed ejecta. The inner surface of the cylindrical target is coated with a 0.1 mm uniform layer of W powder. The liner impacts the target generating a shock that launches the W particles off the target surface. The time history of the trajectory of the shocked-ejected particulate is captured in 21 proton radiographs recorded during the experiment. Comparison of 3 experiments, one into vacuum, one into Ar at 8.3 bars and one into Xe at 8.3 bars are discussed. Results are compared to simulations. Work supported by United States-DOE under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  3. FGD liner experiments with wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsch, W.J.; Ahn, C.; Wolfe, W.E.

    1999-07-01

    The construction of artificial wetlands for wastewater treatment often requires impermeable liners not only to protect groundwater resources but also to ensure that there is adequate water in the wetland to support appropriate aquatic life, particularly wetland vegetation. Liners or relatively impervious site soils are very important to the success of constructed treatment wetlands in areas where ground water levels are typically close to the ground surface. This study, carried out at the Olentangy River Wetland Research Park, investigated the use of FGD material from sulfur scrubbers as a possible liner material for constructed wetlands. While several studies have investigated the use of FGD material to line ponds, no studies have investigated the use of this material as a liner for constructed wetlands. They used experimental mesocosms to see the effect of FGD liner materials in constructed wetlands on water quality and on wetland plant growth. This paper presents the results of nutrient analyses and physicochemical investigation of leachate and surface outflow water samples collected from the mesocosms. Plant growth and biomass of wetland vegetation are also included in this paper. First two year results are reported by Ahn et al. (1998, 1999). The overall goal of this study is the identification of advantages and disadvantages of using FGD by-product as an artificial liner in constructed wetlands.

  4. Beryllium liner implosion experiments on the Z accelerator in preparation for Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF)*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Ryan D.

    2012-10-01

    Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) [1] is a concept that involves using a pulsed electrical current to implode an initially-solid, cylindrical metal tube (liner) filled with preheated and magnetized fusion fuel. One- and two-dimensional simulations predict that if sufficient liner integrity can be maintained throughout the implosion, then significant fusion yield (>100 kJ) is possible on the 25-MA, 100-ns Z accelerator. The greatest threat to the liner integrity is the Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability, which first develops on the outer liner surface, and then works its way inward toward the inner surface throughout the implosion. Two-dimensional simulations predict that a thick liner, with Router/δR=6, should be robust enough to keep the MRT instability from overly disrupting the fusion burn at stagnation. This talk will present the first experiments designed to study a thick, MagLIF-relevant liner implosion through to stagnation on Z [2]. The use of beryllium for the liner material enabled us to obtain penetrating monochromatic (6151±0.5 eV) radiographs that reveal information about the entire volume of the imploding liner. This talk will also discuss experiments that investigated Z's pulse-shaping capabilities to either shock- or shocklessly-compress the imploding liners [3], as well as our most recent experiments that used 2-micron-thick aluminum sleeves to provide high-contrast tracers for the positions and states of the inner surfaces of the imploding beryllium liners. The radiography data to be presented provide stringent constraints on the simulation tools used by the broader high energy density physics and inertial confinement fusion communities, where quantitative areal density measurements, particularly of convergent fusion targets, are relatively scarce. We will also present power-flow tests of the MagLIF load hardware as well as new micro-B-dot measurements of the azimuthal drive magnetic field that penetrates the initially vacuum

  5. Formation of imploding plasma liners for fundamental HEDP studies and MIF Standoff Driver Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Cassibry, Jason; Hatcher, Richard; Stanic, Milos

    2013-08-17

    The disciplines of High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) are characterized by hypervelocity implosions and strong shocks. The Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) is focused on reaching HEDP and/or ICF relevant regimes in excess of 1 Mbar peak pressure by the merging and implosion of discrete plasma jets, as a potentially efficient path towards these extreme conditions in a laboratory. In this work we have presented the first 3D simulations of plasma liner, formation, and implosion by the merging of discrete plasma jets in which ionization, thermal conduction, and radiation are all included in the physics model. The study was conducted by utilizing a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code (SPHC) and was a part of the plasma liner experiment (PLX). The salient physics processes of liner formation and implosion are studied, namely vacuum propagation of plasma jets, merging of the jets (liner forming), implosion (liner collapsing), stagnation (peak pressure), and expansion (rarefaction wave disassembling the target). Radiative transport was found to significantly reduce the temperature of the liner during implosion, thus reducing the thermal leaving more pronounced gradients in the plasma liner during the implosion compared with ideal hydrodynamic simulations. These pronounced gradients lead to a greater sensitivity of initial jet geometry and symmetry on peak pressures obtained. Accounting for ionization and transport, many cases gave higher peak pressures than the ideal hydrodynamic simulations. Scaling laws were developed accordingly, creating a non-dimensional parameter space in which performance of an imploding plasma jet liner can be estimated. It is shown that HEDP regimes could be reached with ~ 5 MJ of liner energy, which would translate to roughly 10 to 20 MJ of stored (capacitor) energy. This is a potentially significant improvement over the currently available means via ICF of achieving HEDP and nuclear fusion relevant parameters.

  6. 2D HYDRA Calculations of Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor Growth and Feedthrough in Cylindrical Liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, Matthew; Zhang, Peng; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Peterson, Kyle; Hess, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Cylindrical liner implosions are susceptible to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRT), along with the azimuthal current-carrying modes (sausage, kink, etc). ``Feedthrough'' of these instabilities has a strong influence on the integrity of the liner/fuel interface in the magnetized liner inertial fusion concept (MagLIF). The linearized ideal MHD equations can be solved to quantify these effects, including the presence of an effective gravity and an axial magnetic field. We investigate the potential of this field to mitigate feedthrough, due to MRT growth from various initial surface finishes (seeded, rough), throughout the implosion using our analytic results and the LLNL code, HYDRA. We will present both low and high convergence cases. Lastly, we illustrate the effect shock compression can have on feedthrough in seeded liners for various fill gases (cold and pre-heated) and magnetic field configurations. M. R. Weis was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories.

  7. Surface treatment using metal foil liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvey, Ray

    1989-01-01

    A metal foil liner can be used to seal large area surfaces. Characteristics of the two-layer foil liner are discussed. Micrographs for foil-to-foil, foil-to-composite, visible seams, and hidden seams are examined.

  8. Advanced Turbofan Duct Liner Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielak, Gerald W.; Premo, John W.; Hersh, Alan S.

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Program goal is to reduce aircraft noise by 10 EPNdB by the year 2000 relative, to 1992 technology. The improvement goal for nacelle attenuation is 25% relative to 1992 technology by 1997 and 50% by 2000. The Advanced Turbofan Duct Liner Concepts Task work by Boeing presented in this document was in support of these goals. The basis for the technical approach was a Boeing study conducted in 1993-94 under NASA/FAA contract NAS1-19349, Task 6, investigating broadband acoustic liner concepts. As a result of this work, it was recommended that linear double layer, linear and perforate triple layer, parallel element, and bulk absorber liners be further investigated to improve nacelle attenuations. NASA LaRC also suggested that "adaptive" liner concepts that would allow "in-situ" acoustic impedance control also be considered. As a result, bias flow and high-temperature liner concepts were also added to the investigation. The major conclusion from the above studies is that improvements in nacelle liner average acoustic impedance characteristics alone will not result in 25% increased nacelle noise reduction relative to 1992 technology. Nacelle design advancements currently being developed by Boeing are expected to add 20-40% more acoustic lining to hardwall regions in current inlets, which is predicted to result in and additional 40-80% attenuation improvement. Similar advancements are expected to allow 10-30% more acoustic lining in current fan ducts with 10-30% more attenuation expected. In addition, Boeing is currently developing a scarf inlet concept which is expected to give an additional 40-80% attenuation improvement for equivalent lining areas.

  9. High Temperature Acoustic Liner Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Jones, Michael G.; Posey, Joe W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes work currently in progress at Langley on liner concepts that employ structures that may be suitable for broadband exhaust noise attenuation in high speed flow environments and at elevated temperatures characteristic of HSCT applications. Because such liners will need to provide about 10 dB suppression over a 2 to 3 octave frequency range, conventional single-degree-of-freedom resonant structures will not suffice. Bulk absorbers have the needed broadband absorption characteristic; however, at lower frequencies they tend to be inefficient.

  10. Reinforcing Liner For Composite Cryogenic Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgeson, John E.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed fiber-reinforced liner for graphite/epoxy fuel tank prevents metal-foil leakage barrier from detaching at low temperatures. Consists of epoxy containing fibers of Spectra 1000. Tank holds inner layers of foil, adhesive, and proposed liner. Liner much thinner than shell, adds little weight, and subtracts little volume. Lined composite tank used to hold liquids from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures. Not suitable for oxygen, because organic materials in liner oxidized quickly.

  11. EVALUATION OF LANDFILL-LINER DESIGNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effectiveness of landfill-liner designs is evaluated in terms of the slope, drainage length, and saturated hydraulic conductivity of the lateral drainage layer, the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the soil liner, and the fraction of the area under a synthetic liner where ...

  12. Preventing Cracks in Silicon-Reactor Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutwack, R.

    1987-01-01

    Correct placement helps prevent contamination while eliminating crack-causing deposits. Repositioning quartz liner in silicon fluidized-bed reactor prevents cracking of liner when cools. Liner protects stainless-steel walls of reactor from abrasion by particles in fluidized bed. Prevents contamination of newly formed silicon by material abraded from wall and ensures high-quality product.

  13. Acoustic Liner for Turbomachinery Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Jones, Michael G.; Hebsur, Mohan G.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this innovation is to reduce aircraft noise in the communities surrounding airports by significantly attenuating the noise generated by the turbomachinery, and enhancing safety by providing a containment barrier for a blade failure. Acoustic liners are used in today's turbofan engines to reduce noise. The amount of noise reduction from an acoustic liner is a function of the treatment area, the liner design, and the material properties, and limited by the constraints of the nacelle or casement design. It is desirable to increase the effective area of the acoustic treatment to increase noise suppression. Modern turbofan engines use wide-chord rotor blades, which means there is considerable treatment area available over the rotor tip. Turbofan engines require containment over the rotors for protection from blade failure. Traditional methods use a material wrap such as Kevlar integrated with rub strips and sometimes metal layers (sandwiches). It is possible to substitute the soft rub-strip material with an open-cell metallic foam that provides noise-reduction benefits and a sacrificial material in the first layer of the containment system. An open-cell foam was evaluated that behaves like a bulk acoustic liner, serves as a tip rub strip, and can be integrated with a rotor containment system. Foams can be integrated with the fan-containment system to provide sufficient safety margins and increased noise attenuation. The major innovation is the integration of the foam with the containment.

  14. Characterization of EPICOR II Prefilter Liner 16

    SciTech Connect

    Yesso, J D; Pasupathi, V; Lowry, L

    1982-08-01

    As part of the overall TMI-2 Information and Examination Program, EPICOR II Prefilter Liner 16 was examined to provide information to aid in the development of technology for safely processing highly loaded ion-exchange media. The characterization program included sampling and analyses of the liner contents, including ion-exchange media, liquids and gases, as well as examinations of the liner interior and exterior. This report details the handling of the liner, sampling and analysis of the contents, and the examinations of the liner.

  15. Segmented ceramic liner for induction furnaces

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, A.H.; Holcombe, C.E.

    1994-07-26

    A non-fibrous ceramic liner for induction furnaces is provided by vertically stackable ring-shaped liner segments made of ceramic material in a light-weight cellular form. The liner segments can each be fabricated as a single unit or from a plurality of arcuate segments joined together by an interlocking mechanism. Also, the liner segments can be formed of a single ceramic material or can be constructed of multiple concentric layers with the layers being of different ceramic materials and/or cellular forms. Thermomechanically damaged liner segments are selectively replaceable in the furnace. 5 figs.

  16. Segmented ceramic liner for induction furnaces

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, Andrew H.; Holcombe, Cressie E.

    1994-01-01

    A non-fibrous ceramic liner for induction furnaces is provided by vertically stackable ring-shaped liner segments made of ceramic material in a light-weight cellular form. The liner segments can each be fabricated as a single unit or from a plurality of arcuate segments joined together by an interlocking mechanism. Also, the liner segments can be formed of a single ceramic material or can be constructed of multiple concentric layers with the layers being of different ceramic materials and/or cellular forms. Thermomechanically damaged liner segments are selectively replaceable in the furnace.

  17. Accommodation of liquid metal by cavity liners

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppson, D.W.

    1989-03-01

    Present liquid metal breeder reactor cell liner designs appear adequate to contain postulated leakages of lithium-lead alloy in an air or steam atmosphere and to contain lithium when inert atmospheres are present. If an air or steam atmosphere may be present in a cavity where lithium amy accumulate under postulated accident conditions, then consideration of stainless steel liners and further testing is recommended. Lithium testing of faulted liners should also be considered. SOFIRE II and WATRe computer codes may be useful in establishing liner design requirements and in determining water release from concrete behind the liners (potential hydrogen production) for postulated leakages to steel-lined concrete cavities.

  18. Novel Materials for Prosthetic Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragolta, Carolina I.; Morford, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Existing materials for prosthetic liners tend to be thick and airtight, causing perspiration to accumulate inside the liner and potentially causing infection and injury that reduce quality of life. The purpose of this project was to examine the suitability of aerogel for prosthetic liner applications. Three tests were performed on several types of aerogel to assess the properties of each material. Moisture vapor permeability was tested by incubating four aerogel varieties with an artificial sweat solution at 37.0 C and less than 20% relative humidity for 24 hours. Two aerogel varieties were eliminated from the study due to difficulties in handling the material, and further testing proceeded with Pyrogel in 2.0 and 6.0 mm thicknesses. Force distribution was tested by compressing samples under a load of 4448 N at a rate of 2.5 mm/min. Biofilm formation was tested in a high-shear CDC Biofilm Reactor. Results showed that 2.0 mm Pyrogel blanket allowed 55.7 plus or minus 28.7% of an artificial sweat solution to transpire, and 35.5 plus or minus 27.8% transpired through 6.0 mm Pyrogel blanket. Samples also outperformed the load-bearing capabilities of existing liner materials. No statistically significant difference was found between the two Pyrogel thicknesses for either moisture vapor permeability or force distribution. In addition, biofilm formation results showed no change between the two Pyrogel thicknesses. The breathability and load bearing properties of aerogel make it a suitable material for application to prosthetic liners.

  19. Filling The Gap of LINERs' SED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curell, Gerold; Petersen, Vaughn; Flohic, Helene

    2016-01-01

    Low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) are found in nearly half of nearby galaxies. Some of the active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in these galaxies may harbor radiatively inefficient accretion flows (RIAFs), which may launch powerful outflows in the form of jets and wind. These outflows can influence the growth of the AGN by feedback. The spectral energy distribution (SED) of the AGN can help us determine which LINERs have RIAFs. However, published SEDs of LINERs are sparse and lack the data needed to constrain the accretion flow models.In order to build more complete SEDs of LINERs, we present the results of observations of 4 LINERS with APEX in the sub-mm. We also analyzed archival observations of 4 LINERS with ALMA. Finally, we put upper limits on the gamma-ray flux of 12 LINERS with archival FERMI observations.

  20. Liner conformality in ionized magnetron sputter metal deposition processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaguchi, S.; Rossnagel, S.M.

    1996-07-01

    The conformality of thin metal films (liners) formed on high-aspect-ratio trench structures in ionized magnetron sputter deposition processes is studied numerically and experimentally. The numerical simulator (SHADE) used to predict the surface topography is based on the shock-tracking method for surface evolution. The simulation results are in good agreement with experimentally observed thin-film topography. It is shown that combination of direct deposition and trench-bottom resputtering results in good conformality of step coverages and the amount of the resputtering needed for the good conformality is almost independent of trench aspect ratios. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  1. Liner/target/CMU cassette design and fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Griego, Jeffrey Randall

    2011-01-07

    As part of an ongoing collaboration in pulsed power technology and condensed matter shock physics with RFNCNNIIEF, the initial design for the target and central measuring unit (CMU) for a high-pressure, high-precision ({approx}1 %), Hugoniot, equation of state (EOS) experiment is shown. VNIIEF would design and construct the disk explosive magnetic generator (DEMG) with peak currents {approx}100 MA, and cylindrical liner system with peak velocity {approx}10-20 km/s. LANL would design and construct the target and velocimetry diagnostic system. The initial mechanical design features a 2 cm diameter target system and a 1 cm diameter CMU with 32 lines of sight for PDV.

  2. One-and-Two-Dimensional Simulations of Liner Performance at Atlas Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Keinigs, R.K.; Atchison, W.L.; Faehl, R.J.; Mclenithan, K.D.; Trainor, R.J.

    1998-10-18

    The authors report results of one-and-two-dimensional MHD simulations of an imploding heavy liner in Z-pinch geometry. The driving current has a pulse shape and peak current characteristic of the Atlas pulsed-power facility being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. One-dimensional simulations of heavy composite liners driven by 30 MA currents can achieve velocities on the order of 14 km/sec. Used to impact a tungsten target, the liner produces shock pressures of approximately fourteen megabars. The first 2-D simulations of imploding liners driven at Atlas current parameters are also described. These simulations have focused on the interaction of the liner with the glide planes, and the effect of realistic surface perturbations on the dynamics of the pinch. It is found that the former interaction does not seriously affect the inner liner surface. Results from the second problem indicate that a surface perturbation having amplitude as small as 0.2 {micro}m can have a significant effect on the implosion dynamics.

  3. Segmented Liner to Control Mode Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Jones, Michael G.; Brown, Martha C.

    2013-01-01

    The acoustic performance of duct liners can be improved by segmenting the treatment. In a segmented liner treatment, one stage of liner reduces the target sound and scatters energy into other acoustic modes, which are attenuated by a subsequent stage. The Curved Duct Test Rig is an experimental facility in which sound incident on the liner can be generated in a specific mode and the scatter of energy into other modes can be quantified. A series of experiments is performed in which the baseline configuration is asymmetric, that is, a liner is on one side wall of the test duct and the wall opposite is acoustically hard. Segmented liner treatment is achieved by progressively replacing sections of the hard wall opposite with liner in the axial direction, from 25% of the wall surface to 100%. It is found that the energy scatter from the (0,0) to the (0,1) mode reduces as the percentage of opposite wall treatment increases, and the frequency of peak attenuation shifts toward higher frequency. Similar results are found when the incident mode is of order (0,1) and scatter is into the (0,0) mode. The propagation code CDUCT-LaRC is used to predict the effect of liner segmenting on liner performance. The computational results show energy scatter and the effect of liner segmentation that agrees with the experimental results. The experiments and computations both show that segmenting the liner treatment is effective to control the scatter of incident mode energy into other modes. CDUCT-LaRC is shown to be a valuable tool to predict trends of liner performance with liner configuration.

  4. IRIDIUM LINER FOR NASA 5 LBF CLASS MATERIAL TEST CHAMBER IRIDIUM LINER FOR ATLANTIC RESEARCH CORPORA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    IRIDIUM LINER FOR NASA 5 LBF CLASS MATERIAL TEST CHAMBER IRIDIUM LINER FOR ATLANTIC RESEARCH CORPORATION 5 LBF CLASS ROCKET CHAMBER 25 LBF CLASS 75 HFC 25 TAC CERAMIC COMPOSITE ROCKET CHAMBER FROM REFRACTURY COMPOSITES INC. PURCHASE ORDER C-551941-

  5. Graphical Acoustic Liner Design and Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howerton, Brian M. (Inventor); Jones, Michael G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An interactive liner design and impedance modeling tool comprises software utilized to design acoustic liners for use in constrained spaces, both regularly and irregularly shaped. A graphical user interface allows the acoustic channel geometry to be drawn in a liner volume while the surface impedance calculations are updated and displayed in real-time. A one-dimensional transmission line model may be used as the basis for the impedance calculations.

  6. Elastomer liners for geothermal tubulars Y267 EPDM Liner Program:

    SciTech Connect

    Hirasuna, A.R.; Davis, D.L.; Flickinger, J.E.; Stephens, C.A.

    1987-12-01

    The elastomer, Y267 EPDM, has been identified as a hydrothermally stable material which can operate at temperatures in excess of 320/sup 0/C. The goal of the Y267 Liner Program was to demonstrate the feasibility of using this material as a liner for mild steel tubulars to prevent or mitigate corrosion. If successful, the usage of EPDM lined pipe by the geothermal community may have a significant impact on operating costs and serve as a viable alternative to the use of alloyed tubulars. Tooling procedures were developed under this program to mold a 0.64 cm (0.25'') thick Y267 EPDM liner into a tubular test section 61 cm (2') in length and 19.1 cm (7.5'') in diameter (ID). A successful effort was made to identify a potential coupling agent to be used to bond the elastomer to the steel tubular wall. This agent was found to withstand the processing conditions associated with curing the elastomer at 288/sup 0/C and to retain a significant level of adhesive strength following hydrothermal testing in a synthetic brine at 260/sup 0/C for a period of 166 hours. Bonding tests were conducted on specimens of mild carbon steel and several alloys including Hastelloy C-276. An objective of the program was to field test the lined section of pipe mentioned above at a geothermal facility in the Imperial Valley. Though a test was conducted, problems encountered during the lining operation precluded an encouraging outcome. The results of the field demonstration were inconclusive. 6 refs., 13 figs., 13 tabs

  7. Effects of Liner Geometry on Acoustic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Tracy, Maureen B.; Watson, Willie R.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2002-01-01

    Current aircraft engine nacelles typically contain acoustic liners consisting of perforated sheets bonded onto honeycomb cavities. Numerous models have been developed to predict the acoustic impedance of these liners in the presence of grazing flow, and to use that information with aeroacoustic propagation codes to assess nacelle liner noise suppression. Recent efforts have provided advances in impedance education methodologies that offer more accurate determinations of acoustic liner properties in the presence of grazing flow. The current report provides the results of a parametric study, in which a finite element method was used to assess the effects of variations of the following geometric parameters on liner impedance, with and without the presence of grazing flow: percent open area, sheet thickness, sheet thickness-to-hole diameter ratio and cavity depth. Normal incidence acoustic impedances were determined for eight acoustic liners, consisting of punched aluminum facesheets bonded to hexcell honeycomb cavities. Similar liners were tested in the NASA Langley Research Center grazing incidence tube to determine their response in the presence of grazing flow. The resultant data provide a quantitative assessment of the effects of these perforate, single-layer liner parameters on the acoustic impedance of the liner.

  8. Cracks in Flow Liners and Their Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. E.; Raju, I. S.

    2005-01-01

    Cracks were detected in flow liners at the gimbal joints in the LH2 feedlines of the space shuttle's main engines. The cracks initiated at defects in the drainage slots of the flow liners and grew due to high cycle fatigue. Fracture mechanics analyses were conducted to evaluate the life of the liners. These analyses yielded extremely short lives in the presence of small surface or corner cracks. A high fidelity detection method, edge replication, was used to detect the very small cracks. The detected cracks were removed by polishing and the surface quality of the slots was reestablished to improve life of the liners.

  9. Testing and Characterization of CMC Combustor Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. Craig; Verrilli, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    Multiple combustor liner applications, both segmented and fully annular designs, have been configured for exposure in NASA's High Pressure Burner Rig (HPBR). The segmented liners were attached to the rig structure with SiC/SiC fasteners and exposed to simulated gas turbine conditions for nearly 200 hours. Test conditions included pressures of 6 atm., gas velocity of 42 m/s, and gas temperatures near 1450 C. The temperatures of both the cooled and combustion flow sides of the liners were measured using optical and contact measurement techniques. Minor weight loss was observed, but the liners remained structural sound, although damage was noted in some fasteners.

  10. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF CONVERGING SHOCKS IN PULSED POWER DRIVEN EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    R. KANZLEITER; W. ATCHISON; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    The final shot of the current Near Term Liner Experiment (NTLX) series occurred on September 29, 2000. Utilization of a pulsed power source with a standardized liner/target ''cartridge'' produced a uniform implosion to drive hydrodynamic experiments. Diagnostics showed that high quality data of shock propagation can be obtained from pulsed power liner drivers as in the current NTLX series. Very good agreement in calculating shock locations was obtained between the codes used to model the NTLX series, RAGE and RAVEN. RAVEN also accurately predicts liner/target impact as measured by B-Dot probes. Large differences are observed between the calculated and measured positions of converging shock waves even in simple geometrical configurations. Liner/target impact is accurately calculated and similar results are produced for shock velocities in Lucite. RAGE and RAVEN use different hydrodynamic algorithms, yet agree, this focuses current efforts on EOS issues within the outer tin target to resolve discrepancies. Further diagnostics covering shock breakout from the outer tin target and shock propagation shortly thereafter would be highly beneficial.

  11. Estimation of leakage rates through flexible membrane liners

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, G.B.; McBean, E.A.; Sykes, J.F.

    1995-12-31

    Leakage rate calculations for both low-permeability soil liners and composite liners using flexible membrane liners (FMLs) overlying low-permeability soil are developed. Latin-Hypercube simulations with uncertainty assigned to the soil liner hydraulic conductivity value and the spatial frequency of FML holes are used to examine the variability in the liner leakage rats. The low-permeability soil hydraulic conductivity is the parameter with the greatest effect on landfill liner leakages rates. Composite liners have a significant impact on reducing leakage rates through the landfill liner.

  12. GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS (GCLS) IN LANDFILL COVERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low permeability, compacted clay linters are commonly required as a barrier to water infiltration in landfill covers. elatively new material, known as geosynthetic clay liner (GCL), has been proposed as an alternative to a compacted clay liner. CL has the practical advantages of ...

  13. HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF THREE GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hydraulic conductivity of three 2.9 m2 (32 sq ft) geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) was measured. Tests were performed on individual sheets of the GCLs, on overlapped pieces of GCLs, and on composite liners consisting of a punctured geomembrane overlying a GCL. Hyd...

  14. REPORT OF WORKSHOP ON GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the report is to summarize the information presented at the Geosynthetic Clay Liner (GCL) workshop held on July 9-10, 1992. The report does not represent the full extent of the information available on geosynthetic liners. Readers are directed to the summary of th...

  15. Study of Plasma Liner Driven Magnetized Target Fusion Via Advanced Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Samulyak, Roman V.; Parks, Paul

    2013-08-31

    The feasibility of the plasma liner driven Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) via terascale numerical simulations will be assessed. In the MTF concept, a plasma liner, formed by merging of a number (60 or more) of radial, highly supersonic plasma jets, implodes on the target in the form of two compact plasma toroids, and compresses it to conditions of the fusion ignition. By avoiding major difficulties associated with both the traditional laser driven inertial confinement fusion and solid liner driven MTF, the plasma liner driven MTF potentially provides a low-cost and fast R&D path towards the demonstration of practical fusion energy. High fidelity numerical simulations of full nonlinear models associated with the plasma liner MTF using state-of-art numerical algorithms and terascale computing are necessary in order to resolve uncertainties and provide guidance for future experiments. At Stony Brook University, we have developed unique computational capabilities that ideally suite the MTF problem. The FronTier code, developed in collaboration with BNL and LANL under DOE funding including SciDAC for the simulation of 3D multi-material hydro and MHD flows, has beenbenchmarked and used for fundamental and engineering problems in energy science applications. We have performed 3D simulations of converging supersonic plasma jets, their merger and the formation of the plasma liner, and a study of the corresponding oblique shock problem. We have studied the implosion of the plasma liner on the magnetized plasma target by resolving Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in 2D and 3D and other relevant physics and estimate thermodynamic conditions of the target at the moment of maximum compression and the hydrodynamic efficiency of the method.

  16. One-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic scaling studies of imploding spherical plasma liners

    SciTech Connect

    Awe, T. J.; Adams, C. S.; Davis, J. S.; Hanna, D. S.; Hsu, S. C.; Cassibry, J. T.

    2011-07-15

    One-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations are performed to develop insight into the scaling of stagnation pressure with initial conditions of an imploding spherical plasma shell or ''liner.'' Simulations reveal the evolution of high-Mach-number (M), annular, spherical plasma flows during convergence, stagnation, shock formation, and disassembly, and indicate that cm- and {mu}s-scale plasmas with peak pressures near 1 Mbar can be generated by liners with initial kinetic energy of several hundred kilo-joules. It is shown that radiation transport and thermal conduction must be included to avoid non-physical plasma temperatures at the origin which artificially limit liner convergence and, thus, the peak stagnation pressure. Scalings of the stagnated plasma lifetime ({tau}{sub stag}) and average stagnation pressure (P{sub stag}, the pressure at the origin, averaged over {tau}{sub stag}) are determined by evaluating a wide range of liner initial conditions. For high-M flows, {tau}{sub stag} {approx} {Delta}R/v{sub 0}, where {Delta}R and v{sub 0} are the initial liner thickness and velocity, respectively. Furthermore, for argon liners, P{sub stag} scales approximately as v{sub 0}{sup 15/4} over a wide range of initial densities (n{sub 0}) and as n{sub 0}{sup 1/2} over a wide range of v{sub 0}. The approximate scaling P{sub stag} {approx} M{sup 3/2} is also found for a wide range of liner-plasma initial conditions.

  17. HEL-1: A DEMG Based Demonstration of Solid Liner Implosions at 100 MA

    SciTech Connect

    Reinovsky, R.E.; Anderson, B.G.; Clark, D.A.

    1997-12-31

    In August 1997, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) conducted a joint experiment in Sarov, Russia to demonstrate the feasibility of applying explosive pulsed power technology to implode large scale, high velocity cylindrical liners. Kilogram mass metal liners imploding at velocities of 5-25 km/sec are useful scientific tools for producing high energy density environments, ultra high pressure shocks, and for the rapid compression of plasmas. To explore the issues associated with the design, operation and diagnosis of such implosions, VNIIEF and LANL designed and executed an practical demonstration in which a liner of approximately 1 kilogram mass was accelerated to 510 km/sec while undergoing a convergence of about 4:1. The scientific objectives of the experiment were threefold. First to explore the limits of very large, explosive, pulse power system delivering about 100 MA as drivers for accelerating solid density imploding liners to kinetic energies of 25 MJ or greater. Second to evaluate the behavior of single material (aluminum) liners imploding at 510 km/sec velocities by comparing experimental data with 1-D and 2-D numerical simulations. Third, to evaluate the condition of the selected liner at radial convergence of 4 and a final radius of 6 cm. A liner of such parameters could be used as a driver for equation of state measurements at megabar pressures or as a driver for a future experiment in which a magnetized fusion plasma would be compressed to approach ignition conditions.

  18. Water movement through an experimental soil liner

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krapac, I.G.; Cartwright, K.; Panno, S.V.; Hensel, B.R.; Rehfeldt, K.R.; Herzog, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    A field-scale soil liner was constructed to test whether compacted soil barriers in cover and liner systems could be built to meet the U.S. EPA saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement (???1 x 10-7 cm s-1). The 8 x 15 x 0.9m liner was constructed in 15 cm compacted lifts using a 20,037 kg pad-foot compactor and standard engineering practices. Water infiltration into the liner has been monitored for one year. Monitoring will continue until water break through at the base of the liner occurs. Estimated saturated hydraulic conductivities were 2.5 x 10-9, 4.0 x 10-8, and 5.0 x 10-8 cm s-1 based on measurements of water infiltration into the liner by large- and small-ring infiltrometers and a water balance analysis, respectively. Also investigated in this research was the variability of the liner's hydraulic properties and estimates of the transit times for water and tracers. Small variances exhibited by small-ring flux data suggested that the liner was homogeneous with respect to infiltration fluxes. The predictions of water and tracer breakthrough at the base of the liner ranged from 2.4-12.6 y, depending on the method of calculation and assumptions made. The liner appeared to be saturated to a depth between 18 and 33 cm at the end of the first year of monitoring. Transit time calculations cannot be verified yet, since breakthrough has not occurred. The work conducted so far indicates that compacted soil barriers can be constructed to meet the saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement established by the U.S. EPA.A field-scale soil liner was constructed to test whether compacted soil barriers in cover and liner systems could be built to meet the U.S. EPA saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement (??? 1 ?? 10-7 cm s-1). The 8 ?? 15 ?? 0.9 m liner was constructed in 15 cm compacted lifts using a 20.037 kg pad-foot compactor and standard engineering practices. Water infiltration into the liner has been monitored for one year. Monitoring will continue until water

  19. Accommodation of liquid metal by cavity liners

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppson, D.W.

    1988-10-01

    Present liquid metal breeder reactor cell liner designs appear adequate to contain postulated leakages of lithium-lead alloy in an air or steam atmosphere and to contain lithium when inert atmospheres are present. If an air or steam atmosphere may be present in a cavity where lithium may accumulate under postulated accident conditions, then consideration of stainless steel liners and further testing is recommended. Lithium testing of faulted liners should also be considered. SOFIRE II and WATRE computer codes may be useful in establishing liner design requirements and in determining water release from concrete behind the liners (potential hydrogen production) for postulated leakages to steel-lined concrete cavities. 1 ref., 10 figs.

  20. Stabilized Liner Compressor: The Return of Linus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchi, Peter; Frese, Sherry; Frese, Michael; Mielke, Charles; Hinrichs, Mark; Nguyen, Doan

    2015-11-01

    To access the lower cost regime of magneto-inertial fusion at megagauss magnetic field-levels requires the use of dynamic conductors in the form of imploding cylindrical shells, aka, liners. Such liner implosions can compress magnetic flux and plasma to attain fusion conditions, but are subject to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, both in the launch and recovery of the liner material and in the final few diameters of implosion. These instabilities were overcome in the Linus program at the Naval Research Laboratory, c. 1979, providing the experimentally-demonstrated basis for repetitive operation and leading to an economical reactor concept at low fusion gain. The recent ARPA-E program for low-cost fusion technology has revived interest in this approach. We shall discuss progress in modeling and design of a Stabilized Liner Compressor (SLC) that extends the earlier work to higher pressures and liner speeds appropriate to potential plasma targets. Sponsored by ARPA-E ALPHA Program.

  1. Magnetic flux penetration of an aluminum liner during working fluid compression

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, D.E.; Hussey, T.W.

    1994-12-31

    The Phillips Laboratory WFX program is a research effort to study the adiabatic compression of a hot hydrogen gas using an electromagnetically imploded solid liner. The potential uses for the megabar pressures obtained include antiproton-catalyzed microfission, magnetized target fusion, hypervelocity projectile acceleration, and equation of state studies. This numerical and analytic study explores the vaporization of an aluminum solid liner during its implosion under the influence of a 5.3 MJ capacitor discharge, and the subsequent magnetic flux penetration into the working fluid. If sufficient magnetic flux diffuses through the liner, then the working fluid is compressed by the magnetic flux rather than the liner. This is undesirable since compression by the magnetic flux will cause the onset of a shock wave within the working fluid. A study of the dynamics of the solid liner was performed with both 1-D and 2-D radiation MHD simulations, which included a careful treatment of the electrical conductivity near the phase transitions. A simple analytic model was developed for determining the effect of the flux penetration on the working fluid compression. The results of this model were used to predict the minimum working fluid density required in order to ignore the flux penetration.

  2. High-resolution observations of tungsten liner collapse and early jet formation

    SciTech Connect

    Winer, K.A.; Breithaupt, R.D.; Muelder, S.A.; Baum, D.W.

    1996-07-01

    High-resolution photography of collapsing tungsten-lined shaped charges has revealed surface texturing both similar to and strikingly different from that previously observed during copper liner collapse. The behavior of three types of tungsten-lined shaped charges, with different liner designs and high explosives but with similar tungsten processing, were characterized by image-converter camera and fast- framing camera photography, and flash x-ray radiography. 120-mm- diameter, trumpet-shaped Octol charges produced surface blistering near the base of the tungsten liner, probably due to inhomogeneities near the liner-explosive interface resulting from cast loading. 148- mm-diameter, quasi-conical LX-14 charges produced smooth shocked- surface texture similar to that observed in conical, copper-lined LX- 14 (Viper) charges. 81-mm-diameter, conical LX-20 charges produced severe radial texturing throughout the collapsing tungsten liner, which transitioned to azimuthal banding on the jet surface. For each type of charge, obscuring debris from the tungsten jet tip prevented clear imaging of the jet surface at late time. 8 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. VPS GRCop-84 Liner Development Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, Sandra K.; Holmes, Richard; McKechnie, Tim; Hickman, Robert; Pickens, Tim

    2003-01-01

    For the past several years, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been working with Plasma Processes, Inc. (PPI) to fabricate combustion chamber liners using the Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) process. Multiple liners of a variety of shapes and sizes have been created. Each liner has been fabricated with GRCop-84 (a copper alloy with chromium and niobium) and a functional gradient coating (FGC) on the hot wall. While the VPS process offers versatility and a reduced fabrication schedule, the material system created with VPS allows the liners to operate at higher temperatures, with maximum blanch resistance and improved cycle life. A subscal unit (5K lbf thrust class) is being cycle tested in a LOX/Hydrogen thrust chamber assembly at MSFC. To date, over 75 hot-fire tests have been accumulated on this article. Tests include conditions normally detrimental to conventional materials, yet the VPS GRCop-84 liner has yet to show any signs of degradation. A larger chamber (15K lbf thrust class) has also been fabricated and is being prepared for hot-fire testing at MSFC near the end of 2003. Linear liners have been successfully created to further demonstrate the versatility of the process. Finally, scale up issues for the VPS process are being tackled with efforts to fabricate a full size, engine class liner. Specifically, a liner for the SSME's Main Combustion Chamber (MCC) has recently been attempted. The SSME size was chosen for convenience, since its design was readily available and its size was sufficient to tackle specific issues. Efforts to fabricate these large liners have already provided valuable lessons for using this process for engine programs. The material quality for these large units is being evaluated with destructive analysis and these results will be available by the end of 2003.

  4. Refractory liner materials used in slagging gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, James P.

    2004-09-01

    Refractory liners are used on the working face of entrained flow slagging gasifiers that react coal, petroleum coke, or other carbon feedstock with oxygen and water. The refractory liners protect the gasifier shell from elevated temperatures, corrosive slags, and thermal cycling during gasification. Refractory failure is primarily by two means, corrosive dissolution and spalling. High chrome oxide refractory materials have evolved as the material of choice to line the hot face of gasifiers, yet the performance of these materials does not meet the service requirements of industry. A review of gasifier liner materials, their evolution, issues impacting their performance, and future research direction are discussed.

  5. Development of plasma spray coated cylinder liners

    SciTech Connect

    Tricard, M.; Hagan, J.; Redington, P.; Subramanian, K.; Haselkorn, M.

    1996-09-01

    Improved fuel economy and reduction of emissions can be achieved by insulation of the combustion chamber components to reduce heat rejection. However, such insulation will also increase the operating temperature of the piston ring/cylinder liner interface from approximately 150 C to over 300 C. Since existing ring/liner materials cannot withstand these higher operating temperatures alternatives are needed for this critical tribological interface. This paper describes the development of a cost effective ID grinding technique for machining the bores of plasma sprayed diesel engine cylinder liners.

  6. Fusion Ignition Rocket Engine with Ballistic Ablative Lithium Liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Adam; Eskridge, Richard; Fimognari, Peter J., III.

    2005-01-01

    Thermo-nuclear fusion may be the key to a high Isp, high specific power (low alpha) propulsion system. In a fusion system energy is liberated within, and imparted directly to, the propellant. In principle, this can overcome the performance limitations inherent in systems that require thermal power transfer across a material boundary, and/or multiple power conversion stages (NTR, NEP). A thermo-nuclear propulsion system, which attempts to overcome some of the problems inherent in the ORION concept, is described. A passive tapered liner is launched behind a vehicle, through a hole in a pusher-plate, that is connected to the vehicle by a shock-absorbing mechanism. A dense FRC plasmoid is then accelerated to high velocity (in excess of 1,000 km/s) and shot through the hole into the liner, when it has reached a given point down-range. The kinetic energy of the FRC is converted into thermal and magnetic-field energy, igniting a fusion bum in the magnetically confined plasma. The fusion reaction serves as an ignition source for the liner, which is made out of detonable materials. The energy liberated in this process is converted to thrust by the pusher-plate, as in the classic ORION concept. However with this concept, the vehicle does not carry a magazine of pre-fabricated pulse-units. A magnetic nozzle may also be used, in place of the pusher-plate. Estimates of the conditions needed to achieve a sufficient gain will be presented, along with a description of the driver characteristics. The incorporation of this concept into the propulsion system of a spacecraft will also be discussed.

  7. Drapery assembly including insulated drapery liner

    DOEpatents

    Cukierski, Gwendolyn

    1983-01-01

    A drapery assembly is disclosed for covering a framed wall opening, the assembly including drapery panels hung on a horizontal traverse rod, the rod having a pair of master slides and means for displacing the master slides between open and closed positions. A pair of insulating liner panels are positioned behind the drapery, the remote side edges of the liner panels being connected with the side portions of the opening frame, and the adjacent side edges of the liner panels being connected with a pair of vertically arranged center support members adapted for sliding movement longitudinally of a horizontal track member secured to the upper horizontal portion of the opening frame. Pivotally arranged brackets connect the center support members with the master slides of the traverse rod whereby movement of the master slides to effect opening and closing of the drapery panels effects simultaneous opening and closing of the liner panels.

  8. Correlating shaped charge performance with processing conditions and microstructure of an aluminum alloy 1100 liner enabled by a new method to arrest nascent jet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheid, James Eric

    custom explosive experiment that delivered meaningful, full-scale shock deformed samples for analysis. The experiment arrested the collapse of actual, as-fabricated liners in the first microseconds of development. This experiment, performed with only 2% of the explosive mass of the full charge, revealed new insights into material-dependent variations in liner collapse including a striking image of the formation of a shaped charge jet axial hole. The highly strain-hardened and elongated forged liner was the best performer of the three. Less energy from the explosive was dissipated by dislocation generation. This translated to more efficient flow whereas the softer materials behaved as shock absorbers delaying flow. A set of hypotheses was formulated and critiqued based on these observations. The key findings were the effects of grain size, and shear bands induced in the microstructure through cold work enabled efficient liner flow. These bands provide highly localized dislocation highways enabling the matrix adjacent to the bands to deform plastically at higher velocity. Where such bands are unavailable, the pressure must first develop bands of smaller grains, thus decreasing energy available for flow. Collapse velocities were then associated with the number of shear bands, the organization of mobile dislocations, material strain, and liner geometry. Microstructures with the ability to deform with the direction of liner collapse at lower stresses will form jets with a higher velocity and elongate earlier. The effect is higher performance at shorter standoffs. This relationship can be used to predict material behavior under explosive load, guiding engineering choices while designing with respect to anticipated shock loading. The explosive experiment designed here has obvious application in refining the performance of other warheads, and in the hydrodynamic modeling of material properties.

  9. CANMET Gasifier Liner Coupon Material Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Fitzsimmons; Dave Grimmett; Bryan McEnerney

    2007-01-31

    This report provides detailed test results consisting of test data and post-test inspections from Task 1 ''Cooled Liner Coupon Development and Test'' of the project titled ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Coal Energy Resources--Advanced Gasification Systems Development (AGSD)''. The primary objective of this development and test program is to verify that ceramic matrix composite (CMC) liner materials planned for use in an advanced gasifier pilot plant will successfully withstand the environments in a commercial gasifier. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) designed and fabricated the cooled liner test assembly article that was tested in a slagging gasifier at CANMET Energy Technology Center (CETC-O) in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The test program conducted in 2006 met the objective of operating the cooled liner test article at slagging conditions in a small scale coal gasifier at CETC-O for over the planned 100 hours. The test hardware was exposed to at least 30 high temperature excursions (including start-up and shut-down cycles) during the test program. The results of the testing has provided valuable information on gasifier startup and required cooling controls in steady state operation of future advanced gasifiers using similar liners. The test program also provided a significant amount of information in the areas of CMC materials and processing for improved capability in a gasifier environment and insight into CMC liner fabrication that will be essential for near-term advanced gasifier projects.

  10. The Ringloc liner compared with the Hexloc liner in total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Olof, Sköldenberg; Mats, Salemyr; Olle, Muren; Åke, Johansson; Torbjörn, Ahl; Henrik, Bodén

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the 10-year survival rate, pelvic osteolysis frequency and linear head penetration rate of the Hexloc and Ringloc liners used together with a partially threaded porous and hydroxyapatite coated cup and the Bi-Metric uncemented femoral stem. The 15-year results for the cup with the Hexloc liner are also reported. We included 332 consecutive hips (166 Hexloc and 166 Ringloc) on 281 patients in the study. Revisions of prosthesis components were recorded and pelvic osteolytic lesions were assessed using radiographs and computed tomography. The linear head penetration rate was measured using the Martell method. The 10-year survival rate of the liner with revision due to liner wear and/or osteolysis as endpoint was 88% for the Hexloc liner and 98% for the Ringloc liner. The 15-year survival rate of the Hexloc liner was 67%. Pelvic osteolysis was found in 27% of the Hexloc and 19% of the Ringloc hips. After 15 years, 53% of the Hexloc hips had developed an osteolytic lesion. The linear head penetration rate was 0.16 mm/year for the Hexloc liner and 0.12 mm/year for the Ringloc liner. This paper is the first to describe the rapidly deteriorating survival up to 15 years with the old generation gamma-in-air sterilized polyethylene used in Hexloc liners. The newer Ringloc liner with the ArCom™ polyethylene has superior clinical results but a linear wear rate and frequency of osteolytic lesions that is higher than expected. PMID:21808678

  11. Shock metamorphic effects in lunar microcraters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaal, R. B.; Hoerz, F.; Gibbons, R. V.

    1976-01-01

    Detailed petrographic descriptions and results of electron microprobe analyses are presented for impact glasses as well as shocked and unshocked minerals associated with individual lunar microcraters (diameters of 0.4 to 4.4 mm). Rocks of four typical lunar lithologies are studied: anorthosite, anorthositic norite, ophitic basalt, and polymict breccia. Textures, mineralogies, and chemical compositions are examined along a radial traverse through each microcrater; i.e., across the impact glasses lining the crater wall, the shock-metamorphosed zone immediately underlying the glass liner, and the unshocked host rock. The microcraters are discussed in a sequence of increasing mineralogical complexity of the host rock (from anorthosite to polymict breccia) in order to distinguish shock effects among mineral types. The shock metamorphic features observed are found to be comparable to those reported in shocked basalt from Lonar Crater, India, and are categorized into five shock-intensity classes with pressures experimentally calibrated.

  12. Consequence analysis of a liner breach due to steam under the liner

    SciTech Connect

    HIMES, D.A.

    1999-06-01

    Radiological and toxicological consequences are estimated for a steam release from tank C-106 associated with a breach of the tank liner due to formation of steam under the liner after dry-out of the sludge layer in the tank. The consequences are shown to be well below the most restrictive risk guidelines.

  13. Performance of a Checkerboard Liner With Uncertain Impedances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. H.; Watson, W. R.

    2005-01-01

    The current fleet of large commercial aircraft has successfully achieved FAA noise certifications because of, in part, the successful application of uniform passive duct liner treatments to control engine system noise. One goal of NASA's engine system noise reduction program is to develop technologies to improve the sound absorbing properties of duct liner treatments so that they remain effective in modern turbo fan engines. One such technology being studied is checkerboard or periodic axially and circumferentially segmented liners. A preliminary assessment of the potential of this technology was conducted by applying uncertainties associated with manufacturing, installation, source structure, and tonal frequency to a liner developed using deterministic design methods and generating a measure of improvement with respect to a uniform liner subjected to the same uncertainties. Deterministic design and analysis of the candidate checkerboard liner showed that it obtains a 1.5 dB per duct aspect ratio improvement in liner attenuation over a similarly designed uniform liner. When uncertainties in liner impedances, source structure, and frequency are considered, the performance of the checkerboard liner drops off dramatically. The final results of this paper show that the candidate checkerboard liner has a less than 25 percent chance of outperforming the uniform liner when moderate levels of uncertainty are considered. It is important to note that this study did not include the effects of mean flow on liner performance and, more important to note, that as a gradient based optimization process was used to design the checkerboard liner, it is almost certain that a global optimal design was not found for the candidate checkerboard liner. Had it been possible to find a better deterministically performing checkerboard liner, the probability that this candidate liner would outperform the uniform liner would certainly have been higher.

  14. Origin of the B-dot jump observed in precision liner experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Stokes, J.L.; Broste, W.B.

    1995-09-01

    In the liner-ejecta experiments carried out at the Los Alamos pulsed power facility Pegasus II, a solid liner was magnetically imploded to impact on a target cylinder to produce the shock-induced ejecta. As a result of improved time resolution for the B-dot (dB/dt) probes fielded last fall, the authors began to notice a sharp jump in the B-dot curve occurring at a time very close to the expected liner-target collision time. This jump was also found in the time derivative of the calculated current (dI/dt) obtained from code simulation. They have shown that the jump is indeed caused by the collision as a sudden change of the liner velocity would induce a sudden jump in the time derivative of the inductance. They have derived a general formula for calculating the jump in dI/dt and verified that the result computed from it is in good agreement with the code simulation. Useful diagnostic applications of the B-dot jump are discussed. This paper is relevant for magnetized target fusion.

  15. What produces the extended LINER-type emission in the NUGA galaxy NGC 5850?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremer, M.; Scharwächter, J.; Eckart, A.; Valencia-S., M.; Zuther, J.; Combes, F.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Fischer, S.

    2013-10-01

    Context. The role of low ionization nuclear emission region (LINER) galaxies within the picture of active galactic nuclei (AGN) has been controversial. It is still not clear whether they host an AGN in a low accretion mode or whether they are not active at all but are instead dominated by alternative ionization mechanisms, namely shocks, winds/outflows, or photoionization by a post-asymptotic giant branch (p-AGB) stellar population. The detection of extended LINER-like emission was often taken as evidence of ionization by stellar components, but this has not been undisputed. Aims: Using optical spectroscopy, we examine the possible ionization mechanisms responsible for the extended LINER-like emission in the central ~4 kpc of NGC 5850. Methods: We performed integral field spectroscopic observations using VIMOS at the VLT, which provides spatially-resolved spectra for the gas emission and the stellar continuum. We subtract the underlying stellar continuum from the galaxy spectra and fit the emission lines. With these methods, we derive and analyze emission line and kinematic maps. Emission line ratio maps are examined by means of diagnostic diagrams. Results: The central few kpc of NGC 5850 are dominated by extended LINER-like emission. The emission-line ratios that are sensitive to the ionization parameter increase with radial distance to the nucleus. The LINER-like region is surrounded by emission that is classed as "composite" in terms of diagnostic diagrams. Two star-forming (SF) regions are present in the 21″ × 19″ field of view. One of them is located approximately in the ring, surrounding the kinematically decoupled core. The second one is close to the nucleus and is the origin of a region of decreased emission line ratios oriented radially outwards. We find the interstellar gas to have a complex kinematic morphology and to have areas of steep velocity gradients. Conclusions: The extended LINER-like emission in NGC 5850 is dominated by ionization from

  16. MiniBooNE liner integrity study

    SciTech Connect

    Ray Stefanski, Phil Martin and Jeff Sims

    2001-11-09

    The civil construction for the MiniBooNE project includes a 50-m decay path and beam absorbers. The decay path is a six-foot diameter corrugated metal pipe (CMP). To prevent activation of the groundwater, the CMP and beam absorbers are surrounded by crushed aggregate, and enclosed in a double-walled geotextile membrane, referred to as the liner. The minimum distance from the beam centerline to the liner is 10 feet. The double-wall construction of the liner forms three regions, the containment volume, the interstitial volume, and the exterior. Each of these volumes is connected to monitoring wells at both the upstream and downstream ends of the decay volume, i.e. a total of six monitoring pipes extend to the surface. To confirm the integrity of the liner system following its placement, the firm Earth Tech was contracted to perform tests. Michael Williams was the primary contact with Earth Tech. The following is the report from Earth Tech, with minor changes in the interest of clarity. A sketch of the decay region is shown; only one of the layers of the liner is shown, and only one monitoring port. At the time of these tests, the excavation in general, but particularly in the vicinity of the monitoring wells had not been backfilled in the final grade, as indicated by the dashed lines.

  17. Use of FGD as an impervious liner

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, W.E.; Butalia, T.S.

    1998-07-01

    Increasing generation of coal combustion products (CCPs), particularly flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material, has led utilities to look for beneficial uses of these products. This paper presents one such utilization application of CCPs, i.e., the use of FGD material as an impervious liner for ponds and lagoons. The construction of a full scale lagoon using compacted FGD as a liner is presented. The project was undertaken primarily to address two critical questions, (1) what is the quality of water that permeates through an FGD liner and (2) what is the quantity of water permeating through a field compacted FGD fill of known thickness? The effects of construction processes on the behavior of compacted FGD are evaluated. The monitoring of the performance of the lagoon liner is discussed. Preliminary results indicate that the permeability of the field compacted FGD liner is reducing with time and is approaching the EPA recommended value of 1 x 10{sup {minus}7} cm/sec for waste containment facilities.

  18. Use of FGD as an impervious liner

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, W.E.; Butalia, T.S.

    1998-04-01

    Increasing generation of coal combustion products (CCPs), particularly flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material, has led utilities to look for beneficial uses of these products. This paper presents one such utilization application of CCPs, i.e., the use of FGD material as an impervious liner for ponds and lagoons. The construction of a full scale lagoon using compacted FGD as a liner is presented. The project was undertaken primarily to address two critical questions, (1) what is the quality of water that permeates through an FGD liner and (2) what is the quantity of water permeating through a field compacted FGD fill of known thickness? The effects of construction processes on the behavior of compacted FGD are evaluated. The monitoring of the performance of the lagoon liner is discussed. Preliminary results indicate that the permeability of the field compacted FGD liner is reducing with time and is approaching the EPA recommended value of 1x10{sup -7} cm/sec for waste containment facilities.

  19. Novel, high-pressure instability experiments using imploding cylindrical liners with liquid deuterium fill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Patrick; Martin, Matthew; McBride, Ryan; Sinars, Daniel; Mattsson, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    We present preliminary results from experiments where a liquid deuterium filled cylindrical liner is imploded onto a perturbed beryllium rod. The liner implosion creates a shock in the deuterium that strikes the interface twice: once as it implodes, and once again after the shock reflects off of the axis. This causes the perturbation to grow due to the Richtmeyer-Meshkov instability and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability while also generating significant vorticity as the shocks cross the interface. In the initial experiments growth of the perturbation is observed after 1st shock, however, after reshock significant three-dimensional structure is observed at scale lengths much smaller than the initial perturbation. At this time, very little evidence of the seeded mode remains. Pressures exceeding 100 Mbar are predicted at stagnation with an Atwood number at the unstable interface of about 1/3. Analysis of the images will be presented. Additionally, future plans will be discussed. Emphasis in the near future will be on improving image contrast and data collection. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract D.

  20. Impact of Inner Surface Perturbations on the Stability of Cylindrical Liner Implosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, Matthew; Peterson, Kyle; Hess, Mark; Lau, Y. Y.; Zhang, Peng; Gilgenbach, Ronald

    2015-11-01

    This paper studies the effects of initial perturbations on the inner liner surface (ILS) of an imploding cylindrical liner. In MagLIF, nonuniform preheat of the fuel could provide an additional source of spatial nonuniformity on the ILS. A blast wave generated by the laser preheat might trigger the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RM) on the ILS which then serves as another seed to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RT) during the stagnation (deceleration) phase of the implosion. Another scenario is that the shock initiated from the outer liner surface, during current rise, propagates inward and is reflected at the ILS. This reflected shock would carry the initial ILS perturbations which then serve as an additional seed for the magneto-RT (MRT) during the acceleration phase of the implosion. These potentially dangerous interactions are analyzed using the 2D HYDRA code. The effects of axial magnetic fields, of the initial surface roughness spectrum, and of gas fill or water fill (to examine deceleration phase RT) are studied. M. R. Weis was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories. This work was also supported by DoE Grant DE-SC0012328.

  1. Drag Measurements of Porous Plate Acoustic Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolter, John D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the results of direct drag measurements on a variety of porous plate acoustic liners. The existing literature describes numerous studies of drag on porous walls with injection or suction, but relatively few of drag on porous plates with neither injection nor suction. Furthermore, the porosity of the porous plate in existing studies is much lower than typically used in acoustic liners. In the present work, the acoustic liners consisted of a perforated face sheet covering a bulk acoustic absorber material. Factors that were varied in the experiment were hole diameter, hole pattern, face sheet thickness, bulk material type, and size of the gap (if any) between the face sheet and the absorber material.

  2. Surface modifications of pistons and cylinder liners

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Y. )

    1988-01-01

    With higher brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) of a diesel engine, pistons and cylinder liners suffer from increasing mechanical and thermal loading which causes several problems on these engine parts. The main critical problems are thermally induced cracking on the piston head and scuffing on the cylinder bore. Hard anodizing the piston head is described. It is currently the most effective countermeasure against heat cracking. Another promising method, to reinforce the piston head by means of SiC-whiskers, is also reported. A new process for improving the surface lubrication of the cylinder liner was developed. The bore has numerous finely distributed micropits which act as good oil reservoir. This improves the antiscuffing property of the cylinder liner.

  3. REVIEW OF LINER AND CAP REGULATIONS FOR LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through its research and field experiences has developed control strategies for hazardous and municipal solid waste landfills and surface impoundments. hese control strategies include liner and cover systems. he liner systems include doubl...

  4. Lifecycle Verification of Tank Liner Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Smith, Barton

    2014-03-01

    This report describes a method that was developed for the purpose of assessing the durability of thermoplastic liners used in a Type IV hydrogen storage tank during the tank s expected service life. In the method, a thermoplastic liner specimen is cycled between the maximum and minimum expected working temperatures while it is differentially pressurized with high-pressure hydrogen gas. The number of thermal cycling intervals corresponds to those expected within the tank s design lifetime. At prescribed intervals, hydrogen permeation measurements are done in situ to assess the ability of the liner specimen to maintain its hydrogen barrier properties and to model its permeability over the tank lifetime. Finally, the model is used to assess whether the steady-state leakage rate in the tank could potentially exceed the leakage specification for hydrogen fuel cell passenger vehicles. A durability assessment was performed on a specimen of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) that is in current use as a tank liner. Hydrogen permeation measurements were performed on several additional tank liner polymers as well as novel polymers proposed for use as storage tank liners and hydrogen barrier materials. The following technical barriers from the Fuel Cell Technologies Program MYRDD were addressed by the project: D. Durability of on-board storage systems lifetime of at least 1500 cycles G. Materials of construction vessel containment that is resistant to hydrogen permeation M. Lack of Tank Performance Data and Understanding of Failure Mechanisms And the following technical targets1 for on-board hydrogen storage systems R&D were likewise addressed: Operational cycle life (1/4 tank to full) FY 2017: 1500 cycles; Ultimate: 1500 cycles Environmental health & safety Permeation and leakage: Meets or exceeds applicable standards Loss of useable H2: FY 2017: 0.05 g/h/kg H2; Ultimate: 0.05 g/h/kg H2

  5. Acoustic Panel Liner for an Engine Nacelle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G. (Inventor); Nark, Douglas M. (Inventor); Ayle, Earl (Inventor); Ichihashi, Fumitaka (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An acoustic panel liner includes a face sheet, back plate, and liner core positioned there-between, which may be used in an engine nacelle. Elongated chambers contain variable amounts of septa at a calibrated depth or depths. The septa may have varying DC flow resistance. The chambers may have a hexagonal or other polygonal cross sections. The septa, such as mesh caps, may be bonded to an inner wall of a corresponding chamber. The insertion depths may be the same or different. If different, the pattern of distribution of the depths may be randomized.

  6. Assessing liner performance using on-farm milk meters.

    PubMed

    Penry, J F; Leonardi, S; Upton, J; Thompson, P D; Reinemann, D J

    2016-08-01

    The primary objective of this study was to quantify and compare the interactive effects of liner compression, milking vacuum level, and pulsation settings on average milk flow rates for liners representing the range of liner compression of commercial liners. A secondary objective was to evaluate a methodology for assessing liner performance that can be applied on commercial dairy farms. Eight different liner types were assessed using 9 different combinations of milking system vacuum and pulsation settings applied to a herd of 80 cows with vacuum and pulsation conditions changed daily for 36d using a central composite experimental design. Liner response surfaces were created for explanatory variables milking system vacuum (Vsystem) and pulsator ratio (PR) and response variable average milk flow rate (AMF=total yield/total cups-on time) expressed as a fraction of the within-cow average flow rate for all treatments (average milk flow rate fraction, AMFf). Response surfaces were also created for between-liner comparisons for standardized conditions of claw vacuum and milk ratio (fraction of pulsation cycle during which milk is flowing). The highest AMFf was observed at the highest levels of Vsystem, PR, and overpressure. All liners showed an increase in AMF as milking conditions were changed from low to high standardized conditions of claw vacuum and milk ratio. Differences in AMF between liners were smallest at the most gentle milking conditions (low Vsystem and low milk ratio), and these between-liner differences in AMF increased as liner overpressure increased. Differences were noted with vacuum drop between Vsystem and claw vacuum depending on the liner venting system, with short milk tube vented liners having the greater vacuum drop than mouthpiece chamber vented liners. The accuracy of liner performance assessment in commercial parlors fitted with milk meters can be improved by using a central composite experimental design with a repeated center point treatment

  7. Advanced liner-cooling techniques for gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Riddlebaugh, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    Component research for advanced small gas turbine engines is currently underway at the NASA Lewis Research Center. As part of this program, a basic reverse-flow combustor geometry was being maintained while different advanced liner wall cooling techniques were investigated. Performance and liner cooling effectiveness of the experimental combustor configuration featuring counter-flow film-cooled panels is presented and compared with two previously reported combustors featuring: splash film-cooled liner walls; and transpiration cooled liner walls (Lamilloy).

  8. 21 CFR 872.3250 - Calcium hydroxide cavity liner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium hydroxide cavity liner. 872.3250 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3250 Calcium hydroxide cavity liner. (a) Identification. A calcium hydroxide cavity liner is a device material intended to be applied to the interior of...

  9. 49 CFR 193.2187 - Nonmetallic membrane liner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nonmetallic membrane liner. 193.2187 Section 193.2187 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... liner. A flammable nonmetallic membrane liner may not be used as an inner container in a storage tank....

  10. 21 CFR 872.3250 - Calcium hydroxide cavity liner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium hydroxide cavity liner. 872.3250 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3250 Calcium hydroxide cavity liner. (a) Identification. A calcium hydroxide cavity liner is a device material intended to be applied to the interior of...

  11. 49 CFR 193.2187 - Nonmetallic membrane liner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nonmetallic membrane liner. 193.2187 Section 193.2187 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... liner. A flammable nonmetallic membrane liner may not be used as an inner container in a storage tank....

  12. 49 CFR 193.2187 - Nonmetallic membrane liner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nonmetallic membrane liner. 193.2187 Section 193.2187 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... liner. A flammable nonmetallic membrane liner may not be used as an inner container in a storage tank....

  13. 21 CFR 872.3250 - Calcium hydroxide cavity liner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium hydroxide cavity liner. 872.3250 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3250 Calcium hydroxide cavity liner. (a) Identification. A calcium hydroxide cavity liner is a device material intended to be applied to the interior of...

  14. 49 CFR 193.2187 - Nonmetallic membrane liner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nonmetallic membrane liner. 193.2187 Section 193.2187 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... liner. A flammable nonmetallic membrane liner may not be used as an inner container in a storage tank....

  15. 49 CFR 193.2187 - Nonmetallic membrane liner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nonmetallic membrane liner. 193.2187 Section 193.2187 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... liner. A flammable nonmetallic membrane liner may not be used as an inner container in a storage tank....

  16. 21 CFR 872.3250 - Calcium hydroxide cavity liner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium hydroxide cavity liner. 872.3250 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3250 Calcium hydroxide cavity liner. (a) Identification. A calcium hydroxide cavity liner is a device material intended to be applied to the interior of...

  17. ELECTRICAL RESPONSE OF A LEAK IN A GEOMEMBRANE LINER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A leak in a geomembrane lined impoundment or landfill has a characteristic electrical response. imulate the waste material, the liner, and the soil under the liner by infinite horizontal layers and express the secondary potential for a leak in the geomembrane liner in terms of a ...

  18. Diagnostics for the plasma liner experiment.

    PubMed

    Lynn, A G; Merritt, E; Gilmore, M; Hsu, S C; Witherspoon, F D; Cassibry, J T

    2010-10-01

    The goal of the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) is to explore and demonstrate the feasibility of forming imploding spherical "plasma liners" via merging high Mach number plasma jets to reach peak liner pressures of ∼0.1 Mbar using ∼1.5 MJ of initial stored energy. Such a system would provide HED plasmas for a variety of fundamental HEDLP, laboratory astrophysics, and materials science studies, as well as a platform for experimental validation of rad-hydro and rad-MHD simulations. It could also prove attractive as a potential standoff driver for magnetoinertial fusion. Predicted parameters from jet formation to liner stagnation cover a large range of plasma density and temperature, varying from n(i)∼10(16) cm(-3), T(e)≈T(i)∼1 eV at the plasma gun mouth to n(i)>10(19) cm(-3), T(e)≈T(i)∼0.5 keV at stagnation. This presents a challenging problem for the plasma diagnostics suite which will be discussed. PMID:21033980

  19. Diagnostics for the Plasma Liner Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, A. G.; Merritt, E.; Gilmore, M.; Hsu, S. C.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Cassibry, J. T.

    2010-10-15

    The goal of the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) is to explore and demonstrate the feasibility of forming imploding spherical ''plasma liners'' via merging high Mach number plasma jets to reach peak liner pressures of {approx}0.1 Mbar using {approx}1.5 MJ of initial stored energy. Such a system would provide HED plasmas for a variety of fundamental HEDLP, laboratory astrophysics, and materials science studies, as well as a platform for experimental validation of rad-hydro and rad-MHD simulations. It could also prove attractive as a potential standoff driver for magnetoinertial fusion. Predicted parameters from jet formation to liner stagnation cover a large range of plasma density and temperature, varying from n{sub i}{approx}10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}, T{sub e}{approx_equal}T{sub i}{approx}1 eV at the plasma gun mouth to n{sub i}>10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}, T{sub e}{approx_equal}T{sub i}{approx}0.5 keV at stagnation. This presents a challenging problem for the plasma diagnostics suite which will be discussed.

  20. Membrane behavior of clay liner materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jong Beom

    Membrane behavior represents the ability of porous media to restrict the migration of solutes, leading to the existence of chemico-osmosis, or the flow of liquid in response to a chemical concentration gradient. Membrane behavior is an important consideration with respect to clay soils with small pores and interactive electric diffuse double layers associated with individual particles, such as bentonite. The results of recent studies indicate the existence of membrane behavior in bentonite-based hydraulic barriers used in waste containment applications. Thus, measurement of the existence and magnitude of membrane behavior in such clay soils is becoming increasingly important. Accordingly, this research focused on evaluating the existence and magnitude of membrane behavior for three clay-based materials that typically are considered for use as liners for waste containment applications, such as landfills. The three clay-based liner materials included a commercially available geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) consisting of sodium bentonite sandwiched between two geotextiles, a compacted natural clay known locally as Nelson Farm Clay, and compacted NFC amended with 5% (dry wt.) of a sodium bentonite. The study also included the development and evaluation of a new flexible-wall cell for clay membrane testing that was used subsequently to measure the membrane behaviors of the three clay liner materials. The consolidation behavior of the GCL under isotropic states of stress also was evaluated as a preliminary step in the determination of the membrane behavior of the GCL under different effective consolidation stresses.

  1. FACTORS CONTROLLING MINIMUM SOIL LINER THICKNESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes a three-part study to gather information on liquid flow through soil liners in hazardous waste disposal facilities. n the first part of the study a model was developed to simulate flow occurring through discreet channels in lifts (a layer of compacted soil) ...

  2. Formed platelet liner concept for regeneratively cooled chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhardt, W. M.; Tobin, S. E.; Mueggenburg, H. H.

    1990-01-01

    A process for the fabrication of a formed platelet regeneratively cooled combustion chamber liner is described, and the benefits offered by the combustor liner are discussed. The advantages of using formed platelet combustor liners include a substantially increased cycle life and decreased coolant pressure drop in conjunction with low manufacturing costs. In the initial experiments, zirconium copper combustor liner sections with a hot gas wall thickness as small as 0.008 inch and channel aspect ratios of 15 have been achieved. It is also shown that HIP provides an excellent bonding technique for joining chamber liner panels.

  3. Statistically Based Approach to Broadband Liner Design and Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M. (Inventor); Jones, Michael G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A broadband liner design optimization includes utilizing in-duct attenuation predictions with a statistical fan source model to obtain optimum impedance spectra over a number of flow conditions for one or more liner locations in a bypass duct. The predicted optimum impedance information is then used with acoustic liner modeling tools to design liners having impedance spectra that most closely match the predicted optimum values. Design selection is based on an acceptance criterion that provides the ability to apply increasing weighting to specific frequencies and/or operating conditions. One or more broadband design approaches are utilized to produce a broadband liner that targets a full range of frequencies and operating conditions.

  4. Influence of atomic processes on the implosion of plasma liners

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyoungkeun; Zhang Lina; Samulyak, Roman; Parks, Paul

    2012-08-15

    The influence of atomic physics processes on the implosion of plasma liners for magneto-inertial nuclear fusion has been investigated numerically by using the method of front tracking in spherically symmetric geometry and equation of state models accounting for dissociation and ionization. Simulation studies of the self-collapse of argon liners to be used in the Los Alamos Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) program have been performed as well as studies of implosion of deuterium and argon liners on plasma targets. Results show that atomic processes in converging liners reduce the temperature of liners and increase the Mach number that results in the increase of the stagnation pressure and the fusion energy gain. For deuterium and argon liners imploding on plasma targets, dissociation and ionization increased the stagnation pressure and the fusion energy gain by the factor of 1.5 (deuterium) and 2 (argon) correspondingly. Similarly, ionization during the self-collapse of argon liners leads to approximately doubling of the Mach number and the stagnation pressure. The influence of the longitudinal density spread of the liner has also been investigated. The self-collapse stagnation pressure decreased by the factor of 8.7 when the initial position of the liner was shifted from the merging radius (33 cm) to the PLX chamber edge (137.2 cm). Simulations with and without the heat conduction demonstrated that the heat conduction has negligible effect on the self-collapse pressure of argon liners.

  5. Geosynthetic clay liners shrinkage under simulated daily thermal cycles.

    PubMed

    Sarabadani, Hamid; Rayhani, Mohammad T

    2014-04-01

    Geosynthetic clay liners are used as part of composite liner systems in municipal solid waste landfills and other applications to restrict the escape of contaminants into the surrounding environment. This is attainable provided that the geosynthetic clay liner panels continuously cover the subsoil. Previous case histories, however, have shown that some geosynthetic clay liner panels are prone to significant shrinkage and separation when an overlying geomembrane is exposed to solar radiation. Experimental models were initiated to evaluate the potential shrinkage of different geosynthetic clay liner products placed over sand and clay subsoils, subjected to simulated daily thermal cycles (60°C for 8 hours and 22°C for 16 hours) modelling field conditions in which the liner is exposed to solar radiation. The variation of geosynthetic clay liner shrinkage was evaluated at specified times by a photogrammetry technique. The manufacturing techniques, the initial moisture content, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to width) of the geosynthetic clay liner were found to considerably affect the shrinkage of geosynthetic clay liners. The particle size distribution of the subsoil and the associated suction at the geosynthetic clay liner-subsoil interface was also found to have significant effects on the shrinkage of the geosynthetic clay liner. PMID:24718363

  6. Liner Stability Experiments at Pegasus: Diagnostics and Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.A.; Morgan, D.V.; Rodriguez, G.

    1998-10-18

    A series of experiments to compare imploding liner performance with magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) modeling has been performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Pegasus II pulse power machine. Liner instability growth originating from initial perturbations machined into the liner has been observed with high resolution. Three major diagnostics were used: radiography, Velocity Interferometer for a Surface of Any Reflector (VISAR), and fiber optic impact pins. For radiography, three flash x-ray units were mounted radially to observe liner shape at three different times during the implosion. Liner velocity was measured continuously with the VISAR for the entire distance traveled in two experiments. Optical impact pins provide a high-resolution measure of liner symmetry and shape near the end of travel. Liner performance has compared well with predictions.

  7. Magneto-hydrodynamic calculation of magnetic flux compression using imploding cylindrical liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jibo; Sun, Chengwei; Gu, Zhuowei

    2015-06-01

    Based on the one-dimensional elastic-plastic reactive hydrodynamic code SSS, the one-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamics code SSS/MHD is developed successfully, and calculation is carried for cylindrical magneto cumulative generators (MC-1 device). The magnetic field diffusion into liner and sample tuber is analyzed, and the result shows that the maximum value of magnetic induction intensity to cavity 0.2 mm in liner is only sixteen Tesla, while the one in sample tuber is several hundred Tesla, which is caused by balancing of electromagnetism force and imploding one for the different velocity of liner and sample tuber. The curves of magnetic induction intensity on axes of cavity and the velocity history on the wall of sample tuber are calculated, which accord with the experiment results. The works in this paper account for that code SSS/MHD can be applied in experiment configures of detonation, shock and electromagnetism load and improve of parameter successfully. The experiment data can be estimated, analyzed and checked validly, and the physics course of correlative device can be understood deeply, according to SSS/MHD. This work was supported by the special funds of the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant 11176002.

  8. Stability of Magnetically Implode Liners for High Energy Density Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Reinovsky, R.E.; Anderson, W.E.; Atchison, W.L.; Bartsch, R.R.; Clark, D.A.; Ekdahl, C.E.; Faehl, R.J.; Goforth, J.H.; Keinigs, R.K.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Morgan, D.; Rodriguez, G.; Tasker, D.G.; Trainor, R.J.; Shlachter, J.S.

    1998-10-18

    Magnetically imploded cylindrical metal shells (z-pinch liners) are attractive drivers for a wide variety of hydrodynamics and material properties experiments. The ultimate utility of liners depends on the acceleration of near-solid density shells to velocities exceeding 20 km/sec with good azimuthal symmetry and axial uniformity. Two pulse power systems (Ranchero and Atlas) currently operational or under development at Los Alamos provide electrical energy adequate to accelerate {approximately}50 gr. liners to 1-2 MJ/cm kinetic energy. As in all z-pinches, the outer surface of a magnetically imploded liner is unstable to magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) modes during acceleration. Large-scale distortion in the liners from RT modes growing from glide plane interactions or initial imperfections could make liners unusable for man experiments. On the other hand, material strength in the liner should, from first principles, reduce the growth rate of RT modes - and can render some combinations of wavelength and amplitude analytically stable. The growth of instabilities in both soft aluminum liners and in high strength aluminum alloy liners has been studied analytically, computationally and experimentally at liner kinetic energies up to 100 KJ/cm on the Pegasus capacitor bank using driving currents up to 12 MA.

  9. Broadband Liner Optimization for the Source Diagnostic Test Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Jones, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    The broadband component of fan noise has grown in relevance with the utilization of increased bypass ratio and advanced fan designs. Thus, while the attenuation of fan tones remains paramount, the ability to simultaneously reduce broadband fan noise levels has become more appealing. This paper describes a broadband acoustic liner optimization study for the scale model Source Diagnostic Test fan. Specifically, in-duct attenuation predictions with a statistical fan source model are used to obtain optimum impedance spectra over a number of flow conditions for three liner locations in the bypass duct. The predicted optimum impedance information is then used with acoustic liner modeling tools to design liners aimed at producing impedance spectra that most closely match the predicted optimum values. Design selection is based on an acceptance criterion that provides the ability to apply increased weighting to specific frequencies and/or operating conditions. Typical tonal liner designs targeting single frequencies at one operating condition are first produced to provide baseline performance information. These are followed by multiple broadband design approaches culminating in a broadband liner targeting the full range of frequencies and operating conditions. The broadband liner is found to satisfy the optimum impedance objectives much better than the tonal liner designs. In addition, the broadband liner is found to provide better attenuation than the tonal designs over the full range of frequencies and operating conditions considered. Thus, the current study successfully establishes a process for the initial design and evaluation of novel broadband liner concepts for complex engine configurations.

  10. Development of 1D Liner Compression Code for IDL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazu, Akihisa; Slough, John; Pancotti, Anthony

    2015-11-01

    A 1D liner compression code is developed to model liner implosion dynamics in the Inductively Driven Liner Experiment (IDL) where FRC plasmoid is compressed via inductively-driven metal liners. The driver circuit, magnetic field, joule heating, and liner dynamics calculations are performed at each time step in sequence to couple these effects in the code. To obtain more realistic magnetic field results for a given drive coil geometry, 2D and 3D effects are incorporated into the 1D field calculation through use of correction factor table lookup approach. Commercial low-frequency electromagnetic fields solver, ANSYS Maxwell 3D, is used to solve the magnetic field profile for static liner condition at various liner radius in order to derive correction factors for the 1D field calculation in the code. The liner dynamics results from the code is verified to be in good agreement with the results from commercial explicit dynamics solver, ANSYS Explicit Dynamics, and previous liner experiment. The developed code is used to optimize the capacitor bank and driver coil design for better energy transfer and coupling. FRC gain calculations are also performed using the liner compression data from the code for the conceptual design of the reactor sized system for fusion energy gains.

  11. The utilization of sepiolite in landfill liners.

    PubMed

    Güney, Y; Ozdemir, H V

    2005-05-01

    In this study, sepiolite and natural soil-added sepiolite mixtures were studied to find out whether they can be used as compacted landfill liner, as they are an economic alternative to the other compacted day liners or not. Geotechnical and physico-chemical properties of sepiolite and sepiolite mixtures, containing 25% and 50% natural soil by weight, and compacted at water contents ranging from 35% to 60%, were determined by hydraulic conductivity, leachate analysis, unconfined compression strength, consolidation, volumetric shrinkage and swelling tests. The test results showed that the compacted natural soil-added sepiolite mixtures exhibit lower permeability and swelling properties, and higher compressive strength than pure sepiolite. The overall evaluation of the results has revealed that the natural soil-added sepiolite showed good promise and it can be used as a landfill barrier due to its high capacity of contaminant adsorption. PMID:15974274

  12. Low-Convergence Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutz, Stephen; Vesey, Roger; Sinars, Daniel; Sefkow, Adam

    2013-10-01

    Numerical simulations indicate that pulsed-power driven liner-implosions could produce substantial fusion yields if the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel is first magnetized and preheated [S.A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. As with all inertial fusion, the implosions could be degraded by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Since highly convergent implosions are more susceptible to this instability, we have explored the necessary conditions to obtain significant fusion yield with low-convergence liner-implosions. Such low-convergence implosions can be obtained if the fuel is sufficiently preheated and magnetized. We present analytic and numerical studies of laser plasma heating, which indicate that low convergence implosions should be possible with sufficient laser energy. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contra.

  13. Atlas performance and imploding liner parameter space

    SciTech Connect

    Reinovsky, R.; Lindemuth, I. R.; Atchison, W. L.; Cochrane, J. C. , Jr.; Faehl, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    Ultra-high magnetic fields have many applications in the confining and controlling plasmas and in exploring electron physics as manifested in the magnetic properties of materials. Another application of high fields is the acceleration of metal conductors to velocities higher than that achievable with conventional high explosive drive or gas guns. The Atlas pulse power system is the world's first pulse power system specifically designed to implode solid and near-solid density metal liners for use in pulse power hydrodynamic experiments. This paper describes the Atlas system during the first year of its operational life at Los Alamos, (comprising 10-15 implosion experiments); describes circuit models that adequately predicted the bulk kinematic behavior of liner implosions; and shows how those (now validated) models can be used to describe the range of parameters accessible through Atlas implosions.

  14. Acoustic-Liner Admittance in a Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, W. R.

    1986-01-01

    Method calculates admittance from easily obtainable values. New method for calculating acoustic-liner admittance in rectangular duct with grazing flow based on finite-element discretization of acoustic field and reposing of unknown admittance value as linear eigenvalue problem on admittance value. Problem solved by Gaussian elimination. Unlike existing methods, present method extendable to mean flows with two-dimensional boundary layers as well. In presence of shear, results of method compared well with results of Runge-Kutta integration technique.

  15. Cavitation modeling and diesel engine cylinder liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandekar, Gautam; Pardue, Sally

    2003-10-01

    A common occurrence of cavitation damage is the waterside pitting of a wet sleeve liner in a diesel engine. The automotive industry utilizes an ultrasonic test of 20 kHz according to ASTM standards to quantify the effectiveness of engine coolant additives to prevent damage. However, recent tests indicate a mismatch between the ultrasonic test results and actual engine test runs. The focus of this study is to generate numerical models of bubble dynamics using already published literature. In most of the published papers higher-range frequencies (ultrasonic >15 kHz) are used. It is useful to explore the results of lower excitation frequencies as the vibrating frequencies of a diesel engine liner are between 500-9000 Hz. A Rayleigh-Plesset equation, nonlinear in nature, is used to plot the relation between bubble radius and time. Plots of the numerical solution from MATLAB are compared with plots published in the literature. Results from when the frequency of excitation is changed to the liner wall frequency and the fluid properties are changed to approximate engine conditions will be presented. Future work will examine the energy released by the bubble collapse and its correlation with erosion measured as mass change in a standard test button.

  16. 30 CFR 250.425 - What are the requirements for pressure testing liners?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... liners? 250.425 Section 250.425 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT... pressure testing liners? (a) You must test each drilling liner (and liner-lap) to a pressure at least equal to the anticipated pressure to which the liner will be subjected during the formation...

  17. 30 CFR 250.425 - What are the requirements for pressure testing liners?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... liners? 250.425 Section 250.425 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT... pressure testing liners? (a) You must test each drilling liner (and liner-lap) to a pressure at least equal to the anticipated pressure to which the liner will be subjected during the formation...

  18. 30 CFR 250.425 - What are the requirements for pressure testing liners?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... liners? 250.425 Section 250.425 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT... pressure testing liners? (a) You must test each drilling liner (and liner-lap) to a pressure at least equal to the anticipated pressure to which the liner will be subjected during the formation...

  19. 30 CFR 250.425 - What are the requirements for pressure testing liners?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... liners? 250.425 Section 250.425 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND... requirements for pressure testing liners? (a) You must test each drilling liner (and liner-lap) to a pressure at least equal to the anticipated pressure to which the liner will be subjected during the...

  20. Septic shock

    MedlinePlus

    Septic shock is a serious condition that occurs when a body-wide infection leads to dangerously low blood ... Septic shock occurs most often in the very old and the very young. It may also occur in ...

  1. Cardiogenic shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000185.htm Cardiogenic shock To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cardiogenic shock is when the heart has been damaged so ...

  2. Magnetic Compression of Low Adiabat Liquid Deuterium Filled Cylindrical Liners to Gbar Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Matthew; Knapp, Patrick; Dolan, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    We report on experiments where cylindrical beryllium liners filled with liquid deuterium were compressed to extreme pressure and density with current pulse shaping. ALEGRA MHD simulation, in conjunction with the BERTHA transmission line model of Z accelerator, was utilized to design a shaped current pulse that minimized both the stagnation adiabat of the liquid deuterium and the confining beryllium shell. In one set of experiments the pressure at stagnation is inferred to be ~ 100 Mbar using penetrating radiography. A peak liner convergence ratio (initial radius over final radius) of 7.6 was measured resulting in an average deuterium density of 10 g/cm3 and areal density of 0.45 g/cm2. The stagnation shock propagating radially outward through the liner wall was directly measured with a strength of ~ 120 Mbar. In a second set of experiments the liner was imploded to a peak convergence of 19 resulting in a density of 55 g/cm3 and areal density of 0.5 g/cm2. The pressure at stagnation in this experiment is estimated to be ~ 2 Gbar. This platform enables the study of high-pressure, high-density, implosion deceleration, and stagnation dynamics at spatial scales that are readily diagnosable (radius ~ 0.1mm - 0.4mm). Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Flux penetration of an aluminum liner during working fluid compression

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, D.E.; Hussey, T.W.

    1995-08-15

    The Phillips Laboratory working fluid experiment is a research effort to study the compression of a hot hydrogen gas using an electromagnetically imploded solid liner. In our experiments, the solid liner is driven by a 5 MJ discharge which Joule heats the aluminum, melting and eventually vaporizing it. This numerical study explores the vaporization and flux penetration of a solid aluminum liner during its implosion. In particular, it considers the effect that flux which has penetrated the liner has on the hot hydrogen working fluid. A study of the dynamics of the solid liner was performed with one-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations, which included a careful treatment of the electrical resistivity near the phase transitions. An analytic snowplow model is developed in order to estimate the minimum working fluid density required to ignore flux penetration through the liner.

  4. Accelerated aging tests of liners for uranium mill tailings disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, S.M.; Buelt, J.L.; Hale, V.Q.

    1981-11-01

    This document describes the results of accelerated aging tests to determine the long-term effectiveness of selected impoundment liner materials in a uranium mill tailings environment. The study was sponsored by the US Department of Energy under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. The study was designed to evaluate the need for, and the performance of, several candidate liners for isolating mill tailings leachate in conformance with proposed Environmental Protection Agency and Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements. The liners were subjected to conditions known to accelerate the degradation mechanisms of the various liners. Also, a test environment was maintained that modeled the expected conditions at a mill tailings impoundment, including ground subsidence and the weight loading of tailings on the liners. A comparison of installation costs was also performed for the candidate liners. The laboratory testing and cost information prompted the selection of a catalytic airblown asphalt membrane and a sodium bentonite-amended soil for fiscal year 1981 field testing.

  5. Method for selectively controlling flow across slotted liners

    SciTech Connect

    Peavy, M.A.; Dees, J.M.

    1993-08-31

    A process is described for decreasing flow rate across the radial boundary of a selected interval in a well bore containing a slotted liner comprising: placing an explosive and an internally catalyzed resin solution inside an elongated container; locating the elongated container opposite the selected interval in the well bore where flow rate through the slotted liner is to be decreased; firing the explosive; and allowing the resin to cure on the slotted liner before initiating flow through the well. A method is described for decreasing production of unwanted fluids from a horizontal well containing a slotted liner comprising: placing an explosive and an internally catalyzed resin inside an elongated container; placing the elongated container opposite an interval in the horizontal well where unwanted fluid is entering the well bore through the slotted liner; firing the explosive; and permitting the resin to cure on the slotted liner before initiating flow in the well.

  6. Analysis of dry cylinder liner behavior during engine operation

    SciTech Connect

    Mizutani, Kazunori; Murata, Katsuhiro; Suzawa, Takashi; Niitsu, Yasuhiko

    1996-09-01

    Engine manufacturers are continuing to develop new engine designs that provide higher power output, lower fuel consumption and lower engine weight. In order to achieve significant engine weight reduction, the light weight cylinder block structure employs dry cylinder liners rather than wet cylinder liners. The cast iron dry liner structure is utilized because of the superior wear and scuff resistance of the cast iron. Thin wall dry cast iron liners are being employed in both gasoline and diesel engines. Dry cylinder liners with wall thickness of 1.5 mm are in production for Japanese automotive diesel engines. In the case of the dry thin wall cast iron liners, 2 design configurations are employed: loose-fit type having a specified clearance between the outer liner surface and the cylinder bore surface; press-in type having an interference fit between the outer surface of liner and the cylinder bore surface. The physical properties of cast iron must be considered during the design phase if successful production designs are to be provided. In addition the operating stress caused by piston slap, combustion pressure variation and resultant effect on operating stress in the liner must be considered during the design. This paper summarizes the results of a series of studies undertaken to determine the effect of piston slap, combustion pressure and initial stress on resultant behavior of thin wall cylinder liners under engine operating conditions. The resultant data may be utilized to improve the overall design of thin wall dry cylinder liners, especially for loose-fit liners.

  7. LIQUID BUTANE FILLED LOAD FOR A LINER DRIVEN PEGASUS EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. SALAZAR; W. ANDERSON; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    A hydrogen rich, low density liquid, contained within the internal volume of a cylindrical liner, was requested of the Polymers and Coatings Group (MST-7) of the Los Alamos Materials Science Division for one of the last liner driven experiments conducted on the Los Alamos Pegasus facility. The experiment was a continuation of the Raleigh-Taylor hydrodynamics series of experiments and associated liners that have been described previously [1,2].

  8. Liquid butane filled load for a liner driven Pegasus experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, M. A.; Armijo, E. V.; Anderson, W. E.; Atchison, W. L.; Bartos, J. J.; Garcia, F.; Randolph, B.; Sheppard, M. G.; Stokes, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    A hydrogen rich, low density liquid, contained within the internal volume of a cylindrical liner, was requested of the Polymers and Coatings Group (MST-7) of the Los Alamos Materials Science Division for one of the last liner driven experiments conducted on the Los Alamos Pegasus facility. The experiment (Fig.1) was a continuation of the Raleigh-Taylor hydrodynamics series of experiments and associated liners that have been described previously.

  9. Durability of organobentonite-amended liner for decelerating chloroform transport.

    PubMed

    He, Shichong; Zhu, Lizhong

    2016-04-01

    Chloroform is added to landfill for suppressing methane generation, which however may transport through landfill liners and lead to contamination of groundwater. To decelerate chloroform transport, the enhanced sorption ability of clay liners following organobentonite addition was tested. In this study, we used batch sorption to evaluate sorption capacity of chloroform to organobentonite, followed by column tests and model simulations for assessing durability of different liners. Results show that adding 10% CTMAB-bentonite (organobentonite synthesized using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) increased the duration of a bentonite liner by 88.5%. CTMAB-bentonite consistently showed the highest sorption capacity (Qm) among six typical organobentonites under various environmental conditions. The removal rate of chloroform by CTMAB-bentonite was 3.6-23 times higher than that by natural soils. According to the results derived by model simulation, a 70-cm 10% CTMAB-bentonite liner exhibited much better durability than a 100-cm compact clay liner (CCL) and natural bentonite liner evidenced by the delayed and lower peak of eluent concentration. A minimum thickness of 65.8 cm of the 10% CTMAB-bentonite liner could completely sorb the chloroform in a 100-m-high landfill. The 10% CTMAB-bentonite liner exhibiting much better durability has the promise for reducing environmental risk of chloroform in landfill. PMID:26874063

  10. Optimization and Control of Acoustic Liner Impedance with Bias Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Houston; Follet, Jesse

    2000-01-01

    Because communities are impacted by steady increases in aircraft traffic, aircraft noise continues to be a growing problem for the growth of commercial aviation. Research has focused on improving the design of specific high noise source areas of aircraft and on noise control measures to alleviate noise radiated from aircraft to the surrounding environment. Engine duct liners have long been a principal means of attenuating engine noise. The ability to control in-situ the acoustic impedance of a liner would provide a valuable tool to improve the performance of liners. The acoustic impedance of a liner is directly related to the sound absorption qualities of that liner. Increased attenuation rates, the ability to change liner acoustic impedance to match various operating conditions, or the ability to tune a liner to more precisely match design impedance represent some ways that in-situ impedance control could be useful. With this in mind, the research to be investigated will focus on improvements in the ability to control liner impedance using a mean flow through the liner which is referred to as bias flow.

  11. Finite element analysis of the impingement on the acetabular liner rim due to wear of the acetabular liner surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saputra, Eko; Anwar, Iwan Budiwan; Ismail, Rifky; Jamari, J.; van der Heide, Emile

    2016-04-01

    This workstudies the impingement on the rim of acetabular liner due to wear on the surface of acetabular liner using finite element simulation. A three dimensional contact model between a femoral head and an acetabular liner was developed. There are three steps in this simulation, i.e. creating the virtualwear on the surface of acetabular liner, applying the load at the femoral head, and rotating the femoral head from neutral position till the impingement occurrence. The virtualwear is created based on the data of wear depth which was obtained from literature. Results showed that the wear on the acetabular liner surface wouldaffected the impingement occurrence, in which the impingement angle becomes narrow. In addition, the failure possibility of the acetabular liner rimwould become higher.

  12. Evaluation of Skin Friction Drag for Liner Applications in Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Brown, Martha C.; Jasinski, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    A parameter that is gaining significance in the evaluation of acoustic liner performance is the skin friction drag induced by air flow over the liner surface. Estimates vary widely regarding the amount of drag the liner induces relative to a smooth wall, from less than a 20% increase to nearly 100%, and parameters such as face sheet perforate hole diameter, percent open area, and sheet thickness are expected to figure prominently in the skin friction drag. Even a small increase in liner drag can impose an economic penalty, and current research is focused on developing 'low drag' liner concepts, with the goal being to approach the skin friction drag of a smooth wall. The issue of skin friction drag takes on greater significance as airframe designers investigate the feasibility of putting sound absorbing liners on the non-lifting surfaces of the wings and fuselage, for the purpose of reducing engine noise reflected and scattered toward observers on the ground. Researchers at the NASA Langley Research Center have embarked on investigations of liner skin friction drag with the aims of: developing a systematic drag measurement capability, establishing the drag of current liners, and developing liners that produce reduced drag without compromising acoustic performance. This paper discusses the experimental procedures that have been developed to calculate the drag coefficient based on the change in momentum thickness and the companion research program being carried out to measure the drag directly using a force balance. Liner samples that are evaluated include a solid wall with known roughness and conventional liners with perforated facesheets of varying hole diameter and percent open area.

  13. LABORATORY STUDIES OF SOIL BEDDING REQUIREMENTS FOR FLEXIBLE MEMBRANE LINERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The initial objective of this study was to investigate the performance of membrane liners during construction of hazardous waste landfills and develop a means for protecting the liners from damage. This objective included the development of laboratory tests that could be used to ...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3250 - Calcium hydroxide cavity liner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium hydroxide cavity liner. 872.3250 Section 872.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3250 Calcium hydroxide cavity liner....

  15. QUANTIFICATION OF LEAK RATES THROUGH HOLES IN LANDFILL LINERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the rate at which liquids leak through flaws in the flexible membrane liner (FML) component of composite FML-soil liners. The variables studied were: flaw size and shape, FML type and thickness, the influence of a geotextile between the compacte...

  16. Optimal Spray Application Rates for Ornamental Nursery Liner Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spray deposition and coverage at different application rates for nursery liners of different sizes were investigated to determine the optimal spray application rates. Experiments were conducted on two and three-year old red maple liners. A traditional hydraulic sprayer with vertical booms was used t...

  17. ONERA-NASA Cooperative Effort on Liner Impedance Eduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primus, Julien; Piot, Estelle; Simon, Frank; Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R

    2013-01-01

    As part of a cooperation between ONERA and NASA, the liner impedance eduction methods developed by the two research centers are compared. The NASA technique relies on an objective function built on acoustic pressure measurements located on the wall opposite the test liner, and the propagation code solves the convected Helmholtz equation in uniform ow using a finite element method that implements a continuous Galerkin discretization. The ONERA method uses an objective function based either on wall acoustic pressure or on acoustic velocity acquired above the liner by Laser Doppler Anemometry, and the propagation code solves the linearized Euler equations by a discontinuous Galerkin discretization. Two acoustic liners are tested in both ONERA and NASA ow ducts and the measured data are treated with the corresponding impedance eduction method. The first liner is a wire mesh facesheet mounted onto a honeycomb core, designed to be linear with respect to incident sound pressure level and to grazing ow velocity. The second one is a conventional, nonlinear, perforate-over-honeycomb single layer liner. Configurations without and with ow are considered. For the nonlinear liner, the comparison of liner impedance educed by NASA and ONERA shows a sensitivity to the experimental conditions, namely to the nature of the source and to the sample width.

  18. Verification of a variable rate sprayer for nursery liner applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An experimental variable-rate sprayer designed for liner applications was tested by comparing its spray deposit and coverage, and droplet density inside canopies of six nursery liner varieties with constant-rate applications. Spray samplers, including water sensitive papers (WSP) and nylon screens, ...

  19. CONSTRUCTION, MONITORING, AND PERFORMANCE OF TWO SOIL LINERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A prototype soil liner and a field-scale soil liner were constructed to test whether compacted soil barrier systems could be built to meet the standard set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for saturated hydraulic conductivity (< 1 x 10'7 cm/s). In situ ponded inf...

  20. Frequency and Time Domain Modeling of Acoustic Liner Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, Donald B.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a research program directed at the acoustics of advanced subsonic propulsion systems undertaken at NASA Langley, Duke University was funded to develop a boundary condition model for bulk-reacting nacelle liners. The overall objective of the Langley program was to understand and predict noise from advanced subsonic transport engines and to develop related noise control technology. The overall technical areas included: fan and propeller source noise, acoustics of ducts and duct liners, interior noise, subjective acoustics, and systems noise prediction. The Duke effort was directed toward duct liner acoustics for the development of analytical methods to characterize liner behavior in both frequency domain and time domain. A review of duct acoustics and liner technology can be found in Reference [1]. At that time, NASA Langley was investigating the propulsion concept of an advanced ducted fan, with a large diameter housed inside a relatively short duct. Fan diameters in excess of ten feet were proposed. The lengths of both the inlet and exhaust portions of the duct were to be short, probably less than half the fan diameter. The nacelle itself would be relatively thin-walled for reasons of aerodynamic efficiency. The blade-passage frequency was expected to be less than I kHz, and very likely in the 200 to 300 Hz range. Because of the design constraints of a short duct, a thin nacelle, and long acoustic wavelengths, the application of effective liner technology would be especially challenging. One of the needs of the NASA Langley program was the capability to accurately and efficiently predict the behavior of the acoustic liner. The traditional point impedance method was not an adequate model for proposed liner designs. The method was too restrictive to represent bulk reacting liners and to allow for the characterization of many possible innovative liner concepts. In the research effort at Duke, an alternative method, initially developed to handle bulk

  1. Study of imploding liner-electrode wall interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chernyshev, V.K.; Zharinov, Y.I.; Kudolkin, I.D.; Ruzin, V.N.; Ionov, A.I.

    1994-12-01

    The report gives the results of the experiments on aluminum liner acceleration and their interaction with electrode walls. The liners having the radius of 30 mm, wall thickness of 1mm and 0.7 mm and a length of 30 mm are accelerated by a magnetic field, created by explosive magnetic generator (EMC). A helical generator 100 mm in diameter and 700 mm in length was used to create a magnetic field. During the process of compression a liner shape was recorded using X-ray facility. The report gives experimental set-up, electrical and design data of experimental units and diagnostic equipment data, also raw experimental data, analysis data and description of an analysis method. Based on the experiments the authors chose the method to bring a liner into a contact with electrode walls, which permits continuous contact of a liner with electrode wall is in the process of motion.

  2. Nondestructive evaluation of environmental barrier coatings in CFCC combustor liners.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J. G.; Benz, J.; Ellingson, W. A.; Kimmel, J. B.; Price, J. R.; Energy Technology; Solar Turbines, Inc

    2007-01-01

    Advanced combustor liners fabricated of SiC/SiC continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composite (CFCC) and covered with environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) have been successfully tested in Solar Turbines Inc. field engines. The primary goal for the CFCC/EBC liners is to reach a 30,000-h lifetime. Because the EBCs, when applied on the hot surfaces of liners, protect the underlying CFCC from oxidation damage, their performance is critical in achieving the lifetime goal. To determine CFCC/EBC liner condition and assess operating damage, the liners were subjected to nondestructive evaluation (NDE) during various processing stages, as well as before and after the engine test. The NDE techniques included pulsed infrared thermal imaging, air-coupled ultrasonic scanning, and X-ray computerized tomography. It was found that EBC damage and spallation depend on the condition of the CFCC material. The NDE results and correlations with destructive examination are discussed.

  3. The effect of base/liner use on restoration leakage.

    PubMed

    von Fraunhofer, J A; Marshall, K R; Holman, B G

    2006-01-01

    Central to the success of a restoration is the quality of the restoration-dentin interfacial seal; any compromise of the seal can lead to secondary or recurrent decay. Class V restorations have a high leakage propensity and this study evaluates the effect of base/liner placement on leakage behavior. Class V intracoronal half enamel/half dentin preparations (3.0 x 2.0 x 2.0 mm) were cut in four groups (n = 10) of extracted human teeth with a new bur used for each cavity preparation. All teeth were single-rooted, single-canal anterior teeth. Base/liner usage differed between each group. The first group of teeth had no liner or base, while a liner was placed in the second group of teeth prior to conditioning and restoration. A base was placed in the third group of cavity preparations and both the base and liner were placed in the fourth group. After preparation, a small diameter bare-end PVC-insulated copper wire was inserted within the root canal of each tooth from the apex to firm contact with the pulp chamber roof. The tooth-wire interface and root surface was sealed and leakage was followed electrochemically for 35 days in 0.9% NaCl solution. All of the teeth leaked to some degree; however, teeth that were restored without liner or base demonstrated the smallest amount of leakage. The greatest leakage was noted in teeth restored with both a base and a liner; teeth restored with only a base showed greater leakage than those restored with only a liner. The findings indicate that the presence of a base and/or a liner results in greater leakage compared with intracoronal Class V preparations that were conditioned and restored only. The data suggest that placing both a base and a liner increases restoration leakage significantly. PMID:16689065

  4. Further Development and Assessment of a Broadband Liner Optimization Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Jones, Michael G.; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of advanced fan designs (including higher bypass ratios) and shorter engine nacelles has highlighted a need for increased fan noise reduction over a broader frequency range. Thus, improved broadband liner designs must account for these constraints and, where applicable, take advantage of advanced manufacturing techniques that have opened new possibilities for novel configurations. This work focuses on the use of an established broadband acoustic liner optimization process to design a variable-depth, multi-degree of freedom liner for a high speed fan. Specifically, in-duct attenuation predictions with a statistical source model are used to obtain optimum impedance spectra over the conditions of interest. The predicted optimum impedance information is then used with acoustic liner modeling tools to design a liner aimed at producing impedance spectra that most closely match the predicted optimum values. The multi-degree of freedom design is carried through design, fabrication, and testing. In-duct attenuation predictions compare well with measured data and the multi-degree of freedom liner is shown to outperform a more conventional liner over a range of flow conditions. These promising results provide further confidence in the design tool, as well as the enhancements made to the overall design process.

  5. Multimegajoule electromagnetic implosion of shaped solid-density liners

    SciTech Connect

    Degnan, J.H.; Baker, W.L.; Alme, M.L.

    1995-03-01

    Electromagnetic implosions of shaped cylindrical aluminum liners that remain at solid density are discussed. The approximate liner parameters have an initial radius of 3 to 4 cm, are 4 cm in height, and are nearly 0.1 cm thick. The liners are driven by the Shiva Star 1300-{mu}f capacitor bank at an 84-kV charging voltage and an nearly 30-nH total initial inductance (including implosion load). The discharge current travels along the length of the liner and rises to 14 MA in nearly 8 {mu}s. The implosion time is nearly 12 {mu}s. Diagnostics include inductive current and capacitive voltage probes, magnetic probes, and radiography. Both right-circular cylinder and conical liner implosion data are displayed and discussed. Radiography indicates implosion behavior substantially consistent with two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic calculations, which predict inner surface implosion velocities exceeding 20 km/s, and compressed density of two to three times solid density. Less growth of perturbations is evident for the conical liner (nearly 1% thickness tolerance) than for the right-circular cylindrical liner (nearly 3% thickness tolerance). 12 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Thermographic inspection of pipes, tanks, and containment liners

    SciTech Connect

    Renshaw, Jeremy B. Muthu, Nathan; Lhota, James R.; Shepard, Steven M.

    2015-03-31

    Nuclear power plants are required to operate at a high level of safety. Recent industry and license renewal commitments aim to further increase safety by requiring the inspection of components that have not traditionally undergone detailed inspected in the past, such as tanks and liners. NEI 09-14 requires the inspection of buried pipes and tanks while containment liner inspections are required as a part of license renewal commitments. Containment liner inspections must inspect the carbon steel liner for defects - such as corrosion - that could threaten the pressure boundary and ideally, should be able to inspect the surrounding concrete for foreign material that could be in contact with the steel liner and potentially initiate corrosion. Such an inspection requires a simultaneous evaluation of two materials with very different material properties. Rapid, yet detailed, inspection results are required due to the massive size of the tanks and containment liners to be inspected. For this reason, thermal NDE methods were evaluated to inspect tank and containment liner mockups with simulated defects. Thermographic Signal Reconstruction (TSR) was utilized to enhance the images and provide detailed information on the sizes and shapes of the observed defects. The results show that thermographic inspection is highly sensitive to the defects of interest and is capable of rapidly inspecting large areas.

  7. Two-dimensional modeling of magnetically imploded liners

    SciTech Connect

    Atchison, W.L.; Bowers, R.L.; Brownell, J.H.; Lee, H.

    1996-11-01

    Magnetically imploded massive cylindrical liner drivers have been studied in two-dimensions for low, intermediate and high energy pulsed power systems. The simulations have been carried out using a resistive Eulerian magnetohydrodynamics computational model which includes material strength, and models the interactions between the imploding liner and the electrode walls. The computations simulate the generation of perturbations and their subsequent growth during the implosion. At low energies a solid liner remains in the plastic regime, reaching an inner cylindrical target with velocities of a few mm per {mu}s. At higher energies (where one-dimensional models predict implosion velocities of order 1 cm/{mu}s or more) resistive heating of the liner results in melting, and the effects of magnetically driven instabilities become important. We discuss the two-dimensional issues which arise in these systems. These include: the onset of perturbations associated with the motion of the liner along the electrodes; the growth of instabilities in liquid layers; and the suppression of instability growth during the implosion by maintaining a solid inner layer. Studies have been made of liners designed for the Pegasus capacitor bank facility (currents in the 5 - 12 MA regime), and for the Procyon high explosive system (currents in the 20 MA regime). This work focus on the design and performance of the first Pegasus composite megabar liner experiment.

  8. Thermographic inspection of pipes, tanks, and containment liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renshaw, Jeremy B.; Lhota, James R.; Muthu, Nathan; Shepard, Steven M.

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear power plants are required to operate at a high level of safety. Recent industry and license renewal commitments aim to further increase safety by requiring the inspection of components that have not traditionally undergone detailed inspected in the past, such as tanks and liners. NEI 09-14 requires the inspection of buried pipes and tanks while containment liner inspections are required as a part of license renewal commitments. Containment liner inspections must inspect the carbon steel liner for defects - such as corrosion - that could threaten the pressure boundary and ideally, should be able to inspect the surrounding concrete for foreign material that could be in contact with the steel liner and potentially initiate corrosion. Such an inspection requires a simultaneous evaluation of two materials with very different material properties. Rapid, yet detailed, inspection results are required due to the massive size of the tanks and containment liners to be inspected. For this reason, thermal NDE methods were evaluated to inspect tank and containment liner mockups with simulated defects. Thermographic Signal Reconstruction (TSR) was utilized to enhance the images and provide detailed information on the sizes and shapes of the observed defects. The results show that thermographic inspection is highly sensitive to the defects of interest and is capable of rapidly inspecting large areas.

  9. Liners for ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Miller, Christopher Francis

    2010-08-10

    Ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel comprising an interior, an exterior, an inlet, an inlet conduit, an outlet, and an outlet conduit; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein the inlet and the outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; (c) a gas manifold having an interior surface wherein the gas manifold is in flow communication with the interior region of each of the planar ion transport membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel; and (d) a liner disposed within any of the inlet conduit, the outlet conduit, and the interior surface of the gas manifold.

  10. CANMET Gasifier Liner Coupon Material Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Fitzsimmons; Alan Darby; Fred Widman

    2005-10-30

    The test plan detailed in this topical report supports Task 1 of the project titled ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Coal Energy Resources - Advanced Gasification Systems Development (AGSD)''. The purpose of these tests is to verify that materials planned for use in an advanced gasifier pilot plant will withstand the environments in a commercial gasifier. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) has developed and designed the cooled liner test assembly article that will be tested at CANMET Energy Technology Centre (CETC-O) in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (CETC-O). The Test Plan TP-00364 is duplicated in its entirety, with formatting changes to comply with the format required for this Topical Report. The table of contents has been modified to include the additional material required by this topical report. Test Request example and drawings of non-proprietary nature are also included as appendices.

  11. A sensate liner for personnel monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Eric J.; Jayaraman, Sundaresan; Park, Ms. Sungmee; Rajamanickam, Rangaswamy; Eisler, Robert, , Dr.; Burghart, Mr. George; McKee, Mr. Tony

    This program develops and demonstrates technologies useful for implementing a manageable cost effective systems approach to monitoring the medical condition of personnel by way of an instrumented uniform hereafter referred to as a Sensate Liner (SL). The SL consists of a form fitting garment which contains and interconnects sensing elements and devices to an electronics pack containing a processor and transmitter. The SL prototype requires fiber, textile, garment and sensor development. The SL textile consists of a mesh of electrically and optically conductive fibers integrated into the normal structure (woven or knitted) of fibers and yarns selected for comfort and durability. A suite of SL garment compatible embedded biological and physical sensors are then integrated into the SL. The initial SL sensor suite is selected to improve triage for combat casualties. Additional SL sensor concepts for medical monitoring will be discussed.

  12. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion is an emerging, relatively unexplored approach to fusion for electrical power and propulsion application. The physical principles of the concept are founded upon both inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). It attempts to combine the favorable attributes of both these orthogonal approaches to fusion, but at the same time, avoiding the extreme technical challenges of both by exploiting a fusion regime intermediate between them. It uses a material liner to compress, heat and contain the fusion reacting plasma (the target plasma) mentally. By doing so, the fusion burn could be made to occur at plasma densities as high as six orders of magnitude higher than conventional MCF such as tokamak, thus leading to an approximately three orders of magnitude reduction in the plasma energy required for ignition. It also uses a transient magnetic field, compressed to extremely high intensity (100's T to 1000T) in the target plasma, to slow down the heat transport to the liner and to increase the energy deposition of charged-particle fusion products. This has several compounding beneficial effects. It leads to longer energy confinement time compared with conventional ICF without magnetized target, and thus permits the use of much lower plasma density to produce reasonable burn-up fraction. The compounding effects of lower plasma density and the magneto-insulation of the target lead to greatly reduced compressional heating power on the target. The increased energy deposition rate of charged-particle fusion products also helps to lower the energy threshold required for ignition and increasing the burn-up fraction. The reduction in ignition energy and the compressional power compound to lead to reduced system size, mass and R&D cost. It is a fusion approach that has an affordable R&D pathway, and appears attractive for propulsion application in the nearer term.

  13. Studies of solid liner stability in electromagnetic implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Atchison, W.L.; Faehl, R.J.; Rienovsky, R.E.; Morgan, D.

    1998-12-31

    The authors have conducted a series of experiments involving electromagnetic implosion of solid aluminum liners on the Pegasus II capacitor bank. These experiments consisted of liners on which single wavelength perturbations had been cut into the outer surface. Typical liner thickness was 400 mm and the usual material was the 1100 aluminum alloy. This alloy is relatively soft with a high conductivity. Recently comparisons have been made with harder but more resistive alloys. The sinusoidal perturbations ranged in amplitude between 10--100 mm and their wavelength between 0.5 and 2.0 mm. Radiographs of the imploding liners showed that the initial perturbations grew to amplitudes of 2000--4000 mm before completely rupturing and injecting flux into the region interior to the liner. Throughout the growth of the perturbations, there was virtually no coupling to other wavelengths. Even after liner disruption, the series of disk-like structures that resulted remained at the same scale length until impact with a center conductor. Two-dimensional MHD simulations of these experiments with the high conductivity Al-1100 alloy have yielded consistently good agreement, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Because the magnetic diffusion time in this alloy is comparable to or longer than the growth time, they find that the dynamics can be approximated by theories of Rayleigh-Taylor instability for which strength has been included. Recently, the authors have conducted two experiments with other aluminum alloys. These alloys have a significantly higher tensile yield strength than the 1100 alloy, but also somewhat high resistivity. Because the magnetic diffusion, ohmic heating, and loss of strength all occur on shorter times than does the growth, the forces acting on the liner are more distributed throughout the liner thickness than on the previous experiments. Qualitatively different features have been observed in the radiographs of these experiments. Two-dimensional MHD

  14. Formed platelet combustor liner construction feasibility, phase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, W. A.; Janke, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Environments generated in high pressure liquid rocket engines impose severe requirements on regeneratively cooled combustor liners. Liners fabricated for use in high chamber pressures using conventional processes suffer from limitations that can impair operational cycle life and can adversely affect wall compatibility. Chamber liners fabricated using formed platelet technology provide an alternative to conventional regeneratively cooled liners (an alternative that has many attractive benefits). A formed platelet liner is made from a stacked assembly of platelets with channel features. The assembly is diffusion bonded into a flat panel and then three-dimensionally formed into a section of a chamber. Platelet technology permits the liner to have very precisely controlled and thin hot gas walls and therefore increased heat transfer efficiency. Further cooling efficiencies can be obtained through enhanced design flexibility. These advantages translate into increased cycle life and enhanced wall compatibility. The increased heat transfer efficiency can alternately be used to increase engine performance or turbopump life as a result of pressure drop reductions within the regeneratively cooled liner. Other benefits can be obtained by varying the materials of construction within the platelet liner to enhance material compatibility with operating environment or with adjoining components. Manufacturing cost savings are an additional benefit of a formed platelet liner. This is because of reduced touch labor and reduced schedule when compared to conventional methods of manufacture. The formed platelet technology is not only compatible with current state-of-the art combustion chamber structural support and manifolding schemes, it is also an enabling technology that allows the use of other high performance and potentially low cost methods of construction for the entire combustion chamber assembly. The contract under which this report is submitted contains three phases: (1) phase

  15. Retrieved Highly Crosslinked UHMWPE Acetabular Liners Have Similar Wear Damage as Conventional UHMWPE

    PubMed Central

    Schroder, David T.; Kelly, Natalie H.; Parks, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Highly crosslinked UHMWPE is associated with increased wear resistance in hip simulator and clinical studies. Laboratory and case studies, however, have described rim fracture in crosslinked acetabular liners. Controversy exists, therefore, on the relative merits of crosslinked liners over conventional liners in terms of wear performance versus resistance to fatigue cracking. Questions/purposes We asked whether crosslinked liners would show less surface damage than conventional liners but would be more susceptible to fatigue damage. Methods We examined 36 conventional UHMWPE and 39 crosslinked UHMWPE retrieved implants with similar patient demographics and identical design for evidence of wear damage, including articular surface damage, impingement, screw-hole creep, and rim cracks. Results We observed no difference in wear damage scores for the two liners. Conventional liners more frequently impinged but were more often elevated with smaller head sizes. We observed creep in approximately 70% of both types of liners. Incipient rim cracks were found in five crosslinked liners, and one liner had a rim fracture. Only one conventional liner had an incipient rim crack. Conclusions Contrary to our expectation, damage was similar between crosslinked and conventional UHMWPE liners. Moreover, the 15% occurrence (six of 39) of incipient or complete fractures in crosslinked liners as compared with a 3% occurrence (one of 36) in conventional liners may have implications for the long-term performance of crosslinked liners. Longer-term studies will be necessary to establish the fate of rim cracks and thus the overall clinical fatigue performance of crosslinked liners. PMID:20844998

  16. Prediction of the acoustic impedance of duct liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, W. E.; Tester, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    Recent research which contributes to the prediction of the acoustic impedance of duct liners is reviewed. This review includes the linear and nonlinear properties of sheet and bulk type materials and methods for the measurement of these properties. It also includes the effect of grazing flow on the acoustic properties of materials. Methods for predicting the properties of single or multilayered, point reacting or extended reaction, and flat or curved liners are discussed. Based on this review, methods for predicting the properties of the duct liners which are typically used in aircraft engines are recommended. Some areas of needed research are discussed briefly.

  17. Pegasus liner stability experiments: Diagnostics and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.A.; Morgan, D.V.; Rodriguez, G.

    1998-12-31

    A series of experiments to compare imploding cylindrical liner performance with Magneto-HydroDynamic (MHD) modeling has been performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Pegasus capacitor bank. Several configurations of aluminum liners have been used; some with initial perturbations and some smooth. Instability growth resulting from the perturbations has been observed with high resolution. Load diagnostics included radial x-rays, fiber optic impact pins, and VISAR (Velocity Interferometer for a Surface of Any Reflector). Diagnostic results and comparisons for several liner stability (LS) experiments are presented.

  18. Simulation of Plasma Jet Merger and Liner Formation within the PLX- α Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samulyak, Roman; Chen, Hsin-Chiang; Shih, Wen; Hsu, Scott

    2015-11-01

    Detailed numerical studies of the propagation and merger of high Mach number argon plasma jets and the formation of plasma liners have been performed using the newly developed method of Lagrangian particles (LP). The LP method significantly improves accuracy and mathematical rigor of common particle-based numerical methods such as smooth particle hydrodynamics while preserving their main advantages compared to grid-based methods. A brief overview of the LP method will be presented. The Lagrangian particle code implements main relevant physics models such as an equation of state for argon undergoing atomic physics transformation, radiation losses in thin optical limit, and heat conduction. Simulations of the merger of two plasma jets are compared with experimental data from past PLX experiments. Simulations quantify the effect of oblique shock waves, ionization, and radiation processes on the jet merger process. Results of preliminary simulations of future PLX- alpha experiments involving the ~ π / 2 -solid-angle plasma-liner configuration with 9 guns will also be presented. Partially supported by ARPA-E's ALPHA program.

  19. Hypovolemic shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... clammy skin Confusion Decreased or no urine output General weakness Pale skin color (pallor) Rapid breathing Sweating , moist skin Unconsciousness The greater and more rapid the blood loss, the more severe the symptoms of shock.

  20. SLIDE PRESENTATION: LIMITATIONS OF USE OF GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS (GCLS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation describes the design and construction issues pertaining to the use of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLSs) in waste containment. The presentation covers new materials, potential design and construction pitfalls and a summary of ongoing research.

  1. Experimental Impedance of Single Liner Elements with Bias Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Follet, J. I.; Betts, J. F.; Kelly, Jeffrey J.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2000-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to generate a high quality database, from which the effects of a mean bias flow on the acoustic impedance of lumped-element single-degree-of-freedom liners was determined. Acoustic impedance measurements were made using the standard two-microphone method in the NASA Langley Normal Incidence Tube. Each liner consisted of a perforated sheet with a constant-area cavity. Liner resistance was shown to increase and to become less frequency and sound pressure level dependent as the bias flow was increased. The resistance was also consistently lower for a negative bias flow (suction) than for a positive bias flow (blowing) of equal magnitude. The slope of the liner reactance decreased with increased flow.

  2. IET. Stack interior. Masons lay fire brick liner, leaving air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET. Stack interior. Masons lay fire brick liner, leaving air layer between bricks and concrete wall. Date: May 20, 1955. INEEL negative no. 55-1306 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. High-speed velocimetry inside imploding cylindrical liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, Daniel; Lemke, Ray; Dalton, Devon; Harding, Eric; McBride, Ryan; Martin, Matthew; Blue, Brent; Walker, Scott

    2014-03-01

    Dynamic planar compression is conceptually simple but difficult to maintain at extreme pressure (>5 Mbar). Higher pressures are attainable with imploding cylindrical liners, using Photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) to track the liner interior. PDV measures Doppler shift directly--1 GHz of beat frequency for every 1 km/s of velocity--requiring a special ``leapfrog'' approach for liners traveling in excess of 20 km/s. Single-point and multi-point PDV measurements have been performed in aluminum, beryllium, and tantalum liners under ramp compression, and the technique can readily applied to other implosion experiments. Combined with electrical current diagnostics, these measurements test thermodynamic equations of state at pressures up to 10 MBar and beyond. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85.

  4. Subscale hot-fire testing of a formed platelet liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, Sandra K.; Hayes, William A.

    1993-01-01

    To investigate low-cost options for fabricating main combustion chambers, formed platelet liners are being developed. The savings in manufacturing time and cost associated with platelet liners are accompanied by promising thermal advantages, such as lower-wall temperatures and increased cycle life. A subscale liner was tested by NASA at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to demonstrate its thermal performance. Testing to date has provided chamber pressures up to 2524 psia, while a maximum chamber pressure of 2700 psia is planned. In general, the liner has remained in good condition and performed well, with only minor areas of localized roughening. Data from this subscale test program is being used to develop a full size chamber for testing on a Space Shuttle Main Engine at MSFC in 1994.

  5. Method of repairing a wellbore liner for sand control

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, J.M.

    1992-10-13

    This patent describes a method of repairing a damaged wellbore liner for controlling sand and other fine materials. It comprises: positioning a quantity of fluid resin material in alignment with the portion of the wellbore liner to be repaired; positioning a gas generator in proximity with the fluid resin material; actuating the gas generator to increase wellbore pressure in a substantially instantaneous manner to a pressure substantially in excess of well pressure to force the fluid resin material from the wellbore into the damaged area of the wellbore liner; and subsequently polymerizing the resin material to form a consolidated, porous permeable matrix that allows the flow of production fluid into the well while preventing the flow of sand, or other fine materials into the well through the previously damaged area of the wellbore liner.

  6. Acoustic Liner Drag: A Parametric Study of Conventional Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howerton, Brian M.; Jones, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Interest in the characterization of the aerodynamic drag performance of acoustic liners has increased in the past several years. This paper details experiments in NASA Langley's Grazing Flow Impedance Tube to quantify the relative drag of several conventional perforate-over-honeycomb liner configurations. For a fixed porosity, facesheet hole diameter and cavity depth are varied to study the effect of each. These configurations are selected to span the range of conventional liner geometries used in commercial aircraft engines. Detailed static pressure and acoustic measurements are made for grazing flows up to M=0.5 at 140 dB SPL for tones between 400 and 2800 Hz. These measurements are used to calculate a resistance factor (?) for each configuration. Analysis shows a correlation between perforate hole size and the resistance factor but cavity depth seems to have little influence. Acoustic effects on liner drag are observed to be limited to the lower Mach numbers included in this investigation.

  7. Development of composite pressure vessels with nonmetallic liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Con F.; Newhouse, Norman L.; Schimenti, John D.; Tiller, Dale B.

    1992-07-01

    Brunswick composites has developed metallic liners and composite cylinders for use in military and civilian aircraft, missiles, inflation systems and space applications. At present an all-composite pressurant tank is being developed for use in the natural gas vehicle (NGV). This tank uses a plastic liner of high density polyethylene (HDPE) as a leak-tight permeation barrier. Tank characteristics and testing are described. HDPE reduces cost, meets all space and missile pressurant tank requirements, and is readily availble. Test results indicate that an all-composite pressurant tank with an HDPE liner provides a tough, high cycle life, lightweight, environmentally stable pressurant tank with very low permeability. HDPE offers a viable, low cost alternative to conventional metal liners as well as many design advantages.

  8. Migration behavior of landfill leachate contaminants through alternative composite liners.

    PubMed

    Varank, Gamze; Demir, Ahmet; Top, Selin; Sekman, Elif; Akkaya, Ebru; Yetilmezsoy, Kaan; Bilgili, M Sinan

    2011-08-01

    Four identical pilot-scale landfill reactors with different alternative composite liners were simultaneously operated for a period of about 540 days to investigate and to simulate the migration behaviors of phenolic compounds (phenol, 2-CP, 2-MP, 3-MP, 4-MP, 2-NP, 4-NP, 2,4-DNP, 2,4-DCP, 2,6-DCP, 2,4,5-TCP, 2,4,6-TCP, 2,3,4,6-TeCP, PCP) and heavy metals (Pb, Cu, Zn, Cr, Cd, Ni) from landfill leachate to the groundwater. Alternative landfill liners of four reactors consist of R1: Compacted clay liner (10 cm+10 cm, k=10(-8)m/sn), R2: Geomembrane (2 mm HDPE)+compacted clay liner (10 cm+10 cm, k=10⁻⁸ m/sn), R3: Geomembrane (2 mm HDPE)+compacted clay liner (10 cm, k=10⁻⁸ m/sn)+bentonite liner (2 cm)+compacted clay liner (10 cm, k=10⁻⁸ m/sn), and R4: Geomembrane (2 mm HDPE)+compacted clay liner (10 cm, k=10⁻⁸ m/sn)+zeolite liner (2 cm)+compacted clay liner (10 cm, k=10⁻⁸ m/sn). Wastes representing Istanbul municipal solid wastes were disposed in the reactors. To represent bioreactor landfills, reactors were operated by leachate recirculation. To monitor and control anaerobic degradation in the reactors, variations of conventional parameters (pH, alkalinity, chloride, conductivity, COD, TOC, TKN, ammonia and alcaly metals) were also investigated in landfill leachate samples. The results of this study showed that about 35-50% of migration of organic contaminants (phenolic compounds) and 55-100% of migration of inorganic contaminants (heavy metals) to the model groundwater could be effectively reduced with the use of bentonite and zeolite materials in landfill liner systems. Although leachate contaminants can reach to the groundwater in trace concentrations, findings of this study concluded that the release of these compounds from landfill leachate to the groundwater may potentially be of an important environmental concern based on the experimental findings. PMID:21621822

  9. Configuration Effects on Acoustic Performance of a Duct Liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Brown, Martha C.; Jones, Michael G.; Nark, Douglas; Howerton, Brian M.

    2008-01-01

    Continued success in aircraft engine noise reduction necessitates ever more complete understanding of the effect that flow path geometry has on sound propagation in the engine. The Curved Duct Test Rig (CDTR) has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center to investigate sound propagation through a duct of comparable size (approximately the gap of GE90) and physical characteristics to the aft bypass duct of typical aircraft engines. The liner test section is designed to mimic the outer/inner walls of an engine exhaust bypass duct that has been unrolled circumferentially. Experiments to investigate the effect of curvature along the flow path on the acoustic performance of a test liner are performed in the CDTR and reported in this paper. Flow paths investigated include both straight and curved with offsets from the inlet to the discharge plane of and 1 duct width, respectively. The test liners are installed on the side walls of the liner test section. The liner samples are perforate over honeycomb core, which design is typical of liners installed in aircraft nacelles. In addition to fully treated side walls, combinations of treated and acoustically rigid walls are investigated. While curvature in the hard wall duct is found not to reduce the incident sound significantly, it does cause mode scattering. It is found that asymmetry of liner treatment causes scattering of the incident mode into less attenuated modes, which degrades the overall liner attenuation. It is also found that symmetry of liner treatment enhances liner performance by eliminating scattering into less attenuated modes. Comparisons of measured liner attenuation with numerical results predicted by an analytic model based on the parabolic approximation (CDUCT-LaRC) have also been made and are reported in this paper. The effect of curvature in the rigid wall configuration estimated by CDUCT-LaRC is similar to the observed results, and the mode scattering seen in the measurements also occurs in the

  10. Flap Side Edge Liners for Airframe Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G. (Inventor); Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor); Choudhari, Meelan M. (Inventor); Howerton, Brian M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    One or more acoustic liners comprising internal chambers or passageways that absorb energy from a noise source on the aircraft are disclosed. The acoustic liners may be positioned at the ends of flaps of an aircraft wing to provide broadband noise absorption and/or dampen the noise producing unsteady flow features, and to reduce the amount of noise generated due to unsteady flow at the inboard and/or outboard end edges of a flap.

  11. Landing Gear Door Liners for Airframe Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G. (Inventor); Howerton, Brian M. (Inventor); Van De Ven, Thomas (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A landing gear door for retractable landing gear of aircraft includes an acoustic liner. The acoustic liner includes one or more internal cavities or chambers having one or more openings that inhibit the generation of sound at the surface and/or absorb sound generated during operation of the aircraft. The landing gear door may include a plurality of internal chambers having different geometries to thereby absorb broadband noise.

  12. Floating junk bonnet protects liner top from debris

    SciTech Connect

    Telfer, G. ); Sweeney, D. )

    1994-09-12

    A new design of debris protection system, the floating junk bonnet, for liner tops prevents well debris from entering the liner top polished bore receptacle (PBR) and sticking the setting tools. The floating junk bonnet improves the recovery of liner setting tools from the well no matter how severe the debris problem is. Well debris (formation cuttings, fines, mud solids, cement solids, foreign bodies, etc) entering the linear top PBR during cementing operations has been a serious problem for many operators. In some cases, this problem has led to liner hanger setting tools sticking in the liner top PBR. The setting tool could then become cemented in place, resulting in an expensive fishing job or sidetrack. A prototype debris protection system was developed and tested prior to offshore application. The liner protection tool was subsequently successfully used on Nelson project development wells in the U.K. North Sea. The paper discusses debris accumulation, the junket basket, the floating junk bonnet design, test procedures, and field test results.

  13. Spherically symmetric simulation of plasma liner driven magnetoinertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Samulyak, Roman; Parks, Paul; Wu Lingling

    2010-09-15

    Spherically symmetric simulations of the implosion of plasma liners and compression of plasma targets in the concept of the plasma jet driven magnetoinertial fusion have been performed using the method of front tracking. The cases of single deuterium and xenon liners and double layer deuterium-xenon liners compressing various deuterium-tritium targets have been investigated, optimized for maximum fusion energy gains, and compared with theoretical predictions and scaling laws of [P. Parks, Phys. Plasmas 15, 062506 (2008)]. In agreement with the theory, the fusion gain was significantly below unity for deuterium-tritium targets compressed by Mach 60 deuterium liners. The most optimal setup for a given chamber size contained a target with the initial radius of 20 cm compressed by a 10 cm thick, Mach 60 xenon liner, achieving a fusion energy gain of 10 with 10 GJ fusion yield. Simulations also showed that composite deuterium-xenon liners reduce the energy gain due to lower target compression rates. The effect of heating of targets by alpha particles on the fusion energy gain has also been investigated.

  14. Microstructural examination of service exposed coal mill liner material

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswarlu, K.; Chowdhury, S.G.; Pathak, L.C.; Ray, A.K.

    2007-10-15

    This study mainly focuses the microstructural characterisation of the service exposed coal liner. These liners are generally referred to as bull ring segments in the bowl mill of coal pulveriser systems. The failed bull ring segment was collected from a coal-fired power plant of Kolaghat thermal plant, West Bengal, India. The crack that has been observed in the middle of the liner was observed under SEM and detailed microstructural studies are made for the liner material. The hardness measurements are made and XRD is carried out to identify the phases present in the sample. The results suggest that the material confirms to high chromium cast iron and microstructural studies reveal that the cracks are mainly due to the heavy service exposed conditions where lumps of coal and silica sand falling on these liners causing severe impact and abrasion conditions. High abrasive studies on the liner material are carried out and it showed that increasing the abrasive size as well as load is responsible for higher wear loss. The results suggest that prolonged exposure to abrasion conditions results in the progressive removal of the matrix material and due to various phase transformations from austenite to martensite introduces surface volume changes and causes the generation of cracks and further lead to failure of the component.

  15. Computer method for design of acoustic liners for turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minner, G. L.; Rice, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    A design package is presented for the specification of acoustic liners for turbofans. An estimate of the noise generation was made based on modifications of existing noise correlations, for which the inputs are basic fan aerodynamic design variables. The method does not predict multiple pure tones. A target attenuation spectrum was calculated which was the difference between the estimated generation spectrum and a flat annoyance-weighted goal attenuated spectrum. The target spectrum was combined with a knowledge of acoustic liner performance as a function of the liner design variables to specify the acoustic design. The liner design method at present is limited to annular duct configurations. The detailed structure of the liner was specified by combining the required impedance (which is a result of the previous step) with a mathematical model relating impedance to the detailed structure. The design procedure was developed for a liner constructed of perforated sheet placed over honeycomb backing cavities. A sample calculation was carried through in order to demonstrate the design procedure, and experimental results presented show good agreement with the calculated results of the method.

  16. Effects of Flow Profile on Educed Acoustic Liner Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie r.; Nark, Douglas M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results of an investigation of the effects of shear flow profile on impedance eduction processes employed at NASA Langley. Uniform and 1-D shear-flow propagation models are used to educe the acoustic impedance of three test liners based on aeroacoustic data acquired in the Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube, at source levels of 130, 140 and 150 dB, and at centerline Mach numbers of 0.0, 0.3 and 0.5. A ceramic tubular, calibration liner is used to evaluate the propagation models, as this liner is expected to be insensitive to SPL, grazing flow Mach number, and flow profile effects. The propagation models are then used to investigate the effects of shear flow profile on acoustic impedances educed for two conventional perforate-over-honeycomb liners. Results achieved with the uniform-flow models follow expected trends, but those educed with the 1-D shear-flow model do not, even for the calibration liner. However, when the flow profile used with the shear-flow model is varied to increase the Mach number gradient near the wall, results computed with the shear-flow model are well matched to those achieved with the uniform-flow model. This indicates the effects of flow profile on educed acoustic liner impedance are small, but more detailed investigations of the flow field throughout the duct are needed to better understand these effects.

  17. High Voltage Coaxial Vacuum Gap Breakdown for Pulsed Power Liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordaro, Samuel; Bott-Suzuki, Simon; Caballero Bendixsen, Luis Sebastian

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics of Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF)1, are presently under detailed study at Sandia National Laboratories. Alongside this, a comprehensive analysis of the influence of the specific liner design geometry in the MagLIF system on liner initiation is underway in the academic community. Recent work at UC San Diego utilizes a high voltage pulsed system (25kV, 150ns) to analyze the vacuum breakdown stage of liner implosion. Such experimental analyses are geared towards determining how the azimuthal symmetry of coaxial gap breakdown affect plasma initiation within the liner. The final aim of the experimental analysis is to assess to what scale symmetry remains important at high (MV) voltages. An analysis of the above will utilize plasma self-emission via optical MCP, current measurements, voltage measurements near the gap, exact location of breakdown via 2D b-dot probe triangulation, as well as measuring the evolution of the B-field along the length of the liner via b-dot array. Results will be discussed along with analytical calculations of breakdown mechanisms

  18. Geosynthetic clay liners - slope stability field study

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, D.A.; Daniel, D.E.; Koerner, R.M.; Bonaparte, R.

    1997-12-31

    A field research project was developed to examine the internal shear performance of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs). Several combinations of cross sections were assembled using GCL materials that were available at the time of project initiation. The cross sections utilized were intended to simulate landfill cover applications. Thirteen (13) resulting test plots were constructed on two different slope angles, and each plot is instrumented for physical displacement and soil moisture characteristics. Test plots were constructed in a manner that dictated the shear plane in the clay portion of the GCL product. The project purpose is to assess field performance and to verify design parameters associated with the application of GCLs in waste containment applications. Interim research data shows that test slopes on 2H:1V show global deformation, but little internal shear evidence, and the 3H:1V slopes show little deformation at approximately 650 days. The research is ongoing, and this paper presents the most recent information available from the project.

  19. Hydraulic conductivity of desiccated geosynthetic clay liners

    SciTech Connect

    Boardman, B.T.; Daniel, D.E.

    1996-03-01

    Large-scale tests were performed to determine the effect of a cycle of wetting and drying on the hydraulic conductivity of several geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs). The GCLs were covered with 0.6 m of pea gravel and permeated with water. After steady seepage had developed, the water was drained away, and the GCL was desiccated by circulating heated air through the overlying gravel. The drying caused severe cracking in the bentonite component of the GCLs. The GCLs were again permeated with water. As the cracked bentonite hydrated and swelled, the hydraulic conductivity slowly decreased from an initially high value. The long-term, steady value of hydraulic conductivity after the wetting and drying cycle was found to be essentially the same as the value for the undesiccated GCL. It is concluded that GCLs possess the ability to self-heal after a cycle of wetting and drying, which is important for applications in which there may be alternate wetting and drying of a hydraulic barrier (e.g. within a landfill final cover).

  20. Expandable Metal Liner For Downhole Components

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe R.

    2004-10-05

    A liner for an annular downhole component is comprised of an expandable metal tube having indentations along its surface. The indentations are formed in the wall of the tube either by drawing the tube through a die, by hydroforming, by stamping, or roll forming and may extend axially, radially, or spirally along its wall. The indentations accommodate radial and axial expansion of the tube within the downhole component. The tube is inserted into the annular component and deformed to match an inside surface of the component. The tube may be expanded using a hydroforming process or by drawing a mandrel through the tube. The tube may be expanded in such a manner so as to place it in compression against the inside wall of the component. The tube is useful for improving component hydraulics, shielding components from contamination, inhibiting corrosion, and preventing wear to the downhole component during use. It may also be useful for positioning conduit and insulated conductors within the component. An insulating material may be disposed between the tube and the component in order to prevent galvanic corrosion of the downhole component.

  1. Studies of shock induced flows in strengthless materials on Pegasus

    SciTech Connect

    Oro, D.M.; Fulton, R.D.; Stokes, J.; Guzik, J.A.; Adams, P.J.; Morgan, D.; Platts, D.; Obst, A.W.; Fell, M.

    1998-12-31

    Experiments on the Pegasus II pulsed power facility at Los Alamos are being conducted to study the evolution and flow of strengthless materials as a result of being shocked. Of particular interest is vorticity and mixing that is induced in the materials by a shock-wave passing through a non-uniform boundary. The experiments provide an important benchmark for hydrodynamic codes, and are a precursor to experiments planned on Atlas in which the materials will be pre-ionized before being shocked. For these experiments, flash radiography is used to image the position of the target boundaries at specific times. In these experiments 3 radiographs along target radii and 2 radiographs along the target axis are taken at independent times. The central cavity of the target is imaged with visible framing cameras. The Xe in this cavity radiates when shocked, and therefore the shape and timing of the shock front in the Xe can be determined from the images. Other diagnostics employed for this work include electric and magnetic field probes that are used to determine the current through the liner and when the liner impacts the target. Both the 1-d magnetohydrodynamics code RAVEN, and the 2-d/3-d adaptive grid eulerian code RAGE are used for pre-shot calculations. In this talk the authors will discuss the motivation for these experiments, compare calculations with radiographs and visible images and discuss future experiments on Pegasus and Atlas.

  2. Precooling an acetabular liner makes its insertion into a metal shell easier.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Richard F; Bourgeault, Craig A; Lew, William D; Bechtold, Joan E

    2006-02-01

    Temporary shrinkage of an acetabular polyethylene liner due to precooling could reduce the force required to snap the liner into its metal shell. This study documented cooling and heating rates of liners with a particular locking mechanism design, determined forces required to seat liners in their shells as a function of temperature, and quantified the force surgeons can exert with their thumbs when seating a liner. It took up to 8 minutes to cool 58- and 70-mm liners in an ice-water bath from room temperature to near 0 degrees C, and up to 24 minutes to subsequently warm these liners to near body temperature. Forces required to seat liners were greater at room and body temperatures than at 0 degrees C. Liners precooled to 0 degrees C required insertion forces that could be generated manually by surgeons. PMID:16520215

  3. [Obstructive shock].

    PubMed

    Pich, H; Heller, A R

    2015-05-01

    An acute obstruction of blood flow in central vessels of the systemic or pulmonary circulation causes the clinical symptoms of shock accompanied by disturbances of consciousness, centralization, oliguria, hypotension and tachycardia. In the case of an acute pulmonary embolism an intravascular occlusion results in an acute increase of the right ventricular afterload. In the case of a tension pneumothorax, an obstruction of the blood vessels supplying the heart is caused by an increase in extravascular pressure. From a hemodynamic viewpoint circulatory shock caused by obstruction is closely followed by cardiac deterioration; however, etiological and therapeutic options necessitate demarcation of cardiac from non-cardiac obstructive causes. The high dynamics of this potentially life-threatening condition is a hallmark of all types of obstructive shock. This requires an expeditious and purposeful diagnosis and a rapid and well-aimed therapy. PMID:25994928

  4. Shock waves in a Z-pinch and the formation of high energy density plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, H. U.; Wessel, F. J.; Ney, P.; Presura, R.; Ellahi, Rahmat; Shukla, P. K.

    2012-12-15

    A Z-pinch liner, imploding onto a target plasma, evolves in a step-wise manner, producing a stable, magneto-inertial, high-energy-density plasma compression. The typical configuration is a cylindrical, high-atomic-number liner imploding onto a low-atomic-number target. The parameters for a terawatt-class machine (e.g., Zebra at the University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada Terawatt Facility) have been simulated. The 2-1/2 D MHD code, MACH2, was used to study this configuration. The requirements are for an initial radius of a few mm for stable implosion; the material densities properly distributed, so that the target is effectively heated initially by shock heating and finally by adiabatic compression; and the liner's thickness adjusted to promote radial current transport and subsequent current amplification in the target. Since the shock velocity is smaller in the liner, than in the target, a stable-shock forms at the interface, allowing the central load to accelerate magnetically and inertially, producing a magneto-inertial implosion and high-energy density plasma. Comparing the implosion dynamics of a low-Z target with those of a high-Z target demonstrates the role of shock waves in terms of compression and heating. In the case of a high-Z target, the shock wave does not play a significant heating role. The shock waves carry current and transport the magnetic field, producing a high density on-axis, at relatively low temperature. Whereas, in the case of a low-Z target, the fast moving shock wave preheats the target during the initial implosion phase, and the later adiabatic compression further heats the target to very high energy density. As a result, the compression ratio required for heating the low-Z plasma to very high energy densities is greatly reduced.

  5. [Neurogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Meister, Rafael; Pasquier, Mathieu; Clerc, David; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2014-08-13

    The neurogenic shock is a common complication of spinal cord injury, especially when localized at the cervical level. Characterized by a vasoplegia (hypotension) and bradycardia, the neurogenic shock is secondary to the damage of the sympathetic nervous system. The clinical presentation often includes tetraplegia, with or without respiratory failure. Early treatment aims to minimize the occurrence of secondary spinal cord lesions resulting from systemic ischemic injuries. Medical management consists in a standardized ABCDE approach, in order to stabilize vital functions and immobilize the spine. The hospital care includes performing imaging, further measures of neuro-resuscitation, and coordinated surgical assessment and treatment of any other injury. PMID:25199226

  6. Interstellar shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, C. F.; Hollenbach, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    The structure of interstellar shocks driven by supernova remnants and by expanding H II regions around early-type stars is discussed. Jump conditions are examined, along with shock fronts, post-shock relaxation layers, collisional shocks, collisionless shocks, nonradiative shocks, radiative atomic shocks, and shock models of observed nebulae. Effects of shock waves on interstellar molecules are examined, with reference to the chemistry behind shock fronts, infrared and vibrational-rotational cooling by molecules, and observations of shocked molecules. Some current problems and applications of the study of interstellar shocks are summarized, including the initiation of star formation by radiative shock waves, interstellar masers, the stability of shocks, particle acceleration in shocks, and shocks in galactic nuclei.

  7. Advanced Computational and Experimental Techniques for Nacelle Liner Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Jones, Michael G.; Brown, Martha C.; Nark, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    The Curved Duct Test Rig (CDTR) has been developed to investigate sound propagation through a duct of size comparable to the aft bypass duct of typical aircraft engines. The axial dimension of the bypass duct is often curved and this geometric characteristic is captured in the CDTR. The semiannular bypass duct is simulated by a rectangular test section in which the height corresponds to the circumferential dimension and the width corresponds to the radial dimension. The liner samples are perforate over honeycomb core and are installed on the side walls of the test section. The top and bottom surfaces of the test section are acoustically rigid to simulate a hard wall bifurcation or pylon. A unique feature of the CDTR is the control system that generates sound incident on the liner test section in specific modes. Uniform air flow, at ambient temperature and flow speed Mach 0.275, is introduced through the duct. Experiments to investigate configuration effects such as curvature along the flow path on the acoustic performance of a sample liner are performed in the CDTR and reported in this paper. Combinations of treated and acoustically rigid side walls are investigated. The scattering of modes of the incident wave, both by the curvature and by the asymmetry of wall treatment, is demonstrated in the experimental results. The effect that mode scattering has on total acoustic effectiveness of the liner treatment is also shown. Comparisons of measured liner attenuation with numerical results predicted by an analytic model based on the parabolic approximation to the convected Helmholtz equation are reported. The spectra of attenuation produced by the analytic model are similar to experimental results for both walls treated, straight and curved flow path, with plane wave and higher order modes incident. The numerical model is used to define the optimized resistance and reactance of a liner that significantly improves liner attenuation in the frequency range 1900-2400 Hz. A

  8. Work of Adhesion of Thin Spray-On Liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, H.

    2012-11-01

    The interface property known as work of adhesion incorporates both adhesion and effective bond width, which are two important design parameters in thin spray-on liner (TSL) support design. The value of this parameter is yet to be recognized by the mining industry and liner manufacturers. The importance of this parameter is introduced in this study. A new methodology using pull-out load-displacement data was developed to calculate the work of adhesion between a TSL and a substrate. Tests were performed using Tekflex as a liner material, which was applied to concrete, granite or sandstone substrate. It was found that a Tekflex liner, when sprayed onto substrates, will likely have work of adhesion values around 777-973 N/m depending on the type of substrate. In addition, for the first time in TSL literature, an effective bond width calculation is introduced in this study. It was found that Tekflex has average effective bond width of 0.7 mm on different substrates. Liner manufacturers should measure and document work of adhesion for their products on a standard substrate.

  9. Demonstration of a wireless, self-powered, electroacoustic liner system.

    PubMed

    Phipps, Alex; Liu, Fei; Cattafesta, Louis; Sheplak, Mark; Nishida, Toshikazu

    2009-02-01

    This paper demonstrates the system operation of a self-powered active liner for the suppression of aircraft engine noise. The fundamental element of the active liner system is an electromechanical Helmholtz resonator (EMHR), which consists of a Helmholtz resonator with one of its rigid walls replaced with a circular piezoceramic composite plate. For this system demonstration, two EMHR elements are used, one for acoustic impedance tuning and one for energy harvesting. The EMHR used for acoustic impedance tuning is shunted with a variable resistive load, while the EMHR used for energy harvesting is shunted to a flyback power converter and storage element. The desired acoustic impedance conditions are determined externally, and wirelessly transmitted to the liner system. The power for the receiver and the impedance tuning circuitry in the liner are supplied by the harvested energy. Tuning of the active liner is demonstrated at three different sound pressure levels (148, 151, and 153 dB) in order to show the robustness of the energy harvesting and storage system. An acoustic tuning range of approximately 200 Hz is demonstrated for each of the three available power levels. PMID:19206864

  10. Analyses of a Reinforced Concrete Containment with Liner Corrosion Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, J.L.; Smith, J.A.

    1998-11-19

    Incidents of liner corrosion in nuclear power containment structures have been recorded. These incidents and concerns of other possible liner corrosion in containment have prompted an interest in determining g the capacity of a degraded containment. Finite element analyses of a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) reinforced concrete containment with liner corrosion were conducted using the A13AQUS finite element code with the ANACAP-U nonlinear concrete constitutive model. The effect of liner corrosion on containment capacity was investigated. A loss of coolant accident was simulated by applying pressure and temperature changes to the structure without corrosion to determine baseline failure limits, followed by multiple analyses of the containment with corrosion at different locations and varying degrees of liner degradation. The corrosion locations were chosen at the base of the containment wall, near the equipment hatch, and at the midheight of the containment wall. Using a strain-based failure criterion the different scenarios were evaluated to prioritize their effect on containment capacity

  11. Wear of a composite ceramic head caused by liner fracture.

    PubMed

    Morlock, Michael M; Witt, Florian; Bishop, Nick; Behn, Rainer; Dalla Pria, Paolo; Barrow, Rob; Dymond, Ian

    2014-07-01

    Third-generation composite ceramics (eg, Delta; DePuy Orthopaedics, Warsaw, Indiana; Ceramtec, Plochingen, Germany) have greatly improved material characteristics compared with second-generation products. This case report presents a patient after total hip arthroplasty with a fractured ceramic liner and a heavily worn ceramic head (both third-generation ceramics) retrieved 9 months after surgery. The patient showed no symptoms in the involved hip but presented to the hospital because of other symptoms. The failure was caused by a tilted liner that was overlooked after surgery and fractured consecutively. Rim chipping and splitting were the 2 fracture modes observed for the liner. The head did not fracture completely because of its high strength but became roughened by the ceramic fragments, causing major wear of the metal back of the cup. The phase transformation of the zirconium grains from tetragonal to monoclinic in the aluminum oxide matrix was shown by radiographic diffraction analysis in the heavily worn areas of the head. This transformation increases the fracture strength of the head. Metal debris caused by a roughened ceramic head without fracture is an unreported phenomenon for third-generation ceramic bearings in hip arthroplasty. This case shows that proper impaction of the ceramic liner into the metal shell to prevent later tiling during reduction is as important as correct component positioning. If a tilted ceramic liner is observed postoperatively, the position must be corrected immediately to prevent the major consequences observed in this patient. PMID:24992062

  12. Thermal energy conservation with draperies and a plastic window liner

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    The contributions of draperies, a plastic window liner, and fabric properties to heat loss reduction were studied. Research questions were developed relative to the contribution of the following to heat loss reduction: properties of drapery fabrics, and the effectiveness of 1) a temporary plastic indoor window liner, and 2) combining draperies with a plastic window liner. Four fabrics (Malimo, Maliwatt, glass and coated) for the window treatments were selected from 12 fabrics on the basis of thermal resistance, in combination with air permeability and thickness. Density, weight, yarn count, fabric construction, and yarn construction were also determined. The draperies were tested sealed (Velcro tape and a three-sided cornice) and unsealed, and with and without a plastic window liner. The effectiveness of each treatment was determined by comparing the percentage of heat loss reduction to the heat loss at the bare window. Yarn count, thickness, density and air permeability accounted for 76% of the variability of the thermal resistance of the fabrics; mean values ranged from 0.95 ft/sup 2/ hr /sup 0/F/Btu (Maliwatt) to 0.66 ft/sup 2/ hr /sup 0/F/Btu (coated). The plastic window liner was the most effective in reducing heat loss (75%).

  13. Non-contact optical three dimensional liner metrology.

    SciTech Connect

    Sebring, R. J.; Anderson, W. E.; Bartos, J. J.; Garcia, F.; Randolph, B.; Salazar, M. A.; Edwards, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    We optically captured the 'as-built' liner geometry of NTLX (near term liner experiments) for Shiva Star using ultra-precision ranging lasers. We subsequently verified the resulting digitized geometry against the 3D CAD model of the part. The results confirmed that the Liner contours are within designed tolerances but revealed subtle fabrication artifacts that would typically go undetected. These features included centimeters long waviness and saddle and bulge regions of 1 micron or less in magnitude. The laser technology typically provided 10 micron spatial resolution with {+-}12 nanometer ranging precision. Atlas liners in the future may have to be diamond turned and will have the centimeter wavelength and 100 angstrom amplitude requirements. The advantages of using laser technology are (1) it avoids surface damage that may occur with conventional contact probes and (2) dramatically improves spatial resolution over CMM, capacitance and inductance type probes. Our work is the result of a perceived future need to develop precision, non-contact, liner inspection techniques to verify geometry, characterize machining artifacts and map wall thickness on delicate diamond turned surfaces. Capturing 'as-built' geometry in a non-contact way coupled with part-to-CAD verification software tools creates a new metrology competency for MST-7.

  14. Hydrodynamic Modeling of the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassibry, Jason; Hsu, Scott; Witherspoon, Doug; Gilmore, Marc

    2009-11-01

    Implosions of plasma liners in cylindrically or spherically convergent geometries can produce high pressures and temperatures with a confinement or dwell time of the order of the rarefaction timescale of the liner. The Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX), to be built at LANL, will explore and demonstrate the feasibility of forming imploding plasma liners with the spherical convergence of hypersonic plasma jets. Modeling will be performed using SPHC and MACH2. According to preliminary 3D SPHC results, high Z plasma liners imploding on vacuum with ˜1.5MJ of initial stored energy will reach ˜100kbar, which is a main objective of the experimental program. Among the objectives of the theoretical PLX effort are to assist in the diagnostic analysis of the PLX, identify possible deleterious effects due to instabilities or asymmetries, identify departures from ideal behavior due to thermal and radiative transport, and help determine scaling laws for possible follow-on applications of ˜1 Mbar HEDP plasmas and magneto-inertial fusion. An overview of the plan to accomplish these objectives will be presented, and preliminary results will be summarized.

  15. In-situ studies on the performance of landfill caps (compacted soil liners, geomembranes, geosynthetic clay liners, capillary barriers)

    SciTech Connect

    Melchior, S.

    1997-12-31

    Since 1986 different types of landfill covers have been studied in-situ on the Georgswerder landfill in Hamburg, Germany. Water balance data are available for eight years. The performance of different carriers has been measured by collecting the leakage on areas ranging from 100 m{sup 2} to 500 m{sup 2}. Composite liners with geomembranes performed best, showing no leakage. An extended capillary barrier also performed well. The performance of compacted soil liners, however, decreased severely within five years due to desiccation, shrinkage and plant root penetration (liner leakage now ranging from 150 mm/a to 200 mm/a). About 50 % of the water that reaches the surface of the liner is leaking through it. The maximum leakage rates have increased from 2 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 3} m{sup -2} s{sup -1} to 4 x 10{sup -8} m{sup 3} m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Two types of geosynthetic clay liners (GCL) have been tested for two years now with disappointing results. The GCL desiccated during the first dry summer of the study. High percolation rates through the GCL were measured during the following winter (45 mm resp. 63 mm in four months). Wetting of the GCL did not significantly reduce the percolation rates.

  16. Cast adrift: Gortex cast liners allow greater patient activity.

    PubMed

    Dubowitz, Gerald; Miller, Deborah M

    2003-01-01

    Extremity fractures are a common injury, with nearly 1.5 million cases reported in the United States in 1998. Treatment often involves lengthy periods of immobilization. This report outlines the use of a Gortex cast liner by a subject who was able to engage in swimming and scuba diving during the healing process. We report that a Gortex cast liner may be considered for an active patient who is keen to return to limited activities during fracture healing. Apparently because of a lack of knowledge of their existence, physicians currently are underutilizing this method of casting in active patients. The use of Gortex liners elsewhere has been reported to have higher patient and physician satisfaction in both use and performance, with no reported detrimental effects on outcome. PMID:14518627

  17. Acoustic Liner Drag: Measurements on Novel Facesheet Perforate Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howerton, Brian M.; Jones, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in characterization of the aerodynamic drag of acoustic liners has increased in the past several years. This paper details experiments in the NASA Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube to quantify the relative drag of several perforate-over-honeycomb liner configurations at flow speeds of centerline flow Mach number equals 0.3 and 0.5. Various perforate geometries and orientations are investigated to determine their resistance factors using a static pressure drop approach. Comparison of these resistance factors gives a relative measurement of liner drag. For these same flow conditions, acoustic measurements are performed with tonal excitation from 400 to 3000 hertz at source sound pressure levels of 140 and 150 decibels. Educed impedance and attenuation spectra are used to determine the impact of variations in perforate geometry on acoustic performance.

  18. Progress In Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Francis Y. C.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Cassibry, Jason; Eskridge, Richard; Lee, Michael; Smith, James; Martin, Adam; Wu, S. T.; Schmidt, George; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) attempts to combine the favorable attributes of magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) for energy confinement with the attributes of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for efficient compression heating and wall-free containment of the fusing plasma. It uses a material liner to compress and contain a magnetized plasma. For practical applications, standoff drivers to deliver the imploding momentum flux to the target plasma remotely are required. Spherically converging plasma jets have been proposed as standoff drivers for this purpose. The concept involves the dynamic formation of a spherical plasma liner by the merging of plasma jets, and the use of the liner so formed to compress a spheromak or a field reversed configuration (FRC).

  19. Metal liner-driven quasi-isentropic compression of deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Weinwurm, Marcus; Bland, Simon N.; Chittenden, Jeremy P.

    2013-09-15

    Properties of degenerate hydrogen and deuterium (D) at pressures of the order of terapascals are of key interest to Planetary Science and Inertial Confinement Fusion. In order to recreate these conditions in the laboratory, we present a scheme, where a metal liner drives a cylindrically convergent quasi-isentropic compression in a D fill. We first determined an external pressure history for driving a self-similar implosion of a D shell from a fictitious flow simulation [D. S. Clark and M. Tabak, Nucl. Fusion 47, 1147 (2007)]. Then, it is shown that this D implosion can be recreated inside a beryllium liner by shaping the current pulse. For a peak current of 10.8 MA cold and nearly isochoric D is assembled at around 12 500 kg/m{sup 3}. Finally, our two-dimensional Gorgon simulations show the robustness of the implosion method to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability when using a sufficiently thick liner.

  20. Transmissivity evolution through interface of composite liners under applied constraint.

    PubMed

    Diagne, M

    2011-08-01

    In landfill liners, geomembranes have defects that constitute preferential passages of leachate from rainwater percolation. Non-woven geotextiles are widely used in wastelandfills as materials having the functions of protection, separation, filtration and drainage. This study seeks to select geotextiles through an investigation conducted among landfill operators who commonly arise a geotextile in the geomembrane-clay interface to facilitate geomembrane welding and to prevent its puncture by angular materials. It also attempts to find out the influence of geotextile in a decimetric transmissivity cell size under 50 kPa stress and smooth ground surface. The results show that the transmissivity in composite liner interface is almost the same as the one calculated with the European standard EN ISO 12958. Transmissivity depends on the mechanical stress applied to the bottom liner, on the geotextile type in the interface and on the ground surface. PMID:20819848

  1. Optimization of a Ranchero driven high energy liner driver system

    SciTech Connect

    Atchison, Walter L; Kaul, Ann; Rousculp, Chris L; Watt, Robert G

    2008-01-01

    An experimental series is planned to implode a dense heavy liner to a velocity in excess of 1 cm/microsecond (10 mm/microsecond) using a RANCHERO coaxial explosive flux compression generator. The goal of this study is to choose the liner mass and starting radius that will deliver the greatest amount of kinetic energy to a target at 1 cm final radius. In this study we used the 1D-MHD simulation code RA YEN to search for the proper initial conditions. The results will be used as a starting point for 2-D simulations and preliminary designs for the first experiments planned in the 2009/2010 time frame. The preliminary results indicate that a liner velocity of 1.25 cm/microsecond and a kinetic energy of greater than 4 megajoules may be possible.

  2. Fracture control method for composite tanks with load sharing liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bixler, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The experimental program was based on the premise that the plastic sizing cycle, which each pressure vessel is subjected to prior to operation, acts as an effective proof test of the liner, screening out all flaws or cracks larger than a critical size. In doing so, flaw growth potential is available for cyclic operation at pressures less than the sizing pressure. Static fracture and cyclic life tests, involving laboratory type specimens and filament overwrapped tanks, were conducted on three liner materials: (1) 2219-T62 aluminum, (2) Inconel X750 STA, and (3) cryoformed 301 stainless steel. Variables included material condition, thickness, flaw size, flaw shape, temperature, sizing stress level, operating stress level and minimum-to-maximum operating stress ratio. From the empirical data base obtained, a procedure was established by which the service life of composite tanks with load sharing liners could be guaranteed with a high degree of confidence.

  3. Metal liner-driven quasi-isentropic compression of deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinwurm, Marcus; Bland, Simon N.; Chittenden, Jeremy P.

    2013-09-01

    Properties of degenerate hydrogen and deuterium (D) at pressures of the order of terapascals are of key interest to Planetary Science and Inertial Confinement Fusion. In order to recreate these conditions in the laboratory, we present a scheme, where a metal liner drives a cylindrically convergent quasi-isentropic compression in a D fill. We first determined an external pressure history for driving a self-similar implosion of a D shell from a fictitious flow simulation [D. S. Clark and M. Tabak, Nucl. Fusion 47, 1147 (2007)]. Then, it is shown that this D implosion can be recreated inside a beryllium liner by shaping the current pulse. For a peak current of 10.8 MA cold and nearly isochoric D is assembled at around 12 500 kg/m3. Finally, our two-dimensional Gorgon simulations show the robustness of the implosion method to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability when using a sufficiently thick liner.

  4. Constraining the Accretion Mode in LINER 1.9s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, Bassem; Der Sahaguian, Elias; Badr, Elie

    2016-01-01

    The accretion mode and the dominant power source in low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs), a class of active galactic nuclei (AGN), are still elusive. We focus on a sample of 22 LINER 1.9s (Ho et al. 1997), a subclass of LINERs that show broad Halpha lines, a signature of blackhole-powered accretion, to test the hypothesis that the ionizing continuum emitted by a radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF) could lead to the LINER ultraviolet (UV) emission-line ratios. Optical line-ratio diagrams are a weak diagnostic tool in distinguishing between possible power sources (Sabra et al. 2003). We search the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) for UV spectra of the objects in the above sample and also perform photoionization simulations using CLOUDY (Ferland et al. 2013). Unfortunately, only one object (NGC 1052; Gabel et al. 2000) of the 22 LINER 1.9s has UV spectra that cover many emission lines; the rest of the objects either do not have any UV spectra, the spectral coverage is in-adequate, or the spectra have very low signal-to-noise ratios. Our photoionization simulations set up two identical grids of clouds with a range of densities and ionization parameters. We illuminate one grid with radiation emitted by a thin accretion disk (AD) and we illuminate the other grid with radiation from a RIAF. We overplot the UV emission-line ratio predictions for AD and RIAF illumination, together with the available line ratios for NGC 1052. Initial results show that UV lines could be used as diagnostics for the accretion mode in AGN. More UV spectral coverage of LINER 1.9s is needed in order to more fully utilize the diagnostic powers of UV emission line ratios.

  5. Assessment of damage to geomembrane liners by shredded scrap tires

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K.R.; Saichek, R.E.

    1998-12-01

    This paper presents the results of a field and laboratory study performed to assess damage to the geomembrane liner caused by using shredded scrap tires as a leachate drainage layer material in landfills. The field testing was performed to assess the damage that occurred to the geomembrane liner during construction and included nine tests conducted with different combinations of tire chip size and thickness, both with a geotextile and without a geotextile overlying the geomembrane, and under different loading conditions. The laboratory testing was performed to characterize the shredded tires, particularly their size distribution, hydraulic conductivity, compressibility, and chemical resistance. The laboratory testing also included performing simulation testing to determine the extent of damage that occurs to the geomembrane liner by the shredded tires under long-term waste-loading conditions. the damage that occurred to the geomembrane liners in both field tests and simulated laboratory tests was determined by visual observations as well as by conducting multi-axial tension tests, wide strip tension tests, and water vapor transmission tests on the exhumed geomembrane samples. Based on these results, a 0.46-m thick layer of secondary shred tire chips, with an average size of 7.6 cm, placed over a 543-g/m{sup 2} geotextile installed over a geomembrane liner using low-ground-pressure (<58 kPa) equipment was determined to provide adequate protection in the geomembrane liner during construction. The degree of protection offered under long-term loading conditions depends on the normal stress and the random orientation of the shredded tire chips at the geomembrane interface.

  6. Optimization of Microphone Locations for Acoustic Liner Impedance Eduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. G.; Watson, W. R.; June, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Two impedance eduction methods are explored for use with data acquired in the NASA Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube. The first is an indirect method based on the convected Helmholtz equation, and the second is a direct method based on the Kumaresan and Tufts algorithm. Synthesized no-flow data, with random jitter to represent measurement error, are used to evaluate a number of possible microphone locations. Statistical approaches are used to evaluate the suitability of each set of microphone locations. Given the computational resources required, small sample statistics are employed for the indirect method. Since the direct method is much less computationally intensive, a Monte Carlo approach is employed to gather its statistics. A comparison of results achieved with full and reduced sets of microphone locations is used to determine which sets of microphone locations are acceptable. For the indirect method, each array that includes microphones in all three regions (upstream and downstream hard wall sections, and liner test section) provides acceptable results, even when as few as eight microphones are employed. The best arrays employ microphones well away from the leading and trailing edges of the liner. The direct method is constrained to use microphones opposite the liner. Although a number of arrays are acceptable, the optimum set employs 14 microphones positioned well away from the leading and trailing edges of the liner. The selected sets of microphone locations are also evaluated with data measured for ceramic tubular and perforate-over-honeycomb liners at three flow conditions (Mach 0.0, 0.3, and 0.5). They compare favorably with results attained using all 53 microphone locations. Although different optimum microphone locations are selected for the two impedance eduction methods, there is significant overlap. Thus, the union of these two microphone arrays is preferred, as it supports usage of both methods. This array contains 3 microphones in the upstream

  7. Novel Processing of 81-mm Cu Shaped Charge Liners

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, A; Korzekwa, D

    2002-01-16

    A seven-step procedure was developed for producing shaped charge liner blanks by back extrusion at liquid nitrogen temperatures. Starting with a 38.1-mm diameter, 101.6-mm long cylinder at 77K, three forging steps with a flat-top die are required to produce the solid cone while maintaining low temperature. The solid cone is forged in four individual back extrusions at 77K to produce the rough liner blank. This procedure is capable of being run in batch processes to improve the time efficiency.

  8. Diagnosing magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on Z

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Stephanie B.; Gomez, Matthew R.; Sefkow, Adam B.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Hahn, Kelly; Harding, Eric; Knapp, Patrick; Schmit, Paul; Awe, Thomas James; McBride, Ryan D.; Jennings, Christopher; Geissel, Matthias; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Peterson, K. J.; Rovang, Dean C.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Herrmann, Mark C.; Mark Harry Hess; Johns, Owen; Lamppa, Derek C.; Martin, Matthew; Porter, J. L.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Stygar, W. A.; Vesey, R. A.; Blue, B. E.; Ryutov, D.; Schroen, Diana; Tomlinson, K.

    2015-05-14

    The Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments performed at Sandia's Z facility have demonstrated significant thermonuclear fusion neutron yields (~1012 DD neutrons) from multi-keV deuterium plasmasinertially confined by slow (~10 cm/μs), stable, cylindrical implosions. Moreover, effective magnetic confinement of charged fusion reactants and products is signaled by high secondary DT neutron yields above 1010. Further analysis of extensive power, imaging, and spectroscopicx-ray measurements provides a detailed picture of ~3 keV temperatures, 0.3 g/cm3 densities, gradients, and mix in the fuel and liner over the 1–2 ns stagnation duration.

  9. Diagnosing magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on Z

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hansen, Stephanie B.; Gomez, Matthew R.; Sefkow, Adam B.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Hahn, Kelly; Harding, Eric; Knapp, Patrick; Schmit, Paul; Awe, Thomas James; et al

    2015-05-14

    The Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments performed at Sandia's Z facility have demonstrated significant thermonuclear fusion neutron yields (~1012 DD neutrons) from multi-keV deuterium plasmasinertially confined by slow (~10 cm/μs), stable, cylindrical implosions. Moreover, effective magnetic confinement of charged fusion reactants and products is signaled by high secondary DT neutron yields above 1010. Further analysis of extensive power, imaging, and spectroscopicx-ray measurements provides a detailed picture of ~3 keV temperatures, 0.3 g/cm3 densities, gradients, and mix in the fuel and liner over the 1–2 ns stagnation duration.

  10. Diagnosing magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on Za)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, S. B.; Gomez, M. R.; Sefkow, A. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Sinars, D. B.; Hahn, K. D.; Harding, E. C.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Awe, T. J.; McBride, R. D.; Jennings, C. A.; Geissel, M.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Peterson, K. J.; Rovang, D. C.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Herrmann, M. C.; Hess, M. H.; Johns, O.; Lamppa, D. C.; Martin, M. R.; Porter, J. L.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Stygar, W. A.; Vesey, R. A.; Blue, B. E.; Ryutov, D.; Schroen, D. G.; Tomlinson, K.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments performed at Sandia's Z facility have demonstrated significant thermonuclear fusion neutron yields (˜1012 DD neutrons) from multi-keV deuterium plasmas inertially confined by slow (˜10 cm/μs), stable, cylindrical implosions. Effective magnetic confinement of charged fusion reactants and products is signaled by high secondary DT neutron yields above 1010. Analysis of extensive power, imaging, and spectroscopic x-ray measurements provides a detailed picture of ˜3 keV temperatures, 0.3 g/cm3 densities, gradients, and mix in the fuel and liner over the 1-2 ns stagnation duration.