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Sample records for links renal reabsorption

  1. Renal water reabsorption: a physiologic retrospective in a molecular era.

    PubMed

    Schafer, James A

    2004-10-01

    The cloning and sequencing of the aquaporin water channels has been an enormous advance in the biomedical sciences, as recognized by the award of the Nobel Prize to Peter Agre last year. Among many other examples, expression of aquaporin proteins in Xenopus oocytes and other heterologous expression systems has confirmed two important models of renal function: the increase in the water permeability of the collecting duct by antidiuretic hormone (ADH), and the mechanism of near isosmotic volume reabsorption by the proximal tubule. These mechanisms were the subjects of intensive investigation by numerous investigators, including Thomas E. Andreoli, who is being honored by this symposium, and who developed many of the key concepts in these areas. His early work with artificial lipid bilayer membranes and the pore-forming antibiotic amphotericin provided the rigorous foundation in experimental and conceptual modeling techniques that he later applied to physiologic and pathophysiologic mechanisms in the kidney, which are summarized in this retrospective. Dr. Andreoli and his colleagues proposed a water channel mechanism for the action of ADH, which has been confirmed by the cloning and heterologous expression of aquaporin-2. They also proposed that volume reabsorption by the proximal tubule depended on a very high hydraulic conductivity and the development of luminal hypotonicity produced by active solute reabsorption. This model has also been confirmed in mice in which aquaporin-1 expression is knocked out, resulting in a low proximal tubule water permeability that exaggerates the development of luminal hypotonicity. PMID:15461698

  2. Factors modifying renal tubular bicarbonate reabsorption in the dog

    PubMed Central

    Ullmann, Elisabeth

    1968-01-01

    1. Acute experiments were carried out on anaesthetized dogs during metabolic alkalosis produced by I.V. administration of NaHCO3. Partial constriction of one ureter led to a significant rise in the HCO3- threshold, beyond the simultaneous value for the other kidney. The magnitude of the increase was not correlated with the reduction of glomerular filtration. 2. Stop-flow analysis, following complete unilateral obstruction of urine flow, demonstrated proximal as well as distal tubular reabsorption of bicarbonate. At any given plasma Pco2 the detailed configuration of the concentration changes which developed depended on (a) the presence and concentration of mannitol, (b) the duration of urinary stasis, and (c) the plasma concentration of HCO3-. 3. If a solution containing 15% (w/v) mannitol was infused I.V., the HCO3- concentration in free flow urine was lower than in plasma, and it fell further during arrest of flow in the entire column of trapped fluid. If less mannitol was infused, or none at all, interruption of urine flow led to a striking increase of HCO3- concentration in the distal portion of the occluded column, and to a fall in the fluid arrested in the proximal segments. 4. It was demonstrated that the HCO3- concentration attained after 2½, 6, or 15 min of urinary stasis at any point in the trapped fluid column was due to the combined effects of water reabsorption and HCO3- reabsorption which proceeded independently, and with a different time course. 5. If mannitol was administered the lowest urinary HCO3- concentration in the series moved progressively to a more distal location with increasing duration of urinary stasis. When HCO3- concentration peaks were present in distal fluid they were conspicuous only after short interruptions of urine flow; during extended stop-flow periods they became attenuated, or disappeared. If no mannitol was administered this did not occur. 6. Provided the plasma level of HCO3- was sufficiently elevated, mannitol (15%, w

  3. Increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption during exercise-induced hypervolemia in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagashima, K.; Wu, J.; Kavouras, S. A.; Mack, G. W.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that renal tubular Na(+) reabsorption increased during the first 24 h of exercise-induced plasma volume expansion. Renal function was assessed 1 day after no-exercise control (C) or intermittent cycle ergometer exercise (Ex, 85% of peak O(2) uptake) for 2 h before and 3 h after saline loading (12.5 ml/kg over 30 min) in seven subjects. Ex reduced renal blood flow (p-aminohippurate clearance) compared with C (0.83 +/- 0.12 vs. 1.49 +/- 0.24 l/min, P < 0.05) but did not influence glomerular filtration rates (97 +/- 10 ml/min, inulin clearance). Fractional tubular reabsorption of Na(+) in the proximal tubules was higher in Ex than in C (P < 0.05). Saline loading decreased fractional tubular reabsorption of Na(+) from 99.1 +/- 0.1 to 98.7 +/- 0.1% (P < 0.05) in C but not in Ex (99.3 +/- 0.1 to 99.4 +/- 0.1%). Saline loading reduced plasma renin activity and plasma arginine vasopressin levels in C and Ex, although the magnitude of decrease was greater in C (P < 0.05). These results indicate that, during the acute phase of exercise-induced plasma volume expansion, increased tubular Na(+) reabsorption is directed primarily to the proximal tubules and is associated with a decrease in renal blood flow. In addition, saline infusion caused a smaller reduction in fluid-regulating hormones in Ex. The attenuated volume-regulatory response acts to preserve distal tubular Na(+) reabsorption during saline infusion 24 h after exercise.

  4. FGF23 promotes renal calcium reabsorption through the TRPV5 channel

    PubMed Central

    Andrukhova, Olena; Smorodchenko, Alina; Egerbacher, Monika; Streicher, Carmen; Zeitz, Ute; Goetz, Regina; Shalhoub, Victoria; Mohammadi, Moosa; Pohl, Elena E; Lanske, Beate; Erben, Reinhold G

    2014-01-01

    αKlotho is thought to activate the epithelial calcium channel Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-5 (TRPV5) in distal renal tubules through its putative glucuronidase/sialidase activity, thereby preventing renal calcium loss. However, αKlotho also functions as the obligatory co-receptor for fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23), a bone-derived phosphaturic hormone. Here, we show that renal calcium reabsorption and renal membrane abundance of TRPV5 are reduced in Fgf23 knockout mice, similar to what is seen in αKlotho knockout mice. We further demonstrate that αKlotho neither co-localizes with TRPV5 nor is regulated by FGF23. Rather, apical membrane abundance of TRPV5 in renal distal tubules and thus renal calcium reabsorption are regulated by FGF23, which binds the FGF receptor-αKlotho complex and activates a signaling cascade involving ERK1/2, SGK1, and WNK4. Our data thereby identify FGF23, not αKlotho, as a calcium-conserving hormone in the kidney. PMID:24434184

  5. A Model of Peritubular Capillary Control of Isotonic Fluid Reabsorption by the Renal Proximal Tubule

    PubMed Central

    Deen, W. M.; Robertson, C. R.; Brenner, B. M.

    1973-01-01

    A mathematical model of peritubular transcapillary fluid exchange has been developed to investigate the role of the peritubular environment in the regulation of net isotonic fluid transport across the mammalian renal proximal tubule. The model, derived from conservation of mass and the Starling transcapillary driving forces, has been used to examine the quantitative effects on proximal reabsorption of changes in efferent arteriolar protein concentration and plasma flow rate. Under normal physiological conditions, relatively small perturbations in protein concentration are predicted to influence reabsorption more than even large variations in plasma flow, a prediction in close accord with recent experimental observations in the rat and dog. Changes either in protein concentration or plasma flow have their most pronounced effects when the opposing transcapillary hydrostatic and osmotic pressure differences are closest to equilibrium. Comparison of these theoretical results with variations in reabsorption observed in micropuncture studies makes it possible to place upper and lower bounds on the difference between interstitial oncotic and hydrostatic pressures in the renal cortex of the rat. PMID:4696761

  6. Aromatase Deficient Female Mice Demonstrate Altered Expression of Molecules Critical for Renal Calcium Reabsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öz, Orhan K.; Hajibeigi, Asghar; Cummins, Carolyn; van Abel, Monique; Bindels, René J.; Kuro-o, Makoto; Pak, Charles Y. C.; Zerwekh, Joseph E.

    2007-04-01

    The incidence of kidney stones increases in women after the menopause, suggesting a role for estrogen deficiency. In order to determine if estrogen may be exerting an effect on renal calcium reabsorption, we measured urinary calcium excretion in the aromatase-deficient female mouse (ArKO) before and following estrogen therapy. ArKO mice had hypercalciuria that corrected during estrogen administration. To evaluate the mechanism by which estrogen deficiency leads to hypercalciuria, we examined the expression of several proteins involved in distal tubule renal calcium reabsorption, both at the message and protein levels. Messenger RNA levels of TRPV5, TRPV6, calbindin-D28K, the Na+/Ca++ exchanger (NCX1), and the plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA1b) were significantly decreased in kidneys of ArKO mice. On the other hand, klotho mRNA levels were elevated in kidneys of ArKO mice. ArKO renal protein extracts had lower levels of calbindin-D28K but higher levels of the klotho protein. Immunochemistry demonstrated increased klotho expression in ArKO kidneys. Estradiol therapy normalized the expression of TRPV5, calbindin-D28K, PMCA1b and klotho. Taken together, these results demonstrate that estrogen deficiency produced by aromatase inactivation is sufficient to produce a renal leak of calcium and consequent hypercalciuria. This may represent one mechanism leading to the increased incidence of kidney stones following the menopause in women.

  7. Mobilization and removing of cadmium from kidney by GMDTC utilizing renal glucose reabsorption pathway.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaojiang; Zhu, Jinqiu; Zhong, Zhiyong; Luo, Minhui; Li, Guangxian; Gong, Zhihong; Zhang, Chenzi; Fei, Fan; Ruan, Xiaolin; Zhou, Jinlin; Liu, Gaofeng; Li, Guoding; Olson, James; Ren, Xuefeng

    2016-08-15

    Chronic exposure to cadmium compounds (Cd(2+)) is one of the major public health problems facing humans in the 21st century. Cd(2+) in the human body accumulates primarily in the kidneys which leads to renal dysfunction and other adverse health effects. Efforts to find a safe and effective drug for removing Cd(2+) from the kidneys have largely failed. We developed and synthesized a new chemical, sodium (S)-2-(dithiocarboxylato((2S,3R,4R,5R)-2,3,4,5,6 pentahydroxyhexyl)amino)-4-(methylthio) butanoate (GMDTC). Here we report that GMDTC has a very low toxicity with an acute lethal dose (LD50) of more than 10,000mg/kg or 5000mg/kg body weight, respectively, via oral or intraperitoneal injection in mice and rats. In in vivo settings, up to 94% of Cd(2+) deposited in the kidneys of Cd(2+)-laden rabbits was removed and excreted via urine following a safe dose of GMDTC treatment for four weeks, and renal Cd(2+) level was reduced from 12.9μg/g to 1.3μg/g kidney weight. We observed similar results in the mouse and rat studies. Further, we demonstrated both in in vitro and in animal studies that the mechanism of transporting GMDTC and GMDTC-Cd complex into and out of renal tubular cells is likely assisted by two glucose transporters, sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2). Collectively, our study reports that GMDTC is safe and highly efficient in removing deposited Cd(2+) from kidneys assisted by renal glucose reabsorption system, suggesting that GMDTC may be the long-pursued agent used for preventive and therapeutic purposes for both acute and chronic Cd(2+) exposure. PMID:27282297

  8. Mode of action of parathyroid hormone and cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate on renal tubular phosphate reabsorption in the dog

    PubMed Central

    Agus, Zalman S.; Puschett, Jules B.; Senesky, Dorothy; Goldberg, Martin

    1971-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of parathyroid hormone and cyclic adenosine monophosphate on proximal tubular sodium and phosphate reabsorption, micropuncture studies were performed on dogs that received a highly purified preparation of parathyroid hormone (PTH), dibutyryl cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP), 5′-AMP, and saline. PTH resulted in a 30-40% inhibition of sodium and phosphate reabsorption in the proximal tubule unassociated with a rise in either total kidney or single nephron glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The bulk of the phosphate rejected proximally was excreted in the final urine while sodium excretion rose minimally despite the marked proximal inhibition, consistent with the presence of reabsorptive sites in the distal nephron for sodium but not phosphate. The infusion of dibutyryl cyclic AMP either systemically or directly into the renal artery inhibited proximal sodium and phosphate reabsorption in the absence of changes in either total kidney or single nephron GFR, resembling the effects of PTH quantitatively and qualitatively. In contrast, another adenine nucleotide, 5′-AMP, did not inhibit the reabsorption of either sodium or phosphate. These observations support the thesis that renal effects of PTH are mediated via stimulation of renal cortical adenyl cyclase. The infusion of a moderate saline load, 25 ml/kg, also produced a similar inhibition of proximal tubular fractional sodium and phosphate reabsorption with a marked phosphaturia but only minimal natriuresis. Thus, changes in sodium and phosphate reabsorption occur in parallel in the proximal tubule when sodium reabsorption is inhibited either with volume expansion or with administration of “specific” phosphaturic agents such as PTH or cyclic AMP. These data are consistent with the thesis that phosphate reabsorption is dependent upon proximal tubular sodium reabsorption wherein the phosphaturic effect of PTH might be the result of a primary inhibition of proximal

  9. Topographically-patterned porous membranes in a microfluidic device as an in vitro model of renal reabsorptive barriers

    PubMed Central

    Frohlich, Else M.; Alonso, José Luis; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.; Zhang, Xin; Arnaout, M. Amin

    2015-01-01

    Models of reabsorptive barriers require both a means to provide realistic physiologic cues to and quantify transport across a layer of cells forming the barrier. Here we have topographically-patterned porous membranes with several user-defined pattern types. To demonstrate the utility of the patterned membranes, we selected one type of pattern and applied it to a membrane to serve as a cell culture support in a microfluidic model of a renal reabsorptive barrier. The topographic cues in the model resemble physiological cues found in vivo while the porous structure allows quantification of transport across the cell layer. Sub-micron surface topography generated via hot-embossing onto a track-etched polycarbonate membrane, fully replicated topographical features and preserved porous architecture. Pore size and shape were analyzed with SEM and image analysis to determine the effect of hot embossing on pore morphology. The membrane was assembled into a bilayer microfluidic device and a human kidney proximal tubule epithelial cell line (HK-2) and primary renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (RPTEC) were cultured to confluency on the membrane. Immunofluorescent staining of both cell types revealed protein expression indicative of the formation of a reabsorptive barrier responsive to mechanical stimulation: ZO-1 (tight junction), paxillin (focal adhesions) and acetylated α-tubulin (primary cilia). HK-2 and RPTEC aligned in the direction of ridge/groove topography of the membrane in the device, evidence that the device has mechanical control over cell response. This topographically-patterned porous membrane provides an in vitro platform on which to model reabsorptive barriers with meaningful applications for understanding biological transport phenomenon, underlying disease mechanisms, and drug toxicity. PMID:23636129

  10. The Cap1–claudin-4 regulatory pathway is important for renal chloride reabsorption and blood pressure regulation

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yongfeng; Yu, Miao; Yang, Jing; Gonzales, Ernie; Perez, Ronaldo; Hou, Mingli; Tripathi, Piyush; Hering-Smith, Kathleen S.; Hamm, L. Lee; Hou, Jianghui

    2014-01-01

    The paracellular pathway through the tight junction provides an important route for transepithelial chloride reabsorption in the kidney, which regulates extracellular salt content and blood pressure. Defects in paracellular chloride reabsorption may in theory cause deregulation of blood pressure. However, there is no evidence to prove this theory or to demonstrate the in vivo role of the paracellular pathway in renal chloride handling. Here, using a tissue-specific KO approach, we have revealed a chloride transport pathway in the kidney that requires the tight junction molecule claudin-4. The collecting duct-specific claudin-4 KO animals developed hypotension, hypochloremia, and metabolic alkalosis due to profound renal wasting of chloride. The claudin-4–mediated chloride conductance can be regulated endogenously by a protease—channel-activating protease 1 (cap1). Mechanistically, cap1 regulates claudin-4 intercellular interaction and membrane stability. A putative cap1 cleavage site has been identified in the second extracellular loop of claudin-4, mutation of which abolished its regulation by cap1. The cap1 effects on paracellular chloride permeation can be extended to other proteases such as trypsin, suggesting a general mechanism may also exist for proteases to regulate the tight junction permeabilities. Together, we have discovered a theory that paracellular chloride permeability is physiologically regulated and essential to renal salt homeostasis and blood pressure control. PMID:25157135

  11. Teaching the Renal Tubular Reabsorption of Glucose Using Two Classic Papers by Shannon et al.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braga, Valdir A.

    2011-01-01

    Most of the transport along the nephron uses membrane proteins and exhibits the three characteristics of mediated transport: saturation, specificity, and competition. Glucose reabsorption in the nephron is an excellent example of the consequences of saturation. Two classic papers by James A. Shannon and colleagues clearly show the ability of the…

  12. Renal bicarbonate reabsorption in the rat. I. Effects of hypokalemia and carbonic anhydrase.

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, G; Kinne, R; Malnic, G; Giebisch, G

    1986-01-01

    Free-flow micropuncture studies were carried out on superficial rat proximal and distal tubules to assess the participation of different nephron segments in bicarbonate transport. Particular emphasis was placed on the role of the distal tubule, and micro-calorimetric methods used to quantitate bicarbonate reabsorption. Experiments were carried out in control conditions, during dietary potassium withdrawal, and after acute intravenous infusions of carbonic anhydrase. We observed highly significant net bicarbonate reabsorption in normal acid-base conditions as evidenced by the maintenance of significant bicarbonate concentration gradients in the presence of vigorous fluid absorption. Distal bicarbonate reabsorption persisted in hypokalemic alkalosis and even steeper transepithelial concentration gradients of bicarbonate were maintained. Enhancement of net bicarbonate reabsorption followed the acute intravenous administration of carbonic anhydrase but was limited to the nephron segments between the late proximal and early distal tubule. The latter observation is consistent with a disequilibrium pH along the proximal straight tubule (S3 segment), the thick ascending limb of Henle, and/or the early distal tubule. PMID:3097074

  13. Prostaglandin E2 stimulates sodium reabsorption in MDCK C7 cells, a renal collecting duct principal cell model.

    PubMed

    Wegmann, M; Nüsing, R M

    2003-11-01

    We examined the direct epithelial effects of the major product of arachidonic acid metabolism in the kidney, prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), on ion transport and signal transduction in the hormone-sensitive Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) C7 subclone as a model of renal collecting duct principal cells. MDCK C7 cells were grown on microporous permeable filter supports and mounted in Ussing-type chambers. Reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR and sequencing were used to determine E-prostanoid (EP) receptor expression. Basolateral and, about 14-fold less potent, apical addition of PGE(2) increased short-circuit current (I(sc)) in a concentration-dependent manner. This ion transport was biphasic with a rapid peak not detectable under chloride-free conditions. The remaining, stably elevated current was unaffected by furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide, ethylisopropanol amiloride, and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenyl-propyl-amino)benzoic acid (NPPB). In contrast, apical amiloride (10 microM) significantly decreased I(sc), indicating sodium reabsorption. The effect of PGE(2) was attenuated in the presence of vasopressin. Agonists acting by cAMP elevation like dibutyryl-cAMP and theophylline also induced an amiloride-sensitive ion transport with similar kinetics as PGE(2). Moreover, PGE(2) rapidly increased intracellular cAMP levels. RT-PCR demonstrated mRNA expression of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), and of the EP2 receptor in MDCK C7 cells. Accordingly, EP2 receptor agonist butaprost mimicked PGE(2) epithelial action. In conclusion, PGE(2) induces amiloride-sensitive sodium reabsorption in MDCK C7 monolayers. This ion transport is most likely mediated by EP2 receptor activation leading to increased intracellular cAMP levels. Therefore, PGE(2) might also contribute to Na(+) reabsorption in the mammalian collecting duct. PMID:14580365

  14. Application of Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling to Explore the Role of Kidney Transporters in Renal Reabsorption of Perfluorooctanoic Acid in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Worley, Rachel Rogers; Fisher, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Renal elimination and the resulting clearance of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) from the serum exhibit pronounced sex differences in the adult rat. The literature suggests that this is largely due to hormonally regulated expression of organic anion transporters (OATs) on the apical and basolateral membranes of the proximal tubule cells that facilitate excretion and reabsorption of PFOA from the filtrate into the blood. Previously developed PBPK models of PFOA exposure in the rat have not been parameterized to specifically account for transporter-mediated renal elimination. We developed a PBPK model for PFOA in the male and female rat to explore the role of Oat1, Oat3, and Oatp1a1 in sex-specific renal reabsorption and excretion of PFOA. Descriptions of the kinetic behavior of these transporters were extrapolated from in vitro studies and the model was used to simulate time-course serum, liver, and urine data for intravenous (IV) and oral exposures in both sexes. Model predicted concentrations of PFOA in the liver, serum, and urine showed good agreement with experimental data for both the male and female rat indicating that in vitro derived physiological descriptions of transporter-mediated renal reabsorption can successfully predict sex-dependent excretion of PFOA in the rat. This study supports the hypothesis that sex-specific serum half-lives for PFOA are largely driven by expression of transporters in the kidney and contributes to the development of PBPK modeling as a tool for evaluating the role of transporters in renal clearance. PMID:26522833

  15. AKAP220 manages apical actin networks that coordinate aquaporin-2 location and renal water reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Jennifer L; Ogier, Leah; Forbush, Katherine A; Bucko, Paula; Gopalan, Janani; Seternes, Ole-Morten; Langeberg, Lorene K; Scott, John D

    2016-07-26

    Filtration through the kidney eliminates toxins, manages electrolyte balance, and controls water homeostasis. Reabsorption of water from the luminal fluid of the nephron occurs through aquaporin-2 (AQP2) water pores in principal cells that line the kidney-collecting duct. This vital process is impeded by formation of an "actin barrier" that obstructs the passive transit of AQP2 to the plasma membrane. Bidirectional control of AQP2 trafficking is managed by hormones and signaling enzymes. We have discovered that vasopressin-independent facets of this homeostatic mechanism are under the control of A-Kinase Anchoring Protein 220 (AKAP220; product of the Akap11 gene). CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing and imaging approaches show that loss of AKAP220 disrupts apical actin networks in organoid cultures. Similar defects are evident in tissue sections from AKAP220-KO mice. Biochemical analysis of AKAP220-null kidney extracts detected reduced levels of active RhoA GTPase, a well-known modulator of the actin cytoskeleton. Fluorescent imaging of kidney sections from these genetically modified mice revealed that RhoA and AQP2 accumulate at the apical surface of the collecting duct. Consequently, these animals are unable to appropriately dilute urine in response to overhydration. We propose that membrane-proximal signaling complexes constrained by AKAP220 impact the actin barrier dynamics and AQP2 trafficking to ensure water homeostasis. PMID:27402760

  16. Physiology and pathophysiology of the vasopressin-regulated renal water reabsorption

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    To prevent dehydration, terrestrial animals and humans have developed a sensitive and versatile system to maintain their water homeostasis. In states of hypernatremia or hypovolemia, the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin (AVP) is released from the pituitary and binds its type-2 receptor in renal principal cells. This triggers an intracellular cAMP signaling cascade, which phosphorylates aquaporin-2 (AQP2) and targets the channel to the apical plasma membrane. Driven by an osmotic gradient, pro-urinary water then passes the membrane through AQP2 and leaves the cell on the basolateral side via AQP3 and AQP4 water channels. When water homeostasis is restored, AVP levels decline, and AQP2 is internalized from the plasma membrane, leaving the plasma membrane watertight again. The action of AVP is counterbalanced by several hormones like prostaglandin E2, bradykinin, dopamine, endothelin-1, acetylcholine, epidermal growth factor, and purines. Moreover, AQP2 is strongly involved in the pathophysiology of disorders characterized by renal concentrating defects, as well as conditions associated with severe water retention. This review focuses on our recent increase in understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying AVP-regulated renal water transport in both health and disease. PMID:18431594

  17. Ways of calcium reabsorption in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Moor, Matthias B; Bonny, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    The role of the kidney in calcium homeostasis has been reshaped from a classic view in which the kidney was regulated by systemic calcitropic hormones such as vitamin D3 or parathyroid hormone to an organ actively taking part in the regulation of calcium handling. With the identification of the intrinsic renal calcium-sensing receptor feedback system, the regulation of paracellular calcium transport involving claudins, and new paracrine regulators such as klotho, the kidney has emerged as a crucial modulator not only of calciuria but also of calcium homeostasis. This review summarizes recent molecular and endocrine contributors to renal calcium handling and highlights the tight link between calcium and sodium reabsorption in the kidney. PMID:27009338

  18. TRPV5-mediated Ca2+ Reabsorption and Hypercalciuria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renkema, Kirsten Y.; Hoenderop, Joost G. J.; Bindels, René J. M.

    2007-04-01

    The concerted action of the intestine, kidney and bone results in the maintenance of a normal Ca2+ balance, a mechanism that is tightly controlled by the calciotropic hormones vitamin D, parathyroid hormone and calcitonin. Disturbances in the Ca2+ balance have been linked to diverse pathophysiological disorders like urolithiasis, hypertension, electroencephalogram abnormalities and rickets. Importantly, the final amount of Ca2+ that is released from the body is determined in the distal part of the nephron, where active Ca2+ reabsorption occurs. Here, Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid member 5 (TRPV5), a highly Ca2+-selective channel, has been recognized as the gatekeeper of active Ca2+ reabsorption. The in vivo relevance of TRPV5 has been further investigated by the characterization of TRPV5 knockout (TRPV5-/-) mice, which exhibit severe disturbances in renal Ca2+ handling, such as profound hypercalciuria, intestinal Ca2+ hyperabsorption and reduced bone thickness. Hypercalciuria increases the risk of kidney stone formation in these mice. This review highlights our current knowledge about TRPV5-mediated Ca2+ reabsorption and emphasizes the physiological relevance and the clinical implications related to the TRPV5-/- mice model.

  19. Renal cell carcinoma: links and risks

    PubMed Central

    Kabaria, Reena; Klaassen, Zachary; Terris, Martha K

    2016-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and a summary of the most commonly associated risk factors. A literature review was performed with a focus on recent studies with a high level of evidence (large prospective cohort studies and meta-analyses). The incidence rate of RCC varies globally, with the rate rising rapidly in more developed regions, demonstrating the effects of increased use of diagnostic imaging and prevalence of modifiable risk factors. Based on the current evidence, cigarette smoking, obesity, and hypertension are the most well-established risk factors for sporadic RCC worldwide. Acquired cystic kidney disease is also a significant risk factor, specifically in dialysis patients. There is increasing evidence for an inverse association between RCC risk and moderate alcohol consumption. Certain analgesics and occupational exposure have been linked to an increased risk of RCC, although data are limited. Diets rich in fruits and vegetables may provide a protective effect. PMID:27022296

  20. Renal cell carcinoma: links and risks.

    PubMed

    Kabaria, Reena; Klaassen, Zachary; Terris, Martha K

    2016-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and a summary of the most commonly associated risk factors. A literature review was performed with a focus on recent studies with a high level of evidence (large prospective cohort studies and meta-analyses). The incidence rate of RCC varies globally, with the rate rising rapidly in more developed regions, demonstrating the effects of increased use of diagnostic imaging and prevalence of modifiable risk factors. Based on the current evidence, cigarette smoking, obesity, and hypertension are the most well-established risk factors for sporadic RCC worldwide. Acquired cystic kidney disease is also a significant risk factor, specifically in dialysis patients. There is increasing evidence for an inverse association between RCC risk and moderate alcohol consumption. Certain analgesics and occupational exposure have been linked to an increased risk of RCC, although data are limited. Diets rich in fruits and vegetables may provide a protective effect. PMID:27022296

  1. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    San Agustin, Jovenal T.; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A.; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W.; Pazour, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  2. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    San Agustin, Jovenal T; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W; Pazour, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  3. Lack of association of variants of the renal salt reabsorption-related genes SLC12A3 and ClC-Kb and hypertension in Mongolian and Han populations in Inner Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Chang, P Y; Zhang, X G; Su, X L

    2011-01-01

    Abnormalities in renal sodium chloride and water reabsorption play important roles in the development of hypertension. Mutations in the genes involved in renal sodium chloride reabsorption can affect blood pressure. Recently, the R904Q variant of the sodium/chloride transporters, member 3 (SLC12A3) gene and the T481S variant of the chloride channel Kb (ClC-Kb) gene were found to be implicated in essential hypertension. We investigated a possible role of the SLC12A3 and ClC-Kb genes in the prevalence of essential hypertension in the Mongolian and Han ethnic groups. The study population comprised 308 unrelated Mongolians with essential hypertension, 271 Mongolian normotensives, 285 unrelated Han with essential hypertension, and 194 Han normotensives living in Inner Mongolia. The presence of the SLC12A3 R904Q and ClC-Kb-T481S polymorphisms was determined using TaqMan PCR. The risk factors for hypertension were age, body mass index, alcohol consumption, total plasma cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The genotype and allele frequencies of SLC12A3 R904Q and ClC-Kb-T481S were not significantly different between hypertensive patients and controls in the Mongolian (SLC12A3 R904Q, P = 0.471 and P = 0.494, ClC-Kb-T481S, P = 0.960 and P = 0.960, respectively) and Han (SLC12A3 R904Q, P = 0.765 and P = 0.777, ClC-Kb-T481S, P = 0.100 and P = 0.103, respectively) populations. There was no significant association between the SLC12A3 R904Q variant and the ClC-Kb-T481S variant and essential hypertension in either ethnic group. PMID:21644212

  4. Deletion of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor–associated protein enhances renal sodium reabsorption and exacerbates angiotensin II–mediated hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ohsawa, Masato; Tamura, Kouichi; Wakui, Hiromichi; Maeda, Akinobu; Dejima, Toru; Kanaoka, Tomohiko; Azushima, Kengo; Uneda, Kazushi; Tsurumi-Ikeya, Yuko; Kobayashi, Ryu; Matsuda, Miyuki; Uchida, Shinichi; Toya, Yoshiyuki; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Akira; Yamashita, Akio; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Umemura, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R)–associated protein (ATRAP) promotes AT1R internalization along with suppression of pathological activation of tissue AT1R signaling. However, the functional significance of ATRAP in renal sodium handling and blood pressure regulation under pathological stimuli is not fully resolved. Here we show the blood pressure of mice with a gene-targeted disruption of ATRAP was comparable to that of wild-type mice at baseline. However, in ATRAP-knockout mice, angiotensin II–induced hypertension was exacerbated and the extent of positive sodium balance was increased by angiotensin II. Renal expression of the sodium-proton antiporter 3, a major sodium transporter in the proximal tubules, urinary pH, renal angiotensinogen production, and angiotensin II content was unaffected. Stimulation of the renal expression and activity of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), a major sodium transporter in the distal tubules, was significantly enhanced by chronic angiotensin II infusion. The circulating and urinary aldosterone levels were comparable. The blood pressure response and renal ENaC expression by aldosterone were not affected. Thus, ATRAP deficiency exacerbated angiotensin II–mediated hypertension by pathological activation of renal tubular AT1R by angiotensin II. This directly stimulates ENaC in the distal tubules and enhances sodium retention in an aldosterone-independent manner. PMID:24694992

  5. Accelerated reabsorption in the proximal tubule produced by volume depletion

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Michael W.; Weinman, Edward J.; Kashgarian, Michael; Hayslett, John P.

    1971-01-01

    The renal response to chronic depletion of extracellular volume was examined using the techniques of micropuncture. Depletion of salt and water was produced by administration of furosemide to rats maintained on a sodium-free diet. There was a marked fall in body weight, plasma volume, and glomerular filtration rate. The intrinsic reabsorptive capacity of the proximal tubule, measured by the split-droplet technique, was greatly enhanced. The acceleration of proximal fluid reabsorption could not be accounted for by changes in filtration rate, tubular geometry, or aldosterone secretion. The half-time of droplet reabsorption in the distal tubule was not altered by sodium depletion. An increase in the reabsorption of fluid in the proximal tubule, as demonstrated directly in the present experiments, provides an explanation for a variety of clinical phenomena associated with volume depletion. Images PMID:5090054

  6. Renal consequences of obesity.

    PubMed

    Naumnik, Beata; Myśliwiec, Michał

    2010-08-01

    The worldwide prevalence of obesity and its associated metabolic and cardiovascular disorders has risen dramatically within the past 2 decades. Our objective is to review the mechanisms that link obesity with altered kidney function. Current evidence suggests that excess weight gain may be responsible for 65-75% of the risk for arterial hypertension. Impaired renal pressure natriuresis, initially due to increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption, is a key factor linking obesity with hypertension. Obesity increases renal sodium reabsorption by activating the renin-angiotensin and sympathetic nervous systems, and by altering intrarenal physical forces. Adipose tissue functions as an endocrine organ, secreting hormones/cytokines (e.g., leptin) which may trigger sodium retention and hypertension. Additionally, excess visceral adipose tissue may physically compress the kidneys, increasing intrarenal pressures and tubular reabsorption. Eventually, sustained obesity via hyperinsulinemia, due to resistance to insulin, causes hyperfiltration, resulting in structural changes in the kidneys--glomerular hyperthrophy and occasionally focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. The consequences of kidney injury are continuous loss of glomerular filtration rate, further increase of arterial pressure and escalation of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. There is a growing awareness of the renal consequences of obesity, and considerable progress is being made in understanding its pathophysiology. Weight reduction results in lowered proteinuria. Aside from low sodium diet and exercises, more widespread use of renoprotective therapy (e.g., ACE inhibitors and statins) in treatment of hypertension in obese subjects should be advocated. Renal protection should result in reducing the cardiovascular complications of obesity. PMID:20671624

  7. Cubilin and Amnionless Mediate Protein Reabsorption in Drosophila Nephrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fujian; Zhao, Ying; Chao, Yufang; Muir, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    The insect nephrocyte and the mammalian glomerular podocyte are similar with regard to filtration, but it remains unclear whether there is an organ or cell type in flies that reabsorbs proteins. Here, we show that the Drosophila nephrocyte has molecular, structural, and functional similarities to the renal proximal tubule cell. We screened for genes required for nephrocyte function and identified two Drosophila genes encoding orthologs of mammalian cubilin and amnionless (AMN), two major receptors for protein reabsorption in the proximal tubule. In Drosophila, expression of dCubilin and dAMN is specific to nephrocytes, where they function as co-receptors for protein uptake. Targeted expression of human AMN in Drosophila nephrocytes was sufficient to rescue defective protein uptake induced by dAMN knockdown, suggesting evolutionary conservation of Cubilin/AMN co-receptors function from flies to humans. Furthermore, we found that Cubilin/AMN-mediated protein reabsorption is required for the maintenance of nephrocyte ultrastructure and fly survival under conditions of toxic stress. In conclusion, the insect nephrocyte combines filtration with protein reabsorption, using evolutionarily conserved genes and subcellular structures, suggesting that it can serve as a simplified model for both podocytes and the renal proximal tubule. PMID:23264686

  8. SGLT2 Mediates Glucose Reabsorption in the Early Proximal Tubule

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Kenneth A.; Cunard, Robyn; Schroth, Jana; Whaley, Jean; Thomson, Scott C.; Koepsell, Hermann; Rieg, Timo

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding for the Na+-glucose co-transporter SGLT2 (SLC5A2) associate with familial renal glucosuria, but the role of SGLT2 in the kidney is incompletely understood. Here, we determined the localization of SGLT2 in the mouse kidney and generated and characterized SGLT2-deficient mice. In wild-type (WT) mice, immunohistochemistry localized SGLT2 to the brush border membrane of the early proximal tubule. Sglt2−/− mice had glucosuria, polyuria, and increased food and fluid intake without differences in plasma glucose concentrations, GFR, or urinary excretion of other proximal tubular substrates (including amino acids) compared with WT mice. SGLT2 deficiency did not associate with volume depletion, suggested by similar body weight, BP, and hematocrit; however, plasma renin concentrations were modestly higher and plasma aldosterone levels were lower in Sglt2−/− mice. Whole-kidney clearance studies showed that fractional glucose reabsorption was significantly lower in Sglt2−/− mice compared with WT mice and varied in Sglt2−/− mice between 10 and 60%, inversely with the amount of filtered glucose. Free-flow micropuncture revealed that for early proximal collections, 78 ± 6% of the filtered glucose was reabsorbed in WT mice compared with no reabsorption in Sglt2−/− mice. For late proximal collections, fractional glucose reabsorption was 93 ± 1% in WT and 21 ± 6% in Sglt2−/− mice, respectively. These results demonstrate that SGLT2 mediates glucose reabsorption in the early proximal tubule and most of the glucose reabsorption by the kidney, overall. This mouse model mimics and explains the glucosuric phenotype of individuals carrying SLC5A2 mutations. PMID:20616166

  9. Adenosine, type 1 receptors: role in proximal tubule Na+ reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Welch, W J

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine type 1 receptor (A1 -AR) antagonists induce diuresis and natriuresis in experimental animals and humans. Much of this effect is due to inhibition of A1 -ARs in the proximal tubule, which is responsible for 60-70% of the reabsorption of filtered Na(+) and fluid. Intratubular application of receptor antagonists indicates that A1 -AR mediates a portion of Na(+) uptake in PT and PT cells, via multiple transport systems, including Na(+) /H(+) exchanger-3 (NHE3), Na(+) /PO4(-) co-transporter and Na(+) -dependent glucose transporter, SGLT. Renal microperfusion and recollection studies have shown that fluid reabsorption is reduced by A1 -AR antagonists and is lower in A1 -AR KO mice, compared to WT mice. Absolute proximal reabsorption (APR) measured by free-flow micropuncture is equivocal, with studies that show either lower APR or similar APR in A1 -AR KO mice, compared to WT mice. Inhibition of A1 -ARs lowers elevated blood pressure in models of salt-sensitive hypertension, partially due to their effects in the proximal tubule. PMID:25345761

  10. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  11. Acute inhibition of NCC does not activate distal electrogenic Na+ reabsorption or kaliuresis.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Robert W; Craigie, Eilidh; Homer, Natalie Z M; Mullins, John J; Bailey, Matthew A

    2014-02-15

    Na(+) reabsorption from the distal renal tubule involves electroneutral and electrogenic pathways, with the latter promoting K(+) excretion. The relative activities of these two pathways are tightly controlled, participating in the minute-to-minute regulation of systemic K(+) balance. The pathways are interdependent: the activity of the NaCl cotransporter (NCC) in the distal convoluted tubule influences the activity of the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) downstream. This effect might be mediated by changes in distal Na(+) delivery per se or by molecular and structural adaptations in the connecting tubule and collecting ducts. We hypothesized that acute inhibition of NCC activity would cause an immediate increase in Na(+) flux through ENaC, with a concomitant increase in renal K(+) excretion. We tested this using renal clearance methodology in anesthetized mice, by the administration of hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) and/or benzamil (BZM) to exert specific blockade of NCC and ENaC, respectively. Bolus HCTZ elicited a natriuresis that was sustained for up to 110 min; urinary K(+) excretion was not affected. Furthermore, the magnitude of the natriuresis was no greater during concomitant BZM administration. This suggests that ENaC-mediated Na(+) reabsorption was not normally limited by Na(+) delivery, accounting for the absence of thiazide-induced kaliuresis. After dietary Na(+) restriction, HCTZ elicited a kaliuresis, but the natiuretic effect of HCTZ was not enhanced by BZM. Our findings support a model in which inhibition of NCC activity does not increase Na(+) reabsorption through ENaC solely by increasing distal Na(+) delivery but rather by inducing a molecular and structural adaptation in downstream nephron segments. PMID:24402096

  12. Effects of glucose on water and sodium reabsorption in the proximal convoluted tubule of rat kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, J H; Green, R; Thomas, S

    1978-01-01

    1. The effects of glucose on sodium and water reabsorption by rat renal proximal tubules was investigated by in situ microperfusion of segments of proximal tubules with solutions containing glucose or no glucose, with and without phlorizin. 2. Absence of glucose did not significantly alter net water flux. Sodium flux was reduced by about 10% but this was not statistically significant. 3. In the absence of glucose in the perfusion fluid net secretion of glucose occurred. 4. Phlorizin reduced either net reabsorption or net secretion of glucose; and net water flux. 5. The data suggest that in later parts of the proximal convoluted tubule some sodium may be co-transported with glucose, but that this represents only a small fraction of the total sodium reabsorption. 6. It is suggested that the glucose carrier is reversible and in appropriate circumstances could cause glucose secretion. 7. Although phlorizin alters net water flux the underlying mechanisms are not clear. 8. The calculated osmolality of the reabsorbate was significantly greater than the perfusate osmolality and greater than plasma osmolality although this was not quite significant statistically. PMID:633143

  13. Fluid reabsorption in Henle's loop and urinary excretion of sodium and water in normal rats and rats with chronic hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Stumpe, Klaus O.; Lowitz, Hans D.; Ochwadt, Bruno

    1970-01-01

    The function of the short loops of Henle was investigated by micropuncture technique in normal rats, in rats with spontaneous hypertension, and in the untouched kidney of rats with experimental renal hypertension. All animals received a standard infusion of 1.2 ml of isotonic saline per hr. With increasing arterial blood pressure (range from 90 to 220 mm Hg), a continuous decrease in transit time of Lissamine green through Henle's loop from 32 to 10 sec was observed. Fractional water reabsorption along the loop declined progressively from 26 to 10%, and fractional sodium reabsorption decreased from 40 to 36% of the filtered load. The fluid volume in Henle's loop calculated from transit time and mean flow rate also decreased with increasing blood pressure. There was no change in superficial single nephron filtration rate but there was a slight increase in total glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Sodium and water reabsorption in the proximal tubule remained unchanged. Urine flow rate, sodium excretion, osmolar clearance, and negative free water clearance increased with increasing blood pressure. The osmolal urine to plasma (U/P) ratio declined but did not fall below a value of 1.5. It is concluded that the increase in sodium and water excretion with chronic elevation of arterial blood pressure is caused by a decrease of sodium and water reabsorption along the loop of Henle, presumably as a consequence of increased medullary blood pressure. PMID:5422022

  14. Animal Models to Study Links between Cardiovascular Disease and Renal Failure and Their Relevance to Human Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Hewitson, Tim D.; Holt, Stephen G.; Smith, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    The close association between cardiovascular pathology and renal dysfunction is well documented and significant. Patients with conventional risk factors for cardiovascular disease like diabetes and hypertension also suffer renal dysfunction. This is unsurprising if the kidney is simply regarded as a “modified blood vessel” and thus, traditional risk factors will affect both systems. Consistent with this, it is relatively easy to comprehend how patients with either sudden or gradual cardiac and or vascular compromise have changes in both renal hemodynamic and regulatory systems. However, patients with pure or primary renal dysfunction also have metabolic changes (e.g., oxidant stress, inflammation, nitric oxide, or endocrine changes) that affect the cardiovascular system. Thus, cardiovascular and renal systems are intimately, bidirectionally and inextricably linked. Whilst we understand several of these links, some of the mechanisms for these connections remain incompletely explained. Animal models of cardiovascular and renal disease allow us to explore such mechanisms, and more importantly, potential therapeutic strategies. In this article, we review various experimental models used, and examine critically how representative they are of the human condition. PMID:26441970

  15. Renal clearance of uric acid is linked to insulin resistance and lower excretion of sodium in gout patients.

    PubMed

    Perez-Ruiz, Fernando; Aniel-Quiroga, Maria Angeles; Herrero-Beites, Ana María; Chinchilla, Sandra Pamela; Erauskin, Gorka Garcia; Merriman, Toni

    2015-09-01

    Inefficient renal excretion of uric acid is the main pathophysiological mechanism for hyperuricemia in gout patients. Polymorphisms of renal tubular transporters linked with sodium and monosaccharide transport have yet to be demonstrated. We intended to evaluate the impact of insulin resistance, evaluated with the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), through a transversal study of non-diabetic patients with gout, with normal renal function, not treated with any medication but colchicine as prophylaxis. One hundred and thirty-three patients were evaluated. Clearance of uric acid was inversely correlated with insulin resistance and directly correlated with fractional excretion of sodium. In multivariate analysis, hypertension and hyperlipidemia, in addition to insulin resistance and fractional excretion of sodium, were associated with renal clearance of uric acid. HOMA cutoff for efficient versus inefficient renal handling of uric acid was 2.72, close to that observed in studies of reference population. The impact of insulin resistance and renal handling of sodium on renal clearance of uric acid may help to explain why hyperuricemia is more commonly associated with diabetes and hypertension. PMID:25763991

  16. Fabrication of Collagen Gel Hollow Fibers by Covalent Cross-Linking for Construction of Bioengineering Renal Tubules.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chong; Zhang, Guoliang; Wang, Qichen; Meng, Qin

    2015-09-01

    Collagen, the most used natural biomacromolecule, has been extensively utilized to make scaffolds for cell cultures in tissue engineering, but has never been fabricated into the configuration of a hollow fiber (HF) for cell culture due to its poor mechanical properties. In this study, renal tubular cell-laden collagen hollow fiber (Col HF) was fabricated by dissolving sacrificial Ca-alginate cores from collagen shells strengthened by carbodiimide cross-linking. The inner/outer diameters of the Col HF were precisely controlled by the flow rates of core alginate/shell collagen solution in the microfluidic device. As found, the renal tubular cells self-assembled into renal tubules with diameters of 50-200 μm post to the culture in Col HF for 10 days. According to the 3D reconstructed confocal images or HE staining, the renal cells appeared as a tight tubular monolayer on the Col HF inner surface, sustaining more 3D cell morphology than the cell layer on the 2D flat collagen gel surface. Moreover, compared with the cultures in either a Transwell or polymer HF membrane, the renal tubules in Col HF exhibited at least 1-fold higher activity on brush border enzymes of alkaline phosphatase and γ-glutamyltransferase, consistent with their gene expressions. The enhancement occurred similarly on multidrug resistance protein 2 and glucose uptake. Such bioengineered renal tubules in Col HF will present great potential as alternatives to synthetic HF in both clinical use and pharmaceutical investigation. PMID:26280545

  17. Proximal HCO3- reabsorption and the determinants of tubular and capillary PCO2 in the rat.

    PubMed

    Maddox, D A; Atherton, L J; Deen, W M; Gennari, F J

    1984-07-01

    Studies were carried out in Munich-Wistar rats to define the CO2 partial pressure (PCO2) profile in the surface tubules and capillaries of the kidney and to relate these measurements to proximal tubular HCO3- reabsorption, renal blood flow, and O2 consumption. In euvolemic rats, PCO2 in Bowman's space (BS) was 12.5 mmHg higher than in arterial blood, indicating CO2 addition to the arterial tree as it traverses the cortex. PCO2 further rose by 3.9 mmHg between the efferent arteriole (EA) and the peritubular capillaries (PC) (P less than 0.01) and by 4.9 mmHg between BS and the early proximal tubule (EP) (P less than 0.01). In studies with paired measurements, PCO2 in EP was 1.8 mmHg higher than in the adjacent PC (P less than 0.05). HCO3- reabsorption in EP (first 0.4-1.25 mm) was 579 pmol X min-1 X mm-1 (34.3 +/- 4.6% of the filtered load). By use of a model of facilitated diffusion of CO2 across the cell, the trans-epithelial PCO2 gradient in EP can be accounted for by the CO2 generated from HCO3- reabsorption, assuming an intracellular pH of 7.3. In the vascular compartment, roughly half the rise in PCO2 between the afferent arteriole (estimated to equal BS PCO2) and PC can be accounted for by metabolic CO2 production and half by titration of blood buffers by reabsorbed HCO3-. PMID:6430105

  18. Megalin and cubilin in proximal tubule protein reabsorption: from experimental models to human disease.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Rikke; Christensen, Erik Ilsø; Birn, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Proximal tubule protein uptake is mediated by 2 receptors, megalin and cubilin. These receptors rescue a variety of filtered ligands, including biomarkers, essential vitamins, and hormones. Receptor gene knockout animal models have identified important functions of the receptors and have established their essential role in modulating urinary protein excretion. Rare genetic syndromes associated with dysfunction of these receptors have been identified and characterized, providing additional information on the importance of these receptors in humans. Using various disease models in combination with receptor gene knockout, the implications of receptor dysfunction in acute and chronic kidney injury have been explored and have pointed to potential new roles of these receptors. Based on data from animal models, this paper will review current knowledge on proximal tubule endocytic receptor function and regulation, and their role in renal development, protein reabsorption, albumin uptake, and normal renal physiology. These findings have implications for the pathophysiology and diagnosis of proteinuric renal diseases. We will examine the limitations of the different models and compare the findings to phenotypic observations in inherited human disorders associated with receptor dysfunction. Furthermore, evidence from receptor knockout mouse models as well as human observations suggesting a role of protein receptors for renal disease will be discussed in light of conditions such as chronic kidney disease, diabetes, and hypertension. PMID:26759048

  19. Inflammation and hypoxia linked to renal injury by CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein δ.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Junna; Tanaka, Tetsuhiro; Eto, Nobuaki; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2015-08-01

    Tubulointerstitial hypoxia plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of kidney injury, and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 is a master regulator of cellular adaptation to hypoxia. Aside from oxygen molecules, factors that modify HIF-1 expression and functional operation remain obscure. Therefore, we sought to identify novel HIF-1-regulating genes in kidney. A short-hairpin RNA library consisting of 150 hypoxia-inducible genes was derived from a microarray analysis of the rat renal artery stenosis model screened for the effect on HIF-1 response. We report that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein δ (CEBPD), a transcription factor and inflammatory response gene, is a novel HIF-1 regulator in kidney. CEBPD was induced in the nuclei of tubular epithelial cells in both acute and chronic hypoxic kidneys. In turn, CEBPD induction augmented HIF-1α expression and its transcriptional activity. Mechanistically, CEBPD directly bound to the HIF-1α promoter and enhanced its transcription. Notably, CEBPD was rapidly induced by inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β in a nuclear factor-κB-dependent manner, which not only increased HIF-1α expression during hypoxia, but was also indispensable for the non-hypoxic induction of HIF-1α. Thus our study provides novel insight into HIF-1 regulation in tubular epithelial cells and offers a potential hypoxia and inflammation link relevant in both acute and chronic kidney diseases. PMID:25692954

  20. The relationship between the renal clearance of creatinine and the apparent renal clearance of beta-2-microglobulin in patients with normal and impaired kidney function.

    PubMed

    Vree, T B; Guelen, P J; Jongman-Nix, B; Walenkamp, G H

    1981-07-18

    The renal clearances of creatinine and beta 2-microglobulin of patients with either normal or impaired kidney function were measured. The renal clearance of beta 2-microglobulin depends on the urinary pH and must be considered as an apparent renal clearance because after tubular reabsorption the compound is metabolized in the kidney. Impaired kidney function reduces the percentage of tubular reabsorption of beta 2-microglobulin. PMID:6166414

  1. X chromosome inactivation pattern in female carriers of X linked hypophosphataemic rickets.

    PubMed Central

    Orstavik, K H; Orstavik, R E; Halse, J; Knudtzon, J

    1996-01-01

    X linked hypophosphataemia (XLH) results from an abnormality of renal tubular phosphate reabsorption. The disorder is inherited as an X linked dominant trait and the gene has been mapped to Xp22.1-p22.2. A candidate gene (PEX) has recently been isolated. The most striking clinical features are growth retardation and skeletal abnormalities. As expected for X linked dominant disorders, females are less affected. However, such a gene dosage effect does not exist for renal phosphate reabsorption. Preferential X chromosome inactivation has been proposed as a possible explanation for this lack of gene dosage. We have examined the X inactivation pattern in peripheral blood cells from 12 females belonging to seven families with XLH using PCR analysis at the androgen receptor locus. The X inactivation pattern in these patients did not differ significantly from the pattern in 30 healthy females. The X inactivation pattern in peripheral blood cells does not necessarily reflect the X inactivation pattern in renal cells. However, the finding of a normal distribution of X inactivation in peripheral blood cells indicates that the similarity in the renal handling of phosphate in male and female patients is not related to a ubiquitous preferential X inactivation. Images PMID:8863165

  2. NEK8 links the ATR-regulated replication stress response and S phase CDK activity to renal ciliopathies.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyo Jei Claudia; Lin, Jia-Ren; Vannier, Jean-Baptiste; Slaats, Gisela G; Kile, Andrew C; Paulsen, Renee D; Manning, Danielle K; Beier, David R; Giles, Rachel H; Boulton, Simon J; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2013-08-22

    Renal ciliopathies are a leading cause of kidney failure, but their exact etiology is poorly understood. NEK8/NPHP9 is a ciliary kinase associated with two renal ciliopathies in humans and mice, nephronophthisis (NPHP) and polycystic kidney disease. Here, we identify NEK8 as a key effector of the ATR-mediated replication stress response. Cells lacking NEK8 form spontaneous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that further accumulate when replication forks stall, and they exhibit reduced fork rates, unscheduled origin firing, and increased replication fork collapse. NEK8 suppresses DSB formation by limiting cyclin A-associated CDK activity. Strikingly, a mutation in NEK8 that is associated with renal ciliopathies affects its genome maintenance functions. Moreover, kidneys of NEK8 mutant mice accumulate DNA damage, and loss of NEK8 or replication stress similarly disrupts renal cell architecture in a 3D-culture system. Thus, NEK8 is a critical component of the DNA damage response that links replication stress with cystic kidney disorders. PMID:23973373

  3. Photofission of [sup 182]W following reabsorption of photopions

    SciTech Connect

    Arruda-Neto, J.D.T.; Saito, T.; Sugawara, M.; Tamae, T.; Miyase, H.; Abe, K.; Konno, O.; Oikawa, M. ); Deppman, A.; Simionatto, S.; Macedo, E.M.L.; Bhandari, B.S. )

    1995-02-01

    The electrofission cross section of [sup 182]W was measured in the range 80--180 MeV. A pronounced inflexion, corresponding to a sharp structure in the ([gamma],[ital f]) curve, shows up around 140 MeV. A photofission model, based on a photopion-deuteron reabsorption process, was worked out to explain this finding. Good agreement between calculation and experimental data was achieved.

  4. Renal Integrin-Linked Kinase Depletion Induces Kidney cGMP-Axis Upregulation: Consequences on Basal and Acutely Damaged Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Cano-Peñalver, José Luis; Griera, Mercedes; García-Jerez, Andrea; Hatem-Vaquero, Marco; Ruiz-Torres, María Piedad; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego; de Frutos, Sergio; Rodríguez-Puyol, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is activated by nitric oxide (NO) and produces cGMP, which activates cGMP-dependent protein kinases (PKG) and is hydrolyzed by specific phosphodiesterases (PDE). The vasodilatory and cytoprotective capacity of cGMP-axis activation results in a therapeutic strategy for several pathologies. Integrin-linked kinase (ILK), a major scaffold protein between the extracellular matrix and intracellular signaling pathways, may modulate the expression and functionality of the cGMP-axis–related proteins. We introduce ILK as a novel modulator in renal homeostasis as well as a potential target for cisplatin (CIS)-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) improvement. We used an adult mice model of depletion of ILK (cKD-ILK), which showed basal increase of sGC and PKG expressions and activities in renal cortex when compared with wildtype (WT) littermates. Twenty-four h activation of sGC activation with NO enhanced the filtration rate in cKD-ILK. During AKI, cKD-ILK maintained the cGMP-axis upregulation with consequent filtration rates enhancement and ameliorated CIS-dependent tubular epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and inflammation and markers. To emphasize the role of cGMP-axis upregulation due to ILK depletion, we modulated the cGMP axis under AKI in vivo and in renal cultured cells. A suboptimal dose of the PDE inhibitor ZAP enhanced the beneficial effects of the ILK depletion in AKI mice. On the other hand, CIS increased contractility-related events in cultured glomerular mesangial cells and necrosis rates in cultured tubular cells; ILK depletion protected the cells while sGC blockade with ODQ fully recovered the damage. PMID:26562149

  5. PGC1α drives NAD biosynthesis linking oxidative metabolism to renal protection.

    PubMed

    Tran, Mei T; Zsengeller, Zsuzsanna K; Berg, Anders H; Khankin, Eliyahu V; Bhasin, Manoj K; Kim, Wondong; Clish, Clary B; Stillman, Isaac E; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Rhee, Eugene P; Parikh, Samir M

    2016-03-24

    The energetic burden of continuously concentrating solutes against gradients along the tubule may render the kidney especially vulnerable to ischaemia. Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 3% of all hospitalized patients. Here we show that the mitochondrial biogenesis regulator, PGC1α, is a pivotal determinant of renal recovery from injury by regulating nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) biosynthesis. Following renal ischaemia, Pgc1α(-/-) (also known as Ppargc1a(-/-)) mice develop local deficiency of the NAD precursor niacinamide (NAM, also known as nicotinamide), marked fat accumulation, and failure to re-establish normal function. Notably, exogenous NAM improves local NAD levels, fat accumulation, and renal function in post-ischaemic Pgc1α(-/-) mice. Inducible tubular transgenic mice (iNephPGC1α) recapitulate the effects of NAM supplementation, including more local NAD and less fat accumulation with better renal function after ischaemia. PGC1α coordinately upregulates the enzymes that synthesize NAD de novo from amino acids whereas PGC1α deficiency or AKI attenuates the de novo pathway. NAM enhances NAD via the enzyme NAMPT and augments production of the fat breakdown product β-hydroxybutyrate, leading to increased production of prostaglandin PGE2 (ref. 5), a secreted autacoid that maintains renal function. NAM treatment reverses established ischaemic AKI and also prevented AKI in an unrelated toxic model. Inhibition of β-hydroxybutyrate signalling or prostaglandin production similarly abolishes PGC1α-dependent renoprotection. Given the importance of mitochondrial health in ageing and the function of metabolically active organs, the results implicate NAM and NAD as key effectors for achieving PGC1α-dependent stress resistance. PMID:26982719

  6. [Renal physiology].

    PubMed

    Gueutin, Victor; Deray, Gilbert; Isnard-Bagnis, Corinne

    2012-03-01

    The kidneys are responsible for the urinary excretion of uremic toxins and the regulation of several body systems such as intra and extracellular volume status, acid-base status, calcium and phosphate metabolism or erythropoiesis. They adapt quantitative and qualitative composition of the urine to keep these systems in balance. The flow of plasma is filtered in the range of 120 mL/min, and depends on the systemic and renal hemodynamics which is subject to self-regulation. The original urine will then be modified in successive segments of the nephron. The proximal nephron is to lead the massive reabsorption of water and essential elements such as sodium, bicarbonates, amino-acids and glucose. The distal nephron includes the distal convoluted tubule, the connector tube and the collecting duct. Its role is to adapt the quality composition of urine to the needs of the body. PMID:22157516

  7. Quantitative Structure-Pharmacokinetic Relationships for the Prediction of Renal Clearance in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Rutwij A.

    2015-01-01

    Renal clearance (CLR), a major route of elimination for many drugs and drug metabolites, represents the net result of glomerular filtration, active secretion and reabsorption, and passive reabsorption. The aim of this study was to develop quantitative structure-pharmacokinetic relationships (QSPKR) to predict CLR of drugs or drug-like compounds in humans. Human CLR data for 382 compounds were obtained from the literature. Step-wise multiple linear regression was used to construct QSPKR models for training sets and their predictive performance was evaluated using internal validation (leave-one-out method). All qualified models were validated externally using test sets. QSPKR models were also constructed for compounds in accordance with their 1) net elimination pathways (net secretion, extensive net secretion, net reabsorption, and extensive net reabsorption), 2) net elimination clearances (net secretion clearance, CLSEC; or net reabsorption clearance, CLREAB), 3) ion status, and 4) substrate/inhibitor specificity for renal transporters. We were able to predict 1) CLREAB (Q2 = 0.77) of all compounds undergoing net reabsorption; 2) CLREAB (Q2 = 0.81) of all compounds undergoing extensive net reabsorption; and 3) CLR for substrates and/or inhibitors of OAT1/3 (Q2 = 0.81), OCT2 (Q2 = 0.85), MRP2/4 (Q2 = 0.78), P-gp (Q2 = 0.71), and MATE1/2K (Q2 = 0.81). Moreover, compounds undergoing net reabsorption/extensive net reabsorption predominantly belonged to Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System classes 1 and 2. In conclusion, constructed parsimonious QSPKR models can be used to predict CLR of compounds that 1) undergo net reabsorption/extensive net reabsorption and 2) are substrates and/or inhibitors of human renal transporters. PMID:25352657

  8. Partial Characterization of the Molecular Nature of Collagen-Linked Fluorescence: Role of Diabetes and End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sell, David R.; Nemet, Ina; Monnier, Vincent M.

    2009-01-01

    Collagen-linked fluorescence at excitation/emission 370/440 nm has widely been used as a marker for advanced glycation in studies of aging, diabetic complications and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Diagnostic devices measuring skin autofluorescence at this wavelength revealed an association between fluorescence and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We now report the presence of a major fluorophore (LW-1) in human skin collagen which increases with age, diabetes and ESRD. It has a molecular weight of 623.2 Da, a UV maximum at 348 nm, and involves a lysine residue in an aromatic ring. LW-1 could not be synthesized using traditional glycation chemistry suggesting a complex mechanism of formation, perhaps related to hypoxia since elevated levels were also found in nondiabetic individuals with chronic lung disease. PMID:19879855

  9. Increased Milk Protein Concentration in a Rehydration Drink Enhances Fluid Retention Caused by Water Reabsorption in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kentaro; Saito, Yuri; Ashida, Kinya; Yamaji, Taketo; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Oda, Munehiro

    2015-01-01

    A fluid-retention effect is required for beverages that are designed to prevent dehydration. That is, fluid absorbed from the intestines should not be excreted quickly; long-term retention is desirable. Here, we focused on the effect of milk protein on fluid retention, and propose a new effective oral rehydration method that can be used daily for preventing dehydration. We first evaluated the effects of different concentrations of milk protein on fluid retention by measuring the urinary volumes of rats fed fluid containing milk protein at concentrations of 1, 5, and 10%. We next compared the fluid-retention effect of milk protein-enriched drink (MPD) with those of distilled water (DW) and a sports drink (SD) by the same method. Third, to investigate the mechanism of fluid retention, we measured plasma insulin changes in rats after ingesting these three drinks. We found that the addition of milk protein at 5 or 10% reduced urinary volume in a dose-dependent manner. Ingestion of the MPD containing 4.6% milk protein resulted in lower urinary volumes than DW and SD. MPD also showed a higher water reabsorption rate in the kidneys and higher concentrations of plasma insulin than DW and SD. These results suggest that increasing milk protein concentration in a beverage enhances fluid retention, which may allow the possibility to develop rehydration beverages that are more effective than SDs. In addition, insulin-modifying renal water reabsorption may contribute to the fluid-retention effect of MPD. PMID:26235579

  10. Phenotypes Developed in Secretin Receptor-Null Mice Indicated a Role for Secretin in Regulating Renal Water Reabsorption▿

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jessica Y. S.; Chung, Samuel C. K.; Lam, Amy K. M.; Tam, Sidney; Chung, Sookja K.; Chow, Billy K. C.

    2007-01-01

    Aquaporin 2 (AQP2) is responsible for regulating the concentration of urine in the collecting tubules of the kidney under the control of vasopressin (Vp). Studies using Vp-deficient Brattleboro rats, however, indicated the existence of substantial Vp-independent mechanisms for membrane insertion, as well as transcriptional regulation, of this water channel. The Vp-independent mechanism(s) is clinically relevant to patients with X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) by therapeutically bypassing the dysfunctional Vp receptor. On the basis of studies with secretin receptor-null (SCTR−/−) mice, we report here for the first time that mutation of the SCTR gene could lead to mild polydipsia and polyuria. Additionally, SCTR−/− mice were shown to have reduced renal expression of AQP2 and AQP4, as well as altered glomerular and tubular morphology, suggesting possible disturbances in the filtration and/or water reabsorption process in these animals. By using SCTR−/− mice as controls and comparing them with wild-type animals, we performed both in vivo and in vitro studies that demonstrated a role for secretin in stimulating (i) AQP2 translocation from intracellular vesicles to the plasma membrane in renal medullary tubules and (ii) expression of this water channel under hyperosmotic conditions. The present study therefore provides information for at least one of the Vp-independent mechanisms that modulate the process of renal water reabsorption. Future investigations in this direction should be important in developing therapeutic means for treating NDI patients. PMID:17283064

  11. Increased renal catabolism of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in murine X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets.

    PubMed Central

    Tenenhouse, H S; Yip, A; Jones, G

    1988-01-01

    The hypophosphatemic (Hyp) mouse, a murine homologue of human X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets, is characterized by renal defects in brush border membrane phosphate transport and vitamin D3 metabolism. The present study was undertaken to examine whether elevated renal 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-24-hydroxylase activity in Hyp mice is associated with increased degradation of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] by side chain oxidation. Metabolites of 1,25(OH)2D3 were separated by HPLC on Zorbax SIL and identified by comparison with standards authenticated by mass spectrometry. Production of 1,24,25-trihydroxyvitamin D3, 24-oxo-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, and 24-oxo-1,23,25-trihydroxyvitamin D3 was twofold greater in mitochondria from mutant Hyp/Y mice than from normal +/Y littermates. Enzyme activities, estimated by the sum of the three products synthesized per milligram mitochondrial protein under initial rate conditions, were used to estimate kinetic parameters. The apparent Vmax was significantly greater for mitochondria from Hyp/Y mice than from +/Y mice (0.607 +/- 0.064 vs. 0.290 +/- 0.011 pmol/mg per protein per min, mean +/- SEM, P less than 0.001), whereas the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) was similar in both genotypes (23 +/- 2 vs. 17 +/- 5 nM). The Km for 1,25(OH)2D3 was approximately 10-fold lower than that for 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3], indicating that 1,25(OH)2D3 is perhaps the preferred substrate under physiological conditions. In both genotypes, apparent Vmax for 25(OH)D3 was fourfold greater than that for 1,25(OH)2D3, suggesting that side chain oxidation of 25(OH)D3 may operate at pharmacological concentrations of substrate. The present results demonstrate that Hyp mice exhibit increased renal catabolism of 1,25(OH)2D3 and suggest that elevated degradation of vitamin D3 hormone may contribute significantly to the clinical phenotype in this disorder. PMID:3339128

  12. Familial renal glycosuria and modifications of glucose renal excretion.

    PubMed

    Prié, D

    2014-12-01

    Under physiological conditions, the kidneys contribute to glucose homoeostasis by producing glucose by gluconeogenesis and preventing glucose loss in urine. The glucose filtered by the glomeruli is completely reabsorbed in the renal proximal tubule. Renal gluconeogenesis produces 25% of the circulating glucose in the postabsorptive state, while the amount of glucose reabsorbed by the kidneys largely exceeds the quantity synthesized by kidney gluconeogenesis. Sodium-glucose cotransporter type 2 (SGLT-2) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) carry out more than 90% of renal glucose uptake. In diabetes, both gluconeogenesis and renal glucose reabsorption are increased. The augmentation of glucose uptake in diabetes is due to the overexpression of renal glucose transporters SGLT-2 and GLUT2 in response to the increase in expression of transcription activator hepatic nuclear factor 1-alpha (HNF1α). The rise in glucose uptake contributes to hyperglycaemia and induces glomerular hyperfiltration by increasing sodium and water reabsorption in the proximal tubule that, in turn, modifies urine flux at the macula densa. SGLT-2 inhibitors improve glycaemic control and prevent renal hyperfiltration in diabetes. Loss of SGLT-2 transporter function is a benign state characterized by glycosuria. In contrast, mutations of other glucose transporters expressed in the kidney are responsible for severe disorders. PMID:25554066

  13. Renal mu opioid receptor mechanisms in regulation of renal function in rats.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Jones, S Y; DiBona, G F

    1991-07-01

    Studies were performed in pentobarbital anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats to determine whether mu opioid receptor agonists produce changes in renal function via intrarenal mechanisms. Left renal artery infusion of isotonic saline vehicle or the selective mu opioid receptor agonist, dermorphin (0.5 nmol/kg/min), did not alter mean arterial pressure or heart rate. In contrast, left renal artery dermorphin administration produced a significant decrease in left kidney urinary flow rate and sodium excretion without altering glomerular filtration rate or effective renal plasma flow; function of the right kidney was unaffected. Pretreatment of the left kidney with the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, 50 micrograms/kg into left renal artery, prevented changes in urinary flow rate and sodium excretion induced by subsequent left renal artery dermorphin administration. Prior bilateral renal denervation abolished the antidiuretic and antinatriuretic responses to left renal artery dermorphin administration. These results suggest that mu opioid receptor agonists participate in the process of renal tubular sodium and water reabsorption via an intrarenal action that is dependent on an interaction with renal sympathetic nerves. This may occur via an action of mu opioid receptor agonists to facilitate the nerve terminal release and/or the direct tubular action of norepinephrine to affect renal tubular sodium and water reabsorption. PMID:1677034

  14. [Detoxication effect of water-soluble imprinted cross-linked chitosan on depleted uranium induced toxicity to renal cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-fei; Li, Chao; Zhao, Chang-qi; Liu, Li-hong

    2011-05-01

    To investigate whether a series of water-soluble cross-linked chitosan derivates synthesized in the guide of imprinting technology could be used as a uranium chelating agent to protect cells exposed to depleted uranium (DU), the imprinted chitosan derivates with high UO2(2+) chelating ability were screened, and cell model of human renal proximal tubule epithelium cells (HK-2) exposed to DU (500 micromol.L-1) was built, chitosan derivates (400 mg.L-1 ) was added to test group and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA, 50 mg.L-1) was added to positive control group. The results showed that three Cu2+ imprinted chitosan derivates had higher uranium chelating ability (>49 microg.mg-1) than chitosan and non-imprinted chitosan derivates. Compared to the cells exposed to DU only, survival of cells in group added chitosan derivates rose up significantly (increased from 57.3% to 88.7%, and DTPA to 72.6%), and DU intracellular accumulation decreased, membrane damage and DNA damage also eased. Among the imprinted chitosan derivates, Cu2+ imprinted penta dialdehyde cross-linked carboxymethyl chitosan (Cu-P-CMC) was the best, and better than DTPA. From ultrastructure observation, the DU precipitates of test group added Cu-P-CMC were most grouped in a big hairy clusters in a string together outside cells. It is possible that the DU-chitosan derivates precipitates are too big to enter into cells, and from this way, the DU uptake by cells decreased so as to detoxication. PMID:21800537

  15. Leptin in end stage renal disease (ESRD): a link between fat mass, bone and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Mallamaci, F; Tripepi, G; Zoccali, C

    2005-01-01

    Adipose tissue is now considered an important system operating strictly in concert with other systems. The adipocyte is the main producer of two pleiotropic compounds, leptin and adiponectin, modulating inflammation and having multiple effects in disparate organs including the cardiovascular and the central nervous system. Leptin has disparate influences on various physiologic and organ systems including glucose homeostasis, hematopoiesis and the reproductive and cardiovascular systems and is a crucial hormone for the regulation of food intake and body weight. Peripherally, leptin modulates insulin sensitivity and high leptin triggers insulin resistance and vice versa. Obesity, a situation where circulating leptin attains very high levels is accompanied by increased bone mass, a phenomenon which may depend on direct stimulation of osteoblasts by leptin. However in animal models the stimulating effect of leptin on the osteoblast is counterbalanced by a strong inhibitor effect on bone formation in the central nervous system. Two recent studies reported an inverse link between leptin, bone mass and PTH in dialysis patients suggesting that leptin may be implicated in low bone turnover in these patients, likely by a mechanism involving the central nervous system. Leptin induces vascular calcifications in vitro. In uremic man leptin is unrelated to valvular calcifications but predicts incident cardiovascular events in overweight and obese dialysis patients. Leptin seems to be a relevant player in the emerging connection between bone and cardiovascular alterations in patients with end stage renal disease. PMID:16245256

  16. Accelerated ageing and renal dysfunction links lower socioeconomic status and dietary phosphate intake

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Ruth; Christensen, Kelly; Mohammed, Suhaib; McGuinness, Dagmara; Cooney, Josephine; Bakshi, Andisheh; Demou, Evangelia; MacDonald, Ewan; Caslake, Muriel; Stenvinkel, Peter; Shiels, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    Background We have sought to explore the impact of dietary Pi intake on human age related health in the pSoBid cohort (n=666) to explain the disparity between health and deprivation status in this cohort. As hyperphosphataemia is a driver of accelerated ageing in rodent models of progeria we tested whether variation in Pi levels in man associate with measures of biological ageing and health. Results We observed significant relationships between serum Pi levels and markers of biological age (telomere length (p=0.040) and DNA methylation content (p=0.028), gender and chronological age (p=0.032). When analyses were adjusted for socio-economic status and nutritional factors, associations were observed between accelerated biological ageing (telomere length, genomic methylation content) and dietary derived Pi levels among the most deprived males, directly related to the frequency of red meat consumption. Conclusions Accelerated ageing is associated with high serum Pi levels and frequency of red meat consumption. Our data provide evidence for a mechanistic link between high intake of Pi and age-related morbidities tied to socio-economic status. PMID:27132985

  17. Genetics Home Reference: renal coloboma syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 link) The Kidney and Urology Foundation of America GeneReviews (1 link) Renal Coloboma Syndrome Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Renal coloboma syndrome Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 ...

  18. Observations on the mechanism and location of ascites reabsorption in man

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, W.G. Jr.; Ibarra, F.

    1987-04-01

    Animal data indicate that ascites is reabsorbed by a lymphatic mechanism and that these vessels are subdiaphragmatic in location. We evaluated the relative role of lymphatics in ascites reabsorption in man by comparing the ascites clearance and plasma appearance rates of intraperitoneally injected radiolabeled albumin to those of intraperitoneally injected labeled autologous red blood cells, which require, owing to their large size, lymphatic removal, in patients with cirrhosis and ascites. To evaluate the location of reabsorption, we repeated these measurements after replacing ascites in the subdiaphragmatic region with 500-1000 ml of intraperitoneally injected air, reasoning that this maneuver should slow or eliminate ascites reabsorption occurring at this site. We found that the transfer rates of albumin and red cells out of ascites were similar and that creation of pneumoperitoneum did not influence these rates. These data confirm that ascites protein reabsorption occurs via a lymphatic mechanism in man. They suggest, however, that these vessels may not be subdiaphragmatic in location.

  19. Inappropriate tall stature and renal ectopy in a male patient with X-linked congenital adrenal hypoplasia due to a novel missense mutation in the DAX-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Franzese, Adriana; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Spagnuolo, Maria Immacolata; Spadaro, Raffaella; Giugliano, Michela; Mukai, Tokuo; Valerio, Giuliana

    2005-05-15

    Mutations in DAX-1 gene cause congenital adrenal hypoplasia (AHC). We present a male patient affected by X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita due to a novel DAX-1 missense mutation. The mutation V287G affects the C-terminal end of the DAX-1 protein which plays an important role in functioning of the receptor. In addition, our patient presented an inappropriate tall stature and renal ectopy, which have not been described in AHC so far. PMID:15800903

  20. ADH-PGE2 interactions in cortical collecting tubule. II. inhibition of Ca and P reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Holt, W F; Lechene, C

    1981-10-01

    In the absence of ADH, microperfused cortical collecting tubules of rabbits reabsorb calcium and phosphorus. Antidiuretic hormone (ADH) (200 microunits/ml Pitressin or synthetic arginine vasopressin) inhibits the reabsorption and may promote the secretion of calcium and phosphorus. At 5 min after incubation with ADH, there was a transitory increase in the potential difference and the reabsorption of sodium. The fluxes of calcium and phosphorus, however, showed no significant change from the control values. At 30-50 min after treatment with ADH, the reabsorption of calcium and phosphorus was inhibited and in some tubules calcium and phosphorus were secreted. The removal of vasopressin from the bath or the addition of 10(-5) M meclofenamate in vitro prevented ADH from inhibiting the reabsorption of calcium and phosphorus. Treatment of tubules with 10(-5) M prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) subsequent to incubation in a medium containing ADH and meclofenamate inhibited the reabsorption or even promoted the secretin of calcium and phosphorus, as did the prolonged incubation with ADH alone. We conclude that cortical collecting tubules reabsorb calcium and phosphorus in the absence of vasopressin and that ADH inhibits calcium and phosphorus reabsorption. Endogenous synthesis of PGE2 may mediate the inhibitory action of ADH, since meclofenamate (an inhibitor of the synthesis of prostaglandins) opposes and exogenous PGE2 mimics ADH. PMID:6947697

  1. Taurine and the renal system

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Taurine participates in a number of different physiologic and biologic processes in the kidney, often reflected by urinary excretion patterns. The kidney is key to aspects of taurine body pool size and homeostasis. This review will examine the renal-taurine interactions relative to ion reabsorption; renal blood flow and renal vascular endothelial function; antioxidant properties, especially in the glomerulus; and the role of taurine in ischemia and reperfusion injury. In addition, taurine plays a role in the renal cell cycle and apoptosis, and functions as an osmolyte during the stress response. The role of the kidney in adaptation to variations in dietary taurine intake and the regulation of taurine body pool size are described. Finally, the protective function of taurine against several kidney diseases is reviewed. PMID:20804616

  2. Assessment of the place of tubular reabsorption of phosphorus in the diagnosis of osteopenia of prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Duygu Besnili; Kavuncuoğlu, Sultan; Çetinkaya, Merih; Petmezci, Ercüment; Dursun, Mesut; Korkmaz, Orhan; Altuncu, Emel Kayrak

    2015-01-01

    Aim: In this study, we aimed to investigate the utility of tubular reabsorption of phosphorus in the diagnosis of osteopenia of prematurity in addition to biochemical markers. Materials and Method: Premature babies with a gestational age of ≤32 weeks and/or a birth weight of ≤1 500 g who were hospitalized in the neonatal intensive care unit between June 2009 and March 2011 were included in the study. These babies were evaluated at the 40th gestational week and serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, urea, creatinine, urinary calcium and phosphorus levels were measured and tubular reabsorption of phosphorus was determined. The subjects who had bone graphy findings and/or an alkaline phosphatase level of >400IU/L and a phosphorus value of <3.5 mg/dL were considered osteopenic. The levels of tubular reabsorption of phosphorus of the osteopenic patients were compared with the ones of the non-osteopenic patients. The study was initiated after obtaining ethics committee approval (date: 04.29.2009/213). Results: During the study period, a total of 698 premature babies were hospitalized in our neonatology unit. A diagnosis of osteopenia of prematurity was made in 24 of 190 subjects who met the study criteria. The level of tubular reabsorption of phosphorus was compared with the serum calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase levels measured at the 40th gestational week and alkaline phosphatase was found to be significantly increased in the group with a high tubular reabsorption of phosphorus (≥%95). When the subjects with a phosphorus level of <3.5 mg/dL and an alkaline phosphatase level of >499 IU were compared with the newborns who were found to have a tubular reabsorption of phosphorus of ≥%95 for the objective of evaluating the specificity and sensitivity of tubular reabsorption of phosphorus, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of tubular reabsorption of phosphorus in the diagnosis of osteopenia

  3. Role of basolateral cell membranes in organic solute reabsorption in rabbit kidneys.

    PubMed

    Foulkes, E C

    1987-06-01

    The present work explores the contributions of basolateral carrier systems in tubular reabsorption of organic solutes. Reabsorption of sugars and amino acids, as previously shown, can be represented by a three-compartment linear model that predicts that 1) if basolateral transport contributes to sugar reabsorption, alpha-methylglucoside reabsorption compared with that of glucose should be characterized by a longer transepithelial transit time (TET) and a correspondingly increased cellular transport pool (S), and 2) saturation of basolateral amino acid carriers, or presence of competing amino acids or other basolateral transport inhibitors, should prolong TET of a test amino acid, and increase S above the expected value. Both predictions were fully confirmed. Heavy metal intoxication not only inhibits transport of amino acids at the brush border, but also prolongs their TET and increases the size of S for a given reabsorbed load. Basolateral extrusion of amino acids is more sensitive to metals than is uptake across the brush border. Although basolateral carriers accelerate return of reabsorbed solute to blood, their contribution to reabsorption does not seem to be mandatory. PMID:3591952

  4. Is nectar reabsorption restricted by the stalk cells of floral and extrafloral nectary trichomes?

    PubMed

    Cardoso-Gustavson, P; Davis, A R

    2015-01-01

    Reabsorption is a phase of nectar dynamics that occurs concurrently with secretion; it has been described in floral nectaries that exude nectar through stomata or unicellular trichomes, but has not yet been recorded in extrafloral glands. Apparently, nectar reabsorption does not occur in multicellular secretory trichomes (MST) due to the presence of lipophilic impregnations - which resemble Casparian strips - in the anticlinal walls of the stalk cells. It has been assumed that these impregnations restrict solute movement within MST to occur unidirectionally and exclusively by the symplast, thereby preventing nectar reflux toward the underlying nectary tissues. We hypothesised that reabsorption is absent in nectaries possessing MST. The fluorochrome lucifer yellow (LYCH) was applied to standing nectar of two floral and extrafloral glands of distantly related species, and then emission spectra from nectary sections were systematically analysed using confocal microscopy. Passive uptake of LYCH via the stalk cells to the nectary tissues occurred in all MST examined. Moreover, we present evidence of nectar reabsorption in extrafloral nectaries, demonstrating that LYCH passed the stalk cells of MST, although it did not reach the deepest nectary tissues. Identical (control) experiments performed with neutral red (NR) demonstrated no uptake of this stain by actively secreting MST, whereas diffusion of NR did occur in plasmolysed MST of floral nectaries at the post-secretory phase, indicating that nectar reabsorption by MST is governed by stalk cell physiology. Interestingly, non-secretory trichomes failed to reabsorb nectar. The role of various nectary components is discussed in relation to the control of nectar reabsorption by secretory trichomes. PMID:24987788

  5. Effects of opioid peptides on neural control of renal function in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Jones, S Y; DiBona, G F

    1990-06-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine the effects of opioid receptor agonists and antagonists on the renal vascular (renal blood flow) and tubular (urinary sodium excretion) responses to renal nerve stimulation and norepinephrine in anesthetized spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Graded frequency renal nerve stimulation (0.5-4.0 Hz) and doses of norepinephrine (10-80 ng/kg) produced frequency and dose-dependent decreases in renal blood flow. The renal vasoconstrictor responses were not altered by intravenous infusion of the opioid receptor agonists methionine enkephalin (mu and delta, 75 micrograms/kg/min) or U-50488H (kappa, 20 micrograms/kg/min) or administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (1 mg/kg i.v.). The antinatriuretic response to low frequency (less than 1.0 Hz) electrical renal nerve stimulation was prevented by naloxone but not affected by methionine enkephalin administration without changes in glomerular filtration rate or effective renal plasma flow. These studies suggest that endogenous opioid receptor mechanisms are involved in the increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption response to low frequency renal nerve stimulation but not in the renal vasoconstrictor response to either renal nerve stimulation or norepinephrine. This might occur by facilitation of the renal nerve terminal release, the direct renal tubular action, or both, of norepinephrine to influence renal tubular sodium reabsorption. PMID:2351429

  6. Role of MHC-Linked Genes in Autoantigen Selection and Renal Disease in a Murine Model of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously described a renal protective effect of factor B deficiency in MRL/lpr mice. Factor B is in the MHC cluster; thus, the deficient mice were H2b, the haplotype on which the knockout was derived, whereas the wild-type littermates were H2k, the H2 of MRL/lpr mice. To determine which protect...

  7. Red shift in the photoluminescence of colloidal carbon quantum dots induced by photon reabsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenxia; Dai, Dejian; Chen, Xifang; Guo, Xiaoxiao; Fan, Jiyang

    2014-03-03

    We synthesize the colloidal carbon/graphene quantum dots 1–9 nm in diameter and study their photoluminescence properties. Surprisingly, the luminescence properties of a fixed collection of colloidal carbon quantum dots can be systematically changed as the concentration varies. A model based on photon reabsorption is proposed which explains well the experiment. Infrared spectral study indicates that the surfaces of the carbon quantum dots are substantially terminated by oxygen atoms, which causes their ultra-high hydrophilicity. Our result clarifies the mystery of distinct emission colors in carbon quantum dots and indicates that photon reabsorption can strongly affect the luminescence properties of colloidal nanocrystals.

  8. Activation of purinergic receptors (P2) in the renal medulla promotes endothelin-dependent natriuresis in male rats.

    PubMed

    Gohar, Eman Y; Speed, Joshua S; Kasztan, Malgorzata; Jin, Chunhua; Pollock, David M

    2016-08-01

    Renal endothelin-1 (ET-1) and purinergic signaling systems regulate Na(+) reabsorption in the renal medulla. A link between the renal ET-1 and purinergic systems was demonstrated in vitro, however, the in vivo interaction between these systems has not been defined. To test whether renal medullary activation of purinergic (P2) receptors promotes ET-dependent natriuresis, we determined the effect of increased medullary NaCl loading on Na(+) excretion and inner medullary ET-1 mRNA expression in anesthetized adult male Sprague-Dawley rats in the presence and absence of purinergic receptor antagonism. Isosmotic saline (NaCl; 284 mosmol/kgH2O) was infused into the medullary interstitium (500 μl/h) during a 30-min baseline urine collection period, followed by isosmotic or hyperosmotic saline (1,800 mosmol/kgH2O) for two further 30-min urine collection periods. Na(+) excretion was significantly increased during intramedullary infusion of hyperosmotic saline. Compared with isosmotic saline, hyperosmotic saline infused into the renal medulla caused significant increases in inner medullary ET-1 mRNA expression. Renal intramedullary infusion of the P2 receptor antagonist suramin inhibited the increase in Na(+) excretion and inner medullary ET-1 mRNA expression induced by NaCl loading in the renal medulla. Activation of medullary P2Y2/4 receptors by infusion of UTP increased urinary Na(+) excretion. Combined ETA and ETB receptor blockade abolished the natriuretic response to intramedullary infusion of UTP. These data demonstrate that activation of medullary P2 receptors promotes ET-dependent natriuresis in male rats, suggesting that the renal ET-1 and purinergic signaling systems interact to efficiently facilitate excretion of a NaCl load. PMID:27226106

  9. A simple slide-rule method for the assessment of renal tubular reaborption of phosphate in man.

    PubMed

    Walton, R J; Bijvoet, O L

    1977-12-15

    The activity of renal tubular reabsorption of phosphate in man is best expressed as the ratio of the maximum rate or reabsorption to the glomerular filtration rate (TmP/GFR). A slide-rule method based on existing data is described for the derivation of TmP/GFR from values of phosphate and creatinine concentrations in single samples of plasma and urine. This is a simple method which is suitable both for research and for clinical purposes. PMID:923101

  10. Renal P2 receptors and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Menzies, R I; Unwin, R J; Bailey, M A

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of extracellular fluid volume is a key component of blood pressure homeostasis. Long-term blood pressure is stabilized by the acute pressure natriuresis response by which changes in renal perfusion pressure evoke corresponding changes in renal sodium excretion. A wealth of experimental evidence suggests that a defect in the pressure natriuresis response contributes to the development and maintenance of hypertension. The mechanisms underlying the relationship between renal perfusion pressure and sodium excretion are incompletely understood. Increased blood flow through the vasa recta increases renal interstitial hydrostatic pressure, thereby reducing the driving force for transepithelial sodium reabsorption. Paracrine signalling also contributes to the overall natriuretic response by inhibiting tubular sodium reabsorption in several nephron segments. In this brief review, we discuss the role of purinergic signalling in the renal control of blood pressure. ATP is released from renal tubule and vascular cells in response to increased flow and can activate P2 receptor subtypes expressed in both epithelial and vascular endothelial/smooth muscle cells. In concert, these effects integrate the vascular and tubular responses to increased perfusion pressure and targeting P2 receptors, particularly P2X7, may prove beneficial for treatment of hypertension. PMID:25345692

  11. The effect of surgery on the renal excretion of beta 2-microglobulin.

    PubMed

    Walenkamp, G H; Vree, T B; Guelen, P J; Jongman-Nix, B

    1983-03-28

    Surgical trauma causes an increase in the renal excretion rate of beta 2-microglobulin whilst creatinine excretion is not influenced. The increase in the renal excretion rate of beta 2-microglobulin is probably the result of an increased release of beta 2-microglobulin by the cells which exceeds a maximum in the active tubular reabsorption of the compound by the proximal tubule cell. The renal excretion of beta 2-microglobulin is proportional to the relative clinical trauma score. PMID:6189646

  12. In vivo microperfusion of the ductuli efferentes testis of the rat: flow dependence of fluid reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Clulow, J; Hansen, L A; Jones, R C

    1996-07-01

    Individual ducts from the initial zone of the efferent ducts of the rat were microperfused in vivo using a double cannulation procedure, which allowed the recovery of perfused fluids for analysis and determination of the rate of fluid reabsorption from the perfused duct. The ducts were perfused at rates from 0.025 to 0.4 microliters min-1 with either Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate (KRB) solution or the native rete testis fluid (nRTF) that perfuses the ducts in situ. Reabsorption of KRB solution increased linearly with a perfusion rate of between 0.025 and 0.1 microliter min-1 (from 17.4 +/- 1.5 to 34.3 +/- 3.2 nl (10 mm duct)-1 min-1), then increased no further. Reabsorption of nRTF increased linearly between 0.025 and 0.2 microliters min-1 (from 17.7 +/- 1.5 to 61.4 +/- 13.5 nl (10 mm duct)-1 min-1) and then declined. The reabsorption rate from nRTF perfusates was significantly higher than from KRB perfusates. As a proportion of the luminal perfusate, reabsorption declined from 73.0 +/- 6.0 to 7.4 +/- 3.0% (10 mm duct)-1 for KRB solution and from 73.1 +/- 6.0 to 4.1 +/- 1.3% (10 mm duct)-1 for nRTF. There was no significant change in the concentration of either Na+ or Cl- in KRB solution or nRTF during perfusion through the efferent ducts, indicating that the reabsorption of these ions was isomolar. However, the reabsorption of K+ from nRTF occurred at a greater rate than that of water, and the initial [K+] declined from 17.2 +/- 0.4 mM in nRTF perfusates to 5.7 +/- 0.5 mM in collectates (perfusion rate, 0.1 microliter min-1) to achieve equilibrium with blood plasma (4.7 +/- 0.4 mM). The osmotic pressure of both KRB and nRTF perfusates equilibrated with blood plasma, indicating a high permeability of the epithelium to water. The results of this study provide further evidence that fluid reabsorption in the efferent ducts is isosmotic, or close to isosmotic, and have shown that, as in the homologous proximal kidney tubule, reabsorption is dependent on luminal flow rate

  13. A novel mu-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on recombinant proteins for sensitive and specific diagnosis of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Zöller, L G; Yang, S; Gött, P; Bautz, E K; Darai, G

    1993-01-01

    Hantavirus nucleocapsid protein has recently been identified as a major antigen inducing an early and long-lasting humoral immune response in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. A mu-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay utilizing recombinant nucleocapsid proteins of Hantavirus strains Hantaan 76-118 (Hantaan serotype) and CG 18-20 (Puumala serotype) as diagnostic antigens and specific monoclonal antibodies as the detection system has been developed. Histidine-tailed recombinant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified in a single step by affinity chromatography on a nickel-chelate resin. The assay was evaluated with a panel of sera from patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome originating from various geographic regions. The overall sensitivity of the mu-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (both recombinant antigens) was 100%, and its specificity was also found to be 100%. Immunoglobulin M antibodies were detected as early as on day 3, and maximum titers were obtained between days 8 and 25 after onset of the disease. The assay was regularly found to be positive within 3 to 4 months but in some cases up to 2 years after the acute phase of the disease. Images PMID:8099085

  14. Renal imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Hierholzer, K; Hierholzer, J

    1997-01-01

    The ancient approach to obtain an image of the kidneys (and other internal organs) was 'section-inspection-imaging' by drawing, painting, sculpturing, and modelling. The present study follows chronologically the development and use of sectioning techniques from ancient (often forbidden) methods to modern microdissection and maceration of silicone-rubber-injected tubules. Inspection evolved from the use of the naked eye to magnifying lenses, microscopes and finally electron microscopy. Pertinent examples such as the description of the kidneys as the site of urine formation, the visualization of loop structures in the renal medulla and the imaging of tight junction strands are discussed. Inspection or visualization of renal structure and function has been revolutionized by modern noninvasive techniques, such as X-ray imaging, imaging by radioisotopes, ultrasound, computer tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance. Pertinent examples are given demonstrating the potency of the various techniques. The contribution of computerized data evaluation is discussed. The development of micropuncture and microperfusion techniques has opened the field for direct imaging not only of renal (sub)structural details but also of functional parameters such as transtubular reabsorption rates, single glomerular capillary filtration and conductance of the paracellular pathway. We focus particularly on techniques specifically designed to visualize renal hemodynamic and transport parameters. PMID:9189257

  15. Creatinine, urea, uric acid, water and electrolytes renal handling in the healthy oldest old

    PubMed Central

    Musso, Carlos Guido; Álvarez Gregori, Joaquín; Jauregui, José Ricardo; Macías Núñez, Juan Florencio

    2012-01-01

    Renal physiology in the healthy oldest old has the following characteristics, in comparison with the renal physiology in the young: a reduced creatinine clearance, tubular pattern of creatinine back-filtration, preserved proximal tubule sodium reabsorption and uric acid secretion, reduced sodium reabsorption in the thick ascending loop of Henle, reduced free water clearance, increased urea excretion, presence of medulla hypotonicity, reduced urinary dilution and concentration capabilities, and finally a reduced collecting tubules response to furosemide which expresses a reduced potassium excretion in this segment due to a sort of aldosterone resistance. All physiological changes of the aged kidney are the same in both genders. PMID:24175249

  16. Population pharmacokinetics of nefopam in elderly, with or without renal impairment, and its link to treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Djerada, Zoubir; Fournet-Fayard, Aurélie; Gozalo, Claire; Lelarge, Chantal; Lamiable, Denis; Millart, Hervé; Malinovsky, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Aims Nefopam is a nonmorphinic central analgesic, for which no recommendation exists concerning adaptation of regimen in aged patients with or without renal impairment. The objective was to describe the pharmacology of nefopam in aged patients to obtain guidelines for practical use. Methods Elderly patients (n = 48), 65–99 years old, with severe or moderate renal impairment or with normal renal function, were recruited. Nefopam (20 mg) was administered as a 30 min infusion postoperatively. Simultaneously, a 1 min intravenous infusion of iohexol was performed, in order to calculate the glomerular filtration rate. Blood samples were drawn to determine nefopam, desmethyl-nefopam and iohexol plasma concentrations. Nefopam and desmethyl-nefopam concentrations were analysed using a nonlinear mixed-effects modelling approach with Monolix version 4.1.3. The association between pharmacokinetic parameters and treatment response was assessed using logistic regression. Results A two-compartment open model was selected to describe the pharmacokinetics of nefopam. The typical population estimates (between-subject variability) for clearance, volume of distribution, intercompartmental clearance and peripheral volume were, respectively, 17.3 l h−1 (53.2%), 114 l (121%), 80.7 l h−1 (79%) and 208 l (63.6%). Morphine requirement was related to exposure of nefopam. Tachycardia and postoperative nausea and vomiting were best associated with maximal concentration and the rate of increase in nefopam plasma concentration. Conclusions We identified the nefopam pharmacokinetic predictors for morphine requirement and side-effects, such as tachycardia and postoperative nausea and vomiting. In order to maintain morphine sparing and decrease side-effects following a single dose of nefopam (20 mg), simulations suggest an infusion time of >45 min in elderly patients with or without renal impairment. PMID:24252055

  17. Renal Control of Calcium, Phosphate, and Magnesium Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Chonchol, Michel; Levi, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    Calcium, phosphate, and magnesium are multivalent cations that are important for many biologic and cellular functions. The kidneys play a central role in the homeostasis of these ions. Gastrointestinal absorption is balanced by renal excretion. When body stores of these ions decline significantly, gastrointestinal absorption, bone resorption, and renal tubular reabsorption increase to normalize their levels. Renal regulation of these ions occurs through glomerular filtration and tubular reabsorption and/or secretion and is therefore an important determinant of plasma ion concentration. Under physiologic conditions, the whole body balance of calcium, phosphate, and magnesium is maintained by fine adjustments of urinary excretion to equal the net intake. This review discusses how calcium, phosphate, and magnesium are handled by the kidneys. PMID:25287933

  18. FGF23 regulates renal sodium handling and blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Andrukhova, Olena; Slavic, Svetlana; Smorodchenko, Alina; Zeitz, Ute; Shalhoub, Victoria; Lanske, Beate; Pohl, Elena E; Erben, Reinhold G

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) is a bone-derived hormone regulating renal phosphate reabsorption and vitamin D synthesis in renal proximal tubules. Here, we show that FGF23 directly regulates the membrane abundance of the Na+:Cl− co-transporter NCC in distal renal tubules by a signaling mechanism involving the FGF receptor/αKlotho complex, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 (SGK1), and with-no lysine kinase-4 (WNK4). Renal sodium (Na+) reabsorption and distal tubular membrane expression of NCC are reduced in mouse models of Fgf23 and αKlotho deficiency. Conversely, gain of FGF23 function by injection of wild-type mice with recombinant FGF23 or by elevated circulating levels of endogenous Fgf23 in Hyp mice increases distal tubular Na+ uptake and membrane abundance of NCC, leading to volume expansion, hypertension, and heart hypertrophy in a αKlotho and dietary Na+-dependent fashion. The NCC inhibitor chlorothiazide abrogates FGF23-induced volume expansion and heart hypertrophy. Our findings suggest that FGF23 is a key regulator of renal Na+ reabsorption and plasma volume, and may explain the association of FGF23 with cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease patients. PMID:24797667

  19. Theoretical and experimental study on reabsorption effect and temperature characteristic of a quasi-three-level 946nm Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jing; Wan, Yuan; Chen, Weibiao

    2015-02-01

    The influence of temperature and incident pump power on reabsorption loss is theoretically discussed. Temperature characteristic and reabsorption loss rate of a diode-pumped quasi-three-level 946 nm Nd:YAG laser are investigated. Reabsorption effect has a significant impact on laser performance. The results indicate that reabsorption loss increases as the working temperature rises and decreases with the increased incident pump power.

  20. Acute SGLT inhibition normalizes O2 tension in the renal cortex but causes hypoxia in the renal medulla in anaesthetized control and diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Julie; Fasching, Angelica; Pihl, Liselotte; Patinha, Daniela; Franzén, Stephanie; Palm, Fredrik

    2015-08-01

    Early stage diabetic nephropathy is characterized by glomerular hyperfiltration and reduced renal tissue Po2. Recent observations have indicated that increased tubular Na(+)-glucose linked transport (SGLT) plays a role in the development of diabetes-induced hyperfiltration. The aim of the present study was to determine how inhibition of SLGT impacts upon Po2 in the diabetic rat kidney. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin in Sprague-Dawley rats 2 wk before experimentation. Renal hemodynamics, excretory function, and renal O2 homeostasis were measured in anesthetized control and diabetic rats during baseline and after acute SGLT inhibition using phlorizin (200 mg/kg ip). Baseline arterial pressure was similar in both groups and unaffected by SGLT inhibition. Diabetic animals displayed reduced baseline Po2 in both the cortex and medulla. SGLT inhibition improved cortical Po2 in the diabetic kidney, whereas it reduced medullary Po2 in both groups. SGLT inhibition reduced Na(+) transport efficiency [tubular Na(+) transport (TNa)/renal O2 consumption (Qo2)] in the control kidney, whereas the already reduced TNa/Qo2 in the diabetic kidney was unaffected by SGLT inhibition. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that when SGLT is inhibited, renal cortex Po2 in the diabetic rat kidney is normalized, which implies that increased proximal tubule transport contributes to the development of hypoxia in the diabetic kidney. The reduction in medullary Po2 in both control and diabetic kidneys during the inhibition of proximal Na(+) reabsorption suggests the redistribution of active Na(+) transport to less efficient nephron segments, such as the medullary thick ascending limb, which results in medullary hypoxia. PMID:26041448

  1. The role of reabsorption in the spectral distribution of phytoplankton fluorescence emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, D. J.; Mcdermid, I. S.; Kiefer, D. A.; Soohoo, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    A theoretical model has been developed to describe an experimentally observed spectral shift in the fluorescence emission from phytoplankton as a result of the internal reabsorption of that emission. This model accounts for both the absorption of the primary excitation and the modification of the fluorescence through the reabsorption of the emitted light by the chloroplast and by the surrounding medium. Comparisons are made between the results of the theoretical model and data derived from experiments using a number of different phytoplankton species, each adapted to varying light conditions. The details of the model are discussed, and the consequences of its interpretation on the spectral distribution of the fluorescence emission from phytoplankton are examined.

  2. Red shift in the photoluminescence of colloidal carbon quantum dots induced by photon reabsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenxia; Fan, Jiyang; Department of Physics, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, People's Republic of China Team

    We synthesize the colloidal carbon/graphene quantum dots 1-9 nm in diameter through a novel alkaline-assisted method and deeply studied their photoluminescence properties. Surprisingly, the luminescence properties of a fixed collection of carbon dots can be systematically changed as the concentration varies. A model based on photon reabsorption is proposed which explains well the experiment. Infrared spectral study indicates that the surfaces of the carbon dots are totally terminated by three bonding-types of oxygen atoms, which result in their ultra-high hydrophilicity. Our result clarifies the mystery of distinct emission colors in carbon dots and indicates that photon reabsorption can strongly affect the luminescence properties of colloidal nanocrystals.This mechanism can be generalized to help understand the complex luminescence properties of other colloidal quantum dots. and should be seriously considered,otherwise, distinct conclusions may be drawn if different concentrations of quantum dots have been utilized in studying their luminescence properies.

  3. Reabsorption trapping of luminecence in laser crystals: enhancement of energy storage and upconversion

    SciTech Connect

    Noginov, M.A.

    1997-06-01

    It is shown that reabsorption of luminescence in laser crystals can enhance energy storage, energy transfer, and upconversion in solid-state laser media. These effects, experimentally observed in Yb-doped and Er-doped crystals, can potentially decrease the threshold for compact cw pumped lasers. The influence of parasitic laser modes and the amplification of spontaneous emission on population inversion in reflective coated laser elements is discussed. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  4. Renal Effects of Prostaglandins and Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) with best-defined renal functions are PGE2 and prostacyclin (PGI2). These vasodilatory PGs increase renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate under conditions associated with decreased actual or effective circulating volume, resulting in greater tubular flow and secretion of potassium. Under conditions of decreased renal perfusion, the production of renal PGs serves as an important compensatory mechanism. PGI2 (and possibly PGE2) increases potassium secretion mainly by stimulating secretion of renin and activating the renin-angiotensin system, which leads to increased secretion of aldosterone. In addition, PGE2 is involved in the regulation of sodium and water reabsorption and acts as a counterregulatory factor under conditions of increased sodium reabsorption. PGE2 decreases sodium reabsorption at the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle probably via inhibition of the Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter type 2 (NKCC2). Cyclooxygenase inhibitors may enhance urinary concentrating ability in part through effects to upregulate NKCC2 in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop and aquaporin-2 in the collecting duct. Thus, they may be useful to treat Bartter's syndrome and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. PMID:24459520

  5. Circadian regulation of renal function.

    PubMed

    Firsov, Dmitri; Bonny, Olivier

    2010-10-01

    Urinary excretion of water and all major electrolytes exhibit robust circadian oscillations. The 24-h periodicity has been well documented for several important determinants of urine formation, including renal blood flow, glomerular filtration, tubular reabsorption, and tubular secretion. Disturbance of the renal circadian rhythms is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for hypertension, polyuria, and other diseases and may contribute to renal fibrosis. The origin of these rhythms has been attributed to the reactive response of the kidney to circadian changes in volume and/or in the composition of extracellular fluids that are entrained by rest/activity and feeding/fasting cycles. However, numerous studies have shown that most of the renal excretory rhythms persist for long periods of time, even in the absence of periodic environmental cues. These observations led to the hypothesis of the existence of a self-sustained mechanism, enabling the kidney to anticipate various predictable circadian challenges to homeostasis. The molecular basis of this mechanism remained unknown until the recent discovery of the mammalian circadian clock made of a system of autoregulatory transcriptional/translational feedback loops, which have been found in all tissues studied, including the kidney. Here, we present a review of the growing evidence showing the involvement of the molecular clock in the generation of renal excretory rhythms. PMID:20664559

  6. Desmopressin use prior to renal transplant biopsy—does it fit?

    PubMed Central

    Anandagoda, Nelomi; Jayawardene, Satish; Macdougall, Iain C.; Shah, Sapna

    2014-01-01

    Desmopressin acetate (DDAVP), a selective agonist of type 2 vasopressin receptors, is sometimes used prior to percutaneous renal biopsy to reduce the risk of bleeding complications. DDAVP increases free water reabsorption in renal collecting ducts, potentially leading to water intoxication or dilutional hyponatraemia. We present two cases, where DDAVP was used prior to percutaneous renal transplant biopsy and was associated with severe hyponatraemia and neurological sequelae. With DDAVP being advocated in many centres prior to percutaneous renal biopsy, these cases highlight the need for increased awareness regarding side effects. In this report, we provide suggestions on strategies to minimize hyponatraemia in this context. PMID:25859381

  7. Na+ reabsorption in cultured rat epididymal epithelium via the Na+/nucleoside cotransporter.

    PubMed

    Leung, G P; Cheung, K H; Tse, C M; Wong, P Y

    2001-03-01

    The effect of nucleoside on Na+ reabsorption via Na+/nucleoside cotransporter in cultured rat epididymal epithelia was studied by short-circuit current (Isc) technique. Guanosine added apically stimulated Isc in a dose-dependent manner, with a median effective concentration (EC50) of 7 +/- 2 microM (mean +/- SEM). Removal of Na+ from the apical bathing solution or pretreatment with a nonspecific Na+/nucleoside cotransporter inhibitor, phloridzin, completely blocked the Isc response to guanosine. Moreover, the guanosine response was abolished by pretreatment of the tissue with ouabain, a Na+/K+-ATPase inhibitor, suggesting the involvement of Na+/nucleoside cotransporter on the apical side and Na+/K+-ATPase on the basolateral side in Na+ reabsorption. In contrast, the Isc response to guanosine was not affected after desensitization of purinoceptors by ATP. Addition of the Na+/K+/2Cl- symport inhibitor bumetanide to the basolateral side or the nonspecific Cl- channel blocker diphenylamine-2-carboxylate to the apical side showed no effect on the Isc response to guanosine, excluding stimulation of Cl- secretion by guanosine as the cause of the guanosine-induced Isc. The Isc response to purine nucleoside (guanosine and inosine) was much higher than that to pyrimidine nucleoside (thymidine and cytidine). Consistent with substrate specificity, results of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed mRNA for concentrative nucleoside transporter (CNT2), which is a purine nucleoside-selective Na+/nucleoside cotransporter in the epididymis, but not for CNT1. It is suggested that the Na+/nucleoside cotransporter (i.e., CNT2) may be one of the elements involved in Na+ and fluid reabsorption in the epididymis, thereby providing an optimal microenvironment for the maturation and storage of spermatozoa. PMID:11207189

  8. Activation of the epithelial Na+ channel in the collecting duct by vasopressin contributes to water reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Bugaj, Vladislav; Pochynyuk, Oleh; Stockand, James D

    2009-11-01

    We used patch-clamp electrophysiology on isolated, split-open murine collecting ducts (CD) to test the hypothesis that regulation of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activity is a physiologically important effect of vasopressin. Surprisingly, this has not been tested directly before. We ask whether vasopressin affects ENaC activity distinguishing between acute and chronic effects, as well as, parsing the cellular signaling pathway and molecular mechanism of regulation. In addition, we quantified possible synergistic regulation of ENaC by vasopressin and aldosterone associating this with a requirement for distal nephron Na+ reabsorption during water conservation vs. maintenance of Na+ balance. We find that vasopressin significantly increases ENaC activity within 2-3 min by increasing open probability (P(o)). This activation was dependent on adenylyl cyclase (AC) and PKA. Water restriction (18-24 h) and pretreatment of isolated CD with vasopressin (approximately 30 min) resulted in a similar increase in P(o). In addition, this also increased the number (N) of active ENaC in the apical membrane. Similar to P(o), increases in N were sensitive to inhibitors of AC. Stressing animals with water and salt restriction separately and jointly revealed an important effect of vasopressin: conservation of water and Na+ each independently increased ENaC activity and jointly had a synergistic effect on channel activity. These results demonstrate a quantitatively important action of vasopressin on ENaC suggesting that distal nephron Na+ reabsorption mediated by this channel contributes to maintenance of water reabsorption. In addition, our results support that the combined actions of vasopressin and aldosterone are required to achieve maximally activated ENaC. PMID:19692483

  9. Reactive Oxygen Species Modulation of Na/K-ATPase Regulates Fibrosis and Renal Proximal Tubular Sodium Handling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiang; Kennedy, David J.; Yan, Yanling; Shapiro, Joseph I.

    2012-01-01

    The Na/K-ATPase is the primary force regulating renal sodium handling and plays a key role in both ion homeostasis and blood pressure regulation. Recently, cardiotonic steroids (CTS)-mediated Na/K-ATPase signaling has been shown to regulate fibrosis, renal proximal tubule (RPT) sodium reabsorption, and experimental Dahl salt-sensitive hypertension in response to a high-salt diet. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are an important modulator of nephron ion transport. As there is limited knowledge regarding the role of ROS-mediated fibrosis and RPT sodium reabsorption through the Na/K-ATPase, the focus of this review is to examine the possible role of ROS in the regulation of Na/K-ATPase activity, its signaling, fibrosis, and RPT sodium reabsorption. PMID:22518311

  10. Selective reabsorption leading to multiple oscillations in the 8446-A atomic-oxygen laser.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feld, M. S.; Feldman, B. J.; Javan, A.; Domash, L. H.

    1973-01-01

    Laser oscillation of atomic oxygen at 8446 A occurs in four closely spaced lines with peculiar intensity ratios, all detuned from the atomic center frequencies of the three fine-structure transitions. These anomalies are caused by the selective reabsorption of resonance radiation from the lower laser level by ground-state oxygen atoms. The selectivity results from the fact that the velocity distribution of the laser levels is considerably wider than that of the ground state, because of the dissociative mode of production of excited oxygen atoms. Possible extension of this mechanism to the atomic-hydrogen system is discussed.

  11. A distinct X-linked syndrome involving joint contractures, keloids, large optic cup-to-disc ratio, and renal stones results from a filamin A (FLNA) mutation.

    PubMed

    Lah, Melissa; Niranjan, Tejasvi; Srikanth, Sujata; Holloway, Lynda; Schwartz, Charles E; Wang, Tao; Weaver, David D

    2016-04-01

    We further evaluated a previously reported family with an apparently undescribed X-linked syndrome involving joint contractures, keloids, an increased optic cup-to-disc ratio, and renal stones to elucidate the genetic cause. To do this, we obtained medical histories and performed physical examination on 14 individuals in the family, five of whom are affected males and three are obligate carrier females. Linkage analysis was performed on all but one individual and chromosome X-exome sequencing was done on two affected males. The analysis localized the putative gene to Xq27-qter and chromosome X-exome sequencing revealed a mutation in exon 28 (c.4726G>A) of the filamin A (FLNA) gene, predicting that a conserved glycine had been replaced by arginine at amino acid 1576 (p.G1576R). Segregation analysis demonstrated that all known carrier females tested were heterozygous (G/A), all affected males were hemizygous for the mutation (A allele) and all normal males were hemizygous for the normal G allele. The data and the bioinformatic analysis indicate that the G1576R mutation in the FLNA gene is very likely pathogenic in this family. The syndrome affecting the family shares phenotypic overlap with other syndromes caused by FLNA mutations, but appears to be a distinct phenotype, likely representing a unique genetic syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26804200

  12. Renal handling of cadmium in perfused rat kidney and effects on renal function and tissue composition.

    PubMed

    Diamond, G L; Cohen, J J; Weinstein, S L

    1986-11-01

    Isolated rat kidneys perfused with a Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate (KRB) solution containing 1 microM CdCl2 plus 6% substrate-free albumin (SFA) and a mixture of substrates accumulated substantially less cadmium in tissue than kidneys perfused with 1 microM CdCl2 in a protein-free KRB solution containing the same substrates: 11 vs. 205 nmol Cd/g dry wt. Decreasing the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) by occluding the ureters of kidneys perfused in the absence of albumin did not change the rate of net tissue uptake of cadmium (Cd), suggesting that the kidney can extract Cd from the peritubular capillary fluid and that net uptake of Cd is not dependent on the reabsorption of filtered Cd. The tissue accumulation of large quantities of Cd (1.8 mumol Cd/g dry wt), which established levels of non-metallothionein-bound Cd exceeding 1 mumol Cd/g dry wt, caused no changes in either GFR, perfusion flow rate, fractional reabsorption of Na+, fractional reabsorption of K+, fractional reabsorption of glucose, or free-water clearance. However, discrete changes in renal tissue K+ content were observed. Exposure to 1 microM CdCl2 resulted in a net loss of renal tissue K+ in rat kidneys perfused with substrate-enriched KRB containing 6% albumin. Exposure to 0.8 microM or 7 microM CdCl2 completely prevented K+ loss from kidneys perfused with a substrate-enriched, protein-free KRB solution. PMID:3777178

  13. Vasopressin regulates renal calcium excretion in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hanouna, Guillaume; Haymann, Jean-Philippe; Baud, Laurent; Letavernier, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Antidiuretic hormone or arginine vasopressin (AVP) increases water reabsorption in the collecting ducts of the kidney. Three decades ago, experimental models have shown that AVP may increase calcium reabsorption in rat kidney. The objective of this study was to assess whether AVP modulates renal calcium excretion in humans. We analyzed calcium, potassium, and sodium fractional excretion in eight patients affected by insipidus diabetes (nephrogenic or central) under acute vasopressin receptor agonist action and in 10 patients undergoing oral water load test affected or not by inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Synthetic V2 receptor agonist (dDAVP) reduced significantly calcium fractional excretion from 1.71% to 0.58% (P < 0.05) in patients with central diabetes insipidus. In patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (resistant to AVP), calcium fractional excretion did not change significantly after injection (0.48–0.68%, P = NS). In normal subjects undergoing oral water load test, calcium fractional excretion increased significantly from 1.02% to 2.54% (P < 0.05). Patients affected by SIADH had a high calcium fractional excretion at baseline that remained stable during test from 3.30% to 3.33% (P = NS), possibly resulting from a reduced calcium absorption in renal proximal tubule. In both groups, there was a significant correlation between urine output and calcium renal excretion. In humans, dDAVP decreases calcium fractional excretion in the short term. Conversely, water intake, which lowers AVP concentration, increases calcium fractional excretion. The correlation between urine output and calcium excretion suggests that AVP-related antidiuresis increases calcium reabsorption in collecting ducts. PMID:26620256

  14. Inhibition of renal Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchange in cadmium-intoxicated rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Do Whan; Chung, Jin Mo; Kim, Jee Yeun; Kim, Kyoung Ryong; Park, Yang Saeng . E-mail: yspark@ns.kosinmed.or.kr

    2005-04-01

    Chronic exposure to cadmium (Cd) results in bicarbonaturia, leading to metabolic acidosis. To elucidate the mechanism(s) by which renal bicarbonate reabsorption is inhibited, we investigated changes in renal transporters and enzymes associated with bicarbonate reabsorption in Cd-intoxicated rats. Cd intoxication was induced by subcutaneous injections of CdCl{sub 2} (2 mg Cd/kg per day) for 3 weeks. Cd intoxication resulted in a significant reduction in V{sub max} of Na{sup +}/H{sup +} antiport with no changes in K{sub Na} in the renal cortical brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV). Western blotting of BBM proteins and indirect immunohistochemistry in renal tissue sections, using an antibody against Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchange-3 (NHE3), showed a diminished expression of NHE3 protein in the BBM. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that NHE3 mRNA expression was reduced in the renal cortex. The activity of carbonic anhydrase IV (CA IV) in BBM was not changed. The protein abundance of Na{sup +}-HCO{sub 3}{sup -} cotransporter-1 (NBC1) in whole kidney membrane fractions was slightly attenuated, whereas that of the Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase {alpha}-subunit was markedly elevated in Cd-intoxicated animals. These results indicate that Cd intoxication impairs NHE3 expression in the proximal tubule, thereby reducing the capacity for bicarbonate reabsorption, leading to bicarbonaturia in an intact animal.

  15. Kidney-specific WNK1 regulates sodium reabsorption and potassium secretion in mouse cortical collecting duct.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chih-Jen; Baum, Michel; Huang, Chou-Long

    2013-02-15

    Kidney-specific with-no-lysine kinase 1 (KS-WNK1) is a kinase-deficient variant of WNK1 that is expressed exclusively in the kidney. It is abundantly expressed in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT) and to a lesser extent in the cortical thick ascending limb (cTAL), connecting tubule, and cortical collecting duct (CCD). KS-WNK1 inhibits Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-)- and sodium chloride cotransporter-mediated Na(+) reabsorption in cTAL and DCT, respectively. Here, we investigated the role of KS-WNK1 in regulating Na(+) and K(+) transport in CCD using in vitro microperfusion of tubules isolated from KS-WNK1 knockout mice and control wild-type littermates. Because baseline K(+) secretion and Na(+) reabsorption were negligible in mouse CCD, we studied tubules isolated from mice fed a high-K(+) diet for 2 wk. Compared with that in wild-type tubules, K(+) secretion was reduced in KS-WNK1 knockout CCD perfused at a low luminal fluid rate of ~1.5 nl/min. Na(+) reabsorption and the lumen-negative transepithelial potential difference were also lower in the KS-WNK1 knockout CCD compared with control CCD. Increasing the perfusion rate to ~5.5 nl/min stimulated K(+) secretion in the wild-type as well as knockout CCD. The magnitudes of flow-stimulated increase in K(+) secretion were similar in wild-type and knockout CCD. Maxi-K(+) channel inhibitor iberiotoxin had no effect on K(+) secretion when tubules were perfused at ~1.5 nl/min, but completely abrogated the flow-dependent increase in K(+) secretion at ~5.5 nl/min. These findings support the notion that KS-WNK1 stimulates ROMK-mediated K(+) secretion, but not flow-dependent K(+) secretion mediated by maxi-K(+) channels in CCD. In addition, KS-WNK1 plays a role in regulating Na(+) transport in the CCD. PMID:23195681

  16. The Effects of Angiotensin II on Renal Water and Electrolyte Excretion in Normal and Caval Dogs*

    PubMed Central

    Porush, Jerome G.; Kaloyanides, George J.; Cacciaguida, Roy J.; Rosen, Stanley M.

    1967-01-01

    The effects of intravenous administration of angiotensin II on renal water and electrolyte excretion were examined during hydropenia, water diuresis, and hypotonic saline diuresis in anesthetized normal dogs and dogs with thoracic inferior vena cava constriction and ascites (caval dogs). The effects of unilateral renal artery infusion of a subpressor dose were also examined. During hydropenia angiotensin produced a decrease in tubular sodium reabsorption, with a considerably greater natriuresis in caval dogs, and associated with a decrease in free water reabsorption (TcH2O). Water and hypotonic saline diuresis resulted in an augmented angiotensin natriuresis, with a greater effect still observed in caval dogs. In these experiments free water excretion (CH2O) was limited to 8-10% of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), although distal sodium load increased in every instance. In the renal artery infusion experiments a significant ipsilateral decrease in tubular sodium reabsorption was induced, particularly in caval dogs. These findings indicate that angiotensin has a direct effect on renal sodium reabsorption unrelated to a systemic circulatory alteration. The attenuation or prevention of the falls in GFR and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) usually induced by angiotensin may partially account for the greater natriuretic response in caval dogs and the augmentation during water or hypotonic saline diuresis. However, a correlation between renal hemodynamics and the degree of natriuresis induced was not always present and, furthermore, GFR and ERPF decreased significantly during the intrarenal artery infusion experiments. Therefore, the present experiments indicate that another mechanism is operative in the control of the angiotensin natriuresis and suggest that alterations in intrarenal hemodynamics may play a role. The decrease in TcH2O and the apparent limitation of CH2O associated with an increase in distal sodium load localize the site of action of angiotensin

  17. Tuning luminescence and reducing reabsorption of CdSe quantum disks for luminescent solar concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huichuan; Xie, Peng; Liu, Yong; Zhou, Xiang; Li, Baojun

    2015-08-01

    Cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum disks (QDs) have been synthesized for application in luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs). Luminescence tuning and reabsorption reduction of the QDs were achieved by controlling their size using a hot injection method. The overlap of the absorption and photoluminescence spectra of the as-prepared CdSe QDs was negligible. The as-prepared CdSe QDs were incorporated into polymethylmethacrylate without aggregation and luminescence quenching. The obtained highly transparent composites with non-affecting light-emitting properties were used as LSCs. The placement of a CdSe QDs doped LSC prototype (10 × 1 × 0.1 cm) on a Si-cell resulted in a 201% increase in the electrical power output of the Si-cell compared with that of the bare Si-cell.

  18. Mechanisms of compensatory renal growth.

    PubMed

    Cleper, Roxana

    2012-11-01

    Congenitally reduced renal mass- as with agenesis of one kidney, unilateral multicystic dysplastic kidney or with premature birth with early arrest of nephrogenesis- as well as acquired loss of a significant part of kidney tissue- as with kidney donation, after surgery for tumor etc- set in motion compensatory processes with main target to meet metabolic body needs. The sensors for reduced renal mass have not yet been identified. The effectors of the compensatory process include a wide range of growth factors- IGF1, TGF-b1, HGF- and signaling molecules-mTOR- which has intricate reciprocal interactions. As nephrogenesis stops at 34-36 weeks of gestation and can't be restarted thereafter, the main result of this compensatory process is increase in glomerular size (glomerulomegaly) and tubular hypertrophy. Renal volume evaluation by ultrasound is a practical noninvasive tool for assessment of compensatory kidney growth. The increased nephron and kidney size induced by the compensatory process have potential detrimental long-term effect through stretch-induced glomerular cell activation of profibrogenic and vasoconstrictor pathways as well as tubular cell nephrotoxicity caused by abnormal activation of reabsorptive mechanisms including GLUT1 and megalin. Deep understanding of these potentially damage process might help in timely implementation of protective strategies. PMID:23469392

  19. Prostaglandin E2 increases proximal tubule fluid reabsorption, and modulates cultured proximal tubule cell responses via EP1 and EP4 receptors.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Rania; Hassouneh, Ramzi; Zimpelmann, Joseph; Karam, Andrew J; Thibodeau, Jean-Francois; Burger, Dylan; Burns, Kevin D; Kennedy, Chris Rj; Hébert, Richard L

    2015-09-01

    Renal prostaglandin (PG) E2 regulates salt and water transport, and affects disease processes via EP1-4 receptors, but its role in the proximal tubule (PT) is unknown. Our study investigates the effects of PGE2 on mouse PT fluid reabsorption, and its role in growth, sodium transporter expression, fibrosis, and oxidative stress in a mouse PT cell line (MCT). To determine which PGE2 EP receptors are expressed in MCT, qPCR for EP1-4 was performed on cells stimulated for 24 h with PGE2 or transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ), a known mediator of PT injury in kidney disease. EP1 and EP4 were detected in MCT, but EP2 and EP3 are not expressed. EP1 was increased by PGE2 and TGFβ, but EP4 was unchanged. To confirm the involvement of EP1 and EP4, sulprostone (SLP, EP1/3 agonist), ONO8711 (EP1 antagonist), and EP1 and EP4 siRNA were used. We first show that PGE2, SLP, and TGFβ reduced H(3)-thymidine and H(3)-leucine incorporation. The effects on cell-cycle regulators were examined by western blot. PGE2 increased p27 via EP1 and EP4, but TGFβ increased p21; PGE2-induced p27 was attenuated by TGFβ. PGE2 and SLP reduced cyclinE, while TGFβ increased cyclinD1, an effect attenuated by PGE2 administration. Na-K-ATPase α1 (NaK) was increased by PGE2 via EP1 and EP4. TGFβ had no effect on NaK. Additionally, PGE2 and TGFβ increased fibronectin levels, reaching 12-fold upon co-stimulation. EP1 siRNA abrogated PGE2-fibronectin. PGE2 also increased ROS generation, and ONO-8711 blocked PGE2-ROS. Finally, PGE2 significantly increased fluid reabsorption by 31 and 46% in isolated perfused mouse PT from C57BL/6 and FVB mice, respectively, and this was attenuated in FVB-EP1 null mice. Altogether PGE2 acting on EP1 and EP4 receptors may prove to be important mediators of PT injury, and salt and water transport. PMID:26121313

  20. Renal effects of continuous negative pressure breathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, M. J.; Discala, V. A.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous negative pressure breathing (CNPB) was utilized to simulate the thoracic vascular distension of zero g or space, in 11 anesthetized rats. The animals underwent renal clearance and micropuncture renal nephron studies before, during, and after CNPB. Rats were pretreated with a high salt diet and I-M desoxycorticosterone (DOCA) in excess. None of these rats diuresed with CNPB. In contrast 5 of the 7 remaining rats increased the fraction of the filtered sodium excreted (C sub Na/GFR, p .05) and their urinary flow rate (V, p .05). Potassium excretion increased (U sub k V, p .05). End proximal tubular fluid specimen's TF/P inulin ratios were unchanged. Whole kidney and single nephron glomerular filtration rates fell 10%. CNPB, a mechanism for atrial distension, appears to cause, in rats, a decrease in distal tubular sodium, water and potassium reabsorption. Exogenous mineral-corticoid prevents the diuresis, saluresis, and kaluresis.

  1. Urinary and renal papillary solutes during cyclooxygenase inhibition with ibuprofen

    SciTech Connect

    Passmore, J.C.; Hartupee, D.A.; Jackson, B.A.

    1987-12-01

    We investigated the mechanisms by which prostaglandin synthetase (cyclooxygenase) inhibitors cause antidiuresis and antinatriuresis in anesthetized dogs. Cyclooxygenase inhibition with ibuprofen caused an increased total solute (Na+, K+, and urea) concentration in the renal papilla. Xenon 133 washout studies revealed no change in medullary blood flow. Ibuprofen induced a 147% increase in papillary Na+ concentration, while increasing urea and K+ only 98% and 35%, respectively, suggesting that a Na+ reabsorption mechanism rather than decreased papillary blood flow was responsible for a majority of the increased papillary solute concentration. A decrease in the excretion of Na+, but not of K+ or urea, in treated dogs further implies increased Na+ reabsorption. Thus, it appears that cyclooxygenase inhibition increases papillary solute concentration primarily by increasing Na+ transport into the papilla.

  2. Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter Inhibitors: Effects on Renal and Intestinal Glucose Transport: From Bench to Bedside.

    PubMed

    Mudaliar, Sunder; Polidori, David; Zambrowicz, Brian; Henry, Robert R

    2015-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease with disabling micro- and macrovascular complications that lead to excessive morbidity and premature mortality. It affects hundreds of millions of people and imposes an undue economic burden on populations across the world. Although insulin resistance and insulin secretory defects play a major role in the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia, several other metabolic defects contribute to the initiation/worsening of the diabetic state. Prominent among these is increased renal glucose reabsorption, which is maladaptive in patients with diabetes. Instead of an increase in renal glucose excretion, which could ameliorate hyperglycemia, there is an increase in renal glucose reabsorption, which helps sustain hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes. The sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) 2 inhibitors are novel antidiabetes agents that inhibit renal glucose reabsorption and promote glucosuria, thereby leading to reductions in plasma glucose concentrations. In this article, we review the long journey from the discovery of the glucosuric agent phlorizin in the bark of the apple tree through the animal and human studies that led to the development of the current generation of SGLT2 inhibitors. PMID:26604280

  3. Challenges and intriguing problems in comparative renal physiology.

    PubMed

    Dantzler, William H

    2005-02-01

    The comparative approach has proved important many times in understanding renal function and continues to offer possible approaches to unsolved problems today, in three general areas. (1) Quantification of glomerular ultrafiltration. In contrast to the complex capillary network in the mammalian glomerulus, the glomerulus of the superficial loopless (reptilian-type) avian nephrons consists of a single capillary loop. This structure, in an avian species where it can be approached directly, should for the first time permit accurate determinations of the pressure profiles and the capillary area involved in glomerular ultrafiltration in an animal with high arterial pressure. (2) Fluid reabsorption by proximal renal tubules. In some reptilian proximal renal tubules, isolated and perfused in vitro, isosmotic fluid reabsorption can occur at control rates when lithium replaces sodium or when some other substance replaces sodium or chloride or both in the perfusate and bathing medium simultaneously. Reabsorption at the control rates, regardless of the composition of the perfusate and bathing medium, can be at least partially inhibited by cold and cyanide, but not by blockers of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase. It is also independent of the buffer system used, but it is reduced about 20% by removal of colloid from the peritubular fluid. During the substitutions, the surface area of the proximal tubule cells increases dramatically and might permit some insignificant force to be more effective in the reabsorptive process. Understanding the process involved in this, apparently unique coupling of solute and fluid transport, certainly would be very valuable in understanding coupled transport of solutes and water across epithelia in general. (3) Urate secretion by proximal renal tubules. Urate is the major excretory end product of nitrogen metabolism in birds, most reptiles, and a few amphibians. It undergoes net secretion by the renal tubules. It has been possible to learn much about the

  4. The role of plasma volume, plasma renin and the sympathetic nervous system in the posture-induced decline in renal lithium clearance in man.

    PubMed

    Smith, D F; Shimizu, M

    1978-01-01

    Excretion of lithium in urine was studied in 2 healthy males while recumbent and while upright, either walking or standing quietly. An oral dose of 24.3 mmol of Lit was taken as three lithium carbonate tablets 13 h before clearance tests. Renal lithium clearance decreased and lithium fractional reabsorption increased while upright. Standing immersed to the neck in water, which prevents the fall in plasma volume upon changing posture from recumbent to upright, prevented the fall in renal lithium clearance as well as the rise in lithium fractional reabsorption while upright. Oral doses of guanethidine (total dose of 200 mg) or oxprenolol (total dose of 140 mg) taken to prevent high levels of sympathetic nervous system activity and plasma renin, respectively, failed to prevent the fall in renal lithium clearance or the rise in lithium fractional reabsorption upon changing posture from recumbent to upright. The findings indicate that the fall in renal lithium clearance and the rise in lithium fractional reabsorption upon changing posture from recumbent to upright is related to the fall in plasma volume but not to high levels of sympathetic nervous system activity or plasma renin activity. PMID:692834

  5. Increasing or stabilizing renal epoxyeicosatrienoic acid production attenuates abnormal renal function and hypertension in obese rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui; Morisseau, Christophe; Wang, JingFeng; Yang, Tianxin; Falck, John R; Hammock, Bruce D; Wang, Mong-Heng

    2007-07-01

    Since epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) affect sodium reabsorption in renal tubules and dilate the renal vasculature, we have examined their effects on renal hemodynamics and sodium balance in male rats fed a high-fat (HF) diet by fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha) agonist and an inducer of cytochrome P-450 (CYP) epoxygenases; by N-methanesulfonyl-6-(2-proparyloxyphenyl)hexanamide (MSPPOH), a selective EET biosynthesis inhibitor; and by 12-(3-adamantane-1-yl-ureido)dodecanoic acid (AUDA), a selective inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase. In rats treated with fenofibrate (30 mg.kg(-1).day(-1) ig) or AUDA (50 mg/l in drinking water) for 2 wk, mean arterial pressure, renal vascular resistance, and glomerular filtration rate were lower but renal blood flow was higher than in vehicle-treated control rats. In addition, fenofibrate and AUDA decreased cumulative sodium balance in the HF rats. Treatment with MSPPOH (20 mg.kg(-1).day(-1) iv) + fenofibrate for 2 wk reversed renal hemodynamics and sodium balance to the levels in control HF rats. Moreover, fenofibrate caused a threefold increase in renal cortical CYP epoxygenase activity, whereas the fenofibrate-induced elevation of this activity was attenuated by MSPPOH. Western blot analysis showed that fenofibrate induced the expression of CYP epoxygenases in renal cortex and microvessels and that the induction effect of fenofibrate was blocked by MSPPOH. These results demonstrate that the fenofibrate-induced increase of CYP epoxygenase expression and the AUDA-induced stabilization of EET production in the kidneys cause renal vascular dilation and reduce sodium retention, contributing to the improvement of abnormal renal hemodynamics and hypertension in HF rats. PMID:17442729

  6. Localization of GFP-tagged concentrative nucleoside transporters in a renal polarized epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Mangravite, L M; Lipschutz, J H; Mostov, K E; Giacomini, K M

    2001-05-01

    Many nucleosides undergo active reabsorption within the kidney, probably via nucleoside transporters. To date, two concentrative nucleoside transporters have been cloned, the sodium-dependent purine-selective nucleoside transporter (SPNT) and concentrative nucleoside transporter 1 (CNT1). We report the stable expression of green fluorescence protein (GFP)-tagged SPNT and CNT1 in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, a polarized renal epithelial line. We demonstrate that the GFP tag does not alter the substrate selectivity and only modestly affects the kinetic activity of the transporters. By using confocal microscopy and functional studies, both SPNT and CNT1 are localized primarily to the apical membrane of MDCK and LLC-PK(1) cells. Apical localization of these transporters suggests a role in renal nucleoside reabsorption and regulation of tubular function via the adenosine pathway. PMID:11292631

  7. Renal Function Assessment During Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Erbas, Belkis; Tuncel, Murat

    2016-09-01

    Theranostics labeled with Y-90 or Lu-177 are highly efficient therapeutic approaches for the systemic treatment of various cancers including neuroendocrine tumors and prostate cancer. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) has been used for many years for metastatic or inoperable neuroendocrine tumors. However, renal and hematopoietic toxicities are the major limitations for this therapeutic approach. Kidneys have been considered as the "critical organ" because of the predominant glomerular filtration, tubular reabsorption by the proximal tubules, and interstitial retention of the tracers. Severe nephrotoxity, which has been classified as grade 4-5 based on the "Common Terminology Criteria on Adverse Events," was reported in the range from 0%-14%. There are several risk factors for renal toxicity; patient-related risk factors include older age, preexisting renal disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, previous nephrotoxic chemotherapy, metastatic lesions close to renal parenchyma, and single kidney. There are also treatment-related issues, such as choice of radionuclide, cumulative radiation dose to kidneys, renal radiation dose per cycle, activity administered, number of cycles, and time interval between cycles. In the literature, nephrotoxicity caused by PRRT was documented using different criteria and renal function tests, from serum creatinine level to more accurate and sophisticated methods. Generally, serum creatinine level was used as a measure of kidney function. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimation based on serum creatinine was preferred by several authors. Most commonly used formulas for estimation of GFR are "Modifications of Diet in Renal Disease" (MDRD) equation and "Cockcroft-Gault" formulas. However, more precise methods than creatinine or creatinine clearance are recommended to assess renal function, such as GFR measurements using Tc-99m-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), Cr-51-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), or

  8. Influence of reabsorption and reemission on stimulated Raman scattering of polymethine dyes in multiple scattering media

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, V P; Komyshan, A O; Smaliuk, A P; Prygodiuk, O A; Ishchenko, A A; Olkhovyk, L A

    2013-12-31

    It is shown that reabsorption of the luminescence radiation in the range of its overlapping with the absorption spectrum and the following reemission to a long-wavelength range may noticeably affect the process of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in polymethine dyes in multiple scattering media (MSM). This is related to the fact that SRS in such media occurs jointly with the random lasing (RL), which favors SRS and makes up with it a united nonlinear process. Reemission into the long-wavelength spectrum range amplified in MSM causes the RL spectrum to shift to longer wavelengths and initiates the long-wavelength band of RL, in which a main part of the lasing energy is concentrated. This weakens or completely stops the SRS if the band is beyond the range of possible spectral localisation of Stokes lines. This process depends on the efficiency of light scattering, dye concentration, temperature and pump intensity; hence, there exist optimal values of these parameters for obtaining SRS in MSM. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  9. Endogenous prostaglandin E2 mediates inhibition of rat thick ascending limb Cl reabsorption in chronic hypercalcemia.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, L N; McKay, A J; Borzecki, J S

    1993-01-01

    The hypothesis that endogenous PGE2 mediates defective thick ascending limb (TAL) Cl reabsorption (percent delivered load: FRCl%) in rats with vitamin D-induced chronic hypercalcemia (HC) was tested by measuring FRCl% in loop segments microperfused in vivo in HC and control rats treated acutely with indomethacin (Indo) or its vehicle, and obtaining the corresponding outer medullary [PGE2]. Microperfusion conditions were developed in which FRCl% was exclusively furosemide sensitive. To determine the cellular mechanism, tubules were perfused acutely with forskolin (FSK), cAMP, or the protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporine (SSP). Outer medullary [PGE2] in HC rats was 9 to 10 times greater than control and could be normalized by Indo. FRCl% was 20% lower in HC rats infused with vehicle, and Indo, FSK, and cAMP returned FRCl% to normal despite sustained HC. Indo or FSK had no effect on FRCl% in control rats and Indo did not prevent inhibition of FRCl% by luminal PGE2 (1 microM). Luminal SSP (10(-7), 10(-8) M) in HC did not return FRCl% to control values. We conclude that impaired TAL FRCl% in HC occurs at a pre-cAMP site and is due to endogenous PGE2 and not to HC. Images PMID:8390479

  10. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of lesinurad, a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor, in healthy adult males

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zancong; Rowlings, Colin; Kerr, Brad; Hingorani, Vijay; Manhard, Kimberly; Quart, Barry; Yeh, Li-Tain; Storgard, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Lesinurad is a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor under investigation for the treatment of gout. Single and multiple ascending dose studies were conducted to evaluate pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of lesinurad in healthy males. Lesinurad was administered as an oral solution between 5 mg and 600 mg (single ascending dose; N=34) and as an oral solution or immediate-release capsules once daily (qday) between 100 mg and 400 mg for 10 days under fasted or fed condition (multiple ascending dose; N=32). Following single doses of lesinurad solution, absorption was rapid and exposure (maximum observed plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration–time curve) increased in a dose-proportional manner. Following multiple qday doses, there was no apparent accumulation of lesinurad. Urinary excretion of unchanged lesinurad was generally between 30% and 40% of dose. Increases in urinary excretion of uric acid and reductions in serum uric acid correlated with dose. Following 400 mg qday dosing, serum uric acid reduction was 35% at 24 hours post-dose, supporting qday dosing. A relative bioavailability study in healthy males (N=8) indicated a nearly identical pharmacokinetic profile following dosing of tablets or capsules. Lesinurad was generally safe and well tolerated. PMID:26170627

  11. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of lesinurad, a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor, in healthy adult males.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zancong; Rowlings, Colin; Kerr, Brad; Hingorani, Vijay; Manhard, Kimberly; Quart, Barry; Yeh, Li-Tain; Storgard, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Lesinurad is a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor under investigation for the treatment of gout. Single and multiple ascending dose studies were conducted to evaluate pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of lesinurad in healthy males. Lesinurad was administered as an oral solution between 5 mg and 600 mg (single ascending dose; N=34) and as an oral solution or immediate-release capsules once daily (qday) between 100 mg and 400 mg for 10 days under fasted or fed condition (multiple ascending dose; N=32). Following single doses of lesinurad solution, absorption was rapid and exposure (maximum observed plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration-time curve) increased in a dose-proportional manner. Following multiple qday doses, there was no apparent accumulation of lesinurad. Urinary excretion of unchanged lesinurad was generally between 30% and 40% of dose. Increases in urinary excretion of uric acid and reductions in serum uric acid correlated with dose. Following 400 mg qday dosing, serum uric acid reduction was 35% at 24 hours post-dose, supporting qday dosing. A relative bioavailability study in healthy males (N=8) indicated a nearly identical pharmacokinetic profile following dosing of tablets or capsules. Lesinurad was generally safe and well tolerated. PMID:26170627

  12. Renal arteriography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read More Acute arterial occlusion - kidney Acute kidney failure Aneurysm Atheroembolic renal disease Blood clots Renal cell carcinoma Renal venogram X-ray Update Date 4/7/2014 Updated by: Jason ... Failure Kidney Tests X-Rays Browse the Encyclopedia A. ...

  13. Renal venogram

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2008:chap 6. Rankin S. Renal parenchymal disease, including renal failure, renovascular disease and transportation. In: Grainger RC, Allison D, Adam, Dixon AK, eds. Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 5th ed. New York, NY: Churchill Livingstone; 2008:chap 39. Read ... arteriography Renal vein thrombosis Tumor Venogram Wilms ...

  14. Renal biomarkers in domestic species.

    PubMed

    Hokamp, Jessica A; Nabity, Mary B

    2016-03-01

    Current conventional tests of kidney damage and function in blood (serum creatinine and urea nitrogen) and urine (urine protein creatinine ratio and urine specific gravity) are widely used for diagnosis and monitoring of kidney disease. However, they all have important limitations, and additional markers of glomerular filtration rate and glomerular and tubular damage are desirable, particularly for earlier detection of renal disease when therapy is most effective. Additionally, urinary markers of kidney damage and function may help localize damage to the affected portion of the kidney. In general, the presence of high- and intermediate-molecular weight proteins in the urine are indicative of glomerular damage, while low-molecular weight proteins and enzymes in the urine suggest tubular damage due to decreased reabsorption of proteins, direct tubular damage, or both. This review aims to discuss many of these new blood and urinary biomarkers in domestic veterinary species, focusing primarily on dogs and cats, how they may be used for diagnosis of renal disease, and their limitations. Additionally, a brief discussion of serum creatinine is presented, highlighting its limitations and important considerations for its improved interpretation in domestic species based on past literature and recent studies. PMID:26918420

  15. Molecular bases of circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Bonny, Olivier; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Gumz, Michelle L; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2013-10-01

    The physiological processes that maintain body homeostasis oscillate during the day. Diurnal changes characterize kidney functions, comprising regulation of hydro-electrolytic and acid-base balance, reabsorption of small solutes and hormone production. Renal physiology is characterized by 24-h periodicity and contributes to circadian variability of blood pressure levels, related as well to nychthemeral changes of sodium sensitivity, physical activity, vascular tone, autonomic function and neurotransmitter release from sympathetic innervations. The circadian rhythmicity of body physiology is driven by central and peripheral biological clockworks and entrained by the geophysical light/dark cycle. Chronodisruption, defined as the mismatch between environmental-social cues and physiological-behavioral patterns, causes internal desynchronization of periodic functions, leading to pathophysiological mechanisms underlying degenerative, immune related, metabolic and neoplastic diseases. In this review we will address the genetic, molecular and anatomical elements that hardwire circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and subtend disarray of time-dependent changes in renal pathology. PMID:23901050

  16. Molecular bases of circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Bonny, Olivier; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Gumz, Michelle L.; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2013-01-01

    The physiological processes that maintain body homeostasis oscillate during the day. Diurnal changes characterize kidney functions, comprising regulation of hydro-electrolytic and acid-base balance, reabsorption of small solutes and hormone production. Renal physiology is characterized by 24-h periodicity and contributes to circadian variability of blood pressure levels, related as well to nychthemeral changes of sodium sensitivity, physical activity, vascular tone, autonomic function and neurotransmitter release from sympathetic innervations. The circadian rhythmicity of body physiology is driven by central and peripheral biological clockworks and entrained by the geophysical light/dark cycle. Chronodisruption, defined as the mismatch between environmental–social cues and physiological–behavioral patterns, causes internal desynchronization of periodic functions, leading to pathophysiological mechanisms underlying degenerative, immune related, metabolic and neoplastic diseases. In this review we will address the genetic, molecular and anatomical elements that hardwire circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and subtend disarray of time–dependent changes in renal pathology. PMID:23901050

  17. Endocrine and Metabolic Regulation of Renal Drug Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Yacovino, Lindsay L.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.

    2012-01-01

    Renal xenobiotic transporters are important determinants of urinary secretion and reabsorption of chemicals. In addition to glomerular filtration, these processes are key to the overall renal clearance of a diverse array of drugs and toxins. Alterations in kidney transporter levels and function can influence the efficacy and toxicity of chemicals. Studies in experimental animals have revealed distinct patterns of renal transporter expression in response to sex hormones, pregnancy, and growth hormone. Likewise, a number of disease states including diabetes, obesity, and cholestasis alter the expression of kidney transporters. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the major xenobiotic transporters expressed in the kidneys and an understanding of metabolic conditions and hormonal factors that regulate their expression and function. PMID:22933250

  18. Mutations in INVS encoding inversin cause nephronophthisis type 2, linking renal cystic disease to the function of primary cilia and left-right axis determination

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Edgar A; Schermer, Bernhard; Obara, Tomoko; O'Toole, John F; Hiller, Karl S; Mueller, Adelheid M; Ruf, Rainer G; Hoefele, Julia; Beekmann, Frank; Landau, Daniel; Foreman, John W; Goodship, Judith A; Strachan, Tom; Kispert, Andreas; Wolf, Matthias T; Gagnadoux, Marie F; Nivet, Hubert; Antignac, Corinne; Walz, Gerd; Drummond, Iain A; Benzing, Thomas; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2013-01-01

    Nephronophthisis (NPHP), an autosomal recessive cystic kidney disease, leads to chronic renal failure in children. The genes mutated in NPHP1 and NPHP4 have been identified, and a gene locus associated with infantile nephronophthisis (NPHP2) was mapped. The kidney phenotype of NPHP2 combines clinical features of NPHP and polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Here, we identify inversin (INVS) as the gene mutated in NPHP2 with and without situs inversus. We show molecular interaction of inversin with nephrocystin, the product of the gene mutated in NPHP1 and interaction of nephrocystin with β-tubulin, a main component of primary cilia. We show that nephrocystin, inversin and β-tubulin colocalize to primary cilia of renal tubular cells. Furthermore, we produce a PKD-like renal cystic phenotype and randomization of heart looping by knockdown of invs expression in zebrafish. The interaction and colocalization in cilia of inversin, nephrocystin and β-tubulin connect pathogenetic aspects of NPHP to PKD, to primary cilia function and to left-right axis determination. PMID:12872123

  19. Role of renal nerves in excretory responses to administration of kappa agonists in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Jones, S Y; DiBona, G F

    1989-10-01

    The present study examined whether the renal sympathetic nerves contribute to the renal excretory responses produced by kappa opioid receptor agonist administration in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Intravenous infusion of the kappa opioid receptor agonists, ketocyclazocine (KC) and U-50488H, produced increases in urine flow rate. KC and U-50488H infusion also resulted in a marked and sustained antinatriuresis which was promptly reversed by low-dose naloxone (50 micrograms/kg i.v.), thus suggesting an opioid receptor-mediated action of both agonists. Although these kappa agonists did not produce changes in glomerular filtration rate or renal plasma flow, efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity increased with the same time course as the antinatriuretic response. To investigate whether the decrease in urinary sodium excretion was mediated via the increase in efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity, experiments were repeated in SHR with prior bilateral renal denervation. These studies demonstrated that similar renal excretory responses (diuresis and a naloxone reversible antiinatriuresis occurred during infusion of KC and U-50488H in renal denervated as were seen in intact SHR. These studies indicate that the renal excretory responses to the kappa opioid agonists KC and U-50488H are not mediated through changes in renal hemodynamics or via a pathway requiring intact renal innervation. Because an antinatriuretic response was observed in renal denervated SHR, this suggests that kappa opioid receptor agonists may influence the renal tubular reabsorption of sodium by additional naloxone-sensitive mechanisms independent of intact renal innervation. PMID:2552076

  20. Roles of organic anion transporters in the progression of chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Atsushi; Niwa, Toshimitsu

    2007-10-01

    Renal proximal and distal tubules carry out specialized directional transport of various solutes. The family of organic anion transporters (OATs), which belongs to the major facilitator superfamily (SLC22A), are expressed in the renal epithelial cells to regulate the excretion and the reabsorption of endogenous and exogenous organic anions that include various kinds of drugs and their metabolites. In recent years, it is revealed that indoxyl sulfate, one of uremic toxins, is a novel physiological substrate for OAT family, and its accumulation within the renal tubules via OATs induces renal dysfunction. The OATs are also expressed in the blood-brain barrier, muscle cells, and bone osteoblasts, which hint at various pathogenic roles of OAT-mediated transport of uremic toxins. In this review, we introduce and discuss the function of OATs in the context of their roles in the progression of chronic renal disease. PMID:17976081

  1. Renal effects of continuous negative pressure breathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous negative pressure breathing (CNPB) was utilized to simulate the thoracic vascular distension of zero G in 11 anesthetized rats. The animals underwent renal clearance and micropuncture renal nephron studies before, during, and after CNPB. Four rats were pretreated with a high salt diet and I-M desoxycorticosterone (DOCA) in excess. None of these rats diuresed with CNPB. In contrast, five of the seven remaining rats increased the fraction of the filtered sodium excreted and their urinary flow rate. Potassium excretion increased. End proximal tubular fluid specimen's TF/P inulin ratios were unchanged. Whole kidney and single nephron glomerular filtration rates fell 10%. CNPB, a mechanism for atrial distension, appears to cause in the rat a decrease in distal tubular sodium and water reabsorption. Exogenous mineral-corticoid prevents the diuresis, saluresis, and kaluresis. The adequacy of other nonatrial volume control mechanisms in regulating renal salt and water conservation in opposition to the studied atrial-renal (Henry-Gauer) reflex of thoracic vascular distension is confirmed.

  2. Renal functional reserve in pigs: renal haemodynamics, renal tubular function and salt and water homeostatic hormones during amino acid and dopamine stimulation.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, E U; Frøkiaer, J; Jørgensen, T M; Pedersen, E B; Rehling, M

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate renal functional reserve [RFR is the difference between glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at rest and maximal GFR after stimulation] in a controlled study in normal pigs. Our basic hypothesis was that a decreased RFR may be used as an early indicator of renal deterioration, i.e. a test to disclose significant obstruction as opposed to simple dilatation in hydronephrosis. During various forms of stimulation (amino acids, captopril and dopamine), we measured changes in GFR, renal plasma flow (RPF), tubular reabsorption of sodium and water, net uptake from plasma to the kidney of three salt and water homeostatic hormones (angiotensin II, aldosterone and atrial natriuretic peptide) and of glucagon, which is thought to play a key role as mediator of the GFR increase during amino acid infusion. We found the largest GFR increase during combined infusion of amino acids and dopamine (+13%), but compared with a non-stimulated control group, the GFR increase was statistically non-significant. RPF increased by 57% during stimulation with amino acids plus dopamine (P < 0.001), while tubular reabsorption of sodium and water, and renal uptake of angiotensin II, aldosterone and atrial natriuretic peptide showed no significant differences between control and stimulation groups. The renal uptake of glucagon increased significantly during amino acid stimulation with no concomitant GFR increase. We conclude that in this experimental, non-obstructed model, RFR is a very insensitive measure, which cannot be used to discriminate between obstruction and simple dilatation in hydronephrosis. Further, our study does not support the hypothesis that glucagon is involved in GFR changes after amino acids. PMID:9015658

  3. Impaired Lysosomal Function Underlies Monoclonal Light Chain-Associated Renal Fanconi Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Luciani, Alessandro; Sirac, Christophe; Terryn, Sara; Javaugue, Vincent; Prange, Jenny Ann; Bender, Sébastien; Bonaud, Amélie; Cogné, Michel; Aucouturier, Pierre; Ronco, Pierre; Bridoux, Frank; Devuyst, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Monoclonal gammopathies are frequently complicated by kidney lesions that increase the disease morbidity and mortality. In particular, abnormal Ig free light chains (LCs) may accumulate within epithelial cells, causing proximal tubule (PT) dysfunction and renal Fanconi syndrome (RFS). To investigate the mechanisms linking LC accumulation and PT dysfunction, we used transgenic mice overexpressing human control or RFS-associated κLCs (RFS-κLCs) and primary cultures of mouse PT cells exposed to low doses of corresponding human κLCs (25 μg/ml). Before the onset of renal failure, mice overexpressing RFS-κLCs showed PT dysfunction related to loss of apical transporters and receptors and increased PT cell proliferation rates associated with lysosomal accumulation of κLCs. Exposure of PT cells to RFS-κLCs resulted in κLC accumulation within enlarged and dysfunctional lysosomes, alteration of cellular dynamics, defective proteolysis and hydrolase maturation, and impaired lysosomal acidification. These changes were specific to the RFS-κLC variable (V) sequence, because they did not occur with control LCs or the same RFS-κLC carrying a single substitution (Ala30→Ser) in the V domain. The lysosomal alterations induced by RFS-κLCs were reflected in increased cell proliferation, decreased apical expression of endocytic receptors, and defective endocytosis. These results reveal that specific κLCs accumulate within lysosomes, altering lysosome dynamics and proteolytic function through defective acidification, thereby causing dedifferentiation and loss of reabsorptive capacity of PT cells. The characterization of these early events, which are similar to those encountered in congenital lysosomal disorders, provides a basis for the reported differential LC toxicity and new perspectives on LC-induced RFS. PMID:26614382

  4. Renal plasticity in response to feeding in the Burmese python, Python molurus bivittatus.

    PubMed

    Esbaugh, A J; Secor, S M; Grosell, M

    2015-10-01

    Burmese pythons are sit-and-wait predators that are well adapted to go long periods without food, yet subsequently consume and digest single meals that can exceed their body weight. These large feeding events result in a dramatic alkaline tide that is compensated by a hypoventilatory response that normalizes plasma pH; however, little is known regarding how plasma HCO3(-) is lowered in the days post-feeding. The current study demonstrated that Burmese pythons contain the cellular machinery for renal acid-base compensation and actively remodel the kidney to limit HCO3(-) reabsorption in the post-feeding period. After being fed a 25% body weight meal plasma total CO2 was elevated by 1.5-fold after 1 day, but returned to control concentrations by 4 days post-feeding (d pf). Gene expression analysis was used to verify the presence of carbonic anhydrase (CA) II, IV and XIII, Na(+) H(+) exchanger 3 (NHE3), the Na(+) HCO3(-) co-transporter (NBC) and V-type ATPase. CA IV expression was significantly down-regulated at 3 dpf versus fasted controls. This was supported by activity analysis that showed a significant decrease in the amount of GPI-linked CA activity in isolated kidney membranes at 3 dpf versus fasted controls. In addition, V-type ATPase activity was significantly up-regulated at 3 dpf; no change in gene expression was observed. Both CA II and NHE3 expression was up-regulated at 3 dpf, which may be related to post-prandial ion balance. These results suggest that Burmese pythons actively remodel their kidney after feeding, which would in part benefit renal HCO3(-) clearance. PMID:26123779

  5. Dietary Intake as a Link between Obesity, Systemic Inflammation, and the Assumption of Multiple Cardiovascular and Antidiabetic Drugs in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Guida, Bruna; Maresca, Immacolata Daniela; Germanò, Roberta; Trio, Rossella; Nastasi, Anna Maria; Federico, Stefano; Memoli, Andrea; Apicella, Luca; Memoli, Bruno; Sabbatini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated dietary intake and nutritional-inflammation status in ninety-six renal transplant recipients, 7.2 ± 5.0 years after transplantation. Patients were classified as normoweight (NW), overweight (OW), and obese (OB), if their body mass index was between 18.5 and 24.9, 25.0 and 29.9, and ≥30 kg/m2, respectively. Food composition tables were used to estimate nutrient intakes. The values obtained were compared with those recommended in current nutritional guidelines. 52% of the patients were NW, 29% were OW, and 19% were OB. Total energy, fat, and dietary n-6 PUFAs intake was higher in OB than in NW. IL-6 and hs-CRP were higher in OB than in NW. The prevalence of multidrug regimen was higher in OB. In all patients, total energy, protein, saturated fatty acids, and sodium intake were higher than guideline recommendations. On the contrary, the intake of unsaturated and n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and fiber was lower than recommended. In conclusion, the prevalence of obesity was high in our patients, and it was associated with inflammation and the assumption of multiple cardiovascular and antidiabetic drugs. Dietary intake did not meet nutritional recommendations in all patients, especially in obese ones, highlighting the need of a long-term nutritional support in renal transplant recipients. PMID:23984354

  6. Localization of Tubular Adaptation to Renal Sodium Loss in Gitelman Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nau, Valérie; Kolb, Isabelle; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa; Hannedouche, Thierry; Moulin, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Gitelman syndrome (GS) is a salt-wasting tubulopathy that results from the inactivation of the human thiazide–sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter located in the distal convoluted tubule. Tubular adaptation to renal sodium loss has been described and localized in the distal tubule in experimental models of GS but not in humans with GS. Design, setting, participants, & measurements The tubular adaptation to renal sodium loss is described. Osmole-free water clearance and endogenous lithium clearance with furosemide infusion are used to compare 7 patients with genetically confirmed GS and 13 control participants. Results Neither endogenous lithium clearance nor osmole-free water clearance disclosed enhanced proximal fluid reabsorption in patients with GS. These patients displayed significantly lower osmole-free water clearance factored by inulin clearance (7.1±1.9 versus 10.1±2.2; P<0.01) and significantly lower fractional sodium reabsorption in the diluting nephron (73.2%±7.1% versus 86.1%±4.7%; P<0.005), consistent with the inactivation of the thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter. The furosemide-induced reduction rate of fractional sodium reabsorption in the diluting segment was higher in patients with GS (75.6%±6.1% versus 69.9%±3.2%; P<0.039), suggesting that sodium reabsorption would be enhanced in the cortical part of the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle in patients with GS. Conclusions These findings suggest that tubular adaptation to renal sodium loss in GS would be devoted to the cortical part of the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle in humans. PMID:22241817

  7. Roles of Akt and SGK1 in the Regulation of Renal Tubular Transport

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Nobuhiko; Nakamura, Motonobu; Suzuki, Masashi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Seki, George; Horita, Shoko

    2015-01-01

    A serine/threonine kinase Akt is a key mediator in various signaling pathways including regulation of renal tubular transport. In proximal tubules, Akt mediates insulin signaling via insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) and stimulates sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1), resulting in increased sodium reabsorption. In insulin resistance, the IRS2 in kidney cortex is exceptionally preserved and may mediate the stimulatory effect of insulin on NBCe1 to cause hypertension in diabetes via sodium retention. Likewise, in distal convoluted tubules and cortical collecting ducts, insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation mediates several hormonal signals to enhance sodium-chloride cotransporter (NCC) and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activities, resulting in increased sodium reabsorption. Serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1) mediates aldosterone signaling. Insulin can stimulate SGK1 to exert various effects on renal transporters. In renal cortical collecting ducts, SGK1 regulates the expression level of ENaC through inhibition of its degradation. In addition, SGK1 and Akt cooperatively regulate potassium secretion by renal outer medullary potassium channel (ROMK). Moreover, sodium-proton exchanger 3 (NHE3) in proximal tubules is possibly activated by SGK1. This review focuses on recent advances in understanding of the roles of Akt and SGK1 in the regulation of renal tubular transport. PMID:26491696

  8. Roles of Akt and SGK1 in the Regulation of Renal Tubular Transport.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Nobuhiko; Nakamura, Motonobu; Suzuki, Masashi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Seki, George; Horita, Shoko

    2015-01-01

    A serine/threonine kinase Akt is a key mediator in various signaling pathways including regulation of renal tubular transport. In proximal tubules, Akt mediates insulin signaling via insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) and stimulates sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1), resulting in increased sodium reabsorption. In insulin resistance, the IRS2 in kidney cortex is exceptionally preserved and may mediate the stimulatory effect of insulin on NBCe1 to cause hypertension in diabetes via sodium retention. Likewise, in distal convoluted tubules and cortical collecting ducts, insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation mediates several hormonal signals to enhance sodium-chloride cotransporter (NCC) and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activities, resulting in increased sodium reabsorption. Serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1) mediates aldosterone signaling. Insulin can stimulate SGK1 to exert various effects on renal transporters. In renal cortical collecting ducts, SGK1 regulates the expression level of ENaC through inhibition of its degradation. In addition, SGK1 and Akt cooperatively regulate potassium secretion by renal outer medullary potassium channel (ROMK). Moreover, sodium-proton exchanger 3 (NHE3) in proximal tubules is possibly activated by SGK1. This review focuses on recent advances in understanding of the roles of Akt and SGK1 in the regulation of renal tubular transport. PMID:26491696

  9. Determinants of renal tissue hypoxia in a rat model of polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ow, Connie P C; Abdelkader, Amany; Hilliard, Lucinda M; Phillips, Jacqueline K; Evans, Roger G

    2014-11-15

    Renal tissue oxygen tension (PO2) and its determinants have not been quantified in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Therefore, we measured kidney tissue PO2 in the Lewis rat model of PKD (LPK) and in Lewis control rats. We also determined the relative contributions of altered renal oxygen delivery and consumption to renal tissue hypoxia in LPK rats. PO2 of the superficial cortex of 11- to 13-wk-old LPK rats, measured by Clark electrode with the rat under anesthesia, was higher within the cysts (32.8 ± 4.0 mmHg) than the superficial cortical parenchyma (18.3 ± 3.5 mmHg). PO2 in the superficial cortical parenchyma of Lewis rats was 2.5-fold greater (46.0 ± 3.1 mmHg) than in LPK rats. At each depth below the cortical surface, tissue PO2 in LPK rats was approximately half that in Lewis rats. Renal blood flow was 60% less in LPK than in Lewis rats, and arterial hemoglobin concentration was 57% less, so renal oxygen delivery was 78% less. Renal venous PO2 was 38% less in LPK than Lewis rats. Sodium reabsorption was 98% less in LPK than Lewis rats, but renal oxygen consumption did not significantly differ between the two groups. Thus, in this model of PKD, kidney tissue is severely hypoxic, at least partly because of deficient renal oxygen delivery. Nevertheless, the observation of similar renal oxygen consumption, despite markedly less sodium reabsorption, in the kidneys of LPK compared with Lewis rats, indicates the presence of inappropriately high oxygen consumption in the polycystic kidney. PMID:25209412

  10. Randomized trial of the anti-FGF23 antibody KRN23 in X-linked hypophosphatemia

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Thomas O.; Imel, Erik A.; Ruppe, Mary D.; Weber, Thomas J.; Klausner, Mark A.; Wooddell, Margaret M.; Kawakami, Tetsuyoshi; Ito, Takahiro; Zhang, Xiaoping; Humphrey, Jeffrey; Insogna, Karl L.; Peacock, Munro

    2014-01-01

    Background. X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) is the most common heritable form of rickets and osteomalacia. XLH-associated mutations in phosphate-regulating endopeptidase (PHEX) result in elevated serum FGF23, decreased renal phosphate reabsorption, and low serum concentrations of phosphate (inorganic phosphorus, Pi) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D]. KRN23 is a human anti-FGF23 antibody developed as a potential treatment for XLH. Here, we have assessed the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and immunogenicity of KRN23 following a single i.v. or s.c. dose of KRN23 in adults with XLH. Methods. Thirty-eight XLH patients were randomized to receive a single dose of KRN23 (0.003–0.3 mg/kg i.v. or 0.1–1 mg/kg s.c.) or placebo. PK, PD, immunogenicity, safety, and tolerability were assessed for up to 50 days. Results. KRN23 significantly increased the maximum renal tubular threshold for phosphate reabsorption (TmP/GFR), serum Pi, and 1,25(OH)2D compared with that of placebo (P < 0.01). The maximum serum Pi concentration occurred later following s.c. dosing (8–15 days) compared with that seen with i.v. dosing (0.5–4 days). The effect duration was dose related and persisted longer in patients who received s.c. administration. Changes from baseline in TmP/GFR, serum Pi, and serum 1,25(OH)2D correlated with serum KRN23 concentrations. The mean t1/2 of KRN23 was 8–12 days after i.v. administration and 13–19 days after s.c. administration. Patients did not exhibit increased nephrocalcinosis or develop hypercalciuria, hypercalcemia, anti-KRN23 antibodies, or elevated serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) or creatinine. Conclusion. KRN23 increased TmP/GFR, serum Pi, and serum 1,25(OH)2D. The positive effect of KR23 on serum Pi and its favorable safety profile suggest utility for KRN23 in XLH patients. Trial registration. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00830674. Funding. Kyowa Hakko Kirin Pharma, Inc. PMID:24569459

  11. Contemporary Renal Cell Cancer Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Wong-Ho; Devesa, Susan S.

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed renal cell cancer incidence patterns in the United States and reviewed recent epidemiologic evidence with regard to environmental and host genetic determinants of renal cell cancer risk. Renal cell cancer incidence rates continued to rise among all racial/ethnic groups in the United States, across all age groups, and for all tumor sizes, with the most rapid increases for localized stage disease and small tumors. Recent cohort studies confirmed the association of smoking, excess body weight, and hypertension with an elevated risk of renal cell cancer, and suggested that these factors can be modified to reduce the risk. There is increasing evidence for an inverse association between renal cell cancer risk and physical activity and moderate intake of alcohol. Occupational exposure to TCE has been positively associated with renal cell cancer risk in several recent studies, but its link with somatic mutations of the VHL gene has not been confirmed. Studies of genetic polymorphisms in relation to renal cell cancer risk have produced mixed results, but genome-wide association studies with larger sample size and a more comprehensive approach are underway. Few epidemiologic studies have evaluated risk factors by subtypes of renal cell cancer defined by somatic mutations and other tumor markers. PMID:18836333

  12. [Renal elastography].

    PubMed

    Correas, Jean-Michel; Anglicheau, Dany; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael

    2016-04-01

    Renal elastography has become available with the development of noninvasive quantitative techniques (including shear-wave elastography), following the rapidly growing field of diagnosis and quantification of liver fibrosis, which has a demonstrated major clinical impact. Ultrasound or even magnetic resonance techniques are leaving the pure research area to reach the routine clinical use. With the increased incidence of chronic kidney disease and its specific morbidity and mortality, the noninvasive diagnosis of renal fibrosis can be of critical value. However, it is difficult to simply extend the application from one organ to the other due to a large number of anatomical and technical issues. Indeed, the kidney exhibits various features that make stiffness assessment more complex, such as the presence of various tissue types (cortex, medulla), high spatial orientation (anisotropy), local blood flow, fatty sinus with variable volume and echotexture, perirenal space with variable fatty content, and the variable depth of the organ. Furthermore, the stiffness changes of the renal parenchyma are not exclusively related to fibrosis, as renal perfusion or hydronephrosis will impact the local elasticity. Renal elastography might be able to diagnose acute or chronic obstruction, or to renal tumor or pseudotumor characterization. Today, renal elastography appears as a promising application that still requires optimization and validation, which is the contrary for liver stiffness assessment. PMID:26976058

  13. Signaling Mechanisms that Link Salt Retention to Hypertension: Endogenous Ouabain, the Na+ Pump, the Na+/Ca2+ Exchanger and TRPC Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Blaustein, Mordecai P.; Hamlyn, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Salt retention as a result of chronic, excessive dietary salt intake, is widely accepted as one of the most common causes of hypertension. In a small minority of cases, enhanced Na+ reabsorption by the kidney can be traced to specific genetic defects of salt transport, or pathological conditions of the kidney, adrenal cortex, or pituitary. Far more frequently, however, the salt retention may be the result of minor renal injury or small genetic variation in renal salt transport mechanisms. How the salt retention actually leads to the increase in peripheral vascular resistance (the hallmark of hypertension) and the elevation of blood pressure remain an enigma. Here we review the evidence that endogenous ouabain (an adrenocortical hormone), arterial smooth muscle α2 Na+ pumps, type-1 Na/Ca exchangers, and receptor- and store-operated Ca2+ channels play key roles in the pathway that links salt to hypertension. We discuss cardenolide structure-function relationships in an effort to understand why prolonged administration of ouabain, but not digoxin, induces hypertension, and why digoxin is actually anti-hypertensive. Finally, we summarize recent observations which indicate that ouabain upregulates arterial myocyte Ca2+ signaling mechanisms that promote vasoconstriction, while simultaneously downregulating endothelial vasodilator mechanisms. In sum, the reports reviewed here provide novel insight into the molecular mechanisms by which salt retention leads to hypertension. PMID:20211726

  14. Comparative inhibition by hard and soft metal ions of steroid-binding capacity of renal mineralocorticoid receptor cross-linked to the 90-kDa heat-shock protein heterocomplex.

    PubMed Central

    Galigniana, M D; Piwien-Pilipuk, G

    1999-01-01

    We analysed the inhibitory effects in vitro and in vivo of several metal ions on aldosterone binding to the rat kidney mineralocorticoid receptor with the purpose of assessing possible toxic effects of those ions on sodium retention, as well as to obtain information on receptor structural requirements for ligand binding. For the assays in vitro, the inhibitory effects of 20 metal ions were analysed on steroid-binding capacity for renal receptor cross-linked to 90-kDa heat-shock protein (hsp90) by pretreatment with dimethyl pimelimidate. Cross-linking prevented the artifactual dissociation of hsp90 (and, consequently, the loss of steroid binding) from the mineralocorticoid receptor due to the presence of high concentrations of salt in the incubation medium. Cross-linked heterocomplex showed no difference in ligand specificity and affinity with respect to native receptor, but increased stability upon thermal- or ionic-strength-induced destabilization was observed. Treatments in vitro with metal ions in the range 10(-8)-10(-1) M resulted in a differential inhibitory effect for each particular ion on aldosterone binding. Using the negative logarithm of metal concentration for 50% inhibition, the ions could be correlated with their Klopman hardness constants. The analysis of this relationship led us to postulate three types of reaction: with thiol, imidazole and carboxyl groups. The essential role played by these residues in steroid binding was confirmed by chemical modification of cysteines with dithionitrobenzoic acid, histidines with diethyl pyrocarbonate and acidic amino acids with Woodward's reagent (N-ethyl-5-phenylisoxazolium-3'-sulphonate). Importantly, the toxic effects of some metal ions were also observed by treatments in vivo of adrenalectomized rats on both steroid-binding capacity and aldosterone-dependent sodium-retaining properties. We suggest that those amino acid residues are involved in the activation process of the mineralocorticoid receptor upon

  15. Assessment of renal function in workers previously exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed Central

    Elinder, C G; Edling, C; Lindberg, E; Kågedal, B; Vesterberg, O

    1985-01-01

    Cadmium induced renal effects were examined in 60 workers (58 men, 2 women) previously exposed to cadmium. Tubular damage in the form of beta 2-microglobulinuria was found in 40%, and urinary albumin and orosomucoid increased significantly with increasing urinary cadmium and increasing relative clearance of beta 2-microglobulin. It is suggested that increased albumin excretion is secondary to the tubular damage. In no case was typical glomerular proteinuria found that could be related to cadmium. Histories of renal stones were more common among the workers with high urinary cadmium concentrations. The glomerular filtration rate was measured in 17 of the workers who had pronounced tubular dysfunction. The average glomerular filtration rate for these men was less than the age adjusted predicted value (mean = 84%). Furthermore, there was a significant (p less than 0.05) correlation (r = -0.47) between tubular reabsorption loss and a decreased glomerular filtration rate. PMID:3904816

  16. Measurement of the helium 23S metastable atom density by observation of the change in the 23S-23P emission line shape due to radiation reabsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikama, T.; Ogane, S.; Iida, Y.; Hasuo, M.

    2016-01-01

    In helium discharge plasmas, the relative emission intensities of the fine-structure transitions belonging to the HeI 23S-23P transition can be affected by radiation reabsorption. Since the magnitude of the reabsorption depends on the density and temperature of the 23S metastable atoms, their density can be determined by measuring the 23S-23P emission line shape using a high wavelength-resolution spectrometer. In this study, the applicable conditions of the method in terms of the opacity and line broadening are revealed, and possible causes of errors in the measurement, i.e. spatial distributions of the density and temperature and the effects of external magnetic and electric fields, are investigated. The effect of reabsorption under an external magnetic field is experimentally confirmed using a glow discharge plasma installed in a superconducting magnet.

  17. Role of renal nerves in excretory responses to exogenous and endogenous opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Jones, S Y; Kopp, U C; Dibona, G F

    1989-03-01

    The present study was designed to investigate opioid peptide-mediated changes in renal function in conscious Sprague-Dawley rats after administration of the native opioid agonist methionine enkephalin (ME), its synthetic analog D-Ala2-methionine enkephalinamide (DALA) and the opioid antagonist naloxone. Intravenous infusion of DALA (25 micrograms/kg/min) and ME (75 micrograms/kg/min) produced no changes in mean arterial pressure, heart rate, glomerular filtration rate or effective renal plasma flow in rats with intact or bilaterally denervated kidneys. In contrast, i.v. infusion of these opioid agonists produced differing effects on the renal excretion of water and sodium; DALA produced an increase in urinary flow rate and sodium excretion and ME produced a decrease in these parameters. Changes in renal sympathetic nerve activity were not involved in producing these effects as supported by measurements of renal sympathetic nerve activity and the finding that prior bilateral renal denervation did not alter the renal responses to either agonist. The renal excretory responses to both DALA and ME infusion were prevented by pretreatment with the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, thus suggesting an opioid receptor-mediated effect of both agonists. Intravenous bolus injections of naloxone alone produced a dose-dependent diuresis and natriuresis without producing changes in systemic or renal hemodynamics or renal sympathetic nerve activity. These studies, therefore, provide evidence that the administration of opioid receptor agonists and antagonists produce changes in the renal excretion of water and sodium via an action on renal tubular reabsorptive mechanisms which are independent of changes in systemic or renal hemodynamics or renal sympathetic nerve activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2703962

  18. Time course and localization of endothelin-1 gene expression in a model of renal disease progression.

    PubMed Central

    Bruzzi, I.; Corna, D.; Zoja, C.; Orisio, S.; Schiffrin, E. L.; Cavallotti, D.; Remuzzi, G.; Benigni, A.

    1997-01-01

    Experimental and human proteinuric glomerulopathies are associated with tubulo-interstitial injury that correlates with the decline of renal function even better than glomerular lesions do. Mechanism(s) leading to tubulo-interstitial damage are unknown. It has been proposed that excessive reabsorption of filtered proteins activates renal cells to produce vasoactive and inflammatory molecules including endothelin-1. The aim of the present study was twofold: we first evaluated the cellular origin of excessive renal endothelin-1 production in the renal mass reduction model and then related endothelin-1 distribution to the development of kidney lesions. Four groups of renal mass reduction (n = 15) and four groups of control rats (n = 5) were studied at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after surgery. Urinary proteins in renal mass reduction rats were comparable with controls at day 7 but became significantly higher thereafter. Renal mass reduction rats first developed tubulo-interstitial changes, which were already evident at day 14 in the majority of them. At 28 days, renal mass reduction rats also developed glomerulosclerosis. A parallel increase of renal endothelin-1 gene expression and synthesis of the corresponding peptide in renal mass reduction rats versus controls was observed from day 14. Nonradioactive in situ hybridization confirmed a pattern of endothelin-1 mRNA consistent with the distribution of lesions. At day 14, endothelin-1 staining was stronger in renal mass reduction than in control kidneys and mainly localized to the cytoplasm of tubular cells, whereas glomeruli were negative. At day 28, endothelin-1 expression further increased in renal mass reduction rats as compared with controls, and the staining was apparent also in glomeruli. Thus, in renal mass reduction, a progressive up-regulation of endothelin-1 occurs during the development of renal injury, that first involves the tubules and, only in a subsequent phase, the glomeruli. Images Figure 2 PMID:9358749

  19. Roles of estrogen and progesterone in modulating renal nerve function in the rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Graceli, J.B.; Cicilini, M.A.; Bissoli, N.S.; Abreu, G.R.; Moysés, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance of extracellular Na+ and Cl- concentrations in mammals depends, at least in part, on renal function. It has been shown that neural and endocrine mechanisms regulate extracellular fluid volume and transport of electrolytes along nephrons. Studies of sex hormones and renal nerves suggested that sex hormones modulate renal function, although this relationship is not well understood in the kidney. To better understand the role of these hormones on the effects that renal nerves have on Na+ and Cl- reabsorption, we studied the effects of renal denervation and oophorectomy in female rats. Oophorectomized (OVX) rats received 17β-estradiol benzoate (OVE, 2.0 mg·kg-1·day-1, sc) and progesterone (OVP, 1.7 mg·kg-1·day-1, sc). We assessed Na+ and Cl- fractional excretion (FENa+ and FECl-, respectively) and renal and plasma catecholamine release concentrations. FENa+, FECl-, water intake, urinary flow, and renal and plasma catecholamine release levels increased in OVX vs control rats. These effects were reversed by 17β-estradiol benzoate but not by progesterone. Renal denervation did not alter FENa+, FECl-, water intake, or urinary flow values vs controls. However, the renal catecholamine release level was decreased in the OVP (236.6±36.1 ng/g) and denervated rat groups (D: 102.1±15.7; ODE: 108.7±23.2; ODP: 101.1±22.1 ng/g). Furthermore, combining OVX + D (OD: 111.9±25.4) decreased renal catecholamine release levels compared to either treatment alone. OVE normalized and OVP reduced renal catecholamine release levels, and the effects on plasma catecholamine release levels were reversed by ODE and ODP replacement in OD. These data suggest that progesterone may influence catecholamine release levels by renal innervation and that there are complex interactions among renal nerves, estrogen, and progesterone in the modulation of renal function. PMID:23828583

  20. Regulation of the collagen cross-linking enzymes LOXL2 and PLOD2 by tumor-suppressive microRNA-26a/b in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    KUROZUMI, AKIRA; KATO, MAYUKO; GOTO, YUSUKE; MATSUSHITA, RYOSUKE; NISHIKAWA, RIKA; OKATO, ATSUSHI; FUKUMOTO, ICHIRO; ICHIKAWA, TOMOHIKO; SEKI, NAOHIKO

    2016-01-01

    Our recent studies of microRNA (miRNA) expression signatures in human cancers revealed that microRNA-26a (miRNA-26a) and microRNA-26b (miRNA-26b) were significantly reduced in cancer tissues. To date, few reports have provided functional analyses of miR-26a or miR-26b in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The aim of the present study was to investigate the functional significance of miR-26a and miR-26b in RCC and to identify novel miR-26a/b-mediated cancer pathways and target genes involved in RCC oncogenesis and metastasis. Downregulation of miR-26a or miR-26b was confirmed in RCC clinical specimens. Restoration of miR-26a or miR-26b in RCC cell lines (786-O and A498) revealed that these miRNAs significantly inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion. Our in silico analysis and luciferase reporter assays showed that lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) and procollagen-lysine, 2-oxoglutarate 5-dioxygenase 2 (PLOD2) were directly regulated by these miRNAs. Moreover, downregulating the PLOD2 gene significantly inhibited cell migration and invasion in RCC cells. Thus, our data showed that two genes promoting metastasis, LOXL2 and PLOD2, were epigenetically regulated by tumor-suppressive microRNAs, miR-26a and miR-26b, providing important insights into the molecular mechanisms of RCC metastasis. PMID:26983694

  1. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition-associated microRNA/mRNA signature is linked to metastasis and prognosis in clear-cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mlcochova, Hana; Machackova, Tana; Rabien, Anja; Radova, Lenka; Fabian, Pavel; Iliev, Robert; Slaba, Katerina; Poprach, Alexandr; Kilic, Ergin; Stanik, Michal; Redova-Lojova, Martina; Svoboda, Marek; Dolezel, Jan; Vyzula, Rostislav; Jung, Klaus; Slaby, Ondrej

    2016-01-01

    Clear-cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) are genetically heterogeneous tumors presenting diverse clinical courses. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial process involved in initiation of metastatic cascade. The aim of our study was to identify an integrated miRNA/mRNA signature associated with metastasis and prognosis in ccRCC through targeted approach based on analysis of miRNAs/mRNAs associated with EMT. A cohort of 230 ccRCC was included in our study and further divided into discovery, training and validation cohorts. EMT markers were evaluated in ccRCC tumor samples, which were grouped accordingly to EMT status. By use of large-scale miRNA/mRNA expression profiling, we identified miRNA/mRNA with significantly different expression in EMT-positive tumors and selected 41 miRNAs/mRNAs for training phase of the study to evaluate their diagnostic and prognostic potential. Fifteen miRNAs/mRNAs were analyzed in the validation phase, where all evaluated miRNA/mRNA candidates were confirmed to be significantly deregulated in tumor tissue. Some of them significantly differed in metastatic tumors, correlated with clinical stage, with Fuhrman grade and with overall survival. Further, we established an EMT-based stage-independent prognostic scoring system enabling identification of ccRCC patients at high-risk of cancer-related death. Finally, we confirmed involvement of miR-429 in EMT regulation in RCC cells in vitro. PMID:27549611

  2. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition-associated microRNA/mRNA signature is linked to metastasis and prognosis in clear-cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mlcochova, Hana; Machackova, Tana; Rabien, Anja; Radova, Lenka; Fabian, Pavel; Iliev, Robert; Slaba, Katerina; Poprach, Alexandr; Kilic, Ergin; Stanik, Michal; Redova-Lojova, Martina; Svoboda, Marek; Dolezel, Jan; Vyzula, Rostislav; Jung, Klaus; Slaby, Ondrej

    2016-01-01

    Clear-cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) are genetically heterogeneous tumors presenting diverse clinical courses. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial process involved in initiation of metastatic cascade. The aim of our study was to identify an integrated miRNA/mRNA signature associated with metastasis and prognosis in ccRCC through targeted approach based on analysis of miRNAs/mRNAs associated with EMT. A cohort of 230 ccRCC was included in our study and further divided into discovery, training and validation cohorts. EMT markers were evaluated in ccRCC tumor samples, which were grouped accordingly to EMT status. By use of large-scale miRNA/mRNA expression profiling, we identified miRNA/mRNA with significantly different expression in EMT-positive tumors and selected 41 miRNAs/mRNAs for training phase of the study to evaluate their diagnostic and prognostic potential. Fifteen miRNAs/mRNAs were analyzed in the validation phase, where all evaluated miRNA/mRNA candidates were confirmed to be significantly deregulated in tumor tissue. Some of them significantly differed in metastatic tumors, correlated with clinical stage, with Fuhrman grade and with overall survival. Further, we established an EMT-based stage-independent prognostic scoring system enabling identification of ccRCC patients at high-risk of cancer-related death. Finally, we confirmed involvement of miR-429 in EMT regulation in RCC cells in vitro. PMID:27549611

  3. Regulation of the collagen cross-linking enzymes LOXL2 and PLOD2 by tumor-suppressive microRNA-26a/b in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kurozumi, Akira; Kato, Mayuko; Goto, Yusuke; Matsushita, Ryosuke; Nishikawa, Rika; Okato, Atsushi; Fukumoto, Ichiro; Ichikawa, Tomohiko; Seki, Naohiko

    2016-05-01

    Our recent studies of microRNA (miRNA) expression signatures in human cancers revealed that microRNA-26a (miRNA-26a) and microRNA-26b (miRNA-26b) were significantly reduced in cancer tissues. To date, few reports have provided functional analyses of miR-26a or miR-26b in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The aim of the present study was to investigate the functional significance of miR-26a and miR-26b in RCC and to identify novel miR-26a/b-mediated cancer pathways and target genes involved in RCC oncogenesis and metastasis. Downregulation of miR-26a or miR-26b was confirmed in RCC clinical specimens. Restoration of miR-26a or miR-26b in RCC cell lines (786-O and A498) revealed that these miRNAs significantly inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion. Our in silico analysis and luciferase reporter assays showed that lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) and procollagen-lysine, 2-oxoglutarate 5-dioxygenase 2 (PLOD2) were directly regulated by these miRNAs. Moreover, downregulating the PLOD2 gene significantly inhibited cell migration and invasion in RCC cells. Thus, our data showed that two genes promoting metastasis, LOXL2 and PLOD2, were epigenetically regulated by tumor-suppressive microRNAs, miR-26a and miR-26b, providing important insights into the molecular mechanisms of RCC metastasis. PMID:26983694

  4. Paradoxical effects of green tea (Camellia sinensis) and antioxidant vitamins in diabetic rats: improved retinopathy and renal mitochondrial defects but deterioration of collagen matrix glycoxidation and cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Mustata, Georgian T; Rosca, Mariana; Biemel, Klaus M; Reihl, Oliver; Smith, Mark A; Viswanathan, Ashwini; Strauch, Christopher; Du, Yunpeng; Tang, Jie; Kern, Timothy S; Lederer, Markus O; Brownlee, Michael; Weiss, Miriam F; Monnier, Vincent M

    2005-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that green tea prevents diabetes-related tissue dysfunctions attributable to oxidation. Diabetic rats were treated daily with tap water, vitamins C and E, or fresh Japanese green tea extract. After 12 months, body weights were decreased, whereas glycated lysine in aorta, tendon, and plasma were increased by diabetes (P < 0.001) but unaffected by treatment. Erythrocyte glutathione and plasma hydroperoxides were improved by the vitamins (P < 0.05) and green tea (P < 0.001). Retinal superoxide production, acellular capillaries, and pericyte ghosts were increased by diabetes (P < 0.001) and improved by green tea and the vitamins (P variable). Lens crystallin fluorescence at 370/440 nm was ameliorated by green tea (P < 0.05) but not the vitamins. Marginal effects on nephropathy parameters were noted. However, suppressed renal mitochondrial NADH-linked ADP-dependent and dinitrophenol-dependent respiration and complex III activity were improved by green tea (P variable). Green tea also suppressed the methylglyoxal hydroimidazolone immunostaining of a 28-kDa mitochondrial protein. Surprising, glycoxidation in tendon, aorta, and plasma was either worsened or not significantly improved by the vitamins and green tea. Glucosepane cross-links were increased by diabetes (P < 0.001), and green tea worsened total cross-linking. In conclusion, green tea and antioxidant vitamins improved several diabetes-related cellular dysfunctions but worsened matrix glycoxidation in selected tissues, suggesting that antioxidant treatment tilts the balance from oxidative to carbonyl stress in the extracellular compartment. PMID:15677510

  5. Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase by parathyroid hormone and cyclic AMP in rat renal cortex in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Beck, N; Kim, K S; Wolak, M; Davis, B B

    1975-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that parathyroid hormone (PTH) inhibits the proximal tubular reabsorption of bicarbonate, and increases the urinary excretion of that ion. There is also a qualitative similarity between the alterations of the proximal tubular reabsorption of phosphate, sodium, and water after PTH administration and after acetazolamide administration. These findings suggest that the renal effect of PTH is possibly mediated through the inhibition of carbonic anhydrase in proximal tubules. Therefore, a possible inhibitory effect of PTH on carbonic anhydrase was evaluated in the homogenate of rat renal cortex by an indicator titration method. Incubation of cortical homogenates with PTH for 10 min at 37degreesC inhibited carbonic anhydrase activity. The inhibitory effect of PTH was ATP-, Mg++-, and K+-dependent and temperature-dependent; inactivation of PTH by heating at 100degreesC abolished the effect of PTH both to activate adenylate cyclase and to inhibit carbonic anhydrase. Calcium 5 mM also partially abolished effects of PTH to activate adenylate cyclase and to inhibit carbonic anhydrase. The inhibitory effect of PTH on carbonic anhydrase was specific to renal cortex. Cyclic AMP, the intracellular messenger substance for PTH, also inhibited carbonic anhydrase in renal cortex. The cyclic AMP-induced inhibition was also Mg++ dependent and temperature dependent, and required preincubation at 37degreesC. But 5'-AMP, a metabolic derivative of cyclic AMP without its biological effect, had no inhibitory effect on carbonic anhydrase. All the above results are consistent with the hypothesis that PTH inhibits proximal tubular reabsorption of bicarbonate and phosphate through the inhibition of carbonic anhydrase, and that inhibitory effect is mediated through the cyclic AMP system. PMID:233968

  6. Pressure natriuresis and the renal control of arterial blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ivy, Jessica R; Bailey, Matthew A

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of extracellular fluid volume by renal sodium excretion lies at the centre of blood pressure homeostasis. Renal perfusion pressure can directly regulate sodium reabsorption in the proximal tubule. This acute pressure natriuresis response is a uniquely powerful means of stabilizing long-term blood pressure around a set point. By logical extension, deviation from the set point can only be sustained if the pressure natriuresis mechanism is impaired, suggesting that hypertension is caused or sustained by a defect in the relationship between renal perfusion pressure and sodium excretion. Here we describe the role of pressure natriuresis in blood pressure control and outline the cascade of biophysical and paracrine events in the renal medulla that integrate the vascular and tubular response to altered perfusion pressure. Pressure natriuresis is impaired in hypertension and mechanistic insight into dysfunction comes from genetic analysis of blood pressure disorders. Transplantation studies in rats show that blood pressure is determined by the genotype of the kidney and Mendelian hypertension indicates that the distal nephron influences the overall natriuretic efficiency. These approaches and the outcomes of genome-wide-association studies broaden our view of blood pressure control, suggesting that renal sympathetic nerve activity and local inflammation can impair pressure natriuresis to cause hypertension. Understanding how these systems interact is necessary to tackle the global burden of hypertension. PMID:25107929

  7. Inhibition of renal membrane binding and nephrotoxicity of aminoglycosides

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.D.; Hottendorf, G.H.; Bennett, D.B.

    1986-06-01

    The initial event in the renal tubular reabsorption of nephrotoxic aminoglycosides involves binding to brush border membranes. This primary event was measured in renal brush border membrane vesicles prepared from rat renal cortex utilizing (3H)gentamicin. In order to gain structure-activity information regarding this interaction the effect of substances having chemical similarities to aminoglycosides (sugars, polyamines and amino acids) on gentamicin binding to brush border membranes was determined. Polyamino acids were found to possess the greatest inhibitory potency. In addition to polymers of cationic amino acids (lysine, ornithine, arginine and histidine), polymers of neutral (asparagine) and acidic (aspartic and glutamic acid) amino acids also exhibited inhibition of the membrane binding of gentamicin. Inasmuch as inhibition of renal membrane binding has the potential to decrease aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity, several polyamino acids that inhibited membrane binding were tested in vivo for potential protective activity vs. gentamicin- and amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity. Polyasparagine90 and polyaspartic acid100 inhibited gentamicin and amikacin nephrotoxicity completely when coadministered to rats with the aminoglycosides. Polylysine20 provided complete and partial inhibition of gentamicin and amikacin nephrotoxicity, respectively. Whereas in vivo distribution studies revealed that cortical levels of (3H)amikacin were elevated slightly by the coadministration of polyaspartic acid, brush border and basolateral membranes contained significantly lower levels of the aminoglycoside (46 and 41% inhibition, respectively). These results question the role of charge per se in the binding of aminoglycosides to renal membranes and further confirm the importance of membrane binding in the pathogenesis of aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity.

  8. [Reabsorption of yellow fluorescent protein in the Rana temporaria kidney by receptor-mediated endocytosis].

    PubMed

    Seliverstova, E V; Prutskova, N P

    2014-01-01

    The absorption of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and the expression of the endocytic receptors, megalin and cubilin, were investigated in the renal proximal tubules (PT) in frogs Rana temporaria after parenteral YFP injections. The methods of confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry were used. The dynamics of YFP absorption was analyzed 2 h after injection. The logarithmic time dependence of the accumulation of YFP-containing endocytic vesicles in PT cells and the completion of absorption process 90-120 min after injection were shown. Unlike substantial megalin and cubilin expression 15-30 min after YFP introduction, immunolabeled endocytic receptors were not detected in PT cells after 2 h. The re-injection of YFP led to the appearance of apical endocytic vesicles containing megalin or cubilin colocalized with YFP. At the same time, the decrease of YFP uptake associated with reduction in the number of receptor-containing vesicles was demonstrated, suggesting a failure of megalin and cubilin expression. The decrease of absorption capacity of PT cells after YFP re-injection was similar to that found previously under conditions of the competitive absorption of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and YFP injected in different sequences. The data are the further demonstration of the proposed mechanism limiting the tubular protein absorption in the frog kidney and suggest the involvement of megalin and cubilin in uptake and vesicular transport of YFP. PMID:25782287

  9. Regulation of Mg2+ Reabsorption and Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin Type 6 Activity by cAMP Signaling.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Maxime G; Kittikulsuth, Wararat; Nair, Anil V; de Baaij, Jeroen H F; Latta, Femke; Genzen, Jonathan R; Kohan, Donald E; Bindels, René J M; Hoenderop, Joost G J

    2016-03-01

    The transient receptor potential melastatin type 6 (TRPM6) epithelial Mg(2+) channels participate in transcellular Mg(2+) transport in the kidney and intestine. Previous reports suggested a hormonal cAMP-dependent regulation of Mg(2+) reabsorption in the kidney. The molecular details of this process are, however, unknown. Adenylate cyclase 3 (Adcy3) has been shown to colocalize with the Na(+)/Cl(-) cotransporter, a marker of the distal convoluted segment of the kidney, the principal site of TRPM6 expression. Given the critical role of TRPM6 in Mg(2+) reabsorption, an inducible kidney-specific Adcy3 deletion mouse model was characterized for blood and urinary electrolyte disturbances under a normal--and low--Mg(2+) diet. Increased urinary Mg(2+) wasting and Trpm6 mRNA levels were observed in the urine and kidney of Adcy3-deleted animals compared with wild-type controls. Serum Mg(2+) concentration was significantly lower in Adcy3-deleted animals at day 7 on the low Mg(2+) diet. Using patch clamp electrophysiology, cell surface biotinylation, and total internal reflection fluorescence live cell imaging of transfected HEK293 cells, we demonstrated that cAMP signaling rapidly potentiates TRPM6 activity by promoting TRPM6 accumulation at the plasma membrane and increasing its single-channel conductance. Comparison of electrophysiological data from cells expressing the phosphorylation-deficient S1252A or phosphomimetic S1252D TRPM6 mutants suggests that phosphorylation at this intracellular residue participates in the observed stimulation of channel activity. Altogether, these data support a physiologically relevant magnesiotropic role of cAMP signaling in the kidney by a direct stimulatory action of protein kinase A on the plasma membrane trafficking and function of TRPM6 ion channels. PMID:26150606

  10. Fluid reabsorption in proximal convoluted tubules of mice with gene deletions of claudin-2 and/or aquaporin1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuning; Mizel, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Deletions of claudin-2 (Cldn2) and aquaporin1 (AQP1) reduce proximal fluid reabsorption (PFR) by about 30% and 50%, respectively. Experiments were done to replicate these observations and to determine in AQP1/claudin-2 double knockout mice (DKO) if the effects of deletions of these established water pores are additive. PFR was determined in inactin/ketamine-anesthetized mice by free-flow micropuncture using single-nephron I125-iothalamate (io) clearance. Animal means of PFR [% of glomerular filtration rate (GFR)] derived from TF/Piothalamate ratios in 12 mice in each of four groups [wild type (WT), Cldn2−/−, AQP1−/−, and DKO) were 45.8 ± 0.85 (51 tubules), 35.4 ± 1 (54 tubules; P < 0.01 vs. WT), 36.8 ± 1 (63 tubules; P < 0.05 vs. WT), and 33.9 ± 1.4 (69 tubules; P < 0.01 vs. WT). Kidney and single-nephron GFRs (SNGFR) were significantly reduced in all mutant strains. The direct relationship between PFR and SNGFR was maintained in mutant mice, but the slope of this relationship was reduced in the absence of Cldn2 and/or AQP1. Transtubular osmotic pressure differences were not different between WT and Cldn2−/− mice, but markedly increased in DKO. In conclusion, the deletion of Cldn2, AQP1, or of both Cldn2 and AQP1 reduces PFR by 22.7%, 19.6%, and 26%, respectively. Our data are consistent with an up to 25% paracellular contribution to PFR. The reduced osmotic water permeability caused by absence of AQP1 augments luminal hypotonicity. Aided by a fall in filtered load, the capacity of non-AQP1-dependent transcellular reabsorption is sufficient to maintain PFR without AQP1 and claudin-2 at 75% of control. PMID:24049145

  11. Pathogenic GLUT9 mutations causing renal hypouricemia type 2 (RHUC2).

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Y; Matsuo, H; Chiba, T; Nagamori, S; Nakayama, A; Inoue, H; Utsumi, Y; Oda, T; Nishiyama, J; Kanai, Y; Shinomiya, N

    2011-12-01

    Renal hypouricemia (MIM 220150) is an inherited disorder characterized by low serum uric acid levels and has severe complications such as exercise-induced acute renal failure and urolithiasis. We have previously reported that URAT1/SLC22A12 encodes a renal urate-anion exchanger and that its mutations cause renal hypouricemia type 1 (RHUC1). With the large health-examination database of the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, we found two missense mutations (R198C and R380W) of GLUT9/SLC2A9 in hypouricemia patients. R198C and R380W occur in highly conserved amino acid motifs in the "sugar transport proteins signatures" that are observed in GLUT family transporters. The corresponding mutations in GLUT1 (R153C and R333W) are known to cause GLUT1 deficiency syndrome because arginine residues in this motif are reportedly important as the determinants of the membrane topology of human GLUT1. Therefore, on the basis of membrane topology, the same may be true of GLUT9. GLUT9 mutants showed markedly reduced urate transport in oocyte expression studies, which would be the result of the loss of positive charges in those conserved amino acid motifs. Together with previous reports on GLUT9 localization, our findings suggest that these GLUT9 mutations cause renal hypouricemia type 2 (RHUC2) by their decreased urate reabsorption on both sides of the renal proximal tubule cells. However, a previously reported GLUT9 mutation, P412R, was unlikely to be pathogenic. These findings also enable us to propose a physiological model of the renal urate reabsorption via GLUT9 and URAT1 and can lead to a promising therapeutic target for gout and related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:22132964

  12. Blunted DOCA/high salt induced albuminuria and renal tubulointerstitial damage in gene-targeted mice lacking SGK1.

    PubMed

    Artunc, Ferruh; Amann, Kerstin; Nasir, Omaima; Friedrich, Björn; Sandulache, Diana; Jahovic, Nermina; Risler, Teut; Vallon, Volker; Wulff, Peer; Kuhl, Dietmar; Lang, Florian

    2006-09-01

    Mineralocorticoids stimulate renal tubular Na(+) reabsorption, enhance salt appetite, increase blood pressure, and favor the development of renal fibrosis. The effects of mineralocorticoids on renal tubular Na(+) reabsorption and salt appetite involve the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1). The kinase is highly expressed in fibrosing tissue. The present experiments thus explored the involvement of SGK1 in renal fibrosis. To this end, SGK1-knockout mice (sgk1 (-/-)) and their wild-type littermates (sgk1 (+/+)) were implanted with desoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-release pellets and offered 1% saline as drinking water for 12 weeks. The treatment led to significant increases in fluid and Na(+) intake and urinary output of fluid and Na(+) in sgk1 (+/+) mice, effects blunted in sgk1 (-/-) mice. Blood pressure increased within the first 7 weeks to a similar extent in both genotypes, but within the next 5 weeks, it increased further only in sgk1 (+/+) mice. Creatinine clearance did not change significantly but albuminuria increased dramatically in sgk1 (+/+) mice, an effect significantly blunted in sgk1 (-/-) mice. Histology after 12 weeks treatment revealed marked glomerular sclerosis and tubulointerstitial damage with interstitial fibrosis and inflammation in kidneys from sgk1 (+/+) mice, but not from sgk1 (-/-) mice. In conclusion, a lack of SGK1 protects against DOCA/high-salt-induced albuminuria and renal fibrosis. PMID:16924469

  13. [Renal colic].

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, J M

    1999-01-01

    The appropriate approach to renal colic, which should be known by the family doctor, is presented. The incidence of this condition in the emergency department of a large general hospital is described as well as the physiopathology of pain, its clinical aspects and the therapeutic attitudes. Renal colic is frequent, it is often possible to diagnose the clinical aspects and general practitioners have the competence for treatment. The use of analgesic drugs, in the correct dosage, is enough to relieve pain and suffering in most of the patients. PMID:10423866

  14. [Renal disease].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-09-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys. Some of these restrictions modify the intake of proteins, sodium, and phosphorus. Milk and dairy products are sources of these nutrients. This article aims to inform the reader about the benefits including milk and dairy products relying on a scientific and critical view according to the clinical conditions and the stage of renal disease in which the patient is. PMID:27603894

  15. Renal organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease in the absence of new treatment modalities has become a strong driver for innovation in nephrology. An increasing understanding of stem cell biology has kindled the prospects of regenerative options for kidney disease. However, the kidney itself is not a regenerative organ, as all the nephrons are formed during embryonic development. Here, we will investigate advances in the molecular genetics of renal organogenesis, including what this can tell us about lineage relationships, and discuss how this may serve to inform us about both the normal processes of renal repair and options for regenerative therapies. PMID:22198432

  16. Managing new-onset gout in pediatric renal transplant recipients: when, how, to what extent.

    PubMed

    Assadi, Farahnak

    2013-01-01

    Hyperuricemia and gout are common among adult renal transplant recipients, but it is rarely reported following pediatric renal transplantations. Treating gout in pediatric kidney transplant recipients presents clinical challenges to the management of both immunosuppressive regimen and hyperuricemia for their effects on serum uric acid levels, renal function and drug interactions. Most renal transplant recipients have a relative impairment of renal clearance of urate due to abnormalities in renal transport, explaining the association of hyperuricemia and decreased glomerular filtration rate. Risk factors for the development of gout include impaired renal function, hypertension, heart failure and diabetes mellitus. Calcineurin inhibitors, particularly cyclosporine, are the most important risk factor for gout in transplant recipients and should not be used in pediatric renal transplant recipients. Diuretic therapy increases the risk of gout by causing extracellular volume contraction with consequent enhancement of proximal tubular reabsorption. Corticosteroids are increasingly replacing nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and colchicine for the treatment of acute gout flares because they have little effect on kidney function. Proper management is aimed at lowering serum uric acid level below 6.0 mg/dL with xanthine oxidase inhibitors such as allopurinol or febuxostat. Allopurinol and mycophenolate mofetil are safer to use in combination than are allopurinol and azathioprine. Febuxostat is an alternative to allopurinol in patients with allopurinol intolerance or hypersensitivity. Pegloticase is indicated for patients with severe gout in whom allopurinol and febuxostat have not been effective or tolerated. PMID:22941874

  17. Effect of chronic alcohol feeding on physiological and molecular parameters of renal thiamin transport

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Veedamali S.; Subramanya, Sandeep B.; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu

    2010-01-01

    The renal thiamin reabsorption process plays an important role in regulating thiamin body homeostasis and involves both thiamin transporters-1 and -2 (THTR1 and THTR2). Chronic alcohol use is associated with thiamin deficiency. Although a variety of factors contribute to the development of this deficiency, effects of chronic alcohol use on renal thiamin transport have not been thoroughly examined. We addressed this issue by examining the effect of chronic alcohol feeding of rats with liquid diet on physiological and molecular parameters of renal thiamin transport. Chronic alcohol feeding caused a significant inhibition in carrier-mediated thiamin transport across the renal brush-border membrane and was evident as early as 2 wk after initiation of alcohol feeding. Similarly, thiamin transport across the renal basolateral membrane was significantly inhibited by chronic alcohol feeding. The inhibition in renal thiamin transport was associated with a marked decrease in the level of expression of THTR1 and -2 proteins, mRNAs, and heterogeneous nuclear RNAs. Chronic alcohol feeding also caused a significant reduction in the level of expression of thiamin pyrophosphokinase but not that of the mitochondrial thiamin pyrophosphate transporter. These studies show that chronic alcohol feeding inhibits the entry and exit of thiamin in the polarized renal epithelial cells and that the effect is, at least in part, mediated at the transcriptional level. These findings also suggest that chronic alcohol feeding interferes with the normal homeostasis of thiamin in renal epithelial cells. PMID:20427470

  18. The Potential Role of Catheter-Based Renal Sympathetic Denervation in Chronic and End-Stage Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Sata, Yusuke; Schlaich, Markus P

    2016-07-01

    Sympathetic activation is a hallmark of chronic and end-stage renal disease and adversely affects cardiovascular prognosis. Hypertension is present in the vast majority of these patients and plays a key role in the progressive deterioration of renal function and the high rate of cardiovascular events in this patient cohort. Augmentation of renin release, tubular sodium reabsorption, and renal vascular resistance are direct consequences of efferent renal sympathetic nerve stimulation and the major components of neural regulation of renal function. Renal afferent nerve activity directly influences sympathetic outflow to the kidneys and other highly innervated organs involved in blood pressure control via hypothalamic integration. Renal denervation of the kidney has been shown to reduce blood pressure in many experimental models of hypertension. Targeting the renal nerves directly may therefore be specifically useful in patients with chronic and end-stage renal disease. In this review, we will discuss the potential role of catheter-based renal denervation in patients with impaired kidney function and also reflect on the potential impact on other cardiovascular conditions commonly associated with chronic kidney disease such as heart failure and arrhythmias. PMID:26740184

  19. Crafting Core/Graded Shell-Shell Quantum Dots with Suppressed Re-absorption and Tunable Stokes Shift as High Optical Gain Materials.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaehan; Lin, Chun Hao; Yoon, Young Jun; Malak, Sidney T; Zhai, Yaxin; Thomas, Edwin L; Vardeny, Valy; Tsukruk, Vladimir V; Lin, Zhiqun

    2016-04-11

    The key to utilizing quantum dots (QDs) as lasing media is to effectively reduce non-radiative processes, such as Auger recombination and surface trapping. A robust strategy to craft a set of CdSe/Cd1-x Znx Se1-y Sy /ZnS core/graded shell-shell QDs with suppressed re-absorption, reduced Auger recombination rate, and tunable Stokes shift is presented. In sharp contrast to conventional CdSe/ZnS QDs, which have a large energy level mismatch between CdSe and ZnS and thus show strong re-absorption and a constrained Stokes shift, the as-synthesized CdSe/Cd1-x Znx Se1-y Sy /ZnS QDs exhibited the suppressed re-absorption of CdSe core and tunable Stokes shift as a direct consequence of the delocalization of the electron wavefunction over the entire QD. Such Stokes shift-engineered QDs with suppressed re-absorption may represent an important class of building blocks for use in lasers, light emitting diodes, solar concentrators, and parity-time symmetry materials and devices. PMID:26990250

  20. Isoform switching of type IV collagen is developmentally arrested in X-linked Alport syndrome leading to increased susceptibility of renal basement membranes to endoproteolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Kalluri, R; Shield, C F; Todd, P; Hudson, B G; Neilson, E G

    1997-01-01

    Normal glomerular capillaries filter plasma through a basement membrane (GBM) rich in alpha3(IV), alpha4(IV), and alpha5(IV) chains of type IV collagen. We now show that these latter isoforms are absent biochemically from the glomeruli in patients with X-linked Alport syndrome (XAS). Their GBM instead retain a fetal distribution of alpha1(IV) and alpha2(IV) isoforms because they fail to developmentally switch their alpha-chain use. The anomalous persistence of these fetal isoforms of type IV collagen in the GBM in XAS also confers an unexpected increase in susceptibility to proteolytic attack by collagenases and cathepsins. The incorporation of cysteine-rich alpha3(IV), alpha4(IV), and alpha5(IV) chains into specialized basement membranes like the GBM may have normally evolved to protectively enhance their resistance to proteolytic degradation at the site of glomerular filtration. The relative absence of these potentially protective collagen IV isoforms in GBM from XAS may explain the progressive basement membrane splitting and increased damage as these kidneys deteriorate. PMID:9153291

  1. Renal Autoregulation in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carlström, Mattias; Wilcox, Christopher S.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Intrarenal autoregulatory mechanisms maintain renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) independent of renal perfusion pressure (RPP) over a defined range (80–180 mmHg). Such autoregulation is mediated largely by the myogenic and the macula densa-tubuloglomerular feedback (MD-TGF) responses that regulate preglomerular vasomotor tone primarily of the afferent arteriole. Differences in response times allow separation of these mechanisms in the time and frequency domains. Mechanotransduction initiating the myogenic response requires a sensing mechanism activated by stretch of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and coupled to intracellular signaling pathways eliciting plasma membrane depolarization and a rise in cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). Proposed mechanosensors include epithelial sodium channels (ENaC), integrins, and/or transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Increased [Ca2+]i occurs predominantly by Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-operated Ca2+ channels (VOCC). Increased [Ca2+]i activates inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3R) and ryanodine receptors (RyR) to mobilize Ca2+ from sarcoplasmic reticular stores. Myogenic vasoconstriction is sustained by increased Ca2+ sensitivity, mediated by protein kinase C and Rho/Rho-kinase that favors a positive balance between myosin light-chain kinase and phosphatase. Increased RPP activates MD-TGF by transducing a signal of epithelial MD salt reabsorption to adjust afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction. A combination of vascular and tubular mechanisms, novel to the kidney, provides for high autoregulatory efficiency that maintains RBF and GFR, stabilizes sodium excretion, and buffers transmission of RPP to sensitive glomerular capillaries, thereby protecting against hypertensive barotrauma. A unique aspect of the myogenic response in the renal vasculature is modulation of its strength and speed by the MD-TGF and by a connecting tubule glomerular feedback (CT-GF) mechanism

  2. CNNM2, Encoding a Basolateral Protein Required for Renal Mg2+ Handling, Is Mutated in Dominant Hypomagnesemia

    PubMed Central

    Stuiver, Marchel; Lainez, Sergio; Will, Constanze; Terryn, Sara; Günzel, Dorothee; Debaix, Huguette; Sommer, Kerstin; Kopplin, Kathrin; Thumfart, Julia; Kampik, Nicole B.; Querfeld, Uwe; Willnow, Thomas E.; Němec, Vladimír; Wagner, Carsten A.; Hoenderop, Joost G.; Devuyst, Olivier; Knoers, Nine V.A.M.; Bindels, René J.; Meij, Iwan C.; Müller, Dominik

    2011-01-01

    Familial hypomagnesemia is a rare human disorder caused by renal or intestinal magnesium (Mg2+) wasting, which may lead to symptoms of Mg2+ depletion such as tetany, seizures, and cardiac arrhythmias. Our knowledge of the physiology of Mg2+ (re)absorption, particularly the luminal uptake of Mg2+ along the nephron, has benefitted from positional cloning approaches in families with Mg2+ reabsorption disorders; however, basolateral Mg2+ transport and its regulation are still poorly understood. Here, by using a candidate screening approach, we identified CNNM2 as a gene involved in renal Mg2+ handling in patients of two unrelated families with unexplained dominant hypomagnesemia. In the kidney, CNNM2 was predominantly found along the basolateral membrane of distal tubular segments involved in Mg2+ reabsorption. The basolateral localization of endogenous and recombinant CNNM2 was confirmed in epithelial kidney cell lines. Electrophysiological analysis showed that CNNM2 mediated Mg2+-sensitive Na+ currents that were significantly diminished in mutant protein and were blocked by increased extracellular Mg2+ concentrations. Our data support the findings of a recent genome-wide association study showing the CNNM2 locus to be associated with serum Mg2+ concentrations. The mutations found in CNNM2, its observed sensitivity to extracellular Mg2+, and its basolateral localization signify a critical role for CNNM2 in epithelial Mg2+ transport. PMID:21397062

  3. Effects of positive acceleration /+Gz/ on renal function and plasma renin in normal man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, M.; Shubrooks, S. J., Jr.; Fishman, L. M.; Duncan, D. C.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of positive radial centrifugation (+Gz) on plasma resin activity (PRA) and renal function were assessed in 15 normal male subjects under carefully controlled conditions of Na, K, and water intake. Twenty minutes of +2.0 Gz resulted in significant decreases in the mean rate of sodium excretion and creatine clearance and in a doubling of PRA in seven sodium-depleted subjects (10 meq Na intake). In eight sodium-replete subjects (200 mq Na intake), 30 min of +2.0 Gz was also associated with a decrease in the mean rate of sodium excretion. As a consequence of a concurrent decrease in creatine clearance, the fractional excretion of sodium during centrifugation did not differ from control, suggesting that the changes in Na excretion were mediated primarily by renal hemodynamic factors, although enhanced renal tubular sodium reabsorption may also have played a role.

  4. Renal Transporter-Mediated Drug-Drug Interactions: Are They Clinically Relevant?

    PubMed

    Lepist, Eve-Irene; Ray, Adrian S

    2016-07-01

    The kidney, through the distinct processes of passive glomerular filtration and active tubular secretion, plays an important role in the elimination of numerous endobiotics (eg, hormones, metabolites), toxins, nutrients, and drugs. Renal transport pathways mediating active tubular secretion and reabsorption in the proximal tubule are complex, involving apical and basolateral transporters acting in concert. Detailed studies of the molecular mechanisms of net active tubular secretion have established the involvement of multiple transporters with overlapping substrate specificity mediating competing secretion and reabsorption pathways. Although drug interactions arising from inhibition of renal transporters are rare relative to other mechanisms, they can involve commonly administered drugs (eg, cimetidine, metformin), may be underappreciated due to muted effects on plasma pharmacokinetics relative to tissue levels, can affect narrow-therapeutic-index medications (eg, antiarrhythmic, oncology medications), and may disproportionately affect sensitive populations where polypharmacy is common (eg, the elderly, diabetics). In particular, there is the potential for larger-magnitude interactions in subjects with reduced glomerular filtration rates due to the increased relative contribution of tubular secretion. The assessment of additional endpoints in drug-drug interaction studies including pharmacodynamics, positron emission tomography imaging, and metabolomics promises to expand our understanding of the clinical relevance of renal drug interactions. PMID:27385181

  5. Obesity-induced hypertension: interaction of neurohumoral and renal mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hall, John E; do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Wang, Zhen; Hall, Michael E

    2015-03-13

    Excess weight gain, especially when associated with increased visceral adiposity, is a major cause of hypertension, accounting for 65% to 75% of the risk for human primary (essential) hypertension. Increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption impairs pressure natriuresis and plays an important role in initiating obesity hypertension. The mediators of abnormal kidney function and increased blood pressure during development of obesity hypertension include (1) physical compression of the kidneys by fat in and around the kidneys, (2) activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and (3) increased sympathetic nervous system activity. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is likely due, in part, to renal compression, as well as sympathetic nervous system activation. However, obesity also causes mineralocorticoid receptor activation independent of aldosterone or angiotensin II. The mechanisms for sympathetic nervous system activation in obesity have not been fully elucidated but may require leptin and activation of the brain melanocortin system. With prolonged obesity and development of target organ injury, especially renal injury, obesity-associated hypertension becomes more difficult to control, often requiring multiple antihypertensive drugs and treatment of other risk factors, including dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus, and inflammation. Unless effective antiobesity drugs are developed, the effect of obesity on hypertension and related cardiovascular, renal and metabolic disorders is likely to become even more important in the future as the prevalence of obesity continues to increase. PMID:25767285

  6. OBESITY-INDUCED HYPERTENSION: INTERACTION OF NEUROHUMORAL AND RENAL MECHANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Hall, John E.; do Carmo, Jussara M.; da Silva, Alexandre A.; Wang, Zhen; Hall, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Excess weight gain, especially when associated with increased visceral adiposity, is a major cause of hypertension, accounting for 65–75% of the risk for human primary (essential) hypertension. Increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption impairs pressure natriuresis and plays an important role in initiating obesity hypertension. The mediators of abnormal kidney function and increased blood pressure during development of obesity hypertension include 1) physical compression of the kidneys by fat in and around the kidneys, 2) activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), and 3) increased sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity. Activation of the RAAS system is likely due, in part, to renal compression as well as SNS activation. However, obesity also causes mineralocorticoid receptor activation independent of aldosterone or angiotensin II. The mechanisms for SNS activation in obesity have not been fully elucidated but appear to require leptin and activation of the brain melanocortin system. With prolonged obesity and development of target organ injury, especially renal injury, obesity-associated hypertension becomes more difficult to control, often requiring multiple antihypertensive drugs and treatment of other risk factors, including dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and diabetes, and inflammation. Unless effective anti-obesity drugs are developed, the impact of obesity on hypertension and related cardiovascular, renal and metabolic disorders is likely to become even more important in the future as the prevalence of obesity continues to increase. PMID:25767285

  7. Effects of morphine on the renal handling of sodium and lithium in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    el-Awady, E S; Walker, L A

    1990-09-01

    The present study was carried out in order to assess the renal response to i.v. morphine in the rat, particularly the effects on tubular handling of sodium and lithium. Rats were prepared surgically with arterial and venous catheters and bladder cannulas. Clearance experiments and measurements of blood pressure and heart rate were carried out at least 4 days after surgery in unanesthetized animals. Intravenous administration of morphine (4 mg/kg b.wt.) caused a decrease in fractional sodium excretion, (at 90 min after injection, vehicle, 2.49 +/- 0.30% vs. morphine, 1.12 +/- 0.17%, P less than .05), in the absence of significant changes in systemic hemodynamics or glomerular filtration rate. This effect was prevented by pretreatment with naloxone. Enhanced proximal tubular reabsorption of sodium was considered as a possible explanation for the decrease in sodium excretion which followed morphine administration. Proximal tubular fluid reabsorption was estimated utilizing the lithium clearance method. Results indicated a reduction in fractional excretion of lithium by morphine administration (at 90 min, vehicle, 34.2 +/- 3.3% vs. morphine, 18.8 +/- 2.3%, P less than .05), which was also prevented by naloxone pretreatment. It is concluded that, under the present experimental conditions, morphine enhances tubular reabsorption of sodium by an opiate receptor-dependent mechanism and that this effect is, at least in part, localized in the proximal tubule. PMID:2395123

  8. Regulation of blood pressure and renal function by NCC and ENaC: lessons from genetically engineered mice.

    PubMed

    Verouti, Sophia N; Boscardin, Emilie; Hummler, Edith; Frateschi, Simona

    2015-04-01

    The activity of the thiazide-sensitive Na(+)/Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC) and of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) is pivotal for blood pressure regulation. NCC is responsible for Na(+) reabsorption in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT) of the nephron, while ENaC reabsorbs the filtered Na(+) in the late DCT and in the cortical collecting ducts (CCD) providing the final renal adjustment to Na(+) balance. Here, we aim to highlight the recent advances made using transgenic mouse models towards the understanding of the regulation of NCC and ENaC function relevant to the control of sodium balance and blood pressure. We thus like to pave the way for common mechanisms regulating these two sodium-transporting proteins and their potential implication in structural remodeling of the nephron segments and Na(+) and Cl(-) reabsorption. PMID:25613995

  9. Perinatal Taurine Alters Arterial Pressure Control and Renal Function in Adult Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Roysommuti, Sanya; Lerdweeraphon, Wichaporn; Malila, Pisamai; Jirakulsomchok, Dusit; Wyss, J. Michael

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigates the effect of perinatal taurine exposure on renal function in adult, female rats on a high sugar diet. Perinatal taurine depleted (TD), supplemented (TS) or untreated control (C) female offspring were fed normal rat chow and tap water (CW,TDW or TSW) or tap water with 5% glucose (CG, TDG or TSG) after weaning. At 7–8 weeks of age, renal function was studied in the conscious, restrained rats. Mean arterial pressure was significantly higher in TDW, TDG, and TSG rats. Plasma sodium concentration was significantly lower in all glucose treated animals, but the greatest decrease was in TDW rats. Basal renal blood flow was lowest in TSW and TSG, and the responses to a saline load were also lowest in those two groups. These changes were consistent with increased renal vascular resistance. The basal glomerular filtration rate was lowest in TSW, but the responses to a saline load were similar in all of the groups. Water excretion was lower in TSG and TSW, consistent with increased renal tubular water reabsorption. These data suggest that perinatal taurine exposure alters normal renal function and renal responses to dietary sugar in adult female offspring. PMID:19239145

  10. Mini-review: regulation of the renal NaCl cotransporter by hormones.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Vega, Lorena; Gamba, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    The renal thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter, NCC, is the major pathway for salt reabsorption in the distal convoluted tubule. The activity of this cotransporter is critical for regulation of several physiological variables such as blood pressure, serum potassium, acid base metabolism, and urinary calcium excretion. Therefore, it is not surprising that numerous hormone-signaling pathways regulate NCC activity to maintain homeostasis. In this review, we will provide an overview of the most recent evidence on NCC modulation by aldosterone, angiotensin II, vasopressin, glucocorticoids, insulin, norepinephrine, estradiol, progesterone, prolactin, and parathyroid hormone. PMID:26511649

  11. Renal Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Yendt, E. R.

    1970-01-01

    The pathogenesis of renal calculi is reviewed in general terms followed by the results of investigation of 439 patients with renal calculi studied by the author at Toronto General Hospital over a 13-year period. Abnormalities of probable pathogenetic significance were encountered in 76% of patients. Idiopathic hypercalciuria was encountered in 42% of patients, primary hyperparathyroidism in 11%, urinary infection in 8% and miscellaneous disorders in 8%. The incidence of uric acid stones and cystinuria was 5% and 2% respectively. In the remaining 24% of patients in whom no definite abnormalities were encountered the mean urinary magnesium excretion was less than normal. Of 180 patients with idiopathic hypercalciuria, only 24 were females. In the diagnosis of hyperparathyroidism, the importance of detecting minimal degrees of hypercalcemia is stressed; attention is also drawn to the new observation that the upper limit of normal for serum calcium is slightly lower in females than in males. The efficacy of various measures advocated for the prevention of renal calculi is also reviewed. In the author's experience the administration of thiazides has been particularly effective in the prevention of calcium stones. Thiazides cause a sustained reduction in urinary calcium excretion and increase in urinary magnesium excretion. These agents also appear to affect the skeleton by diminishing bone resorption and slowing down bone turnover. PMID:5438766

  12. Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zeisberg, Michael; Maeshima, Yohei; Mosterman, Barbara; Kalluri, Raghu

    2002-01-01

    During progression of chronic renal disease, qualitative and quantitative changes in the composition of tubular basement membranes (TBMs) and interstitial matrix occur. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-mediated activation of tubular epithelial cells (TECs) is speculated to be a key contributor to the progression of tubulointerstitial fibrosis. To further understand the pathogenesis associated with renal fibrosis, we developed an in vitro Boyden chamber system using renal basement membranes that partially mimics in vivo conditions of TECs during health and disease. Direct stimulation of TECs with TGF-β1/epithelial growth factor results in an increased migratory capacity across bovine TBM preparations. This is associated with increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) production, namely MMP-2 and MMP-9. Indirect chemotactic stimulation by TGF-β1/EGF or collagen type I was insufficient in inducing migration of untreated TECs across bovine TBM preparation, suggesting that basement membrane integrity and composition play an important role in protecting TECs from interstitial fibrotic stimuli. Additionally, neutralization of MMPs by COL-3 inhibitor dramatically decreases the capacity of TGF-β1-stimulated TECs to migrate through bovine TBM preparation. Collectively, these results demonstrate that basement membrane structure, integrity, and composition play an important role in determining interstitial influences on TECs and subsequent impact on potential aberrant cell-matrix interactions. PMID:12057905

  13. STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) is critical for sodium reabsorption in isolated, perfused thick ascending limb

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Joonho; Baum, Michel; Huang, Chou-Long

    2014-01-01

    SPAK [STE20 (sterile 20)/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase] kinase consists of a full-length (FL-) and an alternatively spliced kidney-specific (KS-) isoform. SPAK regulates the NaCl cotransporter (NCC) in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT). The relative abundance and role of FL- vs. KS-SPAK in regulating Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC2) in thick ascending limb (TAL) are not completely understood. Here, we report that FL-SPAK mRNA was the most abundant in medullary TAL (mTAL), followed by cortical TAL (cTAL) and DCT. KS-SPAK mRNA abundance was relatively lower than FL-SPAK. The ratios of FL-SPAK to KS-SPAK in mTAL, cTAL, and DCT were 12.3, 12.5, and 10.2, respectively. To examine the role of SPAK in the regulation of sodium transport in TAL, we used in vitro microperfusion of mTAL and cTAL isolated from wild-type (WT) and SPAK knockout mice (SPAK-KO) that lack both FL- and KS-SPAK. The rates of sodium absorption in cTAL and mTAL of SPAK-KO mice were 34.5 and 12.5% of WT tubules, respectively. The mRNA levels of related OSR1 kinase and SPAK protease Dnpep in SPAK-KO tubules were not significantly different from WT tubules. We next examined the role of SPAK in the regulation of sodium reabsorption by vasopressin in TAL. Vasopressin increased sodium reabsorption by ∼80% in both mTAL and cTAL from WT mice. While baseline sodium reabsorption was lower in SPAK-KO tubules, vasopressin increased sodium reabsorption over twofold. In conclusion, the combined net effect of SPAK isoforms on sodium reabsorption in TAL is stimulatory. SPAK is not essential for vasopressin stimulation of sodium reabsorption in TAL. PMID:25477470

  14. A computational model of cerebrospinal fluid production and reabsorption driven by Starling forces.

    PubMed

    Buishas, Joel; Gould, Ian G; Linninger, Andreas A

    2014-10-01

    Experimental evidence has cast doubt on the classical model of river-like cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow from the choroid plexus to the arachnoid granulations. We propose a novel model of water transport through the parenchyma from the microcirculation as driven by Starling forces. This model investigates the effect of osmotic pressure on water transport between the cerebral vasculature, the extracellular space (ECS), the perivascular space (PVS), and the CSF. A rigorous literature search was conducted focusing on experiments which alter the osmolarity of blood or ventricles and measure the rate of CSF production. Investigations into the effect of osmotic pressure on the volume of ventricles and the flux of ions in the blood, choroid plexus epithelium, and CSF are reviewed. Increasing the osmolarity of the serum via a bolus injection completely inhibits nascent fluid flow production in the ventricles. A continuous injection of a hyperosmolar solution into the ventricles can increase the volume of the ventricle by up to 125%. CSF production is altered by 0.231 μL per mOsm in the ventricle and by 0.835 μL per mOsm in the serum. Water flux from the ECS to the CSF is identified as a key feature of intracranial dynamics. A complete mathematical model with all equations and scenarios is fully described, as well as a guide to constructing a computational model of intracranial water balance dynamics. The model proposed in this article predicts the effects the osmolarity of ECS, blood, and CSF on water flux in the brain, establishing a link between osmotic imbalances and pathological conditions such as hydrocephalus and edema. PMID:25358881

  15. New insights into diuretic use in patients with chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Christopher S

    2002-03-01

    Patients with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) or the nephrotic syndrome frequently manifest diuretic resistance. Factors limiting diuretic responsiveness in patients with CRI may include a reduced basal level of fractional Na(+) reabsorption that places an upper limit on diuretic response, and enhanced NaCl reabsorption in downstream segments, combined with a reduced delivery of diuretic to the kidney. Diuretics are secreted by the recently characterized organic anion transporters (OATs), which are expressed in proximal tubule cells. Secretion may be inhibited by retained organic anions, urate, or acidosis. These limitations necessitate an increased diuretic dosage, up to a defined ceiling level, and consideration of the use of a nonrenally metabolized loop diuretic rather than furosemide. Diuretic responsiveness in patients with the nephrotic syndrome is limited by avid Na(+) reabsorption by the terminal nephron. Experimental studies have shown that a reduced serum albumin concentration can increase the volume of distribution of loop diuretics, reduce their tubular secretion, and enhance the inactivation of furosemide within the kidney by glucuronidization. Binding of loop diuretics can curtail their action in the loop of Henle. Recent clinical investigations have challenged the importance of some of these mechanisms that were identified in animal models. Strategies to improve loop diuretic responsiveness include increasing diuretic dosage, concurrent use of a thiazide diuretic to inhibit downstream NaCl reabsorption and attempts to maximally reduce albumin excretion. Strategies to limit albumin excretion include the use of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or an angiotensin receptor blocker and appropriate limitation of protein intake. These measures are more logical, effective, and less expensive than infusion of albumin solutions. PMID:11856788

  16. Proximal renal tubular acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    Renal tubular acidosis - proximal; Type II RTA; RTA - proximal; Renal tubular acidosis type II ... by alkaline substances, mainly bicarbonate. Proximal renal tubular acidosis (Type II RTA) occurs when bicarbonate is not ...

  17. A Novel Member of the Trehalose Transporter Family Functions as an H+-Dependent Trehalose Transporter in the Reabsorption of Trehalose in Malpighian Tubules

    PubMed Central

    Kikuta, Shingo; Hagiwara-Komoda, Yuka; Noda, Hiroaki; Kikawada, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    In insects, Malpighian tubules are functionally analogous to mammalian kidneys in that they not only are essential to excrete waste molecules into the lumen but also are responsible for the reabsorption of indispensable molecules, such as sugars, from the lumen to the principal cells. Among sugars, the disaccharide trehalose is highly important to insects because it is the main hemolymph sugar to serve as a source of energy and carbon. The trehalose transporter TRET1 participates in the transfer of newly synthesized trehalose from the fat body across the cellular membrane into the hemolymph. Although transport proteins must play a pivotal role in the reabsorption of trehalose in Malpighian tubules, the molecular context underlying this process remains obscure. Previously, we identified a Tret1 homolog (Nlst8) that is expressed principally in the Malpighian tubules of the brown planthopper (BPH). Here, we used the Xenopus oocyte expression system to show that NlST8 exerts trehalose transport activity that is elevated under low pH conditions. These functional assays indicate that Nlst8 encodes a proton-dependent trehalose transporter (H-TRET1). To examine the involvement of Nlst8 in trehalose reabsorption, we analyzed the sugar composition of honeydew by using BPH with RNAi gene silencing. Trehalose was detected in the honeydew as waste excreted from Nlst8-dsRNA-injected BPH under hyperglycemic conditions. However, trehalose was not expelled from GFP-dsRNA-injected BPH even under hyperglycemic conditions. We conclude that NlST8 could participate in trehalose reabsorption driven by a H+ gradient from the lumen to the principal cells of the Malpighian tubules. PMID:22934042

  18. Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Persu, Alexandre; Renkin, Jean; Thijs, Lutgarde; Staessen, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    The term “ultima ratio” has multiple, though related, meanings. The motto “ultima ratio regum,” cast on the cannons of the French army of King Louis XIV, meant that war is the last argument of kings, that is, the one to be used after all diplomatic arguments have failed. Along similar lines, we propose that, given the current evidence, renal denervation should be used as a last resort, after state-of-the-art drug treatment optimized at expert centers failed to control blood pressure. PMID:22851728

  19. Temporal changes in floral nectar production, reabsorption, and composition associated with dichogamy in annual caraway (Carum carvi; Apiaceae).

    PubMed

    Langenberger, Michael W; Davis, Arthur R

    2002-10-01

    The dynamics of nectar production were studied in perfect florets of two varieties (Karzo, Moran) of annual caraway (Carum carvi L., Apiaceae). Florets were protandrous and strongly dichogamous, lasting 7-15 d but producing nectar from the stylopodia for 4-12 d, in an interrupted fashion. Nectar secretion began during a floret's phase of stamen elongation and anther dehiscence. After reabsorption of uncollected nectar, at which point nectary surfaces were completely dry, the two styles elongated and a second bout of secretion commenced during the female phase, up to 5 d later, when a floret became receptive to pollination. During the male and female phases, respectively, 0.392 ± 0.064 μL and 1.083 ± 0.261 μL of nectar of similar solute concentration (844 mg/mL) was produced per ten florets. On a daily basis, florets yielded 1.5-fold more nectar in the female than during the male phase. First-time nectar removal throughout the female phase did not match the sum of nectar quantities from male and female phases combined, suggesting that under natural conditions, any uncollected male-phase nectar, once reabsorbed, is not made available to visitors of the same florets when in the female phase. Nectar-sugar composition differed between bouts of secretion; it was hexose-rich (59.6% fructose, 26.9% glucose, 13.6% sucrose) initially, but hexose-dominant (70.2, 26.8, 3.1) during the female phase. A 5.7-fold difference in mean nectar production per floret occurred among plants. PMID:21665585

  20. Effects of central administration of morphine on renal function in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Danesh, S; Walker, L A

    1988-02-01

    Systemic administration of morphine in rats produces an anti-natriuretic effect that is at least partially dependent on renal nerves. The present studies were carried out in order to assess the renal response to central administration of morphine. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were surgically prepared with arterial, venous and bladder cannulas. In addition, a guide cannula was placed into the lateral ventrical and secured to the surface of the skull. Experiments were carried out at least 3 days after surgery. Renal clearance measurements were 30 min each. After a basal period, morphine sulfate (4 micrograms/4 microliters) or vehicle was injected into the lateral cerebral ventricle. Two clearance measurements were obtained, followed by central administration of naloxone HCl (4 micrograms/4 microliters) or vehicle and two more clearance periods. Morphine administration had no effect on blood pressure or heart rate but caused a sharp reduction in sodium excretion (3200 +/- 958 vs 970 +/- 158 nEq/100 g/min in period 5; P less than .05). This response was reversed by the addition of naloxone (3280 +/- 583 nEq/100 g/min in period 5; P less than .05). Furthermore, morphine had no effect on renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate. Naloxone increased the renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate in morphine-treated rats, whereas it had no effect in controls. It is concluded that central administration of morphine in conscious rats enhances renal tubular sodium reabsorption by an opiate receptor-dependent mechanism. PMID:3346840

  1. SLC5 Sodium-Anion Cotransporters and Renal Urate Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, David B.; Kwon, Charles Y.; Plata, Consuelo; Romero, Michael F.; Zandi-Nejad, Kambiz

    2007-04-01

    Renal urate transport plays a key role in determining the concentration of circulating uric acid. The reabsorption of filtered urate by the renal proximal tubule appears to require apical sodium-dependent anion transport and the apical URAT1 urate-anion exchanger, in that sodium-dependent transport of lactate, ketoacids, nicotinate, and pyrazinoate (PZA) increases the intracellular concentration of substrates for the subsequent exchange with luminal urate. We have identified SLC5A8 and SLC5A12 as candidates for the sodium-anion cotransporter that collaborates with URAT1. Both transporters function as sodium-dependent nicotinate/monocarboxylate/PZA transporters. Localization studies reveal serial co-expression of these transporters with URAT1, with Slc5a12 in the early proximal tubule and Slc5a8 in S2 and S3 segments. Renal urate excretion is conceivably affected by changes in the activity of SLC5A8, SLC5A12, and/or URAT1, with implications for the pathogenesis of hyperuricemia, nephrolithiasis, and related disorders.

  2. Age-related changes in the renal dopaminergic system and expression of renal amino acid transporters in WKY and SHR rats.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Vanda; Amaral, João; Silva, Elisabete; Simão, Sónia; Cabral, José Miguel; Afonso, Joana; Serrão, Maria Paula; Gomes, Pedro; Pinho, Maria João; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2011-01-01

    This study examined age-related changes in renal dopaminergic activity and expression of amino acid transporters potentially involved in renal tubular uptake of l-DOPA in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats. Aging (from 13 to 91 weeks) was accompanied by increases in systolic blood pressure (SBP) in both WKY and SHR. The sum of urinary dopamine and DOPAC and the urinary dopamine/l-DOPA ratio were increased in aged SHR but not in aged WKY. The urinary dopamine/renal delivery of l-DOPA ratio was increased in both rat strains with aging. LAT2 abundance was increased in aged WKY and SHR. The expression of 4F2hc was markedly elevated in aged SHR but not in aged WKY. ASCT2 was upregulated in both aged WKY and SHR. Plasma aldosterone levels and urinary noradrenaline levels were increased in aged WKY and SHR though levels of both entities were more elevated in aged SHR. Activation of the renal dopaminergic system is more pronounced in aged SHR than in aged WKY and is associated with an upregulation of renal cortical ASCT2 in WKY and of LAT2/4F2hc and ASCT2 in SHR. This activation may be the consequence of a counter-regulatory mechanism for stimuli leading to sodium reabsorption. PMID:21699911

  3. Decrease in transient receptor potential melastatin 6 mRNA stability caused by rapamycin in renal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ikari, Akira; Sanada, Ayumi; Sawada, Hayato; Okude, Chiaki; Tonegawa, Chie; Sugatani, Junko

    2011-06-01

    Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), is used in treatments for transplantation and cancer. Rapamycin causes hypomagnesemia, although precisely how has not been examined. Here, we investigated the effect of rapamycin on the expression of transient receptor potential melastatin 6 (TRPM6), a Mg2+ channel. Rapamycin and LY-294002, an inhibitor of phosphatidilinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) located upstream of mTOR, inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced expression of the TRPM6 protein without affecting TRPM7 expression in rat renal NRK-52E epithelial cells. Both rapamycin and LY-294002 decreased EGF-induced Mg2+ influx. U0126, a MEK inhibitor, inhibited EGF-induced increases in c-Fos, p-ERK, and TRPM6 levels. In contrast, neither rapamycin nor LY-294002 inhibited EGF-induced increases in p-ERK and c-Fos levels. EGF increased p-Akt level, an effect inhibited by LY-294002 and 1L-6-hydroxymethyl-chiro-inositol2-[(R)-2-O-methyl-3-O-octadecylcarbonate] (Akt inhibitor). Akt inhibitor decreased TRPM6 level similar to rapamycin and LY-294002. These results suggest that a PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway is involved in the regulation of TRPM6 expression. Rapamycin inhibited the EGF-induced increase in TRPM6 mRNA but did not inhibit human TRPM6 promoter activity. In the presence of actinomycin D, a transcriptional inhibitor, rapamycin accelerated the decrease in TRPM6 mRNA. Rapamycin decreased the expression and activity of a luciferase linked with the 3'-untranslated region of human TRPM6 mRNA. These results suggest that TRPM6 expression is up-regulated by a PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway and rapamycin reduces TRPM6 mRNA stability, resulting in a decrease in the reabsorption of Mg2+. PMID:21073857

  4. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of lysozyme in renal proximal tubules of the frog Rana temporaria.

    PubMed

    Seliverstova, E V; Prutskova, N P

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of protein reabsorption in the kidney of lower vertebrates remains insufficiently investigated in spite of raising interest to the amphibian and fish kidneys as a useful model for physiological and pathophysiological examinations. In the present study, we examined the renal tubular uptake and the internalization rote of lysozyme after its intravenous injection in the wintering frog Rana temporaria using immunohisto- and immunocytochemistry and specific markers for some endocytic compartments. The distinct expression of megalin and cubilin in the proximal tubule cells of lysozyme-injected frogs was revealed whereas kidney tissue of control animals showed no positive immunoreactivity. Lysozyme was detected in the apical endocytic compartment of the tubular cells and colocalized with clathrin 10 min after injection. After 20 min, lysozyme was located in the subapical compartment negative to clathrin (endosomes), and intracellular trafficking of lysozyme was coincided with the distribution of megalin and cubilin. However, internalized protein was retained in the endosomes and did not reach lysosomes within 30 min after treatment that may indicate the inhibition of intracellular trafficking in hibernating frogs. For the first time, we provided the evidence that lysozyme is filtered through the glomeruli and absorbed by receptor-mediated clathrin-dependent endocytosis in the frog proximal tubule cells. Thus, the protein uptake in the amphibian mesonephros is mediated by megalin and cubilin that confirms a critical role of endocytic receptors in the renal reabsorption of proteins in amphibians as in mammals. PMID:26150156

  5. Kappa-opioid-receptor agonists modulate the renal excretion of water and electrolytes in anaesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Ashton, N; Balment, R J; Blackburn, T P

    1990-01-01

    1. Subcutaneous injection of the kappa-opioid agonists U50,488 (10 mg kg-1) and tifluadom (3.5 mg kg-1) into Inactin-anaesthetized, saline-infused rats was associated with a diuresis, antinatriuresis and antikaliuresis which lasted for up to 2 h. A high (5 mg kg-1), but not low (0.1 mg kg-1), dose of naloxone blocked the renal effects of U50,488. 2. U50,488 administration in anaesthetized, vasopressin-deficient Brattleboro DI rats was associated with an attenuated diuresis, though the antinatriuretic response remained intact. 3. The diuretic action of U50,488 was associated with an increase in glomerular filtration rate while fractional fluid reabsorption remained steady. In contrast, fractional sodium and potassium reabsorption were increased. 4. These data suggest that kappa-opioid agonists alter renal handling of both water and electrolytes. This appears to be mediated by two separate mechanisms: increased fluid loss largely reflects altered glomerular events while the fall in electrolyte excretion results from altered tubular handling. PMID:2158834

  6. SGLT2 Inhibitors: Glucotoxicity and Tumorigenesis Downstream the Renal Proximal Tubule?

    PubMed

    Bertinat, Romina; Nualart, Francisco; Yáñez, Alejandro J

    2016-08-01

    At present, diabetes mellitus is the main cause of end-stage renal disease. Effective glycaemic management is the most powerful tool to delay the establishment of diabetic complications, such as diabetic kidney disease. Together with reducing blood glucose levels, new anti-diabetic agents are expected not only to control the progression but also to restore known defects of the diabetic kidney. Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are promising anti-diabetic agents that reduce hyperglycaemia by impairing glucose reabsorption in proximal tubule of the kidney and increasing glucosuria. SGLT2 inhibitors have shown to reduce glucotoxicity in isolated proximal tubule cells and also to attenuate expression of markers of overall kidney damage in experimental animal models of diabetes, but the actual renoprotective effect for downstream nephron segments is still unknown and deserves further attention. Here, we briefly discuss possible undesired effects of enhanced glucosuria and albuminuria in nephron segments beyond the proximal tubule after SGLT2 inhibitor treatment, offering new lines of research to further understand the renoprotective action of these anti-diabetic agents. Strategies blocking glucose reabsorption by renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (RPTEC) may be protective for RPTEC, but downstream nephron segments will still be exposed to high glucose and albumin levels through the luminal face. The actual effect of constant enhanced glucosuria over distal nephron segments remains to be established. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1635-1637, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26661279

  7. Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis of Lysozyme in Renal Proximal Tubules of the Frog Rana Temporaria

    PubMed Central

    Seliverstova, E.V.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of protein reabsorption in the kidney of lower vertebrates remains insufficiently investigated in spite of raising interest to the amphibian and fish kidneys as a useful model for physiological and pathophysiological examinations. In the present study, we examined the renal tubular uptake and the internalization rote of lysozyme after its intravenous injection in the wintering frog Rana temporaria using immunohisto- and immunocytochemistry and specific markers for some endocytic compartments. The distinct expression of megalin and cubilin in the proximal tubule cells of lysozyme-injected frogs was revealed whereas kidney tissue of control animals showed no positive immunoreactivity. Lysozyme was detected in the apical endocytic compartment of the tubular cells and colocalized with clathrin 10 min after injection. After 20 min, lysozyme was located in the subapical compartment negative to clathrin (endo-somes), and intracellular trafficking of lysozyme was coincided with the distribution of megalin and cubilin. However, internalized protein was retained in the endosomes and did not reach lysosomes within 30 min after treatment that may indicate the inhibition of intra-cellular trafficking in hibernating frogs. For the first time, we provided the evidence that lysozyme is filtered through the glomeruli and absorbed by receptor-mediated clathrin-dependent endocytosis in the frog proximal tubule cells. Thus, the protein uptake in the amphibian mesonephros is mediated by megalin and cubilin that confirms a critical role of endocytic receptors in the renal reabsorption of proteins in amphibians as in mammals. PMID:26150156

  8. Impairment of renal sodium excretion in tropical residents - phenomenological analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, S. K.; Aryee, P. A.; Amuasi, J.; Hesse, I. F. A.; Affram, R. K.

    There is evidence of impaired renal sodium excretion in salt-sensitive African Blacks. A decreased rate of renal sodium chloride (NaCl) excretion, low plasma renin activity and a tendency to elevated blood pressure are the hallmarks of salt sensitivity. Recent evidence indicates that increased proximal and distal tubular fluid reabsorption in some tropical residents may explain the impaired sodium excretion in these people. In this study of a cohort population, we speculated that subjects selected from that population might be salt-sensitive. We therefore measured the sodium balance in 10 normotensive male subjects over 10 consecutive days, after they had ingested a normal or a high amount of sodium, as NaCl (salt) in their diet. We quantified their renal sodium excretion rate by phenomenological analysis of their sodium balance data. We also measured plasma renin activity for 7 consecutive days in a separate group of 6 male and 4 female subjects in order to assess the state of their renin/angiotensin system. We selected all our subjects from a cohort population of 269 subjects randomly selected from a community known to have a high prevalence of primary hypertension. Our data on two separate groups of subjects from the same cohort population revealed delayed renal sodium excretion with t1/2 of about 5 days, compared to published data for normal individuals with t1/2 of less than 24 h. Also, plasma renin activity levels were low. Hence, our subjects are salt-sensitive. Quantification of their renal impairment is important for various reasons: it heightens one's appreciation of the problem of salt retention in African Blacks who are salt-sensitive and it also underlines the importance of the need for further research into the benefits of dietary salt restriction for reducing cardiovascular mortality in African populations, as has been done in some Western countries.

  9. Interaction between the renal excretion rates of beta 2-microglobulin and tobramycin in man.

    PubMed

    Vree, T B; Zweens, K; Huige, P J; Guelen, P J; Jongman-Nix, B

    1984-03-27

    The renal excretion rate of beta 2-microglobulin in man is 127 +/- 98 ng/min at alkaline urine pH (pH 7). Tobramycin, up to intravenous doses of 160 mg (2 mg/kg) does not increase the renal excretion rate of beta 2-microglobulin. Tobramycin must have less affinity than gentamicin for the tubular system for active reabsorption of amino groups containing organic compounds. Due to this reduced affinity tobramycin will be absorbed less by the proximal tubular cells, which may be one of the reasons for tobramycin being less toxic than gentamicin. beta 2-Microglobulin excretion can be used as a parameter for the relative binding affinity of aminoglycosides. PMID:6370509

  10. Role of the Collecting Duct Renin Angiotensin System in Regulation of Blood Pressure and Renal Function.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, Nirupama; Kohan, Donald E

    2016-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the renal tubular renin angiotensin system regulates urinary Na(+) and water excretion and blood pressure. Three key components of the tubular renin angiotensin system, namely renin, prorenin receptor, and angiotensin-II type 1 receptor, are localized to the collecting duct. This system may modulate collecting duct Na(+) and water reabsorption via angiotensin-II-dependent and angiotensin-II-independent pathways. Further, the system may be of greatest relevance in hypertensive states and particularly those characterized by high circulating angiotensin-II. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the synthesis, regulation, and function of collecting duct-derived renin angiotensin system components and examine recent developments with regard to regulation of blood pressure and renal fluid and Na(+) excretion. PMID:26951246

  11. A novel description of FDG excretion in the renal system: application to metformin-treated models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbarino, S.; Caviglia, G.; Sambuceti, G.; Benvenuto, F.; Piana, M.

    2014-05-01

    This paper introduces a novel compartmental model describing the excretion of 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) in the renal system and a numerical method based on the maximum likelihood for its reduction. This approach accounts for variations in FDG concentration due to water re-absorption in renal tubules and the increase of the bladder’s volume during the FDG excretion process. From the computational viewpoint, the reconstruction of the tracer kinetic parameters is obtained by solving the maximum likelihood problem iteratively, using a non-stationary, steepest descent approach that explicitly accounts for the Poisson nature of nuclear medicine data. The reliability of the method is validated against two sets of synthetic data realized according to realistic conditions. Finally we applied this model to describe FDG excretion in the case of animal models treated with metformin. In particular we show that our approach allows the quantitative estimation of the reduction of FDG de-phosphorylation induced by metformin.

  12. Mineralocorticoid-induced sodium appetite and renal salt retention: evidence for common signaling and effector mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yiling; Vallon, Volker

    2014-01-01

    An increase in renal sodium chloride (salt) retention and an increase in sodium appetite are the body's responses to salt restriction or depletion in order to restore salt balance. Renal salt retention and increased sodium appetite can also be maladaptive and sustain the pathophysiology in conditions like salt-sensitive hypertension and chronic heart failure. Here we review the central role of the mineralocorticoid aldosterone in both the increase in renal salt reabsorption and sodium appetite. We discuss the working hypothesis that aldosterone activates similar signaling and effector mechanisms in the kidney and brain, including the mineralocorticoid receptor, the serum- and glucocorticoid-induced kinase SGK1, the ubiquitin ligase NEDD4-2, and the epithelial sodium channel ENaC. The latter also mediates the gustatory salt sensing in the tongue, which is required for the manifestation of increased salt intake. Effects of aldosterone on both the brain and kidney synergize with the effects of angiotensin II. Thus, mineralocorticoids appear to induce similar molecular pathways in the kidney, brain, and possibly tongue, which could provide opportunities for more effective therapeutic interventions. Inhibition of renal salt reabsorption is compensated by stimulation of salt appetite and vice versa; targeting both mechanisms should be more effective. Inhibiting the arousal to consume salty food may improve a patient's compliance to reducing salt intake. While a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms is needed and will provide new therapeutic options, current pharmacological interventions that target both salt retention and sodium appetite include mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and potentially inhibitors of angiotensin II and ENaC. PMID:25376899

  13. Mineralocorticoid-induced sodium appetite and renal salt retention: Evidence for common signaling and effector mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yiling; Vallon, Volker

    2014-01-01

    An increase in renal sodium chloride (salt) retention and an increase in sodium appetite is the body's response to salt restriction or depletion in order to restore salt balance. Renal salt retention and increased sodium appetite can also be maladaptive and sustain the pathophysiology in conditions like salt-sensitive hypertension and chronic heart failure. Here we review the central role of the mineralocorticoid aldosterone in both the increase in renal salt reabsorption and sodium appetite. We discuss the working hypothesis that aldosterone activates similar signaling and effector mechanisms in the kidney and brain, including the mineralocorticoid receptor, the serum-and-glucocorticoid-induced kinase SGK1, the ubiquitin ligase NEDD4-2, and the epithelial sodium channel ENaC. The latter also mediates the gustatory salt sensing in the tongue, which is required for the manifestation of increased salt intake. Effects of aldosterone on both brain and kidney synergize with the effects of angiotensin II. Thus, mineralocorticoids appear to induce similar molecular pathways in the kidney, brain, and possibly tongue, which could provide opportunities for more effective therapeutic interventions. Inhibition of renal salt reabsorption is compensated by stimulation of salt appetite and vice versa; targeting both mechanisms should be more effective. Inhibiting the arousal to consume salty food may improve a patient's compliance to reducing salt intake. While a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms is needed and will provide new options, current pharmacological interventions that target both salt retention and sodium appetite include mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and potentially inhibitors of angiotensin II and ENaC. PMID:25376899

  14. The rectal complex and Malpighian tubules of the cabbage looper (Trichoplusia ni): regional variations in Na+ and K+ transport and cation reabsorption by secondary cells.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Michael J; Ruiz-Sanchez, Esau

    2015-10-01

    In larvae of most Lepidoptera the distal ends of the Malpighian tubules are closely applied to the rectal epithelia and are ensheathed within the perinephric membrane, thus forming the rectal complex. The cryptonephric Malpighian tubules within the rectal complex are bathed in fluid within a functional compartment, the perinephric space, which is separate from the haemolymph. In this study, the scanning ion-selective electrode technique (SIET) was used to measure transport of Na(+) and K(+) across the rectal complex and across multiple regions of the Malpighian tubules of larvae of the cabbage looper Trichoplusia ni. Measurements were made in an intact preparation in which connections of the tubules upstream to the rectal complex and downstream to the urinary bladder and gut remained intact. SIET measurements revealed reabsorption of Na(+) and K(+) across the intact rectal complex and into the bath (haemolymph), with K(+) fluxes approximately twice as large as those of Na(+). Analyses of fluxes in larvae with empty guts, found in recently moulted larvae, versus those with full guts highlighted differences in the rates of K(+) or Na(+) transport within tubule regions that appeared morphologically homogeneous, such as the rectal lead. The distal rectal lead of larvae with empty guts reabsorbed K(+), whereas the same region secreted K(+) in tubules of larvae with full guts. SIET measurements of the ileac plexus also indicated a novel role for secondary (type II) cells in cation reabsorption. Secondary cells reabsorb K(+), whereas the adjacent principal (type I) cells secrete K(+). Na(+) is reabsorbed by both principal and secondary cells, but the rate of reabsorption by the secondary cells is approximately twice the rate in the adjacent principal cells. PMID:26491192

  15. Inherited renal cystic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bohyun; King, Bernard F; Vrtiska, Terri J; Irazabal, Maria V; Torres, Vicente E; Harris, Peter C

    2016-06-01

    A number of inherited renal diseases present with renal cysts and often lead to end-stage renal disease. With recent advances in genetics, increasing number of genes and mutations have been associated with cystic renal diseases. Although genetic testing can provide a definite diagnosis, it is often reserved for equivocal cases or for ongoing investigational research. Therefore, imaging findings are essential in the routine diagnosis, follow-up, and detection of complications in patients with inherited cystic renal diseases. In this article, the most recent classification, genetic analysis, clinical presentations, and imaging findings of inherited cystic renal diseases will be discussed. PMID:27167233

  16. Melamine Impairs Renal and Vascular Function in Rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiao Yu; Wong, Wing Tak; Lau, Chi Wai; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Cheang, Wai San; Liu, Jian; Lu, Ye; Huang, Huihui; Xia, Yin; Chen, Zhen Yu; Mok, Chuen-Shing; Lau, Chau-Ming; Huang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Melamine incident, linked to nephrotoxicity and kidney stone in infants previously exposed to melamine-contaminated milk products, was unprecedentedly grave in China in 2008 as little was known about the mechanistic process leading to renal dysfunction in affected children. This study investigates whether neonatal ingestion of melamine leads to renal and vascular dysfunction in adulthood; and whether ingestion of melamine in pregnant rats leads to renal dysfunction in their offspring. A combination of approaches employed includes functional studies in rat renal arteries, renal blood flow measurement by functional magnetic resonance imaging, assay for pro-inflammatory and fibrotic biomarkers, immunohistochemistry, and detection of plasma and renal melamine. We provide mechanistic evidence showing for the first time that melamine reduces renal blood flow and impairs renal and vascular function associated with overexpression of inflammatory markers, transforming growth factor-β1, bone morphogenic protein 4 and cyclooxygenase-2 in kidney and renal vasculature. Melamine also induces renal inflammation and fibrosis. More importantly, melamine causes nephropathies in offsprings from pregnant rat exposed to melamine during pregnancy, as well as in neonatal rat exposed to melamine afterbirth, thus supporting the clinical observations of kidney stone and acute renal failure in infants consuming melamine-contaminated milk products. PMID:27324576

  17. Melamine Impairs Renal and Vascular Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiao Yu; Wong, Wing Tak; Lau, Chi Wai; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Cheang, Wai San; Liu, Jian; Lu, Ye; Huang, Huihui; Xia, Yin; Chen, Zhen Yu; Mok, Chuen-Shing; Lau, Chau-Ming; Huang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Melamine incident, linked to nephrotoxicity and kidney stone in infants previously exposed to melamine-contaminated milk products, was unprecedentedly grave in China in 2008 as little was known about the mechanistic process leading to renal dysfunction in affected children. This study investigates whether neonatal ingestion of melamine leads to renal and vascular dysfunction in adulthood; and whether ingestion of melamine in pregnant rats leads to renal dysfunction in their offspring. A combination of approaches employed includes functional studies in rat renal arteries, renal blood flow measurement by functional magnetic resonance imaging, assay for pro-inflammatory and fibrotic biomarkers, immunohistochemistry, and detection of plasma and renal melamine. We provide mechanistic evidence showing for the first time that melamine reduces renal blood flow and impairs renal and vascular function associated with overexpression of inflammatory markers, transforming growth factor-β1, bone morphogenic protein 4 and cyclooxygenase-2 in kidney and renal vasculature. Melamine also induces renal inflammation and fibrosis. More importantly, melamine causes nephropathies in offsprings from pregnant rat exposed to melamine during pregnancy, as well as in neonatal rat exposed to melamine afterbirth, thus supporting the clinical observations of kidney stone and acute renal failure in infants consuming melamine-contaminated milk products. PMID:27324576

  18. Renal cell cancer and exposure to gasoline: a review.

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, J K

    1993-01-01

    A review of the epidemiology of renal cell cancer is presented. Risk factors for renal cell cancer such as cigarette smoking, obesity, diet, and use of analgesics and prescription diuretics are examined. Although uncommon, occupational risk factors are also reviewed. Studies examining gasoline exposure and renal cell cancer are evaluated, including investigations recently presented at a meeting on this topic. Overall, most studies find no link between gasoline exposure and renal cell cancer; moreover, the experimental evidence that initiated the health concern is no longer considered relevant to humans. Positive associations, however, reported in two recent studies prevent a firm conclusion of no risk for this exposure. PMID:8020434

  19. Renal vein thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kidneys. Possible Complications Complications may include: Acute renal failure (especially if thrombosis occurs in a dehydrated child) ... Saunders; 2012:chap 34. Read More Acute kidney failure Arteriogram Blood ... embolus Renal Tumor Update Date 5/19/2015 Updated by: ...

  20. Renal papillary necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your provider. Alternative Names Necrosis - renal papillae; Renal medullary necrosis Images Kidney anatomy Kidney - blood and urine flow References Ruggenenti P, Cravedi P, Remuzzi G. Microvascular and macrovascular diseases of the kidney. In: Taal MW, Chertow GM, ...

  1. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... renal function using ureteral stenting, nephrostomy, surgery or dialysis. What is kidney (renal) failure? How is kidney ... as a urinary stent or kidney stone removal. Dialysis , including hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis: These procedures remove ...

  2. Renal papillary necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... renal papillary necrosis, especially after taking over-the-counter pain medicines ... diabetes or sickle cell anemia may reduce your risk. To prevent renal ... over-the-counter pain relievers. Do not take more than the ...

  3. Cardio-renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gnanaraj, Joseph; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Cardio-renal syndrome is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. The purpose of this article is to highlight the interaction between the cardiovascular system and the renal system and how their interaction results in the complex syndrome of cardio-renal dysfunction. Additionally, we outline the available therapeutic strategies to manage this complex syndrome.

  4. Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tao; Guo, Jin-he; Teng, Gao-jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a group of metabolic diseases of multiple etiologies. Although great progress has been made, researchers are still working on the pathogenesis of T2DM and how to best use the treatments available. Aside from several novel pharmacological approaches, catheter-based sympathetic renal denervation (RDN) has gained a significant role in resistant hypertension, as well as improvements in glycemic control in T2DM. In this article, we will summarize herein the role sympathetic activation plays in the progression of T2DM and review the recent clinical RDN experience in glucose metabolism. We performed systematic review in online databases, including PubMed, EmBase, and Web of Science, from inception until 2015. Studies were included if a statistical relationship was investigated between RDN and T2DM. The quality of each included study was assessed by Newcastle–Ottawa scale score. To synthesize these studies, a random-effects model or a fixed-effects model was applied as appropriate. Then, we calculated heterogeneity, performed sensitivity analysis, tested publication bias, and did meta-regression analysis. Finally, we identified 4 eligible articles. In most studies, RDN achieved via novel catheter-based approach using radiofrequency energy has gained a significant role in resistant hypertension, as well as improvements in glycemic control in T2DM. But the DREAMS-Study showed that RDN did not change median insulin sensitivity nor systemic sympathetic activity. Firstly, the current published studies lacked a proper control group, along with the sample capacity was small. Also, data obtained in the subgroups of diabetic patients were not separately analyzed and the follow-up period was very short. In addition, a reduction in blood pressure accounts for the improvements in glucose metabolism and insulin resistance cannot be excluded. If the favorable result of better glucose metabolism is confirmed in large-scale, randomized studies

  5. [Capacities of examination of renal function at excretory urography].

    PubMed

    Bosin, V Iu; Zyrianov, V Iu

    2004-01-01

    The study was undertaken to enhance the diagnostic capacities of excretory urography in evaluating renal function, by determining the renal clearance of a contrast medium. The main task of the study was to develop bloodless and rather reliable ways of estimating the volume of the body's distributed contrast medium and its urinary concentration in the patient at urography. Excretory urography was performed in 248 patients aged 12 to 75 years. The specific gravity of excreted urine was determined with a standard laboratory urometer to 0.001 g/cm3. Absoption spectrophotometry was used to determine the serum concentration of contrast medium in 67 patients. The values of concentrations were plotted in the semilogarithmic ordinate system, followed by extrapolation of the initial segment of the plot to the so-called zero point determining the value of the concentration of contrast medium at the moment of its complete distribution in the intercellular space. The derived value was compared with the medium's dose coming into the body, which made it possible to determine the degree of dilution of the substance, i.e. the volume of its distribution in the organism. There was a linear relationship between the concentrations of renally eliminated contrast medium and the specific gravity of excreted urine. The numerical value of the constant reflecting this relationship is equal to 6. There was evidence for that such studies could be made by routine urometry. A high correlation was found between the body mass and the volume of distribution of contrast medium in the intercellular space. The discovery of the above regularities permitted the procedure for measuring the values of two most important physiological renal process (glomerular filtration and trabecular water reabsorption) to be simplified and widely available. The paper outlines the great promises for using excretory urography as a scanning functional test during a primary study and a follow-up of the patient's status. PMID

  6. Alteration of renal function of rats following spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, C. E.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1998-01-01

    Following spaceflight, changes in renal function of humans have been suggested. To assess the effects of readaptation on renal function, urine was collected from male rats ( approximately 245 g) over a 2-wk period following a 14-day spaceflight. Rats were assigned to three groups: flight animals (n = 6), flight controls (n = 6) housed in the flight cages on the ground, and vivarium controls (n = 5) housed in standard shoe box cages. Animals were placed into individual metabolic cages for urine collection. Urine output was significantly increased for 3 days following flight. Excretion rates of Na+ and K+ were increased, resulting in an increased osmotic excretion rate. Creatinine excretion rate increased over the first two postflight days. Glomerular filtration rate increased immediately following spaceflight without changes in plasma creatinine, Na+, K+, or osmolality. Increased excretion of solute was thus the result of increased delivery and a decreased percent reabsorption of the filtered load. Osmolal clearance was increased immediately postflight while free water clearance was decreased. In growing rats, the diuresis after short-duration spaceflight is the result of an increase in solute excretion with an accompanying reduction in free water clearance.

  7. Cultured Human Renal Cortical Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During the STS-90 shuttle flight in April 1998, cultured renal cortical cells revealed new information about genes. Timothy Hammond, an investigator in NASA's microgravity biotechnology program was interested in culturing kidney tissue to study the expression of proteins useful in the treatment of kidney diseases. Protein expression is linked to the level of differentiation of the kidney cells, and Hammond had difficulty maintaining differentiated cells in vitro. Intrigued by the improvement in cell differentiation that he observed in rat renal cells cultured in NASA's rotating wall vessel (a bioreactor that simulates some aspects of microgravity) and during an experiment performed on the Russian Space Station Mir, Hammond decided to sleuth out which genes were responsible for controlling differentiation of kidney cells. To do this, he compared the gene activity of human renal cells in a variety of gravitational environments, including the microgravity of the space shuttle and the high-gravity environment of a centrifuge. Hammond found that 1,632 genes out of 10,000 analyzed changed their activity level in microgravity, more than in any of the other environments. These results have important implications for kidney research as well as for understanding the basic mechanism for controlling cell differentiation.

  8. Recurrent renal giant leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Öziş, Salih Erpulat; Gülpınar, Kamil; Şahlı, Zafer; Konak, Baha Burak; Keskin, Mete; Özdemir, Süleyman; Ataoğlu, Ömür

    2016-01-01

    Primary renal leiomyosarcomas are rare, aggressive tumors. They constitute 1–2% of adult malignant renal tumors. Although leiomyosarcomas are the most common histological type (50–60%) of renal sarcomas, information on renal leiomyosarcoma is limited. Local or systemic recurrences are common. The radiological appearance of renal leiomyosarcomas is not specific, therefore renal leiomyosarcoma cannot be distinguished from renal cell carcinoma by imaging methods in all patients. A 74-year-old female patient presented to our clinic complaining of a palpable mass on the right side of her abdomen in November 2012. The abdominal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass, 25 × 24 × 23 cm in size. Her past medical history revealed that she has undergone right radical nephrectomy in 2007, due to a 11 × 12 × 13 cm renal mass that was then reported as renal cell carcinoma on abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, but the pathological diagnosis was low-grade renal leiomyosarcoma. The most recent follow-up of the patient was in 2011, with no signs of local recurrence or distant metastases within this four-year period. The patient underwent laparotomy on November 2012, and a 35 cm retroperitoneal mass was excised. The pathological examination of the mass was reported as high-grade leiomyosarcoma. The formation of this giant retroperitoneal mass in 1 year can be explained by the transformation of the lesion’s pathology from low-grade to a high-grade tumor.

  9. Effect of renal denervation on the antinatriuretic response to morphine administration in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Walker, L A; Murphy, J C

    1986-06-01

    The effect of surgical denervation on the antinatriuretic response to morphine was assessed in conscious rats prepared with arterial and venous catheters and bladder cannulas. In sham-operated animals, morphine sulfate (4 mg/kg i.v. plus 2 mg/kg X hr) caused a marked reduction in sodium excretion (650 +/- 218 vs. 2394 +/- 265 nEq/100 g X min in vehicle-treated animals; P less than .05). Although glomerular filtration rate was reduced, fractional excretion of sodium, expressed as a percentage of the filtered load, was also markedly decreased by morphine (0.62 +/- 0.18 vs. 1.51 +/- 0.15% in the vehicle group; P less than .05). The changes in sodium excretion were readily reversed by naloxone. In rats subjected to the renal denervation procedure, morphine had no effect on sodium excretion (1614 +/- 261 vs. 1926 +/- 520 nEq/100 g X min) or on fractional sodium excretion (1.92 +/- 0.50 vs. 1.41 +/- 0.37%). However, glomerular filtration rate was reduced by morphine as in the sham-denervated rats. Blood pressure and heart rate were not significantly affected by morphine in either group. The results suggest that morphine enhances renal tubular sodium reabsorption, at least in part, by a mechanism dependent on intact renal nerves. Because there was no evidence of generalized sympathetic activation (as judged by blood pressure and heart rate changes), the effect may be selective for the renal innervation. PMID:3712279

  10. Heterozygous disruption of renal outer medullary potassium channel in rats is associated with reduced blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Zuo; Shin, Myung Kyun; Horwitz, Sarah Beth; Levorse, John M; Zhu, Lei; Sharif-Rodriguez, Wanda; Streltsov, Denis Y; Dajee, Maya; Hernandez, Melba; Pan, Yi; Urosevic-Price, Olga; Wang, Li; Forrest, Gail; Szeto, Daphne; Zhu, Yonghua; Cui, Yan; Michael, Bindhu; Balogh, Leslie Ann; Welling, Paul A; Wade, James B; Roy, Sophie; Sullivan, Kathleen A

    2013-08-01

    The renal outer medullary potassium channel (ROMK, KCNJ1) mediates potassium recycling and facilitates sodium reabsorption through the Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter in the loop of Henle and potassium secretion at the cortical collecting duct. Human genetic studies indicate that ROMK homozygous loss-of-function mutations cause type II Bartter syndrome, featuring polyuria, renal salt wasting, and hypotension; humans heterozygous for ROMK mutations identified in the Framingham Heart Study have reduced blood pressure. ROMK null mice recapitulate many of the features of type II Bartter syndrome. We have generated an ROMK knockout rat model in Dahl salt-sensitive background by using zinc finger nuclease technology and investigated the effects of knocking out ROMK on systemic and renal hemodynamics and kidney histology in the Dahl salt-sensitive rats. The ROMK(-/-) pups recapitulated features identified in the ROMK null mice. The ROMK(+/-) rats, when challenged with a 4% salt diet, exhibited a reduced blood pressure compared with their ROMK(+/+) littermates. More importantly, when challenged with an 8% salt diet, the Dahl salt-sensitive rats with 50% less ROMK expression showed increased protection from salt-induced blood pressure elevation and signs of protection from renal injury. Our findings in ROMK knockout Dahl salt-sensitive rats, together with the previous reports in humans and mice, underscore a critical role of ROMK in blood pressure regulation. PMID:23753405

  11. Role of renal nerves in compensatory adaptation to chronic reductions in sodium intake

    SciTech Connect

    Mizelle, H.L.; Hall, J.E.; Woods, L.L.; Montani, J.P.; Dzielak, D.J.; Pan, Y.J.

    1987-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the importance of the renal nerves in adaptation to chronic reductions in sodium intake. Conscious dogs with unilateral or bilateral renal denervation were studied. Kidney function was determined by the clearance (/sup 125/I)-contrast media. In dogs studied before and after bilateral denervation, there were no differences in urine volume (UO), Na excretion (U/sub Na/V), or fractional reabsorption of Li, between innervated and denervated kidneys on either normal (80 meg/day) or low Na intake (5 meq/day, 15 days). Plasma renin activity (PRA) was attenuated following denervation on both normal and low Na intake. There was no difference in UO between innervated and denervated kidneys on normal or low Na intake. U/sub Na/V averaged 33.6 +/- 1.3 and 37.6 +/- 2.1 meq/day in innervated and denervated kidneys, respectively, on normal Na intake and 3.5 +/- 0.5 and 4.0 +/- 0.4 meq/day in innervated and denervated kidneys on low Na intake. Norepinephrine content was reduced by 99 +/- 1% in denervated kidneys. These results suggest that, although the renal nerves may play a small role in controlling U/sub Na/V during normal Na, the presence of the nerves is not essential for adaptation to chronic reductions in Na intake. However, the renal nerves may play a role in long-term control of renin secretion.

  12. Localization of corin and atrial natriuretic peptide expression in human renal segments.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liang; Wang, Hao; Dong, Ningzheng; Zhang, Ce; Xue, Boxin; Wu, Qingyu

    2016-09-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)-mediated natriuretic response is a well-established cardiac endocrine function. Corin is a transmembrane protease that activates ANP in the heart. Corin expression has been detected in non-cardiac tissues including the kidney. Here we examined corin, pro-ANP/ANP and natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) expression in human renal segments. By immunostaining and in situ hybridization, we found similar corin, pro-ANP/ANP and NPR-A protein and mRNA expression in human renal segments. The expression was most abundant in the proximal convoluted tubules and the medullary connecting ducts. In the proximal tubules, corin protein was present in the apical membrane region underneath the brush border where the ANP-degrading protease neprilysin was abundant. These results suggest that corin-mediated pro-ANP activation may occur in renal segments and that locally produced ANP may act in an autocrine manner to regulate sodium and water reabsorption in situ Our results also point to the proximal convoluted tubules as a major site for local ANP action. Such a renal corin/ANP autocrine mechanism may differ from the cardiac corin/ANP endocrine mechanism in regulating sodium homoeostasis under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:27343265

  13. Functional Kidney Bioengineering with Pluripotent Stem-Cell-Derived Renal Progenitor Cells and Decellularized Kidney Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Du, Chan; Narayanan, Karthikeyan; Leong, Meng Fatt; Ibrahim, Mohammed Shahrudin; Chua, Ying Ping; Khoo, Vanessa Mei Hui; Wan, Andrew C A

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in developmental biology and stem cell technology have led to the engineering of functional organs in a dish. However, the limited size of these organoids and absence of a large circulatory system poses limits to its clinical translation. To overcome these issues, decellularized whole kidney scaffolds with native microstructure and extracellular matrix (ECM) are employed for kidney bioengineering, using human-induced pluripotent-stem-cell-derived renal progenitor cells and endothelial cells. To demonstrate ECM-guided cellular assembly, the present work is focused on generating the functional unit of the kidney, the glomerulus. In the repopulated organ, the presence of endothelial cells broadly upregulates the expression level of genes related to renal development. When the cellularized native scaffolds are implanted in SCID mice, glomeruli assembly can be achieved by co-culture of the renal progenitors and endothelial cells. These individual glomerular units are shown to be functional in the context of the whole organ using a simulated bio-reactor set-up with urea and creatinine excretion and albumin reabsorption. Our results indicate that the repopulation of decellularized native kidney using clinically relevant, expandable patient-specific renal progenitors and endothelial cells may be a viable approach for the generation of a functional whole kidney. PMID:27294565

  14. Effect of Chronic Bile Duct Obstruction on Renal Handling of Salt and Water

    PubMed Central

    Better, Ori S.; Massry, Shaul G.

    1972-01-01

    Renal sodium reabsorption and the concentrating and diluting abilities of the kidney were evaluated in the same trained mongrel dogs before and after chronic common bile duct ligation (BDL). Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and CPAH were not altered by BDL. The natriuretic response to a standardized infusion of 0.45% solution of NaCl was markedly blunted by BDL (P < 0.01); calculated distal sodium delivery was significantly less in experiments after BDL than in control studies. Furthermore, the fractional reabsorption of sodium at the diluting segment for any given rate of distal delivery was enhanced by BDL. Similarly, CH2O/100 ml GFR for a given sodium delivery was higher after BDL than control values. Maximal urinary concentration (Uosm-max) was lower after BDL, and the mean Uosm-max for the whole group of animals was 60% of the control value (P < 0.001). Mean maximal TH2O/100 ml GFR after BDL was not different from control values; however, TcH2O/100 ml GFR for a given Cosm/100 ml GFR was lower after BDL in three dogs only. The sodium content of the inner part of renal medulla after BDL was significantly lower than the values obtained in control animals. The excretion of an oral water load in the conscious state was impaired after BDL; although all animals excreted hypotonic urine, urinary osmolality was usually higher after BDL than in control studies. Maximal urinary concentration and the excretion of an oral water load were not affected by sham operation. These studies demonstrate that chronic, common bile duct ligation is associated with (a) enhanced sodium reabsorption both in the proximal and diluting segments of the nephron, (b) a defect in attaining maximal urinary concentration, (c) diminished sodium content in the renal papilla, and (d) impaired excretion of a water load. The results suggest that decreased distal delivery of sodium may underlie the abnormality in the concentrating mechanism and in the inability to normally excrete a water load. In

  15. [New perspective on the role of WNK1 and WNK4 in the regulation of NaCl reabsorption and K(+) secretion by the distal nephron].

    PubMed

    Rafael, Chloé; Chavez-Canales, Maria; Hadchouel, Juliette

    2016-03-01

    The study of Familial Hyperkalemic Hypertension (FHHt), a rare monogenic disease, allowed remarkable advances in the understanding of the mechanisms of regulation of NaCl reabsorption by the distal nephron. FHHt results from mutations in the genes encoding WNK1 and WNK4, two serine-threonine kinases of the WNK (With No lysine [K]) family. The clinical manifestations of FHHt are due, among others, to an increased activity of the Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter NCC. Several groups therefore tried to understand how WNK1 and WNK4 could regulate NCC. However, the data were often contradictory. Two of our recent studies allowed to partially explain these controversies and to propose a new model for the regulation of NCC by the WNKs. PMID:27011246

  16. Renal Artery Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Sauk, Steven; Zuckerman, Darryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Renal artery embolization (RAE) is an effective minimally invasive alternative procedure for the treatment of a variety of conditions. Since the 1970s when RAE was first developed, technical advances and growing experience have expanded the indications to not only include treatment of conditions such as symptomatic hematuria and palliation for metastatic renal cancer, but also preoperative infarction of renal tumors, treatment of angiomyolipomas, vascular malformations, medical renal disease, and complications following renal transplantation. With the drastically improved morbidity associated with this technique in part due to the introduction of more precise embolic agents and smaller delivery catheters, RAE continues to gain popularity for various urologic conditions. The indications and techniques for renal artery embolization are reviewed in the following sections. PMID:23204638

  17. Renal cystic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    The book begins with an overview of renal cystic disease and a presentation of simple renal cysts. Subsequent chapters cover cystic disease in association with renal neoplasms and medullary sponge kidney. The chapters addressing autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive polycystic kidney disease discuss and differentiate the infantile and adult forms of the disease. There are also separate discussions of medullary cystic disease, multicystic dysplastic kidney, and cysts of the renarenal sinus.

  18. Calcified renal oncocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, N.F.; Ewing, S.L.

    1983-10-01

    Renal oncocytoma, a neoplasm thought to derive from cells of the proximal convoluted tubules, exhibits benign clinical features. Its preoperative distinction from typical renal cell carcinoma would enable the surgeon to perform a more limited procedure. In a patient who is a poor operative candidate, surgery might be deferred. However, preoperative diagnosis has been elusive. A rare case of bilateral renal oncocytoma is reported. One of these tumors represents the first reported oncocytoma showing radiologically demonstrable calcification.

  19. [Hereditary renal cell carcinomas].

    PubMed

    Hartmann, A; Stöhr, C G; Junker, K

    2010-10-01

    Renal cell carcinomas occur in several hereditary tumor syndromes. These renal tumors frequently have a specific histopathological appearance which can be a sign for a hereditary cause of the disease. The genetic alterations responsible for most of these tumor syndromes were identified in recent years. Interestingly, renal cell carcinomas show specific histopathological features in each of the hereditary renal cancer syndromes. Clear cell and often cystic renal cell carcinomas occur in von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHL), while oncocytomas and chromophobe renal cell carcinomas are found in the Birt-Hugg-Dube syndrome, often also as hybrid tumors. Well differentiated papillary carcinomas (Type 1 according to the WHO) are found in the hereditary papillary renal cell carcinoma (HPRC). In contrast, poorly diffentiated papillary renal cell carcinomas (Type 2 according to the WHO) occur in combination with leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas of the skin and uterus in hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma syndrome (HLRCC). The various genetic causes for these hereditary tumor syndromes open up new therapeutic possibilities, some of which are already being investigated in clinical studies. PMID:20960197

  20. Segmental neurofibromatosis associated with renal angiomyolipomas.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kim-Tan; Chiu, Melvin

    2008-07-01

    Segmental neurofibromatosis (SN) is a rare disorder characterized by neurofibromas or neurofibromas with café-au-lait spots limited to one region of the body without crossing the midline. Renal angiomyolipomas (AMLs) are rare benign neoplasms usually found in association with tuberous sclerosis (TS). Similar to neurofibromatosis (NF), TS has a high spontaneous mutation rate and a family history often is absent. Although both are autosomal dominant diseases with neural involvement, there are few reports in the literature demonstrating a link between the 2 disorders. We report a case of SN associated with renal AMLs. To our knowledge, there has been only 1 prior report of renal AML associated with NF type 1 (NF1), and there have been no prior reports of SN associated with AML. PMID:18712027

  1. Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Bradley P.; Hulbert, John C.; Bissler, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Although not as common as other genetic renal diseases such as autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, patients with tuberous sclerosis complex frequently have significant renal involvement. Recent revelations in the cell biology of these renal disease manifestations as well as effective therapies for tuberous sclerosis complex-related renal issues have heralded hope of improved renal survival and improved quality of life for the TSC patient. This review specifically addresses some of the major renal manifestations of this disease. PMID:21071977

  2. Laboratory Markers of Ventricular Arrhythmia Risk in Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death continues to be a major public health problem. Ventricular arrhythmia is a main cause of sudden cardiac death. The present review addresses the links between renal function tests, several laboratory markers, and ventricular arrhythmia risk in patients with renal disease, undergoing or not hemodialysis or renal transplant, focusing on recent clinical studies. Therapy of hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia should be an emergency and performed simultaneously under electrocardiographic monitoring in patients with renal failure. Serum phosphates and iron, PTH level, renal function, hemoglobin and hematocrit, pH, inflammatory markers, proteinuria and microalbuminuria, and osmolarity should be monitored, besides standard 12-lead ECG, in order to prevent ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. PMID:24982887

  3. Monocarboxylate Transporter Inhibition with Osmotic Diuresis Increases γ-Hydroxybutyrate Renal Elimination in Humans: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Marilyn E.; Morse, Bridget L.; Baciewicz, Gloria J.; Tessena, Matthew M.; Acquisto, Nicole M.; Hutchinson, David J.; DiCenzo, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective The purpose of the current study was to demonstrate proof-of-concept that monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) inhibition with L-lactate combined with osmotic diuresis increases renal clearance of γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) in human subjects. GHB is a substrate for human and rodent MCTs, which are responsible for GHB renal reabsorption, and this therapy increases GHB renal clearance in rats. Methods Ten healthy volunteers were administered GHB orally as sodium oxybate 50 mg/kg (4.5 gm maximum dose) on two different study days. On study day 1, GHB was administered alone. On study day 2, treatment of L-lactate 0.125 mmol/kg and mannitol 200 mg/kg followed by L-lactate 0.75 mmol/kg/hr was administered intravenously 30 minutes after GHB ingestion. Blood and urine were collected for 6 hours, analyzed for GHB, and pharmacokinetic and statistical analyses performed. Results L-lactate/mannitol administration significantly increased GHB renal clearance compared to GHB alone, 439 vs. 615 mL/hr (P=0.001), and increased the percentage of GHB dose excreted in the urine, 2.2 vs. 3.3% (P=0.021). Total clearance was unchanged. Conclusions MCT inhibition with L-lactate combined with osmotic diuresis increases GHB renal elimination in humans. No effect on total clearance was observed in this study due to the negligible contribution of renal clearance to total clearance at this low GHB dose. Considering the nonlinear renal elimination of GHB, further research in overdose cases is warranted to assess the efficacy of this treatment strategy for increasing renal and total clearance at high GHB doses. PMID:24772380

  4. Renal Fanconi Syndrome Is Caused by a Mistargeting-Based Mitochondriopathy.

    PubMed

    Assmann, Nadine; Dettmer, Katja; Simbuerger, Johann M B; Broeker, Carsten; Nuernberger, Nadine; Renner, Kathrin; Courtneidge, Holly; Klootwijk, Enriko D; Duerkop, Axel; Hall, Andrew; Kleta, Robert; Oefner, Peter J; Reichold, Markus; Reinders, Joerg

    2016-05-17

    We recently reported an autosomal dominant form of renal Fanconi syndrome caused by a missense mutation in the third codon of the peroxisomal protein EHHADH. The mutation mistargets EHHADH to mitochondria, thereby impairing mitochondrial energy production and, consequently, reabsorption of electrolytes and low-molecular-weight nutrients in the proximal tubule. Here, we further elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this pathology. We find that mutated EHHADH is incorporated into mitochondrial trifunctional protein (MTP), thereby disturbing β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids. The resulting MTP deficiency leads to a characteristic accumulation of hydroxyacyl- and acylcarnitines. Mutated EHHADH also limits respiratory complex I and corresponding supercomplex formation, leading to decreases in oxidative phosphorylation capacity, mitochondrial membrane potential maintenance, and ATP generation. Activity of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase is thereby diminished, ultimately decreasing the transport activity of the proximal tubule cells. PMID:27160910

  5. Cerebroprotective effects of RAS inhibitors: Beyond their cardio-renal actions.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Jaspreet; Prakash, Atish; Kumar, Puneet; Majeed, Abu Bakar Abdul

    2015-09-01

    Work on the brain renin-angiotensin system has been explored by various researchers and has led to elucidation of its basic physiologies and behavior, including its role in reabsorption and uptake of body fluid, blood pressure maintenance with angiotensin II being its prominent effector. Currently, this system has been implicated for its newly established effects, which are far beyond its cardio-renal effects accounting for maintenance of cerebral blood flow and cerebroprotection, seizure, in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, and bipolar disorder. In this review, we have discussed the distribution of angiotensin receptor subtypes in the central nervous system (CNS) together with enzymatic pathways leading to active angiotensin ligands and its interaction with angiotensin receptor 2 (AT2) and Mas receptors. Secondly, the use of angiotensin analogues (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and AT1 and/or AT2 receptor blockers) in the treatment and management of the CNS disorders mentioned above has been discussed. PMID:25944853

  6. Aflatoxicosis alters avian renal function, calcium, and vitamin D metabolism.

    PubMed

    Glahn, R P; Beers, K W; Bottje, W G; Wideman, R F; Huff, W E; Thomas, W

    1991-11-01

    Experiments were designed to determine the effects of aflatoxicosis on avian renal function, calcium (CA), inorganic phosphorous (Pi), and vitamin D metabolism, and to determine if the effects of aflatoxin are reversible upon discontinuation of toxin administration. Three-week-old male broiler chickens (n = 12 per treatment) received aflatoxin (AF; 2 mg/kg po) or an equal volume of corn oil, the AF carrier vehicle, for 10 consecutive days. After 10 d of treatment, half of the birds from each treatment group were anesthetized and prepared for renal function analysis, which included a 2-h phosphate loading period. Ten days after discontinuation of AF treatment, the remaining birds in each treatment group were anesthetized and prepared for renal function analysis. AF decreased plasma 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] and 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D [1,25(OH)2D] levels after 5 d of treatment. After 10 d of treatment, urine flow rate (V), fractional sodium excretion (FENa), and fractional potassium excretion (FEK) were lower in AF-treated birds. In addition, total plasma Ca tended to be lower (p = .10) and fractional Ca excretion (FECa) tended to be higher (p = .10) in the AF-treated birds. Intravenous phosphate loading produced a sharp increase in urine hydrogen ion concentration ([H+]) in the AF-treated birds. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was reduced and plasma osmolality was increased in AF-treated birds 10 d after discontinuation of toxin administration. The results indicate that AF directly or indirectly affects Ca and Pi metabolism in avians. At the present time, the effects may be related to altered vitamin D and parathyroid hormone (PTH) metabolism. Aflatoxicosis may decrease endogenous PTH synthesis and the renal sensitivity to PTH. The AF-related increase in urine [H+] during phosphate loading is probably due to increased Na+/H+ counterport, suggesting that AF stimulates sodium reabsorption. Also, the decrease in GFR exhibited 10 d after toxin removal indicates

  7. Urinary and proximal tubule acidification during reduction of renal blood flow in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo-Juárez, F; Aires, M M; Malnic, G

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of reduction in renal blood flow (RBF) on urinary acidification and proximal tubule H+ ion secretion were studied after partial aortic clamping in rats. 2. Acute reduction of the renal perfusion pressure (from 109 +/- 3.88 to 77.4 +/- 1.05 mmHg) decreased both inulin and PAH (p-aminohippurate) clearances to about one-third of their control values. Absolute levels of urinary sodium excretion also decreased markedly, but fractional sodium excretion did not change significantly. 3. Urine pH and bicarbonate levels were not affected, but titratable acidity increased significantly from 0.12 +/- 0.011 to 0.25 +/- 0.042 muequiv min-1 ml-1 glomerular filtration rate (GFR). During aortic clamping, cortical PCO2 as determined by means of Severinghaus microelectrodes was reduced by a mean value of 7.0 +/- 1.5 mmHg. 4. Proximal tubule acidification kinetics were studied by stationary microperfusion techniques in which the time course of pH changes was monitored by pH microelectrodes. Steady-state pH fell from a mean control value of 6.77 +/- 0.03 to 6.65 +/- 0.02, and stationary bicarbonate concentrations from 4.70 +/- 0.27 to 2.84 +/- 0.18 mM. Acidification half-time decreased from 5.07 +/- 0.30 to 4.39 +/- 0.19 s, and net bicarbonate reabsorption increased from 1.63 +/- 0.14 to 1.99 +/- 0.12 nmol cm-2 s-1, these changes being statistically significant. 5. The experiments demonstrate that both overall acid excretion and proximal acid secretion are not compromised by a large decrease of RBF to about one-third of the control value; titratable acid excretion and proximal net bicarbonate reabsorption were even moderately increased under these conditions. PMID:2348400

  8. Fructokinase activity mediates dehydration-induced renal injury.

    PubMed

    Roncal Jimenez, Carlos A; Ishimoto, Takuji; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Rivard, Christopher J; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Ejaz, A Ahsan; Cicerchi, Christina; Inaba, Shinichiro; Le, MyPhuong; Miyazaki, Makoto; Glaser, Jason; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; González, Marvin A; Aragón, Aurora; Wesseling, Catharina; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Johnson, Richard J

    2014-08-01

    The epidemic of chronic kidney disease in Nicaragua (Mesoamerican nephropathy) has been linked with recurrent dehydration. Here we tested whether recurrent dehydration may cause renal injury by activation of the polyol pathway, resulting in the generation of endogenous fructose in the kidney that might subsequently induce renal injury via metabolism by fructokinase. Wild-type and fructokinase-deficient mice were subjected to recurrent heat-induced dehydration. One group of each genotype was provided water throughout the day and the other group was hydrated at night, after the dehydration. Both groups received the same total hydration in 24 h. Wild-type mice that received delayed hydration developed renal injury, with elevated serum creatinine, increased urinary NGAL, proximal tubular injury, and renal inflammation and fibrosis. This was associated with activation of the polyol pathway, with increased renal cortical sorbitol and fructose levels. Fructokinase-knockout mice with delayed hydration were protected from renal injury. Thus, recurrent dehydration can induce renal injury via a fructokinase-dependent mechanism, likely from the generation of endogenous fructose via the polyol pathway. Access to sufficient water during the dehydration period can protect mice from developing renal injury. These studies provide a potential mechanism for Mesoamerican nephropathy. PMID:24336030

  9. [Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis].

    PubMed

    Sauguet, A; Honton, B

    2014-12-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis can cause ischaemic nephropathy and arterial hypertension. Renal artery stenosis (RAS) continues to be a problem for clinicians, with no clear consensus on how to investigate and assess the clinical significance of stenotic lesions and manage the findings. RAS caused by fibromuscular dysplasia is probably commoner than previously appreciated, should be actively looked for in younger hypertensive patients and can be managed successfully with angioplasty. Atheromatous RAS is associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular events and increased cardiovascular mortality, and is likely to be seen with increasing frequency. Many patients with RAS may be managed effectively with medical therapy for several years without endovascular stenting, as demonstrated by randomized, prospective trials including the cardiovascular outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial, the Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) trial. These trials share the limitation of excluding subsets of patients with high-risk clinical presentations, including episodic pulmonary edema and rapidly progressing renal failure and hypertension. Blood pressure control and medication adjustment may become more difficult with declining renal function and may prevent the use of angiotensin receptor blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The objective of this review is to evaluate the current management of RAS for cardiologists in the context of recent randomized clinical trials. There is now interest in looking more closely at patient selection for intervention, with focus on intervening only in patients with the highest-risk presentations such as flash pulmonary edema, rapidly declining renal function and severe resistant hypertension. PMID:25450992

  10. Cadmium and renal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Il'yasova, Dora; Schwartz, Gary G. . E-mail: gschwart@wfubmc.edu

    2005-09-01

    Background: Rates of renal cancer have increased steadily during the past two decades, and these increases are not explicable solely by advances in imaging modalities. Cadmium, a widespread environmental pollutant, is a carcinogen that accumulates in the kidney cortex and is a cause of end-stage renal disease. Several observations suggest that cadmium may be a cause of renal cancer. Methods: We performed a systematic review of the literature on cadmium and renal cancer using MEDLINE for the years 1966-2003. We reviewed seven epidemiological and eleven clinical studies. Results: Despite different methodologies, three large epidemiologic studies indicate that occupational exposure to cadmium is associated with increased risk renal cancer, with odds ratios varying from 1.2 to 5.0. Six of seven studies that compared the cadmium content of kidneys from patients with kidney cancer to that of patients without kidney cancer found lower concentrations of cadmium in renal cancer tissues. Conclusions: Exposure to cadmium appears to be associated with renal cancer, although this conclusion is tempered by the inability of studies to assess cumulative cadmium exposure from all sources including smoking and diet. The paradoxical findings of lower cadmium content in kidney tissues from patients with renal cancer may be caused by dilution of cadmium in rapidly dividing cells. This and other methodological problems limit the interpretation of studies of cadmium in clinical samples. Whether cadmium is a cause of renal cancer may be answered more definitively by future studies that employ biomarkers of cadmium exposure, such as cadmium levels in blood and urine.

  11. NHERF-1 and the regulation of renal phosphate reabsoption: a tale of three hormones

    PubMed Central

    Lederer, Eleanor D.

    2012-01-01

    The renal excretion of inorganic phosphate is regulated in large measure by three hormones, namely, parathyroid hormone, dopamine, and fibroblast growth factor-23. Recent experiments have indicated that the major sodium-dependent phosphate transporter in the renal proximal tubule, Npt2a, binds to the adaptor protein sodium-hydrogen exchanger regulatory factor-1 (NHERF-1) and in the absence of NHERF-1, the inhibitory effect of these three hormones is absent. From these observations, a new model for the hormonal regulation of renal phosphate transport was developed. The downstream signaling pathways of these hormones results in the phosphorylation of the PDZ 1 domain of NHERF-1 and the dissociation of Npt2a/NHERF-1 complexes. In turn, this dissociation facilitates the endocytosis of Npt2a with a subsequent decrease in the apical membrane abundance of the transporter and a decrease in phosphate reabsorption. The current review outlines the experimental observations supporting the operation of this unique regulatory system. PMID:22535796

  12. Mitochondrial and Metabolic Dysfunction in Renal Convoluted Tubules of Obese Mice: Protective Role of Melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Giugno, Lorena; Lavazza, Antonio; Reiter, Russel J.; Rodella, Luigi Fabrizio; Rezzani, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a common and complex health problem, which impacts crucial organs; it is also considered an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease. Few studies have analyzed the consequence of obesity in the renal proximal convoluted tubules, which are the major tubules involved in reabsorptive processes. For optimal performance of the kidney, energy is primarily provided by mitochondria. Melatonin, an indoleamine and antioxidant, has been identified in mitochondria, and there is considerable evidence regarding its essential role in the prevention of oxidative mitochondrial damage. In this study we evaluated the mechanism(s) of mitochondrial alterations in an animal model of obesity (ob/ob mice) and describe the beneficial effects of melatonin treatment on mitochondrial morphology and dynamics as influenced by mitofusin-2 and the intrinsic apoptotic cascade. Melatonin dissolved in 1% ethanol was added to the drinking water from postnatal week 5–13; the calculated dose of melatonin intake was 100 mg/kg body weight/day. Compared to control mice, obesity-related morphological alterations were apparent in the proximal tubules which contained round mitochondria with irregular, short cristae and cells with elevated apoptotic index. Melatonin supplementation in obese mice changed mitochondria shape and cristae organization of proximal tubules, enhanced mitofusin-2 expression, which in turn modulated the progression of the mitochondria-driven intrinsic apoptotic pathway. These changes possibly aid in reducing renal failure. The melatonin-mediated changes indicate its potential protective use against renal morphological damage and dysfunction associated with obesity and metabolic disease. PMID:25347680

  13. Purification and renal effects of phospholipase A(2) isolated from Bothrops insularis venom.

    PubMed

    Machado Braga, Marcus Davis; Costa Martins, Alice Maria; Alves, Claudênio Diógenes; de Menezes, Dalgimar Beserra; Martins, René Duarte; Ferreira Barbosa, Paulo Sérgio; de Sousa Oliveira, Isadora Maria; Toyama, Marcos Hikari; Toyama, Daniela Oliveira; Dos Santos Diz Filho, Eduardo Brito; Ramos Fagundes, Fabio Henrique; Fonteles, Manassés Claudino; Azul Monteiro, Helena Serra

    2008-02-01

    Bothrops insularis venom contains a variety of substances presumably responsible for several pharmacological effects. We investigated the biochemical and biological effects of phospholipase A(2) protein isolated from B. insularis venom and the chromatographic profile showed 7 main fractions and the main phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) enzymatic activity was detected in fractions IV and V. Fraction IV was submitted to a new chromatographic procedure on ion exchange chromatography, which allowed the elution of 5 main fractions designated as IV-1 to IV-5, from which IV-4 constituted the main fraction. The molecular homogeneity of this fraction was characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and demonstrated by mass spectrometry (MS), which showed a molecular mass of 13984.20 Da; its N-terminal sequence presented a high amino acid identity (up to 95%) with the PLA(2) of Bothrops jararaca and Bothrops asper. Phospholipase A(2) isolated from B. insularis (Bi PLA(2) ) venom (10 microg/mL) was also studied as to its effect on the renal function of isolated perfused kidneys of Wistar rats (n=6). Bi PLA(2) increased perfusion pressure (PP), renal vascular resistance (RVR), urinary flow (UF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Sodium (%TNa(+)) and chloride tubular reabsorption (%TCl(-)) decreased at 120 min, without alteration in potassium transport. In conclusion, PLA(2) isolated from B. insularis venom promoted renal alterations in the isolated perfused rat kidney. PMID:17953979

  14. Multicystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, V P; Ratnakar, K S

    2001-07-01

    Multicystic renal dysplasia, the most common form of cystic renal disease in the newborn period, is a clinically important consequence of abnormal nephrogenesis. It usually presents as an abdominal mass. The dysplasias are usually unilateral, but it can be bilateral, segmental or focal. The clinical presentation usually depends on the extent of the dysplastic involvement and the degree of the associated urinary obstruction. Here, we present a case of histologically multicystic renal dysplasia, which is ?bilateral. The left kidney showed typical radiological, gross and histopathological features of multicystic dysplasia, but the right kidney showed only radiological features of dysplastic cystic kidney. PMID:11479648

  15. Renal Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Villa, Gianluca; Ricci, Zaccaria; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-10-01

    Renal replacement therapy (RRT) is a cornerstone in the clinical management of patients with acute kidney injury. Results from different studies agree that early renal support therapy (aimed to support the residual kidney function during early phases of organ dysfunction) may reduce mortality with respect to late RRT (aimed to substitute the complete loss of function during the advanced kidney insufficiency). Although it seems plausible that a timely initiation of RRT may be associated with improved renal and nonrenal outcomes in these patients, there is scarce evidence in literature to exactly identify the most adequate onset timing for RRT. PMID:26410148

  16. Idiopathic hypercalciuria and formation of calcium renal stones.

    PubMed

    Coe, Fredric L; Worcester, Elaine M; Evan, Andrew P

    2016-09-01

    The most common presentation of nephrolithiasis is idiopathic calcium stones in patients without systemic disease. Most stones are primarily composed of calcium oxalate and form on a base of interstitial apatite deposits, known as Randall's plaque. By contrast some stones are composed largely of calcium phosphate, as either hydroxyapatite or brushite (calcium monohydrogen phosphate), and are usually accompanied by deposits of calcium phosphate in the Bellini ducts. These deposits result in local tissue damage and might serve as a site of mineral overgrowth. Stone formation is driven by supersaturation of urine with calcium oxalate and brushite. The level of supersaturation is related to fluid intake as well as to the levels of urinary citrate and calcium. Risk of stone formation is increased when urine citrate excretion is <400 mg per day, and treatment with potassium citrate has been used to prevent stones. Urine calcium levels >200 mg per day also increase stone risk and often result in negative calcium balance. Reduced renal calcium reabsorption has a role in idiopathic hypercalciuria. Low sodium diets and thiazide-type diuretics lower urine calcium levels and potentially reduce the risk of stone recurrence and bone disease. PMID:27452364

  17. Renal Mitochondrial Cytopathies

    PubMed Central

    Emma, Francesco; Montini, Giovanni; Salviati, Leonardo; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Renal diseases in mitochondrial cytopathies are a group of rare diseases that are characterized by frequent multisystemic involvement and extreme variability of phenotype. Most frequently patients present a tubular defect that is consistent with complete De Toni-Debré-Fanconi syndrome in most severe forms. More rarely, patients present with chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, cystic renal diseases, or primary glomerular involvement. In recent years, two clearly defined entities, namely 3243 A > G tRNALEU mutations and coenzyme Q10 biosynthesis defects, have been described. The latter group is particularly important because it represents the only treatable renal mitochondrial defect. In this paper, the physiopathologic bases of mitochondrial cytopathies, the diagnostic approaches, and main characteristics of related renal diseases are summarized. PMID:21811680

  18. Transport characteristics of L-citrulline in renal apical membrane of proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Mitsuoka, Keisuke; Shirasaka, Yoshiyuki; Fukushi, Akimasa; Sato, Masanobu; Nakamura, Toshimichi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2009-04-01

    L-Citrulline has diagnostic potential for renal function, because its plasma concentration increases with the progression of renal failure. Although L-citrulline extracted by glomerular filtration in kidney is mostly reabsorbed, the mechanism involved is not clearly understood. The present study was designed to characterize L-citrulline transport across the apical membranes of renal epithelial tubular cells, using primary-cultured rat renal proximal tubular cells, as well as the human kidney proximal tubular cell line HK-2. L-Citrulline was transported in a Na(+)-dependent manner from the apical side of both cell types cultured on permeable supports with a microporous membrane. Kinetic analysis indicated that the transport involves two distinct Na(+)-dependent saturable systems and one Na(+)-independent saturable system in HK-2 cells. The uptake was competitively inhibited by neutral and cationic, but not anionic amino acids. Relatively large cationic and anionic compounds inhibited the uptake, but smaller ones did not. In HK-2 cells, mRNA expression of SLC6A19 and SLC7A9, which encode B(0)AT1 and b(0,+)AT, respectively, was detected by RT-PCR. In addition, L-citrulline transport was significantly decreased in HK-2 cells in which either SLC6A19 or SLC7A9 was silenced. Hence, these results suggest that amino acid transporters B(0)AT1 and b(0,+)AT are involved in the reabsorption of L-citrulline in the kidney, at least in part, by mediating the apical membrane transport of L-citrulline in renal tubule cells. PMID:19322909

  19. 'Transcollateral' Renal Angioplasty for a Completely Occluded Renal Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Subash; Chadha, Davinder S. Swamy, Ajay

    2011-02-15

    Percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty with stenting has been effective in the control of hypertension, renal function, and pulmonary edema caused by atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis. However, the role of the procedure has not been fully established in the context of chronic total occlusion of renal artery. We report the successful use of this procedure in 57-year-old male patient who reported for evaluation of a recent episode of accelerated hypertension. A renal angiogram in this patient showed ostial stenosis of the right renal artery, which was filling by way of the collateral artery. Renal angioplasty for chronic total occlusion of right renal artery was successfully performed in a retrograde fashion through a collateral artery, thereby leading to improvement of renal function and blood pressure control.

  20. Functional role of glucose metabolism, osmotic stress, and sodium-glucose cotransporter isoform-mediated transport on Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 3 activity in the renal proximal tubule.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, Thaissa Dantas; Campos, Luciene Cristina Gastalho; Carraro-Lacroix, Luciene; Girardi, Adriana C C; Malnic, Gerhard

    2014-09-01

    Na(+)-glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1)-mediated glucose uptake leads to activation of Na(+)-H(+) exchanger 3 (NHE3) in the intestine by a process that is not dependent on glucose metabolism. This coactivation may be important for postprandial nutrient uptake. However, it remains to be determined whether SGLT-mediated glucose uptake regulates NHE3-mediated NaHCO3 reabsorption in the renal proximal tubule. Considering that this nephron segment also expresses SGLT2 and that the kidneys and intestine show significant variations in daily glucose availability, the goal of this study was to determine the effect of SGLT-mediated glucose uptake on NHE3 activity in the renal proximal tubule. Stationary in vivo microperfusion experiments showed that luminal perfusion with 5 mM glucose stimulates NHE3-mediated bicarbonate reabsorption. This stimulatory effect was mediated by glycolytic metabolism but not through ATP production. Conversely, luminal perfusion with 40 mM glucose inhibited NHE3 because of cell swelling. Notably, pharmacologic inhibition of SGLT activity by Phlorizin produced a marked inhibition of NHE3, even in the absence of glucose. Furthermore, immunofluorescence experiments showed that NHE3 colocalizes with SGLT2 but not SGLT1 in the rat renal proximal tubule. Collectively, these findings show that glucose exerts a bimodal effect on NHE3. The physiologic metabolism of glucose stimulates NHE3 transport activity, whereas, supraphysiologic glucose concentrations inhibit this exchanger. Additionally, Phlorizin-sensitive SGLT transporters and NHE3 interact functionally in the proximal tubule. PMID:24652792

  1. [Renal function, organic acid transport and protein binding: the three elements defining the response to diuretics in clinical practice: an update].

    PubMed

    Conz, P A

    2005-01-01

    Organic anion transporters (OATs), which are expressed in proximal tubule cells, mediate diuretic secretion into tubular fluid. Increased plasma levels of organic anions and urate and metabolic acidosis, i.e. two characteristic features of chronic renal insufficiency, could be factors contributing to diuretic resistance. These limitations demand increasing doses of diuretics up to a maximum level, or the use of a loop diuretic with non-renal metabolism. Diuretic responsiveness in nephrotic syndrome is limited by strong Na+ reabsorption in the distal nephron. Strategies to improve loop diuretic responsiveness include diuretic dosage and the combination of a loop diuretic with a distal acting diuretic. Strategies to limit protein excretion include the use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers and appropriate salt intake limitation. PMID:16001364

  2. Renal depletion of myo-inositol is associated with its increased degradation in animal models of metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, H-H; Chao, H-N; Walker, C S; Choong, S-Y; Phillips, A; Loomes, K M

    2015-11-01

    Renal depletion of myo-inositol (MI) is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy in animal models, but the underlying mechanisms involved are unclear. We hypothesized that MI depletion was due to changes in inositol metabolism and therefore examined the expression of genes regulating de novo biosynthesis, reabsorption, and catabolism of MI. We also extended the analyses from diabetes mellitus to animal models of dietary-induced obesity and hypertension. We found that renal MI depletion was pervasive across these three distinct disease states in the relative order: hypertension (-51%)>diabetes mellitus (-35%)>dietary-induced obesity (-19%). In 4-wk diabetic kidneys and in kidneys derived from insulin-resistant and hypertensive rats, MI depletion was correlated with activity of the MI-degrading enzyme myo-inositol oxygenase (MIOX). By contrast, there was decreased MIOX expression in 8-wk diabetic kidneys. Immunohistochemistry localized the MI-degrading pathway comprising MIOX and the glucuronate-xylulose (GX) pathway to the proximal tubules within the renal cortex. These findings indicate that MI depletion could reflect increased catabolism through MIOX and the GX pathway and implicate a common pathological mechanism contributing to renal oxidative stress in metabolic disease. PMID:26311112

  3. Disappearing renal calculus

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Helen; Thomas, Johanna; Kumar, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a renal calculus treated solely with antibiotics which has not been previously reported in the literature. A man with a 17 mm lower pole renal calculus and concurrent Escherichia coli urine infection was being worked up to undergo percutaneous nephrolithotomy. However, after a course of preoperative antibiotics the stone was no longer seen on retrograde pyelography or CT imaging. PMID:23580676

  4. Hereditary Renal Cancer Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Naomi B.

    2013-01-01

    Inherited susceptibility to kidney cancer is a fascinating and complex topic. Our knowledge about types of genetic syndromes associated with an increased risk of disease is continually expanding. Currently, there are 10 syndromes associated with an increased risk of all types of renal cancer, which are reviewed herein. Clear cell renal cancer is associated with von Hippel Lindau disease, chromosome 3 translocations, PTEN hamartomatous syndrome and mutations in BAP1, as well as several of the genes encoding the proteins comprising the succinate dehydrogenase complex (SDHB/C/D). Type 1 papillary renal cancers arise in conjunction with germline mutations in MET and type 2 as part of Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Cancer (FH mutations). Chromophone and oncocytic renal cancers are predominantly associated with Birt Hogg Dubé syndrome. Angiomyolipomas are commonly and their malignant counterpart epitheliod angiomyolipomas rarely are found in patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex. The targeted therapeutic options for the renal cancer associated with these diseases are just starting to expand, and are an area of active clinical research. PMID:24359990

  5. Renal Proteome in Mice with Different Susceptibilities to Fluorosis

    PubMed Central

    Peres-Buzalaf, Camila; Salvato, Fernanda; Labate, Carlos Alberto; Everett, Eric T.; Whitford, Gary Milton; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2013-01-01

    A/J and 129P3/J mouse strains have different susceptibilities to dental fluorosis due to their genetic backgrounds. They also differ with respect to several features of fluoride (F) metabolism and metabolic handling of water. This study was done to determine whether differences in F metabolism could be explained by diversities in the profile of protein expression in kidneys. Weanling, male A/J mice (susceptible to dental fluorosis, n = 18) and 129P3/J mice (resistant, n = 18) were housed in pairs and assigned to three groups given low-F food and drinking water containing 0, 10 or 50 ppm [F] for 7 weeks. Renal proteome profiles were examined using 2D-PAGE and LC-MS/MS. Quantitative intensity analysis detected between A/J and 129P3/J strains 122, 126 and 134 spots differentially expressed in the groups receiving 0, 10 and 50 ppmF, respectively. From these, 25, 30 and 32, respectively, were successfully identified. Most of the proteins were related to metabolic and cellular processes, followed by response to stimuli, development and regulation of cellular processes. In F-treated groups, PDZK-1, a protein involved in the regulation of renal tubular reabsorption capacity was down-modulated in the kidney of 129P3/J mice. A/J and 129P3/J mice exhibited 11 and 3 exclusive proteins, respectively, regardless of F exposure. In conclusion, proteomic analysis was able to identify proteins potentially involved in metabolic handling of F and water that are differentially expressed or even not expressed in the strains evaluated. This can contribute to understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying genetic susceptibility to dental fluorosis, by indicating key-proteins that should be better addressed in future studies. PMID:23308176

  6. [Hereditary renal cancer].

    PubMed

    Sanz-Ortega, Julián; Olivier, Carlos; Pérez Segura, Pedro; Galante Romo, Isabel; San José Mansó, Luis; Saez, Mamen

    2009-02-01

    Kidney cancer is the tenth most common cause of cancer death. There are a growing number of genes known to be associated with an increased risk of specific types of kidney cancer. People with Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome have about a 40% risk of developing multiple bilateral clear cell kidney cancers. They can also develop retinal and brain hemangioblastoma, kidneys or pancreas cysts, pheochromocytoma and endolymphatic sac tumor. Four phenotypes with different renal cancer and pheocromocitoma risk have been described depending on the germline mutation. Hereditary papillary renal cell carcinoma syndrome has type 1 papillary renal cell carcinomas associated with protooncogene c-MET germline mutations. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome has FLCN gene mutations associated with fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts with a high risk for spontaneous pneumothorax, and a 15% to 30% risk of kidney cancer (most classified as chromophobe carcinoma, oncocytoma or oncocytic hybrid, but clear cell and papillary kidney cancers have also been reported). Histopathological findings such as oncocytosis and oncocytic hybrids are very unusual outside the syndrome. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer syndrome shows mutations of Fumarate hydratase gene and cutaneous leiomyomata in 76% of affected individuals, uterine leiomyomata in 100% of females, and unilateral, solitary, and aggressive papillary renal cancer in 10 to 16% of patients. A specific histopathological change is eosinophilic prominent nucleoli with a perinucleolar halo. Tuberous sclerosis complex is one of the most prevalent (1/5.800) hereditary syndromes where renal disease is the second leading cause of death, associated with angiomyolipomas (70%), renal cysts, oncocytomas or clear cell cancer. PMID:19418834

  7. Pharmacokinetics in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Levy, G

    1977-04-01

    The physiologic perturbations associated with renal disease can have a pronounced effect on the kinetics of elimination of drugs and their metabolites from the body. Drugs are ordinarily cleared from the body by a number of routes, each of which can be characterized by a clearance value. The sum of these clearances (renal, hepatic, etc.) is the total or body clearance which is inversely proportional to the steady-state plasma concentration produced by a given drug dosage regimen. The quantitative contribution of each route of elimination to the metabolic fate of a drug is proportional to the clearance value of that route relative to the body clearance. As a first approximation, the reduction in the renal clearance of a drug caused by renal disease is proportional to the reduction in the renal clearance of creatinine. The metabolic (biotransformation) clearance of many extensively plasma protein bound drugs is proportional to their free fraction (ratio of concentrations of free to total drug) in plasma. Since severe renal disease causes a reduction in the plasma protein binding of many drugs, the metabolic clearance of such drugs will be increased. The contribution of hemodialysis to the total clearance of a drug depends on the magnitude of the clearance obtained by hemodialysis relative to the magnitude of the body clearance of the drug on a day between dialyses. To compensate for the increased elimination of a drug during hemodialysis, the dosing rate (i.e., the dose per unit of time) must be increased by the factor (hemodialysis clearance and body clearance):body clearance, where body clearance is that during a day between dialyses. Further dosage compensation may be needed if body clearance is increased during hemodialysis due to decreased plasma protein binding of the drug. Under certain conditions, an increased accumulation of pharmacologically active drug metabolites during renal failure becomes a matter of serious concern. PMID:851113

  8. Renal haemodynamic and excretory responses to bradykinin in anaesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Y; Tadano, K; Yamasaki, T

    1999-08-01

    1. Effects of bradykinin (BK) on renal haemodynamics and urine formation were examined in anaesthetized dogs. 2. Renal arterial infusion of BK at doses of 5 or 50 ng/kg per min produced dose-dependent increases in renal blood flow (RBF), without affecting systemic arterial pressure or glomerular filtration rate. There were also significant and dose-dependent increases in urine flow (UF), urinary excretion of sodium (UNaV) and fractional excretion of sodium (FENa) and decreases in urine osmolality during BK infusion. 3. Renal haemodynamic and excretory responses to the BK infusion were completely abolished by the simultaneous administration of Hoe 140 (icatibant, 100 ng/kg per min intrarenally), a selective BK B2-receptor antagonist. 4. In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine (NOARG; 40 micrograms/kg per min intrarenally), a nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor, BK-induced renal vasodilative and natriuretic effects were markedly attenuated, although responses of UF and urine osmolality to BK remained unchanged. The water diuretic effect of BK was abolished in dogs given both NOARG and ibuprofen (12.5 mg/kg bolus injection plus 12.5 mg/kg per h of sustained infusion intravenously), a cyclooxygenase inhibitor. 5. These results clearly indicate that renal haemodynamic and excretory responses to BK were mediated exclusively by the B2-receptor. Renal vasodilative and natriuretic responses are mainly linked to NO generation, while both NO and prostaglandin biosynthesis are involved in the BK-induced water diuresis. PMID:10474781

  9. p66Shc regulates renal vascular tone in hypertension-induced nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Bradley; Palygin, Oleg; Rufanova, Victoriya A; Chong, Andrew; Lazar, Jozef; Jacob, Howard J; Mattson, David; Roman, Richard J; Williams, Jan M; Cowley, Allen W; Geurts, Aron M; Staruschenko, Alexander; Imig, John D; Sorokin, Andrey

    2016-07-01

    Renal preglomerular arterioles regulate vascular tone to ensure a large pressure gradient over short distances, a function that is extremely important for maintaining renal microcirculation. Regulation of renal microvascular tone is impaired in salt-sensitive (SS) hypertension-induced nephropathy, but the molecular mechanisms contributing to this impairment remain elusive. Here, we assessed the contribution of the SH2 adaptor protein p66Shc (encoded by Shc1) in regulating renal vascular tone and the development of renal vascular dysfunction associated with hypertension-induced nephropathy. We generated a panel of mutant rat strains in which specific modifications of Shc1 were introduced into the Dahl SS rats. In SS rats, overexpression of p66Shc was linked to increased renal damage. Conversely, deletion of p66Shc from these rats restored the myogenic responsiveness of renal preglomerular arterioles ex vivo and promoted cellular contraction in primary vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) that were isolated from renal vessels. In primary SMCs, p66Shc restricted the activation of transient receptor potential cation channels to attenuate cytosolic Ca2+ influx, implicating a mechanism by which overexpression of p66Shc impairs renal vascular reactivity. These results establish the adaptor protein p66Shc as a regulator of renal vascular tone and a driver of impaired renal vascular function in hypertension-induced nephropathy. PMID:27270176

  10. Chemokines as Potential Markers in Pediatric Renal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Pereira, André Barreto; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio

    2014-01-01

    Glomerular diseases and obstructive uropathies are the two most frequent causes of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children. Recently, biomarkers have become a focus of clinical research as potentially useful diagnostic tools in pediatric renal diseases. Among several putative biomarkers, chemokines emerge as promising molecules since they play relevant roles in the pathophysiology of pediatric renal diseases. The evaluation of these inflammatory mediators might help in the management of diverse renal diseases in children and the detection of patients at high risk to develop CKD. The aim of this paper is to revise general aspects of chemokines and the potential link between chemokines and the most common pediatric renal diseases by including experimental and clinical evidence. PMID:24692841