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Sample records for lipase lpl single

  1. Human clusterin (CLI) maps to 8p21 in proximity to the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, T.M.; Lichter, P.; Zimmer, M.; Tschopp, J.; Jenne, D.E.; Etienne, J.

    1993-05-01

    Clusterin (gene symbol: CLI) is a post-translationally nicked, two-chain plasma and tissue glycoprotein of 80 kDa. It forms high-density lipoprotein complexes with apolipoprotein A-I in plasma, functions as an inhibitor of the cytolytic reaction of the terminal complement proteins C5 to C9, and is secreted by Sertoli cells in large amounts into the seminal fluid. By isolating and characterizing three partially overlapping cosmid clones, the authors have established the complete physical map of the clusterin gene which spans about 20 kb. The subchromosomal position of the clusterin gene (CLI) and the order of CLI and the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene were determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization. They show that CLI, previously assigned to chromosome 8, is located on 8p21 proximal to the LPL locus. Based on this localization they consider clusterin as a novel candidate gene determining susceptibility to atherosclerosis. 23 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Characterization of the human lipoprotein lipase (LPL) promoter: Evidence of two cis-regulatory regions, LP-[alpha] and LP-[beta] of importance for the differentation-linked induction of the LPL gene during adipogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Enerbaeck, S.; Ohlsson, B.G.; Samuelsson, L.; Bjursell, G. )

    1992-10-01

    When preadipocytes differentiate into adipocytes, several differentiation-linked genes are activated. Lipo-protein lipase (LPL) is one of the first genes induced during this process. To investigate early events in adipocyte development, we have focused on the transcriptional activation of the LPL gene. For this purpose, we have cloned and fused different parts of intragenic and flanking sequences with a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene. Transient transfection experiments and DNase I hypersensitivity assays indicate that several positive as well as negative elements contribute to transcriptional regulation of the LPL gene. When reporter gene constructs were stably introduced into preadipocytes, we were able to monitor and compare the activation patterns of different promoter deletion mutants at selected time points representing the process of adipocyte development. We could delimit two cis-regulatory elements important for gradual activation of the LPL gene during adipocyte development in vitro. These elements, LP-[alpha] (-702 to -666) and LP-[beta] (-468 to -430), contain a striking similarity to a consensus sequence known to bind the transcription factors HNF-3 and fork head. Results of gel mobility shift assays and DNase I and exonuclease III in vitro protection assays indicate that factors with DNA-binding properties similar to those of the HNF-3/fork head family of transcription factors are present in adipocytes and interact with LP-[alpha] and LP-[beta]. We also demonstrate that LP-[alpha] and LP-[beta] were both capable of conferring a differentiation-linked expression pattern to a heterolog promoter, thus mimicking the expression of the endogenous LPL gene during adipocyte differentiation. These findings indicate that interactions with LP-[alpha] and LP-[beta] could be a part of a differentiation switch governing induction of the LPL gene during adipocyte differentiation. 48 refs., 11 figs.

  3. Dietary effects in the early recovery phase of kwashiorkor. Plasma levels of triglycerides, FFA, D-beta-hydroxybutyrate, glycerol, postheparin lipoprotein lipase (LPL), glucose and insulin.

    PubMed

    Persson, B; Habte, D; Sterky, G

    1976-05-01

    The fatty liver often found in untreated kwashiorkor has been associated with highly variable concentration of circulating lipids. The effect on lipid metabolism of two isocaloric diets--one synthetic monomolecular (Vivonex) and one standard (Casilan)--which both initiated satisfactory clinical improvement was studied in 21 Ethiopian children with kwashiorkor during the first weeks of rehabilitation. Before treatment mean fasting values of all biochemical parameters were within normal ranges except for moderately elevated triglycerides--an unexpected finding-and low insulin. Individual values varied greatly; triglyceride between 0.39 and 3.49 mmol/1. FFA correlated both to glycerol, D-beta-hydroxybutyrate and triglyceride values. During treatment insulin, glucose and glycerol remained essentially unchanged and were similar in both dietary groups. In the Vivonex group only there was an initial marked, parallel fall of FFA and D-beta-hydroxybutyrate suggesting greater availability of carbohydrate and enhanced glucose utilization. This pattern of response seemed to occur without comparable inhibition of lipolysis. Triglycerides--like serum albumin--increased faster in the Casilan group. The highest mean triglyceride value was reached by day 8 in the Casilan group and by day 15 in the Vivonex group. Ten minutes following heparin injection triglycerides declined, FFA and glycerol increased indicating release of in vivo active lipase. LPL activity assayed in vitro was similar and unaffected by 2 weeks of dietary treatment in both groups. LPL activity was inversely correlated to triglycerides providing--beside the type of diet--another possible explanation for the wide variations seen in circulatory triglycerides. PMID:1274567

  4. Lipoprotein lipase variants interact with polyunsaturated fatty acids to modulate obesity traits in Puerto Ricans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a candidate gene for obesity based on its role in triglyceride hydrolysis and the partitioning of fatty acids towards storage or oxidation. Whether dietary fatty acids modify LPL associated obesity risk is unknown. We examined five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (...

  5. Polymorphisms in the LPL gene and their association with growth traits in Jiaxian cattle.

    PubMed

    Gui, L S; Huang, Y M; Hong, J Y; Zan, L S

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene was involved in metabolism and transport of lipids, suggesting that the LPL is a potential candidate gene affecting growth traits in animals. The aim of this study was to identify polymorphism in the bovine LPL gene and analyze its possible association with growth traits in 218 randomly selected Jiaxian cattle. We used DNA sequencing to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the LPL gene. A sequence analysis revealed three SNPs: two in intron 5 (C18306T and C18341T) and one in exon 6 (G18362A). G18362A is a missense mutation leading to a change of the 325th glycine to serine. Based on χ(2) tests, the genotypic distributions of C18306T were in agreement with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P > 0.05), whereas the other two mutations were not (0.05 > P > 0.01). Association analyses showed that the C18341T SNP was significantly associated with several growth traits (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05), and the G18362A was associated with withers height (P < 0.05). Our results suggest that LPL gene variation may be considered molecular markers for growth traits in Jiaxian cattle. PMID:27173255

  6. Apolipoprotein A5 and lipoprotein lipase interact to modulate anthropometric measures in Hispanics of Caribbean origin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) proteins interact functionally to regulate lipid metabolism, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for each gene have also been associated independently with obesity risk. Evaluating gene combinations may be more effective than single SNP a...

  7. Lipase

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lipase is used for indigestion, heartburn, allergy to gluten in wheat products (celiac disease), Crohn's disease, and ... that is associated with cystic fibrosis.Allergy to gluten in wheat products (celiac disease). Crohn's disease. Indigestion. ...

  8. Molecular cloning and expression analysis on LPL of Coilia nasus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meiyao; Xu, Dongpo; Liu, Kai; Yang, Jian; Xu, Pao

    2016-06-01

    Coilia nasus is one important commercial anadromous species which mainly distributed in the Yangtze River in China. At present, it has been on the "National Key Protective Species List" because of its severe resource damage. Lipid metabolism is very important during its long-distance migration. To make further research on lipid metabolism of C. nasus, we cloned lipoprotein lipase gene with homologous cloning method. A full-length cDNA of LPL of C. nasus was cloned from liver which covered 3537 bp with a 1519 bp open reading frame encoding 505 deduced amino acids whose molecular mass was 57.5 kDa and theoretical isoelectric point was 7.58. The deduced amino acids had high similarity with the reported LPL sequence of other species. It had typical conserved domain of LPL protein containing catalytic triad, N-linked glycosylation sites and conserved heparin-binding site, etc. We adopted quantitative real-time RT-PCR method to detect the mRNA expression of LPL of C. nasus in ten tissues including mesenteric adipose, liver, muscle, stomach, spleen, heart, head kidney, trunk kidney, gill and brain with β-actin as internal reference. LPL expressed in all the detected tissues. The highest expression was in mesenteric adipose, and followed by liver, muscle, stomach. Lipid expressed lowly in spleen, heart, head kidney, trunk kidney, gill and brain. The research on the cloning and differential expression of LPL of C. nasus will lay foundation for further research on lipid metabolism of C. nasus. PMID:26877109

  9. Design and synthesis of boronic acid inhibitors of endothelial lipase.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Daniel P; LeBlanc, Daniel F; Cromley, Debra; Billheimer, Jeffrey; Rader, Daniel J; Bachovchin, William W

    2012-02-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) are homologous lipases that act on plasma lipoproteins. EL is predominantly a phospholipase and appears to be a key regulator of plasma HDL-C. LPL is mainly a triglyceride lipase regulating (V)LDL levels. The existing biological data indicate that inhibitors selective for EL over LPL should have anti-atherogenic activity, mainly through increasing plasma HDL-C levels. We report here the synthesis of alkyl, aryl, or acyl-substituted phenylboronic acids that inhibit EL. Many of the inhibitors evaluated proved to be nearly equally potent against both EL and LPL, but several exhibited moderate to good selectivity for EL. PMID:22225633

  10. Genetic screening of the LPL gene in hypertriglyceridaemic patients.

    PubMed

    Wright, William T; Young, Ian S; Nicholls, D Paul; Graham, Colin A

    2008-07-01

    Serum triglyceride (TG) level is an important independent risk factor for coronary heart disease, with the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) enzyme playing the major role in regulating the catabolism of TG rich lipoproteins. The complete sequence analysis of the LPL gene was carried out on 19 individuals with extreme hypertriglyceridaemia (HTG; TG>14 mmol/l) with a total of 42 sequence variants being identified, a number of which are novel to this study. A total of eight patients were shown to have functional variants (p.D36N, p.R197H, p.N318S, p.V340I) that alter amino acids at 11 of the 16 LPL alleles. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis showed no exonic deletion or duplications in this population. Further analysis of the p.N318S (also called N291S) variant identified in the sequencing screen, in larger case and control populations, identified this mutation to be strongly associated with HTG. This study has produced a more comprehensive SNP map of LPL and its surrounding area and identified p.N318S as a major predisposing factor to HTG in the Northern Irish population. PMID:18068174

  11. Angiopoietin-like protein 4 inhibition of lipoprotein lipase: evidence for reversible complex formation.

    PubMed

    Lafferty, Michael J; Bradford, Kira C; Erie, Dorothy A; Neher, Saskia B

    2013-10-01

    Elevated triglycerides are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is the rate-limiting enzyme for the hydrolysis of triglycerides from circulating lipoproteins. The N-terminal domain of angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) inhibits LPL activity. ANGPTL4 was previously described as an unfolding molecular chaperone of LPL that catalytically converts active LPL dimers into inactive monomers. Our studies show that ANGPTL4 is more accurately described as a reversible, noncompetitive inhibitor of LPL. We find that inhibited LPL is in a complex with ANGPTL4, and upon dissociation, LPL regains lipase activity. Furthermore, we have generated a variant of ANGPTL4 that is dependent on divalent cations for its ability to inhibit LPL. We show that LPL inactivation by this regulatable variant of ANGPTL4 is fully reversible after treatment with a chelator. PMID:23960078

  12. Comparative studies of vertebrate lipoprotein lipase: a key enzyme of very low density lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Roger S; Vandeberg, John L; Cox, Laura A

    2011-06-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LIPL or LPL; E.C.3.1.1.34) serves a dual function as a triglyceride lipase of circulating chylomicrons and very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) and facilitates receptor-mediated lipoprotein uptake into heart, muscle and adipose tissue. Comparative LPL amino acid sequences and protein structures and LPL gene locations were examined using data from several vertebrate genome projects. Mammalian LPL genes usually contained 9 coding exons on the positive strand. Vertebrate LPL sequences shared 58-99% identity as compared with 33-49% sequence identities with other vascular triglyceride lipases, hepatic lipase (HL) and endothelial lipase (EL). Two human LPL N-glycosylation sites were conserved among seven predicted sites for the vertebrate LPL sequences examined. Sequence alignments, key amino acid residues and conserved predicted secondary and tertiary structures were also studied. A CpG island was identified within the 5'-untranslated region of the human LPL gene which may contribute to the higher than average (×4.5 times) level of expression reported. Phylogenetic analyses examined the relationships and potential evolutionary origins of vertebrate lipase genes, LPL, LIPG (encoding EL) and LIPC (encoding HL) which suggested that these have been derived from gene duplication events of an ancestral neutral lipase gene, prior to the appearance of fish during vertebrate evolution. Comparative divergence rates for these vertebrate sequences indicated that LPL is evolving more slowly (2-3 times) than for LIPC and LIPG genes and proteins. PMID:21561822

  13. [Lipoprotein lipase and diabetic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang-Yu; Yin, Wei-Dong; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2014-02-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyzes plasma triglyceride-rich lipoproteins into free fatty acids (FFA) to provide energy for cardiac tissue. During diabetes, cardiac energy supply is insufficient due to defected utilization of glucose. As a compensation of cardiac energy supply, FFAs are released through the hydrolysis of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and chylomicrons (CM) due to activation of LPL activity. In diabetic patients, activated LPL activity and elevated FFAs result in the intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species and lipids in myocardium and potentially induce the diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM). The present review summarizes the regulatory mechanisms of myocardial LPL and the pathogenesis of DCM induced by LPL and provides novel therapeutic targets and pathways for DCM. PMID:24873138

  14. TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-P-dioxin) reduces lipoprotein lipase activity in the adipose tissue of the guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Brewster, D.W.; Matsumura, F.

    1984-07-31

    TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) adminstered to young male guinea pigs at a dose of 1 ..mu..g/kg (single intraperitoneal injection) caused a large reduction in adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity. This effect occurred rapidly; a 70% decrease was noticed after 24 hour and 80% of LPL activity was lost by 48 hours when the serum triglyceride levels increased to 175% of control levels. LPL is known to play an important role in controlling the amount of free fatty acids supplied to adipose tissues. Administration of a large dose of glucose to fasted guinea pigs, which have shown a similar weight loss, but less LPL loss than TCDD-treated animals, had the effect of elevating their adipose LPL levels back to a near normal level, whereas the same treatment caused no significant increase in the LPL levels of TCDD-treated animals. Evidence indicates that the TCDD-caused decline in LPL activity is irreversible. As a consequence, the affected guinea pigs are incapable of responding to changes in nutritional status. 36 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  15. Post-Heparin LPL Activity Measurement Using VLDL As a Substrate: A New Robust Method for Routine Assessment of Plasma Triglyceride Lipolysis Defects

    PubMed Central

    Di Filippo, Mathilde; Marçais, Christophe; Charrière, Sybil; Marmontel, Oriane; Broyer, Martine; Delay, Mireille; Merlin, Micheline; Nollace, Axel; Valéro, René; Lagarde, Michel; Pruneta-Deloche, Valérie; Moulin, Philippe; Sassolas, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Background Determination of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity is important for hyperchylomicronemia diagnosis, but remains both unreliable and cumbersome with current methods. Consequently by using human VLDL as substrate we developed a new LPL assay which does not require sonication, radioactive or fluorescent particles. Methods Post-heparin plasma was added to the VLDL substrate prepared by ultracentrifugation of heat inactivated normolipidemic human serums, diluted in buffer, pH 8.15. Following incubation at 37°c, the NEFA (non esterified fatty acids) produced were assayed hourly for 4 hours. LPL activity was expressed as µmol/l/min after subtraction of hepatic lipase (HL) activity, obtained following LPL inhibition with NaCl 1.5 mmol/l. Molecular analysis of LPL, GPIHBP1, APOA5, APOC2, APOE genes was available for 62 patients. Results Our method was reproducible (coefficient of variation (CV): intra-assay 5.6%, inter-assay 7.1%), and tightly correlated with the conventional radiolabelled triolein emulsion method (n = 26, r = 0.88). Normal values were established at 34.8±12.8 µmol/l/min (mean±SD) from 20 control subjects. LPL activities obtained from 71 patients with documented history of major hypertriglyceridemia showed a trimodal distribution. Among the 11 patients with a very low LPL activity (<10 µmol/l/min), 5 were homozygous or compound heterozygous for LPL or GPIHBP1 deleterious mutations, 3 were compound heterozygous for APOA5 deleterious mutations and the p.S19W APOA5 susceptibility variant, and 2 were free of any mutations in the usual candidate genes. No homozygous gene alteration in LPL, GPIHBP1 and APOC2 genes was found in any of the patients with LPL activity >10 µmol/l/min. Conclusion This new reproducible method is a valuable tool for routine diagnosis and reliably identifies LPL activity defects. PMID:24788417

  16. Beta-adrenergic blockade and lipoprotein lipase activity in rat tissues after acute exercise.

    PubMed

    Paulin, A; Lalonde, J; Deshaies, Y

    1991-10-01

    The present experiments were aimed at evaluating the acute effects of exercise on lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity in untrained rats. The activity of LPL was measured in postheparin plasma (PHP) before and at various times after a 1-h run on a treadmill (22 m/min, O degrees grade). LPL in PHP was 50% below pre-exercise levels immediately and 3 h after the run but was increased 65% over resting levels 24 h postexercise. To further characterize the very early fall in LPL activity in response to exercise and to assess the possible involvement therein of the beta-adrenergic pathway, LPL in heart, vastus lateralis muscle (VLM), and white (WAT) and brown (BAT) adipose tissues was determined at rest and immediately after exercise in rats that were treated or not with nadolol (25 mg.kg-1.day-1 for 30 days). Immediately after 1 h of exercise, there was a reduction in total enzyme activity in WAT (40% below resting levels), BAT (-58%), VLM (-53%), and heart (-30%). Exercise reduced serum triacylglycerol levels (-64%) and doubled those of nonesterified fatty acids. beta-Adrenergic blockade did not affect any of these variables. Both exercise and nadolol lowered serum cholesterol levels by approximately 20%, but the effects were not additive. These results show that the global intravascular pool of LPL undergoes divergent, time-dependent alterations in response to a single bout of moderate exercise. The acute downregulation of postheparin plasma LPL immediately after exercise reflected a fall in the total enzyme pool of all tissues studied.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1681747

  17. The GPIHBP1-LPL complex is responsible for the margination of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in capillaries.

    PubMed

    Goulbourne, Chris N; Gin, Peter; Tatar, Angelica; Nobumori, Chika; Hoenger, Andreas; Jiang, Haibo; Grovenor, Chris R M; Adeyo, Oludotun; Esko, Jeffrey D; Goldberg, Ira J; Reue, Karen; Tontonoz, Peter; Bensadoun, André; Beigneux, Anne P; Young, Stephen G; Fong, Loren G

    2014-05-01

    Triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) undergo lipolysis by lipoprotein lipase (LPL), an enzyme that is transported to the capillary lumen by an endothelial cell protein, GPIHBP1. For LPL-mediated lipolysis to occur, TRLs must bind to the lumen of capillaries. This process is often assumed to involve heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), but we suspected that TRL margination might instead require GPIHBP1. Indeed, TRLs marginate along the heart capillaries of wild-type but not Gpihbp1⁻/⁻ mice, as judged by fluorescence microscopy, quantitative assays with infrared-dye-labeled lipoproteins, and EM tomography. Both cell-culture and in vivo studies showed that TRL margination depends on LPL bound to GPIHBP1. Notably, the expression of LPL by endothelial cells in Gpihbp1⁻/⁻ mice did not restore defective TRL margination, implying that the binding of LPL to HSPGs is ineffective in promoting TRL margination. Our studies show that GPIHBP1-bound LPL is the main determinant of TRL margination. PMID:24726386

  18. Lipase maturation factor 1: a lipase chaperone involved in lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Péterfy, Miklós

    2012-05-01

    Mutations in lipase maturation factor 1 (LMF1) are associated with severe hypertriglyceridemia in mice and human subjects. The underlying cause is impaired lipid clearance due to lipase deficiency. LMF1 is a chaperone of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and it is critically required for the post-translational activation of three vascular lipases: lipoprotein lipase (LPL), hepatic lipase (HL) and endothelial lipase (EL). As LMF1 is only required for the maturation of homodimeric, but not monomeric, lipases, it is likely involved in the assembly of inactive lipase subunits into active enzymes and/or the stabilization of active dimers. Herein, we provide an overview of current understanding of LMF1 function and propose that it may play a regulatory role in lipase activation and lipid metabolism. Further studies will be required to test this hypothesis and elucidate the full spectrum of phenotypes in combined lipase deficiency. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Triglyceride Metabolism and Disease. PMID:22063272

  19. Skeletal muscle damage and impaired regeneration due to LPL-mediated lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tamilarasan, K P; Temmel, H; Das, S K; Al Zoughbi, W; Schauer, S; Vesely, P W; Hoefler, G

    2012-01-01

    According to the concept of lipotoxicity, ectopic accumulation of lipids in non-adipose tissue induces pathological changes. The most prominent effects are seen in fatty liver disease, lipid cardiomyopathy, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance and skeletal muscle myopathy. We used the MCK(m)-hLPL mouse distinguished by skeletal and cardiac muscle-specific human lipoprotein lipase (hLPL) overexpression to investigate effects of lipid overload in skeletal muscle. We were intrigued to find that ectopic lipid accumulation induced proteasomal activity, apoptosis and skeletal muscle damage. In line with these findings we observed reduced Musculus gastrocnemius and Musculus quadriceps mass in transgenic animals, accompanied by severely impaired physical endurance. We suggest that muscle loss was aggravated by impaired muscle regeneration as evidenced by reduced cross-sectional area of regenerating myofibers after cardiotoxin-induced injury in MCK(m)-hLPL mice. Similarly, an almost complete loss of myogenic potential was observed in C2C12 murine myoblasts upon overexpression of LPL. Our findings directly link lipid overload to muscle damage, impaired regeneration and loss of performance. These findings support the concept of lipotoxicity and are a further step to explain pathological effects seen in muscle of obese patients, patients with the metabolic syndrome and patients with cancer-associated cachexia. PMID:22825472

  20. Parathyroid hormone is not an inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase activity.

    PubMed

    Arnadottir, M; Nilsson-Ehle, P

    1994-01-01

    The reduced lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activities in uraemia are reflected by increased serum triglyceride concentrations and reduced HDL cholesterol concentrations. Both hyperparathyroidism and circulating inhibitor(s) of LPL have been associated with the disturbances of lipid metabolism in uraemia. The aim of the present study was to investigate if parathyroid hormone (PTH) had an inhibitory effect on LPL activity. Plasma post-heparin LPL activities, plasma LPL inhibitory activities, serum PTHintact and serum PTHC-terminal concentrations were analysed in 20 patients on haemodialysis and 20 healthy controls. The effects of purified, human PTHintact and a carboxyterminal fragment of PTH (PTH39-84) on LPL activities in post-heparin plasma from healthy individuals and on the enzyme activity of purified, bovine milk LPL, activated with apolipoprotein CII, were studied. Patients had significantly higher plasma LPL inhibitory activities than controls, but there was no correlation between plasma LPL inhibitory activities and serum PTH concentrations. Neither PTHintact nor PTH39-84 had a significant effect on LPL activities in vitro. Thus there was no evidence of a direct inhibition of LPL activity by PTH under the present in-vivo or in-vitro conditions. PMID:7870347

  1. Mutations in LPL, APOC2, APOA5, GPIHBP1 and LMF1 in patients with severe hypertriglyceridaemia

    PubMed Central

    Surendran, R Preethi; Visser, Maartje E; Heemelaar, Steffie; Wang, Jian; Peter, Jorge; Defesche, Joep C; Kuivenhoven, Jan A; Hosseini, Maryam; Péterfy, Miklós; Kastelein, John JP; Johansen, Chris T; Hegele, Robert A; Stroes, Erik SG; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M

    2014-01-01

    Objective The severe forms of hypertriglyceridaemia (HTG) are caused by mutations in genes that lead to loss of function of lipoprotein lipase (LPL). In most patients with severe HTG (TG >10 mmol/L) it is a challenge to define the underlying cause. We investigated the molecular basis of severe HTG in patients referred to the Lipid Clinic at the Academic Medical Center Amsterdam. Methods The coding regions of LPL, APOC2, APOA5 and two novel genes, lipase maturation factor 1 (LMF1) and GPI-anchored HDL-binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1), were sequenced in 86 patients with type 1 and type 5 HTG and 327 controls. Results In 46 patients (54%) rare DNA sequence variants were identified, comprising variants in LPL (n=19), APOC2 (n=1), APOA5 (n=2), GPIHBP1 (n=3) and LMF1 (n=8). In 22 patients (26%) only common variants in LPL (p.Asp36Asn, p.Asn318Ser and p.Ser474Ter) and APOA5 (p.Ser19Trp) could be identified, whereas no mutations were found in 18 patients (21%). In vitro validation revealed that the mutations in LMF1 were not associated with compromised LPL function. Consistent with this, five of the eight LMF1 variants were also found in controls and therefore cannot account for the observed phenotype. Conclusion The prevalence of mutations in LPL was 34% and mostly restricted to patients with type 1 HTG. Mutations in GPIHBP1 (n=3), APOC2 (n=1) and APOA5 (n=2) were rare but the associated clinical phenotype was severe. Routine sequencing of candidate genes in severe HTG has improved our understanding of the molecular basis of this phenotype associated with acute pancreatitis, and may help to guide future individualized therapeutic strategies. PMID:22239554

  2. GPIHBP1 Is Responsible for the Entry of Lipoprotein Lipase into Capillaries

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Brandon S. J.; Beigneux, Anne P.; Barnes, Richard H.; Tu, Yiping; Gin, Peter; Weinstein, Michael M.; Nobumori, Chika; Nyrén, Rakel; Goldberg, Ira; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Bensadoun, André; Young, Stephen G.; Fong, Loren G.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The lipolytic processing of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is the central event in plasma lipid metabolism, providing lipids for storage in adipose tissue and fuel for vital organs such as the heart. LPL is synthesized and secreted by myocytes and adipocytes but then finds its way into the lumen of capillaries, where it hydrolyzes lipoprotein triglycerides. The mechanism by which LPL reaches the lumen of capillaries represents one of the most persistent mysteries of plasma lipid metabolism. Here, we show that GPIHBP1 is responsible for the transport of LPL into capillaries. In Gpihbp1-deficient mice, LPL is mislocalized to the interstitial spaces surrounding myocytes and adipocytes. Also, we show that GPIHBP1 is located at the basolateral surface of capillary endothelial cells and actively transports LPL across endothelial cells. Our experiments define the function of GPIHBP1 in triglyceride metabolism and provide a mechanism for the transport of LPL into capillaries. PMID:20620994

  3. CETP/LPL/LIPC gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Feng; Han, Yue; Zhang, Rui; Qin, Li; Wang, Ming-Xu; Ma, Le

    2015-01-01

    Three high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-related loci have been reported to be associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but the results were inconsistent. In this study, the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) rs3764261 variant was significantly associated with an increased risk of AMD (odds ratio [OR] = 1.13, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05–1.21, P < 0.001), and the hepatic lipase (LIPC) rs10468017 variant was associated with a significantly decreased risk of AMD (OR = 0.81, CI: 0.76–0.86, P < 0.001). Individuals carrying the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) rs12678919 polymorphism (A → G) had no significant change in the risk of developing AMD (OR = 1.01, CI: 0.92–1.10, P = 0.17). After adjusting for the complement factor H (CFH) gene, both CETP and LPL conferred a significantly increased AMD risk (ORCETP = 1.17, CI: 1.08–1.26, P < 0.001; ORLPL = 1.11, CI: 1.01–1.22, P = 0.02). Subgroup analysis based on ethnicity revealed a significant association between the CETP variant and AMD in both Americans (OR = 1.12, CI: 1.02–1.23, P = 0.01) and Europeans (OR = 1.10, CI: 1.01–1.19, P = 0.011). This meta-analysis revealed that both CETP rs3764261 and LIPC rs10468017 polymorphisms were significantly associated with AMD risk. After adjustment for the CFH gene, CETP/LPL conferred a significantly increased susceptibility to the disease, indicating potential interactions among genes in the complement system and the lipid metabolism pathway. PMID:26503844

  4. Effects of heparin on the uptake of lipoprotein lipase in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Neuger, Lucyna; Vilaró, Senén; Lopez-Iglesias, Carmen; Gupta, Jitendra; Olivecrona, Thomas; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2004-01-01

    Background Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is anchored at the vascular endothelium through interaction with heparan sulfate. It is not known how this enzyme is turned over but it has been suggested that it is slowly released into blood and then taken up and degraded in the liver. Heparin releases the enzyme into the circulating blood. Several lines of evidence indicate that this leads to accelerated flux of LPL to the liver and a temporary depletion of the enzyme in peripheral tissues. Results Rat livers were found to contain substantial amounts of LPL, most of which was catalytically inactive. After injection of heparin, LPL mass in liver increased for at least an hour. LPL activity also increased, but not in proportion to mass, indicating that the lipase soon lost its activity after being bound/taken up in the liver. To further study the uptake, bovine LPL was labeled with 125I and injected. Already two min after injection about 33 % of the injected lipase was in the liver where it initially located along sinusoids. With time the immunostaining shifted to the hepatocytes, became granular and then faded, indicating internalization and degradation. When heparin was injected before the lipase, the initial immunostaining along sinusoids was weaker, whereas staining over Kupffer cells was enhanced. When the lipase was converted to inactive before injection, the fraction taken up in the liver increased and the lipase located mainly to the Kupffer cells. Conclusions This study shows that there are heparin-insensitive binding sites for LPL on both hepatocytes and Kupffer cells. The latter may be the same sites as those that mediate uptake of inactive LPL. The results support the hypothesis that turnover of endothelial LPL occurs in part by transport to and degradation in the liver, and that this transport is accelerated after injection of heparin. PMID:15544705

  5. Saturated fat-rich diet increases fetal lipids and modulates LPL and leptin receptor expression in rat placentas.

    PubMed

    Mazzucco, M B; Higa, R; Capobianco, E; Kurtz, M; Jawerbaum, A; White, V

    2013-06-01

    Metabolic alterations in obese and overweight mothers impact the placenta and the fetus, leading to anomalies in fetal growth and lipid accretion. The primary aim of the study was to examine the effect of a saturated fat-rich diet (FD) on growth, lipid accretion, and lipases, leptin and leptin receptor (ObR) expression in the placenta and fetal liver. We also aimed to find a role for fetal leptin in the modulation of placental and fetal liver lipase and ObR expression. Six-week-old rats were fed with a standard rat chow (control) or a 25% FD for 7 weeks until mating and during pregnancy. Also, in a group of control rats, fetuses were injected with leptin on days 19, 20, and 21 of pregnancy. On day 21, we assessed lipidemia, insulinemia, and leptinemia in mothers and fetuses. In the placenta and fetal liver, lipid concentration was assessed by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and the gene expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), endothelial lipase, insulin receptor (Insr), leptin, and ObR by RT-PCR. The FD induced hypertriglyceridemia and hyperleptinemia (P<0.01) in mothers and fetuses, an increase in maternal (P<0.05) and fetal weight (P<0.01), overaccumulation of lipids in fetal liver (P<0.01), and enhanced leptin expression in the placenta and fetal liver (P<0.05). Placental expression of IR and LPL was increased (P<0.05), and ObR decreased (P<0.05) in the FD group. Fetal administration of leptin induced the placental and fetal liver downregulation of ObR (P<0.05) and upregulation of LPL expression (P<0.05). The FD led to increased fetal lipid levels, which may result from high maternal lipid availability and fetal leptin effects. PMID:23482704

  6. Lipoproteini lipase-derived fatty acids: physiology and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jee; Goldberg, Ira J

    2007-12-01

    Under normal circumstances, most energy substrate used for heart contraction derives from fatty acids in the form of nonesterified fatty acids bound to albumin or fatty acids derived from lipolysis of lipoprotein-bound triglyceride by lipoprotein lipase (LpL). By creating LpL knockout mice (hLpL0), we learned that loss of cardiac LpL leads to myocardial dysfunction; therefore, neither nonesterified fatty acids nor increased glucose metabolism can replace LpL actions. hLpL0 mice do not survive abdominal aortic constriction and they develop more heart failure with hypertension. Conversely, we created a mouse overexpressing cardiomyocyte-anchored LpL. This transgene produced cardiac lipotoxicity and dilated cardiomyopathy. Methods to alter this phenotype and the causes of other models of lipotoxicity are currently being studied and will provide further insight into the physiology of lipid metabolism in the heart. PMID:18367009

  7. Hippocampal lipoprotein lipase regulates energy balance in rodents☆

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Alexandre; Rouch, Claude; Kassis, Nadim; Moullé, Valentine S.; Croizier, Sophie; Denis, Raphaël G.; Castel, Julien; Coant, Nicolas; Davis, Kathryn; Clegg, Deborah J.; Benoit, Stephen C.; Prévot, Vincent; Bouret, Sébastien; Luquet, Serge; Le Stunff, Hervé; Cruciani-Guglielmacci, Céline; Magnan, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Brain lipid sensing is necessary to regulate energy balance. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) may play a role in this process. We tested if hippocampal LPL regulated energy homeostasis in rodents by specifically attenuating LPL activity in the hippocampus of rats and mice, either by infusing a pharmacological inhibitor (tyloxapol), or using a genetic approach (adeno-associated virus expressing Cre-GFP injected into Lpllox/lox mice). Decreased LPL activity by either method led to increased body weight gain due to decreased locomotor activity and energy expenditure, concomitant with increased parasympathetic tone (unchanged food intake). Decreased LPL activity in both models was associated with increased de novo ceramide synthesis and neurogenesis in the hippocampus, while intrahippocampal infusion of de novo ceramide synthesis inhibitor myriocin completely prevented body weight gain. We conclude that hippocampal lipid sensing might represent a core mechanism for energy homeostasis regulation through de novo ceramide synthesis. PMID:24634821

  8. Angiopoietin-like 4 Modifies the Interactions between Lipoprotein Lipase and Its Endothelial Cell Transporter GPIHBP1.

    PubMed

    Chi, Xun; Shetty, Shwetha K; Shows, Hannah W; Hjelmaas, Alexander J; Malcolm, Emily K; Davies, Brandon S J

    2015-05-01

    The release of fatty acids from plasma triglycerides for tissue uptake is critically dependent on the enzyme lipoprotein lipase (LPL). Hydrolysis of plasma triglycerides by LPL can be disrupted by the protein angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4), and ANGPTL4 has been shown to inactivate LPL in vitro. However, in vivo LPL is often complexed to glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high density lipoprotein-binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1) on the surface of capillary endothelial cells. GPIHBP1 is responsible for trafficking LPL across capillary endothelial cells and anchors LPL to the capillary wall during lipolysis. How ANGPTL4 interacts with LPL in this context is not known. In this study, we investigated the interactions of ANGPTL4 with LPL-GPIHBP1 complexes on the surface of endothelial cells. We show that ANGPTL4 was capable of binding and inactivating LPL complexed to GPIHBP1 on the surface of endothelial cells. Once inactivated, LPL dissociated from GPIHBP1. We also show that ANGPTL4-inactivated LPL was incapable of binding GPIHBP1. ANGPTL4 was capable of binding, but not inactivating, LPL at 4 °C, suggesting that binding alone was not sufficient for ANGPTL4's inhibitory activity. We observed that although the N-terminal coiled-coil domain of ANGPTL4 by itself and full-length ANGPTL4 both bound with similar affinities to LPL, the N-terminal fragment was more potent in inactivating both free and GPIHBP1-bound LPL. These results led us to conclude that ANGPTL4 can both bind and inactivate LPL complexed to GPIHBP1 and that inactivation of LPL by ANGPTL4 greatly reduces the affinity of LPL for GPIHBP1. PMID:25809481

  9. SorLA regulates the activity of lipoprotein lipase by intracellular trafficking.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Stine C; Glerup, Simon; Raarup, Merete K; Mari, Muriel C; Nyegaard, Mette; Koster, Gerbrand; Prabakaran, Thaneas; Nilsson, Stefan K; Kjaergaard, Maj M; Bakke, Oddmund; Nykjær, Anders; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Petersen, Claus Munck; Nielsen, Morten S

    2011-04-01

    Many different tissues and cell types exhibit regulated secretion of lipoprotein lipase (LPL). However, the sorting of LPL in the trans Golgi network has not, hitherto, been understood in detail. Here, we characterize the role of SorLA (officially known as SorLA-1 or sortilin-related receptor) in the intracellular trafficking of LPL. We found that LPL bound to SorLA under neutral and acidic conditions, and in cells this binding mainly occurred in vesicular structures. SorLA expression changed the subcellular distribution of LPL so it became more concentrated in endosomes. From the endosomes, LPL was further routed to the lysosomes, which resulted in a degradation of newly synthesized LPL. Consequently, an 80% reduction of LPL activity was observed in cells that expressed SorLA. By analogy, SorLA regulated the vesicle-like localization of LPL in primary neuronal cells. Thus, LPL binds to SorLA in the biosynthetic pathway and is subsequently transported to endosomes. As a result of this SorLA mediated-transport, newly synthesized LPL can be routed into specialized vesicles and eventually sent to degradation, and its activity thereby regulated. PMID:21385844

  10. Hydrolysis products generated by lipoprotein lipase and endothelial lipase differentially impact THP-1 macrophage cell signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Essaji, Yasmin; Yang, Yanbo; Albert, Carolyn J; Ford, David A; Brown, Robert J

    2013-08-01

    Macrophages express lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and endothelial lipase (EL) within atherosclerotic plaques; however, little is known about how lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by these lipases might affect macrophage cell signalling pathways. We hypothesized that hydrolysis products affect macrophage cell signalling pathways associated with atherosclerosis. To test our hypothesis, we incubated differentiated THP-1 macrophages with products from total lipoprotein hydrolysis by recombinant LPL or EL. Using antibody arrays, we found that the phosphorylation of six receptor tyrosine kinases and three signalling nodes--most associated with atherosclerotic processes--was increased by LPL derived hydrolysis products. EL derived hydrolysis products only increased the phosphorylation of tropomyosin-related kinase A, which is also implicated in playing a role in atherosclerosis. Using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, we identified the species of triacylglycerols and phosphatidylcholines that were hydrolyzed by LPL and EL, and we identified the fatty acids liberated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. To determine if the total liberated fatty acids influenced signalling pathways, we incubated differentiated THP-1 macrophages with a mixture of the fatty acids that matched the concentrations of liberated fatty acids from total lipoproteins by LPL, and we subjected cell lysates to antibody array analyses. The analyses showed that only the phosphorylation of Akt was significantly increased in response to fatty acid treatment. Overall, our study shows that macrophages display potentially pro-atherogenic signalling responses following acute treatments with LPL and EL lipoprotein hydrolysis products. PMID:23794138

  11. Expression of lipoprotein lipase mRNA and secretion in macrophages isolated from human atherosclerotic aorta.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, L; Johansson, H; Ottosson, M; Bondjers, G; Wiklund, O

    1993-10-01

    The expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) mRNA and the LPL activity were studied in macrophages (CD14 positive) from human atherosclerotic tissue. Macrophages were isolated after collagenase digestion by immunomagnetic isolation. About 90% of the cells were foam cells with oil red O positive lipid droplets. To analyze the mRNA expression, PCR with specific primers for LPL was used. Arterial macrophages were analyzed directly after isolation and the data showed low expression of LPL mRNA when compared with monocyte-derived macrophages. To induce the expression of LPL mRNA in macrophages, PMA was used. When incubating arterial macrophages with PMA for 24 h we could not detect any increase in LPL mRNA levels. Similarly, the cells secreted very small amounts of LPL even after PMA stimulation. In conclusion, these studies show a very low expression of LPL mRNA in the CD14-positive macrophage-derived foam cells isolated from human atherosclerotic tissue. These data suggest that the CD14-positive cells are a subpopulation of foam cells that express low levels of lipoprotein lipase, and the lipid content could be a major factor for downregulation of LPL. However, the cells were isolated from advanced atherosclerotic lesions, and these findings may not reflect the situation in early fatty streaks. PMID:8408628

  12. Inactivation of lipoprotein lipase occurs on the surface of THP-1 macrophages where oligomers of angiopoietin-like protein 4 are formed

    SciTech Connect

    Makoveichuk, Elena; Sukonina, Valentina; Kroupa, Olessia; Thulin, Petra; Ehrenborg, Ewa; Olivecrona, Thomas; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity is controlled by ANGPTL4 in THP-1 macrophages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both LPL and ANGPTL4 bind to THP-1 macrophages in a heparin-releasable fashion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Only monomers of ANGPTL4 are present within THP-1 macrophages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Covalent oligomers of ANGPTL4 appear on cell surface and in medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inactivation of LPL coincide with ANGPTL4 oligomer formation on cell surfaces. -- Abstract: Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyzes triglycerides in plasma lipoproteins causing release of fatty acids for metabolic purposes in muscles and adipose tissue. LPL in macrophages in the artery wall may, however, promote foam cell formation and atherosclerosis. Angiopoietin-like protein (ANGPTL) 4 inactivates LPL and ANGPTL4 expression is controlled by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR). The mechanisms for inactivation of LPL by ANGPTL4 was studied in THP-1 macrophages where active LPL is associated with cell surfaces in a heparin-releasable form, while LPL in the culture medium is mostly inactive. The PPAR{delta} agonist GW501516 had no effect on LPL mRNA, but increased ANGPTL4 mRNA and caused a marked reduction of the heparin-releasable LPL activity concomitantly with accumulation of inactive, monomeric LPL in the medium. Intracellular ANGPTL4 was monomeric, while dimers and tetramers of ANGPTL4 were present in the heparin-releasable fraction and medium. GW501516 caused an increase in the amount of ANGPTL4 oligomers on the cell surface that paralleled the decrease in LPL activity. Actinomycin D blocked the effects of GW501516 on ANGPTL4 oligomer formation and prevented the inactivation of LPL. Antibodies against ANGPTL4 interfered with the inactivation of LPL. We conclude that inactivation of LPL in THP-1 macrophages primarily occurs on the cell surface where oligomers of ANGPTL4 are formed.

  13. [New insights in regulation factors of lipoprotein lipase].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan-Zhi; Xing, Shu-Hua; Cen, Wang-Min; Chen, Jian-Ning; Li, Xue-Wei

    2013-07-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an essential enzyme in the lipid metabolism, and proper regulation of LPL is important for controlling the delivery of lipid nutrients to tissues. Recent studies have identified glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high density lipoprotein-binding protein 1(GPIHBP1) as the important regulation factor of LPL that serves as a binding platform for lipolysis on the vascular lumen and an endothelial cell transporter transporting LPL from the interstitial spaces to the capillary lumen. In addition, several other regulation factors of LPL have also been identified including microRNAs, SorLA (Sortilin-related receptor with A-type repeats), and apolipoproteins that are potentially important for regulating LPL activity. These discoveries provide new directions for understanding basic mechanisms of lipolysis and hyperlipidemia. In this update, we focused on summarizing recent progresses on GPIHBP1, the endothelial cell LPL transporter. We also highlighted the recent progresses on several other regulation factors of LPL that are relevant to the regulation of LPLactivity. PMID:23853353

  14. Variants of ESR1, APOE, LPL and IL-6 loci in young healthy subjects: association with lipid status and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Sertic, Jadranka; Juricic, Ljiljana; Ljubic, Hana; Bozina, Tamara; Lovric, Jasna; Markeljevic, Jasenka; Jelakovic, Bojan; Merkler, Marijan; Reiner, Zeljko

    2009-01-01

    Findings BMI was increased (>25) in 22% of young healthy subjects. Increased cholesterol values (>5.0 mmol/L) were found in 23% of subjects, LDL-C (>3.0 mmol/L) in 23%, triglycerides (>1.7 mmol/L) in 11% of subjects. We found statistically significant differences in subjects' weight (p = 0.015), BMI (p = 0.023), and waist-hip ratio (WHR) (p = 0.015) in regard to their diet type; subjects with Mediterranean diet had the lowest values compared to those on continental and mixed diet. Significant associations were found for: LPL genetic polymorphic variant and abdominal obesity (p = 0.013), APO epsilon4 allele and hypercholesterolemia (p = 0.003), and ESR1-TA long allele and hypercholesterolemia (p = 0.011). Background Human obesity is a multifactorial syndrome influenced also by genetic factors. Among gene variants found to be involved in body weight regulation and development of obesity, particular attention has been paid to polymorphisms in genes associated with obesity-related metabolic disorders. We explored the association of genetic polymorphisms of: estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1-TA repeats); interleukin-6 (IL-6 G-174C); apolipoprotein E (APO epsilon2, epsilon3, epsilon4); lipoprotein lipase Pvu II (LPL P+/-), with clinical variables: gender, age, body mass index (BMI), diet type and biological variables: triglycerides, cholesterol, HDL-C, LDL-C, CRP, homocysteine, urate, and glucose in 105 healthy young subjects (20-35 yrs) of Croatian origin. Methods Genotyping of IL-6, LPL was performed by PCR-RFLP, of APOE by real-time PCR, and of ESR1 by PCR and capillary electrophoresis. Association analyses were performed of alleles and genotypes with biological variables. Conclusion ESR-1, LPL, and APO E genetic polymorphic variants could represent predictive genetic risk markers for obesity-related metabolic disorders in young healthy subjects. Mediterranean type of diet is also an important protective factor against abdominal obesity. PMID:19804633

  15. Placental lipases in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).

    PubMed

    Barrett, Helen L; Kubala, Marta H; Scholz Romero, Katherin; Denny, Kerina J; Woodruff, Trent M; McIntyre, H David; Callaway, Leonie K; Nitert, Marloes Dekker

    2014-01-01

    Infants of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are more likely to be born large for gestational age with a higher percentage body fat. Elevated maternal lipids may contribute to this. Placental lipases such as lipoprotein lipase (LPL), endothelial lipase (EL) and hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) are involved in transferring lipids from mother to fetus. Previous studies of expression of these lipases in placentae in women with diabetes in pregnancy have reported divergent results. Intracellular lipases such as adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and HSL are central to lipid droplet metabolism. The activities of these lipases are both influenced by Perilipin 1, and ATGL is also activated by a co-factor comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) and inhibited by G0/G1 switch gene 2 (GS02). None of these modifying factors or ATGL have been examined previously in placenta. The purpose of this study was therefore to examine the expression of ATGL, HSL, LPL, EL, as well as Perilipin 1, GS02 and CGI-58 in term pregnancies complicated by GDM. mRNA and protein expression of the lipases were measured in placentae from 17 women with GDM and 17 normoglycaemic pregnancies, matched for maternal BMI and gestational age of delivery. ATGL mRNA expression was increased and HSL mRNA expression reduced in placentae from GDM although there was no differences in protein expression of any of the lipases. All lipases were localised to trophoblasts and endothelial cells. The expression of Perilipin 1 and CGI-58 mRNA was increased and GS02 not altered in GDM. These results suggest that there is no difference in expression in these four lipases between GDM and normoglycaemic placentae, and therefore altered lipid transfer via these lipases does not contribute to large for gestational age in infants of women with GDM. PMID:25118138

  16. Lipoprotein Lipase Deficiency (R243H) in a Type 2 Diabetes Patient with Multiple Arterial Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toru; Sawada, Shojiro; Ishigaki, Yasushi; Tsukita, Sohei; Kodama, Shinjiro; Sugisawa, Takashi; Imai, Junta; Yamada, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Murano, Takeyoshi; Katagiri, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) deficiency is a rare monogenic disorder that manifests as severe hypertriglyceridemia. Whether or not LPL deficiency accelerates the development of atherosclerosis remains controversial. We herein report a 66-year-old woman who was homozygous for the R243H LPL mutation. She had developed multiple arterial aneurysms and systemic atherosclerosis despite good control of other atherogenic risk factors, including diabetes. Furthermore, although intensive pharmaceutical therapies had been minimally effective, medium chain triglyceride (MCT) therapy reduced the serum triglyceride levels. Thus, this case suggests important role that mutated LPL protein plays in the progression of atherosclerosis and that MCT therapy is potentially effective, even for severe hypertriglyceridemia due to LPL deficiency. PMID:27150867

  17. Release of endothelial cell lipoprotein lipase by plasma lipoproteins and free fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, U.; Witte, L.D.; Goldberg, I.J.

    1989-03-15

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) bound to the lumenal surface of vascular endothelial cells is responsible for the hydrolysis of triglycerides in plasma lipoproteins. Studies were performed to investigate whether human plasma lipoproteins and/or free fatty acids would release LPL which was bound to endothelial cells. Purified bovine milk LPL was incubated with cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells resulting in the association of enzyme activity with the cells. When the cells were then incubated with media containing chylomicrons or very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), a concentration-dependent decrease in the cell-associated LPL enzymatic activity was observed. In contrast, incubation with media containing low density lipoproteins or high density lipoproteins produced a much smaller decrease in the cell-associated enzymatic activity. The addition of increasing molar ratios of oleic acid:bovine serum albumin to the media also reduced enzyme activity associated with the endothelial cells. To determine whether the decrease in LPL activity was due to release of the enzyme from the cells or inactivation of the enzyme, studies were performed utilizing radioiodinated bovine LPL. Radiolabeled LPL protein was released from endothelial cells by chylomicrons, VLDL, and by free fatty acids (i.e. oleic acid bound to bovine serum albumin). The release of radiolabeled LPL by VLDL correlated with the generation of free fatty acids from the hydrolysis of VLDL triglyceride by LPL bound to the cells. Inhibition of LPL enzymatic activity by use of a specific monoclonal antibody, reduced the extent of release of /sup 125/I-LPL from the endothelial cells by the added VLDL. These results demonstrated that LPL enzymatic activity and protein were removed from endothelial cells by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (chylomicrons and VLDL) and oleic acid.

  18. Lipoprotein Lipase, Tissue Expression and Effects on Genes Related to Fatty Acid Synthesis in Goat Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wang-Sheng; Hu, Shi-Liang; Yu, Kang; Wang, Hui; Wang, Wei; Loor, Juan; Luo, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) serves as a central factor in hydrolysis of triacylglycerol and uptake of free fatty acids from the plasma. However, there are limited data concerning the action of LPL on the regulation of milk fat synthesis in goat mammary gland. In this investigation, we describe the cloning and sequencing of the LPL gene from Xinong Saanen dairy goat mammary gland, along with a study of its phylogenetic relationships. Sequence analysis showed that goat LPL shares similarities with other species including sheep, bovine, human and mouse. LPL mRNA expression in various tissues determined by RT-qPCR revealed the highest expression in white adipose tissue, with lower expression in heart, lung, spleen, rumen, small intestine, mammary gland, and kidney. Expression was almost undetectable in liver and muscle. The expression profiles of LPL gene in mammary gland at early, peak, mid, late lactation, and the dry period were also measured. Compared with the dry period, LPL mRNA expression was markedly greater at early lactation. However, compared with early lactation, the expression was lower at peak lactation and mid lactation. Despite those differences, LPL mRNA expression was still greater at peak, mid, and late lactation compared with the dry period. Using goat mammary epithelial cells (GMEC), the in vitro knockdown of LPL via shRNA or with Orlistat resulted in a similar degree of down-regulation of LPL (respectively). Furthermore, knockdown of LPL was associated with reduced mRNA expression of SREBF1, FASN, LIPE and PPARG but greater expression of FFAR3. There was no effect on ACACA expression. Orlistat decreased expression of LIPE, FASN, ACACA, and PPARG, and increased FFAR3 and SREBF1 expression. The pattern of LPL expression was similar to the changes in milk fat percentage in lactating goats. Taken together, results suggest that LPL may play a crucial role in fatty acid synthesis. PMID:25501331

  19. Endogenously produced glycosaminoglycans affecting the release of lipoprotein lipase from macrophages and the interaction with lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, R; Sartipy, P; Winkler, R; Zechner, R; Hurt-Camejo, E; Kostner, G M

    2000-04-12

    Macrophages are intimately involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic diseases. A key feature of this process is their uptake of various lipoproteins and subsequent transformation to foam cells. Since lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is believed to play a role in foam cell formation, we investigated if endogenously produced proteoglycans (PGs) affect the release of this enzyme from macrophages. The human leukaemic cell line THP-1 which differentiates into macrophages by treatment with phorbol ester (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) served as a model. The differentiation of THP-1 macrophages promoted the release of PGs into the cell medium which caused the detachment of LPL activity from the cell surface, and prevented LPL re-uptake and inactivation. These PGs were mainly composed of chondroitin sulfate type and exerted a heparin-like effect on LPL release. LPL is known to increase the cell association of lipoproteins by the well known bridging function. Exogenous bovine LPL at a concentration of 1 microg/ml enhanced low density lipoprotein (LDL)-binding 10-fold. Endogenously produced PGs reduced LPL-mediated binding of LDL. It is proposed that the differentiation-dependent increase in the release of PGs interferes with binding of LPL and reduces lipoprotein-binding to macrophages. PMID:10760480

  20. Down-regulation of lipoprotein lipase increases ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Ryoko L; Medh, Jheem D

    2014-08-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) mediates the efflux of excess cholesterol from foam cells to lipid-poor apolipoprotein A-I, in a process called reverse cholesterol transport. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a lipolytic enzyme expressed by macrophages within atherosclerotic lesions. Lentivirus-mediated RNA interference was used to genetically knock-down (KD) the expression of LPL in THP-1 macrophages. Silencing of the LPL gene was confirmed by end-point PCR, real time PCR, and protein analysis. Suppression of LPL expression correlated with a 1.6-fold up-regulation of ABCA1 mRNA levels, and resulted in a 4.5-fold increase in ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux. Replenishing LPL by addition of purified bovine LPL to the cell culture media resulted in down-regulation of ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux in both wild-type and LPL knockdown cells. These findings suggest an inverse correlation between macrophage LPL levels and ABCA1 cholesterol transport activity. PMID:25017912

  1. Lipoprotein lipase expression is a novel prognostic factor in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nückel, Holger; Hüttmann, Andreas; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Schroers, Roland; Führer, Anja; Sellmann, Ludger; Dührsen, Ulrich; Dürig, Jan

    2006-06-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) is a heterogenous disease with a highly variable clinical course. Recent studies have shown that expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and ADAM29 may serve as novel prognostic markers in B-CLL. To investigate the prognostic value of these genes, we quantified their expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR) in a cohort of 133 B-CLL patients and correlated the results with clinical outcome, and other known prognostic factors. LPL, ADAM29, LPL and ADAM29 ratios, as well as CD38 and ZAP-70 protein expression determined by multiparameter flow cytometry, were predictive of treatment-free survival. Multivariate Cox regression analysis identified LPL, ADAM29 and CD38 as independent prognostic markers. Evaluation of several disease characteristics in association with the LPL expression status of the patients' B-CLL cells showed highly significant differences for CD38 and ZAP-70 expression, suggesting a correlation of LPL expression with these established adverse prognostic factors. Sequential RQ-PCR analyses in a subset of 22 patients revealed that LPL mRNA expression was relatively stable in the majority of patients, whereas ADAM29 expression levels varied substantially over time. Furthermore, in a subgroup analysis, LPL provided prognostic information in both early stage (Binet A) and patients with more advanced disease (Binet B and C). Conversely, high ADAM29 expression was predictive of a long treatment-free interval in Binet stage A but did not retain its prognostic significance in Binet B and C patients. The LPL/ADAM29 expression ratio was not found to be an independent prognostic factor and did not offer any advantages over the use of LPL alone. Collectively, our data confirm a role for LPL as a novel prognostic indicator in B-CLL. PMID:16840197

  2. Adipose-specific lipoprotein lipase deficiency more profoundly affects brown than white fat biology.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Arcos, Itsaso; Hiyama, Yaeko; Drosatos, Konstantinos; Bharadwaj, Kalyani G; Hu, Yunying; Son, Ni Huiping; O'Byrne, Sheila M; Chang, Chuchun L; Deckelbaum, Richard J; Takahashi, Manabu; Westerterp, Marit; Obunike, Joseph C; Jiang, Hongfeng; Yagyu, Hiroaki; Blaner, William S; Goldberg, Ira J

    2013-05-17

    Adipose fat storage is thought to require uptake of circulating triglyceride (TG)-derived fatty acids via lipoprotein lipase (LpL). To determine how LpL affects the biology of adipose tissue, we created adipose-specific LpL knock-out (ATLO) mice, and we compared them with whole body LpL knock-out mice rescued with muscle LpL expression (MCK/L0) and wild type (WT) mice. ATLO LpL mRNA and activity were reduced, respectively, 75 and 70% in gonadal adipose tissue (GAT), 90 and 80% in subcutaneous tissue, and 84 and 85% in brown adipose tissue (BAT). ATLO mice had increased plasma TG levels associated with reduced chylomicron TG uptake into BAT and lung. ATLO BAT, but not GAT, had altered TG composition. GAT from MCK/L0 was smaller and contained less polyunsaturated fatty acids in TG, although GAT from ATLO was normal unless LpL was overexpressed in muscle. High fat diet feeding led to less adipose in MCK/L0 mice but TG acyl composition in subcutaneous tissue and BAT reverted to that of WT. Therefore, adipocyte LpL in BAT modulates plasma lipoprotein clearance, and the greater metabolic activity of this depot makes its lipid composition more dependent on LpL-mediated uptake. Loss of adipose LpL reduces fat accumulation only if accompanied by greater LpL activity in muscle. These data support the role of LpL as the "gatekeeper" for tissue lipid distribution. PMID:23542081

  3. Apolipoproteins C-I and C-III Inhibit Lipoprotein Lipase Activity by Displacement of the Enzyme from Lipid Droplets*

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Mikael; Vorrsjö, Evelina; Talmud, Philippa; Lookene, Aivar; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2013-01-01

    Apolipoproteins (apo) C-I and C-III are known to inhibit lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity, but the molecular mechanisms for this remain obscure. We present evidence that either apoC-I or apoC-III, when bound to triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, prevent binding of LPL to the lipid/water interface. This results in decreased lipolytic activity of the enzyme. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that hydrophobic amino acid residues centrally located in the apoC-III molecule are critical for attachment to lipid emulsion particles and consequently inhibition of LPL activity. Triglyceride-rich lipoproteins stabilize LPL and protect the enzyme from inactivating factors such as angiopoietin-like protein 4 (angptl4). The addition of either apoC-I or apoC-III to triglyceride-rich particles severely diminished their protective effect on LPL and rendered the enzyme more susceptible to inactivation by angptl4. These observations were seen using chylomicrons as well as the synthetic lipid emulsion Intralipid. In the presence of the LPL activator protein apoC-II, more of apoC-I or apoC-III was needed for displacement of LPL from the lipid/water interface. In conclusion, we show that apoC-I and apoC-III inhibit lipolysis by displacing LPL from lipid emulsion particles. We also propose a role for these apolipoproteins in the irreversible inactivation of LPL by factors such as angptl4. PMID:24121499

  4. Apolipoproteins C-I and C-III inhibit lipoprotein lipase activity by displacement of the enzyme from lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Mikael; Vorrsjö, Evelina; Talmud, Philippa; Lookene, Aivar; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2013-11-22

    Apolipoproteins (apo) C-I and C-III are known to inhibit lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity, but the molecular mechanisms for this remain obscure. We present evidence that either apoC-I or apoC-III, when bound to triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, prevent binding of LPL to the lipid/water interface. This results in decreased lipolytic activity of the enzyme. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that hydrophobic amino acid residues centrally located in the apoC-III molecule are critical for attachment to lipid emulsion particles and consequently inhibition of LPL activity. Triglyceride-rich lipoproteins stabilize LPL and protect the enzyme from inactivating factors such as angiopoietin-like protein 4 (angptl4). The addition of either apoC-I or apoC-III to triglyceride-rich particles severely diminished their protective effect on LPL and rendered the enzyme more susceptible to inactivation by angptl4. These observations were seen using chylomicrons as well as the synthetic lipid emulsion Intralipid. In the presence of the LPL activator protein apoC-II, more of apoC-I or apoC-III was needed for displacement of LPL from the lipid/water interface. In conclusion, we show that apoC-I and apoC-III inhibit lipolysis by displacing LPL from lipid emulsion particles. We also propose a role for these apolipoproteins in the irreversible inactivation of LPL by factors such as angptl4. PMID:24121499

  5. Nutrient regulation of post-heparin lipoprotein lipase activity in obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Ranganath, L R; Beety, J M; Wright, J; Morgan, L M

    2001-01-01

    This study examines the immediate effect of ingestion of oral carbohydrate and fat on lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity post-heparin in six lean and six obese age-matched women. Subjects were given, on two separate occasions, 340 kcal carbohydrate or an equicaloric amount of fat, both in 300 ml of water. Post-heparin LPL activity (10,000 U) was measured on each occasion 120 minutes after ingestion of the meal. Following oral carbohydrate postprandial plasma insulin levels were significantly higher in obese subjects than in lean (p < 0.01). Impaired glucose tolerance was seen in the obese group. GIP secretion was similar in lean and obese subjects both during oral fat and carbohydrate ingestion. GLP-1 secretion post-carbohydrate was lower in obese subjects. Total LPL activity unadjusted for body weight was similar in the two groups after carbohydrate administration but was significantly lower when adjusted per kg body weight. Total LPL activity was lower in the lean group at 130 minutes after fat administration (p < 0.02). Fasting serum triglycerides were higher in the obese group and were inversely related to the post-carbohydrate LPL activity (r = - 0.65, p < 0.02). Intraluminal lipoprotein lipase activity is not increased in established obesity. Fat and carbohydrate nutrients may affect LPL activity differently in lean and obese subjects. PMID:11280717

  6. Uremic Toxins and Lipases in Haemodialysis: A Process of Repeated Metabolic Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Stegmayr, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Severe kidney disease results in retention of uremic toxins that inhibit key enzymes for lipid breakdown such as lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic lipase (HL). For patients in haemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) the LPL activity is only about half of that of age and gender matched controls. Angiopoietin, like protein 3 and 4, accumulate in the uremic patients. These factors, therefore, can be considered as uremic toxins. In animal experiments it has been shown that these factors inhibit the LPL activity. To avoid clotting of the dialysis circuit during HD, anticoagulation such as heparin or low molecular weight heparin are added to the patient. Such administration will cause a prompt release of the LPL and HL from its binding sites at the endothelial surface. The liver rapidly degrades the release plasma compound of LPL and HL. This results in a lack of enzyme to degrade triglycerides during the later part of the HD and for another 3–4 h. PD patients have a similar baseline level of lipases but are not exposed to the negative effect of anticoagulation. PMID:24784324

  7. Suppression of diet-induced atherosclerosis in low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice overexpressing lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, M; Ishibashi, S; Inaba, T; Yagyu, H; Harada, K; Osuga, J I; Ohashi, K; Yazaki, Y; Yamada, N

    1996-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a key enzyme in the hydrolysis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Conflicting results have been reported concerning its role in atherogenesis. To determine the effects of the overexpressed LPL on diet-induced atherosclerosis, we have generated low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) knockout mice that overexpressed human LPL transgene (LPL/LDLRKO) and compared their plasma lipoproteins and atherosclerosis with those in nonexpressing LDLR-knockout mice (LDLRKO). On a normal chow diet, LPL/LDLRKO mice showed marked suppression of mean plasma triglyceride levels (32 versus 236 mg/dl) and modest decrease in mean cholesterol levels (300 versus 386 mg/dl) as compared with LDLRKO mice. Larger lipoprotein particles of intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL)/LDL were selectively reduced in LPL/LDLRKO mice. On an atherogenic diet, both mice exhibited severe hypercholesterolemia. But, mean plasma cholesterol levels in LPL/ LDLRKO mice were still suppressed as compared with that in LDLRKO mice (1357 versus 2187 mg/dl). Marked reduction in a larger subfraction of IDL/LDL, which conceivably corresponds to remnant lipoproteins, was observed in the LPL/LDLRKO mice. LDLRKO mice developed severe fatty streak lesions in the aortic sinus after feeding with the atherogenic diet for 8 weeks. In contrast, mean lesion area in the LPL/LDLRKO mice was 18-fold smaller than that in LDLRKO mice. We suggest that the altered lipoprotein profile, in particular the reduced level of remnant lipoproteins, is mainly responsible for the protection by LPL against atherosclerosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8692976

  8. Evidence for Two Distinct Binding Sites for Lipoprotein Lipase on Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored High Density Lipoprotein-binding Protein 1 (GPIHBP1)*

    PubMed Central

    Reimund, Mart; Larsson, Mikael; Kovrov, Oleg; Kasvandik, Sergo; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Lookene, Aivar

    2015-01-01

    GPIHBP1 is an endothelial membrane protein that transports lipoprotein lipase (LPL) from the subendothelial space to the luminal side of the capillary endothelium. Here, we provide evidence that two regions of GPIHBP1, the acidic N-terminal domain and the central Ly6 domain, interact with LPL as two distinct binding sites. This conclusion is based on comparative binding studies performed with a peptide corresponding to the N-terminal domain of GPIHBP1, the Ly6 domain of GPIHBP1, wild type GPIHBP1, and the Ly6 domain mutant GPIHBP1 Q114P. Although LPL and the N-terminal domain formed a tight but short lived complex, characterized by fast on- and off-rates, the complex between LPL and the Ly6 domain formed more slowly and persisted for a longer time. Unlike the interaction of LPL with the Ly6 domain, the interaction of LPL with the N-terminal domain was significantly weakened by salt. The Q114P mutant bound LPL similarly to the N-terminal domain of GPIHBP1. Heparin dissociated LPL from the N-terminal domain, and partially from wild type GPIHBP1, but was unable to elute the enzyme from the Ly6 domain. When LPL was in complex with the acidic peptide corresponding to the N-terminal domain of GPIHBP1, the enzyme retained its affinity for the Ly6 domain. Furthermore, LPL that was bound to the N-terminal domain interacted with lipoproteins, whereas LPL bound to the Ly6 domain did not. In summary, our data suggest that the two domains of GPIHBP1 interact independently with LPL and that the functionality of LPL depends on its localization on GPIHBP1. PMID:25873395

  9. Relationship between lipoprotein lipase activity and plasma sex steroid level in obese women.

    PubMed Central

    Iverius, P H; Brunzell, J D

    1988-01-01

    In obese women (n = 16) at their weight, fasting adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity, obtained by elution with serum and heparin at 4 degrees and 37 degrees C, was inversely correlated to plasma estradiol levels (r = -0.724; P = 0.002) and (r = -0.641; P = 0.010), respectively. Furthermore, fasting postheparin plasma LPL activity during a heparin infusion, showed an even stronger inverse correlation to plasma estradiol when measured at 60 min (r = -0.815; P less than 0.001). None of the above parameters was correlated to the body mass index. Postprandial LPL activity in postheparin plasma, measured 10 min after a heparin injection, showed a strong positive correlation with plasma free testosterone (r = 0.780; P = 0.001). Neither of these parameters was correlated with the body mass index. The origin of this LPL activity is presently unknown but could conceivably represent a pool of LPL from skeletal muscle. Since it has been shown convincingly that estrogen decreases adipose tissue LPL activity in the rat, the present studies strongly suggest that estradiol is a major negative regulator of fasting adipose tissue LPL activity in women. PMID:3417867

  10. LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE RELEASES ESTERIFIED OXYLIPINS FROM VERY LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Defects in lipoprotein metabolism alter the lipoprotein distribution of oxidized PUFAs, and we speculate that lipoprotein lipase (LpL) is a determinant in the release of VLDL-associated oxylipins. Here, using 12 wk old normolipidemic (lean) and hyperlipidemic (obese) Zucker-rats, we measured PUFA al...

  11. Linking nutritional regulation of Angptl4, Gpihbp1, and Lmf1 to lipoprotein lipase activity in rodent adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyzes triglycerides in lipoproteins and makes fatty acids available for tissue metabolism. The activity of the enzyme is modulated in a tissue specific manner by interaction with other proteins. We have studied how feeding/fasting and some related perturbations affect the expression, in rat adipose tissue, of three such proteins, LMF1, an ER protein necessary for folding of LPL into its active dimeric form, the endogenous LPL inhibitor ANGPTL4, and GPIHBP1, that transfers LPL across the endothelium. Results The system underwent moderate circadian oscillations, for LPL in phase with food intake, for ANGPTL4 and GPIHBP1 in the opposite direction. Studies with cycloheximide showed that whereas LPL protein turns over rapidly, ANGPTL4 protein turns over more slowly. Studies with the transcription blocker Actinomycin D showed that transcripts for ANGPTL4 and GPIHBP1, but not LMF1 or LPL, turn over rapidly. When food was withdrawn the expression of ANGPTL4 and GPIHBP1 increased rapidly, and LPL activity decreased. On re-feeding and after injection of insulin the expression of ANGPTL4 and GPIHBP1 decreased rapidly, and LPL activity increased. In ANGPTL4−/− mice adipose tissue LPL activity did not show these responses. In old, obese rats that showed signs of insulin resistance, the responses of ANGPTL4 and GPIHBP1 mRNA and of LPL activity were severely blunted (at 26 weeks of age) or almost abolished (at 52 weeks of age). Conclusions This study demonstrates directly that ANGPTL4 is necessary for rapid modulation of LPL activity in adipose tissue. ANGPTL4 message levels responded very rapidly to changes in the nutritional state. LPL activity always changed in the opposite direction. This did not happen in Angptl4−/− mice. GPIHBP1 message levels also changed rapidly and in the same direction as ANGPTL4, i.e. increased on fasting when LPL activity decreased. This was unexpected because GPIHBP1 is known to stabilize LPL. The

  12. Relationship between lipoprotein lipase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha expression in rat liver during development.

    PubMed

    Panadero, M; Bocos, C; Herrera, E

    2006-09-01

    The present study was addressed to determine whether the high expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha) in rat liver during the perinatal stage plays a role in the induction of liver lipoprotein lipase (LPL) expression and activity. Parallel increases in liver mRNA PPAR-alpha and LPL activity were found in newborn rats, and after a slight decline, values remained elevated until weaning. Anticipated weaning for 3 days caused a decline in those two variables as well as in the mRNA LPL level, and a similar change was also found in liver triacylglycerol concentration. Force-feeding with Intralipid in 10-day-old rats or animals kept fasted for 5 h showed high mRNA-PPARalpha and -LPL levels as well as LPL activity with low plasma insulin and high FFA levels, whereas glucose and a combination of glucose and Intralipid produced low mRNA-PPARalpha and -LPL levels as well as LPL activity. Under these latter conditions, plasma insulin and FFA levels were high in those rats receiving the combination of glucose and Intralipid, whereas plasma FFA levels were low in those force-fed with glucose. It is proposed that the hormonal and nutritional induction of liver PPAR-alpha expression around birth and its maintained elevated level throughout suckling is responsible for the induction of liver LPL-expression and activity during suckling. PMID:17451160

  13. Apolipoprotein AV Accelerates Plasma Hydrolysis OfTriglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins By Interaction With Proteoglycan BoundLipoprotein Lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, Martin; Loeffler, Britta; Kluger, Malte; Fabig, Nathalie; Geppert, Gesa; Pennacchio, Len A.; Laatsch, Alexander; Heeren, Joerg

    2005-02-22

    Apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) is associated with differences intriglyceride levels and familial combined hyperlipidemia. In genetically engineered mice, apoAV plasma levels are inversely correlated with plasmatriglycerides. To elucidate the mechanism by which apoAV influences plasma triglycerides, metabolic studies and in vitro assays resembling physiological conditions were performed. In hAPOA5 transgenic mice(hAPOA5tr), catabolism of chylomicrons and VLDL was accelerated due to a faster plasma hydrolysis of triglycerides by lipoprotein lipase (LPL).Hepatic VLDL and intestinal chylomicron production were not affected. The functional interplay between apoAV and LPL was further investigated by crossbreeding a human LPL transgene with the apoa5 knockout, and the hAPOA5tr to an LPL deficient background. Increased LPL activity completely normalized hypertriglyceridemia of apoa5 deficient mice,however, over expression of human apoAV modulated triglyceride levels only slightly when LPL was reduced. To reflect the physiological situation in which LPL is bound to cell surface proteoglycans, we examined hydrolysis in the presence or absence of proteoglycans. Without proteoglycans, apoAV derived either from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, hAPOA5tr HDL, or a recombinant source did not alter the LPL hydrolysis rate. In the presence of proteoglycans, however, apoAV led to a significant and dose-dependent increase in LPL mediated hydrolysis of VLDL triglycerides. These results were confirmed in cell culture using a proteoglycan-deficient cell line.A direct interaction between LPL and apoAV was found by ligand blotting.It is proposed, that apoAV reduces triglyceride levels by guiding VLDL and chylomicrons to proteoglycans bound LPL for lipolysis.

  14. Placental lipoprotein lipase DNA methylation levels are associated with gestational diabetes mellitus and maternal and cord blood lipid profiles.

    PubMed

    Houde, A A; St-Pierre, J; Hivert, M F; Baillargeon, J P; Perron, P; Gaudet, D; Brisson, D; Bouchard, L

    2014-04-01

    Placental lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is crucial for placental lipid transfer. Impaired LPL gene expression and activity were reported in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and intra-uterine growth restriction. We hypothesized that placental LPL DNA methylation is altered by maternal metabolic status and could contribute to fetal programming. The objective of this study was thus to assess whether placental LPL DNA methylation is associated with GDM and both maternal and newborn lipid profiles. Placenta biopsies were sampled at delivery from 126 women including 27 women with GDM diagnosed following a post 75 g-oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) between weeks 24 and 28 of gestation. Placental LPL DNA methylation and expression levels were determined using bisulfite pyrosequencing and quantitative real-time PCR, respectively. DNA methylation levels within LPL proximal promoter region (CpG1) and intron 1 CpG island (CpGs 2 and 3) were lower in placenta of women with GDM. DNA methylation levels at LPL-CpG1 and CpG3 were also negatively correlated with maternal glucose (2-h post OGTT; r=-0.22; P=0.02) and HDL-cholesterol levels (third trimester of pregnancy; r=-0.20; p=0.03), respectively. Moreover, we report correlation between LPL-CpG2 DNA methylation and cord blood lipid profile. DNA methylation levels within intron 1 CpG island explained up to 26% (r⩽-0.51; P<0.001) of placental LPL mRNA expression variance. Overall, we showed that maternal metabolic profile is associated with placental LPL DNA methylation dysregulation. Our results suggest that site-specific LPL epipolymorphisms in the placenta are possibly functional and could potentially be involved in determining the future metabolic health of the newborn. PMID:24847699

  15. RNA/DNA ratio and LPL and MyoD mRNA expressions in muscle of Oreochromis niloticus fed with elevated levels of palm oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayisi, Christian Larbi; Zhao, Jinliang

    2016-02-01

    Palm oil is of great potential as one of the sustainable alternatives to fish oil (FO) in aquafeeds. In this present study, five isonitrogenous diets (32% crude protein) with elevated palm oil levels of 0%, 2%, 4%, 6% and 8% were used during an 8-week feeding trial to evaluate its effects on RNA/DNA ratio and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and MyoD mRNA expressions in muscle of Oreochromis niloticus. The results showed that RNA, DNA content as well as ratio of RNA to DNA were significantly affected ( P < 0.05), in each case the highest was recorded in fish group subjected to 6% palm oil level. There was a strong positive correlation between nucleic acid concentration (RNA concentration and RNA: DNA ratio) and specific growth rate (SGR), protein efficiency ratio (PER), while a negative correlation existed between nucleic acid concentration (RNA concentration and RNA: DNA ratio) and feed conversion ratio (FCR). The mRNA expressions of LPL and MyoD in muscle were not significantly affected by the different palm oil levels, although the highest expression was observed in fish fed with 6% palm oil level. There also existed a strong positive correlation between the mRNA expression of LPL, MyoD and SGR, PER, while their correlation with FCR was negative. In conclusion, elevated palm oil affected the RNA, DNA concentration as well as RNA/DNA ratio significantly, although the mRNA expression of LPL and MyoD were not affected significantly by elevated palm oil levels.

  16. Lipoprotein ApoC-II activation of lipoprotein lipase. Modulation by apolipoprotein A-IV.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, I J; Scheraldi, C A; Yacoub, L K; Saxena, U; Bisgaier, C L

    1990-03-15

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL)-mediated hydrolysis of triglycerides (TG) contained in chylomicrons requires the presence of a cofactor, apolipoprotein (apo) C-II. The physiological mechanism by which chylomicrons gain apoC-II necessary for LPL activation in whole plasma is not known. Using a gum arabic stabilized TG emulsion, activation of LPL by lipoprotein apoC-II was studied. Hydrolysis of TG by LPL was greater in the presence of serum than with addition of either high density lipoproteins (HDL) or very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). LPL activation by either VLDL or HDL increased with addition of the lipoprotein-free fraction of plasma. A similar increase in LPL activity by addition of the lipoprotein-free fraction together with HDL or VLDL was observed when another TG emulsion (Intralipid) or TG-rich lipoproteins from an apoC-II deficient subject were used as a substrate. Human apoA-IV, apoA-I, apoE, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein were assessed for their ability to increase LPL activity in the presence of VLDL. At and below physiological concentrations, only apoA-IV increased LPL activity. One hundred percent of LPL activity measured in the presence of serum was achieved using VLDL plus apoA-IV. In the absence of an apoC-II source, apoA-IV had no effect on LPL activity. Removal of greater than 80% of the apoA-IV from the nonlipoprotein-containing fraction of plasma by incubation with Intralipid markedly reduced its ability to activate LPL in the presence of VLDL or HDL. Gel filtration chromatography demonstrated that incubation of the nonlipoprotein-containing fraction of plasma with HDL and the TG emulsion caused increased transfer of apoC-II to the emulsion and association of apoA-IV with HDL. Our studies demonstrate that apoA-IV increases LPL activation in the presence of lipoproteins. We hypothesize that apoA-IV is required for efficient release of apoC-II from either HDL or VLDL, which then allows for LPL-mediated hydrolysis of TG in nascent

  17. Differential regulation of lipoprotein lipase in the macrophage J774.2 cell line by cytokines.

    PubMed

    Tengku-Muhammad, T S; Hughes, T R; Cryer, A; Ramji, D P

    1996-07-01

    The regulation of macrophage lipoprotein lipase (LPL) by cytokines is of potentially crucial importance in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and in the responses to endotoxin challenge. However, the precise mechanisms by which different cytokines modulate the expression of macrophage LPL activity are poorly understood. The action of six cytokines and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on LPL function using the murine J774.2 cell line as a model system has, therefore, been studied. Although exposure to LPS, interleukin 11 (IL-11), tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and IL-1, over the physiological range of concentrations, resulted in a decrease in the heparin-releasable LPL activity, LPL-mRNA levels and LPL-protein content of the cells, stimulation with IL-6 and leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) had no effect. The maximum suppression of LPL activity and mRNA levels in the cells by IFN-gamma (60%) was lower than that produced by LPS, IL-11, TNF-alpha and IL-1 (78-97%). Each cytokine displayed a characteristic dose-dependent pattern for the suppression of LPL activity and mRNA levels with IL-11/TNF-alpha being more potent than IFN-gamma/IL-1. More than 80% of the decrease in the LPL activity, at all doses of IL-11, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma and IL-1, was due to a corresponding reduction in the mRNA levels. The time course of responses to LPS, IL-11, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma and IL-1 were similar, with the time required to achieve half maximal suppression of LPL activity being between 7 and 9.5 h in each case. These results indicate that LPL in J774.2 macrophages is regulated differentially by various cytokines and that the major control responsible for the reduction of LPL activity by IL-11, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma and IL-1 is exerted at the level of mRNA metabolism (decreased transcription or RNA stability). The responses identified also displayed several differences to those described previously for adipocytes (e.g. 3T3-L1 cell line

  18. Lipase test

    MedlinePlus

    ... for disease of the pancreas, most often acute pancreatitis . Lipase appears in the blood when the pancreas ... Forsmark CE. Pancreatitis. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 144. ...

  19. Lipase test

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bowel (bowel obstruction) Celiac disease Duodenal ulcer Cancer of the pancreas Infection or swelling of the pancreas This test may also be done for familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency . Risks ... Update Date 2/4/2015 Updated ...

  20. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M; Brown, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL. PMID:25130461

  1. Lipoprotein lipase- and hepatic triglyceride lipase-promoted very low density lipoprotein degradation proceeds via an apolipoprotein E-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Medh, Jheem D.; Fry, Glenna L.; Bowen, Susan L.; Ruben, Stacie; Wong, Howard; Chappell, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is the primary recognition signal on triglyceride-rich lipoproteins responsible for interacting with low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors and LDL receptor-related protein (LRP). It has been shown that lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic triglyceride lipase (HTGL) promote receptor-mediated uptake and degradation of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and remnant particles, possibly by directly binding to lipoprotein receptors. In this study we have investigated the requirement for apoE in lipase-stimulated VLDL degradation. We compared binding and degradation of normal and apoE-depleted human VLDL and apoE knockout mouse VLDL in human foreskin fibroblasts. Surface binding at 37°C of apoE knockout VLDL was greater than that of normal VLDL by 3-and 40-fold, respectively, in the presence of LPL and HTGL. In spite of the greater stimulation of surface binding, lipase-stimulated degradation of apoE knockout mouse VLDL was significantly lower than that of normal VLDL (30, 30, and 80%, respectively, for control, LPL, and HTGL treatments). In the presence of LPL and HTGL, surface binding of apoE-depleted human VLDL was, respectively, 40 and 200% of normal VLDL whereas degradation was, respectively, 25 and 50% of normal VLDL. LPL and HTGL stimulated degradation of normal VLDL in a dose-dependent manner and by a LDL receptor-mediated pathway. Maximum stimulation (4-fold) was seen in the presence LPL (1 µg/ml) or HTGL (3 µg/ml) in lovastatin-treated cells. On the other hand, degradation of apoE-depleted VLDL was not significantly increased by the presence of lipases even in lovastatin-treated cells. Surface binding of apoE-depleted VLDL to metabolically inactive cells at 4°C was higher in control and HTGL-treated cells, but unchanged in the presence of LPL. Degradation of prebound apoE-depleted VLDL was only 35% as efficient as that of normal VLDL. Surface binding of apoE knockout or apoE-depleted VLDL was to heparin sulfate proteoglycans

  2. Angiotensin II Reduces Lipoprotein Lipase Expression in Visceral Adipose Tissue via Phospholipase C β4 Depending on Feeding but Increases Lipoprotein Lipase Expression in Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue via c-Src

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi; Tomono, Shoichi; Sato, Koichi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is characterized by visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, high triglyceride (TG)- and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol-levels, hypertension, and diabetes—all of which often cause cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. It remains unclear, however, why visceral adiposity but not subcutaneous adiposity causes insulin resistance and other pathological situations. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) catalyzes hydrolysis of TG in plasma lipoproteins. In the present study, we investigated whether the effects of angiotensin II (AngII) on TG metabolism are mediated through an effect on LPL expression. Adipose tissues were divided into visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) for comparison. AngII accelerated LPL expression in SAT but, on the contrary, suppressed its expression in VAT. In both SAT and VAT, AngII signaled through the same type 1 receptor. In SAT, AngII increased LPL expression via c-Src and p38 MAPK signaling. In VAT, however, AngII reduced LPL expression via the Gq class of G proteins and the subsequent phospholipase C β4 (PLCβ4), protein kinase C β1, nuclear factor κB, and inducible nitric oxide synthase signaling pathways. PLCβ4 small interfering RNA experiments showed that PLCβ4 expression is important for the AngII-induced LPL reduction in VAT, in which PLCβ4 expression increases in the evening and falls at night. Interestingly, PLCβ4 expression in VAT decreased with fasting, while AngII did not decrease LPL expression in VAT in a fasting state. In conclusion, AngII reduces LPL expression through PLCβ4, the expression of which is regulated by feeding in VAT, whereas AngII increases LPL expression in SAT. The different effects of AngII on LPL expression and, hence, TG metabolism in VAT and SAT may partly explain their different contributions to the development of metabolic syndrome. PMID:26447765

  3. Angiotensin II Reduces Lipoprotein Lipase Expression in Visceral Adipose Tissue via Phospholipase C β4 Depending on Feeding but Increases Lipoprotein Lipase Expression in Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue via c-Src.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi; Tomono, Shoichi; Sato, Koichi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is characterized by visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, high triglyceride (TG)- and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol-levels, hypertension, and diabetes-all of which often cause cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. It remains unclear, however, why visceral adiposity but not subcutaneous adiposity causes insulin resistance and other pathological situations. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) catalyzes hydrolysis of TG in plasma lipoproteins. In the present study, we investigated whether the effects of angiotensin II (AngII) on TG metabolism are mediated through an effect on LPL expression. Adipose tissues were divided into visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) for comparison. AngII accelerated LPL expression in SAT but, on the contrary, suppressed its expression in VAT. In both SAT and VAT, AngII signaled through the same type 1 receptor. In SAT, AngII increased LPL expression via c-Src and p38 MAPK signaling. In VAT, however, AngII reduced LPL expression via the Gq class of G proteins and the subsequent phospholipase C β4 (PLCβ4), protein kinase C β1, nuclear factor κB, and inducible nitric oxide synthase signaling pathways. PLCβ4 small interfering RNA experiments showed that PLCβ4 expression is important for the AngII-induced LPL reduction in VAT, in which PLCβ4 expression increases in the evening and falls at night. Interestingly, PLCβ4 expression in VAT decreased with fasting, while AngII did not decrease LPL expression in VAT in a fasting state. In conclusion, AngII reduces LPL expression through PLCβ4, the expression of which is regulated by feeding in VAT, whereas AngII increases LPL expression in SAT. The different effects of AngII on LPL expression and, hence, TG metabolism in VAT and SAT may partly explain their different contributions to the development of metabolic syndrome. PMID:26447765

  4. Physical inactivity amplifies the sensitivity of skeletal muscle to the lipid-induced downregulation of lipoprotein lipase activity.

    PubMed

    Zderic, Theodore W; Hamilton, Marc T

    2006-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a risk factor for lipoprotein disorders and the metabolic syndrome. Physical inactivity has a powerful effect on suppressing lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity in skeletal muscle, the rate-limiting enzyme for hydrolysis of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins. We tested the ability of several compounds to prevent the decrease in LPL. The present study minimized standing and ordinary light nonexercise movements in rats to compare the effects of inactivity and nonexercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) on LPL activity. The key new insight was that the typically quick decrease in LPL activity of oxidative muscle caused by physical inactivity was prevented by nicotinic acid (NA), whereas inhibitors of TNF-alpha, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and NF-kappaB had no such effect. NA was administered at a dose known to acutely impede the appearance of plasma TG from the liver and free fatty acids from adipose tissue, and it was effective at intentionally lowering plasma lipid concentrations to the same level in active and inactive groups. As measured from heparin-releasable LPL activity, LPL in the microvasculature of the most oxidative muscles was approximately 90% lower in the inactive group compared with controls, and this suppression was completely blocked by NA. In contrast to inactivity, NA did not raise muscle LPL in ambulatory controls, whereas a large exogenous fat delivery did decrease LPL activity. In vitro control studies revealed that NA did not have a direct effect on skeletal muscle LPL activity. In conclusion, physical inactivity amplifies the ability of plasma lipids to suppress muscle LPL activity. The light ambulatory contractions responsible for NEAT are sufficient for mitigating these deleterious effects. PMID:16195388

  5. Fatty acid alcohol ester-synthesizing activity of lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, T; Sumiyoshi, M; Okuda, H

    1999-12-01

    The fatty acid alcohol ester-synthesizing activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) was characterized using bovine milk LPL. Synthesizing activities were determined in an aqueous medium using oleic acid or trioleylglycerol as the acyl donor and equimolar amounts of long-chain alcohols as the acyl acceptor. When oleic acid and hexadecanol emulsified with gum arabic were incubated with LPL, palmityl oleate was synthesized, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Apo-very low density lipoprotein (apoVLDL) stimulated LPL-catalyzed palmityl oleate synthesis. The apparent equilibrium ratio of fatty acid alcohol ester/oleic acid was estimated using a high concentration of LPL and a long (20 h) incubation period. The equilibrium ratio was affected by the incubation pH and the alcohol chain length. When the incubation pH was below pH 7.0 and long chain fatty acyl alcohols were used as substrates, the fatty acid alcohol ester/free fatty acid equilibrium ratio favored ester formation, with an apparent equilibrium ratio of fatty acid alcohol ester/fatty acid of about 0.9/0.1. The equilibrium ratio decreased sharply at alkaline pH (above pH 8.0). The ratio also decreased when fatty alcohols with acyl chains shorter than dodecanol were used. When a trioleoylglycerol/fatty acyl alcohol emulsion was incubated with LPL, fatty acid alcohol esters were synthesized in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Fatty acid alcohol esters were easily synthesized from trioleoylglycerol when fatty alcohols with acyl chains longer than dodecanol were used, but synthesis was decreased with fatty alcohols with acyl chain lengths shorter than decanol, and little synthesizing activity was detected with shorter-chain fatty alcohols such as butanol or ethanol. PMID:10578059

  6. Lipoprotein lipase activity and chylomicron clearance in rats fed a high fat diet

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.M.; Layman, D.K.

    1988-11-01

    The relationships of tissue and plasma lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activities to tissue uptake and plasma clearance of UC-labeled chylomicron-triglyceride ( UC-CM-TG) were studied in female rats fed isoenergetic and isonitrogenous control (12% kJ from fat) or high fat diets (72% kJ from fat) for 8 wk. Animals fed the high-fat diet had higher levels of fasting plasma triglycerides and lower LPL activities in heart, renal adipose tissue and post-heparin plasma. Changes in LPL activities of skeletal muscles varied among muscles with higher values in the soleus and plantaris (32-61%) and no differences in the gastrocnemius. The lower LPL activity in renal adipose tissue was associated with lower uptake of fatty acids from UC-CM-TG by adipose. Fatty-acid uptake from labeled TG was not associated with tissue LPL activity in other tissues. Clearance of UC-CM-TG from plasma and the half-lives of UC-CM-TG were similar in both dietary groups. These data indicate that tissue and plasma LPL activities are not a direct index of uptake of fatty acids by tissues or clearance of chylomicron triglycerides.

  7. Gene expression and enzyme activity of lipoprotein lipase correlate with intramuscular fat content in Guangxi san-huang and Arbor Acres chickens.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y N; Wang, J; Chen, B J; Jiang, Q Y; Guo, Y F; Lan, G Q; Jiang, H S

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a key enzyme in lipid metabolism. This study investigated LPL gene expression, LPL enzyme activity, and the correlation of each with intramuscular fat (IMF) in Chinese Guangxi san-huang (GXSH) and Arbor Acres (AA) chickens. The results showed that age and breed had significant effects on LPL expression and enzyme activity. Correlation analyses showed significant positive correlations between LPL expression levels and IMF contents in the breast and thigh tissues of both GXSH (r = 0.712, P = 0.001; r = 0.792, P < 0.001, respectively) and AA (r = 0.644, P < 0.001; r = 0.545, P < 0.001, respectively) chickens. The results also indicated a significant positive correlation between LPL enzyme activity and IMF contents in the breast and thigh tissues of both GXSH (r = 0.615, P = 0.001; r = 0.685, P < 0.001, respectively) and AA (r = 0.600, P = 0.001; r = 0.528, P = 0.003, respectively) chickens. The results indicated that the LPL gene was significantly correlated with IMF in these two breeds. The results presented here could contribute to knowledge of LPL mRNA developmental expression patterns and enzyme activity, and it could facilitate further research on the molecular mechanisms underlying IMF deposition in chickens. PMID:27323106

  8. Triacylglycerol kinetics in endotoxic rats with suppressed lipoprotein lipase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, G.J.; Corll, C.B.; Martinez, R.R.

    1987-07-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia observed in animals after bacterial endotoxin administration and some forms of sepsis can result from increased hepatic triacylglycerol (TG) output or decreased TG clearance by extrahepatic tissues. To differentiate between these two possibilities, TG and free fatty acid (FFA) kinetics were determined in control and endotoxin-injected rats 18 h after treatment. Plasma TG and FFA kinetics were assessed by a constant intravenous infusion with (9,10-/sup 3/H)palmitate-labeled very low-density lipoprotein and (1-/sup 14/C)palmitate bound to albumin, respectively. In addition, lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was determined in heart, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue as well as in postheparin plasma of functionally hepatectomized, adrenalectomized, and gonadectomized rats. Plasma FFA acid concentrations were slightly increased in endotoxin-treated rats but their turnover did not differ from control. Endotoxin-treated rats had a threefold increase in plasma TG concentrations and decreased heart, skeletal muscle, and post-heparin plasma LPL activity. Plasma TG turnover was decreased, indicating that hypertriglyceridemia was not due to an increased TG output by the liver. Instead, the endotoxin-induced increase in plasma TG concentration was consequence of the 80% reduction in TG metabolic clearance rate. Thus, suppression of LPL activity in endotoxic animals impairs TG clearance resulting in hypertriglyceridemia. Furthermore, endotoxin administration reduced the delivery of TG-FFA to extrahepatic tissues because hepatic synthesis and secretion of TG from plasma FFA was decreased and LPL activity was suppressed.

  9. APOE, CETP and LPL genes show strong association with lipid levels in Greek children☆

    PubMed Central

    Smart, M.C.; Dedoussis, G.; Louizou, E.; Yannakoulia, M.; Drenos, F.; Papoutsakis, C.; Maniatis, N.; Humphries, S.E.; Talmud, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims Studies have consistently demonstrated that variants in a number of candidate genes are significant determinants of lipid levels in adults. However, few studies have investigated the impact of these variants in children. Therefore, in the present investigation we examined the influence of ten common variants in the genes for lipoprotein lipase (LPL – S447X), cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP – Taq1B) apolipoprotein (APO) E (ɛ2, ɛ3, ɛ4), APOA5 (−1131C > T and S19W), APOA4 (S347T) and APOC3 (−482C > T; 1100C > T and 3238G > C) on lipoprotein levels children from the Gene–Diet Attica Investigation on childhood obesity (GENDAI). Methods and results The ten variants selected were genotyped in 882 Greek children, mean age: 11.2 ± 0.7 years (418 females and 464 males). Genotypes were assessed using TaqMan technology. Significantly higher total cholesterol (TC) (p = 0.0001) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (p < 0.0001) were observed in APOE ɛ4 carriers compared to ɛ3/ɛ3 homozygotes and ɛ2 carriers. The association of APOE genotype with TC and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) ratio (p = 0.0008) was further modulated by body mass index. Carriers of the CETP TaqIB B2 allele had significantly higher HDL-C (p < 0.0001) and significantly lower TC: HDL-C ratio (p < 0.0001) compared to B1/B1 individuals. No significant associations were observed between APOA4, APOA5 and APOC3 variants and serum lipids. Conclusion This study demonstrates that these common variants are associated with lipid levels in this healthy paediatric cohort, suggesting that even in these young children there may be potential in predicting their lifelong exposure to an adverse lipid profile. PMID:19403283

  10. Wedelolactone Regulates Lipid Metabolism and Improves Hepatic Steatosis Partly by AMPK Activation and Up-Regulation of Expression of PPARα/LPL and LDLR

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li-chao; Xu, Xu-dong; Li, Wei-jie; Luo, Xiu-mei; Jin, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is considered one of the greatest risk factors of cardiovascular diseases. We investigated the anti-hyperlipidemic effect and the underlying mechanism of wedelolactone, a plant-derived coumestan, in HepG2 cells and high-fat diet (HFD)−induced hyperlipidemic hamsters. We showed that in cultured HepG2 cells, wedelolactone up-regulated protein levels of adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα) as well as the gene expression of AMPK, PPARα, lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). Meanwhile, administration of wedelolactone for 4 weeks decreased the lipid profiles of plasma and liver in HFD−induced hyperlipidemic hamsters, including total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C). The activation of AMPK and up-regulation of PPARα was also observed with wedelolactone treatment. Furthermore, wedelolactone also increased the activities of superoxidase dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and decreased the level of the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA) in the liver, therefore decreasing the activity of alanine aminotransferase (ALT). In conclusion, we provide novel experimental evidence that wedelolactone possesses lipid-lowering and steatosis-improving effects, and the underlying mechanism is, at least in part, mediated by the activation of AMPK and the up-regulation of PPARα/LPL and LDLR. PMID:26168156

  11. Feeding a High Concentrate Diet Down-Regulates Expression of ACACA, LPL and SCD and Modifies Milk Composition in Lactating Goats

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hui; Chang, Guangjun; Xu, Tianle; Zhao, Huajian; Zhang, Kai; Shen, Xiangzhen

    2015-01-01

    High concentrate diets are fed to early and mid-lactation stages dairy ruminants to meet the energy demands for high milk production in modern milk industry. The present study evaluated the effects of a high concentrate diet on milk fat and milk composition, especially, cis-9, trans-11 CLA content in milk and gene expression of lactating goats. Eight mid-lactating goats with rumen fistula were randomly assigned into a high concentrate diet (HCD) group and low concentrate diet (LCD) group. High concentrate diet feeding significantly increased lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in plasma and decreased milk fat content, vaccenic acid (VA) and cis-9, trans-11 CLA in milk of the lactating goats. The mRNA expression levels of sterol regulatory element binding protein B 1c (SREBP1c), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), fatty acid synthetase (FASN) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase α (ACACA, ACCα) involving in lipid metabolism were analyzed, and ACACA and LPL all decreased in their expression level in the mammary glands of goats fed a high concentrate diet. DNA methylation rate of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) was elevated and decreased, and SCD mRNA and protein expression was reduced significantly in the mammary glands of goats fed a high concentrate diet. In conclusion, feeding a high concentrate diet to lactating goats decreases milk fat and reduced expression of SCD in the mammary gland, which finally induced cis-9, trans-11 CLA content in milk. PMID:26086219

  12. Acid Lipase Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Acid Lipase Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Cholesterol Ester Storage ... Trials Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Acid Lipase Disease ? Acid lipase disease or deficiency occurs ...

  13. Down-regulation of lipoprotein lipase increases glucose uptake in L6 muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Veronica; Saraff, Kumuda; Medh, Jheem D.

    2009-11-06

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are synthetic hypoglycemic agents used to treat type 2 diabetes. TZDs target the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-{gamma}) and improve systemic insulin sensitivity. The contributions of specific tissues to TZD action, or the downstream effects of PPAR-{gamma} activation, are not very clear. We have used a rat skeletal muscle cell line (L6 cells) to demonstrate that TZDs directly target PPAR-{gamma} in muscle cells. TZD treatment resulted in a significant repression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) expression in L6 cells. This repression correlated with an increase in glucose uptake. Down-regulation of LPL message and protein levels using siRNA resulted in a similar increase in insulin-dependent glucose uptake. Thus, LPL down-regulation improved insulin sensitivity independent of TZDs. This finding provides a novel method for the management of insulin resistance.

  14. Nutritional dependence of the effect of estrogen on fat cell lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Valette, A; Mercier, L; Benoit, V; Meignen, J M; Boyer, J

    1987-10-01

    We investigated the effects of ethynylestradiol (EE) at low dose (1.2 micrograms/day) injected s.c. for 10 days on lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in fat cells of female rats fed a standard diet (5% lipid, 49.5% glucid, 23.5% protein) as a function of the nutritional state. EE caused a 150% increase in LPL activity in the fed state, and a 65% decrease in the fasting state, resulting in a large increment in the physiological feeding-fasting difference. Feeding the rats a diet supplemented with 20% lard reversed the estrogen-dependent LPL increase in the fed state. Under all experimental conditions, EE caused a depletion of fat stores and an increase in plasma levels of triacyglycerol. PMID:3669666

  15. Substrate Selectivity of Lysophospholipid Transporter LplT Involved in Membrane Phospholipid Remodeling in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yibin; Bogdanov, Mikhail; Tong, Shuilong; Guan, Ziqiang; Zheng, Lei

    2016-01-29

    Lysophospholipid transporter (LplT) was previously found to be primarily involved in 2-acyl lysophosphatidylethanolamine (lyso-PE) recycling in Gram-negative bacteria. This work identifies the potent role of LplT in maintaining membrane stability and integrity in the Escherichia coli envelope. Here we demonstrate the involvement of LplT in the recycling of three major bacterial phospholipids using a combination of an in vitro lysophospholipid binding assay using purified protein and transport assays with E. coli spheroplasts. Our results show that lyso-PE and lysophosphatidylglycerol, but not lysophosphatidylcholine, are taken up by LplT for reacylation by acyltransferase/acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase on the inner leaflet of the membrane. We also found a novel cardiolipin hydrolysis reaction by phospholipase A2 to form diacylated cardiolipin progressing to the completely deacylated headgroup. These two distinct cardiolipin derivatives were both translocated with comparable efficiency to generate triacylated cardiolipin by acyltransferase/acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase, demonstrating the first evidence of cardiolipin remodeling in bacteria. These findings support that a fatty acid chain is not required for LplT transport. We found that LplT cannot transport lysophosphatidic acid, and its substrate binding was not inhibited by either orthophosphate or glycerol 3-phosphate, indicating that either a glycerol or ethanolamine headgroup is the chemical determinant for substrate recognition. Diacyl forms of PE, phosphatidylglycerol, or the tetra-acylated form of cardiolipin could not serve as a competitive inhibitor in vitro. Based on an evolutionary structural model, we propose a "sideways sliding" mechanism to explain how a conserved membrane-embedded α-helical interface excludes diacylphospholipids from the LplT binding site to facilitate efficient flipping of lysophospholipid across the cell membrane. PMID:26613781

  16. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M.; Brown, Robert J.

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Lipoprotein hydrolysis products were produced by lipoprotein lipase. • Hydrolysis products lowers expression of macrophage cholesterol transporters. • Hydrolysis products reduces expression of select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products lowers cholesterol transporters and select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products reduces cholesterol efflux from macrophages. - Abstract: Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL.

  17. A lipasin/Angptl8 monoclonal antibody lowers mouse serum triglycerides involving increased postprandial activity of the cardiac lipoprotein lipase

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zhiyao; Abou-Samra, Abdul B.; Zhang, Ren

    2015-01-01

    Lipasin/Angptl8 is a feeding-induced hepatokine that regulates triglyceride (TAG) metabolism; its therapeutical potential, mechanism of action, and relation to the lipoprotein lipase (LPL), however, remain elusive. We generated five monoclonal lipasin antibodies, among which one lowered the serum TAG level when injected into mice, and the epitope was determined to be EIQVEE. Lipasin-deficient mice exhibited elevated postprandial activity of LPL in the heart and skeletal muscle, but not in white adipose tissue (WAT), suggesting that lipasin suppresses the activity of LPL specifically in cardiac and skeletal muscles. Consistently, mice injected with the effective antibody or with lipasin deficiency had increased postprandial cardiac LPL activity and lower TAG levels only in the fed state. These results suggest that lipasin acts, at least in part, in an endocrine manner. We propose the following model: feeding induces lipasin, activating the lipasin-Angptl3 pathway, which inhibits LPL in cardiac and skeletal muscles to direct circulating TAG to WAT for storage; conversely, fasting induces Angptl4, which inhibits LPL in WAT to direct circulating TAG to cardiac and skeletal muscles for oxidation. This model suggests a general mechanism by which TAG trafficking is coordinated by lipasin, Angptl3 and Angptl4 at different nutritional statuses. PMID:26687026

  18. Muscle-specific overexpression of lipoprotein lipase causes a severe myopathy characterized by proliferation of mitochondria and peroxisomes in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Levak-Frank, S; Radner, H; Walsh, A; Stollberger, R; Knipping, G; Hoefler, G; Sattler, W; Weinstock, P H; Breslow, J L; Zechner, R

    1995-01-01

    In extrahepatic tissues lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyzes triglycerides thereby generating FFA for tissue uptake and metabolism. To study the effects of increased FFA uptake in muscle tissue, transgenic mouse lines were generated with a human LPL minigene driven by the promoter of the muscle creatine kinase gene. In these mice human LPL was expressed in skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle, but not in other tissues. In proportion to the level of LPL overexpression, decreased plasma triglyceride levels, elevated FFA uptake by muscle tissue, weight loss, and premature death were observed in three independent transgenic mouse lines. The animals developed a severe myopathy characterized by muscle fiber degeneration, fiber atrophy, glycogen storage, and extensive proliferation of mitochondria and peroxisomes. This degree of proliferation suggests that FFA play an important role in the biogenesis of these organelles. Our experiments indicate that LPL is rate limiting for the supply of muscle tissue with triglyceride-derived FFA. Improper regulation of muscle LPL can lead to major pathological changes and may be important in the pathogenesis of some human myopathies. Muscle-specific LPL transgenic mouse lines will serve as a useful animal model for the investigation of myopathies and the biogenesis of mitochondria and peroxisomes. Images PMID:7635990

  19. Gain-of-function Lipoprotein Lipase variant rs13702 modulates lipid traits through disruption of a microRNA-410 seed site

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have identified hundreds of genetic variants that are associated with lipid phenotypes. However, data supporting a functional role for these variants in the context of lipid metabolism are scarce. We investigated the association of the Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL...

  20. Identification of a small molecule that stabilizes lipoprotein lipase in vitro and lowers triglycerides in vivo.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Mikael; Caraballo, Rémi; Ericsson, Madelene; Lookene, Aivar; Enquist, Per-Anders; Elofsson, Mikael; Nilsson, Stefan K; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2014-07-25

    Patients at increased cardiovascular risk commonly display high levels of plasma triglycerides (TGs), elevated LDL cholesterol, small dense LDL particles and low levels of HDL-cholesterol. Many remain at high risk even after successful statin therapy, presumably because TG levels remain high. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) maintains TG homeostasis in blood by hydrolysis of TG-rich lipoproteins. Efficient clearance of TGs is accompanied by increased levels of HDL-cholesterol and decreased levels of small dense LDL. Given the central role of LPL in lipid metabolism we sought to find small molecules that could increase LPL activity and serve as starting points for drug development efforts against cardiovascular disease. Using a small molecule screening approach we have identified small molecules that can protect LPL from inactivation by the controller protein angiopoietin-like protein 4 during incubations in vitro. One of the selected compounds, 50F10, was directly shown to preserve the active homodimer structure of LPL, as demonstrated by heparin-Sepharose chromatography. On injection to hypertriglyceridemic apolipoprotein A-V deficient mice the compound ameliorated the postprandial response after an olive oil gavage. This is a potential lead compound for the development of drugs that could reduce the residual risk associated with elevated plasma TGs in dyslipidemia. PMID:24984153

  1. Structural characterization of ANGPTL8 (betatrophin) with its interacting partner lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Siddiqa, Amnah; Ahmad, Jamil; Ali, Amjad; Paracha, Rehan Zafar; Bibi, Zurah; Aslam, Babar

    2016-04-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 8 (ANGPTL8) (also known as betatrophin) is a newly identified secretory protein with a potential role in autophagy, lipid metabolism and pancreatic beta-cell proliferation. Its structural characterization is required to enhance our current understanding of its mechanism of action which could help in identifying its receptor and/or other binding partners. Based on the physiological significance and necessity of exploring structural features of ANGPTL8, the present study is conducted with a specific aim to model the structure of ANGPTL8 and study its possible interactions with Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to predict 3-dimensional (3D) structure of ANGPTL8. Three different approaches were used for modeling of ANGPTL8 including homology modeling, de-novo structure prediction and their amalgam which is then proceeded by structure verification using ERRATT, PROSA, Qmean and Ramachandran plot scores. The selected models of ANGPTL8 were further evaluated for protein-protein interaction (PPI) analysis with LPL using CPORT and HADDOCK server. Our results have shown that the crystal structure of iSH2 domain of Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) p85β subunit (PDB entry: 3mtt) is a good candidate for homology modeling of ANGPTL8. Analysis of inter-molecular interactions between the structure of ANGPTL8 and LPL revealed existence of several non-covalent interactions. The residues of LPL involved in these interactions belong from its lid region, thrombospondin (TSP) region and heparin binding site which is suggestive of a possible role of ANGPTL8 in regulating the proteolysis, motility and localization of LPL. Besides, the conserved residues of SE1 region of ANGPTL8 formed interactions with the residues around the hinge region of LPL. Overall, our results support a model of inhibition of LPL by ANGPTL8 through the steric block of its catalytic site which will be further explored using wet lab

  2. Fatty acid ethyl ester-synthesizing activity of lipoprotein lipase from rat postheparin plasma.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, T; Okuda, H

    1994-02-25

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) was obtained from rat postheparin plasma by chromatographies on heparin-Sepharose and hydroxyapatite. The enzyme was associated with fatty acid ethyl ester synthase (FAEE synthase) as judged by their co-elution profiles and identical profiles of inhibition by diisopropyl fluorophosphate. Only one polypeptide of molecular weight 57,000 in purified LPL fraction was labeled by affinity labeling with [3H]-diisopropyl fluorophosphate. The FAEE synthase activity of LPL was not affected by addition of apolipoprotein C-II. Digestion of the enzyme with trypsin resulted in almost complete loss of the triolein-hydrolyzing activity without change in FAEE synthase activity. The tributyrin-hydrolyzing activity of LPL was also not affected by addition of apolipoprotein C-II or trypsin digestion. On addition at progressively higher concentrations, bovine serum albumin increased FAEE synthesis to a maximum at 2 mg/ml and at higher concentrations inhibited its activity. On incubation of purified LPL with chylomicrons in an ethanol/water mixture, FAEE was formed in the presence of a high concentration of bovine serum albumin. The specific activity of FAEE synthesis from chylomicrons was about 65 times that from oleic acid. Triolein/gum arabic emulsion was used for identification of reaction products. We propose the following mechanism of FAEE formation from chylomicrons by LPL. The enzyme attacks chylomicrons forming an acyl-enzyme intermediate, and during the deacylation process, ethanol binds to fatty acids as an acceptor. These results suggest that LPL contributes to nonoxidative ethanol metabolism (FAEE formation) through degradation of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins such as chylomicrons. PMID:8119932

  3. PPARalpha and PPARgamma activators direct a distinct tissue-specific transcriptional response via a PPRE in the lipoprotein lipase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Schoonjans, K; Peinado-Onsurbe, J; Lefebvre, A M; Heyman, R A; Briggs, M; Deeb, S; Staels, B; Auwerx, J

    1996-01-01

    Increased activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) may explain the hypotriglyceridemic effects of fibrates, thiazolidinediones and fatty acids, which are known activators (and/or ligands) of the various peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). Treatment with compounds which activate preferentially PPARalpha, such as fenofibrate, induced LPL expression exclusively in rat liver. In contrast, the antidiabetic thiazolidinedione BRL 49653, a high affinity ligand for PPARgamma, had no effect on liver, but induced LPL expression in rat adipose tissue. In the hepatocyte cell line AML-12, fenofibric acid, but not BRL 49653, induced LPL mRNA, whereas in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, the PPARgamma ligand induced LPL mRNA levels much quicker and to a higher extent than fenofibric acid. In both the in vivo and in vitro studies, inducibility by either PPARalpha or gamma activators, correlated with the tissue distribution of the respective PPARs: an adipocyte-restricted expression of PPARgamma, whereas PPARalpha was expressed predominantly in liver. A sequence element was identified in the human LPL promoter that mediates the functional responsiveness to fibrates and thiazolidinediones. Methylation interference and gel retardation assays demonstrated that a PPARalpha or gamma and the 9-cis retinoic acid receptor (RXR) heterodimers bind to this sequence -169 TGCCCTTTCCCCC -157. These data provide evidence that transcriptional activation of the LPL gene by fibrates and thiazolidinediones is mediated by PPAR-RXR heterodimers and contributes significantly to their hypotriglyceridemic effects in vivo. Whereas thiazolidinediones predominantly affect adipocyte LPL production through activation of PPARgamma, fibrates exert their effects mainly in the liver via activation of PPARalpha. Images PMID:8895578

  4. [Possibility of New Circulating Atherosclerosis-Related Lipid Markers Measurement in Medical and Complete Medical Checkups: Small Dense Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Lipoprotein Lipase].

    PubMed

    Sumino, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Katsuyuki; Murakami, Masami

    2016-03-01

    Small dense low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (sdLDL-C) concentrations correlate more strongly with cardiovascular disease (CVD) than other LDL-C and large LDL particle concentrations. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) plays a central role in triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism by catalyzing the hydrolysis of triglycerides in chylomicrons and very low-density lipoprotein particles and is a useful biomarker in diagnosing Type I, Type IV, and Type V hyperlipidemia. Therefore, the measurement of circulating sdLDL-C and LPL concentrations contributes to the assessment of circulating atherosclerosis-related lipid markers. However, the measurement of these lipids has not been fully adopted in medical and complete medical checkups. Recently, novel automated homogenous assay for measuring sdLDL-C and latex particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (LTIA) for measuring LPL have been developed, respectively. Using these new assays, sdLDL-C values showed excellent agreement with those obtained by isolation of the d = 1.044 - 1.063 g/mL plasma fraction by sequential ultracentrifugation, and LPL values measured with and without heparin injection were highly correlated with the values measured by the LPL-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). These assays may be superior to the previous assays for the measurement of sdLDL-C and LPL concentrations due their simplicity and reproducibility. The measurements of sdLDL-C and LPL concentrations may be useful as lipid markers in the assessment of the development and progression of atherosclerosis and the detection of pathological conditions and diseases if these markers are measured in medical and complete medical checkups. We have introduced the possibility of the novel measurement of circulating atherosclerosis-related lipid markers such as sdLDL-C and LPL in medical and complete medical checkups. Further studies are needed to clarify whether sdLDL-C and LPL concentrations are related to the development and progression of

  5. Lipoprotein lipase activity is required for cardiac lipid droplet production.

    PubMed

    Trent, Chad M; Yu, Shuiqing; Hu, Yunying; Skoller, Nathan; Huggins, Lesley A; Homma, Shunichi; Goldberg, Ira J

    2014-04-01

    The rodent heart accumulates TGs and lipid droplets during fasting. The sources of heart lipids could be either FFAs liberated from adipose tissue or FAs from lipoprotein-associated TGs via the action of lipoprotein lipase (LpL). Because circulating levels of FFAs increase during fasting, it has been assumed that albumin transported FFAs are the source of lipids within heart lipid droplets. We studied mice with three genetic mutations: peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor α deficiency, cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) deficiency, and heart-specific LpL deletion. All three genetically altered groups of mice had defective accumulation of lipid droplet TGs. Moreover, hearts from mice treated with poloxamer 407, an inhibitor of lipoprotein TG lipolysis, also failed to accumulate TGs, despite increased uptake of FFAs. TG storage did not impair maximal cardiac function as measured by stress echocardiography. Thus, LpL hydrolysis of circulating lipoproteins is required for the accumulation of lipids in the heart of fasting mice. PMID:24493834

  6. Deficiency of Lipoprotein Lipase in Neurons Decreases AMPA Receptor Phosphorylation and Leads to Neurobehavioral Abnormalities in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tian; Taussig, Matthew D.; DiPatrizio, Nicholas V.; Astarita, Giuseppe; Piomelli, Daniele; Bergman, Bryan C.; Dell’Acqua, Mark L.; Eckel, Robert H.; Wang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in lipid metabolism have been found in several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyzes triacylglycerides in lipoproteins and regulates lipid metabolism in multiple organs and tissues, including the central nervous system (CNS). Though many brain regions express LPL, the functions of this lipase in the CNS remain largely unknown. We developed mice with neuron-specific LPL deficiency that became obese on chow by 16 wks in homozygous mutant mice (NEXLPL-/-) and 10 mo in heterozygous mice (NEXLPL+/-). In the present study, we show that 21 mo NEXLPL+/- mice display substantial cognitive function decline including poorer learning and memory, and increased anxiety with no difference in general motor activities and exploratory behavior. These neurobehavioral abnormalities are associated with a reduction in the 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (AMPA) receptor subunit GluA1 and its phosphorylation, without any alterations in amyloid β accumulation. Importantly, a marked deficit in omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the hippocampus precedes the development of the neurobehavioral phenotype of NEXLPL+/- mice. And, a diet supplemented with n-3 PUFA can improve the learning and memory of NEXLPL+/- mice at both 10 mo and 21 mo of age. We interpret these findings to indicate that LPL regulates the availability of PUFA in the CNS and, this in turn, impacts the strength of synaptic plasticity in the brain of aging mice through the modification of AMPA receptor and its phosphorylation. PMID:26263173

  7. The acidic domain of the endothelial membrane protein GPIHBP1 stabilizes lipoprotein lipase activity by preventing unfolding of its catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Mysling, Simon; Kristensen, Kristian Kølby; Larsson, Mikael; Beigneux, Anne P; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Fong, Loren G; Bensadouen, André; Jørgensen, Thomas Jd; Young, Stephen G; Ploug, Michael

    2016-01-01

    GPIHBP1 is a glycolipid-anchored membrane protein of capillary endothelial cells that binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial space and shuttles it to the capillary lumen. The LPL•GPIHBP1 complex is responsible for margination of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins along capillaries and their lipolytic processing. The current work conceptualizes a model for the GPIHBP1•LPL interaction based on biophysical measurements with hydrogen-deuterium exchange/mass spectrometry, surface plasmon resonance, and zero-length cross-linking. According to this model, GPIHBP1 comprises two functionally distinct domains: (1) an intrinsically disordered acidic N-terminal domain; and (2) a folded C-terminal domain that tethers GPIHBP1 to the cell membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositol. We demonstrate that these domains serve different roles in regulating the kinetics of LPL binding. Importantly, the acidic domain stabilizes LPL catalytic activity by mitigating the global unfolding of LPL's catalytic domain. This study provides a conceptual framework for understanding intravascular lipolysis and GPIHBP1 and LPL mutations causing familial chylomicronemia. PMID:26725083

  8. Mutations in exon 3 of the lipoprotein lipase gene segregating in a family with hypertriglyceridemia, pancreatitis, and non-insulin-dependent diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, D E; Hata, A; Kwong, L K; Lingam, A; Shuhua, J; Ridinger, D N; Yeager, C; Kaltenborn, K C; Iverius, P H; Lalouel, J M

    1993-01-01

    A proband with chylomicronemia, pancreatitis, and non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM) bears two different mutations in exon 3 of the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene: a missense mutation, 75Arg-->Ser, inherited through the paternal line and a truncation, 73Tyr-->Ter, through the maternal line. NIDDM appeared to be independently segregating. The R75S mutant was studied in extracts and media from transfected COS-1 cells. Detectable amounts of catalytically competent R75S LPL suggested destabilization of the active homodimer as with exon 5 mutants (Hata et al. 1992. J. Biol. Chem. 267:20132-20139). Hydrolysis of a short-chain fatty acid ester indicated that R75S does not directly affect activation of LPL by apoC-II. Subjects with NIDDM and wild-type LPL, and nondiabetic middle-aged carriers of the 73Tyr-->Ter truncation had moderate hypertriglyceridemia (260-521 mg/dl) and reduced high density lipoprotein cholesterol. A maternal aunt with NIDDM carried the truncation. Her phenotype (triglycerides of 5,300 mg/dl, eruptive xanthomatosis, and recurrent pancreatitis) was as severe as that in homozygotes or compound heterozygotes. We conclude: (a) diabetic carriers of dysfunctional LPL alleles are at risk for severe lipemia; and (b) the physiologic defects in NIDDM may be additive or synergistic with heterozygous LPL deficiency. Images PMID:8325986

  9. The acidic domain of the endothelial membrane protein GPIHBP1 stabilizes lipoprotein lipase activity by preventing unfolding of its catalytic domain

    PubMed Central

    Mysling, Simon; Kristensen, Kristian Kølby; Larsson, Mikael; Beigneux, Anne P; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Fong, Loren G; Bensadouen, André; Jørgensen, Thomas JD; Young, Stephen G; Ploug, Michael

    2016-01-01

    GPIHBP1 is a glycolipid-anchored membrane protein of capillary endothelial cells that binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial space and shuttles it to the capillary lumen. The LPL•GPIHBP1 complex is responsible for margination of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins along capillaries and their lipolytic processing. The current work conceptualizes a model for the GPIHBP1•LPL interaction based on biophysical measurements with hydrogen-deuterium exchange/mass spectrometry, surface plasmon resonance, and zero-length cross-linking. According to this model, GPIHBP1 comprises two functionally distinct domains: (1) an intrinsically disordered acidic N-terminal domain; and (2) a folded C-terminal domain that tethers GPIHBP1 to the cell membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositol. We demonstrate that these domains serve different roles in regulating the kinetics of LPL binding. Importantly, the acidic domain stabilizes LPL catalytic activity by mitigating the global unfolding of LPL's catalytic domain. This study provides a conceptual framework for understanding intravascular lipolysis and GPIHBP1 and LPL mutations causing familial chylomicronemia. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12095.001 PMID:26725083

  10. Lipases, industrial uses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipases are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of triglycerides to glycerol and fatty acids. Microbial lipases are relatively stable and are capable of catalyzing a variety of reactions; they are potentially of importance for diverse industrial applications. Lipases can be divided generally into...

  11. Maternal High-Fat Feeding Increases Placental Lipoprotein Lipase Activity by Reducing SIRT1 Expression in Mice.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liping; Guo, Zhuyu; Bosco, Chris; Guidotti, Stefano; Wang, Yunfeng; Wang, Mingyong; Parast, Mana; Schaack, Jerome; Hay, William W; Moore, Thomas R; Shao, Jianhua

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated how maternal overnutrition and obesity regulate expression and activation of proteins that facilitate lipid transport in the placenta. To create a maternal overnutrition and obesity model, primiparous C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat (HF) diet throughout gestation. Fetuses from HF-fed dams had significantly increased serum levels of free fatty acid and body fat. Despite no significant difference in placental weight, lipoprotein lipase (LPL) protein levels and activity were remarkably elevated in placentas from HF-fed dams. Increased triglyceride content and mRNA levels of CD36, VLDLr, FABP3, FABPpm, and GPAT2 and -3 were also found in placentas from HF-fed dams. Although both peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α protein levels were significantly increased in placentas of the HF group, only PPARγ exhibited a stimulative effect on LPL expression in cultured JEG-3 human trophoblasts. Maternal HF feeding remarkably decreased SIRT1 expression in placentas. Through use of an SIRT1 activator and inhibitor and cultured trophoblasts, an inhibitory effect of SIRT1 on LPL expression was demonstrated. We also found that SIRT1 suppresses PPARγ expression in trophoblasts. Most importantly, inhibition of PPARγ abolished the SIRT1-mediated regulatory effect on LPL expression. Together, these results indicate that maternal overnutrition induces LPL expression in trophoblasts by reducing the inhibitory effect of SIRT1 on PPARγ. PMID:25948680

  12. LPL is the strongest prognostic factor in a comparative analysis of RNA-based markers in early chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kaderi, Mohd Arifin; Kanduri, Meena; Buhl, Anne Mette; Sevov, Marie; Cahill, Nicola; Gunnarsson, Rebeqa; Jansson, Mattias; Smedby, Karin Ekström; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Jurlander, Jesper; Juliusson, Gunnar; Mansouri, Larry; Rosenquist, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Background The expression levels of LPL, ZAP70, TCL1A, CLLU1 and MCL1 have recently been proposed as prognostic factors in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. However, few studies have systematically compared these different RNA-based markers. Design and Methods Using real-time quantitative PCR, we measured the mRNA expression levels of these genes in unsorted samples from 252 newly diagnosed chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients and correlated our data with established prognostic markers (for example Binet stage, CD38, IGHV gene mutational status and genomic aberrations) and clinical outcome. Results High expression levels of all RNA-based markers, except MCL1, predicted shorter overall survival and time to treatment, with LPL being the most significant. In multivariate analysis including the RNA-based markers, LPL expression was the only independent prognostic marker for overall survival and time to treatment. When studying LPL expression and the established markers, LPL expression retained its independent prognostic strength for overall survival. All of the RNA-based markers, albeit with varying ability, added prognostic information to established markers, with LPL expression giving the most significant results. Notably, high LPL expression predicted a worse outcome in good-prognosis subgroups, such as patients with mutated IGHV genes, Binet stage A, CD38 negativity or favorable cytogenetics. In particular, the combination of LPL expression and CD38 could further stratify Binet stage A patients. Conclusions LPL expression is the strongest RNA-based prognostic marker in chronic lymphocytic leukemia that could potentially be applied to predict outcome in the clinical setting, particularly in the large group of patients with favorable prognosis. PMID:21508119

  13. [Lack of association between the S447X variant of the lipoprotein lipase gene and plasma lipids. A preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Zambrano Morales, Mariana; Fernández Salgado, Erika; Balzán Urdaneta, Ligia; Labastidas, Neila; Aranguren-Méndez, José; Connell, Lissette; Molero Paredes, Tania; Rojas, Alicia; Panunzio, Amelia

    2014-06-01

    The increase in lipid plasma values is an important cardiovascular risk factor. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) plays an important role in the lipoprotein metabolism and metabolic and genetic factors may influence its levels and functions. The S447X variant of the lipoprotein lipase gene is associated with changes in plasma lipids in different populations. The objective of this research was to analyze the S447X variant of the LPL gene and its relation with plasma lipids of individuals in Zulia state, Venezuela. With this purpose, we studied 75 individuals (34 men and 41 women) between 20 and 60 years of age. Each subject had a medical history which included family history, anthropometric characteristics, nutritional status evaluation and biochemical tests. Genomic DNA was extracted for the molecular study and the polymerase chain reaction was used, followed by enzyme digestion, for restriction fragments length polymorphisms using the Hinf I enzyme. The individuals studied had normal levels of blood glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol and low density lipoproteins (LDL-C) and slightly decreased levels of high density lipoproteins (HDL-C). The genotypic distribution of the LPL gene S447X variant in the studied population was 90.6% for the homozygous genotype SS447 and 9.4% for the heterozygote SX447. The genotype 447XX was not identified. The population was found in Hardy Weinberg genetic equilibrium. No association between the S447X polymorphism of lipoprotein lipase gene and plasma lipids was observed. PMID:24974629

  14. Lipoprotein lipase: size of the functional unit determined by radiation inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Garfinkel, A.S.; Kempner, E.S.; Ben-Zeev, O.; Nikazy, J.; James, S.J.; Schotz, M.C.

    1983-06-01

    Radiation inactivation was used to determine the functional molecular weight of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in rat heart and adipose tissues. This technique reveals the size of the smallest unit required to carry out the enzyme function. Supernatant fractions of the tissue homogenates were exposed to high energy electrons at -135 degrees C. LPL activity showed a simple exponential decay in all samples tested. Because changes in nutritional state shift the distribution of LPL between the capillary endothelial and parenchymal cells within heart and adipose tissues, fasted and refed rats were used for the radiation studies. The functional molecular weight was calculated to be 127,000 +/- 15,000 (mean +/- SD) daltons for heart and adipose. Thus, the smallest unit required for enzyme function was the same in both of these tissues and did not vary with nutritional state. The data suggest that, compared with LPL monomer sizes reported in the range 55,000 to 72,000, this active unit constitutes a dimer.

  15. Alipogene tiparvovec: a review of its use in adults with familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Scott, Lesley J

    2015-02-01

    Alipogene tiparvovec (Glybera®; AMT-011, AAV1-LPL(S447X)) is an adeno-associated virus serotype 1-based gene therapy for adult patients with familial lipoprotein lipase (LPL) deficiency (LPLD) and suffering from severe or multiple pancreatitis attacks despite dietary fat restrictions. It is administered as a one-time series of intramuscular injections in the legs. LPLD, a rare autosomal recessive disorder, results in hyperchylomicronaemia and severe hypertriglyceridaemia, which in turn, are associated with an increased risk of clinical complications, the most debilitating of which is recurrent severe and potentially life-threatening pancreatitis. In clinical studies (n = 27 patients), one-time administration of alipogene tiparvovec was associated with significant reductions in plasma triglyceride levels during the 12 or 14 week study period post administration. Although triglyceride levels returned to pre-treatment levels within 16-26 weeks after administration, patients had sustained improvements in postprandial chylomicron metabolism, with sustained expression of functional copies of the LPL (S477X) gene and of biologically active LPL in skeletal muscle. Moreover, after up to 6 years' follow-up post administration, there were clinically relevant reductions in the incidence of documented pancreatitis and acute abdominal pain events consistent with pancreatitis. Alipogene tiparvovec was generally well tolerated, with most adverse events being localized, transient, mild to moderate injection-site reactions. This article reviews the pharmacology of alipogene tiparvovec and its efficacy and safety in adults with LPLD. PMID:25559420

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF LEPTOSPIRAL LIPASE

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Virendra; Goldberg, Herbert S.; Blenden, Donald

    1964-01-01

    Patel, Virendra (University of Missouri, Columbia), Herbert S. Goldberg, and Donald Blenden. Characterization of leptospiral lipase. J. Bacteriol. 88:877–884. 1964.—A technique for leptospiral lipase extraction which yielded a highly active, stable, and concentrated lipase preparation was developed. The chief characteristics of leptospiral lipase were determined and are summarized below. Leptospiral lipase was soluble in water and stable in both the dry state and in aqueous solution. Tributyrin was found to be the substrate upon which the enzyme was most active. With this substrate, leptospiral lipase was found to display optimal activity at pH 7 and at 30 C. The Michaelis constant of leptospiral lipase with tributyrin substrate was determined to be 4.76 × 10-2m. The enzyme was not inhibited by low concentrations of mercury, iron, cobalt, or copper or by —SH blocking agents. Bile and calcium chloride in low concentrations were able to increase lipase activity at alkaline pH. The isoelectric point of leptospiral lipase was determined to be in the range of pH 5.2 to 5.4. PMID:14219049

  17. Effect of flax supplementation and growth promotants on lipoprotein lipase and glycogenin messenger RNA concentrations in finishing cattle.

    PubMed

    Waylan, A T; Dunn, J D; Johnson, B J; Kayser, J P; Sissom, E K

    2004-06-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyzes triacylglycerols into monoacylglycerol and fatty acids, which are taken up by tissues and used for energy. Glycogenin is the core protein on which glycogen molecules are synthesized. There is one molecule of glycogenin per molecule of glycogen in skeletal muscle; therefore, glycogen storage is limited by the amount of glycogenin present in muscle. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of feeding flaxseed, a source of PUFA, and administering a growth promoter on steady-state LPL and glycogenin mRNA content of muscle in finishing cattle. Sixteen crossbred steers (initial BW = 397 kg), given ad libitum access to a 92% concentrate diet for 28 d, were used in a four-treatment, 2 x 2 factorial experiment, with flaxseed supplementation (0 or 5% of dietary DM) and implanting (not implanted or implanted with Revalor-S) as the main effects. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the LM at 0, 14, and 28 d, and used to quantify LPL and glycogenin mRNA concentrations using real-time quantitative PCR. Implanting with Revalor-S did not affect LPL (P = 0.13) or glycogenin (P = 0.98) mRNA concentrations. A day x flaxseed interaction (P < 0.001) was observed for both LPL and glycogenin mRNA concentrations. No differences (P > 0.10) were observed between 0 and 5% flaxseed supplemented steers; however, at 28 d, nonflaxseed-fed steers had 4.1- and 5.7-fold increases (P < 0.001) over flaxseed steers for LPL and glycogenin mRNA concentrations, respectively. To further evaluate the effects of alpha-linolenic acid (alpha-LA) on LPL and glycogenin mRNA concentrations, muscle satellite cells were isolated from five finishing steers, and different alpha-LA concentrations were applied in culture. The RNA was isolated from the bovine satellite cells. Addition of alpha-LA numerically increased (P = 0.16) the LPL mRNA concentration 48% at 1 microM alpha-LA compared with the control. The expression of glycogenin was increased (P < 0.05) 50% at 1

  18. Angiopoietin-Like 4 Mediates PPAR Delta Effect on Lipoprotein Lipase-Dependent Fatty Acid Uptake but Not on Beta-Oxidation in Myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Robciuc, Marius R.; Skrobuk, Paulina; Anisimov, Andrey; Olkkonen, Vesa M.; Alitalo, Kari; Eckel, Robert H.; Koistinen, Heikki A.; Jauhiainen, Matti; Ehnholm, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) delta is an important regulator of fatty acid (FA) metabolism. Angiopoietin-like 4 (Angptl4), a multifunctional protein, is one of the major targets of PPAR delta in skeletal muscle cells. Here we investigated the regulation of Angptl4 and its role in mediating PPAR delta functions using human, rat and mouse myotubes. Expression of Angptl4 was upregulated during myotubes differentiation and by oleic acid, insulin and PPAR delta agonist GW501516. Treatment with GW501516 or Angptl4 overexpression inhibited both lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity and LPL-dependent uptake of FAs whereas uptake of BSA-bound FAs was not affected by either treatment. Activation of retinoic X receptor (RXR), PPAR delta functional partner, using bexarotene upregulated Angptl4 expression and inhibited LPL activity in a PPAR delta dependent fashion. Silencing of Angptl4 blocked the effect of GW501516 and bexarotene on LPL activity. Treatment with GW501516 but not Angptl4 overexpression significantly increased palmitate oxidation. Furthermore, Angptl4 overexpression did not affect the capacity of GW501516 to increase palmitate oxidation. Basal and insulin stimulated glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis and glucose oxidation were not significantly modulated by Angptl4 overexpression. Our findings suggest that FAs-PPARdelta/RXR-Angptl4 axis controls the LPL-dependent uptake of FAs in myotubes, whereas the effect of PPAR delta activation on beta-oxidation is independent of Angptl4. PMID:23056264

  19. Effect of Low-Power Laser (LPL) and Light-Emitting Diode (LED) on Inflammatory Response in Burn Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Paulo C L; Ferreira, Karina B; da Rocha, Franciani R; Pieri, Bruno L S; Pedroso, Giulia S; De Souza, Claudio T; Nesi, Renata T; Pinho, Ricardo A

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the biochemical and molecular changes in the process of epidermal healing of burn injuries after therapeutic treatment with low-power laser (LPL) and light-emitting diode (LED). Rats were divided into six groups: skin without injury (Sham), burn wounds (BWs), BW + 660-nm LPL, BW + 904-nm LPL, BW + 632-nm LED, and BW + 850-nm LED. The burn wound model was performed using a 100 °C copper plate, with 10 s of contact in the skin. The irradiations started 24 h after the lesion and were performed daily for 7 days. The burn wound groups showed an increase in the superoxide production, dichlorofluorescein, nitrites, and high protein oxidative damage. The activities of glutathione peroxidase and catalase were also increased, and a significant reduction in glutathione levels was observed compared to the control group. However, treatments with 660-nm LPL and 850-nm LED promoted protection against to oxidative stress, and similar results were also observed in the IL-6 and pERK1/2 expression. Taken together, these results suggest that LPL 660 nm and LED 850 nm appear reduced in the inflammatory response and oxidative stress parameters, thus decreasing dermal necrosis and increasing granulation tissue formation, in fact accelerating the repair of burn wounds. PMID:27206919

  20. Production of lipase by clinical isolates of Pseudomonas cepacia.

    PubMed Central

    Lonon, M K; Woods, D E; Straus, D C

    1988-01-01

    Ten clinical isolates of Pseudomonas cepacia from the sputum of cystic fibrosis patients were examined for the ability to produce lipase. Lipase substrates used included egg yolk agar, four different polyoxyethylene sorbitans (Tweens), and p-nitrophenylphosphorylcholine, a chromogenic substrate used to assay for phospholipase C. Lipase activity was detected in the filtrates of organisms grown to the exponential phase in either tryptose minimal medium or chemically defined medium. Lipase activity increased in the filtrates if the cultures were allowed to proceed into the stationary phase. None of the isolates produced phospholipase C. Lipase activity on Tween 20 ranged from 41.6 X 10(-3) to 640.0 X 10(-3) U/micrograms of protein. The activity was similar or slightly lower when Tween 40, 60, or 80 was used as the substrate. There was no correlation between lipase activity on Tween and that demonstrated on egg yolk agar. Lipase activity increased as pH increased from 7.0 to 9.0. Boiling for 5 min resulted in 66% loss of enzyme activity. The remaining activity continued to decrease with increasing boiling time. The enzyme was purified by gel filtration on Sephadex G-200, and the resultant preparation, when subjected to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, resulted in a single protein band (molecular weight, approximately 25,000) from which lipase activity could be eluted. The purified lipase was not cytotoxic to HeLa cells, nor was it toxic when injected intravenously into mice. PMID:3384918

  1. Development and evaluation of an ELISA method for the determination of lipoprotein lipase mass concentration--comparison with a commercial, one-step enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Antikainen, M; Suurinkeroinen, L; Jauhiainen, M; Ehnholm, C; Taskinen, M R

    1996-07-01

    We developed a non-competitive, enzyme-linked, immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the quantitation of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in human postheparin plasma using affinity-purified antihuman milk lipoprotein lipase antibodies produced in chicken eggs and a monoclonal antibody directed against human lipoprotein lipase. We compared our ELISA method with a commercially available sandwich-enzyme immunoassay (Markit-F LPL EIA Kit, Dainippon Pharmaceutical Co, Ltd. Osaka, Japan). The reference values for lipoprotein lipase catalytic activity concentration and mass concentration in healthy Finns were determined. Lipoprotein lipase activity concentration (mean +/- SD) was 297 +/- 112 U/l in women, and mass concentration as measured by the ELISA method was 1058 +/- 367 micrograms/l. The corresponding values for men were 247 +/- 97 U/l and 815 +/- 207 micrograms/l, respectively. Across the whole concentration range of the ELISA method, the control samples' intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation (CV) were 5.1% and 6.5%, respectively. The correlation between the ELISA and EIA methods was good, r = +0.81. The importance of the correct standardisation of immunoassays is discussed. PMID:8864403

  2. Hemorheological abnormalities in lipoprotein lipase deficient mice with severe hypertriglyceridemia

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Tieqiang; Guo Jun; Li Hui; Huang Wei; Xian Xunde; Ross, Colin J.D.; Hayden, Michael R.; Wen Zongyao . E-mail: rheol@bjmu.edu.cn; Liu George . E-mail: vangeorgeliu@gmail.com

    2006-03-24

    Severe hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a metabolic disturbance often seen in clinical practice. It is known to induce life-threatening acute pancreatitis, but its role in atherogenesis remains elusive. Hemorheological abnormality was thought to play an important role in pathogenesis of both pancreatitis and atherosclerosis. However, hemorheology in severe HTG was not well investigated. Recently, we established a severe HTG mouse model deficient in lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in which severe HTG was observed to cause a significant increase in plasma viscosity. Disturbances of erythrocytes were also documented, including decreased deformability, electrophoresis rate, and membrane fluidity, and increased osmotic fragility. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that most erythrocytes of LPL deficient mice deformed with protrusions, irregular appearances or indistinct concaves. Analysis of erythrocyte membrane lipids showed decreased cholesterol (Ch) and phospholipid (PL) contents but unaltered Ch/PL ratio. The changes of membrane lipids may be partially responsible for the hemorheological and morphologic abnormalities of erythrocytes. This study indicated that severe HTG could lead to significant impairment of hemorheology and this model may be useful in delineating the role of severe HTG in the pathogenesis of hyperlipidemic pancreatitis and atherosclerosis.

  3. Cardiomyocyte-endothelial cell control of lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Amy Pei-Ling; Wan, Andrea; Rodrigues, Brian

    2016-10-01

    In people with diabetes, inadequate pharmaceutical management predisposes the patient to heart failure, which is the leading cause of diabetes related death. One instigator for this cardiac dysfunction is change in fuel utilization by the heart. Thus, following diabetes, when cardiac glucose utilization is impaired, the heart undergoes metabolic transformation wherein it switches to using fats as an exclusive source of energy. Although this switching is geared to help the heart initially, in the long term, this has detrimental effects on cardiac function. These include the generation of noxious byproducts, which damage the cardiomyocytes, and ultimately result in increased morbidity and mortality. A key perpetrator that may be responsible for organizing this metabolic disequilibrium is lipoprotein lipase (LPL), the enzyme responsible for providing fat to the hearts. Either exaggeration or reduction in its activity following diabetes could lead to heart dysfunction. Given the disturbing news that diabetes is rampant across the globe, gaining more insight into the mechanism(s) by which cardiac LPL is regulated may assist other researchers in devising new therapeutic strategies to restore metabolic equilibrium, to help prevent or delay heart disease seen during diabetes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart Lipid Metabolism edited by G.D. Lopaschuk. PMID:26995461

  4. Association of lipoprotein lipase gene with coronary heart disease in Sudanese population.

    PubMed

    Abdel Hamid, Muzamil M; Ahmed, Safa; Salah, Awatif; Tyrab, Etayeb M A; Yahia, Lemya M; Elbashir, Elbagire A; Musa, Hassan H

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease is stabilizing in high-income countries and has continued to rise in low-to-middle-income countries. Association of lipid profile with lipoprotein lipase gene was studied in case and control subject. The family history, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking and alcohol consumption were the most risk factors for early-onset of coronary heart disease (CHD). Sudanese patients had significantly (P<0.05) lower TC and LDL-C levels compared to controls. Allele frequency of LPL D9N, N291S and S447X carrier genotype was 4.2%, 30.7% and 7.1%, respectively. We conclude that lipoprotein lipase polymorphism was not associated with the incidence of CHD in Sudan. PMID:26025183

  5. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... and white-colored blood vessels in the retinas Pancreatitis that keeps returning Yellowing of the eyes and ... discuss your diet needs with a registered dietitian. Pancreatitis that is related to lipoprotein lipase deficiency responds ...

  6. Relationship between skeletal muscle lipoprotein lipase activity and 24-hour macronutrient oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, R T; Eckel, R H; Larson, D E; Fontvieille, A M; Rising, R; Jensen, D R; Ravussin, E

    1993-01-01

    A low ratio of whole-body 24-h fat/carbohydrate (CHO) oxidation has been shown to be a predictor of subsequent body weight gain. We tested the hypothesis that the variability of this ratio may be related to differences in skeletal muscle metabolism. Since lipoprotein lipase (LPL) plays a pivotal role in partitioning lipoprotein-borne triglycerides to adipose (storage) and skeletal muscle (mostly oxidation), we postulated that a low ratio of fat/CHO oxidation was associated with a low skeletal muscle LPL (SMLPL) activity. As an index of substrate oxidation, 24-h RQ was measured under sedentary and eucaloric conditions in 16 healthy nondiabetic Pima males. During a 6-h euglycemic, hyperinsulinemic clamp, muscle biopsies were obtained at baseline, 3, and 6 h. Heparin-elutable SMLPL activity was 2.92 +/- 0.56 nmol free fatty acids/g.min (mean +/- SD) at baseline, was unchanged (2.91 +/- 0.51) at the third hour, and increased significantly (P < 0.05) to 3.13 +/- 0.57 at the sixth hour of the clamp. The mean (of baseline and 3-h) SMLPL activity correlated inversely with 24-h RQ (r = 0.57, P < 0.03) but not with body size, body composition, or insulin-mediated glucose uptake. Since SMLPL activity is related to the ratio of whole body fat/CHO oxidation rate, a decreased muscle LPL activity may, therefore, predispose to obesity. PMID:8326010

  7. Modification of pancreatic lipase properties by directed molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Colin, Damien Yann; Deprez-Beauclair, Paule; Silva, Noella; Infantes, Lourdes; Kerfelec, Brigitte

    2010-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis is associated with pancreatic insufficiency and acidic intraluminal conditions that limit the action of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy, especially that of lipase. Directed evolution combined with rational design was used in the aim of improving the performances of the human pancreatic lipase at acidic pH. We set up a method for screening thousands of lipase variants for activity at low pH. A single round of random mutagenesis yielded one lipase variant with an activity at acidic pH enhanced by approximately 50% on medium- and long-chain triglycerides. Sequence analysis revealed two substitutions (E179G/N406S) located in specific regions, the hydrophobic groove accommodating the sn-1 chain of the triglyceride (E179G) and the surface loop that is likely to mediate lipase/colipase interaction in the presence of lipids (N406S). Interestingly, these two substitutions shifted the chain-length specificity of lipase toward medium- and long-chain triglycerides. Combination of those two mutations with a promising one at the entrance of the catalytic cavity (K80E) negatively affected the lipase activity at neutral pH but not that at acidic pH. Our results provide a basis for the design of improved lipase at acidic pH and identify for the first time key residues associated with chain-length specificity. PMID:20150178

  8. Regional distribution of body fat in relation to DNA methylation within the LPL, ADIPOQ and PPARγ promoters in subcutaneous adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Drogan, D; Boeing, H; Janke, J; Schmitt, B; Zhou, Y; Walter, J; Pischon, T; Tierling, S

    2015-01-01

    Obesity may be related to differential DNA methylation and thus to differential expression of key genes in adipose tissue metabolism, such as LPL, ADIPOQ and PPARγ. Using subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) from 59 individuals of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition–Potsdam study, we performed quantitative DNA methylation analysis within the promoters of LPL (LPL-CG1 and -CG2), ADIPOQ (ADIPOQ-CG1 and-CG2) and PPARγ (PPARγ-CG1). We then studied DNA methylation in relation to SAT gene expression, body composition measured using whole-body magnetic resonance imaging, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and long-term changes in BMI and WC. For LPL-CG1 and LPL-CG2, higher methylation levels were associated with lower LPL expression, but with higher past WC gain. LPL-CG1 was also positively associated with BMI, WC, and visceral and subcutaneous fat mass. ADIPOQ-CG1 or -CG2 methylation exhibited no association with ADIPOQ expression or with anthropometric parameters. PPARγ-CG1 methylation was significantly higher in individuals with higher visceral fat mass. Among the investigated sites, LPL-CG1 methylation showed the strongest association with gene expression and regional body fat distribution, thereby possibly linking the degree of obesity with major metabolic processes in SAT. PMID:26148147

  9. Cardiac lipoprotein lipase activity in the hypertrophied heart may be regulated by fatty acid flux

    PubMed Central

    Hauton, David; Caldwell, Germaine M.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterised by an imbalance between lipid uptake and fatty acid β-oxidation leading to an accumulation of lipids, particularly triacylglycerol (TAG). It is unclear whether uptake mechanisms such as lipoprotein lipase (LPL) can be attenuated to diminish this uptake. Rats were cold acclimated to induce cardiac hypertrophy and increase cardiac LPL. Lipid uptake and metabolism were altered by feeding a ‘Western-style’ high fat diet (WSD) or feeding oxfenicine (2 g/L) in the drinking water. Diastolic stiffness (increased volume change/unit pressure change) was induced in hypertrophied hearts for rats fed WSD (P < 0.05) or WSD + oxfenicine (P < 0.01), although absolute performance of cardiac muscle, estimated from stress–strain calculations was unchanged. Cold acclimation increased cardiac endothelial LPL (P < 0.05) but this was diminished following oxfenicine. Following WSD LPL was further decreased below WSD-fed control hearts (P < 0.05) with no further decrease by oxfenicine supplementation. A negative correlation was noted between plasma TAG and endothelial LPL (correlation coefficient = − 0.654; P < 0.001) but not cardiac TAG concentration. Transcript levels of angiopoietin-like protein-4 (ANGPTL4) were increased 6-fold by WSD (P < 0.05) and increased 15-fold following WSD + oxfenicine (P < 0.001). For CA-hearts fed WSD or WSD + oxfenicine ANGPTL4 mRNA levels were preserved at chow-fed levels. VLDLR protein levels were increased 10-fold (P < 0.01) by CA. ANGPTL4 protein levels were increased 2-fold (P < 0.05) by WSD, but restored following oxfenicine. For CA-hearts WSD increased ANGPTL4 protein levels 3-fold (P < 0.01) with WSD + oxfenicine increasing ANGPTL4 protein 4-fold (P < 0.01). These data suggest that endothelial LPL levels in the heart are altered to maintain FA flux and may exploit ANGPTL4. PMID:22226882

  10. Effects of adipocyte lipoprotein lipase on de novo lipogenesis and white adipose tissue browning.

    PubMed

    Bartelt, Alexander; Weigelt, Clara; Cherradi, M Lisa; Niemeier, Andreas; Tödter, Klaus; Heeren, Joerg; Scheja, Ludger

    2013-05-01

    Efficient storage of dietary and endogenous fatty acids is a prerequisite for a healthy adipose tissue function. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is the master regulator of fatty acid uptake from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. In addition to LPL-mediated fatty acid uptake, adipocytes are able to synthesize fatty acids from non-lipid precursor, a process called de novo lipogenesis (DNL). As the physiological relevance of fatty acid uptake versus DNL for brown and white adipocyte function remains unclear, we studied the role of adipocyte LPL using adipocyte-specific LPL knockout animals (aLKO). ALKO mice displayed a profound increase in DNL-fatty acids, especially palmitoleate and myristoleate in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT) depots while essential dietary fatty acids were markedly decreased. Consequently, we found increased expression in adipose tissues of genes encoding DNL enzymes (Fasn, Scd1, and Elovl6) as well as the lipogenic transcription factor carbohydrate response element binding protein-β. In a high-fat diet (HFD) study aLKO mice were characterized by reduced adiposity and improved plasma insulin and adipokines. However, neither glucose tolerance nor inflammatory markers were ameliorated in aLKO mice compared to controls. No signs of increased BAT activation or WAT browning were detected in aLKO mice either on HFD or after 1 week of β3-adrenergic stimulation using CL316,243. We conclude that despite a profound increase in DNL-derived fatty acids, proposed to be metabolically favorable, aLKO mice are not protected from metabolic disease per se. In addition, induction of DNL alone is not sufficient to promote browning of WAT. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Brown and White Fat: From Signaling to Disease. PMID:23228690

  11. Study of Common Genetic Variant S447X in Lipoprotein Lipase and Its Association with Lipids and Lipoproteins in Type 2 Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Momin, A A; Bankar, M P; Bhoite, G M

    2016-07-01

    Elevated plasma triglyceride and non-esterified fatty acid concentrations may cause insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a rate-determining enzyme in lipid metabolism. A variant in the LPL gene has been identified which alters the penultimate amino acid Serine at 447 to a stop codon (S447X), and results in a truncated LPL molecule lacking the C-terminal dipeptide Ser-Gly. The present study was designed to evaluate the frequency of S447X variant in the LPL gene and its effect on the lipid and lipoprotein levels in type 2 diabetic subjects. The genotype frequency distributions of type 2 diabetes patients and controls were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Comparison of the genotype and allelic frequencies of S447X in subjects with type 2 diabetics compared to controls demonstrated no significant difference. In subjects with type 2 diabetics having hypertriglyceridemia (TG ≥ 150 mg/dl) compared to diabetics with TG level <150 mg/dl, significant difference in genotype frequency was found among these groups, while allelic frequency of X was significantly differed. Logistic regression analysis showed the negative association of LPL S447X variant with TG and VLDL cholesterol, while no association with total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and LDL cholesterol was found. The lipid levels except for HDL cholesterol were found to be significantly lower in carriers for S447X than wild type in diabetes group. The decreased level of TG and TG rich lipoprotein in subjects with SNP S447X in LPL, predicts anti-atherogenic activity of carriers for S447X variant in general population as well as type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:27382199

  12. A vanadyl sulfate-bovine serum albumin complex stimulates the release of lipoprotein lipase activity from isolated rat fat pads through an increase in the cellular content of cAMP and myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate.

    PubMed

    Motoyashiki, T; Miyake, M; Yoshida, A; Morita, T; Ueki, H

    1999-08-01

    A vanadyl sulfate-bovine serum albumin complex (vanadyl-BSA) prolonged the stability of the V4+ oxidation state, although vanadyl alone can readily change the oxidation state from V4+ to V5+ under physiological conditions. Vanadyl-BSA stimulated the release of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity from isolated rat fat pads and increased the cellular LPL activity in a time-dependent manner. These effects were independent of protein synthesis. Propranolol, quin 2-AM, ruthenium red, and neomycin all inhibited LPL release more potently than the increase in activity. In contrast, potent inhibition of the increase effect was observed with genistein and wortmannin. Short-term incubation of the fat pads with vanadyl-BSA showed a transient increase in the cellular content of cAMP and myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3), which was inhibited by propranolol and neomycin, respectively. These results suggest that vanadyl-BSA stimulates the release of LPL activity through an increase in the cellular content of cAMP and IP3, leading to an increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration, and that it also increases cellular LPL activity via process(es) sensitive to genistein and wortmannin. PMID:10480313

  13. LplR, a Repressor Belonging to the TetR Family, Regulates Expression of the l-Pantoyl Lactone Dehydrogenase Gene in Rhodococcus erythropolis

    PubMed Central

    Si, Dayong; Urano, Nobuyuki; Shimizu, Sakayu

    2012-01-01

    The l-pantoyl lactone (l-PL) dehydrogenase (LPLDH) gene (lpldh) has been cloned from Rhodococcus erythropolis AKU2103, and addition of 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD) was shown to be required for lpldh expression in this strain. In this study, based on an exploration of the nucleotide sequence around lpldh, a TetR-like regulator gene, which we designated lplR, was found upstream of lpldh, and three putative open reading frames existed between the two genes. Disruption of lplR led to 22.8 times higher lpldh expression, even without 1,2-PD induction, than that in wild-type R. erythropolis AKU2103 without 1,2-PD addition. Introduction of a multicopy vector carrying lplR (multi-lplR) into the wild-type and ΔlplR strains led to no detectable LPLDH activity even in the presence of 1,2-PD. The results of an electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that purified LplR bound to a 6-bp inverted-repeat sequence located in the promoter/operator region of the operon containing lpldh. These results indicated that LplR is a negative regulator in lpldh expression. Based on the clarification of the expression mechanism of lpldh, recombinant cells showing high LPLDH activity were constructed and used as a catalyst for the conversion of l-PL to ketopantoyl lactone. Finally, a promising production process of d-PL from dl-PL was constructed. PMID:22941082

  14. The νSaα Specific Lipoprotein Like Cluster (lpl) of S. aureus USA300 Contributes to Immune Stimulation and Invasion in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Minh Thu; Kraft, Beatrice; Yu, Wenqi; Demicrioglu, Dogan Doruk; Hertlein, Tobias; Burian, Marc; Schmaler, Mathias; Boller, Klaus; Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle; Ohlsen, Knut; Schittek, Birgit; Götz, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    All Staphylococcus aureus genomes contain a genomic island, which is termed νSaα and characterized by two clusters of tandem repeat sequences, i.e. the exotoxin (set) and 'lipoprotein-like' genes (lpl). Based on their structural similarities the νSaα islands have been classified as type I to IV. The genomes of highly pathogenic and particularly epidemic S. aureus strains (USA300, N315, Mu50, NCTC8325, Newman, COL, JH1 or JH9) belonging to the clonal complexes CC5 and CC8 bear a type I νSaα island. Since the contribution of the lpl gene cluster encoded in the νSaα island to virulence is unclear to date, we deleted the entire lpl gene cluster in S. aureus USA300. The results showed that the mutant was deficient in the stimulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines in human monocytes, macrophages and keratinocytes. Purified lipoprotein Lpl1 was further shown to elicit a TLR2-dependent response. Furthermore, heterologous expression of the USA300 lpl cluster in other S. aureus strains enhanced their immune stimulatory activity. Most importantly, the lpl cluster contributed to invasion of S. aureus into human keratinocytes and mouse skin and the non-invasive S. carnosus expressing the lpl gene cluster became invasive. Additionally, in a murine kidney abscess model the bacterial burden in the kidneys was higher in wild type than in mutant mice. In this infection model the lpl cluster, thus, contributes to virulence. The present report is one of the first studies addressing the role of the νSaα encoded lpl gene cluster in staphylococcal virulence. The finding that the lpl gene cluster contributes to internalization into non-professional antigen presenting cells such as keratinocytes highlights the lpl as a new cell surface component that triggers host cell invasion by S. aureus. Increased invasion in murine skin and an increased bacterial burden in a murine kidney abscess model suggest that the lpl gene cluster serves as an important virulence factor. PMID:26083414

  15. Purification and characterization of an extracellular lipase from Geotrichum marinum.

    PubMed

    Huang, Youliang; Locy, Robert; Weete, John D

    2004-03-01

    An extracellular lipase (EC 3.1.1.3) from Geotrichum marinum was purified 76-fold with 46% recovery using Octyl Sepharose 4 Fast Flow and Bio-Gel A 1.5 m chromatography. The purified enzyme showed a prominent band on SDS-PAGE and a single band on native PAGE based on the activity staining. The molecular mass of the lipase was estimated to be 62 kDa using SDS-PAGE and Bio-Gel A chromatography, indicating that the lipase likely functions as a monomer. The pl of the lipase was determined to be 4.54. The apparent V(max) and Km were 1000 micromol/min/mg protein and 11.5 mM, respectively, using olive oil emulsified with taurocholic acid as substrate. The lipase demonstrated a pH optimum at pH 8.0 and a temperature optimum at 40 degrees C. At 6 mM, Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ stimulated activity, but Na+ and K+ at 500 mM and Fe2+ and Mn2+ at 6 mM reduced lipase activity. The anionic surfactant, taurocholic acid, and the zwitterionic surfactant, 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate, enhanced the activity at 0.1 mM. Other anionic surfactants such as SDS and sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate, the cationic surfactants methylbenzethonium bromide and cetyltriethylammonium bromide, and the nonionic surfactants Tween-20 and Triton X-100 inhibited the lipase activity to different extents. The lipase was found to have a preference for TG containing cis double bonds in their FA side chains, and the reaction rate increased with an increasing number of double bonds in the side chain. The lipase had a preference for ester bonds at the sn-1 and sn-3 positions over the ester bond at the sn-2 position. PMID:15233404

  16. Lipoprotein Lipase releases esterified oxylipins from Very Low Density Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Gregory C.; Newman, John W.

    2009-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that defects in lipoprotein metabolism alter the distribution of oxygenated polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in lipoprotein particles. If these oxidation products are released by lipoprotein lipase (LpL), then their delivery to peripheral tissues with bulk lipids could influence cellular function. Using 26 week old normolipidemic and hyperlipidemic Zucker rats, we measured PUFA alcohols, epoxides, diols, ketones and triols (i.e. oxylipins) in esterified and non-esterified fractions of whole plasma, VLDL, and LpL-generated VLDL-lipolysates. Whole plasma, VLDL, and lipolysate oxylipin profiles were distinct and altered by hyperlipidemia. While >90% of the whole plasma oxylipins were esterified, the fraction of each oxylipin class in the VLDL varied: 46% of alcohols, 30% of epoxides, 19% of diols, <10% of ketones, <1% triols. Whole plasma was dominated by arachidonate alcohols, while the linoleate alcohols, epoxides and ketones showed an increased prevalence in VLDL. LpL-mediated VLDL lipolysis of PUFA alcohols, diols and ketones was detected and the relative abundance of oxygenated linoleates was enhanced in the lipolysates, relative to their corresponding VLDL. In summary esterified oxylipins were seen to be LpL substrates with heterogeneous distributions among lipoprotein classes. Moreover, oxylipin distributions are changes within the context of obesity-associated dyslipidemia. These results support the notion that the VLDL-LpL axis may facilitate the delivery of plasma oxylipins to the periphery. The physiological implication of these findings are yet to be elucidated, however these molecules are plausible indicators of systemic oxidative stress, and could report this status to the peripheral tissues. PMID:19042114

  17. [Improvement of the the thermostability of Penicillium expansum lipase by mutagenesis the random mutant ep8 at K55R].

    PubMed

    Cai, Shao-Li; Lin, Jun-Han; Wang, Cai-Mei; Lin, Lin

    2007-07-01

    In order to improve the thermostability of the Penicillium expansum Lipase (PEL), the lipase encoding genes was mutated by site-directed mutagenesis. A recombinant vector pAO815-ep8-K55R which contain double mutant genes was constructed by overlap extension PCR using the cDNA of a random-mutant lipase ep8 (a single site mutant) as the template and two special primers were used to generate another mutation site K55R. The recombinant vector was transformed into Pichia pastoris GS115 by electroporation and the recombinant mutant GS-pAO815-ep8- K55R can secret double-mutant lipase PEL-ep8-K55R-GS into the medium when it was induced by Methanol. The yield of the double-mutant lipase is 508 u/mL, which is 81% that of the wild type lipase PEL-GS (627 u/mL) and 55% that of random-mutant PEL-ep8-GS (924 u/mL). The specific activity of double-mutant lipase is 2309.1 u/mg, which is similar to random-mutant lipase PEL-ep8-GS and the wild type lipase PEL-GS. The optimum temperature of the double-mutant lipase is same with the wild type lipase PEL-GS and random-mutant lipase PEL-ep8-GS. While the Tm of the double-mutant lipase is 41.0 degrees C, 2.3 degrees C higher than the wild type lipase PEL-GS and 0.8% higher than the random-mutant lipase PEL-ep8-GS, indicating that the double-mutant lipase PEL-ep8-K55R-GS has higher thermostability. PMID:17822043

  18. Structure of product-bound SMG1 lipase: active site gating implications.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shaohua; Xu, Jinxin; Pavlidis, Ioannis V; Lan, Dongming; Bornscheuer, Uwe T; Liu, Jinsong; Wang, Yonghua

    2015-12-01

    Monoacylglycerol and diacylglycerol lipases are industrially interesting enzymes, due to the health benefits that arise from the consumption of diglycerides compared to the traditional triglyceride oils. Most lipases possess an α-helix (lid) directly over the catalytic pocket which regulates the activity of the enzyme. Generally, lipases exist in active and inactive conformations, depending on the positioning of this lid subdomain. However, lipase SMG1, a monoacylglycerol and diacylglycerol specific lipase, has an atypical activation mechanism. In the present study we were able to prove by crystallography, in silico analysis and activity tests that only two positions, residues 102 and 278, are responsible for a gating mechanism that regulates the active and inactive states of the lipase, and that no significant structural changes take place during activation except for oxyanion hole formation. The elucidation of the gating effect provided data enabling the rational design of improved lipases with 6-fold increase in the hydrolytic activity toward diacylglycerols, just by providing additional substrate stabilization with a single mutation (F278N or F278T). Due to the conservation of F278 among the monoacylglycerol and diacylglycerol lipases in the Rhizomucor miehei lipase-like family, the gating mechanism described herein might represent a general mechanism applicable to other monoacylglycerol and diacylglycerol lipases as well. Database: Structural data are available in the Protein Data Bank under the accession numbers 4ZRE (F278D mutant) and 4ZRD (F278N mutant). PMID:26365206

  19. Effect of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) on lipolysis and lipoprotein lipase activities in adipose tissue of rats.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Marcela I; Mocchiutti, Norberto O; Bernal, Claudio A

    2010-09-01

    The di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is an ubiquitous environmental chemical with detrimental health effects. The present work was designed to asses some potential mechanisms by which DEHP causes, among others, a reduced body fat retention. Since this effect could be related to an alteration of adipocyte triacylglycerol (TG) metabolism, we evaluated the effects of dietary DEHP in adipose tissues upon (1) the number and size of fat cells; (2) the basal and stimulated lipolysis and (3) the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity. Groups of male Wistar rats were fed for 21 days a control diet alone (control group) or the same control diet supplemented with 2% (w/w) of DEHP (DEHP group). The LPL activity of DEHP-fed rats was increased in lumbar and epididymal adipose tissues. These rats had significantly reduced weight in epididymal and lumbar tissues, together with reduced size of epididymal adipocytes. These alterations do not seem to be associated with higher lipid mobility because neither basal lipolysis nor 'in vitro' stimulated lipolysis by noradrenaline (NA) showed to be modified by DEHP. Based on these results, we concluded that the adipose tissue size reduction induced by DEHP intake is not due to changes in lipolysis nor to a decreased LPL activity. More research is needed to achieve a comprehensive understanding of the potential mechanisms by which DEHP causes, among others, a reduced body fat retention. PMID:20144957

  20. Cholesterol induces lipoprotein lipase expression in a tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri chinensis) model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linqiang; Zhang, Zhiguo; Li, Yunhai; Liao, Shasha; Wu, Xiaoyun; Chang, Qing; Liang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Animal models are indispensible to investigate the pathogenesis and treatments of non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD). Altered cholesterol metabolism has been implicated into the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Here, using high fat, cholesterol and cholate diet (HFHC), we generated a novel tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri chinensis) model of NAFLD, which displayed dyslipidemia with increased levels of plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-c) and high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c), but decreased level of triglycerides (TG). Liver histopathology and genes expression indicated that HFHC diet successfully induced liver steatosis to inflammation and fibrosis progressively within 10 weeks. Moreover, HFHC induced the transcriptional expression of lipoprotein lipase (lpl) in the liver, but repressed the expression of LDL receptor, and the endogenous synthesis pathway and excretion of cholesterol. Notably, Poloxamer 407 (P-407) inhibition of LPL improved the severity of steatosis and reduced inflammation. These results illustrated that LPL plays an important role in cholesterol metabolism in NAFLD, and the tree shrew may be a valuable animal model for further research into NAFLD. PMID:26522240

  1. Microbial lipases: production and applications.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, P K; Saxena, R K; Gupta, R; Yadav, R P; Davidson, S

    1996-01-01

    Lipases occupy a prominent place among biocatalysts and have a wide spectrum of biotechnological applications. Lipases are unique as they hydrolyse fats into fatty acids and glycerol at the water-lipid interface and can reverse the reaction in non-aqueous media. The stability of these enzymes in organic solvents have pushed them into the frontier areas of organic synthesis leading to the designing of novel drugs, surfactants, bioactive compounds and oleochemicals. In addition, lipase-catalysed trans-esterification and inter-esterification reactions have been exploited in the fat industry. Looking into the wide scenario of lipase applications, commercialization of lipase production is a prime area of interest for microbiologists, process engineers and biochemists. Research carried out in this field has revealed that microbes, especially fungi and bacteria, are the tools of choice for commercial production. Recently, the structure determination of a few microbial lipases has widened our knowledge about the unique mechanism of catalysis of this enzyme. PMID:8828407

  2. Biodiesel production from Jatropha oil catalyzed by immobilized Burkholderia cepacia lipase on modified attapulgite.

    PubMed

    You, Qinghong; Yin, Xiulian; Zhao, Yuping; Zhang, Yan

    2013-11-01

    Lipase from Burkholderia cepacia was immobilized on modified attapulgite by cross-linking reaction for biodiesel production with jatropha oil as feedstock. Effects of various factors on biodiesel production were studied by single-factor experiment. Results indicated that the best conditions for biodiesel preparation were: 10 g jatropha oil, 2.4 g methanol (molar ratio of oil to methanol is 1:6.6) being added at 3h intervals, 7 wt% water, 10 wt% immobilized lipase, temperature 35°C, and time 24h. Under these conditions, the maximum biodiesel yield reached 94%. The immobilized lipase retained 95% of its relative activity during the ten repeated batch reactions. The half-life time of the immobilized lipase is 731 h. Kinetics was studied and the Vmax of the immobilized lipases were 6.823 mmol L(-1). This immobilized lipase catalyzed process has potential industrial use for biodiesel production to replace chemical-catalyzed method. PMID:24055964

  3. Lipases in lipophilization reactions.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Lipases are used in various sectors, as pharmaceutical, food or detergency industry. Their advantage versus classical chemical catalysts is that they exhibit a better selectivity and operate in milder reaction conditions. Theses enzymes can also be used in lipophilization reactions corresponding to the grafting of a lipophilic moiety to a hydrophilic one such as sugar, amino acids and proteins, or phenolic compounds. The major difficulty to overcome in such enzyme-catalyzed reaction resides in the fact that the two involved substrates greatly differ in term of polarity and solvent affinity. Therefore, several key parameters are to be considered in order to achieve the reaction in satisfactory kinetics and yields. The present review discusses the nature of such parameters (eg solvent nature, water activity, chemical modification of substrates) and illustrates their effect with examples of lipase-catalyzed lipophilization reactions of various sugar, amino acids or phenolic derivatives. PMID:17681737

  4. [ESTIMATING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF HYPOLIPIDEMIC THERAPY WITH ROSUVASTATIN IN PATIENTS WITH CORONARY HEART DISEASE DEPENDING ON THE GENOTYPE OF LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE].

    PubMed

    Zvyagina, M V; Mal, G S; Bushueva, O Yu; Alymenko, M A; Bykanova, M A; Letova, I M; Gribovskaya, I A; Churnosov, M I; Solodilova, M A; Polonikov, A V

    2016-01-01

    Taking into account the genetic heterogeneity of hyperlipidemias, polymorphic genes involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism may explain differences in the efficacy of hypolipidemic therapy. In the present prospective and randomized study, we have investigated the efficacy of rosuvastatin (10 mg/day) in the therapy of atherogenic hyperlipidemias in a group of 62 patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), depending on the genotype of lipoprotein lipase (LPL). The pharmacological correction was carried out during one year under control of lipid metabolism parameters (total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, HDL-unrelated cholesterol, triglycerides, atherogenic index) at the baseline and on 4th, 8th, 24th and 48th week. The HindIII polymorphism (+495T > G, rs320) of the LPL gene was genotyped in all patients studied through a real-time PCR TaqMan assay. Rosuvastatin produced a significant hypolipidemic effect with respect to all investigated lipid metabolism parameters for 24 weeks of treatment. Changes in the parameters of lipid metabolism upon rosuvastatin treatment differed in patients with genotype +495GG as compared to the rest LPL genotypes. In comparison to the +495TT and TG genotypes, the genotype +495GG showed a greater reduction in total cholesterol on 8th week, and in LDL-C, HDL-unrelated cholesterol, and atherogenic index on the 48th week of rosuvastatin therapy (p <0.01). It can be suggested that the pronounced hypolipidemic effect of rosuvastatin in homozygotes +495GG of the LPL gene is associated with modulation of the LPL activity, as it has been previously reported for other statin drugs. PMID:27159952

  5. Efficient lipase purification using reverse micellar extraction.

    PubMed

    Gaikaiwari, Raghavendra P; Wagh, Shilpa A; Kulkarni, Bhaskar D

    2012-03-01

    Reverse micellar extraction (RME) of enzyme provides an attractive option for conventional method with the potential to achieve purification and concentration in a single step with high yield. This study presents a methodology for optimization of RME with Pseudomonas lipase as model system. Fold-purification, percent recovery and extraction time were the objective functions while the type and concentration of surfactant, contact time, pH, ionic strength, and the ratio of organic to aqueous phase were the decision variables. Under optimized conditions, the AOT (Aerosol OT (bis 2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinate)-isooctane system gave a 15-fold purification, 80% recovery and 2.5-fold concentration of the Pseudomonas lipase with process time of 45 min. PMID:22230773

  6. MicroRNA-27 Prevents Atherosclerosis by Suppressing Lipoprotein Lipase-Induced Lipid Accumulation and Inflammatory Response in Apolipoprotein E Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hai-Peng; Gong, Duo; Lv, Yun-Cheng; Yao, Feng; He, Ping-Ping; Ouyang, Xin-Ping; Lan, Gang; Liu, Dan; Zhao, Zhen-Wang; Tan, Yu-Lin; Zheng, Xi-Long; Yin, Wei-Dong; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions are lipometabolic disorder characterized by chronic progressive inflammation in arterial walls. Previous studies have shown that macrophage-derived lipoprotein lipase (LPL) might be a key factor that promotes atherosclerosis by accelerating lipid accumulation and proinflammatory cytokine secretion. Increasing evidence indicates that microRNA-27 (miR-27) has beneficial effects on lipid metabolism and inflammatory response. However, it has not been fully understood whether miR-27 affects the expression of LPL and subsequent development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE KO) mice. To address these questions and its potential mechanisms, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-treated THP-1 macrophages were transfected with the miR-27 mimics/inhibitors and apoE KO mice fed high-fat diet were given a tail vein injection with miR-27 agomir/antagomir, followed by exploring the potential roles of miR-27. MiR-27 agomir significantly down-regulated LPL expression in aorta and peritoneal macrophages by western blot and real-time PCR analyses. We performed LPL activity assay in the culture media and found that miR-27 reduced LPL activity. ELISA showed that miR-27 reduced inflammatory response as analyzed in vitro and in vivo experiments. Our results showed that miR-27 had an inhibitory effect on the levels of lipid both in plasma and in peritoneal macrophages of apoE KO mice as examined by HPLC. Consistently, miR-27 suppressed the expression of scavenger receptors associated with lipid uptake in ox-LDL-treated THP-1 macrophages. In addition, transfection with LPL siRNA inhibited the miR-27 inhibitor-induced lipid accumulation and proinflammatory cytokines secretion in ox-LDL-treated THP-1 macrophages. Finally, systemic treatment revealed that miR-27 decreased aortic plaque size and lipid content in apoE KO mice. The present results provide evidence that a novel antiatherogenic role of miR-27 was closely related to reducing lipid

  7. MicroRNA-27 Prevents Atherosclerosis by Suppressing Lipoprotein Lipase-Induced Lipid Accumulation and Inflammatory Response in Apolipoprotein E Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Li, Liang; Zhang, Min; Cheng, Hai-Peng; Gong, Duo; Lv, Yun-Cheng; Yao, Feng; He, Ping-Ping; Ouyang, Xin-Ping; Lan, Gang; Liu, Dan; Zhao, Zhen-Wang; Tan, Yu-Lin; Zheng, Xi-Long; Yin, Wei-Dong; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions are lipometabolic disorder characterized by chronic progressive inflammation in arterial walls. Previous studies have shown that macrophage-derived lipoprotein lipase (LPL) might be a key factor that promotes atherosclerosis by accelerating lipid accumulation and proinflammatory cytokine secretion. Increasing evidence indicates that microRNA-27 (miR-27) has beneficial effects on lipid metabolism and inflammatory response. However, it has not been fully understood whether miR-27 affects the expression of LPL and subsequent development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE KO) mice. To address these questions and its potential mechanisms, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-treated THP-1 macrophages were transfected with the miR-27 mimics/inhibitors and apoE KO mice fed high-fat diet were given a tail vein injection with miR-27 agomir/antagomir, followed by exploring the potential roles of miR-27. MiR-27 agomir significantly down-regulated LPL expression in aorta and peritoneal macrophages by western blot and real-time PCR analyses. We performed LPL activity assay in the culture media and found that miR-27 reduced LPL activity. ELISA showed that miR-27 reduced inflammatory response as analyzed in vitro and in vivo experiments. Our results showed that miR-27 had an inhibitory effect on the levels of lipid both in plasma and in peritoneal macrophages of apoE KO mice as examined by HPLC. Consistently, miR-27 suppressed the expression of scavenger receptors associated with lipid uptake in ox-LDL-treated THP-1 macrophages. In addition, transfection with LPL siRNA inhibited the miR-27 inhibitor-induced lipid accumulation and proinflammatory cytokines secretion in ox-LDL-treated THP-1 macrophages. Finally, systemic treatment revealed that miR-27 decreased aortic plaque size and lipid content in apoE KO mice. The present results provide evidence that a novel antiatherogenic role of miR-27 was closely related to reducing lipid

  8. Biodiesel production with immobilized lipase: A review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tianwei; Lu, Jike; Nie, Kaili; Deng, Li; Wang, Fang

    2010-01-01

    Fatty acid alkyl esters, also called biodiesel, are environmentally friendly and show great potential as an alternative liquid fuel. Biodiesel is produced by transesterification of oils or fats with chemical catalysts or lipase. Immobilized lipase as the biocatalyst draws high attention because that process is "greener". This article reviews the current status of biodiesel production with immobilized lipase, including various lipases, immobilization methods, various feedstocks, lipase inactivation caused by short chain alcohols and large scale industrialization. Adsorption is still the most widely employed method for lipase immobilization. There are two kinds of lipase used most frequently especially for large scale industrialization. One is Candida antartica lipase immobilized on acrylic resin, and the other is Candida sp. 99-125 lipase immobilized on inexpensive textile membranes. However, to further reduce the cost of biodiesel production, new immobilization techniques with higher activity and stability still need to be explored. PMID:20580809

  9. Psychrotrophic lipase producers from Arctic soil and sediment samples.

    PubMed

    Rasol, R; Rashidah, A R; Nazuha, R Siti Nur; Smykla, J; Maznah, W O Wan; Alias, S A

    2014-01-01

    Culturable microorganisms were successfully isolated from soil and sediment samples collected in 2011 on the northern coast of Hornsund, West Spitsbergen. A total of 63 single colony isolates from three sampling sites obtained were subjected to temperature dependence study to assess whether they are obligate psychrophilic or psychrotrophic strains. From initial temperature screening, only 53 psychrotrophic isolates were selected that are capable of growing between 4-28 degrees C. The rest that were capable of tolerating higher temperatures up to 37 degrees C were not included in this study. These isolates were chosen for lipase enzyme screening confirmation with the standard plate assay of olive oil and fluorescent dye Rhodamine B. Six lipase positive isolates were also subjected for subsequent lipase enzyme plate screening on tributyrin, triolein, olive oil and palm oil agar. Lipase production by these six isolates was further assayed by using colorimetric method with palm oil and olive oil as the substrate. These isolates with promising lipase activity ranging from 20 U/ml up to 160 U/ml on palm oil and olive oil substrate were successfully identified. Molecular identification by using 16S rRNA revealed that five out of six isolates were Gram-negative Proteobacteria and the other one was a Gram-positive Actinobacteria. PMID:25033666

  10. Lipoprotein particle distribution and skeletal muscle lipoprotein lipase activity after acute exercise

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many of the metabolic effects of exercise are due to the most recent exercise session. With recent advances in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS), it is possible to gain insight about which lipoprotein particles are responsible for mediating exercise effects. Methods Using a randomized cross-over design, very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) responses were evaluated in eight men on the morning after i) an inactive control trial (CON), ii) exercising vigorously on the prior evening for 100 min followed by fasting overnight to maintain an energy and carbohydrate deficit (EX-DEF), and iii) after the same exercise session followed by carbohydrate intake to restore muscle glycogen and carbohydrate balance (EX-BAL). Results The intermediate, low and high density lipoprotein particle concentrations did not differ between trials. Fasting triglyceride (TG) determined biochemically, and mean VLDL size were lower in EX-DEF but not in EX-BAL compared to CON, primarily due to a reduction in VLDL-TG in the 70–120 nm (large) particle range. In contrast, VLDL-TG was lower in both EX-DEF and EX-BAL compared to CON in the 43–55 nm (medium) particle range. VLDL-TG in smaller particles (29–43 nm) was unaffected by exercise. Because the majority of VLDL particles were in this smallest size range and resistant to change, total VLDL particle concentration was not different between any of these conditions. Skeletal muscle lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was also not different across these 3 trials. However, in CON only, the inter-individual differences in LPL activity were inversely correlated with fasting TG, VLDL-TG, total, large and small VLDL particle concentration and VLDL size, indicating a regulatory role for LPL in the non-exercised state. Conclusions These findings reveal a high level of differential regulation between different sized triglyceride-rich lipoproteins following exercise and feeding, in the absence of changes in LPL activity. PMID

  11. Comparative analyses of lipoprotein lipase, hepatic lipase, and endothelial lipase, and their binding properties with known inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziyun; Li, Shen; Sun, Lidan; Fan, Jianglin; Liu, Zhenming

    2013-01-01

    The triglyceride lipase gene subfamily plays a central role in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. There are three members of this subfamily: lipoprotein lipase, hepatic lipase, and endothelial lipase. Although these lipases are implicated in the pathophysiology of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis, their structures have not been fully solved. In the current study, we established homology models of these three lipases, and carried out analysis of their activity sites. In addition, we investigated the kinetic characteristics for the catalytic residues using a molecular dynamics simulation strategy. To elucidate the molecular interactions and determine potential key residues involved in the binding to lipase inhibitors, we analyzed the binding pockets and binding poses of known inhibitors of the three lipases. We identified the spatial consensus catalytic triad "Ser-Asp-His", a characteristic motif in all three lipases. Furthermore, we found that the spatial characteristics of the binding pockets of the lipase molecules play a key role in ligand recognition, binding poses, and affinities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that systematically builds homology models of all the triglyceride lipase gene subfamily members. Our data provide novel insights into the molecular structures of lipases and their structure-function relationship, and thus provides groundwork for functional probe design towards lipase-based therapeutic inhibitors for the treatment of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. PMID:23991054

  12. Lipases in Medicine: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Loli, Heni; Narwal, Sunil Kumar; Saun, Nitin Kumar; Gupta, Reena

    2015-01-01

    Lipases are part of the family of hydrolases that act on carboxylic ester bonds. They are involved in catalyzing the hydrolysis of triglycerides (TG) into chylomicrons and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particles. Uses of lipases are evolving rapidly and currently they are reported to show high potential in medicine. Intensive study and investigations have led researchers to explore lipases for their use in substitution therapy, where in enzyme deficiency during diseased conditions is compensated by their external administration. In our body, they are used to break down fats present in food so that they can be absorbed in the intestine and deficiency of lipases leads to malabsorption of fats and fat-soluble vitamins. Lipases help a person who has cystic fibrosis, Alzheimer's disease, atherosclerosis and act as a candidate target for cancer prevention and therapy. They act as diagnostic tool and their presence or increasing levels can indicate certain infection or disease. Obesity causes metabolic disease and is a serious health problem around the world. Thus inhibiting digestive lipase to reduce fat absorption has become the main pharmacological approach to the treatment of obesity in recent years. PMID:26156413

  13. High-level production of extracellular lipase by Yarrowia lipolytica mutants from methyl oleate.

    PubMed

    Darvishi, Farshad; Destain, Jacqueline; Nahvi, Iraj; Thonart, Philippe; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Hamid

    2011-10-01

    The yeast Yarrowia lipolytica degrades efficiently low-cost hydrophobic substrates for the production of various added-value products such as lipases. To obtain yeast strains producing high levels of extracellular lipase, Y. lipolytica DSM3286 was subjected to mutation using ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and ultraviolet (UV) light. Twenty mutants were selected out of 1600 mutants of Y. lipolytica treated with EMS and UV based on lipase production ability on selective medium. A new industrial medium containing methyl oleate was optimized for lipase production. In the 20 L bioreactor containing new industrial medium, one UV mutant (U6) produced 356 U/mL of lipase after 24h, which is about 10.5-fold higher than that produced by the wild type strain. The properties of the mutant lipase were the same as those of the wild type: molecular weight 38 kDa, optimum temperature 37°C and optimum pH 7. Furthermore, the nucleotide sequences of extracellular lipase gene (LIP2) in wild type and mutant strains were determined. Only two silent substitutions at 362 and 385 positions were observed in the ORF region of LIP2. Two single substitutions and two duplications of the T nucleotide were also detected in the promoter region. LIP2 sequence comparison of the Y. lipolytica DSM3286 and U6 strains shows good targets to effective DNA recombinant for extracellular lipase of Y. lipolytica. PMID:21324386

  14. QSAR study and the hydrolysis activity prediction of three alkaline lipases from different lipase-producing microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The hydrolysis activities of three alkaline lipases, L-A1, L-A2 and L-A3 secreted by different lipase-producing microorganisms isolated from the Bay of Bohai, P. R. China were characterized with 16 kinds of esters. It was found that all the lipases have the ability to catalyze the hydrolysis of the glycerides, methyl esters, ethyl esters, especially for triglycerides, which shows that they have broad substrate spectra, and this property is very important for them to be used in detergent industry. Three QSAR models were built for L-A1, L-A2 and L-A3 respectively with GFA using Discovery studio 2.1. The models equations 1, 2 and 3 can explain 95.80%, 97.45% and 97.09% of the variances (R2adj) respectively while they could predict 95.44%, 89.61% and 93.41% of the variances (R2cv) respectively. With these models the hydrolysis activities of these lipases to mixed esters were predicted and the result showed that the predicted values are in good agreement with the measured values, which indicates that this method can be used as a simple tool to predict the lipase activities for single or mixed esters. PMID:23016923

  15. QSAR study and the hydrolysis activity prediction of three alkaline lipases from different lipase-producing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haikuan; Wang, Xiaojie; Li, Xiaolu; Zhang, Yehong; Dai, Yujie; Guo, Changlu; Zheng, Heng

    2012-01-01

    The hydrolysis activities of three alkaline lipases, L-A1, L-A2 and L-A3 secreted by different lipase-producing microorganisms isolated from the Bay of Bohai, P. R. China were characterized with 16 kinds of esters. It was found that all the lipases have the ability to catalyze the hydrolysis of the glycerides, methyl esters, ethyl esters, especially for triglycerides, which shows that they have broad substrate spectra, and this property is very important for them to be used in detergent industry. Three QSAR models were built for L-A1, L-A2 and L-A3 respectively with GFA using Discovery studio 2.1. The models equations 1, 2 and 3 can explain 95.80%, 97.45% and 97.09% of the variances (R(2)(adj)) respectively while they could predict 95.44%, 89.61% and 93.41% of the variances (R(2)(cv)) respectively. With these models the hydrolysis activities of these lipases to mixed esters were predicted and the result showed that the predicted values are in good agreement with the measured values, which indicates that this method can be used as a simple tool to predict the lipase activities for single or mixed esters. PMID:23016923

  16. Immobilized lipase from Schizophyllum commune ISTL04 for the production of fatty acids methyl esters from cyanobacterial oil.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jyoti; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Kumar, Madan; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    Novel lipase from model mushroom Schizophyllum commune strain ISTL04 produced by solid state fermentation of Leucaena leucocephala seeds, was immobilized onto Celite for enzymatic FAMEs production from cyanobacterial endolith Leptolyngbya ISTCY101. The isolate showed vigorous growth and produced remarkable lipase activity of 146.5 U g(-1) dry solid substrate, without any external lipase inducer. Single-factor experiments were carried out to study the effects of various reaction parameters on the FAMEs yield. The best conditions for enzymatic transesterification as revealed by the results were: 1:3 oil to methanol molar ratio, added at 3h intervals, 12% water content, 1581.5 U g(-1) immobilized lipase, temperature 45 °C, and time 24h. Under these conditions, the maximum FAMEs yield reached 94%. The immobilized lipase was able to produce >90% of the relative FAMEs yield after four repeated transesterification cycles. This immobilized lipase exhibited potential for application in biodiesel industry. PMID:25670399

  17. Polymorphisms in the LPL and CETP Genes and Haplotype in the ESR1 Gene Are Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Women from Southwestern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Cahua-Pablo, José Ángel; Cruz, Miguel; Méndez-Palacios, Abigail; Antúnez-Ortiz, Diana Lizzete; Vences-Velázquez, Amalia; del Carmen Alarcón-Romero, Luz; Parra, Esteban Juan; Tello-Flores, Vianet Argelia; Leyva-Vázquez, Marco Antonio; Valladares-Salgado, Adán; Pérez-Macedonio, Claudia Paola; Flores-Alfaro, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a combination of metabolic disorders associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Studies in women reported associations between polymorphisms in ESR1, LPL and CETP genes and MetS. Our aim was to evaluate the association between variants in ESR1, LPL and CETP genes with MetS and its components. Four hundred and eighty women were analyzed, anthropometric features and biochemical profiles were evaluated, and genotyping was performed by real-time PCR. We found an association with elevated glucose levels (odds ratio (OR) = 2.9; p = 0.013) in carrying the AA genotype of rs1884051 in the ESR1 gene compared with the GG genotype, and the CC genotype of rs328 in the LPL gene was associated with MetS compared to the CG or GG genotype (OR = 2.8; p = 0.04). Moreover, the GA genotype of rs708272 in the CETP gene is associated with MetS compared to the GG or AA genotype (OR = 1.8; p = 0.006). In addition the ACTCCG haplotype in the ESR1 gene is associated with a decrease in the risk of MetS (OR = 0.02; p < 0.001). In conclusion, our results show the involvement of the variants of ESR1, LPL and CETP genes in metabolic events related to MetS or some of its features. PMID:26370976

  18. Overview of fungal lipase: a review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhishek Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Mausumi

    2012-01-01

    Lipases (triacylglycerolacyl hydrolases, EC3.1.1.3) are class of enzymes which catalyze the hydrolysis of long-chain triglycerides. In this review paper, an overview regarding the fungal lipase production, purification, and application is discussed. The review describes various industrial applications of lipase in pulp and paper, food, detergent, and textile industries. Some important lipase-producing fungal genera include Aspergillus, Penicillium, Rhizopus, Candida, etc. Current fermentation process techniques such as batch, fed-batch, and continuous mode of lipase production in submerged and solid-state fermentations are discussed in details. The purification of lipase by hydrophobic interaction chromatography is also discussed. The development of mathematical models applied to lipase production is discussed with special emphasis on lipase engineering. PMID:22072143

  19. A novel apolipoprotein C-II mimetic peptide that activates lipoprotein lipase and decreases serum triglycerides in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Amar, Marcelo J A; Sakurai, Toshihiro; Sakurai-Ikuta, Akiko; Sviridov, Denis; Freeman, Lita; Ahsan, Lusana; Remaley, Alan T

    2015-02-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) mimetic peptides are currently being developed as possible new agents for the treatment of cardiovascular disease based on their ability to promote cholesterol efflux and their other beneficial antiatherogenic properties. Many of these peptides, however, have been reported to cause transient hypertriglyceridemia due to inhibition of lipolysis by lipoprotein lipase (LPL). We describe a novel bihelical amphipathic peptide (C-II-a) that contains an amphipathic helix (18A) for binding to lipoproteins and stimulating cholesterol efflux as well as a motif based on the last helix of apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II) that activates lipolysis by LPL. The C-II-a peptide promoted cholesterol efflux from ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA1-transfected BHK cells similar to apoA-I mimetic peptides. Furthermore, it was shown in vitro to be comparable to the full-length apoC-II protein in activating lipolysis by LPL. When added to serum from a patient with apoC-II deficiency, it restored normal levels of LPL-induced lipolysis and also enhanced lipolysis in serum from patients with type IV and V hypertriglyceridemia. Intravenous injection of C-II-a (30 mg/kg) in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice resulted in a significant reduction of plasma cholesterol and triglycerides of 38 ± 6% and 85 ± 7%, respectively, at 4 hours. When coinjected with the 5A peptide (60 mg/kg), the C-II-a (30 mg/kg) peptide was found to completely block the hypertriglyceridemic effect of the 5A peptide in C57Bl/6 mice. In summary, C-II-a is a novel peptide based on apoC-II, which promotes cholesterol efflux and lipolysis and may therefore be useful for the treatment of apoC-II deficiency and other forms of hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:25395590

  20. Intermittent hypoxia inhibits clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and inactivates adipose lipoprotein lipase in a mouse model of sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Drager, Luciano F.; Li, Jianguo; Shin, Mi-Kyung; Reinke, Christian; Aggarwal, Neil R.; Jun, Jonathan C.; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Sztalryd, Carole; O'Byrne, Sheila M.; Kroupa, Olessia; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Blaner, William S.; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Delayed lipoprotein clearance is associated with atherosclerosis. This study examined whether chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), a hallmark of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), can lead to hyperlipidaemia by inhibiting clearance of triglyceride rich lipoproteins (TRLP). Methods and results Male C57BL/6J mice on high-cholesterol diet were exposed to 4 weeks of CIH or chronic intermittent air (control). FIO2 was decreased to 6.5% once per minute during the 12 h light phase in the CIH group. After the exposure, we measured fasting lipid profile. TRLP clearance was assessed by oral gavage of retinyl palmitate followed by serum retinyl esters (REs) measurements at 0, 1, 2, 4, 10, and 24 h. Activity of lipoprotein lipase (LpL), a key enzyme of lipoprotein clearance, and levels of angiopoietin-like protein 4 (Angptl4), a potent inhibitor of the LpL activity, were determined in the epididymal fat pads, skeletal muscles, and heart. Chronic intermittent hypoxia induced significant increases in levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides, which occurred in TRLP and LDL fractions (P< 0.05 for each comparison). Compared with control mice, animals exposed to CIH showed increases in REs throughout first 10 h after oral gavage of retinyl palmitate (P< 0.05), indicating that CIH inhibited TRLP clearance. CIH induced a >5-fold decrease in LpL activity (P< 0.01) and an 80% increase in Angptl4 mRNA and protein levels in the epididymal fat, but not in the skeletal muscle or heart. Conclusions CIH decreases TRLP clearance and inhibits LpL activity in adipose tissue, which may contribute to atherogenesis observed in OSA. PMID:21478490

  1. A Novel Apolipoprotein C-II Mimetic Peptide That Activates Lipoprotein Lipase and Decreases Serum Triglycerides in Apolipoprotein E–Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Toshihiro; Sakurai-Ikuta, Akiko; Sviridov, Denis; Freeman, Lita; Ahsan, Lusana; Remaley, Alan T.

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) mimetic peptides are currently being developed as possible new agents for the treatment of cardiovascular disease based on their ability to promote cholesterol efflux and their other beneficial antiatherogenic properties. Many of these peptides, however, have been reported to cause transient hypertriglyceridemia due to inhibition of lipolysis by lipoprotein lipase (LPL). We describe a novel bihelical amphipathic peptide (C-II-a) that contains an amphipathic helix (18A) for binding to lipoproteins and stimulating cholesterol efflux as well as a motif based on the last helix of apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II) that activates lipolysis by LPL. The C-II-a peptide promoted cholesterol efflux from ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA1-transfected BHK cells similar to apoA-I mimetic peptides. Furthermore, it was shown in vitro to be comparable to the full-length apoC-II protein in activating lipolysis by LPL. When added to serum from a patient with apoC-II deficiency, it restored normal levels of LPL-induced lipolysis and also enhanced lipolysis in serum from patients with type IV and V hypertriglyceridemia. Intravenous injection of C-II-a (30 mg/kg) in apolipoprotein E–knockout mice resulted in a significant reduction of plasma cholesterol and triglycerides of 38 ± 6% and 85 ± 7%, respectively, at 4 hours. When coinjected with the 5A peptide (60 mg/kg), the C-II-a (30 mg/kg) peptide was found to completely block the hypertriglyceridemic effect of the 5A peptide in C57Bl/6 mice. In summary, C-II-a is a novel peptide based on apoC-II, which promotes cholesterol efflux and lipolysis and may therefore be useful for the treatment of apoC-II deficiency and other forms of hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:25395590

  2. Impact of Lipoprotein Lipase Gene Polymorphism, S447X, on Postprandial Triacylglycerol and Glucose Response to Sequential Meal Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Shatwan, Israa M; Minihane, Anne-Marie; Williams, Christine M; Lovegrove, Julie A; Jackson, Kim G; Vimaleswaran, Karani S

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a key rate-limiting enzyme for the hydrolysis of triacylglycerol (TAG) in chylomicrons and very low-density lipoprotein. Given that postprandial assessment of lipoprotein metabolism may provide a more physiological perspective of disturbances in lipoprotein homeostasis compared to assessment in the fasting state, we have investigated the influence of two commonly studied LPL polymorphisms (rs320, HindIII; rs328, S447X) on postprandial lipaemia, in 261 participants using a standard sequential meal challenge. S447 homozygotes had lower fasting HDL-C (p = 0.015) and a trend for higher fasting TAG (p = 0.057) concentrations relative to the 447X allele carriers. In the postprandial state, there was an association of the S447X polymorphism with postprandial TAG and glucose, where S447 homozygotes had 12% higher TAG area under the curve (AUC) (p = 0.037), 8.4% higher glucose-AUC (p = 0.006) and 22% higher glucose-incremental area under the curve (IAUC) (p = 0.042). A significant gene-gender interaction was observed for fasting TAG (p = 0.004), TAG-AUC (Pinteraction = 0.004) and TAG-IAUC (Pinteraction = 0.016), where associations were only evident in men. In conclusion, our study provides novel findings of an effect of LPL S447X polymorphism on the postprandial glucose and gender-specific impact of the polymorphism on fasting and postprandial TAG concentrations in response to sequential meal challenge in healthy participants. PMID:26999119

  3. Effect of medium- and long-chain triglyceride infusion on lipoprotein and hepatic lipase in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Nordenström, J; Neeser, G; Olivecrona, T; Wahren, J

    1991-12-01

    Plasma lipolytic activity and hydrolysis of intravenous fat were studied in six healthy subjects during infusion of a long-chain triglyceride (LCT) fat emulsion (Intralipid 20%) or of a medium-chain triglyceride (MCT)/LCT emulsion (Lipofundin MCT 20%). The fat emulsions were infused continuously at a rate of 0.17 g triglyceride kg-1 body weight (BW)h-1 for 6 h in random order at 7-day intervals. A continuous infusion of glucose (0.18 g kg-1 BW h-1) was administered for a period of 7 h and was started 1 h before the lipid infusion. Infusions of both types of fat increased plasma triglyceride (TG), free fatty acid (FFA) and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) levels and steady-state values were present during the 3rd to 5th h of infusion. MCT/LCT infusion resulted in higher plasma levels at steady-state of TG (3.63 +/- 0.45 [SEM] vs 2.73 +/- 0.45 mmol l-1; P less than 0.05), FFA (1.05 +/- 0.08 vs 0.54 +/- 0.04 mmol l-1; P less than 0.01) and LPL (4.6 +/- 0.6 vs 2.6 +/- 0.5 mU ml-1; P less than 0.05) in comparison with LCT administration. There was a positive correlation between plasma LPL activity and TG concentration (r = 0.77; P less than 0.001) when data for the two infusions were combined. Although the same amount of fat was infused on a weight basis, the molar infusion rate was 40% higher with MCT/LCT than with LCT infusion, due to differences in molecular weights (634 vs 885 Da).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1778219

  4. Telmisartan increases lipoprotein lipase expression via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shi Nan; Liu, Min; Jing, Dan Qing; Mu, Yi Ming; Lu, Ju Ming; Pan, Chang Yu

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their hypotensive properties, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have been shown to exert clinical antidyslipidemic effects. The mechanism underlying these ARB lipid metabolic effects remains unclear. Some ARBs, for example, telmisartan, activate peroxisome proliferator-activated activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma). We hypothesized that PPAR-gamma-activating ARBs might exert antidyslipidemic effects via PPAR-alpha. In this study, we assessed the effect of telmisartan on the expression of PPAR-alpha and lipoprotein lipase (LPL). PPAR-alpha expression was detected by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot in HepG2 hepatocytes as well as differentiated C2C12 myocytes treated with increasing concentrations of telmisartan (0.1-10 μmol/L) for 48 h. Results showed that 1 μmol/L and 10 μmol/L telmisartan significantly increased the expression of PPAR-alpha mRNA and protein in HepG2 cells (p < 0.01). No effect was shown in differentiated C2C12 cells. Similarly, 1 µmol/L and 10 μmol/L telmisartan significantly increased the expression of LPL mRNA and protein in HepG2 cells (p < 0.01), and this increase was significantly (p < 0.01) inhibited by the PPAR-alpha-specific antagonist MK886. These results indicate that certain of the antidyslipidemic effects of telmisartan might be mediated via increased PPAR-alpha-dependent induction of LPL expression. PMID:24067162

  5. Impact of Lipoprotein Lipase Gene Polymorphism, S447X, on Postprandial Triacylglycerol and Glucose Response to Sequential Meal Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Shatwan, Israa M.; Minihane, Anne-Marie; Williams, Christine M.; Lovegrove, Julie A.; Jackson, Kim G.; Vimaleswaran, Karani S.

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a key rate-limiting enzyme for the hydrolysis of triacylglycerol (TAG) in chylomicrons and very low-density lipoprotein. Given that postprandial assessment of lipoprotein metabolism may provide a more physiological perspective of disturbances in lipoprotein homeostasis compared to assessment in the fasting state, we have investigated the influence of two commonly studied LPL polymorphisms (rs320, HindIII; rs328, S447X) on postprandial lipaemia, in 261 participants using a standard sequential meal challenge. S447 homozygotes had lower fasting HDL-C (p = 0.015) and a trend for higher fasting TAG (p = 0.057) concentrations relative to the 447X allele carriers. In the postprandial state, there was an association of the S447X polymorphism with postprandial TAG and glucose, where S447 homozygotes had 12% higher TAG area under the curve (AUC) (p = 0.037), 8.4% higher glucose-AUC (p = 0.006) and 22% higher glucose-incremental area under the curve (IAUC) (p = 0.042). A significant gene–gender interaction was observed for fasting TAG (p = 0.004), TAG-AUC (Pinteraction = 0.004) and TAG-IAUC (Pinteraction = 0.016), where associations were only evident in men. In conclusion, our study provides novel findings of an effect of LPL S447X polymorphism on the postprandial glucose and gender-specific impact of the polymorphism on fasting and postprandial TAG concentrations in response to sequential meal challenge in healthy participants. PMID:26999119

  6. Regulation of plasma lipid homeostasis by hepatic lipoprotein lipase in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gan; Xu, Jun-Nan; Liu, Dong; Ding, Qingli; Liu, Meng-Na; Chen, Rong; Fan, Mengdi; Zhang, Ye; Zheng, Chao; Zou, Da-Jin; Lyu, Jianxin; Zhang, Weiping J

    2016-07-01

    LPL is a pivotal rate-limiting enzyme to catalyze the hydrolysis of TG in circulation, and plays a critical role in regulating lipid metabolism. However, little attention has been paid to LPL in the adult liver due to its relatively low expression. Here we show that endogenous hepatic LPL plays an important physiological role in plasma lipid homeostasis in adult mice. We generated a mouse model with the Lpl gene specifically ablated in hepatocytes with the Cre/LoxP approach, and found that specific deletion of hepatic Lpl resulted in a significant decrease in plasma LPL contents and activity. As a result, the postprandial TG clearance was markedly impaired, and plasma TG and cholesterol levels were significantly elevated. However, deficiency of hepatic Lpl did not change the liver TG and cholesterol contents or glucose homeostasis. Taken together, our study reveals that hepatic LPL is involved in the regulation of plasma LPL activity and lipid homeostasis. PMID:27234787

  7. Lipases in autolysed cultures of filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    García-Lepe, R; Nuero, O M; Reyes, F; Santamaría, F

    1997-08-01

    Fifty-one fungi from different genera and strains were checked in plate to determine lipase activity in protein precipitates from their autolysed cultures. Each of them was then analysed at 3.5, 6.5 and 9.2 pH units and, as a consequence, basic lipases with high activity at 9.2 pH were found after 1 h of incubation. Only 25% of the studied fungi showed this lipase activity, among them the best producers were fungi from genus Fusarium (47% of fungi had lipase activity). In addition to lipase activity, Fusaria showed a low hydrolytic activity on cutin and suberin. The genus Aspergillus produced lipase and cutinase activity to a similar extent. Aspergillus nidulans 2544 also showed suberinase activity in a considerable amount. Penicillium species had very low activities. Other species and strains from genus Trichoderma, order Mucorales and class Basidiomycetes, did not show lipase activity in their degradative processes. PMID:9281862

  8. Application of lipases to regiospecific interesterification of exotic oils from an Amazonian area.

    PubMed

    Speranza, Paula; Ribeiro, Ana Paula Badan; Macedo, Gabriela Alves

    2016-01-20

    Enzymatic interesterification may favor the development of lipid fractions from Amazonian oils with greater application potential. In this study, the Amazonian buriti oil and murumuru fat were subjected to enzymatic interesterification using two lipases in three different enzyme systems: one with a commercial lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosa, a second with the lipase produced by Rhizopus sp., and a third with a mixture of both lipases. The three enzyme systems were able to catalyze the reaction, but the enzymes showed different specificities. The commercial lipase was specific for unsaturated fatty acids, whereas the Rhizopus sp. lipase was specific for both unsaturated fatty acids and the positions sn -1 and sn -3 of the fatty acid on the triacylglycerol. The mixture of both lipases showed no synergistic effect: the results were intermediate between the two enzymes applied alone. Interesterification reduced the levels of trisaturated and triunsaturated triacylglycerols and increased the levels of diunsaturated-monosaturated and monounsaturated-disaturated triacylglycerols. The thermal melting behavior indicated the formation of a single endothermic region with more homogeneous triacylglycerols. The content of the bioactive β-carotene was preserved after the interesterification reaction with all three-enzyme systems. The interesterified lipids obtained, because of the characteristics of the oils, may be applied to the formulation of cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. PMID:26657709

  9. Wax ester-synthesizing activity of lipases.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, T; Sumiyoshi, M; Okuda, H

    1999-11-01

    The synthesis/hydrolysis of wax esters was studied in an aqueous solution using purified rat pancreatic lipase, porcine pancreatic carboxylester lipase, and Pseudomonas fluorescens lipase. The equilibrium between wax ester synthesis and hydrolysis favored ester formation at neutral pH. The synthesizing activities were measured using free fatty acid or triacylglycerol as the acyl donor and an equimolar amount of long-chain alcohol as the acyl acceptor. When oleic acid and hexadecanol emulsified with gum arabic were incubated with these lipases, wax ester was synthesized, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and the apparent equilibrium ratio of palmityl oleate/free oleic acid was about 0.9/0.1. These lipases catalyzed the hydrolysis of palmityl oleate emulsified with gum arabic, and the apparent equilibrium ratio of palmityl oleate/free oleic acid was also about 0.9/0.1. The apparent equilibrium ratio of wax ester/free fatty acid catalyzed by lipase depended on incubation pH and fatty alcohol chain length. When equimolar amounts of trioleoylglycerol and fatty acyl alcohol were incubated with pancreatic lipase, carboxylester lipase, or P. fluorescens lipase, wax esters were synthesized dose-dependently. These results suggest that lipases can catalyze the synthesis of wax esters from free fatty acids or through degradation of triacylglycerol in an aqueous medium. PMID:10606038

  10. Triglyceride kinetics, tissue lipoprotein lipase, and liver lipogenesis in septic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lanza-Jacoby, S.; Tabares, A. )

    1990-04-01

    The mechanism for the development of hypertriglyceridemia during gram-negative sepsis was studied by examining liver production and clearance of very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) triglyceride (TG). To assess liver output and peripheral clearance the kinetics of VLDL-TG were determined by a constant iv infusion of (2-3H)glycerol-labeled VLDL. Clearance of VLDL-TG was also evaluated by measuring activities of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in heart, soleus muscle, and adipose tissue from fasted control, fasted E. coli-treated, fed control, and fed E. coli-treated rats. Lewis inbred rats, 275-300 g, were made septic with 8 x 10(7) live E. coli colonies per 100 g body wt. Twenty-four hours after E. coli injection, serum TG, free fatty acids (FFA), and cholesterol of fasted E. coli-treated rats were elevated by 170, 76, and 16%, respectively. The elevation of serum TG may be attributed to the 67% decrease in clearance rate of VLDL-TG in fasted E. coli-treated rats compared with their fasted controls. The suppressed activities of LPL in adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and heart were consistent with reduced clearance of TG. Secretion of VLDL-TG declined by 31% in livers of fasted E. coli-treated rats, which was accompanied by a twofold increase in the composition of liver TG. Rates of in vivo TG synthesis in livers of the fasted E. coli-treated rats were twofold higher than in those of fasted control rats. Decreased rate of TG appearance along with the increase in liver synthesis of TG contributed to the elevation of liver lipids in the fasted E. coli-treated rats.

  11. Lipase-catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of lactones to polyesters and its mechanistic aspects.

    PubMed

    Namekawa, S; Suda, S; Uyama, H; Kobayashi, S

    1999-01-01

    Lipase catalysis induced a ring-opening polymerization of lactones with different ring-sizes. Small-size (four-membered) and medium-size lactones (six- and seven-membered) as well as macrolides (12-, 13-, 16-, and 17-membered) were subjected to lipase-catalyzed polymerization. The polymerization behaviors depended primarily on the lipase origin and the monomer structure. The macrolides showing much lower anionic polymerizability were enzymatically polymerized faster than epsilon-caprolactone. The granular immobilized lipase derived from Candida antartica showed extremely efficient catalysis in the polymerization of epsilon-caprolactone. Single-step terminal functionalization of the polyester was achieved by initiator and terminator methods. The enzymatic polymerizability of lactones was quantitatively evaluated by Michaelis-Menten kinetics. PMID:10416661

  12. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae YLL012/YEH1, YLR020/YEH2, and TGL1 genes encode a novel family of membrane-anchored lipases that are required for steryl ester hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Köffel, René; Tiwari, Rashi; Falquet, Laurent; Schneiter, Roger

    2005-03-01

    Sterol homeostasis in eukaryotic cells relies on the reciprocal interconversion of free sterols and steryl esters. The formation of steryl esters is well characterized, but the mechanisms that control steryl ester mobilization upon cellular demand are less well understood. We have identified a family of three lipases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that are required for efficient steryl ester mobilization. These lipases, encoded by YLL012/YEH1, YLR020/YEH2, and TGL1, are paralogues of the mammalian acid lipase family, which is composed of the lysosomal acid lipase, the gastric lipase, and four novel as yet uncharacterized human open reading frames. Lipase triple-mutant yeast cells are completely blocked in steryl ester hydrolysis but do not affect the mobilization of triacylglycerols, indicating that the three lipases are required for steryl ester mobilization in vivo. Lipase single mutants mobilize steryl esters to various degrees, indicating partial functional redundancy of the three gene products. Lipase double-mutant cells in which the third lipase is expressed from the inducible GAL1 promoter have greatly reduced steady-state levels of steryl esters, indicating that overexpression of any of the three lipases is sufficient for steryl ester mobilization in vivo. The three yeast enzymes constitute a novel class of membrane-anchored lipases that differ in topology and subcellular localization. PMID:15713625

  13. The realm of microbial lipases in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Pandey, A; Benjamin, S; Soccol, C R; Nigam, P; Krieger, N; Soccol, V T

    1999-04-01

    In this review, a comprehensive and illustrious survey is made of the applied aspects of microbial lipases in modern biotechnological practices. Lipases are the most versatile biocatalyst and bring about a range of bioconversion reactions such as hydrolysis, interesterification, esterification, alcoholysis, acidolysis and aminolysis. After a brief description of the microbial sources of lipases, the pivotal role of lipases in the processes and products of the food and flavourings industry is illustrated. An illustration is presented of biomedical applications. The panorama of lipases in the manufacture of fine chemicals is depicted with special emphasis on pharmaceuticals, pesticides, cosmetics, biosensors and detergents. Widening applications such as those in waste management and improved tanning techniques are other novel aspects of lipase utilization that are discussed in this review. PMID:10075908

  14. Isolation and Characterization of a Staphylococcal Lipase

    PubMed Central

    Troller, J. A.; Bozeman, M. A.

    1970-01-01

    A number of coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from human skin were found to produce lipase. Lipolytic activity appeared in the growth medium during the stationary phase of growth but did not appear as a result of autolysis of the cells. Maximal lipase synthesis was obtained when the medium was adjusted to pH 7.5 before inoculation. The purified enzyme hydrolyzed tributyrin and tridecanoin most actively, and a relatively high rate of hydrolysis of triolein was also noted. The optimal activity of the purified lipase was at pH 7.5. The characteristics of the concentrated crude enzyme and purified lipase were compared. PMID:5485729

  15. Adsorption of lipase on polypropylene powder.

    PubMed

    Gitlesen, T; Bauer, M; Adlercreutz, P

    1997-04-01

    Adsorption of different lipases by EP-100 polypropylene powder from crude and pure lipase preparations was studied. Langmuir isotherms described the adsorption equilibria well both for protein and lipase activity adsorption. Adsorption isotherms for five different proteins all gave a similar saturation level of 220 mg protein per g carrier. Twelve commercial lipase preparations were tested for selectivity in the adsorption of lipase. For all preparations the selectivity factor was larger than one. In a crude lipase preparation from Pseudomonas fluorescence, the specific activity in solution decreased by two orders of magnitude after adsorption. The adsorption was not significantly influenced by pH changes in the adsorption buffer, indicating that hydrophobic and not electrostatic interactions are the dominating adsorption forces. Adsorption of a crude lipase from Candida rugosa (Sigma) was fast and equilibrium was reached in 30 and 100 min for protein and lipase activity adsorption respectively. Desorption in aqueous solution was negligible. Investigations with seven different lipases showed no correlation between the specific lipolytic activity of dissolved enzyme in aqueous solution and the specific activity of adsorbed enzyme in an esterification reaction in organic solvent. PMID:9106498

  16. Expression of lipases and lipid receptors in sperm storage tubules and possible role of fatty acids in sperm survival in the hen oviduct.

    PubMed

    Huang, A; Isobe, N; Obitsu, T; Yoshimura, Y

    2016-04-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of fatty acids for sperm survival in the sperm storage tubules (SSTs) of the hen oviduct. The mucosa tissues of uterovaginal junction (UVJ) of White Leghorn laying hens with or without artificial insemination using semen from Barred Plymouth Rock roosters were collected. The lipid density in the epithelium of UVJ and SST was analyzed by Sudan black B staining. The expressions of genes encoding lipid receptors and lipases were assayed by polymerase chain reaction in UVJ mucosa and SST cells isolated by laser microdissection. Fatty acid composition was analyzed by gas chromatography, and sperm were cultured with or without the identified predominant fatty acids for 24 hours to examine their effect on sperm viability. The lipid droplets were localized in the epithelium of UVJ mucosa and SSTs. The expression of genes encoding very low-density lipoprotein receptor(VLDLR), low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), and fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) were found in SST cells. Expression of genes encoding endothelial lipase (EL), lipase H (LIPH), adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) were found in UVJ. In contrast, only ATGL was found in SST cells, and its expression was significantly upregulated after artificial insemination. In UVJ mucosal tissues, five fatty acids, namely myristic acid (C14), palmitic acid (C16), stearic acid (C18), oleic acid (C18:1n9), and linoleic acid (C18:2n6), were identified as predominant fatty acids. The viability of sperm cultured with 1 mM oleic acid or linoleic acid was significantly higher than the sperm in the control culture without fatty acids. These results suggest that lipids in the SST cells may be degraded by ATGL, and fatty acids including oleic acid and linoleic acid may be released into the SST lumen to support sperm survival. PMID:26777559

  17. Concomitant production of protease and lipase by Bacillus Licheniformis VSG1: Production, purification and characterization

    PubMed Central

    Sangeetha, R.; Geetha, A.; Arulpandi, I.

    2010-01-01

    This study was aimed at producing protease and lipase simultaneously on a common medium by Bacillus licheniformis VSG1, which was isolated from a tannery effluent. The effect of media composition with respect to protein source, lipid source and emulsifier on the production of protease and lipase was analysed. Both those enzymes were produced under optimized conditions like pH, temperature and incubation time. The enzyme mixture comprising of both protease and lipase was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation, dialysis and gel filtration chromatography to obtain 20-fold pure enzymes. The purified enzyme mixture was characterized to determine the optimum pH and temperature of protease and lipase, the response of the enzymes to inhibitors, additives and solvents. The molecular weight of both the enzymes was determined as 40 kDa on SDS-PAGE. The concomitant production of protease and lipase and the purification of both the enzymes in a single mixture have industrial significance, as many industrial processes use both protease and lipase together. PMID:24031479

  18. Synthesis of Rosin Acid Starch Catalyzed by Lipase

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Rihui; Li, He; Long, Han; Su, Jiating; Huang, Wenqin

    2014-01-01

    Rosin, an abundant raw material from pine trees, was used as a starting material directly for the synthesis of rosin acid starch. The esterification reaction was catalyzed by lipase (Novozym 435) under mild conditions. Based on single factor experimentation, the optimal esterification conditions were obtained as follows: rosin acid/anhydrous glucose unit in the molar ratio 2 : 1, reaction time 4 h at 45°C, and 15% of lipase dosage. The degree of substitution (DS) reaches 0.098. Product from esterification of cassava starch with rosin acid was confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy and iodine coloration analysis. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the morphology and crystallinity of the cassava starch were largely destroyed. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that thermal stability of rosin acid starch decreased compared with native starch. PMID:24977156

  19. 21 CFR 184.1415 - Animal lipase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ed. (1981), p. 110, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1415 Animal lipase. (a) Animal lipase (CAS Reg. No. 9001-62-1) is an enzyme... tissue. The enzyme preparation may be produced as a tissue preparation or as an aqueous extract....

  20. 21 CFR 184.1415 - Animal lipase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ed. (1981), p. 110, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1415 Animal lipase. (a) Animal lipase (CAS Reg. No. 9001-62-1) is an enzyme... tissue. The enzyme preparation may be produced as a tissue preparation or as an aqueous extract....

  1. 21 CFR 184.1415 - Animal lipase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ed. (1981), p. 110, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1415 Animal lipase. (a) Animal lipase (CAS Reg. No. 9001-62-1) is an enzyme... tissue. The enzyme preparation may be produced as a tissue preparation or as an aqueous extract....

  2. 21 CFR 184.1415 - Animal lipase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ed. (1981), p. 110, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1415 Animal lipase. (a) Animal lipase (CAS Reg. No. 9001-62-1) is an enzyme... tissue. The enzyme preparation may be produced as a tissue preparation or as an aqueous extract....

  3. 21 CFR 184.1415 - Animal lipase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... 110, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies....1415 Animal lipase. (a) Animal lipase (CAS Reg. No. 9001-62-1) is an enzyme preparation obtained from edible forestomach tissue of calves, kids, or lambs, or from animal pancreatic tissue. The...

  4. Organic Solvent Tolerant Lipases and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Shamsher S.

    2014-01-01

    Lipases are a group of enzymes naturally endowed with the property of performing reactions in aqueous as well as organic solvents. The esterification reactions using lipase(s) could be performed in water-restricted organic media as organic solvent(s) not only improve(s) the solubility of substrate and reactant in reaction mixture but also permit(s) the reaction in the reverse direction, and often it is easy to recover the product in organic phase in two-phase equilibrium systems. The use of organic solvent tolerant lipase in organic media has exhibited many advantages: increased activity and stability, regiospecificity and stereoselectivity, higher solubility of substrate, ease of products recovery, and ability to shift the reaction equilibrium toward synthetic direction. Therefore the search for organic solvent tolerant enzymes has been an extensive area of research. A variety of fatty acid esters are now being produced commercially using immobilized lipase in nonaqueous solvents. This review describes the organic tolerance and industrial application of lipases. The main emphasis is to study the nature of organic solvent tolerant lipases. Also, the potential industrial applications that make lipases the biocatalysts of choice for the present and future have been presented. PMID:24672342

  5. Gain-of-Function Lipoprotein Lipase Variant rs13702 Modulates Lipid Traits through Disruption of a MicroRNA-410 Seed Site

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Kris; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; Rotllan, Noemi; Tanaka, Toshiko; Smith, Caren E.; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Parnell, Laurence D.; Lee, Yu-Chi; Lahti, Jari; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.; Manichaikul, Ani; Keller, Margaux; Mikkilä, Vera; Ngwa, Julius; van Rooij, Frank J.A.; Ballentyne, Christie M.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Garcia, Melissa; Hofman, Albert; Ferrucci, Luigi; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Perälä, Mia-Maria; Raitakari, Olli; Tracy, Russell P.; Arnett, Donna K.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Boerwinkle, Eric; Eriksson, Johan G.; Franco, Oscar H.; Kähönen, Mika; Nalls, Michael; Siscovick, David S.; Houston, Denise K.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Viikari, Jorma; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Liu, Yongmei; Zillikens, M. Carola; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Fernandez-Hernando, Carlos; Ordovas, Jose M.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified hundreds of genetic variants that are associated with lipid phenotypes. However, data supporting a functional role for these variants in the context of lipid metabolism are scarce. We investigated the association of the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) variant rs13702 with plasma lipids and explored its potential for functionality. The rs13702 minor allele had been predicted to disrupt a microRNA (miR) recognition element (MRE) seed site (MRESS) for the human microRNA-410 (miR-410). Furthermore, rs13702 is in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with several SNPs identified by GWAS. We performed a meta-analysis across ten cohorts of participants that showed a statistically significant association of rs13702 with triacylglycerols (TAG) (p = 3.18 × 10−42) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (p = 1.35 × 10−32) with each copy of the minor allele associated with 0.060 mmol/l lower TAG and 0.041 mmol/l higher HDL-C. Our data showed that an LPL 3′ UTR luciferase reporter carrying the rs13702 major T allele was reduced by 40% in response to a miR-410 mimic. We also evaluated the interaction between intake of dietary fatty acids and rs13702. Meta-analysis demonstrated a significant interaction between rs13702 and dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) with respect to TAG concentrations (p = 0.00153), with the magnitude of the inverse association between dietary PUFA intake and TAG concentration showing −0.007 mmol/l greater reduction. Our results suggest that rs13702 induces the allele-specific regulation of LPL by miR-410 in humans. This work provides biological and potential clinical relevance for previously reported GWAS variants associated with plasma lipid phenotypes. PMID:23246289

  6. Effects of conjugated linoleic acid supplementation and exercise on post-heparin lipoprotein lipase, butyrylcholinesterase, blood lipid profile and glucose metabolism in young men.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Suleyman; Bodur, Ebru; Colak, Ridvan; Turnagol, Husrev

    2013-03-25

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) supplementation and endurance exercise training-induced changes on post-heparin lipoprotein lipase (PH-LPL) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activities along with leptin, insulin and lipid levels in plasma by a randomized double blind experiment. Eighteen sedentary male volunteers were randomly divided into CLA and Placebo (PLC) supplementation groups. Both groups underwent daily supplementation of either 3g CLA or 3g placebo for 30 days, respectively, and performed exercise on a bicycle ergometer 3 times per week for 30-40 min at 50% VO2 peak workload. For plasma glucose, insulin and leptin levels and BChE activity fasting blood was used. For PH-LPL measurements, blood was collected 15 min after 50 IU/kg iv heparin injection. In all groups, there is a statistically significant decrease in BChE (p = 0.03, p = 0.02) and leptin (p = 0.002), insulin and HOMA-IR levels (p = 0.02). Exercise with or without CLA supplementation decreased insulin levels and increased insulin sensitivity. PH-LPL activity was increased significantly in both groups, displaying increased fatty acid mobilization. We conclude that though CLA supplementation and exercise can affect these parameters, CLA is not more effective than exercise alone. Hence, a prolonged supplementation regime may be more effective. Taken together in our small study group, our findings display that BChE is a potential marker for synthetic function of liver, fat metabolism, an obesity marker, a function long overlooked. PMID:23073171

  7. Immune Responses to Intramuscular Administration of Alipogene Tiparvovec (AAV1-LPLS447X) in a Phase II Clinical Trial of Lipoprotein Lipase Deficiency Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Twisk, Jaap; Kwikkers, Karin; Aronica, Eleonora; Brisson, Diane; Methot, Julie; Petry, Harald; Gaudet, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cellular immune responses to adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors used for gene therapy have been linked to attenuated transgene expression and loss of efficacy. The impact of such cellular immune responses on the clinical efficacy of alipogene tiparvovec (Glybera; AAV1-LPLS447X; uniQure), a gene therapy consisting of intramuscular administration of a recombinant AAV1 mediating muscle-directed expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), was investigated. Five subjects with LPL deficiency (LPLD) were administered intramuscularly with a dose of 1×1012 gc/kg alipogene tiparvovec. All subjects were treated with immune suppression starting shortly before administration of alipogene tiparvovec and maintained until 12 weeks after administration. Systemic antibody and T cell responses against AAV1 and LPLS447X, as well as local cellular immune responses in the injected muscle, were investigated in five LPLD subjects. Long-term transgene expression was demonstrated despite a transient systemic cellular response and a stable humoral immune response against the AAV1 capsid protein. Cellular infiltrates were found in four of the five subjects but were not associated with adverse clinical events or elevation of inflammation markers. Consistent herewith, CD8+ T cells in the infiltrates lacked cytotoxic potential. Furthermore, FoxP3+/CD4+ T cells were found in the infiltrates, suggesting that multiple mechanisms contribute to local tolerance. Systemic and local immune responses induced by intramuscular injection of alipogene tiparvovec did not appear to have an impact on safety and did not prevent LPL transgene expression. These findings support the use of alipogene tiparvovec in individuals with LPLD and indicate that muscle-directed AAV-based gene therapy remains a promising approach for the treatment of human diseases. PMID:24299335

  8. Efficacy and long term safety of alipogene tiparvovec (AAV1-LPLS447X) gene therapy for lipoprotein lipase deficiency: an open label trial

    PubMed Central

    Gaudet, Daniel; Méthot, Julie; Déry, Stéphane; Brisson, Diane; Essiembre, Christiane; Tremblay, Gérald; Tremblay, Karine; de Wal, Janneke; Twisk, Jaap; van den Bulk, Nick; Sier-Ferreira, Valerie; van Deventer, Sander

    2016-01-01

    We describe the 2-year follow-up of an open-label trial (CT-AMT-011-01) of AAV1-LPLS447X gene therapy for lipoprotein lipase deficiency (LPLD), an orphan disease associated with chylomicronemia, severe hypertriglyceridemia, metabolic complications and potentially life-threatening pancreatitis. The LPL S447X gene variant, in an adeno-associated viral vector of serotype 1 (alipogene tiparvovec), was administered to 14 adult LPLD patients with a prior history of pancreatitis. Primary objectives were to assess the long-term safety of alipogene tiparvovec and achieve a ≥40% reduction in fasting median plasma triglyceride (TG) at 3–12 weeks compared with baseline. Cohorts 1 (n=2) and 2 (n=4) received 3 × 1011gc/kg, and cohort 3 (n=8) received 1 × 1012gc/kg. Cohorts 2 and 3 also received immunosuppressants from the time of alipogene tiparvovec administration and continued for 12 weeks. Alipogene tiparvovec was well tolerated, without emerging safety concerns for 2 years. Half of the patients demonstrated a ≥40% reduction in fasting TG between 3–12 weeks. TG subsequently returned to baseline, although sustained LPL S447X expression and long-term changes in TG-rich lipoprotein characteristics were noted independently of the effect on fasting plasma TG. PMID:22717743

  9. Effect of plant oils upon lipase and citric acid production in Yarrowia lipolytica yeast.

    PubMed

    Darvishi, Farshad; Nahvi, Iraj; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Hamid; Momenbeik, Fariborz

    2009-01-01

    The nonconventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica degrades very efficiently hydrophobic substrates to produce organic acids, single-cell oil, lipases, and so forth. The aim of this study was to investigate the biochemical behavior and simultaneous production of valuable metabolites such as lipase, citric acid (CA), and single-cell protein (SCP) by Yarrowia lipolytica DSM 3286 grown on various plant oils as sole carbon source. Among tested plant oils, olive oil proved to be the best medium for lipase and CA production. The Y. lipolytica DSM 3286 produced 34.6 +/- 0.1 U/mL of lipase and also CA and SCP as by-product on olive oil medium supplemented with yeast extract. Urea, as organic nitrogen, was the best nitrogen source for CA production. The results of this study suggest that the two biotechnologically valuable products, lipase and CA, could be produced simultaneously by this strain using renewable low-cost substrates such as plant oils in one procedure. PMID:19826636

  10. Effect of Plant Oils upon Lipase and Citric Acid Production in Yarrowia lipolytica Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Darvishi, Farshad; Nahvi, Iraj; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Hamid; Momenbeik, Fariborz

    2009-01-01

    The nonconventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica degrades very efficiently hydrophobic substrates to produce organic acids, single-cell oil, lipases, and so forth. The aim of this study was to investigate the biochemical behavior and simultaneous production of valuable metabolites such as lipase, citric acid (CA), and single-cell protein (SCP) by Yarrowia lipolytica DSM 3286 grown on various plant oils as sole carbon source. Among tested plant oils, olive oil proved to be the best medium for lipase and CA production. The Y. lipolytica DSM 3286 produced 34.6 ± 0.1 U/mL of lipase and also CA and SCP as by-product on olive oil medium supplemented with yeast extract. Urea, as organic nitrogen, was the best nitrogen source for CA production. The results of this study suggest that the two biotechnologically valuable products, lipase and CA, could be produced simultaneously by this strain using renewable low-cost substrates such as plant oils in one procedure. PMID:19826636

  11. Effect of the lipoprotein lipase activator NO-1886 on adriamycin-induced nephrotic syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, K; Hara, T; Kusunoki, M; Tsutsumi, K; Minami, A; Okada, K; Sakamoto, S; Ohnaka, M; Miyata, T; Nakamura, T; Aoki, T; Fukatsu, A; Nakaya, Y; Kakumu, S

    2000-05-01

    Hyperlipidemia associated with nephrotic syndrome may play a role in the deterioration of renal function. Tsutsumi et al have previously reported that the novel compound NO-1886 increases lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity, resulting in a reduction of plasma triglycerides and an elevation of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in normal rats. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether NO-1886 suppresses the renal injury by treatment of the hyperlipidemia in an Adriamycin (Kyowa Hakko Kogyo, Tokyo, Japan) induced nephrosis rat model fed a high-protein diet that induced renal dysfunction and tubulointerstitial injury. Administration of Adriamycin caused hyperlipidemia, proteinuria, and edema with ascites in rats in 4 weeks. Furthermore, a combination of Adriamycin and a high-protein diet increased plasma creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and decreased plasma albumin. Histologically, in Adriamycin-treated rats, marked interstitial cellular infiltration, tubular lumen dilation, and tubular cast formation in the kidney were observed. NO-1886 decreased plasma triglyceride and increased HDL cholesterol in Adriamycin-induced nephrotic rats. NO-1886 treatment reduced plasma creatinine and BUN levels and increased plasma albumin in Adriamycin-treated rats; it also ameliorated the ascites and proteinuria. Histologically, NO-1886-treated rats showed a quantitatively significant preservation of tubulointerstitial lesions. These data suggest that NO-1886 may have a protective effect against Adriamycin-induced nephrosis with tubulointerstitial nephritis in rats by a modification of the plasma lipid disorder. PMID:10831167

  12. Endothelial lipase: Its role in cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Paradis, Marie-Eve; Lamarche, Benoit

    2006-01-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) has recently been identified as a new member of the triglyceride lipase gene family. EL shares a relatively high degree of homology with lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase, but it appears to be more specific at hydrolyzing phospholipids than lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase. EL is also the only identified lipase that is synthesized and expressed by endothelial cells. Data from in vitro and in vivo animal studies have suggested that EL may play a key role in modulating the metabolism of high density lipoproteins. Data are less consistent in clarifying how EL contributes to the metabolism of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins. Investigations in humans are scarce. To date, increased plasma EL concentrations have been associated with a deteriorated lipoprotein-lipid profile along with elevated plasma triglyceride and apolipoprotein B concentrations, as well as with smaller low density lipoprotein particle size. Elevated proinflammatory cytokine concentrations and an increased prevalence of the metabolic syndrome have also been observed among individuals with elevated plasma EL concentrations. Taken together, data suggest that EL is one of several key regulatory enzymes of lipoprotein-lipid metabolism and that a proinflammatory state, such as the metabolic syndrome, may be implicated in the processes relating plasma EL concentrations and lipoprotein concentrations. EL should thus be considered to play an important role in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. PMID:16498510

  13. Synthesis of hepatic lipase in liver and extrahepatic tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Doolittle, M.H.; Wong, H.; Davis, R.C.; Schotz, M.C.

    1987-11-01

    Immunoprecipitations of hepatic lipase from pulse-labeled rat liver have demonstrated that hepatic lipase is synthesized in two distinct molecular weight forms, HL-I (Mr = 51,000) and HL-II (Mr = 53,000). Both forms are immunologically related to purified hepatic lipase, but not to lipoprotein lipase. HL-I and HL-II are also kinetically related and represent different stages of intracellular processing. Glycosidase experiments suggest that HL-I is the high mannose microsomal form of the mature, sialylated HL-II enzyme. Hepatic lipase activity was detected in liver and adrenal gland but was absent in brain, heart, kidney, testes, small intestine, lung, and spleen. The adrenal and liver lipase activities were inhibited in a similar dose-dependent manner by hepatic lipase antiserum. Immunoblot analysis of partially purified adrenal lipase showed an immunoreactive band co-migrating with HL-II at 53,000 daltons which was absent in a control blot treated with preimmune serum. Adrenal lipase and authentic hepatic lipase yielded similar peptide maps, confirming the presence of the lipase in adrenal gland. However, incorporation of L-(/sup 35/S)methionine into immunoprecipitable hepatic lipase was not detected in this tissue. In addition, Northern blot analysis showed the presence of hepatic lipase mRNA in liver but not adrenal gland. The presence of hepatic lipase in adrenal gland in the absence of detectable synthesis or messenger suggests that hepatic lipase originates in liver and is transported to this extrahepatic site.

  14. Organization of the human lipoprotein lipase gene and evolution of the lipase gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchgessner, T.G.; Heinzmann, C.; Svenson, K.; Ameis, D.; Lusis, A.J. ); Chuat, J.C.; Etienne, J.; Guilhot, S.; Pilon, C.; D'Auriol, L.; Galibert, F. ); Schotz, M.C. Wadsworth Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA )

    1989-12-01

    The human lipoprotein lipase gene was cloned and characterized. It is composed of 10 exons spanning {approx} 30 kilobase. The first exon encodes the 5{prime}-untranslated region, the signal peptide plus the first two amino acids of the mature protein. The next eight exons encode the remaining 446 amino acids, and the tenth exon encodes the long 3{prime}-untranslated region of 1948 nucleotides. The lipoprotein lipase transcription start site and the sequence of the 5{prime}-flanking region were also determined. The authors compared the organization of genes for lipoprotein lipase, hepatic lipase, pancreatic lipase, and Drosophila yolk protein 1, which are members of a family of related genes. A model for the evolution of the lipase gene family is presented that involves multiple rounds of gene duplication plus exon-shuffling and intron-loss events.

  15. The selectivity of some fungal lipases.

    PubMed

    Adamczak, M; Bednarski, W

    2003-01-01

    Selectivity is one of the most important lipase properties which depends on a wide range of factors. In order to choose the right enzyme for a special purpose, it is necessary to check its selectivity. Fatty acid selectivity of lipases determined for natural substrales was different from that determined for p-nitrophenyl esters and those determined for each substrate. Enantoiselectivity of lipase from Mucor circinelloides (MCL) determined for 2 was over 100 (E > > 100). In this case, inversion of enantiopreferences was observed; the conversion was 10% and (R)-alcohol was preferentially produced PMID:24757816

  16. [Lipases in catalytic reactions of organic chemistry].

    PubMed

    Bezborodov, A M; Zagustina, N A

    2014-01-01

    Aspects of enzymatic catalysis in lipase-catalyzed reactions of organic synthesis are discussed in the review. The data on modern methods of protein engineering and enzyme modification allowing a broader range of used substrates are briefly summarized. The application of lipase in the preparation of pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals containing no inactive enantiomers and in the synthesis of secondary alcohol enantiomers and optically active amides is demonstrated. The subject of lipase involvement in the C-C bond formation in the Michael reaction is discussed. Data on the enzymatic synthesis of construction materials--polyesters, siloxanes, etc.--are presented. Examples demonstrating the application of lipase enzymatic catalysis in industry are given. PMID:25707112

  17. [Water binding of adsorptive immobilized lipases].

    PubMed

    Loose, S; Meusel, D; Muschter, A; Ruthe, B

    1990-01-01

    It is supposed that not only the total water content of lipase preparations but more their state of water binding is of technological importance in enzymatic interesterification reactions in systems nearly free from water. The isotherms at 65 degrees C of two microbial lipases immobilized on various adsorbents as well as different adsorbents themselves are shown. The water binding capacity in the range of water content of technological interest decreases from the anion exchange resin Amberlyst A 21 via nonpolar adsorbent Amberlite XAD-2 to kieselguhr Celite 545. It is demonstrated that water binding by lipases is depending on temperature but is also affected by adsorptive immobilization. Adsorptive immobilized lipases show hysteresis, which is very important for preparing a definite water content of the enzyme preparations. PMID:2325750

  18. Monoglyceride lipase: Structure and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Scalvini, Laura; Piomelli, Daniele; Mor, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Monoglyceride lipase (MGL), the main enzyme responsible for the hydrolytic deactivation of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (2-AG), is an intracellular serine hydrolase that plays critical roles in many physiological and pathological processes, such as pain, inflammation, neuroprotection and cancer. The crystal structures of MGL that are currently available provide valuable information about how this enzyme might function and interact with site-directed small-molecule inhibitors. On the other hand, its conformational equilibria and the contribution of regulatory cysteine residues present within the substrate-binding pocket or on protein surface remain open issues. Several classes of MGL inhibitors have been developed, from early reversible ones, such as URB602 and pristimerin, to carbamoylating agents that react with the catalytic serine, such as JZL184 and more recent O-hexafluoroisopropyl carbamates. Other inhibitors that modulate MGL activity by interacting with conserved regulatory cysteines act through mechanisms that deserve to be more thoroughly investigated. PMID:26216043

  19. Lipolytic degradation of human very low density lipoproteins by human milk lipoprotein lipase: the identification of lipoprotein B as the main lipoprotein degradation product.

    PubMed

    Alaupovic, P; Wang, C S; McConathy, W J; Weiser, D; Downs, D

    1986-01-01

    Although the direct conversion of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) into low density (LDL) and high density (HDL) lipoproteins only requires lipoprotein lipase (LPL) as a catalyst and albumin as the fatty acid acceptor, the in vitro-formed LDL and HDL differ chemically from their native counterparts. To investigate the reason(s) for these differences, VLDL were treated with human milk LPL in the presence of albumin, and the LPL-generated LDL1-, LDL2-, and HDL-like particles were characterized by lipid and apolipoprotein composition. Results showed that the removal of apolipoproteins B, C, and E from VLDL was proportional to the degree of triglyceride hydrolysis with LDL2 particles as the major and LDL1 and HDL + VHDL particles as the minor products of a complete in vitro lipolysis of VLDL. In comparison with native counterparts, the in vitro-formed LDL2 and HDL + VHDL were characterized by lower levels of triglyceride and cholesterol ester and higher levels of free cholesterol and lipid phosphorus. The characterization of lipoprotein particles present in the in vitro-produced LDL2 showed that, as in plasma LDL2, lipoprotein B (LP-B) was the major apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein accounting for over 90% of the total apolipoprotein B. Other, minor species of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins included LP-B:C-I:E and LP-B:C-I:C-II:C-III. The lipid composition of in vitro-formed LP-B closely resembled that of plasma LP-B. The major parts of apolipoproteins C and E present in VLDL were released to HDL + VHDL as simple, cholesterol/phospholipid-rich lipoproteins including LP-C-I, LP-C-II, LP-C-III, and LP-E. However, some of these same simple lipoprotein particles were present after ultracentrifugation in the LDL2 density segment because of their hydrated density and/or because they formed, in the absence of naturally occurring acceptors (LP-A-I:A-II), weak associations with LP-B. Thus, the presence of varying amounts of these cholesterol

  20. Immobilization and characterization of a thermostable lipase.

    PubMed

    Song, Chongfu; Sheng, Liangquan; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2013-12-01

    Lipases have found a number of commercial applications. However, thermostable lipase immobilized on nanoparticle is not extensively characterized. In this study, a recombinant thermostable lipase (designated as TtL) from Thermus thermophilus WL was expressed in Escherichia coli and immobilized onto 3-APTES-modified Fe3O4@SiO2 supermagnetic nanoparticles. Based on analyses with tricine-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer observation, the diameter of immobilized lipase nanoparticle was 18.4 (± 2.4) nm, and its saturation magnetization value was 52.3 emu/g. The immobilized lipase could be separated from the reaction medium rapidly and easily in a magnetic field. The biochemical characterizations revealed that, comparing with the free one, the immobilized lipase exhibited better resistance to temperature, pH, metal ions, enzyme inhibitors, and detergents. The K m value for the immobilized TtL (2.56 mg/mL) was found to be lower than that of the free one (3.74 mg/mL), showing that the immobilization improved the affinity of lipase for its substrate. In addition, the immobilized TtL exhibited good reusability. It retained more than 79.5 % of its initial activity after reusing for 10 cycles. Therefore, our study presented that the possibility of the efficient reuse of the thermostable lipase immobilized on supermagnetic nanoparticles made it attractive from the viewpoint of practical application. PMID:23748908

  1. Bacterial lipases and chronic blepharitis.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, J M; McCulley, J P

    1986-04-01

    Eyelids and conjunctivae of 36 normal individuals and 60 patients from six clinical groups of chronic blepharitis were cultured for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. The most common species isolated were coagulase-negative staphylococci (C-NS) and Propionibacterium acnes. All strains of these species, and all Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated were tested for the ability to break down triglycerides, cholesterol esters, and fatty waxes. Each strain was incubated independently with appropriate substrates in nutrient media. Each medium was then extracted and assayed for the presence of substrate hydrolysis products by thin-layer chromatography. The percentage of strains capable of hydrolyzing a particular substrate was determined for each individual. S. aureus was a consistent and strong lipase producer, able to hydrolyze all three substrates. P. acnes was able to hydrolyze triolein and behenyl oleate but not cholesteryl oleate. No differences were observed among groups for P. acnes or S. aureus. C-NS showed a high degree of strain variability. Eighty-three percent of C-NS strains could hydrolyze triolein, 82% behenyl oleate, and 40% cholesteryl oleate. Significant group differences were seen in the percentage of lipase positive C-NS strains isolated per individual. Patients in the mixed staphylococcal/seborrheic, meibomian seborrheic, secondary meibomitis, and the meibomian keratoconjunctivitis (MKC) groups harbored significantly more C-NS strains capable of hydrolyzing cholesteryl oleate than did normal individuals. Patients in the meibomian seborrheic, secondary meibomitis, and MKC groups harbored significantly more C-NS strains capable of hydrolyzing behenyl oleate than did normals. No group differences were seen among groups with triolein hydrolyzing C-NS strains. PMID:3957566

  2. Lipase

    MedlinePlus

    ... indigestion, heartburn, allergy to gluten in wheat products (celiac disease), Crohn's disease, and cystic fibrosis. ... cystic fibrosis.Allergy to gluten in wheat products (celiac disease). Crohn's disease. Indigestion. Heartburn. Other conditions. More evidence ...

  3. Lipoprotein lipase is an important modulator of lipid uptake and storage in hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Libby, Andrew E; Wang, Hong; Mittal, Richa; Sungelo, Mitchell; Potma, Eric; Eckel, Robert H

    2015-09-18

    LPL is the rate-limiting enzyme for uptake of TG-derived FFA in peripheral tissues, and the enzyme is expressed in the brain and CNS. We previously created a mouse which lacks neuronal LPL. This animal becomes obese on a standard chow, and we observed reduced lipid uptake in the hypothalamus at 3 months preceding obesity. In our present study, we replicated the animal phenotype in an immortalized mouse hypothalamic cell line (N41) to examine how LPL affects expression of AgRP as well as entry and storage of lipids into neurons. We show that LPL is able to modulate levels of the orexigenic peptide AgRP. LPL also exerts effects on lipid uptake into culture neurons, and that uptake of neutral lipid can be enhanced even by mutant LPL lacking catalytic activity. N41 cells also accumulate neutral lipid in droplets, and this is at least in part regulated by LPL. These data in addition to those published in mice with neuron-specific deletion of LPL suggest that neuronal LPL is an important regulator of lipid homeostasis in neurons and that alterations in LPL levels may have important effects on systemic metabolism and neuronal lipid biology. PMID:26265042

  4. Lipases and their industrial applications: an overview.

    PubMed

    Houde, Alain; Kademi, Ali; Leblanc, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    Lipases (triacylglycerol acylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.3) are part of the family of hydrolases that act on carboxylic ester bonds. The physiologic role of lipases is to hydrolyze triglycerides into diglycerides, monoglycerides, fatty acids, and glycerol. These enzymes are widely found throughout the animal and plant kingdoms, as well as in molds and bacteria. Of all known enzymes, lipases have attracted the most scientific attention. In addition to their natural function of hydrolyzing carboxylic ester bonds, lipases can catalyze esterification, interesterification, and transesterification reactions in nonaqueous media. This versatility makes lipases the enzymes of choice for potential applications in the food, detergent, pharmaceutical, leather, textile, cosmetic, and paper industries. The most significant industrial applications of lipases have been mainly found in the food, detergent, and pharmaceutical sectors. Limitations of the industrial use of these enzymes have mainly been owing to their high production costs, which may be overcome by molecular technologies, enabling the production of these enzymes at high levels and in a virtually purified form. PMID:15304746

  5. Recent Advances in Lipase-Mediated Preparation of Pharmaceuticals and Their Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana Caroline Lustosa de Melo; Fonseca, Thiago de Sousa; de Mattos, Marcos Carlos; de Oliveira, Maria da Conceição Ferreira; de Lemos, Telma Leda Gomes; Molinari, Francesco; Romano, Diego; Serra, Immacolata

    2015-01-01

    Biocatalysis offers an alternative approach to conventional chemical processes for the production of single-isomer chiral drugs. Lipases are one of the most used enzymes in the synthesis of enantiomerically pure intermediates. The use of this type of enzyme is mainly due to the characteristics of their regio-, chemo- and enantioselectivity in the resolution process of racemates, without the use of cofactors. Moreover, this class of enzymes has generally excellent stability in the presence of organic solvents, facilitating the solubility of the organic substrate to be modified. Further improvements and new applications have been achieved in the syntheses of biologically active compounds catalyzed by lipases. This review critically reports and discusses examples from recent literature (2007 to mid-2015), concerning the synthesis of enantiomerically pure active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and their intermediates in which the key step involves the action of a lipase. PMID:26690428

  6. Smart conjugated polymer nanocarrier for healthy weight loss by negative feedback regulation of lipase activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Lei; Zhu, Sha; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Pei-Jian; Yao, Xi-Kuang; Qian, Cheng-Gen; Zhang, Can; Jiang, Xi-Qun; Shen, Qun-Dong

    2016-02-14

    Healthy weight loss represents a real challenge when obesity is increasing in prevalence. Herein, we report a conjugated polymer nanocarrier for smart deactivation of lipase and thus balancing calorie intake. After oral administration, the nanocarrier is sensitive to lipase in the digestive tract and releases orlistat, which deactivates the enzyme and inhibits fat digestion. It also creates negative feedback to control the release of itself. The nanocarrier smartly regulates activity of the lipase cyclically varied between high and low levels. In spite of high fat diet intervention, obese mice receiving a single dose of the nanocarrier lose weight over eight days, whereas a control group continues the tendency to gain weight. Daily intragastric administration of the nanocarrier leads to lower weight of livers or fat pads, smaller adipocyte size, and lower total cholesterol level than that of the control group. Near-infrared fluorescence of the nanocarrier reveals its biodistribution. PMID:26790821

  7. Recent Advances in Lipase-Mediated Preparation of Pharmaceuticals and Their Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Ana Caroline Lustosa de Melo; Fonseca, Thiago de Sousa; de Mattos, Marcos Carlos; de Oliveira, Maria da Conceição Ferreira; de Lemos, Telma Leda Gomes; Molinari, Francesco; Romano, Diego; Serra, Immacolata

    2015-01-01

    Biocatalysis offers an alternative approach to conventional chemical processes for the production of single-isomer chiral drugs. Lipases are one of the most used enzymes in the synthesis of enantiomerically pure intermediates. The use of this type of enzyme is mainly due to the characteristics of their regio-, chemo- and enantioselectivity in the resolution process of racemates, without the use of cofactors. Moreover, this class of enzymes has generally excellent stability in the presence of organic solvents, facilitating the solubility of the organic substrate to be modified. Further improvements and new applications have been achieved in the syntheses of biologically active compounds catalyzed by lipases. This review critically reports and discusses examples from recent literature (2007 to mid-2015), concerning the synthesis of enantiomerically pure active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and their intermediates in which the key step involves the action of a lipase. PMID:26690428

  8. Smart conjugated polymer nanocarrier for healthy weight loss by negative feedback regulation of lipase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Lei; Zhu, Sha; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Pei-Jian; Yao, Xi-Kuang; Qian, Cheng-Gen; Zhang, Can; Jiang, Xi-Qun; Shen, Qun-Dong

    2016-02-01

    Healthy weight loss represents a real challenge when obesity is increasing in prevalence. Herein, we report a conjugated polymer nanocarrier for smart deactivation of lipase and thus balancing calorie intake. After oral administration, the nanocarrier is sensitive to lipase in the digestive tract and releases orlistat, which deactivates the enzyme and inhibits fat digestion. It also creates negative feedback to control the release of itself. The nanocarrier smartly regulates activity of the lipase cyclically varied between high and low levels. In spite of high fat diet intervention, obese mice receiving a single dose of the nanocarrier lose weight over eight days, whereas a control group continues the tendency to gain weight. Daily intragastric administration of the nanocarrier leads to lower weight of livers or fat pads, smaller adipocyte size, and lower total cholesterol level than that of the control group. Near-infrared fluorescence of the nanocarrier reveals its biodistribution.Healthy weight loss represents a real challenge when obesity is increasing in prevalence. Herein, we report a conjugated polymer nanocarrier for smart deactivation of lipase and thus balancing calorie intake. After oral administration, the nanocarrier is sensitive to lipase in the digestive tract and releases orlistat, which deactivates the enzyme and inhibits fat digestion. It also creates negative feedback to control the release of itself. The nanocarrier smartly regulates activity of the lipase cyclically varied between high and low levels. In spite of high fat diet intervention, obese mice receiving a single dose of the nanocarrier lose weight over eight days, whereas a control group continues the tendency to gain weight. Daily intragastric administration of the nanocarrier leads to lower weight of livers or fat pads, smaller adipocyte size, and lower total cholesterol level than that of the control group. Near-infrared fluorescence of the nanocarrier reveals its biodistribution

  9. Conversion of a Mono- and Diacylglycerol Lipase into a Triacylglycerol Lipase by Protein Engineering.

    PubMed

    Lan, Dongming; Popowicz, Grzegorz Maria; Pavlidis, Ioannis V; Zhou, Pengfei; Bornscheuer, Uwe T; Wang, Yonghua

    2015-07-01

    Despite the fact that most lipases are believed to be active against triacylglycerides, there is a small group of lipases that are active only on mono- and diacylglycerides. The reason for this difference in substrate scope is not clear. We tried to identify the reasons for this in the lipase from Malassezia globosa. By protein engineering, and with only one mutation, we managed to convert this enzyme into a typical triacylglycerol lipase (the wild-type lipase does not accept triacylglycerides). The variant Q282L accepts a broad spectrum of triacylglycerides, although the catalytic behavior is altered to some extent. From in silico analysis it seems that specific hydrophobic interactions are key to the altered substrate specificity. PMID:25955297

  10. Association between two common polymorphisms (single nucleotide polymorphism -250G/A and -514C/T) of the hepatic lipase gene and coronary artery disease in type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadzadeh, Ghorban; Ghaffari, Mohammad-Ali; Bazyar, Mohammad; Kheirollah, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Variations in the hepatic lipase (HL) gene are the potential candidate for coronary artery disease (CAD) especially in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in diverse populations. We assessed the association of -514C/T and -250G/A polymorphisms in HL (LIPC) gene with CAD risk in Iranian population with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 322 type 2 diabetic patients, 166 patients with normal angiograms as controls and 156 patients those identified with CAD undergoing their first coronary angiography as CAD cases. Genotyping of -514C/T and -250G/A polymorphisms in the promoter of the LIPC gene were studied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Results: Genotype distributions in CAD cases (73.7%, 20.5%, and 5.8% for −250G/A) and (62.2%, 32.7%, and 5.1% for -514C/T) were significantly different from those in controls (60.8%, 37.4%, and 1.8% for -250G/A) and (51.2%, 48.2%, and 0.6% for -514C/T). CAD cases had lower A-allele frequency than controls (0.131 vs. 0.196, P = 0.028). The odds ratio for the presence of -250 (GG + GA) genotype and A allele in CAD cases were 2.206 (95% confidence interval [CI] =1.33–3.65, P = 0.002) and 1.609 (95% CI = 1.051 −2.463, P = 0.029) respectively. Haplotype analysis demonstrated a significant association between especially LIPC double mutant (−250 A/-514 T) haplotype and presence of CAD. Conclusion: Our findings indicated that -250 G/A polymorphism rather than -514 C/T polymorphism of LIPC gene is more associated with the increased risk of CAD particularly in women with T2DM. PMID:27014654

  11. Toluene promotes lid 2 interfacial activation of cold active solvent tolerant lipase from Pseudomonas fluorescens strain AMS8.

    PubMed

    Yaacob, Norhayati; Mohamad Ali, Mohd Shukuri; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abdul; Leow, Adam Thean Chor

    2016-07-01

    The utilization of cold active lipases in organic solvents proves an excellent approach for chiral synthesis and modification of fats and oil due to the inherent flexibility of lipases under low water conditions. In order to verify whether this lipase can function as a valuable synthetic catalyst, the mechanism concerning activation of the lid and interacting solvent residues in the presence of organic solvent must be well understood. A new alkaline cold-adapted lipase, AMS8, from Pseudomonas fluorescens was studied for its structural adaptation and flexibility prior to its exposure to non-polar, polar aprotic and protic solvents. Solvents such as ethanol, toluene, DMSO and 2-propanol showed to have good interactions with active sites. Asparagine (Asn) and tyrosine (Tyr) were key residues attracted to solvents because they could form hydrogen bonds. Unlike in other solvents, Phe-18, Tyr-236 and Tyr-318 were predicted to have aromatic-aromatic side-chain interactions with toluene. Non-polar solvent also was found to possess highest energy binding compared to polar solvents. Due to this circumstance, the interaction of toluene and AMS8 lipase was primarily based on hydrophobicity and molecular recognition. The molecular dynamic simulation showed that lid 2 (residues 148-167) was very flexible in toluene and Ca(2+). As a result, lid 2 moves away from the catalytic areas, leaving an opening for better substrate accessibility which promotes protein activation. Only a single lid (lid 2) showed the movement following interactions with toluene, although AMS8 lipase displayed double lids. The secondary conformation of AMS8 lipase that was affected by toluene observed a reduction of helical strands and increased coil structure. Overall, this work shows that cold active lipase, AMS8 exhibits distinguish interfacial activation and stability in the presence of polar and non-polar solvents. PMID:27474867

  12. Enantiomeric perylene-glycerolipids as fluorogenic substrates for a dual wavelength assay of lipase activity and stereoselectivity.

    PubMed

    Zandonella, G; Haalck, L; Spener, F; Faber, K; Paltauf, F; Hermetter, A

    1996-01-01

    A new type of fluorogenic alkyldiacyl glycerols was synthesized and used as fluorogenic substrates for the analysis of lipase activities and stereoselectivities. These compounds contain perylene as a fluorophore and the trinitrophenylamino (TNP) residue as a quencher. Both substituents are covalently bound to the omega-ends of the sn-2 and sn-1 (3) acyl chains, respectively. Upon glycerolipid hydrolysis, the residues are separated from each other thus allowing determination of lipase activity by the continuous increase in fluorescence intensity which is caused by dequenching. Using enantiomeric pairs of these compounds, we were able to analyze lipase stereoselectivity depending on the reaction medium. Mixtures of enantiomeric fluorogenic alkyldiacyl glycerols, selectively labelled with pyrene or perylene as fluorophores, can be used for a dual-wavelength "stereoassay" of lipases. Since absorption and emission maxima of both labels are clearly separated, hydrolysis of the respective enantiomeric substrates can be determined simultaneously, and the difference in the rates of hydrolysis can be taken as a parameter for the stereopreference of a lipase. Hydrolysis rates measured with perylene-substituted lipids are generally lower than those obtained with the pyrene analogs. Thus, with a mixture of perylene and pyrene-substituted lipids, we observe a higher apparent stereoselectivity of lipases since we measure a combination of stereo- and substrate selectivity. In the presence of albumin, all microbial lipases tested so far exhibit stereopreference for the sn-1 glycerol position. In our assay, the apparent stereoselectivities are highest if in the presence of albumin, the sn-1 position carries pyrene and the sn-3 position is substituted with perylene. The lipase stereoselectivity assay described here requires the simultaneous measurement of the fluorescence intensities at two different wavelengths in a single cuvette and can thus be carried out using existing and cheap

  13. Lipase production by diverse phylogenetic clades of Aureobasidium pullulans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty-nine strains representing 12 diverse phylogenetic clades of Aureobasidium pullulans were surveyed for lipase production using a quantitative assay. Strains in clades 4 and 10 produced 0.2-0.3 U lipase/ml, while color variant strain NRRL Y-2311-1 in clade 8 produced 0.54 U lipase/ml. Strains i...

  14. Stimulation of Lipase Production During Bacterial Growth on Alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Breuil, Colette; Shindler, D. B.; Sijher, J. S.; Kushner, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Acinetobacter lwoffi strain O16, a facultative psychrophile, can grow on crude oil, hexadecane, octadecane, and most alkanes when tested at 20 but not at 30°C. Growth occurred on a few alkanes at 30°C but after a longer lag than at 20°C. Cells grown on alkanes as sole carbon sources had high levels of cell-bound lipase. In contrast, previous work has shown that those grown on complex medium produced cell-free lipase and those grown on defined medium without alkanes produced little or no lipase. Low concentrations of the detergent Triton X-100 caused the liberation of most of the lipase activity of alkane-grown cells and increased total lipase activity. When ethanol and hexadecane were both present in a mineral medium, diauxic growth occurred; until the ethanol was completely used up, hexadecane was not utilized, and the lipase activity was very low. When growth on hexadecane began, lipase activity increased, reaching a level 50- to 100-fold higher than that of cells growing on ethanol. A similar pattern of lipase formation and hexadecane utilization was observed with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Whenever A. lwoffi and other bacteria degraded alkanes they exhibited substantial lipase activity. Not all bacteria that produced lipase, however, could attack alkanes. Bacteria that could not produce lipase did not attack alkanes. The results suggest that a correlation may exist between lipase formation and alkane utilization. PMID:627533

  15. Thermostable, alkaline and detergent-tolerant lipase from a newly isolated thermophilic Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Ben Bacha, Abir; Moubayed, Nadine M S; Abid, Islam

    2015-04-01

    Lipases are the enzymes of choice for laundry detergent industries, owing to their triglyceride removing ability from the soiled fabric, which eventually reduces the usage of phosphate-based chemical cleansers in the detergent formulation. In this study, a novel thermo-alkaline lipase-producing strain identified as Bacillus stearothermophilus was isolated from the soil samples of olive oil mill. Enhanced lipase production was observed at 55 degrees C, pH 11 and after 48 h of incubation. Among the substrates tested, xylose (a carbon source), peptone (a nitrogen source) and olive oil at a concentration of 1% were suitable substrates for enhancing lipase production. MgSO4 and Tween-80 were suitable substrates for maximizing lipase production. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity by a single CM-Sephadex column chromatography and revealed molecular mass of 67 kDa. The enzyme (BL1) was active over a wide range of pH from 9.0 to 13.0, with an optimum at pH 11.0, exhibited maximal activity at 55 degreesC and retained more than 70% of its activity after incubation at 70 degrees C or pH 13 for 0.5 h or 24 h, respectively. The enzyme hydrolyzed both short and long-chain triacylglycerols at comparable rates. BL1 was studied in a preliminary evaluation for use in detergent formulation solutions. This novel lipase showed extreme stability towards non-ionic and anionic surfactants after pre-incubation for 1 h at 40 degrees C, and good stability towards oxidizing agents. Additionally, the enzyme showed excellent stability and compatibility with various commercial detergents, suggesting its potential as an additive in detergent formulations. PMID:26118130

  16. Higher muscle content of perilipin 5 and endothelial lipase protein in trained than untrained middle-aged men.

    PubMed

    Vigelso, A; Prats, C; Ploug, T; Dela, F; Helge, J W

    2016-06-20

    A high VO(2)max in middle-age is related to high metabolic flexibility and lowered risk of metabolic diseases. However, the influence of a high VO(2)max induced by years of regular training in middle-age on protein expression related to muscle metabolism is not well studied. This study measures key proteins involved in mitochondrial oxidation, glucose and lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle of trained and untrained middle-aged men. 16 middle-aged men, matched for lean body mass, were recruited into an endurance trained (TR, n=8) or an untrained (CON, n=8) group based on their VO(2)max. A muscle biopsy was obtained from m. vastus lateralis and protein levels were analyzed by Western blotting. The TR had higher protein levels of mitochondrial complex III-V, endothelial lipase (EL) and perilipin 5 compared to the CON. Glycogen synthase (P=0.05), perilipin 3 (P=0.09) and ATGL (P=0.09) tended to be higher in TR than CON, but there was no difference in AKT I/II, HKII, GLUT4 and LPL protein expression. Lastly, there was a positive correlation between plasma HDL and EL (R(2)=0.53, P<0.01). In conclusion, a high VO(2)max in middle-aged men was as expected is reflected in higher muscle oxidative capacity, but also in higher endothelial lipase and perilipin 5 expression and a borderline higher glycogen synthase protein expression, which may contribute to a higher metabolic flexibility. PMID:26447519

  17. Use of a fluorescent radiolabeled triacylglycerol as a substrate for lipoprotein lipase and hepatic triglyceride lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Dousset, N.; Negre, A.; Salvayre, R.; Rogalle, P.; Dang, Q.Q.; Douste-Blazy, L.

    1988-06-01

    A fluorescent radiolabeled triacylglycerol has been synthesized by using a fluorescent fatty acid (pyrene decanoic acid) and a radiolabeled oleic acid. This analog of the natural substrate, 1(3)pyrene decanoic-2,3 (1,2)-dioleoyl-sn-glycerol, has been tested as substrate for determining lipoprotein lipase and hepatic triacylglycerol lipase activities in post-heparin plasma. Optimal conditions for the determination of the two post-heparin plasma lipases were similar to those using radiolabeled triolein. Using this substrate, both post-heparin lipases exhibited their characteristic properties (pH optimum and effect of inhibitors) and attacked external ester bonds (1 or 3) containing pyrene decanoic and oleic acids at a similar rate.

  18. [The characterization of microbial lipases. 1. The determination of lipase activity].

    PubMed

    Bariszlovich, M; Meusel, D; Tülsner, M

    1990-01-01

    In the selection of an appropriate method for activity determination of lipases existing technical equipment, kind of enzymes, number of samples investigated (e.g. in routine analysis), and expected sensitivity range have to be taken into account. Titrimetric methods and above all copper salt methods with their high detection sensitivity are the most suitable procedures for activity determination of lipases used in laboratories and institutions without equipment for radiochemical analysis. PMID:2233988

  19. Simultaneous production of alkaline lipase and protease by antibiotic and heavy metal tolerant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Bisht, Deepali; Yadav, Santosh Kumar; Gautam, Pallavi; Darmwal, Nandan Singh

    2013-09-01

    An efficient bacterial strain capable of simultaneous production of lipase and protease in a single production medium was isolated. Thirty six bacterial strains, isolated from diverse habitats, were screened for their lipolytic and proteolytic activity. Of these, only one bacterial strain was found to be lipase and protease producer. The 16S rDNA sequencing and phylogenetic analyses revealed that strain (NSD-09) was in close identity to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The maximum lipase (221.4 U/ml) and protease (187.9 U/ml) activities were obtained after 28 and 24 h of incubation, respectively at pH 9.0 and 37 °C. Castor oil and wheat bran were found to be the best substrate for lipase and protease production, respectively. The strain also exhibited high tolerance to lead (1450 µg/ml) and chromium (1000 µg/ml) in agar plates. It also showed tolerance to other heavy metals, such as Co(+2) , Zn(+2) , Hg(+2) , Ni(+2) and Cd(+2) . Therefore, this strain has scope for tailing bioremediation. Presumably, this is the first attempt on P. aeruginosa to explore its potential for both industrial and environmental applications. PMID:22961768

  20. Optimization of Fermentation Medium for Extracellular Lipase Production from Aspergillus niger Using Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jia; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Zhiliang; Zhang, Qian; Lin, Zhi; Guo, Hongtao; Lin, Carol Sze Ki; Wang, Jianying; Wang, Yunshan

    2015-01-01

    Lipase produced by Aspergillus niger is widely used in various industries. In this study, extracellular lipase production from an industrial producing strain of A. niger was improved by medium optimization. The secondary carbon source, nitrogen source, and lipid were found to be the three most influential factors for lipase production by single-factor experiments. According to the statistical approach, the optimum values of three most influential parameters were determined: 10.5 g/L corn starch, 35.4 g/L soybean meal, and 10.9 g/L soybean oil. Using this optimum medium, the best lipase activity was obtained at 2,171 U/mL, which was 16.4% higher than using the initial medium. All these results confirmed the validity of the model. Furthermore, results of the Box-Behnken Design and quadratic models analysis indicated that the carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratio significantly influenced the enzyme production, which also suggested that more attention should be paid to the C/N ratio for the optimization of enzyme production. PMID:26366414

  1. Optimization of Fermentation Medium for Extracellular Lipase Production from Aspergillus niger Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jia; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Zhiliang; Zhang, Qian; Lin, Zhi; Guo, Hongtao; Lin, Carol Sze Ki; Wang, Jianying; Wang, Yunshan

    2015-01-01

    Lipase produced by Aspergillus niger is widely used in various industries. In this study, extracellular lipase production from an industrial producing strain of A. niger was improved by medium optimization. The secondary carbon source, nitrogen source, and lipid were found to be the three most influential factors for lipase production by single-factor experiments. According to the statistical approach, the optimum values of three most influential parameters were determined: 10.5 g/L corn starch, 35.4 g/L soybean meal, and 10.9 g/L soybean oil. Using this optimum medium, the best lipase activity was obtained at 2,171 U/mL, which was 16.4% higher than using the initial medium. All these results confirmed the validity of the model. Furthermore, results of the Box-Behnken Design and quadratic models analysis indicated that the carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratio significantly influenced the enzyme production, which also suggested that more attention should be paid to the C/N ratio for the optimization of enzyme production. PMID:26366414

  2. Polyphenolic Compounds as Pancreatic Lipase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Tina; Melzig, Matthias F

    2015-07-01

    Obesity and its associated diseases such as diabetes mellitus and coronary heart diseases are a major challenge for our society. An important target for the treatment of obesity includes the development of inhibitors of nutrient digestion and absorption. Inhibition of pancreatic lipase and the associated reduction of lipid absorption is an attractive approach for the discovery of potent agents. Currently, the only clinically approved pharmacologic agent as pancreatic lipase inhibitor is Orlistat. However, its usage is compromised by unpleasant gastrointestinal adverse reactions (oily stools, oily spotting, flatulence). The use of botanical materials as a potential source of new drugs is of increasing importance and application. Natural products that are interesting for obesity treatment are generally considered to have less toxic and side effects than totally synthetic drugs. One of the most important sources of potential pancreatic lipase inhibitors represents the class of polyphenols. This article summarizes most studied subclasses of polyphenols including flavonoids, hydroxycinnamic acids, hydroxybenzoic acids and lignans with pancreatic lipase inhibitory effects. A structural comparison of potent inhibitors shows an increased inhibitory effect depending on number and position of phenolic hydroxyl groups, degree of polymerization and elimination of glycosylation during digestion. PMID:26132857

  3. Structural characterization of MAPLE deposited lipase biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronne, Antonio; Ausanio, Giovanni; Bloisi, Francesco; Calabria, Raffaela; Califano, Valeria; Fanelli, Esther; Massoli, Patrizio; Vicari, Luciano R. M.

    2014-11-01

    Lipases (triacylglycerol ester hydrolases) are enzymes used in several industrial applications. Enzymes immobilization can be used to address key issues limiting widespread application at industrial level. Immobilization efficiency is related to the ability to preserve the native conformation of the enzyme. MAPLE (Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation) technique, a laser deposition procedure for treating organic/polymeric/biomaterials, was applied for the deposition of lipase enzyme in an ice matrix, using near infrared laser radiation. Microscopy analysis showed that the deposition occurred in micrometric and submicrometric clusters with a wide size distribution. AFM imaging showed that inter-cluster regions are uniformly covered with smaller aggregates of nanometric size. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used for both recognizing the deposited material and analyzing its secondary structure. Results showed that the protein underwent reversible self-association during the deposition process. Actually, preliminary tests of MAPLE deposited lipase used for soybean oil transesterification with isopropyl alcohol followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry gave results consistent with undamaged deposition of lipase.

  4. New Extremophilic Lipases and Esterases from Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    López-López, Olalla; Cerdán, Maria E; González Siso, Maria I

    2014-01-01

    Lipolytic enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of ester bonds in the presence of water. In media with low water content or in organic solvents, they can catalyze synthetic reactions such as esterification and transesterification. Lipases and esterases, in particular those from extremophilic origin, are robust enzymes, functional under the harsh conditions of industrial processes owing to their inherent thermostability and resistance towards organic solvents, which combined with their high chemo-, regio- and enantioselectivity make them very attractive biocatalysts for a variety of industrial applications. Likewise, enzymes from extremophile sources can provide additional features such as activity at extreme temperatures, extreme pH values or high salinity levels, which could be interesting for certain purposes. New lipases and esterases have traditionally been discovered by the isolation of microbial strains producing lipolytic activity. The Genome Projects Era allowed genome mining, exploiting homology with known lipases and esterases, to be used in the search for new enzymes. The Metagenomic Era meant a step forward in this field with the study of the metagenome, the pool of genomes in an environmental microbial community. Current molecular biology techniques make it possible to construct total environmental DNA libraries, including the genomes of unculturable organisms, opening a new window to a vast field of unknown enzymes with new and unique properties. Here, we review the latest advances and findings from research into new extremophilic lipases and esterases, using metagenomic approaches, and their potential industrial and biotechnological applications. PMID:24588890

  5. Design of ionic liquids for lipase purification.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Sónia P M; Sousa, Sílvia G; Freire, Mara G; Serafim, Luísa S; Lima, Alvaro S; Coutinho, João A P

    2011-09-15

    Aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) are considered as efficient downstream processing techniques in the production and purification of enzymes, since they can be considered harmless to biomolecules due to their high water content and due to the possibility of maintaining a neutral pH value in the medium. A recent type of alternative ATPS is based on hydrophilic ionic liquids (ILs) and salting-out inducing salts. The aim of this work was to study the lipase (Candida antarctica lipase B - CaLB) partitioning in several ATPS composed of ionic liquids (ILs) and inorganic salts, and to identify the best IL for the enzyme purification. For that purpose a wide range of IL cations and anions, and some of their combinations were studied. For each system the enzyme partitioning between the two phases was measured and the purification factors and enzyme recoveries were determined. The results indicate that the lipase maximum purification and recovery were obtained for cations with a C(8) side alkyl chain, the [N(CN)(2)] anion and ILs belonging to the pyridinium family. However, the highest purification parameters were observed for 1-methyl-3-octylimidazolium chloride [C(8)mim]Cl, suggesting that the IL extraction capability does not result from a cumulative character of the individual characteristics of ILs. The results indicate that the IL based ATPS have an improved performance in the lipase purification and recovery. PMID:21852207

  6. Efficient biocatalyst by encapsulating lipase into nanoporous gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xiaoyu; Liu, Xueying; Li, Yufei; Wu, Chao; Wang, Xia; Xu, Ping

    2013-04-01

    Lipases are one of the most important biocatalysts for biotechnological applications. Immobilization is an efficient method to increase the stability and reusability of lipases. In this study, nanoporous gold (NPG), a new kind of nanoporous material with tunable porosity and excellent biocompatibility, was employed as an effective support for lipase immobilization. The pore size of NPG and adsorption time played key roles in the construction of lipase-NPG biocomposites. The morphology and composition of NPG before and after lipase loading are verified using a scanning electron microscope, equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer. The resulting lipase-NPG biocomposites exhibited excellent catalytic activity and remarkable reusability. The catalytic activity of the lipase-NPG biocomposite with a pore size of 35 nm had no decrease after ten recycles. Besides, the lipase-NPG biocomposite exhibited high catalytic activity in a broader pH range and higher temperature than that of free lipase. In addition, the leaching of lipase from NPG could be prevented by matching the protein's diameter and pore size. Thus, the encapsulation of enzymes within NPG is quite useful for establishing new functions and will have wide applications for different chemical processes.

  7. Highly efficient biodiesel production by a whole-cell biocatalyst employing a system with high lipase expression in Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Tomohiro; Koda, Risa; Adachi, Daisuke; Nakashima, Kazunori; Wada, Junpei; Bogaki, Takayuki; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2011-05-01

    In the present study, a system with high lipase expression in Aspergillus oryzae was developed using an improved enolase promoter (P-enoA124) and the 5' untranslated region of a heat-shock protein (Hsp-UTR). P-enoA142 enhanced the transcriptional level of a heterologous lipase gene and Hsp-UTR improved its translational efficiency. Fusarium heterosporum lipase (FHL) was inserted into a pSENSU-FHL expression vector harboring P-enoA142 and Hsp-UTR and was transformed into an A. oryzae NS4 strain. Transformants possessing pSENSU-FHL in single (pSENSU-FHL#1) and double copies (pSENSU-FHL#2) were selected to evaluate the lipase activity of the whole-cell biocatalyst. The two strains, pSENSU-FHL#1 and #2, showed excellent lipase activity in hydrolysis compared with the strain transformed with conventional expression vector pNAN8142-FHL. Furthermore, by using pSENSU-FHL#2, methanolysis could proceed much more effectively without deactivation, which allowed a swift addition of methanol to the reaction mixture, thereby reducing reaction time. PMID:21380514

  8. Screening for lipase activity in the oil palm.

    PubMed

    Sambanthamurthi, R; Rajanaidu, N; Hasnah Parman, S

    2000-12-01

    The oil palm mesocarp contains an endogenous lipase which is strongly activated at low temperature. Lipase activity is thus very conveniently assayed by prior exposure of the fruits to low temperature. More than 100 oil palm samples from the germplasm collection of the Palm Oil Research Institute of Malaysia (now known as the Malaysian Palm Oil Board) were screened for non-esterified fatty acid activity using both the low-temperature activation assay and a radioactivity assay. The results showed good correlation between assay procedures. The different samples had a very wide range of lipase activity. Elaeis oleifera samples had significantly lower lipase activity compared with E. guineensis (var. tenera) samples. Even within E. guineensis (var. tenera), there was a wide range of activity. The results confirmed that lipase activity is genotype-dependent. Selection for lipase genotypes is thus possible and this will have obvious commercial value. PMID:11171201

  9. Gastric lipase: localization of the enzyme in the stomach

    SciTech Connect

    DeNigris, S.J.; Hamosh, M.; Hamosh, P.; Kasbekar, D.K.

    1986-03-05

    Isolated gastric glands prepared from human and rabbit stomach secrete lipase in response to secretagogues. They have investigated the localization of this enzyme in three species (rabbit, baboon, guinea pig). Gastric mucosa was sampled from the cardia (C), fundus-smooth (FS), fundus-ruggae (FR) and the antral area (A). Lipase activity was measured in mucosal homogenates using /sup 3/H-triolein as substrate and is expressed in units (U) = nmols free fatty acid released/min/mg wet weight. The localization of lipase is compared with that of pepsin (measured by hydrolysis of 2% hemoglobin at pH 1.8 and expressed in I.U.). Lipase is localized in a well defined area in the rabbit and is diffusely distributed in both guinea pig and baboon. The distribution of lipase and pepsin containing cells differs in all three species. The cellular origin of gastric lipase remains to be determined.

  10. Acinetobacter lipases: molecular biology, biochemical properties and biotechnological potential.

    PubMed

    Snellman, Erick A; Colwell, Rita R

    2004-10-01

    Lipases (EC 3.1.1.3) have received increased attention recently, evidenced by the increasing amount of information about lipases in the current literature. The renewed interest in this enzyme class is due primarily to investigations of their role in pathogenesis and their increasing use in biotechnological applications. Also, many microbial lipases are available as commercial products, the majority of which are used in detergents, cosmetic production, food flavoring, and organic synthesis. Lipases are valued biocatalysts because they act under mild conditions, are highly stable in organic solvents, show broad substrate specificity, and usually show high regio- and/or stereo-selectivity in catalysis. A number of lipolytic strains of Acinetobacter have been isolated from a variety of sources and their lipases possess many biochemical properties similar to those that have been developed for biotechnological applications. This review discusses the biology of lipase expression in Acinetobacter, with emphasis on those aspects relevant to potential biotechnology applications. PMID:15378387

  11. Novel lipase purification methods - a review of the latest developments.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chung Hong; Show, Pau Loke; Ooi, Chien Wei; Ng, Eng-Poh; Lan, John Chi-Wei; Ling, Tau Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Microbial lipases are popular biocatalysts due to their ability to catalyse diverse reactions such as hydrolysis, esterification, and acidolysis. Lipases function efficiently on various substrates in aqueous and non-aqueous media. Lipases are chemo-, regio-, and enantio-specific, and are useful in various industries, including those manufacturing food, detergents, and pharmaceuticals. A large number of lipases from fungal and bacterial sources have been isolated and purified to homogeneity. This success is attributed to the development of both conventional and novel purification techniques. This review highlights the use of these techniques in lipase purification, including conventional techniques such as: (i) ammonium sulphate fractionation; (ii) ion-exchange; (iii) gel filtration and affinity chromatography; as well as novel techniques such as (iv) reverse micellar system; (v) membrane processes; (vi) immunopurification; (vi) aqueous two-phase system; and (vii) aqueous two-phase floatation. A summary of the purification schemes for various bacterial and fungal lipases are also provided. PMID:25273633

  12. Porcine pancreatic lipase related protein 2 has high triglyceride lipase activity in the absence of colipase.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xunjun; Ross, Leah E; Sevilla, Wednesday A; Wang, Yan; Lowe, Mark E

    2013-09-01

    Efficient dietary fat digestion is essential for newborns who consume more dietary fat per body weight than at any other time of life. In many mammalian newborns, pancreatic lipase related protein 2 (PLRP2) is the predominant duodenal lipase. Pigs may be an exception since PLRP2 expression has been documented in the intestine but not in the pancreas. Because of the differences in tissue-specific expression, we hypothesized that the kinetic properties of porcine PLRP2 would differ from those of other mammals. To characterize its properties, recombinant porcine PLRP2 was expressed in HEK293T cells and purified to homogeneity. Porcine PLRP2 had activity against tributyrin, trioctanoin and triolein. The activity was not inhibited by bile salts and colipase, which is required for the activity of pancreatic triglyceride lipase (PTL), minimally stimulated PLRP2 activity. Similar to PLRP2 from other species, PLRP2 from pigs had activity against galactolipids and phospholipids. Importantly, porcine PLRP2 hydrolyzed a variety of dietary substrates including pasteurized human mother's milk and infant formula and its activity was comparable to that of PTL. In conclusion, porcine PLRP2 has broad substrate specificity and has high triglyceride lipase activity even in the absence of colipase. The data suggest that porcine PLRP2 would be a suitable lipase for inclusion in recombinant preparations for pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. PMID:23770034

  13. Endothelial lipase is a major determinant of HDL level

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Tatsuro; Choi, Sungshin; Kundu, Ramendra K.; Hirata, Ken-Ichi; Rubin, Edward M.; Cooper, Allen D.; Quertermous, Thomas

    2003-01-30

    For the past three decades, epidemiologic studies have consistently demonstrated an inverse relationship between plasma HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations and coronary heart disease (CHD). Population-based studies have provided compelling evidence that low HDL-C levels are a risk factor for CHD, and several clinical interventions that increased plasma levels of HDL-C were associated with a reduction in CHD risk. These findings have stimulated extensive investigation into the determinants of plasma HDL-C levels. Turnover studies using radiolabeled apolipoprotein A-I, the major protein component of HDL, suggest that plasma HDL-C concentrations are highly correlated with the rate of clearance of apolipoprotein AI. However, the metabolic mechanisms by which HDL are catabolized have not been fully defined. Previous studies in humans with genetic deficiency of cholesteryl ester transfer protein, and in mice lacking the scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI), have demonstrated that these proteins participate in the removal of cholesterol from HDL, while observations in individuals with mutations in hepatic lipase indicate that this enzyme hydrolyzes HDL triglycerides. In this issue of the JCI, reports from laboratories of Tom Quertermous and Dan Rader now indicate that endothelial lipase (LIPG), a newly identified member of the lipase family, catalyzes the hydrolysis of HDL phospholipids and facilitates the clearance of HDL from the circulation. Endothelial lipase was initially cloned by both of these laboratories using entirely different strategies. Quertermous and his colleagues identified endothelial lipase as a transcript that was upregulated in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells undergoing tube formation, whereas the Rader group cloned endothelial lipase as a transcript that was upregulated in the human macrophage-like cell line THP-1 exposed to oxidized LDL. Database searches revealed that endothelial lipase shows strong sequence similarity to lipoprotein

  14. Biosensor Applications of MAPLE Deposited Lipase

    PubMed Central

    Califano, Valeria; Bloisi, Francesco; Aronne, Antonio; Federici, Stefania; Nasti, Libera; Depero, Laura E.; Vicari, Luciano R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) is a thin film deposition technique derived from Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for deposition of delicate (polymers, complex biological molecules, etc.) materials in undamaged form. The main difference of MAPLE technique with respect to PLD is the target: it is a frozen solution or suspension of the (guest) molecules to be deposited in a volatile substance (matrix). Since laser beam energy is mainly absorbed by the matrix, damages to the delicate guest molecules are avoided, or at least reduced. Lipase, an enzyme catalyzing reactions borne by triglycerides, has been used in biosensors for detection of β-hydroxyacid esters and triglycerides in blood serum. Enzymes immobilization on a substrate is therefore required. In this paper we show that it is possible, using MAPLE technique, to deposit lipase on a substrate, as shown by AFM observation, preserving its conformational structure, as shown by FTIR analysis. PMID:25587426

  15. Immobilization of a Commercial Lipase from Penicillium camembertii (Lipase G) by Different Strategies.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Adriano A; Freitas, Larissa; de Carvalho, Ana Karine F; de Oliveira, Pedro C; de Castro, Heizir F

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to select the most suitable procedure to immobilize lipase from Penicillium camembertii (Lipase G). Different techniques and supports were evaluated, including physical adsorption on hydrophobic supports octyl-agarose, poly(hydroxybutyrate) and Amberlite resin XAD-4; ionic adsorption on the anionic exchange resin MANAE-agarose and covalent attachment on glyoxyl-agarose, MANAE-agarose cross-linked with glutaraldehyde, MANAE-agarose-glutaraldehyde, and epoxy-silica-polyvinyl alcohol composite. Among the tested protocols, the highest hydrolytic activity (128.2 ± 8.10 IU·g(-1) of support) was achieved when the lipase was immobilized on epoxy-SiO(2)-PVA using hexane as coupling medium. Lipase immobilized by ionic adsorption on MANAE-agarose also gave satisfactory result, attaining 55.6 ± 2.60 IU·g(-1) of support. In this procedure, the maximum loading of immobilized enzyme was 9.3 mg·g(-1) of gel, and the highest activity (68.8 ± 2.70 IU·g(-1) of support) was obtained when 20 mg of protein·g(-1) was offered. Immobilization carried out in aqueous medium by physical adsorption on hydrophobic supports and covalent attachment on MANAE-agarose-glutaraldehyde and glyoxyl-agarose was shown to be unfeasible for Lipase G. Thermal stability tests revealed that the immobilized derivative on epoxy-SiO(2)-PVA composite using hexane as coupling medium had a slight higher thermal stability than the free lipase. PMID:21811674

  16. Production of lipase by soil fungi and partial characterization of lipase from a selected strain (Penicillium wortmanii).

    PubMed

    Costa, M A; Peralta, R M

    1999-01-01

    Filamentous fungi from soil were screened for their ability to produce lipase. Among 56 filamentous fungi tested, one strain identified as Penicillium wortmanii was selected as the highest lipase producer. Maximum lipase production (12.5 U/ml) was obtained in 7-days cultures utilizing 5% (w/v) olive oil as the carbon source. Optimum pH and temperature for crude lipase were 7.0 and 45 degrees C, respectively. The enzyme was stable at 40 and 45 degrees C and it retained about 55% of its activity when heated at 50 degrees C for 1 hour. PMID:10071862

  17. New lipase assay using Pomegranate oil coating in microtiter plates.

    PubMed

    Ülker, Serdar; Placidi, Camille; Point, Vanessa; Gadenne, Benoît; Serveau-Avesque, Carole; Canaan, Stéphane; Carrière, Frédéric; Cavalier, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Lipases play various roles in fat digestion, lipoprotein metabolism, and in the mobilization of fat stored in lipid bodies in animals, plants and microorganisms. In association with these physiological functions, there is an important field of research for discovering lipase inhibitors and developing new treatments of diseases such as obesity, atherosclerosis, diabetes and tuberculosis. In this context, the development of convenient, specific and sensitive analytical methods for the detection and assay of lipases and/or lipase inhibitors is of major importance. It is shown here that purified triacylglycerols (TAGs) from Punica granatum (Pomegranate) seed oil coated on microtiter plates can be used for the continuous assay of lipase activity by recording the variations with time of the UV absorption spectra at 275 nm. UV absorption is due the release of punicic acid (9Z,11E,13Z-octadeca-9,11,13-trienoic acid), a conjugated triene contained in Pomegranate oil. This new microtiter plate assay allows to accurately measure the activity of a wider range of lipases compared to the similar assay previously developed with Tung oil containing α-eleostearic acid (9Z,11E,13E-octadeca-9,11,13-trienoic acid), including the LipY lipase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although punicic acid is a diastereoisomer of α-eleostearic acid, the Δ(13)cis double bound found in punicic acid gives a different structure to the acyl chain that probably favours the interaction of Pomegranate TAGs with the lipase active site. The microplate lipase assay using Pomegranate TAGs shows high sensitivity, reproducibility and remarkable relevance for the high-speed screening of lipases and/or lipase inhibitors directly from raw culture media without any purification step. PMID:26343557

  18. Cold active microbial lipases: some hot issues and recent developments.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Babu; Ramteke, Pramod W; Thomas, George

    2008-01-01

    Lipases are glycerol ester hydrolases that catalyze the hydrolysis of triglycerides to free fatty acids and glycerol. Lipases catalyze esterification, interesterification, acidolysis, alcoholysis and aminolysis in addition to the hydrolytic activity on triglycerides. The temperature stability of lipases has regarded as the most important characteristic for use in industry. Psychrophilic lipases have lately attracted attention because of their increasing use in the organic synthesis of chiral intermediates due to their low optimum temperature and high activity at very low temperatures, which are favorable properties for the production of relatively frail compounds. In addition, these enzymes have an advantage under low water conditions due to their inherent greater flexibility, wherein the activity of mesophilic and thermophilic enzymes are severely impaired by an excess of rigidity. Cold-adapted microorganisms are potential source of cold-active lipases and they have been isolated from cold regions and studied. Compared to other lipases, relatively smaller numbers of cold active bacterial lipases were well studied. Lipases isolated from different sources have a wide range of properties depending on their sources with respect to positional specificity, fatty acid specificity, thermostability, pH optimum, etc. Use of industrial enzymes allows the technologist to develop processes that closely approach the gentle, efficient processes in nature. Some of these processes using cold active lipase from C. antarctica have been patented by pharmaceutical, chemical and food industries. Cold active lipases cover a broad spectrum of biotechnological applications like additives in detergents, additives in food industries, environmental bioremediations, biotransformation, molecular biology applications and heterologous gene expression in psychrophilic hosts to prevent formation of inclusion bodies. Cold active enzymes from psychrotrophic microorganisms showing high catalytic

  19. Isolation and biochemical characterization of Bacillus pumilus lipases from the Antarctic.

    PubMed

    Arifin, Arild Ranlym; Kim, Soon-Ja; Yim, Joung Han; Suwanto, Antonius; Kim, Hyung Kwoun

    2013-05-01

    Lipase-producing bacterial strains were isolated from Antarctic soil samples using the tricaprylin agar plate method. Seven strains with relatively strong lipase activities were selected. All of them turned out to be Bacillus pumilus strains by the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Their corresponding lipase genes were cloned, sequenced, and compared. Finally, three different Bacillus pumilus lipases (BPL1, BPL2, and BPL3) were chosen. Their amino acid sequence identities were in the range of 92-98% with the previous Bacillus pumilus lipases. Their optimum temperatures and pHs were measured to be 40 degrees C and pH 9. Lipase BPL1 and lipase BPL2 were stable up to 30 degrees C, whereas lipase BPL3 was stable up to 20 degrees C. Lipase BPL2 was stable within a pH range of 6-10, whereas lipase BPL1 and lipase BPL3 were stable within a pH range of 5-11, showing strong alkaline tolerance. All these lipases exhibited high hydrolytic activity toward pnitrophenyl caprylate (C8). In addition, lipase BPL1 showed high hydrolytic activity toward tributyrin, whereas lipase BPL2 and lipase BPL3 hydrolyzed tricaprylin and castor oil preferentially. These results demonstrated that the three Antarctic Bacillus lipases were alkaliphilic and had a substrate preference toward short- and mediumchain triglycerides. These Antarctic Bacillus lipases might be used in detergent and food industries. PMID:23648856

  20. Residue Val237 is critical for the enantioselectivity of Penicillium expansum lipase.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lianghua; Su, Min; Chi, Liying; Zhang, Junling; Zhang, Huihui; Zhu, Ling

    2014-03-01

    The shape of the hydrophobic tunnel leading to the active site of Penicillium expansum lipase (PEL) was redesigned by single-point mutations, in order to better understand enzyme enantioselectivity towards naproxen. A variant with a valine-to-glycine substitution at residue 237 exhibited almost no enantioselectivity (E = 1.1) compared with that (E = 104) of wild-type PEL. The function of the residue, Val237, in the hydrophobic tunnel was further analyzed by site-directed mutagenesis. For each of these variants a significant decrease of enantioselectivity (E < 7) was observed compared with that of wild-type enzyme. Further docking result showed that Val237 plays the most important role in stabilizing the correct orientation of (R)-naproxen. Overall, these results indicate that the residue Val237 is the key amino acid residue maintaining the enantioselectivity of the lipase. PMID:24338160

  1. Comparing the effect of immobilization methods on the activity of lipase biocatalysts in ester hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Costa, L; Brissos, V; Lemos, F; Ribeiro, F Ramôa; Cabral, J M S

    2008-06-01

    The activity of various lipases was compared, in both free and immobilized forms, using the kinetics of the hydrolysis reaction of p-nitrophenyl butyrate, which was followed with in situ UV/Vis diode array spectrophotometry. Several enzymes were used to catalyze the reaction, namely Candida antarctica lipase B and Fusarium solani pisi cutinase wildtype and three single-mutation variants. The enzymes were tested in three different forms: free, immobilized as cross-linked aggregates and supported on zeolite NaY. A simple kinetic model was used to allow a quantitative comparison of the behavior of the different catalysts. It was concluded that although immobilization reduces the activity of the enzyme, the zeolite offers a much higher specific activity when compared to the cross-linked aggregates, thus supplying a heterogeneous catalyst with promising catalytic properties. PMID:17940805

  2. Comparative fatty acid selectivity of lipases in esterification reactions with glycerol and diol analogues in organic media.

    PubMed

    Lee, C H; Parkin, K L

    2000-01-01

    Reaction selectivity of Pseudomonas cepacia, Rhizomucor miehei, and Candida antarctica B lipases was assessed in multicompetitive esterification reaction mixtures containing an homologous series of n-chain even carbon number fatty acid (FA; C4-C18) substrates and a single alcohol cosubstrate (glycerol, 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD), or 1, 3-propanediol (1,3-PD)) in tert-butyl methyl ether at water activity of 0.69 or 0.90 and a reaction temperature of 35 degrees C. For P. cepacia lipase, the ordinal patterns of FA selectivities observed were, with glycerol, C8 > C10, C6, C16 > other FA; with 1,2-PD and 1, 3-PD, C16 > C8 > C14 > other FA. For R. miehei lipase, the ordinal patterns of FA selectivities observed were, with glycerol, C8 > C12 > C10, C14 > other FA; with 1,2-PD and 1,3-PD, C8 > C12 > other FA. For C. antarctica B lipase, the ordinal patterns of FA selectivities observed were, with glycerol, C8 > C10, C6, C12 > other FA; with 1, 2-PD, C8 > C10, C6 > other FA; and with 1,3-PD, C8 > C10 > C6 > other FA. The differences in selectivity among FA ranged up to 16-fold, depending upon the lipase and alcohol cosubstrate used. These findings represent intrinsic and substrate-modulated features of FA selectivities that are of particular relevance to the use of lipases for acylglycerol synthesis reactions. PMID:10835238

  3. Detergent compatible alkaline lipase produced by marine Bacillus smithii BTMS 11.

    PubMed

    Lailaja, V P; Chandrasekaran, M

    2013-08-01

    Bacillus smithii BTMS 11, isolated from marine sediment, produced alkaline and thermostable lipase. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation and ion exchange chromatography which resulted in 0.51 % final yield and a 4.33 fold of purification. The purified enzyme was found to have a specific activity of 360 IU/mg protein. SDS-PAGE analyses, under non-reducing and reducing conditions, yielded a single band of 45 kDa indicating the single polypeptide nature of the enzyme and zymogram analysis using methylumbelliferyl butyrate as substrate confirmed the lipolytic activity of the protein band. The enzyme was found to have 50 °C and pH 8.0 as optimum conditions for maximal activity. However, the enzyme was active over wide range of temperatures (30-80 °C) and pH (7.0-10.0). Effect of a number of metal salts, solvents, surfactants, and other typical enzyme inhibitors on lipase activity was studied to determine the novel characteristics of the enzyme. More than 90 % of the enzyme activity was observed even after 3 h of incubation in the presence of commercial detergents Surf, Sunlight, Ariel, Henko, Tide and Ujala indicating the detergent compatibility of B. smithii lipase. The enzyme was also found to be efficient in stain removal from cotton cloths. Further it was observed that the enzyme could catalyse ester synthesis between fatty acids of varying carbon chain lengths and methanol with high preference for medium to long chain fatty acids showing 70 % of esterification. Results of the study indicated scope for application of this marine bacterial lipase in various industries. PMID:23443894

  4. Unraveling the rationale behind organic solvent stability of lipases.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Debamitra; Parameswaran, Saravanan; Dubey, Vikash Kumar; Patra, Sanjukta

    2012-06-01

    Organic solvent-stable lipases have pronounced impact on industrial economy as they are involved in synthesis by esterification, interesterification, and transesterification. However, very few of such natural lipases have been isolated till date. A study of the recent past provided few pillars to rely on for this work. The three-dimensional structure, inclusive of the surface and active site, of 29 organic solvent-stable lipases was analyzed by subfamily classification and protein solvent molecular docking based on fast Fourier transform correlation approach. The observations revealed that organic solvent stability of lipases is their intrinsic property and unique with respect to each lipase. In this paper, factors like surface distribution of charged, hydrophobic, and neutral residues, interaction of solvents with catalytically immutable residues, and residues interacting with essential water molecules required for lipase activity, synergistically and by mutualism contribute to render a stable lipase organic solvent. The propensity of surface charge in relation to stability in organic solvents by establishing repulsive forces to exclude solvent molecules from interacting with the surface and prohibiting the same from gaining entry to the protein core, thus stabilizing the active conformation, is a new finding. It was also interesting to note that lipases having equivalent surface-exposed positive and negative residues were stable in a wide range of organic solvents, irrespective of their LogP values. PMID:22562495

  5. 21 CFR 862.1465 - Lipase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lipase test system. 862.1465 Section 862.1465 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1465 Lipase test system. (a) Identification....

  6. Development and validation of a lipase nasogastric tube position test

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Oliver; Carr, Reuben; Harbinson, Merrilee; Hanna, George Bushra

    2016-01-01

    Background Nasogastric tube position should be checked every day by either aspirate pH or chest radiography to prevent fatal misplaced feeding into the lungs. Many patients do not have acidic gastric aspirates and require daily chest radiographs. We developed and validated a lipase test that was compatible with non-acidic gastric aspirates. Methods We conducted evaluations of diagnostic test accuracy at a teaching hospital in development and validation stages. Development: We collected gastric and lung aspirates from 34 consecutive patients. We measured pH and human gastric lipase activity in the laboratory. These data helped us develop the lipase test. Ingenza Ltd (Roslin, Scotland) created tributyrin-coated pH test paper, which human gastric lipase converted into butyric acid, thus correcting false negatives. Validation: We tested nasogastric feeding tube aspirates from 36 consecutive patients with pH and lipase tests, using chest radiography or trial by use as the reference standard. Results Development: We demonstrated human gastric lipase activity in the non-acidic stomach aspirates. Validation: The accuracy of the lipase test (sensitivity 97.2%, specificity 100%) was significantly better than pH (sensitivity 65.7%, specificity 100%, p<0.05). Conclusions When nasogastric tube stomach aspirates were not acidic and pH was falsely negative, the lipase test showed a true positive and was significantly more accurate. PMID:26966548

  7. Lipase production by diverse phylogenetic clades of Aureobasidium pullulans.

    PubMed

    Leathers, Timothy D; Rich, Joseph O; Anderson, Amber M; Manitchotpisit, Pennapa

    2013-10-01

    Thirty-nine strains representing 12 diverse phylogenetic clades of Aureobasidium pullulans were surveyed for lipase production using a quantitative assay. Strains in clades 4 and 10 produced 0.2-0.3 U lipase/ml, while color variant strain NRRL Y-2311-1 in clade 8 produced 0.54 U lipase/ml. Strains in clade 9, which exhibit a dark olivaceous pigment, produced the highest levels of lipase, with strain NRRL 62034 yielding 0.57 U lipase/ml. By comparison, Candida cylindracea strain NRRL Y-17506 produced 0.05 U lipase/ml under identical conditions. A. pullulans strain NRRL 62034 reached maximal lipase levels in 5 days on lipase induction medium, while A. pullulans strain NRRL Y-2311-1 and strains in clades 4 and 10 were highest after 6 days. A. pullulans strain NRRL Y-2311-1 and strains in clade 9 produced two extracellular proteins in common, at >50 and <37 kDa. PMID:23801121

  8. Surfactant-activated lipase hybrid nanoflowers with enhanced enzymatic performance.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jiandong; Zhao, Yamin; Liu, Ronglin; Zhong, Cheng; Jia, Shiru

    2016-01-01

    Increasing numbers of materials have been extensively used as platforms for enzyme immobilization to improve catalytic performance. However, activity of the most of the enzymes was declined after immobilization. Here, we develop a surfactant-activated lipase-inorganic flowerlike hybrid nanomaterials with rational design based on interfacial activation and self-assembly. The resulting surfactant-activated lipase-inorganic hybird nanoflower (activated hNF-lipase) exhibited 460% and 200% higher activity than native lipase and conventional lipase-inorganic hybird nanoflower (hNF-lipase). Furthermore, the activated hNF-lipase displayed good reusability due to its monodispersity and mechanical properties, and had excellent long-time stability. The superior catalytic performances were attributed to both the conformational modulation of surfactants and hierarchical structure of nanoflowers, which not only anchored lipases in an active form, but also decreased the enzyme-support negative interaction and mass-transfer limitations. This new biocatalytic system is promising to find widespread use in applications related to biomedicine, biosensor, and biodiesel. PMID:27297609

  9. Surfactant-activated lipase hybrid nanoflowers with enhanced enzymatic performance

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jiandong; Zhao, Yamin; Liu, Ronglin; Zhong, Cheng; Jia, Shiru

    2016-01-01

    Increasing numbers of materials have been extensively used as platforms for enzyme immobilization to improve catalytic performance. However, activity of the most of the enzymes was declined after immobilization. Here, we develop a surfactant-activated lipase-inorganic flowerlike hybrid nanomaterials with rational design based on interfacial activation and self-assembly. The resulting surfactant-activated lipase-inorganic hybird nanoflower (activated hNF-lipase) exhibited 460% and 200% higher activity than native lipase and conventional lipase-inorganic hybird nanoflower (hNF-lipase). Furthermore, the activated hNF-lipase displayed good reusability due to its monodispersity and mechanical properties, and had excellent long-time stability. The superior catalytic performances were attributed to both the conformational modulation of surfactants and hierarchical structure of nanoflowers, which not only anchored lipases in an active form, but also decreased the enzyme-support negative interaction and mass-transfer limitations. This new biocatalytic system is promising to find widespread use in applications related to biomedicine, biosensor, and biodiesel. PMID:27297609

  10. Continuous Production of Alkyl Esters Using an Immobilized Lipase Bioreactor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An immobilized lipase packed-bed bioreactor was developed for esterifying the free fatty acids in greases as a pretreatment step in the production of their simple alkyl esters for use as biodiesel. The immobilized lipases used in the study were immobilized preparations of Candida antarctica (C. a.)...

  11. Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of ascorbyl oleate in acetone: optimization of reaction conditions and lipase reusability.

    PubMed

    Stojanović, Marija; Velićković, Dušan; Dimitrijević, Aleksandra; Milosavić, Nenad; Knežević-Jugović, Zorica; Bezbradica, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    Lipase-catalyzed ascorbyl oleate synthesis is eco-friendly and selective way of production of liposoluble biocompatible antioxidants, but still not present on an industrial level due to the high biocatalyst costs. In this study, response surface methodology was applied in order to estimate influence of individual experimental factors, identify interactions among them, and to determine optimum conditions for enzymatic synthesis of ascorbyl oleate in acetone, in terms of limiting substrate conversion, product yield, and yield per mass of consumed enzyme. As a biocatalyst, commercial immobilized preparation of lipase B from Candida antarctica, Novozym 435, was used. In order to develop cost-effective process, at reaction conditions at which maximum amount of product per mass of biocatalyst was produced (60°C, 0.018 % (v/v) of water, 0.135 M of vitamin C, substrates molar ratio 1:8, and 0.2 % (w/v) of lipase), possibilities for further increase of ester yield were investigated. Addition of molecular sieves at 4(th) hour of reaction enabled increase of yield from 16.7 mmol g⁻¹ to 19.3 mmol g⁻¹. Operational stability study revealed that after ten reaction cycles enzyme retained 48 % of its initial activity. Optimized synthesis with well-timed molecular sieves addition and repeated use of lipase provided production of 153 mmol per gram of enzyme. Further improvement of productivity was achieved using procedure for the enzyme reactivation. PMID:23985489

  12. Genomic organization of the murine CTL lipase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, M.H.; Boyer, S.N.; Grusby, M.J.

    1996-08-01

    Murine cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) lipase was originally identified as an IL-4-inducible gene in CD8-positive T cells. To further our understanding of both the function and the regulation of CTL lipase in T cells, we have cloned and characterized the murine gene. Two overlapping phage clones spanning 29 kb contain the entire CTL lipase gene. The exon structure in similar to those characterized for the human and canine pancreatic lipase-related protein 1 genes, with notable differences in the 5{prime} end. Transcripts initiate from a site that matches a consensus for an initiator sequence. Potential cis-regulatory elements in the CTL lipase 5{prime} regulatory region that would confer dual tissue specificity in exocrine pancreas and cytotoxic T lymphocytes are identified. The implications of this promoter organization are discussed. 27 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Monoolein production by triglycerides hydrolysis using immobilized Rhizopus oryzae lipase.

    PubMed

    Ghattas, Nesrine; Abidi, Ferid; Galai, Said; Marzouki, M Nejib; Salah, Abderraouf Ben

    2014-07-01

    Lipase extracted from Rhizopus oryzae was immobilized in alginate gel beads. The effects of the immobilization conditions, such as, alginate concentration, CaCl2 concentration and amount of initial enzyme on retained activity (specific activity ratio of entrapped active lipase to free lipase) were investigated. The optimal conditions for lipase entrapment were determined: 2% (w/v) alginate concentration, 100mM CaCl2 and enzyme ratio of 2000IU/mL.In such conditions, immobilized lipase by inclusion in alginate showed a highest stability and activity, on olive oil hydrolysis reaction where it could be reused for 10 cycles. After 15min of hydrolysis reaction, the mass composition of monoolein, diolein and triolein were about 78%, 10% and 12%. Hydrolysis' products purification by column chromatography lead to a successful separation of reaction compounds and provide a pure fraction of monoolein which is considered as the widest used emulsifier in food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:24755261

  14. ROG1 encodes a monoacylglycerol lipase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Vishnu Varthini, Lakshmanaperumal; Selvaraju, Kandasamy; Srinivasan, Malathi; Nachiappan, Vasanthi

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolism is extensively studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we report that revertant of glycogen synthase kinase mutation-1 (Rog1p) possesses monoacylglycerol (MAG) lipase activity in S. cerevisiae. The lipase activity of Rog1p was confirmed in two ways: through analysis of a strain with a double deletion of ROG1 and monoglyceride lipase YJU3 (yju3Δrog1Δ) and by site-directed mutagenesis of the ROG1 lipase motif (GXSXG). Rog1p is localized in both the cytosol and the nucleus. Overexpression of ROG1 in a ROG1-deficient strain resulted in an accumulation of reactive oxygen species. These results suggest that Rog1p is a MAG lipase that regulates lipid homeostasis. PMID:25433290

  15. Mechanism of acetaldehyde-induced deactivation of microbial lipases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Microbial lipases represent the most important class of biocatalysts used for a wealth of applications in organic synthesis. An often applied reaction is the lipase-catalyzed transesterification of vinyl esters and alcohols resulting in the formation of acetaldehyde which is known to deactivate microbial lipases, presumably by structural changes caused by initial Schiff-base formation at solvent accessible lysine residues. Previous studies showed that several lipases were sensitive toward acetaldehyde deactivation whereas others were insensitive; however, a general explanation of the acetaldehyde-induced inactivation mechanism is missing. Results Based on five microbial lipases from Candida rugosa, Rhizopus oryzae, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Bacillus subtilis we demonstrate that the protonation state of lysine ε-amino groups is decisive for their sensitivity toward acetaldehyde. Analysis of the diverse modification products of Bacillus subtilis lipases in the presence of acetaldehyde revealed several stable products such as α,β-unsaturated polyenals, which result from base and/or amino acid catalyzed aldol condensation of acetaldehyde. Our studies indicate that these products induce the formation of stable Michael-adducts at solvent-accessible amino acids and thus lead to enzyme deactivation. Further, our results indicate Schiff-base formation with acetaldehyde to be involved in crosslinking of lipase molecules. Conclusions Differences in stability observed with various commercially available microbial lipases most probably result from different purification procedures carried out by the respective manufacturers. We observed that the pH of the buffer used prior to lyophilization of the enzyme sample is of utmost importance. The mechanism of acetaldehyde-induced deactivation of microbial lipases involves the generation of α,β-unsaturated polyenals from acetaldehyde which subsequently form stable Michael-adducts with the enzymes. Lyophilization of

  16. Isolation of lipase producing thermophilic bacteria: optimization of production and reaction conditions for lipase from Geobacillus sp.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Akshita; Kumar, Rakesh; Gupta, Reena

    2012-12-01

    Lipases catalyze the hydrolysis and the synthesis of esters formed from glycerol and long chain fatty acids. Lipases occur widely in nature, but only microbial lipases are commercially significant. In the present study, thirty-two bacterial strains, isolated from soil sample of a hot spring were screened for lipase production. The strain TS-4, which gave maximum activity, was identified as Geobacillus sp. at MTCC, IMTECH, Chandigarh. The isolated lipase producing bacteria were grown on minimal salt medium containing olive oil. Maximal quantities of lipase were produced when 30 h old inoculum was used at 10% (v/v) in production medium and incubated in shaking conditions (150 rpm) for 72 h. The optimal temperature and pH for the bacterial growth and lipase production were found to be 60°C and 9.5, respectively. Maximal enzyme production resulted when mustard oil was used as carbon source and yeast extract as sole nitrogen source at a concentration of 1% (v/v) and 0.15% (w/v), respectively. The different optimized reaction parameters were temperature 65°C, pH 8.5, incubation time 10 min and substrate p-nitrophenyl palmitate. The Km and Vmax values of enzyme were found to be 14 mM and 17.86 μmol ml-1min-1, respectively, with p-nitrophenyl palmitate as substrate. All metal ions studied (1 mM) increased the lipase activity. PMID:23195552

  17. Small-angle X-ray scattering analysis of stearic acid modified lipase.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, T; Nakajima, M; Ichikawa, S; Sano, Y; Nabetani, H; Furusaki, S; Seki, M

    2001-04-01

    Stearic acid modified lipase (from Rhizopus japonicus) exhibited remarkable interesterification activity in n-hexane, but crude native lipase did not. The structure of the fatty acid modified lipase had not been analyzed until now. We analyzed the modified lipase by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements in order to clarify the structure. SAXS measurements showed that the modified lipase consisted of a lipid lamellar structure and implied that the lipase was incorporated into the lamellar structure of stearic acid. The long spacings in the lamellar structures of the modified lipase and stearic acid were measured. PMID:11388447

  18. Clinical efficacy of serum lipase subtype analysis for the differential diagnosis of pancreatic and non-pancreatic lipase elevation

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Chang Seok; Kim, Jin Bong; Park, Sang Hyun; Baik, Gwang Ho; Su, Ki Tae; Yoon, Jai Hoon; Kim, Yeon Soo; Kim, Dong Joon

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Non-pancreatic elevations of serum lipase have been reported, and differential diagnosis is necessary for clinical practice. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of serum lipase subtype analysis for the differential diagnosis of pancreatic and non-pancreatic lipase elevation. Methods: Patients who were referred for the serum lipase elevation were prospectively enrolled. Clinical findings and serum lipase subtypes were analyzed and compared by dividing the patients into pancreatitis and non-pancreatitis groups. Results: A total of 34 patients (12 pancreatitis vs. 22 non-pancreatitis cases) were enrolled. In univariate analysis, the fraction of pancreatic lipase (FPL) in the total amount of serum lipase subtypes was statistically higher in patients with pancreatitis ([median, 0.004; interquartile range [IQR], 0.003 to 0.011] vs. [median, 0.002; IQR, 0.001 to 0.004], p = 0.04). Based on receiver operating characteristic curve analysis for the prediction of acute pancreatitis, FPL was the most valuable predictor (area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve [AUROC], 0.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54 to 0.86; sensitivity, 83.3%; specificity, 63.6%; positive predictive value, 55.6%; negative predictive value, 97.5%). In multivariate analysis, a cut-off value higher than 0.0027 for the FPL was associated with acute pancreatitis (odds ratio, 8.3; 95% CI, 1.3 to 51.7; p = 0.02). Conclusions: The results did not support that serum lipase subtype analysis could replace standard lipase measurement for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. However, the test demonstrated adequate sensitivity for use in triage or as an add-on test for serum lipase elevation. PMID:27243230

  19. Ionic liquid activated Bacillus subtilis lipase A variants through cooperative surface substitutions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Jia, Ning; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Bocola, Marco; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    The interest in performing enzyme-catalyzed reactions in amphiphilic systems, e.g., imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) or surfactants, has been increased over the past decades. Directed protein evolution has been successful in tailoring enzymes for desired properties. Herein, nine IL-resistant Bacillus subtilis lipase A variants, particularly an IL-activated variant M1 (M134N/N138S/L140S), were identified by directed evolution. For instance, variant M2 (M134R/L140S) showed almost doubled specific activity (16.9 vs. 9.4 U/mg) and resistance (233% vs. 111%) at 9 vol% 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([C4 mim][TfO]) compared with wild-type. The specific activities and resistance of purified individual single and double variants have been studied in five different IL-aqueous mixtures. The re-activation of lipase variant M1 (not wild-type) at high IL concentration was attributed to the cooperative effect of three surface substitutions (M134N, N138S, L140S) near the substrate-binding cleft. The presence of IL/substrate clusters under assay conditions was likely related to the re-activation effect. This study provides first example of IL-activated lipase variant generated by protein engineering, and helps to better understand the protein-IL interaction. PMID:25899108

  20. Hormone-sensitive lipase--new roles for an old enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Yeaman, Stephen J

    2004-01-01

    Although described initially as an intracellular adipocyte-specific triacylglycerol lipase, it is now clear that HSL (hormone-sensitive lipase) is expressed in multiple tissues and plays a number of roles in lipid metabolism, including that of a neutral cholesteryl ester hydrolase. The major isoform is a single polypeptide with a molecular mass of approx. 84 kDa and which comprises three major domains: a catalytic domain, a regulatory domain encoding several phosphorylation sites and an N-terminal domain involved in protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions. The activity of HSL is regulated acutely by several mechanisms, including reversible phosphorylation by a number of different protein kinases, translocation to different sites within the cell and interaction with a number of proteins, some of which may serve to direct the inhibitory products of HSL away from the protein. It is also apparent from work with HSL null mice that more than one enzyme species may be classified as a hormone-sensitive lipase. The possible presence of HSL in macrophages remains controversial, and the role of the protein in pancreatic beta-cells has yet to be fully elucidated. Altered expression of HSL in different cell types may be associated with a number of pathological states, including obesity, atherosclerosis and Type II diabetes. PMID:14725507

  1. Different Candida parapsilosis clinical isolates and lipase deficient strain trigger an altered cellular immune response

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Renáta; Alonso, Maria F.; Bain, Judith M.; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Erwig, Lars-Peter; Gácser, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Numerous human diseases can be associated with fungal infections either as potential causative agents or as a result of changed immune status due to a primary disease. Fungal infections caused by Candida species can vary from mild to severe dependent upon the site of infection, length of exposure, and past medical history. Patients with impaired immune status are at increased risk for chronic fungal infections. Recent epidemiologic studies have revealed the increasing incidence of candidiasis caused by non-albicans species such as Candida parapsilosis. Due to its increasing relevance we chose two distinct C. parapsilosis strains, to describe the cellular innate immune response toward this species. In the first section of our study we compared the interaction of CLIB 214 and GA1 cells with murine and human macrophages. Both strains are commonly used to investigate C. parapsilosis virulence properties. CLIB 214 is a rapidly pseudohyphae-forming strain and GA1 is an isolate that mainly exists in a yeast form. Our results showed, that the phagocyte response was similar in terms of overall uptake, however differences were observed in macrophage migration and engulfment of fungal cells. As C. parapsilosis releases extracellular lipases in order to promote host invasion we further investigated the role of these secreted components during the distinct stages of the phagocytic process. Using a secreted lipase deficient mutant strain and the parental strain GA1 individually and simultaneously, we confirmed that fungal secreted lipases influence the fungi's virulence by detecting altered innate cellular responses. In this study we report that two isolates of a single species can trigger markedly distinct host responses and that lipase secretion plays a role on the cellular level of host–pathogen interactions. PMID:26528256

  2. Influence of environmental factors on lipase production by Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Lopes, M de F; Cunha, A E; Clemente, J J; Carrondo, M J; Crespo, M T

    1999-02-01

    A strain of Lactobacillus plantarum, DSMZ 12028 (Deutsch Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen), isolated from a Portuguese dry fermented sausage, "chouriço", was found to produce true lipase, producing free fatty acids from triolein (olive oil). This enzymatic activity was found in whole cells, but was negligible in comparison to lipolytic activity in culture supernatant. Therefore, only extracellular activity was studied. The effect of pH, temperature and glucose concentration on extracellular lipase production was studied in continuously stirred tank reactors, the first time this technology has been used to study the production of this enzyme in lactobacilli. Maximum lipase production was achieved at a pH of 5.5 and 30 degrees C and was kept at a significant level over a wide range of dilution rates (0.05-0.4 h-1); the production of lipase was still significant for low pH values, temperature and glucose concentration, conditions that are close to the ones present during chouriço ripening. The effect of glucose concentration was also studied in a batch system. The control of lipase production was found to be related both to glucose concentration in the medium and to the growth rate/dilution rate. Glucose concentration was found to be important for fast lipase production, although it did not influence the maximum lipase activity reached in a batch culture. PMID:10091332

  3. Lipase production by solid-state fermentation: cultivation conditions and operation of tray and packed-bed bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Gutarra, Melissa L E; Cavalcanti, Elisa D C; Castilho, Leda R; Freire, Denise M G; Sant'Anna, Geraldo L

    2005-01-01

    The production of lipase by Penicillium simplicissimum in solid-state fermentation was studied using babassu cake as the basal medium. Tray-type and packed-bed bioreactors were employed. In the former, the influence of temperature; content of the medium, and medium supplementation with olive oil, sugarcane molasses, corn steep liquor, and yeast hydrolysate was studied. For all combinations of supplements, a temperature of 30 degrees C, a moisture content of 70%, and a concentration of carbon source of 6.25% (m/m, dry basis) provided optimum conditions for lipase production. When used as single supplements olive oil and molasses also were able to provide high lipase activities (20 U/g). Using packed-bed bioreactors and molasses-supplemented medium, optimum conditions for enzyme production were air superficial velocities above 55 cm/min and temperatures below 28 degrees C. The lower temperature optimum found for these reactors is probably related to radial heat gradient formation inside the packed bed. Maximum lipase activities obtained in these bioreactors (26.4 U/g) were 30% higher than in tray-type reactors. PMID:15917592

  4. Obtaining lipases from byproducts of orange juice processing.

    PubMed

    Okino-Delgado, Clarissa Hamaio; Fleuri, Luciana Francisco

    2014-11-15

    The presence of lipases was observed in three byproducts of orange juice processing: peel, core and frit. The enzymes were characterised biochemically over a wide pH range from neutral (6-7) to alkaline (8-9). The optimal temperature for the activity of these byproducts showed wide range at 20°C to 70°C, indicating fairly high thermostability. The activities were monitored on p-NP-butyrate, p-NP-laurate and p-NP-palmitate. For the first time, lipase activity was detected in these residues, reaching 68.5 lipase U/g for the crude extract from fractions called frit. PMID:24912703

  5. Use of continuous culture to screen for lipase-producing microorganisms and interesterification of butter fat by lipase isolates.

    PubMed

    Pabai, F; Kermasha, S; Morin, A

    1996-05-01

    The continuous cultivation technique was used to investigate the screening for lipase-producing microorganisms from four commercial starters suitable for the degradation of domestic wastes. Using this technique, three strains of lipase-producing bacteria were isolated and identified: Pantoea agglomerans (BB96CC1, BB168CC2) and Pseudomonas fluorescens (BW96CC1). In addition, butter fat induced more lipase production when present in the growth medium. Interesterification of butter fat triacylglycerols by enzymatic extracts of the isolated strains of microorganisms resulted in an appreciable interesterification yield, implying that hydrolysis was suppressed and interesterification of butter fat triacylglycerols was maximized in a microemulsion free-cosurfactant system. PMID:8640605

  6. Cloning and characterization of a novel lipase from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia GS11: The first member of a new bacterial lipase family XVI.

    PubMed

    Li, Mu; Yang, Li-Rong; Xu, Gang; Wu, Jian-Ping

    2016-06-20

    Bacterial lipases are an important group of enzymes that offer enormous potential in organic synthesis, and there is considerable interest in identifying and developing novel bacterial lipases. In previous studies, strains of the genus Stenotrophomonas were proved to be potential source of lipases, but there is little genetic information describing lipase from the genus Stenotrophomonas. We have cloned and characterized a novel lipase (LipSM54), the first lipase described from the genus Stenotrophomonas. Enzymatic study showed that LipSM54 was a cold-active, solvent-tolerant and alkaline lipase. Using bioinformatics tools, LipSM54 was found to be related only to several putative lipases from different bacterial origins, none of which could be assigned to any previously described bacterial lipase family. LipSM54 and these related putative lipases share four conserved motifs around the catalytic residues. These motifs clearly distinguish them from the known bacterial lipase families. Consequently, LipSM54 is the first characterized member of the novel bacterial lipase family. PMID:27117245

  7. Immobilization of Yarrowia lipolytica Lipase on Macroporous Resin Using Different Methods: Characterization of the Biocatalysts in Hydrolysis Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jingjing; Chen, Yiling; Sheng, Jun; Sun, Mi

    2015-01-01

    To improve the reusability and organic solvent tolerance of microbial lipase and expand the application of lipase (hydrolysis, esterification, and transesterification), we immobilized marine microbial lipase using different methods and determined the properties of immobilized lipases. Considering the activity and cost of immobilized lipase, the concentration of lipase was fixed at 2 mg/mL. The optimal temperature of immobilized lipases was 40°C and 5°C higher than free lipase. The activities of immobilized lipases were much higher than free lipase at alkaline pH (more than 50% at pH 12). The free lipase lost most activity (35.3%) and immobilized lipases retained more than 46.4% of their initial activity after 3 h heat treatment at 70°C. At alkaline pH, immobilized lipases were more stable than free lipase (more than 60% residue activity at pH 11 for 3 h). Immobilized lipases retained 80% of their activity after 5 cycles and increased enzyme activity (more than 108.7%) after 3 h treatment in tert-butanol. Immobilization of lipase which improved reusability of lipase and provided a chance to expand the application of marine microbial lipase in organic system expanded the application range of lipase to catalyze hydrolysis and esterification in harsh condition. PMID:26240816

  8. Normal lipase drug-induced pancreatitis: a novel finding.

    PubMed

    Shafqet, Muhammad A; Brown, Teresa V; Sharma, Ranita

    2015-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) in the setting of a normal serum amylase has been previously reported in the literature. Serum lipase on the other hand has a negative predictive value approaching 100% and therefore is an excellent test to rule out AP in the emergency department. The occurrence of AP with a normal lipase is extremely rare and has never been reported in the setting of drug-induced pancreatitis. Thiazide diuretics have been implicated as a cause of pancreatic injury via a number of proposed mechanisms. However, all such cases have been in the setting of elevated serum amylase or lipase. We report the first case of radiographically proven hydrochlorothiazide-induced pancreatitis with a normal lipase. PMID:25227976

  9. Lipase-catalyzed ethanolysis of borage oil: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Torres, Carlos F; Hill, Charles G; Otero, Cristina

    2004-01-01

    Ethanolysis of borage oil catalyzed by two commercial lipases (from Pseudomonas cepacia and Candida antarctica) was studied using two different methodologies. Multiresponse models derived from a generalized Michaelis-Menten mechanism were utilized to describe the rates of formation of ethyl esters of the primary fatty acids present in the precursor oil. The relative rate constants determined for each of the fatty acid residues indicated that both lipases discriminate against release of gamma-linolenic acid residues under the reaction conditions studied. However, both lipases also released some of the residues located at the sn-2 position, indicating that for the experimental conditions studied, both lipases are nonspecific. Moreover, inactivation of Novozym 435 was rapid. Because the half-life of this enzyme (ca. 2.2 h) is comparable to the half-life of the reaction, the intrinsic reaction rate and enzyme deactivation must both be considered in modeling the kinetics. PMID:15176879

  10. Lipase Activity among Bacteria Isolated from Amazonian Soils

    PubMed Central

    Willerding, André Luis; de Oliveira, Luiz Antonio; Moreira, Francisco Wesen; Germano, Mariana Gomes; Chagas, Aloísio Freitas

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to select lipase-producing bacteria collected from different counties of the Amazon region. Of the 440 bacteria strains, 181 were selected for the lipase assay in qualitative tests at Petri dishes, being 75 (41%) lipase positive. The enzymatic index was determined during fifteen days at different temperatures (30°, 35°, 40°, and 45°C). The highest lipase activity was observed within 72 hours at 30°C. Twelve bacteria strains presented an index equal to or greater than the standard used like reference, demonstrating the potential of microbial resource. After the bioassay in Petri dishes, the selected bacteria strains were analyzed in quantitative tests on p-nitrophenyl palmitate (p-NPP). A group of the strains was selected for other phases of study with the use in oleaginous substrates of the Amazonian flora, aiming for the application in processes like oil biotransformation. PMID:22007294