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Sample records for lipid analogues act

  1. Synthesis of lipid II phosphonate analogues.

    PubMed

    Borbás, Anikó; Herczegh, Pál

    2011-09-01

    Simple analogues of lipid II were synthesized from 3,4,6-tri-O-acetyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-1-thio-β-D-glucopyranose using conjugate addition onto ethylidene bisphosphonate and subsequent Wadsworth-Horner-Emmons reaction with long chain aliphatic aldehydes. PMID:21600568

  2. Reversible lipidization of somatostatin analogues for the liver targeting.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Liyun; Wang, Jeff; Shen, Wei-Chiang

    2008-10-01

    Tyr(3)-octreotide (TOC), a somatostatin analogue, is reversibly lipidized for passive delivery to the liver with the aim of increasing its association with hepatocytes. The reversibly lipidized TOC (REAL-TOC) was formed by the conjugation of the N-palmitoyl cysteinyl moiety to the cysteinyl residues of reduced TOC through disulfide linkages and characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-time of flight (TOF) analysis. The measured mass of REAL-TOC (M+H)(+) is 1752.31 Da (calculated mass: 1752.78), confirming that two molecules of N-palmitoyl cysteines are linked to TOC via disulfide bonds. TOC and REAL-TOC were radioiodinated and administered to mice. Their biodistribution and intrahepatic distribution were subsequently investigated. The area under the curve (AUC) of (125)I-REAL-TOC in the liver was 3.8-fold greater than that of (125)I-TOC, with 20.5% and 5.8% of the injected dose (ID)/g of (125)I-REAL-TOC remaining in the liver at 2 and 24h post injection, respectively. Within the liver, TOC was primarily distributed to parenchymal cells (PC). Nevertheless, TOC was quickly excreted out and only 2.4% ID per 100mg protein remained in the PC at 2h post injection. (125)I-REAL-TOC was retained in PC for up to 2h with a constant concentration of around 6% ID/100mg protein. (125)I-REAL-TOC was also highly associated with nonparenchymal cells (NPC) at significantly higher levels than (125)I-TOC at 10min, 1h and 2h post injection. Since somatostatin analogues have been evaluated for treating late-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the reversibly lipidized conjugates may possess enhanced therapeutic efficacy due to the liver-targeting effect. PMID:18614343

  3. Anti-tumor activities of lipids and lipid analogues and their development as potential anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Murray, Michael; Hraiki, Adam; Bebawy, Mary; Pazderka, Curtis; Rawling, Tristan

    2015-06-01

    Lipids have the potential for development as anticancer agents. Endogenous membrane lipids, such as ceramides and certain saturated fatty acids, have been found to modulate the viability of tumor cells. In addition, many tumors over-express cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase or cytochrome P450 enzymes that mediate the biotransformation of ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) to potent eicosanoid regulators of tumor cell proliferation and cell death. In contrast, several analogous products from the biotransformation of ω-3 PUFAs impair particular tumorigenic pathways. For example, the ω-3 17,18-epoxide of eicosapentaenoic acid activates anti-proliferative and proapoptotic signaling cascades in tumor cells and the lipoxygenase-derived resolvins are effective inhibitors of inflammatory pathways that may drive tumor expansion. However, the development of potential anti-cancer drugs based on these molecules is complex, with in vivo stability a major issue. Nevertheless, recent successes with the antitumor alkyl phospholipids, which are synthetic analogues of naturally-occurring membrane phospholipid esters, have provided the impetus for development of further molecules. The alkyl phospholipids have been tested against a range of cancers and show considerable activity against skin cancers and certain leukemias. Very recently, it has been shown that combination strategies, in which alkyl phospholipids are used in conjunction with established anticancer agents, are promising new therapeutic approaches. In future, the evaluation of new lipid-based molecules in single-agent and combination treatments may also be assessed. This could provide a range of important treatment options in the management of advanced and metastatic cancer. PMID:25603423

  4. Short acting insulin analogues in intensive care unit patients

    PubMed Central

    Bilotta, Federico; Guerra, Carolina; Badenes, Rafael; Lolli, Simona; Rosa, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Blood glucose control in intensive care unit (ICU) patients, addressed to actively maintain blood glucose concentration within defined thresholds, is based on two major therapeutic interventions: to supply an adequate calories load and, when necessary, to continuously infuse insulin titrated to patients needs: intensive insulin therapy (IIT). Short acting insulin analogues (SAIA) have been synthesized to improve the chronic treatment of patients with diabetes but, because of the pharmacokinetic characteristics that include shorter on-set and off-set, they can be effectively used also in ICU patients and have the potential to be associated with a more limited risk of inducing episodes of iatrogenic hypoglycemia. Medical therapies carry an intrinsic risk for collateral effects; this can be more harmful in patients with unstable clinical conditions like ICU patients. To minimize these risks, the use of short acting drugs in ICU patients have gained a progressively larger room in ICU and now pharmaceutical companies and researchers design drugs dedicated to this subset of medical practice. In this article we report the rationale of using short acting drugs in ICU patients (i.e., sedation and treatment of arterial hypertension) and we also describe SAIA and their therapeutic use in ICU with the potential to minimize iatrogenic hypoglycemia related to IIT. The pharmacodynamic and pharmachokinetic characteristics of SAIA will be also discussed. PMID:24936244

  5. Lipid supplemented medium induces lamellar bodies and precursors of barrier lipids in cultured analogues of human skin.

    PubMed

    Boyce, S T; Williams, M L

    1993-08-01

    Barrier function of cultured skin substitutes (CSS) is required for their effective use in clinical treatment of skin wounds, and for percutaneous absorption in vitro. Arachidonic, palmitic, oleic, and linoleic free fatty acids, in conjunction with the antioxidant alpha-tocopherol acetate (lipid supplements, "LS"), were added to nutrient media of CSS to provide precursors of epidermal barrier lipids. CSS were composed of human keratinocytes (HK), fibroblasts (HF), and collagen-glycosaminoglycan substrates, and were incubated for 14 d submerged or lifted to the air-liquid interface in media based on MCDB 153 +/- LS. Duplicate samples (30 cm2) were harvested and the epidermal analogue was analyzed for total protein, total DNA, total lipid, lipid fractions including acylglucosylceramide (AGC), and presence of lamellar bodies. Significant increases (p < 0.05) were detected between CSS incubated in +LS medium for total lipid, total DNA, ceramide, glucosylceramide, triglycerides, and diglycerides. AGC and lamellar bodies were detected only in epithelia of CSS incubated in +LS medium. These data show that free fatty acids, vitamin E, and lifting of CSS promote increased epithelial morphogenesis compared to CSS cultured submerged without lipid supplements. Presence of lamellar bodies and AGC suggests enhanced production in vitro of barrier-associated epidermal lipids. PMID:8345218

  6. Lateral diffusivity of lipid analogue excimeric probes in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Sassaroli, M; Vauhkonen, M; Perry, D; Eisinger, J

    1990-01-01

    The lateral mobility of pyrenyl phospholipid probes in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) vesicles was determined from the dependence of the pyrene monomeric and excimeric fluorescence yields on the molar probe ratio. The analysis of the experimental data makes use of the milling crowd model for two-dimensional diffusivity and the computer simulated random walks of probes in an array of lipids. The fluorescence yields for 1-palmitoyl-2-(1'-pyrenedecanoyl)phosphatidylcholine (py10PC) in DMPC bilayers are well fitted by the model both below and above the fluid-gel phase transition temperature (Tc) and permit the evaluation of the probe diffusion rate (f), which is the frequency with which probes take random steps of length L, the host membrane lipid-lipid spacing. The lateral diffusion coefficient is then obtained from the relationship D = fL2/4. In passing through the fluid-gel phase transition of DMPC (Tc = 24 degrees C), the lateral mobility of py10PC determined in this way decrease only moderately, while D measured by fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR) experiments is lowered by two or more orders of magnitude in gel phase. This difference in gel phase diffusivities is discussed and considered to be related either to (a) the diffusion length in FPR experiments being about a micrometer or over 100 times greater than that of excimeric probes (approximately 1 nm), or (b) to nonrandomicity in the distribution of the pyrenyl probes in gel phase DMPC. At 35 degrees C, in fluid DMPC vesicles, the diffusion rate is f = 1.8 x 10(8) s-1, corresponding to D = 29 microns2 s-1, which is about three times larger than the value obtained in FPR experiments. The activation energy for lateral diffusion in fluid DMPC was determined to be 8.0 kcal/mol. PMID:2317550

  7. New Insights into Nisin's Antibacterial Mechanism Revealed by Binding Studies with Synthetic Lipid II Analogues.

    PubMed

    't Hart, Peter; Oppedijk, Sabine F; Breukink, Eefjan; Martin, Nathaniel I

    2016-01-12

    Nisin is the preeminent lantibiotic, and to date its antibacterial mechanism has been investigated using a variety of techniques. While nisin's lipid II-mediated mode of action is well-established, a detailed analysis of the thermodynamic parameters governing this interaction has not been previously reported. We here describe an approach employing isothermal titration calorimetry to directly measure the affinity of nisin for lipid II and a number of synthetic lipid II precursors and analogues. Our measurements confirm the pyrophosphate unit of lipid II as the primary site of nisin binding and also indicate that the complete MurNAc moiety is required for a high-affinity interaction. Additionally, we find that while the pentapeptide unit of the lipid II molecule is not required for strong binding by nisin, it does play an important role in stabilizing the subsequently formed nisin-lipid II pore complex, albeit at an entropic cost. The anchoring of lipid II in a membrane environment was also found to play a significant role in enhancing nisin binding and is required in order to achieve a high-affinity interaction. PMID:26653142

  8. Extracellular cellobiose lipid from yeast and their analogues: structures and fungicidal activities.

    PubMed

    Kulakovskaya, Tatyana; Shashkov, Alexander; Kulakovskaya, Ekaterina; Golubev, Wladyslav; Zinin, Alexander; Tsvetkov, Yury; Grachev, Alexey; Nifantiev, Nikolay

    2009-01-01

    Basidiomycetous yeasts Cryptococcus humicola and Pseudozyma fusiformata secrete cellobiose lipids into the culture broth. In the case of Cr. humicola, 16-(tetra-O-acetyl-beta-cellobiosyloxy)-2-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid was defined as major product and 16-(tetra-O-acetyl-beta-cellobiosyloxy)-2,15-dihydrohexadecanoic acid was defined as minor product, while Ps. fusiformata secreted mainly 16-[6-O-acetyl-2'-O-(3-hydroxyhexanoyl)-beta-cellobiosyloxy)-2,15-dihydroxyhexadecanoic acid. These compounds exhibit similar fungicidal activities against different yeasts including pathogenic Cryptococcus and Candida species. The cells of Filobasidiella neoformans causing systemic cryptococcosis completely died after 30-min incubation with 0.02 mg mL(-1) of cellobiose lipids. The same effect on ascomycetous yeast, including pathogenic Candida species, is achieved at 0.1-0.3 mg mL(-1) of cellobiose lipids depending on the test culture used. Cellobiose lipid of Ps. fusiformata inhibits the growth of phytopathogenic fungi Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Phomopsis helianthi more efficiently than cellobiose lipids from Cr. humicola. Fully O-deacylated analogue, namely 16-(beta-cellobiosyloxy)-2-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid, and totally synthetic compound, 16-(beta-cellobiosyloxy)-hexadecanoic acid, do not inhibit the growth of F. neoformans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, while 16-(beta-cellobiosyloxy)-2,15-dihydroxyhexadecanoic acid inhibits the growth of both test cultures but at higher concentrations than cellobiose lipids of Cr. humicola and Ps. fusiformata. The amide of 16-(beta-cellobiosyloxy)-2,15-dihydroxyhexadecanoic acid possessed no fungicide activity. Thus, the structures of both the carbohydrate part and fatty acid aglycon moiety are important for the fungicidal activity of cellobiose lipids. PMID:19202311

  9. Bilayer/cytoskeleton interactions in lipid-symmetric erythrocytes assessed by a photoactivable phospholipid analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, D.; Schlegel, R.A. ); Williamson, P. )

    1991-08-06

    Two mechanisms have been proposed for maintenance of transbilayer phospholipid asymmetry in the erythrocyte plasma membrane, one involving specific interactions between the aminophospholipids of the inner leaflet of the bilayer and the cytoskeleton, particularly spectrin, and the other involving the aminophospholipid translocase. If the former mechanism is correct, then erythrocytes which have lost their asymmetric distribution of phospholipids should display altered bilayer/cytoskeleton interactions. To test this possibility, normal erythrocytes, erythrocytes from patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia or sickle disease, and lipid-symmetric and -asymmetric erythrocyte ghosts were labeled with the radioactive photoactivable analogue of phosphatidylethanolamine, 2-(2-azido-4-nitrobenzoyl)-1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho({sup 14}C) ethanolamine (({sup 14}C)AzPE), previously shown to label cytoskeletal proteins from the bilayer. The labeling pattern of cytoskeletal proteins in pathologic erythrocytes and lipid-asymmetric erythrocyte ghosts was indistinguishable from normal erythrocytes, indicating that the probe detects no differences in bilayer/cytoskeleton interactions in these cells. In contrast, in lipid-symmetric erythrocyte ghosts, labeling of bands 4.1 and 4.2 and actin, and to a lesser extent ankyrin, by ({sup 14}C)AzPE was considerably reduced. Significantly, however, labeling of spectrin was unaltered in the lipid-symmetric cells. These results do not support a model in which spectrin is involved in the maintenance of an asymmetric distribution of phospholipids in erythrocytes.

  10. Conformational studies of synthetic lipid A analogues and partial structures by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, K; Kusumoto, S; Seydel, U

    1997-10-01

    Synthetic lipid A analogues and partial structures were analyzed and compared with natural hexaacyl lipid A from E. coli applying Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The investigations comprised (i) the measurement of the beta <=> alpha phase transition of the acyl chains via monitoring of the symmetric stretching vibration of the methylene groups, (ii) an estimation of the supramolecular aggregate structures evaluating vibrations from the interface like ester carbonyl and applying theoretical calculations (iii) a determination of the inter- and intramolecular conformations monitoring functional groups from the interface and the diglucosamine backbone (ester carbonyl, phosphate). The phase transition temperature Tc was found to be nearly a linear function of the number of acyl chains for most bisphosphoryl compounds indicating comparable packing density, whereas the deviating behaviour of some samples indicated a higher packing density. From the determination of the supramolecular aggregate structures (cubic, HII) of natural hexaacyl lipid A by X-ray small-angle diffraction, the existence of the same aggregate structures also for the synthetic hexaacyl lipid A was deduced from the nearly identical thermotropism of the ester carbonyl band. From this, a good approximation of the supramolecular structures of all synthetic samples was possible on the basis of the theory of Israelachvili. The analysis of the main phosphate band, together with that of the Tc data and former colorimetric results, allowed the establishment of a model of the intermolecular conformations of neighbouring lipid A/LPS molecules. The biological relevance of the findings is discussed in terms of the strongly varying biological activity (between high and no activity) of the samples. PMID:9370256

  11. Structural organisation and phase behaviour of a stratum corneum lipid analogue: ceramide 3A.

    PubMed

    Garidel, Patrick

    2006-05-21

    The thermotropic phase behaviour and structural organisation of ceramide N-linoeoyl-phytosphingosine (ceramide 3A) is investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Its polymorphism and structural properties are compared with two ceramides of the type III class with various hydrocarbon chain saturation degrees. After hydration the main phase transition temperature of ceramide 3A is found at 76 degrees C with a phase transition enthalpy of +29 kJ mol(-1). Analysing the frequency of methylene stretching vibrations (by infrared spectroscopy) reveals that the fluidity (amount of trans-gauche isomers) is strongly increased for ceramide 3A compared to its stearoyl ceramide type III analogue. After lipid hydration, the acyl chains of all investigated phytosphingosine ceramides of type III adopt a hexagonal-like chain packing. The amide I and amide II vibrations are quite sensitive to the phase transition of the ceramide. The corresponding band analysis reveals strong inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonds between the amide and hydroxyl groups in the ceramide head groups. The H-bonding network and conformation of the head group of ceramide 3A is only slightly influenced by hydration. The water penetration capacity of ceramide 3A is, however, considerably larger compared to other phytosphingosine derivatives. The structural and organisational properties of ceramides of type III class are discussed with respect to their physiological relevancies for the stratum corneum lipid barrier property of the skin. PMID:16688309

  12. GLP-1 analogue improves hepatic lipid accumulation by inducing autophagy via AMPK/mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    He, Qin; Sha, Sha; Sun, Lei; Zhang, Jing; Dong, Ming

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) keeps rising year by year, and NAFLD is rapidly becoming the most common liver disease worldwide. Clinical studies have found that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue, liraglutide (LRG), cannot only reduce glucose levels, but also improve hepatic lipase, especially in patients also with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In addition, enhancing autophagy decreases lipid accumulation in hepatocytes. The aim of the present study is to explore the effect of LRG on hepatocyte steatosis and the possible role of autophagy. We set up an obesity mouse model with a high-fat diet (HFD) and induced hepatocyte steatosis with free fatty acids (FFA) in human L-O2 cells. LRG and two inhibitors of autophagy, Chloroquine (CQ) and bafilomycin A1 (Baf), were added into each group, respectively. The lipid profiles and morphological modifications of each group were tested. Immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence staining and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to measure autophagy in this study. The autophagy protein expression of SQSTM1 (P62), and LC3B, along with the signaling pathway proteins of mTOR, phosphorylated mTOR (p-mTOR), AMPK, phosphorylated AMPK (p-AMPK) and Beclin1, were evaluated by western blot. Our results showed that LRG improved hepatocyte steatosis by inducing autophagy, and the AMPK/mTOR pathway is involved. These findings suggest an important mechanism for the positive effects of LRG on hepatic steatosis, and provide new evidence for clinical use of LRG in NAFLD. PMID:27208776

  13. Lipid analogues as potential drugs for the regulation of mitochondrial cell death

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Michael; Dyari, Herryawan Ryadi Eziwar; Allison, Sarah E; Rawling, Tristan

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrion plays an important role in the production of energy as ATP, the regulation of cell viability and apoptosis, and the biosynthesis of major structural and regulatory molecules, such as lipids. During ATP production, reactive oxygen species are generated that alter the intracellular redox state and activate apoptosis. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a well-recognized component of the pathogenesis of diseases such as cancer. Understanding mitochondrial function, and how this is dysregulated in disease, offers the opportunity for the development of drug molecules to specifically target such defects. Altered energy metabolism in cancer, in which ATP production occurs largely by glycolysis, rather than by oxidative phosphorylation, is attributable in part to the up-regulation of cell survival signalling cascades. These pathways also regulate the balance between pro-and anti-apoptotic factors that may determine the rate of cell death and proliferation. A number of anti-cancer drugs have been developed that target these factors and one of the most promising groups of agents in this regard are the lipid-based molecules that act directly or indirectly at the mitochondrion. These molecules have emerged in part from an understanding of the mitochondrial actions of naturally occurring fatty acids. Some of these agents have already entered clinical trials because they specifically target known mitochondrial defects in the cancer cell. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24111728

  14. In Vitro Studies Indicate Intravenous Lipid Emulsion Acts as Lipid Sink in Verapamil Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Kryshtal, Dmytro O; Dawling, Sheila; Seger, Donna; Knollmann, Bjorn C

    2016-06-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE), a component of parenteral nutrition, consists of a fat emulsion of soy bean oil, egg phospholipids, and glycerin. Case reports suggest that ILE may reverse hypotension caused by acute poisoning with lipophilic drugs such as verapamil, but the mechanism remains unclear. The methods used are the following: (1) measurement of ILE concentration in serum samples from a patient with verapamil poisoning treated with ILE, (2) measurement of free verapamil concentrations in human serum mixed in vitro with increasing concentrations of ILE, and (3) measurement of murine ventricular cardiomyocyte L-type Ca(2+) currents, intracellular Ca(2+), and contractility in response to verapamil and/or ILE. Maximum patient serum ILE concentration after infusion of 1 L ILE over 1 h was approximately 1.6 vol%. In vitro GC/MS verapamil assays showed that addition of ILE (0.03-5.0 vol%) dose-dependently decreased the free verapamil concentration in human serum. In voltage-clamped myocytes, adding ILE to Tyrode's solution containing 5 μM verapamil recovered L-type Ca(2+) currents (ICa). Recovery was concentration dependent, with significant ICa recovery at ILE concentrations as low as 0.03 vol%. ILE had no effect on ICa in the absence of verapamil. In field-stimulated intact ventricular myocytes exposed to verapamil, adding ILE (0.5 %) resulted in a rapid and nearly complete recovery of myocyte contractility and intracellular Ca(2+). Our in vitro studies indicate that ILE acts as a lipid sink that rapidly reverses impaired cardiomyocyte contractility in the continued presence of verapamil. PMID:26553277

  15. Effect of a synthetic indolicidin analogue on lipid peroxidation in thermal burns.

    PubMed

    Lazarenko, V A; Lyashev, Yu D; Shevchenko, N I

    2014-08-01

    Experimental simulation of burn was followed by accumulation of LPO products and suppression of antioxidant enzyme activity in the burn wound. Application of a synthetic analogue of indolicidin led to an increase in MDA and acylhydroperoxide concentrations in the burn wound on experimental day 1. Further application of the peptide in a dose of 100 mg/kg had no significant effect on the studied parameters, while the peptide in a dose of 500 mg/kg was followed by a decrease in the level of LPO products on days 10 and 14. Changes in antioxidant enzyme activities in rats treated with 500 mg/kg indolicidin analogue had a two-phase pattern: an increase on day 4 was followed by a decrease. PMID:25110080

  16. Methods of staining and visualization of sphingolipid enriched and non-enriched plasma membrane regions of Arabidopsis thaliana with fluorescent dyes and lipid analogues

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sterols and Sphingolipids form lipid clusters in the plasma membranes of cell types throughout the animal and plant kingdoms. These lipid domains provide a medium for protein signaling complexes at the plasma membrane and are also observed to be principal regions of membrane contact at the inception of infection. We visualized different specific fluorescent lipophilic stains of the both sphingolipid enriched and non-sphingolipid enriched regions in the plasma membranes of live protoplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Lipid staining protocols for several fluorescent lipid analogues in plants are presented. The most emphasis was placed on successful protocols for the single and dual staining of sphingolipid enriched regions and exclusion of sphingolipid enriched regions on the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts. A secondary focus was placed to ensure that these staining protocols presented still maintain cell viability. Furthermore, the protocols were successfully tested with the spectrally sensitive dye Laurdan. Conclusion Almost all existing staining procedures of the plasma membrane with fluorescent lipid analogues are specified for animal cells and tissues. In order to develop lipid staining protocols for plants, procedures were established with critical steps for the plasma membrane staining of Arabidopsis leaf tissue and protoplasts. The success of the plasma membrane staining protocols was additionally verified by measurements of lipid dynamics by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique and by the observation of new phenomena such as time dependent lipid polarization events in living protoplasts, for which a putative physiological relevance is suggested. PMID:22867517

  17. A fluorescent lipid analogue can be used to monitor secretory activity and for isolation of mammalian secretion mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Ktistakis, N T; Kao, C Y; Wang, R H; Roth, M G

    1995-01-01

    The use of reporter proteins to study the regulation of secretion has often been complicated by posttranslational processing events that influence the secretion of certain proteins, but are not part of the cellular mechanisms that specifically regulate secretion. This has been a particular limitation for the isolation of mammalian secretion mutants, which has typically been a slow process. To provide a reporter of secretory activity independent of protein processing events, cells were labeled with the fluorescent lipid analogue C5-DMB-ceramide (ceramide coupled to the fluorophore boron dipyrromethene difluoride) and its secretion was followed by fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Brefeldin A, which severely inhibits secretion in Chinese hamster ovary cells, blocked secretion of C5-DMB-ceramide. At high temperature, export of C5-DMB-ceramide was inhibited in HRP-1 cells, which have a conditional defect in secretion. Using C5-DMB-ceramide as a reporter of secretory activity, several different pulse-chase protocols were designed that selected mutant Chinese hamster ovary cells that were resistant to the drug brefeldin A and others that were defective in the transport of glycoproteins to the cell surface. Mutant cells of either type were identified in a mutagenized population at a frequency of 10(-6). Thus, the fluorescent lipid C5-DMB-ceramide can be used as a specific marker of secretory activity, providing an efficient, general approach for isolating mammalian cells with defects in the secretory pathway. Images PMID:7787242

  18. Short- and long-term effect of a long-acting somatostatin analogue, lanreotide (SR-L) on metastatic gastrinoma.

    PubMed

    Gaztambide, S; Vazquez, J A

    1999-02-01

    Medical treatment is the elective therapy for patients with gastrinoma when the tumor is not found at surgery or is unresectable or when there is a metastatic disease. H2-blockers and omeprazol are able to control gastric acid secretion and, in addition, somatostatin analogues decrease gastrin levels. A new long-acting and slow release formulation of a somatostatin analogue (lanreotide, SR-L) has been developed. We treated two patients suffering from gastrinoma, total gastrectomy and hepatic metastases with 30 mg intramuscular injections of SR-L every 15 and 10 days, respectively, for a seven-month period. After the treatment, gastrin levels decreased from 35,494 and 15,086 ng/l to 3,211 and 167 ng/l (92 and 98% below pre-treatment levels) in case 1 and 2 respectively, with a relief of symptoms and no side effects. PMID:10195383

  19. Abscisic Acid Analogues That Act as Universal or Selective Antagonists of Phytohormone Receptors.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Nelson, Ken M; Douglas, Amy F; Jheengut, Vishal; Alarcon, Idralyn Q; McKenna, Sean A; Surpin, Marci; Loewen, Michele C; Abrams, Suzanne R

    2016-09-13

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays many important roles in controlling plant development and physiology, from flowering to senescence. ABA is now known to exert its effects through a family of soluble ABA receptors, which in Arabidopsis thaliana has 13 members divided into three clades. Homologues of these receptors are present in other plants, also in relatively large numbers. Investigation of the roles of each homologue in mediating the diverse physiological roles of ABA is hampered by this genetic redundancy. We report herein the in vitro screening of a targeted ABA-like analogue library and identification of novel antagonist hits, including the analogue PBI686 that had been developed previously as a probe for identifying ABA-binding proteins. Further in vitro characterization of PBI686 and development of second-generation leads yielded both receptor-selective and universal antagonist hits. In planta assays in different species have demonstrated that these antagonist leads can overcome various ABA-induced physiological changes. While the general antagonists open up a hitherto unexplored avenue for controlling plant growth through inhibition of ABA-regulated physiological processes, the receptor-selective antagonist can be developed into chemical probes to explore the physiological roles of individual receptors. PMID:27523384

  20. Molecular Characterisation of Long-Acting Insulin Analogues in Comparison with Human Insulin, IGF-1 and Insulin X10

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Bo F.; Glendorf, Tine; Hegelund, Anne C.; Lundby, Anders; Lützen, Anne; Slaaby, Rita; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard

    2012-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis There is controversy with respect to molecular characteristics of insulin analogues. We report a series of experiments forming a comprehensive characterisation of the long acting insulin analogues, glargine and detemir, in comparison with human insulin, IGF-1, and the super-mitogenic insulin, X10. Methods We measured binding of ligands to membrane-bound and solubilised receptors, receptor activation and mitogenicity in a number of cell types. Results Detemir and glargine each displayed a balanced affinity for insulin receptor (IR) isoforms A and B. This was also true for X10, whereas IGF-1 had a higher affinity for IR-A than IR-B. X10 and glargine both exhibited a higher relative IGF-1R than IR binding affinity, whereas detemir displayed an IGF-1R:IR binding ratio of ≤1. Ligands with high relative IGF-1R affinity also had high affinity for IR/IGF-1R hybrid receptors. In general, the relative binding affinities of the analogues were reflected in their ability to phosphorylate the IR and IGF-1R. Detailed analysis revealed that X10, in contrast to the other ligands, seemed to evoke a preferential phosphorylation of juxtamembrane and kinase domain phosphorylation sites of the IR. Sustained phosphorylation was only observed from the IR after stimulation with X10, and after stimulation with IGF-1 from the IGF-1R. Both X10 and glargine showed an increased mitogenic potency compared to human insulin in cells expressing many IGF-1Rs, whereas only X10 showed increased mitogenicity in cells expressing many IRs. Conclusions Detailed analysis of receptor binding, activation and in vitro mitogenicity indicated no molecular safety concern with detemir. PMID:22590494

  1. Insulin degludec, a long-acting once-daily basal analogue for type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Berard, Lori; MacNeill, Gail

    2015-02-01

    Here, we discuss certain practical issues related to use of insulin degludec, a new long-acting basal insulin analogue. Degludec provides uniform ("peakless") action that extends over more than 24 hours and is highly consistent from dose to dose. Like the 2 previously available basal analogues (detemir and glargine), degludec is expected to simplify dose adjustment and enable patients to reach their glycemic targets with reduced risk of hypoglycemia. Phase 3 clinical trials involving type 1 and type 2 diabetes have demonstrated that degludec was noninferior to glargine in allowing patients to reach a target glycated hemoglobin (A1C) of 7%, and nocturnal hypoglycemia occurred significantly less frequently with degludec. In addition, when dosing intervals vary substantially from day to day, degludec continues to be effective and to maintain a low rate of nocturnal hypoglycemia. Degludec thus has the potential to reduce risk of nocturnal hypoglycemia, to enhance the flexibility of the dosing schedule and to improve patient and caregiver confidence in the stability of glycemic control. A dedicated injector, the FlexTouch prefilled pen, containing degludec 200 units/mL, will be recommended for most patients with type 2 diabetes. Degludec will also be available as 100 units/mL cartridges, to be used in the NovoPen 4 by patients requiring smaller basal insulin doses, including most patients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:25065475

  2. Can a new ultra-long-acting insulin analogue improve patient care? Investigating the potential role of insulin degludec.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jennifer D; Neumiller, Joshua J; Campbell, R Keith

    2012-12-24

    The basal-bolus concept of delivering insulin to diabetic patients makes physiological sense, as it mimics normal insulin release in people without diabetes. In line with this concept, a major effort put forth by insulin manufacturers has been to develop the ideal exogenous basal insulin product. The perfect basal insulin product would be injected into subcutaneous tissue without causing irritation, release insulin continuously at a constant rate for at least 24 hours, be stable, not contribute to weight gain, have a low risk of allergic reactions and, very importantly, minimize the risk of hypoglycaemia. While the perfect insulin has not yet been discovered, advancements are still being made. Insulin degludec is an ultra-long-acting basal insulin analogue that possesses a flat, stable glucose-lowering effect in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus. Insulin degludec achieves these pharmacokinetic properties by forming soluble multihexamers upon subcutaneous injection, resulting in the formation of a depot in the subcutaneous tissue that is slowly released and absorbed into circulation. Insulin degludec has been associated with slightly less weight gain and fewer nocturnal hypoglycaemic episodes when compared with insulin glargine in some, but not all, clinical studies. This article briefly reviews current evidence for the use of insulin degludec in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus and discusses the potential impact of this new basal insulin on clinical practice. PMID:23145524

  3. Long-acting somatostatin analogues provide significant beneficial effect in patients with refractory small bowel angiodysplasia: Results from a proof of concept open label mono-centre trial

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Barry; Breslin, Niall; McNamara, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Small bowel angiodysplasias account for over 50% of causes of small bowel bleeding and carry a worse prognosis than lesions located elsewhere in the gastrointestinal tract. Re-bleeding rates are high even after first-line endoscopic therapy and are associated with high levels of morbidity for affected patients. Small trials of long-acting somatostatin analogues have shown promising results but have not yet been assessed in patients with refractory small bowel disease. Aim The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of long-acting somatostatin analogues in reducing re-bleeding rates and transfusion requirements, and improving haemoglobin levels in patients with refractory small bowel angiodysplasia. Methods Patients with refractory small bowel angiodysplasia were treated with 20 mg of long-acting octreotide for a minimum of three months. Response was assessed according to: rates of re-bleeding, haemoglobin levels, transfusion requirements, and side effects. Results A total of 24 patients were initially treated and 20 received at least three doses. Rates of complete, partial and non-response were 70%, 20% and 10% respectively. Average haemoglobin rates increased from 9.19 g/dl to 11.35 g/dl (p = 0.0027, 95% confidence interval (CI) −3.5 to −1.1) in the group overall and 70% remained transfusion-free after a mean treatment duration of 8.8 months. The rate of adverse events was higher than previously reported at 30%. Conclusion Long-acting somatostatin analogues offer a therapeutic advantage in a significant proportion of patients with small bowel angiodysplasia. With careful patient selection and close observation, a long-acting somatostatin analogue should be considered in all patients with persistent anaemia attributable to refractory disease in conjunction with other standard treatments. PMID:26966525

  4. Development of a μO-Conotoxin Analogue with Improved Lipid Membrane Interactions and Potency for the Analgesic Sodium Channel NaV1.8.

    PubMed

    Deuis, Jennifer R; Dekan, Zoltan; Inserra, Marco C; Lee, Tzong-Hsien; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel; Craik, David J; Lewis, Richard J; Alewood, Paul F; Mobli, Mehdi; Schroeder, Christina I; Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Vetter, Irina

    2016-05-27

    The μO-conotoxins MrVIA, MrVIB, and MfVIA inhibit the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.8, a well described target for the treatment of pain; however, little is known about the residues or structural elements that define this activity. In this study, we determined the three-dimensional structure of MfVIA, examined its membrane binding properties, performed alanine-scanning mutagenesis, and identified residues important for its activity at human NaV1.8. A second round of mutations resulted in (E5K,E8K)MfVIA, a double mutant with greater positive surface charge and greater affinity for lipid membranes compared with MfVIA. This analogue had increased potency at NaV1.8 and was analgesic in the mouse formalin assay. PMID:27026701

  5. Single-molecule investigation of the interactions between reconstituted planar lipid membranes and an analogue of the HP(2-20) antimicrobial peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Mereuta, Loredana; Luchian, Tudor Park, Yoonkyung; Hahm, Kyung-Soo

    2008-09-05

    In this study, we employed electrophysiology experiments carried out at the single-molecule level to study the mechanism of action of the HPA3 peptide, an analogue of the linear antimicrobial peptide, HP(2-20), isolated from the N-terminal region of the Helicobacter pylori ribosomal protein. Amplitude analysis of currents fluctuations induced by HPA3 peptide at various potentials in zwitterionic lipid membranes reveal the existence of reproducible conductive states in the stochastic behavior of such events, which directly supports the existence of transmembrane pores induced the peptide. From our data recorded both at the single-pore and macroscopic levels, we propose that the HPA3 pore formation is electrophoretically facilitated by trans-negative transmembrane potentials, and HPA3 peptides translocate into the trans monolayers after forming the pores. We present evidence according to which the decrease in the membrane dipole potential of a reconstituted lipid membranes leads to an augmentation of the membrane activity of HPA3 peptides, and propose that a lower electric dipole field of the interfacial region of the membrane caused by phloretin facilitates the surface-bound HPA3 peptides to break free from one leaflet of the membrane, insert into the membrane and contribute to pore formation spanning the entire thickness of the membrane.

  6. Fluoride complexes of aluminium or beryllium act on G-proteins as reversibly bound analogues of the gamma phosphate of GTP.

    PubMed Central

    Bigay, J; Deterre, P; Pfister, C; Chabre, M

    1987-01-01

    Fluoride activation of G proteins requires the presence of aluminium or beryllium and it has been suggested that AIF4- acts as an analogue of the gamma-phosphate of GTP in the nucleotide site. We have investigated the action of AIF4- or of BeF3- on transducin (T), the G protein of the retinal rods, either indirectly through the activation of cGMP phosphodiesterase, or more directly through their effects on the conformation of transducin itself. In the presence of AIF4- or BeF3-, purified T alpha subunit of transducin activates purified cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) in the absence of photoactivated rhodopsin. Activation is totally reversed by elution of fluoride or partially reversed by addition of excess T beta gamma. Activation requires that GDP or a suitable analogue be bound to T alpha: T alpha-GDP and T alpha-GDP alpha S are activable by fluorides, but not T alpha-GDP beta S, nor T alpha that has released its nucleotide upon binding to photoexcited rhodopsin. Analysis of previous works on other G proteins and with other nucleotide analogues confirm that in all cases fluoride activation requires that a GDP unsubstituted at its beta phosphate be bound in T alpha. By contrast with alumino-fluoride complexes, which can adopt various coordination geometries, all beryllium fluoride complexes are tetracoordinated, with a Be-F bond length of 1.55 A, and strictly isomorphous to a phosphate group. Our study confirms that fluoride activation of transducin results from a reversible binding of the metal-fluoride complex in the nucleotide site of T alpha, next to the beta phosphate of GDP, as an analogue of the gamma phosphate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2826123

  7. Mitochondrial targeting by use of lipid nanocapsules loaded with SV30, an analogue of the small-molecule Bcl-2 inhibitor HA14-1.

    PubMed

    Weyland, M; Manero, F; Paillard, A; Grée, D; Viault, G; Jarnet, D; Menei, P; Juin, P; Chourpa, I; Benoit, J-P; Grée, R; Garcion, E

    2011-04-10

    Taking advantage from the development of SV30, a new analogue of the pro-apoptotic molecule HA14-1, the aim of this study was to functionally evaluate SV30 and to develop safe nanocarriers for its administration. By using an inversion phase process, 57nm organic solvent-free lipid nanocapsules loaded with SV30 (SV30-LNCs) were formulated. Biological performance of SV30 and SV30-LNCs were evaluated on F98 cells that express Bax and Bcl-2, through survival assays, HPLC, flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and spectral imaging. We observed that SV30 alone or in combination with paclitaxel, etoposide or beam radiation could trigger cell death in a similar fashion to HA14-1. Although partially blocked by Z-VAD-fmk, this effect was coincident to caspase-3 activation. Hence, we established that SV30-LNCs improved SV30 biological activity together with a potentiation of the mitochondrial membrane potential decrease. Interestingly, flow cytometry and confocal analysis indicated that SV30 itself conferred to LNCs improved mitochondrial targeting skills that may present a great interest toward the development of mitochondria targeted nanomedicines. PMID:21138749

  8. Cyclohexanol analogues are positive modulators of GABA(A) receptor currents and act as general anaesthetics in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hall, Adam C; Griffith, Theanne N; Tsikolia, Maia; Kotey, Francesca O; Gill, Nikhila; Humbert, Danielle J; Watt, Erin E; Yermolina, Yuliya A; Goel, Shikha; El-Ghendy, Bahaa; Hall, C Dennis

    2011-09-30

    GABA(A) receptors meet all the pharmacological criteria required to be considered important general anaesthetic targets. In the following study, the modulatory effects of various commercially available and novel cyclohexanols were investigated on recombinant human γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A), α(1)β(2)γ(2s)) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and compared to the modulatory effects on GABA currents observed with exposures to the intravenous anaesthetic agent, propofol. Submaximal EC(20) GABA currents were typically enhanced by co-applications of 3-300 μM cyclohexanols. For instance, at 30 μM 2,6-diisopropylcyclohexanol (a novel compound) GABA responses were increased ~3-fold (although similar enhancements were achieved at 3 μM propofol). As regards rank order for modulation by the cyclohexanol analogues at 30 μM, the % enhancements for 2,6-dimethylcyclohexanol~2,6-diethylcyclohexanol~2,6-diisopropylcyclohexanol~2,6-di-sec-butylcyclohexanol ≫2,6-di-tert-butylcyclohexanol~4-tert-butylcyclohexanol>cyclohexanol~cyclopentanol~2-methylcyclohexanol. We further tested the potencies of the cyclohexanol analogues as general anaesthetics using a tadpole in vivo assay. Both 2,6-diisopropylcyclohexanol and 2,6-dimethylcyclohexanol were effective as anaesthetics with EC(50)s of 14.0 μM and 13.1 μM respectively, while other cyclohexanols with bulkier side chains were less potent. In conclusion, our data indicate that cyclohexanols are both positive modulators of GABA(A) receptors currents and anaesthetics. The positioning and size of the alkyl groups at the 2 and 6 positions on the cyclohexanol ring were critical determinants of activity. PMID:21658385

  9. Phase III study of pasireotide long-acting release in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumors and carcinoid symptoms refractory to available somatostatin analogues

    PubMed Central

    Wolin, Edward M; Jarzab, Barbara; Eriksson, Barbro; Walter, Thomas; Toumpanakis, Christos; Morse, Michael A; Tomassetti, Paola; Weber, Matthias M; Fogelman, David R; Ramage, John; Poon, Donald; Gadbaw, Brian; Li, Jiang; Pasieka, Janice L; Mahamat, Abakar; Swahn, Fredrik; Newell-Price, John; Mansoor, Wasat; Öberg, Kjell

    2015-01-01

    In a randomized, double-blind, Phase III study, we compared pasireotide long-acting release (pasireotide LAR) with octreotide long-acting repeatable (octreotide LAR) in managing carcinoid symptoms refractory to first-generation somatostatin analogues. Adults with carcinoid tumors of the digestive tract were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive pasireotide LAR (60 mg) or octreotide LAR (40 mg) every 28 days. Primary outcome was symptom control based on frequency of bowel movements and flushing episodes. Objective tumor response was a secondary outcome. Progression-free survival (PFS) was calculated in a post hoc analysis. Adverse events were recorded. At the time of a planned interim analysis, the data monitoring committee recommended halting the study because of a low predictive probability of showing superiority of pasireotide over octreotide for symptom control (n=43 pasireotide LAR, 20.9%; n=45 octreotide LAR, 26.7%; odds ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.27–1.97; P=0.53). Tumor control rate at month 6 was 62.7% with pasireotide and 46.2% with octreotide (odds ratio, 1.96; 95% CI, 0.89–4.32; P=0.09). Median (95% CI) PFS was 11.8 months (11.0 – not reached) with pasireotide versus 6.8 months (5.6 – not reached) with octreotide (hazard ratio, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.20–0.98; P=0.045). The most frequent drug-related adverse events (pasireotide vs octreotide) included hyperglycemia (28.3% vs 5.3%), fatigue (11.3% vs 3.5%), and nausea (9.4% vs 0%). We conclude that, among patients with carcinoid symptoms refractory to available somatostatin analogues, similar proportions of patients receiving pasireotide LAR or octreotide LAR achieved symptom control at month 6. Pasireotide LAR showed a trend toward higher tumor control rate at month 6, although it was statistically not significant, and was associated with a longer PFS than octreotide LAR. PMID:26366058

  10. Myelin basic protein and myelin protein 2 act synergistically to cause stacking of lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Swetha; Wang, Chaozhan; Nanekar, Rahul; Kursula, Petri; Edwardson, J Michael

    2010-04-27

    Saltatory conduction of nerve impulses along axonal membranes depends on the presence of a multilayered membrane, myelin, that wraps around the axon. Myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin protein 2 (P2) are intimately involved in the generation of the myelin sheath. They are also implicated in a number of neurological diseases, including autoimmune diseases of both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Here, we have used atomic force microsopy (AFM) to study the effects of MBP and P2 on lipid bilayers. MBP in association with a mica substrate appeared unstructured, and tended to coat the mica surface in the form of a monolayer. In contrast, P2 appeared as discrete particles, with molecular volumes consistent with the formation of both monomers and dimers. Either MBP or P2, at micromolar concentrations, caused stacking of brain lipid bilayers. This stacking effect was significantly potentiated when both proteins were added together. Bilayers composed of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylserine (PS) were stacked by MBP, provided that cholesterol was also present; in contrast, P2 did not stack PC/PS/cholesterol bilayers. Hence, the bilayer stacking effects of the two proteins have different lipid requirements. PMID:20334434

  11. Differential actions of the prostacyclin analogues treprostinil and iloprost and the selexipag metabolite, MRE-269 (ACT-333679) in rat small pulmonary arteries and veins.

    PubMed

    Orie, N N; Ledwozyw, A; Williams, D J; Whittle, B J; Clapp, L H

    2013-10-01

    The prostacyclin (IP) receptor agonists, treprostinil, iloprost and the selexipag metabolite, MRE-269 (ACT-333679) were evaluated in rat distal pulmonary blood vessels. Small pulmonary arteries and veins were pre-contracted with the thromboxane mimetic, U46619 (25 and 100nM, respectively), and relaxation determined with and without IP receptor antagonists, RO1138452 and RO3244794. In arteries, treprostinil was a more potent vasorelaxant than iloprost, while the efficacy of iloprost was greater. In pulmonary arteries, treprostinil-induced relaxation was essentially abolished by both IP antagonists (1μM), while responses to iloprost were partially inhibited. Both treprostinil and iloprost were equipotent, prominently relaxing pulmonary veins with responses being similarly and partially sensitive to IP antagonists. In contrast, RO1138452 failed to inhibit relaxations to MRE-269 in either pulmonary arteries or veins, suggesting no involvement of typical IP receptors. Thus, rat pulmonary tissues cannot be considered appropriate to assess classical IP receptors using the proposed highly selective non-prostanoid agonist MRE-269, contrasting with the IP receptor agonism profile of prostacyclin analogues, iloprost and treprostinil. PMID:23872196

  12. PF-05231023, a long-acting FGF21 analogue, decreases body weight by reduction of food intake in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Thompson, W Clayton; Zhou, Yingjiang; Talukdar, Saswata; Musante, Cynthia J

    2016-08-01

    PF-05231023, a long-acting FGF21 analogue, is a promising potential pharmacotherapy for the treatment of obesity and associated comorbidities. Previous studies have shown the potential of FGF21 and FGF21-like compounds to decrease body weight in mice, non-human primates, and humans; the precise mechanisms of action remain unclear. In particular, there have been conflicting reports on the degree to which FGF21-induced weight loss in non-human primates is attributable to a decrease in food intake versus an increase in energy expenditure. Here, we present a semi-mechanistic mathematical model of energy balance and body composition developed from similar work in mice. This model links PF-05231023 administration and washout to changes in food intake, which in turn drives changes in body weight. The model is calibrated to and compared with recently published data from cynomolgus macaques treated with PF-05231023, demonstrating its accuracy in describing pharmacotherapy-induced weight loss in these animals. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that PF-05231023 decreases body weight in cynomolgus macaques solely by a reduction in food intake, with no direct effect on energy expenditure. PMID:27405817

  13. Nanostructured self-assembly materials from neat and aqueous solutions of C18 lipid pro-drug analogues of Capecitabine—a chemotherapy agent. Focus on nanoparticulate cubosomes™ of the oleyl analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Xiaojuan; Moghaddam, Minoo J.; Sagnella, Sharon M.; Conn, Charlotte E.; Mulet, Xavier; Danon, Stephen J.; Waddington, Lynne J.; Drummond, Calum J.

    2014-09-24

    A series of prodrug analogues based on the established chemotherapy agent, 5-fluorouracil, have been prepared and characterized. C18 alkyl and alkenyl chains with increasing degree of unsaturation were attached to the N4 position of the 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) base via a carbamate bond. Physicochemical characterization of the prodrug analogues was carried out using a combination of differential scanning calorimetry, cross-polarized optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and small-angle X-ray scattering. The presence of a monounsaturated oleyl chain was found to promote lyotropic liquid crystalline phase formation in excess water with a fluid lamellar phase observed at room temperature and one or more bicontinuous cubic phases at 37 °C. The bulk phase was successfully dispersed into liposomes or cubosomes at room and physiological temperature respectively. In vitro toxicity of the nanoparticulate 5-FCOle dispersions was evaluated against several normal and cancer cell types over a 48 h period and exhibited an IC50 of -100 μM against all cell types. The in vivo efficacy of 5-FCOle cubosomes was assessed against the highly aggressive mouse 4T1 breast cancer model and compared to Capecitabine (a water-soluble commercially available 5-FU prodrug) delivered at the same dosages. After 21 days of treatment, the 0.5 mmol 5-FCOle treatment group exhibited a significantly smaller average tumour volume than all other treatment groups including Capecitabine at similar dosage. These results exemplify the potential of self-assembled amphiphile prodrugs for delivery of bioactives in vivo.

  14. Murine lipid phosphate phosphohydrolase-3 acts as a cell-associated integrin ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Humtsoe, Joseph O.; Bowling, Rodney A.; Feng, Shu; Wary, Kishore K. . E-mail: kwary@ibt.tamhsc.edu

    2005-09-30

    Lipid phosphate phosphohydrolase-3 (LPP3) is a cell surface protein that exhibits ectoenzyme activity. Previously, we identified human LPP3 in a functional assay of angiogenesis and showed that the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif in the proposed second extracellular domain interacts with a subset of integrins to mediate cell-cell adhesion. In contrast to the RGD domain of human LPP3, murine Lpp3 contains a variant sequence, Arg-Gly-Glu (RGE). Whether the RGE motif of murine Lpp3 mediates cell-cell interaction has not been studied. In this report, we test the hypothesis that the cell adhesion function of the LPP3 protein is conserved across mouse and human. A glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein of the proposed second extracellular loop of the murine Lpp3 sequence (GST-mLpp3-RGE) promoted attachment of cells in a long-term cell adhesion assay. GST-mLpp3-RGE interacted with {alpha}{sub 5}{beta}{sub 1} and {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrins in a solid-phase ELISA, while a mutant control, GST-hLPP3-RAD, did not. Long-term adhesion of endothelial cells to GST-mLpp3-RGE induced phosphorylation of FAK, SHC, and CAS, whereas adhesion to GST-hLPP3-RAD failed to do so. Upon long-term adhesion both the GST-hLPP3-RGD and GST-mLpp3-RGE substrates bound to the {alpha}{sub 5}{beta}{sub 1} integrin of FRT-{alpha}{sub 5}(+) cells, an interaction that was inhibited by an anti-{alpha}{sub 5} integrin antibody. In addition, a cell aggregation assay showed that the intact mLpp3-RGE protein interacts with {alpha}{sub 5}{beta}{sub 1} and {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrins expressed by adjacent cells, an interaction that can be blocked by GRGDSP peptides and anti-LPP3-RGD antibodies. These data, together with the known importance of integrins in angiogenesis, provide a mechanism for the function of LPP3 in cell-cell interactions in both human and mouse.

  15. Effect of a long acting GnRH analogue or placebo on plasma LH/FSH, urethral pressure profiles and clinical signs of urinary incontinence due to Sphincter mechanism incompetence in bitches.

    PubMed

    Reichler, Iris Margaret; Jöchle, Wolfgang; Piché, Claude A; Roos, Malgorzata; Arnold, Susi

    2006-09-15

    In 23 bitches with urinary incontinence due to spaying, the effect of treatment with a long-acting formulation of leuprolide acetate on frequency of incontinence, plasma gonadotropin levels and urodynamic parameters was evaluated. In addition, the clinical effect was compared with that of treatment with alpha-adrenergics. Before treatment, the dogs' incontinent episodes occurred, on average, 4 times per day on up to 6 days per week. In the pre-trial after therapy with phenylpropanolamine (n=23) the episodes of incontinence decreased by 92%, in the double-blind study 5 weeks after GnRH-analogue (n=11) by 71%; and by 28% after the placebo (n=12). By the end of the study, nine of twenty-two leuprolide treated bitches responded completely to treatment and were continent for periods lasting 70-575 days after treatment. In another 10 dogs, response to therapy was partial and the frequency of incontinence was reduced by at least 50%. After therapy with placebo, one bitch had no episodes of incontinence for 412 days. Treatment with the GnRH-analogue significantly decreased the plasma gonadotropin levels but there was no correlation between the effect on gonadotropin levels and response to treatment. Treatment with leuprolide or placebo had no effect on urethral closure pressure regardless of the response to treatment. The hypothesis that the change of the plasma gonadotropin levels after spaying is the cause of reduced urethral closure function was not supported by the results of this study. A possible direct effect of GnRH-analogues on the bladder is discussed. Long acting GnRH analogues appear to be a well-tolerated alternative for urinary incontinence treatment, but they appear to be less effective than the alpha-adrenergics. PMID:16672159

  16. Structure Activity Relationship of (N)-Methanocarba Phosphonate Analogues of 5’-AMP as Cardioprotective Agents Acting Through a Cardiac P2X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, T. Santhosh; Zhou, Si-Yuan; Joshi, Bhalchandra V.; Balasubramanian, Ramachandran; Yang, Tiehong; Liang, Bruce T.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    P2X receptor activation protects in heart failure models. MRS2339 3, a 2-chloro-AMP derivative containing a (N)-methanocarba (bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane) system, activates this cardioprotective channel. Michaelis–Arbuzov and Wittig reactions provided phosphonate analogues of 3, expected to be stable in vivo due to the C-P bond. After chronic administration via a mini-osmotic pump (Alzet), some analogues significantly increased intact heart contractile function in calsequestrin-overexpressing mice (genetic model of heart failure) compared to vehicle-infused mice (all inactive at the vasodilatory P2Y1 receptor). Two phosphonates, (1’S,2’R,3’S,4’R,5’S)-4’-(6-amino-2-chloropurin-9-yl)-2’,3’-(dihydroxy)-1’-(phosphonomethylene)-bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane 4 and its homologue 9, both 5’-saturated, containing a 2-Cl substitution, improved echocardiography-derived fractional shortening (20.25% and 19.26%, respectively, versus 13.78% in controls), while unsaturated 5’-extended phosphonates, all 2-H analogues, and a CH3-phosphonate were inactive. Thus, chronic administration of nucleotidase-resistant phosphonates conferred a beneficial effect, likely via cardiac P2X receptor activation. Thus, we have greatly expanded the range of carbocyclic nucleotide analogues that represent potential candidates for the treatment of heart failure. PMID:20192270

  17. Lamellar crystalline self-assembly behaviour and solid lipid nanoparticles of a palmityl prodrug analogue of Capecitabine—A chemotherapy agent

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Xiaojuan; Moghaddam, Minoo J.; Sagnella, Sharon M.; Conn, Charlotte E.; Danon, Stephen J.; Waddington, Lynne J.; Drummond, Calum J.

    2014-09-24

    An amphiphile prodrug, 5'-deoxy-5-fluoro-N4-(palmityloxycarbonyl) cytidine or 5'-deoxy-5-fluoro-N4-(hexadecanaloxycarbonyl) cytidine (5-FCPal), consisting of the same head group as the commercially available chemotherapeutic agent Capecitabine, linked to a palmityl hydrocarbon chain via a carbamate bond is reported. Thermal analysis of this prodrug indicates that it melts at ~115 °C followed quickly by degradation beginning at ~120 °C. The neat solid 5-FCPal amphiphile acquires a lamellar crystalline arrangement with a d-spacing of 28.6 ± 0.3 Å, indicating interdigitation of the hydrocarbon chains. Under aqueous conditions, solid 5-FCPal is non-swelling and no lyotropic liquid crystalline phase formation is observed. In order to assess the in vitro toxicity and in vivo efficacy in colloidal form, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) with an average size of ~700 nm were produced via high pressure homogenization. The in vitro toxicity of the 5-FCPal SLNs against several different cancer and normal cell types was assessed over a 48 h period, and IC50 values were comparable to those observed for Capecitabine. The in vivo efficacy of the 5-FCPal SLNs was then assessed against the highly aggressive mouse 4T1 breast cancer model. To do so, the prodrug SLNs were administered orally at 3 different dosages (0.1, 0.25, 0.5 mmol/mouse/day) and compared to Capecitabine delivered at the same dosages. After 21 days of receiving the treatments, the 0.5 mmol dose of 5-FCPal exhibited the smallest average tumour volume. Since 5-FCPal is activated in a similar manner to Capecitabine via a 3 step enzymatic pathway with the final step occurring preferentially at the tumour site, formulation of the prodrug into SLNs combines the advantage of selective, localized activation with the sustained release properties of nanostructured amphiphile self-assembly and multiple payload materials thereby potentially creating a more effective anticancer agent.

  18. [Insulin analogues: modifications in the structure, molecular and metabolic consequences].

    PubMed

    de Luis, D A; Romero, E

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant DNA technology has provided insulin analogues for the treatment of diabetes mellitus, with an efficacy and safety that has improved the treatment of this disease. We briefly review the principal characteristics of the insulin analogues currently available. Both rapid-acting (lispro, aspart and glulisine) and long acting (glargine and determir) insulin analogues are included in this review. We describe the pharmacology of each insulin analogue, their differences with the human insulin, the administration, indication, efficacy and safety. In addition we discussed the main controversies of the use of these insulin analogues. In particular, those related with the risk of cancer and retinopathy, and their use in pregnant women. PMID:23517895

  19. Preservation of the Blood Brain Barrier and Cortical Neuronal Tissue by Liraglutide, a Long Acting Glucagon-Like-1 Analogue, after Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hakon, Jakob; Ruscher, Karsten; Tomasevic, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral edema is a common complication following moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), and a significant risk factor for development of neuronal death and deterioration of neurological outcome. To this date, medical approaches that effectively alleviate cerebral edema and neuronal death after TBI are not available. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has anti-inflammatory properties on cerebral endothelium and exerts neuroprotective effects. Here, we investigated the effects of GLP-1 on secondary injury after moderate and severe TBI. Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected either to TBI by Controlled Cortical Impact (CCI) or sham surgery. After surgery, vehicle or a GLP-1 analogue, Liraglutide, were administered subcutaneously twice daily for two days. Treatment with Liraglutide (200 μg/kg) significantly reduced cerebral edema in pericontusional regions and improved sensorimotor function 48 hours after CCI. The integrity of the blood-brain barrier was markedly preserved in Liraglutide treated animals, as determined by cerebral extravasation of Evans blue conjugated albumin. Furthermore, Liraglutide reduced cortical tissue loss, but did not affect tissue loss and delayed neuronal death in the thalamus on day 7 post injury. Together, our data suggest that the GLP-1 pathway might be a promising target in the therapy of cerebral edema and cortical neuronal injury after moderate and severe TBI. PMID:25822252

  20. Effect of subcutaneous injection of a long-acting analogue of somatostatin (SMS 201-995) on plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone in normal human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, S.; Tanaka, K.; Kumagae, M.; Takeda, F.; Morio, K.; Kogure, M.; Hasegawa, M.; Horiuchi, T.; Watabe, T.; Miyabe, S.

    1988-01-01

    SMS 201-995 (SMS), a synthetic analogue of somatostatin (SRIF) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of the hypersecretion of hormones such as in acromegaly. However, little is known about the effects of SMS on the secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in normal subjects. In this study, plasma TSH was determined with a highly sensitive immunoradiometric assay, in addition to the concentration of SMS in plasma and urine with a radioimmunoassay, following subcutaneous injection of 25, 50, 100 ..mu..g of SMS or a placebo to normal male subjects, at 0900 h after an overnight fast. The plasma concentrations of SMS were dose-responsive and the peak levels were 1.61 +/- 0.09, 4.91 +/- 0.30 and 8.52 +/- 1.18 ng/ml, which were observed at 30, 15 and 45 min after the injection of 25, 50, and 100 ..mu..g of SMS, respectively. Mean plasma disappearance half-time of SMS was estimated to be 110 +/- 3 min. Plasma TSH was suppressed in a dose dependent manner and the suppression lasted for at least 8 hours. At 8 hours after the injection of 25, 50, and 100 ..mu..g of SMS, the plasma TSH levels were 43.8 +/- 19.4, 33.9 +/- 9.4 and 24.9 +/- 3.2%, respectively, of the basal values.

  1. Lipid antigens in immunity

    PubMed Central

    Dowds, C. Marie; Kornell, Sabin-Christin

    2014-01-01

    Lipids are not only a central part of human metabolism but also play diverse and critical roles in the immune system. As such, they can act as ligands of lipid-activated nuclear receptors, control inflammatory signaling through bioactive lipids such as prostaglandins, leukotrienes, lipoxins, resolvins, and protectins, and modulate immunity as intracellular phospholipid- or sphingolipid-derived signaling mediators. In addition, lipids can serve as antigens and regulate immunity through the activation of lipid-reactive T cells, which is the topic of this review. We will provide an overview of the mechanisms of lipid antigen presentation, the biology of lipid-reactive T cells, and their contribution to immunity. PMID:23999493

  2. Human tear lipocalin acts as an oxidative-stress-induced scavenger of potentially harmful lipid peroxidation products in a cell culture system.

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, M; Wojnar, P; Redl, B

    2001-01-01

    Human tear lipocalin [lipocalin 1 (lcn-1); von Ebner's gland protein] is a member of the lipocalin superfamily that is known to bind an unusual variety of lipophilic ligands. Because of its properties and its tissue-specific expression it has been suggested that lcn-1 might act as a physiological protection factor of epithelia. Overexpression of lcn-1 under certain disease conditions supported such a function. However, experimental investigations into its exact biological role and its mode of expression were impeded because lcn-1 was previously found to be produced only in serous glands. To overcome this problem we therefore sought a cell line that produced lcn-1 endogenously. Using reverse-transcriptase-mediated PCR analysis we found expression of lcn-1 in the human teratocarcinoma-derived NT2 precursor cells. Under normal conditions the production of lcn-1 is low. However, treatment of the cells with H(2)O(2) or FeSO(4), which typically induce lipid peroxidation, significantly enhanced the expression of lcn-1. Binding studies revealed that arachidonic acid and several lipid peroxidation products including 7beta-hydroxycholesterol, 8-isoprostane and 13-hydroxy-9,11-octadecadienoic acid specifically bind to lcn-1. To investigate the physiological consequence of this observation we purified holo-(lcn-1) from culture medium and extracted the bound ligands. The presence of F(2)-isoprostanes in the extracts obtained from the fractions containing lcn-1 indicates that these typical lipid peroxidation products are indeed ligands of the protein in vivo. These results support the idea that lcn-1 acts as a physiological scavenger of potentially harmful lipophilic molecules; lcn-1 might therefore be a novel member of the cellular defence against the deleterious effects of oxidative stress. PMID:11336644

  3. Hormonal regulation of lipid metabolism in developing coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Lipid metabolism in juvenile coho salmon is characterized, and adaptive changes in lipid mobilization are described in relation to development and hormonal influences. The rates of lipogenesis and lipolysis were determined in selected tissues of juvenile salmon during the period of seawater preadaptive development (smoltification). Neutral lipid (sterol) and fatty acid synthesis in the liver and mesenteric fat was measured by tritium incorporation. Fatty acid synthesis in the liver and mesenteric fat decreased by 88% and 81%, respectively, between late February (parr) and early June (smolt). To assess the role of hormones in smoltification-associated lipid depletion, growth hormone, prolactin, thyroxin and cortisol were administered in vivo early in development (parr) to determine if any of these factors could initiate the metabolic responses normally seen later in development (smolt). Growth hormone stimulated lipid mobilization from coho salmon parr. Prolactin strongly stimulated lipid mobilization in coho parr. Thyroxin and cortisol also stimulated lipid mobilization for coho salmon parr. The direct effect of hormones was studied by in vitro pH-stat incubation of liver slices. These data suggest that norepinephrine stimulates fatty acid release via ..beta..-adrenergic pathways. Somatostatin and its partial analogue from the fish caudal neurosecretory system, urotensin II, also affect lipid mobilization. These results establish the presence of hormone-sensitive lipase in salmon liver and suggest that the regulation of lipid metabolism in salmon involves both long-acting and short-acting hormonal agents.

  4. Long-acting insulin analogues (insulin glargine or determir) and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus in the paediatric population.

    PubMed

    Barrio Castellanos, Raquel

    2005-12-01

    Despite many improvements in the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1), the non-physiological time-action profiles of conventional insulins remain a significant obstacle. In recent years, recombinant DNA technology has been used to design insulin molecules that overcome the limitations of regular and NPH insulin. The rapid insulin analogs used as prandial and the long-acting insulin analogs used as basal simulate physiological insulin profiles more closely than the older conventional insulins. The efficacy of insulin analogs now available for multiple daily injection (MDI) and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy in DM1 has been established in pediatric patients. Insulin pumps have improved since they were first introduced. CSII therapy may provide an effective alternative for selected pediatric patients with DM1. In most studies at pediatric age, CSII therapy resulted in a improvement in HbA1c, a decreased rate of hypoglycemia without an abnormal increase in BMI, and without adversely affecting psychosocial outcomes in children and adolescents with DM1. PMID:16398447

  5. Discovery of carbohybrid-based 2-aminopyrimidine analogues as a new class of rapid-acting antimalarial agents using image-based cytological profiling assay.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sukjun; Lim, Donghyun; Lee, Eunyoung; Lee, Nakyung; Lee, Hong-Gun; Cechetto, Jonathan; Liuzzi, Michel; Freitas-Junior, Lucio H; Song, Jin Sook; Bae, Myung Ae; Oh, Sangmi; Ayong, Lawrence; Park, Seung Bum

    2014-09-11

    New antimalarial agents that exhibit multistage activities against drug-resistant strains of malaria parasites represent good starting points for developing next-generation antimalarial therapies. To facilitate the progression of such agents into the development phase, we developed an image-based parasitological screening method for defining drug effects on different asexual life cycle stages of Plasmodium falciparum. High-throughput screening of a newly assembled diversity-oriented synthetic library using this approach led to the identification of carbohybrid-based 2-aminopyrimidine compounds with fast-acting growth inhibitory activities against three laboratory strains of multidrug-resistant P. falciparum. Our structure-activity relationship study led to the identification of two derivatives (8aA and 11aA) as the most promising antimalarial candidates (mean EC50 of 0.130 and 0.096 μM against all three P. falciparum strains, selectivity indices >600, microsomal stabilities >80%, and mouse malaria ED50 values of 0.32 and 0.12 mg/kg/day, respectively), targeting all major blood stages of multidrug-resistant P. falciparum parasites. PMID:25137549

  6. Methyl salicylate 2-O-β-D-lactoside, a novel salicylic acid analogue, acts as an anti-inflammatory agent on microglia and astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuroinflammation has been known to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Activation of microglia and astrocytes is a characteristic of brain inflammation. Epidemiological studies have shown that long-term use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) delays the onset of AD and suppresses its progression. Methyl salicylate-2-O-β-D-lactoside (DL0309) is a new molecule chemically related to salicylic acid. The present study aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of DL0309. Findings Our studies show that DL0309 significantly inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α; and the expression of the inflammation-related proteins iNOS, COX-1, and COX-2 by microglia and astrocytes. At a concentration of 10 μM, DL0309 prominently inhibited LPS-induced activation of NF-κB in glial cells by blocking phosphorylation of IKK and p65, and by blocking IκB degradation. Conclusions We demonstrate here for the first time that DL0309 exerts anti-inflammatory effects in glial cells by suppressing different pro-inflammatory cytokines and iNOS/NO. Furthermore, it also regulates the NF-κB signaling pathway by blocking IKK and p65 activation and IκB degradation. DL0309 also acts as a non-selective COX inhibitor in glial cells. These studies suggest that DL0309 may be effective in the treatment of neuroinflammatory disorders, including AD. PMID:21831328

  7. Mitophagy acts as a safeguard mechanism against human vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis induced by atherogenic lipids.

    PubMed

    Swiader, Audrey; Nahapetyan, Hripsime; Faccini, Julien; D'Angelo, Romina; Mucher, Elodie; Elbaz, Meyer; Boya, Patricia; Vindis, Cécile

    2016-05-17

    Mitophagy is a critical cellular process that selectively targets damaged mitochondria for autophagosomal degradation both under baseline conditions and in response to stress preventing oxidative damage and cell death. Recent studies have linked alterations in mitochondria function and reduced autophagy with the development of age-related pathologies. However, the significance of mitochondrial autophagy in vessel wall in response to atherogenic lipid stressors is not known. In the present study, we investigated the role of mitophagy on human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) apoptosis induced by oxidized low-density lipoproteins (LDL). We reported for the first time that the engulfment of defective mitochondria by autophagosomes occurred in human VSMC in response to oxidized LDL. The molecular mechanism mediating mitophagy in human VSMC involved dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1)-mediated mitochondrial fission, accumulation of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and the recruitment of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin to mitochondria. Likewise, we found increased voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) and mitofusin 2 (Mnf2) mitochondrial proteins ubiquitination and LC3 association to mitochondria. Using flow cytometry in the presence of lysosomal inhibitors, we showed that PINK1 and Parkin silencing impaired mitophagy flux and enhanced oxidized LDL-induced VSMC apoptosis. In addition, overexpression of PINK1 and Parkin were protective by limiting cell death. Moreover, reduced Bax levels found in VSMC-overexpressing Parkin indicated cross talk among mitophagy and mitochondrial apoptotic signalling pathways. Altogether these data demonstrate that mitophagy is a safeguard mechanism against human VSMC apoptosis induced by atherogenic stressors and highlight mitophagy as a potential target to stabilize atherosclerotic plaque. PMID:27119505

  8. Heterocyclic chalcone analogues as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Kumar, Vipin; Kumar, Pradeep

    2013-03-01

    Chalcones, aromatic ketones and enones acting as the precursor for flavonoids such as Quercetin, are known for their anticancer effects. Although, parent chalcones consist of two aromatic rings joined by a three-carbon α,β-unsaturated carbonyl system, various synthetic compounds possessing heterocyclic rings like pyrazole, indole etc. are well known and proved to be effective anticancer agents. In addition to their use as anticancer agents in cancer cell lines, heterocyclic analogues are reported to be effective even against resistant cell lines. In this connection, we hereby highlight the potential of various heterocyclic chalcone analogues as anticancer agents with a brief summary about therapeutic potential of chalcones, mechanism of anticancer action of various chalcone analogues, and current and future prospects related to the chalcones-derived anticancer research. Furthermore, some key points regarding chalcone analogues have been reviewed by analyzing their medicinal properties. PMID:22721390

  9. Proliferating or Differentiating Stimuli Act on Different Lipid-dependent Signaling Pathways in Nuclei of Human Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Neri, Luca M.; Bortul, Roberta; Borgatti, Paola; Tabellini, Giovanna; Baldini, Giovanna; Capitani, Silvano; Martelli, Alberto M.

    2002-01-01

    Previous results have shown that the human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cell line responds to either proliferating or differentiating stimuli. When these cells are induced to proliferate, protein kinase C (PKC)-βII migrates toward the nucleus, whereas when they are exposed to differentiating agents, there is a nuclear translocation of the α isoform of PKC. As a step toward the elucidation of the early intranuclear events that regulate the proliferation or the differentiation process, we show that in the HL-60 cells, a proliferating stimulus (i.e., insulin-like growth factor-I [IGF-I]) increased nuclear diacylglycerol (DAG) production derived from phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate, as indicated by the inhibition exerted by 1-O-octadeyl-2-O-methyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and U-73122 (1-[6((17β-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl)amino)hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione), which are pharmacological inhibitors of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C. In contrast, when HL-60 cells were induced to differentiate along the granulocytic lineage by dimethyl sulfoxide, we observed a rise in the nuclear DAG mass, which was sensitive to either neomycin or propranolol, two compounds with inhibitory effect on phospholipase D (PLD)-mediated DAG generation. In nuclei of dimethyl sulfoxide-treated HL-60 cells, we observed a rise in the amount of a 90-kDa PLD, distinct from PLD1 or PLD2. When a phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate-derived DAG pool was generated in the nucleus, a selective translocation of PKC-βII occurred. On the other hand, nuclear DAG derived through PLD, recruited PKC-α to the nucleus. Both of these PKC isoforms were phosphorylated on serine residues. These results provide support for the proposal that in the HL-60 cell nucleus there are two independently regulated sources of DAG, both of which are capable of acting as the driving force that attracts to this organelle distinct, DAG-dependent PKC isozymes. Our results assume a particular

  10. A Long-Acting FGF21 Molecule, PF-05231023, Decreases Body Weight and Improves Lipid Profile in Non-human Primates and Type 2 Diabetic Subjects.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, Saswata; Zhou, Yingjiang; Li, Dongmei; Rossulek, Michelle; Dong, Jennifer; Somayaji, Veena; Weng, Yan; Clark, Ronald; Lanba, Adhiraj; Owen, Bryn M; Brenner, Martin B; Trimmer, Jeffrey K; Gropp, Kathryn E; Chabot, Jeffrey R; Erion, Derek M; Rolph, Timothy P; Goodwin, Bryan; Calle, Roberto A

    2016-03-01

    FGF21 plays a central role in energy, lipid, and glucose homeostasis. To characterize the pharmacologic effects of FGF21, we administered a long-acting FGF21 analog, PF-05231023, to obese cynomolgus monkeys. PF-05231023 caused a marked decrease in food intake that led to reduced body weight. To assess the effects of PF-05231023 in humans, we conducted a placebo-controlled, multiple ascending-dose study in overweight/obese subjects with type 2 diabetes. PF-05231023 treatment resulted in a significant decrease in body weight, improved plasma lipoprotein profile, and increased adiponectin levels. Importantly, there were no significant effects of PF-05231023 on glycemic control. PF-05231023 treatment led to dose-dependent changes in multiple markers of bone formation and resorption and elevated insulin-like growth factor 1. The favorable effects of PF-05231023 on body weight support further evaluation of this molecule for the treatment of obesity. Longer studies are needed to assess potential direct effects of FGF21 on bone in humans. PMID:26959184

  11. Lipid-Core Nanocapsules Act as a Drug Shuttle Through the Blood Brain Barrier and Reduce Glioblastoma After Intravenous or Oral Administration.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Stephen F; Fiel, Luana A; Shimada, Ana L; Pereira, Natalia R; Guterres, Silvia S; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Farsky, Sandra H

    2016-05-01

    Lipid-core nanocapsules (LNC) are formed by an organogel surrounded by poly(epsilon-caprolactone) and stabilized by polysorbate 80. LNCs increase the concentration of drugs in the brain after oral or intravenous administration. We proposed to determine whether the drug is released from the LNC to cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) or the drug-loaded LNCs can cross the BBB to release the drug. We synthesized a Rhodamine B-polymer conjugate to prepare a fluorescent-labeled LNC formulation, and intravital microscopy was used to determine the ability of the LNCs to cross the brain barrier using different administration routes in C57BI/6 mice. A glioblastoma model was used to determine the impact of the LNC as a shuttle for treatment. After pial vessel exposure, intense fluorescence was detected inside the vessels 10 min after intravenous or 20 min after intraperitoneal injections of fluorescent-labeled LNC. The fluorescence was observed in the perivascular tissue after 30 and 60 min, respectively. Increased tissue fluorescence was detected 240 min after oral administration. The integrity of the barrier was determined during the experiments. Normal leukocyte and platelet adhesion to the vessel wall indicated that Rhodamine B-labeled LNC did not cause pial vessel alterations. After intravenous or oral administration, Rhodamine B-labeled LNC-containing co-encapsulated indomethacin and indomethacin ethyl ester exhibited similar behavior in pial vessels, being more efficient in the treatment of mice with glioblastoma than indomethacin in solution. Therefore, we demonstrated that LNCs act as drug shuttles through the BBB, delivering drugs in brain tissue with high efficiency and reducing glioblastoma after intravenous or oral administration. PMID:27305820

  12. Total body nitrogen and total body carbon as indicators of body protein and body lipids in the melon fly: Effects of methoprene, a juvenile hormone analogue, and of diet supplementation with hydrolyzed yeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The application of methoprene and dietary protein enhanced mating success and had no effect on survival in male melon fly Bactrocera cucurbitae Coquillett (Diptera: Tephritidae). .The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of methoprene and protein on body lipids and protein tu...

  13. The role of phospholipids in the reduction of ubiquinone analogues by the mitochondrial reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide-ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex.

    PubMed Central

    Ragan, C I

    1978-01-01

    The isolated NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex of bovine heart mitochondria reduces ubiquinone analogues by two pathways. One pathway is inhibited by rotenone, and reduction of quinones takes place in the lipid phase of the system. The other pathway is insensitive to rotenone and reduction takes place in the aqueous phase. The variation of rates of electron transpport with the chemical nature of the quinone analogue and the concentrations of both quinone and phospholipid can be rationalized in terms of partition of the quinone between the aqueous and lipid phases of the system. Thus one function of phospholipid associated with the enzyme appears to be to act as solvent for ubiquinone reduced by the rotenone-sensitive pathway. This proposal is supported by the kinetic behaviour of enzyme whose endogenous lipids have been replaced by (1,2)-dimyristoylsn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. Thus, under certain circumstances, the rotenone-sensitive reduction of ubiquinone-1 exhibited a substantial increase in activation energy below the phase-transition temperature of the synthetic lipid, whereas the reduction of other acceptors was unaffected. PMID:210762

  14. L-carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) and carcinine (beta-alanylhistamine) act as natural antioxidants with hydroxyl-radical-scavenging and lipid-peroxidase activities.

    PubMed Central

    Babizhayev, M A; Seguin, M C; Gueyne, J; Evstigneeva, R P; Ageyeva, E A; Zheltukhina, G A

    1994-01-01

    Carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) and carcinine (beta-alanylhistamine) are natural imidazole-containing compounds found in the non-protein fraction of mammalian tissues. Carcinine was synthesized by an original procedure and characterized. Both carnosine and carcinine (10-25 mM) are capable of inhibiting the catalysis of linoleic acid and phosphatidylcholine liposomal peroxidation (LPO) by the O2(-.)-dependent iron-ascorbate and lipid-peroxyl-radical-generating linoleic acid 13-monohydroperoxide (LOOH)-activated haemoglobin systems, as measured by thiobarbituric-acid-reactive substance. Carcinine and carnosine are good scavengers of OH. radicals, as detected by iron-dependent radical damage to the sugar deoxyribose. This suggests that carnosine and carcinine are able to scavenge free radicals or donate hydrogen ions. The iodometric, conjugated diene and t.l.c. assessments of lipid hydroperoxides (13-monohydroperoxide linoleic acid and phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide) showed their efficient reduction and deactivation by carnosine and carcinine (10-25 mM) in the liberated and bound-to-artificial-bilayer states. This suggests that the peroxidase activity exceeded that susceptible to direct reduction with glutathione peroxidase. Imidazole, solutions of beta-alanine, or their mixtures with peptide moieties did not show antioxidant potential. Free L-histidine and especially histamine stimulated iron (II) salt-dependent LPO. Due to the combination of weak metal chelating (abolished by EDTA), OH. and lipid peroxyl radicals scavenging, reducing activities to liberated fatty acid and phospholipid hydroperoxides, carnosine and carcinine appear to be physiological antioxidants able to efficiently protect the lipid phase of biological membranes and aqueous environments. PMID:7998987

  15. Selectivity of celite-immobilized patatin (lipid acyl hydrolase) from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers in esterification reactions As influenced by water activity and glycerol analogues as alcohol acceptors.

    PubMed

    Pinsirodom, P; Parkin, K L

    2000-02-01

    Lipid acyl hydrolase (LAH; patatin) was purified from potato tubers by ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by anion-exchange and affinity chromatography. The major protein band of 40-43 kDa on SDS-PAGE appeared to be patatin, and it stained positive for lipase activity on native PAGE. Selectivity of a Celite-immobilized potato LAH in esterification reactions with n-acyl fatty acids (FA; C4, C6, C8, C10, C12, C14, C16, and C18) and alcohol acceptors (n-propanol, 2-propanol, 1,3-propanediol, and glycerol; 1,2-propanediol was not sufficiently reactive) was studied in isooctane. Immobilized LAH was highly selective for medium chain FAs (C8/C10) with a secondary optimum for chain lengths of C14/16. Water activity (a(w)) influenced activity and FA selectivity of the enzyme. Initial rates of ester synthesis were greatest at a(w) of 0.90 for all alcohol acceptors except for glycerol, where greatest initial rates were observed at a(w) of 0.19. Immobilized LAH preparations exhibited a bell-shape pH profile with optimum activity at pH 6-7 for ester synthesis, and no effect of pH on FA selectivity was observed. PMID:10691609

  16. Aspartame and Its Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, L. A.; Komarova, T. V.; Davidovich, Yurii A.; Rogozhin, S. V.

    1981-04-01

    The results of studies on the biochemistry of the sweet taste are briefly reviewed. The methods of synthesis of "aspartame" — a sweet dipeptide — are considered, its structural analogues are described, and quantitative estimates are made of the degree of sweetness relative to sucrose. Attention is concentrated mainly on problems of the relation between the structure of the substance and its taste in the series of aspartyl derivatives. The bibliography includes 118 references.

  17. The TLR2 agonist in polysaccharide-K is a structurally distinct lipid which acts synergistically with the protein-bound β-glucan.

    PubMed

    Quayle, Kenneth; Coy, Catherine; Standish, Leanna; Lu, Hailing

    2015-04-01

    Protein-bound polysaccharide-K (Krestin; PSK) is a hot-water extract of Trametes versicolor with immune stimulatory activity. It has been used for the past 30 years and has demonstrated anti-tumor efficacy in multiple types of cancer. The ability of PSK to activate dendritic cells and T cells is dependent on its ability to stimulate Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), yet it remains unknown which structural component within PSK activates TLR2. The purpose of this study was to identify the TLR2 agonist within PSK and understand its role in the overall mechanism of PSK's immunogenic activity. TLR2 activity was eliminated by treatment with lipoprotein lipase but not by trypsin or lyticase. Rapid centrifugation of PSK can separate the fraction with TLR2 agonist activity from the soluble β-glucan fraction. To study the potential interaction between the β-glucan component and the lipid component, we labeled the soluble β-glucan with fluorescein. Uptake of the labeled β-glucan by J774A macrophages and JAWSII dendritic cells was inhibited by anti-Dectin-1 antibody but not by anti-TLR2 antibody, confirming that Dectin-1 is the receptor for β-glucan. Interestingly, pre-treatment of JAWSII cells with the TLR2-active lipid fraction significantly enhanced the uptake of the soluble β-glucan, indicating the synergy between the TLR2 agonist component and the β-glucan component. Altogether, these results present evidence that PSK has two active components-the well-characterized protein-bound β-glucan and a previously unreported lipid-which work synergistically via the Dectin-1 and TLR2 receptors. PMID:25510899

  18. Total body nitrogen and total body carbon as indicators of body protein and body lipids in the melon fly Bactrocera cucurbitae: effects of methoprene, a juvenile hormone analogue, and of diet supplementation with hydrolyzed yeast.

    PubMed

    ul Haq, Ihsan; Mayr, Leopold; Teal, P E A; Hendrichs, Jorge; Robinson, Alan S; Stauffer, Christian; Hood-Nowotny, Rebecca

    2010-12-01

    The application of methoprene, and providing access to diet including hydrolyzed yeast, are treatments known to enhance mating success in the male melon fly Bactrocera cucurbitae Coquillett (Diptera: Tephritidae), supporting their use in mass rearing protocols for sterile males in the context of sterile insect technique (SIT) programmes. The objective of the present laboratory study was to investigate the effect of methoprene application and diet supplementation with hydrolyzed yeast (protein) on the turnover of body lipids and protein to confirm the feasibility of their application in melon fly SIT mass-rearing programmes. While females had access to a diet that included hydrolyzed yeast (protein), males were exposed to one of the following treatments: (1) topical application of methoprene and access to diet including protein (M+P+); (2) only diet including protein (M-P+); (3) only methoprene (M+P-) and (4) untreated, only sugar-fed, control males (M-P-). Total body carbon (TBC) and total body nitrogen (TBN) of flies were measured at regular intervals from emergence to 35 days of age for each of the different treatments. Nitrogen assimilation and turnover in the flies were measured using stable isotope ((15)N) dilution techniques. Hydrolyzed yeast incorporation into the diet significantly increased male body weight, TBC and TBN as compared to sugar-fed males. Females had significantly higher body weight, TBC and TBN as compared to all males. TBC and TBN showed age-dependent changes, increasing until the age of sexual maturity and decreasing afterwards in both sexes. Methoprene treatment did not significantly affect TBC or TBN. The progressive increase with age of TBC suggests that lipogenesis occurs in adult male B. cucurbitae, as is the case in other tephritids. Stable isotope dilution was shown to be an effective method for determining N uptake in B. cucurbitae. This technique was used to show that sugar-fed males rely solely on larval N reserves and that the N

  19. Microplate-Based Characterization of Protein-Phosphoinositide Binding Interactions Using a Synthetic Biotinylated Headgroup Analogue

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Denghuang; Smith, Matthew D.; Manna, Debasis; Bostic, Heidi E.; Cho, Wonhwa; Best, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Membrane lipids act as important regulators of a litany of important physiological and pathophysiological events. Many of them act as site-specific ligands for cytosolic proteins in binding events that recruit receptors to the cell surface and control both protein function and subcellular localization. Phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIPns) are a family of signaling lipids that regulate numerous cellular processes by interacting with a myriad of protein binding modules. Characterization of PIPn-binding proteins has been hampered by the lack of a rapid and convenient quantitative assay. Herein, microplate-based detection is presented as an effective approach to characterizing protein-PIPn binding interactions at the molecular level. With this assay, the binding of proteins to isolated PIPn headgroups is detected with high sensitivity using a platform that is amenable to high-throughput screening. In the studies described herein, biotinylated PI-(4,5)-P2 headgroup analogue 1 was designed, synthesized and immobilized onto 96-well streptavidin-coated microplates to study receptor binding. This assay was used to characterize the binding of the PH domain of β-spectrin to this headgroup. The high affinity interaction that was detected for surface association (Kd, surf = 6 nM ±3), demonstrates that receptor binding modules can form high affinity interactions with lipid headgroups outside of a membrane environment. The results also indicate the feasibility of the assay for rapid characterization of PIPn-binding proteins as well as the promise for high-throughput analysis of protein-PIPn binding interactions. Finally, this assay was also employed to characterize the inhibition of the binding of receptors to the PIPn-derivatized microplates using solution phase competitors. This showcases the viability of this assay for rapid screening of inhibitors of PIPn-binding proteins. PMID:19182890

  20. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase is inhibited by organic vanadium coordination compounds: pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylatodioxovanadium(V), BMOV, and an amavadine analogue.

    PubMed

    Aureliano, Manuel; Henao, Fernando; Tiago, Teresa; Duarte, Rui O; Moura, J J G; Baruah, Bharat; Crans, Debbie C

    2008-07-01

    The general affinity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca (2+)-ATPase was examined for three different classes of vanadium coordination complexes including a vanadium(V) compound, pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylatodioxovanadium(V) (PDC-V(V)), and two vanadium(IV) compounds, bis(maltolato)oxovanadium(IV) (BMOV), and an analogue of amavadine, bis( N-hydroxylamidoiminodiacetato)vanadium(IV) (HAIDA-V(IV)). The ability of vanadate to act either as a phosphate analogue or as a transition-state analogue with enzymes' catalysis phosphoryl group transfer suggests that vanadium coordination compounds may reveal mechanistic preferences in these classes of enzymes. Two of these compounds investigated, PDC-V(V) and BMOV, were hydrolytically and oxidatively reactive at neutral pH, and one, HAIDA-V(IV), does not hydrolyze, oxidize, or otherwise decompose to a measurable extent during the enzyme assay. The SR Ca (2+)-ATPase was inhibited by all three of these complexes. The relative order of inhibition was PDC-V(V) > BMOV > vanadate > HAIDA-V(IV), and the IC 50 values were 25, 40, 80, and 325 microM, respectively. Because the observed inhibition is more potent for PDC-V(V) and BMOV than that of oxovanadates, the inhibition cannot be explained by oxovanadate formation during enzyme assays. Furthermore, the hydrolytically and redox stable amavadine analogue HAIDA-V(IV) inhibited the Ca (2+)-ATPase less than oxovanadates. To gauge the importance of the lipid environment, studies of oxidized BMOV in microemulsions were performed and showed that this system remained in the aqueous pool even though PDC-V(V) is able to penetrate lipid interfaces. These findings suggest that the hydrolytic properties of these complexes may be important in the inhibition of the calcium pump. Our results show that two simple coordination complexes with known insulin enhancing effects can invoke a response in calcium homeostasis and the regulation of muscle contraction through the SR Ca (2+)-ATPase. PMID:18510311

  1. Structural Analogues of Selfotel.

    PubMed

    Dziuganowska, Zofia A; Ślepokura, Katarzyna; Volle, Jean-Noël; Virieux, David; Pirat, Jean-Luc; Kafarski, Paweł

    2016-06-17

    A small library of phosphonopiperidylcarboxylic acids, analogues of NMDA antagonist selfotel (CGS 19755), was synthesized. First, the series of aromatic esters was obtained via a palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction (Hirao coupling) of dialkyl phosphites with bromopyridinecarboxylates, followed by their hydrolysis. Then, hydrogenation of the resulting phosphonopyridylcarboxylic acids over PtO2 yielded the desired phosphonopiperidylcarboxylic acids. NMR studies indicated that the hydrogenation reaction proceeds predominantly by cis addition. Several compounds were obtained as monocrystal structures. Preliminary biological studies performed on cultures of neurons suggest that the obtained compounds possess promising activity toward NMDA receptors. PMID:27187758

  2. Cell-Based Lipid Flippase Assay Employing Fluorescent Lipid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Maria S; Costa, Sara; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; López-Marqués, Rosa L

    2016-01-01

    P-type ATPases in the P4 subfamily (P4-ATPases) are transmembrane proteins unique for eukaryotes that act as lipid flippases, i.e., to translocate phospholipids from the exofacial to the cytofacial monolayer of cellular membranes. While initially characterized as aminophospholipid translocases, studies of individual P4-ATPase family members from fungi, plants, and animals show that P4-ATPases differ in their substrate specificities and mediate transport of a broader range of lipid substrates. Here, we describe an assay based on fluorescent lipid derivatives to monitor and characterize lipid flippase activities in the plasma membrane of cells, using yeast as an example. PMID:26695048

  3. Dietary fat and reduced levels of TGFbeta1 act synergistically to promote activation of the vascular endothelium and formation of lipid lesions.

    PubMed

    Grainger, D J; Mosedale, D E; Metcalfe, J C; Böttinger, E P

    2000-07-01

    Transforming growth factor-(beta) (TGF(beta)) has a wide range of activities on vascular cells and inflammatory cells, suggesting it may have different functions during various stages of atherogenesis. We report that mice heterozygous for the deletion of the tgfb1 gene (tgfb1(+/-) mice) have reduced levels of TGF(beta)1 in the artery wall until at least 8 weeks of age. On a normal mouse chow diet, the vascular endothelium of tgfb1(+/-) mice is indistinguishable from wild-type littermates, assessed by morphology and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression. In contrast, levels of the smooth muscle isoforms of actin and myosin in medial smooth muscle cells of tgfb1(+/-) mice are significantly reduced. Following feeding a cholesterol-enriched diet for 12 weeks, high levels of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were detected in the vascular endothelial cells of tgfb1(+/-) mice, but not wild-type mice. Furthermore, marked deposition of lipid into the artery wall was only observed in the tgfb1(+/-) mice on the cholesterol-enriched diet. These vascular lipid lesions were accompanied by local invasion of macrophages. We conclude that deletion of a single allele of the tgfb1 gene results in a reduced level of TGFbeta1 antigen in the aorta together with reduced smooth muscle cell differentiation, whereas the addition of a high fat dietary challenge is required to activate the vascular endothelium and to promote the formation of fatty streaks resembling early atherosclerosis in humans. PMID:10852815

  4. Analogue-to-Digital and Digital-to-Analogue Conversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Discusses circuits for three-bit and four-bit analogue digital converters and digital analogue converters. These circuits feature slow operating speeds that enable the circuitry to be used to demonstrate the mode of operation using oscilloscopes and signal generators. (DDR)

  5. Reducible cationic lipids for gene transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Wetzer, B; Byk, G; Frederic, M; Airiau, M; Blanche, F; Pitard, B; Scherman, D

    2001-01-01

    One of the main challenges of gene therapy remains the increase of gene delivery into eukaryotic cells. We tested whether intracellular DNA release, an essential step for gene transfer, could be facilitated by using reducible cationic DNA-delivery vectors. For this purpose, plasmid DNA was complexed with cationic lipids bearing a disulphide bond. This reduction-sensitive linker is expected to be reduced and cleaved in the reducing milieu of the cytoplasm, thus potentially improving DNA release and consequently transfection. The DNA--disulphide-lipid complexation was monitored by ethidium bromide exclusion, and the size of complexes was determined by dynamic light scattering. It was found that the reduction kinetics of disulphide groups in DNA--lipid complexes depended on the position of the disulphide linker within the lipid molecule. Furthermore, the internal structure of DNA--lipid particles was examined by small-angle X-ray scattering before and after lipid reduction. DNA release from lipid complexes was observed after the reduction of disulphide bonds of several lipids. Cell-transfection experiments suggested that complexes formed with selected reducible lipids resulted in up to 1000-fold higher reporter-gene activity, when compared with their analogues without disulphide bonds. In conclusion, reduction-sensitive groups introduced into cationic lipid backbones potentially allow enhanced DNA release from DNA--lipid complexes after intracellular reduction and represent a tool for improved vectorization. PMID:11389682

  6. New metabolically stabilized analogues of lysophosphatidic acid: agonists, antagonists and enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Prestwich, G D; Xu, Y; Qian, L; Gajewiak, J; Jiang, G

    2005-12-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a metabolically labile natural phospholipid with a bewildering array of physiological effects. We describe herein a variety of long-lived receptor-specific agonists and antagonists for LPA receptors. Several LPA and PA (phosphatidic acid) analogues also inhibit LPP (lipid phosphate phosphatase). The sn-1 or sn-2 hydroxy groups have been replaced by fluorine, difluoromethyl, difluoroethyl, O-methyl or O-hydroxyethoxy groups to give non-migrating LPA analogues that resist acyltransferases. Alkyl ether replacement of acyl esters produced lipase and acyltransferase-resistant analogues. Replacement of the bridging oxygen in the monophosphate by an alpha-monofluoromethylene-, alpha-bromomethylene- or alpha,alpha-difluoromethylenephosphonate gave phosphatase-resistant analogues. Phosphorothioate analogues with O-acyl and O-alkyl chains are potent, long-lived agonists for LPA1 and LPA3 receptors. Most recently, we have (i) prepared stabilized O-alkyl analogues of lysobisphosphatidic acid, (ii) explored the structure-activity relationship of stabilized cyclic LPA analogues and (iii) synthesized neutral head group trifluoromethylsulphonamide analogues of LPA. Through collaborative studies, we have collected data for these stabilized analogues as selective LPA receptor (ant)agonists, LPP inhibitors, TREK (transmembrane calcium channel) K+ channel agonists, activators of the nuclear transcription factor PPAR-gamma (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-gamma), promoters of cell motility and survival, and radioprotectants for human B-cells. PMID:16246118

  7. Phosphonate analogues of aminoacyl adenylates.

    PubMed Central

    Southgate, C C; Dixon, H B

    1978-01-01

    Phosphonomethyl analogues of glycyl phosphate and valyl phosphate, i.e. NH2-CHR-CO-CH2-PO(OH)2, were synthesized and esterified with adenosine to give analogues of aminoacyl adenylates. The interaction of these adenylate analogues with valyl-tRNA synthetase from Escherichia coli was studied by fluorescence titration. The analogue of valyl phosphate has an affinity for the enzyme comparable with that of valine, but that of valyl adenylate is bound much less tightly than either valyl adenylate or corresponding derivative of valinol. The affinity of the analogue of glycyl adenylate was too low to be measured. We conclude that this enzyme interacts specifically with both the side chain and the anhydride linkage of the adenylate intermediate. PMID:743207

  8. Cyanogenic Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Selmar, Dirk; Grocholewski, Sabine; Seigler, David S.

    1990-01-01

    Large amounts of cyanogenic lipids (esters of 1 cyano-2-methylprop-2-ene-1-ol with C:20 fatty acids) are stored in the seeds of Ungnadia speciosa. During seedling development, these lipids are completely consumed without liberation of free HCN to the atmosphere. At the same time, cyanogenic glycosides are synthesized, but the total amount is much lower (about 26%) than the quantity of cyanogenic lipids formerly present in the seeds. This large decrease in the total content of cyanogens (HCN-potential) demonstrates that at least 74% of cyanogenic lipids are converted to noncyanogenic compounds. Whether the newly synthesized cyanogenic glycosides are derived directly from cyanogenic lipids or produced by de novo synthesis is still unknown. Based on the utilization of cyanogenic lipids for the synthesis of noncyanogenic compounds, it is concluded that these cyanogens serve as storage for reduced nitrogen. The ecophysiological significance of cyanolipids based on multifunctional aspects is discussed. PMID:16667514

  9. NASA/ESMD Analogue Mission Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation exploring Earth and its analogues is shown. The topics include: 1) ESMD Goals for the Use of Earth Analogues; 2) Stakeholders Summary; 3) Issues with Current Analogue Situation; 4) Current state of Analogues; 5) External Implementation Plan (Second Step); 6) Recent Progress in Utilizing Analogues; 7) Website Layout Example-Home Page; 8) Website Layout Example-Analogue Site; 9) Website Layout Example-Analogue Mission; 10) Objectives of ARDIG Analog Initiatives; 11) Future Plans; 12) Example: Cold-Trap Sample Return; 13) Example: Site Characterization Matrix; 14) Integrated Analogue Studies-Prerequisites for Human Exploration; and 15) Rating Scale Definitions.

  10. Teduglutide, a glucagon-like peptide 2 analogue: a novel protective agent with anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidant properties in mice with lung injury.

    PubMed

    Arda-Pirincci, Pelin; Oztay, Fusun; Bayrak, Bertan Boran; Yanardag, Refiye; Bolkent, Sehnaz

    2012-12-01

    Teduglutide is a long-acting synthetic analogue of human glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2). GLP-2 regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis as well as normal physiology in the gastrointestinal tract. In the present study, possible cytoprotective and reparative effects of teduglutide were analyzed on a mouse model with lung injury induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and actinomycin D (Act D). BALB/c mice were divided into six groups: control mice (I), mice injected intraperitoneally with 15 μg/kg TNF-α (II), 800 μg/kg Act D (III), Act D 2 min prior to TNF-α administration with the same doses (IV), mice injected subcutaneously with 200 μg/kg teduglutide every 12h for 10 consecutive days (V), and mice given Act D 2 min prior to TNF-α administration on day 11 after receiving teduglutide for 10 days (VI). The TNF-α/Act D administration made the lung a sensitive organ to damage. Mice lung subjected to TNF-α/Act D were characterized by the disruption of alveolar wall, induced pulmonary endothelial/epithelial cell apoptosis and expression of active caspase-3. These mice exhibited an increase in lipid peroxidation, glutathione levels, and activities of myeloperoxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and xanthine oxidase, as well as reduced tissue factor and sodium-potassium/ATPase activities. Teduglutide pretreatment regressed the structural damage, cell apoptosis and oxidative stress by reducing lipid peroxidation in mice received TNF-α/Act D. GLP-2 receptors were present on the cell membrane of type II pneumocytes and interstitial cells. Thus, teduglutide can be suggested as a novel protective agent, which possesses anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidant properties, against lung injury. PMID:23059393

  11. Milk lipids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Milk fat conveys a number of desirable qualities to food, and various lipid components contribute to human nutrition and health. Over 96% of milk lipids consist of triacylglycerols, which contain a variety of fatty acids. Di- and monoacylglycerols, free fatty acids, sterols, and phospho-, glyco-,...

  12. Hydrophobic surfactant proteins and their analogues.

    PubMed

    Walther, Frans J; Waring, Alan J; Sherman, Mark A; Zasadzinski, Joseph A; Gordon, Larry M

    2007-01-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of phospholipids and four surfactant-associated proteins (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D). Its major function in the lung alveolus is to reduce surface tension at the air-water interface in the terminal airways by the formation of a surface-active film enriched in surfactant lipids, hence preventing cellular collapse during respiration. Surfactant therapy using bovine or porcine lung surfactant extracts, which contain only polar lipids and native SP-B and SP-C, has dramatically improved the therapeutic outcomes of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). One important goal of surfactant researchers is to replace animal-derived therapies with fully synthetic preparations based on SP-B and SP-C, produced by recombinant technology or peptide synthesis, and reconstituted with selected synthetic lipids. Here, we review recent research developments with peptide analogues of SP-B and SP-C, designed using either the known primary sequence and three-dimensional (3D) structure of the native proteins or, alternatively, the known 3D structures of closely homologous proteins. Such SP-B and SP-C mimics offer the possibility of studying the mechanisms of action of the respective native proteins, and may allow the design of optimized surfactant formulations for specific pulmonary diseases (e.g., acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)). These synthetic surfactant preparations may also be a cost-saving therapeutic approach, with better quality control than may be obtained with animal-based treatments. PMID:17575474

  13. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator: the NBF1+R (nucleotide-binding fold 1 and regulatory domain) segment acting alone catalyses a Co2+/Mn2+/Mg2+-ATPase activity markedly inhibited by both Cd2+ and the transition-state analogue orthovanadate.

    PubMed

    Annereau, Jean Philippe; Ko, Young Hee; Pedersen, Peter L

    2003-04-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator), a regulated anion channel and member of the ATP-binding-cassette transporter (ABC transporter) superfamily. Of CFTR's five domains, the first nucleotide-binding fold (NBF1) has been of greatest interest both because it is the major 'hotspot' for mutations that cause CF, and because it is connected to a unique regulatory domain (R). However, attempts have failed to obtain a catalytically active NBF1+R protein in the absence of a fusion partner. Here, we report that such a protein can be obtained following its overexpression in bacteria. The pure NBF1+R protein exhibits significant ATPase activity [catalytic-centre activity (turnover number) 6.7 min(-1)] and an apparent affinity for ATP ( K (m), 8.7 microM) higher than reported previously for CFTR or segments thereof. As predicted, the ATPase activity is inhibited by mutations in the Walker A motif. It is also inhibited by vanadate, a transition-state analogue. Surprisingly, however, the best divalent metal activator is Co(2+), followed by Mn(2+) and Mg(2+). In contrast, Ca(2+) is ineffective and Cd(2+) is a potent inhibitor. These novel studies, while demonstrating clearly that CFTR's NBF1+R segment can act independently as an active, vanadate-sensitive ATPase, also identify its unique cation activators and a new inhibitor, thus providing insight into the nature of its active site. PMID:12523935

  14. Review of insulin and its analogues in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mane, Krishnappa; Chaluvaraju, Kc; Niranjan, Ms; Zaranappa, Tr; Manjuthej, Tr

    2012-03-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disorder where in human body does not produce or properly uses insulin, a hormone that is required to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy. Diabetes finally leads to more complications and to prevent these complications insulin and its analogues are used. After more than half a century of treating diabetics with animal insulin's, recombinant DNA technologies and advanced protein chemistry made human insulin preparations available in the early 1980s. As the next step, over the last decade, insulin analogues were constructed by changing the structure of the native protein with the goal of improving the therapeutic properties of it, because the pharmacokinetic characteristics of rapid, intermediate and long-acting preparations of human insulin make it almost impossible to achieve sustained normoglycemia. The first clinically available insulin analogue, lispro, confirmed the hopes by showing that improved glycaemic control can be achieved without an increase in hypoglycaemic events. Two new insulin analogues, insulin glargine and insulin aspart, have recently been approved for clinical use in the United States and several other analogues are being intensively tested. PMID:24826038

  15. Interaction of Daptomycin with Lipid Bilayers: A Lipid Extracting Effect

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Daptomycin is the first approved member of a new structural class of antibiotics, the cyclic lipopeptides. The peptide interacts with the lipid matrix of cell membranes, inducing permeability of the membrane to ions, but its molecular mechanism has been a puzzle. Unlike the ubiquitous membrane-acting host-defense antimicrobial peptides, daptomycin does not induce pores in the cell membranes. Thus, how it affects the permeability of a membrane to ions is not clear. We studied its interaction with giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) and discovered a lipid-extracting phenomenon that correlates with the direct action of daptomycin on bacterial membranes observed in a recent fluorescence microscopy study. Lipid extraction occurred only when the GUV lipid composition included phosphatidylglycerol and in the presence of Ca2+ ions, the same condition found to be necessary for daptomycin to be effective against bacteria. Furthermore, it occurred only when the peptide/lipid ratio exceeded a threshold value, which could be the basis of the minimal inhibitory concentration of daptomycin. In this first publication on the lipid extracting effect, we characterize its dependence on ions and lipid compositions. We also discuss possibilities for connecting the lipid extracting effect to the antibacterial activity of daptomycin. PMID:25093761

  16. Lysophosphatidylserine analogues differentially activate three LysoPS receptors.

    PubMed

    Uwamizu, Akiharu; Inoue, Asuka; Suzuki, Kensuke; Okudaira, Michiyo; Shuto, Akira; Shinjo, Yuji; Ishiguro, Jun; Makide, Kumiko; Ikubo, Masaya; Nakamura, Sho; Jung, Sejin; Sayama, Misa; Otani, Yuko; Ohwada, Tomohiko; Aoki, Junken

    2015-03-01

    Lysophosphatidylserine (1-oleoyl-2 R-lysophosphatidylserine, LysoPS) has been shown to have lipid mediator-like actions such as stimulation of mast cell degranulation and suppression of T lymphocyte proliferation, although the mechanisms of LysoPS actions have been elusive. Recently, three G protein-coupled receptors (LPS1/GPR34, LPS2/P2Y10 and LPS3/GPR174) were found to react specifically with LysoPS, raising the possibility that LysoPS serves as a lipid mediator that exerts its role through these receptors. Previously, we chemically synthesized a number of LysoPS analogues and evaluated them as agonists for mast-cell degranulation. Here, we used a transforming growth factor-α (TGFα) shedding assay to see if these LysoPS analogues activated the three LysoPS receptors. Modification of the serine moiety significantly reduced the ability of the analogues to activate the three LysoPS receptors, whereas modification of other parts resulted in loss of activity in receptor-specific manner. We found that introduction of methyl group to serine moiety (1-oleoyl-lysophosphatidylallothreonine) and removal of sn-2 hydroxyl group (1-oleoyl-2-deoxy-LysoPS) resulted in reduction of reactivity with LPS1 and LPS3, respectively. Accordingly, we synthesized a LysoPS analogue with the two modifications (1-oleoyl-2-deoxy-lysophosphatidylallothreonine) and found it to be an LPS2-selective agonist. These pharmacological tools will definitely help to identify the biological roles of these LysoPS receptors. PMID:25320102

  17. Phosphonomethyl analogues of hexose phosphates.

    PubMed

    Webster, D; Jondorf, W R; Dixon, H B

    1976-05-01

    The analogue of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate in which the phosphate group, -O-PO3H2, on C-6 is replaced by the phosphonomethyl group, -CH2-PO3H2, was made enzymically from the corresponding analogue of 3-phosphoglycerate. It was a substrate for aldolase, which was used to form it, but not for fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase. It was hydrolysed chemically to yield the corresponding analogue of fructose 6-phosphate [i.e. 6-deoxy-6-(phosphonomethyl)-D-fructose, or, more strictly, 6,7-dideoxy-7-phosphono-D-arabino-2-heptulose]. This proved to be a substrate for the sequential actions of glucose 6-phosphate isomerase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. Thus seven out of the nine enzymes of the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways so far tested catalyse the reactions of the phosphonomethyl isosteres of their substrates. PMID:7247

  18. Lipid Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Mashaghi, Samaneh; Jadidi, Tayebeh; Koenderink, Gijsje; Mashaghi, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a multidisciplinary field that covers a vast and diverse array of devices and machines derived from engineering, physics, materials science, chemistry and biology. These devices have found applications in biomedical sciences, such as targeted drug delivery, bio-imaging, sensing and diagnosis of pathologies at early stages. In these applications, nano-devices typically interface with the plasma membrane of cells. On the other hand, naturally occurring nanostructures in biology have been a source of inspiration for new nanotechnological designs and hybrid nanostructures made of biological and non-biological, organic and inorganic building blocks. Lipids, with their amphiphilicity, diversity of head and tail chemistry, and antifouling properties that block nonspecific binding to lipid-coated surfaces, provide a powerful toolbox for nanotechnology. This review discusses the progress in the emerging field of lipid nanotechnology. PMID:23429269

  19. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a beauveriolide analogue library.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Kenichiro; Doi, Takayuki; Sekiguchi, Takafumi; Namatame, Ichiji; Sunazuka, Toshiaki; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Omura, Satoshi; Takahashi, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Synthesis of beauveriolide III (1b), which is an inhibitor of lipid droplet accumulation in macrophages, was achieved by solid-phase assembly of linear depsipeptide using a 2-chlorotrityl linker followed by solution-phase cyclization. On the basis of this strategy, a combinatorial library of beauveriolide analogues was carried out by radio frequency-encoded combinatorial chemistry. After automated purification using preparative reversed-phase HPLC, the library was tested for inhibitory activity of CE synthesis in macrophages to determine structure-activity relationships of beauveriolides. Among them, we found that diphenyl derivative 7{9,1} is 10 times more potent than 1b. PMID:16398560

  20. Lipid diffusibility in the intact erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, J A; Webb, W W

    1983-01-01

    The lateral diffusion of fluorescent lipid analogues in the plasma membrane of intact erythrocytes from man, mouse, rabbit, and frog has been measured by fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR). Intact cells from dystrophic, normoblastic, hemolytic, and spherocytotic mouse mutants; from hypercholesterolemic rabbits and humans; and from prenatal, neonatal, and juvenile mice have been compared with corresponding normals. The lateral diffusion coefficient (D) for 3,3'-dioctadecylindodicarbocyanine iodide (DiI[5]) in intact normal human erythrocytes is D = 8.2 +/- 1.2 X 10(-9) cm2/s at 25 degrees C and D = 2.1 +/- 0.4 X 10(-8) cm2/s at 37 degrees C, and varies approximately 50-fold between 1 degree and 42 degrees C. The diffusion constants of lipid analogue rhodamine-B phosphatidylethanolamine (RBPE) are about twice those of DiI[5]. The temperature dependence and magnitude of D vary by up to a factor of 3 between species and are only influenced by donor age in prenatals. DiI[5] diffusibility is not perturbed by the presence of calcium or local anesthetics or by spectrin depletion (via mutation). However, lipid-analogue diffusibility in erythrocyte ghosts may differ from intact cells. Dietary hypercholesterolemia in rabbits reduces the diffusion coefficient and eliminates the characteristic break in Arrhenius plots of D found in all other cells studied except frog. PMID:6603237

  1. Selective targeting of nuclear receptor FXR by avermectin analogues with therapeutic effects on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lihua; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Yanlin; Zheng, Weili; Han, Yaping; Guo, Fusheng; Ye, Frank Bin; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become a predictive factor of death from many diseases. Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is an ideal target for NAFLD drug development due to its crucial roles in lipid metabolism. The aim of this work is to examine the molecular mechanisms and functional roles of FXR modulation by avermectin analogues in regulating metabolic syndromes like NAFLD. We found that among avermectin analogues studied, the analogues that can bind and activate FXR are effective in regulating metabolic parameters tested, including reducing hepatic lipid accumulation, lowering serum cholesterol and glucose levels, and improving insulin sensitivity, in a FXR dependent manner. Mechanistically, the avermectin analogues that interact with FXR exhibited features as partial agonists, with distinctive properties in modulating coregulator recruitment. Structural features critical for avermectin analogues to selectively bind to FXR were also revealed. This study indicated that in addition to antiparasitic activity, avermectin analogues are promising drug candidates to treat metabolism syndrome including NAFLD by directly targeting FXR. Additionally, the structural features that discriminate the selective binding of FXR by avermectin analogues may provide a unique safe approach to design drugs targeting FXR signaling. PMID:26620317

  2. Lipid Storage Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Lipid Storage Diseases Information Page Condensed from Lipid Storage ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What are Lipid Storage Diseases? Lipid storage diseases are a group ...

  3. Chemical Synthesis and Molecular Recognition of Phosphatase-Resistant Analogues of Phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yong; Lee, Stephanie A.; Kutateladze, Tatiana G.; Sbrissa, Diego; Shisheva, Assia; Prestwich, Glenn D.

    2008-01-01

    The remodeling of phosphatidylinositol polyphosphates in cellular membranes by phosphatases and kinases orchestrates the signaling by these lipids in space and time. In order to provide chemical tools to study of the changes in cell physiology mediated by these lipids, three new metabolically-stabilized (ms) analogues of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PtdIns(3)P were synthesized. We describe herein the total asymmetric synthesis of 3-methylphosphonate, 3-monofluoromethylphosphonate and 3-phosphorothioate analogues of PtdIns(3)P. From differentially protected D-myo-inositol key intermediates, a versatile phosphoramidite reagent was employed in the synthesis of PtdIns(3)P analogues with diacylglyceryl moieties containing dioleoyl, dipalmitoyl and dibutyryl chains. In addition, we introduce a new phosphorlyation reagent, monofluoromethylphosphonyl chloride, which has general applications for the preparation of “pKa-matched” monofluorophosphonates. These ms-PtdIns(3)P analogues exhibited reduced binding activities with 15N-labelled FYVE and PX domains, as significant 1H and 15N chemical shift changes in the FYVE domain were induced by titrating ms-PtdIns(3)Ps into membrane-mimetic dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles. In addition, the PtdIns(3)P analogues with dioleyl and dipalmitoyl chains were substrates for the 5-kinase enzyme PIKfyve; the corresponding phosphorylated ms-PI(3,5)P2 products were detected by radio-TLC analysis. PMID:16417379

  4. New Atglistatin closely related analogues: Synthesis and structure-activity relationship towards adipose triglyceride lipase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Roy, Pierre-Philippe; D'Souza, Kenneth; Cuperlovic-Culf, Miroslava; Kienesberger, Petra C; Touaibia, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    Adipose Triglyceride Lipase (ATGL) performs the first and rate-limiting step in lipolysis by hydrolyzing triacylglycerols stored in lipid droplets to diacylglycerols. By mediating lipolysis in adipose and non-adipose tissues, ATGL is a major regulator of overall energy metabolism and plasma lipid levels. Since chronically high levels of plasma lipids are linked to metabolic disorders including insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, ATGL is an interesting therapeutic target. In the present study, fourteen closely related analogues of Atglistatin (1), a newly discovered ATGL inhibitor, were synthesized, and their ATGL inhibitory activity was evaluated. The effect of these analogues on lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes clearly shows that inhibition of the enzyme by Atglistatin (1) is due to the presence of the carbamate and N,N-dimethyl moieties on the biaryl central core at meta and para position, respectively. Mono carbamate-substituted analogue C2, in which the carbamate group was in the meta position as in Atglistatin (1), showed slight inhibition. Low dipole moment of Atglistatin (1) compared to the synthesized analogues possibly explains the lower inhibitory activities. PMID:27155760

  5. Composition of Hydrothermal Vent Microbial Communities as Revealed by Analyses of Signature Lipids, Stable Carbon Isotopes and Aquificales Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Eder, W.; Huber, Robert; Hinrichs, K-U.; Hayes, J. M.; DesMarais, D. J.; Cady, S. L.; Hope, J. M.; Summons, R. E.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a study of lipid biomarker composition and carbon isotopic fractionation in cultured Aquificales and natural analogues from Yellowstone National Park. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Muscarinic interactions of bisindolylmaleimide analogues.

    PubMed

    Lazareno, S; Popham, A; Birdsall, N J

    1998-11-01

    We have used radioligand binding studies to determine the affinities of seven bisindolylmaleimide analogues, six of which are selective inhibitors of protein kinase C, at human muscarinic M1-M4 receptors. The compounds were most potent at M1 receptors, and Ro-31-8220 was the most potent analogue, with a Kd of 0.6 microM at M1 receptors. The weakest compounds, bisindolylmaleimide IV and bisindolylmaleimide V, had Kd values of 100 microM. If it is necessary to use protein kinase C inhibitors at concentrations of 10 microM or more in studies involving muscarinic receptors then bisindolylmaleimide IV may be the most appropriate inhibitor to use. PMID:9851596

  7. Insulin analogues in pregnancy and specific congenital anomalies: a literature review.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Josta; Garne, Ester; Wender-Ozegowska, Ewa; Morgan, Margery; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T W; Wang, Hao

    2016-05-01

    Insulin analogues are commonly used in pregnant women with diabetes. It is not known if the use of insulin analogues in pregnancy is associated with any higher risk of congenital anomalies in the offspring compared with use of human insulin. We performed a literature search for studies of pregnant women with pregestational diabetes using insulin analogues in the first trimester and information on congenital anomalies. The studies were analysed to compare the congenital anomaly rate among foetuses of mothers using insulin analogues with foetuses of mothers using human insulin. Of 29 studies, we included 1286 foetuses of mothers using short-acting insulin analogues with 1089 references of mothers using human insulin and 768 foetuses of mothers using long-acting insulin analogues with 685 references of mothers using long-acting human insulin (Neutral Protamine Hagedorn). The congenital anomaly rate was 4.84% and 4.29% among the foetuses of mothers using lispro and aspart. For glargine and detemir, the congenital anomaly rate was 2.86% and 3.47%, respectively. No studies on the use of insulin glulisine and degludec in pregnancy were found. There was no statistically significant difference in the congenital anomaly rate among foetuses exposed to insulin analogues (lispro, aspart, glargine or detemir) compared with those exposed to human insulin or Neutral Protamine Hagedorn insulin. The total prevalence of congenital anomalies was not increased for foetuses exposed to insulin analogues. The small samples in the included studies provided insufficient statistical power to identify a moderate increased risk of specific congenital anomalies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26431249

  8. Substrate analogues for isoprenoid enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Stremler, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    Diphosphonate analogues of geranyl diphosphate, resistant to degradation by phosphatases, were found to be alternate substrates for the reaction with farnesyl diphosphate synthetase isolated from avian liver. The difluoromethane analogue was shown to be the better alternate substrate, in agreement with solvolysis results which indicate that the electronegativity of the difluoromethylene unit more closely approximates that of the normal bridging oxygen. The usefulness of the C/sub 10/ difluoro analogue, for detecting low levels of isoprenoid enzymes in the presence of high levels of phosphatase activity, was demonstrated with a cell-free preparation from lemon peel. A series of C/sub 5/ through C/sub 15/ homoallylic and allylic diphosphonates, as well as two 5'-nucleotide diphosphonates, was prepared in high overall yield using the activation-displacement sequence. Radiolabeled samples of several of the allylic diphosphonates were prepared with tritium located at C1. A series of geraniols, stereospecifically deuterated at C1, was prepared. The enantiomeric purities and absolute configurations were determined by derivatization as the mandelate esters for analysis by /sup 1/H NMR. The stereochemistry of the activation-displacement sequence was examined using C1-deuterated substrates.

  9. Phosphonate analogue substrates for enolase.

    PubMed

    Anderson, V E; Cleland, W W

    1990-11-20

    Phosphonate analogues in which the bridge between C-2 and phosphorus is a CH2 group are slow substrates for yeast enolase. The pH variation of the kinetic parameters for the methylene analogue of 2-phosphoglycerate suggests that the substrate binds as a dianion and that Mg2+ can bind subsequently only if a metal ligand and the catalytic base are unprotonated. Primary deuterium isotope effects of 4-8 on V/KMg, but ones of only 1.15-1.32 on V for dehydration, show that proton removal to give the carbanion intermediate largely limits V/KMg and that a slow step follows which largely limits V (presumably carbanion breakdown). Since there is a D2O solvent isotope effect on V for the reverse reaction of 5, but not an appreciable one on the forward reaction, it appears that the slow rates with phosphonate analogues result from the fact that the carbanion intermediate is more stable than that formed from the normal substrates, and its reaction in both directions limits V. Increased stability as a result of replacement of oxygen by carbon at C-2 of the carbanion is the expected chemical behavior. PMID:2271661

  10. Policy issues in space analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, Robin N.; Facktor, Debra D.

    Space mission planning is increasingly focusing on destinations beyond Earth orbit. Advancements in technology will inevitably be required to enable long-duration human spaceflight missions, and breakthroughs in the policy arena will also be needed to achieve success in such missions. By exploring how policy issues have been addressed in analogous extreme environments, policymakers can develop a framework for addressing these issues as they apply to long-term human spaceflight. Policy issues that need to be addressed include: crew selection, training, organization, and activities, medical testing, illness, injury, and death; communication; legal accountability and liability; mission safety and risk management; and environmental contamination. This paper outlines the approach of a study underway by The George Washington University and ANSER to examine how these policy issues have been addressed in several analogues and how the experiences of these analogues can help formulate policies for long-duration human spaceflight missions. Analogues being studied include Antarctic bases, submarine voyages, undersea stations, Biosphere 2, and the U.S. Skylab and Russian Mir space stations.

  11. New insights on glucosylated lipids: metabolism and functions.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yohei; Kohyama-Koganeya, Ayako; Hirabayashi, Yoshio

    2013-09-01

    Ceramide, cholesterol, and phosphatidic acid are major basic structures for cell membrane lipids. These lipids are modified with glucose to generate glucosylceramide (GlcCer), cholesterylglucoside (ChlGlc), and phosphatidylglucoside (PtdGlc), respectively. Glucosylation dramatically changes the functional properties of lipids. For instance, ceramide acts as a strong tumor suppressor that causes apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, while GlcCer has an opposite effect, downregulating ceramide activities. All glucosylated lipids are enriched in lipid rafts or microdomains and play fundamental roles in a variety of cellular processes. In this review, we discuss the biological functions and metabolism of these three glucosylated lipids. PMID:23770033

  12. Terrestrial research in Mars analogue environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, G.

    Fatty acids (FA) content was measured by GC-MS SIM technique in Sulfide ores of present day (Mid-Atlantic Ridge and others) and ancient (Ural Paleocene, Russia) black smokers; Early Proterozoic kerites of Volyn; Siberian, Canadian and Antarctic permafrosts and also in rocks of East-European platform Achaean crystalline basement. Analysis was shown presence those and only those fatty acids which are specific to microorganisms. FA with 12 up 19 of carbon atoms are thought to be a bacterial biomass sign. 3-Hydroxy fatty acids also found in samples and are strong specific markers of gram-negative bacteria. Cultivation yield living bacteria in some cases. The East-European platform Achaean crystalline basement rocks opened by Vorotilov Deep Well (VDW) drilled through Puchezh-Katunski impact structure were studied within depths 2575 - 2805 m. 34 microbial lipid markers were detected by GC-MS and 22 species were identified. Bacteria of g. Bacillus reached 6,8 % in subsurface communities. However, members of gg. Clostridium (37,1 - 33,2 %) and Rhodococcus (27,6 - 33,7 %) were absolute dominants within studied depth interval. Some lipid patterns of kerite samples could be assessed to definite genera or, in special cases, to species of contemporary microorganisms. For instance, 2-hydroxylauric acid is specific to Pseudomonas putida group or Acinetobacter spp., and hydroxymyristic together with hydroxypalmitic are specific to P.cepacea and cyanobacteria. 3-hydroxystearic acid was known as component of Acetobacter diazothrophycus and Gloebacter violaceous cyanobacterium. 10-hydroxystearic acid associated with Nocardia spp., which oxidizes oleic acid in organic substrates. 10-methylhexadecanoic (10Me16) acid together with 10Me14, 10Me15 and 10Me17 analogues are markers of actinomycetes. Significant part of Black Smokers organic matter is probably biogenic. Fatty acid features strongly assigns it to bacterial, microeucariotic and planta cells. Par example 3-hydroxy acids are

  13. FUNCTION GENERATOR FOR ANALOGUE COMPUTERS

    DOEpatents

    Skramstad, H.K.; Wright, J.H.; Taback, L.

    1961-12-12

    An improved analogue computer is designed which can be used to determine the final ground position of radioactive fallout particles in an atomic cloud. The computer determines the fallout pattern on the basis of known wind velocity and direction at various altitudes, and intensity of radioactivity in the mushroom cloud as a function of particle size and initial height in the cloud. The output is then displayed on a cathode-ray tube so that the average or total luminance of the tube screen at any point represents the intensity of radioactive fallout at the geographical location represented by that point. (AEC)

  14. Ecstasy analogues found in cacti.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Jan G; El-Seedi, Hesham R; Stephanson, Nikolai; Beck, Olof; Shulgin, Alexander T

    2008-06-01

    Human interest in psychoactive phenethylamines is known from the use of mescaline-containing cacti and designer drugs such as Ecstasy. From the alkaloid composition of cacti we hypothesized that substances resembling Ecstasy might occur naturally. In this article we show that lophophine, homopiperonylamine and lobivine are new minor constituents of two cactus species, Lophophora williamsii (peyote) and Trichocereus pachanoi (San Pedro). This is the first report of putatively psychoactive phenethylamines besides mescaline in these cacti. A search for further biosynthetic analogues may provide new insights into the structure-activity relationships of mescaline. An intriguing question is whether the new natural compounds can be called "designer drugs." PMID:18720674

  15. The Valles natural analogue project

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, H.; Krumhansl, J.; Ho, C.; McConnell, V.

    1994-12-01

    The contact between an obsidian flow and a steep-walled tuff canyon was examined as an analogue for a highlevel waste repository. The analogue site is located in the Valles Caldera in New Mexico, where a massive obsidian flow filled a paleocanyon in the Battleship Rock tuff. The obsidian flow provided a heat source, analogous to waste panels or an igneous intrusion in a repository, and caused evaporation and migration of water. The tuff and obsidian samples were analyzed for major and trace elements and mineralogy by INAA, XRF, X-ray diffraction; and scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe. Samples were also analyzed for D/H and {sup 39}Ar/{sup 4O} isotopic composition. Overall,the effects of the heating event seem to have been slight and limited to the tuff nearest the contact. There is some evidence of devitrification and migration of volatiles in the tuff within 10 meters of the contact, but variations in major and trace element chemistry are small and difficult to distinguish from the natural (pre-heating) variability of the rocks.

  16. Radiolabeled Somatostatin Analogue Therapy Of Gastroenteropancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bodei, Lisa; Kwekkeboom, Dik J; Kidd, Mark; Modlin, Irvin M; Krenning, Eric P

    2016-05-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) has been utilized for more than two decades and has been accepted as an effective therapeutic modality in the treatment of inoperable or metastatic gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) or neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). The two most commonly used radiopeptides for PRRT, (90)Y-octreotide and (177)Lu-octreotate, produce disease-control rates of 68%-94%, with progression-free survival rates that compare favorably with chemotherapy, somatostatin analogues, and newer targeted therapies. In addition, biochemical and symptomatic responses are commonly observed. In general, PRRT is well tolerated with only low to moderate toxicity in most individuals. In line with the need to place PRRT in the therapeutic sequence of gastroenteropancreatic NENs, a recently sponsored phase III randomized trial in small intestine NENs treated with (177)Lu-octreotate vs high-dose octreotide long-acting release demonstrated that (177)Lu-octreotate significantly improved progression-free survival. Other strategies that are presently being developed include combinations with targeted therapies or chemotherapy, intra-arterial PRRT, and salvage treatments. Sophisticated molecular tools need to be incorporated into the management strategy to more effectively define therapeutic efficacy and for an early identification of adverse events. The strategy of randomized controlled trials is a key issue to standardize the treatment and establish the position of PRRT in the therapeutic algorithm of NENs. PMID:27067503

  17. START ships lipids across interorganelle space.

    PubMed

    Alpy, Fabien; Tomasetto, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The family of StAR related lipid transfer proteins (START) is so-named based on the distinctive capacity for these proteins to transport lipids between membranes. The START domain is a module of about 210 residues, which binds lipids such as glycerolipids, sphingolipids and sterols. This domain has a deep lipid-binding pocket - which shields the hydrophic ligand from the external aqueous environment - covered by a lid. Based on their homology, the fifteen START proteins in mammals have been allocated to six distinct subfamilies, each subfamily being more specialized in the transport and/or sensing of a lipid ligand species. However within the same subgroup, their expression profile and their subcellular localization distinguish them and are critical for their different biological functions. Indeed, START proteins act in a variety of distinct physiological processes, such as lipid transfer between intracellular compartments, lipid metabolism and modulation of signaling events. Mutation or deregulated expression of START proteins is linked to pathological processes, including genetic disorders, autoimmune diseases and cancers. Besides the common single START domain, which is always located at the carboxy-terminal end in mammals, most START proteins harbor additional domains predicted to be critical in favoring lipid exchange. Evidence from well characterized START proteins indicates that these additional domains might be tethering machineries able to bring distinct organelles together and create membrane contact sites prone to lipid exchange via the START domain. PMID:24076129

  18. Partitioning of amino-acid analogues in a five-slab membrane model

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, D; Smith, Jeremy C; Ullmann, G. Matthias

    2008-09-01

    The positional preferences of the twenty amino-acid residues in a phospholipid bilayer are investigated by calculating the solvation free energy of the corresponding side chain analogues using a five-slab continuum electrostatic model. The side-chain analogues of the aromatic residues tryptophan and tyrosine are found to partition in the head-group region, due to compensation between the increase of the non-polar component of the solvation free energy at the boundary with the aqueous region and the decrease in the electrostatic component. The side chain analogue of phenylalanine differs from the other aromatic molecules by being able to partition in both the head-group region and the membrane core. This finding is consistent with experimental findings of the position of phenylalanine in membrane helices. Interestingly, the charged side-chain analogues of arginine and lysine are shown to prefer the head-group region in an orientation that allows the charged moiety to interact with the aqueous layer. The orientation adopted is similar to the 'snorkelling' effect seen in lysine and arginine residues in membrane helices. In contrast, the preference of the charged side-chain analogues of histidine (protonated) and aspartate (deprotonated) for the aqueous layer is shown to be due to a steep decrease in the electrostatic component of the solvation free energy at the boundary to the aqueous region. The calculations allow an understanding of the origins of side chain positioning in membranes and are thus useful in understanding membrane-protein:lipid thermodynamics.

  19. Neuroprotective actions of a histidine analogue in models of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sung-Chun; Arumugam, Thiruma V; Cutler, Roy G; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Magnus, Tim; Chan, Sic L; Mughal, Mohamed R; Telljohann, Richard S; Nassar, Matthew; Ouyang, Xin; Calderan, Andrea; Ruzza, Paolo; Guiotto, Andrea; Mattson, Mark P

    2007-05-01

    Histidine is a naturally occurring amino acid with antioxidant properties, which is present in low amounts in tissues throughout the body. We recently synthesized and characterized histidine analogues related to the natural dipeptide carnosine, which selectively scavenge the toxic lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE). We now report that the histidine analogue histidyl hydrazide is effective in reducing brain damage and improving functional outcome in a mouse model of focal ischemic stroke when administered intravenously at a dose of 20 mg/kg, either 30 min before or 60 min and 3 h after the onset of middle cerebral artery occlusion. The histidine analogue also protected cultured rat primary neurons against death induced by HNE, chemical hypoxia, glucose deprivation, and combined oxygen and glucose deprivation. The histidine analogue prevented neuronal apoptosis as indicated by decreased production of cleaved caspase-3 protein. These findings suggest a therapeutic potential for HNE-scavenging histidine analogues in the treatment of stroke and related neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:17254011

  20. Somatostatin and analogues in the treatment of cancer. A review.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, B M; Parekh, D; Townsend, C M; Thompson, J C

    1991-01-01

    Somatostatin is a naturally occurring cyclic tetradecapeptide that inhibits release of growth hormone and all gastrointestinal hormones. The beneficial effect of somatostatin in the treatment of certain hypersecretory disorders of hormone excess in well recognized; however its clinical usefulness has been limited in the past by its extremely short plasma half-life. The development of long-acting somatostatin analogues has provided clinically useful agents for treatment of hormone-producing tumors. In addition to well-known inhibiting effects on hormone release and actions, recent studies using experimental tumor models have demonstrated an antiproliferative effect of somatostatin and its analogues on growth of a variety of neoplasms. The exact role of somatostatin analogues in cancer therapy has yet to be established; however studies suggest that these agents could provide a useful and relatively nontoxic adjuvant therapy in the treatment of certain tumors. In this review, the oncologic application of somatostatin and possible mechanism of action are examined and current clinical and experimental studies are summarized. PMID:1671812

  1. Anisotropic metamaterial as an analogue of a black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Núñez, Isabel; Bulashenko, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    Propagation of light in a metamaterial medium which mimics curved spacetime and acts like a black hole is studied. We show that for a particular type of spacetimes and wave polarization, the time dilation appears as dielectric permittivity, while the spatial curvature manifests as magnetic permeability. The optical analogue to the relativistic Hamiltonian which determines the ray paths (null geodesics) in the anisotropic metamaterial is obtained. By applying the formalism to the Schwarzschild metric, we compare the ray paths with full-wave simulations in the equivalent optical medium.

  2. Inhibition of receptor/G protein coupling by suramin analogues.

    PubMed

    Beindl, W; Mitterauer, T; Hohenegger, M; Ijzerman, A P; Nanoff, C; Freissmuth, M

    1996-08-01

    Suramin analogues act as direct antagonists of heterotrimeric G proteins because they block the rate-limiting step of G protein activation (i.e., the dissociation of GDP prebound to the G protein alpha subunit). We have used the human brain A1 adenosine receptor and the rat striatal D2 dopamine receptor, two prototypical Gi/G(o)-coupled receptors, as a model system to test whether the following analogues suppress the receptor-dependent activation of G proteins: 8-(3-nitrobenzamido)-1,3,5-naphthalenetrisulfonic acid (NF007), 8-(3-(3-nitrobenzamido)-benzamido)-1,3,5-naphthalenetrisulfonic acid (NF018); 8,8'-(carbonylbis(imino-3,1-phenylene))bis-(1,3,5-naphthalenetr isulfonic acid) (NF023); 8,8'-(carbonylbis(imino-3,1-phenylene)carbonylimino-(3,1- phenylene)) bis(1,3,5-naphthalenetrisulfonic acid) (NF037); and suramin. Suramin and its analogues inhibit the formation of the agonist-specific ternary complex (agonist/receptor/G protein). This inhibition is (i) quasicompetitive with respect to agonist binding in that it can be overcome by increasing receptor occupancy but (ii) does not result from an interaction of the analogues with the ligand binding pocket of the receptors because the binding of antagonists or of agonists in the absence of functional receptor/G protein interaction is not affected. In addition to suppressing the spontaneous release of GDP from defined G protein alpha subunits, suramin and its analogues reduce receptor-catalyzed guanine nucleotide exchange. The site, to which suramin analogues bind, overlaps with the docking site for the receptor on the G protein alpha subunit. The structure-activity relationships for inhibition of agonist binding to the A1 adenosine receptor (suramin > NF037 > NF023) and of agonist binding to the inhibition D2 dopamine receptor (suramin = NF037 > NF023 > NF018) differ. Thus, NF037 discriminates between the ternary complexes formed by the agonist-liganded D2 dopamine receptors and those formed by the A1 adenosine

  3. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-11-08

    Overview of an ongoing, 2 year research project partially funded by APRA-E to create a novel, synthetic analogue of carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it into a membrane for removal of CO2 from flue gas in coal power plants. Mechanism background, preliminary feasibility study results, molecular modeling of analogue-CO2 interaction, and program timeline are provided.

  4. [Significance of insulin analogues in the treatment of people with type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Gallwitz, B; Westrup, D; Schmeisl, G-W

    2014-10-01

    Assessment of the significance of the different insulins used in type 2 diabetes mellitus is of fundamental importance for routine treatment. Compared with human insulin, rapid acting insulin analogues have a faster uptake and a higher peak effect as well as a shorter duration of action. Long acting insulin analogues have a flatter action profile and a longer duration of action than NPH insulin. Consequently, insulin analogues generally allow an improved glycaemic control to be achieved. Moreover, differences relating to practical aspects are of importance (snacks and interval between injection and meals in the case of short acting insulin as well as mixing of suspensions and number of injections in the case of long acting insulins). The consequences for clinical practice are seen differently by countries as shown by a prescription rate of 50 % for insulin analogues in Germany compared with approximately 90 % in certain other European countries. One of the main reasons why questions remain is the lack of meaningful long-term studies on diabetes-related complications. PMID:25317651

  5. Fully analogue photonic reservoir computer.

    PubMed

    Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Akrout, Akram; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Introduced a decade ago, reservoir computing is an efficient approach for signal processing. State of the art capabilities have already been demonstrated with both computer simulations and physical implementations. If photonic reservoir computing appears to be promising a solution for ultrafast nontrivial computing, all the implementations presented up to now require digital pre or post processing, which prevents them from exploiting their full potential, in particular in terms of processing speed. We address here the possibility to get rid simultaneously of both digital pre and post processing. The standalone fully analogue reservoir computer resulting from our endeavour is compared to previous experiments and only exhibits rather limited degradation of performances. Our experiment constitutes a proof of concept for standalone physical reservoir computers. PMID:26935166

  6. An analogue study of intrusions.

    PubMed

    Laposa, Judith M; Alden, Lynn E

    2006-07-01

    According to cognitive theorists, intrusive trauma memories have their origin in how information during the event is processed. Two studies investigated functional cognitive strategies during medical crises that might protect against intrusions. In Study 1, interviews with health-care professionals were used to identify cognitive strategies judged to be effective in controlling emotions and dealing with medical crises. Study 2 systematically manipulated the use of those strategies in a trauma analogue film paradigm. Experimental participants reported fewer intrusions, and less fear and avoidance of film-related stimuli during the subsequent week than controls. The manipulation did not affect anxiety during the film or memory disorganization. Implications for cognitive theories of intrusion development are discussed. PMID:16125135

  7. Fully analogue photonic reservoir computer

    PubMed Central

    Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Akrout, Akram; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Introduced a decade ago, reservoir computing is an efficient approach for signal processing. State of the art capabilities have already been demonstrated with both computer simulations and physical implementations. If photonic reservoir computing appears to be promising a solution for ultrafast nontrivial computing, all the implementations presented up to now require digital pre or post processing, which prevents them from exploiting their full potential, in particular in terms of processing speed. We address here the possibility to get rid simultaneously of both digital pre and post processing. The standalone fully analogue reservoir computer resulting from our endeavour is compared to previous experiments and only exhibits rather limited degradation of performances. Our experiment constitutes a proof of concept for standalone physical reservoir computers. PMID:26935166

  8. Laboratory study of cometary analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colangeli, L.; Brucato, J.; Mennella, V.; Palumbo, P.

    In situ exploration (e.g., GIOTTO mission) and astronomical observations (e.g., ISO) of comets have provided fundamental information about the structure, chemistry and physical properties of materials present in such primordial bodies of the Solar System. Moreover, it is known that cosmic materials evolve, depending on the efficiency of active processes (e.g., thermal annealing, UV irradiation, ion bombardment, gassolid interactions) in different space environments. Thus, the properties of cometary constituents must be considered in a wider perspective, including cosmic dust formation around cold stars and evolution in the interstellar medium until the formation of proto-planetary nebulae. In this scenario, laboratory experiments provide important hints to clarify the status of cometary compounds. The laboratory work is aimed at both reproducing material properties and at simulating their evolution based on the most effective mechanisms active in space. Several techniques are used to synthesise "analogues" of cometary compounds with controlled chemical and physical characteristics. The study of optical properties, complemented by other analytical techniques, is applied to investigate the products of synthesis in the experiments. The monitoring of the effects produced by processing methods, similar to those active in space, provides information both on the reactivity of materials and on the efficiency of treatments. Such an approach is able to provide quantitative information on chemical and structural modifications produced on organic and refractory materials. The comparison of laboratory results with data coming from space observations and in situ measurements provides a powerful tool to understand the real nature of comets and to place constraints on formation and evolution pathways. The laboratory experiments on analogues gain even more relevance as a sort of training in the future perspective of analysing cometary samples returned to Earth by space missions (e

  9. Conformationally Constrained Analogues of Diacylglycerol (DAG). 25. Exploration of the sn-1 and sn-2 carbonyl functionality reveals the essential role of the sn-1 carbonyl at the lipid interface in the binding of DAG-lactones to protein kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ji-Hye; Peach, Megan L.; Pu, Yongmei; Lewin, Nancy E.; Nicklaus, Marc C.; Blumberg, Peter M.; Marquez, Victor E.

    2008-01-01

    A group of DAG-lactones with altered functionality (C=O → CH2 or C=O → C=S) at the sn-1 and sn-2 carbonyl pharmacophores was synthesized and used as probes to dissect the individual role of each carbonyl in binding to protein kinase C (PKC). The results suggest that the hydrated sn-1 carbonyl is engaged in very strong hydrogen bonding interactions with the charged lipid headgroups and organized water molecules at the lipid interface. Conversely, the sn-2 carbonyl has a more modest contribution to the binding process as a result of its involvement with the receptor (C1 domain) via conventional hydrogen bonding to the protein. The parent DAG-lactones, E-6 and Z-7, were designed to bind exclusively in the sn-2 binding mode to insure the correct orientation and disposition of pharmacophores at the binding site. PMID:16134942

  10. A critical appraisal of the role of insulin analogues in the management of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Oiknine, Ralph; Bernbaum, Marla; Mooradian, Arshag D

    2005-01-01

    Insulin is one of the oldest and best studied treatments for diabetes mellitus. Despite many improvements in the management of diabetes, the nonphysiological time-action profiles of conventional insulins remain a significant obstacle. However, the advent of recombinant DNA technology made it possible to overcome these limitations in the time-action profiles of conventional insulins. Used as prandial (e.g. insulin lispro or insulin aspart) and basal (e.g. insulin glargine) insulin, the analogues simulate physiological insulin profiles more closely than the older conventional insulins. If rapid-acting insulin analogues are used in the hospital, healthcare providers will need a new mind-set. Any error in coordination between timing of rapid-acting insulin administration and meal ingestion may result in hypoglycaemia. However, guidelines regarding in-hospital use of insulin analogues are few. The safety profile of insulin analogues is still not completely established in long-term clinical studies. Several studies have shown conflicting results with respect to the tumourigenic potential of this new class of agents. The clinical implications of these findings are not clear. Although novel insulin analogues are promising 'designer drugs' in our armamentarium to overcome some of the limitations of conventional insulin therapy, cost may be a limiting factor for some patients. PMID:15669878

  11. [Rational use of insulin analogues in the treatment of type 1 diabetic children and adolescents: personal experience].

    PubMed

    Dorchy, H

    2006-09-01

    In the last decade, four fast- and long-acting insulin analogues have been created. Due to the pharmacokinetic characteristics of insulin analogues, they provide an insulin profile closer to normal physiology than can be achieved with human insulins. However, they do not necessarily improve glycated haemoglobin, but they allow better quality of life. In the two daily insulin injection regime, fast-acting analogues are very useful to rapidly correct hyperglycaemia, to allow sleeping in and eating something sweet. In the basal-bolus regime (> or =4 insulin injections), long-acting analogues reduce nocturnal hypoglycaemias and improve fasting blood glucose. In the two insulin regime (2 or > or =4 injections), rapid-acting human insulin must not be systematically replaced by a fast-acting analogue. On the other hand, insulin dose alteration must be triple: retrospective, according to numerous previous experiments, in order to enjoy more freedom for meals, sports, etc.; prospective according to programmed changes in meals and sports; with only a "touch" of compensatory adaptation according to actual glycaemia. PMID:16920339

  12. Lipid14: The Amber Lipid Force Field.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Callum J; Madej, Benjamin D; Skjevik, Age A; Betz, Robin M; Teigen, Knut; Gould, Ian R; Walker, Ross C

    2014-02-11

    The AMBER lipid force field has been updated to create Lipid14, allowing tensionless simulation of a number of lipid types with the AMBER MD package. The modular nature of this force field allows numerous combinations of head and tail groups to create different lipid types, enabling the easy insertion of new lipid species. The Lennard-Jones and torsion parameters of both the head and tail groups have been revised and updated partial charges calculated. The force field has been validated by simulating bilayers of six different lipid types for a total of 0.5 μs each without applying a surface tension; with favorable comparison to experiment for properties such as area per lipid, volume per lipid, bilayer thickness, NMR order parameters, scattering data, and lipid lateral diffusion. As the derivation of this force field is consistent with the AMBER development philosophy, Lipid14 is compatible with the AMBER protein, nucleic acid, carbohydrate, and small molecule force fields. PMID:24803855

  13. Effect of unsaturated menthol analogues on the in vitro penetration of 5-fluorouracil through rat skin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Wang, Jian; Cun, Dongmei; Wang, Manli; Jiang, Juan; Xi, Honglei; Cui, Hongxia; Xu, Yongnan; Cheng, Maosheng; Fang, Liang

    2013-02-25

    To explore the structure-activity relationship for terpenes as transdermal penetration enhancers, unsaturated menthol analogues were synthesized in our study, including p-menth-1-en-3-ol (Compd 1), p-menth-4-en-3-ol (Compd 2), p-menth-4(8)-en-3-ol (Compd 3) and p-menth-8-en-3-ol (Compd 4). Their enhancing activity on the penetration of 5-fluorouracil through rat skin was evaluated by in vitro experiments. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, molecular modeling and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were introduced to investigate the enhancer induced alteration in different skin lipid domains. The results indicated that Compd 3 achieved the highest enhancement ability with an enhancement ratio of 3.08. Other analogues were less effective than Compd 3, and no significant difference was found between them and menthol. Treatment of rat skin with these enhancers did not produce any shift in the stretching vibration of the methylene in hydrophobic lipid chains, but significantly improved the polar pathway across the rat skin as suggested by the increased TEWL. Molecular modeling results suggested that polar head groups of the skin lipids provided the main binding site for enhancer action. These findings indicated that the studied compounds enhanced drug transport by interacting with the polar domain of the skin lipid, instead of by affecting the arrangement of the hydrophobic chains. PMID:23333756

  14. Lipid Regulation of Acrosome Exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Roy; Mukai, Chinatsu; Travis, Alexander J

    2016-01-01

    Lipids are critical regulators of mammalian sperm function, first helping prevent premature acrosome exocytosis, then enabling sperm to become competent to fertilize at the right place/time through the process of capacitation, and ultimately triggering acrosome exocytosis. Yet because they do not fit neatly into the "DNA--RNA-protein" synthetic pathway, they are understudied and poorly understood. Here, we focus on three lipids or lipid classes-cholesterol, phospholipids, and the ganglioside G(M1)--in context of the modern paradigm of acrosome exocytosis. We describe how these various- species are precisely segregated into membrane macrodomains and microdomains, simultaneously preventing premature exocytosis while acting as foci for organizing regulatory and effector molecules that will enable exocytosis. Although the mechanisms responsible for these domains are poorly defined, there is substantial evidence for their composition and functions. We present diverse ways that lipids and lipid modifications regulate capacitation and acrosome exocytosis, describing in more detail how removal of cholesterol plays a master regulatory role in enabling exocytosis through at least two complementary pathways. First, cholesterol efflux leads to proteolytic activation of phospholipase B, which cleaves both phospholipid tails. The resultant changes in membrane curvature provide a mechanism for the point fusions now known to occur far before a sperm physically interacts with the zona pellucida. Cholesterol efflux also enables G(M1) to regulate the voltage-dependent cation channel, Ca(V)2.3, triggering focal calcium transients required for acrosome exocytosis in response to subsequent whole-cell calcium rises. We close with a model integrating functions for lipids in regulating acrosome exocytosis. PMID:27194352

  15. Do lipids influence the allergic sensitization process?

    PubMed Central

    Bublin, Merima; Eiwegger, Thomas; Breiteneder, Heimo

    2014-01-01

    Allergic sensitization is a multifactorial process that is not only influenced by the allergen and its biological function per se but also by other small molecular compounds, such as lipids, that are directly bound as ligands by the allergen or are present in the allergen source. Several members of major allergen families bind lipid ligands through hydrophobic cavities or electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions. These allergens include certain seed storage proteins, Bet v 1–like and nonspecific lipid transfer proteins from pollens and fruits, certain inhalant allergens from house dust mites and cockroaches, and lipocalins. Lipids from the pollen coat and furry animals and the so-called pollen-associated lipid mediators are codelivered with the allergens and can modulate the immune responses of predisposed subjects by interacting with the innate immune system and invariant natural killer T cells. In addition, lipids originating from bacterial members of the pollen microbiome contribute to the outcome of the sensitization process. Dietary lipids act as adjuvants and might skew the immune response toward a TH2-dominated phenotype. In addition, the association with lipids protects food allergens from gastrointestinal degradation and facilitates their uptake by intestinal cells. These findings will have a major influence on how allergic sensitization will be viewed and studied in the future. PMID:24880633

  16. Plant volatile analogues strengthen attractiveness to insect.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yufeng; Yu, Hao; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Pickett, John A; Wu, Kongming

    2014-01-01

    Green leaf bug Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) is one of the major pests in agriculture. Management of A. lucorum was largely achieved by using pesticides. However, the increasing population of A. lucorum since growing Bt cotton widely and the increased awareness of ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety makes their population-control very challenging. Therefore this study was conducted to explore a novel ecological approach, synthetic plant volatile analogues, to manage the pest. Here, plant volatile analogues were first designed and synthesized by combining the bioactive components of β-ionone and benzaldehyde. The stabilities of β-ionone, benzaldehyde and analogue 3 g were tested. The electroantennogram (EAG) responses of A. lucorum adult antennae to the analogues were recorded. And the behavior assay and filed experiment were also conducted. In this study, thirteen analogues were acquired. The analogue 3 g was demonstrated to be more stable than β-ionone and benzaldehyde in the environment. Many of the analogues elicited EAG responses, and the EAG response values to 3 g remained unchanged during seven-day period. 3 g was also demonstrated to be attractive to A. lucorum adults in the laboratory behavior experiment and in the field. Its attractiveness persisted longer than β-ionone and benzaldehyde. This indicated that 3 g can strengthen attractiveness to insect and has potential as an attractant. Our results suggest that synthetic plant volatile analogues can strengthen attractiveness to insect. This is the first published study about synthetic plant volatile analogues that have the potential to be used in pest control. Our results will support a new ecological approach to pest control and it will be helpful to ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety. PMID:24911460

  17. Plant Volatile Analogues Strengthen Attractiveness to Insect

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yufeng; Yu, Hao; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Pickett, John A.; Wu, Kongming

    2014-01-01

    Green leaf bug Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) is one of the major pests in agriculture. Management of A. lucorum was largely achieved by using pesticides. However, the increasing population of A. lucorum since growing Bt cotton widely and the increased awareness of ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety makes their population-control very challenging. Therefore this study was conducted to explore a novel ecological approach, synthetic plant volatile analogues, to manage the pest. Here, plant volatile analogues were first designed and synthesized by combining the bioactive components of β-ionone and benzaldehyde. The stabilities of β-ionone, benzaldehyde and analogue 3 g were tested. The electroantennogram (EAG) responses of A. lucorum adult antennae to the analogues were recorded. And the behavior assay and filed experiment were also conducted. In this study, thirteen analogues were acquired. The analogue 3 g was demonstrated to be more stable than β-ionone and benzaldehyde in the environment. Many of the analogues elicited EAG responses, and the EAG response values to 3 g remained unchanged during seven-day period. 3 g was also demonstrated to be attractive to A. lucorum adults in the laboratory behavior experiment and in the field. Its attractiveness persisted longer than β-ionone and benzaldehyde. This indicated that 3 g can strengthen attractiveness to insect and has potential as an attractant. Our results suggest that synthetic plant volatile analogues can strengthen attractiveness to insect. This is the first published study about synthetic plant volatile analogues that have the potential to be used in pest control. Our results will support a new ecological approach to pest control and it will be helpful to ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety. PMID:24911460

  18. Interaction of lipids with the neurotensin receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Bolivar, Juan H; Muñoz-García, Juan C; Castro-Dopico, Tomas; Dijkman, Patricia M; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Watts, Anthony

    2016-06-01

    Information about lipid-protein interactions for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is scarce. Here, we use electron spin resonance (ESR) and spin-labelled lipids to study lipid interactions with the rat neurotensin receptor 1 (NTS1). A fusion protein containing rat NTS1 fully able to bind its ligand neurotensin was reconstituted into phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers at specific lipid:protein molar ratios. The fraction of motionally restricted lipids in the range of 40:1 to 80:1 lipids per receptor suggested an oligomeric state of the protein, and the result was unaffected by increasing the hydrophobic thickness of the lipid bilayer from C-18 to C-20 or C-22 chain length PC membranes. Comparison of the ESR spectra of different spin-labelled lipids allowed direct measurement of lipid binding constants relative to PC (Kr), with spin-labelled phosphatidylethanolamine (PESL), phosphatidylserine (PSSL), stearic acid (SASL), and a spin labelled cholesterol analogue (CSL) Kr values of 1.05±0.05, 1.92±0.08, 5.20±0.51 and 0.91±0.19, respectively. The results contrast with those from rhodopsin, the only other GPCR studied this way, which has no selectivity for the lipids analysed here. Molecular dynamics simulations of NTS1 in bilayers are in agreement with the ESR data, and point to sites in the receptor where PS could interact with higher affinity. Lipid selectivity could be necessary for regulation of ligand binding, oligomerisation and/or G protein activation processes. Our results provide insight into the potential modulatory mechanisms that lipids can exert on GPCRs. PMID:26926422

  19. DMSO induces dehydration near lipid membrane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Song, Jinsuk; Pas, Jolien; Meijer, Lenny H H; Han, Songi

    2015-07-21

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been broadly used in biology as a cosolvent, a cryoprotectant, and an enhancer of membrane permeability, leading to the general assumption that DMSO-induced structural changes in cell membranes and their hydration water play important functional roles. Although the effects of DMSO on the membrane structure and the headgroup dehydration have been extensively studied, the mechanism by which DMSO invokes its effect on lipid membranes and the direct role of water in this process are unresolved. By directly probing the translational water diffusivity near unconfined lipid vesicle surfaces, the lipid headgroup mobility, and the repeat distances in multilamellar vesicles, we found that DMSO exclusively weakens the surface water network near the lipid membrane at a bulk DMSO mole fraction (XDMSO) of <0.1, regardless of the lipid composition and the lipid phase. Specifically, DMSO was found to effectively destabilize the hydration water structure at the lipid membrane surface at XDMSO <0.1, lower the energetic barrier to dehydrate this surface water, whose displacement otherwise requires a higher activation energy, consequently yielding compressed interbilayer distances in multilamellar vesicles at equilibrium with unaltered bilayer thicknesses. At XDMSO >0.1, DMSO enters the lipid interface and restricts the lipid headgroup motion. We postulate that DMSO acts as an efficient cryoprotectant even at low concentrations by exclusively disrupting the water network near the lipid membrane surface, weakening the cohesion between water and adhesion of water to the lipid headgroups, and so mitigating the stress induced by the volume change of water during freeze-thaw. PMID:26200868

  20. Lipid flopping in the liver.

    PubMed

    Linton, Kenneth J

    2015-10-01

    Bile is synthesized in the liver and is essential for the emulsification of dietary lipids and lipid-soluble vitamins. It is a complex mixture of amphiphilic bile acids (BAs; which act as detergent molecules), the membrane phospholipid phosphatidylcholine (PC), cholesterol and a variety of endogenous metabolites and waste products. Over the last 20 years, the combined effort of clinicians, geneticists, physiologists and biochemists has shown that each of these bile components is transported across the canalicular membrane of the hepatocyte by its own specific ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. The bile salt export pump (BSEP) ABCB11 transports the BAs and drives bile flow from the liver, but it is now clear that two lipid transporters, ABCB4 (which flops PC into the bile) and the P-type ATPase ATP8B1/CDC50 (which flips a different phospholipid in the opposite direction) play equally critical roles that protect the biliary tree from the detergent activity of the bile acids. Understanding the interdependency of these lipid floppases and flippases has allowed the development of an assay to measure ABCB4 function. ABCB4 harbours numerous mis-sense mutations which probably reflects the spectrum of liver disease rooted in ABCB4 aetiology. Characterization of the effect of these mutations at the protein level opens the possibility for the development of personalized prognosis and treatment. PMID:26517915

  1. Antimicrobial activity of resveratrol analogues.

    PubMed

    Chalal, Malik; Klinguer, Agnès; Echairi, Abdelwahad; Meunier, Philippe; Vervandier-Fasseur, Dominique; Adrian, Marielle

    2014-01-01

    Stilbenes, especially resveratrol and its derivatives, have become famous for their positive effects on a wide range of medical disorders, as indicated by a huge number of published studies. A less investigated area of research is their antimicrobial properties. A series of 13 trans-resveratrol analogues was synthesized via Wittig or Heck reactions, and their antimicrobial activity assessed on two different grapevine pathogens responsible for severe diseases in the vineyard. The entire series, together with resveratrol, was first evaluated on the zoospore mobility and sporulation level of Plasmopara viticola (the oomycete responsible for downy mildew). Stilbenes displayed a spectrum of activity ranging from low to high. Six of them, including the most active ones, were subsequently tested on the development of Botrytis cinerea (fungus responsible for grey mold). The results obtained allowed us to identify the most active stilbenes against both grapevine pathogens, to compare the antimicrobial activity of the evaluated series of stilbenes, and to discuss the relationship between their chemical structure (number and position of methoxy and hydroxy groups) and antimicrobial activity. PMID:24918540

  2. Condensed matter analogues of cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, Tom; Srivastava, Ajit

    2013-10-01

    It is always exciting when developments in one branch of physics turn out to have relevance in a quite different branch. It would be hard to find two branches farther apart in terms of energy scales than early-universe cosmology and low-temperature condensed matter physics. Nevertheless ideas about the formation of topological defects during rapid phase transitions that originated in the context of the very early universe have proved remarkably fruitful when applied to a variety of condensed matter systems. The mathematical frameworks for describing these systems can be very similar. This interconnection has led to a deeper understanding of the phenomena in condensed matter systems utilizing ideas from cosmology. At the same time, one can view these condensed matter analogues as providing, at least in a limited sense, experimental access to the phenomena of the early universe for which no direct probe is possible. As this special issue well illustrates, this remains a dynamic and exciting field. The basic idea is that when a system goes through a rapid symmetry-breaking phase transition from a symmetric phase into one with spontaneously broken symmetry, the order parameter may make different choices in different regions, creating domains that when they meet can trap defects. The scale of those domains, and hence the density of defects, is constrained by the rate at which the system goes through the transition and the speed with which order parameter information propagates. This is what has come to be known as the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. The resultant scaling laws have now been tested in a considerable variety of different systems. The earliest experiments illustrating the analogy between cosmology and condensed matter were in liquid crystals, in particular on the isotropic-to-nematic transition, primarily because it is very easy to induce the phase transition (typically at room temperature) and to image precisely what is going on. This field remains one of the

  3. Space analogue studies in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugg, D.; Shepanek, M.

    1999-09-01

    Medical research has been carried out on the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) for 50 years. As an extension of this program collaborative Australian/United States research on immunology, microbiology, psychology and remote medicine has produced important data and insight on how humans adapt to the stress of extreme isolation, confinement and the harsh environment of Antarctica. An outstanding analogue for the isolation and confinement of space missions (especially planetary outposts), ANARE has been used as an international research platform by Australia and the United States since 1993. Collaborative research has demonstrated a lowered responsiveness of the immune system under the isolation and confinement of Antarctic winter-over; a reduction of almost 50% in T cell proliferation to mltogen phytohaemogglutinin, as well as changes in latent herpesvirus states and the expansion of the polyclonal latent Epstein-Barr virus infected B cell populations. Although no clinically significant disease has been found to result from these immune changes, research is currently assessing the effects of psychological factors on the immune system. This and associated research performed to date and its relevance to both organisations is discussed, and comment made on possible extensions to the program in both medical and other fields.

  4. Space analogue studies in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugg, D.; Shepanek, M.

    1999-01-01

    Medical research has been carried out on the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) for 50 years. As an extension of this program collaborative Australian/United States research on immunology, microbiology, psychology and remote medicine has produced important data and insight on how humans adapt to the stress of extreme isolation, confinement and the harsh environment of Antarctica. An outstanding analogue for the isolation and confinement of space missions (especially planetary outposts), ANARE has been used as an international research platform by Australia and the United States since 1993. Collaborative research has demonstrated a lowered responsiveness of the immune system under the isolation and confinement of Antarctic winter-over; a reduction of almost 50% in T cell proliferation to mitogen phytohaemogglutinin, as well as changes in latent herpesvirus states and the expansion of the polyclonal latent Epstein-Barr virus infected B cell populations. Although no clinically significant disease has been found to result from these immune changes, research is currently assessing the effects of psychological factors on the immune system. This and associated research performed to date and its relevance to both organisations is discussed, and comment made on possible extensions to the program in both medical and other fields.

  5. Synthesis and SAR of vinca alkaloid analogues.

    PubMed

    Voss, Matthew E; Ralph, Jeffery M; Xie, Dejian; Manning, David D; Chen, Xinchao; Frank, Anthony J; Leyhane, Andrew J; Liu, Lei; Stevens, Jason M; Budde, Cheryl; Surman, Matthew D; Friedrich, Thomas; Peace, Denise; Scott, Ian L; Wolf, Mark; Johnson, Randall

    2009-02-15

    Versatile intermediates 12'-iodovinblastine, 12'-iodovincristine and 11'-iodovinorelbine were utilized as substrates for transition metal based chemistry which led to the preparation of novel analogues of the vinca alkaloids. The synthesis of key iodo intermediates, their transformation into final products, and the SAR based upon HeLa and MCF-7 cell toxicity assays is presented. Selected analogues 27 and 36 show promising anticancer activity in the P388 murine leukemia model. PMID:19147348

  6. Adipocyte size fluctuation, mechano-active lipid droplets and caveolae.

    PubMed

    Le Lay, Soazig; Briand, Nolwenn; Dugail, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Recent data indicate that cell size fluctuation, a key property in adipocyte pathophysiology primarily dependent on lipid storage, is linked to a novel function of lipid droplet organelles acting as mechano-active organelles to regulate cell membrane remodeling and caveolae dynamics. PMID:26167412

  7. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Anchor Analogues Sequester Cholesterol and Reduce Prion Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Clive; Tayebi, Mourad; Williams, Alun

    2010-01-01

    A hallmark of prion diseases is the conversion of the host-encoded prion protein (PrPC where C is cellular) into an alternatively folded, disease-related isoform (PrPSc, where Sc is scrapie), the accumulation of which is associated with synapse degeneration and ultimately neuronal death. The formation of PrPSc is dependent upon the presence of PrPC in specific, cholesterol-sensitive membrane microdomains, commonly called lipid rafts. PrPC is targeted to these lipid rafts because it is attached to membranes via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. Here, we show that treatment of prion-infected neuronal cell lines (ScN2a, ScGT1, or SMB cells) with synthetic glycosylphosphatidylinositol analogues, glucosamine-phosphatidylinositol (glucosamine-PI) or glucosamine 2-O-methyl inositol octadecyl phosphate, reduced the PrPSc content of these cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, ScGT1 cells treated with glucosamine-PI did not transmit infection following intracerebral injection to mice. Treatment with glucosamine-PI increased the cholesterol content of ScGT1 cell membranes and reduced activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (PLA2), consistent with the hypothesis that the composition of cell membranes affects key PLA2-dependent signaling pathways involved in PrPSc formation. The effect of glucosamine-PI on PrPSc formation was also reversed by the addition of platelet-activating factor. Glucosamine-PI caused the displacement of PrPC from lipid rafts and reduced expression of PrPC at the cell surface, putative sites for PrPSc formation. We propose that treatment with glucosamine-PI modifies local micro-environments that control PrPC expression and activation of PLA2 and subsequently inhibits PrPSc formation. PMID:20427265

  8. Irinotecan Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Irinotecan lipid complex is used in combination with other medications to treat pancreatic cancer that has spread ... has worsened after treatment with other chemotherapy medications. Irinotecan lipid complex is in a class of antineoplastic ...

  9. Doxorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Doxorubicin lipid complex is used to treat ovarian cancer that has not improved or that has worsened after treatment with other medications. Doxorubicin lipid complex is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma ( ...

  10. Daunorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Daunorubicin lipid complex is used to treat advanced Kaposi's sarcoma (a type of cancer that causes abnormal tissue to ... body) related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Daunorubicin lipid complex is in a class of medications called ...

  11. Vincristine Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Vincristine lipid complex is used to treat a certain type of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; a type of cancer ... least two different treatments with other medications. Vincristine lipid complex is in a class of medications called ...

  12. Disorders of Lipid Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism Fats (lipids) are ... carbohydrates and low in fats. Supplements of the amino acid carnitine may be helpful. The long-term outcome ...

  13. Daunorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Daunorubicin lipid complex is used to treat advanced Kaposi's sarcoma (a type of cancer that causes abnormal tissue to grow on ... related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Daunorubicin lipid complex is in a class of medications called anthracyclines. ...

  14. Cytarabine Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Cytarabine lipid complex is used to treat lymphomatous meningitis (a type of cancer in the covering of the spinal cord and brain). Cytarabine lipid complex is in a class of medications called antimetabolites. ...

  15. Irinotecan Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Irinotecan lipid complex is used in combination with other medications to treat pancreatic cancer that has spread to other parts of ... after treatment with other chemotherapy medications. Irinotecan lipid complex is in a class of antineoplastic medications called ...

  16. Doxorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Doxorubicin lipid complex is used to treat ovarian cancer that has not improved or that has worsened after treatment with other medications. Doxorubicin lipid complex is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma (a ...

  17. Vincristine Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Vincristine lipid complex is used to treat a certain type of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; a type of cancer of the ... two different treatments with other medications. Vincristine lipid complex is in a class of medications called vinca ...

  18. Lipid Exchange by Ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Drachmann, Nikolaj Düring; Olesen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Lipids play an important role in maintaining P-type ATPase structure and function, and often they are crucial for ATPase activity. When the P-type ATPases are in the membrane, they are surrounded by a mix of different lipid species with varying aliphatic chain lengths and saturation, and the complex interplay between the lipids and the P-type ATPases are still not well understood. We here describe a robust method to exchange the majority of the lipids surrounding the ATPase after solubilisation and/or purification with a target lipid of interest. The method is based on an ultracentrifugation step, where the protein sample is spun through a dense buffer containing large excess of the target lipid, which results in an approximately 80-85 % lipid exchange. The method is a very gently technique that maintains protein folding during the process, hence allowing further characterization of the protein in the presence of a target lipid of interest. PMID:26695050

  19. Role of Lipids in Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lorizate, Maier; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg

    2011-01-01

    Viruses intricately interact with and modulate cellular membranes at several stages of their replication, but much less is known about the role of viral lipids compared to proteins and nucleic acids. All animal viruses have to cross membranes for cell entry and exit, which occurs by membrane fusion (in enveloped viruses), by transient local disruption of membrane integrity, or by cell lysis. Furthermore, many viruses interact with cellular membrane compartments during their replication and often induce cytoplasmic membrane structures, in which genome replication and assembly occurs. Recent studies revealed details of membrane interaction, membrane bending, fission, and fusion for a number of viruses and unraveled the lipid composition of raft-dependent and -independent viruses. Alterations of membrane lipid composition can block viral release and entry, and certain lipids act as fusion inhibitors, suggesting a potential as antiviral drugs. Here, we review viral interactions with cellular membranes important for virus entry, cytoplasmic genome replication, and virus egress. PMID:21628428

  20. Planetary habitability: lessons learned from terrestrial analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Louisa J.; Dartnell, Lewis R.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial analogue studies underpin almost all planetary missions and their use is essential in the exploration of our Solar system and in assessing the habitability of other worlds. Their value relies on the similarity of the analogue to its target, either in terms of their mineralogical or geochemical context, or current physical or chemical environmental conditions. Such analogue sites offer critical ground-truthing for astrobiological studies on the habitability of different environmental parameter sets, the biological mechanisms for survival in extreme environments and the preservation potential and detectability of biosignatures. The 33 analogue sites discussed in this review have been selected on the basis of their congruence to particular extraterrestrial locations. Terrestrial field sites that have been used most often in the literature, as well as some lesser known ones which require greater study, are incorporated to inform on the astrobiological potential of Venus, Mars, Europa, Enceladus and Titan. For example, the possibility of an aerial habitable zone on Venus has been hypothesized based on studies of life at high-altitudes in the terrestrial atmosphere. We also demonstrate why many different terrestrial analogue sites are required to satisfactorily assess the habitability of the changing environmental conditions throughout Martian history, and recommend particular sites for different epochs or potential niches. Finally, habitable zones within the aqueous environments of the icy moons of Europa and Enceladus and potentially in the hydrocarbon lakes of Titan are discussed and suitable analogue sites proposed. It is clear from this review that a number of terrestrial analogue sites can be applied to multiple planetary bodies, thereby increasing their value for astrobiological exploration. For each analogue site considered here, we summarize the pertinent physiochemical environmental features they offer and critically assess the fidelity with which

  1. Monstrous Mycobacterial Lipids.

    PubMed

    Seeliger, Jessica; Moody, D Branch

    2016-02-18

    When it comes to lipid diversity, no bacterial genus approaches Mycobacterium. In this issue of Cell Chemical Biology, Burbaud et al. (2016) provide a multi-genic working model for the biosynthesis of trehalose polyphleate (TPP), one of the largest known lipids in mycobacteria. They demonstrate that this lipid is made by diverse mycobacterial species, including those of medical importance. PMID:26971870

  2. Loratadine analogues as MAGL inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jayendra Z; Ahenkorah, Stephen; Vaara, Miia; Staszewski, Marek; Adams, Yahaya; Laitinen, Tuomo; Navia-Paldanius, Dina; Parkkari, Teija; Savinainen, Juha R; Walczyński, Krzysztof; Laitinen, Jarmo T; Nevalainen, Tapio J

    2015-04-01

    Compound 12a (JZP-361) acted as a potent and reversible inhibitor of human recombinant MAGL (hMAGL, IC50=46 nM), and was found to have almost 150-fold higher selectivity over human recombinant fatty acid amide hydrolase (hFAAH, IC50=7.24 μM) and 35-fold higher selectivity over human α/β-hydrolase-6 (hABHD6, IC50=1.79 μM). Additionally, compound 12a retained H1 antagonistic affinity (pA2=6.81) but did not show cannabinoid receptor activity, when tested at concentrations ⩽ 10 μM. Hence, compound 12a represents a novel dual-acting pharmacological tool possessing both MAGL-inhibitory and antihistaminergic activities. PMID:25752982

  3. Aggregation, lipid exchange, and metastable phases of dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine vesicles.

    PubMed

    Pryor, C; Bridge, M; Loew, L M

    1985-04-23

    A new fluorescent lipid analogue, bimanephosphatidylcholine, has been synthesized for use in lipid bilayers. This probe is well suited as an energy-transfer donor with N-(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)phosphatidylethanolamine as the acceptor. Dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine vesicles are prepared by sonication at pH 9 and characterized by electron microscopy and other methods. Resonance energy transfer between separately labeled donor and acceptor vesicles is monitored during HCl-induced aggregation to determine the kinetics of lipid randomization. Light scattering is also monitored to measure the kinetics of aggregation. The light scattering shows a marked reversal with NaOH while the energy transfer does not, indicating lipid exchange during a reversibly aggregated state; the extent of energy transfer suggests that only lipids in the outer monolayers exchange. The gel to liquid-crystalline phase transition temperature in HCl-treated vesicles is found to be 47 degrees C with diphenylhexatriene. The initial sonicated dispersion does not show a sharp phase transition. In vesicles labeled with both donor and acceptor probes, a small, irreversible increase in energy transfer is obtained upon lowering and then restoring the pH. These results suggest a metastable phase in the sonicated vesicles containing a randomized distribution of lipid and probes within the bilayers; the thermodynamically favored phase, whose formation is triggered by the pH shock, contains domains within which the probe lipids are more highly concentrated. PMID:3995010

  4. Synthetic ceramide analogues increase amyloid-β 42 production by modulating γ-secretase activity.

    PubMed

    Takasugi, Nobumasa; Sasaki, Tomoki; Shinohara, Mitsuru; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Tomita, Taisuke

    2015-02-01

    γ-Secretase cleaves amyloid β-precursor protein (APP) to generate amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), which is a causative molecule of Alzheimer disease (AD). The C-terminal length of Aβ, which is determined by γ-secretase activity, determines the aggregation and deposition profiles of Aβ, thereby affecting the onset of AD. In this study, we found that the synthetic ceramide analogues dl-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PDMP) and (1S,2R-d-erythro-2-N-myristoylamino)-1-phenyl-1-propanol (DMAPP) modulated γ-secretase-mediated cleavage to increase Aβ42 production. Unexpectedly, PDMP and DMAPP upregulated Aβ42 production independent of alteration of ceramide metabolism. Our results propose that synthetic ceramide analogues function as novel γ-secretase modulators that increase Aβ42, and this finding might lead to the understanding of the effect of the lipid environment on γ-secretase activity. PMID:25545059

  5. Glucagonlike Peptide 2 Analogue Teduglutide

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Lakshmi S.; Basson, Marc D.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Short bowel syndrome occurs when a shortened intestine cannot absorb sufficient nutrients or fluids. Teduglutide is a recombinant analogue of human glucagonlike peptide 2 that reduces dependence on parenteral nutrition in patients with short bowel syndrome by promoting enterocytic proliferation, increasing the absorptive surface area. However, enterocyte function depends not only on the number of cells that are present but also on differentiated features that facilitate nutrient absorption and digestion. OBJECTIVE To test the hypothesis that teduglutide impairs human intestinal epithelial differentiation. DESIGN AND SETTING We investigated the effects of teduglutide in the modulation of proliferation and differentiation in human Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells at a basic science laboratory. This was an in vitro study using Caco-2 cells, a human-derived intestinal epithelial cell line commonly used to model enterocytic biology. EXPOSURE Cells were exposed to teduglutide or vehicle control. MAINOUTCOMESAND MEASURES We analyzed the cell cycle by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation or propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry and measured cell proliferation by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay. We used quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction to assay the expression of the enterocytic differentiation markers villin, sucrase-isomaltase, glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4), as well as that of the putative differentiation signals schlafen 12 (SLFN12) and caudal-related homeobox intestine-specific transcription factor (Cdx2). Villin promoter activity was measured by a luciferase-based assay. RESULTS The MTS assay demonstrated that teduglutide increased cell numbers by a mean (SD) of 10% (2%) over untreated controls at a maximal 500nM (n = 6, P < .05). Teduglutide increased bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells vs untreated controls by a mean (SD

  6. Genetic grafting of membrane-acting peptides to the cytotoxin dianthin augments its ability to de-stabilize lipid bilayers and enhances its cytotoxic potential as the component of transferrin-toxin conjugates.

    PubMed

    Lorenzetti, I; Meneguzzi, A; Fracasso, G; Potrich, C; Costantini, L; Chiesa, E; Legname, G; Menestrina, G; Tridente, G; Colombatti, M

    2000-05-15

    Three chimeric proteins were obtained by fusing together the dianthin gene and DNA fragments encoding for the following membrane-acting peptides: the N-terminus of protein G of the vesicular stomatitis virus (KFT25), the N terminus of the HA2 hemagglutinin of influenza virus (pHA2), and a membrane-acting peptide (pJVE). Chimeric dianthins (KFT25DIA, pHA2DIA and pJVEDIA) retained full enzymatic activity in cell-free assays and showed increased ability to induce pH-dependent calcein release from large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs). pHA2DIA and pJVEDIA also showed faster kinetics of interaction with LUVs, while KFT25DIA and pHA2DIA displayed a reduced cytotoxicity as compared to wild-type dianthin. Conjugates made by chemically cross-linking KFT25DIA or pJVEDIA and human transferrin (Tfn) showed greater cell-killing efficiency than conjugates of Tfn and wild-type dianthin. As a consequence, by fusion of membrane-acting peptides to the dianthin sequence the specificity factor (i.e., the ratio between non-specific and specific toxicity) of Tfn-KFT25DIA, Tfn-pHA2DIA and Tfn-pJVEDIA was increased with respect to that of Tfn-based conjugates made with wild-type dianthin. Taken together, our results suggest that genetic fusion of membrane-acting peptides to enzymatic cytotoxins results in the acquisition of new physico-chemical properties exploitable for designing new recombinant cytotoxins and to tackle cell-intoxication mechanisms. PMID:10797275

  7. Nutrients and neurodevelopment: lipids.

    PubMed

    González, Horacio F; Visentin, Silvana

    2016-10-01

    Nutrients, lipids in particular, make up the central nervous system structure and play major functional roles: they stimulate development, migration, and nerve cell differentiation. They are part of gray matter, white matter, nerve nuclei, and synaptogenesis. Breast milk contains lipids which are crucial for infant brain development. The lipid profile of breast milk was used as a guideline for the development of breast milk substitutes. However, to date, no substitute has matched it. Complementary feeding should include docosahexaenoic acid, arachidonic acid, other polyunsaturated fatty acids, saturated fatty acids, and complex lipids found in milk fat. The lipid composition of breast milk depends on maternal intake and nutritional status during pregnancy and breast-feeding. It has a great impact on development. Our goal is to review scientific literature regarding the role of lipids on infant brain development and the importance of breast milk lipid composition, maternal diet, and complementary feeding. PMID:27606648

  8. Mechanistic characterization of the tetraacyldisaccharide-1-phosphate 4'-kinase LpxK involved in lipid A biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Emptage, Ryan P; Pemble, Charles W; York, John D; Raetz, Christian R H; Zhou, Pei

    2013-04-01

    The sixth step in the lipid A biosynthetic pathway involves phosphorylation of the tetraacyldisaccharide-1-phosphate (DSMP) intermediate by the cytosol-facing inner membrane kinase LpxK, a member of the P-loop-containing nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) hydrolase superfamily. We report the kinetic characterization of LpxK from Aquifex aeolicus and the crystal structures of LpxK in complex with ATP in a precatalytic binding state, the ATP analogue AMP-PCP in the closed catalytically competent conformation, and a chloride anion revealing an inhibitory conformation of the nucleotide-binding P-loop. We demonstrate that LpxK activity in vitro requires the presence of a detergent micelle and formation of a ternary LpxK-ATP/Mg(2+)-DSMP complex. Using steady-state kinetics, we have identified crucial active site residues, leading to the proposal that the interaction of D99 with H261 acts to increase the pKa of the imidazole moiety, which in turn serves as the catalytic base to deprotonate the 4'-hydroxyl of the DSMP substrate. The fact that an analogous mechanism has not yet been observed for other P-loop kinases highlights LpxK as a distinct member of the P-loop kinase family, a notion that is also reflected through its localization at the membrane, lipid substrate, and overall structure. PMID:23464738

  9. Convergent syntheses of LeX analogues

    PubMed Central

    Wang, An; Hendel, Jenifer

    2010-01-01

    Summary The synthesis of three Lex derivatives from one common protected trisaccharide is reported. These analogues will be used respectively for competitive binding experiments, conjugation to carrier proteins and immobilization on gold. An N-acetylglucosamine monosaccharide acceptor was first glycosylated at O-4 with a galactosyl imidate. This coupling was performed at 40 °C under excess of BF3·OEt2 activation and proceeded best if the acceptor carried a 6-chlorohexyl rather than a 6-azidohexyl aglycon. The 6-chlorohexyl disaccharide was then converted to an acceptor and submitted to fucosylation yielding the corresponding protected 6-chlorohexyl Lex trisaccharide. This protected trisaccharide was used as a precursor to the 6-azidohexyl, 6-acetylthiohexyl and 6-benzylthiohexyl trisaccharide analogues which were obtained in excellent yields (70–95%). In turn, we describe the deprotection of these intermediates in one single step using dissolving metal conditions. Under these conditions, the 6-chlorohexyl and 6-azidohexyl intermediates led respectively to the n-hexyl and 6-aminohexyl trisaccharide targets. Unexpectedly, the 6-acetylthiohexyl analogue underwent desulfurization and gave the n-hexyl glycoside product, whereas the 6-benzylthiohexyl analogue gave the desired disulfide trisaccharide dimer. This study constitutes a particularly efficient and convergent preparation of these three Lex analogues. PMID:20485599

  10. The CD1 size problem: lipid antigens, ligands, and scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Dalam

    2014-01-01

    Whereas research on CD1d has emphasized a few glycosyl ceramides, the broader family of four human CD1 antigen-presenting molecules binds hundreds of distinct self-lipids. Individual lipid types bind within CD1 grooves in different ways, such that they partially fill the groove, match the groove volume, or protrude substantially from the groove. These differing modes of binding can now be connected to differing immunological functions, as individual lipids can act as stimulatory antigens, inhibitory ligands, or space-filling scaffolds. Because each type of CD1 protein folds to produce antigen-binding grooves with differing sizes and shapes, CD1a, CD1b, CD1c, CD1d, and CD1e have distinct mechanisms of capturing self-lipids and exchanging them for foreign lipids. The size discrepancy between endogeneous lipids and groove volume is most pronounced for CD1b. Recent studies show that the large CD1b cavity can simultaneously bind two self-lipids, the antigen, and its scaffold lipid, which can be exchanged for one large bacterial lipid. In this review, we will highlight recent studies showing how cells regulate lipid antigen loading and the roles CD1 groove structures have in control of the presentation of chemically diverse lipids to T cells. PMID:24658584

  11. Dolastatin 11 conformations, analogues and pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Ahad; Bates, Robert B; Crane, Zackary D; Dicus, Christopher W; Gramme, Michelle R; Hamel, Ernest; Marcischak, Jacob; Martinez, David S; McClure, Kelly J; Nakkiew, Pichaya; Pettit, George R; Stessman, Chad C; Sufi, Bilal A; Yarick, Gayle V

    2005-07-01

    Twenty analogues of the natural antitumor agent dolastatin 11, including majusculamide C, were synthesized and tested for cytotoxicity against human cancer cells and stimulation of actin polymerization. Only analogues containing the 30-membered ring were active. Molecular modeling and NMR evidence showed the low-energy conformations. The amide bonds are all trans except for the one between the Tyr and Val units, which is cis. Since an analogue restricted to negative 2-3-4-5 angles stimulated actin polymerization but was inactive in cells, the binding conformation (most likely the lowest-energy conformation in water) has a negative 2-3-4-5 angle, whereas a conformation with a positive 2-3-4-5 angle (most likely the lowest energy conformation in chloroform) goes through cell walls. The highly active R alcohol from borohydride reduction of dolastatin 11 is a candidate for conversion to prodrugs. PMID:15878670

  12. Screening of bromotyramine analogues as antifouling compounds against marine bacteria.

    PubMed

    Andjouh, Sofyane; Blache, Yves

    2016-09-01

    Rapid and efficient synthesis of 23 analogues inspired by bromotyramine derivatives, marine natural products, by means of CuSO4-catalysed [3+2] alkyne-azide cycloaddition is described. The final target was then assayed for anti-biofilm activity against three Gram-negative marine bacteria, Pseudoalteromonas ulvae (TC14), Pseudoalteromonas lipolytica (TC8) and Paracoccus sp. (4M6). Most of the synthesised bromotyramine/triazole derivatives are more active than the parent natural products Moloka'iamine (A) and 3,5-dibromo-4-methoxy-β-phenethylamine (B) against biofilm formation by the three bacterial strains. Some of these compounds were shown to act as non-toxic inhibitors of biofilm development with EC50 < 200 μM without any effect on bacterial growth even at high concentrations (200 μM). PMID:27450150

  13. Classical Simulated Annealing Using Quantum Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cour, Brian R.; Troupe, James E.; Mark, Hans M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we consider the use of certain classical analogues to quantum tunneling behavior to improve the performance of simulated annealing on a discrete spin system of the general Ising form. Specifically, we consider the use of multiple simultaneous spin flips at each annealing step as an analogue to quantum spin coherence as well as modifications of the Boltzmann acceptance probability to mimic quantum tunneling. We find that the use of multiple spin flips can indeed be advantageous under certain annealing schedules, but only for long anneal times.

  14. Classical Simulated Annealing Using Quantum Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cour, Brian R.; Troupe, James E.; Mark, Hans M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we consider the use of certain classical analogues to quantum tunneling behavior to improve the performance of simulated annealing on a discrete spin system of the general Ising form. Specifically, we consider the use of multiple simultaneous spin flips at each annealing step as an analogue to quantum spin coherence as well as modifications of the Boltzmann acceptance probability to mimic quantum tunneling. We find that the use of multiple spin flips can indeed be advantageous under certain annealing schedules, but only for long anneal times.

  15. Membrane curvature and cholesterol effects on lipids packing and spin-labelled lipids conformational distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manukovsky, Nurit; Sanders, Ella; Matalon, Erez; Wolf, Sharon G.; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2013-10-01

    Nitroxide spin-labelled lipid analogues are often used to study model membrane properties using EPR spectroscopy. Whereas in liquid phase membranes the spin label assumes, on average, its putative location, in gel phases and frozen membrane, depending on its position along the acyl chain, it may exhibit a different average location. Here we used 2H three-pulse Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) of phospholipid spin probes, combined with various deuteration schemes to detect the effect of the model membrane curvature and cholesterol on vertical migrations of the spin label. We compared large and small unilamellar 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) vesicles with and without cholesterol (10%). The vertical displacement of the spin label was manifested as an apparently flat trans-membrane profile of water concentration and of label proximity to the head group choline. The spin-label propensity to migrate was found to increase with vesicle curvature and decrease in the presence of cholesterol. This in turn reflects the effect of packing and ordering of the membrane lipids. The results show that in curved vesicles lacking cholesterol, the label attached to carbon 16 may travel as far high along the membrane normal as the location of the label on carbon 5, due to the presence of U-shaped lipid conformations. This phenomenon must be taken into account when using spin-labelled lipids as membrane depth markers or to trace trans-membrane profiles.

  16. Structures, dynamics, and water permeation free energy across bilayers of Lipid A and its analog studied with molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Tao; Huang, Tiefan; Qiao, Baofu; Zhang, Mo; Ma, Heng; Zhang, Lin

    2014-11-20

    Fundamental studies of the supramolecular layer structures, dynamics and water permeation free energy of hexa-acyl-chain Lipid A and its analogue of tetra-acyl chains would be useful for polymer membranes design for endotoxin removal in water treatment, drug delivery and other biotechnologies. In this work, we studied their supramolecular bilayer by using molecular dynamics simulations and efficient free energy computations. Our simulation accuracy was verified by the agreement between the bilayer structural properties (structure factor, bilayer thickness, and the area per lipid) and lateral diffusion coefficient in our simulation and experimental measurements. More importantly, our simulation for the first time illustrated hexagonal compact packing of the hydrocarbon acyl chains within a leaflet of Lipid A membrane (at 298 K and water content of 40 wt %), which is consistent with experiments. In contrast, Lipid A analogue is found with less ordered ripple structures at the same condition. Our study also demonstrated slower dynamics and larger and broader free energy barrier (∼23 kJ/mol) for water permeation for Lipid A, compared with that of Lipid A analogue. Moreover, the analysis of dynamics showed that highly hydrated hydrophilic diglucosamine backbone is structurally stable, whereas the interdigitated hydrophobic acyl chain tails inside the membrane with faster dynamics screen the aqueous environment from the lipid interior and also reinforce the membrane's structural stability. PMID:25310797

  17. Nuclear receptors, mitochondria and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Alaynick, William A

    2008-09-01

    Lipid metabolism is a continuum from emulsification and uptake of lipids in the intestine to cellular uptake and transport to compartments such as mitochondria. Whether fats are shuttled into lipid droplets in adipose tissue or oxidized in mitochondria and peroxisomes depends on metabolic substrate availability, energy balance and endocrine signaling of the organism. Several members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily are lipid-sensing factors that affect all aspects of lipid metabolism. The physiologic actions of glandular hormones (e.g. thyroid, mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid), vitamins (e.g. vitamins A and D) and reproductive hormones (e.g. progesterone, estrogen and testosterone) and their cognate receptors are well established. The peroxisome-proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) and liver X receptors (LXRs), acting in concert with PPARgamma Coactivator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha), have been shown to regulate insulin sensitivity and lipid handling. These receptors are the focus of intense pharmacologic studies to expand the armamentarium of small molecule ligands to treat diabetes and the metabolic syndrome (hypertension, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and obesity). Recently, additional partners of PGC-1alpha have moved to the forefront of metabolic research, the estrogen-related receptors (ERRs). Although no endogenous ligands for these receptors have been identified, phenotypic analyses of knockout mouse models demonstrate an important role for these molecules in substrate sensing and handling as well as mitochondrial function. PMID:18375192

  18. Two persistent organic pollutants which act through different xenosensors (alpha-endosulfan and 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) interact in a mixture and downregulate multiple genes involved in human hepatocyte lipid and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ambolet-Camoit, Ariane; Ottolenghi, Chris; Leblanc, Alix; Kim, Min Ji; Letourneur, Franck; Jacques, Sébastien; Cagnard, Nicolas; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Barouki, Robert; Aggerbeck, Martine

    2015-09-01

    Individuals, typically, are exposed to mixtures of environmental xenobiotics affecting multiple organs and acting through different xenosensors and pathways in species and cell-type specific manners. 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and α-endosulfan are Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) and endocrine disruptors which act through different xenosensors and accumulate in the liver. Our objective in this HEALS study was to investigate the effects of the mixture of these POPs on gene expression in a human-derived hepatocyte cell line, HepaRG. We found that, in spite of having largely uncorrelated effects, TCDD and α-endosulfan, when mixed, alter the expression of genes. The combined effects of the mixture of the POPs significantly altered the expression of 100 genes (42 up- and 58 down-regulated) whereas the same concentration of either POP alone did not alter significantly the expression of these genes. For 32 other genes, selective inhibitory crosstalk between TCDD and α-endosulfan was observed. One of the POPs inhibited the effect, on gene expression, of the other in the mixture although, when used alone, that POP did not affect expression. The expression of another 82 genes was significantly altered (up- or down-regulated) by a single POP. The addition of the second POP either increased, in the same direction, the effect on gene expression or had no further effect. At low concentrations (0.2 nM TCDD and 1 μM α-endosulfan), the POPs still had significant effects and the levels of expression of the corresponding proteins were found to be affected for some genes. Particularly striking was the 80-90% inhibition, by the mixture, of the expression of a number of genes of several hepatic intermediary metabolic pathways (glycerolipid metabolism, FXR/RXR activation, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, retinoid and bile acid biosynthesis), whereas each pollutant alone had only a moderate effect. PMID:26159488

  19. Lipidated Steroid Saponins from Dioscorea villosa (Wild Yam)†

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shi-Hui; Cai, Geping; Napolitano, José G.; Nikolić, Dejan; Lankin, David C.; McAlpine, James B.; van Breemen, Richard B.; Soejarto, Djaja D.; Pauli, Guido F.; Chen, Shao-Nong

    2014-01-01

    Two groups of lipidated steroid saponins including seven new compounds (2, 3, 5, and 7–10) were isolated from the widely used botanical, wild yam (Dioscorea villosa), employing a fractionation protocol of metabolomic mining. This methodology has very recently led to the isolation of 14 diarylheptanoids from the same plant. Together with these lipidated steroid saponins, they establish additional new markers for Dioscorea villosa. The lipidation of steroids with analogue long-chain fatty acids containing different degrees of unsaturation generates entire series of compounds which are difficult to purify and analyze. The structures of the two series of lipidated steroid saponins (series A and B) were demonstrated by a combination of 1D and 2D NMR as well as GC-MS after chemical modification. Series A was determined to be a mixture of lipidated spirostanol glycosides (1–5), while series B (6–10) proved to be a mixture of five lipidated clionasterol glucosides. The latter group represents the first derivatives of clionasterol to be found in D. villosa. The discovery of this specific structural type of aliphatic esters of steroid saponins expands the characterization of the secondary metabolome of D. villosa. It also may inspire biological studies which take into account the lipophilic character and significantly altered physiochemical characteristics of these otherwise relatively polar phytoconstituents. PMID:23968665

  20. Discovery of Desketoraloxifene Analogues as Inhibitors of Mammalian, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and NAPE Phospholipase D Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) hydrolyses cellular lipids to produce the important lipid second messenger phosphatidic acid. A PLD enzyme expressed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PldA) has been shown to be important in bacterial infection, and NAPE-PLD has emerged as being key in the synthesis of endocannabinoids. In order to better understand the biology and therapeutic potential of these less explored PLD enzymes, small molecule tools are required. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have been previously shown to inhibit mammalian PLD (PLD1 and PLD2). By targeted screening of a library of SERM analogues, additional parallel synthesis, and evaluation in multiple PLD assays, we discovered a novel desketoraloxifene-based scaffold that inhibited not only the two mammalian PLDs but also structurally divergent PldA and NAPE-PLD. This finding represents an important first step toward the development of small molecules possessing universal inhibition of divergent PLD enzymes to advance the field. PMID:25384256

  1. Influence of membrane phospholipid composition and structural organization on spontaneous lipid transfer between membranes.

    PubMed

    Pankov, R; Markovska, T; Antonov, P; Ivanova, L; Momchilova, A

    2006-09-01

    Investigations were carried out on the influence of phospholipid composition of model membranes on the processes of spontaneous lipid transfer between membranes. Acceptor vesicles were prepared from phospholipids extracted from plasma membranes of control and ras-transformed fibroblasts. Acceptor model membranes with manipulated levels of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), sphingomyelin and phosphatidic acid were also used in the studies. Donor vesicles were prepared of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and contained two fluorescent lipid analogues, NBD-PC and N-Rh-PE, at a self-quenching concentration. Lipid transfer rate was assessed by measuring the increase of fluorescence in acceptor membranes due to transfer of fluorescent lipid analogues from quenched donor to unquenched acceptor vesicles. The results showed that spontaneous NBD-PC transfer increased upon fluidization of acceptor vesicles. In addition, elevation of PE concentration in model membranes was also accompanied by an increase of lipid transfer to all series of acceptor vesicles. The results are discussed with respect to the role of lipid composition and structural order of cellular plasma membranes in the processes of spontaneous lipid exchange between membrane bilayers. PMID:17197729

  2. D-luciferin analogues: a multicolor toolbox for bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuan-Qiang; Liu, Jing; Wang, Pi; Zhang, Jingyu; Guo, Wei

    2012-08-20

    Colorful mixture: Three types of luciferin analogues, that is, alkylaminoluciferins, aminoselenoluciferin, and luciferins with a benzimidazole scaffold, have been reported. These analogues show excellent bioluminescent properties and great potential in bioluminescence imaging. PMID:22807027

  3. Solanapyrone analogues from a Hawaiian fungicolous fungus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four new solanayrone analogues (solanapyrones J-M; 1-4) have been isolated from an unidentified fungicolous fungus collected in Hawaii. The structures and relative configurations of these compounds were determined by analysis of ID NMR, 2D NMR, and MS data. Solanapyrone J(1) showed antifungal acti...

  4. New cytotoxic analogues of annonaceous acetogenins.

    PubMed

    Rodier, S; Le Huerou, Y; Renoux, B; Doyon, J; Renard, P; Pierré, A; Gesson, J P; Grée, R

    2001-01-01

    A series of new acetogenin analogues incorporating a central catechol moiety instead of the tetrahydrofuran ring(s) have been prepared and tested against L1210 leukemia cells. Although less potent than bullatacinone, which has the same terminal lactone, these compounds display interesting cell cycle effects. PMID:11962508

  5. Synthesis and Cytoxicity of Sempervirine and Analogues.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaohong; Yang, Chunying; Cleveland, John L; Bannister, Thomas D

    2016-03-01

    Sempervirine and analogues were synthesized using a route featuring Sonogashira and Larock Pd-catalyzed reactions. Structure-activity relationships were investigated using three human cancer cell lines. 10-Fluorosempervirine is the most potently cytotoxic member of the family yet described. PMID:26828413

  6. The arsonomethyl analogue of 3-phosphoglycerate.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, S R; Sparkes, M J; Dixon, H B

    1983-01-01

    4-Arsono-2-hydroxybutanoic acid, the analogue of 3-phosphoglycerate in which -CH2-AsO3H2 replaces -O-PO3H2, was synthesized. It proved to be a substrate for phosphoglycerate kinase. Its Michaelis constant was only slightly higher than that of the natural substrate, but its catalytic constant was about 1300 times smaller. PMID:6615422

  7. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-03-01

    Project overview provides background on carbonic anhydrase transport mechanism for CO2 in the human body and proposed approach for ARPA-E project to create a synthetic enzyme analogue and utilize it in a membrane for CO2 capture from flue gas.

  8. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of squalamine analogue.

    PubMed

    Kim, H S; Choi, B S; Kwon, K C; Lee, S O; Kwak, H J; Lee, C H

    2000-08-01

    Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of squalamine analogue 2 are reported. The synthesis of 2 was accomplished from bisnoralcohol 3. The spermidine moiety was introduced via reductive amination of an appropriately functionalized 3beta-aminosterol with spermidinyl aldehyde 17 utilizing sodium triacetoxyborohydride as the reducing agent. Compound 2 shows weaker antimicrobial activity than squalamine. PMID:11003150

  9. Acting Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Susan Archie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a fun game in which students act as electrons, protons, and neutrons. This activity is designed to help students develop a concrete understanding of the abstract concept of atomic structure. (DKM)

  10. ACT Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page helpful? Also known as: ACT; Activated Coagulation Time Formal name: Activated Clotting Time Related tests: ... in the blood called platelets and proteins called coagulation factors are activated in a sequence of steps ...

  11. Balancing Acts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication Balancing Acts Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of ... from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). It involves simulated trips down the ...

  12. Lipid Quality in Infant Nutrition: Current Knowledge and Future Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Delplanque, Bernadette; Gibson, Robert; Koletzko, Berthold; Lapillonne, Alexandre; Strandvik, Birgitta

    2015-07-01

    Dietary lipids are key for infants to not only meet their high energy needs but also fulfill numerous metabolic and physiological functions critical to their growth, development, and health. The lipid composition of breast milk varies during lactation and according to the mother's diet, whereas the lipid composition of infant formulae varies according to the blend of different fat sources. This report compares the compositions of lipids in breast milk and infant formulae, and highlights the roles of dietary lipids in term and preterm infants and their potential biological and health effects. The major differences between breast milk and formulae lie in a variety of saturated fatty acids (such as palmitic acid, including its structural position) and unsaturated fatty acids (including arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid), cholesterol, and complex lipids. The functional outcomes of these differences during infancy and for later child and adult life are still largely unknown, and some of them are discussed, but there is consensus that opportunities exist for improvements in the qualitative lipid supply to infants through the mother's diet or infant formulae. Furthermore, research is required in several areas, including the needs of term and preterm infants for long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, the sites of action and clinical effects of lipid mediators on immunity and inflammation, the role of lipids on metabolic, neurological, and immunological outcomes, and the mechanisms by which lipids act on short- and long-term health. PMID:25883056

  13. Lipid Quality in Infant Nutrition: Current Knowledge and Future Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Delplanque, Bernadette; Gibson, Robert; Koletzko, Berthold; Lapillonne, Alexandre; Strandvik, Birgitta

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dietary lipids are key for infants to not only meet their high energy needs but also fulfill numerous metabolic and physiological functions critical to their growth, development, and health. The lipid composition of breast milk varies during lactation and according to the mother's diet, whereas the lipid composition of infant formulae varies according to the blend of different fat sources. This report compares the compositions of lipids in breast milk and infant formulae, and highlights the roles of dietary lipids in term and preterm infants and their potential biological and health effects. The major differences between breast milk and formulae lie in a variety of saturated fatty acids (such as palmitic acid, including its structural position) and unsaturated fatty acids (including arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid), cholesterol, and complex lipids. The functional outcomes of these differences during infancy and for later child and adult life are still largely unknown, and some of them are discussed, but there is consensus that opportunities exist for improvements in the qualitative lipid supply to infants through the mother's diet or infant formulae. Furthermore, research is required in several areas, including the needs of term and preterm infants for long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, the sites of action and clinical effects of lipid mediators on immunity and inflammation, the role of lipids on metabolic, neurological, and immunological outcomes, and the mechanisms by which lipids act on short- and long-term health. PMID:25883056

  14. [Dmt(1)]DALDA analogues modified with tyrosine analogues at position 1.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yunxin; Lu, Dandan; Chen, Zhen; Ding, Yi; Chung, Nga N; Li, Tingyou; Schiller, Peter W

    2016-08-01

    Analogues of [Dmt(1)]DALDA (H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2; Dmt=2',6'-dimethyltyrosine), a potent μ opioid agonist peptide with mitochondria-targeted antioxidant activity were prepared by replacing Dmt with various 2',6'-dialkylated Tyr analogues, including 2',4',6'-trimethyltyrosine (Tmt), 2'-ethyl-6'-methyltyrosine (Emt), 2'-isopropyl-6'-methyltyrosine (Imt) and 2',6'-diethyltyrosine (Det). All compounds were selective μ opioid agonists and the Tmt(1)-, Emt(1) and Det(1)-analogues showed subnanomolar μ opioid receptor binding affinities. The Tmt(1)- and Emt(1)-analogues showed improved antioxidant activity compared to the Dmt(1)-parent peptide in the DPPH radical-scavenging capacity assay, and thus are of interest as drug candidates for neuropathic pain treatment. PMID:27301366

  15. Lipid Droplets And Cellular Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Tobias C.; Farese, Robert V.

    2013-01-01

    Among organelles, lipid droplets (LDs) uniquely constitute a hydrophobic phase in the aqueous environment of the cytosol. Their hydrophobic core of neutral lipids stores metabolic energy and membrane components, making LDs hubs for lipid metabolism. In addition, LDs are implicated in a number of other cellular functions, ranging from protein storage and degradation to viral replication. These processes are functionally linked to many physiological and pathological conditions, including obesity and related metabolic diseases. Despite their important functions and nearly ubiquitous presence in cells, many aspects of LD biology are unknown. In the past few years, the pace of LD investigation has increased, providing new insights. Here, we review the current knowledge of LD cell biology and its translation to physiology. PMID:22524315

  16. Lipid A and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ribi, E; Cantrell, J L; Takayama, K; Qureshi, N; Peterson, J; Ribi, H O

    1984-01-01

    Endotoxin isolated from Re mutants of Salmonella typhimurium or Salmonella minnesota and consisting only of 3-deoxy-D-mannooctulosonic acid (KDO) and lipid A synergistically enhances the ability of mycobacterial cell wall skeleton (CWS) to regress transplantable, line-10 tumor (hepatocellular carcinoma) in syngeneic guinea pigs. Tumor regression is rapid, and systemic tumor immunity concomitantly develops when as little as 50 micrograms of each of these two components is combined and injected intralesionally. Selective removal of KDO from endotoxin yields diphosphoryl lipid A, which retains its toxic properties. Subsequent selective removal of the phosphate moiety at the reducing end of the diphosphoryl lipid A molecule yields nontoxic, monophosphoryl lipid A (determined by lethality for chick embryos). Like the parent endotoxin or toxic diphosphoryl lipid A, monophosphoryl lipid A retains the ability to synergistically enhance the antitumor activity of mycobacterial CWS adjuvant. Both di- and monophosphoryl lipid A contain mixtures of a series of structural analogs. They can be separated chromatographically into single components that differ in number, type, and position of ester-linked fatty acids. Comparison of chromatographic fractions reveals that components of toxic and nontoxic lipid A can be paired according to structure. Each component of the pair has the same molecular structure, with the exception of an additional phosphate group in the toxic component. The toxicity of "lipid A's" liberated from endotoxin by acid hydrolysis appears to be determined by the proportion of di- and monophosphoryl lipid A in the hydrolysis mixture. Structural analogs of monophosphoryl lipid A, which differ in degree of O-acylation and type and distribution of fatty acids, have comparable antitumor activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6382555

  17. Recent advances in topoisomerase I-targeting agents, camptothecin analogues.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Kee; Lee, Namkyu

    2002-12-01

    The present review concentrates on camptothecin (CPT) analogues, the most extensively studied topoisomerase I (topo I) inhibitors, and provides concise information on the structural features of human topo I enzyme, mechanisms of interaction of CPT with topo I, structure-activity relationship study of CPT analogues including the influence of lactone stability on antitumor activity, and recent updates of valuable CPT analogues. PMID:12370044

  18. Lipid substrate specificity of phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase of Tetrahymena

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.D.

    1986-05-01

    The ciliate protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila forms about 60% of its phosphatidylcholine by methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine with S-adenosylmethionine using the enzyme phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase. Analogues of ethanolamine or of ethanolamine phosphate are incorporated into the phospholipids of Tetrahymena when cells are cultured in their presence. These compounds, 3-amino-1-propanol, 2-aminoethylphosphonate, 3-aminopropylphosphonate and N,N-dimethylaminoethylphosphonate replace from 50 to 75% of the ethanolamine phosphate in phosphatidylethanolamine. However, analysis of the phospholipids of lipid-altered Tetrahymena showed that none of the phosphatidylethanolamine analogues had been converted to the corresponding phosphatidylcholine analogue. No incorration of (/sup 14/C-CH/sub 3/)methionine into the phosphatidylcholine analogues could be demonstrated in vivo, nor was label from (/sup 3/H-CH/sub 3/)S-adenosylmethionine incorporated in virto. Thus, only phosphatidylethanolamine and its monomethyl and dimethyl derivatives have been found to be substrates for the phosphatidylethanoiamine N-methyltransferase. The enzyme therefore requires a phospholipid substrate containing an ester linkage between the alkylamine and phosphorus, with the amino group required to be ..beta.. to the alcohol.

  19. Lipids: Absorption and transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipid has long been recognized as an important dietary component. Dietary lipid (fat) is a critical source of metabolic energy and a substrate for the synthesis of metabolically active compounds (essential fatty acids), and serves as a carrier for other nutrients such as the fat-soluble vitamins A, ...

  20. Lysosomal Lipid Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Heike; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2011-01-01

    Lysosomal lipid storage diseases, or lipidoses, are inherited metabolic disorders in which typically lipids accumulate in cells and tissues. Complex lipids, such as glycosphingolipids, are constitutively degraded within the endolysosomal system by soluble hydrolytic enzymes with the help of lipid binding proteins in a sequential manner. Because of a functionally impaired hydrolase or auxiliary protein, their lipid substrates cannot be degraded, accumulate in the lysosome, and slowly spread to other intracellular membranes. In Niemann-Pick type C disease, cholesterol transport is impaired and unesterified cholesterol accumulates in the late endosome. In most lysosomal lipid storage diseases, the accumulation of one or few lipids leads to the coprecipitation of other hydrophobic substances in the endolysosomal system, such as lipids and proteins, causing a “traffic jam.” This can impair lysosomal function, such as delivery of nutrients through the endolysosomal system, leading to a state of cellular starvation. Therapeutic approaches are currently restricted to mild forms of diseases with significant residual catabolic activities and without brain involvement. PMID:21502308

  1. Lipids of Archaeal Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Roine, Elina; Bamford, Dennis H.

    2012-01-01

    Archaeal viruses represent one of the least known territory of the viral universe and even less is known about their lipids. Based on the current knowledge, however, it seems that, as in other viruses, archaeal viral lipids are mostly incorporated into membranes that reside either as outer envelopes or membranes inside an icosahedral capsid. Mechanisms for the membrane acquisition seem to be similar to those of viruses infecting other host organisms. There are indications that also some proteins of archaeal viruses are lipid modified. Further studies on the characterization of lipids in archaeal viruses as well as on their role in virion assembly and infectivity require not only highly purified viral material but also, for example, constant evaluation of the adaptability of emerging technologies for their analysis. Biological membranes contain proteins and membranes of archaeal viruses are not an exception. Archaeal viruses as relatively simple systems can be used as excellent tools for studying the lipid protein interactions in archaeal membranes. PMID:23049284

  2. Molecular design, synthesis and anticoagulant activity evaluation of fluorinated dabigatran analogues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Ren, Yu-Jie; Dong, Ming-Hui

    2016-06-15

    In the present study, a series of unreported fluorinated dabigatran analogues, which were based on the structural scaffold of dabigatran, were designed by computer-aided simulation. Fifteen fluorinated dabigatran analogues were screened and synthesized. All target compounds were characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, (19)F NMR and HRMS. According to the preliminary screening results of inhibition ratio, eleven analogues (inhibition ratio >90%) were evaluated for antithrombin activity in vitro (IC50). The test results expressed that all the analogues showed effective inhibitory activities against thrombin. Especially, compounds 8f, 8k and 8o, with IC50 values of 1.81, 3.21 and 2.16nM, respectively, showed remarkable anticoagulant activities which were in the range of reference drug dabigatran (IC50=1.23nM). Moreover, compounds 8k and 8o were developed to investigate their anticoagulant activities in vivo. In those part, compound 8o exhibited a fairly strong inhibitory action for arteriovenous thrombosis with inhibition ratio of 84.66%, which was comparable with that of dabigatran (85.07%). Docking simulations demonstrated that these compounds could act as candidates for further development of novel anticoagulant drugs. PMID:27166573

  3. [Reflections of a clinician on the switch from human to analogue insulin treatment].

    PubMed

    Deák, László

    2012-10-01

    The development of insulin therapy has not been stopped since the manufacturing of human insulin, because better mimic of physiological insulin response made it necessary to modify the human insulin molecule in order to create rapidly absorbing insulin analogues and 24-hour acting basal insulin analogues. Clinical observations indicate that the complete switch from human basal-bolus therapy to insulin analogues means not only "unit-for-unit" switch but it represents a transfer to an insulin therapy with different basal/bolus ratio as a result of different pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of insulin and the level of insulin resistance of the patient. With reference to a case-history, the author presents his experience on a switch from human insulin to insulin analogue. Furthermore, the author summarizes data obtained from a few cases reported in international literature which draw the attention to the fact that the basal/bolus ratio should be adjusted individually, which may be the key for the success in the therapy in these cases. PMID:23022882

  4. Sterculic Acid and Its Analogues Are Potent Inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Hao, Pan; Alaraj, Intisar Q M; Dulayymi, Juma'a R Al; Baird, Mark S; Liu, Jing; Liu, Qun

    2016-04-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a serious disease caused by Toxoplasma gondii, one of the most widespread parasites in the world. Lipid metabolism is important in the intracellular stage of T. gondii. Stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), a key enzyme for the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acid is predicted to exist in T. gondii. Sterculic acid has been shown to specifically inhibit SCD activity. Here, we examined whether sterculic acid and its methyl ester analogues exhibit anti-T. gondii effects in vitro. T. gondii-infected Vero cells were disintegrated at 36 hr because of the propagation and egress of intracellular tachyzoites. All test compounds inhibited tachyzoite propagation and egress, reducing the number of ruptured Vero cells by the parasites. Sterculic acid and the methyl esters also inhibited replication of intracellular tachyzoites in HFF cells. Among the test compounds, sterculic acid showed the most potent activity against T. gondii, with an EC50 value of 36.2 μM, compared with EC50 values of 248-428 μM for the methyl esters. Our study demonstrated that sterculic acid and its analogues are effective in inhibition of T. gondii growth in vitro, suggesting that these compounds or analogues targeting SCD could be effective agents for the treatment of toxoplasmosis. PMID:27180571

  5. Sterculic Acid and Its Analogues Are Potent Inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Pan; Alaraj, Intisar Q. M.; Dulayymi, Juma’a R. Al; Baird, Mark S.; Liu, Jing; Liu, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a serious disease caused by Toxoplasma gondii, one of the most widespread parasites in the world. Lipid metabolism is important in the intracellular stage of T. gondii. Stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), a key enzyme for the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acid is predicted to exist in T. gondii. Sterculic acid has been shown to specifically inhibit SCD activity. Here, we examined whether sterculic acid and its methyl ester analogues exhibit anti-T. gondii effects in vitro. T. gondii-infected Vero cells were disintegrated at 36 hr because of the propagation and egress of intracellular tachyzoites. All test compounds inhibited tachyzoite propagation and egress, reducing the number of ruptured Vero cells by the parasites. Sterculic acid and the methyl esters also inhibited replication of intracellular tachyzoites in HFF cells. Among the test compounds, sterculic acid showed the most potent activity against T. gondii, with an EC50 value of 36.2 μM, compared with EC50 values of 248-428 μM for the methyl esters. Our study demonstrated that sterculic acid and its analogues are effective in inhibition of T. gondii growth in vitro, suggesting that these compounds or analogues targeting SCD could be effective agents for the treatment of toxoplasmosis. PMID:27180571

  6. Synthesis and Th1-immunostimulatory activity of α-galactosylceramide analogues bearing a halogen-containing or selenium-containing acyl chain.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Imran; Hanashima, Shinya; Nomura, Takuto; Lethu, Sébastien; Tsuchikawa, Hiroshi; Murata, Michio; Kusaka, Hiroki; Kita, Shunsuke; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2016-08-15

    A novel series of CD1d ligand α-galactosylceramides (α-GalCers) were synthesized by incorporation of the heavy atoms Br and Se in the acyl chain backbone of α-galactosyl-N-cerotoylphytosphingosine. The synthetic analogues are potent CD1d ligands and stimulate mouse invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells to selectively enhance Th1 cytokine production. These synthetic analogues would be efficient X-ray crystallographic probes to disclose precise atomic positions of alkyl carbons and lipid-protein interactions in KRN7000/CD1d complexes. PMID:27325450

  7. Vitamin E Analogue Improves Rabbit Sperm Quality during the Process of Cryopreservation through Its Antioxidative Action

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhendong; Fan, Xiaoteng; Lv, Yinghua; Zhang, Nan; Fan, Chuning; Zhang, Pengfei; Zeng, Wenxian

    2015-01-01

    The process of cryopreservation results in high concentration of reactive oxygen species which is detrimental to spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to investigate whether addition of vitamin E analogue to freezing extender can facilitate the cryosurvival of spermatozoa in rabbits, and how vitamin E protects spermatozoa against damages during the process of preservation. Freshly ejaculated semen was diluted with Tris-citrate-glucose extender supplemented with different concentrations of Trolox (a vitamin E analogue). The level of radical oxygen species (ROS) in spermatozoa that was exposed to Trolox was significantly lower than that of the control during each step of the process of preservation. The percentage of frozen-thawed spermatozoa with lipid peroxidation in the Trolox treatments was significantly lower than that of the control. The motility, intact acrosome, membrane integrity and mitochondrial potentials of the frozen-thawed spermatozoa in the treatment of 200 μM Trolox were significantly higher than those of the control. These observations suggest that addition of vitamin E to a freezing extender leads to higher integrity of acrosome, plasma membrane and mitochondrial membrane potential as well as higher motility. Vitamin E protects spermatozoa through its capacity to quench ROS accumulation and lipid peroxidation during the process of preservation. Addition of Trolox is recommended to facilitate the improvement of semen preservation for the rabbit breeding industry. PMID:26700473

  8. S-Ribosylhomocysteine analogues with the carbon-5 and sulfur atoms replaced by a vinyl or (fluoro)vinyl unit

    PubMed Central

    Wnuk, Stanislaw F.; Lalama, Jennifer; Garmendia, Craig A.; Robert, Jenay; Zhu, Jinge; Pei, Dehua

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of the protected ribose or xylose 5-aldehyde with sulfonyl-stabilized fluorophosphonate gave (fluoro)vinyl sulfones. Stannyldesulfonylation followed by iododestannylation afforded 5,6-dideoxy-6-fluoro-6-iodo-d-ribo or xylo-hex-5-enofuranoses. Coupling of the hexenofuranoses with alkylzinc bromides gave ten-carbon ribosyl- and xylosylhomocysteine analogues incorporating a fluoroalkene. The fluoroalkenyl and alkenyl analogues were evaluated for inhibition of Bacillus subtilis S-ribosylhomocysteinase (LuxS). One of the compounds, 3,5,6-trideoxy-6-fluoro-d-erythro-hex-5-enofuranose, acted as a competitive inhibitor of moderate potency (KI = 96 µM). PMID:18375129

  9. Avanti lipid tools: connecting lipids, technology, and cell biology.

    PubMed

    Sims, Kacee H; Tytler, Ewan M; Tipton, John; Hill, Kasey L; Burgess, Stephen W; Shaw, Walter A

    2014-08-01

    Lipid research is challenging owing to the complexity and diversity of the lipidome. Here we review a set of experimental tools developed for the seasoned lipid researcher, as well as, those who are new to the field of lipid research. Novel tools for probing protein-lipid interactions, applications for lipid binding antibodies, enhanced systems for the cellular delivery of lipids, improved visualization of lipid membranes using gold-labeled lipids, and advances in mass spectrometric analysis techniques will be discussed. Because lipid mediators are known to participate in a host of signal transduction and trafficking pathways within the cell, a comprehensive lipid toolbox that aids the science of lipidomics research is essential to better understand the molecular mechanisms of interactions between cellular components. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Tools to study lipid functions. PMID:24954118

  10. DNA information: from digital code to analogue structure.

    PubMed

    Travers, A A; Muskhelishvili, G; Thompson, J M T

    2012-06-28

    The digital linear coding carried by the base pairs in the DNA double helix is now known to have an important component that acts by altering, along its length, the natural shape and stiffness of the molecule. In this way, one region of DNA is structurally distinguished from another, constituting an additional form of encoded information manifest in three-dimensional space. These shape and stiffness variations help in guiding and facilitating the DNA during its three-dimensional spatial interactions. Such interactions with itself allow communication between genes and enhanced wrapping and histone-octamer binding within the nucleosome core particle. Meanwhile, interactions with proteins can have a reduced entropic binding penalty owing to advantageous sequence-dependent bending anisotropy. Sequence periodicity within the DNA, giving a corresponding structural periodicity of shape and stiffness, also influences the supercoiling of the molecule, which, in turn, plays an important facilitating role. In effect, the super-helical density acts as an analogue regulatory mode in contrast to the more commonly acknowledged purely digital mode. Many of these ideas are still poorly understood, and represent a fundamental and outstanding biological question. This review gives an overview of very recent developments, and hopefully identifies promising future lines of enquiry. PMID:22615471

  11. Design and synthesis of new fluconazole analogues.

    PubMed

    Pore, Vandana S; Agalave, Sandip G; Singh, Pratiksha; Shukla, Praveen K; Kumar, Vikash; Siddiqi, Mohammad I

    2015-06-21

    We have synthesized new fluconazole analogues containing two different 1,2,3-triazole units in the side chain. The synthesis of new amide analogues using a variety of acids is also described. All the compounds showed very good antifungal activity. A hemolysis study of the most active compounds 6e and 13j showed that both compounds did not cause any hemolysis at the dilutions tested. These compounds did not exhibit any toxicity to L929 cells at MIC and lower concentrations. In the docking study, the overall binding mode of 6e and 13j appeared to be reasonable and provided a good insight into the structural basis of inhibition of Candida albicans Cyp51 by these compounds. PMID:25975803

  12. Synthesis of Lipidated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Mejuch, Tom; Waldmann, Herbert

    2016-08-17

    Protein lipidation is one of the major post-translational modifications (PTM) of proteins. The attachment of the lipid moiety frequently determines the localization and the function of the lipoproteins. Lipidated proteins participate in many essential biological processes in eukaryotic cells, including vesicular trafficking, signal transduction, and regulation of the immune response. Malfunction of these cellular processes usually leads to various diseases such as cancer. Understanding the mechanism of cellular signaling and identifying the protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions in which the lipoproteins are involved is a crucial task. To achieve these goals, fully functional lipidated proteins are required. However, access to lipoproteins by means of standard expression is often rather limited. Therefore, semisynthetic methods, involving the synthesis of lipidated peptides and their subsequent chemoselective ligation to yield full-length lipoproteins, were developed. In this Review we summarize the commonly used methods for lipoprotein synthesis and the development of the corresponding chemoselective ligation techniques. Several key studies involving full-length semisynthetic lipidated Ras, Rheb, and LC3 proteins are presented. PMID:27444727

  13. Synthesis of constrained analogues of tryptophan

    PubMed Central

    Negrato, Marco; Abbiati, Giorgio; Dell’Acqua, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Summary A Lewis acid-catalysed diastereoselective [4 + 2] cycloaddition of vinylindoles and methyl 2-acetamidoacrylate, leading to methyl 3-acetamido-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrocarbazole-3-carboxylate derivatives, is described. Treatment of the obtained cycloadducts under hydrolytic conditions results in the preparation of a small library of compounds bearing the free amino acid function at C-3 and pertaining to the class of constrained tryptophan analogues. PMID:26664620

  14. Synthesis and cytotoxic activity of acetogenin analogues.

    PubMed

    Rodier, S; Le Huérou, Y; Renoux, B; Doyon, J; Renard, P; Pierré, A; Gesson, J P; Grée, R

    2000-06-19

    A set of 16 new simplified analogues of acetogenins has been designed based on: (i) the replacement of the bis THF moiety of these natural products by an ethylene glycol bis ether unit; (ii) the introduction of different lipophilic side chains (alkyl, aryl, dialkylamino, O-cholesteryl); (iii) the presence of the same terminal isolactone. In vitro cytotoxic activity against L1210 leukemia is reported. PMID:10890167

  15. Efficient synthesis of esermethole and its analogues.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongyun; Zhao, Yuanhong; Dai, Xiaoyong; Liu, Jianping; Li, Liang; Zhang, Hongbin

    2011-06-01

    In this work, a general and flexible synthetic route towards the synthesis of pyrroloindoline alkaloids was developed. This new strategy features with a palladium mediated sequential arylation-allylation of o-bromoanilides and leads to the construction of oxindoles bearing a full carbon quaternary center. The cheap triphenylphosphine was proved to be a highly effective ligand for this one pot transformation. On the basis of this new method, esermethole and its analogues were synthesized. PMID:21472186

  16. The Brookhaven electron analogue, 1953--1957

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, M.

    1991-12-18

    The following topics are discussed on the Brookhaven electron analogue: L.J. Haworth and E.L. VanHorn letters; Original G.K. Green outline for report; General description; Parameter list; Mechanical Assembly; Alignment; Degaussing; Vacuum System; Injection System; The pulsed inflector; RF System; Ferrite Cavity; Pick-up electrodes and preamplifiers; Radio Frequency power amplifier; Lens supply; Controls and Power; and RF acceleration summary.

  17. Nano-Self-Assemblies Based on Synthetic Analogues of Mycobacterial Monomycoloyl Glycerol and DDA: Supramolecular Structure and Adjuvant Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Martin-Bertelsen, Birte; Korsholm, Karen S; Roces, Carla B; Nielsen, Maja H; Christensen, Dennis; Franzyk, Henrik; Yaghmur, Anan; Foged, Camilla

    2016-08-01

    The mycobacterial cell-wall lipid monomycoloyl glycerol (MMG) is a potent immunostimulator, and cationic liposomes composed of a shorter synthetic analogue (MMG-1) and dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA) bromide represent a promising adjuvant that induces strong antigen-specific Th1 and Th17 responses. In the present study, we investigated the supramolecular structure and in vivo adjuvant activity of dispersions based on binary mixtures of DDA and an array of synthetic MMG-1 analogues (MMG-2/3/5/6) displaying longer (MMG-2) or shorter (MMG-3) alkyl chain lengths, or variations in stereochemistry of the polar headgroup (MMG-5) or of the hydrophobic moiety (MMG-6). Synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering experiments and cryo transmission electron microscopy revealed that DDA:MMG-1/2/5/6 dispersions consisted of unilamellar and multilamellar vesicles (ULVs/MLVs), whereas a coexistence of both ULVs and hexosomes was observed for DDA:MMG-3, depending on the DDA:MMG molar ratio. The studies also showed that ULVs were formed, regardless of the structural characteristics of the neat MMG analogues in excess buffer [lamellar (MMG-1/2/5) or inverse hexagonal (MMG-3/6) phases]. Immunization of mice with a chlamydia antigen surface-adsorbed to DDA:MMG-1/3/6 dispersions revealed that all tested adjuvants were immunoactive and induced strong Th1 and Th17 responses with a potential for a central effector memory profile. The MMG-1 and MMG-6 analogues were equally immunoactive in vivo upon incorporation into DDA liposomes, despite the reported highly different immunostimulatory properties of the neat analogues in vitro, which were attributed to the different nanostructural characteristics. This clearly demonstrates that optimal formulation and delivery of MMG analogues to the immune system is of major importance and challenges the use of in vitro screening assays with nondispersed compounds to identify potential new vaccine adjuvants. PMID:27377146

  18. Blood Loss Estimation Using Gauze Visual Analogue

    PubMed Central

    Ali Algadiem, Emran; Aleisa, Abdulmohsen Ali; Alsubaie, Huda Ibrahim; Buhlaiqah, Noora Radhi; Algadeeb, Jihad Bagir; Alsneini, Hussain Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Estimating intraoperative blood loss can be a difficult task, especially when blood is mostly absorbed by gauze. In this study, we have provided an improved method for estimating blood absorbed by gauze. Objectives To develop a guide to estimate blood absorbed by surgical gauze. Materials and Methods A clinical experiment was conducted using aspirated blood and common surgical gauze to create a realistic amount of absorbed blood in the gauze. Different percentages of staining were photographed to create an analogue for the amount of blood absorbed by the gauze. Results A visual analogue scale was created to aid the estimation of blood absorbed by the gauze. The absorptive capacity of different gauze sizes was determined when the gauze was dripping with blood. The amount of reduction in absorption was also determined when the gauze was wetted with normal saline before use. Conclusions The use of a visual analogue may increase the accuracy of blood loss estimation and decrease the consequences related to over or underestimation of blood loss. PMID:27626017

  19. Lipid-absorbing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr.; Wallace, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    The removal of bile acids and cholesterol by polymeric absorption is discussed in terms of micelle-polymer interaction. The results obtained with a polymer composed of 75 parts PEO and 25 parts PB plus curing ingredients show an absorption of 305 to 309%, based on original polymer weight. Particle size effects on absorption rate are analyzed. It is concluded that crosslinked polyethylene oxide polymers will absorb water, crosslinked polybutadiene polymers will absorb lipids; neither polymer will absorb appreciable amounts of lipids from micellar solutions of lipids in water.

  20. A Lipid Gate for the Peripheral Control of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hohmann, Andrea G.; Seybold, Virginia; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Cells in injured and inflamed tissues produce a number of proalgesic lipid-derived mediators, which excite nociceptive neurons by activating selective G-protein-coupled receptors or ligand-gated ion channels. Recent work has shown that these proalgesic factors are counteracted by a distinct group of lipid molecules that lower nociceptor excitability and attenuate nociception in peripheral tissues. Analgesic lipid mediators include endogenous agonists of cannabinoid receptors (endocannabinoids), lipid-amide agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, and products of oxidative metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids via cytochrome P450 and other enzyme pathways. Evidence indicates that these lipid messengers are produced and act at different stages of inflammation and the response to tissue injury, and may be part of a peripheral gating mechanism that regulates the access of nociceptive information to the spinal cord and the brain. Growing knowledge about this peripheral control system may be used to discover safer medicines for pain. PMID:25392487

  1. Peripheral gating of pain signals by endogenous analgesic lipids

    PubMed Central

    Piomelli, Daniele; Sasso, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Primary sensory afferents and their neighboring host-defense cells are a rich source of lipid-derived mediators that contribute to the sensation of pain caused by tissue damage and inflammation. But an increasing number of lipid molecules have been shown to act in an opposite way, to suppress the inflammatory process, restore homeostasis in damaged tissues and attenuate pain sensitivity by regulating neural pathways that transmit nociceptive signals from the periphery of the body to the central nervous system. PMID:24473264

  2. Metabolism. Part III: Lipids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the metabolic processes of complex lipids, including saponification, activation and transport, and the beta-oxidation spiral. Discusses fatty acid degradation in regard to biochemical energy and ketone bodies. (TW)

  3. Cytarabine Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Cytarabine lipid complex is used to treat lymphomatous meningitis (a type of cancer in the covering of ... to take.tell your doctor if you have meningitis. Your doctor will probably not want you to ...

  4. Lipid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism is the process your body uses to make energy from the food you eat. Food is ... disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Lipid metabolism disorders, such as Gaucher disease and Tay-Sachs ...

  5. Synthetic analogues of the natural compound cryphonectric acid interfere with photosynthetic machinery through two different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Róbson Ricardo; Pereira, Wagner Luiz; Tomaz, Deborah Campos; de Oliveira, Fabrício Marques; Giberti, Samuele; Forlani, Giuseppe

    2013-06-12

    A series of isobenzofuran-1(3H)-ones (phthalides), analogues of the naturally occurring phytotoxin cryphonectric acid, were designed, synthesized, and fully characterized by NMR, IR, and MS analyses. Their synthesis was achieved via condensation, aromatization, and acetylation reactions. The measurement of the electron transport chain in spinach chloroplasts showed that several derivatives are capable of interfering with the photosynthetic apparatus. Few of them were found to inhibit the basal rate, but a significant inhibition was brought about only at concentrations exceeding 50 μM. Some other analogues acted as uncouplers or energy transfer inhibitors, with a remarkably higher effectiveness. Isobenzofuranone addition to the culture medium inhibited the growth of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus , with patterns consistent with the effects measured in vitro upon isolated chloroplasts. The most active derivatives, being able to completely suppress algal growth at 20 μM, may represent structures to be exploited for the design of new active ingredients for weed control. PMID:23678958

  6. Immobilization and activity assay of cytochrome P450 on patterned lipid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Morigaki, Kenichi . E-mail: morigaki-kenichi@aist.go.jp; Tatsu, Yoshiro; Yumoto, Noboru; Imaishi, Hiromasa . E-mail: himaish@kobe-u.ac.jp

    2007-04-20

    We report on a methodology for immobilizing cytochrome P450 on the surface of micropatterned lipid bilayer membranes and measuring the enzymatic activity. The patterned bilayer comprised a matrix of polymeric lipid bilayers and embedded fluid lipid bilayers. The polymeric lipid bilayer domains act as a barrier to confine fluid lipid bilayers in defined areas and as a framework to stabilize embedded membranes. The fluid bilayer domains, on the other hand, can contain lipid compositions that facilitate the fusion between lipid membranes, and are intended to be used as the binding agent of microsomes containing rat CYP1A1. By optimizing the membrane compositions of the fluid bilayers, we could selectively immobilize microsomal membranes on these domains. The enzymatic activity was significantly higher on lipid bilayer substrates compared with direct adsorption on glass. Furthermore, competitive assay experiment between two fluorogenic substrates demonstrated the feasibility of bioassays based on immobilized P450s.

  7. Immobilization and activity assay of cytochrome P450 on patterned lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Morigaki, Kenichi; Tatsu, Yoshiro; Yumoto, Noboru; Imaishi, Hiromasa

    2007-04-20

    We report on a methodology for immobilizing cytochrome P450 on the surface of micropatterned lipid bilayer membranes and measuring the enzymatic activity. The patterned bilayer comprised a matrix of polymeric lipid bilayers and embedded fluid lipid bilayers. The polymeric lipid bilayer domains act as a barrier to confine fluid lipid bilayers in defined areas and as a framework to stabilize embedded membranes. The fluid bilayer domains, on the other hand, can contain lipid compositions that facilitate the fusion between lipid membranes, and are intended to be used as the binding agent of microsomes containing rat CYP1A1. By optimizing the membrane compositions of the fluid bilayers, we could selectively immobilize microsomal membranes on these domains. The enzymatic activity was significantly higher on lipid bilayer substrates compared with direct adsorption on glass. Furthermore, competitive assay experiment between two fluorogenic substrates demonstrated the feasibility of bioassays based on immobilized P450s. PMID:17335776

  8. Acyl-lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; Debono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P; Franke, Rochus B; Graham, Ian A; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:23505340

  9. Acyl-lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; Debono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P; Franke, Rochus B; Graham, Ian A; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2010-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:22303259

  10. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2010-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:22303259

  11. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:23505340

  12. Characterization of the intrinsic activity for a novel class of cannabinoid receptor ligands: Indole Quinuclidine analogues

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Lirit N.; Ford, Benjamin M.; Madadi, Nikhil R.; Penthala, Narsimha R.; Crooks, Peter A.; Prather, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Our laboratory recently reported that a group of novel indole quinuclidine analogues bind with nanomolar affinity to cannabinoid type-1 and type-2 receptors. This study characterized the intrinsic activity of these compounds by determining whether they exhibit agonist, antagonist, or inverse agonist activity at cannabinoid type-1 and/or type-2 receptors. Cannabinoid receptors activate Gi/Go-proteins that then proceed to inhibit activity of the downstream intracellular effector adenylyl cyclase. Therefore, intrinsic activity was quantified by measuring the ability of compounds to modulate levels of intracellular cAMP in intact cells. Concerning cannabinoid type-1 receptors endogenously expressed in Neuro2A cells, a single analogue exhibited agonist activity, while eight acted as neutral antagonists and two possessed inverse agonist activity. For cannabinoid type-2 receptors stably expressed in CHO cells, all but two analogues acted as agonists; these two exceptions exhibited inverse agonist activity. Confirming specificity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors, modulation of adenylyl cyclase activity by all proposed agonists and inverse agonists was blocked by co-incubation with the neutral cannabinoid type-1 antagonist O-2050. All proposed cannabinoid type-1 receptor antagonists attenuated adenylyl cyclase modulation by cannabinoid agonist CP-55,940. Specificity at cannabinoid type-2 receptors was confirmed by failure of all compounds to modulate adenylyl cyclase activity in CHO cells devoid of cannabinoid type-2 receptors. Further characterization of select analogues demonstrated concentration-dependent modulation of adenylyl cyclase activity with potencies similar to their respective affinities for cannabinoid receptors. Therefore, indole quinuclidines are a novel structural class of compounds exhibiting high affinity and a range of intrinsic activity at cannabinoid type-1 and type-2 receptors. PMID:24858620

  13. Phloem Proteomics Reveals New Lipid-Binding Proteins with a Putative Role in Lipid-Mediated Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Barbaglia, Allison M.; Tamot, Banita; Greve, Veronica; Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Global climate changes inversely affect our ability to grow the food required for an increasing world population. To combat future crop loss due to abiotic stress, we need to understand the signals responsible for changes in plant development and the resulting adaptations, especially the signaling molecules traveling long-distance through the plant phloem. Using a proteomics approach, we had identified several putative lipid-binding proteins in the phloem exudates. Simultaneously, we identified several complex lipids as well as jasmonates. These findings prompted us to propose that phloem (phospho-) lipids could act as long-distance developmental signals in response to abiotic stress, and that they are released, sensed, and moved by phloem lipid-binding proteins (Benning et al., 2012). Indeed, the proteins we identified include lipases that could release a signaling lipid into the phloem, putative receptor components, and proteins that could mediate lipid-movement. To test this possible protein-based lipid-signaling pathway, three of the proteins, which could potentially act in a relay, are characterized here: (I) a putative GDSL-motif lipase (II) a PIG-P-like protein, with a possible receptor-like function; (III) and PLAFP (phloem lipid-associated family protein), a predicted lipid-binding protein of unknown function. Here we show that all three proteins bind lipids, in particular phosphatidic acid (PtdOH), which is known to participate in intracellular stress signaling. Genes encoding these proteins are expressed in the vasculature, a prerequisite for phloem transport. Cellular localization studies show that the proteins are not retained in the endoplasmic reticulum but surround the cell in a spotted pattern that has been previously observed with receptors and plasmodesmatal proteins. Abiotic signals that induce the production of PtdOH also regulate the expression of GDSL-lipase and PLAFP, albeit in opposite patterns. Our findings suggest that while all three

  14. Phloem Proteomics Reveals New Lipid-Binding Proteins with a Putative Role in Lipid-Mediated Signaling.

    PubMed

    Barbaglia, Allison M; Tamot, Banita; Greve, Veronica; Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Global climate changes inversely affect our ability to grow the food required for an increasing world population. To combat future crop loss due to abiotic stress, we need to understand the signals responsible for changes in plant development and the resulting adaptations, especially the signaling molecules traveling long-distance through the plant phloem. Using a proteomics approach, we had identified several putative lipid-binding proteins in the phloem exudates. Simultaneously, we identified several complex lipids as well as jasmonates. These findings prompted us to propose that phloem (phospho-) lipids could act as long-distance developmental signals in response to abiotic stress, and that they are released, sensed, and moved by phloem lipid-binding proteins (Benning et al., 2012). Indeed, the proteins we identified include lipases that could release a signaling lipid into the phloem, putative receptor components, and proteins that could mediate lipid-movement. To test this possible protein-based lipid-signaling pathway, three of the proteins, which could potentially act in a relay, are characterized here: (I) a putative GDSL-motif lipase (II) a PIG-P-like protein, with a possible receptor-like function; (III) and PLAFP (phloem lipid-associated family protein), a predicted lipid-binding protein of unknown function. Here we show that all three proteins bind lipids, in particular phosphatidic acid (PtdOH), which is known to participate in intracellular stress signaling. Genes encoding these proteins are expressed in the vasculature, a prerequisite for phloem transport. Cellular localization studies show that the proteins are not retained in the endoplasmic reticulum but surround the cell in a spotted pattern that has been previously observed with receptors and plasmodesmatal proteins. Abiotic signals that induce the production of PtdOH also regulate the expression of GDSL-lipase and PLAFP, albeit in opposite patterns. Our findings suggest that while all three

  15. Phloem proteomics reveals new lipid-binding proteins with a putative role in lipid-mediated signaling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barbaglia, Allison M.; Tamot, Banita; Greve, Veronica; Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne

    2016-04-28

    Global climate changes inversely affect our ability to grow the food required for an increasing world population. To combat future crop loss due to abiotic stress, we need to understand the signals responsible for changes in plant development and the resulting adaptations, especially the signaling molecules traveling long-distance through the plant phloem. Using a proteomics approach, we had identified several putative lipid-binding proteins in the phloem exudates. Simultaneously, we identified several complex lipids as well as jasmonates. These findings prompted us to propose that phloem (phospho-) lipids could act as long-distance developmental signals in response to abiotic stress, and thatmore » they are released, sensed, and moved by phloem lipid-binding proteins (Benning et al., 2012). Indeed, the proteins we identified include lipases that could release a signaling lipid into the phloem, putative receptor components, and proteins that could mediate lipid-movement. To test this possible protein-based lipid-signaling pathway, three of the proteins, which could potentially act in a relay, are characterized here: (I) a putative GDSL-motif lipase (II) a PIG-P-like protein, with a possible receptor-like function; (III) and PLAFP (phloem lipid-associated family protein), a predicted lipid-binding protein of unknown function. Here we show that all three proteins bind lipids, in particular phosphatidic acid (PtdOH), which is known to participate in intracellular stress signaling. Genes encoding these proteins are expressed in the vasculature, a prerequisite for phloem transport. Cellular localization studies show that the proteins are not retained in the endoplasmic reticulum but surround the cell in a spotted pattern that has been previously observed with receptors and plasmodesmatal proteins. Abiotic signals that induce the production of PtdOH also regulate the expression of GDSL-lipase and PLAFP, albeit in opposite patterns. Our findings suggest that while all

  16. Lipid membranes for membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kukol, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of membrane proteins requires the setup of an accurate representation of lipid bilayers. This chapter describes the setup of a lipid bilayer system from scratch using generally available tools, starting with a definition of the lipid molecule POPE, generation of a lipid bilayer, energy minimization, MD simulation, and data analysis. The data analysis includes the calculation of area and volume per lipid, deuterium order parameters, self-diffusion constant, and the electron density profile. PMID:25330959

  17. Three Efficient Methods for Preparation of Coelenterazine Analogues.

    PubMed

    Shakhmin, Anton; Hall, Mary P; Walker, Joel R; Machleidt, Thomas; Binkowski, Brock F; Wood, Keith V; Kirkland, Thomas A

    2016-07-18

    The growing popularity of bioluminescent assays has highlighted the need for coelenterazine analogues possessing properties tuned for specific applications. However, the structural diversity of known coelenterazine analogues has been limited by current syntheses. Known routes for the preparation of coelenterazine analogues employ harsh reaction conditions that limit access to many substituents and functional groups. Novel synthetic routes reported here establish simple and robust methods for synthesis and investigation of structurally diverse marine luciferase substrates. Specifically, these new routes allow synthesis of coelenterazine analogues containing various heterocyclic motifs and substituted aromatic groups with diverse electronic substituents at the R(2) position. Interesting analogues described herein were characterized by their physicochemical properties, bioluminescent half-life, light output, polarity and cytotoxicity. Some of the analogues represent leads that can be utilized in the development of improved bioluminescent systems. PMID:27305599

  18. Comparative Effectiveness and Safety of Premixed Insulin Analogues in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Qayyum, Rehan; Bolen, Shari; Maruthur, Nisa; Feldman, Leonard; Wilson, Lisa M.; Marinopoulos, Spyridon S.; Ranasinghe, Padmini; Amer, Muhammed; Bass, Eric B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Evidence comparing premixed insulin analogues with other antidiabetic agents is urgently required to guide appropriate therapy. Purpose To summarize the English-language literature on the effectiveness and safety of premixed insulin analogues as compared with other antidiabetic agents in adults with type 2 diabetes. Data Sources We searched MEDLINE®, EMBASE®, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from inception to February 2008, and unpublished data from U.S. Food and Drug Administration, European Medicines Agency, and industry. Study Selection Studies with control arms that compared premixed insulin analogues to another antidiabetic medication in adults with type 2 diabetes Data Extraction Serial abstraction by 2 reviewers using standardized protocols Data Synthesis Evidence from clinical trials was inconclusive for clinical outcomes, such as mortality. Therefore, the review focused on intermediate outcomes. Premixed analogues were similar to premixed human insulin in lowering fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1c, and the incidence of hypoglycemia but were more effective in lowering postprandial glucose (mean difference = -1.1 mmol/L; 95% CI = -1.4 to -0.7 mmol/L [-19.2 mg/dL; 95% CI=-25.9 to -12.5 mg/dL]). As compared to long-acting insulin analogues, premixed analogues were superior in lowering postprandial glucose (mean difference= -1.5 mmol/L; 95%CI = -1.9 to -1.2 mmol/L [-27.9 mg/dL; 95% CI=-34.3 to -21.5 mg/dL]) and hemoglobin A1c (mean difference=-0.39%; 95% CI=-0.50% to -0.28%) but inferior in lowering fasting glucose (mean difference=0.7 mmol/L; 95%CI = 0.3 to 1.0 mmol/L [12.0 mg/dL; 95% CI=6.0 to 18.1 mg/dL]) and had higher incidence of hypoglycemia. When compared to noninsulin antidiabetic agents, premixed analogues were more effective in lowering fasting glucose (mean difference= -1.1mmol/L; 95%CI = -1.7 to 0.6 mmol/L [-20.5 mg/dL; 95% CI=-29.9 to -11.2 mg/dL]), postprandial glucose (mean difference= -2.1 mmol/L; 95%CI

  19. CO2 Removal using a Synthetic Analogue of Carbonic Anhydrase

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-09-14

    Project attempts to develop a synthetic analogue for carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it in a membrane for separation of CO2 from coal power plant flue gas. Conference poster presents result of first 9 months of project progress including concept, basic system architecture and membrane properties target, results of molecular modeling for analogue - CO2 interaction, and next steps of testing analogue resistance to flue gas contaminants.

  20. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission natural analogue research program

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, L.A.; Ott, W.R.

    1995-09-01

    This article describes the natural analogue research program of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC). It contains information on the regulatory context and organizational structure of the high-level radioactive waste research program plan. It also includes information on the conditions and processes constraining selection of natural analogues, describes initiatives of the US NRC, and describes the role of analogues in the licensing process.

  1. Conformationally restrained aromatic analogues of fosmidomycin and FR900098.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Thomas; Schlüter, Katrin; Pein, Miriam; Behrendt, Christoph; Bergmann, Bärbel; Walter, Rolf D

    2007-07-01

    The synthesis and in-vitro antimalarial activity of conformationally restrained bis(pivaloyloxymethyl) ester analogues of the natural product fosmidomycin is presented. In contrast to alpha-aryl-substituted analogues, conformationally restrained aromatic analogues exhibit only moderate in-vitro antimalarial activity against the chloroquine-sensitive strain 3D7 of Plasmodium falciparum. The most active derivative displays an IC(50) value of 47 microM. PMID:17611943

  2. Analogue factoring algorithm based on polychromatic interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamma, Vincenzo; Garuccio, Augusto; Shih, Yanhua

    2010-08-01

    We present a novel factorization algorithm which can be computed using an analogue computer based on a polychromatic source with a given wavelength bandwidth, a multi-path interferometer and a spectrometer. The core of this algorithm stands on the measurement of the periodicity of a "factoring" function given by an exponential sum at continuous argument by recording a sequence of interferograms associated with suitable units of displacement in the inteferometer. A remarking rescaling property of such interferograms allows, in principle, the prime number decomposition of several large integers. The information about factors is encoded in the location of the inteferogram maxima.

  3. Spectroscopic study of solar twins and analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datson, Juliet; Flynn, Chris; Portinari, Laura

    2015-02-01

    Context. Many large stellar surveys have been and are still being carried out, providing huge amounts of data, for which stellar physical parameters will be derived. Solar twins and analogues provide a means to test the calibration of these stellar catalogues because the Sun is the best-studied star and provides precise fundamental parameters. Solar twins should be centred on the solar values. Aims: This spectroscopic study of solar analogues selected from the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey (GCS) at a resolution of 48 000 provides effective temperatures and metallicities for these stars. We test whether our spectroscopic parameters, as well as the previous photometric calibrations, are properly centred on the Sun. In addition, we search for more solar twins in our sample. Methods: The methods used in this work are based on literature methods for solar twin searches and on methods we developed in previous work to distinguish the metallicity-temperature degeneracies in the differential comparison of spectra of solar analogues versus a reference solar reflection spectrum. Results: We derive spectroscopic parameters for 148 solar analogues (about 70 are new entries to the literature) and verify with a-posteriori differential tests that our values are well-centred on the solar values. We use our dataset to assess the two alternative calibrations of the GCS parameters; our methods favour the latest revision. We show that the choice of spectral line list or the choice of asteroid or time of observation does not affect the results. We also identify seven solar twins in our sample, three of which are published here for the first time. Conclusions: Our methods provide an independent means to differentially test the calibration of stellar catalogues around the values of a well-known benchmark star, which makes our work interesting for calibration tests of upcoming Galactic surveys. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Observatory under programme ID 077.D

  4. Phonon analogue of topological nodal semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Po, Hoi Chun; Bahri, Yasaman; Vishwanath, Ashvin

    2015-03-01

    Recently, Kane and Lubensky proposed a mapping between bosonic phonon problems on isostatic lattices to chiral fermion systems based on factorization of the dynamical matrix [Nat. Phys. 10, 39 (2014)]. The existence of topologically protected zero modes in such mechanical problems is related to their presence in the fermionic system and is dictated by a local index theorem. Here we adopt the proposed mapping to construct a two-dimensional mechanical analogue of a fermionic topological nodal semimetal that hosts a robust bulk node in its linearized phonon spectrum. Such topologically protected soft modes with tunable wavevector may be useful in designing mechanical structures with fault-tolerant properties.

  5. Digitoxin Analogues with Improved Anticytomegalovirus Activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac glycosides are potent inhibitors of cancer cell growth and possess antiviral activities at nanomolar concentrations. In this study we evaluated the anticytomegalovirus (CMV) activity of digitoxin and several of its analogues. We show that sugar type and sugar length attached to the steroid core structure affects its anticytomegalovirus activity. Structure–activity relationship (SAR) studies identified the l-sugar containing cardiac glycosides as having improved anti-CMV activity and may lead to better understanding of how these compounds inhibit CMV replication. PMID:24900847

  6. Materials analogue of zero-stiffness structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Arun; Subramaniam, Anandh

    2011-04-01

    Anglepoise lamps and certain tensegrities are examples of zero-stiffness structures. These structures are in a state of neutral equilibrium with respect to changes in configuration of the system. Using Eshelby's example of an edge dislocation in a thin plate that can bend, we report the discovery of a non-trivial new class of material structures as an analogue to zero-stiffness structures. For extended positions of the edge dislocation in these structures, the dislocation experiences a zero image force. Salient features of these material structures along with the key differences from conventional zero-stiffness structures are pointed out.

  7. Mannosylerythritol lipids: production and applications.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2015-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are a glycolipid class of biosurfactants produced by a variety yeast and fungal strains that exhibit excellent interfacial and biochemical properties. MEL-producing fungi were identified using an efficient screening method for the glycolipid production and taxonomical classification on the basis of ribosomal RNA sequences. MEL production is limited primarily to the genus Pseudozyma, with significant variability among the MEL structures produced by each species. Outside of Pseudozyma, one recently isolated strain, Ustilago scitaminea, has been shown to exhibit abundant MEL-B production from sugarcane juice. Structural analyses of these compounds suggest a role for MELs in numerous cosmetic applications. MELs act as effective topical moisturizers and can repair damaged hair. Furthermore, these compounds have been shown to exhibit both protective and healing activities, to activate fibroblasts and papilla cells, and to act as natural antioxidants. In this review, we provide a brief summary of MEL research over the past few decades, focusing on the identification of MEL-producing fungi, the structural characterization of MELs, the use of alternative compounds as a primary carbon source, and the use of these compounds in cosmetic applications. PMID:25748373

  8. Design, synthesis and biological activity of a novel Rutin analogue with improved lipid soluble properties.

    PubMed

    Baldisserotto, Anna; Vertuani, Silvia; Bino, Alessia; De Lucia, Daniela; Lampronti, Ilaria; Milani, Roberta; Gambari, Roberto; Manfredini, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Recent interest in flavonoids has increased greatly due to their biological and pharmacological activities. Flavonoids, consist of a large group of low molecular weight polyphenolic substances, naturally occurring in fruits, vegetables, tea, and wine, and are an integral part of the human diet. Rutin is a common dietary flavonoid that is widely consumed worldwide from plant-derived beverages and foods as traditional and folk medicine remedy as well. Rutin exhibit important pharmacological activities, including anti-oxidation, anti-inflammation, anti-diabetic, anti-adipogenic, neuroprotective and hormone therapy. Here, we present the synthesis, antimicrobial, antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effect on human leukemic K562 cells of compound R2, a new semi-synthetic derivative of Rutin as compared to Rutin itself. The new derivative was also included in finished topical formulations to evaluate a potential application to the dermatology field in view of the antioxidant/antimicrobial/antiinflammatory properties. Stability studies were performed by HPLC; PCL assay and ORAC tests were used to determine the antioxidant activity. R2 presented an antioxidant activity very close to that of the parent Rutin while bearing much better lipophilic character. Regarding antiproliferative effects on the human K562 cell line, R2 was found to be more effective than parent Rutin. Preliminary experiments demonstrated that R2 inhibits NF-kB activity and promotes cellular apoptosis. PMID:25496805

  9. Lipid management in ramadan.

    PubMed

    Slim, Ines; Ach, Koussay; Chaieb, Larbi

    2015-05-01

    During Ramadan fast, Muslims must refrain from smoking, eating, drinking, having sexual activity, and consuming oral medications from sunrise to sunset. It has been previously shown that Ramadan fasting induces favourable changes on metabolic parameters, reduces oxidative stress and inflammation and promotes cardiovascular benefits. Although ill people are exempted from fasting, most patients with chronic diseases are keen on performing this Islamic-ritual. During recent years, Risk stratification and treatment adjustment during Ramadan are well known and structured in several guidelines for patients with diabetes mellitus. Data related to the effect of Ramadan fast on lipid profiles are less known and several controversies have been reported. Here, we focus on lipid profile and lipid management during Ramadan taking into account comorbidities and cardiovascular risk. PMID:26013790

  10. Lipid Production from Nannochloropsis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiao-Nian; Chen, Tian-Peng; Yang, Bo; Liu, Jin; Chen, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are sunlight-driven green cell factories for the production of potential bioactive products and biofuels. Nannochloropsis represents a genus of marine microalgae with high photosynthetic efficiency and can convert carbon dioxide to storage lipids mainly in the form of triacylglycerols and to the ω-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Recently, Nannochloropsis has received ever-increasing interests of both research and public communities. This review aims to provide an overview of biology and biotechnological potential of Nannochloropsis, with the emphasis on lipid production. The path forward for the further exploration of Nannochloropsis for lipid production with respect to both challenges and opportunities is also discussed. PMID:27023568

  11. Lipid Production from Nannochloropsis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Nian; Chen, Tian-Peng; Yang, Bo; Liu, Jin; Chen, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Microalgae are sunlight-driven green cell factories for the production of potential bioactive products and biofuels. Nannochloropsis represents a genus of marine microalgae with high photosynthetic efficiency and can convert carbon dioxide to storage lipids mainly in the form of triacylglycerols and to the ω-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Recently, Nannochloropsis has received ever-increasing interests of both research and public communities. This review aims to provide an overview of biology and biotechnological potential of Nannochloropsis, with the emphasis on lipid production. The path forward for the further exploration of Nannochloropsis for lipid production with respect to both challenges and opportunities is also discussed. PMID:27023568

  12. The electrical properties of Mars analogue dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrison, J.; Jensen, J.; Kinch, K.; Mugford, R.; Nørnberg, P.

    2004-03-01

    Dust is a major environmental factor on the surface and in the atmosphere of Mars. Knowing the electrical charge state of this dust would be of both scientific interest and important for the safety of instruments on the Martian surface. In this study the first measurements have been performed of dust electrification using suspended Mars analogue material. This has been achieved by attracting suspended dust onto electrodes placed inside a Mars simulation wind tunnel. The Mars analogue used was from Salten Skov in Denmark, this contained a high concentration of ferric oxide precipitate. Once suspended, this dust was found to consist of almost equal quantities of negatively (46±6%) and positively (44±15%) charged grains. These grains were estimated to typically carry a net charge of around 10 5e, this is sufficient to dominate the processes of adhesion and cohesion of this suspended dust. Evidence is presented for electrostatic aggregation of the dust while in suspension. Development of a simple instrument for measuring electrical charging of the suspended dust on Mars will be discussed.

  13. Long-term predictions using natural analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    One of the unique and scientifically most challenging aspects of nuclear waste isolation is the extrapolation of short-term laboratory data (hours to years) to the long time periods (10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} years) required by regulatory agencies for performance assessment. The direct validation of these extrapolations is not possible, but methods must be developed to demonstrate compliance with government regulations and to satisfy the lay public that there is a demonstrable and reasonable basis for accepting the long-term extrapolations. Natural systems (e.g., {open_quotes}natural analogues{close_quotes}) provide perhaps the only means of partial {open_quotes}validation,{close_quotes} as well as data that may be used directly in the models that are used in the extrapolation. Natural systems provide data on very large spatial (nm to km) and temporal (10{sup 3}-10{sup 8} years) scales and in highly complex terranes in which unknown synergisms may affect radionuclide migration. This paper reviews the application (and most importantly, the limitations) of data from natural analogue systems to the {open_quotes}validation{close_quotes} of performance assessments.

  14. Self-Powered Analogue Smart Skin.

    PubMed

    Shi, Mayue; Zhang, Jinxin; Chen, Haotian; Han, Mengdi; Shankaregowda, Smitha A; Su, Zongming; Meng, Bo; Cheng, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Haixia

    2016-04-26

    The progress of smart skin technology presents unprecedented opportunities for artificial intelligence. Resolution enhancement and energy conservation are critical to improve the perception and standby time of robots. Here, we present a self-powered analogue smart skin for detecting contact location and velocity of the object, based on a single-electrode contact electrification effect and planar electrostatic induction. Using an analogue localizing method, the resolution of this two-dimensional smart skin can be achieved at 1.9 mm with only four terminals, which notably decreases the terminal number of smart skins. The sensitivity of this smart skin is remarkable, which can even perceive the perturbation of a honey bee. Meanwhile, benefiting from the triboelectric mechanism, extra power supply is unnecessary for this smart skin. Therefore, it solves the problems of batteries and connecting wires for smart skins. With microstructured poly(dimethylsiloxane) films and silver nanowire electrodes, it can be covered on the skin with transparency, flexibility, and high sensitivity. PMID:27010713

  15. Evidence for the existence of lipid-diffusion barriers in the equatorial segment of human spermatozoa.

    PubMed Central

    Arts, E G; Jager, S; Hoekstra, D

    1994-01-01

    Liposomes consisting of negatively charged phospholipids interact almost exclusively with the equatorial segment (ES) of human spermatozoa provided the cells have undergone the acrosome reaction (AR) [Arts, Kuiken, Jager and Hoekstra (1993) Eur. J. Biochem. 217, 1001-1009]. Using fluorescently tagged liposomes, this interaction can be observed by fluorescence microscopy, showing either a diffuse fluorescence in the ES region (pattern ESd, presumably reflecting membrane-incorporated lipids as a result of fusion) or a punctate fluorescence (pattern ESp, representing adhering liposomes). These distribution patterns remain unchanged during prolonged incubation, up to 40 min. Not only do these observations suggest the existence of fairly specific liposomal binding sites, associated with the ES region, but also that a barrier to lipid lateral diffusion seems to exist in the ES membrane. Using liposomes that contain fluorescent lipid analogues in either both leaflets or in the inner leaflet only, we demonstrate that this putative barrier entails both membrane leaflets. Treatment with EDTA caused fluorescence to spread from the ES towards other membrane domains. Since only spermatozoa displaying pattern ESd were affected by the chelator, the randomization was not caused by EDTA-induced fusion activity. Therefore, this observation provides further evidence that in spermatozoa displaying pattern ESd the fluorescent lipid analogues were incorporated in the ES membrane as a result of fusion. Furthermore, these experiments support the view of the existence of a transmembranous block to lipid lateral diffusion in the ES, the stability of which may be governed by bivalent cations. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7998935

  16. Bioorthogonal chemical reporters for analyzing protein lipidation and lipid trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Howard C.; Wilson, John P.; Charron, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Conspectus Protein lipidation and lipid trafficking control many key biological functions in all kingdoms of life. The discovery of diverse lipid species and their covalent attachment to many proteins has revealed a complex and regulated network of membranes and lipidated proteins that are central to fundamental aspects of physiology and human disease. Given the complexity of lipid trafficking and the protein targeting mechanisms involved with membrane lipids, precise and sensitive methods are needed to monitor and identify these hydrophobic molecules in bacteria, yeast, and higher eukaryotes. Although many analytical methods have been developed for characterizing membrane lipids and covalently modified proteins, traditional reagents and approaches have limited sensitivity, do not faithfully report on the lipids of interest, or are not readily accessible. The invention of bioorthogonal ligation reactions, such as the Staudinger ligation and azide–alkyne cycloadditions, has provided new tools to address these limitations, and their use has begun to yield fresh insight into the biology of protein lipidation and lipid trafficking. In this Account, we discuss how these new bioorthogonal ligation reactions and lipid chemical reporters afford new opportunities for exploring the biology of lipid-modified proteins and lipid trafficking. Lipid chemical reporters from our laboratory and several other research groups have enabled improved detection and large-scale proteomic analysis of fatty-acylated and prenylated proteins. For example, fatty acid and isoprenoid chemical reporters in conjunction with bioorthogonal ligation methods have circumvented the limited sensitivity and hazards of radioactive analogs, allowing rapid and robust fluorescent detection of lipidated proteins in all organisms tested. These chemical tools have revealed alterations in protein lipidation in different cellular states and are beginning to provide unique insights in mechanisms of regulation

  17. Combined treatment of somatostatin analogues with pegvisomant in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Franck, S E; Muhammad, A; van der Lely, A J; Neggers, S J C M M

    2016-05-01

    Treatment of acromegaly with monotherapy long-acting somatostatin analogues (LA-SSA) as primary treatment or after neurosurgery can only achieve complete normalization of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in roughly 40 % of patients. Recently, one of the acromegaly consensus groups has recommended switching to combined treatment of LA-SSA and pegvisomant (PEGV) in patients with partial response to LA-SSAs. This combination of LA-SSA and PEGV, a growth hormone receptor antagonist, can normalize IGF-I levels in virtually all patients, requiring that the adequate dose of PEGV is used. The required PEGV dose varies significantly between individual acromegaly patients. One of the advantages of the combination therapy is that tumor size control or even tumor shrinkage can be observed in a vast majority of patients. The main side effects of the combination treatment are gastrointestinal symptoms, lipohypertrophy and transient elevated liver transaminases. In this review we provide an overview of the efficacy and safety of the combined treatment of LA-SSAs with PEGV. PMID:26661938

  18. Immobilized lipid-bilayer materials

    DOEpatents

    Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Loy, Douglas A.; Yamanaka, Stacey A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for preparing encapsulated lipid-bilayer materials in a silica matrix comprising preparing a silica sol, mixing a lipid-bilayer material in the silica sol and allowing the mixture to gel to form the encapsulated lipid-bilayer material. The mild processing conditions allow quantitative entrapment of pre-formed lipid-bilayer materials without modification to the material's spectral characteristics. The method allows for the immobilization of lipid membranes to surfaces. The encapsulated lipid-bilayer materials perform as sensitive optical sensors for the detection of analytes such as heavy metal ions and can be used as drug delivery systems and as separation devices.

  19. Differences in bioactivity between human insulin and insulin analogues approved for therapeutic use- compilation of reports from the past 20 years

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In order to provide comprehensive information on the differences in bioactivity between human insulin and insulin analogues, published in vitro comparisons of human insulin and the rapid acting analogues insulin lispro (Humalog®), insulin aspart ( NovoRapid®), insulin glulisine (Apidra®), and the slow acting analogues insulin glargine (Lantus®), and insulin detemir (Levemir®) were gathered from the past 20 years (except for receptor binding studies). A total of 50 reports were retrieved, with great heterogeneity among study methodology. However, various differences in bioactivity compared to human insulin were obvious (e.g. differences in effects on metabolism, mitogenesis, apoptosis, intracellular signalling, thrombocyte function, protein degradation). Whether or not these differences have clinical bearings (and among which patient populations) remains to be determined. PMID:21714872

  20. Synthesis and Cytostatic Evaluation of 4-N-Alkanoyl and 4-N-Alkyl Gemcitabine Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, Jesse; Sobczak, Adam J.; Balzarini, Jan; Wnuk, Stanislaw F.

    2014-01-01

    Couplings of gemcitabine with the functionalized carboxylic acids (C9-C13) or reactions of 4-N-tosylgemcitabine with the corresponding alkyl amines afforded 4-N-alkanoyl and 4-N-alkyl gemcitabine derivatives. The analogues with a terminal hydroxyl group on the alkyl chain were efficiently fluorinated under conditions that are compatible with protocols for 18F labeling. The 4-N-alkanoylgemcitabines showed potent cytostatic activities in the low nM range against a panel of tumor cell lines while cytotoxicity of the 4-N-alkylgemcitabines were in the low μM range. The cytotoxicity for the 4-N-alkanoylgemcitabine analogues were reduced approximately by two orders of magnitude in the 2′-deoxycytidine kinase (dCK)-deficient CEM/dCK- cell line whereas cytotoxicity of the 4-N-alkylgemcitabines were only 2-5 times lower. None of the compounds acted as efficient substrates for cytosolic dCK, and therefore, the 4-N-alkanoyl analogues need to be converted first to gemcitabine to display a significant cytostatic potential, while 4-N-alkyl derivatives attain the modest activity without “measurable” conversion to gemcitabine. PMID:24341356

  1. Synthesis and biological evaluation of clitocine analogues as adenosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, C H; Daanen, J F; Jiang, M; Yu, H; Kohlhaas, K L; Alexander, K; Jarvis, M F; Kowaluk, E L; Bhagwat, S S

    2001-09-17

    Adenosine kinase (AK) is the primary enzyme responsible for adenosine metabolism. Inhibition of AK effectively increases extracellular adenosine concentrations and represents an alternative approach to enhance the beneficial actions of adenosine as compared to direct-acting receptor agonists. Clitocine (3), isolated from the mushroom Clitocybe inversa, has been found to be a weak inhibitor of AK. We have prepared a number of analogues of clitocine in order to improve its potency and demonstrated that 5'-deoxy-5'-amino-clitocine (7) improved AK inhibitory potency by 50-fold. PMID:11549437

  2. Functional Analysis: The Use of Analogues in Applied Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stichter, Janine Peck

    2001-01-01

    This article suggests possible applications of experimental analyses using analogues to empirically verify results of functional assessments in classrooms for students with autism and related disabilities. Analogue assessments involve creating conditions in which antecedents and consequences are held constant and specific variables suspected to…

  3. Space Analogue Environments: Are the Populations Comparable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandal, G. M.

    Background: Much of our present understanding about psychology in space is based on studies of groups operating in so-called analogue environments where personnel are exposed to many of the same stressors as those experienced by astronauts in space. One possible problem with extrapolating results is that personnel operating in various hazardous and confined environments might differ in characteristics influencing coping, interaction, and performance. The object of this study was to compare the psychological similarity of these populations in order to get a better understanding of whether this extrapolation is justifiable. The samples investigated include polar crossings (N= 22), personnel on Antarctic research stations (N= 183), several military occupations (N= 187), and participants in space simulation studies (N=20). Methods: Personnel in each of these environments were assessed using the Personality Characteristic Inventory (PCI) and Utrecht Coping List (UCL). The PCI is a multidimensional trait assessment battery that measures various aspects of achievement orientation and social competence. The UCL is a questionnaire designed to assess habitual coping strategies when encountering stressful or demanding situations. Results: Only minor differences in use of habitual coping strategies were evident across the different samples. In relation to personality scores, the military subjects and participants in space simulation studies indicated higher competitiveness and negative instrumentality compared to both the personnel on Antarctic research stations and participants in polar expedition. Among the personnel on Antarctic research stations, significant gender differences were found with women scoring lower on competitiveness, negative instrumentality and impatience/irritability. Compared to the other samples, the participants in polar expeditions were found to be more homogeneous in personality and no significant gender differences were evident on the traits that

  4. Structure of lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, John F.; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    The quantitative experimental uncertainty in the structure of fully hydrated, biologically relevant, fluid (Lα) phase lipid bilayers has been too large to provide a firm base for applications or for comparison with simulations. Many structural methods are reviewed including modern liquid crystallography of lipid bilayers that deals with the fully developed undulation fluctuations that occur in the Lα phase. These fluctuations degrade the higher order diffraction data in a way that, if unrecognized, leads to erroneous conclusions regarding bilayer structure. Diffraction measurements at high instrumental resolution provide a measure of these fluctuations. In addition to providing better structural determination, this opens a new window on interactions between bilayers, so the experimental determination of interbilayer interaction parameters is reviewed briefly. We introduce a new structural correction based on fluctuations that has not been included in any previous studies. Updated measurements, such as for the area compressibility modulus, are used to provide adjustments to many of the literature values of structural quantities. Since the gel (Lβ′) phase is valuable as a stepping stone for obtaining fluid phase results, a brief review is given of the lower temperature phases. The uncertainty in structural results for lipid bilayers is being reduced and best current values are provided for bilayers of five lipids. PMID:11063882

  5. Lipids: Absorption and transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the hydrophobic nature of lipids, dietary fat is handled differently than protein or carbohydrate with respect with digestion and absorption. Dietary fats are broken down throughout the gastrointestinal system. A unique group of enzymes and cofactors allows this process to proceed in an eff...

  6. Lipids in cheese

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipids are present in cheese at levels above 20 percent and are analyzed by several techniques. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy are used to examine the microstructure, gas chromatography is employed to look at fatty acid composition, and differential scanning cal...

  7. Lipid droplets go nuclear.

    PubMed

    Farese, Robert V; Walther, Tobias C

    2016-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are sometimes found in the nucleus of some cells. In this issue, Ohsaki et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201507122) show that the nuclear membrane, promyelocytic leukemia bodies, and the protein PML-II play a role in nuclear LD formation, suggesting functional relationships between these structures. PMID:26728852

  8. Act resilient.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Genie; Bice-Stephens, Wynona

    2014-01-01

    Attendees have reported changing from being fearful to serene, from listless to energized, from disengaged to connected, and becoming markedly less anxious in a few weeks. Anecdotally, self-reported stress levels have been reduced by over 50% after just one class. Attendees learn not to be afraid of their feelings by working with emotions in a playful manner. When a person can act angry, but separate himself from his personal story, the emotional energy exists in a separate form that is not attached to specific events, and can be more easily dealt with and neutralized. Attendees are taught to "take out the emotional trash" through expressive comedy. They become less intimated by their own emotional intensity and triggers as they learn how even metaphorical buckets of anger, shame, guilt and hurt can be emotionally emptied. The added benefit is that this is accomplished without the disclosure of personal information of the requirement to reexperience past pain which can trigger its own cascade of stress. PMID:24706248

  9. The glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue exendin-4 reverses impaired intracellular Ca(2+) signalling in steatotic hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Eunüs S; Hua, Jin; Wilson, Claire H; Tallis, George A; Zhou, Fiona H; Rychkov, Grigori Y; Barritt, Greg J

    2016-09-01

    The release of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and subsequent replenishment of ER Ca(2+) by Ca(2+) entry through store-operated Ca(2+) channels (SOCE) play critical roles in the regulation of liver metabolism by adrenaline, glucagon and other hormones. Both ER Ca(2+) release and Ca(2+) entry are severely inhibited in steatotic hepatocytes. Exendin-4, a slowly-metabolised glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue, is known to reduce liver glucose output and liver lipid, but the mechanisms involved are not well understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether exendin-4 alters intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis in steatotic hepatocytes, and to evaluate the mechanisms involved. Exendin-4 completely reversed lipid-induced inhibition of SOCE in steatotic liver cells, but did not reverse lipid-induced inhibition of ER Ca(2+) release. The action of exendin-4 on Ca(2+) entry was rapid in onset and was mimicked by GLP-1 or dibutyryl cyclic AMP. In steatotic liver cells, exendin-4 caused a rapid decrease in lipid (half time 6.5min), inhibited the accumulation of lipid in liver cells incubated in the presence of palmitate plus the SOCE inhibitor BTP-2, and enhanced the formation of cyclic AMP. Hormone-stimulated accumulation of extracellular glucose in glycogen replete steatotic liver cells was inhibited compared to that in non-steatotic cells, and this effect of lipid was reversed by exendin-4. It is concluded that, in steatotic hepatocytes, exendin-4 reverses the lipid-induced inhibition of SOCE leading to restoration of hormone-regulated cytoplasmic Ca(2+) signalling. The mechanism may involve GLP-1 receptors, cyclic AMP, lipolysis, decreased diacylglycerol and decreased activity of protein kinase C. PMID:27178543

  10. Amphotericin B Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Amphotericin B lipid complex injection is used to treat serious, possibly life-threatening fungal infections in people who did not respond ... to tolerate conventional amphotericin B therapy. Amphotericin B lipid complex injection is in a class of medications ...