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Sample records for lipiodol induced cerebral

  1. Cerebral Lipiodol Embolism after Lymphatic Embolization for Plastic Bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Kirschen, Matthew P; Dori, Yoav; Itkin, Maxim; Licht, Daniel J; Ichord, Rebecca; Vossough, Arastoo

    2016-09-01

    An adolescent with plastic bronchitis due to congenital heart disease had altered mental status after an interventional lymphatic procedure in which lipiodol contrast was used. Neuroimaging revealed cerebral lipiodol embolization due to direct shunting between lymphatic channels and pulmonary veins. Cerebral lipiodol embolization is a potential neurologic morbidity associated with interventional lymphatic procedures. PMID:27297208

  2. Cerebral Lipiodol Embolism after Lymphatic Embolization for Plastic Bronchitis

    PubMed Central

    Kirschen, Matthew P.; Dori, Yoav; Itkin, Maxim; Licht, Daniel J.; Ichord, Rebecca; Vossough, Arastoo

    2016-01-01

    An adolescent with plastic bronchitis due to congenital heart disease had altered mental status after an interventional lymphatic procedure in which lipiodol contrast was used. Neuroimaging revealed cerebral lipiodol embolization due to direct shunting between lymphatic channels and pulmonary veins. Cerebral lipiodol embolization is a potential neurologic morbidity associated with interventional lymphatic procedures. PMID:27297208

  3. Cerebral Lipiodol Embolism: A Complication of Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Koichi Nojiri, Junichi; Takase, Yukinori; Egashira, Yoshikazu; Azama, Shinichi; Kato, Akira; Kitahara, Kenji; Miyazaki, Koji; Kudo, Sho

    2007-06-15

    We report a case of cerebral lipiodol embolism following transcatheter chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma. A 70-year-old woman with a large unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma underwent TACE. Her level of consciousness deteriorated after the procedure, and magnetic resonance imaging and non-contrast computed tomography revealed a cerebral lipiodol embolism. Despite intensive care, the patient died 2 weeks later. The complication might have been due to systemic-pulmonary shunts caused by previous surgeries and/or direct invasion of the recurrent tumor.

  4. Caffeine induced changes in cerebral circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, R.J.; Wilson, W.H.

    1985-09-01

    While the caffeine induced cerebral vasoconstriction is well documented, the effects of oral ingestion of the drug in a dose range comparable to the quantities in which it is usually consumed and the intensity and duration of the associated reduction in cerebral circulation are unknown. Cerebral blood flow was measured via the TTXenon inhalation technique before and thirty and ninety minutes after the oral administration of 250 mg of caffeine or a placebo, under double-blind conditions. Caffeine ingestion was found to be associated with significant reductions in cerebral perfusion thirty and ninety minutes later. The placebo group showed no differences between the three sets of cerebral blood flow values.

  5. Acute Chagas Disease Induces Cerebral Microvasculopathy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nisimura, Lindice Mitie; Estato, Vanessa; de Souza, Elen Mello; Reis, Patricia A.; Lessa, Marcos Adriano; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire; Pereira, Mirian Claudia de Souza; Tibiriçá, Eduardo; Garzoni, Luciana Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is the main clinical form of Chagas disease (CD); however, cerebral manifestations, such as meningoencephalitis, ischemic stroke and cognitive impairment, can also occur. The aim of the present study was to investigate functional microvascular alterations and oxidative stress in the brain of mice in acute CD. Acute CD was induced in Swiss Webster mice (SWM) with the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). Cerebral functional capillary density (the number of spontaneously perfused capillaries), leukocyte rolling and adhesion and the microvascular endothelial-dependent response were analyzed over a period of fifteen days using intravital video-microscopy. We also evaluated cerebral oxidative stress with the thiobarbituric acid reactive species TBARS method. Compared with the non-infected group, acute CD significantly induced cerebral functional microvascular alterations, including (i) functional capillary rarefaction, (ii) increased leukocyte rolling and adhesion, (iii) the formation of microvascular platelet-leukocyte aggregates, and (iv) alteration of the endothelial response to acetylcholine. Moreover, cerebral oxidative stress increased in infected animals. We concluded that acute CD in mice induced cerebral microvasculopathy, characterized by a reduced incidence of perfused capillaries, a high number of microvascular platelet-leukocyte aggregates, a marked increase in leukocyte-endothelium interactions and brain arteriolar endothelial dysfunction associated with oxidative stress. These results suggest the involvement of cerebral microcirculation alterations in the neurological manifestations of CD. PMID:25010691

  6. Lipiodol enhanced CT scanning of malignant hepatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Eurvilaichit, C

    2000-04-01

    From August 1984 to March 1991, 41 patients with malignant liver tumors, 30 males and 11 females, aged 30-75 years were treated at Ramathibodi Hospital with injection of mitomycin-C lipiodol emulsion into the tumor via the feeding artery followed by embolization of the feeding artery with gelfoam particles. The patients comprised 30 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma, 4 cases of cholangiocarcinoma and 7 cases of metastatic tumors of which one was from CA stomach, three were from CA breast, and three from CA colon. The vascularity of the tumor was assessed in angiogram obtained prior to treatment and retention pattern of lipiodol in the tumor was evaluated in lipiodol-enhanced CT scan images taken 2-4 weeks following therapy. The results showed that lipiodol CT scan images exhibited four patterns of lipiodol retention in the tumor appearing as opacity as follows (1) homogenous (2) heterogeneous (3) ring-like and (4) none. Lipiodol retention pattern appeared to be somewhat related to vascularity of the tumor. Most of the hypervascular tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma had homogeneous lipiodol accumulation pattern if the tumor size was less than 5 cm. Metastatic tumors and cholangiocarcinoma showed heterogeneous or ring-like pattern of lipiodol accumulation because they were relatively hypovascular. Hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma may exhibit heterogeneous or ring-like pattern if they are larger than 5 cms, and have multiple feeding arteries, necrosis or AV shunting. Hepatocellular carcinoma with AV shunting may not show any lipiodol accumulation at all. PMID:10808700

  7. Dietary cholesterol protects against alcohol-induced cerebral artery constriction

    PubMed Central

    Bukiya, Anna; Dopico, Alex; Leffler, Charles; Fedinec, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Background Binge drinking represents the major form of excessive alcohol (EtOH) consumption in the US. Episodic (such as binge) drinking results in blood alcohol levels (BAL) of 18–80 mM, and leads to alcohol-induced cerebral artery constriction (AICAC). AICAC was shown to arise from EtOH-induced inhibition of large-conductance, calcium/voltage-gated potassium (BK) channels in the vascular smooth muscle. Factors that modulate BK channel-mediated AICAC remain largely unknown. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were placed on high-cholesterol (2% of cholesterol) diet for 18–23 weeks. Their littermates were placed on control iso-caloric diet. AICAC was evaluated both in vivo and in vitro, by means of pial arteriole diameter monitoring through a closed cranial window and diameter measurements of isolated, pressurized cerebral arteries. Cholesterol level in the cerebral artery tissue was manipulated by methyl-β-cyclodextrin to reverse dietary-induced accumulation of cholesterol. BK channel surface presence on the plasma membrane of cerebral artery myocytes was evaluated by immunofluorescence staining. BK channel function in pressurized cerebral artery was assessed using selective BK channel blocker paxilline. Results Within 5 minutes of 50 mM EtOH injection into carotid artery in vivo, arteriole diameter decreased by 20% in control group. Pial arteriole constriction was significantly reduced in rats on high-cholesterol diet, resulting in only 10% reduction of diameter. BAL in both groups, however, remained the same. Significant reduction of AICAC in group on high-cholesterol diet compared to control was also observed after middle cerebral artery dissection and in vitro pressurization at 60 mmHg, this reduction remaining after endothelium removal. Cholesterol level in de-endothelialized cerebral arteries was significantly increased in rats on high-cholesterol diet. Removal of excessive cholesterol content restored AICAC to the level, observed in cerebral arteries of

  8. Escin attenuates cerebral edema induced by acute omethoate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian; Jiang, Na; Han, Bing; Liu, Wenbo; Liu, Tongshen; Fu, Fenghua; Zhao, Delu

    2011-06-01

    Organophosphorus exposure affects different organs such as skeletal muscles, the gastrointestinal tract, liver, lung, and brain. The present experiment aimed to evaluate the effect of escin on cerebral edema induced by acute omethoate poisoning. Sprague-Dawley rats were administered subcutaneously with omethoate at a single dose of 60 mg/kg followed by escin treatment. The results showed that escin reduced the brain water content and the amount of Evans blue in omethoate-poisoned animals. Treatment with escin decreased the levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) in the brain. Escin also alleviated the histopathological change induced by acute omethoate poisoning. The findings demonstrated that escin can attenuate cerebral edema induced by acute omethoate poisoning, and the underlying mechanism was associated with ameliorating the permeability of the blood-brain barrier. PMID:21417632

  9. Venous malformations: Sclerotherapy with a mixture of ethanol and lipiodol

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Jin-Suck; Shin, Kyoo-Ho; Na, Jae-Bum; Won, Jong-Yun; Hahn, Soo-Bong

    1997-07-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the usefulness of a mixture of absolute ethanol and lipiodol in the management of venous malformations. Methods. Percutaneous sclerotherapy was performed with a mixture of absolute ethanol and lipiodol (9:1) in 17 patients with venous malformations, once in 12 patients, twice in 5. The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by pain reduction. Conventional radiographs (n=15) and posttreatment magnetic resonance imaging (n=5) were obtained for the follow-up evaluation. Results. Sclerotherapy was successful in all but two patients. The therapeutic effect was excellent in two patients, good in seven, fair in five, and poor in one. Radiopacity of lipiodol was beneficial for monitoring the procedure rather than for follow-up evaluations. Areas with low signal-intensity strands were increased on T2-weighted images obtained after the sclerotherapy. Conclusion. Sclerotherapy with a mixture of ethanol and lipiodol is effective in treating venous malformations.

  10. Adjuvant Iodine131 Lipiodol after Resection of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Furtado, Ruelan V.; Ha, Leo; Clarke, Stephen; Sandroussi, Charbel

    2015-01-01

    Background. Survival after liver resection for HCC is compromised by a high rate of intrahepatic recurrence. Adjuvant treatment with a single, postoperative dose of intra-arterial I131 lipiodol has shown promise, as a means of prolonging disease-free survival (DFS). Methodology. DFS and overall survival (OS) after a single dose of postoperative I131 lipiodol were compared to liver resection alone, for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Data were collected retrospectively for patients who had a curative resection for HCC between December 1993 and September 2011. Seventy-two patients were given I131 lipiodol after surgery and 70 patients had surgery alone. Results. The DFS at 1, 3, and 5 years was 72%, 43%, and 26% in the surgery group and 70%, 39%, and 29% in the adjuvant I131 lipiodol group (p = 0.75). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year OS was 83%, 64%, and 52% in the surgery group and 96%, 72%, and 61% in the adjuvant I131 lipiodol group (p = 0.16). Conclusion. This retrospective study has found no significant benefit to survival, after adjuvant treatment with I131 lipiodol. PMID:26713092

  11. Induced hypertension for the treatment of cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Direct effect on cerebral blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Muizelaar, J.P.; Becker, D.P.

    1986-04-01

    The best treatment for symptomatic cerebral ischemia from presumed vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage remains a matter of controversy. A direct effect of any treatment modality on regional cerebral blood flow has never been documented. In a series of 43 patients operated on for ruptured anterior circulation aneurysms, five patients (11.6%) developed clinical signs of cerebral ischemia postoperatively. In four of those patients, the diagnosis of vasospasm was made with measurements of cerebral blood flow (133Xe inhalation or intravenous injection, 10-16 detectors, cerebral blood flow infinity). Treatment with induced arterial hypertension with phenylephrine was instituted. Hemodilution was instituted in one patient; the other three patients already had hematocrits in the range of 33. Within 1 hour, the cerebral blood flow measurement was repeated to document the effect of treatment. The average pretreatment hemispherical blood flow on the operated side was 18.8 mL/100 g per minute, on the contralateral side 21.0 mL/100 g per minute. With treatment these flows increased to 30.8 and 35.8 mL/100 g per minute, respectively. There was also an immediate and obvious positive clinical effect in all patients. The role of measurement of cerebral blood flow in the clinical management of vasospasm is discussed. We stress the theoretical and practical advances of measurements of cerebral blood flow over cerebral angiography, especially in comatose patients.

  12. Targeting cancer chemotherapeutic agents by use of lipiodol contrast medium

    SciTech Connect

    Konno, T. )

    1990-11-01

    Arterially administered Lipiodol Ultrafluid contrast medium selectively remained in various malignant solid tumors because of the difference in time required for the removal of Lipiodol contrast medium from normal capillaries and tumor neovasculature. Although blood flow was maintained in the tumor, even immediately after injection Lipiodol contrast medium remained in the neovasculature of the tumor. To target anti-cancer agents to tumors by using Lipiodol contrast medium as a carrier, the characteristics of the agents were examined. Anti-cancer agents had to be soluble in Lipiodol, be stable in it, and separate gradually from it so that the anti-cancer agents would selectively remain in the tumor. These conditions were found to be necessary on the basis of the measurement of radioactivity in VX2 tumors implanted in the liver of 16 rabbits that received arterial injections of 14C-labeled doxorubicin. Antitumor activities and side effects of arterial injections of two types of anti-cancer agents were compared in 76 rabbits with VX2 tumors. Oily anti-cancer agents that had characteristics essential for targeting were compared with simple mixtures of anti-cancer agents with Lipiodol contrast medium that did not have these essential characteristics. Groups of rabbits that received oily anti-cancer agents responded significantly better than groups that received simple mixtures, and side effects were observed more frequently in the groups that received the simple mixtures. These results suggest that targeting of the anti-cancer agent to the tumor is important for treatment of solid malignant tumors.

  13. Aqueous extract of Cordyceps alleviates cerebral ischemia-induced short-term memory impairment in gerbils.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hak; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Eun; Hwang, Lakkyong; Jin, Jun-Jang; Choi, Hyun-Hee; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral ischemia is caused by reduced cerebral blood flow due to a transient or permanent cerebral artery occlusion. Ischemic injury in the brain leads to neuronal cell death, and eventually causes neurological impairments. Cordyceps, the name given to the fungi on insects, has abundant useful natural products with various biological activities. Cordyceps is known to have nephroprotective, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and antiapoptotic effects. We investigated the effects of Cordyceps on short-term memory, neuronal apoptosis, and cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus following transient global ischemia in gerbils. For this study, a step-down avoidance test, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay, immunohistochemistry for caspase-3 and 5-bromo-2'-de-oxyuridine, and western blot for Bax, Bcl-2, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and tyrosin kinase B were performed. In the present study, Cordyceps alleviated cerebral ischemia-induced short-term memory impairment. Cordyceps showed therapeutic effects through inhibiting cerebral ischemia-induced apoptosis in the hippocampus. Cordyceps suppressed cerebral ischemia-induced cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus due to the reduced apoptotic neuronal cell death. Cordyceps treatment also enhanced BDNF and TrkB expressions in the hippocampus of ischemic gerbils. It can be suggested that Cordyceps overcomes cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal apoptosis, thus facilitates recovery following cerebral ischemia injury. PMID:27162767

  14. Aqueous extract of Cordyceps alleviates cerebral ischemia-induced short-term memory impairment in gerbils

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hak; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Eun; Hwang, Lakkyong; Jin, Jun-Jang; Choi, Hyun-Hee; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia is caused by reduced cerebral blood flow due to a transient or permanent cerebral artery occlusion. Ischemic injury in the brain leads to neuronal cell death, and eventually causes neurological impairments. Cordyceps, the name given to the fungi on insects, has abundant useful natural products with various biological activities. Cordyceps is known to have nephroprotective, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and antiapoptotic effects. We investigated the effects of Cordyceps on short-term memory, neuronal apoptosis, and cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus following transient global ischemia in gerbils. For this study, a step-down avoidance test, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay, immunohistochemistry for caspase-3 and 5-bromo-2′-de-oxyuridine, and western blot for Bax, Bcl-2, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and tyrosin kinase B were performed. In the present study, Cordyceps alleviated cerebral ischemia-induced short-term memory impairment. Cordyceps showed therapeutic effects through inhibiting cerebral ischemia-induced apoptosis in the hippocampus. Cordyceps suppressed cerebral ischemia-induced cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus due to the reduced apoptotic neuronal cell death. Cordyceps treatment also enhanced BDNF and TrkB expressions in the hippocampus of ischemic gerbils. It can be suggested that Cordyceps overcomes cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal apoptosis, thus facilitates recovery following cerebral ischemia injury. PMID:27162767

  15. Spaceflight-induced alterations in cerebral artery vasoconstrictor, mechanical, and structural properties: implications for elevated cerebral perfusion and intracranial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Curtis R.; Hanna, Mina; Behnke, Bradley J.; Stabley, John N.; McCullough, Danielle J.; Davis, Robert T.; Ghosh, Payal; Papadopoulos, Anthony; Muller-Delp, Judy M.; Delp, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence indicates that cerebral blood flow is both increased and diminished in astronauts on return to Earth. Data from ground-based animal models simulating the effects of microgravity have shown that decrements in cerebral perfusion are associated with enhanced vasoconstriction and structural remodeling of cerebral arteries. Based on these results, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that 13 d of spaceflight [Space Transportation System (STS)-135 shuttle mission] enhances myogenic vasoconstriction, increases medial wall thickness, and elicits no change in the mechanical properties of mouse cerebral arteries. Basilar and posterior communicating arteries (PCAs) were isolated from 9-wk-old female C57BL/6 mice for in vitro vascular and mechanical testing. Contrary to that hypothesized, myogenic vasoconstrictor responses were lower and vascular distensibility greater in arteries from spaceflight group (SF) mice (n=7) relative to ground-based control group (GC) mice (n=12). Basilar artery maximal diameter was greater in SF mice (SF: 236±9 μm and GC: 215±5 μm) with no difference in medial wall thickness (SF: 12.4±1.6 μm; GC: 12.2±1.2 μm). Stiffness of the PCA, as characterized via nanoindentation, was lower in SF mice (SF: 3.4±0.3 N/m; GC: 5.4±0.8 N/m). Collectively, spaceflight-induced reductions in myogenic vasoconstriction and stiffness and increases in maximal diameter of cerebral arteries signify that elevations in brain blood flow may occur during spaceflight. Such changes in cerebral vascular control of perfusion could contribute to increases in intracranial pressure and an associated impairment of visual acuity in astronauts during spaceflight.—Taylor, C. R., Hanna, M., Behnke, B. J., Stabley, J. N., McCullough, D. J., Davis III, R. T., Ghosh, P., Papadopoulos, A., Muller-Delp, J. M., Delp, M. D. Spaceflight-induced alterations in cerebral artery vasoconstrictor, mechanical, and structural properties: implications for elevated

  16. [A case of recurrent pelvic tumor of sigmoid colon cancer showing partial response to lipiodolization].

    PubMed

    Shimoda, K; Hazama, S; Mitsunaga, H; Uchiyama, T; Oka, M; Suzuki, T

    1991-08-01

    We performed lipiodolization and immunochemotherapy for recurrent pelvic tumor of sigmoid colon cancer using an infuserport which was implanted and connected to the catheter placed in the right internal iliac artery. Following lipiodolization, the level of CEA (980 ng/ml) decreased to within the normal range. MRI showed necrotic change and regression (more than 50%) of tumor. DSA revealed disappearance of tumor neovascularity. No serious side effect but skin erosion in the gluteal region was encountered after lipiodolization. This result suggests that lipiodolization is worth performing in further clinical trials for pelvic tumor. PMID:1652230

  17. Spaceflight-induced alterations in cerebral artery vasoconstrictor, mechanical, and structural properties: implications for elevated cerebral perfusion and intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Curtis R; Hanna, Mina; Behnke, Bradley J; Stabley, John N; McCullough, Danielle J; Davis, Robert T; Ghosh, Payal; Papadopoulos, Anthony; Muller-Delp, Judy M; Delp, Michael D

    2013-06-01

    Evidence indicates that cerebral blood flow is both increased and diminished in astronauts on return to Earth. Data from ground-based animal models simulating the effects of microgravity have shown that decrements in cerebral perfusion are associated with enhanced vasoconstriction and structural remodeling of cerebral arteries. Based on these results, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that 13 d of spaceflight [Space Transportation System (STS)-135 shuttle mission] enhances myogenic vasoconstriction, increases medial wall thickness, and elicits no change in the mechanical properties of mouse cerebral arteries. Basilar and posterior communicating arteries (PCAs) were isolated from 9-wk-old female C57BL/6 mice for in vitro vascular and mechanical testing. Contrary to that hypothesized, myogenic vasoconstrictor responses were lower and vascular distensibility greater in arteries from spaceflight group (SF) mice (n=7) relative to ground-based control group (GC) mice (n=12). Basilar artery maximal diameter was greater in SF mice (SF: 236±9 μm and GC: 215±5 μm) with no difference in medial wall thickness (SF: 12.4±1.6 μm; GC: 12.2±1.2 μm). Stiffness of the PCA, as characterized via nanoindentation, was lower in SF mice (SF: 3.4±0.3 N/m; GC: 5.4±0.8 N/m). Collectively, spaceflight-induced reductions in myogenic vasoconstriction and stiffness and increases in maximal diameter of cerebral arteries signify that elevations in brain blood flow may occur during spaceflight. Such changes in cerebral vascular control of perfusion could contribute to increases in intracranial pressure and an associated impairment of visual acuity in astronauts during spaceflight. PMID:23457215

  18. Kinetics of exercise-induced neural activation; interpretive dilemma of altered cerebral perfusion.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Taiki; Horiuchi, Masahiro; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Sato, Kohei; Tanaka, Naoki; Bailey, Damian M; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2012-02-01

    Neural activation decreases cerebral deoxyhaemoglobin (HHb(C)) and increases oxyhaemoglobin concentration (O(2)Hb(C)). In contrast, patients who present with restricted cerebral blood flow, such as those suffering from cerebral ischaemia or Alzheimer's disease, and during the course of ageing the converse occurs, in that HHb(C) increases and O(2)Hb(C) decreases during neural activation. In the present study, we examined the interpretive implications of altered exercise-induced cerebral blood flow for cortical oxygenation in healthy subjects. Both O(2)Hb(C) and HHb(C) (prefrontal cortex) were determined in 11 healthy men using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA V(mean)) was determined via transcranial Doppler ultrasonography. Measurements were performed during contralateral hand-grip exercise during suprasystolic bilateral thigh-cuff occlusion (Cuff+) and within 2 s of cuff release (Cuff-) for the acute manipulation of cerebral perfusion. During Cuff+, both MCA V(mean) and O(2)Hb(C) increased during exercise, whereas HHb(C) decreased. In contrast, the opposite occurred during the Cuff- manipulation. These findings highlight the inverse relationship between cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygenation as determined by NIRS, which has interpretive implications for the kinetics underlying exercise-induced neural activation. PMID:22041980

  19. TNF-α induces phenotypic modulation in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for cerebral aneurysm pathology.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad S; Starke, Robert M; Jabbour, Pascal M; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula I; Gonzalez, L Fernando; Rosenwasser, Robert H; Owens, Gary K; Koch, Walter J; Greig, Nigel H; Dumont, Aaron S

    2013-10-01

    Little is known about vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypic modulation in the cerebral circulation or pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) has been associated with aneurysms, but potential mechanisms are unclear. Cultured rat cerebral SMCs overexpressing myocardin induced expression of key SMC contractile genes (SM-α-actin, SM-22α, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain), while dominant-negative cells suppressed expression. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha treatment inhibited this contractile phenotype and induced pro-inflammatory/matrix-remodeling genes (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, matrix metalloproteinase-3, matrix metalloproteinase-9, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, interleukin-1 beta). Tumor necrosis factor-alpha increased expression of KLF4, a known regulator of SMC differentiation. Kruppel-like transcription factor 4 (KLF4) small interfering RNA abrogated TNF-α activation of inflammatory genes and suppression of contractile genes. These mechanisms were confirmed in vivo after exposure of rat carotid arteries to TNF-α and early on in a model of cerebral aneurysm formation. Treatment with the synthesized TNF-α inhibitor 3,6-dithiothalidomide reversed pathologic vessel wall alterations after induced hypertension and hemodynamic stress. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in vivo and in vitro demonstrated that TNF-α promotes epigenetic changes through KLF4-dependent alterations in promoter regions of myocardin, SMCs, and inflammatory genes. In conclusion, TNF-α induces phenotypic modulation of cerebral SMCs through myocardin and KLF4-regulated pathways. These results demonstrate a novel role for TNF-α in promoting a pro-inflammatory/matrix-remodeling phenotype, which has important implications for the mechanisms behind intracranial aneurysm formation. PMID:23860374

  20. Music-induced changes in functional cerebral asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Markus; Hodgetts, Sophie; Eerola, Tuomas

    2016-04-01

    After decades of research, it remains unclear whether emotion lateralization occurs because one hemisphere is dominant for processing the emotional content of the stimuli, or whether emotional stimuli activate lateralised networks associated with the subjective emotional experience. By using emotion-induction procedures, we investigated the effect of listening to happy and sad music on three well-established lateralization tasks. In a prestudy, Mozart's piano sonata (K. 448) and Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata were rated as the most happy and sad excerpts, respectively. Participants listened to either one emotional excerpt, or sat in silence before completing an emotional chimeric faces task (Experiment 1), visual line bisection task (Experiment 2) and a dichotic listening task (Experiment 3 and 4). Listening to happy music resulted in a reduced right hemispheric bias in facial emotion recognition (Experiment 1) and visuospatial attention (Experiment 2) and increased left hemispheric bias in language lateralization (Experiments 3 and 4). Although Experiments 1-3 revealed an increased positive emotional state after listening to happy music, mediation analyses revealed that the effect on hemispheric asymmetries was not mediated by music-induced emotional changes. The direct effect of music listening on lateralization was investigated in Experiment 4 in which tempo of the happy excerpt was manipulated by controlling for other acoustic features. However, the results of Experiment 4 made it rather unlikely that tempo is the critical cue accounting for the effects. We conclude that listening to music can affect functional cerebral asymmetries in well-established emotional and cognitive laterality tasks, independent of music-induced changes in the emotion state. PMID:26970942

  1. Holmium-lipiodol-alginate microspheres for fluoroscopy-guided embolotherapy and multimodality imaging.

    PubMed

    Oerlemans, Chris; Seevinck, Peter R; Smits, Maarten L; Hennink, Wim E; Bakker, Chris J G; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Nijsen, J Frank W

    2015-03-30

    Embolotherapy is a minimally invasive transcatheter technique aiming at reduction or complete obstruction of the blood flow by infusion of micro-sized particles in order to induce tumor regression. A major drawback of the current commercially available and clinically used microspheres is that they cannot be detected in vivo with medical imaging techniques, impeding intra- and post-procedural feedback. It can be expected that real-time monitoring of microsphere infusion and post-procedural imaging will result in better predictability and higher efficacy of the treatment. In this study, a novel microsphere formulation has been developed that can be visualized with fluoroscopy, X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The microspheres were prepared with the JetCutter technique and consist of alginate (matrix-forming polymer), holmium (cross-linking and MRI contrast agent), lipiodol (radiopaque contrast agent) and Pluronic F-68 (surfactant). The mean size (±SEM) of the hydrated holmium-lipiodol-alginate microspheres (Ho-lip-ams) was 570±12 μm with a holmium content of 0.38±0.01% (w/w). Stability studies showed that the microspheres remained intact during incubation for two weeks in fetal calf serum (FCS) at 37 °C. The inclusion of lipiodol in the microspheres rendered excellent visualization capabilities for fluoroscopy and CT, whereas the holmium ions, which keep the alginate network together, also allow MR imaging. In this study it was shown that single sphere detection was possible by fluoroscopy, CT and MRI. The Ho-lip-ams were visualized in real-time, during infusion in a porcine kidney using fluoroscopy, and post-procedural, the deposition of the microspheres was examined with fluoroscopy, (cone beam rotational) CT and MRI. The different imaging modalities showed similar deposition patterns of the microspheres within the organ. The combination of intra-procedural visualization, multimodality imaging for patient follow-up and the

  2. Treatment of Liver Tumors with Lipiodol TACE: Technical Recommendations from Experts Opinion.

    PubMed

    de Baere, Thierry; Arai, Yasuaki; Lencioni, Riccardo; Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Rilling, William; Salem, Riad; Matsui, Osamu; Soulen, Michael C

    2016-03-01

    Transarterial chemoembolization with Lipiodol (Lipiodol TACE), also called conventional TACE, was developed in the early 1980s and widely adopted worldwide after randomized control trials and meta-analysis demonstrated superiority of Lipiodol TACE to best supportive care. Presently, there is no level one evidence that other TACE techniques are superior to Lipiodol TACE for intermediate stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which includes patients with preserved liver function and nonsurgical large or multinodular HCC without distant metastases. In addition, TACE is part of the treatment for progressive or symptomatic liver metastases from gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. When injected into the hepatic artery, Lipiodol has the unique property of selective uptake and retention in hyperarterialyzed liver tumors. Lipiodol/drug emulsion followed by particle embolization has been demonstrated to improve the pharmacokinetic of the drug and tumor response. Radio opacity of Lipiodol helps to monitor treatment delivery, with retention of Lipiodol serving as an imaging biomarker for tumor response. For 30 years, Lipiodol TACE has been inconsistently referenced in many publications with various levels of details for the method of preparation and administration, with reported progressive outcomes following improvements in the technique and the devices used to deliver the treatment and better patient selection. Consequently, there is no consensus on the standard method of TACE regarding the use of anticancer agents, embolic material, technical details, and the treatment schedule. In order to develop an internationally validated technical recommendation to standardize the Lipiodol TACE procedure, a worldwide panel of experts participated in a consensus meeting held on May 10, 2014 . PMID:26390875

  3. Effect of Inducible Co-Stimulatory Molecule siRNA in Cerebral Infarction Rat Models

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yingquan; Yang, Yu; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Yina; Tan, Shengyu; Xu, Yan; Li, Dan; Ye, Ling; Chen, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background T cell-induced inflammatory response and related cytokine secretion at the injury site may participate in the pathogenesis of cerebral infarction. Recent studies established inducible co-stimulatory molecule (ICOS) as a novel T cell-related factor for its activation and functions. We thus investigate the role of ICOS in cerebral infarction. Material/Methods The siRNA of ICOS was first used to suppress the gene expression in cultured lymphocytes. An in vivo study was then performed by intravenous application of ICOS siRNA in cerebral infarction rats. Survival rates, neurological scores, serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1, and IL-17 levels were observed. Results The expression of ICOS in cultured lymphocytes was significantly suppressed by siRNA. In the in vivo study, the application of siRNA effectively lowered mortality rates of rats, in addition to the improvement of neurological behaviors and amelioration of cerebral tissue damage. Serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1 and IL-17 were all significantly suppressed after siRNA injection. Conclusions ICOS siRNA can protect brain tissues from ischemia injuries after cerebral infarction, improve limb movement and coordination, lower the mortality rate of rats, and inhibit T cell-induced cytokines. These results collectively suggest the potential treatment efficacy of ICOS siRNA against cerebral infarction. PMID:26436531

  4. PUMA is invovled in ischemia/reperfusion-induced apoptosis of mouse cerebral astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Tian, M; Jin, L; Jia, H; Jin, Y

    2015-01-22

    PUMA (p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis), a BH3-only member of the Bcl-2 protein family, is required for p53-dependent and p53-independent forms of apoptosis. PUMA has been invovled in the onset and progress of several diseases, including cancer, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and ischemic brain disease. Although many studies have shown that ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) can induce the apoptosis of astrocytes, the role of PUMA in I/R-mediated apoptosis of cerebral astrocyte apoptosis remains unclear. To mimic in vivo I/R conditions, primary mouse cerebral astrocytes were incubated in a combinational cultural condition of oxygen, glucose, and serum deprivation (OSGD) for 1 h followed by reperfusion (OSGD/R). Cell death determination assays and cell viability assays indicated that OSGD and OSGD/R induce the apoptosis of primary cerebral astrocytes. The expression of PUMA was significantly elevated in primary cerebral astrocytes during OSGD/R. Moreover, targeted down-regulation of PUMA by siRNA transfection significantly decreased the OSGD/R-induced apoptosis of primary cerebral astrocytes. We also found that OSGD and OSGD/R triggered the release of cytochrome c in astrocytes, indicating the dependence on a mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was extremely generated during OSGD and OSGD/R, and the elimination of ROS by treated with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) remarkably inhibited the expression of PUMA and the apoptosis of primary cerebral astrocytes. The activation of Caspase 3 and Caspase 9 was extremely elevated in primary cerebral astrocytes during OSGD. In addition, we found that knockdown of PUMA led to the depressed expression of Bax, cleaved caspase-9 and caspase-3 during OSGD/R. These results indicate that PUMA is invovled in the apoptosis of cerebral astrocytes upon I/R injury. PMID:25451294

  5. Glycopyrrolate abolishes the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion in humans.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Thomas; Fisher, James P; Young, Colin N; Hartwich, Doreen; Ogoh, Shigehiko; Raven, Peter B; Fadel, Paul J; Secher, Niels H

    2010-10-01

    Brain blood vessels contain muscarinic receptors that are important for cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, but whether a cholinergic receptor mechanism is involved in the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion or affects cerebral metabolism remains unknown. We evaluated CBF and cerebral metabolism (from arterial and internal jugular venous O(2), glucose and lactate differences), as well as the middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA V(mean); transcranial Doppler ultrasound) during a sustained static handgrip contraction at 40% of maximal voluntary contraction (n = 9) and the MCA V(mean) during ergometer cycling (n = 8). Separate, randomized and counterbalanced trials were performed in control (no drug) conditions and following muscarinic cholinergic receptor blockade by glycopyrrolate. Glycopyrrolate increased resting heart rate from approximately 60 to approximately 110 beats min(-1) (P < 0.01) and cardiac output by approximately 40% (P < 0.05), but did not affect mean arterial pressure. The central cardiovascular responses to exercise with glycopyrrolate were similar to the control responses, except that cardiac output did not increase during static handgrip with glycopyrrolate. Glycopyrrolate did not significantly affect cerebral metabolism during static handgrip, but a parallel increase in MCA V(mean) (approximately 16%; P < 0.01) and CBF (approximately 12%; P < 0.01) during static handgrip, as well as the increase in MCA V(mean) during cycling (approximately 15%; P < 0.01), were abolished by glycopyrrolate (P < 0.05). Thus, during both cycling and static handgrip, a cholinergic receptor mechanism is important for the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion without affecting the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen. PMID:20660020

  6. Infection-induced Inflammation and Cerebral Injury in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Strunk, Tobias; Inder, Terrie; Wang, Xiaoyang; Burgner, David; Mallard, Carina; Levy, Ofer

    2014-01-01

    Summary Preterm birth and infectious diseases are the most common causes of neonatal and early childhood deaths worldwide. The rates of preterm birth have increased over recent decades and currently account for 11% of all births globally. Preterm infants are at significant risk of severe infection in early life and throughout childhood. Bacteraemia and/or inflammation during the neonatal period in preterm infants is associated with adverse outcomes, including death, chronic lung disease and neurodevelopmental impairment. Recent studies suggest that bacteraemia may trigger cerebral injury even without penetration of viable bacteria into the central nervous system. Here we review available evidence that supports the concept of a strong association between bacteraemia, inflammation and cerebral injury in preterm infants, with an emphasis on the underlying biological mechanisms, clinical correlates and translational opportunities. PMID:24877996

  7. Coenzyme Q10 Abrogated the 28 Days Aluminium Chloride Induced Oxidative Changes in Rat Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Anuradha S.; Nirwane, Abhijit; Kamble, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to elucidate the impact of oral administration of aluminium chloride for 28 days with respect to oxidative stress in the cerebral cortex of female rats. Further, to investigate the potentials of Coenzyme (Co) Q10 (4, 8, and 12 mg/kg, i.p.) in mitigating the detrimental changes. Materials and Methods: Biochemical estimations of cerebral lipid peroxidation (LPO), reduced glutathione (GSH), vitamin E and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were carried out after 28 days of aluminium chloride (AlCl3) and Co Q10 exposures along with histopathological examination of cerebral cortex of the rats. Results: Subacute exposure to AlCl3(5 mg/kg) led to significant decrease in levels of GSH, vitamin E and activities of SOD, CAT, GPx, and an increase in LPO of cerebral cortex. These aberrations were restored by Co Q10 (12 mg/kg, i.p.). This protection offered was comparable to that of L-deprenyl (1 mg/kg, i.p.) which served as a reference standard. Histopathological evaluations confirmed that the normal cerebral morphology was maintained by Co Q10. Conclusion: Thus, AlCl3 exposure hampers the activities of various antioxidant enzymes and induces oxidative stress in cerebral cortex of female Wistar rats. Supplementation with intraperitoneal Co Q10 abrogated these deleterious effects of AlCl3. PMID:25253934

  8. Α‑lipoic acid protects against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion-induced injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Deng, Houliang; Zuo, Xialin; Zhang, Jingjing; Liu, Xiaoxia; Liu, Li; Xu, Qian; Wu, Zhuomin; Ji, Aimin

    2015-05-01

    It is well established that the brain is sensitive to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)‑induced injury. α‑lipoic acid (LA), a free radical scavenger and antioxidant, has a neuroprotective effect against cerebral I/R‑induced injury, however, the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to evaluate whether LA was able to protect against cerebral I/R‑induced injury and to examine the potential mechanisms. The neuroprotective effects of LA were investigated in a rat model of transient focal ischemia induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) followed by reperfusion. Adult male Sprague‑Dawley rats were randomly assigned into the sham, cerebral I/R injury model and model plus LA groups. Cerebral I/R injury was induced by 90 min MCAO followed by reperfusion for 24 h. Cerebral infarct size was detected by 2,3,5‑triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Neurological deficit score (NDS), brain water content and oxidative parameters, including malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), total antioxidant capacity (T‑AOC) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured. The expression of cleaved caspase‑3, brain‑derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), phosphatidylinositol‑4,5‑bisphosphate 3‑kinase (PI3K), p‑Akt and phosphorylated extracellular signal‑regulated kinase 1/2 (p‑ERK1/2) were also analyzed using western blotting. The present study demonstrated that pretreatment with LA significantly decreased the infarction size, brain water content and improved NDS. LA reversed the levels of oxidative parameters, including MDA, NO, T‑AOC and SOD to their normal state in rat brains following cerebral I/R. Furthermore, the expression of cleaved caspase‑3 markedly decreased and the expression of BDNF, PI3K, p‑Akt and p‑ERK1/2 significantly increased following administration of LA. On the basis of these findings, it was concluded that LA protected the brain from cerebral I/R damage by attenuation of

  9. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Mediates Caffeine Antagonism of Alcohol-Induced Cerebral Artery Constriction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jennifer; Fedinec, Alexander L; Kuntamallappanavar, Guruprasad; Leffler, Charles W; Bukiya, Anna N; Dopico, Alex M

    2016-01-01

    Despite preventive education, the combined consumption of alcohol and caffeine (particularly from "energy drinks") continues to rise. Physiologic perturbations by separate intake of ethanol and caffeine have been widely documented. However, the biologic actions of the alcohol-caffeine combination and their underlying subcellular mechanisms have been scarcely studied. Using intravital microscopy on a closed-cranial window and isolated, pressurized vessels, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro action of ethanol-caffeine mixtures on cerebral arteries from rats and mice, widely recognized models to address cerebrovascular pathophysiology and pharmacology. Caffeine at concentrations found in human circulation after ingestion of one to two cups of coffee (10 µM) antagonized the endothelium-independent constriction of cerebral arteries evoked by ethanol concentrations found in blood during moderate-heavy alcohol intoxication (40-70 mM). Caffeine antagonism against alcohol was similar whether evaluated in vivo or in vitro, suggesting independence of systemic factors and drug metabolism, but required a functional endothelium. Moreover, caffeine protection against alcohol increased nitric oxide (NO•) levels over those found in the presence of ethanol alone, disappeared upon blocking NO• synthase, and could not be detected in pressurized cerebral arteries from endothelial nitric-oxide synthase knockout (eNOS(-/-)) mice. Finally, incubation of de-endothelialized cerebral arteries with the NO• donor sodium nitroprusside (10 µM) fully restored the protective effect of caffeine. This study demonstrates for the first time that caffeine antagonizes ethanol-induced cerebral artery constriction and identifies endothelial NO• as the critical caffeine effector on smooth muscle targets. Conceivably, situations that perturb endothelial function and/or NO• availability will critically alter caffeine antagonism of alcohol-induced cerebrovascular constriction without

  10. Cerebral blood flow changes during sodium-lactate-induced panic attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, R.S.; Devous, M.D. Sr.; Rush, A.J.; Lane, L.; Bonte, F.J.

    1988-04-01

    Dynamic single-photon emission computed axial tomography (CAT) with inhaled xenon-133 was used to measure regional cerebral blood flow in 10 drug-free patients with DSM-III-diagnosed panic disorder and in five normal control subjects. All subjects underwent regional cerebral blood flow studies while at rest or during normal saline infusion and during sodium lactate infusion. Six of the 10 patients and none of the control subjects experienced lactate-induced panic attacks. Lactate infusion markedly raised hemispheric blood flow levels in both control subjects and patients who did not panic. Patients who did panic experienced either a minimal increase or a decrease in hemispheric blood flow.

  11. SU-D-BRB-07: Lipiodol Impact On Dose Distribution in Liver SBRT After TACE

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, D; Ozawa, S; Hioki, K; Suzuki, T; Lin, Y; Okumura, T; Ochi, Y; Nakashima, T; Ohno, Y; Kimura, T; Murakami, Y; Nagata, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) combining transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with Lipiodol is expected to improve local control. This study aims to evaluate the impact of Lipiodol on dose distribution by comparing the dosimetric performance of the Acuros XB (AXB) algorithm, anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), and Monte Carlo (MC) method using a virtual heterogeneous phantom and a treatment plan for liver SBRT after TACE. Methods: The dose distributions calculated using AAA and AXB algorithm, both in Eclipse (ver. 11; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA), and EGSnrc-MC were compared. First, the inhomogeneity correction accuracy of the AXB algorithm and AAA was evaluated by comparing the percent depth dose (PDD) obtained from the algorithms with that from the MC calculations using a virtual inhomogeneity phantom, which included water and Lipiodol. Second, the dose distribution of a liver SBRT patient treatment plan was compared between the calculation algorithms. Results In the virtual phantom, compared with the MC calculations, AAA underestimated the doses just before and in the Lipiodol region by 5.1% and 9.5%, respectively, and overestimated the doses behind the region by 6.0%. Furthermore, compared with the MC calculations, the AXB algorithm underestimated the doses just before and in the Lipiodol region by 4.5% and 10.5%, respectively, and overestimated the doses behind the region by 4.2%. In the SBRT plan, the AAA and AXB algorithm underestimated the maximum doses in the Lipiodol region by 9.0% in comparison with the MC calculations. In clinical cases, the dose enhancement in the Lipiodol region can approximately 10% increases in tumor dose without increase of dose to normal tissue. Conclusion: The MC method demonstrated a larger increase in the dose in the Lipiodol region than the AAA and AXB algorithm. Notably, dose enhancement were observed in the tumor area; this may lead to a clinical benefit.

  12. Traumatic Brain Injury by a Closed Head Injury Device Induces Cerebral Blood Flow Changes and Microhemorrhages

    PubMed Central

    Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Bandaru, Sharath; Zakaria, Nisrine; Shen, Yimin; Kou, Zhifeng; Zhang, Liying; Haacke, Ewart Mark; Cavanaugh, John M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Traumatic brain injury is a poly-pathology characterized by changes in the cerebral blood flow, inflammation, diffuse axonal, cellular, and vascular injuries. However, studies related to understanding the temporal changes in the cerebral blood flow following traumatic brain injury extending to sub-acute periods are limited. In addition, knowledge related to microhemorrhages, such as their detection, localization, and temporal progression, is important in the evaluation of traumatic brain injury. Materials and Methods: Cerebral blood flow changes and microhemorrhages in male Sprague Dawley rats at 4 h, 24 h, 3 days, and 7 days were assessed following a closed head injury induced by the Marmarou impact acceleration device (2 m height, 450 g brass weight). Cerebral blood flow was measured by arterial spin labeling. Microhemorrhages were assessed by susceptibility-weighted imaging and Prussian blue histology. Results: Traumatic brain injury rats showed reduced regional and global cerebral blood flow at 4 h and 7 days post-injury. Injured rats showed hemorrhagic lesions in the cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampus, and brainstem in susceptibility-weighted imaging. Injured rats also showed Prussian blue reaction products in both the white and gray matter regions up to 7 days after the injury. These lesions were observed in various areas of the cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampus, thalamus, and midbrain. Conclusions: These results suggest that changes in cerebral blood flow and hemorrhagic lesions can persist for sub-acute periods after the initial traumatic insult in an animal model. In addition, microhemorrhages otherwise not seen by susceptibility-weighted imaging are present in diverse regions of the brain. The combination of altered cerebral blood flow and microhemorrhages can potentially be a source of secondary injury changes following traumatic brain injury and may need to be taken into consideration in the long-term care of these cases. PMID:26605126

  13. Nox2 Deficiency Prevents Hypertension-Induced Vascular Dysfunction and Hypertrophy in Cerebral Arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Siu-Lung; Baumbach, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in many hypertension-related vascular diseases in the brain, including stroke and dementia. Thus, we examined the role of genetic deficiency of NADPH oxidase subunit Nox2 in the function and structure of cerebral arterioles during hypertension. Arterial pressure was increased in right-sided cerebral arterioles with transverse aortic banding for 4 weeks in 8-week-old wild-type (WT) and Nox2-deficient (-/y) mice. Mice were given NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 10 mg/kg) or vehicle to drink. We measured the reactivity in cerebral arterioles through open cranial window in anesthetized mice and wall cross-sectional area and superoxide levels ex vivo. Aortic constriction increased systolic and pulse pressures in right-sided carotid arteries in all groups of mice. Ethidium fluorescence showed increased superoxide in right-sided cerebral arterioles in WT, but not in Nox2-/y mice. Dilation to acetylcholine, but not sodium nitroprusside, was reduced, and cross-sectional areas were increased in the right-sided arterioles in WT, but were unchanged in Nox2-/y mice. L-NAME reduced dilation to acetylcholine but did not result in hypertrophy in right-sided arterioles of Nox2-/y  mice. In conclusion, hypertension-induced superoxide production derived from Nox2-containing NADPH oxidase promotes hypertrophy and causes endothelial dysfunction in cerebral arterioles, possibly involving interaction with nitric oxide. PMID:23573415

  14. Semaphorin3A elevates vascular permeability and contributes to cerebral ischemia-induced brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Sheng Tao; Nilchi, Ladan; Li, Xuesheng; Gangaraju, Sandhya; Jiang, Susan X.; Aylsworth, Amy; Monette, Robert; Slinn, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) increased significantly in mouse brain following cerebral ischemia. However, the role of Sema3A in stroke brain remains unknown. Our aim was to determine wether Sema3A functions as a vascular permeability factor and contributes to ischemic brain damage. Recombinant Sema3A injected intradermally to mouse skin, or stereotactically into the cerebral cortex, caused dose- and time-dependent increases in vascular permeability, with a degree comparable to that caused by injection of a known vascular permeability factor vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGF). Application of Sema3A to cultured endothelial cells caused disorganization of F-actin stress fibre bundles and increased endothelial monolayer permeability, confirming Sema3A as a permeability factor. Sema3A-mediated F-actin changes in endothelial cells were through binding to the neuropilin2/VEGFR1 receptor complex, which in turn directly activates Mical2, a F-actin modulator. Down-regulation of Mical2, using specific siRNA, alleviated Sema3A-induced F-actin disorganization, cellular morphology changes and endothelial permeability. Importantly, ablation of Sema3A expression, cerebrovascular permeability and brain damage were significantly reduced in response to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) and in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia/haemorrhagic transformation. Together, these studies demonstrated that Sema3A is a key mediator of cerebrovascular permeability and contributes to brain damage caused by cerebral ischemia. PMID:25601765

  15. A Comparison of Three Transarterial Lipiodol-Based Formulations for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: In Vivo Biodistribution Study in Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Simon Chun Ho Leung, Thomas Wai Tong; Lau, Wan Yee; Lee, Nelson; Hui, Edwin Pun; Yeo, Winnie; Lai, Paul Bo San; Mok, Tony Shu Kam

    2008-03-15

    This study aimed to evaluate and compare the biodistribution properties of three transarterial Lipiodol-based therapeutic regimens in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this prospective study with 13 patients randomly allocated to one of three study groups, each of the patients received transcatheter intra-arterial administration into a solitary HCC with one of three different Lipiodol-based formulations: Lipiodol-ethanol mixture (LEM; Group A), Lipiodol alone (Group B), and Lipiodol and gelatin pledgets (Group C). With the use of radioactive iodine-131-labeled Lipiodol, each group was assessed for (1) pattern of Lipiodol accumulation in the lungs within the first 2 weeks as evaluated by single-photon emission computed tomography and (2) decomposition of Lipiodol formulation within the first 2 weeks as evaluated by radioactivity detected in peripheral blood and urine. The degree of Lipiodol retention in the tumor within the first 4 weeks was evaluated with CT. No statistically significant difference in Lipiodol accumulation in the lungs was detected among the three groups. However, the peak accumulation in the lungs was delayed 3 days for Group A compared to Groups B and C. The degree of Lipiodol retention within the tumor in Group A was significantly greater than that in Groups B and C on day 14 (p = 0.014) and day 28 (p = 0.013). This study showed that LEM is associated with a greater embolic effect in intrahepatic HCC at 4 weeks, and a comparable degree of lung shunting and decomposition rates, compared with ethanol-free Lipiodol formulations.

  16. Microvascular lesions by estrogen-induced ID3: its implications in cerebral & cardiorenal vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Das, Jayanta K.; Felty, Quentin

    2014-01-01

    Severe symptoms of cerebral and cardiorenal vascular diseases can be triggered when cerebral, coronary, or glomerular arterioles grow inappropriately as a result of abnormal cell proliferation. The risk factor(s) and molecular mechanisms responsible for microvascular lesion formation are largely unknown. Although controversial, both animal and epidemiological studies have shown that estrogen increases the risk of stroke which may be due to microvascular lesions. Since microvascular diseases are characterized by excessive vessel growth, it is plausible that estrogen-induced neovascularization contributes to the growth of microvascular lesions. We present evidence for how ID3 overexpression in endothelial cells contributes to the development of an estrogen-induced neovascular phenotype with an additional focus on Pyk2 kinase. Our data showed that ID3 overexpression increased neovascularization, cell migration, and spheroid growth of human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells, hCMEC/D3. ID3 overexpressing cells showed significant estrogen-induced G2/M phase transition. Estrogen treatment increased both ID3 phosphorylation and total protein that was inhibited by tamoxifen; and Pyk2 mediated estrogen-induced ID3 mRNA expression. These findings suggest that Pyk2 signals ID3 expression and ID3 is necessary for estrogen-induced neovascularization in hCMEC/D3 cells. A better understanding of how microvascular lesions depend on ID3 may open new avenues for prevention and treatment of neurological diseases. PMID:25129100

  17. Cerebral oxygenation and haemodynamic effects induced by nimodipine in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Canova, Daniela; Roatta, Silvestro; Micieli, Giuseppe; Bosone, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    Summary The cerebrovascular effects of nimodipine are still poorly understood even in the healthy condition; in particular, its effects on tissue oxygenation have never been investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate changes in cerebral oxygenation and blood volume upon oral administration of nimodipine (90 mg) in the healthy condition. In eight subjects, changes in cerebral tissue oxygenation and blood volume were determined simultaneously with changes in blood velocity of the middle cerebral artery (VMCA) by using, respectively, near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD). The subjects also underwent non-invasive assessment of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and end-tidal CO2. TCD and NIRS CO2 reactivity indices were also extracted. Nimodipine significantly reduced ABP (11±13%) and increased heart rate, as well as NIRS oxygenation (6.0±4.8%) and blood volume indices (9.4±10.1%), while VMCA was not significantly decreased (2.0±3.5%). Nimodipine slightly but significantly reduced the VMCA response to changes in pCO2 whereas the CO2 reactivity of NIRS parameters was improved. The observed changes in cerebral tissue oxygenation and blood volume indicate nimodipine-induced cerebrovascular dilation and increased perfusion, while the effect on VMCA possibly results from dilation of the insonated artery. The present results cast doubt on the putative nimodipine-induced impairment of CO2 reactivity. PMID:23402678

  18. Ulinastatin inhibits cerebral ischemia-induced apoptosis in the hippocampus of gerbils.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young-Sam; Shin, Mal-Soon; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang-Ju; Sung, Yun-Hee; Yoon, Hye-Sun; Lee, Bong-Jae

    2015-08-01

    Ulinastatin is a urinary trypsin inhibitor, originally extracted and purified from human urine. Ulinastatin has cytoprotective effects against ischemic injury in several organs. In the present study, the neuroprotective effects of ulinastatin following ischemic cerebral injury in the hippocampus of gerbils was investigated. To induce transient global ischemia in gerbils, the common carotid arteries were occluded using aneurysm clips for 5 min, and the clips were then removed. Ulinastatin was subcutaneously injected into the gerbils once a day for 7 days at doses of 50,000 or 100,000 U/kg. The gerbils were confronted with a step-down avoidance task, following which tissue samples from the gerbils were examined using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, western blot analysis for B-cell lymphoma (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), immunohistochemistry for caspase-3 and immunofluorescence for 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine. The numbers of TUNEL-positive and caspase-3-positive cells in the hippocampal CA1 region increased following cerebral ischemia. The expression of Bax in the hippocampus increased, while the expression of Bcl-2 in the hippocampus decreased following cerebral ischemia. These results confirmed that apoptosis in the hippocampus was enhanced following cerebral ischemia in gerbils. The levels of cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were also enhanced by ischemia, which is possibly an adaptive mechanism to compensate for excessive levels of apoptosis. Ulinastatin treatment inhibited ischemia-induced apoptosis by suppressing apoptosis-associated molecules, and thus ameliorated ischemia-induced short-term memory impairment. The cell proliferation in the hippocampus was also suppressed following ulinastatin treatment. These results suggested the use of ulinastatin as a therapeutic agent for patients with cerebral stroke. PMID:25891426

  19. Lipiodol: A Potential Direct Surrogate for Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Image Guidance in Radiotherapy of Liver Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Yue Jinbo; Sun Xindong; Cai Jing; Yin Fangfang; Yin Yong; Zhu Jian; Lu Jie; Liu Tonghai; Yu Jinming; Shi Xuetao; Song Jinlong

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using lipiodol as a direct surrogate for target localization using cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance in radiotherapy (RT) of patients with unresectable liver tumors after transarterial chemoembolization. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients with an unresectable solitary liver tumor were enrolled for RT using active breathing control (ABC) and CBCT image guidance after transarterial chemoembolization. Each patient had pre- and posttreatment CBCT in the first 10 fractions of treatment. Lipiodol retention was evaluated using daily CBCT scans, and volume of lipiodol retention in the liver was calculated and compared between planning CT and post-RT CT. Influence of lipiodol on dosimetry was evaluated by measuring doses using an ion chamber with and without the presence of lipiodol. Margin analysis was performed on the basis of both inter- and intrafractional target localization errors. Results: Twenty-eight patients successfully completed the study. The shape and size of lipiodol retention did not vary substantially during the course of treatment. The mean Dice similarity coefficient for the lipiodol volume in pretreatment CT and that in posttreatment CT was 0.836 (range, 0.817-0.885). The maximum change (ratio of the lipiodol volume in pretreatment CT to that in posttreatment CT) was 1.045. The mean dose changes with the presence of <10 mL lipiodol were -1.44% and 0.13% for 6 MV and 15 MV, respectively. With ABC and online CBCT image guidance, clinical target volume-planning target volume margins were determined to be 2.5 mm in the mediolateral direction, 2.9 mm in the anteroposterior direction, and 4.0 mm in the craniocaudal direction. Conclusions: Lipiodol could be used as a direct surrogate for CBCT image guidance to improve the localization accuracy for RT of liver tumors. Combination of ABC and CBCT image guidance with lipiodol can potentially reduce the clinical target volume-planning target volume margin.

  20. Ischemic Effects of Transcatheter Arterial Embolization with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate-Lipiodol on the Colon in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ikoma, Akira; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Sonomura, Tetsuo; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki; Takasaka, Isao; Nakata, Kouhei; Sahara, Shinya; Sawa, Naohisa; Shirai, Shintaro; Mori, Ichiro

    2010-10-15

    This study was designed to assess the safety of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with n-butyl cyanoacrylate-lipiodol (NBCA-Lp) for the large bowel and to investigate the vital response to NBCA-Lp in a swine model. In nine swine, nine arteries nourishing the colon were embolized with NBCA-Lp (1 ml of NBCA mixed with 4 ml of lipiodol): sigmoid-rectal branch artery in six swine, right colic branch artery in two, and middle colic branch artery in one. The amount of NBCA-Lp was 0.1-0.4 ml. Sacrifice was conducted 3 days after TAE to identify histological infarction. Classification was conducted retrospectively: group A, vasa recta without NBCA-Lp embolization despite TAE; group B, three or fewer vasa recta with NBCA-Lp embolization; and group C, five or more vasa recta with NBCA-Lp embolization. In one swine in group A, no necrotic focus was observed. In group B, three of four swine experienced no ischemic damage. The remaining one swine experienced necrosis of mucosal and submucosal layers in one-fourth of the circumference. In group C, all four swine with marginal artery and five vasa recta or more embolized experienced total necrosis of mucosa, submucosa, and smooth muscle layers of the whole colonic circumference. Significant difference on the extent of ischemic damage was observed between groups B and C (P < 0.05). Microscopically, NBCA-Lp induced acute vasculitis. Embolization of three or fewer vasa recta with NBCA-Lp induced no ischemic damage or limited necrosis, whereas embolization of five or more vasa recta with NBCA-Lp induced extensive necrosis.

  1. H2S induces vasoconstriction of rat cerebral arteries via cAMP/adenylyl cyclase pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Sen; Ping, Na-Na; Cao, Lei; Mi, Yan-Ni; Cao, Yong-Xiao

    2015-12-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), traditionally known for its toxic effects, is now involved in regulating vascular tone. Here we investigated the vasoconstrictive effect of H2S on cerebral artery and the underlying mechanism. Sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a donor of H2S, concentration-dependently induced vasoconstriction on basilar artery, which was enhanced in the presence of isoprenaline, a β-adrenoceptor agonist or forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator. Administration of NaHS attenuated the vasorelaxant effects of isoprenaline or forskolin. Meanwhile, the NaHS-induced vasoconstriction was diminished in the presence of 8B-cAMP, an analog of cAMP, but was not affected by Bay K-8644, a selective L-type Ca(2+) channel agonist. These results could be explained by the revised effects of NaHS on isoprenaline-induced cAMP elevation and forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity. Additionally, NaHS-induced vasoconstriction was enhanced by removing the endothelium or in the presence of L-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. L-NAME only partially attenuated the effect of NaHS which was given together with forskolin on the pre-contracted artery. In conclusion, H2S induces vasoconstriction of cerebral artery via, at least in part, cAMP/adenylyl cyclase pathway. PMID:26524654

  2. Heavy charged-particle induced lesions in rabbit cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, K.H.; Lyman, J.T.; Fabrikant, J.I.

    1988-02-01

    Fourteen male rabbits received single doses of 20, 40, and 80 Gy of neon irradiation with an extended Bragg peak. They were sacrificed at 1 day, 1 week, and 6 months post-irradiation. The tissue changes which showed a significant time-dose relationship were leakage of carbon particles from blood vessels, focal arachnoiditis, hemorrhage, cystic necrosis, and a total histopathologic score using a point system of grading. The focal nature of the lesions was clearly demonstrated with 2 mm thick macrotome sections. The transition zone between damaged brain and microscopically normal appearing brain was less than 1 mm and the tissue damage induced was morphologically similar to that of other radiation modalities. These findings may have important therapeutic implications for patients. The sharply demarcated boundaries of heavy charged-particle induced lesions suggest these beams will be useful for obliterating tissue in areas where it is critical that a transition from undamaged to severely damaged tissue must occur over a short distance, such as in the central nervous system.

  3. Quantitative assessment of lipiodol deposition after Chemoembolization: Comparison between cone-beam CT and multi-detector CT

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rongxin; Geschwind, Jean-François; Wang, Zhijun; Tacher, Vania; Lin, MingDe

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the ability of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquired directly after TACE to assess lipiodol deposition in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and compare it to unenhanced MDCT. Materials and methods Fifteen HCC patients were treated with conventional TACE, and CBCT was used to assess the lipiodol deposition directly after TACE. Unenhanced MDCT was performed 24 hours after TACE. Four patients were excluded because the margin of tumor or area of lipiodol deposition was not clear. The image enhancement density of the entire tumor (T) and liver parenchyma (L) was measured by ImageJ software, and tumor-to-liver contrast (TLC) was calculated. In addition, volumetric measurement of tumor and lipiodol was performed by semiautomatic 3D volume segmentation and compared using linear regression to evaluate consistency between two imaging modalities. Results The mean value of TLC on CBCT was not significantly different from that on MDCT (337.7±233.5 HU versus 283.0±152.1 HU, P=0.103). The average volume of the whole tumor and of only the lipiodol deposited regions, and the calculated average percentage of lipiodol retention on CBCT were not significantly different when compared to MDCT (tumor volume: 9.6±11.8 cm3 versus 10.8±14.2 cm3, P=0.142; lipiodol volume: 6.3±7.7 cm3 versus 7.0±8.1 cm3, P=0.214; percentage of lipiodol retention: 68.9%±24.0% versus 72.2%±23.1%, P=0.578). Additionally, there was a high correlation in the volume of tumor and lipiodol between CBCT and MDCT (R2=0.919 and 0.903, respectively). Conclusions The quantitative image enhancement and volume analyses demonstrate that CBCT is similar to MDCT in assessing the lipiodol deposition in HCC after TACE. PMID:24094672

  4. Effects of electroacupuncture preconditioning on jugular vein glucose level and cerebral edema in rats undergoing cerebral ischemia reperfusion that induced injury

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qiuxia; Pan, Peng; Xu, Changqing; Li, Wenzhi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) preconditioning on the blood glucose level in jugular vein and water content in brain tissues in rats undergoing cerebral ischemia reperfusion that induced injury. Methods: 90 healthy male Wister rats were randomly assigned to 3 groups: sham-operation (SH) group, cerebral ischemia reperfusion (IR) group and electroacupuncture (EA) preconditioning plus IR group. EA group was pretreated with EA delivered to acupoints of “Baihui” (Du 20) and “Shuigou” (Du 26) 30 min before cerebral ischemia. Results: No marked difference was observed in brain water content 2 h after procedure in IR group, SH group and EA group. Compared with SH group, the brain water contents in IR group and EA group were significantly higher 6 h after reperfusion and peaked at 48 h (P < 0.01). The blood glucose levels in EA and IR groups were significantly higher than that of SH group 2 h after reperfusion, which peaked at 6 h and tended to decline up to 24 h after reperfusion (P < 0.01). 2 h, 6 h, and 24 h after reperfusion, EA group had significantly lower blood glucose levels than IR group (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Electroacupuncture preconditioning can significantly inhibit the augmentation of the blood glucose level and attenuate cerebral edema induced by reperfusion, which leads to alleviation of injury caused by ischemia reperfusion. PMID:25550958

  5. Radiation-induced cerebral meningioma: a recognizable entity

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, A.B.; Shalit, M.N.; Cohen, M.L.; Zandbank, U.; Reichenthal, E.

    1984-11-01

    The authors retrospectively analyzed the clinical and histopathological findings in 201 patients with intracranial meningiomas operated on in the period 1978 to 1982. Forty-three of the patients (21.4%) had at some previous time received radiation treatment to their scalp, the majority for tinea capitis. The findings in these 43 irradiated patients were compared with those in the 158 non-irradiated patients. Several distinctive clinical and histological features were identified in the irradiated group, which suggest that radiation-induced meningiomas can be defined as a separate nosological subgroup. The use of irradiation in large numbers of children with tinea capitis in the era prior to the availability of griseofulvin may be responsible for a significantly increased incidence of intracranial meningiomas.

  6. 188Re-SSS/Lipiodol: Development of a Potential Treatment for HCC from Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Lepareur, Nicolas; Ardisson, Valérie; Noiret, Nicolas; Garin, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 5th most common tumour worldwide and has a dark prognosis. For nonoperable cases, metabolic radiotherapy with Lipiodol labelled with β-emitters is a promising therapeutic option. The Comprehensive Cancer Centre Eugène Marquis and the National Graduate School of Chemistry of Rennes (ENSCR) have jointly developed a stable and efficient labelling of Lipiodol with rhenium-188 (Eβmax = 2.1 MeV) for the treatment of HCC. The major “milestones” of this development, from the first syntheses to the recent first injection in man, are described. PMID:22518301

  7. Molecular Regulation of DNA Damage-Induced Apoptosis in Neurons of Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiping; Pipino, Jacqueline; Chestnut, Barry; Landek, Melissa A.

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral cortical neuron degeneration occurs in brain disorders manifesting throughout life, but the mechanisms are understood poorly. We used cultured embryonic mouse cortical neurons and an in vivo mouse model to study mechanisms of DNA damaged-induced apoptosis in immature and differentiated neurons. p53 drives apoptosis of immature and differentiated cortical neurons through its rapid and prominent activation stimulated by DNA strand breaks induced by topoisomerase-I and -II inhibition. Blocking p53-DNA transactivation with α-pifithrin protects immature neurons; blocking p53-mitochondrial functions with μ-pifithrin protects differentiated neurons. Mitochondrial death proteins are upregulated in apoptotic immature and differentiated neurons and have nonredundant proapoptotic functions; Bak is more dominant than Bax in differentiated neurons. p53 phosphorylation is mediated by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase. ATM inactivation is antiapoptotic, particularly in differentiated neurons, whereas inhibition of c-Abl protects immature neurons but not differentiated neurons. Cell death protein expression patterns in mouse forebrain are mostly similar to cultured neurons. DNA damage induces prominent p53 activation and apoptosis in cerebral cortex in vivo. Thus, DNA strand breaks in cortical neurons induce rapid p53-mediated apoptosis through actions of upstream ATM and c-Abl kinases and downstream mitochondrial death proteins. This molecular network operates through variations depending on neuron maturity. PMID:18820287

  8. MFGE8 inhibits inflammasome-induced IL-1β production and limits postischemic cerebral injury

    PubMed Central

    Deroide, Nicolas; Li, Xuan; Lerouet, Dominique; Van Vré, Emily; Baker, Lauren; Harrison, James; Poittevin, Marine; Masters, Leanne; Nih, Lina; Margaill, Isabelle; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Ryffel, Bernhard; Pocard, Marc; Tedgui, Alain; Kubis, Nathalie; Mallat, Ziad

    2013-01-01

    Milk fat globule-EGF 8 (MFGE8) plays important, nonredundant roles in several biological processes, including apoptotic cell clearance, angiogenesis, and adaptive immunity. Several recent studies have reported a potential role for MFGE8 in regulation of the innate immune response; however, the precise mechanisms underlying this role are poorly understood. Here, we show that MFGE8 is an endogenous inhibitor of inflammasome-induced IL-1β production. MFGE8 inhibited necrotic cell–induced and ATP-dependent IL-1β production by macrophages through mediation of integrin β3 and P2X7 receptor interactions in primed cells. Itgb3 deficiency in macrophages abrogated the inhibitory effect of MFGE8 on ATP-induced IL-1β production. In a setting of postischemic cerebral injury in mice, MFGE8 deficiency was associated with enhanced IL-1β production and larger infarct size; the latter was abolished after treatment with IL-1 receptor antagonist. MFGE8 supplementation significantly dampened caspase-1 activation and IL-1β production and reduced infarct size in wild-type mice, but did not limit cerebral necrosis in Il1b-, Itgb3-, or P2rx7-deficient animals. In conclusion, we demonstrated that MFGE8 regulates innate immunity through inhibition of inflammasome-induced IL-1β production. PMID:23454767

  9. Hypoxia-Induced Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression Precedes Neovascularization after Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Marti, Hugo J. H.; Bernaudin, Myriam; Bellail, Anita; Schoch, Heike; Euler, Monika; Petit, Edwige; Risau, Werner

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that hypoxia induces angiogenesis and thereby may counteract the detrimental neurological effects associated with stroke. Forty-eight to seventy-two hours after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion we found a strong increase in the number of newly formed vessels at the border of the infarction. Using the hypoxia marker nitroimidazole EF5, we detected hypoxic cells in the ischemic border of the neocortex. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is the main regulator of angiogenesis and is inducible by hypoxia, was strongly up-regulated in the ischemic border, at times between 6 and 24 hours after occlusion. In addition, both VEGF receptors (VEGFRs) were up-regulated at the border after 48 hours and later in the ischemic core. Finally, the two transcription factors, hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and HIF-2, known to be involved in the regulation of VEGF and VEGFR gene expression, were increased in the ischemic border after 72 hours, suggesting a regulatory function for these factors. These results strongly suggest that the VEGF/VEGFR system, induced by hypoxia, leads to the growth of new vessels after cerebral ischemia. Exogenous support of this natural protective mechanism might lead to enhanced survival after stroke. PMID:10702412

  10. Curcumin attenuates the middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced reduction in γ-enolase expression in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Gim, Sang-Ah; Lee, So-Ra; Shah, Fawad-Ali; Koh, Phil-Ok

    2015-12-01

    Curcumin exerts a protective effect in cerebral ischemia through its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. γ-enolase is a glycolytic enzyme expressed in neurons that is known to exerts a neuroprotective effect. We investigated whether curcumin regulates γ-enolase expression in focal cerebral ischemic injury in rats. Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was performed to induce focal cerebral ischemia. Adult male rats were injected intraperitoneally with either vehicle or curcumin (50 mg/kg) 1 h after MCAO and cerebral cortex tissues were isolated 24 h after MCAO. We found that MCAO-induced injury resulted in a reduction in γ-enolase expression in vehicle-treated animals using a proteomics approach. However, this reduction was attenuated in animals with MCAO treated with curcumin. Reverse-transcription PCR and Western blot analyses also showed that curcumin treatment prevented the MCAO injury-induced reduction in γ-enolase expression. The results of this study suggest that curcumin exerts its neuroprotective function in focal cerebral ischemia by regulating the expression of γ-enolase. PMID:26755923

  11. Curcumin attenuates the middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced reduction in γ-enolase expression in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Gim, Sang-Ah; Lee, So-Ra; Shah, Fawad-Ali

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin exerts a protective effect in cerebral ischemia through its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. γ-enolase is a glycolytic enzyme expressed in neurons that is known to exerts a neuroprotective effect. We investigated whether curcumin regulates γ-enolase expression in focal cerebral ischemic injury in rats. Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was performed to induce focal cerebral ischemia. Adult male rats were injected intraperitoneally with either vehicle or curcumin (50 mg/kg) 1 h after MCAO and cerebral cortex tissues were isolated 24 h after MCAO. We found that MCAO-induced injury resulted in a reduction in γ-enolase expression in vehicle-treated animals using a proteomics approach. However, this reduction was attenuated in animals with MCAO treated with curcumin. Reverse-transcription PCR and Western blot analyses also showed that curcumin treatment prevented the MCAO injury-induced reduction in γ-enolase expression. The results of this study suggest that curcumin exerts its neuroprotective function in focal cerebral ischemia by regulating the expression of γ-enolase. PMID:26755923

  12. Bench-to-bedside review: Burn-induced cerebral inflammation – a neglected entity?

    PubMed Central

    Flierl, Michael A; Stahel, Philip F; Touban, Basel M; Beauchamp, Kathryn M; Morgan, Steven J; Smith, Wade R; Ipaktchi, Kyros R

    2009-01-01

    Severe burn injury remains a major burden on patients and healthcare systems. Following severe burns, the injured tissues mount a local inflammatory response aiming to restore homeostasis. With excessive burn load, the immune response becomes disproportionate and patients may develop an overshooting systemic inflammatory response, compromising multiple physiological barriers in the lung, kidney, liver, and brain. If the blood–brain barrier is breached, systemic inflammatory molecules and phagocytes readily enter the brain and activate sessile cells of the central nervous system. Copious amounts of reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, proteases, cytokines/chemokines, and complement proteins are being released by these inflammatory cells, resulting in additional neuronal damage and life-threatening cerebral edema. Despite the correlation between cerebral complications in severe burn victims with mortality, burn-induced neuroinflammation continues to fly under the radar as an underestimated entity in the critically ill burn patient. In this paper, we illustrate the molecular events leading to blood–brain barrier breakdown, with a focus on the subsequent neuroinflammatory changes leading to cerebral edema in patients with severe burns. PMID:19638180

  13. Investigation of redox status in chronic cerebral hypoperfusion-induced neurodegeneration in rats

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Anil Kumar; Abdul-Majeed, Saif Saad; Gurtu, Sunil; Mohamed, Wael M.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Aging related reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF) has been linked with neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease and dementia. Experimentally, a condition of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion due to reduced CBF can be induced by permanent bilateral occlusion of common carotid arteries (2-vessel occlusion, 2VO) in rats. Since oxidative stress, leading to neuronal apoptosis and death, is one of the mechanisms, which is thought to play a significant role in chronic degenerative neurological disorders, the present study was planned to assess the ROS status by measuring the levels of anti-oxidant enzymes that might occur during chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Antioxidant enzymes namely glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase were measured in the brain tissue at eight weeks of 2VO induction in rats. Results show significantly elevated levels of GPx, SOD, and catalase enzymes as compared with the control group. It is possible that compensatory rise in antioxidant enzymes occurs in response to increased oxidative stress following ischemic insult. PMID:26937356

  14. Cerebral activity during the anesthesia-like state induced by mesopontine microinjection of pentobarbital.

    PubMed

    Abulafia, Ruth; Zalkind, Vladimir; Devor, Marshall

    2009-05-27

    Microinjection of pentobarbital into a restricted region of rat brainstem, the mesopontine tegmental anesthesia area (MPTA), induces a reversible anesthesia-like state characterized by loss of the righting reflex, atonia, antinociception, and loss of consciousness as assessed by electroencephalogram synchronization. We examined cerebral activity during this state using FOS expression as a marker. Animals were anesthetized for 50 min with a series of intracerebral microinjections of pentobarbital or with systemic pentobarbital and intracerebral microinjections of vehicle. FOS expression was compared with that in awake animals microinjected with vehicle. Neural activity was suppressed throughout the cortex whether anesthesia was induced by systemic or MPTA routes. Changes were less consistent subcortically. In the zona incerta and the nucleus raphe pallidus, expression was strongly suppressed during systemic anesthesia, but only mildly during MPTA-induced anesthesia. Dissociation was seen in the tuberomammillary nucleus where suppression occurred during systemic-induced anesthesia only, and in the lateral habenular nucleus where activity was markedly increased during systemic-induced anesthesia but not following intracerebral microinjection. Several subcortical nuclei previously associated with cerebral arousal were not affected. In the MPTA itself FOS expression was suppressed during systemic anesthesia. Differences in the pattern of brain activity in the two modes of anesthesia are consistent with the possibility that anesthetic endpoints might be achieved by alternative mechanisms: direct drug action for systemic anesthesia or via ascending pathways for MPTA-induced anesthesia. However, it is also possible that systemically administered agents induce anesthesia, at least in part, by a primary action in the MPTA with cortical inhibition occurring secondarily. PMID:19474332

  15. Hydrogen Sulfide Attenuates Tissue Plasminogen Activator-Induced Cerebral Hemorrhage Following Experimental Stroke.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Wang, Yi; Xiao, Yunqi; Hua, Zichun; Cheng, Jian; Jia, Jia

    2016-06-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), the only approved drug for the treatment of ischemic stroke, increases the risk of cerebral hemorrhage. Here, we investigated whether the newly identified gaso-transmitter hydrogen sulfide (H2S), when used in combination with tPA, reduced the hemorrhagic transformation following stroke. In a mouse model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), intravenous injection of tPA enhanced cerebral hemorrhage, which was significantly attenuated by the co-administration of two structurally unrelated H2S donors, ADT-OH and NaHS. By assessing extravasation of Evans blue into the ischemic hemisphere as well as brain edema following MCAO, we further showed that a tPA-exacerbated BBB disruption was significantly ameliorated by the co-administration of ADT-OH. In the mouse MCAO model, tPA upregulated Akt activation, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) activity in the ischemic brain, which was remarkably attenuated by ADT-OH. In the in vitro glucose-oxygen deprivation (OGD) model, ADT-OH markedly attenuated tPA-enhanced Akt activation and VEGF expression in brain microvascular endothelial cells. Finally, ADT-OH improved functional outcomes in mice subjected to MCAO and tPA infusion. In conclusion, H2S donors reduced tPA-induced cerebral hemorrhage by possibly inhibiting the Akt-VEGF-MMP9 cascade. Administration of H2S donors has potential as a novel modality to improve the safety of tPA following stroke. PMID:27018013

  16. Inducible nitric oxide synthase gene expression in brain following cerebral ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Iadecola, C.; Zhang, Fangyi; Xu, S.

    1995-05-01

    Cerebral ischemia is followed by a local inflammatory response that is thought to participate in the extension of the tissue damage occurring in the postischemic period. However, the mechanisms whereby the inflammation contributes to the progression of the damage have not been fully elucidated. In models of inflammation, expression of the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is responsible for cytotoxicity through the production of large amounts of nitric oxide (NO). In this study, therefore, we sought to establish whether iNOS is expressed in the ischemic brain. Rats were killed 6 h to 7 days after occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. iNOS expression in the ischemic area was determined by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Porphobilinogen deaminase mRNA was detected in the same sample and used for normalization. In the ischemic brain, there was expression of iNOS mRNA that began at 12 h, peaked at 48 h, and returned to baseline at 7 days (n = 3/time point). iNOS mRNA expression paralleled the time course of induction of iNOS catalytic activity, determined by the citrulline assay (17.4 {+-} 4.4 pmol citrulline/{mu}g protein/min at 48 h; mean {+-} SD; n = 5 per time point). iNOS immunoreactivity was seen in neutrophils at 48-96 h after ischemia. The data provide molecular, biochemical, and immunocytochemical evidence of iNOS induction following focal cerebral ischemia. These findings, in concert with our recent demonstration that inhibition of iNOS reduces infarct volume in the same stroke model, indicate that NO production may play an important pathogenic role in the progression of the tissue damage that follows cerebral ischemia. 35 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Hypercapnia-induced cerebral and ocular vasodilation is not altered by glibenclamide in humans.

    PubMed

    Bayerle-Eder, M; Wolzt, M; Polska, E; Langenberger, H; Pleiner, J; Teherani, D; Rainer, G; Polak, K; Eichler, H G; Schmetterer, L

    2000-06-01

    Carbon dioxide is an important regulator of vascular tone. Glibenclamide, an inhibitor of ATP-sensitive potassium channel (K(ATP)) activation, significantly blunts vasodilation in response to hypercapnic acidosis in animals. We investigated whether glibenclamide also alters the cerebral and ocular vasodilator response to hypercapnia in humans. Ten healthy male subjects were studied in a controlled, randomized, double-blind two-way crossover study under normoxic and hypercapnic conditions. Glibenclamide (5 mg po) or insulin (0.3 mU. kg(-1). min(-1) iv) were administered with glucose to achieve comparable plasma insulin levels. In control experiments, five healthy volunteers received glibenclamide (5 mg) or nicorandil (40 mg) or glibenclamide and nicorandil in a randomized, three-way crossover study. Mean blood flow velocity and resistive index in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and in the ophthalmic artery (OA) were measured with Doppler sonography. Pulsatile choroidal blood flow was assessed with laser interferometric measurement of fundus pulsation. Forearm blood flow was measured with venous occlusion plethysmography. Hypercapnia increased ocular fundus pulsation amplitude by +18.2-22.3% (P < 0. 001) and mean flow velocity in the MCA by +27.4-33.3% (P < 0.001), but not in the OA (2.1-6.5%, P = 0.2). Forearm blood flow increased by 78.2% vs. baseline (P = 0.041) after nicorandil administration. Glibenclamide did not alter hypercapnia-induced changes in cerebral or ocular hemodynamics and did not affect systemic hemodynamics or forearm blood flow but significantly increased glucose utilization and blunted the nicorandil-induced vasodilation in the forearm. This suggests that hypercapnia-induced changes in the vascular beds under study are not mediated by activation of K(ATP) channels in humans. PMID:10848537

  18. In vivo photoacoustic tomography of mouse cerebral edema induced by cold injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhun; Zhu, Quing; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-06-01

    For the first time, we have implemented photoacoustic tomography (PAT) to image the water content of an edema in vivo. We produced and imaged a cold-induced cerebral edema transcranially, then obtained blood vessel and water accumulation images at 610 and 975 nm, respectively. We tracked the changes at 12, 24, and 36 h after the cold injury. The blood volume decreased after the cold injury, and the maximum area of edema was observed 24 h after the cold injury. We validated PAT of the water content of the edema through magnetic Resonance Imaging and the water spectrum from the spectrophotometric measurement.

  19. Potentiation of aspirin-induced cerebroprotection by minocycline: a therapeutic approach to attenuate exacerbation of transient focal cerebral ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Lokesh K; Addepalli, Veeranjaneyulu

    2012-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease is a major cause of mortality and disability in adults. Diabetes mellitus increases the risk of cerebral ischaemia and is associated with worse clinical outcome following an event. Upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in diabetes appears to play a role in vascular complications of diabetes. We hypothesised that inhibition of MMP-2 and MMP-9 by minocycline can be potentiated by aspirin through inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 and tissue plasminogen activator, resulting in amelioration of clinical cerebral ischaemia in diabetes. In the present study, cerebral ischaemia/reperfusion injury was induced in streptozotocin diabetic rats by 1 h middle cerebral artery occlusion and 24 h reperfusion. Infarct volume, cerebral oedema, neurological severity score and blood-brain barrier disruption were significantly increased in diabetic animals compared with the normoglycemic control group. The combination of aspirin and minocycline treatment significantly improved these parameters in diabetic animals. Moreover, this therapy was associated with significantly lower mortality and reduction in MMP-2 and MMP-9 levels. Our data indicate that combination of aspirin and minocycline therapy protects from the consequences of cerebral ischaemia in animal models of diabetes and is associated with inhibition of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Therefore, this combination therapy may represent a novel strategy to reduce the neurological complications of cerebral ischaemia in diabetes. PMID:22045867

  20. Severe chronic cerebral hypoperfusion induces microglial dysfunction leading to memory loss in APPswe/PS1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Bordeleau, Maude; ElAli, Ayman; Rivest, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral vasculature plays a key role in controlling brain homeostasis. Cerebral vasculature dysfunction, associated to irregularities in cerebral blood perfusion, has been proposed to directly contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. More precisely, chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, which impairs brain homeostasis, was demonstrated to take place even before cognitive decline. However, the mechanisms underlying the implication of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion in AD pathogenesis remain elusive. Therefore, this study aims at investigating the role of severe chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (SCCH) in AD pathogenesis. For this purpose, SCCH was induced in young APPswe/PS1 in order to evaluate the progression of AD-like pathology in these mice. We observed that SCCH accelerated the cognitive decline of young APPswe/PS1 mice, which was associated with an increased amyloid plaque number in brain parenchyma. In addition, SCCH reduced the activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), which has been shown to play an important role in the adaptive responses of neurons. Importantly, SCCH impaired the function of microglial cells, which are implicated in amyloid-β (Aβ) elimination. In vitro approaches underlined the ability of a low-glucose microenvironment to decrease the general activity and phagocytic capacity of microglia. By using a new model of SCCH, our study unravels new insights into the implication of severe chronic cerebral hypoperfusion in AD pathogenesis, mainly by altering microglial cell activity and consequently Aβ clearance. PMID:26918610

  1. 3D Volumetric Evaluation of Lipiodol Retention in HCC after Chemoembolization: A Quantitative Comparison between CBCT and MDCT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhijun; Lin, MingDe; Lesage, David; Chen, Rongxin; Chapiro, Julius; Gu, Tara; Tacher, Vania; Duran, Rafael; Geschwind, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives To evaluate the capability of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquired immediately after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) in determining Lipiodol retention quantitatively and volumetrically when compared to 1-day post-procedure unenhanced MDCT. Materials and methods From June to December, 2012, fifteen patients met the inclusion criteria of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) that was treated with conventional TACE (cTACE), and had intra-procedural CBCT and 1-day post-TACE MDCT. Four patients were excluded because the Lipiodol was diffuse throughout the entire liver or Lipiodol deposition was not clear on both CBCT and MDCT. Eleven patients with a total of 31 target lesions were included in the analysis. A quantitative and 3D software was used to assess complete, localized and diffuse lipiodol deposition. Tumor volume, Lipiodol volume in the tumor, % Lipiodol retention, and Lipiodol enhancement in Hounsfield Unit (HU) were calculated and compared between CBCT and MDCT using two-tailed student’s t-test and Bland-Altman plots. Results The mean value of tumor volume, Lipiodol deposited regions, calculated average % Lipiodol retention, and HU value of CBCT were not significantly different from those of MDCT (tumor volume: 9.37±11.35cm3 vs. 9.34±11.44cm3, P=0.991; Lipiodol volume: 7.84±9.34cm3 vs. 7.84±9.60 cm3, P=0.998; % Lipiodol retention: 89.3%±14.7% vs. 90.2% ± 14.9%, P=0.811; HU value: 307.7±160.1 HU vs. 257.2±120.0 HU, P=0.139). Bland-Altman plots showed only minimal difference and high agreement when comparing CBCT to MDCT. Conclusion CBCT has a similar capability, intraprocedurally, to assess Lipiodol deposition in 3D for patients with HCC treated with cTACE when compared to MDCT. PMID:24507426

  2. Tissue-type plasminogen activator induces synaptic vesicle endocytosis in cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Yepes, M; Wu, F; Torre, E; Cuellar-Giraldo, D; Jia, D; Cheng, L

    2016-04-01

    The release of the serine proteinase tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) from the presynaptic terminal of cerebral cortical neurons plays a central role in the development of synaptic plasticity, adaptation to metabolic stress and neuronal survival. Our earlier studies indicate that by inducing the recruitment of the cytoskeletal protein βII-spectrin and voltage-gated calcium channels to the active zone, tPA promotes Ca(2+)-dependent translocation of synaptic vesicles (SVs) to the synaptic release site where they release their load of neurotransmitters into the synaptic cleft. Here we used a combination of in vivo and in vitro experiments to investigate whether this effect leads to depletion of SVs in the presynaptic terminal. Our data indicate that tPA promotes SV endocytosis via a mechanism that does not require the conversion of plasminogen into plasmin. Instead, we show that tPA induces calcineurin-mediated dynamin I dephosphorylation, which is followed by dynamin I-induced recruitment of the actin-binding protein profilin II to the presynaptic membrane, and profilin II-induced F-actin formation. We report that this tPA-induced sequence of events leads to the association of newly formed SVs with F-actin clusters in the endocytic zone. In summary, the data presented here indicate that following the exocytotic release of neurotransmitters tPA activates the mechanism whereby SVs are retrieved from the presynaptic membrane and endocytosed to replenish the pool of vesicles available for a new cycle of exocytosis. Together, these results indicate that in murine cerebral cortical neurons tPA plays a central role coupling SVs exocytosis and endocytosis. PMID:26820595

  3. Diabetes Inhibits Cerebral Ischemia-Induced Astrocyte Activation - an Observation in the Cingulate Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Li; Mai, Li; Zhang, Jian-Zhong; Wang, Jian-Gang; Chang, Yue; Dong, Jian-Da; Guo, Feng-Ying; Li, P. Andy

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to study the effect of diabetic hyperglycemia on astrocytes after forebrain ischemia. Streptozotocin (STZ)-injected hyperglycemic and vehicle-injected normoglycemic rats were subjected to 15 minutes of forebrain ischemia. The brains were harvested in sham-operated controls and in animals with 1 and 6 h of recirculation following ischemia. Brain damage was accessed by haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry and TdT-mediated-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). Anti-GFAP antibody was employed to study astrocytes. The results showed that the 15-minute ischemia caused neuronal death after 1 and 6 h of reperfusion as revealed by increased numbers of karyopyknotic cells, edema, TUNEL-positive and active caspase-3-positive cells. Ischemia also activated astrocytes in the cingulated cortex as reflected by astrocyte stomata hypertrophy, elongated dendrites and increases in the number of dendrites, and immunoreactivity of GFAP. Diabetic hyperglycemia further enhanced neuronal death and suppressed ischemia-induced astrocyte activation. Further, diabetes-damaged astrocytes have increased withdrawal of the astrocyte end-foot from the cerebral blood vessel wall. It is concluded that diabetes-induced suppression and damages to astrocytes may contribute to its detrimental effects on recovery from cerebral ischemia. PMID:24163590

  4. CART attenuates endoplasmic reticulum stress response induced by cerebral ischemia and reperfusion through upregulating BDNF synthesis and secretion.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Bin; Hu, Shengdi; Liu, Libing; Chen, Man; Wang, Lai; Zeng, Xianwei; Zhu, Shigong

    2013-07-12

    Cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART), a neuropeptide, has shown strong neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury in vivo and in vitro. Here, we report a new effect of CART on ER stress which is induced by cerebral I/R in a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) or by oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) in cultured cortical neurons, as well as a new functionality of BDNF in the neuroprotection by CART against the ER stress in cerebral I/R. The results showed that CART was effective in reducing the neuronal apoptosis and expression of ER stress markers (GRP78, CHOP and cleaved caspase12), and increasing the BDNF expression in I/R injury rat cortex both in vivo and in vitro. In addition, the effects of CART on ischemia-induced neuronal apoptosis and ER stress were suppressed by tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB) IgG, whereas the effects of CART on BDNF transcription, synthesis and secretion were abolished by CREB siRNA. This work suggests that CART is functional in inhibiting the cerebral I/R-induced ER stress and neuronal apoptosis by facilitating the transcription, synthesis and secretion of BDNF in a CREB-dependent way. PMID:23770418

  5. Inorganic Arsenic Induces NRF2-Regulated Antioxidant Defenses in Both Cerebral Cortex and Hippocampus in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Duan, Xiaoxu; Li, Jinlong; Zhao, Shuo; Li, Wei; Zhao, Lu; Li, Wei; Nie, Huifang; Sun, Guifang; Li, Bing

    2016-08-01

    Inorganic arsenic is reported to induce the reactive oxygen species-mediated oxidative stress, which is supposed to be one of the main mechanisms of arsenic-related neurological diseases. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2), a master regulator of antioxidant defense systems, up-regulates the expression of target genes to fight against oxidative damages caused by harmful substances, including metals. In the present study, mice were used as a model to investigate the oxidative stress levels and the expressions of NRF2-regulated antioxidant substances in both cerebral cortex and hippocampus with 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg NaAsO2 exposure intra-gastrically. Our results showed that acute NaAsO2 treatment resulted in decreased total anti-oxidative capacity (T-AOC) and increased maleic dialdehyde production in the nervous system. We also detected rapidly elevation of NRF2 protein levels by enhancement of Nrf2 transcription, especially at 20 mg/kg NaAsO2 exposure group. In the meantime, mRNA and protein levels of Nrf2 encoding antioxidant enzymes heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H: quinine oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were consistently elevated time- and dose-dependently both in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Taken together, the presence study demonstrated the activation of NRF2 pathway, an early antioxidant defensive response, in both cerebral cortex and hippocampus upon inorganic arsenic (iAs) exposure in vivo. A better knowledge on the roles of NRF2 pathway in maintaining cellular redox homeostasis would be helpful for the strategies on improvement of neurotoxicity related to this metalloid. PMID:27165637

  6. Ozone autohemotherapy induces long-term cerebral metabolic changes in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Molinari, F; Simonetti, V; Franzini, M; Pandolfi, S; Vaiano, F; Valdenassi, L; Liboni, W

    2014-01-01

    Ozone autohemotherapy is an emerging therapeutic technique that is gaining increasing importance in treating neurological disorders. A validated and standard methodology to assess the effect of such therapy on brain metabolism and circulation is however still lacking. We used a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system to monitor the cerebral metabolism and a transcranial Doppler (TCD) to monitor the blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral arteries. Fifty-four subjects (32 neurological patients and 22 controls) were tested before, during, and after ozone autohemotherapy. We monitored the concentration changes in the level of oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin, and in the level of the Cytochrome-c-oxidase (CYT-c). As a primary endpoint of the work, we showed the changes in the brain metabolism and circulation of the entire population. The concentration of oxygenated haemoglobin increased after the reinjection of the ozoned blood and remained higher than the beginning for another 1.5 hours. The concentration of the deoxygenated haemoglobin decreased during the therapy and the CYT-c concentration markedly increased about 1 hour after the reinjection. No significant changes were observed on the blood flow velocity. As secondary endpoint, we compared the NIRS metabolic pattern of 20 remitting-relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) patients against 20 controls. We showed that by using only 7 NIRS variables it was possible to characterize the metabolic brain pattern of the two groups of subjects. The MS subjects showed a marked increase of the CYT-c activity and concentration about 40 minutes after the end of the autohemotherapy, possibly revealing a reduction of the chronic oxidative stress level typical of MS sufferers. From a technical point of view, this preliminary study showed that NIRS could be useful to show the effects of ozone autohemotherapy at cerebral level, in a long-term monitoring. The clinical result of this study is the quantitative measurement of the

  7. Melatonin reduces traumatic brain injury-induced oxidative stress in the cerebral cortex and blood of rats

    PubMed Central

    Şenol, Nilgün; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Free radicals induced by traumatic brain injury have deleterious effects on the function and antioxidant vitamin levels of several organ systems including the brain. Melatonin possesses antioxidant effect on the brain by maintaining antioxidant enzyme and vitamin levels. We investigated the effects of melatonin on antioxidant ability in the cerebral cortex and blood of traumatic brain injury rats. Results showed that the cerebral cortex β-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E, reduced glutathione, and erythrocyte reduced glutathione levels, and plasma vitamin C level were decreased by traumatic brain injury whereas they were increased following melatonin treatment. In conclusion, melatonin seems to have protective effects on traumatic brain injury-induced cerebral cortex and blood toxicity by inhibiting free radical formation and supporting antioxidant vitamin redox system. PMID:25206769

  8. Influence of Lipiodol Agent on Proton Beam Range in Radiotherapy Planning Using Computed Tomography for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Dongho; Kim, Tae Hyun; Park, Sung Yong Kwak, Jungwon; Moon, Sung Ho; Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Se Byeong; Park, Soah; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Dae Yong; Cho, Kwan Ho; Park, Joong-Won; Kim, Chang-Min

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of lipiodol on the proton beam range, which has not yet been determined. Methods and Materials: Two computed tomography (CT) data sets were obtained with a T25-flask containing lipiodol and water that was placed above a water phantom. The plan with the lipiodol CT images was performed, and then a verification plan was applied to the water CT images. The actual proton beam ranges in the lipiodol and water were measured under same conditions, and we compared the calculated proton beam range in the treatment planning system with measured values. Results: The calculated distal range in the treatment planning system was 12 cm in water, which was 3.87 cm longer than that in lipiodol (8.13 cm). In contrast, the measured distal range was 12 {+-} 0.01 cm in water, which was 0.21 {+-} 0.01 cm longer than that of lipiodol (11.78 {+-} 0.01 cm). A 3.65 {+-} 0.01-cm range shift was found in the calculated range compared with the measured range. For 10 hepatocellular carcinoma patients, the distal range in the verification plan with the corrected CT images in which the Hounsfield unit (HU) value of lipiodolized lesion was replaced with the average HU value of the surrounding tissue was 0.61 {+-} 0.26 cm (range, 0.26-0.99) longer than that in the plan with uncorrected CT images. Conclusions: It could be relevant for the purposes of range calculation of proton beams in the treatment planning system that the HU value of a lipiodolized lesion is replaced by the average HU value of the surrounding normal tiss0008.

  9. Mechanisms underlying the cerebral microvascular responses to angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Vital, Shantel A; Terao, Satoshi; Nagai, Mutsumi; Granger, D Neil

    2010-11-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) and AngII type-1 receptors (AT1r) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension and ischemic stroke. The objectives of this study was to determine if/how chronic AngII administration affects blood-brain barrier (BBB) function and blood cell adhesion in the cerebral microvasculature. AngII-loaded osmotic pumps were implanted in wild type (WT) and mutant mice. Leukocyte and platelet adhesion were monitored in cerebral venules by intravital microscopy and BBB permeability detected by Evans blue leakage. AngII (two week) infusion increased blood pressure in WT mice. This was accompanied by an increased BBB permeability and a high density of adherent leukocytes and platelets. AT1r (on the vessel wall, but not on blood cells) was largely responsible for the microvascular responses to AngII. Immunodeficient (Rag-1(-/-) ) mice exhibited blunted blood cell recruitment responses without a change in BBB permeability. A similar protection pattern was noted in RANTES(-/-) and P-selectin(-/-) mice, with bone marrow chimeras (blood cell deficiency only) yielding responses comparable to the respective knockouts. These findings implicate AT1r in the microvascular dysfunction associated with AngII-induced hypertension and suggest that immune cells and blood cell-associated RANTES and P-selectin contribute to the blood cell recruitment, but not the BBB failure, elicited by AngII. PMID:21044218

  10. Transdifferentiation-Induced Neural Stem Cells Promote Recovery of Middle Cerebral Artery Stroke Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianhua; Zhang, Maoying; Li, Shaowu; Wu, Bingshan; Nie, Xiaohu; Jiao, Jiao; Zhao, Hao; Wang, Shanshan; Yang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yesen; Sun, Yilin; Wicha, Max S.; Chang, Alfred E.; Gao, Shaorong; Li, Qiao; Xu, Ruxiang

    2015-01-01

    Induced neural stem cells (iNSCs) can be directly transdifferentiated from somatic cells. One potential clinical application of the iNSCs is for nerve regeneration. However, it is unknown whether iNSCs function in disease models. We produced transdifferentiated iNSCs by conditional overexpressing Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, c-Mycin mouse embryonic fibroblasts. They expanded readily in vitro and expressed NSC mRNA profile and protein markers. These iNSCs differentiated into mature astrocytes, neurons and oligodendrocytes in vitro. Importantly, they reduced lesion size, promoted the recovery of motor and sensory function as well as metabolism status in middle cerebral artery stroke rats. These iNSCs secreted nerve growth factors, which was associated with observed protection of neurons from apoptosis. Furthermore, iNSCs migrated to and passed through the lesion in the cerebral cortex, where Tuj1+ neurons were detected. These findings have revealed the function of transdifferentiated iNSCs in vivo, and thus provide experimental evidence to support the development of personalized regenerative therapy for CNS diseases by using genetically engineered autologous somatic cells. PMID:26352672

  11. Substance P-induced relaxation and hyperpolarization in human cerebral arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Petersson, J.; Zygmunt, P. M.; Brandt, L.; Högestätt, E. D.

    1995-01-01

    1. Vascular effects of substance P were studied in human isolated pial arteries removed from 14 patients undergoing cerebral cortical resection. 2. Substance P induced a concentration-dependent relaxation in the presence of indomethacin. No relaxation was seen in arteries where the endothelium had been removed. 3. N omega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG, 0.3 mM) abolished the relaxation in arteries from six patients. The relaxation was only partially inhibited in the remaining eight patients, the reduction of the maximum relaxation being less than 50% in each patient. 4. The L-NOARG-resistant relaxation was abolished when the external K+ concentration was raised above 30 mM. 5. Substance P caused a smooth muscle hyperpolarization (in the presence of L-NOARG and indomethacin), but only when the artery showed an L-NOARG-resistant relaxation. 6. The results indicate that nitric oxide is an important mediator of endothelium-dependent relaxation in human cerebral arteries. Furthermore, another endothelium-dependent pathway, causing hyperpolarization and vasodilatation, was identified in arteries from more than half the population of patients. PMID:7582516

  12. Neural control of locomotion and training-induced plasticity after spinal and cerebral lesions.

    PubMed

    Knikou, Maria

    2010-10-01

    Standing and walking require a plethora of sensorimotor interactions that occur throughout the nervous system. Sensory afferent feedback plays a crucial role in the rhythmical muscle activation pattern, as it affects through spinal reflex circuits the spinal neuronal networks responsible for inducing and maintaining rhythmicity, drives short-term and long-term re-organization of the brain and spinal cord circuits, and contributes to recovery of walking after locomotor training. Therefore, spinal circuits integrating sensory signals are adjustable networks with learning capabilities. In this review, I will synthesize the mechanisms underlying phase-dependent modulation of spinal reflexes in healthy humans as well as those with spinal or cerebral lesions along with findings on afferent regulation of spinal reflexes and central pattern generator in reduced animal preparations. Recovery of walking after locomotor training has been documented in numerous studies but the re-organization of spinal interneuronal and cortical circuits need to be further explored at cellular and physiological levels. For maximizing sensorimotor recovery in people with spinal or cerebral lesions, a multidisciplinary approach (rehabilitation, pharmacology, and electrical stimulation) delivered during various sensorimotor constraints is needed. PMID:20427232

  13. In Utero Bisphenol A Exposure Induces Abnormal Neuronal Migration in the Cerebral Cortex of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Wenting; Endo, Toshihiro; Kubo, Ken-ichiro; Nakajima, Kazunori; Kakeyama, Masaki; Tohyama, Chiharu

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has been known to have endocrine-disrupting activity to induce reproductive and behavioral abnormalities in offspring of laboratory animal species. However, morphological basis of this abnormality during brain development is largely unknown. Cerebral cortex plays a crucial role in higher brain function, and its precisely laminated structure is formed by neuronal migration. In the present study, transfecting a plasmid (pCAG-mCherry) by in utero electroporation (IUE), we visualized developing neurons and investigated the possible effects of in utero BPA exposure on neuronal migration. Pregnant mice were exposed to BPA by osmotic pump at estimated daily doses of 0, 40 (BPA-40), or 400 (BPA-400) μg/kg from embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) to E18.5. IUE was performed at E14.5 and neuronal migration was analyzed at E18.5. Compared with the control group, neuronal migration in the cortical plate was significantly decreased in the BPA-40 group; however, there was no significant difference in the BPA-400 group. Among several neuronal migration-related genes and cortical layer-specific genes, TrkB in the BPA-400 group was found significantly upregulated. In conclusion, in utero exposure to low BPA dose was found to disrupt neuronal migration in the cerebral cortex in a dose-specific manner. PMID:26869994

  14. Functional response of cerebral blood flow induced by somatosensory stimulation in rats with subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiguo; Huang, Qin; Liu, Peng; Li, Pengcheng; Ma, Lianting; Lu, Jinling

    2015-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is often accompanied by cerebral vasospasm (CVS), which is the phenomenon of narrowing of large cerebral arteries, and then can produce delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND) such as lateralized sensory dysfunction. CVS was regarded as a major contributor to DIND in patients with SAH. However, therapy for preventing vasospasm after SAH to improve the outcomes may not work all the time. It is important to find answers to the relationship between CVS and DIND after SAH. How local cerebral blood flow (CBF) is regulated during functional activation after SAH still remains poorly understood, whereas, the regulation of CBF may play an important role in weakening the impact of CVS on cortex function. Therefore, it is worthwhile to evaluate the functional response of CBF in the activated cortex in an SAH animal model. Most evaluation of the effect of SAH is presently carried out by neurological behavioral scales. The functional imaging of cortical activation during sensory stimulation may help to reflect the function of the somatosensory cortex more locally than the behavioral scales do. We investigated the functional response of CBF in the somatosensory cortex induced by an electrical stimulation to contralateral forepaw via laser speckle imaging in a rat SAH model. Nineteen Sprague-Dawley rats from two groups (control group, n=10 and SAH group, n=9) were studied. SAH was induced in rats by double injection of autologous blood into the cisterna magna after CSF aspiration. The same surgical procedure was applied in the control group without CSF aspiration or blood injection. Significant CVS was found in the SAH group. Meanwhile, we observed a delayed peak of CBF response in rats with SAH compared with those in the control group, whereas no significant difference was found in magnitude, duration, and areas under curve of relative CBF changes between the two groups. The results suggest that the regulation function of local CBF during

  15. Early immature neuronal death is partially involved in memory impairment induced by cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jee Hyun; Cho, So Yeon; Jeon, Se Jin; Jung, Ji Wook; Park, Man Seok; Kim, Dong Hyun; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2016-07-15

    Memory impairment is a common after an ischemic stroke. While delayed neuronal death in the CA1 region is usually linked to cerebral ischemia-induced memory impairment, the role of early immature neuronal death within the DG region in the memory state of an ischemic stroke model has rarely been studied. Here, we show a partial role of immature neuronal death in memory impairment in a global ischemia model. We found early immature neuronal death, which was determined by DCX and NeuN-double-staining. Injection of z-DEVD-fmk, a caspase-3 inhibitor, into the DG region rescued cells from immature neuronal death in the DG region without affecting delayed neuronal death in the CA1 region of an ischemic brain. Moreover, z-DEVD-fmk treatment partially rescued ischemia-induced spatial memory impairment. We also found that ischemia-induced LTP impairment in the perforant pathway was restored by z-DEVD-fmk treatment. These results suggest that early immature neuronal death is partially involved in ischemia-induced spatial memory impairment. PMID:27085588

  16. Functional photoacoustic micro-imaging of cerebral hemodynamic changes in single blood vessels after photo-induced brain stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Lun-De; Chen, You-Yin; Lin, Chin-Teng; Li, Meng-Lin

    2013-03-01

    Studying the functional hemodynamic roles of individual cerebral cortical arterioles in maintaining both the structure and function of cortical regions during and after brain stroke in small animals is an important issue. Recently, functional photoacoustic microscopy (fPAM) has been proved as a reliable imaging technique to probe the total hemoglobin concentration (HbT), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) in single cerebral blood vessels of rats. Here, we report the application of fPAM associated with electrophysiology recordings to investigating functional hemodynamic changes in single cortical arterioles of rats with electrical forepaw stimulation after photo-induced ischemic stroke. Because of the weak optical focusing nature of our fPAM system, photo-induced ischemic stroke targeting single cortical arterioles can be easily conducted with simple adaptation. Functional HbT, CBV and SO2 changes associated with the induced stroke in selected arterioles from the anterior cerebral artery system were imaged with 36 x 65-μm spatial resolution. Experimental results showed that after photo-occlusion of a single arteriole, the functional changes of nearby arterioles in cerebral cortex only can be observed immediately after the stroke. After a few minutes of stroke onset, there are no significant functional changes under the forepaw stimulation, suggesting that alternate blood flow routes are not actively recruited. The fPAM with electrophysiology recordings complements existing imaging techniques and has the potential to offer a favorable tool for explicitly studying cerebral hemodynamics in small animal models of photo-indcued ischemic stroke.

  17. Cerebral Networks Linked to Itch-related Sensations Induced by Histamine and Capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Vierow, Verena; Forster, Clemens; Vogelgsang, Rebekka; Dörfler, Arnd; Handwerker, Herman O

    2015-07-01

    This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study explored the central nervous processing of itch induced by histamine and capsaicin, delivered via inactivated cowhage spicules, and the influence of low-dose naltrexone. Scratch bouts were delivered at regular intervals after spicule insertion in order temporarily to suppress the itch. At the end of each trial the subjects rated their itch and scratch-related sensations. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were employed for identifying cerebral networks contributing to the intensities of "itching", "burning", "stinging", "pricking" and "itch relief by scratching". In the capsaicin experiments a network for "burning" was identified, which included the posterior insula, caudate and putamen. In the histamine experiments networks for "itching" and "itch relief" were found, which included operculum, hippocampus and amygdala. Naltrexone generally reduced fMRI activation and the correlations between fMRI signal and ratings. Furthermore, scratching was significantly less pleasant under naltrexone. PMID:25387448

  18. Measurement of in vivo cerebral volumetric strain induced by the Valsalva maneuver.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Seyed Reza; Fehlner, Andreas; Streitberger, Kaspar-Josche; Braun, Jürgen; Samani, Abbas; Sack, Ingolf

    2014-05-01

    Compressibility of biological tissues such as brain parenchyma is related to its poroelastic nature characterized by the geometry and pressure of vasculature and interconnected fluid-filled spaces. Thus, cerebral volumetric strain may be sensitive to intracranial pressure which can be altered under physiological conditions. So far volumetric strain has attained little attention in studies of the mechanical behavior of the brain. This paper reports a study of measuring the in vivo cerebral volumetric strain induced by the Valsalva maneuver (VM) where forced expiration against a closed glottis leads to a transient increase in the intracranial pressure. For this purpose we applied three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging equipped with a patient-controlled acquisition system to five healthy volunteers. With each volunteer, three experiments were performed: one with VM and two in resting state. i.e. normal ventilation, which were conducted before and after VM. The VM data were registered to reference data by morphology based non-rigid deformation, yielding 3D maps of total displacements and volumetric strain. On average, VM induced volumetric strain correlated to whole-brain dilatation of -3.14±0.87% and -2.80±0.71% compared to the reference states before and after VM, respectively. These values were well reproduced by repetitive experiments during the same scan as well as by repeated measurements in one volunteer on different days. Combined with literature data of intracranial pressure changes, our volumetric strain values can be used to elucidate the static compression modulus of the in vivo human brain. These results add knowledge to the understanding of the brain׳s biomechanical properties under physiological conditions. PMID:24656483

  19. Treatment of cerebral ischemia by disrupting ischemia-induced interaction of nNOS with PSD-95.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Li, Fei; Xu, Hai-Bing; Luo, Chun-Xia; Wu, Hai-Yin; Zhu, Ming-Mei; Lu, Wei; Ji, Xing; Zhou, Qi-Gang; Zhu, Dong-Ya

    2010-12-01

    Stroke is a major public health problem leading to high rates of death and disability in adults. Excessive stimulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and the resulting neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activation are crucial for neuronal injury after stroke insult. However, directly inhibiting NMDARs or nNOS can cause severe side effects because they have key physiological functions in the CNS. Here we show that cerebral ischemia induces the interaction of nNOS with postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95). Disrupting nNOS-PSD-95 interaction via overexpressing the N-terminal amino acid residues 1-133 of nNOS (nNOS-N(1-133)) prevented glutamate-induced excitotoxicity and cerebral ischemic damage. Given the mechanism of nNOS-PSD-95 interaction, we developed a series of compounds and discovered a small-molecular inhibitor of the nNOS-PSD-95 interaction, ZL006. This drug blocked the ischemia-induced nNOS-PSD-95 association selectively, had potent neuroprotective activity in vitro and ameliorated focal cerebral ischemic damage in mice and rats subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and reperfusion. Moreover, it readily crossed the blood-brain barrier, did not inhibit NMDAR function, catalytic activity of nNOS or spatial memory, and had no effect on aggressive behaviors. Thus, this new drug may serve as a treatment for stroke, perhaps without major side effects. PMID:21102461

  20. Amiloride but Not Memantine Reduces Neurodegeneration, Seizures and Myoclonic Jerks in Rats with Cardiac Arrest-Induced Global Cerebral Hypoxia and Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Kwok Keung; Truong, Daniel D.

    2013-01-01

    It has been reported that both activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and acid-sensing ion channels during cerebral ischemic insult contributed to brain injury. But which of these two molecular targets plays a more pivotal role in hypoxia-induced brain injury during ischemia is not known. In this study, the neuroprotective effects of an acid-sensing cation channel blocker and an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blocker were evaluated in a rat model of cardiac arrest-induced cerebral hypoxia. We found that intracisternal injection of amiloride, an acid-sensing ion channel blocker, dose-dependently reduced cerebral hypoxia-induced neurodegeneration, seizures, and audiogenic myoclonic jerks. In contrast, intracisternal injection of memantine, a selective uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blocker, had no significant effect on cerebral hypoxia-induced neurodegeneration, seizure and audiogenic myoclonic jerks. Intracisternal injection of zoniporide, a specific sodium-hydrogen exchanger inhibitor, before cardiac arrest-induced cerebral hypoxia, also did not reduce cerebral hypoxia-induced neurodegeneration, seizures and myoclonic jerks. These results suggest that acid-sensing ion channels play a more pivotal role than N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in mediating cerebral hypoxia-induced brain injury during ischemic insult. PMID:23593189

  1. Lipiodol Trans-arterial Chemoembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Idarubicin: First Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Favelier, Sylvain; Boulin, Mathieu; Hamza, Samia; Cercueil, Jean-Pierre; Cherblanc, Violaine; Lepage, Come; Hillon, Patrick; Chauffert, Bruno; Krause, Denis; Guiu, Boris

    2013-08-01

    BackgroundThere is still no consensus about the best chemotherapeutic agent for transarterial chemoembolization (TACE). A recent in vitro study demonstrated that idarubicin, an anthracycline, was by far the most cytotoxic drug on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines. Idarubicin is much more lipophilic than doxorubicin, leading to higher cell penetration through lipidic membranes and greater accumulation of the drug in the lipiodol. Furthermore, idarubicin has the ability to overcome multidrug resistance. Therefore, we designed this pilot human study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of lipiodol TACE using idarubicin.MethodsIn 21 consecutive patients treated by lipiodol TACE with idarubicin (10 mg) for HCC, safety data, tumor response (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, mRECIST), time to treatment failure (TTTF), and overall survival were evaluated.ResultsPostembolization syndrome was observed after 30.9 % (17 of 55) of sessions. No patient died from a TACE-related complication. No hematological grade 3-5 adverse event was observed. At least one grade 3 or higher adverse event occurred in 19 % (4 of 21) of patients. On imaging, no progression was encountered; four patients (24 %) exhibited stable disease, 12 (57 %) exhibited a partial response, and five (19 %) exhibited a complete response. Median TTTF was 16.7 months (Kaplan-Meier analysis). At 6 months, 94.7 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 68.1-99.2) of patients did not reach treatment failure, whereas treatment failure was not reached in 50.6 % (95 % CI 21.6-73.9) of patients at 1 year. Overall survival was 83.5 % (95 % CI 57-94.4) at 1 year.ConclusionIdarubicin seems safe and effective in lipiodol TACE of HCC. This warrants further study to determine the potential of this drug to replace doxorubicin for TACE.

  2. Neuroprotective Effects of Agomelatine and Vinpocetine Against Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion Induced Vascular Dementia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Surbhi; Singh, Prabhat; Sharma, Brij Mohan; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2015-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) has been considered as a critical cause for the development of cognitive decline and dementia of vascular origin. Melatonin receptors have been reported to be beneficial in improving memory deterioration. Phosphodiesterase-1 (PDE1) enzyme offers protection against cognitive impairments and cerebrovascular disorders. Aim of this study is to explore the role of agomelatine (a dual MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptor agonist) and vinpocetine (selective PDE1 inhibitor) in CCH induced vascular dementia (VaD). Two vessel occlusion (2VO) or bilateral common carotid arteries ligation method was performed to initiate a phase of chronic hypoperfusion in mice. 2VO animals have shown significant cognitive deficits (Morris water maze), cholinergic dysfunction (increased acetyl cholinesterase -AChE) activity alongwith increased brain oxidative stress (decreased brain catalase, glutathione, as well as superoxide dismutase with an increase in malondialdehyde levels), and significant increase in brain infarct size (2,3,5- triphenylterazolium chloride-TTC staining). Treatment of agomelatine and vinpocetine reduced CCH induced learning and memory deficits and limited cholinergic dysfunction, oxidative stress, and tissue damage, suggesting that agomelatine and vinpocetine may provide benefits in CCH induced VaD. PMID:26036976

  3. Effects of fructose-1,6-biphosphate on microsphere-induced cerebral ischemia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Trimarchi, G R; Arcadi, F A; Imperatore, C; Ruggeri, P; Costa, G

    1997-01-01

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate has been shown to exert beneficial effects in different experimental models of cerebral ischemia. In view of this evidence, we have determined whether the compound protects the brain during microsphere-induced ischemia. One thousand two hundred microspheres were injected into female rats through a catheter inserted into the right common carotid artery and, 15 minutes and again 24 hours later, we intravenously treated the animals with 333 mg Kg(-1) of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate. The injection of microspheres produced significant changes in the rats' gross behavior, in their performance in the beam walking test, and in their brain lactate concentrations. The treatment with fructose-1,6-bisphosphate significantly attenuated the behavioral alterations induced by microsphere ischemia, but not in reducing brain accumulation of lactate. Moreover, the compound was shown to ameliorate the blood-brain barrier dysfunction, produced 2 and 4 hours after microsphere injection, evaluated by the Evans blue method. These results suggest that fructose-1,6-bisphosphate possesses salutary properties against the damages induced by microsphere ischemia. PMID:9250717

  4. Toxoplasma gondii Upregulates Interleukin-12 To Prevent Plasmodium berghei-Induced Experimental Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Settles, Erik W.; Moser, Lindsey A.; Harris, Tajie H.

    2014-01-01

    A chronic infection with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii has previously been shown to protect mice against subsequent viral, bacterial, or protozoal infections. Here we have shown that a chronic T. gondii infection can prevent Plasmodium berghei ANKA-induced experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) in C57BL/6 mice. Treatment with soluble T. gondii antigens (STAg) reduced parasite sequestration and T cell infiltration in the brains of P. berghei-infected mice. Administration of STAg also preserved blood-brain barrier function, reduced ECM symptoms, and significantly decreased mortality. STAg treatment 24 h post-P. berghei infection led to a rapid increase in serum levels of interleukin 12 (IL-12) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ). By 5 days after P. berghei infection, STAg-treated mice had reduced IFN-γ levels compared to those of mock-treated mice, suggesting that reductions in IFN-γ at the time of ECM onset protected against lethality. Using IL-10- and IL-12βR-deficient mice, we found that STAg-induced protection from ECM is IL-10 independent but IL-12 dependent. Treatment of P. berghei-infected mice with recombinant IL-12 significantly decreased parasitemia and mortality. These data suggest that IL-12, either induced by STAg or injected as a recombinant protein, mediates protection from ECM-associated pathology potentially through early induction of IFN-γ and reduction in parasitemia. These results highlight the importance of early IL-12 induction in protection against ECM. PMID:24396042

  5. Increased glutamate receptor gene expression in the cerebral cortex of insulin induced hypoglycemic and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Joseph, A; Antony, S; Paulose, C S

    2008-10-01

    Hypoglycemia causes brain fuel deprivation, resulting in functional brain failure and brain death. It is a serious complication of insulin therapy in diabetic patients. A single intrafemoral dose of streptozotocin was administered to induce diabetes. Hypoglycemia was induced by appropriate doses of insulin s.c. in control and diabetic rats. Glutamate content and glutamate receptor kinetics were studied using [3H]glutamate. [3H]MK 801 was used to study the NMDA receptor kinetics. NMDA2B and metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) 5 subunits receptor gene expressions were done using real time PCR. There was a significant (P<0.001) increase in the glutamate content in the cerebral cortex of hypoglycemic and diabetic rats when compared with control with more glutamate content in the hypoglycemic group. Scatchard analysis using [3H]glutamate and [3H]MK 801 in the cerebral cortex showed a significant (P<0.001) increase in the maximal binding (Bmax) in both hypoglycemic and diabetic rats when compared with control with no significant change in equilibrium dissociation constant. The glutamate and NMDA receptor binding parameters were significantly (P<0.001) enhanced in the hypoglycemic rats compared with hyperglycemic rats. Real time PCR analysis also showed a significant increase (P<0.001) in the gene expression of NMDA2B and mGluR5 subunits of glutamate receptor. This increased gene expression of NMDA2B and mGluR5 glutamate receptor subunits confirmed the enhanced mRNA of receptor subunits and subsequently at the protein level from the receptor kinetic studies. The enhanced glutamate receptors were more prominent in hypoglycemic group which is of significance in this study. Up-regulation of glutamate leads to Ca2+ overload in cells, potentially leading to cell damage and death. This functional damage during hypoglycemia is suggested to contribute to cognitive and memory deficits which has immense clinical relevance in the therapeutic management of diabetes. PMID:18761060

  6. Hypercapnia-induced increases in cerebral blood flow do not improve lower body negative pressure tolerance during hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Rebekah A. I.; Pearson, James; Schlader, Zachary J.

    2013-01-01

    Heat-related decreases in cerebral perfusion are partly the result of ventilatory-related reductions in arterial CO2 tension. Cerebral perfusion likely contributes to an individual's tolerance to a challenge like lower body negative pressure (LBNP). Thus increasing cerebral perfusion may prolong LBNP tolerance. This study tested the hypothesis that a hypercapnia-induced increase in cerebral perfusion improves LBNP tolerance in hyperthermic individuals. Eleven individuals (31 ± 7 yr; 75 ± 12 kg) underwent passive heat stress (increased intestinal temperature ∼1.3°C) followed by a progressive LBNP challenge to tolerance on two separate days (randomized). From 30 mmHg LBNP, subjects inhaled either (blinded) a hypercapnic gas mixture (5% CO2, 21% oxygen, balanced nitrogen) or room air (SHAM). LBNP tolerance was quantified via the cumulative stress index (CSI). Mean middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAvmean,) and end-tidal CO2 (PetCO2) were also measured. CO2 inhalation of 5% increased PetCO2 at ∼40 mmHg LBNP (by 16 ± 4 mmHg) and at LBNP tolerance (by 18 ± 5 mmHg) compared with SHAM (P < 0.01). Subsequently, MCAvmean was higher in the 5% CO2 trial during ∼40 mmHg LBNP (by 21 ± 12 cm/s, ∼31%) and at LBNP tolerance (by 18 ± 10 cm/s, ∼25%) relative to the SHAM (P < 0.01). However, hypercapnia-induced increases in MCAvmean did not alter LBNP tolerance (5% CO2 CSI: 339 ± 155 mmHg × min; SHAM CSI: 273 ± 158 mmHg × min; P = 0.26). These data indicate that inhaling a hypercapnic gas mixture increases cerebral perfusion during LBNP but does not improve LBNP tolerance when hyperthermic. PMID:23864641

  7. Modulatory effects of seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) in hypobaric hypoxia induced cerebral vascular injury.

    PubMed

    Purushothaman, Jayamurthy; Suryakumar, Geetha; Shukla, Dhananjay; Malhotra, Anand Swaroop; Kasiganesan, Harinath; Kumar, Ratan; Sawhney, Ramesh Chand; Chami, Arumughan

    2008-11-25

    Cerebral edema caused by vascular leakage is a major problem in various injuries of the CNS, such as stroke, head injury and high-altitude illness. A common feature of all these disorders is the fact that they are associated with tissue hypoxia. Hypoxia has been suggested to be a major pathogenic factor for the induction of vascular leakage in the brain. The objective of the present study was to evaluate potential of seabuckthorn (SBT) (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) seed oil in curtailing hypoxia induced transvascular fluid leakage in brain of hypoxia-exposed rats. Exposure of animals to hypobaric hypoxia (9144 m, 5h) caused a significant increase in the transvascular leakage studied by measuring water content and leakage of sodium fluorescein dye in the brain. Hypoxic stress also significantly enhanced the oxidative stress markers such as free radicals and malondialdehyde and it accompanied with decreased levels of antioxidants such as glutathione, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. Pretreatment of animals with SBT seed oil significantly restricted the hypoxia induced increase in fluorescein dye leakage suggesting protection against hypoxia induced transvascular leakage in the brain. Hypoxia induced increase in the levels of free radicals and malondialdehyde were significantly lowered after SBT pretreatment. The SBT seed oil pretreatment also resulted in the significantly improved hypoxic tolerance as evidenced by increased hypoxic gasping time and survival time and decreased plasma catecholamine levels, as compared to hypoxic animals. These observations suggest that SBT seed oil possesses significant hypoxia protection activity and curtailed hypoxia induced enhanced vascular leakage in the brain. PMID:18824077

  8. Cerebral volumetric changes induced by prolonged hypoxic exposure and whole-body exercise.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Thomas; Jubeau, Marc; Lamalle, Laurent; Warnking, Jan M; Millet, Guillaume Y; Wuyam, Bernard; Esteve, François; Levy, Patrick; Krainik, Alexandre; Verges, Samuel

    2014-11-01

    The present study assessed the isolated and synergetic effects of hypoxic exposure and prolonged exercise on cerebral volume and subedema and symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS). Twelve healthy males performed three semirandomized blinded 11-hour sessions with (1) an inspiratory oxygen fraction (FiO2) of 12% and 4-hour cycling, (2) FiO2=21% and 4-hour cycling, and (3) FiO2=8.5% to 12% at rest (matching arterial oxygen saturation measured during the first hypoxic session). Volumetric, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and arterial spin labelling 3T magnetic resonance imaging sequences were performed after 30 minutes and 10 hours in each session. Thirty minutes of hypoxia at rest induced a significant increase in white-matter volume (+0.8±1.0% compared with normoxia) that was exacerbated after 10 hours of hypoxia at rest (+1.5±1.1%) or with cycling (+1.6±1.1%). Total brain parenchyma volume increased significantly after 10 hours of hypoxia with cycling only (+1.3±1.1%). Apparent diffusion coefficient was significantly reduced after 10 hours of hypoxia at rest or with cycling. No significant change in cerebral blood flow was observed. These results demonstrate changes in white-matter volume as early as after 30 minutes of hypoxia that worsen after 10 hours, probably due to cytotoxic edema. Exercise accentuates the effect of hypoxia by increasing total brain volume. These changes do not however correlate with AMS symptoms. PMID:25160673

  9. Reduction of the systemic inflammatory induced by acute cerebral infarction through ultra-early thrombolytic therapy

    PubMed Central

    YE, LICHAO; CAI, RUOWEI; YANG, MEILI; QIAN, JIAQIANG; HONG, ZHILIN

    2015-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke induces systemic inflammation, exhibited as changes in body temperature, white blood cell counts and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. The aim of the present study was to observe the effects of intravenous thrombolytic therapy on inflammatory indices in order to investigate the hypothesis that post-stroke systemic inflammatory response occurs in response to the necrosis of brain tissues. In this study, 62 patients with acute cerebral infarction and indications for intravenous thrombolysis were divided into three groups on the basis of their treatment and response: Successful thrombolysis (n=36), failed thrombolysis (n=12) and control (n=14) groups. The body temperature, white blood cell counts and high-sensitivity (hs)-CRP levels were recorded pre-treatment and on post-stroke days 1, 3, 5 and 7. Spearman's correlation analysis showed that the pre-treatment National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score positively correlated with body temperature, white blood cell count and hs-CRP levels. On day 3 of effective intravenous thrombolysis, the body temperature and white blood cell were decreased and on days 3 and 5, the serum levels of hs-CRP were reduced compared with those in the failed thrombolysis and control groups. The results indicate that the systemic inflammatory response following acute cerebral infarction was mainly caused by ischemic injury of local brain tissue; the more serious the stroke, the stronger the inflammatory response. Ultra-early thrombolytic therapy may inhibit the necrosis of brain tissue and thereby reduce the inflammatory response. PMID:26622513

  10. Increases of Catalase and Glutathione Peroxidase Expressions by Lacosamide Pretreatment Contributes to Neuroprotection Against Experimentally Induced Transient Cerebral Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun Young; Park, Joon Ha; Chen, Bai Hui; Shin, Bich Na; Lee, Yun Lyul; Kim, In Hye; Cho, Jeong-Hwi; Lee, Tae-Kyeong; Lee, Jae-Chul; Won, Moo-Ho; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Yan, Bing Chun; Hwang, In Koo; Cho, Jun Hwi; Kim, Young-Myeong; Kim, Sung Koo

    2016-09-01

    Lacosamide is a new antiepileptic drug which is widely used to treat partial-onset seizures. In this study, we examined the neuroprotective effect of lacosamide against transient ischemic damage and expressions of antioxidant enzymes such as Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1), Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD2), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in the hippocampal cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) region following 5 min of transient global cerebral ischemia in gerbils. We found that pre-treatment with 25 mg/kg lacosamide protected CA1 pyramidal neurons from transient global cerebral ischemic insult using hematoxylin-eosin staining and neuronal nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry. Transient ischemia dramatically changed expressions of SOD1, SOD2 and GPX, not CAT, in the CA1 pyramidal neurons. Lacosamide pre-treatment increased expressions of CAT and GPX, not SOD1 and 2, in the CA1 pyramidal neurons compared with controls, and their expressions induced by lacosamide pre-treatment were maintained after transient cerebral ischemia. In brief, pre-treatment with lacosamide protected hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons from ischemic damage induced by transient global cerebral ischemia, and the lacosamide-mediated neuroprotection may be closely related to increases of CAT and GPX expressions by lacosamide pre-treatment. PMID:27209305

  11. A Salt-Induced Reno-Cerebral Reflex Activates Renin-Angiotensin Systems and Promotes CKD Progression.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei; Li, Aiqing; Wang, Liangliang; Zhou, Zhanmei; Su, Zhengxiu; Bin, Wei; Wilcox, Christopher S; Hou, Fan Fan

    2015-07-01

    Salt intake promotes progression of CKD by uncertain mechanisms. We hypothesized that a salt-induced reno-cerebral reflex activates a renin-angiotensin axis to promote CKD. Sham-operated and 5/6-nephrectomized rats received a normal-salt (0.4%), low-salt (0.02%), or high-salt (4%) diet for 2 weeks. High salt in 5/6-nephrectomized rats increased renal NADPH oxidase, inflammation, BP, and albuminuria. Furthermore, high salt activated the intrarenal and cerebral, but not the systemic, renin-angiotensin axes and increased the activity of renal sympathetic nerves and neurons in the forebrain of these rats. Renal fibrosis was increased 2.2-fold by high versus low salt, but intracerebroventricular tempol, losartan, or clonidine reduced this fibrosis by 65%, 69%, or 59%, respectively, and renal denervation or deafferentation reduced this fibrosis by 43% or 38%, respectively (all P<0.05). Salt-induced fibrosis persisted after normalization of BP with hydralazine. These data suggest that the renal and cerebral renin-angiotensin axes are interlinked by a reno-cerebral reflex that is activated by salt and promotes oxidative stress, fibrosis, and progression of CKD independent of BP. PMID:25635129

  12. Role of Wnt/β-catenin in the tolerance to focal cerebral ischemia induced by electroacupuncture pretreatment.

    PubMed

    He, Xin; Mo, Yunchang; Geng, Wujun; Shi, Yiyi; Zhuang, Xiuxiu; Han, Kunyuan; Dai, Qinxue; Jin, Shenhui; Wang, Junlu

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that pretreatment with electroacupuncture (EA) elicits rapid tolerance to focal cerebral ischemia and that Wnt/β-catenin plays an essential role in cell survival and proliferation. In the present study, we investigated the role of Wnt/β-catenin in EA pretreatment-induced neuroprotection. Two hours after EA pretreatment, focal cerebral ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 2 h. Neuronal survival, cell apoptosis, and the Garcia neurological deficit scores were evaluated 24 h after reperfusion. Moreover, learning and memory deficits were assessed 24 h after reperfusion using the Morris water maze test. Finally, the expression of β-catenin and the B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)/Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) ratio were investigated in the presence and absence of the Wnt/β-catenin antagonist Dickkopf-1 (Dkk-1), which was administered 30 min before MCAO. We observed that EA pretreatment significantly increased the neuronal expression of β-catenin in the hippocampus 24 h after reperfusion. Moreover, EA pretreatment improved the neurological outcomes, decreased neuronal loss, inhibited apoptosis, and reversed learning and memory deficits following reperfusion. These beneficial effects of EA were attenuated by Dkk-1, which effectively reversed the expression of β-catenin. Furthermore, the administration of a Wnt/β-catenin agonist upregulated the expression of β-catenin and the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. These results suggest that Wnt/β-catenin plays a role in the protective effects of EA pretreatment against cerebral ischemia, thus providing evidence of a novel mechanism underlying EA-pretreatment-induced rapid tolerance to focal cerebral ischemia. PMID:26994873

  13. 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde reduces IL-1beta-induced prostaglandin production in rat cerebral endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jian-You; Huo, Hai-Ru; Yang, Yuan-Xiao; Li, Cang-Hai; Liu, Hong-Bin; Zhao, Bao-Sheng; Li, Lan-Fang; Ma, Yue-Ying; Guo, Shu-Ying; Jiang, Ting-Liang

    2006-11-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) works as a common final mediator of the febrile. Guizhi-Tang, one of the most famous traditional Chinese medical formula used to treat influenza, common cold and other pyretic conditions, was previously reported to reduce the production of PGE 2 in rats. 2-Methoxycinnamaldehyde is a principle compound isolated from Guizhi-Tang. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde on PGE2 production of rat cerebral endothelial cells (CECs). 2-Methoxycinnamaldehyde dose-dependently inhibited interleukin (IL)-1beta-induced PGE2 production in CECs with IC50 values of 174 microM. IL-1beta stimulation increased the protein, activity and mRNA expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 but not COX-1. 2-Methoxycinnamaldehyde reduced IL-1beta-induced protein and activity of COX-2, but did not influence the COX-2 mRNA expression. Our results show that prostaglandin production in CECs during stimulated conditions is sensitive to inhibition by 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde and suggest that 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde may reduce COX-2 protein level and activity but not COX-2 mRNA. PMID:17077517

  14. Drinking-induced bradyarrhythmias and cerebral injury in Dahl salt-sensitive rats with sinoaortic denervation.

    PubMed

    Abe, Chikara; Morita, Hironobu

    2013-11-01

    We have demonstrated that a drinking-induced pressor response was larger if the baroreflex did not operate, and the mean arterial pressure reached 163 mmHg in conscious rats with sinoaortic denervation (SAD). Thus we hypothesized that a drinking behavior became a cardiovascular risk factor if a basal arterial pressure was high. To clarify this, we analyzed the occurrence of arrhythmias and the accumulation of microglia in Dahl salt-sensitive rats (Dahl S) with SAD. We maintained Dahl S and Dahl salt-resistant rats (Dahl R) with a high-sodium diet for 5 weeks. After SAD surgery, we measured arterial pressure and electrocardiogram during water-drinking behavior in all rats. Furthermore, we measured tumor necrosis factor-α concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and microglial accumulations around the third and fourth ventricles in rats with programmed drinking at a rapid or slow rate for 7 days. Incidences of drinking-induced bradyarrhythmias and premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) were significantly larger in Dahl S than Dahl R rats. Both bradyarrhythmias and PVCs were completely abolished by atropine administration. Accumulations of microglia around the third ventricle and increases in TNF-α in the CSF were observed in rats that drank water at a rapid rate; these were not seen in rats that drank water slowly. In conclusion, both cardiovascular events and cerebral injury may be increased by drinking in Dahl S rats with SAD. These risks are reduced by modifying drinking behavior such as slowing the drinking rate. PMID:24072408

  15. Angiotensin II type-2 receptor stimulation induces neuronal VEGF synthesis after cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Mateos, Laura; Perez-Alvarez, Maria Jose; Wandosell, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    Intense efforts are being undertaken to understand the pathobiology of ischemia and to develop novel and effective treatments. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) is related with a beneficial role in neurodegenerative disorders, including ischemia. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we have established that AT2R stimulation by C21 compound, a specific AT2R agonist, caused a VEGF upregulation. Using mouse primary cortical neurons exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), we established that this effect was mediated by a mechanism dependent of mTORC1 signaling since mTOR inhibition abolished the C21-induced VEGF upregulation. Also, we have temporally characterized the changes on VEGF levels after ischemia induction in rats using two different approaches: transient and permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO and pMCAO). VEGF levels were permanently augmented after reperfusion (tMCAO) whereas lower levels of VEGF were found after pMCAO, remarkably at 21days. Therefore, C21 compound accelerated the recovery of the neurological status of pMCAO rats, reduced the ischemic damage area and abolished pMCAO-induced VEGF downregulation at 21days. This effect of C21 compound was mainly observed in neurons of the peri-infarct area. Our results suggest that a C21-induced VEGF upregulation may be crucial after an ischemic neuronal insult in both of our experimental approaches. This upregulation was mediated by a mechanism dependent of Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, since mTOR inhibition abolished the VEGF upregulation induced by C21. Considering that VEGF is involved in regenerative processes, we propose that AT2R activation could be used as a potential pharmacological strategy after ischemic stroke. PMID:27045356

  16. Aquaporin-4 Inhibition Mediates Piroxicam-Induced Neuroprotection against Focal Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sudip; Patnaik, Ranjana

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Aquaporin-4(AQP4) is an abundant water channel protein in brain that regulates water transport to maintain homeostasis. Cerebral edema resulting from AQP4 over expression is considered to be one of the major determinants for progressive neuronal insult during cerebral ischemia. Although, both upregulation and downregulation of AQP4 expression is associated with brain pathology, over expression of AQP4 is one of the chief contributors of water imbalance in brain during ischemic pathology. We have found that Piroxicam binds to AQP4 with optimal binding energy value. Thus, we hypothesized that Piroxicam is neuroprotective in the rodent cerebral ischemic model by mitigating cerebral edema via AQP4 regulation. Methods Rats were treated with Piroxicam OR placebo at 30 min prior, 2 h post and 4 h post 60 minutes of MCAO followed by 24 hour reperfusion. Rats were evaluated for neurological deficits and motor function just before sacrifice. Brains were harvested for infarct size estimation, water content measurement, biochemical analysis, RT-PCR and western blot experiments. Results Piroxicam pretreatment thirty minutes prior to ischemia and four hour post reperfusion afforded neuroprotection as evident through significant reduction in cerebral infarct volume, improvement in motor behavior, neurological deficit and reduction in brain edema. Furthermore, ischemia induced surge in levels of nitrite and malondialdehyde were also found to be significantly reduced in ischemic brain regions in treated animals. This neuroprotection was found to be associated with inhibition of acid mediated rise in intracellular calcium levels and also downregulated AQP4 expression. Conclusions Findings of the present study provide significant evidence that Piroxicam acts as a potent AQP4 regulator and renders neuroprotection in focal cerebral ischemia. Piroxicam could be clinically exploited for the treatment of brain stroke along with other anti-stroke therapeutics in

  17. Procaspase-9 induces its cleavage by transnitrosylating XIAP via the Thioredoxin system during cerebral ischemia-reperfusion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dengyue; Zhao, Ningjun; Ma, Bin; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Gongliang; Yan, Xianliang; Hu, Shuqun; Xu, Tie

    2016-01-01

    Transnitrosylation is an important mechanism by which nitric oxide (NO) modulates cell signaling pathways. For instance, SNO-caspase-3 can transnitrosylate the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) to enhance apoptosis. XIAP is a potent antagonist of caspase apoptotic activity. Decrease in XIAP activity via nitrosylation results in SNO-XIAP-mediated caspase activation. Considering the functional liaison of procaspase-9 and XIAP, we hypothesized that procaspase-9 nitrosylates XIAP directly. Our data confirmed that cerebral ischemia-reperfusion induced XIAP nitrosylation, procaspase-9 denitrosylation and cleavage. Interestingly, the time courses of the nitrosylation of procaspase-9 and XIAP were negatively correlated, which was more prominent after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion, suggesting a direct interaction. The nitrosylation of XIAP, as well as the denitrosylation and cleavage of procaspase-9, were inhibited by DNCB, TrxR1 AS-ODNs, or TAT-AVPY treatment. Meanwhile, DNCB, TrxR1 AS-ODNs, or TAT-AVPY also inhibited the decrease in hippocampal CA1 neurons induced by ischemia-reperfusion in rats. The denitrosylation and cleavage of procaspase-9 induced by OGD/reoxygenation in SH-SY5Y cells were inhibited when cells were co-transfected with wild-type procaspase-9 and XIAP mutant (C449G). These data suggest that cerebral ischemia-reperfusion induces a transnitrosylation from procaspase-9 to XIAP via the Trx system to consequently cause apoptosis. Additionally, Cys325 is a critical S-nitrosylation site of procaspase-9. PMID:27052476

  18. Procaspase-9 induces its cleavage by transnitrosylating XIAP via the Thioredoxin system during cerebral ischemia-reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dengyue; Zhao, Ningjun; Ma, Bin; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Gongliang; Yan, Xianliang; Hu, Shuqun; Xu, Tie

    2016-01-01

    Transnitrosylation is an important mechanism by which nitric oxide (NO) modulates cell signaling pathways. For instance, SNO-caspase-3 can transnitrosylate the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) to enhance apoptosis. XIAP is a potent antagonist of caspase apoptotic activity. Decrease in XIAP activity via nitrosylation results in SNO-XIAP-mediated caspase activation. Considering the functional liaison of procaspase-9 and XIAP, we hypothesized that procaspase-9 nitrosylates XIAP directly. Our data confirmed that cerebral ischemia-reperfusion induced XIAP nitrosylation, procaspase-9 denitrosylation and cleavage. Interestingly, the time courses of the nitrosylation of procaspase-9 and XIAP were negatively correlated, which was more prominent after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion, suggesting a direct interaction. The nitrosylation of XIAP, as well as the denitrosylation and cleavage of procaspase-9, were inhibited by DNCB, TrxR1 AS-ODNs, or TAT-AVPY treatment. Meanwhile, DNCB, TrxR1 AS-ODNs, or TAT-AVPY also inhibited the decrease in hippocampal CA1 neurons induced by ischemia-reperfusion in rats. The denitrosylation and cleavage of procaspase-9 induced by OGD/reoxygenation in SH-SY5Y cells were inhibited when cells were co-transfected with wild-type procaspase-9 and XIAP mutant (C449G). These data suggest that cerebral ischemia-reperfusion induces a transnitrosylation from procaspase-9 to XIAP via the Trx system to consequently cause apoptosis. Additionally, Cys325 is a critical S-nitrosylation site of procaspase-9. PMID:27052476

  19. Ginsenoside Rg1 prevents cerebral and cerebellar injury induced by obstructive jaundice in rats via inducing expression of TIPE-2.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tingting; Zu, Guo; Zhou, Lu; Che, Ningwei; Guo, Jing; Liang, Zhanhua

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the effect of Ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1) on cerebral and cerebellar injury in experimental obstructive jaundice (OJ). OJ was done by ligature and section of extrahepatic biliary duct. Rg1 was injected intraperitoneally (10 mg kg(-1)d(-1) or 20 mg kg(-1) d(-1)). Comparison of serum total bile salts (TBA), total bilirubin (TBil), direct bilirubin (DBil), TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β among groups. Malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were determined, also apoptosis and mRNA and protein levels of TIPE2 (TNF-α-inducible protein 8-like 2) were tested in cerebrum and cerebellum. Our results showed that Rg1 reduced MDA and apoptosis in cerebrum and cerebellum induced by OJ, also GSH and antioxidant enzyme activity were raised obviously in rats treated with Rg1. Moreover, decreased mRNA and protein levels of TIPE2 in OJ rats and Rg1 could improve the decreased mRNA and protein levels of TIPE2 in OJ rats. In conclusion, Rg1 decreased oxidative stress and apoptosis, also recovered the antioxidant status and mRNA and protein levels of TIPE2 in the cerebrum and cerebellum of OJ rats. PMID:26592478

  20. Effect of age on exercise-induced alterations in cognitive executive function: relationship to cerebral perfusion.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Samuel J E; Ainslie, Philip N; Murrell, Carissa J; Thomas, Kate N; Franz, Elizabeth A; Cotter, James D

    2012-08-01

    Regular exercise improves the age-related decline in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and is associated with improved cognitive function; however, less is known about the direct relationship between CBF and cognitive function. We examined the influence of healthy aging on the capability of acute exercise to improve cognition, and whether exercise-induced improvements in cognition are related to CBF and cortical hemodynamics. Middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAv; Doppler) and cortical hemodynamics (NIRS) were measured in 13 young (24±5 y) and 9 older (62±3 y) participants at rest and during cycling at 30% and 70% of heart rate range (HRR). Cognitive performance was assessed using a computer-adapted Stroop task (i.e., test of executive function cognition) at rest and during exercise. Average response times on the Stroop task were slower for the older compared to younger group for both simple and difficult tasks (P<0.01). Independent of age, difficult-task response times improved during exercise (P<0.01), with the improvement greater at 70% HRR exercise (P=0.04 vs. 30% HRR). Higher MCAv was correlated with faster response times for simple and difficult tasks at rest (R(2)=0.47 and R(2)=0.47, respectively), but this relation uncoupled progressively during exercise. Exercise-induced increases in MCAv were similar and unaltered during cognitive tasks for both age groups. In contrast, prefrontal cortical hemodynamic NIRS measures [oxyhemoglobin (O(2)Hb) and total hemoglobin (tHb)] were differentially affected by exercise intensity, age and cognitive task; e.g., there were smaller increases in [O(2)Hb] and [tHb] in the older group between exercise intensities (P<0.05). These data indicate that: 1) Regardless of age, cognitive (executive) function is improved while exercising; 2) while MCAv is strongly related to cognition at rest, this relation becomes uncoupled during exercise, and 3) there is dissociation between global CBF and regional cortical oxygenation and

  1. Unique action mechanisms of tramadol in global cerebral ischemia-induced mechanical allodynia.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Wataru; Kageyama, Erika; Harada, Shinichi; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2016-06-15

    Central poststroke pain is associated with specific somatosensory abnormalities, such as neuropathic pain syndrome. Although central poststroke pain is a serious condition, details pertaining to underlying mechanisms are not well established, making current standard treatments only partially effective. Here, we assessed the effects of tramadol, an analgesic drug mediated by opioid receptors, using a mouse model of global cerebral ischemia. Ischemia was induced by bilateral carotid artery occlusion (30 min) in male ddY mice. Development of hind-paw mechanical allodynia was measured 3 days after bilateral carotid artery occlusion using the von Frey test. Mechanical allodynia was significantly and dose dependently suppressed by intraperitoneal tramadol (10 or 20 mg/kg). These effects, which peaked at 10 min and continued for at least 60 min, were inhibited by naloxone (nonselective opioid receptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg, intraperitoneal). Tramadol antinociception was significantly negated by β-funaltrexamine (selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist, 20 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), but not naltrindole (selective δ-opioid receptor antagonist, 5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) or nor-binaltorphimine (selective κ-opioid receptor antagonist, 10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) after 5 min, by β-funaltrexamine and nor-binaltorphimine but not naltrindole after 10 min, and by all selective opioid receptor antagonists at 15 and 30 min after tramadol treatment. These results suggested that antinociception induced by tramadol through various opioid receptors was time dependent. Furthermore, it is possible that the opioid receptors involved in tramadol-induced antinociception change over time with the metabolism of this drug. PMID:27171031

  2. Chronic Ethanol Exposure during Adolescence in Rats Induces Motor Impairments and Cerebral Cortex Damage Associated with Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Francisco Bruno; Santana, Luana Nazaré da Silva; Bezerra, Fernando Romualdo; De Carvalho, Sabrina; Fontes-Júnior, Enéas Andrade; Prediger, Rui Daniel; Crespo-López, Maria Elena; Maia, Cristiane Socorro Ferraz; Lima, Rafael Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Binge drinking is common among adolescents, and this type of ethanol exposure may lead to long-term nervous system damage. In the current study, we evaluated motor performance and tissue alterations in the cerebral cortex of rats subjected to intermittent intoxication with ethanol from adolescence to adulthood. Adolescent male Wistar rats (35 days old) were treated with distilled water or ethanol (6.5 g/kg/day, 22.5% w/v) during 55 days by gavage to complete 90 days of age. The open field, inclined plane and the rotarod tests were used to assess the spontaneous locomotor activity and motor coordination performance in adult animals. Following completion of behavioral tests, half of animals were submitted to immunohistochemical evaluation of NeuN (marker of neuronal bodies), GFAP (a marker of astrocytes) and Iba1 (microglia marker) in the cerebral cortex while the other half of the animals were subjected to analysis of oxidative stress markers by biochemical assays. Chronic ethanol intoxication in rats from adolescence to adulthood induced significant motor deficits including impaired spontaneous locomotion, coordination and muscle strength. These behavioral impairments were accompanied by marked changes in all cellular populations evaluated as well as increased levels of nitrite and lipid peroxidation in the cerebral cortex. These findings indicate that continuous ethanol intoxication from adolescence to adulthood is able to provide neurobehavioral and neurodegenerative damage to cerebral cortex. PMID:24967633

  3. Tetracycline Inhibits Local Inflammation Induced by Cerebral Ischemia via Modulating Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yongjun; Zhu, Juehua; Wu, Li; Xu, Gelin; Dai, Jianwu; Liu, Xinfeng

    2012-01-01

    Background Tetracycline exerts neuroprotection via suppressing the local inflammation induced by cerebral ischemia. However, the underlying mechanism is not completely clear. Methodology/Principal Findings The mRNA and protein expressions of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 6 and the number of activated microglia were measured to detect the inflammatory process in the ischemic hemisphere. The key proteins of nuclear factor kappa B pathway and the binding activity of nuclear factor kappa B were also measured. Two key components of autophagy, Beclin 1 and LC3, were detected by western blotting. Pretreatment with tetracycline inhibited the mRNA and protein expressions of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 6 and decreased the numbers of activated and phagocytotic microglia. Tetracycline down regulated the total and phosphorylated expressions of IKK, IκB and p65 (P<0.05). The autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine, inhibited inflammation and activation of nuclear factor kappa B pathway. The levels of Beclin 1 and LC3 were decreased by 3-methyladenine and tetracycline. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggested that pretreatment of tetracycline may inhibit autophagy in the ischemic stroke brain and then suppress the inflammatory process via inhibiting the activation of nuclear factor kappa B pathway. PMID:23144925

  4. Methylmercury-induced reactive oxygen species formation in neonatal cerebral astrocytic cultures is attenuated by antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Shanker, Gouri; Aschner, Michael

    2003-01-31

    Excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been suggested as a causal factor in various neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease [Brain Res. 830 (1999) 10-15; Biochem. J. 310 (1995) 83-90; Free Radic. Biol. Med. 27 (1999) 612-616]. The present work examined the role of ROS in the neurotoxicity of methylmercury (MeHg). ROS formation in primary astrocytic cultures of neonatal rat cerebral cortex was monitored by 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H(2)DCF-DA) fluorescence. MeHg, at 10 and 20 microM caused a significant increase in ROS formation (10 microM, P<0.01; 20 microM, P<0.001). Additional studies established the effectiveness of antioxidants/free radical scavengers in attenuating the MeHg-stimulated ROS formation in the following rank-order: (1) Trolox (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid), a non-thiol containing antioxidant, (2) n-propyl gallate (PG), a free radical scavenger, (3) superoxide dismutase (SOD), an antioxidant enzyme that dismutates superoxide anion radical, (4) alpha-phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN), a lipophilic hydroxyl radical spin trapping agent. A significant inhibition of MeHg-induced ROS generation was also noted in astrocytes preincubated (3 h) with arachidonyl trifluoromethyl ketone (AACOCF(3,) 20 microM, P<0.05), a specific inhibitor of cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)). Conversely, pretreatment (24 h) with 100 microM buthionine-L-sulfoxamine [BSO, a glutathione (GSH) synthesis inhibitor], significantly increased (P<0.05) ROS formation in MeHg treated astrocytes compared to controls. Combined, these studies invoke ROS as potent mediators of MeHg cytotoxicity and support the hypothesis that excessive ROS generation, at least in part, plays an important role in MeHg-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:12573536

  5. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Teens > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  6. Oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil hepatic infusion with lipiodolized chemoembolization in large hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing-Huan; Xie, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Lan; Le, Fan; Ge, Ning-Ling; Li, Li-Xin; Gan, Yu-Hong; Chen, Yi; Zhang, Ju-Bo; Xue, Tong-Chun; Chen, Rong-Xin; Xia, Jing-Lin; Zhang, Bo-Heng; Ye, Sheng-Long; Wang, Yan-Hong; Ren, Zheng-Gang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with hepatic infusion of oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil and Lipiodol chemoembolization in large hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: In this retrospective study, 132 patients with unresectable HCCs larger than 10 cm were treated with hepatic infusion of oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil followed by Lipiodol chemoembolization. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Sixteen-week disease-control rate, time to progression (TTP), and major complications were also studied. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify prognostic factors affecting OS and TTP. RESULTS: A total of 319 procedures were performed in the 132 patients. Eleven (8.3%) patients received radical resection following TACE treatment (median time to initial TACE 4.3 ± 2.3 mo). The median OS and TTP were 10.3 and 3.0 mo respectively, with a 50.0% 16-wk disease-control rate. Major complications were encountered in 6.0% (8/132) of patients following TACE and included serious jaundice in 1.5% (2/132) patients, aleukia in 1.5% (2/132), and hepatic failure in 3.0% (4/132). One patient died within one month due to serious hepatic failure and severe sepsis after receiving the second TACE. The risk factor associated with TTP was baseline alpha-fetoprotein level, and vascular invasion was an independent factor related to OS. CONCLUSION: Hepatic infusion of oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil followed by lipiodolized-chemoembolization is a safe and promising treatment for patients with HCCs larger than 10 cm in diameter. PMID:25852283

  7. Behavior of Lipiodol Markers During Image Guided Radiotherapy of Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chai Xiangfei; Herk, Marcel van; Kamer, Jeroen B. van de; Remeijer, Peter; Bex, Axel; Betgen, Anja; De Reijke, Theo M.; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Pos, Floris J.; Bel, Arjan

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the stability of a novel type of markers used in partial bladder tumor irradiation and tumor deformation as indicated by the markers. Materials and Methods: In 15 patients with solitary bladder cancer, lipiodol was injected in the bladder wall during flexible cystoscopy to identify the tumor. A planning CT scan was made, followed by daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans during treatment. To study the accuracy of using these markers for image guidance, uncertainties U1 and U2 were calculated, which were defined as the difference between submask registration (covering single marker) and the average of all submask registrations and the difference between the submask registration and the general mask registration (including all markers), respectively. Finally, to study tumor deformation, the relative movement of each marker pair was correlated with the relative bladder volume (RBV). Results: The analyzed patients had 2.3 marker injections on average. The lipiodol spot size was 0.72 +- 1.1 cm{sup 3}. The intensity of spots in both CT and CBCT was significantly higher than the surrounding bladder tissue. The uncertainties U1 and U2 were comparable, and the uncertainties in left-right direction (0.14-0.19 cm) were smaller than those in cranial-caudal and anterior-posterior directions (0.19-0.32 cm). The relative marker movement of within-zone marker pairs was much smaller (and has less dependence on the RBV) than across-zones marker pairs. Conclusions: Lipiodol markers are a feasible method to track bladder tumor by using online CBCT. Tumor deformation is observed, especially for tumors that cross the defined bladder zones.

  8. Left Lobe Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma Treated with Lipiodol-TAE via the Left Internal Mammary Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Kanetsuki, Ichiro; Hori, Akira; Ohshiro, Kiyoshi; Nishi, Hirokazu; Yasutani, Tadashi; Sueyoshi, Takeshi; Tanaka, Hitoshi

    1997-09-15

    A multinodular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was treated with seven transarterial interventions via the hepatic artery over a 2-year, 5-month period before the eighth angiography showed a recurrent HCC in the anterior portion of the left hepatic lobe. The left internal mammary artery (IMA) was feeding the tumor. This was successfully treated with Lipiodol-transcatheter arterial embolization using a coaxial system via a branch of the left IMA. No complications resulted from the procedure. The left IMA should be considered as a possible feeding artery to an HCC occurring in the anterior portion of the left hepatic lobe.

  9. Conditional Tat protein brain expression in the GT-tg bigenic mouse induces cerebral fractional anisotropy abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Amanda N.; Liu, Xiaoxu; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Paris, Jason J.; McLaughlin, Jay P.; Kaufman, Marc J.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral white matter changes including tissue water diffusion abnormalities detected with diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) are commonly found in humans with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection, as well as in animal models of the disorder. The severities of some of these abnormalities have been reported to correlate with measures of disease progression or severity, or with the degree of cognitive dysfunction. Accordingly, DTI may be a useful translational biomarker. HIV-Tat protein appears to be an important factor in the viral pathogenesis of HIV-associated neurotoxicity. We previously reported cerebral gray matter density reductions in the GT-tg bigenic mouse treated with doxycycline (Dox) to conditionally induce Tat protein expression. Presently, we administered intraperitoneal (i.p.) Dox (100 mg/kg/day) for 7 days to GT-tg mice to determine whether induction of conditional Tat expression led to the development of cerebral DTI abnormalities. Perfused and fixed brains from eight GT-tg mice administered Dox and eight control mice administered saline i.p. were extracted and underwent DTI scans on a 9.4 Tesla scanner. A whole brain analysis detected fractional anisotropy (FA) reductions in several areas including insular and endopiriform regions, as well as within the dorsal striatum. These findings suggest that exposure to Tat protein is sufficient to induce FA abnormalities, and further support the use of the GT-tg mouse to model some effects of HIV. PMID:25619988

  10. Neuroprotective Effects of Inhibiting Fyn S-Nitrosylation on Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Damage to CA1 Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Lingyun; Wei, Xuewen; Guo, Peng; Zhang, Guangyi; Qi, Suhua

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) can regulate signaling pathways via S-nitrosylation. Fyn can be post-translationally modified in many biological processes. In the present study, using a rat four-vessel-occlusion ischemic model, we aimed to assess whether Fyn could be S-nitrosylated and to evaluate the effects of Fyn S-nitrosylation on brain damage. In vitro, Fyn could be S-nitrosylated by S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, an exogenous NO donor), and in vivo, endogenous NO synthesized by NO synthases (NOS) could enhance Fyn S-nitrosylation. Application of GSNO, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI, an inhibitor of neuronal NOS) and hydrogen maleate (MK-801, the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist) could decrease the S-nitrosylation and phosphorylation of Fyn induced by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Cresyl violet staining validated that these compounds exerted neuroprotective effects against the cerebral I/R-induced damage to hippocampal CA1 neurons. Taken together, in this study, we demonstrated that Fyn can be S-nitrosylated both in vitro and in vivo and that inhibiting S-nitrosylation can exert neuroprotective effects against cerebral I/R injury, potentially via NMDAR-mediated mechanisms. These findings may lead to a new field of inquiry to investigate the underlying pathogenesis of stroke and the development of novel treatment strategies. PMID:27420046

  11. Effect of Hypothermia-Induced Respiratory Arrest on Cerebral Circulation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Mel'nikova, N N; Petrova, L A

    2016-03-01

    Intravital microscopy was employed to examine cerebral circulation in rats assessed by blood flow in the venules with diameter of 10-30 μ during immersion hypothermia continued to the moment of respiratory arrest and for 10 min thereafter. Circulation in the cerebral microvessels continued during severe hypothermia, and it went on even after hypothermic respiratory arrest while the heart was beating. In pial venules, the blood continued to fl ow for 8-10 min after respiratory arrest. PMID:27021108

  12. Multimodal Neuroprotection Induced by PACAP38 in Oxygen–Glucose Deprivation and Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Stroke Models

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Gadi; Arien-Zakay, Hadar; Chen, Jieli; Zhang, Chunling; Chopp, Michael; Jiang, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP), a potent neuropeptide which crosses the blood–brain barrier, is known to provide neuroprotection in rat stroke models of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) by mechanism(s) which deserve clarification. We confirmed that following i.v. injection of 30 ng/kg of PACAP38 in rats exposed to 2 h of MCAO focal cerebral ischemia and 48 h reoxygenation, 50 % neuroprotection was measured by reduced caspase-3 activity and volume of cerebral infarction. Similar neuroprotective effects were measured upon PACAP38 treatment of oxygen–glucose deprivation and reoxygenation of brain cortical neurons. The neuroprotection was temporally associated with increased expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, phosphorylation of its receptor—tropomyosin-related kinase receptor type B (trkB), activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Akt, and reduction of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 phosphorylation. PACAP38 increased expression of neuronal markers beta-tubulin III, microtubule-associated protein-2, and growth-associated protein-43. PACAP38 induced stimulation of Rac and suppression of Rho GTPase activities. PACAP38 down-regulated the nerve growth factor receptor (p75NTR) and associated Nogo-(Neurite outgrowth-A) receptor. Collectively, these in vitro and in vivo results propose that PACAP exhibits neuroprotective effects in cerebral ischemia by three mechanisms: a direct one, mediated by PACAP receptors, and two indirect, induced by neurotrophin release, activation of the trkB receptors and attenuation of neuronal growth inhibitory signaling molecules p75NTR and Nogo receptor. PMID:22678884

  13. Curcumin treatment recovery the decrease of protein phosphatase 2A subunit B induced by focal cerebral ischemia in Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Fawad-Ali; Park, Dong-Ju; Gim, Sang-Ah

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin provides various biological effects through its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Moreover, curcumin exerts a neuroprotective effect against ischemic condition-induced brain damage. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a ubiquitous serine and threonine phosphatase with various cell functions and broad substrate specificity. Especially PP2A subunit B plays an important role in nervous system. This study investigated whether curcumin regulates PP2A subunit B expression in focal cerebral ischemia. Cerebral ischemia was induced surgically by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Adult male rats were injected with either vehicle or curcumin (50 mg/kg) 1 h after MCAO and cerebral cortex tissues were isolated 24 h after MCAO. A proteomics study, reverse transverse-PCR and Western blot analyses were performed to examine PP2A subunit B expression levels. We identified a reduction in PP2A subunit B expression in MCAO-operated animals using a proteomic approach. However, curcumin treatment prevented injury-induced reductions in PP2A subunit B levels. Reverse transverse-PCR and Western blot analyses confirmed that curcumin treatment attenuated the injury-induced reduction in PP2A subunit B levels. These findings can suggest that the possibility that curcumin maintains levels of PP2A subunit B in response to cerebral ischemia, which likely contributes to the neuroprotective function of curcumin in cerebral ischemic injury. PMID:26472966

  14. MiRNA-124 induces neuroprotection and functional improvement after focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hamzei Taj, Somayyeh; Kho, Widuri; Riou, Adrien; Wiedermann, Dirk; Hoehn, Mathias

    2016-06-01

    microRNA-124 (miR-124), the most abundant miRNA of the CNS, was recently shown to modulate the polarization of activated microglia and infiltrating macrophages towards the anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype and protect neurons in various ways after brain disease. In ischemic stroke, microglia and macrophages of a detrimental and persistent pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype have been shown to aggravate the secondary injury. Thus, shifting the polarization of microglia/macrophages into the beneficial, anti-inflammatory M2-like phenotype is considered neuroprotective after stroke onset. Here, we have induced 30 min transient occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery (MCAO) in 34 male, C57BL/6 mice. Lesion development was monitored with T2-weighted MRI. Liposomated miR-124 was injected in 11 animals at 48 h and in 5 animals at 10 days after MCAO. Arg-1, a marker for M2 phenotype, was co-stained with Iba-1, NeuN or GFAP. The distribution of astrocytes, neurons and microglia/macrophages and their expression of Arg-1 were quantified. Early miR-124 injection resulted in a significantly increased neuronal survival and a significantly increased number of M2-like polarized microglia/macrophages. Moreover, the lesion core, delineated by reactive astrocytes, was significantly reduced over time upon early miR-124 injection. These neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of the early miR-124 treatment were pronounced during the first week with Arg-1. Number of Arg-1+ microglia/macrophages correlated with neuronal protection and with functional improvement during the first week. Thus, our present results demonstrate that miR-124 may serve as a novel therapeutic strategy for neuroprotection and functional recovery upon stroke onset. PMID:27031810

  15. Chronic lead treatment accelerates photochemically induced platelet aggregation in cerebral microvessels of mice, in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Al Dhaheri, A.H.; El-Sabban, F.; Fahim, M.A.

    1995-04-01

    Effects of two chronic treatment levels with lead on platelet aggregation in cerebral (pial) microcirculation of the mouse were investigated. Exposure to lead was made by subcutaneous injections for 7 days of lead acetate dissolved in 5% glucose solution, vehicle. Two doses of lead were used, a low dose of 0.1 mg/kg and a high dose of 1.0 mg/kg. Adult male mice were divided into three groups, 10 each; one group was injected with vehicle (control), another was injected with the low dose, and the third was injected with the high dose. Additional mice were used for the determination of hematological parameters and for the lead level in serum of the three groups. On the eighth day, platelet aggregation in pial microvessels of these groups of mice was carried out in vivo. Animals were anesthetized (urethane, 1-2 mg/g, ip), the trachea was intubated, and a craniotomy was performed. Platelet aggregation in pial microvessels was induced photochemically, by activation of circulating sodium fluorescein (0.1 mg/25 g, iv) with an intense mercury light. The time required for the first platelet aggregate to appear in pial arterioles was significantly shorter in the lead-treated mice than in control. This effect was in a dose-dependent manner; 113 {+-} 44 sec for low dose and 71 {+-} 18 sec for high dose vs 155 {+-} 25 sec for control, P < 0.02 and P < 0.001, respectively. Between the two lead-treated groups, the high dose significantly (P < 0.05) shortened the time to first aggregate. These data evidenced an increased susceptibility to cerebrovascular thrombosis as a result of exposure to lead. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Ammonia-induced senescence in cultured rat astrocytes and in human cerebral cortex in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Görg, Boris; Karababa, Ayse; Shafigullina, Aygul; Bidmon, Hans J; Häussinger, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a frequent complication of liver cirrhosis and is due to a low-grade cerebral edema associated with oxidative/nitrosative stress. Recent reports suggest that cognitive impairment in cirrhotic patients may not resolve completely after an attack of manifest HE. As astrocyte dysfunction is central to the pathogenesis of HE and astrocytes are critically involved in synaptic plasticity, we tested for sustained impairment of astrocyte function by analyzing expression levels of senescence biomarkers in ammonia-treated cultured rat astrocytes and in postmortem brain samples from cirrhotic patients with or without HE. NH4 Cl time- and dose-dependently inhibited proliferation of cultured astrocytes by up to 45% (5 mmol/L, 72 h) and strongly increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. Inhibition of astrocyte proliferation by ammonia was mediated by a l-methionine sulfoximine-, oxidative stress-, and p38(MAPK) -dependent activation of p53 associated with enhanced transcription of cell cycle inhibitory genes GADD45α and p21. Mitochondria and the nucleus were identified as sources of oxygen radical formation after prolonged NH4 Cl exposure. Concurrently, NH4 Cl (5 mmol/L) treatment inhibited both epidermal growth factor- and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-induced proliferation as well as BDNF-mediated astrocyte morphology changes through downregulation of the respective growth factor receptors epidermal growth factor receptor and truncated tyrosine receptor kinase B. Increased mRNA expression levels of senescence-associated genes were also found in post mortem brain samples from patients with liver cirrhosis with HE, but not in those without HE. The data suggest that ammonia toxicity and HE are associated with premature astrocyte senescence, which may impair neurotransmission and contribute to persistence of cognitive disturbances after resolution of episodes of overt HE. PMID:25092802

  17. Hypothermia-induced ischemic tolerance is associated with Drp1 inhibition in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury of mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yingying; Liu, Xiaojie; Zhao, Jie; Tan, Xueying; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Gaofeng; Sun, Lixin; Han, Dengyang; Chen, Huailong; Wang, Mingshan

    2016-09-01

    Excessive mitochondrial fission activation has been implicated in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. Hypothermia is effective in preventing cerebral ischemic damage. However, effects of hypothermia on ischemia-induced mitochondrial fission activation is not well known. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether hypothermia protect the brain by inhibiting mitochondrial fission-related proteins activation following cerebral IR injury. Adult male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to transient forebrain ischemia induced by 15min of bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO). Mice were divided into three groups (n=48 each): Hypothermia (HT) group, with mild hypothermia (32-34°C) for 4h; Normothermia (NT) group, similarly as HT group except for cooling; Sham group, with vessels exposed but without occlusion or cooling. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE), Nissl staining, Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining and behavioral testing (n=6 each) demonstrated that hypothermia significantly decreased ischemia-induced neuronal injury. The expressions of Dynamin related protein 1 (Drp1) and Cytochrome C (Cyto C) (n=6 each) in mice hippocampus were measured at 3, 6, 24, and 72h of reperfusion. IR injury significantly increased expressions of total Drp1, phosphorylated Drp1 (P-Drp1 S616) and Cyto C under normothermia. However, mild hypothermia inhibited Drp1 activation and Cyto C cytosolic release, preserved neural cells integrity and reduced neuronal necrosis and apoptosis. These findings indicated that mild hypothermia-induced neuroprotective effects against ischemia-reperfusion injury is associated with suppressing mitochondrial fission-related proteins activation and apoptosis execution. PMID:27235868

  18. TIGAR contributes to ischemic tolerance induced by cerebral preconditioning through scavenging of reactive oxygen species and inhibition of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun-Hao; Zhang, Tong-Tong; Song, Dan-Dan; Xia, Yun-Fei; Qin, Zheng-Hong; Sheng, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Previous study showed that TIGAR (TP53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator) protected ischemic brain injury via enhancing pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) flux and preserving mitochondria function. This study was aimed to study the role of TIGAR in cerebral preconditioning. The ischemic preconditioning (IPC) and isoflurane preconditioning (ISO) models were established in primary cultured cortical neurons and in mice. Both IPC and ISO increased TIGAR expression in cortical neurons. Preconditioning might upregulate TIGAR through SP1 transcription factor. Lentivirus mediated knockdown of TIGAR significantly abolished the ischemic tolerance induced by IPC and ISO. ISO also increased TIGAR in mouse cortex and hippocampus and alleviated subsequent brain ischemia-reperfusion injury, while the ischemic tolerance induced by ISO was eliminated with TIGAR knockdown in mouse brain. ISO increased the production of NADPH and glutathione (GSH), and scavenged reactive oxygen species (ROS), while TIGAR knockdown decreased GSH and NADPH production and increased the level of ROS. Supplementation of ROS scavenger NAC and PPP product NADPH effectively rescue the neuronal injury caused by TIGAR deficiency. Notably, TIGAR knockdown inhibited ISO-induced anti-apoptotic effects in cortical neurons. These results suggest that TIGAR participates in the cerebral preconditioning through reduction of ROS and subsequent cell apoptosis. PMID:27256465

  19. TIGAR contributes to ischemic tolerance induced by cerebral preconditioning through scavenging of reactive oxygen species and inhibition of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun-Hao; Zhang, Tong-Tong; Song, Dan-Dan; Xia, Yun-Fei; Qin, Zheng-Hong; Sheng, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Previous study showed that TIGAR (TP53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator) protected ischemic brain injury via enhancing pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) flux and preserving mitochondria function. This study was aimed to study the role of TIGAR in cerebral preconditioning. The ischemic preconditioning (IPC) and isoflurane preconditioning (ISO) models were established in primary cultured cortical neurons and in mice. Both IPC and ISO increased TIGAR expression in cortical neurons. Preconditioning might upregulate TIGAR through SP1 transcription factor. Lentivirus mediated knockdown of TIGAR significantly abolished the ischemic tolerance induced by IPC and ISO. ISO also increased TIGAR in mouse cortex and hippocampus and alleviated subsequent brain ischemia-reperfusion injury, while the ischemic tolerance induced by ISO was eliminated with TIGAR knockdown in mouse brain. ISO increased the production of NADPH and glutathione (GSH), and scavenged reactive oxygen species (ROS), while TIGAR knockdown decreased GSH and NADPH production and increased the level of ROS. Supplementation of ROS scavenger NAC and PPP product NADPH effectively rescue the neuronal injury caused by TIGAR deficiency. Notably, TIGAR knockdown inhibited ISO-induced anti-apoptotic effects in cortical neurons. These results suggest that TIGAR participates in the cerebral preconditioning through reduction of ROS and subsequent cell apoptosis. PMID:27256465

  20. Mannosylated liposomal cytidine 5' diphosphocholine prevent age related global moderate cerebral ischemia reperfusion induced mitochondrial cytochrome c release in aged rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Das, N; Mandal, A K; Dungdung, S R; Sarkar, S

    2010-12-29

    Mitochondrial dysfunctions generating from cerebral ischemia-reperfusion exert a potential threat on neuronal cell survival and hence, accelerate the aging process and age dependent neuropathology. Thirty min moderate cerebral ischemia induced by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) followed by 30 min reperfusion caused an increased diene production, depleted glutathione (GSH) content, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities and pyramidal neuronal loss in young (2 months old) and aged (20 months old) rat brain compared to sham operated controls. Cytidine 5' diphosphocholine (CDP-Choline) is a known neuroprotective drug. CDP-Choline after metabolism in the liver suffers hydrolysis and splits into cytidine and choline before entering systemic circulation and hardly circumvents blood brain barrier (BBB) as such. Previous reports show CDP-Choline liposomes significantly increased in vivo uptake compared to "free drug" administration in cerebral ischemia. To enhance the therapeutic concentration build up in brain we sought to formulate mannosylated liposomal CDP-Choline (MLCDP) utilizing the mannose receptors. We tested the therapeutic supremacy of MLCDP over liposomal CDP-Choline (LCDP) in global moderate cerebral ischemia reperfusion induced neuronal damage. CDP-Choline in MLCDP delivery system was found potent to exert substantial protection against global moderate cerebral ischemia reperfusion induced mitochondrial damage in aged rat brain. Membrane lipid peroxidation, GSSG/GSH ratio and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in cerebral tissue were found to be higher in aged, compared to young rat. Further decline of those parameters was observed in aged rat brain by the induction of global moderate cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. MLCDP treatment when compared to free or LCDP treatment prevented global moderate cerebral ischemia-reperfusion induced mitochondrial damage as evident ultra structurally and release of cytochrome c

  1. Overactivation of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 and aquaporin-4 by hypoxia induces cerebral edema

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shao-Jun; Yang, Jia-Fang; Kong, Fan-Ping; Ren, Ji-Long; Hao, Ke; Li, Min; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Xin-Can; Yu, Ri-Sheng; Li, Jun-Fa; Leng, Gareth; Chen, Xue-Qun; Du, Ji-Zeng

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral edema is a potentially life-threatening illness, but knowledge of its underlying mechanisms is limited. Here we report that hypobaric hypoxia induces rat cerebral edema and neuronal apoptosis and increases the expression of corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF), CRF receptor type 1 (CRFR1), aquaporin-4 (AQP4), and endothelin-1 (ET-1) in the cortex. These effects, except for the increased expression of CRF itself, could all be blocked by pretreatment with an antagonist of the CRF receptor CRFR1. We also show that, in cultured primary astrocytes: (i) both CRFR1 and AQP4 are expressed; (ii) exogenous CRF, acting through CRFR1, triggers signaling of cAMP/PKA, intracellular Ca2+, and PKCε; and (iii) the up-regulated cAMP/PKA signaling contributes to the phosphorylation and expression of AQP4 to enhance water influx into astrocytes and produces an up-regulation of ET-1 expression. Finally, using CHO cells transfected with CRFR1+ and AQP4+, we show that transfected CRFR1+ contributes to edema via transfected AQP4+. In conclusion, hypoxia triggers cortical release of CRF, which acts on CRFR1 to trigger signaling of cAMP/PKA in cortical astrocytes, leading to activation of AQP4 and cerebral edema. PMID:25146699

  2. Hemorrhagic shock-induced cerebral bioenergetic imbalance is corrected by pharmacologic treatment with EF24 in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Rao, Geeta; Xie, Jun; Hedrick, Andria; Awasthi, Vibhudutta

    2015-12-01

    Maintenance of cerebral viability and function is an important goal of critical care in victims of injury due to ischemia and hypovolemia. As part of the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, the brain function after trauma is influenced by the systemic inflammatory response. We investigated the effect of EF24, an anti-inflammatory bis-chalcone, on cerebral bioenergetics in a rat model of 45% hemorrhagic shock. The rats were treated with EF24 (0.4 mg/kg) or EF24 with an artificial oxygen carrier liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin (LEH). The volume of LEH administered was equal to the shed blood. The brain was collected after 6 h of shock for biochemical assays. EF24 treatment showed significant recovery of ATP, phosphocreatine, and NAD/NADH ratio. It also increased citrate synthase activity and cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV expression which were reduced in shock brain. Furthermore, it reduced the shock-induced accumulation of pyruvate and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-1 expression, suggesting that EF24 treatment improves cerebral energetics by restoring perturbed pyruvate metabolism in the mitochondria. These effects of EF24 were associated with reduced poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and a significant improvement in the levels of nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in shock brain. Co-administration of LEH with EF24 was only marginally more effective as compared to the treatment with EF24 alone. These results show that EF24 treatment sets up a pro-survival phenotype in shock by resurrecting cerebral bioenergetics. Since EF24 was effective in the absence of accompanying fluid resuscitation, it has potential utility as a pre-hospital pharmacotherapy in shock due to accidental blood loss. PMID:26232641

  3. Pharmacological neutropenia prevents endothelial dysfunction but not smooth muscle functions impairment induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Pétrault, Olivier; Ouk, Thavarak; Gautier, Sophie; Laprais, Maud; Gelé, Patrick; Bastide, Michèle; Bordet, Régis

    2005-01-01

    The polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) activation and mobilization observed in acute cerebral infarction contribute to the brain tissue damage, but PMN could also be involved in postischemic functional injury of ischemied blood vessel. This study was undertaken to investigate whether pharmacological neutropenia could modify the postischemic endothelial dysfunction in comparison to smooth muscle whose impairment is likely more related to reperfusion and oxidative stress. A cerebral ischemia–reperfusion by endoluminal occlusion of right middle cerebral artery (MCA) was performed 4 days after intravenous administration of vinblastine or 12 h after RP-3 anti-rat neutrophils monoclonal antibody (mAb RP-3) injection into the peritoneal cavity, on male Wistar rats with 1-h ischemia then followed by 24-h reperfusion period. Brain infarct volume was measured by histomorphometric analysis and vascular endothelial and smooth muscle reactivity of MCA was analysed using Halpern myograph. Neutropenia induced a neuroprotective effect as demonstrated by a significant decrease of brain infarct size. In parallel to neuroprotection, neutropenia prevented postischemic impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxing response to acetylcholine. In contrast, smooth muscle functional alterations were not prevented by neutropenia. Ischemia–reperfusion-induced myogenic tone impairment remained unchanged in vinblastine and mAb RP-3-treated rats. Postischemic Kir2.x-dependent relaxation impairment was not prevented in neutropenic conditions. The fully relaxation of smooth muscle response to sodium nitroprusside was similar in all groups. Our results evidenced the dissociate prevention of pharmacologically induced neutropenia on postischemic vascular endothelial and smooth muscle impairment. The selective endothelial protection by neutropenia is parallel to a neuroprotective effect suggesting a possible relationship between the two phenomena. PMID:15700030

  4. Influence of preoperative transarterial lipiodol chemoembolization on resection and transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed Central

    Majno, P E; Adam, R; Bismuth, H; Castaing, D; Ariche, A; Krissat, J; Perrin, H; Azoulay, D

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of preoperative transarterial lipiodol chemoembolization (TACE) in the management of patients undergoing liver resection or liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: TACE was performed before surgery in 49 of 76 patients undergoing resection and in 54 of 111 patients undergoing liver transplantation. Results were retrospectively analyzed with regard to the response to treatment, the type of procedure performed, the incidence of complications, the incidence and pattern of recurrence, and survival. RESULTS: In liver resection, downstaging of the tumor by TACE (21 of 49 patients [42%]) and total necrosis (24 of 49 patients [50%]) were associated with a better disease-free survival than either no response to TACE or no TACE (downstaging, 29% vs. 10% and 11 % at 5 years, p = 0.08 and 0.10; necrosis, 22% vs. 13% and 11% at 5 years, p = 0.1 and 0.3). Five patients (10%) with previously unresectable tumors could be resected after downstaging. In liver transplantation, downstaging of tumors >3 cm (19 of 35 patients [54%]) and total necrosis (15 of 54 patients [28%]) were associated with better disease-free survival than either incomplete response to TACE or no TACE (downstaging, 71 % vs. 29% and 49% at 5 years, p = 0.01 and 0.09; necrosis, 87% vs. 47% and 60% at 5 years, p = 0.03 and 0.14). Multivariate analysis of the factors associated with response to TACE showed that downstaging occurred more frequently for tumors >5 cm. CONCLUSIONS: Downstaging or total necrosis of the tumor induced by TACE occurred in 62% of the cases and was associated with improved disease-free survival both after liver resection and transplantation. In liver resection, TACE was also useful to improve the resectability of primarily unresectable tumors. In liver transplantation, downstaging in patients with tumors >3 cm was associated with survival similar to that in patients with less extensive disease. Images Figure 7. Figure 8

  5. Epidermal growth factor-like repeats of tenascin-C-induced constriction of cerebral arteries via activation of epidermal growth factor receptors in rats.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Masashi; Shiba, Masato; Kawakita, Fumihiro; Liu, Lei; Nakasaki, Asuka; Shimojo, Naoshi; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko; Yoshida, Toshimichi; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2016-07-01

    Tenascin-C (TNC), one of matricellular proteins, has been suggested to be involved in cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. However, the mechanisms of how TNC constricts cerebral arteries remain unclear. The aim of this study was to examine if epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats of TNC is involved in TNC-induced constriction of cerebral arteries in rats via EGF receptor (EGFR) activation. Two dosages of recombinant TNC (r-TNC) consisting of the EGF-like repeats was administered intracisternally to healthy rats, and its vasoconstrictor effects were evaluated by neurobehavioral tests and India-ink angiography at 24, 48, and 72 hours after the administration. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were performed to explore the underlying mechanisms on constricted cerebral arteries after 24 hours. The effects of a selective EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (AG1478) on r-TNC-induced vasoconstriction were evaluated by neurobehavioral tests, India-ink angiography and immunohistochemistry at 24 hours after the administration. A higher dosage of r-TNC induced cerebral arterial constriction more severely, which continued for 48 hours. The effects were associated with the activation of EGFR and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 in the smooth muscle cell layer of the constricted cerebral artery, while c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 were not activated. AG1478 blocked r-TNC-induced vasoconstrictive effects, as well as activation of EGFR and ERK1/2. These findings demonstrate that TNC induces constriction of cerebral arteries via activation of EGFR and ERK1/2. PMID:27086972

  6. Protective effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Chen, Ran-Chou; Lu, Wen-Wei; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2015-04-01

    The protein expressions of neurotrophic factors can be enhanced by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation in the brain. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the protective effect of LIPUS stimulation against aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model. LIPUS was administered 7 days before each aluminum chloride (AlCl3) administration, and concomitantly given with AlCl3 daily for a period of 6 weeks. Neurotrophic factors in hippocampus were measured by western blot analysis. Behavioral changes in the Morris water maze and elevated plus maze were examined in rats after administration of AlCl3. Various biochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the extent of brain damages. LIPUS is capable of prompting levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in rat brain. AlCl3 administration resulted in a significant increase in the aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity and beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition in AlCl3 treated rats. LIPUS stimulation significantly attenuated aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity, Aβ deposition and karyopyknosis in AlCl3 treated rats. Furthermore, LIPUS significantly improved memory retention in AlCl3-induced memory impairment. These experimental results indicate that LIPUS has neuroprotective effects against AlCl3-induced cerebral damages and cognitive dysfunction.

  7. Protective effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Chen, Ran-Chou; Lu, Wen-Wei; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2015-01-01

    The protein expressions of neurotrophic factors can be enhanced by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation in the brain. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the protective effect of LIPUS stimulation against aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model. LIPUS was administered 7 days before each aluminum chloride (AlCl3) administration, and concomitantly given with AlCl3 daily for a period of 6 weeks. Neurotrophic factors in hippocampus were measured by western blot analysis. Behavioral changes in the Morris water maze and elevated plus maze were examined in rats after administration of AlCl3. Various biochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the extent of brain damages. LIPUS is capable of prompting levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in rat brain. AlCl3 administration resulted in a significant increase in the aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity and beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition in AlCl3 treated rats. LIPUS stimulation significantly attenuated aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity, Aβ deposition and karyopyknosis in AlCl3 treated rats. Furthermore, LIPUS significantly improved memory retention in AlCl3-induced memory impairment. These experimental results indicate that LIPUS has neuroprotective effects against AlCl3-induced cerebral damages and cognitive dysfunction. PMID:25873429

  8. Modified Constraint-Induced Therapy for Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy: A Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallen, Margaret; Ziviani, Jenny; Naylor, Olivia; Evans, Ruth; Novak, Iona; Herbert, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Conventional constraint-based therapies are intensive and demanding to implement, particularly for children. Modified forms of constraint-based therapies that are family-centred may be more acceptable and feasible for families of children with cerebral palsy (CP)-but require rigorous evaluation using randomized trials. The aim of this study…

  9. Mirror Visual Feedback Induces Lower Neuromuscular Activity in Children with Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feltham, Max G.; Ledebt, Annick; Deconinck, Frederik J. A.; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the effects of mirror feedback information on neuromuscular activation during bimanual coordination in eight children with spastic hemiparetic cerebral palsy (SHCP) and a matched control group. The "mirror box" creates a visual illusion, which gives rise to a visual perception of a zero lag, symmetric movement between the two…

  10. Sleep induced by small doses of tubocurarine injected into cerebral ventricles of dog

    PubMed Central

    Haranath, P. S. R. K.; Shyamalakumari, S.

    1973-01-01

    In unanaesthetized dogs, sleep with the typical sleep pattern in the E.E.G. was produced with (+)-tubocurarine when injected in a small dose (500 ng) into, or perfused in low concentration (100 ng/ml) through the cerebral ventricles. PMID:4362592

  11. Exercise preconditioning reduces ischemia reperfusion-induced focal cerebral infarct volume through up-regulating the expression of HIF-1α.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Deng, Wenqian; Yuan, Qiongjia; Yang, Huijun

    2015-03-01

    To study the effect and mechanism of exercise preconditioning on focal cerebral ischemia reperfusion induced cerebral infarction via rat model; Sixty Sprague Dawley rats were divided into three groups at random: ischemia reperfusion group (IR, n=24), sham group (sham, n=12) and exercise preconditioning group (EP, n=24). Group EP carried out moderate exercise preconditioning for 4 weeks (swimming with non-weight bearing, 60 minutes/day, 6 days/week), Rats in Group EP and IR were established cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury model by Zea Longa's thread method. The cerebral infarct volume in rat of different group was evaluated after 2%TTC staining, expression of HIF-1α in rats' brain was detected by real-time RT-PCR, immunohistochmeistry method and western blot. No cerebral infarction and significant expression of HIF-1α in Group sham. Compared with Group IR, there was smaller infarct volume and stronger HIF-1α expression in Group EP (P<0.05). Moderate exercise preconditioning reduces ischemia reperfusion induced focal cerebral infarct volume through up-regulating the expression of HIF-1α. PMID:25796156

  12. Ischemia-induced stimulation of Na-K-Cl cotransport in cerebral microvascular endothelial cells involves AMP kinase

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Breanna K.; Foroutan, Shahin

    2011-01-01

    Increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) Na-K-Cl cotransporter activity appears to contribute to cerebral edema formation during ischemic stroke. We have shown previously that inhibition of BBB Na-K-Cl cotransporter activity reduces edema and infarct in the rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model of ischemic stroke. We have also shown that the BBB cotransporter is stimulated by the ischemic factors hypoxia, aglycemia, and arginine vasopressin (AVP), although the mechanisms responsible are not well understood. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key mediator of cell responses to stress, can be activated by a variety of stresses, including ischemia, hypoxia, and aglycemia. Previous studies have shown that the AMPK inhibitor Compound C significantly reduces infarct in mouse MCAO. The present study was conducted to evaluate the possibility that AMPK participates in ischemic factor-induced stimulation of the BBB Na-K-Cl cotransporter. Cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (CMEC) were assessed for Na-K-Cl cotransporter activity as bumetanide-sensitive 86Rb influx. AMPK activity was assessed by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence methods using antibodies that detect total versus phosphorylated (activated) AMPK. We found that hypoxia (7% and 2% O2), aglycemia, AVP, and oxygen-glucose deprivation (5- to 120-min exposures) increase activation of AMPK. We also found that Compound C inhibition of AMPK reduces hypoxia-, aglycemia-, and AVP-induced stimulation of CMEC Na-K-Cl cotransporter activity. Confocal immunofluorescence of perfusion-fixed rat brain slices revealed the presence of AMPK, both total and phosphorylated kinase, in BBB in situ of both control and ischemic brain. These findings suggest that ischemic factor stimulation of the BBB Na-K-Cl cotransporter involves activation of AMPK. PMID:21562306

  13. Ischemia-induced stimulation of Na-K-Cl cotransport in cerebral microvascular endothelial cells involves AMP kinase.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Breanna K; Foroutan, Shahin; O'Donnell, Martha E

    2011-08-01

    Increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) Na-K-Cl cotransporter activity appears to contribute to cerebral edema formation during ischemic stroke. We have shown previously that inhibition of BBB Na-K-Cl cotransporter activity reduces edema and infarct in the rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model of ischemic stroke. We have also shown that the BBB cotransporter is stimulated by the ischemic factors hypoxia, aglycemia, and arginine vasopressin (AVP), although the mechanisms responsible are not well understood. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key mediator of cell responses to stress, can be activated by a variety of stresses, including ischemia, hypoxia, and aglycemia. Previous studies have shown that the AMPK inhibitor Compound C significantly reduces infarct in mouse MCAO. The present study was conducted to evaluate the possibility that AMPK participates in ischemic factor-induced stimulation of the BBB Na-K-Cl cotransporter. Cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (CMEC) were assessed for Na-K-Cl cotransporter activity as bumetanide-sensitive (86)Rb influx. AMPK activity was assessed by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence methods using antibodies that detect total versus phosphorylated (activated) AMPK. We found that hypoxia (7% and 2% O(2)), aglycemia, AVP, and oxygen-glucose deprivation (5- to 120-min exposures) increase activation of AMPK. We also found that Compound C inhibition of AMPK reduces hypoxia-, aglycemia-, and AVP-induced stimulation of CMEC Na-K-Cl cotransporter activity. Confocal immunofluorescence of perfusion-fixed rat brain slices revealed the presence of AMPK, both total and phosphorylated kinase, in BBB in situ of both control and ischemic brain. These findings suggest that ischemic factor stimulation of the BBB Na-K-Cl cotransporter involves activation of AMPK. PMID:21562306

  14. Rosiglitazone ameliorates astrocyte over-activation and inflammatory cytokine release induced by global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    REN, SHANLING; XU, YAN; LV, DONGWEI; ZHANG, LEI

    2016-01-01

    Global cerebral ischemia (GCI) is a leading cause of mortality worldwide and remains the primary cause of long-term neurological disability. Astrocyte over-activation and extensive neuron loss in the ischemic brain are the characteristic pathological features of cerebral ischemia. Rosiglitazone (RSG) is a peroxisome-proliferating activating receptor-γ agonist known for its anti-inflammatory activity. Previous studies have suggested that RSG is able to exert neuroprotection in numerous acute and chronic brain injury models. However, whether RSG treatment is involved in astrocyte over-activation and inflammatory reaction in the cortex remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether RSG treatment improved functional impairment induced following GCI and protected against cortex neuron loss, and to elucidate the potential mechanisms underlying these functions. Rats were randomly divided into three groups: Sham-operated, GCI and RSG treatment groups. The RSG treatment group was treated with 2 mg/kg RSG immediately following GCI. The results demonstrated that RSG treatment significantly reduced infarct volume and neuron survival rates in addition to increasing function recovery. Furthermore, these results correlate with a reduction in astrocyte over-activation and inflammatory cytokines in the rat cortex. However, no significant changes in glutamate transporter-1 expression levels were observed following RSG treatment compared with the GCI rats. The results of this investigation provide in vivo evidence that RSG significantly protected rats against ischemia-reperfusion-induced brain injury. In addition, RSG may exert neuroprotective effects by inhibiting astrocyte over-activation, and thereby reducing the levels of inflammatory cytokines in the GCI-injured brain. All data revealed that RSG may be a potential neuroprotective agent for cerebral ischemia. PMID:26998039

  15. Cerebral oxygenation during hyperoxia-induced increase in exercise tolerance for untrained men.

    PubMed

    Oussaidene, Kahina; Prieur, Fabrice; Bougault, Valerie; Borel, Benoit; Matran, Regis; Mucci, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the involvement of cerebral oxygenation in limitation of maximal exercise. We hypothesized that O2 supplementation improves physical performance in relation to its effect on cerebral oxygenation during exercise. Eight untrained men (age 27 ± 6 years; VO2 max 45 ± 8 ml min(-1) kg(-1)) performed two randomized exhaustive ramp exercises on a cycle ergometer (1 W/3 s) under normoxia and hyperoxia (FIO2 = 0.3). Cerebral (ΔCOx) and muscular (ΔMOx) oxygenation responses to exercise were monitored using near-infrared spectroscopy. Power outputs corresponding to maximal exercise intensity, to threshold of ΔCOx decline (ThCOx) and to the respiratory compensation point (RCP) were determined. Power output (W max = 302 ± 20 vs. 319 ± 28 W) and arterial O2 saturation estimated by pulse oximetry (SpO2 = 95.7 ± 0.9 vs. 97.0 ± 0.5 %) at maximal exercise were increased by hyperoxia (P < 0.05). However, the ΔMOx response during exercise was not significantly modified with hyperoxia. RCP (259 ± 17 vs. 281 ± 25 W) and ThCOx (259 ± 23 vs. 288 ± 30 W) were, however, improved (P < 0.05) with hyperoxia and the ThCOx shift was related to the W max improvement with hyperoxia (r = 0.71, P < 0.05). The relationship between the change in cerebral oxygenation response to exercise and the performance improvement with hyperoxia supports that cerebral oxygenation is limiting the exercise performance in healthy young subjects. PMID:23579360

  16. Cerebral Hypoxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Hypoxia Information Page Synonym(s): Hypoxia, Anoxia Table of Contents ( ... Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What is Cerebral Hypoxia? Cerebral hypoxia refers to a condition in which ...

  17. FNIRS-based evaluation of cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy undergoing constraint-induced movement therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jianwei; Khan, Bilal; Hervey, Nathan; Tian, Fenghua; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Clegg, Nancy J.; Smith, Linsley; Roberts, Heather; Tulchin-Francis, Kirsten; Shierk, Angela; Shagman, Laura; MacFarlane, Duncan; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2015-03-01

    Sensorimotor cortex plasticity induced by constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in six children (10.2 ± 2.1 years old) with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) was assessed by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The activation laterality index and time-to-peak/duration during a finger tapping task were quantified before, immediately after, and six months after CIMT. Five age-matched healthy children (9.8 ± 1.3 years old) were also imaged at the same time points to provide comparative activation metrics for normal controls. In children with CP the activation time-to-peak/duration for all sensorimotor centers displayed significant normalization immediately after CIMT that persisted six months later. In contrast to this longer term improvement in localized activation response, the laterality index that depended on communication between sensorimotor centers improved immediately after CIMT, but relapsed six months later.

  18. Electroacupuncture restores learning and memory impairment induced by both diabetes mellitus and cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xiang-Hong; Chen, Shu-Li; Shi, Hong; Cai, Hong; Jin, Zhi-Gao

    2008-10-10

    Previous investigations have demonstrated that electroacupunctural stimulation can ameliorate primary and secondary symptoms such as peripheral neuropathy and diabetic encephalopathy in diabetic rats. In this study, we investigated whether electroacupuncture could improve learning and memory which was typically impaired in diabetic rats with cerebral ischemia. Furthermore, we investigated the mechanisms underlying its effects using passive avoidance test, active avoidance test, Morris water maze and electrophysiology. Electroacupuncture increased the step-down latency in passive avoidance test and accurate rate in active avoidance test, decreased the escape latency in Morris water maze. After electroacupuncture treatment, the long-term potentiation (LTP) impaired by both diabetes and cerebral ischemia was restored significantly. These results suggest that electroacupuncture can ameliorate learning and memory capacity impaired by hyperglycemia and ischemia. LTP plays a very important role in this beneficial effect. PMID:18692547

  19. Rapid pressure-to-flow dynamics of cerebral autoregulation induced by instantaneous changes of arterial CO2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Simpson, David M; Kouchakpour, Hesam; Panerai, Ronney B; Chen, Jie; Gao, Shan; Zhang, Pandeng; Wu, Xinyu

    2014-12-01

    Continuous assessment of CA is desirable in a number of clinical conditions, where cerebral hemodynamics may change within relatively short periods. In this work, we propose a novel method that can improve temporal resolution when assessing the pressure-to-flow dynamics in the presence of rapid changes in arterial CO2. A time-varying multivariate model is proposed to adaptively suppress the instantaneous effect of CO2 on CBFV by the recursive least square (RLS) method. Autoregulation is then quantified from the phase difference (PD) between arterial blood pressure (ABP) and CBFV by calculating the instantaneous PD between the signals using the Hilbert transform (HT). A Gaussian filter is used prior to HT in order to optimize the temporal and frequency resolution and show the rapid dynamics of cerebral autoregulation. In 13 healthy adult volunteers, rapid changes of arterial CO2 were induced by rebreathing expired air, while simultaneously and continuously recording ABP, CBFV and end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2). Both simulation and physiological studies show that the proposed method can reduce the transient distortion of the instantaneous phase dynamics caused by the effect of CO2 and is faster than our previous method in tracking time-varying autoregulation. The normalized mean square error (NMSE) of the predicted CBFV can be reduced significantly by 38.7% and 37.7% (p<0.001) without and with the Gaussian filter applied, respectively, when compared with the previous univariate model. These findings suggest that the proposed method is suitable to track rapid dynamics of cerebral autoregulation despite the influence of confounding covariates. PMID:25287624

  20. Pilot Study of the Efficacy of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Infants and Toddlers with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Lowes, Linda Pax; Mayhan, Marianne; Orr, Teresa; Batterson, Nancy; Tonneman, Jill Alyce; Meyer, Angela; Alfano, Lindsay; Wang, Wei; Whalen, Cara N; Nelin, Mary Ann; Lo, Warren David; Case-Smith, Jane

    2014-01-01

    The evidence for Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT) effectiveness for infants and toddlers with unilateral cerebral palsy is minimal. We performed a pilot study of CIMT using one-month usual care, one-month intervention, and one-month maintenance (return to usual care) phases on five infants (7- to 18-month old). For the CIMT phase, the infants received 2 hr of occupational therapy and 1 hr of parent-implemented home program for five days/week. The infants were casted for the rst 23 days, and bimanual therapy was provided for the last three days. Fine motor skills for the more affected arm and gross motor skills improved significantly during the CIMT; these gains were maintained at one-month follow-up. Individual infant data show mixed effects. This pilot study provides initial evidence that CIMT is feasible for infants with unilateral cerebral palsy, and presents preliminary data for CIMT on fine and gross motor performance. PMID:23848499

  1. Cadmium-Induced Apoptosis in Primary Rat Cerebral Cortical Neurons Culture Is Mediated by a Calcium Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui; Sun, Ya; Hu, Fei-fei; Bian, Jian-chun; Liu, Xue-zhong; Gu, Jian-hong; Liu, Zong-ping

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an extremely toxic metal, capable of severely damaging several organs, including the brain. Studies have shown that Cd disrupts intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i) homeostasis, leading to apoptosis in a variety of cells including primary murine neurons. Calcium is a ubiquitous intracellular ion which acts as a signaling mediator in numerous cellular processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival/death. However, little is known about the role of calcium signaling in Cd-induced apoptosis in neuronal cells. Thus we investigated the role of calcium signaling in Cd-induced apoptosis in primary rat cerebral cortical neurons. Consistent with known toxic properties of Cd, exposure of cerebral cortical neurons to Cd caused morphological changes indicative of apoptosis and cell death. It also induced elevation of [Ca2+]i and inhibition of Na+/K+-ATPase and Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase activities. This Cd-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i was suppressed by an IP3R inhibitor, 2-APB, suggesting that ER-regulated Ca2+ is involved. In addition, we observed elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, dysfunction of cytochrome oxidase subunits (COX-I/II/III), depletion of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), and cleavage of caspase-9, caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) during Cd exposure. Z-VAD-fmk, a pan caspase inhibitor, partially prevented Cd-induced apoptosis and cell death. Interestingly, apoptosis, cell death and these cellular events induced by Cd were blocked by BAPTA-AM, a specific intracellular Ca2+ chelator. Furthermore, western blot analysis revealed an up-regulated expression of Bcl-2 and down-regulated expression of Bax. However, these were not blocked by BAPTA-AM. Thus Cd toxicity is in part due to its disruption of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, by compromising ATPases activities and ER-regulated Ca2+, and this elevation in Ca2+ triggers the activation of the Ca2+-mitochondria apoptotic signaling pathway. This

  2. Suppression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha and its downstream genes reduces acute hyperglycemia-enhanced hemorrhagic transformation in a rat model of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunhua; Ostrowski, Robert P; Zhou, Changman; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2010-07-01

    We evaluated a role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) and its downstream genes in acute hyperglycemia-induced hemorrhagic transformation in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 280-300 g (n = 105) were divided into sham, 90 min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), MCAO plus HIF-1alpha inhibitors, 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2) or 3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl)-1-benzylindazole (YC-1), groups. Rats received an injection of 50% dextrose (6 ml/kg intraperitoneally) at 15 min before MCAO. HIF-1alpha inhibitors were administered at the onset of reperfusion. The animals were examined for neurological deficits and sacrificed at 6, 12, 24, and 72 hr following MCAO. The cerebral tissues were collected for histology, zymography, and Western blot analysis. The expression of HIF-1alpha was increased in ischemic brain tissues after MCAO and reduced by HIF-1alpha inhibitors. In addition, 2ME2 reduced the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the elevation of active matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (MMP-2/MMP-9) in the ipsilateral hemisphere. Both 2ME2 and YC-1 reduced infarct volume and ameliorated neurological deficits. However, only 2ME2 attenuated hemorrhagic transformation in the ischemic territory. In conclusion, the inhibition of HIF-1alpha and its downstream genes attenuates hemorrhagic conversion of cerebral infarction and ameliorates neurological deficits after focal cerebral ischemia. PMID:20155812

  3. Diosgenin attenuates the brain injury induced by transient focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxin; Xue, Xuanji; Zhao, Jing; Qian, Chunxiang; Guo, Zengjun; Ito, Yoichiro; Sun, Wenji

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to explore the potential cerebroprotection of diosgenin against the transient focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and its possible underlying mechanisms. The diosgenin at two dose levels, namely 100 and 200mgkg(-1), was intragastrically administrated once daily for 7-day period prior to the surgery. Then, the rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) using the intraluminal thread for 90min. After 24h reperfusion, several diagnostic indicators were evaluated and all animals were sacrificed to harvest their brains and blood for subsequent biochemical analyses. The results indicated that diosgenin treatment significantly inhibited the death rate and improved the impaired neurological functions along with neurological deficit scores and cerebral infarct size as compared with the rats exposed to I/R insult without agents administration. The increase in the number of apoptotic cells determined by TUNEL in the hippocampus CA1 and cortex was also apparently attenuated in the diosgenin treatment group, which was closely correlated with suppression of Caspase-3 activity and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. In addition the elevated concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) in blood serum of the I/R treated rats were reduced almost to their normal level. Further results obtained from the Western blotting analysis revealed that the protein expression of IκBα in the injured brain was up-regulated, while the p65 subunit of NF-κB was down-regulated in nucleus after the treatment. Collectively, this neuroprotection of diosgenin against I/R injury may be attained through its anti-apoptosis, anti-inflammation and intervening the NF-κB signal pathway properties. Due to the satisfactory findings, diosgenin might be a powerful therapeutic agent to combat the similar disease in future clinic. PMID:27425638

  4. Logistic Regression Analyses for Predicting Clinically Important Differences in Motor Capacity, Motor Performance, and Functional Independence after Constraint-Induced Therapy in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Tien-ni; Wu, Ching-yi; Chen, Chia-ling; Shieh, Jeng-yi; Lu, Lu; Lin, Keh-chung

    2013-01-01

    Given the growing evidence for the effects of constraint-induced therapy (CIT) in children with cerebral palsy (CP), there is a need for investigating the characteristics of potential participants who may benefit most from this intervention. This study aimed to establish predictive models for the effects of pediatric CIT on motor and functional…

  5. Motor Learning Curve and Long-Term Effectiveness of Modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy in Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geerdink, Yvonne; Aarts, Pauline; Geurts, Alexander C.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the progression of manual dexterity during 6 weeks (54 h) (modified) constraint-induced movement therapy ((m)CIMT) followed by 2 weeks (18 h) bimanual training (BiT) in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (CP), to establish whether and when a maximal training effect was reached and which factors…

  6. Effects of calcium antagonists on isolated bovine cerebral arteries: inhibition of constriction and calcium-45 uptake induced by potassium or serotonin

    SciTech Connect

    Wendling, W.W.; Harakal, C.

    1987-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanisms by which organic calcium channel blockers inhibit cerebral vasoconstriction. Isolated bovine middle cerebral arteries were cut into rings to measure contractility or into strips to measure radioactive calcium (/sup 45/Ca) influx and efflux. Calcium channel blockers (10(-5) M verapamil or 3.3 X 10(-7) M nifedipine) and calcium-deficient solutions all produced near-maximal inhibition of both potassium- and serotonin-induced constriction. In calcium-deficient solutions containing potassium or serotonin, verapamil and nifedipine each blocked subsequent calcium-induced constriction in a competitive manner. Potassium and serotonin significantly increased /sup 45/Ca uptake into cerebral artery strips during 5 minutes of /sup 45/Ca loading; for potassium /sup 45/Ca uptake increased from 62 to 188 nmol/g, and for serotonin from 65 to 102 nmol/g. Verapamil or nifedipine had no effect on basal /sup 45/Ca uptake but significantly blocked the increase in /sup 45/Ca uptake induced by potassium or serotonin. Potassium, and to a lesser extent serotonin, each induced a brief increase in the rate of /sup 45/Ca efflux into calcium-deficient solutions. Verapamil or nifedipine had no effect on basal or potassium-stimulated /sup 45/Ca efflux. The results demonstrate that verapamil and nifedipine block /sup 45/Ca uptake through both potential-operated (potassium) and receptor-operated (serotonin) channels in bovine middle cerebral arteries.

  7. Effects of Home-Based Constraint-Induced Therapy versus Dose-Matched Control Intervention on Functional Outcomes and Caregiver Well-Being in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Keh-chung; Wang, Tien-ni; Wu, Ching-yi; Chen, Chia-ling; Chang, Kai-chieh; Lin, Yu-chan; Chen, Yi-ju

    2011-01-01

    This study compared home-based constraint-induced therapy (CIT) with a dose-matched home-based control intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP). The differences in unilateral and bilateral motor performance, daily functions, and quality of parental well-being (i.e., the stress level of their parents) were evaluated. The study included 21…

  8. Behavioral Stress-induced Activation of FoxO3a in the Cerebral Cortex of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenjun; Chen, Ligong; Yang, Sufen; Li, Fuzeng; Li, Xiaohua

    2011-01-01

    Background The transcription factor FoxO3a is highly expressed in brain, but little is known about the response of FoxO3a to behavioral stress and its impact in the associated behavioral changes. Methods We tested the response of brain FoxO3a in the learned helplessness (LH) paradigm and tested signaling pathways that mediate the response of FoxO3a. Results A single session of inescapable shocks (IES) in mice reduced FoxO3a phosphorylation at the Akt-regulating serine/threonine residues and induced prolonged nuclear accumulation of FoxO3a in the cerebral cortex, both indicate activation of FoxO3a in brain. The response of FoxO3a is accompanied by a transient inactivation of Akt and a prolonged activation of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK3β). Noticeably, FoxO3a formed a protein complex with GSK3β in the cerebral cortex, and the interaction between the two proteins was stronger in IES-treated mice. Inhibition of GSK3 was able to abolish IES-induced LH behavior, disrupt IES-induced GSK3β-FoxO3a interaction, and reduce nuclear FoxO3a accumulation. In vitro approaches further revealed that the interaction between GSK3β and FoxO3a was strongest when both were active, FoxO3a was phosphorylated by recombinant GSK3β, and GSK3 inhibitors effectively reduced FoxO3a transcriptional activity. Importantly, IES-induced LH behavior was markedly diminished in FoxO3a-deficient mice that have minimal FoxO3a expression and reduced levels of FoxO3a-inducible genes. Conclusions FoxO3a is activated in response to IES by interacting with GSK3β, and inhibition of GSK3β or reducing FoxO3a expression promotes resistance to stress-induced behavioral disturbance by disrupting this signaling mechanism. PMID:21978520

  9. TLR9 bone marrow chimeric mice define a role for cerebral TNF in neuroprotection induced by CpG preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Packard, Amy E B; Leung, Philberta Y; Vartanian, Keri B; Stevens, Susan L; Bahjat, Frances R; Stenzel-Poore, Mary P

    2012-12-01

    Systemic preconditioning with the TLR9 ligand CpG induces neuroprotection against brain ischemic injury through a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-dependent mechanism. It is unclear how systemic administration of CpG engages the brain to induce the protective phenotype. To address this, we created TLR9-deficient reciprocal bone marrow chimeric mice lacking TLR9 on either hematopoietic cells or radiation-resistant cells of nonhematopoietic origin. We report that wild-type mice reconstituted with TLR9-deficient hematopoietic cells failed to show neuroprotection after systemic CpG preconditioning. Further, while hematopoietic expression of TLR9 is required for CpG-induced neuroprotection it is not sufficient to restore protection to TLR9-deficient mice that are reconstituted with hematopoietic cells bearing TLR9. To determine whether the absence of protection was associated with TNF, we examined TNF levels in the systemic circulation and the brain. We found that although TNF is required for CpG preconditioning, systemic TNF levels did not correlate with the protective phenotype. However, induction of cerebral TNF mRNA required expression of TLR9 on both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells and correlated with neuroprotection. In accordance with these results, we show the therapeutic potential of intranasal CpG preconditioning, which induces brain TNF mRNA and robust neuroprotection with no concomitant increase in systemic levels of TNF. PMID:23010947

  10. Curcumin modulates dopaminergic receptor, CREB and phospholipase c gene expression in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Curcumin, an active principle component in rhizome of Curcuma longa, has proved its merit for diabetes through its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. This study aims at evaluating the effect of curcumin in modulating the altered dopaminergic receptors, CREB and phospholipase C in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of STZ induced diabetic rats. Radioreceptor binding assays and gene expression was done in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of male Wistar rats using specific ligands and probes. Total dopaminergic receptor binding parameter, Bmax showed an increase in cerebral cortex and decrease in the cerebellum of diabetic rats. Gene expression studies using real time PCR showed an increased expression of dopamine D1 and D2 receptor in the cerebral cortex of diabetic rats. In cerebellum dopamine D1 receptor was down regulated and D2 receptor showed an up regulation. Transcription factor CREB and phospholipase C showed a significant down regulation in cerebral cortex and cerebellum of diabetic rats. We report that curcumin supplementation reduces diabetes induced alteration of dopamine D1, D2 receptors, transcription factor CREB and phospholipase C to near control. Our results indicate that curcumin has a potential to regulate diabetes induced malfunctions of dopaminergic signalling, CREB and Phospholipase C expression in cerebral cortex and cerebellum and thereby improving the cognitive and emotional functions associated with these regions. Furthermore, in line with these studies an interaction between curcumin and dopaminergic receptors, CREB and phospholipase C is suggested, which attenuates the cortical and cerebellar dysfunction in diabetes. These results suggest that curcumin holds promise as an agent to prevent or treat CNS complications in diabetes. PMID:20513244

  11. Cerebral blood flow during paroxysmal EEG activation induced by sleep in patients with complex partial seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Gozukirmizi, E.; Meyer, J.S.; Okabe, T.; Amano, T.; Mortel, K.; Karacan, I.

    1982-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements were combined with sleep polysomnography in nine patients with complex partial seizures. Two methods were used: the 133Xe method for measuring regional (rCBF) and the stable xenon CT method for local (LCBF). Compared to nonepileptic subjects, who show diffuse CBF decreases during stages I-II, non-REM sleep onset, patients with complex partial seizures show statistically significant increases in CBF which are maximal in regions where the EEG focus is localized and are predominantly seen in one temporal region but are also propagated to other cerebral areas. Both CBF methods gave comparable results, but greater statistical significance was achieved by stable xenon CT methodology. CBF increases are more diffuse than predicted by EEG paroxysmal activity recorded from scalp electrodes. An advantage of the 133Xe inhalation method was achievement of reliable data despite movement of the head. This was attributed to the use of a helmet which maintained the probes approximated to the scalp. Disadvantages were poor resolution (7 cm3) and two-dimensional information. The advantage of stable xenon CT method is excellent resolution (80 mm3) in three dimensions, but a disadvantage is that movement of the head in patients with seizure disorders may limit satisfactory measurements.

  12. Cerebral blood flow during paroxysmal EEG activation induced by sleep in patients with complex partial seizures.

    PubMed

    Gozukirmizi, E; Meyer, J S; Okabe, T; Amano, T; Mortel, K; Karacan, I

    1982-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements were combined with sleep polysomnography in nine patients with complex partial seizures. Two methods were used: the 133Xe method for measuring regional (rCBF) and the stable xenon CT method for local (LCBF). Compared to nonepileptic subjects, who show diffuse CBF decreases during stages I-II, non-REM sleep onset, patients with complex partial seizures show statistically significant increases in CBF which are maximal in regions where the EEG focus is localized and are predominantly seen in one temporal region but are also propagated to other cerebral areas. Both CBF methods gave comparable results, but greater statistical significance was achieved by stable xenon CT methodology. CBF increases are more diffuse than predicted by EEG paroxysmal activity recorded from scalp electrodes. An advantage of the 133Xe inhalation method was achievement of reliable data despite movement of the head. This was attributed to the use of a helmet which maintained the probes approximated to the scalp. Disadvantages were poor resolution (7 cm3) and two-dimensional information. The advantage of stable xenon CT method is excellent resolution (80 mm3) in three dimensions, but a disadvantage is that movement of the head in patients with seizure disorders may limit satisfactory measurements. PMID:7163722

  13. Current Options for the Management of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage-Induced Cerebral Vasospasm: A Comprehensive Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Dabus, Guilherme; Nogueira, Raul G.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Cerebral vasospasm is one of the leading causes of morbi-mortality following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. The aim of this article is to discuss the current status of vasospasm therapy with emphasis on endovascular treatment. Methods A comprehensive review of the literature obtained by a PubMed search. The most relevant articles related to medical, endovascular and alternative therapies were selected for discussion. Results Current accepted medical options include the oral nimodipine and ‘triple-H’ therapy (hypertension, hypervolemia and hemodilution). Nimodipine remains the only modality proven to reduce the incidence of infarction. Although widely used, ‘triple-H’ therapy has not been demonstrated to significantly change overall outcome after cerebral vasospasm. Indeed, both induced hypervolemia and hemodilution may have deleterious effects, and more recent physiologic data favor normovolemia with induced hypertension or optimization of cardiac output. Endovascular options include percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty (PTA) and intra-arterial (IA) infusion of vasodilators. Multiple case reports and case series have been encountered in the literature using different drug regimens with diverse mechanisms of action. Compared with PTA, IA drug infusion has the advantages of distal penetration and a better safety profile. Its main disadvantages are the more frequent need for repeat treatments and its systemic hemodynamic repercussions. Alternative options using intraventricular/cisternal drug therapy and flow augmentation strategies have also shown possible benefits; however, their use is not yet as well established. Conclusion Blood pressure or cardiac output optimization should be the mainstay of hyperdynamic therapy. Endovascular treatment appears to have a positive impact on neurological outcome compared with the natural history of the disease. The role of intraventricular therapy and flow augmentation strategies in association

  14. Dexmedetomidine Protects against Transient Global Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion Induced Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Xichun; Wang, Qi; Li, Wenzhi

    2016-01-01

    Background Transient global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) is a major perioperative complication, and diabetes increases the response of oxidative stress and inflammation induced by I/R. The objective of this study was to determine the protective effect of dexmedetomidine against transient global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion induced oxidative stress and inflammation in diabetic rats. Methods Sixty-four rats were assigned into four experimental groups: normoglycemia, normoglycemia + dexmedetomidine, hyperglycemia, and hyperglycemia + dexmedetomidine and all subsequent neurological examinations were evaluated by a blinded observer. Damage to the brain was histologically assessed using the TUNEL staining method while western blotting was used to investigate changes in the expression levels of apoptosis-related proteins as well as the microglia marker, ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1). Water content in the brain was also analyzed. In addition, hippocampal concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA) and Nox2 (a member of the Nox family of NADPH oxidases), and the activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase were analyzed. Finally, changes in serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-6 were detected. Results Results showed that diabetes increased brain water content, the number of apoptotic neurons, early neurological deficit scores, oxidative stress (MDA and Nox2) and inflammation (pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α and IL-6) levels following transient global I/R injury, but that these symptoms were attenuated following administration of dexmedetomidine. Conclusions These findings suggest that dexmedetomidine can significantly alleviate damage resulting from I/R, and this mechanism may be related to a reduction in both oxidative stress and inflammation which is normally associated with I/R. PMID:26982373

  15. LPS Induces Occludin Dysregulation in Cerebral Microvascular Endothelial Cells via MAPK Signaling and Augmenting MMP-2 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lan-hui; Huang, Wen; Mo, Xue-an; Chen, Yan-lan; Wu, Xiang-hong

    2015-01-01

    Disrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity contributes to cerebral edema during central nervous system infection. The current study explored the mechanism of lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced dysregulation of tight junction (TJ) proteins. Human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) were exposed to LPS, SB203580 (p38MAPK inhibitor), or SP600125 (JNK inhibitor), and cell vitality was determined by MTT assay. The proteins expressions of p38MAPK, JNK, and TJs (occludin and zonula occludens- (ZO-) 1) were determined by western blot. The mRNA levels of TJ components and MMP-2 were measured with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and MMP-2 protein levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). LPS, SB203580, and SP600125 under respective concentrations of 10, 7.69, or 0.22 µg/mL had no effects on cell vitality. Treatment with LPS decreased mRNA and protein levels of occludin and ZO-1 and enhanced p38MAPK and JNK phosphorylation and MMP-2 expression. These effects were attenuated by pretreatment with SB203580 or SP600125, but not in ZO-1 expression. Both doxycycline hyclate (a total MMP inhibitor) and SB-3CT (a specific MMP-2 inhibitor) partially attenuated the LPS-induced downregulation of occludin. These data suggest that MMP-2 overexpression and p38MAPK/JNK pathways are involved in the LPS-mediated alterations of occludin in hCMEC/D3; however, ZO-1 levels are not influenced by p38MAPK/JNK. PMID:26290681

  16. Honokiol suppresses TNF-α-induced neutrophil adhesion on cerebral endothelial cells by disrupting polyubiquitination and degradation of IκBα.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Jen; Wang, Yu-Ling; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chen, Chun-Yu; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Shen, Jiann-Jong; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion molecules expressed on cerebral endothelial cells (ECs) mediate leukocyte recruitment and play a significant role in cerebral inflammation. Increased levels of adhesion molecules on the EC surface induce leukocyte infiltration into inflammatory areas and are thus hallmarkers of inflammation. Honokiol, isolated from the Chinese medicinal herb Magnolia officinalis, has various pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory effects, yet the nature of honokiol targeting molecules remains to be revealed. Here, we investigated the inhibitory effect of honokiol on neutrophil adhesion and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression, which underlie its molecular target, and mechanisms for inactivating nuclear factor κ enhancer binding protein (NF-κB) in mouse cerebral ECs. Honokiol inhibited tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced neutrophil adhesion and VCAM-1 gene expression in cerebral ECs. The inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB was downregulated by honokiol. Honokiol significantly blocked TNF-α-induced NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation and degradation of the proteasome-dependent inhibitor of NF-κB α (IκBα). From docking model prediction, honokiol directly targeted the ubiquitin-ubiquitin interface of Lys48-linked polychains. Moreover, honokiol prevented the TNF-α-induced Lys48-linked polyubiquitination, including IκBα-polyubiquitin interaction. Honokiol has protective anti-inflammatory effects on TNF-α-induced neutrophil adhesion and VCAM-1 gene expression in cerebral ECs, at least in part by directly inhibiting ubiquitination-mediated IκBα degradation and then preventing NF-κB nuclear translocation. PMID:27212040

  17. Autophagy protects human brain microvascular endothelial cells against methylglyoxal-induced injuries, reproducible in a cerebral ischemic model in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lili; Li, Xue; Zhong, Yinbo; Yu, Jing; Yu, Lina; Dai, Haibin; Yan, Min

    2015-10-01

    Cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) are crucial for brain vascular repair and maintenance, but their physiological function may be impaired during ischemic stroke and diabetes. Methylglyoxal (MGO), a reactive dicarbonyl produced during glucose metabolism, could exacerbate ischemia-induced EC injury and dysfunction. We investigated the protective effect of autophagy on cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) that underwent MGO treatment. A further study was conducted to explore the underlying mechanisms of the protective effect. Autophagic activity was assessed by evaluating protein levels, using western blot. 3-methyladenine (3-MA), bafilomycin A1, ammonium chloride (AC), Beclin 1 siRNA, and chloroquine (CQ) were used to cause autophagy inhibition. Alarmar blue assay and lactate dehydrogenase release assay were used to evaluate cell viability. Streptozotocin was administered to induce type I diabetes in rats and post-permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion was performed to elicit cerebral ischemia. Blood-brain barrier permeability was also assessed. Our study found that MGO reduced HBMEC cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, and triggered the responsive autophagy activation. Autophagy inhibitors bafilomycin A1, AC, 3-MA, and BECN1 siRNA exacerbated MGO-induced HBMEC injury. FAK phosphorylation inhibitor PF573228 inhibited MGO-triggered autophagy and enhanced lactate dehydrogenase release. Meanwhile, similar autophagy activation in brain vascular ECs was observed during permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced cerebral ischemia in diabetic rats, while chloroquine-induced autophagy inhibition enhanced blood-brain barrier permeability. Taken together, our study indicates that autophagy triggered by MGO defends HBMEC against injuries. PMID:26251121

  18. Honokiol suppresses TNF-α-induced neutrophil adhesion on cerebral endothelial cells by disrupting polyubiquitination and degradation of IκBα

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-Jen; Wang, Yu-Ling; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chen, Chun-Yu; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Shen, Jiann-Jong; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion molecules expressed on cerebral endothelial cells (ECs) mediate leukocyte recruitment and play a significant role in cerebral inflammation. Increased levels of adhesion molecules on the EC surface induce leukocyte infiltration into inflammatory areas and are thus hallmarkers of inflammation. Honokiol, isolated from the Chinese medicinal herb Magnolia officinalis, has various pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory effects, yet the nature of honokiol targeting molecules remains to be revealed. Here, we investigated the inhibitory effect of honokiol on neutrophil adhesion and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression, which underlie its molecular target, and mechanisms for inactivating nuclear factor κ enhancer binding protein (NF-κB) in mouse cerebral ECs. Honokiol inhibited tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced neutrophil adhesion and VCAM-1 gene expression in cerebral ECs. The inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB was downregulated by honokiol. Honokiol significantly blocked TNF-α–induced NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation and degradation of the proteasome-dependent inhibitor of NF-κB α (IκBα). From docking model prediction, honokiol directly targeted the ubiquitin–ubiquitin interface of Lys48-linked polychains. Moreover, honokiol prevented the TNF-α-induced Lys48-linked polyubiquitination, including IκBα-polyubiquitin interaction. Honokiol has protective anti-inflammatory effects on TNF-α-induced neutrophil adhesion and VCAM-1 gene expression in cerebral ECs, at least in part by directly inhibiting ubiquitination-mediated IκBα degradation and then preventing NF-κB nuclear translocation. PMID:27212040

  19. Enhancement of Intratumoral Chemotherapy with Cisplatin with or without Microwave Ablation and Lipiodol. Future Concept for Local Treatment in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Stopek, Joshua; Kosmidis, Efstratios; Vogl, Thomas; Linsmeier, Bernd; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Lampaki, Sofia; Lazaridis, George; Mpakas, Andreas; Browning, Robert; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Drevelegas, Antonis; Baka, Sofia; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Turner, J Francis; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Brachmann, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Novel therapies for lung cancer are being explored nowadays with local therapies being the tip of the arrow. Intratumoral chemotherapy administration and local microwave ablation have been investigated in several studies. It has been previously proposed that lipiodol has the ability to modify the microenvironment matrix. In our current study we investigated this theory in BALBC mice. In total 160 BALBC mice were divided in eight groups: a) control, b) cisplatin, c) microwave, d) microwave and lipiodol, e) cisplatin and lipiodol, f) microwave and cisplatin, g) lipiodol and h) lipiodol, cisplatin and microwave. Lewis lung carcinoma cell lines (106) were injected into the right back leg of each mouse. After the 8th day, when the tumor volume was about 100mm3 the therapy application was initiated, once per week for four weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed for each tumor when a mouse died or when sacrificed if they were still alive by the end of the experiment (8-Canal multifunctional spool; NORAS MRI products, Gmbh, Germany). Imaging and survival revealed efficient tumor apoptosis for the groups b,c,d,e and f. However; severe toxicity was observed in group h and no follow up was available for this group after the second week of therapy administration. Lipiodol in its current form does assist in a more efficient way the distribution of cisplatin, as the microwave apoptotic effect. Future modification of lipiodol might provide a more efficient method of therapy enhancement. Combination of drug and microwave ablation is possible and has an efficient apoptotic effect. PMID:25663938

  20. Enhancement of Intratumoral Chemotherapy with Cisplatin with or without Microwave Ablation and Lipiodol. Future Concept for Local Treatment in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Stopek, Joshua; Kosmidis, Efstratios; Vogl, Thomas; Linsmeier, Bernd; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Lampaki, Sofia; Lazaridis, George; Mpakas, Andreas; Browning, Robert; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Drevelegas, Antonis; Baka, Sofia; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Turner, J Francis; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Brachmann, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Novel therapies for lung cancer are being explored nowadays with local therapies being the tip of the arrow. Intratumoral chemotherapy administration and local microwave ablation have been investigated in several studies. It has been previously proposed that lipiodol has the ability to modify the microenvironment matrix. In our current study we investigated this theory in BALBC mice. In total 160 BALBC mice were divided in eight groups: a) control, b) cisplatin, c) microwave, d) microwave and lipiodol, e) cisplatin and lipiodol, f) microwave and cisplatin, g) lipiodol and h) lipiodol, cisplatin and microwave. Lewis lung carcinoma cell lines (10(6)) were injected into the right back leg of each mouse. After the 8th day, when the tumor volume was about 100mm(3) the therapy application was initiated, once per week for four weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed for each tumor when a mouse died or when sacrificed if they were still alive by the end of the experiment (8-Canal multifunctional spool; NORAS MRI products, Gmbh, Germany). Imaging and survival revealed efficient tumor apoptosis for the groups b,c,d,e and f. However; severe toxicity was observed in group h and no follow up was available for this group after the second week of therapy administration. Lipiodol in its current form does assist in a more efficient way the distribution of cisplatin, as the microwave apoptotic effect. Future modification of lipiodol might provide a more efficient method of therapy enhancement. Combination of drug and microwave ablation is possible and has an efficient apoptotic effect. PMID:25663938

  1. Long-Term Outcome of Transcatheter Subsegmental and Segmental Arterial Chemoemobolization Using Lipiodol for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Takaki, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Hiroshi; Anai, Hiroshi Tanaka, Toshihiro; Yamamoto, Kiyosei; Morimoto, Kengo; Nishiofuku, Hideyuki; Inoue, Masayoshi; Sueyoshi, Satoru; Nagata, Takeshi; Hidaka, Teruyuki; Uchida, Hideo; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: To clarify the efficacy of transcatheter hepatic sub-subsegmental, subsegmental, and segmental arterial chemoembolization using lipiodol (subseg/seg lip-TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), long-term outcomes of patients who had been treated using subseg/seg lip-TACE alone were retrospectively examined. Materials and Methods: Subjects comprised 199 patients with HCC (T1/2/{>=}3 = 30/108/61; Child-Pugh A/B/C = 115/52/32; Japan Integrated Staging [JIS] score {<=}1/2/{>=}3 = 88/64/47) who underwent subseg/seg lip-TACE using lipiodol mixed with an anticancer drug followed by injection of gelatin sponge particles. Each patient was followed-up every 3 months, and repeat subseg/seg lip-TACE and/or conventional lip-TACE was performed in cases showing recurrence. One-, 3-, 5-, 7-, and 10-year cumulative survival rates were calculated. Subgroup analyses were performed by stratifying the population according to T-factor, Child-Pugh classification, and JIS score. Results: Median duration of follow-up was 3.8 years (range 0.2 to 16.4). Median overall survival was 3.8 years. One-, 3-, 5-, 7- and 10-year survival rates were 91.5, 66.1, 38.8, 20.3, and 9.4% for all patients, and 95.5, 76.9, 51.9, 27.9 and 20.4% for patients with JIS {<=}1, respectively. Significant survival differences were found across two subgroups of staging systems (T2 vs. T3{<=} [P = 0.0012] and JIS score {<=}1 vs. 2 [P = 0.0036]). Conclusion: This study demonstrated that subseg/seg lip-TACE is a feasible treatment for obtaining prolonged survival in patients with localized HCC showing rich vasculature. Outcomes are influenced by both tumor stage and liver function, as seen in the best prolonged survival in patients with JIS score {<=}1.

  2. Effect of ST36 Acupuncture on Hyperventilation-Induced CO 2 Reactivity of the Basilar and Middle Cerebral Arteries and Heart Rate Variability in Normal Subjects.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Sang-Ho; Im, Jin-Wook; Jung, Woo-Sang; Cho, Ki-Ho; Kim, Young-Suk; Ko, Chang-Nam; Park, Jung-Mi; Park, Seong-Uk; Cho, Seung-Yeon; Moon, Sang-Kwan

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to verify the effect of acupuncture on cerebral haemodynamics to provide evidence for the use of acupuncture treatment as a complementary therapy for the high-risk stroke population. The effect of ST36 acupuncture treatment on the hyperventilation-induced CO2 reactivity of the basilar and middle cerebral arteries was studied in 10 healthy male volunteers (mean age, 25.2 ± 1.5 years) using a transcranial Doppler sonography with an interval of 1 week between measurements, and a portable ECG monitoring system was used to obtain ECG data simultaneously. The CO2 reactivity of the basilar and middle cerebral arteries increased significantly after ST36 acupuncture treatment, whereas the mean arterial blood pressure and pulse rate did not change significantly. The high-frequency power significantly increased after ST36 acupuncture treatment, and the percentage increase of high-frequency power correlated significantly with the percentage increase in the CO2 reactivity of the contralateral middle cerebral artery. These data suggest that ST36 acupuncture treatment increases CO2 reactivity, indicating improvement of vasodilatory potential of the cerebral vasculature to compensate for fluctuations caused by changes in external conditions. The increase in parasympathetic tone by ST36 acupuncture treatment is responsible for this therapeutic effect. PMID:25132861

  3. Effect of ST36 Acupuncture on Hyperventilation-Induced CO2 Reactivity of the Basilar and Middle Cerebral Arteries and Heart Rate Variability in Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Woo-Sang; Cho, Ki-Ho; Kim, Young-Suk; Ko, Chang-Nam; Park, Jung-Mi; Moon, Sang-Kwan

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to verify the effect of acupuncture on cerebral haemodynamics to provide evidence for the use of acupuncture treatment as a complementary therapy for the high-risk stroke population. The effect of ST36 acupuncture treatment on the hyperventilation-induced CO2 reactivity of the basilar and middle cerebral arteries was studied in 10 healthy male volunteers (mean age, 25.2 ± 1.5 years) using a transcranial Doppler sonography with an interval of 1 week between measurements, and a portable ECG monitoring system was used to obtain ECG data simultaneously. The CO2 reactivity of the basilar and middle cerebral arteries increased significantly after ST36 acupuncture treatment, whereas the mean arterial blood pressure and pulse rate did not change significantly. The high-frequency power significantly increased after ST36 acupuncture treatment, and the percentage increase of high-frequency power correlated significantly with the percentage increase in the CO2 reactivity of the contralateral middle cerebral artery. These data suggest that ST36 acupuncture treatment increases CO2 reactivity, indicating improvement of vasodilatory potential of the cerebral vasculature to compensate for fluctuations caused by changes in external conditions. The increase in parasympathetic tone by ST36 acupuncture treatment is responsible for this therapeutic effect. PMID:25132861

  4. Neurologic disease induced in transgenic mice by cerebral overexpression of interleukin 6.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, I L; Abraham, C R; Masliah, E; Kemper, P; Inglis, J D; Oldstone, M B; Mucke, L

    1993-01-01

    Cytokines are thought to be important mediators in physiologic and pathophysiologic processes affecting the central nervous system (CNS). To explore this hypothesis, transgenic mice were generated in which the cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6), under the regulatory control of the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene promoter, was overexpressed in the CNS. A number of transgenic founder mice and their offspring exhibited a neurologic syndrome the severity of which correlated with the levels of cerebral IL-6 expression. Transgenic mice with high levels of IL-6 expression developed severe neurologic disease characterized by runting, tremor, ataxia, and seizure. Neuropathologic manifestations included neuro-degeneration, astrocytosis, angiogenesis, and induction of acute-phase-protein production. These findings indicate that cytokines such as IL-6 can have a direct pathogenic role in inflammatory, infectious, and neurodegenerative CNS diseases. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7694279

  5. Cortical reorganization induced by virtual reality therapy in a child with hemiparetic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    You, Sung H; Jang, Sung Ho; Kim, Yun-Hee; Kwon, Yong-Hyun; Barrow, Irene; Hallett, Mark

    2005-09-01

    Virtual reality (VR) therapy is a new, neurorehabilitation intervention aimed at enhancing motor performance in children with hemiparetic cerebral palsy (CP). This case report investigated the effects of VR therapy on cortical reorganization and associated motor function in an 8-year-old male with hemiparetic CP. Cortical activation and associated motor development were measured before and after VR therapy using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and standardized motor tests. Before VR therapy, the bilateral primary sensorimotor cortices (SMCs) and ipsilateral supplementary motor area (SMA) were predominantly activated during affected elbow movement. After VR therapy, the altered activations disappeared and the contralateral SMC was activated. This neuroplastic change was associated with enhanced functional motor skills including reaching, self-feeding, and dressing. These functions were not possible before the intervention. To our knowledge, this is the first fMRI study in the literature that provides evidence for neuroplasticity after VR therapy in a child with hemiparetic CP. PMID:16138671

  6. Network and external perturbation induce burst synchronisation in cat cerebral cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lameu, Ewandson L.; Borges, Fernando S.; Borges, Rafael R.; Batista, Antonio M.; Baptista, Murilo S.; Viana, Ricardo L.

    2016-05-01

    The brain of mammals are divided into different cortical areas that are anatomically connected forming larger networks which perform cognitive tasks. The cat cerebral cortex is composed of 65 areas organised into the visual, auditory, somatosensory-motor and frontolimbic cognitive regions. We have built a network of networks, in which networks are connected among themselves according to the connections observed in the cat cortical areas aiming to study how inputs drive the synchronous behaviour in this cat brain-like network. We show that without external perturbations it is possible to observe high level of bursting synchronisation between neurons within almost all areas, except for the auditory area. Bursting synchronisation appears between neurons in the auditory region when an external perturbation is applied in another cognitive area. This is a clear evidence that burst synchronisation and collective behaviour in the brain might be a process mediated by other brain areas under stimulation.

  7. Laser acupuncture induced specific cerebral cortical and subcortical activations in humans.

    PubMed

    Siedentopf, Christian M; Koppelstaetter, Florian; Haala, Ilka Anna; Haid, Veronika; Rhomberg, Paul; Ischebeck, Anja; Buchberger, Waltraud; Felber, Stephan; Schlager, Andreas; Golaszewski, Stefan M

    2005-09-01

    As recent studies demonstrated, acupuncture can elicit activity in specific brain areas. This study aims to explore further the central effect using laser acupuncture. We investigated the cerebral effects of laser acupuncture at both acupoints GB43 with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). As a control condition the laser was mounted at the same acupoints but without application of laser stimulation. The group results showed significant brain activations within the thalamus, nucleus subthalamicus, nucleus ruber, the brainstem, and the Brodmann areas 40 and 22 for the acupuncture condition. No significant brain activations were observed within the placebo condition. The activations we observed were laser acupuncture-specific and predominantly ipsilateral. This supports the assumption that acupuncture is mediated by meridians, since meridians do not cross to the other side. Furthermore, we could show that laser acupuncture allows one to design a pure placebo condition. PMID:15990948

  8. Caffeic acid protects mice from memory deficits induced by focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro Fernandes, Francisco Diego; Fontenele Menezes, Ana Paula; de Sousa Neves, Julliana Catharina; Fonteles, Analu Aragão; da Silva, Ana Thais Araújo; de Araújo Rodrigues, Patrícia; Santos do Carmo, Marta Regina; de Souza, Carolina Melo; de Andrade, Geanne Matos

    2014-10-01

    Brain ischemia pathophysiology involves a complex cascade of events such as inflammation and oxidative stress that lead to neuronal loss and cognitive deficits. Caffeic acid (CA) is a natural phenolic compound with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. To evaluate the neuroprotective efficacy of this compound in mice subjected to a permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion, animals were pretreated and post-treated with CA, 2, 20, and 60 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally, at 24, 48, 72, 96, or 120 h after ischemia. Animals were evaluated at 24 h after the permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion for brain infarction and neurological deficit score. At 72 h after the occlusion, animals were evaluated for locomotor activity, working memory, and short-term aversive memory; long-term aversive memory was evaluated 24 h after the evaluation of short-term aversive memory. Finally, at 120 h after the event, spatial memory and the expression levels of synaptophysin (SYP), SNAP-25, and caspase 3 were evaluated. The treatment with CA reduced the infarcted area and improved neurological deficit scores. There was no difference in locomotor activity between groups. The working, spatial, and long-term aversive memory deficits improved with CA. Furthermore, western blotting data showed that the expression of SYP, which correlates with synaptic formation and function, decreased after ischemic insult, and CA inhibited the reduction of SYP expression. Ischemia also increased, and CA treatment decreased, caspase 3 expression. These results suggest that CA exerts neuroprotective and antidementia effects, at least in part, by preventing the loss of neural cells and synapses in ischemic brain injury. PMID:25171077

  9. Hyperventilation-induced reduction in cerebral blood flow: Assessment by positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bednarczyk, E.M.; Rutherford, W.F.; Leisure, G.P.; Munger, M.A.; Panacek, E.A.; Miraldi, F.D.; Green, J.A. )

    1990-05-01

    The use of positron emission tomography (PET) has been well documented as a relatively noninvasive method of measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF), both globally and regionally. The utility of readily detecting alterations in CBF is apparent, particularly when applied to the evaluation of therapeutic interventions thought to influence CBF. We report the effects of hypocapnia, an experimental condition of known cerebral vasoconstriction, in ten normal volunteers. Subjects had brain blood flow evaluated utilizing H215O as the positron emitter before and after approximately five minutes of hyperventilation. Baseline CBF was measured as a mean +/- SD of 61.2 +/- 16.3 mL/min/100 g of tissue. Mean baseline arterial blood gas values were PaO2 107.4 +/- 14 mm Hg, PaCO2 37.7 +/- 0.89 mm Hg, and pH 7.39 (calculated from mean (H+)). Post hyperventilation, global CBF was measured as 31.1 +/- 10.8 mL/min/100 g. Mean arterial blood gas values were PaO2 141.7 +/- 21 mm Hg, PaCO2 19.7 +/- 5 mm Hg, and pH 7.63 (calculated from mean (H+)). CBF decreased by a mean of 49.5 +/- 11 percent. Data analysis using the Student's t-test showed a significant change over baseline in PaCO2 (p less than 0.001) and CBF (p less than 0.001), in the hyperventilated state. Correlations were noted between the decrease in CBF and change in PaCO2 (r = 0.81) as well as between hyperventilation PaCO2 and the change in CBF (r = 0.97). We conclude that, as measured by PET, CBF decreases significantly during a state of artificial hyperventilation to a degree consistent with results seen using other methods. PET appears to be a valuable tool in the assessment of interventions that could influence CBF.

  10. Tumor vascularity and lipiodol deposition as early radiological markers for predicting risk of disease progression in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma after transarterial chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng-Shi; Li, Fang-Kun; Guo, Chen-Yang; Xiao, Jin-Cheng; Hu, Hong-Tao; Cheng, Hong-Tao; Zheng, Lin; Zong, Deng-Wei; Ma, Jun-Li; Jiang, Li; Li, Hai-Liang

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the factors impacting overall survival (OS) and time to progression (TTP) in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who received transarterial chemoembolization (TACE). HCC patients were grouped based on tumor vascularity and lipidiol deposition after TACE. Tumor vascularity was classified based on contrast enhancement on arterial phase baseline CT scans. Lipiodol deposition was evaluated using CT scans. The progression-free rate was significantly higher in patients with good blood supply + good lipiodol deposition compared to those with good blood supply + poor lipiodol deposition. In patients with poor lipidiol deposition, risk of death was significantly positively correlated with stage, and negatively correlated with number of TACE procedures and degree of lipidiol deposition after the first TACE. Risk of disease progression in these patients was positively correlated with tumor size, and negatively correlated with number of TACE procedures and degree of lipidiol deposition after the first TACE. Our data showed that tumor vascularity and lipiodol deposition can be used as early radiological markers to identify patients who do not respond to TACE, and who can be considered earlier for alternative combination treatment strategies. Our data also indicated that poor lipiodol retention may predict a poor TTP and OS despite the blood supply status. PMID:26769845

  11. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... the things that kids do every day. What's CP? Some kids with CP use wheelchairs and others ...

  12. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Cerebral palsy Cerebral palsy E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... movement problems a child has. What is spastic CP? Spastic means tight or stiff muscles, or muscles ...

  13. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  14. Cerebral palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that can involve brain and nervous system functions, such as movement, ... and thinking. There are several different types of cerebral palsy, including spastic, dyskinetic, ataxic, hypotonic, and mixed.

  15. Up-regulation of ryanodine receptor expression increases the calcium-induced calcium release and spontaneous calcium signals in cerebral arteries from hindlimb unloaded rats.

    PubMed

    Morel, Jean-Luc; Dabertrand, Fabrice; Porte, Yves; Prevot, Anne; Macrez, Nathalie

    2014-08-01

    Microgravity induces a redistribution of blood volume. Consequently, astronauts' body pressure is modified so that the upright blood pressure gradient is abolished, thereby inducing a modification in cerebral blood pressure. This effect is mimicked in the hindlimb unloaded rat model. After a duration of 8 days of unloading, Ca2+ signals activated by depolarization and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate intracellular release were increased in cerebral arteries. In the presence of ryanodine and thapsigargin, the depolarization-induced Ca2+ signals remained increased in hindlimb suspended animals, indicating that Ca2+ influx and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release mechanism were both increased. Spontaneous Ca2+ waves and localized Ca2+ events were also investigated. Increases in both amplitude and frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ waves were measured in hindlimb suspension conditions. After pharmacological segregation of Ca2+ sparks and Ca2+ sparklets, their kinetic parameters were characterized. Hindlimb suspension induced an increase in the frequencies of both Ca2+ localized events, suggesting an increase of excitability. Labeling with bodipy compounds suggested that voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptor expressions were increased. Finally, the expression of the ryanodine receptor subtype 1 (RyR1) was increased in hindlimb unloading conditions. Taken together, these results suggest that RyR1 expression and voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels activity are the focal points of the regulation of Ca2+ signals activated by vasoconstriction in rat cerebral arteries with an increase of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx. PMID:24233561

  16. The effects of MEK1/2 inhibition on cigarette smoke exposure-induced ET receptor upregulation in rat cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lei; Ping, Na-Na; Cao, Yong-Xiao; Li, Wei; Cai, Yan; Warfvinge, Karin; Edvinsson, Lars

    2016-08-01

    Cigarette smoking, a major stroke risk factor, upregulates endothelin receptors in cerebral arteries. The present study examined the effects of MEK1/2 pathway inhibition on cigarette smoke exposure-induced ET receptor upregulation. Rats were exposed to the secondhand smoke (SHS) for 8weeks followed by intraperitoneal injection of MEK1/2 inhibitor, U0126 for another 4weeks. The urine cotinine levels were assessed with high-performance liquid chromatography. Contractile responses of isolated cerebral arteries were recorded by a sensitive wire myograph. The mRNA and protein expression levels of receptor and MEK/ERK1/2 pathway molecules were examined by real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Cerebral artery receptor localization was determined with immunohistochemistry. The results showed the urine cotinine levels from SHS exposure group were significantly higher than those from the fresh group. In addition, the MEK1/2 inhibitor, U0126 significantly reduced SHS exposure-increased ETA receptor mRNA and protein levels as well as contractile responses mediated by ETA receptors. The immunoreactivity of increased ETA receptor expression was primarily cytoplasmic in smooth muscle cells. In contrast, ETB receptor was noted in endothelial cells. However, the SHS-induced decrease in endothelium-dependent relaxation was unchanged after U0126 treatment. Furthermore, SHS increased the phosphorylation of MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 protein in cerebral arteries. By using U0126 could inhibit the phosphorylated ERK1/2 protein but not MEK1/2. Taken together, our data show that treatment with MEK1/2 pathway inhibitor offsets SHS exposure-induced ETA receptor upregulation in rat cerebral arteries. PMID:27212444

  17. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Palsy Information Page Clinical Trials Trial of Erythropoietin Neuroprotection ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Cerebral Palsy? The term cerebral palsy refers to a group ...

  18. Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Information Page Synonym(s): Aneurysm, Brain Aneurysm Condensed from ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Cerebral Aneurysms? A cerebral aneurysm is a weak or thin ...

  19. NCX1 Exchanger Cooperates with Calretinin to Confer Preconditioning-Induced Tolerance Against Cerebral Ischemia in the Striatum.

    PubMed

    Boscia, Francesca; Casamassa, Antonella; Secondo, Agnese; Esposito, Alba; Pannaccione, Anna; Sirabella, Rossana; Pignataro, Giuseppe; Cuomo, Ornella; Vinciguerra, Antonio; de Rosa, Valeria; Annunziato, Lucio

    2016-03-01

    Recently, the Na(+)/Ca(+2) exchanger NCX1 and the calcium binding protein calretinin have emerged as new molecular effectors of delayed preconditioning in the brain. In the present study, we investigated whether NCX1 and calretinin cooperate within the preconditioned striatum to confer neurons greater resistance to degeneration. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed that NCX1 expression was upregulated in calretinin-positive interneurons in the rat striatum after tolerance induction. Consistently, coimmunoprecipitation assays performed on human SHSY-5Y cells, a neuronal cell line which constitutively expresses calretinin, revealed a binding between NCX1 and calretinin. Finally, silencing of calretinin expression, both in vitro and in vivo, significantly prevented preconditioning-induced neuroprotection. Interestingly, our biochemical and functional studies showed that the selective silencing of calretinin in brain cells significantly prevented not only the preconditioning-induced upregulation of NCX1 expression and activity but also the activation of the prosurvival protein kinase Akt, which is involved in calretinin and NCX1 protective actions. Collectively, our results indicate that the Na(+)/Ca(+2) exchanger NCX1 and the calcium binding protein calretinin cooperate within the striatum to confer tolerance against cerebral ischemia. PMID:25633096

  20. Local cerebral hyperthermia induces spontaneous thrombosis and arteriolar constriction in the pia mater of the mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sabban, Farouk; Fahim, Mohamed A.

    1995-06-01

    The effect of local cerebral hyperthermia on responses of pial microvessels of the mouse was investigated. A set protocol was followed, involving the performance of a craniotomy on anaesthetized animals and using intravital microscope-television closed circuitry. Controlled hyperthermic exposure was applied regionally by heating the brain surface with irrigating artificial cerebrospinal fluid. Microvascular responses such as changes in diameter, thrombosis and embolism were monitored and video-taped observations were further viewed and analysed. When both brain surface and core body temperatures were kept at 37° C, no changes in pial microvessels were noted. With core body temperature kept at 37° C and at a brain surface temperature of 43.1° C, passing emboli and arteriolar constriction were observed. A few minutes later, visible thrombosis was prevalent. Further spontaneous thrombo-embolic activity continued and at the end of a 50-min hyperthermic exposure, arterioles attained a constriction of 37%. Thrombus formation was sometimes massive enough to occlude fully the microvessel. The protocol followed in this study can be adopted to other small animal species and for a variety of experimental procedures involving hyperthermia and the pial microcirculation.

  1. Local cerebral glucose utilization in monkeys with hemiparkinsonism induced by intracarotid infusion of the neurotoxin MPTP.

    PubMed

    Palombo, E; Porrino, L J; Bankiewicz, K S; Crane, A M; Sokoloff, L; Kopin, I J

    1990-03-01

    Quantitative 2-[14C]deoxyglucose autoradiography was used to map the pattern of alterations in local cerebral glucose utilization associated with unilateral lesions of the substantia nigra pars compacta produced by the infusion of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) into one internal carotid artery of rhesus monkeys. These monkeys become hemiparkinsonian, displaying rigidity, bradykinesia, and tremor of the limbs contralateral to the side of MPTP infusion; during spontaneous activity they turn toward the side of the lesion. Eighty-two brain areas were examined, and statistically significant metabolic changes were confined mainly to basal ganglia structures ipsilateral to the side of the lesion. Glucose utilization was reduced in the substantia nigra pars compacta and ventral tegmental area, i.e., in the areas of cell loss. Increases in glucose utilization in regions normally innervated by the lesioned area were observed in the post-commissural portions of the putamen and dorsolateral caudate. Other structures showing statistically significant metabolic changes were the external segment of the globus pallidus (+40%), subthalamic nucleus (-17%), and pedunculopontine nucleus (+15%). There were also smaller changes in portions of the thalamus (ventral anterior nucleus, parafascicular nucleus) and premotor cortex. All significant metabolic changes were confined to the side of the substantia nigra lesion and were essentially restricted to regions involved in the production of movement or maintenance of posture. PMID:2319306

  2. Computer-aided detection of radiation-induced cerebral microbleeds on susceptibility-weighted MR images☆

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Wei; Hess, Christopher P.; Chang, Susan M.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Lupo, Janine M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent interest in exploring the clinical relevance of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) has motivated the search for a fast and accurate method to detect them. Visual inspection of CMBs on MR images is a lengthy, arduous task that is highly prone to human error because of their small size and wide distribution throughout the brain. Several computer-aided CMB detection algorithms have recently been proposed in the literature, but their diagnostic accuracy, computation time, and robustness are still in need of improvement. In this study, we developed and tested a semi-automated method for identifying CMBs on minimum intensity projected susceptibility-weighted MR images that are routinely used in clinical practice to visually identify CMBs. The algorithm utilized the 2D fast radial symmetry transform to initially detect putative CMBs. Falsely identified CMBs were then eliminated by examining geometric features measured after performing 3D region growing on the potential CMB candidates. This algorithm was evaluated in 15 patients with brain tumors who exhibited CMBs on susceptibility-weighted images due to prior external beam radiation therapy. Our method achieved heightened sensitivity and acceptable amount of false positives compared to prior methods without compromising computation speed. Its superior performance and simple, accelerated processing make it easily adaptable for detecting CMBs in the clinic and expandable to a wide array of neurological disorders. PMID:24179783

  3. Modulation of ischemic-induced damage to cerebral adenylate cyclase in gerbils by calcium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Christie-Pope, B C; Palmer, G C

    1986-12-01

    It has been previously established that prolonged bilateral carotid occlusion followed by recirculation produces damage to the synaptic enzyme adenylate cyclase in the frontal cortex of the gerbil. Since calcium entrance into the brain may account in part for the deleterious consequences of stroke, the present study examined whether pretreatment with calcium channel blockers would modify the effects of 60 min of bilateral ischemia plus 40 min of reflow on various parameters of cortical adenylate cyclase activation. In this context activation of cerebral homogenates by norepinephrine with or without 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate was preserved by pretreatment of ischemic gerbils with verapamil but worsened by flunarizine. In contrast, in particulate fractions (treated with EGTA to reduce metallic ion levels) the damage to the Mn2+-sensitive catalytic site of adenylate cyclase was prevented only by flunarizine. Pretreatment with the two calcium channel blockers resulted in an elevated basal activity of the enzyme, thereby reducing the response in the homogenate preparation to forskolin. Gerbils pretreated with verapamil tended to have an increased ability for survival resulting from the ischemic episode. Under in vitro conditions the enzyme preparations were not markedly influenced by either drug. PMID:3508245

  4. An experimental study on laser-induced suturing of venous grafts in cerebral revascularization surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puca, Alfredo; Albanese, Alessio; Esposito, Giuseppe; Maira, Giulio; Rossi, Giacomo; Pini, Roberto

    2005-04-01

    To test laser-assisted high flow bypass in cerebral revascularization procedures, we set up an experimental model on rabbits which included harvesting a jugular vein graft and its implantation on the common carotid artery through a double end-to-side anastomosis. The study was carried out on 25 New Zealand rabbits by performing on each animal the proximal anastomosis using conventional suturing, while the distal one was obtained by means of low-power diode laser welding in association with the topical application of Indocyanine Green (ICG) solution to enhance local absorption of the laser light. After the procedure, the animals were subjected to a follow-up from 2 to 9 days. Bypass patency was evaluated by means of Doppler study. The vascular segments were excised and evaluated by histological and immunohistochemical examinations. Utilization of the diode laser was associated with a substantial shortening of the operative time, as well as with a more active endothelial regeneration process at the anastomotic site.

  5. Cerebroprotective effect of Moringa oleifera against focal ischemic stroke induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Kirisattayakul, Woranan; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Tong-Un, Terdthai; Muchimapura, Supaporn; Wannanon, Panakaporn; Jittiwat, Jinatta

    2013-01-01

    The protection against ischemic stroke is still required due to the limitation of therapeutic efficacy. Based on the role of oxidative stress in stroke pathophysiology, we determined whether Moringa oleifera, a plant possessing potent antioxidant activity, protected against brain damage and oxidative stress in animal model of focal stroke. M. oleifera leaves extract at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg·kg(-1) was orally given to male Wistar rats (300-350 g) once daily at a period of 2 weeks before the occlusion of right middle cerebral artery (Rt.MCAO) and 3 weeks after Rt.MCAO. The determinations of neurological score and temperature sensation were performed every 7 days throughout the study period, while the determinations of brain infarction volume, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px were performed 24 hr after Rt.MCAO. The results showed that all doses of extract decreased infarction volume in both cortex and subcortex. The protective effect of medium and low doses of extract in all areas occurred mainly via the decreased oxidative stress. The protective effect of the high dose extract in striatum and hippocampus occurred via the same mechanism, whereas other mechanisms might play a crucial role in cortex. The detailed mechanism required further exploration. PMID:24367723

  6. Cerebroprotective Effect of Moringa oleifera against Focal Ischemic Stroke Induced by Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Tong-Un, Terdthai; Muchimapura, Supaporn; Wannanon, Panakaporn; Jittiwat, Jinatta

    2013-01-01

    The protection against ischemic stroke is still required due to the limitation of therapeutic efficacy. Based on the role of oxidative stress in stroke pathophysiology, we determined whether Moringa oleifera, a plant possessing potent antioxidant activity, protected against brain damage and oxidative stress in animal model of focal stroke. M. oleifera leaves extract at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg·kg−1 was orally given to male Wistar rats (300–350 g) once daily at a period of 2 weeks before the occlusion of right middle cerebral artery (Rt.MCAO) and 3 weeks after Rt.MCAO. The determinations of neurological score and temperature sensation were performed every 7 days throughout the study period, while the determinations of brain infarction volume, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px were performed 24 hr after Rt.MCAO. The results showed that all doses of extract decreased infarction volume in both cortex and subcortex. The protective effect of medium and low doses of extract in all areas occurred mainly via the decreased oxidative stress. The protective effect of the high dose extract in striatum and hippocampus occurred via the same mechanism, whereas other mechanisms might play a crucial role in cortex. The detailed mechanism required further exploration. PMID:24367723

  7. Evaluation of near infrared spectroscopy for detecting the β blocker-induced decrease in cerebral oxygenation during hemodilution in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Tadayoshi; Morita, Koji; Sato, Shigehito

    2015-12-01

    β blockers reduce cerebral oxygenation after acute hemodilution and may contribute to the incidence of stroke when used perioperatively. The goal of the study was to investigate whether cerebral tissue oxygenation using near infrared spectroscopy can detect the β blocker-induced decrease in cerebral oxygenation depending on the severity of hemodilution and/or the dose of β blockers. Animals were anesthetized with 2% isoflurane and randomly assigned to a landiolol or esmolol group. After baseline measurement, landiolol or esmolol was administered at 40 µg/kg/min for 20 min, increased to 200 µg/kg/min for 20 min, and then stopped. Hemodynamic and arterial variables and the tissue oxygenation index (TOI) were recorded at each β blocker dose. Two stages of hemodilution were sequentially induced by repeated hemorrhage of 600 ml (33% of estimated blood volume) and infusion of the same volume of hydroxyethylstarch. During each stage, landiolol or esmolol was similarly administered and measurements were made. Landiolol and esmolol both dose-dependently decreased heart rate, mean arterial pressure and cardiac output, depending on the severity of hemodilution. Landiolol at 40 µg/kg/min was almost equivalent in potency to 200 µg/kg/min esmolol for decreasing HR before hemodilution. Based on the TOI, short-acting β blockers reduced cerebral oxygenation in a dose-dependent manner during hemodilution, and oxygenation returned to the baseline level after drug infusion was stopped. TOI may be useful for identification of a decrease in cerebral oxygenation for patients receiving β blockade during surgery associated with major bleeding. PMID:25876017

  8. Radiation-Induced Changes in Normal-Appearing White Matter in Patients With Cerebral Tumors: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nagesh, Vijaya Tsien, Christina I.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Ross, Brian D.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Junick, Larry; Cao Yue

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the radiation-induced changes in normal-appearing white matter before, during, and after radiotherapy (RT) in cerebral tumor patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with low-grade glioma, high-grade glioma, or benign tumor treated with RT were studied using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. The biologically corrected doses ranged from 50 to 81 Gy. The temporal changes were assessed before, during, and to 45 weeks after the start of RT. The mean diffusivity of water (), fractional anisotropy of diffusion, diffusivity perpendicular ({lambda}{sub perpendicular}) and parallel ({lambda}{sub parallel}) to white matter fibers were calculated in normal-appearing genu and splenium of the corpus callosum. Results: In the genu and splenium, fractional anisotropy decreased and , {lambda}{sub parallel}, {lambda}{sub -perpendicular} increased linearly and significantly with time (p < 0.01). At 45 weeks after the start of RT, {lambda}{sub -perpendicular} had increased {approx}30% in the genu and splenium, and {lambda}{sub parallel} had increased 5% in the genu and 9% in the splenium, suggesting that demyelination is predominant. The increases in {lambda}{sub perpendicular} and {lambda}{sub parallel} were dose dependent, starting at 3 weeks and continuing to 32 weeks from the start of RT. The dose-dependent increase in {lambda}{sub perpendicular} and {lambda}{sub parallel} was not sustained after 32 weeks, indicating the transition from focal to diffuse effects. Conclusion: The acute and subacute changes in normal-appearing white matter fibers indicate radiation-induced demyelination and mild structural degradation of axonal fibers. The structural changes after RT are progressive, with early dose-dependent demyelination and subsequent diffuse dose-independent demyelination and mild axonal degradation. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging is potentially a biomarker for the assessment of radiation-induced white matter injury.

  9. Radiation-Induced Changes in Normal Appearing White Matter in Patients with Cerebral Tumors: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Nagesh, V.; Tsien, C.I.; Chenevert, T.L.; Ross, B.D.; Lawrence, T.S.; Junck, L.; Cao, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify radiation-induced changes in normal appearing white matter (NAWM) before, during and after radiation therapy (RT) in cerebral tumor patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with low-grade glioma, high-grade glioma or benign tumor treated with RT were studied using diffusion tensor MRI. The biologically corrected doses ranged from 50 to 81 Gy. Temporal changes were assessed before, during, and till 45 weeks after start of RT. The mean diffusivity of water , fractional anisotropy (FA) of diffusion, diffusivity perpendicular (λ⊥) and parallel (λ∥) to white matter fibers were calculated in normal-appearing genu and splenium of the corpus callosum. Results: In the genu and splenium, FA decreased and , λ∥, and λ⊥ increased linearly and significantly over time (p< 0.01). At 45 weeks after start of RT, λ⊥ increased ∼30% in the genu and splenium, while λ∥ increased 5% in the genu and 9% in the splenium, suggesting demyelination is predominant. The increases in λ⊥ and λ∥ were dose-dependent starting at 3 weeks and continuing to 32 weeks from the start of RT. The dose-dependent increase in λ⊥ and λ∥ were not sustained after 32 weeks indicating the transition from the focal to diffuse effects. Conclusions: The acute and sub-acute changes in normal appearing white matter fibers indicate radiation-induced demyelination and mild structural degradation of axonal fibers. The structural changes after RT are progressive, with early dose-dependent demyelination and subsequent diffuse dose-independent demyelination and mild axonal degradation. DT-MR imaging is potentially a marker for assessment of radiation-induced white matter injury. PMID:18313524

  10. Transarterial Chemoembolization With Cisplatin as Second-Line Treatment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Unresponsive to Chemoembolization With Epirubicin-Lipiodol Emulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Noboru Osuga, Keigo; Higashihara, Hiroki; Tomoda, Kaname; Mikami, Koji; Nakazawa, Tetsuro; Nakamura, Hironobu; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate the efficacy of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) using cisplatin as a second-line treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) unresponsive to TACE using epirubicin-Lipiodol emulsion at our institution. Materials and Methods: Between January 2006 and March 2009, 51 patients with unresectable HCC underwent TACE using cisplatin. All patients had shown persistent viable tumor or tumor progression after at least 2 sessions of TACE using epirubicin-Lipiodol emulsion. TACE procedures consisted of arterial injection of a mixture of Lipiodol and cisplatin (30-100 mg [mean 57 {+-} 21]) (n = 29) or arterial infusion of cisplatin (30-100 mg [mean 87 {+-} 19]) solution (n = 22) followed by injection of 1-mm porous gelatin particles. Early tumor response was assessed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) criteria. Overall survival and progression-free survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was assessed according to NCI-CTCAE version 3 criteria. Results: Response rates were 11.8 and 27.5% by RECIST and EASL criteria, respectively. Overall survival rates were 61.9, 48.2, and 28.9% at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively, and the median survival time was 15.4 months. Progression-free survival rate was 35.2% at 1 year, and median progression-free survival time was 3.1 months. No major complications were observed, and the occurrence of postembolization syndrome was minimal. Grade 3 to 4 toxicities included thrombocytopenia (5.8%), increased aspartate aminotransferase (AST) level (35.3%), and increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level (23.5%). Conclusions: witching the TACE anticancer drug from epirubicin to cisplatin might be the feasible option for advanced HCC, even when considered resistant to the initial form of TACE.

  11. Antioxidant Activity of Grapevine Leaf Extracts against Oxidative Stress Induced by Carbon Tetrachloride in Cerebral Cortex, Hippocampus and Cerebellum of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wohlenberg, Mariane; Almeida, Daniela; Bokowski, Liane; Medeiros, Niara; Agostini, Fabiana; Funchal, Cláudia; Dani, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, it has become increasingly important to study the beneficial properties of derivatives of grapes and grapevine. The objective of this study was to determine the antioxidant activity of Vitis labrusca leaf extracts, comparing conventional and organic grapevines, in different brain areas of rats. We used male Wistar rats treated with grapevine leaf extracts for a period of 14 days, and on the 15th day, we administered in half of the rats, mineral oil and the other half, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). The animals were euthanized by decapitation and the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum were removed to assess oxidative stress parameters and the activity of antioxidant enzymes. Lipid peroxidation levels (TBARS) were unchanged. However, CCl4 induced oxidative damage to proteins in all tissues studied, and this injury was prevented by both extracts. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was increased by CCl4 in the cerebral cortex and decreased in other tissues. However, CCl4 increased catalase (CAT) activity in the cerebellum and decreased it in the cerebral cortex. The SOD/CAT ratio was restored in the cerebellum by both extracts and only in the cerebral cortex by the organic extract. PMID:26784867

  12. Antioxidant Activity of Grapevine Leaf Extracts against Oxidative Stress Induced by Carbon Tetrachloride in Cerebral Cortex, Hippocampus and Cerebellum of Rats.

    PubMed

    Wohlenberg, Mariane; Almeida, Daniela; Bokowski, Liane; Medeiros, Niara; Agostini, Fabiana; Funchal, Cláudia; Dani, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, it has become increasingly important to study the beneficial properties of derivatives of grapes and grapevine. The objective of this study was to determine the antioxidant activity of Vitis labrusca leaf extracts, comparing conventional and organic grapevines, in different brain areas of rats. We used male Wistar rats treated with grapevine leaf extracts for a period of 14 days, and on the 15th day, we administered in half of the rats, mineral oil and the other half, carbon tetrachloride (CCl₄). The animals were euthanized by decapitation and the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum were removed to assess oxidative stress parameters and the activity of antioxidant enzymes. Lipid peroxidation levels (TBARS) were unchanged. However, CCl₄ induced oxidative damage to proteins in all tissues studied, and this injury was prevented by both extracts. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was increased by CCl₄ in the cerebral cortex and decreased in other tissues. However, CCl₄ increased catalase (CAT) activity in the cerebellum and decreased it in the cerebral cortex. The SOD/CAT ratio was restored in the cerebellum by both extracts and only in the cerebral cortex by the organic extract. PMID:26784867

  13. Transarterial Infusion Chemotherapy Using Cisplatin-Lipiodol Suspension With or Without Embolization for Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kawaoka, Tomokazu; Aikata, Hiroshi Takaki, Shintaro; Katamura, Yoshio; Hiramatsu, Akira; Waki, Koji; Takahashi, Shoichi; Hieda, Masashi; Toyota, Naoyuki; Ito, Katsuhide; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2009-07-15

    We evaluate the long-term prognosis and prognostic factors in patients treated with transarterial infusion chemotherapy using cisplatin-lipiodol (CDDP/LPD) suspension with or without embolization for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Study subjects were 107 patients with HCC treated with repeated transarterial infusion chemotherapy alone using CDDP/LPD (adjusted as CDDP 10mg/LPD 1ml). The median number of transarterial infusion procedures was two (range, one to nine), the mean dose of CDDP per transarterial infusion chemotherapy session was 30 mg (range, 5.0-67.5 mg), and the median total dose of transarterial infusion chemotherapy per patient was 60 mg (range, 10-390 mg). Survival rates were 86% at 1 year, 40% at 3 years, 20% at 5 years, and 16% at 7 years. For patients with >90% LPD accumulation after the first transarterial infusion chemotherapy, rates were 98% at 1 year, 60% at 3 years, and 22% at 5 years. Multivariate analysis identified >90% LPD accumulation after the first transarterial infusion chemotherapy (p = 0.001), absence of portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT; p < 0.001), and Child-Pugh class A (p = 0.012) as independent determinants of survival. Anaphylactic shock was observed in two patients, at the fifth transarterial infusion chemotherapy session in one and the ninth in the other. In conclusion, transarterial infusion chemotherapy with CDDP/LPD appears to be a useful treatment option for patients with unresectable HCC without PVTT and in Child-Pugh class A. LPD accumulation after the first transarterial infusion chemotherapy is an important prognostic factor. Careful consideration should be given to the possibility of anaphylactic shock upon repeat infusion with CDDP/LPD.

  14. Effect of lipiodol and methylene blue on the thoracoscopic preoperative positioning

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chuan-Yu; Yu, Hua-Long; Liu, Shi-He; Jiang, Gang; Wang, Yong-Jie

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare and analyze the site-specific accuracy of mixture of lipiodol and methylene blue (MLM) (0.6 ml, 1:5) and pure methylene blue (0.5 ml) on the rabbit lungs. In this study, CT-guided percutaneous injection of MLM and methylene blue. Compare the staining degree by biopsy of lung tissue. Use 4 points system to evaluate the site-specific accuracy at 6h and 24 h after injection. For MLM, evaluate its radiopacity by radiation. When evaluate the positioning, 2 points mean acceptable, 3 points mean excellent. The results indicated that the staining range of MLM is obvious less than that of methylene blue (0.6 vs. 1.0 cm, P<0.01), but the staining capacity of MLM is higher than that of methylene blue (2.8 vs. 2.2, P = 0.01). About the staining abilities which are evaluated as excellent, MLM group accounts for 81%, methylene blue group accounts for 38% (P = 0.011). About the radiopacity which are evaluated as acceptable or excellent, MLM group accounts for 62%. With good direct vision, the suitable positioning rate of MLM can be 100%, which is better than that of methylene blue. In conclusion, percutaneous injection of MLM can be used to lung positioning. The result shows that use MLM is better than only using methylene blue. But it is necessary to do the investigation in human beings in order to confirm the feasibility of its clinical application. PMID:26221301

  15. Astrocytic adaptation during cerebral angiogenesis follows the new vessel formation induced through chronic hypoxia in adult mouse cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masamoto, Kazuto; Kanno, Iwao

    2014-03-01

    We examined longitudinal changes of the neuro-glia-vascular unit during cerebral angiogenesis induced through chronic hypoxia in the adult mouse cortex. Tie2-GFP mice in which the vascular endothelial cells expressed green fluorescent proteins (GFP) were exposed to chronic hypoxia, while the spatiotemporal developments of the cortical capillary sprouts and the neighboring astrocytic remodeling were characterized with repeated two-photon microscopy. The capillary sprouts appeared at early phases of the hypoxia adaptation (1-2 weeks), while the morphological changes of the astrocytic soma and processes were not detected in this phase. In the later phases of the hypoxia adaptation (> 2 weeks), the capillary sprouts created a new connection with existing capillaries, and its neighboring astrocytes extended their processes to the newly-formed vessels. The findings show that morphological adaptation of the astrocytes follow the capillary development during the hypoxia adaptation, which indicate that the newly-formed vessels provoke cellular interactions with the neighboring astrocytes to strengthen the functional blood-brain barrier.

  16. Predictive Risk of Radiation Induced Cerebral Necrosis in Pediatric Brain Cancer Patients after VMAT Versus Proton Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Derek; Zhang, Rui; Sanders, Mary; Newhauser, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Cancer of the brain and central nervous system (CNS) is the second most common of all pediatric cancers. Treatment of many of these cancers includes radiation therapy of which radiation induced cerebral necrosis (RICN) can be a severe and potentially devastating side effect. Risk factors for RICN include brain volume irradiated, the dose given per fraction and total dose. Thirteen pediatric patients were selected for this study to determine the difference in predicted risk of RICN when treating with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) compared to passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Plans were compared on the basis of dosimetric endpoints in the planned treatment volume (PTV) and brain and a radiobiological endpoint of RICN calculated using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman probit model. Uncertainty tests were performed to determine if the predicted risk of necrosis was sensitive to positional errors, proton range errors and selection of risk models. Both PSPT and IMPT plans resulted in a significant increase in the maximum dose to the brain, a significant reduction in the total brain volume irradiated to low doses, and a significant lower predicted risk of necrosis compared with the VMAT plans. The findings of this study were upheld by the uncertainty analysis. PMID:25866999

  17. The use of EEG to measure cerebral changes during computer-based motion-sickness-inducing tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strychacz, Christopher; Viirre, Erik; Wing, Shawn

    2005-05-01

    Motion sickness (MS) is a stressor commonly attributed with causing serious navigational and performance errors. The distinct nature of MS suggests this state may have distinct neural markers distinguishable from other states known to affect performance (e.g., stress, fatigue, sleep deprivation, high workload). This pilot study used new high-resolution electro-encephalograph (EEG) technologies to identify distinct neuronal activation changes that occur during MS. Brain EEG activity was monitored while subjects performed a ball-tracking task and viewed stimuli on a projection screen intended to induce motion sickness/spatial disorientation. Results show the presence of EEG spectral changes in all subjects who developed motion sickness when compared to baseline levels. These changes included: 1) low frequency (1 to 10 Hz) changes that may reflect oculomotor movements rather than intra-cerebral sources; 2) increased spectral power across all frequencies (attributable to increased scalp conductivity related to sweating), 3) local increases of power spectra in the 20-50 Hz range (likely attributable to external muscles on the skull) and; 4) a central posterior (occipital) independent component that shows suppression of a 20 Hz peak in the MS condition when compared to baseline. Further research is necessary to refine neural markers, characterize their origin and physiology, to distinguish between motion sickness and other states and to enable markers to be used for operator state monitoring and the designing of interventions for motion sickness.

  18. Intravenous Administration of Cilostazol Nanoparticles Ameliorates Acute Ischemic Stroke in a Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Noriaki; Yoshioka, Chiaki; Ito, Yoshimasa; Funakami, Yoshinori; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2015-01-01

    It was reported that cilostazol (CLZ) suppressed disruption of the microvasculature in ischemic areas. In this study, we have designed novel injection formulations containing CLZ nanoparticles using 0.5% methylcellulose, 0.2% docusate sodium salt, and mill methods (CLZnano dispersion; particle size 81 ± 59 nm, mean ± S.D.), and investigated their toxicity and usefulness in a cerebral ischemia/reperfusion-induced injury model (MCAO/reperfusion mice). The pharmacokinetics of injections of CLZnano dispersions is similar to that of CLZ solutions prepared with 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin, and no changes in the rate of hemolysis of rabbit red blood cells, a model of cell injury, were observed with CLZnano dispersions. In addition, the intravenous injection of 0.6 mg/kg CLZnano dispersions does not affect the blood pressure and blood flow, and the 0.6 mg/kg CLZnano dispersions ameliorate neurological deficits and ischemic stroke in MCAO/reperfusion mice. It is possible that the CLZnano dispersions will provide effective therapy for ischemic stroke patients, and that injection preparations of lipophilic drugs containing drug nanoparticles expand their therapeutic usage. PMID:26690139

  19. Modulation of antioxidant enzyme expression by PTU-induced hypothyroidism in cerebral cortex of postnatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bhanja, Shravani; Jena, Srikanta

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the effect of 6-n-propylthiouracil (PTU)-induced hypothyroidism on oxidative stress parameters and expression of antioxidant enzymes in cerebral cortex of rat brain during postnatal development. A significant decrease in levels of lipid peroxidation and H(2)O(2) were seen in 7 and 30 days old PTU-treated rats with respect to their controls. Significantly decreased activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) along with the translated products of SOD1 and SOD2 were observed in 7, 15 and 30 days old PTU-treated rats as compared to their respective controls. However, increase in translated product of CAT was seen in all age groups of PTU-treated rats. Glutathione peroxidase activity was decreased in 7 days and increased in 15 days old PTU-treated rats with respect to their control groups. Histological sections clearly show a decline in neuronal migration with neurons packed together in the hypothyroid group as compared to the control. PMID:22987056

  20. High Glucose-Induced Mitochondrial Respiration and Reactive Oxygen Species in Mouse Cerebral Pericytes is Reversed by Pharmacological Inhibition of Mitochondrial Carbonic Anhydrases: Implications for Cerebral Microvascular Disease in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Gul N.; Morofuji, Yoichi; Banks, William A.; Price, Tulin O.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress leads to diabetes-associated damage to the microvasculature of the brain. Pericytes in close proximity to endothelial cells in the brain microvessels are vital to the integrity of the blood-brain barrier and are especially susceptible to oxidative stress. According to our recently published results, streptozotocin-diabetic mouse brain exhibits oxidative stress and loose pericytes by twelve weeks of diabetes, and cerebral pericytes cultured in high glucose media suffer intracellular oxidative stress and apoptosis. Oxidative stress in diabetes is hypothesized to be caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced during hyperglycemia-induced enhanced oxidative metabolism of glucose (respiration). To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of high glucose on respiration rate and ROS production in mouse cerebral pericytes. Previously, we showed that pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases protects the brain from oxidative stress and pericyte loss. The high glucose-induced intracellular oxidative stress and apoptosis of pericytes in culture were also reversed by inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases. Therefore, we extended our current study to determine the effect of these inhibitors on high glucose-induced increases in pericyte respiration and ROS. We now report that both the respiration and ROS are significantly increased in pericytes challenged with high glucose. Furthermore, inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases significantly slowed down both the rate of respiration and ROS production. These data provide new evidence that pharmacological inhibitors of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases, already in clinical use, may prove beneficial in protecting the brain from oxidative stress caused by ROS produced as a consequence of hyperglycemia-induced enhanced respiration. PMID:24076121

  1. Blast Overpressure Waves Induce Transient Anxiety and Regional Changes in Cerebral Glucose Metabolism and Delayed Hyperarousal in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Awwad, Hibah O.; Gonzalez, Larry P.; Tompkins, Paul; Lerner, Megan; Brackett, Daniel J.; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Standifer, Kelly M.

    2015-01-01

    Physiological alterations, anxiety, and cognitive disorders are strongly associated with blast-induced traumatic brain injury (blast TBI), and are common symptoms in service personnel exposed to blasts. Since 2006, 25,000–30,000 new TBI cases are diagnosed annually in U.S. Service members; increasing evidence confirms that primary blast exposure causes diffuse axonal injury and is often accompanied by altered behavioral outcomes. Behavioral and acute metabolic effects resulting from blast to the head in the absence of thoracic contributions from the periphery were examined, following a single blast wave directed to the head of male Sprague-Dawley rats protected by a lead shield over the torso. An 80 psi head blast produced cognitive deficits that were detected in working memory. Blast TBI rats displayed increased anxiety as determined by elevated plus maze at day 9 post-blast compared to sham rats; blast TBI rats spent significantly more time than the sham controls in the closed arms (p < 0.05; n = 8–11). Interestingly, anxiety symptoms were absent at days 22 and 48 post-blast. Instead, blast TBI rats displayed increased rearing behavior at day 48 post-blast compared to sham rats. Blast TBI rats also exhibited suppressed acoustic startle responses, but similar pre-pulse inhibition at day 15 post-blast compared to sham rats. Acute physiological alterations in cerebral glucose metabolism were determined by positron emission tomography 1 and 9 days post-blast using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG). Global glucose uptake in blast TBI rat brains increased at day 1 post-blast (p < 0.05; n = 4–6) and returned to sham levels by day 9. Our results indicate a transient increase in cerebral metabolism following a blast injury. Markers for reactive astrogliosis and neuronal damage were noted by immunoblotting motor cortex tissue from day 10 post-blast in blast TBI rats compared to sham controls (p < 0.05; n = 5–6). PMID:26136722

  2. Blast Overpressure Waves Induce Transient Anxiety and Regional Changes in Cerebral Glucose Metabolism and Delayed Hyperarousal in Rats.

    PubMed

    Awwad, Hibah O; Gonzalez, Larry P; Tompkins, Paul; Lerner, Megan; Brackett, Daniel J; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Standifer, Kelly M

    2015-01-01

    Physiological alterations, anxiety, and cognitive disorders are strongly associated with blast-induced traumatic brain injury (blast TBI), and are common symptoms in service personnel exposed to blasts. Since 2006, 25,000-30,000 new TBI cases are diagnosed annually in U.S. Service members; increasing evidence confirms that primary blast exposure causes diffuse axonal injury and is often accompanied by altered behavioral outcomes. Behavioral and acute metabolic effects resulting from blast to the head in the absence of thoracic contributions from the periphery were examined, following a single blast wave directed to the head of male Sprague-Dawley rats protected by a lead shield over the torso. An 80 psi head blast produced cognitive deficits that were detected in working memory. Blast TBI rats displayed increased anxiety as determined by elevated plus maze at day 9 post-blast compared to sham rats; blast TBI rats spent significantly more time than the sham controls in the closed arms (p < 0.05; n = 8-11). Interestingly, anxiety symptoms were absent at days 22 and 48 post-blast. Instead, blast TBI rats displayed increased rearing behavior at day 48 post-blast compared to sham rats. Blast TBI rats also exhibited suppressed acoustic startle responses, but similar pre-pulse inhibition at day 15 post-blast compared to sham rats. Acute physiological alterations in cerebral glucose metabolism were determined by positron emission tomography 1 and 9 days post-blast using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG). Global glucose uptake in blast TBI rat brains increased at day 1 post-blast (p < 0.05; n = 4-6) and returned to sham levels by day 9. Our results indicate a transient increase in cerebral metabolism following a blast injury. Markers for reactive astrogliosis and neuronal damage were noted by immunoblotting motor cortex tissue from day 10 post-blast in blast TBI rats compared to sham controls (p < 0.05; n = 5-6). PMID:26136722

  3. Mechanical Injury Induces Brain Endothelial-Derived Microvesicle Release: Implications for Cerebral Vascular Injury during Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Allison M; Lutton, Evan M; Merkel, Steven F; Razmpour, Roshanak; Ramirez, Servio H

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the endothelium responds to mechanical forces induced by changes in shear stress and strain. However, our understanding of vascular remodeling following traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains incomplete. Recently published studies have revealed that lung and umbilical endothelial cells produce extracellular microvesicles (eMVs), such as microparticles, in response to changes in mechanical forces (blood flow and mechanical injury). Yet, to date, no studies have shown whether brain endothelial cells produce eMVs following TBI. The brain endothelium is highly specialized and forms the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which regulates diffusion and transport of solutes into the brain. This specialization is largely due to the presence of tight junction proteins (TJPs) between neighboring endothelial cells. Following TBI, a breakdown in tight junction complexes at the BBB leads to increased permeability, which greatly contributes to the secondary phase of injury. We have therefore tested the hypothesis that brain endothelium responds to mechanical injury, by producing eMVs that contain brain endothelial proteins, specifically TJPs. In our study, primary human adult brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) were subjected to rapid mechanical injury to simulate the abrupt endothelial disruption that can occur in the primary injury phase of TBI. eMVs were isolated from the media following injury at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h. Western blot analysis of eMVs demonstrated a time-dependent increase in TJP occludin, PECAM-1 and ICAM-1 following mechanical injury. In addition, activation of ARF6, a small GTPase linked to extracellular vesicle production, was increased after injury. To confirm these results in vivo, mice were subjected to sham surgery or TBI and blood plasma was collected 24 h post-injury. Isolation and analysis of eMVs from blood plasma using cryo-EM and flow cytometry revealed elevated levels of vesicles containing occludin following brain trauma

  4. Mechanical Injury Induces Brain Endothelial-Derived Microvesicle Release: Implications for Cerebral Vascular Injury during Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Allison M.; Lutton, Evan M.; Merkel, Steven F.; Razmpour, Roshanak; Ramirez, Servio H.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the endothelium responds to mechanical forces induced by changes in shear stress and strain. However, our understanding of vascular remodeling following traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains incomplete. Recently published studies have revealed that lung and umbilical endothelial cells produce extracellular microvesicles (eMVs), such as microparticles, in response to changes in mechanical forces (blood flow and mechanical injury). Yet, to date, no studies have shown whether brain endothelial cells produce eMVs following TBI. The brain endothelium is highly specialized and forms the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which regulates diffusion and transport of solutes into the brain. This specialization is largely due to the presence of tight junction proteins (TJPs) between neighboring endothelial cells. Following TBI, a breakdown in tight junction complexes at the BBB leads to increased permeability, which greatly contributes to the secondary phase of injury. We have therefore tested the hypothesis that brain endothelium responds to mechanical injury, by producing eMVs that contain brain endothelial proteins, specifically TJPs. In our study, primary human adult brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) were subjected to rapid mechanical injury to simulate the abrupt endothelial disruption that can occur in the primary injury phase of TBI. eMVs were isolated from the media following injury at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h. Western blot analysis of eMVs demonstrated a time-dependent increase in TJP occludin, PECAM-1 and ICAM-1 following mechanical injury. In addition, activation of ARF6, a small GTPase linked to extracellular vesicle production, was increased after injury. To confirm these results in vivo, mice were subjected to sham surgery or TBI and blood plasma was collected 24 h post-injury. Isolation and analysis of eMVs from blood plasma using cryo-EM and flow cytometry revealed elevated levels of vesicles containing occludin following brain trauma

  5. Effects of Adjuvant Analgesics on Cerebral Ischemia-Induced Mechanical Allodynia.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Wataru; Harada, Shinichi; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    Central post-stroke pain (CPSP), a potential sequela of stroke, is classified as neuropathic pain. Although we recently established a CPSP-like model in mice, the effects of adjuvant analgesics as therapeutic drugs for neuropathic pain in this model are unknown. Hence, the aim of the present study was to assess the usefulness of our model by evaluating the effects of adjuvant analgesics used for treating neuropathic pain in this mouse model of CPSP. Male ddY mice were subjected to 30 min of bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCAO). The development of hind paw mechanical allodynia was measured after BCAO using the von Frey test. The mechanical allodynia was significantly increased on day 3 after BCAO compared with that during the pre-BCAO assessment. BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia was significantly decreased by intraperitoneal injections of imipramine (a tricyclic antidepressant), mexiletine (an antiarrhythmic), gabapentin (an antiepileptic), or a subcutaneous injection of morphine (an opioid receptor agonist) compared with that following vehicle treatment in BCAO-mice. By contrast, milnacipran (a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor), paroxetine (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor), carbamazepine (antiepileptic), and indomethacin (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) did not affect the BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia. Our results show that BCAO in mice may be useful as an animal model of CPSP. In addition, BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia may be suppressed by some adjuvant analgesics used to treat neuropathic pain. PMID:27150152

  6. Use of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons as a model for Cerebral Toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naomi; Ashour, Danah; Dratz, Edward; Halonen, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a ubiquitous protozoan parasite with approximately one-third of the worlds' population chronically infected. In chronically infected individuals, the parasite resides primarily in cysts within neurons in the central nervous system. The chronic infection in immunocompetent individuals has been considered to be asymptomatic but increasing evidence indicates the chronic infection can lead to neuropsychiatric disorders such as Schizophrenia, prenatal depression and suicidal thoughts. A better understanding of the mechanism(s) by which the parasite exerts effects on human behavior is limited due to lack of suitable human neuronal models. In this paper, we report the use of human neurons derived from normal cord blood CD34+ cells generated via genetic reprogramming, as an in vitro model for the study T. gondii in neurons. This culture method resulted in a relatively pure monolayer of induced human neuronal-like cells that stained positive for neuronal markers, MAP2, NFL, NFH and NeuN. These induced human neuronal-like cells (iHNs) were efficiently infected by the Prugniad strain of the parasite and supported replication of the tachyzoite stage and development of the cyst stage. Infected iHNs could be maintained through 5 days of infection, allowing for formation of large cysts. This induced human neuronal model represents a novel culture method to study both tachyzoite and bradyzoite stages of T. gondii in human neurons. PMID:27083472

  7. Ameliorating effects of traditional Chinese medicine preparation, Chinese materia medica and active compounds on ischemia/reperfusion-induced cerebral microcirculatory disturbances and neuron damage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai; Fan, Jingyu; Han, Jingyan

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic stroke and ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury induced by thrombolytic therapy are conditions with high mortality and serious long-term physical and cognitive disabilities. They have a major impact on global public health. These disorders are associated with multiple insults to the cerebral microcirculation, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction, leukocyte adhesion and infiltration, brain blood barrier (BBB) disruption, and capillary hypoperfusion, ultimately resulting in tissue edema, hemorrhage, brain injury and delayed neuron damage. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used in China, Korea, Japan and other Asian countries for treatment of a wide range of diseases. In China, the usage of compound TCM preparation to treat cerebrovascular diseases dates back to the Han Dynasty. Even thousands of years earlier, the medical formulary recorded many classical prescriptions for treating cerebral I/R-related diseases. This review summarizes current information and underlying mechanisms regarding the ameliorating effects of compound TCM preparation, Chinese materia medica, and active components on I/R-induced cerebral microcirculatory disturbances, brain injury and neuron damage. PMID:26579420

  8. Glutamate-induced activation of nitric oxide synthase is impaired in cerebral cortex in vivo in rats with chronic liver failure.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Regina; Erceg, Slaven; Rodriguez-Diaz, Jesus; Saez-Valero, Javier; Piedrafita, Blanca; Suarez, Isabel; Felipo, Vicente

    2007-07-01

    It has been proposed that impairment of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway in brain contributes to cognitive impairment in hepatic encephalopathy. The aims of this work were to assess whether the function of this pathway and of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) are altered in cerebral cortex in vivo in rats with chronic liver failure due to portacaval shunt (PCS) and whether these alterations are due to hyperammonemia. The glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway function and NOS activation by NMDA was analysed by in vivo microdialysis in cerebral cortex of PCS and control rats and in rats with hyperammonemia without liver failure. Similar studies were done in cortical slices from these rats and in cultured cortical neurons exposed to ammonia. Basal NOS activity, nitrites and cGMP are increased in cortex of rats with hyperammonemia or liver failure. These increases seem due to increased inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. NOS activation by NMDA is impaired in cerebral cortex in both animal models and in neurons exposed to ammonia. Chronic liver failure increases basal NOS activity, nitric oxide and cGMP but reduces activation of NOS induced by NMDA receptors activation. Hyperammonemia is responsible for both effects which will lead, independently, to alterations contributing to neurological alterations in hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:17286583

  9. Ameliorating effects of traditional Chinese medicine preparation, Chinese materia medica and active compounds on ischemia/reperfusion-induced cerebral microcirculatory disturbances and neuron damage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kai; Fan, Jingyu; Han, Jingyan

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic stroke and ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury induced by thrombolytic therapy are conditions with high mortality and serious long-term physical and cognitive disabilities. They have a major impact on global public health. These disorders are associated with multiple insults to the cerebral microcirculation, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction, leukocyte adhesion and infiltration, brain blood barrier (BBB) disruption, and capillary hypoperfusion, ultimately resulting in tissue edema, hemorrhage, brain injury and delayed neuron damage. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used in China, Korea, Japan and other Asian countries for treatment of a wide range of diseases. In China, the usage of compound TCM preparation to treat cerebrovascular diseases dates back to the Han Dynasty. Even thousands of years earlier, the medical formulary recorded many classical prescriptions for treating cerebral I/R-related diseases. This review summarizes current information and underlying mechanisms regarding the ameliorating effects of compound TCM preparation, Chinese materia medica, and active components on I/R-induced cerebral microcirculatory disturbances, brain injury and neuron damage. PMID:26579420

  10. Ischemia-Induced Changes of PRAS40 and p-PRAS40 Immunoreactivities in the Gerbil Hippocampal CA1 Region After Transient Cerebral Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Park, Joon Ha; Shin, Bich Na; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Cho, Jeong-Hwi; Kim, In Hye; Kim, Dae Won; Won, Moo-Ho; Hong, Seongkweon; Cho, Jun Hwi; Lee, Choong-Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Proline-rich Akt substrate of 40-kDa (PRAS40) is one of the important interactive linkers between Akt and mTOR signaling pathways. The increase of PRAS40 is related with the reduction of brain damage induced by cerebral ischemia. In the present study, we investigated time-dependent changes in PRAS40 and phospho-PRAS40 (p-PRAS40) immunoreactivities in the hippocampal CA1 region of the gerbil after 5 min of transient cerebral ischemia. PRAS40 immunoreactivity in the CA1 region was decreased in pyramidal neurons from 12 h after ischemic insult in a time-dependent manner, and, at 5 days post-ischemia, PRAS40 immunoreactivity was newly expressed in astrocytes. p-PRAS40 immunoreactivity in the CA1 pyramidal neurons was hardly found 12 h and apparently detected again 1 and 2 days after ischemic insult. At 5 days post-ischemia, p-PRAS40 immunoreactivity in the CA1 pyramidal neurons was not found. These results indicate that ischemia-induced changes in PRAS40 and p-PRAS40 immunoreactivities in CA1 pyramidal neurons and astrocytes may be closely associated with delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 region following transient cerebral ischemia. PMID:26526334

  11. Resveratrol protects CA1 neurons against focal cerebral ischemic reperfusion-induced damage via the ERK-CREB signaling pathway in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Fang, Fang; Wang, Yuanyin; Wang, Liecheng

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a primary cause of mortality and disability in the aged population. Resveratrol (Res), a natural polyphenol enriched in plants, presents diverse biological activities, e.g., antiinflammatory and anti-oxidation effects. Here, we evaluated whether Res pretreatment influenced focal cerebral ischemia-induced cognitive impairment, and we explored the underlying mechanisms in rats. The results showed that a single administration of Res (30mg/kg, i.p.) at 1 or 4h, but not at 24h before focal cerebral ischemia exerted significant neuroprotective effects, including a reduction in hippocampal CA1 neuronal death and spatial cognition deficits caused by ischemia. The neuroprotective effects of Res were suppressed by pretreatment with MK801, an NMDA receptor blocker, or U0126, an extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) kinase inhibitor. A western blot analysis revealed that Res treatment at 1h before ischemia significantly increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cyclic-AMP response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, which can be prevented with U0126 pretreatment. The results showed that the NMDA receptor-mediated ERK-CREB signaling pathway might participates in Res-induced neuroprotection in rats with focal cerebral ischemia. PMID:27143440

  12. Induction of oxidative stress and inhibition of superoxide dismutase expression in rat cerebral cortex and cerebellum by PTU-induced hypothyroidism and its reversal by curcumin.

    PubMed

    Jena, Srikanta; Anand, Chinmay; Chainy, Gagan Bihari Nityananda; Dandapat, Jagneshwar

    2012-08-01

    The present study was carried out to elucidate the effectiveness of curcumin in ameliorating the expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in cerebral cortex and cerebellum of rat brain under 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU)-induced hypothyroidism. Induction of hypothyroidism in adult rats by PTU resulted in augmentation of lipid peroxidation (LPx), an index of oxidative stress in cerebellum but not in cerebral cortex. Curcumin-supplementation to PTU-treated (hypothyroid) rats showed significant reduction in the level of LPx in both the regions of brain. The decreased translated products (SOD1 and SOD2) and the unchanged activity of SOD in cerebral cortex of PTU-treated rats were increased on supplementation of curcumin to the hypothyroid rats. Declined translated products of SOD1 and SOD2 in cerebellum of PTU-treated rats were alleviated on administration of curcumin to hypothyroid rats. On the other hand, the decreased activity of SOD in cerebellum of PTU-treated rats was further declined on administration of curcumin to the hypothyroid rats. Results of the present investigation indicate that curcumin differentially modulates the expression of superoxide dismutase in rat brain cortex and cerebellum under PTU-induced hypothyroidism. PMID:22076484

  13. Protective effects of propofol against whole cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats through the inhibition of the apoptosis-inducing factor pathway.

    PubMed

    Tao, Tao; Li, Chun-Lei; Yang, Wan-Chao; Zeng, Xian-Zhang; Song, Chun-Yu; Yue, Zi-Yong; Dong, Hong; Qian, Hua

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury could cause neural apoptosis that involved the signaling cascades. Cytochrome c release from the mitochondria and the followed activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3 are the important steps. Now, a new mitochondrial protein, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), has been shown to have relationship with the caspase-independent apoptotic pathway. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of propofol through inhibiting AIF-mediated apoptosis induced by whole cerebral I/R injury in rats. 120 Wistar rats that obtained the permission of the animal care committee of Harbin Medical University were randomly divided into three groups: sham group (S group), cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury group (I/R group), and propofol treatment group (P group). Propofol (1.0mg/kg/min) was administered intravenously for 1h before the induction of ischemia in P group. The apoptotic rate in three groups was detected by flow cytometry after 24h of reperfusion. The mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) changes were detected via microplate reader. The expressions of B-cell leukemia-2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2 associated X protein (Bax) and AIF were evaluated using Western blot after 6h, 24h and 48h of reperfusion. The results of our study showed that apoptotic level was lower in P group compared with I/R group and propofol could protect MMP. The ratio of Bcl-2/Bax was significantly higher in P group compared with I/R group. The translocation of AIF from mitochondrial to nucleus was lower in P group than that in I/R group. Our findings suggested that the protective effects of propofol on cerebral I/R injury might be associated with inhibiting translocation of AIF from mitochondrial to the nucleus in hippocampal neurons. PMID:27163721

  14. Role of thalamic nuclei in the modulation of Fos expression within the cerebral cortex during hypertonic saline-induced muscle nociception.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Lei, J; Ye, G; Xu, H; You, H-J

    2015-09-24

    It has been proposed that thalamic mediodorsal (MD) and ventromedial (VM) nuclei form thalamic 'nociceptive discriminators' in discrimination of nociceptive afferents, and specifically govern endogenous descending facilitation and inhibition. The present study conducted in rats was to explore the role of thalamic MD and VM nuclei in modulation of cerebral neuronal activities by means of detection of spatiotemporal variations of Fos expression within the cerebral cortex. Following a unilateral intramuscular injection of 5.8% saline into the gastrocnemius muscle, Fos expression within the bilateral, different areas of the cerebral cortex except S2 was significantly increased (P<0.05). Particularly, the increases in Fos expression within the cingulate cortex and the insular cortex occurred at 0.5h, 4h and reached the peak level at 4h, 16h, respectively. Electrolytic lesion of the contralateral thalamic MD and VM nuclei significantly blocked the 5.8% saline intramuscularly induced increases in Fos expression within the bilateral cingulate and insular cortices, respectively. Additionally, the 5.8% saline-induced Fos expression in the cingulate cortex and the insular cortex were dose-dependently attenuated by microinjection of μ-opioid antagonist β-funaltrexamine hydrochloride into the thalamic MD and VM nuclei. It is suggested that (1) the neural circuits of 'thalamic MD nucleus - cingulate cortex' and 'thalamic VM nucleus - insular cortex' form two distinct pathways in the endogenous control of nociception, (2) mirror or contralateral pain is hypothesized to be related to cross-talk of neuronal activities within the bilateral cerebral cortices modulated by μ-opioid receptors within the thalamic MD and VM nuclei. PMID:26189794

  15. Traumatic Brain Injury-Induced Ependymal Ciliary Loss Decreases Cerebral Spinal Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Guoxiang; Elkind, Jaclynn A.; Kundu, Suhali; Smith, Colin J.; Antunes, Marcelo B.; Tamashiro, Edwin; Kofonow, Jennifer M.; Mitala, Christina. M.; Stein, Sherman C.; Grady, M. Sean; Einhorn, Eugene; Cohen, Noam A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) afflicts up to 2 million people annually in the United States and is the primary cause of death and disability in young adults and children. Previous TBI studies have focused predominantly on the morphological, biochemical, and functional alterations of gray matter structures, such as the hippocampus. However, little attention has been given to the brain ventricular system, despite the fact that altered ventricular function is known to occur in brain pathologies. In the present study, we investigated anatomical and functional alterations to mouse ventricular cilia that result from mild TBI. We demonstrate that TBI causes a dramatic decrease in cilia. Further, using a particle tracking technique, we demonstrate that cerebrospinal fluid flow is diminished, thus potentially negatively affecting waste and nutrient exchange. Interestingly, injury-induced ventricular system pathology resolves completely by 30 days after injury as ependymal cell ciliogenesis restores cilia density to uninjured levels in the affected lateral ventricle. PMID:24749541

  16. XeCl excimer laser-induced autofluorescence spectroscopy for human cerebral tumor diagnosis: preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrillier, Sigrid; Hor, Frederic; Desgeorges, Michel; Ettori, Dominique; Sitbon, Jean R.

    1993-09-01

    Three-hundred-eight nm laser-induced autofluorescence spectra of the normal human brain, astrocytoma grade IV and glioblastoma grade IV specimens, have been recorded in vitro two hours after surgical resection. Typical fluorescence spectra for normal (N) and malignant (M) tissue show 4 maxima at about 352, 362, 383, and 460 nm. These spectra are analyzed in detail. Subtle differences in normalized spectra of N and M tissues appear to be large enough for diagnosis. Several criteria such as maxima and minima absolute intensity and intensity ratios at typical wavelengths are computed and used to classify the tissue. This preliminary study shows that fluorescence spectroscopy with 308 nm UV excitation could be a valid technique for discriminating tumor types. However, it should be noted that these measurements are made in vitro. Living tissues may have different spectral characteristics, therefore future in vivo investigations must be performed.

  17. Toward a theory of the general-anesthetic-induced phase transition of the cerebral cortex. I. A thermodynamics analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steyn-Ross, Moira L.; Steyn-Ross, D. A.; Sleigh, J. W.; Wilcocks, Lara C.

    2001-07-01

    In a recent paper the authors developed a stochastic model for the response of the cerebral cortex to a general anesthetic agent. The model predicted that there would be an anesthetic-induced phase change at the point of transition into unconsciousness, manifested as a divergence in the electroencephalogram spectral power, and a change in spectral energy distribution from being relatively broadband in the conscious state to being strongly biased towards much lower frequencies in the unconscious state. Both predictions have been verified in recent clinical measurements. In the present paper we extend the model by calculating the equilibrium distribution function for the cortex, allowing us to establish a correspondence between the cortical phase transition and the more familiar thermodynamic phase transitions. This correspondence is achieved by first identifying a cortical free energy function, then by postulating that there exists an inverse relationship between an anesthetic effect and a quantity we define as cortical excitability, which plays a role analogous to temperature in thermodynamic phase transitions. We follow standard thermodynamic theory to compute a cortical entropy and a cortical ``heat capacity,'' and we investigate how these will vary with anesthetic concentration. The significant result is the prediction that the entropy will decrease discontinuously at the moment of induction into unconsciousness, concomitant with a release of ``latent heat'' which should manifest as a divergence in the analogous heat capacity. There is clear clinical evidence of heat capacity divergence in historical anesthetic-effect measurements performed in 1977 by Stullken et al. [Anesthesiology 46, 28 (1977)]. The discontinuous step change in cortical entropy suggests that the cortical phase transition is analogous to a first-order thermodynamic transition in which the comatose-quiescent state is strongly ordered, while the active cortical state is relatively disordered.

  18. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Wimalasundera, Neil; Stevenson, Valerie L

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral palsy has always been known as a disorder of movement and posture resulting from a non-progressive injury to the developing brain; however, more recent definitions allow clinicians to appreciate more than just the movement disorder. Accurate classification of cerebral palsy into distribution, motor type and functional level has advanced research. It also facilitates appropriate targeting of interventions to functional level and more accurate prognosis prediction. The prevalence of cerebral palsy remains fairly static at 2-3 per 1000 live births but there have been some changes in trends for specific causal groups. Interventions for cerebral palsy have historically been medical and physically focused, often with limited evidence to support their efficacy. The use of more appropriate outcome measures encompassing quality of life and participation is helping to deliver treatments which are more meaningful for people with cerebral palsy and their carers. PMID:26837375

  19. Glutamatergic and central cholinergic dysfunction in the CA1, CA2 and CA3 fields on spatial learning and memory in chronic cerebral ischemia-Induced vascular dementia of rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanjing; Gou, Zengmei; Du, Yifeng; Fan, Yongjun; Liang, Lizhen; Yan, Yongxing; Lin, Ping; Jin, Mudan; Du, Yifenf

    2016-05-01

    Chronic cerebral ischemia (CCI) is associated with cognitive decline in aging, vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Substantial evidence has shown that chronic cerebral ischemia may cause cognitive impairment, but the underlying neurobiological mechanism is poorly understood so far. In the present study, we used a rat model of chronic cerebral ischemia by permanent bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) to investigate the alterations of glutamatergic and central cholinergic dysfunction, and their causal relationship with the cognitive deficits induced by chronic cerebral ischemia. We found that BCCAO rats exhibited spatial learning and memory impairments dysfunction 3 month after BCCAO. Meanwhile, vGluT levels as well as glutamatergic and central cholinergic positive neurons in the hippocampus CA1-3 field significantly decreased. The protection of glutamergic and cholinergic neurons or regulating glutamate and central cholinergic levels in hippocampal subregion may have beneficial effects on cognitive impairments associated with the possible mechanism in CCI-induced vascular dementia. PMID:27040427

  20. Visually induced nausea causes characteristic changes in cerebral, autonomic and endocrine function in humans

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Adam D; Ban, Vin F; Coen, Steven J; Sanger, Gareth J; Barker, Gareth J; Gresty, Michael A; Giampietro, Vincent P; Williams, Steven C; Webb, Dominic L; Hellström, Per M; Andrews, Paul L R; Aziz, Qasim

    2015-01-01

    Abstract An integrated understanding of the physiological mechanisms involved in the genesis of nausea remains lacking. We aimed to describe the psychophysiological changes accompanying visually induced motion sickness, using a motion video, hypothesizing that differences would be evident between subjects who developed nausea in comparison to those who did not. A motion, or a control, stimulus was presented to 98 healthy subjects in a randomized crossover design. Validated questionnaires and a visual analogue scale (VAS) were used for the assessment of anxiety and nausea. Autonomic and electrogastrographic activity were measured at baseline and continuously thereafter. Plasma vasopressin and ghrelin were measured in response to the motion video. Subjects were stratified into quartiles based on VAS nausea scores, with the upper and lower quartiles considered to be nausea sensitive and resistant, respectively. Twenty-eight subjects were exposed to the motion video during functional neuroimaging. During the motion video, nausea-sensitive subjects had lower normogastria/tachygastria ratio and cardiac vagal tone but higher cardiac sympathetic index in comparison to the control video. Furthermore, nausea-sensitive subjects had decreased plasma ghrelin and demonstrated increased activity of the left anterior cingulate cortex. Nausea VAS scores correlated positively with plasma vasopressin and left inferior frontal and middle occipital gyri activity and correlated negatively with plasma ghrelin and brain activity in the right cerebellar tonsil, declive, culmen, lingual gyrus and cuneus. This study demonstrates that the subjective sensation of nausea is associated with objective changes in autonomic, endocrine and brain networks, and thus identifies potential objective biomarkers and targets for therapeutic interventions. Key points Nausea is a highly individual and variable experience. The reasons for this variability are incompletely understood although

  1. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α upregulation in microglia following hypoxia protects against ischemia-induced cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Huang, Weiyi; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Yu, Lei; Xie, Caijun; Zhu, Dongan; Peng, Zizhuang; Chen, Jiehan

    2014-10-01

    Activated microglia were considered to be the toxic inflammatory mediators that induce neuron degeneration after brain ischemia. Hypoxia can enhance the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in microglia and cause microglial activation. However, intermittent hypoxia has been reported recently to be capable of protecting the body from myocardial ischemia. We established a high-altitude environment as the hypoxic condition in this study. The hypoxic condition displayed a neuroprotective effect after brain ischemia, and mice exposed to this condition presented better neurological performance and smaller infarct size. At the same time, a high level of HIF-1α, low level of isoform of nitric oxide synthase, and a reduction in microglial activation were also seen in ischemic focus of hypoxic mice. However, this neuroprotective effect could be blocked by 2-methoxyestradiol, the HIF-1α inhibitor. Our finding suggested that HIF-1α expression was involved in microglial activation in vitro and was regulated by oxygen supply. The microglia were inactivated by re-exposure to hypoxia, which might be due to overexpression of HIF-1α. These results indicated that hypoxic conditions can be exploited to achieve maximum neuroprotection after brain ischemia. This mechanism possibly lies in microglial inactivation through regulation of the expression of HIF-1α. PMID:25089804

  2. Flight-induced inhibition of the cerebral median peptidergic neurosecretory system in Locusta migratoria

    SciTech Connect

    Diederen, J.H.; van Etten, E.W.; Biegstraaten, A.I.; Terlou, M.; Vullings, H.G.; Jansen, W.F.

    1988-08-01

    This study discusses the effects of a 1-hr period of flight on the peptidergic pars intercerebralis (PI)-corpus cardiacum storage part (CCS) system in male Locusta migratoria, particularly the effect on material in this system stained by a histochemical method for peptidergic neurosecretory material (NSM) or labeled by in vivo incorporation of radioactive amino acid molecules. By use of an automatic image analysis system a number of parameters of the stained or radioactively labeled substances were measured to quantify the flight-induced effects and to get information on the manner in which the neurosecretory cell bodies in the PI and their axonal endings in the CCS accommodate changing amounts of NSM. The CCS of flown locusts contained distinctly more stained and radioactively labeled substances than the CCS of unflown locusts. A tendency to similar differences was observed in the cluster of neurosecretory cell bodies in the PI. The results indicate that 1 hr flight inhibited the release of NSM by the PI-CCS system. After the onset of reduced release activity by flight, some NSM continued to be synthesized and transported from the PI to the CCS, gradually filling up and expanding the entire PI-CCS system, the NSM at the same time becoming more and more densely packed. It is concluded that the peptidergic PI-CCS system is not actively involved in the control of flight metabolism or flight behavior.

  3. Muscle Recruitment and Coordination following Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy with Electrical Stimulation on Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kaishou; He, Lu; Mai, Jianning; Yan, Xiaohua; Chen, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate changes of muscle recruitment and coordination following constraint-induced movement therapy, constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation, and traditional occupational therapy in treating hand dysfunction. Methods In a randomized, single-blind, controlled trial, children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy were randomly assigned to receive constraint-induced movement therapy (n = 22), constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation (n = 23), or traditional occupational therapy (n = 23). Three groups received a 2-week hospital-based intervention and a 6-month home-based exercise program following hospital-based intervention. Constraint-induced movement therapy involved intensive functional training of the involved hand during which the uninvolved hand was constrained. Electrical stimulation was applied on wrist extensors of the involved hand. Traditional occupational therapy involved functional unimanual and bimanual training. All children underwent clinical assessments and surface electromyography (EMG) at baseline, 2 weeks, 3 and 6 months after treatment. Surface myoelectric signals were integrated EMG, root mean square and cocontraction ratio. Clinical measures were grip strength and upper extremity functional test. Results Constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation group showed both a greater rate of improvement in integrated EMG of the involved wrist extensors and cocontraction ratio compared to the other two groups at 3 and 6 months, as well as improving in root mean square of the involved wrist extensors than traditional occupational therapy group (p<0.05). Positive correlations were found between both upper extremity functional test scores and integrated EMG of the involved wrist as well as grip strength and integrated EMG of the involved wrist extensors (p<0.05). Conclusions Constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation is likely to produce the best outcome in

  4. Hemodynamic changes in a rat parietal cortex after endothelin-1-induced middle cerebral artery occlusion monitored by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Ma, Yushu; Dou, Shidan; Wang, Yi; La, Dongsheng; Liu, Jianghong; Ma, Zhenhe

    2016-07-01

    A blockage of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) on the cortical branch will seriously affect the blood supply of the cerebral cortex. Real-time monitoring of MCA hemodynamic parameters is critical for therapy and rehabilitation. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful imaging modality that can produce not only structural images but also functional information on the tissue. We use OCT to detect hemodynamic changes after MCA branch occlusion. We injected a selected dose of endothelin-1 (ET-1) at a depth of 1 mm near the MCA and let the blood vessels follow a process first of occlusion and then of slow reperfusion as realistically as possible to simulate local cerebral ischemia. During this period, we used optical microangiography and Doppler OCT to obtain multiple hemodynamic MCA parameters. The change trend of these parameters from before to after ET-1 injection clearly reflects the dynamic regularity of the MCA. These results show the mechanism of the cerebral ischemia-reperfusion process after a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion and confirm that OCT can be used to monitor hemodynamic parameters.

  5. Brazilein inhibits neuronal inflammation induced by cerebral ischemia and oxygen-glucose deprivation through targeting NOD2 expression.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiao-Jin; Chai, Yu-Shuang; Yuan, Zhi-Yi; Wang, Xin-Pei; Jiang, Jing-Fei; Lei, Fan; Xing, Dong-Ming; DU, Li-Jun

    2016-05-01

    Brazilein is reported to have immunosuppressive effect on cardiovascular and cerebral-vascular diseases. The essential roles of innate immunity in cerebral ischemia are increasingly identified, but no studies concerning the influence of brazilein on the innate immunity receptors have been reported. The present study was designed to investigate the regulation of NOD2 (Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2) by brazilein for its protection of neuron in cerebral ischemia in vivo and oxygen-glucose deprivation in vitro. The results showed that brazilein could reverse the elevated expression of NOD2 and TNFα (tumor necrosis factor alpha) elicited by cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. This reduction could also be detected in normal mice and C17.2 cells, indicating that this suppressive effect of brazilein was correlated with NOD2. The results from GFP reporter plasmid assay suggested brazilein inhibited NOD2 gene transcription. In conclusion, brazilein could attenuate NOD2 and TNFα expression in cerebral ischemia and NOD2 may be one possible target of brazilein for its immune suppressive effect in neuro-inflammation. PMID:27478098

  6. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Graham, H Kerr; Rosenbaum, Peter; Paneth, Nigel; Dan, Bernard; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Damiano, Diane L; Becher, Jules G; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Colver, Allan; Reddihough, Dinah S; Crompton, Kylie E; Lieber, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of childhood-onset, lifelong physical disability in most countries, affecting about 1 in 500 neonates with an estimated prevalence of 17 million people worldwide. Cerebral palsy is not a disease entity in the traditional sense but a clinical description of children who share features of a non-progressive brain injury or lesion acquired during the antenatal, perinatal or early postnatal period. The clinical manifestations of cerebral palsy vary greatly in the type of movement disorder, the degree of functional ability and limitation and the affected parts of the body. There is currently no cure, but progress is being made in both the prevention and the amelioration of the brain injury. For example, administration of magnesium sulfate during premature labour and cooling of high-risk infants can reduce the rate and severity of cerebral palsy. Although the disorder affects individuals throughout their lifetime, most cerebral palsy research efforts and management strategies currently focus on the needs of children. Clinical management of children with cerebral palsy is directed towards maximizing function and participation in activities and minimizing the effects of the factors that can make the condition worse, such as epilepsy, feeding challenges, hip dislocation and scoliosis. These management strategies include enhancing neurological function during early development; managing medical co-morbidities, weakness and hypertonia; using rehabilitation technologies to enhance motor function; and preventing secondary musculoskeletal problems. Meeting the needs of people with cerebral palsy in resource-poor settings is particularly challenging. PMID:27188686

  7. Region-specific cerebral metabolic alterations in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic rats: an in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Huang, Mingming; Gao, Lifeng; Lei, Hao

    2015-11-01

    Clinical and experimental in vivo (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) studies have demonstrated that type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is associated with cerebral metabolic abnormalities. However, less is known whether T1DM induces different metabolic disturbances in different brain regions. In this study, in vivo (1)H-MRS was used to measure metabolic alterations in the visual cortex, striatum, and hippocampus of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced uncontrolled T1DM rats at 4 days and 4 weeks after induction. It was observed that altered neuronal metabolism occurred in STZ-treated rats as early as 4 days after induction. At 4 weeks, T1DM-related metabolic disturbances were clearly region specific. The diabetic visual cortex had more or less normal-appearing metabolic profile; while the striatum and hippocampus showed similar abnormalities in neuronal metabolism involving N-acetyl aspartate and glutamate; but only the hippocampus exhibited significant changes in glial markers such as taurine and myo-inositol. It is concluded that cerebral metabolic perturbations in STZ-induced T1DM rats are region specific at 4 weeks after induction, perhaps as a manifestation of varied vulnerability among the brain regions to sustained hyperglycemia. PMID:26036938

  8. Therapeutic interventions in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dilip R

    2005-11-01

    Various therapeutic interventions have been used in the management of children with cerebral palsy. Traditional physiotherapy and occupational therapy are widely used interventions and have been shown to be of benefit in the treatment of cerebral palsy. Evidence in support of the effectiveness of the neurodevelopmental treatment is equivocal at best. There is evidence to support the use and effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in children with cerebral palsy. The effectiveness of many other interventions used in the treatment of cerebral palsy has not been clearly established based on well-controlled trials. These include: sensory integration, body-weight support treadmill training, conductive education, constraint-induced therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and the Vojta method. This article provides an overview of salient aspects of popular interventions used in the management of children with cerebral palsy. PMID:16391455

  9. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of disorders that affect a ... ability to move and maintain balance and posture. CP is the most common motor disability in childhood. ...

  10. Cerebral Arteriosclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cerebral arteriosclerosis is the result of thickening and hardening of the walls of the arteries in the ... cause an ischemic stroke. When the thickening and hardening is uneven, arterial walls can develop bulges (called ...

  11. Cerebral angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cerebral angiography is done in the hospital or radiology center. You lie on an x-ray table. ... be done in preparation for medical treatment (interventional radiology procedures) by way of certain blood vessels. What ...

  12. Facilitating Mitochondrial Calcium Uptake Improves Activation-Induced Cerebral Blood Flow and Behavior after mTBI

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Madhuvika; Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Kannurpatti, Sridhar S.

    2016-01-01

    Mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (mTBI) leads to secondary neuronal loss via excitotoxic mechanisms, including mitochondrial Ca2+ overload. However, in the surviving cellular population, mitochondrial Ca2+ influx, and oxidative metabolism are diminished leading to suboptimal neuronal circuit activity and poor prognosis. Hence we tested the impact of boosting neuronal electrical activity and oxidative metabolism by facilitating mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in a rat model of mTBI. In developing rats (P25-P26) sustaining an mTBI, we demonstrate post-traumatic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the sensorimotor cortex in response to whisker stimulation compared to sham using functional Laser Doppler Imaging (fLDI) at adulthood (P67-P73). Compared to sham, whisker stimulation-evoked positive CBF responses decreased while negative CBF responses increased in the mTBI animals. The spatiotemporal CBF changes representing underlying neuronal activity suggested profound changes to neurovascular activity after mTBI. Behavioral assessment of the same cohort of animals prior to fLDI showed that mTBI resulted in persistent contralateral sensorimotor behavioral deficit along with ipsilateral neuronal loss compared to sham. Treating mTBI rats with Kaempferol, a dietary flavonol compound that enhanced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, eliminated the inter-hemispheric asymmetry in the whisker stimulation-induced positive CBF responses and the ipsilateral negative CBF responses otherwise observed in the untreated and vehicle-treated mTBI animals in adulthood. Kaempferol also improved somatosensory behavioral measures compared to untreated and vehicle treated mTBI animals without augmenting post-injury neuronal loss. The results indicate that reduced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in the surviving populations affect post-traumatic neural activation leading to persistent behavioral deficits. Improvement in sensorimotor behavior and spatiotemporal neurovascular activity following kaempferol

  13. The Comparisons of Cerebral Hemodynamics Induced by Obstructive Sleep Apnea with Arousal and Periodic Limb Movement with Arousal: A Pilot NIRS Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Schneider, Maja; Laures, Marco; Qi, Ming; Khatami, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and restless legs syndrome (RLS) with periodic limb movement during sleep (PLMS) are two sleep disorders characterized by repetitive respiratory or movement events associated with cortical arousals. We compared the cerebral hemodynamic changes linked to periodic apneas/hypopneas with arousals (AHA) in four OSA-patients with periodic limb movements (PLMA) with arousals in four patients with RLS-PLMS using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). AHA induced homogenous pattern of periodic fluctuations in oxygenated (HbO2) and deoxygenated (HHb) hemoglobin, i.e., the decrease of HbO2 was accompanied by an increase of HHb during the respiratory event and resolved to reverse pattern when cortical arousal started. Blood volume (BV) showed the same pattern as HHb but with relative smaller amplitude in most of the AHA events.These changing patterns were significant as Wilcoxon signed-rank tests gave p < 0.001 when comparing the area under the curve of these hemodynamic parameters to zero. By contrast, in PLMA limb movements induced periodic increments in HbO2 and BV (Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, p < 0.001), but HHb changed more heterogeneously even during the events coming from the same patient. Heart rate (HR) also showed different patterns between AHA and PLMA. It significantly decreased during the respiratory event (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001) and then increased after the occurrence of cortical arousal (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001); while in PLMA HR first increased preceding the occurrence of cortical arousal (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001) and then decreased. The results of this preliminary study show that both AHA and PLMA induce changes in cerebral hemodynamics. The occurrence of cortical arousal is accompanied by increased HR in both events, but by different BV changes (i.e., decreased/increased BV in AHA/PLMA, respectively). HR changes may partially account for the increased cerebral hemodynamics during PLMA

  14. Ruscogenin Attenuates Cerebral Ischemia-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction by Suppressing TXNIP/NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation and the MAPK Pathway.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guosheng; Jiang, Nan; Hu, Yang; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Guangyun; Yin, Mingzhu; Ma, Xiaonan; Zhou, Kecheng; Qi, Jin; Yu, Boyang; Kou, Junping

    2016-01-01

    Ruscogenin, an important steroid sapogenin derived from Ophiopogon japonicus, has been shown to inhibit cerebral ischemic injury. However, its potential molecular action on blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction after stroke remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effects of ruscogenin on BBB dysfunction and the underlying mechanisms in middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion (MCAO/R)-injured mice and oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R)-injured mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (bEnd.3). The results demonstrated that administration of ruscogenin (10 mg/kg) decreased the brain infarction and edema, improved neurological deficits, increased cerebral brain flow (CBF), ameliorated histopathological damage, reduced evans blue (EB) leakage and upregulated the expression of tight junctions (TJs) in MCAO/R-injured mice. Meanwhile, ruscogenin (0.1-10 µM) treatment increased cell viability and trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) value, decreased sodium fluorescein leakage, and modulated the TJs expression in OGD/R-induced bEnd.3 cells. Moreover, ruscogenin also inhibited the expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and caspase-1, and markedly suppressed the expression of Nucleotide-binding domain (NOD)-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) and thiredoxin-interactive protein (TXNIP) in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, ruscogenin decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and inhibited the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in OGD/R-induced bEnd.3 cells. Our findings provide some new insights into its potential application for the prevention and treatment of ischemic stroke. PMID:27589720

  15. Effectiveness of Constraint induced movement therapy as compared to bimanual therapy in Upper motor function outcome in child with hemiplegic Cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Zafer, Hira; Amjad, Imran; Malik, Arshad Nawaz; Shaukat, Enfall

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aims at determining the effectiveness of constraint induced movement therapy as compared to bimanual therapy for improving functional status in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy. Methods: This study was a randomized control trial, children (n = 20) with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy was randomly allocated to CIMT (constraint induced movement therapy) and BMT (bimanual therapy) group. The children with spastic hemiplegia, age between 1.5 and 12 year and having 10 degrees of wrist extension and 10 degrees of finger extension were included in study. Treatment regime was two hours of daily training six days a week for two weeks. Constraint was applied to CIMT group for six hours. The outcome tool QUEST was used for baseline and post treatment assessment. Result: CIMT had superior outcome as compared to BMT in improving functional status (p=0.007). On QUEST tool grasp and dissociated movements results were significant (p=0.005) and (p=0.028) respectively. Weight bearing and protective extension resulted in no significant outcome (p=0.080) and (p=0.149) respectively. Dissociated movements and grasp are significantly improved but there is no difference for weight bearing and protective extension in CIMT treated group as compared to BMT treated group. Conclusion: CIMT approach is better in improving functional status of child with cerebral palsy as compared to BMT. Significant improvement in grasp and dissociated movement is noted in group of CIMT while there was no significant improvement in weight bearing and protective extension in CIMT group when compared to BMT. CIMT is considered the appropriate treatment approach for unilateral conditions while BMT for bilateral conditions. PMID:27022371

  16. Montelukast, a cysteinyl leukotriene receptor-1 antagonist protects against hippocampal injury induced by transient global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Saad, M A; Abdelsalam, R M; Kenawy, S A; Attia, A S

    2015-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) are potent pro-inflammatory and immune modulating lipid mediators involved in inflammatory diseases and were boosted in human brain after acute phase of cerebral ischemia. The antagonism of CysLTs receptors may offer protection against ischemic damage. Therefore it seemed interesting to study the possible neuroprotective effect of Montelukast, a CysLTR1 antagonist in global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury in rats. Global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion was induced by bilateral carotid artery occlusion for 15 min followed by 60 min reperfusion period. Animals were randomly allocated into three groups (n = 30 per group): Sham operated, I/R control and rats treated with montelukast (0.5 mg/kg, po) daily for 7 days then I/R was induced 1 h after the last dose of montelukast. After reperfusion rats were killed by decapitation, brains were removed and both hippocampi separated and the following biochemical parameters were estimated; lactate dehydrogenase activity, oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxides, nitric oxide and reduced glutathione), inflammatory markers (myeloperoxidase, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, nuclear factor kappa-B, interleukin-6 and interleukin-10), apoptotic biomarkers (caspase 3 and cytochrome C), neurotransmitters (glutamate, gamma aminobutyric acid), Cys-LTs contents and CysLT1 receptor expression; as well as total brain infarct size and histopathological examination of the hippocampus were assessed. Montelukast protected hippocampal tissue by reducing oxidative stress, inflammatory and apoptotic markers. Furthermore, it reduced glutamate and lactate dehydrogenase activity as well as infarct size elevated by I/R. These results were consistent with the histopathological findings. Montelukast showed a neuroprotective effects through antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic mechanisms. PMID:25403620

  17. [Deep hypotension induced by sodium nitroprusside in neurosurgery. II.--Cerebral hemodynamic effects and metabolic rate of oxygen (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Pinaud, M; Souron, R; Gazeau, M F; Lajat, Y; Chatal, J F; Nicolas, F

    1979-01-01

    The cerebral hemodynamic effects of sodium nitroprusside (S. N.) have been the object of animal studies mainly. During the only human study performed, the drop in mean arterial pressure (MAP) is limited to 67 mm Hg. The study of the evolution of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in cases of more severe hypotension (MAP less than 45 mm Hg) seems of some interest. The study was composed of the measurement of the CBF using Xenon 133 and the calculation of cerebral vascular resistances (CVR) as well as cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2). Eleven patients with an average age of 37 years underwent surgery for cerebral aneurism 10 to 15 days after the inaugural hemorrhagic accident, under narconeuroleptanalgesia and stable ventilatory conditions. They are divided into 2 groups: Group I, 9 patients with normal levels of consciousness; Group II, 2 patients either agitated or obnubilated. The study is composed of 3 successive measures: (1) (T0) during stable anesthesia just prior to hypotension; (2) (T1) after 5 minutes of hypotension (MAP = 40 +/- 7 MM Hg); (3) (T2) 20 minutes after having stopped S. N. infusion. For the 9 patients in Group I, CBF remains unchanged at T1, the CVR decreases (p less than 0.001) and CMRO2 decreases (p less than 0.05). At T2 all of these parameters return to T0 values. The postoperative clinical evolution is favorable and uncomplicated. For the 2 patients in Group II the CBF, initially higher, falls from 20 to 30 p. cent at T1 with a drastic reduction in CMRO2. Despite the improvement of these parameters at T2, a prolonged postoperative coma is observed. This study suggests that CBF and CMRO2 are important parameters to monitor during controlled severe hypotension. Decrease in MAP must be less than 50 p. cent of control value and time-limited. PMID:484888

  18. Triptan-induced contractile (5-HT1B receptor) responses in human cerebral and coronary arteries: relationship to clinical effect.

    PubMed

    Edvinsson, Lars; Uddman, Erik; Wackenfors, Angelica; Davenport, Anthony; Longmore, Jenny; Malmsjö, Malin

    2005-09-01

    Triptans are agonists at 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D (where 5-HT is 5-hydroxytryptamine; serotonin) receptors and cause vasoconstriction of isolated blood vessels. The aim of the present study was to determine vasoconstrictor potency (EC50) of triptans in human coronary and cerebral arteries and to examine whether there was any relationship with the maximal plasma concentrations (Cmax; nM) of the drugs achieved following oral administration of clinically relevant doses to man using values reported in the literature. We also examined the expression of 5-HT1B receptors in atherosclerotic and normal coronary arteries. The vasocontractile responses to sumatriptan, rizatriptan or eletriptan were characterized by in vitro pharmacology. The ratio of Cmax/EC50 was calculated. 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors were visualized by immunohistochemical techniques in coronary arteries. Sumatriptan, rizatriptan and eletriptan were powerful vasoconstrictors in cerebral artery. The rank order of agonist potency was eletriptan=rizatriptan=sumatriptan. In the coronary artery, the triptans were weaker vasoconstrictors. The rank order of potency was similar. In cerebral artery the ratio of Cmax/EC50 was not significantly different from unity, indicating a relationship between these two parameters. In general for the coronary artery, the ratios were significantly less than unity, indicating no direct relationship. Immunohistochemistry showed expression of 5-HT1B receptors in the medial layer, but did not reveal any obvious difference in 5-HT1B receptor expression between normal and atherosclerotic coronary arteries. The results support the notion that triptans are selective vasoconstrictors of cerebral arteries over coronary arteries and that there is a relationship between vasoconstrictor potency in cerebral arteries and clinically relevant plasma levels. PMID:15853772

  19. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Parents > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... kids who are living with the condition. About Cerebral Palsy Cerebral palsy is one of the most common ...

  20. Cerebral palsy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cerebral palsy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cerebral palsy : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/cerebral_palsy/cerebral_palsy. ...

  1. MicroRNA-25 Negatively Regulates Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury-Induced Cell Apoptosis Through Fas/FasL Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun-Feng; Shi, Li-Li; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Zhao-Hua; Liang, Fei; Xu, Xi; Zhao, Ling-Yu; Yang, Peng-Bo; Zhang, Jian-Shui; Tian, Ying-Fang

    2016-04-01

    MicroRNA-25 (miR-25) has been reported to be a major miRNA marker in neural cells and is strongly expressed in ischemic brain tissues. However, the precise mechanism and effect of miR-25 in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury needs further investigations. In the present study, the oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model was constructed in human SH-SY5Y and IMR-32 cells to mimic I/R injury and to evaluate the role of miR-25 in regulating OGD/reperfusion (OGDR)-induced cell apoptosis. We found that miR-25 was downregulated in the OGDR model. Overexpression of miR-25 via miRNA-mimics transfection remarkably inhibited OGDR-induced cell apoptosis. Moreover, Fas was predicted as a target gene of miR-25 through bioinformatic analysis. The interaction between miR-25 and 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of Fas mRNA was confirmed by dual-luciferase reporter assay. Fas protein expression was downregulated by miR-25 overexpression in OGDR model. Subsequently, the small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of Fas expression also inhibited cell apoptosis induced by OGDR model; in contrast, Fas overexpression abrogated the protective effects of miR-25 on OGDR-induced cells. Taken together, our results indicate that the upregulation of miR-25 inhibits cerebral I/R injury-induced apoptosis through downregulating Fas/FasL, which will provide a promising therapeutic target. PMID:26768135

  2. Pretreatment with 2-(4-Methoxyphenyl)ethyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-β-D-pyranoside Attenuates Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Injury In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xia; Deng, Aiqing; Zhou, Tianqiu; Ding, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Salidroside, extracted from the root of Rhodiola rosea L, is known for its pharmacological properties, in particular its neuroprotective effects. 2-(4-Methoxyphenyl) ethyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-β-D- pyranoside (GlcNAc-Sal), an analog of salidroside, was recently synthesized and shown to possess neuroprotective properties. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of GlcNAc-Sal against oxygen–glucose deprivation-reperfusion (OGD-R)-induced neurotoxicity in vitro and global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (GCI-R) injury in vivo. Cell viability tests and Hoechst 33342 staining confirmed that GlcNAc-Sal pretreatment markedly attenuated OGD-R induced apoptotic cell death in immortalized mouse hippocampal HT22 cells. Western blot, immunofluorescence and PCR analyses revealed that GlcNAc-Sal pretreatment restored the balance of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins and inhibited the activation of caspase-3 and PARP induced by OGD-R treatment. Further analyses showed that GlcNAc-Sal pretreatment antagonized reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, iNOS-derived NO production and NO-related apoptotic cell death during OGD-R stimulation. GCI-R was induced by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) and reperfusion in mice in vivo. Western blot analysis showed that GlcNAc-Sal pretreatment decreased the expression of caspase-3 and increased the expression of Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma 2)/Bax (Bcl-2-associated X protein) induced by GCI-R treatment. Our findings suggest that GlcNAc-Sal pretreatment prevents brain ischemia reperfusion injury by the direct or indirect suppression of cell apoptosis and GlcNAc-Sal could be developed as a broad-spectrum agent for the prevention and/or treatment of cerebral ischemic injury. PMID:24991917

  3. Influence of age upon the cerebral metabolic changes induced by acute hypoxia on the synaptosomes from dog brain.

    PubMed

    Benzi, G; Arrigoni, E; Agnoli, A; Raimondo, S; Fulle, D; Pastoris, O; Curti, D; Villa, R F

    1982-01-01

    The synaptosomal fraction obtained from the motor area of the cerebral cortex of normocapnic, normoxic or hypoxic "young adult," "mature" and "senescent" beagle dogs is incubated and analyzed for : ATP, ADP, AMP, creatine phosphate, pyruvate and lactate. The data are compared with those obtained from the whole controlateral cortical motor area, by the surface freezing technique. After hypoxic hypoxia /15 min; PaO2 = 17-19 mm Hg), the metabolite contents and ratios are differently affected by ageing when the evaluations are performed in the incubated synaptosomal preparation or in the controlateral whole cerebral tissue. In fact, ageing does not affect so much the cerebral changes that occur in the overall energetic state during the hypoxic assault in vivo, but rather those that the synaptosomes remember the tend to reverse during the subsequent incubation in vitro. The protective action of several drugs on the synaptosomal phosphorylation state is tested. Phenobarbital shows a quite broad, age-independent spectrum of action. (-)Eburnamonine and dihydroergocristine exhibits a more limited, age-dependent effectiveness, but are devoid of anesthetic action. Papaverine proves unable to affect the tested biochemical parameters. PMID:6807702

  4. Dynamic pattern of gene expression of ZnT-4, caspase-3, LC3, and PRG-3 in rat cerebral cortex following flurothyl-induced recurrent neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Ni, Hong; Feng, Xing; Xiao, Zhuo-jun; Tao, Lu-yang; Jin, Mei-fang

    2011-12-01

    Zinc transporters, plasticity-related genes, and autophagic/apoptotic pathway both are associated with developmental seizure-induced brain excitotoxicity. Here, for the first time, we report the timing of expression pattern of zinc transporter 4 (ZnT-4), plasticity-related gene 3 (PRG-3), specific marker of autophagic vacuoles (LC3), and apoptotic marker caspase-3 in cerebral cortex following neonatal seizures. A seizure was induced by inhalant flurothyl daily in neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats from postnatal day 6 (P6). Rats were assigned into the recurrent-seizure group (RS, seizures induced in six consecutive days) and the control group. At 1.5 h, 3 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, 48 h, 7 days, and 14 days after the last seizure, the mRNA level of the four genes in cerebral cortex was detected using RT-PCR method. At an early period 6 h or 12 h after the last seizures, both ZnT-4 and LC3 showed significantly up-regulated mRNA level while PRG-3 showed significantly down-regulated mRNA level at 12 h in cerebral cortex of RS group than those at the corresponding time point in control group. In the long-term time point of 7 days after the last seizure, the mRNA level of caspase-3 down-regulated; meanwhile, there was up-regulated mRNA level of LC-3 in RS group when compared to the control rats. This is the first report investigating the gene expression pattern of ZnT-4, PRG-3, LC-3, and caspase-3 in the developing brain. The results suggest that the disturbed expression pattern of the four genes might play a role in the pathophysiology of recurrent neonatal seizure-induced acute and long-term brain damage. PMID:21286846

  5. Neuroprotection of Ischemic Preconditioning is Mediated by Anti-inflammatory, Not Pro-inflammatory, Cytokines in the Gerbil Hippocampus Induced by a Subsequent Lethal Transient Cerebral Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Won; Lee, Jae-Chul; Cho, Jeong-Hwi; Park, Joon Ha; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Chen, Bai Hui; Shin, Bich-Na; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Seo, Jeong Yeol; Cho, Jun Hwi; Kang, Il Jun; Hong, Seongkweon; Kim, Young-Myeong; Won, Moo-Ho; Kim, In Hye

    2015-09-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) induced by sublethal transient cerebral ischemia could reduce neuronal damage/death following a subsequent lethal transient cerebral ischemia. We, in this study, compared expressions of interleukin (IL)-2 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α as pro-inflammatory cytokines, and IL-4 and IL-13 as anti-inflammatory cytokines in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region between animals with lethal ischemia and ones with IPC followed by lethal ischemia. In the animals with lethal ischemia, pyramidal neurons in the stratum pyramidale (SP) of the hippocampal CA1 region were dead at 5 days post-ischemia; however, IPC protected the CA1 pyramidal neurons from lethal ischemic injury. Expressions of all cytokines were significantly decreased in the SP after lethal ischemia and hardly detected in the SP at 5 days post-ischemia because the CA1 pyramidal neurons were dead. IPC increased expressions of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-13) in the stratum pyramidale of the CA1 region following no lethal ischemia (sham-operation), and the increased expressions of IL-4 and IL-13 by IPC were continuously maintained is the SP of the CA1 region after lethal ischemia. However, pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-2 and TNF-α) in the SP of the CA1 region were similar those in the sham-operated animals with IPC, and the IL-4 and IL-13 expressions in the SP were maintained after lethal ischemia. In conclusion, this study shows that anti-inflammatory cytokines significantly increased and longer maintained by IPC and this might be closely associated with neuroprotection after lethal transient cerebral ischemia. PMID:26290267

  6. Protease Omi cleaving Hax-1 protein contributes to OGD/R-induced mitochondrial damage in neuroblastoma N2a cells and cerebral injury in MCAO mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jia-yuan; Li, Mei; Cao, Li-juan; Sun, Mei-ling; Chen, Dong; Ren, Hai-gang; Xia, Qin; Tao, Zhou-teng; Qin, Zheng-hong; Hu, Qing-song; Wang, Guang-hui

    2015-01-01

    Aim: In the penumbra after focal cerebral ischemia, an increase of protease Omi is linked to a decrease of Hs1-associated protein X-1 (Hax-1), a protein belonging to the Bcl-2 family. In this study we investigated the mechanisms underlying the regulation of Hax-1 by protease Omi in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Methods: Mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD/R); cell viability was assessed with MTT assay. Mice underwent 2-h middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and reperfusion, and the infarct volume was determined with TTC staining. The expression of Omi and Hax-1 was detected using immunoblot and immunofluorescence assays. The mitochondrial membrane potential was measured using TMRM staining. Results: In the brains of MCAO mice, the protein level of Omi was significantly increased, while the protein level of Hax-1 was decreased. Similar changes were observed in OGD/R-treated N2a cells, but the mRNA level of Hax-1 was not changed. Furthermore, in OGD/R-treated N2a cells, knockdown of Omi significantly increased Hax-1 protein level. Immunofluorescence assay showed that Omi and Hax-1 were co-localized in mitochondria of N2a cells. OGD/R caused marked mitochondrial damage and apoptosis in N2a cells, while inhibition of Omi protease activity with UCF-101 (10 μmol/L) or overexpression of Hax-1 could restore the mitochondrial membrane potential and attenuate cell apoptosis. Moreover, pretreatment of MCAO mice with UCF-101 (7.15 mg/kg, ip) could restore Hax-1 expression, inhibit caspase activation, and significantly reduce the infarct volume. Conclusion: Protease Omi impairs mitochondrial function by cleaving Hax-1, which induces apoptosis in OGD/R-treated N2a cells and causes I/R injury in MCAO mice. PMID:26299953

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Coinfection Has No Impact on Plasmodium berghei ANKA-Induced Experimental Cerebral Malaria in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Jannike; Behrends, Jochen; Jacobs, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is the most severe complication of human infection with Plasmodium falciparum. The mechanisms predisposing to CM are still not fully understood. Proinflammatory immune responses are required for the control of blood-stage malaria infection but are also implicated in the pathogenesis of CM. A fine balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses is required for parasite clearance without the induction of host pathology. The most accepted experimental model to study human CM is Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbANKA) infection in C57BL/6 mice that leads to the development of a complex neurological syndrome which shares many characteristics with the human disease. We applied this model to study the outcome of PbANKA infection in mice previously infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis is coendemic with malaria in large regions in the tropics, and mycobacteria have been reported to confer some degree of unspecific protection against rodent Plasmodium parasites in experimental coinfection models. We found that concomitant M. tuberculosis infection did not change the clinical course of PbANKA-induced experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) in C57BL/6 mice. The immunological environments in spleen and brain did not differ between singly infected and coinfected animals; instead, the overall cytokine and T cell responses in coinfected mice were comparable to those in animals solely infected with PbANKA. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis coinfection is not able to change the outcome of PbANKA-induced disease, most likely because the inflammatory response induced by the parasite rapidly dominates in mice previously infected with M. tuberculosis. PMID:26644378

  8. [Neuroprotective activity of the proline-containing dipeptide noopept on the model of brain ischemia induced by the middle cerebral artery occlusion].

    PubMed

    Gavrilova, S A; Us, K S; Ostrovskaia, R U; Koshelev, V B

    2006-01-01

    The influence of noopept (N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester, GVS-111) on the extent of ischemic cortical stroke was investigated in experiments on white mongrel male rats with ischemia induced by a combination of the middle cerebral artery occlusion with ipsilateral common carotid artery ligation. Animals were treated with noopept (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) according to the following schedule: 15 min and 2, 24, and 48 h after the occlusion. Test rats were decapitated 72 h after occlusion, brains were extracted and frozen, and thin brain slices were stained with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride. The slices were scanned and processed using Auc 1 computer program, which estimates the percentage of damaged area relative to that of the whole ipsilateral hemisphere. The conditions of coagulation the distal segment of middle cerebral artery were selected, which caused necrosis localized in the fronto-parietal and dorso-lateral regions of the brain cortex without any damage of subcortical structures. The extent of the brain damage in control group (treated by saline) was 18.6%, while that in the group treated with noopept was 12.2%, thus demonstrating a decrease in the infarction area by 34.5% (p < 05). The data on noopept efficacy on the model of the extensive ischemic injury of brain cortex show that this drug has good prospects for use in the neuroprotective treatment of stroke. PMID:16995431

  9. Therapeutic potentials of an artificial oxygen-carrier, liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin, for ischemia/reperfusion-induced cerebral dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Kakehata, Jin; Yamaguchi, Taku; Togashi, Hiroko; Sakuma, Ichiro; Otani, Hiroshi; Morimoto, Yuji; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro

    2010-01-01

    We performed this study to elucidate whether a newly developed liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin, TRM-645 (TRM), can prevent cerebral dysfunction resulting from acute ischemic stroke when used as an oxygen carrier. Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) in the perforant path-dentate gyrus synapses and anxiety-related behaviors in the elevated plus-maze test were evaluated as indices of cerebral functional outcomes in the rat with two-vessel occlusion (2VO), which was induced by 10-min clamping of bilateral common carotid arteries. Saline or TRM (hemoglobin concentration of 6 g/dl: 2.5 or 5 ml/kg) was administered via the tail vein immediately after ischemic insult. Hippocampal LTP formation was markedly impaired and the open arm durations in the elevated plus-maze decreased significantly 4 days after 2VO, compared to those of sham-operated (control) rats, suggesting the hippocampal synaptic dysfunction and anxiogenic properties in 2VO rats. TRM (5 ml/kg) restored the hippocampal LTP formation and normalized the anxiety-related behavior. TRM also improved the decreased tissue oxygen partial pressure in the 2VO rat hippocampus, possibly due to oxygen delivery to ischemic regions. Liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin TRM might have therapeutic potentials for protecting the brain from neurological complications associated with acute ischemic stroke, as a promising blood substitute for oxygen therapy. PMID:20838027

  10. Acute Hyperammonemia Induces NMDA-Mediated Hypophosphorylation of Intermediate Filaments Through PP1 and PP2B in Cerebral Cortex of Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Rônan Vivian; da Silva Ferreira, Fernanda; Heimfarth, Luana; Pierozan, Paula; Fernandes, Carolina; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, we studied the effects of toxic ammonia levels on the cytoskeleton of neural cells, with emphasis in the homeostasis of the phosphorylating system associated with the intermediate filaments (IFs). We used in vivo and in vitro models of acute hyperammonemia in 10- and 21-day-old rats. In the in vivo model, animals were intraperitoneally injected with ammonium acetate (7 mmol/Kg), and the phosphorylation level of the cytoskeletal proteins was analyzed in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus 30 and 60 min after injection. The injected ammonia altered the IF phosphorylation of astrocytes (GFAP and vimentin) and neurons (neurofilament subunits of low, middle, and high molecular weight, respectively: NFL, NFM, and NFH) from cerebral cortex of 21-day-old rats. This was a transitory effect observed 30 min after injection, recovering 30 min afterward. Phosphorylation was not altered in the cerebral cortex of 10-day-old pups. The homeostasis of hippocampal IFs was preserved at the studied ages and times. In the in vitro model, cortical slices of 10- and 21-day-old rats were incubated with 0.5, 1, or 5 mM NH4Cl, and the phosphorylation level of the IF proteins was analyzed after 30 min. The IF phosphorylation was not altered in cortical slices of 10-day-old rats; however, in cortical slices of 21-day-old pups, 5 mM NH4Cl induced hypophosphorylation of GFAP and vimentin, preserving neurofilament phosphorylation levels. Hypophosphorylation was mediated by the protein phosphatases 1 (PP1) and 2B (PP2B), and this event was associated with Ca(2+) influx via N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors. The aim of this study is to show that acute ammonia toxicity targets the phosphorylating system of IFs in the cerebral cortex of rats in a developmentally regulated manner, and NMDA-mediated Ca(2+) signaling plays a central role in this mechanism. We propose that the disruption of cytoskeletal homeostasis could be an endpoint of the acute hyperammonemia

  11. Dense Accumulation of Lipiodol Emulsion in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Nodule during Selective Balloon-occluded Transarterial Chemoembolization: Measurement of Balloon-occluded Arterial Stump Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Irie, Toshiyuki Kuramochi, Masashi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To reveal the mechanism of dense accumulation of lipiodol emulsion (LE) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during selective balloon-occluded transarterial chemoembolization (B-TACE). Methods. Balloon-occluded arterial stump pressure (BOASP) at the embolization portion was measured during selective B-TACE for 43 nodules in 42 patients. Fluoroscopy and digital subtraction angiography were prospectively observed during selective B-TACE to note whether dense LE accumulation in HCC occurred. The LE concentration ratio of HCC to embolized liver parenchyma (LECHL ratio) was also calculated for each treatment on the basis of the computed tomographic scan obtained immediately after selective B-TACE. The relationships between degree of LE accumulation and the BOASP, as well as the LECHL ratio, were analyzed. Results. Arterial flow beyond the catheter tip was maintained even after balloon inflation. In 39 of 43 treatments, LE inflow into the nontumorous liver parenchyma ceased immediately after LE droplets were filled in arteries of the nontumorous liver parenchyma while LE inflow into the HCC nodule continued (group 1). More dense LE accumulation in HCC nodule was obtained in these 39 treatments. In four treatments, LE inflow both into the nontumorous liver parenchyma and into the HCC nodule continued, and no dense LE accumulation in HCC nodule was observed (group 2). In these four treatments, thick anastomotic vessels with collateral artery were noted. The BOASP in group 1 was (mean {+-} SD) 33.8 {+-} 12.8 mmHg (range 13-64 mmHg) and that in group 2 was 92.3 {+-} 7.4 mmHg (range 83-100 mmHg). There was a statistically significant difference in BOASP between groups (p = 0.00004, Welch's t test). The LECHL ratio in group 1 was 18.3 {+-} 13.9 (range 2.9-54.2) and that in group 2 was 2.6 {+-} 1.1 (range 1.7-4.2). There was a statistically significant difference in the LECHL ratio between the groups (p = 0.000034, Welch's t test). Conclusion. Selective B-TACE induced

  12. Modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy Combined with Bimanual Training (mCIMT-BiT) in Children with Unilateral Spastic Cerebral Palsy: How Are Improvements in Arm-Hand Use Established?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aarts, Pauline B.; Jongerius, Peter H.; Geerdink, Yvonne A.; van Limbeek, Jacques; Geurts, Alexander C.

    2011-01-01

    A recent randomized controlled trial indicated that modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy followed by Bimanual Training (mCIMT-BiT) is an effective intervention to improve spontaneous use of the affected upper limb in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (CP). The present study aimed to investigate how the above-mentioned…

  13. Possible involvement of the HMGB1/RAGE signaling mechanism in the induction of central post-stroke pain induced by acute global cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shinichi; Matsuura, Wataru; Liu, Keyue; Nishibori, Masahiro; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2016-09-01

    Central post-stroke pain (CPSP) is one of the most under-recognized consequences of cerebral stroke, but the development of an effective treatment strategy is urgent. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE, one of the receptors of HMGB1) have recently been shown to be critical in the modulation of nociceptive transduction following peripheral neuropathy. The aim of this study was to determine the interactions between CPSP and HMGB1/RAGE signaling. Male ddY mice were subjected to 30min of bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCAO). The development of hind paw mechanical allodynia was measured after BCAO using the von Frey test. Neuronal damage was estimated by histological analysis on day 3 after BCAO. The expression levels of the HMGB1 protein in the spinal cord and the sciatic nerve were significantly increased on day 3 after BCAO, although no effects of BCAO were noted on RAGE protein expression. BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia was significantly decreased by the intravenous and intrathecal administration of anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody. The BCAO-induced increase of phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was canceled by the administration of anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody. In addition, BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia was significantly decreased by intrathecal administration of U0126, an inhibitor of ERK. The results showed that BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia can be regulated by the activation of HMGB1/RAGE signaling. PMID:27335313

  14. Resting State and Diffusion Neuroimaging Predictors of Clinical Improvements Following Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy in Children With Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Manning, Kathryn Y; Fehlings, Darcy; Mesterman, Ronit; Gorter, Jan Willem; Switzer, Lauren; Campbell, Craig; Menon, Ravi S

    2015-10-01

    The aim was to identify neuroimaging predictors of clinical improvements following constraint-induced movement therapy. Resting state functional magnetic resonance and diffusion tensor imaging data was acquired in 7 children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data were acquired at baseline and 1 month later following a 3-week constraint therapy regimen. A more negative baseline laterality index characterizing an atypical unilateral sensorimotor resting state network significantly correlated with an improvement in the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure score (r = -0.81, P = .03). A more unilateral network with decreased activity in the affected hemisphere was associated with greater improvements in clinical scores. Higher mean diffusivity in the posterior limb of the internal capsule of the affect tract correlated significantly with improvements in the Jebsen-Taylor score (r = -0.83, P = .02). Children with more compromised networks and tracts improved the most following constraint therapy. PMID:25762587

  15. Oligodendrogenesis after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruilan; Chopp, Michael; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle of adult rodent brain generate oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) that disperse throughout the corpus callosum and striatum where some of OPCs differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes. Studies in animal models of stroke demonstrate that cerebral ischemia induces oligodendrogenesis during brain repair processes. This article will review evidence of stroke-induced proliferation and differentiation of OPCs that are either resident in white matter or are derived from SVZ neural progenitor cells and of therapies that amplify endogenous oligodendrogenesis in ischemic brain. PMID:24194700

  16. Iterative image reconstruction for cerebral perfusion CT using a pre-contrast scan induced edge-preserving prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianhua; Zhang, Hua; Gao, Yang; Huang, Jing; Liang, Zhengrong; Feng, Qianjing; Chen, Wufan

    2012-11-01

    Cerebral perfusion x-ray computed tomography (PCT) imaging, which detects and characterizes the ischemic penumbra, and assesses blood-brain barrier permeability with acute stroke or chronic cerebrovascular diseases, has been developed extensively over the past decades. However, due to its sequential scan protocol, the associated radiation dose has raised significant concerns to patients. Therefore, in this study we developed an iterative image reconstruction algorithm based on the maximum a posterior (MAP) principle to yield a clinically acceptable cerebral PCT image with lower milliampere-seconds (mA s). To preserve the edges of the reconstructed image, an edge-preserving prior was designed using a normal-dose pre-contrast unenhanced scan. For simplicity, the present algorithm was termed as ‘MAP-ndiNLM’. Evaluations with the digital phantom and the simulated low-dose clinical brain PCT datasets clearly demonstrate that the MAP-ndiNLM method can achieve more significant gains than the existing FBP and MAP-Huber algorithms with better image noise reduction, low-contrast object detection and resolution preservation. More importantly, the MAP-ndiNLM method can yield more accurate kinetic enhanced details and diagnostic hemodynamic parameter maps than the MAP-Huber method.

  17. Effects of Buprenorphine and Meloxicam Analgesia on Induced Cerebral Ischemia in C57BL/6 Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Kirsten R; Fauerby, Natasha; Raida, Zindy; Kalliokoski, Otto; Hau, Jann; Johansen, Flemming F; Abelson, Klas SP

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory mice constitute an extensively used model to study the pathologic and functional outcomes of cerebral ischemic stroke. The middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model requires surgical intervention, which potentially can result in postsurgical pain and stress. In the present study, we investigated whether buprenorphine and meloxicam, at clinically relevant doses provided pain relief without altering infarct volume in male C57BL/6 mice. Common known side-effects of buprenorphine, including decreased food consumption, were noted after surgery in buprenorphine-treated mice, but these effects were brief and seen only during the treatment period. Fecal corticosterone metabolites did not differ significantly between the groups. In the present study, buprenorphine treatment did not alter infarction volume when compared with that of mice that did not receive analgesia. In contrast, meloxicam treatment significantly reduced infarct volume and may be a confounder if used as an analgesic during MCAO surgery. Furthermore, investigation of behavioral profiles by using an automated behavioral scoring system showed that rearing and sniffing behaviors decreased as infarct volume increased. This suggests that studies of exploratory behavior may aid in developing new markers of short-term stroke-related behavioral deficiencies in laboratory mice. PMID:23582417

  18. Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion induces memory deficits and facilitates Aβ generation in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingxi; Du, Yehong; Wang, Kejian; Xu, Ge; Luo, Shifang; He, Guiqiong

    2016-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia frequently responsible for cognitive decline in the elderly. The etiology and molecular mechanism of AD pathogenesis remain inconclusive. Aging and vascular factors are important independent causes and contributors to sporadic AD. Clinical imaging studies showed that cerebral blood flow decreases before cognitive impairment in patients with AD. To investigate the effect of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) on cognitive impairment and morphological features, we developed a new manner of CCH mouse model by narrowing bilateral common carotid arteries. Mice started to manifest spatial memory deficits 1month after the surgery and exhibited behavioral changes in a time-dependent manner. Mice also presented memory deficits accompanied with morphological changes at the neuronal and synaptic levels. CCH damaged the normal neuronal morphology and significantly reduced the expression level of PSD95. CCH activated astrocytes, increased the co-expression of GFAP and AQP4, and destroyed the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Furthermore, CCH facilitated intracellular and extracellular Aβ deposition by up-regulating γ-secretase and β-secretase levels. Our results showed good reproducibility of post-CCH pathological processes, which are characterized by neuronal apoptosis, axonal abnormalities, glial activation, BBB damage, amyloid deposition, and cognitive dysfunction; these processes may be used to decipher the complex interplay and pathological process between CCH and AD. This study provides laboratory evidence for the prevention and treatment of cognitive malfunction and AD. PMID:27421879

  19. Iterative image reconstruction for cerebral perfusion CT using pre-contrast scan induced edge-preserving prior

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianhua; Zhang, Hua; Gao, Yang; Huang, Jing; Liang, Zhengrong; Feng, Qianjing; Chen, Wufan

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral perfusion X-ray computed tomography (PCT) imaging, which detects and characterizes the ischemic penumbra, and assesses blood-brain barrier permeability with acute stroke or chronic cerebrovascular diseases, has been developed extensively over the past decades. However, due to its sequential scan protocol, the associated radiation dose has raised significant concerns to patients. Therefore, in this study we developed an iterative image reconstruction algorithm based on the maximum a posterior (MAP) principle to yield a clinically acceptable cerebral PCT image with lower milliampere seconds (mAs). To preserve the edges of the reconstructed image, an edge-preserving prior was designed using a normal-dose pre-contrast unenhanced scan. For simplicity, the present algorithm was termed as “MAP-ndiNLM”. Evaluations with the digital phantom and the simulated low-dose clinical brain PCT datasets clearly demonstrate that the MAP-ndiNLM method can achieve more significant gains than the existing FBP and MAP-Huber algorithms with better image noise reduction, low-contrast object detection and resolution preservation. More importantly, the MAP-ndiNLM method can yield more accurate kinetic enhanced details and diagnostic hemodynamic parameter maps than the MAP-Huber method. PMID:23104003

  20. Genistein attenuates brain damage induced by transient cerebral ischemia through up-regulation of ERK activity in ovariectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiquan; Wei, Haidong; Cai, Min; Lu, Yan; Hou, Wugang; Yang, Qianzi; Dong, Hailong; Xiong, Lize

    2014-01-01

    Stroke has severe consequences in postmenopausal women. As replacement therapy of estrogen have various adverse effects and the undermined outcomes. Genistein, a natural phytoestrogen, has been suggested to be a potential neuroprotective agent for such stroke patients. However, the role of genistein and its underlying mechanism in ovariectomized mice has not yet been evaluated. In the present study, ovariectomized mice were treated with genistein (10 mg/kg) or vehicle daily for two weeks before developing transient cerebral ischemia (middle cerebral artery occlusion). The neurological manifestation was evaluated, and infarct volumes were demonstrated by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining at 24 h after reperfusion. In addition, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was detected by Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining, and cellular apoptosis was evaluated in the ischemic penumbra. We found that treatment with genistein reduced infarct volumes, improved neurological outcomes and attenuated cellular apoptosis at 24 h after reperfusion. ERK1/2 showed increased phosphorylation by genistein treatment after reperfusion, and an ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 abolished this protective effect of genistein in terms of infarct volumes, neurological scores and cellular apoptosis. Our findings indicate that treatment with genistein can reduce the severity of subsequent stroke episodes, and that this beneficial function is associated with ERK activation. PMID:24719563

  1. Induction of Nerve Injury-Induced Protein 1 (Ninjurin 1) in Myeloid Cells in Rat Brain after Transient Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Hahnbie; Luo, Lidan

    2016-01-01

    Nerve injury-induced protein-1 (Ninjurin-1, Ninj1) was initially identified as a novel adhesion molecule in rat sciatic nerve and to be up-regulated in neurons and Schwann cells of distal nerve segments after nerve transection or crush injury. Recently, Ninj1 was found to act as a modulator of cell migration, angiogenesis, and apoptosis. Accumulating evidence indicates that innate immune response plays beneficial and deleterious roles in brain ischemia, and the trans-endothelial migration of blood-derived immune cells is key initiator of this response. In the present study, we examined the expression profile and cellular distribution of Ninj1 in rat brain after transient focal cerebral ischemia. Ninj1 expression was found to be significantly induced in cortical penumbras 1 day after 60 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and to increase gradually for 8 days and then declined. In infarction cores of cortices, patterns of Ninj1 expression were similar to those observed in cortical penumbras, except induction was maintained for 10 days. At 1 day post-MCAO, Ninj1 inductions were detected mainly in neutrophils and endothelial cells in both infarction cores and penumbras, but reactive macrophages were the major cellular expressers of Ninj1 at 4 days post-MCAO. Expressional induction in reactive macrophages was maintained in infarction cores after 12 days post-MCAO but not in penumbras. These dynamic expressions of Ninj1 in different immune cells at different times suggest that this protein performs various, critical roles in the modulation of acute and delayed immune responses in the postischemic brain. PMID:27122992

  2. Minocycline prevents morphine-induced apoptosis in rat cerebral cortex and lumbar spinal cord: a possible mechanism for attenuating morphine tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hassanzadeh, Kambiz; Habibi-asl, Bohlool; Farajnia, Safar; Roshangar, Leila

    2011-05-01

    Tolerance to the chronic administration of opioids such as morphine reduces the utility of these drugs in pain management. Despite significant investigation, the precise cellular mechanisms underlying opioid tolerance and dependence remain elusive. It has been indicated that tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine is associated with apoptosis in the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of the intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of minocycline (a second-generation tetracycline) on morphine-induced apoptosis in the cerebral cortex and lumbar spinal cord of rats after morphine-induced tolerance. Different groups of rats received either morphine (ip) and distilled water (icv) or morphine and different doses of minocycline (icv) or minocycline alone once per day. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) method was used to analyze apoptosis. The anti-apoptotic factors, Bcl-2 and HSP 70 and the pro-apoptotic element caspase-3 were evaluated by immunoblotting. The results indicated that minocycline attenuated the number of apoptotic cells in both the cerebral cortex and lumbar spinal cord. Immunoblotting findings showed that the amounts of anti-apoptotic agents (Bcl-2 and HSP 70) were greater in the treatment groups than in the controls in both regions. Although minocycline did not change the level of caspase-3 at the doses used with morphine but the minocycline treated rats showed a significantly lower increase in caspase-3 activity than did in the control. In conclusion, minocycline decreased the number of TUNEL-positive cells and increased the amount of anti-apoptotic factors (Bcl-2 and HSP 70), but did not change the caspase-3 content. PMID:20711699

  3. Induction of Nerve Injury-Induced Protein 1 (Ninjurin 1) in Myeloid Cells in Rat Brain after Transient Focal Cerebral Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Hahnbie; Luo, Lidan; Lee, Ja-Kyeong

    2016-04-01

    Nerve injury-induced protein-1 (Ninjurin-1, Ninj1) was initially identified as a novel adhesion molecule in rat sciatic nerve and to be up-regulated in neurons and Schwann cells of distal nerve segments after nerve transection or crush injury. Recently, Ninj1 was found to act as a modulator of cell migration, angiogenesis, and apoptosis. Accumulating evidence indicates that innate immune response plays beneficial and deleterious roles in brain ischemia, and the trans-endothelial migration of blood-derived immune cells is key initiator of this response. In the present study, we examined the expression profile and cellular distribution of Ninj1 in rat brain after transient focal cerebral ischemia. Ninj1 expression was found to be significantly induced in cortical penumbras 1 day after 60 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and to increase gradually for 8 days and then declined. In infarction cores of cortices, patterns of Ninj1 expression were similar to those observed in cortical penumbras, except induction was maintained for 10 days. At 1 day post-MCAO, Ninj1 inductions were detected mainly in neutrophils and endothelial cells in both infarction cores and penumbras, but reactive macrophages were the major cellular expressers of Ninj1 at 4 days post-MCAO. Expressional induction in reactive macrophages was maintained in infarction cores after 12 days post-MCAO but not in penumbras. These dynamic expressions of Ninj1 in different immune cells at different times suggest that this protein performs various, critical roles in the modulation of acute and delayed immune responses in the postischemic brain. PMID:27122992

  4. Arachidonic acid- and prostaglandin E2-induced cerebral vasodilation is mediated by carbon monoxide, independent of reactive oxygen species in piglets

    PubMed Central

    Leffler, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) and prostaglandin (PG) E2 stimulate carbon monoxide (CO) production, and AA metabolism is known to be associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study was conducted to address the hypothesis that CO and/or ROS mediate cerebrovascular dilation in newborn pigs. Experiments were performed on anesthetized newborn pigs with closed cranial windows. Different concentrations of AA (10−8-10−6 M), PGE2 (10−8-10−6 M), iloprost (10−8-10−6 M), and their vehicle (artificial cerebrospinal fluid) were given. Piglets with PGE2 and iloprost received indomethacin (5 mg/kg iv) to inhibit cyclooxygenase. AA, PGE2, and iloprost caused concentration-dependent increases in pial arteriolar diameter. The effects of both AA and PGE2 in producing cerebral vascular dilation and associated CO production were blocked by the heme oxygenase inhibitor chromium mesoporphyrin (2 × 10−5 M), but not by the prostacyclin analog, iloprost. ROS inhibitor tempol (SOD mimetic) (1 × 10−5 M) and the H2O2 scavenger catalase (1,000 U/ml) also do not block these vasodilator effects of AA and PGE2. Heme-l-lysinate-induced cerebrovascular dilation and CO production was blocked by chromium mesoporphyrin. Hypoxanthine plus xanthine oxidase, a combination that is known to generate ROS, caused pial arteriolar dilation and CO production that was inhibited by tempol and catalase. These data suggest that AA- and PGE2-induced cerebral vascular dilation is mediated by CO, independent of ROS. PMID:21984542

  5. Protective mechanisms of CA074-me (other than cathepsin-B inhibition) against programmed necrosis induced by global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Wang, Jingye; Song, Xinghui; Wei, Ruili; He, Fangping; Peng, Guoping; Luo, Benyan

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the key role of lysosomes in ischemic cell death in the brain and have led to the "lysosomocentric" hypothesis. In this hypothesis, the release of cathepsin-B due to a change of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) or rupture is critical, and this can be prevented by its inhibitors CA074 and CA074-me. However, the role of CA074-me in neuronal death and its effect on the change of lysosomal membrane integrity after global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is not clear, so we investigated this here. Rat hippocampal CA1 neuronal death was evaluated after 20-min global cerebral I/R injury. CA074-me (1 μg, 10 μg) were given intracerebroventricularly 1h before ischemia or 1h post reperfusion. The changes of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), cathepsin-B, lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1), receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3), and the change of lysosomal pH were evaluated respectively. Hippocampal CA1 neuronal programmed necrosis induced by global cerebral I/R injury was prevented by CA074-me both pre-treatment and post-treatment. Diffuse cytoplasmic cathepsin-B and LAMP-1 immunostaining synchronized with the pyknotic nuclear changes 2 days post reperfusion, and a rise of lysosomal pH with the leakage of DND-153, a dye of lysosomes, after oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) was detected. Both of these changes demonstrated the rupture of lysosomal membrane and the leakage of cathepsin-B, and this was strongly inhibited by CA074-me pre-treatment. The overexpression and nuclear translocation of RIP3 and the reduction of NAD(+) level after I/R injury were also inhibited, while the upregulation of Hsp70 was strengthened by CA074-me pre-treatment. Delayed fulminant leakage of cathepsin-B due to lysosomal rupture is a critical harmful factor in neuronal programmed necrosis induced by 20-min global I/R injury. In addition to being an inhibitor of cathepsin-B, CA074-me may have an indirect neuroprotective effect by

  6. Preconditioning with recombinant high-mobility group box 1 induces ischemic tolerance in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Liu, Xiao-Xi; Huang, Kai-Bin; Yin, Su-Bing; Wei, Jing-Jing; Hu, Ya-Fang; Gu, Yong; Zheng, Guo-Qing

    2016-05-01

    Preconditioning with ligands of toll-like receptors (TLRs) is a powerful neuroprotective approach whereby a low dose of stimulus confers significant protection against subsequent substantial brain damage by reprogramming the ischemia-activated TLRs signaling. Herein, we aim to explore whether preconditioning with recombinant high-mobility group box 1 (rHMGB1), one of the TLRs ligands, decreases cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). Rats were intracerebroventricularly pretreated with rHMGB1, 1 or 3 days before induction of middle cerebral artery occlusion. Results showed that preconditioning with rHMGB1 1 day, but not 3 days, prior to ischemia dramatically reduced neurological deficits, infarct size, brain swelling, cell apoptosis, and blood-brain barrier permeability. Interleukin-1R-associated kinase-M (IRAK-M), a critical negative regulator of TLRs signaling, was robustly increased in response to brain IRI and was further elevated by rHMGB1 pretreatment, indicating its role associated with the rHMGB1 preconditioning-mediated ischemic tolerance. In vitro and in vivo assays indicated that the induced IRAK-M expression was localized in microglia. In addition, TLR4 specific inhibitor TAK-242 abolished the neuroprotective effects and the induction of IRAK-M offered by rHMGB1 preconditioning. Collectively, our study demonstrates that rHMGB1 preconditioning is neuroprotective during cerebral IRI, which is associated with activated TLR4/IRAK-M signaling in microglia. We found that high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) pretreatment conditioned the brain against subsequent ischemia-reperfusion injury. We propose the following mechanism for HMGB1 preconditioning-mediated ischemic tolerance: through toll-like receptor TLR4, HMGB1 preconditioning magnifies the up-regulation of interleukin-1R-associated kinase-M (IRAK-M) induced by ischemia-reperfusion in microglia, resulting in the decreased phosphorylation of IRAK-1. These findings are helpful in understanding the

  7. Assessment of Lipiodol Deposition and Residual Cancer for Hepatocellular Carcinoma After Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization via Iodine-Based Material Decomposition Images with Spectral Computed Tomography Imaging: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanhong; Xiao, An; Yang, Jia; Zhang, Zaixian; Zhang, Guixiang

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is critical to follow up hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) in clinical practice. Computed tomography (CT) is used to assess lipiodol deposition, whereas it is difficult to assess hypovascular residual cancer masked by lipiodol. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is superior to CT in showing residual cancer, but cannot display lipiodol deposition. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the value of spectral CT imaging in both lipiodol deposition and residual cancer for HCC patients after TACE. Patients and Methods: Ten HCC patients after treated with TACE underwent Discovery CT750 HD and MRI750 3T examination. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of iodine-based material decomposition images, monochromatic images and conventional CT images were generated. Results: Consequently, 30 residual lesions were detected in MRI of 10 patients. They were found in iodine-based images and monochromatic images versus 29 in conventional CT images. The area under ROC curves for the lesion-to-normal parenchyma ratio (LNR) on arterial phase (AP) in iodine-based material decomposition images, monochromatic images and conventional CT images were 0.933, 0.833 and 0.817, respectively. Conclusion: The study data highlighted good value of iodine-based material decomposition images of spectral CT in assessment of both lipiodol deposition and residual cancer for follow-up of HCC patients previously treated with TACE. PMID:26715981

  8. Pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures are associated with Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase activity decrease and alpha subunit phosphorylation state in the mice cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Marquezan, Bárbara P; Funck, Vinícius R; Oliveira, Clarissa V; Pereira, Letícia M; Araújo, Stífani M; Zarzecki, Micheli S; Royes, Luiz Fernando F; Furian, Ana Flávia; Oliveira, Mauro S

    2013-08-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and phosphorylation state of the catalytic α subunit are altered by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures. PTZ (30, 45 or 60 g/kg, i.p.) was administered to adult male Swiss mice, and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and phosphorylation state were measured in the cerebral cortex 15 min after PTZ administration. Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity significantly decreased after PTZ-induced seizures (60 mg/kg). Immunoreactivity of phosphorylated Ser943 at α subunit was increased after PTZ-induced seizures. A significant positive correlation between Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and latency to myoclonic jerks and generalized seizures was found. Conversely, a strong negative correlation between Ser943 phosphorylation and latency to generalized seizures was detected. Given the role of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase as a major regulator of brain excitability, Ser943 at Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α subunit may represent a potentially valuable new target for drug development for seizure disorders. PMID:23602551

  9. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Cerebral Palsy (CP) By Eddie Whidden, MA Preface Introduction Information About ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Cerebral Palsy (CP) What is CP? Cerebral palsy is a ...

  10. Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet See a list of all NINDS ... I get more information? What is a cerebral aneurysm? A cerebral aneurysm (also known as an intracranial ...

  11. Voluntary suppression of hyperthermia-induced hyperventilation mitigates the reduction in cerebral blood flow velocity during exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Bun; Honda, Yasushi; Ikebe, Yusuke; Fujii, Naoto; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2015-04-15

    Hyperthermia during prolonged exercise leads to hyperventilation, which can reduce arterial CO2 pressure (PaCO2 ) and, in turn, cerebral blood flow (CBF) and thermoregulatory response. We investigated 1) whether humans can voluntarily suppress hyperthermic hyperventilation during prolonged exercise and 2) the effects of voluntary breathing control on PaCO2 , CBF, sweating, and skin blood flow. Twelve male subjects performed two exercise trials at 50% of peak oxygen uptake in the heat (37°C, 50% relative humidity) for up to 60 min. Throughout the exercise, subjects breathed normally (normal-breathing trial) or they tried to control their minute ventilation (respiratory frequency was timed with a metronome, and target tidal volumes were displayed on a monitor) to the level reached after 5 min of exercise (controlled-breathing trial). Plotting ventilatory and cerebrovascular responses against esophageal temperature (Tes) showed that minute ventilation increased linearly with rising Tes during normal breathing, whereas controlled breathing attenuated the increased ventilation (increase in minute ventilation from the onset of controlled breathing: 7.4 vs. 1.6 l/min at +1.1°C Tes; P < 0.001). Normal breathing led to decreases in estimated PaCO2 and middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAV) with rising Tes, but controlled breathing attenuated those reductions (estimated PaCO2 -3.4 vs. -0.8 mmHg; MCAV -10.4 vs. -3.9 cm/s at +1.1°C Tes; P = 0.002 and 0.011, respectively). Controlled breathing had no significant effect on chest sweating or forearm vascular conductance (P = 0.67 and 0.91, respectively). Our results indicate that humans can voluntarily suppress hyperthermic hyperventilation during prolonged exercise, and this suppression mitigates changes in PaCO2 and CBF. PMID:25632021

  12. 4(α-L-RHAMNOSYLOXY)-BENZYL ISOTHIOCYANATE, A BIOACTIVE PHYTOCHEMICAL THAT DEFENDS CEREBRAL TISSUE AND PREVENTS SEVERE DAMAGE INDUCED BY FOCAL ISCHEMIA/REPERFUSION.

    PubMed

    Galuppo, M; Giacoppo, S; Iori, R; De Nicola, G R; Milardi, D; Bramanti, P; Mazzon, E

    2015-01-01

    Natural compounds are a promising source to treat several pathologies. The present study shows the in vivo pharmacological beneficial effect of 4(α-L-rhamnosyloxy)-benzyl isothiocyanate (glucomoringin isothiocyanate; GMG-ITC) obtained from glucomoringin (GMG; 4(α;-L-rhamnosyloxy)- benzyl glucosinolate), purified from Moringa oleifera seeds and hydrolyzed by myrosinase enzyme (β-thioglucoside glucohydrolase; E.C. 3.2.1.147). Cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (CIR) was induced in rats according to a classic model of carotid artery occlusion for a time period of 1 h and the reperfusion time was prolonged for seven days. GMG-ITC (3.5 mg GMG/ml plus 30 μl enzyme/rat; one ml i.p./rat) was administered 15 min after the beginning of ischemia and daily. The results clearly show that GMG-ITC possesses the capability to counteract the CIR-induced damage reducing TNF-alpha release, IκB-alpha cytosolic degradation/NFκBp65 nuclear translocation, as well as several other direct or indirect markers of inflammation (phospho-ERK p42/44, p-selectin) and oxidative stress (inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS), MMP-9). GMG-ITC was shown to exert neuroprotective properties in preventing CIR-induced damage and the related cascade of inflammatory and oxidative mediators that exacerbate the progression of this disease in an experimental rat model. Our results clearly show that the tested phytochemical GMG-ITC possesses the capability to counteract CIR-induced damage. PMID:26122222

  13. Melatonin Counteracts at a Transcriptional Level the Inflammatory and Apoptotic Response Secondary to Ischemic Brain Injury Induced by Middle Cerebral Artery Blockade in Aging Rats

    PubMed Central

    Paredes, Sergio D.; Rancan, Lisa; Kireev, Roman; González, Alberto; Louzao, Pedro; González, Pablo; Rodríguez-Bobada, Cruz; García, Cruz; Vara, Elena; Tresguerres, Jesús A.F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aging increases oxidative stress and inflammation. Melatonin counteracts inflammation and apoptosis. This study investigated the possible protective effect of melatonin on the inflammatory and apoptotic response secondary to ischemia induced by blockade of the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) in aging male Wistar rats. Animals were subjected to MCA obstruction. After 24 h or 7 days of procedure, 14-month-old nontreated and treated rats with a daily dose of 10 mg/kg melatonin were sacrificed and right and left hippocampus and cortex were collected. Rats aged 2 and 6 months, respectively, were subjected to the same brain injury protocol, but they were not treated with melatonin. mRNA expression of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), Bcl-2-associated death promoter (BAD), Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), and sirtuin 1 was measured by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. In nontreated animals, a significant time-dependent increase in IL-1β, TNF-α, BAD, and BAX was observed in the ischemic area of both hippocampus and cortex, and to a lesser extent in the contralateral hemisphere. Hippocampal GFAP was also significantly elevated, while Bcl-2 and sirtuin 1 decreased significantly in response to ischemia. Aging aggravated these changes. Melatonin administration was able to reverse significantly these alterations. In conclusion, melatonin may ameliorate the age-dependent inflammatory and apoptotic response secondary to ischemic cerebral injury. PMID:26594596

  14. Susceptibility-weighted MR Imaging of Radiation Therapy-induced Cerebral Microbleeds in Patients with Glioma: A Comparison Between 3T and 7T

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Wei; Hess, Christopher P.; Chang, Susan M.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Lupo, Janine M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral microbleeds have been observed in normal-appearing brain tissue of patients with glioma years after receiving radiation therapy. The contrast of these paramagnetic lesions varies with field strength due to differences in the effects of susceptibility. The purpose of this study was to compare 3T and 7T MRI as platforms for detecting cerebral microbleeds in patients treated with radiotherapy using SWI. Methods SWI was performed with both 3T and 7T MR scanners on 10 patients with glioma who had received prior radiotherapy. Imaging sequences were optimized to obtain data within a clinically acceptable scan time. Both T2*-weighted magnitude images and SWI data were reconstructed, minimum-intensity projection was implemented, and microbleeds were manually identified. The number of microbleeds was counted and compared among datasets. Results Significantly more microbleeds were identified on SWI than magnitude images at both 7T (p=0.002) and 3T (p=0.023). 7T SWI detected significantly more microbleeds than 3T SWI for 7 out of 10 patients who had tumors located remote from deep brain regions (p=0.016), but when the additional 3 patients with more inferior tumors were included, the difference was not significant. Conclusion SWI is more sensitive for detecting microbleeds than magnitude images at both 3T and 7T. For areas without heightened susceptibility artifacts, 7T SWI is more sensitive to detecting radiation therapy-induced microbleeds than 3T SWI. Tumor location should be considered in conjunction with field strength when selecting the most appropriate strategy for imaging microbleeds. PMID:24281386

  15. Dietary Sutherlandia and Elderberry Mitigate Cerebral Ischemia-Induced Neuronal Damage and Attenuate p47phox and Phospho-ERK1/2 Expression in Microglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Dennis Y.; Cui, Jiankun; Simonyi, Agnes; Engel, Victoria A.; Chen, Shanyan; Fritsche, Kevin L.; Thomas, Andrew L.; Applequist, Wendy L.; Folk, William R.; Lubahn, Dennis B.; Sun, Albert Y.; Sun, Grace Y.

    2014-01-01

    Sutherlandia (Sutherlandia frutescens) and elderberry (Sambucus spp.) are used to promote health and for treatment of a number of ailments. Although studies with cultured cells have demonstrated antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties of these botanicals, little is known about their ability to mitigate brain injury. In this study, C57BL/6 J male mice were fed AIN93G diets without or with Sutherlandia or American elderberry for 2 months prior to a 30-min global cerebral ischemia induced by occlusion of the bilateral common carotid arteries (BCCAs), followed by reperfusion for 3 days. Accelerating rotarod assessment at 24 h after BCCA occlusion showed amelioration of sensorimotor impairment in the mice fed the supplemented diets as compared with the ischemic mice fed the control diet. Quantitative digital pathology assessment of brain slides stained with cresyl violet at 3 days after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) revealed significant reduction in neuronal cell death in both dietary groups. Immunohistochemical staining for ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule-1 demonstrated pronounced activation of microglia in the hippocampus and striatum in the ischemic brains 3 days after I/R, and microglial activation was significantly reduced in animals fed supplemented diets. Mitigation of microglial activation by the supplements was further supported by the decrease in expression of p47phox, a cytosolic subunit of NADPH oxidase, and phospho-ERK1/2, a mitogen-activated protein kinase known to mediate a number of cytoplasmic processes including oxidative stress and neuroinflammatory responses. These results demonstrate neuroprotective effect of Sutherlandia and American elderberry botanicals against oxidative and inflammatory responses to cerebral I/R. PMID:25324465

  16. Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator Induces Neurological Side Effects Independent on Thrombolysis in Mechanical Animal Models of Focal Cerebral Infarction: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, You-Dong; Liu, Yi-Yun; Ren, Yi-Fei; Liang, Zi-Hong; Wang, Hai-Yang; Zhao, Li-Bo; Xie, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) is the only effective drug approved by US FDA to treat ischemic stroke, and it contains pleiotropic effects besides thrombolysis. We performed a meta-analysis to clarify effect of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) on cerebral infarction besides its thrombolysis property in mechanical animal stroke. Methods Relevant studies were identified by two reviewers after searching online databases, including Pubmed, Embase, and ScienceDirect, from 1979 to 2016. We identified 6, 65, 17, 12, 16, 12 and 13 comparisons reporting effect of endogenous tPA on infarction volume and effects of rtPA on infarction volume, blood-brain barrier, brain edema, intracerebral hemorrhage, neurological function and mortality rate in all 47 included studies. Standardized mean differences for continuous measures and risk ratio for dichotomous measures were calculated to assess the effects of endogenous tPA and rtPA on cerebral infarction in animals. The quality of included studies was assessed using the Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable score. Subgroup analysis, meta-regression and sensitivity analysis were performed to explore sources of heterogeneity. Funnel plot, Trim and Fill method and Egger’s test were obtained to detect publication bias. Results We found that both endogenous tPA and rtPA had not enlarged infarction volume, or deteriorated neurological function. However, rtPA would disrupt blood-brain barrier, aggravate brain edema, induce intracerebral hemorrhage and increase mortality rate. Conclusions This meta-analysis reveals rtPA can lead to neurological side effects besides thrombolysis in mechanical animal stroke, which may account for clinical exacerbation for stroke patients that do not achieve vascular recanalization with rtPA. PMID:27387385

  17. Cerebral oxygenation and hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Anthony R.; Morrison, Shawnda A.; Ainslie, Philip N.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperthermia is associated with marked reductions in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Increased distribution of cardiac output to the periphery, increases in alveolar ventilation and resultant hypocapnia each contribute to the fall in CBF during passive hyperthermia; however, their relative contribution remains a point of contention, and probably depends on the experimental condition (e.g., posture and degree of hyperthermia). The hyperthermia-induced hyperventilatory response reduces arterial CO2 pressure (PaCO2) causing cerebral vasoconstriction and subsequent reductions in flow. During supine passive hyperthermia, the majority of recent data indicate that reductions in PaCO2 may be the primary, if not sole, culprit for reduced CBF. On the other hand, during more dynamic conditions (e.g., hemorrhage or orthostatic challenges), an inability to appropriately decrease peripheral vascular conductance presents a condition whereby adequate cerebral perfusion pressure may be compromised secondary to reductions in systemic blood pressure. Although studies have reported maintenance of pre-frontal cortex oxygenation (assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy) during exercise and severe heat stress, the influence of cutaneous blood flow is known to contaminate this measure. This review discusses the governing mechanisms associated with changes in CBF and oxygenation during moderate to severe (i.e., 1.0°C to 2.0°C increase in body core temperature) levels of hyperthermia. Future research directions are provided. PMID:24624095

  18. Preparation of the core-shell structure adriamycin lipiodol microemulsions and their synergistic anti-tumor effects with diethyldithiocarbamate in vivo.

    PubMed

    Daocheng, Wu; Mingxi, Wan

    2010-11-01

    We prepared the core-shell structure adriamycin lipiodol microemulsions (ADM-CSLMs) and evaluated their in vivo antitumor effects in combination with Diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC). Two types of ADM-CSLMs, adriamycin liposome-lipiodol microemulsion(ADM-LLM) and adriamycin microsphere lipiodol microemulsion (ADM-MLM), were prepared through the emulsification method. The drug loading and encapsulation efficiency of ADM-CSLMs were measured by the high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC). The size and shape of the ADM-CSLMs were determined by an atom force microscopy (AFM), a transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and a particle size analyzer, respectively. The synergistic effects of DDC and ADM-CSLMs for cancer treatment of carcinoma drug-resistance cell was evaluated by the MTT method, the activation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was detected by chemiluminescence, and the ADM accumulation in cells was measured by flow cytometry. Walker-256 carcinoma was transplanted to the livers of the male SD rats, ADM-CSLMs were administrated to the livers of the rats by intervention hepatic artery embolization through microsurgery. The tumor growth and animal survival were evaluated. The results show that the average diameter of ADM-LLM and ADM-MLM were 4.23 ± 1.2 μm and 4.67 ± 1.4 μm, respectively, and their ADM encapsulation efficiency were 83.7% and 87.2% with respect to loading efficiency of 82 μg/ml and 91 μg/ml. The tumor growth and animal survival in two of the ADM-CSLMs combined with DDC groups were significantly higher than that of ADM only treatment, ADM liposome combined with DDC (P < 0.01), as well as the ADM microsphere combined with DDC (P < 0.01). Therefore, ADM-CSLMs are useful carriers for the treatment of carcinoma and their anti-tumor effect can be enhanced by DDC in a suitable concentration. PMID:20888179

  19. Intra-Arterial Rhenium-188 Lipiodol in the Treatment of Inoperable Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Results of an IAEA-Sponsored Multination Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, Patricia; Raoul, Jean-Luc Vidmar, Gaj; Sereegotov, Erdenechimeg; Sundram, Felix X.; Kumar, Ajay; Jeong, Jae Min; Pusuwan, Pawana; Divgi, Chaitanya; Zanzonico, Pat; Stare, Janez; Buscombe, John; Chau Trinh Thi Minh; Saw, Maung Maung; Chen Shaoliang; Ogbac, Ruben; Padhy, Ajit K.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: Intra-arterial injections (IAI) of 131I-lipiodol is effective in treating hepatocellular carcinoma patients, but is expensive and requires a 7-day hospitalization in a radioprotection room. 188Re is inexpensive, requires no patient isolation, and can be used with lipiodol. Methods and Materials: This International Atomic Energy Agency-sponsored phase II trial aimed to assess the safety and the efficacy of a radioconjugate 188Re + lipiodol (188Re-Lip) in a large cohort of hepatocellular carcinoma patients from developing countries. A scout dose is used to determine the maximal tolerated dose (lungs <12 Gy, normal liver <30 Gy, bone marrow <1.5 Gy) and then the delivery of the calculated activity. Efficacy was assessed using response evaluation criteria in solid tumor (RECIST) and alpha-feto-protein ({alpha}FP) levels and severe adverse events were graded using the Common Toxicity Criteria of the National Cancer Institute scale v2.0. Results: The trial included 185 patients from eight countries. The procedure was feasible in all participating centers. One treatment was given to 134 patients; 42, 8, and 1 received two, three, and four injections, respectively. The injected activity during the first treatment was 100 mCi. Tolerance was excellent. We observed three complete responses and 19 partial responses (22% of evaluable patients, 95% confidence interval 16-35%); 1- and 2-year survivals were 46% and 23%. Some factors affected survival: country of origin, existence of a cirrhosis, Cancer of the Liver Italian Program score, tumor dose, absence of progression, and posttreatment decrease in {alpha}FP level. Conclusions: IAI of 188Re-Lip in developing countries is feasible, safe, cost-effective, and deserves a phase III trial.

  20. Cerebral Area Differential Redox Response of Neonatal Rats to Selenite-Induced Oxidative Stress and to Concurrent Administration of Highbush Blueberry Leaf Polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Ferlemi, Anastasia-Varvara; Mermigki, Penelope G; Makri, Olga E; Anagnostopoulos, Dimitrios; Koulakiotis, Nikolaos S; Margarity, Marigoula; Tsarbopoulos, Anthony; Georgakopoulos, Constantinos D; Lamari, Fotini N

    2015-11-01

    Our goal was to delineate the mechanisms of selenite-induced oxidative stress in neonatal rats and investigate the potential of blueberry leaf polyphenols to counteract the induced stress. Vaccinium corymbosum leaf decoction (BLD) was analyzed by UPLC-MS and LC-DAD, along with its in vitro antioxidant activity (DPPH radical scavenging, FRAP, ferrous chelation). Newborn suckling Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: 'Se' and 'SeBLD' received 20 μmol Na2SeO3/kg BW subcutaneously (PN day 10); 'SeBLD' received 100 mg dry BLD/kg BW intraperitoneally (PN11 and 12) and Group 'C' received normal saline. Βiochemical analysis revealed tissue-specific effects of selenite. Brain as a whole was more resistant to selenite toxicity in comparison to liver; midbrain and cerebellum were in general not affected, but cortex was moderately disturbed. Liver lipid peroxidation, GSH, SOD, CAT, GPx were significantly affected, whereas proteolytic activity was not. BLD, which is rich in chlorogenic acid and flavonols (especially quercetin derivatives), exerted significant antioxidant protective effects in all regions. In conclusion, we provide for the first time an insight to the neonatal rat cerebral and liver redox response against a toxic selenite dose and blueberry leaf polyphenols. PMID:26357951

  1. Evaluation of cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy undergoing constraint-induced movement therapy based on functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jianwei; Khan, Bilal; Hervey, Nathan; Tian, Fenghua; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Clegg, Nancy J.; Smith, Linsley; Roberts, Heather; Tulchin-Francis, Kirsten; Shierk, Angela; Shagman, Laura; MacFarlane, Duncan; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2015-04-01

    Sensorimotor cortex plasticity induced by constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in six children (10.2±2.1 years old) with hemiplegic cerebral palsy was assessed by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The activation laterality index and time-to-peak/duration during a finger-tapping task and the resting-state functional connectivity were quantified before, immediately after, and 6 months after CIMT. These fNIRS-based metrics were used to help explain changes in clinical scores of manual performance obtained concurrently with imaging time points. Five age-matched healthy children (9.8±1.3 years old) were also imaged to provide comparative activation metrics for normal controls. Interestingly, the activation time-to-peak/duration for all sensorimotor centers displayed significant normalization immediately after CIMT that persisted 6 months later. In contrast to this improved localized activation response, the laterality index and resting-state connectivity metrics that depended on communication between sensorimotor centers improved immediately after CIMT, but relapsed 6 months later. In addition, for the subjects measured in this work, there was either a trade-off between improving unimanual versus bimanual performance when sensorimotor activation patterns normalized after CIMT, or an improvement occurred in both unimanual and bimanual performance but at the cost of very abnormal plastic changes in sensorimotor activity.

  2. Evaluation of cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy undergoing constraint-induced movement therapy based on functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jianwei; Khan, Bilal; Hervey, Nathan; Tian, Fenghua; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Clegg, Nancy J.; Smith, Linsley; Roberts, Heather; Tulchin-Francis, Kirsten; Shierk, Angela; Shagman, Laura; MacFarlane, Duncan; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Sensorimotor cortex plasticity induced by constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in six children (10.2±2.1 years old) with hemiplegic cerebral palsy was assessed by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The activation laterality index and time-to-peak/duration during a finger-tapping task and the resting-state functional connectivity were quantified before, immediately after, and 6 months after CIMT. These fNIRS-based metrics were used to help explain changes in clinical scores of manual performance obtained concurrently with imaging time points. Five age-matched healthy children (9.8±1.3 years old) were also imaged to provide comparative activation metrics for normal controls. Interestingly, the activation time-to-peak/duration for all sensorimotor centers displayed significant normalization immediately after CIMT that persisted 6 months later. In contrast to this improved localized activation response, the laterality index and resting-state connectivity metrics that depended on communication between sensorimotor centers improved immediately after CIMT, but relapsed 6 months later. In addition, for the subjects measured in this work, there was either a trade-off between improving unimanual versus bimanual performance when sensorimotor activation patterns normalized after CIMT, or an improvement occurred in both unimanual and bimanual performance but at the cost of very abnormal plastic changes in sensorimotor activity. PMID:25900145

  3. Reperfusion-induced temporary appearance of therapeutic window in penumbra after 2 h of photothrombotic middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hiroshi; Yoshii, Narihiko; Akira, Toshiaki; Nakahara, Tatsuo

    2009-03-01

    To explore the effects of reperfusion on evolution of focal ischemic injury, spontaneously hypertensive male rats were subjected to photothrombotic distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) with or without YAG laser-induced reperfusion. The volume of fodrin breakdown zone, water content, and brain tissue levels of sodium (Na(+)) and potassium (K(+)) were measured in the ischemic core and penumbra. Reperfusion attenuated fodrin breakdown, and the volume containing fodrin breakdown product at 3 h after reperfusion (5 h after MCAO) (30+/-7 mm(3)) was significantly smaller than the 42+/-3 mm(3) of the permanent occlusion group. After 3 to 6 h of ischemia, Na(+) increased, and K(+) decreased in the ischemic core. Reperfusion after 2 h of MCA occlusion did not mitigate the ischemia-induced changes in brain tissue electrolytes and water content at 3 to 6 h of ischemia. Even in reperfusion after comparatively long periods of occlusion where brain infarction size, assessed 3 days after MCAO, was not significantly reduced by reperfusion, and the precipitating indicators of the ischemic core (Na(+), K(+), water content) did not improve, temporary improvement or a delay in progression of ischemic injury was discernible in the penumbra. These results indicate the possibility that treatment with reperfusion is permissive to the effects of neuroprotection. PMID:19088742

  4. Time-Course and Regional Analyses of the Physiopathological Changes Induced after Cerebral Injection of an Amyloid β Fragment in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zussy, Charleine; Brureau, Anthony; Delair, Brice; Marchal, Stephane; Keller, Emeline; Ixart, Guy; Naert, Gaelle; Meunier, Johann; Chevallier, Nathalie; Maurice, Tangui; Givalois, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative pathology characterized by the presence of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, accompanied by synaptic and neuronal loss. The major component of senile plaques is an amyloid β protein (Aβ) formed by pathological processing of the Aβ precursor protein. We assessed the time-course and regional effects of a single intracerebroventricular injection of aggregated Aβ fragment 25–35 (Aβ25-35) in rats. Using a combined biochemical, behavioral, and morphological approach, we analyzed the peptide effects after 1, 2, and 3 weeks in the hippocampus, cortex, amygdala, and hypothalamus. The scrambled Aβ25-35 peptide was used as negative control. The aggregated forms of Aβ peptides were first characterized using electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and Congo Red staining. Intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ25-35 decreased body weight, induced short- and long-term memory impairments, increased endocrine stress, cerebral oxidative and cellular stress, neuroinflammation, and neuroprotective reactions, and modified endogenous amyloid processing, with specific time-course and regional responses. Moreover, Aβ25-35, the presence of which was shown in the different brain structures and over 3 weeks, provoked a rapid glial activation, acetylcholine homeostasis perturbation, and hippocampal morphological alterations. In conclusion, the acute intracerebroventricular Aβ25-35 injection induced substantial central modifications in rats, highly reminiscent of the human physiopathology, that could contribute to physiological and cognitive deficits observed in AD. PMID:21703413

  5. Maladjusted host immune responses induce experimental cerebral malaria-like pathology in a murine Borrelia and Plasmodium co-infection model.

    PubMed

    Normark, Johan; Nelson, Maria; Engström, Patrik; Andersson, Marie; Björk, Rafael; Moritz, Thomas; Fahlgren, Anna; Bergström, Sven

    2014-01-01

    In the Plasmodium infected host, a balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses is required to clear the parasites without inducing major host pathology. Clinical reports suggest that bacterial infection in conjunction with malaria aggravates disease and raises both mortality and morbidity in these patients. In this study, we investigated the immune responses in BALB/c mice, co-infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 parasites and the relapsing fever bacterium Borrelia duttonii. In contrast to single infections, we identified in the co-infected mice a reduction of L-Arginine levels in the serum. It indicated diminished bioavailability of NO, which argued for a dysfunctional endothelium. Consistent with this, we observed increased sequestration of CD8+ cells in the brain as well over expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM by brain endothelial cells. Co-infected mice further showed an increased inflammatory response through IL-1β and TNF-α, as well as inability to down regulate the same through IL-10. In addition we found loss of synchronicity of pro- and anti-inflammatory signals seen in dendritic cells and macrophages, as well as increased numbers of regulatory T-cells. Our study shows that a situation mimicking experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) is induced in co-infected mice due to loss of timing and control over regulatory mechanisms in antigen presenting cells. PMID:25075973

  6. Maladjusted Host Immune Responses Induce Experimental Cerebral Malaria-Like Pathology in a Murine Borrelia and Plasmodium Co-Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Normark, Johan; Nelson, Maria; Engström, Patrik; Andersson, Marie; Björk, Rafael; Moritz, Thomas; Fahlgren, Anna; Bergström, Sven

    2014-01-01

    In the Plasmodium infected host, a balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses is required to clear the parasites without inducing major host pathology. Clinical reports suggest that bacterial infection in conjunction with malaria aggravates disease and raises both mortality and morbidity in these patients. In this study, we investigated the immune responses in BALB/c mice, co-infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 parasites and the relapsing fever bacterium Borrelia duttonii. In contrast to single infections, we identified in the co-infected mice a reduction of L-Arginine levels in the serum. It indicated diminished bioavailability of NO, which argued for a dysfunctional endothelium. Consistent with this, we observed increased sequestration of CD8+ cells in the brain as well over expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM by brain endothelial cells. Co-infected mice further showed an increased inflammatory response through IL-1β and TNF-α, as well as inability to down regulate the same through IL-10. In addition we found loss of synchronicity of pro- and anti-inflammatory signals seen in dendritic cells and macrophages, as well as increased numbers of regulatory T-cells. Our study shows that a situation mimicking experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) is induced in co-infected mice due to loss of timing and control over regulatory mechanisms in antigen presenting cells. PMID:25075973

  7. Protective effect of L-Theanine against aluminium induced neurotoxicity in cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of rat brain - histopathological, and biochemical approach.

    PubMed

    Sumathi, Thangarajan; Shobana, Chandrasekar; Thangarajeswari, Mohan; Usha, Ramakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    L-Theanine is an amino acid derivative primarily found in tea. It has been reported to promote relaxation and have neuroprotective effects. The present study was designed to investigate the role of oxidative stress and the status of antioxidant system in the management of aluminum chloride (AlCl3) induced brain toxicity in various rat brain regions and further to elucidate the potential role of L-Theanine in alleviating such negative effects. Aluminium administration significantly decreased the level of reduced glutathione and the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, Ca(2+) ATPase and Mg(2+) ATPase and increased the level of lipid peroxidation and the activities of alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase in all the brain regions when compared with control rats. Pre-treatment with L-Theanine at a dose of 200 mg/kg b.w. significantly increased the antioxidant status and activities of membrane bound enzymes and also decreased the level of LPO and the activities of marker enzymes, when compared with aluminium induced rats. Aluminium induction also caused histopathological changes in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus of rat brain which was reverted by pretreatment with L-Theanine. The present study clearly indicates the potential of L-Theanine in counteracting the damage inflicted by aluminium on rat brain regions. PMID:24654859

  8. The role of the cerebral ganglia in the venom-induced behavioral manipulation of cockroaches stung by the parasitoid jewel wasp.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Maayan; Libersat, Frederic

    2015-04-01

    The jewel wasp stings cockroaches and injects venom into their cerebral ganglia, namely the subesophageal ganglion (SOG) and supraesophageal ganglion (SupOG). The venom induces a long-term hypokinetic state, during which the stung cockroach shows little or no spontaneous walking. It was shown that venom injection to the SOG reduces neuronal activity, thereby suggesting a similar effect of venom injection in the SupOG. Paradoxically, SupOG-ablated cockroaches show increased spontaneous walking in comparison with control. Yet most of the venom in the SupOG of cockroaches is primarily concentrated in and around the central complex (CX). Thus the venom could chiefly decrease activity in the CX to contribute to the hypokinetic state. Our first aim was to resolve this discrepancy by using a combination of behavioral and neuropharmacological tools. Our results show that the CX is necessary for the initiation of spontaneous walking, and that focal injection of procaine to the CX is sufficient to induce the decrease in spontaneous walking. Furthermore, it was shown that artificial venom injection to the SOG decreases walking. Hence our second aim was to test the interactions between the SupOG and SOG in the venom-induced behavioral manipulation. We show that, in the absence of the inhibitory control of the SupOG on walking initiation, injection of venom in the SOG alone by the wasp is sufficient to induce the hypokinetic state. To summarize, we show that venom injection to either the SOG or the CX of the SupOG is, by itself, sufficient to decrease walking. PMID:25687435

  9. PCP-induced alterations in cerebral glucose utilization in rat brain: blockade by metaphit, a PCP-receptor-acylating agent

    SciTech Connect

    Tamminga, C.A.; Tanimoto, K.; Kuo, S.; Chase, T.N.; Contreras, P.C.; Rice, K.C.; Jackson, A.E.; O'Donohue, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of phencyclidine (PCP) on regional cerebral glucose utilization was determined by using quantitative autoradiography with (/sup 14/C)-2-deoxyglucose. PCP increased brain metabolism in selected areas of cortex, particularly limbic, and in the basal ganglia and thalamus, whereas the drug decreased metabolism in areas related to audition. These results are consistent with the known physiology of central PCP neurons and may help to suggest brain areas involved in PCP-mediated actions. Moreover, based on the behavioral similarities between PCP psychosis and an acute schizophrenic episode, these data may be relevant to the understanding of schizophrenia. The PCP-receptor-acylating agent, metaphit, blocked most of these PCP actions. In addition, metaphit by itself was found to diminish glucose utilization rather uniformly throughout brain. These results indicate an antagonist effect of metaphit on the PCP system and suggest a widespread action of metaphit, putatively at a PCP-related site, possibly in connection with the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor.

  10. Oral administration of Cimicifuga racemosa extract affects immobilization stress-induced changes in murine cerebral monoamine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nadaoka, Isao; Yasue, Masaaki; Sami, Manabu; Kitagawa, Yasushi

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the effects of Cimicifuga racemosa (CR) plant extracts on the changes in levels of the cerebral monoamines norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin (5-HT), the respective metabolites 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and plasma corticosterone in mice subjected to acute immobilization stress. Single oral administration of the CR extract (1,000 mg/kg) significantly attenuated plasma corticosterone levels that had been increased as a result of enforced immobilization. Acute immobilization stress caused significant changes in the corresponding amine-to-metabolite ratios in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and cortex; however, CR-extract treatment significantly attenuated the MHPG/NE change in the hypothalamus, and the 5-HIAA/5- HT changes in each region of the brain. Our results suggest that the CR extract interacts not only with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis but also with the sympathetic adrenomedullary (SAM) system under stress conditions. Thus the CR extract can alleviate acute stress responses by suppressing the changes of amine-to-metabolite ratio in brain. PMID:22572387

  11. Carbon Monoxide Improves Neurologic Outcomes by Mitochondrial Biogenesis after Global Cerebral Ischemia Induced by Cardiac Arrest in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Yao, Lan; Zhou, Li-Li; Liu, Yuan-Shan; Chen, Ming-di; Wu, Hai-Dong; Chang, Rui-Ming; Li, Yi; Zhou, Ming-Gen; Fang, Xiang-Shao; Yu, Tao; Jiang, Long-Yuan; Huang, Zi-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to brain injury following global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest. Carbon monoxide treatment has shown potent cytoprotective effects in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to investigate the effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules on brain mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury following resuscitation after cardiac arrest in rats. A rat model of cardiac arrest was established by asphyxia. The animals were randomly divided into the following 3 groups: cardiac arrest and resuscitation group, cardiac arrest and resuscitation plus carbon monoxide intervention group, and sham control group (no cardiac arrest). After the return of spontaneous circulation, neurologic deficit scores (NDS) and S-100B levels were significantly decreased at 24, 48, and 72 h, but carbon monoxide treatment improved the NDS and S-100B levels at 24 h and the 3-day survival rates of the rats. This treatment also decreased the number of damaged neurons in the hippocampus CA1 area and increased the brain mitochondrial activity. In addition, it increased mitochondrial biogenesis by increasing the expression of biogenesis factors including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor-1, nuclear respiratory factor-2 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Thus, this study showed that carbon monoxide treatment alleviated brain injury after cardiac arrest in rats by increased brain mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:27489503

  12. Carbon Monoxide Improves Neurologic Outcomes by Mitochondrial Biogenesis after Global Cerebral Ischemia Induced by Cardiac Arrest in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Yao, Lan; Zhou, Li-li; Liu, Yuan-shan; Chen, Ming-di; Wu, Hai-dong; Chang, Rui-ming; Li, Yi; Zhou, Ming-gen; Fang, Xiang-shao; Yu, Tao; Jiang, Long-yuan; Huang, Zi-tong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to brain injury following global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest. Carbon monoxide treatment has shown potent cytoprotective effects in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to investigate the effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules on brain mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury following resuscitation after cardiac arrest in rats. A rat model of cardiac arrest was established by asphyxia. The animals were randomly divided into the following 3 groups: cardiac arrest and resuscitation group, cardiac arrest and resuscitation plus carbon monoxide intervention group, and sham control group (no cardiac arrest). After the return of spontaneous circulation, neurologic deficit scores (NDS) and S-100B levels were significantly decreased at 24, 48, and 72 h, but carbon monoxide treatment improved the NDS and S-100B levels at 24 h and the 3-day survival rates of the rats. This treatment also decreased the number of damaged neurons in the hippocampus CA1 area and increased the brain mitochondrial activity. In addition, it increased mitochondrial biogenesis by increasing the expression of biogenesis factors including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor-1, nuclear respiratory factor-2 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Thus, this study showed that carbon monoxide treatment alleviated brain injury after cardiac arrest in rats by increased brain mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:27489503

  13. Cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Postels, Douglas G; Birbeck, Gretchen L

    2013-01-01

    Malaria, the most significant parasitic disease of man, kills approximately one million people per year. Half of these deaths occur in those with cerebral malaria (CM). The World Health Organization (WHO) defines CM as an otherwise unexplained coma in a patient with malarial parasitemia. Worldwide, CM occurs primarily in African children and Asian adults, with the vast majority (greater than 90%) of cases occurring in children 5 years old or younger in sub-Saharan Africa. The pathophysiology of the disease is complex and involves infected erythrocyte sequestration, cerebral inflammation, and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier. A recently characterized malarial retinopathy is visual evidence of Plasmodium falciparum's pathophysiological processes occurring in the affected patient. Treatment consists of supportive care and antimalarial administration. Thus far, adjuvant therapies have not been shown to improve mortality rates or neurological outcomes in children with CM. For those who survive CM, residual neurological abnormalities are common. Epilepsy, cognitive impairment, behavioral disorders, and gross neurological deficits which include motor, sensory, and language impairments are frequent sequelae. Primary prevention strategies, including bed nets, vaccine development, and chemoprophylaxis, are in varied states of development and implementation. Continuing efforts to find successful primary prevention options and strategies to decrease neurological sequelae are needed. PMID:23829902

  14. Warming Effect on Miriplatin-Lipiodol Suspension as a Chemotherapeutic Agent for Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Preliminary Clinical Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kora, Shinn-ichi; Urakawa, Hiroshi; Mitsufuji, Toshimichi; Osame, Akinobu; Higashihara, Hideyuki; Yoshimitsu, Kengo

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo retrospectively elucidate the preliminary clinical impact of warmed miriplatin-lipiodol suspension (MPT-LPD) when used as a chemotherapeutic agent for transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Materials and MethodsBetween June and December 2010, TACE was performed with MPT-LPD at room temperature (RT group), and after January 2011, TACE with MPT-LPD warmed to 40 Degree-Sign C was performed (W group). The intraarterial appearance of MPT-LPD immediately after injection through microcatheters at the second-order branches was compared between the two groups with a 5-point grading system. Local therapeutic effects of HCCs as assessed by follow-up computed tomography (CT) obtained 1-3 months after TACE were compared between the groups with a 4-point grading system (TE1-TE4). After April 2011, angiography-assisted CT was routinely performed at TACE, and HCCs that revealed apparent corona enhancement (CE) were retrospectively selected. The degree of concordance between CE and MPT-LPD accumulation as assessed by CT immediately after TACE was assessed with a 3-point grading scale.ResultsMPT-LPD therapy resulted in a smooth and continuous appearance in the W group (grades 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 were, respectively, 1, 2, 11, 18, and 4) compared to the RT group (4, 0, 1, 2, and 0). The W group (TE1, TE2, TE3, and TE4 were 1, 9, 11, and 12) revealed better local therapeutic effects than the RT group (6, 3, 9, and 0) (p < 0.05). CE was found in 26 HCC nodules, and concordance between CE and MPT-LPD accumulation was observed in 66 % (grades 1, 2, and 3 were, respectively, 2, 8, and 19).ConclusionWarmed MPT-LPD flowed more smoothly within vascular lumen, passed through tumor sinusoid of HCC, and had better local therapeutic effects at short-term observation than MPT-LPD at room temperature.

  15. [Cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Malagón Valdez, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    The term cerebral palsy (CP), is used for a great number of clinical neurological syndromes. The syndromes are characterized by having a common cause, motor defects. It is important, because they can cause a brain damage by presenting motor defects and some associated deficiencies, such as mental deficiency, epilepsy, language and visual defects and pseudobulbar paralysis, with the non-evolving fact. Some authors prefer using terms such as "non-evolving encephalopathies". In the treatment the utility of prevention programs of early stimulation and special rehabilitation methods, and treatment of associated deficiencies such as epilepsy, mental deficiency, language, audition and visual problems, and the attention deficit improve the prognosis in an important way. The prognosis depends on the severity of the disease and the associated manifestations. PMID:18422084

  16. Cadmium induced inhibition of autophagy is associated with microtubule disruption and mitochondrial dysfunction in primary rat cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Qiwen; Song, Ruilong; Zhang, Yajing; Yang, Jinlong; Wang, Yi; Yuan, Yan; Bian, Jianchun; Liu, Xuezhong; Gu, Jianhong; Zhu, Jiaqiao; Liu, Zongping

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have reported that mitochondria serve as direct targets for cadmium- (Cd-) induced neuronal toxicity, which can be attenuated by autophagy. The molecular mechanisms' underlying Cd-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagy in neurons are not known. In this study, we studied the upstream signaling pathways induced by Cd-mediated mitochondrial metabolism alterations using primary rat neuron as a model. We found that Cd induced the destruction of microtubules (MTs), and resulted in tau hyper-phosphorylation and decreased acetylated tubulin levels, which were related to a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels. As a result of taxol disruption, alterations in macroautophagy, like altered cellular distribution of the autophagy-related protein light chain 3 beta (LC3B) and the expression of Atg5 were found compared with Cd group. We found for the first time that MT disruption induced by Cd reduced the levels of autophagy, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. These observations suggest new therapeutic strategies aimed to activate or ameliorate pro-survival macroautophagy. PMID:26582496

  17. BID Mediates Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation-Induced Neuronal Injury in Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures and Modulates Tissue Inflammation in a Transient Focal Cerebral Ischemia Model without Changing Lesion Volume

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Nellie Anne; Bonner, Helena; Elkjær, Maria Louise; D’Orsi, Beatrice; Chen, Gang; König, Hans Georg; Svensson, Martina; Deierborg, Tomas; Pfeiffer, Shona; Prehn, Jochen H.; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke

    2016-01-01

    The BH3 interacting-domain death agonist (BID) is a pro-apoptotic protein involved in death receptor-induced and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Recently, it has also been suggested that BID is involved in the regulation of inflammatory responses in the central nervous system. We found that BID deficiency protected organotypic hippocampal slice cultures in vitro from neuronal injury induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation. In vivo, BID-knockout (KO) mice and wild type (WT) mice were subjected to 60 min of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) to induce focal cerebral ischemia, and allowed to recover for 24 h. Infarct volumes and functional outcome were assessed and the inflammatory response was evaluated using immunofluorescence, Western blotting, quantitative PCR (qPCR) and Mesoscale multiplex analysis. We observed no difference in the infarct volume or neurological outcome between BID-KO and WT mice. The inflammatory response was reduced by BID deficiency as indicated by a change in microglial/leukocyte response. In conclusion, our data suggest that BID deficiency is neuroprotective in an in vitro model and modulates the inflammatory response to focal cerebral ischemia in vivo. However, this is not translated into a robust neuroprotection in vivo. PMID:26869884

  18. Improved targeting of 5-[125I/131I]iodo-2‧-deoxyuridine to rat hepatoma by using lipiodol emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hung-Man; Yeh, Hsin-Pei; Chang, Tien-Kui; Huang, Kuang-Liang; Chuang, Kuo-Tang; Liu, Ren-Shen; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Chi, Kwan-Hwa; Chen, Fu-Du; Lin, Wuu-Jyh; Chen, Chin-Hsiung; Wang, Hsin-Ell

    2006-12-01

    This study aims to assess whether emulsion of [ 125/131I]IUdR and lipiodol (IUdR/LP) can improve delivery of IUdR into hepatoma. MethodsIn vitro release profile of IUdR from IUdR/LP to serum was performed. IUdR/LP was injected into N1-S1 hepatoma-bearing SD rat via hepatic artery and IUdR/normal saline (IUdR/NS) was used for comparison. Biodistribution, autoradiography, imaging and tumor DNA incorporation assay were performed. The radioactive metabolites in plasma and urine were analyzed. Radiation doses to tumor and organs were estimated. ResultsIUdR released from lipiodol into serum was fast. There were longer retention, more DNA incorporation and higher radiation dose of IUdR in the tumor by using IUdR/LP. IUdR/LP deposited deep in the hepatomas. Only free iodide was found in the plasma and urine after injection of IUdR/LP. ConclusionsHepatic artery injection of IUdR/LP emulsion could definitely enhance the tumor cell uptake and incorporation to DNA of *IUdR, prolong the tumor retention time and increase radiation dose to tumor. IUdR/LP may be an effective therapeutic agent for the treatment of hepatic tumors.

  19. Electroacupuncture Pretreatment Attenuates Cerebral Ischemic Injury via Notch Pathway-Mediated Up-Regulation of Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Deng, Bin; Li, Yichong; Zhou, Lihua; Yang, Lei; Gou, Xingchun; Wang, Qiang; Chen, Guozhong; Xu, Hao; Xu, Lixian

    2015-11-01

    We have reported electroacupuncture (EA) pretreatment induced the tolerance against focal cerebral ischemia through activation of canonical Notch pathway. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully understood. Evidences suggest that up-regulation of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) contributes to neuroprotection against ischemia which could interact with Notch signaling pathway in this process. Therefore, the current study is to test that up-regulation of HIF-1α associated with Notch pathway contributes to the neuroprotection of EA pretreatment. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with EA at the acupoint "Baihui (GV 20)" 30 min per day for successive 5 days before MCAO. HIF-1α levels were measured before and after reperfusion. Then, HIF-1α antagonist 2ME2 and γ-secretase inhibitor MW167 were used. Neurologic deficit scores, infarction volumes, neuronal apoptosis, and Bcl2/Bax were evaluated. HIF-1α and Notch1 intracellular domain (NICD) were assessed. The results showed EA pretreatment enhanced the neuronal expression of HIF-1α, reduced infarct volume, improved neurological outcome, inhibited neuronal apoptosis, up-regulated expression of Bcl-2, and down-regulated expression of Bax after reperfusion in the penumbra, while the beneficial effects were attenuated by 2ME2. Furthermore, intraventricular injection with MW167 efficiently suppressed both up-regulation of NICD and HIF-1α after reperfusion. However, administration with 2ME2 could only decrease the expression of HIF-1α in the penumbra. In conclusion, EA pretreatment exerts neuroprotection against ischemic injury through Notch pathway-mediated up-regulation of HIF-1α. PMID:25976178

  20. Mild hypothermia causes differential, time-dependent changes in cytokine expression and gliosis following endothelin-1-induced transient focal cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Stroke is an important cause of morbidity and mortality and few therapies exist thus far. Mild hypothermia (33°C) is a promising neuroprotective strategy to improve outcome after ischemic stroke. However, its complete mechanism of action has not yet been fully elaborated. This study is the first to investigate whether this neuroprotection occurs through modulation of the neuroinflammatory response after stroke in a time-dependent manner. Methods The Endothelin-1 (Et-1) model was used to elicit a transient focal cerebral ischemia in male Wistar rats. In this model, the core and penumbra of the insult are represented by the striatum and the cortex respectively. We assessed the effects of 2 hours of hypothermia, started 20 minutes after Et-1 injection on neurological outcome and infarct volume. Furthermore, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine expression was determined using ELISA. Microgliosis and astrogliosis were investigated using CD-68 and GFAP staining respectively. All parameters were determined 8, 24, 72 hours and 1 week after the administration of Et-1. Results Et-1 infusion caused neurological deficit and a reproducible infarct size which increased up to 3 days after the insult. Both parameters were significantly reduced by hypothermia. The strongest reduction in infarct volume with hypothermia, at 3 days, corresponded with increased microglial activation. Reducing the brain temperature affected the stroke induced increase in interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor α in the striatum, 8 hours after its induction, but not at later time points. Transforming growth factor β increased as a function of time after the Et-1-induced insult and was not influenced by cooling. Hypothermia reduced astrogliosis at 1 and 3 days after stroke onset. Conclusions The beneficial effects of hypothermia after stroke on infarct volume and functional outcome coincide with a time-dependent modulation of the cytokine expression and gliosis. PMID:21627837

  1. Neuroprotective properties of marrow-isolated adult multilineage-inducible cells in rat hippocampus following global cerebral ischemia are enhanced when complexed to biomimetic microcarriers.

    PubMed

    Garbayo, Elisa; Raval, Ami P; Curtis, Kevin M; Della-Morte, David; Gomez, Lourdes A; D'Ippolito, Gianluca; Reiner, Teresita; Perez-Stable, Carlos; Howard, Guy A; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A; Montero-Menei, Claudia N; Schiller, Paul C

    2011-12-01

    Cell-based therapies for global cerebral ischemia represent promising approaches for neuronal damage prevention and tissue repair promotion. We examined the potential of marrow-isolated adult multilineage-inducible (MIAMI) cells, a homogeneous subpopulation of immature human mesenchymal stromal cell, injected into the hippocampus to prevent neuronal damage induced by global ischemia using rat organotypic hippocampal slices exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation and rats subjected to asphyxial cardiac arrest. We next examined the value of combining fibronectin-coated biomimetic microcarriers (FN-BMMs) with epidermal growth factor (EGF)/basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) pre-treated MIAMI compared to EGF/bFGF pre-treated MIAMI cells alone, for their in vitro and in vivo neuroprotective capacity. Naïve and EGF/bFGF pre-treated MIAMI cells significantly protected the Cornu Ammonis layer 1 (CA1) against ischemic death in hippocampal slices and increased CA1 survival in rats. MIAMI cells therapeutic value was significantly increased when delivering the cells complexed with FN-BMMs, probably by increasing stem cell survival and paracrine secretion of pro-survival and/or anti-inflammatory molecules as concluded from survival, differentiation and gene expression analysis. Four days after oxygen and glucose deprivation and asphyxial cardiac arrest, few transplanted cells administered alone survived in the brain whereas stem cell survival improved when injected complexed with FN-BMMs. Interestingly, a large fraction of the transplanted cells administered alone or in complexes expressed βIII-tubulin suggesting that partial neuronal transdifferentiation may be a contributing factor to the neuroprotective mechanism of MIAMI cells. PMID:21496021

  2. NEUROPROTECTIVE PROPERTIES OF MARROW-ISOLATED ADULT MULTILINEAGE INDUCIBLE CELLS IN RAT HIPPOCAMPUS FOLLOWING GLOBAL CEREBRAL ISCHEMIA ARE ENHANCED WHEN COMPLEXED TO BIOMIMETIC MICROCARRIERS

    PubMed Central

    Garbayo, E.; Raval, A.P.; Curtis, K.M.; Della-Morte, D.; Gomez, L.A.; D'Ippolito, G.; Reiner, T.; Perez-Stable, C.; Howard, G.A.; Perez-Pinzon, M.A.; Montero-Menei, C.N.; Schiller, P.C.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapies for global cerebral ischemia represent promising approaches for neuronal damage prevention and tissue repair promotion. We examined the potential of Marrow-Isolated Adult Multilineage Inducible (MIAMI) cells, a homogeneous subpopulation of immature human mesenchymal stromal cell, injected into the hippocampus to prevent neuronal damage induced by global ischemia using rat organotypic hippocampal slices exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and rats subjected to asphyxial cardiac arrest (ACA). We next examined the value of combining fibronectin-coated biomimetic microcarriers (FN-BMMs) with EGF/bFGF pre-treated MIAMI compared to EGF/bFGF pre-treated MIAMI cells alone, for their in vitro and in vivo neuroprotective capacity. Naïve and EGF/bFGF pre-treated MIAMI cells significantly protected the Cornu Ammonis layer 1 (CA1) against ischemic death in hippocampal slices and increased CA1 survival in rats. MIAMI cells therapeutic value was significantly increased when delivering the cells complexed with FN-BMMs, probably by increasing stem cell survival and paracrine secretion of pro-survival and/or anti-inflammatory molecules as concluded from survival, differentiation and gene expression analysis. Four days after OGD and ACA, few transplanted cells administered alone survived in the brain whereas stem cell survival improved when injected complexed with FN-BMMs. Interestingly, a large fraction of the transplanted cells administered alone or in complexes expressed βIII-Tubulin suggesting that partial neuronal transdifferentiation may be a contributing factor to the neuroprotective mechanism of MIAMI cells. PMID:21496021

  3. Cerebral edema induced in mice by a convulsive dose of soman. Evaluation through diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and histology

    SciTech Connect

    Testylier, Guy . E-mail: guytestylier@crssa.net; Lahrech, Hana; Montigon, Olivier; Foquin, Annie; Delacour, Claire; Bernabe, Denis; Segebarth, Christoph; Dorandeu, Frederic; Carpentier, Pierre

    2007-04-15

    Purpose: In the present study, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and histology were used to assess cerebral edema and lesions in mice intoxicated by a convulsive dose of soman, an organophosphate compound acting as an irreversible cholinesterase inhibitor. Methods: Three hours and 24 h after the intoxication with soman (172 {mu}g/kg), the mice were anesthetized with an isoflurane/N{sub 2}O mixture and their brain examined with DW-MRI. After the imaging sessions, the mice were sacrificed for histological analysis of their brain. Results: A decrease in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was detected as soon as 3 h after the intoxication and was found strongly enhanced at 24 h. A correlation was obtained between the ADC change and the severity of the overall brain damage (edema and cellular degeneration): the more severe the damage, the stronger the ADC drop. Anesthesia was shown to interrupt soman-induced seizures and to attenuate edema and cell change in certain sensitive brain areas. Finally, brain water content was assessed using the traditional dry/wet weight method. A significant increase of brain water was observed following the intoxication. Conclusions: The ADC decrease observed in the present study suggests that brain edema in soman poisoning is mainly intracellular and cytotoxic. Since entry of water into Brain was also evidenced, this type of edema is certainly mixed with others (vasogenic, hydrostatic, osmotic). The present study confirms the potential of DW-MRI as a non-invasive tool for monitoring the acute neuropathological consequences (edema and neurodegeneration) of soman-induced seizures.

  4. Baclofen ameliorates spatial working memory impairments induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion via up-regulation of HCN2 expression in the PFC in rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Pan; Chen, Cheng; Lu, Yun; Fu, TianLi; Lu, Qing; Xu, Xulin; Li, Changjun; He, Zhi; Guo, Lianjun

    2016-07-15

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) causes memory deficits and increases the risk of vascular dementia (VD) through several biologically plausible pathways. However, whether CCH causes prefrontal cortex (PFC)-dependent spatial working memory impairments and Baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, could ameliorate the impairments is still not clear especially the mechanisms underlying the process. In this study, rats were subjected to permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (two-vessel occlusion, 2VO) to induce CCH. Two weeks later, rats were treated with 25mg/kg Baclofen (intraperitioneal injection, i.p.) for 3 weeks. Spatial working memory was evaluated in a Morris water maze using a modified delayed matching-to-place (DMP) procedure. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were used to quantify the protein levels and protein localization. Our results showed that 2VO caused striking spatial working memory impairments, accompanied with a decreased HCN2 expression in PFC, but the protein levels of protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5, a neuron specific protein), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), synaptophysin (SYP), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), parvalbumin (PV) and HCN1 were not distinguishably changed as compared with sham-operated rats. Baclofen treatment significantly improved the spatial working memory impairments caused by 2VO, accompanied with a reversion of 2VO-induced down-regulation of HCN2. Furthermore, there was a co-localization of HCN2 subunits and parvalbumin-positive neurons in PFC. Therefore, HCN2 may target inhibitory interneurons that is implicated in working memory processes, which may be a possible mechanism of the up-regulation of HCN2 by Baclofen treatment that reliefs spatial working memory deficits in rats with CCH. PMID:27085590

  5. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein induces apoptotic insults to mouse cerebral endothelial cells via a Bax-mitochondria-caspase protease pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.-G.; Chen, T.-L.; Chang, H.-C.; Tai, Y.-T.; Cherng, Y.-G.; Chang, Y.-T.; Chen, R.-M. . E-mail: rmchen@tmu.edu.tw

    2007-02-15

    Cerebral endothelial cells (CECs) are crucial components of the blood-brain barrier. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) can induce cell injuries. In this study, we attempted to evaluate the effects of oxLDL on mouse CECs and its possible mechanisms. Mouse CECs were isolated from brain tissues and identified by immunocytochemical staining of vimentin and Factor VIII. oxLDL was prepared from LDL oxidation by copper sulfate. Exposure of mouse CECs to oxLDL decreased cell viability in concentration- and time-dependent manners. oxLDL time-dependently caused shrinkage of cell morphologies. Administration of oxLDL to CECs induced DNA fragmentation in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Analysis of the cell cycle revealed that oxLDL concentration- and time-dependently increased the proportion of CECs which underwent apoptosis. Analysis of confocal microscopy and immunoblot revealed that oxLDL significantly increased cellular and mitochondrial Bax levels as well as the translocation of this proapoptotic protein from the cytoplasm to mitochondria. In parallel with the increase in the levels and translocation of Bax, oxLDL time-dependently decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential. Exposure of mouse CECs to oxLDL decreased the amounts of mitochondrial cytochrome c, but enhanced cytosolic cytochrome c levels. The amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species were significantly augmented after oxLDL administration. Sequentially, oxLDL increased activities of caspase-9, -3, and -6 in time-dependent manners. Pretreatment with Z-VEID-FMK, an inhibitor of caspase-6, significantly decreased caspase-6 activity and the oxLDL-induced DNA fragmentation and cell apoptosis. This study showed that oxLDL induces apoptotic insults to CECs via signal-transducing events, including enhancing Bax translocation, mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome c release, increases in intracellular reactive oxygen species, and cascade activation of caspase-9, -3, and -6. Therefore, ox

  6. Diphenyl diselenide, a simple organoselenium compound, decreases methylmercury-induced cerebral, hepatic and renal oxidative stress and mercury deposition in adult mice.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Andressa Sausen; Funck, Vinícius Rafael; Rotta, Mariana dos Santos; Bohrer, Denise; Mörschbächer, Vanessa; Puntel, Robson Luís; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne; Farina, Marcelo; Aschner, Michael; Rocha, João Batista Teixeira

    2009-04-01

    Oxidative stress has been pointed out as an important molecular mechanism in methylmercury (MeHg) intoxication. At low doses, diphenyl diselenide ((PhSe)2), a structurally simple organoselenium compound, has been shown to possess antioxidant and neuroprotective properties. Here we have examined the possible in vivo protective effect of diphenyl diselenide against the potential pro-oxidative effects of MeHg in mouse liver, kidney, cerebrum and cerebellum. The effects of MeHg exposure (2 mg/(kg day) of methylmercury chloride 10 ml/kg, p.o.), as well as the possible antagonist effect of diphenyl diselenide (1 and 0.4 mg/(kg day); s.c.) on body weight gain and on hepatic, cerebellar, cerebral and renal levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), non-protein thiols (NPSH), ascorbic acid content, mercury concentrations and activities of antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) were evaluated after 35 days of treatment. MeHg caused an increase in TBARS and decreased NPSH levels in all tissues. MeHg also induced a decrease in hepatic ascorbic acid content and in renal GPx and CAT activities. Diphenyl diselenide (1 mg/kg) conferred protection against MeHg-induced hepatic and renal lipid peroxidation and at both doses prevented the reduction in hepatic NPSH levels. Diphenyl diselenide also conferred a partial protection against MeHg-induced oxidative stress (TBARS and NPSH) in liver and cerebellum. Of particular importance, diphenyl diselenide decreased the deposition of Hg in cerebrum, cerebellum, kidney and liver. The present results indicate that diphenyl diselenide can protect against some toxic effects of MeHg in mice. This protection may be related to its antioxidant properties and its ability to reduce Hg body burden. We posit that formation of a selenol intermediate, which possesses high nucleophilicity and high affinity for MeHg, accounts for the ability of diphenyl diselenide to ameliorate MeHg-induced

  7. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein induces apoptotic insults to mouse cerebral endothelial cells via a Bax-mitochondria-caspase protease pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tyng-Guey; Chen, Ta-Liang; Chang, Huai-Chia; Tai, Yu-Ting; Cherng, Yih-Giun; Chang, Ya-Ting; Chen, Ruei-Ming

    2007-02-15

    Cerebral endothelial cells (CECs) are crucial components of the blood-brain barrier. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) can induce cell injuries. In this study, we attempted to evaluate the effects of oxLDL on mouse CECs and its possible mechanisms. Mouse CECs were isolated from brain tissues and identified by immunocytochemical staining of vimentin and Factor VIII. oxLDL was prepared from LDL oxidation by copper sulfate. Exposure of mouse CECs to oxLDL decreased cell viability in concentration- and time-dependent manners. oxLDL time-dependently caused shrinkage of cell morphologies. Administration of oxLDL to CECs induced DNA fragmentation in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Analysis of the cell cycle revealed that oxLDL concentration- and time-dependently increased the proportion of CECs which underwent apoptosis. Analysis of confocal microscopy and immunoblot revealed that oxLDL significantly increased cellular and mitochondrial Bax levels as well as the translocation of this proapoptotic protein from the cytoplasm to mitochondria. In parallel with the increase in the levels and translocation of Bax, oxLDL time-dependently decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential. Exposure of mouse CECs to oxLDL decreased the amounts of mitochondrial cytochrome c, but enhanced cytosolic cytochrome c levels. The amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species were significantly augmented after oxLDL administration. Sequentially, oxLDL increased activities of caspase-9, -3, and -6 in time-dependent manners. Pretreatment with Z-VEID-FMK, an inhibitor of caspase-6, significantly decreased caspase-6 activity and the oxLDL-induced DNA fragmentation and cell apoptosis. This study showed that oxLDL induces apoptotic insults to CECs via signal-transducing events, including enhancing Bax translocation, mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome c release, increases in intracellular reactive oxygen species, and cascade activation of caspase-9, -3, and -6. Therefore, ox

  8. The Degree of Lipiodol Accumulation Can Be an Indicator of Successful Treatment for Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) Patients - in the Case of Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization (TACE) and External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ping; Zeng, Zhao-Chong; Wang, Bin-Liang; Zhang, Jian-Ying; Fan, Jia; Zhou, Jian; Hu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) results in improved survival due to better local control in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The purpose of this study was to investigate lipiodol accumulation, as it reflects tumor burden and is a potential prognostic factor, in HCC patients treated with TACE/EBRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied 147 patients with unresectable HCC treated with TACE and EBRT. Clinical features, adverse reactions, and prognostic factors were analyzed. All patients were treated with TACE 1-6 times in combination with EBRT (44-66 Gy) in dose of 2 Gy/fraction given once a day five times a week. Tumor status and laboratory findings were followed. The degree of lipiodol accumulation was assessed by computed tomography before EBRT, and was categorized as either complete/intense or low/moderate. Results: The response rate of tumor size after EBRT was 68.2%, median survival was 23.1 months, and overall survival rates were 86.6%, 49.2%, and 28.2% at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that lower hemoglobin levels, higher alkaline phosphatase levels, Child-Pugh B, negative alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) response after EBRT, poor treatment response after EBRT, tumor diameter >10 cm, and poor lipiodol accumulation were unfavorable prognostic factors. On multivariate analysis, higher hemoglobin levels, Child-Pugh A, decreased AFP levels after treatment, Helical Tomotherapy (HT) and intense lipiodol accumulation after TACE were significant favorable predictors. Conclusions: The degree of lipiodol accumulation before EBRT is a prognostic factor in patients with unresectable HCC. Increased AFP levels after EBRT are always associated with poor survival. HT is recommended as a potentially better EBRT modality than three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). PMID:27471557

  9. Roles of Caveolin-1 in Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertrophy and Inward Remodeling of Cerebral Pial Arterioles.

    PubMed

    Umesalma, Shaikamjad; Houwen, Frederick Keith; Baumbach, Gary L; Chan, Siu-Lung

    2016-03-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a major determinant of inward remodeling and hypertrophy in pial arterioles that may have an important role in stroke during chronic hypertension. Previously, we found that epidermal growth factor receptor is critical in Ang II-mediated hypertrophy that may involve caveolin-1 (Cav-1). In this study, we examined the effects of Cav-1 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) on Ang II-mediated structural changes in pial arterioles. Cav-1-deficient (Cav-1(-/-)), MMP9-deficient (MMP9(-/-)), and wild-type mice were infused with either Ang II (1000 ng/kg per minute) or saline via osmotic minipumps for 28 days (n=6-8 per group). Systolic arterial pressure was measured by a tail-cuff method. Pressure and diameter of pial arterioles were measured through an open cranial window in anesthetized mice. Cross-sectional area of the wall was determined histologically in pressurized fixed pial arterioles. Expression of Cav-1, MMP9, phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor, and Akt was determined by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Deficiency of Cav-1 or MMP9 did not affect Ang II-induced hypertension. Ang II increased the expression of Cav-1, phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor, and Akt in wild-type mice, which was attenuated in Cav-1(-/-) mice. Ang II-induced hypertrophy, inward remodeling, and increased MMP9 expression in pial arterioles were prevented in Cav-1(-/-) mice. Ang II-mediated increases in MMP9 expression and inward remodeling, but not hypertrophy, were prevented in MMP9(-/-) mice. In conclusion, Cav-1 is essential in Ang II-mediated inward remodeling and hypertrophy in pial arterioles. Cav-1-induced MMP9 is exclusively involved in inward remodeling, not hypertrophy. Further studies are needed to determine the role of Akt in Ang II-mediated hypertrophy. PMID:26831194

  10. United Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of UCP blog for the latest updates. United Cerebral Palsy UCP educates, advocates and provides support services to ... Partners Merz Logo Sprint Relay Copyright © 2015 United Cerebral Palsy 1825 K Street NW Suite 600 Washington, DC ...

  11. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is a neurological condition in which proteins called amyloid build up on the walls of the arteries ... The cause of cerebral amyloid angiopathy is unknown. Sometimes, it ... Persons with this condition have deposits of amyloid protein ...

  12. Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stretch Additional Content Medical News Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations By James E. Wilberger, MD, Derrick A. Dupre, ... a direct, strong blow to the head. Cerebral lacerations are tears in brain tissue, caused by a ...

  13. Structural Changes Induced by Daily Music Listening in the Recovering Brain after Middle Cerebral Artery Stroke: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Särkämö, Teppo; Ripollés, Pablo; Vepsäläinen, Henna; Autti, Taina; Silvennoinen, Heli M.; Salli, Eero; Laitinen, Sari; Forsblom, Anita; Soinila, Seppo; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Music is a highly complex and versatile stimulus for the brain that engages many temporal, frontal, parietal, cerebellar, and subcortical areas involved in auditory, cognitive, emotional, and motor processing. Regular musical activities have been shown to effectively enhance the structure and function of many brain areas, making music a potential tool also in neurological rehabilitation. In our previous randomized controlled study, we found that listening to music on a daily basis can improve cognitive recovery and improve mood after an acute middle cerebral artery stroke. Extending this study, a voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis utilizing cost function masking was performed on the acute and 6-month post-stroke stage structural magnetic resonance imaging data of the patients (n = 49) who either listened to their favorite music [music group (MG), n = 16] or verbal material [audio book group (ABG), n = 18] or did not receive any listening material [control group (CG), n = 15] during the 6-month recovery period. Although all groups showed significant gray matter volume (GMV) increases from the acute to the 6-month stage, there was a specific network of frontal areas [left and right superior frontal gyrus (SFG), right medial SFG] and limbic areas [left ventral/subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (SACC) and right ventral striatum (VS)] in patients with left hemisphere damage in which the GMV increases were larger in the MG than in the ABG and in the CG. Moreover, the GM reorganization in the frontal areas correlated with enhanced recovery of verbal memory, focused attention, and language skills, whereas the GM reorganization in the SACC correlated with reduced negative mood. This study adds on previous results, showing that music listening after stroke not only enhances behavioral recovery, but also induces fine-grained neuroanatomical changes in the recovering brain. PMID:24860466

  14. Toward a theory of the general-anesthetic-induced phase transition of the cerebral cortex. II. Numerical simulations, spectral entropy, and correlation times.

    PubMed

    Steyn-Ross, D A; Steyn-Ross, M L; Wilcocks, L C; Sleigh, J W

    2001-07-01

    In our two recent papers [M.L. Steyn-Ross et al., Phys. Rev. E 60, 7299 (1999); 64, 011917 (2001)] we presented clinical evidence for a general anesthetic-induced phase change in the cerebral cortex, and showed how the significant features of the cortical phase change (biphasic power surge, spectral energy redistribution, "heat capacity" divergence), could be explained using a stochastic single-macrocolumn model of the cortex. The model predictions were based on rather strong "adiabatic" assumptions which assert that the mean-field excitatory and inhibitory macrocolumn voltages are "slow" variables whose equilibration times are much longer than those of the input "currents" that drive the macrocolumn. In the present paper we test the adiabatic assumption by running numerical simulations of the stochastic differential equations. These simulations confirm the number and nature of the steady-state solutions, the growth of fluctuation power at transition, and the redistribution of spectral energy towards lower frequencies. We use spectral entropy to quantify these changes in the power spectral density, and to show that the spectral entropy should decrease markedly at the point of transition. This prediction agrees with recent clinical findings by Viertiö-Oja and colleagues [J. Clinical Monitoring Computing 16, 60 (2000)]. Our modeling work shows that there is an inverse relationship between spectral entropy H and correlation time T of the soma-voltage fluctuations: H inversely proportional to (ln T). In a theoretical analysis we prove that this proportionality becomes exact for an ideal Lorentzian process. These findings suggest that by monitoring the changes in EEG correlation time, it should be possible to track changes in the state of patient consciousness. PMID:11461299

  15. Structural changes induced by daily music listening in the recovering brain after middle cerebral artery stroke: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Särkämö, Teppo; Ripollés, Pablo; Vepsäläinen, Henna; Autti, Taina; Silvennoinen, Heli M; Salli, Eero; Laitinen, Sari; Forsblom, Anita; Soinila, Seppo; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Music is a highly complex and versatile stimulus for the brain that engages many temporal, frontal, parietal, cerebellar, and subcortical areas involved in auditory, cognitive, emotional, and motor processing. Regular musical activities have been shown to effectively enhance the structure and function of many brain areas, making music a potential tool also in neurological rehabilitation. In our previous randomized controlled study, we found that listening to music on a daily basis can improve cognitive recovery and improve mood after an acute middle cerebral artery stroke. Extending this study, a voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis utilizing cost function masking was performed on the acute and 6-month post-stroke stage structural magnetic resonance imaging data of the patients (n = 49) who either listened to their favorite music [music group (MG), n = 16] or verbal material [audio book group (ABG), n = 18] or did not receive any listening material [control group (CG), n = 15] during the 6-month recovery period. Although all groups showed significant gray matter volume (GMV) increases from the acute to the 6-month stage, there was a specific network of frontal areas [left and right superior frontal gyrus (SFG), right medial SFG] and limbic areas [left ventral/subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (SACC) and right ventral striatum (VS)] in patients with left hemisphere damage in which the GMV increases were larger in the MG than in the ABG and in the CG. Moreover, the GM reorganization in the frontal areas correlated with enhanced recovery of verbal memory, focused attention, and language skills, whereas the GM reorganization in the SACC correlated with reduced negative mood. This study adds on previous results, showing that music listening after stroke not only enhances behavioral recovery, but also induces fine-grained neuroanatomical changes in the recovering brain. PMID:24860466

  16. Lack of excitatory amino acid-induced effects on calcium fluxes measured with sup 45 Ca sup 2+ in rat cerebral cortex synaptosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Simonato, M.; Jope, R.S.; Bianchi, C.; Beani, L. )

    1989-07-01

    Ca{sup 2+} uptake was measured in purified rat cerebral cortex synaptosomes (P3 pellets) using {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} as a tracer. Ca{sup 2+} influx increased in time, and with an increase in external K+ concentration and temperature. The net (external K+-induced, depolarization-dependent) uptake follows a two-component course. The exponential term, due to the opening of voltage-operated calcium channels (VOC), has a rate constant which increases with an increase in the depolarization level (1.04 versus 0.54 nmol/s/mg protein for 50 mM - versus 15 mM (K+)-dependent net influx). The linear term, due to the Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange system, has a similar rate constant at all depolarization levels (0.16 +/- 0.05 and 0.11 +/- 0.02 nmol/s/mg protein). Excitatory amino acids (glutamate, kainate and n-methyl-d-aspartate-NMDA-) were tested on this preparation at doses ranging between 5 x 10(-5) M and 5 x 10(-3) M and at multiple incubation times, under resting conditions and under two depolarizing conditions (partial depolarization: 15 mM external K{sup +} and maximal depolarization: 50 mM external K+). NMDA was also tested in the absence of Mg{sup 2+}. No effect was detectable under any of these experimental conditions. Hypotheses to interpret these data are discussed. Further studies on other preparations are needed in order to directly investigate the presynaptic effects of excitatory amino acids.

  17. Motor learning curve and long-term effectiveness of modified constraint-induced movement therapy in children with unilateral cerebral palsy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Geerdink, Yvonne; Aarts, Pauline; Geurts, Alexander C

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the progression of manual dexterity during 6 weeks (54h) (modified) constraint-induced movement therapy ((m)CIMT) followed by 2 weeks (18h) bimanual training (BiT) in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (CP), to establish whether and when a maximal training effect was reached and which factors might influence the motor learning curve. In addition, long-term retention of effects was determined. In a randomized controlled trial of 52 children with CP, aged 2.5-8 years, comparing mCIMT-BiT to conventional therapy, 28 children were allocated to the mCIMT-BiT group. This group was assessed weekly with the Box and Block test. Long-term effectiveness was determined by collecting follow-up data of the primary (Assisting Hand Assessment, ABILHAND-Kids) and secondary (Melbourne, COPM) outcomes at six months and one year after intervention. Fifteen children (53.6%) reached a maximum training effect within the mCIMT period. This group differed from others with respect to age, but not gender, affected side or manual ability. Children younger than five years had a greater chance to reach a maximum score within 6 weeks mCIMT (OR=6.67, 95%CI=1.24-35.71) that stabilized already after four weeks; older children showed a longer progression and tended to decline afterwards. In both age groups, beneficial effects were retained in the long term. The findings suggest that children of 5 years and older might profit from a longer period of mCIMT than 54h to reach their maximum unimanual capacity and to retain this capacity during subsequent bimanual training. PMID:23291509

  18. Cerebral Lactate Metabolism After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Patet, Camille; Suys, Tamarah; Carteron, Laurent; Oddo, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral energy dysfunction has emerged as an important determinant of prognosis following traumatic brain injury (TBI). A number of studies using cerebral microdialysis, positron emission tomography, and jugular bulb oximetry to explore cerebral metabolism in patients with TBI have demonstrated a critical decrease in the availability of the main energy substrate of brain cells (i.e., glucose). Energy dysfunction induces adaptations of cerebral metabolism that include the utilization of alternative energy resources that the brain constitutively has, such as lactate. Two decades of experimental and human investigations have convincingly shown that lactate stands as a major actor of cerebral metabolism. Glutamate-induced activation of glycolysis stimulates lactate production from glucose in astrocytes, with subsequent lactate transfer to neurons (astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle). Lactate is not only used as an extra energy substrate but also acts as a signaling molecule and regulator of systemic and brain glucose use in the cerebral circulation. In animal models of brain injury (e.g., TBI, stroke), supplementation with exogenous lactate exerts significant neuroprotection. Here, we summarize the main clinical studies showing the pivotal role of lactate and cerebral lactate metabolism after TBI. We also review pilot interventional studies that examined exogenous lactate supplementation in patients with TBI and found hypertonic lactate infusions had several beneficial properties on the injured brain, including decrease of brain edema, improvement of neuroenergetics via a "cerebral glucose-sparing effect," and increase of cerebral blood flow. Hypertonic lactate represents a promising area of therapeutic investigation; however, larger studies are needed to further examine mechanisms of action and impact on outcome. PMID:26898683

  19. Aging and Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Networker, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This special edition of "The Networker" contains several articles focusing on aging and cerebral palsy (CP). "Aging and Cerebral Palsy: Pathways to Successful Aging" (Jenny C. Overeynder) reports on the National Invitational Colloquium on Aging and Cerebral Palsy held in April 1993. "Observations from an Observer" (Kathleen K. Barrett) describes…

  20. Gender Differences in Protection Against Angiotensin II-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction by MnSOD in the Cerebral Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Chrissobolis, Sophocles; Faraci, Frank M.

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) produces oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in blood vessels. The vasculature from females may be protected against deleterious effects of Ang II. We tested the hypothesis that manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) protects against Ang II-induced endothelial dysfunction. Experiments were performed in C57Bl/6, wild-type (MnSOD+/+) and MnSOD deficient (MnSOD+/−) mice treated systemically with vehicle or Ang II. Basilar arteries were isolated from C57Bl/6 mice treated for one week with a non-pressor dose of Ang II (0.28 mg/kg × day). Ang II treatment produced superoxide-mediated impairment of responses to the endothelium-dependent vasodilator acetylcholine (Ach)(P<0.05). In male, but not female MnSOD+/+ mice, Ang II modestly inhibited responses to ACh (P<0.05). In contrast, Ang II selectively impaired these responses by up to 70% in male MnSOD+/− mice (P<0.05) and this effect was reversed by tempol (P<0.05). Ang II had no effect on ACh responses in MnSOD+/− female mice. Vascular superoxide levels following treatment with an inhibitor of CuZn- and extracellular-SOD, were higher in Ang II-treated vs vehicle-treated MnSOD+/− mice. Thus, a non-pressor dose of Ang II produces endothelial dysfunction in male mice only, suggesting that the female vasculature is protected from Ang II. In male, but not female mice, MnSOD deficiency enhanced endothelial dysfunction, suggesting that MnSOD normally protects the vasculature during disease states in which Ang II contributes to vascular dysfunction. PMID:20194298

  1. Relationship between cerebral sodium-glucose transporter and hyperglycemia in cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yui; Harada, Shinichi; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2015-09-14

    Post-ischemic hyperglycemia exacerbates the development of cerebral ischemia. To elucidate this exacerbation mechanism, we focused on sodium-glucose transporter (SGLT) as a mediator that lead hyperglycemia to cerebral ischemia. SGLT transport glucose into the cell, together with sodium ion, using the sodium concentration gradient. We have previously reported that suppression of cerebral SGLT ameliorates cerebral ischemic neuronal damage. However, detail relationship cerebral between SGLT and post-ischemic hyperglycemia remain incompletely defined. Therefore, we examined the involvement of cerebral SGLT on cerebral ischemic neuronal damage with or without hyperglycemic condition. Cell survival rate of primary cultured neurons was assessed by biochemical assay. A mouse model of focal ischemia was generated using a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Neuronal damage was assessed with histological and behavioral analyses. Concomitant hydrogen peroxide/glucose treatment exacerbated hydrogen peroxide alone-induced cell death. Although a SGLT family-specific inhibitor, phlorizin had no effect on developed hydrogen peroxide alone-induced cell death, it suppressed cell death induced by concomitant hydrogen peroxide/glucose treatment. α-MG induced a concentration-dependent and significant decrease in neuronal survival. PHZ administered on immediately after reperfusion had no effect, but PHZ given at 6h after reperfusion had an effect. Our in vitro study indicates that SGLT is not involved in neuronal cell death in non-hyperglycemic condition. We have already reported that post-ischemic hyperglycemia begins to develop at 6h after MCAO. Therefore, current our in vivo study show post-ischemic hyperglycemic condition may be necessary for the SGLT-mediated exacerbation of cerebral ischemic neuronal damage. PMID:26254165

  2. A Combination of Remote Ischemic Perconditioning and Cerebral Ischemic Postconditioning Inhibits Autophagy to Attenuate Plasma HMGB1 and Induce Neuroprotection Against Stroke in Rat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jue; Han, Dong; Sun, Miao; Feng, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Remote ischemic perconditioning (RIPerC) and ischemic postconditioning (IPOC) are well-acknowledged neuroprotective procedures during ischemic injury. The present study established a combined RIPerC and IPOC (RIPerC + IPOC) model in rats and studied how it would regulate the autophagy process and affect HMGB1 levels in a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Rats with MCAO were treated with RIPerC by fastening and release of the left hind limb to achieve 4 cycles of 5 min remote ischemia reperfusion, 40 min prior to cerebral reperfusion, and then treated with IPOC by exposing the cerebral middle artery to 3 cycles of 30 s reperfusion/30 s occlusion at the onset of cerebral reperfusion. Infarction volumes, neurological deficits, and pathological changes were assessed 24 h after ischemia. The autophagy activator rapamycin (RAP) and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) were administrated for further mechanism. The expression and location of HMGB1 and the autophagy-related proteins like LC3, Beclin1, and P62 as well as plasma HMGB1 levels were measured. Our results suggested that RIPerC + IPOC attenuated plasma HMGB1 levels to intensify its neuroprotective effect against cerebral ischemic reperfusion injury via inhibiting the autophagy process. PMID:26852332

  3. Reduced Mechanical Stretch Induces Enhanced Endothelin B Receptor-Mediated Contractility via Activation of Focal Adhesion Kinase and Extracellular Regulated Kinase 1/2 in Cerebral Arteries from Rat.

    PubMed

    Spray, Stine; Rasmussen, Marianne N P; Skovsted, Gry F; Warfvinge, Karin; Sheykhzade, Majid; Edvinsson, Lars

    2016-07-01

    Cerebral ischaemia results in enhanced endothelin B (ETB ) receptor-mediated contraction and receptor protein expression in the affected cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). Organ culture of cerebral arteries is a method to induce similar alterations in ETB receptor expression. We suggest that rapid and sustained reduction in wall tension/stretch is a possible trigger mechanism for this vascular remodelling. Isolated rat middle cerebral artery (MCA) segments were incubated in a wire myograph with or without mechanical stretch, prior to assessment of their contractile response to the selective ETB receptor agonist sarafotoxin 6c. The involvement of extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was studied by their specific inhibitors U0126 and PF-228, respectively. Compared with their stretched counterparts, unstretched MCA segments showed a significantly increased ETB receptor-mediated contractile response after 12 hr of incubation, which was attenuated by either U0126 or PF-228. The functionally increased ETB -mediated contractility could be attributed to two different mechanisms: (i) a difference in ETB receptor localization from primarily endothelial expression to SMC expression and (ii) an increased calcium sensitivity of the SMCs due to an increased expression of the calcium channel transient receptor potential canonical 1. Collectively, our results present a possible mechanism linking lack of vessel wall stretch/tension to changes in ETB receptor-mediated contractility via triggering of an early mechanosensitive signalling pathway involving ERK1/2 and FAK signalling. A mechanism likely to be an initiating factor for the increased ETB receptor-mediated contractility found after cerebral ischaemia. PMID:26781487

  4. Cerebral perturbations during exercise in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Verges, Samuel; Rupp, Thomas; Jubeau, Marc; Wuyam, Bernard; Esteve, François; Levy, Patrick; Perrey, Stéphane; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2012-04-15

    Reduction of aerobic exercise performance observed under hypoxic conditions is mainly attributed to altered muscle metabolism due to impaired O(2) delivery. It has been recently proposed that hypoxia-induced cerebral perturbations may also contribute to exercise performance limitation. A significant reduction in cerebral oxygenation during whole body exercise has been reported in hypoxia compared with normoxia, while changes in cerebral perfusion may depend on the brain region, the level of arterial oxygenation and hyperventilation induced alterations in arterial CO(2). With the use of transcranial magnetic stimulation, inconsistent changes in cortical excitability have been reported in hypoxia, whereas a greater impairment in maximal voluntary activation following a fatiguing exercise has been suggested when arterial O(2) content is reduced. Electromyographic recordings during exercise showed an accelerated rise in central motor drive in hypoxia, probably to compensate for greater muscle contractile fatigue. This accelerated development of muscle fatigue in moderate hypoxia may be responsible for increased inhibitory afferent signals to the central nervous system leading to impaired central drive. In severe hypoxia (arterial O(2) saturation <70-75%), cerebral hypoxia per se may become an important contributor to impaired performance and reduced motor drive during prolonged exercise. This review examines the effects of acute and chronic reduction in arterial O(2) (and CO(2)) on cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygenation, neuronal function, and central drive to the muscles. Direct and indirect influences of arterial deoxygenation on central command are separated. Methodological concerns as well as future research avenues are also considered. PMID:22319046

  5. Concise Review: Are Stimulated Somatic Cells Truly Reprogrammed into an ES/iPS-Like Pluripotent State? Better Understanding by Ischemia-Induced Multipotent Stem Cells in a Mouse Model of Cerebral Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Nakagomi, Takayuki; Nakano-Doi, Akiko; Narita, Aya; Matsuyama, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Following the discovery of pluripotent stem (PS) cells such as embryonic stem (ES) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, there has been a great hope that injured tissues can be repaired by transplantation of ES/iPS-derived various specific types of cells such as neural stem cells (NSCs). Although PS cells can be induced by ectopic expression of Yamanaka's factors, it is known that several stimuli such as ischemia/hypoxia can increase the stemness of somatic cells via reprogramming. This suggests that endogenous somatic cells acquire stemness during natural regenerative processes following injury. In this study, we describe whether somatic cells are converted into pluripotent stem cells by pathological stimuli without ectopic expression of reprogramming factors based on the findings of ischemia-induced multipotent stem cells in a mouse model of cerebral infarction. PMID:25945100

  6. [Etiology of cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Jaisle, F

    1996-01-01

    The "perinatal asphyxia" is regarded to be one of the causes of cerebral palsy, though in the very most of the children with cerebral palsy there is found no hypoxia during labour. It should be mentioned, that the definition of "perinatal" and "asphyxia" neither are unic nor concret. And also there is no correlation between nonreassuring fetal heart rate patterns and acidosis in fetal blood with the incidence of cerebral palsy. Numerous studies in pregnant animals failed in proving an acute intrapartal hypoxia to be the origin of the cerebral palsy. Myers (1975) describes four patterns of anatomic brain damage after different injuries. Only his so called oligo-acidotic hypoxia, which is protracted and lasts over a longer time is leading to brain injury, which can be regarded in analogy to the injury of children with cerebral palsy. Summarising the update publications about the causes of cerebral palsy and the studies in pregnant animals there is no evidence that hypoxia during labour may be the cause of cerebral palsy. There is a great probability of a pre(and post-)natal origin of brain injury (for instance a periventricular leucomalacia found after birth) which leads to cerebral palsy. Short after labour signs of a so called "asphyxia" may occur in addition to this preexisting injury and misrepresent the cause of cerebral palsy. Finally the prepartal injury may cause both: Cerebral palsy and hypoxia. PMID:9035826

  7. Synthesis of CNS active thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-like peptides: Biological evaluation and effect on cognitive impairment induced by cerebral ischemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Meena, Chhuttan L; Thakur, Avinash; Nandekar, Prajwal P; Sangamwar, Abhay T; Sharma, Shyam S; Jain, Rahul

    2015-09-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-like peptides were synthesized by replacing critical histidine and pGlu residues in the native peptide. The peptides were evaluated in vitro for receptor binding activity assay and in the cell functional assay; the peptides exhibit selective basal signaling agonist behavior toward TRH-R2. For example, peptides 8a, 8b, 8c, 8 f, 8 h, 8 l and 12 d activated TRH-R2 with potency (EC50) of 0.53 μM, 0.048 μM, 0.05 μM, 0.006 μM, 0.31 μM, 0.034 μM and 0.004 μM, respectively. In contrast for signaling activation of TRH-R1, the same peptide required higher concentration of 19.35 μM, 3.98 μM, 2.54 μM, 0.287 μM, 11.28 μM, 0.986 μM and 0.944 μM, respectively. The results showed that peptides were 36.5, 82.9, 50.8, 47.8, 36.3, 32.6 and 235-fold selective to TRH-R2 receptor subtype. The peptides were investigated for CNS activity at 10 μmol/kg in pentobarbital-induced sleep assay study. Peptides 8c (16.5 ± 1.4 min) and 8l (16.5 ± 2.1 min) displayed excellent CNS activity. In an in vivo study, peptide 8c did not cause significant change in the rat plasma TSH levels. The peptide 8c was further investigated for neuroprotective potential, and significantly reduced infracts volume and neurological score in the focal cerebral ischemia model in mice. Peptide 8c also significantly lowered MDA levels, indicating reduction of oxidative and enhanced percentage cell survival in CA1 region, when compared to ischemic brain. PMID:26216015

  8. Local cerebral metabolic effects of L-dopa therapy in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced parkinsonism in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Porrino, L J; Burns, R S; Crane, A M; Palombo, E; Kopin, I J; Sokoloff, L

    1987-08-01

    The quantitative 2-deoxy[14C]glucose autoradiographic method was used to map the distribution of alterations in local cerebral glucose utilization that accompanies clinically effective chronic L-dopa therapy of rhesus monkeys made parkinsonian by the administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). This pattern of changes was compared to the effects of a similar treatment regimen in normal monkeys. L-Dopa (100 mg with 10 mg carbidopa) was administered orally to normal and parkinsonian monkeys 3 times daily for 60-120 days prior to measurement of local cerebral glucose utilization. In parkinsonian monkeys treated with L-dopa, signs and symptoms of parkinsonism were controlled or suppressed, and widespread increases in glucose utilization were seen throughout the brain. Cerebral metabolic activity was increased both in areas rich in dopaminergic receptors, such as the caudate and putamen, and in nondopaminergic areas involved in motor functions. In many structures the rates of glucose utilization in L-dopa-treated parkinsonian monkeys were increased to levels that far exceeded rates measured in normal monkeys. In sharp contrast, similar treatment with L-dopa in normal monkeys had little if any effect on local cerebral glucose utilization. L-Dopa, then, appears to have an action in animals with selective lesions of the substantia nigra pars compacta produced by MPTP that is distinctly different from its effects in the normal monkey. PMID:3497401

  9. Local cerebral metabolic effects of L-dopa therapy in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced parkinsonism in monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Porrino, L.J.; Burns, R.S.; Crane, A.M.; Palombo, E.; Kopin, I.J.; Sokoloff, L.

    1987-08-01

    The quantitative 2-deoxy(/sup 14/C) glucose autoradiographic method was used to map the distribution of alterations in local cerebral glucose utilization that accompanies clinically effective chronic L-dopa therapy of rhesus monkeys made parkinsonian by the administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). This pattern of changes was compared to the effects of a similar treatment regimen in normal monkeys. L-Dopa was administered orally to normal and parkinsonian monkeys 3 times daily for 60-120 days prior to measurement of local cerebral glucose utilization. In parkinsonian monkeys treated with L-dopa, signs and symptoms of parkinsonism were controlled or suppressed, and widespread increases in glucose utilization were seen throughout the brain. Cerebral metabolic activity was increased both in areas rich in dopaminergic receptors, such as the caudate and putamen, and in nondopaminergic areas involved in motor functions. In many structures the rates of glucose utilization in L-dopa-treated parkinsonian monkeys were increased to levels that far exceeded rates measured in normal monkeys. In sharp contrast, similar treatment with L-dopa in normal monkeys had little if any effect on local cerebral glucose utilization. L-Dopa, then, appears to have an action in animals with selective lesions of the substantia nigra pars compacta produced by MPTP that is distinctly different from its effects in the normal monkey.

  10. Patterns of human local cerebral glucose metabolism during epileptic seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.

    1982-10-01

    Ictal patterns of local cerebral metabolic rate have been studied in epileptic patients by positron computed tomography with /sup 18/F-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Partial seizures were associated with activation of anatomic structures unique to each patient studied. Ictal increases and decreases in local cerebral metabolism were observed. Scans performed during generalized convulsions induced by electroshock demonstrated a diffuse ictal increase and postictal decrease in cerebral metabolism. Petit mal absences were associated with a diffuse increase in cerebral metabolic rate. The ictal fluorodeoxyglucose patterns obtained from patients do not resemble autoradiographic patterns obtained from common experimental animal models of epilepsy.

  11. 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces expression of p27(kip¹) and FoxO3a in female rat cerebral cortex and PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guangfei; Liu, Jiao; Yoshimoto, Katsuhiko; Chen, Gang; Iwata, Takeo; Mizusawa, Noriko; Duan, Zhiqing; Wan, Chunhua; Jiang, Junkang

    2014-05-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a potent toxin that alters normal brain development, producing cognitive disability and motor dysfunction. Previous studies in rats have proved that female rats are more sensitive to TCDD lethality than male ones. Recent studies have shown that TCDD induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, but the regulatory proteins involved in these processes have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we constructed an acute TCDD injury female rat model, and investigated the effects of TCDD on apoptosis and expression of cell cycle regulators, forkhead box class O 3a (FoxO3a) and p27(kip1), in the central nervous system (CNS). Increased levels of active caspase-3 were observed in the cerebral cortex of female rats treated with TCDD, suggesting that TCDD-induced apoptosis occurs in the CNS. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotinylated-dUTP nick-end labeling assay showed that apoptosis primarily occurred in neurons. Furthermore, Western blot analysis, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry showed a significant up-regulation of FoxO3a and p27(kip1) in the cerebral cortex. Immunofluorescent labeling indicated that FoxO3a and p27(kip1) were predominantly localized in apoptotic neurons, but not in astrocytes. In vitro experiments using PC12, a rat neuron-like pheochromocytoma cell line, also revealed that TCDD induced apoptosis and an increase in FoxO3a and p27(kip1) expression. Furthermore, knockdown of FoxO3a expression inhibited p27(kip1) transcription and TCDD-induced apoptosis. Based on our data, induction of FoxO3a may play an important role in TCDD-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:24594276

  12. Is longer sevoflurane preconditioning neuroprotective in permanent focal cerebral ischemia?

    PubMed

    Qiu, Caiwei; Sheng, Bo; Wang, Shurong; Liu, Jin

    2013-08-15

    Sevoflurane preconditioning has neuroprotective effects in the cerebral ischemia/reperfusion model. However, its influence on permanent cerebral ischemia remains unclear. In the present study, the rats were exposed to sevoflurane for 15, 30, 60, and 120 minutes, followed by induction of permanent cerebral ischemia. Results demonstrated that 30- and 60-minute sevoflurane preconditioning significantly reduced the infarct volume at 24 hours after cerebral ischemia, and 60-minute lurane preconditioning additionally reduced the number of TUNEL- and caspase-3-positive cells in the ischemic penumbra. However, 120-minute sevoflurane preconditioning did not show evident neuroprotective effects. Moreover, 60-minute sevoflurane preconditioning significantly attenuated neurological deficits and infarct volume in rats at 4 days after cerebral ischemia. These findings indicated that 60-minute sevoflurane preconditioning can induce the best neuroprotective effects in rats with permanent cerebral ischemia through the inhibition of apoptosis. PMID:25206521

  13. Hemiparesis post cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Taiaa, Oumkaltoum; Amil, Touriya; Darbi, Abdelatif

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is one of the most serious complications in the Plasmodium falciparum infection. In endemic areas, the cerebral malaria interested mainly children. The occurrence in adults is very rare and most interested adult traveling in tropical zones. This case report describes a motor deficit post cerebral malaria in a young adult traveling in malaria endemic area. This complication has been reported especially in children and seems very rare in adults. PMID:25995798

  14. Modified constraint-induced movement therapy or bimanual occupational therapy following injection of Botulinum toxin-A to improve bimanual performance in young children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a randomised controlled trial methods paper

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Use of Botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A) for treatment of upper limb spasticity in children with cerebral palsy has become routine clinical practice in many paediatric treatment centres worldwide. There is now high-level evidence that upper limb BoNT-A injection, in combination with occupational therapy, improves outcomes in children with cerebral palsy at both the body function/structure and activity level domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Investigation is now required to establish what amount and specific type of occupational therapy will further enhance functional outcomes and prolong the beneficial effects of BoNT-A. Methods/Design A randomised, controlled, evaluator blinded, prospective parallel-group trial. Eligible participants were children aged 18 months to 6 years, diagnosed with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy and who were able to demonstrate selective motor control of the affected upper limb. Both groups received upper limb injections of BoNT-A. Children were randomised to either the modified constraint-induced movement therapy group (experimental) or bimanual occupational therapy group (control). Outcome assessments were undertaken at pre-injection and 1, 3 and 6 months following injection of BoNT-A. The primary outcome measure was the Assisting Hand Assessment. Secondary outcomes included: the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test; Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory; Canadian Occupational Performance Measure; Goal Attainment Scaling; Pediatric Motor Activity Log; modified Ashworth Scale and; the modified Tardieu Scale. Discussion The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology of a randomised controlled trial comparing the effects of modified constraint-induced movement therapy (a uni-manual therapy) versus bimanual occupational therapy (a bimanual therapy) on improving bimanual upper limb performance of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy following upper limb injection of Bo

  15. Cerebral Asymmetries and Reading Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirozzolo, Francis J.

    1978-01-01

    Reviewed are historical developments regarding the concepts of cerebral localization, and analyzed are implications of current research on the role of the cerebral hemispheres in reading disorders. (CL)

  16. Cerebral Palsy (CP) Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Pop Quiz: Cerebral Palsy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Sandy is the parent of a child with cerebral palsy and the Board President of Gio’s Garden , a ...

  17. Computed Tomography Guided Percutaneous Injection of a Mixture of Lipiodol and Methylene Blue in Rabbit Lungs: Evaluation of Localization Ability for Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Kwang Nam; Kim, Tae Jung; Song, Yong Sub; Kim, Dong Il

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative localization is necessary prior to video assisted thoracoscopic surgery for the detection of small or deeply located lung nodules. We compared the localization ability of a mixture of lipiodol and methylene blue (MLM) (0.6 mL, 1:5) to methylene blue (0.5 mL) in rabbit lungs. CT-guided percutaneous injections were performed in 21 subjects with MLM and methylene blue. We measured the extent of staining on freshly excised lung and evaluated the subjective localization ability with 4 point scales at 6 and 24 hr after injections. For MLM, radio-opacity was evaluated on the fluoroscopy. We considered score 2 (acceptable) or 3 (excellent) as appropriate for localization. The staining extent of MLM was significantly smaller than methylene blue (0.6 vs 1.0 cm, P<0.001). MLM showed superior staining ability over methylene blue (2.8 vs 2.2, P=0.010). Excellent staining was achieved in 17 subjects (81%) with MLM and 8 (38%) with methylene blue (P=0.011). An acceptable or excellent radio-opacity of MLM was found in 13 subjects (62%). An appropriate localization rate of MLM was 100% with the use of the directly visible ability and radio-opacity of MLM. MLM provides a superior pulmonary localization ability over methylene blue. PMID:24431917

  18. Effect of a new vasodilator (flunarizine) on the cerebral circulation.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, M; Takagi, S; Seki, T; Takeoka, T; Goto, F

    1975-07-01

    In order to clarify the effects of flunarizine, a newly-synthesized derivative of piperazine on cerebral circulation and metabolism, cerebrocortical oxygen tension, carbon dioxide tension and cerebrocortical blood flow were continuously recorded, along with a simultaneous monitoring of arterial blood pressure in 11 cats. Maximal changes in cerebrocortical oxygen tension induced by intravenous administration of flunarizine (0.6-1.0 mg/kg) were compared with those of papaverine hydrochloride (1 mg/kg). Flunarizine caused increases in cerebrocortical oxygen tension as well as cerebrocortical blood flow and a decrease in cerebrocortical carbon dioxide tension despite a fall in blood pressure, indicating an increase of cerebral blood flow presumably due to cerebral vasodilatation. Since the increase of cerebrocortical oxygen tension induced by flunarizine was comparable to that induced by papaverine, it was concluded that flunarizine appears to be a potent vasodilator of cerebral vessels. PMID:1159451

  19. Effects of cerebral ischemia on neuronal hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    He, Yangdong; Hua, Ya; Liu, Wenquan; Hu, Haitao; Keep, Richard F.; Xi, Guohua

    2009-01-01

    Summary The present study examined whether or not neuronal hemoglobin (Hb) is present in rats. It then examined whether cerebral ischemia or ischemic preconditioning (IPC) affects neuronal Hb levels in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either 15 minutes of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion with 24 hours of reperfusion, an IPC stimulus, or 24 hours of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO), or IPC followed three days later by 24 hours of pMCAO. In vitro, primary cultured neurons were exposed to 2 hours of oxygen-glucose deprivation with 22 hours of reoxygenation. Results showed that Hb is widely expressed in rat cerebral neurons but not astrocytes. Hb expression was significantly upregulated in the ipsilateral caudate and the cortical core of the middle cerebral artery territory after IPC. Hb levels also increased in more penumbral cortex and the contralateral hemisphere 24 hours after pMCAO, but expression in the ipsilateral caudate and cortical core area were decreased. Ischemic preconditioning modified pMCAO-induced brain Hb changes. Neuronal Hb levels in vitro were increased by 2 hours of oxygen-glucose deprivation and 22 hours of reoxygenation. These results indicate that Hb is synthesized in neurons and can be upregulated by ischemia. PMID:19066615

  20. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fenichel GM, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ... al. Course of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation. Neurology. 2007;68:1411-1416. PMID: 17452586 www.ncbi. ...

  1. Rehabilitation in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most frequent physical disability of childhood onset. Over the past four decades, prevalence has remained remarkably constant at 2 to 3 per 1,000 live births in industrialized countries. In this article I concentrate on the rehabilitation and outcome of patients with cerebral palsy. The epidemiologic, pathogenetic, and diagnostic aspects are highlighted briefly as they pertain to the planning and implementation of the rehabilitation process. PMID:1866952

  2. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nance, Elizabeth; Johnston, Michael V; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kannan, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed. PMID:24204146

  3. Association of cisplatin and intra-arterial injection of {sup 131}I-lipiodol in treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma: Results of phase II trial

    SciTech Connect

    Raoul, Jean-Luc . E-mail: raoul@rennes.fnclcc.fr; Boucher, Eveline; Olivie, Damien; Guillygomarc'h, Anne; Boudjema, Karim; Garin, Etienne

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: Intra-arterial injections of {sup 131}I-lipiodol ({sup 131}I-Lip) provide an effective treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma. In hepatocellular carcinoma cell cultures, concurrent administration of cisplatin increases the cytotoxicity of {sup 131}I. The efficacy and tolerance of intra-arterial injections of {sup 131}I-Lip combined with systemic cisplatin was tested in a phase II trial. Methods and Materials: The inclusion criteria were proven unresectable nonmetastatic hepatocellular carcinoma, compensated liver disease, and adequate laboratory test findings. Treatment comprised the combination of intra-arterial injection of {sup 131}I-Lip (2.2 GBq) with intravenous infusion of low-dose cisplatin. The combined treatment could be repeated. Results: A total of 41 patients were included; 37 had cirrhosis and 38 had measurable tumors. One to four treatments (median, two) were given. The cisplatin dose was 75 mg for the first course and 72 mg for the second. Grade 3-4 (n/n) adverse effects were observed in 14 patients, polymorphonuclear leukocytes (3/0), platelets (5/1), asthenia (1/0), pain (1/0), and vomiting (1/0). Four patients developed pulmonary toxicity; 2 cases were likely related to {sup 131}I-Lip administration and 1 was fatal. The response rate was 47% (18 of 38), and the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 73% {+-} 7% and 48% {+-} 9%, respectively. Conclusion: This combination had a tolerable toxicity profile and provided an objective response rate, warranting a phase III trial.

  4. CT Perfusion Imaging Can Predict Patients' Survival and Early Response to Transarterial Chemo-Lipiodol Infusion for Liver Metastases from Colorectal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Wei-Fu; Cheng, De-Lei; Zhou, Chun-Ze; Ni, Ming; Lu, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To prospectively evaluate the performance of computed tomography perfusion imaging (CTPI) in predicting the early response to transarterial chemo-lipiodol infusion (TACLI) and survival of patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM). Materials and Methods Computed tomography perfusion imaging was performed before and 1 month after TACLI in 61 consecutive patients. Therapeutic response was evaluated on CT scans 1 month and 4 months after TACLI; the patients were classified as responders and non-responders based on 4-month CT scans after TACLI. The percentage change of CTPI parameters of target lesions were compared between responders and non-responders at 1 month after TACLI. The optimal parameter and cutoff value were determined. The patients were divided into 2 subgroups according to the cutoff value. The log-rank test was used to compare the survival rates of the 2 subgroups. Results Four-month images were obtained from 58 patients, of which 39.7% were responders and 60.3% were non-responders. The percentage change in hepatic arterial perfusion (HAP) 1 month after TACLI was the optimal predicting parameter (p = 0.003). The best cut-off value was -21.5% and patients who exhibited a ≥ 21.5% decrease in HAP had a significantly higher overall survival rate than those who exhibited a < 21.5% decrease (p < 0.001). Conclusion Computed tomography perfusion imaging can predict the early response to TACLI and survival of patients with CRLM. The percentage change in HAP after TACLI with a cutoff value of -21.5% is the optimal predictor. PMID:26175580

  5. Activation of cerebral sodium-glucose transporter type 1 function mediated by post-ischemic hyperglycemia exacerbates the development of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Y; Ogihara, S; Harada, S; Tokuyama, S

    2015-12-01

    The regulation of post-ischemic hyperglycemia plays an important role in suppressing neuronal damage in therapeutic strategies for cerebral ischemia. We previously reported that the cerebral sodium-glucose transporter (SGLT) was involved in the post-ischemic hyperglycemia-induced exacerbation of cerebral ischemic neuronal damage. Cortical SGLT-1, one of the cerebral SGLT isoforms, is dramatically increased by focal cerebral ischemia. In this study, we focused on the involvement of cerebral SGLT-1 in the development of cerebral ischemic neuronal damage. It was previously reported that activation of 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) increases SGLT-1 expression. Moreover, ischemic stress-induced activation of AMPK exacerbates cerebral ischemic neuronal damage. Therefore, we directly confirmed the relationship between cerebral SGLT-1 and cerebral AMPK activation using in vitro primary culture of mouse cortical neurons. An in vivo mouse model of focal cerebral ischemia was generated using a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). The development of infarct volume and behavioral abnormalities on day 3 after MCAO were ameliorated in cerebral SGLT-1 knock down mice. Cortical and striatal SGLT-1 expression levels were significantly increased at 12h after MCAO. Immunofluorescence revealed that SGLT-1 and the neuronal nuclear antigen (NeuN) were co-localized in the cortex and striatum of MCAO mice. In the in vitro study, primary cortical neurons were cultured for five days before each treatment with reagents. Concomitant treatment with hydrogen peroxide and glucose induced the elevation of SGLT-1 and phosphorylated AMPK/AMPK ratio, and this elevation was suppressed by compound C, an AMPK inhibitor in primary cortical neurons. Moreover, compound C suppressed neuronal cell death induced by concomitant hydrogen peroxide/glucose treatment in primary cortical neurons. Therefore, we concluded that enhanced cerebral SGLT-1 function mediated by post

  6. Effects of CDP-choline on neurologic deficits and cerebral glucose metabolism in a rat model of cerebral ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kakihana, M.; Fukuda, N.; Suno, M.; Nagaoka, A.

    1988-02-01

    The effects of cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) on neurologic deficits and cerebral glucose metabolism were studied in a rat model of transient cerebral ischemia. Cerebral ischemia was induced by occluding both common carotid arteries for 20 or 30 minutes 24 hours after the vertebral arteries were permanently occluded by electrocautery. CDP-choline was administered intraperitoneally twice daily for 4 days after reestablishing carotid blood flow. CDP-choline at two dosages (50 and 250 mg/kg) shortened the time required for recovery of spontaneous motor activity in a dose-related manner; recovery time was measured early after reperfusion. Neurologic signs were observed for 10 days. High-dose CDP-choline improved neurologic signs in the rats within 20-30 minutes of ischemia. When cerebral glucose metabolism was assessed on Day 4, increases in the levels of glucose and pyruvate were accompanied by decreases in the synthesis of labeled acetylcholine from uniformly labeled (/sup 14/C)glucose measured in the cerebral cortex of rats with 30 minutes of ischemia. High-dose CDP-choline also attenuated changes in these variables. CDP-(1,2-/sup 14/C)choline injected intravenously 10 minutes after reperfusion was used for membrane lipid biosynthesis. These results indicate that CDP-choline has beneficial effects on brain dysfunction induced by cerebral ischemia, which may be due in part to the restorative effects of CDP-choline on disturbed cerebral glucose metabolism, probably by stimulating phospholipid biosynthesis.

  7. Vasospasm in Cerebral Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Eisenhut, Michael

    2014-01-01

    All forms of cerebral inflammation as found in bacterial meningitis, cerebral malaria, brain injury, and subarachnoid haemorrhage have been associated with vasospasm of cerebral arteries and arterioles. Vasospasm has been associated with permanent neurological deficits and death in subarachnoid haemorrhage and bacterial meningitis. Increased levels of interleukin-1 may be involved in vasospasm through calcium dependent and independent activation of the myosin light chain kinase and release of the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1. Another key factor in the pathogenesis of cerebral arterial vasospasm may be the reduced bioavailability of the vasodilator nitric oxide. Therapeutic trials in vasospasm related to inflammation in subarachnoid haemorrhage in humans showed a reduction of vasospasm through calcium antagonists, endothelin receptor antagonists, statins, and plasminogen activators. Combination of therapeutic modalities addressing calcium dependent and independent vasospasm, the underlying inflammation, and depletion of nitric oxide simultaneously merit further study in all conditions with cerebral inflammation in double blind randomised placebo controlled trials. Auxiliary treatment with these agents may be able to reduce ischemic brain injury associated with neurological deficits and increased mortality. PMID:25610703

  8. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Allroggen, H.; Abbott, R.

    2000-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a challenging condition because of its variability of clinical symptoms and signs. It is very often unrecognised at initial presentation. All age groups can be affected. Large sinuses such as the superior sagittal sinus are most frequently involved. Extensive collateral circulation within the cerebral venous system allows for a significant degree of compensation in the early stages of thrombus formation. Systemic inflammatory diseases and inherited as well as acquired coagulation disorders are frequent causes, although in up to 30% of cases no underlying cause can be identified. The oral contraceptive pill appears to be an important additional risk factor. The spectrum of clinical presentations ranges from headache with papilloedema to focal deficit, seizures and coma. Magnetic resonance imaging with venography is the investigation of choice; computed tomography alone will miss a significant number of cases. It has now been conclusively shown that intravenous heparin is the first-line treatment for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis because of its efficacy, safety and feasability. Local thrombolysis may be indicated in cases of deterioration, despite adequate heparinisation. This should be followed by oral anticoagulation for 3-6 months. The prognosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is generally favourable. A high index of clinical suspicion is needed to diagnose this uncommon condition so that appropriate treatment can be initiated.


Keywords: cerebral venous sinus thrombosis PMID:10622773

  9. Neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Namura, Shobu; Ooboshi, Hiroaki; Liu, Jialing; Yenari, Midori A.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia, a focal or global insufficiency of blood flow to the brain, can arise through multiple mechanisms, including thrombosis and arterial hemorrhage. Ischemia is a major driver of stroke, one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. While the general etiology of cerebral ischemia and stroke has been known for some time, the conditions have only recently been considered treatable. This report describes current research in this field seeking to fully understand the pathomechanisms underlying stroke; to characterize the brain’s intrinsic injury, survival, and repair mechanisms; to identify putative drug targets as well as cell-based therapies; and to optimize the delivery of therapeutic agents to the damaged cerebral tissue. PMID:23488559

  10. The hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning-induced brain protection is mediated by a reduction of early apoptosis after transient global cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, Robert P.; Graupner, Gerhart; Titova, Elena; Zhang, Jennifer; Chiu, Jeffrey; Dach, Neal; Corleone, Dalia; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2008-01-01

    We hypothesized that the brain-protective effect of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) preconditioning in a transient global cerebral ischemia rat model is mediated by the inhibition of early apoptosis. One hundred ten male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats (300–350 g body weight) were allocated to the sham group and three other groups with 10 minutes of four-vessel occlusion, untreated or preconditioned with either 3 or 5 hyperbaric oxygenations. HBO preconditioning improved neurobehavioral scores and reduced mortality, decreased ischemic cell change, reduced the number of early apoptotic cells and hampered a conversion of early to late apoptotic alterations. HBO preconditioning reduced the immunoreactivity of phosphorylated p38 in vulnerable neurons and increased the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in early stage post-ischemia. However, preconditioning with 3 HBO treatments proved less beneficial than with 5 HBO treatments. We conclude that HBO preconditioning may be neuroprotective by reducing early apoptosis and inhibition of the conversion of early to late apoptosis, possibly through an increase in brain BDNF level and the suppression of p38 activation. PMID:17822911

  11. Cerebral hemodynamic and oxygenation changes induced by inner and heard speech: a study combining functional near-infrared spectroscopy and capnography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholkmann, Felix; Klein, Sabine D.; Gerber, Ursina; Wolf, Martin; Wolf, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of inner and heard speech on cerebral hemodynamics and oxygenation in the anterior prefrontal cortex (PFC) using functional near-infrared spectroscopy and to test whether potential effects were caused by alterations in the arterial carbon dioxide pressure (PaCO2). Twenty-nine healthy adult volunteers performed six different tasks of inner and heard speech according to a randomized crossover design. During the tasks, we generally found a decrease in PaCO (only for inner speech), tissue oxygen saturation (StO), oxyhemoglobin ([O2Hb]), total hemoglobin ([tHb]) concentration and an increase in deoxyhemoglobin concentration ([HHb]). Furthermore, we found significant relations between changes in [OHb], [HHb], [tHb], or StO and the participants' age, the baseline PETCO2, or certain speech tasks. We conclude that changes in breathing during the tasks led to lower PaCO (hypocapnia) for inner speech. During heard speech, no significant changes in PaCO occurred, but the decreases in StO, [OHb], and [tHb] suggest that changes in PaCO were also involved here. Different verse types (hexameter and alliteration) led to different changes in [tHb], implying different brain activations. In conclusion, StO, [OHb], [HHb], and [tHb] are affected by interplay of both PaCO reactivity and functional brain activity.

  12. Hypoxia-induced Bax and Bcl-2 protein expression, caspase-9 activation, DNA fragmentation, and lipid peroxidation in mitochondria of the cerebral cortex of newborn piglets: the role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Mishra, O P; Randis, T; Ashraf, Q M; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, M

    2006-09-01

    ). Levels of fluorescent compounds (microg of quinine sulfate/g protein) were 12.48+/-4.13 in normoxic and 37.92+/-7.62 in hypoxic (P=0.003 vs. normoxic). Densities (ODxmm2) of low molecular weight DNA fragments were 143+/-38 in normoxic, 365+/-152 in hypoxic, (P<0.05 vs. normoxic) and 163+/-25 in hypoxic-nitric oxide synthase animals (P<0.05 vs. hypoxic, P=NS vs. normoxic). The data demonstrate that hypoxia results in increased mitochondrial proapoptotic protein Bax, increased mitochondrial caspase-9 activity, increased mitochondrial lipid peroxidation, and increased fragmentation of DNA in mitochondria of the cerebral cortex of newborn piglets. The administration of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, nitric oxide synthase, prior to hypoxia prevented fragmentation of mitochondrial DNA, indicating that the hypoxia-induced mitochondrial DNA fragmentation is NO-mediated. We propose that NO free radicals generated during hypoxia lead to NO-mediated altered expression of Bax leading to increased ratio of pro-apoptotic/anti-apoptotic protein resulting in modification of mitochondrial membrane, and subsequently Ca2+-influx and fragmentation of mitochondrial DNA. PMID:16777344

  13. Cerebral Vasospasm Pharmacological Treatment: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Siasios, Ioannis; Kapsalaki, Eftychia Z.; Fountas, Kostas N.

    2013-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage- (aSAH-) associated vasospasm constitutes a clinicopathological entity, in which reversible vasculopathy, impaired autoregulatory function, and hypovolemia take place, and lead to the reduction of cerebral perfusion and finally ischemia. Cerebral vasospasm begins most often on the third day after the ictal event and reaches the maximum on the 5th–7th postictal days. Several therapeutic modalities have been employed for preventing or reversing cerebral vasospasm. Triple “H” therapy, balloon and chemical angioplasty with superselective intra-arterial injection of vasodilators, administration of substances like magnesium sulfate, statins, fasudil hydrochloride, erythropoietin, endothelin-1 antagonists, nitric oxide progenitors, and sildenafil, are some of the therapeutic protocols, which are currently employed for managing patients with aSAH. Intense pathophysiological mechanism research has led to the identification of various mediators of cerebral vasospasm, such as endothelium-derived, vascular smooth muscle-derived, proinflammatory mediators, cytokines and adhesion molecules, stress-induced gene activation, and platelet-derived growth factors. Oral, intravenous, or intra-arterial administration of antagonists of these mediators has been suggested for treating patients suffering a-SAH vasospam. In our current study, we attempt to summate all the available pharmacological treatment modalities for managing vasospasm. PMID:23431440

  14. The cerebral venous system and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark H; Imray, Christopher H E

    2016-01-15

    Most hypobaric hypoxia studies have focused on oxygen delivery and therefore cerebral blood inflow. Few have studied venous outflow. However, the volume of blood entering and leaving the skull (∼700 ml/min) is considerably greater than cerebrospinal fluid production (0.35 ml/min) or edema formation rates and slight imbalances of in- and outflow have considerable effects on intracranial pressure. This dynamic phenomenon is not necessarily appreciated in the currently taught static "Monro-Kellie" doctrine, which forms the basis of the "Tight-Fit" hypothesis thought to underlie high altitude headache, acute mountain sickness, and high altitude cerebral edema. Investigating both sides of the cerebral circulation was an integral part of the 2007 Xtreme Everest Expedition. The results of the relevant studies performed as part of and subsequent to this expedition are reviewed here. The evidence from recent studies suggests a relative venous outflow insufficiency is an early step in the pathogenesis of high altitude headache. Translation of knowledge gained from high altitude studies is important. Many patients in a critical care environment develop hypoxemia akin to that of high altitude exposure. An inability to drain the hypoxemic induced increase in cerebral blood flow could be an underappreciated regulatory mechanism of intracranial pressure. PMID:26294747

  15. Diabetes aggravates nanoparticles induced breakdown of the blood-brain barrier permeability, brain edema formation, alterations in cerebral blood flow and neuronal injury. An experimental study using physiological and morphological investigations in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Hari Shanker; Patnaik, Ranjana; Sharma, Aruna

    2010-12-01

    The possibility that diabetes aggravates nanoparticles induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, edema formation and brain pathology was examined in a rat model. Engineered nanoparticles from metals Ag and Cu (50-60 mn) were administered (50 mg/kg, i.p.) once daily for 7 days in normal and streptozotocine induced diabetic rats. On the 8th day, BBB permeability to Evans blue and radioactive iodine (131I-sodium) was examined in 16 brain regions. In these brain regions alterations in regional CBF was also evaluated using radiolabelled (125I) carbonized microspheres (o.d. 15 +/- 6 microm). Regional brain edema and Na+, K+ and Cl- ion analysis were done in 8 selected brain regions. Histopathology was used to detect neuronal damage employing Nissl staining. Nanoparticles treatment in diabetic rats showed much more profound disruption of the BBB to Evans blue albumin (EBA) and radioiodine in almost all the 16 regions examined as compared to the normal animals. In these diabetic animals reduction in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) was more pronounced than in normal rats. Edema development as seen using water content and increase in Na+ and a decrease in K+ ion were most marked in diabetic rats as compared to normal rats after nanoparticles treatment. Cell changes in the regions of BBB disruptions were also exacerbated in diabetic rats compared to normal group after nanoparticles treatment. Taken together, these observations are the first to show that diabetic rats are more susceptible to nanoparticles induced cerebrovascular reactions in the brain and neuronal damage. The possible mechanisms and significance of the present findings are discussed. PMID:21121280

  16. Plasma infusions into porcine cerebral white matter induce early edema, oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and DNA fragmentation: implications for white matter injury with increased blood-brain-barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Kenneth R; Dean, Christopher; Beiler, Shauna; Bryan, David W; Packard, Benjamin A; Smulian, A George; Linke, Michael J; de Courten-Myers, Gabrielle M

    2005-04-01

    Plasma infused into porcine cerebral white matter induces both acute interstitial and delayed vasogenic edema. Edematous white matter contains extracellular plasma proteins and rapidly induces oxidative stress as evidenced by increased protein carbonyl formation and heme oxygenase-1 induction. We tested the hypothesis that edematous white matter would also upregulate pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and develop DNA damage. We infused autologous plasma into the frontal hemispheric white matter of pentobarbital-anesthetized pigs. We monitored and controlled physiological variables and froze brains in situ at 1, 4 or 24 hrs. We determined edema volumes by computer-assisted morphometry. We measured white matter protein carbonyl formation by immunoblotting, cytokine gene expression by standard RT-PCR methods and DNA fragmentation by agarose gel electrophoresis. White matter edema developed acutely (1 hr) after plasma infusion and increased significantly in volume between 4 and 24 hrs. Protein carbonyl formation also occurred rapidly in edematous white matter with significant elevations (3 to 4-fold) already present at 1 hr. This increase remained through 24 hrs. Pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression was also rapidly increased at 1 hr post-infusion. Evidence for DNA fragmentation began at 2 to 4 hrs, and a pattern indicative of both ongoing necrosis and apoptosis was robust by 24 hrs. Plasma protein accumulation in white matter induces acute edema development and a cascade of patho-chemical events including oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and DNA damage. These results suggest that in diseases with increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability or following intracerebral hemorrhage or traumatic brain injury, interstitial plasma can rapidly damage white matter. PMID:16181107

  17. Cerebral Folate Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) is associated with low levels of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with normal folate levels in the plasma and red blood cells. The onset of symptoms caused by the deficiency of folates in the brain is at around 4 to 6 months of age. This is followed by delayed development, with deceleration…

  18. Cerebral Palsy Litigation

    PubMed Central

    Sartwelle, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    The cardinal driver of cerebral palsy litigation is electronic fetal monitoring, which has continued unabated for 40 years. Electronic fetal monitoring, however, is based on 19th-century childbirth myths, a virtually nonexistent scientific foundation, and has a false positive rate exceeding 99%. It has not affected the incidence of cerebral palsy. Electronic fetal monitoring has, however, increased the cesarian section rate, with the expected increase in mortality and morbidity risks to mothers and babies alike. This article explains why electronic fetal monitoring remains endorsed as efficacious in the worlds’ labor rooms and courtrooms despite being such a feeble medical modality. It also reviews the reasons professional organizations have failed to condemn the use of electronic fetal monitoring in courtrooms. The failures of tort reform, special cerebral palsy courts, and damage limits to stem the escalating litigation are discussed. Finally, the authors propose using a currently available evidence rule—the Daubert doctrine that excludes “junk science” from the courtroom—as the beginning of the end to cerebral palsy litigation and electronic fetal monitoring’s 40-year masquerade as science. PMID:25183322

  19. Cerebral White Matter

    PubMed Central

    Schmahmann, Jeremy D.; Smith, Eric E.; Eichler, Florian S.; Filley, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Lesions of the cerebral white matter (WM) result in focal neurobehavioral syndromes, neuropsychiatric phenomena, and dementia. The cerebral WM contains fiber pathways that convey axons linking cerebral cortical areas with each other and with subcortical structures, facilitating the distributed neural circuits that subserve sensorimotor function, intellect, and emotion. Recent neuroanatomical investigations reveal that these neural circuits are topographically linked by five groupings of fiber tracts emanating from every neocortical area: (1) cortico-cortical association fibers; (2) corticostriatal fibers; (3) commissural fibers; and cortico-subcortical pathways to (4) thalamus and (5) pontocerebellar system, brain stem, and/or spinal cord. Lesions of association fibers prevent communication between cortical areas engaged in different domains of behavior. Lesions of subcortical structures or projection/striatal fibers disrupt the contribution of subcortical nodes to behavior. Disconnection syndromes thus result from lesions of the cerebral cortex, subcortical structures, and WM tracts that link the nodes that make up the distributed circuits. The nature and the severity of the clinical manifestations of WM lesions are determined, in large part, by the location of the pathology: discrete neurological and neuropsychiatric symptoms result from focal WM lesions, whereas cognitive impairment across multiple domains—WM dementia—occurs in the setting of diffuse WM disease. We present a detailed review of the conditions affecting WM that produce these neurobehavioral syndromes, and consider the pathophysiology, clinical effects, and broad significance of the effects of aging and vascular compromise on cerebral WM, in an attempt to help further the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of these disorders. PMID:18990132

  20. Erythropoietin and cerebral vascular protection: role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, Anantha Vijay R; Katusic, Zvonimir S

    2006-11-01

    Cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a major clinical problem causing cerebral ischemia and infarction. The pathogenesis of vasospasm is related to a number of pathological processes including endothelial damage and alterations in vasomotor function leading to narrowing of arterial diameter and a subsequent decrease in cerebral blood flow. Discovery of the tissue protective effects of erythropoietin (EPO) stimulated the search for therapeutic application of EPO for the prevention and treatment of cerebrovascular disease. Recent studies have identified the role of EPO in vascular protection mediated by the preservation of endothelial cell integrity and stimulation of angiogenesis. In this review, we discuss the EPO-induced activation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase and its contribution to the prevention of cerebral vasospasm. PMID:17049112

  1. Focal cerebral ischaemia induces a decrease in activity and a shift in ouabain affinity of Na+, K+-ATPase isoforms without modifications in mRNA and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Jamme, I; Barbey, O; Trouvé, P; Charlemagne, D; Maixent, J M; MacKenzie, E T; Pellerin, L; Nouvelot, A

    1999-02-20

    In a mouse model of focal cerebral ischaemia, we observed after 1 h of ischaemia, that the total Na+, K+-ATPase activity was decreased by 39.4%, and then did not vary significantly up to 6 h post-occlusion. In the sham group, the dose-response curves for ouabain disclosed three inhibitory sites of low (LA), high (HA) and very high (VHA) affinity. In ischaemic animals, we detected the presence of only two inhibitory sites for ouabain. After 1 h of permanent occlusion, the first site exhibited a low affinity while the second site presented an affinity intermediate between those of HA and VHA sites, which evolved after 3 h and 6 h of occlusion towards that of the VHA site. The presence of only two ouabain sites for Na+, K+-ATPase after ischaemia could result from a change in ouabain affinity of both HA and VHA sites (alpha2 and alpha3 isoforms, respectively) to form a unique component. Irrespective of the duration of ischaemia, the smaller activity of this second site accounted entirely for the loss in total activity. Surprisingly, no modifications in protein and mRNA expression of any alpha or beta isoforms of the enzyme were observed, thus suggesting that ischaemia could induce intrinsic modifications of the Na+, K+-ATPase. PMID:10082868

  2. The Pirate group intervention protocol: description and a case report of a modified constraint-induced movement therapy combined with bimanual training for young children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Pauline B; van Hartingsveldt, Margo; Anderson, Patricia G; van den Tillaar, Ingrid; van der Burg, Jan; Geurts, Alexander C

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe a child-friendly modified constraint-induced movement therapy protocol that is combined with goal-directed task-specific bimanual training (mCIMT-BiT). This detailed description elucidates the approach and supports various research reports. This protocol is used in a Pirate play group setting and aims to extend bimanual skills in play and self-care activities for children with cerebral palsy and unilateral spastic paresis of the upper limb. To illustrate the content and course of treatment and its effect, a case report of a two-year-old boy is presented. After the eight-week mCIMT-BiT intervention, the child improved the capacity of his affected arm and hand in both quantitative and qualitative terms and his bimanual performance in daily life as assessed by the Assisting Hand Assessment, ABILHAND-Kids, Video Observations Aarts and Aarts Module Determine Developmental Disregard, Canadian Occupational Performance Measure and Goal Attainment Scaling. It is argued that improvement of affected upper-limb capacity in a test situation may be achieved and retained relatively easily, but it may take a lot more training to stabilize the results and automate motor control of the upper limb. Future studies with groups of children should elaborate on these intensity and generalization issues. PMID:21751275

  3. Noninvasive measurement of cerebral oxygen saturation and cerebral phronetal function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengli; Zhang, Aiyu; Xu, Min; Jin, Taiyi

    1998-08-01

    Using the Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS), the noninvasive measurement of cerebral oxygen concentration can be achieved in vivo based on the Lambert-Beer Law. In this paper, we discuss the possibility of studying higher brain functions through combining cerebral oxygen saturation and cerebral function measurement. Event-related experiments are introduced to measure the cerebral phronetal function. Time domain curves show sight differences among these experiment results. However, with the aid of DFT, experiment data of all five human volunteers show the frequency near 20 Hz or 40 Hz is evoked depending on the difficulty of the mental tasks. The results demonstrate the feasibility of cerebral functions study by means of cerebral oxygen saturation measurement analyzed in the frequency domain.

  4. Cocaine Constrictor Mechanisms of the Cerebral Vasculature.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, Robert M; Yoon, SeongHun; Zuccarello, Mario

    2016-05-01

    Cocaine constriction of the cerebral vasculature is thought to contribute to the ischemia associated with cocaine use. However, the mechanisms whereby cocaine elicits relevant vasoconstriction remain elusive. Indeed, proposed intra- and intercellular mechanisms based on over 3 decades of ex vivo vascular studies are, for the most part, of questionable relevancy due to the generally low contractile efficacy of cocaine combined with the use of nonresistance-type vessels. Furthermore, the significance attached to mechanisms derived from in vivo animal studies may be limited by the inability to demonstrate cocaine-induced decreased cerebral blood flow, as observed in (awake) humans. Despite these apparent limitations, we surmise that the vasoconstriction relevant to cocaine-induced ischemia is elicited by inhibition of dilator and activation of constrictor pathways because of cocaine action on the neurovascular unit (neuron, astrocyte, and vessel) and on vessels outside the unit. Furthermore, previous cocaine exposure, that is, conditions present in human subjects, downregulates and sensitizes these dilator and constrictor pathways, respectively, thereby enhancing constriction to acute cocaine. Identification of specific intra- and intercellular mechanisms requires investigations in the isolated microvasculature and the neurovascular unit from species chronically exposed to cocaine and in which cocaine decreases cerebral blood flow. PMID:26771152

  5. Cerebral Ischemic Preconditioning: the Road So Far….

    PubMed

    Thushara Vijayakumar, N; Sangwan, Amit; Sharma, Bhargy; Majid, Arshad; Rajanikant, G K

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral preconditioning constitutes the brain's adaptation to lethal ischemia when first exposed to mild doses of a subtoxic stressor. The phenomenon of preconditioning has been largely studied in the heart, and data from in vivo and in vitro models from past 2-3 decades have provided sufficient evidence that similar machinery exists in the brain as well. Since preconditioning results in a transient protective phenotype labeled as ischemic tolerance, it can open many doors in the medical warfare against stroke, a debilitating cerebrovascular disorder that kills or cripples thousands of people worldwide every year. Preconditioning can be induced by a variety of stimuli from hypoxia to pharmacological anesthetics, and each, in turn, induces tolerance by activating a multitude of proteins, enzymes, receptors, transcription factors, and other biomolecules eventually leading to genomic reprogramming. The intracellular signaling pathways and molecular cascades behind preconditioning are extensively being investigated, and several first-rate papers have come out in the last few years centered on the topic of cerebral ischemic tolerance. However, translating the experimental knowledge into the clinical scaffold still evades practicality and faces several challenges. Of the various preconditioning strategies, remote ischemic preconditioning and pharmacological preconditioning appears to be more clinically relevant for the management of ischemic stroke. In this review, we discuss current developments in the field of cerebral preconditioning and then examine the potential of various preconditioning agents to confer neuroprotection in the brain. PMID:26081149

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of experimental cerebral oedema.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, D; McDonald, W I; Tofts, P S; Johnson, G; Landon, D N

    1986-01-01

    Triethyl tin(TET)-induced cerebral oedema has been studied in cats by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the findings correlated with the histology and fine structure of the cerebrum following perfusion-fixation. MRI is a sensitive technique for detecting cerebral oedema, and the distribution and severity of the changes correlate closely with the morphological abnormalities. The relaxation times, T1 and T2 increase progressively as the oedema develops, and the proportional increase in T2 is approximately twice that in T1. Analysis of the magnetisation decay curves reveals slowly-relaxing and rapidly-relaxing components which probably correspond to oedema fluid and intracellular water respectively. The image appearances taken in conjunction with relaxation data provide a basis for determining the nature of the oedema in vivo. Images PMID:3806109

  7. Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: Emerging Concepts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) involves cerebrovascular amyloid deposition and is classified into several types according to the amyloid protein involved. Of these, sporadic amyloid β-protein (Aβ)-type CAA is most commonly found in older individuals and in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cerebrovascular Aβ deposits accompany functional and pathological changes in cerebral blood vessels (CAA-associated vasculopathies). CAA-associated vasculopathies lead to development of hemorrhagic lesions [lobar intracerebral macrohemorrhage, cortical microhemorrhage, and cortical superficial siderosis (cSS)/focal convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)], ischemic lesions (cortical infarction and ischemic changes of the white matter), and encephalopathies that include subacute leukoencephalopathy caused by CAA-associated inflammation/angiitis. Thus, CAA is related to dementia, stroke, and encephalopathies. Recent advances in diagnostic procedures, particularly neuroimaging, have enabled us to establish a clinical diagnosis of CAA without brain biopsies. Sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods, such as gradient-echo T2* imaging and susceptibility-weighted imaging, are useful for detecting cortical microhemorrhages and cSS. Amyloid imaging with amyloid-binding positron emission tomography (PET) ligands, such as Pittsburgh Compound B, can detect CAA, although they cannot discriminate vascular from parenchymal amyloid deposits. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid markers may be useful, including levels of Aβ40 for CAA and anti-Aβ antibody for CAA-related inflammation. Moreover, cSS is closely associated with transient focal neurological episodes (TFNE). CAA-related inflammation/angiitis shares pathophysiology with amyloid-related imaging abnormalities (ARIA) induced by Aβ immunotherapies in AD patients. This article reviews CAA and CAA-related disorders with respect to their epidemiology, pathology, pathophysiology, clinical features, biomarkers, diagnosis

  8. Genetics of Cerebral Vasospasm

    PubMed Central

    Ladner, Travis R.; Zuckerman, Scott L.; Mocco, J

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CV) is a major source of morbidity and mortality in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). It is thought that an inflammatory cascade initiated by extravasated blood products precipitates CV, disrupting vascular smooth muscle cell function of major cerebral arteries, leading to vasoconstriction. Mechanisms of CV and modes of therapy are an active area of research. Understanding the genetic basis of CV holds promise for the recognition and treatment for this devastating neurovascular event. In our review, we summarize the most recent research involving key areas within the genetics and vasospasm discussion: (1) Prognostic role of genetics—risk stratification based on gene sequencing, biomarkers, and polymorphisms; (2) Signaling pathways—pinpointing key inflammatory molecules responsible for downstream cellular signaling and altering these mediators to provide therapeutic benefit; and (3) Gene therapy and gene delivery—using viral vectors or novel protein delivery methods to overexpress protective genes in the vasospasm cascade. PMID:23691311

  9. Phenylpropanolamine and cerebral hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, J.R.; LeBlanc, H.J.

    1985-05-01

    Computerized tomography, carotid angiograms, and arteriography were used to diagnose several cases of cerebral hemorrhage following the use of phenylpropanolamine. The angiographic picture in one of the three cases was similar to that previously described in association with amphetamine abuse and pseudoephedrine overdose, both substances being chemically and pharmacologically similar to phenylpropanolamine. The study suggests that the arterial change responsible for symptoms may be due to spasm rather than arteriopathy. 14 references, 5 figures.

  10. Cerebral dysgenesis. An overview.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, G B; Sheth, R D; Bodensteiner, J B

    1994-11-01

    A significant portion of patients with neurodevelopmental abnormalities (mental retardation, learning disabilities, and so forth) have no definable cause for these problems. Mounting evidence suggests a substantial number of these idiopathic conditions have subtle abnormalities of brain development (cerebral dysgenesis) as the inherent pathophysiologic event. In this article the authors summarize normal and abnormal brain development, the diagnostic approach to idiopathic neurodevelopmental anomalies, and the new molecular genetic insights into the underlying causes of brain malformations. PMID:7845342

  11. What provides cerebral reserve?

    PubMed

    Staff, Roger T; Murray, Alison D; Deary, Ian J; Whalley, Lawrence J

    2004-05-01

    The cerebral reserve hypothesis is a heuristic concept used to explain apparent protection from the onset of cerebral disease and/or cognitive decline in old age. A significant obstacle when investigating the reserve hypothesis is the absence of baseline data with which to compare current cognitive status. We tested the influence of three hypothesized proxies of reserve (education, head size and occupational attainment [OCC]) in 92 volunteers born in 1921, whose cognitive function was measured at age 11 and 79 years, and who underwent brain MRI. The association between each proxy and old age cognitive function was tested, adjusting for variance contributed by childhood mental ability and detrimental age-related pathological changes measured using MRI. The results showed that education and OCC, but not total intracranial volume (TICV), contribute to cerebral reserve and help retain cognitive function in old age. Education was found to contribute between 5 and 6% of the variance found in old age memory function but was found to have no significant association with reasoning abilities. OCC was found to contribute around 5% of the variance found in old age memory function and between 6 and 8% of the variance found in old age reasoning abilities. We conclude that the intellectual challenges experienced during life, such as education and occupation, accumulate reserve and allow cognitive function to be maintained in old age. PMID:15047587

  12. [Insomnia and cerebral hypoperfusion].

    PubMed

    Káposzta, Zoltán; Rácz, Klára

    2007-11-18

    Insomnia is defined as difficulty with the initiation, maintenance, duration, or quality of sleep that results in the impairment of daytime functioning, despite adequate opportunity and circumstances for sleep. In most countries approximately every third inhabitant has insomnia. Insomnia can be classified as primary and secondary. The pathogenesis of primary insomnia is unknown, but available evidence suggests a state of hyperarousal. Insomnia secondary to other causes is more common than primary insomnia. Cerebral hypoperfusion can be the cause of insomnia in some cases. In such patients the cerebral blood flow should be improved using parenteral vascular therapy. If insomnia persists despite treatment, then therapy for primary insomnia should be instituted using benzodiazepine-receptor agonists such as Zolpidem, Zopiclone, or Zaleplon. In those cases Midazolam cannot be used for the treatment of insomnia due to its marked negative effect on cerebral blood flow. In Hungary there is a need to organize multidisciplinary Insomnia Clinics because insomnia is more than a disease, it is a public health problem in this century. PMID:17988972

  13. 3-N-butylphthalide improves neuronal morphology after chronic cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wanhong; Luo, Chao; Wang, Jue; Gong, Jian; Li, Bin; Gong, Yingxia; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hanqin

    2014-04-01

    3-N-butylphthalide is an effective drug for acute ischemic stroke. However, its effects on chronic cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal injury remain poorly understood. Therefore, this study ligated bilateral carotid arteries in 15-month-old rats to simulate chronic cerebral ischemia in aged humans. Aged rats were then intragastrically administered 3-n-butylphthalide. 3-N-butylphthalide administration improved the neuronal morphology in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of rats with chronic cerebral ischemia, increased choline acetyltransferase activity, and decreased malondialdehyde and amyloid beta levels, and greatly improved cognitive function. These findings suggest that 3-n-butylphthalide alleviates oxidative stress caused by chronic cerebral ischemia, improves cholinergic function, and inhibits amyloid beta accumulation, thereby improving cerebral neuronal injury and cognitive deficits. PMID:25206879

  14. Effects of Semelil (ANGIPARS™) on focal cerebral ischemia in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Asadi-Shekaari, M; Eftekhar Vaghefi, H; Talakoub, A; Khorram Khorshid, HR

    2010-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study Cerebral ischemia is one of the main causes of long term disability and death in aged populations. Many herbal drugs and extracts have been used for the treatment of cerebral ischemia induced insults. This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of Semelil (ANGIPARS™), a new herbal drug, on focal cerebral ischemia in male rats. Material and methods Male rats were divided into five groups: sham-operated, ischemic animals treated with distilled water as vehicle, ischemic animals treated with 1, 10 and 100 mg/kg of Semilil respectively. Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model was used in NMRI rats and neuronal injury analyzed in hippocampal CA1 sector after 48 hrs of Middle Cerebral Artery (MCAO). Results Results of this study showed that treatment with semelil attenuated ischemic damages and has positive effects on focal cerebral ischemia. PMID:22615626

  15. Regional cerebral blood flow during comprehension and speech (in cerebrally healthy subjects)

    SciTech Connect

    Lechevalier, B.; Petit, M.C.; Eustache, F.; Lambert, J.; Chapon, F.; Viader, F. )

    1989-07-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured by the xenon-133 inhalation method in 10 cerebrally healthy subjects at rest and during linguistic activation tests. These consisted of a comprehension test (binaural listening to a narrative text) and a speech test (making sentences from a list of words presented orally at 30-s intervals). The comprehension task induced a moderate increase in the mean right CBF and in both inferior parietal areas, whereas the speech test resulted in a diffuse increase in the mean CBF of both hemispheres, predominating regionally in both inferior parietal, left operculary, and right upper motor and premotor areas. It is proposed that the activation pattern induced by linguistic stimulation depends on not only specific factors, such as syntactic and semantic aspects of language, but also the contents of the material proposed and the attention required by the test situation.

  16. What You Should Know about Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Stroke What You Should Know About Cerebral Aneurysms Updated:Jun 13,2014 About Cerebral Aneurysms Diagnosis ... to view an animation What is a cerebral aneurysm? An aneurysm is a weak area in a ...

  17. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Stokum, Jesse A; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2016-03-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  18. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema

    PubMed Central

    Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  19. Neuroprotective effects of rutaecarpine on cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chunlin; Zhang, Ji; Wang, Shu; Xue, Guiping; Hou, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Rutaecarpine, an active component of the traditional Chinese medicine Tetradium ruticarpum, has been shown to improve myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury. Because both cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases are forms of ischemic vascular disease, they are closely related. We hypothesized that rutaecarpine also has neuroprotective effects on cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. A cerebral ischemia reperfusion model was established after 84, 252 and 504 μg/kg carpine were given to mice via intraperitoneal injection, daily for 7 days. Results of the step through test, 2,3,5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride dyeing and oxidative stress indicators showed that rutaecarpine could improve learning and memory ability, neurological symptoms and reduce infarction volume and cerebral water content in mice with cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. Rutaecarpine could significantly decrease the malondialdehyde content and increase the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase in mouse brain. Therefore, rutaecarpine could improve neurological function following injury induced by cerebral ischemia reperfusion, and the mechanism of this improvement may be associated with oxidative stress. These results verify that rutaecarpine has neuroprotective effects on cerebral ischemia reperfusion in mice. PMID:25206511

  20. Effect of vitamin E on cerebral cortical oxidative stress and brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression induced by hypoxia and exercise in rats.

    PubMed

    Sakr, H F; Abbas, A M; El Samanoudy, A Z

    2015-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in the proliferation of neurons, and its expression increases significantly with exercise. We aimed to investigate the effects of chronic exercise (swimming) and sustained hypoxia on cortical BDNF expression in both the presence and absence of vitamin E. Sixty four male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two equal groups; a normoxic group and a hypoxic group. Both groups were equally subdivided into four subgroups: sedentary, sedentary with vitamin E, chronic exercise either with or without vitamin E supplementation. Arterial PO(2), and the levels of cortical malondialdehyde (MDA), antioxidants (reduced glutathione GSH, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and vitamin E) and BDNF gene expression were investigated. Hypoxia significantly increased MDA production and BDNF gene expression and decreased the antioxidants compared to control rats. Chronic exercise in hypoxic and normoxic rats increased MDA level and BDNF gene expression and decreased the antioxidants. Providing vitamin E supplementation to the hypoxic and normoxic rats significantly reduced MDA and BDNF gene expression and increased antioxidants. We conclude that sustained hypoxia and chronic exercise increased BDNF gene expression and induced oxidative stress. Moreover, vitamin E attenuated the oxidative stress and decreased BDNF gene expression in sustained hypoxia and chronic exercise which confirms the oxidative stress-induced stimulation of BDNF gene expression. PMID:25903950

  1. A new rodent model of cerebral hyperperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Bin; Zhao, Lei; Xiao, Wei; Cai, Bing; Wang, Tian-Long; Li, Dong-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Most studies of hyperperfusion and hyperperfusion syndrome after carotid endarterectomy or carotid stenting are based on clinical observation or meta-analyses in patients, whereas there is little corresponding fundamental research since proper animal model that can reproduce phenotype stably is not available. Therefore, we developed a rat model in which the pathophysiologic process of hyperperfusion can be mimicked. Methods: Global ischemia was induced by occluding bilateral common carotid arteries (BCAO) for 2 weeks. After that, the ligature was loosened to allow reperfusion. Phenylephrine was administered at concentrations of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 80, and 120 μg/mL for rapidly elevating blood pressure. Relative cerebral blood flow in relation to mean arterial pressure (MAP) was measured with Laser Doppler techniques. Sham animals underwent the same surgical operation but without artery-occlusion and received the same concentrations of phenylephrine. Results: Mild hypertension rapidly increased cerebral blood flow. Phenylephrine at different concentrations produced different effects on blood pressure. Hyperperfusion can be induced by phenylephrine at around 30 μg/mL, whereas phenylephrine at 80 μg/ml or higher induced arrhythmia and further cardiac dysfunction thus failed to induce hyperperfusion. Conclusions: Our data suggest that 30-50 μg/mL phenylephrine mildly elevated MAP and cerebral blood flow to the level exceeding 100% of baseline. This hyperperfusion model possesses several advantages including high phenotype reproducibility, low experimental failure rate and low animal mortality rate. It can be applied to study carotid stenosis or ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats. PMID:26770334

  2. Neuroprotective effects of systemic cerebral endothelial cell transplantation in a rat model of cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jong-Hyun; Na, Joo-Young; Lee, Min-Cheol; Choi, Kang-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Kil; Min, Jung-Joon; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Man-Seok; Kim, Hyung-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line (hCMEC)/D3 cells, which are from a stable clonal cell line of human immortalized cerebral endothelial cells, were intra-arterially transplanted through the common carotid artery in a rat model of photochemical-induced cerebral ischemia. Their therapeutic effects on infarct size, blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, and outcome were examined. The hCMEC/D3 cells were genetically modified with the firefly luciferase gene for in vivo imaging post-transplantation. Transplanted hCMEC/D3 cells were identified in the infarcted brain by bioluminescence imaging at 1 day after transplantation. Compared with the control group, the hCMEC/D3-transplanted group showed reduced infarct size on day 3, reduced Evans blue dye leakage on day 1 indicating decreased BBB breakdown, and early recovery from Rotarod test neurological deficits. The hCMEC/D3-transplanted group also showed decreased levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, which were inversely correlated with TIMP-1 levels on post-transplantation days 1 and 3. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β were markedly diminished in the hCMEC/D3-transplanted group compared with controls. The systemically transplanted cells selectively migrated and integrated into the ischemically lesioned area, which accelerated neurological recovery. This new cerebral endothelial cell-based therapy may hold promise for clinical trials in patients with ischemic stroke. PMID:27347342

  3. Neuroprotective effects of systemic cerebral endothelial cell transplantation in a rat model of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jong-Hyun; Na, Joo-Young; Lee, Min-Cheol; Choi, Kang-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Kil; Min, Jung-Joon; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Man-Seok; Kim, Hyung-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line (hCMEC)/D3 cells, which are from a stable clonal cell line of human immortalized cerebral endothelial cells, were intra-arterially transplanted through the common carotid artery in a rat model of photochemical-induced cerebral ischemia. Their therapeutic effects on infarct size, blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, and outcome were examined. The hCMEC/D3 cells were genetically modified with the firefly luciferase gene for in vivo imaging post-transplantation. Transplanted hCMEC/D3 cells were identified in the infarcted brain by bioluminescence imaging at 1 day after transplantation. Compared with the control group, the hCMEC/D3-transplanted group showed reduced infarct size on day 3, reduced Evans blue dye leakage on day 1 indicating decreased BBB breakdown, and early recovery from Rotarod test neurological deficits. The hCMEC/D3-transplanted group also showed decreased levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, which were inversely correlated with TIMP-1 levels on post-transplantation days 1 and 3. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β were markedly diminished in the hCMEC/D3-transplanted group compared with controls. The systemically transplanted cells selectively migrated and integrated into the ischemically lesioned area, which accelerated neurological recovery. This new cerebral endothelial cell-based therapy may hold promise for clinical trials in patients with ischemic stroke. PMID:27347342

  4. Cerebral vasoreactivity during hypercapnia is reset by augmented sympathetic influence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peizhen; Huang, Guoyuan; Shi, Xiangrong

    2011-02-01

    Sympathetic nerve activity influences cerebral blood flow, but it is unknown whether augmented sympathetic nerve activity resets cerebral vasoreactivity to hypercapnia. This study tested the hypothesis that cerebral vasodilation during hypercapnia is restrained by lower-body negative pressure (LBNP)-stimulated sympathoexcitation. Cerebral hemodynamic responses were assessed in nine healthy volunteers [age 25 yr (SD 3)] during rebreathing-induced increases in partial pressure of end-tidal CO(2) (Pet(CO(2))) at rest and during LBNP. Cerebral hemodynamic responses were determined by changes in flow velocity of middle cerebral artery (MCAV) using transcranial Doppler sonography and in regional cerebral tissue oxygenation (ScO(2)) using near-infrared spectroscopy. Pet(CO(2)) values during rebreathing were similarly increased from 41.9 to 56.5 mmHg at rest and from 40.7 to 56.0 mmHg during LBNP of -15 Torr. However, the rates of increases in MCAV and in ScO(2) per unit increase in Pet(CO(2)) (i.e., the slopes of MCAV/Pet(CO(2)) and ScO(2)/Pet(CO(2))) were significantly (P ≤0.05) decreased from 2.62 ± 0.16 cm·s(-1)·mmHg(-1) and 0.89 ± 0.10%/mmHg at rest to 1.68 ± 0.18 cm·s(-1)·mmHg(-1) and 0.63 ± 0.07%/mmHg during LBNP. In conclusion, the sensitivity of cerebral vasoreactivity to hypercapnia, in terms of the rate of increases in MCAV and in ScO(2), is diminished by LBNP-stimulated sympathoexcitation. PMID:21071587

  5. Improving the Correction of Eddy Current-Induced Distortion in Diffusion-Weighted Images by Excluding Signals from the Cerebral Spinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Liu, Xiaozheng; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Zhenyu; Zhou, Yongdi; Li, Gengying; Dubin, Marc; Bansal, Ravi; Peterson, Bradley. S.; Xu, Dongrong

    2012-01-01

    Iterative Cross-Correlation (ICC) is the most popularly used schema for correcting eddy current (EC)-induced distortion in diffusion-weighted imaging data, however, it cannot process data acquired at high b-values. We analyzed the error sources and affecting factors in parameter estimation, and propose an efficient algorithm by expanding the ICC framework with a number of techniques: (1) Pattern recognition for excluding brain ventricles; (2) ICC with the extracted ventricle for parameter initialization; (3) Gradient-based Entropy Correlation Coefficient (GECC) for optimal and finer registration. Experiments demonstrated that our method is robust with high accuracy and error tolerance, and outperforms other ICC-family algorithms and popular approaches currently in use. PMID:22835646

  6. Cerebral Hemodynamics and Vascular Reactivity in Mild and Severe Ischemic Rodent Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Stroke Models

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Jeongeun; Jo, Areum; Kang, Bok-Man; Lee, Sohee; Bang, Oh Young; Heo, Chaejeong; Jhon, Gil-Ja; Lee, Youngmi

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia can cause decreased cerebral neurovascular coupling, leading to a failure in the autoregulation of cerebral blood flow. This study aims to investigate the effect of varying degrees of ischemia on cerebral hemodynamic reactivity using in vivo real-time optical imaging. We utilized direct cortical stimulation to elicit hyper-excitable neuronal activation, which leads to induced hemodynamic changes in both the normal and middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) ischemic stroke groups. Hemodynamic measurements from optical imaging accurately predict the severity of occlusion in mild and severe MCAO animals. There is neither an increase in cerebral blood volume nor in vessel reactivity in the ipsilateral hemisphere (I.H) of animals with severe MCAO. The pial artery in the contralateral hemisphere (C.H) of the severe MCAO group reacted more slowly than both hemispheres in the normal and mild MCAO groups. In addition, the arterial reactivity of the I.H in the mild MCAO animals was faster than the normal animals. Furthermore, artery reactivity is tightly correlated with histological and behavioral results in the MCAO ischemic group. Thus, in vivo optical imaging may offer a simple and useful tool to assess the degree of ischemia and to understand how cerebral hemodynamics and vascular reactivity are affected by ischemia. PMID:27358581

  7. Brain endothelial dysfunction in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Musolino, Patricia L; Gong, Yi; Snyder, Juliet M T; Jimenez, Sandra; Lok, Josephine; Lo, Eng H; Moser, Ann B; Grabowski, Eric F; Frosch, Matthew P; Eichler, Florian S

    2015-11-01

    See Aubourg (doi:10.1093/awv271) for a scientific commentary on this article.X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene leading to accumulation of very long chain fatty acids. Its most severe neurological manifestation is cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy. Here we demonstrate that progressive inflammatory demyelination in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy coincides with blood-brain barrier dysfunction, increased MMP9 expression, and changes in endothelial tight junction proteins as well as adhesion molecules. ABCD1, but not its closest homologue ABCD2, is highly expressed in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, far exceeding its expression in the systemic vasculature. Silencing of ABCD1 in human brain microvascular endothelial cells causes accumulation of very long chain fatty acids, but much later than the immediate upregulation of adhesion molecules and decrease in tight junction proteins. This results in greater adhesion and transmigration of monocytes across the endothelium. PCR-array screening of human brain microvascular endothelial cells after ABCD1 silencing revealed downregulation of both mRNA and protein levels of the transcription factor c-MYC (encoded by MYC). Interestingly, MYC silencing mimicked the effects of ABCD1 silencing on CLDN5 and ICAM1 without decreasing the levels of ABCD1 protein itself. Together, these data demonstrate that ABCD1 deficiency induces significant alterations in brain endothelium via c-MYC and may thereby contribute to the increased trafficking of leucocytes across the blood-brain barrier as seen in cerebral adrenouleukodystrophy. PMID:26377633

  8. Focal embolic cerebral ischemia in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Rui Lan; Jiang, Quan; Ding, Guangliang; Chopp, Michael; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of focal cerebral ischemia are well accepted for investigating the pathogenesis and potential treatment strategies for human stroke. Occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) with an endovascular filament is a widely used model to induce focal cerebral ischemia. However, this model is not amenable to thrombolytic therapies. As thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) is a standard of care within 4.5 hours of human stroke onset, suitable animal models that mimic cellular and molecular mechanisms of thrombosis and thrombolysis of stroke are required. By occluding the MCA with a fibrin-rich allogeneic clot, we have developed an embolic model of MCA occlusion in the rat, which recapitulates the key components of thrombotic development and of thrombolytic therapy of rtPA observed from human ischemic stroke. The surgical procedures of our model can be typically completed within approximately 30 min and are highly adaptable to other strains of rats as well as mice for both genders. Thus, this model provides a powerful tool for translational stroke research. PMID:25741989

  9. Opiates and cerebral functional activity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Trusk, T.C.

    1986-01-01

    Cerebral activity was measured using the free-fatty acid (1-/sup 14/C) octanoate as a fast functional tracer in conscious, unrestrained rats 5 minutes after intravenous injection of heroin, cocaine or saline vehicle. Regional changes of octanoate labeling density in the autoradiograms relative to saline-injected animals were used to determine the functional activity effects of each drug. Heroin and cocaine each produced a distinctive pattern of activity increases and suppression throughout the rat brain. Similar regional changes induced by both drugs were found in limbic brain regions implicated in drug reinforcement. Labeled octanoate autoradiography was used to measure the cerebral functional response to a tone that had previously been paired to heroin injections. Rats were trained in groups of three consisting of one heroin self-administration animal, and two animals receiving yoked infusion of heroin or saline. A tone was paired with each infusion during training. Behavioral experiments in similarly trained rats demonstrated that these training conditions impart secondary reinforcing properties to the tone in animals previously self-administering heroin, while the tone remains behaviorally neutral in yoked-infusion rats. Cerebral functional activity was measured during presentation of the tone without drug infusion. Octanoate labeling density changed in fifteen brain areas in response to the tone previously paired to heroin without response contingency. Labeling density was significantly modified in sixteen regions as a result of previously pairing the tone to response-contingent heroin infusions.

  10. Hemodynamics of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Sforza, Daniel M.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan Raul

    2009-01-01

    The initiation and progression of cerebral aneurysms are degenerative processes of the arterial wall driven by a complex interaction of biological and hemodynamic factors. Endothelial cells on the artery wall respond physiologically to blood-flow patterns. In normal conditions, these responses are associated with nonpathological tissue remodeling and adaptation. The combination of abnormal blood patterns and genetics predisposition could lead to the pathological formation of aneurysms. Here, we review recent progress on the basic mechanisms of aneurysm formation and evolution, with a focus on the role of hemodynamic patterns. PMID:19784385

  11. Cerebral pathology post heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Peteghem, S Van; Pauw, M De

    2015-04-01

    Cerebral pathology is frequently encountered post heart transplantation with a cumulative incidence of about 80% after 15 years. A broad spectrum of disease entities is reported, from minor abnormalities to life-threatening diseases. Although cerebral infections and malignancies are rare in this patient population, they have a high mortality rate. Since 1991, 171 orthotopic heart transplantations were performed at the Ghent University Hospital with a 10-year survival rate of 75%. Severe cerebral complications occurred in 10 patients, with epilepsy in 2 patients, cerebrovascular accidents in 4 patients, cerebral infections in 3 patients and a cerebral malignancy in 1 patient, resulting in a fatal outcome in 7 patients. We present four of these cases. PMID:25292206

  12. The effect of Scutellaria baicalensis stem-leaf flavonoids on spatial learning and memory in chronic cerebral ischemia-induced vascular dementia of rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanjing; Liang, Lizhen; Xu, Jian; Wu, Jiali; Yan, Yongxing; Lin, Ping; Chen, Qiang; Zheng, Fengming; Wang, Qin; Ren, Qian; Gou, Zengmei; Du, Yifeng

    2016-05-01

    Flavonoids have been shown to improve cognitive function and delay the dementia progression. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In the present study, we examined the effect of Scutellaria baicalensis stem-leaf total flavonoids (SSTFs) extracted from S. baicalensis Georgi on spatial learning and memory in a vascular dementia (VaD) rat model and explored its molecular mechanisms. The VaD rats were developed by permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid artery. Seven days after recovery, the VaD rats were treated with either 50 or 100 mg/kg of SSTF for 60 days. The spatial learning and memory was evaluated in the Morris water maze (MWM) test. The tau hyperphosphorylation and the levels of the related protein kinases or phosphatases were examined by western blot analysis. In VaD rats, SSTF treatment at 100 mg/kg significantly reduced the escape latency in training trial in MWM test. In the probe trial, SSTF treatment increased the searching time and travel distance in the target quadrant. SSTF treatment inhibited the tau phosphorylation in both cortex and hippocampus in VaD rats. Meanwhile, SSTF reduced the activity of glycogen synthase kinase 3β and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in VaD rats. In contrast, SSTF treatment increased the level of the protein phosphatase 2A subunit B in VaD rats. SSTF treatment significantly improved the spatial cognition in VaD rats. Our results suggest that SSTF may alleviate tau-hyperphosphorylation-induced neurotoxicity through coordinating the activity of kinases and phosphatase after a stroke. SSTF may be developed into promising novel therapeutics for VaD. PMID:27118553

  13. Cerebral cartography and connectomics

    PubMed Central

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamics of functional brain connectivity, the definition of areal parcellations and their hierarchical organization into large-scale networks, the extension of whole-brain connectivity to cellular-scale networks, and the mapping of structure/function relations in empirical recordings and computational models. Successfully addressing these challenges will require extensions of methods and tools from network science to the mapping and analysis of human brain connectivity data. The emerging view that the brain is more than a collection of areas, but is fundamentally operating as a complex networked system, will continue to drive the creation of ever more detailed and multi-modal network maps as tools for on-going exploration and discovery in human connectomics. PMID:25823870

  14. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  15. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-10-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  16. [Noradrenaline and cerebral aging].

    PubMed

    Jouvet, M; Albarede, J L; Lubin, S; Meyrignac, C

    1991-01-01

    The central functions of norepinephrine (NE) are a recent discovery: regulation of alertness and of the wakefulness-sleep cycle, maintenance of attention, memory and learning, cerebral plasticity and neuro-protection. The anatomical, histological, biochemical and physiological properties of the central noradrenergic system: extreme capacity for ramification and arborization; slow conduction, non-myelinized axons with extrasynaptic varicosities producing and releasing NE; frequency of co-transmission phenomena, and; neuromodulation with fiber effect responsible for improvement in the signal over background noise ratio and selection of significant stimuli form a true interface between the outside world and the central nervous system, notably for the neocortex in the context of the cognitive treatment of information. This central noradrenergic system is involved in the neurophysiology and the clinical features of cerebral aging (ideation-motor and cognitive function slowing down, loss of behavioral adjustment), neuro-degenerative disorders (SDAT, Parkinson's disease), certain aspects of depression and less obvious conditions (head injuries, sequelae of cerebrovascular accidents, sub-cortical dementia). The recent development of medications improving alertness (adrafinil, modafinil) with a pure central action and specifically noradrenergic, may contribute to an improvement in these multifactorial disorders. PMID:1864252

  17. Cerebral blood flow velocity in two patients with neonatal cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Nishimaki, S; Seki, K; Yokota, S

    2001-04-01

    Cerebral blood flow velocity was measured in the middle cerebral artery of two patients who exhibited unilateral neonatal cerebral infarction during the neonatal period. Doppler studies demonstrated increases in cerebral blood flow velocity but decreases in the resistance index on the affected side of the middle cerebral artery in the neonate who developed hemiplegia with cystic encephalomalacia, although the neonate with normal neurologic outcome exhibited symmetric cerebral blood flow velocity and resistance index. The asymmetry in cerebral blood flow velocity measurements of both middle cerebral arteries may be useful to evaluate the severity of brain damage and predict the neurodevelopmental prognosis of unilateral neonatal cerebral infarction. PMID:11377112

  18. Endothelin-1 Mediates Brain Microvascular Dysfunction Leading to Long-Term Cognitive Impairment in a Model of Experimental Cerebral Malaria.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Brandi D; Martins, Yuri C; Akide-Ndunge, Oscar B; Bruno, Fernando P; Wang, Hua; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Spray, David C; Desruisseaux, Mahalia S

    2016-03-01

    Plasmodium falciparum infection causes a wide spectrum of diseases, including cerebral malaria, a potentially life-threatening encephalopathy. Vasculopathy is thought to contribute to cerebral malaria pathogenesis. The vasoactive compound endothelin-1, a key participant in many inflammatory processes, likely mediates vascular and cognitive dysfunctions in cerebral malaria. We previously demonstrated that C57BL6 mice infected with P. berghei ANKA, our fatal experimental cerebral malaria model, sustained memory loss. Herein, we demonstrate that an endothelin type A receptor (ETA) antagonist prevented experimental cerebral malaria-induced neurocognitive impairments and improved survival. ETA antagonism prevented blood-brain barrier disruption and cerebral vasoconstriction during experimental cerebral malaria, and reduced brain endothelial activation, diminishing brain microvascular congestion. Furthermore, exogenous endothelin-1 administration to P. berghei NK65-infected mice, a model generally regarded as a non-cerebral malaria negative control for P. berghei ANKA infection, led to experimental cerebral malaria-like memory deficits. Our data indicate that endothelin-1 is critical in the development of cerebrovascular and cognitive impairments with experimental cerebral malaria. This vasoactive peptide may thus serve as a potential target for adjunctive therapy in the management of cerebral malaria. PMID:27031954

  19. Endothelin-1 Mediates Brain Microvascular Dysfunction Leading to Long-Term Cognitive Impairment in a Model of Experimental Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Brandi D.; Martins, Yuri C.; Akide-Ndunge, Oscar B.; Bruno, Fernando P.; Wang, Hua; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Spray, David C.; Desruisseaux, Mahalia S.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum infection causes a wide spectrum of diseases, including cerebral malaria, a potentially life-threatening encephalopathy. Vasculopathy is thought to contribute to cerebral malaria pathogenesis. The vasoactive compound endothelin-1, a key participant in many inflammatory processes, likely mediates vascular and cognitive dysfunctions in cerebral malaria. We previously demonstrated that C57BL6 mice infected with P. berghei ANKA, our fatal experimental cerebral malaria model, sustained memory loss. Herein, we demonstrate that an endothelin type A receptor (ETA) antagonist prevented experimental cerebral malaria-induced neurocognitive impairments and improved survival. ETA antagonism prevented blood-brain barrier disruption and cerebral vasoconstriction during experimental cerebral malaria, and reduced brain endothelial activation, diminishing brain microvascular congestion. Furthermore, exogenous endothelin-1 administration to P. berghei NK65-infected mice, a model generally regarded as a non-cerebral malaria negative control for P. berghei ANKA infection, led to experimental cerebral malaria-like memory deficits. Our data indicate that endothelin-1 is critical in the development of cerebrovascular and cognitive impairments with experimental cerebral malaria. This vasoactive peptide may thus serve as a potential target for adjunctive therapy in the management of cerebral malaria. PMID:27031954

  20. Abnormal catecholamine urinary excretion after emotional stimulus in patients with cerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Stoica, E; Enulescu, O

    1981-01-01

    The epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) urinary excretion before and after a mild "emotional stimulus" (ES) was determined in 22 patients with cerebral infarction and 30 patients with cerebral hemorrhage, as well as in 18 normotensive and 18 hypertensive controls. In patients with cerebral infarction, the majority normotensive, the "emotional stimulus" induced a significant increase in NE excretion, but non-significant alterations in E excretion. Similar changes were noted in normotensive controls. In patients with cerebral hemorrhage, almost all hypertensive, and in hypertensive controls, ES brought about a consistent rise in E excretion without influencing significantly the NE excretion. The presence of a constant increase in E excretion after a mild emotion not only in patients with cerebral hemorrhage but also in subjects with uncomplicated essential hypertension, suggests that the E release found in patients with cerebral hemorrhage is related to the hypertensive state pre-existing the stroke rather than to hemorrhagic stroke itself. The pattern of catecholamine discharge in hypertensive patients might play a part in the occurrence of cerebral hemorrhagic accidents. The epinephrine discharges induce sudden increases in systolic blood pressure which could lead to the rupture of cerebral vessels with hyalinotic or atherosclerotic alterations. PMID:7245303

  1. Impact of COPD exacerbation on cerebral blood flow.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Sema; Kaya, Ihsan; Cece, Hasan; Gencer, Mehmet; Ziylan, Zeki; Yalcin, Funda; Turksoy, Ozlem

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbation on cerebral blood flow (CBF). In 21 COPD patients - in both exacerbation and stable phases -Doppler ultrasonographies of internal carotid artery (ICA) and vertebral artery (VA) were performed. There were significant differences in total, anterior and posterior CBF, ICA and VA flow volumes in exacerbated COPD compared to stable COPD. Total CBF was correlated with cross-sectional areas of left and right ICA, whereas independent predictor of total CBF was cross-sectional area of right ICA. Increased CBF might indicate cerebral autoregulation-mediated vasodilatation to overcome COPD exacerbation induced hypoxia. PMID:22542376

  2. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation measured with coherent hemodynamics spectroscopy (CHS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Tgavalekos, Kristen T.; Fantini, Sergio

    2015-03-01

    Coherent Hemodynamics Spectroscopy (CHS) is a novel technique for non-invasive measurements of local microcirculation quantities such as the capillary blood transit times and dynamic autoregulation. The basis of CHS is to measure, for instance with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), peripheral coherent hemodynamic changes that are induced by controlled perturbations in the systemic mean arterial pressure (MAP). In this study, the MAP perturbation was induced by the fast release of two pneumatic cuffs placed around the subject's thighs after they were kept inflated (at 200 mmHg) for two minutes. The resulting transient changes in cerebral oxy- (O) and deoxy- (D) hemoglobin concentrations measured with NIRS on the prefrontal cortex are then described by a novel hemodynamic model, from which quantifiable parameters such as the capillary blood transit time and a cutoff frequency for cerebral autoregulation are obtained. We present results on eleven healthy volunteers in a protocol involving measurements during normal breathing and during hyperventilation, which is known to cause a hypocapnia-induced increase in cerebral autoregulation. The measured capillary transit time was unaffected by hyperventilation (normal breathing: 1.1±0.1 s; hyperventilation: 1.1±0.1 s), whereas the cutoff frequency of autoregulation, which increases for higher autoregulation efficiency, was indeed found to be significantly greater during hyperventilation (normal breathing: 0.017±0.002 Hz; hyperventilation: 0.034±0.005 Hz). These results provide a validation of local cerebral autoregulation measurements with the new technique of CHS.

  3. Cerebral venous angiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.; Gilmor, R.L.; Richmond, B.

    1984-04-01

    Several unusual cases of cerebral venous angiomas as well as some characteristic cases are reported. The characteristic angiographic feature is that of a collection of dilated medullary veins draining into a single large draining vein, which appears first in the early venous phase and persists into the late venous phase of the arteriogram. Computed tomography (CT) was abnormal in 12/13 cases. The draining vein was the most common abnormality identified on CT. Coronal and sagittal reconstruction may be helpful in demonstrating the draining vein. A case of large twin venous angiomas, a case of hemorrhage from a venous angioma, and a case of a venous angioma with an incidentally associated glioblastoma are presented.

  4. Expression of Estrogen Receptor α in the Mouse Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Alicia K.; Humphreys, Gwendolyn I.; Nardulli, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Although estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and 17β-estradiol play critical roles in protecting the cerebral cortex from ischemia-induced damage, there has been some controversy about the expression of ERα in this region of the brain. We have examined ERα mRNA and protein levels in the cerebral cortices of female mice at postnatal days 5 and 17 and at 4, 13, and 18 months of age. We found that although ERα transcript levels declined from postnatal day 5 through 18 months of age, ERα protein levels remained stable. Importantly, expression of the E2-regulated progesterone receptor gene was sustained in younger and in older females suggesting that age-related changes in estrogen responsiveness in the cerebral cortex are not due to the absence of ERα protein. PMID:25700604

  5. Multiple molecular penumbras after focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Sharp, F R; Lu, A; Tang, Y; Millhorn, D E

    2000-07-01

    Though the ischemic penumbra has been classically described on the basis of blood flow and physiologic parameters, a variety of ischemic penumbras can be described in molecular terms. Apoptosis-related genes induced after focal ischemia may contribute to cell death in the core and the selective cell death adjacent to an infarct. The HSP70 heat shock protein is induced in glia at the edges of an infarct and in neurons often at some distance from the infarct. HSP70 proteins are induced in cells in response to denatured proteins that occur as a result of temporary energy failure. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is also induced after focal ischemia in regions that can extend beyond the HSP70 induction. The region of HIF induction is proposed to represent the areas of decreased cerebral blood flow and decreased oxygen delivery. Immediate early genes are induced in cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, and other brain regions. These distant changes in gene expression occur because of ischemia-induced spreading depression or depolarization and could contribute to plastic changes in brain after stroke. PMID:10908035

  6. Cerebral perfusion reserve indexes determined by fluoromethane positron emission scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, R.L.; Sunderland, J.J.; Lagreze, H.L.; Nickles, R.J.; Rowe, B.R.; Turski, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    An index of cerebral perfusion reserve (RES%), defined as the percent change of regional cerebral blood flow over baseline per mm Hg of end-tidal CO/sub 2/ tension, was determined for each middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory in patients with unilateral carotid distribution transient ischemic attacks or minor cerebrovascular accidents and was compared with that of age-matched, neurologically normal volunteers. Vasodilator responses to induced hypercapnia were tested during inhalation of 5% CO/sub 2/ in 95% O/sub 2/ while regional cerebral blood flow was measured by fluoromethane inhalation positron emission tomography. Mean RES% for 24 normal MCA territories was 5.2 +/- 0.8%. Mean RES% for 15 patient nonischemic MCA territories was 3.8 +/- 1.3% and for 15 ischemic MCA territories was 2.8 +/- 1.9% (both p less than 0.001). Individual RES% values and symmetry ratios between ischemic and nonischemic regions were also determined and compared with angiographic data. Areas of diminished, asymmetric, or paradoxical (two patients) CO/sub 2/ reactivity appear to correspond to areas of compensatory vasodilation. We found this technique to be a safe and reproducible method for defining and recording localized areas of cerebral tissue at apparent risk for hemodynamically related damage.

  7. Cerebral aneurysms following radiotherapy for medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, P.J.; Sung, J.H.

    1989-04-01

    Three patients, two males and one female aged 21, 14, and 31 years, respectively, developed cerebral saccular aneurysms several years after undergoing radiotherapy for cerebellar medulloblastoma at 2, 5, and 14 years of age, respectively. Following surgery, all three received combined cobalt-60 irradiation and intrathecal colloidal radioactive gold (/sup 198/Au) therapy, and died from rupture of the aneurysm 19, 9, and 17 years after the radiotherapy, respectively. Autopsy examination revealed no recurrence of the medulloblastoma, but widespread radiation-induced vasculopathy was found at the base of the brain and in the spinal cord, and saccular aneurysms arose from the posterior cerebral arteries at the basal cistern or choroidal fissure. The aneurysms differed from the ordinary saccular aneurysms of congenital type in their location and histological features. Their locations corresponded to the areas where intrathecally administered colloidal /sup 198/Au is likely to pool, and they originated directly from a segment of the artery rather than from a branching site as in congenital saccular aneurysms. It is, therefore, concluded that the aneurysms in these three patients were most likely radiation-induced.

  8. Successful repair of a syphilitic aortic arch aneurysm accompanied by serious cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Chiba, Kiyoshi; Koizumi, Nobusato; Ogino, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    We present a 52-year-old male with a syphilitic aortic arch aneurysm accompanied by relevant extensive cerebral infarction. He was admitted to a local hospital for sudden loss of consciousness, where he was diagnosed with serious cerebral infarction. During his treatment, a multilocular aortic arch aneurysm involving the arch vessels was found incidentally. He was transferred to our hospital for surgical treatment. A preoperative routine laboratory test for syphilis was highly positive, which suggested that the aneurysm was likely caused by syphilis and the cerebral infarction was also induced by the involvement of syphilitic aortitis or arteritis. After 2 weeks of antibiotic therapy for syphilis, total arch replacement was performed successfully using meticulous brain protection with antegrade selective cerebral perfusion and deep hypothermia. He recovered without any further cerebral deficits. The pathological examination of the surgical specimen showed some characteristic changes of syphilitic aortitis. PMID:24492165

  9. The TRIF-dependent signaling pathway is not required for acute cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Fang; Wang, Jun; Sayeed, Iqbal; Ishrat, Tauheed; Atif, Fahim; Stein, Donald G.

    2009-12-18

    TIR domain-containing adaptor protein (TRIF) is an adaptor protein in Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways. Activation of TRIF leads to the activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). While studies have shown that TLRs are implicated in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and in neuroprotection against ischemia afforded by preconditioning, little is known about TRIF's role in the pathological process following cerebral I/R. The present study investigated the role that TRIF may play in acute cerebral I/R injury. In a mouse model of cerebral I/R induced by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion, we examined the activation of NF-{kappa}B and IRF3 signaling in ischemic cerebral tissue using ELISA and Western blots. Neurological function and cerebral infarct size were also evaluated 24 h after cerebral I/R. NF-{kappa}B activity and phosphorylation of the inhibitor of kappa B (I{kappa}B{alpha}) increased in ischemic brains, but IRF3, inhibitor of {kappa}B kinase complex-{epsilon} (IKK{epsilon}), and TANK-binding kinase1 (TBK1) were not activated after cerebral I/R in wild-type (WT) mice. Interestingly, TRIF deficit did not inhibit NF-{kappa}B activity or p-I{kappa}B{alpha} induced by cerebral I/R. Moreover, although cerebral I/R induced neurological and functional impairments and brain infarction in WT mice, the deficits were not improved and brain infarct size was not reduced in TRIF knockout mice compared to WT mice. Our results demonstrate that the TRIF-dependent signaling pathway is not required for the activation of NF-{kappa}B signaling and brain injury after acute cerebral I/R.

  10. Cerebral Laterality and Verbal Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Jay L.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Research suggests that we process information by way of two distinct and functionally separate coding systems. Their location, somewhat dependent on cerebral laterality, varies in right- and left-handed persons. Tests this dual coding model. (Editor/RK)

  11. Cognitive Deficits and Cerebral Asymmetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakker, Dirk J.

    1982-01-01

    Research concerning cerebral asymmetry and its effect on scholastic achievement, reading disabilities, learning disabilities, and linguistic competence is reviewed in an exploration of brain hemisphere-specific etiologies of dyslexia. (CJ)

  12. Adrenergic and prostanoid mechanisms in control of cerebral blood flow in hypotensive newborn pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Armstead, W.M.; Leffler, C.W.; Busija, D.W.; Beasley, D.G.; Mirro, R. )

    1988-04-01

    The interaction between adrenergic and prostanoid mechanisms in the control of cerebral hemodynamics in the conscious, hypotensive newborn pig was investigated. Pretreatment with the selective {alpha}{sub 1}- and {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenoceptor antagonists prazosin and yohimbine, respectively, had no effect on cerebral blood flow, calculated cerebral vascular resistance, or cerebral metabolic rate either before or after hemmorrhagic hypotension. Indomethacin treatment (5 mg/kg ia) of piglets following hemorrhage caused a significant decrease in blood flow to all brain regions within 20 min. This decrease in cerebral blood flow resulted from increased cerebral vascular resistances of 54 and 177%, 20 and 40 min after treatment, respectively. Cerebral oxygen consumption was reduced from 2.42 {+-} 0.28 to 1.45 {+-} 0.28 ml{center dot}100 g{sup {minus}1} and to 1.0 {+-} 0.28 ml{center dot}100 g{sup {minus}1}{center dot}min{sup {minus}1} 20 and 40 min after indomethacin, respectively, in hemorrhaged piglets. Decreases in cerebral blood flow and metabolic rate and increases in vascular resistance on treatment with indomethacin were the same as in animals pretreated with vehicle, prazosin, or yohimbine. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the prostanoid system contributes to the maintenance of cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate during hypotension in the newborn, as reported previously. These data do not implicate removal of sympathetic modulation by prostanoids as a mechanism for indomethacin-induced cerebral vasoconstriction in hypotensive newborn piglets.

  13. Anti-inflammatory properties of lipoxin A4 protect against diabetes mellitus complicated by focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jiang-quan; Liu, Cheng-ling; Wang, Zheng-yuan; Liu, Ling; Cheng, Ling; Fan, Ya-dan

    2016-01-01

    Lipoxin A4 can alleviate cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury by reducing the inflammatory reaction, but it is currently unclear whether it has a protective effect on diabetes mellitus complicated by focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. In this study, we established rat models of diabetes mellitus using an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. We then induced focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery for 2 hours and reperfusion for 24 hours. After administration of lipoxin A4 via the lateral ventricle, infarction volume was reduced, the expression levels of pro-inflammatory factors tumor necrosis factor alpha and nuclear factor-kappa B in the cerebral cortex were decreased, and neurological functioning was improved. These findings suggest that lipoxin A4 has strong neuroprotective effects in diabetes mellitus complicated by focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and that the underlying mechanism is related to the anti-inflammatory action of lipoxin A4. PMID:27212926

  14. Recombinant Osteopontin in Cerebral Vasospasm After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hidenori; Hasegawa, Yu; Chen, Wanqiu; Kanamaru, Kenji; Zhang, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Osteopontin (OPN), a pleiotropic extracellular matrix glycoprotein, has been reported to be protective against ischemic lesions, but effects of OPN on vascular functions have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to assess whether recombinant OPN (r-OPN) could prevent cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in rats. Methods r-OPN was administered intraventricularly to rats undergoing SAH by the endovascular perforation, and its protective effects were evaluated by measuring the diameter of cerebral arteries and neurobehavioral testing. Western blotting and immunofluorescence were performed to explore the underlying mechanisms. An integrin receptor antagonist GRGDSP or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase (MKP)-1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) was also administered to r-OPN-treated SAH rats, and those effects were evaluated. Results Pre-SAH administration of r-OPN prevented vasospasm and neurological impairments at 24–72 hours post-SAH. r-OPN enhanced an endogenous MAPK inhibitor, MKP-1, and suppressed the phosphorylation of MAPKs, caldesmon and heat shock protein 27 in the spastic cerebral arteries at 24 hours post-SAH. Immunofluorescence revealed that MKP-1 was induced in the arterial smooth muscle layer. GRGDSP prevented r-OPN-induced MKP-1 upregulation, and MKP-1 siRNA abolished both MAPK inactivation and anti-vasospastic effects by r-OPN. Post-SAH r-OPN treatment also prevented vasospasm. Interpretation r-OPN induced MKP-1 in the spastic cerebral arteries via binding to L-arginyl-glycyl-L-aspartate-dependent integrin receptors and prevented vasospasm after SAH. Therapeutic induction of MKP-1 may be a novel approach for the prevention and treatment of cerebral vasospasm. PMID:21031580

  15. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in essential thrombocytosis.

    PubMed

    Murawaki, Ayumi; Nakayasu, Hiroyuki; Doi, Mitsuru; Suzuki-Kinoshita, Kaori; Asai, Yasumasa; Omura, Hiromi; Nakashima, Kenji

    2012-11-01

    We report a 67-year-old woman with essential thrombocytosis who developed cerebral infarction and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia during treatment for the cerebral infarction. She developed additional cerebral infarcts, acute femoral artery occlusion, and thrombophlebitis of her lower extremities. She was successfully treated with argatroban. This is the first report of a patient with essential thrombocytosis who developed heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and serious conditions, which included multiple thromboembolisms and coagulation disorders mimicking disseminated intravascular coagulation. PMID:22425438

  16. Abnormal cerebral vasodilation in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: use of serial 133Xe cerebral blood flow measurement plus acetazolamide to assess cerebral vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Tran Dinh, Y R; Lot, G; Benrabah, R; Baroudy, O; Cophignon, J; Seylaz, J

    1993-10-01

    A patient with cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was investigated by serial measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) using the xenon-133 emission tomography method. The CBF was measured before and after acetazolamide injection. On Day 2 after SAH, there was early local hyperperfusion in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory, ipsilateral to the left posterior communicating artery aneurysm. The regional CBF of this arterial territory decreased slightly after acetazolamide injection, probably because of vasoplegia and the "steal" phenomenon, and thus surgery was delayed. A right hemiplegia with aphasia and disturbed consciousness occurred 4 days later (on Day 6 after SAH) due to arterial vasospasm, despite treatment with a calcium-channel blocker. The initial hyperemia of the left MCA territory was followed by ischemia. The vasodilation induced by acetazolamide administration was significantly subnormal until Day 13, at which time CBF and vasoreactivity amplitude returned to normal and the patient's clinical condition improved. Surgery on Day 14 and outcome were without complication. It is concluded that serial CBF measurements plus acetazolamide injection are useful for monitoring the development of cerebral vasospasm to determine the most appropriate time for aneurysm surgery. PMID:8410215

  17. [Plasma osmolarity and cerebral volume].

    PubMed

    Boulard, G

    2001-02-01

    Under normal physiological conditions, the osmolarity of extracellular fluids (ECFs) and natremia are controlled by two regulatory mechanisms modulating the water balance and sodium outflow from information collected by the osmoreceptors and baroreceptors, respectively. As well, under normal physiological conditions, water and electrolytes of brain ECFs are secreted by the endothelial cells of brain capillaries. Furthermore, isotonicity is present on both sides of the blood-brain barrier. In the event of systemic osmolarity disorders, water transport subject to osmosis laws occurs at the level of the blood-brain barrier. In the case of plasmatic hyperosmolarity cerebral dehydration is observed, while cerebral edema occurs in the contrary case. However, plasmatic osmolarity disorders have less effect on the cerebral volume when their introduction is slow. Experimentation in acute conditions shows that measured variations of the cerebral water content are lower than calculated variations, thus suggesting the existence of an adaptive mechanism, that is, the cerebral osmoregulation which limits the variation of the volume of brain cells by modulating their osmoactive molecule content. These osmoactive molecules are, on the one hand, the electrolytes, which are early and rapidly mobilized, and, on the other hand, the organic osmoles (amino acids, etc.), whose secretion is slower and delayed. This phenomenon should be taken into account in the treatment of osmolarity disorders. Thus, the related-risk of treatment for natremia disorders is therapeutic reversal of the osmotic gradient at the level of the blood-brain barrier. This reversal, which corresponds to a second osmotic stress, requires the implementation of a new procedure of cerebral osmoregulation in the opposite direction of the preceding one. As successive osmotic stresses decrease the effectiveness of brain osmoregulation, the risk for cerebral dehydration and pontine myelinolysis increases when the treatment

  18. Cerebral versus systemic hemodynamics during graded orthostatic stress in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, B. D.; Giller, C. A.; Lane, L. D.; Buckey, J. C.; Blomqvist, C. G.

    1994-01-01

    estimated from changes in the blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (VMCA) using transcranial Doppler. Pulsatility (systolic minus diastolic/mean velocity) normalized for systemic arterial pressure pulsatility was used as an index of distal cerebral vascular resistance. End-tidal PACO2 was closely monitored during LBNP. From rest to maximal LBNP before the onset of symptoms or systemic hypotension, Qc and FBF decreased by 29.9% and 34.4%, respectively. VMCA decreased less, by 15.5% consistent with a smaller decrease in CBF. Similarly, SVR and FVR increased by 62.8% and 69.8%, respectively, whereas pulsatility increased by 17.2%, suggestive of a mild degree of small-vessel cerebral vasoconstriction. Seven of 13 subjects had presyncope during LBNP, all associated with a sudden drop in BP (29 +/- 9%). By comparison, hyperventilation alone caused greater changes in VMCA (42 +/- 2%) and pulsatility but never caused presyncope. In a separate group of 3 subjects, superimposition of hyperventilation during highlevel LBNP caused a further decrease in VMCA (31 +/- 7%) but no change in BP or level of consciousness. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that cerebral vasoconstriction occurs in healthy humans during graded reductions in central blood volume caused by LBNP. However, the magnitude of this response is small compared with changes in SVR or FVR during LBNP or other stimuli known to induce cerebral vasoconstriction (hypocapnia). We speculate that this degree of cerebral vasoconstriction is not by itself sufficient to cause syncope during orthostatic stress. However, it may exacerbate the decrease in CBF associated with hypotension if hemodynamic instability develops.

  19. N-Nitrosodiethylamine-Induced Pig Liver Hepatocellular Carcinoma Model: Radiological and Histopathological Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiao; Zhou Xiangping Guan Yongsong; Wang, Yi-Xiang J.; Scutt, Diane; Gong Qiyong

    2006-06-15

    Experimental research involving animal models plays a critical role in the development and improvement of minimally invasive therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). As a large animal, the pig is commonly used for surgery and interventional radiology research. In this study, liver multicentric HCC with cirrhosis was induced in six China Taihu pigs by intraperitoneal injection of 10 mg/kg of N-nitrosodiethylamine once a week for 3 months, followed by a period of 10-12 months without N-nitrosodiethylamine treatment. All pigs were in generally good health until the end of the study. The tumor nodules appeared hyperattenuating in the arterial phase of a dynamic computed tomography (CT) scan. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and CT angiography demonstrated that the tumors derived their blood supply mainly from the hepatic artery system. Lipiodol-CT showed Lipiodol retention in tumor areas. The histology and electron microscopic ultrastructure of the chemically induced liver HCC in this study resembled human HCC with a cirrhosis background. An immunohistochemistry study confirmed that the tumors were of hepatocyte origin. All highly, moderately, and poorly differentiated HCC tumors were identified in this study. Cholangiocarcinoma was not seen in any of the animals. Due to its comparable size to human anatomy, the pig liver HCC model would give a better scope for interventional and surgical manipulations than small animal models.

  20. Hypertension may be the most important component of hyperdynamic therapy in cerebral vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Harrigan, Mark R

    2010-01-01

    Although hyperdynamic therapy is an accepted method of treatment of patients with symptomatic cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, it remains unproven in large scale trials and controlled studies. Furthermore, methods of hyperdynamic therapy and specific endpoints vary widely. A systematic review of clinical trials of the various techniques of hyperdynamic therapy and their effects on cerebral blood flow found only 11 studies suitable for analysis. Although controlled trials are lacking, there is some evidence to suggest that hypertension is the most promising component of hyperdynamic therapy. These findings support a future randomized trial of induced hypertension in patients with symptomatic cerebral vasospasm. PMID:20497601

  1. Radon inhalation protects against transient global cerebral ischemic injury in gerbils.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Takahiro; Etani, Reo; Takata, Yuji; Nishiyama, Yuichi; Kawabe, Atsushi; Kumashiro, Masayuki; Taguchi, Takehito; Yamaoka, Kiyonori

    2014-10-01

    Although brain disorders are not the main indication for radon therapy, our previous study suggested that radon inhalation therapy might mitigate brain disorders. In this study, we assessed whether radon inhalation protects against transient global cerebral ischemic injury in gerbils. Gerbils were treated with inhaled radon at a concentration of 2,000 Bq/m(3) for 24 h. After radon inhalation, transient global cerebral ischemia was induced by bilateral occlusion of the common carotid artery. Results showed that transient global cerebral ischemia induced neuronal damage in hippocampal CA1, and the number of damaged neurons was significantly increased compared with control. However, radon treatment inhibited ischemic damage. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the radon-treated gerbil brain was significantly higher than that in sham-operated gerbils. These findings suggested that radon inhalation activates antioxidative function, especially SOD, thereby inhibiting transient global cerebral ischemic injury in gerbils. PMID:24792782

  2. Effectiveness of sugammadex for cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Ozbilgin, Sule; Yılmaz, Osman; Ergur, Bekir Ugur; Hancı, Volkan; Ozbal, Seda; Yurtlu, Serhan; Gunenc, Sakize Ferim; Kuvaki, Bahar; Kucuk, Burcu Ataseven; Sisman, Ali Rıza

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral ischemia may cause permanent brain damage and behavioral dysfunction. The efficacy and mechanisms of pharmacological treatments administered immediately after cerebral damage are not fully known. Sugammadex is a licensed medication. As other cyclodextrins have not passed the necessary phase tests, trade preparations are not available, whereas sugammadex is frequently used in clinical anesthetic practice. Previous studies have not clearly described the effects of the cyclodextrin family on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) damage. The aim of this study was to determine whether sugammadex had a neuroprotective effect against transient global cerebral ischemia. Animals were assigned to control, sham-operated, S 16 and S 100 groups. Transient global cerebral ischemia was induced by 10-minute occlusion of the bilateral common carotid artery, followed by 24-hour reperfusion. At the end of the experiment, neurological behavior scoring was performed on the rats, followed by evaluation of histomorphological and biochemical measurements. Sugammadex 16 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg improved neurological outcome, which was associated with reductions in both histological and neurological scores. The hippocampus TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling) and caspase results in the S 16 and S 100 treatment groups were significantly lower than those of the I/R group. Neurological scores in the treated groups were significantly higher than those of the I/R group. The study showed that treatment with 16 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg sugammadex had a neuroprotective effect in a transient global cerebral I/R rat model. However, 100 mg/kg sugammadex was more neuroprotective in rats. PMID:27377841

  3. Hydrostatic determinants of cerebral perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, E.M.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    We examined the cerebral blood flow response to alterations in perfusion pressure mediated through decreases in mean arterial pressure, increases in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, and increases in jugular venous (JV) pressure in 42 pentobarbital anesthetized dogs. Each of these three pressures was independently controlled. Cerebral perfusion pressure was defined as mean arterial pressure minus JV or CSF pressure, depending on which was greater. Mean hemispheric blood flow was measured with the radiolabeled microsphere technique. Despite 30-mm Hg reductions in mean arterial pressure or increases in CSF or JV pressure, CBF did not change as long as the perfusion pressure remained greater than approximately 60 mm Hg. However, whenever perfusion pressure was reduced to an average of 48 mm Hg, cerebral blood flow decreased 27% to 33%. These results demonstrate the capacity of the cerebral vascular bed to respond similarly to changes in the perfusion pressure gradient obtained by decreasing mean arterial pressure, increasing JV pressure or increasing CSF pressure, and thereby support the above definition of cerebral perfusion pressure.

  4. Cerebral oximetry and cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Skhirtladze-Dworschak, Keso; Dworschak, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Cerebral oximetry is a Food and Drug Administration-approved technology that allows monitoring of brain oxygen saturation in accessible superficial brain cortex regions, which are amongst the most vulnerable in regard to ischemic or hypoxic injury. Since most oxygen in the area of interest is located in the venous compartment, the determined regional brain oxygen saturation approximately reflects the local balance between oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption. Major systemic alterations in blood oxygen content and oxygen delivery will be accompanied by corresponding changes in regional brain saturation. This systematic review, which is based on a Medline search, focuses on the characteristic changes in regional cerebral oxygen saturation that occur, when global oxygen supply to the brain ceases. It further highlights the potential application of cerebral oximetry in the management of cardiac arrest victims, the predictability of clinical outcome after global cerebral ischemia, and it also indicates possible potentials for the management of cerebral reperfusion after having instituted return of spontaneous circulation. PMID:23782549

  5. Hypocapnia and cerebral hypoperfusion in orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, V.; Spies, J. M.; Novak, P.; McPhee, B. R.; Rummans, T. A.; Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Orthostatic and other stresses trigger tachycardia associated with symptoms of tremulousness, shortness of breath, dizziness, blurred vision, and, often, syncope. It has been suggested that paradoxical cerebral vasoconstriction during head-up tilt might be present in patients with orthostatic intolerance. We chose to study middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow velocity (BFV) and cerebral vasoregulation during tilt in patients with orthostatic intolerance (OI). METHODS: Beat-to-beat BFV from the MCA, heart rate, CO2, blood pressure (BP), and respiration were measured in 30 patients with OI (25 women and 5 men; age range, 21 to 44 years; mean age, 31.3+/-1.2 years) and 17 control subjects (13 women and 4 men; age range, 20 to 41 years; mean age, 30+/-1.6 years); ages were not statistically different. These indices were monitored during supine rest and head-up tilt (HUT). We compared spontaneous breathing and hyperventilation and evaluated the effect of CO2 rebreathing in these 2 positions. RESULTS: The OI group had higher supine heart rates (P<0.001) and cardiac outputs (P<0.01) than the control group. In response to HUT, OI patients underwent a greater heart rate increment (P<0.001) and greater reductions in pulse pressure (P<0.01) and CO2 (P<0.001), but total systemic resistance failed to show an increment. Among the cerebrovascular indices, all BFVs (systolic, diastolic, and mean) decreased significantly more, and cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) was increased in OI patients (P<0.01) compared with control subjects. In both groups, hyperventilation induced mild tachycardia (P<0.001), a significant reduction of BFV, and a significant increase of CVR associated with a fall in CO2. Hyperventilation during HUT reproduced hypocapnia, BFV reduction, and tachycardia and worsened symptoms of OI; these symptoms and indices were improved within 2 minutes of CO2 rebreathing. The relationships between CO2 and BFV and heart rate were well described by

  6. Cerebral palsy and aging

    PubMed Central

    Haak, Peterson; Lenski, Madeleine; Hidecker, Mary Jo Cooley; Li, Min; Paneth, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP), the most common major disabling motor disorder of childhood, is frequently thought of as a condition that affects only children. Deaths in children with CP, never common, have in recent years become very rare, unless the child is very severely and multiply disabled. Thus, virtually all children assigned the diagnosis of CP will survive into adulthood. Attention to the adult with CP has been sparse, and the evolution of the motor disorder as the individual moves through adolescence, young adulthood, middle age, and old age is not well understood. Nor do we know what happens to other functional domains, such as communication and eating behavior, in adults with CP. Although the brain injury that initially causes CP by definition does not progressively worsen through the lifetime, the effects of CP manifest differently throughout the life span. The aging process must inevitably interact with the motor disorder, but we lack systematic, large-scale follow-up studies of children with CP into adulthood and through adulthood with thorough assessments performed over time. In this paper we summarize what is known of the epidemiology of CP throughout the life span, beginning with mortality and life expectancy, then survey what is known of functioning, ability, and quality of life of adults with CP. We conclude by describing a framework for future research on CP and aging that is built around the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) and suggest specific tools and approaches for conducting that research in a sound manner. PMID:19740206

  7. Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibition attenuates middle cerebral artery remodeling but increases cerebral ischemic damage in hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Girgla, Saavia S.; Moreno, Guillermo; McClain, Jonathon L.; Dorrance, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension causes vascular inflammation evidenced by an increase in perivascular macrophages and proinflammatory cytokines in the arterial wall. Perivascular macrophage depletion reduced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression in cerebral arteries of hypertensive rats and attenuated inward remodeling, suggesting that TNF-α might play a role in the remodeling process. We hypothesized that TNF-α inhibition would improve middle cerebral artery (MCA) structure and reduce damage after cerebral ischemia in hypertensive rats. Six-week-old male stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) were treated with the TNF-α inhibitor etanercept (ETN; 1.25 mg·kg−1·day−1 ip daily) or PBS (equivolume) for 6 wk. The myogenic tone generation, postischemic dilation, and passive structure of MCAs were assessed by pressure myography. Cerebral ischemia was induced by MCA occlusion (MCAO). Myogenic tone was unchanged, but MCAs from SHRSP + ETN had larger passive lumen diameter and reduced wall thickness and wall-to-lumen ratio. Cerebral infarct size was increased in SHRSP + ETN after transient MCAO, despite an improvement in dilation of nonischemic MCA. The increase in infarct size was linked to a reduction in the number of microglia in the infarct core and upregulation of markers of classical macrophage/microglia polarization. There was no difference in infarct size after permanent MCAO or when untreated SHRSP subjected to transient MCAO were given ETN at reperfusion. Our data suggests that TNF-α inhibition attenuates hypertensive MCA remodeling but exacerbates cerebral damage following ischemia/reperfusion injury likely due to inhibition of the innate immune response of the brain. PMID:25015967

  8. Cerebritis: an unusual complication of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Mainak; Simes, David C; Prabha, Ramesh D

    2009-01-01

    Cerebritis is part of a continuum of brain infection and is difficult to diagnose. Cerebritis caused by Klebsiella in immunocompetent adults without predisposing factors such as neurosurgery or penetrating brain injury has not been reported before. We report a case of Klebsiella cerebritis in an adult patient with a proven extracranial focus of infection. We suggest considering cerebritis as a differential diagnosis for altered level of consciousness in patients of severe sepsis, even if an extracranial source of infection is proven. PMID:19881180

  9. Cerebritis: An unusual complication of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Mainak; Simes1, David C.; Prabha1, Ramesh D.

    2009-01-01

    Cerebritis is part of a continuum of brain infection and is difficult to diagnose. Cerebritis caused by Klebsiella in immunocompetent adults without predisposing factors such as neurosurgery or penetrating brain injury has not been reported before. We report a case of Klebsiella cerebritis in an adult patient with a proven extracranial focus of infection. We suggest considering cerebritis as a differential diagnosis for altered level of consciousness in patients of severe sepsis, even if an extracranial source of infection is proven. PMID:19881180

  10. Multiple infected cerebral hydatid cysts.

    PubMed

    Gana, R; Skhissi, M; Maaqili, R; Bellakhdar, F

    2008-05-01

    We report an unusual patient with multiple infected cerebral hydatid cysts. A 20-year-old man presented with a 2-month history of headache and progressive left-sided hempiparesis. A cerebral CT scan showed a large and heterogeneous parieto-occipital lesion. During surgery an infected hydatid cyst was discovered with multiple daughter vesicles. Post-operatively the patient was treated with albendazol, cefotaxime and metronidazole. The clinical course was good with total recovery of the hemiparesis. A follow-up CT scan showed persistence of some small deep-seated cysts. Multiple infected cerebral hydatid cyst is uncommon and can be confused with other cystic brain lesions. The aim of surgery is to remove the cyst unruptured and this should be followed by antihelminthic and antibiotic treatment in order to avoid recurrences. PMID:18342511

  11. Oculoauriculovertebral spectrum and cerebral anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Schrander-Stumpel, C T; de Die-Smulders, C E; Hennekam, R C; Fryns, J P; Bouckaert, P X; Brouwer, O F; da Costa, J J; Lommen, E J; Maaswinkel-Mooy, P D

    1992-01-01

    We report on three Dutch children with a clinical diagnosis of oculoauriculovertebral spectrum (OAVS) and hydrocephalus. The clinical features are compared to 15 published cases of OAVS and hydrocephalus. Several other cerebral abnormalities were present in the whole group. About half of the cases had cleft lip/palate, anophthalmia/microphthalmia, or a cardiac defect. Mental retardation was found in five of the surviving 11 patients and early death occurred in one-third. We compared the cases with OAVS and hydrocephalus with published reports of OAVS and other cerebral anomalies and found no significant clinical differences. However, the clinical characteristics were clearly more severely expressed than generally found in patients with OAVS. Children with OAVS and more severe clinical features, especially anophthalmia/microphthalmia and cleft lip/palate, seem to be at an increased risk for cerebral malformations and for mental retardation. Images PMID:1583660

  12. Exercise preconditioning exhibits neuroprotective effects on hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Shamsaei, Nabi; Khaksari, Mehdi; Erfani, Sohaila; Rajabi, Hamid; Aboutaleb, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested the neuroprotective effects of physical exercise on cerebral ischemic injury. However, the role of physical exercise in cerebral ischemia-induced hippocampal damage remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of pre-ischemia treadmill training on hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage after cerebral ischemia. Male adult rats were randomly divided into control, ischemia and exercise + ischemia groups. In the exercise + ischemia group, rats were subjected to running on a treadmill in a designated time schedule (5 days per week for 4 weeks). Then rats underwent cerebral ischemia induction through occlusion of common carotids followed by reperfusion. At 4 days after cerebral ischemia, rat learning and memory abilities were evaluated using passive avoidance memory test and rat hippocampal neuronal damage was detected using Nissl and TUNEL staining. Pre-ischemic exercise significantly reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells and necrotic cell death in the hippocampal CA1 region as compared to the ischemia group. Moreover, pre-ischemic exercise significantly prevented ischemia-induced memory dysfunction. Pre-ischemic exercise mighct prevent memory deficits after cerebral ischemia through rescuing hippocampal CA1 neurons from ischemia-induced degeneration. PMID:26487851

  13. Neuroprotective effects of tadalafil on gerbil dopaminergic neurons following cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Taek; Chung, Kyung Jin; Lee, Han Sae; Ko, Il Gyu; Kim, Chang Ju; Na, Yong Gil; Kim, Khae Hawn

    2013-03-15

    Impairment of dopamine function, which is known to have major effects on behaviors and cognition, is one of the main problems associated with cerebral ischemia. Tadalafil, a long-acting phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor, is known to ameliorate neurologic impairment induced by brain injury, but not in dopaminergic regions. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of treatment with tadalafil on cyclic guanosine monophosphate level and dopamine function following cerebral ischemia. Forty adult Mongolian gerbils were randomly and evenly divided into five groups (n = 8 in each group): Sham-operation group, cerebral ischemia-induced and 0, 0.1, 1, and 10 mg/kg tadalafil-treated groups, respectively. Tadalafil dissolved in distilled water was administered orally for 7 consecutive days, starting 1 day after surgery. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate assay and immunohistochemistry were performed for thyrosine hydroxylase expression and western blot analysis for dopamine D2 receptor expression. A decrease in cyclic guanosine monophosphate level following cerebral ischemia was found with an increase in thyrosine hydroxylase activity and a decrease in dopamine D2 receptor expression in the striatum and substantia nigra region. However, treatment with tadalafil increased cyclic guanosine monophosphate expression, suppressed thyrosine hydroxylase expression and increased dopamine D2 receptor expression in the striatum and substantia nigra region in a dose-dependent manner. Tadalafil might ameliorate cerebral ischemia-induced dopaminergic neuron injury. Therefore, tadalafil has the potential as a new neuroprotective treatment strategy for cerebral ischemic injury. PMID:25206715

  14. Role of dual-specificity protein phosphatase-5 in modulating the myogenic response in rat cerebral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Wickramasekera, Nadi T.; Gebremedhin, Debebe; Carver, Koryn A.; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Ramchandran, Ramani; Schuett, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the role of the dual-specificity protein phosphatase-5 (DUSP-5) in the pressure-induced myogenic responses of organ-cultured cerebral arterial segments. In these studies, we initially compared freshly isolated and organ-cultured cerebral arterial segments with respect to responses to step increases in intravascular pressure, vasodilator and vasoconstrictor stimuli, activities of the large-conductance arterial Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa) single-channel current, and stable protein expression of DUSP-5 enzyme. The results demonstrate maintained pressure-dependent myogenic vasoconstriction, DUSP-5 protein expression, endothelium-dependent and -independent dilations, agonist-induced constriction, and unitary KCa channel conductance in organ-cultured cerebral arterial segments similar to that in freshly isolated cerebral arteries. Furthermore, using a permeabilization transfection technique in organ-cultured cerebral arterial segments, gene-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) induced knockdown of DUSP-5 mRNA and protein, which were associated with enhanced pressure-dependent cerebral arterial myogenic constriction and increased phosphorylation of PKC-βII. In addition, siRNA knockdown of DUSP-5 reduced levels of phosphorylated ROCK and ERK1 with no change in the level of phosphorylated ERK2. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation significantly attenuated pressure-induced myogenic constriction in cerebral arteries. The findings within the present studies illustrate that DUSP-5, native in cerebral arterial muscle cells, appears to regulate signaling of pressure-dependent myogenic cerebral arterial constriction, which is crucial for the maintenance of constant cerebral blood flow to the brain. PMID:23172031

  15. Behaviour Problems Amongst Children With Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswin, Maureen

    Based on 6 years of work with cerebral palsied children, the thesis considers types and causes of cerebral palsy, the life pattern of the child with cerebral palsy from early years to adolescence, and the effect of the handicapped child on his parents and family. Literature on behavior disorders is reviewed, and kinds of behavior problems are…

  16. Neuroevolutional Approach to Cerebral Palsy and Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mysak, Edward D.

    Intended for cerebral palsy specialists, the book emphasizes the contribution that a neuroevolutional approach to therapy can make to habilitation goals of the child with cerebral palsy and applies the basic principles of the Bobath approach to therapy. The first section discusses cerebral palsy as a reflection of disturbed neuro-ontogenisis and…

  17. Cerebral vasculitis associated with cocaine abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, B.R.; Fainstat, M.

    1987-10-16

    A case of cerebral vasculitis in a previously healthy 22-year-old man with a history of cocaine abuse is described. Cerebral angiograms showed evidence of vasculitis. A search for possible causes other than cocaine produced no results. The authors include cocaine with methamphetamines, heroin, and ephedrine as illicit drugs that can cause cerebral vasculitis.

  18. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update

    PubMed Central

    Sehrawat, Nidhi; Bansal, Kalpana; Chopra, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Special and medically compromised patients present a unique population that challenges the dentist’s skill and knowledge. Providing oral care to people with cerebral palsy (CP) requires adaptation of the skills we use everyday. In fact, most people with mild or moderate forms of CP can be treated successfully in the general practice setting. This article is to review various dental considerations and management of a CP patient. How to cite this article: Sehrawat N, Marwaha M, Bansal K, Chopra R. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):109-118. PMID:25356010

  19. Inflammation, Cerebral Vasospasm, and Evolving Theories of Delayed Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Kevin R.; Zuckerman, Scott L.; Mocco, J

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CVS) is a potentially lethal complication of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Recently, the symptomatic presentation of CVS has been termed delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), occurring as early as 3-4 days after the sentinel bleed. For the past 5-6 decades, scientific research has promulgated the theory that cerebral vasospasm plays a primary role in the pathology of DCI and subsequently delayed ischemic neurological decline (DIND). Approximately 70% of patients develop CVS after aSAH with 50% long-term morbidity rates. The exact etiology of CVS is unknown; however, a well-described theory involves an antecedent inflammatory cascade with alterations of intracellular calcium dynamics and nitric oxide fluxes, though the intricacies of this inflammatory theory are currently unknown. Consequently, there have been few advances in the clinical treatment of this patient cohort, and morbidity remains high. Identification of intermediaries in the inflammatory cascade can provide insight into newer clinical interventions in the prevention and management of cerebral vasospasm and will hopefully prevent neurological decline. In this review, we discuss current theories implicating the inflammatory cascade in the development of CVS and potential treatment targets. PMID:24058736

  20. Radiosurgery for cerebral cavernomas.

    PubMed

    Nagy, G; Kemeny, A A

    2015-09-01

    The role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the management of cerebral cavernomas (CCMs) remains controversial. However, during the last decade the increasing knowledge on natural history and numerous publications from SRS centers using modern treatment protocols has been changing the initial resistance of the neurosurgical community. Unfortunately, the quality of publications on CCM SRS remains heterogeneous. Controversies arise from the lack of control groups, the different definition of hemorrhage, heterogeneous patient populations, and poor definition of treatment protocols. The key for proper interpretation of results is the understanding of the natural history of CCMs, which is varied both according to anatomical location and the presence or absence of previous hemorrhage. Hemispheric lesions appear to be more benign with lower annual bleed rate and risk of persisting disability, whereas those found in the thalamus, basal ganglia and brainstem typically have higher rebleed risk resulting in higher cumulative morbidity following subsequent hemorrhages. However, we are still unable at presentation to predict the future behavior of an individual lesion. In the present paper we critically review and analyze the modern SRS literature on CCMs. The expanding number of available data with current treatment protocols strongly supports the initial intuition that SRS is an effective treatment alternative for deep-seated CCMs with multiple hemorrhages reducing pretreatment annual rebleed rates from 32% pre-treatment to 1.5% within 2 years after treatment (N.=197). Moreover, it appears to stabilize lesions with no more than one bleed, and it is also effective for CCMs causing therapy resistant epilepsy especially if applied within 3 years after presentation. In modern SRS series the rate of persisting adverse radiation effects is low, resulting only in mild morbidity even in deep-seated lesions (4.16%, N.=376), and morbidity caused by post-treatment hemorrhages is also

  1. Beneficial synergistic effects of concurrent treatment with theanine and caffeine against cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lingyan; Tian, Xia; Gou, Lingshan; Ling, Xin; Wang, Ling; Feng, Yan; Yin, Xiaoxing; Liu, Yi

    2013-07-01

    Theanine and caffeine, 2 naturally occurring components in tea, have repeatedly been shown to deliver unique cognitive benefits when consumed in combination. In this study, we assessed the beneficial synergistic effects of concurrent treatment with theanine and caffeine against cerebral damage in rats. Theanine and caffeine had no effect on physiological variables, including pH, partial pressures of oxygen (PaO2) and carbon dioxide (PaCO2), mean arterial blood pressure, plasma glucose, or regional cerebral blood flow. Treatment with theanine (1 mg/kg body mass, intraperitoneal injection) alone significantly reduced cerebral infarction induced by cerebral ischemia-reperfusion, but caffeine (10 mg/kg, intravenous administration) alone only had a marginal effect. However, the combination of theanine plus caffeine resulted in a significant reduction of cerebral infarction and brain edema compared with theanine monotherapy. Meanwhile, increased malondialdehyde levels as well as decreased superoxide dismutase activity, glutathione peroxidase activity, and glutathione levels observed in the cerebral cortex after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion were significantly ameliorated by the combination therapy. Furthermore, the elevated inflammatory response levels observed in the cortex after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion were markedly attenuated by the combined treatment. Thus, it is suggested that the neuroprotective potential of a combination therapy with theanine and caffeine against cerebral ischemia-reperfusion is partly ascribed to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:23826680

  2. Laser Speckle Imaging of Cerebral Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qingming; Jiang, Chao; Li, Pengcheng; Cheng, Haiying; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Zheng; Tuchin, Valery V.

    Monitoring the spatio-temporal characteristics of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is crucial for studying the normal and pathophysiologic conditions of brain metabolism. By illuminating the cortex with laser light and imaging the resulting speckle pattern, relative CBF images with tens of microns spatial and millisecond temporal resolution can be obtained. In this chapter, a laser speckle imaging (LSI) method for monitoring dynamic, high-resolution CBF is introduced. To improve the spatial resolution of current LSI, a modified LSI method is proposed. To accelerate the speed of data processing, three LSI data processing frameworks based on graphics processing unit (GPU), digital signal processor (DSP), and field-programmable gate array (FPGA) are also presented. Applications for detecting the changes in local CBF induced by sensory stimulation and thermal stimulation, the influence of a chemical agent on CBF, and the influence of acute hyperglycemia following cortical spreading depression on CBF are given.

  3. Cerebral ischemia during surgery: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhi-Bin; Meng, Lingzhong; Gelb, Adrian W; Lee, Roger; Huang, Wen-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cerebral ischemia is the pathophysiological condition in which the oxygenated cerebral blood flow is less than what is needed to meet cerebral metabolic demand. It is one of the most debilitating complications in the perioperative period and has serious clinical sequelae. The monitoring and prevention of intraoperative cerebral ischemia are crucial because an anesthetized patient in the operating room cannot be neurologically assessed. In this paper, we provide an overview of the definition, etiology, risk factors, and prevention of cerebral ischemia during surgery.

  4. Dynamic Cerebral Autoregulation Is Acutely Impaired during Maximal Apnoea in Trained Divers

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Troy J.; Kavanagh, Justin J.; Breskovic, Toni; Johnson, Bruce D.; Dujic, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    Aims To examine whether dynamic cerebral autoregulation is acutely impaired during maximal voluntary apnoea in trained divers. Methods Mean arterial pressure (MAP), cerebral blood flow-velocity (CBFV) and end-tidal partial pressures of O2 and CO2 (PETO2 and PETCO2) were measured in eleven trained, male apnoea divers (28±2 yr; 182±2 cm, 76±7 kg) during maximal “dry” breath holding. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation was assessed by determining the strength of phase synchronisation between MAP and CBFV during maximal apnoea. Results The strength of phase synchronisation between MAP and CBFV increased from rest until the end of maximal voluntary apnoea (P<0.05), suggesting that dynamic cerebral autoregulation had weakened by the apnoea breakpoint. The magnitude of impairment in dynamic cerebral autoregulation was strongly, and positively related to the rise in PETCO2 observed during maximal breath holding (R2 = 0.67, P<0.05). Interestingly, the impairment in dynamic cerebral autoregulation was not related to the fall in PETO2 induced by apnoea (R2 = 0.01, P = 0.75). Conclusions This study is the first to report that dynamic cerebral autoregulation is acutely impaired in trained divers performing maximal voluntary apnoea. Furthermore, our data suggest that the impaired autoregulatory response is related to the change in PETCO2, but not PETO2, during maximal apnoea in trained divers. PMID:24498340

  5. Impaired cerebral vasoreactivity after embolization of arteriovenous malformations: assessment with serial acetazolamide challenge xenon CT

    SciTech Connect

    Tarr, R.W.; Johnson, D.W.; Horton, J.A.; Yonas, H.; Pentheny, S.; Durham, S.; Jungreis, C.A.; Hecht, S.T. )

    1991-05-01

    Embolization of a portion of the nidus of an arteriovenous malformation not only may alter hemodynamics within the nidus, but also may change blood flow dynamics in adjacent normal vessels. Sequential acetazolamide-challenge xenon CT cerebral blood flow studies were performed in eight patients before and after embolization of arteriovenous malformations to assess the hemodynamic effects on the major vascular territories supplying the malformation. Acetazolamide is a potent cerebral vasodilator, and its administration combined with cerebral blood flow studies allows assessment of cerebral vasoreactivity. In seven of the eight patients, one or more parenchymal areas exhibited a normal cerebral blood flow augmentation response to acetazolamide before embolization, but diminished acetazolamide flow augmentation was seen after embolization, indicating abnormal vasoreactivity. We found that the decrease in vasoreactivity peaked 6-10 days after embolization. In one of the eight patients, a temporary delayed neurologic deficit developed during a period of impaired cerebral vasoreactivity following embolization. Our results suggest that embolization of an arteriovenous malformation can induce vasoreactivity changes in adjacent normal vessels. Because these changes appear to be somewhat time-dependent, an appropriate interval should be observed between embolization stages or before surgical resection of an arteriovenous malformation following embolization to allow hemodynamic equilibration to occur. Acetazolamide challenge combined with serial cerebral blood flow studies following embolization enables determination of this hemodynamic equilibration.

  6. The Hemodynamic Effects of Blood Flow-Arterial Wall Interaction on Cerebral Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Marie

    2005-11-01

    Mechanical stresses such as wall shear induced by blood flow play an important role on cardiovascular diseases and cerebral disorders like arterioscleroses and cerebral aneurysm. In order to obtain a better understanding of mechanism of formation, growth, and rupture of cerebral aneurysm, this paper focuses on investigation of cerebral hemodynamics and its effects on aneurismal wall. The paper mainly consists of three parts. Since it is important to obtain the detailed information on the hemodynamic properties in the cerebral circulatory system, the first part discusses a large-scale hemodynamic simulation of the Cerebral Arterial Circle of Willis. The second part presents the simulation and in-vitro experiment of cerebral aneurysm with the consideration of blood flow-arterial wall interaction. Both simulations in the first and the second parts are conducted in a patient specific manner using medical images and also include modeling of boundary conditions to emulate realistic hemodynamic conditions. The present mathematical model, however, includes only macroscopic mechanical functions. Therefore, in the third part, the paper touches upon on future prospects in modeling of microscopic functions such as the effects of endothelial cells and multi physics functions such as physiological effects.

  7. [Cerebral ischemia in young adults].

    PubMed

    Berlit, P; Endemann, B; Vetter, P

    1991-08-01

    An overview is given over etiology and prognosis of cerebral ischemias until the age of 40. In a time period of 19 years, 168 patients were diagnosed with cerebral ischemia until the age of 40 (91 females, 77 males). The most frequent etiology is premature atherosclerosis in patients with vascular risk factors (up to 50%). Cardiogenic embolism is responsible for 1 to 34% of the cases: cardiac valve diseases and endocarditis being the most frequent sources. In 2 to 19% a vasculitis is diagnosed. While infectious arteritis is especially frequent in countries of the third world, immunovasculitides are common in Europe and the USA. Noninflammatory vasculopathies include spontaneous or traumatic dissection, fibromuscular dysplasia and vascular malformations. A migrainous stroke is especially frequent in female smokers with intake of oral contraceptives. During pregnancy both sinus thrombosis and arterial ischemia occur. Hematologic causes for ischemia are polycythemia, thrombocytosis and genetic diseases (sickle cell anemia, AT3-deficiency). Cerebral ischemia may occur in connection with the ingestion of ergot-derivates. The prognosis of cerebral ischemia in young adults is better than in older stroke-patients. PMID:1937340

  8. Innervation of the cerebral vasculature.

    PubMed

    Duckles, S P

    1983-01-01

    With the development of specific antibodies to vasoactive peptides and application of immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay methods, knowledge of vascular innervation has grown rapidly. In the cerebral circulation, four possible neurotransmitters are present: norepinephrine, acetylcholine, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and substance P. There is a dense adrenergic innervation of cerebral arteries, but contractile responses to nerve stimulation or circulating catecholamines are relatively small both in vitro and in vivo. Recent studies using radioligand binding techniques indicate a lack of specific 3H-prazosin binding in cerebral arteries, in contrast to other vascular beds. Thus a lack of alpha1-adrenergic receptors in cerebral arteries may account for weak responsiveness to sympathetic stimulation. Both VIP and acetylcholine may be vasodilator neurotransmitters, but blockade of cholinergic responses does not alter neurogenic vasodilation. The lack of specific VIP antagonists hampers efforts to explore this system more fully. Substance P-containing nerves are affected by capsaicin, supporting the hypothesis that these are primary sensory afferents, perhaps mediating pain. Future work in this area may focus on defining the pathways of these nerves and exploring the role of co-transmitters and possible interactions between nerves. With this basic information, experiments can be designed to elucidate more clearly the functional roles these nerves play. PMID:6210001

  9. Neuropathology of Acquired Cerebral Trauma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D.

    1987-01-01

    To help educators understand the cognitive and behavioral sequelae of cerebral injury, the neuropathology of traumatic brain injury and the main neuropathological features resulting from trauma-related brain damage are reviewed. A glossary with definitions of 37 neurological terms is appended. (Author/DB)

  10. Investigating cerebral oedema using poroelasticity.

    PubMed

    Vardakis, John C; Chou, Dean; Tully, Brett J; Hung, Chang C; Lee, Tsong H; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral oedema can be classified as the tangible swelling produced by expansion of the interstitial fluid volume. Hydrocephalus can be succinctly described as the abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within the brain which ultimately leads to oedema within specific sites of parenchymal tissue. Using hydrocephalus as a test bed, one is able to account for the necessary mechanisms involved in the interaction between oedema formation and cerebral fluid production, transport and drainage. The current state of knowledge about integrative cerebral dynamics and transport phenomena indicates that poroelastic theory may provide a suitable framework to better understand various diseases. In this work, Multiple-Network Poroelastic Theory (MPET) is used to develop a novel spatio-temporal model of fluid regulation and tissue displacement within the various scales of the cerebral environment. The model is applied through two formats, a one-dimensional finite difference - Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) coupling framework, as well as a two-dimensional Finite Element Method (FEM) formulation. These are used to investigate the role of endoscopic fourth ventriculostomy in alleviating oedema formation due to fourth ventricle outlet obstruction (1D coupled model) in addition to observing the capability of the FEM template in capturing important characteristics allied to oedema formation, like for instance in the periventricular region (2D model). PMID:26749338

  11. Regional brain blood flow and cerebral hemispheric oxygen consumption during acute hypoxaemia in the llama fetus

    PubMed Central

    Llanos, Aníbal J; Riquelme, Raquel A; Sanhueza, Emilia M; Herrera, Emilio; Cabello, Gertrudis; Giussani, Dino A; Parer, Julian T

    2002-01-01

    Unlike fetal animals of lowland species, the llama fetus does not increase its cerebral blood flow during an episode of acute hypoxaemia. This study tested the hypothesis that the fetal llama brain maintains cerebral hemispheric O2 consumption by increasing cerebral O2 extraction rather than decreasing cerebral oxygen utilisation during acute hypoxaemia. Six llama fetuses were surgically instrumented under general anaesthesia at 217 days of gestation (term ca 350 days) with vascular and amniotic catheters in order to carry out cardiorespiratory studies. Following a control period of 1 h, the llama fetuses underwent 3 × 20 min episodes of progressive hypoxaemia, induced by maternal inhalational hypoxia. During basal conditions and during each of the 20 min of hypoxaemia, fetal cerebral blood flow was measured with radioactive microspheres, cerebral oxygen extraction was calculated, and fetal cerebral hemispheric O2 consumption was determined by the modified Fick principle. During hypoxaemia, fetal arterial O2 tension and fetal pH decreased progressively from 24 ± 1 to 20 ± 1 Torr and from 7.36 ± 0.01 to 7.33 ± 0.01, respectively, during the first 20 min episode, to 16 ± 1 Torr and 7.25 ± 0.05 during the second 20 min episode and to 14 ± 1 Torr and 7.21 ± 0.04 during the final 20 min episode. Fetal arterial partial pressure of CO2 (Pa,CO2, 42 ± 2 Torr) remained unaltered from baseline throughout the experiment. Fetal cerebral hemispheric blood flow and cerebral hemispheric oxygen extraction were unaltered from baseline during progressive hypoxaemia. In contrast, a progressive fall in fetal cerebral hemispheric oxygen consumption occurred during the hypoxaemic challenge. In conclusion, these data do not support the hypothesis that the fetal llama brain maintains cerebral hemispheric O2 consumption by increasing cerebral hemispheric O2 extraction. Rather, the data show that in the llama fetus, a reduction in cerebral hemispheric metabolism occurs during acute

  12. Endogenous Protease Nexin-1 Protects against Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Mirante, Osvaldo; Price, Melanie; Puentes, Wilfredo; Castillo, Ximena; Benakis, Corinne; Thevenet, Jonathan; Monard, Denis; Hirt, Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    The serine protease thrombin plays a role in signalling ischemic neuronal death in the brain. Paradoxically, endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms can be triggered by preconditioning with thrombin (thrombin preconditioning, TPC), leading to tolerance to cerebral ischemia. Here we studied the role of thrombin’s endogenous potent inhibitor, protease nexin-1 (PN-1), in ischemia and in tolerance to cerebral ischemia induced by TPC. Cerebral ischemia was modelled in vitro in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures from rats or genetically engineered mice lacking PN-1 or with the reporter gene lacZ knocked into the PN-1 locus PN-1HAPN-1-lacZ/HAPN-1-lacZ (PN-1 KI) exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). We observed increased thrombin enzyme activity in culture homogenates 24 h after OGD. Lack of PN-1 increased neuronal death in the CA1, suggesting that endogenous PN-1 inhibits thrombin-induced neuronal damage after ischemia. OGD enhanced β-galactosidase activity, reflecting PN-1 expression, at one and 24 h, most strikingly in the stratum radiatum, a glial cell layer adjacent to the CA1 layer of ischemia sensitive neurons. TPC, 24 h before OGD, additionally increased PN-1 expression 1 h after OGD, compared to OGD alone. TPC failed to induce tolerance in cultures from PN-1−/− mice confirming PN-1 as an important TPC target. PN-1 upregulation after TPC was blocked by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, L-JNKI1, known to block TPC. This work suggests that PN-1 is an endogenous neuroprotectant in cerebral ischemia and a potential target for neuroprotection. PMID:23949634

  13. Endogenous protease nexin-1 protects against cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Mirante, Osvaldo; Price, Melanie; Puentes, Wilfredo; Castillo, Ximena; Benakis, Corinne; Thevenet, Jonathan; Monard, Denis; Hirt, Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    The serine protease thrombin plays a role in signalling ischemic neuronal death in the brain. Paradoxically, endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms can be triggered by preconditioning with thrombin (thrombin preconditioning, TPC), leading to tolerance to cerebral ischemia. Here we studied the role of thrombin's endogenous potent inhibitor, protease nexin-1 (PN-1), in ischemia and in tolerance to cerebral ischemia induced by TPC. Cerebral ischemia was modelled in vitro in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures from rats or genetically engineered mice lacking PN-1 or with the reporter gene lacZ knocked into the PN-1 locus PN-1HAPN-1-lacZ/HAPN-1-lacZ (PN-1 KI) exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). We observed increased thrombin enzyme activity in culture homogenates 24 h after OGD. Lack of PN-1 increased neuronal death in the CA1, suggesting that endogenous PN-1 inhibits thrombin-induced neuronal damage after ischemia. OGD enhanced β-galactosidase activity, reflecting PN-1 expression, at one and 24 h, most strikingly in the stratum radiatum, a glial cell layer adjacent to the CA1 layer of ischemia sensitive neurons. TPC, 24 h before OGD, additionally increased PN-1 expression 1 h after OGD, compared to OGD alone. TPC failed to induce tolerance in cultures from PN-1(-/-) mice confirming PN-1 as an important TPC target. PN-1 upregulation after TPC was blocked by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, L-JNKI1, known to block TPC. This work suggests that PN-1 is an endogenous neuroprotectant in cerebral ischemia and a potential target for neuroprotection. PMID:23949634

  14. Antifungal activity of the local complement system in cerebral aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Rambach, Günter; Hagleitner, Magdalena; Mohsenipour, Iradj; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Maier, Hans; Würzner, Reinhard; Dierich, Manfred P; Speth, Cornelia

    2005-10-01

    Dissemination of aspergillosis into the central nervous system is associated with nearly 100% mortality. To study the reasons for the antifungal immune failure we analyzed the efficacy of cerebral complement to combat the fungus Aspergillus. Incubation of Aspergillus in non-inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) revealed that complement levels were sufficient to obtain a deposition on the surface, but opsonization was much weaker than in serum. Consequently complement deposition from normal CSF on fungal surface stimulated a very low phagocytic activity of microglia, granulocytes, monocytes and macrophages compared to stimulation by conidia opsonized in serum. Similarly, opsonization of Aspergillus by CSF was not sufficient to induce an oxidative burst in infiltrating granulocytes, whereas conidia opsonized in serum induced a clear respiratory signal. Thus, granulocytes were capable of considerably reducing the viability of serum-opsonized Aspergillus conidia, but not of conidia opsonized in CSF. The limited efficacy of antifungal attack by cerebral complement can be partly compensated by enhanced synthesis, leading to elevated complement concentrations in CSF derived from a patient with cerebral aspergillosis. This inflammatory CSF was able to induce (i) a higher complement deposition on the Aspergillus surface than non-inflammatory CSF, (ii) an accumulation of complement activation products and (iii) an increase in phagocytic and killing activity of infiltrating granulocytes. However, levels and efficacy of the serum-derived complement were not reached. These data indicate that low local complement synthesis and activation may represent a central reason for the insufficient antifungal defense in the brain and the high mortality rate of cerebral aspergillosis. PMID:16027023

  15. Malignant Hemispheric Cerebral Infarction Associated with Idiopathic Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Kei; Mikami, Takeshi; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Aisaka, Wakiko; Irifune, Hideto; Narimatsu, Eichi

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome (ISCLS) is a rare condition that is characterized by unexplained episodic capillary hyperpermeability due to a shift of fluid and protein from the intravascular to the interstitial space. This results in diffuse general swelling, fetal hypovolemic shock, hypoalbuminemia, and hemoconcentration. Although ISCLS rarely induces cerebral infarction, we experienced a patient who deteriorated and was comatose as a result of massive cerebral infarction associated with ISCLS. In this case, severe hypotensive shock, general edema, hemiparesis, and aphasia appeared after serious antecedent gastrointestinal symptoms. Progressive life-threatening ischemic cerebral edema required decompressive hemicraniectomy. The patient experienced another episode of severe hypotension and limb edema that resulted in multiple extremity compartment syndrome. Treatment entailed forearm and calf fasciotomies. Cerebral edema in the ischemic brain progresses rapidly in patients suffering from ISCLS. Strict control of fluid volume resuscitation and aggressive diuretic therapy may be needed during the post-leak phase of fluid remobilization. PMID:24163674

  16. Sexual Activity as a Risk Factor for the Spontaneous Rupture of Cerebral Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Blanke-Roeser, Constantin; Matschke, Jakob; Püschel, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhages from ruptured cerebral aneurysms have a high clinical relevance and often lead to death. Approximately 2% to 5% of the people worldwide, even of younger age, are said to have aneurysms at cerebral arteries. In many cases, they remain clinically unapparent for decades. However, there are numerous risk factors for the rupture of an aneurysm, including temporary raises of the blood pressure. Such changes of the blood pressure can be induced even by several everyday behaviors. For example, any sort of sexual activities may cause extensive raises of the blood pressure because of several physical and psychological factors. The term "sexual activity" covers sexual intercourse as well as masturbation. In this article, the remarkable case of a 24-year-old woman with a ruptured cerebral aneurysm in the context of masturbation is presented. It is discussed with respect to the possible pathophysiological effects of sexual activity on cerebral aneurysms. PMID:27043460

  17. Chronic oleoylethanolamide treatment improves spatial cognitive deficits through enhancing hippocampal neurogenesis after transient focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Chao; Guo, Han; Zhou, Hao; Suo, Da-Qin; Li, Wen-Jun; Zhou, Yu; Zhao, Yun; Yang, Wu-Shuang; Jin, Xin

    2015-04-15

    Oleoylethanolamide (OEA) has been shown to have neuroprotective effects after acute cerebral ischemic injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic OEA treatment on ischemia-induced spatial cognitive impairments, electrophysiology behavior and hippocampal neurogenesis. Daily treatments of 30 mg/kg OEA significantly ameliorated spatial cognitive deficits and attenuated the inhibition of long-term potentiation (LTP) in the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rat model. Moreover, OEA administration improved cognitive function in a manner associated with enhanced neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Further study demonstrated that treatment with OEA markedly increased the expressions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors α (PPARα). Our data suggest that chronic OEA treatment can exert functional recovery of cognitive impairments and neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemic insult in rats via triggering of neurogenesis in the hippocampus, which supports the therapeutic use of OEA for cerebral ischemia. PMID:25748831

  18. Detection of Cerebral Hemorrhage in Rabbits by Time-Difference Magnetic Inductive Phase Shift Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Wencai; Yan, Qingguang; Qin, Mingxin; Jin, Gui; Sun, Jian; Ning, Xu; Zhuang, Wei; Peng, Bin; Li, Gen

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral hemorrhage, a difficult issue in clinical practice, is often detected and studied with computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET). However, these expensive devices are not readily available in economically underdeveloped regions, and hence are unable to provide bedside and emergency on-site monitoring. The magnetic inductive phase shift (MIPS) is an emerging technology that may become a new tool to detect cerebral hemorrhage and to serve as an inexpensive partial substitute to medical imaging. In order to study a wider band of cerebral hemorrhage MIPS and to provide more useful information for measuring cerebral hemorrhage, we established a cerebral hemorrhage magnetic induction phase shift spectroscopy (MIPSS) detection system. Thirteen rabbits with five cerebral hemorrhage states were studied using a single coil-coil within a 1 MHz-200 MHz frequency range in linear sweep. A feature band (FB) with the highest detection sensitivity and the greatest stability was selected for further analysis and processing. In addition, a maximum conductivity cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MRI was performed to verify and interpret the MIPSS result. The average phase shift change induced by a 3 ml injection of autologous blood under FB was -7.7503° ± 1.4204°, which was considerably larger than our previous work. Data analysis with a non-parametric statistical Friedman M test showed that in the FB, MIPSS could distinguish the five states of cerebral hemorrhage in rabbits, with a statistical significance of p<0.05. A B-F distribution profile was designed according to the MIPSS under FB that can provide instantaneous diagnostic information about the cerebral hemorrhage severity from a single set of measurements. The results illustrate that the MIPSS detection method is able to provide a new possibility for real-time monitoring and diagnosis of the severity of cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:26001112

  19. Cerebral angiography, blood flow and vascular reactivity in progressive hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunxia; Shen, Qiang; Huang, Shiliang; Li, Wei; Muir, Eric R.; Long, Justin; Duong, Timothy Q.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hypertension alters cerebral vascular morphology, cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebrovascular reactivity, increasing susceptibility to neurological disorders. This study evaluated: i) the lumen diameters of major cerebral and downstream arteries using magnetic resonance angiography, and ii) basal CBF, and iii) cerebrovascular reactivity to hypercapnia of multiple brain regions using arterial-spin-labeling technique in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) at different stages. Comparisons were made with age-matched normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. In 10-week SHR, lumen diameter started to reduce, basal CBF, and hypercapnic CBF response were higher from elevated arterial blood pressure, but there was no evidence of stenosis, compared to age-matched WKY. In 20-week SHR, lumen diameter remained reduced, CBF returned toward normal from vasoconstriction, hypercapnic CBF response reversed and became smaller, but without apparent stenosis. In 40-week SHR, lumen diameter remained reduced and basal CBF further decreased, resulting in larger differences compared to WKY. There was significant stenosis in main supplying cerebral vessels. Hypercapnic CBF response further decreased, with some animals showing negative hypercapnic CBF responses in some brain regions, indicative of compromised cerebrovascular reserve. The territory with negative hypercapnia CBF responses corresponded with the severity of stenosis in arteries that supplied those territories. We also found enlargement of downstream vessels and formation of collateral vessels as compensatory responses to vasoconstriction upstream vessels. The middle cerebral and azygos arteries were amongst the most susceptible to hypertension-induced changes. Multimodal MRI provides clinically relevant data that might be useful to characterize disease pathogenesis, stage disease progression, and monitor treatment effects in hypertension. PMID:25731987

  20. A case of miriplatin-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kumasawa, Fumio; Miura, Takao; Takahashi, Toshimi; Endo, Daisuke; Ohki, Takashi; Nakagawara, Hiroshi; Maruoka, Shuichiro; Tsujino, Ichiro; Masahiro, Ogawa; Gon, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Noriaki; Moriyama, Mitsuhiko; Hashimoto, Shu

    2016-07-01

    A 69-year-old man with an 8-year history of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was hospitalized for treatment of recurrent tumour. In 2010, the first transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) using miriplatin with agents (Lipiodol Ultra-Fluid) was performed and did not occur any adverse events. In 2014, since his HCC recurred, the TACE using miriplatin with agents was performed. Following this therapy, pyrexia occurred on day 3, followed by respiratory failure with cough and dyspnea on day 5. Chest radiography revealed scattered infiltration in the right upper lung fields, and chest computed tomography revealed ground grass attenuations, indicating fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonia. These findings progressively deteriorated, and a diagnosis of miriplatin-induced lung injury was made. His respiratory failure also progressively deteriorated. Treatment with pulse methylprednisolone therapy resulted in a dramatic improvement in both patient symptoms and radiological abnormalities. PMID:26867794

  1. Cerebral autoregulation with changes in arterial and cerebral venous pressure

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, R.W.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of cerebral venous pressure (Pcv) elevation on cerebral autoregulation has been incompletely studied. The authors compared the effect of decreased cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) by elevated Pcv and decreased arterial pressure (Pa) on cerebral blood flow (CBF) in a canine modified bypass model. CPP of 80, 70, 60, 50, 40 and 30 mmHg were produced by decreasing Pa with intracranial pressure (ICP) and Pcv maintained at 0 mmHg (group 1, n = 5), or by elevating Pcv as Pa was maintained at 80 mmHg (group 2, n = 5. CBF was measured using radiolabeled microspheres, and CMRO/sub 2/ = CBF times arterial-sagittal sinus O/sub 2/ content difference. Cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) = CPP/CBF. In group 1 CBF (ml/100 gm/min) was unchanged from control (36 +/- 4) as CPP was decreased from 80 to 40 mmHg. As CPP was decreased to 30 mmHg, CBF decreased to 28 +/- 1. CVR (mmHg/ml/min/100 gm) was 2.3 +/- 0.3 and progressively decreased to 1.0 +/- 0.1 at CPP of 30 mmHg. In group 2 CBF was 34 +/- 3 and was unchanged as CPP decreased to 50 mmHg. At CPP of 40 and 30 mmHg CBF decreased to 25 +/- 3 and 22 +/- 2 respectively. Control CRV was 2.4 +/- 0.2 and progressively decreased to 1.4 +/- 0.1 as CPP decreased to 30 mmHg. CMRO/sub 2/ was unchanged from control in both groups. Thus, CBF is maintained to low CPP regardless of whether vascular transmural pressure was decreased (decrease Pa) or increased (increased Pcv) demonstrating that the myogenic mechanism of autoregulation may be unimportant in normoxic dogs.

  2. What's new in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    JONES, M H

    1953-11-01

    Among new researches bearing on cerebral palsy are the growth of brain cells in tissue cultures for experimentation; the use of polysaccharides to prevent the formation of a glial barrier to nerve growth after injury; observation of changes in reactions of neurons at various stages of development; the finding of hypernatremia and hyperchloremia in lesions of the frontal lobe and the thalamus; stimulation of cerebral blood flow by injection of sodium bicarbonate and retardation with ammonium chloride; and studies of serial sections of brains of palsied children who died. Study of development in the early months of life has made possible the detection of significant abnormalities in behavior early in life. Loss of hearing may be tested in very young children by measuring minute variations in electrical resistance of the skin upon auditory stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system. Conditions which have been described as having been confused with cerebral palsy are dislocation of a cervical vertebra, hereditary spastic paraplegia, transverse myelopathy, injury to the spinal cord or cauda equina by anomalous growths of the spine, and also encephalitis and meningitis. Sedation has proved a valuable adjunct to electroencephalographic study of cerebral palsy. Better criteria for abnormality in the young child should be determined and the application of them more clearly standardized. Simple exercises are useful for early training of palsied children to stimulate development. "Crossed laterality"-the dominant eye being contralateral to the preferred hand-has been counteracted by special training with great success in eliminating emotional and behavior problems and accelerating development.Recent studies indicate that only 50 per cent of cerebral palsy patients have normal or better intelligence. Subluxation of the hip joint, a common deformity associated with cerebral palsy, can sometimes be corrected by operation if detected at an early stage. Radical ablation of

  3. CEREBRAL PALSY. PRENTICE-HALL FOUNDATIONS OF SPEECH PATHOLOGY SERIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHANCE, BURTON, JR.; MCDONALD, EUGENE T.

    THIS INTRODUCTORY TEXT ON CEREBRAL PALSY IS DIVIDED INTO TWO SECTIONS. THE FIRST SECTION OF THE BOOK CONTAINS INFORMATION ABOUT UNDERSTANDING THE MEANING OF CEREBRAL PALSY, PROGRAMS FOR THOSE WITH CEREBRAL PALSY, THE NEUROLOGICAL BASES, ETIOLOGY, AND DIAGNOSIS, AND THE CLASSIFICATION OF CEREBRAL PALSY. PROBLEMS OFTEN ASSOCIATED WITH CEREBRAL PALSY…

  4. Treatment for cerebral small vessel disease: effect of relaxin on the function and structure of cerebral parenchymal arterioles during hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Siu-Lung; Sweet, Julie G.; Cipolla, Marilyn J.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effect of hypertension on the function and structure of cerebral parenchymal arterioles (PAs), a major target of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), and determined whether relaxin is a treatment for SVD during hypertension. PAs were isolated from 18-wk-old female normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs), and SHRs treated with human relaxin 2 for 14 d (4 μg/h; n=8/group) and studied using a pressurized arteriograph system. Hypertension reduced PA inner diameter (58±3 vs. 49±3 μm at 60 mmHg in WKY rats, P<0.05), suggesting inward remodeling that was reversed by relaxin (56±4 μm, P<0.05). Relaxin also increased PA distensibility in SHRs (34±2 vs. 10±2% in SHRs, P<0.05). Relaxin was detected in cerebrospinal fluid (110±30 pg/ml) after systemic administration, suggesting that it crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Relaxin receptors (RXFP1/2) were not detected in cerebral vasculature, but relaxin increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) expression in brain cortex. Inhibition of VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase (axitinib, 4 mg/kg/d, 14 d) had no effect on increased distensibility with relaxin, but caused outward hypertrophic remodeling of PAs from SHRs. These results suggest that relaxin crosses the BBB and activates MMP-2 in brain cortex, which may interact with PAs to increase distensibility. VEGF appears to be involved in remodeling of PAs, but not relaxin-induced increased distensibility.—Chan, S.-L., Sweet, J. G., Cipolla, M. J. Treatment for cerebral small vessel disease: effect of relaxin on the function and structure of cerebral parenchymal arterioles during hypertension. PMID:23783073

  5. Bruxism control in a child with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Cristiana Aroeira G R; de Paula, Viviane Andrade Cancio; Portela, Maristela Barbosa; Primo, Laura Salignac Guimarães; Castro, Gloria Fernanda

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is one of the most severe childhood disabilities due to a lesion in the developing brain. Oral conditions often observed in this pathogenic are a tendency for the delayed eruption of permanent molars, higher percentages of malocclusion and parafunctional habits, including bruxism. The significance of oral conditions observed in CP patients demonstrates the need for intensive home and professional care for these individuals. This paper presents a 7-year-old boy, with cerebral palsy, severe mental retardation, who had high abrasion wear of the primary teeth related to bruxism. Dental care was carried out under oxide-induced sedation, and management of the bruxism was achieved after the use of a resin acrylic protective appliance fixed on both sides of the mandibula. The treatment performed offered efficiency advantages, was clinically viable, and should be a valuable option to practitioners considering appliance therapy to control parafunctional behavior. PMID:21991456

  6. Cerebral lateralization and color perception: a transcranial Doppler study.

    PubMed

    Njemanze, P C; Gomez, C R; Horenstein, S

    1992-03-01

    Eight normal subjects were examined in dark, light and color conditions. Mean cerebral blood flow velocity (MBFV) were recorded almost simultaneously from their posterior cerebral arteries (PCA) using transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasound. The side-to-side difference was significant during the dark (p = 0.0159) and color stimulation (p = 0.0001) but not in light condition. This side-to-side difference in MBFV was used to characterize lateralization of color perception. This showed that the right PCA was always greater than the left during the presentation of color stimuli. Primary psychological colors (blue, yellow, red and green) induced greater lateralization as compared with color resulting from a mixed blue-green wavelength. This suggests that the right visual cortex is selectively sensitive to wavelengths. PMID:1572174

  7. Binding of radiolabeled misonidazole in cerebral infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Rasey, J.S.; Hoffman, J.; Spence, A.M.; Krohn, K.A.

    1985-05-01

    The metabolic trapping of the radiolabeled nitroimidazole, misonidazole, in viable hypoxic tissue may form the basis for the nuclear imaging of ischemia in cerebral infarction. Misonidazole congeners could be labeled with /sup 75/Br, /sup 18/F, or /sup 11/C and detected with PET. Infarction was induced in male Mongolian gerbils by ligation of the right common carotid artery. Severity of the lesions was determined by scoring neurological symptoms with a stroke index, in which scores >10, out of a possible 25, indicate presence of a severe infarct. Gerbils with scores ranging from 0 (asymptomatic) to 13 as well as control (unligated) animals received 3 injections (50 ..mu..Moles/kg) of /sup 3/H-misonidazole in 2 hours and % injected dose/g (% I.D./g) was determined 2 hours after the final injection. Uptake into whole brain of control animals averaged 0.137 +- 0.0168 % I.D./g. The cerebral hemispheres of ligated gerbils were divided into 7, 2 mm-thick coronal sections which were then bisected. In the right half of slide number3 (midparietal region) the % I.D./g increased with increasing stroke index. For anim