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Sample records for liquid crystal formation

  1. Formation and performance of polymer dispersed liquid crystal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Philip Kwok-Kiou

    Polymer dispersed liquid crystals (PDLC's) are novel composite materials consisting of micron-size liquid crystalline droplets dispersed uniformly in a solid polymer matrix. PDLC's are formed by spinodal decomposition induced by thermal quenching or polymerization. These materials have excellent magneto-optical properties, and have great potential in applications that require efficient light scattering. Present commercial applications include switchable windows for privacy control and large-scale billboards. The optical properties depend on the droplet size, shape and positional order, which are determined during the formation stage, and reorientation dynamics of the liquid crystalline molecules confined within the droplets which occurs during product use. In this thesis, new complex mathematical models that describe the formation and performance of PDLC's are successfully developed, implemented, solved and validated. The nonequilibrium thermodynamic formation model takes into account initial thermal fluctuations computed using Monte Carlo simulations and realistic arbitrary boundary conditions. The performance model is based on classical nematic liquid crystalline magneto-viscoelastic theories, and incorporates transient viscoelastic boundary conditions. The simulations are able to reproduce successfully all the experimentally observed significant dynamical and morphological features of film formation as well as all the dynamical stages observed during the use of these thin optical films. In addition, the sensitivity of the phase separating morphology to processing conditions and material parameters is elucidated. Furthermore, a new scaling method is introduced to describe the phase separation phenomena during the early and intermediate stages of spinodal decomposition induced by thermal quenching. The droplet size selection mechanism for the polymerization-induced phase separation method of forming PDLC films is identified and explained for the first time. Lastly

  2. Liquid Crystal Formation from Sunflower Oil: Long Term Stability Studies.

    PubMed

    da Rocha-Filho, Pedro Alves; Maruno, Mônica; Ferrari, Márcio; Topan, José Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The Brazilian biodiversity offers a multiplicity of raw materials with great potential in cosmetics industry applications. Some vegetable oils and fatty esters increase skin hydration by occlusivity, keeping the skin hydrated and with a shiny appearance. Sunflower (Helianthus annus L.) oil is widely employed in cosmetic emulsions in the form of soaps, creams, moisturizers and skin cleansers due to the presence of polyphenols and its high vitamin E content. Liquid crystals are systems with many applications in both pharmaceutical and cosmetic formulations and are easily detected by microscopy under polarized light due to their birefringence properties. The aim of this research was to develop emulsions from natural sunflower oil for topical uses. Sunflower oil (75.0% w/w) was combined with liquid vaseline (25.0% w/w) employing a natural self-emulsifying base (SEB) derivative. The high temperature of the emulsification process did not influence the antioxidant properties of sunflower oil. Fatty esters were added to cosmetic formulations and extended stability tests were performed to characterize the emulsions. Fatty esters like cetyl palmitate and cetyl ester increase the formation of anisotropic structures. O/W emulsions showed acidic pH values and pseudoplastic behavior. The presence of a lamellar phase was observed after a period of 90 days under different storage conditions. PMID:27294894

  3. Liquid-liquid phase separation in supersaturated lysozyme solutions and associated precipitate formation/crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschol, Martin; Rosenberger, Franz

    1997-08-01

    Using cloud point determinations, the phase boundaries (binodals) for metastable liquid-liquid (L-L) separation in supersaturated hen egg white lysozyme solutions with 3%, 5%, and 7% (w/v) NaCl at pH=4.5 and protein concentrations c between 40 and 400 mg/ml were determined. The critical temperature for the binodal increased approximately linearly with salt concentration. The coexisting liquid phases both remained supersaturated but differed widely in protein concentration. No salt repartitioning was observed between the initial and the two separated liquid phases. After the L-L separation, due to the presence of the high protein concentration phase, crystallization occurred much more rapidly than in the initial solution. At high initial protein concentrations, a metastable gel phase formed at temperatures above the liquid binodal. Both crystal nucleation and gel formation were accelerated in samples that had been cycled through the binodal. Solutions in the gel and L-L regions yielded various types of precipitates. Based on theoretical considerations, previous observations with other proteins, and our experimental results with lysozyme, a generic phase diagram for globular proteins is put forth. A limited region in the (T,c) plane favorable for the growth of protein single crystals is delineated.

  4. Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation in Supersaturated Lysozyme Solutions and Associated Precipitate Formation/Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muschol, Martin; Rosenberger, Franz

    1997-01-01

    Using cloud point determinations, the phase boundaries (binodals) for metastable liquid-liquid (L-L) separation in supersaturated hen egg white lysozyme solutions with 3%, 5%, and 7% (wlv) NaCl at pH= 4.5 and protein concentrations c between 40 and 400 mg/ml were determined. The critical temperature for the binodal increased approximately linearly with salt concentration. The coexisting liquid phases both remained supersaturated but differed widely in protein concentration. No salt repartitioning was observed between the initial and the two separated liquid phases. After the L-L separation, due to the presence of the high protein concentration phase, crystallization occurred much more rapidly than in the initial solution. At high initial protein concentrations, a metastable gel phase formed at temperatures above the liquid binodal. Both crystal nucleation and gel formation were accelerated in samples that had been cycled through the binodal. Solutions in the gel and L-L regions yielded various types of precipitates. Based on theoretical considerations, previous observations with other proteins, and our experimental results with lysozyme, a generic phase diagram for globular proteins is put forth. A limited region in the (T,c) plane favorable for the growth of protein single crystals is delineated.

  5. Pattern formation in electrohydrodynamic convection of a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghiu, Nadina

    2003-10-01

    The first part of this dissertation is a study of the selection mechanism for the dendritic growth pattern of electrohydrodynamic convection (EHC) in a nematic liquid crystal (NLC). The cell gap d, the magnetic field H, and the voltage V are systematically varied. The transition from the non-convective state to the convective state is first order-like, although in this case it occurs in a nonequilibrium one-phase system. In the layer plane, the two-fold dendritic pattern grows about the only anisotropy direction, perpendicular to the homogeneous director alignment. While for crystalline dendrites the tip radius of curvature rho and the growth speed v are sharply selected, these dendrites show partial selection. At fixed d, H, and V, rho or v for different dendrites varies each within a band. There is no systematic dependence of rho on V. Thus, these dendrites represent an entirely new selection problem for pattern formation. The non-convective state is anisotropic in the plane of the pattern within a (magnetic coherence) length xim of each substrate. The degree of anisotropy decays with xim/d and the selection becomes less sharp. In contrast to sharply interfaced solidification patterns, these dendrites are outlined by a diffuse boundary, which width w ˜ 2xim. While anisotropic surface tension stabilizes crystalline growth, the magnetic field stabilizes this dendritic growth. Finding where and what scale convection first starts is important for understanding pattern selection in EHC. In the second part of this dissertation, fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy (FCPM) is employed to study normal dielectric rolls (NDRs) in a NLC. While polarizing microscopy gives a two-dimensional information of the integrated three-dimensional (3D) pattern of optical birefringence, FCPM can uniquely map 3D orientational patterns in LC. FCPM visualizes the intensity of polarized fluorescence light emitted by the dye molecules aligned by the LC molecules. The fluorescence

  6. Liquid-crystal mediated nanoparticle interactions and gel formation

    PubMed Central

    Whitmer, Jonathan K.; Joshi, Abhijeet A.; Roberts, Tyler F.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal particles embedded within nematic liquid crystals exhibit strong anisotropic interactions arising from preferential orientation of nematogens near the particle surface. Such interactions are conducive to forming branched, gel-like aggregates. Anchoring effects also induce interactions between colloids dispersed in the isotropic liquid phase, through the interactions of the pre-nematic wetting layers. Here we utilize computer simulation using coarse-grained mesogens to perform a molecular-level calculation of the potential of mean force between two embedded nanoparticles as a function of anchoring for a set of solvent conditions straddling the isotropic–nematic transition. We observe that strong, nontrivial interactions can be induced between particles dispersed in mesogenic solvent, and explore how such interactions might be utilized to induce a gel state in the isotropic and nematic phases. PMID:23697437

  7. Simple method of formation of switchable liquid crystal gratings by introducing periodic photoalignment pattern into liquid crystal cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoustine, Valeri; Kazakevitch, Anna; So, Vincent; Tam, Robin

    2006-10-01

    We have developed a method for the generation of grating structures in nematic liquid crystals that is a modification of the technique described in [Ph.J. Bos, J.C. Chen, D.L. Johnson, W.E. Glenn, C.E. Holton, B.E. Smith, US Patent 5 825 448, October 20, 1998]. Exploiting UV photoalignment as an alignment technique and an amplitude mask, we introduced a periodical variation of the alignment direction into one of the liquid crystal cell surfaces, while the other surface was aligned uniformly. This significantly simplified the process of grating structure formation and allowed for the generation of polarization independent and electrically controllable gratings. It was found that the grating with a period of 86 μm made using this method demonstrated diffraction efficiency of about 30% in the first diffraction order for a thin grating configuration, and the diffraction signal could be suppressed by more than 20 dB by applying electric field across the cell. Using the edge gradient method we found that a spatial resolution limit of the method was as low as 1.1 μm. This indicates a potential for the proposed method to create periodical structures with a period of about 1 μm.

  8. Formation of a columnar liquid crystal in a simple one-component system of particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metere, Alfredo; Sarman, Sten; Oppelstrup, Tomas; Dzugutov, Mikhail

    We report a molecular dynamics simulation demonstrating that a columnar liquid crystal, commonly formed by disc-shaped molecules, can be formed by identical particles interacting via a spherically symmetric potential. Upon isochoric cooling from a low-density isotropic liquid state the simulated system performed a weak first order phase transition which produced a liquid crystal phase composed of parallel particle columns arranged in a hexagonal pattern in the plane perpendicular to the column axis. The particles within columns formed a liquid structure and demonstrated a significant intracolumn diffusion. Further cooling resulted in another first-order transition whereby the column structure became periodically ordered in three dimensions transforming the liquid-crystal phase into a crystal. This result is the first observation of a liquid crystal formation in a simple one-component system of particles. Its conceptual significance is in that it demonstrated that liquid crystals that have so far only been produced in systems of anisometric molecules, can also be formed by mesoscopic soft-matter and colloidal systems of spherical particles with appropriately tuned interatomic potential.

  9. Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    Thermochromic liquid crystals, or TLCs, are a type of liquid crystals that react to changes in temperature by changing color. The Hallcrest/NASA collaboration involved development of a new way to visualize boundary layer transition in flight and in wind tunnel testing of aircraft wing and body surfaces. TLCs offered a new and potentially better method of visualizing the boundary layer transition in flight. Hallcrest provided a liquid crystal formulation technique that afforded great control over the sensitivity of the liquid crystals to varying conditions. Method is of great use to industry, government and universities for aerodynamic and hydrodynamic testing. Company's principal line is temperature indicating devices for industrial use, such as non-destructive testing and flaw detection in electric/electronic systems, medical application, such as diagnostic systems, for retail sale, such as room, refrigerator, baby bath and aquarium thermometers, and for advertising and promotion specials. Additionally, Hallcrest manufactures TLC mixtures for cosmetic applications, and liquid crystal battery tester for Duracell batteries.

  10. Semiconductor nanorod liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liang-shi; Walda, Joost; Manna, Liberato; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2002-01-28

    Rodlike molecules form liquid crystalline phases with orientational order and positional disorder. The great majority of materials in which liquid crystalline phases have been observed are comprised of organic molecules or polymers, even though there has been continuing and growing interest in inorganic liquid crystals. Recent advances in the control of the sizes and shapes of inorganic nanocrystals allow for the formation of a broad class of new inorganic liquid crystals. Here we show the formation of liquid crystalline phases of CdSe semiconductor nanorods. These new liquid crystalline phases may have great importance for both application and fundamental study.

  11. Formation of contour optical traps using a four-channel liquid crystal focusing device

    SciTech Connect

    Korobtsov, A V; Kotova, S P; Losevsky, N N; Mayorova, A M; Samagin, S A

    2014-12-31

    The capabilities and specific features of the formation and dynamic control of so-called contour optical traps using a fourchannel liquid crystal modulator are studied theoretically and experimentally. Circular, elliptical and C-shaped traps are formed. Trapping and confinement of absorbing micro-objects by the formed traps are demonstrated. (optical traps)

  12. Formation of a defect-free uniform lying helix in a thick cholesteric liquid crystal cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Yo; Moritake, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    We report on the formation of a uniform lying helix (ULH) in a thick cholesteric liquid crystal cell, using an oscillatory shear flow and an electric field across the cell. The helix axis was formed perpendicularly to the shear flow in the cell-plane direction. The cholesteric liquid crystal transitioned from a focal conic texture to the ULH at a critical shear rate. The critical shear rate was inversely proportional to the cell thickness, and thus our method easily demonstrated a defect-free ULH even in a 54-µm-thick cell.

  13. Surface induced phase separation and pattern formation at the isotropic interface in chiral nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Zola, R S; Evangelista, L R; Yang, Y-C; Yang, D-K

    2013-02-01

    We study the pattern formation of a chiral nematic liquid crystal under a wetting transition. In the isotropic-liquid crystal transition, a surface-enhanced effect happens and a thin liquid crystal layer forms at the substrates of the cell. In this confined system, chirality, elastic anisotropy, surface anchoring, and wetting strength interplay. A striped pattern is formed due to the chiral nature of the material and the tilted anchoring at the isotropic boundary. As the wetting layer grows from cooling the sample, first the stripes rotate through a process where dislocation defects are formed. As the wetting layer grows further, the periodicity of the stripe structure changes, and finally a splitting of the stripes occurs. Because of the unique properties of this system, new insights about pitch-thickness ratio, interface anchoring, and elastic anisotropy effect are found. Since the anchoring at the isotropic boundary is weak, the critical ratio between the thickness of the wetting layer and the helical pitch is different from that reported in the literature. We also discover that the elastic anisotropy and elastic constant ratios play a critical role in stripe formation. Because of the similarity with biological fibrous composites (twisted plywood), our system may be used as a synthetic version to mimic the naturally occurring one. We carry out a simulation study to explain the experimental results. PMID:23414046

  14. Surface Induced Phase Separation and Pattern Formation at the Isotropic Interface in Chiral Nematic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zola, R. S.; Evangelista, L. R.; Yang, Y.-C.; Yang, D.-K.

    2013-02-01

    We study the pattern formation of a chiral nematic liquid crystal under a wetting transition. In the isotropic-liquid crystal transition, a surface-enhanced effect happens and a thin liquid crystal layer forms at the substrates of the cell. In this confined system, chirality, elastic anisotropy, surface anchoring, and wetting strength interplay. A striped pattern is formed due to the chiral nature of the material and the tilted anchoring at the isotropic boundary. As the wetting layer grows from cooling the sample, first the stripes rotate through a process where dislocation defects are formed. As the wetting layer grows further, the periodicity of the stripe structure changes, and finally a splitting of the stripes occurs. Because of the unique properties of this system, new insights about pitch-thickness ratio, interface anchoring, and elastic anisotropy effect are found. Since the anchoring at the isotropic boundary is weak, the critical ratio between the thickness of the wetting layer and the helical pitch is different from that reported in the literature. We also discover that the elastic anisotropy and elastic constant ratios play a critical role in stripe formation. Because of the similarity with biological fibrous composites (twisted plywood), our system may be used as a synthetic version to mimic the naturally occurring one. We carry out a simulation study to explain the experimental results.

  15. Liquid Crystal Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Madeline J.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of liquid crystals and several important liquid crystal devices are described. Ideas for practical experiments to illustrate the properties of liquid crystals and their operation in devices are also described. (Author/JN)

  16. Liquid Crystal Inquiries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marroum, Renata-Maria

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the properties and classification of liquid crystals. Presents a simple experiment that illustrates the structure of liquid crystals and the differences between the various phases liquid crystals can assume. (JRH)

  17. Influence of PEG-12 Dimethicone addition on stability and formation of emulsions containing liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Andrade, F F; Santos, O D H; Oliveira, W P; Rocha-Filho, P A

    2007-06-01

    Oil/water emulsions, containing liquid crystals, were developed employing Andiroba oil, PEG-12 Dimethicone and Crodafos CES. It was evaluated the influence of silicone surfactants on the emulsions stability and on the formation of liquid crystalline phases and therefore, physicochemical characteristics, such as rheology and zeta potential, were evaluated. Emulsions were prepared by the emulsions phase inversion method. All the formulations presented lamellar liquid crystalline phases. The PEG-12 Dimethicone addition did not change microscopically the liquid crystalline phases. The emulsions containing silicone demonstrated lower viscosity than those without the additive. This is an important feature, as the silicone did not change the rheological profile; however, the addition of silicone still can be used as a viscosity controller. The formulations had their viscosity increased 15 and 150 days after their preparation. This characteristic shows that the emulsions have their organization increased along the storing time. In the analysis of zeta potential, we could verify that all formulations presented negative values between -39.7 and -70.0 mV. Within this range of values, the emulsion physical stability is high (Fig. 10). It was concluded that the addition of PEG-12 Dimethicone kept the liquid crystalline phase of the emulsion obtained with Crodafos CES, influencing in a positive way in the system stability. PMID:18489351

  18. A computer simulation study of the formation of liquid crystal nanodroplets from a homogeneous solution.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Roberto; Costantini, Alberto; Muccioli, Luca; Orlandi, Silvia; Zannoni, Claudio

    2007-01-28

    The aggregation of liquid crystal nanodroplets from a homogeneous solution is an important but not well understood step in the preparation of various advanced photonic materials. Here, the authors performed molecular dynamics computer simulations of the formation of liquid crystalline nanodroplets, starting from an isotropic and uniform binary solution of spherical Lennard-Jones (solvent) and elongated ellipsoidal Gay-Berne (solute) rigid particles in low (<10%) concentration. They studied the dynamics of demixing and the mesogen ordering process and characterized the resulting nanodroplets assessing the effect of temperature, composition, and specific solute-solvent interaction on the morphology, structure, and anisotropy. They find that the specific solute-solvent interaction, composition, and temperature can be adjusted to tune the nanodroplet growth and size. PMID:17286507

  19. A computer simulation study of the formation of liquid crystal nanodroplets from a homogeneous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berardi, Roberto; Costantini, Alberto; Muccioli, Luca; Orlandi, Silvia; Zannoni, Claudio

    2007-01-01

    The aggregation of liquid crystal nanodroplets from a homogeneous solution is an important but not well understood step in the preparation of various advanced photonic materials. Here, the authors performed molecular dynamics computer simulations of the formation of liquid crystalline nanodroplets, starting from an isotropic and uniform binary solution of spherical Lennard-Jones (solvent) and elongated ellipsoidal Gay-Berne (solute) rigid particles in low (<10%) concentration. They studied the dynamics of demixing and the mesogen ordering process and characterized the resulting nanodroplets assessing the effect of temperature, composition, and specific solute-solvent interaction on the morphology, structure, and anisotropy. They find that the specific solute-solvent interaction, composition, and temperature can be adjusted to tune the nanodroplet growth and size.

  20. Liquid Crystal Based Sensor to Detect Beta-Sheet Formation of Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadati, Monirosadat; Izmitli Apik, Aslin; Abbott, Nicholas L.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-03-01

    Protein aggregation into amyloid fibrils is involved in the progression of Alzheimer's, typeII diabetes and Huntington's diseases. Although larger aggregates remain important for clinical determination, small oligomers are of great interest due to their potentially toxic nature. It is therefore crucial to develop methods that probe the aggregation process at early stages and in the vicinity of biological membranes. Here, we present a simple method that relies on liquid crystalline materials and a Langmuir monolayer at the aqueous-liquid crystal (LC) interface. The approach is based on the LC's specific response to β-sheet structures, which abound in amyloid fibrils. When the system is observed under polarized light, the fibrils formed by amyloidogenic peptides give rise to the formation of elongated and branched structures in the LCs. Moreover, the PolScope measurements prove that the LCs are predominantly aligned along the fibrils when exposed to a β-sheet forming peptide. In contrast, non-amyloidogenic peptides form ellipsoidal domains of irregularly tilted LCs. This method is capable of reporting aggregation at lipid-aqueous interfaces at nanomolar concentrations of the peptide, and much earlier than commonly used fluorescence-based techniques. We thank Prof. Oleg D. Levrentovich and Young-Ki Kim from the Liquid Crystal Institute of Kent State University for the use of their PolScope instrument. This work was partially supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation (P300P2_151342).

  1. Domain Structure Formation in Swollen Side-Chain Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowshi, Christopher; Luchette, Paul; Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) are soft materials consisting of a crosslinked polymer network that incorporates mesogenic groups, allowing for orientational order in a solid rubber. Maintaining uniaxial strain on a swollen nematic polymer gel will fix the direction of average orientation of mesogens along the strain axis, yielding a monodomain LCE. Failure to strain the swollen gel within ~ 30 minutes of formation will produce an opaque polydomain LCE that possesses no long-range nematic order unless stretched. Polarized laser light scattering has been previously employed to monitor the size of liquid crystal domains in fully-formed LCEs; however, no studies have focused on the initial stages of domain formation. We have recorded the time evolution of the far-field scattering patterns produced by swollen polymer gels under varying levels of applied strain. These scattering patterns provide dynamical information of domain behavior during synthesis and processing of monodomain and polydomain LCEs. This work was supported by the NSF under grant DMR 0606357.

  2. Formation of liquid-crystal cholesteric pitch in the centimeter range.

    PubMed

    Kasyanyuk, Denis; Slyusarenko, Kostyantyn; West, John; Vasnetsov, Mikhail; Reznikov, Yuriy

    2014-02-01

    The formation of a macroscopic cholesteric spiral in a nematic liquid crystal (LC) doped with chiral molecules is studied. Measurements of the orientation of the disclination line formed in a LC θ-cell manufactured with one substrate having linear in-plane alignment and the opposing substrate having circular alignment showed the formation of a uniform macroscopic cholesteric spiral with a pitch length of centimeters. We found a linear dependence of the reciprocal pitch p(-1) on the concentration c in a wide range of p, extending from micrometers up to several centimeters. It suggests that the pitch of a spiral in a nematic LC doped with chiral dopants results from a long-range orientation owing to short-range chiral interactions in the vicinity of the chiral additive. PMID:25353485

  3. Formation of liquid-crystal cholesteric pitch in the centimeter range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasyanyuk, Denis; Slyusarenko, Kostyantyn; West, John; Vasnetsov, Mikhail; Reznikov, Yuriy

    2014-02-01

    The formation of a macroscopic cholesteric spiral in a nematic liquid crystal (LC) doped with chiral molecules is studied. Measurements of the orientation of the disclination line formed in a LC θ-cell manufactured with one substrate having linear in-plane alignment and the opposing substrate having circular alignment showed the formation of a uniform macroscopic cholesteric spiral with a pitch length of centimeters. We found a linear dependence of the reciprocal pitch p-1 on the concentration c in a wide range of p, extending from micrometers up to several centimeters. It suggests that the pitch of a spiral in a nematic LC doped with chiral dopants results from a long-range orientation owing to short-range chiral interactions in the vicinity of the chiral additive.

  4. Formation of Polymer Networks for Fast In-Plane Switching of Liquid Crystals at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Byeong-Hun; Song, Dong Han; Kim, Ki-Han; Wok Park, Byung; Choi, Sun-Wook; Park, Sung Il; Kang, Sung Gu; Yoon, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Byeong Koo; Yoon, Tae-Hoon

    2013-09-01

    We formed a polymer structure to enable fast in-plane switching of liquid crystals at low temperatures. The problem of the inevitable slow response at low temperatures was reduced by the formation of in-cell polymer networks in in-plane switching (IPS) cells. The electro-optic characteristics of polymer-networked IPS cells were measured at temperatures ranging from -10 to 20 °C. The turn-on and turn-off times of an IPS cell were reduced by 44.5 and 47.2% at -10 °C by the formation of polymer networks. We believe that the proposed technology can be applied to emerging display devices such as mobile phones and automotive displays that may be used at low temperatures.

  5. Feedback-free single-beam pattern formation by nanosecond pulses in dye-doped liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepeshkin, Nick N.; Lukishova, Svetlana G.; Boyd, Robert W.; Marshall, Kenneth L.

    2006-08-01

    Generally, optical feedback and/or two counter-propagating beams are necessary to form high-definition patterns in the cross section of a laser beam after passing through a nonlinear medium. In this paper we present an observation of pattern formation in liquid crystal media in a single laser beam without any external feedback. We found that after irradiation of a dye-doped liquid crystal cell with repetitive nanosecond pulses, the beam coming out of the liquid crystal cell exhibits a spectacular kaleidoscopic change of beam patterns in the far field. The patterns vary from pulse to pulse in an ordered manner cycling through a variety of complicated forms. We speculate that localized phase separation of the dye from the liquid crystal host occurs in the focal region of the beam in our experiments, and that the observed far-field patterns result from the laser-beam diffraction on these absorptive and refractive inhomogeneities.

  6. Pattern formation from consistent dynamical closures of uniaxial nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Híjar, Humberto; de Hoyos, Diego Marquina; Santamaría-Holek, Iván

    2012-03-21

    Pattern formation in uniaxial polymeric liquid crystals is studied for different dynamic closure approximations. Using the principles of mesoscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamics in a mean-field approach, we derive a Fokker-Planck equation for the single-particle non-homogeneous distribution function of particle orientations and the evolution equations for the second and fourth order orientational tensor parameters. Afterwards, two dynamic closure approximations are discussed, one of them considering the relaxation of the fourth order orientational parameter and leading to a novel expression for the free-energy like function in terms of the scalar order parameter. Considering the evolution equation of the density of the system and values of the interaction parameter for which isotropic and nematic phases coexist, our analysis predicts that patterns and traveling waves can be produced in lyotropic uniaxial nematics even in the absence of external driving. PMID:22443750

  7. Circular flow formation triggered by Marangoni convection in nematic liquid crystal films with a free surface.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyunhee; Takezoe, Hideo

    2016-01-14

    We demonstrate circular flow formation at a surface in homeotropically oriented nematic liquid crystals with a free surface using focused laser beam irradiation. Under a weak laser power, a pit together with an associated circular bulge is formed: the Marangoni effect. Here a diverging molecular flow from the pit (thermocapillary flow) also induces director tilt in the radial direction. Upon increasing the laser power, the pit becomes deeper, and eventually evolves into a circular flow associated with a deeper pit and a subsidiary circular bulge or valley structure. This phenomenon is induced by escaping from excess deformation energy due to a bend deformation of the director. Actually, we confirmed that the circular flow is never formed in the isotropic phase. The handedness of the vortex cannot be controlled by circular polarisation, but is controllable by doping with chiral molecules. This rotational motion (a nematic micro-rotor) is a unique phenomenon only exhibited by anisotropic liquids, and is expected to be applied for novel devices. PMID:26482229

  8. Effects of added silica nanoparticles on the nematic liquid crystal phase formation in beidellite suspensions.

    PubMed

    Landman, Jasper; Paineau, Erwan; Davidson, Patrick; Bihannic, Isabelle; Michot, Laurent J; Philippe, Adrian-Marie; Petukhov, Andrei V; Lekkerkerker, Henk N W

    2014-05-01

    In this article, we present a study of the liquid crystal phase behavior of mixed suspensions of the natural smectite clay mineral beidellite and nonadsorbing colloidal silica particles. While virtually all smectite clays dispersed in water form gels at very low concentrations, beidellite displays a first order isotropic-nematic phase transition before gel formation (J. Phys. Chem. B, 2009, 113, 15858-15869). The addition of silica nanospheres shifts the concentrations of the coexisting isotropic and nematic phases to slightly higher values while at the same time markedly accelerating the phase separation process. Furthermore, beidellite suspensions at volume fractions above the isotropic-nematic phase separation, trapped in a kinetically arrested gel state, liquefy on the addition of silica nanospheres and proceed to isotropic-nematic phase separation. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we probe the structural changes caused by the addition of the silica nanospheres, and we relate the modification of the phase transition kinetics to the change of the rheological properties. PMID:24758198

  9. Liquid crystal polyester thermosets

    SciTech Connect

    Benicewicz, B.C.; Hoyt, A.E.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention relates to the field of curable liquid crystal polyester monomers and to thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions prepared therefrom. It is an object of this invention to provide curable liquid crystalline polyester materials. Another object of this invention is to provide a process of preparing curable liquid crystal polyester monomers. Yet another object of this invention is to provide liquid crystalline blends of polyester materials. It is a further object of this invention to provide thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions. It is a still further object of this invention to provide thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions having a high heat resistance. 1 fig.

  10. Liquid crystal polyester thermosets

    SciTech Connect

    Benicewicz, B.C.; Hoyt, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    The present invention relates to the field of curable liquid crystal polyester monomers and to thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions prepared therefrom. It is an object of this invention to provide curable liquid crystalline polyester materials. Another object of this invention is to provide a process of preparing curable liquid crystal polyester monomers. Yet another object of this invention is to provide liquid crystalline blends of polyester materials. It is a further object of this invention to provide thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions. It is a still further object of this invention to provide thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions having a high heat resistance. 1 fig.

  11. Liquid Crystal Optofluidics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Cuennet, J. G.; Psaltis, D.

    2012-10-11

    By employing anisotropic fluids and namely liquid crystals, fluid flow becomes an additional degree of freedom in designing optofluidic devices. In this paper, we demonstrate optofluidic liquid crystal devices based on the direct flow of nematic liquid crystals in microfluidic channels. Contrary to previous reports, in the present embodiment we employ the effective phase delay acquired by light travelling through flowing liquid crystal, without analysing the polarisation state of the transmitted light. With this method, we demonstrate the variation in the diffraction pattern of an array of microfluidic channels acting as a grating. We also discuss our recent activities in integrating mechanical oscillators for on-chip peristaltic pumping.

  12. Formation of H-type liquid crystal dimer at air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Karthik, C. Gupta, Adbhut Joshi, Aditya Manjuladevi, V. Gupta, Raj Kumar; Varia, Mahesh C.; Kumar, Sandeep

    2014-04-24

    We have formed the Langmuir monolayer of H-shaped Azo linked liquid crystal dimer molecule at the air-water interface. Isocycles of the molecule showed hysteresis suggesting the ir-reversible nature of the monolayer formed. The thin film deposited on the silicon wafer was characterized using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). The images showed uniform domains of the dimer molecule. We propose that these molecules tend to take book shelf configuration in the liquid phase.

  13. Tunable liquid crystal lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woltman, Scott J.

    Liquid crystal lasers are dye-doped distributed feedback lasing systems. Fabricated by coupling the periodic structure of a liquid crystal medium with a fluorescent dye, the emission from these systems is tunable by controlling the liquid crystal system---be it through electric or thermal field effects, photochemical reactions, mechanical deformations, etc. The laser action arises from an extended interaction time between the radiation field, the laser emission, and the matter field, the periodic liquid crystal medium, at the edge of the photonic band gap. In this thesis, several tunable liquid crystal laser systems are investigated: cholesteric liquid crystals, holographic-polymer dispersed liquid crystals and liquid crystal polarization gratings. The primary focus has been to fabricate systems that are tunable through electrical means, as applications requiring mechanical or thermal changes are often difficult to control. Cholesteric liquid crystal lasers are helical Bragg reflectors, with a band gap for circularly polarized light of equivalent handedness to their helix. These materials were doped with a laser dye and laser emission was observed. The use of an in-plane electric field tends to unwind the helical pitch of the film and in doing so tunable emission was demonstrated for ˜15 nm. Holographic-polymer dispersed liquid crystals (H-PDLCs) are grating structures consisting of alternating layers of polymer and liquid crystal, with different indices of refraction. The application of an electric field index matches these layers and switches off the grating. Thus, laser emission can be switched on and off through the use of an electric field. Spatially tunable H-PDLC lasers were fabricated by creating chirped gratings, formed by divergent beams. The emission was shown to tune ˜5 nm as the pump beam was translated across a 1 inch film. Liquid crystal polarization gratings use photo-patterned alignment layers, through a polarization holography exposure, to

  14. Formation of binary phase gratings in photopolymer-liquid crystal composites by a surface-controlled anisotropic phase separation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jae-Hong; Khoo, Iam Choon; Yu, Chang-Jae; Jung, Min-Sik; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2005-01-10

    We report on formation of binary phase gratings in photopolymer-liquid crystal (PLC) composites using a surface-controlled phase separation method. The binary nature of the PLC phase gratings is produced by employing a single step photo-ablation through an amplitude photomask which precisely controls the interfacial interactions between the LC and the photopolymer on the alignment layer. A subsequent illumination of the ultraviolet light onto the whole PLC promotes an anisotropic phase separation resulting in the formation of distinct binary patterns for the PLC structure. The electrically tunable diffraction properties of the binary phase gratings are presented.

  15. Gel formation in a mixture of a block copolymer and a nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Khazimullin, Maxim; Müller, Thomas; Messlinger, Stephan; Rehberg, Ingo; Schöpf, Wolfgang; Krekhov, Alexei; Pettau, Robin; Kreger, Klaus; Schmidt, Hans-Werner

    2011-08-01

    The viscoelastic properties of a binary mixture of a mesogenic side-chain block copolymer in a low molecular weight nematic liquid crystal are studied for mass concentrations ranging from the diluted regime up to a liquid crystalline gel state at about 3%. In the gel state, the system does not flow, exhibits a polydomain structure on a microscopic level, and strongly scatters light. Below the gelation point, the system is homogeneous and behaves like a usual nematic, so the continuum theory of liquid crystals can be applied for interpreting the experimental data. Using the dynamic Fréedericksz transition technique, the dependence of the splay elastic constant and the rotational viscosity on the polymer concentration have been obtained. Comparing the dynamic behavior of block copolymer solutions with the respective homopolymer solutions reveals that, above a mass concentration of 1%, self-assembling of the block copolymer chain segments in clusters occurred, resulting in a gel state at higher concentrations. The effective cluster size is estimated as a function of the concentration, and a scaling-law behavior near the sol-gel transition is confirmed. This technique may serve as an alternative method for determining the gelation point. PMID:21929007

  16. Gel formation in a mixture of a block copolymer and a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazimullin, Maxim; Müller, Thomas; Messlinger, Stephan; Rehberg, Ingo; Schöpf, Wolfgang; Krekhov, Alexei; Pettau, Robin; Kreger, Klaus; Schmidt, Hans-Werner

    2011-08-01

    The viscoelastic properties of a binary mixture of a mesogenic side-chain block copolymer in a low molecular weight nematic liquid crystal are studied for mass concentrations ranging from the diluted regime up to a liquid crystalline gel state at about 3%. In the gel state, the system does not flow, exhibits a polydomain structure on a microscopic level, and strongly scatters light. Below the gelation point, the system is homogeneous and behaves like a usual nematic, so the continuum theory of liquid crystals can be applied for interpreting the experimental data. Using the dynamic Fréedericksz transition technique, the dependence of the splay elastic constant and the rotational viscosity on the polymer concentration have been obtained. Comparing the dynamic behavior of block copolymer solutions with the respective homopolymer solutions reveals that, above a mass concentration of 1%, self-assembling of the block copolymer chain segments in clusters occurred, resulting in a gel state at higher concentrations. The effective cluster size is estimated as a function of the concentration, and a scaling-law behavior near the sol-gel transition is confirmed. This technique may serve as an alternative method for determining the gelation point.

  17. Electrohydrodynamic Pattern Formation in Nematic Liquid Crystals by External Pure Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Jong-Hoon

    2010-12-01

    Pure noise-induced electrohydrodynamic convections (EHCs) in nematic liquid crystals are presented in comparison with ac field-induced ones. There exists a characteristic cutoff frequency fc* of noise dividing EHC patterns qualitatively. Sufficiently colored noise with fc < fc* can induce a variety of well-ordered patterns such as Williams domains, fluctuating Williams domains, and grid patterns. The amplitude of the primary pattern (Williams domains) and its wavelength are investigated with varying intensity VN and/or cutoff frequency fc of noise. The present noise-induced EHCs are discussed on the basis of the conventional (ac-based) Carr-Helfrich mechanism.

  18. Out-of-equilibrium processes in suspensions of oppositely charged colloids: liquid-to-crystal nucleation and gel formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, Eduardo; Valeriani, Chantal; Vissers, Teun; Fortini, Andrea; Leunissen, Mirjam E.; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Frenkel, Daan; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2008-12-01

    We study the kinetics of the liquid-to-crystal transformation and of gel formation in colloidal suspensions of oppositely charged particles. We analyse, by means of both computer simulations and experiments, the evolution of a fluid quenched to a state point of the phase diagram where the most stable state is either a homogeneous crystalline solid or a solid phase in contact with a dilute gas. On the one hand, at high temperatures and high packing fractions, close to a substitutionally-ordered/substitutionally-disordered solid-solid coexistence line, we find that the fluid-to-crystal pathway does not follow the minimum free energy route. On the other hand, a quench to a state point far from the substitutionally-ordered/substitutionally-disordered crystal coexistence border is followed by a fluid-to-solid transition through the minimum free energy pathway. At low temperatures and packing fractions we observe that the system undergoes a gas-liquid spinodal decomposition that, at some point, stops, giving rise to a gel-like structure. Both our simulations and experiments suggest that increasing the interaction range favours crystallization over vitrification in gel-like structures.

  19. Excitability in liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Coullet, P.; Frisch, T.; Gilli, J. M.; Rica, S.

    1994-09-01

    The spiral waves observed in a liquid crystal submitted to a vertical electric field and a horizontal rotating magnetic field are explained in the framework of a purely mechanical description of the liquid crystal. The originality of the experiment described in this paper is the presence of the vertical electric field which allows us to analyze the spiral waves in the framework of a weakly nonlinear theory. PMID:12780124

  20. Out-of-equilibrium processes in suspensions of oppositely charged colloids: liquid-to-crystal nucleation and gel formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, Eduardo

    2009-03-01

    We study the kinetics of the liquid-to-crystal transformation and of gel formation in colloidal suspensions of oppositely charged particles. We analyse, by means of both computer simulations and experiments, the evolution of a fluid quenched to a state point of the phase diagram where the most stable state is either a homogeneous crystalline solid or a solid phase in contact with a dilute gas. On the one hand, at high temperatures and high packing fractions, close to an ordered-solid/disordered-solid coexistence line, we find that the fluid-to-crystal pathway does not follow the minimum free energy route. On the other hand, a quench to a state point far from the ordered-crystal/disordered-crystal coexistence border is followed by a fluid-to-solid transition through the minimum free energy pathway. At low temperatures and packing fractions we observe that the system undergoes a gas-liquid spinodal decomposition that, at some point, arrests giving rise to a gel-like structure. Both our simulations and experiments suggest that increasing the interaction range favors crystallization over vitrification in gel-like structures. [4pt] In collaboration with Chantal Valeriani, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC Utrecht, The Netherlands and SUPA, School of Physics, University of Edinburgh, JCMB King's Buildings, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, UK; Teun Vissers, Andrea Fortini, Mirjam E. Leunissen, and Alfons van Blaaderen, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University; Daan Frenke, FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam, The Netherlands and Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, CB2 1EW, Cambridge, UK; and Marjolein Dijkstra, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University.

  1. Kinetics of co-crystal formation with caffeine and citric acid via liquid-assisted grinding analyzed using the distinct element method.

    PubMed

    Shimono, Keisuke; Kadota, Kazunori; Tozuka, Yuichi; Shimosaka, Atsuko; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki; Hidaka, Jusuke

    2015-08-30

    The kinetics of co-crystal formation of caffeine (CF) with citric acid (CTA) was evaluated. Ball milling of CF and CTA in molar ratios of 4:1, 3:1, 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, and 1:4 was performed by the liquid-assisted grinding (LAG) method. The samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Two types of co-crystals (co-crystal-1, a 1:1 CF-CTA co-crystal; and co-crystal-2, a new co-crystal form) were obtained. The kinetic characteristics of this new co-crystal formation were assessed by calculating the ball impact energy and force using the distinct element method (DEM) simulations. The results indicated that co-crystal-2 creation occurred under a condition in which the ball impact force exceeded a certain threshold value. Moreover, the total ball impact energy was positively correlated with co-crystal formation, exhibiting a higher ball impact force than the threshold value. The kinetics of co-crystal-2 formation was almost consistent with the Jander equation. Consequently, co-crystal-2 formation could be explained according to a three-dimensional diffusion mechanism. PMID:25998562

  2. Polymer Crystallization at Curved Liquid/Liquid Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenda

    Liquid/liquid interface, either flat or curved, is a unique template for studying self-assembly of a variety of nanomaterials such as nanoparticles and nanorods. The resultant monolayer films can be ordered or disordered depending on the regularity of the nanomaterials. Integration of nanoparticles into two-dimensional structure leads to intriguing collective properties of the nanoparticles. Crystallization can also be guided by liquid/liquid interface. Due to the particular shape of the interface, crystallization can happen in a different manner comparing to the normal solution crystallization. In this dissertation, liquid/liquid interface is employed to guide the crystallization of polymers, mainly focusing on using curved liquid/liquid interface. Due to the unique shape of the interface and feasibility to control the curvature, polymer crystallization can take place in different manner and lead to the formation of curved or vesicular crystals. Curved liquid/liquid interface is typically created through o/w emulsions. With the presence of surfactant, the emulsions are controlled to be stable at least for the polymer crystallization periods. The difference to normal solution crystallization is: the nuclei will diffuse to the curved interface due to the Pickering effect and guide the crystallization along the curved liquid/liquid interface. If the supercooling can be controlled to be very small, crystal growth in the bulk droplets can be avoided. The advantages of this strategy are: 1) the formation process of vesicular type crystals can be monitored by controlling the polymer supply; 2) curved crystals, bowl-like structures and enclosed capsules can be easily obtained comparing to the self-assembly method for vesicle formation; 3) the obtained vesicles will be made of polymer crystals, which will possess the extraordinary mechanical properties. Based on the nucleation type, this dissertation is divided into two parts. The first part is focused on the self

  3. Thermoelectricity in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Said, Suhana; Nordin, Abdul Rahman; Abdullah, Norbani; Balamurugan, S.

    2015-09-01

    The thermoelectric effect, also known as the Seebeck effect, describes the conversion of a temperature gradient into electricity. A Figure of Merit (ZT) is used to describe the thermoelectric ability of a material. It is directly dependent on its Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity, and inversely dependent on its thermal conductivity. There is usually a compromise between these parameters, which limit the performance of thermoelectric materials. The current achievement for ZT~2.2 falls short of the expected threshold of ZT=3 to allow its viability in commercial applications. In recent times, advances in organic thermoelectrics been significant, improving by over 3 orders of magnitude over a period of about 10 years. Liquid crystals are newly investigated as candidate thermoelectric materials, given their low thermal conductivity, inherent ordering, and in some cases, reasonable electrical conductivity. In this work the thermoelectric behaviour of a discotic liquid crystal, is discussed. The DLC was filled into cells coated with a charge injector, and an alignment of the columnar axis perpendicular to the substrate was allowed to form. This thermoelectric behavior can be correlated to the order-disorder transition. A reasonable thermoelectric power in the liquid crystal temperature regime was noted. In summary, thermoelectric liquid crystals may have the potential to be utilised in flexible devices, as a standalone power source.

  4. Crystal Formation in Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Bernardo S; Mangan, Matthew S; Latz, Eicke

    2016-05-20

    The formation and accumulation of crystalline material in tissues is a hallmark of many metabolic and inflammatory conditions. The discovery that the phase transition of physiologically soluble substances to their crystalline forms can be detected by the immune system and activate innate immune pathways has revolutionized our understanding of how crystals cause inflammation. It is now appreciated that crystals are part of the pathogenesis of numerous diseases, including gout, silicosis, asbestosis, and atherosclerosis. In this review we discuss current knowledge of the complex mechanisms of crystal formation in diseased tissues and their interplay with the nutrients, metabolites, and immune cells that account for crystal-induced inflammation. PMID:26772211

  5. Liquid crystal orientation control in photonic liquid crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chychlowski, M. S.; Nowinowski-Kruszelnicki, E.; Woliński, T. R.

    2011-05-01

    Similarly to liquid crystal displays technology in photonic liquid crystal fibers (PLCFs) a molecular orientation control is a crucial issue that influences proper operation of PLCF-based devices. The paper presents two distinct configurations: planar and radial escaped orientation of the LC molecules inside capillaries as well as methods of their application to photonic liquid crystal fibers. Possibilities of LC orientation control influence both: attenuation and transmitting spectra of the PLCF The orienting method is based on creation of an additional orienting layer on the inner surface of the capillary or air hole of the photonic liquid crystal fiber. Aligning materials used in the experiment are commercially available polyimides SE1211 and SE130 which induce liquid crystal homeotropic and planar anchoring conditions. The orienting layer increase an order parameter of the liquid crystal improving propagation properties and stability of photonic liquid crystal fiber-based devices.

  6. Nematic liquid crystal bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, Susannah; Ellis, Perry; Vallamkondu, Jayalakshmi; Danemiller, Edward; Vernon, Mark; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    We study the effects of confining a nematic liquid crystal between two parallel glass plates with homeotropic boundary conditions for the director at all bounding surfaces. We find that the free surface of the nematic bridge is a surface of constant mean curvature. In addition, by changing the distance between the plates and the contact angle with the glass plates, we transition between loops and hedgehogs that can be either radial or hyperbolic.

  7. Living liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shuang; Sokolov, Andrey; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Aranson, Igor S.

    2014-01-01

    Collective motion of self-propelled organisms or synthetic particles, often termed “active fluid,” has attracted enormous attention in the broad scientific community because of its fundamentally nonequilibrium nature. Energy input and interactions among the moving units and the medium lead to complex dynamics. Here, we introduce a class of active matter––living liquid crystals (LLCs)––that combines living swimming bacteria with a lyotropic liquid crystal. The physical properties of LLCs can be controlled by the amount of oxygen available to bacteria, by concentration of ingredients, or by temperature. Our studies reveal a wealth of intriguing dynamic phenomena, caused by the coupling between the activity-triggered flow and long-range orientational order of the medium. Among these are (i) nonlinear trajectories of bacterial motion guided by nonuniform director, (ii) local melting of the liquid crystal caused by the bacteria-produced shear flows, (iii) activity-triggered transition from a nonflowing uniform state into a flowing one-dimensional periodic pattern and its evolution into a turbulent array of topological defects, and (iv) birefringence-enabled visualization of microflow generated by the nanometers-thick bacterial flagella. Unlike their isotropic counterpart, the LLCs show collective dynamic effects at very low volume fraction of bacteria, on the order of 0.2%. Our work suggests an unorthodox design concept to control and manipulate the dynamic behavior of soft active matter and opens the door for potential biosensing and biomedical applications. PMID:24474746

  8. Living liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuang; Sokolov, Andrey; Lavrentovich, Oleg D; Aranson, Igor S

    2014-01-28

    Collective motion of self-propelled organisms or synthetic particles, often termed "active fluid," has attracted enormous attention in the broad scientific community because of its fundamentally nonequilibrium nature. Energy input and interactions among the moving units and the medium lead to complex dynamics. Here, we introduce a class of active matter--living liquid crystals (LLCs)--that combines living swimming bacteria with a lyotropic liquid crystal. The physical properties of LLCs can be controlled by the amount of oxygen available to bacteria, by concentration of ingredients, or by temperature. Our studies reveal a wealth of intriguing dynamic phenomena, caused by the coupling between the activity-triggered flow and long-range orientational order of the medium. Among these are (i) nonlinear trajectories of bacterial motion guided by nonuniform director, (ii) local melting of the liquid crystal caused by the bacteria-produced shear flows, (iii) activity-triggered transition from a nonflowing uniform state into a flowing one-dimensional periodic pattern and its evolution into a turbulent array of topological defects, and (iv) birefringence-enabled visualization of microflow generated by the nanometers-thick bacterial flagella. Unlike their isotropic counterpart, the LLCs show collective dynamic effects at very low volume fraction of bacteria, on the order of 0.2%. Our work suggests an unorthodox design concept to control and manipulate the dynamic behavior of soft active matter and opens the door for potential biosensing and biomedical applications. PMID:24474746

  9. Dynamic pattern formation of liquid crystals using binary self-assembled monolayers on an ITO surface under DC voltage.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takao; Oyama, Makiko; Terada, Kei-ichi; Haga, Masa-aki

    2014-12-01

    There have been numerous studies of liquid crystal (LC) convection using sandwich-type LC cells under AC voltage. In contrast to previous LC convection studies under AC voltage, we propose the use of a binary self-assembled monolayer (SAM) with a redox-active Ru complex and insulating octadecyl phosphonic acid (C18) molecules on an indium tin oxide (ITO) surface as the electrode of sandwich-type LC cells under DC bias voltage. This is because the functionalized molecules immobilized on the ITO surface are expected to control the LC orientation and electrical conduction of LC cells, under an exact DC bias voltage. We successfully achieved LC pattern formation using ITO electrodes with binary SAMs in LC cells. Moreover, we confirmed that the LC pattern size was increased by increasing the coverage of the Ru complex in binary SAMs. We consider that a combination of three factors, electrical conduction change, controlling of LC orientation in the initial stage and redox-activity of the Ru-complex, is the reason for LC convection although we cannot fully explain the distribution of these three factors. We believe that our LC pattern formation is promising for new type devices e.g., artificial compound eyes using the LC device technology. PMID:25327940

  10. Liquid Crystals in Tribology

    PubMed Central

    Carrión, Francisco-José; Martínez-Nicolás, Ginés; Iglesias, Patricia; Sanes, José; Bermúdez, María-Dolores

    2009-01-01

    Two decades ago, the literature dealing with the possible applications of low molar mass liquid crystals, also called monomer liquid crystals (MLCs), only included about 50 references. Today, thousands of papers, conference reports, books or book chapters and patents refer to the study and applications of MLCs as lubricants and lubricant additives and efforts are made to develop new commercial applications. The development of more efficient lubricants is of paramount technological and economic relevance as it is estimated that half the energy consumption is dissipated as friction. MLCs have shown their ability to form ordered boundary layers with good load-carrying capacity and to lower the friction coefficients, wear rates and contact temperature of sliding surfaces, thus contributing to increase the components service life and to save energy. This review includes the use of MLCs in lubrication, and dispersions of MLCs in conventional polymers (PDMLCs). Finally, new lubricating system composed of MLC blends with surfactants, ionic liquids or nanophases are considered. PMID:19865534

  11. Chemical and biological sensing using liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Carlton, Rebecca J.; Hunter, Jacob T.; Miller, Daniel S.; Abbasi, Reza; Mushenheim, Peter C.; Tan, Lie Na; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2014-01-01

    The liquid crystalline state of matter arises from orientation-dependent, non-covalent interaction between molecules within condensed phases. Because the balance of intermolecular forces that underlies formation of liquid crystals is delicate, this state of matter can, in general, be easily perturbed by external stimuli (such as an electric field in a display). In this review, we present an overview of recent efforts that have focused on exploiting the responsiveness of liquid crystals as the basis of chemical and biological sensors. In this application of liquid crystals, the challenge is to design liquid crystalline systems that undergo changes in organization when perturbed by targeted chemical and biological species of interest. The approaches described below revolve around the design of interfaces that selectively bind targeted species, thus leading to surface-driven changes in the organization of the liquid crystals. Because liquid crystals possess anisotropic optical and dielectric properties, a range of different methods can be used to read out the changes in organization of liquid crystals that are caused by targeted chemical and biological species. This review focuses on principles for liquid crystal-based sensors that provide an optical output. PMID:24795857

  12. Optical trapping in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoni, F.; Lucchetti, L.; Criante, L.; Bracalente, F.; Aieta, F.

    2010-08-01

    Optical trapping and manipulation of micrometric silica particles dispersed in a nematic liquid crystal is reported. Several kind of samples are considered: homeotropic and planar undoped cells and homeotropic and planar cells doped by a small amount of the azo-dye Methyl-Red. The incident light intensity is over the threshold for optical reorientation of the molecular director. The refractive index of the dispersed particles is lower than the ones of the liquid crystal therefore the usual conditions for laser trapping and manipulation are not fulfilled. Nevertheless optical trapping is possible and is closely related to the optical nonlinearity of the hosting liquid crystal1. Trapping in doped and undoped cells are compared and it is shown that in the first case intensity lower by more than one order of magnitude is required as compared to the one needed in undoped samples. The effect is faster and the structural forces are of longer range. The formation of bubble-gum like defects in doped samples under certain experimental conditions is also reported and discussed.

  13. Formation of the smectic-B crystal from a simple monatomic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metere, A.; Oppelstrup, T.; Sarman, S.; Laaksonen, A.; Dzugutov, M.

    2013-12-01

    We report a molecular dynamics simulation demonstrating that the smectic-B crystalline phase (Cry-B), commonly observed in mesogenic systems of anisotropic molecules, can be formed by a system of identical particles interacting via a spherically symmetric potential. The Cry-B phase forms as a result of a first-order transition from an isotropic liquid phase upon isochoric cooling at appropriate number density. Its structure, determined by the design of the pair potential, corresponds to the Cry-B structure formed by elongated particles with the aspect ratio 1.8. The diffraction pattern and the real-space structure inspection demonstrate dominance of the ABC-type of axial layer stacking. This result opens a general possibility of producing smectic phases using isotropic interparticle interaction both in simulations and in colloidal systems.

  14. Advancements of vertically aligned liquid crystal displays.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pankaj; Jaggi, Chinky; Sharma, Vandna; Raina, Kuldeep Kumar

    2016-02-01

    This review describes the recent advancements in the field of the vertical aligned (VA) liquid crystal displays. The process and formation of different vertical alignment modes such as conventional VA, patterned VA, multi-domain VA, and polymer stabilised VA etc are widely discussed. Vertical alignment of liquid crystal due to nano particle dispersion in LC host, bifunctional PR-SAM formed by silane coupling reaction to oxide surfaces, azo dye etc., are also highlighted and discussed. Overall, the article highlights the advances in the research of vertical aligned liquid crystal in terms of their scientific and technological aspects. PMID:26800482

  15. Ferroelectric domain formation in discotic liquid crystals: Monte Carlo study on the influence of boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Bose, Tushar Kanti; Saha, Jayashree

    2015-10-01

    The realization of a spontaneous macroscopic ferroelectric order in fluids of anisotropic mesogens is a topic of both fundamental and technological interest. Recently we demonstrated that a system of dipolar achiral disklike ellipsoids can exhibit long-searched ferroelectric liquid crystalline phases of dipolar origin. In the present work, extensive off-lattice Monte Carlo simulations are used to investigate the phase behavior of the system under the influences of the electrostatic boundary conditions that restrict any global polarization. We find that the system develops strongly ferroelectric slablike domains periodically arranged in an antiferroelectric fashion. Exploring the phase behavior at different dipole strengths, we find existence of the ferroelectric nematic and ferroelectric columnar order inside the domains. For higher dipole strengths, a biaxial phase is also obtained with a similar periodic array of ferroelectric slabs of antiparallel polarizations. We have studied the depolarizing effects by using both the Ewald summation and the spherical cutoff techniques. We present and compare the results of the two different approaches of considering the depolarizing effects in this anisotropic system. It is explicitly shown that the domain size increases with the system size as a result of considering a longer range of dipolar interactions. The system exhibits pronounced system size effects for stronger dipolar interactions. The results provide strong evidence to the novel understanding that the dipolar interactions are indeed sufficient to produce long-range ferroelectric order in anisotropic fluids. PMID:26565261

  16. Optical vortex arrays from smectic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Son, Baeksik; Kim, Sejeong; Kim, Yun Ho; Käläntär, K; Kim, Hwi-Min; Jeong, Hyeon-Su; Choi, Siyoung Q; Shin, Jonghwa; Jung, Hee-Tae; Lee, Yong-Hee

    2014-02-24

    We demonstrate large-area, closely-packed optical vortex arrays using self-assembled defects in smectic liquid crystals. Self-assembled smectic liquid crystals in a three-dimensional torus structure are called focal conic domains. Each FCD, having a micro-scale feature size, produces an optical vortex with consistent topological charge of 2. The spiral profile in the interferometry confirms the formation of an optical vortex, which is predicted by Jones matrix calculations. PMID:24663788

  17. Vacuum filtration based formation of liquid crystal films of semiconducting carbon nanotubes and high performance transistor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Benjamin; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we report ultra-thin liquid crystal films of semiconducting carbon nanotubes using a simple vacuum filtration process. Vacuum filtration of nanotubes in aqueous surfactant solution formed nematic domains on the filter membrane surface and exhibited local ordering. A 2D fast Fourier transform was used to calculate the order parameters from scanning electron microscopy images. The order parameter was observed to be sensitive to the filtration time demonstrating different regions of transformation namely nucleation of nematic domains, nanotube accumulation and large domain growth.Transmittance versus sheet resistance measurements of such films resulted in optical to dc conductivity of σ opt/σ dc = 9.01 indicative of purely semiconducting nanotube liquid crystal network.Thin films of nanotube liquid crystals with order parameters ranging from S = 0.1-0.5 were patterned into conducting channels of transistor devices which showed high I on/I off ratios from 10-19 800 and electron mobility values μ e = 0.3-78.8 cm2 (V-s)-1, hole mobility values μ h = 0.4-287 cm2 (V-s)-1. High I on/I off ratios were observed at low order parameters and film mass. A Schottky barrier transistor model is consistent with the observed transistor characteristics. Electron and hole mobilities were seen to increase with order parameters and carbon nanotube mass fractions. A fundamental tradeoff between decreasing on/off ratio and increasing mobility with increasing nanotube film mass and order parameter is therefore concluded. Increase in order parameters of nanotubes liquid crystals improved the electronic transport properties as witnessed by the increase in σ dc/σ opt values on macroscopic films and high mobilities in microscopic transistors. Liquid crystal networks of semiconducting nanotubes as demonstrated here are simple to fabricate, transparent, scalable and could find wide ranging device applications.

  18. Wetting of cholesteric liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Nuno M; Figueirinhas Pereira, Maria Carolina; Bernardino, Nelson R; Telo da Gama, Margarida M

    2016-02-01

    We investigate theoretically the wetting properties of cholesteric liquid crystals at a planar substrate. If the properties of substrate and of the interface are such that the cholesteric layers are not distorted, the wetting properties are similar to those of a nematic liquid crystal. If, on the other hand, the anchoring conditions force the distortion of the liquid crystal layers the wetting properties are altered, the free cholesteric-isotropic interface is non-planar and there is a layer of topological defects close to the substrate. These deformations can either promote or hinder the wetting of the substrate by a cholesteric, depending on the properties of the cholesteric liquid crystal. PMID:26920516

  19. Voxelated liquid crystal elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Taylor H.; McConney, Michael E.; Wie, Jeong Jae; Tondiglia, Vincent P.; White, Timothy J.

    2015-02-01

    Dynamic control of shape can bring multifunctionality to devices. Soft materials capable of programmable shape change require localized control of the magnitude and directionality of a mechanical response. We report the preparation of soft, ordered materials referred to as liquid crystal elastomers. The direction of molecular order, known as the director, is written within local volume elements (voxels) as small as 0.0005 cubic millimeters. Locally, the director controls the inherent mechanical response (55% strain) within the material. In monoliths with spatially patterned director, thermal or chemical stimuli transform flat sheets into three-dimensional objects through controlled bending and stretching. The programmable mechanical response of these materials could yield monolithic multifunctional devices or serve as reconfigurable substrates for flexible devices in aerospace, medicine, or consumer goods.

  20. Two distinct crystallization processes in supercooled liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tane, Masakazu; Kimizuka, Hajime; Ichitsubo, Tetsu

    2016-05-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations we show that two distinct crystallization processes, depending on the temperature at which crystallization occurs, appear in a supercooled liquid. As a model for glass-forming materials, an Al2O3 model system, in which both the glass transition and crystallization from the supercooled liquid can be well reproduced, is employed. Simulations in the framework of an isothermal-isobaric ensemble indicate that the calculated time-temperature-transformation curve for the crystallization to γ(defect spinel)-Al2O3 exhibited a typical nose shape, as experimentally observed in various glass materials. During annealing above the nose temperature, the structure of the supercooled liquid does not change before the crystallization, because of the high atomic mobility (material transport). Thus, the crystallization is governed by the abrupt crystal nucleation, which results in the formation of a stable crystal structure. In contrast, during annealing below the nose temperature, the structure of the supercooled liquid gradually changes before the crystallization, and the formed crystal structure is less stable than that formed above the nose temperature, because of the restricted material transport.

  1. Two distinct crystallization processes in supercooled liquid.

    PubMed

    Tane, Masakazu; Kimizuka, Hajime; Ichitsubo, Tetsu

    2016-05-21

    Using molecular dynamics simulations we show that two distinct crystallization processes, depending on the temperature at which crystallization occurs, appear in a supercooled liquid. As a model for glass-forming materials, an Al2O3 model system, in which both the glass transition and crystallization from the supercooled liquid can be well reproduced, is employed. Simulations in the framework of an isothermal-isobaric ensemble indicate that the calculated time-temperature-transformation curve for the crystallization to γ(defect spinel)-Al2O3 exhibited a typical nose shape, as experimentally observed in various glass materials. During annealing above the nose temperature, the structure of the supercooled liquid does not change before the crystallization, because of the high atomic mobility (material transport). Thus, the crystallization is governed by the abrupt crystal nucleation, which results in the formation of a stable crystal structure. In contrast, during annealing below the nose temperature, the structure of the supercooled liquid gradually changes before the crystallization, and the formed crystal structure is less stable than that formed above the nose temperature, because of the restricted material transport. PMID:27208956

  2. Formation of liquid crystal multi-domains with different threshold voltages by varying the surface anchoring energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Jin, Huillian; Kim, Jung-Wook; Kim, Ki-Han; Park, Byung Wok; Yoon, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Hoon; Shin, Ki-Chul; Kim, Hee Seop

    2012-09-01

    We propose methods to obtain multi-domains with different threshold voltages for vertically aligned liquid crystal displays without additional transistors or capacitors. We exposed an ultraviolet light through a photomask and spatially varied the surface anchoring energy by partially decomposing the polyimide or inducing the adsorption of reactive monomers. The threshold voltage was reduced with smaller surface anchoring, and the reduction of the threshold could be qualitatively interpreted using a model describing a weak anchoring condition.

  3. Modeling liquid crystal polymeric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez Pinto, Vianney Karina

    The main focus of this work is the theoretical and numerical study of materials that combine liquid crystal and polymer. Liquid crystal elastomers are polymeric materials that exhibit both the ordered properties of the liquid crystals and the elastic properties of rubbers. Changing the order of the liquid crystal molecules within the polymer network can induce shape change. These materials are very valuable for applications such as actuators, sensors, artificial muscles, haptic displays, etc. In this work we apply finite element elastodynamics simulations to study the temperature induced shape deformation in nematic elastomers with complex director microstructure. In another topic, we propose a novel numerical method to model the director dynamics and microstructural evolution of three dimensional nematic and cholesteric liquid crystals. Numerical studies presented in this work are in agreement with experimental observations and provide insight into the design of application devices.

  4. Liquid crystal filled diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jepsen, Mary Lou

    1997-12-01

    Liquid crystal technology is becoming increasingly important for flat displays in electronics, computers and TV. Most liquid crystal displays currently made have as their basic unit, two flat surfaces each coated with a transparent, conductive layer, between which a thin layer of liquid crystals is sandwiched. The work detailed in this dissertation is based on a modification of the basic liquid crystal unit and studies the properties of structures which consist of certain anisotropic liquid crystals confined between a flat substrate and a corrugated one, each substrate being transparent and having a thin trans-parent conductive coating. Without an applied electric field, the refractive indices of the liquid crystal and corrugated substrate do not match, and thus strong diffraction occurs. When an electric field is applied to the device, the liquid crystals are re-oriented so that the refractive indices now match, and the device behaves as a uniform slab of homogeneous material producing no diffraction. Rigorous coupled wave analysis was developed to design the ideal devices and analyze the performance of our experimental ones. 99% diffraction efficiencies in single wavelength polarized illumination are shown to be possible with this class of devices. The best device we fabricated showed a 62% distraction efficiency, as our fabrication process roughened the top surface of the device so that (≃30%) of the incident light was lost to scatter. Several new fabrication processes are proposed to eliminate this scatter problem, and that details of fabrication processes thus far attempted are outlined.

  5. Pressure sensor using liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, Devendra S. (Inventor); Holmes, Harlan K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A pressure sensor includes a liquid crystal positioned between transparent, electrically conductive films (18 and 20), that are biased by a voltage (V) which induces an electric field (E) that causes the liquid crystal to assume a first state of orientation. Application of pressure (P) to a flexible, transparent film (24) causes the conductive film (20) to move closer to or farther from the conductive film (18), thereby causing a change in the electric field (E'(P)) which causes the liquid crystal to assume a second state of orientation. Polarized light (P.sub.1) is directed into the liquid crystal and transmitted or reflected to an analyzer (A or 30). Changes in the state of orientation of the liquid crystal induced by applied pressure (P) result in a different light intensity being detected at the analyzer (A or 30) as a function of the applied pressure (P). In particular embodiments, the liquid crystal is present as droplets (10) in a polymer matrix (12) or in cells (14) in a polymeric or dielectric grid (16) material in the form of a layer (13) between the electrically conductive films (18 and 20). The liquid crystal fills the open wells in the polymer matrix (12) or grid (16) only partially.

  6. Liquid encapsulated crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Low-defect crystals are grown in a closed ampoule under a layer of encapsulant. After crystal growth, the crystal is separated from the melt and moved into the layer of encapsulant and cooled to a first temperature at which crystal growth stops. The crystal is then moved into the inert gas ambient in the ampoule and further cooled. The crystal can be separated from the melt by decanting the melt into an adjacent reservoir or by rotating the ampoule to rotate the crystal into the encapsulant layer.

  7. Liquid encapsulated crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Low-defect crystals are grown in a closed ampoule under a layer of encapsulant. After crystal growth, the crystal is separated from the melt and moved into the layer of encapsulant and cooled to a first temperature at which crystal growth stops. The crystal is then moved into the inert gas ambient in the ampoule and further cooled. The crystal can be separated from the melt by decanting the melt into and adjacent reservoir or by rotating the ampoule to rotate the crystal into the encapsulant layer.

  8. Magnetoactive Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Moritz; Kaiser, Andreas; Krause, Simon; Finkelmann, Heino; Schmidt, Annette

    2008-03-01

    Liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) offer an interesting spectrum of properties, including temperature induced, fully reversible shape changes connected with considerable development of pulling force, and synthetic diversity. In order to take advantage of LCEs for an extended number of viable devices, it is desirable to trigger such shape changes with electromagnetic fields rather than temperature changes. Magnetoactive LCEs are accessible by the incorporation of superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles into oriented nematic side-chain LCEs and offer a contactless activation pathway to activate the nematic-to-isotrope transition by local magnetic heating in external fields due to relaxational processes. In magnetomechanical measurements at 300 kHz and 43 kA.m-1, a sample contraction of up to 30 % is observed under field influence, that is fully released when the field is switched off. The load evolved reaches 60 kPa and more. The materials' ability to respond to a contactless electromagnetic stimulus with a well-defined contraction can be of use for various actuator applications.

  9. Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows

    SciTech Connect

    Taheri, Bahman; Bodnar, Volodymyr

    2011-12-31

    Energy consumption by private and commercial sectors in the U.S. has steadily grown over the last decade. The uncertainty in future availability of imported oil, on which the energy consumption relies strongly, resulted in a dramatic increase in the cost of energy. About 20% of this consumption are used to heat and cool houses and commercial buildings. To reduce dependence on the foreign oil and cut down emission of greenhouse gases, it is necessary to eliminate losses and reduce total energy consumption by buildings. To achieve this goal it is necessary to redefine the role of the conventional windows. At a minimum, windows should stop being a source for energy loss. Ideally, windows should become a source of energy, providing net gain to reduce energy used to heat and cool homes. It is possible to have a net energy gain from a window if its light transmission can be dynamically altered, ideally electronically without the need of operator assistance, providing optimal control of the solar gain that varies with season and climate in the U.S. In addition, the window must not require power from the building for operation. Resolution of this problem is a societal challenge and of national interest and will have a broad global impact. For this purpose, the year-round, allclimate window solution to provide an electronically variable solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) with a wide dynamic range is needed. AlphaMicron, Inc. (AMI) developed and manufactured 1ft × 1ft prototype panels for the world’s first auto-adjusting Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows (ALCWs) that can operate from sunlight without the need for external power source and demonstrate an electronically adjustable SHGC. This novel windows are based on AlphaMicron’s patented e-Tint® technology, a guesthost liquid crystal system implemented on flexible, optically clear plastic films. This technology is suitable both for OEM and aftermarket (retro-fitting) lamination to new and existing windows. Low level of

  10. Thermotropic liquid crystals from biomacromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kai; Chen, Dong; Marcozzi, Alessio; Zheng, Lifei; Su, Juanjuan; Pesce, Diego; Zajaczkowski, Wojciech; Kolbe, Anke; Pisula, Wojciech; Müllen, Klaus; Clark, Noel A.; Herrmann, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Complexation of biomacromolecules (e.g., nucleic acids, proteins, or viruses) with surfactants containing flexible alkyl tails, followed by dehydration, is shown to be a simple generic method for the production of thermotropic liquid crystals. The anhydrous smectic phases that result exhibit biomacromolecular sublayers intercalated between aliphatic hydrocarbon sublayers at or near room temperature. Both this and low transition temperatures to other phases enable the study and application of thermotropic liquid crystal phase behavior without thermal degradation of the biomolecular components. PMID:25512508

  11. Self-Assembly and Formation of Chromonic Liquid Crystals from the Dyes Quinaldine Red Acetate and Pyronin Y.

    PubMed

    Magana, J R; Homs, M; Solans, C; Obiols-Rabasa, M; Salonen, L M; Rodríguez-Abreu, C

    2016-01-14

    The aqueous self-assembly behavior of the dyes Quinaldine red acetate and Pyronin Y in a wide range of concentrations is reported here for the first time. (1)H NMR spectroscopy, polarized-light optical microscopy, and small and wide X-ray scattering were used to get insight into molecular interactions, phase boundaries and aggregate structure. Quinaldine red acetate and Pyronin Y self-organize into unimolecular stacks driven by attractive aromatic interactions. At high concentrations, spatial correlation among the molecular stacks gives rise to nematic liquid crystals in both systems. Quinaldine red acetate additionally produces a rare chromonic O phase built of columnar aggregates with anisotropic cross-section ordered in a rectangular lattice. The O phase changes into a columnar lamellar structure as a result of a temperature-induced phase transition. Results open the possibility of finding chromonic liquid crystals in other commercially available dyes with a similar molecular structure. This would eventually expand the availability of these unique soft materials and thus introduce new applications for marketed dyes. PMID:26700729

  12. Spontaneous helix formation in non-chiral bent-core liquid crystals with fast linear electro-optic effect

    PubMed Central

    Sreenilayam, Sithara P.; Panarin, Yuri P.; Vij, Jagdish K.; Panov, Vitaly P.; Lehmann, Anne; Poppe, Marco; Prehm, Marko; Tschierske, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs) represent one of the foundations of modern communication and photonic technologies. Present display technologies are based mainly on nematic LCs, which suffer from limited response time for use in active colour sequential displays and limited image grey scale. Herein we report the first observation of a spontaneously formed helix in a polar tilted smectic LC phase (SmC phase) of achiral bent-core (BC) molecules with the axis of helix lying parallel to the layer normal and a pitch much shorter than the optical wavelength. This new phase shows fast (∼30 μs) grey-scale switching due to the deformation of the helix by the electric field. Even more importantly, defect-free alignment is easily achieved for the first time for a BC mesogen, thus providing potential use in large-scale devices with fast linear and thresholdless electro-optical response. PMID:27156514

  13. Spontaneous helix formation in non-chiral bent-core liquid crystals with fast linear electro-optic effect.

    PubMed

    Sreenilayam, Sithara P; Panarin, Yuri P; Vij, Jagdish K; Panov, Vitaly P; Lehmann, Anne; Poppe, Marco; Prehm, Marko; Tschierske, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs) represent one of the foundations of modern communication and photonic technologies. Present display technologies are based mainly on nematic LCs, which suffer from limited response time for use in active colour sequential displays and limited image grey scale. Herein we report the first observation of a spontaneously formed helix in a polar tilted smectic LC phase (SmC phase) of achiral bent-core (BC) molecules with the axis of helix lying parallel to the layer normal and a pitch much shorter than the optical wavelength. This new phase shows fast (∼30 μs) grey-scale switching due to the deformation of the helix by the electric field. Even more importantly, defect-free alignment is easily achieved for the first time for a BC mesogen, thus providing potential use in large-scale devices with fast linear and thresholdless electro-optical response. PMID:27156514

  14. Spontaneous helix formation in non-chiral bent-core liquid crystals with fast linear electro-optic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenilayam, Sithara P.; Panarin, Yuri P.; Vij, Jagdish K.; Panov, Vitaly P.; Lehmann, Anne; Poppe, Marco; Prehm, Marko; Tschierske, Carsten

    2016-05-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs) represent one of the foundations of modern communication and photonic technologies. Present display technologies are based mainly on nematic LCs, which suffer from limited response time for use in active colour sequential displays and limited image grey scale. Herein we report the first observation of a spontaneously formed helix in a polar tilted smectic LC phase (SmC phase) of achiral bent-core (BC) molecules with the axis of helix lying parallel to the layer normal and a pitch much shorter than the optical wavelength. This new phase shows fast (~30 μs) grey-scale switching due to the deformation of the helix by the electric field. Even more importantly, defect-free alignment is easily achieved for the first time for a BC mesogen, thus providing potential use in large-scale devices with fast linear and thresholdless electro-optical response.

  15. Randomized Grain Boundary Liquid Crystal Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Wang, H.; Li, M.; Glaser, M.; Maclennan, J.; Clark, N.

    2012-02-01

    The formation of macroscopic, chiral domains, in the B4 and dark conglomerate phases, for example, is a feature of bent-core liquid crystals resulting from the interplay of chirality, molecular bend and molecular tilt. We report a new, chiral phase observed in a hockey stick-like liquid crystal molecule. This phase appears below a smectic A phase and cools to a crystal phase. TEM images of the free surface of the chiral phase show hundreds of randomly oriented smectic blocks several hundred nanometers in size, similar to those seen in the twist grain boundary (TGB) phase. However, in contrast to the TGB phase, these blocks are randomly oriented. The characteristic defects in this phase are revealed by freeze-fracture TEM images. We will show how these defects mediate the randomized orientation and discuss the intrinsic mechanism driving the formation of this phase. This work is supported by NSF MRSEC Grant DMR0820579 and NSF Grant DMR0606528.

  16. Deformations in chiral liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibaev, Petr; Reddy, Kathryn; Bateman, Daniel; Iljin, Andrey

    2014-03-01

    Deformations and their relaxation in chiral liquid crystals are studied experimentally and theoretically in planar geometry for liquid crystalline mixtures of varying viscosities. It is shown by both methods that shear deformation in liquid crystals results in the inclination and extension of cholesteric helix in samples with high viscosity. Stretching deformation results in shrinking cholesteric helix. This leads to a possibility of detecting deformations on a nanometer scale by observing changes in selective reflection spectra. Theoretical model takes into account elastic strain of physical network formed by the entanglements between components of liquid crystalline mixture, viscosity of the matrix and elasticity of the liquid crystalline subsystem. This allows to model mechanical response of the matrix with different viscosities to stretching and shear of various amplitudes. It is shown that relaxation of the cholesteric helix takes much shorter time than mechanical relaxation of the mixtures. The model perfectly agrees with experimental data. The model is compared with theoretical model describing behavior of elastomers.

  17. Liquid crystal nanodroplets in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. Michael; Petersen, Matt K.; Plimpton, Steven J.; Grest, Gary S.

    2009-01-01

    The aggregation of liquid crystal nanodroplets from a homogeneous solution is studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The liquid crystal particles are modeled as elongated ellipsoidal Gay-Berne particles while the solvent is modeled as spherical Lennard-Jones particles. Extending previous studies of Berardi et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 044905 (2007)], we find that liquid crystal nanodroplets are not stable and that after sufficiently long times the nanodroplets always aggregate into a single large droplet. Results describing the droplet shape and orientation for different temperatures and shear rates are presented. The implementation of the Gay-Berne potential for biaxial ellipsoidal particles in a parallel molecular dynamics code is also briefly discussed.

  18. Liquid crystal nanodroplets in solution.

    PubMed

    Brown, W Michael; Petersen, Matt K; Plimpton, Steven J; Grest, Gary S

    2009-01-28

    The aggregation of liquid crystal nanodroplets from a homogeneous solution is studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The liquid crystal particles are modeled as elongated ellipsoidal Gay-Berne particles while the solvent is modeled as spherical Lennard-Jones particles. Extending previous studies of Berardi et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 044905 (2007)], we find that liquid crystal nanodroplets are not stable and that after sufficiently long times the nanodroplets always aggregate into a single large droplet. Results describing the droplet shape and orientation for different temperatures and shear rates are presented. The implementation of the Gay-Berne potential for biaxial ellipsoidal particles in a parallel molecular dynamics code is also briefly discussed. PMID:19191407

  19. Liquid crystal assisted optical fibres.

    PubMed

    Wahle, M; Kitzerow, H-S

    2014-01-13

    Microstructured fibres which consist of a circular step index core and a liquid crystal inclusion running parallel to this core are investigated. The attenuation and electro-optic effects of light coupled into the core are measured. Coupled mode theory is used to study the interaction of core modes with the liquid crystal inclusion. The experimental and theoretical results show that these fibres can exhibit attenuation below 0.16 dB cm(-1) in off-resonant wavelength regions and still have significant electro-optic effects which can lead to a polarisation extinction of 6 dB cm(-1). PMID:24514987

  20. A liquid crystal adaptive lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowel, S. T.; Cleverly, D.

    1981-01-01

    Creation of an electronically controlled liquid crystal lens for use as a focusing mechanism in a multi-element lens system or as an adaptive optical element is analyzed. Varying the index of refraction is shown to be equivalent to the shaping of a solid refracting material. Basic characteristics of liquid crystals, essential for the creation of a lens, are reviewed. The required variation of index of refraction is provided by choosing appropriate electrode voltages. The configuration required for any incoming polarization is given and its theoretical performance in terms of modulation transfer function derived.

  1. Ionic Liquid Crystals: Versatile Materials.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Karel; Lava, Kathleen; Bielawski, Christopher W; Binnemans, Koen

    2016-04-27

    This Review covers the recent developments (2005-2015) in the design, synthesis, characterization, and application of thermotropic ionic liquid crystals. It was designed to give a comprehensive overview of the "state-of-the-art" in the field. The discussion is focused on low molar mass and dendrimeric thermotropic ionic mesogens, as well as selected metal-containing compounds (metallomesogens), but some references to polymeric and/or lyotropic ionic liquid crystals and particularly to ionic liquids will also be provided. Although zwitterionic and mesoionic mesogens are also treated to some extent, emphasis will be directed toward liquid-crystalline materials consisting of organic cations and organic/inorganic anions that are not covalently bound but interact via electrostatic and other noncovalent interactions. PMID:27088310

  2. Fast response liquid crystal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yung-Hsun

    Liquid crystal (LC) has been widely used for displays, spatial light modulators, variable optical attenuators (VOAs) and other tunable photonic devices. The response time of these devices is mainly determined by the employed liquid crystal material. The response time of a LC device depends on the visco-elastic coefficient (gamma1/K11), LC cell gap (d), and applied voltage. Hence, low visco-elastic coefficient LC materials and thinner cell gap are favorable for reducing the response time. However, low visco-elastic coefficient LCs are usually associated with a low birefringence because of shorter molecular conjugation. For display applications, such as LCD TVs, low birefringence (Deltan<0.1) LCs are commonly used. However, for optical communications at 1550 nm, low birefringence requires to a thick cell gap which, in turn, increases the response time. How to obtain fast response for the LC devices is a fundamentally important and technically challenging task. In this dissertation, we investigate several methods to improve liquid crystal response time, for examples, using dual-frequency liquid crystals, polymer stabilized liquid crystals, and sheared polymer network liquid crystals. We discover a new class of material, denoted as sheared polymer network liquid crystal (SPNLC) which exhibits a submillisecond response time. Moreover, this response time is insensitive to the LC cell gap. This is the first LC device exhibiting such an interesting property. Chapters 1 and 2 describe the motivation and background of this dissertation. From chapter 3 to chapter 6, dual-frequency liquid crystals and polymer network methods are demonstrated as examples for the variable optical attenuators. Variable optical attenuator (VOA) is a key component in optical communications. Especially, the sheared PNLC VOA shows the best result; its dynamic range reaches 43 dB while the response time is in the submillisecond range at 1550 nm wavelength, which is 50 times faster than the commercial

  3. Tactoids of chiral liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacio-Betancur, Viviana; Villada-Gil, Stiven; Zhou, Ye; Armas-Pérez, Julio C.; de Pablo, Juan José; Hernández-Ortiz, Juan Pablo

    The phase diagram of chiral liquid crystals confined in ellipsoids is obtained, by following a theoretically informed Monte Carlo relaxation of the tensor alignment field Q. The free energy of the system is described by a functional in the framework of the Landau-de Gennes formalism. This study also includes the effect of anchoring strength, curvature, and chirality of the system. In the low chirality region of the phase diagram we found the twist bipolar (BS) phase and some cholesteric phases such as the radial spherical structure (RSS), twist cylinder (TC) and double twist cylinder (DTC) whose axis of rotation is not necessarily aligned with the major axis of the geometry. For high chirality scenarios, the disclination lines are twisted or bent near the surface preventing the formation of symmetric networks of defects, although an hexagonal pattern is formed on the surface which might serve as open sites for collocation of colloids. By analyzing the free energies of isochoric systems, prolate geometries tend to be more favorable for high chirality and low anchoring conditions. Universidad Nacional de Colombia Ph.D. grant and COLCIENCIAS under the Contract No. 110-165-843-748. CONACYT for Postdoctoral Fellowships Nos. 186166 and 203840.

  4. Copper sulfate: Liquid or crystals?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two separate experiments were conducted to evaluate copper toxicity to channel catfish and free-swimming Ichthyophthirius multifiliis or Ich (the stage of Ich that can be treated); the compounds we used were CuSO4 crystals and a non-chelated liquid CuSO4 product. In 96 hr tests conducted in aquaria...

  5. Liquid-Crystal Optical Correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1989-01-01

    Optical correlator uses commercially-available liquid-crystal television (LCTV) screen as spatial light modulator. Correlations with this device done at video frame rates, making such operations as bar-code recognition possible at reasonable cost. With further development, such correlator useful in automation, robotic vision, and optical image processing.

  6. Experiments with Cholesteric Liquid Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fergason, James L.

    1970-01-01

    Describes laboratory experiments designed to demonstrate (1) the properties of cholesteric liquid crystals, (2) thermal mapping, (3) thermal diffusivity, (4) adiabatic expansion of rubber, and (5) measurement of radiated energy by a point source. Contains all of the information on materials and apparatus needed to perform the experiments.…

  7. Liquid crystal polyester thermosets

    DOEpatents

    Benicewicz, Brian C.; Hoyt, Andrea E.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides (1) curable liquid crystalline polyester monomers represented by the formula: R.sup.1 --A.sup.1 --B.sup.1 --A.sup.2 --B.sup.2 --A.sup.3 --R.sup.2 where R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 are radicals selected from the group consisting of maleimide, substituted maleimide, nadimide, substituted naimide, ethynyl, and (C(R.sup.3).sub.2).sub.2 where R.sup.3 is hydrogen with the proviso that the two carbon atoms of (C(R.sup.3).sub.2).sub.2 are bound on the aromatic ring of A.sup.1 or A.sup.3 to adjacent carbon atoms, A.sup.1 and A.sup.3 are 1,4-phenylene and the same where said group contains one or more substituents selected from the group consisting of halo, e.g., fluoro, chloro, bromo, or iodo, nitro lower alkyl, e.g., methyl, ethyl, or propyl, alkoxy, e.g., methoxy, ethoxy, or propoxy, and fluoroalkyl, e.g., trifluoromethyl, pentafluoroethyl and the like, A.sup.2 is selected from the group consisting of 1,4-phenylene, 4,4'-biphenyl, 2,6-naphthylene and the same where said groups contain one or more substituents selected from the group consisting of halo, e.g., fluoro, chloro, bromo, or iodo, nitro, lower alkyl, e.g., methyl, ethyl, and propyl, lower alkoxy, e.g., methoxy, ethoxy, or propoxy, and fluoroalkyl or fluoroalkoxy, e.g., trifluoromethyl, pentafluoroethyl and the like, and B.sup.1 and B.sup.2 are selected from the group consisting of --C(O)--O-- and --O--C(O)--, (2) thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions comprised of heat-cured segments derived from monomers represented by the formula: R.sup.1 --A.sup.1 --B.sup.1 --A.sup.2 --B.sup.2 --A.sup.3 --R.sup.2 as described above, (3) curable blends of at least two of the polyester monomers and (4) processes of preparing the curable liquid crystalline polyester monomers.

  8. Hierarchical organization in liquid crystal-in-liquid crystal emulsions.

    PubMed

    Mushenheim, Peter C; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2014-11-21

    We report the formation and characterization of hierarchical ordering in systems comprised of micrometer-sized droplets of thermotropic nematic liquid crystals (LCs) dispersed in continuous nematic phases of a lyotropic chromonic LC (disodium cromoglycate (DSCG)). Significantly, we find the orientations of the two LC phases to be coupled, with nematic droplets of 4'-pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl (5CB) exhibiting a bipolar configuration with an axis of symmetry aligned orthogonal to the far-field director of the DSCG phase. We determine that this coupling of orientations does not result from either anisometric LC droplet shape or interfacial ionic phenomena but rather is consistent with the influence of van der Waals interactions that arise from the anisotropic polarizabilities of nematic 5CB (Δn = +0.18) and DSCG (Δn = -0.02) phases. We also find that it is possible to rotate and uniformly align the nematic droplets by using a weak magnetic field (B ∼ 0.3 T). An analysis of the dynamics of relaxation of the orientations of the 5CB droplets following removal of the magnetic field reveals the DSCG and 5CB droplets to be coupled by energies of ∼10(4) kT, consistent with a simple theoretical estimate of the influence of anisotropic van der Waals interactions. We also observed the nematic 5CB droplets to form dimers and larger assemblies mediated by the elasticity of the nematic DSCG. Overall, these results reveal that LC-in-LC emulsions define a new class of hierarchically ordered soft matter in which both thermotropic and lyotropic LCs are coupled in their ordering. PMID:25278032

  9. Hierarchical Organization in Liquid Crystal-in-Liquid Crystal Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Mushenheim, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    We report the formation and characterization of hierarchical ordering in systems comprised of micrometer-sized droplets of thermotropic nematic liquid crystals (LCs) dispersed in continuous nematic phases of a lyotropic chromonic LC (disodium cromoglycate (DSCG)). Significantly, we find the orientations of the two LC phases to be coupled, with nematic droplets of 4′-pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl (5CB) exhibiting a bipolar configuration with an axis of symmetry aligned orthogonal to the far-field director of the DSCG phase. We determine that this coupling of orientations does not result from either anisometric LC droplet shape or interfacial ionic phenomena but rather is consistent with the influence of van der Waals interactions that arise from the anisotropic polarizabilities of nematic 5CB (Δn = + 0.18) and DSCG (Δn = − 0.02) phases. We also find that it is possible to rotate and uniformly align the nematic droplets by using a weak magnetic field (B ∼ 0.3 T). An analysis of the dynamics of relaxation of the orientations of the 5CB droplets following removal of the magnetic field reveals the DSCG and 5CB droplets to be coupled by energies of ∼104kT, consistent with a simple theoretical estimate of the influence of anisotropic van der Waals interactions. We also observed the nematic 5CB droplets to form dimers and larger assemblies mediated by the elasticity of the nematic DSCG. Overall, these results reveal that LC-in-LC emulsions define a new class of hierarchically ordered soft matter in which both thermotropic and lyotropic LCs are coupled in their ordering. PMID:25278032

  10. Liquid Crystals: The Phase of the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ondris-Crawford, Renate; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Liquid crystal displays are currently utilized to convey information via graphic displays. Presents experiments and explanations that employ the concept of liquid crystals to learn concepts related to the various states of matter, electric and magnetic forces, refraction of light, and optics. Discusses applications of liquid crystal technology.…

  11. Liquid Crystal Displays: A Motivator for Some Simple Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selkirk, Keith

    1980-01-01

    The format of digits in liquid crystal displays (LCDs) on calculators and watches can motivate some simple investigations appropriate for school mathematics. Several sample problems or investigations are provided. (MK)

  12. Pattern Formation in a Nematic Liquid Crystal Mixture with Negative Anisotropy of the Electric Conductivity-A Long-Known System with "Inverse" Light Scattering Revisited.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bingru; Kitzerow, Heinz

    2016-07-14

    Pattern formation in binary calamitic liquid crystal mixtures with positive dielectric anisotropy and negative conductivity anisotropy, which attracted attention owing to field-induced light scattering under unusual conditions many years ago, is reinvestigated in the conductive regime. Homeotropic cells with these mixtures exhibit a direct transition to isotropic electroconvection, while planar cells show a Fréedericksz transition to the quasi-homeotropic state and subsequent electroconvection at higher voltages. A temperature-induced change from normal and oblique convection rolls to longitudinal rolls reveals a transition from standard electroconvection to nonstandard electroconvection, which can be attributed to a sign inversion of the conductivity anisotropy. In summary, this system shows an unusually large variety of patterns and effects, which were observed and theoretically considered more recently in other systems of quite different types. PMID:27347852

  13. Rates and processes of crystal growth in the system anorthite-albite. [magmatic liquids in igneous rock formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, R. J.; Klein, L.; Uhlmann, D. R.; Hays, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    The growth rates and interface morphologies of crystals of synthetic compositions in the anorthite (CaAl2Si2O8)-albite (NaAlSi3O8) plagioclase feldspar system are measured in an investigation of the crystallization of igneous rocks. Mixed plagioclase glasses with compositions of 75% and 50% anorthite were observed using the microscope heating technique as they crystallized at temperatures near the liquidus, and 75%, 50% and 20% anorthite crystals were treated by resistance heating and observed at greater degrees of undercooling. Growth rates were found to be independent of time and to decrease with increasing albite content, ranging from 0.5 to 2 x 10 to the -5th cm/min. The crystal morphologies for all compositions are faceted near the liquidus and become progressively skeletal, dendritic and fibrillar with increasing undercooling.

  14. Liquid crystal light valve structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koda, N. J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An improved photosensor film and liquid crystal light valves embodying said film is provided. The photosensor film and liquid crystal light valve is characterized by a significant lower image retention time while maintaining acceptable photosensitivity. The photosensor film is produced by sputter depositing CdS onto an ITO substrate in an atmosphere of argon/H2S gas while maintaining the substrate at a temperature in the range of about 130 C to about 200 C and while introducing nitrogen gas into the system to the extent of not more than about 1% of plasma mixture. Following sputter deposition of the CdS, the film is annealed in an inert gas at temperatures ranging from about 300 C to about 425 C.

  15. Bent core liquid crystal elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Verduzco, R.; DiMasi, E.; Luchette, P.; Ho Hong, S.; Harden, J.; Palffy-Muhoray, P.; Kilbey II, S.M.; Sprunt, S.; Gleeson, G.T. Jakli, A.

    2010-07-28

    Liquid crystal (LC) elastomers with bent-core side-groups incorporate the properties of bent-core liquid crystals in a flexible and self-supporting polymer network. Bent-core liquid crystal elastomers (BCEs) with uniform alignment were prepared by attaching a reactive bent-core LC to poly(hydrogenmethylsiloxane) and crosslinking with a divinyl crosslinker. Phase behavior studies indicate a nematic phase over a wide temperature range that approaches room temperature, and thermoelastic measurements show that these BCEs can reversibly change their length by more than a factor of two upon heating and cooling. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies reveal multiple, broad low-angle peaks consistent with short-range smectic C order of the bent-core side groups. A comparison of these patterns with predictions of a Landau model for short-range smectic C order shows that the length scale for smectic ordering in BCEs is similar to that seen in pure bent-core LCs. The combination of rubber elasticity and smectic ordering of the bent-core side groups suggests that BCEs may be promising materials for sensing, actuating, and other advanced applications.

  16. Swimming bacteria in liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Zhou, Shuang; Aranson, Igor; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    Dynamics of swimming bacteria can be very complex due to the interaction between the bacteria and the fluid, especially when the suspending fluid is non-Newtonian. Placement of swimming bacteria in lyotropic liquid crystal produces a new class of active materials by combining features of two seemingly incompatible constituents: self-propelled live bacteria and ordered liquid crystals. Here we present fundamentally new phenomena caused by the coupling between direction of bacterial swimming, bacteria-triggered flows and director orientations. Locomotion of bacteria may locally reduce the degree of order in liquid crystal or even trigger nematic-isotropic phase transition. Microscopic flows generated by bacterial flagella disturb director orientation. Emerged birefringence patterns allow direct optical observation and quantitative characterization of flagella dynamics. At high concentration of bacteria we observed the emergence of self-organized periodic texture caused by bacteria swimming. Our work sheds new light on self-organization in hybrid bio-mechanical systems and can lead to valuable biomedical applications. Was supported by the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under the Contract No. DE AC02-06CH11357.

  17. Liquid crystal assemblies in biologically inspired systems

    PubMed Central

    Safinya, Cyrus R.; Deek, Joanna; Beck, Roy; Jones, Jayna B.; Leal, Cecilia; Ewert, Kai K.; Li, Youli

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, which is part of a collection in honor of Noel Clark's remarkable career on liquid crystal and soft matter research, we present examples of biologically inspired systems, which form liquid crystal (LC) phases with their LC nature impacting biological function in cells or being important in biomedical applications. One area focuses on understanding network and bundle formation of cytoskeletal polyampholytes (filamentous-actin, microtubules, and neurofilaments). Here, we describe studies on neurofilaments (NFs), the intermediate filaments of neurons, which form open network nematic liquid crystal hydrogels in axons. Synchrotron small-angle-x-ray scattering studies of NF-protein dilution experiments and NF hydrogels subjected to osmotic stress show that neurofilament networks are stabilized by competing long-range repulsion and attractions mediated by the neurofilament's polyampholytic sidearms. The attractions are present both at very large interfilament spacings, in the weak sidearm-interpenetrating regime, and at smaller interfilament spacings, in the strong sidearm-interpenetrating regime. A second series of experiments will describe the structure and properties of cationic liposomes (CLs) complexed with nucleic acids (NAs). CL-NA complexes form liquid crystalline phases, which interact in a structure-dependent manner with cellular membranes enabling the design of complexes for efficient delivery of nucleic acid (DNA, RNA) in therapeutic applications. PMID:24558293

  18. Macroscopic dynamics of polar nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Brand, Helmut R; Pleiner, Harald; Ziebert, Falko

    2006-08-01

    We present the macroscopic equations for polar nematic liquid crystals. We consider the case where one has both, the usual nematic director, n[over ] , characterizing quadrupolar order as well as the macroscopic polarization, P , representing polar order, but where their directions coincide and are rigidly coupled. In this case one has to choose P as the independent macroscopic variable. Such equations are expected to be relevant in connection with nematic phases with unusual properties found recently in compounds composed of banana-shaped molecules. Among the effects predicted, which are absent in conventional nematic liquid crystals showing only quadrupolar order, are pyro-electricity and its analogs for density and for concentration in mixtures as well as a flow alignment behavior, which is more complex than in usual low molecular weight nematics. We also discuss the formation of defect structures expected in such systems. PMID:17025458

  19. Tunable liquid crystal photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yun-Hsing

    2005-07-01

    Liquid crystal (LC)-based adaptive optics are important for information processing, optical interconnections, photonics, integrated optics, and optical communications due to their tunable optical properties. In this dissertation, we describe novel liquid crystal photonic devices. In Chap. 3, we demonstrate a novel electrically tunable-efficiency Fresnel lens which is devised for the first time using nanoscale PDLC. The tunable Fresnel lens is very desirable to eliminate the need of external spatial light modulator. The nanoscale LC devices are polarization independent and exhibit a fast response time. Because of the small droplet sizes, the operating voltage is higher than 100 Vrms. To lower the driving voltage, in Chap. 2 and Chap. 3, we have investigated tunable Fresnel lens using polymer-network liquid crystal (PNLC) and phase-separated composite film (PSCOF). The operating voltage is below 12 Vrms. The PNLC and PSCOF devices are polarization dependent. To overcome this shortcoming, stacking two cells with orthogonal alignment directions is a possibility. Using PNLC, we also demonstrated LC blazed grating. The diffraction efficiency of these devices is continuously controlled by the electric field. We also develop a system with continuously tunable focal length. A conventional mechanical zooming system is bulky and power hungry. In Chap. 4, we developed an electrically tunable-focus flat LC spherical lens and microlens array. A huge tunable range from 0.6 m to infinity is achieved by the applied voltage. In Chap. 5, we describe a LC microlens array whose focal length can be switched from positive to negative by the applied voltage. The fast response time feature of our LC microlens array will be very helpful in developing 3-D animated images. In Chap. 6, we demonstrate polymer network liquid crystals for switchable polarizers and optical shutters. The use of dual-frequency liquid crystal and special driving scheme leads to a sub-millisecond response time. In

  20. Ionic conductivity of imidazole-functionalized liquid crystal mesogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roddecha, Supacharee; Anthamatten, Mitchell

    2012-02-01

    Imidazole has been investigated as a novel anhydrous proton conducting functional group that could enable higher temperature operation (> 120 ^oC) of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Its amphoteric behavior can support Grotthuss-like proton transport; however molecular mobility and a high concentration of imidazole groups are needed to achieve high ionic conductivity. Our hypothesis is that liquid crystal ordering, particularly in layered smectic phase, can facilitate formation of 2D proton transport and promote proton conductivity. We have designed and synthesized two imidazole-terminated liquid crystal mesogens, and the ionic conductivities in the liquid crystalline and isotropic states have been measured. Here we report on synthesis and characterization of diacylhydrazine liquid crystals bearing imidazole terminal groups. The proton conductivity of products is compared to pure liquid imidazole and to liquid crystal mesogens without imidazole groups.

  1. Computer simulations of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smondyrev, Alexander M.

    Liquid crystal physics is an exciting interdisciplinary field of research with important practical applications. Their complexity and the presence of strong translational and orientational fluctuations require a computational approach, especially in the studies of nonequlibrium phenomena. In this dissertation we present the results of computer simulation studies of liquid crystals using the molecular dynamics technique. We employed the Gay-Berne phenomenological model of liquid crystals to describe the interaction between the molecules. Both equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena were studied. In the first case we studied the flow properties of the liquid crystal system in equilibrium as well as the dynamics of the director. We measured the viscosities of the Gay-Berne model in the nematic and isotropic phases. The temperature-dependence of the rotational and shear viscosities, including the nonmonotonic behavior of one shear viscosity, are in good agreement with experimental data. The bulk viscosities are significantly larger than the shear viscosities, again in agreement with experiment. The director motion was found to be ballistic at short times and diffusive at longer times. The second class of problems we focused on is the properties of the system which was rapidly quenched to very low temperatures from the nematic phase. We find a glass transition to a metastable phase with nematic order and frozen translational and orientational degrees of freedom. For fast quench rates the local structure is nematic-like, while for slower quench rates smectic order is present as well. Finally, we considered a system in the isotropic phase which is then cooled to temperatures below the isotropic-nematic transition temperature. We expect topological defects to play a central role in the subsequent equilibration of the system. To identify and study these defects we require a simulation of a system with several thousand particles. We present the results of large

  2. Formation of holographic memory for optically reconfigurable gate array by angle-multiplexing recording of multi-circuit information in liquid crystal composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiwara, Akifumi; Maekawa, Hikaru; Watanabe, Minoru; Moriwaki, Retsu

    2014-02-01

    A holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC) memory to record multi-context information for an optically reconfigurable gate array is formed by the angle-multiplexing recording using a successive laser exposure in liquid crystal (LC) composites. The laser illumination system is constructed using the half mirror and photomask written by the different configuration contexts placed on the motorized stages under the control of a personal computer. The fabricated holographic memory implements a precise reconstruction of configuration contexts corresponding to the various logical circuits such as OR circuit and NOR circuit by the laser illumination at different incident angle in the HPDLC memory.

  3. Nanoscopic Manipulation and Imaging of Liquid Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenblatt, Charles S.

    2014-02-04

    This is the final project report. The project’s goals centered on nanoscopic imaging and control of liquid crystals and surfaces. We developed and refined techniques to control liquid crystal orientation at surfaces with resolution as small as 25 nm, we developed an optical imaging technique that we call Optical Nanotomography that allows us to obtain images inside liquid crystal films with resolution of 60 x 60 x 1 nm, and we opened new thrust areas related to chirality and to liquid crystal/colloid composites.

  4. Multifunctional Glassy Liquid Crystal for Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,S.H.

    2004-11-05

    As an emerging class of photonic materials, morphologically stable glassy liquid crystals, were developed following a versatile molecular design approach. Glassy cholesteric liquid crystals with elevated phase-transition temperatures and capability for selective-wavelength reflection and circular polarization were synthesized via determinstic synthesis strategies. Potential applications of glassy cholesteric liquid crystals include high-performance polarizers, optical notch filters and reflectors, and circularly polarized photoluminescence. A glassy nematic liquid crystal comprising a dithienylethene core was also synthesized for the demonstration of nondestructive rewritable optical memory and photonic switching in the sollid state.

  5. New triazolium based ionic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Stappert, Kathrin; Unal, Derya; Mallick, Bert; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2014-01-01

    A set of novel 1,2,3-triazolium based ionic liquid crystals was synthesized and their mesomorphic behaviour studied by DSC (differential scanning calorimetry), POM (polarizing optical microscopy) and SAXS (small angle X-ray scattering). Beside the variation of the chain length (C10, C12 and C14) at the 1,2,3-triazolium cation also the anion has been varied (Br-, I-, I3-, BF4-, SbF6-, N(CN)2-, Tf2N-) to study the influence of ion size, symmetry and H-bonding capability on the mesophase formation. Interestingly, for the 1,3-didodecyl-1,2,3-triazolium cation two totally different conformations were found in the crystal structure of the bromide (U-shaped) and the triiodide (rod shaped).

  6. Two-Dimensional Skyrmion Lattice Formation in a Nematic Liquid Crystal Consisting of Highly Bent Banana Molecules.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sungmin; Lee, Eun-Woo; Li, Tianqi; Liang, Xiaobin; Tokita, Masatoshi; Nakajima, Ken; Watanabe, Junji

    2016-09-12

    We synthesized a novel banana-shaped molecule based on a 1,7-naphthalene central core that exhibits a distinct mesomorphism of the nematic-to-nematic phase transition. Both the X-ray profile and direct imaging of atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigations clearly indicates the formation of an anomalous nematic phase possessing a two-dimensional (2D) tetragonal lattice with a large edge (ca. 59 Å) directed perpendicular to the director in the low-temperature nematic phase. One plausible model is proposed by an analogy of skyrmion lattice in which two types of cylinders formed from left- and right-handed twist-bend helices stack into a 2D tetragonal lattice, diminishing the inversion domain wall. PMID:27511324

  7. Photorefractive conjugated polymer-liquid crystal composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wasielewski, M. R.; Yoon, B. A.; Fuller, M.; Wiederrecht, G. P.; Niemczyk, M. P.; Svec, W. A.

    2000-05-15

    A new mechanism for space-charge field formation in photorefractive liquid crystal composites containing poly(2,5-bis(2{prime}-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene) (BEH-PPV) and the electron acceptor N,N{prime}-dioctyl-1,4:5,8-naphthalenediimide, NI, is observed. Using asymmetric energy transfer (beam coupling) measurements that are diagnostic for the photorefractive effect, the direction of beam coupling as a function of grating fringe spacing inverts at a spacing of 5.5 {micro}m. The authors show that the inversion is due to a change in the dominant mechanism for space-charge field formation. At small fringe spacings, the space-charge field is formed by ion diffusion in which the photogenerated anion is the more mobile species. At larger fringe spacings, the polarity of the space charge field inverts due to dominance of a charge transport mechanism in which photogenerated holes are the most mobile species due to hole migration along the BEH-PEV chains coupled with interchain hole hopping. Control experiments are presented, which use composites that can access only one of the two charge transport mechanisms. The results show that charge migration over long distances leading to enhanced photorefractive effects can be obtained using conjugated polymers dissolved in liquid crystals.

  8. Liquid-Crystal Point-Diffraction Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.

    1996-01-01

    Liquid-crystal point-diffraction interferometer (LCPDI) invented to combine flexible control of liquid-crystal phase-shifts with robustness of point-diffraction interferometers. Produces interferograms indicative of shapes of wavefronts of laser beams having passed through or reflected from objects of interest. Interferograms combined in computers to produce phase maps describing wavefronts.

  9. Demonstrations with a Liquid Crystal Shutter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2012-01-01

    The experiments presented show the response of a liquid crystal shutter to applied electric voltages and the delay of the operations. Both properties are important for liquid crystal displays of computers and television sets. Two characteristics of the shutter are determined: (i) the optical transmittance versus applied voltage of various…

  10. Liquid Crystals in Education--The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cepic, Mojca

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of teaching about liquid crystals is discussed from several points of view: the rationale why to teach them, the basics about liquid crystals or what the teacher should teach about them, the fundamental pre-knowledge of students required, the set of experiments accompanying the teaching and the brief report on the already…

  11. Liquid crystal-templated conducting organic polymers

    DOEpatents

    Stupp, Samuel I.; Hulvat, James F.

    2004-01-20

    A method of preparing a conductive polymeric film, includes providing a liquid crystal phase comprising a plurality of hydrophobic cores, the phase on a substrate, introducing a hydrophobic component to the phase, the component a conductive polymer precursor, and applying an electric potential across the liquid crystal phase, the potential sufficient to polymerize the said precursor.

  12. Liquid Crystal Cells Based on Photovoltaic Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchetti, L.; Kushnir, K.; Zaltron, A.; Simoni, F.

    2016-02-01

    Liquid crystal cells with LiNbO3:Fe crystals as substrates, are described. The photovoltaic field generated by the substrates is able to reorient the liquid crystal director thus giving rise to a phase shift on the light propagating through the cell, as in liquid crystal light valves. The process does not require the application of an external electric field, thus being potentially useful for applications requiring a high degree of compactness. An efficient optical switch with a high transmission contrast, based on the described optically-induced electric field, is also proposed.

  13. Crystal formation in furunculosis agar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bullock, G.L.; Ross, A.J.

    1964-01-01

    SINCE ITS INTRODUCTION SOME MONTHS AGO, FURUNCULOSIS AGAR has been employed in the diagnosis of suspect furunculosis and also as a general purpose medium. During our work with this medium we have noticed discrete "colonies," of crystalline material, which very closely resemble microbial colonies. These crystal colonies are compact and appear on both the surface and subsurface; they occur in inoculated slants and plates incubated for long periods (2 to 3 weeks), as well as in uninoculated stored medium. As the crystal colonies could be confusing to workers using this medium, we decided to attempt to identify them and also to determine whether storage conditions and different lots of medium affect crystal formation.

  14. Liquid crystal device and method thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Shiyanovskii, Sergij V; Gu, Mingxia; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2012-10-23

    The invention provides a liquid crystal device and method thereof. Subsequent to applying a first electrical voltage on a liquid crystal to induce a reorientation of the liquid crystal, a second electrical voltage with proper polarity is applied on the liquid crystal to assist the relaxation of the reorientation that was induced by the first electrical voltage. The "switch-off" phase of the liquid crystal can therefore be accelerated or temporally shortened, and the device can exhibit better performance such as fast response to on/off signals. The invention can be widely used LCD, LC shutter, LC lens, spatial light modulator, telecommunication device, tunable filter, beam steering device, and electrically driven LC device, among others.

  15. Patterned cholesteric liquid crystal polymer film.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Liang; Ma, Ji; Myhre, Graham; Balakrishnan, Kaushik; Pau, Stanley

    2013-02-01

    Herein, the ability to create arbitrarily patterned circular polarized optical devices is demonstrated by using cholesteric liquid crystal polymer. Photoalignment with polarized ultraviolet light is utilized to create aligned cholesteric liquid crystal films. Two different methods, thermal annealing and solvent rinse, are utilized for patterning cholesteric liquid crystal films over large areas. The patterned cholesteric liquid crystal films are measured using a Mueller matrix imaging polarimeter, and the polarization properties, including depolarization index, circular diattenuation (CD), and circular retardance are derived. Patterned nonlinearly polarized optical devices can be fabricated with feature sizes as small as 20 μm with a CD of 0.812±0.015. Circular polarizing filters based on polymer cholesteric liquid crystal films have applications in three-dimensional displays, medical imaging, polarimetry, and interferometry. PMID:23456060

  16. Phototropic liquid crystals comprising one component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolewska, Anna; Zawada, Joanna; Bartkiewicz, Stanislaw; Galewski, Zbigniew

    2013-09-01

    Phototropic liquid crystals (PtLC), in which the phase transition can be controlled by the light, are a new class of liquid crystal materials possessing number of potential applications, especially in photonic devices. So far a significant majority of PtLC materials has been realized by the doping a classical liquid crystal with a photochromic dye. Here we report PtLCs comprising a single compound. Liquid-crystalline and photochromic properties have been accomplished in alkylo-alkoxy derivatives of azobenzene. Such compounds show a rich polymorphism which can be controlled by the light. The phenomenon of the photochemical phase transition has been investigated by means of holographic grating recording.

  17. Hexagonal columnar liquid crystal in the cells secreting spider silk.

    PubMed

    Knight, D; Vollrath, F

    1999-12-01

    The liquid crystallinity of spider dragline silk dope is thought to be important for both the spinning process and the extreme mechanical properties of the final thread. Although the formation of the liquid crystalline units is poorly understood, it has been suggested that spider silk proteins are secreted in a random coil and then aggregate end-to-end into rod-shaped units to form supramolecular liquid crystals. However, evidence presented here from transmission electron microscopy indicates that coat protein of the dragline silk of a Nephila spider is stored as hexagonal columnar liquid crystals within the intracellular secretory vesicles. This implies that this component is already folded into short rods within the gland cells and forms molecular rather than supramolecular liquid crystals. PMID:18627876

  18. Modeling liquid-liquid phase transitions and quasicrystal formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skibinsky, Anna

    In this thesis, studies which concern two different subjects related to phase transitions in fluids and crystalline solids are presented. Condensed matter formation, structure, and phase transitions are modeled using molecular dynamics simulations of simple discontinuous potentials with attractive and repulsive interactions. Novel phase diagrams are proposed for quasicrystals, crystals, and liquids. In the first part of the thesis, the formation of a quasicrystal in a two dimensional monodisperse system is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations of hard sphere particles interacting via a two-dimensional square-well potential. It is found that for certain values of the square-well parameters more than one stable crystalline phase can form. By quenching the liquid phase at a very low temperature, an amorphous phase is obtained. When this the amorphous phase is heated, a quasicrystalline structure with five-fold symmetry forms. From estimations of the Helmholtz potentials of the stable crystalline phases and of the quasicrystal, it is concluded that within a specific temperature range, the observed quasicrystal phase can be the stable phase. The second part of the thesis concerns a study of the liquid-liquid phase transition for a single-component system in three dimensions, interacting via an isotropic potential with a repulsive soft-core shoulder at short distance and an attractive well at an intermediate distance. The potential is similar to potentials used to describe such liquid systems as colloids, protein solutions, or liquid metals. It is shown that the phase diagram for such a potential can have two lines of first-order fluid-fluid phase transitions: one separating a gas and a low-density liquid (LDL), and another between the LDL and a high-density liquid (HDL). Both phase transition lines end in a critical point, a gas-LDL critical point and, depending on the potential parameters, either a gas-HDL critical point or a LDL-HDL critical point. A

  19. Engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many plants accumulate crystals of calcium oxalate. Just how these crystals form remains unknown. To gain insight into the mechanisms regulating calcium oxalate crystal formation, a crystal engineering approach was initiated utilizing the non-crystal accumulating plant, Arabidopsis. The success of t...

  20. Ice-Crystal Fallstreaks from Supercooled Liquid Water Parent Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James R.; O'C. Starr, David; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Spinhirne, James D.; Ferrare, Richard A.

    2003-01-01

    On 31 December 2001, ice-crystal fallstreaks (e.g., cirrus uncinus, or colloquially "Mare's Tails") from supercooled liquid water parent clouds were observed by ground-based lidars pointed vertically from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (SGP) facility near Lamont, Oklahoma. The incidence of liquid phase cloud with apparent ice-phase precipitation is investigated. Scenarios for mixed-phase particle nucleation, and fallstreak formation and sustenance are discussed. The observations are unique in the context of the historical reverence given to the commonly observed c h s uncinus fallstreak (wholly ice) versus this seemingly contradictory coincidence of liquid water begetting ice-crystal streaks.

  1. Liquid crystal devices for photonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigrinov, Vladimir G.

    2007-11-01

    photonic crystal / liquid crystal (PC/LC) devices became a "hot" topic of research. New PC/LC passive elements of fiber optical systems: electrically tunable LC photonic fibers, fiber optics tunable LC filters, tunable photonic crystal lasers are envisaged. A method for the formation of controllable PC/LC structures, based on photo-aligned LC is considered. Filling of the interstices of the photonic crystal with the photo-aligned LC material and subjecting the LC to a varying electric field can produce a tunable photonic crystal element. We have already used the photoaligning materials to align LC mixtures in small cavities, such as the holes and tubes of photonic crystals, having size of 1 μm and less and obtained excellent LC orientation inside the tubes by photoalignment.

  2. Effect of Viscosity on the Crystallization of Undercooled Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    There have been numerous studies of glasses indicating that low-gravity processing enhances glass formation. NASA PI s are investigating the effect of low-g processing on the nucleation and crystal growth rates. Dr. Ethridge is investigating a potential mechanism for glass crystallization involving shear thinning of liquids in 1-g. For shear thinning liquids, low-g (low convection) processing will enhance glass formation. The study of the viscosity of glass forming substances at low shear rates is important to understand these new crystallization mechanisms. The temperature dependence of the viscosity of undercooled liquids is also very important for NASA s containerless processing studies. In general, the viscosity of undercooled liquids is not known, yet knowledge of viscosity is required for crystallization calculations. Many researchers have used the Turnbull equation in error. Subsequent nucleation and crystallization calculations can be in error by many orders of magnitude. This demonstrates the requirement for better methods for interpolating and extrapolating the viscosity of undercooled liquids. This is also true for undercooled water. Since amorphous water ice is the predominant form of water in the universe, astrophysicists have modeled the crystallization of amorphous water ice with viscosity relations that may be in error by five orders-of-magnitude.

  3. Guided-wave liquid-crystal photonics.

    PubMed

    Zografopoulos, D C; Asquini, R; Kriezis, E E; d'Alessandro, A; Beccherelli, R

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we review the state of the art in the field of liquid-crystal tunable guided-wave photonic devices, a unique type of fill-once, molecular-level actuated, optofluidic systems. These have recently attracted significant research interest as potential candidates for low-cost, highly functional photonic elements. We cover a full range of structures, which span from micromachined liquid-crystal on silicon devices to periodic structures and liquid-crystal infiltrated photonic crystal fibers, with focus on key-applications for photonics. Various approaches on the control of the LC molecular orientation are assessed, including electro-, thermo- and all-optical switching. Special attention is paid to practical issues regarding liquid-crystal infiltration, molecular alignment and actuation, low-power operation, as well as their integrability in chip-scale or fiber-based devices. PMID:22842818

  4. Formation of supramolecular assemblies and liquid crystals by purine nucleobases and cyanuric acid in water: implications for the possible origins of RNA.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Cafferty, B J; Karunakaran, S C; Schuster, G B; Hud, N V

    2016-07-27

    The free nucleobases and mononucleotides of RNA do not form Watson-Crick base pairs in water, a fact that presents several challenges for the prebiotic synthesis of RNA. 2,6-Diaminopurine and adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP) are shown to form supramolecular assemblies with cyanuric acid in water. These assemblies and their propensity to form liquid crystals suggest a possible means by which non-covalent structures might have originally selected the shape of the Watson-Crick base pairs. PMID:27253677

  5. Temperature sensing with thermochromic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. R.; Sabatino, D. R.; Praisner, T. J.

    A review of the most recent developments in the application of thermochromic liquid crystals to fluid flow temperature measurement is presented. The experimental aspects including application, illumination, recording, and calibration of liquid crystals on solid surfaces, as well as in fluid suspensions, are discussed. Because of the anisotropic optical properties of liquid crystals, on-axis lighting/viewing arrangements, combined with in-situ calibration techniques, generally provide the most accurate temperature assessments. However, where on-axis viewing is not possible, calibration techniques can be employed, which reduce the uncertainty associated with off-axis viewing and lighting arrangements. It has been determined that the use of hue definitions that display a linear trend across the color spectrum yield the most accurate correlation with temperature. The uncertainty of both wide-band and narrow-band thermochromic liquid crystal calibration techniques can be increased due to hysteresis effects, which occur when the temperature of the liquid crystals exceeds their maximum activation temperature. Although liquid crystals are commonly used to provide time-mean temperature measurements, techniques are available which allow the monitoring of temporal changes. Selected examples illustrating the use of thermochromic liquid crystals are shown, and a survey of reported temperature measurement uncertainties is presented.

  6. A swing driven by liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cheng

    Angular momentum in liquid crystals exists as flow, director reorientation, etc. However, it is hard to observe and measure angular momentum in liquid crystals by a direct mechanical approach. Torsion pendulum is a general tool to measure angular momentum by torque balance. Our torsion pendulum can harvest the angular momentum in liquid crystals to make it observable. The oscillation of the pendulum keeps increasing by constructively adding a small angular momentum of liquid crystals each period at the resonant frequency of the pendulum. Its similar to a swing driven by a force at its resonant frequency. For the torsion pendulum, a cage made of two aluminum discs, in which a liquid crystal cell is placed, is suspended between two thin tungsten wires. A gold mirror, which is a part of the optical lever system, is attached on one tungsten wire. As first demonstration, we fabricate a circular hybrid liquid crystal cell, which can induce concentric backflows to generate angular momentum. The alignment on the planar substrate is concentric and tangential. Due to the coupling between director rotation and flow, the induced backflow goes around the cell when we add electrical pulses between top and bottom substrates. The oscillation is observed by a position sensitive detector and analyzed on the basis of Eriksen-Leslie theory. With vacuum condition and synchronous driving system, the oscillation signal is improved. We demonstrate that this torsion pendulum can sensitively detect the angular momentum in liquid crystals.

  7. Liquid Crystal Research Shows Deformation By Drying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    These images, from David Weitz's liquid crystal research, show ordered uniform sized droplets (upper left) before they are dried from their solution. After the droplets are dried (upper right), they are viewed with crossed polarizers that show the deformation caused by drying, a process that orients the bipolar structure of the liquid crystal within the droplets. When an electric field is applied to the dried droplets (lower left), and then increased (lower right), the liquid crystal within the droplets switches its alignment, thereby reducing the amount of light that can be scattered by the droplets when a beam is shone through them.

  8. Instability of liquid crystal elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ning; Li, Meie; Zhou, Jinxiong

    2016-01-01

    Nematic liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) contract in the director direction but expand in other directions, perpendicular to the director, when heated. If the expansion of an LCE is constrained, compressive stress builds up in the LCE, and it wrinkles or buckles to release the stored elastic energy. Although the instability of soft materials is ubiquitous, the mechanism and programmable modulation of LCE instability has not yet been fully explored. We describe a finite element method (FEM) scheme to model the inhomogeneous deformation and instability of LCEs. A constrained LCE beam working as a valve for microfluidic flow, and a piece of LCE laminated with a nanoscale poly(styrene) (PS) film are analyzed in detail. The former uses the buckling of the LCE beam to occlude the microfluidic channel, while the latter utilizes wrinkling or buckling to measure the mechanical properties of hard film or to realize self-folding. Through rigorous instability analysis, we predict the critical conditions for the onset of instability, the wavelength and amplitude evolution of instability, and the instability patterns. The FEM results are found to correlate well with analytical results and reported experiments. These efforts shed light on the understanding and exploitation of the instabilities of LCEs.

  9. Nanolitre-scale crystallization using acoustic liquid-transfer technology

    PubMed Central

    Villaseñor, Armando G.; Wong, April; Shao, Ada; Garg, Ankur; Donohue, Timothy J.; Kuglstatter, Andreas; Harris, Seth F.

    2012-01-01

    Focused acoustic energy allows accurate and precise liquid transfer on scales from picolitre to microlitre volumes. This technology was applied in protein crystallization, successfully transferring a diverse set of proteins as well as hundreds of precipitant solutions from custom and commercial crystallization screens and achieving crystallization in drop volumes as small as 20 nl. Only higher concentrations (>50%) of 2-­methyl-2,4-pentanediol (MPD) appeared to be systematically problematic in delivery. The acoustic technology was implemented in a workflow, successfully reproducing active crystallization systems and leading to the discovery of crystallization conditions for previously uncharacterized proteins. The technology offers compelling advantages in low-nanolitre crystallization trials by providing significant reagent savings and presenting seamless scalability for those crystals that require larger volume optimization experiments using the same vapor-diffusion format. PMID:22868754

  10. Do protein crystals nucleate within dense liquid clusters?

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Dominique; Vorontsova, Maria A.; Potenza, Marco A. C.; Sanvito, Tiziano; Sleutel, Mike; Giglio, Marzio; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Protein-dense liquid clusters are regions of high protein concentration that have been observed in solutions of several proteins. The typical cluster size varies from several tens to several hundreds of nanometres and their volume fraction remains below 10−3 of the solution. According to the two-step mechanism of nucleation, the protein-rich clusters serve as locations for and precursors to the nucleation of protein crystals. While the two-step mechanism explained several unusual features of protein crystal nucleation kinetics, a direct observation of its validity for protein crystals has been lacking. Here, two independent observations of crystal nucleation with the proteins lysozyme and glucose isomerase are discussed. Firstly, the evolutions of the protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized simultaneously by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS), respectively. It is demonstrated that protein crystals appear following a significant delay after cluster formation. The cDDLS correlation functions follow a Gaussian decay, indicative of nondiffusive motion. A possible explanation is that the crystals are contained inside large clusters and are driven by the elasticity of the cluster surface. Secondly, depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy reveals the evolution from liquid clusters without crystals to newly nucleated crystals contained in the clusters to grown crystals freely diffusing in the solution. Collectively, the observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters in lysozyme and glucose isomerase solutions are locations for crystal nucleation. PMID:26144225

  11. Polymer single crystal membrane from liquid/liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenda; Li, Christopher; Soft Matter Research Group-Drexel University Team

    2013-03-01

    Vesicles, mimicking the structure of cell membrane at the molecular scale, are small membrane-enclosed sacks that can store or transport substances. The weak mechanical properties and the nature of environment-sensitivity of the current available vesicles: liposomes, polymersomes, colloidsomes limit their applications as an excellent candidate for targeting delivery of drugs/genes in biomedical engineering and treatment. Recently, we developed an emulsion-based method to grow curved polymer single crystals. Varying the polymer concentration and/or the emulsification conditions (such as surfactant concentration, water-oil volume ratio), curved crystals with different sizes and different openness could be obtained. This growing process was attributed to polymer crystal growth along the liquid/liquid interface. In addition, the liquid/liquid interfacial crystal growth is promising for synthesis of enclosed hollow sphere.

  12. Liquid crystal television spatial light modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    1989-01-01

    The spatial light modulation characteristics and capabilities of the liquid crystal television (LCTV) spatial light modulators (SLMs) are discussed. A comparison of Radio Shack, Epson, and Citizen LCTV SLMs is made.

  13. Liquid crystal on subwavelength metal gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Palto, S. P.; Barnik, M. I.; Artemov, V. V.; Shtykov, N. M.; Geivandov, A. R.; Yudin, S. G.; Gorkunov, M. V.

    2015-06-14

    Optical and electrooptical properties of a system consisting of subwavelength metal gratings and nematic liquid crystal layer are studied. Aluminium gratings that also act as interdigitated electrodes are produced by focused ion beam lithography. It is found that a liquid crystal layer strongly influences both the resonance and light polarization properties characteristic of the gratings. Enhanced transmittance is observed not only for the TM-polarized light in the near infrared spectral range but also for the TE-polarized light in the visible range. Although the electrodes are separated by nanosized slits, and the electric field is strongly localized near the surface, a pronounced electrooptical effect is registered. The effect is explained in terms of local reorientation of liquid crystal molecules at the grating surface and propagation of the orientational deformation from the surface into the bulk of the liquid crystal layer.

  14. Rapid leak detection with liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Iceland, W. F.; Ruppe, E. P.

    1978-01-01

    Small leaks in vacuum lines are detected by applying liquid-crystal coating, warming suspected area, and observing color change due to differential cooling by leak jet. Technique is used on inside or outside walls of vacuum-jacketed lines.

  15. Thermal Conductivity and Liquid Crystal Thermometers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, R. D., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    Describes using stock liquid crystal postcards as inexpensive classroom thermometers. Also suggests using these postcards as a good visual temperature indicator for classroom demonstrations such as temperature gradients. One such activity is provided. (MVL)

  16. Multidimensional optics and dynamics of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shouping

    2007-12-01

    In this dissertation, we present an alternative description of multidimensional optics in liquid crystals and uniaxial media, and a systematical investigation on the dynamic properties of twist nematic devices and ECB devices including flow. We also present our investigation on the backflow and dynamic properties of nematic liquid crystals in modulated electric fields. Based on the understanding to backflow and dynamics of liquid crystals, the dynamics of colloidal particles dispersed in nematic liquid crystals and the flow-induced dynamic optical crosstalk between pixels in nematic liquid crystal devices are also studied. The alternative description of multidimensional optics combines the geometrical optics approximation (GOA) with the beam propagation method (BPM). The general treatment of this approach is developed both theoretically and numerically. The investigation on the dynamic properties of twist nematic devices and ECB devices with consideration of backflow is done experimentally, theoretically and numerically. The calculation results are compared with the experimental results, and the optical responses due to backflow are discussed in detail. The investigation on the backflow and dynamic properties of a nematic liquid crystal in modulated electric fields includes director, flow and the shift of liquid crystal fluid. Especially, an important phenomenon, reverseswitching, is shown in this investigation. The dynamics of colloidal particles dispersed in a nematic cela is studied experimentally and by computer simulation. The polarity of director distortions determines the direction of lift force, and the backflow is responsible for the horizontal translational motion. The optical crosstalk between pixels demonstrates the significance of switching-induce flow in pixilated devices. The electrical switching of a pixel in a twisted nematic device can induce an optical response in neighboring pixels. These phenomena are studied in detail, both experimentally and

  17. Liquid crystals under the spotlight: light based measurements of electrical and flow properties of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Thomas P.; Proctor, Matthew B.; Kaczmarek, Malgosia; D'Alessandro, Giampaolo

    2015-09-01

    Optical light modulation in photorefractive liquid crystal cells depends strongly on the relative voltage drop across the photoconductive and liquid crystal layers. This quantity can be estimated using the Voltage Transfer Function, a generalization of the standard cross polarized intensity measurements. Another advantage of this new measurement technique is that we can use it to estimate dynamical parameters of the liquid crystal and of the device, either through simple black-box models or using a full Ericksen-Leslie theory. In this latter case we can obtain estimates of some of the viscosities of the liquid crystal.

  18. Molecular Models of Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajshekhar

    Liquid crystal elastomers combine the elastic properties of conventional rubbers with the optical properties of liquid crystals. This dual nature gives rise to unusual physical properties, including the stress induced transition from a polydomain state, consisting of multiple nematic regions with independent orientations, to a monodomain state consisting of a single nematic region with a uniform director. We propose several molecular-scale coarse-grained models of liquid crystal elastomers with varying degrees of resolution. The models employ the Gay-Berne soft potential, and exhibit the chain connectivity of a diamond network. Simulation results show that these models are able to capture the polydomain state exhibited by liquid crystal elastomers in the absence of any external stress. When subjected to uniaxial stress, our models exhibit a polydomain to monodomain transition. We explain that the polydomain state occurs through the aggregation of liquid crystal molecules assisted by crosslinking sites, and conclude that the transition mechanism to the monodomain state is based on the reorientation of nematic domains along the direction of applied stress. Our modeling efforts are primarily focused on three models. The first two models consider the effects of rigid and flexible crosslinkers in liquid crystal elastomers with a diamond topology for chain connectivity. The third model deviates from the diamond network topology and adopts a random network topology.

  19. Biosensing using smectic and cholesteric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Piotr; Mann, Elizabeth; Jakli, Antal

    2015-03-01

    Liquid-crystal-based biosensors utilize liquid crystal alignment's high sensitivity to the presence of lipids and proteins self-assembled at the liquid crystal/aqueous solution interface. The optical response of the bulk liquid crystal to the interface offers inexpensive, easy optical detection of such biologically relevant molecules. Present technique uses nematic liquid crystal phase state that typically has a planar-to-homeotropic response only. Here we show that smectic and cholesteric phase states of liquid crystals can be used as new sensing modes that can provide additional information or improve the characteristics of a potential biosensor device. Smectic-A phase extends the detection range both toward the lower and higher concentration. Cholesteric phase (nematic with a chiral dopant) may be sensitive to the chirality of biological surface-active molecules such as phospholipids. Additionally, the ``finger-print'' texture of a cholesteric phase may show the differences between biomolecule homologues, thus providing a promising way of distinguishing between subtle differences of hydrocarbon chain or head-group size and structure.

  20. Effects of magnetic pre-alignment of nano-powders on formation of high textured barium hexa-ferrite quasi-single crystals via a magnetic forming and liquid participation sintering route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junliang; Zeng, Yanwei; Zhang, Xingkai; Zhang, Ming

    2015-05-01

    Highly textured barium hexa-ferrite quasi-single crystal with narrow ferromagnetic resonance line-width is believed to be a potential gyromagnetic material for self-biased microwave devices. To fabricate barium hexa-ferrite quasi-single crystal with a high grain orientation degree, a magnetic forming and liquid participation sintering route has been developed. In this paper, the effects of the pre-alignment of the starting nano-powders on the formation of barium quasi-single crystal structures have been investigated. The results indicated that: the crystallites with large sizes and small specific surfaces were easily aligned for they got higher driving forces and lower resistances during magnetic forming. The average restricting magnetic field was about 4.647 kOe to overcome the average friction barrier between crystallites. The pre-aligned crystallites in magnetic forming acted as the "crystal seeds" for oriented growth of the un-aligned crystallites during liquid participation sintering to achieve a high grain orientation. To effectively promote the grain orientation degrees of the sintered pellets, the grain orientation degrees of the green compacts must be higher than a limited value of 15.0%. Barium hexa-ferrite quasi-single crystal with a high grain orientation degree of 98.6% was successfully fabricated after sintering the green compact with its grain orientation degree of 51.1%.

  1. New developments in nanoparticle-liquid crystal composites: from magic-sized semiconductor nanoclusters to alignment pattern formation via nanoparticle stenciling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaei, Javad; Sawatzky, Ryan; Sharma, Anshul; Urbanski, Martin; Yu, Kui; Kitzerow, Heinz-S.; Hegmann, Torsten

    2012-03-01

    We here report on the alignment and electro-optic properties of nematic liquid crystals (LCs) either containing nanoscale particles as additives or featuring particles patterned on substrates. The investigated nematic LCs or LC dispersions are doped or in contact with magic-sized semiconductor CdSe nanocrystals (MSNCs) or silane- and alkylthiol monolayercapped gold nanoparticles. Three single-sized CdSe quantum dots capped with myristic acid exhibiting bright bandgap photoluminescence (PL) at λmax ~ 463 nm were tested as additives. Two of the quantum dots only vary in the amount of defects as indicated by different bandgap and deep trap PL. The third MSNC sample is compositionally different, doped with Zn. These MSNCs with almost identical sizes were doped at different concentrations (1-5 wt%) into the nematic phase of the 2-phenylpyrimidine-based LC1. Only the Zn-doped MSNCs showed the formation of birefringent stripes surrounded by areas of homeotropic alignment between plain glass slides at all concentrations as observed for many other nanoparticle-doped nematic LCs reported earlier by our group. In polyimide-coated glass slides favoring planar orientation of the nematic director, planar alignment was observed. Similarly, siloxane-coated gold nanoparticle additives with narrow size distribution, but larger size, show homeotropic alignment between plain glass and planar alignment in rubbed polyimide-coated cells. Surprisingly then, we succeeded in creating alignment patterns using smaller, ~2 nm alkylthiol-capped gold nanoparticles using a process called stenciling that allowed us to generate patterns of homeotropic alignment in a continuum of planar alignment of the nematic LC. Finally, electro-optic investigations on some of these samples revealed that only the Zn-doped magic-sized MSNCs significantly lower the dielectric anisotropy as well as the splay elastic constant of the nematic host, despite identical size and surface functionality of the three used

  2. 21 CFR 880.6970 - Liquid crystal vein locator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Liquid crystal vein locator. 880.6970 Section 880... Devices § 880.6970 Liquid crystal vein locator. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal vein locator is a... skin by displaying the color changes of heat sensitive liquid crystals (cholesteric esters)....

  3. 21 CFR 880.6970 - Liquid crystal vein locator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Liquid crystal vein locator. 880.6970 Section 880... Devices § 880.6970 Liquid crystal vein locator. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal vein locator is a... skin by displaying the color changes of heat sensitive liquid crystals (cholesteric esters)....

  4. 21 CFR 880.6970 - Liquid crystal vein locator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Liquid crystal vein locator. 880.6970 Section 880... Devices § 880.6970 Liquid crystal vein locator. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal vein locator is a... skin by displaying the color changes of heat sensitive liquid crystals (cholesteric esters)....

  5. 21 CFR 880.6970 - Liquid crystal vein locator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Liquid crystal vein locator. 880.6970 Section 880... Devices § 880.6970 Liquid crystal vein locator. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal vein locator is a... skin by displaying the color changes of heat sensitive liquid crystals (cholesteric esters)....

  6. 21 CFR 880.6970 - Liquid crystal vein locator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Liquid crystal vein locator. 880.6970 Section 880... Devices § 880.6970 Liquid crystal vein locator. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal vein locator is a... skin by displaying the color changes of heat sensitive liquid crystals (cholesteric esters)....

  7. Semiconductor liquid crystal composition and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Li, Liang-shi

    2005-04-26

    Semiconductor liquid crystal compositions and methods for making such compositions are disclosed. One embodiment of the invention is directed to a liquid crystal composition including a solvent and semiconductor particles in the solvent. The solvent and the semiconductor particles are in an effective amount in the liquid crystal composition to form a liquid crystal phase.

  8. Bonded boojum-colloids in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Zahra; Silvestre, Nuno M; Telo da Gama, Margarida M

    2013-08-20

    We investigate bonded boojum-colloids in nematic liquid crystals, configurations where two colloids with planar degenerate anchoring are double-bonded through line defects connecting their surfaces. This bonded structure promotes the formation of linear chains aligned with the nematic director. We show that the bonded configuration is the global minimum in systems that favor twist deformations. In addition, we investigate the influence of confinement on the stability of bonded boojum-colloids. Although the unbonded colloid configuration, where the colloids bundle at oblique angles, is favored by confinement, the bonded configuration is again the global minimum for liquid crystals with sufficiently small twist elastic constants. PMID:23859624

  9. Electro-osmosis in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Tovkach, O M; Calderer, M Carme; Golovaty, Dmitry; Lavrentovich, Oleg; Walkington, Noel J

    2016-07-01

    We derive a mathematical model of a nematic electrolyte based on a variational formulation of nematodynamics. We verify the model by comparing its predictions to the results of the experiments on the substrate-controlled liquid-crystal-enabled electrokinetics. In the experiments, a nematic liquid crystal confined to a thin planar cell with surface-patterned anchoring conditions exhibits electro-osmotic flows along the "guiding rails" imposed by the spatially varying director. Extending our previous work, we consider a general setup which incorporates dielectric anisotropy of the liquid-crystalline matrix and the full set of nematic viscosities. PMID:27575193

  10. Electro-osmosis in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovkach, O. M.; Calderer, M. Carme; Golovaty, Dmitry; Lavrentovich, Oleg; Walkington, Noel J.

    2016-07-01

    We derive a mathematical model of a nematic electrolyte based on a variational formulation of nematodynamics. We verify the model by comparing its predictions to the results of the experiments on the substrate-controlled liquid-crystal-enabled electrokinetics. In the experiments, a nematic liquid crystal confined to a thin planar cell with surface-patterned anchoring conditions exhibits electro-osmotic flows along the "guiding rails" imposed by the spatially varying director. Extending our previous work, we consider a general setup which incorporates dielectric anisotropy of the liquid-crystalline matrix and the full set of nematic viscosities.

  11. Phase behavior of ionic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrat, S.; Bier, M.; Harnau, L.

    2010-05-01

    Bulk properties of ionic liquid crystals are investigated using density functional theory. The liquid crystal molecules are represented by ellipsoidal particles with charges located in their center or at their tails. Attractive interactions are taken into account in terms of the Gay-Berne pair potential. Rich phase diagrams involving vapor, isotropic and nematic liquid, as well as smectic phases are found. The dependence of the phase behavior on various parameters such as the length of the particles and the location of charges on the particles is studied.

  12. Liquid nitrogen dewar for protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Gaseous Nitrogen Dewar apparatus developed by Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine for use aboard Mir and the International Space Station allows large quantities of protein samples to be crystallized in orbit. The specimens are contained either in plastic tubing (heat-sealed at each end). Biological samples are prepared with a precipitating agent in either a batch or liquid-liquid diffusion configuration. The samples are then flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen before crystallization can start. On orbit, the Dewar is placed in a quiet area of the station and the nitrogen slowly boils off (it is taken up by the environmental control system), allowing the proteins to thaw to begin crystallization. The Dewar is returned to Earth after one to four months on orbit, depending on Shuttle flight opportunities. The tubes then are analyzed for crystal presence and quality

  13. [Liquid method of electret formation].

    PubMed

    Lowkis, B; Raubuć, Z

    1983-01-01

    The work presents the results of investigations of electrets formed according to the liquid method. This method utilizes transmission of electric charge from conductive liquid to dielectric surface. Electrets were made of poliester foil "Hostaphan". Various liquids such as acetone, ethanol, Ringer solution and distilled water were used for charging. It was established that surface densities of electret charge formed by Ringer solution and acetone are about from 15 to 20 nC/cm2, whereas those formed by ethanol and distilled water from 5 to 10 nC/cm2. These electrets are characterized by big stability of charge and their survival time is about 100 years. Deelectrization of electrets in liquids that were formerly used for formation was also performed. It appeared that the survival time of the samples after deelectrization was several times longer than the survival time of electrets. The longest survival time have samples formed by ethanol and deelectrized by Ringer solution (about 10(9) years). PMID:6680180

  14. Key Developments in Ionic Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez Fernandez, Alexandra; Kouwer, Paul H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquid crystals are materials that combine the classes of liquid crystals and ionic liquids. The first one is based on the multi-billion-dollar flat panel display industry, whilst the latter quickly developed in the past decades into a family of highly-tunable non-volatile solvents. The combination yields materials with a unique set of properties, but also with many challenges ahead. In this review, we provide an overview of the key concepts in ionic liquid crystals, particularly from a molecular perspective. What are the important molecular parameters that determine the phase behavior? How should they be introduced into the molecules? Finally, which other tools does one have to realize specific properties in the material? PMID:27196890

  15. Liquid crystal quantitative temperature measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei; Wu, Zongshan

    2001-10-01

    Quantitative temperature measurement using wide band thermochromic liquid crystals is an “area” thermal measurement technique. This technique utilizes the feature that liquid crystal changes its reflex light color with variation of temperature and applies an image capturing and processing system to calibrate the characteristic curve of liquid crystal’s color-temperature. Afterwards, the technique uses this curve to measure the distribution of temperature on experimental model. In this paper, firstly, each part of quantitative temperature measurement system using liquid crystal is illustrated and discussed. Then the technique is employed in a long duration hypersonic wind tunnel, and the quantitative result of the heat transfer coefficient along laminar plate is obtained. Additionally, some qualitative results are also given. In the end, comparing the experimental results with reference enthalpy theoretical results, a conclusion of thermal measurement accuracy is drawn.

  16. Do protein crystals nucleate within dense liquid clusters?

    SciTech Connect

    Maes, Dominique; Vorontsova, Maria A.; Potenza, Marco A. C.; Sanvito, Tiziano; Sleutel, Mike; Giglio, Marzio; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2015-06-27

    The evolution of protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS) and depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy. Newly nucleated crystals within protein-rich clusters were detected directly. These observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters are locations for crystal nucleation. Protein-dense liquid clusters are regions of high protein concentration that have been observed in solutions of several proteins. The typical cluster size varies from several tens to several hundreds of nanometres and their volume fraction remains below 10{sup −3} of the solution. According to the two-step mechanism of nucleation, the protein-rich clusters serve as locations for and precursors to the nucleation of protein crystals. While the two-step mechanism explained several unusual features of protein crystal nucleation kinetics, a direct observation of its validity for protein crystals has been lacking. Here, two independent observations of crystal nucleation with the proteins lysozyme and glucose isomerase are discussed. Firstly, the evolutions of the protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized simultaneously by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS), respectively. It is demonstrated that protein crystals appear following a significant delay after cluster formation. The cDDLS correlation functions follow a Gaussian decay, indicative of nondiffusive motion. A possible explanation is that the crystals are contained inside large clusters and are driven by the elasticity of the cluster surface. Secondly, depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy reveals the evolution from liquid clusters without crystals to newly nucleated crystals contained in the clusters to grown crystals freely diffusing in the solution. Collectively, the observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters in

  17. Effect of the Surface Affinity of Liquid Crystals and Monomers on the Orientation of Polymer-Dispersed Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Yoon, Tae-Hoon

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the effect of the surface affinity of liquid crystals and reactive monomers on liquid crystal orientation. Liquid crystals and monomers having different contact angles with the vertical alignment polyimide were mixed and photo-polymerized using a UV light. Liquid crystals with smaller contact angles and reactive monomers with greater contact angles promoted a uniform vertical orientation of liquid crystals with a vertical polymer morphology. On the other hand, liquid crystals with greater contact angles and monomers with smaller contact angles resulted in a deformed liquid crystal orientation with an elliptical polymer structure.

  18. Photonics of liquid-crystal structures: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Palto, S. P. Blinov, L. M.; Barnik, M. I.; Lazarev, V. V.; Umanskii, B. A.; Shtykov, N. M.

    2011-07-15

    The original results of studies of the electro-optical and laser effects which have been performed at the Laboratory of Liquid Crystals of the Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, over the last few years are reviewed. Cholesteric liquid crystals as vivid representatives of photonic structures and their behavior in an electric field are considered in detail. The formation of higher harmonics in the periodic distribution of the director field in a helical liquid crystal structure and, correspondingly, the new (anharmonic) mode of electro-optical effects are discussed. Another group of studies is devoted to bistable light switching by an electric field in chiral nematics. Polarization diffraction gratings controlled by an electric field are also considered. The results of studies devoted to microlasers on various photonic structures with cholesteric and nematic liquid crystals are considered in detail. Particular attention is given to the new regime: leaky-mode lasing. Designs of liquid crystal light amplifiers and their polarization, field, and spectral characteristics are considered in the last section.

  19. Liquid-core, liquid-cladding photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    De Matos, Christiano J; Cordeiro, Cristiano M B; Dos Santos, Eliane M; Ong, Jackson S; Bozolan, Alexandre; Brito Cruz, Carlos H

    2007-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a simple and novel technique to simultaneously insert a liquid into the core of a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) and a different liquid into its cladding. The result is a liquid-core, liquid-cladding waveguide in which the two liquids can be selected to yield specific guidance characteristics. As an example, we tuned the core-cladding index difference by proper choice of the inserted liquids to obtain control over the number of guided modes. Single-mode guidance was achieved for a particular choice of liquids. We also experimentally and theoretically investigated the nature of light confinement and observed the transition from photonic bandgap to total internal reflection guidance both with the core-cladding index contrast and with the PCF length. PMID:19547475

  20. Optically isotropic liquid crystal media formulated by doping star-shaped cyclic oligosiloxane liquid crystal surfactants in twin nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namil; Kim, Dae-Yoon; Park, Minwook; Choi, Yu-Jin; Kim, Soeun; Lee, Seung Hee; Jeong, Kwang-Un

    2015-05-21

    The formation of optically isotropic liquid crystal (LC) media has been investigated by doping the star-shaped LC molecular surfactants (SiLC) into the rod-shaped twin LC host molecules (DiLC). The experimental phase diagram was constructed on the basis of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and then a theoretical calculation was conducted through a combined Flory-Huggins (FH)/Maier-Saupe-McMillan (MSM)/phase field (PF) model to account for the experimental results. The phase diagram of the SiLC/DiLC mixtures revealed the broad coexistence regions such as smectic A + crystal (SmA1 + Cr2), liquid + crystal (L1 + Cr2), and liquid + nematic (L1 + N2) at the intermediate composition along with the narrow single phase crystal (Cr2), smectic (SmA1), and nematic (N2) regions. The morphologies and structures of these coexistence regions were further confirmed by polarized optical microscopy (POM) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD). At the 80/20 SiLC/DiLC composition, the optical anisotropy was induced under an alternating current (AC) electric field above its isotropization temperature. The formation of an optically isotropic LC medium in mixtures of the SiLC molecular surfactants and nematic LC host may allow us to develop new electro-optical devices. PMID:25779205

  1. Reversible switching of liquid crystal micro-particles in a nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Koki; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Masanori

    2016-01-21

    Liquid crystal micro-particles are functional materials possessing optical and dielectric anisotropies originating from the arrangement of rod-like molecules within the particles. Although they can be switched by an electric field, particles dispersed in isotropic hosts usually cannot return to their original state, because there is no restoration force acting on the particles. Here, we describe reversible switching of liquid crystal micro-particles by dispersing them in a nematic liquid crystal host. We fabricate square micro-particles with unidirectional molecular alignment and investigate their static and dynamic electro-optic properties by applying an in-plane electric field. The behavior of the micro-particles is well-described by the theoretical model we construct, making this study potentially useful for the development of liquid crystal-liquid crystal particle composites with engineered properties. PMID:26514389

  2. Novel ferroelectric liquid crystals consisting glassy liquid crystal as chiral dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huang-Ming Philip; Tsai, Yun-Yen; Lin, Chi-Wen; Shieh, Han-Ping David

    2006-08-01

    A series of ferroelectric liquid crystals consisting new glassy liquid crystals (GLCs) as chiral dopants were prepared and evaluated for their potentials in fast switching ability less than 1 ms. The properties of pure ferroelectric glassy liquid crystals (FGLCs) and mixtures were reported in this paper. In particular, the novel FGLC possessing wide chiral smectic C mesophase over 100 °C is able to suppress smectic A phase of host. The mixture containing 2.0 % GLC-1 performs greater alignment ability and higher contrast ratio than R2301 (Clariant, Japan) in a 2 μm pre-made cell (EHC, Japan). These results indicate that novel FLC mixtures consisting glassy liquid crystals present a promising liquid crystal materials for fast switching field sequential color displays.

  3. Liquid Crystal Ordering of Random DNA Oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, Tommaso; Zanchetta, Giuliano; Fraccia, Tommaso; Cerbino, Roberto; Tsai, Ethan; Moran, Mark; Smith, Gregory; Walba, David; Clark, Noel

    2012-02-01

    Concentrated solutions of DNA oligomers (6 to 20 base pairs) organize into chiral nematic (NEM) and columnar (COL) liquid crystal (LC) phases. When the oligomer duplexes are mixed with single strands, LC phase formation proceeds through macroscopic phase separation, as a consequence of the combination of various self-assembly processes including strand pairing, reversible linear aggregation, demixing and LC ordering. We extended our investigation to the case of LC ordering in oligonucleotides whose sequences are partially or entirely randomly chosen, and we observed LC phases even in entirely random 20mers, corresponding to a family of 4^20 10^12 different sequences. We have tracked the origin of this behaviour: random sequences pair into generally defected duplexes, a large fraction of them terminating with stretches of unpaired bases (overhangs); overhangs promote linear aggregation of duplexes, with a mean strength depending on the overhang length; LC formation is accompanied by a phase separation where the duplexes with longer overhangs aggregate to form COL LC domains that coexist with an isotropic fluid rich in duplexes whose structure cannot aggregate.

  4. The microscopic pathway to crystallization in supercooled liquids

    PubMed Central

    Russo, John; Tanaka, Hajime

    2012-01-01

    Despite its fundamental and technological importance, a microscopic understanding of the crystallization process is still elusive. By computer simulations of the hard-sphere model we reveal the mechanism by which thermal fluctuations drive the transition from the supercooled liquid state to the crystal state. In particular we show that fluctuations in bond orientational order trigger the nucleation process, contrary to the common belief that the transition is initiated by density fluctuations. Moreover, the analysis of bond orientational fluctuations shows that these not only act as seeds of the nucleation process, but also i) determine the particular polymorph which is to be nucleated from them and ii) at high density favour the formation of fivefold structures which can frustrate the formation of crystals. These results can shed new light on our understanding of the relationship between crystallization and vitrification. PMID:22792437

  5. The effect of position of (S)-2-octyloxy tail on the formation of frustrated blue phase and antiferroelectric phase in Schiff base liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiung-Cheng; Hsu, Ching-Chung; Chen, Li-Wen; Cheng, Yu-Lun

    2014-12-14

    Two series of chiral salicylaldimine-based liquid crystals which differ from each other in the position of the (S)-2-octyloxy tail have been synthesized and characterized by polarizing optical microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and electrical switching. Compounds OH I (n = 6-7) having (S)-2-octyloxy tail close to the salicylaldimine core and compounds OH II (n = 6-11) having (S)-2-octyloxy tail far from the salicylaldimine core exhibit polymorphism of mesophases including frustrated blue phase and antiferroelectric (SmC*(A)) phases. Notably, as compared with structurally similar Schiff base compounds H I (n = 7), intramolecular hydrogen bonding in antiferroelectric salicylaldimine-based compounds OH I (n = 7) induces the frustrated blue phase. However, as compared with structurally similar Schiff base compounds OH II (n = 8), the lack of intramolecular hydrogen bonding in Schiff base compounds H II (n = 8) suppresses antiferroelectric properties. PMID:25341417

  6. Orientation of nematic liquid crystal in open glass microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarinia, H.; Beeckman, J.; Neyts, K.; Schacht, E.; Gironès, J.; James, R.; Fernandez, F. A.

    2009-09-01

    Liquid crystal materials can have bulk reorientation due to surface interaction and are therefore of interest for biosensing applications. We present a setup, with holes etched in a substrate, filled with liquid crystal and covered by a sample fluid. The influence of the depth of the microcavities and the type of liquid on the liquid crystal orientation is investigated by experiments and simulations.

  7. Liquid-crystal fiber-optic switch.

    PubMed

    Soref, R A

    1979-05-01

    An adjustable access coupler for multimode fiber-optic networks has been constructed, based on the voltage-tunable total-internal-reflection effect in nematic liquid crystals. Fibers are coupled via graded-index rod lenses at normal incidence to flint-glass prisms in contact with a 6-microm liquid-crystal layer. The achromatic four-port switch has a 1.6-dB optical insertion loss, a tap ratio controllable from -4.6 to -48 dB, a directionality of 44 dB, and an operating voltage of 5 to 20 V rms. PMID:19687832

  8. Dynamic Theory of Polydomain Liquid Crystal Elastomers.

    PubMed

    Duzgun, Ayhan; Selinger, Jonathan V

    2015-10-30

    When liquid crystal elastomers are prepared without any alignment, disordered polydomain structures emerge as the materials are cooled into the nematic phase. These polydomain structures are often attributed to quenched disorder in the cross-linked polymer network. As an alternative explanation, we develop a theory for the dynamics of the isotropic-nematic transition in liquid crystal elastomers, and show that the dynamics can induce a polydomain structure with a characteristic length scale, through a mechanism analogous to the Cahn-Hilliard equation for phase separation. PMID:26565497

  9. Topology and bistability in liquid crystal devices

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, A.; Newton, C. J. P.; Robbins, J. M.; Zyskin, M.

    2007-05-15

    We study nematic liquid crystal configurations in a prototype bistable device--the post aligned bistable nematic (PABN) cell. Working within the Oseen-Frank continuum model, we describe the liquid crystal configuration by a unit-vector field n, in a model version of the PABN cell. First, we identify four distinct topologies in this geometry. We explicitly construct trial configurations with these topologies which are used as initial conditions for a numerical solver, based on the finite-element method. The morphologies and energetics of the corresponding numerical solutions qualitatively agree with experimental observations and suggest a topological mechanism for bistability in the PABN cell geometry.

  10. Optical solitons in liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, Y.S.; Lam, L.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we will discuss theoretically the possible existence of optical solitons in the isotropic liquid and in the nematic phase. For the same compound, when heated, the nematic phase will go through a first order transition at temperature T{sub c} to the isotropic liquid phase. As temperature increases from below T{sub c}, the orientation order parameter, Q, decreases, drops to zero abruptly at T{sub c} and remains zero for T > T{sub c}. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Crystals, liquid crystals and superfluid helium on curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitelli, Vincenzo

    In this thesis we study the ground state of ordered phases grown as thin layers on substrates with smooth spatially varying Gaussian curvature. The Gaussian curvature acts as a source for a one body potential of purely geometrical origin that controls the equilibrium distribution of the defects in liquid crystal layers, thin films of He4 and two dimensional crystals on a frozen curved surface. For superfluids, all defects are repelled (attracted) by regions of positive (negative) Gaussian curvature. For liquid crystals, charges between 0 and 4pi are attracted by regions of positive curvature while all other charges are repelled. As the thickness of the liquid crystal film increases, transitions between two and three dimensional defect structures are triggered in the ground state of the system. Thin spherical shells of nematic molecules with planar anchoring possess four short 12 disclination lines but, as the thickness increases, a three dimensional escaped configuration composed of two pairs of half-hedgehogs becomes energetically favorable. Finally, we examine the static and dynamical properties that distinguish two dimensional crystals constrained to lie on a curved substrate from their flat space counterparts. A generic mechanism of dislocation unbinding in the presence of varying Gaussian curvature is presented. We explore how the geometric potential affects the energetics and dynamics of dislocations and point defects such as vacancies and interstitials.

  12. Angular velocity response of nanoparticles dispersed in liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Pin-Chun; Shih, Wen-Pin

    2013-06-01

    A hybrid material of nanoparticles dispersed in liquid crystal changed capacitance after spinning beyond threshold angular velocity. Once the centrifugal force of nanoparticles overcomes the attractive force between liquid crystals, the nanoparticles begin to move. The order of highly viscous liquid crystals is disturbed by the nanoparticles' penetrative movement, and the dielectric constant of the liquid crystal cell changes as a result. We found that the angular velocity response of nanoparticles dispersed in liquid crystal with higher working temperature and nanoparticles' density provided higher sensitivity. The obtained results are important for the continuous improvement of liquid-crystal-based inertial sensors or nano-viscometers.

  13. Investigations into complex liquid crystal mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchhoff, Jennifer

    Liquid crystal phases exhibit physical characteristics that lie between those of liquid and crystal phases. The many liquid crystal sub-phases are defined based on the degree of positional and orientational ordering the molecules have and the materials that make up these liquid crystal phases. This thesis presents a study of the molecular packing and physical properties of complex liquid crystal phases using dopants to better examine the stability and packing mechanisms of these phases. It also looks at the dispersion of quantum dots in liquid crystal materials, examining the electro-optical properties of the mixtures. The main goal of this thesis is to examine the effects of dopants on the properties of liquid crystal phases using optical microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, electro-optical measurements, and X-ray scattering. For those mixtures with quantum dots fluorescence microscopy and photoluminescence measurements were also conducted. Rod-like liquid crystals are commonly used in display applications when the material is in a nematic liquid crystal phase, which is the least ordered phase exhibiting no positional ordering. The more complicated chiral smectic liquid crystal phases, which have a one dimensional layer structure, show potential for faster and tri-stable switching. A chiral rod-like liquid crystal material is doped with both chiral and achiral rod-like liquid crystals to examine the stability of one of the chiral smectic sub-phase, the SmC* FI1 phase. This phase consists of tilted molecules rotating about the cone defined by the tilt angle with a periodicity of three layers and an overall helical structure. The SmC*FI1 phase is stabilized by the competition between antiferroelectric and ferroelectric interactions, and small amounts of the achiral dopant broadens the range of this phase by almost 5°C. Higher dopant concentrations of the achiral material result in the destabilization of not just the SmC*FI1 phase but all tilted sub

  14. Helmet-Mounted Liquid-Crystal Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steve; Plough, Alan; Clarke, Robert; Mclean, William; Fournier, Joseph; Marmolejo, Jose A.

    1991-01-01

    Helmet-mounted binocular display provides text and images for almost any wearer; does not require fitting for most users. Accommodates users from smallest interpupillary distance to largest. Two liquid-crystal display units mounted in helmet. Images generated seen from any position head can assume inside helmet. Eyes directed to position for best viewing.

  15. Inexpensive Electrooptic Experiments on Liquid Crystal Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciferno, Thomas M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of an electrooptic apparatus that can be incorporated into the classroom to test liquid crystal displays (LCDs) and introduce students to experiments of an applied physics nature with very practical implications. Presents experiments that give students hands-on experience with technologies of current interest to…

  16. Infrared diagnosis using liquid crystal detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hugenschmidt, M.; Vollrath, K.

    1986-01-01

    The possible uses of pulsed carbon dioxide lasers for analysis of plasmas and flows need appropriate infrared image converters. Emphasis was placed on liquid crystal detectors and their operational modes. Performance characterstics and selection criteria, such as high sensitivity, short reaction time, and high spatial resolution are discussed.

  17. Annihilation of defects in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetec, M.; Ambrožič, M.; Kralj, S.

    The annihilation of defect is studied theoretically in liquid crystals (LCs). We consider the annihilation of point disclinations in nematic and line edge dislocations in smectic A LC phase, respectively. We stress qualitative similarities in these processes. The whole annihilation regime is taken into account, consisting of the pre-collision, collision, and post-collision stage.

  18. Origin of Aggregate Formation in Antibody Crystal Suspensions Containing PEG.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Christian; Mathaes, Roman; Saedler, Rainer; Winter, Gerhard

    2016-03-01

    The crystalline state of proteins is deemed as a promising formulation platform for biopharmaceuticals. However, a stabilizing effect of protein crystal suspensions is controversially discussed. In fact, antibodies can display an increased aggregation and particle formation profile after the crystallization process compared with liquid or solid amorphous formulations. Nevertheless, studies regarding aggregate formation and its origin remain meager in literature. It was the aim of this study to investigate these aspects for a model IgG antibody (mAb1), which shows an increased aggregate formation after crystallization with polyethylene glycol. The presence of a dynamic equilibrium, a steady exchange of protein between the crystals and the supernatant, was demonstrated by replacing the supernatant with an identical but fluorescence-labeled protein solution and followed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Aggregate formation was monitored by size exclusion high-pressure chromatography and flow cytometry. Constantly increasing aggregate levels were found for the crystal fraction and for the supernatant. For the later, markedly higher particle counts were detected. The labeled supernatant and the unlabeled protein crystals allowed a precise identification of the origin of the aggregates. The rising aggregate fractions of the crystals displayed high mean fluorescence intensities that elucidated their origin in the supernatant. PMID:26886344

  19. Colloidal cholesteric liquid crystal in spherical confinement.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfeng; Jun-Yan Suen, Jeffrey; Prince, Elisabeth; Larin, Egor M; Klinkova, Anna; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Zhu, Shoujun; Yang, Bai; Helmy, Amr S; Lavrentovich, Oleg D; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    The organization of nanoparticles in constrained geometries is an area of fundamental and practical importance. Spherical confinement of nanocolloids leads to new modes of packing, self-assembly, phase separation and relaxation of colloidal liquids; however, it remains an unexplored area of research for colloidal liquid crystals. Here we report the organization of cholesteric liquid crystal formed by nanorods in spherical droplets. For cholesteric suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals, with progressive confinement, we observe phase separation into a micrometer-size isotropic droplet core and a cholesteric shell formed by concentric nanocrystal layers. Further confinement results in a transition to a bipolar planar cholesteric morphology. The distribution of polymer, metal, carbon or metal oxide nanoparticles in the droplets is governed by the nanoparticle size and yields cholesteric droplets exhibiting fluorescence, plasmonic properties and magnetic actuation. This work advances our understanding of how the interplay of order, confinement and topological defects affects the morphology of soft matter. PMID:27561545

  20. Colloidal cholesteric liquid crystal in spherical confinement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunfeng; Jun-Yan Suen, Jeffrey; Prince, Elisabeth; Larin, Egor M.; Klinkova, Anna; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Zhu, Shoujun; Yang, Bai; Helmy, Amr S.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    The organization of nanoparticles in constrained geometries is an area of fundamental and practical importance. Spherical confinement of nanocolloids leads to new modes of packing, self-assembly, phase separation and relaxation of colloidal liquids; however, it remains an unexplored area of research for colloidal liquid crystals. Here we report the organization of cholesteric liquid crystal formed by nanorods in spherical droplets. For cholesteric suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals, with progressive confinement, we observe phase separation into a micrometer-size isotropic droplet core and a cholesteric shell formed by concentric nanocrystal layers. Further confinement results in a transition to a bipolar planar cholesteric morphology. The distribution of polymer, metal, carbon or metal oxide nanoparticles in the droplets is governed by the nanoparticle size and yields cholesteric droplets exhibiting fluorescence, plasmonic properties and magnetic actuation. This work advances our understanding of how the interplay of order, confinement and topological defects affects the morphology of soft matter. PMID:27561545

  1. Electric heating effects in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Y.; Shiyanovskii, S. V.; Lavrentovich, O. D.

    2006-07-01

    Electric heating effects in the nematic liquid crystal change the liquid crystal physical properties and dynamics. We propose a model to quantitatively describe the heating effects caused by dielectric dispersion and ionic conductivity in the nematic liquid crystals upon the application of an ac electric field. The temperature increase of the liquid crystal cell is related to the properties of the liquid crystal such as the imaginary part of the dielectric permittivity, thermal properties of the bounding plates, and the surrounding medium as well as frequency and amplitude of the electric field. To study the temperature dynamics experimentally, we use a small thermocouple inserted directly into the nematic bulk; we assure that the thermocouple does not alter the thermal behavior of the system by comparing the results to those obtained by a noncontact birefringent probing technique recently proposed by Wen and Wu [Appl. Phys. Lett. 86, 231104 (2005)]. We determine how the temperature dynamics and the stationary value of the temperature increase depend on the parameters of the materials and the applied field. We used different surrounding media, from extremely good heat conductors such as aluminum cooling device to extremely poor conductor, Styrofoam; these two provide two limiting cases as compared to typical conditions of nematic cell exploitation in a laboratory or in commercial devices. The experiments confirm the theoretical predictions, namely, that the temperature rise is controlled not only by the heat transfer coefficient of the surrounding medium (as in the previous model) but also by the thickness and the thermal conductivity coefficient of the bounding plates enclosing the nematic layer. The temperature increase strongly depends on the director orientation and can change nonmonotonously with the frequency of the applied field.

  2. Crystallization of glass-forming liquids: Specific surface energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelzer, Jürn W. P.; Abyzov, Alexander S.

    2016-08-01

    A generalization of the Stefan-Skapski-Turnbull relation for the melt-crystal specific interfacial energy is developed in terms of the generalized Gibbs approach extending its standard formulation to thermodynamic non-equilibrium states. With respect to crystal nucleation, this relation is required in order to determine the parameters of the critical crystal clusters being a prerequisite for the computation of the work of critical cluster formation. As one of its consequences, a relation for the dependence of the specific surface energy of critical clusters on temperature and pressure is derived applicable for small and moderate deviations from liquid-crystal macroscopic equilibrium states. Employing the Stefan-Skapski-Turnbull relation, general expressions for the size and the work of formation of critical crystal clusters are formulated. The resulting expressions are much more complex as compared to the respective relations obtained via the classical Gibbs theory. Latter relations are retained as limiting cases of these more general expressions for moderate undercoolings. By this reason, the formulated, here, general relations for the specification of the critical cluster size and the work of critical cluster formation give a key for an appropriate interpretation of a variety of crystallization phenomena occurring at large undercoolings which cannot be understood in terms of the Gibbs' classical treatment.

  3. Liquid Crystals: Graphene Oxide Liquid Crystals: Discovery, Evolution and Applications (Adv. Mater. 16/2016).

    PubMed

    Narayan, Rekha; Kim, Ji Eun; Kim, Ju Young; Lee, Kyung Eun; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2016-04-01

    Graphene-oxide liquid crystals (GOLCs) have recently been discovered as a novel 2D material with remarkable properties. On page 3045, S. O. Kim and co-workers review the discovery of different GOLC mesophases and recent progress on fundamental studies and applications. The image displays the nematic schlieren texture (in the background) formed by flowing domains of graphene-oxide liquid crystals and their potential applications in energy storage, optoelectronics and wet-spun fibers. PMID:27105812

  4. Flexoelectricity in an oxadiazole bent-core nematic liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, S. Panov, V. P.; Gleeson, H. F.; Greco, C.; Ferrarini, A.; Görtz, V.; Goodby, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    We have determined experimentally the magnitude of the difference in the splay and bend flexoelectric coefficients, |e{sub 1} − e{sub 3}|, of an oxadiazole bent-core liquid crystal by measuring the critical voltage for the formation of flexodomains together with their wave number. The coefficient |e{sub 1} − e{sub 3}| is found to be a factor of 2–3 times higher than in most conventional calamitic nematic liquid crystals, varying from 8 pCm{sup −1} to 20 pCm{sup −1} across the ∼60 K—wide nematic regime. We have also calculated the individual flexoelectric coefficients e{sub 1} and e{sub 3}, with the dipolar and quadrupolar contributions of the bent-core liquid crystal by combining density functional theory calculations with a molecular field approach and atomistic modelling. Interestingly, the magnitude of the bend flexoelectric coefficient is found to be rather small, in contrast to common expectations for bent-core molecules. The calculations are in excellent agreement with the experimental values, offering an insight into how molecular parameters contribute to the flexoelectric coefficients and illustrating a huge potential for the prediction of flexoelectric behaviour in bent-core liquid crystals.

  5. Shear-Sensitive Monomer/Polymer Liquid Crystal System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Eftekhari, Abe; Parmar, D. S.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes preliminary investigation of new monomer/polymer liquid crystal system, thin film of shear-sensitive cholesteric monomer liquid crystal (TI 511) on Xydar (STR800) (or equivalent) liquid crystal polymer substrate. Monomer/polymer liquid crystal films applied to surfaces provide quantitative indications of shear stresses caused by winds blowing along surfaces. Effects of shear stresses reversible in new coating system. System provides quantitative data on flows in wind tunnels.

  6. Liquid crystal film development for plasma mirrors and waveplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, G. E.; Poole, P. L.; Willis, C.; Hanna, R. J.; Pytel, K.; Sullivan, K. S.; Andereck, C. D.; Schumacher, D. W.

    2015-11-01

    Many laser-plasma phenomena currently under study depend critically on the quality of the pulse contrast. Costly sacrificial plasma mirrors are now commonly used to improve the temporal laser contrast before target interaction, especially for ion acceleration where high contrast is necessary to achieve interesting new mechanisms. Liquid crystal films were originally developed as variable thickness thin-film targets, and were demonstrated for this purpose in. Varying film formation parameters such as volume, temperature, and draw speed allows thickness control between 10 nm and several 10s of microns, in-situ and under vacuum. Development since that initial work has allowed large area films to be formed, several cm2 in extent, with the same thickness range. The molecular flatness of a freely suspended film renders these films excellent low-cost plasma mirrors, given appropriate formation control. Additionally, the birefringence of the liquid crystal used here permits these films to be used as large area zero-order waveplates at the appropriate thickness. Details on the current state of liquid crystal film application development, including a >1 Hz small area film formation device, will be presented. This work was performed with support from the DARPA PULSE program through a grant from AMRDEC and by the NNSA under contract DE-NA0001976.

  7. Chem I Supplement: Liquid Crystals--The Chameleon Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Glenn H.

    1983-01-01

    Presents information relevant to everyday life so as to stimulate student interest in the properties of the two basic types of liquid crystals: thermotropic and lyotropic. Describes the applications of liquid crystals to electronics, biomedicine, and polymer science and appraises the future of liquid crystal research. (JM)

  8. 21 CFR 880.2200 - Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. 880... Personal Use Monitoring Devices § 880.2200 Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal forehead temperature strip is a device applied to the forehead that is used to...

  9. 21 CFR 880.2200 - Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. 880... Personal Use Monitoring Devices § 880.2200 Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal forehead temperature strip is a device applied to the forehead that is used to...

  10. 21 CFR 880.2200 - Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. 880... Personal Use Monitoring Devices § 880.2200 Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal forehead temperature strip is a device applied to the forehead that is used to...

  11. 21 CFR 880.2200 - Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. 880... Personal Use Monitoring Devices § 880.2200 Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal forehead temperature strip is a device applied to the forehead that is used to...

  12. 21 CFR 880.2200 - Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. 880... Personal Use Monitoring Devices § 880.2200 Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal forehead temperature strip is a device applied to the forehead that is used to...

  13. Liquid crystals for holographic optical data storage.

    PubMed

    Matharu, Avtar S; Jeeva, Shehzad; Ramanujam, P S

    2007-12-01

    A tutorial review is presented to inform and inspire the reader to develop and integrate strong scientific links between liquid crystals and holographic data storage, from a materials scientist's viewpoint. The principle of holographic data storage as a means of providing a solution to the information storage demands of the 21st century is detailed. Holography is a small subset of the much larger field of optical data storage and similarly, the diversity of materials used for optical data storage is enormous. The theory of polarisation holography which produces holograms of constant intensity, is discussed. Polymeric liquid crystals play an important role in the development of materials for holographic storage and photoresponsive materials based on azobenzene are targeted for discussion due to their ease of photo-reversion between trans- and cis-states. Although the final polymer may not be liquid crystalline, irradiation can induce ordered domains. The mesogens act in a co-operative manner, enhancing refractive indices and birefringences. Surface relief gratings are discussed as a consequence of holographic storage. Cholesteric polymers comprising azobenzene are briefly highlighted. Irradiation causing cis-trans-isomerisation can be used to control helix pitch. A brief mention of liquid crystals is also made since these materials may be of future interest since they are optically transparent and amenable to photo-induced anisotropy. PMID:17982514

  14. Zeolite-like liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Poppe, Silvio; Lehmann, Anne; Scholte, Alexander; Prehm, Marko; Zeng, Xiangbing; Ungar, Goran; Tschierske, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Zeolites represent inorganic solid-state materials with porous structures of fascinating complexity. Recently, significant progress was made by reticular synthesis of related organic solid-state materials, such as metal-organic or covalent organic frameworks. Herein we go a step further and report the first example of a fluid honeycomb mimicking a zeolitic framework. In this unique self-assembled liquid crystalline structure, transverse-lying π-conjugated rod-like molecules form pentagonal channels, encircling larger octagonal channels, a structural motif also found in some zeolites. Additional bundles of coaxial molecules penetrate the centres of the larger channels, unreachable by chains attached to the honeycomb framework. This creates a unique fluid hybrid structure combining positive and negative anisotropies, providing the potential for tuning the directionality of anisotropic optical, electrical and magnetic properties. This work also demonstrates a new approach to complex soft-matter self-assembly, by using frustration between space filling and the entropic penalty of chain extension. PMID:26486751

  15. Zeolite-like liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, Silvio; Lehmann, Anne; Scholte, Alexander; Prehm, Marko; Zeng, Xiangbing; Ungar, Goran; Tschierske, Carsten

    2015-10-01

    Zeolites represent inorganic solid-state materials with porous structures of fascinating complexity. Recently, significant progress was made by reticular synthesis of related organic solid-state materials, such as metal-organic or covalent organic frameworks. Herein we go a step further and report the first example of a fluid honeycomb mimicking a zeolitic framework. In this unique self-assembled liquid crystalline structure, transverse-lying π-conjugated rod-like molecules form pentagonal channels, encircling larger octagonal channels, a structural motif also found in some zeolites. Additional bundles of coaxial molecules penetrate the centres of the larger channels, unreachable by chains attached to the honeycomb framework. This creates a unique fluid hybrid structure combining positive and negative anisotropies, providing the potential for tuning the directionality of anisotropic optical, electrical and magnetic properties. This work also demonstrates a new approach to complex soft-matter self-assembly, by using frustration between space filling and the entropic penalty of chain extension.

  16. Zeolite-like liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Poppe, Silvio; Lehmann, Anne; Scholte, Alexander; Prehm, Marko; Zeng, Xiangbing; Ungar, Goran; Tschierske, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Zeolites represent inorganic solid-state materials with porous structures of fascinating complexity. Recently, significant progress was made by reticular synthesis of related organic solid-state materials, such as metal-organic or covalent organic frameworks. Herein we go a step further and report the first example of a fluid honeycomb mimicking a zeolitic framework. In this unique self-assembled liquid crystalline structure, transverse-lying π-conjugated rod-like molecules form pentagonal channels, encircling larger octagonal channels, a structural motif also found in some zeolites. Additional bundles of coaxial molecules penetrate the centres of the larger channels, unreachable by chains attached to the honeycomb framework. This creates a unique fluid hybrid structure combining positive and negative anisotropies, providing the potential for tuning the directionality of anisotropic optical, electrical and magnetic properties. This work also demonstrates a new approach to complex soft-matter self-assembly, by using frustration between space filling and the entropic penalty of chain extension. PMID:26486751

  17. Photoalignment of liquid crystals and development of novel glassy liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chunki

    This thesis consists of two parts: (i) photoalignment of liquid crystals, including a nematic fluid, a glassy-namtic pentafluorene, and a cholesteric glassy liquid crystal; and (ii) development of cholesteric glassy liquid crystals comprising a hybrid chiral-nematic mesogen and of photochromic glassy liquid crystals with dithienylethene cores. Photoalignment behaviors were interpreted in terms of the kinetics of axis-selective photodimerization, the rotational mobility of pendant coumarin monomers, and the coumarin monomer's and dimer's absorption dipoles located by computational chemistry. Coumarin-containing polymethacrylate films were employed to elucidate the roles played by coumarin monomer's and dimer's orientational order, their relative abundance, and the energetics of their interactions with overlying liquid crystals. Under favorable conditions, photoalignment was shown to be comparable to rubbing polymimide film in the ability to orient liquid crystals. A hole-conducting copolymer film comprising triphenylamine and coumarin was used to unravel how the dilution of coumarin monomers, polarization ratio of UV-irradiation to induce dimerization of coumarin, and triplet energy transfer from triphenylamine to coumarin moieties affect the quality of photoalignment and its cross-over behavior. Cholesteric glassy liquid crystals are comprised of a helical stack of quasi-nematic layers frozen in the solid state capable of selective wavelength reflection with simultaneous circular polarization. Potentially applications of this material class include robust non-absorbing circular polarizers, optical notch filters and reflectors, and polarized light-emitters and lasers. To facilitate material synthesis over prior arts, hybrid chiral-nematic mesogens were chemically bonded to benzene via enantiomeric 2-methylpropylene spacers, exhibiting a broad cholesteric fluid temperature range. Phase transition temperatures, glass-forming ability, morphological stability against

  18. Bond orientational order in liquids: Towards a unified description of water-like anomalies, liquid-liquid transition, glass transition, and crystallization: Bond orientational order in liquids.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hajime

    2012-10-01

    There are at least three fundamental states of matter, depending upon temperature and pressure: gas, liquid, and solid (crystal). These states are separated by first-order phase transitions between them. In both gas and liquid phases a complete translational and rotational symmetry exist, whereas in a solid phase both symmetries are broken. In intermediate phases between liquid and solid, which include liquid crystal and plastic crystal phases, only one of the two symmetries is preserved. Among the fundamental states of matter, the liquid state is the most poorly understood. We argue that it is crucial for a better understanding of liquids to recognize that a liquid generally has the tendency to have a local structural order and its presence is intrinsic and universal to any liquid. Such structural ordering is a consequence of many-body correlations, more specifically, bond angle correlations, which we believe are crucial for the description of the liquid state. We show that this physical picture may naturally explain difficult unsolved problems associated with the liquid state, such as anomalies of water-type liquids (water, Si, Ge, ...), liquid-liquid transition, liquid-glass transition, crystallization and quasicrystal formation, in a unified manner. In other words, we need a new order parameter representing a low local free-energy configuration, which is a bond orientational order parameter in many cases, in addition to a density order parameter for the physical description of these phenomena. Here we review our two-order-parameter model of liquid and consider how transient local structural ordering is linked to all of the above-mentioned phenomena. The relationship between these phenomena is also discussed. PMID:23104614

  19. Narrowband multispectral liquid crystal tunable filter.

    PubMed

    Abuleil, Marwan; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim

    2016-05-01

    Multispectral tunable filters with high performance are desirable components in various biomedical and industrial applications. In this Letter, we present a new narrowband multispectral tunable filter with high throughput over a wide dynamic range. It is composed from a wideband large dynamic range liquid crystal tunable filter combined with a multiple narrowbands spectral filter made of two stacks of photonic crystals and cavity layer in between. The filter tunes between nine spectral bands covering the range 450-1000 nm with bandwidth <10  nm and throughput >80%. PMID:27128048

  20. Liquid crystal alignment in cylindrical microcapillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chychłowski, M.; Yaroshchuk, O.; Kravchuk, R.; Woliński, T.

    2011-09-01

    A variety of alignment configurations of liquid crystals (LCs) inside the glassy cylindrical capillaries is realized by using alignment materials providing different anchoring. The radial configuration with central disclination line is obtained for homeotropic boundary conditions. In turn, the axial, transversal and tilted alignment structures are realized by using materials for planar anchoring. The uniformity and controlling of the latter structures were provided by photoalignment method. This approach can be further used to control LC alignment in the photonic crystal fibers recognized as advanced elements for different optical devices.

  1. Liquid crystal alignment in cylindrical microcapillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chychłowski, M.; Yaroshchuk, O.; Kravchuk, R.; Woliński, T.

    2012-03-01

    A variety of alignment configurations of liquid crystals (LCs) inside the glassy cylindrical capillaries is realized by using alignment materials providing different anchoring. The radial configuration with central disclination line is obtained for homeotropic boundary conditions. In turn, the axial, transversal and tilted alignment structures are realized by using materials for planar anchoring. The uniformity and controlling of the latter structures were provided by photoalignment method. This approach can be further used to control LC alignment in the photonic crystal fibers recognized as advanced elements for different optical devices.

  2. Method For Screening Microcrystallizations For Crystal Formation

    DOEpatents

    Santarsiero, Bernard D. , Stevens, Raymond C. , Schultz, Peter G. , Jaklevic, Joseph M. , Yegian, Derek T. , Cornell, Earl W. , Nordmeyer, Robert A.

    2003-10-07

    A method is provided for performing array microcrystallizations to determine suitable crystallization conditions for a molecule, the method comprising: forming an array of microcrystallizations, each microcrystallization comprising a drop comprising a mother liquor solution whose composition varies within the array and a molecule to be crystallized, the drop having a volume of less than 1 microliter; storing the array of microcrystallizations under conditions suitable for molecule crystals to form in the drops in the array; and detecting molecule crystal formation in the drops by taking images of the drops.

  3. Modal liquid crystal array of optical elements.

    PubMed

    Algorri, J F; Love, G D; Urruchi, V

    2013-10-21

    In this study, a novel liquid crystal array based on modal control principle is proposed and demonstrated. The advanced device comprises a six striped electrode structure that forms a configurable 2D matrix of optical elements. A simulation program based on the Frank-Oseen equations and modal control theory has been developed to predict the device electrooptic response, that is, voltage distribution, interference pattern and unwrapped phase. A low-power electronics circuit, that generates complex waveforms, has been built for driving the device. A combined variation of the waveform amplitude and phase has provided a high tuning versatility to the device. Thus, the simulations have demonstrated the generation of a liquid crystal prism array with tunable slope. The proposed device has also been configured as an axicon array. Test measurements have allowed us to demonstrate that electrooptic responses, simulated and empirical, are fairly in agreement. PMID:24150324

  4. Photoinduced molecular reorientation of absorbing liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrucci, L.; Paparo, D.

    1997-08-01

    The phenomenon of photoinduced molecular reorientation of absorbing nematic liquid crystals is analyzed in a macroscopic general framework and with a specific molecular model. The photoinduced torque responsible for the reorientation is shown to describe a transfer of angular momentum from the molecule center-of-mass degrees of freedom to the rotational ones, mediated by molecular friction. As a consequence, a photoinduced stress tensor is predicted to develop together with the torque in the illuminated fluid. A molecular expression of the photoinduced torque is derived with a rigorous procedure, valid both for a pure material and for a dye-liquid-crystal mixture. This torque expression corrects those reported in previous works on the same subject. The photoinduced torque is evaluated analytically in a simple approximate limit.

  5. Errors in thermochromic liquid crystal thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiberg, Roland; Lior, Noam

    2004-09-01

    This article experimentally investigates and assesses the errors that may be incurred in the hue-based thermochromic liquid crystal thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC) method, and their causes. The errors include response time, hysteresis, aging, surrounding illumination disturbance, direct illumination and viewing angle, amount of light into the camera, TLC thickness, digital resolution of the image conversion system, and measurement noise. Some of the main conclusions are that: (1) The 3×8 bits digital representation of the red green and blue TLC color values produces a temperature measurement error of typically 1% of the TLC effective temperature range, (2) an eight-fold variation of the light intensity into the camera produced variations, which were not discernable from the digital resolution error, (3) this temperature depends on the TLC film thickness, and (4) thicker films are less susceptible to aging and thickness nonuniformities.

  6. Angular effects on thermochromic liquid crystal thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodzwa, Paul M.; Eaton, John K.

    2007-12-01

    This paper directly discusses the effects of lighting and viewing angles on liquid crystal thermography. This is because although thermochromic liquid crystals (TLCs) are a widely-used and accepted tool in heat transfer research, little effort has been directed to analytically describing these effects. Such insight is invaluable for the development of effective mitigation strategies. Using analytical relationships that describe the perceived color shift, a systematic manner of improving the performance of a TLC system is presented. This is particularly relevant for applications where significant variations in lighting and/or viewing angles are expected (such as a highly curved surface). This discussion includes an examination of the importance of the definition of the hue angle used to calibrate the color of a TLC-painted surface. The theoretical basis of the validated high-accuracy calibration approach reported by Kodzwa et al. (Exp Fluids s00348-007-0310-6, 2007) is presented.

  7. Phototunable reflection notches of cholesteric liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hrozhyk, Uladzimir A.; Serak, Svetlana V.; Tabiryan, Nelson V.; Bunning, Timothy J.

    2008-09-15

    The reflection notch of cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) formed from highly photosenstive azobenzene nematic liquid crystals doped with light-insensitive, large helical twisting power chiral dopants is shown to be widely phototunable by green laser beams. The nonlinear transmission properties of these materials were studied. We have shown that the relative shift in Bragg wavelength is independent of the chiral dopant concentration and develop a predictive theory of such behavior. The theory describes the dynamics of phototuning as well. Reflection shifts greater than 150 nm were driven with low power, cw of 532 nm in these photosensitive CLCs, previously attainable only through UV pre-exposure. A nonlinear feedback mechanism was demonstrated for CLCs of left, right, and both handedness upon laser-induced blueshifting of the reflection notch from a red wavelength using a green cw laser.

  8. Photorefractivity in liquid crystals doped with a soluble conjugated polymer.

    SciTech Connect

    Niemczyk, M. P.; Svec, W. A.; Wasielewski, M. R.; Wiederrecht, G. P.

    1999-07-07

    Photoconductive polymers are doped into liquid crystals to create a new mechanism for space-charge field formation in photorefractive liquid crystal composites. The composites contain poly(2,5-bis(2{prime}-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene) (BEH-PPV) and the electron acceptor N,N{prime}-dioctyl-1,4:5,8-naphthalenediimide, NI. Using asymmetric energy transfer (beam coupling) measurements that are diagnostic for the photorefractive effect, the direction of beam coupling as a function of grating fringe spacing inverts at a spacing of 5.5 {micro}m. We show that the inversion is due to a change in the dominant mechanism for space-charge field formation. At small fringe spacings, the space-charge field is formed by ion diffusion in which the photogenerated anion is the more mobile species. At larger fringe spacings, the polarity of the space charge field inverts due to dominance of a charge transport mechanism in which photogenerated holes are the most mobile species due to hole migration along the BEH-PPV chains coupled with interchain hole hopping. Control experiments are presented, which use composites that can access only one of the two charge transport mechanisms. The results show that charge migration over long distances leading to enhanced photorefractive effects can be obtained using conjugated polymers dissolved in liquid crystals.

  9. Nanoconfinement-Induced Structures in Chiral Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Melle, Michael; Theile, Madlona; Hall, Carol K.; Schoen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We employ Monte Carlo simulations in a specialized isothermal-isobaric and in the grand canonical ensemble to study structure formation in chiral liquid crystals as a function of molecular chirality. Our model potential consists of a simple Lennard-Jones potential, where the attractive contribution has been modified to represent the orientation dependence of the interaction between a pair of chiral liquid-crystal molecules. The liquid crystal is confined between a pair of planar and atomically smooth substrates onto which molecules are anchored in a hybrid fashion. Hybrid anchoring allows for the formation of helical structures in the direction perpendicular to the substrate plane without exposing the helix to spurious strains. At low chirality, we observe a cholesteric phase, which is transformed into a blue phase at higher chirality. More specifically, by studying the unit cell and the spatial arrangement of disclination lines, this blue phase can be established as blue phase II. If the distance between the confining substrates and molecular chirality are chosen properly, we see a third structure, which may be thought of as a hybrid, exhibiting mixed features of a cholesteric and a blue phase. PMID:23989605

  10. Photorefractivity in liquid crystals doped with a soluble conjugated polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiederrecht, Gary P.; Svec, Walter A.; Niemczyk, Mark P.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    1999-10-01

    Photoconductive polymers are doped into liquid crystals to create a new mechanism for space-charge field formation in photorefractive liquid crystal composites. The composites contain poly(2,5-bis(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4- phenylenevinylene) (BEH-PPV) and the electron acceptor N,N'- dioctyl-1,4:5,8-naphthalenediimide, NI. Using asymmetric energy transfer (beam coupling) measurements that are diagnostic for the photorefractive effect, the direction of beam coupling as a function of grating fringe spacing inverts at a spacing of 5.5 micrometers . We show that the inversion is due to a change in the dominant mechanism for space-charge field formation. At small fringe spacings, the space-charge field is formed by ion diffusion in which the photogenerated anion is the more mobile species. At larger fringe spacings, the polarity of the space charge field inverts due to dominance of a charge transport mechanism in which photogenerated holes are the most mobile spaces due to hole migration along the BEH-PPV chains coupled with interchain hole hopping. Control experiments are presented, which use composites that can access only one of the two charge transport mechanisms. The results show that charge migration over long distances leading to enhanced photorefractive effects can be obtained using conjugated polymers dissolved in liquid crystals.

  11. Liquid crystal phase shifters for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woehrle, Christopher D.

    Space communication satellites have historically relied heavily on high gain gimbal dish antennas for performing communications. Reflector dish antennas lack flexibility in anti-jamming capabilities, and they tend to have a high risk associated to them given the need for mechanical mechanisms to beam steer. In recent years, a great amount of investment has been made into phased array antenna technologies. Phased arrays offer increased signal flexibility at reduced financial cost and in system risk. The problem with traditional phased arrays is the significant program cost and overall complexity added to the satellite by integrating antenna elements that require many dedicated components to properly perform adaptive beam steering. Several unique methods have been proposed to address the issues that plague traditional phase shifters slated for space applications. Proposed approaches range from complex mechanical switches (MEMS) and ferroelectric devices to more robust molecular changes. Nematic liquid crystals offer adaptive beam steering capabilities that traditional phased arrays have; however, with the added benefit of reduced system cost, complexity, and increased resilience to space environmental factors. The objective of the work presented is to investigate the feasibility of using nematic liquid crystals as a means of phase shifting individual phased array elements slated for space applications. Significant attention is paid to the survivability and performance of liquid crystal and associated materials in the space environment. Performance regarding thermal extremes and interactions with charged particles are the primary factors addressed.

  12. Optical modeling of liquid crystal biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Dae Kun; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2006-11-01

    Optical simulations of a liquid crystal biosensor device are performed using an integrated optical/textural model based on the equations of nematodynamics and two optical methods: the Berreman optical matrix method [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 62, 502 (1972)] and the discretization of the Maxwell equations based on the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. Testing the two optical methods with liquid crystal films of different degrees of orientational heterogeneities demonstrates that only the FDTD method is suitable to model this device. Basic substrate-induced texturing process due to protein adsorption gives rise to an orientation correlation function that is nearly linear with the transmitted light intensity, providing a basis to calibrate the device. The sensitivity of transmitted light to film thickness, protein surface coverage, and wavelength is established. A crossover incident light wavelength close to λco≈500nm is found, such that when λ >λco thinner films are more sensitive to the amount of protein surface coverage, while for λ <λco the reverse holds. In addition it is found that for all wavelengths the sensitivity increases with the amount of protein coverage. The integrated device model based on FDTD optical simulations in conjunction with the Landau-de Gennes nematodynamics model provides a rational basis for further progress in liquid crystal biosensor devices.

  13. Structures of cyano-biphenyl liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Yuan-Chao; Tsang, Tung; Rahimzadeh, E.; Yin, L.

    1989-01-01

    The structures of p-alkyl- p'-cyano- bicyclohexanes, C(n)H(2n+1) (C6H10)(C6H10) CN (n-CCH), and p-alkyl- p'-cyano- biphenyls, C(n)H(2n+1) (C6H4)(C6H4) CN (n-CBP), were studied. It is convenient to use an x ray image intensification device to search for symmetric x ray diffraction patterns. Despite the similarities in molecular structures of these compounds, very different crystal structures were found. For the smectic phase of 2CCH, the structure is close to rhombohedral with threefold symmetry. In contrast, the structure is close to hexagonal close-packed with two molecules per unit cell for 4CCH. Since intermolecular forces may be quite weak for these liquid crystals systems, it appears that crystal structures change considerably when the alkyl chain length is slightly altered. Different structures were also found in the crystalline phase of n-CBP for n = 6 to 9. For n = 7 to 9, the structures are close to monclinic. The structures are reminiscent of the smectic-A liquid crystal structures with the linear molecules slightly tilted away from the c-axis. In contrast, the structure is quite different for n = 6 with the molecules nearly perpendicular to the c-axis.

  14. Mixing effects in the crystallization of supercooled quantum binary liquids.

    PubMed

    Kühnel, M; Fernández, J M; Tramonto, F; Tejeda, G; Moreno, E; Kalinin, A; Nava, M; Galli, D E; Montero, S; Grisenti, R E

    2015-08-14

    By means of Raman spectroscopy of liquid microjets, we have investigated the crystallization process of supercooled quantum liquid mixtures composed of parahydrogen (pH2) or orthodeuterium (oD2) diluted with small amounts of neon. We show that the introduction of the Ne impurities affects the crystallization kinetics in terms of a significant reduction of the measured pH2 and oD2 crystal growth rates, similarly to what found in our previous work on supercooled pH2-oD2 liquid mixtures [Kühnel et al., Phys. Rev. B 89, 180201(R) (2014)]. Our experimental results, in combination with path-integral simulations of the supercooled liquid mixtures, suggest in particular a correlation between the measured growth rates and the ratio of the effective particle sizes originating from quantum delocalization effects. We further show that the crystalline structure of the mixtures is also affected to a large extent by the presence of the Ne impurities, which likely initiate the freezing process through the formation of Ne-rich crystallites. PMID:26277142

  15. Mixing effects in the crystallization of supercooled quantum binary liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Kühnel, M.; Kalinin, A.; Fernández, J. M.; Tejeda, G.; Moreno, E.; Montero, S.; Tramonto, F.; Galli, D. E.; Nava, M.; Grisenti, R. E.

    2015-08-14

    By means of Raman spectroscopy of liquid microjets, we have investigated the crystallization process of supercooled quantum liquid mixtures composed of parahydrogen (pH{sub 2}) or orthodeuterium (oD{sub 2}) diluted with small amounts of neon. We show that the introduction of the Ne impurities affects the crystallization kinetics in terms of a significant reduction of the measured pH{sub 2} and oD{sub 2} crystal growth rates, similarly to what found in our previous work on supercooled pH{sub 2}-oD{sub 2} liquid mixtures [Kühnel et al., Phys. Rev. B 89, 180201(R) (2014)]. Our experimental results, in combination with path-integral simulations of the supercooled liquid mixtures, suggest in particular a correlation between the measured growth rates and the ratio of the effective particle sizes originating from quantum delocalization effects. We further show that the crystalline structure of the mixtures is also affected to a large extent by the presence of the Ne impurities, which likely initiate the freezing process through the formation of Ne-rich crystallites.

  16. Domain Structures in Nematic Liquid Crystals on a Polycarbonate Surface

    PubMed Central

    Parshin, Alexander M.; Gunyakov, Vladimir A.; Zyryanov, Victor Y.; Shabanov, Vasily F.

    2013-01-01

    Alignment of nematic liquid crystals on polycarbonate films obtained with the use of solvents with different solvations is studied. Domain structures occurring during the growth on the polymer surface against the background of the initial thread-like or schlieren texture are demonstrated. It is established by optical methods that the domains are stable formations visualizing the polymer surface structures. In nematic droplets, the temperature-induced transition from the domain structure with two extinction bands to the structure with four bands is observed. This transition is shown to be caused by reorientation of the nematic director in the liquid crystal volume from the planar alignment to the homeotropic state with the pronounced radial configuration of nematic molecules on the surface. The observed textures are compared with different combinations of the volume LC orientations and the radial distribution of the director field and the disclination lines at the polycarbonate surface. PMID:23965955

  17. Domain structures in nematic liquid crystals on a polycarbonate surface.

    PubMed

    Parshin, Alexander M; Gunyakov, Vladimir A; Zyryanov, Victor Y; Shabanov, Vasily F

    2013-01-01

    Alignment of nematic liquid crystals on polycarbonate films obtained with the use of solvents with different solvations is studied. Domain structures occurring during the growth on the polymer surface against the background of the initial thread-like or schlieren texture are demonstrated. It is established by optical methods that the domains are stable formations visualizing the polymer surface structures. In nematic droplets, the temperature-induced transition from the domain structure with two extinction bands to the structure with four bands is observed. This transition is shown to be caused by reorientation of the nematic director in the liquid crystal volume from the planar alignment to the homeotropic state with the pronounced radial configuration of nematic molecules on the surface. The observed textures are compared with different combinations of the volume LC orientations and the radial distribution of the director field and the disclination lines at the polycarbonate surface. PMID:23965955

  18. Ferromagnetic Switching of Knotted Vector Fields in Liquid Crystal Colloids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiaoxuan; Ackerman, Paul J; Liu, Qingkun; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2015-08-28

    We experimentally realize polydomain and monodomain chiral ferromagnetic liquid crystal colloids that exhibit solitonic and knotted vector field configurations. Formed by dispersions of ferromagnetic nanoplatelets in chiral nematic liquid crystals, these colloidal ferromagnets exhibit spontaneous long-range alignment of magnetic dipole moments of individual platelets, giving rise to a continuum of the magnetization field M(r). Competing effects of surface confinement and chirality prompt spontaneous formation and enable the optical generation of localized twisted solitonic structures with double-twist tubes and torus knots of M(r), which exhibit a strong sensitivity to the direction of weak magnetic fields ∼1  mT. Numerical modeling, implemented through free energy minimization to arrive at a field-dependent three-dimensional M(r), shows a good agreement with experiments and provides insights into the torus knot topology of observed field configurations and the corresponding physical underpinnings. PMID:26371682

  19. Intrinsic response of polymer liquid crystals in photochemical phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Tomiki; Sasaki, Takeo; Kim, Haengboo )

    1991-01-24

    Time-resolved measurements were performed on the photochemically induced isothermal phase transition of polymer liquid crystals (PLC) with mesogenic side chains of phenyl benzoate (PAPB3) and cyanobiphenyl (PACB3) under conditions wherein the photochemical reaction of the doped photoresponsive molecule (4-butyl-4-{prime}-methoxyazobenzene, BMAB) was completed within {approximately} 10 ns, and the subsequent phase transition of the matrix PLC from nematic (N) to isotropic (I) state was followed by time-resolved measurements of the birefringence of the system. Formation of a sufficient amount of the cis isomer of BMAB with a single pulse of a laser lowered the N-I phase transition temperature of the mixture, inducing the N-I phase transition of PLCs isothermally in a time range of {approximately} 200 ms. This time range is comparable to that of low molecular weight liquid crystals, indicating that suppression in mobility of mesogens in PLCs does not affect significantly the thermodynamically controlled process.

  20. Capillary smectization and layering in a confined liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    de Las Heras, D; Velasco, E; Mederos, L

    2005-01-14

    Using density-functional theory, we have analyzed the phase behavior of a model liquid crystal confined between two parallel, planar surfaces (i.e., the so-called slit pore). As a result of confinement, a rich phase behavior arises. The complete liquid-crystal phase diagram of the confined fluid is mapped out as a function of wall separation and chemical potential. Strong commensuration effects in the film with respect to wall separation lead to enhanced smectic ordering, which gives capillary smectization (i.e., formation of a smectic phase in the pore), or frustrated smectic ordering, which suppresses capillary smectization. These effects also produce layering transitions. Our nonlocal density-functional-based analysis provides a unified picture of all the above phenomena. PMID:15698132

  1. Protein crystallization on liquid surfaces: Forced versus natural crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsa, A.

    2005-11-01

    Two-dimensional crystallization of proteins has recently been reported where streptavidin protein dissolved in the bulk liquid anchors to binding sites on a biotinylated lipid monolayer initially spread on the liquid surface. Thermodynamic aspects investigated include the effects of subphase buffer and pH, dilution of bulk protein and monolayer. Here, we investigate three possible avenues where flow can influence protein crystallization: i) change the initial state of monolayer, ii) advect dissolved protein to the interface, iii) apply direct hydrodynamic force on the crystals at the interface. The flow system consists of a stationary open cylinder driven by constant rotation of the floor, in the axisymmetric flow regime with inertia. Direct imaging of the interface illuminated by forward scattering of a laser was utilized to avoid labeling proteins for conventional fluorescence microscopy. These images provide greater detail than Brewster angle microscopy. Scientific motivation is to use flow to probe protein structure, and the application is to make designer protein thin-films, e.g. for biosensors.

  2. A roadmap to uranium ionic liquids: Anti-crystal engineering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yaprak, Damla; Spielberg, Eike T.; Bäcker, Tobias; Richter, Mark; Mallick, Bert; Klein, Axel; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2014-04-15

    In the search for uranium-based ionic liquids, tris(N,N-dialkyldithiocarbamato)uranylates have been synthesized as salts of the 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (C4mim) cation. As dithiocarbamate ligands binding to the UO22+ unit, tetra-, penta-, hexa-, and heptamethylenedithiocarbamates, N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate, N-methyl-N-propyldithiocarbamate, N-ethyl-N-propyldithiocarbamate, and N-methyl-N-butyldithiocarbamate have been explored. X-ray single-crystal diffraction allowed unambiguous structural characterization of all compounds except N-methyl-N-butyldithiocarbamate, which is obtained as a glassy material only. In addition, powder X-ray diffraction as well as vibrational and UV/Vis spectroscopy, supported by computational methods, were used to characterize the products. Differential scanning calorimetry was employed to investigate the phase-transition behavior depending on the N,N-dialkyldithiocarbamato ligand with the aim tomore » establish structure–property relationships regarding the ionic liquid formation capability. Compounds with the least symmetric N,N-dialkyldithiocarbamato ligand and hence the least symmetric anions, tris(N-methyl-N-propyldithiocarbamato)uranylate, tris(N-ethyl-N-propyldithiocarbamato)uranylate, and tris(N-methyl-N-butyldithiocarbamato)uranylate, lead to the formation of (room-temperature) ionic liquids, which confirms that low-symmetry ions are indeed suitable to suppress crystallization. As a result, these materials combine low melting points, stable complex formation, and hydrophobicity and are therefore excellent candidates for nuclear fuel purification and recovery.« less

  3. A roadmap to uranium ionic liquids: Anti-crystal engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Yaprak, Damla; Spielberg, Eike T.; Bäcker, Tobias; Richter, Mark; Mallick, Bert; Klein, Axel; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2014-04-15

    In the search for uranium-based ionic liquids, tris(N,N-dialkyldithiocarbamato)uranylates have been synthesized as salts of the 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (C4mim) cation. As dithiocarbamate ligands binding to the UO22+ unit, tetra-, penta-, hexa-, and heptamethylenedithiocarbamates, N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate, N-methyl-N-propyldithiocarbamate, N-ethyl-N-propyldithiocarbamate, and N-methyl-N-butyldithiocarbamate have been explored. X-ray single-crystal diffraction allowed unambiguous structural characterization of all compounds except N-methyl-N-butyldithiocarbamate, which is obtained as a glassy material only. In addition, powder X-ray diffraction as well as vibrational and UV/Vis spectroscopy, supported by computational methods, were used to characterize the products. Differential scanning calorimetry was employed to investigate the phase-transition behavior depending on the N,N-dialkyldithiocarbamato ligand with the aim to establish structure–property relationships regarding the ionic liquid formation capability. Compounds with the least symmetric N,N-dialkyldithiocarbamato ligand and hence the least symmetric anions, tris(N-methyl-N-propyldithiocarbamato)uranylate, tris(N-ethyl-N-propyldithiocarbamato)uranylate, and tris(N-methyl-N-butyldithiocarbamato)uranylate, lead to the formation of (room-temperature) ionic liquids, which confirms that low-symmetry ions are indeed suitable to suppress crystallization. As a result, these materials combine low melting points, stable complex formation, and hydrophobicity and are therefore excellent candidates for nuclear fuel purification and recovery.

  4. A roadmap to uranium ionic liquids: anti-crystal engineering.

    PubMed

    Yaprak, Damla; Spielberg, Eike T; Bäcker, Tobias; Richter, Mark; Mallick, Bert; Klein, Axel; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2014-05-19

    In the search for uranium-based ionic liquids, tris(N,N-dialkyldithiocarbamato)uranylates have been synthesized as salts of the 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (C4mim) cation. As dithiocarbamate ligands binding to the UO2(2+) unit, tetra-, penta-, hexa-, and heptamethylenedithiocarbamates, N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate, N-methyl-N-propyldithiocarbamate, N-ethyl-N-propyldithiocarbamate, and N-methyl-N-butyldithiocarbamate have been explored. X-ray single-crystal diffraction allowed unambiguous structural characterization of all compounds except N-methyl-N-butyldithiocarbamate, which is obtained as a glassy material only. In addition, powder X-ray diffraction as well as vibrational and UV/Vis spectroscopy, supported by computational methods, were used to characterize the products. Differential scanning calorimetry was employed to investigate the phase-transition behavior depending on the N,N-dialkyldithiocarbamato ligand with the aim to establish structure-property relationships regarding the ionic liquid formation capability. Compounds with the least symmetric N,N-dialkyldithiocarbamato ligand and hence the least symmetric anions, tris(N-methyl-N-propyldithiocarbamato)uranylate, tris(N-ethyl-N-propyldithiocarbamato)uranylate, and tris(N-methyl-N-butyldithiocarbamato)uranylate, lead to the formation of (room-temperature) ionic liquids, which confirms that low-symmetry ions are indeed suitable to suppress crystallization. These materials combine low melting points, stable complex formation, and hydrophobicity and are therefore excellent candidates for nuclear fuel purification and recovery. PMID:24737451

  5. Bond orientational ordering in a metastable supercooled liquid: a shadow of crystallization and liquid-liquid transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hajime

    2010-12-01

    It is widely believed that a liquid state can be characterized by a single order parameter, density, and that a transition from a liquid to solid can be described by density ordering (translational ordering). For example, this type of theory has had great success in describing the phase behaviour of hard spheres. However, there are some features that cannot be captured by such theories. For example, hard spheres crystallize into either hcp or fcc structures, without a tendency of bcc ordering which is expected by the Alexander-McTague theory based on the Landau-type free energy of the density order parameter. We also found hcp-like bond orientational ordering in a metastable supercooled liquid, which promotes nucleation of hcp crystals. Furthermore, theories based on the single order parameter cannot explain water-like thermodynamic and kinetic anomalies of a liquid and liquid-liquid transition in a single-component liquid. Based on these facts, we argue that we need an additional order parameter to describe a liquid state. It is bond orientational order, which is induced by dense packing in hard spheres or by directional bonding in molecular and atomic liquids. Bond orientational order is intrinsically of local nature, unlike translational order which is of global nature. This feature plays a unique role in crystallization and quasicrystal formation. We also reveal that bond orientational ordering is a cause of dynamic heterogeneity near a glass transition and is linked to slow dynamics. In relation to this, we note that, for describing the structuring of a highly disordered liquid, we need a structural signature of low configurational entropy, which is more general than bond orientational order. Finally, the water-like anomaly and liquid-liquid transition can be explained by bond orientational ordering due to hydrogen or covalent bonding and its cooperativity, respectively. So we argue that bond orientational ordering is a key to the physical understanding of

  6. Liquid crystal-ZnO nanoparticle photovoltaics: Role of nanoparticles in ordering the liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Miranda, L. J.; Traister, Kaitlin M.; Melendez-Rodriguez, Iriselies; Salamanca-Riba, Lourdes

    2010-11-29

    We investigate the role that order plays in the transfer of charges in the ZnO nano-particle-octylcyanobiphenyl (8CB) liquid crystal system, considered for photovoltaic applications. We have changed the concentration of ZnO nanoparticles in 8CB from 1.18 to 40 wt %. Our results show an improvement in the alignment of the liquid crystal with increasing weight percentage of ZnO nanoparticles, up to a concentration of 30 wt %. In addition, the current generated by the system increases by three orders of magnitude.

  7. Liquid crystal nanocomposites produced by mixtures of hydrogen bonded achiral liquid crystals and functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katranchev, B.; Petrov, M.; Keskinova, E.; Naradikian, H.; Rafailov, P. M.; Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U.; Spassov, T.

    2014-12-01

    The liquid crystalline (LC) nature of alkyloxybenzoic acids is preserved after adding of any mesogenic or non-mesogenic compound through hydrogen bonding. However, this noncovalent interaction provokes a sizable effect on the physical properties as, e. g. melting point and mesomorphic states. In the present work we investigate nanocomposites, prepared by mixture of the eighth homologue of p-n-alkyloxybenzoic acids (8OBA) with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) with the purpose to modify the optical properties of the liquid crystal. We exercise optical control on the LC system by inserting SWCNT specially functionalized by carboxylic groups. Since the liquid crystalline state combines order and mobility at the molecular (nanoscale) level, molecular modification can lead to different macroscopical nanocomposite symmetry. The thermal properties of the functionalized nanocomposite are confirmed by DSC analyses. The mechanism of the interaction between surface-treated nanoparticles (functionalized nanotubes) and the liquid crystal 8OBA bent- dimer molecules is briefly discussed.

  8. The electro-optical and electrochromic properties of electrolyte-liquid crystal dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cupelli, Daniela; De Filpo, Giovanni; Chidichimo, Giuseppe; Nicoletta, Fiore Pasquale

    2006-07-01

    Liquid crystals are known to exhibit a reversible color change by applying a direct current electric field, if a small amount of quaternary ammonium salts is dissolved into them. Applications of such an electrochromic liquid crystal cell have been proposed as interesting laser-addressed writing and image storage devices. Liquid crystal dispersions are composite materials formed by liquid crystal droplets embedded in either a polymer or a monomer matrix. Thin films of liquid crystal dispersions can be turned from an opaque to a transparent state by application of a suitable alternating current electric field. Herein, we report our investigations on electrolyte-liquid crystal dispersions, which show independent electro-optical and electrochromic properties characterized by fast bleaching times. This cell involves the reorientation of liquid crystal molecules, trapped in droplets, for the electro-optical changes from the opaque to transparent state and the formation of complexes at the cathode, between the positive ions of electrolyte and liquid crystal dispersed in the matrix, for the electrochromic changes from the bleached to colored state. The device is able to change its electro-optical transmittance within few milliseconds and its color within few seconds.

  9. Dynamics of an overdamped active nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putzig, Elias; Baskaran, Aparna

    2015-03-01

    A continuum model for the dynamics of an overdamped (often termed ``dry'') active nematic liquid crystal will be presented here. This talk will focus on how such a model can be used to describe the formation and self-propulsion of defects which has been seen in active liquid crystals in experiments and simulations. We will start with a general model which shows phase-separations and structure formation near the critical density (for the isotropic-nematic phase transition), and show how this model can be extended to describe extensile active nematics which are deeper within the ordered phase. The spontaneous formation of defects occurs when the contribution of the extensile stresses, to the dynamics of the order parameter, gives rise to a bend instability. This leads to a steady state of defect formation and annihilation, and the self-propulsion of defects, as is seen in experiments and simulation. This work was supported through the NSF (NSF-DMR-1149266), Brandeis-MRSEC through the NSF (DMR-0820492), and the HPC cluster at Brandeis which provided computing time. EFP also acknowledges support through (NIH-5T32EB009419) and IGERT (DGE-1068620).

  10. Cholesteric liquid crystal photonic crystal lasers and photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying

    This dissertation discusses cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) and polymers based photonic devices including one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal lasers and broadband circular polarizers. CLCs showing unique self-organized chiral structures have been widely used in bistable displays, flexible displays, and reflectors. However, the photonic band gap they exhibit opens a new way for generating laser light at the photonic band edge (PBE) or inside the band gap. When doped with an emissive laser dye, cholesteric liquid crystals provide distributed feedback so that mirrorless lasing is hence possible. Due to the limited surface anchoring, the thickness of gain medium and feedback length is tens of micrometers. Therefore lasing efficiency is quite limited and laser beam is highly divergent. To meet the challenges, we demonstrated several new methods to enhance the laser emission while reducing the beam divergence from a cholesteric liquid crystal laser. Enhanced laser emission is demonstrated by incorporating a single external CLC reflector as a polarization conserved reflector. Because the distributed feedback from the active layer is polarization selective, a CLC reflector preserves the original polarization of the reflected light and a further stimulated amplification ensues. As a result of virtually doubled feedback length, the output is dramatically enhanced in the same circular polarization state. Meanwhile, the laser beam divergence is dramatically reduced due to the increased cavity length from micrometer to millimeter scale. Enhanced laser emission is also demonstrated by the in-cell metallic reflector because the active layer is pumped twice. Unlike a CLC reflector, the output from a mirror-reflected CLC laser is linearly polarized as a result of coherent superposition of two orthogonal circular polarization states. The output linear polarization direction can be well controlled and fine tuned by varying the operating temperature and cell gap. Enhanced laser

  11. Ordered and disordered colloidal particle monolayers at liquid crystal interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei-Shao; Lohr, Matthew; Gharbi, Mohamed Amine; Stebe, Kathleen; Yodh, A. G.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we investigate ordered colloidal particle monolayers at the air/liquid-crystal (LC) interface. Specifically, silica microparticles are treated with DMOAP to create homeotropic anchoring of LC mesogens at their surfaces. These particles are then spread on an air-exposed interface of the LC 5CB. Macroscopic ordered patterns of these microparticles form due to long-range interactions between particles that are mediated by elastic deformations of the underlying LC. Different confinement conditions lead to various self-assembled patterns ranging from hexagonal lattices to chain-like dipole formations. Using dark-field video microscopy, we track and analyze the dynamics of the colloidal particles in the hexagonal crystal packing, deriving mean squared displacements, phonon modes and density of states, etc., under several conditions. Further, heating of the nematic LC into its isotropic phase enables us to observe melting dynamics of this unusual quasi-2D crystal. The investigations provide insight into crystalline packings controlled by liquid-crystal mediated colloidal interactions. This work is funded by NSF Grant DMR12-05463, PENN MRSEC Grant DMR11-20901, and NASA Grant NNX08AO0G.

  12. Wide Angle Liquid Crystal Optical Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xing-Hua; Wang, Bin; Bos, Philip J.; Anderson, James E.; Pouch, John J.; Miranda, Felix A.; McManamon, Paul F.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate modeling of a high resolution, liquid crystal (LC) based, optical phased array (OPA) is shown. The simulation shows excellent agreement with a test 2-D LC OPA. The modeling method is extendable to cases where the array element size is close to the wavelength of light. The fringing fields of such a device are first studied, and subsequently reduced. This results in a device that demonstrates plus or minus 7.4 degrees of continuous beam steering at a wavelength of 1550 nm, and a diffraction efficiency (DE) higher than 72%.

  13. Liquid crystal-based hydrophone arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodzeli, Zourab; Silvestri, Leonardo; Michie, Andrew; Chigrinov, Vladimir G.; Guo, Qi; Pozhidaev, Eugene P.; Kiselev, Alexei D.; Ladouceur, Francois

    2012-09-01

    We describe a fiber optic hydrophone array system that could be used for underwater acoustic surveillance applications (e.g. military, counter terrorist, and customs authorities in protecting ports and harbors), offshore production facilities or coastal approaches as well as various marine applications. In this paper, we propose a new approach to underwater sonar systems using the voltage-controlled liquid crystals and simple multiplexing method. The proposed method permits measurement of sound under water at multiple points along an optical fiber using the low cost components and standard single mode fiber, without complex interferometric measurement techniques, electronics or demodulation software.

  14. Laser damage resistant nematic liquid crystal cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raszewski, Z.; Piecek, W.; Jaroszewicz, L.; Soms, L.; Marczak, J.; Nowinowski-Kruszelnicki, E.; Perkowski, P.; Kedzierski, J.; Miszczyk, E.; Olifierczuk, M.; Morawiak, P.; Mazur, R.

    2013-08-01

    There exists a problem in diagnostics of a dense plasma (so-called Thomson diagnostics). For this purpose, the plasma is illuminated by series of high energy laser pulses. Such pulses are generated by several independent lasers operating sequentially, and these pulses are to be directed along an exactly the same optical path. In this case, the energy of each separate pulse is as large as 3 J, so it is impossible to generate a burst of such pulses by a single laser. In this situation, several independent lasers have to be used. To form optical path with λ = 1.064 μm and absolute value of the energy of laser pulse through of 3 J, a special refractive index matched twisted Nematic Liquid Crystal Cell (NLCC) of type LCNP2 with switching on time τON smaller than 5 μs might be applied. High laser damage resistance of NLCC and short τON can be fulfilled by preparation of liquid crystal cells with Liquid Crystal Mixture (LCM), well tuned to twisted nematic electro-optical effect, and well tuned all optical interfaces (Air - Antireflection - Quartz Plate - Electrode - Blocking Film - Aligning Layer - LCM - Aligning Layer - Blocking Film - Electrode - Quartz Plate - Antireflection - Air). In such LCNP2 cell, the transmission is higher than 97% at λ = 1.064 μm, as it is presented by Gooch and Tarry [J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 8, 1575 (1975)]. The safe laser density energy is about 0.6 J/cm2 for a train of laser pulses (λ = 1.064 μm, pulse duration 10 ns FWHM, pulse repetition rate 100 pps, train duration 10 s), so the area of liquid crystal cell tolerating 3 J through it shall be as large as 5 cm2. Due to the presence of two blocking film layers between electrodes, LCNP2 can be driven by high voltages. Switching on time smaller than τON = 5 μs was obtained under 200 V switching voltage.

  15. Stochastic rotation dynamics for nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kuang-Wu Mazza, Marco G.

    2015-04-28

    We introduce a new mesoscopic model for nematic liquid crystals (LCs). We extend the particle-based stochastic rotation dynamics method, which reproduces the Navier-Stokes equation, to anisotropic fluids by including a simplified Ericksen-Leslie formulation of nematodynamics. We verify the applicability of this hybrid model by studying the equilibrium isotropic-nematic phase transition and nonequilibrium problems, such as the dynamics of topological defects and the rheology of sheared LCs. Our simulation results show that this hybrid model captures many essential aspects of LC physics at the mesoscopic scale, while preserving microscopic thermal fluctuations.

  16. Thermal diode made by nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, Djair; Fernandes, Ivna; Moraes, Fernando; Fumeron, Sébastien; Pereira, Erms

    2016-09-01

    This work investigates how a thermal diode can be designed from a nematic liquid crystal confined inside a cylindrical capillary. In the case of homeotropic anchoring, a defect structure called escaped radial disclination arises. The asymmetry of such structure causes thermal rectification rates up to 3.5% at room temperature, comparable to thermal diodes made from carbon nanotubes. Sensitivity of the system with respect to the heat power supply, the geometry of the capillary tube and the molecular anchoring angle is also discussed.

  17. Phase Behavior of Perturbed Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralj, S.; Kutnjak, Z.; Lahajnar, G.; Svetec, M.

    We study theoretically the combined effect of confinement and randomness on LC phase transitions in orientational (isotropic-nematic) and translational (nematic-smectic A) degrees of ordering. We focus to cases where these transitions are of (very) weakly 1st order. An adequate experimental realisation is, e.g., 8CB liquid crystal confined to a Controlled-Pore Glass matrix. Based on universal responses of "hard" and "soft" continuum fields to distortions we derive how different mechanisms influence qualitative and quantitative characteristics of phase transitions under consideration.

  18. Adaptive lens using liquid crystal concentration redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hongwen; Lin, Yi-Hsin; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2006-05-01

    An adaptive lens using electrically induced liquid crystal (LC)/monomer concentration redistribution is demonstrated. In the absence of an electric field, the LC/monomer mixture is homogeneously distributed. Application of an inhomogeneous electric field causes the LC molecules to diffuse towards the high field region and the liquid monomer towards the low field region. On the other hand, the LC molecules tend to diffuse from high to low concentration direction in order to balance the concentration change. A gradient LC concentration is thus obtained. Using the gradient LC concentration, we demonstrate a tunable-focus lens. Compared with a conventional LC lens, our lens has advantages in small astigmatism and without light scattering, but its response time is slower.

  19. Tuning fluidic resistance via liquid crystal microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Anupam

    2013-01-01

    Flow of molecularly ordered fluids, like liquid crystals, is inherently coupled with the average local orientation of the molecules, or the director. The anisotropic coupling-typically absent in isotropic fluids-bestows unique functionalities to the flowing matrix. In this work, we harness this anisotropy to pattern different pathways to tunable fluidic resistance within microfluidic devices. We use a nematic liquid crystalline material flowing in microchannels to demonstrate passive and active modulation of the flow resistance. While appropriate surface anchoring conditions-which imprint distinct fluidic resistances within microchannels under similar hydrodynamic parameters-act as passive cues, an external field, e.g., temperature, is used to actively modulate the flow resistance in the microfluidic device. We apply this simple concept to fabricate basic fluidic circuits, which can be hierarchically extended to create complex resistance networks, without any additional design or morphological patterning of the microchannels. PMID:24256819

  20. Localized soft elasticity in liquid crystal elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Taylor H.; Biggins, John S.; Shick, Andreas F.; Warner, Mark; White, Timothy J.

    2016-02-01

    Synthetic approaches to prepare designer materials that localize deformation, by combining rigidity and compliance in a single material, have been widely sought. Bottom-up approaches, such as the self-organization of liquid crystals, offer potential advantages over top-down patterning methods such as photolithographic control of crosslink density, relating to the ease of preparation and fidelity of resolution. Here, we report on the directed self-assembly of materials with spatial and hierarchical variation in mechanical anisotropy. The highly nonlinear mechanical properties of the liquid crystalline elastomers examined here enables strain to be locally reduced >15-fold without introducing compositional variation or other heterogeneities. Each domain (>=0.01 mm2) exhibits anisotropic nonlinear response to load based on the alignment of the molecular orientation with the loading axis. Accordingly, we design monoliths that localize deformation in uniaxial and biaxial tension, shear, bending and crack propagation, and subsequently demonstrate substrates for globally deformable yet locally stiff electronics.

  1. Tuning Fluidic Resistance via Liquid Crystal Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Anupam

    2013-01-01

    Flow of molecularly ordered fluids, like liquid crystals, is inherently coupled with the average local orientation of the molecules, or the director. The anisotropic coupling—typically absent in isotropic fluids—bestows unique functionalities to the flowing matrix. In this work, we harness this anisotropy to pattern different pathways to tunable fluidic resistance within microfluidic devices. We use a nematic liquid crystalline material flowing in microchannels to demonstrate passive and active modulation of the flow resistance. While appropriate surface anchoring conditions—which imprint distinct fluidic resistances within microchannels under similar hydrodynamic parameters—act as passive cues, an external field, e.g., temperature, is used to actively modulate the flow resistance in the microfluidic device. We apply this simple concept to fabricate basic fluidic circuits, which can be hierarchically extended to create complex resistance networks, without any additional design or morphological patterning of the microchannels. PMID:24256819

  2. UV sensors based on liquid crystals mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanishvili, Andro; Petriashvili, Gia; Chilaya, Guram; Barberi, Riccardo; De Santo, Maria P.; Matranga, Mario A.; Ciuchi, F.

    2006-04-01

    The Erythemal Response Spectrum is a scientific expression that describes the sensitivity of the skin to the ultraviolet radiation. The skin sensitivity strongly depends on the UV wavelength: a long exposition to UV radiation causes erythema once a threshold dose has been exceeded. In the past years several devices have been developed in order to monitor the UV exposure, most of them are based on inorganic materials that are able to mimic the human skin behaviour under UV radiation. We present a new device based on liquid crystals technology. The sensor is based on a liquid crystalline mixture that absorbs photons at UV wavelength and emits them at a longer one. This system presents several innovative features: the absorption range of the mixture can be varied to be sensitive to different wavelengths, the luminescence intensity can be tuned, the system can be implemented on flexible devices.

  3. Structures of cholesteric liquid crystals confined in rectangular micro-channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qi-Huo; Guo, Yubing; Xiang, Jie; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    When cholesteric liquid crystals are confined in various geometries, the interplays between the boundary conditions, the bulk structures and different length scales (pitch, penetration depth, and confinement size) may cause frustration and formation of intriguing topological defects and disclination lines. This paper presents our recent studies on the structures of cholesteric liquid crystals confined in rectangular microchannels with homeotropic alignments. The rectangular microchannels with various sizes and aspect ratios are made in glass substrates by using modern nanofabrication techniques. Detailed liquid crystal structures and their optical characterizations will be presented as a function of the channel depth and width. Work was supported by ACS PRF 53018-ND7.

  4. Hard-body models of bulk liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Mederos, Luis; Velasco, Enrique; Martínez-Ratón, Yuri

    2014-11-19

    Hard models for particle interactions have played a crucial role in the understanding of the structure of condensed matter. In particular, they help to explain the formation of oriented phases in liquids made of anisotropic molecules or colloidal particles and continue to be of great interest in the formulation of theories for liquids in bulk, near interfaces and in biophysical environments. Hard models of anisotropic particles give rise to complex phase diagrams, including uniaxial and biaxial nematic phases, discotic phases and spatially ordered phases such as smectic, columnar or crystal. Also, their mixtures exhibit additional interesting behaviours where demixing competes with orientational order. Here we review the different models of hard particles used in the theory of bulk anisotropic liquids, leaving aside interfacial properties and discuss the associated theoretical approaches and computer simulations, focusing on applications in equilibrium situations. The latter include one-component bulk fluids, mixtures and polydisperse fluids, both in two and three dimensions, and emphasis is put on liquid-crystal phase transitions and complex phase behaviour in general. PMID:25335432

  5. Control of liquid crystal molecular orientation using ultrasound vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Satoki; Koyama, Daisuke; Shimizu, Yuki; Emoto, Akira; Nakamura, Kentaro; Matsukawa, Mami

    2016-03-01

    We propose a technique to control the orientation of nematic liquid crystals using ultrasound and investigate the optical characteristics of the oriented samples. An ultrasonic liquid crystal cell with a thickness of 5-25 μm and two ultrasonic lead zirconate titanate transducers was fabricated. By exciting the ultrasonic transducers, the flexural vibration modes were generated on the cell. An acoustic radiation force to the liquid crystal layer was generated, changing the molecular orientation and thus the light transmission. By modulating the ultrasonic driving frequency and voltage, the spatial distribution of the molecular orientation of the liquid crystals could be controlled. The distribution of the transmitted light intensity depends on the thickness of the liquid crystal layer because the acoustic field in the liquid crystal layer is changed by the orientational film.

  6. Molecular reorientation of a nematic liquid crystal by thermal expansion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Ki; Senyuk, Bohdan; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2012-01-01

    A unique feature of nematic liquid crystals is orientational order of molecules that can be controlled by electromagnetic fields, surface modifications and pressure gradients. Here we demonstrate a new effect in which the orientation of nematic liquid crystal molecules is altered by thermal expansion. Thermal expansion (or contraction) causes the nematic liquid crystal to flow; the flow imposes a realigning torque on the nematic liquid crystal molecules and the optic axis. The optical and mechanical responses activated by a simple temperature change can be used in sensing, photonics, microfluidic, optofluidic and lab-on-a-chip applications as they do not require externally imposed gradients of temperature, pressure, surface realignment, nor electromagnetic fields. The effect has important ramifications for the current search of the biaxial nematic phase as the optical features of thermally induced structural changes in the uniaxial nematic liquid crystal mimic the features expected of the biaxial nematic liquid crystal. PMID:23072803

  7. Nematic liquid crystals for optical shutters: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imus, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    Nonmechanical shutter utilizes nematic crystals to attenuate illumination, thus protecting light-sensitive devices such as vidicon or image orthicon tubes and phototubes. Opacity of liquid crystals is controlled by photosensor.

  8. Diffraction properties of highly birefringent liquid-crystal composite gratings.

    PubMed

    Butler, J J; Malcuit, M S

    2000-03-15

    We have fabricated electrically switchable holographic gratings, using Polaroid Corporation's DMP-128 photopolymer filled with the nematic liquid crystal E7. It is shown that a coupled-wave theory that includes the effects of the birefringence of the liquid crystal must be used to explain the diffraction properties of these anisotropic volume gratings. Furthermore, a detailed comparison of theory and experiment provides information about the alignment of the liquid crystal within the polymer host. PMID:18059899

  9. Partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystals for boundary layer investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, Devendra S.; Singh, Jag J.

    1992-01-01

    A new configuration termed partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystal in which the liquid crystal microdroplets dispersed in a rigid polymer matrix are partially entrapped on the free surface of the thin film deposited on a glass substrate is reported. Optical transmission characteristics of the partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystal thin film in response to an air flow induced shear stress field reveal its potential as a sensor for gas flow and boundary layer investigations.

  10. Electro-optical switching by liquid-crystal controlled metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Decker, Manuel; Kremers, Christian; Minovich, Alexander; Staude, Isabelle; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E; Chigrin, Dmitry; Neshev, Dragomir N; Jagadish, Chennupati; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2013-04-01

    We study the optical response of a metamaterial surface created by a lattice of split-ring resonators covered with a nematic liquid crystal and demonstrate millisecond timescale switching between electric and magnetic resonances of the metasurface. This is achieved due to a high sensitivity of liquid-crystal molecular reorientation to the symmetry of the metasurface as well as to the presence of a bias electric field. Our experiments are complemented by numerical simulations of the liquid-crystal reorientation. PMID:23571978