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Sample records for liquid effluent monitoring

  1. Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) System Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.T.

    1994-10-11

    The liquid effluent sampling program is part of the effort to minimize adverse environmental impact during the cleanup operation at the Hanford Site. Of the 33 Phase I and Phase II liquid effluents, all streams actively discharged to the soil column will be sampled. The Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) is being developed as the organized information repository facility in support of the liquid effluent monitoring requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement. It is necessary to provide an automated repository into which the results from liquid effluent sampling will be placed. This repository must provide for effective retention, review, and retrieval of selected sample data by authorized persons and organizations. This System Construction document is the aggregation of the DMR P+ methodology project management deliverables. Together they represent a description of the project and its plan through four Releases, corresponding to the definition and prioritization of requirements defined by the user.

  2. Nonradiological liquid effluent monitoring program. 1992 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.A.; Peterson-Wright, L.J.; Meachum, T.R.

    1993-08-01

    A monitoring program for nonradioactive parameters and pollutants in liquid effluents was initiated in October 1985 for facilities operated by EG&G Idaho, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Program design and implementation are discussed in this report. Design and methodologies for sampling, analysis, and data management are also discussed. Monitoring results for 28 liquid effluent streams from (October 1991 through December 1992) are presented with emphasis on calendar year 1992 activities. All parameter measurements and concentrations were below the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act toxic characteristics limits.

  3. Optimizing liquid effluent monitoring at a large nuclear complex.

    PubMed

    Chou, Charissa J; Barnett, D Brent; Johnson, Vernon G; Olson, Phil M

    2003-12-01

    Effluent monitoring typically requires a large number of analytes and samples during the initial or startup phase of a facility. Once a baseline is established, the analyte list and sampling frequency may be reduced. Although there is a large body of literature relevant to the initial design, few, if any, published papers exist on updating established effluent monitoring programs. This paper statistically evaluates four years of baseline data to optimize the liquid effluent monitoring efficiency of a centralized waste treatment and disposal facility at a large defense nuclear complex. Specific objectives were to: (1) assess temporal variability in analyte concentrations, (2) determine operational factors contributing to waste stream variability, (3) assess the probability of exceeding permit limits, and (4) streamline the sampling and analysis regime. Results indicated that the probability of exceeding permit limits was one in a million under normal facility operating conditions, sampling frequency could be reduced, and several analytes could be eliminated. Furthermore, indicators such as gross alpha and gross beta measurements could be used in lieu of more expensive specific isotopic analyses (radium, cesium-137, and strontium-90) for routine monitoring. Study results were used by the state regulatory agency to modify monitoring requirements for a new discharge permit, resulting in an annual cost savings of US dollars 223,000. This case study demonstrates that statistical evaluation of effluent contaminant variability coupled with process knowledge can help plant managers and regulators streamline analyte lists and sampling frequencies based on detection history and environmental risk. PMID:15160897

  4. Liquid Effluent Monitoring Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, M.Y.

    1995-05-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting a program to monitor the waste water from PNL-operated research and development facilities on the Hanford Site. The purpose of the program is to collect data to assess administrative controls and to determine whether discharges to the process sewer meet sewer criteria. Samples have been collected on a regular basis from the major PNL facilities on the Hanford Site since March 1994. A broad range of analyses has been performed to determine the primary constituents in the liquid effluent. The sampling program is briefly summarized in the paper. Continuous monitoring of pH, conductivity, and flow also provides data on the liquid effluent streams. In addition to sampling and monitoring, the program is evaluating the dynamics of the waste stream with dye studies and is evaluating the use of newer technologies for potential deployment in future sampling/monitoring efforts. Information collected to date has been valuable in determining sources of constituents that may be higher than the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for the Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). This facility treats the waste streams before discharge to the Columbia River.

  5. Liquid effluent retention facility final-status groundwater monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, M.D.; Chou, C.J.; Bjornstad, B.N.

    1997-09-01

    The following sections describe the groundwater-monitoring program for the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF). The LERF is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). The LERF is included in the {open_quotes}Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste, Permit WA890008967{close_quotes}, (referred to herein as the Permit) (Ecology 1994) and is subject to final-status requirements for groundwater monitoring (WAC 173-303-645). This document describes a RCRA/WAC groundwater detection-monitoring program for groundwater in the uppermost aquifer system at the LERF. This plan describes the LERF monitoring network, constituent list, sampling schedule, statistical methods, and sampling and analysis protocols that will be employed for the LERF. This plan will be used to meet the groundwater monitoring requirements from the time the LERF becomes part of the Permit and through the post-closure care period, until certification of final closure.

  6. Radiochemical Sensor for Continuous and Remote Liquid Effluents Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Tarancon, A.; Garcia, J.F.; Rauret, G.; Padro, A.

    2008-07-01

    On-line radioactivity monitoring in liquid effluents is an increasing need according to the international regulations at present. Classical activity determination procedures include the sequence of sampling, chemical treatment, measurement and data treatment. These steps are man-power consuming, generate a great amount of waste and introduce an important delay between the potential pollution event and its detection and quantification. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a radiochemical sensor for liquid effluents capable of sending information about the specific activity and volume of a contamination episode to a remote position, on line and continuously. The capabilities of the sensor developed here allow detecting and quantifying contamination pulses of alpha, beta and gamma emitters of different volumes and activity levels included in a continuous stream. Sensor receptor includes two detection systems, one addressed to determine alpha, beta and gamma events and the other to detect sample gamma emissions. Detailed sensor structure will be shown at the conference because patent is in process at this moment. Detection efficiencies (%) obtained in the alpha-beta-gamma system for the range of contamination volumes considered (2- 300 ml) are: 1.6 - 3.2%, for Pu-240; 22.2 - 58.4%, for Sr-90/Y-90 and 8.8 -17.7%, for Cs-134. In the gamma system, values for Cs-134 detection range from 0.6% to 1.3%. Prediction errors obtained show that sensor is capable to detect Sr-90/Y-90 contamination pulses of at least 2 ml and 3 Bq/ml with a relative error lower of 10% in activity and 60% in volume. When contamination pulse increases up to 7 ml, relative errors decrease to 5% for both magnitudes. For Pu-240 and Cs-134, when contamination pulses are of at least 7 ml and 300 Bq/ml, the relative errors obtained in determinations performed in the alpha-beta-gamma system are lower than 10% in activity and 20 % in volume. The same errors are obtained in the gamma system for Cs

  7. Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System test plans releases 2.0 and 3.0

    SciTech Connect

    Guettler, D.A.

    1995-05-26

    The Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) is being developed as the organized information repository facility in support of the liquid effluent monitoring requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement. It is necessary to provide an automated repository into which the results from liquid effluent sampling will be placed. This repository must provide for effective retention, review, and retrieval of selected sample data by authorized persons and organizations. This System Architecture document is the aggregation of the DMR P+ methodology project management deliverables. Together they represent a description of the project and its plan through four Releases, corresponding to the definition and prioritization of requirements defined by the user.

  8. Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) test plans release 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.T.

    1994-10-12

    The Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) is being developed as the organized information repository facility in support of the liquid effluent monitoring requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement. It is necessary to provide an automated repository into which the results from liquid effluent sampling will be placed. This repository must provide for effective retention, review, and retrieval of selected sample data by authorized persons and organizations. This System Architecture document is the aggregation of the DMR P+ methodology project management deliverables. Together they represent a description of the project and its plan through four Releases, corresponding to the definition and prioritization of requirements defined by the user.

  9. Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System test plans release 1.2

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.T.

    1994-10-11

    The Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) is being developed as the organized information repository facility in support of the liquid effluent monitoring requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement. It is necessary to provide an automated repository into which the results from liquid effluent sampling will be placed. This repository must provide for effective retention, review, and retrieval of selected sample data by authorized persons and organizations. This System Architecture document is the aggregation of the DMR P+ methodology project management deliverables. Together they represent a description of the project and its plan through four Releases, corresponding to the definition and prioritization of requirements defined by the user.

  10. Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) test plans release 1.1

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.T.

    1994-09-08

    The Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) is being developed as the organized information repository facility in support of the liquid effluent monitoring requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement. It is necessary to provide an automated repository into which the results from liquid effluent sampling will be placed. This repository must provide for effective retention, review, and retrieval of selected sample data by authorized persons and organizations. This System Architecture document is the aggregation of the DMR P+ methodology project management deliverables. Together they represent a description of the project and its plan through four Releases, corresponding to the definition and prioritization of requirements defined by the user.

  11. INEEL Liquid Effluent Inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Major, C.A.

    1997-06-01

    The INEEL contractors and their associated facilities are required to identify all liquid effluent discharges that may impact the environment at the INEEL. This liquid effluent information is then placed in the Liquid Effluent Inventory (LEI) database, which is maintained by the INEEL prime contractor. The purpose of the LEI is to identify and maintain a current listing of all liquid effluent discharge points and to identify which discharges are subject to federal, state, or local permitting or reporting requirements and DOE order requirements. Initial characterization, which represents most of the INEEL liquid effluents, has been performed, and additional characterization may be required in the future to meet regulations. LEI information is made available to persons responsible for or concerned with INEEL compliance with liquid effluent permitting or reporting requirements, such as the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, Wastewater Land Application, Storm Water Pollution Prevention, Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures, and Industrial Wastewater Pretreatment. The State of Idaho Environmental Oversight and Monitoring Program also needs the information for tracking liquid effluent discharges at the INEEL. The information provides a baseline from which future liquid discharges can be identified, characterized, and regulated, if appropriate. The review covered new and removed buildings/structures, buildings/structures which most likely had new, relocated, or removed LEI discharge points, and at least 10% of the remaining discharge points.

  12. Operability test procedure for the TK-900 beta/gamma liquid effluent monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Weissenfels, R.D.

    1995-02-24

    This operability test procedure will verify that the 221-B beta/gamma liquid effluent monitoring system, installed near the east end of the six inch chemical sewer header, functions as intended by design. An off-line, skid mounted, beta/gamma radiation monitor and pH monitor was installed near stairwell three in the 221-B electrical gallery by Project W-007H. The skid mounted monitoring system includes two radiation detectors and a pH meter, both with local digital displays. Output signals from each monitor are also received and displayed by the Facility Process Monitor and Control System (FPMCS). Pumps, motors, gauges, valves and transport lines complement the skid monitoring system. The system is part of BAT/AKART for the BCE liquid effluent system.

  13. Operability test report for the TK-900 beta/gamma liquid effluent monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Weissenfels, R.D.

    1995-04-10

    This operability test report will verify that the 221-B beta/gamma liquid effluent monitoring system installed near the east end of the six inch chemical sewer header, functions as intended by design. An off-line, skid mounted, beta/gamma radiation monitor and pH monitor was installed near stairwell three in the 221-B electrical gallery by Project W-007H. The skid mounted monitoring system includes two radiation detectors and a pH meter, both with local digital displays. Output signals from each monitor are also received and displayed by the Facility Process Monitor and Control System (FPMCS). Pumps, motors, gauges, valves and transport lines complement the skid monitoring system. The system is part of BAT/AKART for the BCE liquid effluent system.

  14. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 300 area facility liquid effluent monitoring: 1994 and 1995 field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, R.G.; Thompson, C.J.; Damberg, E.G.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1997-07-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Effluent Management Services manages liquid waste streams from some of the 300 Area buildings on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, to ensure liquid discharges to the Columbia River are in compliance with permit requirements. The buildings are owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. In fiscal year (FY) 1994 and FY 1995, three field tests were conducted to gather information that could be used to (1) increase the understanding of 300 Area building liquid waste streams based on the characterization and monitoring data collected during calendar year (CY) 1994 and CY 1995 and (2) establish improved methods for evaluating facility releases. The three field tests were (1) an evaluation of a continuous monitoring/event-triggered sampling system, (2) a volatile organic compound hold-time study, and (3) an investigation of the dilution and retention properties of the 300 Area process sewer. The results from the first field test showed that future characterization and monitoring of 300 Area facility liquid waste streams could benefit significantly from augmenting continuous monitoring with event-triggered sampling. Current continuous-monitoring practices (i.e., monitoring of pH, conductivity, and flow) cannot detect discharges of organic pollutants. Effluent control effectiveness would be enhanced by incorporating a continuous total organic carbon analyzer in the system to detect events involving releases of organic compounds. In the second field test, sample hold times were shown to have a significant effect on volatile organic compound data. Samples analyzed in the field within 1 hour of collection generally had 1.5 to 3 times higher volatile organic compound concentrations than those analyzed 1.5 to 4 weeks later at on-site and off-site laboratories, respectively. The number of volatile organic compounds detected also decreased with increasing hold times.

  15. Facility effluent monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the facility effluent monitoring programs and provides an evaluation of effluent monitoring data. These evaluations are useful in assessing the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control systems, as well as management practices.

  16. Nuclear reactor effluent monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Minns, J.L.; Essig, T.H.

    1993-12-31

    Radiological environmental monitoring and effluent monitoring at nuclear power plants is important both for normal operations, as well as in the event of an accident. During normal operations, environmental monitoring verifies the effectiveness of in-plant measures for controlling the release of radioactive materials in the plant. Following an accident, it would be an additional mechanism for estimating doses to members of the general public. This paper identifies the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory basis for requiring radiological environmental and effluent monitoring, licensee conditions for effluent and environmental monitoring, NRC independent oversight activities, and NRC`s program results.

  17. Aqueous effluent tritium monitor development

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Wilson, H.T. )

    1992-03-01

    This paper discusses the development of a low-level tritium monitor for aqueous effluent which has explored several potential techniques. In one method, a water-immiscible liquid scintillation cocktail was ultrasonically mixed with an aqueous sample to form a water-cocktail dispersion for analysis by liquid scintillation spectrometry. The organic cocktail could then be reused after phase separation. Of the cocktails tested, a toluene-based cocktail showed the highest tritium detection efficiency (7%). In another technique, the sensitivity of various solid scintillators (plastic beads, crushed inorganic salts, etc.) to tritium in aqueous solutions was measured. The most efficient solid scintillator had a 2% tritium detection efficiency. In a third method, a large surface area detector was constructed from thin fibers of plastic scintillator. This detector had a 0.1% intrinsic tritium detection efficiency.

  18. Air Emission, Liquid Effluent Inventory and Reporting

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-08-18

    The IES maintains an inventory of radiological air and liquid effluents released to the atmosphere. The IES utilizes the official stack numbers. Data may be entered by generators for any monitoring time period. Waste volumes released as well as their radiological constituents are tracked. The IES provides data to produce a report for NESHAPS as well as several administrative action/anomaly reports. These reports flag unusual occurences (releases) that are above normal range releases.

  19. Aqueous effluent tritium monitor development

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Wilson, H.T.

    1991-12-31

    The development of a low-level tritium monitor for aqueous effluents has explored several potential techniques. In one method, a water-immiscible liquid scintillation cocktail was ultrasonically mixed with an aqueous sample to form a water-cocktail dispersion which was analyzed by liquid scintillation spectrometry. The organic cocktail could then be reused after phase separation. Of the cocktails tested, the highest tritium detection efficiency (7%) was determined for a toluene-based cocktail. In another technique, the response of various solid scintillators (plastic beads, crushed inorganic salts, etc.) to tritium solutions was measured. A 2% tritium detection efficiency was observed for the most efficient solid scintillators tested. In a third method, a large surface area detector was constructed from thin fibers of plastic scintillator. This detector had a 0.1% intrinsic tritium detection efficiency. While sensitivities of {approximately}25 kBg/L of tritium for a short count have been attained using several of these techniques, non can reach the environmental level of <1 kBg/L in aqueous solutions.

  20. Aqueous effluent tritium monitor development

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Wilson, H.T.

    1991-01-01

    The development of a low-level tritium monitor for aqueous effluents has explored several potential techniques. In one method, a water-immiscible liquid scintillation cocktail was ultrasonically mixed with an aqueous sample to form a water-cocktail dispersion which was analyzed by liquid scintillation spectrometry. The organic cocktail could then be reused after phase separation. Of the cocktails tested, the highest tritium detection efficiency (7%) was determined for a toluene-based cocktail. In another technique, the response of various solid scintillators (plastic beads, crushed inorganic salts, etc.) to tritium solutions was measured. A 2% tritium detection efficiency was observed for the most efficient solid scintillators tested. In a third method, a large surface area detector was constructed from thin fibers of plastic scintillator. This detector had a 0.1% intrinsic tritium detection efficiency. While sensitivities of {approximately}25 kBg/L of tritium for a short count have been attained using several of these techniques, non can reach the environmental level of <1 kBg/L in aqueous solutions.

  1. Waste monitoring system for effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, J.M.; Gomez, B.; Trujillo, L.; Malcom, J.E.; Nekimken, H.; Pope, N.; Bibeau, R.

    1995-07-01

    The waste monitoring system in use at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Plutonium Facility, TA-55, is a computer-based system that proves real-time information on industrial effluents. Remote computers monitor discharge events and data moves from one system to another via a local area network. This report describes the history, system design, summary, instrumentation list, displays, trending screens, and layout of the waste monitoring system.

  2. Facility effluent monitoring plan for WESF

    SciTech Connect

    SIMMONS, F.M.

    1999-09-01

    The FEMP for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) provides sufficient information on the WESF effluent characteristics and the effluent monitoring systems so that a compliance assessment against applicable requirements may be performed. Radioactive and hazardous material source terms are related to specific effluent streams that are in turn, related to discharge points and, finally are compared to the effluent monitoring system capability.

  3. Liquid effluent study characterization data

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    During the development of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement), public comments were received regarding reduction of the discharge of liquid effluents into the soil column. As a result, the US Department of Energy (DOE), with concurrence of the Washington State Department of Ecology (WSDE)and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), committed to a special project designed to document the discharge history and the charter of Hanford Site liquid discharges. The results of this project will be used in determining the need for additional waste stream analysis, and/or to negotiate additional milestones pertaining to such discharges in the Tri-Party Agreement. Wastestream sampling data collected prior to October 1989 were reported in the Waste Stream Characterization Report. Preliminary Stream-specific Reports were prepared which evaluated that data and proposed dangerous waste designations for each stream. This document contains the wastestream sampling and analysis data collected as part of the liquid effluent study. Data contained in this report were obtained from samples collected from October 1989 through March 1990. Information is presented on the wastestreams that have been sampled, the parameters analyzed, and the dates and times at which the samples were collected. This information will be evaluated in the final Stream-Specific Reports. 9 refs., 4 tabs.

  4. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 327 Facility

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    The 327 Facility [Post-Irradiation Testing Laboratory] provides office and laboratory space for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) scientific and engineering staff conducting multidisciplinary research in the areas of post-irradiated fuels and structural materials. The facility is designed to accommodate the use of radioactive and hazardous materials in the conduct of these activities. This report summarizes the airborne emissions and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

  5. Computer software configuration management plan for 200 East/West Liquid Effluent Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, F.A. Jr.

    1995-02-27

    This computer software management configuration plan covers the control of the software for the monitor and control system that operates the Effluent Treatment Facility and its associated truck load in station and some key aspects of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility that stores condensate to be processed. Also controlled is the Treated Effluent Disposal System`s pumping stations and monitors waste generator flows in this system as well as the Phase Two Effluent Collection System.

  6. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 324 Facility

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    The 324 Facility [Waste Technology Engineering Laboratory] in the 300 Area primarily supports the research and development of radioactive and nonradioactive waste vitrification technologies, biological waste remediation technologies, spent nuclear fuel studies, waste mixing and transport studies, and tritium development programs. All of the above-mentioned programs deal with, and have the potential to, release hazardous and/or radioactive material. The potential for discharge would primarily result from (1) conducting research activities using the hazardous materials, (2) storing radionuclides and hazardous chemicals, and (3) waste accumulation and storage. This report summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents, and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterizing effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

  7. Effluent Treatment Facility tritium emissions monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, D.L.

    1991-07-25

    An Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved sampling and analysis protocol was developed and executed to verify atmospheric emissions compliance for the new Savannah River Site (SRS) F/H area Effluent Treatment Facility. Sampling equipment was fabricated, installed, and tested at stack monitoring points for filtrable particulate radionuclides, radioactive iodine, and tritium. The only detectable anthropogenic radionuclides released from Effluent Treatment Facility stacks during monitoring were iodine-129 and tritium oxide. This paper only examines the collection and analysis of tritium oxide.

  8. Liquid effluent study: Ground water characterization data

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This report is a support document to the Liquid Effluent Study Final Project Report (WHC 1990c). The focus is on sampling and analysis rationale, quality assurance (QA), data validation, and sampling conditions for the groundwater quality assessment. Interpretation of the groundwater data is provided in the final project report. 20 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Millimeter wave sensor for monitoring effluents

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Bakhtiari, Sasan; Raptis, Apostolos C.; Dieckman, Stephen L.

    1995-01-01

    A millimeter-wave sensor for detecting and measuring effluents from processing plants either remotely or on-site includes a high frequency signal source for transmitting frequency-modulated continuous waves in the millimeter or submillimeter range with a wide sweep capability and a computer-controlled detector for detecting a plurality of species of effluents on a real time basis. A high resolution spectrum of an effluent, or effluents, is generated by a deconvolution of the measured spectra resulting in a narrowing of the line widths by 2 or 3 orders of magnitude as compared with the pressure broadened spectra detected at atmospheric pressure for improved spectral specificity and measurement sensitivity. The sensor is particularly adapted for remote monitoring such as where access is limited or sensor cost restricts multiple sensors as well as for large area monitoring under nearly all weather conditions.

  10. 200 Area Liquid Effluent Facilities -- Quality assurance program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, L.

    1995-03-13

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) describes the quality assurance and management controls used by the 200 Area Liquid Effluent Facilities (LEF) to perform its activities in accordance with DOE Order 5700.6C. The 200 Area LEF consists of the following facilities: Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF); Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF); Liquid Effluent Retention facility (LERF); and Truck Loading Facility -- (Project W291). The intent is to ensure that all activities such as collection of effluents, treatment, concentration of secondary wastes, verification, sampling and disposal of treated effluents and solids related with the LEF operations, conform to established requirements.

  11. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koster, James E.; Bolton, Richard D.

    1999-01-01

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans.

  12. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koster, J.E.; Bolton, R.D.

    1999-03-02

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans. 4 figs.

  13. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 3720 Building

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, K.D.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1999-04-02

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) has been prepared for the Environmental Science Laboratory (3720 Facility) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to meet the requirements in DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Programs'' This FEMP has been prepared for the 3720 Facility primarily because it has a major (potential to emit >0.1 mrem/yr) emission point for radionuclide air emissions according to the annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) assessment performed. This section summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the inventory based NESHAP assessment for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements. The 3720 Facility provides office and laboratory space for PNNL scientific and engineering staff conducting multidisciplinary research in the areas of materials characterization and testing and waste management. The facility is designed to accommodate the use of radioactive and hazardous materials to conduct these activities. Radioactive material storage and usage occur throughout the facility and include a large number of isotopes. This material is in several forms, including solid, liquid, and dispersible particulate. The facility is in the process of being vacated for shutdown, but is considered a Major Emission Point as of the date of this document approval.

  14. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 325 Facility

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    The Applied Chemistry Laboratory (325 Facility) houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and mixed hazardous waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials, and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed, low-level, and transuranic wastes generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Radioactive material storage and usage occur throughout the facility and include a large number of isotopes. This material is in several forms, including solid, liquid, particulate, and gas. Some of these materials are also heated during testing which can produce vapors. The research activities have been assigned to the following activity designations: High-Level Hot Cell, Hazardous Waste Treatment Unit, Waste Form Development, Special Testing Projects, Chemical Process Development, Analytical Hot Cell, and Analytical Chemistry. The following summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

  15. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the fast flux test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Nickels, J M; Dahl, N R

    1992-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in US Department of Energy Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determination was performed during calendar year 1991 and the evaluation requires the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements.

  16. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 325 Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, K.D.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1999-04-02

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) has been prepared for the 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to meet the requirements in DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Programs.'' This FEMP has been prepared for the RPL primarily because it has a ''major'' (potential to emit >0.1 mrem/yr) emission point for radionuclide air emissions according to the annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) assessment performed. This section summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the inventory based NESHAP assessment for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements. The RPL at PNNL houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and radioactive mixed waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities within the building include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed radioactive, low-level radioactive, and transuranic wastes generated by PNNL activities.

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DATA SYSTEMS USER GUIDE: LIQUID EFFLUENTS DATA SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a user guide to the Liquid Effluents Data System (LEDS), a computerized data base on liquid effluents (or wastewater) from stationary point sources. The LEDS is one of four waste stream data bases which are components of the Environmental Assessment Data Systems (EA...

  18. Quality Assurance Project Plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, T.P.

    1994-10-20

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, which are part of the overall Hanford Site Environmental Protection Plan. This plan specifically applies to the sampling and analysis activities and continuous monitoring performed for all Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company. It is generic in approach and will be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of the individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans.

  19. Quality Assurance Project Plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities

    SciTech Connect

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-06-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the Facility Monitoring Plans of the overall site-wide environmental monitoring plan. This plan specifically applies to the sampling and analysis activities and continuous monitoring performed for all Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company. It is generic in approach and will be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. This document is intended to be a basic road map to the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan documents (i.e., the guidance document for preparing Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations, management plan, and Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans). The implementing procedures, plans, and instructions are appropriate for the control of effluent monitoring plans requiring compliance with US Department of Energy, US Environmental Protection Agency, state, and local requirements. This Quality Assurance Project Plan contains a matrix of organizational responsibilities, procedural resources from facility or site manuals used in the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, and a list of the analytes of interest and analytical methods for each facility preparing a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan. 44 refs., 1 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Real-time sewer effluent monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, S.; Yamauchi, R.K.

    1990-12-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has upgraded its early sewer monitoring system from the 1970's. LLNL must insure that its waste water is of a consistent and acceptable nature for the City of Livermore's community sewer system. The Sewer Monitor UpGrade system (SMUG) is now monitoring the Lab's sewer effluent. SMUG monitors the effluent for pH, flow rate, metals, and alpha, beta and gamma emitting isotopes. It turns on the appropriate alarms if present alarm levels are exceeded. The hardware consists of DEC Micro VAX II/GPX that has been repackaged by Nuclear Data Company as the Genie 9900 Data Acquisition and Display System. The gamma detector, three XRFAs, pH meter, and flow rate meter are commercially available. The metals sample cells are custom built at the Lab. The operating system is the VMS version 5.4. The application software is written in DEC's Fortran-77 and MACRO, and Nuclear Data software library. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the uranium trioxide facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lohrasbi, J.; Johnson, D.L.; De Lorenzo, D.S.

    1993-12-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

  2. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium uranium extraction facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegand, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

  3. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farm facility

    SciTech Connect

    Crummel, G.M.

    1998-05-18

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements.

  4. Liquid effluent Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) implementation summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Lueck, K.J.

    1995-04-26

    This report summarizes liquid effluent analytical data collected during the Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) Implementation Program, evaluates whether or not the sampling performed meets the requirements of the individual SAPs, compares the results to the WAC 173-200 Ground Water Quality Standards. Presented in the report are results from liquid effluent samples collected (1992-1994) from 18 of the 22 streams identified in the Consent Order (No. DE 91NM-177) requiring SAPs.

  5. Effluent emissions monitoring at the DOE Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, L.W.

    1993-05-01

    There are numerous regulatory requirements controlling the effluent emissions monitoring at a U.S. Department of Energy site. This paper defines how these regulatory effluent emissions monitoring requirements and the Quality Assurance oversight of these requirements were implemented by Westinghouse Hanford Company, the operations contractor, at the DOE Hanford Site.

  6. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 222-S Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Nickels, J.M.; Warwick, G.J.

    1992-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation requires the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable Federal, State, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, as a minimum, every three years.

  7. Facility effluent monitoring plan for 242-A evaporator facility

    SciTech Connect

    Crummel, G.M.; Gustavson, R.D.

    1995-02-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation showed the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, as a minimum, every three years.

  8. Systems engineering implementation plan for the liquid effluents services program

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, S.S.

    1995-01-01

    A graded approach is being taken by the Liquid Effluents Services Program in implementing systems engineering because of the advanced state of the program. The approach is cost-effective and takes credit for related work already completed, yet retains the benefits of systems engineering. This plan describes how the Liquid Effluents Services Program will implement systems engineering so there is a common understanding. Systems engineering work to be performed and the products of that work are identified. The relation to the current planning process and integration with the sitewide systems engineering effort is described.

  9. Assessment of Radioactive Liquid Effluents Release at IPEN-CNEN/SP

    SciTech Connect

    Bessa Nisti, Marcelo; Godoy dos Santos, Adir Janete

    2008-08-07

    A continuous effluent monitoring program has been established at IPEN's plant in order to allow an environmental impact assessment due to radioactive liquid effluent discharge to sanitary system. Representative samples of radioactive liquid effluents are analyzed by using high resolution gamma spectroscopy and instrumental neutron activation analysis, facing to Brazilian radioprotection regulatory rules. The results are consolidating yearly in the Institute source-term. In this paper, results of the source-term are presented, concerning to years 2004, 2005 and 2006. The total activity discharged was 8.5xl0{sup 8} Bq, 5.7x10{sup 8} Bq and 2.7xl0{sup 8} Bq, respectively. As the release is strongly dependent on the total amount of the effluent and on the dilution factor, special attention is needed in order to obtain the correct value of that last one. The estimated inside plant dilution factor, considering the recent facilities and the reshaping of the sewerage system was 80, 180 and 130, for period of 2004, 2005 and 2006 discharged liquid radioactive effluent.

  10. Assessment of Radioactive Liquid Effluents Release at IPEN-CNEN/SP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisti, Marcelo Bessa; dos Santos, Adir Janete Godoy

    2008-08-01

    A continuous effluent monitoring program has been established at IPEN's plant in order to allow an environmental impact assessment due to radioactive liquid effluent discharge to sanitary system. Representative samples of radioactive liquid effluents are analyzed by using high resolution gamma spectroscopy and instrumental neutron activation analysis, facing to Brazilian radioprotection regulatory rules. The results are consolidating yearly in the Institute source-term. In this paper, results of the source-term are presented, concerning to years 2004, 2005 and 2006. The total activity discharged was 8.5×l08 Bq, 5.7×108 Bq and 2.7×l08 Bq, respectively. As the release is strongly dependent on the total amount of the effluent and on the dilution factor, special attention is needed in order to obtain the correct value of that last one. The estimated inside plant dilution factor, considering the recent facilities and the reshaping of the sewerage system was 80, 180 and 130, for period of 2004, 2005 and 2006 discharged liquid radioactive effluent.

  11. Hanford Facility dangerous waste permit application, liquid effluent retention facility and 200 area effluent treatment facility

    SciTech Connect

    Coenenberg, J.G.

    1997-08-15

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to 10 be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document 11 number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the 12 Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation 13 submitted for individual, `operating` treatment, storage, and/or disposal 14 units, such as the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 15 Treatment Facility (this document, DOE/RL-97-03). 16 17 Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford 18 Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B 19 permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of 20 Ecology (Ecology 1987 and 1996) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 21 (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needs 22 defined by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of 23 Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington 24 State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit 25 application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the 26 chapter headings and subheadings. A checklist indicating where information is 27 contained in the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 28 Treatment Facility permit application documentation, in relation to the 29 Washington State Department of Ecology guidance, is located in the Contents 30 Section. 31 32 Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in 33 nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units 34 (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever 35 appropriate, the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 36 Treatment Facility permit application documentation makes cross-reference to 37 the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating

  12. 300 Area Liquid Effluent Facilities (LEF) Authorization Envelope

    SciTech Connect

    WRIGHT, E.J.; STORDEUR, R.T.

    2000-04-07

    The purpose of this document is to establish the facility Authorization Envelope (AE) for the 300 Liquid Effluent Facilities (LEP )Project and identify the requirements related to the maintenance of the AE as Specified in HNF-PRO-2701, Authorization Envelope and Authorization Agreement. The 300 LEF Project consists of two separate facilities operating under one management organization. They are the 310 Facility and the 340 Facility. The AE documents the limits of operations for all 300 LEF Project activities.

  13. Continuous environmental monitoring for aqueous effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Pitt, Jr., W. W.; Jones, G. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    An aquatic environmental monitor has been developed that will continuously monitor aqueous waste streams from coal processing plants. The monitor contains three different instruments: a continuous chemical oxygen demand monitor and two continuous-flow fluorometers with different excitation-emission characteristics. A prototype instrument was fabricated and evaluated for several different applications. The details of the instrument design and results of its evaluation are presented in this report.

  14. 1994 Environmental monitoring drinking water and nonradiological effluent programs annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, B.D.; Brock, T.A.; Meachum, T.R.

    1995-10-01

    EG&G Idaho, Inc., initiated monitoring programs for drinking water in 1988 and for nonradiological parameters and pollutants in liquid effluents in 1985. These programs were initiated for the facilities operated by EG&G Idaho for the US Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. On October 1, 1994, Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) replaced EG&G Idaho as the prime contractor at the INEL and assumed responsibility for these programs. Section I discusses the general site characteristics, the analytical laboratories, and sampling methodology general to both programs. Section 2, the Drinking Water Program, tracks the bacteriological, chemical, and radiological parameters required by State and Federal regulations. This section describes the drinking water monitoring activities conducted at 17 LITCO-operated production wells and 11 distribution systems. It also contains all of the drinking water parameters detected and the regulatory limits exceeded during calendar year 1994. In addition, groundwater quality is discussed as it relates to contaminants identified at the wellhead for LITCO production wells. Section 3 discusses the nonradiological liquid effluent monitoring results for 27 liquid effluent streams. These streams are presented with emphasis on calendar year 1994 activities. All parameter measurements and concentrations were below the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act toxic characteristics limits.

  15. Development of aqueous tritium effluent monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J. )

    1989-01-01

    A variety of techniques have been evaluated and tested in an attempt to develop a monitor for tritium at low-levels in aqueous streams. One system tested was commercially available, HPLC radioactivity monitor. This system uses crushed yttrium silicate as the scintillator and employs standard fast coincidence electronics to measure tritium in a flowing stream. Laboratory tests of this unit indicate that the monitor can sense tritium at concentrations above 600 pCi/cc using a two (2) minute counting interval. Pooling the count rate data over a longer interval, (e.g.,. 24 hours) results in a detection limit of {approximately}20 pCi/cc, under constant background conditions. Unfortunately, the cells are easily plugged with debris even under laboratory conditions. To overcome this problem, a prototype system was designed, fabricated, and is being tested in the laboratory. The prototype used unclad fibers of plastic scintillator as the detection medium. Approximately 500 1mm-diam fibers were assembled into a flow cell with two 51mm-diam photomultipliers (PMTs) coupled to the ends of the fiber bundles to detect the scintillations. Fast coincidence, pulse shaping electronics are used to minimize the single photon and dark current backgrounds. The tritium counting efficiency, background, and sensitivity will be determined in the laboratory followed by field reliability testing. 10 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Continuous tritium effluent water monitor at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Wilson, H.T.

    1992-01-01

    A continuous monitor for tritium in water has been installed in the secondary cooling water effluent from the K-Reactor at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The monitor is designed to provide early detection of a small leak of the tritiated heavy water moderator and facilitate rapid isolation procedures. The tritium detector consists of an analysis cell containing 0.1--0.25 mm diameter beads of plastic scintillator interposed between two photomultiplier tubes and standard fast-slow coincidence electronics. A small portion of the effluent stream is first filtered through a series of cartridge filters (0.2 [mu]m final filter) and then chemically treated by ion exchange resin and activated charcoal before reaching the cell. Flow through the detector is [approx]3 mL/min. The tritium effluent water monitor (TEWM) will alarm if the tritium in the outfall exceeds 56 Bq/mL during a 10 minute counting interval. The installation and performance of the TEWM are discussed.

  17. Continuous tritium effluent water monitor at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Wilson, H.T.

    1992-11-01

    A continuous monitor for tritium in water has been installed in the secondary cooling water effluent from the K-Reactor at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The monitor is designed to provide early detection of a small leak of the tritiated heavy water moderator and facilitate rapid isolation procedures. The tritium detector consists of an analysis cell containing 0.1--0.25 mm diameter beads of plastic scintillator interposed between two photomultiplier tubes and standard fast-slow coincidence electronics. A small portion of the effluent stream is first filtered through a series of cartridge filters (0.2 {mu}m final filter) and then chemically treated by ion exchange resin and activated charcoal before reaching the cell. Flow through the detector is {approx}3 mL/min. The tritium effluent water monitor (TEWM) will alarm if the tritium in the outfall exceeds 56 Bq/mL during a 10 minute counting interval. The installation and performance of the TEWM are discussed.

  18. New parameter for monitoring fouling during ultrafiltration of WWTP effluent.

    PubMed

    Roorda, J H; van der Graaf, J H

    2001-01-01

    Variations in water quality of waste water treatment plant (WWTP) effluent complicate ultrafiltration of this feed water. Traditional parameters do not provide sufficient information to explain the fouling of membranes during ultrafiltration of WWTP effluent. New parameters for measuring and monitoring the fouling potential of feed water for ultrafiltration membranes need to be developed. The normalised membrane fouling index for ultrafiltration membranes (MFI-UFn) can be used as such and is according to the cake filtration theory calculated from the ratio of filtration time and filtration volume as a function of the filtration volume. MFI-UFn can be calculated from both experiments with constant Trans Membrane Pressure (TMP) and from experiments with constant flux. This parameter can also be calculated independent of the scale of the experiment. Results show that differences in fouling potential can be measured for various feed waters using the same membrane type and for various membrane types using the same feed water. Variation in feed water quality leads to a deviation of the MFI-UFn, as was found especially for WWTP effluent. The applied TMP influences the value of the MFI-UFn, indicating cake compression when applying a higher TMP. MFI-UFn can be used to identify the effect of pre-treatment methods, which is useful when using WWTP effluent as feed water for an ultrafiltration processes. PMID:11436787

  19. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2004-11-15

    located downstream of control technologies and just before discharge to the atmosphere. The need for monitoring airborne emissions of hazardous chemicals is established in the Hanford Site Air Operating Permit and in notices of construction. Based on the current potential-to-emit, the Hanford Site Air Operating Permit does not contain general monitoring requirements for BOP facilities. However, the permit identifies monitoring requirements for specific projects and buildings. Needs for future monitoring will be established by future permits issued pursuant to the applicable state and federal regulations. A number of liquid-effluent discharge systems serve the BOP facilities: sanitary sewer, process sewer, retention process sewer, and aquaculture system. Only the latter system discharges to the environment; the rest either discharge to treatment plants or to long-term storage. Routine compliance sampling of liquid effluents is only required at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory. Liquid effluents from other BOP facilities may be sampled or monitored to characterize facility effluents or to investigate discharges of concern. Effluent sampling and monitoring for the BOP facilities depends on the inventories, activities, and environmental permits in place for each facility. A description of routine compliance monitoring for BOP facilities is described in the BOP FEMP.

  20. AIRBORNE MONITORING OF COOLING TOWER EFFLUENTS. VOLUME I. TECHNICAL SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    MRI conducted an airborne plume monitoring program as part of the Chalk Point Cooling Tower Project. Plume measurement included: temperature, dew point, visibility, turbulence, droplet size distribution and concentration, liquid water content, sodium chloride concentration (NaCl)...

  1. LIQUID EFFLUENT RETENTION FACILITY (LERF) BASIN 42 STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB

    2004-10-29

    This report documents laboratory results obtained under test plan RPP-21533 for samples submitted by the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) from the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) Basin 42 (Reference 1). The LERF Basin 42 contains process condensate (PC) from the 242-A Evaporator and landfill leachate. The ETF processes one PC campaign approximately every 12 to 18 months. A typical PC campaign volume can range from 1.5 to 2.5 million gallons. During the September 2003 ETF Basin 42 processing campaign, a recurring problem with 'gelatinous buildup' on the outlet filters from 60A-TK-I (surge tank) was observed (Figure 1). This buildup appeared on the filters after the contents of the surge tank were adjusted to a pH of between 5 and 6 using sulfuric acid. Biological activity in the PC feed was suspected to be the cause of the gelatinous material. Due to this buildup, the filters (10 {micro}m CUNO) required daily change out to maintain process throughput.

  2. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, C.J.

    1995-10-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure lonq-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years.

  3. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium-uranium extraction facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lohrasbi, J.; Johnson, D.L.; De Lorenzo, D.S.

    1993-12-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

  4. EU-wide monitoring survey on emerging polar organic contaminants in wastewater treatment plant effluents.

    PubMed

    Loos, Robert; Carvalho, Raquel; António, Diana C; Comero, Sara; Locoro, Giovanni; Tavazzi, Simona; Paracchini, Bruno; Ghiani, Michela; Lettieri, Teresa; Blaha, Ludek; Jarosova, Barbora; Voorspoels, Stefan; Servaes, Kelly; Haglund, Peter; Fick, Jerker; Lindberg, Richard H; Schwesig, David; Gawlik, Bernd M

    2013-11-01

    In the year 2010, effluents from 90 European wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) were analyzed for 156 polar organic chemical contaminants. The analyses were complemented by effect-based monitoring approaches aiming at estrogenicity and dioxin-like toxicity analyzed by in vitro reporter gene bioassays, and yeast and diatom culture acute toxicity optical bioassays. Analyses of organic substances were performed by solid-phase extraction (SPE) or liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) or gas chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS). Target microcontaminants were pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), veterinary (antibiotic) drugs, perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), organophosphate ester flame retardants, pesticides (and some metabolites), industrial chemicals such as benzotriazoles (corrosion inhibitors), iodinated x-ray contrast agents, and gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging agents; in addition biological endpoints were measured. The obtained results show the presence of 125 substances (80% of the target compounds) in European wastewater effluents, in concentrations ranging from low nanograms to milligrams per liter. These results allow for an estimation to be made of a European median level for the chemicals investigated in WWTP effluents. The most relevant compounds in the effluent waters with the highest median concentration levels were the artificial sweeteners acesulfame and sucralose, benzotriazoles (corrosion inhibitors), several organophosphate ester flame retardants and plasticizers (e.g. tris(2-chloroisopropyl)phosphate; TCPP), pharmaceutical compounds such as carbamazepine, tramadol, telmisartan, venlafaxine, irbesartan, fluconazole, oxazepam, fexofenadine, diclofenac, citalopram, codeine, bisoprolol, eprosartan, the antibiotics trimethoprim, ciprofloxacine, sulfamethoxazole, and clindamycine, the insect repellent N,N'-diethyltoluamide (DEET), the pesticides

  5. 40 CFR 401.17 - pH Effluent limitations under continuous monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true pH Effluent limitations under... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 401.17 pH Effluent limitations under continuous monitoring. (a) Where a permittee continuously measures the pH of wastewater pursuant to...

  6. 40 CFR 401.17 - pH Effluent limitations under continuous monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false pH Effluent limitations under... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 401.17 pH Effluent limitations under continuous monitoring. (a) Where a permittee continuously measures the pH of wastewater pursuant to...

  7. 40 CFR 401.17 - pH Effluent limitations under continuous monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true pH Effluent limitations under continuous monitoring. 401.17 Section 401.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 401.17 pH Effluent limitations...

  8. 40 CFR 401.17 - pH Effluent limitations under continuous monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true pH Effluent limitations under continuous monitoring. 401.17 Section 401.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 401.17 pH Effluent limitations...

  9. 40 CFR 401.17 - pH Effluent limitations under continuous monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true pH Effluent limitations under continuous monitoring. 401.17 Section 401.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 401.17 pH Effluent limitations...

  10. Technology basis for the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility Operating Specifications. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.G.

    1995-05-17

    The Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) consists of three retention basins, each with a nominal storage capacity of 6.5 million gallons. LERF serves as interim storage of 242-A Evaporator process condensate for treatment in the Effluent Treatment Facility. This document provides the technical basis for the LERF Operating Specifications, OSD-T-151-00029.

  11. Contribution of Hanford liquid effluents to strontium-90 levels in offsite soils

    SciTech Connect

    Jaquish, R.E.

    1993-08-01

    Strontium-90 is a major constituent of liquid effluents entering the Columbia River at the 100-N Area. The Columbia River also contains {sup 90}Sr from world-wide fallout that enters the Columbia River upstream of Hanford. Irrigation water pumped from the Columbia River can deposit {sup 90}Sr on soil where it can be taken up by farm crops. Fallout has also deposited {sup 90}Sr directly on soil by atmospheric deposition. A review of the sources of {sup 90}Sr in soil in the vicinity of Hanford indicates that about 2% can be attributed to Hanford liquid effluents. PNL measurements of {sup 90}Sr in soil at a background location agree with predicted levels of fallout made by the Federal Radiation Council in 1964. Alfalfa is routinely monitored for {sup 90}Sr and is of special interest since it has concentrations higher than other farm crops. The concentrations of {sup 90}Sr in alfalfa measured in the Hanford vicinity are in the range one would expect, based on measured soil concentrations and using uptake factors from an earlier {sup 90}Sr uptake study at Hanford.

  12. High pressure liquid level monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bean, Vern E.; Long, Frederick G.

    1984-01-01

    A liquid level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

  13. Clinical Validation of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Imipenem in Spent Effluent in Critically Ill Patients Receiving Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Aiping; Li, Zhe; Yu, Junxian; Li, Ren; Cheng, Sheng; Duan, Meili; Bai, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The primary objective of this pilot study was to investigate whether the therapeutic drug monitoring of imipenem could be performed with spent effluent instead of blood sampling collected from critically ill patients under continuous renal replacement therapy. Methods A prospective open-label study was conducted in a real clinical setting. Both blood and effluent samples were collected pairwise before imipenem administration and 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 h after imipenem administration. Plasma and effluent imipenem concentrations were determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters of blood and effluent samples were calculated. Results Eighty-three paired plasma and effluent samples were obtained from 10 patients. The Pearson correlation coefficient of the imipenem concentrations in plasma and effluent was 0.950 (P<0.0001). The average plasma-to-effluent imipenem concentration ratio was 1.044 (95% confidence interval, 0.975 to 1.114) with Bland-Altman analysis. No statistically significant difference was found in the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters tested in paired plasma and effluent samples with Wilcoxon test. Conclusion Spent effluent of continuous renal replacement therapy could be used for therapeutic drug monitoring of imipenem instead of blood sampling in critically ill patients. PMID:27093294

  14. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    DAVIS, W.E.

    2000-03-08

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee public safety, or the environment. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan ensures long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and must be updated, as a minimum, every 3 years.

  15. Generic effluent monitoring system certification for salt well portable exhauster

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Maughan, A.D.

    1997-09-01

    Tests were conducted to verify that the Generic Effluent Monitoring System (GEMS), as it is applied to the Salt Well Portable Exhauster, meets all applicable regulatory performance criteria for air sampling systems at nuclear facilities. These performance criteria address both the suitability of the air sampling probe location and the transport of the sample to the collection devices. The criteria covering air sampling probe location ensure that the contaminants in the stack are well mixed with the airflow at the probe location such that the extracted sample represents the whole. The sample transport criteria ensure that the sampled contaminants are quantitatively delivered to the collection device. The specific performance criteria are described in detail in the report. The tests demonstrated that the GEMS/Salt Well Exhauster system meets all applicable performance criteria. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted the testing using a mockup of the Salt Well Portable Exhauster stack at the Numatec Hanford Company`s 305 Building. The stack/sampling system configuration tested was designed to provide airborne effluent control for the Salt Well pumping operation at some U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site, Washington. The portable design of the exhauster allows it to be used in other applications and over a range of exhaust air flowrates (approximately 200 - 1100 cubic feet per minute). The unit includes a stack section containing the sampling probe and another stack section containing the airflow, temperature and humidity sensors. The GEMS design features a probe with a single shrouded sampling nozzle, a sample delivery line, and sample collection system. The collection system includes a filter holder to collect the sample of record and an in-line detector head and filter for monitoring beta radiation-emitting particles.

  16. Environmental regulatory guide for radiological effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is obligated to regulate its own activities so as to provide radiation protection for both workers and the public.'' Presidential Executive Order 12088, Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards,'' further requires the heads of executive agencies to ensure that all Federal facilities and activities comply with applicable pollution control standards and to take all actions necessary for the prevention, control, and abatement of environmental pollution. This regulatory guide describes the elements of an acceptable effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance program for DOE sites involving radioactive materials. These elements are applicable to all DOE and contractor activities for which the DOE exercises environmental, safety, and health responsibilities, and are intended to be applicable over the broad range of DOE facilities and sites. In situations where the high-priority elements may not provide sufficient coverage of a specific monitoring or surveillance topic, the document provides additional guidance. The high-priority elements are written as procedures and activities that should'' be performed, and the guidance is written as procedures and activities that should'' be performed. The regulatory guide both incorporates and expands on requirements embodied in DOE 5400.5 and DOE 5400.1. 221 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Statement of work for services provided by the waste sampling and characterization facility for the effluent and environmental monitoring program during calendar year 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Gleckler, B.P., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-28

    This document defines the services the Waste Sampling & Characterization Facility (WSCF) shall provide the Effluent and Environmental Monitoring Program (EEM) throughout the calendar year for analysis. The purpose of the EEM Program is to monitor liquid and gaseous effluents, and the environment immediately around the facilities which may contain radioactive and hazardous materials. Monitoring data are collected, evaluated, and reported to determine their degree of compliance with applicable federal and state regulations and permits. The Appendix identifies the samples EEM plans to submit for analysis in CY-1997. Analysis of effluent (liquid and air discharges) and environmental (air, liquid, animal, and vegetative) samples is required using standard laboratory procedures, in accordance with regulatory and control requirements cited in Quality Assurance Program Plan for Radionuclide Airborne Emissions Monitoring (especially Appendix G) (VTHC 1995a), Effluent Monitoring Quality Assurance Project Plan for Radionuclide Airborne Emissions Data (WHC 1995b), Operational Environmental Monitoring Program Quality Assurance Project Plan (WHC 1994b), and Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (DOE 1996). Should changes to this document be necessary, WSCF or the Air & Water Services (A&WS) Organization may amend it at any time with a jointly approved internal memo.

  18. Method and means of monitoring the effluent from nuclear facilities

    DOEpatents

    Lattin, Kenneth R.; Erickson, Gerald L.

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive iodine is detected in the effluent cooling gas from a nuclear reactor or nuclear facility by passing the effluent gas through a continuously moving adsorbent filter material which is then purged of noble gases and conveyed continuously to a detector of radioactivity. The purging operation has little or no effect upon the concentration of radioactive iodine which is adsorbed on the filter material.

  19. Generic effluent monitoring system certification for AP-40 exhauster stack

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Davis, W.E.; Bussell, J.H.; Maughan, A.D.

    1997-09-01

    Tests were conducted to verify that the Generic Effluent Monitoring System (GEMS), as applied to the AP-40 exhauster stack, meets all applicable regulatory performance criteria for air sampling systems at nuclear facilities. These performance criteria address both the suitability of the air sampling probe location and the transport of the sample to the collection devices. The criteria covering air sampling probe location ensure that the contaminants in the stack are well mixed with the airflow at the probe location such that the extracted sample represents the whole. The sample transport criteria ensure that the sampled contaminants are quantitatively delivered to the collection device. The specific performance criteria are described in detail in the report. The tests demonstrated that the GEMS/AP-40 system meets all applicable performance criteria. The contaminant mixing tests were conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at the wind tunnel facility, 331-H Building, using a mockup of the actual stack. The particle sample transport tests were conducted by PNNL at the Numatec Hanford Company`s 305 Building. The AP-40 stack is typical of several 10-in. diameter stacks that discharge the filtered ventilation air from tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The GEMS design features a probe with a single shrouded sampling nozzle, a sample delivery line, and sample collection system. The collection system includes a filter holder to collect the sample of record and an in-line detector head and filter for monitoring beta radiation-emitting particles. Unrelated to the performance criteria, it was found that the record sample filter holder exhibited symptoms of sample bypass around the particle collection filter. This filter holder should either be modified or replaced with a different type. 10 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project

    SciTech Connect

    HUNACEK, G.S.

    2000-08-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document was prepared using the specific guidelines identified in Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC)-EP-0438-1, ''A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans'', and assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the third revision to the original annual report. This document is reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it is updated as necessary.

  1. Liquid-Level Monitor for Pressurized Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Davis, W. T.; Mall, G. H.

    1986-01-01

    Technique for monitoring water levels in pressurized stainless-steel cylinders, based on differences in gamma-ray attenuation coefficients in water and air, developed. Full-scale laboratory prototype system constructed to test technique. Technique usable with liquids other than water, since linear attenuation coefficients for intermediate-energy gamma rays in air considerably lower than in liquids. Also adaptable for continuous monitoring of liquid levels in resevoir systems and in underground storage tanks.

  2. Cost of meeting geothermal liquid effluent disposal regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, K.D.; Currie, J.W.; Price, B.A.; Rogers, E.A.

    1981-06-01

    Background information is presented on the characteristics of liquid wastes and the available disposal options. Regulations that may directly or indirectly influence liquid waste disposal are reviewed. An assessment of the available wastewater-treatment systems is provided. A case study of expected liquid-waste-treatment and disposal costs is summarized. (MHR)

  3. Liquid effluent FY 1996 program plan WBS 1.2.2.1. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Liquid Effluents Program supports the three Hanford Site mission components: (1) Clean up the site, (2) provide scientific and technological excellence to meet global needs, and (3) Partner in the economic diversification of the region. Nine Hanford Site objectives have been established for the Hanford Site programs to accomplish all three components of this mission.

  4. ASSESSMENT OF LIQUID EMULSION MEMBRANE FOR CLEAN UP OF AQUEOUS WASTE EFFLUENTS FROM HAZARDOUS ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    El-Reefy, Sohair A.; Selim, Y.T.; Hassan, M.A.; Aly, H.F.

    2003-02-27

    Four liquid emulsion membrane (LEM) systems are given to remove different hazardous elements such as uranium, thorium, cobalt, copper, lead, and cadmium from different aqueous waste effluents. The optimum conditions for use of these systems are deduced. The potentiality of LEM for removal of hazardous pollutants from aqueous waste solutions is given.

  5. Liquid effluents 1994 fiscal year work plan: WBS 1.2.2.1

    SciTech Connect

    Ashworth, F.L. Jr.

    1993-08-01

    The program mission is to manage current and future liquid effluent streams in a safe, responsible, cost effective and legally compliant manner. This is achieved through planning and integration, public and stakeholder interaction, definition of requirements for generators and provision of timely treatment, storage, disposal capability, and waste minimization of waste streams where applicable.

  6. Real-time aqueous tritium monitor using liquid scintillation counting

    SciTech Connect

    Sigg, R.A.; McCarty, J.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Sanders, M.A.

    1994-07-01

    An ability to continuously monitor low-level tritium releases in aqueous effluents is of particular interest to heavy water facilities such as those at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Canadian CANDU reactors. SRS developed a real-time monitoring system based on flow-through liquid scintillation (LS) counting. Sensitivities of 16 pCi/mL and 1 pCi/mL result from five minute and daily averages of counting data respectively. This sensitivity is about 200 times better than similar methods using solid scintillants. The LS system features uncomplicated sample pretreatment, precise of the cocktail and sample water, system features uncomplicated sample pretreatment, precise proportioning of the cocktail and sample water, on-line quench corrections, cocktail consumption as low as 0.15 mL/min, and response to changes in environmental tritium is less than 30 minutes. Field tests demonstrate that conditions necessary for stable analytical results are achieved.

  7. Effluent monitoring of the December 10, 1974, Titan 3-E launch at Air Force Eastern Test Range, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wornom, D. E.; Woods, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    Surface and airborne field measurements of the cloud behavior and effluent dispersion from a solid rocket motor launch vehicle are presented. The measurements were obtained as part of a continuing launch vehicle effluent monitoring program to obtain experimental field measurements in order to evaluate a model used to predict launch vehicle environmental impact. Results show that the model tends to overpredict effluent levels.

  8. Gauging Systems Monitor Cryogenic Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Rocket fuel needs to stay cool - super cool, in fact. The ability to store gas propellants like liquid hydrogen and oxygen at cryogenic temperatures (below -243 F) is crucial for space missions in order to reduce their volumes and allow their storage in smaller (and therefore, less costly) tanks. The Agency has used these cryogenic fluids for vehicle propellants, reactants, and life support systems since 1962 with the Centaur upper stage rocket, which was powered with liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. During proposed long-duration missions, super-cooled fluids will also be used in space power systems, spaceports, and lunar habitation systems. In the next generation of launch vehicles, gaseous propellants will be cooled to and stored for extended periods at even colder temperatures than currently employed via a process called densification. Densification sub-cools liquids to temperatures even closer to absolute zero (-459 F), increasing the fluid s density and shrinking its volume beyond common cryogenics. Sub-cooling cryogenic liquid hydrogen, for instance, from 20 K (-423 F) to 15 K (-432.4 F) reduces its mass by 10 percent. These densified liquid gases can provide more cost savings from reduced payload volume. In order to benefit from this cost savings, the Agency is working with private industry to prevent evaporation, leakage, and other inadvertent loss of liquids and gases in payloads - requiring new cryogenic systems to prevent 98 percent (or more) of boil-off loss. Boil-off occurs when cryogenic or densified liquids evaporate, and is a concern during launch pad holds. Accurate sensing of propellants aboard space vehicles is also critical for proper engine shutdown and re-ignition after launch, and zero boil-off fuel systems are also in development for the Altair lunar lander.

  9. Toxicity testing and instream biological monitoring in evaluating municipal effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Krier, K.; Pontasch, K.

    1995-12-31

    Twelve streams receiving municipal wastewater treatment plant effluents were evaluated in riffle areas above and below the outfall using the Environmental Protection Agency`s Rapid Bioassessment Protocols (RBPs) for benthic macroinvertebrates. Eight of the sites evaluated using RBP 1 exhibited stream health in the downstream riffles equaling or exceeding the upstream riffles. RBP 1 results suggested possible impacts at the remaining four sites, and these sites were more intensely evaluated using RBPs 2 and 3, acute effluent toxicity tests with Daphnia magna, and quantification of periphytic chlorophyll a and ash free dry weight (AFDW). Results from RBP 2 indicated three of the four sites evaluated have similar taxonomic richness above and below the outfall, while one site is heavily impacted by organic pollutants. Toxicity tests with 100% effluent resulted in no mortality with any of the four effluents tested. Relative to the respective upstream sites, chlorophyll a was significantly increased at one downstream site and significantly reduced at another. AFDW was similar above and below the outfalls in all streams. These results suggest that laboratory toxicity tests may not always be adequate predictors of instream biological effects.

  10. 242-A Evaporator/Liquid Effluent Retention Facility data quality objectives

    SciTech Connect

    Von Bargen, B.H.

    1994-09-29

    The purpose of data quality objectives (DQO) is to determine the most cost effective methods of gathering the essential data necessary to make decisions to support successful operation of the facility. The essential data is defined by such information as sample amount, sample location, required analyses, and how sampling and analyses are performed. Successful operation is defined as meeting the campaign objectives while operating within established requirements. This DQO document addresses that portion of the system from 242-A Evaporator candidate feed tanks through discharge of process condensate to the Liquid Effluent Retention of Facility (LERF). Later revisions will incorporate and integrate the entire system, including the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF).

  11. Functional design criteria for Project W-252, Phase II Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, C.E.

    1994-11-10

    This document provides the functional design criteria required for the Phase 2 Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal Project, Project W-252. Project W-252 shall provide new facilities and existing facility modifications required to implement Best Available Technology/All Known, Available, and Reasonable Methods of Prevention, Control, and Treatment (BAT/AKART) for the 200 East Phase II Liquid Effluent Streams. The project will also provide a 200 East Area Phase II Effluent Collection System (PTECS) for connection to a disposal system for relevant effluent streams to which BAT/AKART has been applied. Liquid wastestreams generated in the 200 East Area are currently discharged to the soil column. Included in these wastestreams are cooling water, steam condensate, raw water, and sanitary wastewaters. It is the policy of the DOE that the use of soil columns to treat and retain radionuclides and nonradioactive contaminants be discontinued at the earliest practical time in favor of wastewater treatment and waste minimization. In 1989, the DOE entered into an interagency agreement with Ecology and EPA. This agreement is referred to as the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). Project W-252 is one of the projects required to achieve the milestones set forth in the Tri-Party Agreement. One of the milestones requires BAT/AKART implementation for Phase II streams by October 1997. This Functional Design Criteria (FDC) document provides the technical baseline required to initiate Project W-252 to meet the Tri-Party Agreement milestone for the application of BAT/AKART to the Phase II effluents.

  12. Functional design criteria for project W-252, phase II liquid effluent treatment and disposal. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, C.E.

    1995-05-01

    This document is the Functional Design Criteria for Project W-252. Project W-252 provides the scope to provide BAT/AKART (best available technology...) to 200 Liquid Effluent Phase II streams (B-Plant). This revision (Rev. 2) incorporates a major descoping of the project. The descoping was done to reflect a combination of budget cutting measures allowed by a less stringent regulatory posture toward the Phase II streams

  13. Continuous monitoring for tritium in aqueous effluents at SRS using solid scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Effluents from selected facilities that routinely handle or produce large quantities of tritium are now continuously monitored for tritium concentration at the Savannah River site (SRS). The tritium effluent water monitors (TEWMs), developed at SRS, are placed at strategic locations in these facilities to sample and analyze the aqueous effluents in real time. The TEWM includes a water purification system, a flow cell containing solid scintillator, coincidence electronics, and alarm interfaces to plant systems. The main purpose of the TEWM is to alert cognizant personnel to an upset condition that might result in an unplanned release of tritium to the environment. Operation of the TEWMs supports the existing programs for sampling and analyses of tritium in the site's aqueous discharges.

  14. Gaseous effluent monitoring and identification using an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.R.; Bennett, C.L.; Fields, D.J.; Hernandez, J.

    1993-10-01

    We are developing an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer for chemical effluent monitoring. The system consists of a 2-D infrared imaging array in the focal plane of a Michelson interferometer. Individual images are coordinated with the positioning of a moving mirror in the Michelson interferometer. A three dimensional data cube with two spatial dimensions and one interferogram dimension is then Fourier transformed to produce a hyperspectral data cube with one spectral dimension and two spatial dimensions. The spectral range of the instrument is determined by the choice of optical components and the spectral range of the focal plane array. Measurements in the near UV, visible, near IR, and mid-IR ranges are possible with the existing instrument. Gaseous effluent monitoring and identification measurements will be primarily in the ``fingerprint`` region of the spectrum, ({lambda} = 8 to 12 {mu}m). Initial measurements of effluent using this imaging interferometer in the mid-IR will be presented.

  15. Photoelectric system continuously monitors liquid level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Immersion probe presents a depth-sensitive optical transmission path between a light source and a photoelectric cell to continuously monitor the level of a transparent liquid in a tank. This system operates automatically, without moving parts, and provides output signals to a remote recorder.

  16. Removal of nitrate from liquid effluents with bio-nano hybrid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eroglu, Ela; Haniff Wahid, M.; Chen, Xianjue; Smith, Steven M.; Raston, Colin L.

    2013-04-01

    Microalgae are a group of microorganisms that are abundant in the environment and have been commonly used as a tool for sustainable green technologies including bioenergy production1,2, CO2 sequestration2, wastewater treatment3,4, and nutritional supplement5. We have recently developed a hybridization process between common microalgal cells (Chlorella vulgaris) and multi-layer graphene sheets4. Graphene has very strong adhesion energies6 with an ability to attach on the surface of microalgal cells, which results in a functional hybrid material. Initially dynamic thin films formed within a microfluidic platform, as a vortex fluidic device, were used to exfoliate multi-layer graphene from graphite flakes in water. This was followed by hybridizing the multi-layer graphene with microalgal cells. The resulting bio-nano hybrid material was particularly efficient for the removal of nitrate from liquid effluents without being toxic for the microalgal cells. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy techniques were used for the characterization of the formed graphene sheets, with the fluorescence microscopy and chlorophyll content analyzed for monitoring the viability and growth pattern of the microalgal cells. E. Eroglu and A. Melis, Biotechnol. Bioeng., 2009, 102(5), 1406-1415. É. C Francisco, D. B. Neves, E. Jacob-Lopes, and T. T. Franco, J. Chem. Technol. Biotechnol., 2010, 85, 395-403. E. Eroglu, V. Agarwal, M. Bradshaw, X. Chen, S.M. Smith, C.L. Raston and K.S. Iyer, Green Chem., 2012, 14(10), 2682 - 2685. M. H. Wahid, E. Eroglu, X. Chen, S.M. Smith, and C.L. Raston, Green Chem., 2012, doi:10.1039/C2GC36892G. P. Spolaore, C. Joannis-Cassan, E. Duran and A. Isambert, J. Biosci. Bioeng., 2006, 101, 87-96. S. P. Koenig, N. G. Boddeti, M. L. Dunn and J. S. Bunch, Nat. Nanotechnol., 2011, 6, 543-546.

  17. Results of the F/H Effluent Treatment Facility biological monitoring program, July 1987--July 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, W.L.

    1992-07-01

    As required by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) under NPDES Permit SCO000175, biological monitoring was conducted in Upper Three Runs Creek to determine if discharges from the F/H Effluent Treatment Facility have adversely impacted the biotic community of the receiving stream. Data included in this summary report encompass July 1987 through July 1991. As originally designed, the F/H ETF was not expected to remove all of the mercury from the wastewater; therefore, SCDHEC specified that studies be conducted to determine if mercury was bioaccumulating in aquatic biota. Subsequent to approval of the biological monitoring program, an ion exchange column was added to the F/H ETF specifically to remove mercury, which eliminated mercury from the F/H ETF effluent. The results of the biological monitoring program indicate that at the present rate of discharge, the F/H ETF effluent has not adversely affected the receiving stream with respect to any of the parameters that were measured. The effluent is not toxic at the in-stream waste concentration and there is no evidence of mercury bioaccumulation.

  18. Best Available Technology (BAT) guidance for radiological liquid effluents at US Department of Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wallo, A. III; Peterson, H.T. Jr. ); Ikenberry, T.A. ); Baker, R.E. )

    1993-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), in DOE Order 5400.5 (1990), directs operators of DOE facilities to apply the Best Available Technology (BAT) to control radiological liquid effluents from these facilities when specific conditions are present. DOE has published interim guidance to assist facility operators in knowing when a BAT analysis is needed and how such an analysis should be performed and documented. The purpose of the guidance is to provide a uniform basis in determining BAT throughout DOE and to assist in evaluating BAT determinations during programmatic audits. The BAT analysis process involves characterizing the effluent source; identifying and selecting candidate control technologies; evaluating the potential environmental, operational, resource, and economic impacts of the control technologies; developing an evaluation matrix for comparing the technologies; selecting the BAT; and documenting the evaluation process. The BAT analysis process provides a basis for consistent evaluation of liquid effluent releases, yet allows an individual site or facility the flexibility to address site-specific issues or concerns in the most appropriate manner.

  19. Use of Fourier transform spectroscopy in combustion effluent monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, Gordon S.; McIntosh, Bruce C.

    1991-04-01

    FTIR spectroscopy is a well demonstrated technique for laboratory analysis. However, its application in stationary source monitoring for waste incinerators and other sources of combustion is viewed with considerable caution. The E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. has committed significant resources to pioneer the use of FTIR analysis in continuous emission monitoring applications. Applications criteria derived from their experience will enhance the success of many future applications. The success of Du Pont's current efforts in this field will aid in opening the door to the widespread acceptance and use of this significant environmental technology.

  20. Effluent monitoring Quality Assurance Project Plan for radioactive airborne emissions data. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, T.P.

    1995-12-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for compiling Hanford Site radioactive airborne emissions data. These data will be reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the US Department of Energy, and the Washington State Department of Health. Effluent Monitoring performs compliance assessments on radioactive airborne sampling and monitoring systems. This Quality Assurance Project Plan is prepared in compliance with interim guidelines and specifications. Topics include: project description; project organization and management; quality assurance objectives; sampling procedures; sample custody; calibration procedures; analytical procedures; monitoring and reporting criteria; data reduction, verification, and reporting; internal quality control; performance and system audits; corrective actions; and quality assurance reports.

  1. Application of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry for the determination of oxygenated volatile organic compounds in effluents from the production of petroleum bitumen.

    PubMed

    Boczkaj, Grzegorz; Makoś, Patrycja; Przyjazny, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    We present a new procedure for the determination of oxygenated volatile organic compounds in samples of postoxidative effluents from the production of petroleum bitumens using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. The eight extraction parameters were optimized for 43 oxygenated volatile organic compounds. The detection limits obtained ranged from 0.07 to 0.82 μg/mL for most of the analytes, the precision was good (relative standard deviation below 2.91% at the 5 μg/mL level and 4.75% at the limit of quantification), the recoveries for the majority of compounds varied from 70.6 to 118.9%, and the linear range was wide, which demonstrates the usefulness of the procedure. The developed procedure was used for the determination of oxygenated volatile organic compounds in samples of raw postoxidative effluents and in effluents after chemical treatment. In total, 23 compounds at concentration levels from 0.37 to 32.95 μg/mL were identified in real samples. The same samples were also analyzed in the SCAN mode, which resulted in four more phenol derivatives being identified and tentatively determined. The studies demonstrated the need for monitoring volatile organic compounds content in effluents following various treatments due to the formation of secondary oxygenated volatile organic compounds. PMID:27144480

  2. Groundwater monitoring plan for the Hanford Site 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    DB Barnett

    2000-05-17

    Seven years of groundwater monitoring at the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) have shown that the uppermost aquifer beneath the facility is unaffected by TEDF effluent. Effluent discharges have been well below permitted and expected volumes. Groundwater mounding from TEDF operations predicted by various models has not been observed, and waterlevels in TEDF wells have continued declining with the dissipation of the nearby B Pond System groundwater mound. Analytical results for constituents with enforcement limits indicate that concentrations of all these are below Practical Quantitation Limits, and some have produced no detections. Likewise, other constituents on the permit-required list have produced results that are mostly below sitewide background. Comprehensive geochemical analyses of groundwater from TEDF wells has shown that most constituents are below background levels as calculated by two Hanford Site-wide studies. Additionally, major ion proportions and anomalously low tritium activities suggest that groundwater in the aquifer beneath the TEDF has been sequestered from influences of adjoining portions of the aquifer and any discharge activities. This inference is supported by recent hydrogeologic investigations which indicate an extremely slow rate of groundwater movement beneath the TEDF. Detailed evaluation of TEDF-area hydrogeology and groundwater geochemistry indicate that additional points of compliance for groundwater monitoring would be ineffective for this facility, and would produce ambiguous results. Therefore, the current groundwater monitoring well network is retained for continued monitoring. A quarterly frequency of sampling and analysis is continued for all three TEDF wells. The constituents list is refined to include only those parameters key to discerning subtle changes in groundwater chemistry, those useful in detecting general groundwater quality changes from upgradient sources, or those retained for comparison with end

  3. Methods of reducing liquid effluent from the OSU TRIGA MKII Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Higginbotham, J.F.; Dodd, B.; Pratt, D.S.; Smith, S.; Anderson, T.V.

    1992-07-01

    In 1991, the OSU Radiation Center implemented a program to minimize the liquid effluent generated by the reactor facility. The goal of program is to become a 'zero' release facility with regards to routine liquid discharges. Only two liquid waste streams exist for the OSU reactor facility: discharges resulting from changing resin in the deminerializer and decontamination of equipment, primarily sample loading tubes. This paper describes a system which allows remote resin exchange to performed with the collection of all flush water. This water is then recycled for use as makeup for the primary water system. The service life of the resin is maximized by using a steam distillation unit as the source of makeup water to the deminerializer system instead of water coming directly from the City of Corvallis water supply. The second source of liquid waste water comes from the decontamination of the plastic loading tubes used to encapsulate samples. This process originally involved placing the tubes in a dishwasher and sending the discharge to a hold up tank. If the radionuclide concentrations in the tank were below the maximum permissible concentrations of 10CFR20 then it was released to the sanitary sewerage. This process was replaced in 1991 with a system which involved manual washing and rinsing of the tubes with the liquids being absorbed for disposal as solid waste. This paper will also describe the system which is being built to replace this process. It will use the dishwasher unit again but the liquid discharge will collected for absorption and disposal as solid waste. (author)

  4. Systems and methods for monitoring a solid-liquid interface

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, Nathan G; Lewis, Monte A.; Clark, Roger F

    2013-06-11

    Systems and methods are provided for monitoring a solid-liquid interface during a casting process. The systems and methods enable determination of the location of a solid-liquid interface during the casting process.

  5. Radioactive Air Emission Notice of Construction (NOC) for Construction of Liquid Effluent Transfer System Project W-519

    SciTech Connect

    HOMAN, N.A.

    2000-05-01

    The proposed action is to install a new liquid effluent transfer system (three underground waste transfer pipelines). As such, a potential new source will be created as a result of the construction activities. The anticipated emissions associated with this activity are insignificant.

  6. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal Facility hot test report

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, R.L.

    1993-09-01

    Prior to initial operation with radioactive feed or ``hot`` operation, the Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal (LET&D) Facility underwent extensive testing. This report provides a detailed description and analysis of this testing. Testing has determined that LET&D is capable of processing radioactive solutions between the design flowrates of 275 gph to 550 gph. Modifications made to prevent condensation on the off-gas HEPA filters, to the process vacuum control, bottoms cooler rupture disks, and feed control system operation were successful. Unfortunately, two mixers failed prior to ``hot`` testing due to manufacturer`s error which limited operation of the PEW Evaporator System and sampling was not able to prove that design removal efficiencies for Mercury, Cadmium, Plutonium, and Non-Volatile Radionuclides.

  7. Novel electrowinning technologies: The treatment and recovery of metals from liquid effluents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shijie

    2008-10-01

    Over the past several years, considerable efforts have been made to evaluate two novel solution treatment and electrowinning technologies. These two technologies, due to their unique features and superior operating characteristics, could very well represent the next generation of plant practice for the treatment and recovery of metals from liquid effluents. This article reports on the results of using the two technologies to treat printed circuit board spent micro-etch solutions and compares these results with those of competing current technologies for treating similar solutions. The new technologies had about 1.5 10 times higher current efficiencies than current practice and reduced the concentration of metals such as 15 g/L to less than 1 ppm compared to levels as high as 300 ppm again for current practice.

  8. A continuous active monitoring approach to identify cross-connections between potable water and effluent distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Friedler, E; Alfiya, Y; Shaviv, A; Gilboa, Y; Harussi, Y; Raize, O

    2015-03-01

    A continuous active monitoring approach was developed for identification of cross-connections between potable water supply systems and treated wastewater effluent reuse distribution systems. The approach is based on monitoring the oxidation reduction potential (ORP) at the potable water system while injecting sulfite (a reducing agent) into the effluent line. A sharp decrease in the ORP of the potable water would indicate a cross-connection event. The approach was tested in batch experiments on treated municipal wastewater effluent of varying degree of treatment, and at dilution ratios of up to 1:100 (effluent/potable). The approach was then examined under continuous flow conditions, which simulated cross-connection events at various dilution ratios (up to 1:100). In the continuous runs, differences between the potable water ORP and the effluent-potable water mixture (containing sulfite as sodium bisulfite (SBS)) ORP were 450-630 mV. This suggests high potential for identifying a cross-connection event. Implementation of the approach includes adding sulfite to effluent used for agricultural irrigation; hence, possible effects on soil and on crops were studied in soil columns and pots planted with basil (Ocimum basilicum) as a model plant. No negative effects of sulfite addition to the irrigation effluent were observed in the irrigated soils and plants, and therefore, it could be safely implemented also in agricultural applications. PMID:25701471

  9. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, M.Y.; Shields, K.D.

    1999-04-02

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of research and development (R and D) facilities for the Department of Energy on the Hanford Site. According to DOE Order 5400.1, a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan is required for each site, facility, or process that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials. Three of the R and D facilities: the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling and thus individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (FEMPs) have been developed for them. Because no definition of ''significant'' is provided in DOE Order 5400.1 or the accompanying regulatory guide DOE/EH-0173T, this FEMP was developed to describe monitoring requirements in the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities that do not have individual FEMPs. The remainder of the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities are referred to as Balance-of-Plant (BOP) facilities. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R and D. R and D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in the FEMP.

  10. Trace analysis and occurrence of anhydroerythromycin and tylosin in influent and effluent wastewater by liquid chromatography combined with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shinwoo; Cha, Jongmun; Carlson, Kenneth

    2006-06-01

    Two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) of northern Colorado were monitored for anhydroerythromycin and tylosin. An analytical method has been developed and validated for the trace determination and confirmation of these compounds in the raw influent and final effluent water matrices. This method was used to evaluate the occurrence and fate of these compounds in WWTPs. The method uses solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with positive electrospray ionization. Detection and quantification was performed using selected reaction monitoring, and a method detection limit of between 0.01 and 0.06 microg/L was obtained. Unequivocal confirmation analysis of analyte identity according to the criteria (based on the use of identification points) of the 2002/657/EC European Commission Decision was possible with satisfactory results. Average recoveries for the two compounds ranged from 89.2+/-9.7% for raw influent to 93.7+/-6.9% for effluent wastewaters. The within-run precision of the assay was found to be always less than 14.1% for the two analytes. The overall precision was always less than 13.7%. The relative uncertainty of the present assay was also evaluated and the combined relative uncertainty ranged from 6.4 to 15.5% over three days of the validation study. These compounds were partially removed in the WWTPs with a removal efficiency of >50%. The measured concentrations in raw influents and effluents ranged from 0.09-0.35 and 0.04-0.12 microg/L for anhydroerythromycin to 0.06-0.18 and ND-0.06 microg/L for tylosin, respectively. The results indicate that WWTP effluents are relevant point sources for residues of these compounds in the aquatic environment. These occurrence results were compared with those in WWTP wastewaters of other countries. PMID:16715282

  11. An evaluation of air effluent and workplace radioactivity monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, W.T. Environmental Evaluation Group, Albuquerque, NM )

    1993-02-01

    Improvements are needed in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) air effluent and workplace radioactivity monitoring prior to receipt of radioactive wastes. This report provides a detailed review Zf radioactivity air monitoring regulatory requirements and related facility design requirements. Air monitoring data, supplied by the Westinghouse Isolation Division, are analyzed. The WIPP Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) requires that the WIPP radiological facilities always have multiple confinement barriers to prevent the accidental release of radioactive material to the environment. The Waste Handling Building has standard confinement barriers that satisfy the regulatory requirements, but the underground confinement barriers.include a more complex system for filtering air in the event of-an accidental release. A continuous air monitor (CAM) is an integral part of the underground confinement barrier strategy. For the last four years'' the reliability and sensitivity of the CAMs have been the subject of numerous reports and meetings which are summarized in this report. Data supplied to the Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) show that the Station A CAM, which monitors the underground.exhaust, does not satisfy the requirements of the FSAR. The CAM system is not fail-safe, and operations appear to be affected by high levels of salt aerosol and poor detector performance. Additional test information is needed to establish the limits of CAM performance. Findings and recommendations are also provided on alternative monitoring methods, procedures and calculations.

  12. An evaluation of air effluent and workplace radioactivity monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, W.T. |

    1993-02-01

    Improvements are needed in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) air effluent and workplace radioactivity monitoring prior to receipt of radioactive wastes. This report provides a detailed review Zf radioactivity air monitoring regulatory requirements and related facility design requirements. Air monitoring data, supplied by the Westinghouse Isolation Division, are analyzed. The WIPP Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) requires that the WIPP radiological facilities always have multiple confinement barriers to prevent the accidental release of radioactive material to the environment. The Waste Handling Building has standard confinement barriers that satisfy the regulatory requirements, but the underground confinement barriers.include a more complex system for filtering air in the event of-an accidental release. A continuous air monitor (CAM) is an integral part of the underground confinement barrier strategy. For the last four years`` the reliability and sensitivity of the CAMs have been the subject of numerous reports and meetings which are summarized in this report. Data supplied to the Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) show that the Station A CAM, which monitors the underground.exhaust, does not satisfy the requirements of the FSAR. The CAM system is not fail-safe, and operations appear to be affected by high levels of salt aerosol and poor detector performance. Additional test information is needed to establish the limits of CAM performance. Findings and recommendations are also provided on alternative monitoring methods, procedures and calculations.

  13. Prioritization methodology for the monitoring of active pharmaceutical ingredients in hospital effluents.

    PubMed

    Daouk, Silwan; Chèvre, Nathalie; Vernaz, Nathalie; Bonnabry, Pascal; Dayer, Pierre; Daali, Youssef; Fleury-Souverain, Sandrine

    2015-09-01

    The important number of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) available on the market along with their potential adverse effects in the aquatic ecosystems, lead to the development of prioritization methods, which allow choosing priority molecules to monitor based on a set of selected criteria. Due to the large volumes of API used in hospitals, an increasing attention has been recently paid to their effluents as a source of environmental pollution. Based on the consumption data of a Swiss university hospital, about hundred of API has been prioritized following an OPBT approach (Occurrence, Persistence, Bioaccumulation and Toxicity). In addition, an Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) allowed prioritizing API based on predicted concentrations and environmental toxicity data found in the literature for 71 compounds. Both prioritization approaches were compared. OPBT prioritization results highlight the high concern of some non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antiviral drugs, whereas antibiotics are revealed by ERA as potentially problematic to the aquatic ecosystems. Nevertheless, according to the predicted risk quotient, only the hospital fraction of ciprofloxacin represents a risk to the aquatic organisms. Some compounds were highlighted as high-priority with both methods: ibuprofen, trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, ritonavir, gabapentin, amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, raltegravir, propofol, etc. Analyzing consumption data and building prioritization lists helped choosing about 15 API to be monitored in hospital wastewaters. The API ranking approach adopted in this study can be easily transposed to any other hospitals, which have the will to look at the contamination of their effluents. PMID:26144564

  14. Monitoring of environmental phenolic endocrine disrupting compounds in treatment effluents and river waters, Korea.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eun-Joung; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Kang, Seo-Young; Kim, Sang-Don; Bang, Sun-Baek; Hamm, Se-Yeong; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2007-10-15

    The last two decades have witnessed growing scientific and public concerns over endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) that have the potential to alter the normal structure or functions of the endocrine system in wildlife and humans. In this study, the phenolic EDCs such as alkylphenol, chlorinated phenol and bisphenol A were considered. They are commonly found in wastewater discharges and in sewage treatment plant. In order to monitor the levels and seasonal variations of phenolic EDCs in various aquatic environments, a total of 15 water samples from the discharged effluent from sewage and wastewater treatment plants and river water were collected for 3 years. Ten environmental phenolic EDCs were determined by GC-MS and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). GC-MS analysis revealed that most abundant phenolic EDCs were 4-n-heptylphenol, followed by nonlyphenol and bisphenol A during 2002-2003, while 4-t-butylphenol and 4-t-octylphenol were newly detected in aquatic environments in 2004. The category of phenolic EDCs showed similar fluorescence spectra and nearly equal fluorescence decay time. This makes it hard to distinguish each phenolic EDC from the EDCs mixture by LIF. Therefore, the results obtained from LIF analysis were expressed in terms of the fluorescence intensity of the total phenolic EDCs rather than that of the individual EDC. However, LIF monitoring and GC-MS analysis showed consistent result in that the river water samples had lower phenolic EDCs concentration compared to the effluent sample. This revealed a lower fluorescence intensity and the phenolic EDCs concentration in summer was lower than that in winter. For the validation of LIF monitoring for the phenolic EDCs, the correlation between EDCs concentration acquired from GC-MS and fluorescence intensity from LIF was obtained (R=0.7379). This study supports the feasibility of the application of LIF into EDCs monitoring in aquatic systems. PMID:19073088

  15. Effluent monitoring at a bleached kraft mill: directions for best management practices for eliminating effects on fish reproduction.

    PubMed

    Martel, Pierre H; Kovacs, Tibor G; O'connor, Brian I; Semeniuk, Sharon; Hewitt, L Mark; Maclatchy, Deborah L; McMaster, Mark E; Parrott, Joanne L; van den Heuvel, Michael R; Van Der Kraak, Glen J

    2011-01-01

    A long-term monitoring study was conducted on effluents from a bleached kraft pulp and paper mill located in Eastern Canada. The study was designed to gain insights into temporal effluent variability with respect to fish reproduction as it related to production upsets, mill restarts and conditions affecting biological treatment performance. Final effluent quality was monitored between February 2007 and May 2009 using biochemical and chemical oxygen demand, total suspended solids, resin and fatty acids, a gas chromatographic profiling index, and the presence of methyl substituted 2-cyclopentenones. Selected effluent samples were evaluated for effects on fish reproduction (egg production) using a shortened version of the adult fathead minnow reproductive test. The events relating to negative effects on fish reproduction were upsets of the pulping liquor recovery system resulting in black liquor losses, operational upsets of the hardwood line resulting in the loss of oxygen delignification filtrates, and conditions that reduced the performance of biological treatment (e.g., mill shutdown and low ambient temperatures). The reductions in egg production observed in fathead minnow were associated with biochemical oxygen demand values > 20 mg/L, GC profiling indices > 1.2 and the presence of methyl-substituted 2-cyclopentenones at concentrations > 100 μg/L. This study demonstrated the importance of both in-plant measures for controlling the loss of organics as well as the optimum operation of biological effluent treatment for eliminating effluent-related effects on fish reproduction (egg production) in the laboratory. PMID:21644165

  16. Selective extraction of zinc(II) over iron(II) from spent hydrochloric acid pickling effluents by liquid-liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Marcelo Borges; Rocha, Sônia Denise Ferreira; Magalhães, Fernando Silva; Benedetto, Jeaneth dos Santos

    2008-02-11

    The selective removal of zinc(II) over iron(II) by liquid-liquid extraction from spent hydrochloric acid pickling effluents produced by the zinc hot-dip galvanizing industry was studied at room temperature. Two distinct effluents were investigated: effluent 1 containing 70.2g/L of Zn, 92.2g/L of Fe and pH 0.6, and effluent 2 containing 33.9 g/L of Zn, 203.9g/L of Fe and 2M HCl. The following extractants were compared: TBP (tri-n-butyl phosphate), Cyanex 272 [bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)phosphinic acid], Cyanex 301 [bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) dithiophosphinic acid] and Cyanex 302 [bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) monothiophosphinic acid]. The best separation results were obtained for extractants TBP and Cyanex 301. Around 92.5% of zinc and 11.2% of iron were extracted from effluent 1 in one single contact using 100% (v/v) of TBP. With Cyanex 301, around 80-95% of zinc and less than 10% of iron were extracted from effluent 2 at pH 0.3-1.0. For Cyanex 272, the highest extraction yield for zinc (70% of zinc with 20% of iron extraction) was found at pH 2.4. Cyanex 302 presented low metal extraction levels (below 10%) and slow phase disengagement characteristics. Reactions for the extraction of zinc with TBP and Cyanex 301 from hydrochloric acid solution were proposed. PMID:17570579

  17. Nitrous oxide emission from an agricultural field fertilized with liquid lagoonal swine effluent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, S. C.; Phillips, R. L.; Fischer, E. N.

    2000-06-01

    Contemporary agriculture is characterized by the intensive production of livestock in confined facilities and land application of stored waste as an organic fertilizer. Emission of nitrous oxide (N2O) from receiving soils is an important but poorly constrained term in the atmospheric N2O budget. In particular, there are few data for N2O emissions from spray fields associated with industrial scale swine production facilities that have rapidly expanded in the southeastern United States. In an intensive, 24-day investigation over three spray cycles, we followed the time course for changes in N2O emission and soil physicochemical variables in an agricultural field irrigated with liquid lagoonal swine effluent. The total N (535 mg L-1) of the liquid waste was almost entirely NH4+-N (>90%) and thus had a low mineralization potential. Soil profiles for nitrification and denitrification indicated that >90% of potential activity was localized in the surface 20 cm. Application of this liquid fertilizer to warm (19° to 28°C) soils in a form that is both readily volatilized and immediately utilizable by the endogenous N-cycling microbial community resulted in a sharp decline in soil NH4+-N and supported a rapid but short-lived (i.e., days) burst of nitrification, denitrification, and N2O emission. Nitrous oxide fluxes as high as 9200 μg N2O-N m-2 h-1 were observed shortly after fertilization, but emissions decreased to prefertilization levels within a few days. Poor correlations between N2O efflux and soil physicochemical variables (temperature, moisture, NO3--N, NH4+-N) and fertilizer loading rate point to the complexity of interacting factors affecting N2O production and emission. Total fertilizer N applied and N2O-N emitted were 29.7 g m-2 (297 kg N ha-1) and 395 mg m-2, respectively. The fractional loss of applied N to N2O (corrected for background emission) was 1.4%, in agreement with the mean of 1.25% reported for mineral fertilizers. The direct effects of fertilizer

  18. Distillery effluent as a liquid fertilizer: a win-win option for sustainable agriculture.

    PubMed

    Kumari, K; Ranjan, N; Kumar, S; Sinha, R C

    2016-01-01

    A promising approach to recycle the residual distillery waste as a potential liquid fertilizer has been discussed in this paper. Field studies were conducted on Brassica compestris to assess the potential of the diluted post- methanated distillery effluent. The results indicated that there was not much variation in pH, conductivity and nitrate of soil, whereas total dissolved solids, conductivity, nitrate and chemical oxygen demand of the well water increased slightly but well within the permissible limit. However, there was a significant increase in the plant biomass, diameter of the shoot and root, area of leaf, as well as number and length of pods and root hairs. The hydrophilic colloids of the seed increased significantly (p < .01) and the yield of mustard seeds was increased by 30% as compared to the conventional fertilizer. The carbohydrate, chlorophyll and ascorbic acid content of the leaf, stem and root were also analysed and its morpho- physiological significance is also presented in this paper. PMID:26229037

  19. A purity monitor for the KEDR liquid krypton calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtushenko, P. N.; Kotov, K. Yu.; Maslennikov, A. L.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Snopkov, R. G.; Rogozin, A. I.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present a purity monitor for the KEDR liquid krypton calorimeter. A new method is suggested based on the usage of a short pulse of a gas discharge as a source of ultraviolet radiation for the photoproduction of electrons in a drift cell of the monitor. This paper describes the design of the monitor, the results of experiments with gaseous and liquid krypton, as well as the experience of using the developed device in the process of krypton purification for the KEDR liquid krypton calorimeter.

  20. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 52 - Performance Specifications and, Specification Test Procedures for Monitoring Systems for Effluent...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....7Reference method. Method 2 as delineated in 40 CFR Part 60. 4. Measurement system performance specifications... tube which uses the flow direction of the test gas, then the following test shall be followed and a..., Specification Test Procedures for Monitoring Systems for Effluent Stream Gas Volumetric Flow Rate E Appendix...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 52 - Performance Specifications and, Specification Test Procedures for Monitoring Systems for Effluent...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Performance Specifications and, Specification Test Procedures for Monitoring Systems for Effluent Stream Gas Volumetric Flow Rate E Appendix E to Part 52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 52 - Performance Specifications and, Specification Test Procedures for Monitoring Systems for Effluent...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Performance Specifications and, Specification Test Procedures for Monitoring Systems for Effluent Stream Gas Volumetric Flow Rate E Appendix E to Part 52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 52 - Performance Specifications and, Specification Test Procedures for Monitoring Systems for Effluent...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....7Reference method. Method 2 as delineated in 40 CFR Part 60. 4. Measurement system performance specifications... tube which uses the flow direction of the test gas, then the following test shall be followed and a..., Specification Test Procedures for Monitoring Systems for Effluent Stream Gas Volumetric Flow Rate E Appendix...

  4. Comparison of different liquid anaerobic digestion effluents as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fuqing; Shi, Jian; Lv, Wen; Yu, Zhongtang; Li, Yebo

    2013-01-01

    Effluents from three liquid anaerobic digesters, fed with municipal sewage sludge, food waste, or dairy waste, were evaluated as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover in mesophilic reactors. Three feedstock-to-effluent (F/E) ratios (i.e., 2, 4, and 6) were tested for each effluent. At an F/E ratio of 2, the reactor inoculated by dairy waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 238.5L/kg VS(feed), while at an F/E ratio of 4, the reactor inoculated by food waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 199.6L/kg VS(feed). The microbial population and chemical composition of the three effluents were substantially different. Food waste effluent had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens, while dairy waste effluent had the largest populations of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Dairy waste also had the highest C/N ratio of 8.5 and the highest alkalinity of 19.3g CaCO(3)/kg. The performance of solid-state batch anaerobic digestion reactors was closely related to the microbial status in the liquid anaerobic digestion effluents. PMID:22958949

  5. Nectophotometer: an infrared motility monitor used to rapidly identify toxicity in effluents and receiving waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Pinto, Richard W.; Santelli, John

    2007-04-01

    A change in the motility pattern of fish and aquatic invertebrates when initially exposed to a toxin has long been used in tests designed to signal the presence of toxins in effluents and receiving waters. We have discovered that the level of motility change occurring within 2.5 hours of exposure to all concentrations of a test toxicant correlates well with mortality observed after three days exposure to the toxin, but that the first 30 minutes of exposure is a poor predictor of mortality. Defining this 'best to use exposure time' can increase the sensitivity of toxicity monitoring systems to a weak toxin, one that causes a motility change so minor that it may otherwise go unnoticed. Motility is monitored and automatically recorded using a Nectophotometer, an automated bio-monitor with computer interface that senses interruptions of infrared beams when organisms separately exposed to multiple concentrations of a toxin move through the beams. In our tests changes in the motility of Artemia salina within the first 2.5 hours of exposure predict 3 day mortality with an average accuracy of 89%. The Nectophotometer has promise for allowing rapid assessment of the toxicity to invertebrates and fish, and may also be used to assess airborne toxicity if motile insects respond in a similar manner.

  6. Methods and systems for monitoring a solid-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Stoddard, Nathan G.; Clark, Roger F.; Kary, Tim

    2010-07-20

    Methods and systems are provided for monitoring a solid-liquid interface, including providing a vessel configured to contain an at least partially melted material; detecting radiation reflected from a surface of a liquid portion of the at least partially melted material that is parallel with the liquid surface; measuring a disturbance on the surface; calculating at least one frequency associated with the disturbance; and determining a thickness of the liquid portion based on the at least one frequency, wherein the thickness is calculated based on.times. ##EQU00001## where g is the gravitational constant, w is the horizontal width of the liquid, and f is the at least one frequency.

  7. Comparison of different liquid anaerobic digestion effluents as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Fuqing; Shi Jian; Lv Wen; Yu Zhongtang; Li Yebo

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compared methane production of solid AD inoculated with different effluents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Food waste effluent (FWE) had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with FWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dairy waste effluent (DWE) was rich of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with DWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 2. - Abstract: Effluents from three liquid anaerobic digesters, fed with municipal sewage sludge, food waste, or dairy waste, were evaluated as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover in mesophilic reactors. Three feedstock-to-effluent (F/E) ratios (i.e., 2, 4, and 6) were tested for each effluent. At an F/E ratio of 2, the reactor inoculated by dairy waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 238.5 L/kgVS{sub feed}, while at an F/E ratio of 4, the reactor inoculated by food waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 199.6 L/kgVS{sub feed}. The microbial population and chemical composition of the three effluents were substantially different. Food waste effluent had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens, while dairy waste effluent had the largest populations of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Dairy waste also had the highest C/N ratio of 8.5 and the highest alkalinity of 19.3 g CaCO{sub 3}/kg. The performance of solid-state batch anaerobic digestion reactors was closely related to the microbial status in the liquid anaerobic digestion effluents.

  8. Assessment and monitoring of nutrient loading in the sediments of tidal creeks receiving shrimp farm effluent in Quang Ninh, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Bui, Thuyet D; Luong-Van, Jim; Maier, Stefan W; Austin, Chris M

    2013-10-01

    Coastal shrimp farming may lead to the contamination of sediments of surrounding estuarine and marine ecosystems as shrimp farm effluent often contains high levels of pollutants including a range of organic compounds (from uneaten feed, shrimp feces, and living and dead organisms) which can accumulate in the sediments of receiving waterways. The assessment and monitoring of sediment quality in tidal creeks receiving shrimp farm effluent can support environmental protection and decision making for sustainable development in coastal areas since sediment quality often shows essential information on long-term aquatic ecosystem health. Within this context, this paper investigates nutrient loadings in the sediments of tidal creeks receiving shrimp farm effluent in Quang Ninh, Vietnam, which now have a high concentration of intensive and semi-intensive shrimp farms. Sediment samples taken from inside creek sections directly receiving effluent from concentrated shrimp farms (IEC), from main creeks adjacent to points of effluent discharge outside concentrated shrimp farms (OEC), and few kilometers away from shrimp farms (ASF) as reference sites were collected and analyzed before and after shrimp crops to investigate spatial and temporal variation. The results showed that there were statistically significant differences in the concentrations of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and total organic carbon among IEC, OEC, and ASF sites while the seasonal variation being limited over study times. A sediment nutrient index (SNI) computed from coefficient scores of the factor analysis efficiently summarizes sediment nutrient loads, which are high, albeit quite variable, in canals directly receiving effluents from farms but then decline sharply with distance from shrimp farms. The visualization and monitoring of sediment quality data including SNI on maps can strongly support managers to manage eutrophication at concentrated shrimp farming areas, contributing to sustainable

  9. Calculation of releases of radioactive materials in gaseous and liquid effluents from pressurized water reactors (PWR-GALE Code). Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekaran, T.; Lee, J.Y.; Willis, C.A.

    1985-04-01

    This report revises the original issuance of NUREG-0017, ''Calculation of Releases of Radioactive Materials in Gaseous and Liquid Effluents from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR-GALE-Code)'' (April 1976), to incorporate more recent operating data now available as well as the results of a number of in-plant measurement programs at operating pressurized water reactors. The PWR-GALE Code is a computerized mathematical model for calculating the releases of radioactive material in gaseous and liquid effluents (i.e., the gaseous and liquid source terms). The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission uses the PWR-GALE Code to determine conformance with the requirements of Appendix I to 10 CFR Part 50.

  10. Mercury removal from liquid effluents of the chlor-alkali industry by using the biomass Sargassum sp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobral, L. G. S.; de Barros Lima, R.; Leite, S. G. F.; Fernandes, A. L. V.

    2003-05-01

    In this work, the used biomass, for removing the mercuric species from the liquid effluents of the chlor-alkali plants was the macro-algae Sargassum sp. According to the results obtained, until this moment in time, it was possible to remove more than 99% of the ionic mercury with the advantage of not releasing me aqueous phase, that returns to the operation of brine production, the electrolyte of the electrolytic cells. In addition, it was verified that the biomass, once loaded with Mercury, can be reused in the biosorption step, after suffering an elution process.

  11. High-performance liquid chromatography and immunoassay techniques for monitoring urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, V.C.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) as sensitive techniques for monitoring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolites in human urine. The method was tested using synthesized PAH conjugates as positive markers. Results showed that a PAH conjugate, S-(9,10-dihydro-9-hydroxy-10-phenanthryl)N-acetyl cysteine (PHONAC), present in HPLC effluent could be detected by ELISA at picomole levels, well below the sensitivity of the HPLC UV detector. Analyses of urine from mice dosed with phenanthrene demonstrated that a substance detected by HPLC which was not detected in ELISA tests was the principal phenanthrene metabolite. This substance was not hydrolysed by Beta-glucuronidase. PHONAC was detected by ELISA in mouse urine extracts subjected to HPLC.

  12. Degradation and monitoring of acetamiprid, thiabendazole and their transformation products in an agro-food industry effluent during solar photo-Fenton treatment in a raceway pond reactor.

    PubMed

    Carra, Irene; Sirtori, Carla; Ponce-Robles, Laura; Sánchez Pérez, José Antonio; Malato, Sixto; Agüera, Ana

    2015-07-01

    In this study, pesticides acetamiprid and thiabendazole and their transformation products (TPs), seven from each pesticide, were successfully monitored during solar photo-Fenton treatment in a real secondary effluent from an agro-food industry spiked with 100μgL(-1) of each pesticide. To this end, a highly sensitive procedure was developed, based on liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to hybrid quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometry (QqLIT-MS). In addition, finding low-cost and operational technology for the application of AOPs would then facilitate their use on a commercial level. Simple and extensive photoreactors such as raceway pond reactors (RPRs) are therefore proposed as an alternative for the application of solar photo-Fenton. Results showed that high degradation could be achieved in a complex water matrix (>99% TBZ and 91% ACTM in 240min) using a 120-L RPR pilot plant as novel technology. The analyses indicated that after the treatment only three TPs from ACTM were still present in the effluent, while the others had been removed. The study showed that the goal of either just removing the parent compounds, or going one step further and removing all the TPs, can significantly change the treatment time, which would affect process costs. PMID:25841181

  13. Liquid volume monitoring based on ultrasonic sensor and Arduino microcontroller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husni, M.; Siahaan, D. O.; Ciptaningtyas, H. T.; Studiawan, H.; Aliarham, Y. P.

    2016-04-01

    Incident of oil leakage and theft in oil tank often happens. To prevent it, the liquid volume insides the tank needs to be monitored continuously. Aim of the study is to calculate the liquid volume inside oil tank on any road condition and send the volume data and location data to the user. This research use some ultrasonic sensors (to monitor the fluid height), Bluetooth modules (to sent data from the sensors to the Arduino microcontroller), Arduino Microcontroller (to calculate the liquid volume), and also GPS/GPRS/GSM Shield module (to get location of vehicle and sent the data to the Server). The experimental results show that the accuracy rate of monitoring liquid volume inside tanker while the vehicle is in the flat road is 99.33% and the one while the vehicle is in the road with elevation angle is 84%. Thus, this system can be used to monitor the tanker position and the liquid volume in any road position continuously via web application to prevent illegal theft.

  14. Tritium monitoring in groundwater and evaluation of model predictions for the Hanford Site 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, D.B.; Bergeron, M.P.; Cole, C.R.; Freshley, M.D.; Wurstner, S.K.

    1997-08-01

    The Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) disposal site, also known as the State-Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS), receives treated effluent containing tritium, which is allowed to infiltrate through the soil column to the water table. Tritium was first detected in groundwater monitoring wells around the facility in July 1996. The SALDS groundwater monitoring plan requires revision of a predictive groundwater model and reevaluation of the monitoring well network one year from the first detection of tritium in groundwater. This document is written primarily to satisfy these requirements and to report on analytical results for tritium in the SALDS groundwater monitoring network through April 1997. The document also recommends an approach to continued groundwater monitoring for tritium at the SALDS. Comparison of numerical groundwater models applied over the last several years indicate that earlier predictions, which show tritium from the SALDS approaching the Columbia River, were too simplified or overly robust in source assumptions. The most recent modeling indicates that concentrations of tritium above 500 pCi/L will extend, at most, no further than {approximately}1.5 km from the facility, using the most reasonable projections of ETF operation. This extent encompasses only the wells in the current SALDS tritium-tracking network.

  15. Mineral composition and rates of flow of effluent from the distal ileum of liquid-fed calves.

    PubMed

    Smith, R H

    1966-04-01

    1. Liquid-fed calves (aged 1(1/2)-4 months) examined more than five weeks after inserting a re-entrant fistula into the distal ileum, of normal sodium and potassium status and without abnormal gut infection, showed mean emergence rates from the ileum for sodium, potassium and water of 2.3 m-mole/hr, 0.38 m-mole/hr and 21 g/hr respectively after 16 hr fasting.2. Sodium and potassium emergence rates changed little when the residues from a milk or glucose-solution feed arrived at the distal ileum. When magnesium chloride was added to a glucose-solution feed an increase sometimes occurred but only in association with decreased small-intestine transit time.3. Widely differing sodium and potassium intakes had no appreciable direct effect on their emergence rates. Continued feeding of a diet deficient in either ion, however, altered the calf's metabolism and led to appropriate changes in the sodium/potassium ratio of ileal effluent. These changes were not simulated by injecting adrenal cortex hormones. The ratio also decreased when ileal effluent was allowed to discharge for several weeks without being returned to the colon. It was abnormally high in samples obtained less than five weeks after inserting cannulae.4. An increase in sodium and potassium emergence rates, which often occurred spontaneously at about 3 months of age, appeared to be due to infection and was usually prevented by giving aureomycin orally.5. Water emergence rate reflected changes in the emergence rates of osmotically effective constituents and isotonicity was maintained. In effluent after fasting, the cations involved were mainly sodium and potassium, and [Na] + [K] was approximately constant (mean 132 m-mole/l.). In effluent following feeds of milk or glucose, magnesium chloride solution, [Na] + [K] was depressed and [Na] + [K] + 1.5 [Mg] was approximately constant (mean 139 m-mole/l.). Magnesium behaved as it were mainly ionic. Calcium had no apparent osmotic effect and was probably insoluble.6

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF ORGANICS IN TANNERY EFFLUENTS BY LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combined high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry using a moving belt interface has been used to study extracts from five tannery and leather finishing industry discharges. Liquid chromatographic separation was performed with a Zorbax CN column using a normal phas...

  17. Pinellas Plant environmental monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1996-07-01

    The Pinellas Plant Environmental Monitoring Program is comprised of two major activities as follows: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. The collection and analysis of samples or measurements of liquid and gaseous effluents for the purpose of characterizing and quantifying contaminants, assessing radiation exposures to members of the public, providing a means to control effluents at or near the point of discharge, and demonstrating compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements. The collection and analysis of samples or direct measurements of air, water, soil, food stuff, biota, and other media from DOE sites and their environs for the purpose of determining compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements, assessing radiation exposure to members of the public, and assessing the effects, if any, on the local environment. Effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at the Pinellas Plant include monitoring liquid and airborne effluents, groundwater, surface water, soil, and local weather conditions.

  18. Comparison of solid-state anaerobic digestion and composting of yard trimmings with effluent from liquid anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Long; Yang, Liangcheng; Xu, Fuqing; Michel, Frederick C; Li, Yebo

    2014-10-01

    Solid-state anaerobic digestion (SS-AD) and composting of yard trimmings with effluent from liquid AD were compared under thermophilic condition. Total solids (TS) contents of 22%, 25%, and 30% were studied for SS-AD, and 35%, 45%, and 55% for composting. Feedstock/effluent (F/E) ratios of 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 were tested. In composting, the greatest carbon loss was obtained at 35% TS, which was 2-3 times of that at 55% TS and was up to 50% higher than that in SS-AD. In SS-AD, over half of the degraded carbon was converted to methane with the greatest methane yield of 121 L/kg VS(feedstock). Methane production from SS-AD was low at F/E ratios of 2 and 3, likely due to the inhibitory effect of high concentrations of ammonia nitrogen (up to 5.6g/kg). The N-P-K values were similar for SS-AD digestate and compost with different dominant nitrogen forms. PMID:25079209

  19. Rocketdyne division, envionmental monitoring and facility effluent. Annual report, De Soto and Santa Susana Field Laboratories Sites, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J. D.

    1989-05-01

    Environmental and facility effluent radioactivity monitoring at the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International is performed by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Group of the Health, Safety, and Environment Department. Soil and surface water are routinely sampled to a distance of 16 km from division sites. Groundwater from Santa Susana Field Laboratories (SSFL) supply water wells and other test wells is periodically sampled to measure radioactivity. Continuous ambient air sampling and direct radiation monitoring by thermoluminescent dosimetry are performed at several on-site and off-site locations for measuring airborne radioactivity concentrations and site ambient radiation levels. Radioactivity in effluents discharged to the atmosphere from nuclear facilities is continually sampled and monitored to assure that amounts released to uncontrolled areas are below appropriate limits. These procedures also help identify processes that may require additional engineering safeguards to minimize radioactivity in such discharges. In addition, selected nonradioactive chemical constituent concentrations in surface water discharged to uncontrolled areas are measured. The environmental radioactivity reported herein is attributed to natural sources and to residual fallout of radioactive material from past atmospheric testing of nuclear devices.

  20. Electrochemical treatment of olive mill wastewater: treatment extent and effluent phenolic compounds monitoring using some uncommon analytical tools.

    PubMed

    Belaid, Chokri; Khadraoui, Moncef; Mseddii, Salma; Kallel, Monem; Elleuch, Boubaker; Fauvarque, Jean Frangois

    2013-01-01

    Problems related with industrials effluents can be divided in two parts: (1) their toxicity associated to their chemical content which should be removed before discharging the wastewater into the receptor media; (2) and the second part is linked to the difficulties of pollution characterisation and monitoring caused by the complexity of these matrixes. This investigation deals with these two aspects, an electrochemical treatment method of an olive mill wastewater (OMW) under platinized expanded titanium electrodes using a modified Grignard reactor for toxicity removal as well as the exploration of the use of some specific analytical tools to monitor effluent phenolic compounds elimination. The results showed that electrochemical oxidation is able to remove/mitigate the OMW pollution. Indeed, 87% of OMW color was removed and all aromatic compounds were disappeared from the solution by anodic oxidation. Moreover, 55% of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and the total organic carbon (TOC) were reduced. On the other hand, UV-Visible spectrophotometry, Gaz chromatography/mass spectrometry, cyclic voltammetry and 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) showed that the used treatment seems efficaciously to eliminate phenolic compounds from OMW. It was concluded that electrochemical oxidation in a modified Grignard reactor is a promising process for the destruction of all phenolic compounds present in OMW. Among the monitoring analytical tools applied, cyclic voltammetry and 13C NMR a re among th e techniques that are introduced for thefirst time to control the advancement of the OMW treatment and gave a close insight on polyphenols disappearance. PMID:23586318

  1. Rocketdyne division, environmental monitoring and facility effluent. Annual report, De Soto and Santa Susana Field Laboratories Sites, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J. D.

    1987-03-01

    Environmental and facility effluent radioactivity monitoring at the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International is performed by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Group of the Health, Safety, and Environment Department. Soil and surface water are routinely sampled to a distance of 10 miles from Division sites. Ground water from site supply water wells and other test wells is periodically sampled to measure radioactivity in these waters. Continuous ambient air sampling and direct radiation monitoring by thermoluminescent dosimetry are performed at several on=site and off-site locations for measuring airborne radioactivity concentrations and site ambient radiation levels. Radioactivity in effluents discharged to the atmosphere from nuclear facilities is continuously sampled and monitored to ensure that amounts released to uncontrolled areas are below appropriate limits and to identify processes that may require additional engineering safeguards to minimize radioactivity in such discharges. In addition, selected nonradioactive chemical constituent concentrations in surface water discharged to uncontrolled areas are determined. The environmental radioactivity reported herein is attributed to natural sources, to local fallout of radioactive debris from the Chernobyl reactor accident, and to residual fallout of radioactive material from past atmospheric testing of nuclear devices.

  2. Rocketdyne division, environmental monitoring and facility effluent. Annual Report, De Soto and Santa Susana Field Laboratories Sites 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J. D.

    1988-03-01

    Environmental and facility effluent radioactivity monitoring at the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International is performed by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Group of the Health, Safety, and Environment Department. Soil and surface water are routinely sampled to a distance of 10 miles from Division sites. Ground water from site supply water wells and other test wells is periodically sampled to measure radioactivity in these waters. Continuous ambient air sampling and direct radiation monitoring by thermoluminescent dosimetry are performed at several on-site and off-site locations for measuring airborne radioactivity concentrations and site ambient radiation levels. Radioactivity in effluents discharged to the atmosphere from nuclear facilities is continually sampled and monitored to ensure that amounts released to uncontrolled areas are below appropriate limited and to identify processes that rnay require additional engineering safeguards to minimize radioactivity in such discharges. In addition, selected nonradioactive chemical constituent concentrations in surface water discharged to uncontrolled areas are determined. The environmental radioactivity reported herein is attributed to natural sources and to residual fallout of radioactive material from past atmospheric testing of nuclear devices. Work in nuclear energy research and development in what has become the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation began in 1946. In addition to a broad spectrum of conventional programs in rocket propulsion, utilization of space, and national defense, Rocketdyne is working on the design, development, and testing of components and systems for central station nuclear power plants, the decladding of irradiated nuclear fuel, and the decontamination and decommissioning of facilities.

  3. Development of biological oxygen demand biosensor for monitoring the fermentation industry effluent.

    PubMed

    Verma, Neelam; Singh, Ashish Kumar

    2013-01-01

    A biosensor was developed for the determination of BOD value of fermentation industry effluent. The developed biosensor was fabricated by immobilizing the microbial consortium on cellulose acetate (CA) membrane in close proximity to a DO probe electrode. The microbial consortium was harvested from the fermentation industry effluent. The BOD biosensor was calibrated by using a solution containing the equivalent amount of glucose/glutamic acid (GGA) as a standard sample solution. The response time was optimized by immobilizing different concentrations of cell biomass on CA membrane. Once the response time was optimized, it was used for determination of BOD of fermentation industry effluent. For analysis of fermentation industry effluent, the response time was observed 7 minutes with detection limit 1 mg/L. Good linear range with GGA standard solution was observed, R (2) 0.99 with relative standard deviation (RSD) <%. The observed BOD value by biosensor showed a good comparison with the conventional method for the determination of BOD. PMID:25969770

  4. Development of Biological Oxygen Demand Biosensor for Monitoring the Fermentation Industry Effluent

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Neelam; Singh, Ashish Kumar

    2013-01-01

    A biosensor was developed for the determination of BOD value of fermentation industry effluent. The developed biosensor was fabricated by immobilizing the microbial consortium on cellulose acetate (CA) membrane in close proximity to a DO probe electrode. The microbial consortium was harvested from the fermentation industry effluent. The BOD biosensor was calibrated by using a solution containing the equivalent amount of glucose/glutamic acid (GGA) as a standard sample solution. The response time was optimized by immobilizing different concentrations of cell biomass on CA membrane. Once the response time was optimized, it was used for determination of BOD of fermentation industry effluent. For analysis of fermentation industry effluent, the response time was observed 7 minutes with detection limit 1 mg/L. Good linear range with GGA standard solution was observed, R2 0.99 with relative standard deviation (RSD) <%. The observed BOD value by biosensor showed a good comparison with the conventional method for the determination of BOD. PMID:25969770

  5. Monitoring endocrine activity in kraft mill effluent treated by aerobic moving bed bioreactor system.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, S; Pozo, G; Jarpa, M; Hernandez, V; Becerra, J; Vidal, G

    2010-01-01

    A Moving Bed Bioreactor (MBBR) was operated at three different hydraulic retention times for a period of 414 days. The fate of the extractive compounds and the estrogenic activity of the Pinus radiata kraft mill effluents were evaluated using Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES) and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) detection. Results show that the MBBR reactor is able to remove between 80-83% of estrogenic activity present in the kraft mill Pinus radiata influent, where the values of the effluent's estrogenic activity ranged between 0.123-0.411 ng L(-1), expressed as estrogenic equivalent (EEqs) of 17-a-ethynylestradiol (EE2 eq.). Additionally, the biomass of the MBBR reactor accumulated estrogenic activity ranging between 0.29-0.37 ng EEqs EE2 during the different Hydraulic Retention Time (HRT) operations. The main groups present in pulp mills effluents, corresponding to fatty acids, hydrocarbons, phenols, sterols and triterpenes, were detected by solid phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The results suggest that the sterols produce the estrogenic activity in the evaluated effluent. PMID:20595766

  6. Iraq liquid radioactive waste tanks maintenance and monitoring program plan.

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, Matthew L.; Cochran, John Russell; Sol Shamsaldin, Emad

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop a project management plan for maintaining and monitoring liquid radioactive waste tanks at Iraq's Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center. Based on information from several sources, the Al-Tuwaitha site has approximately 30 waste tanks that contain varying amounts of liquid or sludge radioactive waste. All of the tanks have been non-operational for over 20 years and most have limited characterization. The program plan embodied in this document provides guidance on conducting radiological surveys, posting radiation control areas and controlling access, performing tank hazard assessments to remove debris and gain access, and conducting routine tank inspections. This program plan provides general advice on how to sample and characterize tank contents, and how to prioritize tanks for soil sampling and borehole monitoring.

  7. Advanced active health monitoring system of liquid rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Xinlin P.; Wu, Zhanjun; Beard, Shawn; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2008-11-01

    An advanced SMART TAPE system has been developed for real-time in-situ monitoring and long term tracking of structural integrity of pressure vessels in liquid rocket engines. The practical implementation of the structural health monitoring (SHM) system including distributed sensor network, portable diagnostic hardware and dedicated data analysis software is addressed based on the harsh operating environment. Extensive tests were conducted on a simulated large booster LOX-H2 engine propellant duct to evaluate the survivability and functionality of the system under the operating conditions of typical liquid rocket engines such as cryogenic temperature, vibration loads. The test results demonstrated that the developed SHM system could survive the combined cryogenic temperature and vibration environments and effectively detect cracks as small as 2 mm.

  8. Methods and systems for monitoring a solid-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Stoddard, Nathan G.; Clark, Roger F.

    2011-10-04

    Methods and systems are provided for monitoring a solid-liquid interface, including providing a vessel configured to contain an at least partially melted material; detecting radiation reflected from a surface of a liquid portion of the at least partially melted material; providing sound energy to the surface; measuring a disturbance on the surface; calculating at least one frequency associated with the disturbance; and determining a thickness of the liquid portion based on the at least one frequency, wherein the thickness is calculated based on L=(2m-1)v.sub.s/4f, where f is the frequency where the disturbance has an amplitude maximum, v.sub.s is the speed of sound in the material, and m is a positive integer (1, 2, 3, . . . ).

  9. Monitoring release of pharmaceutical compounds: occurrence and environmental risk assessment of two WWTP effluents and their receiving bodies in the Po Valley, Italy.

    PubMed

    Al Aukidy, M; Verlicchi, P; Jelic, A; Petrovic, M; Barcelò, D

    2012-11-01

    This study describes an investigation on the occurrence of 27 pharmaceutical compounds, belonging to different classes, in the effluent from two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and their receiving water bodies in the sensitive area of the Po Valley (northern Italy). These canals were monitored upstream and downstream of the effluent discharge points in order to evaluate the effluent impact on the quality of surface waters, commonly used for irrigation. An environmental risk assessment was also conducted by calculating the risk quotient, i.e. the ratio between measured concentration and predicted no effect concentration. Collected data show that, although average values of the selected compounds were in general higher in the effluent than in the surface waters, some compounds not detected in the WWTP effluent were detected in the receiving water (upstream as well as downstream), indicating that sources other than treated effluents are present as contaminations during extraction and analysis have to be excluded. The most critical compounds for the environment were found to be the antibiotics sulfamethoxazole, clarithromycin and azithromycin. The study shows that the potential toxicological effects of persistent micropollutants can be mitigated to some extent by a high dilution capacity, i.e. a high average flow rate in the receiving water body with respect to the effluent. PMID:22967493

  10. EFFECTS OF LIQUID DETERGENT PLANT EFFLUENT ON THE ROTATING BIOLOGICAL CONTACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes data on the treatment of wastewaters from a liquid detergent manufacturing plant by a rotating biological contactor and presents the findings of an analytical effort to determine the presence or absence of metals and organic compounds which were among those...

  11. Method for analyzing the chemical composition of liquid effluent from a direct contact condenser

    DOEpatents

    Bharathan, Desikan; Parent, Yves; Hassani, A. Vahab

    2001-01-01

    A computational modeling method for predicting the chemical, physical, and thermodynamic performance of a condenser using calculations based on equations of physics for heat, momentum and mass transfer and equations of equilibrium thermodynamics to determine steady state profiles of parameters throughout the condenser. The method includes providing a set of input values relating to a condenser including liquid loading, vapor loading, and geometric characteristics of the contact medium in the condenser. The geometric and packing characteristics of the contact medium include the dimensions and orientation of a channel in the contact medium. The method further includes simulating performance of the condenser using the set of input values to determine a related set of output values such as outlet liquid temperature, outlet flow rates, pressures, and the concentration(s) of one or more dissolved noncondensable gas species in the outlet liquid. The method may also include iteratively performing the above computation steps using a plurality of sets of input values and then determining whether each of the resulting output values and performance profiles satisfies acceptance criteria.

  12. Ocean Circulation Modeling for Aquatic Dispersion of Liquid Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Y.G.; Lee, G.B.; Bang, S.Y.; Choi, S.B.; Lee, S.U.; Yoon, J.H.; Nam, S.Y.; Lee, H.R.

    2006-07-01

    Recently, three-dimensional models have been used for aquatic dispersion of radioactive effluents in relation to nuclear power plant siting based on the Notice No. 2003-12 'Guideline for investigating and assessing hydrological and aquatic characteristics of nuclear facility site' of the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) in Korea. Several nuclear power plants have been under construction or planed, which are Shin-Kori Unit 1 and 2, Shin-Wolsong Unit 1 and 2, and Shin-Ulchin Unit 1 and 2. For assessing the aquatic dispersion of radionuclides released from the above nuclear power plants, it is necessary to know the coastal currents around sites which are affected by circulation of East Sea. In this study, a three dimensional hydrodynamic model for the circulation of the East Sea of Korea has been developed as the first phase, which is based on the RIAMOM (Research Institute of Applied Mechanics' Ocean Model, Kyushu University, Japan). The model uses the primitive equation with hydrostatic approximation, and uses Arakawa-B grid system horizontally and Z coordinate vertically. Model domain is 126.5 deg. E to 142.5 deg. E of east longitude and 33 deg. N and 52 deg. N of the north latitude. The space of the horizontal grid was 1/12 deg. to longitude and latitude direction and vertical level was divided to 20. This model uses Generalized Arakawa Scheme, Slant Advection, and Mode-Splitting Method. The input data were from JODC (Japan Oceanographic Data Center), KNFRDI (Korea National Fisheries Research and Development Institute), and ECMWF (European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts). The modeling results are in fairly good agreement with schematic patterns of the surface circulation in the East Sea/Japan Sea. The local current model and aquatic dispersion model of the coastal region will be developed as the second phase. The oceanic dispersion experiments will be also carried out by using ARGO Drifter around a nuclear power plant site. (authors)

  13. 75 FR 63856 - In the Matter of Certain Liquid Crystal Display Devices, Including Monitors, Televisions, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Liquid Crystal Display Devices, Including Monitors, Televisions, and... sale for importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain liquid crystal... importation of certain liquid crystal display devices, including monitors, televisions, and modules,...

  14. 75 FR 74080 - In the Matter of Certain Liquid Crystal Display Devices, Including Monitors, Televisions, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... COMMISSION Inv. No. 337-TA-749 In the Matter of Certain Liquid Crystal Display Devices, Including Monitors... sale within the United States after importation of certain liquid crystal display devices, including... importation of certain liquid crystal display devices, including monitors, televisions, and modules,...

  15. [Transport processes of low-level radioactive liquid effluent of nuclear power station in closed water body].

    PubMed

    Wu, Guo-Zheng; Xu, Zong-Xue

    2012-07-01

    The transport processes of low-level radioactive liquid effluent of Xianning nuclear power station in the closed water body Fushui Reservoir are simulated using the EFDC model. Six nuclides concentration distribution with different half-lives in the reservoir are analyzed under the condition of 97% guarantee rate incoming water and four-running nuclear power units. The results show that the nuclides concentration distribution is mainly affected by the flow field of the reservoir and the concentration is decided by the half-lives of nuclide and the volume of incoming water. In addition, the influence region is enlarged as increasing of half-life and tends to be stable when the half-life is longer than 5 years. Moreover, the waste water discharged from the outlet of the nuclear power plant has no effect on the water-intake for the outlet located at the upstream of the water-intake and the flow field flows to the dam of the reservoir. PMID:23002624

  16. Ultrasonic technique for monitoring of liquid density variations.

    PubMed

    Kazys, R; Rekuviene, R; Sliteris, R; Mazeika, L; Zukauskas, E

    2015-01-01

    A novel ultrasonic measurement technique for density measurements of different liquids in extreme conditions has been developed. The proposed density measurement method is based on transformation of the acoustic impedance of the measured liquid. The higher accuracy of measurements is achieved by means of the λ/4 acoustic matching layer between the load and the ultrasonic waveguide transducer. Introduction of the matching layer enhances sensitivity of the measurement system. Sometimes, the density measurements must be performed in very complex conditions: high temperature (up to 200 °C), pressure (up to 10 MPa), and high chemical activity of the medium under measurement. In this case, the special geometry metal waveguides are proposed to use in order to protect the piezoelectric transducer surface from influence of a high temperature. The experimental set-up of technique was calibrated using the reference liquids with different densities: ethyl ether, ethyl alcohol, distilled water, and different concentration (20%, 40%, and 60%) sugar-water solutions. The uncertainty of measurements is less than 1%. The proposed measurement method was verified in real conditions by monitoring the density of a melted polypropylene during manufacturing process. PMID:25638115

  17. Ultrasonic technique for monitoring of liquid density variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazys, R.; Rekuviene, R.; Sliteris, R.; Mazeika, L.; Zukauskas, E.

    2015-01-01

    A novel ultrasonic measurement technique for density measurements of different liquids in extreme conditions has been developed. The proposed density measurement method is based on transformation of the acoustic impedance of the measured liquid. The higher accuracy of measurements is achieved by means of the λ/4 acoustic matching layer between the load and the ultrasonic waveguide transducer. Introduction of the matching layer enhances sensitivity of the measurement system. Sometimes, the density measurements must be performed in very complex conditions: high temperature (up to 200 °C), pressure (up to 10 MPa), and high chemical activity of the medium under measurement. In this case, the special geometry metal waveguides are proposed to use in order to protect the piezoelectric transducer surface from influence of a high temperature. The experimental set-up of technique was calibrated using the reference liquids with different densities: ethyl ether, ethyl alcohol, distilled water, and different concentration (20%, 40%, and 60%) sugar-water solutions. The uncertainty of measurements is less than 1%. The proposed measurement method was verified in real conditions by monitoring the density of a melted polypropylene during manufacturing process.

  18. Monitoring system for a liquid-cooled nuclear fission reactor

    DOEpatents

    DeVolpi, Alexander

    1987-01-01

    A monitoring system for detecting changes in the liquid levels in various regions of a water-cooled nuclear power reactor, viz., in the downcomer, in the core, in the inlet and outlet plenums, at the head, and elsewhere; and also for detecting changes in the density of the liquid in these regions. A plurality of gamma radiation detectors are used, arranged vertically along the outside of the reactor vessel, and collimator means for each detector limits the gamma-radiation it receives as emitting from only isolated regions of the vessel. Excess neutrons produced by the fission reaction will be captured by the water coolant, by the steel reactor walls, or by the fuel or control structures in the vessel. Neutron capture by steel generates gamma radiation having an energy level of the order of 5-12 MeV, whereas neutron capture by water provides an energy level of approximately 2.2 MeV, and neutron capture by the fission fuel or its cladding provides an energy level of 1 MeV or less. The intensity of neutron capture thus changes significantly at any water-metal interface. Comparative analysis of adjacent gamma detectors senses changes from the normal condition with liquid coolant present to advise of changes in the presence and/or density of the coolant at these specific regions. The gamma detectors can also sense fission-product gas accumulation at the reactor head to advise of a failure of fuel-pin cladding.

  19. A comparison between floc morphology and the effluent clarity at a full-scale activated sludge plant using optical monitoring.

    PubMed

    Koivuranta, E; Keskitalo, J; Stoor, T; Hattuniemi, J; Sarén, M; Niinimäki, J

    2014-08-01

    A charge-coupled device camera was used for the optical monitoring of activated sludge flocs and filaments, and the image analysis results were compared with the effluent clarity at a full-scale activated sludge plant during a three-month period. The study included a maintenance stoppage at the wastewater treatment plant, which was followed by a settling problem. Thus, the study presents the development of floc morphology from poor flocculation to good flocculation. In this case, the evolution of flocs was a slow process, and the optimum floc morphology was achieved before the purification results improved. To diagnose the cause of the settling problems using optical monitoring, four major factors were found to be relevant: the mean area of the flocs, the amount of small particles, the amount of filament and the shape parameters of the flocs. In this case, the settling problem was caused by dispersed growth based on the image analysis results. In conclusion, the method used has the potential for usefulness in the development of monitoring applications to predict plant performance and also to diagnose the causes of the settling problems. PMID:24956750

  20. Liquid effluent/Hanford Environmental compliance FY 1995 Multi-Year Program Plan/Fiscal Year Work Plan, WBS 1.2.2.1 and 1.2.2.2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This document details the program effort to eliminate the use of the soil column for liquid effluent treatment and to manage current and future liquid effluent streams at the Hanford Site, in a safe responsible cost effective and legally compliant mannger. This should be achieved through planning, public and stakeholder interaction, definition of requiremtns for generators, and provision of timely treatment, stroage, disposal capability, and waste minimization of waste streams.

  1. 40 CFR 417.82 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Manufacture of Liquid Soaps Subcategory § 417.82 Effluent limitations guidelines representing...

  2. 40 CFR 417.83 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Manufacture of Liquid Soaps Subcategory § 417.83 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree...

  3. 40 CFR 417.82 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Manufacture of Liquid Soaps Subcategory § 417.82 Effluent limitations guidelines representing...

  4. 40 CFR 417.83 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Manufacture of Liquid Soaps Subcategory § 417.83 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree...

  5. 40 CFR 417.83 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Manufacture of Liquid Soaps Subcategory § 417.83 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree...

  6. 40 CFR 417.82 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Manufacture of Liquid Soaps Subcategory § 417.82 Effluent limitations guidelines representing...

  7. 40 CFR 417.83 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Manufacture of Liquid Soaps Subcategory § 417.83 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree...

  8. 40 CFR 417.82 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Manufacture of Liquid Soaps Subcategory § 417.82 Effluent limitations guidelines representing...

  9. 40 CFR 417.82 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Manufacture of Liquid Soaps Subcategory § 417.82 Effluent limitations guidelines representing...

  10. 40 CFR 417.83 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Manufacture of Liquid Soaps Subcategory § 417.83 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree...

  11. Determination of natural and synthetic glucocorticoids in effluent of sewage treatment plants using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Tomohiko; Sato, Kentaro; Joon-Woo, Kim; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Suzuki, Go; Nakayama, Kei

    2015-09-01

    A sensitive and comprehensive analytical method for glucocorticoids (GCs) in water samples was developed and applied to effluent of sewage treatment plants (STPs). In the present study, totally 10 natural and synthetic GCs, including cortisol, betamethasone valerate, clobetasol propionate, clobetasone butyrate, difluprednate, betamethasone, dexamethasone, betamethasone dipropionate, methylprednisolone, and prednisolone, were targeted. Analytes were extracted and concentrated using an OASIS HLB solid phase extraction cartridge. Chromatographic separation and quantification were achieved using an ultrahigh performance liquid chromatograph coupled with a tandem mass spectrometer (UHPLC-MS/MS). Method detection limits were 0.05 to 0.89 ng/L, which were 1-2 orders of magnitude more sensitive than in the previous reports. Cortisol was detected in more than half of (27 out of 50) analyzed effluent samples at concentrations in the range of ND-1.36 ng/L, indicating continuous discharge of natural GC via STP effluent. On the other hand, dexamethasone + betamethasone, prednisolone, betamethasone valerate, and clobetasol propionate were detected in 25, 8, 20, and 9 samples among 50 effluent samples, respectively, suggesting not extreme but significant administration of synthetic GCs. PMID:25963071

  12. Liquid intake monitoring through breathing signal using machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Bo; Biswas, Subir

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents the design, system structure and performance for a wireless and wearable diet monitoring system. Food and drink intake can be detected by the way of detecting a person's swallow events. The system works based on the key observation that a person's otherwise continuous breathing process is interrupted by a short apnea when she or he swallows as a part of solid or liquid intake process. We detect the swallows through the difference between normal breathing cycle and breathing cycle with swallows using a wearable chest-belt. Three popular machine learning algorithms have been applied on both time and frequency domain features. Discrimination power of features is then analyzed for applications where only small number of features is allowed. It is shown that high detection performance can be achieved with only few features.

  13. Distributed Health Monitoring System for Reusable Liquid Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. F.; Figueroa, F.; Politopoulos, T.; Oonk, S.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to correctly detect and identify any possible failure in the systems, subsystems, or sensors within a reusable liquid rocket engine is a major goal at NASA John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC). A health management (HM) system is required to provide an on-ground operation crew with an integrated awareness of the condition of every element of interest by determining anomalies, examining their causes, and making predictive statements. However, the complexity associated with relevant systems, and the large amount of data typically necessary for proper interpretation and analysis, presents difficulties in implementing complete failure detection, identification, and prognostics (FDI&P). As such, this paper presents a Distributed Health Monitoring System for Reusable Liquid Rocket Engines as a solution to these problems through the use of highly intelligent algorithms for real-time FDI&P, and efficient and embedded processing at multiple levels. The end result is the ability to successfully incorporate a comprehensive HM platform despite the complexity of the systems under consideration.

  14. Fast liquid chromatography-diode array detection assisted by chemometrics for quantification of seven ultraviolet filters in effluent wastewater.

    PubMed

    Vosough, Maryam; Mojdehi, Nahal Rahimdoost

    2011-09-30

    A fast chromatographic method is presented for simultaneous quantification of seven organic ultraviolet (UV) filters (benzophenone-3,4-methylbenzilidene camphor, octocrylene, 1-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-3-(4-methyoxyphenyl)1,3-propanedione), ethylhexyl methoxy cinnamate, ethylhexyl salicylate and homosalate) in effluent wastewater samples. The UV filters were pre-concentrated by Bond Elut-ENV cartridges and separated on an ODS column (15 cm × 0.46 cm, 5 μm) in less than 2.5 min using a non-aqueous mobile phase of methanol-acetonitrile (50:50, v/v) with flow-rate of 1.5 mL min(-1). Appropriate baseline correction through asymmetric least squares was applied to reduce the matrix of background signals in three way data. Then, second-order calibration based on multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) was implemented on the unfolded three-way data obtained from liquid chromatography with diode array detection (LC-DAD) through standard addition calibration method for handling co-eluted peaks, systematic and proportional errors. Recoveries ranging from 76% to 130% and %RSD values less than 11.2 for all UV filter shows the accuracy and precision of the proposed method in wastewater samples. In addition, statistical t-test as well as computed elliptical joint confidence region (EJCR) confirms the accuracy of the proposed method and indicates the absence of both constant and proportional errors in the predicted concentrations. This study demonstrates that coupling of the fast HPLC-DAD method with powerful algorithm of MCR-ALS can be considered as an efficient method for quantification of UV filters in highly contaminated samples of wastewaters where both time and cost per each analysis can be reduced significantly. PMID:21872075

  15. Calibration of monitors used for surveillance of radioactivity in effluent water from CERN's accelerator installations.

    PubMed

    Vojtyla, P

    2001-07-01

    Water released into the environment from CERN's accelerator installations may contain both long-lived (7Be, 22Na) and short-lived (11C, 13N, 24Na) gamma radioactivity. Each potential release point is equipped with an on-line monitor for short-lived radionuclides, which consists of a scintillation probe immersed in a tank filled with monitored water. Whilst calibration standards are available for long-lived radioactivity, computer simulations are the only feasible way to determine the monitor efficiency for the short-lived radionuclides. The paper describes computer simulations using the Monte Carlo code GEANT 3.21. An excellent agreement between measured and computed efficiencies was obtained for the long-lived radionuclides, validating the computer model. A calibration method is proposed for light positron emitters, which combines an experimental calibration for 7Be and correction factors obtained in the simulations. PMID:11339535

  16. Real-time alpha monitoring of a radioactive liquid waste stream at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.D.; Whitley, C.R.; Rawool-Sullivan, M.

    1995-12-31

    This poster display concerns the development, installation, and testing of a real-time radioactive liquid waste monitor at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The detector system was designed for the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility so that influent to the plant could be monitored in real time. By knowing the activity of the influent, plant operators can better monitor treatment, better segregate waste (potentially), and monitor the regulatory compliance of users of the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Collection System. The detector system uses long-range alpha detection technology, which is a nonintrusive method of characterization that determines alpha activity on the liquid surface by measuring the ionization of ambient air. Extensive testing has been performed to ensure long-term use with a minimal amount of maintenance. The final design was a simple cost-effective alpha monitor that could be modified for monitoring influent waste streams at various points in the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Collection System.

  17. Novel nanohybrid materials for the effective removal of phosphates and nitrates from liquid effluents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eroglu, Ela; Haniff Wahid, M.; Boulos, Ramiz A.; Chen, Xianjue; Eggers, Paul K.; Toster, Jeremiah; D'Alonzo, Nicholas J.; Smith, Steven M.; Raston, Colin L.

    2014-05-01

    Within our research group, various types of nanofabrication processes have been applied for creating novel nanohybrid materials, including the immobilization of some microorganisms with electrospun nanofibres1, laminar nanomaterials (i.e. graphene and graphene oxide)2,3, microfibers of human hair4, and magnetic nanoparticles impregnated in polymer5. These approaches afford nanohybrid materials with microalgal cells1-5 or diatom frustules6 for the removal of waste pollutants, mainly nitrate and phosphate ions, while establishing a new paradigm in the field. Aside from these immobilization studies, we also investigated the improvement of nitrate removal with exfoliated graphene sheets in the presence of p-phosphonic acid calix[8]arene molecules.7 Various material characterization techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy were used for the characterization of the novel nanohybrid materials, while fluorescence microscopy and chlorophyll content analysis were mainly used for monitoring the viability and growth pattern of the microalgal cells. Nitrate and phosphate analyses were carried out by following HACH® standard methods. In this talk, a brief overview of the fabrication processes of these nanohybrid materials and their application for wastewater treatment will be highlighted. 1. E. Eroglu, V. Agarwal, M. Bradshaw, X. Chen, S.M. Smith, C.L. Raston and K.S. Iyer, Green Chemistry, 2012, 14(10), 2682 - 2685. 2. M.H. Wahid, E. Eroglu, X. Chen, S.M. Smith and C.L. Raston, Green Chemistry, 2013, 15(3), 650-655. 3. M.H. Wahid, E. Eroglu, X. Chen, S.M. Smith and C.L. Raston, RSC Advances, 2013, 3(22), 8180-8183. 4. R.A. Boulos, E. Eroglu, X. Chen, A. Scaffidi, J. Toster, B. Edwards and C.L. Raston, Green Chemistry, 2013, 15(5), 1268-1273. 5. E. Eroglu, N.J. D'Alonzo, S.M. Smith and C.L. Raston, Nanoscale, 2013, 5(7), 2627-2631. 6. J. Toster, I. Kusumawardani, E. Eroglu, K.S. Iyer, F

  18. Trinidad Head, California: New NOAA/CMDL Baseline Observatory for Monitoring Asian Atmospheric Effluents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnell, R. C.; Butler, J. H.

    2002-12-01

    Long-range transport of dust and air pollution from Asia to the Mauna Loa, Hawaii, Atmospheric Baseline Observatory has been documented since the early 1970s. In a single year, as many as 30 distinct pollution flow events from Asia have been observed there. Some flows last a few hours, whereas others persist for up to 5 days. More recently, it has been recognized by both measurements and satellite photos that there are significant numbers of air pollution flow events from Asia into North America along a broad front, ranging from the north slope of Alaska to central California. There is a valid concern that ozone and ozone precursors advecting from Asia could eventually put California into noncompliance with federal air-quality regulations. As a component of the Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation (ITCT) program, NOAA/CMDL established an atmospheric monitoring observatory (April 2002) at Trinidad Head, California in collaboration with Humboldt State University, to monitor both the inflow of air pollution from Asia as well as regionally influenced air. The station monitors aerosols, ozone (continuous surface and weekly ozonesonde balloon profiles), radiation, and halocarbon and carbon cycle trace gases (weekly flasks). Data from Trinidad Head are monitored via the internet at CMDL in Boulder. Plans call for the installation of a GC/MS for the measurement of PAN, hydrocarbons, and certain halocarbons, and for vertical profiles of trace gases and ozone to be obtained (with light aircraft) upwind and above the site on a weekly basis. It is expected that the Trinidad Head observatory will expand measurement programs over the next 5 years and be in operation for many decades to come.

  19. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory annual environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) sites are summarized and assessed in this report. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each site and at off-site background locations.

  20. Gas-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methodology for the quantitation of estrogenic contaminants in bile of fish exposed to wastewater treatment works effluents and from wild populations.

    PubMed

    Fenlon, Kate A; Johnson, Andrew C; Tyler, Charles R; Hill, Elizabeth M

    2010-01-01

    Fish can be exposed to a complex mixture of chemical contaminants arising from the exposure to wastewater treatment works (WwTWs) effluents. Some of these contaminants are estrogenic and have been associated with feminisation of male fish and the presence of populations containing intersex individuals. However the detection of trace levels (ng/L) of estrogenic chemicals surface waters can be difficult and does not give information on the exposure of aquatic organisms to these contaminants. In this study we assessed whether the analysis of estrogenic substances that bioconcentrate in fish bile can be used to detect the exposure of fish to feminising contaminants in receiving waters and effluents, and thus facilitate their monitoring of these substances in aquatic environments. Estrogenic metabolites in bile were deconjugated using enzymatic hydrolysis and partially purified by solid phase extraction. Steroidal and xenoestrogens were derivatized to their trimethylsilyl ethers and quantified by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) using multiple reaction monitoring. The method was validated using spiked bile samples from immature female rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) as well as bile from sexually mature roach (Rutilus rutilus) that had been exposed to either tap water or an undiluted estrogenic effluent for 10 days or captured from a river site downstream of a WwTWs effluent discharge. The mean recovery of target analytes from spiked bile was between 86 and 99% and the limit of detection was between 0.1 and 0.7ng/mL bile for bisphenol A (BPA), 17beta-estradiol (E2), estrone (E1) and 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2), and 11, 60 and 327ng/mL bile for branched nonyl chain isomeric mixtures of 4-nonylphenolethoxylate (NP1EO), 4-nonylphenol (NP) and 4-nonylphenoldiethoxylate (NP2EO), respectively. All target analytes were detected in bile from roach exposed directly to a WwTWs effluent, with concentrations between 6-13microg/mL bile for NP, 18-21microg

  1. Comparison of digestate from solid anaerobic digesters and dewatered effluent from liquid anaerobic digesters as inocula for solid state anaerobic digestion of yard trimmings.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fuqing; Wang, Feng; Lin, Long; Li, Yebo

    2016-01-01

    To select a proper inoculum for the solid state anaerobic digestion (SS-AD) of yard trimmings, digestate from solid anaerobic digesters and dewatered effluent from liquid anaerobic digesters were compared at substrate-to-inoculum (S/I) ratios from 0.2 to 2 (dry basis), and total solids (TS) contents from 20% to 35%. The highest methane yield of around 244L/kg VSfeed was obtained at an S/I ratio of 0.2 and TS content of 20% for both types of inoculum. The highest volumetric methane productivity was obtained with dewatered effluent at an S/I ratio of 0.6 and TS content of 24%. The two types of inoculum were found comparable regarding methane yields and volumetric methane productivities at each S/I ratio, while using dewatered effluent as inoculum reduced the startup time. An S/I ratio of 1 was determined to be a critical level and should be set as the upper limit for mesophilic SS-AD of yard trimmings. PMID:26575617

  2. Characterization of an Am-Be PGNAA set-up developed for in situ liquid analysis: Application to domestic waste water and industrial liquid effluents analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idiri, Z.; Mazrou, H.; Amokrane, A.; Bedek, S.

    2010-01-01

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) set-up with an Am-Be source developed for in situ analysis of liquid samples is described. The linearity of its response was tested for chlorine and cadmium dissolved in water. Prompt gamma efficiency of the system has been determined experimentally using prompt gamma of chlorine dissolved in water and detection limits for different elements have been derived for domestic waste water. A methodology to analyze any kind of liquid is then proposed. This methodology consists mainly on using standards with water as bulk or in the case of absolute method, to use gamma efficiency determined with prompt gammas emitted by chlorine dissolved in water. To take into account the thermal neutron flux variations inside the samples, flux monitoring was carried out using a He-3 neutron detector placed at the external sample container surface. Finally, to correct for the differences in gamma attenuation, average gamma attenuations factors were calculated using MCNP5 code. This method was then checked successfully by determining cadmium in industrial phosphoric acid and our result was in good agreement with that obtained with inductively coupled plasma (ICP) method.

  3. 40 CFR 417.162 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Manufacture of Liquid Detergents Subcategory § 417.162 Effluent limitations guidelines... available (BPT): (a) For normal liquid detergent operations the following values pertain:...

  4. 40 CFR 417.162 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Manufacture of Liquid Detergents Subcategory § 417.162 Effluent limitations guidelines... available (BPT): (a) For normal liquid detergent operations the following values pertain:...

  5. 40 CFR 417.162 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Manufacture of Liquid Detergents Subcategory § 417.162 Effluent limitations guidelines... available (BPT): (a) For normal liquid detergent operations the following values pertain:...

  6. 77 FR 3793 - Certain Liquid Crystal Display Devices, Including Monitors, Televisions, and Modules, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Liquid Crystal Display Devices, Including Monitors, Televisions, and Modules, and Components Thereof; Request for Statements on the Public Interest AGENCY: U.S. International Trade...

  7. Filtration device for active effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Guerin, M.; Meunier, G.

    1994-12-31

    Among the various techniques relating to solid/liquid separations, filtration is currently utilized for treating radioactive effluents. After testing different equipments on various simulated effluents, the Valduc Center has decided to substitute a monoplate filter for a rotative diatomite precoated filter.

  8. Solidification of Simulated Liquid Effluents Originating From Sodium-Bearing Waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, FY-03 Report

    SciTech Connect

    S. V. Raman; A. K. Herbst; B. A. Scholes; S. H. Hinckley; R. D. Colby

    2003-09-01

    In this report, the mechanism and methods of fixation of acidic waste effluents in grout form are explored. From the variations in the pH as a function of total solids addition to acidic waste effluent solutions, the stages of gellation, liquefaction, slurry formation and grout development are quantitatively revealed. Experimental results indicate the completion of these reaction steps to be significant for elimination of bleed liquid and for setting of the grout to a dimensionally stable and hardened solid within a reasonable period of about twenty eight days that is often observed in the cement and concrete industry. The reactions also suggest increases in the waste loading in the direction of decreasing acid molarity. Consequently, 1.0 molar SBW-180 waste is contained in higher quantity than the 2.8 molar SBW-189, given the same grout formulation for both effluents. The variations in the formulations involving components of slag, cement, waste and neutralizing agent are represented in the form of a ternary formulation map. The map in turn graphically reveals the relations among the various formulations and grout properties, and is useful in predicting the potential directions of waste loading in grouts with suitable properties such as slurry viscosity, Vicat hardness, and mechanical strength. A uniform formulation for the fixation of both SBW-180 and SBW-189 has emerged from the development of the formulation map. The boundaries for the processing regime on this map are 100 wt% cement to 50 wt% cement / 50 wt% slag, with waste loadings ranging from 55 wt% to 68 wt%. Within these compositional bounds all the three waste streams SBW-180, SBW-189 and Scrub solution are amenable to solidification. A large cost advantage is envisaged to stem from savings in labor, processing time, and processing methodology by adopting a uniform formulation concept for fixation of compositionally diverse waste streams. The experimental efforts contained in this report constitute the

  9. Process for treating effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, Charles M.; Shapiro, Carolyn

    1997-01-01

    A method for treating a gaseous effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor containing entrained solids is provided comprising the steps of expanding the gas/solids effluent from a first to a second lower pressure at a temperature at which no liquid condenses; separating the solids from the gas effluent; neutralizing the effluent to remove any acid gases; condensing the effluent; and retaining the purified effluent to the supercritical water oxidation reactor.

  10. Process for treating effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, C.M.; Shapiro, C.

    1997-11-25

    A method for treating a gaseous effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor containing entrained solids is provided comprising the steps of expanding the gas/solids effluent from a first to a second lower pressure at a temperature at which no liquid condenses; separating the solids from the gas effluent; neutralizing the effluent to remove any acid gases; condensing the effluent; and retaining the purified effluent to the supercritical water oxidation reactor. 6 figs.

  11. Organic liquid scintillation detector shape and volume impact on radiation portal monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paff, Marc G.; Clarke, Shaun D.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2016-07-01

    We have developed and tested a radiation portal monitor using organic liquid scintillation detectors. In order to optimize our system designs, neutron measurements were carried out with three organic liquid scintillation detectors of different shapes and sizes, along with a 3He radiation portal monitor (RPM) as a reference. The three liquids tested were a 7.62 cm diameter by 7.62 cm length cylindrical active volume organic liquid scintillation detector, a 12.7 cm diameter by 12.7 cm length cylindrical active volume organic liquid scintillation detector, and a 25 cm by 25 cm by 10 cm "paddle" shaped organic liquid scintillation detector. Background and Cf-252 neutron measurements were recorded to allow for a comparison of neutron intrinsic efficiencies as well as receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves between detectors. The 12.7 cm diameter cylindrical active volume organic liquid scintillation detector exhibited the highest intrinsic neutron efficiency (54%) of all three liquid scintillators. An ROC curve analysis for a heavily moderated Cf-252 measurement showed that using the 12.7 cm diameter by 12.7 cm length cylindrical active volume Eljen EJ309 organic liquid scintillation detector would result in the fewest needed detector units in order to achieve a near 100% positive neutron alarm rate while maintaining a better than 1 in 10,000 false alarm rate on natural neutron background. A small number of organic liquid scintillation detectors could therefore be a valid alternative to 3He in some RPM applications.

  12. Rapid determination of 12 antibiotics and caffeine in sewage and bioreactor effluent by online column-switching liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lima Gomes, Paulo C F; Tomita, Inês N; Santos-Neto, Álvaro J; Zaiat, Marcelo

    2015-11-01

    This study presents a column-switching solid-phase extraction online-coupled to a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS/MS) method for simultaneous analysis of 12 antibiotics (7 sulfonamides and 5 fluoroquinolones) and caffeine detected in the sewage and effluent of a pilot anaerobic reactor used in sewage treatment. After acidification and filtration, the samples were directly injected into a simple and conventional LC system. Backflush and foreflush modes were compared based on the theoretical plates and peak asymmetry observed. The method was tested in terms of detection (MDL) and quantification limit (MQL), linearity, relative recovery, and precision intra- and inter-day in lab-made sewage samples. The method presented suitable figures of merit in terms of detection, varying from 8.00 × 10(-5) to 6.00 × 10(-2) ng (0.800 up to 600 ng L(-1); caffeine) with direct injection volume of only 100 μL and 13 min of total analysis time (sample preparation and chromatographic run). When the method was applied in the analysis of sewage and effluent of the anaerobic reactor (n = 15), six antibiotics and caffeine were detected in concentrations ranging from 0.018 to 1097 μg L(-1). To guarantee a reliable quantification, standard addition was used to overcome the matrix effect. PMID:26446896

  13. Comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution time of flight mass spectrometry for chemical characterization of sewage treatment plant effluents.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Xiyu; Leonards, Pim; Legler, Juliette; van der Oost, Ron; de Boer, Jacob; Lamoree, Marja

    2015-02-01

    For the first time a comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC×LC) system coupled with a high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer (HR-ToF MS) was developed and applied for analysis of emerging toxicants in wastewater effluent. The system was optimized and validated using environmental standard compound mixtures of e.g. carbamate pesticides and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), to characterize the chromatographic system, to test the stability of the retention times and orthogonality. Various stationary phases in the second dimension were compared for the LC×LC analysis of silicon rubber passive sampler extracts of a wastewater effluent. A combination of C18 and Pentafluorophenyl (PFP) was found to be most effective. Finally, the hyphenation of LC×LC with HR-ToF MS was optimized, including splitter settings, transfer of data files between the different software packages and background subtraction using instrument software tools, after which tentative identification of 20 environmental contaminants was achieved, including pesticides, pharmaceuticals and food additives. As examples, three pesticides (isoproturon, terbutryn and diazinon) were confirmed by two-dimensional retention alignment. PMID:25578044

  14. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Report, Calendar Year 2003

    SciTech Connect

    2003-12-31

    The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations.

  15. Post-Closure Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-09-01

    The Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent site is located in the southeastern portion of the Area 12 Camp at the Nevada Test Site. This site is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996) as Corrective Action Site (CAS) 12-19-01 and is the only CAS assigned to Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 339. Post-closure sampling and inspection of the site were completed on March 27, 2002. Post-closure monitoring activities were scheduled biennially (every two years) in the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent, Nevada Test Site (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOEN], 1997). A baseline for the site was established by sampling in 1997. Based on the recommendations from the 1999 post-closure monitoring report (DOE/NV, 1999), samples were collected in 2000, earlier than originally proposed, because the 1999 sample results did not provide the expected decrease in total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations at the site. Sampling results from 2000 (DOE/NV, 2000) and 2001 (DOE/NV, 2001) revealed favorable conditions for natural degradation at the CAU 339 site, but because of differing sample methods and heterogeneity of the soil, data results from 2000 and later were not directly correlated with previous results. Post-closure monitoring activities for 2002 consisted of the following: (1) Soil sample collection from three undisturbed plots (Plots A, B, and C, Figure 2). (2) Sample analysis for TPH as oil and bio-characterization parameters (Comparative Enumeration Assay [CEA] and Standard Nutrient Panel [SNP]). (3) Site inspection to evaluate the condition of the fencing and signs. (4) Preparation and submittal of the Post-Closure Monitoring Report.

  16. 40 CFR 409.37 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SUGAR PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Liquid Cane Sugar Refining Subcategory § 409.37 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent...

  17. 40 CFR 409.37 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SUGAR PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Liquid Cane Sugar Refining Subcategory § 409.37 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent...

  18. 40 CFR 409.37 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SUGAR PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Liquid Cane Sugar Refining Subcategory § 409.37 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent...

  19. 40 CFR 409.37 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SUGAR PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Liquid Cane Sugar Refining Subcategory § 409.37 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent...

  20. 40 CFR 409.37 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SUGAR PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Liquid Cane Sugar Refining Subcategory § 409.37 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent...

  1. 40 CFR 418.53 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... material ammonia is in the gaseous form: Effluent characteristic Effluent limitations Maximum for any 1 day Average of daily values for 30 consecutive days shall not exceed— Ammonia (as N) 0.0045 0.00045 Nitrate... ammonia is in the shipped liquid form: Effluent characteristic Effluent limitations Maximum for any 1...

  2. 40 CFR 418.53 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... material ammonia is in the gaseous form: Effluent characteristic Effluent limitations Maximum for any 1 day Average of daily values for 30 consecutive days shall not exceed— Ammonia (as N) 0.0045 0.00045 Nitrate... ammonia is in the shipped liquid form: Effluent characteristic Effluent limitations Maximum for any 1...

  3. 40 CFR 418.53 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... material ammonia is in the gaseous form: Effluent characteristic Effluent limitations Maximum for any 1 day Average of daily values for 30 consecutive days shall not exceed— Ammonia (as N) 0.0045 0.00045 Nitrate... ammonia is in the shipped liquid form: Effluent characteristic Effluent limitations Maximum for any 1...

  4. 40 CFR 418.53 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... material ammonia is in the gaseous form: Effluent characteristic Effluent limitations Maximum for any 1 day Average of daily values for 30 consecutive days shall not exceed— Ammonia (as N) 0.0045 0.00045 Nitrate... ammonia is in the shipped liquid form: Effluent characteristic Effluent limitations Maximum for any 1...

  5. 40 CFR 418.53 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... material ammonia is in the gaseous form: Effluent characteristic Effluent limitations Maximum for any 1 day Average of daily values for 30 consecutive days shall not exceed— Ammonia (as N) 0.0045 0.00045 Nitrate... ammonia is in the shipped liquid form: Effluent characteristic Effluent limitations Maximum for any 1...

  6. Method for monitoring the crystallization of an organic material from a liquid

    DOEpatents

    Asay, Blaine W.; Henson, Bryan F.; Sander, Robert K.; Robinson, Jeanne M.; Son, Steven F.; Dickson, Peter M.

    2004-10-05

    Method for monitoring the crystallization of at least one organic material from a liquid. According to the method, a liquid having at least one organic material capable of existing in at least one non-centrosymmetric phase is prepared. The liquid is interrogated with a laser beam at a chosen wavelength. As at least a portion of the at least one organic material crystallizes from the liquid, the intensity of any light scattered by the crystallized material at a wavelength equal to one-half the chosen wavelength of the interrogating laser beam is monitored. If the intensity of this scattered light, increases, then the crystals that form include at least one non-cetrosymmetric phase.

  7. Out-Of-Drum Grout Mixer Testing With Simulated Liquid Effluents Originating From Sodium-Bearing Waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect

    B. A. Scholes; A. K. Herbst; S. V. Raman; S. H. Hinckley

    2003-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is considering several optional processes for disposal of liquid sodium-bearing waste. During fiscal year 2003, alternatives were evaluated for grout formulation development and associated mixing for the Sodium-Bearing Waste cesium ion exchange process. The neutralization agents calcium or sodium hydroxide and the solidification agents Portland cement, with or without blast furnace slag were evaluated. A desired uniform formulation was pursued to develop a grout waste form without any bleed liquid and solidify within a reasonable period of about twenty-eight days. This testing evaluates the out-of-drum alternative of mixing the effluent with solidification agents prior to being poured into drums versus the in-drum alternative of mixing them all together after being poured into the drums. Experimental results indicate that sodium-bearing waste can be immobilized in grout using the Autocon continuous mixer within the range of 66 to 72 weight percent. Furthermore, a loading of 30 weight percent NWCF scrubber simulant also produced an acceptable grout waste form.

  8. Distributed temperature monitoring for liquid sodium leakage detection using OFDR-based Rayleigh backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldyreva, E.; Cotillard, R.; Laffont, G.; Ferdinand, P.; Cambet, D.; Jeannot, J.-P.; Charvet, P.; Albaladéjo, S.; Rodriguez, G.

    2014-05-01

    For the first time, a gold coated single mode optical fiber has been used to detect a liquid sodium leakage on a pipe of secondary circuit pipe mock-up of nuclear fast reactor (Gen IV) by means of Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry-based on Rayleigh backscattering. During 150 min of the experiment we were able to detect and monitor the evolution of a liquid sodium leakage on the surface of the pipe.

  9. A cryogenic monitor system for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter in the SLD detector

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.J.; Fox, J.D.

    1988-10-01

    This paper describes the monitoring electronics system design for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter (LAC) portion of the SLD detector. This system measures temperatures and liquid levels inside the LAC cryostat and transfers the results over a fiber-optic serial link to an external monitoring computer. System requirements, unique design constraints, and detailed analog, digital and software designs are presented. Fault tolerance and the requirement for a single design to work in several different operating environments are discussed. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Engineering evaluation of alternatives: Technologies for monitoring interstitial liquids in single-shell tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Brevick, C.H.; Jenkins, C.E.

    1996-02-01

    A global search of mature, emerging, and conceptual tank liquid monitoring technologies, along with a historical review of Hanford tank farm waste monitoring instrumentation, was conducted to identify methods for gauging the quantity of interstitial waste liquids contained in Hanford SSTs. Upon completion of the search, an initial screening of alternatives was conducted to identify candidates which might be capable of monitoring interstitial tank liquids. The nine candidate technologies that were selected, evaluated, and ranked are summarized. Hydrostatic tank gauging (HTG) is the technology generally recommended for gauging the quantity of process materials contained in Hanford SSTs. HTG is a mass-based technique that has the capability for continuous remote monitoring. HTG has the advantages of no moving parts, intrinsic safety, and potentially gauging a one-million gal tank with a precision of approximately {+-}500 pounds (i.e., {+-}62 gal of water or {+-}0.02 in. of level in a 75 ft diameter tank). HTG is relatively inexpensive and probe design, construction, testing, installation, and operation should be straightforward. HTG should be configured as part of a hybrid tank gauging system. A hybrid system employs two or more independent measurement systems which function in concert to provide redundancy, improved accuracy, and maximum information at minimum cost. An excellent hybrid system choice for monitoring interstitial liquids in SSTs might be the combination of HTG with thermal differential technology.

  11. A zero power harmonic transponder sensor for ubiquitous wireless μL liquid-volume monitoring.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiyu; Chen, Pai-Yen; Hung, Cheng-Hsien; Gharpurey, Ranjit; Akinwande, Deji

    2016-01-01

    Autonomous liquid-volume monitoring is crucial in ubiquitous healthcare. However, conventional approach is based on either human visual observation or expensive detectors, which are costly for future pervasive monitoring. Here we introduce a novel approach based on passive harmonic transponder antenna sensor and frequency hopping spread spectrum (FHSS) pattern analysis, to provide a very low cost wireless μL-resolution liquid-volume monitoring without battery or digital circuits. In our conceptual demonstration, the harmonic transponder comprises of a passive nonlinear frequency multiplier connected to a metamaterial-inspired 3-D antenna designed to be highly sensitive to the liquid-volume within a confined region. The transponder first receives some FHSS signal from an interrogator, then converts such signal to its harmonic band and re-radiates through the antenna sensor. The harmonic signal is picked up by a sniffer receiver and decoded through pattern analysis of the high dimensional FHSS signal strength data. A robust, zero power, absolute accuracy wireless liquid-volume monitoring is realized in the presence of strong direct coupling, background scatters, distance variance as well as near-field human-body interference. The concepts of passive harmonic transponder sensor, metamaterial-inspired antenna sensor, and FHSS pattern analysis based sensor decoding may help establishing cost-effective, energy-efficient and intelligent wireless pervasive healthcare monitoring platforms. PMID:26732251

  12. A zero power harmonic transponder sensor for ubiquitous wireless μL liquid-volume monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haiyu; Chen, Pai-Yen; Hung, Cheng-Hsien; Gharpurey, Ranjit; Akinwande, Deji

    2016-01-01

    Autonomous liquid-volume monitoring is crucial in ubiquitous healthcare. However, conventional approach is based on either human visual observation or expensive detectors, which are costly for future pervasive monitoring. Here we introduce a novel approach based on passive harmonic transponder antenna sensor and frequency hopping spread spectrum (FHSS) pattern analysis, to provide a very low cost wireless μL-resolution liquid-volume monitoring without battery or digital circuits. In our conceptual demonstration, the harmonic transponder comprises of a passive nonlinear frequency multiplier connected to a metamaterial-inspired 3-D antenna designed to be highly sensitive to the liquid-volume within a confined region. The transponder first receives some FHSS signal from an interrogator, then converts such signal to its harmonic band and re-radiates through the antenna sensor. The harmonic signal is picked up by a sniffer receiver and decoded through pattern analysis of the high dimensional FHSS signal strength data. A robust, zero power, absolute accuracy wireless liquid-volume monitoring is realized in the presence of strong direct coupling, background scatters, distance variance as well as near-field human-body interference. The concepts of passive harmonic transponder sensor, metamaterial-inspired antenna sensor, and FHSS pattern analysis based sensor decoding may help establishing cost-effective, energy-efficient and intelligent wireless pervasive healthcare monitoring platforms. PMID:26732251

  13. A zero power harmonic transponder sensor for ubiquitous wireless μL liquid-volume monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haiyu; Chen, Pai-Yen; Hung, Cheng-Hsien; Gharpurey, Ranjit; Akinwande, Deji

    2016-01-01

    Autonomous liquid-volume monitoring is crucial in ubiquitous healthcare. However, conventional approach is based on either human visual observation or expensive detectors, which are costly for future pervasive monitoring. Here we introduce a novel approach based on passive harmonic transponder antenna sensor and frequency hopping spread spectrum (FHSS) pattern analysis, to provide a very low cost wireless μL-resolution liquid-volume monitoring without battery or digital circuits. In our conceptual demonstration, the harmonic transponder comprises of a passive nonlinear frequency multiplier connected to a metamaterial-inspired 3-D antenna designed to be highly sensitive to the liquid-volume within a confined region. The transponder first receives some FHSS signal from an interrogator, then converts such signal to its harmonic band and re-radiates through the antenna sensor. The harmonic signal is picked up by a sniffer receiver and decoded through pattern analysis of the high dimensional FHSS signal strength data. A robust, zero power, absolute accuracy wireless liquid-volume monitoring is realized in the presence of strong direct coupling, background scatters, distance variance as well as near-field human-body interference. The concepts of passive harmonic transponder sensor, metamaterial-inspired antenna sensor, and FHSS pattern analysis based sensor decoding may help establishing cost-effective, energy-efficient and intelligent wireless pervasive healthcare monitoring platforms.

  14. Uptake calibration of polymer-based passive samplers for monitoring priority and emerging organic non-polar pollutants in WWTP effluents.

    PubMed

    Posada-Ureta, Oscar; Olivares, Maitane; Zatón, Leire; Delgado, Alejandra; Prieto, Ailette; Vallejo, Asier; Paschke, Albrecht; Etxebarria, Nestor

    2016-05-01

    The uptake calibration of more than 12 non-polar organic contaminants by 3 polymeric materials is shown: bare polydimetilsiloxane (PDMS, stir-bars), polyethersulfone tubes and membranes (PES) and polyoxymethylene membranes (POM), both in their free form and membrane-enclosed sorptive coating (MESCO). The calibration process was carried out exposing the samplers to a continuous flow of contaminated water at 100 ng mL(-1) for up to 28 days, and, consequently, the sampling rates (Rs, mL day(-1)) of several organic microcontaminants were provided for the first time. In situ Rs values were also determined disposing the samplers in the effluent of a wastewater treatment plant. Finally, these passive samplers were applied to monitor the effluents of two wastewater treatment plants. This application lead to the confirmation of the presence of galaxolide, tonalide and 4-tert-octylphenol at high ng mL(-1) levels, as well as the identification of compounds like some phthalates and alkylphenols at levels below the detection limits for active sampling methods. PMID:26892638

  15. Multi-residue analytical methodology-based liquid chromatography-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry for the analysis of pharmaceutical residues in surface water and effluents from sewage treatment plants and hospitals.

    PubMed

    Al-Qaim, Fouad F; Abdullah, M P; Othman, Mohamed R; Latip, Jalifah; Zakaria, Zuriati

    2014-06-01

    An analytical method that facilitated the analysis of 11 pharmaceuticals residue (caffeine, prazosin, enalapril, carbamazepine, nifedipine, levonorgestrel, simvastatin, hydrochlorothiazide, gliclazide, diclofenac-Na, and mefenamic acid) with a single pre-treatment protocol was developed. The proposed method included an isolation and concentration procedure using solid phase extraction (Oasis HLB), a separation step using high-performance liquid chromatography, and a detection procedure that applies time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The method was validated for drinking water (DW), surface water (SW), sewage treatment plant (STP) influent and effluent, and hospital (HSP) influent and effluent. The limits of quantification were as low as 0.4, 1.6, 5, 3, 2.2 and 11 ng/L in DW, SW, HSP influent and effluent, STP effluent, and STP influent, respectively. On average, good recoveries higher than 75% were obtained for most of the target analytes in all matrices. Matrix effect was evaluated for all samples matrices. The proposed method successfully determined and quantified the target compounds in raw and treated wastewater of four STPs and three hospitals in Malaysia, as well as in two SW sites. The results showed that a number of the studied compounds pose moderate to high persistency in sewage treatment effluents as well as in the recipient rivers, namely; caffeine, simvastatin, and hydrochlorothiazide. Ten out of 11 compounds were detected and quantified in 13 sampling points. Caffeine was detected with the highest level, with concentrations reaching up to 9099 ng/L in STP influent. PMID:24768127

  16. 78 FR 71817 - Liquidity Coverage Ratio: Liquidity Risk Measurement, Standards, and Monitoring

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ... Covered Companies,'' 77 FR 594 (Jan. 5, 2010); ``Enhanced Prudential Standards and Early Remediation Requirements for Foreign Banking Organizations and Foreign Nonbank Financial Companies,'' 77 FR 76628 (Dec. 28... and liquidity risk management. \\10\\ 75 FR 13656 (March 22, 2010). Additionally, in 2012, pursuant...

  17. Westinghouse Hanford Company effluent report for 300 and 400 area operations for calendar year 1987

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, M.J.

    1989-02-01

    Releases from the facilities in the 300 and 400 Areas remain well within the applicable administrative control values (ACV). No significant trends were noted in either the airborne or liquid effluent data. Airborne and liquid radioactive effluents constitute a major portion of the effluent sampling and monitoring program. Radioactive releases from facilities in the 300 and 400 Areas, which are operated by Westinghouse Hanford, totaled 36.5 Ci. Noble gases released from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) represented 36.3 Ci of this total. Nonradioactive airborne emissions from the 384 Powerhouse remained far below regulatory limits. The only other potential source of significant nonradioactive airborne emissions are the defense reactor fuel fabrication facilities located in the 300 Area. However, these facilities were shut down during calendar year (CY) 1987 and, therefore, were not a significant emission source. The fuel fabrication facilities are currently being placed in cold standby. There are a number of nonradioactive liquid effluent streams located in the 300 and 400 Areas. Of these, only the 300 Area process sewer system has a significant potential for the release of chemical contaminants to the environment. The other liquid effluent streams (e.g., the sanitary waste systems or the water treatment plant filter backwash) are single purpose, adequately characterized, and not significantly threatened by chemical contaminants. 3 refs., 7 tabs.

  18. Benzoin Condensation: Monitoring a Chemical Reaction by High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharya, Apurba; Purohit, Vikram C.; Bellar, Nicholas R.

    2004-01-01

    High-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) is the preferred method of separating a variety of materials in complex mixtures such as pharmaceuticals, polymers, soils, food products and biological fluids and is also considered to be a powerful analytical tool in both academia and industry. The use of HPLC analysis as a means of monitoring and…

  19. A nonintrusive nuclear monitor for measuring liquid contents in sealed vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Mall, G. H.

    1984-01-01

    A nonintrusive nuclear technique for monitoring fluid contents in sealed vessels, regardless of the fluid distribution inside the vessels is described. The technique is applicable to all-g environments. It is based on the differences in Cesium-137 gamma ray attenuation coefficients in air and the test liquids.

  20. 77 FR 37067 - Certain Liquid Crystal Display Devices, Including Monitors, Televisions, Modules, and Components...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ... France and Thomson Licensing LLC of Princeton, New Jersey (collectively ``Thomson''). 75 FR 63856 (Oct... Thomson. 75 FR 74080 (Nov. 30, 2010). The complaint alleged violations of section 337 of the Tariff Act of... COMMISSION Certain Liquid Crystal Display Devices, Including Monitors, Televisions, Modules, and...

  1. Monitoring defects on monolayer graphene using nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Lim, Young Jin; Lee, Byung Hoon; Kwon, You Ri; Choi, Young Eun; Murali, G; Lee, Joong Hee; Nguyen, Van Luan; Lee, Young Hee; Lee, Seung Hee

    2015-06-01

    Defects in graphene governs electrical and optical properties. Although grain boundaries in graphene inevitably formed during large area synthesis process, which act as scattering centers for charge carriers to degrade mobility, have been studied extensively, point defects have been rarely investigated mainly due to the absence of facile observation tools. Here, we report polarized optical microscopy to observe defect distributions in monolayer graphene. This was realized by aligning liquid crystal s (LC) on graphene where the defect population was modulated by irradiating ultraviolet (UV) light directly on graphene surface under moisture condition. Aromatic rings in LC molecules are oriented with hexagonal rings in graphene to have preferred orientation, providing a way to identify relative orientations of graphene domains and point defects. Our studies show that point defects generated by prolonged UV irradiation time give rise to irregular LC alignment with disclination lines on the graphene surface and a large-size LC domain associated with graphene single domain eventually disappeared. This indicates that defects associated with oxygen-containing functional groups cause to reduce the strong stacking interaction between graphene and LC molecules. PMID:26072784

  2. 40 CFR 417.163 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Manufacture of Liquid Detergents Subcategory § 417.163 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree... subpart after application of the best available technology economically achievable: (a) For normal...

  3. 40 CFR 417.163 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Manufacture of Liquid Detergents Subcategory § 417.163 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree... subpart after application of the best available technology economically achievable: (a) For normal...

  4. 40 CFR 417.163 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Manufacture of Liquid Detergents Subcategory § 417.163 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree... subpart after application of the best available technology economically achievable: (a) For normal...

  5. Impact of membrane-induced particle immobilization on seeded growth monitored by in situ liquid scanning transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Weiner, Rebecca G.; Chen, Dennis P.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Skrabalak, Sara E.

    2016-04-01

    In situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy probes seeded growth in real time. The growth of Pd on Au nanocubes is monitored as a model system to compare growth within a liquid cell and traditional colloidal synthesis. Furthermore, different growth patterns are observed due to seed immobilization and the highly reducing environment within the liquid cell.

  6. Treating separated liquid dairy manure derived from mesophilic anaerobic digester effluent to reduce indicator pathogens and Salmonella concentrations for use as organic fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Collins, Elizabeth W; Ogejo, Jactone A; Krometis, Leigh Anne H

    2015-01-01

    Dairy manure has much potential for use as an organic fertilizer in the United States. However, the levels of indicator organisms and pathogens in dairy manure can be ten times higher than stipulated use guidelines by the National Organic Standards Board (NOSB) even after undergoing anaerobic digestion at mesophilic temperatures. The objective of this study was to identify pasteurization temperatures and treatment durations to reduce fecal coliforms, E. coli, and Salmonella concentrations in separated liquid dairy manure (SLDM) of a mesophilic anaerobic digester effluent to levels sufficient for use as an organic fertilizer. Samples of SLDM were pasteurized at 70, 75, and 80°C for durations of 0 to 120 min. Fecal coliforms, E. coli, and Salmonella concentrations were assessed via culture-based techniques. All of the tested pasteurization temperatures and duration combinations reduced microbial concentrations to levels below the NOSB guidelines. The fecal coliforms and E. coli reductions ranged 2from 0.76 to 1.34 logs, while Salmonella concentrations were reduced by more than 99% at all the pasteurization temperatures and active treatment durations. PMID:26061210

  7. Selection of liquid-level monitoring method for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory inactive liquid low-level waste tanks, remedial investigation/feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    Several of the inactive liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory contain residual wastes in liquid or solid (sludge) form or both. A plan of action has been developed to ensure that potential environmental impacts from the waste remaining in the inactive LLLW tank systems are minimized. This document describes the evaluation and selection of a methodology for monitoring the level of the liquid in inactive LLLW tanks. Criteria are established for comparison of existing level monitoring and leak testing methods; a preferred method is selected and a decision methodology for monitoring the level of the liquid in the tanks is presented for implementation. The methodology selected can be used to continuously monitor the tanks pending disposition of the wastes for treatment and disposal. Tanks that are empty, are scheduled to be emptied in the near future, or have liquid contents that are very low risk to the environment were not considered to be candidates for installing level monitoring. Tanks requiring new monitoring equipment were provided with conductivity probes; tanks with existing level monitoring instrumentation were not modified. The resulting data will be analyzed to determine inactive LLLW tank liquid level trends as a function of time.

  8. Laser ablation of absorbing liquids under transparent cover: acoustical and optical monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samokhin, A. A.; Il'ichev, N. N.; Pivovarov, P. A.; Sidorin, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Phase transition induced with infrared (λ = 2920 nm and λ = 2940 nm) nanosecond laser pulses in strongly absorbing liquids (water, ethanol) under transparent solid cover is investigated with the help of acoustical and optical monitoring. LiNbO3 transducer is used for registration of pressure pulses generated in irradiated liquids. Optical signals due to scattering and specular reflection of probing optical beams are explored with the schemes involving total internal reflection and interference effects. Combination of these two optical diagnostic methods permits for the first time to show that irradiation of covered liquids leads to vapor cavity formation which is divided from the cover with thin (submicron) liquid film despite the fact that radiation intensity maximum is located just at the liquid-plate boundary. The cavity formation is due to explosive boiling which occurs when the superheated liquid reaches its superheating limit in near critical region. After the first acoustical signal, the second signal is observed with several hundreds microseconds time delay which is caused by the vapor cavity collapse. Some results of optical and acoustical diagnostics in the case of free liquid surface are also presented.

  9. Method for radioactivity monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Umbarger, C. John; Cowder, Leo R.

    1976-10-26

    The disclosure relates to a method for analyzing uranium and/or thorium contents of liquid effluents preferably utilizing a sample containing counting chamber. Basically, 185.7-keV gamma rays following .sup.235 U alpha decay to .sup.231 Th which indicate .sup.235 U content and a 63-keV gamma ray doublet found in the nucleus of .sup.234 Pa, a granddaughter of .sup.238 U, are monitored and the ratio thereof taken to derive uranium content and isotopic enrichment .sup.235 U/.sup.235 U + .sup.238 U) in the liquid effluent. Thorium content is determined by monitoring the intensity of 238-keV gamma rays from the nucleus of .sup.212 Bi in the decay chain of .sup.232 Th.

  10. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1999

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the three KAPL Sites [Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York; Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York; S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut] during calendar year 1999 resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations.

  11. Groundwater screening evaluation/monitoring plan: 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (Project W-049H). Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, D.B.; Davis, J.D.; Collard, L.B.; Freeman, P.B.; Chou, C.J.

    1995-05-01

    This report consists of the groundwater screening evaluation required by Section S.8 of the State Waste Discharge Permit for the 200 Area TEDF. Chapter 1.0 describes the purpose of the groundwater monitoring plan. The information in Chapter 2.0 establishes a water quality baseline for the facility and is the groundwater screening evaluation. The following information is included in Chapter 2.0: Facility description;Well locations, construction, and development data; Geologic and hydrologic description of the site and affected area; Ambient groundwater quality and current use; Water balance information; Hydrologic parameters; Potentiometric map, hydraulic gradients, and flow velocities; Results of infiltration and hydraulic tests; Groundwater and soils chemistry sampling and analysis data; Statistical evaluation of groundwater background data; and Projected effects of facility operation on groundwater flow and water quality. Chapter 3.0 defines, based on the information in Chapter 2.0, how effects of the TEDF on the environment will be evaluated and how compliance with groundwater quality standards will be documented in accordance with the terms and conditions of the permit. Chapter 3.0 contains the following information: Media to be monitored; Wells proposed as the point of compliance in the uppermost aquifer; Basis for monitoring well network and evidence of monitoring adequacy; Contingency planning approach for vadose zone monitoring wells; Which field parameters will be measured and how measurements will be made; Specification of constituents to be sampled and analyzed; and Specification of the sampling and analysis procedures that will be used. Chapter 4.0 provides information on how the monitoring results will be reported and the proposed frequency of monitoring and reporting. Chapter 5.0 lists all the references cited in this monitoring plan. These references should be consulted for additional or more detailed information.

  12. Impact of different ratios of feedstock to liquid anaerobic digestion effluent on the performance and microbiome of solid-state anaerobic digesters digesting corn stover.

    PubMed

    Li, Yueh-Fen; Shi, Jian; Nelson, Michael C; Chen, Po-Hsu; Graf, Joerg; Li, Yebo; Yu, Zhongtang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to understand how the non-microbial factors of L-AD effluent affected the microbiome composition and successions in the SS-AD digesters using both Illumina sequencing and qPCR quantification of major genera of methanogens. The SS-AD digesters started with a feedstock/total effluent (F/Et) ratio 2.2 (half of the effluent was autoclaved) performed stably, while the SS-AD digesters started with a 4.4 F/Et ratio (no autoclaved effluent) suffered from digester acidification, accumulation of volatile fatty acids, and ceased biogas production two weeks after startup. Some bacteria and methanogens were affected by non-microbial factors of the L-AD fluent. Alkalinity, the main difference between the two F/Et ratios, may be the crucial factor when SS-AD digesters were started using L-AD effluent. PMID:26575616

  13. Optically monitored dip coating as a contactless viscometry method for liquid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michels, Alexandre F.; Menegotto, Thiago; Horowitz, Flavio

    2005-02-01

    Real-time interferometric monitoring of the dip coating process is applied to the study of properties of flowing liquids. Nonvolatile Newtonian oils are considered, allowing validity of a simple model after the steady state is reached where film physical thickness depends on time as t^- 1/2 . Measurement of two distinct mineral oil standards, under several withdrawing speeds, resulted in kinematic viscosities of 1.17 ± 0.03 and 9.9 ± 0.2 S (1S = 1 cm^2/s). Agreement of these results with nominal values from the manufacturer suggests that interferometric monitoring of dip coating may become a valuable method for accurate, contactless viscometry of liquid films. Advantages and present limitations are discussed.

  14. Quantitative NMR monitoring of liquid ingress into repellent heterogeneous layered fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencsik, Martin; Adriaensen, Hans; Brewer, Stuart A.; McHale, Glen

    2008-07-01

    Fabrics which are water repellent and repellent to other liquids are often constructed using multiple layers of material. Such a construction is preferable to a single layer of a liquid-repellent textile because, under the action of an applied pressure, ingress of a liquid through the first layer can be halted by the second or subsequent layers. In the quantitative investigation of this problem, current techniques provide limited information on the progress and distribution of the liquid as it ingresses into a fabric. Moreover, many techniques require that the material is delaminated prior to analysis, and cannot be conducted in real time to measure the progress of a liquid through the textile substrate. In this work we demonstrate that unilateral NMR, which allows signal to be collected from a volume of interest in a material residing above the instrument, can be a powerful tool to quantitatively monitor the ingress of a liquid through a layered sample exhibiting pronounced heterogeneities in repellency. A known volume of oil was placed on the top of a model textile sample composed of three 80 μm thick layers. Spatially resolved one dimensional vertical NMR profiles of the system were acquired as a function of the pressure vertically applied to the top of the sample. These profiles show that the absolute liquid volume present in each layer of textile can routinely be measured within 4 min with a spatial resolution of 15 μm. If each individual layer exhibits different repellency to the test liquid, the complexity of the dynamics of the ingress can be investigated in great detail. An elegant application of the unilateral instrument was obtained in which the sensitive volume matched the region of interest of the individual layers of the textile under investigation.

  15. Quantitative NMR monitoring of liquid ingress into repellent heterogeneous layered fabrics.

    PubMed

    Bencsik, Martin; Adriaensen, Hans; Brewer, Stuart A; McHale, Glen

    2008-07-01

    Fabrics which are water repellent and repellent to other liquids are often constructed using multiple layers of material. Such a construction is preferable to a single layer of a liquid-repellent textile because, under the action of an applied pressure, ingress of a liquid through the first layer can be halted by the second or subsequent layers. In the quantitative investigation of this problem, current techniques provide limited information on the progress and distribution of the liquid as it ingresses into a fabric. Moreover, many techniques require that the material is delaminated prior to analysis, and cannot be conducted in real time to measure the progress of a liquid through the textile substrate. In this work we demonstrate that unilateral NMR, which allows signal to be collected from a volume of interest in a material residing above the instrument, can be a powerful tool to quantitatively monitor the ingress of a liquid through a layered sample exhibiting pronounced heterogeneities in repellency. A known volume of oil was placed on the top of a model textile sample composed of three 80 microm thick layers. Spatially resolved one dimensional vertical NMR profiles of the system were acquired as a function of the pressure vertically applied to the top of the sample. These profiles show that the absolute liquid volume present in each layer of textile can routinely be measured within 4 min with a spatial resolution of 15 microm. If each individual layer exhibits different repellency to the test liquid, the complexity of the dynamics of the ingress can be investigated in great detail. An elegant application of the unilateral instrument was obtained in which the sensitive volume matched the region of interest of the individual layers of the textile under investigation. PMID:18450487

  16. Fiber optic liquid level monitoring system using microstructured polymer fiber Bragg grating array sensors: performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, C. A. F.; Pospori, A.; Sáez-Rodríguez, D.; Nielsen, K.; Bang, O.; Webb, D. J.

    2015-09-01

    A highly sensitive liquid level monitoring system based on microstructured polymer optical fiber Bragg grating (mPOFBG) array sensors is reported for the first time. The configuration is based on five mPOFBGs inscribed in the same fiber in the 850 nm spectral region, showing the potential to interrogate liquid level by measuring the strain induced in each mPOFBG embedded in a silicone rubber (SR) diaphragm, which deforms due to hydrostatic pressure variations. The sensor exhibits a highly linear response over the sensing range, a good repeatability, and a high resolution. The sensitivity of the sensor is found to be 98 pm/cm of water, enhanced by more than a factor of 9 when compared to an equivalent sensor based on a silica fiber around 1550 nm. The temperature sensitivity is studied and a multi-sensor arrangement proposed, which has the potential to provide level readings independent of temperature and the liquid density.

  17. Liquid-purity monitor for the LUX-ZEPLIN dark matter search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manalaysay, Aaron; Lux-Zeplin Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment will be the first liquid-xenon (LXe) dark matter search to feature a multi-tonne fiducial target. Drawing on the lessons learned in the LUX and ZEPLIN experiments, this next step will probe dark-matter candidates with unprecedented sensitivity. As these LXe detectors have grown larger, so too has the distance over which ionization electrons (from particle interactions) must be drifted through the liquid. Because of this, even minute levels of electronegative impurities can significantly attenuate the ionization signal, and must therefore be closely monitored. I will present the concept of a liquid-purity monitor which uses new and novel techniques, including state-of-the-art UV LEDs and low-work-function materials, and will measure levels of impurities in LZ's liquid circulation line in real time. This device will provide vital supplemental data to the roughly weekly in-situ purity measurements carried out within the detector's active volume, will greatly improve the resolution of the ionization channel in this detector, and will yield instant feedback in response to changing detector conditions.

  18. Analysis of benzalkonium chloride in the effluent from European hospitals by solid-phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography with post-column ion-pairing and fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Kümmerer, K; Eitel, A; Braun, U; Hubner, P; Daschner, F; Mascart, G; Milandri, M; Reinthaler, F; Verhoef, J

    1997-07-11

    A highly reproducible and specific method for the analysis of the quaternary ammonium compound, benzalkonium chloride, in effluents from European hospitals is presented. Benzalkonium chloride was extracted with end-capped RP-18 solid-phase cartridges and was selectively eluted. The resulting solution was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). After elution from the analytical column of the HPLC system, 9,10-dimethoxyanthracene-2-sulfonate was added continuously as a fluorescence marker, forming a hydrophobic ion-pair with benzalkonium chloride. The ion-pair was analyzed by fluorescence detection. The method was applied to highly complex effluent samples from different sized European hospitals. The measured concentrations were between 0.05 and 6.03 mg/l. The amounts emitted per bed and year were 4.5-362 g and did not correlate with the size of the hospital. The total amounts were 2.6-909 kg/year. PMID:9253191

  19. Colorimetric humidity sensor based on liquid composite materials for the monitoring of food and pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Bridgeman, Devon; Corral, Javier; Quach, Ashley; Xian, Xiaojun; Forzani, Erica

    2014-09-01

    Using supported ionic-liquid membrane (SILM)-inspired methodologies, we have synthesized, characterized, and developed a humidity sensor by coating a liquid composite material onto a hygroscopic, porous substrate. Similar to pH paper, the sensor responds to the environment's relative humidity and changes color accordingly. The humidity indicator is prepared by casting a few microliters of low-toxicity reagents on a nontoxic substrate. The sensing material is a newly synthesized liquid composite that comprises a hygroscopic medium for environmental humidity capture and a color indicator that translates the humidity level into a distinct color change. Sodium borohydride was used to form a liquid composite medium, and DenimBlu30 dye was used as a redox indicator. The liquid composite medium provides a hygroscopic response to the relative humidity, and DenimBlu30 translates the chemical changes into a visual change from yellow to blue. The borate-redox dye-based humidity sensor was prepared, and then Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and image analysis methods were used to characterize the chemical composition, optimize synthesis, and gain insight into the sensor reactivity. Test results indicated that this new sensing material can detect relative humidity in the range of 5-100% in an irreversible manner with good reproducibility and high accuracy. The sensor is a low-cost, highly sensitive, easy-to-use humidity indicator. More importantly, it can be easily packaged with products to monitor humidity levels in pharmaceutical and food packaging. PMID:25141132

  20. Polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS): application for monitoring organic micropollutants in wastewater effluent and surface water.

    PubMed

    Miège, Cécile; Budzinski, Hélène; Jacquet, Romain; Soulier, Coralie; Pelte, Thomas; Coquery, Marina

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we discuss the advantages and drawbacks of POCIS (Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler) for the evaluation of river water quality downstream of wastewater treatment plants. POCIS proved well adapted to sampling alkylphenols and several pharmaceuticals. Concentration factors and the decrease in limits of quantification, compared to grab water sample analyses, were significant except for hormones, β-blockers and bronchodilators. Promising preliminary results obtained in situ on deuterated atenolol used as a performance reference compound need to be confirmed in-lab. This work confirms that POCIS is a valuable tool for monitoring hydrophilic organic molecules in river and wastewaters. PMID:22193508

  1. Development of a new neutron monitor using a boron-loaded organic liquid scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasolonjatovo, A. H. D.; Shiomi, T.; Kim, E.; Nakamura, T.; Nunomiya, T.; Endo, A.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yoshizawa, M.

    2002-10-01

    A new type of neutron dose monitor was developed by using a 12.7 cm diameter×12.7 cm long boron-loaded organic liquid scintillation detector BC523A. This detector aims to have a response in the wide energy range of thermal energy to 100 MeV by using the H and C reactions to the fast neutrons of organic liquid and the 10B(n, α) reaction to thermalized neutrons in the liquid. The response functions of this detector were determined by the Monte Carlo simulation in the energy region from thermal energy to 100 MeV. Using these response functions, the spectrum-weighted dose function, G-function, to get the neutron dose from the light output spectrum of the detector was also determined by the unfolding technique. The calculated G-function was applied to determine the neutron dose in real neutron fields having energies ranging from thermal energy to several tens of MeV, where the light output spectra were measured with the BC523A detector. The thus-obtained ambient doses and effective doses show rather good agreement with the fluence-to-dose conversion factor given by ICRP 74. This detector will be useful as a wide-energy range neutron monitor.

  2. An attempt to monitor liquid water content in seasonal snow using capacitance probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanzi, Francesco; Caruso, Marco; Jommi, Cristina; De Michele, Carlo; Ghezzi, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Liquid water dynamics in snow are a key factor in wet snow avalanche triggering, in ruling snowmelt runoff timing and amounts, and in remote sensing interpretation. It follows that a continuous-time monitoring of this variable would be very desirable. Nevertheless, such an operation is nowadays hampered by the difficulty in obtaining direct, precise and continuous-time measurements of this quantity without perturbing the snowpack itself. As a result, only a few localized examples exist of continuous-time measurements of this variable. In this framework, we tried to get undisturbed measurements of liquid water content using capacitance probes. These instruments were originally designed to obtain liquid water content data in soils. After being installed on a support and driven in the snow, they include part of the medium under investigation in a LC circuit. The resonant frequency of the circuit depends on liquid water content, hence its measurement. To test these sensors, we designed two different field surveys (in April 2013 and April 2014) at a medium elevation site (around 1980 m a.s.l.). In both the cases, a profile of sensors was inserted in the snowpack, and undisturbed measurements of liquid water content were obtained using time-domain-reflectometry based devices. To assist in the interpretation of the readings from these sensors, some laboratory tests were run, and a FEM model of a sensor was implemented. Results show that sensors are sensitive to increasing liquid water content in snow. Nonetheless, long-term tests in snow cause the systematic development of an air gap between the instrument and the surrounding snow, that hampers the interpretation. Perspectives on future investigation are discussed to bring the proposed procedure towards long-term applications in snowpacks.

  3. Elimination of liquid discharge to the environment from the TA-50 Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, D.; Williams, N.; Hall, D.; Hargis, K.; Saladen, M.; Sanders, M.; Voit, S.; Worland, P.; Yarbro, S.

    1998-06-01

    Alternatives were evaluated for management of treated radioactive liquid waste from the radioactive liquid waste treatment facility (RLWTF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The alternatives included continued discharge into Mortandad Canyon, diversion to the sanitary wastewater treatment facility and discharge of its effluent to Sandia Canyon or Canada del Buey, and zero liquid discharge. Implementation of a zero liquid discharge system is recommended in addition to two phases of upgrades currently under way. Three additional phases of upgrades to the present radioactive liquid waste system are proposed to accomplish zero liquid discharge. The first phase involves minimization of liquid waste generation, along with improved characterization and monitoring of the remaining liquid waste. The second phase removes dissolved salts from the reverse osmosis concentrate stream to yield a higher effluent quality. In the final phase, the high-quality effluent is reused for industrial purposes within the Laboratory or evaporated. Completion of these three phases will result in zero discharge of treated radioactive liquid wastewater from the RLWTF.

  4. Acoustic Monitor for Liquid-Solid Slurries Measurements at Low Weight Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Tavlarides, Lawrence L.

    2005-06-01

    Our effort in this project is to develop an acoustic monitor for accurate, real-time characterization of the size and weight fractions of solids in slurries for process monitoring and to determine the optimal timing for slurry transfers. This capability will be valuable in the Savannah River Site accelerated clean-up program. Our scientific work during the first research period developed a theory, supported by experiments, to describe sound attenuation of solids in suspensions in the presence of bubbles, which permits us to determine the solid-liquid weight percent. Engineering developments during the second research period led to the design, construction, and demonstration, in our laboratories, of the Syracuse Acoustic Monitor (SAM) system that measures weight percent solids accurately in slurries of 0.5 to 8.0 weight percent on-line and in real-time. Also, we had shown the potential for these measurements in solid-gas-liquid slurries by removing the interference due to the presence of gas bubbles.

  5. Monitoring the solid-liquid interface in tanks using profiling sonar and 3D visualization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, Nitin; Zhang, Jinsong; Roelant, David; Srivastava, Rajiv

    2005-03-01

    Visualization of the interface between settled solids and the optically opaque liquid above is necessary to facilitate efficient retrieval of the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from underground storage tanks. A profiling sonar was used to generate 2-D slices across the settled solids at the bottom of the tank. By incrementally rotating the sonar about its centerline, slices of the solid-liquid interface can be imaged and a 3-D image of the settled solids interface generated. To demonstrate the efficacy of the sonar in real-time solid-liquid interface monitoring systems inside HLW tanks, two sets of experiments were performed. First, various solid objects and kaolin clay (10 μm dia) were successfully imaged while agitating with 30% solids (by weight) entrained in the liquid. Second, a solid with a density similar to that of the immersed fluid density was successfully imaged. Two dimensional (2-D) sonar images and the accuracy and limitations of the in-tank imaging will be presented for these two experiments. In addition, a brief review of how to utilize a 2-D sonar image to generate a 3-D surface of the settled layer within a tank will be discussed.

  6. Design and performance characterization of a fibre optical sensor for liquid level monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, J. Z.; Zhao, Y. L.; Jiang, Z. D.

    2005-01-01

    In order to continuously monitor liquid level in petroleum and chemical industries, a fibre optical sensor based on a microbend effect was designed and manufactured. The sensor is composed of a sensing diaphragm with a hard center, a microbend modulator (a pair of tooth plates), sensing and reference fibres, adjusting bolts, a stainless steel housing, emitting/detecting devices and signal processing circuits. To reduce the effect of temperature, the diaphragm is directly machined instead of welded onto the housing. To eliminate the fluctuation of light source, a reference fibre configured in parallel with the sensing fibre is introduced. Also, the cost was lowered by using standard communication optical fibres. Test results show that this sensor is suited for applications of liquid level measurement especially in fields where electrical isolation and/or electro magnetic interference (EMI) resistance are strictly required.

  7. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. 1981 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Auyong, M.; Griggs, K.S.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1982-03-11

    This report gives methods and results of the 1981 radiation monitoring program at LLL for both radioactive and non-radioactive contamination from gaseous and liquid effluents. Off-site monitoring includes various radionuclides but especially tritium in the ecosystems. (PSB)

  8. Evaluation of ELISA kits followed by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry for the determination of organic pollutants in industrial effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, M.; Oubina, A.; Barcelo, D.

    1998-07-15

    Contaminated industrial effluents often contain a variety of organic pollutants which are difficult to analyze by standard GC-MS methods since they often miss the more polar or nonvolatile of these organic compounds. The identification of highly polar analytes by chemical or rapid biological techniques is needed for characterization of the effluents. The present work evaluates the use of enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) kits for determining pentachlorophenol, carcinogenic PAHs and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and o-, m-, and p-xylene) among the organic analytes present in various industrial effluents from Europe. The analytical protocol applied for the evaluation of the kits was based on the use of ELISA followed by solid-phase extraction (SPE) for the preconcentration of a variety of organic pollutants such as pentachlorophenol, phthalates, and nonylphenol and final determination with LC-MS characterization using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) interface in the positive and negative ionization modes. The developed protocol permitted the unequivocal identification of target analytes such as pentachlorophenol, nonylphenol, dibutylphthalate, dimethylphthalate, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate 2-methylbenzenesulfonamide, and 2,2-dimethylbenzene-sulfonamide present in industrial effluents. The advantages and limitations of the three RaPID-magnetic particle-based ELISA kits applied to the characterization of industrial effluents are also reported.

  9. Liquid balance monitoring inside conventional, Retrofit, and bio-reactor landfill cells

    SciTech Connect

    Abichou, Tarek; Barlaz, Morton A.; Green, Roger; Hater, Gary

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • The Retrofit, Control, and As-Built cells received 48, 14, and 213 L Mg{sup −1} (liters of liquids per metric ton of waste). • The leachate collection system yielded 60, 57 and 198 L Mg{sup −1} from the Retrofit, Control, and As-Built cells. • The head on liner in all cells was below regulatory limits. • Measured moisture content of the waste samples was consistent with that calculated from accumulated liquid by balance. • The in-place saturated hydraulic conductivity of the MSW was calculated to be in the range of 10{sup −8} to 10{sup −7} m s{sup −1}. - Abstract: The Outer Loop landfill bioreactor (OLLB) in Louisville, KY, USA has been the site of a study to evaluate long-term bioreactor performance at a full-scale operational landfill. Three types of landfill units were studied including a conventional landfill (Control cell), a new landfill area that had an air addition and recirculation piping network installed as waste was being placed (As-Built cell), and a conventional landfill that was modified to allow for liquids recirculation (Retrofit cell). During the monitoring period, the Retrofit, Control, and As-Built cells received 48, 14, and 213 L Mg{sup −1} (liters of liquids per metric ton of waste), respectively. The leachate collection system yielded 60, 57 and 198 L Mg{sup −1} from the Retrofit, Control, and As-Built cells, respectively. The head on liner in all cells was below regulatory limits. In the Control and As-Built cells, leachate head on liner decreased once waste placement stopped. The measured moisture content of the waste samples was consistent with that calculated from the estimate of accumulated liquid by the liquid balance. Additionally, measurements on excavated solid waste samples revealed large spatial variability in waste moisture content. The degree of saturation in the Control cells decreased from 85% to 75%. The degree of saturation increased from 82% to 83% due to liquids addition in the Retrofit

  10. Integrated system of test data management and monitoring for the ground test of liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue; Zhang, Zhenpeng; Zhang, Jun

    2008-10-01

    An integrated system of test data management and monitoring (ISTDMM) for liquid rocket engine (LRE) ground test is designed to meet the demand of the LRE test station and development unit according to the LRE test information and test process. It is an opening, distributing and highly integrating application platform, mainly includes the test data management systems, the real-time fault detection systems and data display and playback system. It can manage and analyze the test data and simulation data of the LRE, can monitor the LRE test condition in real-time and the test process in long-distance by network, and can playback the engine test process and simulate the engine work process, and can test and evaluate the fault detection algorithms and systems of LRE. It is well advanced, reliable, and practical.

  11. Design and Testing of a Solid-Liquid Interface Monitor for High-Level Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, D.; Awwad, A.; Roelant, D.; Srivastava, R.

    2008-07-01

    A high-level waste (HLW) monitor has been designed, fabricated and tested at full-scale for deployment inside a Hanford tank. The Solid-Liquid Interface Monitor (SLIM) integrates a commercial sonar system with a mechanical deployment system for deploying into an underground waste tank. The system has undergone several design modifications based upon changing requirements at Hanford. We will present the various designs of the monitor from first to last and will present performance data from the various prototype systems. We will also present modeling of stresses in the enclosure under 85 mph wind loading. The system must be able to function at winds up to 15 mph and must withstand a maximum loading of 85 mph. There will be several examples presented of engineering tradeoffs made as FIU analyzed new requirements and modified the design to accommodate. We will present our current plans for installing into the Cold Test Facility at Hanford and into a double-shelled tank at Hanford. Finally, we will present our vision for how this technology can be used at Hanford and Savannah River Site to improve the filling and emptying of high-level waste tanks. In conclusion: 1. The manually operated first-generation SLIM is a viable option on tanks where personnel are allowed to work on top of the tank. 2. The remote controlled second-generation SLIM can be utilized on tanks where personnel access is limited. 3. The totally enclosed fourth-generation SLIM, when the design is finalized, can be used when the possibility exists for wind dispersion of any HLW that maybe on the system. 4. The profiling sonar can be used effectively for real-time monitoring of the solid-liquid interface over a large area. (authors)

  12. Isotope-Ratio-Monitoring Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (IRM-LCMS): First Results from a Moving Wire Interface System.

    PubMed

    Brand, W A; Dobberstein, P

    1996-08-01

    Abstract A Liquid Chromatography-Combustion (LC-C) Interface, based on a moving wire technique, has been built and tested. The LC effluent is deposited onto a transport wire, which carries the sample through solvent evaporation and combustion ovens. CO(2) from the combustion step is analysed in an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Performance of the interface was tested by loop injections of sucrose and glucose into a liquid flow of methanol/water (80/20). Accuracy and precision of δ(13)C(PDB) < 1‰ was achieved for sample concentrations > 500 ng/ul (5μl loop), sufficient for studies at natural isotope ratios. In case of (13)C tracer applications the detection limit was determined to be about 20 pg carbon tracer (on wire). PMID:22088119

  13. Quality Assurance Program Plan for FFTF effluent controls. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Seamans, J.A.

    1995-06-08

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan is specific to environmental related activities within the FFTF Property Protected Area. The activities include effluent monitoring and Low Level Waste Certification.

  14. Analysis of VX nerve agent hydrolysis products in wastewater effluents by ion chromatography with amperometric and conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Piao, Haishan; Marx, Randall B; Schneider, Steven; Irvine, David A; Staton, John

    2005-09-30

    An analytical method, based on the use of ion chromatography, was developed to monitor the levels of three regulated VX hydrolysis products in the effluent from a biological wastewater treatment process--ethylmethylphosphonic acid, methylphosphonic acid and 2-(diisopropyl)aminoethanethiol. Previous methods have not been applied to wastewater matrices or 2-(diisopropyl)aminoethanethiol. Despite the specificity and sensitivity constraints of this method, it was possible to measure the compounds in bioreactor effluents down to a level substantially below the US Army discharge limit of 0.1% (w/v). Analytical data was confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) at an independent laboratory. PMID:16130773

  15. Application of novel consortium TSR for treatment of industrial dye manufacturing effluent with concurrent removal of ADMI, COD, heavy metals and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Tallika L; Patel, Bhargav C; Kadam, Avinash A; Tipre, Devayani R; Dave, Shailesh R

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed towards the effective bio-treatment of actual industrial effluent containing as high as 42,000 mg/L COD (chemical oxygen demand), >28,000 ADMI (American Dye Manufacturers Institute) color value and four heavy metals using indigenous developed bacterial consortium TSR. Mineral salt medium supplemented with as low as 0.02% (w/v) yeast extract and glucose was found to remove 70% ADMI, 69% COD and >99% sorption of heavy metals in 24 h from the effluent by consortium TSR. The biodegradation of effluent was monitored by UV-vis light, HPLC (high performance liquid chromatography), HPTLC (high performance thin layer chromotography) and FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) and showed significant differences in spectra of untreated and treated effluent, confirming degradation of the effluent. Induction of intracellular azoreductase (107%) and NADH-DCIP reductase (128%) in addition to extracellular laccase (489%) indicates the vital role of the consortium TSR in the degradation process. Toxicity study of the effluent using Allium cepa by single cell gel electrophoresis showed detoxification of the effluent. Ninety per cent germination of plant seeds, Triticum aestivum and Phaseolus mungo, was achieved after treatment by consortium TSR in contrast to only 20% and 30% germination of the respective plants in case of untreated effluent. PMID:25945844

  16. Assessment of fiber optic sensors for aging monitoring of industrial liquid coolants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riziotis, Christos; El Sachat, Alexandros; Markos, Christos; Velanas, Pantelis; Meristoudi, Anastasia; Papadopoulos, Aggelos

    2015-03-01

    Lately the demand for in situ and real time monitoring of industrial assets and processes has been dramatically increased. Although numerous sensing techniques have been proposed, only a small fraction can operate efficiently under harsh industrial environments. In this work the operational properties of a proposed photonic based chemical sensing scheme, capable to monitor the ageing process and the quality characteristics of coolants and lubricants in industrial heavy machinery for metal finishing processes is presented. The full spectroscopic characterization of different coolant liquids revealed that the ageing process is connected closely to the acidity/ pH value of coolants, despite the fact that the ageing process is quite complicated, affected by a number of environmental parameters such as the temperature, humidity and development of hazardous biological content as for example fungi. Efficient and low cost optical fiber sensors based on pH sensitive thin overlayers, are proposed and employed for the ageing monitoring. Active sol-gel based materials produced with various pH indicators like cresol red, bromophenol blue and chorophenol red in tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), were used for the production of those thin film sensitive layers deposited on polymer's and silica's large core and highly multimoded optical fibers. The optical characteristics, sensing performance and environmental robustness of those optical sensors are presented, extracting useful conclusions towards their use in industrial applications.

  17. In-situ strain monitoring in liquid containers of LNG transporting carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Min-Cheol; Seo, Jun-Kyu; Kim, Kyung-Jo; Lee, Sang-Min; Kim, Myung-Hyun

    2008-08-01

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) transport carriers are exposed to a risk by the repeated bump in the LNG container during the vessel traveling over the wave in ocean. The liquid inside the container, especially when it was not fully contained, make a strong bump onto the insulation panel of the tank wall. The insulation panel consists of several layers of thick polyurethane foam (PUF) to maintain the LNG below the cryogenic temperature, -162°C. Due to the repeated shock on the PUF, a crack could be developed on the tank wall causing a tremendous disaster for LNG carriers. To prevent the accidental crack on the tank, a continuous monitoring of the strain imposed on the PUF is recommended. In this work, a fiber-optic Bragg grating was imbedded inside the PUF for monitoring the strain parallel to the impact direction. The optical fiber sensor with a small diameter of 125 μm was suitable to be inserted in the PUF through a small hole drilled after the PUF was cured. In-situ monitoring of the strain producing the change of Bragg reflection wavelength, a high speed wavelength interrogation method was employed by using an arrayed waveguide grating. By dropping a heavy mass on the PUF, we measured the strain imposed on the insulation panel.

  18. On-line quantitative monitoring of liquid-liquid extraction of Lonicera japonica and Artemisia annua using near-infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sha; Jin, Ye; Liu, Qian; Liu, Qi-an; Wu, Jianxiong; Bi, Yu-an; Wang, Zhengzhong; Xiao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Liquid-liquid extraction of Lonicera japonica and Artemisia annua (JQ) plays a significant role in manufacturing Reduning injection. Many process parameters may influence liquid-liquid extraction and cause fluctuations in product quality. Objective: To develop a near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy method for on-line monitoring of liquid-liquid extraction of JQ. Materials and Methods: Eleven batches of JQ extraction solution were obtained, ten for building quantitative models and one for assessing the predictive accuracy of established models. Neochlorogenic acid (NCA), chlorogenic acid (CA), cryptochlorogenic acid (CCA), isochlorogenic acid B (ICAB), isochlorogenic acid A (ICAA), isochlorogenic acid C (ICAC) and soluble solid content (SSC) were selected as quality control indicators, and measured by reference methods. NIR spectra were collected in transmittance mode. After selecting the spectral sub-ranges, optimizing the spectral pretreatment and neglecting outliers, partial least squares regression models were built to predict the content of indicators. The model performance was evaluated by the coefficients of determination (R2), the root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) and the relative standard error of prediction (RSEP). Results: For NCA, CA, CCA, ICAB, ICAA, ICAC and SSC, R2 was 0.9674, 0.9704, 0.9641, 0.9514, 0.9436, 0.9640, 0.9809, RMSEP was 0.0280, 0.2913, 0.0710, 0.0590, 0.0815, 0.1506, 1.167, and RSEP was 2.32%, 4.14%, 3.86%, 5.65%, 7.29%, 6.95% and 4.18%, respectively. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that NIR spectroscopy could provide good predictive ability in monitoring of the content of quality control indicators in liquid-liquid extraction of JQ. PMID:26246744

  19. Optical absorption properties of electron bubbles and experiments on monitoring individual electron bubbles in liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei

    When a free electron is injected into liquid helium, it forms a microscopic bubble essentially free of helium atoms, which is referred to as an electron bubble. It represents a fine example of a quantum-mechanical particle confined in a potential well. In this dissertation, we describe our studies on bubble properties, especially the optical absorption properties of ground state electron bubbles and experiments on imaging individual electron bubbles in liquid helium. We studied the effect of zero-point and thermal fluctuations on the shape of ground state electron bubbles in liquid helium. The results are used to determine the line shape for the 1S to 1P optical transition. The calculated line shape is in very good agreement with the experimental measurements of Grimes and Adams. For 1S to 2P transition, the obtained transition line width agrees well with the measured data of Zipfel over a range of pressure up to 15 bars. Fluctuations in the bubble shape also make other "unallowed" transitions possible. The transition cross-sections from the 1S state to the 1D and 2D states are calculated with magnitude approximately two orders smaller than that of the 1S to 1P and 2P transitions. In our electron bubble imaging experiments, a planar ultrasonic transducer was used to generate strong sound wave pulse in liquid helium. The sound pulse passed through the liquid so as to produce a transient negative pressure over a large volume (˜ 1 cm3). An electron bubble that was passed by the sound pulse exploded for a fraction of a microsecond and grew to have a radius of around 10 microns. While the bubble had this large size it was illuminated with a flash lamp and its position was recorded. In this way, we can determine its position. Through the application of a series of sound pulses, we can then take images along the track of individual electrons. The motion of individual electron bubbles has been successfully monitored. Interesting bubble tracks that may relate to electrons

  20. Polar organic chemical integrative sampling and liquid chromatography- electrospray/ion-trap mass spectrometry for assessing selected prescription and illicit drugs in treated sewage effluents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones-Lepp, T. L.; Alvarez, D.A.; Petty, J.D.; Huckins, J.N.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the research presented in this paper was twofold: (1) to demonstrate the coupling of two state-of-the-art techniques: a time-weighted polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) and microliquid chromatography-electrospray/ion-trap mass spectrometry and (2) to assess the ability of these methodologies to detect six drugs (azithromycin, fluoxetine, omeprazole, levothyroxine, methamphetamine, methylenedioxymethamphetamine [MDMA]) in a real-world environment, e.g., waste water effluent. In the effluent from three wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), azithromycin was detected at concentrations ranging from 15 to 66 ng/L, which is equivalent to a total annual release of 1 to 4 kg into receiving waters. Detected and confirmed in the effluent from two WWTPs were two illicit drugs, methamphetamine and MDMA, at 2 and 0.5 ng/L, respectively. Although the ecotoxicologic significance of drugs in environmental matrices, particularly water, has not been closely examined, it can only be surmised that these substances have the potential to adversely affect biota that are continuously exposed to them even at very low levels. The potential for chronic effects on human health is also unknown but of increasing concern because of the multi-use character of water, particularly in densely populated, arid areas.

  1. The monitoring and data quality assessment of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, Olivier; ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Group

    2015-02-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton (pp) collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon (LAr) sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry in the pseudo-rapidity region |η| < 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.5 < |η| < 4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform response without azimuthal gaps. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; while a classic parallel-plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative design based on cylindrical electrodes with thin liquid argon gaps is employed at low angles, where the particle flux is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats maintained at about 88.5 K. The 182,468 cells are read out via front-end boards housed in on-detector crates that also contain monitoring, calibration, trigger and timing boards. In the first three years of LHC operation, approximately 27 fb-1 of pp collision data were collected at centre-of-mass energies of 7-8 TeV. Throughout this period, the calorimeter consistently operated with performances very close to specifications, with high data-taking efficiency. This is in large part due to a sophisticated data monitoring procedure designed to quickly identify issues that would degrade the detector performance, to ensure that only the best quality data are used for physics analysis. After a description of the detector design, main characteristics and operation principles, this paper details the data quality assessment procedures developed during the 2011 and 2012 LHC data-taking periods, when more than 98% of the luminosity recorded by ATLAS had high quality LAr calorimeter data suitable for physics analysis.

  2. Dynamic covalent chemistry of bisimines at the solid/liquid interface monitored by scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesielski, Artur; El Garah, Mohamed; Haar, Sébastien; Kovaříček, Petr; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Samorì, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic covalent chemistry relies on the formation of reversible covalent bonds under thermodynamic control to generate dynamic combinatorial libraries. It provides access to numerous types of complex functional architectures, and thereby targets several technologically relevant applications, such as in drug discovery, (bio)sensing and dynamic materials. In liquid media it was proved that by taking advantage of the reversible nature of the bond formation it is possible to combine the error-correction capacity of supramolecular chemistry with the robustness of covalent bonding to generate adaptive systems. Here we show that double imine formation between 4-(hexadecyloxy)benzaldehyde and different α,ω-diamines as well as reversible bistransimination reactions can be achieved at the solid/liquid interface, as monitored on the submolecular scale by in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy imaging. Our modular approach enables the structurally controlled reversible incorporation of various molecular components to form sophisticated covalent architectures, which opens up perspectives towards responsive multicomponent two-dimensional materials and devices.

  3. Monitoring Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers With A Raspberry Pi Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patteson, Crystal

    2016-03-01

    The MicroBooNE detector is the first of three liquid argon (LAr) time projection chambers (TPCs) that are central to the short-baseline neutrino program at Fermilab. These chambers consist of thousands of stainless steel or beryllium-copper sense wires that detect ionization electrons produced when neutrinos interact with liquid argon nuclei inside the detector. The wires are several hundred microns in diameter to several meters in length. The construction of such LAr TPCs often takes place in an assembly hall, which is different from the detector hall where the experiment will operate, as was the case with MicroBooNE. Since in situ access to the chamber and its wires in the beamline enclosure can be limited, we investigate the possibility of using a Raspberry Pi single-board computer connected to a low-cost camera installed inside the cryostat as a cost-efficient way to verify the integrity of the wires after transport. We also highlight other benefits of this monitoring device implemented in MicroBooNE, including detector hall surveillance and verification of the status of LED indicators on detector electronics. The author would like to thank Dr. Matthew Toups for his encouragement and guidance on this research project.

  4. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory annual environmental monitoring report. Calendar Year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the three KAPL sites resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each site and at off-site background locations. KAPL environmental controls are subject to applicable state and federal regulations governing use, emission, treatment, storage and/or disposal of solid, liquid and gaseous materials. Some non-radiological water and air emissions are generated and treated on-site prior to discharge to the environment. Liquid effluents and air emissions are controlled and monitored in accordance with permits issued by the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CTDEP) for the Windsor Site and by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) for the Knolls and Kesselring Sites. The liquid effluent monitoring data show that KAPL has maintained a high degree of compliance with permit requirements. Where required, radionuclide air emission sources are authorized by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The non-radiological air emissions, with the exception of opacity for the boilers, are not required to be monitored.

  5. Removal of non aqueous phase liquid liquid (NAPL) from a loam soil monitored by time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    comegna, alessandro; coppola, Antonio; dragonetti, giovanna; ajeel, ali; saeed, ali; sommella, angelo

    2016-04-01

    Non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) are compounds with low or no solubility with water. These compounds, due to the several human activities, can be accidentally introduced in the soil system and thus constitute a serious geo-environmental problem, given the toxicity level and the high mobility. The remediation of contaminated soil sites requires knowledge of the contaminant distribution in the soil profile and groundwater. Methods commonly used to characterize contaminated sites are coring, soil sampling and the installation of monitoring wells for the collection of groundwater samples. The main objective of the present research is to explore the potential application of time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique in order to evaluate the effect of contaminant removal in a loam soil, initially contaminated with NAPL and then flushed with different washing solutions. The experimental setup consist of: i) a Techtronix cable tester; ii) a three-wire TDR probe with wave guides 14.5 cm long inserted vertically into the soil samples; iii) a testing cell of 8 cm in diameter and 15 cm high; iv) a peristaltic pump for upward injection of washing solution. In laboratory, soil samples were oven dried at 105°C and passed through a 2 mm sieve. Known quantities of soil and NAPL (corn oil, a non-volatile and non-toxic organic compound) were mixed in order to obtain soil samples with different degrees of contamination. Once a soil sample was prepared, it was repacked into a plastic cylinder and then placed into the testing cell. An upward injection of washing solution was supplied to the contaminated sample with a rate q=1.5 cm3/min, which corresponds to a darcian velocity v=6.0 cm/h. The out coming fluid, from the soil column was collected, then the washing solution and oil was separated. Finally both the amount of oil that was remediated and the dielectric permittivity (measured via TDR) of the contaminated soil sample were recorded. Data collected were employed to implement a

  6. Characterization and monitoring of 300 Area Facility liquid waste streams: Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Manke, K.L.; Riley, R.G.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Damberg, E.G.; Evans, J.C.; Ikenberry, A.S.; Olsen, K.B.; Ozanich, R.M.; Thompson, C.J.

    1994-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of characterizing and monitoring the following sources during a portion of this year: liquid waste streams from Buildings 331, 320, and 3720; treated and untreated Columbia River water; and water at the confluence of the waste streams (that is, end-of-pipe). Characterization and monitoring data were evaluated for samples collected between March 22 and June 21, 1994, and subsequently analyzed for hazardous chemicals, radioactivity, and general parameters. Except for bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, concentrations of chemicals detected and parameters measured at end-of-pipe were below the US Environmental Protection Agency existing and proposed drinking water standards. The source of the chemicals, except bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, is not currently known. The bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate is probably an artifact of the plastic tubing used in the early stages of the sampling program. This practice was stopped. Concentrations and clearance times for contaminants at end-of-pipe depended strongly on source concentration at the facility release point, waste stream flow rates, dispersion, and the mechanical action of sumps. When present, the action of sumps had the greatest impact on contaminant clearance times. In the absence of sump activity, dispersion and flow rate were the controlling factors.

  7. Liquid crystal based sensors monitoring lipase activity: a new rapid and sensitive method for cytotoxicity assays.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Zakir; Zafiu, Christian; Küpcü, Seta; Pivetta, Lucineia; Hollfelder, Nadine; Masutani, Akira; Kilickiran, Pinar; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin

    2014-06-15

    In this work we present liquid crystal (LC) based sensor devices to monitor cell viability. The sensing layer is composed by the LC and a planar monolayer of phospholipids. In the presence of minute traces of phospholipases, which hydrolyze enzymatically phospholipids, the LC-lipid interface is disintegrated. This event causes a change in orientation of the LC, which was followed in a polarized microscope. The lipase activity can be used to measure the cell viability, since members of this enzyme family are released by cells, as they undergo necrosis. The described sensor was used to monitor the presence of the lipases released from three different cell lines, which were either exposed to highly cytotoxic model compounds (sodium azide and paracetamol) or subjected to freeze-thaw cycles to induce cell death by a non-chemical based inducer for apoptosis, such as temperature. Finally, the comparison of lipase activity detected by a state-of-the-art fluorescence assay to the LC based system resulted in the superiority of the LC system concerning incubation time and sensitivity. PMID:24508543

  8. A reliable monitoring of the biocompatibility of an effluent along an oxidative pre-treatment by sequential bioassays and chemical analyses.

    PubMed

    Amat, A M; Arques, A; García-Ripoll, A; Santos-Juanes, L; Vicente, R; Oller, I; Maldonado, M I; Malato, S

    2009-02-01

    A new approach to assess biocompatibility of an effluent, based on combination of different bioassays and chemical analyses, has been tested using a mixture of four commercial pesticides treated by a solar photo-Fenton as target effluent. A very fast elimination of the pesticides occurred (all of them were below detection limit at t30W=36 min), but mineralisation was a more time-consuming process, due to the formation of organic intermediates and to the presence of solvents, as shown by GC-MS analysis. Measurements based on activated sludge indicated that detoxification was coincident with the removal of the active ingredients, while more sensitive Vibrio fischeri bacterium showed significant toxicity until the end of the experiment, although the effluent might be compatible with biological processes. Biodegradability of the solutions was enhanced by the photochemical process, to reach BOD5/COD ratios above 0.8. Longer time bioassays, such as the Zahn-Wellens' test, support the applicability of coupling photochemical with activated sludge-based biological processes to deal with these effluents. PMID:19070346

  9. Monitoring algal toxins in lake water by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bogialli, Sara; Bruno, Milena; Curini, Roberta; Di Corcia, Antonio; Fanali, Chiara; Laganà, Aldo

    2006-05-01

    Microcystins (MCs) and cylindrospermopsin (CYL) are potent natural toxins produced by cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) that grow worldwide in eutrophic freshwaters and cause animal and human water-based toxicoses. The main purpose of this work has been assessing the contamination levels of some MCs and CYL in eutrophic Italian lake (Albano) water. To do this, we have developed an original analytical method involving MC extraction with a sorbent (Carbograph 4) cartridge. CYL is a highly polar compound that is scarcely retained by any sorbent material. To analyze this toxin, we directly injected 0.5 mL of filtered lake water into the liquid chromatography (LC) column. Analytes were quantified by LC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry in the multireaction monitoring mode. The recovery of five selected MCs added to an analyte free lake water sample at three different concentrations (50, 150, and 500 ng/L) ranged between 93 and 103% with RSD values no larger than 8%. Limits of quantification (LOQ) of the five MCs were within the 2-9 ng/L range, whereas the LOQ of CYL was 300 ng/L. The occurrence and abundance of cyanotoxins in Lake Albano was monitored over four months (Sept-Dec 2004) by analyzing water samples collected monthly at the center of the lake and at different depths (from 0 to -30 m). During survey and with the MS/MS system operating in the parent ion scan mode, we individuated two demethylated forms of MC-RR and one demethylated variety of MC-LR. Demethylated MC-RRs are known to be even more toxic than MC-RR toward zooplanktic grazers. CYL was the most-abundant toxin during the first three monitoring months. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work reporting concentration levels of CYL in lake water. PMID:16719091

  10. Two-terminal longitudinal hotwire sensor for monitoring the position and speed of advancing liquid fronts in microfluidic channels

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Kee Suk; Shaikh, Kashan; Goluch, Edgar; Liu Chang

    2006-03-06

    We report a simple and practical sensor for monitoring both the absolute position and advancing speed of liquid front in a microfluidic channel. The sensor consists of a longitudinal hot wire element - a two-terminal electrical device, with its length spanning the entire channel. The design, materials, fabrication method, and use of this sensor are extremely simple. Characterization results are presented.

  11. Sensor-model prediction, monitoring and in-situ control of liquid RTM advanced fiber architecture composite processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranbuehl, D.; Kingsley, P.; Hart, S.; Loos, A.; Hasko, G.; Dexter, B.

    In-situ frequency dependent electromagnetic sensors (FDEMS) and the Loos resin transfer model have been used to select and control the processing properties of an epoxy resin during liquid pressure RTM impregnation and cure. Once correlated with viscosity and degree of cure the FDEMS sensor monitors and the RTM processing model predicts the reaction advancement of the resin, viscosity and the impregnation of the fabric. This provides a direct means for predicting, monitoring, and controlling the liquid RTM process in-situ in the mold throughout the fabrication process and the effects of time, temperature, vacuum and pressure. Most importantly, the FDEMS-sensor model system has been developed to make intelligent decisions, thereby automating the liquid RTM process and removing the need for operator direction.

  12. Sensor-model prediction, monitoring and in-situ control of liquid RTM advanced fiber architecture composite processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, D.; Kingsley, P.; Hart, S.; Loos, A.; Hasko, G.; Dexter, B.

    1992-01-01

    In-situ frequency dependent electromagnetic sensors (FDEMS) and the Loos resin transfer model have been used to select and control the processing properties of an epoxy resin during liquid pressure RTM impregnation and cure. Once correlated with viscosity and degree of cure the FDEMS sensor monitors and the RTM processing model predicts the reaction advancement of the resin, viscosity and the impregnation of the fabric. This provides a direct means for predicting, monitoring, and controlling the liquid RTM process in-situ in the mold throughout the fabrication process and the effects of time, temperature, vacuum and pressure. Most importantly, the FDEMS-sensor model system has been developed to make intelligent decisions, thereby automating the liquid RTM process and removing the need for operator direction.

  13. Continuous monitoring of the progressive degradation of a liquid composite by means of a noninvasive microwave resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catala-Civera, Jose M.; Canos-Marin, Antoni J.; de los Reyes, E.

    2000-07-01

    Microwave control capabilities have been used to monitor the degradation of polyol, an alcohol composite material commonly used in the footwear industry for polymerization purposes. The liquid flows continuously inside a thin pipe and its desirable properties are altered with time associated to moisture absorption processes. Consequently, variations in the dielectric properties are involved, and they can be detected by permittivity measurements. In this paper, in order to obtain high sensitivity and resolution, a rectangular cavity resonator working at a fixed frequency was designed using as sample holder a rectangular pipe containing the liquid going through. Changes in the liquid modify the original response of the cavity with a non- degraded liquid and these differences have been used to determine the degree of degradation of the material. The final response of the microwave resonator was experimentally validated with measurements in a continuous line.

  14. A liquid crystal-based passive badge for personal monitoring of exposure to hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sheila E; Grinwald, Bart A; Bremer, Laura L; Kupcho, Kurt A; Acharya, Bharat R; Owens, Patrick D

    2014-01-01

    A new liquid crystal (LC)-based passive dosimeter badge for personal monitoring of exposure to hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas is reported. When a thin film of LC supported on a surface functionalized with lead perchlorate Pb(ClO4)2 (the LC sensor) is exposed to H2S, the orientation of LC molecules in the film changes from perpendicular to parallel. This reorientation induces a change in the appearance of the LC film when viewed between crossed polarizers. A H2S dosimeter was fabricated by pairing a LC sensor with a glass substrate forming a headspace between the two surfaces, to control diffusion of H2S across the LC film. When the dosimeter is exposed to H2S, a bright front appears as a function of exposure time. An algorithm has been developed to correlate this response length and exposure dose. The dosimeters are functionally stable when subjected to extreme temperature and humidity fluctuations, and are immune to a number of potentially interfering chemicals, except mercaptans. These dosimeters detect H2S at 0.2 ppm TWA (8 hr) with ±20% overall accuracy. The dosimeters were used to monitor the personal exposure of personnel working in an oil refinery. The TWA concentrations measured by the LC-based dosimeters correlate strongly with the NIOSH 1063 method that uses a sorbent tube and a pump followed by laboratory analysis. Thus, the LC-based dosimeters can provide a sensitive tool for on-site assessment of personal exposure to H2S in different environments. PMID:24766440

  15. Process for treating effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.M.; Shapiro, C.

    1995-12-31

    The present invention relates generally to a method for treating and recycling the effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor and more specifically to a method for treating and recycling the effluent by expanding the effluent without extensive cooling. Supercritical water oxidation is the oxidation of fuel, generally waste material, in a body of water under conditions above the thermodynamic critical point of water. The current state of the art in supercritical water oxidation plant effluent treatment is to cool the reactor effluent through heat exchangers or direct quench, separate the cooled liquid into a gas/vapor stream and a liquid/solid stream, expand the separated effluent, and perform additional purification on gaseous, liquid, brine and solid effluent. If acid gases are present, corrosion is likely to occur in the coolers. During expansion, part of the condensed water will revaporize. Vaporization can damage the valves due to cavitation and erosion. The present invention expands the effluent stream without condensing the stream. Radionuclides and suspended solids are more efficiently separated in the vapor phase. By preventing condensation, the acids are kept in the much less corrosive gaseous phase thereby limiting the damage to treatment equipment. The present invention also reduces the external energy consumption, by utilizing the expansion step to also cool the effluent.

  16. ICCP Environmental Monitoring Report CY-1992

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, J.K.

    1993-07-01

    Summarized in this report are the data collected through Environmental Monitoring programs conducted at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) by the Environmental Safety & Health (ES&H) Department. This report is published in response to DOE Order 5400.1. This report covers the period from December 21, 1991 through December 20, 1992 and details airborne and liquid effluents from the Chemical Processing Plant.

  17. Monitoring Tensile Fatigue of Superelastic NiTi Wire in Liquids by Electrochemical Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racek, Jan; Stora, Marc; Šittner, Petr; Heller, Luděk; Kopeček, Jaromir; Petrenec, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Fatigue of superelastic NiTi wires was investigated by cyclic tension in simulated biofluid. The state of the surface of the fatigued NiTi wire was monitored by following the evolution of the electrochemical open circuit potential (OCP) together with macroscopic stresses and strains. The ceramic TiO2 oxide layer on the NiTi wire surface cannot withstand the large transformation strain and fractures in the first cycle. Based on the analysis of the results of in situ OCP experiments and SEM observation of cracks, it is claimed that the cycled wire surface develops mechanochemical reactions at the NiTi/liquid interface leading to cumulative generation of hydrogen, uptake of the hydrogen by the NiTi matrix, local loss of the matrix strength, crack transfer into the NiTi matrix, accelerated crack growth, and ultimately to the brittle fracture of the wire. Fatigue degradation is thus claimed to originate from the mechanochemical processes occurring at the excessively deforming surface not from the accumulation of defects due to energy dissipative bulk deformation processes. Ironically, combination of the two exciting properties of NiTi—superelasticity due to martensitic transformation and biocompatibility due to the protective TiO2 surface oxide layer—leads to excessive fatigue damage during cyclic mechanical loading in biofluids.

  18. High-performance liquid chromatographic procedure for routine residue monitoring of seven sulfonamides in milk.

    PubMed

    Furusawa, N; Kishida, K

    2001-12-01

    A simplified method for routine monitoring of 7 residual sulfonamides (SAs) (sulfadiazine (SDZ), sulfamerazine (SMR), sulfadimidine (SDD), sulfamonomethoxine (SMM), sulfamethoxazole (SMX), sulfadimethoxine (SDM), and sulfaquinoxaline (SQ)) in milk using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a photodiode array detector is described. The spiked and blank samples were cleaned up by using an Ultrafree-MC/PL centrifugal ultrafiltration unit. For determination/identification, a Mightysil RP-4 GP column and a mobile phase of 25% (v/v) ethanol in water with a photodiode array detector were used. Average recoveries from milk samples spiked with 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.5 microg mL(-1) of each drug were >82%. The inter- and intra-assay variabilities were 2.0-3.1%. The practical detection limits for 7 SAs were 0.005-0.02 microg mL(-1). The total time and amount of solvent required for the analysis of one sample were <40 min and <6 mL of ethanol, respectively. No toxic solvents were used. PMID:11769794

  19. A simple strategy to monitor lipase activity using liquid crystal-based sensors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiong-Zheng; Jang, Chang-Hyun

    2012-09-15

    In this study, we developed a simple label-free technique for monitoring the enzymatic activity of lipase using liquid crystal (LC)-based sensors. The optical response of LCs changed from a bright to dark appearance when an aqueous solution of lipase was in contact with a nematic LC, 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB), that was doped with glyceryl trioleate, which is a glyceride that can be enzymatically hydrolyzed by lipase. Since the oleic acid released from the enzymatic reaction could spontaneously form a self-assembled monolayer at the aqueous/LC interface due to its amphiphilic property, the orientation of the LCs transited from a planar to homeotropic state, which induced a change in the optical response of the LCs. We did not observe a bright-to-dark shift in the optical appearance of LCs when pure 5CB was immersed into the lipase solution. Moreover, we further confirmed the specificity of the enzymatic reaction by transferring an aqueous buffer solution not containing an analyte, or with bovine serum albumin (BSA) or trypsin onto the interface of aqueous solutions and the glyceryl trioleate-doped 5CB, which did not produce any distinctive contrast in the optical appearance. These results suggest the feasibility of measuring the enzymatic activity of lipase using the LC-based sensing technique. Furthermore, our strategy could also be used for the preparation of a self-assembled monolayer of carboxylates at the aqueous/LC interface. PMID:22967518

  20. Characterization and monitoring of 300 Area facility liquid waste streams: 1994 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, R.G.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Damberg, E.G.; Evans, J.C.; Julya, J.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Ozanich, R.M.; Thompson, C.J.; Vogel, H.R.

    1995-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of characterizing and monitoring the following sources during calendar year 1994: liquid waste streams from Buildings 306, 320, 324, 326, 331, and 3720 in the 300 Area of Hanford Site and managed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory; treated and untreated Columbia River water (influent); and water at the confluence of the waste streams (that is, end-of-pipe). Data were collected from March to December before the sampling system installation was completed. Data from this initial part of the program are considered tentative. Samples collected were analyzed for chemicals, radioactivity, and general parameters. In general, the concentrations of chemical and radiological constituents and parameters in building wastewaters which were sampled and analyzed during CY 1994 were similar to historical data. Exceptions were the occasional observances of high concentrations of chloride, nitrate, and sodium that are believed to be associated with excursions that were occurring when the samples were collected. Occasional observances of high concentrations of a few solvents also appeared to be associated with infrequent building r eases. During calendar year 1994, nitrate, aluminum, copper, lead, zinc, bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, and gross beta exceeded US Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant levels.

  1. Use of micellar liquid chromatography for rapid monitoring of fungicides post harvest applied to citrus wastewater.

    PubMed

    Peris-Vicente, Juan; Marzo-Mas, Ana; Roca-Genovés, Pasqual; Carda-Broch, Samuel; Esteve-Romero, Josep

    2016-04-01

    A method based on micellar liquid chromatography has been developed to simultaneously monitor four pesticides largely post-harvest applied to citrus: thiabendazole, pyrimethanil, o-phenylphenol and imazalil. Water samples were filtered and directly injected without other treatment, thus avoiding extraction steps. The composition of the mobile phase was optimized using a chemometrical approach to achieve and excellent resolution to 0.07mol/L SDS/5%, V/V 1-pentanol buffered at pH3. Mobile phase run through a C18 column at 1mL/min at room temperature. The detection was performing by UV-Visible absorbance using a wavelength program: 0-10min, 305nm (for thiabendazole); 10-12; 265nm (for pyrimethanil) and 12-18, 220nm (o-phenylphenol and imazalil). The developed method was validated following the guidelines of the US Environmental Protection Agency in terms of: quantitation range, (0.5-4 to 15μg/mL), linearity (r(2)>0.9995), sensitivity (LOD, 0.18-1.4μg/mL), precision (<9.2%), trueness (93.9%-103.7%), and ruggedness (<9.9%). It was found that the fungicides remain up to eight days in surface water at outdoor conditions. The method was used to screen the presence of the analytes in several waste water samples, and was proved to be useful in routine analysis. PMID:27090721

  2. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Ggg of... - Monitoring Requirements for Control Devices a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon bed temperature. 4. Operating time since end of last regeneration 4. Operating time to be based on... a diversion was detected at any time during each hour. 2. Valves sealed closed with car-seal or lock.... 2. pH of effluent scrubber liquid 2. Once a day. Thermal incinerator Temperature monitoring...

  3. Acousto-optic tunable filter near-infrared spectroscopy for in-line monitoring liquid-liquid extraction of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis based on statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sha; Jin, Ye; Liu, Qi-An; Wu, Jian-Xiong; Bi, Yu-An; Wang, Zhen-Zhong; Xiao, Wei

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to monitor liquid-liquid extraction of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis (Zhizi in Chinese) using in-line near-infrared spectroscopy. Shanzhiside (SZS), deacetyl asperulosidic acid methyl ester (DAAME), genipin-1-β-D-gentiobioside (GG), geniposide (GS), total acids (TA) and soluble solid content (SSC) were selected as quality control indicators, and measured by reference methods. Both partial least-squares regression (PLSR) and back propagation artificial neural networks (BP-ANN) were applied to create models to predict the content of above indicators. Paired-samples t-test and nonparametric test were used to compare differences in predictive values between two models of each indicator. Relative standard error of prediction (RSEP) and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) were used to evaluate the predictive accuracy of the established models. The results showed that there was no significant difference in predicting DAAME, GS and TA between two models. However, PLSR model gave better accuracy in predicting GG and SZS than BP-ANN model. The BP-ANN model of SSC was better than PLSR model. This study shows that NIR spectroscopy can be used for rapid and accurate analysis of quality control indicators in the liquid-liquid extraction of Zhizi. Simultaneously, this study can serve as technical support for the application of NIR spectroscopy in the industrial production process. PMID:26601419

  4. Understanding the transformation, speciation, and hazard potential of copper particles in a model septic tank system using zebrafish to monitor the effluent.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sijie; Taylor, Alicia A; Ji, Zhaoxia; Chang, Chong Hyun; Kinsinger, Nichola M; Ueng, William; Walker, Sharon L; Nel, André E

    2015-02-24

    Although copper-containing nanoparticles are used in commercial products such as fungicides and bactericides, we presently do not understand the environmental impact on other organisms that may be inadvertently exposed. In this study, we used the zebrafish embryo as a screening tool to study the potential impact of two nano Cu-based materials, CuPRO and Kocide, in comparison to nanosized and micron-sized Cu and CuO particles in their pristine form (0-10 ppm) as well as following their transformation in an experimental wastewater treatment system. This was accomplished by construction of a modeled domestic septic tank system from which effluents could be retrieved at different stages following particle introduction (10 ppm). The Cu speciation in the effluent was identified as nondissolvable inorganic Cu(H2PO2)2 and nondiffusible organic Cu by X-ray diffraction, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT), and Visual MINTEQ software. While the nanoscale materials, including the commercial particles, were clearly more potent (showing 50% hatching interference above 0.5 ppm) than the micron-scale particulates with no effect on hatching up to 10 ppm, the Cu released from the particles in the septic tank underwent transformation into nonbioavailable species that failed to interfere with the function of the zebrafish embryo hatching enzyme. Moreover, we demonstrate that the addition of humic acid, as an organic carbon component, could lead to a dose-dependent decrease in Cu toxicity in our high content zebrafish embryo screening assay. Thus, the use of zebrafish embryo screening, in combination with the effluents obtained from a modeled exposure environment, enables a bioassay approach to follow the change in the speciation and hazard potential of Cu particles instead of difficult-to-perform direct particle tracking. PMID:25625504

  5. Understanding the Transformation, Speciation, and Hazard Potential of Copper Particles in a Model Septic Tank System using Zebrafish to Monitor the Effluent

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Sijie; Taylor, Alicia A.; Zhaoxia, Ji; Chang, Chong Hyun; Kinsinger, Nichola M.; Ueng, William; Walker, Sharon L.; Nel, André E.

    2015-01-01

    Although copper-containing nanoparticles are used in commercial products such as fungicides and bactericides, we presently do not understand the environmental impact on other organisms that may be inadvertently exposed. In this study, we used the zebrafish embryo as a screening tool to study the potential impact of two nano Cu-based materials, CuPRO and Kocide, in comparison to nano-sized and micron-sized Cu and CuO particles in their pristine form (0 – 10 ppm) as well as following their transformation in an experimental wastewater treatment system. This was accomplished by construction of a modeled domestic septic tank system from which effluents could be retrieved at different stages following particle introduction (10 ppm). The Cu speciation in the effluent was identified as non-dissolvable inorganic Cu(H2PO2)2 and non-diffusible organic Cu by X-ray diffraction, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT), and Visual MINTEQ software. While the nanoscale materials, including the commercial particles, were clearly more potent (showing 50% hatching interference above 0.5 ppm) than the micron-scale particulates with no effect on hatching up to 10 ppm, the Cu released from the particles in the septic tank underwent transformation into non-bioavailable species that failed to interfere with the function of the zebrafish embryo hatching enzyme. Moreover, we demonstrate that the addition of humic acid, as an organic carbon component, could lead to a dose-dependent decrease in Cu toxicity in our high content zebrafish embryo screening assay. Thus, the use of zebrafish embryo screening, in combination with the effluents obtained from a modeled exposure environment, enables a bioassay approach to follow the change in the speciation, and hazard potential of Cu particles instead of difficult-to-perform direct particle tracking. PMID:25625504

  6. Low cost methodology for estrogens monitoring in water samples using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and HPLC with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Lima, Diana L D; Silva, Carla Patrícia; Otero, Marta; Esteves, Valdemar I

    2013-10-15

    A new low cost methodology for estrogens' analysis in water samples was developed in this work. Based on dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection, the developed method is fast, cheap, easy-to-use, uses low volumes of organic solvents and has the possibility of a large number of samples to be extracted in parallel. Under optimum conditions (sample volume: 8 mL; extraction solvent: 200 μL of chlorobenzene; dispersive solvent: 2000 μL of acetone), the enrichment factor and extraction recoveries were 145 and 72% for 17β-estradiol (E2) and 178 and 89% for 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), respectively. Limits of detection of 2.0 ng L(-1) for E2 and 6.5 ng L(-1) for EE2 were achieved, allowing the detection and quantification of these compounds in surface and waste water samples with concentrations from 12 to 32 ng L(-1) for E2 and from 11 to 18 ng L(-1) for EE2. Also, recovery tests were performed to evaluate possible matrix effects. Recoveries between 98% and 106% were obtained using humic acids (HA) to simulate the effect of organic matter, and between 86% and 120% in real water samples. PMID:24054691

  7. Simultaneous analysis and monitoring of 16 UV filters in cosmetics by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dojung; Kim, Sangseop; Kim, Seol-A; Choi, Myoengsin; Kwon, Kyoung-Jin; Kim, Mijeong; Kim, Dong-Sup; Kim, Seung-Hee; Choi, Bo-Kyung

    2012-01-01

    Sixteen UV filters were simultaneously analyzed using the high-performance liquid chromatographic method. They were drometrizole (USAN Drometrizole), 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (USAN Enzacamene), menthyl anthranilate (USAN Menthyl anthranilate), benzophenone-3 (USAN Oxybenzone), benzophenone-8 (USAN Dioxybenzone), butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane (USAN Avobenzone), ethylhexyl triazone (USAN Octyl triazone), octocrylene (USAN Octocrylene), ethylhexyl dimethyl p-aminobenzoic acid (USAN Padimate O), ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate (USAN Octinoxate), p-aminobenzoic acid (USAN Aminobenzoic acid), 2-phenylbenzimidazole-5-sulfonic acid (USAN Ensulizole), isoamyl p-methoxycinnamate (USAN Amiloxate), and recent UV filters such as diethylhexyl butamidotriazone (USAN Iscotrizinol), methylene bis-benzotriazolyl tetramethylbutylphenol (USAN Bisoctrizole), and terephthalylidene dicamphor sulfonic acid (USAN Ecamsule). Separation of the UV filters was carried out in a C(18) column with a gradient of methanol-phosphate buffer, and the UV detection was at 300, 320, or 360 nm without any interference. The limits of detection were between 0.08 and 1.94 μg/ml, and the limits of quantitation were between 0.24 and 5.89 μg/ml. The extracting solvent for the UV filters was methanol, except for ethylhexyl triazone and methylene bis-benzotriazolyl tetramethylbutylphenol, which were prepared with tetrahydrofuran. The recoveries from spiked samples were between 94.90% and 116.54%, depending on the matrixes used. The developed method was applied to 23 sunscreens obtained from local markets, and the results were acceptable to their own criteria and to maximum authorized concentrations. Consequently, these results would provide a simple extracting method and a simultaneous determination for various UV filters, which can improve the quality control process as well as the environmental monitoring of sunscreens. PMID:22591562

  8. Validated Liquid Culture Monitoring System for Lifespan Extension of Caenorhabditis elegans through Genetic and Dietary Manipulations.

    PubMed

    Win, Myat Thu Thu; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Munesue, Seiichi; Han, Dong; Harada, Shin-Ichi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    Nutritional and genetic factors influence aging and life expectancy. The reduction of food intake without malnutrition, referred to caloric restriction (CR), has been shown to increase lifespan in a wide variety of species. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) is one of the principle models with which to study the biology of aging and search for anti-aging compounds. In this study, we validated and optimized a high-throughput liquid culture system to monitor C. elegans lifespan with minimized mechanical stress. We used alive and ultraviolet (UV)-killed Escherichia coli (E. coli) OP50 at 10(8) or 10(9) colony-forming units (cfu)/ml to feed Bristol N2 wild-type (WT) and mutant worms of a well-characterized insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (ILS) pathway: the insulin receptor homolog daf-2 (e1370), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase age-1 (hx546), and transcriptional factor FOXO homolog daf-16 (mu86 and mgDf50). Compared with alive E. coli at 10(9) cfu/ml, supplementations of alive E. coli at 10(8) cfu/ml or UV-killed E. coli at 10(9) cfu/ml dramatically prolonged lifespan in WT and age-1 mutants, and to a lesser extent, in daf-2 and daf-16 mutants, suggesting that signaling pathways in CR and ILS do not overlap fully. Feeding 10(8) cfu/ml UV-killed E. coli, which led to maximally saturated longevity in WT and daf-2 mutant, can prolonged lifespan in age-1, but not daf-16, mutants. This approach will be useful for investigating the biology of aging, physiological responses and gene functions under CR conditions and also for screening pharmacologic compounds to extend lifespan or affect other biologic processes. PMID:23936742

  9. POLAR ORGANIC CHEMICAL INTEGRATIVE SAMPLING AND LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY-ELECTROSPRAY/ION-TRAP MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR ASSESSING SELECTED PRESCRIPTION AND ILLICIT DRUGS IN TREATED SEWAGE EFFLUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the research presented in this paper is two-fold: (1) to demonstrate the 4 coupling of two state-of-the-art techniques: a time-weighted polar organic integrative sampler (POCIS) and micro-liquid chromatography-electrospray/ion trap mass spectrometry (u-LC-6 ES/ITMS...

  10. Radioactive effluents in Savannah River -- Summary report for 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1992-07-16

    During 1991, low-level radiometric studies of the Savannah River continued to distinguish between effluent contributions from Plant Vogtle and the Savannah River Site. Measurements of these radioactive effluents are of mutual interest to both institutions, as they can address disturbing trends before they become health and legal concerns. During 1991, the radioactive effluents in the Savannah River were somewhat less than those observed in 1990. This decreasing trend has followed Vogtle improvements in pre-processing their liquid effluents. These effluents continue to be dominated by {sup 58}Co, which had a maximum concentration of only 0.21 pCi/L, which is an order of magnitude lower than the maximum observed in 1990. Many of the other man-made radionuclides observed in 1987--1990 have now decreased to where some are not even detected, and no new radionuclides were detected in the 1991 Vogtle effluents.

  11. Rapid Monitoring and Determination of Class 1 Residual Solvents in Pharmaceuticals Using Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Rouhollah; Azizi, Saber

    2015-07-01

    A simple and rapid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) method coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for monitoring and determination of class 1 residual solvents, benzene (Bz), carbon tetrachloride (CT), 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCE), 1,1-dichloroethene (1,1-DCE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCE), in pharmaceuticals was developed and evaluated. The parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of analytes such as type and volume of extraction solvent, type and volume of dispersive solvent and ionic strength were investigated and optimized. 1-Octanol and methanol proved to be the most suitable extraction and dispersive solvents, respectively. The method showed linearity for 1,1-DCE, 1,1,1-TCE, CT, Bz and 1,2-DCE in the ranges of 0.001-80, 0.005-80, 0.002-80, 0.0001-40 and 0.001-80 µg/mL, respectively. The relative recoveries were in the range of 84-92, 87-98, 83-94, 89-98 and 87-96% for 1,1-DCE, 1,1,1-TCE, CT, Bz and 1,2-DCE, respectively. The obtained results showed that the proposed method can be used to monitor and determine class 1 residual solvents in pharmaceuticals. PMID:25398952

  12. 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) Effluent Sampling and Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN, M.J.

    2000-05-18

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) has been developed to comply with effluent monitoring requirements at the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF), as stated in Washington State Waste Discharge Permit No. ST 4502 (Ecology 2000). This permit, issued by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) under the authority of Chapter 90.48 Revised Code of Washington (RCW) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 173-216, is an April 2000 renewal of the original permit issued on April 1995.

  13. Stennis Space Center's approach to liquid rocket engine health monitoring using exhaust plume diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, D. G.; Tejwani, G. D.; Bircher, F. E.; Loboda, J. A.; Van Dyke, D. B.; Chenevert, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Details are presented of the approach used in a comprehensive program to utilize exhaust plume diagnostics for rocket engine health-and-condition monitoring and assessing SSME component wear and degradation. This approach incorporates both spectral and video monitoring of the exhaust plume. Video monitoring provides qualitative data for certain types of component wear while spectral monitoring allows both quantitative and qualitative information. Consideration is given to spectral identification of SSME materials and baseline plume emissions.

  14. ANALYSIS FOR B-LACTAM ANTIBIOTICS IN KIDNEY TISSUE BY LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION AND SELECTIVE REACTION MONITORING/TANDEM ION TRAP MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eleven B-lactams antibiotics were analyzed in fortified and incurred beef kidney tissue using high-performance liquid chromatography/selective reaction monitoring/tandem ion trap mass spectrometry. The analytes included: deacetylcephapirin, amoxicillin, cephapirin, desfuroylceftiofur cysteine disul...

  15. ACOUSTIC MONITOR FOR LIQUID-SOLID SLURRIES MEASUREMENTS AT LOW WEIGHT FRACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The principal objective of the project is to develop an acoustic probe for determining the weight fraction of particles in a flowing suspension. The suspension can be solid-liquid (S-L) or solid-gas-liquid (S-G-L). The work will include testing the theory of acoustic wave propaga...

  16. Probing Ion Transfer across Liquid-Liquid Interfaces by Monitoring Collisions of Single Femtoliter Oil Droplets on Ultramicroelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Deng, Haiqiang; Dick, Jeffrey E; Kummer, Sina; Kragl, Udo; Strauss, Steven H; Bard, Allen J

    2016-08-01

    We describe a method of observing collisions of single femtoliter (fL) oil (i.e., toluene) droplets that are dispersed in water on an ultramicroelectrode (UME) to probe the ion transfer across the oil/water interface. The oil-in-water emulsion was stabilized by an ionic liquid, in which the oil droplet trapped a highly hydrophobic redox probe, rubrene. The ionic liquid also functions as the supporting electrolyte in toluene. When the potential of the UME was biased such that rubrene oxidation would be possible when a droplet collided with the electrode, no current spikes were observed. This implies that the rubrene radical cation is not hydrophilic enough to transfer into the aqueous phase. We show that current spikes are observed when tetrabutylammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate or tetrahexylammonium hexafluorophosphate are introduced into the toluene phase and when tetrabutylammonium perchlorate is introduced into the water phase, implying that the ion transfer facilitates electron transfer in the droplet collisions. The current (i)-time (t) behavior was evaluated quantitatively, which indicated the ion transfer is fast and reversible. Furthermore, the size of these emulsion droplets can also be calculated from the electrochemical collision. We further investigated the potential dependence on the electrochemical collision response in the presence of tetrabutylammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate in toluene to obtain the formal ion transfer potential of tetrabutylammonium across the toluene/water interface, which was determined to be 0.754 V in the inner potential scale. The results yield new physical insights into the charge balance mechanism in emulsion droplet collisions and indicate that the electrochemical collision technique can be used to probe formal ion transfer potentials between water and solvents with very low (ε < 5) dielectric constants. PMID:27387789

  17. High performance liquid level monitoring system based on polymer fiber Bragg gratings embedded in silicone rubber diaphragms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Carlos A. F.; Peng, Gang-Ding; Webb, David J.

    2015-05-01

    Liquid-level sensing technologies have attracted great prominence, because such measurements are essential to industrial applications, such as fuel storage, flood warning and in the biochemical industry. Traditional liquid level sensors are based on electromechanical techniques; however they suffer from intrinsic safety concerns in explosive environments. In recent years, given that optical fiber sensors have lots of well-established advantages such as high accuracy, costeffectiveness, compact size, and ease of multiplexing, several optical fiber liquid level sensors have been investigated which are based on different operating principles such as side-polishing the cladding and a portion of core, using a spiral side-emitting optical fiber or using silica fiber gratings. The present work proposes a novel and highly sensitive liquid level sensor making use of polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (POFBGs). The key elements of the system are a set of POFBGs embedded in silicone rubber diaphragms. This is a new development building on the idea of determining liquid level by measuring the pressure at the bottom of a liquid container, however it has a number of critical advantages. The system features several FBG-based pressure sensors as described above placed at different depths. Any sensor above the surface of the liquid will read the same ambient pressure. Sensors below the surface of the liquid will read pressures that increase linearly with depth. The position of the liquid surface can therefore be approximately identified as lying between the first sensor to read an above-ambient pressure and the next higher sensor. This level of precision would not in general be sufficient for most liquid level monitoring applications; however a much more precise determination of liquid level can be made by linear regression to the pressure readings from the sub-surface sensors. There are numerous advantages to this multi-sensor approach. First, the use of linear regression using

  18. Detailed monitoring of two biogas plants and mechanical solid-liquid separation of fermentation residues.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Alexander; Mayr, Herwig; Hopfner-Sixt, Katharina; Amon, Thomas

    2009-06-01

    The Austrian "green electricity act" (Okostromgesetz) has led to an increase in biogas power plant size and consequently to an increased use of biomass. A biogas power plant with a generating capacity of 500 kW(el) consumes up to 38,000 kg of biomass per day. 260 ha of cropland is required to produce this mass. The high water content of biomass necessitates a high transport volume for energy crops and fermentation residues. The transport and application of fermentation residues to farmland is the last step in this logistic chain. The use of fermentation residues as fertilizer closes the nutrient cycle and is a central element in the efficient use of biomass for power production. Treatment of fermentation residues by separation into liquid and solid phases may be a solution to the transport problem. This paper presents detailed results from the monitoring of two biogas plants and from the analysis of the separation of fermentation residues. Furthermore, two different separator technologies for the separation of fermentation residues of biogas plants were analyzed. The examined biogas plants correspond to the current technological state of the art and have designs developed specifically for the utilization of energy crops. The hydraulic retention time ranged between 45.0 and 83.7 days. The specific methane yields were 0.40-0.43 m(3)N CH(4) per kg VS. The volume loads ranged between 3.69 and 4.00 kg VS/m(3). The degree of degradation was between 77.3% and 82.14%. The screw extractor separator was better suited for biogas slurry separation than the rotary screen separator. The screw extractor separator exhibited a high throughput and good separation efficiency. The efficiency of slurry separation depended on the dry matter content of the fermentation residue. The higher the dry matter content, the higher the proportion of solid phase after separation. In this project, we found that the fermentation residues could be divided into 79.2% fluid phase with a dry matter

  19. Simultaneous multicomponent spectrophotometric monitoring of methyl and propyl parabens using multivariate statistical methods after their preconcentration by robust ionic liquid-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khani, Rouhollah; Ghasemi, Jahan B.; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2014-03-01

    A powerful and efficient signal-preprocessing technique that combines local and multiscale properties of the wavelet prism with the global filtering capability of orthogonal signal correction (OSC) is applied for pretreatment of spectroscopic data of parabens as model compounds after their preconcentration by robust ionic liquid-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method (IL-DLLME). In the proposed technique, a mixture of a water-immiscible ionic liquid (as extraction solvent) [Hmim][PF6] and disperser solvent is injected into an aqueous sample solution containing one of the IL's ions, NaPF6, as extraction solvent and common ion source. After preconcentration, the absorbance of the extracted compounds was measured in the wavelength range of 200-700 nm. The wavelet orthogonal signal correction with partial least squares (WOSC-PLS) method was then applied for simultaneous determination of each individual compound. Effective parameters, such as amount of IL, volume of the disperser solvent and amount of NaPF6, were inspected by central composite design to identify the most important parameters and their interactions. The effect of pH on the sensitivity and selectivity was studied according to the net analyte signal (NAS) for each component. Under optimum conditions, enrichment factors of the studied compounds were 75 for methyl paraben (MP) and 71 for propyl paraben (PP). Limits of detection for MP and PP were 4.2 and 4.8 ng mL-1, respectively. The root mean square errors of prediction for MP and PP were 0.1046 and 0.1275 μg mL-1, respectively. The practical applicability of the developed method was examined using hygienic, cosmetic, pharmaceutical and natural water samples.

  20. Simultaneous multicomponent spectrophotometric monitoring of methyl and propyl parabens using multivariate statistical methods after their preconcentration by robust ionic liquid-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Khani, Rouhollah; Ghasemi, Jahan B; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2014-03-25

    A powerful and efficient signal-preprocessing technique that combines local and multiscale properties of the wavelet prism with the global filtering capability of orthogonal signal correction (OSC) is applied for pretreatment of spectroscopic data of parabens as model compounds after their preconcentration by robust ionic liquid-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method (IL-DLLME). In the proposed technique, a mixture of a water-immiscible ionic liquid (as extraction solvent) [Hmim][PF6] and disperser solvent is injected into an aqueous sample solution containing one of the IL's ions, NaPF6, as extraction solvent and common ion source. After preconcentration, the absorbance of the extracted compounds was measured in the wavelength range of 200-700 nm. The wavelet orthogonal signal correction with partial least squares (WOSC-PLS) method was then applied for simultaneous determination of each individual compound. Effective parameters, such as amount of IL, volume of the disperser solvent and amount of NaPF6, were inspected by central composite design to identify the most important parameters and their interactions. The effect of pH on the sensitivity and selectivity was studied according to the net analyte signal (NAS) for each component. Under optimum conditions, enrichment factors of the studied compounds were 75 for methyl paraben (MP) and 71 for propyl paraben (PP). Limits of detection for MP and PP were 4.2 and 4.8 ng mL(-)(1), respectively. The root mean square errors of prediction for MP and PP were 0.1046 and 0.1275 μg mL(-)(1), respectively. The practical applicability of the developed method was examined using hygienic, cosmetic, pharmaceutical and natural water samples. PMID:24317257

  1. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2001-12-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York and the Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York and site closure activities at the S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut, continued to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment during calendar year 2000. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations. Monitoring programs at the S1C Site were reduced in scope during calendar year 2000 due to completion of site dismantlement activities during 1999.

  2. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2001

    SciTech Connect

    2002-12-31

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and Site closure activities at the S1C Site (also known as the KAPL Windsor Site) continue to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations. The environmental monitoring program for the S1C Site continues to be reduced in scope from previous years due to the completion of Site dismantlement activities during 1999 and a return to green field conditions during 2000.

  3. Method for removing and decolorizing aqueous waste effluents containing dissolved or dispersed organic matter

    DOEpatents

    Case, F.N.; Ketchen, E.E.

    1975-10-14

    A method is provided for treating organic waste material dissolved or dispersed in an aqueous effluent, which comprises contacting the effluent with an inert particulate carbonaceous sorbent at an oxygen pressure up to 2000 psi, irradiating the resultant mixture with high energy radiation until a decolorized liquid is produced, and then separating the decolorized liquid.

  4. Monitoring of N-methyl carbamate pesticide residues in water using hollow fibre supported liquid membrane and solid phase extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msagati, Titus A. M.; Mamba, Bhekie B.

    The aim of this work was to develop a method for the determination of N-methyl carbamates in water involving hollow fibre supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) and solid phase extraction (SPE) as sample preparation methods. Four N-methyl carbamate pesticides, aldicarb, carbaryl, carbofuran and methiocarb sulfoxide, were simultaneously extracted and analysed by a liquid chromatograph with a diode array detector (LC-UV/DAD) and a liquid chromatograph coupled to a ion trap quadrupole mass spectrometer (LC-ESI-MS). The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation of carabamate extracts was performed on a C18 column with water-acetonitrile as the mobile phase. The mass spectrometry analyses were carried out in the positive mode, operating under both the selected ion monitoring (SIM) and full scan modes. The solid phase recoveries of the extracts ranged between 8% and 98%, with aldicarb having the highest recoveries, followed by carbaryl, carbofuran and methiocarb had the lowest recovery. The HFSLM recovery ranged between 8% and 58% and the order of recovery was similar to the SPE trend. Factors controlling the efficiency of the HFSLM extraction such as sample pH, stripping phase pH, enrichment time, stirring speed as well as organic solvent used for entrapment of analytes, were optimised to achieve the highest enrichment factors.

  5. Occupational Exposure to Mercury: Air Exposure Assessment and Biological Monitoring based on Dispersive Ionic Liquid-Liquid Microextraction

    PubMed Central

    SHIRKHANLOO, Hamid; GOLBABAEI, Farideh; HASSANI, Hamid; EFTEKHAR, Farrokh; KIAN, Mohammad Javad

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Exposure to mercury (Hg) as a heavy metal can cause health effects. The objective of this study was to assess occupational exposure to Hg in a chlor-alkali petrochemical industry in Iran by determining of Hg concentrations in air, blood and urine samples. Methods The study was performed on 50 exposed subjects and 50 unexposed controls. Air samples were collected in the breathing zone of exposed subjects, using hopcalite sorbents. Analysis was performed using a cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometer (CV-AAS) according to NIOSH analytical method 6009. For all participants, blood and urine samples were collected and then transferred into sterile glass tubes. After micro-extraction with ionic liquid and back extraction with nitric acid, Hg concentrations in blood and urine samples were determined by CV-AAS. Results The mean concentration of air Hg was 0.042± 0.003 mg/m3. The mean concentrations of Hg in blood and urine samples of exposed subjects were significantly higher than unexposed controls (22.41± 12.58 versus 1.19± 0.95 μg/l and 30.61± 10.86 versus 1.99± 1.34 μg/g creatinine, respectively). Correlation of air Hg with blood Hg, urine Hg and blood Hg-urine Hg ratio were significant statistically (P< 0.05). Conclusions The values of Hg in blood and urine samples of chlor-alkali workers were considerably high. Correlation coefficients showed that blood Hg and blood Hg-urine Hg ratio are better indicators than urine Hg for assessing occupationally exposed workers in terms of current exposure assessment. PMID:26110150

  6. Development of advanced electrochemical emission spectroscopy for monitoring corrosion in simulated DOE liquid waste. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, D.D.

    1998-06-01

    'Objective of this project is to develop and use Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy (EES) and other electrochemical techniques as in situ tools for exploring corrosion mechanisms of iron and carbon steel in highly alkaline solutions and for continuously monitoring corrosion on structural materials in DOE liquid waste storage system. In particular, the author will explore the fundamental aspects of the passive behavior of pure iron since breakdown of passivity leads to localized corrosion. This report summarizes work after 1 year of a 3 year project.'

  7. Pinellas Plant environmental monitoring report, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    This report presents the results of the 1982 annual effluent and environmental monitoring program for the Pinellas Plant. Average maximum ground level concentrations of tritium, carbon 14 and krypton 85 were all less than 0.2% of the standard for continuous monoccupational exposure. Offsite releases of liquid effluents were analyzed for biochemical oxygen demand, suspended solids, fecal coliform bacteria, pH, nitrogen, phosphorus, arsenic, chlorides, chromium, copper, cyanides, detergents, fluorides, iron, lead, mercury, oil plus greases, phenols, turbidity and zinc. No plutonium was released to the environment and monitoring data showed background levels. Calculations were made to determine the radiation doses resulting from releases of tritium oxide, krypton 85 and carbon 14. (ASR)

  8. Monitoring electron and proton diffusion flux through three-dimensional, paper-based, variable biofilm and liquid media layers.

    PubMed

    Choi, Gihoon; Choi, Seokheun

    2015-09-01

    The goal of this work is to pursue analytical approaches that elucidate electron and proton diffusion inside the Shewanella oneidensis biofilm and bulk liquid, which will inevitably promote the translation of Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC) technology for renewable, "green energy" solutions that are in demand to sustain the world's ever-increasing energy demands and to mitigate the depletion of current resources. This study provides a novel strategy for monitoring electron/proton fluxes in 3-D multi-laminate structures of paper as a scaffold to support S. oneidensis biofilms and bulk media liquid. Multiple layers of paper containing bacterial cells and/or media are stacked to form a layered 3-D model of the overall biofilm/bulk liquid construct. Mass transport of electrons and protons into this 3-D system can be quantified along with the exploration of microbial energy production. Assembly of a 3D paper stack can be modular and allows us to control the thickness of the overall biofilm/bulk liquid construct with the different diffusion distances of the electrons/protons through the stack. By measuring the current generated from the 3-D stack, the electron and proton diffusivity through biofilms were quantitatively investigated. We found that (i) the diffusion length of the electrons/protons in the S. oneidensis biofilm/bulk liquid is a determinant factor for the MFC performance, (ii) the electron transfer through the endogenous mediators of S. oneidensis can be a more critical factor to limit the current/power generation of the MFCs than the proton transfer in the MFC system and (iii) the thicker biofilm allows higher and longer current generation but requires more time to reach a peak current value and increases the total energy loss of the MFC system. PMID:26179156

  9. Highly sensitive liquid level monitoring system utilizing polymer fiber Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Marques, Carlos A F; Peng, Gang-Ding; Webb, David J

    2015-03-01

    A novel and highly sensitive liquid level sensor based on a polymer optical fiber Bragg grating (POFBG) is experimentally demonstrated. Two different configurations are studied and both configurations show the potential to interrogate liquid level by measuring the strain induced in a POFBG embedded in a silicone rubber diaphragm, which deforms due to hydrostatic pressure variations. The sensor exhibits a highly linear response over the sensing range and a good repeatability. For comparison, a similar sensor using a FBG inscribed in silica fiber is fabricated, which displays a sensitivity that is a factor of 5 smaller than the POFBG. The temperature sensitivity is studied and a novel multi-sensor arrangement proposed which has the potential to provide level readings independent of temperature and the liquid density. PMID:25836830

  10. Simultaneous monitoring the real and imaginary parts of the analyte refractive index using liquid-core photonic bandgap Bragg fibers.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingwen; Qu, Hang; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous monitoring of the real and imaginary parts of the liquid analyte refractive index by using a hollow-core Bragg fiber. We apply this two-channel fiber sensor to monitor concentrations of various commercial cooling oils. The sensor operates using spectral monitoring of the fiber bandgap center wavelength, as well as monitoring of the fiber transmission amplitude at mid-bandgap position. The sensitivity of the fiber sensor to changes in the real part of the core refractive index is found to be 1460nm/Refractive index unit (RIU). By using spectral modality and effective medium theory, we determine the concentrations of the two commercial fluids from the measured refractive indices with an accuracy of ~0.57% for both low- and high-loss oils. Moreover, using an amplitude-based detection modality allows determination of the oil concentration with accuracy of ~1.64% for low-loss oils and ~2.81% for the high-loss oils. PMID:26368402

  11. Acoustic Monitor for Liquid-Solid Slurries Measurements at Low Weight Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. L.L. Tavlarides; Dr. A.S. Sangan

    2004-12-08

    The principle objective of the project was to develop an acoustic probe for determining the weight fraction of particles in a flowing suspension. The suspension can be solid-liquid (S-L) or solid-gas-liquid (S-G-L). The work accomplished during the first three years of DOE funding was devoted to the development of a rigorous theory for acoustic wave propagation through solid-liquid (S-L) and solid-gas-liquid (S-G-L). In the first funding period we developed an acoustic probe for S-G-L suspensions that has resulted in a theory, supported by our experiments, to describe small amplitude acoustic wave propagations in dilute suspensions (Norato, 1999; Spelter al., 1999, 2001: Norato et al. 2002). The theory agrees well with experimental data of sound attenuation over a wide range of particle sizes, frequencies, and weight percent solids. We have also completed theoretical and experimental investigation on the effect of entrained gas bubbles on the attenuation. This analysis permits us to determine the S-L weight percent in the presence of bubbles.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED ELECTROCHEMICAL EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY FOR MONITORING CORROSION IN SIMULATED DOE LIQUID WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Department of Energy currently stores millions of gallons of high level liquid radioactive waste in underground, carbon steel-lined concrete tanks at the Hanford Reservation in the state of Washington and at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Because of the indefinite...

  13. ANNUAL REPORT. DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED ELECTROCHEMICAL EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY FOR MONITORING CORROSION IN SIMULATED DOE LIQUID WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current report summarizes work performed on the project over the past calendar year (2001). The work concentrated on four areas: the fracture of AISI 4340 steel simulating weld heat affected zones in DOE liquid waste storage tanks, investigation of the passive state on nickel...

  14. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) sites are summarized and assessed in this report. The principal function at KAPL sites (Knolls, Kesselring, and Windsor) is research and development in the design and operation of Naval nuclear propulsion plants. The Kesselring Site is also used for the training of personnel in the operation of these plants. The Naval nuclear propulsion plant at the Windsor Site is currently being dismantled. Operations at the three KAPL sites resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each site and at off-site background locations.

  15. Estimating effluent COD

    SciTech Connect

    Eckenfelder, W.W.; Landine, R.

    1995-06-01

    In many parts of the world, chemical oxygen demand (COD) is a primary effluent parameter. Unlike BOD, which considers only biodegradable organics, COD also includes non-degradable organics and non-degradable biological oxidation by-products, generally referred to as soluble microbial products (SMP). The SMP can vary from 2% to 10% of the influent degradable COD. If the technology is limited to biological treatment only, the degradable COD will be removed. Further reductions in COD will require physical chemical treatments such as activated carbon. Effluent COD values for several industrial wastewaters are presented. Effluent characteristics from the anaerobic treatment of industrial wastewaters are also discussed.

  16. Geohydrologic evaluation for the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility State-Approved Land Disposal Site: Addendum to WAC 173-240 Engineering Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ballantyne, N.A.

    1993-08-01

    This document provides a geohydrologic evaluation for the disposal of liquid effluent from the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at the Hanford Site. This work forms an addendum to the engineering report that supports the completion of the ETF.

  17. Effluent Monitoring Procedures: Basic Parameters for Municipal Effluents. Staff Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    This is one of several short-term courses developed to assist in the training of waste water treatment plant operational personnel in the tests, measurements, and report preparation required for compliance with their NPDES Permits. This Staff Guide provides step-by-step guidelines on course planning, development and implementation involving…

  18. Monitors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, David

    1984-01-01

    Provides guidelines for selecting a monitor to suit specific applications, explains the process by which graphics images are produced on a CRT monitor, and describes four types of flat-panel displays being used in the newest lap-sized portable computers. A comparison chart provides prices and specifications for over 80 monitors. (MBR)

  19. NATIONAL WWTP EFFLUENT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reports of potential wildlife risk from exposure to environmental estrogens emphasize the need to better understand both estrogenic presence and persistence in treated wastewater effluents. In addition to wildlife exposure, human exposure should also be examined, especially in si...

  20. GEOTHERMAL EFFLUENT SAMPLING WORKSHOP

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report outlines the major recommendations resulting from a workshop to identify gaps in existing geothermal effluent sampling methodologies, define needed research to fill those gaps, and recommend strategies to lead to a standardized sampling methodology.

  1. Memory deficit in Swiss mice exposed to tannery effluent.

    PubMed

    Rabelo, Letícia Martins; Costa E Silva, Bianca; de Almeida, Sabrina Ferreira; da Silva, Wellington Alves Mizael; de Oliveira Mendes, Bruna; Guimarães, Abraão Tiago Batista; da Silva, Anderson Rodrigo; da Silva Castro, André Luis; de Lima Rodrigues, Aline Sueli; Malafaia, Guilherme

    2016-01-01

    Although it is known that tannery effluents constitute highly toxic pollutants whose effects in humans represent public health problems in several countries, studies involving experimental mammalian models are rare. In this context, the objective of the present study was to assess the effect of the exposure to tannery effluent on the memory of male and female Swiss mice. Animals of each sex were distributed into two experimental groups: the control group, in which the animals received only drinking water and the effluent group, in which the mice received 1% of gross tannery effluent diluted in water. The animals were exposed to the effluent by gavage, oral dosing, for 15days, ensuring the administration of 0.1mL of liquid (water or effluent)/10g of body weight/day. On the 14th and 15th experimental days the animals were submitted to the object recognition test. It was observed that the new object recognition indices calculated for the animals exposed to the effluent (males and females) were significantly lower than those obtained with the control group. The exposure to tannery effluent caused memory deficit in Swiss mice in a similar way for both sexes, reinforcing previous findings that these pollutants affect the central nervous system. It contributes to the knowledge in the area by attesting harmful effects to the cognition of such animals. PMID:27063058

  2. Paper Mill Effluent Decolorization by Fifty Streptomyces Strains

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Manuel; Rodríguez, Juana; Soliveri, Juan; Copa, José L.; Pérez, María I.; Arias, María E.

    1994-01-01

    Fifty actinomycete strains isolated from lignocellulosic substrates were examined for the ability to remove the color from a paper mill effluent obtained after semichemical alkaline pulping of wheat straw. Streptomyces sp. strains UAH 15, UAH 23, UAH 30, and UAH 51 were selected for their ability to decolorize the effluent in a liquid medium containing 1% (wt/vol) glycerol, 0.2% (wt/vol) ammonium sulfate, and 80% (vol/vol) effluent. The highest levels of decolorization achieved after the strains grew were 60 to 65%. Strains UAH 30 and UAH 51 were selected for further study because of their different patterns of effluent decolorization during growth. Fractionation of the decolorized effluent by gel permeation chromatography demonstrated that there were reductions in the levels of absorbance of the high- and medium-molecular-weight compounds. These fractions were mainly responsible for the color of the effluent, while the last fractions, the low-molecular-weight compounds, could have been responsible for the residual color of the decolorized effluent. Thin-layer chromatography revealed significant differences among the patterns of bands corresponding to the acidified supernatants obtained after precipitation of alkali-lignin from the effluent samples decolorized by different Streptomyces strains. Images PMID:16349426

  3. Biological monitoring of Upper Three Runs Creek, Savannah River Plant, Aiken County, South Carolina. Final report on macroinvertebrate stream assessments for F/H area ETF effluent discharge, July 1987--February 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, W.L.

    1991-10-01

    In anticipation of the fall 1988 start up of effluent discharges into Upper Three Creek by the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC, a two and one half year biological study was initiated in June 1987. Upper Three Runs Creek is an intensively studied fourth order stream known for its high species richness. Designed to assess the potential impact of F?H area effluent on the creek, the study includes qualitative and quantitative macroinvertebrate stream surveys at five sites, chronic toxicity testing of the effluent, water chemistry and bioaccumulation analysis. This final report presents the results of both pre-operational and post-operational qualitative and quantitative (artificial substrate) macroinvertebrate studies. Six quantitative and three qualitative studies were conducted prior to the initial release of the F/H ETF effluent and five quantitative and two qualitative studies were conducted post-operationally.

  4. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. 1982 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Griggs, K.S.; Gonzalez, M.A.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1983-03-14

    Environmental monitoring efforts spanned air, water, vegetation and foodstuffs, and radiation doses. Monitoring data collection, analysis, and evaluation are presented for air, soils, sewage, water, vegetation and foodstuffs, milk, and general environmental radioactivity. Non-radioactive monitoring addresses beryllium, chemical effluents in sewage, noise pollution, and storm runoff and liquid discharge site pollutants. Quality assurance efforts are addressed. Five appendices present tabulated data; environmental activity concentration; dose calculation method; discharge limits to sanitary sewer systems of Livermore; and sampling and analytical procedures for environmental monitoring. (PSB)

  5. Development of Advanced Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy for Monitoring Corrosion in Simulated DOE Liquid Waste

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonal, Digby D.; Marx, Brian M.; Ahn, Sejin; Ruiz, Julio de; Soundararajan, Balaji; Smith, Morgan; Coulson, Wendy

    2005-06-15

    Various forms of general and localized corrosion represent principal threats to the integrity of DOE liquid waste storage tanks. These tanks, which are of a single wall or double wall design, depending upon their age, are fabricated from welded carbon steel and contain a complex waste-form comprised of NaOH and NaNO3, along with trace amounts of phosphate, sulfate, carbonate, and chloride. Because waste leakage can have a profound environmental impact, considerable interest exists in predicting the accumulation of corrosion damage, so as to more effectively schedule maintenance and repair.

  6. Analysis of polyphenolic antioxidants from the fruits of three pouteria species by selected ion monitoring liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Yang, Hui; Basile, Margaret J; Kennelly, Edward J

    2004-09-22

    Pouteria campechiana, Pouteria sapota, and Pouteria viridis are tropical plants in the Sapotaceae family that bear edible fruits. The fresh fruits of these three Pouteria species were each extracted, and activity-guided fractionations were performed to identify the antioxidant constituents. Seven polyphenolic antioxidants, gallic acid (1), (+)-gallocatechin (2), (+)-catechin (3), (-)-epicatechin (4), dihydromyricetin (5), (+)-catechin-3-O-gallate (6), and myricitrin (7), were isolated and identified. Extracts of the three Pouteria fruits were analyzed by a selected ion monitoring liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method to quantify their polyphenolic antioxidants. The highest level of the seven measured polyphenols was found in P. sapota, the second highest in P. viridis, and the lowest in P. campechiana. The levels of the seven polyphenols corresponded with the results of the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl assay, by which P. sapota had the highest antioxidant activity, P. viridis the second highest, and P. campechiana the lowest. PMID:15366835

  7. Capacitance monitoring of the infiltration of ceramic particulate preforms with liquid metals at 750 to 850 C

    SciTech Connect

    Jonas, T.R.; Cornie, J.A.; Russell, K.C. )

    1993-06-01

    The authors previously developed a capacitance technique to determine the position of the infiltration front as a function of time during the pressure infiltration of ceramic particulate preforms with liquid metals. In the present work, the technique was extended to higher temperatures and was used to monitor the infiltration of alumina particulate preforms with Al-Mg alloys and silicon carbide particulate preforms with Sn and an Al-Si alloy. The infiltration front position could be determined in the alumina preforms. However, it was not possible to clearly interpret the results obtained from the infiltration of semiconducting silicon carbide preforms. The observed range of capacitance circuit voltage to infiltration distance ratios agreed with the predicted range for both simulated and alumina preform infiltration experiments. Formation of unstable infiltration fronts could also be detected.

  8. Acoustic emission monitoring of hydraulic fracturing laboratory experiment with supercritical and liquid CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Aoyagi, Kazuhei; Niwa, Tomoya; Chen, Youqing; Murata, Sumihiko; Chen, Qu; Nakayama, Yoshiki

    2012-08-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is often used for enhanced oil recovery in depleted petroleum reservoirs, and its behavior in rock is also of interest in CO2 capture and storage projects. CO2 usually becomes supercritical (SC-CO2) at depths greater than 1,000 m, while it is liquid (L-CO2) at low temperatures. The viscosity of L-CO2 is one order lower than that of normal liquid water, and that of SC-CO2 is much lower still. To clarify fracture behavior induced with injection of the low viscosity fluids, we conducted hydraulic fracturing experiments using 17 cm cubic granite blocks. The AE sources with the SC- and L-CO2 injections tend to distribute in a larger area than those with water injection, and furthermore, SC-CO2 tended to generate cracks extending more three dimensionally rather than along a flat plane than L-CO2. It was also found that the breakdown pressures for SC- and L-CO2 injections are expected to be considerably lower than for water.

  9. TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL VARIABILITY IN THE ESTROGENICITY OF A MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER EFFLUENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenicity of a municipal wastewater effluent was monitored using the vitellogenin biomarker in adult male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Variability in expression of the vitellogenin biomarker was evident among monitoring periods. Significant increases in plasma vit...

  10. Radiological effluents released and public doses from nuclear power plants in Korea.

    PubMed

    Son, Jung Kwon; Kim, Hee Geun; Kong, Tae Young; Ko, Jong Hyun; Lee, Goung Jin

    2013-08-01

    As of the end of 2010, there were 20 commercially operating nuclear reactors in Korea. Releases of radioactive effluents from nuclear power plants (NPPs) have increased continuously; the total radioactivity of effluent amount released in 2010 was 547.12 TBq. From 2001 to 2010, the annual average radioactivity of gaseous and liquid effluents per reactor was 11.61 TBq for pressurised water reactors and 118.12 TBq for pressurised heavy water reactors. Most of the radioactivity from gaseous and liquid effluents came from tritium. Based on the results of release trends and analyses, the characteristics of effluents have been investigated to improve the management of radioactive effluents from NPPs. PMID:23509396

  11. Laser measurement of extinction coefficients of highly absorbing liquids. [airborne oil spill monitoring application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Kincaid, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    A coaxial dual-channel laser system has been developed for the measurement of extinction coefficients of highly absorbing liquids. An empty wedge-shaped sample cell is first translated laterally through a He-Ne laser beam to measure the differential thickness using interference fringes in reflection. The wedge cell is carefully filled with the oil sample and translated through the coaxially positioned dye laser beam for the differential attenuation or extinction measurement. Optional use of the instrumentation as a single-channel extinction measurement system and also as a refractometer is detailed. The system and calibration techniques were applied to the measurement of two crude oils whose extinction values were required to complete the analysis of airborne laser data gathered over four controlled spills.

  12. Controls, health assessment, and conditional monitoring for large, reusable, liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cikanek, H. A., III

    1986-01-01

    Past and future progress in the performance of control systems for large, liquid rocket engines typified such as current state-of-the-art, the Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), is discussed. Details of the first decade of efforts, which culminates in the F-1 and J-2 Saturn engines control systems, are traced, noting problem modes and improvements which were implemented to realize the SSME. Future control system designs, to accommodate the requirements of operation of engines for a heavy lift launch vehicle, an orbital transfer vehicle and the aerospace plane, are summarized. Generic design upgrades needed include an expanded range of fault detection, maintenance as-needed instead of as-scheduled, reduced human involvement in engine operations, and increased control of internal engine states. Current NASA technology development programs aimed at meeting the future control system requirements are described.

  13. Accuracy of liquid cytology in the diagnosis and monitoring of eosinophilic oesophagitis

    PubMed Central

    García Rojo, Marcial; López Viedma, Bartolomé; de la Santa Belda, Eva; Palomar, Pilar Olivencia; Torrijos, Elisa Gómez; López, Lucia González; Camacho, José Olmedo

    2014-01-01

    Background Oesophagoscopy with biopsy is considered the gold standard for diagnosing and monitoring eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE). Therefore is important to discover less-invasive diagnostic methods. Methods Cytology specimens were obtained in patients with active EoE (AEoE) (≥15 eos/hpf) and EoE in remission (EoER) (<15 eos/hpf). The samples were assessed by two independent pathologists and were compared with biopsy samples. EoE cytology specimens were compared with specimens obtained from patients with GERD. Results Specimens of 36 patients (69.4% male, mean age 30.88 years) were included. AEoE (17, 47.2%), EoER (11, 30.5%) and GERD (22.2%). eos/hpf in cytology (AEoE 9.23 vs. EoER 1.54 vs. GERD 2, p = 0.01). Linear correlation between eos/hpf average biopsy and cytology eos/hpf: r = 0.57, p < 0.001. For diagnosis of EoE ≥3 eos/hpf in cytology obtained a sensitivity of 70%, specificity 81%, PPV 86% and NPV 60% (AUC = 0.81, p = 0.01). For detection of AEoE, ≥3 eos/hpf in LBC obtained a sensitivity of 70%, specificity 82%, PPV 81% and NPV 66% (AUC = 0.87, p = 0.001). Conclusions LBC in oesophageal aspirate seems to be effective for the diagnosis and monitoring activity in EoE. These results support the usefulness of non-invasive methods for the diagnosis and monitoring of EoE. PMID:25452842

  14. Ionic liquids as passive monitors of an atmosphere rich in mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, M. A.; Solis, C.; Andrade, E.; Mondragón, M. A.; Isaac-Olivé, K.; Rocha, M. F.

    2011-12-01

    An ionic liquid (IL) is a compound at dynamical equilibrium in which at any time more than 99.99% of it is shifted toward the ionic rather than the molecular species. ILs have raised considerable attention during the past few years due to their extremely low vapor pressure, good electrolytic properties and wide electrochemical window. Also, they remain liquid at a wide range of temperature. ILs are able to dissolve some non polar chemical species as well as some very polar ones. Their main applications have been so far in environmental chemistry and can be considered as environmental friendly solvents. Mercury is a naturally occurring element that is found in the atmosphere, generally present in three forms: elemental (Hg 0), oxidized, and particulate-bounded. It is a very toxic element and its assessment in the environment is highly desired, however due to its volatility is an element difficult to detect by conventional sampling methods. This paper presents the results of a research on mercury binding using ILs. The following ILs were tested: 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium-hexafluorophosphate [BMIM][PF 6] and 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium thiocyanate [BMIM] [SCN]. Known amounts of ILs were introduced, in the form of bulk or thin coating layer, to a 70 mL glass tube with a known amount of metallic Hg and sealed with a PTFE® cap. The concentration of Hg in the IL was measured after 12 weeks of exposure. Total Hg determination was performed by particle X-ray emission (PIXE). Changes in the spectroscopic properties due to the Hg binding were followed by Raman and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The sorption efficiency for the ILs under different experimental conditions is discussed.

  15. Piezoelectrically Actuated Microvalve for Liquid Effluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2003-01-01

    Modifications have been proposed to effect further improvement of the device described in Improved Piezoelectrically Actuated Microvalve (NPO-30158), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 1 (January 2002), page 29. To recapitulate: What is being developed is a prototype of valves for microfluidic systems and other microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). The version of the valve reported in the cited previous article included a base (which contained a seat, an inlet, and an outlet), a diaphragm, and a linear actuator. With the exception of the actuator, the parts were micromachined from silicon. The linear actuator consisted of a stack of piezoelectric disks in a rigid housing. To make the diaphragm apply a large sealing force on the inlet and outlet, the piezoelectric stack was compressed into a slightly contracted condition during assembly of the valve. Application of a voltage across the stack caused the stack to contract into an even more compressed condition, lifting the diaphragm away from the seat, thereby creating a narrow channel between the inlet and outlet. The positions of the inlet and outlet, relative to the diaphragm and seat, were such that the inlet flow and pressure contributed to sealing and thus to a desired normally-closed mode of operation.

  16. A guide for effluent radiological measurements at DOE installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corley, J. P.; Corbit, C. D.

    1983-07-01

    Effluent monitoring and reporting programs are maintained at all US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities that may: (1) discharge significant concentrations of radioactivity in relation to applicable standards, or (2) discharge quantities of radioactivity that have potential health and safety or other environmental significance. This Guide is intended to provide supplemental guidance to DOE Orders on methods, procedures, and performance criteria to bring more comparable rationale to DOE facility effluent measurement programs and promote compliance with applicable standards and provide the DOE Office of Operational Safety (OOS) and Operations Offices with an additional tool for evaluating effluent measurement programs at DOE facilities.

  17. Single-mode D-shaped optical fiber sensor for the refractive index monitoring of liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qazi, Hummad Habib; Mohammad, Abu Bakar bin; Ahmad, Harith; Zamani Zulkifli, Mohd; Wadi Harun, Sulaiman

    2016-04-01

    A new fabrication method is introduced for the production of D-shaped optical fiber. A mechanical end and edge polishing system with aluminum oxide polishing film is utilized to perform sequential polishing on one side (lengthwise) of single-mode optical fiber in order to obtain a D-shaped cross section. Adjusting specific mechanical parameters allows for control of the volume of the D-shaped zone, while the fiber surface smoothness is governed by selection of polishing film grit size. To meet the accuracy and repeatability requirements, optical power loss is monitored during the entire polishing process in situ and in real time. This proposed technique possesses advantages of rapidity, safety, simplicity, repeatability and stability with high precision in comparison with contemporary methods for production. Sensor performance tests on the fiber reveal a linear response with linearity up to R2 = 0.984 for surrounding refractive index in the range of 1.320-1.342 refractive index, which corresponds to different concentrations of the glucose solution test environment. The produced D-shaped optical fiber has potential sensing and monitoring applications in chemical, environmental, biological and biochemical fields.

  18. Application of Denaturing High-Performance Liquid Chromatography for Monitoring Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Oil Fields

    PubMed Central

    Nyyssönen, Mari; Bomberg, Malin; Laitila, Arja; Simell, Jaakko; Kapanen, Anu; Juvonen, Riikka

    2013-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) participate in microbially induced corrosion (MIC) of equipment and H2S-driven reservoir souring in oil field sites. Successful management of industrial processes requires methods that allow robust monitoring of microbial communities. This study investigated the applicability of denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) targeting the dissimilatory sulfite reductase ß-subunit (dsrB) gene for monitoring SRB communities in oil field samples from the North Sea, the United States, and Brazil. Fifteen of the 28 screened samples gave a positive result in real-time PCR assays, containing 9 × 101 to 6 × 105 dsrB gene copies ml−1. DHPLC and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) community profiles of the PCR-positive samples shared an overall similarity; both methods revealed the same samples to have the lowest and highest diversity. The SRB communities were diverse, and different dsrB compositions were detected at different geographical locations. The identified dsrB gene sequences belonged to several phylogenetic groups, such as Desulfovibrio, Desulfococcus, Desulfomicrobium, Desulfobulbus, Desulfotignum, Desulfonatronovibrio, and Desulfonauticus. DHPLC showed an advantage over DGGE in that the community profiles were very reproducible from run to run, and the resolved gene fragments could be collected using an automated fraction collector and sequenced without a further purification step. DGGE, on the other hand, included casting of gradient gels, and several rounds of rerunning, excising, and reamplification of bands were needed for successful sequencing. In summary, DHPLC proved to be a suitable tool for routine monitoring of the diversity of SRB communities in oil field samples. PMID:23793633

  19. Development of Advanced Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy for Monitoring Corrosion in Simulated DOE Liquid Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Digby Macdonald; Brian Marx; Balaji Soundararajan; Morgan Smith

    2005-07-28

    The different tasks that have been carried out under the current program are as follows: (1) Theoretical and experimental assessment of general corrosion of iron/steel in borate buffer solutions by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ellipsometry and XPS techniques; (2) Development of a damage function analysis (DFA), which would help in predicting the accumulation of damage due to pitting corrosion in an environment prototypical of DOE liquid waste systems; (3) Experimental measurement of crack growth rate, acoustic emission signals, and coupling currents for fracture in carbon and low alloy steels as functions of mechanical (stress intensity), chemical (conductivity), electrochemical (corrosion potential, ECP), and microstructural (grain size, precipitate size, etc) variables in a systematic manner, with particular attention being focused on the structure of the noise in the current and its correlation with the acoustic emissions; (4) Development of fracture mechanisms for carbon and low alloy steels that are consistent with the crack growth rate, coupling current data and acoustic emissions; (5) Inserting advanced crack growth rate models for SCC into existing deterministic codes for predicting the evolution of corrosion damage in DOE liquid waste storage tanks; (6) Computer simulation of the anodic and cathodic activity on the surface of the steel samples in order to exactly predict the corrosion mechanisms; (7) Wavelet analysis of EC noise data from steel samples undergoing corrosion in an environment similar to that of the high level waste storage containers, to extract data pertaining to general, pitting and stress corrosion processes, from the overall data. The work has yielded a number of important findings, including an unequivocal demonstration of the role of chloride ion in passivity breakdown on nickel in terms of cation vacancy generation within the passive film, the first detection and characterization of individual micro fracture

  20. Monitoring dediazoniation product formation by high-performance liquid chromatography after derivatization.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Díaz, Carlos; González-Romero, Elisa

    2003-03-14

    A derivatization protocol that exploits the rapid reaction between arenediazonium ions and a suitable coupling agent followed by high-performance liquid chromatography analyses of the reaction mixture was employed to determine the product distribution, the rate constants for product formation and the association constant of 4-nitrobenzenediazonium, PNBD, ion with beta-cyclodextrin, beta-CD. The derivatization of PNBD with the coupling agent leads to the formation of a stable azo dye that prevents by-side reactions of PNBD with the solvents of the mobile phase, including water, or the metallic parts of the chromatographic system that would eventually lead to erroneous identification and quantification of dediazoniation products. The results show that in the presence of beta-CD, nitrobenzene is formed at the expense of 4-nitrophenol, which is the major product in its absence. The observed rate constants for the interaction between PNBD and beta-CD increase upon increasing [beta-CD] showing a saturation profile indicative of the formation of an inclusion complex between PNBD and beta-CD. By fitting the experimental data to a simplified Lineaweaver-Burk equation, the corresponding association constant and the maximum acceleration rate of beta-CD towards PNBD were estimated. The protocol is applicable under a variety of experimental conditions provided that the rate of the coupling reaction is much faster than that of dediazoniation. PMID:12650254

  1. Development of Advanced Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy for Monitoring Corrosion in Simulated DOE Liquid Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Digby D. Macdonald; Brian M. Marx; Sejin Ahn; Julio de Ruiz; Balaji Soundararaja; Morgan Smith; and Wendy Coulson

    2008-01-15

    Various forms of general and localized corrosion represent principal threats to the integrity of DOE liquid waste storage tanks. These tanks, which are of a single wall or double wall design, depending upon their age, are fabricated from welded carbon steel and contain a complex waste-form comprised of NaOH and NaNO{sub 3}, along with trace amounts of phosphate, sulfate, carbonate, and chloride. Because waste leakage can have a profound environmental impact, considerable interest exists in predicting the accumulation of corrosion damage, so as to more effectively schedule maintenance and repair. The different tasks that are being carried out under the current program are as follows: (1) Theoretical and experimental assessment of general corrosion of iron/steel in borate buffer solutions by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ellipsometry and XPS techniques; (2) Development of a damage function analysis (DFA) which would help in predicting the accumulation of damage due to pitting corrosion in an environment prototypical of DOE liquid waste systems; (3) Experimental measurement of crack growth rate, acoustic emission signals and coupling currents for fracture in carbon and low alloy steels as functions of mechanical (stress intensity), chemical (conductivity), electrochemical (corrosion potential, ECP), and microstructural (grain size, precipitate size, etc) variables in a systematic manner, with particular attention being focused on the structure of the noise in the current and its correlation with the acoustic emissions; (4) Development of fracture mechanisms for carbon and low alloy steels that are consistent with the crack growth rate, coupling current data and acoustic emissions; (5) Inserting advanced crack growth rate models for SCC into existing deterministic codes for predicting the evolution of corrosion damage in DOE liquid waste storage tanks; (6) Computer simulation of the anodic and cathodic activity on the surface of the steel samples

  2. Ciclosporin monitoring in kidney-transplanted children: high-performance liquid chromatography versus radioimmunoassay.

    PubMed

    Khoss, A E; Hamilton, G; Illievich, V; Mühlbacher, F; Roth, E; Steger, H; Wladika, W; Howanietz, H; Balzar, E

    Due to large individual differences in absorption, utilization and metabolism of the predominantly used drug ciclosporin (CsA) for selective immunosuppression in kidney graft recipients, therapeutic blood levels (immunosuppression/toxicity) can be maintained only by frequent measurements of the CsA concentrations in blood samples and dosage readjustments. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the usefulness of a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for native CsA and a radioimmunoassay (RIA) method for CsA and metabolites measuring simultaneously using both HPLC and RIA and creatinine serum levels (Crea) in whole blood samples from 19 kidney-transplanted children over a 3-year observation period. By comparison of the results of HPLC, RIA and Crea determinations (n = 1,284) we found a highly variable metabolization rate (RIA/HPLC ratio) of 5.25 +/- 2.33 (range 1.37-12.9). No direct correlation was found between changes in RIA/HPLC ratios and kidney function, rejection and infection periods. Dosage/HPLC and dosage/RIA showed no significant correlation. A higher correlation between HPLC, Crea and nephrotoxicity was found than between RIA and Crea. Because of rapid and large variations of CsA metabolization rates in young allograft recipients, we recommend measurements of CsA blood concentrations with any HPLC method specific for unchanged drug, since CsA metabolites detected by RIA, at least those which are most abundant, have less immunosuppressive and toxic effects. PMID:3075152

  3. Removal of phosphorus from livestock effluents.

    PubMed

    Szogi, Ariel A; Vanotti, Matias B

    2009-01-01

    For removal of phosphorus (P) from swine liquid manure before land application, we developed a treatment process that produces low P effluents and a valuable P by-product with minimal chemical addition and ammonia losses. The new wastewater process included two sequential steps: (i) biological nitrification and (ii) increasing the pH of the nitrified wastewater to precipitate P. We hypothesized that by reduction of inorganic buffers (NH(4)(+) and carbonate alkalinity) via nitrification, P could be selectively removed by subsequent hydrated lime [Ca(OH)(2)] addition. The objective of the study was to assess if this new treatment could consistently reduce inorganic buffer capacity with varied initial concentrations of N (100-723 mg NH(4)(+) L(-1)), P (26-85 mg TP L(-1)), and alkalinity (953-3063 mg CaCO(3) L(-1)), and then efficiently remove P from swine lagoon liquid. The process was tested with surface lagoon liquids from 10 typical swine farms in North Carolina. Each lagoon liquid received treatment in a nitrification bioreactor, followed by chemical treatment with Ca(OH)(2) at Ca rates of 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 mmol L(-1) to precipitate P. This configuration was compared with a control that received the same Ca rates but without the nitrification pretreatment. The new process significantly reduced >90% the inorganic buffers concentrations compared with the control and prevented ammonia losses. Subsequent lime addition resulted in efficient pH increase to > or = 9.5 for optimum P precipitation in the nitrified liquid and significant reduction of effluent total P concentration versus the control. With this new process, the total P concentration in treated liquid effluent can be adjusted for on-farm use with up to >90% of P removal. The recovered solid Ca phosphate material can be easily exported from the farm and reused as P fertilizer. Therefore, the new process can be used to reduce the P content in livestock effluents to levels that would diminish problems of

  4. Layered Plant-Growth Media for Optimizing Gaseous, Liquid and Nutrient Requirements: Modeling, Design and Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinse, R.; Jones, S. B.; Bingham, G.; Bugbee, B.

    2006-12-01

    Rigorous management of restricted root zones utilizing coarse-textured porous media greatly benefits from optimizing the gas-water balance within plant-growth media. Geophysical techniques can help to quantify root- zone parameters like water content, air-filled porosity, temperature and nutrient concentration to better address the root systems performance. The efficiency of plant growth amid high root densities and limited volumes is critically linked to maintaining a favorable water content/air-filled porosity balance while considering adequate fluxes to replenish water at decreasing hydraulic conductivities during uptake. Volumes adjacent to roots also need to be optimized to provide adequate nutrients throughout the plant's life cycle while avoiding excessive salt concentrations. Our objectives were to (1) design and model an optimized root zone system using optimized porous media layers, (2) verify our design by monitoring the water content distribution and tracking nutrient release and transport, and (3) mimic water and nutrient uptake using plants or wicks to draw water from the root system. We developed a unique root-zone system using layered Ottawa sands promoting vertically uniform water contents and air-filled porosities. Watering was achieved by maintaining a shallow saturated layer at the bottom of the column and allowing capillarity to draw water upward, where coarser particle sizes formed the bottom layers with finer particles sizes forming the layers above. The depth of each layer was designed to optimize water content based on measurements and modeling of the wetting water retention curves. Layer boundaries were chosen to retain saturation between 50 and 85 percent. The saturation distribution was verified by dual-probe heat-pulse water-content sensors. The nutrient experiment involved embedding slow release fertilizer in the porous media in order to detect variations in electrical resistivity versus time during the release, diffusion and uptake of

  5. Fast liquid chromatography separation and multiple-reaction monitoring mass spectrometric detection of neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Hammad, Loubna A; Neely, Matthew; Bridge, Bob; Mechref, Yehia

    2009-07-01

    We describe here the fast LC-MS/MS separation of a mixture of neurotransmitters consisting of dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, 3,4-dihydroxybenzylamine (DHBA), salsolinol, serotonin, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The new UltiMate 3000 Rapid Separation system (RSLC) was successfully coupled to the 4000 QTRAP mass spectrometer operating in multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The separation was attained using a 100 mm length, 2.2 microm particle size Acclaim column at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. The column back pressure was 350 bar, while the total run time including column re-equilibration was 5.2 min. The peak resolution was minimally affected by the fast separation. The RSLC-MRM separation was found to have a precision range based on peak area for 50 replicate runs of 2-5% CV for all analytes, and the reproducibility of the retention time for all analytes was found to range from 0-2% CV. The described method represents an almost seven times shorter analysis time of neurotransmitters using LC/MRM which is very useful in screening large quantities of biological samples for various neurotransmitters. PMID:19569096

  6. Multiple-reaction monitoring liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for monosaccharide compositional analysis of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Hammad, Loubna A; Saleh, Marwa M; Novotny, Milos V; Mechref, Yehia

    2009-06-01

    A simple, sensitive, and rapid quantitative LC-MS/MS assay was designed for the simultaneous quantification of free and glycoprotein bound monosaccharides using a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) approach. This study represents the first example of using LC-MS/MS methods to simultaneously quantify all common glycoprotein monosaccharides, including neutral and acidic monosaccharides. Sialic acids and reduced forms of neutral monosaccharides are efficiently separated using a porous graphitized carbon column. Neutral monosaccharide molecules are detected as their alditol acetate anion adducts [M + CH(3)CO(2)](-) using electrospray ionization in negative ion MRM mode, while sialic acids are detected as deprotonated ions [M - H](-). The new method exhibits very high sensitivity to carbohydrates with limits of detection as low as 1 pg for glucose, galactose, and mannose, and below 10 pg for other monosaccharides. The linearity of the described approach spans over three orders of magnitudes (pg to ng). The method effectively quantified monosaccharides originating from as little as 1 microg of fetuin, ribonuclease B, peroxidase, and alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein human (AGP) with results consistent with literature values and with independent CE-LIF measurements. The method is robust, rapid, and highly sensitive. It does not require derivatization or postcolumn addition of reagents. PMID:19318280

  7. Pd Nanoparticle Formation in Ionic Liquid Thin Films Monitored by in situ Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mehl, Sascha; Toghan, Arafat; Bauer, Tanja; Brummel, Olaf; Taccardi, Nicola; Wasserscheid, Peter; Libuda, Jörg

    2015-11-10

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are flexible reaction media and solvents for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles (NPs). Here, we describe a new preparation method for metallic NPs in nanometer thick films of ultraclean ILs in an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment. CO-covered Pd NPs are formed by simultaneous and by sequential physical vapor deposition (PVD) of the IL and the metal in the presence of low partial pressures of CO. The film thickness and the particle size can be controlled by the deposition parameters. We followed the formation of the NPs and their thermal behavior by time-resolved IR reflection absorption spectroscopy (TP-IRAS) and by temperature-programmed IRAS (TR-IRAS). Codeposition of Pd and [C1C2Im][OTf] in CO at 100 K leads to the growth of homogeneous multilayer films of CO-covered Pd aggregates in an IL matrix. The size of these NPs can be controlled by the metal fraction in the co-deposit. With increasing metal fraction, the size of the Pd NPs also increases. At very low metal content, small Pd carbonyl-like species are formed, which bind CO in on-top geometry only. Upon annealing, the [OTf](-) anion coadsorbs at the NP surface and partially displaces CO. Co-adsorption of CO and IL is indicated by a strong red-shift of the CO stretching bands. While the weakly bound on-top CO is mainly replaced below the melting transition of the IL, coadsorbate shells with bridge-bonded CO and IL are stable well above the melting point. Larger three-dimensional Pd NPs can be prepared by PVD of Pd onto a solid [C1C2Im][OTf] film at 100 K. Upon annealing, on-top CO desorbs from these NPs below 200 K. Upon melting of the IL film, the CO-covered Pd NPs immerse into the IL and again form a stable coadsorbate shell that consists of bridge-bonded CO and the IL. PMID:26479118

  8. Monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2004-11-23

    The invention provides apparatus and methods which facilitate movement of an instrument relative to an item or location being monitored and/or the item or location relative to the instrument, whilst successfully excluding extraneous ions from the detection location. Thus, ions generated by emissions from the item or location can successfully be monitored during movement. The technique employs sealing to exclude such ions, for instance, through an electro-field which attracts and discharges the ions prior to their entering the detecting location and/or using a magnetic field configured to repel the ions away from the detecting location.

  9. Electrical signatures of ethanol-liquid mixtures: implications for monitoring biofuels migration in the subsurface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Personna, Yves Robert; Slater, Lee; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Werkema, Dale; Szabo, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol (EtOH), an emerging contaminant with potential direct and indirect environmental effects, poses threats to water supplies when spilled in large volumes. A series of experiments was directed at understanding the electrical geophysical signatures arising from groundwater contamination by ethanol. Conductivity measurements were performed at the laboratory scale on EtOH–water mixtures (0 to 0.97 v/v EtOH) and EtOH–salt solution mixtures (0 to 0.99 v/v EtOH) with and without a sand matrix using a conductivity probe and a four-electrode electrical measurement over the low frequency range (1–1000 Hz). A Lichtenecker–Rother (L–R) type mixing model was used to simulate electrical conductivity as a function of EtOH concentration in the mixture. For all three experimental treatments increasing EtOH concentration resulted in a decrease in measured conductivity magnitude (|σ|). The applied L–R model fitted the experimental data at concentration ≤ 0.4 v/v EtOH, presumably due to predominant and symmetric intermolecular (EtOH–water) interaction in the mixture. The deviation of the experimental |σ| data from the model prediction at higher EtOH concentrations may be associated with hydrophobic effects of EtOH–EtOH interactions in the mixture. The |σ| data presumably reflected changes in relative strength of the three types of interactions (water–water, EtOH–water, and EtOH–EtOH) occurring simultaneously in EtOH–water mixtures as the ratio of EtOH to water changed. No evidence of measurable polarization effects at the EtOH–water and EtOH–water–mineral interfaces over the investigated frequency range was found. Our results indicate the potential for using electrical measurements to characterize and monitor EtOH spills in the subsurface.

  10. Circulating microRNA signature as liquid-biopsy to monitor lung cancer in low-dose computed tomography screening

    PubMed Central

    Marchiano, Alfonso; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Galeone, Carlotta; Verri, Carla; Suatoni, Paola; Sverzellati, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Liquid biopsies can detect biomarkers carrying information on the development and progression of cancer. We demonstrated that a 24 plasma-based microRNA signature classifier (MSC) was capable of increasing the specificity of low dose computed tomography (LDCT) in a lung cancer screening trial. In the present study, we tested the prognostic performance of MSC, and its ability to monitor disease status recurrence in LDCT screening-detected lung cancers. Between 2000 and 2010, 3411 heavy smokers enrolled in two screening programmes, underwent annual or biennial LDCT. During the first five years of screening, 84 lung cancer patients were classified according to one of the three MSC levels of risk: high, intermediate or low. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed according to MSC and clinico-pathological information. Follow-up MSC analysis was performed on longitudinal plasma samples (n = 100) collected from 31 patients before and after surgical resection. Five-year survival was 88.9% for low risk, 79.5% for intermediate risk and 40.1% for high risk MSC (p = 0.001). The prognostic power of MSC persisted after adjusting for tumor stage (p = 0.02) and when the analysis was restricted to LDCT-detected cases after exclusion of interval cancers (p < 0.001). The MSC risk level decreased after surgery in 76% of the 25 high-intermediate subjects who remained disease free, whereas in relapsing patients an increase of the MSC risk level was observed at the time of detection of second primary tumor or metastatic progression. These results encourage exploiting the MSC test for lung cancer monitoring in LDCT screening for lung cancer. PMID:26451608

  11. Circulating microRNA signature as liquid-biopsy to monitor lung cancer in low-dose computed tomography screening.

    PubMed

    Sestini, Stefano; Boeri, Mattia; Marchiano, Alfonso; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Galeone, Carlotta; Verri, Carla; Suatoni, Paola; Sverzellati, Nicola; La Vecchia, Carlo; Sozzi, Gabriella; Pastorino, Ugo

    2015-10-20

    Liquid biopsies can detect biomarkers carrying information on the development and progression of cancer. We demonstrated that a 24 plasma-based microRNA signature classifier (MSC) was capable of increasing the specificity of low dose computed tomography (LDCT) in a lung cancer screening trial. In the present study, we tested the prognostic performance of MSC, and its ability to monitor disease status recurrence in LDCT screening-detected lung cancers.Between 2000 and 2010, 3411 heavy smokers enrolled in two screening programmes, underwent annual or biennial LDCT. During the first five years of screening, 84 lung cancer patients were classified according to one of the three MSC levels of risk: high, intermediate or low. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed according to MSC and clinico-pathological information. Follow-up MSC analysis was performed on longitudinal plasma samples (n = 100) collected from 31 patients before and after surgical resection.Five-year survival was 88.9% for low risk, 79.5% for intermediate risk and 40.1% for high risk MSC (p = 0.001). The prognostic power of MSC persisted after adjusting for tumor stage (p = 0.02) and when the analysis was restricted to LDCT-detected cases after exclusion of interval cancers (p < 0.001). The MSC risk level decreased after surgery in 76% of the 25 high-intermediate subjects who remained disease free, whereas in relapsing patients an increase of the MSC risk level was observed at the time of detection of second primary tumor or metastatic progression.These results encourage exploiting the MSC test for lung cancer monitoring in LDCT screening for lung cancer. PMID:26451608

  12. Photoelectrocatalytic decolorization and degradation of textile effluent using ZnO thin films.

    PubMed

    Sapkal, R T; Shinde, S S; Mahadik, M A; Mohite, V S; Waghmode, T R; Govindwar, S P; Rajpure, K Y; Bhosale, C H

    2012-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been successfully deposited onto fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass at substrate temperature of 400 °C and used as electrode in photoelectrocatalytic reactor. The untreated textile effluent was circulated through photoelectrocatalytic reactor under UVA illumination for the decolorization and degradation. Textile effluent was decolorized by 93% within 3h at room temperature with significant reduction in COD (69%). High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of samples before and after decolorization confirmed the degradation of dyes molecules from textile effluent into simpler oxidizable products. Phytotoxicity study revealed reduction in toxic nature of textile effluent after treatment. PMID:22727863

  13. Preliminary evaluation of liquid integrity monitoring methods for gunite and associated tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) are inactive, liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks located in and around the North and South Tank Farms (NTF and STF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These tanks, which contain a supernatant over a layer of radioactive sludge, are the subject of an ongoing treatability study that will determine the best way to remove the sludge and remediate the tanks. As part of this study, a preliminary assessment of liquid integrity (or ``tightness``) monitoring methods for the Gunite tanks has been conducted. Both an external and an internal liquid integrity monitoring method were evaluated, and a preliminary assessment of the liquid integrity of eight Gunite tanks was made with the internal method. The work presented in this report shows that six of the eight GAAT considered here are liquid tight and that, in the case of the other two, data quality was too poor to allow a conclusive decision. The analysis indicates that when the release detection approach described in this report is used during the upcoming treatability study, it will function as a sensitive and robust integrity monitoring system. Integrity assessments based on both the internal and external methods can be used as a means of documenting the integrity of the tanks before the initiation of in-tank operations. Assessments based on the external method can be used during these operations as a means of providing a nearly immediate indication of a release, should one occur. The external method of release detection measures the electrical conductivity of the water found in the dry wells associated with each of the tanks. This method is based on the fact that the conductivity of the liquid in the GAAT is very high, while the conductivity of the groundwater in the dry wells and the underdrain system for the GAAT is very low.

  14. Automatic identification approach for high-performance liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring fatty acid global profiling.

    PubMed

    Tie, Cai; Hu, Ting; Jia, Zhi-Xin; Zhang, Jin-Lan

    2015-08-18

    Fatty acids (FAs) are a group of lipid molecules that are essential to organisms. As potential biomarkers for different diseases, FAs have attracted increasing attention from both biological researchers and the pharmaceutical industry. A sensitive and accurate method for globally profiling and identifying FAs is required for biomarker discovery. The high selectivity and sensitivity of high-performance liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring (HPLC-MRM) gives it great potential to fulfill the need to identify FAs from complicated matrices. This paper developed a new approach for global FA profiling and identification for HPLC-MRM FA data mining. Mathematical models for identifying FAs were simulated using the isotope-induced retention time (RT) shift (IRS) and peak area ratios between parallel isotope peaks for a series of FA standards. The FA structures were predicated using another model based on the RT and molecular weight. Fully automated FA identification software was coded using the Qt platform based on these mathematical models. Different samples were used to verify the software. A high identification efficiency (greater than 75%) was observed when 96 FA species were identified in plasma. This FAs identification strategy promises to accelerate FA research and applications. PMID:26189701

  15. Quantification of monosaccharides through multiple-reaction monitoring liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry using an aminopropyl column.

    PubMed

    Hammad, Loubna A; Derryberry, Dakota Z; Jmeian, Yazen R; Mechref, Yehia

    2010-06-15

    A simple, sensitive, and reproducible quantitative liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method was designed for the simultaneous quantification of monosaccharides derived from glycoprotein and blood serum using a multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) approach. Sialic acids and neutral monosaccharides were efficiently separated using an amino-bonded silica phase column. Neutral monosaccharide molecules were detected as their aldol acetate anion adducts [M + CH(3)CO(2)](-) using electrospray ionization in negative ion MRM mode, while sialic acids were detected as deprotonated ions [M-H](-). The new method did not require a reduction step, and exhibited very high sensitivity to carbohydrates with limits of detection of 1 pg for the sugars studied. The linearity of the described approach spanned over three orders of magnitude (pg to ng). The method was validated for monosaccharides originating from N-linked glycans attached to glycoproteins and glycoproteins found in human blood serum. The method effectively quantified monosaccharides originating from as little as 1 microg of glycoprotein and 5 microL of blood serum. The method was robust, reproducible, and highly sensitive. It did not require reduction, derivatization or postcolumn addition of reagents. PMID:20486252

  16. Using confocal Raman microscopy to real-time monitor poplar cell wall swelling and dissolution during ionic liquid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xun; Ma, Jing; Ji, Zhe; Yang, Gui-Hua; Zhou, Xia; Xu, Feng

    2014-08-01

    The ionic liquids (ILs) are recognized as the potential solvents for the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials before biomass conversion. However, little knowledge of how the cell wall of biomass responds to the IL locally and dynamically during the pretreatment is available. In the current work, the process of IL pretreatment of poplar using 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2 mim][OAc]) was real-time monitored on a cellular level by employing confocal Raman microscopy. The results showed that the biomass dissolution during the IL pretreatment can be clearly divided into two stages: (1) slow penetration of IL, and (2) rapid dissolution of lignin and carbohydrates. In this case, the onset of the dissolution of these compositions occurred only after the cell wall of biomass swelled to a certain extent. Because the first stage was a slow process which determined the process reaction rate, it can be deduced that enhancing the penetration capacity of IL was crucial for improving the pretreatment efficiency. Based on the obtained results, a model was proposed to better understand how the plant cell wall responds to the IL before, during, and after pretreatment. PMID:24861030

  17. Multiplex Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Assay for Simultaneous Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Ribavirin, Boceprevir, and Telaprevir

    PubMed Central

    Aouri, Manel; Moradpour, Darius; Cavassini, Matthias; Mercier, Thomas; Buclin, Thierry; Csajka, Chantal; Telenti, Amalio; Rauch, Andri

    2013-01-01

    New directly acting antivirals (DAAs) that inhibit hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication are increasingly used for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. A marked pharmacokinetic variability and a high potential for drug-drug interactions between DAAs and numerous drug classes have been identified. In addition, ribavirin (RBV), commonly associated with hemolytic anemia, often requires dose adjustment, advocating for therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) in patients under combined antiviral therapy. However, an assay for the simultaneous analysis of RBV and DAAs constitutes an analytical challenge because of the large differences in polarity among these drugs, ranging from hydrophilic (RBV) to highly lipophilic (telaprevir [TVR]). Moreover, TVR is characterized by erratic behavior on standard octadecyl-based reversed-phase column chromatography and must be separated from VRT-127394, its inactive C-21 epimer metabolite. We have developed a convenient assay employing simple plasma protein precipitation, followed by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) for the simultaneous determination of levels of RBV, boceprevir, and TVR, as well as its metabolite VRT-127394, in plasma. This new, simple, rapid, and robust HPLC-MS/MS assay offers an efficient method of real-time TDM aimed at maximizing efficacy while minimizing the toxicity of antiviral therapy. PMID:23629707

  18. Monitoring gradient profile on-line in micro- and nano-high performance liquid chromatography using conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Chen, Apeng; Lu, Joann J; Cao, Chengxi; Liu, Shaorong

    2016-08-19

    In micro- or nano-flow high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), flow-splitters and gradient elutions are commonly used for reverse phase HPLC separations. When a flow splitter was used at a high split-ratio (e.g., 1000:1 or higher), the actual gradient may deviate away from the programmed gradient. Sometimes, mobile phase concentrations can deviate by as much as 5%. In this work, we noticed that the conductivity (σ) of a gradient decreased with the increasing organic-solvent fraction (φ). Based on the relationship between σ and φ, a method was developed for monitoring gradient profile on-line to record any deviations in these HPLC systems. The conductivity could be measured by a traditional conductivity detector or a capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detector (C(4)D). The method was applied for assessing the performance of an electroosmotic pump (EOP) based nano-HPLC. We also observed that σ value of the gradient changed with system pressure; a=0.0175ΔP (R(2)=0.964), where a is the percentage of the conductivity increase and ΔP is the system pressure in bar. This effect was also investigated. PMID:27435687

  19. A highly shape-adaptive, stretchable design based on conductive liquid for energy harvesting and self-powered biomechanical monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Fang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Niu, Simiao; Li, Shengming; Yin, Yajiang; Dai, Keren; Zhang, Guangjie; Lin, Long; Wen, Zhen; Guo, Hengyu; Wang, Jie; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Zi, Yunlong; Liao, Qingliang; You, Zheng; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-01-01

    The rapid growth of deformable and stretchable electronics calls for a deformable and stretchable power source. We report a scalable approach for energy harvesters and self-powered sensors that can be highly deformable and stretchable. With conductive liquid contained in a polymer cover, a shape-adaptive triboelectric nanogenerator (saTENG) unit can effectively harvest energy in various working modes. The saTENG can maintain its performance under a strain of as large as 300%. The saTENG is so flexible that it can be conformed to any three-dimensional and curvilinear surface. We demonstrate applications of the saTENG as a wearable power source and self-powered sensor to monitor biomechanical motion. A bracelet-like saTENG worn on the wrist can light up more than 80 light-emitting diodes. Owing to the highly scalable manufacturing process, the saTENG can be easily applied for large-area energy harvesting. In addition, the saTENG can be extended to extract energy from mechanical motion using flowing water as the electrode. This approach provides a new prospect for deformable and stretchable power sources, as well as self-powered sensors, and has potential applications in various areas such as robotics, biomechanics, physiology, kinesiology, and entertainment. PMID:27386560

  20. A highly shape-adaptive, stretchable design based on conductive liquid for energy harvesting and self-powered biomechanical monitoring.

    PubMed

    Yi, Fang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Niu, Simiao; Li, Shengming; Yin, Yajiang; Dai, Keren; Zhang, Guangjie; Lin, Long; Wen, Zhen; Guo, Hengyu; Wang, Jie; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Zi, Yunlong; Liao, Qingliang; You, Zheng; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-06-01

    The rapid growth of deformable and stretchable electronics calls for a deformable and stretchable power source. We report a scalable approach for energy harvesters and self-powered sensors that can be highly deformable and stretchable. With conductive liquid contained in a polymer cover, a shape-adaptive triboelectric nanogenerator (saTENG) unit can effectively harvest energy in various working modes. The saTENG can maintain its performance under a strain of as large as 300%. The saTENG is so flexible that it can be conformed to any three-dimensional and curvilinear surface. We demonstrate applications of the saTENG as a wearable power source and self-powered sensor to monitor biomechanical motion. A bracelet-like saTENG worn on the wrist can light up more than 80 light-emitting diodes. Owing to the highly scalable manufacturing process, the saTENG can be easily applied for large-area energy harvesting. In addition, the saTENG can be extended to extract energy from mechanical motion using flowing water as the electrode. This approach provides a new prospect for deformable and stretchable power sources, as well as self-powered sensors, and has potential applications in various areas such as robotics, biomechanics, physiology, kinesiology, and entertainment. PMID:27386560

  1. Chemical and Microbiological Water Quality of Subsurface Agricultural Drains during a Field Trial of Liquid Dairy Manure Effluent Application Rate and Varying Tillage Practices, Upper Tiffin Watershed, Southeastern Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haack, Sheridan Kidd; Duris, Joseph W.

    2008-01-01

    A field trial was done in the Upper Tiffin River Watershed, in southeastern Michigan, to determine the influence of liquid dairy manure effluent (LDME) management practices on the quality of agricultural subsurface-drain water. Samples from subsurface drains were analyzed for nutrients, fecal-coliform and Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria, antibiotics, chemicals typically detected in wastewater, and the occurrence of genes indicating the presence of shiga-toxin-producing E. coli, or of bovine-specific Bacteroidetes bacteria. Samples were collected from November 2, 2006, to March 20, 2007, from eight subsurface drains under field plots that received no LDME and no tillage (controls) or received 4,000 or 8,000 gallons per acre (gal/acre) of LDME and either no tillage or two different types of tillage. The two types of tillage tested were (1) ground-driven, rotary, subsurface cultivation and (2) rolling-tine aeration. Samples were collected before LDME application and at 4 hours, and 1, 2, 6, 7, and 14 days post-application. Nutrient concentrations were high in subsurface-drain water throughout the field-trial period and could not be attributed to the field-trial LDME application. Of the 59 drain-water samples, including those collected before LDME application and control samples for each date, 56 had concentrations greater than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), Ecoregion VI recommended surface-water criterion for total phosphorus, and all samples had concentrations greater than the recommended total nitrogen criterion. Nitrate + nitrite nitrogen concentration exceeded 20 milligrams per liter for every sample and contributed most to the total nitrogen concentrations. Substantial increases in drain-water concentrations of organic and ammonia nitrogen and total phosphorus were found for all treatments, including controls, at 14 days post-application after 0.84 inch of rainfall over 2 days. E. coli concentrations exceeded the USEPA recreational

  2. Silage effluent management: a review.

    PubMed

    Gebrehanna, M M; Gordon, R J; Madani, A; VanderZaag, A C; Wood, J D

    2014-10-01

    Silage effluent is a potent wastewater that can be produced when ensiling crops that have a high moisture content (MC). Silage effluent can cause fish-kills and eutrophication due to its high biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and nutrient content, respectively. It has a high acidity (pH ≈ 3.5-5) making it corrosive to steel and damaging to concrete, which makes handling, storage and disposal a challenge. Although being recognized as a concentrated wastewater, most research has focused on preventing its production. Despite noted imprecision in effluent production models-and therefore limited ability to predict when effluent will flow-there has been little research aimed at identifying effective reactive management options, such as containment and natural treatment systems. Increasing climate variability and intensifying livestock agriculture are issues that will place a greater importance on developing comprehensive, multi-layered management strategies that include both preventative and reactive measures. This paper reviews important factors governing the production of effluent, approaches to minimize effluent flows as well as treatment and disposal options. The challenges of managing silage effluent are reviewed in the context of its chemical constituents. A multi-faceted approach should be utilized to minimize environmental risks associated with silage effluent. This includes: (i) managing crop moisture content prior to ensiling to reduce effluent production, (ii) ensuring the integrity of silos and effluent storages, and (iii) establishing infrastructure for effluent treatment and disposal. A more thorough investigation of constructed wetlands and vegetated infiltration areas for treating dilute silage effluent is needed. In particular, there should be efforts to improve natural treatment system design criteria by identifying pre-treatment processes and appropriate effluent loading rates. There is also a need for research aimed at understanding the effects of

  3. Effluent Monitoring Procedures: Metals Analyses. Staff Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    This is one of several short-term courses developed to assist in the training of waste water treatment plant operational personnel in the tests, measurements, and report preparation required for compliance with their NPDES Permits. The Staff Guide provides step-by-step information on course planning, development, and implementation involving…

  4. Effluent Monitoring Procedures: Nutrients. Student Reference Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    This is one of several short-term courses developed to assist in the training of waste water treatment plant operational personnel in the tests, measurements, and report preparation required for compliance with their NPDES Permits. The Student Reference Manual provides step-by-step procedures for laboratory application of equipment operating…

  5. Effluent Monitoring Procedures: Nutrients. Staff Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    This is one of several short-term courses developed to assist in the training of waste water treatment plant operational personnel in the tests, measurements, and report preparation required for compliance with their NPDES Permits. This Staff Guide provides step-by-step guidelines on course planning, development and implementation involving…

  6. IDENTIFICATION OF COMPONENTS OF ENERGY-RELATED WASTES AND EFFLUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A state-of-the-art review on the characterization of organic and elemental substances in energy-related liquid and solid effluents was conducted. Previous and on-going research programs and reports were reviewed to summarize the existing and probable future data on chemical eleme...

  7. 40 CFR 418.52 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... from nitric acid production in which all the raw material ammonia is in the gaseous form: Effluent... not exceed— Ammonia (as N) 0.007 0.0007 Nitrate (as N) 0.33 0.044 (b) The following limitations... acid production in which all the raw material ammonia is in the shipped liquid form:...

  8. 40 CFR 418.52 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... from nitric acid production in which all the raw material ammonia is in the gaseous form: Effluent... not exceed— Ammonia (as N) 0.007 0.0007 Nitrate (as N) 0.33 0.044 (b) The following limitations... acid production in which all the raw material ammonia is in the shipped liquid form:...

  9. 40 CFR 418.52 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... from nitric acid production in which all the raw material ammonia is in the gaseous form: Effluent... not exceed— Ammonia (as N) 0.007 0.0007 Nitrate (as N) 0.33 0.044 (b) The following limitations... acid production in which all the raw material ammonia is in the shipped liquid form:...

  10. 40 CFR 418.52 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... from nitric acid production in which all the raw material ammonia is in the gaseous form: Effluent... not exceed— Ammonia (as N) 0.007 0.0007 Nitrate (as N) 0.33 0.044 (b) The following limitations... acid production in which all the raw material ammonia is in the shipped liquid form:...

  11. 40 CFR 418.52 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... from nitric acid production in which all the raw material ammonia is in the gaseous form: Effluent... not exceed— Ammonia (as N) 0.007 0.0007 Nitrate (as N) 0.33 0.044 (b) The following limitations... acid production in which all the raw material ammonia is in the shipped liquid form:...

  12. Treatment of anaerobic digestion effluent of sewage sludge using soilless cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchimura, Koki; Sago, Yuki; Kamahara, Hirotsugu; Atsuta, Yoichi; Daimon, Hiroyuki

    2014-02-01

    Soilless cultivation was carried out using anaerobic digestion effluent of sewage sludge as liquid fertilizer, with a preparation which cultures microorganisms in nutrient solution. As a result, ammonium ions contained in the effluent were nitrified into nitrate ions by the microorganisms. And then, Japanese mustard spinach (Brassica rapa var. perviridis) was cultivated by soilless cultivation system. The plants were grown well using microbial nutrient solution, which similar to the plants using conventional inorganic nutrient solution. In contrast, the plants were grown poorly using the effluent as liquid fertilizer without microorganisms.

  13. Occurrences and fate of selected human antibiotics in influents and effluents of sewage treatment plant and effluent-receiving river Yamuna in Delhi (India).

    PubMed

    Mutiyar, Pravin K; Mittal, Atul K

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics consumption has increased worldwide, and their residues are frequently reported in aquatic environments. It is believed that antibiotics reach aquatic water bodies through sewage. Medicine consumed for healthcare practices are often released into sewage, and after sewage treatment plant, it reaches the receiving water bodies of lakes or rivers. In the present study, we determined the fate of some commonly used antibiotics in a sewage treatment plant (STP) located in Delhi and the environmental concentration of these antibiotics in the Yamuna River, which receives the sewage and industrial effluent of Delhi. There are many reports on antibiotics occurrences in STP and river water worldwide, but monitoring data from the Indian subcontinent is sparse. Samples were taken from a STP and from six sampling sites on the Yamuna River. Several antibiotics were tested for using offline solid-phase extraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography equipped with photodiode array analysis. Recoveries varied from 25.5-108.8 %. Ampicillin had the maximum concentration in wastewater influents (104.2 ± 98.11 μg l(-1)) and effluents (12.68 ± 8.38 μg l(-1)). The fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins had the lower concentrations. Treatment efficiencies varied between 55 and 99 %. Significant amounts of antibiotics were discharged in effluents and were detected in the receiving water body. The concentration of antibiotics in the Yamuna River varied from not detected to 13.75 μg l(-1) (ampicillin) for the compounds investigated. PMID:24085621

  14. Treated effluent disposal system process control computer software requirements and specification

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, F.A. Jr.

    1994-06-03

    The software requirements for the monitor and control system that will be associated with the effluent collection pipeline system known as the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal System is covered. The control logic for the two pump stations and specific requirements for the graphic displays are detailed.

  15. Environmental monitoring at Ames Laboratory: calendar year 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, M.D.

    1981-04-01

    The results and conclusions from the Ames Laboratory environmental monitoring programs for the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor (ALRR) and other Laboratory facilities are presented. The major areas of radiological monitoring were ALRR effluent air, environmental air, effluent water and environmental water. A summary of the radioactivity found in the environment is presented. The ALRR ceased operation on December 1, 1977. Decommissioning activities began January 3, 1978, and are scheduled for completion October 1, 1981. Analysis of air samples collected at the ALRR on-site station showed no radioactivity that could be attributed to ALRR operations. The radiosotope of significance in the ALRR stack effluent was tritium (H-3). The yearly individual dose from H-3 at the exclusion fence was estimated to be 0.016 mRem and the estimated dose to the entire population within an 80 Km (50 mile) radius of the ALRR was 26.6 man-Rem. These values are 0.0032% and 0.026%, respectively, of the doses derived from the concentration guides. On September 1, 1978, the ALRR site was connected to the City of Ames sanitary sewage system. All liquids (except building foundation and roof water) from the ALRR complex are now discharged to the sewage system negating the requirement for monitoring chemical constituents of effluent and environmental waters. In the radioactive liquid waste released to the City of Ames sewage system from the ALRR complex, H-3 was the predominant isotope. After dilution with other waste water from the ALRR complex, the potential dose was not more than 0.68% of the dose derived from the concentration guide. Building foundation and roof water are discharged to a drainage gulch on site.

  16. Peptides quantification by liquid chromatography with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization and selected reaction monitoring detection.

    PubMed

    Lesur, Antoine; Varesio, Emmanuel; Domon, Bruno; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2012-10-01

    We present a novel analytical platform for peptides quantitative assays in biological matrices based on microscale liquid chromatography fractionation and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric detection using the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The MALDI source was equipped with a high frequency Nd:YAG laser (1000 Hz) and mounted on a triple quadrupole/linear ion trap mass spectrometer (MALDI-QqQ(LIT)). Compared to conventional LC-ESI-SRM/MS, the separated analytes are "time-frozen" onto the MALDI plate in fractions, and navigation through the LC chromatogram makes it possible to perform SRM experiments as well as enhanced product ion spectra acquisition for confirmatory analyses without time constraints. The LC spots were analyzed using different rastering speeds ranging from 0.25 to 4 mm/sec with the shortest analysis time of 425 ms/spot. Since the LC runs can be multiplexed and do not need a comprehensive investigation, the present platform offers a valuable alternative to LC-ESI-SRM/MS for high throughput proteomic analyses. In addition, the derivatization of the N-terminal α-amino group by sulfonation was found to be key for the fragmentation of singly charged peptides under low collision energy regime. Under such conditions, y-ion series were observed in the MS/MS spectra, and thus the design of SRM experiments was greatly simplified. The quantitative performance of the platform was compared to that of LC-ESI-SRM/MS by spiking yeast tryptic peptides in human plasma digests. Both platforms exhibited similar sensitivities, accuracy (within ±20%) and precision (under 20%) in the relative quantification mode. As a proof of principle, the relative and absolute quantification of proteins associated with glycolysis, glyoxylate and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycles over a growth time course of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on glucose media was successfully performed using isotopic dilution. PMID:22897511

  17. A review on development of analytical methods to determine monitorable drugs in serum and urine by micellar liquid chromatography using direct injection.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Romero, Josep; Albiol-Chiva, Jaume; Peris-Vicente, Juan

    2016-07-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring is a common practice in clinical studies. It requires the quantification of drugs in biological fluids. Micellar liquid chromatography (MLC), a well-established branch of Reverse Phase-High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC), has been proven by many researchers as a useful tool for the analysis of these matrices. This review presents several analytical methods, taken from the literature, devoted to the determination of several monitorable drugs in serum and urine by micellar liquid chromatography. The studied groups are: anticonvulsants, antiarrhythmics, tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, analgesics and bronchodilators. We detail the optimization strategy of the sample preparation and the main chromatographic conditions, such as the type of column, mobile phase composition (surfactant, organic solvent and pH), and detection. The finally selected experimental parameters, the validation, and some applications have also been described. In addition, their performances and advantages have been discussed. The main ones were the possibility of direct injection, and the efficient chromatographic elution, in spite of the complexity of the biological fluids. For each substance, the measured concentrations were accurate and precise at their respective therapeutic range. It was found that the MLC-procedures are fast, simple, inexpensive, ecofriendly, safe, selective, enough sensitive and reliable. Therefore, they represent an excellent alternative for the determination of drugs in serum and urine for monitoring purposes. PMID:27216388

  18. Determination of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BRDU) in well water by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Technical report, February-September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, W.E.; Rosencrance, A.B.

    1992-09-01

    A liquid chromatographic method has been developed for the analysis of 5-Br deoxyuridine (BrdU) in well water. The samples are injected directly onto a high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) without further sample preparation. Separation of BrdU from possible interferences found in well water was achieved by using a C-18 column and a mobile phase containing water and methanol. A programmable ultraviolet (UV) detector was used to monitor the effluent for BrdU. HPLC provides a rapid and reproducible method for the analysis of BrdU. High Performance Liquid Chromatograph (HPLC), 5-Bromo-2'deoxyuridine (BrdU), Ultraviolet (UV).

  19. Cleanup Verification Package for the 116-K-2 Effluent Trench

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Capron

    2006-04-04

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 116-K-2 effluent trench, also referred to as the 116-K-2 mile-long trench and the 116-K-2 site. During its period of operation, the 116-K-2 site was used to dispose of cooling water effluent from the 105-KE and 105-KW Reactors by percolation into the soil. This site also received mixed liquid wastes from the 105-KW and 105-KE fuel storage basins, reactor floor drains, and miscellaneous decontamination activities.

  20. Geochemical and hydrologic characterization of the effluent draining from U12e, U12n, and U12t tunnels, area 12, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, C.E.; Gillespie, L.; Gillespie, D.

    1993-05-01

    The objective of the Tunnel Effluent Characterization Project at the Nevada Test Site was to characterize the tunnel effluents in terms of rate of discharge, pH, temperature, specific conductivity, turbidity, and aqueous chemistry. The parameters were monitored for one year to identify hazardous constituents within the effluent and to characterize temporal variations.

  1. Determination of Pyrethroids through Liquid-Liquid Extraction and GC-ECD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, B.

    2010-12-01

    Storm water samples from various locations in San Diego Creek and Newport Bay watershed, southern California, were taken to study the occurrence and fate of pyrethroids. This study focused on four commonly used pyrethroids: bifenthrin, cypermethrin, permethrin, and fenpropathrin. Since the ban of DDT, usage of pyrethroids became an effective second choice. However, pyrethroids are extremely toxic to fish and aquatic organisms. They can pass through secondary wastewater treatment system, causing the final effluent to be in lethal doses to aquatic invertebrates and some insects such as mayflies. Hence, it is necessary to monitor the amount of pyrethroid concentration in storm water. As a part of this study, I attended the RISE internship program at Stanford University in this summer. In the seven weeks, I learned liquid-liquid extraction, water-bath evaporation, nitrogen evaporation, and gas chromatography-electron capture detector techniques to extract and detect the pyrethroid residues in the water sample.

  2. Effluent variability study for the 200 area treated effluent disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-12

    The variability of permitted constituents in grab samples and 24-hr composites of liquid effluent discharged to the Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site was evaluated for the period July 1995 through April 1996. The variability study was required as a condition of the wastewater discharge permit issued by the State of Washington Department of Ecology. Results of the statistical evaluation indicated that (1) except for iron, and possibly chloride, there is a very low probability of exceeding existing permit limits, (2) seasonal effects related to intake water quality account for the variability in several chemical constituents and (3) sample type (grab vs 24-hr composite) have little if any effect on monthly mean constituent concentrations.

  3. Measurement and removal of bioconcentratable compounds in refinery effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Gala, W.R.; Dorn, P.B.; Means, J.C.; Jenkins, K.D.; Folwarkow, S.

    1994-12-31

    Public concern regarding the presence of persistent, bioconcentratable compounds in fish and shellfish has led the petroleum industry to investigate methods for the measurement of bioconcentratable compounds in refinery effluents. Research has focused on developing methods to measure polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other hydrocarbons directly in the effluent and in bivalves exposed to refinery effluents in the field and in the laboratory. Results from a multi-refinery study in the San Francisco Bay Area using selective ion monitoring GC/MS-MS indicated that alkylated and non-substituted 2--3 ring PAHs are rarely present in refinery effluents at concentrations greater than 100 ng/L. Higher MW PAHs were rarely detected. PAHs did not substantially bioconcentrate in bivalves exposed in the laboratory to refinery effluent and reference sea water. Total PAHs were generally less than 50 {mu}g/g in the effluent-exposed bivalves. A comparison of the waste water treatment facilities at each refinery suggest that biological treatment already required by existing regulations is sufficient to reduce PAH concentrations to these low levels.

  4. Treatment of effluents from uranium oxide production.

    PubMed

    Ladeira, A C Q; Gonçalves, J S; Morais, C A

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle comprises a series of industrial processes which involve the production of electricity from uranium in nuclear power reactors. In Brazil the conversion of uranium hexafluoride (UF6) into uranium dioxide (UO2) takes place in Resende (RJ) at the Nuclear Fuel Factory (FCN). The process generates liquid effluents with significant concentrations of uranium, which might be treated before being discharged into the environment. This study investigates the recovery of uranium from three distinct liquid effluents: one with a high carbonate content and the other with an elevated fluoride concentration. This paper also presents a study on carbonate removal from an effluent that consists of a water-methanol solution generated during the filtration of the yellow cake (ammonium uranyl tricarbonate). The results showed that: (1) the uranium from the carbonated solution can be recovered through the ion exchange technique using the strong base anionic resin IRA 910-U, as the carbonate has been removed as CO2 after heating; (2) the most suitable technique to recover uranium from the fluoride solution is its precipitation as (NH4)2UO4F2 (ammonium fluorouranate peroxide), (3) the solution free of carbonate can be added to the fluoride solution and the uranium from the final solution can be recovered by precipitation as ammonium fluorouranate peroxide as well; (4) the carbonate from the water-methanol solution can be recovered as calcium carbonate through the addition of calcium chloride, or it can be recovered as ammonium sulphate through the addition of sulphuric acid. The ammonium sulphate product can be used as a fertilizer. PMID:21473275

  5. The use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to monitor treatment response and disease recurrence in locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Carpinetti, Paola; Donnard, Elisa; Bettoni, Fabiana; Asprino, Paula; Koyama, Fernanda; Rozanski, Andrei; Sabbaga, Jorge; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Parmigiani, Raphael B.; Galante, Pedro A.F.; Perez, Rodrigo O.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) followed by surgery is the mainstay treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Variable degrees of tumor regression are observed after nCRT and alternative treatment strategies, including close surveillance without immediate surgery, have been investigated to spare patients with complete tumor regression from potentially adverse outcomes of radical surgery. However, clinical and radiological assessment of response does not allow accurate identification of patients with complete response. In addition, surveillance for recurrence is similarly important for these patients, as early detection of recurrence allows salvage resections and adjuvant interventions. We report the use of liquid biopsies and personalized biomarkers for monitoring treatment response to nCRT and detecting residual disease and recurrence in patients with rectal cancer. We sequenced the whole-genome of four rectal tumors to identify patient-specific chromosomal rearrangements that were used to monitor circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in liquid biopsies collected at diagnosis and during nCRT and follow-up. We compared ctDNA levels to clinical, radiological and pathological response to nCRT. Our results indicate that personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies may not be sensitive for the detection of microscopic residual disease. However, it can be efficiently used to monitor treatment response to nCRT and detect disease recurrence, preceding increases in CEA levels and radiological diagnosis. Similar good results were observed when assessing tumor response to systemic therapy and disease progression. Our study supports the use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to tailor the management of rectal cancer patients, however, replication in a larger cohort is necessary to introduce this strategy into clinical practice. PMID:26451609

  6. Detoxification or decontamination of effluents and/or flue gases

    SciTech Connect

    Samhaber, F.

    1984-07-31

    This invention provides a process for detoxifying or decontaminating liquid effluents and/or waste gas containing poisonous chromium NOx by reacting these with each other with formation of chromium and higher oxide(s) of N. Optionally in addition another suitable reducing agent may be used. The process is particularly useful, for example, in a plant such as a stainless steel pickling plant where both these chemical components are available. Preferably liquid-liquid extraction may be used to extract and recover nitric acid formed as an oxidation product and preferably if additional chromium is required, this may be provided by electrolytic oxidation of chromium to chromium in a suitable chemical circuit.

  7. Monitoring of the Liquid Water Content During Snowmelt Using C-Band SAR Data and the Snow Model CROCUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondeau-Genesse, G.; Trudel, M.; Leconte, R.

    2014-12-01

    Coupling C-Band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data to a multilayer snow model is a step in better understanding the temporal evolution of the radar backscattering coefficient during snowmelt. The watershed used for this study is the Nechako River Basin, located in the Rocky Mountains of British-Columbia (Canada). This basin has a snowpack of several meters in depth and part of its water is diverted to the Kemano hydropower system, managed by Rio-Tinto Alcan. Eighteen RADARSAT-2 ScanSAR Wide archive images were acquired in VV/VH polarization for the winter of 2011-2012, under different snow conditions. They are interpreted along with CROCUS, a multilayer physically-based snow model developed by Météo-France. This model discretizes the snowpack into 50 layers, which makes it possible to monitor various characteristics, such as liquid water content (LWC), throughout the season. CROCUS is used to model three specific locations of the Nechako River Basin. Results vary from one site to another, but in general there is a good agreement between the modeled LWC of the first layer of the snowpack and the backscattering coefficient of the RADARSAT-2 images, with a coefficient of determination (R²) of 0.80 and more. The radar images themselves were processed using an updated version of Nagler's methodology, which consists of subtracting an image in wet snow conditions to one in dry snow conditions, as wet snow can then be identified using a soft threshold centered around -3 dB. A second filter was used in order to differentiate dry snow and bare soil. That filter combines a VH/VV ratio threshold and an altitude criterion. The ensuing maps show a good agreement with the MODIS snow-covered area, which is already obtained daily over the Nechako River Basin, but with additional information on the location of wet snow and without sensibility to cloud cover. As a next step, the outputs of CROCUS will be used in Mätzler's Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS) to

  8. Remote monitoring of a multi-component liquid-phase organic synthesis by infrared emission spectroscopy: the recovery of pure component emissivities by band-target entropy minimization.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shuying; Tjahjono, Martin; Rajarathnam, D; Chuanzhao, Li; Lyapkalo, Ilya; Chen, David; Garland, Marc

    2007-10-01

    A liquid-phase cycloaddition reaction near ambient temperature involving dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate (DMAD) and cyclopentadiene (CP) as reactants was measured using a conventional Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer with an emission accessory. Two semi-batch experiments were performed and a total of 55 spectra were collected using a DTGS detector. Band-target entropy minimization (BTEM), a pure component spectral reconstruction technique, was applied to analyze the data set to retrieve the pure component emission spectrum from the reaction system. The estimated emission spectra of the solvent chloroform, DMAD, CP, and product, namely dimethyl bicyclo[2.2.1]-2,5-heptadiene-2,3-dicarboxylate, were all reconstructed with rather good quality. The estimated emission spectra are similar to independent FT-IR spectra of the same cycloaddition reaction. Using a least squares fit, the relative concentration profiles of the species are obtained. Because this appears to be the first time that a liquid-phase reaction has been monitored by infrared emission spectroscopy, further improvements and opportunities for general multi-phase liquid reaction monitoring are discussed. PMID:17958955

  9. Near infrared spectroscopy compared to liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry and capillary electrophoresis as a detection tool for peptide reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Petter, Christine H; Heigl, Nico; Bachmann, Stefan; Huck-Pezzei, Verena A C; Najam-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; Bakry, Rania; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas; Bonn, Günther K; Huck, Christian W

    2008-05-01

    Peptide interaction is normally monitored by liquid chromatography (LC), liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS), mass spectrometric (MS) methods such as MALDI-TOF/MS or capillary electrophoresis (CE). These analytical techniques need to apply either high pressure or high voltages, which can cause cleavage of newly formed bondages. Therefore, near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) is presented as a rapid alternative to monitor the interaction of glutathione and oxytocin, simulating physiological conditions. Thereby, glutathione can act as a nucleophile with oxytocin forming four new conjugates via a disulphide bondage. Liquid chromatography coupled to UV (LC-UV) and mass spectrometry via an electrospray ionisation interface (LC-ESI-MS) resulted in a 82% and a 78% degradation of oxytocin at pH 3 and a 5% and a 7% degradation at pH 6.5. Capillary electrophoresis employing UV-detection (CE-UV) showed a 44% degradation of oxytocin. LC and CE in addition to the NIRS are found to be authentic tools for quantitative analysis. Nevertheless, NIRS proved to be highly suitable for the detection of newly formed conjugates after separating them on a thin layer chromatography (TLC) plate. The recorded fingerprint in the near infrared region allows for a selective distinct qualitative identification of conjugates without the need for expensive instrumentation such as quadrupole or MALDI-TOF mass spectrometers. The performance of the established NIRS method is compared to LC and CE; its advantages are discussed in detail. PMID:18095054

  10. Organic liquid scintillation detectors for on-the-fly neutron/gamma alarming and radionuclide identification in a pedestrian radiation portal monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paff, Marc Gerrit; Ruch, Marc L.; Poitrasson-Riviere, Alexis; Sagadevan, Athena; Clarke, Shaun D.; Pozzi, Sara

    2015-07-01

    We present new experimental results from a radiation portal monitor based on the use of organic liquid scintillators. The system was tested as part of a 3He-free radiation portal monitor testing campaign at the European Commission's Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy, in February 2014. The radiation portal monitor was subjected to a wide range of test conditions described in ANSI N42.35, including a variety of gamma-ray sources and a 20,000 n/s 252Cf source. A false alarm test tested whether radiation portal monitors ever alarmed in the presence of only natural background. The University of Michigan Detection for Nuclear Nonproliferation Group's system triggered zero false alarms in 2739 trials. It consistently alarmed on a variety of gamma-ray sources travelling at 1.2 m/s at a 70 cm source to detector distance. The neutron source was detected at speeds up to 3 m/s and in configurations with up to 8 cm of high density polyethylene shielding. The success of on-the-fly radionuclide identification varied with the gamma-ray source measured as well as with which of two radionuclide identification methods was used. Both methods used a least squares comparison between the measured pulse height distributions to library spectra to pick the best match. The methods varied in how the pulse height distributions were modified prior to the least squares comparison. Correct identification rates were as high as 100% for highly enriched uranium, but as low as 50% for 241Am. Both radionuclide identification algorithms produced mixed results, but the concept of using liquid scintillation detectors for gamma-ray and neutron alarming in radiation portal monitor was validated.

  11. ICPP environmental monitoring report CY-1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    Summarized in this report are the data collected through Environmental Monitoring programs conducted at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) by the Environmental Protection Department. The ICPP is responsible for complying with all applicable Federal, State, Local and DOE Rules, Regulations and Orders. Radiological effluent and emissions are regulated by the DOE in accordance with the Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs) as presented in DOE Order 5400.5. The State of Idaho regulates nonradiological waste resulting from the ICPP operations including airborne, liquid, and solid waste. The Environmental Department updated the Quality Assurance (QA) Project Plan for Environmental Monitoring activities during the third quarter of 1992. QA activities have resulted in the ICPP`s implementation of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules and guidelines pertaining to the collection, analyses, and reporting of environmentally related samples. Where no EPA methods for analyses existed for radionuclides, LITCO methods were used.

  12. Management of nonprocess elements in low-effluent bleached kraft pulp mills

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, P.S.

    1995-12-31

    Increasing environmental regulation for the discharge of chlorinated organics in bleach plant effluents has required most manufacturers in the pulp and paper industry to reduce the charge of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of kraft pulp. The best long term solution for reducing effluent pollutants from bleached kraft pulp mills is to move towards low-effluent (closed-cycle) bleaching. Closure of operating bleach plants would dramatically reduce both the volume and the pollutant concentration of pulp mill effluents. However, closing the mill creates many operational problems including a concentration build-up of nonprocess elements (NPE`s) in process streams. NPE`s usually enter the pulp process as trace constituents of wood. Recent studies have lead to a fundamental understanding of how NPE`s partition between the solid cellulose phase and the liquid aqueous phase in pulp mill process streams. This knowledge will help in the design, operation and optimization of future low-effluent bleach plants.

  13. Monitoring of antifungal drugs in biological samples using ultrasonic-assisted supramolecular dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of a floating organic droplet.

    PubMed

    Ezoddin, Maryam; Abdi, Khosrou

    2016-08-01

    A new method for the simultaneous determination of the three antifungal drugs using ultrasonic-assisted supramolecular dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of a floating organic droplet (UASMDLLME-SFO) was proposed. The supramolecular solvents produced from reversed micelles of 1-dodecanol (extraction solvent) in tetrahydrofuran (THF) were injected into the aqueous sample solution. Reverse micelle coacervates were produced in situ through self-assembly processes. The antifungal drugs were extracted from the aqueous sample into a supramolecular solvent. Sonication accelerated the mass transfer of the target analytes into the supramolecular solvent phase and enhanced the dispersion process. Some parameters affecting the extraction efficiency such as type and volume of the extraction solvent, pH, volume of the disperser solvent and ultrasound extraction time were investigated. Under optimum conditions, the limits of detections for ketoconazole, clotrimazole and miconazole ranged from 0.08 to 1.3μgL(-1) and the relative standard deviations (RSDs, n=5)<6% were obtained. The method was successfully applied for preconcentration of the three drugs in biological and water samples. PMID:27262083

  14. Determination of two-liquid mixture composition by assessing its dielectric parameters 2. modified measuring system for monitoring the dehydration process of bioethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilitis, O.; Shipkovs, P.; Merkulovs, D.; Rucins, A.; Zihmane-Ritina, K.; Bremers, G.

    2014-02-01

    In Part 2 of the work we describe a modified measuring system for precise monitoring of the dehydration process of bioethanol production. This is based on the earlier proposed system for measuring the concentration of solutions and two-liquid mixtures using devices with capacitive sensors (1-300pF), which provides a stable measuring resolution of ± 0.005 pF at measuring the capacitance of a sensor. In this part of our work we determine additional requirements that are to be imposed on the measuring system at monitoring the ethanol dehydration process and control of bioethanol production. The most important parameters of the developed measuring system are identified. An exemplary calculation is given for the thermocompensated calibration of measuring devices. The results of tests have shown a good performance of the developed measuring system.

  15. Offsite dose calculation manual guidance: Standard radiological effluent controls for pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke, W.W.; Essig, T.H.

    1991-04-01

    This report contains guidance which may be voluntarily used by licensees who choose to implement the provision of Generic Letter 89-01, which allows Radiological Effect Technical Specifications (RETS) to be removed from the main body of the Technical Specifications and placed in the Offsite Dose Calculation Manual (ODCM). Guidance is provided for Standard Effluent Controls definitions, Controls for effluent monitoring instrumentation, Controls for effluent releases, Controls for radiological environmental monitoring, and the basis for Controls. Guidance on the formulation of RETS has been available in draft from (NUREG-0471 and -0473) for a number of years; the current effort simply recasts those RETS into Standard Radiological Effluent Controls for application to the ODCM. Also included for completeness are: (1) radiological environmental monitoring program guidance previously which had been available as a Branch Technical Position (Rev. 1, November 1979); (2) existing ODCM guidance; and (3) a reproduction of generic Letter 89-01.

  16. Structural health monitoring of liquid-filled tanks: a Bayesian approach for location of acoustic emission sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zárate, Boris A.; Pollock, Adrian; Momeni, Sepand; Ley, Obdulia

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) is a well-established nondestructive testing method for assessing the condition of liquid-filled tanks. Often the tank can be tested without the need for accurate location of AE sources. But sometimes, accurate location is required, such as in the case of follow-up inspections after AE has indicated a significant defect. Traditional computed location techniques that considered only the wave traveling through the shell of the tank have not proved reliable when applied to liquid-filled tanks. This because AE sensors are often responding to liquid-borne waves, that are not considered in the traditional algorithms. This paper describes an approach for locating AE sources on the wall of liquid filled tanks that includes two novel aspects: (i) the use of liquid-borne waves, and (ii) the use of a probabilistic algorithm. The proposed algorithm is developed within a Bayesian framework that considers uncertainties in the wave velocities and the time of arrival. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo is used to estimate the distribution of the AE source location. This approach was applied on a 102 inch diameter (29 000 gal) railroad tank car by estimating the source locations from pencil lead break with waveforms recorded. Results show that the proposed Bayesian approach for source location can be used to calculate the most probable region of the tank wall where the AE source is located.

  17. Role of livestock effluent suspended particulate in sealing effluent ponds.

    PubMed

    Bennett, J McL; Warren, B R

    2015-05-01

    Intensive livestock feed-lots have become more prevalent in recent years to help in meeting the predicted food production targets based on expected population growth. Effluent from these is stored in ponds, representing a potential concern for seepage and contamination of groundwater. Whilst previous literature suggests that effluent particulate can limit seepage adequately in combination with a clay liner, this research addresses potential concerns for sealing of ponds with low concentration fine and then evaluates this against proposed filter-cake based methodologies to describe and predict hydraulic reduction. Short soil cores were compacted to 98% of the maximum dry density and subject to ponded head percolation with unfiltered-sediment-reduced effluent, effluent filtered to <3 μm, and chemically synthesized effluent. Reduction in hydraulic conductivity was observed to be primarily due to the colloidal fraction of the effluent, with larger particulate fractions providing minimal further reduction. Pond sealing was shown to follow mathematical models of filter-cake formation, but without the formation of a physical seal on top of the soil surface. Management considerations based on the results are presented. PMID:25721977

  18. Dairy shed effluent treatment and recycling: Effluent characteristics and performance.

    PubMed

    Fyfe, Julian; Hagare, Dharma; Sivakumar, Muttucumaru

    2016-09-15

    Dairy farm milking operations produce considerable amounts of carbon- and nutrient-rich effluent that can be a vital source of nutrients for pasture and crops. The study aim was to characterise dairy shed effluent from a commercial farm and examine the changes produced by treatment, storage and recycling of the effluent through a two-stage stabilisation pond system. The data and insights from the study are broadly applicable to passive pond systems servicing intensive dairy and other livestock operations. Raw effluent contained mostly poorly biodegradable particulate organic material and organically bound nutrients, as well as a large fraction of fixed solids due to effluent recycling. The anaerobic pond provided effective sedimentation and biological treatment, but hydrolysis of organic material occurred predominantly in the sludge and continually added to effluent soluble COD, nutrients and cations. Sludge digestion also suppressed pH in the pond and increased salt levels through formation of alkalinity. High sludge levels significantly impaired pond treatment performance. In the facultative pond, BOD5 concentrations were halved; however smaller reductions in COD showed the refractory nature of incoming organic material. Reductions in soluble N and P were proportional to reductions in respective particulate forms, suggesting that respective removal mechanisms were not independent. Conditions in the ponds were unlikely to support biological nutrient removal. Recycling caused conservative inert constituents to accumulate within the pond system. Material leaving the system was mostly soluble (86% TS) and inert (65% TS), but salt concentrations remained below thresholds for safe land application. PMID:27213866

  19. Environmental monitoring at Ames Laboratory: Calendar year 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, M.D.

    1980-04-01

    The results and conclusions from the Ames Laboratory environmental monitoring programs for the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor (ALRR) are presented. The major areas of radiological monitoring were ALRR effluent air, environmental air, effluent water and environmental water. Analysis of air samples collected at the ALRR site showed detectable amounts of /sup 60/Co. This isotope was 1.5 x 10/sup -4/% of the concentration guide (1) and was probably due to ALRR operations. The radioisotope of significance in the ALRR stack effluent was tritium. The average yearly individual dose from /sup 3/H at the exclusion fence was estimated to 0.0038 mRem and the estimated dose to the entire population within an 80 Km (50 mile) radius of the ALRR was 6.31 man-Rem. These values are 0.00076% and 0.0063%, respectively, of the doses derived from the concentration guides. In the radioactive liquid waste released to the City of Ames sewage system from the ALRR complex, /sup 3/H was the predominant isotope. After dilution with other waste water from the ALRR complex, the potential dose was not more than 0.59% of the dose derived from the concentration guide.

  20. MONITORING OF WATERWAYS FOR EMERGING CONTAMINANTS USING INTEGRATIVE SAMPLING COUPLED WITH LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY-ELECTROSPRAY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing the potential impact to the aquatic environment from emerging contaminants, entails monitoring a complex mixture (pharmaceuticals, polar pesticides, industrial by- products and degradation products) in natural waters. The presence of these chemicals, often at ultra-trac...

  1. Foraminiferal assemblages as bioindicators to assess potential pollution in mangroves used as a natural biofilter for shrimp farm effluents (New Caledonia).

    PubMed

    Debenay, J-P; Marchand, C; Molnar, N; Aschenbroich, A; Meziane, T

    2015-04-15

    In New Caledonia, semi-intensive shrimp farms release untreated effluents into the mangrove. Foraminiferal assemblages were analyzed for assessing the impact of effluent release on the benthic compartment. Comparison was made between samples collected (1) in an effluent receiving mangrove before and after the rearing cycle, and (2) for one-year monitoring an effluent receiving and a control mangrove. The distribution of foraminiferal assemblages was primarily driven by the gradient between Rhizophora stands and salt-flats, related to salinity and tidal elevation, and by seasonal cycles. The potential impact of effluent release was due to the combined effects of normal-saline effluents on surface salinity, and of nutrient input and microbial stimulation on food availability. Foraminiferal assemblages did not indicate a substantial impact of farm effluents and suggest that semi-intensive shrimp farming using mangrove for effluent discharge may appear as a sustainable solution in New Caledonia, when considering only the impact on the mangrove itself. PMID:25758645

  2. Liquid Chromatography-Selected Reaction Monitoring (LC-SRM) Approach for the Separation and Quantitation of Sialylated N-Glycans Linkage Isomers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The study of N-linked glycans is among the most challenging bioanalytical tasks because of their complexity and variety. The presence of glycoform families that differ only in branching and/or linkage position makes the identification and quantitation of individual glycans exceedingly difficult. Quantitation of these individual glycans is important because changes in the abundance of these isomers are often associated with significant biomedical events. For instance, previous studies have shown that the ratio of α2-3 to α2-6 linked sialic acid (SA) plays an important role in cancer biology. Consequently, quantitative methods to detect alterations in the ratios of glycans based on their SA linkages could serve as a diagnostic tool in oncology, yet traditional glycomic profiling cannot readily differentiate between these linkage isomers. Here, we present a liquid chromatography-selected reaction monitoring (LC-SRM) approach that we demonstrate is capable of quantitating the individual SA linkage isomers. The LC method is capable of separating sialylated N-glycan isomers differing in α2-3 and α2-6 linkages using a novel superficially porous particle (Fused-Core) Penta-HILIC (hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography) column. SRM detection provides the relative quantitation of each SA linkage isomer, and minimizes interferences from coeluting glycans that are problematic for UV/Fluorescence based quantitation. With our approach, the relative quantitation of each SA linkage isomer is obtained from a straightforward liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) experiment. PMID:25299151

  3. Liquid chromatography-selected reaction monitoring (LC-SRM) approach for the separation and quantitation of sialylated N-glycans linkage isomers.

    PubMed

    Tao, Shujuan; Huang, Yining; Boyes, Barry E; Orlando, Ron

    2014-11-01

    The study of N-linked glycans is among the most challenging bioanalytical tasks because of their complexity and variety. The presence of glycoform families that differ only in branching and/or linkage position makes the identification and quantitation of individual glycans exceedingly difficult. Quantitation of these individual glycans is important because changes in the abundance of these isomers are often associated with significant biomedical events. For instance, previous studies have shown that the ratio of α2-3 to α2-6 linked sialic acid (SA) plays an important role in cancer biology. Consequently, quantitative methods to detect alterations in the ratios of glycans based on their SA linkages could serve as a diagnostic tool in oncology, yet traditional glycomic profiling cannot readily differentiate between these linkage isomers. Here, we present a liquid chromatography-selected reaction monitoring (LC-SRM) approach that we demonstrate is capable of quantitating the individual SA linkage isomers. The LC method is capable of separating sialylated N-glycan isomers differing in α2-3 and α2-6 linkages using a novel superficially porous particle (Fused-Core) Penta-HILIC (hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography) column. SRM detection provides the relative quantitation of each SA linkage isomer, and minimizes interferences from coeluting glycans that are problematic for UV/Fluorescence based quantitation. With our approach, the relative quantitation of each SA linkage isomer is obtained from a straightforward liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) experiment. PMID:25299151

  4. Characterizing shipboard bilgewater effluent before and after treatment.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Christine; Falatko, Debra; Danesi, Robin; Albert, Ryan

    2014-04-01

    Operational discharges from oceangoing vessels, including discharges of bilgewater, release oil into marine ecosystems that can potentially damage marine life, terrestrial life, human health, and the environment. Bilgewater is a mix of oily fluids and other pollutants from a variety of sources onboard a vessel. If bilgewater cannot be retained onboard, it must be treated by an oily water separator before discharge for larger ocean-going vessels. We evaluated the effectiveness of bilgewater treatment systems by analyzing land-based type approval data, collecting and analyzing shipboard bilgewater effluent data, assessing bilgewater effluent concentrations compared to regulatory standards, evaluating the accuracy of shipboard oil content monitors relative to analytical results, and assessing additional pollution reduction benefits of treatment systems. Land-based type approval data were gathered for 20 treatment systems. Additionally, multiple samples of influent and effluent from operational bilgewater treatment systems onboard three vessels were collected and analyzed, and compared to the land-based type approval data. Based on type approval data, 15 treatment systems were performing below 5 ppm oil. Shipboard performance measurements verified land-based type approval data for the three systems that were sampled. However, oil content monitor readings were more variable than actual oil concentration measurements from effluent samples, resulting in false negatives and positives. The treatment systems sampled onboard for this study generally reduced the majority of other potentially harmful pollutants, which are not currently regulated, with the exception of some heavy metal analytes. PMID:24420560

  5. Occurrence of synthetic musk fragrances in effluent and non-effluent impacted environments.

    PubMed

    Chase, Darcy A; Karnjanapiboonwong, Adcharee; Fang, Yu; Cobb, George P; Morse, Audra N; Anderson, Todd A

    2012-02-01

    Synthetic musk fragrances (SMFs) are considered micropollutants and can be found in various environmental matrices near wastewater discharge areas. These emerging contaminants are often detected in wastewater at low concentrations; they are continuously present and constitute a constant exposure source. Objectives of this study were to investigate the environmental fate, transport, and transformation of SMFs. Occurrence of six polycyclic musk compounds (galaxolide, tonalide, celestolide, phantolide, traseolide, cashmeran) and two nitro musk compounds (musk xylene and musk ketone) was monitored in wastewater, various surface waters and their sediments, as well as groundwater, soil cores, and plants from a treated wastewater land application site. Specifically, samples were collected quarterly from (1) a wastewater treatment plant to determine initial concentrations in wastewater effluent, (2) a storage reservoir at a land application site to determine possible photolysis before land application, (3) soil cores to determine the amount of sorption after land application and groundwater recharge to assess lack thereof, (4) a lake system and its sediment to assess degradation, and (5) non-effluent impacted local playa lakes and sediments to assess potential sources of these compounds. All samples were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Data indicated that occurrence of SMFs in effluent-impacted environments was detectable at ng/L and ng/g concentrations, which decreased during transport throughout wastewater treatment and land application. However, unexpected concentrations, ng/L and ng/g, were also detected in playa lakes not receiving treated effluent. Additionally, soil cores from land application sites had ng/g concentrations, and SMFs were detected in plant samples at trace levels. Galaxolide and tonalide were consistently found in all environments. Information on occurrence is critical to assessing exposure to these potential

  6. Continuous Aqueous Tritium Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.

    1995-03-29

    Continuous monitoring for tritium in the aqueous effluents of selected Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities is performed using a custom designed system that includes an automated water purification system and a flow-through radiation detection system optimized for tritium. Beads of plastic scintillators coupled with coincidence electronics provide adequate sensitivity (=25kBz/L) for tritium break-through detection int he aqueous discharge stream from these facilities. The tritium effluent water monitors (TEWMs) at SRS provide early warning (within 30 minutes) of an unanticipated release of tritium, supplement the routine sampling surveillances, and mitigate the impact of aqueous plant discharges of tritium releases to the environment.

  7. Continuous aqueous tritium monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.

    1995-10-01

    Continuous monitoring for tritium in the aqueous effluents of selected Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities is performed using a unique system that includes an automated water purification system and a flow-through radiation detection system optimized for tritium. Beads of plastic scintillator coupled with coincidence electronics provide adequate sensitivity (approx.25kBq/L) for tritium breakthrough detection in the aqueous discharge stream from these facilities. The tritium effluent water monitors (TEWMs) at SRS provide early warning (within 30 minutes) of an unanticipated release of tritium, supplement the routine sampling surveillances, and mitigate the impact of aqueous plant discharges of tritium to the environment. 4 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Simultaneous quantification of olanzapine and its metabolite N-desmethylolanzapine in human plasma by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for therapeutic drug monitoring.

    PubMed

    Lou, Hong-gang; Ruan, Zou-rong; Jiang, Bo; Chen, Jin-liang

    2015-05-01

    A simple, sensitive, and selective liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the simultaneous quantification of olanzapine (OLZ) and its metabolite N-desmethylolanzapine (DMO) in human plasma for therapeutic drug monitoring. Sample preparation was performed by one-step protein precipitation with methanol. The analytes were chromatographed on a reversed-phase YMC-ODS-AQ C18 Column (2.0 × 100 mm,3 µm) by a gradient program at a flow rate of 0.30 mL/min. Quantification was performed on a triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer via electrospray ionization in positive ion mode. The method was validated for selectivity, linearity, accuracy, precision, matrix effect, recovery and stability. The calibration curve was linear over the concentration range 0.2-120 ng/mL for OLZ and 0.5-50 ng/mL for DMO. Intra- and interday precisions for OLZ and DMO were <11.29%, and the accuracy ranged from 95.23 to 113.16%. The developed method was subsequently applied to therapeutic drug monitoring for psychiatric patients receiving therapy of OLZ tablets. The method seems to be suitable for therapeutic drug monitoring of patients undergoing therapy with OLZ and might contribute to prediction of the risk of adverse reactions. PMID:25297964

  9. High-contrast X-ray radiography using hybrid semiconductor pixel detectors with 1 mm thick Si sensor as a tool for monitoring liquids in natural building stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krejci, F.; Slavikova, M.; Zemlicka, J.; Jakubek, J.; Kotlik, P.

    2014-07-01

    For the preservation of buildings and other cultural heritage, the application of various conservation products such as consolidants or water repellents is often used. X-ray radiography utilizing semiconductor particle-counting detectors stands out as a promising tool in research of consolidants inside natural building stones. However, a clear visualization of consolidation products is often accomplished by doping with a contrast agent, which presents a limitation. This approach causes a higher attenuation for X-rays, but also alters the penetration ability of the original consolidation product. In this contribution, we focus on the application of Medipix type detectors newly equipped with a 1 mm thick Si sensor. This thicker sensor has enhanced detection efficiency leading to extraordinary sensitivity for monitoring consolidants and liquids in natural building stones even without any contrast agent. Consequently, methods for the direct monitoring of organosilicon consolidants and dynamic visualization of the water uptake in the Opuka stone using high-contrast X-ray radiography are demonstrated. The presented work demonstrates a significant improvement in the monitoring sensitivity of X-ray radiography in stone consolidation studies and also shows advantages of this detector configuration for X-ray radiography in general.

  10. Monitoring the oleuropein content of olive leaves and fruits using ultrasound- and salt-assisted liquid-liquid extraction optimized by response surface methodology and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ismaili, Ahmad; Heydari, Rouhollah; Rezaeepour, Reza

    2016-01-01

    A novel and rapid ultrasound- and salt-assisted liquid-liquid extraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography has been optimized by response surface methodology for the determination of oleuropein from olive leaves. Box-Behnken design was used for optimizing the main parameters including ultrasound time (A), pH (B), salt concentration (C), and volume of miscible organic solvent (D). In this technique, a mixture of plant sample and extraction solvent was subjected to ultrasound waves. After ultrasound-assisted extraction, phase separation was performed by the addition of salt to the liquid phase. The optimal conditions for the highest extraction yield of oleuropein were ultrasound time, 30 min; volume of organic solvent, 2.5 mL; salt concentration, 25% w/v; and sample pH, 4. Experimental data were fitted with a quadratic model. Analysis of variance results show that BC interaction, A(2) , B(2) , C(2) , and D(2) are significant model terms. Unlike the conventional extraction methods for plant extracts, no evaporation and reconstitution operations were needed in the proposed technique. PMID:26530030

  11. 40 CFR 463.27 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS PLASTICS MOLDING AND FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Cleaning Water Subcategory § 463.27 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent...

  12. 40 CFR 440.115 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.115 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent...

  13. 40 CFR 440.35 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Uranium, Radium and Vanadium Ores Subcategory § 440.35 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent...

  14. 40 CFR 440.112 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.112 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent...

  15. 40 CFR 440.115 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.115 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent...

  16. 40 CFR 440.112 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.112 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent...

  17. 40 CFR 440.92 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Antimony Ore Subcategory § 440.92 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent...

  18. 40 CFR 440.35 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Uranium, Radium and Vanadium Ores Subcategory § 440.35 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent...

  19. 40 CFR 440.115 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.115 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent...

  20. 40 CFR 440.92 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Antimony Ore Subcategory § 440.92 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent...

  1. 40 CFR 440.112 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.112 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent...

  2. 40 CFR 440.92 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Antimony Ore Subcategory § 440.92 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent...

  3. 40 CFR 428.42 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Latex Rubber Subcategory § 428.42 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent...

  4. 40 CFR 428.43 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Latex Rubber Subcategory § 428.43 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent...

  5. 40 CFR 428.23 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Emulsion Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.23 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent...

  6. 40 CFR 428.42 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Latex Rubber Subcategory § 428.42 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent...

  7. 40 CFR 428.33 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Solution Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.33 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent...

  8. 40 CFR 428.43 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Latex Rubber Subcategory § 428.43 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent...

  9. 40 CFR 428.33 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Solution Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.33 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent...

  10. 40 CFR 428.43 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Latex Rubber Subcategory § 428.43 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent...

  11. 40 CFR 428.23 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Emulsion Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.23 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent...

  12. Organic-resistant screen-printed graphitic electrodes: Application to on-site monitoring of liquid fuels.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Eduardo S; Silva, Luiz A J; Sousa, Raquel M F; Richter, Eduardo M; Foster, Christopher W; Banks, Craig E; Munoz, Rodrigo A A

    2016-08-31

    This work presents the potential application of organic-resistant screen-printed graphitic electrodes (SPGEs) for fuel analysis. The required analysis of the antioxidant 2,6-di-tert-butylphenol (2,6-DTBP) in biodiesel and jet fuel is demonstrated as a proof-of-concept. The screen-printing of graphite, Ag/AgCl and insulator inks on a polyester substrate (250 μm thickness) resulted in SPGEs highly compatible with liquid fuels. SPGEs were placed on a batch-injection analysis (BIA) cell, which was filled with a hydroethanolic solution containing 99% v/v ethanol and 0.1 mol L(-1) HClO4 (electrolyte). An electronic micropipette was connected to the cell to perform injections (100 μL) of sample or standard solutions. Over 200 injections can be injected continuously without replacing electrolyte and SPGE strip. Amperometric detection (+1.1 V vs. Ag/AgCl) of 2,6-DTBP provided fast (around 8 s) and precise (RSD = 0.7%, n = 12) determinations using an external calibration curve. The method was applied for the analysis of biodiesel and aviation jet fuel samples and comparable results with liquid and gas chromatographic analyses, typically required for biodiesel and jet fuel samples, were obtained. Hence, these SPGE strips are completely compatible with organic samples and their combination with the BIA cell shows great promise for routine and portable analysis of fuels and other organic liquid samples without requiring sophisticated sample treatments. PMID:27506338

  13. Radioactive effluents in Savannah River

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1991-11-27

    During 1990, low-level radiometric studies of the Savannah River continued to distinguish between effluent contributions from Plant Vogtle and the Savannah River Site. Measurements of these radioactive effluents are of mutual interest to both institutions, as they can address disturbing trends before they become health and legal concerns. The Environmental Technology Section (ETS) has conducted radiometric studies of Plant Vogtle since late 1986, prior to its startup. The plant has two 1100 MWe pressurized water reactors developed by Westinghouse. Unit 1 started commercial operations in June 1987, and Unit 2 began in May 1989. During powered operations, ETS has routinely detected neutron-activated isotopes in controlled releases but all activities have been several orders of magnitude below the DOE guide values. In 1990, processing improvements for Vogtle effluents have yielded even lower activities in the river. The Vogtle release data and the ETS measurements have tracked well over the past four years.

  14. USE OF TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION EVALUATION METHODS TO CHARACTERIZE IDENTIFY, AND CONFIRM HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM TOXICITY IN AN INDUSTRIAL EFFLUENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) was conducted on effluent from a major industrial discharger. Initial monitoring showed slight chronic toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia; later sample showed substantial toxicity to C. dubia. Chemical analysis detected hexavalent chromium ...

  15. Instrumentation of sampling aircraft for measurement of launch vehicle effluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wornom, D. E.; Woods, D. C.; Thomas, M. E.; Tyson, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    An aircraft was selected and instrumented to measure effluents emitted from large solid propellant rockets during launch activities. The considerations involved in aircraft selection, sampling probes, and instrumentation are discussed with respect to obtaining valid airborne measurements. Discussions of the data acquisition system used, the instrument power system, and operational sampling procedures are included. Representative measurements obtained from an actual rocket launch monitoring activity are also presented.

  16. Ion pair-based liquid-phase microextraction combined with cuvetteless UV-vis micro-spectrophotometry as a miniaturized assay for monitoring ammonia in waters.

    PubMed

    Senra-Ferreiro, Sonia; Pena-Pereira, Francisco; Costas-Mora, Isabel; Romero, Vanesa; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2011-09-15

    A miniaturized method based on liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) in combination with microvolume UV-vis spectrophotometry for monitoring ammonia in waters is proposed. The methodology is based on the extraction of the ion pair formed between the blue indophenol obtained according to the Berthelot reaction and a quaternary ammonium salt into a microvolume of organic solvent. Experimental parameters affecting the LPME performance such as type and concentration of the quaternary ammonium ion salt required to form the ion pair, type and volume of extractant solvent, effect of disperser solvent, ionic strength and extraction time, were optimized. A detection limit of 5.0 μg L(-1) ammonia and an enrichment factor of 30 can be attained after a microextraction time of 4 min. The repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation, was 7.6% (n=7). The proposed method can be successfully applied to the determination of trace amounts of ammonia in several environmental water samples. PMID:21807208

  17. Non-destructive monitoring of microbial biofilms at solid-liquid interfaces using on-line devices

    SciTech Connect

    Nivens, D.E. . Dept. of Chemistry Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN . Inst. for Applied Microbiology); Chambers, J.Q. . Dept. of Chemistry); White, D.C. . Inst. for Applied Microbiology Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN . Dept. of Microbiology Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1990-01-01

    Corrosion, biofouling, and related problems have been an impetus for investigating interactions between microorganisms and solid surfaces. In recent years, a number of studies have been performed to assess the damages caused by microbial influenced corrosion (MIC). In a number of these studies, electrochemical techniques have monitored the performance of metal surfaces exposed to bacteria. However, most of these methods can only indirectly detect the presence of biofilms. In this paper, two non-destructive on-line monitoring devices, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FT/IR) and the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) were used to directly monitor biofilm formation. These devices have been developed to study the initial fouling process and subsequent biofilm development and not merely the effects of the living film on the host material. The ATR-FT/IR technique provides information about biomass, exopolymer production, and the nutritional status of microbial biofilms. The QCM provides a direct measure of biomass. ATR-FT/IR and QCM detect 10{sup 6} and 10{sup 4} Caulobacter crescentus cells/cm{sup 2}, respectively. Both techniques can be coupled with electrochemical methods for deeper insight into mechanisms of MIC. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  18. In situ monitoring of atmospheric nitrous acid based on multi-pumping flow system and liquid waveguide capillary cell.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuhan; Lu, Keding; Dong, Huabin; Li, Xin; Cheng, Peng; Zou, Qi; Wu, Yusheng; Liu, Xingang; Zhang, Yuanhang

    2016-05-01

    In the last four decades, various techniques including spectroscopic, wet chemical and mass spectrometric methods, have been developed and applied for the detection of ambient nitrous acid (HONO). We developed a HONO detection system based on long path photometry which consists of three independent modules i.e., sampling module, fluid propulsion module and detection module. In the propulsion module, solenoid pumps are applied. With solenoid pumps the pulsed flow can be computer controlled both in terms of pump stroke volume and pulse frequency, which enables the attainment of a very stable flow rate. In the detection module, a customized Liquid Waveguide Capillary Cell (LWCC) is used. The customized LWCC pre-sets the optical fiber in-coupling with the liquid wave guide, providing the option of fast startup and easy maintenance of the absorption photometry. In summer 2014, our system was deployed in a comprehensive campaign at a rural site in the North China Plain. More than one month of high quality HONO data spanning from the limit of detection to 5ppb were collected. Intercomparison of our system with another established system from Forschungszentrum Juelich is presented and discussed. In conclusion, our instrument achieved a detection limit of 10pptV within 2min and a measurement uncertainty of 7%, which is well suited for investigation of the HONO budget from urban to rural conditions in China. PMID:27155434

  19. Phytoremediation of the coalmine effluent.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Sandhya; Kumar Banerjee, Tarun

    2012-07-01

    Coal mine effluent was subjected to detoxification by phytoremediation using two macrophytes Azolla pinnata and Lemna minor. Both plants were kept separately in the effluents for 7 day. The initial concentration (mg L⁻¹) of eight metals: Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Ni, Pb, Cr and Cd investigated in the effluent were 22.91±0.02, 9.61±1.6, 2.04±0.23, 1.03±0.15, 0.86±0.19, 0.69±0.11, 0.18±0.007 and 0.06±0.008 respectively. The initial fresh biomass of each plant was 100g. After one week, metals removed in A. pinnata-phytoremediated effluent were in the order: Mn (98%)>Fe (95.4%)>Zn (95%)>Cu (93%)>Pb (86.9%)>Cd (85%)>Cr (77.7%)>Ni (66.2%) and metal decrease in L. minor-phytoremediated effluent were: Mn (99.5%)>Cu (98.8%)>Zn (96.7%)>Ni (94.5%)>Fe (93.1%)>Cd (86.7%)>Pb (84%)>Cr (76%). Due to metal toxicity the total chlorophyll and protein contents of L. minor decreased by 29.3% and 38.55% respectively. The decrease of these macromolecules in A. pinnata was 27% and 15.56% respectively. Also, the reduction in biomass of L. minor was greater than that for A. pinnata. Based on the finding we could suggest that both the plants are suitable for bioremediation of mine effluent at the contaminated sites. However, attention for quick disposal of these metal loaded plants is urgently required. PMID:22571948

  20. MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT GAMMA MONITORS SYSTEM FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Casella, V

    2007-06-25

    The Department of Energy (DOE) selected Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) as the preferred technology for the removal of radioactive cesium from High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Before the full-scale Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) becomes operational, the liquid Waste Organization (LWO) plans to process a portion of dissolved saltcake waste through a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). This work was derived from Technical Task Request SP-TTR-2004-00013, ''Gamma Monitor for MCU.'' The deliverables for this task are the hardware and software for the gamma monitors and a report summarizing the testing and acceptance of this equipment for use in the MCU. Revision of this report is a deliverable in Technical Task Report SP-TTR-2006-00010, ''NaI Shield Box Testing.'' Gamma-ray monitors were developed to: {lg_bullet} Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the decontaminated salt solution before entering the DSS (Decontaminated Salt Solution) Hold Tank, {lg_bullet} Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the strip effluent before entering the Strip Effluent Hold Tank, {lg_bullet} Verify proper operation of the solvent extraction system by verifying material balance within the process (The DSS Hold Tank Cs-137 concentration will be very low and the Cs-137 concentration in the Strip Effluent Hold Tank will be approximately fifteen times higher than the Cs-137 concentration in the Feed Tank.)

  1. Evaluating the capabilities of aerosol-to-liquid particle extraction system (ALPXS)/ICP-MS for monitoring trace metals in indoor air.

    PubMed

    Jayawardene, Innocent; Rasmussen, Pat E; Chenier, Marc; Gardner, H David

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the application of the Aerosol-to-Liquid Particle Extraction System (ALPXS), which uses wet electrostatic precipitation to collect airborne particles, for multi-element indoor stationary monitoring. Optimum conditions are determined for capturing airborne particles for metal determination by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), for measuring field blanks, and for calculating limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ). Due to the relatively high flow rate (300 L min(-1)), a sampling duration of 1 hr to 2 hr was adequate to capture airborne particle-bound metals under the investigated experimental conditions. The performance of the ALPXS during a building renovation demonstrated signal-to-noise ratios appropriate for sampling airborne particles in environments with elevated metal concentrations, such as workplace settings. The ALPXS shows promise as a research tool for providing useful information on short-term variations (transient signals) and for trapping particles into aqueous solutions where needed for subsequent characterization. As the ALPXS does not provide size-specific samples, and its efficiency at different flow rates has yet to be quantified, the ALPXS would not replace standard filter-based protocols accepted for regulatory applications (e.g., exposure measurements), but rather would provide additional information if used in conjunction with filter based methods. Implications: This study investigates the capability of the Aerosol-to-Liquid Particle Extraction System (ALPXS) for stationary sampling of airborne metals in indoor workplace environments, with subsequent analysis by ICP-MS. The high flow rate (300 L/min) permits a short sampling duration (< 2 hr). Results indicated that the ALPXS was capable of monitoring short-term changes in metal emissions during a renovation activity. This portable instrument may prove to be advantageous in occupational settings as a qualitative indicator of elevated

  2. Improved biodegradation of textile dye effluent by coculture.

    PubMed

    Vijayalakshmidevi, S R; Muthukumar, Karuppan

    2015-04-01

    The present study demonstrates the de-colorization and degradation of textile effluent by coculture consisting of three bacterial species isolated from textile effluent contaminated environment with an aim to reduce the treatment time. The isolates were identified as Ochrobactrum sp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Providencia vermicola by 16S rRNA analysis. Their secondary structure was predicted and GC content of the sequence was found to be 54.39, 52.10, and 52.53%. The co-culture showed a prominent increase in the degradation activity due to the action of oxidoreductase enzymatic mechanism of laccase, NADH-DCIP reductase and azoreductase activity. The biodegradability index of 0.75 was achieved with 95% chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction in 16 h and 78 and 85% reduction in total organic carbon (TOC) and total solids was observed. Bioaccumulation of metals was identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The effective decolorization was confirmed from the results of UV-vis spectroscopy, high performance liquid chromatography and Fourier transformed infrared spectrometer analyzes. The possible degradation pathway was obtained from the analysis of liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis and the metabolites such as 2-amino naphthalene and N-phenyl-1.3,5 triazine were observed. The toxic nature of the effluent was analyzed using phyto-toxicity, cell-death assay and geno-toxicity tests. PMID:25594688

  3. Environmental monitoring at Hanford, Washington, USA: A brief site history and summary of recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, R. H.; Jaquish, R. E.; Mitchell, P. J.; Rickard, W. H.

    1989-09-01

    Nuclear and nonnuclear industrial and research activities have been conducted on the Hanford reservation since 1943. Materials originating from these activities may enter the surrounding environment through releases of airborne and liquid effluents and solid wastes. Concern about the environmental effects of these releases has evolved over the past four decades into a comprehensive onsite and offsite monitoring program. Today, environmental monitoring to assess potential impacts of released materials includes field sampling and chemical and physical analyses of air, ground and surface water, fish and wildlife, soil, vegetation, and foodstuffs. This paper reviews the history of Hanford operations and summarizes the current environmental monitoring program and its major findings. Mathematical models based on monitoring data show that radiation doses to people living near the Hanford site are well below existing regulatory standards. Only trace amounts of radionuclides from Hanford have been detected in the offsite environment.

  4. Use of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to monitor beta-lactam plasma concentrations during the treatment of endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Tattevin, P; Tribut, O; Arvieux, C; Dupont, M; Flicoteaux, R; Desbordes, L; Le Tulzo, Y; Michelet, C

    2005-01-01

    Guidelines recommend high doses of beta-lactams for the therapy of endocarditis. This report describes a retrospective study of 15 endocarditis patients (median age 64 years), treated according to guidelines, whose beta-lactam trough plasma concentrations were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography because of tolerance or efficacy concerns. For amoxycillin, the mean level was 86.8 mg/L (range: 30-212 mg/L); five (45%) patients had concentrations > 1000 x MIC. For cloxacillin, the mean level was 47.9 mg/L (range: 16.7-104 mg/L). The consequences of high and unpredicted beta-lactam trough plasma concentrations for a prolonged period have not yet been thoroughly evaluated. PMID:15649311

  5. Monitoring the formation of inorganic fullerene-like MoS2 nanostructures by laser ablation in liquid environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compagnini, Giuseppe; Sinatra, Marco G.; Messina, Gabriele C.; Patanè, Giacomo; Scalese, Silvia; Puglisi, Orazio

    2012-05-01

    Laser ablation of solid targets in liquid media is emerging as a simple, clean and reproducible way to generate a large number of intriguing nanometric structures with peculiar properties. In this work we present some results on the formation of MoS2 fullerene-like nanoparticles (10-15 nm diameter) obtained by the ablation of crystalline targets in water. Such a top-down approach can be considered greener than standard sulphidization reactions and represents an intriguing single step procedure. The generation of the MoS2 nanostructures is in competition with that of oxide clusters and strongly depends on the oxidative environment created by the plasma plume. The size, shape and crystalline phase of the obtained nanoparticles are studied by microscopy while X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy is used to investigate the chemical state of produced nanostructures and to propose mechanisms for their growth.

  6. Incineration and monitoring of low-level 3H and 14C wastes at a biological research institution

    SciTech Connect

    Hamrick, P.E.; Knapp, S.J.; Parker, M.G.; Watson, J.E. Jr.

    1986-10-01

    Low-level radioactive waste containing liquid scintillation fluid and known amounts of /sup 14/C and /sup 3/H has been incinerated in a modified pathological incinerator with the incinerator effluent, refractory surface and ash being monitored. The study relates the activity monitored to that incinerated and discusses how this relation was affected by a modification of the incinerator and monitoring conditions. No significant activity was found to be associated with the ash, particulates or the refractory surface. These data suggest that most of the activity is released as tritiated water vapor and /sup 14/C-labeled carbon dioxide. However, incomplete oxidation may occur for short periods of time depending on the amount of liquid scintillation fluid incinerated, with the possible release of /sup 14/C-labeled carbon monoxide.

  7. The occurrence and fate of chemicals of emerging concern in coastal urban rivers receiving discharge of treated municipal wastewater effluent.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Ashmita; Lyons, J Michael; Smith, Deborah J; Drewes, Jörg E; Snyder, Shane A; Heil, Ann; Maruya, Keith A

    2014-02-01

    To inform future monitoring and assessment of chemicals of emerging concern (CECs) in coastal urban watersheds, the occurrence and fate of more than 60 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), commercial/household chemicals, current-use pesticides, and hormones were characterized in 2 effluent-dominated rivers in southern California (USA). Water samples were collected during 2 low-flow events at locations above and below the discharge points of water reclamation plants (WRPs) and analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Approximately 50% of targeted CECs were detectable at stations downstream from WRPs, compared with <31% and <10% at the reference stations above the WRPs. Concentrations of chlorinated phosphate flame retardants were highest among the CECs tested, with mean total aggregate concentrations of tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP), and tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP) of 3400 ng/L and 2400 ng/L for the 2 rivers. Maximum in-stream concentrations of pyrethroids (bifenthrin and permethrin), diclofenac, and galaxolide exceeded risk-based thresholds established for monitoring of CECs in effluent-dominated receiving waters. In contrast, maximum concentrations of PPCPs commonly detected in treated wastewater (e.g., acetaminophen, N,N,diethyl-meta-toluamide [DEET], and gemfibrozil) were less than 10% of established thresholds. Attenuation of target CECs was not observed downstream of WRP discharge until dilution by seawater occurred in the tidal zone, partly because of the short hydraulic residence times in these highly channelized systems (<3 d). In addition to confirming CECs for future in-stream monitoring, these results suggest that conservative mass transport is an important boundary condition for assessment of the input, fate, and effects of CECs in estuaries at the bottom of these watersheds. PMID:24399464

  8. Method of purifying a gas stream using 1,2,3-triazolium ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Luebke, David; Nulwala, Hunald; Tang, Chau

    2014-12-09

    A method for separating a target gas from a gaseous mixture using 1,2,3-triazolium ionic liquids is presented. Industrial effluent streams may be cleaned by removing carbon dioxide from the stream by contacting the effluent stream with a 1,2,3-triazolium ionic liquid compound.

  9. Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-09

    This report describes environmental monitoring activities at Hanford Reservation. Attention is focused on effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. All Hanford contractors reviewed potential sources of contamination. A facility effluent monitoring plan was written for each facility with the potential to release significant quantities of hazardous materials, addressing both radiological and nonradiological effluent monitoring. The environmental surveillance program assesses onsite and offsite environmental impacts and offsite human health exposures. The program monitors air, surface water, sediment, agricultural products, vegetation, soil, and wildlife. In addition, independent onsite surveillance is conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of Hanford Site effluent controls in order to comply with applicable environmental standards and regulations.

  10. Confirmation of 13 sulfonamides in honey by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for monitoring plans: validation according to European Union Decision 2002/657/EC.

    PubMed

    Dubreil-Chéneau, Estelle; Pirotais, Yvette; Verdon, Eric; Hurtaud-Pessel, Dominique

    2014-04-25

    A rapid and reliable liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous confirmation of 13 sulfonamides in honey was developed and fully validated in accordance with the European Commission Decision No 2002/657/EC. The validation scheme was built in accordance with the target level of 50μgkg(-1) for all analytes. The sulfonamides investigated were as follows: sulfaguanidine (SGN), sulfanilamide (SNL), sulfadiazine (SDZ), sulfathiazole (STZ), sulfamerazine (SMR), sulfamethizole (SMZ), sulfadimerazine (SDM), sulfamonomethoxine (SMNM), sulfamethoxypiridazine (SMP), sulfadoxine (SDX), sulfamethoxazole (SMX), sulfaquinoxaline (SQX) and sulfadimethoxine (SDT). Several extraction procedures were investigated during the development phase. Finally, the best results were obtained with a procedure using acidic hydrolysis and cation exchange purification. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a C18 analytical column. Matrix effects were also investigated. Data acquisition implemented for the confirmatory purpose was performed by monitoring 2 MRM transitions per analyte under the positive electrospray mode. Mean relative recoveries ranged from 85.8% to 110.2% and relative standard deviations lying between 2.6% and 19.8% in intra-laboratory reproducibility conditions. The decision limits (CCα) ranged from 1.8 to 15.5μgkg(-1). High resolution mass spectrometry was used to investigate the possible formation of sulfonamide metabolites in honey. The validation results proved that the method is suitable for the screening and confirmatory steps as implemented for the French monitoring residue plan for sulfonamides residue control in honeybees. PMID:24666935

  11. Monitoring utilizations of amino acids and vitamins in culture media and Chinese hamster ovary cells by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jinshu; Chan, Pik Kay; Bondarenko, Pavel V

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring amino acids and vitamins is important for understanding human health, food nutrition and the culture of mammalian cells used to produce therapeutic proteins in biotechnology. A method including ion pairing reversed-phase liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry was developed and optimized to quantify 21 amino acids and 9 water-soluble vitamins in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and culture media. By optimizing the chromatographic separation, scan time, monitoring time window, and sample preparation procedure, and using isotopically labeled (13)C, (15)N and (2)H internal standards, low limits of quantitation (≤0.054 mg/L), good precision (<10%) and good accuracy (100±10%) were achieved for nearly all the 30 compounds. Applying this method to CHO cell extracts, statistically significant differences in the metabolite levels were measured between two cell lines originated from the same host, indicating differences in genetic makeup or metabolic activities and nutrient supply levels in the culture media. In a fed-batch process of manufacturing scale bioreactors, two distinguished trends for changes in amino acid concentrations were identified in response to feeding. Ten essential amino acids showed a zigzag pattern with maxima at the feeding days, and 9 non-essential amino acids displayed a smoothly changing profile as they were mainly products of cellular metabolism. Five of 9 vitamins accumulated continuously during the culture period, suggesting that they were fed in access. The method serves as an effective tool for the development and optimization of mammalian cell cultures. PMID:26355770

  12. Validation and use of an enzymic time-temperature integrator to monitor thermal impacts inside a solid/liquid model food.

    PubMed

    Guiavarc'h, Yann P; Dintwa, Edward; Van Loey, Ann M; Zuber, François T; Hendrickx, Marc E

    2002-01-01

    Heat denaturation kinetics of Bacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase, equilibrated at 81% equilibrium relative humidity at 4 degrees C (BLA81), was studied with help of isothermal and nonisothermal conditions by monitoring the decrease in enthalpy associated with the heat denaturation of the enzyme. Due to its low water content, BLA81 denaturation could be studied in the range of 118-124 degrees C. Two batches of BLA81 were successfully validated under nonisothermal conditions allowing the determinations of process values (reference temperature of 121.1 degrees C) in the range of 1-15 min. In a second step, BLA81 was used as a time-temperature integrator (TTI) to investigate potential differences of process values received by freely moving spherical particles as compared to a centrally fixed particle (single-position impact) inside cans containing water as brine. Results showed that the process value received by freely moving particles can be from 5.6% (4 rpm) to 19.7% (8 rpm) smaller than the process value received by the centrally fixed sphere. This means that evaluating the process value by means of a particle fixed at the critical point in a package can lead to potentially overestimations of the actual process value with possible hazardous quality/safety implications. These results highlight the potentials of the TTI technology to monitor the safety of heat-processed agitated solid/liquid foodstuffs. PMID:12363362

  13. Determination of Drugs in Plasma Samples by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Schizophrenic Patients.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Diego Soares; Pinto, Mônia Aparecida Lemos; de Souza, Israel Donizeti; Hallak, Jaime Eduardo Cecilio; Crippa, José Alexandre de Souza; Queiroz, Maria Eugênia Costa

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the development of a simple, sensitive and selective method based on high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) to determine antipsychotics (olanzapine, quetiapine, clozapine, haloperidol and chlorpromazine) along with antidepressants (mirtazapine, paroxetine, citalopram, sertraline, imipramine, clomipramine and fluoxetine), anticonvulsants (carbamazepine and lamotrigine) and anxiolytics (diazepam and clonazepam) in plasma samples obtained from schizophrenic patients. The samples were prepared by protein precipitation. The target drugs were separated on an XSelect SCH C18 column (100 mm × 2.1 mm × 2.5 µm) within 8.0 min by means of gradient elution. The drugs were then detected on a quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionization source, operating in the multiple reactions monitoring mode and in the positive ionization mode. The LC-MS-MS method was linear range from subtherapeutic to toxic concentrations with lower limit of quantification values ranged from 0.2 to 5.0 ng mL(-1), precision with coefficient of variation values lower than 12%, and accuracy ranged from 90 to 108%. The developed method enabled successful analysis of the target drugs in plasma samples obtained from 51 schizophrenic patients. Therapeutic drug monitoring revealed that many of the evaluated schizophrenic patients presented altered plasma concentrations of the analyzed drugs. These altered concentrations resulted from pharmacokinetic interactions among the medications prescribed to treat schizophrenia. PMID:26333987

  14. Direct injection human plasma analysis for the quantification of antihypertensive drugs for therapeutic drug monitoring using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Meimaroglou, Stefanos; Vonaparti, Ariadni; Migias, George; Gennimata, Dimitra; Poulou, Sofia; Panderi, Irene

    2015-11-01

    The concept of personalized medicine is related to the development of new sensitive, precise and accurate analytical methods for therapeutic drug monitoring. In this article a rapid, sensitive and specific method was developed for the quantification of aliskiren, losartan, valsartan and hydrochlorothiazide in human plasma. Sample preparation was performed by protein precipitation with acetonitrile followed by filtration. All analytes and the internal standard (tiamulin) were separated by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography using an X-Bridge-HILIC analytical column (150.0×2.1mm i.d., particle size 3.5μm) under isocratic elution. The mobile phase was composed of a 10% 5mM ammonium formate water solution pH 4.5, adjusted with formic acid, in acetonitrile and pumped at a flow rate of 0.25mLmin(-1). The assay was linear over the concentration range of 5-500ngmL(-1) for all the analytes. Intermediate precision was less than 5.2% over the tested concentration ranges. The method is the first reported application of HILIC in the analysis antihypertensives in human plasma. With a small sample size (50μL human plasma) and a run time less than 6.0min for each sample the method can be used to support a wide range of clinical studies and therapeutic drug monitoring. PMID:26432361

  15. Monitoring and determination of sulfonamide antibiotics (sulfamethoxydiazine, sulfamethazine, sulfamethoxazole and sulfadiazine) in imported Pangasius catfish products in Thailand using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jansomboon, Worawat; Boontanon, Suwanna Kitpati; Boontanon, Narin; Polprasert, Chongrak; Thi Da, Chau

    2016-12-01

    This research aimed to monitor the concentrations of sulfamethoxydiazine (SMD), sulfamethazine (SMT), sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and sulfadiazine (SDZ) in imported Pangasius catfish products in Thailand. The residues of the four sulfonamides (SAs) were analyzed by extraction process and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The highest concentrations found were 10.97ng/g for SMD, 6.23ng/g for SMT, 11.13ng/g for SDZ and 245.91ng/g for SMX, which was higher than the European Union (EU) standard (100ng/g). Moreover, all samples contaminated with SMX also contained SMT, indicating that more than one antibiotic was used for production in the country of origin. Because Thai standards for antibiotics in food have not been completely set, all contaminated discovered would not be considered to be an illegal food, in which antibiotic residues may affect human health in the long term. Therefore, antibiotic residues in Pangasius catfish products should be continually regulated and monitored. PMID:27374578

  16. ICPP environmental monitoring report for CY-1996

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, J.K.

    1997-06-01

    Summarized in this report are the data collected through Environmental Monitoring programs conducted at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) by the Environmental Affairs Department. This report is published in response to DOE Order 5400.1. The ICPP is responsible for complying with all applicable Federal, State, Local and DOE Rules, Regulations and Orders. Radiological effluent and emissions are regulated by the DOE in accordance with the Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs) as presented in DOE Order 5400.5. The State of Idaho regulates nonradiological waste resulting from the ICPP operations including airborne, liquid, and solid waste. Quality Assurance activities have resulted in the ICPP`s implementation of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules and guidelines pertaining to the collection, analyses, and reporting of environmentally related samples. Where no EPA methods for analyses existed for radionuclides, Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO) methods were used.

  17. Assignment of ozone-sensitive tryptophan residue in tryptophanase by a dual-monitoring high-performance liquid chromatography system

    SciTech Connect

    Ida, N.; Tokushige, M.

    1985-02-01

    Tryptophanase purified from Escherichia coli B/1t7-A is inactivated by mild ozonization following pseudo-first-order kinetics. Previous data from the authors suggest that one out of two tryptophan residues (Trp's) in the enzyme subunit is preferentially oxidized concomitant with the ozone inactivation and has a direct interaction with the coenzyme, pyridoxal phosphate. To determine which Trp is more susceptible to ozonization and interacts with PLP, the native and ozonized enzyme proteins were cleaved by trypsin and the two Trp-containing peptides were analyzed by reverse-phase HPLC equipped with a dual-monitoring system consisting of an uv and a fluorescence monitor connected in tandem for selective detection of Trp-containing peptides. This device facilitated rapid detection and quantitation of the Trp-containing peptides which decreased upon ozonization. The results showed that Trp preferentially oxidized upon ozonization and involved in the interaction with PLP was the one in peptide T-15 rather than that in T-23, which Kagamiyama et al. originally designated.

  18. Bioaccumulation tests applied in whole effluent assessment: A review

    SciTech Connect

    De Maagd, P.G.J.

    2000-01-01

    Until recently, the emphasis within whole effluent assessment has been on the application of bioassays for acute and chronic toxicity. Although the need for additional parameters to assess the ecotoxicological hazard and risk of effluents for receiving water systems has been repeatedly advocated, other parameters such as bioaccumulation, genotoxicity, sediment toxicity, and nutrient impacts are seldom addressed. This paper discusses the potential additional value of including bioaccumulation parameters in whole effluent assessment and methods that can be used for routine assessment. It is concluded that screening on the presence of potentially bioaccumulating compounds leads to a more comprehensive hazard assessment and should therefore be included in whole effluent assessment. A chemical method to assess potentially bioaccumulating substances (PBSs) is preferred above methods using organisms or classical group parameters such as extractable organic halogens (EOX). In situ studies with organisms are not feasible for routine assessment for a number of reasons, including cost efficiency and matrix problems. Classical group parameters such as EOX do not relate to bioaccumulation or toxicity. Chemical methods for assessing bioaccumulation are usually presented as integrated methods composed of different procedure steps such as pretreatment, extraction, separation, and detection. However, an optimal method may be constructed by combining procedure steps from different reported methods. Solid phase microextraction combined with high performance liquid chromatography or gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry is regarded as the preferable method for the assessment of PBSs. Before implementation in whole effluent assessment, however, the method must be carefully validated. Hazard assessment based on bioaccumulation seems feasible. For risk assessment, however, additional information is a prerequisite. Quantitative causal relationships between test assay results

  19. 40 CFR 429.12 - Monitoring requirements. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Monitoring requirements. 429.12 Section 429.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES... Monitoring requirements....

  20. 40 CFR 429.12 - Monitoring requirements. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Monitoring requirements. 429.12 Section 429.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES... Monitoring requirements....

  1. Perspective on Advancing FDA Regulatory Monitoring for Mycotoxins in Foods using Liquid Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry (Review).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Wong, Jon W; Krynitsky, Alexander J; Trucksess, Mary W

    2016-07-01

    The presence of mycotoxins (such as aflatoxins, deoxynivalenol, fumonisins, and patulin) is routinely monitored by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ensure that their concentrations in food are below the levels requiring regulatory action or advisories. To improve the efficiency of mycotoxin analysis, the researchers at the FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition have been evaluating modern LC-MS technologies. Consequently, a variety of LC-tandem MS and LC-high-resolution MS methods have been developed, which simultaneously identify and quantitate multiple mycotoxins in foods and feeds. Although matrix effects (matrix-induced ion suppression or enhancement) associated with LC-MS-based mycotoxin analysis remain, this review discusses methods for managing these effects and proposes practical solutions for the future implementation of LC-MS-based multimycotoxin analysis. PMID:27330044

  2. A Wireless Embedded Sensor based on Magnetic Higher-order Harmonic Fields: Application to Liquid Pressure Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ee Lim; Pereles, Brandon D.

    2010-01-01

    A wireless sensor based on the magnetoelastic, magnetically soft ferromagnetic alloy was constructed for remote measurement of pressure in flowing fluids. The pressure sensor was a rectangular strip of ferromagnetic alloy Fe40Ni38Mo4B18 adhered on a solid polycarbonate substrate and protected by a thin polycarbonate film. Upon excitation of a time-varying magnetic field through an excitation coil, the magnetically soft sensor magnetized and produced higher-order harmonic fields, which were detected through a detection coil. Under varying pressures, the sensor's magnetoelastic property caused a change in its magnetization, altering the amplitudes of the higher-order harmonic fields. A theoretical model was developed to describe the effect of pressure on the sensor's higher order harmonic fields. Experimental observations showed the 2nd order harmonic field generated by the pressure sensor was correlated to the surrounding fluid pressure, consistent with the theoretical results. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the sensor exhibited good repeatability and stability with minimal drift. Sensors with smaller dimensions were shown to have greater sensitivity but lower pressure range as compared to their larger counterparts. Since the sensor signal was also dependent on the location of the sensor with respect to the excitation/detection coil, a calibration algorithm was developed to eliminate signal variations due to the changing sensor location. Because of its wireless and passive nature, this sensor is useful for continuous and long-term monitoring of pressure at inaccessible areas. For example, sensors with these capabilities are suitable to be used in biomedical applications where permanent implantation and long-term monitoring are needed. PMID:20514363

  3. Monitoring multi-class pesticide residues in fresh fruits and vegetables by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Frenich, A Garrido; Vidal, J L Martínez; López, T López; Aguado, S Cortés; Salvador, I Martínez

    2004-09-10

    A new analytical method was developed using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry for the routine analysis of 31 multi-class pesticide residues and applied to approximately 50 fresh fruit and vegetable samples (green bean, cucumber, pepper, tomato, eggplant, watermelon, melon and zucchini). Extraction of the pesticides with ethyl acetate was carried out. The optimal ionisation conditions were selected for each pesticide in the same run. The procedure was validated and the values of some merit figures, such as recovery, precision, linear range, detection limit and quantification limit for each pesticide were calculated together with its calculated expanded uncertainty (U). The average recoveries in cucumber obtained for each pesticide ranged between 74 and 105% at two different fortification levels (n = 10 each) that ranged between 9 and 250 ng g(-1) (depending on the pesticide). The uncertainty associated to the analytical method was lower than 23% for all compounds tested. The calculated limits of detection and quantitation were typically <1 ng g(-1) that were much lower than the maximum residue levels established by European legislation. PMID:15481257

  4. Photo-Fenton and modified photo-Fenton at neutral pH for the treatment of emerging contaminants in wastewater treatment plant effluents: a comparison.

    PubMed

    Klamerth, N; Malato, S; Agüera, A; Fernández-Alba, A

    2013-02-01

    This study compares two different solar photo-Fenton processes, conventional photo-Fenton at pH3 and modified photo-Fenton at neutral pH with minimal Fe (5 mg L⁻¹) and minimal initial H₂O₂ (50 mg L⁻¹) concentrations for the degradation of emerging contaminants in Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants effluents in solar pilot plant. As Fe precipitates at neutral pH, complexing agents which are able to form photoactive species, do not pollute the environment or increase toxicity have to be used to keep the iron in solution. This study was done using real effluents containing over 60 different contaminants, which were monitored during treatment by liquid chromatography coupled to a hybrid quadrupole/linear ion trap mass analyzer (LC-QTRAP-MS/MS) operating in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. Concentrations of the selected contaminants ranged from a few ng L⁻¹ to tens of μg L⁻¹. It was demonstrated in all cases the removal of over 95% of the contaminants. Photo-Fenton at pH3 provided the best treatment time, but has the disadvantage that the water must be previously acidified. The most promising process was photo-Fenton modified with Ethylenediamine-N,N'-disuccinic acid (EDDS), as the pH remained in the neutral range. PMID:23206497

  5. A framework for identifying characteristic odor compounds in municipal wastewater effluent.

    PubMed

    Agus, Eva; Zhang, Lifeng; Sedlak, David L

    2012-11-15

    Municipal wastewater often contains trace amounts of organic compounds that can compromise aesthetics of drinking water and undermine public confidence if a small amount of effluent enters the raw water source of a potable water supply. To efficiently identify compounds responsible for odors in wastewater effluent, an analytical framework consisting of gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography with olfactometry detection (GC-Olf) coupled with flavor profile analysis (FPA) was used to identify and monitor compounds that could affect the aesthetics of drinking water. After prioritizing odor peaks detected in wastewater effluent by GC-Olf, the odorous components were tentatively identified using retention indices, mass spectra and odor descriptors. Wastewater effluent samples were typically dominated by earthy-musty odors with additional odors in the amine, sulfidic and fragrant categories. 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (246TCA), geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (2MIB) were the main sources of the earthy/musty odors in wastewater effluent. The other odors were attributable to a suite of compounds, which were detected in some but not all of the wastewater effluents at levels well in excess of their odor thresholds. In most cases, the identities of odorants were confirmed using authentic standards. The fate of these odorous compounds, including 2-pyrrolidone, methylnaphthalenes, vanillin and 5-hydroxyvanillin (5-OH-vanillin), should be considered in future studies of water systems that receive effluent from upstream sources. PMID:22981490

  6. [Influence of the substrate composition in extensive green roof on the effluent quality].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Lin; Li, Tian; Gu, Jun-Qing

    2014-11-01

    By monitoring the effluent quality from different green roof assemblies during several artificial rain events, the main pollutant characteristics and the influence of substrate composition in extensive green roof on the effluent quality were studied. Results showed that the main pollutants in the effluent were N, P and COD; with the increase of cumulative rain, the concentrations of pollutants in the effluent decreased, which had obvious leaching effect; The average concentrations of heavy metals in the early effluent from all assemblies reached drinking water standard, including the assemblies using crushed bricks; When garden soil and compost were used as organic matter, the assemblies had serious leaching of nutrient substance. After the accumulated rainfall reached 150 mm, the TN, TP and COD concentrations of effluent were 2.93, 0.73 and 78 mg x L(-1), respectively, which exceeded the Surface water V class limit. By means of application of the Water Treatment Residual, the leaching of TP from green planting soil was decreased by about 60%. The inorganic compound soil had better effluent quality, however we also need to judge whether the substrate could be applied in extensive green roof or not, by analyzing its ability of water quantity reduction and the plant growth situation. PMID:25639089

  7. Brookhaven National Laboratory environmental monitoring plan for Calendar Year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, J.R.; Paquette, D.; Lee, R.

    1996-10-01

    As required by DOE Order 5400.1, each U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant quantities of hazardous materials shall provide a written Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) covering effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance, provides specific guidance regarding environmental monitoring activities.

  8. Isotope ratio monitoring of small molecules and macromolecules by liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Godin, Jean-Philippe; Hau, Jörg; Fay, Laurent-Bernard; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2005-01-01

    In the field of isotope ratio mass spectrometry, the introduction of an interface allowing the connection of liquid chromatography (LC) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has opened a range of new perspectives. The LC interface is based on a chemical oxidation, producing CO2 from organic molecules. While first results were obtained from the analysis of low molecular weight compounds, the application of compound-specific isotope analysis by irm-LC/MS to other molecules, in particular biomolecules, is presented here. The influence of the LC flow rate on the CO2 signal and on the observed delta13C values is demonstrated. The limits of quantification for angiotensin III and for leucine were 100 and 38 pmol, respectively, with a standard deviation of the delta13C values better than 0.4 per thousand. Also, accuracy and precision of delta13C values for elemental analyser-IRMS and flow injection analysis-IRMS (FIA-LC/MS) were compared. For compounds with molecular weights ranging from 131 to 66,390 Da, precision was better than 0.3 per thousand, and accuracy varied from 0.1 to 0.7 per thousand. In a second part of the work, a two-dimensional (2D)-LC method for the separation of 15 underivatised amino acids is demonstrated; the precision of delta13C values for several amino acids by irm-LC/MS was better than 0.3 per thousand at natural abundance. For labelled mixtures, the coefficient of variation was between 1% at 0.07 atom % excess (APE) for threonine and alanine, and around 10% at 0.03 APE for valine and phenylalanine. The application of irm-LC/MS to the determination of the isotopic enrichment of 13C-threonine in an extract of rat colon mucosa demonstrated a precision of 0.5 per thousand, or 0.001 atom %. PMID:16124031

  9. 300 area TEDF permit compliance monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect

    BERNESKI, L.D.

    1998-11-20

    This document presents the permit compliance monitoring plan for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). It addresses the compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and Department of Natural Resources Aquatic Lands Sewer Outfall Lease.

  10. Environmental monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, R.C.

    1997-02-01

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. 52 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs.

  11. Quantitation of low molecular weight sugars by chemical derivatization-liquid chromatography/multiple reaction monitoring/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Han, Jun; Lin, Karen; Sequria, Carita; Yang, Juncong; Borchers, Christoph H

    2016-07-01

    A new method for the separation and quantitation of 13 mono- and disaccharides has been developed by chemical derivatization/ultra-HPLC/negative-ion ESI-multiple-reaction monitoring MS. 3-Nitrophenylhydrazine (at 50°C for 60 min) was shown to be able to quantitatively derivatize low-molecular weight (LMW) reducing sugars. The nonreducing sugar, sucrose, was not derivatized. A pentafluorophenyl-bonded phase column was used for the chromatographic separation of the derivatized sugars. This method exhibits femtomole-level sensitivity, high precision (CVs of ≤ 4.6%) and high accuracy for the quantitation of LMW sugars in wine. Excellent linearity (R(2) ≥ 0.9993) and linear ranges of ∼500-fold for disaccharides and ∼1000-4000-fold for monosaccharides were achieved. With internal calibration ((13) C-labeled internal standards), recoveries were between 93.6% ± 1.6% (xylose) and 104.8% ± 5.2% (glucose). With external calibration, recoveries ranged from 82.5% ± 0.8% (ribulose) to 105.2% ± 2.1% (xylulose). Quantitation of sugars in two red wines and two white wines was performed using this method; quantitation of the central carbon metabolism-related carboxylic acids and tartaric acid was carried out using a previously established derivatization procedure with 3-nitrophenylhydrazine as well. The results showed that these two classes of compounds-both of which have important organoleptic properties-had different compositions in red and white wines. PMID:27120558

  12. Ecofriendly degradation, decolorization and detoxification of textile effluent by a developed bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Phugare, Swapnil S; Kalyani, Dayanand C; Surwase, Shripad N; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2011-07-01

    Present study illustrates the effectual decolorization and degradation of the textile effluent using a developed bacterial consortium SDS, consisted of bacterial species Providencia sp. SDS and Pseudomonas aeuroginosa strain BCH, originally isolated from dye contaminated soil. The intensive metabolic activity of the consortium SDS led to complete decolorization of textile effluent within 20 h at pH 7 and temperature 30°C. Significant induction in the activities of veratryl alcohol oxidase, laccase, azoreductase and DCIP reductase were observed during decolorization, which indicates their involvement in decolorization and degradation process. The decolorization and biodegradation was monitored using UV-vis spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, HPLC and HPTLC analysis. Toxicological analysis of effluent before and after treatment was performed using classical Allium cepa test. Investigations of various toxicological parameters viz, oxidative stress response, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and phytotoxicity, collectively concludes that, the toxicity of effluent reduces significantly after treatment with consortium SDS. PMID:21524793

  13. Effects on ground-water quality from irrigating pasture with sewage effluent near Lakeland, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichenbaugh, R.C.

    1977-01-01

    Since 1969 an average of 25,000 gpd of domestic secondary-treated effluent has been used to supplement irrigation of 30 acres of grazed pasture north of Lakeland, Florida. Monitor wells were contructed near the effluent-irrigated pasture. The water table in the surficial aquifer under the pasture varied from 1.0 to 3.3 feet below land surface. Total nitrogen was less than 20 percent of the effluent content after percolating 8 feet; no increase in nitrogen was detected 20 feet below the surface, or in down-gradient ground water. There was no evidence of phosphorus or carbon contamination of ground water. Low numbers of bacteria (generally coliform) were noted in some samples from nine wells. Four wells sampled contained bacteria of probable fecal origin. Low-rate application of the effluent to the pasture apparently has had little effect on the soil and ground water. (Woodard-USGS)

  14. Characterization of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care products in hospital effluent and waste water influent/effluent by direct-injection LC-MS-MS.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Tiago S; Murphy, Mark; Mendola, Nicholas; Wong, Virginia; Carlson, Doreen; Waring, Linda

    2015-06-15

    Two USEPA Regional Laboratories developed direct-injection LC/MS/MS methods to measure Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) in water matrices. Combined, the laboratories were prepared to analyze 185 PPCPs (with 74 overlapping) belonging to more than 20 therapeutical categories with reporting limits at low part-per-trillion. In partnership with Suffolk County in NY, the laboratories conducted PPCP analysis on 72 samples belonging to 4 Water Systems (WS). Samples were collected at different stages of the WS (hospital effluents, WWTP influents/effluents) to assess PPCP relevance in hospital discharges, impact on WWTP performance and potential ecological risk posed by analytes not eliminated during treatment. Major findings include: a) acceptable accuracy between the two laboratories for most overlapping PPCPs with better agreement for higher concentrations; b) the measurement of PPCPs throughout all investigated WS with total PPCP concentrations ranging between 324 and 965 μg L(-1) for hospital effluent, 259 and 573 μg L(-1) for WWTP influent and 19 and 118 μg L(-1) for WWTP effluent; c) the variable contribution of hospital effluents to the PPCP loads into the WWTP influents (contribution ranging between 1% (WS-2) and 59% (WS-3); d) the PPCP load reduction after treatment for all WS reaching more than 95% for WS using activated sludge processes (WS-2 and WS-4), with inflow above 6500 m(3) d(-1), and having a lower percentage of hospital effluent in the WWTP influent; e) the relevance of four therapeutical categories for the PPCP load in WWTP effluents (analgesics, antidiabetics, antiepileptics and psychoanaleptics); and f) the risk quotients calculated using screening-level Predicted Non Effect Concentration indicate that WWTP effluents contain 33 PPCPs with potential medium to high ecological risk. To our knowledge no other monitoring investigation published in the scientific literature uses direct-injection methods to cover as many PPCPs and

  15. Dried Blood Spot Methodology in Combination With Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectrometry Facilitates the Monitoring of Teriflunomide

    PubMed Central

    Lunven, Catherine; Turpault, Sandrine; Beyer, Yann-Joel; O'Brien, Amy; Delfolie, Astrid; Boyanova, Neli; Sanderink, Ger-Jan; Baldinetti, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Background: Teriflunomide, a once-daily oral immunomodulator approved for treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, is eliminated slowly from plasma. If necessary to rapidly lower plasma concentrations of teriflunomide, an accelerated elimination procedure using cholestyramine or activated charcoal may be used. The current bioanalytical assay for determination of plasma teriflunomide concentration requires laboratory facilities for blood centrifugation and plasma storage. An alternative method, with potential for greater convenience, is dried blood spot (DBS) methodology. Analytical and clinical validations are required to switch from plasma to DBS (finger-prick sampling) methodology. Methods: Using blood samples from healthy subjects, an LC-MS/MS assay method for quantification of teriflunomide in DBS over a range of 0.01–10 mcg/mL was developed and validated for specificity, selectivity, accuracy, precision, reproducibility, and stability. Results were compared with those from the current plasma assay for determination of plasma teriflunomide concentration. Results: Method was specific and selective relative to endogenous compounds, with process efficiency ∼88%, and no matrix effect. Inaccuracy and imprecision for intraday and interday analyses were <15% at all concentrations tested. Quantification of teriflunomide in DBS assay was not affected by blood deposit volume and punch position within spot, and hematocrit level had a limited but acceptable effect on measurement accuracy. Teriflunomide was stable for at least 4 months at room temperature, and for at least 24 hours at 37°C with and without 95% relative humidity, to cover sampling, drying, and shipment conditions in the field. The correlation between DBS and plasma concentrations (R2 = 0.97), with an average blood to plasma ratio of 0.59, was concentration independent and constant over time. Conclusions: DBS sampling is a simple and practical method for monitoring teriflunomide

  16. Solving matrix-effects exploiting the second order advantage in the resolution and determination of eight tetracycline antibiotics in effluent wastewater by modelling liquid chromatography data with multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares and unfolded-partial least squares followed by residual bilinearization algorithms I. Effect of signal pre-treatment.

    PubMed

    De Zan, M M; Gil García, M D; Culzoni, M J; Siano, R G; Goicoechea, H C; Martínez Galera, M

    2008-02-01

    The effect of piecewise direct standardization (PDS) and baseline correction approaches was evaluated in the performance of multivariate curve resolution (MCR-ALS) algorithm for the resolution of three-way data sets from liquid chromatography with diode-array detection (LC-DAD). First, eight tetracyclines (tetracycline, oxytetracycline, chlorotetracycline, demeclocycline, methacycline, doxycycline, meclocycline and minocycline) were isolated from 250 mL effluent wastewater samples by solid-phase extraction (SPE) with Oasis MAX 500 mg/6 mL cartridges and then separated on an Aquasil C18 150 mm x 4.6mm (5 microm particle size) column by LC and detected by DAD. Previous experiments, carried out with Milli-Q water samples, showed a considerable loss of the most polar analytes (minocycline, oxitetracycline and tetracycline) due to breakthrough. PDS was applied to overcome this important drawback. Conversion of chromatograms obtained from standards prepared in solvent was performed obtaining a high correlation with those corresponding to the real situation (r2 = 0.98). Although the enrichment and clean-up steps were carefully optimized, the sample matrix caused a large baseline drift, and also additive interferences were present at the retention times of the analytes. These problems were solved with the baseline correction method proposed by Eilers. MCR-ALS was applied to the corrected and uncorrected three-way data sets to obtain spectral and chromatographic profiles of each tetracycline, as well as those corresponding to the co-eluting interferences. The complexity of the calibration model built from uncorrected data sets was higher, as expected, and the quality of the spectral and chromatographic profiles was worse. PMID:18093603

  17. Effluent sampling of Scout D and Delta launch vehicle exhausts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulten, W. C.; Storey, R. W.; Gregory, G. L.; Woods, D. C.; Harris, F. S., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Characterization of engine-exhaust effluents (hydrogen chloride, aluminum oxide, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide) has been attempted by conducting field experiments monitoring the exhaust cloud from a Scout-Algol III vehicle launch and a Delta-Thor vehicle launch. The exhaust cloud particulate size number distribution (total number of particles as a function of particle diameter), mass loading, morphology, and elemental composition have been determined within limitations. The gaseous species in the exhaust cloud have been identified. In addition to the ground-based measurements, instrumented aircraft flights through the low-altitude, stabilized-exhaust cloud provided measurements which identified CO and HCI gases and Al2O3 particles. Measurements of the initial exhaust cloud during formation and downwind at several distances have established sampling techniques which will be used for experimental verification of model predictions of effluent dispersion and fallout from exhaust clouds.

  18. Pinellas Plant environmental monitoring report, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    The effluent and environmental monitoring programs maintained by the Pinellas Plant are designed to determine the efficiencies of treatment and control mechanisms, to provide measurements of discharge concentrations for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess the concentrations of these discharges in the environment. Small quantities of tritium gas, tritium oxide, carbon-14 labeled solvent and krypton-85 gas were released from the plant during the year. Average maximum ground level concentrations of these radioisotopes were all significantly less than 1/10 of 1% of the standard for continuous nonoccupational exposure. Off-site releases of liquid effluents were analyzed for compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued for this site. Analyses were performed for biochemical oxygen demand, suspended solids, fecal coliform bacteria, pH, nitrogen, phosphorus, arsenic, chlorides, chromium, copper, cyanides, detergents, fluorides, iron, lead, mercury, oil plus greases, phenols, turbidity and zinc. Excursions above permit limits were experienced in the results for suspended solids, fecal coliforms, iron and mercury. In addition to the non-radioactive parameters listed, a small quantity of radioactive tritium oxide was released in the effluent. Analyses showed the average concentration was 0.43% of the nonoccupational standard. Site perimeter and off-site air samples for tritium gas and tritium oxide, as well as off-site surface water samples obtained to distance of 9.6 kilometers from the plant site and analyzed for tritium content, showed levels significantly less than 1/10 of 1% of the standard for continuous nonoccupational exposure. Calculation were made to determine the radiation doses resulting from releases of tritium oxide, krypton-85 and carbon-14 to: an individual at the site boundary; individuals in the closest residential area; and the population within 80 kilometers (50 miles) of the plant site.

  19. Use of electromagnetic induction tomography for monitoring liquid metal/gas flow regimes on a model of an industrial steel caster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzija, N.; Yin, W.; Gerbeth, G.; Stefani, F.; Timmel, K.; Wondrak, T.; Peyton, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring of the steel flow through the submerged entry nozzle (SEN) during continuous casting presents a challenge for the instrumentation system because of the high temperature environment and the limited access to the nozzle in between the tundish and the mould. Electromagnetic inductance tomography (EMT) presents an attractive tool to visualize the steel flow profile within the SEN. In this paper, we investigate various flow regimes over a range of stopper positions and gas volume flow rates on a model of a submerged entry nozzle. A scaled (approximately 10:1) experimental rig consisting of a tundish, stopper rod, nozzle and mould was used. Argon gas was injected through the centre of the stopper rod and the behaviour of the two-phase GaInSn/argon flow was studied. The experiments were performed with GaInSn as an analogue for liquid steel, because it has similar conductive properties as molten steel and allows measurements at room temperature. The electromagnetic system used in our experiments to monitor the behaviour of the two-phase GaInSn/argon flow consisted of an array of eight equally spaced induction coils arranged around the object, a data acquisition system and a host computer. The present system operates with a sinusoidal excitation waveform with a frequency of 40 kHz and the system has a capture rate of 40 frames per second. The results show the ability of the system to distinguish the different flow regimes and to detect the individual bubbles. Sample tomographic images given in the paper clearly illustrate the different flow regimes.

  20. Mildronate (Meldonium) in professional sports - monitoring doping control urine samples using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography - high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Görgens, Christian; Guddat, Sven; Dib, Josef; Geyer, Hans; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2015-01-01

    To date, substances such as Mildronate (Meldonium) are not on the radar of anti-doping laboratories as the compound is not explicitly classified as prohibited. However, the anti-ischemic drug Mildronate demonstrates an increase in endurance performance of athletes, improved rehabilitation after exercise, protection against stress, and enhanced activations of central nervous system (CNS) functions. In the present study, the existing evidence of Mildronate's usage in sport, which is arguably not (exclusively) based on medicinal reasons, is corroborated by unequivocal analytical data allowing the estimation of the prevalence and extent of misuse in professional sports. Such data are vital to support decision-making processes, particularly regarding the ban on drugs in sport. Due to the growing body of evidence (black market products and athlete statements) concerning its misuse in sport, adequate test methods for the reliable identification of Mildronate are required, especially since the substance has been added to the 2015 World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) monitoring program. In the present study, two approaches were established using an in-house synthesized labelled internal standard (Mildronate-D3 ). One aimed at the implementation of the analyte into routine doping control screening methods to enable its monitoring at the lowest possible additional workload for the laboratory, and another that is appropriate for the peculiar specifics of the analyte, allowing the unequivocal confirmation of findings using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry (HILIC-HRMS). Here, according to applicable regulations in sports drug testing, a full qualitative validation was conducted. The assay demonstrated good specificity, robustness (rRT=0.3%), precision (intra-day: 7.0-8.4%; inter-day: 9.9-12.9%), excellent linearity (R>0.99) and an adequate lower limit of detection (<10 ng/mL). PMID:25847280

  1. A simple, rapid and reliable liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method for determination of methotrexate in human plasma and its application to therapeutic drug monitoring.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Wang, Yixuan; Sun, Yan; Ouyang, Nian; Qian, Jun

    2015-08-01

    A simple, rapid and reliable liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry method was established and validated for the determination of methotrexate in human plasma. After a straightforward protein precipitation by acetonitrile-water (70:30, v/v), methotrexate (MTX) and p-aminoacetophenone (used as internal standard, IS) were separated on a Column C18 column (50 × 2.1 mm, 3 µm; Column Technology, Fremont, CA, USA) using a gradient elution with mobile phase of acetonitrile and 0.03% acetic acid aqueous solution at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. The total chromatographic runtime was 5 min for each injection. Quantification detection was performed in a triple-quadruple tandem mass spectrometer under positive mode monitoring the following mass transitions: m/z 455.3 → 308.3 for MTX and m/z 136.1 → 94.4 for IS. The calibration curve was linear over the range of 0.05-25.0 µmol/L with a lower limit of quantification of 0.05 µmol/L. The intra- and interday precisions were <5.2%, the accuracy varied from -4.1 to 4.5%. The recovery was >94%. The LC-MS/MS method showed an excellent agreement with the existing HPLC-UV method using Passing-Bablok regression and Bland-Altman difference plot analysis. The validated LC-MS/MS can be successfully applied to the routine therapeutic drug monitoring of MTX in clinical laboratories. PMID:25641007

  2. Increased Depth and Breadth of Plasma Protein Quantitation via Two-Dimensional Liquid Chromatography/Multiple Reaction Monitoring-Mass Spectrometry with Labeled Peptide Standards.

    PubMed

    Percy, Andrew J; Yang, Juncong; Chambers, Andrew G; Borchers, Christoph H

    2016-01-01

    Absolute quantitative strategies are emerging as a powerful and preferable means of deriving concentrations in biological samples for systems biology applications. Method development is driven by the need to establish new-and validate current-protein biomarkers of high-to-low abundance for clinical utility. In this chapter, we describe a methodology involving two-dimensional (2D) reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), operated under alkaline and acidic pH conditions, combined with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-mass spectrometry (MS) (also called selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-MS) and a complex mixture of stable isotope-labeled standard (SIS) peptides, to quantify a broad and diverse panel of 253 proteins in human blood plasma. The quantitation range spans 8 orders of magnitude-from 15 mg/mL (for vitamin D-binding protein) to 450 pg/mL (for protein S100-B)-and includes 31 low-abundance proteins (defined as being <10 ng/mL) of potential disease relevance. The method is designed to assess candidates at the discovery and/or verification phases of the biomarker pipeline and can be adapted to examine smaller or alternate panels of proteins for higher sample throughput. Also detailed here is the application of our recently developed software tool-Qualis-SIS-for protein quantitation (via regression analysis of standard curves) and quality assessment of the resulting data. Overall, this chapter provides the blueprint for the replication of this quantitative proteomic method by proteomic scientists of all skill levels. PMID:26867735

  3. LC-PDA and LC-ESI-MS separation and determination of process-related substances arising from stilbene-type fluorescent whitening agents. Application to monitoring of their photodegradation products in industrial effluents and aqueous environmental systems.

    PubMed

    Rao, R Nageswara; Venkateswarlu, N; Khalid, Sara; Narsimha, R

    2005-03-01

    A simple and rapid gradient elution high-performance liquid chromatographic method using photodiode array and electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detectors was developed for separation and determination of the process-related substances and photodegradation products of stilbenesulfonic acids, viz. 4,4'-dinitrostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DNSDA), 4-amino-4'-nitrostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (ANSDA), and 4,4'-diaminostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DASDA) in industrial waste waters. Gradient elution was carried out using ammonium acetate and acetonitrile as mobile phase and an Inertsil-ODS 3V column for separation. The negative-ion electrospray ionization mass spectra containing [M-H]- ions of sulfonic acids allowed molecular mass determination of unknowns and the structures were proposed on the basis of the fragment ions in the MS/MS spectra. PMID:15835732

  4. Fast and selective determination of triterpenic compounds in olive leaves by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with multiple reaction monitoring after microwave-assisted extraction.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Avila, N; Priego-Capote, F; Ruiz-Jiménez, J; de Castro, M D Luque

    2009-04-15

    A method for fast and selective determination of the main triterpenic compounds present in olive leaves - oleanolic, ursolic and maslinic acids as triterpenic acids and, uvaol and erythrodiol as triterpenic dialcohols - is reported here. Quantitative isolation of the analytes has been accomplished in 5min by microwave assistance using ethanol as extractant. Due to the medium polarity of triterpenic acids and dialcohols, different ethanol-water ratios were tested in order to select the optimum extractant composition for their solubilisation. Microwave assistance provided a significant shortening of the leaching time as compared to conventional procedures by maceration, which usually requires at least 5h. After extraction, determination was carried out by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) with a triple quadrupole (qQq) mass detector without any clean-up step prior to chromatographic analysis. Highly selective identification of triterpenes was confirmed by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) using the most representative transitions from the precursor ion to the different product ions, while the most sensitive transitions were used for MS-MS quantitation. Total analysis performed in 25 min enables the characterization of a fraction with particular interest in the pharmacological area. PMID:19174200

  5. Quantification of Bile Acids in Traditional Animal Medicines and Their Preparations Using Ultra High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry in the Multiple Reaction Monitoring Mode.

    PubMed

    Yerigui; Wu, Xiu-Hong; Wang, Xi-Jun; Ma, Chao-Mei

    2016-01-01

    An ultra-high-performance liquid chromatograph-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry has been established and validated for the simultaneous quantification of 15 bile acids in four traditional animal medicines and their preparations. The separations of bile acids were performed on an Agilent ZORBAX Eclipse XDB-C18 column (50 × 2.1 mm; 1.8 μm) with methanol-0.1% formic acid as the mobile phase. Glycyrrhetinic acid was added as internal standard owing to its similar physiochemical properties with the bile acids. Using this condition, detected in the multiple reaction monitoring mode, the 15 bile acids, including three groups of isomers, were well quantified individually. Method validation showed that the linear regression relationship (r(2), 0.9993 - 0.9999), precisions (intra-day RSD, 0.96 - 4.31%; inter-day, 1.73 - 4.43%), and recovery (95.3 - 120.9%) were all satisfactory. The analysis results showed that bear bile and bezoar (Niu Huang) as well as their formulations contained large amounts of most of the 15 bile acids. In addition, this research revealed for the first time the presences of bile acids in animal waste medication used in traditional medicine from two clinics, Hei-Bing-Pian (discharges of wild boar) and Trogopterus Dung. The established method could be used for the quantification of other bile- or animal waste-based crude drugs and their formulated products. PMID:27169647

  6. Immunoaffinity enrichment and liquid chromatography-selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry for quantitation of carbonic anhydrase 12 in cultured renal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Rafalko, Agnes; Iliopoulos, Othon; Fusaro, Vincent A.; Hancock, William; Hincapie, Marina

    2010-01-01

    Liquid chromatography-selected reaction monitoring (LC-SRM) is a highly specific and sensitive mass spectrometry (MS) technique that is widely being applied to selectively qualify and validate candidate markers within complex biological samples. However, in order for LC-SRM methods to take on these attributes, target-specific optimization of sample processing is required, in order to reduce analyte complexity, prior to LC-SRM. In this study, we have developed a targeted platform consisting of protein immunoaffinity enrichment on magnetic beads and LC-SRM for measuring carbonic anhydrase 12 (CA12) protein in a renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell line (PRC3), a candidate biomarker for RCC whose expression at the protein level has not been previously reported. Sample processing and LC-SRM assay were optimized for signature peptides selected as surrogate markers of CA12 protein. Using LC-SRM coupled with stable isotope dilution, we achieved limits of quantitation in the low fmol range sufficient for measuring clinically relevant biomarkers with good intra- and inter-assay accuracy and precision (≤17%). Our results show that using a quantitative immunoaffinity capture approach provides specific, accurate, and robust assays amenable to high-throughput verification of potential biomarkers. PMID:20936840

  7. Immunoaffinity enrichment and liquid chromatography-selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry for quantitation of carbonic anhydrase 12 in cultured renal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rafalko, Agnes; Iliopoulos, Othon; Fusaro, Vincent A; Hancock, William; Hincapie, Marina

    2010-11-01

    Liquid chromatography-selected reaction monitoring (LC-SRM) is a highly specific and sensitive mass spectrometry (MS) technique that is widely being applied to selectively qualify and validate candidate markers within complex biological samples. However, in order for LC-SRM methods to take on these attributes, target-specific optimization of sample processing is required, in order to reduce analyte complexity, prior to LC-SRM. In this study, we have developed a targeted platform consisting of protein immunoaffinity enrichment on magnetic beads and LC-SRM for measuring carbonic anhydrase 12 (CA12) protein in a renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell line (PRC3), a candidate biomarker for RCC whose expression at the protein level has not been previously reported. Sample processing and LC-SRM assay were optimized for signature peptides selected as surrogate markers of CA12 protein. Using LC-SRM coupled with stable isotope dilution, we achieved limits of quantitation in the low fmol range sufficient for measuring clinically relevant biomarkers with good intra- and interassay accuracy and precision (≤17%). Our results show that using a quantitative immunoaffinity capture approach provides specific, accurate, and robust assays amenable to high-throughput verification of potential biomarkers. PMID:20936840

  8. Cell bioassay for paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP): comparison with postcolumn derivatization liquid chromatographic analysis and application to the monitoring of PSP in shellfish.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Rumiko; Saito, Hiroshi; Okumura, Masanao; Kondo, Fumio

    2006-01-25

    We performed a neuroblastoma cell (Neuro2a) culture assay modified slightly from a method reported previously to provide a simple and sensitive evaluation of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxicity in shellfish. The cell bioassay was just as sensitive for C-toxins as for gonyautoxins. The sensitivity of our cell bioassay was 4 times that of the current standard mouse bioassay. Using the cell bioassay, we evaluated PSP toxicity in 361 shellfish samples collected from Mikawa Bay and Ise Bay, Aichi Prefecture, Japan, from April 1999-March 2002. The results were compared with those obtained in a postcolumn derivatization liquid chromatographic analysis. PSP toxins were detected in 236/361 samples by both assays, and there was a fairly good correlation (r = 0.9001, n = 236, p < 0.001) between the results from the two assays. We applied this cell bioassay when short-necked clams in the bay turned poisonous in 2001. The chronological changes in PSP toxicity in the short-necked clams were analyzed and compared with those of the cell density of poisonous plankton (Alexandrium tamarense) occurring in the bay. The PSP toxicity in shellfish peaked 2 weeks after the cell density reached a maximum. We recommend using the cell bioassay for routine monitoring of PSP toxicity in shellfish living in natural marine environments. PMID:16417278

  9. A rapid & sensitive liquid chromatography- tandem mass spectrometry method for the quantitation of busulfan levels in plasma & application for routine therapeutic monitoring in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Desire, Salamun; Mohanan, Ezhil Pavai; George, Biju; Mathews, Vikram; Chandy, Mammen; Srivastava, Alok; Balasubramanian, Poonkuzhali

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Busulfan (Bu) in combination with cyclophosphamide is widely used in myeloablative conditioning regimen prior to haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Its narrow therapeutic range and toxic side effects at high systemic exposure and graft rejection at low exposure emphasize the need for busulfan dose optimization using targeted dose adjustment prior to HSCT. We report here a rapid and sensitive method to quantitate busulfan plasma levels in patients receiving busulfan as part of pre-transplant conditioning. Methods: The method involves simple protein precipitation of the plasma followed by analysis using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with tandem mass spectrometry - electrospray ionization technique (LC-ESI MS/MS) in positive ionization mode and quantified using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). Deuterated busulfan (d8-busulf`an) was used as the internal standard. Results: The method was linear for the concentration ranging from 0 to 4000 ng/ml of busulfan with a limit of detection of 2 ng/ml and limit of quantitation of 5 ng/ml. The assay was accurate for serial concentrations of Bu in plasma for five consecutive days and the CV was less than 10 per cent. Conclusion: Using this rapid and sensitive method, busulfan levels were targeted and subsequent doses adjusted at our center in 26 patients receiving high dose busulfan in combination with cyclophosphamide or fludarabine. PMID:23703347

  10. Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and dynamic multiple reaction monitoring method for determining multiple pesticide residues in tomato.

    PubMed

    Andrade, G C R M; Monteiro, S H; Francisco, J G; Figueiredo, L A; Botelho, R G; Tornisielo, V L

    2015-05-15

    A quick and sensitive liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry method, using dynamic multiple reaction monitoring and a 1.8-μm particle size analytical column, was developed to determine 57 pesticides in tomato in a 13-min run. QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) method for samples preparations and validations was carried out in compliance with EU SANCO guidelines. The method was applied to 58 tomato samples. More than 84% of the compounds investigated showed limits of detection equal to or lower than 5 mg kg(-1). A mild (<20%), medium (20-50%), and strong (>50%) matrix effect was observed for 72%, 25%, and 3% of the pesticides studied, respectively. Eighty-one percent of the pesticides showed recoveries ranging between 70% and 120%. Twelve pesticides were detected in 35 samples, all below the maximum residue levels permitted in the Brazilian legislation; 15 samples exceeded the maximum residue levels established by the EU legislation for methamidophos; and 10 exceeded limits for acephate and four for bromuconazole. PMID:25577051

  11. Optical Fiber Distributed Sensing Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) Strain Measurements Taken During Cryotank Y-Joint Test Article Load Cycling at Liquid Helium Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Prosser, William H.; Hare, David A.; Moore, Thomas C.; Kenner, Winfred S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines cryogenic Y-joint testing at Langley Research Center (LaRC) to validate the performance of optical fiber Bragg grating strain sensors for measuring strain at liquid helium temperature (-240 C). This testing also verified survivability of fiber sensors after experiencing 10 thermal cool-down, warm-up cycles and 400 limit load cycles. Graphite composite skins bonded to a honeycomb substrate in a sandwich configuration comprised the Y-joint specimens. To enable SHM of composite cryotanks for consideration to future spacecraft, a light-weight, durable monitoring technology is needed. The fiber optic distributed Bragg grating strain sensing system developed at LaRC is a viable substitute for conventional strain gauges which are not practical for SHM. This distributed sensing technology uses an Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR). This measurement approach has the advantage that it can measure hundreds of Bragg grating sensors per fiber and the sensors are all written at one frequency, greatly simplifying fiber manufacturing. Fiber optic strain measurements compared well to conventional strain gauge measurements obtained during these tests. These results demonstrated a high potential for a successful implementation of a SHM system incorporating LaRC's fiber optic sensing system on the composite cryotank and other future cryogenic applications.

  12. Optical fiber distributed sensing structural health monitoring (SHM) strain measurements taken during cryotank Y-joint test article load cycling at liquid helium temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Prosser, William H.; Hare, David A.; Moore, Thomas C.; Kenner, W. S.

    2007-09-01

    This paper outlines cryogenic Y-joint testing at Langley Research Center (LaRC) to validate the performance of optical fiber Bragg grating strain sensors for measuring strain at liquid helium temperature (-240°C). This testing also verified survivability of fiber sensors after experiencing 10 thermal cool-down, warm-up cycles and 400 limit load cycles. Graphite composite skins bonded to a honeycomb substrate in a sandwich configuration comprised the Y-joint specimens. To enable SHM of composite cryotanks for consideration to future spacecraft, a light-weight, durable monitoring technology is needed. The fiber optic distributed Bragg grating strain sensing system developed at LaRC is a viable substitute for conventional strain gauges which are not practical for SHM. This distributed sensing technology uses an Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR). This measurement approach has the advantage that it can measure hundreds of Bragg grating sensors per fiber and the sensors are all written at one frequency, greatly simplifying fiber manufacturing. Fiber optic strain measurements compared well to conventional strain gauge measurements obtained during these tests. These results demonstrated a high potential for a successful implementation of a SHM system incorporating LaRC's fiber optic sensing system on the composite cryotank and other future cryogenic applications.

  13. Development of a liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring procedure for concurrent verification of exposure to different forms of mustard agents.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Thong-Hiang; Ho, Mer-Lin; Loke, Weng-Keong

    2008-01-01

    A novel liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring (LC-MRM) procedure has been developed for retrospective diagnosis of exposure to different forms of mustard agents. This concise method is able to validate prior exposure to nitrogen mustards (HN-1, HN-2, and HN-3) or sulfur mustard (HD) in a single run, which significantly reduces analysis time compared to separate runs to screen for different mustards' biomarkers based on tandem mass spectrometry. Belonging to one of the more toxic classes of chemical warfare agents, these potent vesicants bind covalently to the cysteine-34 residue of human serum albumin. This results in the formation of stable adducts whose identities were confirmed by a de novo sequencing bioinformatics software package. Our developed technique tracks these albumin-derived adduct biomarkers in blood samples which persist in vitro following exposure, enabling a detection limit of 200 nM of HN-1, 100 nM of HN-2, 200 nM of HN-3, or 50 nM of HD in human blood. The CWA-adducts formed in blood samples can be conveniently and sensitively analyzed by this MRM technique to allow rapid and reliable screening. PMID:18269793

  14. 1982 environmental monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Day, L.E.; Naidu, J.R.

    1983-04-01

    The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of BNL during 1982 are summarized in this report. As an aid in the interpretation of the data, the amounts of radioactivity and other pollutants released in airborne and liquid effluents from Laboratory facilities to the environment are also indicated. The environmental data include external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates; tritium concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the concentrations of radioactivity in biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratory; and concentrations of radioactivity in milk samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory. 30 references, 9 figures, 18 tables.

  15. 1981 environmental monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, J.R.; Olmer, L.L.

    1982-04-01

    The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of BNL during 1981 are summarized in this report. As an aid in the interpretation of the data, the amounts of radioactivity and other pollutants released in airborne and liquid effluents from Laboratory facilities to the environment are also indicated. The environmental data includes external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates; tritium and iodine concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the concentrations of radioactivity in sediments and biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratory; and concentrations of radioactivity in milk samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory. 28 references, 9 figures, 20 tables.

  16. 1979 environmental monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, J.R.

    1980-04-01

    The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) during 1979 are summarized. As an aid in the interpretation of the data, the amounts of radioactivity and other pollutants released in airborne and liquid effluents from Laboratory facilities to the environment are also indicated. The environmental data includes external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates; tritium and iodine concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the concentrations of radioactivity in sediments and biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratory; and concentrations of radioactivity in milk samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory.

  17. Effluent treatment for nuclear thermal propulsion ground testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipers, Larry R.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives are to define treatment functions, review concept options, discuss PIPET effluent treatment system (ETS), and outline future activities. The topics covered include the following: reactor exhaust; effluent treatment functions; effluent treatment categories; effluent treatment options; concept evaluation; PIPETS ETS envelope; PIPET effluent treatment concept; and future activities.

  18. Groundwater monitoring plan for the Hanford Site 216-B-3 pond RCRA facility

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, D.B.; Chou, C.J.

    1998-06-01

    The 216-B-3 pond system was a series of ponds for disposal of liquid effluent from past Hanford production facilities. In operation since 1945, the B Pond system has been a RCRA facility since 1986, with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim-status groundwater monitoring in place since 1988. In 1994, discharges were diverted from the main pond, where the greatest potential for contamination was thought to reside, to the 3C expansion pond. In 1997, all discharges to the pond system were discontinued. In 1990, the B Pond system was elevated from detection groundwater monitoring to an assessment-level status because total organic halogens and total organic carbon were found to exceed critical means in two wells. Subsequent groundwater quality assessment failed to find any specific hazardous waste contaminant that could have accounted for the exceedances, which were largely isolated in occurrence. Thus, it was recommended that the facility be returned to detection-level monitoring.

  19. Interim-status groundwater monitoring plan for the 216-B-63 trench. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, M.D.

    1995-06-13

    This document outlines the groundwater monitoring plan for interim-status detection-level monitoring of the 216-B-63 Trench. This is a revision of the initial groundwater monitoring plan prepared for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) by Bjornstad and Dudziak (1989). The 216-B-63 Trench, located at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State, is an open, unlined, earthern trench approximately 1.2 m (4 ft) wide at the bottom, 427 m (1400 ft) long, and 3 m (10 ft) deep that received wastewater containing hazardous waste and radioactive materials from B Plant, located in the 200 East Area. Liquid effluent discharge to the 216-B-63 Trench began in March 1970 and ceased in February 1992. The trench is now managed by Waste Tank Operations.

  20. Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, R.C.

    1993-07-01

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed.