Science.gov

Sample records for liquid lithium uptake

  1. Laboratory experiments of uptake and release of hydrogen isotopes in liquid lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyarzabal, E.; Martin-Rojo, A. B.; Tabarés, F. L.

    2015-08-01

    Laboratory studies of hydrogen and deuterium retention/desorption and hydride formation in liquid lithium samples exposed to those gases at 200 °C and 400 °C are reported in the present work. Two distinct absorption phases with different kinetics are observed and discussed. The calculated absorption rate constants show a preferential absorption of D2 over H2 in clean lithium and a faster absorption of H2 for predeuterated samples. First dynamic experiments on Li samples preimplanted with H2 and D2 show no evidence of isotope exchange at least up to 500 °C. TDS of Li samples exposed to H/D and of Li/LiH powder mixtures present desorption peaks at ∼500 °C, well below the observed decomposition temperature for LiH powder and no precipitated LiH is detected after the complete evaporation of Li (∼700 °C). Also, preferential release of H2 retained in the solution with respect to the formation of LiH is deduced from the desorption spectra.

  2. Lithium isotope fractionation during uptake by gibbsite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimpenny, Josh; Colla, Christopher A.; Yu, Ping; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Rustad, James R.; Casey, William H.

    2015-11-01

    The intercalation of lithium from solution into the six-membered μ2-oxo rings on the basal planes of gibbsite is well-constrained chemically. The product is a lithiated layered-double hydroxide solid that forms via in situ phase change. The reaction has well established kinetics and is associated with a distinct swelling of the gibbsite as counter ions enter the interlayer to balance the charge of lithiation. Lithium reacts to fill a fixed and well identifiable crystallographic site and has no solvation waters. Our lithium-isotope data shows that 6Li is favored during this intercalation and that the solid-solution fractionation depends on temperature, electrolyte concentration and counter ion identity (whether Cl-, NO3- or ClO4-). We find that the amount of isotopic fractionation between solid and solution (ΔLisolid-solution) varies with the amount of lithium taken up into the gibbsite structure, which itself depends upon the extent of conversion and also varies with electrolyte concentration and in the counter ion in the order: ClO4- < NO3- < Cl-. Higher electrolyte concentrations cause more rapid expansion of the gibbsite interlayer and some counter ions, such as Cl-, are more easily taken up than others, probably because they ease diffusion. The relationship between lithium loading and ΔLisolid-solution indicates two stages: (1) uptake into the crystallographic sites that favors light lithium, in parallel with adsorption of solvated cations, and (2) continued uptake of solvated cations after all available octahedral vacancies are filled; this second stage has no isotopic preference. The two-step reaction progress is supported by solid-state NMR spectra that clearly resolve a second reservoir of lithium in addition to the expected layered double-hydroxide phase.

  3. Lithium-loaded liquid scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Kesanli, Banu; Neal, John S.

    2012-05-15

    The invention is directed to a liquid scintillating composition containing (i) one or more non-polar organic solvents; (ii) (lithium-6)-containing nanoparticles having a size of up to 10 nm and surface-capped by hydrophobic molecules; and (iii) one or more fluorophores. The invention is also directed to a liquid scintillator containing the above composition.

  4. Ionic liquids for rechargeable lithium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Salminen, Justin; Papaiconomou, Nicolas; Kerr, John; Prausnitz,John; Newman, John

    2005-09-29

    We have investigated possible anticipated advantages of ionic-liquid electrolytes for use in lithium-ion batteries. Thermal stabilities and phase behavior were studied by thermal gravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The ionic liquids studied include various imidazoliumTFSI systems, pyrrolidiniumTFSI, BMIMPF{sub 6}, BMIMBF{sub 4}, and BMIMTf. Thermal stabilities were measured for neat ionic liquids and for BMIMBF{sub 4}-LiBF{sub 4}, BMIMTf-LiTf, BMIMTFSI-LiTFSI mixtures. Conductivities have been measured for various ionic-liquid lithium-salt systems. We show the development of interfacial impedance in a Li|BMIMBF{sub 4} + LiBF{sub 4}|Li cell and we report results from cycling experiments for a Li|BMIMBF{sub 4} + 1 mol/kg LIBF{sub 4}|C cell. The interfacial resistance increases with time and the ionic liquid reacts with the lithium electrode. As expected, imidazolium-based ionic liquids react with lithium electrodes. We seek new ionic liquids that have better chemical stabilities.

  5. Convective Stirring in Liquid Lithium (LTX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassin, Margaret; Kearns, Eugene; Majeski, Richard

    2011-10-01

    LTX is a spherical tokamak with R=0.4 m, a=0.26 m, and elongation=1.5. LTX has a heated (300 - 400 C) liner, designed to be coated with lithium. During experiments in 2010, oxidation of the lithium surface was observed when the liner was heated to 300 C, above the melting point of lithium (182 C). A pumping system is being installed to absorb and pump background gasses which react with lithium, similar to a getter pump, using liquid and solid lithium. Lithium will be loaded into a yttria crucible heated from below by a small, HeatWave model TB175 300W cartridge heater to produce convective currents in order to maintain a clean lithium surface and decrease the time for oxide formation. This system was tested in an argon glove box using a copper heat concentrator - instead of the HeatWave vacuum-compatible unit. Infrared thermometry and thermocouples were used to monitor the surface temperature of the molten lithium, and convective flow patterns. A 200 FPS high speed camera was also employed to monitor flows, using the motion of residual oxide patches. Results from the measurements will be presented. Supported by US DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  6. High performance discharges in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment with liquid lithium walls

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, J. C.; Bell, R. E.; Boyle, D. P.; Esposti, B.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Lucia, M.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Merino, E.; Punjabi-Vinoth, S.; Tchilingurian, G.; Capece, A.; Koel, B.; Roszell, J.; Biewer, T. M.; Gray, T. K.; Kubota, S.; Beiersdorfer, P.; and others

    2015-05-15

    The first-ever successful operation of a tokamak with a large area (40% of the total plasma surface area) liquid lithium wall has been achieved in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX). These results were obtained with a new, electron beam-based lithium evaporation system, which can deposit a lithium coating on the limiting wall of LTX in a five-minute period. Preliminary analyses of diamagnetic and other data for discharges operated with a liquid lithium wall indicate that confinement times increased by 10× compared to discharges with helium-dispersed solid lithium coatings. Ohmic energy confinement times with fresh lithium walls, solid and liquid, exceed several relevant empirical scaling expressions. Spectroscopic analysis of the discharges indicates that oxygen levels in the discharges limited on liquid lithium walls were significantly reduced compared to discharges limited on solid lithium walls. Tokamak operations with a full liquid lithium wall (85% of the total plasma surface area) have recently started.

  7. Thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamic (TEMHD) stirring of liquid lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworski, M. A.; Xu, Wenyu; Kim, Jason; Lee, Matt; Neumann, Martin; Surla, Vijay; Ruzic, David

    2009-11-01

    The Solid/Liquid Lithium Divertor Experiment (SLiDE) was constructed to examine passive flows in liquid lithium under an applied heat load and external magnetic field. The offered explanation for the results of the CDX-U experiment, where liquid lithium was capable of transporting >50[MW/m^2] of incident heat flux without rapid evaporation, was thermocapillary (Marangonic) driven flows. The SLiDE apparatus utilizes a line-stripe heat source and external magnetic fields to mimic a divertor scenario to test the thermocapillary hypothesis. Instead of thermocapillary induced flows, TEMHD flows are observed on the order of 10 [cm/s]. The thermoelectric effect was confirmed through a series of qualitative experiments in the apparatus which will be described. A quantitative scaling matching the measured target temperatures and heat fluxes is compared to the measured velocities. A novel plasma facing component based on porous material TEMHD is also presented.

  8. Lithium-Air and ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The final portion of this project was accomplished at Sandia National Labs, Livermore, with the overall goal being to optimize lithium-air cells with an ionic liquid electrolyte. Both of these are potential future routes for lithium-ion technology. Lithiumair presents the advantage of higher gravimetric energy density, and ionic liquids present the advantage of greater hydrophobicity and much lower volatility, along with a larger window of electrochemical stability. Ionic liquids however have several drawbacks for the battery industry. Currently they are not as cost effective as many organic solvents. Additionally, because of the added viscosity of ionic interactions compared to the typical dipole interactions of a solvent, the ionic conductivity is lower than for common organic solvents.

  9. Deuterium Uptake in Magnetic-Fusion Devices with Lithium-Conditioned Carbon Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Krstic, Predrag S.; Allain, J. P.; Taylor, C. N.; Dadras, J.; Morokuma, K.; Jakowski, J.; Allouche, A.; Skinner, C. H.

    2013-01-01

    Lithium wall conditioning has lowered hydrogenic recycling and dramatically improved plasma performance in many magnetic-fusion devices. In this Letter, we report quantum-classical atomistic simulations and laboratory experiments that elucidate the roles of lithium and oxygen in the uptake of hydrogen in amorphous carbon. Surprisingly, we show that lithium creates a high oxygen concentration on a carbon surface when bombarded by deuterium. Furthermore, surface oxygen, rather than lithium, plays the key role in trapping hydrogen.

  10. High Performance Discharges in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) with Liquid Lithium Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, John

    2014-10-01

    The possibility of a liquid metal first wall for a fusion reactor has been extensively discussed. Small-area liquid lithium limiters and divertor targets have been installed in tokamaks, but no confinement device has ever operated with a large-area liquid lithium wall. Here we report the first-ever successful operation of a tokamak with a large area (2 m2, or 40% of the total plasma surface area) liquid lithium wall in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX). These results were obtained with a new, electron beam-based lithium evaporation system, which can deposit a lithium coating on the hot (300 C) wall of LTX in a five-minute period. Preliminary analyses of diamagnetic and other data for discharges operated with a liquid lithium wall indicate that confinement times increased by 10 × compared to discharges with helium-dispersed solid lithium coatings. Ohmic confinement times exceeded ITER98P(y,2) scaling by up to a factor of four. LTX lacks auxiliary heating, so these confinement improvements represent changes in electron confinement. Spectroscopic analysis of the discharges using the John Hopkins University transmission grating extreme ultraviolet spectrometer indicates that oxygen levels in the discharges run against liquid walls were significantly reduced compared to discharges operated against solid lithium walls. This differs strongly from earlier trials of molten lithium walls in LTX, which showed evidence for strong oxygen influx from walls operated at similar temperatures. At present, the Thomson scattering system is undergoing upgrades and realignment, after which confinement times obtained with magnetic diagnostics will be compared with kinetic measurements. A second electron beam will be installed to extend liquid lithium wall operation to 4 m2 coverage, or >80% of the total plasma surface area. Results with expanded liquid lithium wall area will be presented. Supported by US DOE Contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Advances in primary lithium liquid cathode batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomgren, George E.

    1989-05-01

    Recent work on cell development and various aspects of cell chemistry and cell development of lithium/thionyl chloride liquid cathode batteries is reviewed. As a result of safety studies, a number of cell sizes can now be considered satisfactory for many applications and the energy densities of these cells is higher than any other developed battery system. Primary batteries operate with low to moderate currents and the anode delay effect appears to be under reasonable control. Reserve cells are in the design stage and operate at high to very high power densities as well as very high energy densities. The nature of the anode film and the operation of the lithium anode has been studied with substantial success and understanding has grown accordingly. Also, studies of the structure of the electrolyte and the effects on the electrolyte of impurities and additives have led to improved understanding in this area as well. Work in progress on new electrolytes is reviewed. The state of the art of mathematical modeling is also discussed and it is expected that this work will continue to develop.

  12. Testing of Liquid Lithium Limiters in CDX-U

    SciTech Connect

    R. Majeski; R. Kaita; M. Boaz; P. Efthimion; T. Gray; B. Jones; D. Hoffman; H. Kugel; J. Menard; T. Munsat; A. Post-Zwicker; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Spaleta; G. Taylor; J. Timberlake; R. Woolley; L. Zakharov; M. Finkenthal; D. Stutman; G. Antar; R. Doerner; S. Luckhardt; R. Seraydarian; R. Maingi; M. Maiorano; S. Smith; D. Rodgers

    2004-07-30

    Part of the development of liquid metals as a first wall or divertor for reactor applications must involve the investigation of plasma-liquid metal interactions in a functioning tokamak. Most of the interest in liquid-metal walls has focused on lithium. Experiments with lithium limiters have now been conducted in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) device at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Initial experiments used a liquid-lithium rail limiter (L3) built by the University of California at San Diego. Spectroscopic measurements showed some reduction of impurities in CDX-U plasmas with the L3, compared to discharges with a boron carbide limiter. While no reduction in recycling was observed with the L3, which had a plasma-wet area of approximately 40 cm2, subsequent experiments with a larger area fully toroidal lithium limiter demonstrated significant reductions in both recycling and in impurity levels. Two series of experiments with the toroidal limiter have now be en performed. In each series, the area of exposed, clean lithium was increased, until in the latest experiments the liquid-lithium plasma-facing area was increased to 2000 cm2. Under these conditions, the reduction in recycling required a factor of eight increase in gas fueling in order to maintain the plasma density. The loop voltage required to sustain the plasma current was reduced from 2 V to 0.5 V. This paper summarizes the technical preparations for lithium experiments and the conditioning required to prepare the lithium surface for plasma operations. The mechanical response of the liquid metal to induced currents, especially through contact with the plasma, is discussed. The effect of the lithium-filled toroidal limiter on plasma performance is also briefly described.

  13. Diagnostics for liquid lithium experiments in CDX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R.; Efthimion, P.; Hoffman, D.; Jones, B.; Kugel, H.; Majeski, R.; Munsat, T.; Raftopoulos, S.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.

    2001-01-01

    A flowing liquid lithium first wall or divertor target could virtually eliminate the concerns with power density and erosion, tritium retention, and cooling associated with solid walls in fusion reactors. To investigate the interaction of a spherical torus plasma with liquid lithium limiters, large area divertor targets, and walls, discharges will be established in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) where the plasma--wall interactions are dominated by liquid lithium surfaces. Among the unique CDX-U lithium diagnostics is a multilayer mirror (MLM) array, which will monitor the 13.5 nm LiIII line for core lithium concentrations. Additional spectroscopic diagnostics include a grazing incidence extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectrometer (STRS) and a filterscope system to monitor D{sub {alpha}} and various impurity lines local to the lithium limiter. Profile data will be obtained with a multichannel tangential bolometer and a multipoint Thomson scattering system configured to give enhanced edge resolution. Coupons on the inner wall of the CDX-U vacuum vessel will be used for surface analysis. A 10000 frame per second fast visible camera and an IR camera will also be available.

  14. Diagnostics for liquid lithium experiments in CDX-U

    SciTech Connect

    R. Kaita; P. Efthimion; D. Hoffman; B. Jones; H. Kugel; R. Majeski; T. Munsat; S. Raftopoulos; G. Taylor; J. Timberlake; V. Soukhanovskii; D. Stutman; M. Iovea; M. Finkenthal; R. Doerner; S. Luckhardt; R. Maingi; R. Causey

    2000-06-21

    A flowing liquid lithium first wall or diverter target could virtually eliminate the concerns with power density and erosion, tritium retention, and cooling associated with solid walls in fusion reactors. To investigate the interaction of a spherical torus plasma with liquid lithium limiters, large area diverter targets, and walls, discharges will be established in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) where the plasma-wall interactions are dominated by liquid lithium surfaces. Among the unique CDX-U lithium diagnostics is a multi-layer mirror (MLM) array, which will monitor the 135 {angstrom} LiIII line for core lithium concentrations. Additional spectroscopic diagnostics include a grazing incidence XUV spectrometer (STRS) and a filterscope system to monitor D{sub {alpha}} and various impurity lines local to the lithium limiter. Profile data will be obtained with a multichannel tangential bolometer and a multipoint Thomson scattering system configured to give enhanced edge resolution. Coupons on th e inner wall of the CDX-U vacuum vessel will be used for surface analysis. A 10,000 frame per second fast visible camera and an IR camera will also be available.

  15. Stable lithium electrodeposition in liquid and nanoporous solid electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Archer, Lynden A

    2014-10-01

    Rechargeable lithium, sodium and aluminium metal-based batteries are among the most versatile platforms for high-energy, cost-effective electrochemical energy storage. Non-uniform metal deposition and dendrite formation on the negative electrode during repeated cycles of charge and discharge are major hurdles to commercialization of energy-storage devices based on each of these chemistries. A long-held view is that unstable electrodeposition is a consequence of inherent characteristics of these metals and their inability to form uniform electrodeposits on surfaces with inevitable defects. We report on electrodeposition of lithium in simple liquid electrolytes and in nanoporous solids infused with liquid electrolytes. We find that simple liquid electrolytes reinforced with halogenated salt blends exhibit stable long-term cycling at room temperature, often with no signs of deposition instabilities over hundreds of cycles of charge and discharge and thousands of operating hours. We rationalize these observations with the help of surface energy data for the electrolyte/lithium interface and impedance analysis of the interface during different stages of cell operation. Our findings provide support for an important recent theoretical prediction that the surface mobility of lithium is significantly enhanced in the presence of lithium halide salts. Our results also show that a high electrolyte modulus is unnecessary for stable electrodeposition of lithium. PMID:25108613

  16. Analysis of lithium driven electron density peaking in FTU liquid lithium limiter experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szepesi, G.; Romanelli, M.; Militello, F.; Peeters, A. G.; Camenen, Y.; Casson, F. J.; Hornsby, W. A.; Snodin, A. P.; Wágner, D.; the FTU Team

    2013-03-01

    The impact of lithium impurities on the microstability and turbulent transport characteristics in the core of a typical FTU liquid lithium limiter (LLL) (Mazzitelli et al 2011 Nucl. Fusion 51 073006) discharge during the density ramp-up phase is studied. A non-linear gyrokinetic analysis performed with GKW (Peeters et al 2009 Comput. Phys. Commun. 180 2650) accompanied by a quasi-linear fluid analysis is presented. We show that a centrally peaked, high concentration lithium profile contributes to the electron peaking by reducing the outward electron flux, and that it leads to inward turbulent deuterium transport through ion flux separation.

  17. MHD Activity in FTU Discharges With a Liquid Lithium Limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botrugno, A.; Apicella, M. L.; Buratti, P.; Mazzitelli, G.; Smeulders, P.

    2008-03-01

    Experiments on plasma configurations with Liquid Lithium Limiter (LLL) have been performed on FTU to investigate liquid lithium facing the plasma. The liquid lithium surface with capillary porous system (CPS) has been inserted in the scrape off layer (SOL) of the FTU vacuum chamber in various plasma discharges. MHD activity in discharges with and without LLL has been investigated and compared. The main MHD effect observed with LLL is a reduction of the amplitude of tearing modes with poloidal (toroidal) number m = 2 (n = l). The magnetic activities in FTU are analysed by means of a set of poloidal field pick-up coils. A total of 57 coils are installed at various toroidal and poloidal positions. In this paper we will describe in details the diagnostic apparatus and experimental results.

  18. Collective microdynamics of liquid lithium: An inelastic neutron scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskiĭ, N. M.; Novikov, A. G.; Savostin, V. V.

    2010-05-01

    A portion of the dispersion curve for collective modes in liquid lithium has been constructed from experimental data on inelastic scattering of slow neutrons obtained on the DIN-2PI neutron spectrometer (IBR-2 reactor, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia). Measurements have been performed at a temperature of 500 K ( T m (Li) = 453.7 K). The coherent scattering component has been separated from the experimental spectra and analyzed. Information on the characteristics of collective excitations in liquid lithium has been derived.

  19. Lithium-Sulfur Batteries: from Liquid to Solid Cells?

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhan; Liang, Chengdu

    2014-11-11

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries supply a theoretical specific energy 5 times higher than that of lithium-ion batteries (2,500 vs. ~500 Wh kg-1). However, the insulating properties and polysulfide shuttle effects of the sulfur cathode and the safety concerns of the lithium anode in liquid electrolytes are still key limitations to practical use of traditional Li-S batteries. In this review, we start with a brief discussion on fundamentals of Li-S batteries and key challenges associated with the conventional liquid cells. Then, we introduce the most recent progresses in the liquid systems, including the sulfur positive electrodes, the lithium negative electrodes, and the electrolytes and binders. We discuss the significance of investigating electrode reaction mechanisms in liquid cells using in-situ techniques to monitor the compositional and morphological changes. By moving from the traditional liquid cells to recent solid cells, we discuss the importance of this game-changing shift with positive advances in both solid electrolytes and electrode materials. Finally, the opportunities and perspectives for future research on Li-S batteries are presented.

  20. Lithium-Sulfur Batteries: from Liquid to Solid Cells?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lin, Zhan; Liang, Chengdu

    2014-11-11

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries supply a theoretical specific energy 5 times higher than that of lithium-ion batteries (2,500 vs. ~500 Wh kg-1). However, the insulating properties and polysulfide shuttle effects of the sulfur cathode and the safety concerns of the lithium anode in liquid electrolytes are still key limitations to practical use of traditional Li-S batteries. In this review, we start with a brief discussion on fundamentals of Li-S batteries and key challenges associated with the conventional liquid cells. Then, we introduce the most recent progresses in the liquid systems, including the sulfur positive electrodes, the lithium negative electrodes, and themore » electrolytes and binders. We discuss the significance of investigating electrode reaction mechanisms in liquid cells using in-situ techniques to monitor the compositional and morphological changes. By moving from the traditional liquid cells to recent solid cells, we discuss the importance of this game-changing shift with positive advances in both solid electrolytes and electrode materials. Finally, the opportunities and perspectives for future research on Li-S batteries are presented.« less

  1. Modeling of Spherical Torus Plasmas for Liquid Lithium Wall Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    R. Kaita; S. Jardin; B. Jones; C. Kessel; R. Majeski; J. Spaleta; R. Woolley; L. Zakharo; B. Nelson; M. Ulrickson

    2002-01-29

    Liquid metal walls have the potential to solve first-wall problems for fusion reactors, such as heat load and erosion of dry walls, neutron damage and activation, and tritium inventory and breeding. In the near term, such walls can serve as the basis for schemes to stabilize magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. Furthermore, the low recycling characteristics of lithium walls can be used for particle control. Liquid lithium experiments have already begun in the Current Drive eXperiment-Upgrade (CDX-U). Plasmas limited with a toroidally localized limiter have been investigated, and experiments with a fully toroidal lithium limiter are in progress. A liquid surface module (LSM) has been proposed for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). In this larger ST, plasma currents are in excess of 1 MA and a typical discharge radius is about 68 cm. The primary motivation for the LSM is particle control, and options for mounting it on the horizontal midplane or in the divertor region are under consideration. A key consideration is the magnitude of the eddy currents at the location of a liquid lithium surface. During plasma start up and disruptions, the force due to such currents and the magnetic field can force a conducting liquid off of the surface behind it. The Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) has been used to estimate the magnitude of this effect. This program is a two dimensional, time dependent, free boundary simulation code that solves the MHD equations for an axisymmetric toroidal plasma. From calculations that match actual ST equilibria, the eddy current densities can be determined at the locations of the liquid lithium. Initial results have shown that the effects could be significant, and ways of explicitly treating toroidally local structures are under investigation.

  2. Electrical detection of liquid lithium leaks from pipe joints

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J. A. Jaworski, M. A.; Mehl, J.; Kaita, R.; Mozulay, R.

    2014-11-15

    A test stand for flowing liquid lithium is under construction at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. As liquid lithium reacts with atmospheric gases and water, an electrical interlock system for detecting leaks and safely shutting down the apparatus has been constructed. A defense in depth strategy is taken to minimize the risk and impact of potential leaks. Each demountable joint is diagnosed with a cylindrical copper shell electrically isolated from the loop. By monitoring the electrical resistance between the pipe and the copper shell, a leak of (conductive) liquid lithium can be detected. Any resistance of less than 2 kΩ trips a relay, shutting off power to the heaters and pump. The system has been successfully tested with liquid gallium as a surrogate liquid metal. The circuit features an extensible number of channels to allow for future expansion of the loop. To ease diagnosis of faults, the status of each channel is shown with an analog front panel LED, and monitored and logged digitally by LabVIEW.

  3. Electrical detection of liquid lithium leaks from pipe jointsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, J. A.; Jaworski, M. A.; Mehl, J.; Kaita, R.; Mozulay, R.

    2014-11-01

    A test stand for flowing liquid lithium is under construction at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. As liquid lithium reacts with atmospheric gases and water, an electrical interlock system for detecting leaks and safely shutting down the apparatus has been constructed. A defense in depth strategy is taken to minimize the risk and impact of potential leaks. Each demountable joint is diagnosed with a cylindrical copper shell electrically isolated from the loop. By monitoring the electrical resistance between the pipe and the copper shell, a leak of (conductive) liquid lithium can be detected. Any resistance of less than 2 kΩ trips a relay, shutting off power to the heaters and pump. The system has been successfully tested with liquid gallium as a surrogate liquid metal. The circuit features an extensible number of channels to allow for future expansion of the loop. To ease diagnosis of faults, the status of each channel is shown with an analog front panel LED, and monitored and logged digitally by LabVIEW.

  4. Comparison of H-Mode Plasmas Diverted to Solid and Liquid Lithium Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    R. Kaita, et. al.

    2012-07-20

    Experiments were conducted with a Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) in NSTX. Among the goals was to use lithium recoating to sustain deuterium (D) retention by a static liquid lithium surface, approximating the ability of flowing liquid lithium to maintain chemical reactivity. Lithium evaporators were used to deposit lithium on the LLD surface. Improvements in plasma edge conditions were similar to those with lithiated graphite plasma-facing components (PFCs), including an increase in confinement over discharges without lithiumcoated PFCs and ELM reduction during H-modes. With the outer strike point on the LLD, the D retention in the LLD was about the same as that for solid lithium coatings on graphite, or about two times that achieved without lithium PFC coatings. There were also indications of contamination of the LLD surface, possibly due erosion and redeposition of carbon from PFCs. Flowing lithium may thus be needed for chemically active PFCs during long-pulse operation.

  5. Status of National Spherical Torus Experiment Liquid Lithium Divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugel, H. W.; Viola, M.; Ellis, R.; Bell, M.; Gerhardt, S.; Kaita, R.; Kallman, J.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D.; Roquemore, A. L.; Schneider, H.; Timberlake, J.; Zakharov, L.; Nygren, R. E.; Allain, J. P.; Maingi, R.; Soukhanovskii, V.

    2009-11-01

    Recent NSTX high power divertor experiments have shown significant and recurring benefits of solid lithium coatings on plasma facing components to the performance of divertor plasmas in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. The next step in this work is the 2009 installation of a Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD). The 20 cm wide LLD located on the lower outer divertor, consists of four, 80 degree sections; each section is separated by a row of graphite diagnostic tiles. The temperature controlled LLD structure consists of a 0.01cm layer of vacuum flame-sprayed, 50 percent porous molybdenum, on top of 0.02 cm, 316-SS brazed to a 1.9 cm Cu base. The physics design of the LLD encompasses the desired plasma requirements, the experimental capabilities and conditions, power handling, radial location, pumping capability, operating temperature, lithium filling, MHD forces, and diagnostics for control and characterization.

  6. Effect of Energetic Plasma Flux on Flowing Liquid Lithium Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalathiparambil, Kishor; Jung, Soonwook; Christenson, Michael; Fiflis, Peter; Xu, Wenyu; Szott, Mathew; Ruzic, David

    2014-10-01

    An operational liquid lithium system with steady state flow driven by thermo-electric magneto-hydrodynamic force and capable of constantly refreshing the plasma exposed surface have been demonstrated at U of I. To evaluate the system performance in reactor relevant conditions, specifically to understand the effect of disruptive plasma events on the performance of the liquid metal PFCs, the setup was integrated to a pulsed plasma generator. A coaxial plasma generator drives the plasma towards a theta pinch which preferentially heats the ions, simulating ELM like flux, and the plasma is further guided towards the target chamber which houses the flowing lithium system. The effect of the incident flux is examined using diagnostic tools including triple Langmuir probe, calorimeter, rogowski coils, Ion energy analyzers, and fast frame spectral image acquisition with specific optical filters. The plasma have been well characterized and a density of ~1021 m-3, with electron temperature ~10 - 20 eV is measured, and final plasma velocities of 34 - 74 kms-1 have been observed. Calorimetric measurements using planar molybdenum targets indicate a maximum plasma energy (with 6 kV plasma gun and 20 kV theta pinch) of 0.08 MJm-2 with plasma divergence effects resulting in marginal reduction of 40 +/- 23 J in plasma energy. Further results from the other diagnostic tools, using the flowing lithium targets and the planar targets coated with lithium will be presented. DOE DE-SC0008587.

  7. Lithium, Vanadium and Chromium Uptake Ability of Brassica juncea from Lithium Mine Tailings.

    PubMed

    Elektorowicz, M; Keropian, Z

    2015-01-01

    The potential for phytoremediation and phytostabilization of lithium in lieu with vanadium and chromium on a formulated acidic heterogeneous growth media engineered around lithium mine tailings, was investigated in four phases: (1) overall efficiency of the removal of the three metals, (2) bioaccumulation ratios of the three metals, (3) overall relative growth rate, and (4) translocation index of the three metals in the physiology of the hyperaccumulator plant. A pot study was conducted to assess the suitability of Brassica juncea (Indian mustard) in a phytoremediation process whereby it was lingered for eighty-six days under homogeneous growth conditions and irrigated bidaily with organic fertilizer amended with LiCl. A post harvest data analysis was achieved through ashing and the implementation of cold digestion procedure in a concentrated hydrochloric acidic matrix. In physiological efficiency parameters, the hyperaccumulator plant was twice as able to phytostabilize chromium and four times was able to phytostabilize vanadium in comparison to lithium. Moreover, it was extremely efficient in translocating and accumulating lithium inside its upper physiological sites, more so than chromium and vanadium, thereby demonstrating Indian mustard, as a hyperaccumulator plant, for phytoextraction and phytostabilization in an acidic heterogeneous rhizosphere, with an extremely low relative growth rate. PMID:25747238

  8. Ionic liquid based lithium battery electrolytes: charge carriers and interactions derived by density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Angenendt, Knut; Johansson, Patrik

    2011-06-23

    The solvation of lithium salts in ionic liquids (ILs) leads to the creation of a lithium ion carrying species quite different from those found in traditional nonaqueous lithium battery electrolytes. The most striking differences are that these species are composed only of ions and in general negatively charged. In many IL-based electrolytes, the dominant species are triplets, and the charge, stability, and size of the triplets have a large impact on the total ion conductivity, the lithium ion mobility, and also the lithium ion delivery at the electrode. As an inherent advantage, the triplets can be altered by selecting lithium salts and ionic liquids with different anions. Thus, within certain limits, the lithium ion carrying species can even be tailored toward distinct important properties for battery application. Here, we show by DFT calculations that the resulting charge carrying species from combinations of ionic liquids and lithium salts and also some resulting electrolyte properties can be predicted. PMID:21591707

  9. Germanium coating boosts lithium uptake in Si nanotube battery anodes.

    PubMed

    Haro, Marta; Song, Taeseup; Guerrero, Antonio; Bertoluzzi, Luca; Bisquert, Juan; Paik, Ungyu; Garcia-Belmonte, Germà

    2014-09-01

    Si nanotubes for reversible alloying reaction with lithium are able to accommodate large volume changes and offer improved cycle retention and reliable response when incorporated into battery anodes. However, Si nanotube electrodes exhibit poor rate capability because of their inherently low electron conductivity and Li ion diffusivity. Si/Ge double-layered nanotube electrodes show promise to improve structural stability and electrochemical kinetics, as compared to homogeneous Si nanotube arrays. The mechanism explaining the enhancement in the rate capabilities is revealed here by means of electrochemical impedance methods. The Ge shell efficiently provides electrons to the active materials, which increase the semiconductor conductivity thereby assisting Li(+) ion incorporation. The charge transfer resistance which accounts for the interfacial Li(+) ion intake from the electrolyte is reduced by two orders of magnitude, indicating the key role of the Ge layer as an electron supplier. Other resistive processes hindering the electrode charge-discharge process are observed to show comparable values for Si and Si/Ge array electrodes. PMID:25046732

  10. Investigation of parameters of interaction of hydrogen isotopes with liquid lithium and lithium capillary-porous system under reactor irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazhibayeva, I. L.; Kulsartov, T. V.; Gordienko, Yu. N.; Zaurbekova, Zh. A.; Ponkratov, Yu. V.; Barsukov, N. I.; Tulubayev, Ye. Yu.; Baklanov, V. V.; Gnyrya, V. S.; Kenzhin, Ye. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the effect of reactor irradiation on the processes of interaction of hydrogen with liquid lithium and a lithium capillary-porous system (CPS) is considered. The experiments are carried out by the gas-absorption method with use of a specially designed ampoule device. The results of investigation of the interaction of hydrogen with liquid lithium and a lithium CPS under conditions of reactor irradiation are described; namely, these are the temperature dependences of the rate constant for the interaction of hydrogen with liquid lithium at different reactor powers, the activation energies of the processes, and the pre-exponential factor in the Arrhenius dependence. The effect of increasing absorption of hydrogen by the samples under investigation as a result of the reactor irradiation is fixed. The effect can be explained by increasing mobility of hydrogen in liquid lithium due to hot spots in lithium bulk and the interaction of helium and tritium ions (formed as a result of the nuclear reaction of 6Li with neutron) with a surface hydride film.

  11. Investigation of parameters of interaction of hydrogen isotopes with liquid lithium and lithium capillary-porous system under reactor irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tazhibayeva, I. L. Kulsartov, T. V.; Gordienko, Yu. N.; Zaurbekova, Zh. A.; Ponkratov, Yu. V.; Barsukov, N. I.; Tulubayev, Ye. Yu.; Baklanov, V. V.; Gnyrya, V. S.; Kenzhin, Ye. A.

    2015-12-15

    In this study, the effect of reactor irradiation on the processes of interaction of hydrogen with liquid lithium and a lithium capillary-porous system (CPS) is considered. The experiments are carried out by the gas-absorption method with use of a specially designed ampoule device. The results of investigation of the interaction of hydrogen with liquid lithium and a lithium CPS under conditions of reactor irradiation are described; namely, these are the temperature dependences of the rate constant for the interaction of hydrogen with liquid lithium at different reactor powers, the activation energies of the processes, and the pre-exponential factor in the Arrhenius dependence. The effect of increasing absorption of hydrogen by the samples under investigation as a result of the reactor irradiation is fixed. The effect can be explained by increasing mobility of hydrogen in liquid lithium due to hot spots in lithium bulk and the interaction of helium and tritium ions (formed as a result of the nuclear reaction of {sup 6}Li with neutron) with a surface hydride film.

  12. Response of NSTX Liquid Lithium divertor to High Heat Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, Tyler; Kallman, J; Kaitaa, R; Foley, E L; Grayd, T K; Kugel, H; Levinton, F; McLean, A G; Skinner, C H

    2012-07-18

    Samples of the NSTX Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) with and without an evaporative Li coating were directly exposed to a neutral beam ex-situ at a power of ~1.5 MW/m2 for 1-3 seconds. Measurements of front face and bulk sample temperature were obtained. Predictions of temperature evolution were derived from a 1D heat flux model. No macroscopic damage occurred when the "bare" sample was exposed to the beam but microscopic changes to the surface were observed. The Li-coated sample developed a lithium hydroxide (LiOH) coating, which did not change even when the front face temperature exceeded the pure Li melting point. These results are consistent with the lack of damage to the LLD surface and imply that heating alone may not expose pure liquid Li if the melting point of surface impurities is not exceeded. This suggests that flow and heat are needed for future PFCs requiring a liquid Li surface. __________________________________________________

  13. Lithium dope and undope reactions for tin in an ionic liquid electrolyte with some glymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Yasushi; Miyashita, Sodai; Miura, Takashi

    Lithium doped and undoped reactions for tin have been investigated in 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide (BMPTFSA) containing 0.1 M LiTFSA with some glymes. Lithium doped and undoped for tin were found to be possible in the ionic liquid electrolyte in both absence and presence of glymes. The interfacial resistance for lithium doped and undoped reactions in the ionic liquid electrolyte was decreased by addition of 0.2 M glymes probably due to the coordination of the glymes to Li +. It was suggested that the interfacial resistance is strongly affected by the coordination environment of Li + in the ionic liquid electrolyte.

  14. Studies of ionic liquids in lithium-ion battery test systems

    SciTech Connect

    Salminen, Justin; Prausnitz, John M.; Newman, John

    2006-06-01

    In this work, thermal and electrochemical properties of neat and mixed ionic liquid - lithium salt systems have been studied. The presence of a lithium salt causes both thermal and phase-behavior changes. Differential scanning calorimeter DSC and thermal gravimetric analysis TGA were used for thermal analysis for several imidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, trifluoromethansulfonate, BF{sub 4}, and PF{sub 6} systems. Conductivities and diffusion coefficient have been measured for some selected systems. Chemical reactions in electrode - ionic liquid electrolyte interfaces were studied by interfacial impedance measurements. Lithium-lithium and lithium-carbon cells were studied at open circuit and a charged system. The ionic liquids studied include various imidazolium systems that are already known to be electrochemically unstable in the presence of lithium metal. In this work the development of interfacial resistance is shown in a Li|BMIMBF{sub 4} + LiBF{sub 4}|Li cell as well as results from some cycling experiments. As the ionic liquid reacts with the lithium electrode the interfacial resistance increases. The results show the magnitude of reactivity due to reduction of the ionic liquid electrolyte that eventually has a detrimental effect on battery performance.

  15. Influence of Lithium Solutes on Double-Layer Structure of Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alexander M; Perkin, Susan

    2015-12-01

    The ionic liquid-electrode interface has attracted much recent interest owing to its importance for development of energy storage devices; however, the important step of adding electro-active ions is not yet well understood at the molecular level. Using direct force measurements across confined electrolyte films, we study the effect of added lithium-ion solute on the double-layer structure of an ionic liquid electrolyte with molecular resolution. We find anionic clusters involving lithium can persist adjacent to the surfaces, and in many cases, this inhibits direct adsorption of lithium ions to the negative surface. Two apparently similar ionic liquid solvents show diverging properties, with one facilitating and the other preventing direct Li-ion adsorption onto the negative surface. The results have implications for the selection of ionic liquids as electrolytes in lithium-ion batteries. PMID:26580815

  16. Development of a liquid lithium thin film for use as a heavy ion beam stripper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momozaki, Y.; Nolen, J.; Reed, C.; Novick, V.; Specht, J.

    2009-04-01

    A series of experiments was performed to investigate the feasibility of a liquid lithium thin film for a charge stripper in a high-power heavy ion linac. Various preliminary experiments using simulants were first conducted to determine the film formation scheme, to investigate the film stability, and to obtain the design parameters for a liquid lithium thin film system. Based on the results from these preliminary studies, a prototypical, high pressure liquid lithium system was constructed to demonstrate liquid lithium thin film formation. This system was capable of driving liquid lithium at lesssim300 °C and up to 13.9 MPa (2000 psig) through a nozzle opening as large as 1 mm (40 mil) in diameter. This drive pressure corresponds to a Li velocity of >200 m/s. A thin lithium film of 9 mm in width at velocity of ~58 m/s was produced. Its thickness was estimated to be roughly lesssim13 μm. High vacuum was maintained in the area of the film. This type of liquid metal thin film may also be used in other high power beam applications such as for intense X-ray or neutron sources.

  17. Lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, lithium consumption in the United States was estimated to have been about 1 kt (1,100 st) of contained lithium, a 23-percent decrease from 2009. The United States was estimated to be the fourth largest consumer of lithium. It remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. Only one company, Chemetall Foote Corp. (a subsidiary of Chemetall GmbH of Germany), produced lithium compounds from domestic resources. In 2010, world lithium consumption was estimated to have been about 21 kt (22,000 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds, a 12-percent increase from 2009.

  18. Lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, lithium consumption in the United States was estimated to have been about 1.2 kt (1,300 st) of contained lithium, a 40-percent decrease from 2008. The United States was estimated to be the fourth largest consumer of lithium, and remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. Only one company, Chemetall Foote Corp. (a subsidiary of Chemetall GmbH of Germany), produced lithium compounds from domestic resources. In 2009, world lithium consumption was estimated to have been about 18.7 kt (20,600 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds.

  19. Development of a lithium liquid metal ion source for MeV ion beam analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Read, P.M.; Maskrey, J.T.; Alton, G.D.

    1988-01-01

    Lithium liquid metal ion sources are an attractive complement to the existing gaseous ion sources that are extensively used for ion beam analysis. This is due in part to the high brightness of the liquid metal ion source and in part to the availability of a lithium ion beam. High brightness is of particular importance to MeV ion microprobes which are now approaching current density limitations on targets determined by the ion source. The availability of a lithium beam provides increased capabilities for hydrogen profiling and high resolution Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. This paper describes the design and performance of a lithium liquid metal ion source suitable for use on a 5MV Laddertron accelerator. Operational experience with the source and some of its uses for ion beam analysis are discussed. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Liquid Cooling of Tractive Lithium Ion Batteries Pack with Nanofluids Coolant.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Xie, Huaqing; Yu, Wei; Li, Jing

    2015-04-01

    The heat generated from tractive lithium ion batteries during discharge-charge process has great impacts on the performances of tractive lithium ion batteries pack. How to solve the thermal abuse in tractive lithium ion batteries pack becomes more and more urgent and important for future development of electrical vehicles. In this work, TiO2, ZnO and diamond nanofluids are prepared and utilized as coolants in indirect liquid cooling of tractive lithium ion batteries pack. The results show that nanofluids present superior cooling performance to that of pure fluids and the diamond nanofluid presents relatively excellent cooling abilities than that of TiO2 and ZnO nanofluids. During discharge process, the temperature distribution of batteries in batteries pack is uniform and stable, due to steady heat dissipation by indirect liquid cooling. It is expected that nanofluids could be considered as a potential alternative for indirect liquid cooling in electrical vehicles. PMID:26353564

  1. Safety and diagnostic systems on the Liquid Lithium Test Stand (LLTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, J. A.; Jaworski, M. A.; Ellis, R.; Kaita, R.; Mozulay, R.

    2013-10-01

    The Liquid Lithium Test Stand (LLTS) is a test bed for development of flowing liquid lithium systems for plasma-facing components at PPPL. LLTS is designed to test operation of liquid lithium under vacuum, including flowing, solidifying (such as would be the case at the end of plasma operations), and re-melting. Constructed of stainless steel, LLTS is a closed loop of pipe with two reservoirs and a pump, as well as diagnostics for temperature, flow rate, and pressure. Since liquid lithium is a highly reactive material, special care must be taken when designing such a system. These include a permanent-magnet MHD pump and MHD flow meter that have no mechanical components in direct contact with the liquid lithium. The LLTS also includes an expandable 24-channel leak-detector interlock system which cuts power to heaters and the pump if any lithium leaks from a pipe joint. Design for the interlock systems and flow meter are presented. This work is supported by US DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  2. A physical model of an ejection suppressed CPS liquid lithium divertor target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Wei; Zheng, X. J.; Gou, F. J.; Deng, B. Q.; Peng, L. L.; Cao, X.; Zhang, W. W.; Xue, X. Y.

    2015-04-01

    A physical model has been developed which includes high temperature liquid lithium evaporation, the expanding motion of the liquid lithium vapour cloud, the shielding effects of the vapour cloud on incident plasma particle bombardments, ejection suppressed analysis and a perpendicular field proposal, and photon radiation, heat flux and transport in the lithium vapour cloud plasma. The engineering outline design scheme and the relevant parameters for the liquid lithium surface divertor target plate configured by discrete tiny capillary arrays have been established. Splashing can be suppressed by utilizing discrete and electrical insulating capillary porous systems (CPSs), since the conductivity among the capillary cells has been cut off by adopting a special kind of ceramic composite material made of a non-conducting and unbreakable composite which is able to withstand high temperatures. The formula to describe the temperature-dependent evaporation power has been derived. The maximum temperature increases of the discrete plasma-facing liquid lithium surface divertor target plate have been compared under the high energy flux deposition of 10 MJ m-2 during a 1 ms time duration with or without evaporation power. The results show that a high surface heat load can be withstood by the designed discrete plasma-facing liquid lithium surface divertor target plate due to violent evaporation. The energy deposition of incident energetic particles and weakly relativistic electrons from the scrape-off layer have been calculated. A laboratory experimental facility to simulate liquid lithium surface interactions with plasma has been set up. Research on lithium evaporation, re-deposition and ejection suppressed experiments under high density linear plasma dumping is ongoing.

  3. The thermoelectrochemistry of lithium-glyme solvate ionic liquids: towards waste heat harvesting.

    PubMed

    Black, Jeffrey J; Murphy, Thomas; Atkin, Rob; Dolan, Andrew; Aldous, Leigh

    2016-07-27

    Thermoelectrochemistry offers a simple, scalable technique for direct conversion of waste heat into useful electricity. Here the thermoelectrochemical properties of lithium-glyme solvate ionic liquids, as well as their dilute electrolyte analogues, have been investigated using mixtures of tetraglyme (G4, tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether) and lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (Li[NTf2]). The thermoelectrochemical process is entropically-driven by release of the glyme from the lithium-glyme complex cation, due to electrodeposition of lithium metal at the hotter lithium electrode with concomitant electrodissolution at the cooler lithium electrode. The optimum ratio for thermochemical electricity generation is not the solvate ionic liquid (equimolar mixture of Li[NTf2] and glyme), but rather one Li[NTf2] to four G4, due to the mixtures relatively high ionic conductivity and good apparent Seebeck coefficient (+1.4 mV K(-1)). Determination of the lithium-glyme mixture thermal conductivity enabled full assessment of the Figure of Merit (ZT), and the efficiency relative to the Carnot efficiency to be determined. As the lithium electrodeposits are porous, alternating the temperature gradient results in a system that actually improves with repeated use. PMID:27412130

  4. Lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, world lithium consumption was estimated to have been about 25 kt (25,000 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds, a 10-percent increase from 2010. U.S. consumption was estimated to have been about 2 kt (2,200 st) of contained lithium, a 100-percent increase from 2010. The United States was estimated to be the fourth-ranked consumer of lithium and remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. One company, Chemetall Foote Corp. (a subsidiary of Chemetall GmbH of Germany), produced lithium compounds from domestic brine resources near Silver Peak, NV.

  5. Microstructure evolution of Li uptake/removal in MoO{sub 2}@C nanoparticles with high lithium storage performance

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yulong; Zhang, Hong; Ouyang, Pan; Chen, Wenhao; Li, Zhicheng

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • The carbon-coated MoO{sub 2} (MoO{sub 2}@C) ultra fine nanoparticles are synthesized by one-pot hydrothermal method. • MoO{sub 2}@C nanoparticles have high specific capacity, excellent cycling performance and rate performance. • Phase transformations for lithium ion uptake/removal are examined carefully by TEM. • Phase transformations are highly reversible during the redox process. - Abstract: A facile one pot strategy of a hydrothermal methodology was applied to synthesize the carbon coated MoO{sub 2} (MoO{sub 2}@C) nanostructured particles, which are composed of ultra fine nanoparticles with homogeneous carbon coating about several nanometers. As an electrode in lithium ion batteries, the MoO{sub 2}@C shows a high specific capacity and reversible capacity (730 mA h g{sup −1} after 60 cycles). Microstructure investigations, by using a high resolution transmission electron microscopy, of the MoO{sub 2}@C based electrodes employed at various states during the first discharge/charge cycle were conducted to elucidate the lithium ion uptake/removal mechanism and cycling behavior. In the lithium uptake process, the original MoO{sub 2} phase transfers into Li{sub 0.98}MoO{sub 2} through an addition type reaction, and then nanosized metallic Mo emerges as a result of a conversion reaction. In turn, Mo could be oxidized to the intermediate Li{sub 0.98}MoO{sub 2} before converting to hyperfine MoO{sub 2} phase on upcoming lithium removal process.

  6. Lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, lithium consumption in the United States was at 2.5 kt of contained lithium, nearly 32% more than the estimate for 2004. World consumption was 14.1 kt of lithium contained in minerals and compounds in 2003. Exports from the US increased slightly compared with 2004. Due to strong demand for lithium compounds in 2005, both lithium carbonate plants in Chile were operating at or near capacity.

  7. Liquid surface skimmer apparatus for molten lithium and method

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Samuel C.; Pollard, Roy E.; Thompson, William F.; Stark, Marshall W.; Currin, Jr., Robert T.

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus for separating two fluids having different specific gravities. The invention also relates to a method for using the separating apparatus of the present invention. This invention particularly relates to the skimming of molten lithium metal from the surface of a fused salt electrolyte in the electrolytic production of lithium metal from a mixed fused salt.

  8. Lithium ion conductive behavior of TiO2 nanotube/ionic liquid matrices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A series of TiO2 nanotube (TNT)/ionic liquid matrices were prepared, and their lithium ion conductive properties were studied. SEM images implied that ionic liquid was dispersed on the whole surface of TNT. Addition of TNT to ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide (BMImTFSA)) resulted in significant increase of ionic conductivity. Furthermore, lithium transference number was also largely enhanced due to the interaction of anion with TNT. Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann parameter showed higher carrier ion number for TNT/BMImTFSA in comparison with BMImTFSA. PMID:25313300

  9. Simplified thermochemistry of oxygen in lithium and sodium for liquid metal cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tower, L. K.

    1972-01-01

    Plots of oxygen chemical potential against composition of lithium-oxygen solutions and sodium-oxygen solutions for a range of temperature were constructed. For each liquid metal two such plots were prepared. For one plot ideal solution behavior was assumed. For the other plot, existing solubility limit data for oxygen in the liquid metal were used to determine a first-order term for departure from ideality. The use of the plots in evaluating the oxygen gettering capability of refractory metals in liquid metal cooling systems is illustrated by a simple example involving lithium, oxygen, and hafnium.

  10. A high power beam-on-target test of liquid lithium target for RIA.

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen, J.; Reed, C.; Novick, V.; Specht, J.; Plotkin, P.; Momozaki,Y.; Gomes, I.

    2005-08-29

    Experiments were conducted to demonstrate the stable operation of a windowless liquid lithium target under extreme thermal loads that are equivalent to uranium beams from the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The engineering and safety issues accompanying liquid lithium systems are first discussed. The liquid metal technology knowledge base generated primarily for fast reactors, and liquid metal cooled fusion reactors, was applied to the development of these systems in a nuclear physics laboratory setting. The use of a high energy electron beam for simulating a high power uranium beam produced by the RIA driver linac is also described. Calculations were performed to obtain energy deposition profiles produced by electron beams at up to a few MeV to compare with expected uranium beam energy deposition profiles. It was concluded that an experimental simulation using a 1-MeV electron beam would be a valuable tool to assess beam-jet interaction. In the experiments, the cross section of the windowless liquid lithium target was 5 mm x 10 mm, which is a 1/3rd scale prototype target, and the velocity of the liquid lithium was varied up to 6 m/s. Thermal loads up to 20 kW within a beam spot diameter of 1mm were applied on the windowless liquid lithium target by the 1-MeV electron beam. The calculations showed that the maximum power density and total power deposited within the target, from the electron beam, was equivalent to that of a 200-kW, 400-MeV/u uranium beam. It was demonstrated that the windowless liquid lithium target flowing at velocities as low as 1.8 m/s stably operated under beam powers up to 20 kW without disruption or excessive vaporization.

  11. Experiments with Liquid Metal Walls: Status of the Lithium Tokamak Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, Robert; Boyle, Dennis; Gray, Timothy; Granstedt, Erik; Hammett, Gregory; Jacobson, Craig M; Jones, Andrew; Kozub, Thomas; Kugel, Henry; Leblanc, Benoit; Logan, Nicholas; Lucia, Matthew; Lundberg, Daniel; Majeski, Richard; Mansfield, Dennis; Menard, Jonathan; Spaleta, Jeffrey; Strickler, Trevor; Timberlak, John

    2010-02-16

    Liquid metal walls have been proposed to address the first wall challenge for fusion reactors. The Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is the first magnetic confinement device to have liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFC's) that encloses virtually the entire plasma. In the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U), a predecessor to LTX at PPPL, the highest improvement in energy confinement ever observed in Ohmically-heated tokamak plasmas was achieved with a toroidal liquid lithium limiter. The LTX extends this liquid lithium PFC by using a conducting conformal shell that almost completely surrounds the plasma. By heating the shell, a lithium coating on the plasma-facing side can be kept liquefied. A consequence of the low-recycling conditions from liquid lithium walls is the need for efficient plasma fueling. For this purpose, a molecular cluster injector is being developed. Future plans include the installation of a neutral beam for core plasma fueling, and also ion temperature measurements using charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy. Low edge recycling is also predicted to reduce temperature gradients that drive drift wave turbulence. Gyrokinetic simulations are in progress to calculate fluctuation levels and transport for LTX plasmas, and new fluctuation diagnostics are under development to test these predictions. __________________________________________________

  12. Stabilizing lithium metal using ionic liquids for long-lived batteries.

    PubMed

    Basile, A; Bhatt, A I; O'Mullane, A P

    2016-01-01

    Suppressing dendrite formation at lithium metal anodes during cycling is critical for the implementation of future lithium metal-based battery technology. Here we report that it can be achieved via the facile process of immersing the electrodes in ionic liquid electrolytes for a period of time before battery assembly. This creates a durable and lithium ion-permeable solid-electrolyte interphase that allows safe charge-discharge cycling of commercially applicable Li|electrolyte|LiFePO4 batteries for 1,000 cycles with Coulombic efficiencies >99.5%. The tailored solid-electrolyte interphase is prepared using a variety of electrolytes based on the N-propyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide room temperature ionic liquid containing lithium salts. The formation is both time- and lithium salt-dependant, showing dynamic morphology changes, which when optimized prevent dendrite formation and consumption of electrolyte during cycling. This work illustrates that a simple, effective and industrially applicable lithium metal pretreatment process results in a commercially viable cycle life for a lithium metal battery. PMID:27292652

  13. Stabilizing lithium metal using ionic liquids for long-lived batteries

    PubMed Central

    Basile, A.; Bhatt, A. I.; O'Mullane, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Suppressing dendrite formation at lithium metal anodes during cycling is critical for the implementation of future lithium metal-based battery technology. Here we report that it can be achieved via the facile process of immersing the electrodes in ionic liquid electrolytes for a period of time before battery assembly. This creates a durable and lithium ion-permeable solid–electrolyte interphase that allows safe charge–discharge cycling of commercially applicable Li|electrolyte|LiFePO4 batteries for 1,000 cycles with Coulombic efficiencies >99.5%. The tailored solid–electrolyte interphase is prepared using a variety of electrolytes based on the N-propyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide room temperature ionic liquid containing lithium salts. The formation is both time- and lithium salt-dependant, showing dynamic morphology changes, which when optimized prevent dendrite formation and consumption of electrolyte during cycling. This work illustrates that a simple, effective and industrially applicable lithium metal pretreatment process results in a commercially viable cycle life for a lithium metal battery. PMID:27292652

  14. Equilibrium distribution of lanthanum, neodymium, and thorium between lithium chloride melt and liquid bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagnit'ko, A. V.; Ignat'ev, V. V.

    2013-04-01

    The distribution of lanthanum, neodymium, and thorium between a lithium chloride melt and liquid bismuth with additions of lithium as a reducing agent are investigated at 650°C. Equilibrium values of their distribution constants are measured. It is shown that in contrast to neodymium and lanthanum, thorium cannot be extracted from bismuth into lithium chloride. This allows us to propose an efficient scheme for separating lanthanides and thorium in a system for the extraction of fuel salts in molten-salt nuclear reactors.

  15. High-flux neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target

    SciTech Connect

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G.; Paul, M.; Arenshtam, A.; Berkovits, D.; Kijel, D.; Nagler, A.; Eliyahu, I.; Silverman, I.

    2013-04-19

    A prototype compact Liquid Lithium Target (LiLiT), able to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source, was built. The neutron source is intended for nuclear astrophysical research, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in hospitals and material studies for fusion reactors. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear research Center (SNRC). The lithium target will produce neutrons through the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated by a high-intensity proton beam, necessary for intense neutron flux for the above applications. The liquid-lithium loop of LiLiT is designed to generate a stable lithium jet at high velocity on a concave supporting wall with free surface toward the incident proton beam (up to 10 kW). During off-line tests, liquid lithium was flown through the loop and generated a stable jet at velocity higher than 5 m/s on the concave supporting wall. The target is now under extensive test program using a high-power electron-gun. Up to 2 kW electron beam was applied on the lithium flow at velocity of 4 m/s without any flow instabilities or excessive evaporation. High-intensity proton beam irradiation will take place at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator currently in commissioning at SNRC.

  16. High-flux neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G.; Paul, M.; Arenshtam, A.; Berkovits, D.; Kijel, D.; Nagler, A.; Eliyahu, I.; Silverman, I.

    2013-04-01

    A prototype compact Liquid Lithium Target (LiLiT), able to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source, was built. The neutron source is intended for nuclear astrophysical research, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in hospitals and material studies for fusion reactors. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear research Center (SNRC). The lithium target will produce neutrons through the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated by a high-intensity proton beam, necessary for intense neutron flux for the above applications. The liquid-lithium loop of LiLiT is designed to generate a stable lithium jet at high velocity on a concave supporting wall with free surface toward the incident proton beam (up to 10 kW). During off-line tests, liquid lithium was flown through the loop and generated a stable jet at velocity higher than 5 m/s on the concave supporting wall. The target is now under extensive test program using a high-power electron-gun. Up to 2 kW electron beam was applied on the lithium flow at velocity of 4 m/s without any flow instabilities or excessive evaporation. High-intensity proton beam irradiation will take place at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator currently in commissioning at SNRC.

  17. Lithium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.

    1998-01-01

    The lithium industry can be divided into two sectors: ore concentrate producers and chemical producers. Ore concentrate producers mine lithium minerals. They beneficiate the ores to produce material for use in ceramics and glass manufacturing.

  18. Liquid lithium divertor characteristics and plasma-material interactions in NSTX high-performance plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworski, M. A.; Abrams, T.; Allain, J. P.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gray, T. K.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H. W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Maingi, R.; McLean, A. G.; Menard, J.; Nygren, R.; Ono, M.; Podesta, M.; Roquemore, A. L.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Scotti, F.; Skinner, C. H.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Stotler, D. P.; the NSTX Team

    2013-08-01

    Liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFCs) have been proposed as a means of solving several problems facing the creation of economically viable fusion power reactors. To date, few demonstrations exist of this approach in a diverted tokamak and we here provide an overview of such work on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) was installed and operated for the 2010 run campaign using evaporated coatings as the filling method. The LLD consisted of a copper-backed structure with a porous molybdenum front face. Nominal Li filling levels by the end of the run campaign exceeded the porosity void fraction by 150%. Despite a nominal liquid level exceeding the capillary structure and peak current densities into the PFCs exceeding 100 kA m-2, no macroscopic ejection events were observed. In addition, no substrate line emission was observed after achieving lithium-melt temperatures indicating the lithium wicks and provides a protective coating on the molybdenum porous layer. Impurity emission from the divertor suggests that the plasma is interacting with oxygen-contaminated lithium whether diverted on the LLD or not. A database of LLD discharges is analysed to consider whether there is a net effect on the discharges over the range of total deposited lithium in the machine. Examination of H-97L indicates that performance was constant throughout the run, consistent with the hypothesis that it is the quality of the surface layers of the lithium that impact performance. The accumulation of impurities suggests a fully flowing liquid lithium system to obtain a steady-state PFC on timescales relevant to NSTX.

  19. Lithium-air batteries using hydrophobic room temperature ionic liquid electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboki, Takashi; Okuyama, Tetsuo; Ohsaki, Takahisa; Takami, Norio

    Lithium-air batteries using hydrophobic ionic liquid consisting of 1-alkyl-3-methyl imidazolium cation and perfluoroalkylsulfonyl imide anion were investigated. 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide, which has high conductivity and prevents hydrolysis of the lithium anode, showed the best electrolyte performance. The cell worked for 56 days in air, and the cathode carbon materials showed high discharge capacity of 5360 mAh g -1. In addition to hydrophobic ionic liquids for use as electrolytes, various carbon materials for use as high-capacity cathodes were investigated.

  20. Recent Advances in Applicability of TEMHD Driven Liquid Lithium as a Fusion Relevant PFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szott, Matthew; Fiflis, Peter; Kalathiparambil, Kishor; Ruzic, David N.

    2015-11-01

    Liquid lithium displays increasing promise as a replacement to solid plasma facing components (PFC) in fusion device applications. Liquid PFCs reduce erosion and thermal stress damage, prolonging device lifetime, while lithium has been shown to decrease edge recycling, reduce impurities, and enhance plasma performance. The Liquid Metal Infused Trench (LiMIT) concept developed at UIUC successfully demonstrates horizontal and vertical thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamic (TEMHD) flow of liquid lithium through metal trenches for use as a PFC. Installed in the HT-7 tokamak and at the Magnum-PSI linear plasma device, the system performed effectively in fusion relevant conditions. In high heat flux tests, trench dry-out was observed, which exposes solid trench material due to higher TEMHD force on the area with the highest heat flux. A 3D free surface fluid model of dry-out and experimental tests conducted to mitigate the detrimental effect are described. The final designs for the upcoming test of LiMIT as a limiter for the EAST tokamak are discussed, along with velocity characteristics of steady-state TEMHD driven flow through the LiMIT system inclined up to 180 degrees from horizontal, which is necessary for broad applicability of a liquid lithium PFC system.

  1. High-power liquid-lithium target prototype for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Paul, M; Arenshtam, A; Berkovits, D; Bisyakoev, M; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Hazenshprung, N; Kijel, D; Nagler, A; Silverman, I

    2011-12-01

    A prototype of a compact Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT), which will possibly constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in hospitals, was built. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC). The liquid-lithium target will produce neutrons through the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated using a high-intensity proton beam (>10 kW), necessary for sufficient neutron flux. In off-line circulation tests, the liquid-lithium loop generated a stable lithium jet at high velocity, on a concave supporting wall; the concept will first be tested using a high-power electron beam impinging on the lithium jet. High intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5 MeV, 2-4 mA) will take place at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF) superconducting linear accelerator currently in construction at SNRC. Radiological risks due to the (7)Be produced in the reaction were studied and will be handled through a proper design, including a cold trap and appropriate shielding. A moderator/reflector assembly is planned according to a Monte Carlo simulation, to create a neutron spectrum and intensity maximally effective to the treatment and to reduce prompt gamma radiation dose risks. PMID:21459008

  2. Polymer electrolytes containing guanidinium-based polymeric ionic liquids for rechargeable lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingtao; Yang, Li; Fang, Shaohua; Dong, Siming; Hirano, Shin-ichi; Tachibana, Kazuhiro

    2011-10-01

    The electrochemical properties of solvent-free, quaternary polymer electrolytes based on a novel polymeric ionic liquid (PIL) as polymer host and incorporating 1g13TFSI ionic liquid, LiTFSI salt and nano-scale silica are reported. The PIL-LiTFSI-1g13TFSI-SiO2 electrolyte membranes are found to be chemically stable even at 80 °C in contact with lithium anode and thermally stable up to 320 °C. Particularly, the quaternary polymer electrolytes exhibit high lithium ion conductivity at high temperature, wide electrochemical stability window, time-stable interfacial resistance values and good lithium stripping/plating performance. Batteries assembled with the quaternary polymer electrolyte at 80 °C are capable to deliver 140 mAh g-1 at 0.1C rates with very good capacity retention.

  3. High-power liquid-lithium jet target for neutron production.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Arenshtam, A; Kijel, D; Paul, M; Berkovits, D; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Friedman, M; Hazenshprung, N; Mardor, I; Nagler, A; Shimel, G; Tessler, M; Silverman, I

    2013-12-01

    A compact liquid-lithium target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at the Soreq Nuclear Research Center. The lithium target, to be bombarded by the high-intensity proton beam of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), will constitute an intense source of neutrons produced by the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction for nuclear astrophysics research and as a pilot setup for accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. The liquid-lithium jet target acts both as neutron-producing target and beam dump by removing the beam thermal power (>5 kW, >1 MW/cm(3)) with fast transport. The target was designed based on a thermal model, accompanied by a detailed calculation of the (7)Li(p,n) neutron yield, energy distribution, and angular distribution. Liquid lithium is circulated through the target loop at ~200 °C and generates a stable 1.5 mm-thick film flowing at a velocity up to 7 m/s onto a concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power areal densities of >4 kW/cm(2) and volume power density of ~2 MW/cm(3) at a lithium flow of ~4 m/s while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. The LiLiT setup is presently in online commissioning stage for high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5 MeV, 1-2 mA) at SARAF. PMID:24387433

  4. High-power liquid-lithium jet target for neutron production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfon, S.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Paul, M.; Berkovits, D.; Eliyahu, I.; Feinberg, G.; Friedman, M.; Hazenshprung, N.; Mardor, I.; Nagler, A.; Shimel, G.; Tessler, M.; Silverman, I.

    2013-12-01

    A compact liquid-lithium target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at the Soreq Nuclear Research Center. The lithium target, to be bombarded by the high-intensity proton beam of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), will constitute an intense source of neutrons produced by the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction for nuclear astrophysics research and as a pilot setup for accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. The liquid-lithium jet target acts both as neutron-producing target and beam dump by removing the beam thermal power (>5 kW, >1 MW/cm3) with fast transport. The target was designed based on a thermal model, accompanied by a detailed calculation of the 7Li(p,n) neutron yield, energy distribution, and angular distribution. Liquid lithium is circulated through the target loop at ˜200 °C and generates a stable 1.5 mm-thick film flowing at a velocity up to 7 m/s onto a concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power areal densities of >4 kW/cm2 and volume power density of ˜2 MW/cm3 at a lithium flow of ˜4 m/s while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. The LiLiT setup is presently in online commissioning stage for high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5 MeV, 1-2 mA) at SARAF.

  5. High-power liquid-lithium jet target for neutron production

    SciTech Connect

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Berkovits, D.; Eliyahu, I.; Hazenshprung, N.; Mardor, I.; Nagler, A.; Shimel, G.; Silverman, I.; Paul, M.; Friedman, M.; Tessler, M.

    2013-12-15

    A compact liquid-lithium target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at the Soreq Nuclear Research Center. The lithium target, to be bombarded by the high-intensity proton beam of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), will constitute an intense source of neutrons produced by the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction for nuclear astrophysics research and as a pilot setup for accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. The liquid-lithium jet target acts both as neutron-producing target and beam dump by removing the beam thermal power (>5 kW, >1 MW/cm{sup 3}) with fast transport. The target was designed based on a thermal model, accompanied by a detailed calculation of the {sup 7}Li(p,n) neutron yield, energy distribution, and angular distribution. Liquid lithium is circulated through the target loop at ∼200 °C and generates a stable 1.5 mm-thick film flowing at a velocity up to 7 m/s onto a concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power areal densities of >4 kW/cm{sup 2} and volume power density of ∼2 MW/cm{sup 3} at a lithium flow of ∼4 m/s while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. The LiLiT setup is presently in online commissioning stage for high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91–2.5 MeV, 1–2 mA) at SARAF.

  6. Ether-functionalized ionic liquid electrolytes for lithium-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamoto, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Yushi; Shiotsuki, Taishi; Mizuno, Fuminori; Higashi, Shougo; Takechi, Kensuke; Asaoka, Takahiko; Nishikoori, Hidetaka; Iba, Hideki

    2013-12-01

    Ionic liquids composed of N,N-diethyl-N-methyl-N-(2-methoxyethyl)ammonium (DEME), N-methyl-N-methoxyethylpiperidinium (PP1.1o2) cations functionalized with ethers, N-methyl-N-propylpiperidinium (PP13), and N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium (P14) cations and the bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide (TFSA) anion are investigated for application as electrolytes in non-aqueous lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries. The PP13-TFSA, P14-TFSA and DEME-TFSA ionic liquids have high oxygen radical stability. A comparison of the lithium supply capacity measured using pulse-gradient spin-echo NMR for 7Li nuclei and the oxygen supply capacity measured using electrochemical methods indicates that the oxygen supply is the rate-limiting step for the generation of lithium-oxygen compounds (LiOx) in these ionic liquids with supporting electrolytes. The DEME-TFSA system has the highest LiOx generation activity among the ionic liquid systems examined. We demonstrate the improved performance (output power, discharge-charge capacity and coulombic efficiency) of a Li-O2 battery using the DEME-TFSA system compared with that using the PP13-TFSA system. The improvements observed for the DEME-TFSA system are attributed to the high LiOx generation properties and lithium ion supply.

  7. Ionic liquid decorated mesoporous silica nanoparticles: a new high-performance hybrid electrolyte for lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Wong, Ka-Wai; Ng, Ka-Ming

    2016-03-10

    We report a novel hybrid electrolyte based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles decorated with an ionic liquid, which exhibits a superior lithium ion transference number of >0.8, and an excellent electrochemical window of >5 V with attractive ionic conductivity. The insights obtained pave a new way for the preparation of high-performance electrolytes with mesoporous structures. PMID:26926805

  8. Ionic liquid-based electrolyte with binary lithium salts for high performance lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Feng; Zhu, Qizhen; Chen, Renjie; Chen, Nan; Chen, Yan; Ye, Yusheng; Qian, Ji; Li, Li

    2015-11-01

    Rechargeable Li-S batteries have suffered several technical obstacles, such as rapid capacity fading and low coulombic efficiency. To overcome these problems, we design new electrolytes containing N-methoxyethyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)-imide (Pyr1,2O1TFSI) and tri(ethylene glycol)dimethyl ether (TEGDME) in mass ratio of 7:3. Moreover, Lithium difluoro(oxalate)borate (LiODFB) is introduced for the modification. Although the addition of LiODFB as additive lead to extremely high viscosity of electrolyte and inferior performance of the cells, the electrolyte containing lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI, 0.84 nm) and LiODFB (0.60 nm) mixture with a total molar concentration of 0.4 mol kg-1 as binary lithium salt shows excellent electrochemical performance. The Pyr1,2O1TFSI/TEGDME electrolyte with LiTFSI/LiODFB binary lithium salts in mole ratio of 6:4 is obtained after optimizing ratio. The Li-S cells containing this electrolyte system show excellent capacity and cycle performance, whose initial discharge capacity is 1264.4 mAh g-1, and retains 911.4 mAh g-1 after 50 cycles with the coulombic efficiency more than 95%. It can be attributed the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI)-forming ability of LiODFB which protect Li anode from suffering lithium dendrites and prevent the shuttle phenomenon. The novel electrolytes provide good cycling stability and high coulombic efficiency for the Li-S batteries, which is suggested as a promising electrolyte for Li-S batteries.

  9. Functional binders for reversible lithium intercalation into graphite in propylene carbonate and ionic liquid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komaba, Shinichi; Yabuuchi, Naoaki; Ozeki, Tomoaki; Okushi, Koji; Yui, Hiroharu; Konno, Kozo; Katayama, Yasushi; Miura, Takashi

    Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), poly(methacrylic acid) (PMA), and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), which have oxygen species as functional groups, were utilized as a binder for graphite electrodes, and the electrochemical reversibility of lithium intercalation was examined in PC medium and ionic liquid electrolyte, lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide dissolved in 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide (BMP-TFSA). Columbic efficiency of 75-80% with more than 300 mAh g -1 was achieved upon first reduction/oxidation cycle in both electrolytes using these binding polymers, which were significantly improved in comparison to a conventional PVdF binder (less than 45% of columbic efficiency for the first cycle). For the graphite-PVdF electrode, co-intercalation and/or decomposition of PC molecules solvating to Li ions were observed by the electrochemical reduction, resulting in the cracking of graphite particles. In contrast, the co-intercalation and decomposition of PC molecules and BMP cations for the first reduction process were completely suppressed for the graphite electrodes prepared with the polymers containing oxygen atoms. It was proposed that the selective permeability of lithium ions was attained by the uniform coating of the graphite particles with PAA, PMA, and PVA polymers, because the electrostatic interaction between the positively charged lithium ions and negatively charged oxygen atom in the polymer should modulate the desolvation process of lithium ions during the lithium intercalation into graphite, showing the similar functions like artificial solid-electrolyte interphase.

  10. Use of Ionic Liquids in Rod-Coil Block Copolyimides for Improved Lithium Ion Conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Tigelaar, Dean M.; Chapin, Kara; Bennett, William R.

    2007-01-01

    Solvent-free, solid polymer electrolytes (SPE) have the potential to improve safety, increase design flexibility and enhance performance of rechargeable lithium batteries. Solution based electrolytes are flammable and typically incompatible with lithium metal anodes, limiting energy density. We have previously demonstrated use of polyimide rod coil block copolymers doped with lithium salts as electrolytes for lithium polymer batteries. The polyimide rod blocks provide dimensional stability while the polyethylene oxide (PEO) coil portions conduct ions. Phase separation of the rods and coils in these highly branched polymers provide channels with an order of magnitude improvement in lithium conduction over polyethylene oxide itself at room temperature. In addition, the polymers have been demonstrated in coin cells to be compatible with lithium metal. For practical use at room temperature and below, however, at least an order of magnitude improvement in ion conduction is still required. The addition of nonvolatile, room temperature ionic liquids has been shown to improve the ionic conductivity of high molecular weight PEO. Herein we describe use of these molten salts to improve ionic conductivity in the rod-coil block copolymers.

  11. Lithium

    MedlinePlus

    ... bipolar disorder (manic-depressive disorder; a disease that causes episodes of depression, episodes of mania, and other abnormal moods). Lithium ... Lithium is also sometimes used to treat depression, schizophrenia (a mental ... emotions), disorders of impulse control (inability to resist the urge ...

  12. Single-Ion Block Copoly(ionic liquid)s as Electrolytes for All-Solid State Lithium Batteries.

    PubMed

    Porcarelli, Luca; Shaplov, Alexander S; Salsamendi, Maitane; Nair, Jijeesh R; Vygodskii, Yakov S; Mecerreyes, David; Gerbaldi, Claudio

    2016-04-27

    Polymer electrolytes have been proposed as replacement for conventional liquid electrolytes in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) due to their intrinsic enhanced safety. Nevertheless, the power delivery of these materials is limited by the concentration gradient of the lithium salt. Single-ion conducting polyelectrolytes represent the ideal solution since their nature prevents polarization phenomena. Herein, the preparation of a new family of single-ion conducting block copolymer polyelectrolytes via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization technique is reported. These copolymers comprise poly(lithium 1-[3-(methacryloyloxy)propylsulfonyl]-1-(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide) and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate blocks. The obtained polyelectrolytes show low Tg values in the range of -61 to 0.6 °C, comparatively high ionic conductivity (up to 2.3 × 10(-6) and 1.2 × 10(-5) S cm(-1) at 25 and 55 °C, respectively), wide electrochemical stability (up to 4.5 V versus Li(+)/Li), and a lithium-ion transference number close to unity (0.83). Owing to the combination of all mentioned properties, the prepared polymer materials were used as solid polyelectrolytes and as binders in the elaboration of lithium-metal battery prototypes with high charge/discharge efficiency and excellent specific capacity (up to 130 mAh g(-1)) at C/15 rate. PMID:27043201

  13. Safe lithium-ion battery with ionic liquid-based electrolyte for hybrid electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damen, Libero; Lazzari, Mariachiara; Mastragostino, Marina

    2011-10-01

    A lithium-ion battery featuring graphite anode, LiFePO4-C cathode and an innovative, safe, ionic liquid-based electrolyte, was assembled and characterized in terms of specific energy and power after the USABC-DOE protocol for power-assist hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) application. The test results show that the battery surpasses the energy and power goals stated by USABC-DOE and, hence, this safe lithium-ion battery should be suitable for application in the evolving HEV market.

  14. Characterization of Liquid Lithium Wetting and Thermoelectric Properties for Nuclear Fusion Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiflis, Peter; Xu, Wenyu; Christenson, Michael; Andruczyk, Daniel; Curreli, Davide; Ruzic, David

    2013-10-01

    Critical to the implementation of flowing liquid lithium plasma facing components is understanding the interactions of liquid lithium with various surfaces. Presented here are experiments investigating the material compatibility, wetting characteristics, and relative thermopower of liquid lithium with a variety of potential substrate candidates for the LiMIT concept. Wetting experiments with lithium used the contact angle as a metric. Among those materials investigated are 316 SS, Mo, Ta, and W. The contact angle, as well as its dependence on temperature was measured. For example, at 200 C, tungsten registers a contact angle of 130°, whereas above its wetting temperature of 350 C, the contact angle is less than 80°. Several methods were found to decrease the critical wetting temperature of various materials and are presented here. The thermopower of W, Mo, Ta, Li, Ga, Wood's metal and Sn has been measured relative to stainless steel, and the Seebeck coefficient of has then been calculated. For molybdenum the Seebeck coefficient has a linear rise with temperature from SMo = 3.9 μVK-1 at 30 °C to 7.5 μVK-1 at 275 °C. On Assignment at PPPL

  15. Effects of solutes on thermodynamic activity of tritium in liquid lithium blanket of fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lyublinski, I.E.; Evtikhin, V.A.; Krassine, V.P.

    1995-10-01

    The study of tritium dissolved in liquid lithium systems containing metallic impurities is of technological interest for tritium removal processes and suppression of the tritium leakages from the blanket in a fusion reactor. The interaction parameter formalism and coordination cluster theory have been used to calculate the tritium activity coefficients in Li-T-Al, Li-T-Mg, Li-T-Si, Li-T-Y and Li-T-La systems. Calculations performed demonstrated that silicon, aluminum and magnesium have no influence on the tritium activity coefficients in dilute lithium solutions within the temperature range 400-800{degree}C, but yttrium and lanthanum may be used to effectively decrease this coefficient in lithium melts. 13 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. New Polymer and Liquid Electrolytes for Lithium Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    McBreen, J.; Lee, H. S.; Yang, X. Q.; Sun, X.

    1999-03-29

    All non-aqueous lithium battery electrolytes are Lewis bases that interact with cations. Unlike water, they don't interact with anions. The result is a high degree of ion pairing and the formation of triplets and higher aggregates. This decreases the conductivity and the lithium ion transference and results in polarization losses in batteries. Approaches that have been used to increase ion dissociation in PEO based electrolytes are the use of salts with low lattice energy, the addition of polar plasticizers to the polymer, and the addition of cation completing agents such as crown ethers or cryptands. Complexing of the anions is a more promising approach since it should increase both ion dissociation and the lithium transference. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) we have synthesized two new families of neutral anion completing agents, each based on Lewis acid centers. One is based on electron deficient nitrogen sites on substituted aza-ethers, wherein the hydrogen on the nitrogen is replaced by electron withdrawing groups such as CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3{sup -}}. The other is based on electron deficient boron sites on borane or borate compounds with various fluorinated aryl or alkyl groups. Some of the borane based anion receptors can promote the dissolution of LiF in several solvents. Several of these compounds, when added in equivalent amounts, produce 1.2M LiF solutions in DME, an increase in volubility of LiF by six orders of magnitude. Some of these LiF electrolytes have conductivities as high as 6 x 10{sup -3} Scm{sup -1}. The LiF electrolytes with borane anion acceptors in PC:EC:DEC solvents have excellent electrochemical stability. This has been demonstrated in small Li/LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cells.

  17. Thermodynamic analysis of chromium solubility data in liquid lithium containing nitrogen: Comparison between experimental data and computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasin, Valery P.; Soyustova, Svetlana I.

    2015-10-01

    The mathematical formalism for description of solute interactions in dilute solution of chromium and nitrogen in liquid lithium have been applied for calculating of the temperature dependence of the solubility of chromium in liquid lithium with the various nitrogen contents. It is shown that the derived equations are useful to provide understanding of a relationship between thermodynamic properties and local ordering in the Li-Cr-N melt. Comparison between theory and data reported in the literature for solubility of chromium in nitrogen-contaminated liquid lithium, was allowed to explain the reasons of the deviation of the experimental semi-logarithmic plot of chromium content in liquid lithium as a function of the reciprocal temperature from a straight line.

  18. A flowing liquid lithium limiter for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Ren, J; Zuo, G Z; Hu, J S; Sun, Z; Yang, Q X; Li, J G; Zakharov, L E; Xie, H; Chen, Z X

    2015-02-01

    A program involving the extensive and systematic use of lithium (Li) as a "first," or plasma-facing, surface in Tokamak fusion research devices located at Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, was started in 2009. Many remarkable results have been obtained by the application of Li coatings in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) and liquid Li limiters in the HT-7 Tokamak-both located at the institute. In furtherance of the lithium program, a flowing liquid lithium (FLiLi) limiter system has been designed and manufactured for EAST. The design of the FLiLi limiter is based on the concept of a thin flowing film which was previously tested in HT-7. Exploiting the capabilities of the existing material and plasma evaluation system on EAST, the limiter will be pre-wetted with Li and mechanically translated to the edge of EAST during plasma discharges. The limiter will employ a novel electro-magnetic pump which is designed to drive liquid Li flow from a collector at the bottom of limiter into a distributor at its top, and thus supply a continuously flowing liquid Li film to the wetted plasma-facing surface. This paper focuses on the major design elements of the FLiLi limiter. In addition, a simulation of incoming heat flux has shown that the distribution of heat flux on the limiter surface is acceptable for a future test of power extraction on EAST. PMID:25725839

  19. A flowing liquid lithium limiter for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, J.; Zuo, G. Z.; Hu, J. S.; Sun, Z.; Yang, Q. X.; Li, J. G.; Xie, H.; Chen, Z. X.; Zakharov, L. E.

    2015-02-15

    A program involving the extensive and systematic use of lithium (Li) as a “first,” or plasma-facing, surface in Tokamak fusion research devices located at Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, was started in 2009. Many remarkable results have been obtained by the application of Li coatings in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) and liquid Li limiters in the HT-7 Tokamak—both located at the institute. In furtherance of the lithium program, a flowing liquid lithium (FLiLi) limiter system has been designed and manufactured for EAST. The design of the FLiLi limiter is based on the concept of a thin flowing film which was previously tested in HT-7. Exploiting the capabilities of the existing material and plasma evaluation system on EAST, the limiter will be pre-wetted with Li and mechanically translated to the edge of EAST during plasma discharges. The limiter will employ a novel electro-magnetic pump which is designed to drive liquid Li flow from a collector at the bottom of limiter into a distributor at its top, and thus supply a continuously flowing liquid Li film to the wetted plasma-facing surface. This paper focuses on the major design elements of the FLiLi limiter. In addition, a simulation of incoming heat flux has shown that the distribution of heat flux on the limiter surface is acceptable for a future test of power extraction on EAST.

  20. A flowing liquid lithium limiter for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, J.; Zuo, G. Z.; Hu, J. S.; Sun, Z.; Yang, Q. X.; Li, J. G.; Zakharov, L. E.; Xie, H.; Chen, Z. X.

    2015-02-01

    A program involving the extensive and systematic use of lithium (Li) as a "first," or plasma-facing, surface in Tokamak fusion research devices located at Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, was started in 2009. Many remarkable results have been obtained by the application of Li coatings in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) and liquid Li limiters in the HT-7 Tokamak—both located at the institute. In furtherance of the lithium program, a flowing liquid lithium (FLiLi) limiter system has been designed and manufactured for EAST. The design of the FLiLi limiter is based on the concept of a thin flowing film which was previously tested in HT-7. Exploiting the capabilities of the existing material and plasma evaluation system on EAST, the limiter will be pre-wetted with Li and mechanically translated to the edge of EAST during plasma discharges. The limiter will employ a novel electro-magnetic pump which is designed to drive liquid Li flow from a collector at the bottom of limiter into a distributor at its top, and thus supply a continuously flowing liquid Li film to the wetted plasma-facing surface. This paper focuses on the major design elements of the FLiLi limiter. In addition, a simulation of incoming heat flux has shown that the distribution of heat flux on the limiter surface is acceptable for a future test of power extraction on EAST.

  1. Solvation of lithium salts in protic ionic liquids: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Morales, Trinidad; Carrete, Jesús; Cabeza, Óscar; Russina, Olga; Triolo, Alessandro; Gallego, Luis J; Varela, Luis M

    2014-01-23

    The structure of solutions of lithium nitrate in a protic ionic liquid with a common anion, ethylammonium nitrate, at room temperature is investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations. Several structural properties, such as density, radial distribution functions, hydrogen bonds, spatial distribution functions, and coordination numbers, are analyzed in order to get a picture of the solvation of lithium cations in this hydrogen-bonded, amphiphilically nanostructured environment. The results reveal that the ionic liquid mainly retains its structure upon salt addition, the interaction between the ammonium group of the cation and the nitrate anion being only slightly perturbed by the addition of the salt. Lithium cations are solvated by embedding them in the polar nanodomains of the solution formed by the anions, where they coordinate with the latter in a solid-like fashion reminiscent of a pseudolattice structure. Furthermore, it is shown that the average coordination number of [Li](+) with the anions is 4, nitrate coordinating [Li](+) in both monodentate and bidentate ways, and that in the second coordination layer both ethylammonium cations and other lithiums are also found. Additionally, the rattling motion of lithium ions inside the cages formed by their neighboring anions, indicative of the so-called caging effect, is confirmed by the analysis of the [Li](+) velocity autocorrelation functions. The overall picture indicates that the solvation of [Li](+) cations in this amphiphilically nanostructured environment takes place by means of a sort of inhomogeneous nanostructural solvation, which we could refer to as nanostructured solvation, and which could be a universal solvation mechanism in ionic liquids. PMID:24405468

  2. Ferrous alloy metallurgy - liquid lithium corrosion and welding. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D. L.; Matlock, D. K.

    1980-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth has been used to evaluate the interaction between liquid lithium and an imposed stress. Fatigue crack growth data on type 304L stainless steel at 700C and 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel between 500 and 700C show that for all imposed test conditions (i.e. frequency, temperature, and nitrogen content in the lithium) the interaction of lithium with the strain at the crack tip results in enhanced crack growth rates. The enhanced growth rates result from the effects of either enhanced grain boundary penetration or a change in crack propagation mechanism due to liquid metal embrittlement. Auger spectroscopy of grain boundary penetrated specimen shows that a lithium-oxygen compound forms at the grain boundary. Moessbauer evaluations of the ferrite layer of corroded type 304 stainless steel are being used to develop a model for weight loss in liquid lithium. The welding research in progress is directed to characterize the influence of variations of the austenitic weld metal composition on the microstructural and mechanical properties of dissimilar metal weldments. Weldments of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel to 316 stainless steel have been investigated for fusion microstructure, thermal expansion impact strength and characterization of specific long time in-service failures. Modification of weld metal microstructures by microalloy additions is being investigated as a concept to improve weld metal properties. The behavior of a strip electrode in a gas metal arc is being investigated to determine the feasibility of gas metal arc weld strip overlay cladding.

  3. Retention/Diffusivity Studies in Free-Surface Flowing Liquid Lithium

    SciTech Connect

    R.A. Stubbers; G.H. Miley; M. Nieto; W. Olczak; D.N. Ruzic; A. Hassanein

    2004-12-14

    FLIRE was designed to measure the hydrogen and helium retention and diffusivity in a flowing stream of liquid lithium, and it has accomplished these goals. Retention coefficients for helium in the flowing liquid stream were 0.1-2% for flow speeds of 44 cm/s and implantation energies between 500 and 2000 eV. The energy dependence of retention is linear for the energy range considered, as expected, and the dependence of retention on flow velocity fits the expected square-root of flow speed dependence. Estimates of the helium diffusion coefficient in the flowing lithium stream were {approx} 4 x 10{sup -7} cm{sup 2}/s, and are independent of implantation energy. This value is much lower than expected, which could be due to several factors, such as mixing, bubble formation or surface film formation. In the case of hydrogen, long term retention and release mechanisms are of greatest importance, since this relates to tritium inventory in flowing lithium PFCs for fusion applications. The amount of hydride formation was measured for flowing lithium exposed to neutral deuterium gas. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) measurements indicate that the hydride concentration was between 0.1 and 0.2% over a wide range of pressures (6.5 x 10{sup -5} to 1 Torr). This result implies that the deuterium absorption rate is limited by the surface dissociation rate, since deuterium (hydrogen/tritium) is absorbed in its atomic form, not its molecular form.

  4. Experiments on FTU with an actively water cooled liquid lithium limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzitelli, G.; Apicella, M. L.; Apruzzese, G.; Crescenzi, F.; Iannone, F.; Maddaluno, G.; Pericoli-Ridolfini, V.; Roccella, S.; Reale, M.; Viola, B.; Lyublinski, I.; Vertkov, A.

    2015-08-01

    In order to prevent the overheating of the liquid Li surface and the consequent Li evaporation for T > 500 °C, an advanced version of the liquid lithium limiter has been realized and installed on FTU. This new system, named Cooled Lithium Limiter (CLL), has been optimized to demonstrate the lithium limiter capability to sustain thermal loads as high as 10 MW/m2 with up to 5 s of plasma pulse duration. The CLL operates with an actively cooled system with water circulation at the temperature of about 200 °C, for heating lithium up to the melting point and for the heat removal during the plasma discharges. To characterize CLL during discharges, a fast infrared camera and the spectroscopic signals from Li and D atom emission have been used. The experiments analyzed so far and simulated by ANSYS code, point out that heat loads as high as 2 MW/m2 for 1.5 s have been withstood without problems.

  5. A Spectroscopic Measurement of Recycling on the Surface of a Liquid Lithium Limiter in CDX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marfuta, P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Maingi, R.

    2003-10-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of lithium plasma-facing surfaces should give a quantitative assessment of the local recycling in CDX-U. We will use both a 1-D CCD camera with an interference filter and a pair of fiber-optic filterscopes focused on different parts of a fully-toroidal liquid lithium limiter tray. Additional filterscope data will be taken along a sightline immediately above the tray, so that the edge plasma emission can be subtracted from the direct views of the lithium surface. The diagnostics will measure the H-alpha line both with and without lithium in the limiter tray to assess the reduction of neutral hydrogen recycling, as well as the Li-I emission to observe the level of lithium introduced into the plasma, and the C-III and O-II lines to measure the effect of the lithium on plasma impurities.

  6. Liquid Metal Walls, Lithium, And Low Recycling Boundary Conditions In Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Majeski, R.

    2010-05-20

    At present, the only solid material believed to be a viable option for plasma-facing components (PFCs) in a fusion reactor is tungsten. Operated at the lower temperatures typical of present-day fusion experiments, tungsten is known to suffer from surface degradation during long-term exposure to helium-containing plasmas, leading to reduced thermal conduction to the bulk, and enhanced erosion. Existing alloys are also quite brittle at temperatures under 700 deg. C. However, at a sufficiently high operating temperature (700 - 1000 deg. C), tungsten is self-annealing and it is expected that surface damage will be reduced to the point where tungsten PFCs will have an acceptable lifetime in a reactor environment.The existence of only one potentially viable option for solid PFCs, though, constitutes one of the most significant restrictions on design space for DEMO and follow-on fusion reactors. In contrast, there are several candidates for liquid metal-based PFCs, including gallium, tin, lithium, and tin-lithium eutectics. We will discuss options for liquid metal walls in tokamaks, looking at both high and low recycling materials. We will then focus in particular on one of the candidate liquids, lithium.Lithium is known to have a high chemical affinity for hydrogen, and has been shown in test stands and fusion experiments to produce a low recycling surface, especially when liquid. Because it is also low-Z and is usable in a tokamak over a reasonable temperature range (200 - 400 deg. C), it has been now been used as a PFC in several confinement experiments (TFTR, T11-M, CDX-U, NSTX, FTU, and TJ-II), with favorable results. The consequences of substituting low recycling walls for the traditional high recycling variety on tokamak equilibria are very extensive. We will discuss some of the expected modifications, briefly reviewing experimental results, and comparing the results to expectations.

  7. Liquid Metal Walls, Lithium, And Low Recycling Boundary Conditions In Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeski, R.

    2010-05-01

    At present, the only solid material believed to be a viable option for plasma-facing components (PFCs) in a fusion reactor is tungsten. Operated at the lower temperatures typical of present-day fusion experiments, tungsten is known to suffer from surface degradation during long-term exposure to helium-containing plasmas, leading to reduced thermal conduction to the bulk, and enhanced erosion. Existing alloys are also quite brittle at temperatures under 700°C. However, at a sufficiently high operating temperature (700 - 1000 °C), tungsten is self-annealing and it is expected that surface damage will be reduced to the point where tungsten PFCs will have an acceptable lifetime in a reactor environment. The existence of only one potentially viable option for solid PFCs, though, constitutes one of the most significant restrictions on design space for DEMO and follow-on fusion reactors. In contrast, there are several candidates for liquid metal-based PFCs, including gallium, tin, lithium, and tin-lithium eutectics. We will discuss options for liquid metal walls in tokamaks, looking at both high and low recycling materials. We will then focus in particular on one of the candidate liquids, lithium. Lithium is known to have a high chemical affinity for hydrogen, and has been shown in test stands and fusion experiments to produce a low recycling surface, especially when liquid. Because it is also low-Z and is usable in a tokamak over a reasonable temperature range (200 - 400 °C), it has been now been used as a PFC in several confinement experiments (TFTR, T11-M, CDX-U, NSTX, FTU, and TJ-II), with favorable results. The consequences of substituting low recycling walls for the traditional high recycling variety on tokamak equilibria are very extensive. We will discuss some of the expected modifications, briefly reviewing experimental results, and comparing the results to expectations.

  8. Liquid Metal Walls, Lithium, And Low Recycling Boundary Conditions In Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    R. Majeski

    2010-01-15

    At present, the only solid material believed to be a viable option for plasma-facing components (PFCs) in a fusion reactor is tungsten. Operated at the lower temperatures typical of present-day fusion experiments, tungsten is known to suffer from surface degradation during long-term exposure to helium-containing plasmas, leading to reduced thermal conduction to the bulk, and enhanced erosion. Existing alloys are also quite brittle at temperatures under 700oC. However, at a sufficiently high operating temperature (700 - 1000 oC), tungsten is selfannealing and it is expected that surface damage will be reduced to the point where tungsten PFCs will have an acceptable lifetime in a reactor environment. The existence of only one potentially viable option for solid PFCs, though, constitutes one of the most significant restrictions on design space for DEMO and follow-on fusion reactors. In contrast, there are several candidates for liquid metal-based PFCs, including gallium, tin, lithium, and tin-lithium eutectics. We will discuss options for liquid metal walls in tokamaks, looking at both high and low recycling materials. We will then focus in particular on one of the candidate liquids, lithium. Lithium is known to have a high chemical affinity for hydrogen, and has been shown in test stands1 and fusion experiments2,3 to produce a low recycling surface, especially when liquid. Because it is also low-Z and is usable in a tokamak over a reasonable temperature range (200 - 400 oC), it has been now been used as a PFC in several confinement experiments (TFTR, T11- M, CDX-U, NSTX, FTU, and TJ-II), with favorable results. The consequences of substituting low recycling walls for the traditional high recycling variety on tokamak equilibria are very extensive. We will discuss some of the expected modifications, briefly reviewing experimental results, and comparing the results to expectations.

  9. Properties of a new liquid desiccant solution - Lithium chloride and calcium chloride mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Ertas, A.; Anderson, E.E.; Kiris, I. )

    1992-09-01

    Desiccants, broadly classified as solid and liquid desiccants, have the property of extracting and retaining moisture from air brought into contact with them. By using either type, moisture in the air is removed and the resulting dry air can be used for air-conditioning or drying purposes. Because of its properties, lithium chloride is the most stable liquid desiccant and has a large dehydration concentration (30% to 45%), but its cost is relatively high ($9.00-13.00 per kg). It is expected that lithium chloride will reduce the relative humidity to as low as 15%. Calcium chloride is the cheapest (45 cents per kg) and most readily available desiccant, but it has the disadvantage of being unstable depending on the air inlet conditions and the concentration of the desiccant in the solution. To stabilize calcium chloride and to decrease the high cost of lithium chloride, the two can be mixed in different weight combinations. The main objective of this research is to measure the physical properties of different combinations of this mixture such as density, viscosity, and vapor pressure which are necessary for analysis of heat and mass transfer in a packed tower desiccant-air contact system. The solubility of this new liquid desiccant under certain temperature-concentrations will also be studied.

  10. Ionic-liquid-nanoparticle hybrid electrolytes: applications in lithium metal batteries.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingying; Korf, Kevin; Kambe, Yu; Tu, Zhengyuan; Archer, Lynden A

    2014-01-01

    Development of rechargeable lithium metal battery (LMB) remains a challenge because of uneven lithium deposition during repeated cycles of charge and discharge. Ionic liquids have received intensive scientific interest as electrolytes because of their exceptional thermal and electrochemical stabilities. Ionic liquid and ionic-liquid-nanoparticle hybrid electrolytes based on 1-methy-3-propylimidazolium (IM) and 1-methy-3-propylpiperidinium (PP) have been synthesized and their ionic conductivity, electrochemical stability, mechanical properties, and ability to promote stable Li electrodeposition investigated. PP-based electrolytes were found to be more conductive and substantially more efficient in suppressing dendrite formation on cycled lithium anodes; as little as 11 wt % PP-IL in a PC-LiTFSI host produces more than a ten-fold increase in cell lifetime. Both PP- and IM-based nanoparticle hybrid electrolytes provide up to 10 000-fold improvements in cell lifetime than anticipated based on their mechanical modulus alone. Galvanostatic cycling measurements in Li/Li4 Ti5 O12 half cells using IL-nanoparticle hybrid electrolytes reveal more than 500 cycles of trouble-free operation and enhanced rate capability. PMID:24282090

  11. Lithium

    MedlinePlus

    ... mania (frenzied, abnormally excited mood) in people with bipolar disorder (manic-depressive disorder; a disease that causes episodes of depression, episodes of mania, and other abnormal moods). Lithium is in a ... antimanic agents. It works by decreasing abnormal activity in the brain.

  12. Composite Electrolytes for Lithium Batteries: Ionic Liquids in APTES Crosslinked Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tigelaar, Dean M.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Bennett, William R.

    2007-01-01

    Solvent free polymer electrolytes were made consisting of Li(+) and pyrrolidinium salts of trifluoromethanesulfonimide added to a series of hyperbranched poly(ethylene oxide)s (PEO). The polymers were connected by triazine linkages and crosslinked by a sol-gel process to provide mechanical strength. The connecting PEO groups were varied to help understand the effects of polymer structure on electrolyte conductivity in the presence of ionic liquids. Polymers were also made that contain poly(dimethylsiloxane) groups, which provide increased flexibility without interacting with lithium ions. When large amounts of ionic liquid are added, there is little dependence of conductivity on the polymer structure. However, when smaller amounts of ionic liquid are added, the inherent conductivity of the polymer becomes a factor. These electrolytes are more conductive than those made with high molecular weight PEO imbibed with ionic liquids at ambient temperatures, due to the amorphous nature of the polymer.

  13. MHD considerations for a self-cooled liquid lithium blanket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sze, D. K.; Mattas, R. F.; Hull, A. B.; Picologlou, B. F.; Smith, D. L.

    1992-03-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects can present a feasibility issue for a self-cooled liquid metal blanket of magnetically confined fusion reactors, especially the inboard regime of a tokamak. This pressure drop can be significantly reduced by using an insulated wall structure. A self-healing insulating coating has been identified, which will reduce the pressure drop by more than a factor of 10. The future research direction to further quantify the performance of this coating is also outlined.

  14. Susceptibility of 2 1/4 Cr-1Mo steel to liquid metal induced embrittlement by lithium-lead solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhard, B.A.; Edwards, G.R.

    1984-08-01

    An investigation has been conducted on the liquid metal induced embrittlement susceptibility of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel exposed to lithium and 1a/o lead-lithium at temperatures between 190/sup 0/C and 525/sup 0/C. This research was part of an ongoing effort to evaluate the compatibility of liquid lithium solutions with potential fusion reactor containment materials. Of particular interest was the microstructure present in a weld heat-affected zone, a microstructure known to be highly susceptible to corrosive attack by liquid lead-lithium solutions. Embrittlement susceptibility was determined by conducting tension tests on 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel exposed to an inert environment as well as to a lead-lithium liquid and observing the change in tensile behavior. The 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel was also given a base plate heat treatment to observe its embrittlement susceptibility to 1a/o lead-lithium. The base plate microstructure was severely embrittled at temperatures less than 500/sup 0/C. Tempering the base plate was effective in restoring adequate ductility to the steel.

  15. Synergistic effects of mixing sulfone and ionic liquid as safe electrolytes for lithium sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chen; Guo, Bingkun; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    A strategy of mixing both an ionic liquid and sulfone is reported to give synergistic effects of reducing viscosity, increasing ionic conductivity, reducing polysulfide dissolution, and improving safety. The mixtures of ionic liquids and sulfones also show distinctly different physicochemical properties, including thermal properties and crystallization behavior. By using these electrolytes, lithium sulfur batteries assembled with lithium and mesoporous carbon composites show a reversible specific capacity of 1265 mAh g(-1) (second cycle) by using 40 % 1.0 M lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) in N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide with 60 % 1.0 M LiTFSI in methylisopropylsulfone in the first cycle. This capacity is slightly lower than that obtained in pure 1.0 M LiTFSI as the sulfone electrolyte; however, it exhibits excellent cycling stability and remains as high as 655 mAh g(-1) even after 50 cycles. This strategy provides a method to alleviate polysulfide dissolution and redox shuttle phenomena, at the same time, with improved ionic conductivity. PMID:25427945

  16. An advanced lithium-air battery exploiting an ionic liquid-based electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Elia, G A; Hassoun, J; Kwak, W-J; Sun, Y-K; Scrosati, B; Mueller, F; Bresser, D; Passerini, S; Oberhumer, P; Tsiouvaras, N; Reiter, J

    2014-11-12

    A novel lithium-oxygen battery exploiting PYR14TFSI-LiTFSI as ionic liquid-based electrolyte medium is reported. The Li/PYR14TFSI-LiTFSI/O2 battery was fully characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, capacity-limited cycling, field emission scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results of this extensive study demonstrate that this new Li/O2 cell is characterized by a stable electrode-electrolyte interface and a highly reversible charge-discharge cycling behavior. Most remarkably, the charge process (oxygen oxidation reaction) is characterized by a very low overvoltage, enhancing the energy efficiency to 82%, thus, addressing one of the most critical issues preventing the practical application of lithium-oxygen batteries. PMID:25329836

  17. Strong tendency of homeotropic alignment and anisotropic lithium ion conductivity of sulfonate functionalized zwitterionic imidazolium ionic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Rondla, Rohini; Lin, Joseph C Y; Yang, C T; Lin, Ivan J B

    2013-09-17

    Here, we report the first attempt to investigate the liquid crystal (LC) behavior of SO3(-) functionalized imidazolium zwitterionic (SO3(-)ImZI) salts, which display homeotropic alignment on a glass slide without the aid of any aligning approach. Doping lithium salt to ImZI salts lowers the melting temperatures and raises the clearing temperatures substantially to form room temperature ImZILCs. Excellent anisotropic lithium ion conductivity is achieved; which is strengthened by their tendency for homeotropic alignment. PMID:24010889

  18. Ionic Liquid Electrolytes for Li–Air Batteries: Lithium Metal Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Grande, Lorenzo; Paillard, Elie; Kim, Guk-Tae; Monaco, Simone; Passerini, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the electrochemical stability and lithium plating/stripping performance of N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (Pyr14TFSI) are reported, by investigating the behavior of Li metal electrodes in symmetrical Li/electrolyte/Li cells. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements and galvanostatic cycling at different temperatures are performed to analyze the influence of temperature on the stabilization of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI), showing that TFSI-based ionic liquids (ILs) rank among the best candidates for long-lasting Li–air cells. PMID:24815072

  19. Research proposal for development of an electron stripper using a thin liquid lithium film for rare isotope accelerator.

    SciTech Connect

    Momozaki, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2006-03-06

    Hydrodynamic instability phenomena in a thin liquid lithium film, which has been proposed for the first stripper in the driver linac of Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA), were discussed. Since it was considered that film instability could significantly impair the feasibility of the liquid lithium film stripper concept, potential issues and research tasks in the RIA project due to these instability phenomena were raised. In order to investigate these instability phenomena, a research proposal plan was developed. In the theoretical part of this research proposal, a use of the linear stability theory was suggested. In the experimental part, it was pointed out that the concept of Reynolds number and Weber number scaling may allow conducting a preliminary experiment using inert simulants, hence reducing technical difficulty, complexity, and cost of the experiments. After confirming the thin film formation in the preliminary experiment using simulants, demonstration experiments using liquid lithium were proposed.

  20. Electrochemical Stability Window of Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids as Electrolytes for Lithium Batteries.

    PubMed

    Kazemiabnavi, Saeed; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Thornton, Katsuyo; Banerjee, Soumik

    2016-06-30

    This paper presents the computational assessment of the electrochemical stability of a series of alkyl methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids for their use as lithium battery electrolytes. The oxidation and reduction potentials of the constituent cation and anion of each ionic liquid with respect to a Li(+)/Li reference electrode were calculated using density functional theory following the method of thermodynamic cycles, and the electrochemical stability windows (ESW)s of these ionic liquids were obtained. The effect of varying the length of alkyl side chains of the methylimidazolium-based cations on the redox potentials and ESWs was investigated. The results show that the limits of the ESWs of these methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids are defined by the oxidation potential of the anions and the reduction potential of alkyl-methylimidazolium cations. Moreover, ionic liquids with [PF6](-) anion have a wider ESW. In addition to characterizing structure-function relationships, the accuracy of the computational approach was assessed through comparisons of the data against experimental measurements of ESWs. The potentials calculated by the thermodynamic cycle method are in good agreement with the experimental data while the HOMO/LUMO method overestimates the redox potentials. This work demonstrates that these approaches can provide guidance in selecting ionic liquid electrolytes when designing high-voltage rechargeable batteries. PMID:27266487

  1. Polymeric ionic liquid-plastic crystal composite electrolytes for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaowei; Zhang, Zhengxi; Li, Sijian; Yang, Li; Hirano, Shin-ichi

    2016-03-01

    In this work, composite polymer electrolytes (CPEs), that is, 80%[(1-x)PIL-(x)SN]-20%LiTFSI, are successfully prepared by using a pyrrolidinium-based polymeric ionic liquid (P(DADMA)TFSI) as a polymer host, succinonitrile (SN) as a plastic crystal, and lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) as a lithium salt. XRD and DSC measurements confirm that the as-obtained CPEs have amorphous structures. The 80%[50%PIL-50%SN]-20%LiTFSI (50% SN) electrolyte reveals a high room temperature ionic conductivity of 5.74 × 10-4 S cm-1, a wide electrochemical window of 5.5 V, as well as good mechanical strength with a Young's modulus of 4.9 MPa. Li/LiFePO4 cells assembled with the 50% SN electrolyte at 0.1C rate can deliver a discharge capacity of about 150 mAh g-1 at 25 °C, with excellent capacity retention. Furthermore, such cells are able to achieve stable discharge capacities of 131.8 and 121.2 mAh g-1 at 0.5C and 1.0C rate, respectively. The impressive findings demonstrate that the electrolyte system prepared in this work has great potential for application in lithium ion batteries.

  2. Physics Design Requirements for the National Spherical Torus Experiment Liquid Lithium Divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, W.; Bell, M.; Berzak,L.; Brooks, A.; Ellis, R.; Gerhardt, S.; Harjes, H.; Kaita, R.; Kallman, J.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D.; Menard, J.; Nygren,R. E.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stotler, D.; Wakeland, P.; Zakharov L. E.

    2008-09-26

    Recent NSTX high power divertor experiments have shown significant and recurring benefits of solid lithium coatings on PFC's to the performance of divertor plasmas in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. The next step in this work is installation of a liquid lithium divertor (LLD) to achieve density control for inductionless current drive capability (e.g., about a 15-25% ne decrease from present highest non-inductionless fraction discharges which often evolve toward the density limit, ne/nGW~1), to enable ne scan capability (x2) in the H-mode, to test the ability to operate at significantly lower density for future ST-CTF reactor designs (e.g., ne/nGW = 0.25), and eventually to investigate high heat-flux power handling (10 MW/m2) with longpulse discharges (>1.5s). The first step (LLD-1) physics design encompasses the desired plasma requirements, the experimental capabilities and conditions, power handling, radial location, pumping capability, operating temperature, lithium filling, MHD forces, and diagnostics for control and characterization.

  3. Ionic Liquid-Enhanced Solid State Electrolyte Interface (SEI) for Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jianming; Gu, Meng; Chen, Honghao; Meduri, Praveen; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2013-05-16

    Li-S battery is a complicated system with many challenges existing before its final market penetration. While most of the reported work for Li-S batteries is focused on the cathode design, we demonstrate in this work that the anode consumption accelerated by corrosive polysulfide solution also critically determines the Li-S cell performance. To validate this hypothesis, ionic liquid (IL) N-methyl-N-butylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (Py14TFSI) has been employed to modify the properties of SEI layer formed on Li metal surface in Li-S batteries. It is found that the IL-enhanced passivation film on the lithium anode surface exhibits much different morphology and chemical compositions, effectively protecting lithium metal from continuous attack by soluble polysulfides. Therefore, both cell impedance and the irreversible consumption of polysulfides on lithium metal are reduced. As a result, the Coulombic efficiency and the cycling stability of Li-S batteries have been greatly improved. After 120 cycles, Li-S battery cycled in the electrolyte containing IL demonstrates a high capacity retention of 94.3% at 0.1 C rate. These results unveil another important failure mechanism for Li-S batteries and shin the light on the new approaches to improve Li-S battery performances.

  4. Uptake of liquid from wet surfaces by the brush-tipped proboscis of a butterfly

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Chul; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of the brush-tipped proboscis of the Asian comma (Polygonia c-aureum) on wet-surface feeding. The tip region of this proboscis was observed, especially two microstructures; the intake slits through which liquid passes into the proboscis and the brush-like sensilla styloconica. The sensilla styloconica were connected laterally to the intake slits in the tip region. The liquid-feeding flow between the proboscis and the wet surface was measured by micro-particle image velocimetry. During liquid feeding, the sensilla styloconica region accumulates liquid by pinning the air-liquid interface to the tips of the sensilla styloconica, thus the intake slit region remains immersed. The film flow that passes through the sensilla styloconica region shows a parabolic velocity profile, and the corresponding flow rate is proportional to the cubed length of the sensilla styloconica. Based on these observations, we demonstrated that the sensilla styloconica promotes the uptake of liquid from wet surfaces. This study may inspire the development of a microfluidic device to collect liquid from moist substrates. PMID:25373895

  5. Development of liquid-lithium film jet-flow for the target of (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reactions for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tooru; Miura, Kuniaki; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Aritomi, Masanori

    2014-06-01

    A feasibility study on liquid lithium target in the form of a flowing film was performed to evaluate its potential use as a neutron generation target of (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction in BNCT. The target is a windowless-type flowing film on a concave wall. Its configuration was adapted for a proton beam which is 30mm in diameter and with energy and current of up to 3MeV and 20mA, respectively. The flowing film of liquid lithium was 0.6mm in thickness, 50mm in width and 50mm in length. The shapes of the nozzle and concave back wall, which create a stable flowing film jet, were decided based on water experiments. A lithium hydrodynamic experiment was performed to observe the stability of liquid lithium flow behavior. The flowing film of liquid lithium was found to be feasible at temperatures below the liquid lithium boiling saturation of 342°C at the surface pressure of 1×10(-3)Pa. Using a proto-type liquid lithium-circulating loop for BNCT, the stability of the film flow was confirmed for velocities up to 30m/s at 220°C and 250°C in vacuum at a pressure lower than 10(-3) Pa. It is expected that for practical use, a flowing liquid lithium target of a windowless type can solve the problem of radiation damage and target cooling. PMID:24412425

  6. Rock-salt structure lithium deuteride formation in liquid lithium with high-concentrations of deuterium: a first-principles molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mohan; Abrams, T.; Jaworski, M. A.; Carter, Emily A.

    2016-01-01

    Because of lithium’s possible use as a first wall material in a fusion reactor, a fundamental understanding of the interactions between liquid lithium (Li) and deuterium (D) is important. We predict structural and dynamical properties of liquid Li samples with high concentrations of D, as derived from first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. Liquid Li samples with four concentrations of inserted D atoms (LiDβ , β =0.25 , 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00) are studied at temperatures ranging from 470 to 1143 K. Densities, diffusivities, pair distribution functions, bond angle distribution functions, geometries, and charge transfer between Li and D atoms are calculated and analyzed. The analysis suggests liquid-solid phase transitions can occur at some concentrations and temperatures, forming rock-salt LiD within liquid Li. We also observe formation of some D2 molecules at high D concentrations.

  7. Ionomer-Liquid Electrolyte Hybrid Ionic Conductor for High Cycling Stability of Lithium Metal Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jongchan; Lee, Hongkyung; Choo, Min-Ju; Park, Jung-Ki; Kim, Hee-Tak

    2015-09-01

    The inhomogeneous Li electrodeposition of lithium metal electrode has been a major impediment to the realization of rechargeable lithium metal batteries. Although single ion conducting ionomers can induce more homogeneous Li electrodeposition by preventing Li+ depletion at Li surface, currently available materials do not allow room-temperature operation due to their low room temperature conductivities. In the paper, we report that a highly conductive ionomer/liquid electrolyte hybrid layer tightly laminated on Li metal electrode can realize stable Li electrodeposition at high current densities up to 10 mA cm-2 and permit room-temperature operation of corresponding Li metal batteries with low polarizations. The hybrid layer is fabricated by laminating few micron-thick Nafion layer on Li metal electrode followed by soaking 1 M LiPF6 EC/DEC (1/1) electrolyte. The Li/Li symmetric cell with the hybrid layer stably operates at a high current density of 10 mA cm-2 for more than 2000 h, which corresponds to more than five-fold enhancement compared with bare Li metal electrode. Also, the prototype Li/LiCoO2 battery with the hybrid layer offers cycling stability more than 350 cycles. These results demonstrate that the hybrid strategy successfully combines the advantages of bi-ionic liquid electrolyte (fast Li+ transport) and single ionic ionomer (prevention of Li+ depletion).

  8. Ionomer-Liquid Electrolyte Hybrid Ionic Conductor for High Cycling Stability of Lithium Metal Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Song, Jongchan; Lee, Hongkyung; Choo, Min-Ju; Park, Jung-Ki; Kim, Hee-Tak

    2015-01-01

    The inhomogeneous Li electrodeposition of lithium metal electrode has been a major impediment to the realization of rechargeable lithium metal batteries. Although single ion conducting ionomers can induce more homogeneous Li electrodeposition by preventing Li(+) depletion at Li surface, currently available materials do not allow room-temperature operation due to their low room temperature conductivities. In the paper, we report that a highly conductive ionomer/liquid electrolyte hybrid layer tightly laminated on Li metal electrode can realize stable Li electrodeposition at high current densities up to 10 mA cm(-2) and permit room-temperature operation of corresponding Li metal batteries with low polarizations. The hybrid layer is fabricated by laminating few micron-thick Nafion layer on Li metal electrode followed by soaking 1 M LiPF6 EC/DEC (1/1) electrolyte. The Li/Li symmetric cell with the hybrid layer stably operates at a high current density of 10 mA cm(-2) for more than 2000 h, which corresponds to more than five-fold enhancement compared with bare Li metal electrode. Also, the prototype Li/LiCoO2 battery with the hybrid layer offers cycling stability more than 350 cycles. These results demonstrate that the hybrid strategy successfully combines the advantages of bi-ionic liquid electrolyte (fast Li(+) transport) and single ionic ionomer (prevention of Li(+) depletion). PMID:26411701

  9. Ionic liquids in lithium battery electrolytes: Composition versus safety and physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilken, Susanne; Xiong, Shizhao; Scheers, Johan; Jacobsson, Per; Johansson, Patrik

    2015-02-01

    Ionic liquids have been highlighted as non-flammable, environmentally friendly, and suggested as possible solvents in lithium ion battery electrolytes. Here, the application of two ionic liquids from the EMIm-family in a state-of-the-art carbonate solvent based electrolyte is studied with a focus on safety improvement. The impact of the composition on physical and safety related properties is investigated for IL concentrations of additive (∼5 wt%) up to co-solvent concentrations (∼60 wt%). Furthermore, the role of the lithium salt concentration is separately addressed by studying a set of electrolytes at 0.5 M, 1 M, and 2 M LiPF6 concentrations. A large impact on the electrolyte properties is found for the electrolytes containing EMImTFSI and high salt concentrations. The composition 2 M LiPF6 EC:DEC:IL (1:1:3 wt%) is found non-flammable for both choices of ILs added. The macroscopic observations are complemented by a Raman spectroscopy analysis whereby a change in the Li+ solvation is detected for IL concentrations >4.5 mol%.

  10. Ionomer-Liquid Electrolyte Hybrid Ionic Conductor for High Cycling Stability of Lithium Metal Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jongchan; Lee, Hongkyung; Choo, Min-Ju; Park, Jung-Ki; Kim, Hee-Tak

    2015-01-01

    The inhomogeneous Li electrodeposition of lithium metal electrode has been a major impediment to the realization of rechargeable lithium metal batteries. Although single ion conducting ionomers can induce more homogeneous Li electrodeposition by preventing Li+ depletion at Li surface, currently available materials do not allow room-temperature operation due to their low room temperature conductivities. In the paper, we report that a highly conductive ionomer/liquid electrolyte hybrid layer tightly laminated on Li metal electrode can realize stable Li electrodeposition at high current densities up to 10 mA cm−2 and permit room-temperature operation of corresponding Li metal batteries with low polarizations. The hybrid layer is fabricated by laminating few micron-thick Nafion layer on Li metal electrode followed by soaking 1 M LiPF6 EC/DEC (1/1) electrolyte. The Li/Li symmetric cell with the hybrid layer stably operates at a high current density of 10 mA cm−2 for more than 2000 h, which corresponds to more than five-fold enhancement compared with bare Li metal electrode. Also, the prototype Li/LiCoO2 battery with the hybrid layer offers cycling stability more than 350 cycles. These results demonstrate that the hybrid strategy successfully combines the advantages of bi-ionic liquid electrolyte (fast Li+ transport) and single ionic ionomer (prevention of Li+ depletion). PMID:26411701

  11. Lithium-antimony-lead liquid metal battery for grid-level energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kangli; Jiang, Kai; Chung, Brice; Ouchi, Takanari; Burke, Paul J.; Boysen, Dane A.; Bradwell, David J.; Kim, Hojong; Muecke, Ulrich; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2014-10-01

    The ability to store energy on the electric grid would greatly improve its efficiency and reliability while enabling the integration of intermittent renewable energy technologies (such as wind and solar) into baseload supply. Batteries have long been considered strong candidate solutions owing to their small spatial footprint, mechanical simplicity and flexibility in siting. However, the barrier to widespread adoption of batteries is their high cost. Here we describe a lithium-antimony-lead liquid metal battery that potentially meets the performance specifications for stationary energy storage applications. This Li||Sb-Pb battery comprises a liquid lithium negative electrode, a molten salt electrolyte, and a liquid antimony-lead alloy positive electrode, which self-segregate by density into three distinct layers owing to the immiscibility of the contiguous salt and metal phases. The all-liquid construction confers the advantages of higher current density, longer cycle life and simpler manufacturing of large-scale storage systems (because no membranes or separators are involved) relative to those of conventional batteries. At charge-discharge current densities of 275 milliamperes per square centimetre, the cells cycled at 450 degrees Celsius with 98 per cent Coulombic efficiency and 73 per cent round-trip energy efficiency. To provide evidence of their high power capability, the cells were discharged and charged at current densities as high as 1,000 milliamperes per square centimetre. Measured capacity loss after operation for 1,800 hours (more than 450 charge-discharge cycles at 100 per cent depth of discharge) projects retention of over 85 per cent of initial capacity after ten years of daily cycling. Our results demonstrate that alloying a high-melting-point, high-voltage metal (antimony) with a low-melting-point, low-cost metal (lead) advantageously decreases the operating temperature while maintaining a high cell voltage. Apart from the fact that this finding

  12. Experimental Characterization of Thermo-electric Driven Liquid Lithium Flow in Narrow Trenches for Magnetic Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenyu; Christenson, Michael; Fiflis, Peter; Curreli, Davide; Andruczyk, Daniel; Ruzic, David

    2013-10-01

    The application of liquid metal, especially liquid lithium has become an important topic for plasma facing component (PFC) design. A liquid PFC can effectively eliminate the erosion and thermal stress problems compared to the solid PFC while transferring heat and prolong the lifetime limit of the PFCs. A liquid lithium surface can also suppress the hydrogen isotopes recycling and getter the impurities in fusion reactors. The Lithium/metal infused trench (LiMIT) concept successfully proved that the thermoelectric effect can be utilized to drive liquid lithium flow within horizontally placed metallic open trenches in transverse magnetic field. A limiter based on this concept was tested in HT-7 and gave out positive results. However a broader application of this concept may require the trench be tilted or even placed vertically, for which strong capillary force caused by narrow trenches may be the solution. A new LiMIT design with very narrow trenches have been manufactured and tested in University of Illinois and related results will be presented. Based on this idea new limiters are designed for EAST and LTX and scheduled experiments on both devices will be discussed. This project is supported by DOE/ALPS contract: DEFG02- 99ER54515.

  13. Measurement of hydrogen solubility and desorption rate in V-4Cr-4Ti and liquid lithium-calcium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Erck, R.; Park, E.T.

    1997-04-01

    Hydrogen solubility in V-4Cr-4Ti and liquid lithium-calcium was measured at a hydrogen pressure of 9.09 x 10{sup {minus}4} torr at temperatures between 250 and 700{degrees}C. Hydrogen solubility in V-4Cr-4Ti and liquid lithium decreased with temperature. The measured desorption rate of hydrogen in V-4Cr-4Ti is a thermally activated process; the activation energy is 0.067 eV. Oxygen-charged V-4Cr-4Ti specimens were also investigated to determine the effect of oxygen impurity on hydrogen solubility and desorption in the alloy. Oxygen in V-4Cr-4Ti increases hydrogen solubility and desorption kinetics. To determine the effect of a calcium oxide insulator coating on V-4Cr-4Ti, hydrogen solubility in lithium-calcium alloys that contained 0-8.0 percent calcium was also measured. The distribution ratio R of hydrogen between liquid lithium or lithium-calcium and V-4Cr-4Ti increased as temperature decreased (R {approx} 10 and 100 at 700 and 250{degrees}C, respectively). However at <267{degrees}C, solubility data could not be obtained by this method because of the slow kinetics of hydrogen permeation through the vanadium alloy.

  14. Nanostructure of mixtures of protic ionic liquids and lithium salts: effect of alkyl chain length.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Morales, Trinidad; Carrete, Jesús; Rodríguez, Julio R; Cabeza, Óscar; Gallego, Luis J; Russina, Olga; Varela, Luis M

    2015-02-21

    The bulk structure of mixtures of two protic ionic liquids, propylammonium nitrate and butylammonium nitrate, with a salt with a common anion, is analyzed at room temperature by means of small angle X-ray scattering and classical molecular dynamics simulations. The study of several structural properties, such as density, radial distribution functions, spatial distribution functions, hydrogen bonds, coordination numbers and velocity autocorrelation functions, demonstrates that increasing the alkyl chain length of the alkylammonium cation results in more segregated, better defined polar and apolar domains, the latter having a larger size. This increase, ascribed to the erosion of the H-bond network in the ionic liquid polar regions as salt is added, is confirmed by means of small angle X-ray scattering measurements, which show a clear linear increase of the characteristic spatial sizes of the studied protic ionic liquids with salt concentration, similar to that previously reported for ethylammonium nitrate (J. Phys. Chem. B, 2014, 118, 761-770). In addition, larger ionic liquid cations lead to a lower degree of hydrogen bonding and to more sparsely packed three-dimensional structures, which are more easily perturbed by the addition of lithium salts. PMID:25609558

  15. Bicyclic imidazolium ionic liquids as potential electrolytes for rechargeable lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Chen; Shao, Nan; Bell, Jason R; Guo, Bingkun; Luo, Huimin; Jiang, Deen; Dai, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    A bicyclic imidazolium ionic liquids, 1-ethyl-2,3-trimethyleneimidazolium bis(tri fluoromethane sulfonyl)imide ([ETMIm][TFSI]), and reference imidazolium compounds, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide ([EMIm][TFSI]) and 1, 2-dimethyl-3-butylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide ([DMBIm][TFSI]), were synthesized and investigated as solvents for lithium ion batteries. Although the alkylation at the C-2 position of the imidazolium ring does not affect the thermal stability of the ionic liquids, with or without the presence of 0.5 molar lithium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI), the stereochemical structure of the molecules has shown profound influences on the electrochemical properties of the corresponding ionic liquids. [ETMIm][TFSI] shows better reduction stability than do [EMIm][TFSI] and [DMBIm][TFSI], as confirmed by both linear sweep voltammery (LSV) and theoretical calculation. The Li||Li cell impedance of 0.5M LiTFSI/[ETMIm][TFSI] is stabilized, whereas that of 0.5M LiTFSI/[DMBIm][TFSI] is still fluctuating after 20 hours, indicating a relatively stable solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) is formed in the former. Furthermore, the Li||graphite half-cell based on 0.5M LiTFSI/[BTMIm][TFSI] exhibits reversible capacity of 250mAh g-1 and 70mAh g-1 at 25 C, which increases to 330 mAh g-1 and 250 mAh g-1 at 50 C, under the current rate of C/20 and C/10, respectively. For comparison, the Li||graphite half-cell based on 0.5M LiTFSI/[DMBIm][TFSI] exhibits poor capacity retention under the same current rate at both temperatures.

  16. Safety Analysis of the US Dual Coolant Liquid Lead-Lithium ITER Test Blanket Module

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, Brad; Reyes, Susana; Sawan, Mohamed; Wong, Clement

    2006-07-01

    The US is proposing a prototype of a dual coolant liquid lead-lithium (DCLL) DEMO blanket concept for testing in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) as an ITER Test Blanket Module (TBM). Because safety considerations are an integral part of the design process to ensure that this TBM does not adversely impact the safety of ITER, a safety assessment has been conducted for this TBM and its ancillary systems as requested by the ITER project. Four events were selected by the ITER International Team (IT) to address specific reactor safety concerns, such as VV pressurization, confinement building pressure build-up, TBM decay heat removal capability, tritium and activation products release from the TBM system, and hydrogen and heat production from chemical reactions. This paper summarizes the results of this safety assessment conducted with the MELCOR computer code.

  17. Electrochemical co-deposition of magnesium with lithium from quaternary ammonium-based ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamura, Osamu; Yoshimoto, Nobuko; Matsumoto, Mami; Egashia, Minato; Morita, Masayuki

    Electrochemical deposition of magnesium (Mg) has been successfully achieved from an ionic liquid (IL) solution based on quaternary ammonium salt containing lithium (Li) salt. Irreversible electrochemical behavior was generally observed in the IL-based electrolytes containing simple Mg salt. In the IL-based electrolyte dissolving both Mg and Li salts, electrochemical reduction and oxidation of magnesium cation (Mg 2+) have become detectable. Such reversible processes correspond respectively to cathodic deposition and anodic dissolution of metallic Mg, which are accompanied by the co-deposition/co-dissolution of Li. Potentiostatic electrolysis of IL dissolving binary Mg and Li salts gave metallic deposit consisting of both elements with total current efficiency of ca. 52%.

  18. Liquid-lithium cooling for 100-kW ISOL and fragmentation targets.

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen, J. A.; Reed, C. B.,Hassanein, A.,Gomes, I. C.

    2000-11-10

    Advanced exotic beam facilities that are currently being developed will use powerful driver accelerator for the production of short-lived rare isotopes. Multi-beam-drivers capable of producing high power beams from very light to very heavy ions are now technically feasible. A challenge for such facilities is the development of production targets to be used for a variety of reaction mechanisms with beam powers of about 100 kilowatts. This paper presents engineering concepts that have been developed recently for using liquid lithium coolant for two types of targets, one for use with light-ion beams on high atomic number (Z) targets and the other for heavy-ion beams on low-Z targets.

  19. Observation of electrodeposited lithium by optical microscope in room temperature ionic liquid-based electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, H.; Sakaebe, H.; Matsumoto, H.

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) were applied to a lithium (Li) metal battery system, and the behavior of Li electrodeposition on nickel electrodes in RTILs was investigated using in situ optical microscopy with/without an organic additive, vinylene carbonate (VC), in the RTILs. Two RTILs, PP13[TFSA] (N-methyl- N-propylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide) and EMI[FSA] (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide), were chosen as the base electrolytes. Dendritic particles were obtained in the case of EMI[FSA] with and without VC, and PP13[TFSA] without VC, while non-dendritic fine particles were obtained in the case of PP13[TFSA] with VC.

  20. Liquid lithium target as a high intensity, high energy neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Parkin, Don M.; Dudey, Norman D.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a target jet for charged particles. In one embodiment the charged particles are high energy deuterons that bombard the target jet to produce high intensity, high energy neutrons. To this end, deuterons in a vacuum container bombard an endlessly circulating, free-falling, sheet-shaped, copiously flowing, liquid lithium jet that gushes by gravity from a rectangular cross-section vent on the inside of the container means to form a moving web in contact with the inside wall of the vacuum container. The neutrons are produced via break-up of the beam in the target by stripping, spallation and compound nuclear reactions in which the projectiles (deuterons) interact with the target (Li) to produce excited nuclei, which then "boil off" or evaporate a neutron.

  1. Lithium-Ion-Conducting Electrolytes: From an Ionic Liquid to the Polymer Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Fernicola, A.; Weise, F. C.; Greenbaum, S. G.; Kagimoto, J.; Scrosati, B.; Soleto, A.

    2009-01-01

    This work concerns the design, the synthesis, and the characterization of the N-butyl-N-ethylpiperidinium N,N-bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide (PP24TFSI) ionic liquid (IL). To impart Li-ion transport, a suitable amount of lithium N,N-bis-(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide (LiTFSI) is added to the IL. The Li–IL mixture displays ionic conductivity values on the order of 10−4 S cm−1 and an electrochemical stability window in the range of 1.8–4.5 V vs Li+/Li. The voltammetric analysis demonstrates that the cathodic decomposition gives rise to a passivating layer on the surface of the working electrode, which kinetically extends the stability of the Li/IL interface as confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. The LiTFSI–PP24TFSI mixture is incorporated in a poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) matrix to form various electrolyte membranes with different LiTFSI–PP24TFSI contents. The ionic conductivity of all the membranes resembles that of the LiTFSI–IL mixture, suggesting an ionic transport mechanism similar to that of the liquid component. NMR measurements demonstrate a reduction in the mobility of all ions following the addition of LiTFSI to the PP24TFSI IL and when incorporating the mixture into the membrane. Finally, an unexpected but potentially significant enhancement in Li transference number is observed in passing from the liquid to the membrane electrolyte system. PMID:20354582

  2. Lithium-sulphur battery with activated carbon cloth-sulphur cathode and ionic liquid as electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiderska-Mocek, Agnieszka; Rudnicka, Ewelina

    2015-01-01

    In this study a binder-free activated carbon cloth-sulphur (ACC-S) composite cathode is presented. Such a cathode was obtained using the impregnating technique of microporous activated carbon cloth with elemental melted sulphur. The surface morphology of an activated carbon cloth-sulphur electrode was studied using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), which was equipped with an EDX spectroscopy attachment. Electrochemical properties of the ACC-S composite cathode was tested in an ionic liquid electrolyte consisting of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulphonyl)imide (EtMeImNTf2) and bis(trifluoromethanesulphonyl)imide (LiNTf2). The ACC-sulphur cathode working together with lithium anode was tested with the use of cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge/discharge cycles and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The capacity and cyclic stability of the ACC-S composite cathode were much better than those for the sulphur cathode (a mixture of sulphur from graphene nanoplatelets and carbon black) tested in the same ionic liquid electrolyte. The ACC-sulphur cathode showed good cyclability and coulombic efficiency (99%) with the ionic liquid electrolyte. The reversible capacity of the ACC-S|electrolyte|Li cell was ca. 830 mAh g-1 after 50 cycles.

  3. Three-dimensional modeling of the thermoelectric MHD problem of the LIMIT liquid lithium divertor for fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curreli, Davide; Xu, Wenyu; Lindquist, Kyle; Andruczyk, Daniel; Ruzic, David N.

    2012-10-01

    Flowing liquid lithium is a promising technique for the continuous heat removal from plasma-facing components in fusion devices. In ITER-like conditions, the divertor has to handle stationary fluxes of the order 10 MW/m^2; heat fluxes even bigger occur during H-mode-related instabilities and disruptions. The Lithium-Metal Infused Trenches (LIMIT) concept, proposed at University of Illinois, offers a viable and self-adaptive solution, thanks to the use of a thermoelectric MHD drive of liquid lithium inside elongated metal trenches. We present a 3D finite-element-based model for the solution of the TEMHD. The continuity of mass, momentum, energy and current are solved together with the generalized constitutive laws of thermoelectricity. The numerical results show that TE currents are generated at the interface between the two metals; under the action of the toroidal magnetic field, the resulting JxB force pushes the liquid lithium along the channels. The force acts mainly at the interface, where the Hartmann and the fluid boundary layers are present, developing early turbulence and fluid bi-shaped macrostructures on the velocity field. The stability of the method is discussed, together with further developments toward turbulent average of the convective noise.

  4. Lithium-antimony-lead liquid metal battery for grid-level energy storage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kangli; Jiang, Kai; Chung, Brice; Ouchi, Takanari; Burke, Paul J; Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Kim, Hojong; Muecke, Ulrich; Sadoway, Donald R

    2014-10-16

    The ability to store energy on the electric grid would greatly improve its efficiency and reliability while enabling the integration of intermittent renewable energy technologies (such as wind and solar) into baseload supply. Batteries have long been considered strong candidate solutions owing to their small spatial footprint, mechanical simplicity and flexibility in siting. However, the barrier to widespread adoption of batteries is their high cost. Here we describe a lithium-antimony-lead liquid metal battery that potentially meets the performance specifications for stationary energy storage applications. This Li||Sb-Pb battery comprises a liquid lithium negative electrode, a molten salt electrolyte, and a liquid antimony-lead alloy positive electrode, which self-segregate by density into three distinct layers owing to the immiscibility of the contiguous salt and metal phases. The all-liquid construction confers the advantages of higher current density, longer cycle life and simpler manufacturing of large-scale storage systems (because no membranes or separators are involved) relative to those of conventional batteries. At charge-discharge current densities of 275 milliamperes per square centimetre, the cells cycled at 450 degrees Celsius with 98 per cent Coulombic efficiency and 73 per cent round-trip energy efficiency. To provide evidence of their high power capability, the cells were discharged and charged at current densities as high as 1,000 milliamperes per square centimetre. Measured capacity loss after operation for 1,800 hours (more than 450 charge-discharge cycles at 100 per cent depth of discharge) projects retention of over 85 per cent of initial capacity after ten years of daily cycling. Our results demonstrate that alloying a high-melting-point, high-voltage metal (antimony) with a low-melting-point, low-cost metal (lead) advantageously decreases the operating temperature while maintaining a high cell voltage. Apart from the fact that this

  5. Effect of lithium salts addition on the ionic liquid based extraction of essential oil from Farfarae Flos.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-Yu; Zhang, Sha-Sha; Jie-Xing; Qin, Xue-Mei

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an ionic liquids (ILs) based extraction approach has been successfully applied to the extraction of essential oil from Farfarae Flos, and the effect of lithium chloride was also investigated. The results indicated that the oil yields can be increased by the ILs, and the extraction time can be reduced significantly (from 4h to 2h), compared with the conventional water distillation. The addition of lithium chloride showed different effect according to the structures of ILs, and the oil yields may be related with the structure of cation, while the chemical compositions of essential oil may be related with the anion. The reduction of extraction time and remarkable higher efficiency (5.41-62.17% improved) by combination of lithium salt and proper ILs supports the suitability of the proposed approach. PMID:25459951

  6. Liquid Lithium Divertor and Scrape-Off-Layer Interactions on the National Spherical Torus Experiment: 2010 ? 2013 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2013-08-27

    The implementation of the liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) in NSTX presented a unique opportunity in plasma-material interactions studies. A high density Langmuir Probe (HDLP) array utilizing a dense pack of triple Langmuir probes was built at PPPL and the electronics designed and built by UIUC. It was shown that the HDLP array could be used to characterize the modification of the EEDF during lithium experiments on NSTX as well as characterize the transient particle loads during lithium experiments as a means to study ELMs. With NSTX being upgraded and a new divertor being installed, the HDLP array will not be used in NSTX-U. However UIUC is currently helping to develop two new systems for depositing lithium into NSTX-U, a Liquid Lithium Pellet Dripper (LLPD) for use with the granular injector for ELM mitigation and control studies as well as an Upward-Facing Lithium Evaporator (U-LITER) based on a flash evaporation system using an electron beam. Currently UIUC has Daniel Andruczyk Stationed at PPPL and is developing these systems as well as being involved in preparing the Materials Analysis Particle Probe (MAPP) for use in LTX and NSTX-U. To date the MAPP preparations have been completed. New sample holders were designed by UIUC?s Research Engineer at PPPL and manufactured at PPPL and installed. MAPP is currently being used on LTX to do calibration and initial studies. The LLPD has demonstrated that it can produce pellets. There is still some adjustments needed to control the frequency and particle size. Equipment for the U-LITER has arrived and initial test are being made of the electron beam and design of the U-LITER in progress. It is expected to have these ready for the first run campaign of NSTX-U.

  7. Stable silicon-ionic liquid interface for next-generation lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piper, Daniela Molina; Evans, Tyler; Leung, Kevin; Watkins, Tylan; Olson, Jarred; Kim, Seul Cham; Han, Sang Sub; Bhat, Vinay; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Buttry, Daniel A.; Lee, Se-Hee

    2015-02-01

    We are currently in the midst of a race to discover and develop new battery materials capable of providing high energy-density at low cost. By combining a high-performance Si electrode architecture with a room temperature ionic liquid electrolyte, here we demonstrate a highly energy-dense lithium-ion cell with an impressively long cycling life, maintaining over 75% capacity after 500 cycles. Such high performance is enabled by a stable half-cell coulombic efficiency of 99.97%, averaged over the first 200 cycles. Equally as significant, our detailed characterization elucidates the previously convoluted mechanisms of the solid-electrolyte interphase on Si electrodes. We provide a theoretical simulation to model the interface and microstructural-compositional analyses that confirm our theoretical predictions and allow us to visualize the precise location and constitution of various interfacial components. This work provides new science related to the interfacial stability of Si-based materials while granting positive exposure to ionic liquid electrochemistry.

  8. Failure Mechanism of Fast-Charged Lithium Metal Batteries in Liquid Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Dongping; Shao, Yuyan; Lozano, Terence J.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Graff, Gordon L.; Polzin, Bryant; Zhang, Jiguang; Engelhard, Mark H.; Saenz, Natalio T.; Henderson, Wesley A.; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, lithium anode has re-attracted broad interest because of the necessity of employing lithium metal in the next-generation battery technologies such as lithium sulfur (Li-S) and lithium oxygen (Li-O2) batteries. Fast capacity degradation and safety issue associated with rechargeable lithium metal batteries have been reported, although the fundamental understanding on the failure mechanism of lithium metal at high charge rate is still under debate due to the complicated interfacial chemistry between lithium metal and electrolyte. Herein, we demonstrate that, at high current density, the quick growth of porous solid electrolyte interphase towards bulk lithium, instead of towards the separator, dramatically builds up the cell impedance that directly leads to the cell failure. Understanding the lithium metal failure mechanism is very critical to gauge the various approaches used to address the stability and safety issues associated with lithium metal anode. Otherwise, all cells will fail quickly at high rates before the observation of any positive effects that might be brought from adopting the new strategies to protect lithium.

  9. Mesoporous silica/ionic liquid quasi-solid-state electrolytes and their application in lithium metal batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaowei; Zhang, Zhengxi; Yin, Kun; Yang, Li; Tachibana, Kazuhiro; Hirano, Shin-ichi

    2015-03-01

    In this work, the ordered mesoporous silica, SBA-15, is chosen as the matrix for the first time to prepare quasi-solid-state electrolytes (QSSEs) with an ionic liquid, LiTFSI salt and PVdF-HFP. The as-obtained QSSEs are evaluated by electrochemical methods. Lithium metal batteries containing these QSSEs exhibit high discharge capacity and good cycle performance at room temperature, indicating successful battery operation.

  10. Recent progress in the NSTX/NSTX-U lithium programme and prospects for reactor-relevant liquid-lithium based divertor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, M.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H. W.; Ahn, J.-W.; Allain, J. P.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Clayton, D. J.; Canik, J. M.; Ding, S.; Gerhardt, S.; Gray, T. K.; Guttenfelder, W.; Hirooka, Y.; Kallman, J.; Kaye, S.; Kumar, D.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Maingi, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; McLean, A.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Nygren, R.; Paul, S.; Podesta, M.; Raman, R.; Ren, Y.; Sabbagh, S.; Scotti, F.; Skinner, C. H.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Surla, V.; Taylor, C. N.; Timberlake, J.; Zakharov, L. E.; the NSTX Research Team

    2013-11-01

    Developing a reactor-compatible divertor has been identified as a particularly challenging technology problem for magnetic confinement fusion. Application of lithium (Li) in NSTX resulted in improved H-mode confinement, H-mode power threshold reduction, and other plasma performance benefits. During the 2010 NSTX campaign, application of a relatively modest amount of Li (300 mg prior to the discharge) resulted in a ˜50% reduction in heat load on the liquid lithium divertor (LLD) attributable to enhanced divertor bolometric radiation. These promising Li results in NSTX and related modelling calculations motivated the radiative LLD concept proposed here. Li is evaporated from the liquid lithium (LL) coated divertor strike-point surface due to the intense heat flux. The evaporated Li is readily ionized by the plasma due to its low ionization energy, and the poor Li particle confinement near the divertor plate enables ionized Li ions to radiate strongly, resulting in a significant reduction in the divertor heat flux. This radiative process has the desired effect of spreading the localized divertor heat load to the rest of the divertor chamber wall surfaces, facilitating the divertor heat removal. The LL coating of divertor surfaces can also provide a ‘sacrificial’ protective layer to protect the substrate solid material from transient high heat flux such as the ones caused by the edge localized modes. By operating at lower temperature than the first wall, the LL covered large divertor chamber wall surfaces can serve as an effective particle pump for the entire reactor chamber, as impurities generally migrate towards lower temperature LL divertor surfaces. To maintain the LL purity, a closed LL loop system with a modest circulating capacity (e.g., ˜1 l s-1 for ˜1% level ‘impurities’) is envisioned for a steady-state 1 GW-electric class fusion power plant.

  11. CaO insulator coatings on a vanadium-base alloy in liquid 2 at.% calcium-lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Kassner, T.F.

    1996-10-01

    The electrical resistance of CaO coatings produced on V-4%Cr-4%Ti and V-15%Cr-5%Ti by exposure of the alloy (round bottom samples 6-in. long by 0.25-in. dia.) to liquid lithium that contained 2 at.% dissolved calcium was measured as a function of time at temperatures between 300-464{degrees}C. The solute element, calcium in liquid lithium, reacted with the alloy substrate at these temperatures for 17 h to produce a calcium coating {approx}7-8 {mu}m thick. The calcium-coated vanadium alloy was oxidized to form a CaO coating. Resistance of the coating layer on V-15Cr-5Ti, measured in-situ in liquid lithium that contained 2 at.% calcium, was 1.0 x 10{sup 10} {Omega}-cm{sup 2} at 300{degrees}C and 400 h, and 0.9 x 10{sup 10} {Omega}-cm{sup 2} at 464{degrees}C and 300 h. Thermal cycling between 300 and 464{degrees}C changed the resistance of the coating layer, which followed insulator behavior. Examination of the specimen after cooling to room temperature revealed no cracks in the CaO coating. The coatings were evaluated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray analysis. Adhesion between CaO and vanadium alloys was enhanced as exposure time increased.

  12. Evaluation of the rate of uptake of nitrogen dioxide by atmospheric and surface liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.; Schwartz, S.E.

    1981-12-20

    The rate of uptake of NO/sub 2/ by liquid water according to (R1), 2NO/sub 2/(g)+H/sub 2/O(l)..-->..2H+NO/sub 3//sup -/+NO/sub 2//sup -/, is shown to be unaffected by O/sub 2/(0.2 atm). Hence the rate constant and Henry's law solubility constant of NO/sub 2/ previously obtained may be employed to evaluate the rates of aqueous phase reactions of NO/sub 2/ in the ambient atmosphere. Reactions (R1) and (R2), NO/sub 2/(g)+NO(g)+H/sub 2/O(l)..-->..2H/sup +/+2NO/sub 2//sup -/, are quite slow at representative atmospheric partial pressures and cloud liquid water content; the characteristic times range upward from 10/sup 3/--10/sup 4/ hours at 10/sup -7/ atm, increasing with decreasing partial pressures of the gases. Direct acidification of cloud liquid water by (R1) or (R2) is also unimportant. Catalytic enhancement of (R1) is potentially important for catalyst concentrations of order 10/sup -7/ M, assuming sufficiently fast rate constants (approx.10/sup 8/ M/sup -1/s/sup -1/). Iron-catalyzed reaction in particular, however, is found to be unimportant. Reaction of NO/sub 2/ with dissolved S(IV) is potentially important, based upon an assumed upper limit rate constant of 2.5 x 10/sup 7/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/. Deposition of NO/sub 2/ to surface (ocean or lake) water is shown to be controlled by aqueous phase mass transport and/or reaction and is much slower than heretofore assumed.

  13. Recent Progress in the NSTX/NSTX-U Lithium Program and Prospects for Reactor-Relevant Liquid-Lithium Based Divertor Development

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ono, et al.

    2012-10-27

    Developing a reactor compatible divertor has been identified as a particularly challenging technology problem for magnetic confinement fusion. While tungsten has been identified as the most attractive solid divertor material, the NSTX/NSTX-U lithium (Li) program is investigating the viability of liquid lithium (LL) as a potential reactor compatible divertor plasma facing component (PFC) . In the near term, operation in NSTX-U is projected to provide reactor-like divertor heat loads < 40 MW/m^2 for 5 s. During the most recent NSTX campaign, ~ 0.85 kg of Li was evaporated onto the NSTX PFCs where a ~50% reduction in heat load on the Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) was observed, attributable to enhanced divertor bolometric radiation. This reduced divertor heat flux through radiation observed in the NSTX LLD experiment is consistent with the results from other lithium experiments and calculations. These results motivate an LL-based closed radiative divertor concept proposed here for NSTX-U and fusion reactors. With an LL coating, the Li is evaporated from the divertor strike point surface due to the intense heat. The evaporated Li is readily ionized by the plasma due to its low ionization energies, and the ionized Li ions can radiate strongly, resulting in a significant reduction in the divertor heat flux. Due to the rapid plasma transport in divertor plasma, the radiation values can be significantly enhanced up to ~ 11 MJ/cc of LL. This radiative process has the desired function of spreading the focused divertor heat load to the entire divertor chamber facilitating the divertor heat removal. The LL divertor surface can also provide a "sacrificial" surface to protect the substrate solid material from transient high heat flux such as the ones caused by the ELMs. The closed radiative LLD concept has the advantages of providing some degree of partition in terms of plasma disruption forces on the LL, Li particle divertor retention, and strong divertor pumping action from the

  14. Fractionalization beyond Luttinger Liquid in the spectroscopy of Lithium Purple Bronze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natalia, Lera; Jose, Alvarez

    We offer an interpretation for the departures of ARPES and STS spectroscopies experiments in quasi-one-dimensional Lithium Purple Bronze (LiPB) from single-band Luttinger Liquid (LL) theory. We base our calculation on a phenomenological description of the published data proposed in the original experiments and consider two bands crossing the Fermi level. We discuss the breakdown of the LL scaling relation η = α - 1 , the separation of the spinon edge and the holon peak, the phenomenological TL fit to the Energy Distribution Curves (EDC) and the survival of power-like density of states down to 4K. We consider non-critical fluctuations in one of the separated modes in which the electron fractionalize, and discuss under which conditions could be related with the upturn in the resistivity at 20-30K. We discuss the possibility of a gap in such separated mode and its role on the robust one-dimensional behavior. The connection with the proposed triplet superconductivity is at T = 1 . 4 K is also studied. We acknowledge financial support from MINECO FIS2012-37549-C05-03.

  15. Lithium-sulfur batteries based on nitrogen-doped carbon and an ionic-liquid electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Guang; Wang, Xiqing; Mayes, Richard T; Dai, Sheng

    2012-10-01

    Nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon (NC) and sulfur were used to prepare an NC/S composite cathode, which was evaluated in an ionic-liquid electrolyte of 0.5 M lithium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) in methylpropylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide ([MPPY][TFSI]) by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and cycle testing. To facilitate the comparison, a C/S composite based on activated carbon (AC) without nitrogen doping was also fabricated under the same conditions. Compared with the AC/S composite, the NC/S composite showed enhanced activity toward sulfur reduction, as evidenced by the lower onset sulfur reduction potential, higher redox current density in the CV test, and faster charge-transfer kinetics, as indicated by EIS measurements. At room temperature under a current density of 84 mA g(-1) (C/20), the battery based on the NC/S composite exhibited a higher discharge potential and an initial capacity of 1420 mAh g(-1), whereas the battery based on the AC/S composite showed a lower discharge potential and an initial capacity of 1120 mAh g(-1). Both batteries showed similar capacity fading with cycling due to the intrinsic polysulfide solubility and the polysulfide shuttle mechanism; capacity fading can be improved by further cathode modification. PMID:22847977

  16. Ether and siloxane functionalized ionic liquids and their mixtures as electrolyte for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Santosh N; Tiwari, Aarti; Nagaiah, Tharamani C; Mandal, Debaprasad

    2016-06-28

    The present study deals with an investigation of two novel imidazolium ionic liquids bearing ether-ether (1O2O2-Im-2O1) or ether-siloxane (1O2O2-Im-1SiOSi) functionalities with TFSI anion and their mixtures with propylene carbonate as electrolytes in lithium-ion batteries. The electrochemical stability and conductivity of these novel ILs were analyzed by electrochemical studies, such as cyclic voltammetry, linear sweep voltammetry and impedance measurements. The applicability of these ILs as electrolytes in Li-ion batteries was studied in the presence of a high concentration of LiTFSI (1 mol kg(-1) electrolyte) and the ether-ether IL was shown to possess a high electrochemical stability window (ESW) of 5.9 V and good conductivity of 2.2 mS cm(-1). The electrochemical stability and conductivity were further complimented by self-diffusion of different ions using pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) NMR, viscosity and thermal properties like TGA and DSC analysis. More importantly, we explored the effect of temperature on the electrochemical stability and conductivity of these ILs by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. PMID:27004982

  17. Two-Dimensional Optical Measurement of Waves on Liquid Lithium Jet Simulating IFMIF Target Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kazuhiro Itoh; Hiroyuki Koterazawa; Taro Itoh; Yutaka Kukita; Hiroo Kondo; Nobuo Yamaoka; Hiroshi Horiike; Mizuho Ida; Hideo Nakamura; Hiroo Nakamura; Takeo Muroga

    2006-07-01

    Waves on a liquid-lithium jet flow, simulating a proposed high-energy beam target design, have been measured using an optical technique based on specular reflection of a single laser beam on the jet surface. The stream-wise and spanwise fluctuations of the local free-surface slope were least-square fitted with a sinusoidal curve to makeup the signals lost due to the constriction in the optical arrangement. The waveform was estimated with an assumption that wave phase speed can be calculated using the dispersion relation for linear capillary-gravity waves. The direction of propagation on the jet surface was also evaluated so that the wave amplitudes, calculated by integral of slope angle signal, agree consistently in stream-wise and spanwise direction. These measurements and analyses show that the waves at the measurement location for a jet velocity of 1.2 m/s can best be represented by oblique waves with an inclination of 1.23 rad, a wavelength of 3.8 mm and a wave amplitude of about 0.05 mm. (authors)

  18. How does lithium oxalyldifluoroborate enable the compatibility of ionic liquids and carbon-based capacitors?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Renjie; Chen, Yan; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Rong; He, Zhouying; Wu, Feng; Li, Li

    2015-02-01

    Lithium oxalyldifluoroborate (LiODFB) has several unique characteristics, such as high ionic conductivity over a wide temperature range and the ability to form and stabilize solid electrolyte interface films on graphite surfaces. A series of binary, room-temperature, molten electrolytes composed of LiODFB and organic compounds with acylamino groups (acetamide, oxazolidinone or OZO) have been synthesized. Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy indicates that Cdbnd O and N-H functional groups undergo blue or red shifts upon addition of LiODFB. The electrolytes have excellent thermal stabilities and electrochemical characteristics that allow them to be promising electrolytes for electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs). Here, we examine 1:5 molar ratio LiODFB and acetamide/OZO ionic liquid (IL) electrolytes in EDLCs. IL compatibility with two types of carbon-based electrodes is investigated theoretically and experimentally. We simulate possible structures and ion diameters for the ILs, which must be compatible with pore sizes of the carbon electrodes. Mesoporous activated carbon AC2, with a pore size similar to the ionic diameter of LiODFB-acetamide, has a specific capacitance of 154.2 Fg-1 at 20 m Ag-1. Additionally, typical capacitive and reversibility behaviors can be seen in the charge-discharge curves over 0-2 V. Finally, the EDLCs exhibit good charging/discharging performances.

  19. Lithium-sulfur batteries based on nitrogen-doped carbon and ionic liquid electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiao-Guang; Wang, Xiqing; Mayes, Richard T; Dai, Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon (NC) and sulfur were used to prepare an NC/S composite cathode, which was evaluated in an ionic liquid electrolyte of 0.5 M lithium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) in methylpropylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide (MPPY.TFSI) by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and cycle testing. To facilitate the comparison, a C/S composite based on activated carbon (AC) without nitrogen doping was also fabricated under the same conditions as those for the NC/S composite. Compared with the AC/S composite, the NC/S composite showed enhanced activity toward sulfur reduction, as evidenced by the early onset sulfur reduction potential, higher redox current density in the CV test, and faster charge transfer kinetics as indicated by EIS measurement. At room temperature under a current density of 84 mA g-1 (C/20), the battery based on the NC/S composite exhibited higher discharge potential and an initial capacity of 1420 mAh g-1 whereas that based on the AC/S composite showed lower discharge potential and an initial capacity of 1120 mAh g-1. Both batteries showed similar capacity fading with cycling due to the intrinsic polysulfide solubility and the polysulfide shuttle mechanism; the capacity fading can be improved by further modification of the cathode.

  20. Study on hydrogen isotopes permeation in fluidized state of liquid lithium-lead

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, S.; Yoshimura, R.; Okada, M.; Fukada, S.; Edao, Y.

    2015-03-15

    Lithium-lead (Li-Pb) is one of the most promising candidate materials for the liquid blanket of fusion reactors. Hydrogen transfer under a fluidized condition of Li-Pb is investigated experimentally to design a Li-Pb blanket system. Li-Pb eutectic alloy flows inside a Ni tube in the experimental system, where H{sub 2} permeates into and out of the forced Li-Pb flow. The overall H{sub 2} permeation rate is analyzed using a mass balance model. Hydrogen atoms diffuse in Ni and Li-Pb. The steady-state H{sub 2} permeation rate obtained by this experiment is smaller than the result of the calculation model. A resistance factor is introduced to the present analysis in order to evaluate the influence of other H{sub 2} transfer mechanisms, such as diffusion in Li-Pb and dissolution reaction between Ni and Li-Pb. The contribution of the resistance to the overall H{sub 2} permeation rate becomes large when the flow rate of Li-Pb is low. This is because the boundary layer thickness between Ni and Li-Pb affects the overall H{sub 2} permeation rate. When the flow velocity of Li-Pb increases, the thickness of the boundary layer becomes thin, and the driving force of H{sub 2} permeation through the Ni wall becomes bigger. (authors)

  1. Reactive Uptake of Ammonia and Formation of Organic Nitrogen Species for Non-Liquid/Liquid Secondary Organic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. T.; Li, Y.; Liu, P.

    2015-12-01

    Formation of ammonium and organic nitrogen (ON) species was studied for secondary organic material (SOM) of variable viscosity, ranging from non-liquid to liquid physical states. The SOM was produced as particles of 50 to 150 nm in diameter in aerosol form from six precursors, including three terpenoid and three aromatic species. The viscosity of the hygroscopic SOM was adjusted by exposure to relative humidity (RH) from <5% to >90% RH in steps of 10% at 293 ± 2 K. The aerosol was subsequently exposed to 5 ppm NH3 for mean reaction times of 30, 370, or 5230 s. Ammonium and ON were characterized by high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-AMS). The ammonium-to-organic ratio of mass concentrations (MNH4/MOrg) in the particles increased monotonically from <5% RH to a limiting value at a threshold RH, implicating a switchover in the reaction kinetics from a system limited by diffusivity within the SOM for low RH to one limited by other factors, such as saturated uptake, at higher RH. Formation of ON was observed for aromatic-derived SOMs, but not significant for terpenoid-derived SOMs. For aromatic-derived SOMs, the ON-to-organic ratio of mass concentrations (MON/MOrg) was negligible for RH <20%, increased monotonically from 20% to 60% RH, and stayed constant for RH >60%. The threshold RH for the switchover from kinetically controlled regime to a non-kinetically-controlled one was thus different between formation of ammonium and ON. This difference suggests that water may play a role in the slow reactions of ON formation as a reactant or a catalyst, in addition to affecting the reactant diffusion as in the fast reaction of ammonium formation. The implication is that formation of ammonium salts and organic nitrogen species by certain SOMs should be treated separately in chemical transport models to reflect the different roles of water that may affect the phase state of the SOMs or may act as a reactant or a catalyst.

  2. Effects of compatibility of polymer binders with solvate ionic liquid electrolytes on discharge and charge reactions of lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Toshitada; Ikoma, Ai; Kido, Ryosuke; Ueno, Kazuhide; Dokko, Kaoru; Watanabe, Masayoshi

    2016-03-01

    Electrochemical reactions in Li-S cells with a solvate ionic liquid (SIL) electrolyte composed of tetraglyme (G4) and Li[TFSA] (TFSA: bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide) are studied. The sulfur cathode (S cathode) comprises sulfur, carbon powder, and a polymer binder. Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA-x) with different degrees of saponification (x%) are used as binders to prepare the composite cathodes. For the Li-S cell containing PEO binder, lithium polysulfides (Li2Sm, 2 ≤ m ≤ 8), reaction intermediates of the S cathode, dissolve into the electrolyte, and Li2Sm acts as a redox shuttle in the Li-S cell. In contrast, in the Li-S cell with PVA-x binder, the dissolution of Li2Sm is suppressed, leading to high columbic efficiencies during charge-discharge cycles. The compatibility of the PVA-x binder with the SIL electrolyte changes depending on the degree of saponification. Decreasing the degree of saponification leads to increased electrolyte uptake by the PVA-x binder, increasing the charge and discharge capacities of Li-S cell. The rate capability of Li-S cell is also enhanced by the partial swelling of the PVA-x binder. The enhanced performance of Li-S cell containing PVA-x is attributed to the lowering of resistance of Li+ ion transport in the composite cathode.

  3. Electron Solvation in Liquid Ammonia: Lithium, Sodium, Magnesium, and Calcium as Electron Sources.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2016-03-10

    A free electron in solution, known as a solvated electron, is the smallest possible anion. Alkali and alkaline earth atoms serve as electron donors in solvents that mediate outer-sphere electron transfer. We report herein ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of lithium, sodium, magnesium, and calcium in liquid ammonia at 250 K. By analyzing the electronic properties and the ionic and solvation structures and dynamics, we systematically characterize these metals as electron donors and ammonia molecules as electron acceptors. We show that the solvated metal strongly modifies the properties of its solvation shells and that the observed effect is metal-specific. Specifically, the radius and charge exhibit major impacts. The single solvated electron present in the alkali metal systems is distributed more uniformly among the solvent molecules of each metal's two solvation shells. In contrast, alkaline earth metals favor a less uniform distribution of the electron density. Alkali and alkaline earth atoms are coordinated by four and six NH3 molecules, respectively. The smaller atoms, Li and Mg, are stronger electron donors than Na and Ca. This result is surprising, as smaller atoms in a column of the periodic table have higher ionization potentials. However, it can be explained by stronger electron donor-acceptor interactions between the smaller atoms and the solvent molecules. The structure of the first solvation shell is sharpest for Mg, which has a large charge and a small radius. Solvation is weakest for Na, which has a small charge and a large radius. Weak solvation leads to rapid dynamics, as reflected in the diffusion coefficients of NH3 molecules of the first two solvation shells and the Na atom. The properties of the solvated electrons established in the present study are important for radiation chemistry, synthetic chemistry, condensed-matter charge transfer, and energy sources. PMID:26886153

  4. Lithium purification technique

    DOEpatents

    Keough, R.F.; Meadows, G.E.

    1984-01-10

    A method for purifying liquid lithium to remove unwanted quantities of nitrogen or aluminum. The method involves precipitation of aluminum nitride by adding a reagent to the liquid lithium. The reagent will be either nitrogen or aluminum in a quantity adequate to react with the unwanted quantity of the impurity to form insoluble aluminum nitride. The aluminum nitride can be mechanically separated from the molten liquid lithium.

  5. Lithium purification technique

    DOEpatents

    Keough, Robert F.; Meadows, George E.

    1985-01-01

    A method for purifying liquid lithium to remove unwanted quantities of nitrogen or aluminum. The method involves precipitation of aluminum nitride by adding a reagent to the liquid lithium. The reagent will be either nitrogen or aluminum in a quantity adequate to react with the unwanted quantity of the impurity to form insoluble aluminum nitride. The aluminum nitride can be mechanically separated from the molten liquid lithium.

  6. Effect of liquid uptake on critical heat flux utilizing a three dimensional, interconnected alumina nano porous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    June Zhang, Bong; Kim, Kwang J.

    2012-07-01

    In this letter, we propose a three dimensional, interconnected alumina nano porous surface (ANPS), which shows significant critical heat flux (CHF) and a reduction of wall superheat. ANPS is versatile in morphology modifications such as thickness and pore diameter and is used to enhance heat transfer. Structurally well-defined, porous wicks are efficient to absorb and spread liquid into a porous matrix. To characterize various surface wetting environments, synthetic approaches of wetting and liquid absorption have been carried out. We have studied the quantitative evaluation of liquid uptake utilizing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The CHF augment trend is well matched with the amount of liquid absorbed into the porous media, pre-determined by the EIS.

  7. Liquid-phase plasma synthesis of silicon quantum dots embedded in carbon matrix for lithium battery anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Ying; Yu, Hang; Li, Haitao; Ming, Hai; Pan, Keming; Huang, Hui; Liu, Yang; Kang, Zhenhui

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Silicon quantum dots embedded in carbon matrix (SiQDs/C) were fabricated. • SiQDs/C exhibits excellent battery performance as anode materials with high specific capacity. • The good performance was attributed to the marriage of small sized SiQDs and carbon. - Abstract: Silicon quantum dots embedded in carbon matrix (SiQDs/C) nanocomposites were prepared by a novel liquid-phase plasma assisted synthetic process. The SiQDs/C nanocomposites were demonstrated to show high specific capacity, good cycling life and high coulmbic efficiency as anode materials for lithium-ion battery.

  8. A Long-Life Lithium Ion Battery with Enhanced Electrode/Electrolyte Interface by Using an Ionic Liquid Solution.

    PubMed

    Elia, Giuseppe Antonio; Ulissi, Ulderico; Mueller, Franziska; Reiter, Jakub; Tsiouvaras, Nikolaos; Sun, Yang-Kook; Scrosati, Bruno; Passerini, Stefano; Hassoun, Jusef

    2016-05-10

    In this paper, we report an advanced long-life lithium ion battery, employing a Pyr14 TFSI-LiTFSI non-flammable ionic liquid (IL) electrolyte, a nanostructured tin carbon (Sn-C) nanocomposite anode, and a layered LiNi1/3 Co1/3 Mn1/3 O2 (NMC) cathode. The IL-based electrolyte is characterized in terms of conductivity and viscosity at various temperatures, revealing a Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher (VTF) trend. Lithium half-cells employing the Sn-C anode and NMC cathode in the Pyr14 TFSI-LiTFSI electrolyte are investigated by galvanostatic cycling at various temperatures, demonstrating the full compatibility of the electrolyte with the selected electrode materials. The NMC and Sn-C electrodes are combined into a cathode-limited full cell, which is subjected to prolonged cycling at 40 °C, revealing a very stable capacity of about 140 mAh g(-1) and retention above 99 % over 400 cycles. The electrode/electrolyte interface is further characterized through a combination of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigations upon cell cycling. The remarkable performances reported here definitively indicate that IL-based lithium ion cells are suitable batteries for application in electric vehicles. PMID:26990320

  9. A membrane-free lithium/polysulfide semi-liquid battery for large-scale energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yuan; Zheng, Guangyuan; Cui, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale energy storage represents a key challenge for renewable energy and new systems with low cost, high energy density and long cycle life are desired. In this article, we develop a new lithium/polysulfide (Li/PS) semi-liquid battery for large-scale energy storage, with lithium polysulfide (Li{sub 2}S{sub 8}) in ether solvent as a catholyte and metallic lithium as an anode. Unlike previous work on Li/S batteries with discharge products such as solid state Li{sub 2}S{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}S, the catholyte is designed to cycle only in the range between sulfur and Li{sub 2}S{sub 4}. Consequently all detrimental effects due to the formation and volume expansion of solid Li{sub 2}S{sub 2}/Li{sub 2}S are avoided. This novel strategy results in excellent cycle life and compatibility with flow battery design. The proof-of-concept Li/PS battery could reach a high energy density of 170 W h kg{sup -1} and 190 W h L{sup -1} for large scale storage at the solubility limit, while keeping the advantages of hybrid flow batteries. We demonstrated that, with a 5 M Li{sub 2}S{sub 8} catholyte, energy densities of 97 W h kg{sup -1} and 108 W h L{sup -1} can be achieved. As the lithium surface is well passivated by LiNO{sub 3} additive in ether solvent, internal shuttle effect is largely eliminated and thus excellent performance over 2000 cycles is achieved with a constant capacity of 200 mA h g{sup -1}. This new system can operate without the expensive ion-selective membrane, and it is attractive for large-scale energy storage.

  10. Determination of ginsenoside compound K in human plasma by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry of lithium adducts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yunhui; Lu, Youming; Yang, Yong; Chen, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Liang; Zhong, Dafang

    2015-01-01

    Ginsenoside compound K (GCK), the main metabolite of protopanaxadiol constituents of Panax ginseng, easily produces alkali metal adduct ions during mass spectrometry particularly with lithium. Accordingly, we have developed a rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometric method for analysis of GCK in human plasma based on formation of a lithium adduct. The analyte and paclitaxel (internal standard) were extracted from 50 µL human plasma using methyl tert-butyl ether. Chromatographic separation was performed on a Phenomenex Gemini C18 column (50 mm×2.0 mm; 5 μm) using stepwise gradient elution with acetonitrile–water and 0.2 mmol/L lithium carbonate at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. Detection was performed in the positive ion mode using multiple reaction monitoring of the transitions at m/z 629→449 for the GCK-lithium adduct and m/z 860→292 for the adduct of paclitaxel. The assay was linear in the concentration range 1.00–1000 ng/mL (r2>0.9988) with intra- and inter-day precision of ±8.4% and accuracy in the range of −4.8% to 6.5%. Recovery, stability and matrix effects were all satisfactory. The method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study involving administration of a single GCK 50 mg tablet to healthy Chinese volunteers. PMID:26579476

  11. Enhanced low-temperature lithium storage performance of multilayer graphene made through an improved ionic liquid-assisted synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raccichini, Rinaldo; Varzi, Alberto; Chakravadhanula, Venkata Sai Kiran; Kübel, Christian; Balducci, Andrea; Passerini, Stefano

    2015-05-01

    The electrochemical properties of graphene are strongly depending on its synthesis. Between the different methods proposed so far, liquid phase exfoliation turns out to be a promising method for the production of graphene. Unfortunately, the low yield of this technique, in term of solid material obtained, still limit its use to small scale applications. In this article we propose a low cost and environmentally friendly method for producing multilayer crystalline graphene with high yield. Such innovative approach, involving an improved ionic liquid assisted, microwave exfoliation of expanded graphite, allows the production of graphene with advanced lithium ion storage performance, for the first time, at low temperatures (<0 °C), as low as -30 °C, with respect to commercially available graphite.

  12. Bis(fluoromalonato)borate (BFMB) Anion Based Ionic Liquid As an Additive for Lithium-Ion Battery Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiao-Guang; Liao, Chen; Baggetto, Loic; Guo, Bingkun; Unocic, Raymond R; Veith, Gabriel M; Dai, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Propylene carbonate (PC) is a good solvent for lithium ion battery applications due to its low melting point and high dielectric constant. However, PC is easily intercalated into graphite causing it to exfoliate, killing its electrochemical performance. Here we report on the synthesis of a new ionic liquid electrolyte based on partially fluorinated borate anion, 1-butyl-1,2-dimethylimidazolium bis(fluoromalonato)borate (BDMIm.BFMB), which can be used as an additive in 1 M LiPF6/PC electrolyte to suppress graphite exfoliation and improve cycling performance. In addition, both PC and BDMIm.BFMB can be used synergistically as additive to 1.0M LiPF6/methyl isopropyl sulfone (MIPS) to dramatically improve its cycling performance. It is also found that the chemistry nature of the ionic liquids has dramatic effect on their role as additive in PC based electrolyte.

  13. Synthesis and Compatibility of Ionic Liquid Containing Rod-Coil Polyimide Gel Electrolytes with Lithium Metal Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tigelaar, Dean M.; Palker, Allyson E.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Bennett, William R.

    2008-01-01

    A highly cross-linked polyimide-polyethylene oxide copolymer has been synthesized that is capable of holding large volumes of liquid component, simultaneously maintaining good dimensional stability. An amine end capped oligomer was made that was imidized in solution, followed by reaction with a triisocyanate in the presence of desired additives at ambient temperature. Polymer films are able to hold over 4 times their weight in room temperature ionic liquid RTIL or carbonate solvent. Electrolytes were studied that contained varying amounts of RTIL, lithium trifluoromethanesulfonimide LiTFSi, and alumina nanoparticles. Electrochemical stability of these electrolytes with lithium metal electrodes was studied by galvanic cycling and impedance spectroscopy. Improved cycling stability and decreased interfacial resistance were observed when increasing amounts of RTIL and LiTFSi were added. The addition of small amounts of alumina further decreased interfacial resistance by nearly an order of magnitude. During the course of the study, cycling stability increased from less than 3 to greater than 1000 h at 60 C and 0.25 mA/cm2 current density.

  14. Rapid and simple pretreatment of human body fluids using electromembrane extraction across supported liquid membrane for capillary electrophoretic determination of lithium.

    PubMed

    Strieglerová, Lenka; Kubáň, Pavel; Boček, Petr

    2011-05-01

    Electromembrane extraction was used for simultaneous sample cleanup and preconcentration of lithium from untreated human body fluids. The sample of a body fluid was diluted 100 times with 0.5 mM Tris solution and lithium was extracted by electromigration through a supported liquid membrane composed of 1-octanol into 100 mM acetic acid acceptor solution. Matrix compounds, such as proteins, red blood cells, and other high-molecular-weight compounds were efficiently retained on the supported liquid membrane. The liquid membrane was anchored in pores of a short segment of a polypropylene hollow fiber, which represented a low cost, single use, disposable extraction unit and was discarded after each use. Acceptor solutions were analyzed using capillary electrophoresis with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (CE-C(4) D) and baseline separation of lithium was achieved in a background electrolyte solution consisting of 18 mM L-histidine and 40 mM acetic acid at pH 4.6. Repeatability of the electromembrane extraction-CE-C(4) D method was evaluated for the determination of lithium in standard solutions and real samples and was better than 0.6 and 8.2% for migration times and peak areas, respectively. The concentration limit of detection of 9 nM was achieved. The developed method was applied to the determination of lithium in urine, blood serum, blood plasma, and whole blood at both endogenous and therapeutic concentration levels. PMID:21500213

  15. Preliminary assessment of interactions between the FMIT deuteron beam and liquid-lithium target

    SciTech Connect

    Hassberger, J A

    1983-03-01

    Scoping calculations were performed to assess the limit of response of the FMIT lithium target to the deuteron-beam interactions. Results indicate that most response modes have acceptably minor impacts on the lithium-target behavior. Individual modes of response were studied separately to assess sensitivity of the target to various phenomena and to identify those needing detailed evaluation. A few responses are of sufficient magnitude to warrant further investigation. Potential for several different responses combining additively is identified as the major area requiring further consideration.

  16. Brillouin Scattering Study of Liquid Glass Transition in Lithium Borate Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ike, Yuji; Matsuda, Yu; Kojima, Seiji; Kodama, Masao

    2006-05-01

    Elastic properties of different compositions of lithium borate glasses xLi2O\\cdot(1-x)B2O3 (x=0.06--0.28) were investigated in the temperature range from 25 to 600 °C by Brillouin scattering spectroscopy. The composition dependence of the lithium borate glass system shows a stiffening tendency and a higher onset temperature of softening with increasing mole fraction of Li2O. We successfully observed the change in longitudinal elastic modulus in the vicinity of the glass transition temperature (Tg). The elastic moduli show a marked temperature dependence above the glass transition temperature Tg, while they show little change below Tg. These results strongly relate to the structural conversion of cross-linking borate units from triangular BO3 to tetrahedral BO4 units by the addition of Li2O. The increase in lithium oxide enhances the glass network integrity in the composition range of this study. A significant decrease in the elastic modulus above Tg can be attributed to the association of boroxol ring deformation and a change in the coordination number of boron atoms. These elastic properties were discussed in comparison with lithium silicate glass.

  17. Method of forming single crystals of beta silicon carbide using liquid lithium as a solvent

    DOEpatents

    Lundberg, Lynn B.

    1982-01-01

    A method of growing single crystals of beta SiC from solution using molten lithium as a solvent for polycrystalline SiC feed material. Reasonable growth rates are accomplished at temperatures in the range of about 1330.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C.

  18. Effect of ion structure on conductivity in lithium-doped ionic liquid electrolytes: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongjun; Maginn, Edward

    2013-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to examine the role cation and anion structure have on the performance of ionic liquid (IL) electrolytes for lithium conduction over the temperature range of 320-450 K. Two model ionic liquids were studied: 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide ([bmim][Tf2N]) and 1-butyl-4-methylpyridinium pyrrolide ([bmpyr][pyl]) doped with Li[Tf2N] and Li[pyl], respectively. The results have demonstrated that the Li+ doped IL containing the planar [bmpyr] cation paired with the planar [pyl] anion significantly outperformed the [bmim][Tf2N] IL. The different coordination of Li+ with the [Tf2N]- or [pyl]- anions produces a remarkable change in IL structure with a concomitant effect on the transport of all ions. For the doped [bmim][Tf2N], each Li+ is coordinated by four oxygen atoms from [Tf2N]- anions. Formation of a rigid structure between Li+ and [Tf2N]- induces a decrease in the mobility of all ions. In contrast, for the doped [bmpyr][pyl], each Li+ is coordinated by two nitrogen atoms from [pyl]- anions. The original alternating structure cation|anion|cation in the neat [bmpyr][pyl] is replaced by another alternating structure cation|anion|Li+|anion|cation in the doped [bmpyr][pyl]. Increases of Li+ mole fraction in doped [bmpyr][pyl] affects the dynamics to a much lesser extent compared with [bmim][Tf2N] and leads to reduced diffusivities of cations and anions, but little change in the dynamics of Li+. More importantly, the calculations predict that the Li+ ion conductivity of doped [bmpyr][pyl] is comparable to that observed in organic liquid electrolytes and is about an order of magnitude higher than that of doped [bmim][Tf2N]. Such Li+ conductivity improvement suggests that this and related ILs may be promising candidates for use as electrolytes in lithium ion batteries and capacitors.

  19. Sulfonic Acid- and Lithium Sulfonate-Grafted Poly(Vinylidene Fluoride) Electrospun Mats As Ionic Liquid Host for Electrochromic Device and Lithium-Ion Battery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rui; Liu, Wanshuang; Leong, Yew Wei; Xu, Jianwei; Lu, Xuehong

    2015-08-01

    Electrospun polymer nanofibrous mats loaded with ionic liquids (ILs) are promising nonvolatile electrolytes with high ionic conductivity. The large cations of ILs are, however, difficult to diffuse into solid electrodes, making them unappealing for application in some electrochemical devices. To address this issue, a new strategy is used to introduce proton conduction into an IL-based electrolyte. Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (P(VDF-HFP)) copolymer is functionalized with sulfonic acid through covalent attachment of taurine. The sulfonic acid-grafted P(VDF-HFP) electrospun mats consist of interconnected nanofibers, leading to remarkable improvement in dimensional stability of the mats. IL-based polymer electrolytes are prepared by immersing the modified mats in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIM(+)BF4(-)). It is found that the SO3(-) groups can have Lewis acid-base interactions with the cations (BMIM(+)) of IL to promote the dissociation of ILs, and provide additional proton conduction, resulting in significantly improved ionic conductivity. Using this novel electrolyte, polyaniline-based electrochromic devices show higher transmittance contrast and faster switching behavior. Furthermore, the sulfonic acid-grafted P(VDF-HFP) electrospun mats can also be lithiated, giving additional lithium ion conduction for the IL-based electrolyte, with which Li/LiCoO2 batteries display enhanced C-rate performance. PMID:26167794

  20. Lithium orotate, carbonate and chloride: pharmacokinetics, polyuria in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D F

    1976-01-01

    1 The pharmacokinetics of the lithium ion administered as lithium orotate were studied in rats. Parallel studies were carried out with lithium carbonate and lithium chloride. 2 No differences in the uptake, distribution and excretion of the lithium ion were observed between lithium orotate, lithium carbonate and lithium chloride after single intraperitoneal, subcutaneous or intragastric injections (0.5-1.0 mEq lithium/kg) or after administration of the lithium salts for 20 days in the food. 3 The findings oppose the notion that the pharmacokinetics of the lithium ion given as lithium orotate differ from lithium chloride or lithium carbonate. 4 Polyuria and polydipsia developed more slowly in rats given lithium orotate than in those given lithium carbonate or lithium chloride, perhaps due to an effect of the orotate anion. PMID:1260219

  1. A high performance ceramic-polymer separator for lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jitendra; Kichambare, Padmakar; Rai, Amarendra K.; Bhattacharya, Rabi; Rodrigues, Stanley; Subramanyam, Guru

    2016-01-01

    A three-layered (ceramic-polymer-ceramic) hybrid separator was prepared by coating ceramic electrolyte [lithium aluminum germanium phosphate (LAGP)] over both sides of polyethylene (PE) polymer membrane using electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) technique. Ionic conductivities of membranes were evaluated after soaking PE and LAGP/PE/LAGP membranes in a 1 Molar (1M) lithium hexafluroarsenate (LiAsF6) electrolyte in ethylene carbonate (EC), dimethyl carbonate (DMC) and ethylmethyl carbonate (EMC) in volume ratio (1:1:1). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques were employed to evaluate morphology and structure of the separators before and after cycling performance tests to better understand structure-property correlation. As compared to regular PE separator, LAGP/PE/LAGP hybrid separator showed: (i) higher liquid electrolyte uptake, (ii) higher ionic conductivity, (iii) lower interfacial resistance with lithium and (iv) lower cell voltage polarization during lithium cycling at high current density of 1.3 mA cm-2 at room temperature. The enhanced performance is attributed to higher liquid uptake, LAGP-assisted faster ion conduction and dendrite prevention. Optimization of density and thickness of LAGP layer on PE or other membranes through manipulation of PVD deposition parameters will enable practical applications of this novel hybrid separator in rechargeable lithium batteries with high energy, high power, longer cycle life, and higher safety level.

  2. Optimum Reflector Configurations for Minimizing Fission Power Peaking in a Lithium-Cooled, Liquid-Metal Reactor with Sliding Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, Michael L.; Poston, David I.

    2005-02-06

    Many design constraints limit the development of a space fission power system optimized for fuel performance, system reliability, and mission cost. These design constraints include fuel mass provisions to meet cycle-length requirements, fuel centerline and clad temperatures, and clad creep from fission gas generation. Decreasing the fission power peaking of the reactor system enhances all of the mentioned parameters. This design study identifies the cause, determines the reflector configurations for reactor criticality, and generates worth curves for minimized fission-power-peaking configuration in a lithium-cooled liquid-metal reactor that uses sliding reflectors. Because of the characteristics of the core axial power distribution and axial power distortions inherent to the sliding reflector design, minimizing the power peaking of the reactor involves placing the reflectors in a position that least distorts the axial power distribution. The views expressed in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect agreement by the Government.

  3. Note: Proton irradiation at kilowatt-power and neutron production from a free-surface liquid-lithium target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfon, S.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Paul, M.; Weissman, L.; Aviv, O.; Berkovits, D.; Dudovitch, O.; Eisen, Y.; Eliyahu, I.; Feinberg, G.; Haquin, G.; Hazenshprung, N.; Kreisel, A.; Mardor, I.; Shimel, G.; Shor, A.; Silverman, I.; Tessler, M.; Yungrais, Z.

    2014-05-01

    The free-surface Liquid-Lithium Target, recently developed at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), was successfully used with a 1.9 MeV, 1.2 mA (2.3 kW) continuous-wave proton beam. Neutrons (˜2 × 1010 n/s having a peak energy of ˜27 keV) from the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction were detected with a fission-chamber detector and by gold activation targets positioned in the forward direction. The setup is being used for nuclear astrophysics experiments to study neutron-induced reactions at stellar energies and to demonstrate the feasibility of accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

  4. Note: Proton irradiation at kilowatt-power and neutron production from a free-surface liquid-lithium target

    SciTech Connect

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Weissman, L.; Aviv, O.; Berkovits, D.; Dudovitch, O.; Eisen, Y.; Eliyahu, I.; Haquin, G.; Hazenshprung, N.; Kreisel, A.; Mardor, I.; Shimel, G.; Shor, A.; Silverman, I.; Yungrais, Z.; Paul, M. Tessler, M.

    2014-05-15

    The free-surface Liquid-Lithium Target, recently developed at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), was successfully used with a 1.9 MeV, 1.2 mA (2.3 kW) continuous-wave proton beam. Neutrons (∼2 × 10{sup 10} n/s having a peak energy of ∼27 keV) from the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction were detected with a fission-chamber detector and by gold activation targets positioned in the forward direction. The setup is being used for nuclear astrophysics experiments to study neutron-induced reactions at stellar energies and to demonstrate the feasibility of accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

  5. Liquid oxygen LOX compatibility evaluations of aluminum lithium (Al-Li) alloys: Investigation of the Alcoa 2090 and MMC weldalite 049 alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.

    1989-01-01

    The behavior of liquid oxygen (LOX) compatibility of aluminum lithium (Al-Li) alloys is investigated. Alloy systems of Alcoa 2090, vintages 1 to 3, and of Martin Marietta Corporation (MMC) Weldalite 049 were evaluated for their behavior related to the LOX compatibility employing liquid oxygen impact test conditions under ambient pressures and up to 1000 psi. The developments of these aluminum lithium alloys are of critical and significant interest because of their lower densities and higher specific strengths and improved mechanical properties at cryogenic temperatures. Of the different LOX impact tests carried out at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), it is seen that in certain test conditions at higher pressures, not all Al-Li alloys are LOX compatible. In case of any reactivity, it appears that lithium makes the material more sensitive at grain boundaries due to microstructural inhomogeneities and associated precipitate free zones (PFZ). The objectives were to identify and rationalize the microstructural mechanisms that could be relaxed to LOX compatibility behavior of the alloy system in consideration. The LOX compatibility behavior of Al-Li 2090 and Weldalite 049 is analyzed in detail using microstructural characterization techniques with light optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe analysis, and surface studies using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), electron spectroscopy in chemical analysis (ESCA) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Differences in the behavior of these aluminum lithium alloys are assessed and related to their chemistry, heat treatment conditions, and microstructural effects.

  6. Method and apparatus to produce and maintain a thick, flowing, liquid lithium first wall for toroidal magnetic confinement DT fusion reactors

    DOEpatents

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    A system for forming a thick flowing liquid metal, in this case lithium, layer on the inside wall of a toroid containing the plasma of a deuterium-tritium fusion reactor. The presence of the liquid metal layer or first wall serves to prevent neutron damage to the walls of the toroid. A poloidal current in the liquid metal layer is oriented so that it flows in the same direction as the current in a series of external magnets used to confine the plasma. This current alignment results in the liquid metal being forced against the wall of the toroid. After the liquid metal exits the toroid it is pumped to a heat extraction and power conversion device prior to being reentering the toroid.

  7. Addition of a thin-film inorganic solid electrolyte (Lipon) as a protective film in lithium batteries with a liquid electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudney, Nancy J.

    Three rechargeable lithium cells have been fabricated using thin films of Li and sputter-deposited Li xMn 2- yO 4 as the electrodes, and a LiPF 6 organic liquid electrolyte. Cells were cycled up to 18 times between 4.5 and 2.5 V at 25°C both with and without the addition of the thin-film lithium phosphorus oxynitride solid electrolyte, known as Lipon. Of the cells tested, the Lipon film was most effective in maximizing the capacity and cycling efficiency when deposited in direct contact with the cathode; however, a significant improvement over the Lipon-free cell was also observed with Lipon sandwiched between layers of the liquid electrolyte. In the latter case, the Lipon was deposited onto a microporous polypropylene separator membrane.

  8. Ionic liquid based lithium battery electrolytes: fundamental benefits of utilising both TFSI and FSI anions?

    PubMed

    Kerner, M; Plylahan, N; Scheers, J; Johansson, P

    2015-07-15

    Several IL based electrolytes with an imidazolium cation (EMI) have been investigated trying to elucidate a possible beneficial effect of mixing FSI and TFSI anions in terms of physico-chemical properties and especially Li(+) solvation. All electrolytes were evaluated in terms of phase transitions, densities and viscosities, thermal stabilities, ionic conductivities and local structure, i.e. charge carriers. The electrolytes with up to 20% of Li-salts showed to be promising for high temperature lithium ion battery application (ca. 100 °C) and a synergetic effect of having mixed anions is discernible with the LiTFSI0.2EMIFSI0.8 electrolyte giving the best overall performance. The determination of the charge carriers revealed the SN to be ca. 2 for all analysed electrolytes, and proved the analysis of the mixed anion electrolytes to be challenging and inherently leads to an ambiguous picture of the Li(+) solvation. PMID:26147418

  9. Suppressive effect of lithium phosphorous oxynitride at carbon anode on solvent decomposition in liquid electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kwang-il; Park, Jong-Guen; Kim, Woo-Seong; Sung, Yung-Eun; Choi, Yong-Kook

    The irreversible capacity during the first cycle is investigated at a carbon electrode in a Li-ion battery in 1 M LiPF 6/EC:DEC (ethylene carbonate:1,2 diethyl carbonate; 1:1 volume ratio). Solvent decomposition is one of main causes of the initial irreversible capacity. A lithium phosphorus oxynitride (LiPON) thin-film, which is a solid ionic conductor, is deposited on the surface of the carbon electrode by means of a radio frequency magnetron sputtering system. The effect of the LiPON layer is examined with chronopotentiometry and cyclic voltammetry, as well as with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The deposition of LiPON on the surface of the carbon electrode results in a decrease in the initial irreversible capacity due to the suppression of solvent decomposition on the electrode surface.

  10. Quantum-dot lithium in zero magnetic field: Electronic properties, thermodynamics, and Fermi liquid-Wigner solid crossover in the ground state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, S. A.

    2002-03-01

    Energy spectra, electron densities, pair-correlation functions, and heat capacity of quantum-dot lithium in zero external magnetic field (a system of three interacting two-dimensional electrons in a parabolic confinement potential) are studied using the exact diagonalization approach. Particular attention is given to a Fermi liquid-Wigner solid crossover in the ground state of the dot, induced by intradot Coulomb interaction.

  11. Demonstration of a high-intensity neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Arenshtam, A; Kijel, D; Paul, M; Weissman, L; Berkovits, D; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Kreisel, A; Mardor, I; Shimel, G; Shor, A; Silverman, I; Tessler, M

    2015-12-01

    A free surface liquid-lithium jet target is operating routinely at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), bombarded with a ~1.91 MeV, ~1.2 mA continuous-wave narrow proton beam. The experiments demonstrate the liquid lithium target (LiLiT) capability to constitute an intense source of epithermal neutrons, for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The target dissipates extremely high ion beam power densities (>3 kW/cm(2), >0.5 MW/cm(3)) for long periods of time, while maintaining stable conditions and localized residual activity. LiLiT generates ~3×10(10) n/s, which is more than one order of magnitude larger than conventional (7)Li(p,n)-based near threshold neutron sources. A shield and moderator assembly for BNCT, with LiLiT irradiated with protons at 1.91 MeV, was designed based on Monte Carlo (MCNP) simulations of BNCT-doses produced in a phantom. According to these simulations it was found that a ~15 mA near threshold proton current will apply the therapeutic doses in ~1h treatment duration. According to our present results, such high current beams can be dissipated in a liquid-lithium target, hence the target design is readily applicable for accelerator-based BNCT. PMID:26300076

  12. Structures and Electronic Properties of Lithium Chelate-Based Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Si, Dawei; Chen, Kexian; Yao, Jia; Li, Haoran

    2016-04-28

    The conformations, electronic properties, and interaction energies of four chelate-based ionic liquids [Li(EA)][Tf2N], [Li(HDA)][Tf2N], [Li(DEA)][Tf2N], and [Li(DOBA)][Tf2N] have been theoretically explored. The reliability of the located conformers has been confirmed via the comparison between the simulated and experimental infrared spectra. Our results show that the N-Li and O-Li coordinate bonds in cation are elongated as the numbers of coordinate heteroatoms of alkanolamine ligands to Li(+) increased. Also the binding energies between Li(+) and ligands are increased and the interaction energies between cations and Tf2N anion are decreased. The cation-anion interaction energies follow the order of [Li(DOBA)][Tf2N] < [Li(HDA)][Tf2N] < [Li(DEA)][Tf2N] < [Li(EA)][Tf2N], which fall within the energetic ranges of conventional ionic liquids. Interestingly, the strongest stabilization orbital interactions in these ionic liquids and their cations revealed by the natural bond orbital analysis lie in the interaction between the lone pair (LP) of the coordinate heteroatoms in ligands or anion as donors and the vacant valence shell nonbonding orbital (LP*) of Li(+) as acceptors, which are very different from that of conventional ionic liquids. Moreover, the charges transferred from cations to anion are quite similar, and the charge of Li(+) is proposed for possibly predicting the order of the interaction energies of ionic liquids in series. The present study allows for the deeper understanding the differences between chelate-based ionic liquids and conventional ionic liquids. PMID:27070194

  13. Manganese uptake of imprinted polymers

    DOE Data Explorer

    Susanna Ventura

    2015-09-30

    Batch tests of manganese imprinted polymers of variable composition to assess their ability to extract lithium and manganese from synthetic brines at T=45C . Data on manganese uptake for two consecutive cycles are included.

  14. Lithium(I) in liquid ammonia: A quantum mechanical charge field (QMCF) molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasetyo, Niko; Canaval, Lorenz R.; Wijaya, Karna; Armunanto, Ria

    2015-01-01

    The solvation of Li(I) in liquid ammonia has been investigated by an ab initio quantum mechanical charge-field molecular dynamics (QMCF-MD) simulation. Being the first simulation of a metal cation in liquid ammonia employing this methodology, the work yields a wide range of accurate structural and dynamical data. Li(I) is tetrahedrally coordinated by four ammonia molecules in the first solvation shell at a distance of 2.075 Å. Two ligand exchange attempts have been observed within 12 ps of simulation time. The second solvation shell shows a more labile structure with numerous successful exchanges. The results are in excellent agreement with experiments.

  15. Ionic liquid enabled FeS2 for high-energy-density lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Evans, Tyler; Piper, Daniela Molina; Kim, Seul Cham; Han, Sang Sub; Bhat, Vinay; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Lee, Se-Hee

    2014-11-19

    High-energy-density FeS2 cathodes en-abled by a bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (TFSI-) anion-based room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) electrolyte are demonstrated. A TFSI-based ionic liquid (IL) significantly mitigates polysulfide dissolution, and therefore the parasitic redox shuttle mechanism, that plagues sulfur-based electrode chemistries. FeS2 stabilization with a TFSI(-) -based IL results in one of the highest energy density cathodes, 542 W h kg(-1) (normalized to cathode composite mass), reported to date. PMID:25236752

  16. Innovative application of ionic liquid to separate Al and cathode materials from spent high-power lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xianlai; Li, Jinhui

    2014-04-30

    Because of the increasing number of electric vehicles, there is an urgent need for effective recycling technologies to recapture the significant amount of valuable metals contained in spent lithium-ion batteries (LiBs). Previous studies have indicated, however, that Al and cathode materials were quite difficult to separate due to the strong binding force supplied by the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), which was employed to bind cathode materials and Al foil. This research devoted to seek a new method of melting the PVDF binder with heated ionic liquid (IL) to separate Al foil and cathode materials from the spent high-power LiBs. Theoretical analysis based on Fourier's law was adopted to determine the heat transfer mechanism of cathode material and to examine the relationship between heating temperature and retention time. All the experimental and theoretic results show that peel-off rate of cathode materials from Al foil could reach 99% when major process parameters were controlled at 180°C heating temperature, 300 rpm agitator rotation, and 25 min retention time. The results further imply that the application of IL for recycling Al foil and cathode materials from spent high-power LiBs is highly efficient, regardless of the application source of the LiBs or the types of cathode material. This study endeavors to make a contribution to an environmentally sound and economically viable solution to the challenge of spent LiB recycling. PMID:24607415

  17. Novel polymer electrolytes based on thermoplastic polyurethane and ionic liquid/lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide/propylene carbonate salt system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavall, R. L.; Ferrari, S.; Tomasi, C.; Marzantowicz, M.; Quartarone, E.; Magistris, A.; Mustarelli, P.; Lazzaroni, S.; Fagnoni, M.

    Polymer electrolytes were prepared from thermoplastic polyurethane with addition of mixture of ionic liquid N-ethyl(methylether)-N-methylpyrrolidinium trifluoromethanesulfonimmide (PYRA 12O1TFSI), lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfoneimide) salt and propylene carbonate. The electrolytes characterization was performed by thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry and scanning electron microscopy. The electrical properties were investigated in detail by impedance spectroscopy with the aid of equivalent circuit fitting of the impedance spectra. A model describing temperature evolution of ionic conductivity and the properties of electrolyte/blocking electrode interface was developed. The electrochemical stability of the electrolytes was studied by linear voltammetry. Our results indicate that the studied electrolytes have good self-standing characteristics, and also a sufficient level of thermal stability and a fairly good electrochemical window. The ionic conductivity increases with increasing amount of mixture, and the character of temperature dependence of conductivity indicates decoupling of ion transport from polymer matrix. For studied system, the highest value of ionic conductivity measured at room temperature was 10 -4 S cm -1.

  18. Liquid-Water Uptake and Removal in PEM Fuel-Cell Components

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Prodip K.; Gunterman, Haluna P.; Kwong, Anthony; Weber, Adam Z.

    2011-09-23

    Management of liquid water is critical for optimal fuel-cell operation, especially at low temperatures. It is therefore important to understand the wetting properties and water holdup of the various fuel-cell layers. While the gas-diffusion layer is relatively hydrophobic and exhibits a strong intermediate wettability, the catalyst layer is predominantly hydrophilic. In addition, the water content of the ionomer in the catalyst layer is lower than that of the bulk membrane, and is affected by platinum surfaces. Liquid-water removal occurs through droplets on the surface of the gas-diffusion layer. In order to predict droplet instability and detachment, a force balance is used. While the pressure or drag force on the droplet can be derived, the adhesion or surface-tension force requires measurement using a sliding-angle approach. It is shown that droplets produced by forcing water through the gas-diffusion layer rather than placing them on top of it show much stronger adhesion forces owing to the contact to the subsurface water.

  19. Scoping studies: behavior and control of lithium and lithium aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppson, D W

    1982-01-01

    The HEDL scoping studies examining the behavior of lithium and lithium aerosols have been conducted to determine and examine potential safety and environmental issues for postulated accident conditions associated with the use of lithium as a fusion reactor blanket and/or coolant. Liquid lithium reactions with air, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and concretes have been characterized. The effectiveness of various powder extinguishing agents and methods of application were determined for lithium-air reactions. The effectiveness of various lithium aerosol collection methods were determined and the volatilization and transport of radioactive metals potentially associated with lithium-air reactions were evaluated. Liquid lithium atmosphere reactions can be safely controlled under postulated accident conditions, but special handling practices must be provided. Lithium-concrete reactions should be avoided because of the potential production of high temperatures, corrosive environment and hydrogen. Carbon microspheres are effective in extinguishing well established lithium-air reactions for the lithium quantities tested (up to 10 kg). Large mass loading of lithium aerosols can be efficiently collected with conventional air cleaning systems. Potentially radioactive species (cobalt, iron and manganese) will be volatilized in a lithium-air reaction in contact with neutron activated stainless steel.

  20. Biotite weathering and nutrient uptake by ectomycorrhizal fungus, Suillus tomentosus, in liquid-culture experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh-Brunstad, Zsuzsanna; Kent Keller, C.; Thomas Dickinson, J.; Stevens, Forrest; Li, C. Y.; Bormann, Bernard T.

    2008-06-01

    Ectomycorrhiza-forming fungi (EMF) alter the nutrient-acquisition capabilities of vascular plants, and may play an important role in mineral weathering and the partitioning of products of weathering in soils under nutrient-limited conditions. In this study, we isolated the weathering function of Suillus tomentosus in liquid-cultures with biotite micas incubated at room temperature. We hypothesized that the fungus would accelerate weathering by hyphal attachment to biotite surfaces and transmission of nutrient cations via direct exchange into the fungal biomass. We combined a mass-balance approach with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to estimate weathering rates and study dissolution features on biotite surfaces. Weathering of biotite flakes was about 2-3 orders of magnitude faster in shaken liquid-cultures with fungus compared to shaken controls without fungus, but with added inorganic acids. Adding fungus in nonshaken cultures caused a higher dissolution rate than in inorganic pH controls without fungus, but it was not significantly faster than organic pH controls without fungus. The K +, Mg 2+ and Fe 2+ from biotite were preferentially partitioned into fungal biomass in the shaken cultures, while in the nonshaken cultures, K + and Mg 2+ was lost from biomass and Fe 2+ bioaccumulated much less. Fungal hyphae attached to biotite surfaces, but no significant surface changes were detected by SEM. When cultures were shaken, the AFM images of basal planes appeared to be rougher and had abundant dissolution channels, but such channel development was minor in nonshaken conditions. Even under shaken conditions the channels only accounted for only 1/100 of the total dissolution rate of 2.7 × 10 -10 mol of biotite m -2 s -1. The results suggest that fungal weathering predominantly occurred not by attachment and direct transfer of nutrients via hyphae, but because of the acidification of the bulk liquid by organic acids, fungal

  1. An approach of ionic liquids/lithium salts based microwave irradiation pretreatment followed by ultrasound-microwave synergistic extraction for two coumarins preparation from Cortex fraxini.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zaizhi; Gu, Huiyan; Yang, Lei

    2015-10-23

    Ionic liquids/lithium salts solvent system was successfully introduced into the separation technique for the preparation of two coumarins (aesculin and aesculetin) from Cortex fraxini. Ionic liquids/lithium salts based microwave irradiation pretreatment followed by ultrasound-microwave synergy extraction (ILSMP-UMSE) procedure was developed and optimized for the sufficient extraction of these two analytes. Several variables which can potentially influence the extraction yields, including pretreatment time and temperature, [C4mim]Br concentration, LiAc content, ultrasound-microwave synergy extraction (UMSE) time, liquid-solid ratio, and UMSE power were optimized by Plackett-Burman design. Among seven variables, UMSE time, liquid-solid ratio, and UMSE power were the statistically significant variables and these three factors were further optimized by Box-Behnken design to predict optimal extraction conditions and find out operability ranges with maximum extraction yields. Under optimum operating conditions, ILSMP-UMSE showed higher extraction yields of two target compounds than those obtained by reference extraction solvents. Method validation studies also evidenced that ILSMP-UMSE is credible for the preparation of two coumarins from Cortex fraxini. This study is indicative of the proposed procedure that has huge application prospects for the preparation of natural products from plant materials. PMID:26411478

  2. Electrochemical investigations of ionic liquids with vinylene carbonate for applications in rechargeable lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng

    2010-01-01

    Ionic liquids based on methylpropylpyrrolidinium (MPPY) and methylpropylpiperidinium (MPPI) cations and bis(trifluoromethanesulfionyl)imide (TFSI) anion have been synthesized and characterized by thermal analysis, cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy as well as gavanostatic charge/discharge tests. 10 wt% of vinylene carbonate (VC) was added to the electrolytes of 0.5 M LiTFSI/MPPY.TFSI and 0.5 M LiTFSI/MPPI.TFSI, which were evaluated in Li || natural graphite (NG) half cells at 25 oC and 50 oC under different current densities. At 25 oC, due to their intrinsic high viscosities, the charge/discharge capacities under the current density of 80 A cm-2 were much lower than those under the current density of 40 A cm-2. At 50 oC, with reduced viscosities, the charge/discharge capacities under both current densities were almost indistinguishable, which were also close to the typical values obtained using conventional carbonate electrolytes. In addition, the discharge capacities of the half cells were very stable with cycling, due to the effective formation of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) on the graphite electrode. On the contrary, the charge/discharge capacities of the Li || LiCoO2 cells using both ionic liquid electrolytes under the current density of 40 A cm-2 decreased continually with cycling, which were primarily due to the low oxidative stability of VC on the surface of LiCoO2.

  3. Crosslinked polymer gel electrolytes based on polyethylene glycol methacrylate and ionic liquid for lithium battery applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Chen; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Gel polymer electrolytes were synthesized by copolymerization polyethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate with polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate in the presence of a room temperature ionic liquid, methylpropylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (MPPY TFSI). The physical properties of gel polymer electrolytes were characterized by thermal analysis, impedance spectroscopy, and electrochemical tests. The ionic conductivities of the gel polymer electrolytes increased linearly with the amount of MPPY TFSI and were mainly attributed to the increased ion mobility as evidenced by the decreased glass transition temperatures. Li||LiFePO4 cells were assembled using the gel polymer electrolytes containing 80 wt% MPPY TFSI via an in situ polymerization method. A reversible cell capacity of 90 mAh g 1 was maintained under the current density of C/10 at room temperature, which was increased to 130 mAh g 1 by using a thinner membrane and cycling at 50 C.

  4. Natural abundance 17O nuclear magnetic resonance and computational modeling studies of lithium based liquid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xuchu; Hu, Mary Y.; Wei, Xiaoliang; Wang, Wei; Chen, Zhong; Liu, Jun; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2015-07-01

    Natural abundance 17O NMR measurements were conducted on electrolyte solutions consisting of Li[CF3SO2NSO2CF3] (LiTFSI) dissolved in the solvents of ethylene carbonate (EC), propylene carbonate (PC), ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), and their mixtures at various concentrations. It was observed that 17O chemical shifts of solvent molecules change with the concentration of LiTFSI. The chemical shift displacements of carbonyl oxygen are evidently greater than those of ethereal oxygen, strongly indicating that Li+ ion is coordinated with carbonyl oxygen rather than ethereal oxygen. To understand the detailed molecular interaction, computational modeling of 17O chemical shifts was carried out on proposed solvation structures. By comparing the predicted chemical shifts with the experimental values, it is found that a Li+ ion is coordinated with four double bond oxygen atoms from EC, PC, EMC and TFSI- anion. In the case of excessive amount of solvents of EC, PC and EMC the Li+ coordinated solvent molecules are undergoing quick exchange with bulk solvent molecules, resulting in average 17O chemical shifts. Several kinds of solvation structures are identified, where the proportion of each structure in the liquid electrolytes investigated depends on the concentration of LiTFSI.

  5. Natural Abundance 17O Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Computational Modeling Studies of Lithium Based Liquid Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xuchu; Hu, Mary Y.; Wei, Xiaoliang; Wang, Wei; Chen, Zhong; Liu, Jun; Hu, Jian Z.

    2015-07-01

    Natural abundance 17O NMR measurements were conducted on electrolyte solutions consisting of Li[CF3SO2NSO2CF3] (LiTFSI) dissolved in the solvents of ethylene carbonate (EC), propylene carbonate (PC), ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), and their mixtures at various concentrations. It was observed that 17O chemical shifts of solvent molecules change with the concentration of LiTFSI. The chemical shift displacements of carbonyl oxygen are evidently greater than those of ethereal oxygen, strongly indicating that Li+ ion is coordinated with carbonyl oxygen rather than ethereal oxygen. To understand the detailed molecular interaction, computational modeling of 17O chemical shifts was carried out on proposed solvation structures. By comparing the predicted chemical shifts with the experimental values, it is found that a Li+ ion is coordinated with four double bond oxygen atoms from EC, PC, EMC and TFSI- anion. In the case of excessive amount of solvents of EC, PC and EMC the Li+ coordinated solvent molecules are undergoing quick exchange with bulk solvent molecules, resulting in average 17O chemical shifts. Several kinds of solvation structures are identified, where the proportion of each structure in the liquid electrolytes investigated depends on the concentration of LiTFSI.

  6. Failure Mechanism for Fast-Charged Lithium Metal Batteries with Liquid Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, DP; Shao, YY; Lozano, T; Bennett, WD; Graff, GL; Polzin, B; Zhang, JG; Engelhard, MH; Saenz, NT; Henderson, WA; Bhattacharya, P; Liu, J; Xiao, J

    2014-09-11

    In recent years, the Li metal anode has regained a position of paramount research interest because of the necessity for employing Li metal in next-generation battery technologies such as Li-S and Li-O-2. Severely limiting this utilization, however, are the rapid capacity degradation and safety issues associated with rechargeable Li metal anodes. A fundamental understanding of the failure mechanism of Li metal at high charge rates has remained elusive due to the complicated interfacial chemistry that occurs between Li metal and liquid electrolytes. Here, it is demonstrated that at high current density the quick formation of a highly resistive solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) entangled with Li metal, which grows towards the bulk Li, dramatically increases up the cell impedance and this is the actual origin of the onset of cell degradation and failure. This is instead of dendritic or mossy Li growing outwards from the metal surface towards/through the separator and/or the consumption of the Li and electrolyte through side reactions. Interphase, in this context, refers to a substantive layer rather than a thin interfacial layer. Discerning the mechanisms and consequences for this interphase formation is crucial for resolving the stability and safety issues associated with Li metal anodes.

  7. Effects and uptake of gold nanoparticles deposited at the air-liquid interface of a human epithelial airway model

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, C.; Rothen-Rutishauser, B.; Muehlfeld, C.; Schmid, O.; Ferron, G.A.; Maier, K.L.; Gehr, P.; Lenz, A.-G.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of nanoparticles (NPs) in medicine and biology has increased rapidly in recent years. Gold NPs have advantageous properties such as chemical stability, high electron density and affinity to biomolecules, making them very promising candidates as drug carriers and diagnostic tools. However, diverse studies on the toxicity of gold NPs have reported contradictory results. To address this issue, a triple cell co-culture model simulating the alveolar lung epithelium was used and exposed at the air-liquid interface. The cell cultures were exposed to characterized aerosols with 15 nm gold particles (61 ng Au/cm{sup 2} and 561 ng Au/cm{sup 2} deposition) and incubated for 4 h and 24 h. Experiments were repeated six times. The mRNA induction of pro-inflammatory (TNFalpha, IL-8, iNOS) and oxidative stress markers (HO-1, SOD2) was measured, as well as protein induction of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, GM-CSF, TNFalpha, INFgamma). A pre-stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was performed to further study the effects of particles under inflammatory conditions. Particle deposition and particle uptake by cells were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and design-based stereology. A homogeneous deposition was revealed, and particles were found to enter all cell types. No mRNA induction due to particles was observed for all markers. The cell culture system was sensitive to LPS but gold particles did not cause any synergistic or suppressive effects. With this experimental setup, reflecting the physiological conditions more precisely, no adverse effects from gold NPs were observed. However, chronic studies under in vivo conditions are needed to entirely exclude adverse effects.

  8. Lithium Redistribution in Lithium-Metal Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrese, A; Albertus, P; Christensen, J; Newman, J

    2012-01-01

    A model of a lithium-metal battery with a CoO2 positive electrode has been modeled in order to predict the movement of lithium in the negative electrode along the negative electrode/separator interface during cell cycling. A finite-element approach was used to incorporate an intercalation positive electrode using superposition, electrode tabbing, transport using concentrated solution theory, as well as the net movement of the lithium electrode during cycling. From this model, it has been found that movement of lithium along the negative electrode/separator interface does occur during cycling and is affected by three factors: the cell geometry, the slope of the open-circuit-potential function of the positive electrode, and concentration gradients in both the solid and liquid phases in the cell. (C) 2012 The Electrochemical Society. [DOI: 10.1149/2.027210jes] All rights reserved.

  9. Ionic liquids-lithium salts pretreatment followed by ultrasound-assisted extraction of vitexin-4″-O-glucoside, vitexin-2″-O-rhamnoside and vitexin from Phyllostachys edulis leaves.

    PubMed

    Hou, Kexin; Chen, Fengli; Zu, Yuangang; Yang, Lei

    2016-01-29

    An efficient method for the extraction of vitexin, vitexin-4″-O-glucoside, and vitexin-2″-O-rhamnoside from Phyllostachys edulis leaves comprises heat treatment using an ionic liquid-lithium salt mixture (using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide as the solvent and lithium chloride as the additive), followed by ultrasound-assisted extraction. To obtain higher extraction yields, the effects of the relevant experimental parameters (including heat treatment temperature and time, relative amounts of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide and lithium chloride, power and time of the ultrasound irradiation, and the liquid-solid ratio) are evaluated and response surface methodology is used to optimize the significant factors. The morphologies of the treated and untreated P. edulis leaves are studied by scanning electron microscopy. The improved extraction method proposed provides high extraction yield, good repeatability and precision, and has wide potential applications in the analysis of plant samples. PMID:26763300

  10. Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C.A.; Xu, K.; Liu, C.

    1996-01-16

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100 C or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors. 4 figs.

  11. Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C. Austen; Xu, Kang; Liu, Changle

    1996-01-01

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100.degree. C. or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors.

  12. High-power electron beam tests of a liquid-lithium target and characterization study of (7)Li(p,n) near-threshold neutrons for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Paul, M; Arenshtam, A; Berkovits, D; Cohen, D; Eliyahu, I; Kijel, D; Mardor, I; Silverman, I

    2014-06-01

    A compact Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC). The target is intended to demonstrate liquid-lithium target capabilities to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in hospitals. The lithium target will produce neutrons through the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power >5kW generated by high-intensity proton beams, necessary for sufficient therapeutic neutron flux. In preliminary experiments liquid lithium was flown through the target loop and generated a stable jet on the concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power densities of more than 4kW/cm(2) and volumetric power density around 2MW/cm(3) at a lithium flow of ~4m/s, while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. These power densities correspond to a narrow (σ=~2mm) 1.91MeV, 3mA proton beam. A high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5MeV, 2mA) is being commissioned at the SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator. In order to determine the conditions of LiLiT proton irradiation for BNCT and to tailor the neutron energy spectrum, a characterization of near threshold (~1.91MeV) (7)Li(p,n) neutrons is in progress based on Monte-Carlo (MCNP and Geant4) simulation and on low-intensity experiments with solid LiF targets. In-phantom dosimetry measurements are performed using special designed dosimeters based on CR-39 track detectors. PMID:24387907

  13. Chemical feasibility of lithium as a matrix for structural composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swann, R. T.; Esterling, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    The chemical compatibility of lithium with tows of carbon and aramid fibers and silicon carbide and boron monofilaments was investigated by encapsulating the fibers in liquid lithium and also by sintering. The lithium did not readily wet the various fibers. In particular, very little lithium infiltration into the carbon and aramid tows was achieved and the strength of the tows was seriously degraded. The strength of the boron and silicon carbide monofilaments, however, was not affected by the liquid lithium. Therefore lithium is not feasible as a matrix for carbon and aramid fibers, but a composite containing boron or silicon carbide fibers in a lithium matrix may be feasible for specialized applications.

  14. Compatibility of poly(bisAEA4)-LiTFSI-MPPipTFSI ionic liquid gel polymer electrolyte with Li4Ti5O12 lithium ion battery anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepniak, Izabela

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents the use of Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) as anode with ionic liquid gel polymer electrolyte (IL-GPE) for application in lithium ion batteries. IL-GPE was obtained by in situ photopolymerization method of a mixture of ethoxylated bisphenol A diacrylate (bis(AEA4) and 0.4 M solution of lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) in N-methyl-N-propylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (MPPipTFSI). The surface morphology of the IL-GPE was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Stable, porous and flexible gel polymer electrolyte characterized high ionic conductivity (0.64 mS cm-1 at 25 °C) and a wide electrochemical stability window (ESW) (4.8 V). The performances of LTO/IL-GPE/Li cell were tested by using cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and galvanostatic charge/discharge. Good charge/discharge capacities and low capacity loss at medium C rates preliminary cycling was obtained.

  15. The Role of Organic Oxidation State and Liquid-Liquid Phase Separations on the Reactive Uptake of N2O5 to Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaston, C.; Thornton, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present laboratory measurements of N2O5(g) reactive uptake coefficients, γ(N2O5), onto mixed organic/inorganic submicron particles using organic compounds with a variety of oxidation states (e.g., atomic O:C ratios) and molecular weights. The organic mass fraction, organic molecular composition, and relative humidity were varied to assess the importance of organic mass, oxidation state, and particle phase on the N2O5(g) uptake coefficient. At a constant relative humidity, mixtures of organic components with a low oxidation state (e.g., O:C < 0.5) and ammonium bisulfate (ABS) were found to significantly suppress the uptake of N2O5(g) compared to pure inorganic components even when the organic mass fraction was small (e.g., ≤ 15%); the observed behavior was most consistent with the formation of an organic coating (i.e. phase separation). As the water content of the particles increased, the effect of organic coatings became less pronounced, presumably due to incorporation of water into the organic phase or to an eventual transition into a single mixed system. In contrast, highly oxygenated organic components had a smaller impact on N2O5(g) uptake even as the water content of the particles changed, consistent with these highly soluble components not exhibiting phase separations. Notably, at constant relative humidity the reactive uptake coefficient of mixtures of ABS and poly(ethylene glycol), PEG, decreased nearly linearly as the PEG mass fraction increased. These measurements were found to mimic, with striking similarity, observations of N2O5 uptake onto ambient particles as a function of organic mass fraction. We use the measurements of reactive uptake coefficients across a range of particle types and humidities to improve upon N2O5 reactivity parameterizations for use in atmospheric models that incorporate organic coatings. Our findings suggest that a decrease in N2O5 diffusion and/or solubility in the organic layer, by up to 97% compared to uncoated

  16. Allylic ionic liquid electrolyte-assisted electrochemical surface passivation of LiCoO2 for advanced, safe lithium-ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Junyoung; Yim, Taeeun; Park, Jang Hoon; Ryu, Ji Heon; Lee, Sang Young; Kim, Young Gyu; Oh, Seung M.

    2014-01-01

    Room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) electrolytes have attracted much attention for use in advanced, safe lithium-ion batteries (LIB) owing to their nonvolatility, high conductivity, and great thermal stability. However, LIBs containing RTIL-electrolytes exhibit poor cyclability because electrochemical side reactions cause problematic surface failures of the cathode. Here, we demonstrate that a thin, homogeneous surface film, which is electrochemically generated on LiCoO2 from an RTIL-electrolyte containing an unsaturated substituent on the cation (1-allyl-1-methylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, AMPip-TFSI), can avert undesired side reactions. The derived surface film comprised of a high amount of organic species from the RTIL cations homogenously covered LiCoO2 with a <25 nm layer and helped suppress unfavorable thermal reactions as well as electrochemical side reactions. The superior performance of the cell containing the AMPip-TFSI electrolyte was further elucidated by surface, electrochemical, and thermal analyses. PMID:25168309

  17. Allylic ionic liquid electrolyte-assisted electrochemical surface passivation of LiCoO2 for advanced, safe lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Mun, Junyoung; Yim, Taeeun; Park, Jang Hoon; Ryu, Ji Heon; Lee, Sang Young; Kim, Young Gyu; Oh, Seung M

    2014-01-01

    Room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) electrolytes have attracted much attention for use in advanced, safe lithium-ion batteries (LIB) owing to their nonvolatility, high conductivity, and great thermal stability. However, LIBs containing RTIL-electrolytes exhibit poor cyclability because electrochemical side reactions cause problematic surface failures of the cathode. Here, we demonstrate that a thin, homogeneous surface film, which is electrochemically generated on LiCoO2 from an RTIL-electrolyte containing an unsaturated substituent on the cation (1-allyl-1-methylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, AMPip-TFSI), can avert undesired side reactions. The derived surface film comprised of a high amount of organic species from the RTIL cations homogenously covered LiCoO2 with a <25 nm layer and helped suppress unfavorable thermal reactions as well as electrochemical side reactions. The superior performance of the cell containing the AMPip-TFSI electrolyte was further elucidated by surface, electrochemical, and thermal analyses. PMID:25168309

  18. Simulation of the neutron spectrum from the 7Li(p,n) reaction with a liquid-lithium target at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, M.; Cohen, D.; Paul, M.; Berkovits, D.; Eisen, Y.; Feinberg, G.; Giorginis, G.; Halfon, S.; Krása, A.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Shor, A.

    2013-01-01

    The 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction has been used for the last 25 years to produce quasi-Maxwellian neutrons in order to measure Maxwellian-Averaged Cross-Sections in the relevant temperatures for stellar nucleosynthesis. A liquid-lithium target at the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility is expected to allow us to perform such measurements at higher neutron intensities. Here we describe a Monte Carlo tool, SimLiT, developed to evaluate neutron spectra, intensities and angular distributions resulting from this reaction. We also demonstrate the feasibility to couple SimLiT with an advanced transport code, resulting in a powerful tool for planning and analysis of experiments using the 7Li(p,n) reaction as a neutron source.

  19. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of niobium oxides by solid/liquid state oxygen source and lithium assisted metal-halide chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellekamp, M. Brooks; Greenlee, Jordan D.; Shank, Joshua C.; Doolittle, W. Alan

    2015-09-01

    In order to consistently grow high quality niobium oxides and lithium niobium oxides, a novel solid/liquid state oxygen source, LiClO4, has been implemented in a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system. LiClO4 is shown to decompose into both molecular and atomic oxygen upon heating. This allows oxidation rates similar to that of molecular oxygen but at a reduced overall beam flux, quantified by in situ Auger analysis. LiClO4 operation is decomposition limited to less than 400 °C, and other material limitations are identified. The design of a custom near-ambient NbCl5 effusion cell is presented, which improves both short and long term stability. Films of Nb oxidation state +2, +3, and +5 are grown using these new tools, including the multi-functional sub-oxide LiNbO2.

  20. Allylic ionic liquid electrolyte-assisted electrochemical surface passivation of LiCoO2 for advanced, safe lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Junyoung; Yim, Taeeun; Park, Jang Hoon; Ryu, Ji Heon; Lee, Sang Young; Kim, Young Gyu; Oh, Seung M.

    2014-08-01

    Room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) electrolytes have attracted much attention for use in advanced, safe lithium-ion batteries (LIB) owing to their nonvolatility, high conductivity, and great thermal stability. However, LIBs containing RTIL-electrolytes exhibit poor cyclability because electrochemical side reactions cause problematic surface failures of the cathode. Here, we demonstrate that a thin, homogeneous surface film, which is electrochemically generated on LiCoO2 from an RTIL-electrolyte containing an unsaturated substituent on the cation (1-allyl-1-methylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, AMPip-TFSI), can avert undesired side reactions. The derived surface film comprised of a high amount of organic species from the RTIL cations homogenously covered LiCoO2 with a <25 nm layer and helped suppress unfavorable thermal reactions as well as electrochemical side reactions. The superior performance of the cell containing the AMPip-TFSI electrolyte was further elucidated by surface, electrochemical, and thermal analyses.

  1. Lithium ion conducting PVdF-HFP composite gel electrolytes based on N-methoxyethyl- N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)-imide ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, S.; Quartarone, E.; Mustarelli, P.; Magistris, A.; Fagnoni, M.; Protti, S.; Gerbaldi, C.; Spinella, A.

    Blends of PVdF-HFP and ionic liquids (ILs) are interesting for application as electrolytes in plastic Li batteries. They combine the advantages of the gel polymer electrolytes (GPEs) swollen by conventional organic liquid electrolytes with the nonflammability, and high thermal and electrochemical stability of ILs. In this work we prepared and characterized PVdF-HFP composite membranes swollen with a solution of LiTFSI in ether-functionalized pyrrolidinium-imide ionic liquid (PYRA 12O1TFSI). The membranes were filled in with two different types of silica: (i) mesoporous SiO 2 (SBA-15) and (ii) a commercial nano-size one (HiSil™ T700). The ionic conductivity and the electrochemical properties of the gel electrolytes were studied in terms of the nature of the filler. The thermal and the transport properties of the composite membranes are similar. In particular, room temperature ionic conductivities higher than 0.25 mS cm -1 are easily obtained at defined filler contents. However, the mesoporous filler guarantees higher lithium transference numbers, a more stable electrochemical interface and better cycling performances. Contrary to the HiSil™-based membrane, the Li/LiFePO 4 cells with PVdF-HFP/PYRA 12O1TFSI-LiTFSI films containing 10 wt% of SBA-15 show good charge/discharge capacity, columbic efficiency close to unity, and low capacity losses at medium C-rates during 180 cycles.

  2. The Effects of Temperature and Oxidation on Deuterium Retention in Solid and Liquid Lithium Films on Molybdenum Plasma-Facing Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capece, Angela

    2014-10-01

    Liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFCs) enable in-situ renewal of the surface, thereby offering a solution to neutron damage, erosion, and thermal fatigue experienced by solid PFCs. Lithium in particular has a high chemical affinity for hydrogen, which has resulted in reduced recycling and enhanced plasma performance on many fusion devices including TFTR, T11-M, FTU, CDX-U, LTX, TJ-II, and NSTX. A key component to the improvement in plasma performance is deuterium retention in Li; however, this process is not well understood in the complex tokamak environment. Recent surface science experiments conducted at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory have used electron spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption to understand the mechanisms for D retention in Li coatings on Mo substrates. The experiments were designed to give monolayer-control of Li films and were conducted in ultrahigh vacuum under controlled environments. An electron cyclotron resonance plasma source was used to deliver a beam of deuterium ions to the surface over a range of ion energies. Our work shows that D is retained as LiD in metallic Li films. However, when oxygen is present in the film, either by diffusion from the subsurface at high temperature or as a contaminant during the deposition process, Li oxides are formed that retain D as LiOD. Experiments indicate that LiD is more thermally stable than LiOD, which decomposes to liberate D2 gas and D2O at temperatures 100 K lower than the LiD decomposition temperature. Other experiments show how D retention varies with substrate temperature to provide insight into the differences between solid and liquid lithium films. This work was supported by DOE Contract No. DE AC02-09CH11466.

  3. Lithium-sulfur hexafluoride magnetohydrodynamic power system

    SciTech Connect

    Dobran, F.

    1987-02-24

    A method is described to operate a two-phase flow magnetohydrodynamic electric power generation system with liquid lithium and gaseous sulfur-hexafluoride flowing through a diverging channel, with side electrodes to remove the electric current generated in the flowing liquid lithium, across the applied magnetic field that is perpendicular to both the flow velocity and electrodes. Sulfur-hexafluoride is dispersed in the form of small bubbles and reacts with liquid lithium that forms a continuous phase to conduct the current between the electrodes so as to produce a near isothermal two-phase flow mixture and provides for an expansion of lithium across the magnetic field in the generator.

  4. Transfers of iodine in the soil-plant-air system: Solid-liquid partitioning, migration, plant uptake adn volatilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human exposure to soil iodine depends upon the partitioning of the iodine into the, mobile, liquid and gaseous soil phases. From the liquid phase, iodine can be transported into surface- and ground-waters, plant roots, and, consequently, into the human diet. From the gaseous phase, iodine can be tra...

  5. Ozone uptake on glassy, semi-solid and liquid organic matter and the role of reactive oxygen intermediates in atmospheric aerosol chemistry.

    PubMed

    Berkemeier, Thomas; Steimer, Sarah S; Krieger, Ulrich K; Peter, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich; Ammann, Markus; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-05-14

    Heterogeneous and multiphase reactions of ozone are important pathways for chemical ageing of atmospheric organic aerosols. To demonstrate and quantify how moisture-induced phase changes can affect the gas uptake and chemical transformation of organic matter, we apply a kinetic multi-layer model to a comprehensive experimental data set of ozone uptake by shikimic acid. The bulk diffusion coefficients were determined to be 10(-12) cm(2) s(-1) for ozone and 10(-20) cm(2) s(-1) for shikimic acid under dry conditions, increasing by several orders of magnitude with increasing relative humidity (RH) due to phase changes from amorphous solid over semisolid to liquid. Consequently, the reactive uptake of ozone progresses through different kinetic regimes characterised by specific limiting processes and parameters. At high RH, ozone uptake is driven by reaction throughout the particle bulk; at low RH it is restricted to reaction near the particle surface and kinetically limited by slow diffusion and replenishment of unreacted organic molecules. Our results suggest that the chemical reaction mechanism involves long-lived reactive oxygen intermediates, likely primary ozonides or O atoms, which may provide a pathway for self-reaction and catalytic destruction of ozone at the surface. Slow diffusion and ozone destruction can effectively shield reactive organic molecules in the particle bulk from degradation. We discuss the potential non-orthogonality of kinetic parameters, and show how this problem can be solved by using comprehensive experimental data sets to constrain the kinetic model, providing mechanistic insights into the coupling of transport, phase changes, and chemical reactions of multiple species in complex systems. PMID:27095585

  6. Lithium-ion batteries having conformal solid electrolyte layers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Gi-Heon; Jung, Yoon Seok

    2014-05-27

    Hybrid solid-liquid electrolyte lithium-ion battery devices are disclosed. Certain devices comprise anodes and cathodes conformally coated with an electron insulating and lithium ion conductive solid electrolyte layer.

  7. Ionic Liquid-Organic Carbonate Electrolyte Blends To Stabilize Silicon Electrodes for Extending Lithium Ion Battery Operability to 100 °C.

    PubMed

    Ababtain, Khalid; Babu, Ganguli; Lin, Xinrong; Rodrigues, Marco-Tulio F; Gullapalli, Hemtej; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Grinstaff, Mark W; Arava, Leela Mohana Reddy

    2016-06-22

    Fabrication of lithium-ion batteries that operate from room temperature to elevated temperatures entails development and subsequent identification of electrolytes and electrodes. Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) can address the thermal stability issues, but their poor ionic conductivity at room temperature and compatibility with traditional graphite anodes limit their practical application. To address these challenges, we evaluated novel high energy density three-dimensional nano-silicon electrodes paired with 1-methyl-1-propylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (Pip) ionic liquid/propylene carbonate (PC)/LiTFSI electrolytes. We observed that addition of PC had no detrimental effects on the thermal stability and flammability of the reported electrolytes, while largely improving the transport properties at lower temperatures. Detailed investigation of the electrochemical properties of silicon half-cells as a function of PC content, temperature, and current rates reveal that capacity increases with PC content and temperature and decreases with increased current rates. For example, addition of 20% PC led to a drastic improvement in capacity as observed for the Si electrodes at 25 °C, with stability over 100 charge/discharge cycles. At 100 °C, the capacity further increases by 3-4 times to 0.52 mA h cm(-2) (2230 mA h g(-1)) with minimal loss during cycling. PMID:27237138

  8. Ozone uptake and formation of reactive oxygen intermediates on glassy, semi-solid and liquid organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkemeier, Thomas; Steimer, Sarah S.; Krieger, Ulrich K.; Peter, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich; Ammann, Markus; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous and multiphase reactions of ozone are important pathways for chemical ageing of atmospheric organic aerosols (Abbatt, Lee and Thornton, 2012). The effects of particle phase state on the reaction kinetics are still not fully elucidated and cannot be described by classical models assuming a homogeneous condensed phase (Berkemeier et al., 2013). We apply a kinetic multi-layer model, explicitly resolving gas adsorption, condensed phase diffusion and condensed phase chemistry (Shiraiwa et al., 2010), to systematic measurements of ozone uptake onto proxies for secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Our findings show how moisture-induced phase changes affect the gas uptake and chemical transformation of organic matter through change in the physicochemical properties of the substrate: the diffusion coefficients are found to be low under dry conditions, but increase by several orders of magnitude toward higher relative humidity (RH). The solubility of ozone in the dry organic matrix is found to be one order of magnitude higher than in the dilute aqueous solution. The model simulations reveal that at high RH, ozone uptake is mainly controlled by reaction throughout the particle bulk, whereas at low RH, bulk diffusion is retarded severely and reaction at the surface becomes the dominant pathway, with ozone uptake being limited by replenishment of unreacted organic molecules from the bulk phase. The experimental results can only be reconciled including a pathway for ozone self-reaction, which becomes especially important under dry and polluted conditions. Ozone self-reaction can be interpreted as formation and recombination of long-lived reactive oxygen intermediates at the aerosol surface, which could also explain several kinetic parameters and has implications for the health effects of organic aerosol particles. This study hence outlines how kinetic modelling can be used to gain mechanistic insight into the coupling of mass transport, phase changes, and chemical

  9. Analysis of secondary cells with lithium anodes and immobilized fused-salt electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, E. J.; Rogers, G. L.; Shimotake, H.

    1969-01-01

    Secondary cells with liquid lithium anodes, liquid bismuth or tellurium cathodes, and fused lithium halide electrolytes immobilized as rigid pastes operate between 380 and 485 degrees. Applications include power sources in space, military vehicle propulsion and special commercial vehicle propulsion.

  10. Fabrication and performance testing of CaO insulator coatings on V-5%Cr-5%Ti in liquid lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Dragel, G.

    1995-04-01

    Corrosion resistance of structural materials, and the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) force and its influence on thermal hydraulics and corrosion, are major concerns in the design of liquid-metal blankets for magnetic fusion reactors (MFRs). The objective of this study is to develop in-situ stable coatings at the liquid-metal/structural-material interface, with emphasis on coatings that can be converted to an electrically insulating film to prevent adverse currents that are generated by the MHD force from passing through the structural walls. The electrical resistance of CaO coatings produced on V-5Cr-5Ti by exposure of the alloy to liquid Li that contained 0.5 - 8.5 wt.% dissolved Ca was measured as a function of time at temperatures between 250 and 600{degree}C. The solute element, Ca in liquid Li, reacted with the alloy substrate at 400-420{degree}C to produce a CaO coating.

  11. CaO insulator coatings and self-healing of defects on V-Cr-Ti alloys in liquid lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Kassner, T.F.

    1996-02-01

    Electrically insulating and corrosion-resistant coatings are required at the liquid metal/structural interface in fusion first-wall/blanket applications. The electrical resistance of CaO coatings produced on V-5%Cr-5%Ti by exposure of the alloy to liquid Li that contained 0.5--85 wt.% dissolved Ca was measured as a function of time at temperatures between 250 and 600{degrees}C. The solute element, Ca in liquid Li, reacted with the alloy substrate at 400--420{degrees}C to produce a CaO coating. Resistance of the coating layer measured in-situ in liquid Li was {approx}10{sup 6} {Omega} at 400{degrees}C. Thermal cycling between 300 and 700{degrees}C changed the coating layer resistance. which followed insulator behavior. These results suggest that thin homogeneous coatings can be produced on variously shaped surfaces by controlling the exposure time, temperature, and composition of the liquid metal. The technique can be applied to various shapes(e.g., inside/outside of tubes, complex geometrical shapes) because the coating is formed by liquid-phase reaction. Examination of the specimens after cooling to room temperature revealed no spallation, but homogeneous crazing cracks were present in the CaO coating. Additional tests to investigate the in-situ self-healing behavior of the cracks indicated that rapid healing occurred at {ge}360{degrees}C.

  12. Ultrafast and scalable laser liquid synthesis of tin oxide nanotubes and its application in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhikun; Cao, Zeyuan; Deng, Biwei; Wang, Yuefeng; Shao, Jiayi; Kumar, Prashant; Liu, C. Richard; Wei, Bingqing; Cheng, Gary J.

    2014-05-01

    Laser-induced photo-chemical synthesis of SnO2 nanotubes has been demonstrated by employing a nanoporous polycarbonate membrane as a template. The SnO2 nanotube diameter can be controlled by the nanoporous template while the nanotube length can be tuned by laser parameters and reaction duration. The microstructure characterization of the nanotubes indicates that they consist of mesoporous structures with sub 5 nm size nanocrystals connected by the twinning structure. The application of SnO2 nanotubes as an anode material in lithium ion batteries has also been explored, and they exhibited high capacity and excellent cyclic stability. The laser based emerging technique for scalable production of crystalline metal oxide nanotubes in a matter of seconds is remarkable. The compliance of the laser based technique with the existing technologies would lead to mass production of novel nanomaterials that would be suitable for several emerging applications.Laser-induced photo-chemical synthesis of SnO2 nanotubes has been demonstrated by employing a nanoporous polycarbonate membrane as a template. The SnO2 nanotube diameter can be controlled by the nanoporous template while the nanotube length can be tuned by laser parameters and reaction duration. The microstructure characterization of the nanotubes indicates that they consist of mesoporous structures with sub 5 nm size nanocrystals connected by the twinning structure. The application of SnO2 nanotubes as an anode material in lithium ion batteries has also been explored, and they exhibited high capacity and excellent cyclic stability. The laser based emerging technique for scalable production of crystalline metal oxide nanotubes in a matter of seconds is remarkable. The compliance of the laser based technique with the existing technologies would lead to mass production of novel nanomaterials that would be suitable for several emerging applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr

  13. Removal by a Trace of Sodium of the Period Lengthening of the Potassium Uptake Rhythm Due to Lithium in Lemna gibba G3 1

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Takao

    1984-01-01

    The effect of Li+ on the period of the K+ uptake rhythm in the flow medium culture of the duckweed (Lemna gibba G3) was investigated under various ionic conditions. In the presence of Li+ at 0.2 millimolar or higher concentrations, the period was longer than the normal level of 25.4 hours by 2 hours. Li+ also lowered the amplitude of the rhythm. Although Na+ itself did not change any parameter of the rhythm, simultaneous application of Na+ at a very low concentration (20 micromolar) almost completely removed the effects of 0.5 millimolar Li+ on both the period and the amplitude. However, divalent cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+) or Rb+ did not remove the Li+ action on the period. The effect of Li+ and its removal by Na+ corresponded to intracellular Li+ and Na+ levels. The period was prolonged when the duckweed contained more Li+ than 5 micromoles/gram fresh weight. But the Li+ effect was cancelled when the in vivo Na+ level was greater than one-fifth that of Li+, even if the Li+ level exceeded over 5 micromoles/gram fresh weight. PMID:16663736

  14. CaO insulator and Be intermetallic coatings on V-base alloys for liquid-lithium fusion blanket applications

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Kassner, T.F.

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this study is to develop (a) stable CaO insulator coatings at the Liquid-Li/structural-material interface, with emphasis on electrically insulating coating that prevent adverse MHD-generated currents from passing through the V-alloy wall, and (b) stable Be-V intermetallic coating for first-wall components that face the plasma. Electrically insulating and corrosion-resistant coatings are required at the liquid-Li/structural interface in fusion first-wall/blanket application. The electrical resistance of CaO coatings produced on oxygen-enriched surface layers of V-5%Cr-5%Ti by exposing the alloy to liquid Li that contained 0.5-85 wt% dissolved Ca was measured as a function of time at temperatures between 250 and 600{degrees}C. Crack-free Be{sub 2}V intermetallic coatings were also produced by exposing V-alloys to liquid Li that contained Be as a solute. These techniques can be applied to various shapes (e.g., inside/outside of tubes, complex geometrical shapes) because the coatings are formed by liquid-phase reactions.

  15. Henry`s law solubilities and Setchenow coefficients for biogenic reduced sulfur species obtained from gas-liquid uptake measurements

    SciTech Connect

    De Bruyn, W.J.; Swartz, E.; Hu, J.H.

    1995-04-20

    Biogenically produced reduced sulfur compounds, including dimethylsulfide (DMS, CH{sub 3}SCH{sub 3}), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}), methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}SH), and carbonyl sulfide (OCS), are a major source of sulfur in the marine atmosphere. This source is estimated to contribute 25-40% of global sulfur emissions. These species and their oxidation products, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO{sub 2}), and methane sulfonic acid (MSA), dominate the production of aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the clean marine atmosphere. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to study the evolving role of combustion-produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. Using a newly developed bubble column apparatus, a series of aqueous phase uptake studies have been completed for the reduced sulfur species DMS, H{sub 2}S, CS{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}SH, and OCS. Aqueous phase uptake has been studied as a function of temperature (278-298 K), pH (1-14), H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration (0-1 M), NaCl concentration (0-5 M), and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration (0-4 M). The Henry`s law coefficients for CH{sub 3}SH and CS{sub 2} were determined for the first time, as were the Setchenow coefficients for all the species studied. 33 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Electrospun Nanofiber-Coated Membrane Separators for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hun

    Lithium-ion batteries are widely used as a power source for portable electronic devices and hybrid electric vehicles due to their excellent energy and power densities, long cycle life, and enhanced safety. A separator is considered to be the critical component in lithium-ion rechargeable batteries. The separator is placed between the positive and negative electrodes in order to prevent the physical contact of electrodes while allowing the transportation of ions. In most commercial lithium-ion batteries, polyolefin microporous membranes are commonly used as the separator due to their good chemical stability and high mechanical strength. However, some of their intrinsic natures, such as low electrolyte uptake, poor adhesion property to the electrodes, and low ionic conductivity, can still be improved to achieve higher performance of lithium-ion batteries. In order to improve these intrinsic properties, polyolefin microporous membranes can be coated with nanofibers by using electrospinning technique. Electrospinning is a simple and efficient method to prepare nanofibers which can absorb a significant amount of liquid electrolyte to achieve low internal resistance and battery performance. This research presents the preparation and investigation of composite membrane separators prepared by coating nanofibers onto polyolefin microporous membranes via electrospinning technique. Polyvinylidene fluoride polymers and copolymers were used for the preparation of electrospun nanofiber coatings because they have excellent electrochemical stability, good adhesion property, and high temperature resistance. The nanofiber coatings prepared by electrospinning form an interconnected and randomly orientated structure on the surface of the polyolefin microporous membranes. The size of the nanofibers is on a scale that does not interfere with the micropores in the membrane substrates. The resultant nanofiber-coated membranes have the potential to combine advantages of both the polyolefin

  17. In situ SEM observation of the Si negative electrode reaction in an ionic-liquid-based lithium-ion secondary battery.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Tetsuya; Kanetsuku, Tsukasa; Sano, Teruki; Oshima, Yoshifumi; Ui, Koichi; Yamagata, Masaki; Ishikawa, Masashi; Kuwabata, Susumu

    2015-06-01

    By exploiting characteristics such as negligible vapour pressure and ion-conductive nature of an ionic liquid (IL), we established an in situ scanning electron microscope (SEM) method to observe the electrode reaction in the IL-based Li-ion secondary battery (LIB). When 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide ([C2mim][FSA]) with lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide (Li[TFSA]) was used as the electrolyte, the Si negative electrode exhibited a clear morphology change during the charge process, without any solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer formation, while in the discharge process, the appearance was slightly changed, suggesting that a morphology change is irreversible in the charge-discharge process. On the other hand, the use of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide ([C2mim][TFSA]) with Li[TFSA] did not induce a change in the Si negative electrode. It is interesting to note this distinct contrast, which could be attributed to SEI layer formation from the electrochemical breakdown of [C2mim](+) at the Si negative electrode|separator interface in the [C2mim][TFSA]-based LIB. This in situ SEM observation technique could reveal the effect of the IL species electron-microscopically on the Si negative electrode reaction. PMID:25688094

  18. One-pot synthesis of SnO{sub 2}/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite in ionic liquid-based solution and its application for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Changdong Zhang, Heng; Wang, Xiuli; Tu, Jiangping

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A facile and low-temperature method is developed for SnO{sub 2}/graphene composite. • Synthesis performed in a choline chloride-based ionic liquid. • The composite shows an enhanced cycling stability as anode for Li-ion batteries. • 4 nm SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles mono-dispersed on the surface of reduced graphene oxide. - Abstract: A facile and low-temperature method is developed for SnO{sub 2}/graphene composite which involves an ultrasonic-assistant oxidation–reduction reaction between Sn{sup 2+} and graphene oxide in a choline chloride–ethylene glycol based ionic liquid under ambient conditions. The reaction solution is non-corrosive and environmental-friendly. Moreover, the proposed technique does not require complicated infrastructures and heat treatment. The SnO{sub 2}/graphene composite consists of about 4 nm sized SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles with cassiterite structure mono-dispersed on the surface of reduced graphene oxide. As anode for lithium-ion batteries, the SnO{sub 2}/graphene composite shows a satisfying cycling stability (535 mAh g{sup −1} after 50 cycles @100 mA g{sup −1}), which is significantly prior to the bare 4 nm sized SnO{sub 2} nanocrsytals. The graphene sheets in the hybrid nanostructure could provide a segmentation effect to alleviate the volume expansion of the SnO{sub 2} and restrain the small and active Sn-based particles aggregating into larger and inactive clusters during cycling.

  19. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Sam W; Spencer, Larry S; Phillips, Michael R; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J

    2014-03-25

    A method of producing high purity lithium metal is provided, where gaseous-phase lithium metal is extracted from lithium hydride and condensed to form solid high purity lithium metal. The high purity lithium metal may be hydrided to provide high purity lithium hydride.

  20. Ab Initio Simulations and Electronic Structure of Lithium-Doped Ionic Liquids: Structure, Transport, and Electrochemical Stability.

    PubMed

    Haskins, Justin B; Bauschlicher, Charles W; Lawson, John W

    2015-11-19

    Density functional theory (DFT), density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD), and classical molecular dynamics using polarizable force fields (PFF-MD) are employed to evaluate the influence of Li(+) on the structure, transport, and electrochemical stability of three potential ionic liquid electrolytes: N-methyl-N-butylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([pyr14][TFSI]), N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide ([pyr13][FSI]), and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium boron tetrafluoride ([EMIM][BF4]). We characterize the Li(+) solvation shell through DFT computations of [Li(Anion)n]((n-1)-) clusters, DFT-MD simulations of isolated Li(+) in small ionic liquid systems, and PFF-MD simulations with high Li-doping levels in large ionic liquid systems. At low levels of Li-salt doping, highly stable solvation shells having two to three anions are seen in both [pyr14][TFSI] and [pyr13][FSI], whereas solvation shells with four anions dominate in [EMIM][BF4]. At higher levels of doping, we find the formation of complex Li-network structures that increase the frequency of four anion-coordinated solvation shells. A comparison of computational and experimental Raman spectra for a wide range of [Li(Anion)n]((n-1)-) clusters shows that our proposed structures are consistent with experiment. We then compute the ion diffusion coefficients and find measures from small-cell DFT-MD simulations to be the correct order of magnitude, but influenced by small system size and short simulation length. Correcting for these errors with complementary PFF-MD simulations, we find DFT-MD measures to be in close agreement with experiment. Finally, we compute electrochemical windows from DFT computations on isolated ions, interacting cation/anion pairs, and liquid-phase systems with Li-doping. For the molecular-level computations, we generally find the difference between ionization energy and electron affinity from isolated ions and interacting cation/anion pairs to

  1. Lithium-Ion Cell Storage Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Leonine; Rao, Gopalkrishna M.

    2000-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the issues concerning storage of lithium ion batteries. The presentation outlines tests used to establish a best long term storage for the lithium ion cells. Another objective of the study was to determine the preferred solstice condition for the lithium ion chemistry (polymer and liquid electrolyte). It also compared voltage clamped with trickle charge storage. The tests and results are reviewed

  2. Janus Solid-Liquid Interface Enabling Ultrahigh Charging and Discharging Rate for Advanced Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiaxin; Hou, Yuyang; Duan, Yandong; Song, Xiaohe; Wei, Yi; Liu, Tongchao; Hu, Jiangtao; Guo, Hua; Zhuo, Zengqing; Liu, Lili; Chang, Zheng; Wang, Xiaowei; Zherebetskyy, Danylo; Fang, Yanyan; Lin, Yuan; Xu, Kang; Wang, Lin-Wang; Wu, Yuping; Pan, Feng

    2015-09-01

    LiFePO4 has long been held as one of the most promising battery cathode for its high energy storage capacity. Meanwhile, although extensive studies have been conducted on the interfacial chemistries in Li-ion batteries,1-3 little is known on the atomic level about the solid-liquid interface of LiFePO4/electrolyte. Here, we report battery cathode consisted with nanosized LiFePO4 particles in aqueous electrolyte with an high charging and discharging rate of 600 C (3600/600 = 6 s charge time, 1 C = 170 mAh g(-1)) reaching 72 mAh g(-1) energy storage (42% of the theoretical capacity). By contrast, the accessible capacity sharply decreases to 20 mAh g(-1) at 200 C in organic electrolyte. After a comprehensive electrochemistry tests and ab initio calculations of the LiFePO4-H2O and LiFePO4-EC (ethylene carbonate) systems, we identified the transient formation of a Janus hydrated interface in the LiFePO4-H2O system, where the truncated symmetry of solid LiFePO4 surface is compensated by the chemisorbed H2O molecules, forming a half-solid (LiFePO4) and half-liquid (H2O) amphiphilic coordination environment that eases the Li desolvation process near the surface, which makes a fast Li-ion transport across the solid/liquid interfaces possible. PMID:26305572

  3. Self-healing of defects in CaO coatings on V-5%Cr-5%Ti in liquid lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Kassner, T.F.

    1994-11-01

    In-situ electrical resistance of CaO coatings produced on V-5%Cr-5%Ti by exposure of the alloy to liquid Li that contained 0.5-85 wt % dissolved Ca was measured as a function of time at temperatures between 250 and 600{degrees}C. Examination of the specimens after cooling to room temperature revealed no spallation, but homogeneous crazing cracks were present in the CaO coating. Additional tests to investigate the in-situ self-healing behavior of the cracks indicated that rapid healing occurred at >360{degrees}C.

  4. Femtosecond laser patterning of lithium-ion battery separator materials: impact on liquid electrolyte wetting and cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pröll, J.; Schmitz, B.; Niemöeller, A.; Robertz, B.; Schäfer, M.; Torge, M.; Smyrek, P.; Seifert, H. J.; Pfleging, W.

    2015-03-01

    High capacity Li-ion batteries are composed of alternating stacked cathode and anode layers with thin separator membranes in between for preventing internal shorting. Such batteries can suffer from insufficient cell reliability, safety and electrochemical performance due to poor liquid electrolyte wetting properties. Within the electrolyte filling process, homogeneous wetting of cathode, separator and anode layers is strongly requested due to the fact that insufficient electrolyte wetting of battery components can cause limited capacity under challenging operation or even battery failure. The capacity of the battery is known to be limited by the quantity of wetting of the electrode and separator layers. Therefore, laser structuring processes have recently been developed for forming capillary micro-structures into cathode and anode layers leading to improved wetting properties. Additionally, many efforts have been undertaken to enhance the wettability and safety issues of separator layers, e.g. by applying thin coatings to polymeric base materials. In this paper, we present a rather new approach for ultrafast femtosecond laser patterning of surface coated separator layers. Laser patterning allows the formation of micro-vias and micro-channel structures into thin separator membranes. Liquid electrolyte wetting properties were investigated before and after laser treatment. The electrochemical cyclability of batteries with unstructured and laser-structured separators was tested in order to determine an optimal combination with respect to separator material, functional coating and laser-induced surface topography.

  5. Lithium nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Azab, Abed N; Shnaider, Alla; Osher, Yamima; Wang, Dana; Bersudsky, Yuly; Belmaker, R H

    2015-12-01

    Reports of toxic effects on the kidney of lithium treatment emerged very soon after lithium therapy was introduced. Lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is usually self-limiting or not clinically dangerous. Some reports of irreversible chronic kidney disease and renal failure were difficult to attribute to lithium treatment since chronic kidney disease and renal failure exist in the population at large. In recent years, large-scale epidemiological studies have convincingly shown that lithium treatment elevates the risk of chronic kidney disease and renal failure. Most patients do not experience renal side effects. The most common side effect of polyuria only weakly predicts increasing creatinine or reduced kidney function. Among those patients who do experience decrease in creatinine clearance, some may require continuation of lithium treatment even as their creatinine increases. Other patients may be able to switch to a different mood stabilizer medication, but kidney function may continue to deteriorate even after lithium cessation. Most, but not all, evidence today recommends using a lower lithium plasma level target for long-term maintenance and thereby reducing risks of severe nephrotoxicity. PMID:26043842

  6. Lithium mass flow control for high power Lorentz Force Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodys, Andrea D.; Emsellem, Gregory; Cassady, Leonard D.; Polk, James E.; Choueiri, Edgar Y.

    2001-02-01

    A lithium feeding system has been developed to measure and control propellant flow for 30-200 kW Lithium Lorentz Force Accelerators (LiLFAs). The new, mechanically actuated, liquid lithium feed system has been designed and tested as a central component of a campaign to obtain basic data and establish scaling laws and performance relations for these thrusters. Calibration data are presented which demonstrate reliable and controllable feed of liquid lithium to the vaporizer hollow cathode of the thruster at flow rates between 10 and 120 mg/s. The ability to thermally track the liquid lithium through the system by the use of external temperature measurements is demonstrated. In addition, recent developments are presented in the establishment and successful testing of a lithium handling facility and safety procedures allowing for the in-house loading of the feed system and the neutralization, cleaning and disposal of up to 300 g of lithium. .

  7. Interaction of the ionic liquid [BMP][TFSA] with rutile TiO2(110) and coadsorbed lithium.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Benedikt; Hekmatfar, Maral; Buchner, Florian; Behm, R Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Aiming at a fundamental understanding of the processes at the electrode|ionic liquid interface in Li ion batteries, we investigated the interaction of the ionic liquid n-butyl-n-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [BMP][TFSA] and of Li with a reduced rutile TiO2(110) (1 × 1) surface as well as the interaction between [BMP][TFSA] and Li on the TiO2(110) surface under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunnelling microscopy. Between 80 K and 340 K [BMP][TFSA] adsorbs molecularly on the surface and at higher temperatures decomposition is observed, resulting in products such as Sad, Fad and TiNx. The decomposition pattern is compared to proposals based on theory. Small amounts of Li intercalate even at 80 K into TiO2(110), forming Li(+) and Ti(3+) species. The stoichiometry in the near surface region corresponds to Li7Ti5O12. For higher coverages in the range of several monolayers part of the Li remains on the surface, forming a Li2O cover layer. At 300 K, Ti(3+) species become sufficiently mobile to diffuse into the bulk. Li post-deposition on a [BMP][TFSA] covered TiO2(110) surface at 80 K results in two competing reactions, Li intercalation and reaction with the IL, resulting in the decomposition of the IL. Upon warming up, the Ti(3+) formed at low T is consumed by reaction with the IL adlayer and intermediate decomposition products. Post-deposition of [BMP][TFSA] (300 K) on a surface pre-covered with a Li2O/Li7Ti5O12 layer results in the partial reaction of [BMP][TFSA] with the Li(+) and Ti(3+) species, which gets completed at higher temperatures. PMID:26869155

  8. Spectroscopic characterization of the interaction of lithium with thin films of the ionic liquid 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide.

    PubMed

    Olschewski, Mark; Gustus, René; Marschewski, Marcel; Höfft, Oliver; Endres, Frank

    2014-12-21

    In this experimental investigation the interaction of lithium with 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ([OMIm]Tf2N) is shown. For this purpose thin films of lithium and [OMIm]Tf2N were successively vapor deposited on a copper substrate and analyzed by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) as well as by Ultraviolet Photoelectron Spectroscopy (UPS). When [OMIm]Tf2N is evaporated on top of a thin lithium film a chemical shift analysis of XPS spectra shows a variety of reaction products like LiF, Li2O and LixCHy which reveals the instability of the IL against lithium. Time resolved XPS spectra were discussed to distinguish cation reactions from beam damage effects. In a second step lithium is deposited on a [OMIm]Tf2N layer. The XPS spectra are in agreement with the results of the previous step, but show some differences concerning the [OMIm] cation. In a third step [OMIm]Tf2N has been deposited on a passivated lithium layer. XPS results show nearly unaffected [Tf2N](-) anions and partially decomposed [OMIm](+) cations. Interestingly the cation reactions show similarities when compared to the interaction of [C4C1Pyrr]Tf2N (1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis[trifluoromethylsulfonyl]amide) and lithium. PMID:25356533

  9. State of the art in high power lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenebault, P.; Planchat, J. P.

    The features of liquid cathode systems used in high-power lithium batteries are reviewed. Practical examples representing the state of the art in the field of high-power lithium batteries are presented, illustrating the advantages and limitations of high-power lithium batteries. Other potentially substitute systems are examined. It is concluded that the high-rate lithium/sulfur oxychloride couples remain the most interesting systems in terms of energy density and specific power, especially in the reserve configuration.

  10. Charge carrier dynamics and relaxation in (polyethylene oxide-lithium-salt)-based polymer electrolyte containing 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide as ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, A; Ghosh, A

    2011-11-01

    In this paper we report the dynamics of charge carriers and relaxation in polymer electrolytes based on polyethylene oxide (PEO), lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) and 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (BMPTFSI) ionic liquid prepared by solution cast technique. It has been observed that the incorporation of BMPTFSI into PEO-LiTFSI electrolyte is an effective way for increasing the amorphous phase to a large extent. It has also been observed that both the glass transition and melting temperatures decrease with the increase of BMPTFSI concentration. The ionic conductivity of these polymer electrolytes increases with the increase of BMPTFSI concentration. The highest ionic conductivity obtained at 25 °C is ~3×10(-4) S cm(-1) for the electrolyte containing 60 wt % BMPTFSI and ethylene oxide (EO)/Li ratio of 20. The temperature dependence of the dc conductivity and the hopping frequency show Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher type behavior indicating a strong coupling between the ionic and the polymer chain segmental motions. The frequency dependence of the ac conductivity exhibits a power law with an exponent n which decreases with the increase of temperature. The scaling of the ac conductivity indicates that relaxation dynamics of charge carriers follows a common mechanism for all temperatures and BMPTFSI concentrations. We have also presented the electric modulus data which have been analyzed in the framework of a Havriliak-Negami equation and the shape parameters obtained by the analysis show slight temperature dependence, but change sharply with BMPTFSI concentration. The stretched exponent β obtained from Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts fit to the modulus data is much lower than unity signifying that the relaxation is highly nonexponential. The decay function obtained from analysis of experimental modulus data is highly asymmetric with time. PMID:22181434

  11. Ionic Liquid Hybrid Electrolytes for Lithium-Ion Batteries: A Key Role of the Separator-Electrolyte Interface in Battery Electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Huie, Matthew M; DiLeo, Roberta A; Marschilok, Amy C; Takeuchi, Kenneth J; Takeuchi, Esther S

    2015-06-10

    Batteries are multicomponent systems where the theoretical voltage and stoichiometric electron transfer are defined by the electrochemically active anode and cathode materials. While the electrolyte may not be considered in stoichiometric electron-transfer calculations, it can be a critical factor determining the deliverable energy content of a battery, depending also on the use conditions. The development of ionic liquid (IL)-based electrolytes has been a research area of recent reports by other researchers, due, in part, to opportunities for an expanded high-voltage operating window and improved safety through the reduction of flammable solvent content. The study reported here encompasses a systematic investigation of the physical properties of IL-based hybrid electrolytes including quantitative characterization of the electrolyte-separator interface via contact-angle measurements. An inverse trend in the conductivity and wetting properties was observed for a series of IL-based electrolyte candidates. Test-cell measurements were undertaken to evaluate the electrolyte performance in the presence of functioning anode and cathode materials, where several promising IL-based hybrid electrolytes with performance comparable to that of conventional carbonate electrolytes were identified. The study revealed that the contact angle influenced the performance more significantly than the conductivity because the cells containing IL-tetrafluoroborate-based electrolytes with higher conductivity but poorer wetting showed significantly decreased performance relative to the cells containing IL-bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide electrolytes with lower conductivity but improved wetting properties. This work contributes to the development of new IL battery-based electrolyte systems with the potential to improve the deliverable energy content as well as safety of lithium-ion battery systems. PMID:25710110

  12. Regenerable hydrogen storage in lithium amidoborane.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ziwei; Tan, Yingbin; Chen, Xiaowei; Yu, Xuebin

    2012-09-25

    Regenerable hydrogen storage of lithium amidoborane is firstly achieved through the routes of direct thermal dehydrogenation and subsequent chemical hydrogenation of its dehydrogenated products by treatment with hydrazine in liquid ammonia. PMID:22875287

  13. Smart Multifunctional Fluids for Lithium Ion Batteries: Enhanced Rate Performance and Intrinsic Mechanical Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jie; Tian, Tongfei; Meng, Qing; Guo, Zaiping; Li, Weihua; Zhang, Peng; Ciacchi, Fabio T.; Huang, Jewel; Yang, Wenrong

    2013-08-01

    Lithium ion batteries are attractive power sources for the consumer electronics market and are being aggressively developed for road transportation. Nevertheless, issues with safety and reliability need to be solved prior to the large-scale uptake of these batteries. There have recently been significant development and assessment of materials with resistance to mechanical abuse, with the aims of reinforcing the battery and preventing puncturing during a crash. Most of the work on battery mechanical safety has concentrated on the external packaging of batteries, with little attention being paid to the enclosed electrolyte. We report on smart multifunctional fluids that act as both highly conductive electrolytes and intrinsic mechanical protectors for lithium ion batteries. These fluids exhibit a shear thickening effect under pressure or impact and thus demonstrate excellent resistance to crushing. Also, the fluids show higher ionic conductivities and comparable redox stability windows to the commercial liquid electrolytes.

  14. Smart multifunctional fluids for lithium ion batteries: enhanced rate performance and intrinsic mechanical protection.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jie; Tian, Tongfei; Meng, Qing; Guo, Zaiping; Li, Weihua; Zhang, Peng; Ciacchi, Fabio T; Huang, Jewel; Yang, Wenrong

    2013-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries are attractive power sources for the consumer electronics market and are being aggressively developed for road transportation. Nevertheless, issues with safety and reliability need to be solved prior to the large-scale uptake of these batteries. There have recently been significant development and assessment of materials with resistance to mechanical abuse, with the aims of reinforcing the battery and preventing puncturing during a crash. Most of the work on battery mechanical safety has concentrated on the external packaging of batteries, with little attention being paid to the enclosed electrolyte. We report on smart multifunctional fluids that act as both highly conductive electrolytes and intrinsic mechanical protectors for lithium ion batteries. These fluids exhibit a shear thickening effect under pressure or impact and thus demonstrate excellent resistance to crushing. Also, the fluids show higher ionic conductivities and comparable redox stability windows to the commercial liquid electrolytes. PMID:23962885

  15. Lithium ion conducting electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C. Austen; Liu, Changle

    1996-01-01

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte having exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100.degree. C. or lower, including room temperature, and comprising the lithium salts selected from the group consisting of the thiocyanate, iodide, bromide, chloride, perchlorate, acetate, tetrafluoroborate, perfluoromethane sulfonate, perfluoromethane sulfonamide, tetrahaloaluminate, and heptahaloaluminate salts of lithium, with or without a magnesium-salt selected from the group consisting of the perchlorate and acetate salts of magnesium. Certain of the latter embodiments may also contain molecular additives from the group of acetonitrile (CH.sub.3 CN) succinnonitrile (CH.sub.2 CN).sub.2, and tetraglyme (CH.sub.3 --O--CH.sub.2 --CH.sub.2 --O--).sub.2 (or like solvents) solvated to a Mg.sup.+2 cation to lower the freezing point of the electrolyte below room temperature. Other particularly useful embodiments contain up to about 40, but preferably not more than about 25, mol percent of a long chain polyether polymer dissolved in the lithium salts to provide an elastic or rubbery solid electrolyte of high ambient temperature conductivity and exceptional 100.degree. C. conductivity. Another embodiment contains up to about but not more than 10 mol percent of a molecular solvent such as acetone.

  16. Lithium ion conducting electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C.A.; Liu, C.

    1996-04-09

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described having exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100 C or lower, including room temperature, and comprising the lithium salts selected from the group consisting of the thiocyanate, iodide, bromide, chloride, perchlorate, acetate, tetrafluoroborate, perfluoromethane sulfonate, perfluoromethane sulfonamide, tetrahaloaluminate, and heptahaloaluminate salts of lithium, with or without a magnesium-salt selected from the group consisting of the perchlorate and acetate salts of magnesium. Certain of the latter embodiments may also contain molecular additives from the group of acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN), succinnonitrile (CH{sub 2}CN){sub 2}, and tetraglyme (CH{sub 3}--O--CH{sub 2}--CH{sub 2}--O--){sub 2} (or like solvents) solvated to a Mg{sup +2} cation to lower the freezing point of the electrolyte below room temperature. Other particularly useful embodiments contain up to about 40, but preferably not more than about 25, mol percent of a long chain polyether polymer dissolved in the lithium salts to provide an elastic or rubbery solid electrolyte of high ambient temperature conductivity and exceptional 100 C conductivity. Another embodiment contains up to about but not more than 10 mol percent of a molecular solvent such as acetone. 2 figs.

  17. Transformation of Schizosaccharomyces pombe: Lithium Acetate/ Dimethyl Sulfoxide Procedure.

    PubMed

    Murray, Johanne M; Watson, Adam T; Carr, Antony M

    2016-04-01

    Transformation ofSchizosaccharomyces pombewith DNA requires the conditioning of cells to promote DNA uptake followed by cell growth under conditions that select and maintain the plasmid or integration event. The three main methodologies are electroporation, treatment with lithium cations, and transformation of protoplasts. The lithium acetate method described here is widely used because it is simple and reliable. PMID:27037075

  18. Uptake of strontium by chamisa (Chrysothamnus nauseosus) shrub plants growing over a former liquid waste disposal site at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fresquez, P.R.; Foxx, T.S.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

    1996-06-01

    A major concern of managers at low-level waste burial site facilities is that plant roots may translocate contaminants up to the soil surface. This study investigates the uptake of strontium ({sup 90}Sr), a biologically mobile element, by chamisa (Chrysothamnus nauseosus), a deep-rooted shrub plant, growing in a former liquid waste disposal site (Solid Waste Management Unit [SWMU] 10-003[c]) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico. Surface soil samples were also collected from below (understory) and between (interspace) shrub canopies. Both chamisa plants growing over SWMU 10-003(c) contained significantly higher concentrations of {sup 90}Sr than a control plant--one plant, in particular, contained 3.35 x 10{sup 6} Bq kg{sup {minus}1} ash (9.05 x 10{sup 4} pCi g{sup {minus}1} ash) in top-growth material. Similarly, soil surface samples collected underneath and between plants contained {sup 90}Sr concentrations above background and LANL screening action levels (> 218 Bq kg{sup {minus}1} dry [5.90 pCi g{sup {minus}1} dry]); this probably occurred as a result of chamisa plant leaf fall contaminating the soil understory area followed by water and/or winds moving {sup 90}Sr to the soil interspace areas. Although some soil surface migration of {sup 90}Sr from SWMU 10-003(c) has occurred, the level of {sup 90}Sr in sediments collected downstream of SWMU 10-003(c) at the LANL boundary was still within regional (background) concentrations.

  19. Anode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Belharouak, Ilias; Amine, Khalil

    2008-06-24

    Primary and secondary Li-ion and lithium-metal based electrochemical cell system. The suppression of gas generation is achieved through the addition of an additive or additives to the electrolyte system of respective cell, or to the cell itself whether it be a liquid, a solid- or plastized polymer electrolyte system. The gas suppression additives are primarily based on unsaturated hydrocarbons.

  20. Anode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Belharouak, Ilias; Amine, Khalil

    2011-04-05

    Primary and secondary Li-ion and lithium-metal based electrochemical cell systems. The suppression of gas generation is achieved through the addition of an additive or additives to the electrolyte system of respective cell, or to the cell itself whether it be a liquid, a solid- or plasticized polymer electrolyte system. The gas suppression additives are primarily based on unsaturated hydrocarbons.

  1. Anode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Belharouak, Ilias; Amine, Khalil

    2012-01-31

    Primary and secondary Li-ion and lithium-metal based electrochemical cell systems. The suppression of gas generation is achieved through the addition of an additive or additives to the electrolyte system of respective cell, or to the cell itself whether it be a liquid, a solid- or plasticized polymer electrolyte system. The gas suppression additives are primarily based on unsaturated hydrocarbons.

  2. Three-dimensional characterization of electrodeposited lithium microstructures using synchrotron X-ray phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, David S; Bayley, Paul M; Chang, Hee Jung; Taiwo, Oluwadamilola O; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Brett, Daniel J L; Rau, Christoph; Withers, Philip J; Shearing, Paul R; Grey, Clare P; Lee, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    The electrodeposition of metallic lithium is a major cause of failure in lithium batteries. The 3D microstructure of electrodeposited lithium 'moss' in liquid electrolytes has been characterised at sub-micron resolution for the first time. Using synchrotron X-ray phase contrast imaging we distinguish mossy metallic lithium microstructures from high surface area lithium salt formations by their contrasting X-ray attenuation. PMID:24898258

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies on the rotational and translational motions of ionic liquids composed of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cation and bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide and bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide anions and their binary systems including lithium salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayamizu, Kikuko; Tsuzuki, Seiji; Seki, Shiro; Umebayashi, Yasuhiro

    2011-08-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) are stable liquids composed of anions and cations. 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium (EMIm, EMI) is a popular and important cation that produces thermally stable ILs with various anions. In this study two amide-type anions, bis(trifluoro-methanesulfonyl)amide [N(SO2CF3)2, TFSA, TFSI, NTf2, or Tf2N] and bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide [(N(SO2F)2, FSA, or FSI] were investigated by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. In addition to EMIm-TFSA and EMIm-FSA, lithium-salt-doped binary systems were prepared (EMIm-TFSA-Li and EMIm-FSA-Li). The spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) were measured by 1H, 19F, and 7Li NMR spectroscopy and the correlation times of 1H NMR, τc(EMIm) (8 × 10-10 to 3 × 10-11 s) for the librational molecular motion of EMIm and those of 7Li NMR, τc(Li) (5 × 10-9 to 2 × 10-10 s) for a lithium jump were evaluated in the temperature range between 253 and 353 K. We found that the bulk viscosity (η) versus τc(EMIm) and cation diffusion coefficient DEMIm versus the rate 1/τc(EMIm) have good relationships. Similarly, linear relations were obtained for the η versus τc(Li) and the lithium diffusion coefficient DLi versus the rate 1/τc(Li). The mean one-jump distances of Li were calculated from τc(Li) and DLi. The experimental values for the diffusion coefficients, ionic conductivity, viscosity, and density in our previous paper were analyzed by the Stokes-Einstein, Nernst-Einstein, and Stokes-Einstein-Debye equations for the neat and binary ILs to clarify the physicochemical properties and mobility of individual ions. The deviations from the classical equations are discussed.

  4. Cells containing solvated electron lithium negative electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, Francisco A.; Semkow, Krystyna W.; Sammells, Anthony F.

    1989-12-01

    This paper presents results obtained on cells based on solvated electron lithium negative electrodes, which may have application in high-energy-density secondary or reserve battery systems. The approach uses Li initially dissolved in liquid ammonia to give a solvated electron lithium/ammonia solution. This liquid negative active material is protected from direct contact with the liquid nonaqueous electrolyte in the positive electrode compartment by a lithium-intercalated electronically conducting ceramic membrane possessing Li(x)WoO2 composition with x values between 0.1 and 1.0. Depending upon initial lithium activity in the negative electrode compartments, the experimental cell was found to possess an initial open-circuit potential between 2.1 and 2.5 V.

  5. Structure, ion transport, and relaxation dynamics of polyethylene oxide/poly (vinylidene fluoride co-hexafluoropropylene)—lithium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl) imide blend polymer electrolyte embedded with ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S.; Ghosh, A.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied structure, ion transport, and relaxation dynamics in polyethylene oxide/poly (vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene)-lithium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide blend polymer electrolytes embedded with 1-propyl-3-methyleimidazoliuum bis(trifluromethyle-sulfonyl)imide ionic liquid. Structural property and ion-polymer interaction of polymer electrolytes have been studied using X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The addition of ionic liquid decreases glass transition temperature and reduces crystalline phase in the polymer matrix. It is also observed that surface becomes smooth with increase of ionic liquid content. The temperature dependence of the Li ion conductivity follows Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher type behaviour when a sufficient amount of ionic liquid is added to polymer matrix. The electric modulus has been studied using Havriliak-Negami function for the understanding of ion dynamics. The modulus data have been analyzed using non-exponential Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts function. It is observed that the non-exponential parameter β is quite lower than unity, suggesting existence of a non-exponential relaxation. The temperature dependence of the relaxation time also follows Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher relation for compositions with higher ionic liquid content.

  6. Review of lithium-ion technology

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, S.C.; Cieslak, W.R.

    1993-12-31

    The first practical use of graphite intercalation compounds (GIC) as battery anodes was reported in a 1981 patent by Basu in which a molten salt cell was described having a negative electrode that consisted of lithium intercalated in graphite. A second patent by Basu, issued in 1983, described an ambient temperature rechargeable system which also utilized lithium intercalated in graphite as the anode. Work in this area progressed at a low level, however, until interest was sparked in 1990 when Sony Corporation announced a new ``lithium-ion`` rechargeable cell containing a lithium ion intercalating carbon anode. These cells have the advantages of metallic lithium systems; i.e., high energy density, high voltage, and light weight, without the disadvantages of dendrite formation on charge and the safety considerations associated with metallic lithium. Materials other than carbon have been studied as intercalation anodes. Examples are Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, WO{sub 2} and TiS{sub 2}. Although these alternate anode materials are of interest academically and for specialty applications, they do not hold much promise for widespread general use due to their increased weight and lower cell voltage. Studies of cathode materials for lithium-ion systems have centered on the transition metal chalcogenides. A number of these materials are capable of reversibly intercalating lithium ions at a useful potential versus lithium. Both organic liquids and polymers are candidate electrolytes for this technology.

  7. A lithium superionic conductor.

    PubMed

    Kamaya, Noriaki; Homma, Kenji; Yamakawa, Yuichiro; Hirayama, Masaaki; Kanno, Ryoji; Yonemura, Masao; Kamiyama, Takashi; Kato, Yuki; Hama, Shigenori; Kawamoto, Koji; Mitsui, Akio

    2011-09-01

    Batteries are a key technology in modern society. They are used to power electric and hybrid electric vehicles and to store wind and solar energy in smart grids. Electrochemical devices with high energy and power densities can currently be powered only by batteries with organic liquid electrolytes. However, such batteries require relatively stringent safety precautions, making large-scale systems very complicated and expensive. The application of solid electrolytes is currently limited because they attain practically useful conductivities (10(-2) S cm(-1)) only at 50-80 °C, which is one order of magnitude lower than those of organic liquid electrolytes. Here, we report a lithium superionic conductor, Li(10)GeP(2)S(12) that has a new three-dimensional framework structure. It exhibits an extremely high lithium ionic conductivity of 12 mS cm(-1) at room temperature. This represents the highest conductivity achieved in a solid electrolyte, exceeding even those of liquid organic electrolytes. This new solid-state battery electrolyte has many advantages in terms of device fabrication (facile shaping, patterning and integration), stability (non-volatile), safety (non-explosive) and excellent electrochemical properties (high conductivity and wide potential window). PMID:21804556

  8. Medium-Sized Mammals around a Radioactive Liquid Waste Lagoon at Los Alamos National Laboratory: Uptake of Contaminants and Evaluation of Radio-Frequency Identification Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie A. Hansen; Phil R. Fresquez; Rhonda J. Robinson; John D. Huchton; Teralene S. Foxx

    1999-11-01

    Use of a radioactive liquid waste lagoon by medium-sized mammals and levels of tritium, other selected radionuclides, and metals in biological tissues of the animals were documented at Technical Area 53 (TA-53) of Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1997 and 1998. Rock squirrel (Spermophilus variegates), raccoon (Procyon lotor), striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis), and bobcat (Lynx rufus) were captured at TA-53 and at a control site on the Santa Fe National Forest. Captured animals were anesthetized and marked with radio-frequency identification (RFD) tags and/or ear tags. We collected urine and hair samples for tritium and metals (aluminum, antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, selenium, silver, and thallium) analyses, respectively. In addition, muscle and bone samples from two rock squirrels collected from each of TA-53, perimeter, and regional background sites were tested for tritium, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and total uranium. Animals at TA-53 were monitored entering and leaving the lagoon area using a RFID monitor to read identification numbers from the RFID tags of marked animals and a separate camera system to photograph all animals passing through the monitor. Cottontail rabbit (Sylvilagus spp.), rock squirrel, and raccoon were the species most frequently photographed going through the RFID monitor. Less than half of all marked animals in the lagoon area were detected using the lagoon. Male and female rock squirrels from the lagoon area had significantly higher tritium concentrations compared to rock squirrels from the control area. Metals tested were not significantly higher in rock squirrels from TA-53, although there was a trend toward increased levels of lead in some individuals at TA-53. Muscle and bone samples from squirrels in the lagoon area appeared to have higher levels of tritium, total uranium, and {sup 137}Cs than samples collected from perimeter and

  9. Stable Lithium Deposition Generated from Ceramic-Cross-Linked Gel Polymer Electrolytes for Lithium Anode.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Chih-Hao; Hsiao, Yang-Hung; Hsu, Chun-Han; Kuo, Ping-Lin

    2016-06-22

    In this work, a composite gel electrolyte comprising ceramic cross-linker and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) matrix is shown to have superior resistance to lithium dendrite growth and be applicable to gel polymer lithium batteries. In contrast to pristine gel electrolyte, these nanocomposite gel electrolytes show good compatibility with liquid electrolytes, wider electrochemical window, and a superior rate and cycling performance. These silica cross-linkers allow the PEO to form the lithium ion pathway and reduce anion mobility. Therefore, the gel not only features lower polarization and interfacial resistance, but also suppresses electrolyte decomposition and lithium corrosion. Further, these nanocomposite gel electrolytes increase the lithium transference number to 0.5, and exhibit superior electrochemical stability up to 5.0 V. Moreover, the lithium cells feature long-term stability and a Coulombic efficiency that can reach 97% after 100 cycles. The SEM image of the lithium metal surface after the cycling test shows that the composite gel electrolyte with 20% silica cross-linker forms a uniform passivation layer on the lithium surface. Accordingly, these features allow this gel polymer electrolyte with ceramic cross-linker to function as a high-performance lithium-ionic conductor and reliable separator for lithium metal batteries. PMID:27247991

  10. Lithium Circuit Test Section Design and Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Godfroy, Thomas; Garber, Anne; Martin, James

    2006-01-20

    The Early Flight Fission -- Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team has designed and built an actively pumped lithium flow circuit. Modifications were made to a circuit originally designed for NaK to enable the use of lithium that included application specific instrumentation and hardware. Component scale freeze/thaw tests were conducted to both gain experience with handling and behavior of lithium in solid and liquid form and to supply anchor data for a Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) model that was modified to include the physics for freeze/thaw transitions. Void formation was investigated. The basic circuit components include: reactor segment, lithium to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic (EM) liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and trace heaters. This paper discusses the overall system design and build and the component testing findings.

  11. Lithium Circuit Test Section Design and Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfroy, Thomas; Garber, Anne

    2006-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission - Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team has designed and built an actively pumped lithium flow circuit. Modifications were made to a circuit originally designed for NaK to enable the use of lithium that included application specific instrumentation and hardware. Component scale freeze/thaw tests were conducted to both gain experience with handling and behavior of lithium in solid and liquid form and to supply anchor data for a Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) model that was modified to include the physics for freeze/thaw transitions. Void formation was investigated. The basic circuit components include: reactor segment, lithium to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic (EM) liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and trace heaters. This paper will discuss the overall system design and build and the component testing findings.

  12. Lithium Circuit Test Section Design and Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfroy, Thomas; Garber, Anne; Martin, James

    2006-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission - Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team has designed and built an actively pumped lithium flow circuit. Modifications were made to a circuit originally designed for NaK to enable the use of lithium that included application specific instrumentation and hardware. Component scale freeze/thaw tests were conducted to both gain experience with handling and behavior of lithium in solid and liquid form and to supply anchor data for a Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) model that was modified to include the physics for freeze/thaw transitions. Void formation was investigated. The basic circuit components include: reactor segment, lithium to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic (EM) liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and trace heaters. This paper discusses the overall system design and build and the component testing findings.

  13. LiTFSI in 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide: a possible electrolyte for ionic liquid based lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Abhishek; Schubert, Thomas J S; Iliev, Boyan; Endres, Frank

    2015-05-01

    In this communication, we show that the combination of 1 M lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide and 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide (LiTFSI/[Py1,4]FSI) can be regarded as a possible stable electrolyte for IL based lithium ion batteries. We compare the charge-discharge results with the electrolyte 1 M LiTFSI in 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ([Py1,4]TFSI) on an electrodeposited Ge electrode and show using a charge-discharge analysis and Raman spectroscopy that 1 M LiTFSI/[Py1,4]FSI is advantageous in maintaining the charge capacity as well as electrolyte stability at high current densities. PMID:25868690

  14. Silica/polyacrylonitrile hybrid nanofiber membrane separators via sol-gel and electrospinning techniques for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanilmaz, Meltem; Lu, Yao; Zhu, Jiadeng; Zhang, Xiangwu

    2016-05-01

    Silica/polyacrylonitrile (SiO2/PAN) hybrid nanofiber membranes were fabricated by using sol-gel and electrospinning techniques and their electrochemical performance was evaluated for use as separators in lithium-ion batteries. The aim of this study was to design high-performance separator membranes with enhanced electrochemical performance and good thermal stability compared to microporous polyolefin membranes. In this study, SiO2 nanoparticle content up to 27 wt% was achieved in the membranes by using sol-gel technique. It was found that SiO2/PAN hybrid nanofiber membranes had superior electrochemical performance with good thermal stability due to their high SiO2 content and large porosity. Compared with commercial microporous polyolefin membranes, SiO2/PAN hybrid nanofiber membranes had larger liquid electrolyte uptake, higher electrochemical oxidation limit, and lower interfacial resistance with lithium. SiO2/PAN hybrid nanofiber membranes with different SiO2 contents (0, 16, 19 and 27 wt%) were also assembled into lithium/lithium iron phosphate cells, and high cell capacities and good cycling performance were demonstrated at room temperature. In addition, cells using SiO2/PAN hybrid nanofiber membranes with high SiO2 contents showed superior C-rate performance compared to those with low SiO2 contents and commercial microporous polyolefin membrane.

  15. The Impact Of Lithium Wall Coatings On NSTX Discharges And The Engineering Of The Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX)

    SciTech Connect

    R. Majeski, H. Kugel and R. Kaita

    2010-03-18

    Recent experiments on the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) have shown the benefits of solid lithium coatings on carbon PFC's to diverted plasma performance, in both Land H- mode confinement regimes. Better particle control, with decreased inductive flux consumption, and increased electron temperature, ion temperature, energy confinement time, and DD neutron rate were observed. Successive increases in lithium coverage resulted in the complete suppression of ELM activity in H-mode discharges. A liquid lithium divertor (LLD), which will employ the porous molybdenum surface developed for the LTX shell, is being installed on NSTX for the 2010 run period, and will provide comparisons between liquid walls in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) and liquid divertor targets in NSTX. LTX, which recently began operations at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, is the world's first confinement experiment with full liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFCs). All materials and construction techniques in LTX are compatible with liquid lithium. LTX employs an inner, heated, stainless steel-faced liner or shell, which will be lithium-coated. In order to ensure that lithium adheres to the shell, it is designed to operate at up to 500 - 600 oC to promote wetting of the stainless by the lithium, providing the first hot wall in a tokamak to operate at reactor-relevant temperatures. The engineering of LTX will be discussed.

  16. Lithium in 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, estimated world lithium consumption was about 28 kt (31,000 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds, an 8 percent increase from that of 2011. Estimated U.S. consumption was about 2 kt (2,200 st) of contained lithium, the same as that of 2011. The United States was thought to rank fourth in consumption of lithium and remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. One company, Rockwood Lithium Inc., produced lithium compounds from domestic brine resources near Silver Peak, NV.

  17. Studies on the translational and rotational motions of ionic liquids composed of N-methyl-N-propyl-pyrrolidinium (P13) cation and bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide and bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide anions and their binary systems including lithium salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayamizu, Kikuko; Tsuzuki, Seiji; Seki, Shiro; Fujii, Kenta; Suenaga, Masahiko; Umebayashi, Yasuhiro

    2010-11-01

    Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTIL, IL) are stable liquids composed of anions and cations. N-methyl-N-propyl-pyrrolidinium (P13, Py13, PYR13, or mppy) is an important cation and produces stable ILs with various anions. In this study two amide-type anions, bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide [N(SO2CF3)2, TFSA, TFSI, NTf2, or Tf2N] and bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide [N(SO2F)2, FSA, or FSI], were investigated. In addition to P13-TFSA and P13-FSA, lithium salt doped samples were prepared (P13-TFSA-Li and P13-FSA-Li). The individual ion diffusion coefficients (D) and spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) were measured by H1, F19, and L7i NMR. At the same time, the ionic conductivity (σ), viscosity (η), and density (ρ) were measured over a wide temperature range. The van der Waals volumes of P13, TFSA, FSA, Li(TFSA)2, and Li(FSA)3 were estimated by molecular orbital calculations. The experimental values obtained in this study were analyzed by the classical Stokes-Einstein, Nernst-Einstein (NE), and Stokes-Einstein-Debye equations and Walden plots were also made for the neat and binary ILs to clarify physical and mobile properties of individual ions. From the temperature-dependent velocity correlation coefficients for neat P13-TFSA and P13-FSA, the NE parameter 1-ξ was evaluated. The ionicity (electrochemical molar conductivity divided by the NE conductivity from NMR) and the 1-ξ had exactly the same values. The rotational and translational motions of P13 and jump of a lithium ion are also discussed.

  18. Lithium-metal infused trenches (LiMIT) for heat removal in fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzic, D. N.; Xu, W.; Andruczyk, D.; Jaworski, M. A.

    2011-10-01

    Observation of liquid lithium flow in metal trenches has been made using a lithium-metal infused trench (LiMIT) tile and is reported here. The flow is self-pumping and uses thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamics to remove heated lithium and replenish it at a lower temperature. Flow velocities have been measured and compared with theoretical predictions.

  19. Mechanochemistry of lithium nitride under hydrogen gas.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Zhang, J; Wang, S; Jiang, L; Latroche, M; Du, J; Cuevas, F

    2015-09-14

    Hydrogen uptake during the mechanochemistry of lithium nitride under 9 MPa hydrogen pressure has been analyzed by means of in situ solid-gas absorption and ex situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. In situ hydrogenation curves show two H-sorption steps leading to an overall hydrogen uptake of 9.8 wt% H after 3 hours of milling. The milled end-products consist of nanocrystalline (∼10 nm) LiNH2 and LiH phases. The first reaction step comprises the transformation of the polymorph α-Li3N (S.G. P6/mmm) into the β-Li3N (S.G. P63/mmc) metastable phase and the reaction of the latter with hydrogen to form lithium imide: β-Li3N + H2→ Li2NH + LiH. Reaction kinetics of the first step is zero-order. Its rate-limiting control is assigned to the collision frequency between milling balls and Li3N powder. In the second absorption step, lithium imide converts to lithium amide following the reaction scheme Li2NH + H2→ LiNH2 + LiH. Reaction kinetics is here limited by one-dimensional nucleation and the growth mechanism, which, in light of structural data, is assigned to the occurrence of lithium vacancies in the imide compound. This study provides new insights into the reaction paths and chemical kinetics of light hydrogen storage materials during their mechanochemical synthesis. PMID:26234206

  20. Hybrid Lithium-Sulfur Batteries with a Solid Electrolyte Membrane and Lithium Polysulfide Catholyte.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xingwen; Bi, Zhonghe; Zhao, Feng; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2015-08-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries are receiving great attention as the most promising next-generation power source with significantly high charge-storage capacity. However, the implementation of Li-S batteries is hampered by a critical challenge because of the soluble nature of the intermediate polysulfide species in the liquid electrolyte. The use of traditional porous separators unavoidably allows the migration of the dissolved polysulfide species from the cathode to the lithium-metal anode and results in continuous loss of capacity. In this study, a LiSICON (lithium super ionic conductor) solid membrane is used as a cation-selective electrolyte for lithium-polysulfide (Li-PS) batteries to suppress the polysulfide diffusion. Ionic conductivity issue at the lithium metal/solid electrolyte interface is successfully addressed by insertion of a "soft", liquid-electrolyte integrated polypropylene interlayer. The solid LiSICON lithium-ion conductor maintains stable ionic conductivity during the electrochemical cycling of the cells. The Li-PS battery system with a hybrid solid/liquid electrolyte exhibits significantly enhanced cyclability relative to the cells with the traditional liquid-electrolyte integrated porous separator. PMID:26161547

  1. Quantification of new antiepileptic drugs by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and its application to cellular uptake experiment using human placental choriocarcinoma BeWo cells.

    PubMed

    Furugen, Ayako; Kobayashi, Masaki; Nishimura, Ayako; Takamura, Shigeo; Narumi, Katsuya; Yamada, Takehiro; Iseki, Ken

    2015-10-01

    A method for quantification of new antiepileptic drugs, including lamotrigine (LTG), levetiracetam (LEV), gabapentin (GBP), and topiramate (TPM), in cellular samples, using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry was developed to better understand the membrane transport mechanisms of these drugs. Cell lysate was deproteinized by methanol containing LEV-d3 as an internal standard (IS). Chromatographic separation was performed on a C18 column using gradient elution with methanol-water-formic acid (10:90:0.1, v/v/v) and methanol-formic acid (100:0.1, v/v). Analytes were detected in positive ion electrospray mode with selected reaction monitoring (SRM). This method was applicable for a linear range of 5 to 500pmol for LTG; 5 to 1000pmol for LEV; 10 to 10,000pmol for GBP; and 5 to 5000pmol for TPM. The intra-day precision, inter-day precision, and accuracy data were assessed and found to be acceptable. This developed and validated method was then successfully applied to the investigation of uptake of the new antiepileptic drugs in placental choriocarcinoma BeWo cells. The intracellular concentration of these drugs in BeWo cells, accumulating over 30min at 37°C was in the order of GBP>LTG>LEV≈TPM. Furthermore, the uptake of GBP at 4°C was much lower than that at 37°C. The uptake of GBP was saturated at high concentrations. The kinetic parameters calculated for GBP uptake in BeWo cells were determined as Km of 105.4±6.4μM and Vmax at 8153±348pmol/mg protein/min. The novel method described here should enable investigators to elucidate the transport mechanisms of these antiepileptic drugs in BeWo cells. PMID:26343016

  2. Honeycomb-like porous gel polymer electrolyte membrane for lithium ion batteries with enhanced safety.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinqiang; Sun, Bing; Huang, Xiaodan; Chen, Shuangqiang; Wang, Guoxiu

    2014-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries have shown great potential in applications as power sources for electric vehicles and large-scale energy storage. However, the direct uses of flammable organic liquid electrolyte with commercial separator induce serious safety problems including the risk of fire and explosion. Herein, we report the development of poly(vinylidene difluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) polymer membranes with multi-sized honeycomb-like porous architectures. The as-prepared polymer electrolyte membranes contain porosity as high as 78%, which leads to the high electrolyte uptake of 86.2 wt%. The PVDF-HFP gel polymer electrolyte membranes exhibited a high ionic conductivity of 1.03 mS cm(-1) at room temperature, which is much higher than that of commercial polymer membranes. Moreover, the as-obtained gel polymer membranes are also thermally stable up to 350 °C and non-combustible in fire (fire-proof). When applied in lithium ion batteries with LiFePO4 as cathode materials, the gel polymer electrolyte demonstrated excellent electrochemical performances. This investigation indicates that PVDF-HFP gel polymer membranes could be potentially applicable for high power lithium ion batteries with the features of high safety, low cost and good performance. PMID:25168687

  3. Honeycomb-like porous gel polymer electrolyte membrane for lithium ion batteries with enhanced safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinqiang; Sun, Bing; Huang, Xiaodan; Chen, Shuangqiang; Wang, Guoxiu

    2014-08-01

    Lithium ion batteries have shown great potential in applications as power sources for electric vehicles and large-scale energy storage. However, the direct uses of flammable organic liquid electrolyte with commercial separator induce serious safety problems including the risk of fire and explosion. Herein, we report the development of poly(vinylidene difluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) polymer membranes with multi-sized honeycomb-like porous architectures. The as-prepared polymer electrolyte membranes contain porosity as high as 78%, which leads to the high electrolyte uptake of 86.2 wt%. The PVDF-HFP gel polymer electrolyte membranes exhibited a high ionic conductivity of 1.03 mS cm-1 at room temperature, which is much higher than that of commercial polymer membranes. Moreover, the as-obtained gel polymer membranes are also thermally stable up to 350°C and non-combustible in fire (fire-proof). When applied in lithium ion batteries with LiFePO4 as cathode materials, the gel polymer electrolyte demonstrated excellent electrochemical performances. This investigation indicates that PVDF-HFP gel polymer membranes could be potentially applicable for high power lithium ion batteries with the features of high safety, low cost and good performance.

  4. Honeycomb-like porous gel polymer electrolyte membrane for lithium ion batteries with enhanced safety

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinqiang; Sun, Bing; Huang, Xiaodan; Chen, Shuangqiang; Wang, Guoxiu

    2014-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries have shown great potential in applications as power sources for electric vehicles and large-scale energy storage. However, the direct uses of flammable organic liquid electrolyte with commercial separator induce serious safety problems including the risk of fire and explosion. Herein, we report the development of poly(vinylidene difluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) polymer membranes with multi-sized honeycomb-like porous architectures. The as-prepared polymer electrolyte membranes contain porosity as high as 78%, which leads to the high electrolyte uptake of 86.2 wt%. The PVDF-HFP gel polymer electrolyte membranes exhibited a high ionic conductivity of 1.03 mS cm−1 at room temperature, which is much higher than that of commercial polymer membranes. Moreover, the as-obtained gel polymer membranes are also thermally stable up to 350°C and non-combustible in fire (fire-proof). When applied in lithium ion batteries with LiFePO4 as cathode materials, the gel polymer electrolyte demonstrated excellent electrochemical performances. This investigation indicates that PVDF-HFP gel polymer membranes could be potentially applicable for high power lithium ion batteries with the features of high safety, low cost and good performance. PMID:25168687

  5. Results and future plans of the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, J. C.; Abrams, T.; Baylor, L. R.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Biewer, T.; Bohler, D.; Boyle, D.; Granstedt, E.; Gray, T.; Hare, J.; Jacobson, C. M.; Jaworski, M.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; LeBlanc, B.; Lundberg, D. P.; Lucia, M.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Merino, E.; Ryou, A.; Shi, E.; Squire, J.; Stotler, D.; Thomas, C. E.; Tritz, K.; Zakharov, L.

    2013-07-01

    The Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) is a spherical tokamak with the unique capability of studying the low-recycling regime by coating nearly 90% of the first wall with lithium in either solid or liquid form. Several grams of lithium are evaporated onto the plasma-facing side of the first wall. Without lithium coatings, the plasma discharge is limited to less than 5 ms and only 10 kA of plasma current, and the first wall acts as a particle source. With cold lithium coatings, plasma discharges last up to 20 ms with plasma currents up to 70 kA. The lithium coating provides a low-recycling first wall condition for the plasma and higher fueling rates are required to realize plasma densities similar to that of pre-lithium walls. Traditional puff fueling, supersonic gas injection, and molecular cluster injection (MCI) are used. Liquid lithium experiments will begin in 2012.

  6. Electrolytes for high-energy lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Jennifer L.; Lu, Yingying; Moganty, Surya S.; Agarwal, Praveen; Jayaprakash, N.; Archer, Lynden A.

    2012-06-01

    From aqueous liquid electrolytes for lithium-air cells to ionic liquid electrolytes that permit continuous, high-rate cycling of secondary batteries comprising metallic lithium anodes, we show that many of the key impediments to progress in developing next-generation batteries with high specific energies can be overcome with cleaver designs of the electrolyte. When these designs are coupled with as cleverly engineered electrode configurations that control chemical interactions between the electrolyte and electrode or by simple additives-based schemes for manipulating physical contact between the electrolyte and electrode, we further show that rechargeable battery configurations can be facilely designed to achieve desirable safety, energy density and cycling performance.

  7. A comprehensive study on the blockage of thyroid and gastric uptakes of 188Re-perrhenate in endovascular irradiation using liquid-filled balloon to prevent restenosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, W Y; Hsieh, J F; Tsai, S C; Yen, T C; Wang, S J; Knapp, F F

    2000-01-01

    188Re-perrhenate has been reported effective in preventing restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. However, if the balloon ruptures, 188Re-perrhenate is released into the circulation, causing high radiation dosing to the thyroid and stomach. In this study, we evaluated the effects of perchlorate or iodide given at different times and in different ways for blocking the uptake of 188Re-perrhenate in the thyroid glands and the stomach to find the best method to apply clinically to reduce the radiation dose in case of balloon rupture. Sodium perchlorate, sodium iodide, or potassium iodide was given orally or intravenously to rats before, during, and after the injection of 188Re-perrhenate. The rats were sacrificed and we calculated the concentration of 188Re-perrhenate in various organs to evaluate the preblocking, mixed formula, and postblocking effects of perchlorate or iodide. Our data showed that the preblocking method effectively reduced the uptake of 188Re-perrhenate in both the thyroid and the stomach. The mixed formula method also demonstrated good blocking effect. The postblocking method showed obvious depression of thyroid uptake of perrhenate but its blocking effect on the stomach was not satisfactory. PMID:10755650

  8. Reversible uptake of COS, CS2 and SO2; Ionic liquids with O-alkylxanthate, O-alkylthiocarbonate, and O-alkylsulfite anions

    SciTech Connect

    Heldebrant, David J.; Yonker, Clement R.; Jessop, Philip G.; Phan, Lam

    2009-08-14

    Further development of CO2 binding organic liquids to capture and release carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide and sulfur dioxide. This paper investigates a brand new class of ionic liquids which have potential as chemical sensors for acid gas capture. Applications to flue gas scrubbing are discussed with an emphasis on capture and release of COS, CS2 and SO2 with amidine and guanidine bases with alcohols. Formal spectroscopic characterization is presented.

  9. Lithium-associated hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Siyam, Fadi F; Deshmukh, Sanaa; Garcia-Touza, Mariana

    2013-08-01

    Goiters and hypothyroidism are well-known patient complications of the use of lithium for treatment of bipolar disease. However, the occurrence of lithium-induced hyperthyroidism is a more rare event. Many times, the condition can be confused with a flare of mania. Monitoring through serial biochemical measurement of thyroid function is critical in patients taking lithium. Hyperthyroidism induced by lithium is a condition that generally can be controlled medically without the patient having to discontinue lithium therapy, although in some circumstances, discontinuation of lithium therapy may be indicated. We report on a patient case of lithium-associated hyperthyroidism that resolved after discontinuation of the medication. PMID:23948626

  10. NSTX Plasma Response to Lithium Coated Divertor

    SciTech Connect

    H.W. Kugel, M.G. Bell, J.P. Allain, R.E. Bell, S. Ding, S.P. Gerhardt, M.A. Jaworski, R. Kaita, J. Kallman, S.M. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, R. Maingi, R. Majeski, R. Maqueda, D.K. Mansfield, D. Mueller, R. Nygren, S.F. Paul, R. Raman, A.L. Roquemore, S.A. Sabbagh, H. Schneider, C.H. Skinner, V.A. Soukhanovskii, C.N. Taylor, J.R. Timberlak, W.R. Wampler, L.E. Zakharov, S.J. Zweben, and the NSTX Research Team

    2011-01-21

    NSTX experiments have explored lithium evaporated on a graphite divertor and other plasma facing components in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. Improvements in plasma performance have followed these lithium depositions, including a reduction and eventual elimination of the HeGDC time between discharges, reduced edge neutral density, reduced plasma density, particularly in the edge and the SOL, increased pedestal electron and ion temperature, improved energy confinement and the suppression of ELMs in the H-mode. However, with improvements in confinement and suppression of ELMs, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Zeff and the radiated power in H-mode plasmas as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities. Lithium itself remained at a very low level in the plasma core, <0.1%. Initial results are reported from operation with a Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) recently installed.

  11. Selective Recovery of Lithium from Cathode Materials of Spent Lithium Ion Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Akitoshi; Ankei, Naoki; Nishihama, Syouhei; Yoshizuka, Kazuharu

    2016-07-01

    Selective recovery of lithium from four kinds of cathode materials, manganese-type, cobalt-type, nickel-type, and ternary-type, of spent lithium ion battery was investigated. In all cathode materials, leaching of lithium was improved by adding sodium persulfate (Na2S2O8) as an oxidant in the leaching solution, while the leaching of other metal ions (manganese, cobalt, and nickel) was significantly suppressed. Optimum leaching conditions, such as pH, temperature, amount of Na2S2O8, and solid/liquid ratio, for the selective leaching of lithium were determined for all cathode materials. Recovery of lithium from the leachate as lithium carbonate (Li2CO3) was then successfully achieved by adding sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) to the leachate. Optimum recovery conditions, such as pH, temperature, and amount of Na2CO3, for the recovery of lithium as Li2CO3 were determined for all cases. Purification of Li2CO3 was achieved by lixiviation in all systems, with purities of the Li2CO3 higher than 99.4%, which is almost satisfactory for the battery-grade purity of lithium.

  12. CaO insulator coatings and self-healing of defects on V-Cr-Ti alloys in liquid lithium system

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Kassner, T.F.

    1995-09-01

    Electrically insulating and corrosion-resistant coatings are required at the liquid metal/structural interface in fusion first-wall/blanket applications. Electrical resistance of CaO coatings that were produced on V-5%Cr-5%Ti by exposure of the alloy to liquid Li containing 0.5-85 wt.% dissolved Ca was measured as a function of time at temperatures between 250 and 600{degrees}C. The solute element, Ca in liquid Li, reacted with the alloy substrate at 400-420{degrees}C to produce a CaO coating. Resistance of the coating layer measured in-situ in liquid Li was {approx}10{sup 6} {Omega} at 400{degrees}C. Thermal cycling between 300 and 700{degrees}C changed the coating layer resistance, which followed insulator behavior. These results suggest that thin homogeneous coatings can be produced on variously shaped surfaces by controlling the exposure time, temperature, and composition of the liquid metal. The technique can be applied to various shapes (e.g., inside/outside of tubes, complex geometrical shapes) because the coating is formed by liquid-phase reaction. Examination of the specimens after cooling to room temperature revealed no spallation, but homogeneous crazing cracks were present in the CaO coating. Additional tests to investigate the in-situ self-healing behavior of the cracks indicated that rapid healing occurred at {>=}360{degrees}C.

  13. A first principles molecular dynamics study of lithium atom solvation in binary liquid mixture of water and ammonia: Structural, electronic, and dynamical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratihar, Subha; Chandra, Amalendu

    2011-01-01

    The preferential solvation of solutes in mixed solvent systems is an interesting phenomenon that plays important roles in solubility and kinetics. In the present study, solvation of a lithium atom in aqueous ammonia solution has been investigated from first principles molecular dynamics simulations. Solvation of alkali metal atoms, like lithium, in aqueous and ammonia media is particularly interesting because the alkali metal atoms release their valence electrons in these media so as to produce solvated electrons and metal counterions. In the present work, first principles simulations are performed employing the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics method. Spontaneous ionization of the Li atom is found to occur in the mixed solvent system. From the radial distribution functions, it is found that the Li ^+ ion is preferentially solvated by water and the coordination number is mostly four in its first solvation shell and exchange of water molecules between the first and second solvation shells is essentially negligible in the time scale of our simulations. The Li ^+ ion and the unbound electron are well separated and screened by the polar solvent molecules. Also the unbound electron is primarily captured by the hydrogens of water molecules. The diffusion rates of Li ^+ ion and water molecules in its first solvation shell are found to be rather slow. In the bulk phase, the diffusion of water is found to be slower than that of ammonia molecules because of strong ammonia-water hydrogen bonds that participate in solvating ammonia molecules in the mixture. The ratio of first and second rank orientational correlation functions deviate from 3, which suggests a deviation from the ideal Debye-type orientational diffusion. It is found that the hydrogen bond lifetimes of ammonia-ammonia pairs is very short. However, ammonia-water H-bonds are found to be quite strong when ammonia acts as an acceptor and these hydrogen bonds are found to live longer than even water-water hydrogen

  14. Acetazolamide Attenuates Lithium-Induced Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Theun; Sinke, Anne P; Kortenoeven, Marleen L A; Alsady, Mohammad; Baumgarten, Ruben; Devuyst, Olivier; Loffing, Johannes; Wetzels, Jack F; Deen, Peter M T

    2016-07-01

    To reduce lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (lithium-NDI), patients with bipolar disorder are treated with thiazide and amiloride, which are thought to induce antidiuresis by a compensatory increase in prourine uptake in proximal tubules. However, thiazides induced antidiuresis and alkalinized the urine in lithium-NDI mice lacking the sodium-chloride cotransporter, suggesting that inhibition of carbonic anhydrases (CAs) confers the beneficial thiazide effect. Therefore, we tested the effect of the CA-specific blocker acetazolamide in lithium-NDI. In collecting duct (mpkCCD) cells, acetazolamide reduced the cellular lithium content and attenuated lithium-induced downregulation of aquaporin-2 through a mechanism different from that of amiloride. Treatment of lithium-NDI mice with acetazolamide or thiazide/amiloride induced similar antidiuresis and increased urine osmolality and aquaporin-2 abundance. Thiazide/amiloride-treated mice showed hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, hypercalcemia, metabolic acidosis, and increased serum lithium concentrations, adverse effects previously observed in patients but not in acetazolamide-treated mice in this study. Furthermore, acetazolamide treatment reduced inulin clearance and cortical expression of sodium/hydrogen exchanger 3 and attenuated the increased expression of urinary PGE2 observed in lithium-NDI mice. These results show that the antidiuresis with acetazolamide was partially caused by a tubular-glomerular feedback response and reduced GFR. The tubular-glomerular feedback response and/or direct effect on collecting duct principal or intercalated cells may underlie the reduced urinary PGE2 levels with acetazolamide, thereby contributing to the attenuation of lithium-NDI. In conclusion, CA activity contributes to lithium-NDI development, and acetazolamide attenuates lithium-NDI development in mice similar to thiazide/amiloride but with fewer adverse effects. PMID:26574046

  15. Thermochemistry of tantalum-wall cooling system with lithium and sodium working fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tower, L. K.

    1972-01-01

    Plots are presented which show the distribution of oxygen between liquid lithium and tantalum or niobium, and between liquid sodium and tantalum at elevated temperatures. Additional plots showing the composition of the gas phase above the solutions of oxygen and alkali metal are presented. The use of the plots is illustrated by an example tantalum heat pipe filled with lithium.

  16. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, Ian D.; Poris, Jaime; Huggins, Robert A.

    1983-01-01

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  17. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, I.D.; Poris, J.; Huggins, R.A.

    1980-07-18

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell which may be operated at temperatures between about 100 to 170/sup 0/C. The cell is comprised of an electrolyte, which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode.

  18. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, Ian D.; Poris, Jaime; Huggins, Robert A.

    1982-02-09

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  19. Stabilization of tokamak plasma by lithium streams

    SciTech Connect

    L.E. Zakharov

    2000-08-07

    The stabilization theory of free-boundary magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in tokamaks by liquid lithium streams driven by magnetic propulsion is formulated. While the conventional, wall-locked, resistive wall mode can be well suppressed by the flow, a new, stream-locked mode determines the limits of the flow stabilization.

  20. High Temperature Stable Separator for Lithium Batteries Based on SiO₂ and Hydroxypropyl Guar Gum.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Diogo Vieira; Loeffler, Nicholas; Kim, Guk-Tae; Passerini, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    A novel membrane based on silicon dioxide (SiO₂) and hydroxypropyl guar gum (HPG) as binder is presented and tested as a separator for lithium-ion batteries. The separator is made with renewable and low cost materials and an environmentally friendly manufacturing processing using only water as solvent. The separator offers superior wettability and high electrolyte uptake due to the optimized porosity and the good affinity of SiO₂ and guar gum microstructure towards organic liquid electrolytes. Additionally, the separator shows high thermal stability and no dimensional-shrinkage at high temperatures due to the use of the ceramic filler and the thermally stable natural polymer. The electrochemical tests show the good electrochemical stability of the separator in a wide range of potential, as well as its outstanding cycle performance. PMID:26512701

  1. Spreading of lithium on a stainless steel surface at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, C. H.; Capece, A. M.; Roszell, J. P.; Koel, B. E.

    2016-01-01

    Lithium conditioned plasma facing surfaces have lowered recycling and enhanced plasma performance on many fusion devices and liquid lithium plasma facing components are under consideration for future machines. A key factor in the performance of liquid lithium components is the wetting by lithium of its container. We have observed the surface spreading of lithium from a mm-scale particle to adjacent stainless steel surfaces using a scanning Auger microprobe that has elemental discrimination. The spreading of lithium occurred at room temperature (when lithium is a solid) from one location at a speed of 0.62 μm/day under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Separate experiments using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) investigated bonding energetics between monolayer-scale films of lithium and stainless steel. While multilayer lithium desorption from stainless steel begins to occur just above 500 K (Edes = 1.54 eV), sub-monolayer Li desorption occurred in a TPD peak at 942 K (Edes = 2.52 eV) indicating more energetically favorable lithium-stainless steel bonding (in the absence of an oxidation layer) than lithium-lithium bonding.

  2. Initial Lithium Capabilities for NSTX-U and Plans for Mitigating Associated Risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaita, R.; Blanchard, W.; Cai, D.; Jaworski, M.; Lunsford, R.; Roquemore, A. L.; Schneider, H.; Cadwallader, L.

    2015-11-01

    The effect on plasma performance of lithium plasma-facing components (PFCs) is an important research focus on NSTX-U. Lithium evaporators (LITERs) are mounted at two upper dome locations to evaporate lithium onto the lower divertor region. The introduction of lithium into NSTX-U will also be conducted by the injection of small granules from a lithium granule injector (LGI). The main risk for the LITERs and the LGI is commensurate to the state of the lithium. The lithium used in the LGI is in the form of solid, micron-sized granules, and relatively few granules would enter NSTX-U should any possible failure modes occur. Each LITER, however, can operate with up to 80 grams of liquid lithium. The PFC water-cooling lines will thus be emptied during lithium operations, to prevent exposure of liquid lithium to water if there is a simultaneous LITER structural failure and a water leak. If there is a simultaneous LITER structural failure and a large air leak, the graphite PFCs could then be subject to high heat from rapid lithium oxidation. The likelihood that it would cause serious PFC damage is being evaluated. A mitigation scheme is a gas purge system that fills the vacuum vessel with argon should there be a significant pressure excursion when the lithium is at elevated temperature. Work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  3. Spreading of lithium on a stainless steel surface at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C. H.; Capece, A. M.; Roszell, J. P.; Koel, B. E.

    2015-11-10

    Lithium conditioned plasma facing surfaces have lowered recycling and enhanced plasma performance on many fusion devices and liquid lithium plasma facing components are under consideration for future machines. A key factor in the performance of liquid lithium components is the wetting by lithium of its container. We have observed the surface spreading of lithium from a mm-scale particle to adjacent stainless steel surfaces using a scanning Auger microprobe that has elemental discrimination. Here, the spreading of lithium occurred at room temperature (when lithium is a solid) from one location at a speed of 0.62 μm/day under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Separate experiments using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) investigated bonding energetics between monolayer-scale films of lithium and stainless steel. While multilayer lithium desorption from stainless steel begins to occur just above 500 K (Edes = 1.54 eV), sub-monolayer Li desorption occurred in a TPD peak at 942 K (Edes = 2.52 eV) indicating more energetically favorable lithium-stainless steel bonding (in the absence of an oxidation layer) than lithium lithium bonding.

  4. Spreading of lithium on a stainless steel surface at room temperature

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Skinner, C. H.; Capece, A. M.; Roszell, J. P.; Koel, B. E.

    2015-11-10

    Lithium conditioned plasma facing surfaces have lowered recycling and enhanced plasma performance on many fusion devices and liquid lithium plasma facing components are under consideration for future machines. A key factor in the performance of liquid lithium components is the wetting by lithium of its container. We have observed the surface spreading of lithium from a mm-scale particle to adjacent stainless steel surfaces using a scanning Auger microprobe that has elemental discrimination. Here, the spreading of lithium occurred at room temperature (when lithium is a solid) from one location at a speed of 0.62 μm/day under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Separatemore » experiments using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) investigated bonding energetics between monolayer-scale films of lithium and stainless steel. While multilayer lithium desorption from stainless steel begins to occur just above 500 K (Edes = 1.54 eV), sub-monolayer Li desorption occurred in a TPD peak at 942 K (Edes = 2.52 eV) indicating more energetically favorable lithium-stainless steel bonding (in the absence of an oxidation layer) than lithium lithium bonding.« less

  5. Spreading of lithium on a stainless steel surface at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C. H.; Capece, A. M.; Roszell, J. P.; Koel, B. E.

    2016-01-01

    Lithium conditioned plasma facing surfaces have lowered recycling and enhanced plasma performance on many fusion devices and liquid lithium plasma facing components are under consideration for future machines. A key factor in the performance of liquid lithium components is the wetting by lithium of its container. We have observed the surface spreading of lithium from a mm-scale particle to adjacent stainless steel surfaces using a scanning Auger microprobe that has elemental discrimination. The spreading of lithium occurred at room temperature (when lithium is a solid) from one location at a speed of 0.62 mu m/day under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Separate experiments using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) investigated bonding energetics between monolayer-scale films of lithium and stainless steel. While multilayer lithium desorption from stainless steel begins to occur just above 500 K (E-des = 1.54 eV), sub-monolayer Li desorption occurred in a TPD peak at 942 K (E-des = 2.52 eV) indicating more energetically favorable lithium-stainless steel bonding (in the absence of an oxidation layer) than lithium lithium bonding. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A review of lithium and non-lithium based solid state batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joo Gon; Son, Byungrak; Mukherjee, Santanu; Schuppert, Nicholas; Bates, Alex; Kwon, Osung; Choi, Moon Jong; Chung, Hyun Yeol; Park, Sam

    2015-05-01

    Conventional lithium-ion liquid-electrolyte batteries are widely used in portable electronic equipment such as laptop computers, cell phones, and electric vehicles; however, they have several drawbacks, including expensive sealing agents and inherent hazards of fire and leakages. All solid state batteries utilize solid state electrolytes to overcome the safety issues of liquid electrolytes. Drawbacks for all-solid state lithium-ion batteries include high resistance at ambient temperatures and design intricacies. This paper is a comprehensive review of all aspects of solid state batteries: their design, the materials used, and a detailed literature review of various important advances made in research. The paper exhaustively studies lithium based solid state batteries, as they are the most prevalent, but also considers non-lithium based systems. Non-lithium based solid state batteries are attaining widespread commercial applications, as are also lithium based polymeric solid state electrolytes. Tabular representations and schematic diagrams are provided to underscore the unique characteristics of solid state batteries and their capacity to occupy a niche in the alternative energy sector.

  7. Magnetic diagnostics for the lithium tokamak experiment.

    PubMed

    Berzak, L; Kaita, R; Kozub, T; Majeski, R; Zakharov, L

    2008-10-01

    The lithium tokamak experiment (LTX) is a spherical tokamak with R(0)=0.4 m, a=0.26 m, B(TF) approximately 3.4 kG, I(P) approximately 400 kA, and pulse length approximately 0.25 s. The focus of LTX is to investigate the novel low-recycling lithium wall operating regime for magnetically confined plasmas. This regime is reached by placing an in-vessel shell conformal to the plasma last closed flux surface. The shell is heated and then coated with liquid lithium. An extensive array of magnetic diagnostics is available to characterize the experiment, including 80 Mirnov coils (single and double axis, internal and external to the shell), 34 flux loops, 3 Rogowskii coils, and a diamagnetic loop. Diagnostics are specifically located to account for the presence of a secondary conducting surface and engineered to withstand both high temperatures and incidental contact with liquid lithium. The diagnostic set is therefore fabricated from robust materials with heat and lithium resistance and is designed for electrical isolation from the shell and to provide the data required for highly constrained equilibrium reconstructions. PMID:19044600

  8. High performance batteries with carbon nanomaterials and ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Wen

    2012-08-07

    The present invention is directed to lithium-ion batteries in general and more particularly to lithium-ion batteries based on aligned graphene ribbon anodes, V.sub.2O.sub.5 graphene ribbon composite cathodes, and ionic liquid electrolytes. The lithium-ion batteries have excellent performance metrics of cell voltages, energy densities, and power densities.

  9. Lithium pellet production (LiPP): A device for the production of small spheres of lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Fiflis, P.; Andrucyzk, D.; McGuire, M.; Curreli, D.; Ruzic, D. N.; Roquemore, A. L.

    2013-06-15

    With lithium as a fusion material gaining popularity, a method for producing lithium pellets relatively quickly has been developed for NSTX. The Lithium Pellet Production device is based on an injector with a sub-millimeter diameter orifice and relies on a jet of liquid lithium breaking apart into small spheres via the Plateau-Rayleigh instability. A prototype device is presented in this paper and for a pressure difference of {Delta}P= 5 Torr, spheres with diameters between 0.91 < D < 1.37 mm have been produced with an average diameter of D= 1.14 mm, which agrees with the developed theory. Successive tests performed at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory with Wood's metal have confirmed the dependence of sphere diameter on pressure difference as predicted.

  10. Lithium pellet production (LiPP): A device for the production of small spheres of lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiflis, P.; Andrucyzk, D.; Roquemore, A. L.; McGuire, M.; Curreli, D.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2013-06-01

    With lithium as a fusion material gaining popularity, a method for producing lithium pellets relatively quickly has been developed for NSTX. The Lithium Pellet Production device is based on an injector with a sub-millimeter diameter orifice and relies on a jet of liquid lithium breaking apart into small spheres via the Plateau-Rayleigh instability. A prototype device is presented in this paper and for a pressure difference of ΔP = 5 Torr, spheres with diameters between 0.91 < D < 1.37 mm have been produced with an average diameter of D = 1.14 mm, which agrees with the developed theory. Successive tests performed at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory with Wood's metal have confirmed the dependence of sphere diameter on pressure difference as predicted.

  11. Lithium as an Alternative Option in Graves Thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Ishita; Nylen, Eric Sixtus; Sen, Sabyasachi

    2015-01-01

    A 67-year-old woman was admitted with signs and symptoms of Graves thyrotoxicosis. Biochemistry results were as follows: TSH was undetectable; FT4 was >6.99 ng/dL (0.7–1.8); FT3 was 18 pg/mL (3–5); TSI was 658% (0–139). Thyroid uptake and scan showed diffusely increased tracer uptake in the thyroid gland. The patient was started on methimazole 40 mg BID, but her LFTs elevated precipitously with features of fulminant hepatitis. Methimazole was determined to be the cause and was stopped. After weighing pros and cons, lithium was initiated to treat her persistent thyrotoxicosis. Lithium 300 mg was given daily with a goal to maintain between 0.4 and 0.6. High dose Hydrocortisone and propranolol were also administered concomitantly. Free thyroid hormone levels decreased and the patient reached a biochemical and clinical euthyroid state in about 8 days. Though definitive RAI was planned, the patient has been maintained on lithium for more than a month to control her hyperthyroidism. Trial removal of lithium results in reemergence of thyrotoxicosis within 24 hours. Patient was maintained on low dose lithium treatment with lithium level just below therapeutic range which was sufficient to maintain euthyroid state for more than a month. There were no signs of lithium toxicity within this time period. Conclusion. Lithium has a unique physiologic profile and can be used to treat thyrotoxicosis when thionamides cannot be used while awaiting elective radioablation. Lithium levels need to be monitored; however, levels even at subtherapeutic range may be sufficient to treat thyrotoxicosis. PMID:26425375

  12. Lithium-ion battery electrode prepared by confining carbon nanotubes/V2O5 nanoribbons suspension in model air-liquid foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carn, Florent; Morcrette, Mathieu; Desport, Barthélemy; Backov, Rénal

    2013-03-01

    Well-defined macroporous V2O5-CNTs hybrid solid foams are synthesized in the form of monolith by a controlled bubbling process. For the first time, the solid phase results from the co-assembly of two different anisotropic nano-building blocks in the continuous phase of model foams whose bubble size and liquid fraction could be tuned. Their electrochemical properties were examined in view of their application as cathode for Li-ion battery. This first investigation revealed that capacity up to 250 mAh g-1 (i.e. 2 Li per V2O5) can be attain with a good retention under cycles when CNTs are present making these new cellular materials interesting candidate for systems which require the penetration of viscous ionic-liquid/polymer electrolytes.

  13. Lithium use in batteries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Lithium has a number of uses but one of the most valuable is as a component of high energy-density rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. Because of concerns over carbon dioxide footprint and increasing hydrocarbon fuel cost (reduced supply), lithium may become even more important in large batteries for powering all-electric and hybrid vehicles. It would take 1.4 to 3.0 kilograms of lithium equivalent (7.5 to 16.0 kilograms of lithium carbonate) to support a 40-mile trip in an electric vehicle before requiring recharge. This could create a large demand for lithium. Estimates of future lithium demand vary, based on numerous variables. Some of those variables include the potential for recycling, widespread public acceptance of electric vehicles, or the possibility of incentives for converting to lithium-ion-powered engines. Increased electric usage could cause electricity prices to increase. Because of reduced demand, hydrocarbon fuel prices would likely decrease, making hydrocarbon fuel more desirable. In 2009, 13 percent of worldwide lithium reserves, expressed in terms of contained lithium, were reported to be within hard rock mineral deposits, and 87 percent, within brine deposits. Most of the lithium recovered from brine came from Chile, with smaller amounts from China, Argentina, and the United States. Chile also has lithium mineral reserves, as does Australia. Another source of lithium is from recycled batteries. When lithium-ion batteries begin to power vehicles, it is expected that battery recycling rates will increase because vehicle battery recycling systems can be used to produce new lithium-ion batteries.

  14. Properties of lead-lithium solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, N.J.; Darnell, A.; Blink, J.A.

    1980-10-01

    Lead-lithium solutions are of interest to liquid metal wall ICF reactor designers because Pb may be present to some extent in both heavy ion beam and laser-driven ICF targets; therefore, Pb will be present as an impurity in a flowing lithium wall. In addition, Pb-Li solutions containing approx. 80 a/o Pb are a strong candidate for a heavy ion beam driven HYLIFE converter and a viable alternative to a pure Li wall for a laser driven converter. The properties of Pb-Li solutions including the effect of hydrogen impurities are reviewed, and the reactor design implications are discussed.

  15. Corrosion of oxygen-doped tantalum by lithium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.

    1976-01-01

    The increase in the penetration of tantalum by liquid lithium with increasing oxygen content of tantalum results from the ability of lithium to extract oxygen from tantalum oxides and/or from regions of high oxygen concentrations, accompanied by the creation of minute channels. At low oxygen concentration, oxides are present primarily at the grain boundaries and the lithium penetration is primarily intergranular. At high oxygen concentration, oxides and/or regions of high oxygen concentration are present both at the grain boundaries and within the grains; lithium penetration is both intergranular and transgranular. For a specific oxygen concentration, the severity of corrosion decreases with increasing temperature because (1) the oxygen solubility increases with temperature, decreasing the number of oxide particles and/or regions of high oxygen concentration, and (2) the diffusivity of oxygen in tantalum increases, allowing more rapid oxygen removal at the tantalum lithium interface.

  16. All Solid State Rechargeable Lithium Batteries using Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallinan, Daniel; Balsara, Nitash

    2011-03-01

    The growing need for alternative energy and increased demand for mobile technology require higher density energy storage. Existing battery technologies, such as lithium ion, are limited by theoretical energy density as well as safety issues. Other battery chemistries are promising options for dramatically increasing energy density. Safety can be improved by replacing the flammable, reactive liquids used in existing lithium-ion battery electrolytes with polymer electrolytes. Block copolymers are uniquely suited for this task because ionic conductivity and mechanical strength, both important properties in battery formulation, can be independently controlled. In this study, lithium batteries were assembled using lithium metal as negative electrode, polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) copolymer with lithium salt as electrolyte, and a positive electrode. The positive electrode consisted of polymer electrolyte for ion conduction, carbon for electron conduction, and an active material. Batteries were charged and discharged over many cycles. The battery cycling results were compared to a conventional battery chemistry.

  17. Conference report on the 3rd international symposium on lithium application for fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzitelli, G.; Hirooka, Y.; Hu, J. S.; Mirnov, S. V.; Nygren, R.; Shimada, M.; Ono, M.; Tabares, F. L.

    2015-01-14

    The third International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Device (ISLA-2013) was held on 9–11 October 2013 at ENEA Frascati Centre with growing participation and interest from the community working on more general aspect of liquid metal research for fusion energy development. ISLA-2013 has been confirmed to be the largest and the most important meeting dedicated to liquid metal application for the magnetic fusion research. Overall, 45 presentation plus 5 posters were given, representing 28 institutions from 11 countries. The latest experimental results from nine magnetic fusion devices were presented in 16 presentations from NSTX (PPPL, USA), FTU (ENEA, Italy), T-11M (Trinity, RF), T-10 (Kurchatov Institute, RF), TJ-II (CIEMAT, Spain), EAST(ASIPP, China), HT-7 (ASIPP, China), RFX (Padova, Italy), KTM (NNC RK, Kazakhstan). Sessions were devoted to the following: (I) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (facility overviews), (II) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (topical issues), (III) special session on liquid lithium technology, (IV) lithium laboratory test stands, (V) Lithium theory/modelling/comments, (VI) innovative lithium applications and (VII) special Session on lithium-safety and lithium handling. There was a wide participation from the fusion technology communities, including IFMIF and TBM communities providing productive exchange with the physics oriented magnetic confinement liquid metal research groups. This international workshop will continue on a biennial basis (alternating with the Plasma–Surface Interactions (PSI) Conference) and the next workshop will be held at CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain, in 2015.

  18. Conference Report on the 3rd International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzitelli, G.; Hirooka, Y.; Hu, J. S.; Mirnov, S. V.; Nygren, R.; Shimada, M.; Ono, M.; Tabares, F. L.

    2015-02-01

    The third International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Device (ISLA-2013) was held on 9-11 October 2013 at ENEA Frascati Centre with growing participation and interest from the community working on more general aspect of liquid metal research for fusion energy development. ISLA-2013 has been confirmed to be the largest and the most important meeting dedicated to liquid metal application for the magnetic fusion research. Overall, 45 presentation plus 5 posters were given, representing 28 institutions from 11 countries. The latest experimental results from nine magnetic fusion devices were presented in 16 presentations from NSTX (PPPL, USA), FTU (ENEA, Italy), T-11M (Trinity, RF), T-10 (Kurchatov Institute, RF), TJ-II (CIEMAT, Spain), EAST(ASIPP, China), HT-7 (ASIPP, China), RFX (Padova, Italy), KTM (NNC RK, Kazakhstan). Sessions were devoted to the following: (I) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (facility overviews), (II) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (topical issues), (III) special session on liquid lithium technology, (IV) lithium laboratory test stands, (V) Lithium theory/modelling/comments, (VI) innovative lithium applications and (VII) special Session on lithium-safety and lithium handling. There was a wide participation from the fusion technology communities, including IFMIF and TBM communities providing productive exchange with the physics oriented magnetic confinement liquid metal research groups. This international workshop will continue on a biennial basis (alternating with the Plasma-Surface Interactions (PSI) Conference) and the next workshop will be held at CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain, in 2015.

  19. Conference report on the 3rd international symposium on lithium application for fusion devices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mazzitelli, G.; Hirooka, Y.; Hu, J. S.; Mirnov, S. V.; Nygren, R.; Shimada, M.; Ono, M.; Tabares, F. L.

    2015-01-14

    The third International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Device (ISLA-2013) was held on 9–11 October 2013 at ENEA Frascati Centre with growing participation and interest from the community working on more general aspect of liquid metal research for fusion energy development. ISLA-2013 has been confirmed to be the largest and the most important meeting dedicated to liquid metal application for the magnetic fusion research. Overall, 45 presentation plus 5 posters were given, representing 28 institutions from 11 countries. The latest experimental results from nine magnetic fusion devices were presented in 16 presentations from NSTX (PPPL, USA), FTU (ENEA, Italy),more » T-11M (Trinity, RF), T-10 (Kurchatov Institute, RF), TJ-II (CIEMAT, Spain), EAST(ASIPP, China), HT-7 (ASIPP, China), RFX (Padova, Italy), KTM (NNC RK, Kazakhstan). Sessions were devoted to the following: (I) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (facility overviews), (II) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (topical issues), (III) special session on liquid lithium technology, (IV) lithium laboratory test stands, (V) Lithium theory/modelling/comments, (VI) innovative lithium applications and (VII) special Session on lithium-safety and lithium handling. There was a wide participation from the fusion technology communities, including IFMIF and TBM communities providing productive exchange with the physics oriented magnetic confinement liquid metal research groups. This international workshop will continue on a biennial basis (alternating with the Plasma–Surface Interactions (PSI) Conference) and the next workshop will be held at CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain, in 2015.« less

  20. Conference report on the 3rd International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzitelli, Guiseppe; Hirooka, Y.; Hu, J. S.; Mirnov, S. V.; Nygren, R.; Shimada, M.; Ono, M.; Tabares, F. L.

    2015-01-14

    The third International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Device (ISLA-2013) was held on 9-11 October 2013 at ENEA Frascati Centre with growing participation and interest from the community working on more general aspect of liquid metal research for fusion energy development. ISLA-2013 has been confirmed to be the largest and the most important meeting dedicated to liquid metal application for the magnetic fusion research. Overall, 45 presentation plus 5 posters were given, representing 28 institutions from 11 countries. The latest experimental results from nine magnetic fusion devices were presented in 16 presentations from NSTX (PPPL, USA), FTU (ENEA, Italy), T-11M (Trinity, RF), T-10 (Kurchatov Institute, RF), TJ-II (CIEMAT, Spain), EAST(ASIPP, China), HT-7 (ASIPP, China), RFX (Padova, Italy), KTM (NNC RK, Kazakhstan). Sessions were devoted to the following: (I) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (facility overviews), (II) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (topical issues), (III) special session on liquid lithium technology, (IV) lithium laboratory test stands, (V) Lithium theory/modelling/comments, (VI) innovative lithium applications and (VII) special Session on lithium-safety and lithium handling. There was a wide participation from the fusion technology communities, including IFMIF and TBM communities providing productive exchange with the physics oriented magnetic confinement liquid metal research groups. Furthermore, this international workshop will continue on a biennial basis (alternating with the Plasma-Surface Interactions (PSI) Conference) and the next workshop will be held at CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain, in 2015.

  1. The synergetic effect of lithium polysulfide and lithium nitrate to prevent lithium dendrite growth.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiyang; Yao, Hongbin; Yan, Kai; Zheng, Guangyuan; Liang, Zheng; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Cui, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Lithium metal has shown great promise as an anode material for high-energy storage systems, owing to its high theoretical specific capacity and low negative electrochemical potential. Unfortunately, uncontrolled dendritic and mossy lithium growth, as well as electrolyte decomposition inherent in lithium metal-based batteries, cause safety issues and low Coulombic efficiency. Here we demonstrate that the growth of lithium dendrites can be suppressed by exploiting the reaction between lithium and lithium polysulfide, which has long been considered as a critical flaw in lithium-sulfur batteries. We show that a stable and uniform solid electrolyte interphase layer is formed due to a synergetic effect of both lithium polysulfide and lithium nitrate as additives in ether-based electrolyte, preventing dendrite growth and minimizing electrolyte decomposition. Our findings allow for re-evaluation of the reactions regarding lithium polysulfide, lithium nitrate and lithium metal, and provide insights into solving the problems associated with lithium metal anodes. PMID:26081242

  2. The synergetic effect of lithium polysulfide and lithium nitrate to prevent lithium dendrite growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiyang; Yao, Hongbin; Yan, Kai; Zheng, Guangyuan; Liang, Zheng; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Cui, Yi

    2015-06-01

    Lithium metal has shown great promise as an anode material for high-energy storage systems, owing to its high theoretical specific capacity and low negative electrochemical potential. Unfortunately, uncontrolled dendritic and mossy lithium growth, as well as electrolyte decomposition inherent in lithium metal-based batteries, cause safety issues and low Coulombic efficiency. Here we demonstrate that the growth of lithium dendrites can be suppressed by exploiting the reaction between lithium and lithium polysulfide, which has long been considered as a critical flaw in lithium-sulfur batteries. We show that a stable and uniform solid electrolyte interphase layer is formed due to a synergetic effect of both lithium polysulfide and lithium nitrate as additives in ether-based electrolyte, preventing dendrite growth and minimizing electrolyte decomposition. Our findings allow for re-evaluation of the reactions regarding lithium polysulfide, lithium nitrate and lithium metal, and provide insights into solving the problems associated with lithium metal anodes.

  3. Exophthalmos and elevated thyroxine levels in association with lithium therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, P.L.; Evans, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    Although goiter formation and hypothyroidism are not infrequent following lithium therapy, the association of exophthalmos and/or elevated thyroxine levels with lithium is uncommon. We describe a 62 year old man who rapidly developed exophthalmos, elevated circulating thyroxine, elevated TSH levels and elevated radioiodine uptake within six weeks of reexposure to lithium carbonate. When the medication was stopped, all indices of thyroid function returned to normal and the proptosis receded from 22 to 17mm. Lithium decreases secretion of preformed thyroid hormone and the secondary elevation of TSH levels usually restores euthyroid status. We propose that in our patient, because triiodothyronine levels remained normal, the pituitary was refractory to the normal inhibitory feedback effect of thyroxine and that continued hypersecretion of TSH resulted in hyperthyroidism

  4. Method of recycling lithium borate to lithium borohydride through diborane

    DOEpatents

    Filby, Evan E.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a method for the recycling of lithium borate to lithium borohydride which can be reacted with water to generate hydrogen for utilization as a fuel. The lithium borate by-product of the hydrogen generation reaction is reacted with hydrogen chloride and water to produce boric acid and lithium chloride. The boric acid and lithium chloride are converted to lithium borohydride through a diborane intermediate to complete the recycle scheme.

  5. 0.4 Ah class graphite/LiMn 2O 4 lithium-ion battery prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appetecchi, Giovanni Battista; Prosini, Pier Paolo

    0.4 Ah lithium-ion battery prototypes, developed within a national project devoted to development of power sources for consumer applications, have been fabricated and tested. A novel, intrinsically porous, PVdF-HFP/MgO composite separator, capable to be hot-laminated onto PVDF-HFP-based electrodes without losing its ability to retain liquid electrolyte, was developed. The devices were assembled by direct lamination of the components, namely graphite anode tapes, PVDF-HFP/MgO separators and LiMn 2O 4 cathode films. The prototypes, formed by a stack of 12 single cells connected in parallel, need no external pressure to maintain contact between the layers. The battery performance was evaluated in terms of capacity, cycle life, energy and power density at different rates. The capability of prototypes to uptake liquid electrolyte was also investigated. The results have indicated the feasibility to scale-up lithium-ion cells to manufacture 0.4 Ah class battery prototypes showing good cycling performance.

  6. Tailor-made pore controlled poly (arylene ether ketone) membranes as a lithium-ion battery separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mong, Anh; Kim, Dukjoon

    2016-02-01

    Porous poly(arylene ether ketone) (PAEK) membranes are prepared by selective removal of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) molecules from self-assembled PAEK-PLA block copolymers. The pore size and porosity of the membranes are precisely controlled by adjusting PLA concentration. The synthesis of the PAEK-PLA copolymer is confirmed by FTIR and NMR spectroscopies and the morphology of the membrane is examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Several important properties such as liquid electrolyte uptake, contact angle, thermal and mechanical stability, and lithium ion conductivity are measured and compared with those of commercial poly(propylene) (PP) membranes to investigate their application feasibility as a separator. The porous PAEK membrane shows improved thermal and dimensional stability compared to the PP membrane. The EC/DEC/EMC (1:1:1, v/v/v) soaked PAEK membrane with a pore diameter of 50 nm shows the highest lithium ion conductivity, higher than that of PP membrane. More importantly, the porous PAEK membranes show superior liquid electrolyte holding capacity to the PP membrane.

  7. Ceramic and polymeric solid electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fergus, Jeffrey W.

    Lithium-ion batteries are important for energy storage in a wide variety of applications including consumer electronics, transportation and large-scale energy production. The performance of lithium-ion batteries depends on the materials used. One critical component is the electrolyte, which is the focus of this paper. In particular, inorganic ceramic and organic polymer solid-electrolyte materials are reviewed. Solid electrolytes provide advantages in terms of simplicity of design and operational safety, but typically have conductivities that are lower than those of organic liquid electrolytes. This paper provides a comparison of the conductivities of solid-electrolyte materials being used or developed for use in lithium-ion batteries.

  8. Lithium-system corrosion/erosion studies for the FMIT project

    SciTech Connect

    Bazinet, G D

    1983-04-01

    The corrosion behavior of selected materials in a liquid lithium environment has been studied in support of system and component designs for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. The liquid lithium test resources and the capabilities of several laboratories were used to study specific concerns associated with the overall objective. Testing conditions ranged from approx. 3700 hours to approx. 6500 hours of exposure to flowing lithium at temperatures from 230/sup 0/C to 270/sup 0/C and static lithium at temperatures from 200/sup 0/C to 500/sup 0/C. Principal areas of investigation included lithium corrosion/erosion effects of FMIT lithium system materials (largely Type 304 and Type 304L austenitic stainless steels) and candidate materials for major system components.

  9. Particle Control and Plasma Performance in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX)

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Majeski, et. al.

    2013-02-21

    The Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) is a small, low aspect ratio tokamak, which is fitted with a stainless steel-clad copper liner, conformal to the last closed flux surface. The liner can be heated to 350{degree}C. Several gas fueling systems, including supersonic gas injection, and molecular cluster injection have been studied, and produce fueling efficiencies up to 35%. Discharges are strongly affected by wall conditioning. Discharges without lithium wall coatings are limited to plasma currents of order 10 kA, and discharge durations of order 5 msec. With solid lithium coatings discharge currents exceed 70 kA, and discharge durations exceed 30 msec. Heating the lithium wall coating, however, results in a prompt degradation of the discharge, at the melting point of lithium. These results suggest that the simplest approach to implementing liquid lithium walls in a tokamak - thin, evaporated, liquefied coatings of lithium - does not produce an adequately clean surface.

  10. High cyclability of ionic liquid-produced TiO2 nanotube arrays as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huaqing; Martha, Surendra K.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Luo, Huimin; Dai, Sheng; Qu, Jun

    2012-11-01

    TiO2 nanotubes (NTs) are considered as a potential SEI-free anode material for Li-ion batteries to offer enhanced safety. Organic solutions, dominatingly ethylene glycol (EG)-based, have widely been used for synthesizing TiO2 NTs via anodization because of their ability to generate long tubes and well-aligned structures. However, it has been revealed that the EG-produced NTs are composited with carbonaceous decomposition products of EG, release of which during the tube crystallization process inevitably causes nano-scale porosity and cracks. These microstructural defects significantly deteriorate the NTs' charge transport efficiency and mechanical strength/toughness. Here we report using ionic liquids (ILs) to anodize titanium to grow low-defect TiO2 NTs by reducing the electrolyte decomposition rate (less IR drop due to higher electrical conductivity) as well as the chance of the decomposition products mixing into the TiO2 matrix (organic cations repelled away). Promising electrochemical results have been achieved when using the IL-produced TiO2 NTs as an anode for Li-ion batteries. The ILNTs demonstrated excellent capacity retention without microstructural damage for nearly 1200 cycles of charge-discharge, while the NTs grown in a conventional EG solution totally pulverized in cycling, resulting in significant capacity fade.

  11. Lithium and symptomatic hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    Ananth, J; Dubin, S E

    1983-01-01

    Hyperparathyroidism with or without adenoma has occasionally been reported in association with lithium treatment, and in symptomatic patients depression, psychosis and an exacerbation of existing psychopathology may occur. Three lithium-treated patients with hyperparathyroidism are reported, in whom discontinuation of lithium in one and removal of parathyroid adenomata in two led to both a reduction in plasma calcium levels and an improvement in their psychopathology. PMID:6423822

  12. Conductivity and stability towards lithium metal of lithium triflate (LiSO 3CF 3) and lithium bistrifluorosulfonylimide (Li(SO 2CF 3)N) in amines and their mixtures with ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahys, Bernard; Akturk, Necmettin; Herlem, Michel

    The solvates based on combinations of lithium salts with ammonia (called liquid ammoniates) form highly conductive and low cost electrolytes. The generalizing of this fact is possible with amines. Like ammoniates, their solvates possess properties which can widely vary with the composition, the nature of the amine and the anion. Mixtures of NH 3, amine(s) and lithium salt(s) were also investigated. These properties include the glass-transition temperature, the conductivity, the vapour pressure and the corrosion rate of lithium. The conductivity can be as high as 1 × 10 -2 Ω -1 cm -1 at 60 °C. The lithium stability depends on the anion and on the nature of the amines: with n-propylamine and isopropylamine charged with lithium triflate (only 1.5 M) lithium metal is very stable even at +70 °C during several months.

  13. High Temperature Stable Separator for Lithium Batteries Based on SiO2 and Hydroxypropyl Guar Gum

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Diogo Vieira; Loeffler, Nicholas; Kim, Guk-Tae; Passerini, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    A novel membrane based on silicon dioxide (SiO2) and hydroxypropyl guar gum (HPG) as binder is presented and tested as a separator for lithium-ion batteries. The separator is made with renewable and low cost materials and an environmentally friendly manufacturing processing using only water as solvent. The separator offers superior wettability and high electrolyte uptake due to the optimized porosity and the good affinity of SiO2 and guar gum microstructure towards organic liquid electrolytes. Additionally, the separator shows high thermal stability and no dimensional-shrinkage at high temperatures due to the use of the ceramic filler and the thermally stable natural polymer. The electrochemical tests show the good electrochemical stability of the separator in a wide range of potential, as well as its outstanding cycle performance. PMID:26512701

  14. Electrolyte compositions for lithium ion batteries

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng; Liao, Chen

    2016-03-29

    The invention is directed in a first aspect to an ionic liquid of the general formula Y.sup.+Z.sup.-, wherein Y.sup.+ is a positively-charged component of the ionic liquid and Z.sup.- is a negatively-charged component of the ionic liquid, wherein Z.sup.- is a boron-containing anion of the following formula: ##STR00001## The invention is also directed to electrolyte compositions in which the boron-containing ionic liquid Y.sup.+Z.sup.- is incorporated into a lithium ion battery electrolyte, with or without admixture with another ionic liquid Y.sup.+X.sup.- and/or non-ionic solvent and/or non-ionic solvent additive.

  15. Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of lithium polymer electric vehicle batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Corbus, D; Hammel, C J

    1995-02-01

    Lithium solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) batteries are being investigated by researchers worldwide as a possible energy source for future electric vehicles (EVs). One of the main reasons for interest in lithium SPE battery systems is the potential safety features they offer as compared to lithium battery systems using inorganic and organic liquid electrolytes. However, the development of lithium SPE batteries is still in its infancy, and the technology is not envisioned to be ready for commercialization for several years. Because the research and development (R&D) of lithium SPE battery technology is of a highly competitive nature, with many companies both in the United States and abroad pursuing R&D efforts, much of the information concerning specific developments of lithium SPE battery technology is proprietary. This report is based on information available only through the open literature (i.e., information available through library searches). Furthermore, whereas R&D activities for lithium SPE cells have focused on a number of different chemistries, for both electrodes and electrolytes, this report examines the general environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues common to many lithium SPE chemistries. However, EH&S issues for specific lithium SPE cell chemistries are discussed when sufficient information exists. Although lithium batteries that do not have a SPE are also being considered for EV applications, this report focuses only on those lithium battery technologies that utilize the SPE technology. The lithium SPE battery technologies considered in this report may contain metallic lithium or nonmetallic lithium compounds (e.g., lithium intercalated carbons) in the negative electrode.

  16. Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of lithium polymer electric vehicle batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbus, D.; Hammel, C. J.

    1995-02-01

    Lithium solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) batteries are being investigated by researchers worldwide as a possible energy source for future electric vehicles (EV's). One of the main reasons for interest in lithium SPE battery systems is the potential safety features they offer as compared to lithium battery systems using inorganic and organic liquid electrolytes. However, the development of lithium SPE batteries is still in its infancy, and the technology is not envisioned to be ready for commercialization for several years. Because the research and development (R&D) of lithium SPE battery technology is of a highly competitive nature, with many companies both in the United States and abroad pursuing R&D efforts, much of the information concerning specific developments of lithium SPE battery technology is proprietary. This report is based on information available only through the open literature (i.e., information available through library searches). Furthermore, whereas R&D activities for lithium SPE cells have focused on a number of different chemistries, for both electrodes and electrolytes, this report examines the general environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues common to many lithium SPE chemistries. However, EH&S issues for specific lithium SPE cell chemistries are discussed when sufficient information exists. Although lithium batteries that do not have a SPE are also being considered for EV applications, this report focuses only on those lithium battery technologies that utilize the SPE technology. The lithium SPE battery technologies considered in this report may contain metallic lithium or nonmetallic lithium compounds (e.g., lithium intercalated carbons) in the negative electrode.

  17. Electrochemical analysis of lithium polymer batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yong-Bong

    Lithium batteries consist of lithium anode, polymer electrolyte separator, and the porous, composite cathode. Lithium batteries have been very attractive to the battery industries because lithium metal has an extremely high energy density. The use of lithium metal can cause dendrite formation by uneven electro-deposition during charge. The lithium battery can explode in a liquid electrolyte when it is shorted by the dendrite. It has been reported that the mechanical properties of a polymer electrolyte can retard the dendrite initiation. We have attempted to study the dendrite initiation quantitatively by developing a mathematical model that evaluates the behavior of the interface and by performing dendrite-initiation experiments with the use of cross-linked polymer electrolytes to vary the mechanical properties of the electrolyte. Cross-linking the polymer backbone may decrease the transport properties of the polymer electrolyte. The transport properties are diffusion coefficient, ionic conductivity, and transference number of the electrolyte. When poor transport properties of the polymer electrolyte cause salt depletion at the cathode at low salt concentrations, side reactions and dendrite initiation can be accelerated. In order to study how cross-linking the polymer backbone affects the transport properties, the transport properties are measured experimentally by LBNL method which is based on concentrated solution theory. Porous electrodes are commonly used as the cathode in lithium battery systems. Because the electrochemical reaction occurs at the active particles in the porous, composite cathode during charge and discharge, the kinetics of the electrochemical reaction at the active particles in the cathode affects the battery performance. AC impedance has been broadly used to study the kinetics of the electrochemical reaction in the cathode. However, the AC impedance spectra have been analyzed by regarding the porous cathode as a planar electrode by most

  18. Accommodation of liquid metal by cavity liners

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppson, D.W.

    1989-03-01

    Present liquid metal breeder reactor cell liner designs appear adequate to contain postulated leakages of lithium-lead alloy in an air or steam atmosphere and to contain lithium when inert atmospheres are present. If an air or steam atmosphere may be present in a cavity where lithium amy accumulate under postulated accident conditions, then consideration of stainless steel liners and further testing is recommended. Lithium testing of faulted liners should also be considered. SOFIRE II and WATRe computer codes may be useful in establishing liner design requirements and in determining water release from concrete behind the liners (potential hydrogen production) for postulated leakages to steel-lined concrete cavities.

  19. Laminar Multicell Lithium Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Bruder, A. H.

    1984-01-31

    Laminar batteries of series connected cells comprising lithium anodes and an electrolyte containing a passivating solvent reactive with lithium in which the cells are electrically connected in series by intercell barriers comprising outer layers of electrochemically inert electronically conducting material in contact with the electrochemically active anode and cathode of adjacent cells and a layer of metal foil between the electrochemically inert layers.

  20. In-situ measurement of the lithium distribution in Li-ion batteries using micro-IBA techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, A.; Orikasa, Y.; Chen, K.; Uchimoto, Y.; Kamiya, T.; Koka, M.; Satoh, T.; Mima, K.; Kato, Y.; Fujita, K.

    2016-03-01

    Direct observation of lithium concentration distribution in lithium-ion battery composite electrodes has been performed for the first time. Lithium-ion battery model cells for particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and particle induced gamma ray emission (PIGE) measurements were designed and fabricated. Two dimensional images of lithium concentration in LiFePO4 composite electrodes were obtained with PIXE and PIGE by scanning the proton microbeam for various charged states of the electrodes. Lithium concentration in LiFePO4 composite electrodes was decreased from the contact interface between LiFePO4 electrode and liquid electrolyte during the charge reaction.

  1. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2015-01-13

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  2. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2013-07-23

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  3. Lithium and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Motoi, Yumiko; Shimada, Kohei; Ishiguro, Koichi; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2014-06-18

    Lithium, a drug used to treat bipolar disorders, has a variety of neuroprotective mechanisms, including autophagy regulation, in various neuropsychiatric conditions. In neurodegenerative diseases, lithium enhances degradation of aggregate-prone proteins, including mutated huntingtin, phosphorylated tau, and α-synuclein, and causes damaged mitochondria to degrade, while in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia and Alzheimer's disease autophagy downregulation by lithium is observed. The signaling pathway of lithium as an autophagy enhancer might be associated with the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-independent pathway, which is involved in myo-inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) in Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease. However, the mTOR-dependent pathway might be involved in inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) in other diseases. Lithium's autophagy-enhancing property may contribute to the therapeutic benefit of patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:24738557

  4. An investigation of voids formation mechanisms and their effects on freeze and thaw processes of lithium and lithium fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Yang, Jae-Young

    1991-01-01

    The mechanisms of void formation during the cooldown and freezing of lithium coolant within the primary loop of SP-100 type systems are investigated. These mechanisms are: (1) homogeneous nucleation; (2) heterogeneous nucleation; (3) normal segregation of helium gas dissolved in liquid lithium; and (4) shrinkage of lithium during freezing. To evaluate the void formation potential due to segregation, a numerical scheme that couples the freezing and mass diffusion processes in both the solid and liquid regions is developed. The results indicated that the formation of He bubbles is unlikely by either homogeneous or heterogeneous nucleation during the cooldown process. However, homogeneous nucleation of He bubbles following the segregation of dissolved He in liquid lithium ahead of the solid-liquid interface is likely to occur. Results also show that total volume of He void is insignificant when compared to that of shrinkage voids. In viewing this, the subsequent research focuses on the effects of shrinkage void forming during freezing of lithium on subsequent thaw processes are investigated using a numerical scheme that is based on a single (solid/liquid) cell approach. The cases of lithium-fluoride are also investigated to show the effect of larger volume shrinkage upon freezing on the freeze and thaw processes. Results show that a void forming at the wall appreciably reduces the solid-liquid interface velocity, during both freeze and thaw, and causes a substantial rise in the wall temperature during thaw. However, in the case of Li, the maximum wall temperature was much lower than the melting temperature of PWC-11, which is used as the structure material in the SP-100 system. Hence, it is included that a formation of hot spots is unlikely during the startup or restart of the SP-100 system.

  5. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Kim, Jeom-Soo; Johnson, Christopher S.

    2008-01-01

    An uncycled electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula Li.sub.(2+2x)/(2+x)M'.sub.2x/(2+x)M.sub.(2-2x)/(2+x)O.sub.2-.delta., in which 0.ltoreq.x<1 and .delta. is less than 0.2, and in which M is a non-lithium metal ion with an average trivalent oxidation state selected from two or more of the first row transition metals or lighter metal elements in the periodic table, and M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state selected from the first and second row transition metal elements and Sn. Methods of preconditioning the electrodes are disclosed as are electrochemical cells and batteries containing the electrodes.

  6. Ceramic-metal seals for advanced battery systems. [sodium sulfur and lithium sulfur batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, L.

    1978-01-01

    The search for materials which are electrochemically compatible with the lithium sulfur and sodium sulfur systems is discussed. The use liquid or braze alloys, titanium hydrite coatings, and tungsten yttria for bonding beryllium with ceramic is examined.

  7. Techniques for lithium removal from 1040 C aged tantalum alloy, T-111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gahn, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    The liquid ammonia and vacuum distillation techniques were found to be satisfactory for removing lithium from 1040 C aged T-111 (tantalum - 8-percent tungsten- 2-percent hafnium). Results of ductility tests and chemical analysis show that these two methods are adequate for removing lithium without embrittlement or contamination of the T-111. Moist air exposure of T-111 with traces of lithium on the surface produced mixed results. Some specimens were ductile; others were brittle. Brittle T-111 had an increased hydrogen content. Water removal of lithium from T-111 caused brittleness and an increased hydrogen concentration.

  8. Materials issues in lithium ion rechargeable battery technology

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, D.H.

    1995-07-01

    Lithium ion rechargeable batteries are predicted to replace Ni/Cd as the workhorse consumer battery. The pace of development of this battery system is determined in large part by the availability of materials and the understanding of interfacial reactions between materials. Lithium ion technology is based on the use of two lithium intercalating electrodes. Carbon is the most commonly used anode material, while the cathode materials of choice have been layered lithium metal chalcogenides (LiMX{sub 2}) and lithium spinel-type compounds. Electrolytes may be either organic liquids or polymers. Although the first practical use of graphite intercalation compounds as battery anodes was reported in 1981 for molten salt cells and in 1983 for ambient temperature systems, it was not until Sony Energytech announced a new lithium ion intercalating carbon anode in 1990, that interest peaked. The reason for this heightened interest is that these electrochemical cells have the high energy density, high voltage and light weight of metallic lithium, but without the disadvantages of dendrite formation on charge, improving their safety and cycle life.

  9. Lithium Polysulfidophosphates: A Family of Lithium-Conducting Sulfur-Rich Compounds for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhan; Liu, Zengcai; Fu, Wujun; Dudney, Nancy J; Liang, Chengdu

    2013-01-01

    Given the great potential for improving the energy density of state-of-the-art lithium-ion batteries by a factor of 5, a breakthrough in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries will have a dramatic impact in a broad scope of energy related fields. Conventional Li-S batteries that use liquid electrolytes are intrinsically short-lived with low energy efficiency. The challenges stem from the poor electronic and ionic conductivities of elemental sulfur and its discharge products. We report herein lithium polysulfidophosphates (LPSP), a family of sulfur-rich compounds, as the enabler of long-lasting and energy-efficient Li-S batteries. LPSP have ionic conductivities of 3.0 10-5 S cm-1 at 25 oC, which is 8 orders of magnitude higher than that of Li2S (~10-13 S cm-1). The high Li-ion conductivity of LPSP is the salient characteristic of these compounds that impart the excellent cycling performance to Li-S batteries. In addition, the batteries are configured in an all-solid state that promises the safe cycling of high-energy batteries with metallic lithium anodes.

  10. Electronic structure calculations on lithium battery electrolyte salts.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Patrik

    2007-03-28

    New lithium salts for non-aqueous liquid, gel and polymeric electrolytes are crucial due to the limiting role of the electrolyte in modern lithium batteries. The solvation of any lithium salt to form an electrolyte solution ultimately depends on the strength of the cation-solvent vs. the cation-anion interaction. Here, the latter is probed via HF, B3LYP and G3 theory gas-phase calculations for the dissociation reaction: LiX <--> Li(+) + X(-). Furthermore, a continuum solvation method (C-PCM) has been applied to mimic solvent effects. Anion volumes were also calculated to facilitate a discussion on ion conductivities and cation transport numbers. Judging from the present results, synthesis efforts should target heterocyclic anions with a size of ca. 150 A(3) molecule(-1) to render new highly dissociative lithium salts that result in electrolytes with high cation transport numbers. PMID:17356757

  11. Improvement in Plasma Performance with Lithium Coatings in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R; Ahn, J -W; Allain, J P; Bell, M G; Bell, R; Boedo, J; Bush, C; Mansfield, D; Menard, J; Mueller, D; Ono, M; Paul, S; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Ross, P W; Sabbagh, S; Schneider, H; Skinner, C H; Soukhanovskii, V; Stevenson, T; Stotler, D; Timberlake, J; Wampler, W R; Wilgen, J B

    2008-09-12

    Lithium as a plasma-facing material has attractive features, including a reduction in the recycling of hydrogenic species and the potential for withstanding high heat and neutron fluxes in fusion reactors. Dramatic effects on plasma performance with lithium-coated plasma-facing components (PFCOs) have been demonstrated on many fusion devices, including TFTR, [1] T-11M, [2] and FT-U. [3] Using a liquid-lithium-filled tray as a limiter, the CDX-U device achieved very significant enhancement in the confinement time of ohmically heated plasmas. [4] The recent NSTX experiments reported here have demonstrated, for the first time, significant and recurring benefits of lithium PFC coatings on divertor plasma performance in both L- and H- mode regimes heated by neutral beams.

  12. Improvement in Plasma Performance with Lithium Coatings in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R

    2009-02-17

    Lithium as a plasma-facing material has attractive features, including a reduction in the recycling of hydrogenic species and the potential for withstanding high heat and neutron fluxes in fusion reactors. Dramatic effects on plasma performance with lithium-coated plasma-facing components (PFC's) have been demonstrated on many fusion devices, including TFTR, T-11M, and FT-U. Using a liquid-lithium-filled tray as a limiter, the CDX-U device achieved very significant enhancement in the confinement time of ohmically heated plasmas. The recent NSTX experiments reported here have demonstrated, for the first time, significant and recurring benefits of lithium PFC coatings on divertor plasma performance in both L- and H- mode regimes heated by neutral beams.

  13. Interphase Evolution of a Lithium-Ion/Oxygen Battery.

    PubMed

    Elia, Giuseppe Antonio; Bresser, Dominic; Reiter, Jakub; Oberhumer, Philipp; Sun, Yang-Kook; Scrosati, Bruno; Passerini, Stefano; Hassoun, Jusef

    2015-10-14

    A novel lithium-ion/oxygen battery employing Pyr14TFSI-LiTFSI as the electrolyte and nanostructured LixSn-C as the anode is reported. The remarkable energy content of the oxygen cathode, the replacement of the lithium metal anode by a nanostructured stable lithium-alloying composite, and the concomitant use of nonflammable ionic liquid-based electrolyte result in a new and intrinsically safer energy storage system. The lithium-ion/oxygen battery delivers a stable capacity of 500 mAh g(-1) at a working voltage of 2.4 V with a low charge-discharge polarization. However, further characterization of this new system by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy reveals the progressive decrease of the battery working voltage, because of the crossover of oxygen through the electrolyte and its direct reaction with the LixSn-C anode. PMID:26389522

  14. Benzimidazole-derived anion for lithium-conducting electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzicki, Leszek; Oledzki, Piotr; Bitner, Anna; Bukowska, Maria; Szczecinski, Przemyslaw

    2016-02-01

    In this work we announce new lithium salt of 5,6-dicyano-2-(trifluoromethyl)benzimidazolide (LiTDBI) designed for application in lithium conductive electrolytes. It was synthesized and completely characterized by NMR techniques. Studies show salt's thermal stability up to 270 °C and electrochemical stability in liquid solvents up to +4.7 V vs. metallic lithium anode. Basic characterization of electrolytes made with this salt show conductivity over 1 mS cm-1 and unusually high transference number at high concentrations (0.74 in EC:DMC 1:2 ratio mixture) along with low onset of conductivity peak. As a final proof of concept, cycling in half-cell was performed and electrolyte based on LiTDBI showed perfect capacity retention. Such properties show remarkable progress in creating efficient lithium-conducting electrolytes with use of weakly-coordinating anions.

  15. Modified natural graphite as anode material for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y. P.; Jiang, C.; Wan, C.; Holze, R.

    A concentrated nitric acid solution was used as an oxidant to modify the electrochemical performance of natural graphite as anode material for lithium ion batteries. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance, thermogravimmetry, differential thermal analysis, high resolution electron microscopy, and measurement of the reversible capacity suggest that the surface structure of natural graphite was changed, a fresh dense layer of oxides was formed. Some structural imperfections were removed, and the stability of the graphite structure increased. These changes impede decomposition of electrolyte solvent molecules, co-intercalation of solvated lithium ions and movement of graphene planes along the a-axis direction. Concomitantly, more micropores were introduced, and thus, lithium intercalation and deintercalation were favored and more sites were provided for lithium storage. Consequently, the reversible capacity and the cycling behavior of the modified natural graphite were much improved by the oxidation. Obviously, the liquid-solid oxidation is advantageous in controlling the uniformity of the products.

  16. Electrohydrodynamic ion emission from molten lithium nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Panitz, J.A.; Pregenzer, A.L.; Gerber, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Positive ions have been generated at the surface of molten lithium nitrate by applying a high electrostatic field to a thin layer of the molten salt on the apex of a field emitter tip. The ion emission process is characteristic of electrohydrodynamic ion formation, usually observed when a high electric field is applied to the surface of a liquid metal or alloy. With molten lithium nitrate, a single emission site appears at threshold. The divergence of the ion beam is several degrees. At higher field strengths multiple emission sites are observed. An ion species at m/e = 76 amu dominates the mass spectrum at all field strengths. This species is identified as a cluster ion (LiNO/sub 3/ )Li/sup +/ . At low source temperatures, (LiNO/sub 3/ )/sub 2/ Li/sup +/ is also observed. Despite the low ionization potential of lithium (5.4 eV), Li/sup +/ accounts for <8% of the total ion current generated by the source under all operating conditions. Multiply charged lithium is not detected in the mass spectra, suggesting the electric field at the Taylor cone apex is not sufficient to field-ionize singly charged species by a postionization process.

  17. Results and code prediction comparisons of lithium-air reaction and aerosol behavior tests

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppson, D.W.

    1986-03-01

    The Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) Fusion Safety Support Studies include evaluation of potential safety and environmental concerns associated with the use of liquid lithium as a breeder and coolant for fusion reactors. Potential mechanisms for volatilization and transport of radioactive metallic species associated with breeder materials are of particular interest. Liquid lithium pool-air reaction and aerosol behavior tests were conducted with lithium masses up to 100 kg within the 850-m/sup 3/ containment vessel in the Containment Systems Test Facility. Lithium-air reaction rates, aerosol generation rates, aerosol behavior and characterization, as well as containment atmosphere temperature and pressure responses were determined. Pool-air reaction and aerosol behavior test results were compared with computer code calculations for reaction rates, containment atmosphere response, and aerosol behavior. The volatility of potentially radioactive metallic species from a lithium pool-air reaction was measured. The response of various aerosol detectors to the aerosol generated was determined. Liquid lithium spray tests in air and in nitrogen atmospheres were conducted with lithium temperatures of about 427/sup 0/ and 650/sup 0/C. Lithium reaction rates, containment atmosphere response, and aerosol generation and characterization were determined for these spray tests.

  18. Lithium cell test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    Three lithium SO2 cells, two lithium CF cells, and a vinyl chloride cell, all with crimped seals, and all strictly experimental, were independently discharged on resistors. Three temperatures were used and several different storage temperatures. Discharge rate generally on the nominal discharges were 0.1 amp, 0.5 amp, and 1 amp. Tests results show that the crimp seals are inadequate, especially for the SO2 cells. Normal discharges present no hazards. All cells discharge to zero. The problem of lithium cell explosions, such as occurred during off-limits testing, is discussed.

  19. Lithium Dendrite Formation

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-06

    Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have captured the first real-time nanoscale images of lithium dendrite structures known to degrade lithium-ion batteries. The ORNL team’s electron microscopy could help researchers address long-standing issues related to battery performance and safety. Video shows annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging (ADF STEM) of lithium dendrite nucleation and growth from a glassy carbon working electrode and within a 1.2M LiPF6 EC:DM battery electrolyte.

  20. Influence of lithium coating on the optics of Doppler backscatter system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. H.; Liu, A. D. Zhou, C.; Hu, J. Q.; Wang, M. Y.; Yu, C. X.; Liu, W. D.; Li, H.; Lan, T.; Xie, J. L.

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents the first investigation of the effect of lithium coating on the optics of Doppler backscattering. A liquid lithium limiter has been applied in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), and a Doppler backscattering has been installed in the EAST. A parabolic mirror and a flat mirror located in the vacuum vessel are polluted by lithium. An identical optical system of the Doppler backscattering is set up in laboratory. The power distributions of the emission beam after the two mirrors with and without lithium coating (cleaned before and after), are measured at three different distances under four incident frequencies. The results demonstrate that the influence of the lithium coating on the power distributions are very slight, and the Doppler backscattering can work normally under the dosage of lithium during the 2014 EAST campaign.

  1. Influence of lithium coating on the optics of Doppler backscatter system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X H; Liu, A D; Zhou, C; Hu, J Q; Wang, M Y; Yu, C X; Liu, W D; Li, H; Lan, T; Xie, J L

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the first investigation of the effect of lithium coating on the optics of Doppler backscattering. A liquid lithium limiter has been applied in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), and a Doppler backscattering has been installed in the EAST. A parabolic mirror and a flat mirror located in the vacuum vessel are polluted by lithium. An identical optical system of the Doppler backscattering is set up in laboratory. The power distributions of the emission beam after the two mirrors with and without lithium coating (cleaned before and after), are measured at three different distances under four incident frequencies. The results demonstrate that the influence of the lithium coating on the power distributions are very slight, and the Doppler backscattering can work normally under the dosage of lithium during the 2014 EAST campaign. PMID:26520951

  2. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kang, Sun-Ho

    2010-06-08

    An uncycled preconditioned electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula xLi.sub.2-yH.sub.yO.xM'O.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.1-zH.sub.zMO.sub.2 in which 0lithium metal ion with an average trivalent oxidation state selected from two or more of the first row transition metals or lighter metal elements in the periodic table, and M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state selected from the first and second row transition metal elements and Sn. The xLi.sub.2-yH.sub.y.xM'O.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.1-zH.sub.zMO.sub.2 material is prepared by preconditioning a precursor lithium metal oxide (i.e., xLi.sub.2M'O.sub.3.(1-x)LiMO.sub.2) with a proton-containing medium with a pH<7.0 containing an inorganic acid. Methods of preparing the electrodes are disclosed, as are electrochemical cells and batteries containing the electrodes.

  3. Lithium drifted germanium system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fjarlie, E. J.

    1969-01-01

    General characteristics of the lithium-drifted germanium photodiode-Dewar-preamplifier system and particular operating instructions for the device are given. Information is included on solving operational problems.

  4. APPARATUS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF LITHIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Baker, P.S.; Duncan, F.R.; Greene, H.B.

    1961-08-22

    Methods and apparatus for the production of high-purity lithium from lithium halides are described. The apparatus is provided for continuously contacting a molten lithium halide with molten barium, thereby forming lithium metal and a barium halide, establishing separate layers of these reaction products and unreacted barium and lithium halide, and continuously withdrawing lithium and barium halide from the reaction zone. (AEC)

  5. Safer Electrolytes for Lithium-Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kejha, Joe; Smith, Novis; McCloseky, Joel

    2004-01-01

    A number of nonvolatile, low-flammability liquid oligomers and polymers based on aliphatic organic carbonate molecular structures have been found to be suitable to be blended with ethylene carbonate to make electrolytes for lithium-ion electrochemical cells. Heretofore, such electrolytes have often been made by blending ethylene carbonate with volatile, flammable organic carbonates. The present nonvolatile electrolytes have been found to have adequate conductivity (about 2 mS/cm) for lithium ions and to remain liquid at temperatures down to -5 C. At normal charge and discharge rates, lithiumion cells containing these nonvolatile electrolytes but otherwise of standard design have been found to operate at current and energy densities comparable to those of cells now in common use. They do not perform well at high charge and discharge rates -- an effect probably attributable to electrolyte viscosity. Cells containing the nonvolatile electrolytes have also been found to be, variously, nonflammable or at least self-extinguishing. Hence, there appears to be a basis for the development of safer high-performance lithium-ion cells.

  6. Novel Nanofiber-based Membrane Separators for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanilmaz, Meltem

    of the resultant composite membranes is restricted because these nanoparticles are not exposed to liquid electrolytes and have limited effect on improving the cell performance. Hence, we introduced new nanoparticle-on-nanofiber hybrid membrane separators by combining electrospraying with electrospinning techniques. Electrochemical properties were enhanced due to the increased surface area caused by the unique hybrid structure of SiO2 nanoparticles and PVDF nanofibers. To design a high-performance separator with enhanced mechanical properties and good thermal stability, electrospun SiO2/nylon 6,6 nanofiber membranes were fabricated. It was found that SiO2/nylon 6,6 nanofiber membranes had superior thermal stability and mechanical strength. Electrospinning has serious drawbacks such as low spinning rate and high production cost. Centrifugal spinning is a fast, cost-effective and safe alternative to the electrospinning. SiO2/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) membranes were produced by using centrifugal spinning. Compared with commercial microporous polyolefin membranes, SiO2/PAN membranes had larger liquid electrolyte uptake, higher electrochemical oxidation limit, and lower interfacial resistance with lithium. SiO2/PAN membrane separators were assembled into lithium/lithium iron phosphate cells and these cells exhibited good cycling and C-rate performance.

  7. Lithium to the Rescue.

    PubMed

    Jope, Richard S; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2016-01-01

    Lithium, an element that Mother Nature has put in some drinking water sources, has been used for its curative powers for centuries. Today, it's given in capsule form as a mood stabilizer for bipolar disorder and depression. New research, however, reveals its role as a neuroprotector, and suggests that a better understanding of the role enzymes modulated by lithium play could lead to new treatments for Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27408673

  8. Lithium battery management system

    DOEpatents

    Dougherty, Thomas J.

    2012-05-08

    Provided is a system for managing a lithium battery system having a plurality of cells. The battery system comprises a variable-resistance element electrically connected to a cell and located proximate a portion of the cell; and a device for determining, utilizing the variable-resistance element, whether the temperature of the cell has exceeded a predetermined threshold. A method of managing the temperature of a lithium battery system is also included.

  9. Solid-state lithium battery

    SciTech Connect

    Ihlefeld, Jon; Clem, Paul G; Edney, Cynthia; Ingersoll, David; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Fenton, Kyle Ross

    2014-11-04

    The present invention is directed to a higher power, thin film lithium-ion electrolyte on a metallic substrate, enabling mass-produced solid-state lithium batteries. High-temperature thermodynamic equilibrium processing enables co-firing of oxides and base metals, providing a means to integrate the crystalline, lithium-stable, fast lithium-ion conductor lanthanum lithium tantalate (La.sub.1/3-xLi.sub.3xTaO.sub.3) directly with a thin metal foil current collector appropriate for a lithium-free solid-state battery.

  10. Hydrogen Outgassing from Lithium Hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Smith, R A; Balazs1, B; McLean II, W

    2006-04-20

    Lithium hydride is a nuclear material with a great affinity for moisture. As a result of exposure to water vapor during machining, transportation, storage and assembly, a corrosion layer (oxide and/or hydroxide) always forms on the surface of lithium hydride resulting in the release of hydrogen gas. Thermodynamically, lithium hydride, lithium oxide and lithium hydroxide are all stable. However, lithium hydroxides formed near the lithium hydride substrate (interface hydroxide) and near the sample/vacuum interface (surface hydroxide) are much less thermally stable than their bulk counterpart. In a dry environment, the interface/surface hydroxides slowly degenerate over many years/decades at room temperature into lithium oxide, releasing water vapor and ultimately hydrogen gas through reaction of the water vapor with the lithium hydride substrate. This outgassing can potentially cause metal hydriding and/or compatibility issues elsewhere in the device. In this chapter, the morphology and the chemistry of the corrosion layer grown on lithium hydride (and in some cases, its isotopic cousin, lithium deuteride) as a result of exposure to moisture are investigated. The hydrogen outgassing processes associated with the formation and subsequent degeneration of this corrosion layer are described. Experimental techniques to measure the hydrogen outgassing kinetics from lithium hydride and methods employing the measured kinetics to predict hydrogen outgassing as a function of time and temperature are presented. Finally, practical procedures to mitigate the problem of hydrogen outgassing from lithium hydride are discussed.

  11. Effect of a thin ceramic-coating layer on thermal and electrochemical properties of polyethylene separator for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chuan; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Lixiao; Yang, Pingting; Zhao, Jinbao

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a new kind of ceramic-coating separator for lithium-ion batteries is successfully prepared by forming a ceramic layer consisted of Al2O3 powder, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) mix binder onto one side of pristine PE separator. During the preparation of the separator, water is used as solvent and a very small amount of SBR-CMC mixture is applied as binder to obtain better thermal stability. The effect of thickness of the ceramic-coating layer on its thermal stability, physical properties and electrochemical performance is also investigated. The results clearly showed that the ceramic-coating separator with SBR-CMC binder has wonderful thermal stability, good wettability and high uptake of liquid electrolyte. Pouch cell tests with the ceramic-coating separator also show excellent stable cycle performance.

  12. Lithium: for harnessing renewable energy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Dwight; Jaskula, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Lithium, which has the chemical symbol Li and an atomic number of 3, is the first metal in the periodic table. Lithium has many uses, the most prominent being in batteries for cell phones, laptops, and electric and hybrid vehicles. Worldwide sources of lithium are broken down by ore-deposit type as follows: closed-basin brines, 58%; pegmatites and related granites, 26%; lithium-enriched clays, 7%; oilfield brines, 3%; geothermal brines, 3%; and lithium-enriched zeolites, 3% (2013 statistics). There are over 39 million tons of lithium resources worldwide. Of this resource, the USGS estimates there to be approximately 13 million tons of current economically recoverable lithium reserves. To help predict where future lithium supplies might be located, USGS scientists study how and where identified resources are concentrated in the Earth’s crust, and they use that knowledge to assess the likelihood that undiscovered resources also exist.

  13. Rechargeable ambient temperature lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holleck, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    The cycling performance of a secondary lithium cell with a 2-methyl THF lithium hectofluorarsenate electrolyte is discussed. Stripping efficiency, dendritization, passivation on standing, and discharge efficiency are considered.

  14. Uptake As Language Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Rod

    1995-01-01

    Investigates the sincerity and validity of uptake as a measure of language learning by comparing the words students report they have learned after completing a listening task with the words they score correctly on a translation test. Results indicate that whereas uptake may have construct validity, its concurrent validity is uncertain. (16…

  15. Magnetic Diagnostics for the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment

    SciTech Connect

    Berzak, L.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; Majeski, R.; Zakharov, L.

    2008-06-20

    The Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) is a spherical tokamak with R0 = 0.4m, a = 0.26m, BTF ~ 3.4kG, IP ~ 400kA, and pulse length ~ 0.25s. The focus of LTX is to investigate the novel, low-recycling Lithium Wall operating regime for magnetically confined plasmas. This regime is reached by placing an in-vessel shell conformal to the plasma last closed flux surface. The shell is heated and then coated with liquid lithium. An extensive array of magnetic diagnostics is available to characterize the experiment, including 80 Mirnov coils (single and double-axis, internal and external to the shell), 34 flux loops, 3 Rogowskii coils, and a diamagnetic loop. Diagnostics are specifically located to account for the presence of a secondary conducting surface and engineered to withstand both high temperatures and incidental contact with liquid lithium. The diagnostic set is therefore fabricated from robust materials with heat and lithium resistance and is designed for electrical isolation from the shell and to provide the data required for highly constrained equilibrium reconstructions.

  16. Lithium-based surfaces controlling fusion plasma behavior at the plasma-material interface

    SciTech Connect

    Allain, Jean Paul; Taylor, Chase N.

    2012-05-15

    The plasma-material interface and its impact on the performance of magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion plasmas are considered to be one of the key scientific gaps in the realization of nuclear fusion power. At this interface, high particle and heat flux from the fusion plasma can limit the material's lifetime and reliability and therefore hinder operation of the fusion device. Lithium-based surfaces are now being used in major magnetic confinement fusion devices and have observed profound effects on plasma performance including enhanced confinement, suppression and control of edge localized modes (ELM), lower hydrogen recycling and impurity suppression. The critical spatial scale length of deuterium and helium particle interactions in lithium ranges between 5-100 nm depending on the incident particle energies at the edge and magnetic configuration. Lithium-based surfaces also range from liquid state to solid lithium coatings on a variety of substrates (e.g., graphite, stainless steel, refractory metal W/Mo/etc., or porous metal structures). Temperature-dependent effects from lithium-based surfaces as plasma facing components (PFC) include magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability issues related to liquid lithium, surface impurity, and deuterium retention issues, and anomalous physical sputtering increase at temperatures above lithium's melting point. The paper discusses the viability of lithium-based surfaces in future burning-plasma environments such as those found in ITER and DEMO-like fusion reactor devices.

  17. Conference report on the 3rd International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Devices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mazzitelli, Guiseppe; Hirooka, Y.; Hu, J. S.; Mirnov, S. V.; Nygren, R.; Shimada, M.; Ono, M.; Tabares, F. L.

    2015-01-14

    The third International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Device (ISLA-2013) was held on 9-11 October 2013 at ENEA Frascati Centre with growing participation and interest from the community working on more general aspect of liquid metal research for fusion energy development. ISLA-2013 has been confirmed to be the largest and the most important meeting dedicated to liquid metal application for the magnetic fusion research. Overall, 45 presentation plus 5 posters were given, representing 28 institutions from 11 countries. The latest experimental results from nine magnetic fusion devices were presented in 16 presentations from NSTX (PPPL, USA), FTU (ENEA, Italy),more » T-11M (Trinity, RF), T-10 (Kurchatov Institute, RF), TJ-II (CIEMAT, Spain), EAST(ASIPP, China), HT-7 (ASIPP, China), RFX (Padova, Italy), KTM (NNC RK, Kazakhstan). Sessions were devoted to the following: (I) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (facility overviews), (II) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (topical issues), (III) special session on liquid lithium technology, (IV) lithium laboratory test stands, (V) Lithium theory/modelling/comments, (VI) innovative lithium applications and (VII) special Session on lithium-safety and lithium handling. There was a wide participation from the fusion technology communities, including IFMIF and TBM communities providing productive exchange with the physics oriented magnetic confinement liquid metal research groups. Furthermore, this international workshop will continue on a biennial basis (alternating with the Plasma-Surface Interactions (PSI) Conference) and the next workshop will be held at CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain, in 2015.« less

  18. Electrochemical in situ investigations of SEI and dendrite formation on the lithium metal anode.

    PubMed

    Bieker, Georg; Winter, Martin; Bieker, Peter

    2015-04-14

    This comparative work studies the self-enforcing heterogeneity of lithium deposition and dissolution as the cause for dendrite formation on the lithium metal anode in various liquid organic solvent based electrolytes. In addition, the ongoing lithium corrosion, its rate and thus the passivating quality of the SEI are investigated in self-discharge measurements. The behavior of the lithium anode is characterized in two carbonate-based standard electrolytes, 1 M LiPF6 in EC/DEC (3 : 7) and 1 M LiPF6 in EC/DMC (1 : 1), and in two alternative electrolytes 1 M LiPF6 in TEGDME and 1 M LiTFSI in DMSO, which have been proposed in the literature as promising electrolytes for lithium metal batteries, more specifically for lithium/air batteries. As a result, electrolyte decomposition, SEI and dendrite formation at the lithium electrode as well as their mutual influences are understood in the development of overpotentials, surface resistances and lithium electrode surface morphologies in subsequent lithium deposition and dissolution processes. A general model of different stages of these processes could be elaborated. PMID:25735488

  19. Reversibility of anodic lithium in rechargeable lithium-oxygen batteries.

    PubMed

    Shui, Jiang-Lan; Okasinski, John S; Kenesei, Peter; Dobbs, Howard A; Zhao, Dan; Almer, Jonathan D; Liu, Di-Jia

    2013-01-01

    Non-aqueous lithium-air batteries represent the next-generation energy storage devices with very high theoretical capacity. The benefit of lithium-air batteries is based on the assumption that the anodic lithium is completely reversible during the discharge-charge process. Here we report our investigation on the reversibility of the anodic lithium inside of an operating lithium-air battery using spatially and temporally resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction and three-dimensional micro-tomography technique. A combined electrochemical process is found, consisting of a partial recovery of lithium metal during the charging cycle and a constant accumulation of lithium hydroxide under both charging and discharging conditions. A lithium hydroxide layer forms on the anode separating the lithium metal from the separator. However, numerous microscopic 'tunnels' are also found within the hydroxide layer that provide a pathway to connect the metallic lithium with the electrolyte, enabling sustained ion-transport and battery operation until the total consumption of lithium. PMID:23929396

  20. Novel approach to recover cobalt and lithium from spent lithium-ion battery using oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xianlai; Li, Jinhui; Shen, Bingyu

    2015-09-15

    With the booming of consumer electronics (CE) and electric vehicle (EV), a large number of spent lithium-ion battery (LIBs) have been generated worldwide. Resource depletion and environmental concern driven from the sustainable industry of CE and EV have motivated spent LIBs should be recovered urgently. However, the conventional process combined with leaching, precipitating, and filtering was quite complicated to recover cobalt and lithium from spent LIBs. In this work, we developed a novel recovery process, only combined with oxalic acid leaching and filtering. When the optimal parameters for leaching process is controlled at 150 min retention time, 95 °C heating temperature, 15 g L(-1) solid-liquid ratio, and 400 rpm rotation rate, the recovery rate of lithium and cobalt from spent LIBs can reach about 98% and 97%, respectively. Additionally, we also tentatively discovered the leaching mechanism of lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) using oxalic acid, and the leaching order of the sampling LiCoO2 of spent LIBs. All the obtained results can contribute to a short-cut and high-efficiency process of spent LIBs recycling toward a sound closed-loop cycle. PMID:25897692

  1. Lithium As Plasma Facing Component for Magnetic Fusion Research

    SciTech Connect

    Masayuki Ono

    2012-09-10

    The use of lithium in magnetic fusion confinement experiments started in the 1990's in order to improve tokamak plasma performance as a low-recycling plasma-facing component (PFC). Lithium is the lightest alkali metal and it is highly chemically reactive with relevant ion species in fusion plasmas including hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, carbon, and oxygen. Because of the reactive properties, lithium can provide strong pumping for those ions. It was indeed a spectacular success in TFTR where a very small amount (~ 0.02 gram) of lithium coating of the PFCs resulted in the fusion power output to improve by nearly a factor of two. The plasma confinement also improved by a factor of two. This success was attributed to the reduced recycling of cold gas surrounding the fusion plasma due to highly reactive lithium on the wall. The plasma confinement and performance improvements have since been confirmed in a large number of fusion devices with various magnetic configurations including CDX-U/LTX (US), CPD (Japan), HT-7 (China), EAST (China), FTU (Italy), NSTX (US), T-10, T-11M (Russia), TJ-II (Spain), and RFX (Italy). Additionally, lithium was shown to broaden the plasma pressure profile in NSTX, which is advantageous in achieving high performance H-mode operation for tokamak reactors. It is also noted that even with significant applications (up to 1,000 grams in NSTX) of lithium on PFCs, very little contamination (< 0.1%) of lithium fraction in main fusion plasma core was observed even during high confinement modes. The lithium therefore appears to be a highly desirable material to be used as a plasma PFC material from the magnetic fusion plasma performance and operational point of view. An exciting development in recent years is the growing realization of lithium as a potential solution to solve the exceptionally challenging need to handle the fusion reactor divertor heat flux, which could reach 60 MW/m2 . By placing the liquid lithium (LL) surface in the path of the main

  2. A review of lithium deposition in lithium-ion and lithium metal secondary batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhe; Huang, Jun; Yann Liaw, Bor; Metzler, Viktor; Zhang, Jianbo

    2014-05-01

    Major aspects related to lithium deposition in lithium-ion and lithium metal secondary batteries are reviewed. For lithium-ion batteries with carbonaceous anode, lithium deposition may occur under harsh charging conditions such as overcharging or charging at low temperatures. The major technical solutions include: (1) applying electrochemical models to predict the critical conditions for deposition initiation; (2) preventions by improved battery design and material modification; (3) applying adequate charging protocols to inhibit lithium deposition. For lithium metal secondary batteries, the lithium deposition is the inherent reaction during charging. The major technical solutions include: (1) the use of mechanistic models to elucidate and control dendrite initiation and growth; (2) engineering surface morphology of the lithium deposition to avoid dendrite formation via adjusting the composition and concentration of the electrolyte; (3) controlling battery working conditions. From a survey of the literature, the areas that require further study are proposed; e.g., refining the lithium deposition criteria, developing an effective AC self pre-heating method for low-temperature charging of lithium-ion batteries, and clarifying the role the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) plays in determining the deposition morphology; to facilitate a refined control of the lithium deposition.

  3. Lithium Dinitramide as an Additive in Lithium Power Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorkovenko, Alexander A.

    2007-01-01

    Lithium dinitramide, LiN(NO2)2 has shown promise as an additive to nonaqueous electrolytes in rechargeable and non-rechargeable lithium-ion-based electrochemical power cells. Such non-aqueous electrolytes consist of lithium salts dissolved in mixtures of organic ethers, esters, carbonates, or acetals. The benefits of adding lithium dinitramide (which is also a lithium salt) include lower irreversible loss of capacity on the first charge/discharge cycle, higher cycle life, lower self-discharge, greater flexibility in selection of electrolyte solvents, and greater charge capacity. The need for a suitable electrolyte additive arises as follows: The metallic lithium in the anode of a lithium-ion-based power cell is so highly reactive that in addition to the desired main electrochemical reaction, it engages in side reactions that cause formation of resistive films and dendrites, which degrade performance as quantified in terms of charge capacity, cycle life, shelf life, first-cycle irreversible capacity loss, specific power, and specific energy. The incidence of side reactions can be reduced through the formation of a solid-electrolyte interface (SEI) a thin film that prevents direct contact between the lithium anode material and the electrolyte. Ideally, an SEI should chemically protect the anode and the electrolyte from each other while exhibiting high conductivity for lithium ions and little or no conductivity for electrons. A suitable additive can act as an SEI promoter. Heretofore, most SEI promotion was thought to derive from organic molecules in electrolyte solutions. In contrast, lithium dinitramide is inorganic. Dinitramide compounds are known as oxidizers in rocket-fuel chemistry and until now, were not known as SEI promoters in battery chemistry. Although the exact reason for the improvement afforded by the addition of lithium dinitramide is not clear, it has been hypothesized that lithium dinitramide competes with other electrolyte constituents to react with

  4. Lithium overdosage and related tests.

    PubMed

    Pigatto, Paolo D; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Guzzi, Gianpaolo

    2016-12-01

    Lithium acts biochemically through the inositol depletion in brain cortex. At low doses, however, it is partly effective and/or ineffective, whereas in high concentrations is toxic. We would like to make one point about this review. In fact, in our view, the patient should be given a support to correct hypernatremia and even sodium levels should be tested serially-along with serum lithium concentrations-because high sodium levels reduce the rate of elimination of lithium. Lithium is mainly a neurotoxicant. Lithium-related central nervous system toxicity as well as the cardiovascular and thyroid changes are most likely due to the cations (Na2 (+) and K(+)) competition. PMID:26753697

  5. The Lithium Tokamak eXperiment - Upgrade (LTX-U)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeski, R.; Bell, R.; Boyle, D.; Diallo, A.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; Leblanc, B.; Lucia, M.; Merino, E.; Schmitt, J. C.; Biewer, T. M.; Gray, T. K.; Kubota, S.; Peebles, W. A.; Hansen, C.; Jarboe, T.; Bialek, J.; Koel, B.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Widman, K.; Tritz, K.

    2015-11-01

    Results from the LTX program during the last 18 months have significantly advanced the concept of the liquid lithium-walled tokamak. These results include energy confinement times in an ohmic, wall-limited tokamak which exceed ITER ELMy H-mode scaling by a factor of 2-4, the development of very flat electron temperature profiles, and measurements of lithium concentrations in the core which are less than 0.5%, with a full liquid lithium wall. Although considerable investigation of ohmically heated discharges remains, the results strongly support an extension to regimes with strong auxiliary heating, in order to better determine whether liquid lithium walls should be deployed in a large confinement device. A widened operational window, in both toroidal field and plasma current, is also advisable, as well as eventual operation in diverted geometry. An upgrade of LTX, imaginatively named LTX-U, has been proposed. The upgraded device will be described. The results which form the basis for this next step will be briefly summarized. Supported by US DOE contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Room-Temperature-Cured Copolymers for Lithium Battery Gel Electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Tigelaar, Dean M.

    2009-01-01

    Polyimide-PEO copolymers (PEO signifies polyethylene oxide) that have branched rod-coil molecular structures and that can be cured into film form at room temperature have been invented for use as gel electrolytes for lithium-ion electric-power cells. These copolymers offer an alternative to previously patented branched rod-coil polyimides that have been considered for use as polymer electrolytes and that must be cured at a temperature of 200 C. In order to obtain sufficient conductivity for lithium ions in practical applications at and below room temperature, it is necessary to imbibe such a polymer with a suitable carbonate solvent or ionic liquid, but the high-temperature cure makes it impossible to incorporate and retain such a liquid within the polymer molecular framework. By eliminating the high-temperature cure, the present invention makes it possible to incorporate the required liquid.

  7. Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries, which use a new battery chemistry, are being developed under cooperative agreements between Lockheed Martin, Ultralife Battery, and the NASA Lewis Research Center. The unit cells are made in flat (prismatic) shapes that can be connected in series and parallel to achieve desired voltages and capacities. These batteries will soon be marketed to commercial original-equipment manufacturers and thereafter will be available for military and space use. Current NiCd batteries offer about 35 W-hr/kg compared with 110 W-hr/kg for current lithium ion batteries. Our ultimate target for these batteries is 200 W-hr/kg.

  8. LITHIUM PROPHYLAXIS IN AFFECTIVE DISORDER

    PubMed Central

    Rao, A. Venkoba; Hariharasubramanian, N.; Devi, S. Parvathi; Sugumar, A.; Srinivasan, V.

    1982-01-01

    SUMMARY Out of 108 patients on the rolls in the Lithium clinic, Madurai Medical College and Govt. Rajaji Hospital, Madurai, India, 47 patients suffering from affective disorders receiving lithium continuously for more than three years were analysed with a view to study the recurrences. Thirteen suffered no relapses while on lithium while nineteen experienced them while on lithium. Four were free from recurrences after lithium was withdrawn- Seven defaulted but suffered recurrences while in four the drug was withdrawn and in both the groups remission was achieved with re-administration of lithium. The study reveals that lithium besides averting the recurrences can reduce the frequency, number, duration, intensity of episodes and improve the amenability to drugs. Among the symptoms, suicidal ideas and behaviour and insight were found to be influenced favourably by lithium. Among the factors that help favourable response to lithium were a positive family history of affective disorder, in the first degree relatives and lesser frequency and number of episodes in the pre-lithium period. A reappraisal of the natural history of the illness is called for in the light of lithium prophylaxis of manic depressive psychosis. PMID:21965880

  9. Liquid metal drop ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khuri-Yakub, B. T.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this project was to demonstrate the possibility of ejecting liquid metals using drop on demand printing technology. The plan was to make transducers for operation in the 100 MHz frequency range and to use these transducers to demonstrate the ability to eject drops of liquid metals such as gallium. Two transducers were made by indium bonding piezoelectric lithium niobate to quartz buffer rods. The lithium niobate plates were thinned by mechanical polishing to a thickness of 37 microns for operation at 100 MHz. Hemispherical lenses were polished in the opposite ends of the buffer rods. The lenses, which focus the sound waves in the liquid metal, had an F-number equals 1. A mechanical housing was made to hold the transducers and to allow precise control over the liquid level above the lens. We started by demonstrating the ability to eject drops of water on demand. The drops of water had a diameter of 15 microns which corresponds to the wavelength of the sound wave in the water. A videotape of this ejection was made. We then used a mixture of Gallium and Indium (used to lower the melting temperature of the Gallium) to demonstrate the ejection of liquid metal drops. This proved to be difficult because of the oxide skin which forms on the surface of the liquid. In some instances, we were able to eject metal drops, however, this was not consistent and reproducible. An experiment was set up at NASA-Lewis to stabilize the process of drop on demand liquid metal ejection. The object was to place the transducer and liquid metal in a vacuum station so that no oxide would form on the surface. We were successful in demonstrating that liquid metals could be ejected on demand and that this technology could be used for making sheet metal in space.

  10. Impurities in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, D. P.; Bell, R. E.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Biewer, T. M.; Gray, T. K.; Tritz, K.; Widmann, K.

    2014-10-01

    The Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) is designed to study the low-recycling regime through the use of close-fitting, lithium-coated, heatable shell quadrants surrounding the plasma volume. Lithium coatings can getter and bury impurities, but they can also become covered by impurity compounds. Liquefied coatings can both dissolve impurity compounds and bring them to the surface, while sputtering and evaporation rates increase strongly with temperature. Here, we use spectroscopic measurements to assess the effects of varying wall conditions on plasma impurities, mainly Li, C, and O. A passive Doppler spectroscopy system measures toroidal and poloidal impurity profiles using fixed-wavelength and variable-wavelength visible spectrometers. In addition, survey and high-resolution extreme ultraviolet spectrometers detect emission from higher charge states. Preliminary results show that fresh Li coatings generally reduced C and O emission. C emission decreased sharply following the first solid Li coatings. Inverted toroidal profiles in a discharge with solid Li coatings show peaked Li III emissivity and temperature profiles. Recently, experiments with fresh liquid coatings led to especially strong O reduction. Results from these and additional experiments will be presented. Supported by US DOE Contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  11. Radioactive iodine uptake

    MedlinePlus

    ... uptake may be due to: Factitious hyperthyroidism Iodine overload Subacute thyroiditis Silent (or painless) thyroiditis Amiodarone Risks ... to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A. ...

  12. 77 FR 28259 - Mailings of Lithium Batteries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... for mailpieces containing lithium metal or lithium-ion cells or batteries and applies regardless of...'' instead of ``lithium content'' for secondary lithium-ion batteries when describing maximum quantity limits...-ion (Rechargeable) Cells and Batteries Small consumer-type lithium-ion cells and batteries like...

  13. Bioavailability of lithium from lithium citrate syrup versus conventional lithium carbonate tablets.

    PubMed

    Guelen, P J; Janssen, T J; De Witte, T C; Vree, T B; Benson, K

    1992-10-01

    The bioavailability of lithium citrate syrup was compared with that of regular lithium carbonate tablets in 18 healthy male human volunteers. Blood samples were collected up to 48 h after dosing. Lithium serum concentrations were determined by means of AAS. The absorption rate following oral administration of the syrup was greater (tmax 0.8 h) than following administration of regular tablets (tmax 1.4 h). Maximum lithium serum concentrations, however, were only about 10 per cent higher after syrup dosing and serum concentrations resulting from syrup and tablets were almost superimposable from 2 h after dosing. The terminal half-life of lithium was found to be 22 h after syrup as well as after tablet dosing. No side-effects were observed during the study. The bioavailability of lithium from syrup relative to tablets was found to be bioequivalent with respect to the maximum lithium serum concentration and the extent of drug absorption (AUC). PMID:1489941

  14. Lithium disulfide battery

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1988-01-01

    A negative electrode limited secondary electrochemical cell having dense FeS.sub.2 positive electrode operating exclusively on the upper plateau, a Li alloy negative electrode and a suitable lithium-containing electrolyte. The electrolyte preferably is 25 mole percent LiCl, 38 mole percent LiBr and 37 mole percent KBr. The cell may be operated isothermally.

  15. Lithium and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... role in the rate of miscarriage, which include maternal age, gestational age, and history of previous miscarriage that ... Studies on children up to seven years of age who were exposed to lithium during pregnancy did not find significant physical, mental, or behavioral ...

  16. Lithium thionyl chloride battery

    SciTech Connect

    Saathoff, D.J.; Venkatasetty, H.V.

    1982-10-19

    The discharge rate and internal conductivity of electrochemical cell including a lithium anode, and a cathode and an electrolyte including LiAlCl4 and SOC2 is improved by the addition of an amount of a mixture containing AlCl3 and butyl pyridinium chloride.

  17. Lithium battery discharge tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. J.

    1980-01-01

    The long term discharge of a variety of lithium cells was characterized and the susceptibility of the cells to chemical variation during the slow discharge was tested. A shunt resistor was set across the terminals to monitor the voltage as a function of time. Failures were identified by premature voltage drops.

  18. Erbium doping of lithium niobate by the ion exchange process for high-gain optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caccavale, Frederico; Fedorov, Vyacheslav A.; Korkishko, Yuri N.; Morozova, Tamara V.; Sada, Cinzia; Segato, Francesco

    2000-04-01

    The erbium-lithium ion exchange is presented as a method for the erbium local doping of lithium niobate crystals. Ion exchange process is performed immersing the LiNbO3 substrates in a liquid melt, containing erbium ions; due to their high mobility, the lithium ions migrate from the crystal to the melt, and are replaced by erbium ions. A systematic analysis of the doping process is performed, and the influence of the process parameters is investigated: exchange time and temperature, crystal cut direction, composition and chemical reactivity of the Er ions liquid source. By structural (X-Ray Diffraction and Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry), compositional (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) and spectroscopic techniques (optical spectroscopy and micro-luminescence), the formation of lithium deficient phases and the incorporation of the Er ions into the LiNbO3 matrix is studied.

  19. Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of lithium ion electric vehicle batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Vimmerstedt, L.J.; Ring, S.; Hammel, C.J.

    1995-09-01

    The lithium ion system considered in this report uses lithium intercalation compounds as both positive and negative electrodes and has an organic liquid electrolyte. Oxides of nickel, cobalt, and manganese are used in the positive electrode, and carbon is used in the negative electrode. This report presents health and safety issues, environmental issues, and shipping requirements for lithium ion electric vehicle (EV) batteries. A lithium-based electrochemical system can, in theory, achieve higher energy density than systems using other elements. The lithium ion system is less reactive and more reliable than present lithium metal systems and has possible performance advantages over some lithium solid polymer electrolyte batteries. However, the possibility of electrolyte spills could be a disadvantage of a liquid electrolyte system compared to a solid electrolyte. The lithium ion system is a developing technology, so there is some uncertainty regarding which materials will be used in an EV-sized battery. This report reviews the materials presented in the open literature within the context of health and safety issues, considering intrinsic material hazards, mitigation of material hazards, and safety testing. Some possible lithium ion battery materials are toxic, carcinogenic, or could undergo chemical reactions that produce hazardous heat or gases. Toxic materials include lithium compounds, nickel compounds, arsenic compounds, and dimethoxyethane. Carcinogenic materials include nickel compounds, arsenic compounds, and (possibly) cobalt compounds, copper, and polypropylene. Lithiated negative electrode materials could be reactive. However, because information about the exact compounds that will be used in future batteries is proprietary, ongoing research will determine which specific hazards will apply.

  20. Lithium Coatings on NSTX Plasma Facing Components and Its Effects On Boundary Control, Core Plasma Performance, and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    H.W.Kugel, M.G.Bell, H.Schneider, J.P.Allain, R.E.Bell, R Kaita, J.Kallman, S. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, D. Mansfield, R.E. Nygen, R. Maingi, J. Menard, D. Mueller, M. Ono, S. Paul, S.Gerhardt, R.Raman, S.Sabbagh, C.H.Skinner, V.Soukhanovskii, J.Timberlake, L.E.Zakharov, and the NSTX Research Team

    2010-01-25

    NSTX high-power divertor plasma experiments have used in succession lithium pellet injection (LPI), evaporated lithium, and injected lithium powder to apply lithium coatings to graphite plasma facing components. In 2005, following wall conditioning and LPI, discharges exhibited edge density reduction and performance improvements. Since 2006, first one, and now two lithium evaporators have been used routinely to evaporate lithium onto the lower divertor region at total rates of 10-70 mg/min for periods 5-10 min between discharges. Prior to each discharge, the evaporators are withdrawn behind shutters. Significant improvements in the performance of NBI heated divertor discharges resulting from these lithium depositions were observed. These evaporators are now used for more than 80% of NSTX discharges. Initial work with injecting fine lithium powder into the edge of NBI heated deuterium discharges yielded comparable changes in performance. Several operational issues encountered with lithium wall conditions, and the special procedures needed for vessel entry are discussed. The next step in this work is installation of a Liquid Lithium Divertor surface on the outer part of the lower divertor.

  1. Lithium coatings on NSTX plasma facing components and its effects on boundary control, core plasma performance, and operation

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H. W.; Bell, M. G.; Maingi, R.

    2010-01-01

    NSTX high power divertor plasma experiments have used in succession lithium pellet injection (LPI), evaporated lithium, and injected lithium powder to apply lithium coatings to graphite plasma facing components. In 2005, following the wall conditioning and LPI, discharges exhibited edge density reduction and performance improvements. Since 2006, first one, and now two lithium evaporators have been used routinely to evaporate lithium onto the lower divertor region at total rates of 10-70 mg/min for periods 5-10 min between discharges. Prior to each discharge, the evaporators are withdrawn behind shutters. Significant improvements in the performance of NBI heated divertor discharges resulting from these lithium depositions were observed. These evaporators are now used for more than 80% of NSTX discharges. Initial work with injecting fine lithium powder into the edge of NBI heated deuterium discharges yielded comparable changes in performance. Several operational issues encountered with lithium wall conditions, and the special procedures needed for vessel entry are discussed. The next step in this work is installation of a liquid lithium divertor surface on the outer part of the lower divertor.

  2. Closely packed x-poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate) coated polyetherimide/poly(vinylidene fluoride) fiber separators for lithium ion batteries with enhanced thermostability and improved electrolyte wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yunyun; Xiao, Ke; Yu, Jianyong; Ding, Bin

    2016-09-01

    The x-polyethylene glycol diacrylate (x-PEGDA) coated polyetherimide/polyvinylidene fluoride (PEI/PVdF) membranes are obtained by the facile combination of dip-coating and free radical polymerization of PEGDA on the electrospun PEI/PVdF fiber membranes. Successful cross-linking of PEGDA increases the average fibers diameter from 553 to 817 nm and reduces the packing density, which not only increases the tensile strength of x-PEGDA coated PEI/PVdF membranes, but also decreases the average pore diameter. Besides, the x-PEGDA coated PEI/PVdF membranes are endowed with good wettability, high electrolyte uptake, high ionic conductivity and improved electrochemical stability window because of the good affinity of PEI and PEGDA with liquid electrolyte. Benefiting from the synergetic effect of PEI and PVdF, the x-PEGDA coated PEI/PVdF membranes exhibit excellent thermal stability and nonflammability, which are beneficial for enhancing the safety of lithium ion batteries. More importantly, the x-PEGDA coated PEI/PVdF membranes based Li/LiFePO4 cell exhibits comparable cycling stability with capacity retention of 95.9% after 70 cycles and better rate capability compared with the Celgard membrane based cell. The results clearly demonstrate that the x-PEGDA coated PEI/PVdF membranes are the promising separator candidate with improved wettability and safety for next-generation lithium ion batteries.

  3. Poly(vinylidene fluoride)-based, co-polymer separator electrolyte membranes for lithium-ion battery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, C. M.; Gomez Ribelles, J. L.; Lanceros-Méndez, S.; Appetecchi, G. B.; Scrosati, B.

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper we report and discuss the physicochemical properties of novel electrolyte membranes, based on poly(vinylidenefluoride-co-trifluoroethylene), PVdF-TrFE, and poly(vinylidenefluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene), PVdF-HFP, co-polymer hosts and the PVdF-TrFE/poly(ethylene oxide (PEO) blend as separators for lithium battery systems. The results have shown that the examined separator membranes, particularly those based on the PVdF co-polymers, are able to uptake large liquid amounts leading to high ionic conductivity values. Tests performed on Li/LiFePO4 and Li/Sn-C cells have revealed very good cycling performance even at high current rates and 100% of DOD, approaching the results achieved in liquid electrolytes. A capacity fading lower than 0.002% per cycle was observed. Particularly, the Li/LiFePO4 cathode cells have exhibited excellent rate capability, being still able to deliver at 2C above 89% of the capacity discharged at 0.1C. These results, in conjunction with the about 100% coulombic efficiency, suggest very good electrolyte/electrode compatibility, which results from the high purity and stability of the electrolyte and electrode materials and the cell manufacturing.

  4. Stable lithium electrodeposition in salt-reinforced electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Shu, Jonathan; Archer, Lynden A.

    2015-04-01

    Development of high-energy lithium-based batteries that are safe remains a challenge due to the non-uniform lithium electrodeposition during repeated charge and discharge cycles. We report on the effectiveness of lithium bromide (LiBr) salt additives in a common liquid electrolyte (i.e. propylene carbonate (PC)) on the stability of lithium electrodeposition. From galvanostatic cycling measurements, we find that the presence of LiBr in PC provides more than 20-fold enhancement in cell lifetime over the control LiTFSI/PC electrolyte. Batteries containing 30 mol% LiBr additive in the electrolytes are able to cycle stably for at least 1.8 months with no observations of cell failure. From galvanostatic polarization measurements, an electrolyte containing 30 mol% LiBr shows a maximum improvement in lifetime. The formation of uneven lithium electrodeposits is significantly suppressed by the Br-containing SEI layers, evidenced by impedance spectra, post-mortem SEM and XPS analyses. The study also concludes that good solubility of halogenated salts is not necessary for achieving the observed improvements in cell lifetime.

  5. Cold melting and solid structures of dense lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Guillaume, Christophe L.; Gregoryanz, Eugene; Degtyareva, Olga; McMahon, Malcolm I.; Hanfland, Michael; Evans, Shaun; Guthrie, M.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Mao, H. K.

    2011-01-09

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies have produced several unusual and interesting results on dense lithium, the first metal in the periodic table. These include the deviation from simple metal behaviour, superconductivity at 17 K, and a metal to semiconductor transition. Despite these efforts, at present there is no agreement on the location of the high-pressure solid phases and melting curve of Li, and there is no clear picture of its phase diagram above 50 GPa. Using powder and single-crystal high-pressure diffraction techniques, we have mapped out the lithium phase diagram up to 130 GPa over a wide temperature range between 77 and 300 K. Whereas the melting temperatures of materials usually rise under pressure, and even the lightest condensed gases, hydrogen and helium, melt at temperatures of the order of 10³ K at 50 GPa, we find that at these pressures lithium remains a liquid at temperatures as low as 190 K, by far the lowest melting temperature observed for any material at such pressure. We also find that in its solid state above 60 GPa, lithium adopts three novel and complex crystal structures not previously observed in any element. Estimates of the zero-point energy suggest that quantum effects play a significant role in shaping the lithium phase diagram.

  6. Fragmentation of suddenly heated liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Blink, J.A.

    1985-03-01

    Fragmentation of free liquids in Inertial Confinement Fusion reactors could determine the upper bound on reactor pulse rate. The x-ray ablated materials must cool and recondense to allow driver beam propagation. The increased surface area caused by fragmentation will enhance the cooling and condensation rates. Relaxation from the suddenly heated state will move a liquid into the negative pressure region under the liquid-vapor P-V dome. The lithium equation of state was used to demonstrate that neutron-induced vaporization uses only a minor fraction of the added heat, much less than would be required to drive the expansion. A 77% expansion of the lithium is required before the rapid vaporization process of spinodal decomposition could begin, and nucleation and growth are too slow to contribute to the expansion.

  7. Neutronics Evaluation of Lithium-Based Ternary Alloys in IFE Blankets

    SciTech Connect

    Jolodosky, A.; Fratoni, M.

    2014-11-20

    Pre-conceptual fusion blanket designs require research and development to reflect important proposed changes in the design of essential systems, and the new challenges they impose on related fuel cycle systems. One attractive feature of using liquid lithium as the breeder and coolant is that it has very high tritium solubility and results in very low levels of tritium permeation throughout the facility infrastructure. However, lithium metal vigorously reacts with air and water and presents plant safety concerns. If the chemical reactivity of lithium could be overcome, the result would have a profound impact on fusion energy and associated safety basis. The overriding goal of this project is to develop a lithium-based alloy that maintains beneficial properties of lithium (e.g. high tritium breeding and solubility) while reducing overall flammability concerns. To minimize the number of alloy combinations that must be explored, only those alloys that meet certain nuclear performance metrics will be considered for subsequent thermodynamic study. The specific scope of this study is to evaluate the neutronics performance of lithium-based alloys in the blanket of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) engine. The results of this study will inform the development of lithium alloys that would guarantee acceptable neutronics performance while mitigating the chemical reactivity issues of pure lithium.

  8. The history of lithium therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shorter, Edward

    2013-01-01

    The use of lithium in psychiatry goes back to the mid-19th century. Early work, however, was soon forgotten, and John Cade is credited with reintroducing lithium to psychiatry for mania in 1949. Mogens Schou undertook a randomly controlled trial for mania in 1954, and in the course of that study became curious about lithium as a prophylactic for depressive illness. In 1970, the United States became the 50th country to admit lithium to the marketplace. Meanwhile, interest in lithium for the prophylaxis of depression was growing apace and today the agent is widely prescribed for that indication, even though it has not been accepted by the Food and Drug Administration. Lithium was almost derailed by a small group of opponents from the Maudsley Hospital and its status today is threatened by the “mood stabilizers.” PMID:19538681

  9. Experimental lithium system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kolowith, R.; Berg, J.D.; Miller, W.C.

    1985-04-01

    A full-scale mockup of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility lithium system was built at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL). This isothermal mockup, called the Experimental Lithium System (ELS), was prototypic of FMIT, excluding the accelerator and dump heat exchanger. This 3.8 m/sup 3/ lithium test loop achieved over 16,000 hours of safe and reliable operation. An extensive test program demonstrated satisfactory performance of the system components, including the HEDL-supplied electromagnetic lithium pump, the lithium jet target, the purification and characterization hardware, as well as the auxiliary argon and vacuum systems. Experience with the test loop provided important information on system operation, performance, and reliability. This report presents a complete overview of the entire Experimental Lithium System test program and also includes a summary of such areas as instrumentation, coolant chemistry, vapor/aerosol transport, and corrosion.

  10. Open cycle lithium chloride cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, T. G.; Loef, G. O. G.; Iyer, R.; Wenger, J.

    1983-05-01

    A lithium chloride open cycle absorption chiller has been designed, built and tested. Solution reconcentration takes place in a small counter current packed column supplied with solar heated air. Removal of noncondensable gases that enter the chiller dissolved in the strong solution and the make-up refrigerant streams is accomplished by a liquid-jet ejector and a small vacuum pump. Cooling capacities approaching 1.4 tons and COP levels of 0.58 have been achieved at non-optimum operating conditions. Test results from preliminary system operation suggest that mass transfer processes in both the packed column reconcentrator and the absorber are controlled by concentration gradients in the lithium chloride solution. Liquid phase controlled mass transfer dictates an operating strategy different from the previously assumed gas phase controlled process to obtain maximum rates of evaporation in the packed column. Determination of optimal operating conditions leading to decreased electrical power consumption and improved cooling capacity and coefficient of performance will require further analysis and testing.

  11. Membranes in Lithium Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Hou, Junbo

    2012-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries have proven themselves the main choice of power sources for portable electronics. Besides consumer electronics, lithium ion batteries are also growing in popularity for military, electric vehicle, and aerospace applications. The present review attempts to summarize the knowledge about some selected membranes in lithium ion batteries. Based on the type of electrolyte used, literature concerning ceramic-glass and polymer solid ion conductors, microporous filter type separators and polymer gel based membranes is reviewed. PMID:24958286

  12. Performance Projections For The Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX)

    SciTech Connect

    Majeski, R.; Berzak, L.; Gray, T.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; Levinton, F.; Lundberg, D. P.; Manickam, J.; Pereverzev, G. V.; Snieckus, K.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Spaleta, J.; Stotler, D.; Strickler, T.; Timberlake, J.; Yoo, J.; Zakharov, L.

    2009-06-17

    Use of a large-area liquid lithium limiter in the CDX-U tokamak produced the largest relative increase (an enhancement factor of 5-10) in Ohmic tokamak confinement ever observed. The confinement results from CDX-U do not agree with existing scaling laws, and cannot easily be projected to the new lithium tokamak experiment (LTX). Numerical simulations of CDX-U low recycling discharges have now been performed with the ASTRA-ESC code with a special reference transport model suitable for a diffusion-based confinement regime, incorporating boundary conditions for nonrecycling walls, with fuelling via edge gas puffing. This model has been successful at reproducing the experimental values of the energy confinement (4-6 ms), loop voltage (<0.5 V), and density for a typical CDX-U lithium discharge. The same transport model has also been used to project the performance of the LTX, in Ohmic operation, or with modest neutral beam injection (NBI). NBI in LTX, with a low recycling wall of liquid lithium, is predicted to result in core electron and ion temperatures of 1-2 keV, and energy confinement times in excess of 50 ms. Finally, the unique design features of LTX are summarized.

  13. LITHIUM TOXICITY - A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ratanendra; Deb, Jayant Kumar; Sinha, Baxi Neeraj Prasad; Sinha, Vinod Kumar

    2001-01-01

    Lithium is the treatment for acute mania and bipolar disorders. Ever since its introduction in the psychiatric arsenal, case reports of toxicity have been appearing in the literature at regular intervals. This study was thus carried out to study the presentation and associated features of lithium toxicity. In this retrospective study, case record files of all patients suspected to have developed lithium toxicity during a five year period were retrieved. It was found that toxicity presented most commonly with cerebellar symptoms and appeared at lower serum levels. Lithium could be restarted albeit at a lower dose and with a gradual titration in a number of cases. PMID:21407839

  14. Lithium batteries with laminar anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Bruder, A.H.

    1986-11-04

    This patent describes a laminar electrical cell, comprising an anode, a cathode, and an electrolyte permeable separator between the anode and the cathode. The anode consists essentially of a layer of lithium having at least one surface of unreacted lithium metal in direct contact with and adhered to a layer of conductive plastic with no intermediate adhesive promoting adjuncts. The cathode comprises a slurry of MnO/sub 2/ and carbon particles in a solution of a lithium salt in an organic solvent, the solution permeating the separator and being in contact with the lithium.

  15. Separator for lithium batteries and lithium batteries including the separator

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, D.L.

    1989-03-14

    A multilayer separator is described for preventing the internal shorting of lithium batteries, the multilayer separator including porous membranes and an electroactive polymeric material contained within the separator layers wherein the polymer is one that will react with any lithium dendrites that could penetrate the separator thus preventing an internal short circuit of the cell.

  16. Shrinkage void formation and its effect on freeze and thaw processes of lithium and lithium-fluoride for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jae Y.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of shrinkage void forming during freezing of lithium and lithium fluoride on subsequent thaw processes are investigated using a numerical scheme that is based on a single (solid/liquid) cell approach. Results show that a void forming at the wall appreciably reduces the solid-liquid interface velocity, during both freeze and thaw, and causes a substantial rise in the wall temperature during thaw. However, in the case of Li, the maximum wall temperature was much lower than the melting temperature of PWC-11, which is used as the structure material in the SP-100 system. Hence, it is concluded that a formation of hot spots is unlikely during the startup or restart of the SP-100 system.

  17. Lithium Polymer Electrolytes and Solid State NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkeley, Emily R.

    2004-01-01

    Research is being done at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) developing new kinds of batteries that do not depend on a solution. Currently, batteries use liquid electrolytes containing lithium. Problems with the liquid electrolyte are (1) solvents used can leak out of the battery, so larger, more restrictive, packages have to be made, inhibiting the diversity of application and decreasing the power density; (2) the liquid is incompatible with the lithium metal anode, so alternative, less efficient, anodes are required. The Materials Department at GRC has been working to synthesize polymer electrolytes that can replace the liquid electrolytes. The advantages are that polymer electrolytes do not have the potential to leak so they can be used for a variety of tasks, small or large, including in the space rover or in space suits. The polymers generated by Dr. Mary Ann Meador's group are in the form of rod -coil structures. The rod aspect gives the polymer structural integrity, while the coil makes it flexible. Lithium ions are used in these polymers because of their high mobility. The coils have repeating units of oxygen which stabilize the positive lithium by donating electron density. This aids in the movement of the lithium within the polymer, which contributes to higher conductivity. In addition to conductivity testing, these polymers are characterized using DSC, TGA, FTIR, and solid state NMR. Solid state NMR is used in classifying materials that are not soluble in solvents, such as polymers. The NMR spins the sample at a magic angle (54.7') allowing the significant peaks to emerge. Although solid state NMR is a helpful technique in determining bonding, the process of preparing the sample and tuning it properly are intricate jobs that require patience; especially since each run takes about six hours. The NMR allows for the advancement of polymer synthesis by showing if the expected results were achieved. Using the NMR, in addition to looking at polymers, allows for

  18. Excess lithium salt functions more than compensating for lithium loss when synthesizing Li6.5La3Ta0.5Zr1.5O12 in alumina crucible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Ma, Jiang-Tao; Wang, Chang-An

    2014-08-01

    Garnet type electrolyte "Li6.5La3Ta0.5Zr1.5O12" (LLZTO) was prepared by conventional solid-state reaction in alumina crucibles and excess lithium salt (from 0% to 50 mol%) was added into the starting materials to investigate the effects of excess lithium salt on the property of LLZTO. SEM, XRD and AC impedance were used to determine the microstructure, phase formation and Li-ion conductivity. Cubic garnet with a minor second phase LiAlO2 in the grain boundary was obtained for the pellets with excess lithium salt. As the amount of excess lithium salt increased, more Al element diffused from alumina crucibles to LLZTO pellets and reacted with excess lithium salt to form liquid Li2O-Al2O3 phase in the grain boundary, which accelerated the pellets' densification and reduced lithium loss at a high temperature. Ionic conductivity of LLZTO pellets increased with the amount of excess lithium salt added and leveled off at ∼4 × 10-4 S cm-1 when lithium salt exceeded 30 mol%. The performance of Li-air batteries with hybrid electrolytes, using homemade LLZTO thin pellets as solid electrolytes, was investigated. The LLZTO thin pellet with more excess lithium salt in starting material had a higher density and resulted in better cell performance.

  19. Solid lithium-ion electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, J.G.; Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1998-02-10

    The present invention relates to the composition of a solid lithium-ion electrolyte based on the Li{sub 2}O--CeO{sub 2}--SiO{sub 2} system having good transparent characteristics and high ion conductivity suitable for uses in lithium batteries, electrochromic devices and other electrochemical applications. 12 figs.

  20. Intercell connector for lithium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Bruder, A.H.

    1984-10-16

    Laminar batteries of series connected cells comprising lithium anodes and an electrolyte containing a passivating solvent reactive with lithium in which the cells are electrically connected in series by intercell barriers comprising outer layers of electrochemically inert electronically conducting material in contact with the electrochemically active anode and cathode of adjacent cells and a layer of metal foil between the electrochemically inert layers.

  1. Solid lithium-ion electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Ji-Guang; Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to the composition of a solid lithium-ion electrolyte based on the Li.sub.2 O--CeO.sub.2 --SiO.sub.2 system having good transparent characteristics and high ion conductivity suitable for uses in lithium batteries, electrochromic devices and other electrochemical applications.

  2. Progress in secondary lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holleck, G. L.

    1982-01-01

    The lithium/molybdenum trisulfide system is discussed. This system has a higher potential energy density than that of lithium/titanium disulfide. Possible energy densities and performance values for cells, projected from preliminary data obtained on small cells, are summarized. The electrode structure is emphasized as an important factor in the decreasing of capacity upon cycling.

  3. Improved Carbon Anodes For Rechargeable Lithium Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Chen-Kuo; Surampudi, Subbarao; Attia, Alan; Halpert, Gerald

    1994-01-01

    Carbon anodes for rechargeable lithium cells improved by choosing binder contents and fabrication conditions to achieve maximum porosity, uniform loading, and maximum reversible lithium capacity. Stacking electrodes under pressure during assembly of cells increases cyclability of lithium. Rechargeable, high-energy-density lithium cells containing improved carbon anodes find use in spacecraft, military, communications, automotive, and other demanding applications.

  4. Basic technology for 6Li enrichment using an ionic-liquid impregnated organic membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Tsuyoshi; Terai, Takayuki

    2011-10-01

    The tritium needed as a fuel for fusion reactors is produced by the neutron capture reaction of lithium-6 ( 6Li) in tritium breeding materials. However, natural Li contains only about 7.6 at.% 6Li. In this paper, a new lithium isotope separation technique using an ionic-liquid impregnated organic membrane is proposed. In order to separate and concentrate lithium isotopes, only lithium ions are able to move through the membrane by electrodialysis between the cathode and the anode in lithium solutions. Preliminary experiments of lithium isotope separation were conducted using this phenomenon. Organic membranes impregnated with TMPA-TFSI and PP13-TFSI as ionic liquids were prepared, and the relationship between the 6Li separation coefficient and the applied electrodialytic conditions was evaluated using them. The results showed that the 6Li isotope separation coefficient in this method (about 1.1-1.4) was larger than that in the mercury amalgam method (about 1.06).

  5. Lithium Treatment for Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Maletzky, Barry M.; Shore, James H.

    1978-01-01

    Although used around the world since 1949, lithium has come into extensive use in psychiatry in the United States only within the past decade. Before initiating treatment with this drug, physicians must be familiar with the diagnostic scheme of the major affective disorders, the indications and contraindications to lithium's use, and its principles of treatment, including evaluation before lithium therapy, criteria for monitoring blood levels and signs of impending toxicity. Despite earlier reports about the toxicity of lithium when it was promoted as a salt substitute, lithium is a safe drug. Its use not only has revolutionized the treatment of the major affective disorders, but has opened up new and broad avenues of research into the regulation of man's emotions. PMID:664651

  6. Accommodation of liquid metal by cavity liners

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppson, D.W.

    1988-10-01

    Present liquid metal breeder reactor cell liner designs appear adequate to contain postulated leakages of lithium-lead alloy in an air or steam atmosphere and to contain lithium when inert atmospheres are present. If an air or steam atmosphere may be present in a cavity where lithium may accumulate under postulated accident conditions, then consideration of stainless steel liners and further testing is recommended. Lithium testing of faulted liners should also be considered. SOFIRE II and WATRE computer codes may be useful in establishing liner design requirements and in determining water release from concrete behind the liners (potential hydrogen production) for postulated leakages to steel-lined concrete cavities. 1 ref., 10 figs.

  7. HOW RELIABLE IS 24 HOUR SERUM LITHIUM LEVEL AFTER A TEST DOSE OF LITHIUM IN PREDICTING OPTIMAL LITHIUM DOSE?

    PubMed Central

    Kuruvilla, K.; Shaji, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    SUMMARY 57% of a group of 35 patients treated with Lithium Carbonate at dosages predicted by the nomogram suggested by Cooper et al (1973) failed to reach therapeutic levels of serum lithium. This finding casts serious doubts on the usefulness of the claim by Cooper et al (1973 & 1976) that 24 hour serum lithium level after a test dose of 600 mg. lithium can predict the daily lithium dose. PMID:21927360

  8. Performance of the lithium metal infused trenches in the magnum PSI linear plasma simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiflis, P.; Morgan, T. W.; Brons, S.; Van Eden, G. G.; Van Den Berg, M. A.; Xu, W.; Curreli, D.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2015-09-01

    The application of liquid metal, especially liquid lithium, as a plasma facing component (PFC) has the capacity to offer a strong alternative to solid PFCs by reducing damage concerns and enhancing plasma performance. The liquid-metal infused trenches (LiMIT) concept is a liquid metal divertor alternative which employs thermoelectric current from either plasma or external heating in tandem with the toroidal field to self-propel liquid lithium through a series of trenches. LiMIT was tested in the linear plasma simulator, Magnum PSI, at heat fluxes of up to 3 MW m-2. Results of these experiments, including velocity and temperature measurements, as well as power handling considerations are discussed, focusing on the 80 shots performed at Magnum scanning magnetic fields and heat fluxes up to ~0.3 T and 3 MW m-2. Comparisons to predictions, both analytical and modelled, are made and show good agreement. Concerns over MHD droplet ejection are additionally addressed.

  9. Lithium-vanadium advanced blanket development. ITER final report on U.S. contribution: Task T219/T220

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.; Mattas, R.F.

    1997-07-01

    The objective of this task is to develop the required data base and demonstrate the performance of a liquid lithium-vanadium advanced blanket design. The task has two main activities related to vanadium structural material and liquid lithium system developments. The vanadium alloy development activity included four subtasks: (1.1) baseline mechanical properties of non irradiated base metal and weld metal joints; (1.2) compatibility with liquid lithium; (1.3) material irradiation tests; and (1.4) development of material manufacturing and joining methods. The lithium blanket technology activity included four subtasks: (2.1) electrical insulation development and testing for liquid metal systems; (2.2) MHD pressure drop and heat transfer study for self-cooled liquid metal systems; (2.3) chemistry of liquid lithium; and (2.4) design, fabrication and testing of ITER relevant size blanket mockups. A summary of the progress and results obtained during the period 1995 and 1996 in each of the subtask areas is presented in this report.

  10. Uptake of glyoxal by organic and Inorganic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Ashley L; Hanley, Sean W; De Haan, David O

    2008-06-15

    The uptake of glyoxal by a variety of organic and inorganic aerosol types was examined in a Teflon chamber. Rapid glyoxal uptake was observed for all liquid-phase aerosols at all relative humidity levels tested (< 5 to 50% RH). Even for aerosol with known water content, Henry's Law cannot predict glyoxal uptake: H* > (3 +/- 1.5) x 10(8) mol kg(-1) atm(-1) for l-tartaric acid, H* > (1 +/- 0.5) x 10(8) for dl-malic acid and H* = (2 +/- 1) x 10(7) for malonic acid aerosol. Other liquid-phase aerosol particles containing amine functional groups (arginine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid) took up even more glyoxal (H* > 3 x 10(8)). The trend of higher glyoxal uptake onto aerosol containing more nucleophilic organic compounds suggests that glyoxal is reacting with organic compounds in the aerosol phase. Solid-phase aerosol showed RH-dependent glyoxal uptake, likely due to the existence of surface water layers. However, particle growth rates were the highestfor sodium sulfate aerosol. For organic aerosol, growth rates correlated with the acidity of the carboxylic acid groups of the aerosol material, suggesting that glyoxal uptake is enhanced by mildly acidic conditions. PMID:18605566

  11. Fate and Uptake of Pharmaceuticals in Soil–Earthworm Systems

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals present a potential threat to soil organisms, yet our understanding of their fate and uptake in soil systems is limited. This study therefore investigated the fate and uptake of 14C-labeled carbamazepine, diclofenac, fluoxetine, and orlistat in soil–earthworm systems. Sorption coefficients increased in the order of carbamazepine < diclofenac < fluoxetine < orlistat. Dissipation of 14C varied by compound, and for orlistat, there was evidence of formation of nonextractable residues. Uptake of 14C was seen for all compounds. Depuration studies showed complete elimination of 14C for carbamazepine and fluoxetine treatments and partial elimination for orlistat and diclofenac, with greater than 30% of the 14C remaining in the tissue at the end of the experiment. Pore-water-based bioconcentration factors (BCFs), based on uptake and elimination of 14C, increased in the order carbamazepine < diclofenac < fluoxetine and orlistat. Liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography–Fourier transform mass spectrometry indicated that the observed uptake in the fluoxetine and carbamazepine treatments was due to the parent compounds but that diclofenac was degraded in the test system so uptake was due to unidentifiable transformation products. Comparison of our data with outputs of quantitative structure−activity relationships for estimating BCFs in worms showed that these models tend to overestimate pharmaceutical BCFs so new models are needed. PMID:24762061

  12. High-performance lithium storage in an ultrafine manganese fluoride nanorod anode with enhanced electrochemical activation based on conversion reaction.

    PubMed

    Rui, Kun; Wen, Zhaoyin; Huang, Xiao; Lu, Yan; Jin, Jun; Shen, Chen

    2016-02-01

    A facile, one-step solvothermal reaction route for the preparation of manganese fluoride nanorods is successfully developed using manganese(II) chloride tetrahydrate (MnCl2·4H2O) as the manganese source and the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BmimBF4) as the fluorine source. X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) are conducted to characterize the structural and microstructural properties of the synthesized MnF2. The pure-phase tetragonal MnF2 displays nanorod-like morphology with a diameter of about 20 nm and a length of several hundreds of nanometers. The electrochemical performance of the MnF2 nanorod anode for rechargeable lithium batteries is investigated. A reversible discharge capacity as high as 443 mA h g(-1) at 0.1 C is obtained for the lithium uptake reaction with an initial discharge plateau around 0.7 V. The striking enhancement in electrochemical Li storage performance in ultrafine MnF2 nanorods can be attributed to the small diameters of the nanorods and efficient one-dimensional electron transport pathways. Long cycle performance for 2000 cycles at 10 C with a stabilized capacity of about 430 mA h g(-1) after activation is also achieved. Furthermore, lithiated and delithiated MnF2 anodes are analyzed with HRTEM to elucidate the conversion mechanism for the electrochemical reaction of MnF2 nanorods with Li at a microscopic level. PMID:26766389

  13. First results of the use of a continuously flowing lithium limiter in high performance discharges in the EAST device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J. S.; Zuo, G. Z.; Ren, J.; Yang, Q. X.; Chen, Z. X.; Xu, H.; Zakharov, L. E.; Maingi, R.; Gentile, C.; Meng, X. C.; Sun, Z.; Xu, W.; Chen, Y.; Fan, D.; Yan, N.; Duan, Y. M.; Yang, Z. D.; Zhao, H. L.; Song, Y. T.; Zhang, X. D.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.; EAST Team

    2016-04-01

    As an alternative choice of solid plasma facing components (PFCs), flowing liquid lithium can serve as a limiter or divertor PFC and offers a self-healing surface with acceptable heat removal and good impurity control. Such a system could improve plasma performance, and therefore be attractive for future fusion devices. Recently, a continuously flowing liquid lithium (FLiLi) limiter has been successfully designed and tested in the EAST superconducting tokamak. A circulating lithium layer with a thickness of  <0.1 mm and a flow rate ~2 cm3 s-1 was achieved. A novel in-vessel electro-magnetic pump, working with the toroidal magnetic field of the EAST device, was reliable to control the lithium flow speed. The flowing liquid limiter was found to be fully compatible with various plasma scenarios, including high confinement mode plasmas heated by lower hybrid waves or by neutral beam injection. It was also found that the controllable lithium emission from the limiter was beneficial for the reduction of recycling and impurities, for the reduction of divertor heat flux, and in certain cases, for the improvement of plasma stored energy, which bodes well application for the use of flowing liquid lithium PFCs in future fusion devices.

  14. Lithium electric dipole polarizability

    SciTech Connect

    Puchalski, M.; KePdziera, D.; Pachucki, K.

    2011-11-15

    The electric dipole polarizability of the lithium atom in the ground state is calculated including relativistic and quantum electrodynamics corrections. The obtained result {alpha}{sub E}=164.0740(5) a.u. is in good agreement with the less accurate experimental value of 164.19(1.08) a.u. The small uncertainty of about 3 parts per 10{sup 6} comes from the approximate treatment of quantum electrodynamics corrections. Our theoretical result can be considered as a benchmark for more general atomic structure methods and may serve as a reference value for the relative measurement of polarizabilities of the other alkali-metal atoms.

  15. Lithium niobate explosion monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bundy, C.H.; Graham, R.A.; Kuehn, S.F.; Precit, R.R.; Rogers, M.S.

    1990-01-09

    Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier. 8 figs.

  16. Lithium niobate explosion monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bundy, Charles H.; Graham, Robert A.; Kuehn, Stephen F.; Precit, Richard R.; Rogers, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier.

  17. Halo Star Lithium Depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsonneault, M. H.; Walker, T. P.; Steigman, G.; Narayanan, Vijay K.

    1999-12-10

    The depletion of lithium during the pre-main-sequence and main-sequence phases of stellar evolution plays a crucial role in the comparison of the predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis with the abundances observed in halo stars. Previous work has indicated a wide range of possible depletion factors, ranging from minimal in standard (nonrotating) stellar models to as much as an order of magnitude in models that include rotational mixing. Recent progress in the study of the angular momentum evolution of low-mass stars permits the construction of theoretical models capable of reproducing the angular momentum evolution of low-mass open cluster stars. The distribution of initial angular momenta can be inferred from stellar rotation data in young open clusters. In this paper we report on the application of these models to the study of lithium depletion in main-sequence halo stars. A range of initial angular momenta produces a range of lithium depletion factors on the main sequence. Using the distribution of initial conditions inferred from young open clusters leads to a well-defined halo lithium plateau with modest scatter and a small population of outliers. The mass-dependent angular momentum loss law inferred from open cluster studies produces a nearly flat plateau, unlike previous models that exhibited a downward curvature for hotter temperatures in the 7Li-Teff plane. The overall depletion factor for the plateau stars is sensitive primarily to the solar initial angular momentum used in the calibration for the mixing diffusion coefficients. Uncertainties remain in the treatment of the internal angular momentum transport in the models, and the potential impact of these uncertainties on our results is discussed. The 6Li/7Li depletion ratio is also examined. We find that the dispersion in the plateau and the 6Li/7Li depletion ratio scale with the absolute 7Li depletion in the plateau, and we use observational data to set bounds on the 7Li depletion in main-sequence halo

  18. Solid lithium electrolyte via addition of lithium salts to metal-organic frameworks

    DOEpatents

    Wiers, Brian M.; Balsara, Nitash P.; Long, Jeffrey R.

    2016-03-29

    Various embodiments of the invention disclose that the uptake of LiO.sup.iPr in Mg.sub.2(dobdc) (dobdc.sup.4-=1,4-dioxido-2,5-benzenedicarboxylate) followed by soaking in a typical electrolyte solution leads to a new solid lithium electrolyte Mg.sub.2(dobdc).0.35LiO.sup.iPr.0.25LiBF.sub.4.EC.DEC. Two-point ac impedance data show a pressed pellet of this material to have a conductivity of 3.1.times.10.sup.-4 S/cm at 300 K. In addition, the results from variable-temperature measurements reveal an activation energy of approximately 0.15 eV, while single-particle data suggest that intraparticle transport dominates conduction.

  19. Method of recycling lithium borate to lithium borohydride through methyl borate

    DOEpatents

    Filby, Evan E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a method for the recycling of lithium borate to lithium borohydride which can be reacted with water to generate hydrogen for utilization as a fuel. The lithium borate by-product of the hydrogen generation reaction is reacted with hydrogen chloride and water to produce boric acid and lithium chloride. The boric acid and lithium chloride are converted to lithium borohydride through a methyl borate intermediate to complete the recycle scheme.

  20. Liquid Cryogen Absorber for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Baynham, D.E.; Bish, P.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Cummings, M.A.; Green,M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivaniouchenkov, I.; Lau, W.; Yang, S.Q.; Zisman, M.S.

    2005-08-20

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will test ionization cooling of muons. In order to have effective ionization cooling, one must use an absorber that is made from a low-z material. The most effective low z materials for ionization cooling are hydrogen, helium, lithium hydride, lithium and beryllium, in that order. In order to measure the effect of material on cooling, several absorber materials must be used. This report describes a liquid-hydrogen absorber that is within a pair of superconducting focusing solenoids. The absorber must also be suitable for use with liquid helium. The following absorber components are discussed in this report; the absorber body, its heat exchanger, the hydrogen system, and the hydrogen safety. Absorber cooling and the thin windows are not discussed here.

  1. Synergetic interactions improve cobalt leaching from lithium cobalt oxide in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Li, Tianchi; Liu, Chuan; Quan, Xie; Chen, Lijie; Wang, Aijie; Chen, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt leaching from lithium cobalt oxide is a promising reduction process for recovery of cobalt and recycle of spent lithium ion batteries, but suffers from consumption of large amount of reductants and energy, and generation of excess secondary polluted sludge. Thus, effective and environmental friendly processes are needed to improve the existing process limitations. Here we reported microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to effectively reduce Co(III) in lithium cobalt oxide with concomitant energy generation. There was a synergetic interaction in MFCs, leading to a more rapid Co(III) leaching at a rate 3.4 times the sum of rates by conventional chemical processes and no-acid controls. External resistor, solid/liquid ratio, solution conductivity, pH and temperature affected system performance. This study provides a new process for recovery of cobalt and recycle of spent lithium ion batteries with concomitant energy generation from MFCs. PMID:23211478

  2. Thin lithium cobalt dioxide rechargeable cells using polyacrylonitrile-based polymer electrolytes. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Slane, S.

    1994-07-01

    Rechargeable Li/LiCoO2 cells with polymer electrolytes have achieved 100 mAh/g capacity and over 75 charge/discharge cycles with an average discharge potential of 3.7 volts. Solid-state polymer lithium electrolytes based on poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) have achieved room temperature conductivities of 0,001 siemens per cm, equal to that of some liquid organic electrolytes. Polymer films of ethylene carbonate, propylene carbonate, PAN, and lithium salts have yielded conductivities as high as 4x10-4 siemens per cm at 25 deg C. These high conductivities made the use of polymer electrolytes a viable possibility in advanced lithium batteries. Reported here are the film preparation techniques, conductivities from -70 to 70 deg C, and discharge curves of Li/LiCoO2 cells. Rechargeable battery, Lithium, Polymer electrolyte, Ionic conductivity.

  3. High-Performance Lithium-Air Battery with a Coaxial-Fiber Architecture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Wang, Lie; Guo, Ziyang; Xu, Yifan; Wang, Yonggang; Peng, Huisheng

    2016-03-24

    The lithium-air battery has been proposed as the next-generation energy-storage device with a much higher energy density compared with the conventional lithium-ion battery. However, lithium-air batteries currently suffer enormous problems including parasitic reactions, low recyclability in air, degradation, and leakage of liquid electrolyte. Besides, they are designed into a rigid bulk structure that cannot meet the flexible requirement in the modern electronics. Herein, for the first time, a new family of fiber-shaped lithium-air batteries with high electrochemical performances and flexibility has been developed. The battery exhibited a discharge capacity of 12,470 mAh g(-1) and could stably work for 100 cycles in air; its electrochemical performances were well maintained under bending and after bending. It was also wearable and formed flexible power textiles for various electronic devices. PMID:26929017

  4. Effect of Lithium Enrichment on the Tritium Breeding Characteristics of Various Breeders in a Fusion Driven Hybrid Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Übeyli, Mustafa

    2009-09-01

    Selection of lithium containing materials is very important in the design of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion driven hybrid reactor in order to supply its tritium self-sufficiency. Tritium, an artificial isotope of hydrogen, can be produced in the blanket by using the neutron capture reactions of lithium in the coolants and/or blanket materials which consist of lithium. This study presents the effect of lithium-6 enrichment in the coolant of the reactor on the tritium breeding of the hybrid blanket. Various liquid-solid breeder couples were investigated to determine the effective breeders. Numerical results pointed out that the tritium production increased with increasing lithium-6 enrichment for all cases.

  5. Novel carbonaceous materials for lithium secondary batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Sandi, G.; Winans, R.E.; Carrado, K.A.; Johnson, C.S.

    1997-07-01

    Carbonaceous materials have been synthesized using pillared clays (PILCs) as templates. The PILC was loaded with organic materials such as pyrene in the liquid and vapor phase, styrene in the vapor phase, trioxane, ethylene and propylene. The samples were then pyrolyzed at 700 C in an inert atmosphere, followed by dissolution of the inorganic template by conventional demineralization methods. X-ray powder diffraction of the carbons showed broad d{sub 002} peaks in the diffraction pattern, indicative of a disordered or turbostratic system. N{sub 2} BET surface areas of the carbonaceous materials range from 10 to 100 m{sup 2}/g. There is some microporosity (r < 1 nm) in the highest surface area carbons. Most of the surface area, however, comes from a mixture of micro and mesopores with radii of 2--5 nm. Electrochemical studies were performed on these carbons. Button cells were fabricated with capacity- limiting carbon pellets electrodes as the cathode a/nd metallic lithium foil as the anode. Large reversible capacities (up to 850 mAh/g) were achieved for most of the samples. The irreversible capacity loss was less than 180 mAh/g after the first cycle, suggesting that these types of carbon materials are very stable to lithium insertion and de-insertion reactions.

  6. Putrescine uptake in saintpaulia petals.

    PubMed

    Bagni, N; Pistocchi, R

    1985-02-01

    Putrescine uptake and the kinetics of this uptake were studied in petals of Saintpaulia ionantha Wendl. Uptake experiments of [(3)H] or [(14)C] putrescine were done on single petals at room temperature at various pH values. The results show that putrescine uptake occurs against a concentration gradient at low external putrescine concentration (0.5-100 micromolar) and follows a concentration gradient at higher external putrescine concentrations (100 micromolar to 100 millimolar). 2,4-Dinitrophenol and carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone, two uncouplers, had no effect on putrescine uptake. Uptake rates were constant for 2 hours, reaching a maximum after 3 to 4 hours. Putrescine uptake depended markedly on the external pH and two maxima were observed: at low external concentrations of putrescine, the optimum was at pH 5 to 5.5; at higher concentrations the optimum was at pH 8. PMID:16664065

  7. High power density self-cooled lithium-vanadium blanket.

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Majumdar, S.; Smith, D.

    1999-07-01

    A self-cooled lithium-vanadium blanket concept capable of operating with 2 MW/m{sup 2} surface heat flux and 10 MW/m{sup 2} neutron wall loading has been developed. The blanket has liquid lithium as the tritium breeder and the coolant to alleviate issues of coolant breeder compatibility and reactivity. Vanadium alloy (V-4Cr-4Ti) is used as the structural material because it can accommodate high heat loads. Also, it has good mechanical properties at high temperatures, high neutron fluence capability, low degradation under neutron irradiation, good compatibility with the blanket materials, low decay heat, low waste disposal rating, and adequate strength to accommodate the electromagnetic loads during plasma disruption events. Self-healing electrical insulator (CaO) is utilized to reduce the MHD pressure drop. A poloidal coolant flow with high velocity at the first wall is used to reduce the peak temperature of the vanadium structure and to accommodate high surface heat flux. The blanket has a simple blanket configuration and low coolant pressure to reduce the fabrication cost, to improve the blanket reliability, and to increase confidence in the blanket performance. Spectral shifter, moderator, and reflector are utilized to improve the blanket shielding capability and energy multiplication, and to reduce the radial blanket thickness. Natural lithium is used to avoid extra cost related to the lithium enrichment process.

  8. Anodes for rechargeable lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Kepler, Keith D.; Vaughey, John T.

    2003-01-01

    A negative electrode (12) for a non-aqueous electrochemical cell (10) with an intermetallic host structure containing two or more elements selected from the metal elements and silicon, capable of accommodating lithium within its crystallographic host structure such that when the host structure is lithiated it transforms to a lithiated zinc-blende-type structure. Both active elements (alloying with lithium) and inactive elements (non-alloying with lithium) are disclosed. Electrochemical cells and batteries as well as methods of making the negative electrode are disclosed.

  9. A Lithium Superionic Sulfide Cathode for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhan; Liu, Zengcai; Dudney, Nancy J; Liang, Chengdu

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a facile synthesis approach for core-shell structured Li2S nanoparticles, which have Li2S as the core and Li3PS4 as the shell. This material functions as lithium superionic sulfide (LSS) cathode for long-lasting, energy-efficient lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. The LSS has an ionic conductivity of 10-7 S cm-1 at 25 oC, which is 6 orders of magnitude higher than that of bulk Li2S (~10-13 S cm-1). The high lithium-ion conductivity of LSS imparts an excellent cycling performance to all-solid Li-S batteries, which also promises safe cycling of high-energy batteries with metallic lithium anodes.

  10. High cycle life secondary lithium battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Carter, Boyd J. (Inventor); Shen, David H. (Inventor); Somoano, Robert B. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A secondary battery (10) of high energy density and long cycle is achieved by coating the separator (18) with a film (21) of cationic polymer such as polyvinyl-imidazoline. The binder of the positive electrode (14) such as an ethylene-propylene elastomer binder (26) containing particles (28) of TiS.sub.2 chalcogenide can also be modified to contain sulfone functional groups by incorporating liquid or solid sulfone materials such as 0.1 to 5 percent by weight of sulfolane into the binder. The negative lithium electrode (14), separator (18) and positive electrode (16) are preferably spirally wound and disposed within a sealed casing (17) containing terminals (32, 34). The modified separator and positive electrode are more wettable by the electrolytes in which a salt is dissolved in a polar solvent such as sulfolane.

  11. Plasma Performance Improvement with Lithium-Coated Plasma-Facing Components in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R., et. al.

    2008-09-29

    Lithium as a plasma-facing material has many attractive features, including a reduction in the recycling of hydrogenic species and the potential for withstanding high heat and neutron fluxes in fusion reactors. Recent NSTX experiments have shown, for the first time, significant and recurring benefits of lithium coatings on plasma-facing components (PFC's) to the performance of divertor plasmas in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. They included decreases in the plasma density and inductive flux consumption, and increases in the electron temperature, ion temperature, energy confinement time, and DD neutron rate. Extended periods of MHD quiescence were also achieved, and measurements of the visible emission from the lower divertor showed a reduction in the deuterium, carbon, and oxygen line emission. Other salient results with lithium evaporation included a broadening of the electron temperature profile, and changes in edge density gradients that benefited electron Bernstein wave coupling. There was also a reduction in ELM frequency and amplitude, followed by a period of complete ELM suppression. In general, it was observed that both the best and the average confinement occurred after lithium deposition and that the increase in WMHD occurs mostly through an increase in We. In addition, a liquid lithium divertor (LLD) is being installed on NSTX this year. As the first fully-toroidal liquid metal divertor target, experiments with the LLD can provide insight into the behavior of metallic ITER PFC's should they liquefy during high-power divertor tokamak operations. The NSTX lithium coating and LLD experiments are important near-term steps in demonstrating the potential of liquid lithium as a solution to the first-wall problem for both magnetic and inertial fusion reactors.

  12. Plasma Performance Improvement with Lithium-Coated Plasma-Facing Components in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R; Kugel, H; Bell, M G; Bell, R; Boedo, J; Bush, C; Ellis, R; Gates, D; Gerhardt, S; Gray, T; Kallman, J; Kaye, S; LeBlanc, B; Majeski, R; Maingi, R; Mansfield, D; Menard, J; Mueller, D; Ono, M; Paul, S; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Ross, P W; Sabbagh, S; Schneider, H; Skinner, S H; Soukhanovskii, V; Stevenson, T; Stotler, D; Timberlake, J; Zakharov, L; Ahn, J; Allain, J P; Wampler, W R

    2009-01-08

    Lithium as a plasma-facing material has many attractive features, including a reduction in the recycling of hydrogenic species and the potential for withstanding high heat and neutron fluxes in fusion reactors. Recent NSTX experiments have shown, for the first time, significant and recurring benefits of lithium coatings on plasma-facing components (PFC's) to the performance of divertor plasmas in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. They included decreases in the plasma density and inductive flux consumption, and increases in the electron temperature, ion temperature, energy confinement time, and DD neutron rate. Extended periods of MHD quiescence were also achieved, and measurements of the visible emission from the lower divertor showed a reduction in the deuterium, carbon, and oxygen line emission. Other salient results with lithium evaporation included a broadening of the electron temperature profile, and changes in edge density gradients that benefited electron Bernstein wave coupling. There was also a reduction in ELM frequency and amplitude, followed by a period of complete ELM suppression. In general, it was observed that both the best and the average confinement occurred after lithium deposition and that the increase in WMHD occurs mostly through an increase in We. In addition, a liquid lithium divertor (LLD) is being installed on NSTX this year. As the first fully-toroidal liquid metal divertor target, experiments with the LLD can provide insight into the behavior of metallic ITER PFC's should they liquefy during high-power divertor tokamak operations. The NSTX lithium coating and LLD experiments are important near-term steps in demonstrating the potential of liquid lithium as a solution to the first-wall problem for both magnetic and inertial fusion reactors.

  13. Cyanoethylated Compounds as Additives in Lithium/Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasubramanian, Ganesan

    1998-05-08

    The power loss of lithium/lithium ion battery cells is significantly reduced, especially at low temperatures, when about 1% by weight of an additive is incorporated in the electrolyte layer of the cells. The usable additives are organic solvent soluble cyanoethylated polysaccharides and poly(vinyl alcohol). The power loss decrease results primarily from the decrease in the charge transfer resistance at the interface between the electrolyte and the cathode.

  14. Lithium metal doped electrodes for lithium-ion rechargeable chemistry

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gao; Battaglia, Vince; Wang, Lei

    2016-09-13

    An embodiment of the invention combines the superior performance of a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) or polyethyleneoxide (POE) binder, the strong binding force of a styrene-butadiene (SBR) binder, and a source of lithium ions in the form of solid lithium metal powder (SLMP) to form an electrode system that has improved performance as compared to PVDF/SBR binder based electrodes. This invention will provide a new way to achieve improved results at a much reduced cost.

  15. Cyanoethylated compounds as additives in lithium/lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Nagasubramanian, Ganesan

    1999-01-01

    The power loss of lithium/lithium ion battery cells is significantly reduced, especially at low temperatures, when about 1% by weight of an additive is incorporated in the electrolyte layer of the cells. The usable additives are organic solvent soluble cyanoethylated polysaccharides and poly(vinyl alcohol). The power loss decrease results primarily from the decrease in the charge transfer resistance at the interface between the electrolyte and the cathode.

  16. Nanostructure of the Ionic Liquid-Graphite Stern Layer.

    PubMed

    Elbourne, Aaron; McDonald, Samila; Voïchovsky, Kislon; Endres, Frank; Warr, Gregory G; Atkin, Rob

    2015-07-28

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are attractive solvents for devices such as lithium ion batteries and capacitors, but their uptake is limited, partially because their Stern layer nanostructure is poorly understood compared to molecular solvents. Here, in situ amplitude-modulated atomic force microscopy has been used to reveal the Stern layer nanostructure of the 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (EMIm TFSI)-HOPG (highly ordered pyrolytic graphite) interface with molecular resolution. The effect of applied surface potential and added 0.1 wt/wt % Li TFSI or EMIm Cl on ion arrangements is probed between ±1 V. For pure EMIm TFSI at open-circuit potential, well-defined rows are present on the surface formed by an anion-cation-cation-anion (A-C-C-A) unit cell adsorbed with like ions adjacent. As the surface potential is changed, the relative concentrations of cations and anions in the Stern layer respond, and markedly different lateral ion arrangements ensue. The changes in Stern layer structure at positive and negative potentials are not symmetrical due to the different surface affinities and packing constraints of cations and anions. For potentials outside ±0.4 V, images are featureless because the compositional variation within the layer is too small for the AFM tip to detect. This suggests that the Stern layer is highly enriched in either cations or anions (depending on the potential) oriented upright to the surface plane. When Li(+) or Cl(-) is present, some Stern layer ionic liquid cations or anions (respectively) are displaced, producing starkly different structures. The Stern layer structures elucidated here significantly enhance our understanding of the ionic liquid electrical double layer. PMID:26051040

  17. Discharge characteristics of lithium/molten nitrate thermal battery cells using silver salts as solid cathode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManis, G. E.; Miles, M. H.; Fletcher, A. N.

    1985-12-01

    Thermal battery cells using molten nitrate electrolytes and liquid lithium anodes have been evaluated using several silver salts with low solubility in molten nitrates as solid cathode materials. These cathode materials do not readily diffuse into the anolyte and, thus, do not have parasitic reactions with the lithium anode. Furthermore, the solid cathode materials have voltammetric characteristics as favorable as many soluble silver salt cathodes. This paper presents the effects of temperature, current density, and cathode material on cell discharge characteristics.

  18. Preliminary Evaluations of Polymer-based Lithium Battery Electrolytes Under Development for the Polymer Electrolyte Rechargeable Systems Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.; Bennett, William R.

    2003-01-01

    A component screening facility has been established at The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to evaluate candidate materials for next generation, lithium-based, polymer electrolyte batteries for aerospace applications. Procedures have been implemented to provide standardized measurements of critical electrolyte properties. These include ionic conductivity, electronic resistivity, electrochemical stability window, cation transference number, salt diffusion coefficient and lithium plating efficiency. Preliminary results for poly(ethy1ene oxide)-based polymer electrolyte and commercial liquid electrolyte are presented.

  19. Study on High Speed Lithium Jet For Neutron Source of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Minoru; Kobayashi, Tooru; Zhang, Mingguang; Mák, Michael; Štefanica, Jirí; Dostál, Václav; Zhao, Wei

    The feasibility study of a liquid lithium type proton beam target was performed for the neutron source of the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). As the candidates of the liquid lithium target, a thin sheet jet and a thin film flow on a concave wall were chosen, and a lithium flow experiment was conducted to investigate the hydrodynamic stability of the targets. The surfaces of the jets and film flows with a thickness of 0.5 mm and a width of 50 mm were observed by means of photography. It has been found that a stable sheet jet and a stable film flow on a concave wall can be formed up to certain velocities by using a straight nozzle and a curved nozzle with the concave wall, respectively.

  20. Nuclear quantum and electronic exchange-correlation effects on the high pressure phase diagram of lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, Raymond; Morales, Miguel; Bonev, Stanimir

    Lithium at ambient conditions is the simplest alkali metal and exhibits textbook nearly-free electron character. However, increased core/valence electron overlap under compression leads to surprisingly complex behavior. Dense lithium is known to posses a maximum in the melting line, a metal to semiconductor phase transition around 80GPa, reemergent metallicity around 120GPa, and low coordination solid and liquid phases. In addition to its complex electronic structure at high pressure, the atomic mass of lithium is low enough that nuclear quantum effects could have a nontrivial impact on its phase diagram. Through a combination of density functional theory based path-integral and classical molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated the impact of both nuclear quantum effects and anharmonicity on the melting line and solid phase boundaries. Additionally, we have determined the robustness of previously predicted tetrahedral clustering in the dense liquid to the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects and approximate treatment of electronic exchange-correlation effects.

  1. Silica Precipitation and Lithium Sorption

    SciTech Connect

    Jay Renew

    2015-09-20

    This file contains silica precipitation and lithium sorption data from the project. The silica removal data is corrected from the previous submission. The previous submission did not take into account the limit of detection of the ICP-MS procedure.

  2. 21 CFR 862.3560 - Lithium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lithium test system. 862.3560 Section 862.3560....3560 Lithium test system. (a) Identification. A lithium test system is a device intended to measure lithium (from the drug lithium carbonate) in serum or plasma. Measurements of lithium are used to...

  3. 21 CFR 862.3560 - Lithium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lithium test system. 862.3560 Section 862.3560....3560 Lithium test system. (a) Identification. A lithium test system is a device intended to measure lithium (from the drug lithium carbonate) in serum or plasma. Measurements of lithium are used to...

  4. 21 CFR 862.3560 - Lithium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lithium test system. 862.3560 Section 862.3560....3560 Lithium test system. (a) Identification. A lithium test system is a device intended to measure lithium (from the drug lithium carbonate) in serum or plasma. Measurements of lithium are used to...

  5. 21 CFR 862.3560 - Lithium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lithium test system. 862.3560 Section 862.3560....3560 Lithium test system. (a) Identification. A lithium test system is a device intended to measure lithium (from the drug lithium carbonate) in serum or plasma. Measurements of lithium are used to...

  6. Fueling studies on the lithium tokamak experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundberg, Daniel Patrick

    Lithium plasma facing components reduce the flux of "recycled" particles entering the plasma edge from the plasma facing components. This results in increased external fueling requirements and provides the opportunity to control the magnitude and distribution of the incoming particle flux. It has been predicted that the plasma density profile will then be determined by the deposition profile of the external fueling, rather than dominated by the recycled particle flux. A series of experiments on the Lithium Tokamak Experiment demonstrate that lithium wall coatings facilitate control of the neutral and plasma particle inventories. With fresh lithium coatings and careful gas injection programming, over 90% of the injected particle inventory can be absorbed in the lithium wall during a discharge. Furthermore, dramatic changes in the fueling requirements and plasma parameters were observed when lithium coatings were applied. This is largely due to the elimination of water as an impurity on the plasma facing components. A Molecular Cluster Injector (MCI) was developed for the fueling of LTX plasmas. The MCI uses a supersonic nozzle, cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures, to create the conditions necessary for molecular cluster formation. It has been predicted that molecular clusters will penetrate deeper into plasmas than gas-phase molecules via a reduced ionization cross-section and by improving the collimation of the neutral jet. Using an electron beam diagnostic, the densities of the cryogenic MCI are measured to be an order of magnitude higher than in the room-temperature jets formed with the same valve pressure. This indicates increased collimation relative to what would be expected from ideal gas dynamics alone. A systematic study of the fueling efficiencies achieved with the LTX fueling systems is presented. The fueling efficiency of the Supersonic Gas Injector (SGI) is demonstrated to be strongly dependent on the distance between the nozzle and plasma edge. The

  7. Lithium wetting of stainless steel for plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, C. H.; Capece, A. M.; Roszell, J. P.; Koel, B. E.

    2014-10-01

    Ensuring continuous wetting of a solid container by the liquid metal is a critical issue in the design of liquid metal plasma facing components foreseen for NSTX-U and FNSF. Ultrathin wetting layers may form on metallic surfaces under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions if material reservoirs are present from which spreading and wetting can start. The combined scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and ion beam etching capabilities of a Scanning Auger Microprobe (SAM) have been used to study the spreading of lithium films on stainless steel substrates. A small (mm-scale) amount of metallic lithium was applied to a stainless steel surface in an argon glove box and transferred to the SAM. Native impurities on the stainless steel and lithium surfaces were removed by Ar+ ion sputtering. Elemental mapping of Li and Li-O showed that surface diffusion of Li had taken place at room temperature, well below the 181°C Li melting temperature. The influence of temperature and surface oxidation on the rate of Li spreading on stainless steel will be reported. Support was provided through DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  8. Modeling the Lithium Ion Battery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summerfield, John

    2013-01-01

    The lithium ion battery will be a reliable electrical resource for many years to come. A simple model of the lithium ions motion due to changes in concentration and voltage is presented. The battery chosen has LiCoO[subscript 2] as the cathode, LiPF[subscript 6] as the electrolyte, and LiC[subscript 6] as the anode. The concentration gradient and…

  9. Air breathing lithium power cells

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.

    2014-07-15

    A cell suitable for use in a battery according to one embodiment includes a catalytic oxygen cathode; a stabilized zirconia electrolyte for selective oxygen anion transport; a molten salt electrolyte; and a lithium-based anode. A cell suitable for use in a battery according to another embodiment includes a catalytic oxygen cathode; an electrolyte; a membrane selective to molecular oxygen; and a lithium-based anode.

  10. Early North American research on lithium.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G; Gershon, S

    1999-12-01

    Research and clinical interest in lithium in the USA lagged behind that in Europe, largely because of the experience of deaths due to lithium in cardiac patients. The first American report on lithium was published in 1960 by Sam Gershon, the Australian psychiatrist who had undertaken lithium studies in Melbourne in conjunction with the physiologist Trautner. Major USA clinical trials originated in the 1960s; and the clinical significance of lithium was recognised in a special section in the American Journal of Psychiatry in 1968. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of lithium for control of manic episodes was finally given in 1970. PMID:10622180

  11. Lithium compensation for full cell operation

    DOEpatents

    Xiao, Jie; Zheng, Jianming; Chen, Xilin; Lu, Dongping; Liu, Jun; Jiguang, Jiguang

    2016-05-17

    Disclosed herein are embodiments of a lithium-ion battery system comprising an anode, an anode current collector, and a layer of lithium metal in contact with the current collector, but not in contact with the anode. The lithium compensation layer dissolves into the electrolyte to compensate for the loss of lithium ions during usage of the full cell. The specific placement of the lithium compensation layer, such that there is no direct physical contact between the lithium compensation layer and the anode, provides certain advantages.

  12. Dendrite preventing separator for secondary lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, David H. (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Dendrites are prevented from shorting a secondary lithium battery by use of a first porous separator, such as porous polypropylene, adjacent to the lithium anode that is unreactive with lithium and a second porous fluoropolymer separator between the cathode and the first separator, such as polytetrafluoroethylene, that is reactive with lithium. As the tip of a lithium dendrite contacts the second separator, an exothermic reaction occurs locally between the lithium dendrite and the fluoropolymer separator. This results in the prevention of the dendrite propagation to the cathode.

  13. Dendrite preventing separator for secondary lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, David H. (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Dendrites are prevented from shorting a secondary lithium battery by use of a first porous separator such as porous polypropylene adjacent the lithium anode that is unreactive with lithium and a second porous fluoropolymer separator between the cathode and the first separator such as polytetrafluoroethylene that is reactive with lithium. As the tip of a lithium dendrite contacts the second separator, an exothermic reaction occurs locally between the lithium dendrite and the fluoropolymer separator. This results in the prevention of the dendrite propagation to the cathode.

  14. Secondary lithium batteries for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, B.; Khanna, S. K.; Yen, S. P. S.; Shen, D.; Somoano, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    Secondary lithium cells which use a LiAsF6-2-Me-THF electrolyte and a TiS2 intercalatable cathode exhibit encouraging cycle life at ambient temperature. Electrochemical and surface analytical studies indicate that the electrolyte is unstable in the presence of metallic lithium, leading to the formation of a lithium passivating film composed of lithium arsenic oxyfluorides and lithium fluorsilicates. The lithium cyclability remains as the most important problem to solve. Different electrolyte solvents, such as sulfolane, exhibit promising characteristics but lead to new compatibility problems with the other cell component materials.

  15. An Advanced Lithium-Ion Battery Based on a Graphene Anode and a Lithium Iron Phosphate Cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassoun, Jusef; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Agostini, Marco; Angelucci, Marco; Betti, Maria Grazia; Cingolani, Roberto; Gemmi, Mauro; Mariani, Carlo; Panero, Stefania; Pellegrini, Vittorio; Scrosati, Bruno

    2014-08-01

    Li-ion rechargeable batteries have enabled the wireless revolution transforming global communication. Future challenges, however, demands distributed energy supply at a level that is not feasible with the current energy-storage technology. New materials, capable of providing higher energy density are needed. Here we report a new class of lithium-ion batteries based on a graphene ink anode and a lithium iron phosphate cathode. By carefully balancing the cell composition and suppressing the initial irreversible capacity of the anode, we demonstrate an optimal battery performance in terms of specific capacity, i.e. 165 mAhg-1, estimated energy density of about 190 Whkg-1 and life, with a stable operation for over 80 charge-discharge cycles. We link these unique properties to the graphene nanoflake anode displaying crystalline order and high uptake of lithium at the edges, as well as to its structural and morphological optimization in relation to the overall battery composition. Our approach, compatible with any printing technologies, is cheap and scalable and opens up new opportunities for the development of high-capacity Li-ion batteries.

  16. Lithium peroxide primary element

    SciTech Connect

    Winsel, A.

    1982-05-04

    In a galvanic primary element of the system Li/H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, the aqueous cathode depolarizer H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is fixated as a polyurethane gel. It can thereby be controlled and caused to react with the anode metal in accordance with the current drain requirements. This is accomplished using a ram to press the gel toward a conductor which covers the lithium anode, which may take the form of a metal grid and/or a gas diffusion electrode. The oxygen which forms in the working layer through catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide creates a gas bubble when the current is interrupted or the ram is stopped, thereby interrupting the further supply of hydrogen peroxide to the catalyst.

  17. Optimized Silicon Electrode Architecture, Interface, and Microgeometry for Next-Generation Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Molina Piper, Daniela; Evans, Tyler; Xu, Shanshan; Kim, Seul Cham; Han, Sang Sub; Liu, Ken Liang; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Yang, Ronggui; Lee, Se-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Optimized performance of silicon-ionic- liquid lithium-ion batteries through the implementation of a new electrode-microgeometry. The incorporation of 1D silicon nanowires into the cyclized-polyacrylonitrile-based electrode-architecture allows for greatly improved active material utilization, higher rate capabilities, and reduced interfacial reactions. PMID:26506084

  18. Low impurity concentrations and enhanced confinement in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, D. P.; Bell, R. E.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Schmitt, J. C.; Scotti, F.; Biewer, T. M.; Gray, T. K.

    2015-11-01

    Significant improvements in confinement and overall performance have been shown in many devices using lithium wall-coatings, though impurities have often been an issue. Previous results with partial coatings in LTX, a modest-sized, ohmically-heated spherical tokamak, demonstrated energy confinement times exceeding ITER ELMy H-mode scalings. Here we report the results of new experiments with fully lithium coated walls, including first-ever successful operation of a tokamak plasma with a full liquid lithium wall. Energy confinement estimates based on magnetic analysis exceed the ITER98P scaling by 2-4x, and can now be confirmed with electron temperature and density profiles from Thomson scattering. Past attempts at a full liquid Li coating in LTX were unsuccessful, with difficulty achieving breakdown and short, cold, impurity dominated plasmas. Now, spectroscopic measurements in discharges with full liquid coatings indicate low core core impurity concentrations of Li, C, and O. The implications for impurity transport will be discussed. The results for confinement and impurity behavior with solid and liquid lithium on stainless steel surfaces in LTX are relevant to future devices and upgrades with all-metal walls, including NSTX-U. This work is supported by US DOE contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE- AC05-00OR22725.

  19. Electromagnetic Pumps for Liquid Metal-Fed Electric Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Markusic, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    Prototype designs of two separate pumps for use in electric propulsion systems with liquid lithium and bismuth propellants are presented. Both pumps are required to operate at elevated temperatures, and the lithium pump must additionally withstand the corrosive nature of the propellant. Compatibility of the pump materials and seals with lithium and bismuth were demonstrated through proof-of-concept experiments followed by post-experiment visual inspections. The pressure rise produced by the bismuth pump was found to be linear with input current and ranged from 0-9 kPa for corresponding input current levels of 0-30 A, showing good quantitative agreement with theoretical analysis.

  20. Lithium bromide absorption chiller passes gas conditioning field test

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, M.J.; Huey, M.A.

    1995-07-31

    A lithium bromide absorption chiller has been successfully used to provide refrigeration for field conditioning of natural gas. The intent of the study was to identify a process that could provide a moderate level of refrigeration necessary to meet the quality restrictions required by natural-gas transmission companies, minimize the initial investment risk, and reduce operating expenses. The technology in the test proved comparatively less expensive to operate than a propane refrigeration plant. Volatile product prices and changes in natural-gas transmission requirements have created the need for an alternative to conventional methods of natural-gas processing. The paper describes the problems with the accumulation of condensed liquids in pipelines, gas conditioning, the lithium bromide absorption cycle, economics, performance, and operating and maintenance costs.

  1. Recombinant glucose uptake system

    DOEpatents

    Ingrahm, Lonnie O.; Snoep, Jacob L.; Arfman, Nico

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant organisms are disclosed that contain a pathway for glucose uptake other than the pathway normally utilized by the host cell. In particular, the host cell is one in which glucose transport into the cell normally is coupled to PEP production. This host cell is transformed so that it uses an alternative pathway for glucose transport that is not coupled to PEP production. In a preferred embodiment, the host cell is a bacterium other than Z. mobilis that has been transformed to contain the glf and glk genes of Z. mobilis. By uncoupling glucose transport into the cell from PEP utilization, more PEP is produced for synthesis of products of commercial importance from a given quantity of biomass supplied to the host cells.

  2. Vacuolar Ca(2+) uptake.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Jon K

    2011-08-01

    Calcium transporters that mediate the removal of Ca(2+) from the cytosol and into internal stores provide a critical role in regulating Ca(2+) signals following stimulus induction and in preventing calcium toxicity. The vacuole is a major calcium store in many organisms, particularly plants and fungi. Two main pathways facilitate the accumulation of Ca(2+) into vacuoles, Ca(2+)-ATPases and Ca(2+)/H(+) exchangers. Here I review the biochemical and regulatory features of these transporters that have been characterised in yeast and plants. These Ca(2+) transport mechanisms are compared with those being identified from other vacuolated organisms including algae and protozoa. Studies suggest that Ca(2+) uptake into vacuoles and other related acidic Ca(2+) stores occurs by conserved mechanisms which developed early in evolution. PMID:21310481

  3. A new lithium salt with dihydroxybenzene and lithium tetrafluoroborate for lithium battery electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhao-Ming; Sun, Bin-Bin; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Chun-Hua

    2011-10-01

    A new unsymmetrical lithium salt containing F-, C6H4O22- [dianion of 1,2-benzenediol], lithium difluoro(1,2-benzene-diolato(2-)-o,o‧)borate (LDFBDB) is synthesized and characterized. Its thermal decomposition in nitrogen begins at 170 °C. The cyclic voltammetry study shows that the LDFBDB solution in propylene carbonate (PC) is stable up to 3.7 V versus Li+/Li. It is soluble in common organic solvents. The ionic dissociation properties of LDFBDB are examined by conductivity measurements in PC, PC+ ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), PC + dimethyl ether (DME), PC + ethylene carbonate (EC) + EMC solutions. The conductivity values of the 0.564 mol dm-3 LDFBDB electrolyte in PC + DME solution is 3.90 mS cm-1. All these properties of the new lithium salt including the thermal characteristics, electrochemical stabilities, solubilities, ionic dissociation properties are studied and compared with those of its derivatives, lithium difluoro(3-fluoro-1,2-benzene-diolato(2-)-o,o‧)borate (FLDFBDB), lithium [3-fluoro-1,2-benzenediolato(2-)-o,o‧ oxalato]borate (FLBDOB), and lithium bis(oxalate)borate (LBOB).

  4. Lithium sputtering from lithium-coated plasma facing components in the NSTX divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotti, F.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Ahn, J.-W.; Bell, R. E.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H. W.; McLean, A. G.; Meier, E. T.; Podestà, M.; Roquemore, A. L.

    2015-08-01

    Lithium sputtering yields and gross impurity influxes from lithium-coated graphite and molybdenum plasma facing components (PFCs) have been analyzed for the first time in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) divertor during H-mode NBI-heated discharges. Motivated by the beneficial effects of lithium conditioning on discharge performance and reproducibility, evaporative lithium coatings were the routine wall conditioning technique in NSTX. Neutral lithium sputtering yields from solid lithium coatings in NSTX were found to be consistent with values reported from test stand experiments from deuterium-saturated lithium (with sputtering yields YLi ∼ 0.03- 0.07). Temperature-enhanced lithium sputtering was observed on lithium-coated graphite and molybdenum as a result of PFC heating by both embedded heaters and incident plasma heat flux, leading to YLi ∼ 0.1- 0.2 for surface temperatures above the lithium melting point.

  5. Protective lithium ion conducting ceramic coating for lithium metal anodes and associate method

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.

    1994-01-01

    A battery structure including a cathode, a lithium metal anode and an electrolyte disposed between the lithium anode and the cathode utilizes a thin-film layer of lithium phosphorus oxynitride overlying so as to coat the lithium anode and thereby separate the lithium anode from the electrolyte. If desired, a preliminary layer of lithium nitride may be coated upon the lithium anode before the lithium phosphorous oxynitride is, in turn, coated upon the lithium anode so that the separation of the anode and the electrolyte is further enhanced. By coating the lithium anode with this material lay-up, the life of the battery is lengthened and the performance of the battery is enhanced.

  6. Correlating Microstructural Lithium Metal Growth with Electrolyte Salt Depletion in Lithium Batteries Using ⁷Li MRI.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hee Jung; Ilott, Andrew J; Trease, Nicole M; Mohammadi, Mohaddese; Jerschow, Alexej; Grey, Clare P

    2015-12-01

    Lithium dendrite growth in lithium ion and lithium rechargeable batteries is associated with severe safety concerns. To overcome these problems, a fundamental understanding of the growth mechanism of dendrites under working conditions is needed. In this work, in situ (7)Li magnetic resonance (MRI) is performed on both the electrolyte and lithium metal electrodes in symmetric lithium cells, allowing the behavior of the electrolyte concentration gradient to be studied and correlated with the type and rate of microstructure growth on the Li metal electrode. For this purpose, chemical shift (CS) imaging of the metal electrodes is a particularly sensitive diagnostic method, enabling a clear distinction to be made between different types of microstructural growth occurring at the electrode surface and the eventual dendrite growth between the electrodes. The CS imaging shows that mossy types of microstructure grow close to the surface of the anode from the beginning of charge in every cell studied, while dendritic growth is triggered much later. Simple metrics have been developed to interpret the MRI data sets and to compare results from a series of cells charged at different current densities. The results show that at high charge rates, there is a strong correlation between the onset time of dendrite growth and the local depletion of the electrolyte at the surface of the electrode observed both experimentally and predicted theoretical (via the Sand's time model). A separate mechanism of dendrite growth is observed at low currents, which is not governed by salt depletion in the bulk liquid electrolyte. The MRI approach presented here allows the rate and nature of a process that occurs in the solid electrode to be correlated with the concentrations of components in the electrolyte. PMID:26524078

  7. Non-aqueous electrolytes for lithium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Bakos, V.W.; Steklenski, D.J.

    1989-02-14

    An electrochemical cell is described comprising a lithium anode, a cathode and an electrolyte having a conductivity, and reciprocal ohms per cm, of at least 3.5 in, comprising a lithium salt, propylene carbonate and 1,2-dimethoxypropane.

  8. Michael Thackeray on Lithium-air Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Thackeray, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Michael Thackeray, Distinguished Fellow at Argonne National Laboratory, speaks on the new technology Lithium-air batteries, which could potentially increase energy density by 5-10 times over lithium-ion batteries.

  9. Michael Thackeray on Lithium-air Batteries

    ScienceCinema

    Thackeray, Michael

    2013-04-19

    Michael Thackeray, Distinguished Fellow at Argonne National Laboratory, speaks on the new technology Lithium-air batteries, which could potentially increase energy density by 5-10 times over lithium-ion batteries.

  10. Khalil Amine on Lithium-air Batteries

    ScienceCinema

    Khalil Amine

    2010-01-08

    Khalil Amine, materials scientist at Argonne National Laboratory, speaks on the new technology Lithium-air batteries, which could potentially increase energy density by 5-10 times over lithium-ion batteries.

  11. Khalil Amine on Lithium-air Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil Amine

    2009-09-14

    Khalil Amine, materials scientist at Argonne National Laboratory, speaks on the new technology Lithium-air batteries, which could potentially increase energy density by 5-10 times over lithium-ion batteries.

  12. A general approach towards carbon nanotube and iron oxide coaxial architecture and its lithium storage capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling; Ni, Jiangfeng; Wang, Wencong; Li, Liang

    2015-12-01

    Coaxial architectures consisting of metal oxide and carbon nanotube are promising for many energy applications due to their synergetic interaction. The engineering and development of coaxial structures through a simple approach are highly desirable but remain a challenge. Herein, we present a general and facile ethylene glycol bath approach to fabricate coaxial architectures in which the metal oxide component is sandwiched by carbon nanotube and amorphous carbon. These unique architectures can serve as efficient electrode for lithium storage. The internal carbon nanotube allows rapid electron transport, while the external amorphous carbon acts as flexible buffer to accommodate volume variation upon lithium uptake. When evaluated in lithium cells, the carbon nanotube and iron oxide coaxial material exhibits a remarkable electrochemical lithium storage. It affords a capacity of 1083 mAh g-1 over 60 cycles, and retains 529 mAh g-1 at a high rate of 5 A g-1, drastically outperforming the pure iron oxide counterpart. This facile approach is in principle applicable to constructing other coaxial electrodes, and thus holds great potential in the manipulation of battery materials for lithium storage application.

  13. Hemispherand-Strapped Calix[4]pyrrole: An Ion-pair Receptor for the Recognition and Extraction of Lithium Nitrite.

    PubMed

    He, Qing; Zhang, Zhan; Brewster, James T; Lynch, Vincent M; Kim, Sung Kuk; Sessler, Jonathan L

    2016-08-10

    The hemispherand-strapped calix[4]pyrrole (1) acts as an ion pair receptor that exhibits selectivity for lithium salts. In organic media (CD2Cl2 and CD3OD, v/v, 9:1), receptor 1 binds LiCl with high preference relative to NaCl, KCl, and RbCl. DFT calculations provided support for the observed selectivity. Single crystal structures of five different lithium ion-pair complexes of 1 were obtained. In the case of LiCl, a single bridging water molecule between the lithium cation and chloride anion was observed, while tight contact ion pairs were observed in the case of the LiBr, LiI, LiNO3, and LiNO2 salts. Receptor 1 proved effective as an extractant for LiNO2 under both model solid-liquid and liquid-liquid extraction conditions. PMID:27442768

  14. Protection of tokamak plasma facing components by a capillary porous system with lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyublinski, I.; Vertkov, A.; Mirnov, S.; Lazarev, V.

    2015-08-01

    Development of plasma facing material (PFM) based on the Capillary-Porous System (CPS) with lithium and activity on realization of lithium application strategy are addressed to meet the challenges under the creation of steady-state tokamak fusion reactor and fusion neutron source. Presented overview of experimental study of lithium CPS in plasma devices demonstrates the progress in protection of tokamak plasma facing components (PFC) from damage, stabilization and self-renewal of liquid lithium surface, elimination of plasma pollution and lithium accumulation in tokamak chamber. The possibility of PFC protection from the high power load related to cooling of the tokamak boundary plasma by radiation of non-fully stripped lithium ions supported by experimental results. This approach demonstrated in scheme of closed loops of Li circulation in the tokamak vacuum chamber and realized in a series of design of tokamak in-vessel elements.

  15. Particle control and plasma performance in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment

    SciTech Connect

    Majeski, R.; Abrams, T.; Boyle, D.; Granstedt, E.; Hare, J.; Jacobson, C. M.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; LeBlanc, B.; Lundberg, D. P.; Lucia, M.; Merino, E.; Schmitt, J.; Stotler, D.; Biewer, T. M.; Canik, J. M.; Gray, T. K.; Maingi, R.; McLean, A. G.; Kubota, S.; and others

    2013-05-15

    The Lithium Tokamak eXperiment is a small, low aspect ratio tokamak [Majeski et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 055014 (2009)], which is fitted with a stainless steel-clad copper liner, conformal to the last closed flux surface. The liner can be heated to 350 °C. Several gas fueling systems, including supersonic gas injection and molecular cluster injection, have been studied and produce fueling efficiencies up to 35%. Discharges are strongly affected by wall conditioning. Discharges without lithium wall coatings are limited to plasma currents of order 10 kA, and discharge durations of order 5 ms. With solid lithium coatings discharge currents exceed 70 kA, and discharge durations exceed 30 ms. Heating the lithium wall coating, however, results in a prompt degradation of the discharge, at the melting point of lithium. These results suggest that the simplest approach to implementing liquid lithium walls in a tokamak—thin, evaporated, liquefied coatings of lithium—does not produce an adequately clean surface.

  16. Hot filament technique for measuring the thermal conductivity of molten lithium fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Perry, William D.

    1990-01-01

    Molten salts, such as lithium fluoride, are attractive candidates for thermal energy storage in solar dynamic space power systems because of their high latent heat of fusion. However, these same salts have poor thermal conductivities which inhibit the transfer of heat into the solid phase and out of the liquid phase. One concept for improving the thermal conductivity of the thermal energy storage system is to add a conductive filler material to the molten salt. High thermal conductivity pitch-based graphite fibers are being considered for this application. Although there is some information available on the thermal conductivity of lithium fluoride solid, there is very little information on lithium fluoride liquid, and no information on molten salt graphite fiber composites. This paper describes a hot filament technique for determining the thermal conductivity of molten salts. The hot filament technique was used to find the thermal conductivity of molten lithium fluoride at 930 C, and the thermal conductivity values ranged from 1.2 to 1.6 W/mK. These values are comparable to the slightly larger value of 5.0 W/mK for lithium fluoride solid. In addition, two molten salt graphite fiber composites were characterized with the hot filament technique and these results are also presented.

  17. The Thomson Scattering System on the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX)

    SciTech Connect

    T. Strickler, R. Majeski, R. Kaita, B. LeBlanc

    2008-07-31

    The Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) is a spherical tokamak with R0 = 0.4m, a = 0.26m, BTF ~ 3.4kG, IP ~ 400kA, and pulse length ~ 0.25s. The goal of LTX is to investigate tokamak plasmas that are almost entirely surrounded by a lithium-coated plasma-facing shell conformal to the last closed magnetic flux surface. Based on previous experimental results and simulation, it is expected that the low-recycling liquid lithium surfaces will result in higher temperatures at the plasma edge, flatter overall temperature profiles, centrally-peaked density profiles, and an increased confinement time. To test these predictions, the electron temperature and density profiles in LTX will be measured by a multi-point Thomson scattering system (TVTS). Initially, TS measurements will be made at up to 12 simultaneous points between the plasma center and plasma edge. Later, high resolution edge measurements will be deployed to study the lithium edge physics in greater detail. Technical challenges to implementing the TS system included limited "line of sight" access to the plasma due to the plasma-facing shell and problems associated with the presence of liquid lithium.

  18. Multi-layered, chemically bonded lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Nanda, Jagjit; Bischoff, Brian L; Bhave, Ramesh R

    2014-05-13

    Disclosed are multilayer, porous, thin-layered lithium-ion batteries that include an inorganic separator as a thin layer that is chemically bonded to surfaces of positive and negative electrode layers. Thus, in such disclosed lithium-ion batteries, the electrodes and separator are made to form non-discrete (i.e., integral) thin layers. Also disclosed are methods of fabricating integrally connected, thin, multilayer lithium batteries including lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries.

  19. Complete atrioventricular block secondary to lithium therapy.

    PubMed

    Shiraki, Teruo; Kohno, Kunihisa; Saito, Daiji; Takayama, Hiroki; Fujimoto, Akira

    2008-05-01

    Sinus node dysfunction has been reported most frequently among the adverse cardiovascular effects of lithium. In the present case, complete atrioventricular (AV) block with syncopal attacks developed secondary to lithium therapy, necessitating permanent pacemaker implantation. Serum lithium levels remained under or within the therapeutic range during the syncopal attacks. Lithium should be used with extreme caution, especially in patients with mild disturbance of AV conduction. PMID:18441470

  20. Novel Electrolytes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Lucht, Brett L

    2014-12-12

    We have been investigating three primary areas related to lithium ion battery electrolytes. First, we have been investigating the thermal stability of novel electrolytes for lithium ion batteries, in particular borate based salts. Second, we have been investigating novel additives to improve the calendar life of lithium ion batteries. Third, we have been investigating the thermal decomposition reactions of electrolytes for lithium-oxygen batteries.

  1. Cardiovascular malformations with lithium use during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, M R; Goldfield, M

    1975-05-01

    The 143 cases of lithium use during pregnancy collected by the Register of Lithium Babies show that infants exposed to lithium appear to have a higher than expected ratio of cardiovascular anomalies to all anomalies and may have an increased risk of congenital heart disease. The authors believe that these findings justify a conservative policy on the use of lithium with fertile and pregnant women. PMID:1119612

  2. Rechargeable lithium battery technology - A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpert, Gerald; Surampudi, Subbarao

    1990-01-01

    The technology of the rechargeable lithium battery is discussed with special attention given to the types of rechargeable lithium cells and to their expected performance and advantages. Consideration is also given to the organic-electrolyte and polymeric-electrolyte cells and to molten salt lithium cells, as well as to technical issues, such as the cycle life, charge control, rate capability, cell size, and safety. The role of the rechargeable lithium cell in future NASA applications is discussed.

  3. Primary lithium batteries, some consumer considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bro, P.

    1983-01-01

    In order to determine whether larger size lithium batteries would be commercially marketable, the performance of several D size lithium batteries was compared with that of an equivalent alkaline manganese battery, and the relative costs of the different systems were compared. It is concluded that opportunities exist in the consumer market for the larger sizes of the low rate and moderate rate lithium batteries, and that the high rate lithium batteries need further improvements before they can be recommended for consumer applications.

  4. Aplastic anemia associated with lithium therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M. Z.; Khan, A. G.; Chaudhry, Z. A.

    1973-01-01

    A case is reported of fatal aplastic anemia developing in a 50-year-old woman who received lithium carbonate in the generally accepted dosage for a manic-depressive disorder. The serum lithium had been determined at regular intervals and never exceeded what is considered a safe level. Patients for whom lithium is prescribed should have periodic hematologic examinations. PMID:4691107

  5. Solid composite electrolytes for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Kumar, Binod; Scanlon, Jr., Lawrence G.

    2000-01-01

    Solid composite electrolytes are provided for use in lithium batteries which exhibit moderate to high ionic conductivity at ambient temperatures and low activation energies. In one embodiment, a ceramic-ceramic composite electrolyte is provided containing lithium nitride and lithium phosphate. The ceramic-ceramic composite is also preferably annealed and exhibits an activation energy of about 0.1 eV.

  6. Anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    DOEpatents

    Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Meduri, Praveen; Sumanasekera, Gamini

    2014-12-30

    An anode material for lithium-ion batteries is provided that comprises an elongated core structure capable of forming an alloy with lithium; and a plurality of nanostructures placed on a surface of the core structure, with each nanostructure being capable of forming an alloy with lithium and spaced at a predetermined distance from adjacent nanostructures.

  7. Army position on lithium battery safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss, E.

    1982-01-01

    User requirements for lithium sulfur batteries are presented. They include careful analysis of design and quality control, along with certain equipment specifications. Some of the specifications include: hermetically sealed cells; lithium limited cells with stoichiometry of lithium to sulfur dioxide as a ratio of one; low moisture content in the cells; and battery capacity.

  8. NASA/Marshall's lithium battery applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paschal, L. E.

    1980-01-01

    A general lithium battery is described and a summary of lithium battery applications is presented. Four aspects of a particular lithium battery, the inducement environmental contamination monitoring battery, are discussed-design and construction details, thermal vacuum tests, projection tests, and acceptance tests.

  9. Magnetism in lithium-oxygen discharge product.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Jung, Hun-Ji; Lau, Kah Chun; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Schlueter, John A; Du, Peng; Assary, Rajeev S; Greeley, Jeffrey; Ferguson, Glen A; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Hassoun, Jusef; Iddir, Hakim; Zhou, Jigang; Zuin, Lucia; Hu, Yongfeng; Sun, Yang-Kook; Scrosati, Bruno; Curtiss, Larry A; Amine, Kahlil

    2013-07-01

    Nonaqueous lithium-oxygen batteries have a much superior theoretical gravimetric energy density compared to conventional lithium-ion batteries, and thus could render long-range electric vehicles a reality. A molecular-level understanding of the reversible formation of lithium peroxide in these batteries, the properties of major/minor discharge products, and the stability of the nonaqueous electrolytes is required to achieve successful lithium-oxygen batteries. We demonstrate that the major discharge product formed in the lithium-oxygen cell, lithium peroxide, exhibits a magnetic moment. These results are based on dc-magnetization measurements and a lithium-oxygen cell containing an ether-based electrolyte. The results are unexpected because bulk lithium peroxide has a significant band gap. Density functional calculations predict that superoxide-type surface oxygen groups with unpaired electrons exist on stoichiometric lithium peroxide crystalline surfaces and on nanoparticle surfaces; these computational results are consistent with the magnetic measurement of the discharged lithium peroxide product as well as EPR measurements on commercial lithium peroxide. The presence of superoxide-type surface oxygen groups with spin can play a role in the reversible formation and decomposition of lithium peroxide as well as the reversible formation and decomposition of electrolyte molecules. PMID:23670967

  10. Conductive lithium storage electrode

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Chung, Sung-Yoon; Bloking, Jason T.; Andersson, Anna M.

    2008-03-18

    A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z(A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).s- ub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001lithium phosphate that can intercalate lithium or hydrogen. The compound can be used in an electrochemical device including electrodes and storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

  11. Conductive lithium storage electrode

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Chung, Sung-Yoon; Bloking, Jason T.; Andersson, Anna M.

    2012-04-03

    A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001lithium phosphate that can intercalate lithium or hydrogen. The compound can be used in an electrochemical device including electrodes and storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

  12. Uptake of VOC by sunflower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkers, A.; Miebach, M.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.

    2003-04-01

    To study potential VOC uptake by plants we exposed sunflower (Helianthus annuus) to different VOC in continuously stirred tank reactors. For many VOC like methanol, ethanol, acetone, methylvinylketone, isoprene or limonene no uptake was detectable within the accuracy of our analytic set up. Other VOC like hexanal, octanal, (E)-3-hexenol and nopinone were taken up by sunflower. The uptake was related to stomatal aperture. Obviously, these VOC enter the plants through stomata. In case of hexanal, octanal, and (E)-3-hexenol the uptake was only limited by stomatal aperture implying that these VOC are rapidly metabolised. For nopinone the uptake seems to be limited by a slow metabolization. Estimations of deposition velocities showed that dry deposition of these compounds cannot be neglected as sink if diffusion through stomata is the limiting step for dry deposition. In such cases the lifetime with respect to dry deposiotion is comparable to the lifetime with respect to oxidation by hydroxyl radicals.

  13. Nanostructured electrolytes for stable lithium electrodeposition in secondary batteries.

    PubMed

    Tu, Zhengyuan; Nath, Pooja; Lu, Yingying; Tikekar, Mukul D; Archer, Lynden A

    2015-11-17

    modulus and stability requirements have to date proven to be insurmountable obstacles to progress. In this Account, we first review recent advances in continuum theory for dendrite growth and proliferation during metal electrodeposition. We show that the range of options for designing electrolytes and separators that stabilize electrodeposition is now substantially broader than one might imagine from previous literature accounts. In particular, separators designed at the nanoscale to constrain ion transport on length scales below a theory-defined cutoff, and structured electrolytes in which a fraction of anions are permanently immobilized to nanoparticles, to a polymer network or ceramic membrane are considered particularly promising for their ability to stabilize electrodeposition of lithium metal without compromising ionic conductivity or room temperature battery operation. We also review recent progress in designing surface passivation films for metallic lithium that facilitate fast deposition of lithium at the electrolyte/electrode interface and at the same time protect the lithium from parasitic side reactions with liquid electrolytes. A promising finding from both theory and experiment is that simple film-forming halide salt additives in a conventional liquid electrolyte can substantially extend the lifetime and safety of LMBs. PMID:26496667

  14. The lithium vapor box divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldston, R. J.; Myers, R.; Schwartz, J.

    2016-02-01

    It has long been recognized that volumetric dissipation of the plasma heat flux from a fusion power system is preferable to its localized impingement on a material surface. Volumetric dissipation mitigates both the anticipated very high heat flux and intense particle-induced damage due to sputtering. Recent projections to a tokamak demonstration power plant suggest an immense upstream parallel heat flux, of order 20 GW m-2, implying that fully detached operation may be a requirement for the success of fusion power. Building on pioneering work on the use of lithium by Nagayama et al and by Ono et al as well as earlier work on the gas box divertor by Watkins and Rebut, we present here a concept for a lithium vapor box divertor, in which lithium vapor extracts momentum and energy from a fusion-power-plant divertor plasma, using fully volumetric processes. At the high powers and pressures that are projected this requires a high density of lithium vapor, which must be isolated from the main plasma in order to avoid lithium build-up on the chamber walls or in the plasma. Isolation is achieved through a powerful multi-box differential pumping scheme available only for condensable vapors. The preliminary box-wise calculations are encouraging, but much more work is required to demonstrate the practical viability of this scheme, taking into account at least 2D plasma and vapor flows within and between the vapor boxes and out of the vapor boxes to the main plasma.

  15. Ionic conductivity of dual-phase polymer electrolytes comprised of NBR/SBR latex films swollen with lithium salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Morihiko; Ichino, Toshihiro; Rutt, J.S.; Nishi, Shiro . NTT Interdisciplinary Research Lab.)

    1994-08-01

    Dual-phase polymer electrolytes (DPE) with high ionic conductivity and good mechanical strength were prepared by swelling poly(acrylonitrile-co-butadiene) rubber (NBR) and poly(styrene-co-butadiene) rubber (SBR) mixed latex films with lithium salt solutions (e.g., 1M LiClO[sub 4]/[gamma]-butyrolactone). The latex films retain particle morphology in the solid state. The NBR phase (formed from fused NBR latex particles) is polar and is impregnated selectively with polar lithium salt solutions, yielding ion-conductive channels, whereas the SBR phase (formed from fused SBR latex particles) is nonpolar and is not impregnated, providing a mechanically supportive matrix. The ionic conductivity of the DPE increased dramatically with increasing content of lithium salt solution, and higher amounts of solution were imbibed with increasing content of NBR relative to SBR. Several factors which affect the ionic conductivity of this system were examined, and the highest ionic conductivity (>10[sup [minus]3] S/cm) was obtained when either an NBR/SBR 70/30 (w/w) or a 50/50 (w/w) latex film was saturated with 1M LiClO[sub 4]/[gamma]-BL solution or 1M LiClO[sub 4]/[gamma]-BL/DME solution. Ion-conductive behavior changed critically with increasing lithium salt solution uptake. At low levels of lithium salt solution uptake, evidence suggested that ionic conductivity of the absorbed lithium salt solution was strongly influenced by the presence of the NBR in the ion-conductive channel, but at higher levels, the effects of the NBR were reduced and free'' lithium salt solution was present.

  16. Effect of cation structure on the oxygen solubility and diffusivity in a range of bis{(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl}imide anion based ionic liquids for lithium-air battery electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Neale, Alex R; Li, Peilin; Jacquemin, Johan; Goodrich, Peter; Ball, Sarah C; Compton, Richard G; Hardacre, Christopher

    2016-04-28

    This paper reports on the solubility and diffusivity of dissolved oxygen in a series of ionic liquids (ILs) based on the bis{(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl}imide anion with a range of related alkyl and ether functionalised cyclic alkylammonium cations. Cyclic voltammetry has been used to observe the reduction of oxygen in ILs at a microdisk electrode and chronoamperometric measurements have then been applied to simultaneously determine both the concentration and the diffusion coefficient of oxygen in different ILs. The viscosity of the ILs and the calculated molar volume and free volume are also reported. It is found that, within this class of ILs, the oxygen diffusivity generally increases with decreasing viscosity of the neat IL. An inverse relationship between oxygen solubility and IL free volume is reported for the two IL families implying that oxygen is not simply occupying the available empty space. In addition, it is reported that the introduction of an ether-group into the IL cation structure promotes the diffusivity of dissolved oxygen but reduces the solubility of the gas. PMID:27052672

  17. Lithium ion conducting electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Angell, C.A.; Liu, C.; Xu, K.; Skotheim, T.A.

    1999-10-05

    The present invention relates generally to highly conductive alkali-metal ion non-crystalline electrolyte systems, and more particularly to novel and unique molten (liquid), rubbery, and solid electrolyte systems which are especially well suited for use with high current density electrolytic cells such as primary and secondary batteries.

  18. Lithium ion conducting electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, Charles Austen; Liu, Changle; Xu, Kang; Skotheim, Terje A.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to highly conductive alkali-metal ion non-crystalline electrolyte systems, and more particularly to novel and unique molten (liquid), rubbery, and solid electrolyte systems which are especially well suited for use with high current density electrolytic cells such as primary and secondary batteries.

  19. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kim, Jaekook

    2006-11-14

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2M'O.sub.3 in which 0

  20. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kim, Jaekook

    2004-01-13

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2 M'O.sub.3 in which 0