Science.gov

Sample records for liquid metal eurisol

  1. Structural-hydraulic test of the liquid metal EURISOL target mock-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milenković, Rade Ž.; Dementjevs, Sergejs; Samec, Karel; Platacis, Ernests; Zik, Anatolij; Flerov, Aleksej; Manfrin, Enzo; Thomsen, Knud

    2009-08-01

    Structural-hydraulic tests of the European Isotope Separation On-Line (EURISOL) neutron converter target mock-up, named MErcury Target EXperiment 1 (METEX 1), have been conducted by Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI, Switzerland) in cooperation with Institute of Physics of the University of Latvia (IPUL, Latvia). PSI proceeded with extensive thermal-hydraulic and structural computational studies, followed by the target mock-up tests carried out on the mercury loop at IPUL. One of the main goals of the METEX 1 test is to investigate the hydraulic and structural behaviour of the EURISOL target mock-up for various inlet flow conditions (i.e. mass flow rates) and, in particular, for nominal operating flow rate and pressure in the system. The experimental results were analysed by advanced time-frequency methods such as Short-Time Fourier Transform in order to check the vibration characteristics of the mock-up and the resonance risk. The experimental results (obtained in METEX 1), which include inlet flow rate, pressure of the cover gas, total pressure loss, structural acceleration, sound and strain data, were jointly analysed together with numerical data obtained from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD).

  2. Liquid metal cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Hundal, Rolv

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal being provided with a hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal which acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly.

  3. Liquid metal enabled pump

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Sivan, Vijay; Petersen, Phred; O’Mullane, Anthony P.; Abbott, Derek; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    Small-scale pumps will be the heartbeat of many future micro/nanoscale platforms. However, the integration of small-scale pumps is presently hampered by limited flow rate with respect to the input power, and their rather complicated fabrication processes. These issues arise as many conventional pumping effects require intricate moving elements. Here, we demonstrate a system that we call the liquid metal enabled pump, for driving a range of liquids without mechanical moving parts, upon the application of modest electric field. This pump incorporates a droplet of liquid metal, which induces liquid flow at high flow rates, yet with exceptionally low power consumption by electrowetting/deelectrowetting at the metal surface. We present theory explaining this pumping mechanism and show that the operation is fundamentally different from other existing pumps. The presented liquid metal enabled pump is both efficient and simple, and thus has the potential to fundamentally advance the field of microfluidics. PMID:24550485

  4. Liquid metal drop ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khuri-Yakub, B. T.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this project was to demonstrate the possibility of ejecting liquid metals using drop on demand printing technology. The plan was to make transducers for operation in the 100 MHz frequency range and to use these transducers to demonstrate the ability to eject drops of liquid metals such as gallium. Two transducers were made by indium bonding piezoelectric lithium niobate to quartz buffer rods. The lithium niobate plates were thinned by mechanical polishing to a thickness of 37 microns for operation at 100 MHz. Hemispherical lenses were polished in the opposite ends of the buffer rods. The lenses, which focus the sound waves in the liquid metal, had an F-number equals 1. A mechanical housing was made to hold the transducers and to allow precise control over the liquid level above the lens. We started by demonstrating the ability to eject drops of water on demand. The drops of water had a diameter of 15 microns which corresponds to the wavelength of the sound wave in the water. A videotape of this ejection was made. We then used a mixture of Gallium and Indium (used to lower the melting temperature of the Gallium) to demonstrate the ejection of liquid metal drops. This proved to be difficult because of the oxide skin which forms on the surface of the liquid. In some instances, we were able to eject metal drops, however, this was not consistent and reproducible. An experiment was set up at NASA-Lewis to stabilize the process of drop on demand liquid metal ejection. The object was to place the transducer and liquid metal in a vacuum station so that no oxide would form on the surface. We were successful in demonstrating that liquid metals could be ejected on demand and that this technology could be used for making sheet metal in space.

  5. Design of a compact high-power neutron source—The EURISOL converter target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samec, K.; Milenković, R. Ž.; Dementjevs, S.; Ashrafi-Nik, M.; Kalt, A.

    2009-07-01

    The EURISOL project, a multi-lateral initiative supported by the EU, aims to develop a facility to achieve high yields of isotopes in radioactive beams and extend the variety of these isotopes towards more exotic types. The neutron source at the heart of the projected facility is designed to generate isotopes by fissioning uranium carbide (UC) targets arranged around a 4 MW neutron source. For reasons of efficiency, it is essential that the neutron source be as compact as possible, to avoid losing neutrons by absorption whilst maximising the escaping neutron flux, thus increasing the number of fissions in the UC targets. The resulting configuration presents a challenge in terms of absorbing heat deposition rates of up to 8 kW/cm3 in the neutron source; it has led to the selection of liquid metal for the target material. The current paper presents the design of a compact high-power liquid-metal neutron source comprising a specially optimised beam window concept. The design is based on two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical simulations for thermal hydraulics and hydraulic aspects, as well as finite-element method (FEM) for assessing thermo-mechanical stability. The resulting optimised design was validated by a dedicated hydraulic test under realistic flow conditions. A full-scale mock-up was built at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and was tested at the Institute of Physics of the University of Latvia (IPUL).

  6. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Joseph P.; Andraka, Charles E.; Lukens, Laurance L.; Moreno, James B.

    1992-01-01

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other.

  7. Liquid metal hydrogen barriers

    DOEpatents

    Grover, George M.; Frank, Thurman G.; Keddy, Edward S.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen barriers which comprise liquid metals in which the solubility of hydrogen is low and which have good thermal conductivities at operating temperatures of interest. Such barriers are useful in nuclear fuel elements containing a metal hydride moderator which has a substantial hydrogen dissociation pressure at reactor operating temperatures.

  8. Thermohydraulics in liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kottowski, H. M.

    Heat transfer problems in single-phase and two-phase liquid metal forced convection flow are reviewed. Liquid metal boiling heat transfer in pool flow; and dry out heat fluxes are considered. It is shown that in technological plants working with liquid metals, superheating up to 150 C occurs, and can lead to nonstationary hydraulic transition between the single-phase and established two-phase flows. Boiling phases relative to subcooled boiling and bubble boiling have no importance for technological processes. Piston, slug and annular flow patterns dominate. On the basis of the flow patterns observed during boiling, the separate flow model principle is the only one suitable for calculating the two-phase flow pressure drop. Using this model and total pressure drop measurements, a relationship for the two-phase frictional pressure characteristic, valid for tubular and annular geometry, can be determined.

  9. Liquid metal pump

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.

    1982-01-01

    The liquid metal pump comprises floating seal rings and attachment of the pump diffuser to the pump bowl for isolating structural deflections from the pump shaft bearings. The seal rings also eliminate precision machining on large assemblies by eliminating the need for a close tolerance fit between the mounting surfaces of the pump and the seals. The liquid metal pump also comprises a shaft support structure that is isolated from the pump housing for better preservation of alignment of shaft bearings. The shaft support structure also allows for complete removal of pump internals for inspection and repair.

  10. Liquid metal thermal electric converter

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Joseph P.; Andraka, Charles E.; Lukens, Laurance L.; Moreno, James B.

    1989-01-01

    A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

  11. Liquid metal thermoacoustic engine

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.; Wheatley, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    We are studying a liquid metal thermoacoustic engine both theoretically and experimentally. This type of engine promises to produce large quantities of electrical energy from heat at modest efficiency with no moving parts. A sound wave is usually thought of as consisting of pressure oscillations, but always attendant to the pressure oscillation are temperature oscillations. The combination produces a rich variety of ''thermoacoustic'' effects. These effects are usually so small that they are never noticed in everyday life; nevertheless under the right circumstances they can be harnessed to produce powerful heat engines, heat pumps, and refrigerators. In our liquid metal thermoacoustic engine, heat flow from a high temperature source to a low temperature sink generates a high-amplitude standing acoustic wave in liquid sodium. This acoustic power is converted to electric power by a simple magnetohydrodynamic effect at the acoustic oscillation frequency. We have developed a detailed thermoacoustic theory applicable to this engine, and find that a reasonably designed liquid sodium engine operating between 700/sup 0/C and 100/sup 0/C should generate about 60 W/cm/sup 2/ of acoustic power at about 1/3 of Carnot's efficiency. Construction of a 3000 W-thermal laboratory model engine has just been completed, and we have exciting preliminary experimental results as of the time of preparation of this manuscript showing, basically, that the engine works. We have also designed and built a 1 kHz liquid sodium magnetohydrodynamic generator and have extensive measurements on it. It is now very well characterized both experimentally and theoretically. The first generator of its kind, it already converts acoustic power to electric power with 40% efficiency. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Method of foaming a liquid metal

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Albert K.; Johnson, Carl E.

    1980-01-01

    The addition of a small quantity of barium to liquid metal NaK or sodium has been found to promote foam formation and improve bubble retention in the liquid metal. A stable liquid metal foam will provide a more homogeneous liquid metal flow through the channel of a two-phase liquid metal MHD power generator to improve operating efficiency.

  13. EXPERIMENTAL LIQUID METAL FUEL REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Happell, J.J.; Thomas, G.R.; Denise, R.P.; Bunts, J.L. Jr.

    1962-01-23

    A liquid metal fuel nuclear fission reactor is designed in which the fissionable material is dissolved or suspended in a liquid metal moderator and coolant. The liquid suspension flows into a chamber in which a critical amount of fissionable material is obtained. The fluid leaves the chamber and the heat of fission is extracted for power or other utilization. The improvement is in the support arrangement for a segrnented graphite core to permit dif ferential thermal expansion, effective sealing between main and blanket liquid metal flows, and avoidance of excessive stress development in the graphite segments. (AEC)

  14. LIQUID METAL COMPOSITIONS CONTAINING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Teitel, R.J.

    1959-04-21

    Liquid metal compositions containing a solid uranium compound dispersed therein is described. Uranium combines with tin to form the intermetallic compound USn/sub 3/. It has been found that this compound may be incorporated into a liquid bath containing bismuth and lead-bismuth components, if a relatively small percentage of tin is also included in the bath. The composition has a low thermal neutron cross section which makes it suitable for use in a liquid metal fueled nuclear reactor.

  15. Solute diffusion in liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.

    1973-01-01

    A gas model of diffusion in liquid metals is presented. In this model, ions of liquid metals are assumed to behave like the molecules in a dense gas. Diffusion coefficient of solute is discussed with reference to its mass, ionic size, and pair potential. The model is applied to the case of solute diffusion in liquid silver. An attempt was made to predict diffusion coefficients of solutes with reasonable accuracy.

  16. Actively convected liquid metal divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Michiya; Hirooka, Yoshi

    2014-12-01

    The use of actively convected liquid metals with j × B force is proposed to facilitate heat handling by the divertor, a challenging issue associated with magnetic fusion experiments such as ITER. This issue will be aggravated even more for DEMO and power reactors because the divertor heat load will be significantly higher and yet the use of copper would not be allowed as the heat sink material. Instead, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel alloys with heat conductivities substantially lower than that of copper, will be used as the structural materials. The present proposal is to fill the lower part of the vacuum vessel with liquid metals with relatively low melting points and low chemical activities including Ga and Sn. The divertor modules, equipped with electrodes and cooling tubes, are immersed in the liquid metal. The electrode, placed in the middle of the liquid metal, can be biased positively or negatively with respect to the module. The j × B force due to the current between the electrode and the module provides a rotating motion for the liquid metal around the electrodes. The rise in liquid temperature at the separatrix hit point can be maintained at acceptable levels from the operation point of view. As the rotation speed increases, the current in the liquid metal is expected to decrease due to the v × B electromotive force. This rotating motion in the poloidal plane will reduce the divertor heat load significantly. Another important benefit of the convected liquid metal divertor is the fast recovery from unmitigated disruptions. Also, the liquid metal divertor concept eliminates the erosion problem.

  17. Liquid metal heat transfer issues

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, H.W.; Yoder, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    An alkali liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor coupled with an alkali metal Rankine cycle provides a practicable option for space systems/missions requiring power in the 1 to 100 MW(e) range. Thermal issues relative to the use of alkali liquid metals for this purpose are identified as these result from the nature of the alkali metal fluid itself, from uncertainties in the available heat transfer correlations, and from design and performance requirements for system components operating in the earth orbital microgravity environment. It is noted that, while these issues require further attention to achieve optimum system performance, none are of such magnitude as to invalidate this particular space power concept.

  18. Liquid metal boiling inception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabin, C. M.; Poppendiek, H. F.; Mouritzen, G.; Meckel, P. T.; Cloakey, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental study of the inception of boiling in potassium in forced convection is reported. The boiler consisted of a 0.19-inch inside diameter, niobium-1% zirconium boiler tube approximately six feet long. Heating was accomplished by direct electrical tube wall conduction. Experiments were performed with both all-liquid fill and two-phase fill startup sequences and with a range of flow rates, saturation temperatures, inert gas levels, and fill liquid temperatures. Superheat of the liquid above the equilibrium saturation temperature was observed in all the experiments. Incipient boiling liquid superheat ranged from a few degrees to several hundred. Comparisons of these data with other data and with several analytical treatments are presented.

  19. Transverse excitations in liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, S.; Munejiri, S.; Inui, M.; Kajihara, Y.; Pilgrim, W.-C.; Baron, A. Q. R.; Shimojo, F.; Hoshino, K.

    2013-02-01

    The transverse acoustic excitation modes were detected by inelastic x-ray scattering in liquid Ga, Cu and Fe in the Q range around 10 nm-1 using a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility, SPring-8, although these liquid metals are mostly described by a simple hard-sphere liquid. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations clearly support this finding for liquid Ga. From the detailed analyses for the S(Q,ω) spectra with good statistic qualities, the lifetime of less than 1 ps and the propagating length of less than 1 nm can be estimated for the transverse acoustic phonon modes, which correspond to the lifetime and size of cages formed instantaneously in these liquid metals. The microscopic Poisson's ratio estimated from the dynamic velocities of sound is 0.42 for liquid Ga and about -0.2 for liquid transition metals, indicating a rubber-like soft and extremely hard elastic properties of the cage clusters, respectively. The origin of these microscopic elastic properties is discussed in detail.

  20. Metal pad instabilities in liquid metal batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zikanov, Oleg

    2015-12-01

    A mechanical analogy is used to analyze the interaction between the magnetic field, electric current, and deformation of interfaces in liquid metal batteries. In the framework of a low-mode, nondissipative, linear stability model, it is found that, during charging or discharging, a sufficiently large battery is prone to instabilities of two types. One is similar to the metal pad instability known to exist in the aluminum reduction cells. Another type is new. It is related to the destabilizing effect of the Lorentz force formed by the azimuthal magnetic field induced by the base current, and the current perturbations caused by the local variations of the thickness of the electrolyte layer.

  1. Metals Separation by Liquid Extraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malmary, G.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    As part of a project focusing on techniques in industrial chemistry, students carry out experiments on separating copper from cobalt in chloride-containing aqueous solution by liquid extraction with triisoctylamine solvent and search the literature on the separation process of these metals. These experiments and the literature research are…

  2. Casimir force between liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel-Sirvent, R.; Escobar, J. V.

    2014-08-01

    We present a theoretical calculation of the Casimir force between liquid metals at room temperature using as case studies mercury (Hg) and eutectic indium gallium (EInGa). The surface tension of the liquids creates surfaces of zero roughness that are truly equipotential, an ideal characteristic for Casimir force experiments. As we show the dielectric properties of Au, EInGa and Hg are very similar and the difference on the Casimir force between Au and EInGa and Au and Hg is less than 4%. Based on these results, a modification of the IUPUI experiment for detecting deviations of Newtonian gravity is proposed.

  3. Metal pad instabilities in liquid metal batteries.

    PubMed

    Zikanov, Oleg

    2015-12-01

    A mechanical analogy is used to analyze the interaction between the magnetic field, electric current, and deformation of interfaces in liquid metal batteries. In the framework of a low-mode, nondissipative, linear stability model, it is found that, during charging or discharging, a sufficiently large battery is prone to instabilities of two types. One is similar to the metal pad instability known to exist in the aluminum reduction cells. Another type is new. It is related to the destabilizing effect of the Lorentz force formed by the azimuthal magnetic field induced by the base current, and the current perturbations caused by the local variations of the thickness of the electrolyte layer. PMID:26764818

  4. Transformable liquid-metal nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yue; Hu, Quanyin; Lin, Yiliang; Pacardo, Dennis B; Wang, Chao; Sun, Wujin; Ligler, Frances S; Dickey, Michael D; Gu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    To date, numerous inorganic nanocarriers have been explored for drug delivery systems (DDSs). However, the clinical application of inorganic formulations has often been hindered by their toxicity and failure to biodegrade. We describe here a transformable liquid-metal nanomedicine, based on a core-shell nanosphere composed of a liquid-phase eutectic gallium-indium core and a thiolated polymeric shell. This formulation can be simply produced through a sonication-mediated method with bioconjugation flexibility. The resulting nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin (Dox) have an average diameter of 107 nm and demonstrate the capability to fuse and subsequently degrade under a mildly acidic condition, which facilitates release of Dox in acidic endosomes after cellular internalization. Equipped with hyaluronic acid, a tumour-targeting ligand, this formulation displays enhanced chemotherapeutic inhibition towards the xenograft tumour-bearing mice. This liquid metal-based DDS with fusible and degradable behaviour under physiological conditions provides a new strategy for engineering theranostic agents with low toxicity. PMID:26625944

  5. Transformable liquid-metal nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yue; Hu, Quanyin; Lin, Yiliang; Pacardo, Dennis B.; Wang, Chao; Sun, Wujin; Ligler, Frances S.; Dickey, Michael D.; Gu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    To date, numerous inorganic nanocarriers have been explored for drug delivery systems (DDSs). However, the clinical application of inorganic formulations has often been hindered by their toxicity and failure to biodegrade. We describe here a transformable liquid-metal nanomedicine, based on a core–shell nanosphere composed of a liquid-phase eutectic gallium-indium core and a thiolated polymeric shell. This formulation can be simply produced through a sonication-mediated method with bioconjugation flexibility. The resulting nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin (Dox) have an average diameter of 107 nm and demonstrate the capability to fuse and subsequently degrade under a mildly acidic condition, which facilitates release of Dox in acidic endosomes after cellular internalization. Equipped with hyaluronic acid, a tumour-targeting ligand, this formulation displays enhanced chemotherapeutic inhibition towards the xenograft tumour-bearing mice. This liquid metal-based DDS with fusible and degradable behaviour under physiological conditions provides a new strategy for engineering theranostic agents with low toxicity. PMID:26625944

  6. Transformable liquid-metal nanomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yue; Hu, Quanyin; Lin, Yiliang; Pacardo, Dennis B.; Wang, Chao; Sun, Wujin; Ligler, Frances S.; Dickey, Michael D.; Gu, Zhen

    2015-12-01

    To date, numerous inorganic nanocarriers have been explored for drug delivery systems (DDSs). However, the clinical application of inorganic formulations has often been hindered by their toxicity and failure to biodegrade. We describe here a transformable liquid-metal nanomedicine, based on a core-shell nanosphere composed of a liquid-phase eutectic gallium-indium core and a thiolated polymeric shell. This formulation can be simply produced through a sonication-mediated method with bioconjugation flexibility. The resulting nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin (Dox) have an average diameter of 107 nm and demonstrate the capability to fuse and subsequently degrade under a mildly acidic condition, which facilitates release of Dox in acidic endosomes after cellular internalization. Equipped with hyaluronic acid, a tumour-targeting ligand, this formulation displays enhanced chemotherapeutic inhibition towards the xenograft tumour-bearing mice. This liquid metal-based DDS with fusible and degradable behaviour under physiological conditions provides a new strategy for engineering theranostic agents with low toxicity.

  7. Surface chemistry of liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, J. Adin, Jr.; Peebles, Henry; Peebles, Diamond; Rye, Robert; Yost, Fred

    1993-01-01

    The fundamental surface chemistry of the behavior of liquid metals spreading on a solid substrate is not at all well understood. Each of these questions involves knowing the details of the structure of interfaces and their dynamics. For example the structure of a monolayer of tin oxide on pure liquid tin is unknown. This is in contrast to the relatively large amount of data available on the structure of copper oxide monolayers on solid, pure copper. However, since liquid tin has a vapor pressure below 10(exp -10)torr for a reasonable temperature range above its melting point, it is possible to use the techniques of surface science to study the geometric, electronic and vibrational structures of these monolayers. In addition, certain techniques developed by surface chemists for the study of liquid systems can be applied to the ultra-high vacuum environment. In particular we have shown that light scattering spectroscopy can be used to study the surface tension tensor of these interfaces. The tin oxide layer in particular is very interesting in that the monolayer is rigid but admits of bending. Ellipsometric microscopy allows the visualization of monolayer thick films and show whether island formation occurs at various levels of dosing.

  8. Liquid metal Flow Meter - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, C.; Hoogendoom, S.; Hudson, B.; Prince, J.; Teichert, K.; Wood, J.; Chase, K.

    2007-01-30

    Measuring the flow of liquid metal presents serious challenges. Current commercially-available flow meters use ultrasonic, electromagnetic, and other technologies to measure flow, but are inadequate for liquid metal flow measurement because of the high temperatures required by most liquid metals. As a result of the reactivity and high temperatures of most liquid metals, corrosion and leakage become very serious safety concerns. The purpose of this project is to develop a flow meter for Lockheed Martin that measures the flow rate of molten metal in a conduit.

  9. Liquid metal embrittlement. [crack propagation in metals with liquid metal in crack space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiller, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Crack propagation is discussed for metals with liquid metal in the crack space. The change in electrochemical potential of an electron in a metal due to changes in stress level along the crack surface was investigated along with the change in local chemistry, and interfacial energy due to atomic redistribution in the liquid. Coupled elastic-elastrostatic equations, stress effects on electron energy states, and crack propagation via surface roughening are discussed.

  10. Bearing for liquid metal pump

    DOEpatents

    Dickinson, Robert J.; Wasko, John; Pennell, William E.

    1984-01-01

    A liquid metal pump bearing support comprises a series of tangentially oriented spokes that connect the bearing cylinder to the pump internals structure. The spokes may be arranged in a plurality of planes extending from the bearing cylinder to the pump internals with the spokes in one plane being arranged alternately with those in the next plane. The bearing support structure provides the pump with sufficient lateral support for the bearing structure together with the capability of accommodating differential thermal expansion without adversely affecting pump performance.

  11. Multilayer liquid metal stretchable inductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, N.; Meyer, C. D.; Bedair, S. S.; Nochetto, H.; Kierzewski, I. M.

    2014-08-01

    Liquid metals are ideally suited for creating low resistance traces able to undergo large mechanical strains. In this work, multilayer fluidic channels in soft silicone are used to create two inductor topologies, a solenoid and a double planar coil, based on the liquid metal galinstan. Electromechanical models were developed for the inductance upon stretching for each inductor, finding that the double planar coil has lower strain sensitivity in each direction than the solenoid. A three turn double planar coil and six turn solenoid, with unstretched inductances of approximately 250 nH and 55 nH respectively, were fabricated and tested using custom tensile and compressive strain testing setups and compared with the analytical model. The double planar coil was found to increase in inductance when stretched in either in-plane axes, with a measured rise of approximately 40% for 100% strain. The solenoid decreased in inductance by 24% for 100% strain along the core direction, and increased by 50% for the same strain along the core width.

  12. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant system

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Boardman, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting for fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. The reactor system is enhanced with sealing means for excluding external air from contact with the liquid metal coolant leaking from the reactor vessel during an accident. The invention also includes a silo structure which resists attack by leaking liquid metal coolant, and an added unique cooling means.

  13. Technique for detecting liquid metal leaks

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.

    1979-01-01

    In a system employing flowing liquid metal as a heat transfer medium in contact with tubular members containing a working fluid, i.e., steam, liquid metal leaks through the wall of the tubular member are detected by dislodging the liquid metal compounds forming in the tubular member at the leak locations and subsequently transporting the dislodged compound in the form of an aerosol to a detector responsive to the liquid metal compound. In the application to a sodium cooled tubular member, the detector would consist of a sodium responsive device, such as a sodium ion detector.

  14. Radiopure Metal-Loaded Liquid Scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, Richard; Yeh, Minfang

    2015-03-18

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillator plays a key role in particle and nuclear physics experiments. The applications of metal ions in various neutrino experiments and the purification methods for different scintillator components are discussed in this paper.

  15. Radiopure metal-loaded liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, Richard; Yeh, Minfang

    2015-08-17

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillator plays a key role in particle and nuclear physics experiments. The applications of metal ions in various neutrino experiments and the purification methods for different scintillator components are discussed in this paper.

  16. Liquid-metal-piston MHD generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, J. P.

    1969-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic generator uses a slug or piston of liquid potassium as the working fluid. An expanding vapor of the metal is allowed to reciprocate the liquid-metal-piston through a magnetic field and the expansion energy is converted directly into electrical energy.

  17. Liquid metal ion source and alloy

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Jr., William M.; Utlaut, Mark W.; Behrens, Robert G.; Szklarz, Eugene G.; Storms, Edmund K.; Santandrea, Robert P.; Swanson, Lynwood W.

    1988-10-04

    A liquid metal ion source and alloy, wherein the species to be emitted from the ion source is contained in a congruently vaporizing alloy. In one embodiment, the liquid metal ion source acts as a source of arsenic, and in a source alloy the arsenic is combined with palladium, preferably in a liquid alloy having a range of compositions from about 24 to about 33 atomic percent arsenic. Such an alloy may be readily prepared by a combustion synthesis technique. Liquid metal ion sources thus prepared produce arsenic ions for implantation, have long lifetimes, and are highly stable in operation.

  18. Sewage sludge dewatering using flowing liquid metals

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Larry W.

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus for reducing the moisture content of a moist sewage sludge having a moisture content of about 50% to 80% and formed of small cellular micro-organism bodies having internally confined water is provided. A hot liquid metal is circulated in a circulation loop and the moist sewage sludge is injected in the circulation loop under conditions of temperature and pressure such that the confined water vaporizes and ruptures the cellular bodies. The vapor produced, the dried sludge, and the liquid metal are then separated. Preferably, the moist sewage sludge is injected into the hot liquid metal adjacent the upstream side of a venturi which serves to thoroughly mix the hot liquid metal and the moist sewage sludge. The venturi and the drying zone after the venturi are preferably vertically oriented. The dried sewage sludge recovered is available as a fuel and is preferably used for heating the hot liquid metal.

  19. Tokamak with liquid metal toroidal field coil

    DOEpatents

    Ohkawa, Tihiro; Schaffer, Michael J.

    1981-01-01

    Tokamak apparatus includes a pressure vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within the pressure vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside said liner. Electric current is passed through the liquid metal over a conductive path linking the toroidal space to produce a toroidal magnetic field within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof. Toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof.

  20. Liquid metal cooling of synchrotron optics

    SciTech Connect

    Smither, R.K.

    1992-09-01

    The installation of insertion devices at existing synchrotron facilities around the world has stimulated the development of new ways to cool the optical elements in the associated x-ray beamlines. Argonne has been a leader in the development of liquid metal cooling for high heat load x-ray optics for the next generation of synchrotron facilities. The high thermal conductivity, high volume specific heat, low kinematic viscosity, and large working temperature range make liquid metals a very efficient heat transfer fluid. A wide range of liquid metals were considered in the initial phase of this work. The most promising liquid metal cooling fluid identified to date is liquid gallium, which appears to have all the desired properties and the fewest number of undesired features of the liquid metals examined. Besides the special features of liquid metals that make them good heat transfer fluids, the very low vapor pressure over a large working temperature range make liquid gallium an ideal cooling fluid for use in a high vacuum environment. A leak of the liquid gallium into the high vacuum and even into very high vacuum areas will not result in any detectable vapor pressure and may even improve the vacuum environment as the liquid gallium combines with any water vapor or oxygen present in the system. The practical use of a liquid metal for cooling silicon crystals and other high heat load applications depends on having a convenient and efficient delivery system. The requirements for a typical cooling system for a silicon crystal used in a monochromator are pumping speeds of 2 to 5 gpm (120 cc per sec to 600 cc per sec) at pressures up to 100 psi.

  1. Development of a liquid metal slip ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberger, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    A liquid metal slip ring/solar orientation mechanism was designed and a model tested. This was a follow-up of previous efforts for the development of a gallium liquid metal slip ring in which the major problem was the formation and ejection of debris. A number of slip ring design approaches were studied. The probe design concept was fully implemented with detail drawings and a model was successfully tested for dielectric strength, shock vibration, acceleration and operation. The conclusions are that a gallium liquid metal slip ring/solar orientation mechanism is feasible and that the problem of debris formation and ejection has been successfully solved.

  2. Electromagnetic flow rate meter. [for liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A liquid metal, whose flow rate is to be determined, is directed through a chamber made of electrically-insulating material on which there is impressed a magnetic field perpendicular to the direction of flow of the liquid metal. The magnetic field is made to increase in strength in a downstream direction of the flow of liquid metal. At least a pair of electrodes are disposed in the chamber traversely and perpendicular to the direction of flow and an ammeter is connected between the electrodes. Electrodes may be disposed in the top or the bottom of the chamber and each may be segmented. Oppositely disposed electrodes may be used with at least one dividing wall extending from each electrode to cause reversal of the direction of flow of the liquid metal. The magnetic field may be provided by electromagnets or permanent magnets such as shaded pole permanent magnets.

  3. Liquid metal cooled divertor for ARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Muraviev, E.

    1995-01-01

    A liquid metal, Ga-cooled divertor design was completed for the double null ARIES-II divertor design. The design analysis indicated a surface heat flux removal capability of up to 15 MW/m{sup 2}, and its relative easy maintenance. Design issues of configuration, thermal hydraulics, thermal stresses, liquid metal loop and safety effects were evaluated. For coolant flow control, it was found that it is necessary to use some part of the blanket cooling ducts for the draining of liquid metal from the top divertor. In order to minimize the inventory of Ga, it was recommended that the liquid metal loop equipment should be located as close to the torus as possible. More detailed analysis of transient conditions especially under accident conditions was identified as an issue that will need to be addressed.

  4. Solar driven liquid metal MHD power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.

    1983-06-01

    A solar energy collector focuses solar energy onto a solar oven which is attached to a mixer which in turn is attached to the channel of a MHD generator. Gas enters the oven and a liquid metal enters the mixer. The gas/liquid metal mixture is heated by the collected solar energy and moves through the MHD generator thereby generating electrical power. The mixture is then separated and recycled.

  5. Solar driven liquid metal MHD power generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A solar energy collector focuses solar energy onto a solar oven which is attached to a mixer which in turn is attached to the channel of a MHD generator. Gas enters the oven and a liquid metal enters the mixer. The gas/liquid metal mixture is heated by the collected solar energy and moves through the MHD generator thereby generating electrical power. The mixture is then separated and recycled.

  6. Reduction of Metal Oxide to Metal using Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ramana Reddy

    2012-04-12

    A novel pathway for the high efficiency production of metal from metal oxide means of electrolysis in ionic liquids at low temperature was investigated. The main emphasis was to eliminate the use of carbon and high temperature application in the reduction of metal oxides to metals. The emphasis of this research was to produce metals such as Zn, and Pb that are normally produced by the application of very high temperatures. The reduction of zinc oxide to zinc and lead oxide to lead were investigated. This study involved three steps in accomplishing the final goal of reduction of metal oxide to metal using ionic liquids: 1) Dissolution of metal oxide in an ionic liquid, 2) Determination of reduction potential using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and 3) Reduction of the dissolved metal oxide. Ionic liquids provide additional advantage by offering a wide potential range for the deposition. In each and every step of the process, more than one process variable has been examined. Experimental results for electrochemical extraction of Zn from ZnO and Pb from PbO using eutectic mixtures of Urea ((NH2)2CO) and Choline chloride (HOC2H4N(CH3)3+Cl-) or (ChCl) in a molar ratio 2:1, varying voltage and temperatures were carried out. Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy studies of ionic liquids with and without metal oxide additions were conducted. FTIR and induction coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICPS) was used in the characterization of the metal oxide dissolved ionic liquid. Electrochemical experiments were conducted using EG&G potentiostat/galvanostat with three electrode cell systems. Cyclic voltammetry was used in the determination of reduction potentials for the deposition of metals. Chronoamperometric experiments were carried out in the potential range of -0.6V to -1.9V for lead and -1.4V to -1.9V for zinc. The deposits were characterized using XRD and SEM-EDS for phase, morphological and elemental analysis. The results showed that pure metal was deposited on the cathode

  7. Recent developments in liquid-metal embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoloff, N. S.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reviews developments in liquid-metal embrittlement of the past 7 years including data on cyclic loading. Embrittlement by solid and liquid metals and by hydrogen has many common features, although the mechanism of embrittler transport differs. Fracture may occur in each type of embrittlement by environmentally assisted shear and by reduced cohesion; embrittlement under cyclic loading has been widely observed, with stress level, temperature, and substrate alloy composition and grain size being the major variables. The degree of embrittlement between any combination of environment (i.e. hydrogen, liquid metal, or solid metal) and substrate depends upon the strength of the interaction with the substrate, the kinetics of embrittler transport, the mutual solubility of embrittler and substrate, and a large number of test and microstructural conditions. A method of calculating the most significant of these variables and the strength of interaction was reviewed and predictions of embrittlement in previously untested couples were made.

  8. Ionic liquid incorporating thiosalicylate for metal removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilfred, Cecilia Devi; Mustafa, Fadwa Babiker; Romeli, Fatimah Julia

    2012-09-01

    Ionic liquids are a class of organic molten salts "designer solvents" that are composed totally of anions (inorganic and organic polyatomic) and organic cations. The replacement of volatile organic solvents from a separation process is of utmost importance since the use of a large excess of these solvents is hazardous and creates ecological problem. The new method for metal ion extraction is by using task-specific ionic liquids such as ionic liquids which incorporate thiosalicylate functionality. This paper looks at producing a new cluster of ionic liquids which incorporates thiosalicylate with pyridinium cation. Its thermophysical properties such as density and viscosity in single and binary mixtures are studied. The ionic liquids' capability in metal removal processes is evaluated.

  9. Double-duct liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic engine

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, Carsten M.

    1995-01-01

    An internal combustion, liquid metal (LM) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) engine and an alternating current (AC) magnetohydrodynamic generator, are used in combination to provide useful AC electric energy output. The engine design has-four pistons and a double duct configuration, with each duct containing sodium potassium liquid metal confined between free pistons located at either end of the duct. The liquid metal is forced to flow back and forth in the duct by the movement of the pistons, which are alternatively driven by an internal combustion process. In the MHD generator, the two LM-MHD ducts pass in close proximity through a Hartmann duct with output transformer. AC power is produced by operating the engine with the liquid metal in the two generator ducts always flowing in counter directions. The amount of liquid metal maintained in the ducts may be varied. This provides a variable stroke length for the pistons. The engine/generator provides variable AC power at variable frequencies that correspond to the power demands of the vehicular propulsion. Also the engine should maintain nearly constant efficiency throughout the range of power usage. Automobiles and trucks could be powered by the invention, with no transmission or power converter devices being required.

  10. Double-duct liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic engine

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, Carsten M.

    1997-01-01

    An internal combustion, liquid metal (LM) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) engine and an alternating current (AC) magnetohydrodynamic generator, are used in combination to provide useful AC electric energy output. The engine design has four pistons and a double duct configuration, with each duct containing sodium potassium liquid metal confined between free pistons located at either end of the duct. The liquid metal is forced to flow back and forth in the duct by the movement of the pistons, which are alternatively driven by an internal combustion process. In the MHD generator, the two LM-MHD ducts pass in close proximity through a Hartmann duct with output transformer. AC power is produced by operating the engine with the liquid metal in the two generator ducts always flowing in counter directions. The amount of liquid metal maintained in the ducts may be varied. This provides a variable stroke length for the pistons. The engine/generator provides variable AC power at variable frequencies that correspond to the power demands of the vehicular propulsion. Also the engine should maintain nearly constant efficiency throughout the range of power usage. Automobiles and trucks could be powered by the invention, with no transmission or power converter devices being required.

  11. Mixing in a liquid metal electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, DH; Sadoway, DR

    2014-05-01

    Fluid mixing has first-order importance for many engineering problems in mass transport, including design and optimization of liquid-phase energy storage devices. Liquid metal batteries are currently being commercialized as a promising and economically viable technology for large-scale energy storage on worldwide electrical grids. But because these batteries are entirely liquid, fluid flow and instabilities may affect battery robustness and performance. Here we present estimates of flow magnitude and ultrasound measurements of the flow in a realistic liquid metal electrode. We find that flow does substantially affect mass transport by altering the electrode mixing time. Above a critical electrical current density, the convective flow organizes and gains speed, which promotes transport and would yield improved battery efficiency. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  12. Liquid Metal Integrated Test System (LIMITS).

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, James Maurice; Troncosa, Kenneth P.; Bauer, Frederick J.; Nygren, Richard Einar; Youchison, Dennis Lee; Lutz, Thomas Joseph; Ulrickson, Michael Andrew; Tanaka, Tina Joan

    2003-08-01

    This paper describes the liquid metal integrated test system (LIMITS) at Sandia National Laboratories. This system was designed to study the flow of molten metals and salts in a vacuum as a preliminary study for flowing liquid surfaces inside of magnetic fusion reactors. The system consists of a heated furnace with attached centrifugal pump, a vacuum chamber, and a transfer chamber for storage and addition of fresh material. Diagnostics include an electromagnetic flow meter, a high temperature pressure transducer, and an electronic level meter. Many ports in the vacuum chamber allow testing the thermal behavior of the flowing liquids heated with an electron beam or study of the effect of a magnetic field on motion of the liquid. Some preliminary tests have been performed to determine the effect of a static magnetic field on stream flow from a nozzle.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic effects in liquid metal batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, F.; Galindo, V.; Kasprzyk, C.; Landgraf, S.; Seilmayer, M.; Starace, M.; Weber, N.; Weier, T.

    2016-07-01

    Liquid metal batteries (LMBs) consist of two liquid metal electrodes and a molten salt ionic conductor sandwiched between them. The density ratios allow for a stable stratification of the three layers. LMBs were already considered as part of energy conversion systems in the 1960s and have recently received renewed interest for economical large-scale energy storage. In this paper, we concentrate on the magnetohydrodynamic aspects of this cell type with special focus on electro-vortex flows and possible effects of the Tayler instability.

  14. Oxygen tensioactivity on liquid-metal drops.

    PubMed

    Ricci, E; Arato, E; Passerone, A; Costa, P

    2005-12-14

    The influence of oxygen on the surface tension of liquid metals is a topic of undoubted interest as the formation of oxide films, or even oxygen contamination of the metal interface, represents the main source of error in determining the surface tension. The evaluation of gas-atmosphere mass exchanges under stationary conditions allows the evaluation of an effective oxygen pressure at which the oxidation of metal becomes evident. This effective oxygen pressure can be considered as a property of the system and, according to experimental evidence, can be many orders of magnitude greater than the equilibrium pressure. The measurement of the surface tension is a good way of studying interface properties, their temporal change and their connections to transport and reaction rates. This paper represents a review of a work undertaken with the aim of understanding oxygen mass transport at the liquid metal surface in relation to the study of capillary phenomena at high temperature. PMID:16098947

  15. Membranes Remove Metal Ions Fron Industrial Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, W. P. L.; May, C.

    1983-01-01

    Use of membrane films affords convenient and economical alternative for removing and recovering metal cations present in low concentrations from large quantities of liquid solutions. Possible applications of membrane films include use in analytical chemistry for determination of small amounts of toxic metallic impurities in lakes, streams, and municipal effluents. Also suitable for use as absorber of certain pollutant gases and odors present in confined areas.

  16. Conduction in fully ionized liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1974-01-01

    Electron transport is considered in high-density fully ionized liquid metals. Ionic structure is described in terms of hard-sphere-correlation functions and the scattering is determined from self-consistently screened point ions. Applications to the physical properties of the deep interior of Jupiter are briefly considered.

  17. Conduction in fully ionized liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1973-01-01

    Electron transport is considered in high density fully ionized liquid metals. Ionic structure is described in terms of hard-sphere correlation functions and the scattering is determined from self-consistently screened point ions. Applications to the physical properties of the deep interior of Jupiter are briefly considered.

  18. Solar-driven liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.

    1981-01-01

    A solar oven heated by concentrated solar radiation as the heat source of a liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic (LMMHD) power generation system is proposed. The design allows the production of electric power in space, as well as on Earth, at high rates of efficiency. Two types of the solar oven suitable for the system are discussed.

  19. Solar-driven liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.

    1981-05-01

    A solar oven heated by concentrated solar radiation as the heat source of a liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic (LMMHD) power generation system is proposed. The design allows the production of electric power in space, as well as on Earth, at high rates of efficiency. Two types of the solar oven suitable for the system are discussed.

  20. Liquid-metal-cooled reactor

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.

    A perforated depressor plate extending across the bottom of the instrument tree of a fast breeder reactor cooperates with a circular cylindrical metal bellows forming a part of the upper adapter of each core assembly and bearing on the bottom of the depressor plate to restrict flow of coolant between core assemblies, thereby reducing significantly the pressure differential between the coolant inside the core assemblies and the coolant outside of the core assemblies. Openings in the depressor plate are slightly smaller than the top of the upper adapter so the depressor plate will serve as a backup mechanical holddown for the core. In addition, coolant mixing devices and locating devices are provided attached to the depressor plate.

  1. Liquid crystal on subwavelength metal gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Palto, S. P.; Barnik, M. I.; Artemov, V. V.; Shtykov, N. M.; Geivandov, A. R.; Yudin, S. G.; Gorkunov, M. V.

    2015-06-14

    Optical and electrooptical properties of a system consisting of subwavelength metal gratings and nematic liquid crystal layer are studied. Aluminium gratings that also act as interdigitated electrodes are produced by focused ion beam lithography. It is found that a liquid crystal layer strongly influences both the resonance and light polarization properties characteristic of the gratings. Enhanced transmittance is observed not only for the TM-polarized light in the near infrared spectral range but also for the TE-polarized light in the visible range. Although the electrodes are separated by nanosized slits, and the electric field is strongly localized near the surface, a pronounced electrooptical effect is registered. The effect is explained in terms of local reorientation of liquid crystal molecules at the grating surface and propagation of the orientational deformation from the surface into the bulk of the liquid crystal layer.

  2. A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, G.V.; Carlson, N.M., Donaldson, A.D.

    1990-12-12

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid. 3 figs.

  3. Atomic Dynamics in Metallic Liquids and Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Egami, Takeshi; Levashov, Valentin A; Aga, Rachel S; Morris, James R

    2007-01-01

    How atoms move in metallic glasses and liquids is an important question in discussing atomic transport, glass formation, structural relaxation and other properties of metallic glasses. While the concept of free-volume has long been used in describing atomic transport, computer simulations and isotope measurements have shown that atomic transport occurs by a much more collective process than assumed in the free-volume theory. We introduce a new approach to describe the atomic dynamics in metallic glasses, in terms of local energy landscapes related to fluctuations in the topology of atomic connectivity. This approach may form the basis for a new paradigm for discussing the structure-properties relationship in metallic glasses.

  4. Compact, Lightweight Electromagnetic Pump for Liquid Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfroy, Thomas; Palzin, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    A proposed direct-current electromagnetic pump for circulating a molten alkali metal alloy would be smaller and lighter and would demand less input power, relative to currently available pumps of this type. (Molten alkali metals are used as heat-transfer fluids in high-temperature stages of some nuclear reactors.) The principle of operation of this or any such pump involves exploitation of the electrical conductivity of the molten metal: An electric current is made to pass through the liquid metal along an axis perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the flow channel, and a magnetic field perpendicular to both the longitudinal axis and the electric current is superimposed on the flowchannel region containing the electric current. The interaction between the electric current and the magnetic field produces the pumping force along the longitudinal axis. The advantages of the proposed pump over other such pumps would accrue from design features that address overlapping thermal and magnetic issues.

  5. Liquid metal pump for nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Allen, H.G.; Maloney, J.R.

    1975-10-01

    A pump for use in pumping high temperature liquids at high pressures, particularly liquid metals used to cool nuclear reactors is described. It is of the type in which the rotor is submerged in a sump but is fed by an inlet duct which bypasses the sump. A chamber, kept full of fluid, surrounds the pump casing into which fluid is bled from the pump discharge and from which fluid is fed to the rotor bearings and hence to the sump. This equalizes pressure inside and outside the pump casing and reduces or eliminates the thermal shock to the bearings and sump tank.

  6. Liquid metal switches for electromagnetic railgun systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mitcham, A.J.; Prothero, D.H.; Brooks, J.C. )

    1991-01-01

    The need for a reliable and effective commutating switch is essential to the operation of an HPG-driven railgun system. This switch must offer the lowest possible resistance during the current build up time and then must commutate the current quickly and efficiently into the railgun barrel. This paper considers the essential requirements for such a switch and, after briefly reviewing the available switch technologies, describes a new type of switch based on a liquid metal switching medium.

  7. POWER GENERATION FROM LIQUID METAL NUCLEAR FUEL

    DOEpatents

    Dwyer, O.E.

    1958-12-23

    A nuclear reactor system is described wherein the reactor is the type using a liquid metal fuel, such as a dispersion of fissile material in bismuth. The reactor is designed ln the form of a closed loop having a core sectlon and heat exchanger sections. The liquid fuel is clrculated through the loop undergoing flssion in the core section to produce heat energy and transferrlng this heat energy to secondary fluids in the heat exchanger sections. The fission in the core may be produced by a separate neutron source or by a selfsustained chain reaction of the liquid fuel present in the core section. Additional auxiliary heat exchangers are used in the system to convert water into steam which drives a turbine.

  8. Nonexponential relaxation in a simple liquid metal.

    PubMed

    Demmel, F; Morkel, C

    2012-05-01

    A hallmark of the changes in dynamics towards the glass transition is the stretched exponential structural relaxation. Quasielastic neutron scattering results on liquid rubidium demonstrate such a nonexponential relaxation process in a simple liquid metal above the melting point. The nonexponential decay is an indication of non-Markovian dynamics and points to the collective character of the relaxation process. Describing the relaxation dynamics by a two-step process, the long lasting part of the decay process is in remarkable quantitative agreement with predictions from mode coupling theory. The feedback mechanism of the slowing down process in the theoretical description suggests that this contribution is at the origin of the structural arrest. With rising temperature the intermediate scattering function transforms into a simple exponential decay at a temperature range which indicates the end of the highly viscous solidlike behavior in the liquid. PMID:23004742

  9. Stretchable Loudspeaker using Liquid Metal Microchannel

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Sang Woo; Park, Jeongwon; Hong, Soo Yeong; Park, Heun; Jeong, Yu Ra; Park, Junhong; Lee, Sang-Soo; Ha, Jeong Sook

    2015-01-01

    Considering the various applications of wearable and bio-implantable devices, it is desirable to realize stretchable acoustic devices for body-attached applications such as sensing biological signals, hearing aids, and notification of information via sound. In this study, we demonstrate the facile fabrication of a Stretchable Acoustic Device (SAD) using liquid metal coil of Galinstan where the SAD is operated by the electromagnetic interaction between the liquid metal coil and a Neodymium (Nd) magnet. To fabricate a liquid metal coil, Galinstan was injected into a micro-patterned elastomer channel. This fabricated SAD was operated simultaneously as a loudspeaker and a microphone. Measurements of the frequency response confirmed that the SAD was mechanically stable under both 50% uniaxial and 30% biaxial strains. Furthermore, 2000 repetitive applications of a 50% uniaxial strain did not induce any noticeable degradation of the sound pressure. Both voice and the beeping sound of an alarm clock were successfully recorded and played back through our SAD while it was attached to the wrist under repeated deformation. These results demonstrate the high potential of the fabricated SAD using Galinstan voice coil in various research fields including stretchable, wearable, and bio-implantable acoustic devices. PMID:26181209

  10. Stretchable Loudspeaker using Liquid Metal Microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Sang Woo; Park, Jeongwon; Hong, Soo Yeong; Park, Heun; Jeong, Yu Ra; Park, Junhong; Lee, Sang-Soo; Ha, Jeong Sook

    2015-07-01

    Considering the various applications of wearable and bio-implantable devices, it is desirable to realize stretchable acoustic devices for body-attached applications such as sensing biological signals, hearing aids, and notification of information via sound. In this study, we demonstrate the facile fabrication of a Stretchable Acoustic Device (SAD) using liquid metal coil of Galinstan where the SAD is operated by the electromagnetic interaction between the liquid metal coil and a Neodymium (Nd) magnet. To fabricate a liquid metal coil, Galinstan was injected into a micro-patterned elastomer channel. This fabricated SAD was operated simultaneously as a loudspeaker and a microphone. Measurements of the frequency response confirmed that the SAD was mechanically stable under both 50% uniaxial and 30% biaxial strains. Furthermore, 2000 repetitive applications of a 50% uniaxial strain did not induce any noticeable degradation of the sound pressure. Both voice and the beeping sound of an alarm clock were successfully recorded and played back through our SAD while it was attached to the wrist under repeated deformation. These results demonstrate the high potential of the fabricated SAD using Galinstan voice coil in various research fields including stretchable, wearable, and bio-implantable acoustic devices.

  11. Stretchable Loudspeaker using Liquid Metal Microchannel.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sang Woo; Park, Jeongwon; Hong, Soo Yeong; Park, Heun; Jeong, Yu Ra; Park, Junhong; Lee, Sang-Soo; Ha, Jeong Sook

    2015-01-01

    Considering the various applications of wearable and bio-implantable devices, it is desirable to realize stretchable acoustic devices for body-attached applications such as sensing biological signals, hearing aids, and notification of information via sound. In this study, we demonstrate the facile fabrication of a Stretchable Acoustic Device (SAD) using liquid metal coil of Galinstan where the SAD is operated by the electromagnetic interaction between the liquid metal coil and a Neodymium (Nd) magnet. To fabricate a liquid metal coil, Galinstan was injected into a micro-patterned elastomer channel. This fabricated SAD was operated simultaneously as a loudspeaker and a microphone. Measurements of the frequency response confirmed that the SAD was mechanically stable under both 50% uniaxial and 30% biaxial strains. Furthermore, 2000 repetitive applications of a 50% uniaxial strain did not induce any noticeable degradation of the sound pressure. Both voice and the beeping sound of an alarm clock were successfully recorded and played back through our SAD while it was attached to the wrist under repeated deformation. These results demonstrate the high potential of the fabricated SAD using Galinstan voice coil in various research fields including stretchable, wearable, and bio-implantable acoustic devices. PMID:26181209

  12. Liquid-metal embrittlement of refractory metals by molten plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.R.; Bergin, J.B.; McInturff, S.A.; Kuhn, B.A.

    1980-07-01

    Embrittlement by molten plutonium of the refractory metals and alloys W-25 wt % Re, tantalum, molybdenum, and Ta-10 wt % W was studied. At 900/sup 0/C and a strain rate of 10/sup -4/ s/sup -1/, the materials tested may be ranked in order of decreasing susceptibility to liquid-plutonium embrittlement as follows: molybdenum, W-25 wt % Re, Ta-10 wt % W, and tantalum. These materials exhibited a wide range in susceptibility. Embrittlement was found to exhibit a high degree of temperature and strain-rate dependence, and we present arguments that strongly support a stress-assisted, intergranular, liquid-metal corrosion mechanism. We also believe microstructure plays a key role in the extent of embrittlement. In the case of W-25 wt % Re, we have determined that a dealloying corrosion takes place in which rhenium is selectively withdrawn from the alloy.

  13. Liquid suspensions of reversible metal hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, J.J.; Grohse, E.W.; Winsche, W.E.

    1983-12-08

    The reversibility of the process M + x/2 H/sub 2/ ..-->.. MH/sub x/, where M is a metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH/sub x/ in the presence of H/sub 2/, generally used to store and recall H/sub 2/, is found to proceed under a liquid, thereby to reduce contamination, provide better temperature control and provide in situ mobility of the reactants. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H/sub 2/, to store hydrogen (at high pressures) and to release (at low pressures) previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H/sub 2/ through the liquid is dependent upon the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the former is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particle. When the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

  14. Gold metal liquid-like droplets.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Evgeny; Scanlon, Micheál D; Momotenko, Dmitry; Vrubel, Heron; Méndez, Manuel A; Brevet, Pierre-Francois; Girault, Hubert H

    2014-09-23

    Simple methods to self-assemble coatings and films encompassing nanoparticles are highly desirable in many practical scenarios, yet scarcely any examples of simple, robust approaches to coat macroscopic droplets with continuous, thick (multilayer), reflective and stable liquid nanoparticle films exist. Here, we introduce a facile and rapid one-step route to form films of reflective liquid-like gold that encase macroscopic droplets, and we denote these as gold metal liquid-like droplets (MeLLDs). The present approach takes advantage of the inherent self-assembly of gold nanoparticles at liquid-liquid interfaces and the increase in rates of nanoparticle aggregate trapping at the interface during emulsification. The ease of displacement of the stabilizing citrate ligands by appropriate redox active molecules that act as a lubricating molecular glue is key. Specifically, the heterogeneous interaction of citrate stabilized aqueous gold nanoparticles with the lipophilic electron donor tetrathiafulvalene under emulsified conditions produces gold MeLLDs. This methodology relies exclusively on electrochemical reactions, i.e., the oxidation of tetrathiafulvalene to its radical cation by the gold nanoparticle, and electrostatic interactions between the radical cation and nanoparticles. The gold MeLLDs are reversibly deformable upon compression and decompression and kinetically stable for extended periods of time in excess of a year. PMID:25184343

  15. Modeling of thermodiffusion in liquid metal alloys.

    PubMed

    Eslamian, Morteza; Sabzi, Fatemeh; Saghir, M Ziad

    2010-11-01

    In this paper following the linear non-equilibrium thermodynamics approach, an expression is derived for the calculation of the thermodiffusion factor in binary liquid metal alloys. The expression is comprised of two terms; the first term accounts for the thermally driven interactions between metal ions, a phenomenon similar to that of the non-ionic binary mixtures, such as hydrocarbons; the second term is called the electronic contribution and is the mass diffusion due to an internal electric field that is induced as a result of the imposed thermal gradient. Both terms are formulated as functions of the net heats of transport. The ion-ion net heat of transport is simulated by the activation energy of viscous flow and the electronic net heat of transport is correlated with the force acting on the ions by the rearrangement of the conduction electrons and ions. A methodology is presented and used to estimate the liquid metal properties, such as the partial molar internal energies, enthalpies, volumes and the activity coefficients used for model validation. The prediction power of the proposed expression along with some other existing thermodiffusion models for liquid mixtures, such as the Haase, Kempers, Drickamer and Firoozabadi formulas are examined against available experimental data obtained on ground or in microgravity environment. The proposed model satisfactorily predicts the thermodiffusion data of mixtures that are composed of elements with comparable melting points. It is also potentially and qualitatively able to predict a sign change in thermodiffusion factor of Na-K liquid mixture. With some speculation, the sign change is attributed to an anomalous change in thermoelectric power of Na-K mixture with composition. PMID:20856973

  16. Direct energy conversion using liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onea, Alexandru; Diez de los Rios Ramos, Nerea; Hering, Wolfgang; Stieglitz, Robert; Moster, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Liquid metals have excellent properties to be used as heat transport fluids due to their high thermal conductivity and their wide applicable temperature range. The latter issue can be used to go beyond limitations of existing thermal solar energy systems. Furthermore, the direct energy converter Alkali Metal Thermo Electric Converter (AMTEC) can be used to make intangible areas of energy conversion suitable for a wide range of applications. One objective is to investigate AMTEC as a complementary cycle for the next generation of concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. The experimental research taking place in the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) is focused on the construction of a flexible AMTEC test facility, development, test and improvement of liquid-anode and vapor-anode AMTEC devices as well as the coupling of the AMTEC cold side to the heat storage tank proposed for the CSP system. Within this project, the investigations foreseen will focus on the analyses of BASE-metal interface, electrode materials and deposition techniques, corrosion and erosion of materials brought in contact with high temperature sodium. This prototype demonstrator is planned to be integrated in the KArlsruhe SOdium LAboratory (KASOLA), a flexible closed mid-size sodium loop, completely in-house designed, presently under construction at the Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (INR) within KIT.

  17. Magnetic-field-induced liquid metal droplet manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daeyoung; Lee, Jeong-Bong

    2015-01-01

    We report magnetic-field-induced liquid metal droplet on-demand manipulation by coating a liquid metal with ferromagnetic materials. The gallium-based liquid metal alloy has a challenging drawback that it is instantly oxidized in ambient air, resulting in surface wetting on most surfaces. When the oxidized surface of the droplet is coated with ferromagnetic materials, it is non-wettable and can be controlled by applying an external magnetic field. We coated the surface of a liquid metal droplet with either an electroplated CoNiMnP layer or an iron (Fe) particle by simply rolling the liquid metal droplet on an Fe particle bed. For a paper towel, the minimum required magnetic flux density to initiate movement of the ~8 μL Fe-particle-coated liquid metal droplet was 50 gauss. Magnetic-field-induced liquid metal droplet manipulation was investigated under both horizontal and vertical magnetic fields. Compared to the CoNiMnP-electroplated liquid metal droplet, the Fe-particle-coated droplet could be well controlled because Fe particles were uniformly coated on the surface of the droplet. With a maximum applied magnetic flux density of ~1,600 gauss, the CoNiMnP layer on the liquid metal broke down, resulting in fragmentation of three smaller droplets, and the Fe particle was detached from the liquid metal surface and was re-coated after the magnetic field had been removed.

  18. 'Crystal Genes' in Metallic Liquids and Glasses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Zhang, Feng; Ye, Zhuo; Zhang, Yue; Fang, Xiaowei; Ding, Zejun; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Mendelev, Mikhail I; Ott, Ryan T; Kramer, Matthew J; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the underlying structural order that transcends liquid, glass and crystalline states in metallic systems. A genetic algorithm is applied to search for the most common energetically favorable packing motifs in crystalline structures. These motifs are in turn compared to the observed packing motifs in the actual liquid or glass structures using a cluster-alignment method. Using this method, we have revealed the nature of the short-range order in Cu64Zr36 glasses. More importantly, we identified a novel structural order in the Al90Sm10 system. In addition, our approach brings new insight into understanding the origin of vitrification and describing mesoscopic order-disorder transitions in condensed matter systems. PMID:27030071

  19. Statistical Mechanics of Metallic Glasses and Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Egami, Takeshi; Levashov, Valentin A; Morris, James R; Haruyama, O.

    2010-01-01

    It is difficult to formulate the statistical mechanical theory of liquids and glasses, because phonons, which are the basis for the statistical mechanics of lattice dynamics in crystals, are strongly scattered and have a very short lifetime in liquids and glasses. Instead computer simulation and the free-volume theory are most frequently used in explaining experimental results on metallic glasses. However, both of them suffer from serious problems as discussed in this paper. We propose an alternative approach based upon the dynamics of the atomic level stresses. We review recent progress with this approach, and show that it is possible to calculate thermodynamic quantities, including the glass transition temperature and the kinetics of structural relaxation by this approach.

  20. Aspects of non-Fermi-liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivovarov, Eugene

    We consider several examples of metallic systems that exhibit non-Fermi-liquid behavior. In these examples the system is not a Fermi liquid due to the presence of a "hidden" order. The primary models are density waves with an odd-frequency-dependent order parameter and density waves with d-wave symmetry. In the first model, the same-time correlation functions vanish and there is a conventional Fermi surface. In the second model, the gap vanishes at the nodes. We derive the phase diagrams and study the thermodynamic and kinetic properties. We also consider the effects of competing orders on the phase diagram when the underlying microscopic interaction has a high symmetry.

  1. Prospects for advanced electron cyclotron resonance and electron beam ion source charge breeding methods for EURISOL

    SciTech Connect

    Delahaye, P.; Jardin, P.; Maunoury, L.; Traykov, E.; Varenne, F.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.; Ban, G.; Celona, L.; Lunney, D.; Choinski, J.; Gmaj, P.; Jakubowski, A.; Steckiewicz, O.; Kalvas, T.; and others

    2012-02-15

    As the most ambitious concept of isotope separation on line (ISOL) facility, EURISOL aims at producing unprecedented intensities of post-accelerated radioactive isotopes. Charge breeding, which transforms the charge state of radioactive beams from 1+ to an n+ charge state prior to post-acceleration, is a key technology which has to overcome the following challenges: high charge states for high energies, efficiency, rapidity and purity. On the roadmap to EURISOL, a dedicated R and D is being undertaken to push forward the frontiers of the present state-of-the-art techniques which use either electron cyclotron resonance or electron beam ion sources. We describe here the guidelines of this R and D.

  2. Liquid oxygen/metal gelled monopropellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickman, John H.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this program were to establish the feasibility of metallized/liquid oxygen monopropellants and select the best monopropellant formulation for continued study. The metal powders mixed with the liquid oxygen were aluminum/magnesium (80/20), silicon and iron (Iron was only tested for burning properties). The formulations were first evaluated on whether they detonated when ignited or burned. The formulations only burned when ignited. The viscosity for the formulations ranged from 900 cps to 100 cps at shear rates up to 300 seconds(sup -1). Two percent (by weight) of Cab-O-Sil was added to the aluminum and aluminum/magnesium formulations for gelling while the silicon formulation used three percent. Within a seven hour period, settling was suggested only in the 29 percent aluminum and 29 percent aluminum/magnesium formulations. The monopropellants were burned in a cylinder submerged in a liquid nitrogen bath. Experimental data at ambient pressure indicated that the monopropellants were extinguished when the flame front reached regions submerged under the liquid nitrogen. The burn rate increased dramatically when burned in a cylinder enclosure with less heat sink available to the monopropellant. The test results were inconclusive as to whether the increased burn rate was due to the lower heat sink capacity or the small amount of pressure (2 psi) generated during the burning of the monopropellant. The burning of the aluminum and aluminum/magnesium resulted in a brilliant white flame similar to that of an arc welder. These monopropellants burned in a pulsating manner with the aluminum/magnesium appearing to have less pulsating combustion. The silicon monopropellant burned with an orange glow. No sparks or energetic burning was apparent as with the aluminum or aluminum/magnesium.

  3. Liquid metal nanodroplet dynamics inside nanocontainers

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyun Young; Chun, Hyunkyung; Park, Sora; Kang, Seoung-Hun; Ahn, Chi Won; Kwon, Young-Kyun; Upmanyu, Moneesh; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Jung, Yung Joon

    2013-01-01

    Here we report direct observations of spatial movements of nanodroplets of Pb metal trapped inside sealed carbon nanocontainers. We find drastic changes in the mobility of the liquid droplets as the particle size increases from a few to a few ten nanometers. In open containers the droplet becomes immobile and readily evaporates to the vacuum environment. The particle mobility strongly depends on confinement, particle size, and wetting on the enclosed surface. The collisions between droplets increase mobility but the tendency is reversed if collisions lead to droplet coalescence. The dynamics of confined nanodroplets could provide new insights into the activity of nanostructures in spatially constrained geometries. PMID:24005021

  4. Power losses in liquid metal current collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, M. M.; Wallace, D. R.

    1980-05-01

    A numerical capability has been developed which will compute ohmic and viscous power losses in liquid metal current collectors. The present work extends previous analytical investigations in that semi-infinite collector geometries are no longer assumed. This new capability is based on the finite element method and makes use of electrical current densities computed by the heat transfer portion of the NASTRAN structural analysis program. Although some limitations and questions remain, a comparison between the new numerical capability and experiment shows very good agreement in the computation of the power losses.

  5. Accommodation of liquid metal by cavity liners

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppson, D.W.

    1989-03-01

    Present liquid metal breeder reactor cell liner designs appear adequate to contain postulated leakages of lithium-lead alloy in an air or steam atmosphere and to contain lithium when inert atmospheres are present. If an air or steam atmosphere may be present in a cavity where lithium amy accumulate under postulated accident conditions, then consideration of stainless steel liners and further testing is recommended. Lithium testing of faulted liners should also be considered. SOFIRE II and WATRe computer codes may be useful in establishing liner design requirements and in determining water release from concrete behind the liners (potential hydrogen production) for postulated leakages to steel-lined concrete cavities.

  6. Thermal convection in a liquid metal battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuxin; Zikanov, Oleg

    2016-08-01

    Generation of thermal convection flow in the liquid metal battery, a device recently proposed as a promising solution for the problem of the short-term energy storage, is analyzed using a numerical model. It is found that convection caused by Joule heating of electrolyte during charging or discharging is virtually unavoidable. It exists in laboratory prototypes larger than a few centimeters in size and should become much stronger in larger-scale batteries. The phenomenon needs further investigation in view of its positive (enhanced mixing of reactants) and negative (loss of efficiency and possible disruption of operation due to the flow-induced deformation of the electrolyte layer) effects.

  7. Process for preparing liquid metal electrical contact device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, R. R.; Berkopec, F. D.; Culp, D. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The parts of an electrical contact device are treated by sputter etching to remove the parent metal oxide. Prior to exposure of the electrodes to any oxygen, a sacrificial metal is sputter deposited on the parts. Preferably this sacrificial metal is one that oxidizes slowly and is readily dissolved by the liquid metal. The sacrificial metal may then be removed from unwanted areas. The remainder of the ring and the probe to be wet by the liquid metal are submerged in the liquid metal or the liquid metal is flushed over these areas, preferably while they are being slightly abraded, unitl all the sacrificial material on these portions is wet by the liquid metal. In doing so the liquid metal dissolves the sacrificial metal and permanently wets the parent metal. Preferred materials used in the process and for the electrodes of electrical contact devices are high purity (99.0%) nickel or AISI type 304 stainless steel for the electrical contact devices, gallium as the liquid metal, and gold as the sacrificial material.

  8. Small Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor Safety Study

    SciTech Connect

    Minato, A; Ueda, N; Wade, D; Greenspan, E; Brown, N

    2005-11-02

    The Small Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor Safety Study documents results from activities conducted under Small Liquid Metal Fast Reactor Coordination Program (SLMFR-CP) Agreement, January 2004, between the Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) of Japan and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)[1]. Evaluations were completed on topics that are important to the safety of small sodium cooled and lead alloy cooled reactors. CRIEPI investigated approaches for evaluating postulated severe accidents using the CANIS computer code. The methods being developed are improvements on codes such as SAS 4A used in the US to analyze sodium cooled reactors and they depend on calibration using safety testing of metal fuel that has been completed in the TREAT facility. The 4S and the small lead cooled reactors in the US are being designed to preclude core disruption from all mechanistic scenarios, including selected unprotected transients. However, postulated core disruption is being evaluated to support the risk analysis. Argonne National Laboratory and the University of California Berkeley also supported LLNL with evaluation of cores with small positive void worth and core designs that would limit void worth. Assessments were also completed for lead cooled reactors in the following areas: (1) continuing operations with cladding failure, (2) large bubbles passing through the core and (3) recommendations concerning reflector control. The design approach used in the US emphasizes reducing the reactivity in the control mechanisms with core designs that have essentially no, or a very small, reactivity change over the core life. This leads to some positive void worth in the core that is not considered to be safety problem because of the inability to identify scenarios that would lead to voiding of lead. It is also believed that the void worth will not dominate the severe accident analysis. The approach used by 4S requires negative void worth throughout

  9. High-Power Liquid-Metal Heat-Transfer Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Fujita, Toshio

    1991-01-01

    Proposed closed-loop system for transfer of thermal power operates at relatively high differential pressure between vapor and liquid phases of liquid-metal working fluid. Resembles "capillary-pumped" liquid-metal heat-transfer loop except electric field across permselective barrier of beta alumina keeps liquid and vapor separate at heat-input end. Increases output thermal power, contains no moving parts, highly reliable and well suited to long-term unattended operation.

  10. Self-Actuation of Liquid Metal via Redox Reaction.

    PubMed

    Gough, Ryan C; Dang, Jonathan H; Moorefield, Matthew R; Zhang, George B; Hihara, Lloyd H; Shiroma, Wayne A; Ohta, Aaron T

    2016-01-13

    Presented here is a method for actuating a gallium-based liquid-metal alloy without the need for an external power supply. Liquid metal is used as an anode to drive a complementary oxygen reduction reaction, resulting in the spontaneous growth of hydrophilic gallium oxide on the liquid-metal surface, which induces flow of the liquid metal into a channel. The extent and duration of the actuation are controllable throughout the process, and the induced flow is both reversible and repeatable. This self-actuation technique can also be used to trigger other electrokinetic or fluidic mechanisms. PMID:26693856

  11. Liquid-liquid transition in a strong bulk metallic glass-forming liquid.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuai; Yang, Fan; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kaban, Ivan; Shuleshova, Olga; Meyer, Andreas; Busch, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphic phase transitions are common in crystalline solids. Recent studies suggest that phase transitions may also exist between two liquid forms with different entropy and structure. Such a liquid-liquid transition has been investigated in various substances including water, Al2O3-Y2O3 and network glass formers. However, the nature of liquid-liquid transition is debated due to experimental difficulties in avoiding crystallization and/or measuring at high temperatures/pressures. Here we report the thermodynamic and structural evidence of a temperature-induced weak first-order liquid-liquid transition in a bulk metallic glass-forming system Zr(41.2)Ti(13.8)Cu(12.5)Ni10Be(22.5) characterized by non- (or weak) directional bonds. Our experimental results suggest that the local structural changes during the transition induce the drastic viscosity changes without a detectable density anomaly. These changes are correlated with a heat capacity maximum in the liquid. Our findings support the hypothesis that the 'strong' kinetics (low fragility) of a liquid may arise from an underlying lambda transition above its glass transition. PMID:23817404

  12. CFD analysis and optimization of a liquid lead-bismuth loop target for ISOL facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houngbo, D.; Popescu, L.; Schuurmans, P.; Delonca, M.; Losito, R.; Maglioni, C.; Stora, T.; Bricault, P.; Vierendeels, J.

    2015-03-01

    In the context of the forthcoming next generation of Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) facilities based on an Isotope Separation On Line (ISOL) method, the development of production targets capable of dissipating the high power deposited by the primary beam is a major challenge. The concept of a high-power target based on a liquid Pb-Bi loop incorporating a heat-exchanger and a diffusion chamber was proposed within EURISOL DS and is being developed within the LIEBE1 This study shows that approximately 100 ms after the proton pulse the irradiated liquid-metal is entirely and uniformly evacuated from the irradiation volume and spread in a shower of small droplets (100-μm radii), in order to reduce the diffusion length of isotopes. Solutions to deal with the typical cavitation risk due to the presence of low-pressure zones in the liquid have also been found and simulated.

  13. Accommodation of liquid metal by cavity liners

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppson, D.W.

    1988-10-01

    Present liquid metal breeder reactor cell liner designs appear adequate to contain postulated leakages of lithium-lead alloy in an air or steam atmosphere and to contain lithium when inert atmospheres are present. If an air or steam atmosphere may be present in a cavity where lithium may accumulate under postulated accident conditions, then consideration of stainless steel liners and further testing is recommended. Lithium testing of faulted liners should also be considered. SOFIRE II and WATRE computer codes may be useful in establishing liner design requirements and in determining water release from concrete behind the liners (potential hydrogen production) for postulated leakages to steel-lined concrete cavities. 1 ref., 10 figs.

  14. Bulk Metallic Glass in Supercooled Liquid State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Deng, L.; Tang, N.; Jin, J. S.

    2014-07-01

    Size effect on the flow behavior of Zr55Al10Ni5Cu30 bulk metallic glass in its supercooled liquid state was investigated by compression tests with specimen diameters varying from 1 to 3 mm. It was found that the smaller the specimen, the higher flow stress exhibits. Strain gradient theory considering friction effect is validated to be suitable to rationalize this size effect. The more geometrical-necessary flow sites needed to be created in smaller specimens, the higher stress it may result in. Considering the efficiency of power dissipation and instability condition, processing maps of different specimens were constructed. With the specimen size decreasing, the processing condition corresponding to low temperature or high strain rate becomes disadvantageous to the thermoplastic forming of Zr55Al10Ni5Cu30, which is closely related to the local stress concentration and strain gradient induced by friction.

  15. Steering liquid metal flow in microchannels using low voltages.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Lin, Yiliang; Joshipura, Ishan D; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Dickey, Michael D

    2015-10-01

    Liquid metals based on gallium, such as eutectic gallium indium (EGaIn) and Galinstan, have been integrated as static components in microfluidic systems for a wide range of applications including soft electrodes, pumps, and stretchable electronics. However, there is also a possibility to continuously pump liquid metal into microchannels to create shape reconfigurable metallic structures. Enabling this concept necessitates a simple method to control dynamically the path the metal takes through branched microchannels with multiple outlets. This paper demonstrates a novel method for controlling the directional flow of EGaIn liquid metal in complex microfluidic networks by simply applying a low voltage to the metal. According to the polarity of the voltage applied between the inlet and an outlet, two distinct mechanisms can occur. The voltage can lower the interfacial tension of the metal via electrocapillarity to facilitate the flow of the metal towards outlets containing counter electrodes. Alternatively, the voltage can drive surface oxidation of the metal to form a mechanical impediment that redirects the movement of the metal towards alternative pathways. Thus, the method can be employed like a 'valve' to direct the pathway chosen by the metal without mechanical moving parts. The paper elucidates the operating mechanisms of this valving system and demonstrates proof-of-concept control over the flow of liquid metal towards single or multiple directions simultaneously. This method provides a simple route to direct the flow of liquid metal for applications in microfluidics, optics, electronics, and microelectromechanical systems. PMID:26279150

  16. Impact dynamics of oxidized liquid metal drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qin; Brown, Eric; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2013-04-01

    With exposure to air, many liquid metals spontaneously generate an oxide layer on their surface. In oscillatory rheological tests, this skin is found to introduce a yield stress that typically dominates the elastic response but can be tuned by exposing the metal to hydrochloric acid solutions of different concentration. We systematically studied the normal impact of eutectic gallium-indium (eGaIn) drops under different oxidation conditions and show how this leads to two different dynamical regimes. At low impact velocity (or low Weber number), eGaIn droplets display strong recoil and rebound from the impacted surface when the oxide layer is removed. In addition, the degree of drop deformation or spreading during impact is controlled by the oxide skin. We show that the scaling law known from ordinary liquids for the maximum spreading radius as a function of impact velocity can still be applied to the case of oxidized eGaIn if an effective Weber number We is employed that uses an effective surface tension factoring in the yield stress. In contrast, no influence on spreading from different oxidations conditions is observed for high impact velocity. This suggests that the initial kinetic energy is mostly damped by bulk viscous dissipation. Results from both regimes can be collapsed in an impact phase diagram controlled by two variables, the maximum spreading factor Pm=R0/Rm, given by the ratio of initial to maximum drop radius, and the impact number K=We/Re4/5, which scales with the effective Weber number We as well as the Reynolds number Re. The data exhibit a transition from capillary to viscous behavior at a critical impact number Kc≈0.1.

  17. Heavy liquid metals: Research programs at PSI

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Y.

    1996-06-01

    The author describes work at PSI on thermohydraulics, thermal shock, and material tests for mechnical properties. In the presentation, the focus is on two main programs. (1) SINQ LBE target: The phase II study program for SINQ is planned. A new LBE loop is being constructed. The study has the following three objectives: (a) Pump study - design work on an electromagnetic pump to be integrated into the target. (b) Heat pipe performance test - the use of heat pipes as an additional component of the target cooling system is being considered, and it may be a way to futher decouple the liquid metal and water coolant loops. (c) Mixed convection experiment - in order to find an optimal configuration of the additional flow guide for window cooling, mixed convection around the window is to be studied. The experiment will be started using water and then with LBE. (2) ESS Mercury target: For ESS target study, the following experimental studies are planned, some of which are exampled by trial experiments. (a) Flow around the window: Flow mapping around the hemi-cylindrical window will be made for optimising the flow channels and structures, (b) Geometry optimisation for minimizing a recirculation zone behind the edge of the flow separator, (c) Flow induced vibration and buckling problem for a optimised structure of the flow separator and (d) Gas-liquid two-phase flow will be studied by starting to establish the new experimental method of measuring various kinds of two-phase flow characteristics.

  18. Theory of the spin-1 bosonic liquid metal - Equilibrium properties of liquid metallic deuterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva, J.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1984-01-01

    The theory of a two-component quantum fluid comprised of spin-1/2 fermions and nonzero spin bosons is examined. This system is of interest because it embodies a possible quantum liquid metallic phase of highly compressed deuterium. Bose condensation is assumed present and the two cases of nuclear-spin-polarized and -unpolarized systems are considered. A significant feature in the unpolarized case is the presence of a nonmagnetic mode with quadratic dispersion owing its existence to nonzero boson spin. The physical character of this mode is examined in detail within a Bogoliubov approach. The specific heat, bulk modulus, spin susceptibility, and thermal expansion are all determined. Striking contrasts in the specific heats and thermal-expansion coefficients of the liquid and corresponding normal solid metallic phase are predicted.

  19. Tokamak with liquid metal for inducing toroidal electrical field

    DOEpatents

    Ohkawa, Tihiro

    1981-01-01

    A tokamak apparatus includes a vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within said vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner confines gas therein. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside the liner. A magnetic field is established in the liquid metal to develop magnetic flux linking the toroidal space. The gas is ionized. The liquid metal and the toroidal space are moved relative to one another transversely of the space to generate electric current in the ionized gas in the toroidal space about its major axis and thereby heat plasma developed in the toroidal space.

  20. Contactless Inductive Bubble Detection in a Liquid Metal Flow.

    PubMed

    Gundrum, Thomas; Büttner, Philipp; Dekdouk, Bachir; Peyton, Anthony; Wondrak, Thomas; Galindo, Vladimir; Eckert, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The detection of bubbles in liquid metals is important for many technical applications. The opaqueness and the high temperature of liquid metals set high demands on the measurement system. The high electrical conductivity of the liquid metal can be exploited for contactless methods based on electromagnetic induction. We will present a measurement system which consists of one excitation coil and a pickup coil system on the opposite sides of the pipe. With this sensor we were able to detect bubbles in a sodium flow inside a stainless steel pipe and bubbles in a column filled with a liquid Gallium alloy. PMID:26751444

  1. Contactless Inductive Bubble Detection in a Liquid Metal Flow

    PubMed Central

    Gundrum, Thomas; Büttner, Philipp; Dekdouk, Bachir; Peyton, Anthony; Wondrak, Thomas; Galindo, Vladimir; Eckert, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The detection of bubbles in liquid metals is important for many technical applications. The opaqueness and the high temperature of liquid metals set high demands on the measurement system. The high electrical conductivity of the liquid metal can be exploited for contactless methods based on electromagnetic induction. We will present a measurement system which consists of one excitation coil and a pickup coil system on the opposite sides of the pipe. With this sensor we were able to detect bubbles in a sodium flow inside a stainless steel pipe and bubbles in a column filled with a liquid Gallium alloy. PMID:26751444

  2. Formation of monatomic metallic glasses through ultrafast liquid quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Li; Wang, Jiangwei; Sheng, Hongwei; Zhang, Ze; Mao, Scott X.

    2014-08-01

    It has long been conjectured that any metallic liquid can be vitrified into a glassy state provided that the cooling rate is sufficiently high. Experimentally, however, vitrification of single-element metallic liquids is notoriously difficult. True laboratory demonstration of the formation of monatomic metallic glass has been lacking. Here we report an experimental approach to the vitrification of monatomic metallic liquids by achieving an unprecedentedly high liquid-quenching rate of 1014 K s-1. Under such a high cooling rate, melts of pure refractory body-centred cubic (bcc) metals, such as liquid tantalum and vanadium, are successfully vitrified to form metallic glasses suitable for property interrogations. Combining in situ transmission electron microscopy observation and atoms-to-continuum modelling, we investigated the formation condition and thermal stability of the monatomic metallic glasses as obtained. The availability of monatomic metallic glasses, being the simplest glass formers, offers unique possibilities for studying the structure and property relationships of glasses. Our technique also shows great control over the reversible vitrification-crystallization processes, suggesting its potential in micro-electromechanical applications. The ultrahigh cooling rate, approaching the highest liquid-quenching rate attainable in the experiment, makes it possible to explore the fast kinetics and structural behaviour of supercooled metallic liquids within the nanosecond to picosecond regimes.

  3. Formation of monatomic metallic glasses through ultrafast liquid quenching.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Li; Wang, Jiangwei; Sheng, Hongwei; Zhang, Ze; Mao, Scott X

    2014-08-14

    It has long been conjectured that any metallic liquid can be vitrified into a glassy state provided that the cooling rate is sufficiently high. Experimentally, however, vitrification of single-element metallic liquids is notoriously difficult. True laboratory demonstration of the formation of monatomic metallic glass has been lacking. Here we report an experimental approach to the vitrification of monatomic metallic liquids by achieving an unprecedentedly high liquid-quenching rate of 10(14) K s(-1). Under such a high cooling rate, melts of pure refractory body-centred cubic (bcc) metals, such as liquid tantalum and vanadium, are successfully vitrified to form metallic glasses suitable for property interrogations. Combining in situ transmission electron microscopy observation and atoms-to-continuum modelling, we investigated the formation condition and thermal stability of the monatomic metallic glasses as obtained. The availability of monatomic metallic glasses, being the simplest glass formers, offers unique possibilities for studying the structure and property relationships of glasses. Our technique also shows great control over the reversible vitrification-crystallization processes, suggesting its potential in micro-electromechanical applications. The ultrahigh cooling rate, approaching the highest liquid-quenching rate attainable in the experiment, makes it possible to explore the fast kinetics and structural behaviour of supercooled metallic liquids within the nanosecond to picosecond regimes. PMID:25119235

  4. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F.; O'Mullane, Anthony P.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-08-01

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems.

  5. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals.

    PubMed

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F; O'Mullane, Anthony P; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems. PMID:27488954

  6. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals

    PubMed Central

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F.; O'Mullane, Anthony P.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems. PMID:27488954

  7. Measurement of the differential pressure of liquid metals

    DOEpatents

    Metz, H.J.

    1975-09-01

    This patent relates to an improved means for measuring the differential pressure between any two points in a process liquid metal coolant loop, wherein the flow of liquid metal in a pipe is opposed by a permanent magnet liquid metal pump until there is almost zero flow shown by a magnetic type flowmeter. The pressure producing the liquid metal flow is inferred from the rate of rotation of the permanent magnet pump. In an alternate embodiment, a differential pressure transducer is coupled to a process pipeline by means of high-temperature bellows or diaphragm seals, and a permanent magnet liquid metal pump in the high-pressure transmission line to the pressure transducer can be utilized either for calibration of the transducer or for determining the process differential pressure as a function of the magnet pump speed. (auth)

  8. Effects of water in film boiling over liquid metal melts

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.; Finfrock, C.; Burson, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    Liquid-liquid boiling experiments have been performed with H/sub 2/O and liquid metal melts in the 100-series test matrix (Runs 121, 126, 127) and the VE test matrix. Some of the pre-explosion unstable film boiling data as well as observations from the explosive series have been previously reported.

  9. Solar-Driven Liquid-Metal MHD Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohl, F.; Lee, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generator with solar oven as its heat source has potential to produce electric power in space and on Earth at high efficiency. Generator focuses radiation from Sun to heat driving gas that pushes liquid metal past magnetic coil. Power is extracted directly from electric currents set up in conducting liquid. Using solar energy as fuel can save considerable costs and payload weight, compared to previous systems.

  10. Liquid metal actuation by electrical control of interfacial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaker, Collin B.; Dickey, Michael D.

    2016-09-01

    By combining metallic electrical conductivity with low viscosity, liquid metals and liquid metal alloys offer new and exciting opportunities to serve as reconfigurable components of electronic, microfluidic, and electromagnetic devices. Here, we review the physics and applications of techniques that utilize voltage to manipulate the interfacial tension of liquid metals; such techniques include electrocapillarity, continuous electrowetting, electrowetting-on-dielectric, and electrochemistry. These techniques lower the interfacial tension between liquid metals and a surrounding electrolyte by driving charged species (or in the case of electrochemistry, chemical species) to the interface. The techniques are useful for manipulating and actuating liquid metals at sub-mm length scales where interfacial forces dominate. We focus on metals and alloys that are liquid near or below room temperature (mercury, gallium, and gallium-based alloys). The review includes discussion of mercury—despite its toxicity—because it has been utilized in numerous applications and it offers a way of introducing several phenomena without the complications associated with the oxide layer that forms on gallium and its alloys. The review focuses on the advantages, applications, opportunities, challenges, and limitations of utilizing voltage to control interfacial tension as a method to manipulate liquid metals.

  11. Liquid metal actuation-based reversible frequency tunable monopole antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daeyoung; Pierce, Richard G.; Henderson, Rashaunda; Doo, Seok Joo; Yoo, Koangki; Lee, Jeong-Bong

    2014-12-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a reversible resonant frequency tunable antenna based on liquid metal actuation. The antenna is composed of a coplanar waveguide fed monopole stub printed on a copper-clad substrate, and a tunnel-shaped microfluidic channel linked to the printed metal. The gallium-based liquid metal can be injected and withdrawn from the channel in response to an applied air pressure. The gallium-based liquid metal is treated with hydrochloric acid to eliminate the oxide layer, and associated wetting/sticking problems, that arise from exposure to an ambient air environment. Elimination of the oxide layer allows for reliable actuation and repeatable and reversible tuning. By controlling the liquid metal slug on-demand with air pressure, the liquid metal can be readily controllable to connect/disconnect to the monopole antenna so that the physical length of the antenna reversibly tunes. The corresponding reversible resonant frequency changes from 4.9 GHz to 1.1 GHz. The antenna properties based on the liquid metal actuation were characterized by measuring the reflection coefficient and agreed well with simulation results. Additionally, the corresponding time-lapse images of controlling liquid metal in the channel were studied.

  12. Intrinsically Stretchable Biphasic (Solid-Liquid) Thin Metal Films.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Arthur; Michaud, Hadrien O; Gerratt, Aaron P; de Mulatier, Séverine; Lacour, Stéphanie P

    2016-06-01

    Stretchable biphasic conductors are formed by physical vapor deposition of gallium onto an alloying metal film. The properties of the photolithography-compatible thin metal films are highlighted by low sheet resistance (0.5 Ω sq(-1) ) and large stretchability (400%). This novel approach to deposit and pattern liquid metals enables extremely robust, multilayer and soft circuits, sensors, and actuators. PMID:26923313

  13. MHD Effects on Surface Stability and Turbulence in Liquid Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Lauren; Ji, Hantau; Zweben, Stewart

    2000-10-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is a significant element in understanding many phenomena observed in space and laboratory plasmas. MHD models also appropriately describe behaviors of liquid metals. Currently, there are many interests in the utilization of liquid metal in fusion devices; therefore an understanding of MHD physics in liquid metals is imperative. A small experiment has been built to study the MHD effects on turbulence and surface waves in liquid metal. To fully examine the MHD properties, a reference case in hydrodynamics is established using water or Gallium without the presence of the magnetic field or electrical current. An external wave driver with varying frequency and amplitude excites surface waves on the liquid metal. The experimental case using Gallium is run with the presence of the magnetic field and/ or electric pulses. The magnetic field is induced using two magnetic field coils on either side of the liquid metal and the electrical current is induced using electrodes. The measured dispersion relations of the two cases are then compared to the theoretical predictions. Several diagnostics are used in concert to accurately measure the wave characteristics. The surface waves will be recorded visually through a camera and the amplitude and frequency of the waves will be measured using a laser and fiber-optic system. This successful experiment will significantly enhance knowledge of liquid metal wave behavior and therefore aid in the applications of MHD in fusion plasmas. This worked was conducted as part of the DOE-sponsored National Undergraduate Fellowship Program in Plasma Physics

  14. Hydrogenation of coal liquid utilizing a metal carbonyl catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Feder, Harold M.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    1979-01-01

    Coal liquid having a dissolved transition metal, catalyst as a carbonyl complex such as Co.sub.2 (CO.sub.8) is hydrogenated with hydrogen gas or a hydrogen donor. A dissociating solvent contacts the coal liquid during hydrogenation to form an immiscible liquid mixture at a high carbon monoxide pressure. The dissociating solvent, e.g. ethylene glycol, is of moderate coordinating ability, while sufficiently polar to solvate the transition metal as a complex cation along with a transition metal, carbonyl anion in solution at a decreased carbon monoxide pressure. The carbon monoxide pressure is reduced and the liquids are separated to recover the hydrogenated coal liquid as product. The dissociating solvent with the catalyst in ionized form is recycled to the hydrogenation step at the elevated carbon monoxide pressure for reforming the catalyst complex within fresh coal liquid.

  15. Structural disorder in metallic glass-forming liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Shao-Peng; Feng, Shi-Dong; Wang, Li-Min; Qiao, Jun-Wei; Niu, Xiao-Feng; Dong, Bang-Shao; Wang, Wei-Min; Qin, Jing-Yu

    2016-06-01

    We investigated structural disorder by a new structural parameter, quasi-nearest atom (QNA), in atomistic configurations of eight metallic glass-forming systems generated through molecular dynamics simulations at various temperatures. Structural analysis reveals that the scaled distribution of the number of QNA appears to be an universal property of metallic liquids and the spatial distribution of the number of QNA displays to be clearly heterogeneous. Furthermore, the new parameter can be directly correlated with potential energy and structural relaxation at the atomic level. Some straightforward relationships between QNA and other properties (per-atom potential energy and α-relaxation time) are introduced to reflect structure-property relationship in metallic liquids. We believe that the new structural parameter can well reflect structure disorder in metallic liquids and play an important role in understanding various properties in metallic liquids.

  16. Structural disorder in metallic glass-forming liquids

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Shao-Peng; Feng, Shi-Dong; Wang, Li-Min; Qiao, Jun-Wei; Niu, Xiao-Feng; Dong, Bang-Shao; Wang, Wei-Min; Qin, Jing-Yu

    2016-01-01

    We investigated structural disorder by a new structural parameter, quasi-nearest atom (QNA), in atomistic configurations of eight metallic glass-forming systems generated through molecular dynamics simulations at various temperatures. Structural analysis reveals that the scaled distribution of the number of QNA appears to be an universal property of metallic liquids and the spatial distribution of the number of QNA displays to be clearly heterogeneous. Furthermore, the new parameter can be directly correlated with potential energy and structural relaxation at the atomic level. Some straightforward relationships between QNA and other properties (per-atom potential energy and α-relaxation time) are introduced to reflect structure-property relationship in metallic liquids. We believe that the new structural parameter can well reflect structure disorder in metallic liquids and play an important role in understanding various properties in metallic liquids. PMID:27278113

  17. Structural disorder in metallic glass-forming liquids.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shao-Peng; Feng, Shi-Dong; Wang, Li-Min; Qiao, Jun-Wei; Niu, Xiao-Feng; Dong, Bang-Shao; Wang, Wei-Min; Qin, Jing-Yu

    2016-01-01

    We investigated structural disorder by a new structural parameter, quasi-nearest atom (QNA), in atomistic configurations of eight metallic glass-forming systems generated through molecular dynamics simulations at various temperatures. Structural analysis reveals that the scaled distribution of the number of QNA appears to be an universal property of metallic liquids and the spatial distribution of the number of QNA displays to be clearly heterogeneous. Furthermore, the new parameter can be directly correlated with potential energy and structural relaxation at the atomic level. Some straightforward relationships between QNA and other properties (per-atom potential energy and α-relaxation time) are introduced to reflect structure-property relationship in metallic liquids. We believe that the new structural parameter can well reflect structure disorder in metallic liquids and play an important role in understanding various properties in metallic liquids. PMID:27278113

  18. Dynamo theory and liquid metal MHD experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lielausis, O.

    1994-06-01

    High values of magnetic Reynolds number Rm are characteristic not only to astrophysics, but also to other interesting objects, including liquid metal (LM) flows. LM experiments have been performed illustrating important predictions of the dynamo theory, for example, about the existence and features of the alpha effect. Consideration of so called 'laminar' dynamos provides a theoretical base for direct experimental realization and examination of the dynamo process. First step results, gathered a subcritical conditions, confirm the statement that self-excitation in LM experiments can be achieved practically today. In such devices as LM (sodium) cooled fast breeders Rm can reach values of up to 50 and specific MHD phenomena have been observed in operating fast reactors. Cautions against crisis like processes have been expressed. It is important for the dynamo theory to understand what kind of perturbed motion is able to coexist with the generated magnetic field. Fundamentally new ideas here are issuing from the theory of 2D MHD turbulence. LM MHD served for the first direct proves, confirming, that the predicted surprising features of 2D turbulence can be observed in reality. It is worth incorporating these already not new ideas in the dynamo theory. In such a way a field for new solutions could be established.

  19. Liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic (LMMHD) converter for space power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemany, A.; Marty, Ph.; Thibault, J. P.

    The liquid metal MHD or (Faraday) Converter is a conversion system which allows the production of electricity from thermal energy without any moving solid part. Then, such a system is very attractive in space where a long lifetime is required. The basic principle of the process is the expansion of a gas to accelerate a high-temperature liquid metal in an MHD generator where this liquid metal interacts with a magnetic field to produce electricity. By using an inductive generator the electric current can be delivered directly on the alternative form with adjustable voltage and frequency.

  20. Liquid metal folding patterns induced by electric capillary force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2016-04-01

    A fundamental phenomenon regarding spontaneous formation of symmetrical folding patterns induced on liquid metal free surface with circular shape features was disclosed. The occurrence and evolution processes of the patterns were demonstrated and interpreted. The electric capillary force imposed on liquid metal due to surface tension gradient was found responsible for producing a variety of surface folding patterns like wheel-shape, dual concentric ring-shape, and so on. All the patterns display a property of axial symmetry and could be analogue to the Rayleigh-Benard convection which produces hexagonal patterns. This finding on liquid metal flow folding refreshes knowledge of classical fluid kinematics.

  1. Thermal behaviors of liquid La-based bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D. W.; Wang, X. D. E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn; Lou, H. B.; Cao, Q. P.; Jiang, J. Z. E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn; Wang, L. W.; Zhang, D. X.

    2014-12-14

    Thermal behaviors of liquid La-based bulk metallic glasses have been measured by using the dilatometer with a self-sealed sample cell. It is demonstrated that the strong glass forming liquid not only has the small thermal expansion coefficient but also shows the slow variation rate. Moreover, the strong glass former has relatively dense atomic packing and also small density change in the liquid state. The results suggest that the high glass forming ability of La-based metallic glasses would be closely related to the slow atomic rearrangements in liquid melts.

  2. Thermal behaviors of liquid La-based bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D. W.; Wang, X. D.; Lou, H. B.; Cao, Q. P.; Wang, L. W.; Zhang, D. X.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2014-12-01

    Thermal behaviors of liquid La-based bulk metallic glasses have been measured by using the dilatometer with a self-sealed sample cell. It is demonstrated that the strong glass forming liquid not only has the small thermal expansion coefficient but also shows the slow variation rate. Moreover, the strong glass former has relatively dense atomic packing and also small density change in the liquid state. The results suggest that the high glass forming ability of La-based metallic glasses would be closely related to the slow atomic rearrangements in liquid melts.

  3. Structural crossover in a supercooled metallic liquid and the link to a liquid-to-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, S.; Blodgett, M.; Kelton, K. F.; Ma, J. L.; Fan, J.; Wang, X.-L.

    2016-05-01

    Time-resolved synchrotron measurements were carried out to capture the structure evolution of an electrostatically levitated metallic-glass-forming liquid during free cooling. The experimental data shows a crossover in the liquid structure at ˜1000 K, about 115 K below the melting temperature and 150 K above the crystallization temperature. The structure change is characterized by a dramatic growth in the extended-range order below the crossover temperature. Molecular dynamics simulations have identified that the growth of the extended-range order was due to an increased correlation between solute atoms. These results provide structural evidence for a liquid-to-liquid-phase-transition in the supercooled metallic liquid.

  4. Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor for Space Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitzberg, Abraham

    2003-01-01

    The conceptual design is for a liquid metal (LM) cooled nuclear reactor that would provide heat to a closed Brayton cycle (CBC) power conversion subsystem to provide electricity for electric propulsion thrusters and spacecraft power. The baseline power level is 100 kWe to the user. For long term power generation, UN pin fuel with Nb1Zr alloy cladding was selected. As part of the SP-100 Program this fuel demonstrated lifetime with greater than six atom percent burnup, at temperatures in the range of 1400-1500 K. The CBC subsystem was selected because of the performance and lifetime database from commercial and aircraft applications and from prior NASA and DOE space programs. The high efficiency of the CBC also allows the reactor to operate at relatively low power levels over its 15-year life, minimizing the long-term power density and temperature of the fuel. The scope of this paper is limited to only the nuclear components that provide heated helium-xenon gas to the CBC subsystem. The principal challenge for the LM reactor concept was to design the reactor core, shield and primary heat transport subsystems to meet mission requirements in a low mass configuration. The LM concept design approach was to assemble components from prior programs and, with minimum change, determine if the system met the objective of the study. All of the components are based on technologies having substantial data bases. Nuclear, thermalhydraulic, stress, and shielding analyses were performed using available computer codes. Neutronics issues included maintaining adequate operating and shutdown reactivities, even under accident conditions. Thermalhydraulic and stress analyses calculated fuel and material temperatures, coolant flows and temperatures, and thermal stresses in the fuel pins, components and structures. Using conservative design assumptions and practices, consistent with the detailed design work performed during the SP-100 Program, the mass of the reactor, shield, primary heat

  5. Liquid metal heat sink for high-power laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrovec, John; Litt, Amardeep S.; Copeland, Drew A.; Junghans, Jeremy; Durkee, Roger

    2013-02-01

    We report on the development of a novel, ultra-low thermal resistance active heat sink (AHS) for thermal management of high-power laser diodes (HPLD) and other electronic and photonic components. AHS uses a liquid metal coolant flowing at high speed in a miniature closed and sealed loop. The liquid metal coolant receives waste heat from an HPLD at high flux and transfers it at much reduced flux to environment, primary coolant fluid, heat pipe, or structure. Liquid metal flow is maintained electromagnetically without any moving parts. Velocity of liquid metal flow can be controlled electronically, thus allowing for temperature control of HPLD wavelength. This feature also enables operation at a stable wavelength over a broad range of ambient conditions. Results from testing an HPLD cooled by AHS are presented.

  6. The effect of solid metal composition on solid metal/ liquid metal partitioning of trace elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, N.; van Westrenen, W.

    2010-12-01

    Fundamental understanding of the partitioning behaviour of elements between different core and/or mantle phases is needed to constrain processes of planetary differentiation and evolution. The partitioning behaviour of elements between solid metal and liquid metal in the Fe-S system, of relevance to core crystallisation in planetesimals and the terrestrial planets, has been investigated by several workers [1-6], most of whom [1-5] conclude that variations in partition coefficients can be explained by variations in melt composition. However, recently Stewart et al. [6] showed that the crystal-lattice strain model commonly used to describe silicate mineral - silicate melt partitioning can be applied to partially molten metallic systems. This suggests the structure of the solid metal also plays a role in determining solid metal / molten metal partitioning. Here, we investigate the effect of the structure of the solid metal in the Fe-S system on solid/liquid metal partitioning by obtaining new element partitioning data at pressures between 0.5 and 3 GPa. The effect of the solid metal is isolated from pressure-temperature-melt composition effects by performing experiments at constant P and T with two Fe-S bulk compositions on either side of the eutectic composition. In addition to the effect of solid metal composition we investigate the effects of pressure and S content on trace element partitioning behaviour and the application of the lattice strain model to our results. Starting mixtures were doped with several hundred ppm levels of trace elements Ni, Co, W, Mo, V, Nb, Ta, Sn, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Mn, P, Ge,. Experiments were performed using a QUICKPress piston cylinder apparatus at the VU University, Amsterdam using alumina capsules. Experiments were heated to 1073 K at pressure and allowed to sinter for a duration of 10 hours before the temperature was raised at a rate of 50 K / min to the target value. Preliminary EPMA data for a 1 GPa experiment with FeS as the solid

  7. Investigation of a liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic power system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.; Hays, L. G.; Cerini, D. J.; Bogdanoff, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    Liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic power conversion is being investigated for nuclear-electric propulsion. A liquid-metal MHD converter has no moving mechanical parts and requires a heat source temperature of only 1300 K. Cycle efficiencies of 5% to 8% for single-stage converters and 10% for multistage converters appear attainable. The specific weight of a 240 kWe MHD power plant has been estimated as 30 kg/kWe with shielding for unmanned science missions.

  8. Analysis of liquid metal embrittlement from a bond energy viewpoint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. J.; Stoloff, N. S.

    1975-01-01

    Absorption induced embrittlement of solid metals by certain liquid metals is analyzed through an Engel-Brewer calculation of the solid-liquid interaction energy, and of the effect of the latter in reducing fracture surface energy. The reduction in fracture surface energy is estimated by comparison of the electronic contribution to the solid-liquid interaction energy with solid-solid bond energy for some 40 liquid-solid couples. Regular solution theory is used to estimate mutual solubility as the relative difference in parameter values. Embrittlement can be predicted by using reduction in fracture surface energy and solubility parameter difference as critical variables. The effect of solute additions to the liquid on the degree of embrittlement is interpreted via the same two variables; the principal effect of solutes is to modify solubility relationships at the solid-liquid interface.

  9. Glass-to-Metal Seal Against Liquid Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, John L.; Gatewood, John R.

    1987-01-01

    Simple compression joint with indium gasket forms demountable seal for superfluids. Seal developed for metal lid on glass jar used in experiments on liquid helium. Glass container allows contents to be viewed for such purposes as calibration of liquid-level detectors and adjustments of displacement plungers. Seal contains liquid helium even when temperature drops below 2.19K. Made from inexpensive, commercially available materials and parts.

  10. Orthogonal metals: The simplest non-Fermi liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandkishore, Rahul; Metlitski, Max A.; Senthil, T.

    2012-07-01

    We present a fractionalized metallic phase which is indistinguishable from the Fermi liquid in conductivity and thermodynamics, but is sharply distinct in one-electron properties, such as the electron spectral function. We dub this phase the “orthogonal metal.” The orthogonal metal and the transition to it from the Fermi liquid are naturally described using a slave-particle representation wherein the electron is expressed as a product of a fermion and a slave Ising spin. We emphasize that when the slave spins are disordered, the result is not a Mott insulator (as erroneously assumed in the prior literature), but rather the orthogonal metal. We construct prototypical ground-state wave functions for the orthogonal metal by modifying the Jastrow factor of Slater-Jastrow wave functions that describe ordinary Fermi liquids. We further demonstrate that the transition from the Fermi liquid to the orthogonal metal can, in some circumstances, provide a simple example of a continuous destruction of a Fermi surface with a critical Fermi surface appearing right at the critical point. We present exactly soluble models that realize an orthogonal metal phase, and the phase transition to the Fermi liquid. These models thus provide valuable solvable examples for phase transitions associated with the death of a Fermi surface.

  11. The formation of metal/metal-matrix nano-composites by the ultrasonic dispersion of immiscible liquid metals

    SciTech Connect

    Keppens, V.M.; Mandrus, D.; Boatner, L.A.; Rankin, J.

    1996-12-01

    Ultrasonic energy has been used to disperse one liquid metallic component in a second immiscible liquid metal, thereby producing a metallic emulsion. Upon lowering the temperature of this emulsion below the mp of the lowest-melting constituent, a metal/metal-matrix composite is formed. This composite consists of sub-micron-to-micron- sized particles of the minor metallic phase that are embedded in a matrix consisting of the major metallic phase. Zinc-bismuth was used as a model system, and ultrasonic dispersion of a minor Bi liquid phase was used to synthesize metal/metal-matrix composites. These materials were characterized using SEM and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis.

  12. REMOVAL OF CERTAIN FISSION PRODUCT METALS FROM LIQUID BISMUTH COMPOSITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Dwyer, O.E.; Howe, H.E.; Avrutik, E.R.

    1959-11-24

    A method is described for purifying a solution of urarium in liquid bismuth containing at least one metal from the group consisting of selenium, tellurium, palladium, ruthenium, rhodium, niobium, and zirconium. The solution is contacted with zinc in an inert atmosphere to form a homogeneous melt, a solid zinc phase is formed, and the zinc phase containing the metal is separated from the melt.

  13. Dewetting Properties of Metallic Liquid Film on Nanopillared Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiongying; He, Yezeng; Wang, Yong; Dong, Jichen; Li, Hui

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report simulation evidence that the graphene surface decorated by carbon nanotube pillars shows strong dewettability, which can give it great advantages in dewetting and detaching metallic nanodroplets on the surfaces. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show that the ultrathin liquid film first contracts then detaches from the graphene on a time scale of several nanoseconds, as a result of the inertial effect. The detaching velocity is in the order of 10 m/s for the droplet with radii smaller than 50 nm. Moreover, the contracting and detaching behaviors of the liquid film can be effectively controlled by tuning the geometric parameters of the liquid film or pillar. In addition, the temperature effects on the dewetting and detaching of the metallic liquid film are also discussed. Our results show that one can exploit and effectively control the dewetting properties of metallic nanodroplets by decorating the surfaces with nanotube pillars. PMID:24487279

  14. The emissivities of liquid metals at their fusion temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnell, D. W.; Treverton, J. A.; Valerga, A. J.; Margrave, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    A survey of the literature through 1969 shows an almost total lack of experimental emissivity data for metals in the liquid state. The emissivities for several transition metals and various other metals and compounds in the liquid state at their fusion temperatures have been determined. The technique used involves electromagnetic levitation-induction heating of the materials in an inert atmosphere. The brightness temperature of the liquid phase of the material is measured as the material is heated through fusion. Given a reliable value of the fusion temperature, which is available for most pure substances, one may readily calculate an emissivity for the liquid phase at the fusion temperatures. Even in cases where melting points are poorly known, the brightness temperatures are unique parameters, independent of the temperature scale and measured for a chemically defined system at a fixed point. Better emissivities may be recalculated as better melting point data become available.

  15. Impregnated-electrode-type liquid metal ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, J.; Gotoh, Y.; Tsuji, H.; Takagi, T.

    We have developed an impregnated-electrode-type liquid metal ion source whose tip is a sintered-porous structure made of a refractory metal such as tungsten. By this structure the ratio of the liquid metal surface area facing the vacuum to the volume is low, which decreases useless metal evaporation from the surface. The maximum vapour pressure of the metal in operation for this ion source is 10 -1-10 0 Torr, which is 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than that for the needle type. Therefore, useful metal ions such as Ga +, Au +, Ag +, In +, Si 2+, Ge 2+, and Sb 2+ can be extracted from single element metals or alloys. The porous structure of the tip has also an effect on the positive control of the liquid metal flow rate to the tip head. Thus, a stable operation with a high current of a few hundreds of μA can be obtained together with a low current high brightness ion beam. Therefore, this ion source is suitable not only for microfocusing but also for a general use as a metal ion source.

  16. Investigating Free-surface, MHD Instabilities in Liquid Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumfiel, Geoff; Ji, Hantao; Zweben, Stewart

    1999-11-01

    The addition of the Lorentz force (j × B) to MHD fluids, such as liquid metals, could introduce new instabilities to free-surface motions. An experiment is under development at PPPL that will contribute to the understanding of these instabilities. This experiment is designed to explore how instabilities form and propagate on the surface of liquid metals. Metals with low melting points and reasonable conductive properties (such as Ga) are melted in an eight inch, square Pyrex container. The container is placed in a large magnetic field (up to 5 kG) and a perpendicular current is set up in the metal. Waves are generated using a simple wave driving apparatus. A one dimensional, diode camera is used to monitor wave propagation perpendicular to the B-field. Initial results will be presented and discussed. This experiment will provide information that could eventually be used to better control free-surface motions in liquid Li walls in fusion reactors.

  17. Emerging Applications of Liquid Metals Featuring Surface Oxides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Gallium and several of its alloys are liquid metals at or near room temperature. Gallium has low toxicity, essentially no vapor pressure, and a low viscosity. Despite these desirable properties, applications calling for liquid metal often use toxic mercury because gallium forms a thin oxide layer on its surface. The oxide interferes with electrochemical measurements, alters the physicochemical properties of the surface, and changes the fluid dynamic behavior of the metal in a way that has, until recently, been considered a nuisance. Here, we show that this solid oxide “skin” enables many new applications for liquid metals including soft electrodes and sensors, functional microcomponents for microfluidic devices, self-healing circuits, shape-reconfigurable conductors, and stretchable antennas, wires, and interconnects. PMID:25283244

  18. Compatibility of materials with liquid metal targets for SNS

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; Pawel, S.J.; DeVan, J.H.

    1996-06-01

    Several heavy liquid metals are candidates as the target in a spallation neutron source: Hg, Pb, Bi, and Pb-Bi eutectic. Systems with these liquid metals have been used in the past and a data-base on compatibility already exists. Two major compatibility issues have been identified when selecting a container material for these liquid metals: temperature gradient mass transfer and liquid metal embrittlement or LME. Temperature gradient mass transfer refers to dissolution of material from the high temperature portions of a system and its deposition in the lower temperature areas. Solution and deposition rate constants along with temperature, {Delta}T, and velocity are usually the most important parameters. For most candidate materials mass transfer corrosion has been found to be proportionately worse in Bi compared with Hg and Pb. For temperatures to {approx}550{degrees}C, ferritic/martensitic steels have been satisfactory in Pb or Hg systems and the maximum temperature can be extended to {approx}650{degrees}C with additions of inhibitors to the liquid metal, e.g. Mg, Ti, Zr. Above {approx}600{degrees}C, austenitic stainless steels have been reported to be unsatisfactory, largely because of the mass transfer of nickel. Blockage of flow from deposition of material is usually the life-limiting effect of this type of corrosion. However, mass transfer corrosion at lower temperatures has not been studied. At low temperatures (usually < 150{degrees}C), LME has been reported for some liquid metal/container alloy combinations. Liquid metal embrittlement, like hydrogen embrittlement, results in brittle fracture of a normally ductile material.

  19. ISOLATION OF RADIOACTIVE METALS FROM LIQUID WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metals are present in many waste streams, and pose challenges with regard to their disposal. Release of metals into the environment presents both human health and ecological concerns. As a result, efforts are directed at reducing their toxicity, bioavailability, and environment...

  20. Two-component Fermi-liquid theory - Equilibrium properties of liquid metallic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva, J.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1981-01-01

    It is reported that the transition of condensed hydrogen from an insulating molecular crystal phase to a metallic liquid phase, at zero temperature and high pressure, appears possible. Liquid metallic hydrogen (LMH), comprising interpenetrating proton and electron fluids, would constitute a two-component Fermi liquid with both a very high component-mass ratio and long-range, species-dependent bare interactions. The low-temperature equilibrium properties of LMH are examined by means of a generalization to the case of two components of the phenomenological Landau Fermi-liquid theory, and the low-temperature specific heat, compressibility, thermal expansion coefficient and spin susceptibility are given. It is found that the specific heat and the thermal expansion coefficient are vastly greater in the liquid than in the corresponding solid, due to the presence of proton quasiparticle excitations in the liquid.

  1. Liquid Galvanic Coatings for Protection of Imbedded Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDowell, Louis G. (Inventor); Curran, Joseph J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Coating compositions and methods of their use are described herein for the reduction of corrosion in imbedded metal structures. The coatings are applied as liquids to an external surface of a substrate in which the metal structures are imbedded. The coatings are subsequently allowed to dry. The liquid applied coatings provide galvanic protection to the imbedded metal structures. Continued protection can be maintained with periodic reapplication of the coating compositions, as necessary, to maintain electrical continuity. Because the coatings may be applied using methods similar to standard paints, and because the coatings are applied to external surfaces of the substrates in which the metal structures are imbedded, the corresponding corrosion protection may be easily maintained. The coating compositions are particularly useful in the protection of metal-reinforced concrete.

  2. Separation of metals by supported liquid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Takigawa, D.Y.

    1990-12-31

    A supported liquid membrane system for the separation of a preselected chemical species within a feedstream, preferably an aqueous feedstream, includes a feed compartment containing a feed solution having at least one preselected chemical species therein, a stripping compartment containing a stripping solution therein, and a microporous polybenzimidazole membrane situated between the compartments, the microporous polybenzimidazole membrane containing an extractant mixture selective for the preselected chemical species within the membrane pores is disclosed along with a method of separating preselected chemical species from a feedstream with such a system, and a supported liquid membrane for use in such a system.

  3. Separation of metals by supported liquid membrane

    DOEpatents

    Takigawa, Doreen Y.

    1992-01-01

    A supported liquid membrane system for the separation of a preselected chemical species within a feedstream, preferably an aqueous feedstream, includes a feed compartment containing a feed solution having at least one preselected chemical species therein, a stripping compartment containing a stripping solution therein, and a microporous polybenzimidazole membrane situated between the compartments, the microporous polybenzimidazole membrane containing an extractant mixture selective for the preselected chemical species within the membrane pores is disclosed along with a method of separating preselected chemical species from a feedstream with such a system, and a supported liquid membrane for use in such a system.

  4. Stretchable Metamaterial Absorber Using Liquid Metal-Filled Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyeongseob; Lee, Dongju; Eom, Seunghyun; Lim, Sungjoon

    2016-01-01

    A stretchable metamaterial absorber is proposed in this study. The stretchability was achieved by liquid metal and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). To inject liquid metal, microfluidic channels were fabricated using PDMS powers and microfluidic-channel frames, which were built using a three-dimensional printer. A top conductive pattern and ground plane were designed after considering the easy injection of liquid metal. The proposed metamaterial absorber comprises three layers of PDMS substrate. The top layer is for the top conductive pattern, and the bottom layer is for the meandered ground plane. Flat PDMS layers were inserted between the top and bottom PDMS layers. The measured absorptivity of the fabricated absorber was 97.8% at 18.5 GHz, and the absorption frequency increased from 18.5 to 18.65 GHz as the absorber was stretched from its original length (5.2 cm) to 6.4 cm. PMID:27077861

  5. Stretchable Metamaterial Absorber Using Liquid Metal-Filled Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS).

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeongseob; Lee, Dongju; Eom, Seunghyun; Lim, Sungjoon

    2016-01-01

    A stretchable metamaterial absorber is proposed in this study. The stretchability was achieved by liquid metal and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). To inject liquid metal, microfluidic channels were fabricated using PDMS powers and microfluidic-channel frames, which were built using a three-dimensional printer. A top conductive pattern and ground plane were designed after considering the easy injection of liquid metal. The proposed metamaterial absorber comprises three layers of PDMS substrate. The top layer is for the top conductive pattern, and the bottom layer is for the meandered ground plane. Flat PDMS layers were inserted between the top and bottom PDMS layers. The measured absorptivity of the fabricated absorber was 97.8% at 18.5 GHz, and the absorption frequency increased from 18.5 to 18.65 GHz as the absorber was stretched from its original length (5.2 cm) to 6.4 cm. PMID:27077861

  6. Temperature-dependent liquid metal flowrate control device

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Roger D.

    1978-01-01

    A temperature-dependent liquid metal flowrate control device includes a magnet and a ferromagnetic member defining therebetween a flow path for liquid metal, the ferromagnetic member being formed of a material having a curie temperature at which a change in the flow rate of the liquid metal is desired. According to the preferred embodiment the magnet is a cylindrical rod magnet axially disposed within a cylindrical member formed of a curie material and having iron pole pieces at the ends. A cylindrical iron shunt and a thin wall stainless steel barrier are disposed in the annulus between magnet and curie material. Below the curie temperature flow between steel barrier and curie material is impeded and above the curie temperature flow impedance is reduced.

  7. Review of liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.S.; Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    A survey of space-power related liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos National Laboratory is presented. Heat pipe development at Los Alamos has been on-going since 1963. Heat pipes were initially developed for thermionic nuclear-electrical power production in space. Since then Los Alamos has developed liquid metal heat pipes for numerous applications related to high temperature systems in both the space and terrestrial environments. Some of these applications include thermionic electrical generators, thermoelectric energy conversion (both in-core and direct radiation), thermal energy storage, hypersonic vehicle leading edge cooling, and heat pipe vapor laser cells. Some of the work performed at Los Alamos has been documented in internal reports that are often little-known. A representative description and summary of progress in space-related liquid metal heat pipe technology is provided followed by a reference section citing sources where these works may be found. 53 refs.

  8. Task-specific ionic liquid for solubilizing metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Nockemann, Peter; Thijs, Ben; Pittois, Stijn; Thoen, Jan; Glorieux, Christ; Van Hecke, Kristof; Van Meervelt, Luc; Kirchner, Barbara; Binnemans, Koen

    2006-10-26

    Protonated betaine bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide is an ionic liquid with the ability to dissolve large quantities of metal oxides. This metal-solubilizing power is selective. Soluble are oxides of the trivalent rare earths, uranium(VI) oxide, zinc(II) oxide, cadmium(II) oxide, mercury(II) oxide, nickel(II) oxide, copper(II) oxide, palladium(II) oxide, lead(II) oxide, manganese(II) oxide, and silver(I) oxide. Insoluble or very poorly soluble are iron(III), manganese(IV), and cobalt oxides, as well as aluminum oxide and silicon dioxide. The metals can be stripped from the ionic liquid by treatment of the ionic liquid with an acidic aqueous solution. After transfer of the metal ions to the aqueous phase, the ionic liquid can be recycled for reuse. Betainium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide forms one phase with water at high temperatures, whereas phase separation occurs below 55.5 degrees C (temperature switch behavior). The mixtures of the ionic liquid with water also show a pH-dependent phase behavior: two phases occur at low pH, whereas one phase is present under neutral or alkaline conditions. The structures, the energetics, and the charge distribution of the betaine cation and the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide anion, as well as the cation-anion pairs, were studied by density functional theory calculations. PMID:17048916

  9. Film boiling of R-11 on liquid metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.; Irvine, T.F. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An interesting problem is the effect of an immiscible liquid heating surface on the process of film boiling. Such surfaces raise questions concerning interface stability to disturbances, effects of gas bubbling, and vapor explosions in layered systems. The specific motivation for this study was to investigate film boiling from a liquid surface with application to cooling of molten reactor core debris by an overlying pool of reactor coolant. To investigate this phenomenon, and apparatus consisting of a nominal six-inch diameter steel vessel to hold the liquid metal and boiling fluid was constructed; coolant reservoirs, heaters, controllers, and allied instrumentation were attached. A transient energy balance was performed on the liquid metal pool by a submerged assembly of microthermocouples in the liquid metal and an array of thermocouples on the wall of the test vessel. The thermocouple data were used to determine the boiling heat flux as well as the boiling superheat. On an average basis, the deviation between the prediction of the Berenson model and the experimental data was less than one percent when Berenson was corrected for thermal radiation effects. Evidence from visualization tests of R-11 in film boiling over molten metal pools to superheats in excess of 600 K supports this conclusion. 13 refs.

  10. Dynamical Correlation In Some Liquid Alkaline Earth Metals Near Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakore, B. Y.; Suthar, P. H.; Khambholja, S. G.; Gajjar, P. N.; Jani, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    The study of dynamical variables: velocity autocorrelation function (VACF) and power spectrum of liquid alkaline earth metals (Ca, Sr, and Ba) have been presented based on the static harmonic well approximation. The effective interatomic potential for liquid metals is computed using our well recognized model potential with the exchange correlation functions due to Hartree, Taylor, Ichimaru and Utsumi, Farid et al. and Sarkar et al. It is observed that the VACF computed using Sarkar et al. gives the good agreement with available molecular dynamics simulation (MD) results [Phys Rev. B 62, 14818 (2000)]. The shoulder of the power spectrum depends upon the type of local field correlation function used.

  11. Current collector geometry and mixing in liquid metal electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashour, Rakan; Kelley, Douglas

    2015-11-01

    Liquid metal batteries are emerging as an efficient and cost effective technology for large-scale energy storage on electrical grids. In these batteries, critical performance related factors such as the limiting current density and life cycle are strongly influenced by fluid mixing and transport of electrochemical species to and from the electrode-electrolyte interface. In this work, ultrasound velocimetry is used to investigate the role of negative current collector location on the induced velocity, flow pattern, and mixing time in liquid metal electrodes. Ultrasound velocity measurements are obtained at a range of operating current densities. Furthermore, a comparison between velocity profiles produced by current collectors with different sizes is also presented.

  12. Electromagnetically Sustained Liquid Metal Flow for Feedback Stabilization Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirhoseini, Seyyed Mohammad; Volpe, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    Liquid metal walls in fusion reactors, whether nearly static or rapidly flowing, will be subject to instabilities that will make them locally bulge, thus entering in contact with the plasma, or deplete, hence exposing the underlying solid substrate. To prevent this, research has begun at Columbia University to create liquid metal flows and demonstrate their stabilization by electromagnetic forces, adjusted in feedback with thickness measurements. Here we present initial results regarding the sustainment of a flow of Galinstan (a gallium, indium, tin alloy) by a special pump consisting of a ferromagnetic rotor, with permanent magnets mounted on it. The magnetic field is partly ``frozen'' in the liquid metal surrounding the rotor. Therefore, as the field rotates, the liquid metal rotates as well, although with a slip factor. This solution was preferred to conventional pumps, which would enter in electrical contact with the metal flow. The pump, 3D-printed at Columbia, allows to adjust the flow-velocity from few mm/s to several cm/s.

  13. Factors Affecting Liquid-Metal Embrittlement in C-103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclemore, R.; Lampson, F. K.

    1982-01-01

    Results of a study of weld cracks on Space Shuttle control thrustors point toward better understanding of cracking problem in columbium metal, which has also plagued nonaerospace users. Although liquid-metal embrittlement is known to be cause of problem, factors affecting growth and severity of cracks are not well understood. New results tie crack growth to type of contaminants present, grain size and level of stress present while welding is done.

  14. Characteristics of the boat inductor for keeping liquid metal in the suspended state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogel, A. A.; Siforova, T. A.; Mezdrogina, M. M.

    1985-01-01

    Characteristics of the boat inductor for keeping liquid metal in the suspended state are examined. Behavioral features of the liquid metal, and the suspension boundary of liquid metal in the lower position are discussed. It is concluded that the inductor can be used to crystallize metals in the suspended state.

  15. A sliding cell technique for diffusion measurements in liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Yongliang; Zhu, Chunao; Zhang, Bo

    2014-03-01

    The long capillary and shear cell techniques are the usual methods for diffusion measurements in liquid metals. Here we present a new "sliding cell technique" to measure interdiffusion in liquid alloys, which combines the merits of these two methods. Instead of a number of shear cells, as used in the shear cell method, only one sliding cell is designed to separate and join the liquid diffusion samples. Using the sliding cell technique, the influence of the heating process (which affects liquid diffusion measurements in the conventional long capillary method) can be eliminated. Time-dependent diffusion measurements at the same isothermal temperature were carried out in Al-Cu liquids. Compared with the previous results measured by in-situ X-ray radiography, the obtained liquid diffusion coefficient in this work is believed to be influenced by convective flow. The present work further supports the idea that to obtain accurate diffusion constants in liquid metals, the measurement conditions must be well controlled, and there should be no temperature gradients or other disturbances.

  16. A sliding cell technique for diffusion measurements in liquid metals

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Yongliang; Zhu, Chunao; Zhang, Bo

    2014-03-15

    The long capillary and shear cell techniques are the usual methods for diffusion measurements in liquid metals. Here we present a new “sliding cell technique” to measure interdiffusion in liquid alloys, which combines the merits of these two methods. Instead of a number of shear cells, as used in the shear cell method, only one sliding cell is designed to separate and join the liquid diffusion samples. Using the sliding cell technique, the influence of the heating process (which affects liquid diffusion measurements in the conventional long capillary method) can be eliminated. Time-dependent diffusion measurements at the same isothermal temperature were carried out in Al-Cu liquids. Compared with the previous results measured by in-situ X-ray radiography, the obtained liquid diffusion coefficient in this work is believed to be influenced by convective flow. The present work further supports the idea that to obtain accurate diffusion constants in liquid metals, the measurement conditions must be well controlled, and there should be no temperature gradients or other disturbances.

  17. Plasma torch with liquid metal electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Predtechenskii, M.R.; Tukhto, O.M.

    2006-03-15

    In order to eliminate the negative effect of erosion processes on electrodes in arc plasma generators, a new scheme of arc discharge was proposed in which the surface of a molten metal acts as electrodes. A plasma reactor was designed on the basis of this concept. The electrophysical characteristics of such a discharge in steam and air as plasma gases were studied. Experiments on destruction of toxic polychlorinated biphenyls and steam coal gasification were performed.

  18. LSPR properties of metal nanoparticles adsorbed at a liquid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhilin; Chen, Shu; Fang, Pingping; Ren, Bin; Girault, Hubert H; Tian, Zhongqun

    2013-04-21

    Unlike the solid-air and solid-liquid interfaces, the optical properties of metal nanoparticles adsorbed at the liquid-liquid interface have not been theoretically exploited to date. In this work, the three dimensional finite difference time domain (3D-FDTD) method is employed to clarify the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) based optical properties of gold nanoparticles (NPs) adsorbed at the water-oil interface, including near field distribution, far field absorption and their relevance. The LSPR spectra of NPs located at a liquid-liquid interface are shown to differ significantly from those in a uniform liquid environment or at the other interfaces. The absorption spectra exhibit two distinct LSPR peaks, the positions and relative strengths of which are sensitive to the dielectric properties of each liquid and the exact positions of the NPs with respect to the interface. Precise control of the particles' position and selection of the appropriate wavelength of the excitation laser facilitates the rational design and selective excitation of localized plasmon modes for interfacial NPs, a necessary advance for the exploration of liquid-liquid interfaces via surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). According to our calculations, the SERS enhancement factor for Au nanosphere dimers at the water-oil interface can be as high as 10(7)-10(9), implying significant promise for future investigations of interfacial structure and applications of liquid-liquid interfaces towards chemical analysis. PMID:23376970

  19. An Integrated Liquid Cooling System Based on Galinstan Liquid Metal Droplets.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiu Yang; Tang, Shi-Yang; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Ghorbani, Kamran

    2016-01-27

    The continued miniaturization of electronic components demands integrated liquid cooling systems with minimized external connections and fabrication costs that can be implanted very close to localized hot spots. This might be challenging for existing liquid cooling systems because most of them rely on external pumps, connecting tubes, and microfabricated heat sinks. Here, we demonstrate an integrated liquid cooling system by utilizing a small droplet of liquid metal Galinstan, which is placed over the hot spot. Energizing the liquid metal droplet with a square wave signal creates a surface tension gradient across the droplet, which induces Marangoni flow over the surface of droplet. This produces a high flow rate of coolant medium through the cooling channel, enabling a "soft" pump. At the same time, the high thermal conductivity of liquid metal extends the heat transfer surface and facilitates the dissipation of heat, enabling a "soft" heat sink. This facilitates the rapid cooling of localized hot spots, as demonstrated in our experiments. Our technology facilitates customized liquid cooling systems with simple fabrication and assembling processes, with no moving parts that can achieve high flow rates with low power consumption. PMID:26716607

  20. Ecotoxicology of heavy metals: Liquid-phase extraction by nanosorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burakov, A.; Romantsova, I.; Babkin, A.; Neskoromnaya, E.; Kucherova, A.; Kashevich, Z.

    2015-11-01

    The paper considers the problem of extreme toxicity heavy metal compounds dissolved in wastewater and liquid emissions of industrial enterprises to living organisms and environment as a whole. The possibility of increasing extraction efficiency of heavy metal ions by sorption materials was demonstrated. The porous space of the latter was modified by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) during process of the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of carbon on metal oxide catalysts. The increasing of the sorption capacity (10-30%) and the sorption rate of nanomodified activated carbons in comparison with standard materials in the example of absorption of Co2+ and Ni2+ ions from aqueous solutions was proven.

  1. Generation and characterization of gas bubbles in liquid metals

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, S.; Gerbeth, G.; Witke, W.

    1996-06-01

    There is an ongoing research performed in the RCR on local transport phenomena in turbulent liquid metal (LM) duct flows exposed to external magnetic fields. In this context so-called MHD flow phenomena can be observed, which are unknown in usual hydraulic engineering. The field of interest covers also the influence of magnetic fields on the behaviour of liquid metal - gas mixtures. Profound knowledge on these LMMHD two-phase flow plays an important role in a variety of technological applications, in particular, in the design of Liquid-Metal MHD generators or for several metallurgical processes employing gas-stirred reactors. However, the highly empirical nature of two-phase flow analysis gives little hope for the prediction of MHD two-phase flows without extensive experimental data. A summary is given about the authors research activities focussing on two directions: (a) Momentum transfer between gas and liquid metal in a bubbly flow regime to investigate the influence of the external magnetic field on the velocity slip ration S (b) Peculiarities of the MHD turbulence to use small gas bubbles as local tracers in order to study the turbulent mass transfer.

  2. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Fanning, Alan W.

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of cooling medium flow circuits which cooperate to remove and carry heat away from the fuel core upon loss of the normal cooling flow circuit to areas external thereto.

  3. Liquid Metal Magnetohydrodynamics — Astrophysical Relevance and Engineering Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbeth, G.; Grants, I.; Gundrum, T.; Stefani, F.

    Magnetic fields influence the motion of liquid metals, but the melt motion modifies magnetic field distributions as well. Eventually, melt motions are able to create a magnetic field, known as the dynamo effect. We present various laboratory experiments demonstrating this interaction between the flow and magnetic fields.

  4. Neutron Radiography Visualization of Solid Particles in Stirring Liquid Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, M.; Ščepanskis, M.; Jakovičs, A.; Thomsen, K.; Nikoluškins, R.; Vontobel, P.; Beinerts, T.; Bojarevičs, A.; Platacis, E.

    This paper presents the analysis of the first dynamic neutron radiography experiment that visualized motion of solid particles in liquid metal, which was stirred by a system of four counter-rotating magnets. The paper also contains the quantitative results derived from neutron images: the distribution of particle concentration, number of admixed particles and velocities as functions of the magnet rotation speed.

  5. Wideband-Switchable Metamaterial Absorber Using Injected Liquid Metal.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Ki; Lee, Dongju; Lim, Sungjoon

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterial absorbers can provide good solutions for radar-cross-section (RCS) reduction. In spite of their attractive features of thinness, lightness, and low cost, resonant metamaterial absorbers have a drawback of narrow bandwidth. For practical radar applications, wideband absorbers are necessary. In this paper, we propose a wideband-switchable metamaterial absorber using liquid metal. In order to reduce RCS both for X-band and C-band, the switchable Jerusalem cross (JC) resonator is introduced. The JC resonator consists of slotted circular rings, chip resistors, and microfluidic channels. The JC resonator is etched on a flexible printed circuit board (FPCB), and the microfluidic channels are laser-etched on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) material. The proposed absorber can switch the absorption frequency band by injecting a liquid metal alloy into the channels. The performance of the absorber was demonstrated through full-wave simulation and through measurements employing prototypes. The experimental results showed absorption ratios of over 90% from 7.43 GHz to 14.34 GHz, and from 5.62 GHz to 7.3 GHz, with empty channels and liquid metal-filled channels, respectively. Therefore, the absorption band was successfully switched between the C-band (4-8 GHz) and the X-band (8-12 GHz) by injecting liquid metal eutectic gallium indium alloy (EGaIn) into the channels. PMID:27546310

  6. Solubility data are compiled for metals in liquid zinc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, I. G.; Johnson, I.

    1967-01-01

    Available data is compiled on the solubilities of various metals in liquid zinc. The temperature dependence of the solubility data is expressed using the empirical straight line relationship existing between the logarithm of the solubility and the reciprocal of the absolute temperature.

  7. Wideband-Switchable Metamaterial Absorber Using Injected Liquid Metal

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Ki; Lee, Dongju; Lim, Sungjoon

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterial absorbers can provide good solutions for radar-cross-section (RCS) reduction. In spite of their attractive features of thinness, lightness, and low cost, resonant metamaterial absorbers have a drawback of narrow bandwidth. For practical radar applications, wideband absorbers are necessary. In this paper, we propose a wideband-switchable metamaterial absorber using liquid metal. In order to reduce RCS both for X-band and C-band, the switchable Jerusalem cross (JC) resonator is introduced. The JC resonator consists of slotted circular rings, chip resistors, and microfluidic channels. The JC resonator is etched on a flexible printed circuit board (FPCB), and the microfluidic channels are laser-etched on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) material. The proposed absorber can switch the absorption frequency band by injecting a liquid metal alloy into the channels. The performance of the absorber was demonstrated through full-wave simulation and through measurements employing prototypes. The experimental results showed absorption ratios of over 90% from 7.43 GHz to 14.34 GHz, and from 5.62 GHz to 7.3 GHz, with empty channels and liquid metal-filled channels, respectively. Therefore, the absorption band was successfully switched between the C-band (4–8 GHz) and the X-band (8–12 GHz) by injecting liquid metal eutectic gallium indium alloy (EGaIn) into the channels. PMID:27546310

  8. Turbulent convection in liquid metal with and without rotation

    PubMed Central

    King, Eric M.; Aurnou, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic fields of Earth and other planets are generated by turbulent, rotating convection in liquid metal. Liquid metals are peculiar in that they diffuse heat more readily than momentum, quantified by their small Prandtl numbers, . Most analog models of planetary dynamos, however, use moderate fluids, and the systematic influence of reducing is not well understood. We perform rotating Rayleigh–Bénard convection experiments in the liquid metal gallium over a range of nondimensional buoyancy forcing and rotation periods (E). Our primary diagnostic is the efficiency of convective heat transfer . In general, we find that the convective behavior of liquid metal differs substantially from that of moderate fluids, such as water. In particular, a transition between rotationally constrained and weakly rotating turbulent states is identified, and this transition differs substantially from that observed in moderate fluids. This difference, we hypothesize, may explain the different classes of magnetic fields observed on the Gas and Ice Giant planets, whose dynamo regions consist of and fluids, respectively. PMID:23569262

  9. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    PubMed Central

    Geslin, Pierre-Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Moreover, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics. PMID:26582248

  10. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying.

    PubMed

    Geslin, Pierre-Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Moreover, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics. PMID:26582248

  11. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geslin, Pierre-Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-11-01

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Moreover, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.

  12. The emissivities of liquid metals at their fusion temperatures.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnell, D. W.; Treverton, J. A.; Valerga, A. J.; Margrave , J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The emissivities for several transition metals and various other metals and compounds in the liquid state at their fusion temperatures have been determined in this laboratory. The technique used involves electromagnetic levitation-induction heating of the materials in an inert atmosphere. The brightness temperature of the liquid phase of the material is measured as the material is heated through fusion. Given a reliable value of the fusion temperature, which is available for most pure substances, one may readily calculate an emissivity for the liquid phase at the fusion temperature. Even in cases where melting points are poorly known, the brightness temperatures are unique parameters, independent of the temperature scale and measured for a chemically defined system at a fixed point.

  13. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Geslin, Pierre -Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-11-19

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growthmore » of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Furthermore, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.« less

  14. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    SciTech Connect

    Geslin, Pierre -Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-11-19

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Furthermore, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.

  15. Liquid Metal Propellant Feed System for Plasma Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markusic, T. E.

    2004-01-01

    High-power plasma thrusters that utilize molten metallic propellants (e.g., the Lithium Lorentz Force Accelerator) are currently being investigated as a primary propulsion option for in-space nuclear-electric systems. A critical component of the thruster is the propellant feed system, which must reliably and accurately pump liquid metal into the thruster discharge chamber. We present design details and calibration results for a compact liquid metal propellant feed system that contains no moving parts, for use in laboratory testing of plasma thrusters. Feed line pressure is maintained using an MHD flow coupler, and the flow rate is monitored using a simple voltage divider, which is submerged in the propellant reservoir. Results for lithium and gallium propellants show capability to meter propellant at flow rates up to 10 +/- 0.1 mg/s.

  16. Self-Running Liquid Metal Drops that Delaminate Metal Films at Record Velocities.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Mohammed; Sundaresan, Rishi; Dickey, Michael D

    2015-10-21

    This paper describes a new method to spontaneously accelerate droplets of liquid metal (eutectic gallium indium, EGaIn) to extremely fast velocities through a liquid medium and along predefined metallic paths. The droplet wets a thin metal trace (a film ∼100 nm thick, ∼ 1 mm wide) and generates a force that simultaneously delaminates the trace from the substrate (enhanced by spontaneous electrochemical reactions) while accelerating the droplet along the trace. The formation of a surface oxide on EGaIn prevents it from moving, but the use of an acidic medium or application of a reducing bias to the trace continuously removes the oxide skin to enable motion. The trace ultimately provides a sacrificial pathway for the metal and provides a mm-scale mimic to the templates used to guide molecular motors found in biology (e.g., actin filaments). The liquid metal can accelerate along linear, curved and U-shaped traces as well as uphill on surfaces inclined by 30 degrees. The droplets can accelerate through a viscous medium up to 180 mm/sec which is almost double the highest reported speed for self-running liquid metal droplets. The actuation of microscale objects found in nature (e.g., cells, microorganisms) inspires new mechanisms, such as these, to manipulate small objects. Droplets that are metallic may find additional applications in reconfigurable circuits, optics, heat transfer elements, and transient electronic circuits; the paper demonstrates the latter. PMID:26423030

  17. Liquid Metal Infiltration Processing of Metallic Composites: A Critical Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sree Manu, K. M.; Ajay Raag, L.; Rajan, T. P. D.; Gupta, Manoj; Pai, B. C.

    2016-07-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) are one of the advanced materials widely used for aerospace, automotive, defense, and general engineering applications. MMC can be tailored to have superior properties such as enhanced high-temperature performance, high specific strength and stiffness, increased wear resistance, better thermal and mechanical fatigue, and creep resistance than those of unreinforced alloys. To fabricate such composites with ideal properties, the processing technique has to ensure high volume fraction of reinforcement incorporation, uniform distribution of the reinforcement, and acceptable adhesion between the matrix and the reinforcing phase without unwanted interfacial reactions which degrades the mechanical properties. A number of processing techniques such as stir casting/vortex method, powder metallurgy, infiltration, casting etc. have been developed to synthesize MMC employing a variety of alloy and the reinforcement's combinations. Among these, infiltration process is widely used for making MMC with high volume fraction of reinforcements and offers many more advantages compared to other conventional manufacturing processes. The present paper critically reviews the various infiltration techniques used for making the MMC, their process parameters, characteristics, and selected studies carried out worldwide and by authors on the development of metal ceramic composites by squeeze infiltration process.

  18. Corrosion behavior of surface treated steel in liquid sodium negative electrode of liquid metal battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeonghyeon; Shin, Sang Hun; Lee, Jung Ki; Choi, Sungyeol; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-03-01

    While liquid metal batteries are attractive options for grid-scale energy storage applications as they have flexible siting capacities and small footprints, the compatibility between structural materials such as current collectors and negative electrode such as sodium is one of major issues for liquid metal batteries. Non-metallic elements such as carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen in the liquid sodium influence the material behaviors of the cell construction materials in the battery system. In this study, the compatibility of structural materials with sodium is investigated in high temperature liquid sodium, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is used to monitor in-situ the corrosion behavior at the surface of materials in sodium. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coatings of SiC and Si3N4 are applied as protective barriers against dissolution and corrosion on the steel surface. The results show that CVD coating of Si compounds can delay corrosion of steel in high temperature liquid sodium comparing to the result of as-received specimens, while SiC coating is more durable than Si3N4 coating in high temperature liquid sodium.

  19. Mechanical behaviour of the T91 martensitic steel under monotonic and cyclic loadings in liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, J.-B.; Verleene, A.; Serre, I.; Legris, A.

    2004-11-01

    The paper deals with the mechanical properties in liquid metals of the T91 martensitic steel, a candidate material for the window of an accelerating driven system (ADS). Two main questions are examined, the risk of liquid metal embrittlement and the accelerated fatigue damage by a liquid metal. It is found that the transition from ductile to brittle behaviour induced by a liquid metal is possible as a result of a decrease in surface energy caused by the adsorbed liquid metal. The embrittlement can occur only with a hard microstructure and a nucleation of very sharp defects inside the liquid metal. Under cycling straining, the fatigue resistance of the standard T91 steel is decreased by a factor of about 2 in the liquid metal as compared to air. It is proposed that short crack growth is promoted by the liquid metal which weakens the microstructural grain boundary barriers and skip the microcrack coalescence stage.

  20. Plasticity in the Supercooled Liquid Region of Bulk Metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, T G; Wadsworth, J; Liu, C T; Ice, G E

    2000-10-30

    Intensive efforts have been carried out over the past decade to develop means to slow down the phase transformation kinetics during the forming of metallic glasses. As a result of these efforts, some metallic glasses can now be fabricated in bulk forms (BMG) from the liquid state at cooling rates on the order of 1-10 K/s, which is close to that of conventional casting. This enables the production of bulk amorphous alloys with a thickness of {approx}10 mm. While advances in amorphous metallic alloy development have been impressive, they have been made largely through experience [1]. Three main conclusions drawn from this study are: (1) Bulk metallic glasses generally have excellent mechanical formability in the supercooled liquid region. (2) Bulk metallic glasses may not be necessarily behave like a Newtonian fluid (i.e. m=1). The non-Newtonian behavior is associated with glass instability during deformation. (3) Multi-component Bulk metallic glasses can be used as the precursor of a nanocrystalline solid. However, the nanocrystalline solid is not necessarily superplastic. The non-superplastic behavior is caused by the difficult strain accommodation at grain triple junctions.

  1. Design of catalytic substrates for uniform graphene films: from solid-metal to liquid-metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Lifang; Zeng, Mengqi; Zhang, Tao; Fu, Lei

    2015-05-01

    The controllable synthesis of uniform graphene with a specific layer number is crucial for both fundamental research and emerging applications due to the high sensitivity of the various extraordinary physicochemical properties of graphene to its layer numbers. However, the excessive segregation of extra C, the inactivation of the self-limiting of Cu and the superabundant nucleation at grain boundaries and defect sites render that the controllable synthesis of uniform graphene is still a challenge. By the employment of various solid and liquid metals with quasi-atomically smooth surfaces to avoid defects or grain boundaries, a series of studies have been performed and significant improvements have been achieved in the controllable synthesis of uniform graphene films. In this review, the representative strategies of designing catalytic substrates, including polycrystalline metals, single-crystalline metals, binary metal alloys and liquid metals, are highlighted. The future of the controllable synthesis of uniform graphene is also discussed.

  2. Design of catalytic substrates for uniform graphene films: from solid-metal to liquid-metal.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lifang; Zeng, Mengqi; Zhang, Tao; Fu, Lei

    2015-05-28

    The controllable synthesis of uniform graphene with a specific layer number is crucial for both fundamental research and emerging applications due to the high sensitivity of the various extraordinary physicochemical properties of graphene to its layer numbers. However, the excessive segregation of extra C, the inactivation of the self-limiting of Cu and the superabundant nucleation at grain boundaries and defect sites render that the controllable synthesis of uniform graphene is still a challenge. By the employment of various solid and liquid metals with quasi-atomically smooth surfaces to avoid defects or grain boundaries, a series of studies have been performed and significant improvements have been achieved in the controllable synthesis of uniform graphene films. In this review, the representative strategies of designing catalytic substrates, including polycrystalline metals, single-crystalline metals, binary metal alloys and liquid metals, are highlighted. The future of the controllable synthesis of uniform graphene is also discussed. PMID:25927465

  3. First-principles calculation of entropy for liquid metals.

    PubMed

    Desjarlais, Michael P

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate the accurate calculation of entropies and free energies for a variety of liquid metals using an extension of the two-phase thermodynamic (2PT) model based on a decomposition of the velocity autocorrelation function into gas-like (hard sphere) and solid-like (harmonic) subsystems. The hard sphere model for the gas-like component is shown to give systematically high entropies for liquid metals as a direct result of the unphysical Lorentzian high-frequency tail. Using a memory function framework we derive a generally applicable velocity autocorrelation and frequency spectrum for the diffusive component which recovers the low-frequency (long-time) behavior of the hard sphere model while providing for realistic short-time coherence and high-frequency tails to the spectrum. This approach provides a significant increase in the accuracy of the calculated entropies for liquid metals and is compared to ambient pressure data for liquid sodium, aluminum, gallium, tin, and iron. The use of this method for the determination of melt boundaries is demonstrated with a calculation of the high-pressure bcc melt boundary for sodium. With the significantly improved accuracy available with the memory function treatment for softer interatomic potentials, the 2PT model for entropy calculations should find broader application in high energy density science, warm dense matter, planetary science, geophysics, and material science. PMID:24483423

  4. First-principles calculation of entropy for liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjarlais, Michael P.

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate the accurate calculation of entropies and free energies for a variety of liquid metals using an extension of the two-phase thermodynamic (2PT) model based on a decomposition of the velocity autocorrelation function into gas-like (hard sphere) and solid-like (harmonic) subsystems. The hard sphere model for the gas-like component is shown to give systematically high entropies for liquid metals as a direct result of the unphysical Lorentzian high-frequency tail. Using a memory function framework we derive a generally applicable velocity autocorrelation and frequency spectrum for the diffusive component which recovers the low-frequency (long-time) behavior of the hard sphere model while providing for realistic short-time coherence and high-frequency tails to the spectrum. This approach provides a significant increase in the accuracy of the calculated entropies for liquid metals and is compared to ambient pressure data for liquid sodium, aluminum, gallium, tin, and iron. The use of this method for the determination of melt boundaries is demonstrated with a calculation of the high-pressure bcc melt boundary for sodium. With the significantly improved accuracy available with the memory function treatment for softer interatomic potentials, the 2PT model for entropy calculations should find broader application in high energy density science, warm dense matter, planetary science, geophysics, and material science.

  5. Friction and wear of selected metals and of carbons in liquid natural gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisander, D. W.

    1971-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments were conducted with hemispherically tipped (4.76-mm radius) rider specimens in sliding contact with a rotating disk submerged in liquid natural gas (LNG). The program included metal combinations and carbon-metal combinations. These experiments revealed that the metal combinations were not lubricated by the LNG. Carbons had much lower wear in LNG than in liquid hydrogen or in liquid nitrogen. (Wear of carbon in liquid hydrogen was 100 times that in LNG.) The friction coefficients obtained in LNG (0.6 for metal-metal and 0.2 for carbon-metal) are similar to those obtained in liquid hydrogen.

  6. NEW INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF MEASUREMENTS: Liquid-metal ion emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabovich, M. D.

    1983-05-01

    This article describes and discusses the fundamental laws of ion emission from liquid-metal tips in a strong electric field. The widespread views of a liquid-metal emitter as being the smoothed tip of a Taylor cone are examined critically. The instability of a liquid metal in an electric field is discussed, and in line with this, an alternative concept is given of a sharp-tipped electrohydrodynamic emitter. The prospects for applying liquid-metal ion emitters are noted.

  7. First-principles study of liquid and amorphous metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, Panchapakesan

    Computer simulations using state of the art First-Principles ab-initio methods enable us to probe the structural features of novel materials like liquid metals and metallic glass forming alloys, both in their supercooled liquid state as well as in their quenched amorphous forms where available. The ab-initio nature of the calculations enable us to capture the chemical identity realistically at the atomistic level without any free parameters. The results show that even though elemental liquid metals like face-centered cubic (FCC) Cu and body-centered cubic (BCC) Fe (and W) have similar atomic structure at high temperature, which is also similar to jammed packing of hard-spheres, they differ quite appreciably even with slight supercooling. This difference enables us to further supercool Fe and W to a much greater degree than Cu. The origin of this difference between elemental metals with different crystalline ground states can be understood based on concepts of geometric frustration. Further, the role played by atoms of different sizes in controlling the geometric frustration in glass forming alloys has been investigated. Studies of Silicon in its supercooled regime have been made to investigate the existence of a possible structural transition. Attempts to clarify if the structural transition could be a thermodynamic phase transition have been made and changes in electronic properties accompanying this structural change have been studied.

  8. Plasma/Liquid-Metal Interactions During Tokamak Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.; Allain, J.P.; Insepov, Z.; Konkashbaev, I.

    2005-04-15

    One of the critical technological challenges of future tokamak fusion devices is the ability for plasma-facing components to handle both normal and abnormal plasma/surface interaction events that compromise their lifetime and operation of the machine. Under normal operation plasma/surface interactions that are important include: sputtering, particle implantation and recycling, He pumping and ELM (edge localized modes)-induced erosion. In abnormal or off-normal operation: disruptions and vertical displacement events (VDEs) are important. To extend PFC lifetime under these conditions, liquid-metals have been considered as candidate PFCs (Plasma-Facing Components), including: liquid lithium, tin-lithium, gallium and tin.Liquid lithium has been measured to have nonlinear increase of physical sputtering with rise in temperature. Such increase can be a result of exposure to ELM-level particle fluxes. The significant increase in particle flux to the divertor and nearby PFCs can enhance sputtering erosion by an order of magnitude or more. In addition from the standpoint of hydrogen recycling and helium pumping liquid lithium appears to be a good candidate plasma-facing material (PFM). Advanced designs of first wall and divertor systems propose the application of liquid-metals as an alternate PFC to contend with high-heat flux constraints of large-scale tokamak devices. Additional issues include PFC operation under disruptions and long temporal instabilities such as VDEs. A comprehensive two-fluid model is developed to integrate core and SOL (scrape-off layer) parameters during ELMs with PFC surface evolution using the HEIGHTS package. Special emphasis is made on the application of lithium as a candidate plasma-facing liquid-metal.

  9. Plasma/liquid metal interactions during tokamak operation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.; Allain, J. P.; Insepov, Z.; Konkashbaev, I.; Energy Technology

    2005-04-01

    One of the critical technological challenges of future tokamak fusion devices is the ability for plasma-facing components to handle both normal and abnormal plasma/surface interaction events that compromise their lifetime and operation of the machine. Under normal operation plasma/surface interactions that are important include: sputtering, particle implantation and recycling, He pumping and ELM (edge localized modes)-induced erosion. In abnormal or off-normal operation: disruptions and vertical displacement events (VDEs) are important. To extend PFC lifetime under these conditions, liquid-metals have been considered as candidate PFCs (Plasma-Facing Components), including: liquid lithium, tin-lithium, gallium and tin. Liquid lithium has been measured to have nonlinear increase of physical sputtering with rise in temperature. Such increase can be a result of exposure to ELM-level particle fluxes. The significant increase in particle flux to the divertor and nearby PFCs can enhance sputtering erosion by an order of magnitude or more. In addition from the standpoint of hydrogen recycling and helium pumping liquid lithium appears to be a good candidate plasma-facing material (PFM). Advanced designs of first wall and divertor systems propose the application of liquid-metals as an alternate PFC to contend with high-heat flux constraints of large-scale tokamak devices. Additional issues include PFC operation under disruptions and long temporal instabilities such as VDEs. A comprehensive two-fluid model is developed to integrate core and SOL (scrape-off layer) parameters during ELMs with PFC surface evolution using the HEIGHTS package. Special emphasis is made on the application of lithium as a candidate plasma-facing liquid-metal.

  10. Separation of metal species by supported liquid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Danesi, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    The work performed in the Separation Chemistry Group of the Chemistry Division of Argonne National Laboratory on the transport and separation properties of supported liquid membranes (SLM) are reviewed. The models and equations which describe the permeation through SLMs of metal species are described. These models have been tested with various carriers absorbed on flat-sheet and hollow-fiber SLMs by measuring the permeation of several metal species of hydrometallurgical and nuclear interest. An equation for the separation factor of metal species in SLM processes and examples of separations of metal ions are reported. The possibility of bypassing the single stage character of SLM separations by using multilayer composite SLMs, arranged in series, is also analyzed. Finally, the factors which control the stability of SLMs are briefly discussed. 28 references, 27 figures, 6 tables.

  11. Separation of metal species by supported liquid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Danesi, P.R.

    1984-01-01

    The works performed on the transport and separation properties of supported liquid membranes (SLM) are reviewed. The models and equations which describe the permeation through SLMs of metal species are described. These models have been tested with various carriers absorbed on flat-sheet and hollow-fiber SLMs by measuring the permeation of several metal species of hydrometallurgical and nuclear interest. An equation for the separation factor of metal species in SLM processes and examples of separations of metal ions are reported. The possibility of bypassing the single stage character of SLM separations by using multilayer composite SLMs, arranged in series, is also analyzed. Finally, the factors which control the stability of SLMs are briefly discussed.

  12. Liquid-solid joining of bulk metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yongjiang; Xue, Peng; Guo, Shu; Wu, Yang; Cheng, Xiang; Fan, Hongbo; Ning, Zhiliang; Cao, Fuyang; Xing, Dawei; Sun, Jianfei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we successfully welded two bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials, Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 and Zr50.7Cu28Ni9Al12.3 (at. %), using a liquid-solid joining process. An atomic-scale metallurgical bonding between two BMGs can be achieved. The interface has a transition layer of ~50 μm thick. The liquid-solid joining of BMGs can shed more insights on overcoming their size limitation resulting from their limited glass-forming ability and then promoting their applications in structural components. PMID:27471073

  13. Liquid-solid joining of bulk metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongjiang; Xue, Peng; Guo, Shu; Wu, Yang; Cheng, Xiang; Fan, Hongbo; Ning, Zhiliang; Cao, Fuyang; Xing, Dawei; Sun, Jianfei; Liaw, Peter K

    2016-01-01

    Here, we successfully welded two bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials, Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 and Zr50.7Cu28Ni9Al12.3 (at. %), using a liquid-solid joining process. An atomic-scale metallurgical bonding between two BMGs can be achieved. The interface has a transition layer of ~50 μm thick. The liquid-solid joining of BMGs can shed more insights on overcoming their size limitation resulting from their limited glass-forming ability and then promoting their applications in structural components. PMID:27471073

  14. Liquid-solid joining of bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yongjiang; Xue, Peng; Guo, Shu; Wu, Yang; Cheng, Xiang; Fan, Hongbo; Ning, Zhiliang; Cao, Fuyang; Xing, Dawei; Sun, Jianfei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2016-07-01

    Here, we successfully welded two bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials, Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 and Zr50.7Cu28Ni9Al12.3 (at. %), using a liquid-solid joining process. An atomic-scale metallurgical bonding between two BMGs can be achieved. The interface has a transition layer of ~50 μm thick. The liquid-solid joining of BMGs can shed more insights on overcoming their size limitation resulting from their limited glass-forming ability and then promoting their applications in structural components.

  15. PREFACE: 13th International Conference on Liquid and Amorphous Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popel, Pjotr; Gelchinskii, Boris; Sidorov, Valeriy; Son, Leonid; Sabirzjanov, Alexandre

    2007-06-01

    The state of the art in the field of liquid and amorphous metals and alloys is regularly updated through two series of complementary international conferences, the LAM (Liquid and Amorphous Metals) and the RQ (Rapidly Quenched Materials). The first series of the conferences started as LM-1 in 1966 at Brookhaven for the basic understanding of liquid metals. The subsequent LM conferences were held in Tokyo (1972) and Bristol (1976). The conference was renewed in Grenoble (1980) as a LAM conference including amorphous metals and continued in Los Angeles (1983), Garmisch-Partenkirchen (1986), Kyoto (1989), Vienna (1992), Chicago (1995), Dortmund (1998), Yokohama (2001) and Metz (2004). The conferences are mainly devoted to liquid and amorphous metals and alloys. However, communications on some non-metallic systems such as semi conductors, quasicrystals etc, were accepted as well. The conference tradition strongly encourages the participation of junior researchers and graduate students. The 13th conference of the LAM series was organized in Ekaterinburg, Russia, by the Institute of Metallurgy of the Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IMet UB RAS) and Ural State Pedagogical University (USPU) and held on 8-13 July 2007 under the chairmanship of Professors Pjotr Popel (USPU) and Boris Gelchinskii (IMet UB RAS). There were 242 active and about 60 guest participants from 20 countries who attended the conference. There were no parallel sessions and all oral reports were separated into three groups: invited talks (40 min), full-scale (25 min) and brief (15 min) oral reports. The program included 10 sessions, ranging from purely theoretical subjects to technological application of molten and amorphous alloys. The following sessions took place: A) Electronic structure and transport, magnetic properties; B) Phase transitions; C) Structure; D) Atomic dynamics and transport; E) Thermodynamics; F) Modelling, simulation; G) Surface and interface; H) Mechanical properties

  16. Magnetorotational Instability in a Rotating Liquid Metal Annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Hantao Ji; Jeremy Goodman; Akira Kageyama

    2001-03-10

    Although the magnetorotational instability (MRI) has been widely accepted as a powerful accretion mechanism in magnetized accretion disks, it has not been realized in the laboratory. The possibility of studying MRI in a rotating liquid-metal annulus (Couette flow) is explored by local and global stability analysis and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. Stability diagrams are drawn in dimensionless parameters, and also in terms of the angular velocities at the inner and outer cylinders. It is shown that MRI can be triggered in a moderately rapidly rotating table-top apparatus, using easy-to-handle metals such as gallium. Practical issues of this proposed experiment are discussed.

  17. Excess Entropy Scaling Law for Diffusivity in Liquid Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakse, N.; Pasturel, A.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding how dynamic properties depend on the structure and thermodynamics in liquids is a long-standing open problem in condensed matter physics. A very simple approach is based on the Dzugutov contribution developed on model fluids in which a universal (i.e. species-independent) connection relates the pair excess entropy of a liquid to its reduced diffusion coefficient. However its application to “real” liquids still remains uncertain due to the ability of a hard sphere (HS) reference fluid used in reducing parameters to describe complex interactions that occur in these liquids. Here we use ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to calculate both structural and dynamic properties at different temperatures for a wide series of liquid metals including Al, Au, Cu, Li, Ni, Ta, Ti, Zn as well as liquid Si and B. From this analysis, we demonstrate that the Dzugutov scheme can be applied successfully if a self-consistent method to determine the packing fraction of the hard sphere reference fluid is used as well as the Carnahan-Starling approach to express the excess entropy.

  18. Excess Entropy Scaling Law for Diffusivity in Liquid Metals

    PubMed Central

    Jakse, N.; Pasturel, A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how dynamic properties depend on the structure and thermodynamics in liquids is a long-standing open problem in condensed matter physics. A very simple approach is based on the Dzugutov contribution developed on model fluids in which a universal (i.e. species-independent) connection relates the pair excess entropy of a liquid to its reduced diffusion coefficient. However its application to “real” liquids still remains uncertain due to the ability of a hard sphere (HS) reference fluid used in reducing parameters to describe complex interactions that occur in these liquids. Here we use ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to calculate both structural and dynamic properties at different temperatures for a wide series of liquid metals including Al, Au, Cu, Li, Ni, Ta, Ti, Zn as well as liquid Si and B. From this analysis, we demonstrate that the Dzugutov scheme can be applied successfully if a self-consistent method to determine the packing fraction of the hard sphere reference fluid is used as well as the Carnahan-Starling approach to express the excess entropy. PMID:26862002

  19. Excess Entropy Scaling Law for Diffusivity in Liquid Metals.

    PubMed

    Jakse, N; Pasturel, A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how dynamic properties depend on the structure and thermodynamics in liquids is a long-standing open problem in condensed matter physics. A very simple approach is based on the Dzugutov contribution developed on model fluids in which a universal (i.e. species-independent) connection relates the pair excess entropy of a liquid to its reduced diffusion coefficient. However its application to "real" liquids still remains uncertain due to the ability of a hard sphere (HS) reference fluid used in reducing parameters to describe complex interactions that occur in these liquids. Here we use ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to calculate both structural and dynamic properties at different temperatures for a wide series of liquid metals including Al, Au, Cu, Li, Ni, Ta, Ti, Zn as well as liquid Si and B. From this analysis, we demonstrate that the Dzugutov scheme can be applied successfully if a self-consistent method to determine the packing fraction of the hard sphere reference fluid is used as well as the Carnahan-Starling approach to express the excess entropy. PMID:26862002

  20. Harvesting human kinematical energy based on liquid metal magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Dewei; Liu, Jing; Zhou, Yixin

    2009-03-01

    A flexible human energy harvesting generator - Liquid Metal Magnetohydrodynamics Generator (LMMG) is proposed and fabricated. Conceptual experiments were performed to investigate this electricity harvesting principle. Theoretical analysis predicts that the present method is promising at converting otherwise wasted human kinematical energy via a directional selective generation paradigm. In vitro experiment demonstrates output of 1.4 V/3.61 μW by 5.68 g Ga 62In 25Sn 13 liquid metal with a rather high efficiency of more than 45%. The in vivo experiment actuated by a wrist swing during brisk walking with the plastic valve to rectify the flow, verified the potentiality of unidirectional actuation. This concept based on the flexible movement of LMMG is robust to supply electricity which would be important for future wearable micro/nano devices as a voltage constrained charge provider.

  1. A liquid metal flume for free surface magnetohydrodynamic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nornberg, M. D.; Ji, H.; Peterson, J. L.; Rhoads, J. R.

    2008-09-01

    We present an experiment designed to study magnetohydrodynamic effects in free surface channel flow. The wide aspect ratio channel (the width to height ratio is about 15) is completely enclosed in an inert atmosphere to prevent oxidization of the liquid metal. A custom-designed pump reduces entrainment of oxygen, which was found to be a problem with standard centrifugal and gear pumps. Laser Doppler velocimetry experiments characterize velocity profiles of the flow. Various flow constraints mitigate secondary circulation and end effects on the flow. Measurements of the wave propagation characteristics in the liquid metal demonstrate the surfactant effect of surface oxides and the damping of fluctuations by a cross-channel magnetic field.

  2. Surface oxidability of pure liquid metals and alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arato, E.; Bernardi, M.; Giuranno, D.; Ricci, E.

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of the oxygen-liquid metal interaction is a topic of particular technological interest. A deep knowledge of the kinetics and transport mechanisms involved in the oxidation phenomena is necessary: the effect of oxidation reactions taking place in the gas phase and the evaporation of oxides must be considered. This paper aims to review our works in order to provide a systematic analysis of the oxidation of pure metals and determine the most likely to keeping oxygen-free the surface in a binary alloy. In addition, the upgrading of this theoretical approach, here briefly described, is addressed to give a contribution to a better understanding of the evolution of oxidation phenomena close to the solid-liquid-gas interfaces.

  3. Liquid-metal dip seal with pneumatic spring

    DOEpatents

    Poindexter, Allan M.

    1977-01-01

    An improved liquid-metal dip seal for sealing the annulus between rotating plugs in the reactor vessel head of a liquid-metal fast-breeder nuclear reactor has two legs of differing widths communicating under a seal blade; the wide leg is also in communication with cover gas of the reactor and the narrow leg is also in communication with an isolated plug annulus above the seal. The annulus contains inert gas which acts as a pneumatic spring. Upon increasing cover gas pressure which depresses the level in the wide leg and greatly increases the level in the narrow leg, the pneumatic spring is compressed, and resists further level changes, thus preventing radioactive cover gas from bubbling through the seal.

  4. A Liquid Metal Flume for Free Surface Magnetohydrodynamic Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nornberg, M.D.; Ji, H.; Peterson, J.L.; Rhoads, J.R.

    2008-08-27

    We present an experiment designed to study magnetohydrodynamic effects in free-surface channel flow. The wide aspect ratio channel (the width to height ratio is about 15) is completely enclosed in an inert atmosphere to prevent oxidization of the liquid metal. A custom-designed pump reduces entrainment of oxygen, which was found to be a problem with standard centrifugal and gear pumps. Laser Doppler Velocimetry experiments characterize velocity profiles of the flow. Various flow constraints mitigate secondary circulation and end effects on the flow. Measurements of the wave propagation characteristics in the liquid metal demonstrate the surfactant effect of surface oxides and the damping of fluctuations by a cross-channel magnetic field.

  5. Development of insulating coatings for liquid metal blankets

    SciTech Connect

    Malang, S.; Borgstedt, H.U.; Farnum, E.H.; Natesan, K.; Vitkovski, I.V.

    1994-07-01

    It is shown that self-cooled liquid metal blankets are feasible only with electrically insulating coatings at the duct walls. The requirements on the insulation properties are estimated by simple analytical models. Candidate insulator materials are selected based on insulating properties and thermodynamic consideration. Different fabrication technologies for insulating coatings are described. The status of the knowledge on the most crucial feasibility issue, the degradation of the resisivity under irradiation, is reviewed.

  6. Liquid Metal Pump Technologies for Nuclear Surface Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.

    2007-01-01

    Multiple liquid metal pump options are reviewed for the purpose of determining the technologies that are best suited for inclusion in a nuclear reactor thermal simulator intended to test prototypical space nuclear system components. Conduction, induction, and thermoelectric electromagnetic pumps are evaluated based on their performance characteristics and the technical issues associated incorporation into a reactor system. The thermoelectric electromagnetic pump is recommended for inclusion in the present system based on favorable quantitative and qualitative measures relative to the other options under consideration.

  7. Steam generator for liquid metal fast breeder reactor

    DOEpatents

    Gillett, James E.; Garner, Daniel C.; Wineman, Arthur L.; Robey, Robert M.

    1985-01-01

    Improvements in the design of internal components of J-shaped steam generators for liquid metal fast breeder reactors. Complex design improvements have been made to the internals of J-shaped steam generators which improvements are intended to reduce tube vibration, tube jamming, flow problems in the upper portion of the steam generator, manufacturing complexities in tube spacer attachments, thermal stripping potentials and difficulties in the weld fabrication of certain components.

  8. Heat capacities of liquid metals above 1500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margrave, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Heat capacity data are presented for liquid transition metals for temperatures close to the melting point and for 3000, 4000, and 5000 K. The data have been obtained by summarizing the results of levitation, exploding-wire, and drop-calorimetry measurements reported in the literature and by providing analytical estimates where experimental data are not available. The data given here are useful in assigning heat loads and predicting structure survival during extreme temperature excursions caused by nuclear, laser, or particle irradiations.

  9. Liquid Metal Thermal Electric Converter bench test module

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, L.L.; Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.

    1988-04-01

    This report describes the design, fabrication, and test of a Liquid Metal Thermal Electric Converter Bench Test Module. The work presented in this document was conducted as a part of Heat Engine Task of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Thermal Technology Program. The objective of this task is the development and evaluation of heat engine technologies applicable to distributed receiver systems, in particular, dish electric systems.

  10. Thermodynamics of Liquid Alkali Metals and Their Binary Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakor, P. B.; Patel, Minal H.; Gajjar, P. N.; Jani, A. R.

    2009-07-01

    The theoretical investigation of thermodynamic properties like internal energy, entropy, Helmholtz free energy, heat of mixing (ΔE) and entropy of mixing (ΔS) of liquid alkali metals and their binary alloys are reported in the present paper. The effect of concentration on the thermodynamic properties of Ac1Bc2 alloy of the alkali-alkali elements is investigated and reported for the first time using our well established local pseudopotential. To investigate influence of exchange and correlation effects, we have used five different local field correction functions viz; Hartree(H), Taylor(T), Ichimaru and Utsumi(IU), Farid et al. (F) and Sarkar et al. (S). The increase of concentration C2, increases the internal energy and Helmholtz free energy of liquid alloy Ac1Bc2. The behavior of present computation is not showing any abnormality in the outcome and hence confirms the applicability of our model potential in explaining the thermodynamics of liquid binary alloys.

  11. Proposal for universality in the viscosity of metallic liquids

    PubMed Central

    Blodgett, M. E.; Egami, T.; Nussinov, Z.; Kelton, K. F.

    2015-01-01

    The range of magnitude of the liquid viscosity, η, as a function of temperature is one of the most impressive of any physical property, changing by approximately 17 orders of magnitude from its extrapolated value at infinite temperature (ηo) to that at the glass transition temperature, Tg. We present experimental measurements of containerlessly processed metallic liquids that suggest that log(η/ηo) as a function of TA/T is a potentially universal scaled curve. In stark contrast to previous approaches, the scaling requires only two fitting parameters, which are on average predictable. The temperature TA corresponds to the onset of cooperative motion and is strongly correlated with Tg, suggesting that the processes underlying the glass transition first appear in the high temperature liquid. PMID:26350788

  12. Novel thiosalicylate-based ionic liquids for heavy metal extractions.

    PubMed

    Leyma, Raphlin; Platzer, Sonja; Jirsa, Franz; Kandioller, Wolfgang; Krachler, Regina; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2016-08-15

    This study aims to develop novel ammonium and phosphonium ionic liquids (ILs) with thiosalicylate (TS) derivatives as anions and evaluate their extracting efficiencies towards heavy metals in aqueous solutions. Six ILs were synthesized, characterized, and investigated for their extracting efficacies for cadmium, copper, and zinc. Liquid-liquid extractions of Cu, Zn, or Cd with ILs after 1-24h using model solutions (pH 7; 0.1M CaCl2) were assessed using flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (F-AAS). Phosphonium-based ILs trihexyltetradecylphosphonium 2-(propylthio)benzoate [P66614][PTB] and 2-(benzylthio)benzoate [P66614][BTB] showed best extraction efficiency for copper and cadmium, respectively and zinc was extracted to a high degree by [P66614][BTB] exclusively. PMID:27131456

  13. Proposal for universality in the viscosity of metallic liquids.

    PubMed

    Blodgett, M E; Egami, T; Nussinov, Z; Kelton, K F

    2015-01-01

    The range of magnitude of the liquid viscosity, η, as a function of temperature is one of the most impressive of any physical property, changing by approximately 17 orders of magnitude from its extrapolated value at infinite temperature (ηo) to that at the glass transition temperature, Tg. We present experimental measurements of containerlessly processed metallic liquids that suggest that log(η/ηo) as a function of TA/T is a potentially universal scaled curve. In stark contrast to previous approaches, the scaling requires only two fitting parameters, which are on average predictable. The temperature TA corresponds to the onset of cooperative motion and is strongly correlated with Tg, suggesting that the processes underlying the glass transition first appear in the high temperature liquid. PMID:26350788

  14. Proposal for Universality in the Viscosity of Metallic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Blodgett, M. E.; Egami, Takeshi; Nussinov, Z.; Kelton, K. F.

    2015-09-09

    The range of magnitude of the liquid viscosity, η, as a function of temperature is one of the most impressive of any physical property, changing by approximately 17 orders of magnitude from its extrapolated value at infinite temperature (ηo) to that at the glass transition temperature, Tg. We present experimental measurements of containerlessly processed metallic liquids that suggest that log(η/ηo) as a function of TA/T is a potentially universal scaled curve. In stark contrast to previous approaches, the scaling requires only two fitting parameters, which are on average predictable. The temperature TA corresponds to the onset of cooperative motion and is strongly correlated with Tg, suggesting that the processes underlying the glass transition first appear in the high temperature liquid.

  15. Proposal for Universality in the Viscosity of Metallic Liquids

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Blodgett, M. E.; Egami, Takeshi; Nussinov, Z.; Kelton, K. F.

    2015-09-09

    The range of magnitude of the liquid viscosity, η, as a function of temperature is one of the most impressive of any physical property, changing by approximately 17 orders of magnitude from its extrapolated value at infinite temperature (ηo) to that at the glass transition temperature, Tg. We present experimental measurements of containerlessly processed metallic liquids that suggest that log(η/ηo) as a function of TA/T is a potentially universal scaled curve. In stark contrast to previous approaches, the scaling requires only two fitting parameters, which are on average predictable. The temperature TA corresponds to the onset of cooperative motion andmore » is strongly correlated with Tg, suggesting that the processes underlying the glass transition first appear in the high temperature liquid.« less

  16. Theoretical Studies of the Surface Tension of Liquid Metal System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, D. G.; Shih, W. H.

    1985-01-01

    A major goal of this project is to understand the surface tension and other thermophysical properties of liquid metals and alloys from a fundamental viewpoint. The approach is to calculate these quantities by a first principles technique which combines the statistical-mechanical theory of the liquid state with an electronic pseudopotential theory of electrons in metals. The inhomogeneity of the surface is treated using an ionic-density-functional formalism developed with the support of NASA. Of particular interest are the variation of surface tension with temperature and impurity concentration: such variations strongly influence the types of convection which make take place in a low-gravity environment. Some progress has already been achieved in computing the reduction of surface tension due to the presence of low-surface-tension impurities, and the corresponding surface segregation of such impurities. In the coming year, it is planned to concentrate on the surface properties of materials of particular interest to the MSA program: Si, Ga and GaSn alloys. An additional goal is to gain some theoretical understanding of the high temperature thermophysical properties of liquid metals, particularly high melting point materials which have not been studied extensively from a theoretical viewpoint.

  17. Quasiparticles and Fermi liquid behaviour in an organic metal

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, T.; Chainani, A.; Yamamoto, H.M.; Miyazaki, T.; Akimoto, T.; Shimojima, T.; Ishizaka, K.; Watanabe, S.; Chen, C.-T.; Fukaya, A.; Kato, R.; Shin, S.

    2012-01-01

    Many organic metals display exotic properties such as superconductivity, spin-charge separation and so on and have been described as quasi-one-dimensional Luttinger liquids. However, a genuine Fermi liquid behaviour with quasiparticles and Fermi surfaces have not been reported to date for any organic metal. Here, we report the experimental Fermi surface and band structure of an organic metal (BEDT-TTF)3Br(pBIB) obtained using angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, and show its consistency with first-principles band structure calculations. Our results reveal a quasiparticle renormalization at low energy scales (effective mass m*=1.9 me) and ω2 dependence of the imaginary part of the self energy, limited by a kink at ~50 meV arising from coupling to molecular vibrations. The study unambiguously proves that (BEDT-TTF)3Br(pBIB) is a quasi-2D organic Fermi liquid with a Fermi surface consistent with Shubnikov-de Haas results. PMID:23011143

  18. Ultrasound Velocity Measurement in a Liquid Metal Electrode.

    PubMed

    Perez, Adalberto; Kelley, Douglas H

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of electrochemical technologies depend on fluid flow, and often that fluid is opaque. Measuring the flow of an opaque fluid is inherently more difficult than measuring the flow of a transparent fluid, since optical methods are not applicable. Ultrasound can be used to measure the velocity of an opaque fluid, not only at isolated points, but at hundreds or thousands of points arrayed along lines, with good temporal resolution. When applied to a liquid metal electrode, ultrasound velocimetry involves additional challenges: high temperature, chemical activity, and electrical conductivity. Here we describe the experimental apparatus and methods that overcome these challenges and allow the measurement of flow in a liquid metal electrode, as it conducts current, at operating temperature. Temperature is regulated within ±2 °C using a Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controller that powers a custom-built furnace. Chemical activity is managed by choosing vessel materials carefully and enclosing the experimental setup in an argon-filled glovebox. Finally, unintended electrical paths are carefully prevented. An automated system logs control settings and experimental measurements, using hardware trigger signals to synchronize devices. This apparatus and these methods can produce measurements that are impossible with other techniques, and allow optimization and control of electrochemical technologies like liquid metal batteries. PMID:26273726

  19. Nanoparticulate gellants for metallized gelled liquid hydrogen with aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan; Starkovich, John; Adams, Scott

    1996-01-01

    Gelled liquid hydrogen was experimentally formulated using sol-gel technology. As a follow-on to work with cryogenic simulants, hydrogen was gelled with an alkoxide material: BTMSE. Initial results demonstrated that gellants with a specific surface area of 1000 m(exp 2)/g could be repeatably fabricated. Gelled hexane and metallized gelled hexane (with 13.8-wt% Al) were produced. Propellant settling testing was conducted for acceleration levels of 2 to 10 times normal gravity and a minimum gellant percentage was determined for stable gelled hexane and metalized gelled hexane. A cryogenic capillary rheometer was also designed, constructed, and used to determine the viscosity of gelled hydrogen. Small volumes of liquid hydrogen were gelled with a 7- to 8-wt% gellant level. The gelled H2 viscosity was 1.5 to 3.7 times that of liquid hydrogen: 0.048 to 0.116 mPa-s versus 0.03 mPa-s for liquid H2 (at 16 K and approximately 1 atm pressure).

  20. Fungal transformation of metallic lead to pyromorphite in liquid medium.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Young Joon; Hillier, Stephen; Pendlowski, Helen; Gadd, Geoffrey Michael

    2014-10-01

    Many approaches have been proposed to reduce the toxicity of hazardous substances such as lead in the environment. Several techniques using microorganisms rely on metal removal from solution by non-specific biosorption. However, immobilization of metals through formation of biominerals mediated by metabolic processes offers another solution but which has been given limited attention. In this work, we have investigated lead biomineralization by Paecilomyces javanicus, a fungus isolated from a lead-contaminated soil, in a liquid medium. P. javanicus was able to grow in the presence of metallic lead, supplied as lead shot, and secondary lead minerals were deposited on the lead surfaces as revealed by scanning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis and X-ray powder diffraction revealed that pyromorphite was formed in the presence of the fungus, but not in abiotic controls. Our results clearly demonstrate that fungal activities can play an important role in lead biocorrosion and biomineralization in an aqueous environment. These findings are relevant to bioremediation approaches for liquid wastes contaminated with lead, or other metals, and also to the immobilization and biorecovery of rare or valuable elements. They also provide further understanding of microbial roles in environmental lead cycling. PMID:25065784

  1. Experimental determination of the Si isotope fractionation factor between liquid metal and liquid silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hin, Remco C.; Fitoussi, Caroline; Schmidt, Max W.; Bourdon, Bernard

    2014-02-01

    The conditions of core formation and the abundances of the light elements in Earth's core remain debated. Silicon isotope fractionation provides a tool contributing to this subject. We present experimentally determined Si isotope fractionation factors between liquid metal and liquid silicate at 1450 °C and 1750 °C, which allow calibrating the temperature dependence of Si isotope fractionation. Experiments were performed in a centrifuging piston cylinder at 1 GPa, employing both graphite and MgO capsules. Tin was used to lower the melting temperature of the metal alloys for experiments performed at 1450 °C. Tests reveal that neither Sn nor C significantly affects Si isotope fractionation. An alkaline fusion technique was employed to dissolve silicate as well as metal phases prior to ion exchange chemistry and mass spectrometric analysis. The results show that metal is consistently enriched in light isotopes relative to the silicate, yielding average metal-silicate fractionation factors of -1.48±0.08‰ and -1.11±0.14‰ at 1450 °C and 1750 °C, respectively. The temperature dependence of equilibrium Si isotope fractionation between metal and silicate can thus be described as Δ30SiMetal-Silicate=-4.42(±0.05)×106/T2. The Si isotope equilibrium fractionation is thus about 1.7 times smaller than previously proposed on the basis of experiments. A consequence of this smaller fractionation is that the calculated difference between the Si isotope composition of the bulk Earth and that of the bulk silicate Earth generated by core formation is smaller than previously thought. It is therefore increasingly difficult to match the Si isotope composition of the bulk silicate Earth with that of chondrites for metal-silicate equilibration temperatures above ∼2500 K. This suggests that Si isotopes were more sensitive to the early stages of core formation when low oxygen fugacities allowed significant incorporation of Si into metal.

  2. NGNP Process Heat Utilization: Liquid Metal Phase Change Heat Exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Vivek Utgikar; Fred Gunnerson

    2008-09-01

    One key long-standing issue that must be overcome to fully realize the successful growth of nuclear power is to determine other benefits of nuclear energy apart from meeting the electricity demands. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will most likely be producing electricity and heat for the production of hydrogen and/or oil retrieval from oil sands and oil shale to help in our national pursuit of energy independence. For nuclear process heat to be utilized, intermediate heat exchange is required to transfer heat from the NGNP to the hydrogen plant or oil recovery field in the most efficient way possible. Development of nuclear reactor - process heat technology has intensified the interest in liquid metals as heat transfer media because of their ideal transport properties. Liquid metal heat exchangers are not new in practical applications. An important rational for considering liquid metals is the potential convective heat transfer is among the highest known. Thus explains the interest in liquid metals as coolant for intermediate heat exchange from NGNP. For process heat it is desired that, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) transfer heat from the NGNP in the most efficient way possible. The production of electric power at higher efficiency via the Brayton Cycle, and hydrogen production, requires both heat at higher temperatures and high effectiveness compact heat exchangers to transfer heat to either the power or process cycle. Compact heat exchangers maximize the heat transfer surface area per volume of heat exchanger; this has the benefit of reducing heat exchanger size and heat losses. High temperature IHX design requirements are governed in part by the allowable temperature drop between the outlet and inlet of the NGNP. In order to improve the characteristics of heat transfer, liquid metal phase change heat exchangers may be more effective and efficient. This paper explores the overall heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop of the phase change

  3. Liquid Metals: Stretchable, High-k Dielectric Elastomers through Liquid-Metal Inclusions (Adv. Mater. 19/2016).

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Michael D; Fassler, Andrew; Kazem, Navid; Markvicka, Eric J; Mandal, Pratiti; Majidi, Carmel

    2016-05-01

    An all-soft-matter composite consisting of liquid metal microdroplets embedded in a soft elastomer matrix is presented by C. Majidi and co-workers on page 3726. This composite exhibits a high dielectric constant while maintaining exceptional elasticity and compliance. The image shows the composite's microstructure captured by 3D X-ray imaging using a nano-computed tomographic scanner. PMID:27167031

  4. Nanostructured elastomers: From smectic liquid crystals to noble metal nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentz, Daniel M.

    method of the nanoinfusion process has been demonstrated that displays significant enhancements to nanoparticle concentration (volume fraction) in thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers (TPUs), as well as decreased average particle size. This latter method involves the creation of an interpenetrating layer of a functionalized monomer via an infusion-polymerization approach. Said functional group is subsequently used to reduce the metal precursor as it is infused using the same processing step as the above method. TEM images show significantly higher volume fraction of nanoparticles using this method, providing the potential for more drastic improvements in optical and other properties. Another material of interest for synthesis of nanocomposites are liquid crystalline elastomers. Liquid crystalline elastomers have received attention for their unique mechanical properties, which underlie their potential for use in applications such as artificial muscles (due to the electroclinic effect) and constrained vibration damping applications (due to their broad peak in tan delta versus either temperature or frequency). An interesting feature observed in the liquid crystalline elastomers produced in our groups is the formation of a neck in the sample under uniaxial tension. The mechanical response of these smectic main-chain liquid crystalline elastomers (MCLCE) has been characterized at a variety of strain rates and temperatures in order to understand the cause of the observed neck formation. A well-defined yield stress is observed at a critical strain that is essentially independent of strain rate, followed by necking and cold-drawing. Cold-drawing is rarely observed in liquid crystalline elastomers, but we believe that it is observed in MCLCE due to the unfolding of hairpin chains at the start of the polydomain to monodomain transition. A neck forms as the hairpins straighten out, resulting in a decreased cross-sectional area that promotes yielding. Infusions of both metal

  5. Interfacial Transport Phenomena Stability in Liquid-Metal/Water Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Corradini; Anderson, Mark; Bonazza, Riccardo; Cho, D. H.

    2002-12-19

    One concept being considered for steam generation in innovative nuclear reactor applications, involves water coming into direct contact with a circulating molten metal. The vigorous agitation of the two fluids, the direct liquid-liquid contact and the consequent large interfacial area can give rise to large heat transfer coefficients and rapid steam generation. For an optimum design of such direct contact heat exchange and vaporization systems, detailed knowledge is necessary of the various flow regimes, interfacial transport phenomena, heat transfer and operational stability.In order to investigate the characteristics of such a molten metal/water direct contact heat exchanger, a series of experiments were performed in both a 1-D and 2-d experimental facility. The facilities primarily consist of a liquid-metal melt chamber, heated test section, water pumping/injection system, and steam suppression tank (condenser). A real-time high energy X-ray imaging system along with several temperature measurements and flow measurements were developed and utilized to measure the multiphase flow and obtain an empirical database of local as well as overall system parameters. Results have found volumetric void fraction between 0.05-0.2, overall volumetric heat transfer coefficient ranging from 4-20 kW/m3K, evaporation zone lengths on the order of 10cm and local heat transfer coefficients varying between 500-5000 W/m2K depending on the inlet water injection conditions and system pressure. Time-dependent void fraction distribution and generated water-vapor bubble characteristics (i.e. bubble formation rate, bubble rise velocity, and bubble surface area) were measured using an X-ray image analysis technique. These measurements aided in the determination of the volumetric thermal performance as well as well as the first detailed information on local interfacial phenomenon. This information in turn resulted in the first experimental measurements of the local heat transfer coefficient

  6. A handy liquid metal based electroosmotic flow pump.

    PubMed

    Gao, Meng; Gui, Lin

    2014-06-01

    A room temperature liquid metal based electroosmotic flow (EOF) pump has been proposed in this work. This low-cost EOF pump is convenient for both fabrication and integration. It utilizes polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels filled with the liquid-metal as non-contact pump electrodes. The electrode channels are fabricated symmetrically to both sides of the pumping channel, having no contact with the pumping channel. To test the pumping performance of the EOF pump, the mean flow velocities of the fluid (DI water) in the EOF pumps were experimentally measured by tracing the fluorescent microparticles in the flow. To provide guidance for designing a low voltage EOF pump, parametric studies on dimensions of the electrode and pumping channels were performed in this work. According to the experimental results, the pumping speed can reach 5.93 μm s(-1) at a driving voltage of only 1.6 V, when the gap between the electrode and the pumping channel is 20 μm. Injecting a room temperature liquid metal into microchannels can provide a simple, rapid, low-cost but accurately self-aligned way to fabricate microelectrodes for EOF pumps, which is a promising method to achieve the miniaturization and integration of the EOF pump in microfluidic systems. The non-contact liquid electrodes have no influence on the fluid in the pumping channel when pumping, reducing Joule heat generation and preventing gas bubble formation at the surface of electrodes. The pump has great potential to drive a wide range of fluids, such as drug reagents, cell suspensions and biological macromolecule solutions. PMID:24706096

  7. Liquid-liquid phase separation in heavy-metal fluoride glass

    SciTech Connect

    Suscavaye, M.J.; El-Bayoumi, O.H.

    1985-09-01

    The microstructure of heavy-metal fluoride glass of composition 28.5CdF/sub 2/. 5.0LiF.28.5AlF/sub 3/.38PbF/sub 2/ was investigated using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray techniques. Liquid-liquid phase separation was observed in crucible-cooled glass samples. The volume fraction of the dispersed glass phase increased substantially as a result of heating the sample at 309/sup 0/C for 1 h.

  8. Dual-plane ultrasound flow measurements in liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büttner, Lars; Nauber, Richard; Burger, Markus; Räbiger, Dirk; Franke, Sven; Eckert, Sven; Czarske, Jürgen

    2013-05-01

    An ultrasound measurement system for dual-plane, two-component flow velocity measurements especially in opaque liquids is presented. Present-day techniques for measuring local flow structures in opaque liquids disclose considerable drawbacks concerning line-wise measurement of single ultrasound probes. For studying time-varying flow patterns, conventional ultrasound techniques are either limited by time-consuming mechanical traversing or by the sequential operation of single probes. The measurement system presented within this paper employs four transducer arrays with a total of 100 single elements which allows for flow mapping without mechanical traversing. A high frame rate of several 10 Hz has been achieved due to an efficient parallelization scheme using time-division multiplexing realized by a microcontroller-based electronic switching matrix. The functionality and capability of the measurement system are demonstrated on a liquid metal flow at room temperature inside a cube driven by a rotating magnetic field (RMF). For the first time, the primary and the secondary flow have been studied in detail and simultaneously using a configuration with two crossed measurement planes. The experimental data confirm predictions made by numeric simulation. After a sudden switching on of the RMF, inertial oscillations of the secondary flow were observed by means of a time-resolved measurement with a frame rate of 3.4 Hz. The experiments demonstrate that the presented measurement system is able to investigate complex and transient flow structures in opaque liquids. Due to its ability to study the temporal evolution of local flow structures, the measurement system could provide considerable progress for fluid dynamics research, in particular for applications in the food industry or liquid metal technologies.

  9. Surface Phenomena in Liquid Metal Alloys with Application to Development of a Liquid Metal Ion Source of Boron and Arsenic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozack, Michael James

    A liquid metal ion (LMI) source is a low volatility liquid metal film which flows to the apex of a solid needle support structure. Subsequent application of a high electric field deforms the liquid and results in ion emission. Considerable interest has been shown in development of LMI sources capable of producing a variety of technologically important ions. For implantation of silicon, for example, B is the preferred p-type dopant, while As and P are the preferred n type dopants. It has been difficult to construct long-lived ion sources based upon these species because B possesses a high melting point and reacts strongly with most refractory metal supports, while As and P have high vapor pressures. To overcome these difficulties, the material and thermochemical properties of liquid metal alloy surfaces have been studied. A number of successful contact systems have been identified for B, while the development of a LMI source of As has been completely solved. To lower the chemical reactivity of B alloys, it has been necessary to utilize nonmetallic support structures. In these cases wettability of B-based alloys is governed by surface segregation of low-level, low surface tension impurities within the alloys which inhibit reaction between the alloy and substrate. Coating the substrate with a material having a high affinity to carbon (e.g., B or Si) acts to tie up the segregated material and promote wetting. Suppressing the high vapor pressure of As has been accomplished by constructing a liquid compound with a low (i.e., strongly negative) Gibbs free energy of formation. For a given arsenic compound, AsX(,n)(1), where X is a low volatility element, the equilibrium condition between vapor and liquid is AsX(,n)(1) = n X(g) + As(g). The equilibrium constant for this reaction is K = P(As)P('n)(X) and the Gibbs free energy is dG = -RT ln K. When dG is strongly negative, K and P(As) will typically be smaller than the case of an ideal solution (no compound formation) of the

  10. Study of liquid metals as a basis for nanoscience.

    PubMed

    Yao, Makoto; Ohmasa, Yoshinori

    2008-03-19

    There are two ways to proceed with nanoscience: so-called top-down and bottom-up methods. Usually, the former methods are thought of as in the province of physicists and the latter in that of chemists. However, this is not entirely true because the physics of disordered matter, especially liquid metals, is well-developed bottom-up science and it has indeed provided nanoscience with basic ideas and theoretical tools such as ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Here we wish to present experimental studies on such phenomena that originate from quantum mechanical properties and subsequently lead to classical non-equilibrium processes: among these are slow dynamics due to metal-nonmetal transitions in liquids, and wetting and dewetting transitions of liquid semiconductors. Since all these phenomena are related to a spatiotemporal range far wider than that treated by the present ab initio MD simulations, it is desirable that new progress in theoretical physics be stimulated, resulting in further developments in nanoscience. PMID:21694194

  11. Calcium-Antimony Alloys as Electrodes for Liquid Metal Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Ouchi, T; Kim, H; Ning, XH; Sadoway, DR

    2014-08-08

    The performance of a calcium-antimony (Ca-Sb) alloy serving as the positive electrode in a Ca vertical bar vertical bar Sb liquid metal battery was investigated in an electrochemical cell, Ca(in Bi) vertical bar LiCl-NaCl-CaCl2 vertical bar Ca(in Sb). The equilibrium potential of the Ca-Sb electrode was found to lie on the interval, 1.2-0.95 V versus Ca, in good agreement with electromotive force (emf) measurements in the literature. During both alloying and dealloying of Ca at the Sb electrode, the charge transfer and mass transport at the interface are facile enough that the electrode potential varies linearly from 0.95 to 0.75 V vs Ca(s) as current density varies from 50 to 500 mA cm(-2). The discharge capacity of the Ca vertical bar vertical bar Sb cells increases as the operating temperature increases due to the higher solubility and diffusivity of Ca in Sb. The cell was successfully cycled with high coulombic efficiency (similar to 100%) and small fade rate (<0.01% cycle(-1)). These data combined with the favorable costs of these metals and salts make the Ca vertical bar vertical bar Sb liquid metal battery attractive for grid-scale energy storage. (C) The Author(s) 2014. Published by ECS. All rights reserved.

  12. Numerical Modeling of Inclusion Behavior in Liquid Metal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellot, Jean-Pierre; Descotes, Vincent; Jardy, Alain

    2013-09-01

    Thermomechanical performance of metallic alloys is directly related to the metal cleanliness that has always been a challenge for metallurgists. During liquid metal processing, particles can grow or decrease in size either by mass transfer with the liquid phase or by agglomeration/fragmentation mechanisms. As a function of numerical density of inclusions and of the hydrodynamics of the reactor, different numerical modeling approaches are proposed; in the case of an isolated particle, the Lagrangian technique coupled with a dissolution model is applied, whereas in the opposite case of large inclusion phase concentration, the population balance equation must be solved. Three examples of numerical modeling studies achieved at Institut Jean Lamour are discussed. They illustrate the application of the Lagrangian technique (for isolated exogenous inclusion in titanium bath) and the Eulerian technique without or with the aggregation process: for precipitation and growing of inclusions at the solidification front of a Maraging steel, and for endogenous inclusions in the molten steel bath of a gas-stirred ladle, respectively.

  13. Impinging jet separators for liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    In many liquid metal MHD power, cycles, it is necessary to separate the phases of a high-speed liquid-gas flow. The usual method is to impinge the jet at a glancing angle against a solid surface. These surface separators achieve good separation of the two phases at a cost of a large velocity loss due to friction at the separator surface. This report deals with attempts to greatly reduce the friction loss by impinging two jets against each other. In the crude impinging jet separators tested to date, friction losses were greatly reduced, but the separation of the two phases was found to be much poorer than that achievable with surface separators. Analyses are presented which show many lines of attack (mainly changes in separator geometry) which should yield much better separation for impinging jet separators).

  14. Breakdown voltage of metal-oxide resistors in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, L. F.; Gollapinni, S.; James, C. C.; Jones, B. J.P.; Jostlein, H.; Lockwitz, S.; Naples, D.; Raaf, J. L.; Rameika, R.; Schukraft, A.; Strauss, T.; Weber, M. S.; Wolbers, S. A.

    2014-11-07

    We characterized a sample of metal-oxide resistors and measured their breakdown voltage in liquid argon by applying high voltage (HV) pulses over a 3 second period. This test mimics the situation in a HV-divider chain when a breakdown occurs and the voltage across resistors rapidly rise from the static value to much higher values. All resistors had higher breakdown voltages in liquid argon than their vendor ratings in air at room temperature. Failure modes range from full destruction to coating damage. In cases where breakdown was not catastrophic, subsequent breakdown voltages were lower in subsequent measuring runs. One resistor type withstands 131 kV pulses, the limit of the test setup.

  15. ‘Crystal Genes’ in Metallic Liquids and Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yang; Zhang, Feng; Ye, Zhuo; Zhang, Yue; Fang, Xiaowei; Ding, Zejun; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Mendelev, Mikhail I.; Ott, Ryan T.; Kramer, Matthew J.; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2016-03-01

    We analyze the underlying structural order that transcends liquid, glass and crystalline states in metallic systems. A genetic algorithm is applied to search for the most common energetically favorable packing motifs in crystalline structures. These motifs are in turn compared to the observed packing motifs in the actual liquid or glass structures using a cluster-alignment method. Using this method, we have revealed the nature of the short-range order in Cu64Zr36 glasses. More importantly, we identified a novel structural order in the Al90Sm10 system. In addition, our approach brings new insight into understanding the origin of vitrification and describing mesoscopic order-disorder transitions in condensed matter systems.

  16. Zn Penetration in Liquid Metal Embrittled TWIP Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Heeseung; Cho, Lawrence; Lee, Changwook; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-06-01

    Hot-dip Zn-coated high manganese twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel is sensitive to liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The microstructure of Zn-coated TWIP steel after brittle fracture at 1123 K (850 °C) was investigated. The grain boundaries at the tip of the Zn penetration were analyzed by electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Γ-(Fe,Mn)3Zn10 was found at the tip of the Zn penetration in the TWIP steel, implying that liquid Fe- and Mn-saturated Zn-rich alloy had percolated along the grain boundaries to the tip of the Zn penetration. Evidence for extensive Zn grain boundary diffusion ahead of the Zn-rich alloy percolation path was also observed. Both the Stoloff-Johnson-Westwood-Kamdar model and the Krishtal-Gordon-An model for LME crack formation are compatible with the present in-depth microanalysis of the Zn penetration.

  17. Nanostructure operations by means of the liquid metal ion sourcesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasanov, I. S.; Gurbanov, I. I.

    2012-02-01

    Characteristics of a disperse phase of liquid metal ion source on the basis of various working substances are investigated. It is revealed that generation of the charged particles occurs in the threshold image and is simultaneously accompanied by excitation of capillary instability on a surface of the emitter. The majority of particles has the size about 2 nm (Sn) and a specific charge of 5 × 104 C/kg. If the working liquid possesses high viscosity (Ni), generation of nanodroplets does not occur. Gold nanoparticles are used for deposition on a surface of quartz cantilevers with the purpose of increase in sensitivity of biosensors and on an external surface of carbon nanotubes for creation pressure sensors. By means of an ion source nanostructures can be etched on a flat surface of conductive materials without difficult ion optics.

  18. ‘Crystal Genes’ in Metallic Liquids and Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yang; Zhang, Feng; Ye, Zhuo; Zhang, Yue; Fang, Xiaowei; Ding, Zejun; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Mendelev, Mikhail I.; Ott, Ryan T.; Kramer, Matthew J.; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the underlying structural order that transcends liquid, glass and crystalline states in metallic systems. A genetic algorithm is applied to search for the most common energetically favorable packing motifs in crystalline structures. These motifs are in turn compared to the observed packing motifs in the actual liquid or glass structures using a cluster-alignment method. Using this method, we have revealed the nature of the short-range order in Cu64Zr36 glasses. More importantly, we identified a novel structural order in the Al90Sm10 system. In addition, our approach brings new insight into understanding the origin of vitrification and describing mesoscopic order-disorder transitions in condensed matter systems. PMID:27030071

  19. Zn Penetration in Liquid Metal Embrittled TWIP Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Heeseung; Cho, Lawrence; Lee, Changwook; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-04-01

    Hot-dip Zn-coated high manganese twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel is sensitive to liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The microstructure of Zn-coated TWIP steel after brittle fracture at 1123 K (850 °C) was investigated. The grain boundaries at the tip of the Zn penetration were analyzed by electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Γ-(Fe,Mn)3Zn10 was found at the tip of the Zn penetration in the TWIP steel, implying that liquid Fe- and Mn-saturated Zn-rich alloy had percolated along the grain boundaries to the tip of the Zn penetration. Evidence for extensive Zn grain boundary diffusion ahead of the Zn-rich alloy percolation path was also observed. Both the Stoloff-Johnson-Westwood-Kamdar model and the Krishtal-Gordon-An model for LME crack formation are compatible with the present in-depth microanalysis of the Zn penetration.

  20. Directed liquid phase assembly of highly ordered metallic nanoparticle arrays

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Yueying; Dong, Nanyi; Fu, Shaofang; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Kondic, Lou; Vincenti, Maria A.; de Ceglia, Domenico; Rack, Philip D.

    2014-04-01

    Directed assembly of nanomaterials is a promising route for the synthesis of advanced materials and devices. We demonstrate the directed-assembly of highly ordered two-dimensional arrays of hierarchical nanostructures with tunable size, spacing and composition. The directed assembly is achieved on lithographically patterned metal films that are subsequently pulse-laser melted; during the brief liquid lifetime, the pattened nanostructures assemble into highly ordered primary and secondary nanoparticles, with sizes below that which was originally patterned. Complementary fluid-dynamics simulations emulate the resultant patterns and show how the competition of capillary forces and liquid metal–solid substrate interaction potential drives the directed assembly. Lastly, asmore » an example of the enhanced functionality, a full-wave electromagnetic analysis has been performed to identify the nature of the supported plasmonic resonances.« less

  1. Directed liquid phase assembly of highly ordered metallic nanoparticle arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yueying; Dong, Nanyi; Fu, Shaofang; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Kondic, Lou; Vincenti, Maria A.; de Ceglia, Domenico; Rack, Philip D.

    2014-04-01

    Directed assembly of nanomaterials is a promising route for the synthesis of advanced materials and devices. We demonstrate the directed-assembly of highly ordered two-dimensional arrays of hierarchical nanostructures with tunable size, spacing and composition. The directed assembly is achieved on lithographically patterned metal films that are subsequently pulse-laser melted; during the brief liquid lifetime, the pattened nanostructures assemble into highly ordered primary and secondary nanoparticles, with sizes below that which was originally patterned. Complementary fluid-dynamics simulations emulate the resultant patterns and show how the competition of capillary forces and liquid metal–solid substrate interaction potential drives the directed assembly. Lastly, as an example of the enhanced functionality, a full-wave electromagnetic analysis has been performed to identify the nature of the supported plasmonic resonances.

  2. ‘Crystal Genes’ in Metallic Liquids and Glasses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, Yang; Zhang, Feng; Ye, Zhuo; Zhang, Yue; Fang, Xiaowei; Ding, Zejun; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Mendelev, Mikhail I.; Ott, Ryan T.; Kramer, Matthew J.; et al

    2016-03-31

    We analyze the underlying structural order that transcends liquid, glass and crystalline states in metallic systems. A genetic algorithm is applied to search for the most common energetically favorable packing motifs in crystalline structures. These motifs are in turn compared to the observed packing motifs in the actual liquid or glass structures using a cluster-alignment method. Using this method, we have revealed the nature of the short-range order in Cu64Zr36 glasses. More importantly, we identified a novel structural order in the Al90Sm10 system. In addition, our approach brings new insight into understanding the origin of vitrification and describing mesoscopic order-disordermore » transitions in condensed matter systems.« less

  3. Metal ion adsorption at the ionic liquid-mica interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Samila; Elbourne, Aaron; Warr, Gregory G.; Atkin, Rob

    2015-12-01

    Mica has been employed in many studies of ionic liquid (IL) interfaces on account of its atomic smoothness and well defined surface properties. However, until now it has been unclear whether ions dissolved in ILs can compete with the IL cation and adsorb to mica charge sites. In this work amplitude modulated atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) has been used to probe metal ion adsorption at the interface of mica with propylammonium nitrate (PAN), a room temperature IL. Lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium nitrate salts were added to PAN at a concentration of ~60 mM. Aluminum nitrate was also investigated, but only at 5 mM because its solubility in PAN is much lower. The AM-AFM images obtained when the metal ions were present are strikingly different to that of pure PAN, indicating that the ions compete effectively with the propylammonium cation and adsorb to negatively charged sites on the mica surface despite their much lower concentration. This is a consequence of electrostatic attractions between the mica charge sites and the metal ions being significantly stronger than for the propylammonium cation; compared to the metal ions the propylammonium charged group is relatively constrained sterically. A distinct honeycomb pattern is noted for the PAN + Al3+ system, less obviously for the divalent ions and not at all for monovalent ions. This difference is attributed to the strength of electrostatic interactions between metal ions and mica charge sites increasing with the ion charge, which means that divalent and (particularly) trivalent ions are located more precisely above the charged sites of the mica lattice. The images obtained allow important distinctions between metal ion adsorption at mica-water and mica-PAN interfaces to be made.Mica has been employed in many studies of ionic liquid (IL) interfaces on account of its atomic smoothness and well defined surface properties. However, until now it has been unclear whether ions dissolved in ILs can compete

  4. Present status of liquid metal research for a fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabarés, Francisco L.

    2016-01-01

    Although the use of solid materials as targets of divertor plasmas in magnetic fusion research is accepted as the standard solution for the very challenging issue of power and particle handling in a fusion reactor, a generalized feeling that the present options chosen for ITER will not represent the best choice for a reactor is growing up. The problems found for tungsten, the present selection for the divertor target of ITER, in laboratory tests and in hot plasma fusion devices suggest so. Even in the absence of the strong neutron irradiation expected in a reactor, issues like surface melting, droplet ejection, surface cracking, dust generation, etc., call for alternative solutions in a long pulse, high efficient fusion energy-producing continuous machine. Fortunately enough, decades of research on plasma facing materials based on liquid metals (LMs) have produced a wealth of appealing ideas that could find practical application in the route to the realization of a commercial fusion power plant. The options presently available, although in a different degree of maturity, range from full coverage of the inner wall of the device with liquid metals, so that power and particle exhaust together with neutron shielding could be provided, to more conservative combinations of liquid metal films and conventional solid targets basically representing a sort of high performance, evaporative coating for the alleviation of the surface degradation issues found so far. In this work, an updated review of worldwide activities on LM research is presented, together with some open issues still remaining and some proposals based on simple physical considerations leading to the optimization of the most conservative alternatives.

  5. Optical properties and emissivities of liquid metals and alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, Shankar; Nordine, Paul C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the results from our on-going program to investigate the optical properties of liquid metals and alloys at elevated temperatures. Ellipsometric and polarimetric techniques have been used to investigate the optical properties of materials in the 1000 - 3000 K temperature range and in the 0.3 - 0.1 mu m wavelength range. The ellipsometric and polarimetric techniques are described and the characteristics of the instruments are presented. The measurements are conducted by reflecting a polarized laser beam from an electromagnetically levitated liquid metal or alloy specimen. A Rotating Analyzer Ellipsometer (RAE) or a four-detector Division-of-Amplitude Photopolarimeter (DOAP) is used to determine the polarimetric properties of the light reflected at an angle of incidence of approximately 68 deg. Optical properties of the specimen which are calculated from these measurements include the index of refraction, extinction coefficient, normal spectral emissivity, and spectral hemispherical emissivity. These properties have been determined at various wavelengths and temperatures for liquid Ag, Al, Au, Cu, Nb, Ni, Pd, Pt, Si, Ti, Ti-Al alloys, U, and Zr. We also describe new experiments using pulsed-dye laser spectroscopic ellipsometry for studies of the wavelength dependence of the emissivities and optical properties of materials at high temperature. Preliminary results are given for liquid Al. The application of four-detector polarimetry for rapid determination of surface emissivity and true temperature is also described. Characteristics of these devices are presented. An example of the accuracy of this instrument in measurements of the melting point of zirconium is illustrated.

  6. Thermal Control Using Liquid-Metal Bridge Switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsa, Amir H.; Olles, Joseph; Tilger, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    A short term effort (3-months) was undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility of a novel method to locally control the heat transfer rate and demonstrate the potential to achieve a turndown ratio of approximately 10:1. The technology had to be demonstrated to be at a TRL of 2-3, with a plan to advance it to a TRL 5-6. Here, we show that the concept recently developed in our laboratory, namely the pinned-contact, double droplet switch made by overfilling a hole drilled in a suitable substrate can be implemented with a low-melting temperature metal. When toggled near a second substrate, a liquid bridge can be reversibly connected or disconnected, on demand. We have shown experimentally that liquid-metal bridge switches can be made from gallium with a suitable choice of substrate materials, activation strategies, and control techniques. Individual as well as arrays of gallium bridge switches were shown to be feasible and can be robustly controlled. The very short response time of the bridge connection and disconnection (on the order of 1 millisecond) provides for utility in a wide range of applications. The liquid bridge switches may be controlled actively or passively. We have shown through computations and analysis that liquid bridge switches provide locally large turndown ratios (on the order of 103:1), so a relatively sparse packing of them would be needed to obtain the desired turndown ratio of 10:1. For the laboratory demonstrations, pressure activation was utilized. Simple designs for a passive control strategy are presented which are highly attractive for several reasons, including i) large turndown ratio, ii) no solid-moving parts, and iii) stable operation. Finally, we note that passive systems do not require any electronics for their control. This along with the relatively small molecular weight of candidate materials for the system, makes for a robust design outside of Earth?s magnetic field, where spacecraft are subject to significant radiation bombardment.

  7. The stress analysis of a heavy liquid metal pump impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X. D.; Li, X. L.; Zhu, Z. Q.; Li, C. J.; Gao, S.

    2016-05-01

    Lead-based coolant reactor is a promising Generation-IV reactor. In the lead-based coolant reactor, the coolant is liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic. The main pump in the reactor is a very important device. It supplies force for the coolant circulation. The liquid metal has a very large density which is about ten times of the water. Also, the viscosity of the coolant is small which is about one sixth of the water. When the pump transports heavy liquid, the blade loading is heavy. The large force can cause the failure of the blade when the fatigue stress exceeds the allowable stress. The impeller fraction is a very serious accident which is strictly prohibited in the nuclear reactor. In this paper, the numerical method is used to simulate the flow field of a heavy liquid metal pump. The SST k-w turbulent model is used in the calculation to get a more precise flow structure. The hydraulic force is obtained with the one way fluid solid coupling. The maximum stress in the impeller is analyzed. The stress in the liquid metal pump is compared with that in the water pump. The calculation results show that the maximum stress of the impeller blade increases with increase of flow rate. In the design of the impeller blade thickness, the impeller strength in large operating condition should be considered. The maximum stress of the impeller blade located in the middle and near the hub of the leading edge. In this position, the blade is easy to fracture. The maximum deformation of the impeller firstly increase with increase of flow rate and then decrease with increase of flow rate. The maximum deformation exists in the middle of the leading edge when in small flow rate and in the out radius of the impeller when in large flow rate. Comparing the stress of the impeller when transporting water and LBE, the maximum stress is almost one-tenth of that in the LBE impeller which is the same ratio of the density. The static stress in different medium is proportional to the pressure

  8. Indirect passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Boardman, Charles E.

    1990-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

  9. Hydrogen permeation resistant layers for liquid metal reactors

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, J.C.

    1980-03-01

    Reviewing the literature in the tritium diffusion field one can readily see a wide divergence in results for both the response of permeation rate to pressure, and the effect of oxide layers on total permeation rates. The basic mechanism of protective oxide layers is discussed. Two coatings which are less hydrogen permeable than the best naturally occurring oxide are described. The work described is part of an HEDL-ANL cooperative research program on Tritium Permeation in Liquid Metal Cooled Reactors. This includes permeation work on hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium with the hydrogen-deuterium research leading to the developments presented.

  10. A self-correcting procedure for computational liquid metal magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araseki, Hideo; Kotake, Shoji

    1994-02-01

    This paper describes a new application of the self-correcting procedure to computational liquid metal magnetohydrodynamics. In this procedure, the conservation law of the electric current density incorporated in a Poisson equation for the scalar potential plays an important role of correcting this potential. This role is similar to that of the conservation law of mass in a Poisson equation for the pressure. Some numerical results show that the proposed self-correcting procedure can provide a more accurate numerical solution of the electric current density than the existing solution procedure.

  11. Passive cooling safety system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Boardman, Charles E.; Hui, Marvin M.; Berglund, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

  12. Liquid-Metal Pump Technologies for Nuclear Surface Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, K. A.

    2007-01-01

    Multiple liquid-metal pump options are reviewed for the purpose of determining the technologies that are best suited for inclusion in a nuclear reactor thermal simulator intended to test prototypical space nuclear system components. Conduction, induction, and thermoelectric electromagnetic pumps are evaluated based on their performance characteristics and the technical issues associated with incorporation into a reactor system. The thermoelectric pump is recommended for inclusion in the planned system at NASA MSFC based on its relative simplicity, low power supply mass penalty, flight heritage, and the promise of increased pump efficiency over earlier flight pump designs through the use of skutterudite thermoelectric elements.

  13. Liquid-metal atomization for hot working preforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, N. J.; Pelloux, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Rapid quenching of a liquid metal by atomization or splat cooling overcomes the major limitation of most solidification processes, namely, the segregation of alloying elements, impurities, and constituent phases. The cooling rates of different atomizing processes are related to the dendrite arm spacings and to the microstructure of the atomized powders. The increased solubility limits and the formation of metastable compounds in splat-cooled alloys are discussed. Consolidation of the powders by hot isostatic compaction, hot extrusion, or hot forging and rolling processes yields billets with properties equivalent to or better than those of the wrought alloys. The application of this powder processing technology to high-performance alloys is reviewed.

  14. Liquid metal thermal-electric converter electrode development

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, J.I.

    1988-02-01

    This report describes work done in support of distributed receiver technology development. Dish-electric systems are being pursued in an effort to circumvent the need for energy transport by providing for heat-to-electricity energy conversion by individual heat engines at the focal point of parabolic dish concentrators. The Liquid Metal Thermal-Electric Converter is an engine that can convert thermal energy to electricity without the need for moving parts. The report documents the results of contracted work in the development of a long-lifetime, high-performance electrode for LMTEC, including the materials prepared for it. 17 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Solid Metal-Liquid Metal Partitioning of Pt, Re, and Os: The Effect of Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chabot, N. L.; Campbell, A. J.; Humayun, M.

    2004-01-01

    If the measured Os isotopic ratios are a signature from the Earth's outer core, understanding them is a unique opportunity to understand more about the Earth's core. The distribution of elements between the Earth's solid inner core and the liquid outer core will depend on their solid metal-liquid metal partition coefficients (D). Solid metal-liquid metal partitioning data are loosely consistent with the needed fractionations between Re-Os and Pt-Os to account for the Os isotopic signature; D(Os) is greater than both D(Re) and D(Pt), and the magnitude of the partition coefficients are similar to those needed [e.g. 7, 8]. The pressure in the core, the composition of the core, and the crystal structure of the solid Fe alloy in the inner core may influence the specific values of the partition coefficients. It may thus be possible to use these sensitivities of the partition coefficients to gain insight into the conditions within the Earth's core. In this abstract, we focus on the compositional influence of C, a potential component of the light element in the Earth's core [9], on the partitioning behaviors of Pt, Re, and Os.

  16. Magnesium-Antimony Liquid Metal Battery for Stationary Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Bradwell, DJ; Kim, H; Sirk, AHC; Sadoway, DR

    2012-02-01

    Batteries are an attractive option for grid: scale energy storage applications because of their small footprint and flexible siting. A high-temperature (700 degrees C) magnesium antimony (MgllSb) liquid metal battery comprising a negative electrode of Mg, a molten salt electrolyte (MgCL2-KCl-NaCl), and a positive electrode of Sb is proposed and characterized. Because of the immiscibility of the contiguous salt and metal phases, they stratify by density into three distinct layers. Cells were cycled at rates ranging from 50 to 200 mA/cm(2) and demonstrated up to 69% DC-DC energy efficiency. The self-segregating nature of the battery components and the use Of low-cost materials results in a promising technology for stationary energy storage applications.

  17. Metal ion adsorption at the ionic liquid-mica interface.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Samila; Elbourne, Aaron; Warr, Gregory G; Atkin, Rob

    2016-01-14

    Mica has been employed in many studies of ionic liquid (IL) interfaces on account of its atomic smoothness and well defined surface properties. However, until now it has been unclear whether ions dissolved in ILs can compete with the IL cation and adsorb to mica charge sites. In this work amplitude modulated atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) has been used to probe metal ion adsorption at the interface of mica with propylammonium nitrate (PAN), a room temperature IL. Lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium nitrate salts were added to PAN at a concentration of ∼60 mM. Aluminum nitrate was also investigated, but only at 5 mM because its solubility in PAN is much lower. The AM-AFM images obtained when the metal ions were present are strikingly different to that of pure PAN, indicating that the ions compete effectively with the propylammonium cation and adsorb to negatively charged sites on the mica surface despite their much lower concentration. This is a consequence of electrostatic attractions between the mica charge sites and the metal ions being significantly stronger than for the propylammonium cation; compared to the metal ions the propylammonium charged group is relatively constrained sterically. A distinct honeycomb pattern is noted for the PAN + Al(3+) system, less obviously for the divalent ions and not at all for monovalent ions. This difference is attributed to the strength of electrostatic interactions between metal ions and mica charge sites increasing with the ion charge, which means that divalent and (particularly) trivalent ions are located more precisely above the charged sites of the mica lattice. The images obtained allow important distinctions between metal ion adsorption at mica-water and mica-PAN interfaces to be made. PMID:26661934

  18. High Temperature Concentrated Solar Power Using Liquid Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Asegun

    One of the most attractive ways to try and reduce the cost of concentrated solar power (CSP) is to increase the system efficiency and the biggest loss in the system occurs in the conversion of heat to electricity via heat engine. Heat engines that utilize turbomachinery currently operate near their thermodynamic limitations and thus one of the only ways to improve heat engine efficiency is to increase the turbine inlet temperature. Significant effort is being devoted to the development of supercritical CO2 heat engines, but the most efficient heat engines are combined cycles, which reach efficiencies as high as 60%. However, such heat engines require turbine inlet temperatures ~1300-1500C, which is far beyond what is currently feasible with the state of the art molten salt infrastructure. In working towards the development of a system that can operate in the 1300-1500C temperature range, the most significant challenges lie in the materials and forming functional and reliable components out of new materials. One of the most attractive options from a cost and heat transfer perspective is to use liquid metals, such as tin and aluminum-silicon alloys along with a ceramic based infrastructure. This talk will overview ongoing efforts in the Atomistic Simulation and Energy (ASE) research group at Georgia Tech to develop prototype components such as an efficient high temperature cavity receiver, pumps and valves that can make a liquid metal based CSP infrastructure realizable.

  19. The Surface Structure of Liquid Metals and Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pershan, Peter

    2004-03-01

    X-ray scattering of the surface structure of liquid metals and liquid metal alloys will be discussed. We will report observations of the theoretically predicted surface induced atomic layering; however, quantitative interpretation of the local surface structure factor requires that the Debye-Waller effect associated with thermal capillary waves be accounted for. We will explain how that is done. Results that will be described for surfaces that exhibit simple layering , such as Ga, In and K, will be contrasted with anomalous layering that is observed for Sn. In addition data on the surfaces of alloys such as GaBi, InBi, AuGe and AuSi will be presented This work is supported by DE-FG02-88-ER45379 and DMR-0124936. Experiments at BNL and CMC-Cat at the APS are supported by DE-AC02-98CH10886. Experiments at ChemMatCars at the APS are supported by NSF/DOE grant CHE0087817.

  20. Liquid metal-to-gas leak-detection instruments. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Matlin, E.; Witherspoon, J.E.; Johnson, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    It is desirable for liquid-metal-cooled reactors that small liquid metal-to-gas leaks be reliably detected. Testing has been performed on a number of detection systems to evaluate their sensitivity, response time, and performance characteristics. This testing has been scheduled in three phases. The first phase was aimed at screening out the least suitable detectors and optimizing the performance of the most promising. In the second phase, candidates were tested in a 1500 ft/sup 3/ walk-in type enclosure in which leaks were simulated on 24-in. and 3-in. piping. In the third phase of testing, selected type detectors were tested in the 1500-ft/sup 3/ enclosure with Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) pipe insulation configurations and detector tubing configuration with cell gas recirculation simulated. Endurance testing of detection equipment was also performed as part of this effort. Test results have been shown that aerosol-type detectors will reliably detect leaks as small as a few grams per hour when sampling pipe insulation annuli.

  1. The Atomic scale structure of liquid metal-electrolyte interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, B. M.; Festersen, S.; Magnussen, O. M.

    2016-07-01

    Electrochemical interfaces between immiscible liquids have lately received renewed interest, both for gaining fundamental insight as well as for applications in nanomaterial synthesis. In this feature article we demonstrate that the atomic scale structure of these previously inaccessible interfaces nowadays can be explored by in situ synchrotron based X-ray scattering techniques. Exemplary studies of a prototypical electrochemical system - a liquid mercury electrode in pure NaCl solution - reveal that the liquid metal is terminated by a well-defined atomic layer. This layering decays on length scales of 0.5 nm into the Hg bulk and displays a potential and temperature dependent behaviour that can be explained by electrocapillary effects and contributions of the electronic charge distribution on the electrode. In similar studies of nanomaterial growth, performed for the electrochemical deposition of PbFBr, a complex nucleation and growth behaviour is found, involving a crystalline precursor layer prior to the 3D crystal growth. Operando X-ray scattering measurements provide detailed data on the processes of nanoscale film formation.

  2. The Atomic scale structure of liquid metal-electrolyte interfaces.

    PubMed

    Murphy, B M; Festersen, S; Magnussen, O M

    2016-08-01

    Electrochemical interfaces between immiscible liquids have lately received renewed interest, both for gaining fundamental insight as well as for applications in nanomaterial synthesis. In this feature article we demonstrate that the atomic scale structure of these previously inaccessible interfaces nowadays can be explored by in situ synchrotron based X-ray scattering techniques. Exemplary studies of a prototypical electrochemical system - a liquid mercury electrode in pure NaCl solution - reveal that the liquid metal is terminated by a well-defined atomic layer. This layering decays on length scales of 0.5 nm into the Hg bulk and displays a potential and temperature dependent behaviour that can be explained by electrocapillary effects and contributions of the electronic charge distribution on the electrode. In similar studies of nanomaterial growth, performed for the electrochemical deposition of PbFBr, a complex nucleation and growth behaviour is found, involving a crystalline precursor layer prior to the 3D crystal growth. Operando X-ray scattering measurements provide detailed data on the processes of nanoscale film formation. PMID:27301317

  3. Thermodynamic properties of lanthanide metals in liquid bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamana, Hajimu; Sheng, Jiawei; Souda, Naohiko; Moriyama, Hirotake

    2001-04-01

    Thermodynamic quantities of La, Gd, Tb, and Dy in liquid bismuth were experimentally determined by electromotive force (EMF) measurement using a cell consisting of molten alkaline chloride and liquid bismuth. Excess Gibbs energy changes and activity coefficients were determined at varying concentrations and temperatures. Through their temperature dependence, corresponding enthalpy changes and entropy changes were determined. The excess enthalpy changes of La, Gd, Tb, and Dy in liquid bismuth in a temperature range from 850 to 1100 K were evaluated to be, -221.54±2.31, -202.25±1.80, -199.83±0.55, and -193.80±0.99 kJ/mol, respectively. The systematic variation of excess enthalpy change of lanthanides along the 4f-series was discussed. As a result, it was found that the excess enthalpy changes of La, Gd, Tb, Dy, and Er are likely to depend linearly on the 2/3 power of their metallic volume.

  4. Liquid metal micro heat pipes for space radiator applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerner, F. M.; Henderson, H. T.

    1995-01-01

    Micromachining is a chemical means of etching three-dimensional structures, typically in single-crystalline silicon. These techniques are leading toward what is coming to be referred to as MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems), where in addition to the ordinary two dimensional (planar) microelectronics, it is possible to build three-dimensional micromotors, electrically-actuated microvalves, hydraulic systems, and much more on the same microchip. These techniques become possible because of differential etching rates of various crystallographic planes and materials used for semiconductor microfabrication. The University of Cincinnati group in collaboration with NASA Lewis formed micro heat pipes in silicon by the above techniques. Work is ongoing at a modest level, but several essential bonding and packaging techniques have been recently developed. Currently, we have constructed and filled water/silicon micro heat pipes. Preliminary thermal tests of arrays of 125 micro heat pipes etched in a 1 inch x 1 inch x 250 micron silicon wafer have been completed. These pipes are instrumented with extremely small P-N junctions to measure their effective conductivity and their maximum operating power. A relatively simple one-dimensional model has been developed in order to predict micro heat pipes' operating characteristics. This information can be used to optimize micro heat pipe design with respect to length, hydraulic diameter, and number of pipes. Work is progressing on the fabrication of liquid-metal micro heat pipes. In order to be compatible with liquid metal (sodium or potassium), the inside of the micro heat pipes will be coated with a refractory metal (such as tungsten, molybdenum, or titanium).

  5. Conceptual design strategy for liquid-metal-wall inertial-fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Monsler, M.J.; Meier, W.R.

    1981-02-01

    The liquid-metal-wall chamber has emerged as an attractive reactor concept for inertial fusion energy conversion. The principal feature of this concept is a thick, free-flowing blanket of liquid metal used to protect the structure of the reactor. The development and design of liquid-metal-wall chambers over the past decade provides a basis for formulating a conceptual design strategy for such chambers. Both the attractive and unattractive features of a LMW chamber are enumerated, and a design strategy is formulated which accommodates the engineering constraints while minimizing the liquid-metal flow rate.

  6. Mechanical annealing in the flow of supercooled metallic liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Meng; Dai, Lan Hong; Liu, Lin

    2014-08-07

    Flow induced structural evolution in a supercooled metallic liquid Vit106a (Zr{sub 58.5}Cu{sub 15.6}Al{sub 10.3}Ni{sub 12.8}Nb{sub 2.8}, at. %) was investigated via uni-axial compression combined with differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). Compression tests at strain rates covering the transition from Newtonian flow to non-Newtonian flow and at the same strain rate 2 × 10{sup −1} s{sup −1} to different strains were performed at the end of glass transition (T{sub g-end} = 703 K). The relaxation enthalpies measured by DSC indicate that the samples underwent non-Newtonian flow contain more free volume than the thermally annealed sample (703 K, 4 min), while the samples underwent Newtonian flow contain less, namely, the free volume of supercooled metallic liquids increases in non-Newtonian flow, while decreases in Newtonian flow. The oscillated variation of the relaxation enthalpies of the samples deformed at the same strain rate 2 × 10{sup −1} s{sup −1} to different strains confirms that the decrease of free volume was caused by flow stress, i.e., “mechanical annealing.” Micro-hardness tests were also performed to show a similar structural evolution tendency. Based on the obtained results, the stress-temperature scaling in the glass transition of metallic glasses are supported experimentally, as stress plays a role similar to temperature in the creation and annihilation of free volume. In addition, a widening perspective angle on the glass transition of metallic glasses by exploring the 3-dimensional stress-temperature-enthalpy phase diagram is presented. The implications of the observed mechanical annealing effect on the amorphous structure and the work-hardening mechanism of metallic glasses are elucidated based on atomic level stress model.

  7. Jumping liquid metal droplet in electrolyte triggered by solid metal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jianbo; Wang, Junjie; Liu, Jing; Zhou, Yuan

    2016-05-01

    We report the electron discharge effect due to point contact between liquid metal and solid metal particles in electrolyte. Adding nickel particles induces drastic hydrogen generating and intermittent jumping of a sub-millimeter EGaIn droplet in NaOH solution. Observations from different orientations disclose that such jumping behavior is triggered by pressurized bubbles under the assistance of interfacial interactions. Hydrogen evolution around particles provides clear evidence that such electric instability originates from the varied electric potential and morphology between the two metallic materials. The point-contact-induced charge concentration significantly enhances the near-surface electric field intensity at the particle tips and thus causes electric breakdown of the electrolyte.

  8. ISOLATION OF METALS FROM LIQUID WASTES: REACTIVE SCAVENGING IN TURBULENT THERMAL REACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metal-bearing liquids constitute a major part of the DOE waste inventory. This waste is extremely varied with respect to metals (radionuclides, heavy metals, transuranics) and other species (e.g., organics). For much of this waste, concentration of metals to reduce the volume req...

  9. Kinetics of gas-to-liquid and liquid-to-solid transfer of particles in metal-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.; Rana, F.; Moitra, A.; Kacar, S.

    1990-01-01

    Analytical models for transfer of particles from gas to liquid and from liquid to solid are introduced. The model for calculation of the pushing/engulfment transition in directionally solidified particulate metal matrix composites, considers process thermodynamics, process kinetics, thermophysical properties and buoyant forces. Based on processing variables (solidification velocity and direction) and on material variables (interface energies, particle size, particle and liquid density, volume fraction of particles and particle/liquid thermal conductivity ratio) four types of behavior were predicted. Also, two numerical models for liquid-to-solid transfer are discussed, as well as the limitations of presently available models.

  10. Gallium-Based Room Temperature Liquid Metals and its Application to Single Channel Two-Liquid Hyperelastic Capacitive Strain Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shanliangzi

    Gallium-based liquid metals are of interest for a variety of applications including flexible electronics, soft robotics, and biomedical devices. Still, nano- to microscale device fabrication with these materials is challenging because of their strong adhesion to a majority of substrates. This unusual high adhesion is attributed to the formation of a thin oxide shell; however, its role in the adhesion process has not yet been established. In the first part of the thesis, we described a multiscale study aiming at understanding the fundamental mechanisms governing wetting and adhesion of gallium-based liquid metals. In particular, macroscale dynamic contact angle measurements were coupled with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) imaging to relate macroscopic drop adhesion to morphology of the liquid metal-surface interface. In addition, room temperature liquid-metal microfluidic devices are also attractive systems for hyperelastic strain sensing. Currently two types of liquid metal-based strain sensors exist for inplane measurements: single-microchannel resistive and two-microchannel capacitive devices. However, with a winding serpentine channel geometry, these sensors typically have a footprint of about a square centimeter, limiting the number of sensors that can be embedded into. In the second part of the thesis, firstly, simulations and an experimental setup consisting of two GaInSn filled tubes submerged within a dielectric liquid bath are used to quantify the effects of the cylindrical electrode geometry including diameter, spacing, and meniscus shape as well as dielectric constant of the insulating liquid and the presence of tubing on the overall system's capacitance. Furthermore, a procedure for fabricating the two-liquid capacitor within a single straight polydiemethylsiloxane channel is developed. Lastly, capacitance and response of this compact device to strain and operational issues arising from complex hydrodynamics near liquid-liquid and liquid

  11. Clustomesogens: Liquid Crystalline Hybrid Nanomaterials Containing Functional Metal Nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Molard, Yann

    2016-08-16

    Inorganic phosphorescent octahedral metal nanoclusters fill the gap between metal complexes and nanoparticles. They are finite groups of metal atoms linked by metal-metal bonds, with an exact composition and structure at the nanometer scale. As their phosphorescence internal quantum efficiency can approach 100%, they represent a very attractive class of molecular building blocks to design hybrid nanomaterials dedicated to light energy conversion, optoelectronic, display, lighting, or theragnostic applications. They are obtained as AnM6X(i)8X(a)6 ternary salt powders (A = alkali cation, M = Mo, Re, W, X(i): halogen inner ligand, X(a) = halogen apical ligand) by high temperature solid state synthesis (750-1200 °C). However, their ceramic-like behavior has largely restricted their use as functional components in the past. Since these last two decades, several groups, including ours, started to tackle the challenge of integrating them in easy-to-process materials. Within this context, we have extensively explored the nanocluster ternary salt specificities to develop a new class of self-organized hybrid organic-inorganic nanomaterials known as clustomesogens. These materials, combine the specific properties of nanoclusters (magnetic, electronic, luminescence) with the anisotropy-related properties of liquid crystals (LCs). This Account covers the research and development of clustomesogens starting from the design concepts and synthesis to their introduction in functional devices. We developed three strategies to build such hybrid super- or supramolecules. In the covalent approach, we capitalized on the apical ligand-metal bond iono-covalent character to graft tailor-made organic LC promoters on the {M6X(i)8}(n+) nanocluster cores. The supramolecular approach relies on the host-guest complexation of the ternary cluster salt alkali cations with functional crown ether macrocycles. We showed that the hybrid LC behavior depends on the macrocycles structural features

  12. Carbonate-coordinated metal complexes precede the formation of liquid amorphous mineral emulsions of divalent metal carbonates.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Stephan E; Müller, Lars; Barrea, Raul; Kampf, Christopher J; Leiterer, Jork; Panne, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Emmerling, Franziska; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M=Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed. PMID:21218241

  13. Carbonate-coordinated metal complexes precede the formation of liquid amorphous mineral emulsions of divalent metal carbonates†

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Stephan E.; Müller, Lars; Barrea, Raul; Kampf, Christopher J.; Leiterer, Jork; Panne, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed. PMID:21218241

  14. High current liquid metal ion source using porous tungsten multiemitters.

    PubMed

    Tajmar, M; Vasiljevich, I; Grienauer, W

    2010-12-01

    We recently developed an indium Liquid-Metal-Ion-Source that can emit currents from sub-μA up to several mA. It is based on a porous tungsten crown structure with 28 individual emitters, which is manufactured using Micro-Powder Injection Molding (μPIM) and electrochemical etching. The emitter combines the advantages of internal capillary feeding with excellent emission properties due to micron-size tips. Significant progress was made on the homogeneity of the emission over its current-voltage characteristic as well as on investigating its long-term stability. This LMIS seems very suitable for space propulsion as well as for micro/nano manufacturing applications with greatly increased milling/drilling speeds. This paper summarizes the latest developments on our porous multiemitters with respect to manufacturing, emission properties and long-term testing. PMID:21111260

  15. Liquid metal MHD research and development in Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branover, H.

    1991-05-01

    The study and development of liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in Israel, from 1973 to the present, are reviewed. Following extensive research and evaluation, it was established that the most promising concept for a relatively short development time was the gravitational system, using lead or lead alloys as the magnetohydrodynamic fluid and steam or gases as the working fluid. The Etgar Program, set up to investigate such systems, is comprised of seven segments, of which the first six have been completed; work on the last segment has been started. The segments are as follows: studies of the physical phenomena; development of a universal numerical code for parametric studies and optimization and design of the system; materials studies; development of engineering components; construction and testing of small-scale Etgar-type systems; economic evaluation and comparison with conventional technologies; and development of an industrial demonstration plant.

  16. Testing of Liquid Metal Components for Nuclear Surface Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Godfroy, Thomas J.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2010-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) was established by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to provide a capability for performing hardware-directed activities to support multiple in-space nuclear reactor concepts by using a non-nuclear test methodology. This includes fabrication and testing at both the module/component level and near prototypic reactor configurations. The EFF-TF is currently supporting an effort to develop an affordable fission surface power (AFSP) system that could be deployed on the Lunar surface. The AFSP system is presently based on a pumped liquid metal-cooled (Sodium-Potassium eutectic, NaK-78) reactor design. This design was derived from the only fission system that the United States has deployed for space operation, the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) 10A reactor, which was launched in 1965. Two prototypical components recently tested at MSFC were a pair of Stirling power conversion units that would be used in a reactor system to convert heat to electricity, and an annular linear induction pump (ALIP) that uses travelling electromagnetic fields to pump the liquid metal coolant through the reactor loop. First ever tests were conducted at MSFC to determine baseline performance of a pair of 1 kW Stirling convertors using NaK as the hot side working fluid. A special test rig was designed and constructed and testing was conducted inside a vacuum chamber at MSFC. This test rig delivered pumped NaK for the hot end temperature to the Stirlings and water as the working fluid on the cold end temperature. These test were conducted through a hot end temperature range between 400 to 550C in increments of 50 C and a cold end temperature range from 30 to 70 C in 20 C increments. Piston amplitudes were varied from 6 to 1 1mm in .5 mm increments. A maximum of 2240 Watts electric was produced at the design point of 550 hot end, 40 C cold end with a piston amplitude of 10.5mm. This power level was reached at a gross thermal

  17. Liquid Metal Pump Technologies for Nuclear Surface Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.

    2007-01-01

    Multiple liquid metal pump options are reviewed for the purpose of determining the technologies that are best suited for inclusion in a nuclear reactor thermal simulator intended to rest prototypical space nuclear surface power system components. Conduction, induction and thermoelectric electromagnetic pumps are evaluated based on their performance characteristics and the technical issues associated with incorporation into a reactor system. A thermoelectric electromagnetic pump is selected as the best option for use in NASA-MSFC's Fission Surface Power-Primary Test Circuit reactor simulator based on its relative simplicity, low power supply mass penalty, flight heritage, and the promise of increased pump efficiency over those earlier pump designs through the use of skutterudite thermoelectric elements.

  18. Review of experimental investigations of liquid-metal heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubarsky, Bernard; Kaufman, Samuel J

    1956-01-01

    Experimental data of various investigators of liquid-metal heat-transfer characteristics were reevaluated using as consistent assumptions and methods as possible and then compared with each other and with theoretical results. The reevaluated data for both local fully developed and average Nusselt numbers in the turbulent flow region were found still to have considerable spread, with the bulk of the data being lower than predicted by existing analysis. An equation based on empirical grounds which represents most of the fully developed heat-transfer data is nu = 0.625 pe(0.4) where nu represents the Nusselt number and pe the Peclet number. The theoretical prediction of the heat transfer in the entrance region was found to give lower values, in most cases, than those found in the experimental work.

  19. Capture of liquid hydrogen boiloff with metal hydride absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosso, M. J.; Golben, P. M.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure which uses metal hydrides to capture some of this low pressure (,1 psig) hydrogen for subsequent reliquefaction is described. Of the five normally occurring sources of boil-off vapor the stream associated with the off-loading of liquid tankers during dewar refill was identified as the most cost effective and readily recoverable. The design, fabrication and testing of a proof-of-concept capture device, operating at a rate that is commensurate with the evolution of vapor by the target stream, is described. Liberation of the captured hydrogen gas at pressure .15 psig at normal temperatures (typical liquefier compressor suction pressure) are also demonstrated. A payback time of less than three years is projected.

  20. Liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic system evaluation. [coal-fired designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, R. R.; Lippert, T. E.

    1976-01-01

    The present study emphasizes a direct coal-fired design using a bubbly two-component flow of sodium and argon in the MHD generator and a Rankine steam-bottoming plant. Two basic cycles were studied, corresponding to argon temperatures of 922 and 1089 K at the duct inlet. The MHD duct system consisted of multiple ducts arranged in clusters and separated by iron magnet pole pieces. The ducts, each with an output of about 100 MW, were parallel to the flow, but were connected in series electrically to provide a higher MHD voltage. With channel efficiencies of 80%, a pump efficiency of 90%, and a 45% efficient steam-bottoming plant, the overall efficiency of the 1089 K liquid-metal MHD power plant was 43%.

  1. Reliability and Maintainability Data for Liquid Metal Cooling Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, Lee Charles

    2015-05-01

    One of the coolants of interest for future fusion breeding blankets is lead-lithium. As a liquid metal it offers the advantages of high temperature operation for good station efficiency, low pressure, and moderate flow rate. This coolant is also under examination for use in test blanket modules to be used in the ITER international project. To perform reliability, availability, maintainability and inspectability (RAMI) assessment as well as probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) of lead-lithium cooling systems, component failure rate data are needed to quantify the system models. RAMI assessment also requires repair time data and inspection time data. This paper presents a new survey of the data sets that are available at present to support RAMI and PSA quantification. Recommendations are given for the best data values to use when quantifying system models.

  2. Heterogeneous fragmentation of metallic liquid microsheet with high velocity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An-Min, He; Pei, Wang; Jian-Li, Shao

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the fragmentation of metallic liquid sheets with high velocity gradient. Dynamic fragmentation of the system involves the formation of a network of fragments due to the growth and coalescence of holes, decomposition of the network into filaments, and further breakup of the filaments into spherical clusters. The final size distribution of the fragmented clusters in the large volume limit is found to obey a bilinear exponential form, which is resulted from the heterogeneous breakup of quasi-cylindrical filaments. The main factors contributing to fragmentation heterogeneity are introduced, including strain rate inhomogeneity and matter distribution nonuniformity of fragments produced during decomposition of the network structure. Project supported by the Science and Technology Development Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant Nos. 2013A0201010 and 2015B0201039) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11402032).

  3. Cleavage crystallography of liquid metal embrittled aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, A. P.; Stoner, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    The crystallography of liquid metal-induced transgranular cleavage in six aluminum alloys having a variety of microstructures has been determined via Laue X-ray back reflection. The cleavage crystallography was independent of alloy microstructure, and the cleavage plane was 100-plane oriented in all cases. It was further determined that the cleavage crystallography was not influenced by alloy texture. Examination of the fracture surface indicated that there was not a unique direction of crack propagation. In addition, the existence of 100-plane cleavage on alloy 2024 fracture surfaces was inferred by comparison of secondary cleavage crack intersection geometry on the 2024 surfaces with the geometry of secondary cleavage crack intersections on the test alloys.

  4. Method of shielding a liquid-metal-cooled reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sayre, Robert K.

    1978-01-01

    The primary heat transport system of a nuclear reactor -- particularly for a liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder reactor -- is shielded and protected from leakage by establishing and maintaining a bed of a powdered oxide closely and completely surrounding all components thereof by passing a gas upwardly therethrough at such a rate as to slightly expand the bed to the extent that the components of the system are able to expand without damage and yet the particles of the bed remain close enough so that the bed acts as a guard vessel for the system. Preferably the gas contains 1 to 10% oxygen and the gas is passed upwardly through the bed at such a rate that the lower portion of the bed is a fixed bed while the upper portion is a fluidized bed, the line of demarcation therebetween being high enough that the fixed bed portion of the bed serves as guard vessel for the system.

  5. Numerical simulation of turbulent forced convection in liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodret, S.; Vitale Di Maio, D.; Caruso, G.

    2014-11-01

    In the frame of the future generation of nuclear reactors, liquid metals are foreseen to be used as a primary coolant. Liquid metals are characterized by a very low Prandtl number due to their very high heat diffusivity. As such, they do not meet the so-called Reynolds analogy which assumes a complete similarity between the momentum and the thermal boundary layers via the use of the turbulent Prandtl number. Particularly, in the case of industrial fluid-dynamic calculations where a resolved computation near walls could be extremely time consuming and could need very large computational resources, the use of the classical wall function approach could lead to an inaccurate description of the temperature profile close to the wall. The first aim of the present study is to investigate the ability of a well- established commercial code (ANSYS FLUENT v.14) to deal with this issue, validating a suitable expression for the turbulent Prandtl number. Moreover, a thermal wall-function developed at Universite Catholique de Louvain has been implemented in FLUENT and validated, overcoming the limits of the solver to define it directly. Both the resolved and unresolved approaches have been carried out for a channel flow case and assessed against available direct numerical and large eddy simulations. A comparison between the numerically evaluated Nusselt number and the main correlations available in the literature has been also carried out. Finally, an application of the proposed methodology to a typical sub-channel case has been performed, comparing the results with literature correlations for tube banks.

  6. The Dounreay PFR Liquid-Metal Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sherwood, D.V.; Comline, A.; Small, J.; Blyth, J

    2005-04-15

    The UKAEA Prototype Fast Reactor at Dounreay had a liquid sodium-cooled core. Following its shutdown in 1994, the liquid metal is being removed from the reactor and other vessels by means of specialized equipment and reacted with an aqueous solution of sodium hydroxide in a special vessel. The reaction products are neutralized with hydrochloric acid to produce a saline solution.The reactor sodium delivery and processing equipment is all of novel design. As sodium has been withdrawn from the vessel, it has been necessary to switch off the primary sodium pumps (used to heat the sodium), and the reactor is now kept at temperature by a purpose-designed electric heater and a NaK loop heater.A primary sodium extract pump has currently removed [approximately]450 tonnes of primary sodium from the reactor. As the level falls special equipment will be used to punch a hole in the primary circuit pipe work and to drill the strongback to allow trapped sodium to drain for extraction.

  7. A reconfigurable liquid metal antenna driven by electrochemically controlled capillarity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Adams, J. J.; Trlica, C.; Khan, M. R.; Dickey, M. D.

    2015-05-21

    We describe a new electrochemical method for reversible, pump-free control of liquid eutectic gallium and indium (EGaIn) in a capillary. Electrochemical deposition (or removal) of a surface oxide on the EGaIn significantly lowers (or increases) its interfacial tension as a means to induce the liquid metal in (or out) of the capillary. A fabricated prototype demonstrates this method in a reconfigurable antenna application in which EGaIn forms the radiating element. By inducing a change in the physical length of the EGaIn, the operating frequency of the antenna tunes over a large bandwidth. This purely electrochemical mechanism uses low, DC voltages to tune the antenna continuously and reversibly between 0.66 GHz and 3.4 GHz resulting in a 5:1 tuning range. Gain and radiation pattern measurements agree with electromagnetic simulations of the device, and its measured radiation efficiency varies from 41% to 70% over its tuning range.

  8. Growth of metal oxide nanowires from supercooled liquid nanodroplets.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M. H.; Lee, B.; Lee, S.; Larson, C.; Balik, J. M.; Yavuz, C. T.; Seifert, S.; Vajda, S.; Winans, R. E.; Moskovits, M.; Stucky, G. D.; Wodtke, A. M.; Univ. of California at Santa Barbara; Yale Univ.

    2009-12-01

    Nanometer-sized liquid droplets formed at temperatures below the bulk melting point become supercooled as they grow through Ostwald ripening or coalescence and can be exploited to grow nanowires without any catalyst. We used this simple approach to synthesize a number of highly crystalline metal oxide nanowires in a chemical or physical vapor deposition apparatus. Examples of nanowires made in this way include VO{sub 2}, V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, RuO{sub 2}, MoO{sub 2}, MoO{sub 3}, and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, some of which have not been previously reported. Direct evidence of this new mechanism of nanowire growth is found from in situ 2-dimensional GISAXS (grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering) measurements of VO{sub 2} nanowire growth, which provides quantitative information on the shapes and sizes of growing nanowires as well as direct evidence of the presence of supercooled liquid droplets. We observe dramatic changes in nanowire growth by varying the choice of substrate, reflecting the influence of wetting forces on the supercooled nanodroplet shape and mobility as well as substrate-nanowire lattice matching on the definition of nanowire orientation. Surfaces with defects can also be used to pattern the growth of the nanowires. The simplicity of this synthesis concept suggests it may be rather general in its application.

  9. Electric current induced flow of liquid metals: Mechanism and substrate-surface effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, P.; Howarth, J.; Dutta, I.

    2014-01-28

    Long range, continuous flow of liquid metals occurs upon application of an electric current. Here, we report experimental results elucidating the mechanism of current-induced liquid metal flow, and its dependence on substrate surface condition. It is shown that the observed flow is diffusion-controlled, with the flow-rate depending linearly on applied current density, indicating that it is driven by electromigration. The effective charge number for liquid electromigration, Z*, of several pure metals, such as Al, Bi, Ga, Sn, and Pb, were deduced from the experimental results and were found to be close to the elemental valency. With the exception of liquid Pb, Z* for all liquid metals tested in this study were positive, indicating that: (i) electron wind contributes much less to Z* in liquid metals than in solids, and (ii) with a few exceptions, liquid metals generally flow in the direction of the electric current. On smooth substrates which are wetted well by the liquid metal, flow occurs in a thin, continuous stream. On rough surfaces which are poorly wetted, on the other hand, discrete beads of liquid form, with mass transport between adjacent beads occurring by surface diffusion on the substrate. A rationale for the role of substrate roughness in fostering this observed transition in flow mechanism is presented.

  10. Relaxational Dynamics of a Model Glass-forming Metallic Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; O'Keeffe, Stephanie; Podlesnyak, Andrey; Ehlers, Georg; Mills, Rebecca; Lokshin, Konstantin; Dmowski, Wojciech; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the diffusional behavior of multi-component glass-forming metallic liquids is of critical importance to the development of novel alloy systems such as bulk metallic glasses (BMG). However, such diffusions are highly activated and complicated because of structural disorder induced by quenching, and chemical disorders induced by size mismatch. Herein, we report temperature and wave-vector transfer (Q) dependence of two-step collective relaxations in the BMG (LM601: ZrCuNiAl) melt measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering. Q-dependence of both fast and slow relaxation time, and the adiabatic sound speed are found to obey the principle of de Gennes narrowing. The measured spectra show a distinct vibrational mode at around 15 meV. Classical Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation of CuZrAl system, using EAM potential shows that this acoustic mode arises from local vibrations of Al in the cage formed by Cu and Zr atoms. Furthermore, we observed a breakdown of Stokes-Einstein relation in the MD simulated system well above its melting temperature. Accompanied dynamical clustering was detected using unsupervised machine learning techniques. These mechanisms in tandem can be responsible for the excellent glass-forming ability of this material.

  11. Ultrasound Doppler Velocimetry Measurements in Turbulent Liquid Metal Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivero, Michel; Jian, Dandan; Karcher, Christian; Cuevas, Sergio

    2010-11-01

    Control of molten metal flow using magnetic fields is important in industrial applications. The Electromagnetic Flow Control Channel (EFCO) is an experimental test facility, located at Ilmenau University of Technology, for the development of such kind of control systems. The working fluid is the low-melting liquid metal alloy GaInSn in eutectic composition. In this channel, flow control is realized by combining and coupling the non-contact flow driving technology of electromagnetic pumps based on rotating permanent magnets and the non-contact flow rate measurement technology termed Lorentz Force Velocimetry (LFV). The flow rate is adjusted by controlling the rotation rate of the permanent magnet system. Physically, LFV is based on measuring the force acting on a magnet system. This force is induced by the melt flow passing through the static magnetic field generated by the system and is proportional to the flow. To calibrate such flow meters, we apply UDV technique to measure and analyse both turbulent hydrodynamic and MHD flow profiles in EFCO at various Reynolds numbers.

  12. Studies of cycles for liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic generation of power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K.; Petrick, M.

    1969-01-01

    Studies of liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic power cycles indicate that the overall efficiency of a binary cycle, employing a liquid-metal topping cycle and a bottoming steam cycle, may reach 60 percent. Details of analyses and data on cycles are presented, and the commercial potential of the binary cycle is discussed.

  13. The Radiative Properties and Optical Constants of Liquid Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havstad, Mark Alan

    1991-02-01

    Measurements of the optical constants and thermal radiative properties of three metals; tungsten (in the solid phase) and uranium and aluminum (both in the liquid phase) have been made using a new instrument which includes two independent optical systems and surface control and analysis capability. The two optical systems, one for measuring the complex index of refraction by ellipsometry, the other for measuring the normal spectral emissivity by direct comparison to an integral blackbody cavity, operate over the wavelength range 0.4 to 10mum with sample temperatures between 940 and 1630 K. The surface science capabilities of the instrument permit the preparation of high purity samples of known composition in-situ. The device includes two 5 KeV argon ion sputter guns, an ultra-high vacuum pumping system and an Auger spectrometer. The ellipsometric optical system uses a novel radiation source (a carbon composite filament), refractive optics (CaF_2) and both calcite and wire grid polarizers to cover the wavelength range. The system for measuring the normal spectral emissivity uses reflective optics and an integral blackbody cavity located in the wall of the crucible holding the liquid sample. The two measurement techniques allow independent determinations of normal spectral emissivity, and thus allow unbiased estimation of errors. The sensitivity of six techniques for determining the complex index of refraction of molten metals (including the ellipsometric method used here) is analyzed over the wavelength range of interest. It is shown that only methods measuring both the phase shift and the amplitude attenuation upon reflection provide adequate accuracy over the full spectral range of interest. For tungsten, the measurement made using the two optical systems agreed well with each other and with previously published works. For aluminum, only the ellipsometric technique was employed, because the vapor pressure of aluminum prevented attaining sample temperatures high

  14. The design of a heat transfer liquid metal MHD experiment for ALEX (Argonne Liquid-Metal Experiment)

    SciTech Connect

    Picologlou, B.F.; Reed, C.B.; Hua, T.Q.; Lavine, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    An experiment to study heat transfer in liquid metal MHD flow, under conditions relevant to coolant channels for tokamak first wall and high heat flux devices, is described. The experimental configuration is a rectangular duct in a transverse magnetic field, heated on one wall parallel to the field. The specific objective of the experiment is to resolve important issues related to the presence and heat transfer characteristics of wall jets and flow instabilities in MHD flows in rectangular duct with electrically conducting walls. Available analytical tools for MHD thermal hydraulics have been used in the design of the test article and its instrumentation. Proposed tests will cover a wide range of Peclet and Hartmann numbers and interaction parameters. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Diffusion in liquid metal systems. [information on electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukanwa, A. O.

    1975-01-01

    Physical properties of twenty liquid metals are reported; some of the data on such liquid metal properties as density, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, and heat capacity are summarized in graphical form. Data on laboratory handling and safety procedure are summarized for each metal; heat-transfer-correlations for liquid metals under various conditions of laminar and turbulent flow are included. Where sufficient data were available, temperature equations of properties were obtained by the method of least-squares fit. All values of properties given are valid in the given liquid phase ranges only. Additional tabular data on some 40 metals are reported in the appendix. Included is a brief description of experiments that were performed to investigate diffusion in liquid indium-gallium systems.

  16. Single channel double-duct liquid metal electrical generator using a magnetohydrodynamic device

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, Carsten M.; Deeds, W. Edward

    1999-01-01

    A single channel double-duct liquid metal electrical generator using a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) device. The single channel device provides useful output AC electric energy. The generator includes a two-cylinder linear-piston engine which drives liquid metal in a single channel looped around one side of the MHD device to form a double-duct contra-flowing liquid metal MHD generator. A flow conduit network and drive mechanism are provided for moving liquid metal with an oscillating flow through a static magnetic field to produce useful AC electric energy at practical voltages and currents. Variable stroke is obtained by controlling the quantity of liquid metal in the channel. High efficiency is obtained over a wide range of frequency and power output.

  17. Single channel double-duct liquid metal electrical generator using a magnetohydrodynamic device

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, C.M.; Deeds, W.E.

    1999-07-13

    A single channel double-duct liquid metal electrical generator using a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) device. The single channel device provides useful output AC electric energy. The generator includes a two-cylinder linear-piston engine which drives liquid metal in a single channel looped around one side of the MHD device to form a double-duct contra-flowing liquid metal MHD generator. A flow conduit network and drive mechanism are provided for moving liquid metal with an oscillating flow through a static magnetic field to produce useful AC electric energy at practical voltages and currents. Variable stroke is obtained by controlling the quantity of liquid metal in the channel. High efficiency is obtained over a wide range of frequency and power output. 5 figs.

  18. Simplified thermochemistry of oxygen in lithium and sodium for liquid metal cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tower, L. K.

    1972-01-01

    Plots of oxygen chemical potential against composition of lithium-oxygen solutions and sodium-oxygen solutions for a range of temperature were constructed. For each liquid metal two such plots were prepared. For one plot ideal solution behavior was assumed. For the other plot, existing solubility limit data for oxygen in the liquid metal were used to determine a first-order term for departure from ideality. The use of the plots in evaluating the oxygen gettering capability of refractory metals in liquid metal cooling systems is illustrated by a simple example involving lithium, oxygen, and hafnium.

  19. Corrosion-resistant fuel cladding allow for liquid metal fast breeder reactors

    DOEpatents

    Brehm, Jr., William F.; Colburn, Richard P.

    1982-01-01

    An aluminide coating for a fuel cladding tube for LMFBRs (liquid metal fast breeder reactors) such as those using liquid sodium as a heat transfer agent. The coating comprises a mixture of nickel-aluminum intermetallic phases and presents good corrosion resistance to liquid sodium at temperatures up to 700.degree. C. while additionally presenting a barrier to outward diffusion of .sup.54 Mn.

  20. A Study of Liquid Metal Film Flow, Under Fusion Relevant Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, M.; Ying, A.; Abdou, M.A.

    2005-04-15

    The use of flowing liquid metal streams or 'liquid walls' as a plasma contact surface is a very attractive option and has received considerable attention over the past several years both in the plasma physics and fusion engineering programs. A key issue for the feasibility of flowing liquid metal plasma facing component (PFC) systems, lies in their magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) behavior. The spatially varying magnetic field environment, typical of a fusion device can lead to serious flow disrupting MHD forces that hinder the development of a smooth and controllable flow needed for PFC applications. The present study builds up on the ongoing research effort at UCLA, directed towards providing qualitative and quantitative data on liquid metal free surface flow behavior under fusion relevant magnetic fields, to aid in better understanding of flowing liquid metal PFC systems.

  1. Metal Chlorides in Ionic Liquid Solvents Convert Sugars to 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Haibo; Holladay, John E.; Brown, Heather M.; Zhang, Z. Conrad

    2007-06-15

    Sugars were converted to hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) at high yield in ionic liquids without the addition of Bronsted acids. Very small amount of certain metal halides significantly reduced the fructose dehydration barrier in ionic liquids producing HMF at high yields. Most remarkably, glucose, a common sugar molecule, was selectively converted to HMF in good yield in ionic liquids containing a small amount of CrCl2. Thus CrCl2 is unique among metal chlorides tested for its effectiveness in both isomerizing glucose as well as dehydrating fructose. Only negligble amount of levulinic acid was formed in the reactions. The catalytic activity of metal chlorides for sugar conversion in ionic liquids is perhaps related to hydroxyl group of the sugar forming metal complexes with the unsaturated metal center.

  2. Alloys for a liquid metal fast breeder reactor

    DOEpatents

    Rowcliffe, Arthur F.; Bleiberg, Melvin L.; Diamond, Sidney; Bajaj, Ram

    1979-01-01

    An essentially gamma-prime precipitation-hardened iron-chromium-nickel alloy has been designed with emphasis on minimum nickel and chromium contents to reduce the swelling tendencies of these alloys when used in liquid metal fast breeder reactors. The precipitation-hardening components have been designed for phase stability and such residual elements as silicon and boron, also have been selected to minimize swelling. Using the properties of these alloys in one design would result in an increased breeding ratio over 20% cold worked stainless steel, a reference material, of 1.239 to 1.310 and a reduced doubling time from 15.8 to 11.4 years. The gross stoichiometry of the alloying composition comprises from about 0.04% to about 0.06% carbon, from about 0.05% to about 1.0% silicon, up to about 0.1% zirconium, up to about 0.5% vanadium, from about 24% to about 31% nickel, from 8% to about 11% chromium, from about 1.7% to about 3.5% titanium, from about 1.0% to about 1.8% aluminum, from about 0.9% to about 3.7% molybdenum, from about 0.04% to about 0.8% boron, and the balance iron with incidental impurities.

  3. Design analyses of self-cooled liquid metal blankets

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.

    1986-12-01

    A trade-off study of liquid metal self-cooled blankets was carried out to define the performance of these blankets and to determine the potential to operate at the maximum possible values of the performance parameters. The main parameters considered during the course of the study were the tritium breeding ratio (TBR), the blanket energy multiplication factor, the energy fraction lost to the shield, the lithium-6 enrichment in the breeder material, the total blanket thickness, the reflector material selection, and the compositions of the different blanket zones. Also, a study was carried out to assess the impact of different reactor design choices on the reactor performance parameters. The design choices include the impurity control system (limiter or divertor), the material choice for the limiter, the elimination of tritium breeding from the inboard section of tokamak reactors, and the coolant choice for the nonbreeding inboard blanket. In addition, tritium breeding benchmark calculations were performed using different transport codes and nuclear data libraries. The importance of the TBR in the blanket design motivated the benchmark calculations.

  4. Liquid-vapor phase diagram of metals using EAM potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Chandrani

    2013-02-01

    Pair-wise additive potentials are not adequate to describe the properties of metallic systems since many body effects are completely ignored in that approximation. In this regard, the embedded atom method is more appropriate because, in addition to the pair interaction, the total energy includes an embedding energy which is the energy required to add an impurity atom to the host electron fluid. Thus EAM takes into account the many body effects to some extent. We use the Cai and Ye's EAM potential to predict the liquid vapor phase diagram and critical constants of Aluminum and Copper within a perturbation theory approach. In this method, free energy of a fluid molecule, trapped in a cage formed by its nearest neighbors, is expanded about a hard sphere reference system. The first order correction term is calculated in terms of the zero temperature isotherm of the solid obtained using the EAM potential. Higher order correction terms are added to account for the deviation of the behavior of the real fluid from the reference hard sphere fluid.

  5. Liquid metal thermoelectric converter (LMTEC) for solar applications

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, J.I.

    1985-01-01

    An overview is given of the research and development plan for the Liquid Metal Thermoelectric Converter (LMTEC) being undertaken by Sandia Laboratories under the Solar Thermal Technologies program of DOE. Sandia initiated work in this area less than a year ago and has pursued the work as a specific subtask starting in FY 1985. As with any new project, a significant part of the initial effort has been spent on reviewing the current technology in thermo-electric converters including Thermally Regenerative Electrochemical Systems (TRES), fuel cells, thermionic devices, magnetohydrodynamics, and other modes of direct thermal-to-electric conversion. Consequently, no formal research results are included in this paper and the presentation is intended more to indicate those areas in which further research and development efforts could be expended to prove of positive impact on the solar application of LMTEC. The principal objective of this task is to design, engineer, and develop a LMTEC suitable for use in solar distributed receiver applications. Since the thermal requirements for the LMTEC are in the temperature range of parabolic dishes, the engineering development effort will concentrate on a device that can be mounted at the focal point of a dish and preferably incorporated into the receiver. Due to a technology review, the LMTEC most likely will be based on the current Sodium Heat Engine (SHE) concept. Our main effort will consist of optimizing the concept for solar applications and conducting the necessary engineering development to produce a 20 to 50 kWe device.

  6. An investigation of corrosion in liquid-metal heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, D.R.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Andraka, C.E.; Showalter, S.K.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Cordiero, P.G.

    1998-08-01

    Research is underway to develop a 75-kW heat pipe to transfer solar energy from the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator to the heater tubes of a Stirling engine. The high flux levels and high total power level encountered in this application have made it necessary to use a high-performance wick structure with fibers on the order of 4 to 8 microns in diameter. This fine wick structure is highly susceptible to corrosion damage and plugging, as dissolved contaminants plate out on the evaporator surface. Normal operation of the heat pipe also tends to concentrate contaminants in localized areas of the evaporator surface where heat fluxes are the highest. Sandia National Laboratories is conducting a systematic study to identify procedures that reduce corrosion and contamination problems in liquid-metal heat pipes. A series of heat pipes are being tested to explore different options for cleaning heat-pipe systems. Models are being developed to help understand the overall importance of operating parameters on the life of heat-pipe systems. In this paper, the authors present their efforts to reduce corrosion damage.

  7. On-Chip Production of Size-Controllable Liquid Metal Microdroplets Using Acoustic Waves.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Ayan, Bugra; Nama, Nitesh; Bian, Yusheng; Lata, James P; Guo, Xiasheng; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-07-01

    Micro- to nanosized droplets of liquid metals, such as eutectic gallium indium (EGaIn) and Galinstan, have been used for developing a variety of applications in flexible electronics, sensors, catalysts, and drug delivery systems. Currently used methods for producing micro- to nanosized droplets of such liquid metals possess one or several drawbacks, including the lack in ability to control the size of the produced droplets, mass produce droplets, produce smaller droplet sizes, and miniaturize the system. Here, a novel method is introduced using acoustic wave-induced forces for on-chip production of EGaIn liquid-metal microdroplets with controllable size. The size distribution of liquid metal microdroplets is tuned by controlling the interfacial tension of the metal using either electrochemistry or electrocapillarity in the acoustic field. The developed platform is then used for heavy metal ion detection utilizing the produced liquid metal microdroplets as the working electrode. It is also demonstrated that a significant enhancement of the sensing performance is achieved by introducing acoustic streaming during the electrochemical experiments. The demonstrated technique can be used for developing liquid-metal-based systems for a wide range of applications. PMID:27309129

  8. Design study for a liquid metal slip ring solar array orientation mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    The design of a single axis orientation mechanism for solar arrays on high power synchronous satellites is studied primarily with respect to providing 116 liquid metal slip rings for reduced friction and improved electrical characteristics. Designs and tradeoff studies for the slip rings and other components are presented. An assembly containing 33 slip rings of three design approaches was designed, fabricated, and vacuum tested to 30 amperes and 30,000 volts. Containment of the liquid metal gallium in large diameter slip rings was difficult. A design approach is presented which is expected to provide improved retention of the liquid metal.

  9. Preliminary Analysis of Liquid Metal MHD Pressure Drop in the Blanket for the FDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong-yan; Wu, Yi-can; He, Xiao-xong

    2002-10-01

    Preliminary analysis and calculation of liquid metal Li17Pb83 magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop in the blanket for the FDS have been presented to evaluate the significance of MHD effects on the thermal-hydraulic design of the blanket. To decrease the liquid metal MHD pressure drop, Al2O3 is applied as an electronically insulated coating onto the inner surface of the ducts. The requirement for the insulated coating to reduce the additional leakage pressure drop caused by coating imperfections has been analyzed. Finally, the total liquid metal MHD pressure drop and magnetic pump power in the FDS blanket have been given.

  10. Frequency-Switchable Metamaterial Absorber Injecting Eutectic Gallium-Indium (EGaIn) Liquid Metal Alloy.

    PubMed

    Ling, Kenyu; Kim, Hyung Ki; Yoo, Minyeong; Lim, Sungjoon

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated a new class of frequency-switchable metamaterial absorber in the X-band. Eutectic gallium-indium (EGaIn), a liquid metal alloy, was injected in a microfluidic channel engraved on polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) to achieve frequency switching. Numerical simulation and experimental results are presented for two cases: when the microfluidic channels are empty, and when they are filled with liquid metal. To evaluate the performance of the fabricated absorber prototype, it is tested with a rectangular waveguide. The resonant frequency was successfully switched from 10.96 GHz to 10.61 GHz after injecting liquid metal while maintaining absorptivity higher than 98%. PMID:26561815

  11. Frequency-Switchable Metamaterial Absorber Injecting Eutectic Gallium-Indium (EGaIn) Liquid Metal Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Kenyu; Kim, Hyung Ki; Yoo, Minyeong; Lim, Sungjoon

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated a new class of frequency-switchable metamaterial absorber in the X-band. Eutectic gallium-indium (EGaIn), a liquid metal alloy, was injected in a microfluidic channel engraved on polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) to achieve frequency switching. Numerical simulation and experimental results are presented for two cases: when the microfluidic channels are empty, and when they are filled with liquid metal. To evaluate the performance of the fabricated absorber prototype, it is tested with a rectangular waveguide. The resonant frequency was successfully switched from 10.96 GHz to 10.61 GHz after injecting liquid metal while maintaining absorptivity higher than 98%. PMID:26561815

  12. Review of the highlights of X-ray studies of liquid metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Pershan, P. S.

    2014-12-14

    X-ray studies of the interface between liquid metals and their coexisting vapor are reviewed. After a brief discussion of the few elemental liquid metals for which the surface Debye-Waller effect is sufficiently weak to allow measurement, this paper will go on to discuss the various types of surface phenomena that have been observed for liquid metal alloys. These include surface adsorption, surface freezing, surface aggregation of nm size atomic clusters, and surface chemistry that leads to new 3D crystalline phases.

  13. Investigation of Liquid Metal Embrittlement of Materials for use in Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Daniel; Jaworski, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Liquid metals can provide a continually replenished material for the first wall and extraction blankets of fusion reactors. However, research has shown that solid metal surfaces will experience embrittlement when exposed to liquid metals under stress. Therefore, it is important to understand the changes in structural strength of the solid metal materials and test different surface treatments that can limit embrittlement. Research was conducted to design and build an apparatus for exposing solid metal samples to liquid metal under high stress and temperature. The apparatus design, results of tensile testing, and surface imaging of fractured samples will be presented. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships Program (SULI).

  14. Nanofabrication of highly ordered, tunable metallic mesostructures via quasi-hard-templating of lyotropic liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinyi; Lu, Wei; Dai, Jiyan; Bourgeois, Laure; Yao, Jianfeng; Wang, Huanting; Friend, James R.; Zhao, Dongyuan; MacFarlane, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of metal frameworks perforated with nanotunnels is a challenge because metals have high surface energies that favor low surface area structures; traditional liquid-crystal templating techniques cannot achieve the synthetic control required. We report a synthetic strategy to fabricate metal nanomaterials with highly ordered, tunable mesostructures in confined systems based on a new quasi-hard-templating liquid-crystals mechanism. The resulting platinum nanowires exhibit long range two-dimensional hexagonally ordered mesopore structures. In addition, single crystalline hexagonal mesoporous platinum nanowires with dominant {110} facets have been synthesized. Finally, we demonstrate that the mesostructures of metal nanomaterials can be tuned from hexagonal to lamellar mesostructures. PMID:25502015

  15. Carbonate-coordinated metal complexes precede the formation of liquid amorphous mineral emulsions of divalent metal carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Stephan E.; Müller, Lars; Barrea, Raul; Kampf, Christopher J.; Leiterer, Jork; Panne, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Emmerling, Franziska; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed.During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: (S1 and S5) TEM at higher magnifications and of crystallizations conducted at pH = 6.0, 9.0 and 11.3; (S2) sketch of a spreading liquid particle on a TEM grid; (S3) wide-angle scattering of BaCO3 and CdCO3; (S4 and S6-S9) ESI-MS spectra of a solution of carbon dioxide and of bicarbonates of Sr, Ba, Pb, Mn and Cd. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00761g

  16. Testing of Liquid Metal Components for Nuclear Surface Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, K. A.; Pearson, J. B.; Godfroy, T. J.; Schoenfeld, M.; Webster, K.; Briggs, M. H.; Geng, S. M.; Adkins, H. E.; Werner, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    The capability to perform testing at both the module/component level and in near prototypic reactor configurations using a non-nuclear test methodology allowed for evaluation of two components critical to the development of a potential nuclear fission power system for the lunar surface. A pair of 1 kW Stirling power convertors, similar to the type that would be used in a reactor system to convert heat to electricity, were integrated into a reactor simulator system to determine their performance using pumped NaK as the hot side working fluid. The performance in the pumped-NaK system met or exceed the baseline performance measurements where the converters were electrically heated. At the maximum hot-side temperature of 550 C the maximum output power was 2375 watts. A specially-designed test apparatus was fabricated and used to quantify the performance of an annular linear induction pump that is similar to the type that could be used to circulate liquid metal through the core of a space reactor system. The errors on the measurements were generally much smaller than the magnitude of the measurements, permitting accurate performance evaluation over a wide range of operating conditions. The pump produced flow rates spanning roughly 0.16 to 5.7 l/s (2.5 to 90 GPM), and delta p levels from less than 1 kPa to 90 kPa (greater than 0.145 psi to roughly 13 psi). At the nominal FSP system operating temperature of 525 C the maximum efficiency was just over 4%.

  17. Natural circulation in a liquid metal one-dimensional loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarantino, M.; De Grandis, S.; Benamati, G.; Oriolo, F.

    2008-06-01

    A wide use of pure lead, as well as its alloys (such as lead-bismuth, lead-lithium), is foreseen in several nuclear-related fields: it is studied as coolant in critical and sub-critical nuclear reactors, as spallation target for neutron generation in several applications and for tritium generation in fusion systems. In this framework, a new facility named NAtural CIrculation Experiment (NACIE), has been designed at ENEA-Brasimone Research Centre. NACIE is a rectangular loop, made by stainless steel pipes. It consists mainly of a cold and hot leg and an expansion tank installed on the top of the loop. A fuel bundle simulator, made by three electrical heaters placed in a triangular lattice, is located in the lower part of the cold leg, while a tube in tube heat exchanger is installed in the upper part of the hot leg. The adopted secondary fluid is THT oil, while the foreseen primary fluid for the tests is lead-bismuth in eutectic composition (LBE). The aim of the facility is to carry out experimental tests of natural circulation and collect data on the heat transfer coefficient (HTC) for heavy liquid metal flowing through rod bundles. The paper is focused on the preliminary estimation of the LBE flow rate along the loop. An analytical methodology has been applied, solving the continuity, momentum and energy transport equations under appropriate hypothesis. Moreover numerical simulations have been performed. The FLUENT 6.2 CFD code has been utilized for the numerical simulations. The main results carried out from the pre-tests simulations are illustrated in the paper, and a comparison with the theoretical estimations is done.

  18. Model of liquid-metal splashing in the cathode spot of a vacuum arc discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gashkov, M. A.; Zubarev, N. M.; Zubareva, O. V.; Mesyats, G. A.; Uimanov, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    The formation of microjets is studied during the extrusion of a melted metal by the plasma pressure from craters formed on a cathode in a burning vacuum arc. An analytic model of liquid-metal splashing that includes two stages is proposed. At the first stage, the liquid motion has the axial symmetry and a liquid-metal wall surrounding the crater is formed. At the second stage, the axial symmetry is broken due to the development of the Plateau-Rayleigh instability in the upper part of the wall. The wall breakup process is shown to have a threshold. The minimal plasma pressure and the minimal electric current flowing through the crater required for obtaining the liquid-metal splashing regime are found. The basic spatial and temporal characteristics of the jet formation process are found using the analytic model.

  19. Removal and recovery of heavy metals from wastewaters by supported liquid membranes.

    PubMed

    Yang, X J; Fane, A G; MacNaughton, S

    2001-01-01

    The removal and recovery of Cu, Cr and Zn from plating rinse wastewater using supported liquid membranes (SLM) are investigated. SLMs with specific organic extractants as the liquid membrane carriers in series are able to remove and concentrate heavy metals with very high purity, which is very promising for recycling of heavy metals in the electroplating industry. A technical comparison between the membrane process and the conventional chemical precipitation process was made. PMID:11380200

  20. RARE-EARTH METAL FISSION PRODUCTS FROM LIQUID U-Bi

    DOEpatents

    Wiswall, R.H.

    1960-05-10

    Fission product metals can be removed from solution in liquid bismuth without removal of an appreciable quantity of uranium by contacting the liquid metal solution with fused halides, as for example, the halides of sodium, potassium, and lithium and by adding to the contacted phases a quantity of a halide which is unstable relative to the halides of the fission products, a specific unstable halide being MgCl/sub 3/.

  1. The t-matrix resistivity of liquid rare earth metals using pseudopotential

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, Kamaldeep G.; Bhatt, N. K.; Vyas, P. R.; Gohel, V. B.

    2015-06-24

    Present theoretical study of liquid metal resistivity of some trivalent (La,Ce,Gd) and divalent (Eu,Yb) rare earth metals using pseudopotential has been carried out employing Ziman’s weak scattering and transition matrix (t-matrix) approaches. Our computed results of liquid metal resistivity using t-matrix approach are better than resistivity computed using Ziman’s approach and are also in excellent agreement with experimental results and other theoretical findings. The present study confirms that for f-shell metals pseudopotential must be determined uniquely and t-matrix approach is more physical in comparison with Ziman’s nearly free electron approach. The present pseudopotential accounts s-p-d hybridization properly. Such success encourages us to study remaining liquid state properties of these metals.

  2. Experimental Investigation on Liquid Metal Flow Distribution in Insulating Manifold under Uniform Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Masato; Ueki, Yoshitaka; Yokomine, Takehiko; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    2012-11-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) problem which is caused by interaction between electrical conducting fluid flow and the magnetic field is one of the biggest problem in the liquid metal blanket of the fusion reactor. In the liquid metal blanket concept, it is necessary to distribute liquid metal flows uniformly in the manifold because imbalance of flow rates should affect the heat transfer performance directly, which leads to safety problem. While the manifold is insulated electrically as well as the flow duct, the 3D-MHD effect on the flowing liquid metal in the manifold is more apparent than that in straight duct. With reference to the flow distribution in this concept, the liquid metal flow in the electrical insulating manifold under the uniform transverse magnetic field is investigated experimentally. In this study, GaInSn is selected as working fluid. The experimental system includes the electrical magnet and the manifold test section which is made of acrylic resin for perfectly electrical insulation. The liquid metal flows in a non-symmetric 180°-turn with manifold, which consists of one upward channel and two downward channels. The flow rates in each channel are measured by electromagnetic flow meters for several combinations Reynolds number and Hartman number. The effects of magnetic field on the uniformity of flow distribution are cleared.

  3. Development of a fast thermal response microfluidic system using liquid metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Meng; Gui, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Room temperature liquid metal gallium alloy has been widely used in many micro-electromechanical systems applications, such as on-chip electrical microheaters, micro temperature sensors, micro pumps and so on. Injecting liquid metal into microchannels can provide a simple, rapid, low-cost but efficient way to integrate these elements in microfluidic chips with high accuracy. The liquid metal-filled microstructures can be designed in any shape and easily integrated into microfluidic chips. In this paper, an on-chip liquid metal-based thermal microfluidic system is proposed for quick temperature control at the microscale. The micro system utilizes just one microfluidic chip as a basic working platform, which has liquid metal-based on-chip heaters, temperature sensors and electroosmotic flow pumps. Under the comprehensive control of these elements, the micro system can quickly change the temperature of a target fluid in the microfluidic chip. These liquid metal-based on-chip elements are very helpful for the fabrication and miniaturization of the microfluidic chip. In this paper, deionized water is used to test the temperature control performance of the thermal microfluidic system. According to the experimental results, the micro system can efficiently control the temperature of water ranging from 28 °C to 90 °C. The thermal microfluidic system has great potential for use in many microfluidic applications, such as on-chip polymerase chain reaction, temperature gradient focusing, protein crystallization and chemical synthesis.

  4. Binding in pair potentials of liquid simple metals from nonlocality in electronic kinetic energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrot, F.; March, N. H.

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents an explicit expression for the pair potential in liquid simple metals from low-order density-gradient theory when the superposition of single-center displaced charges is employed. Numerical results are presented for the gradient expansion pair interaction in liquid Na and Be. The low-order density-gradient equation for the pair potential is presented.

  5. Compatibility of materials for use in liquid-metal blankets of fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1983-11-01

    A review of corrosion and environmental effects on the mechanical properties of austenitic and ferritic steels for use with liquid metals in fusion reactors is presented. The mechanisms and kinetics of the corrosion processes in liquid lithium and Pb-17Li systems are examined and their influence on degradation of structural material is discussed. Requirements for additional data are identified.

  6. Correlation between carbon activity and carbon content in α-iron in liquid sodium negative electrode of liquid metal battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sang Hun; Lee, Jeong Hyeon; Lee, Jung Ki; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2015-11-01

    Non-metallic elements such as carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen in liquid sodium exert a significant effect on the material behaviour of cell construction materials in liquid metal battery systems. Austenitic Fe-18%Cr-8%Ni foil and α-iron foil are equilibrated at 550 °C in sodium, and, subsequently, the concentration of carbon in the foils is analysed. A new relationship has been obtained between carbon activity and carbon concentration in α-iron foil, and is compared with the previously developed ones involving 304 SS foil reference samples. An equilibrium method has been developed to measure the activity of carbon in liquid sodium by using α-iron with this new expression. The results show similar values to those obtained with the 304 SS foil reference samples.

  7. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Lari, R.J.; Praeg, W.F.; Turner, L.R.; Battles, J.E.; Hull, J.R.; Rote, D.M.

    1988-06-17

    An apparatus for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent to the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel. 8 figs.

  8. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Lari, R.J.; Praeg, W.F.; Turner, L.R.; Battles, J.E.; Hull, J.R.; Rote, D.M.

    1990-12-04

    An apparatus is disclosed for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel. 9 figs.

  9. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Lari, Robert J.; Praeg, Walter F.; Turner, Larry R.; Battles, James E.; Hull, John R.; Rote, Donald M.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel.

  10. Biomedical Implementation of Liquid Metal Ink as Drawable ECG Electrode and Skin Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Background Conventional ways of making bio-electrodes are generally complicated, expensive and unconformable. Here we describe for the first time the method of applying Ga-based liquid metal ink as drawable electrocardiogram (ECG) electrodes. Such material owns unique merits in both liquid phase conformability and high electrical conductivity, which provides flexible ways for making electrical circuits on skin surface and a prospective substitution of conventional rigid printed circuit boards (PCBs). Methods Fundamental measurements of impedance and polarization voltage of the liquid metal ink were carried out to evaluate its basic electrical properties. Conceptual experiments were performed to draw the alloy as bio-electrodes to acquire ECG signals from both rabbit and human via a wireless module developed on the mobile phone. Further, a typical electrical circuit was drawn in the palm with the ink to demonstrate its potential of implementing more sophisticated skin circuits. Results With an oxide concentration of 0.34%, the resistivity of the liquid metal ink was measured as 44.1 µΩ·cm with quite low reactance in the form of straight line. Its peak polarization voltage with the physiological saline was detected as −0.73 V. The quality of ECG wave detected from the liquid metal electrodes was found as good as that of conventional electrodes, from both rabbit and human experiments. In addition, the circuit drawn with the liquid metal ink in the palm also runs efficiently. When the loop was switched on, all the light emitting diodes (LEDs) were lit and emitted colorful lights. Conclusions The liquid metal ink promises unique printable electrical properties as both bio-electrodes and electrical wires. The implemented ECG measurement on biological surface and the successfully run skin circuit demonstrated the conformability and attachment of the liquid metal. The present method is expected to innovate future physiological measurement and biological circuit

  11. Thermophysical properties of simple liquid metals: A brief review of theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, David

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we review the current theory of the thermophysical properties of simple liquid metals. The emphasis is on thermodynamic properties, but we also briefly discuss the nonequilibrium properties of liquid metals. We begin by defining a 'simple liquid metal' as one in which the valence electrons interact only weakly with the ionic cores, so that the interaction can be treated by perturbation theory. We then write down the equilibrium Hamiltonian of a liquid metal as a sum of five terms: the bare ion-ion interaction, the electron-electron interaction, the bare electron-ion interaction, and the kinetic energies of electrons and ions. Since the electron-ion interaction can be treated by perturbation, the electronic part contributes in two ways to the Helmholtz free energy: it gives a density-dependent term which is independent of the arrangement of ions, and it acts to screen the ion-ion interaction, giving rise to effective ion-ion pair potentials which are density-dependent, in general. After sketching the form of a typical pair potential, we briefly enumerate some methods for calculating the ionic distribution function and hence the Helmholtz free energy of the liquid: monte Carlo simulations, molecular dynamics simulations, and thermodynamic perturbation theory. The final result is a general expression for the Helmholtz free energy of the liquid metal. It can be used to calculate a wide range of thermodynamic properties of simple metal liquids, which we enumerate. They include not only a range of thermodynamic coefficients of both metals and alloys, but also many aspects of the phase diagram, including freezing curves of pure elements and phase diagrams of liquid alloys (including liquidus and solidus curves). We briefly mention some key discoveries resulting from previous applications of this method, and point out that the same methods work for other materials not normally considered to be liquid metals (such as colloidal suspensions, in which the

  12. Enhanced coupling of optical energy during liquid-confined metal ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyun Wook; Welch, Ashley J.

    2015-10-21

    Liquid-confined laser ablation was investigated with various metals of indium, aluminum, and nickel. Ablation threshold and rate were characterized in terms of surface deformation, transient acoustic responses, and plasma emissions. The surface condition affected the degree of ablation dynamics due to variations in reflectance. The liquid confinement yielded up to an order of larger ablation crater along with stronger acoustic transients than dry ablation. Enhanced ablation performance resulted possibly from effective coupling of optical energy at the interface during explosive vaporization, plasma confinement, and cavitation. The deposition of a liquid layer can induce more efficient ablation for laser metal processing.

  13. Ionic liquid-modified metal sulfides/graphene oxide nanocomposites for photoelectric conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Yù; Pei, Qi; Feng, Ting; Mao, Hui; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Shuyao; Liu, Daliang; Wang, Hongyu; Song, Xi-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Ionic liquid-modified metal sulfides/graphene oxide nanocomposites are prepared via a facile electrostatic adsorption. Ionic liquid (IL) is firstly used as surface modifier and structure-directing agent of metal sulfide (MS) crystallization process, obtaining ionic liquid modified-MS (IL-MS) nanoparticles with positive charges on surface. IL-MS/GO is obtained by electrostatic adherence between positively charged IL-MS and negatively charged graphene oxide (GO). The as-prepared sample shows enhanced photocurrent and highly efficient photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation, indicating IL-MS/GO nanocomposites greatly promoted the separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs.

  14. Liquid-metal pin-fin pressure drop by correlation in cross flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhibi; Kuzay, T.M.; Assoufid, L.

    1994-08-01

    The pin-fin configuration is widely used as a heat transfer enhancement method in high-heat-flux applications. Recently, the pin-fin design with liquid-metal coolant was also applied to synchrotron-radiation beamline devices. This paper investigates the pressure drop in a pin-post design beamline mirror with liquid gallium as the coolant. Because the pin-post configuration is a relatively new concept, information in literature about pin-post mirrors or crystals is rare, and information about the pressure drop in pin-post mirrors with liquid metal as the coolant is even more sparse. Due to this the authors considered the cross flow in cylinder-array geometry, which is very similar to that of the pin-post, to examine the pressure drop correlation with liquid metals over pin fins. The cross flow of fluid with various fluid characteristics or properties through a tube bank was studied so that the results can be scaled to the pin-fin geometry with liquid metal as the coolant. Study lead to two major variables to influence the pressure drop: fluid properties, viscosity and density, and the relative length of the posts. Correlation of the pressure drop between long and short posts and the prediction of the pressure drop of liquid metal in the pin-post mirror and comparison with an existing experiment are addressed.

  15. Transient behaviour of deposition of liquid metal droplets on a solid substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapuis, J.; Romero, E.; Soulié, F.; Bordreuil, C.; Fras, G.

    2015-12-01

    This paper investigates the mechanisms that contribute to the spreading of liquid metal macro-drop deposited during Stationary Pulsed Gas Metal Arc Welding on an initially cold solid workpiece. Surface tension and inertial effects take an important part in the behaviour of the liquid metal macro-drop, but in this configuration the influence of energetic effects can also be significant. The experimental results are discussed in the light of dimensional analysis in order to appreciate the influence of the process parameters and the physical mechanisms involved on the spreading of a macro-drop. A law is established to model forced non-isothermal spreading.

  16. Method and apparatus for regenerating cold traps within liquid-metal systems

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Jr., John M.

    1976-01-01

    Oxide and hydride impurities of a liquid metal such as sodium are removed from a cold trap by heating to a temperature at which the metal hydroxide is stable in a molten state. The partial pressure of hydrogen within the system is measured to determine if excess hydride or oxide is present. Excess hydride is removed by venting hydrogen gas while excess oxide can be converted to molten hydroxide through the addition of hydrogen. The resulting, molten hydroxide is drained from the trap which is then returned to service at cold trap temperatures within the liquid-metal system.

  17. Magnetic trap effect to restrict motion of self-powered tiny liquid metal motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Si-Cong; Gui, Han; Yuan, Bin; Liu, Jing

    2015-08-01

    We reported a phenomenon that the magnetic field can make up a boundary to restrict motion of the aluminum powered liquid metal motor. For the droplet motors with diameter below 1 mm, such magnetic trap effect will be strong enough to bounce them off the boundary. We attributed the effect to the electromagnetic mechanism. Owing to the Lorentz force, the high magnetic field will break up the directional running of the motor. The more aluminum added in the metal droplet, the stronger the trap effect. This phenomenon suggests an important way to control behavior of the liquid metal motors.

  18. Conductor of high electrical current at high temperature in oxygen and liquid metal environment

    DOEpatents

    Powell, IV, Adam Clayton; Pati, Soobhankar; Derezinski, Stephen Joseph; Lau, Garrett; Pal, Uday B.; Guan, Xiaofei; Gopalan, Srikanth

    2016-01-12

    In one aspect, the present invention is directed to apparatuses for and methods of conducting electrical current in an oxygen and liquid metal environment. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for production of metals from their oxides comprising providing a cathode in electrical contact with a molten electrolyte, providing a liquid metal anode separated from the cathode and the molten electrolyte by a solid oxygen ion conducting membrane, providing a current collector at the anode, and establishing a potential between the cathode and the anode.

  19. Atomic dynamics in Zr-(Co,Ni)-Al metallic glass-forming liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, C. C.; Yang, F.; Kargl, F.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Simeoni, G. G.; Meyer, A.

    2015-06-01

    The microscopic transport and the macroscopic flow behavior of Zr-(Co,Ni)-Al melts are systemically investigated using containerless processing techniques. A remarkable decrease of the Co, Ni self-diffusion coefficient and increase of the melt viscosity upon alloying Al, are observed. In contrast to many other metallic glass-forming liquids, the average packing fraction of the melt derived from the measured macroscopic density decreases. Our study indicates that chemical interactions of Al with transition metal atoms play an important role in slowing down liquid dynamics of metal melts, which also contribute to their improved glass-forming ability.

  20. Recovery and Extraction of Heavy Metal Ions Using Ionic Liquid as Green Solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumano, Masami; Yabutani, Tomoki; Motonaka, Junko; Mishima, Yuji

    Ionic liquids are expected to replace conventional organic solvents in organic synthesis, solvent extraction and electrochemistry due to their unique characters such as low volatility, high stability and so on. In this work, N,N,-diethyl-N-methyl-N-(2-methoxyethyl) ammonium bis(trifluoromethansulfonyl)imide was used as an alternative solvent to extract heavy metal ions. As the extracting conditions, the additional effect of 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) as metal chelating agent into ionic liquids, shaking time and volume ratio were investigated. As extraction efficiency depended on 8-HQ concentration significantly, in order to extract high concentrated metal ions the solubility of 8-HQ into ionic liquid was tested. N,N,-diethyl-N-methyl-N-(2-methoxyethyl) ammonium bis(trifluoromethansulfonyl)imide had good solubility of 8-HQ. Consequently, 5 μmol of copper, zinc, cadmium and manganese could be completely recovered with 100 μl of ionic liquid.

  1. MHD heat pipes for imposition of a strong current into high temperature liquid metals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnichenko, A. A.; Kolesnichenko, A. F.; Buryak, V.; Vodyanyuk, V.

    2001-06-01

    MHD high temperature heat pipe can be used as an electrode for imposition of strong currents into any liquid metals te{1, 2}. Low melting liquid metal inside heat pipe is used not only as a heat carrier but also as a conductor of strong current. The edge of an electrode that has a contact with high temperature liquid metal is made from the same metal, but solid. Position of a solid-liquid interface has to be controlled to prevent intensive freezing of a liquid metal on the electrode and, conversely, to prevent melting of the electrode. An example of application of electrodes equipped with MHD heat pipe has relation to channel induction furnaces, where the MHD heat pipes are installed instead of channels filled by molten metal. The second example of application is the MHD pump of alternating or direct currents, where the MHD heat pipes are used as electrodes for imposition of strong currents. One of these pumps was created with participation of the scientific society Net Shape Cast (Ukraine) Ltd., especially for pumping of steel, and was checked for pumping of different kinds of steel. Figs 5, Refs 3.

  2. Fabrication methods and applications of microstructured gallium based liquid metal alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khondoker, M. A. H.; Sameoto, D.

    2016-09-01

    This review contains a comparative study of reported fabrication techniques of gallium based liquid metal alloys embedded in elastomers such as polydimethylsiloxane or other rubbers as well as the primary challenges associated with their use. The eutectic gallium–indium binary alloy (EGaIn) and gallium–indium–tin ternary alloy (galinstan) are the most common non-toxic liquid metals in use today. Due to their deformability, non-toxicity and superior electrical conductivity, these alloys have become very popular among researchers for flexible and reconfigurable electronics applications. All the available manufacturing techniques have been grouped into four major classes. Among them, casting by needle injection is the most widely used technique as it is capable of producing features as small as 150 nm width by high-pressure infiltration. One particular fabrication challenge with gallium based liquid metals is that an oxide skin is rapidly formed on the entire exposed surface. This oxide skin increases wettability on many surfaces, which is excellent for keeping patterned metal in position, but is a drawback in applications like reconfigurable circuits, where the position of liquid metal needs to be altered and controlled accurately. The major challenges involved in many applications of liquid metal alloys have also been discussed thoroughly in this article.

  3. Spectral emissivities and optical constants of electromagnetically levitated liquid metals as functions of temperature and wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, S.; Hauge, R. H.; Margrave, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    The development of a noncontact temperature measurement device utilizing rotating analyzer ellipsometry is described. The technique circumvents the necessity of spectral emissivity estimation by direct measurement concomittant with radiance brightness. Using this approach, the optical properties of electromagnetically levitated liquid metals Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pd, Pt, and Zr were measured in situ at four wavelengths and up to 600 K superheat in the liquid. The data suggest an increase in the emissivity of the liquid compared with the incandescent solid. The data also show moderate temperature dependence of the spectral emissivity. A few measurements of the optical properties of undercooled liquid metals were also conducted. The data for both solids and liquids show excellent agreement with available values in the literature for the spectral emissivities as well as the optical constants.

  4. Preventing Oxide Adhesion of Liquid Metal Alloys to Enable Actuation in Microfluidic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshipura, Ishan; Johnson, Alexander; Ayers, Hudson; Dickey, Michael

    This work explores the wetting behavior of an oxide-coated liquid metal, eutectic alloy of gallium and indium (`EGaIn'), which remains a liquid at room temperature. Liquid metals uniquely combine fluidity with metallic properties. Combined, these properties enable soft, stretchable, and shape reconfigurable electronics with `softer than skin' interfaces. Ga forms spontaneously a thin surface oxide that alters its wetting behavior and makes it difficult to move across surfaces without leaving residue behind. We examine the effects of surface roughness (i.e., Cassie-Baxter state) and lubrication to minimize adhesion of Ga oxide to surfaces. Lubricated surfaces create a `slip-layer' of liquid between the metal and surface that also inhibits wetting. This slip layer allows the metal to move reversibly through microchannels by preventing adhesion of the oxide. The metal may be pumped or moved by using low voltages or pneumatic actuation. Optical microscopy confirms the importance of the slip-layer, which enables non-stick motion of the metal through capillaries. Finally, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy characterizes the electrohydrodynanic motion of EGaIn in capillary systems.

  5. Chemical reactions of metal powders with organic and inorganic liquids during ball milling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arias, A.

    1975-01-01

    Chromium and/or nickel powders were milled in metal chlorides and in organic liquids representative of various functional groups. The powders always reacted with the liquid and became contaminated with elements from them. The milled powders had specific surface areas ranging from 0.14 to 37 sq m/g, and the total contamination with elements from the milling liquid ranged from 0.01 to 56 weight percent. Compounds resulting from substitution, addition, or elimination reactions formed in or from the milling liquid.

  6. Velocity-density systematics of liquid indium and the validity of the Birch's law for a liquid metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, J.; Komabayashi, T.; Hirose, K.; Baron, A. Q.; Tsutsui, S.; Ohishi, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Earth's core is composed mostly of iron with some amounts of light element(s). In order to put constraints on the composition of the core, high-pressure (P) and -temperature (T) elastic properties and density of both solid and liquid iron and iron compounds are of quite importance. The Birch's law which suggests that the compressional velocity would change linearly with density, has been applied to the discussion of the core composition, since it does not require temperature of the core which is one of the most difficult parameters to constrain. Assuming the Birch's law, 300-K compression experiments of solid iron or iron compounds in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) can directly address the velocity-density relations of the inner core. On the other hand, the velocity-density relation for liquid iron has not been studied in the DAC since it requires high-temperatures. Here we investigated both velocity and density of a liquid metal, in order to study the validity of the Birch's law for the liquid metal. Since the melting temperature of iron is very high, we chose indium whose melting temperature is 430 K at 1 bar. For sound velocity measurements of liquid indium, we conducted inelastic X-ray scattering measurements in an externally heated DAC. The inelastic X-ray scattering measurements were conducted at the BL35XU, SPring-8 (Japan). We collected the data of solid and liquid phases at 10 different pressure and temperature conditions. The maximum P-T condition was 9 GPa and 750 K. The melting was confirmed by the two dimensional X-ray diffraction images. For density measurements, in-situ X-ray absorption experiments in the externally heated DAC were conducted at the BL10XU, SPring-8. Dual holes are drilled in the rhenium gasket and each hole was filled with either indium or NaCl. X-ray transmission intensities were measured by a photodiode across the sample and the standard material (NaCl). Assuming the Lambert-Beer law, we estimated the density of liquid indium up to

  7. Metallotropic liquid crystals formed by surfactant templating of molten metal halides.

    PubMed

    Martin, James D; Keary, Cristin L; Thornton, Todd A; Novotnak, Mark P; Knutson, Jeremey W; Folmer, Jacob C W

    2006-04-01

    Liquid crystals consist of anisotropic molecular units, and most are organic molecules. Materials incorporating metals into anisotropic molecules, described as metallomesogens, have been prepared. Anisotropic structures such as one-dimensional chains and two-dimensional layers are frequently observed in solid-state inorganic materials, however, little is understood about structural organization in melts of such materials. Achieving liquid-crystalline behaviour in inorganic fluids should be possible if the anisotropic structure can be retained or designed into the molten phase. We demonstrated the ability to engineer zeolite-type structures into metal halide glasses and liquids. In this work we have engineered lamellar, cubic and hexagonal liquid-crystalline structure in metal-halide melts by controlling the volume fraction and nature of the inorganic block (up to 80 mol%) with respect to alkylammonium surfactants. The high metal content of these liquid-crystalline systems significantly advances the field of metallomesogens, which seeks to combine magnetic, electronic, optical, redox and catalytic properties common to inorganic materials with the fluid properties of liquid crystals. PMID:16547520

  8. The use of ionic liquids based on choline chloride for metal deposition: A green alternative?

    PubMed

    Haerens, Kurt; Matthijs, Edward; Chmielarz, Andrzej; Van der Bruggen, Bart

    2009-08-01

    Ionic liquids are studied intensively for different applications. They tend to be denoted as "green solvents", largely because of their low vapour pressure. In recent years toxicity and biotoxicity of ionic liquids have also been investigated, which proved that not all of these are "green". In this paper the use of ionic liquids based on choline chloride and ethylene glycol in electrochemistry is discussed in the context of their use as green solvents. Due to their low toxicity and ready biodegradability, these deep eutectic solvents are promising for the electrodeposition of metals. The influence of the use of these liquids as metal deposition baths on the waste water is investigated. Drag-out was found to be the most influencing parameter on the environmental impact of the process, as it is three times higher compared to classical solutions due to the higher viscosity of the ionic liquid. There are no major changes needed in the rinsing configuration of classic electroplating plants, and ion exchange to remove the metal out of the waste water was not hindered by the presence of the ionic liquid. The formation of by-products during the deposition of metals has to be further investigated and evaluated in consideration of the environmental impact. PMID:19523749

  9. Heavy Liquid Metal Corrosion of Structural Materials in Advanced Nuclear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caro, M.; Woloshun, K.; Rubio, F.; Maloy, S. A.; Hosemann, P.

    2013-08-01

    Interest in advanced nuclear concepts using liquid metal coolant has increased in the past few years. Liquid metal coolants have been proposed for the next generation of small-sized nuclear reactors, which offer exceptional safety and reliability, sustainability, nonproliferation, and economic competitiveness. Heavy liquid metal coolants are investigated for advanced fast reactors that operate at high temperatures, reaching high efficiencies. Lead and lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolants are also proposed as coolants and targets of accelerator driven systems. High temperature, corrosive environment, high fast neutron flux, high fluence, and radiation damage, among other physical phenomena, challenge the integrity of materials in these advanced systems. Excellent compatibility with the liquid coolant is recognized as a key factor in the selection of structural materials for advanced concepts. In this article, we review materials requirements for heavy metal cooled systems with emphasis on lead and LBE materials corrosion properties. We describe experimental corrosion tests currently ongoing at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Development of Lead Alloy Technical Applications (DELTA) loop. DELTA is a facility designed to study the long-term corrosive effects of LBE on structural materials under relevant conditions of chemistry, flow, and temperature. The research studies will provide data of corrosion rates and corrosion mechanisms in selected steel exposed to high velocity (above 2 m/s) in flowing LBE at 500°C. Fundamental research studies will help support conceptual design efforts and further the development of heavy liquid metals technology.

  10. Modelling of liquid metal flow and oxide film defects in filling of aluminium alloy castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, X.; Jolly, M.; Yang, X.; Campbell, J.

    2012-07-01

    The liquid metal flow behaviours in different runner system designs have important effects on the mechanical strength of aluminium alloy castings. In this paper, a new model has been developed which is a two-dimensional program using a finite difference technique and the Marker and Cell (MAC) method to simulate the flow of liquid metal during filling a mould. In the program the Eulerian method has been used for the liquid metal flow, while the Oxide Film Entrainment Tracking Algorithm (OFET) method (a Lagrangian method) has been used to simulate the movement of the oxide film on the liquid metal surface or in the liquid metal flow. Several examples have been simulated and tested and the relevant results were obtained. These results were compared with measured bending strengths. It was found that the completed program was capable of simulating effectively the filling processes of different runner systems. The simulation results are consistent with the experiment. In addition, the program is capable of providing clearer images for predicting the distribution of the oxide film defects generated during filling a mould.

  11. Liquid metal blanket module testing and design for ITER/TIBER II

    SciTech Connect

    Mattas, R.F.; Cha, Y.; Finn, P.A.; Majumdar, S.; Picologlou, B.; Stevens, H.; Turner, L.

    1988-05-01

    A major goal for ITER is the testing of nuclear components to demonstrate the integrated performance of the most attractive concepts that can lead to a commercial fusion reactor. As part of the ITER/TIBER II study, the test program and design of test models were examined for a number of blanket concepts. The work at Argonne National Laboratory focused on self-cooled liquid metal blankets. A test program for liquid metal blankets was developed based upon the ITER/TIBER II operating schedule and the specific data needs to resolve the key issues for liquid metals. Testing can begin early in reactor operation with liquid metal MHD tests to confirm predictive capability. Combined heat transfer/MHD tests can be performed during initial plasma operation. After acceptable heat transfer performance is verified, tests to determine the integrated high temperature performance in a neutron environment can begin. During the high availability phase operation, long term performance and reliability tests will be performed. It is envisioned that a companion test program will be conducted outside ITER to determine behavior under severe accident conditions and upper performance limits. A detailed design of a liquid metal test module and auxiliary equipment was also developed. The module followed the design of the TPSS blanket. Detailed analysis of the heat transfer and tritium systems were performed, and the overall layout of the systems was determined. In general, the blanket module appears to be capable of addressing most of the testing needs. 8 refs., 27 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. Modeling of liquid-metal corrosion/deposition in a fusion reactor blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Malang, S.; Smith, D.L.

    1984-04-01

    A model has been developed for the investigation of the liquid-metal corrosion and the corrosion product transport in a liquid-metal-cooled fusion reactor blanket. The model describes the two-dimensional transport of wall material in the liquid-metal flow and is based on the following assumptions: (1) parallel flow in a straight circular tube; (2) transport of wall material perpendicular to the flow direction by diffusion and turbulent exchange; in flow direction by the flow motion only; (3) magnetic field causes uniform velocity profile with thin boundary layer and suppresses turbulent mass exchange; and (4) liquid metal at the interface is saturated with wall material. A computer code based on this model has been used to analyze the corrosion of ferritic steel by lithium lead and the deposition of wall material in the cooler part of a loop. Three cases have been investigated: (1) ANL forced convection corrosion experiment (without magnetic field); (2) corrosion in the MARS liquid-metal-cooled blanket (with magnetic field); and (3) deposition of wall material in the corrosion product cleanup system of the MARS blanket loop.

  13. Onset of cooperative dynamics in equilibrium glass-forming metallic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Zhang, Yang

    Onset of cooperative dynamics has been observed in the metastable regime of many molecular liquids, colloids, and granular materials approaching their respective glass or jamming transition points. It is also considered to play a significant role in the emergence of slow dynamics. However, the nature of such dynamical cooperativity remains elusive in multicomponent metallic liquids characterized by complex many-body interactions and high mixing entropy. Herein, we report indications of the onset of cooperative dynamics in an equilibrium glass-forming metallic liquid (ZrCuNiAl). This is revealed by deviation of the experimentally measured mean diffusion coefficient from its high temperature Arrhenius behavior below To ~ 1300 K, i.e., a crossover from uncorrelated dynamics above To to landscape-influenced correlated dynamics below To. The onset/crossover in this system is observed at approximately twice of its calorimetric glass transition temperature (Tg ~ 697 K) and in the stable liquid phase, unlike many molecular liquids. Furthermore, we show the presence of such a dynamical onset phenomenon in ten other glass-forming metallic liquids, universally occurring at approximately twice of their Tg and in their liquid phases.

  14. Positive electrode current collector for liquid metal cells

    DOEpatents

    Shimotake, Hiroshi; Bartholme, Louis G.

    1984-01-01

    A current collector for the positive electrode of an electrochemical cell with a positive electrode including a sulfide. The cell also has a negative electrode and a molten salt electrolyte including halides of a metal selected from the alkali metals and the alkaline earth metals in contact with both the positive and negative electrodes. The current collector has a base metal of copper, silver, gold, aluminum or alloys thereof with a coating thereon of iron, nickel, chromium or alloys thereof. The current collector when subjected to cell voltage forms a sulfur-containing compound on the surface thereby substantially protecting the current collector from further attack by sulfur ions during cell operation. Both electroless and electrolytic processes may be used to deposit coatings.

  15. Positive-electrode current collector for liquid-metal cells

    DOEpatents

    Shimotake, H.; Bartholme, L.G.

    1982-09-27

    A current collector for the positive electrode of an electrochemical cell with a positive electrode including a sulfide. The cell also has a negative electrode and a molten salt electrolyte including halides of a metal selected from the alkali metals and the alkaline earth metals in contact with both the positive and negative electrodes. The current collector has a base metal of copper, silver, gold, aluminum or alloys thereof with a coating thereon of iron, nickel, chromium or alloys thereof. The current collector when subjected to cell voltage forms a sulfur-containing compound on the surface thereby substantially protecting the current collector from further attack by sulfur ions during cell operation. Both electroless and electrolytic processes may be used to deposit coatings.

  16. Liquid metal filtration and distribution using fiberglass fabric

    SciTech Connect

    Brochu, C.; Dault, R.; Tremblay, S.P.

    1996-10-01

    In the last decade, the aluminum industry has mainly focused on improving metal quality by working on furnaces and casting practices and especially on in-line treatment units. However, fiberglass fabric is widely used throughout the industry. It is specially used at the last step before the solidification process when molten metal is transferred from the trough to the ingot mold. In this regard, little effort has been reported on better understanding or using fiberglass fabric in molten aluminum filtration and distribution applications. This paper will review the fiberglass fabric options. The different fiberglass fabric coatings and finishes will be described as well as their properties and characteristics with regard to molten aluminum. Fiberglass fabric used in filtration applications will be defined as a function of selected parameters such as opening, finish, throughput, etc. Finally, metal distribution will be discussed. A better understanding of fiberglass fabric finishes and bag configuration will improve metal distribution and ultimately, the final ingot quality.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of bubble formation and cavitation in liquid metals.

    SciTech Connect

    Insepov, Z.; Hassanein, A.; Bazhirov, T. T.; Norman, G. E.; Stegailov, V. V.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Inst. for High Energy Densities of Joint Inst. for High Temperatures of RAS

    2007-11-01

    Thermodynamics and kinetics of nano-scale bubble formation in liquid metals such as Li and Pb were studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at pressures typical for magnetic and inertial fusion. Two different approaches to bubble formation were developed. In one method, radial densities, pressures, surface tensions, and work functions of the cavities in supercooled liquid lithium were calculated and compared with the surface tension experimental data. The critical radius of a stable cavity in liquid lithium was found for the first time. In the second method, the cavities were created in the highly stretched region of the liquid phase diagram; and then the stability boundary and the cavitation rates were calculated in liquid lead. The pressure dependences of cavitation frequencies were obtained over the temperature range 700-2700 K in liquid Pb. The results of MD calculations for cavitation rate were compared with estimates of classical nucleation theory (CNT).

  18. On the Shape of Liquid Metal Droplets in Electromagnetic Levitation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, E.; Sauerland, S.; Szekely, J.; Egry, I.

    1993-01-01

    We present calculations and measurements on the shape of liquid metal droplets in electromagnetic levitation experiments. A normal stress balance model was developed to predict the shapes of liquid metal droplets that will be obtained in a microgravity experiment to measure the viscosity and surface tension of undercooled metals. This model was tested by calculating the droplet shapes in containerless experiments conducted to determine the surface tension of liquid metals. Inconsistencies associated with the results of a previous paper are elucidated. The computational results of the mathematical model are compared with the results of ground-based experiments for two different metals. The importance of the ratio of electromagnetic skin depth-to-droplet radius to the accuracy of the mathematical model is discussed. A planned alternate approach to modeling the shape by consideration of the entire droplet rather than only the surface is presented. As an example of an application. the influence of the shape on the splitting of the surface oscillation modes of levitated liquid metal droplets is discussed.

  19. Production of aluminium metal matrix composites by liquid processing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Kumar, R.; Tharmaraj, R.; Velu, P. Shenbaga

    2016-05-01

    Owing to high strength to low weight ratio, Aluminium matrix composites are widely used in diverse applications of many industries. This lucrative property is achieved by reinforcing the brittle ceramic particles in the aluminium matrix. Aluminium matrix composites are produced by liquid processing methods and solid processing methods. Nevertheless, liquidprocessing techniques stand out because of its simplicity and its suitability for mass production. In this review article, the production of aluminium matrix composites by different liquid processing technique is discussed and a comparative study is carried out.

  20. Homogeneous liquid-liquid extraction of metal ions with non-fluorinated bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate ionic liquids having a lower critical solution temperature in combination with water.

    PubMed

    Depuydt, Daphne; Liu, Liwang; Glorieux, Christ; Dehaen, Wim; Binnemans, Koen

    2015-09-28

    Ionic liquids with an ether-functionalised cation and the bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate anion show thermomorphic behaviour in water, with a lower critical solution temperature. These ionic liquids are useful for homogeneous liquid-liquid extraction of first-row (3d) transition metals. PMID:26255754

  1. Pinball liquid phase from Hund's coupling in frustrated transition-metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralko, Arnaud; Merino, Jaime; Fratini, Simone

    2015-04-01

    The interplay of nonlocal Coulomb repulsion and Hund's coupling in the d -orbital manifold in frustrated triangular lattices is analyzed by a multiband extended Hubbard model. We find a rich phase diagram with several competing phases, including a robust pinball liquid phase, which is an unconventional metal characterized by threefold charge order, bad metallic behavior, and the emergence of high-spin local moments. Our results naturally explain the anomalous charge-ordered metallic state observed in the triangular layered compound AgNiO2. The potential relevance to other triangular transition-metal oxides is discussed.

  2. Lunar Oxygen Production and Metals Extraction Using Ionic Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marone, Matthew; Paley, Mark Steven; Donovan, David N.; Karr, Laurel J.

    2009-01-01

    Initial results indicate that ionic liquids are promising media for the extraction of oxygen from lunar regolith. IL acid systems can solubilize regolith and produce water with high efficiency. IL electrolytes are effective for water electrolysis, and the spent IL acid media are capable of regeneration.

  3. Performance test of electromagnetic pump on heavy liquid metal in PREKY-I facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    li, X. L.; Ma, X. D.; Zhu, Z. Q.; Li, Y.; Lv, K. F.

    2016-05-01

    Pump is a key sub-system which drives the heavy liquid metal circulation in experimental loops. In the paper, the hydraulic and mechanical performances of an electromagnetic pump (EMP) were tested in the liquid metal test facility named PREKY-I. The test results showed that the EMP worked at good state when the working current was up to 170 ampere. In this condition, the flow rate was 5m3/h, and pressure head 7.5bar, when the outlet temperature was kept at 380°C during the test. The performance was close to the expected design parameters. The EMP had run continuously for 200 hours with stable performance. From the test results, the EMP could be used in KYLIN-II loop, which is the upgrade liquid metal test loop of PREKY-I.

  4. Performance capabilities of a space-power liquid metal MHD converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laborde, R.; Alemany, A.; Werkoff, F.

    In a Liquid Metal MHD (or Faraday) converter, thermal energy is converted into electrical energy by the expansion of a condensable fluid, the acceleration of a liquid metal and its circulation through a MHD generator. The performance capabilities of such a converter appear to be very attractive for a utilization in space with lithium and caesium as liquid metal and condensable fluid respectively. A code based on balance equations has been developed to estimate the masses, sizes and efficiencies of all parts of the converters. Iterative methods are used for each part, while the caesium mass flow rate acts as a control parameter in an external loop. Lastly we present results typical of a 200 kW electrical power station.

  5. Development of a lithium liquid metal ion source for MeV ion beam analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Read, P.M.; Maskrey, J.T.; Alton, G.D.

    1988-01-01

    Lithium liquid metal ion sources are an attractive complement to the existing gaseous ion sources that are extensively used for ion beam analysis. This is due in part to the high brightness of the liquid metal ion source and in part to the availability of a lithium ion beam. High brightness is of particular importance to MeV ion microprobes which are now approaching current density limitations on targets determined by the ion source. The availability of a lithium beam provides increased capabilities for hydrogen profiling and high resolution Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. This paper describes the design and performance of a lithium liquid metal ion source suitable for use on a 5MV Laddertron accelerator. Operational experience with the source and some of its uses for ion beam analysis are discussed. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Development of a wet vapor homogeneous liquid metal MHD power system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Branover, H.; Unger, Y.; El-Boher, A.; Schweitzer, H.

    1991-09-01

    A feasibility study for the approval of liquid metal seeds recovery from a liquid metal vapor-inert gas mixture was conducted and presented in this report. The research activity included background studies on processes relating to mixing stream condenser performance, parametric studies and its experimental validation. The condensation process under study includes mass transfer phenomena combined with heat transfer and phase change. Numerical methods were used in order to solve the dynamic equations and to carry out the parametric study as well as the experimental data reduction. The MSC performance is highly effected by droplet diameter, thus the possibility of atomizing liquid metals were experimentally investigated. The results are generalized and finally used for a set of recommendations by which the recovery of seeds is expected to be feasible.

  7. Linking structure to fragility in bulk metallic glass-forming liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Shuai E-mail: m.stolpe@mx.uni-saarland.de; Stolpe, Moritz E-mail: m.stolpe@mx.uni-saarland.de; Gross, Oliver; Gallino, Isabella; Hembree, William; Busch, Ralf; Evenson, Zach; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kruzic, Jamie J.

    2015-05-04

    Using in-situ synchrotron X-ray scattering, we show that the structural evolution of various bulk metallic glass-forming liquids can be quantitatively connected to their viscosity behavior in the supercooled liquid near T{sub g}. The structural signature of fragility is identified as the temperature dependence of local dilatation on distinct key atomic length scales. A more fragile behavior results from a more pronounced thermally induced dilatation of the structure on a length scale of about 3 to 4 atomic diameters, coupled with shallower temperature dependence of structural changes in the nearest neighbor environment. These findings shed light on the structural origin of viscous slowdown during undercooling of bulk metallic glass-forming liquids and demonstrate the promise of predicting the properties of bulk metallic glasses from the atomic scale structure.

  8. Crystalline monolayer surface of liquid Au-Cu-Si-Ag-Pd: Metallic glass former

    SciTech Connect

    Mechler, S; Yahel, E; Pershan, P S; Meron, M; Lin, B

    2012-02-06

    It is demonstrated by means of x-ray synchrotron reflectivity and diffraction that the surface of the liquid phase of the bulk metallic glass forming alloy Au49Cu26.9Si16.3Ag5.5Pd2.3 consists of a two-dimensional crystalline monolayer phase for temperatures of up to about 50 K above the eutectic temperature. The present alloy as well as glass forming Au82Si18 and Au-Si-Ge alloys containing small amounts of Ge are the only metallic liquids to exhibit surface freezing well above the melting temperature. This suggests that the phenomena of surface freezing in metallic liquids and glass forming ability are related and probably governed by similar physical properties.

  9. Liquid nanodroplet formation through phase explosion mechanism in laser-irradiated metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzi, Alberto; Gorrini, Federico; Miotello, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Some quantitative aspects of laser-irradiated pure metals, while approaching phase explosion, are still not completely understood. Here, we develop a model that describes the main quantities regulating the liquid-vapor explosive phase transition and the expulsion of liquid nanodroplets that, by solidifying, give rise to nanoparticle formation. The model combines both a thermodynamics description of the explosive phase change and a Monte Carlo simulation of the randomly generated critical vapor bubbles. The calculation is performed on a set of seven metals (Al, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ag, and Au) which are frequently used in pulsed laser ablation experiments. Our final predictions about the size distribution of the liquid nanodroplets and the number ratio of liquid/vapor ejected atoms are compared, whenever possible, with available molecular dynamics simulations and experimental data.

  10. Metal corrosion in a supercritical carbon dioxide - liquid sodium power cycle.

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Robert Charles; Conboy, Thomas M.

    2012-02-01

    A liquid sodium cooled fast reactor coupled to a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton power cycle is a promising combination for the next generation nuclear power production process. For optimum efficiency, a microchannel heat exchanger, constructed by diffusion bonding, can be used for heat transfer from the liquid sodium reactor coolant to the supercritical carbon dioxide. In this work, we have reviewed the literature on corrosion of metals in liquid sodium and carbon dioxide. The main conclusions are (1) pure, dry CO{sub 2} is virtually inert but can be highly corrosive in the presence of even ppm concentrations of water, (2) carburization and decarburization are very significant mechanism for corrosion in liquid sodium especially at high temperature and the mechanism is not well understood, and (3) very little information could be located on corrosion of diffusion bonded metals. Significantly more research is needed in all of these areas.

  11. Electrolytic reduction of liquid metal oxides and its application to reconfigurable structured devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinqi; Appusamy, Kanagasundar; Guruswamy, Sivaraman; Nahata, Ajay

    2015-03-01

    Structured metallic patterns are routinely used for a wide variety of applications, ranging from electronic circuits to plasmonics and metamaterials. Numerous techniques have been developed for the fabrication of these devices, in which the metal patterns are typically formed using conventional metals. While this approach has proven very successful, it does generally limit the ability to reconfigure the geometry of the overall device. Here, we demonstrate the ability to create artificially structured metallic devices using liquid metals, in which the configuration can be altered via the electrolysis of saline solutions or deionized water. We accomplish this using an elastomeric mold with two different sets of embedded microfluidic channels that are patterned and injected with EGaIn and water, respectively. The electrochemical reaction is then used to etch the thin oxide layer that forms on eutectic gallium indium (EGaIn) in a controlled reproducible manner. Once the oxide layer is dissolved locally, the underlying liquid metal retracts away from the original position to a position where a new stable oxide layer can reform, which is equivalent to erasing a section of the liquid metal. To allow for full reconfigurability, the entire device can be reset by refilling all of the microchannels with EGaIn.

  12. Electrolytic reduction of liquid metal oxides and its application to reconfigurable structured devices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinqi; Appusamy, Kanagasundar; Guruswamy, Sivaraman; Nahata, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Structured metallic patterns are routinely used for a wide variety of applications, ranging from electronic circuits to plasmonics and metamaterials. Numerous techniques have been developed for the fabrication of these devices, in which the metal patterns are typically formed using conventional metals. While this approach has proven very successful, it does generally limit the ability to reconfigure the geometry of the overall device. Here, we demonstrate the ability to create artificially structured metallic devices using liquid metals, in which the configuration can be altered via the electrolysis of saline solutions or deionized water. We accomplish this using an elastomeric mold with two different sets of embedded microfluidic channels that are patterned and injected with EGaIn and water, respectively. The electrochemical reaction is then used to etch the thin oxide layer that forms on eutectic gallium indium (EGaIn) in a controlled reproducible manner. Once the oxide layer is dissolved locally, the underlying liquid metal retracts away from the original position to a position where a new stable oxide layer can reform, which is equivalent to erasing a section of the liquid metal. To allow for full reconfigurability, the entire device can be reset by refilling all of the microchannels with EGaIn. PMID:25727894

  13. Electrolytic reduction of liquid metal oxides and its application to reconfigurable structured devices

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinqi; Appusamy, Kanagasundar; Guruswamy, Sivaraman; Nahata, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Structured metallic patterns are routinely used for a wide variety of applications, ranging from electronic circuits to plasmonics and metamaterials. Numerous techniques have been developed for the fabrication of these devices, in which the metal patterns are typically formed using conventional metals. While this approach has proven very successful, it does generally limit the ability to reconfigure the geometry of the overall device. Here, we demonstrate the ability to create artificially structured metallic devices using liquid metals, in which the configuration can be altered via the electrolysis of saline solutions or deionized water. We accomplish this using an elastomeric mold with two different sets of embedded microfluidic channels that are patterned and injected with EGaIn and water, respectively. The electrochemical reaction is then used to etch the thin oxide layer that forms on eutectic gallium indium (EGaIn) in a controlled reproducible manner. Once the oxide layer is dissolved locally, the underlying liquid metal retracts away from the original position to a position where a new stable oxide layer can reform, which is equivalent to erasing a section of the liquid metal. To allow for full reconfigurability, the entire device can be reset by refilling all of the microchannels with EGaIn. PMID:25727894

  14. Bioremediation of heavy metals in liquid media through fungi isolated from contaminated sources.

    PubMed

    Joshi, P K; Swarup, Anand; Maheshwari, Sonu; Kumar, Raman; Singh, Namita

    2011-10-01

    Wastewater particularly from electroplating, paint, leather, metal and tanning industries contain enormous amount of heavy metals. Microorganisms including fungi have been reported to exclude heavy metals from wastewater through bioaccumulation and biosorption at low cost and in eco-friendly way. An attempt was, therefore, made to isolate fungi from sites contaminated with heavy metals for higher tolerance and removal of heavy metals from wastewater. Seventy-six fungal isolates tolerant to heavy metals like Pb, Cd, Cr and Ni were isolated from sewage, sludge and industrial effluents containing heavy metals. Four fungi (Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Aspegillus awamori, Aspergillus flavus, Trichoderma viride) also were included in this study. The majority of the fungal isolates were able to tolerate up to 400 ppm concentration of Pb, Cd, Cr and Ni. The most heavy metal tolerant fungi were studied for removal of heavy metals from liquid media at 50 ppm concentration. Results indicated removal of substantial amount of heavy metals by some of the fungi. With respect to Pb, Cd, Cr and Ni, maximum uptake of 59.67, 16.25, 0.55, and 0.55 mg/g was observed by fungi Pb3 (Aspergillus terreus), Trichoderma viride, Cr8 (Trichoderma longibrachiatum), and isolate Ni27 (A. niger) respectively. This indicated the potential of these fungi as biosorbent for removal of heavy metals from wastewater and industrial effluents containing higher concentration of heavy metals. PMID:23024411

  15. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), Westinghouse phase 1. Volume 10: Liquid-metal MHD systems. [energy conversion efficiency of electric power plants using liquid metal magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, R. R.; Lippert, T. E.

    1976-01-01

    Electric Power Plant costs and efficiencies are presented for two basic liquid-metal cycles corresponding to 922 and 1089 K (1200 and 1500 F) for a commercial applications using direct coal firing. Sixteen plant designs are considered for which major component equipment were sized and costed. The design basis for each major component is discussed. Also described is the overall systems computer model that was developed to analyze the thermodynamics of the various cycle configurations that were considered.

  16. Multiphysics analysis of liquid metal annular linear induction pumps: A project overview

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maidana, Carlos Omar; Nieminen, Juha E.

    2016-03-14

    Liquid metal-cooled fission reactors are both moderated and cooled by a liquid metal solution. These reactors are typically very compact and they can be used in regular electric power production, for naval and space propulsion systems or in fission surface power systems for planetary exploration. The coupling between the electromagnetics and thermo-fluid mechanical phenomena observed in liquid metal thermo-magnetic systems for nuclear and space applications gives rise to complex engineering magnetohydrodynamics and numerical problems. It is known that electromagnetic pumps have a number of advantages over rotating mechanisms: absence of moving parts, low noise and vibration level, simplicity of flowmore » rate regulation, easy maintenance and so on. However, while developing annular linear induction pumps, we are faced with a significant problem of magnetohydrodynamic instability arising in the device. The complex flow behavior in this type of devices includes a time-varying Lorentz force and pressure pulsation due to the time-varying electromagnetic fields and the induced convective currents that originates from the liquid metal flow, leading to instability problems along the device geometry. The determinations of the geometry and electrical configuration of liquid metal thermo-magnetic devices give rise to a complex inverse magnetohydrodynamic field problem were techniques for global optimization should be used, magnetohydrodynamics instabilities understood –or quantified- and multiphysics models developed and analyzed. Lastly, we present a project overview as well as a few computational models developed to study liquid metal annular linear induction pumps using first principles and the a few results of our multi-physics analysis.« less

  17. Efficient separation of transition metals from rare earths by an undiluted phosphonium thiocyanate ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Rout, Alok; Binnemans, Koen

    2016-06-21

    The ionic liquid trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium thiocyanate has been used for the extraction of the transition metal ions Co(ii), Ni(ii), Zn(ii), and the rare-earth ions La(iii), Sm(iii) and Eu(iii) from aqueous solutions containing nitrate or chloride salts. The transition metal ions showed a high affinity for the ionic liquid phase and were efficiently extracted, while the extraction efficiency of the rare-earth ions was low. This difference in extraction behavior enabled separation of the pairs Co(ii)/Sm(iii), Ni(ii)/La(iii) and Zn(ii)/Eu(iii). These separations are relevant for the recycling of rare earths and transition metals from samarium cobalt permanent magnets, nickel metal hydride batteries and lamp phosphors, respectively. The extraction of metal ions from a chloride or nitrate solution with a thiocyanate ionic liquid is an example of "split-anion extraction", where different anions are present in the aqueous and ionic liquid phase. Close to 100% loading was possible for Co(ii) and Zn(ii) up to a concentration of 40 g L(-1) of the transition metal salt in the initial aqueous feed solution, whereas the extraction efficiency for Ni(ii) gradually decreased with increase in the initial feed concentration. Stripping of Co(ii), Zn(ii) and Ni(ii) from the loaded ionic liquid phase was possible by a 15 wt% NH3 solution. The ionic liquid could reused after extraction and stripping. PMID:27243450

  18. Modeling of the mass transfer rates of metal ions across supported liquid membranes. 1: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Elhassadi, A.A.; Do, D.D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with the modeling of the transport and separation of metal ions across supported liquid membranes. The mass transfer resistance at the liquid-membrane interfaces and the interfacial chemical reactions at both the extracting side and the stripping side are taken into account in the model equations. Simple analysis of the time scale of the system shows the influence of various important parameters and their interactions on the overall transport rate. Parametric studies are also dealt with in this paper.

  19. Colloids as model systems for liquid undercooled metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wette, Patrick; Klassen, Ina; Holland-Moritz, Dirk; Palberg, Thomas; Roth, Stephan V.; Herlach, Dieter M.

    2009-01-01

    Charged colloidal particles interact via a hard core Yukawa potential, while isotropic Lennard-Jones-like potentials are frequently used as pair potentials in metals. We present measurements of the structure factor of shear molten monodisperse colloids and molten metals using ultrasmall-angle x-ray scattering and elastic neutron scattering, respectively. In both systems data analysis gives evidence of fivefold-symmetric short-range order becoming more pronounced with increasing deviations from equilibrium. The experiments demonstrate that in both systems topological effects control ordering in the melt state.

  20. Photolithography-Based Patterning of Liquid Metal Interconnects for Monolithically Integrated Stretchable Circuits.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Woo; Moon, Yu Gyeong; Seong, Hyejeong; Jung, Soon Won; Oh, Ji-Young; Na, Bock Soon; Park, Nae-Man; Lee, Sang Seok; Im, Sung Gap; Koo, Jae Bon

    2016-06-22

    We demonstrate a new patterning technique for gallium-based liquid metals on flat substrates, which can provide both high pattern resolution (∼20 μm) and alignment precision as required for highly integrated circuits. In a very similar manner as in the patterning of solid metal films by photolithography and lift-off processes, the liquid metal layer painted over the whole substrate area can be selectively removed by dissolving the underlying photoresist layer, leaving behind robust liquid patterns as defined by the photolithography. This quick and simple method makes it possible to integrate fine-scale interconnects with preformed devices precisely, which is indispensable for realizing monolithically integrated stretchable circuits. As a way for constructing stretchable integrated circuits, we propose a hybrid configuration composed of rigid device regions and liquid interconnects, which is constructed on a rigid substrate first but highly stretchable after being transferred onto an elastomeric substrate. This new method can be useful in various applications requiring both high-resolution and precisely aligned patterning of gallium-based liquid metals. PMID:27250997

  1. Liquid-metal, pin-fin pressure drop by correlation in cross flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Kuzay, T.M.; Assoufid, L. )

    1995-02-01

    The pin-fin configuration is widely used in high-heat-flux applications. Recently, the pin-fin design with liquid-metal coolant was also applied to synchrotron-radiation beamline devices. This article investigates the pressure drop in a pin-post crystal with liquid gallium as the coolant. Because the pin-post configuration is a relatively new concept, information in the literature on pin-post mirrors or crystals is rare, and information on the pressure drop in pin-post mirrors with liquid metal as the coolant is even rarer. Because the cross flow in cylinder-array geometry is very similar to that of the pin post, the pressure drop correlation data for the cross flow of fluid with various fluid characteristics or properties through a tube bank are studied so that the results can be scaled to the pin-fin geometry with liquid metal as the coolant. The emphasis of this article is on the influence of two variables on the pressure drop: viscosity and density of fluid. The difference and correlation of the pressure drop between long and short posts and the predication of the pressure drop of liquid metal in the pin-post mirror and comparison with an existing experiment are addressed.

  2. Packaging a liquid metal ESD with micro-scale Mercury droplet.

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, Casey Anderson

    2011-08-01

    A liquid metal ESD is being developed to provide electrical switching at different acceleration levels. The metal will act as both proof mass and electric contact. Mercury is chosen to comply with operation parameters. There are many challenges surrounding the deposition and containment of micro scale mercury droplets. Novel methods of micro liquid transfer are developed to deliver controllable amounts of mercury to the appropriate channels in volumes under 1 uL. Issues of hermetic sealing and avoidance of mercury contamination are also addressed.

  3. Liquid metal MHD heat transfer investigations apllied to fusion Tokamak reactor cooling ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sviridov, V. G.; Ivochkin, Yu. P.; Razuvanov, N. G.; Zhilin, V. G.; Genin, L. G.; Ivanova, O. N.; Averianov, K. V.

    2003-12-01

    The liquid metal heat transfer experimental investigations were carried out at the joint MPEI-IIHI magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) complex. The united scientific group examines the liquid metal flow in a horizontal heated tube without and under a longitudinal or a transverse magnetic field. Various configurations of the applied heat flux were taken into consideration. All these cases correspond to the flow in the Tokamak fusion reactor blanket or divertor. Temperature fields, temperature fluctuations field, heat transfer intensities were measured. Strong influence of thermogravitational convection was observed in a horizontal heated tube. Depending on the MHD-configuration, magnetic fields (MF) can enhance or weaken this effect. Tables 2, Figs 5, Refs 8.

  4. X-ray grating interferometry with a liquid-metal-jet source

    SciTech Connect

    Thüring, T.; Rutishauser, S.; Stampanoni, M.; Zhou, T.; Lundström, U.; Burvall, A.; Hertz, H. M.; David, C.

    2013-08-26

    A liquid-metal-jet X-ray tube is used in an X-ray phase-contrast microscope based on a Talbot type grating interferometer. With a focal spot size in the range of a few microns and a photon flux of ∼10{sup 12} photons/s×sr, the brightness of such a source is approximately one order of magnitude higher than for a conventional microfocus source. For comparison, a standard microfocus source was used with the same grating interferometer, showing significantly increased visibility for the liquid-metal-jet arrangement. Together with the increased flux, this results in improved signal-to-noise ratio.

  5. Transport properties of liquid metals and viscosity of the earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    Coefficients expressing transport properties of liquid metals (viscosity and diffusivity) can be scaled to the absolute melting temperature. A systematic review of the published experimental data leads to the conclusion that the effect of pressure on viscosity and diffusivity can be taken into account through its effect on the melting temperature. Hence the viscosity and diffusivity at the melting temperature are constants for a given metal. The viscosity of the earth's liquid core, near the inner core boundary, is probably close to 6 centipoises. It is suggested that the diffusivity of sulfur in the core is probably of the order of 0.0001 sq cm/sec.

  6. Full strength compacts by extrusion of glassy metal powder at the supercooled liquid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Yoshihito; Kato, Hidemi; Inoue, Akihisa; Masumoto, Tsuyoshi

    1995-10-01

    We report the production of full strength compacts of metallic glass by warm extrusion of powders at the supercooled liquid state just above the glass transition temperature. The alloy used was Zr65Al10Ni10Cu15 (at. %) which has the lowest viscosity among Zr-based metallic glasses with large supercooled liquid region. The tensile strength and Young's modulus of the glassy powder compacts were 1520 MPa and 80 GPa, respectively, which are similar to that obtained in the as-cast bulk alloy and melt-spun ribbon. This opens up possibilities of producing high strength amorphous alloys with complex shapes.

  7. Analysis of heat transfer for a normally impinging liquid-metal slot jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1973-01-01

    A two-dimensional liquid-metal slot jet that is impinging normally against a uniformly heated flat plate is analyzed. The distributions of wall temperature and heat-transfer coefficient are obtained as functions of position along the plate. The liquid-metal assumptions are made that the jet is inviscid and that molecular condition is dominating heat diffusion. The solution is obtained by mapping the jet flow region into a potential plane where it occupies a strip of uniform width. The energy equation is transformed into potential coordinates, and an exact solution obtained in the strip region. Conformal mapping is then used to transform the solution into the physical plane.

  8. Double-sided electromagnetic pump with controllable normal force for rapid solidification of liquid metals

    DOEpatents

    Kuznetsov, Stephen B.

    1987-01-01

    A system for casting liquid metals is provided with an electromagnetic pump which includes a pair of primary blocks each having a polyphase winding and being positioned to form a gap through which a movable conductive heat sink passes. A solidifying liquid metal sheet is deposited on the heat sink and the heat sink and sheet are held in compression by forces produced as a result of current flow through the polyphase windings. Shaded-pole interaction between the primary windings, heat sink and solidifying strip produce transverse forces which act to center the strip on the heat sink.

  9. Double-sided electromagnetic pump with controllable normal force for rapid solidification of liquid metals

    DOEpatents

    Kuznetsov, S.B.

    1987-01-13

    A system for casting liquid metals is provided with an electromagnetic pump which includes a pair of primary blocks each having a polyphase winding and being positioned to form a gap through which a movable conductive heat sink passes. A solidifying liquid metal sheet is deposited on the heat sink and the heat sink and sheet are held in compression by forces produced as a result of current flow through the polyphase windings. Shaded-pole interaction between the primary windings, heat sink and solidifying strip produce transverse forces which act to center the strip on the heat sink. 5 figs.

  10. Updated reference design of a liquid metal cooled tandem mirror fusion breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Berwald, D.H.; Whitley, R.H.; Garner, J.K.; Gromada, R.J.; McCarville, T.J.; Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Bandini, B.R.; Fulton, F.J.; Wong, C.P.C.; Maya, I.; Hoot, C.G.; Schultz, K.R.; Miller, L.G.; Beeston, J.M.; Harris, B.L.; Westman, R.A.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Orient, G.; Wolfer, M.; DeVan, J.H.; Torterelli, P.

    1985-09-01

    Detailed studies of key techinical issues for liquid metal cooled fusion breeder (fusion-fission hybrid blankets) have been performed during the period 1983-4. Based upon the results of these studies, the 1982 reference liquid metal cooled tandem mirror fusion breeder blanket design was updated and is described. The updated reference blankets provides increased breeding and lower technological risk in comparison with the original reference blanket. In addition to the blanket design revisions, a plant concept, cost, and fuel cycle economics assessment is provided. The fusion breeder continues to promise an economical source of fissile fuel for the indefinite future.

  11. Transmission electron microscopic observations of embrittlement of an aluminum alloy by liquid metal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.M.; Su, Y.J.; Qiao, L.J.; Chu, W.Y.

    1999-09-01

    Change in dislocation configuration ahead of a loaded crack tip of Al alloy 7075 (UNS A97075) before and after adsorbing Hg-3at% Ga atoms, and initiation of liquid-metal-induced microcracking have been observed in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) using a special TEM constant-deflection device with precracked foil. Results showed that chemisorption of liquid metal atoms can facilitate dislocation emission multiplication and motion. A microcrack initiated in the dislocation free zone or at the crack tip and propagated by a cleavage made when the chemisorption-facilitated local plasticity developed to a critical level.

  12. Onset of Cooperative Dynamics in an Equilibrium Glass-Forming Metallic Liquid.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; O'Keeffe, Stephanie; Mills, Rebecca; Podlesynak, Andrey; Ehlers, Georg; Dmowski, Wojciech; Lokshin, Konstantin; Stevick, Joseph; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2016-02-18

    Onset of cooperative dynamics has been observed in many molecular liquids, colloids, and granular materials in the metastable regime on approaching their respective glass or jamming transition points, and is considered to play a significant role in the emergence of the slow dynamics. However, the nature of such dynamical cooperativity remains elusive in multicomponent metallic liquids characterized by complex many-body interactions and high mixing entropy. Herein, we report evidence of onset of cooperative dynamics in an equilibrium glass-forming metallic liquid (LM601: Zr51Cu36Ni4Al9). This is revealed by deviation of the mean effective diffusion coefficient from its high-temperature Arrhenius behavior below TA ≈ 1300 K, i.e., a crossover from uncorrelated dynamics above TA to landscape-influenced correlated dynamics below TA. Furthermore, the onset/crossover temperature TA in such a multicomponent bulk metallic glass-forming liquid is observed at approximately twice of its calorimetric glass transition temperature (Tg ≈ 697 K) and in its stable liquid phase, unlike many molecular liquids. PMID:26798946

  13. Controlling Surface Chemistry of Gallium Liquid Metal Alloys to Enhance their Fluidic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyas, Nahid; Cumby, Brad; Cook, Alexander; Durstock, Michael; Tabor, Christopher; Materials; Manufacturing Directorate Team

    Gallium liquid metal alloys (GaLMAs) are one of the key components of emerging technologies in reconfigurable electronics, such as tunable radio frequency antennas and electronic switches. Reversible flow of GaLMA in microchannels of these types of devices is hindered by the instantaneous formation of its oxide skin in ambient environment. The oxide film sticks to most surfaces leaving unwanted metallic residues that can cause undesired electronic properties. In this report, residue-free reversible flow of a binary alloy of gallium (eutectic gallium indium) is demonstrated via two types of surface modifications where the oxide film is either protected by an organic thin film or chemically removed. An interface modification layer (alkyl phosphonic acids) was introduced into the microfluidic system to modify the liquid metal surface and protect its oxide layer. Alternatively, an ion exchange membrane was utilized as a 'sponge-like' channel material to store and slowly release small amounts of HCl to react with the surface oxide of the liquid metal. Characterization of these interfaces at molecular level by surface spectroscopy and microscopy provided with mechanistic details for the interfacial interactions between the liquid metal surface and the channel materials.

  14. Liquid-metal binary cycles for stationary power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutstein, M.; Furman, E. R.; Kaplan, G. M.

    1975-01-01

    The use of topping cycles to increase electric power plant efficiency is discussed, with particular attention to mercury and alkali metal Rankine cycle systems that could be considered for topping cycle applications. An overview of this technology, possible system applications, the required development, and possible problem areas is presented.

  15. Economizer Based Data Center Liquid Cooling with Advanced Metal Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy Chainer

    2012-11-30

    A new chiller-less data center liquid cooling system utilizing the outside air environment has been shown to achieve up to 90% reduction in cooling energy compared to traditional chiller based data center cooling systems. The system removes heat from Volume servers inside a Sealed Rack and transports the heat using a liquid loop to an Outdoor Heat Exchanger which rejects the heat to the outdoor ambient environment. The servers in the rack are cooled using a hybrid cooling system by removing the majority of the heat generated by the processors and memory by direct thermal conduction using coldplates and the heat generated by the remaining components using forced air convection to an air- to- liquid heat exchanger inside the Sealed Rack. The anticipated benefits of such energy-centric configurations are significant energy savings at the data center level. When compared to a traditional 10 MW data center, which typically uses 25% of its total data center energy consumption for cooling this technology could potentially enable a cost savings of up to $800,000-$2,200,000/year (assuming electricity costs of 4 to 11 cents per kilowatt-hour) through the reduction in electrical energy usage.

  16. Liquid metal diffusion experiments in microgravity—vibrational effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathiak, G.; Plescher, E.; Willnecker, R.

    2005-02-01

    Diffusion and convection in melts play an important role in most technological processes involving the liquid state. Many diffusion experiments in liquids suffer from additional transport induced by gravity-driven flow. Therefore, different research groups performed experiments under microgravity conditions aboard a space vehicle. But even there, diffusion measurements can be disturbed by residual accelerations and vibrations. To analyse this additional transport, model experiments using water as liquid were performed inside an airplane performing zero gravity flight manoeuvres. Because of the short duration of low gravity, the analogy between diffusive mass transport and the faster heat transport was used. The angle between the capillary and the direction of acceleration ranged between 0° and 90°. For an oscillation amplitude of 100 mm, the increase of the frequency up to 1 Hz led to a slight increase of the additional transport. Experiments with 1.7 Hz showed an additional transport of a 50% maximum. The effect of the angle between the capillary and the acceleration vector was within the experimental error limits.

  17. Overview of EU activities on DEMO liquid metal breeder blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Giancarli, L.; Proust, E.

    1994-12-31

    The European test-blanket development programme, started in 1988, is aiming at the selection by 1995 of two DEMO-relevant blanket lines to be tested in ITER. At present, four lines of blanket are under development, two of them using solid and the other two liquid breeder materials. As far as liquid breeders are concerned, two lines of blankets have been selected within the European Union, the water-cooled lithium-lead (the eutectic Pb-17Li) blankets and the dual-coolant Pb-17Li blankets. Designs have been developed considering an agreed set of DEMO specifications, such as, for instance, a fusion power of 2,200 MW, a neutron wall-loading of 2MW/m{sup 2}, a life-time of 20,000 hours, and the use of martensitic steel as a structural material. Moreover, an experimental program has been set up in order to address the main critical issues for each line. The present paper gives an overview of both design and experimental activities within the European Union concerning these two lines of liquid breeder blankets.

  18. Performance investigations of liquid-metal heat pipes for space and terrestrial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemme, J. E.; Keddy, E. S.; Phillips, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The high heat transfer capacity of liquid-metal heat pipes is demonstrated in performance tests with mercury, potassium, sodium, and lithium working fluids and wick structures which serve to minimize liquid pressure losses and vapor/liquid interactions. Appropriate wicks for horizontal and vertical operation are described. It is shown that heat-transfer with these wicks is limited by vapor flow effects. Examples are given of particular effects associated with a long adiabatic section between evaporator and condenser and with a heat source of uniform temperature as opposed to a source of uniform power.

  19. Liquid drop technique for generation of organic glass and metal shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. D.

    1982-01-01

    It was found that liquid drop techniques are very useful in several diverse areas. For producing very uniform metallic, organic, inorganic and, on particular, glassy shells, the liquid jet method is the most reproducible and exceptionally useful of all the techniques studied. The technique of capillary wave synchronization of the break-up of single and multiple component jets was utilized to produce uniform sized liquid drops and solid particles, and hollow liquid and solid shells. The technique was also used to encapsulate a number of liquids in impermeable spherical shells. Highly uniform glass shells were made by generating uniform drops of glass forming materials in an aqueous solution, subsequently evaporating the water, and then fusing and blowing the remaining solids in a high temperature vertical tube furnace. Experimental results are presented and the critical problems in further research in this field are discussed.

  20. Partitioning of transition metals between diopside and coexisting silicate liquids. I - Nickel, cobalt, and manganese

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, D. J.; Weill, D. F.

    1978-01-01

    Distribution coefficients have been found for the partitioning of Ni, Co, and Mn between calcium-rich clinopyroxenes and coexisting silicate liquids. Values are found for the 1110-1360 C temperature range. The breakdown of Henry's Law was not observed. The measured clinopyroxene/liquid distribution coefficients ranged from 1.5-14.0 for Ni, 0.5-2.0 for Co, and 0.3-1.2 for Mn. Analyses of pyroxenes grown from charges differing in the amounts of transition metals indicate that Ni and Co occupy the M1 site of diopside and that Mn occupies the M1 and M2 sites. Equilibrium constants were found in terms of the activities of the components in the liquid and solid phases. These activities are based on the mole fractions. An activity/concentration model was used for the liquid phase in order to explain the variations in the clinopyroxene/liquid coefficients due to bulk composition.

  1. Deposition of metal films on an ionic liquid as a basis for a lunar telescope.

    PubMed

    Borra, Ermanno F; Seddiki, Omar; Angel, Roger; Eisenstein, Daniel; Hickson, Paul; Seddon, Kenneth R; Worden, Simon P

    2007-06-21

    An optical/infrared telescope of 20-100 m aperture located on the Moon would be able to observe objects 100 to 1,000 times fainter than the proposed next generation of space telescopes. The infrared region of the spectrum is particularly important for observations of objects at redshifts z > 7. The apparent simplicity and low mass of a liquid mirror telescope, compared with a traditional pointable glass mirror, suggest that the concept should be considered further. A previously proposed liquid mirror telescope, based upon a spinning liquid metallic alloy, is not appropriate for infrared applications, which will require a liquid below 130 K. Here we report the successful coating of an ionic liquid with silver. The surface is smooth and the silver coating is stable on a timescale of months. The underlying ionic liquid does not evaporate in a vacuum and remains liquid down to a temperature of 175 K. Given that there are approximately 10(6) simple and approximately 10(18) ternary ionic liquids, it should be possible to synthesize liquids with even lower melting temperatures. PMID:17581579

  2. Liquid metals as ultra-stretchable, soft, and shape reconfigurable conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaker, Collin B.; Dickey, Michael D.

    2015-05-01

    Conventional, rigid materials remain the key building blocks of most modern electronic devices, but they are limited in their ability to conform to curvilinear surfaces. It is possible to make electronic components that are flexible and in some cases stretchable by utilizing thin films, engineered geometries, or inherently soft and stretchable materials that maintain their function during deformation. Here, we describe the properties and applications of a micromoldable liquid metal that can form conductive components that are ultra-stretchable, soft, and shape-reconfigurable. This liquid metal is a gallium-based alloy with low viscosity and high conductivity. The metal develops spontaneously a thin, passivating oxide layer on the surface that allows the metal to be molded into non-spherical shapes, including films and wires, and patterned by direct-write techniques or microfluidic injection. Furthermore, unlike mercury, the liquid metal has low toxicity and negligible vapor pressure. This paper discusses the mechanical and electrical properties of the metal in the context of electronics, and discusses how the properties of the oxide layer have been exploited for new patterning techniques that enable soft, stretchable and reconfigurable devices.

  3. Analyses of MHD Pressure Drop in a Curved Bend for Different Liquid Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad, Kameel; Rafique, Muhammad; Majid, Asad

    In this research we have analyzed liquid-metal flow in a curved bend in the presence of a magnetic field, which acts in two transverse directions. The magnetic field along the x-axis varied as B0(R + x)-1, while the magnetic field in y-direction is kept constant. The duct has conducting vanadium walls and liquid metal (lithium, sodium and potassium) have been used as a coolant. Magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) equations in three dimensions have been developed in the modified toroidal coordinate system. Then these coupled set of equations are solved by using finite difference techniques and an extended SIMPLER algorithm approach and an estimation of MHD pressure drop has been made for three different liquid metals, namely lithium, sodium and potassium. The results for a curved bend indicate an immense axial MHD pressure drop. The axial MHD pressure drop for three liquid metals, increases for an increase in both kinds of magnetic fields. It has been found that the MHD pressure drop is maximum in the case of sodium and minimum in the case of lithium In this paper a detailed comparative analysis has been carried out to find a suitable fluid for the cooling of high heat flux components of a fusion reactor, which is compatible with liquid metal lithium blanket and can also remove the 5 MW m-2 heat flux falling on the limiter or diverter plate. We finally concluded that from MHD pressure drop point of view that liquid lithium is the best choice for cooling of high heat flux components of a fusion reactor

  4. A Method to Manipulate Surface Tension of a Liquid Metal via Surface Oxidation and Reduction.

    PubMed

    Eaker, Collin B; Khan, M Rashed; Dickey, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Controlling interfacial tension is an effective method for manipulating the shape, position, and flow of fluids at sub-millimeter length scales, where interfacial tension is a dominant force. A variety of methods exist for controlling the interfacial tension of aqueous and organic liquids on this scale; however, these techniques have limited utility for liquid metals due to their large interfacial tension. Liquid metals can form soft, stretchable, and shape-reconfigurable components in electronic and electromagnetic devices. Although it is possible to manipulate these fluids via mechanical methods (e.g., pumping), electrical methods are easier to miniaturize, control, and implement. However, most electrical techniques have their own constraints: electrowetting-on-dielectric requires large (kV) potentials for modest actuation, electrocapillarity can affect relatively small changes in the interfacial tension, and continuous electrowetting is limited to plugs of the liquid metal in capillaries. Here, we present a method for actuating gallium and gallium-based liquid metal alloys via an electrochemical surface reaction. Controlling the electrochemical potential on the surface of the liquid metal in electrolyte rapidly and reversibly changes the interfacial tension by over two orders of magnitude ( ̴500 mN/m to near zero). Furthermore, this method requires only a very modest potential (< 1 V) applied relative to a counter electrode. The resulting change in tension is due primarily to the electrochemical deposition of a surface oxide layer, which acts as a surfactant; removal of the oxide increases the interfacial tension, and vice versa. This technique can be applied in a wide variety of electrolytes and is independent of the substrate on which it rests. PMID:26863045

  5. Pinhole formation from liquid metal microdroplets impact on solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hao; Qi, Le-hua; Luo, Jun; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Deng, Weiwei

    2016-01-01

    The impact of molten metal droplets on solid substrates may entrap gas to form pinholes. This letter shows that the detailed pinhole structure is more sophisticated than expected: the void is toroid, which is a result of rapid contact line retraction and subsequent phase change. The substrate surface roughness affects the pinhole size by providing leaky channels that weaken gas pressure buildup. When the droplet diameter is sufficiently large, Kevin-Helmholtz instability may be triggered to form multiple pinholes.

  6. Electromagnetic Pumps for Liquid Metal-Fed Electric Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Markusic, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    Prototype designs of two separate pumps for use in electric propulsion systems with liquid lithium and bismuth propellants are presented. Both pumps are required to operate at elevated temperatures, and the lithium pump must additionally withstand the corrosive nature of the propellant. Compatibility of the pump materials and seals with lithium and bismuth were demonstrated through proof-of-concept experiments followed by post-experiment visual inspections. The pressure rise produced by the bismuth pump was found to be linear with input current and ranged from 0-9 kPa for corresponding input current levels of 0-30 A, showing good quantitative agreement with theoretical analysis.

  7. Carbyne fiber synthesis within evaporating metallic liquid carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Cannella, Christopher B.; Goldman, Nir

    2015-07-09

    Carbyne (e.g., linear chains of sp-bonded carbon) has been the subject of intense research focus due to its presence in astrophysical bodies, as well as its potential for use as a nanoelectronic device and superhard material. In this work, we discuss the formation of carbyne fiber bundles over a nanosecond time scale in laser pulse melting studies, using a previously determined density functional tight binding model for carbon coupled with a new correction for the dispersion energy. We determine our dispersion energy model by optimizing a modified Lennard-Jones potential to an experimentally determined equation of state for graphite, yielding excellent results for the bulk modulus and density under ambient conditions. We then simulate previous experiments by heating graphite to high temperature, followed by expanding the ensuing liquid phase to low density. Our results indicate that the initial, hot liquid phase mainly consists of sp2-bonded carbon atoms, which form a system of sp-bonded strands bound together via dispersion interactions upon achieving low density and temperature. Lastly, the high computational efficiency of our approach allows for direct comparison with experiments that span a wide range of thermodynamic conditions and can help determine parameters for synthesis of carbon-based materials with potentially exotic properties.

  8. Non-Fermi liquid phase in metallic Skyrmion crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Haruki; Parameswaran, Siddharth; Raghu, Srinivas; Vishwanath, Ashvin

    2014-03-01

    Motivated by reports of a non-Fermi liquid state in MnSi, we examine the effect of coupling phonons of an incommensurate skyrmion crystal (SkX) to conduction electrons. We find that non-Fermi liquid behavior emerges in both two and three dimensions over the entire phase, due to an anomalous electron-phonon coupling that is linked to the net skyrmion density. A small parameter, the spiral wave vector in lattice units, allows us to exercise analytic control and ignore Landau damping of phonons over a wide energy range. At the lowest energy scales the problem is similar to electrons coupled to a gauge field. The best prospects for realizing these effects is in short period skyrmion lattice systems such as MnGe or epitaxial MnSi films. We also compare our results with the unusual T 3 / 2 scaling of temperature dependent resistivity seen in high pressure experiments on MnSi. We acknowledge support from the NSF via Grant DMR-0645691, the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences via contract DE-AC02-76SF00515, and the Simons, Templeton, and Alfred P. Sloan Foundations.

  9. Carbyne fiber synthesis within evaporating metallic liquid carbon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cannella, Christopher B.; Goldman, Nir

    2015-07-09

    Carbyne (e.g., linear chains of sp-bonded carbon) has been the subject of intense research focus due to its presence in astrophysical bodies, as well as its potential for use as a nanoelectronic device and superhard material. In this work, we discuss the formation of carbyne fiber bundles over a nanosecond time scale in laser pulse melting studies, using a previously determined density functional tight binding model for carbon coupled with a new correction for the dispersion energy. We determine our dispersion energy model by optimizing a modified Lennard-Jones potential to an experimentally determined equation of state for graphite, yielding excellentmore » results for the bulk modulus and density under ambient conditions. We then simulate previous experiments by heating graphite to high temperature, followed by expanding the ensuing liquid phase to low density. Our results indicate that the initial, hot liquid phase mainly consists of sp2-bonded carbon atoms, which form a system of sp-bonded strands bound together via dispersion interactions upon achieving low density and temperature. Lastly, the high computational efficiency of our approach allows for direct comparison with experiments that span a wide range of thermodynamic conditions and can help determine parameters for synthesis of carbon-based materials with potentially exotic properties.« less

  10. Utilizing Metalized Fabrics for Liquid and Rip Detection and Localization

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Stephen; Mahan, Cody; Kuhn, Michael J; Rowe, Nathan C

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel technique for utilizing conductive textiles as a distributed sensor for detecting and localizing liquids (e.g., blood), rips (e.g., bullet holes), and potentially biosignals. The proposed technique is verified through both simulation and experimental measurements. Circuit theory is utilized to depict conductive fabric as a bounded, near-infinite grid of resistors. Solutions to the well-known infinite resistance grid problem are used to confirm the accuracy and validity of this modeling approach. Simulations allow for discontinuities to be placed within the resistor matrix to illustrate the effects of bullet holes within the fabric. A real-time experimental system was developed that uses a multiplexed Wheatstone bridge approach to reconstruct the resistor grid across the conductive fabric and detect liquids and rips. The resistor grid model is validated through a comparison of simulated and experimental results. Results suggest accuracy proportional to the electrode spacing in determining the presence and location of discontinuities in conductive fabric samples. Future work is focused on refining the experimental system to provide more accuracy in detecting and localizing events as well as developing a complete prototype that can be deployed for field testing. Potential applications include intelligent clothing, flexible, lightweight sensing systems, and combat wound detection.

  11. Evolution of the liquid metal reactor: The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

    1989-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept has been under development at Argonne National Laboratory since 1984. A key feature of the IFR concept is the metallic fuel. Metallic fuel was the original choice in early liquid metal reactor development. Solid technical accomplishments have been accumulating year after year in all aspects of the IFR development program. But as we make technical progress, the ultimate potential offered by the IFR concept as a next generation advanced reactor becomes clearer and clearer. The IFR concept can meet all three fundamental requirements needed in a next generation reactor. This document discusses these requirements: breeding, safety, and waste management. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, T.W.; Schmidt, F.A.

    1995-08-01

    A method is described for treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation. 2 figs.

  13. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Timothy W.; Schmidt, Frederick A.

    1995-08-01

    Method of treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation.

  14. Electromagnetic induction pump for pumping liquid metals and other conductive liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Smither, R.K.

    1993-05-11

    An electromagnetic induction pump is described in which an electrically conductive liquid is made to flow by means of a force created by interaction of a permanent magnetic field and a DC current. The pump achieves high efficiency through combination of: powerful permanent magnet materials which provide a high strength field that is uniform and constant; steel tubing formed into a coil which is constructed to carry conducting liquids with minimal electrical resistance and heat; and application of a voltage to induce a DC current which continuously produces a force in the direction of the desired flow.

  15. Electromagnetic induction pump for pumping liquid metals and other conductive liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Smither, Robert K.

    1993-01-01

    An electromagnetic induction pump in which an electrically conductive liquid is made to flow by means of a force created by interaction of a permanent magnetic field and a DC current. The pump achieves high efficiency through combination of: powerful permanent magnet materials which provide a high strength field that is uniform and constant; steel tubing formed into a coil which is constructed to carry conducting liquids with minimal electrical resistance and heat; and application of a voltage to induce a DC current which continuously produces a force in the direction of the desired flow.

  16. X-ray reflectivity studies of liquid metal and alloy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, M.J.; Pershan, P.S.; Magnussen, O.M.; Ocko, B.M.; Deutsch, M.; Berman, L.E.

    1997-06-01

    Surface-induced atomic layering at the liquid/vapor interface in liquid metals has been observed using x-ray reflectivity on sputtered clean surfaces under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. A well-defined quasi-Bragg peak is obtained for surfaces of elemental Ga and a Ga-In alloy at large wave vectors q{sub z}{approximately}2.3{endash}2.5 {Angstrom}{sup {minus}1}. These results are an unambiguous indication of atomic layering with an interlayer spacing d{approximately}2{pi}/q{sub z}=2.5{endash}2.7 {Angstrom}. For liquid Ga, the amplitude of the electron-density oscillations, which is significantly underestimated by existing theory and molecular simulation, decays with a characteristic length of 6 {Angstrom}, which is twice that of Hg. Results on the alloy show a clear enrichment of indium at the topmost surface layer, consistent with the Gibbs adsorption rule. The enrichment consists of a single monolayer, with subsequent layers at the bulk eutectic composition. In order to suppress mechanically excited surface waves, the measurements were performed on thin liquid metal films ({lt}0.5 mm deep), which leads to a macroscopically curved surface due to the large surface tensions in liquid metals. The experimental challenges posed by measurements on curved surfaces and the techniques that were developed are discussed in detail. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Investigation of Liquid Metal Heat Exchanger Designs for Fission Surface Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.; Penswick, Barry; Robbie, Malcolm; Geng, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    Fission surface power is an option for future Moon and Mars surface missions. High power nuclear reactor heated Stirling convertors are an option to provide reliable power for long duration outpost operations. This report investigates various design approaches for the liquid metal to acceptor heat exchange and clarifies the details used in the analysis.

  18. Bellows-Type Accumulators for Liquid Metal Loops of Space Reactor Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tournier, Jean-Michel; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2006-01-20

    In many space nuclear power systems, the primary and/or secondary loops use liquid metal working fluids, and require accumulators to accommodate the change in the liquid metal volume and maintain sufficient subcooling to avoid boiling. This paper developed redundant and light-weight bellows-type accumulators with and without a mechanical spring, and compared the operating condition and mass of the accumulators for different types of liquid metal working fluids and operating temperatures: potassium, NaK-78, sodium and lithium loops of a total capacity of 50 liters and nominal operating temperatures of 840 K, 860 K, 950 K and 1340 K, respectively. The effects of using a mechanical spring and different structural materials on the design, operation and mass of the accumulators are also investigated. The structure materials considered include SS-316, Hastelloy-X, C-103 and Mo-14Re. The accumulator without a mechanical spring weighs 23 kg and 40 kg for a coolant subcooling of 50 K and 100 K, respectively, following a loss of the fill gas. The addition of a mechanical spring comes with a mass penalty, in favor of higher redundancy and maintaining a higher liquid metal subcooling.

  19. Nuclear Engineering Computer Modules, Thermal-Hydraulics, TH-2: Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reihman, Thomas C.

    This learning module is concerned with the temperature field, the heat transfer rates, and the coolant pressure drop in typical liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) fuel assemblies. As in all of the modules of this series, emphasis is placed on developing the theory and demonstrating the use with a simplified model. The heart of the module is…

  20. Method for passive cooling liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors, and system thereof

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Busboom, Herbert J.

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel.

  1. Subtask 12E1: Compatibility of structural materials in liquid alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Rink, D.L.; Haglund, R.; Clark, R.W.

    1995-03-01

    The objectives of this task are to (a) evaluate the chemical compatibility of structural alloys such as V-5 wt.%Cr-5 wt.%Ti alloy and Type 316 stainless steel for application in liquid alkali metals such as lithium and sodium-78 wt.% potassium (NaK) at temperatures that are in the range of interest for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER); (b) evaluate the transfer of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen between structural materials and liquid metals; and (c) evaluate the effects of such transfers on the mechanical and microstructural characteristics of the materials for long-term service in liquid-metal environments. Candidate structural materials are being evaluated for their compatibility, interstitial-element transfer, and corrosion in liquid alkali-metal systems such as lithium and NaK. Type 316 stainless steel and V-5Cr-5Ti coupon specimens with and without prealuminizing treatment have been exposed to NaK and lithium environments of commercial purity for times up to 3768 h at temperatures between 300 and 400{degrees}C. 13 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Black holes in the lab: A review of accretion experiments using plasmas and liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forest, Cary

    2016-04-01

    In this talk, we will survey recent liquid metal and plasma experiments attempting to study the magnetorotational instability, and ultimately, turbulent transport of angular momentum in laboratory plasmas that can mimic the Keplerian velocity profiles of accretion disks. We will describe the basic requirements of such experiments, the techniques used to create such laboratory experiments, and then review the results obtained thus far. The experiments fall into two camps, the first of which use resisitve liquid metal in couette flow geometry, and the second of which uses confined plasma that is stirred by induction on the plasma boundary. The regimes covered by liquid metals are compimentary: liquid metals are very resistive but nearly inviscid and may be appropriate for modeling protostellar disks, while hot plasmas are more viscous than resisitve and may be appropriate for hot accretion disks around black holes. Both approaches have overcome major experimental hurdles and now have dimensionless parameters that are in a regime where the MRI should be observed.

  3. Bellows-Type Accumulators for Liquid Metal Loops of Space Reactor Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournier, Jean-Michel; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2006-01-01

    In many space nuclear power systems, the primary and/or secondary loops use liquid metal working fluids, and require accumulators to accommodate the change in the liquid metal volume and maintain sufficient subcooling to avoid boiling. This paper developed redundant and light-weight bellows-type accumulators with and without a mechanical spring, and compared the operating condition and mass of the accumulators for different types of liquid metal working fluids and operating temperatures: potassium, NaK-78, sodium and lithium loops of a total capacity of 50 liters and nominal operating temperatures of 840 K, 860 K, 950 K and 1340 K, respectively. The effects of using a mechanical spring and different structural materials on the design, operation and mass of the accumulators are also investigated. The structure materials considered include SS-316, Hastelloy-X, C-103 and Mo-14Re. The accumulator without a mechanical spring weighs 23 kg and 40 kg for a coolant subcooling of 50 K and 100 K, respectively, following a loss of the fill gas. The addition of a mechanical spring comes with a mass penalty, in favor of higher redundancy and maintaining a higher liquid metal subcooling.

  4. The measurement of self-diffusion coefficients in liquid metals with quasielastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Quasielastic incoherent neutron scattering (QENS) has proven to be a versatile tool to study self diffusion of atoms in liquid metals. Here it is shown, that coherent contributions to the signal in the small q limit appear as a flat and energy independent constant to the QENS signal in single-component liquid metals even for systems with a small incoherent scattering cross section, like aluminum. Container-less processing via electromagnetic or electrostatic levitation devices, especially designed for QENS, enables the in-situ measurement on liquid metallic droplets of sizes between 5 mm to 10 mm in diameter. This gives access to the study of chemically reactive, refractory metallic melts and extends the accessible temperature range to undercoolings of several hundred Kelvin below the respective melting point. Compared to experiments using a thin-walled crucible giving hollow-cylindrical sample geometry it is shown that multiple scattering on levitated droplets is negligible for the analysis of the self-diffusion coefficient. QENS results of liquid germanium and 73germanium isotope mixtures, titanium, nickel, copper and aluminum are reviewed. The self-diffusion coefficients of these systems are best described by an Arrhenius-type temperature dependence around their respective melting points.

  5. Instability of the Liquid Metal-Pattern Interface in the Lost Foam Casting of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, W. D.; Ainsworth, M. J.

    2016-06-01

    The nature of the liquid metal-pattern interface during mold filling in the Lost Foam casting of aluminum alloys was investigated using real-time X-ray radiography for both normal expanded polystyrene, and brominated polystyrene foam patterns. Filling the pattern under the action of gravity from above or below had little effect on properties, both cases resulting in a large scatter of tensile strength values, (quantified by their Weibull Modulus). Countergravity filling at different velocities demonstrated that the least scatter of tensile strength values (highest Weibull Modulus) was associated with the slowest filling, when a planar liquid metal-pattern interface occurred. Real-time X-ray radiography showed that the advancing liquid metal front became unstable above a certain critical velocity, leading to the entrainment of the degrading pattern material and associated defects. It has been suggested that the transition of the advancing liquid metal-pattern interface into an unstable regime may be a result of Saffman-Taylor Instability.

  6. DEMONSTRATION OF A LIQUID CARBON DIOXIDE PROCESS FOR CLEANING METAL PARTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a demonstration of liquid carbon dioxide (LCO2) as an alternative to chlorinated solvents for cleaning metal parts. It describes the LCO2 process, the parts tested, the contaminants removed, and results from preliminary laboratory testing and on-site d...

  7. Different Shades of Oxide: Wetting Mechanisms of Gallium-based Liquid Metal Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doudrick, Kyle; Liu, Shanliangzui; Mutunga, Eva M.; Klein, Kate L.; Damle, Viraj; Varanasi, Kripa K.; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2014-11-01

    Gallium-based liquid metals are of interest for a number of applications including biomedical devices, flexible electronics, and soft robotics. Yet, device fabrication with these materials is challenging because they adhere strongly to majority of common substrates. This unusually high adhesion is attributed to the formation of a thin gallium oxide shell, however, its role in the adhesion process has not yet been determined. Here, we show that, dependent on formation process and resulting morphology of the liquid metal-substrate interface, Galinstan adhesion can occur in two modes. The first mode occurs when the oxide shell is not broken as it comes in contact with the surface. Because of the nanoscale topology of the oxide, this mode results in minimal adhesion between the liquid metal and most solids, regardless of substrate's surface energy or texture. In the second mode, the formation of the Galinstan-substrate interface involves breaking of the original oxide skin and formation of a composite interface that includes contact between the substrate and pieces of old oxide, bare liquid metal, and new oxide. We show that in this mode Galinstan adhesion is dominated by the new oxide-substrate contact. KR acknowledges startup funding from ASU.

  8. Liquid metal extraction of Nd from NdFeB magnet scrap

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yanchen

    1999-12-10

    This research involves using molten magnesium (Mg) to remove neodymium (Nd) from NdFeB magnet scrap by diffusion. The results show that liquid metal extraction of Nd may be a viable and inexpensive method for recovering the expensive rare earth element Nd for use in Mg castings.

  9. Failed fuel identification techniques for liquid-metal cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, J.D.B.; Gross, K.C.; Mikaili, R.; Frank, S.M.; Cutforth, D.C.; Angelo, P.L.

    1995-06-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), located in Idaho and operated for the US Department of Energy by Argonne National Laboratory, has been used as an irradiation testbed for LMR fuels and components for thirty years. During this time many endurance tests have been carried out with experimental LMR metal, oxide, carbide and nitride fuel elements, in which cladding failures were intentionally allowed to occur. This paper describes methods that have been developed for the detection, identification and verification of fuel failures.

  10. An experimental test of Henry's Law in solid metal-liquid metal systems with implications for iron meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabot, N. L.; Campbell, A. J.; Jones, J. H.; Humayun, M.; Agee, C. B.

    2003-02-01

    Experimental solid metal-liquid metal partition coefficients have been used to model the crystallization of magmatic iron meteorites and understand the evolution of asteroid cores. However, the majority of the partitioning experiments have been conducted with trace elements doped at levels that are orders of magnitude higher than measured in iron meteorites. Concern about Henry's Law and the unnatural doping levels have been cited as one reason that two recent iron meteorite studies have dismissed the experimental partition coefficients in their modeling. Using laser ablation ICP-MS analysis, this study reports experimentally determined solid metal-liquid metal trace element partition coefficients from runs doped down to the levels occurring in iron meteorites. The analyses for 12 trace elements (As, Co, Cr, Cu, Ga, Ge, Ir, Os, Pd, Pt, Re, and W) show no deviations from Henry's Law, and these results support decades of experimental work in which the partition coefficients were assumed to be independent of trace element concentration. Further, since our experiments are doped with natural levels of trace elements, the partitioning results are directly applicable to iron meteorites and should be used when modeling their crystallization. In contrast, our new Ag data are inconsistent with previous studies, suggesting the high Ag-content in previous studies may have influenced the measured Ag partitioning behavior.

  11. Calculations of electrical transport properties of liquid metals at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, R.; Jain, A.

    1972-01-01

    It is shown how the usual nearly-free-electron model for the electrical resistivity of simple liquid metals can be extended to the case of liquid transition metals such as iron. A simple prescription is given for calculating the resistivity at different densities and temperatures. As an application and example of the method, calculations on liquid iron at different densities were carried out and the resistivity of molten iron in the earth's outer core is estimated. The effects of alloying iron with other elements are also considered. The calculated conductivity of the outer core is well within the limit required for the dynamo model of the geomagnetic field and agrees well with some recent shock wave data.

  12. Enhancement of heat removal using concave liquid metal targets for high-power accelerators.

    SciTech Connect

    Konkashbaev, I.; Fischer, P.; Hassanein, A.; Mokhov, N. V.; Mathematics and Computer Science; FNAL

    2007-01-01

    The need is increasing for development of high-power targets and beam dump areas for the production of intense beams of secondary particles. The severe constraints arising from a megawatt beam deposited on targets and absorbers call for nontrivial procedures to dilute the beam. This study describes the development of targets and absorbers and the advantages of using flowing liquid metal in concave channels first proposed by IFMIF to raise the liquid metal boiling point by increasing the pressure in liquid supported by a centrifugal force. Such flow with a back-wall is subject to Taylor-Couette instability. The instability can play a positive role of increasing the heat transfer from the hottest region in the target/absorber to the back-wall cooled by water. Results of theoretical analysis and numerical modeling of both targets and dump areas for the IFMIF, ILC, and RIA facilities are presented.

  13. High-Temperature Liquid Metal Infusion Considering Surface Tension-Viscosity Dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vinod; Harris, Christopher K.; Bronson, Arturo; Shantha-Kumar, Sanjay; Medina, Arturo

    2016-02-01

    In considering the significant effect of the surface tension-viscosity dissipation driving the fluid flow within a capillary, high-temperature liquid metal infusion was analyzed for titanium, yttrium, hafnium, and zirconium penetrating into a packed bed. A model of the dissipation considers the momentum balance within the capillary to determine the rate of infusion, which is compared with the Semlak-Rhines model developed for liquid metal penetration into a packed bed assumed as a bundle of tubes mimicking the porosity of a packed bed. For liquid Ti, the penetration rate was calculated from 0.2 µs to 1 ms and rose to a maximum of 7 m/s at approximately 1 µs; after which, the rate decreased to 0.7 m/s at 1 ms. Beyond 10 µs, the decreasing trend of the rate of penetration determined by the model of dissipation compared favorably with the Semlak-Rhines equation.

  14. Thermochemical Energy Storage through De/Hydrogenation of Organic Liquids: Reactions of Organic Liquids on Metal Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Ulmer, Ulrich; Cholewa, Martin; Diemant, Thomas; Bonatto Minella, Christian; Dittmeyer, Roland; Behm, R Jürgen; Fichtner, Maximilian

    2016-06-01

    A study of the reactions of liquid acetone and toluene on transition metal hydrides, which can be used in thermal energy or hydrogen storage applications, is presented. Hydrogen is confined in TiFe, Ti0.95Zr0.05Mn1.49V0.45Fe0.06 ("Hydralloy C5"), and V40Fe8Ti26Cr26 after contact with acetone. Toluene passivates V40Fe8Ti26Cr26 completely for hydrogen desorption while TiFe is only mildly deactivated and desorption is not blocked at all in the case of Hydralloy C5. LaNi5 is inert toward both organic liquids. Gas chromatography (GC) investigations reveal that CO, propane, and propene are formed during hydrogen desorption from V40Fe8Ti26Cr26 in liquid acetone, and methylcyclohexane is formed in the case of liquid toluene. These reactions do not occur if dehydrogenated samples are used, which indicates an enhanced surface reactivity during hydrogen desorption. Significant amounts of carbon-containing species are detected at the surface and subsurface of acetone- and toluene-treated V40Fe8Ti26Cr26 by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The modification of the surface and subsurface chemistry and the resulting blocking of catalytic sites is believed to be responsible for the containment of hydrogen in the bulk. The surface passivation reactions occur only during hydrogen desorption of the samples. PMID:27183004

  15. Characterization of MHD liquid metal instabilities: dynamo saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lathrop, Daniel P.; Sisan, Daniel R.

    2003-10-01

    The motion of conducting fluids, where the effects of inertia and Lorentz forces are relevant, is key to understanding a variety of astrophysical and planetary flows. How the Lorentz forces modify turbulent flows is an important aspect of the understanding of dynamo self-generation. We characterize the states observed in spherical Couette flow (flow between concentric spheres) of liquid Sodium in the presence of magnetic fields. We observe a large number of distinct states as the influence of Lorentz forces is increased. These transitions proceed from a magnetic field free state which shows intense turbulence. The states are characterized by measurements of the Gauss coefficients of the external magnetic field. The competing effects of inertia and Lorentz forces are also examined using measurements of the total dissipation (via the applied torque).

  16. Behavior of liquid metal droplets in an aspirating nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, W.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Mason, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of particle size, velocity, and relative mass flux were made on spray field produced by aspirating liquid tin into 350{degrees}C argon flowing through a venturi nozzle via a small orifice in the throat of the nozzle. Details of the aspiration and droplet formation process were observed through windows in the nozzle. The spatial distribution of droplet size, velocity, and relative number density were measured at a location 10 mm from the nozzle exit. Due to the presence of separated flow in the nozzle, changes in nozzle inlet pressure did not significantly effect resulting droplet size and velocity. This suggests that good aerodynamic nozzle design is required if spray characteristics are to be controlled by nozzle flow. 5 refs.

  17. Behavior of liquid metal droplets in an aspirating nozzle. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, W.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Mason, T.A.

    1990-12-31

    Measurements of particle size, velocity, and relative mass flux were made on spray field produced by aspirating liquid tin into 350{degrees}C argon flowing through a venturi nozzle via a small orifice in the throat of the nozzle. Details of the aspiration and droplet formation process were observed through windows in the nozzle. The spatial distribution of droplet size, velocity, and relative number density were measured at a location 10 mm from the nozzle exit. Due to the presence of separated flow in the nozzle, changes in nozzle inlet pressure did not significantly effect resulting droplet size and velocity. This suggests that good aerodynamic nozzle design is required if spray characteristics are to be controlled by nozzle flow. 5 refs.

  18. 3-D printing of liquid metals for stretchable and flexible conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trlica, Chris; Parekh, Dishit Paresh; Panich, Lazar; Ladd, Collin; Dickey, Michael D.

    2014-06-01

    3-D printing is an emerging technology that has been used primarily on small scales for rapid prototyping, but which could also herald a wider movement towards decentralized, highly customizable manufacturing. Polymers are the most common materials to be 3-D printed today, but there is great demand for a way to easily print metals. Existing techniques for 3-D printing metals tend to be expensive and energy-intensive, and usually require high temperatures or pressures, making them incompatible with polymers, organics, soft materials, and biological materials. Here, we describe room temperature liquid metals as complements to polymers for 3-D printing applications. These metals enable the fabrication of soft, flexible, and stretchable devices. We survey potential room temperature liquid metal candidates and describe the benefits of gallium and its alloys for these purposes. We demonstrate the direct printing of a liquid gallium alloy in both 2-D and 3-D and highlight the structures and shapes that can be fabricated using these processes.

  19. Liquid metal embrittlement susceptibility of welded MANET II (DIN 1.4914) in liquid Pb17Li.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sample, T.; Fenici, P.; Kolbe, H.

    1996-10-01

    TIG welding of 12 mm thick plates of MANET II steel was accomplished using filler material of the same composition. Tensile tests, at a constant displacement rate of 0.1 mm min -1 (corresponding to an initial strain rate of 1.1 × 10 -4 s -1), were carried out on specimens consisting solely of the weld, HAZ and bulk material under vacuum and liquid Pb17Li at 250 and 400°C. The post-weld heat treatment (750°C/4 h air cooled) which was given to the welded plates was sufficient to prevent any liquid metal embrittlement. The presence of oxide inclusions and pores in the weld reduced the extent of plastic strain at rupture exhibited by some of the welds.

  20. The role of a bilayer interfacial phase on liquid metal embrittlement.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian; Cheng, Huikai; Asl, Kaveh Meshinchi; Kiely, Christopher J; Harmer, Martin P

    2011-09-23

    Intrinsically ductile metals are prone to catastrophic failure when exposed to certain liquid metals, but the atomic-level mechanism for this effect is not fully understood. We characterized a model system, a nickel sample infused with bismuth atoms, by using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and observed a bilayer interfacial phase that is the underlying cause of embrittlement. This finding provides a new perspective for understanding the atomic-scale embrittlement mechanism and for developing strategies to control the practically important liquid metal embrittlement and the more general grain boundary embrittlement phenomena in alloys. This study further demonstrates that adsorption can induce a coupled grain boundary structural and chemical phase transition that causes drastic changes in properties. PMID:21940889

  1. Instability of Nano- and Microscale Liquid Metal Filaments: Transition from Single Droplet Collapse to Multidroplet Breakup.

    PubMed

    Hartnett, C A; Mahady, K; Fowlkes, J D; Afkhami, S; Kondic, L; Rack, P D

    2015-12-22

    We carry out experimental and numerical studies to investigate the collapse and breakup of finite size, nano- and microscale, liquid metal filaments supported on a substrate. We find the critical dimensions below which filaments do not break up but rather collapse to a single droplet. The transition from collapse to breakup can be described as a competition between two fluid dynamic phenomena: the capillary driven end retraction and the Rayleigh-Plateau type instability mechanism that drives the breakup. We focus on the unique spatial and temporal transition region between these two phenomena using patterned metallic thin film strips and pulsed-laser-induced dewetting. The experimental results are compared to an analytical model proposed by Driessen et al. and modified to include substrate interactions. In addition, we report the results of numerical simulations based on a volume-of-fluid method to provide additional insight and highlight the importance of liquid metal resolidification, which reduces inertial effects. PMID:26595519

  2. LIBS Detection of Heavy Metal Elements in Liquid Solutions by Using Wood Pellet as Sample Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Guanhong; Sun, Duixiong; Su, Maogen; Dong, Chenzhong

    2014-06-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the analysis of heavy metals in liquid samples. A new approach was presented to lower the limit of detection (LOD) and minimize the sample matrix effects, in which dried wood pellets absorbed the given amounts of Cr standard solutions and then were baked because they have stronger and rapid absorption properties for liquid samples as well as simple elemental compositions. In this work, we have taken a typical heavy metal Cr element as an example, and investigated the spectral feasibility of Cr solutions and dried wood pellets before and after absorbing Cr solutions at the same experimental conditions. The results were demonstrated to successfully produce a superior analytical response for heavy metal elements by using wood pellet as sample matrix according to the obtained LOD of 0.07 ppm for Cr element in solutions.

  3. Efficiency of Absorption of Solar Radiation By Liquids Containing Metallic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafyeva, L. G.; Pustovalov, V. K.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of a comparative analysis of the optical properties of metallic nanoparticles that allows us to select their parameters for effective applications. The optical properties of several metallic (Ni, Ti, Pt, Zn, Mo, and Pd) monodisperse nanoparticles of radii 25 nm, 50 nm, and 75 nm were theoretically studied and analyzed in the spectral range 200-2500 nm. We studied the influence of the nanoparticle parameters (type of metal, radius and concentration of the nanoparticles, etc.) and the surrounding liquid (water) on the optical absorption cross section, scattering cross section, and extinction cross section for absorption, scattering, and extinction of radiation by the nanoparticles. We have established that titanium, nickel, and to a lesser extent molybdenum nanoparticles of radii ~75 nm can be used for efficient absorption and extinction of solar radiation by heterogeneous liquids.

  4. A study on corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steel in liquid metals at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sang Hun; Kim, Jong Jin; Jung, Ju Ang; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Bang, In Cheol; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the interaction between austenitic stainless steel, AISI 316L, and gallium liquid metal at a high temperature, for the potential application to advanced fast reactor coolants. Test specimens of AISI 316L were exposed to static gallium at 500 °C for up to 700 h in two different cover-gas conditions, including air and vacuum. Similar experimental tests were conducted in gallium alloy liquid metal environments, including Ga-14Sn-6Zn and Ga-8Sn-6Zn, in order to study the effect of addition of alloying elements. The results have shown that the weight change and metal loss of specimens were generally reduced in Ga-14Sn-6Zn and Ga-8Sn-6Zn compared to those in pure gallium at a high temperature.

  5. Instability of nano- and microscale liquid metal filaments: Transition from single droplet collapse to multidroplet breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnett, Chris A.; Mahady, Kyle; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Afkhami, Shahriar; Rack, P. D.; Kondic, L.

    2015-11-23

    We carry out experimental and numerical studies to investigate the collapse and breakup of finite size, nano- and microscale, liquid metal filaments supported on a substrate. We find the critical dimensions below which filaments do not break up but rather collapse to a single droplet. The transition from collapse to breakup can be described as a competition between two fluid dynamic phenomena: the capillary driven end retraction and the Rayleigh–Plateau type instability mechanism that drives the breakup. We focus on the unique spatial and temporal transition region between these two phenomena using patterned metallic thin film strips and pulsed-laser-induced dewetting. The experimental results are compared to an analytical model proposed by Driessen et al. and modified to include substrate interactions. Additionally, we report the results of numerical simulations based on a volume-of-fluid method to provide additional insight and highlight the importance of liquid metal resolidification, which reduces inertial effects.

  6. EXAFS study into the speciation of metal salts dissolved in ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Jennifer M; Ip, Chung-Man; Forrest, Gregory C H; Singh, Kuldip; Gurman, Stephen J; Ryder, Karl S; Abbott, Andrew P; Frisch, Gero

    2014-06-16

    The speciation of metals in solution controls their reactivity, and this is extremely pertinent in the area of metal salts dissolved in ionic liquids. In the current study, the speciation of 25 metal salts is investigated in four deep eutectic solvents (DESs) and five imidazolium-based ionic liquids using extended X-ray absorption fine structure. It is shown that in diol-based DESs M(I) ions form [MCl2](-) and [MCl3](2-) complexes, while all M(II) ions form [MCl4](2-) complexes, with the exception of Ni(II), which exhibits a very unusual coordination by glycol molecules. This was also found in the X-ray crystal structure of the compound [Ni(phen)2(eg)]Cl2·2eg (eg = ethylene glycol). In a urea-based DES, either pure chloro or chloro-oxo coordination is observed. In [C6mim][Cl] pure chloro complexation is also observed, but coordination numbers are smaller (typically 3), which can be explained by the long alkyl chain of the cation. In [C2mim][SCN] metal ions are entirely coordinated by thiocyanate, either through the N or the S atom, depending on the hardness of the metal ion according to the hard-soft acid-base principle. With weaker coordinating anions, mixed coordination between solvent and solute anions is observed. The effect of hydrate or added water on speciation is insignificant for the diol-based DESs and small in other liquids with intermediate or strong ligands. One of the main findings of this study is that, with respect to metal speciation, there is no fundamental difference between deep eutectic solvents and classic ionic liquids. PMID:24897923

  7. Natural Convection Heat Transfer in a Rectangular Liquid Metal Pool With Bottom Heating and Top Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Il S.; Yu, Yong H.; Son, Hyoung M.; Hwang, Jin S.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2006-07-01

    An experimental study is performed to investigate the natural convection heat transfer characteristics with subcooled coolant to create engineering database for basic applications in a lead alloy cooled reactor. Tests are performed in the ALTOS (Applied Liquid-metal Thermal Operation Study) apparatus as part of MITHOS (Metal Integrated Thermo Hydrodynamic Operation System). A relationship is determined between the Nusselt number Nu and the Rayleigh number Ra in the liquid metal rectangular pool. Results are compared with correlations and experimental data in the literature. Given the similar Ra condition, the present test results for Nu of the liquid metal pool with top subcooling are found to be similar to those predicted by the existing correlations or experiments. The current test results are utilized to develop natural convection heat transfer correlations applicable to low Prandtl number Pr fluids that are heated from below and cooled by the external coolant above. Results from this study are slated to be used in designing BORIS (Battery Optimized Reactor Integral System), a small lead cooled modular fast reactor for deployment at remote sites cycled with MOBIS (Modular Optimized Brayton Integral System) for electricity generation, tied with NAVIS (Naval Application Vessel Integral System) for ship propulsion, joined with THAIS (Thermochemical Hydrogen Acquisition Integral System) for hydrogen production, and coupled with DORIS (Desalination Optimized Reactor Integral System) for seawater desalination. Tests are performed with Wood's metal (Pb-Bi-Sn-Cd) filling a rectangular pool whose lower surface is heated and upper surface cooled by forced convection of water. The test section is 20 cm long, 11.3 cm high and 15 cm wide. The simulant has a melting temperature of 78 deg. C. The constant temperature and heat flux condition was realized for the bottom heating once the steady state had been met. The test parameters include the heated bottom surface temperature

  8. A high-performance liquid chromatography method for determining transition metal content in proteins.

    PubMed

    Atanassova, Anelia; Lam, Robert; Zamble, Deborah B

    2004-12-01

    Transition metals are common components of cellular proteins and the detailed study of metalloproteins necessitates the identification and quantification of bound metal ions. Screening for metals is also an informative step in the initial characterization of the numerous unknown and unclassified proteins now coming through the proteomic pipeline. We have developed a high-performance liquid chromatography method for the quantitative determination of the most prevalent biological transition metals: manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, and zinc. The method is accurate and simple and can be adapted for automated high-throughput studies. The metal analysis involves acid hydrolysis to release the metal ions into solution, followed by ion separation on a mixed-bead ion-exchange column and absorbance detection after postcolumn derivatization with the metallochromic indicator 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol. The potential interferences by common components of protein solutions were investigated. The metal content of a variety of metalloproteins was analyzed and the data were compared to data obtained from inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. The sensitivity of the assay allows for the detection of 0.1-0.8 nmol, depending on the metal. The amount of protein required is governed by the size of the protein and the fraction of protein with metal bound. For routine analysis 50 microg was used but for many proteins 10 microg would be sufficient. The advantages, disadvantages, and possible applications of this method are discussed. PMID:15519577

  9. Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid theory for metallic fullurene polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Hideo; Shima, Hiroyuki; Noda, Yusuke; Ono, Shota; Ohno, Kaoru

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the low energy behavior of local density of states in metallic C60 polymers theoretically. The multichannel bosonization method is applied to electronic band structures evaluated from first-principles calculation, by which the effects of electronic correlation and nanoscale corrugation in the atomic configuration are fully taken into account. We obtain a closed-form expression for the power-law anomalies in the local density of states, which successfully describes the experimental observation on the C60 polymers in a quantitative manner. An important implication from the closed-form solution is the existence of an experimentally unobserved crossover at nearly a hundred milli-electron volts, beyond which the power-law exponent of the C60 polymers should change significantly.

  10. Electron transfer at semiconducting metal dichalcogenide/liquid electrolyte interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, J.N.

    1992-01-01

    Charge transfer at semiconductor/electrolyte interfaces is the critical process in photoelectrochemical systems. Many aspects of the theory for these interfaces have yet to be experimentally verified. There are few reliable measurements of the fundamental electron transfer rate at nonilluminated semiconductors. This situation stems from experimental limitations imposed by most semiconductor electrode surfaces. Layered metal dichalcogenide semiconductors have excellent properties as semiconductor electrodes, but edge sites and crystal defects must be masked so only the defect-free basal plane of the two-dimensional material is exposed to solution. Conventional epoxy encapsulation of the crystal epoxy can introduce deleterious effects. A minielectrochemical cell was developed to perform experiments in a single drop of electrolyte held against the working electrode. The electrochemical behavior and operational considerations of the cell for aqueous and nonaqueous systems were investigated. Spatially-resolved electrochemistry was demonstrated for n-WSe[sub 2] and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite. The minicell was used to investigate electron transfer at nonilluminated n-WSe[sub 2]/dimethylferrocene[sup +/0] interfaces. This semiconductor is resistant to corrosion and has stable interfacial energetics. Interfaces with excellent diode behavior could be obtained by probing different regions of the surface. Electron transfer at these high quality surfaces was studied over an extensive solution concentration range. The rate of electron transfer was independent of solution acceptor concentration from 5 [mu]M to 0.25 M. The electron transfer data can be explained by assuming a surface-state mediate mechanism. A second metal dichalcogenide, n-SnS[sub 2], was investigated to compare the behavior of this wide band gap material to the narrow band gap n-WSe[sub 2]. The n-SnS[sub 2] electrodes displayed undesirable electrochemical effects in several solvent systems.

  11. Removal of metals and ceramics by combined effects of micro liquid jet and laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Daehwan; Seo, Changho; Kim, Dongsik

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we analyze a hybrid laser/liquid jet micromachining process for several metals and ceramics based on the optical breakdown of a microdroplet. In the process, materials are removed by the combined effects of a laser pulse and a high-speed pulsed microjet ejected from the microdroplet. The opto-hydrodynamic phenomena occurring during this process and the interaction of the laser/liquid jet with various materials, including copper, aluminum, stainless steel, alumina, and boron nitride, are investigated experimentally. The results show that the laser/liquid jet can remove the materials with substantially increased removal rates and reduced thermal side effects compared with the conventional pulsed laser ablation process. Visualization of the process reveals that the materials are partially ablated and melted by the laser pulse during the early stage of the process and that the molten material is subsequently eliminated by the hydrodynamic impact of the liquid jet.

  12. Microscopic Motion of Liquid Metal Plasma Facing Components In A Diverted Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jaworski, M A; Morley, N B; Abrams, T; Kaita, R; Kallman, J; Kugel, H; Majeski, R

    2010-09-22

    Liquid metal plasma facing components (PFCs) have been identified as an alternative material for fusion plasma experiments. The use of a liquid conductor where significant magnetic fields are present is considered risky, with the possibility of macroscopic fluid motion and possible ejection into the plasma core. Analysis is carried out on thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamic (TEMHD) forces caused by temperature gradients in the liquid-container system itself in addition to scrape-off-layer currents interacting with the PFC from a diverted plasma. Capillary effects at the liquid-container interface will be examined which govern droplet ejection criteria. Stability of the interface is determined using linear stability methods. In addition to application to liquidmetal PFCs, thin film liquidmetal effects have application to current and future devices where off-normal events may liquefy portions of the first wall and other plasma facing components.

  13. Descent of low-Bond-number liquid-metal diapirs with trailing conduits during core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rains, C.; Weeraratne, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    Formation of the early Earth involved violent impacts and meteorite bombardment which partially or fully melted surface materials, facilitating separation of iron metal from silicates. Geochemical constraints on core formation times indicate that this liquid metal must have been transported to the center of the Earth within 30 Ma. Among the mechanisms that have been proposed, metal-silicate plumes resulting from Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities of a liquid-metal pond at the bottom of a magma ocean provide the fastest rates of delivery to the core. Recent studies have shown that these rapidly descending plumes develop trailing conduits that fill with the overlying melted silicate material. However, while large plumes descend quickly, they do not provide enough time or surface area for metal-silicate equilibration to be achieved throughout the mantle. Instead, small metal drops descending in the wake of larger diapirs or in conduits of their own making may have been crucial in the equilibration process that resulted in the excess siderophile mantle abundance. We investigate the instability and descent of liquid-metal drops through a highly viscous layer using three-component laboratory fluid experiments representing the Earth's proto-mantle (layer 2) covered by a magma ocean (layer 1), and a liquid iron pond (layer 3) initially resting at their interface. Silicate materials are represented by dehydrated (layer 2), or diluted (layer 1) glucose and salt solutions. Liquid gallium represents the iron metal phase. We scale our experiments to the Earth's mantle through the use of Bond numbers to characterize drops and diapirs, and a non-dimensional length scale λ, which we define as the ratio of radius to height, to characterize conduits. Previous laboratory work using liquid gallium has investigated high-Bond-number diapirs (B = 13 - 66) and conduits of λ ~ 0.2, analogous to large plumes in the Earth. Here, we focus on low Bond numbers (B ~ 4), and small λ ~ .05 to

  14. Conventional and microwave hydrothermal synthesis of monodispersed metal oxide nanoparticles at liquid-liquid interface

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monodispersed nanoparticles of metal oxide including ferrites MFe2O4 (M=, Ni, Co, Mn) and γ-Fe2O3, Ta2O5 etc. have been synthesized using a water-toluene interface under both conventional and microwave hydrothermal conditions. This general synthesis procedure uses readily availab...

  15. Ionomer-Liquid Electrolyte Hybrid Ionic Conductor for High Cycling Stability of Lithium Metal Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jongchan; Lee, Hongkyung; Choo, Min-Ju; Park, Jung-Ki; Kim, Hee-Tak

    2015-09-01

    The inhomogeneous Li electrodeposition of lithium metal electrode has been a major impediment to the realization of rechargeable lithium metal batteries. Although single ion conducting ionomers can induce more homogeneous Li electrodeposition by preventing Li+ depletion at Li surface, currently available materials do not allow room-temperature operation due to their low room temperature conductivities. In the paper, we report that a highly conductive ionomer/liquid electrolyte hybrid layer tightly laminated on Li metal electrode can realize stable Li electrodeposition at high current densities up to 10 mA cm-2 and permit room-temperature operation of corresponding Li metal batteries with low polarizations. The hybrid layer is fabricated by laminating few micron-thick Nafion layer on Li metal electrode followed by soaking 1 M LiPF6 EC/DEC (1/1) electrolyte. The Li/Li symmetric cell with the hybrid layer stably operates at a high current density of 10 mA cm-2 for more than 2000 h, which corresponds to more than five-fold enhancement compared with bare Li metal electrode. Also, the prototype Li/LiCoO2 battery with the hybrid layer offers cycling stability more than 350 cycles. These results demonstrate that the hybrid strategy successfully combines the advantages of bi-ionic liquid electrolyte (fast Li+ transport) and single ionic ionomer (prevention of Li+ depletion).

  16. 3D printing of liquid metals as fugitive inks for fabrication of 3D microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Dishit P; Ladd, Collin; Panich, Lazar; Moussa, Khalil; Dickey, Michael D

    2016-05-21

    This paper demonstrates a simple method to fabricate 3D microchannels and microvasculature at room temperature by direct-writing liquid metal as a sacrificial template. The formation of a surface oxide skin on the low-viscosity liquid metal stabilizes the shape of the printed metal for planar and out-of-plane structures. The printed structures can be embedded in a variety of soft (e.g. elastomeric) and rigid (e.g. thermoset) polymers. Both acid and electrochemical reduction are capable of removing the oxide skin that forms on the metal, which destabilizes the ink so that it withdraws from the encapsulating material due to capillary forces, resulting in nearly full recovery of the fugitive ink at room temperature. Whereas conventional fabrication procedures typically confine microchannels to 2D planes, the geometry of the printed microchannels can be varied from a simple 2D network to complex 3D architectures without using lithography. The method produces robust monolithic structures without the need for any bonding or assembling techniques that often limit the materials of construction of conventional microchannels. Removing select portions of the metal leaves behind 3D metal features that can be used as antennas, interconnects, or electrodes for interfacing with lab-on-a-chip devices. This paper describes the capabilities and limitations of this simple process. PMID:27025537

  17. Ionomer-Liquid Electrolyte Hybrid Ionic Conductor for High Cycling Stability of Lithium Metal Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Song, Jongchan; Lee, Hongkyung; Choo, Min-Ju; Park, Jung-Ki; Kim, Hee-Tak

    2015-01-01

    The inhomogeneous Li electrodeposition of lithium metal electrode has been a major impediment to the realization of rechargeable lithium metal batteries. Although single ion conducting ionomers can induce more homogeneous Li electrodeposition by preventing Li(+) depletion at Li surface, currently available materials do not allow room-temperature operation due to their low room temperature conductivities. In the paper, we report that a highly conductive ionomer/liquid electrolyte hybrid layer tightly laminated on Li metal electrode can realize stable Li electrodeposition at high current densities up to 10 mA cm(-2) and permit room-temperature operation of corresponding Li metal batteries with low polarizations. The hybrid layer is fabricated by laminating few micron-thick Nafion layer on Li metal electrode followed by soaking 1 M LiPF6 EC/DEC (1/1) electrolyte. The Li/Li symmetric cell with the hybrid layer stably operates at a high current density of 10 mA cm(-2) for more than 2000 h, which corresponds to more than five-fold enhancement compared with bare Li metal electrode. Also, the prototype Li/LiCoO2 battery with the hybrid layer offers cycling stability more than 350 cycles. These results demonstrate that the hybrid strategy successfully combines the advantages of bi-ionic liquid electrolyte (fast Li(+) transport) and single ionic ionomer (prevention of Li(+) depletion). PMID:26411701

  18. Ionomer-Liquid Electrolyte Hybrid Ionic Conductor for High Cycling Stability of Lithium Metal Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jongchan; Lee, Hongkyung; Choo, Min-Ju; Park, Jung-Ki; Kim, Hee-Tak

    2015-01-01

    The inhomogeneous Li electrodeposition of lithium metal electrode has been a major impediment to the realization of rechargeable lithium metal batteries. Although single ion conducting ionomers can induce more homogeneous Li electrodeposition by preventing Li+ depletion at Li surface, currently available materials do not allow room-temperature operation due to their low room temperature conductivities. In the paper, we report that a highly conductive ionomer/liquid electrolyte hybrid layer tightly laminated on Li metal electrode can realize stable Li electrodeposition at high current densities up to 10 mA cm−2 and permit room-temperature operation of corresponding Li metal batteries with low polarizations. The hybrid layer is fabricated by laminating few micron-thick Nafion layer on Li metal electrode followed by soaking 1 M LiPF6 EC/DEC (1/1) electrolyte. The Li/Li symmetric cell with the hybrid layer stably operates at a high current density of 10 mA cm−2 for more than 2000 h, which corresponds to more than five-fold enhancement compared with bare Li metal electrode. Also, the prototype Li/LiCoO2 battery with the hybrid layer offers cycling stability more than 350 cycles. These results demonstrate that the hybrid strategy successfully combines the advantages of bi-ionic liquid electrolyte (fast Li+ transport) and single ionic ionomer (prevention of Li+ depletion). PMID:26411701

  19. Levitation of a metallic sphere near gas-liquid and liquid-liquid interfaces by the repulsive Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Norio

    2014-06-01

    By counteracting gravity, the repulsive Casimir force enables stable levitation of a perfectly conducting particle near a liquid-air interface if the particle exists inside the liquid. In the present study, we examine the levitation of a gold particle near a bromobenzene-air interface and calculate the levitation height using the scattering-matrix formulation. In addition, we consider the Casimir force acting on a gold sphere near the interface between bromobenzene and water. At asymptotically large separations, the Casimir force is attractive because of the large static dielectric permittivity of water. However, the Casimir force changes from attractive to repulsive as the separation decreases. We also found that the gold particle can be levitated in bromobenzene above water.

  20. Calcium-bismuth electrodes for large-scale energy storage (liquid metal batteries)

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H; Boysen, DA; Ouchi, T; Sadoway, DR

    2013-11-01

    Calcium is an attractive electrode material for use in grid-scale electrochemical energy storage due to its low electronegativity, earth abundance, and low cost. The feasibility of combining a liquid Ca-Bi positive electrode with a molten salt electrolyte for use in liquid metal batteries at 500-700 degrees C was investigated. Exhibiting excellent reversibility up to current densities of 200 mA cm(-2), the calcium bismuth liquid alloy system is a promising positive electrode candidate for liquid metal batteries. The measurement of low self-discharge current suggests that the solubility of calcium metal in molten salt electrolytes can be sufficiently suppressed to yield high coulombic efficiencies >98%. The mechanisms giving rise to Ca-Bi electrode overpotentials were investigated in terms of associated charge transfer and mass transport resistances. The formation of low density Ca11Bi10 intermetallics at the electrode electrolyte interface limited the calcium deposition rate capability of the electrodes; however, the co-deposition of barium into bismuth from barium-containing molten salts suppressed Ca-Bi intermetallic formation thereby improving the discharge capacity. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Impermeable flexible liquid barrier film for encapsulation of DSSC metal electrodes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junghee; Min, Misook; Yoon, Yeoheung; Kim, Won Jung; Kim, Sol; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2016-01-01

    Encapsulation of electronic devices such as dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) is prone to degradation under normal atmospheric conditions, even with hermetic barriers on the metal electrodes. Overcoming this problem is crucial to increasing DSSC lifetimes and making them commercially viable. Herein, we report a new impermeable flexible liquid barrier film using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and partially reduced graphene oxide (PrGO), which dramatically enhances the lifetime of Ag metal electrodes (typically used in DSSCs) immersed in a highly acidic iodolyte solution. The Ag metal electrode encapsulated by the PVA/PrGO film survived for over 500 hrs, superior to existing barriers of glass frits, epoxy resins and polymers. The PVA/PrGO film strongly adheres to the Ag metal surface, and the resulting PVA/PrGO/Ag electrode is stable even on a curved substrate, with a sheet resistance nearly independent of curvature. These results give new insight for the design of high-performance and solution-processable flexible liquid barrier films for a wide range of applications, in particular for the encapsulation of electronic devices with liquid electrolytes. PMID:27263654

  2. Impermeable flexible liquid barrier film for encapsulation of DSSC metal electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junghee; Min, Misook; Yoon, Yeoheung; Kim, Won Jung; Kim, Sol; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2016-01-01

    Encapsulation of electronic devices such as dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) is prone to degradation under normal atmospheric conditions, even with hermetic barriers on the metal electrodes. Overcoming this problem is crucial to increasing DSSC lifetimes and making them commercially viable. Herein, we report a new impermeable flexible liquid barrier film using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and partially reduced graphene oxide (PrGO), which dramatically enhances the lifetime of Ag metal electrodes (typically used in DSSCs) immersed in a highly acidic iodolyte solution. The Ag metal electrode encapsulated by the PVA/PrGO film survived for over 500 hrs, superior to existing barriers of glass frits, epoxy resins and polymers. The PVA/PrGO film strongly adheres to the Ag metal surface, and the resulting PVA/PrGO/Ag electrode is stable even on a curved substrate, with a sheet resistance nearly independent of curvature. These results give new insight for the design of high-performance and solution-processable flexible liquid barrier films for a wide range of applications, in particular for the encapsulation of electronic devices with liquid electrolytes. PMID:27263654

  3. Densification of a powder-metal skeleton by transient liquid-phase infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Adam; Sachs, Emanuel; Kernan, Brian; Posco, Samuel Allen; Rafflenbful, Lukas

    2004-02-01

    Transient liquid-phase infiltration (TLI) is a new method for densifying a powder-metal skeleton that produces a final part of homogeneous composition without significant dimensional change, offering advantages over traditional infiltration and full-density sintering. Fabrication of direct metal parts with complex geometry is possible using TLI in conjunction with solid freeform fabrication (SFF) processes such as three-dimensional printing, which produce net-shape powder-metal skeletons directly from computer-aided design models. The TLI method uses an infiltrant material similar in composition to the skeleton, but also containing a melting-point depressant (MPD), which allows the liquid metal to fill the skeleton void space and later facilitates homogenization. The materials requirements for such a system are discussed, and four experimental material systems were developed with final compositions of approximately Ni-40 wt pct Cu, Ni-4 wt pct Si, Fe-3 wt pct Si, and Fe-12 wt pct Cr-1 wt pct C, with copper, silicon, and carbon serving as the MPDs. Infiltration techniques include gating the introduction of liquid, saturating the melt to prevent erosion, and controlling variations in bulk composition along the infiltration path. Infiltration lengths exceeded 200 mm in the two nickel systems and exceeded 100 mm in the two iron systems. After infiltration, various heat treatments were conducted and mechanical properties were tested, including the tensile, hardness, and impact strength.

  4. Surface study of metal-containing ionic liquids by means of photoemission and absorption spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporali, Stefano; Pedio, Maddalena; Chiappe, Cinzia; Pomelli, Christian S.; Acres, Robert G.; Bardi, Ugo

    2016-06-01

    The vacuum/liquid interface of different ionic liquids obtained by dissolving bistriflimide salts of Ag, Al, Cu, Ni, and Zn in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bistriflimide ([bmim][Tf2N]) was investigated under vacuum using AR-XPS and NEXAFS. The XPS spectra show chemical shifts of the nitrogen of the bistriflimide anion as a function of the metal type, indicating different strength of the coordination bonds. In silver bearing ILs, silver ions were found to be only weakly coordinated. On the contrary, Ni, Cu, Zn, and especially Al exhibit large chemical shifts attributable to strong interaction with the bistriflimide ions. The outermost surface was enriched with or depleted of metal ions as a function of the nature of the metals. Nickel and zinc tend to slightly concentrate at the surface while copper, silver, and especially aluminum are depleted at the surface. We also observed that the aliphatic alkyl chains of the cations tend to protrude outside the surface in all systems studied. However, the presence of metals generally increases the amount of bistriflimide at the vacuum/liquid interface.

  5. The properties of high-intensity impregnated-electrode-type liquid-metal ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Junzo

    1989-04-01

    The impregnated-electrode-type liquid-metal ion source has a porous tip structure produced by sintering tungsten powders. Thus, stable operation over a wide range of emission currents (a few to several hundred μA) is possible, since the liquid-metal flow rate can be controlled. In addition, various liquid metals at relatively high vapor pressure (maximum pressure: 0.3 Torr) can be ionized. This type is therefore suitable for general use as a metal ion source. With the newly designed double lens system to overcome large beam divergence, more than 200 μA of lithium ion current was transported over a distance of 0.4 m within an optical column 2 cm in diameter. After mass separation, more than 70 μA of Li + was obtained. Using multipoint emission to further intensify the current, a germanium ion current of mA order was obtained just after the extractor. This ion source can also be used for mufocusing applications, one of which is a new technique of direct deposition by focused ion beam.

  6. Impermeable flexible liquid barrier film for encapsulation of DSSC metal electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Junghee; Min, Misook; Yoon, Yeoheung; Kim, Won Jung; Kim, Sol; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2016-06-01

    Encapsulation of electronic devices such as dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) is prone to degradation under normal atmospheric conditions, even with hermetic barriers on the metal electrodes. Overcoming this problem is crucial to increasing DSSC lifetimes and making them commercially viable. Herein, we report a new impermeable flexible liquid barrier film using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and partially reduced graphene oxide (PrGO), which dramatically enhances the lifetime of Ag metal electrodes (typically used in DSSCs) immersed in a highly acidic iodolyte solution. The Ag metal electrode encapsulated by the PVA/PrGO film survived for over 500 hrs, superior to existing barriers of glass frits, epoxy resins and polymers. The PVA/PrGO film strongly adheres to the Ag metal surface, and the resulting PVA/PrGO/Ag electrode is stable even on a curved substrate, with a sheet resistance nearly independent of curvature. These results give new insight for the design of high-performance and solution-processable flexible liquid barrier films for a wide range of applications, in particular for the encapsulation of electronic devices with liquid electrolytes.

  7. Advanced Launch Vehicle Upper Stages Using Liquid Propulsion and Metallized Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    1990-01-01

    Metallized propellants are liquid propellants with a metal additive suspended in a gelled fuel or oxidizer. Typically, aluminum (Al) particles are the metal additive. These propellants provide increase in the density and/or the specific impulse of the propulsion system. Using metallized propellant for volume-and mass-constrained upper stages can deliver modest increases in performance for low earth orbit to geosynchronous earth orbit (LEO-GEO) and other earth orbital transfer missions. Metallized propellants, however, can enable very fast planetary missions with a single-stage upper stage system. Trade studies comparing metallized propellant stage performance with non-metallized upper stages and the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) are presented. These upper stages are both one- and two-stage vehicles that provide the added energy to send payloads to altitudes and onto trajectories that are unattainable with only the launch vehicle. The stage designs are controlled by the volume and the mass constraints of the Space Transportation System (STS) and Space Transportation System-Cargo (STS-C) launch vehicles. The influences of the density and specific impulse increases enabled by metallized propellants are examined for a variety of different stage and propellant combinations.

  8. Failure Mechanism for Fast-Charged Lithium Metal Batteries with Liquid Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, DP; Shao, YY; Lozano, T; Bennett, WD; Graff, GL; Polzin, B; Zhang, JG; Engelhard, MH; Saenz, NT; Henderson, WA; Bhattacharya, P; Liu, J; Xiao, J

    2014-09-11

    In recent years, the Li metal anode has regained a position of paramount research interest because of the necessity for employing Li metal in next-generation battery technologies such as Li-S and Li-O-2. Severely limiting this utilization, however, are the rapid capacity degradation and safety issues associated with rechargeable Li metal anodes. A fundamental understanding of the failure mechanism of Li metal at high charge rates has remained elusive due to the complicated interfacial chemistry that occurs between Li metal and liquid electrolytes. Here, it is demonstrated that at high current density the quick formation of a highly resistive solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) entangled with Li metal, which grows towards the bulk Li, dramatically increases up the cell impedance and this is the actual origin of the onset of cell degradation and failure. This is instead of dendritic or mossy Li growing outwards from the metal surface towards/through the separator and/or the consumption of the Li and electrolyte through side reactions. Interphase, in this context, refers to a substantive layer rather than a thin interfacial layer. Discerning the mechanisms and consequences for this interphase formation is crucial for resolving the stability and safety issues associated with Li metal anodes.

  9. The Connection Between Local Icosahedral Order in Metallic Liquids and the Nucleation of Ordered Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor); Kelton, K. F.; Gangopadhyay, A.; Lee, G. W.; Hyers, R. W.; Rathz, R. J.; Rogers, J.; Schenk, T.; Simonet, V.; Holland-Moritz, D.

    2003-01-01

    Over fifty years ago, David Turnbull showed that the temperature of many metallic liquids could be decreased far below their equilibrium melting temperature before crystallization occurred. To explain those surprising results, Charles Frank hypothesized that the local structures of undercooled metallic liquids are different from those of crystal phases, containing a significant degree of icosahedral order that is incompatible with extended periodicity. Such structural differences must create a barrier to the formation crystal phases, explaining the observed undercooling behavior. If true, the nucleation from the liquid of phases with extended icosahedral order should be easier. Icosahedral order is often favored in small clusters, as observed recently in liquid-like clusters of pure Pb on the (111) surface of Si, for example. However, it has never been shown that an increasing preference for icosahedral phase formation can be directly linked with the development of icosahedral order in the undercooled liquid. Owing to the combination of very recent advances in levitation techniques and the availability of synchrotron x-ray and high flux neutron facilities, this is shown here.

  10. The Connection Between Local Icosahedral Order in Metallic Liquids and the Nucleation of Ordered Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Lee, G. W.; Hyers, R. W.; Rathz, T. J.; Rogers, J. R.; Robinson, M. B.; Schenk, T.; Simonet, V.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Over fifty years ago, David Turnbull showed that the temperature of many metallic liquids could be decreased far below their equilibrium melting temperature before crystallization occurred. To explain those surprising results, Charles Frank hypothesized that the local structures of undercooled metallic liquids are different from those of crystal phases, containing a significant degree of icosahedral order that is incompatible with extended periodicity. Such structural differences must create a barrier to the formation crystal phases, explaining the observed undercooling behavior. If true, the nucleation from the liquid of phases with extended icosahedral order should be easier. Icosahedral order is often favored in small clusters, as observed recently in liquid-like clusters of pure Pb on the (111) surface of Si(3), for example. However, it has never been shown that an increasing preference for icosahedral phase formation can be directly linked with the development of icosahedral order in the undercooled liquid. Owing to the combination of very recent advances in levitation techniques and the availability of synchrotron X-ray and high flux neutron facilities.

  11. The Connection Between Local Icosahedral Order in Metallic Liquids and the Nucleation Behavior of Ordered Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Lee, G. W.; Hyers, R. W.; Rathz, T. J.; Rogers, J. R.; Robinson, M. B.; Schenk, T.; Simonet, V.

    2003-01-01

    Over fifty years ago, David Turnbull showed that the temperature of many metallic liquids could be decreased far below their equilibrium melting temperature before crystallization occurred. To explain those surprising results, Charles Frank hypothesized that the local structures of undercooled metallic liquids are different from those of crystal phases, containing a significant degree of icosahedral order that is incompatible with extended periodicity. Such structural differences must create a barrier to the formation crystal phases, explaining the observed undercooling behavior. If true, the nucleation from the liquid of phases with extended icosahedral order should be easier. Icosahedral order is often favored in small clusters, as observed recently in liquid-like clusters of pure Pb on the (111) surface of Si[3], for example. However, it has never been shown that an increasing preference for icosahedral phase formation can be directly linked with the development of icosahedral order in the undercooled liquid. Owing to the combination of very recent advances in levitation techniques and the availability of synchrotron x-ray and high flux neutron facilities, this is shown here.

  12. Experiments with Liquid Metal Walls: Status of the Lithium Tokamak Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, Robert; Boyle, Dennis; Gray, Timothy; Granstedt, Erik; Hammett, Gregory; Jacobson, Craig M; Jones, Andrew; Kozub, Thomas; Kugel, Henry; Leblanc, Benoit; Logan, Nicholas; Lucia, Matthew; Lundberg, Daniel; Majeski, Richard; Mansfield, Dennis; Menard, Jonathan; Spaleta, Jeffrey; Strickler, Trevor; Timberlak, John

    2010-02-16

    Liquid metal walls have been proposed to address the first wall challenge for fusion reactors. The Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is the first magnetic confinement device to have liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFC's) that encloses virtually the entire plasma. In the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U), a predecessor to LTX at PPPL, the highest improvement in energy confinement ever observed in Ohmically-heated tokamak plasmas was achieved with a toroidal liquid lithium limiter. The LTX extends this liquid lithium PFC by using a conducting conformal shell that almost completely surrounds the plasma. By heating the shell, a lithium coating on the plasma-facing side can be kept liquefied. A consequence of the low-recycling conditions from liquid lithium walls is the need for efficient plasma fueling. For this purpose, a molecular cluster injector is being developed. Future plans include the installation of a neutral beam for core plasma fueling, and also ion temperature measurements using charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy. Low edge recycling is also predicted to reduce temperature gradients that drive drift wave turbulence. Gyrokinetic simulations are in progress to calculate fluctuation levels and transport for LTX plasmas, and new fluctuation diagnostics are under development to test these predictions. __________________________________________________

  13. Study of small-amplitude magnetohydrodynamic surface waves on liquid metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hantao; Fox, William; Pace, David; Rappaport, H. L.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) surface waves on liquid metal are studied theoretically and experimentally in the small magnetic Reynolds number limit. A linear dispersion relation is derived when a horizontal magnetic field and a horizontal electric current is imposed. Waves always damp in the deep liquid limit with a magnetic field parallel to the propagation direction. When the magnetic field is weak, waves are weakly damped and the real part of the dispersion is unaffected, while in the opposite limit waves are strongly damped with shortened wavelengths. In a table-top experiment, planar MHD surface waves on liquid gallium are studied in detail in the regime of weak magnetic field and deep liquid. A noninvasive diagnostic accurately measures surface waves at multiple locations by reflecting an array of lasers off the surface onto a screen, which is recorded by an intensified-CCD (charge-coupled device) camera. The measured dispersion relation is consistent with the linear theory with a reduced surface tension likely due to surface oxidation. In excellent agreement with linear theory, it is observed that surface waves are damped only when a horizontal magnetic field is imposed parallel to the propagation direction. No damping is observed under a perpendicular magnetic field. The existence of strong wave damping even without magnetic field suggests the importance of the surface oxide layer. Implications to the liquid metal wall concept in fusion reactors, especially on the wave damping and a Rayleigh-Taylor instability when the Lorentz force is used to support liquid metal layer against gravity, are discussed.

  14. Laplace-Pressure Actuation of Liquid Metal Devices For Reconfigurable Electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumby, Brad Lee

    Present day electronics are now taking on small form factors, unexpected uses, adaptability, and other features that only a decade ago were unimaginable even for most engineers. These electronic devices, such as tablets, smart phones, wearable sensors, and others, have further had a profound impact on how society interacts, works, maintains health, etc. To optimize electronics a growing trend has been to both minimize the physical space taken up by the individual electronic components as well as to maximize the number of functionalities in a single electronic device, forming a compact and efficient package. To accomplish this challenge in one step, many groups have used a design that has reconfigurable electromagnetic properties, maximizing the functionality density of the device. This would allow the replacement of multiple individual components into an integrated system that would achieve a similar result as the separate individual devices while taking up less space. For example, could a device have a reconfigurable antenna, allowing it optimal communication in various settings and across multiple communication bands, thus increasing functionality, range, and even reducing total device size. Thus far a majority of such reconfigurable devices involve connecting/disconnecting various physically static layouts to achieve a summation of individual components that give rise to multiple effects. However, this is not an ideal situation due to the fact that the individual components whether connected or not are taking up real-estate as well as electrical interference with adjacent connected components. This dissertation focuses on the reconfigurability of the metallic component of the electronic device, specifically microwave devices. This component used throughout this dissertation is that of an eutectic liquid metal alloy. The liquid metal allows the utilization of both the inherent compact form (spherical shape) of a liquid in the lowest energy state and the fact that

  15. High Temperature Ultrasonic Transducers for In-Service Inspection of Liquid Metal Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Posakony, Gerald J.; Harris, Robert V.; Baldwin, David L.; Jones, Anthony M.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2011-12-31

    In-service inspection of liquid metal (sodium) fast reactors requires the use of ultrasonic transducers capable of operating at high temperatures (>200°C), high gamma radiation fields, and the chemically reactive liquid sodium environment. In the early- to mid-1970s, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission supported development of high-temperature, submersible single-element transducers, used for scanning and under-sodium imaging in the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor. Current work is building on this technology to develop the next generation of high-temperature linear ultrasonic transducer arrays for under-sodium viewing and in-service inspections.

  16. High current Cu3P liquid metal ion source using a novel extractor configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi-Rusli, R. H.; Corelli, J. C.

    1987-12-01

    It has been found that by utilizing a sharp needle for the extractor electrode in close proximity to the source tip wetted with Cu3P liquid alloy, a large increase (factor ˜300) in ion current is observed in comparison to standard liquid metal ion sources (LMIS's). In standard previously used LMIS's the extractor electrode was a flat plane with a circular hole centered on the source needle tip. This new high current source has important applications in focused and broad ion beam deposition systems.

  17. Nonlinear absorption in ionic liquids with transition metallic atoms in the anion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nóvoa-López, José A.; López Lago, Elena; Seijas, Julio A.; Pilar Vázquez-Tato, M.; Troncoso, Jacobo; de la Fuente, Raúl; Salgueiro, José R.; Michinel, Humberto

    2016-02-01

    Nonlinear absorption has been investigated by open aperture Z-scan in ionic liquids obtained by combination of 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium cations with anions containing a transition metal (Co, Zn, Cu or Ni) and thiocyanate groups. The laser source was a Ti:Sapphire oscillator (80-fs pulses, λ = 810 nm, repetition rate of 80.75 MHz). All liquids present quite low heat capacities that favor the development of strong thermal effects. Thermal effects and nonlinear absorption make them potential materials for optical limiting purposes.

  18. Drop Dynamics and Speciation in Isolation of Metals from Liquid Wastes by Reactive Scavenging

    SciTech Connect

    Arne J. Pearlstein; Alexander Scheeline

    2002-08-30

    Computational and experimental studies of the motion and dynamics of liquid drops in gas flows were conducted with relevance to reactive scavenging of metals from atomized liquid waste. Navier-Stoke's computations of deformable drops revealed a range of conditions from which prolate drops are expected, and showed how frajectiones of deformable drops undergoing deceleration can be computed. Experimental work focused on development of emission fluorescence, and scattering diagnostics. The instrument developed was used to image drop shapes, soot, and nonaxisymmetric departures from steady flow in a 22kw combustor

  19. Rational Concept for Designing Vapor-Liquid-Solid Growth of Single Crystalline Metal Oxide Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Klamchuen, Annop; Suzuki, Masaru; Nagashima, Kazuki; Yoshida, Hideto; Kanai, Masaki; Zhuge, Fuwei; He, Yong; Meng, Gang; Kai, Shoichi; Takeda, Seiji; Kawai, Tomoji; Yanagida, Takeshi

    2015-10-14

    Metal oxide nanowires hold great promise for various device applications due to their unique and robust physical properties in air and/or water and also due to their abundance on Earth. Vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth of metal oxide nanowires offers the high controllability of their diameters and spatial positions. In addition, VLS growth has applicability to axial and/or radial heterostructures, which are not attainable by other nanowire growth methods. However, material species available for the VLS growth of metal oxide nanowires are substantially limited even though the variety of material species, which has fascinating physical properties, is the most interesting feature of metal oxides. Here we demonstrate a rational design for the VLS growth of various metal oxide nanowires, based on the "material flux window". This material flux window describes the concept of VLS nanowire growth within a limited material flux range, where nucleation preferentially occurs only at a liquid-solid interface. Although the material flux was previously thought to affect primarily the growth rate, we experimentally and theoretically demonstrate that the material flux is the important experimental variable for the VLS growth of metal oxide nanowires. On the basis of the material flux window concept, we discover novel metal oxide nanowires, composed of MnO, CaO, Sm2O3, NiO, and Eu2O3, which were previously impossible to form via the VLS route. The newly grown NiO nanowires exhibited stable memristive properties superior to conventional polycrystalline devices due to the single crystallinity. Thus, this VLS design route offers a useful guideline for the discovery of single crystalline nanowires that are composed of functional metal oxide materials. PMID:26372675

  20. Solid-liquid interface free energies of pure bcc metals and B2 phases

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wilson, S. R.; Gunawardana, K. G. S. H.; Mendelev, M. I.

    2015-04-07

    The solid-liquid interface (SLI) free energy was determined from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for several body centered cubic (bcc) metals and B2 metallic compounds (space group: Pm3¯m ; prototype: CsCl). In order to include a bcc metal with a low melting temperature in our study, a semi-empirical potential was developed for Na. Two additional synthetic “Na” potentials were also developed to explore the effect of liquid structure and latent heat on the SLI free energy. The obtained MD data were compared with the empirical Turnbull, Laird, and Ewing relations. All three relations are found to predict the general trend observedmore » in the MD data for bcc metals obtained within the present study. However, only the Laird and Ewing relations are able to predict the trend obtained within the sequence of “Na” potentials. The Laird relation provides the best prediction for our MD data and other MD data for bcc metals taken from the literature. Overall, the Laird relation also agrees well with our B2 data but requires a proportionality constant that is substantially different from the bcc case. It also fails to explain a considerable difference between the SLI free energies of some B2 phases which have nearly the same melting temperature. In contrast, this difference is satisfactorily described by the Ewing relation. Thus, the Ewing relation obtained from the bcc dataset also provides a reasonable description of the B2 data.« less

  1. Solid-liquid interface free energies of pure bcc metals and B2 phases

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, S. R.; Gunawardana, K. G. S. H.; Mendelev, M. I.

    2015-04-07

    The solid-liquid interface (SLI) free energy was determined from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for several body centered cubic (bcc) metals and B2 metallic compounds (space group: Pm3¯m ; prototype: CsCl). In order to include a bcc metal with a low melting temperature in our study, a semi-empirical potential was developed for Na. Two additional synthetic “Na” potentials were also developed to explore the effect of liquid structure and latent heat on the SLI free energy. The obtained MD data were compared with the empirical Turnbull, Laird, and Ewing relations. All three relations are found to predict the general trend observed in the MD data for bcc metals obtained within the present study. However, only the Laird and Ewing relations are able to predict the trend obtained within the sequence of “Na” potentials. The Laird relation provides the best prediction for our MD data and other MD data for bcc metals taken from the literature. Overall, the Laird relation also agrees well with our B2 data but requires a proportionality constant that is substantially different from the bcc case. It also fails to explain a considerable difference between the SLI free energies of some B2 phases which have nearly the same melting temperature. In contrast, this difference is satisfactorily described by the Ewing relation. Thus, the Ewing relation obtained from the bcc dataset also provides a reasonable description of the B2 data.

  2. Liquid metal alloy ion source based metal ion injection into a room-temperature electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, A.; Ritter, E.; Zschornack, G.; Ullmann, F.; Pilz, W.; Bischoff, L.

    2012-02-15

    We have carried out a series of measurements demonstrating the feasibility of using the Dresden electron beam ion source (EBIS)-A, a table-top sized, permanent magnet technology based electron beam ion source, as a charge breeder. Low charged gold ions from an AuGe liquid metal alloy ion source were injected into the EBIS and re-extracted as highly charged ions, thereby producing charge states as high as Au{sup 60+}. The setup, the charge breeding technique, breeding efficiencies as well as acceptance and emittance studies are presented.

  3. Polarization and mass transfer during the electrolysis of molten salts with liquid metallic electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhalev, Yu. G.

    2014-08-01

    Calculations are used to show that the fraction of the overvoltage of the stage of discharge-ionization can be significant in the total overvoltage during the polarization of liquid metallic electrodes in molten chlorides depleted of electrochemically active particles (depending on the type of the dissipative structures that appear near the electrode/electrolyte interface). This finding is taken into account to obtain criterion equations to describe the mass-transfer rate as a function of the physicochemical properties of the electrolyte and the metal electrode.

  4. Conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to metal carbides for production of liquid fuels and chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, A.F.; Modestino, A.J.; Howard, J.B.; Peters, W.A.

    1993-02-01

    Light hydrocarbon gases could be reacted with low cost alkaline earth metal oxide (CaO, MgO) in high-temperature plasma reactor to achieve very high ([le]100%) gas conversion to H[sub 2], CO, and the corresponding metal carbides. These carbides could be stored, transported, and hydrolyzed to acetylene or methyl acetylene, which in turn could be upgraded to a wide range of chemicals and premium liquid hydrocarbon fuels. An electric arc discharge reactor was built for converting methane. Literature reviews were made.

  5. Metal-organic frameworks as host materials of confined supercooled liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, J. K. H.; Sippel, P.; Denysenko, D.; Lunkenheimer, P.; Volkmer, D.; Loidl, A.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we examine the use of metal-organic framework (MOF) systems as host materials for the investigation of glassy dynamics in confined geometry. We investigate the confinement of the molecular glass former glycerol in three MFU-type MOFs with different pore sizes (MFU stands for "Metal-Organic Framework Ulm-University") and study the dynamics of the confined liquid via dielectric spectroscopy. In accord with previous reports on confined glass formers, we find different degrees of deviations from bulk behavior depending on pore size, demonstrating that MOFs are well-suited host systems for confinement investigations.

  6. Experimental evidence for Mo isotope fractionation between metal and silicate liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hin, Remco C.; Burkhardt, Christoph; Schmidt, Max W.; Bourdon, Bernard; Kleine, Thorsten

    2013-10-01

    Stable isotope fractionation of siderophile elements may inform on the conditions and chemical consequences of core-mantle differentiation in planetary objects. The extent to which Mo isotopes fractionate during such metal-silicate segregation, however, is so far unexplored. We have therefore investigated equilibrium fractionation of Mo isotopes between liquid metal and liquid silicate to evaluate the potential of Mo isotopes as a new tool to study core formation. We have performed experiments at 1400 and 1600 °C in a centrifuging piston cylinder. Tin was used to lower the melting temperature of the Fe-based metal alloys to <1400 °C, while variable Fe-oxide contents were used to vary oxygen fugacity in graphite and MgO capsules. Isotopic analyses were performed using a double spike technique. In experiments performed at 1400 °C, the 98Mo/95Mo ratio of silicate is 0.19±0.03‰ (95% confidence interval) heavier than that of metal. This fractionation is not significantly affected by the presence or absence of carbon. Molybdenum isotope fractionation is furthermore independent of oxygen fugacity in the range IW -1.79 to IW +0.47, which are plausible values for core formation. Experiments at 1600 °C show that, at equilibrium, the 98Mo/95Mo ratio of silicate is 0.12±0.02‰ heavier than that of metal and that the presence or absence of Sn does not affect this fractionation. Equilibrium Mo isotope fractionation between liquid metal and liquid silicate as a function of temperature can therefore be described as ΔMoMetal-Silicate98/95=-4.70(±0.59)×105/T2. Our experiments show that Mo isotope fractionation may be resolvable up to metal-silicate equilibration temperatures of about 2500 °C, rendering Mo isotopes a novel tool to investigate the conditions of core formation in objects ranging from planetesimals to Earth sized bodies.

  7. Reference site selection report for the advanced liquid metal reactor at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sivill, R.L.

    1990-03-01

    This Reference Site Selection Report was prepared by EG G, Idaho Inc., for General Electric (GE) to provide information for use by the Department of Energy (DOE) in selecting a Safety Test Site for an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor. Similar Evaluation studies are planned to be conducted at other potential DOE sites. The Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) Concept was developed for ALMR by GE. A ALMR Safety Test is planned to be performed on a DOE site to demonstrate features and meet Nuclear Regulatory Commission Requirements. This study considered possible locations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory that met the ALMR Prototype Site Selection Methodology and Criteria. Four sites were identified, after further evaluation one site was eliminated. Each of the remaining three sites satisfied the criteria and was graded. The results were relatively close. Thus concluding that the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a suitable location for an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor Safety Test. 23 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

  8. Evaluation of liquid metal embrittlement of SS304 by Cd and Cd-Al solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.; Iyer, N.C. ); Begley, J.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The susceptibility of stainless steel 304 to liquid metal embrittlement (LME) by cadmium (Cd) and cadmium-aluminum (Cd-Al) solutions was examined as part of a failure evaluation for SS304-clad cadmium reactor safety rods which had been exposed to elevated temperatures. The active, or cadmium (Cd) bearing, portion of the safety rod consists of a 0.756 in. diameter aluminum allow (Al-6061) core, a 0.05 in. thick Cd layer, and a 0.042 in. thick Type 304 stainless steel cladding. The safety rod thermal tests were conducted as part of a program to define the response of reactor core components to a hypothetical LOCA for the Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactor. LME was considered as a potential failure mechanism based on the nature of the failure and susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels to embrittlement by other liquid metals.

  9. Evaluation of liquid metal embrittlement of SS304 by Cd and Cd-Al solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.; Iyer, N.C.; Begley, J.A.

    1992-07-01

    The susceptibility of stainless steel 304 to liquid metal embrittlement (LME) by cadmium (Cd) and cadmium-aluminum (Cd-Al) solutions was examined as part of a failure evaluation for SS304-clad cadmium reactor safety rods which had been exposed to elevated temperatures. The active, or cadmium (Cd) bearing, portion of the safety rod consists of a 0.756 in. diameter aluminum allow (Al-6061) core, a 0.05 in. thick Cd layer, and a 0.042 in. thick Type 304 stainless steel cladding. The safety rod thermal tests were conducted as part of a program to define the response of reactor core components to a hypothetical LOCA for the Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactor. LME was considered as a potential failure mechanism based on the nature of the failure and susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels to embrittlement by other liquid metals.

  10. Non-Fermi-Liquid Behavior in Metallic Quasicrystals with Local Magnetic Moments.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Eric C; Jagannathan, Anuradha; Miranda, Eduardo; Vojta, Matthias; Dobrosavljević, Vladimir

    2015-07-17

    Motivated by the intrinsic non-Fermi-liquid behavior observed in the heavy-fermion quasicrystal Au51Al34Yb15, we study the low-temperature behavior of dilute magnetic impurities placed in metallic quasicrystals. We find that a large fraction of the magnetic moments are not quenched down to very low temperatures T, leading to a power-law distribution of Kondo temperatures P(T(K))∼T(K)(α-1), with a nonuniversal exponent α, in a remarkable similarity to the Kondo-disorder scenario found in disordered heavy-fermion metals. For α<1, the resulting singular P(T(K)) induces non-Fermi-liquid behavior with diverging thermodynamic responses as T→0. PMID:26230810

  11. Spatially resolved distribution function and the medium-range order in metallic liquid and glass

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Xiaowei; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Hao, Shaogang; Kramer, Matthew; Yao, Yongxin; Mendelev, Mikhail; Napolitano, Ralph; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2011-12-23

    The structural description of disordered systems has been a longstanding challenge in physical science. We propose an atomic cluster alignment method to reveal the development of three-dimensional topological ordering in a metallic liquid as it undercools to form a glass. By analyzing molecular dynamic (MD) simulation trajectories of a Cu{sub 64.5}Zr{sub 35.5} alloy, we show that medium-range order (MRO) develops in the liquid as it approaches the glass transition. Specifically, around Cu sites, we observe 'Bergman triacontahedron' packing (icosahedron, dodecahedron and icosahedron) that extends out to the fourth shell, forming an interpenetrating backbone network in the glass. The discovery of Bergman-type MRO from our order-mining technique provides unique insights into the topological ordering near the glass transition and the relationship between metallic glasses and quasicrystals.

  12. Numerical Simulation of MHD Effect in Liquid Metal Blankets with Flow Channel Insert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Pan, H. C.

    2011-09-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic effect in liquid metal blankets with flow channel insert and pressure equalization slot for fusion liquid metal blanket is studied by numerical simulation based on two dimensional fully developed flow model. The code is verified by comparing analytical solution and numerical solution of Hunt Case II. The velocity field and MHD pressure drop varying with electric conductivity of the FCI is analyzed. The result shows that the average velocity in central area of the cross section decreases with the increase of the electric conductivity of FCI. While the average velocity in gap zone is reverse. Comparing with MHD duct flow without FCI, MHD pressure drop is reduced significantly when the FCI material is electrically insulating.

  13. Liquid metal MHD and heat transfer in a tokamak blanket slotted coolant channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, C. B.; Hua, T. Q.; Black, D. B.; Kirillov, I. R.; Sidorenkov, S. I.; Shapiro, A. M.; Evtushenko, I. A.

    A liquid metal MHD (Magnetohydrodynamic)/heat transfer test was conducted at the ALEX (Argonne Liquid Metal Experiment) facility of ANL (Argonne National Laboratory), jointly between ANL and NIIEFA (Efremov Institute). The test section was a rectangular slotted channel geometry (meaning the channel has a high aspect ratio, in this case 10:1, and the long side is parallel to the applied magnetic field). Isothermal and heat transfer data were collected. A heat flux of approximately 9 W/sq cm was applied to the top horizontal surface (the long side) of the test section. Hartmann Numbers to 1050 (2 Tesla), interaction parameters to 9 x 10(exp 3), Peclet numbers of 10-200, based on the half-width of the small dimension (7 mm), and velocities of 1-75 cm/sec. were achieved. The working fluid was NaK (sodium potassium eutectic). All four interior walls were bare, 300-series stainless steel, conducting walls.

  14. Production of nanoparticles by laser-induced ablation of metals in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Bozon-Verduraz, F; Brayner, R; Voronov, Valerii V; Kirichenko, N A; Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A

    2003-08-31

    The production of noble metal (Ag and Au) nanoparticles upon the ablation of metal targets in liquids (H{sub 2}O, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH, etc.) caused by irradiation by a copper vapour laser is studied. The nanoparticles emerging in a liquid are investigated using X-ray diffractometry, optical absorption spectroscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The colloidal nanoparticle solutions exhibits a distinct plasmon resonance at 520 and 400 nm for Au and Ag, respectively. It is shown that the proximity of laser wavelength to the resonance makes it possible to decrease the dimension of nanoparticles by irradiating the colloidal solution. The size distribution function of nanoparticles is simulated taking into account the production, coagulation, and splitting of nanopartiles in the laser beam. (special issue devoted to the memory of academician a m prokhorov)

  15. Study of the design model of a liquid metal induction pump

    SciTech Connect

    Borghi, C.A.; Cristofolini, A.; Fabbri, M.

    1998-09-01

    The determination of the geometry and of the electrical configuration of an MHD device gives rise to an inverse magnetohydrodynamic field problem. Here, the design of an electromagnetic pump for liquid metal is optimized. The model includes both electrodynamics and fluid-dynamics of the liquid metal. End effects are included in the model, in order to take into account the finite length of the pump and consequently the decrease of efficiency. For the Electrodynamic model, the permeability of the ferromagnetic core is assumed to be infinite. A finite slot configuration of the primary windings is assumed. In the design problem considered, the optimization regards the electrical supply system, the pump dimensions and the slot configuration.

  16. On the behavior and stability of a liquid metal in quasi-planar electric contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuilov, S. D.

    2016-06-01

    The contacts between conductors formed under relatively low pressures can be treated as quasi-planar. Melting of the material of such contacts upon the passage of electric current is used in some technological processes, but the behavior of liquid in these conditions has not been analyzed. In this study, such an estimate was obtained for specific conditions appearing under electric-pulse compacting (briquetting) of metal shavings. Analysis of derived relations shows that this estimate is valid for any quasi-2D contacts upon passage of a pulsed current of duration from microseconds to milliseconds. It is shown that the spacing between contact surfaces decreases, the liquid metal is extruded in the lateral directions, and the area of the contact and its conductivity increase. Sausage-type magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability and overheating instability do not evolve in these conditions because the instability wavelength is larger than the rated thickness of the molten layer; screw MHD instability can appear in slower processes.

  17. Reconfigurable liquid metal fiber-optic mirror for continuous, widely-tunable true-time-delay.

    PubMed

    Schermer, Ross T; Villarruel, Carl A; Bucholtz, Frank; McLaughlin, Colin V

    2013-02-11

    This paper reports the demonstration of a widely-translatable fiber-optic mirror based on the motion of liquid metal through the hollow core of a photonic bandgap fiber. By moving a liquid metal mirror within the hollow core of an optical fiber, large, continuous changes in optical path length are achieved in a comparatively small package. A fiber-optic device is demonstrated which provided a continuously-variable optical path length of over 3.6 meters, without the use of free-space optics or resonant optical techniques (i.e. slow light). This change in path length corresponds to a continuously-variable true-time delay of over 12 ns, or 120 periods at a modulation frequency of 10 GHz. Wavelength dependence was shown to be negligible across the C and L bands. PMID:23481731

  18. Non-Fermi-Liquid Behavior in Metallic Quasicrystals with Local Magnetic Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Eric C.; Jagannathan, Anuradha; Miranda, Eduardo; Vojta, Matthias; Dobrosavljević, Vladimir

    2015-07-01

    Motivated by the intrinsic non-Fermi-liquid behavior observed in the heavy-fermion quasicrystal Au51Al34Yb15 , we study the low-temperature behavior of dilute magnetic impurities placed in metallic quasicrystals. We find that a large fraction of the magnetic moments are not quenched down to very low temperatures T , leading to a power-law distribution of Kondo temperatures P (TK)˜TKα -1, with a nonuniversal exponent α , in a remarkable similarity to the Kondo-disorder scenario found in disordered heavy-fermion metals. For α <1 , the resulting singular P (TK) induces non-Fermi-liquid behavior with diverging thermodynamic responses as T →0 .

  19. Physical model of the vapor-liquid (insulator-metal) transition in an exciton gas

    SciTech Connect

    Khomkin, A. L. Shumikhin, A. S.

    2015-04-15

    We propose a simple physical model describing the transition of an exciton gas to a conducting exciton liquid. The transition occurs due to cohesive coupling of excitons in the vicinity of the critical point, which is associated with transformation of the exciton ground state to the conduction band and the emergence of conduction electrons. We calculate the cohesion binding energy for the exciton gas and, using it, derive the equations of state, critical parameters, and binodal. The computational method is analogous to that used by us earlier [5] for predicting the vapor-liquid (insulator-metal) phase transition in atomic (hypothetical, free of molecules) hydrogen and alkali metal vapors. The similarity of the methods used for hydrogen and excitons makes it possible to clarify the physical nature of the transition in the exciton gas and to predict more confidently the existence of a new phase transition in atomic hydrogen.

  20. Liquid metal MHD and heat transfer in a tokamak blanket slotted coolant channel

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, C.B.; Hua, T.Q.; Black, D.B.; Kirillov, I.R.; Sidorenkov, S.I.; Shapiro, A.M.; Evtushenko, I.A.

    1993-12-31

    A liquid metal MHD (Magnetohydrodynamic)/heat transfer test was conducted at the ALEX (Argonne Liquid Metal Experiment) facility of ANL (Argonne National Laboratory), jointly between ANL and NIIEFA (Efremov Institute). The test section was a rectangular slotted channel geometry (meaning the channel has a high aspect ratio, in this case 10:1, and the long side is parallel to the applied magnetic field). Isothermal and heat transfer data were collected. A heat flux of {approximately}9 W/cm{sup 2} was applied to the top horizontal surface (the long side) of the test section. Hartmann Numbers to 1050 (2 Tesla), interaction parameters to 9 {times} 10{sup 3}, Peclet numbers of 10--200, based on the half-width of the small dimension (7mm), and velocities of 1--75 cm/sec. were achieved. The working fluid was NaK (sodium potassium eutectic). All four interior walls were bare, 300-series stainless steel, conducting walls.