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Sample records for liquid metal pool

  1. A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, G.V.; Carlson, N.M., Donaldson, A.D.

    1990-12-12

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid. 3 figs.

  2. Method of measuring a liquid pool volume

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Gabe V.; Carlson, Nancy M.; Donaldson, Alan D.

    1991-01-01

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid.

  3. Probing laser induced metal vaporization by gas dynamics and liquid pool transport phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    DebRoy, T.; Basu, S.; Mundra, K. )

    1991-08-01

    During laser beam welding of many important engineering alloys, an appreciable amount of alloying element vaporization takes place from the weld pool surface. As a consequence, the composition of the solidified weld pool is often significantly different from that of the alloy being welded. Currently there is no comprehensive theoretical model to predict, from first principles, laser induced metal vaporization rates and the resulting weld pool composition changes. The weld pool heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena have been coupled with the velocity distribution functions of the gas molecules at various locations above the weld pool to determine the rates of the laser induced element vaporization for pure metals. The procedure allows for calculations of the condensation flux based on the equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy in both the vapor and the liquid phases. Computed values of the rates of vaporization of pure metals were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimentally determined values. The synthesis of the principles of gas dynamics and weld pool transport phenomena can serve as a basis for weld metal composition control.

  4. Natural Convection Heat Transfer in a Rectangular Liquid Metal Pool With Bottom Heating and Top Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Il S.; Yu, Yong H.; Son, Hyoung M.; Hwang, Jin S.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2006-07-01

    An experimental study is performed to investigate the natural convection heat transfer characteristics with subcooled coolant to create engineering database for basic applications in a lead alloy cooled reactor. Tests are performed in the ALTOS (Applied Liquid-metal Thermal Operation Study) apparatus as part of MITHOS (Metal Integrated Thermo Hydrodynamic Operation System). A relationship is determined between the Nusselt number Nu and the Rayleigh number Ra in the liquid metal rectangular pool. Results are compared with correlations and experimental data in the literature. Given the similar Ra condition, the present test results for Nu of the liquid metal pool with top subcooling are found to be similar to those predicted by the existing correlations or experiments. The current test results are utilized to develop natural convection heat transfer correlations applicable to low Prandtl number Pr fluids that are heated from below and cooled by the external coolant above. Results from this study are slated to be used in designing BORIS (Battery Optimized Reactor Integral System), a small lead cooled modular fast reactor for deployment at remote sites cycled with MOBIS (Modular Optimized Brayton Integral System) for electricity generation, tied with NAVIS (Naval Application Vessel Integral System) for ship propulsion, joined with THAIS (Thermochemical Hydrogen Acquisition Integral System) for hydrogen production, and coupled with DORIS (Desalination Optimized Reactor Integral System) for seawater desalination. Tests are performed with Wood's metal (Pb-Bi-Sn-Cd) filling a rectangular pool whose lower surface is heated and upper surface cooled by forced convection of water. The test section is 20 cm long, 11.3 cm high and 15 cm wide. The simulant has a melting temperature of 78 deg. C. The constant temperature and heat flux condition was realized for the bottom heating once the steady state had been met. The test parameters include the heated bottom surface temperature

  5. Method of measuring a liquid pool volume

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, G.V.; Carlson, N.M.; Donaldson, A.D.

    1991-03-19

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools is disclosed, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid. 3 figures.

  6. Modeling of Electromagnetic Field and Liquid Metal Pool Shape in an Electroslag Remelting Process with Two Series-Connected Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baokuan; Wang, Bo; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka

    2014-06-01

    A three-dimensional finite-element model has been developed to understand the electromagnetic field and liquid metal pool shape in an electroslag remelting (ESR) process with two series-connected electrodes. The magnetic vector potential is introduced into the Maxwell's equations, and the nodal-based method is used to solve a three-dimensional harmonic electromagnetic field. The heat transfer of the solidifying processes of ingot is modeled by a source-based enthalpy method, and the Joule heating is included in an inner source. The results show the main part of the current flows through the slag cap and a little enters into ingot in a two-series-connected electrode ESR system. As the interaction of self-induced and mutual-induced of two electrodes occurs, the skin effect is significantly suppressed by the neighbor effect. A symmetrical pattern of magnetic flux density in a two-series-connected electrode ESR system is displayed. The magnetic flux density between two electrodes is reinforced and reduced at the outside of two electrodes. The maximum Joule heat power density is located at the interface of slag and electrodes, and it decreases with an increase of the electrode immersion depth. The averaged Joule heat power density increases when slag cap thickness is reduced. With the increase of ingot height, the liquid metal pool shape changes from arc shaped to "V" shaped. When the ingot height is more than the diameter in the ESR processes, the liquid metal pool shape is constant.

  7. Seismic analysis of a large pool-type LMR (liquid metal reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.; Gvildys, J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the seismic study of a 450-MWe liquid metal reactor (LMR) under 0.3-g SSE ground excitation. Two calculations were performed using the new design configuration. They deal with the seismic response of the reactor vessel, the guard vessel and support skirt, respectively. In both calculations, the stress and displacement fields at important locations of those components are investigated. Assessments are also made on the elastic and inelastic structural capabilities for other beyond-design basis seismic loads. Results of the reactor vessel analysis reveal that the maximum equivalent stress is only about half of the material yield stress. For the guard vessel and support skirt, the stress level is very small. Regarding the analysis if inelastic structural capability, solutions of the Newmark-Hall ductility modification method show that the reactor vessel can withstand seismics with ground ZPAs ranging from 1.015 to 1.31 g, which corresponds to 3.37 to 4.37 times the basic 0.3-g SSE. Thus, the reactor vessel and guard vessel are strong enough to resist seismic loads. 4 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Flame spread across liquid pools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard; Miller, Fletcher; Schiller, David; Sirignano, William A.

    1993-01-01

    For flame spread over liquid fuel pools, the existing literature suggests three gravitational influences: (1) liquid phase buoyant convection, delaying ignition and assisting flame spread; (2) hydrostatic pressure variation, due to variation in the liquid pool height caused by thermocapillary-induced convection; and (3) gas-phase buoyant convection in the opposite direction to the liquid phase motion. No current model accounts for all three influences. In fact, prior to this work, there was no ability to determine whether ignition delay times and flame spread rates would be greater or lesser in low gravity. Flame spread over liquid fuel pools is most commonly characterized by the relationship of the initial pool temperature to the fuel's idealized flash point temperature, with four or five separate characteristic regimes having been identified. In the uniform spread regime, control has been attributed to: (1) gas-phase conduction and radiation; (2) gas-phase conduction only; (3) gas-phase convection and liquid conduction, and most recently (4) liquid convection ahead of the flame. Suggestions were made that the liquid convection was owed to both vuoyancy and thermocapillarity. Of special interest to this work is the determination of whether, and under what conditions, pulsating spread can and will occur in microgravity in the absence of buoyant flows in both phases. The approach we have taken to resolving the importance of buoyancy for these flames is: (1) normal gravity experiments and advanced diagnostics; (2) microgravity experiments; and (3) numerical modelling at arbitrary gravitational level.

  9. Thermohydraulics in liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kottowski, H. M.

    Heat transfer problems in single-phase and two-phase liquid metal forced convection flow are reviewed. Liquid metal boiling heat transfer in pool flow; and dry out heat fluxes are considered. It is shown that in technological plants working with liquid metals, superheating up to 150 C occurs, and can lead to nonstationary hydraulic transition between the single-phase and established two-phase flows. Boiling phases relative to subcooled boiling and bubble boiling have no importance for technological processes. Piston, slug and annular flow patterns dominate. On the basis of the flow patterns observed during boiling, the separate flow model principle is the only one suitable for calculating the two-phase flow pressure drop. Using this model and total pressure drop measurements, a relationship for the two-phase frictional pressure characteristic, valid for tubular and annular geometry, can be determined.

  10. Safety Investigation of Liquid-Metal-Cooled Nuclear Systems with Heat Exchanger in the Risers of Simple Flow-Path Pool Design

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsson, Johan; Wider, Hartmut U.

    2005-12-15

    Safety investigations were performed on 600- and 1426-MW(thermal) liquid-metal-cooled reactors with the heat exchangers (HXs) located in the risers of simple flow-path pool designs. This includes both critical reactors and accelerator-driven systems (ADSs) using liquid-metal coolants. For the 600-MW(thermal) ADS, the safety implications were examined for vessel sizes of two heights (11 and 15 m) and two diameters (6 and 10 m). Then, the reference design of 11-m height and 6-m diameter was compared with a similar design, but with the HXs located in the downcomers. The transients investigated were total-loss-of-power (TLOP), unprotected-loss-of-flow (ULOF), protected-loss-of-flow, and unprotected loss-of-heat-sink accidents. The 600-MW(thermal) ADS of 11-m height and 6-m diameter peaks at 1041 K after 29 h during a TLOP accident. If the diameter is increased to 10 m, it will peak after 55 h at a 178 K lower temperature thanks to its larger thermal inertia. The difference between locating the HXs in the risers and the downcomers is insignificant for this accident type. With the HXs in the risers, the temperature peaks at 1045 K after 28 h. During a ULOF accident in an ADS at full power, the core outlet temperature stabilizes at 1010 K, which is 337 K above the nominal outlet temperature. When the vessel height is increased to 15 m, the natural convection is improved, and the core outlet temperature stabilizes at 911 K. A Pb-cooled 1426-MW(thermal) reactor of 11-m height and 12-m diameter is also shown to be sufficiently coolable during a TLOP accident; i.e., it peaks at 1093 K after 49 h. In a pool-type design with a simple flow path, the use of HXs in the risers and flaps at their inlets that prevent a flow reversal will have significant safety advantages in case of HX tube failures. Steam or gas bubbles exiting from the secondary circuit cannot be dragged into the core region by the liquid-metal coolant. Instead, they would rise with the coolant and exit through the

  11. Liquid metal cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Hundal, Rolv

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal being provided with a hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal which acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly.

  12. Drop Impact on to Moving Liquid Pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Sánchez, Beatriz Natividad; Castrejón-Pita, José Rafael; Castrejón-Pita, Alfonso Arturo; Hutchings, Ian M.

    2014-11-01

    The deposition of droplets on to moving liquid substrates is an omnipresent situation both in nature and industry. A diverse spectrum of phenomena emerges from this simple process. In this work we present a parametric experimental study that discerns the dynamics of the impact in terms of the physical properties of the fluid and the relative velocity between the impacting drop and the moving liquid pool. The behaviour ranges from smooth coalescence (characterized by little mixing) to violent splashing (generation of multiple satellite droplets and interfacial vorticity). In addition, transitional regimes such as bouncing and surfing are also found. We classify the system dynamics and show a parametric diagram for the conditions of each regime. This work was supported by the EPSRC (Grant EP/H018913/1), the Royal Society, Becas Santander Universidades and the International Relationships Office of the University of Extremadura.

  13. Burning of liquid pools in reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanury, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    The existing literature on the combustion of liquid fuel pools is reviewed to identify the physical and chemical aspects which require an improved understanding. Among the pre-, trans- and post-ignition processes, a delineation was made of those which seem to uniquely benefit from studies in the essential environment offered by spacelab. The role played by the gravitational constant in analytical and experimental justifications was developed. The analytical justifications were based on hypotheses, models and dimensional analyses whereas the experimental justifications were based on an examination of the range of gravity and gravity-dependent variables possible in the earth-based laboratories. Some preliminary expositions into the questions of feasibility of the proposed spacelab experiment are also reported.

  14. Liquid metal enabled pump

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Sivan, Vijay; Petersen, Phred; O’Mullane, Anthony P.; Abbott, Derek; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    Small-scale pumps will be the heartbeat of many future micro/nanoscale platforms. However, the integration of small-scale pumps is presently hampered by limited flow rate with respect to the input power, and their rather complicated fabrication processes. These issues arise as many conventional pumping effects require intricate moving elements. Here, we demonstrate a system that we call the liquid metal enabled pump, for driving a range of liquids without mechanical moving parts, upon the application of modest electric field. This pump incorporates a droplet of liquid metal, which induces liquid flow at high flow rates, yet with exceptionally low power consumption by electrowetting/deelectrowetting at the metal surface. We present theory explaining this pumping mechanism and show that the operation is fundamentally different from other existing pumps. The presented liquid metal enabled pump is both efficient and simple, and thus has the potential to fundamentally advance the field of microfluidics. PMID:24550485

  15. Liquid metal drop ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khuri-Yakub, B. T.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this project was to demonstrate the possibility of ejecting liquid metals using drop on demand printing technology. The plan was to make transducers for operation in the 100 MHz frequency range and to use these transducers to demonstrate the ability to eject drops of liquid metals such as gallium. Two transducers were made by indium bonding piezoelectric lithium niobate to quartz buffer rods. The lithium niobate plates were thinned by mechanical polishing to a thickness of 37 microns for operation at 100 MHz. Hemispherical lenses were polished in the opposite ends of the buffer rods. The lenses, which focus the sound waves in the liquid metal, had an F-number equals 1. A mechanical housing was made to hold the transducers and to allow precise control over the liquid level above the lens. We started by demonstrating the ability to eject drops of water on demand. The drops of water had a diameter of 15 microns which corresponds to the wavelength of the sound wave in the water. A videotape of this ejection was made. We then used a mixture of Gallium and Indium (used to lower the melting temperature of the Gallium) to demonstrate the ejection of liquid metal drops. This proved to be difficult because of the oxide skin which forms on the surface of the liquid. In some instances, we were able to eject metal drops, however, this was not consistent and reproducible. An experiment was set up at NASA-Lewis to stabilize the process of drop on demand liquid metal ejection. The object was to place the transducer and liquid metal in a vacuum station so that no oxide would form on the surface. We were successful in demonstrating that liquid metals could be ejected on demand and that this technology could be used for making sheet metal in space.

  16. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Joseph P.; Andraka, Charles E.; Lukens, Laurance L.; Moreno, James B.

    1992-01-01

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other.

  17. Numerical simulation of turbulent flow and heat transfer in the wedge-shaped liquid metal pool of a twin-roll caster

    SciTech Connect

    Seyedein, S.H.; Hasan, H.

    1997-03-01

    Controlled flow and heat transfer are important for the quality of a strip in a twin-roll continuous casting process. A numerical study was carried out to investigate the two-dimensional turbulent flow and heat transfer in the liquid stainless-steel-filled wedge-shaped cavity formed by the two counterrotating rolls in a twin-roll continuous casting system. The turbulent characteristics of the flow were modeled using a low-Reynolds-number {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model due to Launder and Sharma. The arbitrary nature of the computational domain was accounted for through the use of a nonorthogonal boundary-fitted coordinate system on a staggered grid. A control-volume-based finite difference scheme was used to solve the transformed transport equations. This study is primarily focused on elucidating the inlet superheat dissipation in the melt pool with the rolls being maintained at a constant liquidus temperature of the steel. A parametric study was carried out to ascertain the effect of the inlet superheat, the casting speed, and the roll gap at the nip of the rotating rolls on the flow and heat transfer characteristics. The velocity fields show two counterrotating recirculation zones in the upstream region. The local Nusselt number on the roll surface shows significant variations. The contours of temperature and turbulent viscosity show the complex nature of the turbulent transport phenomena to be expected in a twin-roll casting process.

  18. 41 CFR 109-27.5106 - Precious metals pool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Precious metals pool. 109-27.5106 Section 109-27.5106 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.51-Management of Precious Metals § 109-27.5106 Precious metals pool....

  19. 41 CFR 109-27.5106 - Precious metals pool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Precious metals pool. 109-27.5106 Section 109-27.5106 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.51-Management of Precious Metals § 109-27.5106 Precious metals pool....

  20. 41 CFR 109-27.5106 - Precious metals pool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Precious metals pool. 109-27.5106 Section 109-27.5106 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.51-Management of Precious Metals § 109-27.5106 Precious metals pool....

  1. 41 CFR 109-27.5106 - Precious metals pool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Precious metals pool. 109-27.5106 Section 109-27.5106 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.51-Management of Precious Metals § 109-27.5106 Precious metals pool....

  2. 41 CFR 109-27.5106 - Precious metals pool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Precious metals pool. 109-27.5106 Section 109-27.5106 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.51-Management of Precious Metals § 109-27.5106 Precious metals pool....

  3. Liquid metal hydrogen barriers

    DOEpatents

    Grover, George M.; Frank, Thurman G.; Keddy, Edward S.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen barriers which comprise liquid metals in which the solubility of hydrogen is low and which have good thermal conductivities at operating temperatures of interest. Such barriers are useful in nuclear fuel elements containing a metal hydride moderator which has a substantial hydrogen dissociation pressure at reactor operating temperatures.

  4. Liquid metal pump

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.

    1982-01-01

    The liquid metal pump comprises floating seal rings and attachment of the pump diffuser to the pump bowl for isolating structural deflections from the pump shaft bearings. The seal rings also eliminate precision machining on large assemblies by eliminating the need for a close tolerance fit between the mounting surfaces of the pump and the seals. The liquid metal pump also comprises a shaft support structure that is isolated from the pump housing for better preservation of alignment of shaft bearings. The shaft support structure also allows for complete removal of pump internals for inspection and repair.

  5. Liquid metal thermal electric converter

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Joseph P.; Andraka, Charles E.; Lukens, Laurance L.; Moreno, James B.

    1989-01-01

    A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

  6. Liquid metal thermoacoustic engine

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.; Wheatley, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    We are studying a liquid metal thermoacoustic engine both theoretically and experimentally. This type of engine promises to produce large quantities of electrical energy from heat at modest efficiency with no moving parts. A sound wave is usually thought of as consisting of pressure oscillations, but always attendant to the pressure oscillation are temperature oscillations. The combination produces a rich variety of ''thermoacoustic'' effects. These effects are usually so small that they are never noticed in everyday life; nevertheless under the right circumstances they can be harnessed to produce powerful heat engines, heat pumps, and refrigerators. In our liquid metal thermoacoustic engine, heat flow from a high temperature source to a low temperature sink generates a high-amplitude standing acoustic wave in liquid sodium. This acoustic power is converted to electric power by a simple magnetohydrodynamic effect at the acoustic oscillation frequency. We have developed a detailed thermoacoustic theory applicable to this engine, and find that a reasonably designed liquid sodium engine operating between 700/sup 0/C and 100/sup 0/C should generate about 60 W/cm/sup 2/ of acoustic power at about 1/3 of Carnot's efficiency. Construction of a 3000 W-thermal laboratory model engine has just been completed, and we have exciting preliminary experimental results as of the time of preparation of this manuscript showing, basically, that the engine works. We have also designed and built a 1 kHz liquid sodium magnetohydrodynamic generator and have extensive measurements on it. It is now very well characterized both experimentally and theoretically. The first generator of its kind, it already converts acoustic power to electric power with 40% efficiency. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Method for determining molten metal pool level in twin-belt continuous casting machines

    DOEpatents

    Kaiser, Timothy D.; Daniel, Sabah S.; Dykes, Charles D.

    1989-03-21

    A method for determining level of molten metal in the input of a continuous metal casting machine having at least one endless, flexible, revolving casting belt with a surface which engages the molten metal to be cast and a reverse, cooled surface along which is directed high velocity liquid coolant includes the steps of predetermining the desired range of positions of the molten metal pool and positioning at least seven heat-sensing transducers in bearing contact with the moving reverse belt surface and spaced in upstream-downstream relationship relative to belt travel spanning the desired pool levels. A predetermined temperature threshold is set, somewhat above coolant temperature and the output signals of the transducer sensors are scanned regarding their output signals indicative of temperatures of the moving reverse belt surface. Position of the molten pool is determined using temperature interpolation between any successive pair of upstream-downstream spaced sensors, which follows confirmation that two succeeding downstream sensors are at temperature levels exceeding threshold temperature. The method accordingly provides high resolution for determining pool position, and verifies the determined position by utilizing full-strength signals from two succeeding downstream sensors. In addition, dual sensors are used at each position spanning the desired range of molten metal pool levels to provide redundancy, wherein only the higher temperature of each pair of sensors at a station is utilized.

  8. Peak pool boiling heat flux in viscous liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhir, V. K.; Lienhard, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    The stability of a gas jet in a surrounding viscous liquid is studied. An expression is developed for the critical velocity at which the jet becomes unstable in a returning viscous liquid. The stability analysis is made to correspond with the geometrical configuration of gas jets and liquid columns similar to those observed near the peak pool boiling heat flux. The critical velocity of the gas jet is then used to obtain the functional form of the peak heat flux on flat plates and cylindrical heaters. The expressions are compared with original observations of the peak heat flux in very viscous liquids on flat plate, and cylindrical, heaters at both earth-normal, and elevated, gravities.

  9. Method of foaming a liquid metal

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Albert K.; Johnson, Carl E.

    1980-01-01

    The addition of a small quantity of barium to liquid metal NaK or sodium has been found to promote foam formation and improve bubble retention in the liquid metal. A stable liquid metal foam will provide a more homogeneous liquid metal flow through the channel of a two-phase liquid metal MHD power generator to improve operating efficiency.

  10. EXPERIMENTAL LIQUID METAL FUEL REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Happell, J.J.; Thomas, G.R.; Denise, R.P.; Bunts, J.L. Jr.

    1962-01-23

    A liquid metal fuel nuclear fission reactor is designed in which the fissionable material is dissolved or suspended in a liquid metal moderator and coolant. The liquid suspension flows into a chamber in which a critical amount of fissionable material is obtained. The fluid leaves the chamber and the heat of fission is extracted for power or other utilization. The improvement is in the support arrangement for a segrnented graphite core to permit dif ferential thermal expansion, effective sealing between main and blanket liquid metal flows, and avoidance of excessive stress development in the graphite segments. (AEC)

  11. LIQUID METAL COMPOSITIONS CONTAINING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Teitel, R.J.

    1959-04-21

    Liquid metal compositions containing a solid uranium compound dispersed therein is described. Uranium combines with tin to form the intermetallic compound USn/sub 3/. It has been found that this compound may be incorporated into a liquid bath containing bismuth and lead-bismuth components, if a relatively small percentage of tin is also included in the bath. The composition has a low thermal neutron cross section which makes it suitable for use in a liquid metal fueled nuclear reactor.

  12. Solute diffusion in liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.

    1973-01-01

    A gas model of diffusion in liquid metals is presented. In this model, ions of liquid metals are assumed to behave like the molecules in a dense gas. Diffusion coefficient of solute is discussed with reference to its mass, ionic size, and pair potential. The model is applied to the case of solute diffusion in liquid silver. An attempt was made to predict diffusion coefficients of solutes with reasonable accuracy.

  13. Alkali metal pool boiler life tests for a 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. G.; Rosenfeld, J. H.; Noble, J.

    The overall operating temperature and efficiency of solar-powered Stirling engines can be improved by adding an alkali metal pool boiler heat transport system to supply heat more uniformly to the heater head tubes. One issue with liquid metal pool boilers is unstable boiling. Stable boiling is obtained with an enhanced boiling surface containing nucleation sites that promote continuous boiling. Over longer time periods, it is possible that the boiling behavior of the system will change. An 800-h life test was conducted to verify that pool boiling with the chosen fluid/surface combination remains stable as the system ages. The apparatus uses NaK boiling on a - 100 + 140 stainless steel sintered porous layer, with the addition of a small amount of xenon. Pool boiling remained stable to the end of life test. The pool boiler life test included a total of 82 cold starts, to simulate startup each morning, and 60 warm restarts, to simulate cloud cover transients. The behavior of the cold and warm starts showed no significant changes during the life test. In the experiments, the fluid/surface combination provided stable, high-performance boiling at the operating temperature of 700 C. Based on these experiments, a pool boiler was designed for a full-scale 25-kWe Stirling system.

  14. Alkali metal pool boiler life tests for a 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. G.; Rosenfeld, J. H.; Noble, J.

    1991-01-01

    The overall operating temperature and efficiency of solar-powered Stirling engines can be improved by adding an alkali metal pool boiler heat transport system to supply heat more uniformly to the heater head tubes. One issue with liquid metal pool boilers is unstable boiling. Stable boiling is obtained with an enhanced boiling surface containing nucleation sites that promote continuous boiling. Over longer time periods, it is possible that the boiling behavior of the system will change. An 800-h life test was conducted to verify that pool boiling with the chosen fluid/surface combination remains stable as the system ages. The apparatus uses NaK boiling on a - 100 + 140 stainless steel sintered porous layer, with the addition of a small amount of xenon. Pool boiling remained stable to the end of life test. The pool boiler life test included a total of 82 cold starts, to simulate startup each morning, and 60 warm restarts, to simulate cloud cover transients. The behavior of the cold and warm starts showed no significant changes during the life test. In the experiments, the fluid/surface combination provided stable, high-performance boiling at the operating temperature of 700 C. Based on these experiments, a pool boiler was designed for a full-scale 25-kWe Stirling system.

  15. Feasibility study of liquid pool burning in reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanury, A. M.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of conducting experiments in the Spacelab on ignition and flame spread with liquid fuel pools which are initially at a temperature lower than the fuel's flash point temperature was studied. Theories were developed for the ignition and flame spread processes, and experiments were conducted to understand the factors influencing the ignition process and the spread rate. The results were employed to devise a conceptual Spacelab experiment which is expected to be feasible for a safe conduct and to be suitable for obtaining crucial data on the concerned processes.

  16. Convection in molten pool created by a concentrated energy flux on a solid metal target

    SciTech Connect

    Dikshit, B.; Zende, G. R.; Bhatia, M. S.; Suri, B. M.

    2009-08-15

    During surface evaporation of metals by use of a concentrated energy flux such as electron beam or lasers, a liquid metal pool having a very high temperature gradient is formed around the hot zone created by the beam. Due to temperature dependence of surface tension, density, and depression of the evaporating surface caused by back pressure of the emitted vapor in this molten pool, a strong convective current sets in the molten pool. A proposition is made that this convection may pass through three different stages during increase in the electron beam power depending upon dominance of the various driving forces. To confirm this, convective heat transfer is quantified in terms of dimensionless Nusselt number and its evolution with power is studied in an experiment using aluminum, copper, and zirconium as targets. These experimentally determined values are also compared to the theoretical values predicted by earlier researchers to test the validity of their assumptions and to know about the type of flow in the melt pool. Thus, conclusion about the physical characteristics of flow in the molten pool of metals could be drawn by considering the roles of surface tension and curvature of the evaporating surface on the evolution of convective heat transfer.

  17. Actively convected liquid metal divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Michiya; Hirooka, Yoshi

    2014-12-01

    The use of actively convected liquid metals with j × B force is proposed to facilitate heat handling by the divertor, a challenging issue associated with magnetic fusion experiments such as ITER. This issue will be aggravated even more for DEMO and power reactors because the divertor heat load will be significantly higher and yet the use of copper would not be allowed as the heat sink material. Instead, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel alloys with heat conductivities substantially lower than that of copper, will be used as the structural materials. The present proposal is to fill the lower part of the vacuum vessel with liquid metals with relatively low melting points and low chemical activities including Ga and Sn. The divertor modules, equipped with electrodes and cooling tubes, are immersed in the liquid metal. The electrode, placed in the middle of the liquid metal, can be biased positively or negatively with respect to the module. The j × B force due to the current between the electrode and the module provides a rotating motion for the liquid metal around the electrodes. The rise in liquid temperature at the separatrix hit point can be maintained at acceptable levels from the operation point of view. As the rotation speed increases, the current in the liquid metal is expected to decrease due to the v × B electromotive force. This rotating motion in the poloidal plane will reduce the divertor heat load significantly. Another important benefit of the convected liquid metal divertor is the fast recovery from unmitigated disruptions. Also, the liquid metal divertor concept eliminates the erosion problem.

  18. Liquid metal heat transfer issues

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, H.W.; Yoder, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    An alkali liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor coupled with an alkali metal Rankine cycle provides a practicable option for space systems/missions requiring power in the 1 to 100 MW(e) range. Thermal issues relative to the use of alkali liquid metals for this purpose are identified as these result from the nature of the alkali metal fluid itself, from uncertainties in the available heat transfer correlations, and from design and performance requirements for system components operating in the earth orbital microgravity environment. It is noted that, while these issues require further attention to achieve optimum system performance, none are of such magnitude as to invalidate this particular space power concept.

  19. Liquid metal boiling inception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabin, C. M.; Poppendiek, H. F.; Mouritzen, G.; Meckel, P. T.; Cloakey, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental study of the inception of boiling in potassium in forced convection is reported. The boiler consisted of a 0.19-inch inside diameter, niobium-1% zirconium boiler tube approximately six feet long. Heating was accomplished by direct electrical tube wall conduction. Experiments were performed with both all-liquid fill and two-phase fill startup sequences and with a range of flow rates, saturation temperatures, inert gas levels, and fill liquid temperatures. Superheat of the liquid above the equilibrium saturation temperature was observed in all the experiments. Incipient boiling liquid superheat ranged from a few degrees to several hundred. Comparisons of these data with other data and with several analytical treatments are presented.

  20. Pool boiling from rotating and stationary spheres in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuan, Winston M.; Schwartz, Sidney H.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented for a preliminary experiment involving saturated pool boiling at 1 atm from rotating 2 and 3 in. diameter spheres which were immersed in liquid nitrogen (LN2). Additional results are presented for a stationary, 2 inch diameter sphere, quenched in LN2, which were obtained utilizing a more versatile and complete experimental apparatus that will eventually be used for additional rotating sphere experiments. The speed for the rotational tests was varied from 0 to 10,000 rpm. The stationary experiments parametrically varied pressure and subcooling levels from 0 to 600 psig and from 0 to 50 F, respectively. During the rotational tests, a high speed photographic analysis was undertaken to measure the thickness of the vapor film surrounding the sphere. The average Nusselt number over the cooling period was plotted against the rotational Reynolds number. Stationary sphere results included local boiling heat transfer coefficients at different latitudinal locations, for various pressure and subcooling levels.

  1. Transverse excitations in liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, S.; Munejiri, S.; Inui, M.; Kajihara, Y.; Pilgrim, W.-C.; Baron, A. Q. R.; Shimojo, F.; Hoshino, K.

    2013-02-01

    The transverse acoustic excitation modes were detected by inelastic x-ray scattering in liquid Ga, Cu and Fe in the Q range around 10 nm-1 using a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility, SPring-8, although these liquid metals are mostly described by a simple hard-sphere liquid. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations clearly support this finding for liquid Ga. From the detailed analyses for the S(Q,ω) spectra with good statistic qualities, the lifetime of less than 1 ps and the propagating length of less than 1 nm can be estimated for the transverse acoustic phonon modes, which correspond to the lifetime and size of cages formed instantaneously in these liquid metals. The microscopic Poisson's ratio estimated from the dynamic velocities of sound is 0.42 for liquid Ga and about -0.2 for liquid transition metals, indicating a rubber-like soft and extremely hard elastic properties of the cage clusters, respectively. The origin of these microscopic elastic properties is discussed in detail.

  2. Film boiling of R-11 on liquid metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.; Irvine, T.F. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An interesting problem is the effect of an immiscible liquid heating surface on the process of film boiling. Such surfaces raise questions concerning interface stability to disturbances, effects of gas bubbling, and vapor explosions in layered systems. The specific motivation for this study was to investigate film boiling from a liquid surface with application to cooling of molten reactor core debris by an overlying pool of reactor coolant. To investigate this phenomenon, and apparatus consisting of a nominal six-inch diameter steel vessel to hold the liquid metal and boiling fluid was constructed; coolant reservoirs, heaters, controllers, and allied instrumentation were attached. A transient energy balance was performed on the liquid metal pool by a submerged assembly of microthermocouples in the liquid metal and an array of thermocouples on the wall of the test vessel. The thermocouple data were used to determine the boiling heat flux as well as the boiling superheat. On an average basis, the deviation between the prediction of the Berenson model and the experimental data was less than one percent when Berenson was corrected for thermal radiation effects. Evidence from visualization tests of R-11 in film boiling over molten metal pools to superheats in excess of 600 K supports this conclusion. 13 refs.

  3. Metal pad instabilities in liquid metal batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zikanov, Oleg

    2015-12-01

    A mechanical analogy is used to analyze the interaction between the magnetic field, electric current, and deformation of interfaces in liquid metal batteries. In the framework of a low-mode, nondissipative, linear stability model, it is found that, during charging or discharging, a sufficiently large battery is prone to instabilities of two types. One is similar to the metal pad instability known to exist in the aluminum reduction cells. Another type is new. It is related to the destabilizing effect of the Lorentz force formed by the azimuthal magnetic field induced by the base current, and the current perturbations caused by the local variations of the thickness of the electrolyte layer.

  4. Metals Separation by Liquid Extraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malmary, G.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    As part of a project focusing on techniques in industrial chemistry, students carry out experiments on separating copper from cobalt in chloride-containing aqueous solution by liquid extraction with triisoctylamine solvent and search the literature on the separation process of these metals. These experiments and the literature research are…

  5. Instantaneous liquid release from a rail tanker: the influence of noise shields on pool shape and pool size.

    PubMed

    Rosmuller, Nils

    2009-05-30

    In the Netherlands, the Betuweline is a dedicated freight railway. It will, among other things, be used for transportation of all kinds of hazardous materials from the Port of Rotterdam to the German Hinterland and vice versa. The line is approximately 150 km long. Alongside the line, more than 100 km noise shields have been constructed. The question is how, and to what extent, this noise shield will affect the pool shape and size of an instantaneous release of a flammable liquid, such as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). In case of an instantaneous release of liquid from a rail tanker (50 m(3)), both risk analysts and emergency responders use a circular pool shape of about 600 m(2) would result. To assess the influence of a noise shield, a full scale test was conducted on an already constructed part of the Betuweline. A rail tanker was filled with 50 m(3) red-colored environmentally safe liquid. The liquid was instantaneously released. A very peculiar pool shape actually results due to the presence of a noise shield. A zone between the rails and the noise shield (2m wide and 90 m long) is within 2-3 min filled with 15 cm of liquid. The total pool size area was about 750 m(2). Both shape and size deviate substantially from the traditional figures. These insights are both relevant to emergency responders for disaster abatement purposes and to risk analysts for effective modeling purposes. The Dutch Ministry of Transport is examining possible strategies to deal with these results. The results of this study are based upon one single instantaneous release test. In addition, it is valuable to find out what the pool shape and size would be in case of a continuous release from the rail tanker near a noise shield. PMID:18849112

  6. Casimir force between liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel-Sirvent, R.; Escobar, J. V.

    2014-08-01

    We present a theoretical calculation of the Casimir force between liquid metals at room temperature using as case studies mercury (Hg) and eutectic indium gallium (EInGa). The surface tension of the liquids creates surfaces of zero roughness that are truly equipotential, an ideal characteristic for Casimir force experiments. As we show the dielectric properties of Au, EInGa and Hg are very similar and the difference on the Casimir force between Au and EInGa and Au and Hg is less than 4%. Based on these results, a modification of the IUPUI experiment for detecting deviations of Newtonian gravity is proposed.

  7. Metal pad instabilities in liquid metal batteries.

    PubMed

    Zikanov, Oleg

    2015-12-01

    A mechanical analogy is used to analyze the interaction between the magnetic field, electric current, and deformation of interfaces in liquid metal batteries. In the framework of a low-mode, nondissipative, linear stability model, it is found that, during charging or discharging, a sufficiently large battery is prone to instabilities of two types. One is similar to the metal pad instability known to exist in the aluminum reduction cells. Another type is new. It is related to the destabilizing effect of the Lorentz force formed by the azimuthal magnetic field induced by the base current, and the current perturbations caused by the local variations of the thickness of the electrolyte layer. PMID:26764818

  8. Transformable liquid-metal nanomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yue; Hu, Quanyin; Lin, Yiliang; Pacardo, Dennis B.; Wang, Chao; Sun, Wujin; Ligler, Frances S.; Dickey, Michael D.; Gu, Zhen

    2015-12-01

    To date, numerous inorganic nanocarriers have been explored for drug delivery systems (DDSs). However, the clinical application of inorganic formulations has often been hindered by their toxicity and failure to biodegrade. We describe here a transformable liquid-metal nanomedicine, based on a core-shell nanosphere composed of a liquid-phase eutectic gallium-indium core and a thiolated polymeric shell. This formulation can be simply produced through a sonication-mediated method with bioconjugation flexibility. The resulting nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin (Dox) have an average diameter of 107 nm and demonstrate the capability to fuse and subsequently degrade under a mildly acidic condition, which facilitates release of Dox in acidic endosomes after cellular internalization. Equipped with hyaluronic acid, a tumour-targeting ligand, this formulation displays enhanced chemotherapeutic inhibition towards the xenograft tumour-bearing mice. This liquid metal-based DDS with fusible and degradable behaviour under physiological conditions provides a new strategy for engineering theranostic agents with low toxicity.

  9. Transformable liquid-metal nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yue; Hu, Quanyin; Lin, Yiliang; Pacardo, Dennis B; Wang, Chao; Sun, Wujin; Ligler, Frances S; Dickey, Michael D; Gu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    To date, numerous inorganic nanocarriers have been explored for drug delivery systems (DDSs). However, the clinical application of inorganic formulations has often been hindered by their toxicity and failure to biodegrade. We describe here a transformable liquid-metal nanomedicine, based on a core-shell nanosphere composed of a liquid-phase eutectic gallium-indium core and a thiolated polymeric shell. This formulation can be simply produced through a sonication-mediated method with bioconjugation flexibility. The resulting nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin (Dox) have an average diameter of 107 nm and demonstrate the capability to fuse and subsequently degrade under a mildly acidic condition, which facilitates release of Dox in acidic endosomes after cellular internalization. Equipped with hyaluronic acid, a tumour-targeting ligand, this formulation displays enhanced chemotherapeutic inhibition towards the xenograft tumour-bearing mice. This liquid metal-based DDS with fusible and degradable behaviour under physiological conditions provides a new strategy for engineering theranostic agents with low toxicity. PMID:26625944

  10. Transformable liquid-metal nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yue; Hu, Quanyin; Lin, Yiliang; Pacardo, Dennis B.; Wang, Chao; Sun, Wujin; Ligler, Frances S.; Dickey, Michael D.; Gu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    To date, numerous inorganic nanocarriers have been explored for drug delivery systems (DDSs). However, the clinical application of inorganic formulations has often been hindered by their toxicity and failure to biodegrade. We describe here a transformable liquid-metal nanomedicine, based on a core–shell nanosphere composed of a liquid-phase eutectic gallium-indium core and a thiolated polymeric shell. This formulation can be simply produced through a sonication-mediated method with bioconjugation flexibility. The resulting nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin (Dox) have an average diameter of 107 nm and demonstrate the capability to fuse and subsequently degrade under a mildly acidic condition, which facilitates release of Dox in acidic endosomes after cellular internalization. Equipped with hyaluronic acid, a tumour-targeting ligand, this formulation displays enhanced chemotherapeutic inhibition towards the xenograft tumour-bearing mice. This liquid metal-based DDS with fusible and degradable behaviour under physiological conditions provides a new strategy for engineering theranostic agents with low toxicity. PMID:26625944

  11. Surface chemistry of liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, J. Adin, Jr.; Peebles, Henry; Peebles, Diamond; Rye, Robert; Yost, Fred

    1993-01-01

    The fundamental surface chemistry of the behavior of liquid metals spreading on a solid substrate is not at all well understood. Each of these questions involves knowing the details of the structure of interfaces and their dynamics. For example the structure of a monolayer of tin oxide on pure liquid tin is unknown. This is in contrast to the relatively large amount of data available on the structure of copper oxide monolayers on solid, pure copper. However, since liquid tin has a vapor pressure below 10(exp -10)torr for a reasonable temperature range above its melting point, it is possible to use the techniques of surface science to study the geometric, electronic and vibrational structures of these monolayers. In addition, certain techniques developed by surface chemists for the study of liquid systems can be applied to the ultra-high vacuum environment. In particular we have shown that light scattering spectroscopy can be used to study the surface tension tensor of these interfaces. The tin oxide layer in particular is very interesting in that the monolayer is rigid but admits of bending. Ellipsometric microscopy allows the visualization of monolayer thick films and show whether island formation occurs at various levels of dosing.

  12. Liquid metal Flow Meter - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, C.; Hoogendoom, S.; Hudson, B.; Prince, J.; Teichert, K.; Wood, J.; Chase, K.

    2007-01-30

    Measuring the flow of liquid metal presents serious challenges. Current commercially-available flow meters use ultrasonic, electromagnetic, and other technologies to measure flow, but are inadequate for liquid metal flow measurement because of the high temperatures required by most liquid metals. As a result of the reactivity and high temperatures of most liquid metals, corrosion and leakage become very serious safety concerns. The purpose of this project is to develop a flow meter for Lockheed Martin that measures the flow rate of molten metal in a conduit.

  13. Liquid metal embrittlement. [crack propagation in metals with liquid metal in crack space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiller, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Crack propagation is discussed for metals with liquid metal in the crack space. The change in electrochemical potential of an electron in a metal due to changes in stress level along the crack surface was investigated along with the change in local chemistry, and interfacial energy due to atomic redistribution in the liquid. Coupled elastic-elastrostatic equations, stress effects on electron energy states, and crack propagation via surface roughening are discussed.

  14. Bearing for liquid metal pump

    DOEpatents

    Dickinson, Robert J.; Wasko, John; Pennell, William E.

    1984-01-01

    A liquid metal pump bearing support comprises a series of tangentially oriented spokes that connect the bearing cylinder to the pump internals structure. The spokes may be arranged in a plurality of planes extending from the bearing cylinder to the pump internals with the spokes in one plane being arranged alternately with those in the next plane. The bearing support structure provides the pump with sufficient lateral support for the bearing structure together with the capability of accommodating differential thermal expansion without adversely affecting pump performance.

  15. Multilayer liquid metal stretchable inductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, N.; Meyer, C. D.; Bedair, S. S.; Nochetto, H.; Kierzewski, I. M.

    2014-08-01

    Liquid metals are ideally suited for creating low resistance traces able to undergo large mechanical strains. In this work, multilayer fluidic channels in soft silicone are used to create two inductor topologies, a solenoid and a double planar coil, based on the liquid metal galinstan. Electromechanical models were developed for the inductance upon stretching for each inductor, finding that the double planar coil has lower strain sensitivity in each direction than the solenoid. A three turn double planar coil and six turn solenoid, with unstretched inductances of approximately 250 nH and 55 nH respectively, were fabricated and tested using custom tensile and compressive strain testing setups and compared with the analytical model. The double planar coil was found to increase in inductance when stretched in either in-plane axes, with a measured rise of approximately 40% for 100% strain. The solenoid decreased in inductance by 24% for 100% strain along the core direction, and increased by 50% for the same strain along the core width.

  16. Ignition delay of a gas mixture above a liquid fuel pool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, D. N.; Sirignano, W. A.

    1991-01-01

    A computational study has been made of transient heat transfer and fluid flow of an axisymmetric two-layer gas-and-liquid system heated from above by a small hot spot (e.g., a hot wire or pilot flame) located close to the liquid surface. The gas phase is unconfined above the liquid pool. The effects of varying gravity level (0.0001 to 1 gn), liquid pool height, and heater height are investigated. Thermocapillary convection induced by the nonuniform heating of the liquid surface combines with buoyancy forces to affect the heat transfer and the transport of fuel vapor toward the heat source. At reduced gravity, gas-phase conduction is comparable to the incident radiation at the liquid surface, whereas at 1 gn, buoyant convection carries the heat upward from the heat source and, therefore, the liquid is heated primarily by radiation.

  17. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant system

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Boardman, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting for fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. The reactor system is enhanced with sealing means for excluding external air from contact with the liquid metal coolant leaking from the reactor vessel during an accident. The invention also includes a silo structure which resists attack by leaking liquid metal coolant, and an added unique cooling means.

  18. Rebound of continuous droplet streams from an immiscible liquid pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doak, William J.; Laiacona, Danielle M.; German, Guy K.; Chiarot, Paul R.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the rebound of high velocity continuous water droplet streams from the surface of an immiscible oil pool. The droplets have diameters and velocities of less than 90 μm and 15 m/s, respectively, and were created at frequencies up to 60 kHz. The impact and rebound of continuous droplet streams at this scale and velocity have been largely unexplored. This regime bridges the gap between single drop and jet impacts. The impinging droplets create a divot at the surface of the oil pool that had a common characteristic shape across a wide-range of droplet and oil properties. After impact, the reflected droplets maintain the same uniformity and periodicity of the incoming droplets but have significantly lower velocity and kinetic energy. This was solely attributed to the generation of a flow induced in the viscous oil pool by the impacting droplets. Unlike normally directed impact of millimeter-scale droplets with a solid surface, our results show that an air film does not appear to be maintained beneath the droplets during impact. This suggests direct contact between the droplets and the surface of the oil pool. A ballistic failure limit, correlated with the Weber number, was identified where the rebound was suppressed and the droplets were driven through the oil surface. A secondary failure mode was identified for aperiodic incoming streams. Startup effects and early time dynamics of the rebounding droplet stream were also investigated.

  19. Technique for detecting liquid metal leaks

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.

    1979-01-01

    In a system employing flowing liquid metal as a heat transfer medium in contact with tubular members containing a working fluid, i.e., steam, liquid metal leaks through the wall of the tubular member are detected by dislodging the liquid metal compounds forming in the tubular member at the leak locations and subsequently transporting the dislodged compound in the form of an aerosol to a detector responsive to the liquid metal compound. In the application to a sodium cooled tubular member, the detector would consist of a sodium responsive device, such as a sodium ion detector.

  20. Radiopure Metal-Loaded Liquid Scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, Richard; Yeh, Minfang

    2015-03-18

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillator plays a key role in particle and nuclear physics experiments. The applications of metal ions in various neutrino experiments and the purification methods for different scintillator components are discussed in this paper.

  1. Radiopure metal-loaded liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, Richard; Yeh, Minfang

    2015-08-17

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillator plays a key role in particle and nuclear physics experiments. The applications of metal ions in various neutrino experiments and the purification methods for different scintillator components are discussed in this paper.

  2. Bubble Departure from Metal-Graphite Composite Surfaces and Its Effects on Pool Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.; Sankovic, John M.; Motil, Brian J.; Yang, W-J.; Zhang, Nengli

    2010-01-01

    The formation and growth processes of a bubble in the vicinity of graphite micro-fiber tips on metal-graphite composite boiling surfaces and their effects on boiling behavior are investigated. It is discovered that a large number of micro bubbles are formed first at the micro scratches and cavities on the metal matrix in pool boiling. By virtue of the non-wetting property of graphite, once the growing micro bubbles touch the graphite tips, the micro bubbles are sucked by the tips and merged into larger micro bubbles sitting on the end of the tips. The micro bubbles grow rapidly and coalesce to form macro bubbles, each spanning several tips. The necking process of a detaching macro bubble is analyzed. It is revealed that a liquid jet is produced by sudden break-off of the bubble throat. The composite surfaces not only have higher temperatures in micro- and macrolayers but also make higher frequency of the bubble departure, which increase the average heat fluxes in both the bubble growth stage and in the bubble departure period. Based on these analyses, the enhancement mechanism of pool boiling heat transfer on composite surfaces is clearly revealed.

  3. Liquid-metal-piston MHD generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, J. P.

    1969-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic generator uses a slug or piston of liquid potassium as the working fluid. An expanding vapor of the metal is allowed to reciprocate the liquid-metal-piston through a magnetic field and the expansion energy is converted directly into electrical energy.

  4. Liquid metal ion source and alloy

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Jr., William M.; Utlaut, Mark W.; Behrens, Robert G.; Szklarz, Eugene G.; Storms, Edmund K.; Santandrea, Robert P.; Swanson, Lynwood W.

    1988-10-04

    A liquid metal ion source and alloy, wherein the species to be emitted from the ion source is contained in a congruently vaporizing alloy. In one embodiment, the liquid metal ion source acts as a source of arsenic, and in a source alloy the arsenic is combined with palladium, preferably in a liquid alloy having a range of compositions from about 24 to about 33 atomic percent arsenic. Such an alloy may be readily prepared by a combustion synthesis technique. Liquid metal ion sources thus prepared produce arsenic ions for implantation, have long lifetimes, and are highly stable in operation.

  5. Sewage sludge dewatering using flowing liquid metals

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Larry W.

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus for reducing the moisture content of a moist sewage sludge having a moisture content of about 50% to 80% and formed of small cellular micro-organism bodies having internally confined water is provided. A hot liquid metal is circulated in a circulation loop and the moist sewage sludge is injected in the circulation loop under conditions of temperature and pressure such that the confined water vaporizes and ruptures the cellular bodies. The vapor produced, the dried sludge, and the liquid metal are then separated. Preferably, the moist sewage sludge is injected into the hot liquid metal adjacent the upstream side of a venturi which serves to thoroughly mix the hot liquid metal and the moist sewage sludge. The venturi and the drying zone after the venturi are preferably vertically oriented. The dried sewage sludge recovered is available as a fuel and is preferably used for heating the hot liquid metal.

  6. Tokamak with liquid metal toroidal field coil

    DOEpatents

    Ohkawa, Tihiro; Schaffer, Michael J.

    1981-01-01

    Tokamak apparatus includes a pressure vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within the pressure vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside said liner. Electric current is passed through the liquid metal over a conductive path linking the toroidal space to produce a toroidal magnetic field within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof. Toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof.

  7. Liquid metal cooling of synchrotron optics

    SciTech Connect

    Smither, R.K.

    1992-09-01

    The installation of insertion devices at existing synchrotron facilities around the world has stimulated the development of new ways to cool the optical elements in the associated x-ray beamlines. Argonne has been a leader in the development of liquid metal cooling for high heat load x-ray optics for the next generation of synchrotron facilities. The high thermal conductivity, high volume specific heat, low kinematic viscosity, and large working temperature range make liquid metals a very efficient heat transfer fluid. A wide range of liquid metals were considered in the initial phase of this work. The most promising liquid metal cooling fluid identified to date is liquid gallium, which appears to have all the desired properties and the fewest number of undesired features of the liquid metals examined. Besides the special features of liquid metals that make them good heat transfer fluids, the very low vapor pressure over a large working temperature range make liquid gallium an ideal cooling fluid for use in a high vacuum environment. A leak of the liquid gallium into the high vacuum and even into very high vacuum areas will not result in any detectable vapor pressure and may even improve the vacuum environment as the liquid gallium combines with any water vapor or oxygen present in the system. The practical use of a liquid metal for cooling silicon crystals and other high heat load applications depends on having a convenient and efficient delivery system. The requirements for a typical cooling system for a silicon crystal used in a monochromator are pumping speeds of 2 to 5 gpm (120 cc per sec to 600 cc per sec) at pressures up to 100 psi.

  8. Development of a liquid metal slip ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberger, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    A liquid metal slip ring/solar orientation mechanism was designed and a model tested. This was a follow-up of previous efforts for the development of a gallium liquid metal slip ring in which the major problem was the formation and ejection of debris. A number of slip ring design approaches were studied. The probe design concept was fully implemented with detail drawings and a model was successfully tested for dielectric strength, shock vibration, acceleration and operation. The conclusions are that a gallium liquid metal slip ring/solar orientation mechanism is feasible and that the problem of debris formation and ejection has been successfully solved.

  9. Vapor explosions during the impact of molten tin droplets into a liquid pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouraytem, Nadia; Li, Er Qiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2014-11-01

    High-speed video imaging is used to study the impact of a molten tin droplet into a liquid pool. Three different regimes have been identified as nucleation boiling, film boiling or vapor explosion. The latter generally comprises two stages; during the first stage, vapor gets entrapped into the molten tin drop and then, at a second stage, the vapor is superheated by the tin material, creating a violent expansion (explosion). It was observed that the addition of surfactant to the fluid pool could promote the explosion and make it occur at a lower temperature. Furthermore, other parameters such as the pool liquid surface tension, boiling temperature, viscosity and molten tin temperature have been varied to examine the explosion dynamics.

  10. Electromagnetic flow rate meter. [for liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A liquid metal, whose flow rate is to be determined, is directed through a chamber made of electrically-insulating material on which there is impressed a magnetic field perpendicular to the direction of flow of the liquid metal. The magnetic field is made to increase in strength in a downstream direction of the flow of liquid metal. At least a pair of electrodes are disposed in the chamber traversely and perpendicular to the direction of flow and an ammeter is connected between the electrodes. Electrodes may be disposed in the top or the bottom of the chamber and each may be segmented. Oppositely disposed electrodes may be used with at least one dividing wall extending from each electrode to cause reversal of the direction of flow of the liquid metal. The magnetic field may be provided by electromagnets or permanent magnets such as shaded pole permanent magnets.

  11. Liquid metal cooled divertor for ARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Muraviev, E.

    1995-01-01

    A liquid metal, Ga-cooled divertor design was completed for the double null ARIES-II divertor design. The design analysis indicated a surface heat flux removal capability of up to 15 MW/m{sup 2}, and its relative easy maintenance. Design issues of configuration, thermal hydraulics, thermal stresses, liquid metal loop and safety effects were evaluated. For coolant flow control, it was found that it is necessary to use some part of the blanket cooling ducts for the draining of liquid metal from the top divertor. In order to minimize the inventory of Ga, it was recommended that the liquid metal loop equipment should be located as close to the torus as possible. More detailed analysis of transient conditions especially under accident conditions was identified as an issue that will need to be addressed.

  12. Simulation of metal transfer and weld pool development in gas metal arc welding of thin sheet metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang

    Gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is the most commonly used arc welding method in industry for joining steels and aluminum alloys. But due to the mathematical difficulties associated with the free surface motion of the molten droplet and the weld pool, the process is not well understood and the development of new welding procedures in the manufacturing industry highly depends on expensive, time-consuming and experience-based trial and error. In this dissertation, numerical methods are developed to overcome the difficulties and to simulate the metal transfer and weld pool development in the GMAW of sheet metals. The simulations are validated by experiments and used to study an industrial welding process. A numerical procedure is first developed to model the free surface motion in fusion welding processes. Thermal and electromagnetic models are integrated with the fluid models. Recommendations are made on the selection and improvement of publicly available numerical algorithms, while alternative methods are also reviewed. A model combining the enthalpy, effective-viscosity and volume-of-fluid methods is then developed to simulate the metal transfer process in globular, spray and short-circuiting transfer modes. The model not only describes the influence of gravity, electromagnetic force and surface tension on droplet profile and transfer frequency, but also models the nonisothermal phenomena such as heat transfer and phase change. The melting front motion, the droplet detachment and oscillation, the satellite formation and the fluid convection within the droplet are analyzed. It has been found that the taper formation in spray transfer is closely related to the heat input on the unmelted portion of the welding wire, and the taper formation affects the globular-spray transition by decelerating the transfer process. Experiments with a high-speed motion analyzer validate the simulation results. The model is then extended to simulate the initiation, development and

  13. Solar driven liquid metal MHD power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.

    1983-06-01

    A solar energy collector focuses solar energy onto a solar oven which is attached to a mixer which in turn is attached to the channel of a MHD generator. Gas enters the oven and a liquid metal enters the mixer. The gas/liquid metal mixture is heated by the collected solar energy and moves through the MHD generator thereby generating electrical power. The mixture is then separated and recycled.

  14. Solar driven liquid metal MHD power generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A solar energy collector focuses solar energy onto a solar oven which is attached to a mixer which in turn is attached to the channel of a MHD generator. Gas enters the oven and a liquid metal enters the mixer. The gas/liquid metal mixture is heated by the collected solar energy and moves through the MHD generator thereby generating electrical power. The mixture is then separated and recycled.

  15. Critical Heat Flux in Pool Boiling on Metal-Graphite Composite Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Yang, Wen-Jei; Chao, David F.; Chao, David F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A study is conducted on high heat-flux pool boiling of pentane on micro-configured composite surfaces. The boiling surfaces are copper-graphite (Cu-Gr) and aluminum-graphite (Al-Gr) composites with a fiber volume concentration of 50%. The micro-graphite fibers embedded in the matrix contribute to a substantial enhancement in boiling heat-transfer performance. Correlation equations are obtained for both the isolated and coalesced bubble regimes, utilizing a mathematical model based on a metal-graphite, two-tier configuration with the aid of experimental data. A new model to predict the critical heat flux (CHF) on the composites is proposed to explain the fundamental aspects of the boiling phenomena. Three different factors affecting the CHF are considered in the model. Two of them are expected to become the main agents driving vapor volume detachment under microgravity conditions, using the metal-graphite composite surfaces as the heating surface and using liquids with an unusual Marangoni effect as the working fluid.

  16. Reduction of Metal Oxide to Metal using Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ramana Reddy

    2012-04-12

    A novel pathway for the high efficiency production of metal from metal oxide means of electrolysis in ionic liquids at low temperature was investigated. The main emphasis was to eliminate the use of carbon and high temperature application in the reduction of metal oxides to metals. The emphasis of this research was to produce metals such as Zn, and Pb that are normally produced by the application of very high temperatures. The reduction of zinc oxide to zinc and lead oxide to lead were investigated. This study involved three steps in accomplishing the final goal of reduction of metal oxide to metal using ionic liquids: 1) Dissolution of metal oxide in an ionic liquid, 2) Determination of reduction potential using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and 3) Reduction of the dissolved metal oxide. Ionic liquids provide additional advantage by offering a wide potential range for the deposition. In each and every step of the process, more than one process variable has been examined. Experimental results for electrochemical extraction of Zn from ZnO and Pb from PbO using eutectic mixtures of Urea ((NH2)2CO) and Choline chloride (HOC2H4N(CH3)3+Cl-) or (ChCl) in a molar ratio 2:1, varying voltage and temperatures were carried out. Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy studies of ionic liquids with and without metal oxide additions were conducted. FTIR and induction coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICPS) was used in the characterization of the metal oxide dissolved ionic liquid. Electrochemical experiments were conducted using EG&G potentiostat/galvanostat with three electrode cell systems. Cyclic voltammetry was used in the determination of reduction potentials for the deposition of metals. Chronoamperometric experiments were carried out in the potential range of -0.6V to -1.9V for lead and -1.4V to -1.9V for zinc. The deposits were characterized using XRD and SEM-EDS for phase, morphological and elemental analysis. The results showed that pure metal was deposited on the cathode

  17. Recent developments in liquid-metal embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoloff, N. S.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reviews developments in liquid-metal embrittlement of the past 7 years including data on cyclic loading. Embrittlement by solid and liquid metals and by hydrogen has many common features, although the mechanism of embrittler transport differs. Fracture may occur in each type of embrittlement by environmentally assisted shear and by reduced cohesion; embrittlement under cyclic loading has been widely observed, with stress level, temperature, and substrate alloy composition and grain size being the major variables. The degree of embrittlement between any combination of environment (i.e. hydrogen, liquid metal, or solid metal) and substrate depends upon the strength of the interaction with the substrate, the kinetics of embrittler transport, the mutual solubility of embrittler and substrate, and a large number of test and microstructural conditions. A method of calculating the most significant of these variables and the strength of interaction was reviewed and predictions of embrittlement in previously untested couples were made.

  18. Ionic liquid incorporating thiosalicylate for metal removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilfred, Cecilia Devi; Mustafa, Fadwa Babiker; Romeli, Fatimah Julia

    2012-09-01

    Ionic liquids are a class of organic molten salts "designer solvents" that are composed totally of anions (inorganic and organic polyatomic) and organic cations. The replacement of volatile organic solvents from a separation process is of utmost importance since the use of a large excess of these solvents is hazardous and creates ecological problem. The new method for metal ion extraction is by using task-specific ionic liquids such as ionic liquids which incorporate thiosalicylate functionality. This paper looks at producing a new cluster of ionic liquids which incorporates thiosalicylate with pyridinium cation. Its thermophysical properties such as density and viscosity in single and binary mixtures are studied. The ionic liquids' capability in metal removal processes is evaluated.

  19. Double-duct liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic engine

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, Carsten M.

    1995-01-01

    An internal combustion, liquid metal (LM) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) engine and an alternating current (AC) magnetohydrodynamic generator, are used in combination to provide useful AC electric energy output. The engine design has-four pistons and a double duct configuration, with each duct containing sodium potassium liquid metal confined between free pistons located at either end of the duct. The liquid metal is forced to flow back and forth in the duct by the movement of the pistons, which are alternatively driven by an internal combustion process. In the MHD generator, the two LM-MHD ducts pass in close proximity through a Hartmann duct with output transformer. AC power is produced by operating the engine with the liquid metal in the two generator ducts always flowing in counter directions. The amount of liquid metal maintained in the ducts may be varied. This provides a variable stroke length for the pistons. The engine/generator provides variable AC power at variable frequencies that correspond to the power demands of the vehicular propulsion. Also the engine should maintain nearly constant efficiency throughout the range of power usage. Automobiles and trucks could be powered by the invention, with no transmission or power converter devices being required.

  20. Double-duct liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic engine

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, Carsten M.

    1997-01-01

    An internal combustion, liquid metal (LM) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) engine and an alternating current (AC) magnetohydrodynamic generator, are used in combination to provide useful AC electric energy output. The engine design has four pistons and a double duct configuration, with each duct containing sodium potassium liquid metal confined between free pistons located at either end of the duct. The liquid metal is forced to flow back and forth in the duct by the movement of the pistons, which are alternatively driven by an internal combustion process. In the MHD generator, the two LM-MHD ducts pass in close proximity through a Hartmann duct with output transformer. AC power is produced by operating the engine with the liquid metal in the two generator ducts always flowing in counter directions. The amount of liquid metal maintained in the ducts may be varied. This provides a variable stroke length for the pistons. The engine/generator provides variable AC power at variable frequencies that correspond to the power demands of the vehicular propulsion. Also the engine should maintain nearly constant efficiency throughout the range of power usage. Automobiles and trucks could be powered by the invention, with no transmission or power converter devices being required.

  1. Thermo/Soluto-capillary instabilities in 3D bi-component liquid pools using DNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Adam; Saenz, Pedro; Valluri, Prashant; Sefiane, Khellil

    2015-11-01

    The behaviour of surface tension dominated flows in the presence of a temperature gradient and phase change is of great importance in designing micro-cooling devices. While evaporating pools and droplets have been investigated numerically and experimentally, these studies have dealt only with pure fluids. For bicomponent liquid mixtures, limited experimental studies have been conducted but a rigorous numerical model is absent. We present a two-phase multicomponent DNS model to simulate thermo/soluto-capillary instabilities in bicomponent liquid layers subject to a horizontal temperature gradient. The strategy fully accounts for a deformable interface using a variant of volume-of-fluid method. The presence of a second component introduces thermophoresis in the liquid phase which then gives rise to solutal Marangoni effects. By combining mixture thermodynamics with multiphase DNS, we investigate thermo/soluto-capillary and interfacial instabilities of a 3D bicomponent liquid pool. An important aspect we quantify is the strength of solutal over thermal Marangoni convection and its effect on stability of resultant interfacial waves and phase-separation in the liquid. The model is robust enough to include phase-change and the advection-diffusion of volatile species in the gas phase. Funded by EPSRC, Grant No. EP/K00963X/1.

  2. Liquid Metal Integrated Test System (LIMITS).

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, James Maurice; Troncosa, Kenneth P.; Bauer, Frederick J.; Nygren, Richard Einar; Youchison, Dennis Lee; Lutz, Thomas Joseph; Ulrickson, Michael Andrew; Tanaka, Tina Joan

    2003-08-01

    This paper describes the liquid metal integrated test system (LIMITS) at Sandia National Laboratories. This system was designed to study the flow of molten metals and salts in a vacuum as a preliminary study for flowing liquid surfaces inside of magnetic fusion reactors. The system consists of a heated furnace with attached centrifugal pump, a vacuum chamber, and a transfer chamber for storage and addition of fresh material. Diagnostics include an electromagnetic flow meter, a high temperature pressure transducer, and an electronic level meter. Many ports in the vacuum chamber allow testing the thermal behavior of the flowing liquids heated with an electron beam or study of the effect of a magnetic field on motion of the liquid. Some preliminary tests have been performed to determine the effect of a static magnetic field on stream flow from a nozzle.

  3. Mixing in a liquid metal electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, DH; Sadoway, DR

    2014-05-01

    Fluid mixing has first-order importance for many engineering problems in mass transport, including design and optimization of liquid-phase energy storage devices. Liquid metal batteries are currently being commercialized as a promising and economically viable technology for large-scale energy storage on worldwide electrical grids. But because these batteries are entirely liquid, fluid flow and instabilities may affect battery robustness and performance. Here we present estimates of flow magnitude and ultrasound measurements of the flow in a realistic liquid metal electrode. We find that flow does substantially affect mass transport by altering the electrode mixing time. Above a critical electrical current density, the convective flow organizes and gains speed, which promotes transport and would yield improved battery efficiency. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic effects in liquid metal batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, F.; Galindo, V.; Kasprzyk, C.; Landgraf, S.; Seilmayer, M.; Starace, M.; Weber, N.; Weier, T.

    2016-07-01

    Liquid metal batteries (LMBs) consist of two liquid metal electrodes and a molten salt ionic conductor sandwiched between them. The density ratios allow for a stable stratification of the three layers. LMBs were already considered as part of energy conversion systems in the 1960s and have recently received renewed interest for economical large-scale energy storage. In this paper, we concentrate on the magnetohydrodynamic aspects of this cell type with special focus on electro-vortex flows and possible effects of the Tayler instability.

  5. Oxygen tensioactivity on liquid-metal drops.

    PubMed

    Ricci, E; Arato, E; Passerone, A; Costa, P

    2005-12-14

    The influence of oxygen on the surface tension of liquid metals is a topic of undoubted interest as the formation of oxide films, or even oxygen contamination of the metal interface, represents the main source of error in determining the surface tension. The evaluation of gas-atmosphere mass exchanges under stationary conditions allows the evaluation of an effective oxygen pressure at which the oxidation of metal becomes evident. This effective oxygen pressure can be considered as a property of the system and, according to experimental evidence, can be many orders of magnitude greater than the equilibrium pressure. The measurement of the surface tension is a good way of studying interface properties, their temporal change and their connections to transport and reaction rates. This paper represents a review of a work undertaken with the aim of understanding oxygen mass transport at the liquid metal surface in relation to the study of capillary phenomena at high temperature. PMID:16098947

  6. Reflection of illumination laser from gas metal arc weld pool surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoji; Zhang, Yu Ming

    2009-11-01

    The weld pool is the core of the welding process where complex welding phenomena originate. Skilled welders acquire their process feedback primarily from the weld pool. Observation and measurement of the three-dimensional weld pool surface thus play a fundamental role in understanding and future control of complex welding processes. To this end, a laser line is projected onto the weld pool surface in pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and an imaging plane is used to intercept its reflection from the weld pool surface. Resultant images of the reflected laser are analyzed and it is found that the weld pool surface in GMAW does specularly reflect the projected laser as in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Hence, the weld pool surface in GMAW is also specular and it is in principle possible that it may be observed and measured by projecting a laser pattern and then intercepting and imaging the reflection from it. Due to high frequencies of surface fluctuations, GMAW requires a relatively short time to image the reflected laser.

  7. Membranes Remove Metal Ions Fron Industrial Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, W. P. L.; May, C.

    1983-01-01

    Use of membrane films affords convenient and economical alternative for removing and recovering metal cations present in low concentrations from large quantities of liquid solutions. Possible applications of membrane films include use in analytical chemistry for determination of small amounts of toxic metallic impurities in lakes, streams, and municipal effluents. Also suitable for use as absorber of certain pollutant gases and odors present in confined areas.

  8. Correlations of Melt Pool Geometry and Process Parameters During Laser Metal Deposition by Coaxial Process Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocylok, Sörn; Alexeev, Eugen; Mann, Stefan; Weisheit, Andreas; Wissenbach, Konrad; Kelbassa, Ingomar

    One major demand of today's laser metal deposition (LMD) processes is to achieve a fail-save build-up regarding changing conditions like heat accumulations. Especially for the repair of thin parts like turbine blades is the knowledge about the correlations between melt pool behavior and process parameters like laser power, feed rate and powder mass stream indispensable. The paper will show the process layout with the camera based coaxial monitoring system and the quantitative influence of the process parameters on the melt pool geometry. Therefore the diameter, length and area of the melt pool are measured by a video analytic system at various parameters and compared with the track wide in cross-sections and the laser spot diameter. The influence of changing process conditions on the melt pool is also investigated. On the base of these results an enhanced process of the build-up of a multilayer one track fillet geometry will be presented.

  9. CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT RESULTING FROM MULTICOMPONENT NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUID POOL DISSOLUTION IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL SUBSURFACE FORMATIONS (R823579)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A semi-analytical method for simulating transient contaminant transport originating from the dissolution of multicomponent nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) pools in three-dimensional, saturated, homogeneous porous media is presented. Each dissolved component may undergo first-order...

  10. Conduction in fully ionized liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1973-01-01

    Electron transport is considered in high density fully ionized liquid metals. Ionic structure is described in terms of hard-sphere correlation functions and the scattering is determined from self-consistently screened point ions. Applications to the physical properties of the deep interior of Jupiter are briefly considered.

  11. Conduction in fully ionized liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1974-01-01

    Electron transport is considered in high-density fully ionized liquid metals. Ionic structure is described in terms of hard-sphere-correlation functions and the scattering is determined from self-consistently screened point ions. Applications to the physical properties of the deep interior of Jupiter are briefly considered.

  12. Solar-driven liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.

    1981-01-01

    A solar oven heated by concentrated solar radiation as the heat source of a liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic (LMMHD) power generation system is proposed. The design allows the production of electric power in space, as well as on Earth, at high rates of efficiency. Two types of the solar oven suitable for the system are discussed.

  13. Solar-driven liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.

    1981-05-01

    A solar oven heated by concentrated solar radiation as the heat source of a liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic (LMMHD) power generation system is proposed. The design allows the production of electric power in space, as well as on Earth, at high rates of efficiency. Two types of the solar oven suitable for the system are discussed.

  14. Pool boiling enhancement through bubble induced convective liquid flow in feeder microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaikumar, A.; Kandlikar, S. G.

    2016-01-01

    Bubbles departing from the nucleation sites induce a liquid flow from the bulk to the heated surface during pool boiling. Alternating the nucleating regions with non-nucleating regions facilitates separate liquid-vapor pathways for departing vapor bubbles and returning liquid. We explored an additional enhancement through liquid feeder channels on the heater surface directing the returning liquid towards the nucleating region. The nucleating bubbles were confined to the nucleating region as the returning liquid flow induced strong convective currents over the non-nucleating regions. In the best performing configuration, the nucleating regions were 0.5 mm wide, separated by non-nucleating regions of width 2.125 mm, which corresponded to the bubble departure diameter. The non-nucleating regions contained 0.5 mm wide feeder channels directing liquid towards the nucleating region. High speed images indicated distinct vapor columns over the nucleating regions with liquid channeled through the feeder channels. At higher heat fluxes, the strong liquid currents established over the feeder channels suppressed any undesirable nucleation in them keeping the separated vapor-liquid pathways functional. This enhancement technique resulted in a critical heat flux of 394 W/cm2 at a wall superheat of 5.5 °C which translated to a heat transfer coefficient of 713 kW/m2 °C. The additional surface area and high heat transfer coefficient due to microchannel flow in feeder channels, and the unobstructed surface available for the bubbles to expand over the prime heat transfer surface area before departing were seen to be responsible for their superior performance.

  15. Three-Dimensional Ignition and Flame Propagation Above Liquid Fuel Pools: Computational Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Jinsheng; Sirignano, William A.

    2001-01-01

    A three-dimensional unsteady reactive Navier-Stokes code is developed to study the ignition and flame spread above liquid fuels initially below the flashpoint temperature. Opposed air flow to the flame spread due to forced and/or natural convection is considered. Pools of finite width and length are studied in air channels of prescribed height and width. Three-dimensional effects of the flame front near the edge of the pool are captured in the computation. The formation of a recirculation zone in the gas phase similar to that found in two-dimensional calculations is also present in the three-dimensional calculations. Both uniform spread and pulsating spread modes are found in the calculated results.

  16. Liquid-metal-cooled reactor

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.

    A perforated depressor plate extending across the bottom of the instrument tree of a fast breeder reactor cooperates with a circular cylindrical metal bellows forming a part of the upper adapter of each core assembly and bearing on the bottom of the depressor plate to restrict flow of coolant between core assemblies, thereby reducing significantly the pressure differential between the coolant inside the core assemblies and the coolant outside of the core assemblies. Openings in the depressor plate are slightly smaller than the top of the upper adapter so the depressor plate will serve as a backup mechanical holddown for the core. In addition, coolant mixing devices and locating devices are provided attached to the depressor plate.

  17. Liquid crystal on subwavelength metal gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Palto, S. P.; Barnik, M. I.; Artemov, V. V.; Shtykov, N. M.; Geivandov, A. R.; Yudin, S. G.; Gorkunov, M. V.

    2015-06-14

    Optical and electrooptical properties of a system consisting of subwavelength metal gratings and nematic liquid crystal layer are studied. Aluminium gratings that also act as interdigitated electrodes are produced by focused ion beam lithography. It is found that a liquid crystal layer strongly influences both the resonance and light polarization properties characteristic of the gratings. Enhanced transmittance is observed not only for the TM-polarized light in the near infrared spectral range but also for the TE-polarized light in the visible range. Although the electrodes are separated by nanosized slits, and the electric field is strongly localized near the surface, a pronounced electrooptical effect is registered. The effect is explained in terms of local reorientation of liquid crystal molecules at the grating surface and propagation of the orientational deformation from the surface into the bulk of the liquid crystal layer.

  18. Compact, Lightweight Electromagnetic Pump for Liquid Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfroy, Thomas; Palzin, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    A proposed direct-current electromagnetic pump for circulating a molten alkali metal alloy would be smaller and lighter and would demand less input power, relative to currently available pumps of this type. (Molten alkali metals are used as heat-transfer fluids in high-temperature stages of some nuclear reactors.) The principle of operation of this or any such pump involves exploitation of the electrical conductivity of the molten metal: An electric current is made to pass through the liquid metal along an axis perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the flow channel, and a magnetic field perpendicular to both the longitudinal axis and the electric current is superimposed on the flowchannel region containing the electric current. The interaction between the electric current and the magnetic field produces the pumping force along the longitudinal axis. The advantages of the proposed pump over other such pumps would accrue from design features that address overlapping thermal and magnetic issues.

  19. Atomic Dynamics in Metallic Liquids and Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Egami, Takeshi; Levashov, Valentin A; Aga, Rachel S; Morris, James R

    2007-01-01

    How atoms move in metallic glasses and liquids is an important question in discussing atomic transport, glass formation, structural relaxation and other properties of metallic glasses. While the concept of free-volume has long been used in describing atomic transport, computer simulations and isotope measurements have shown that atomic transport occurs by a much more collective process than assumed in the free-volume theory. We introduce a new approach to describe the atomic dynamics in metallic glasses, in terms of local energy landscapes related to fluctuations in the topology of atomic connectivity. This approach may form the basis for a new paradigm for discussing the structure-properties relationship in metallic glasses.

  20. Liquid metal pump for nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Allen, H.G.; Maloney, J.R.

    1975-10-01

    A pump for use in pumping high temperature liquids at high pressures, particularly liquid metals used to cool nuclear reactors is described. It is of the type in which the rotor is submerged in a sump but is fed by an inlet duct which bypasses the sump. A chamber, kept full of fluid, surrounds the pump casing into which fluid is bled from the pump discharge and from which fluid is fed to the rotor bearings and hence to the sump. This equalizes pressure inside and outside the pump casing and reduces or eliminates the thermal shock to the bearings and sump tank.

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic flow in the liquid phase for a specific pool boiling scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bühler, Leo

    2002-11-01

    In the EVOLVE concept for a nuclear fusion blanket a pool boiling scenario has been proposed where a number of permanent vertical vapour channels are formed in a horizontal layer of liquid lithium. Similar situations occur during laser beam welding where a relatively long vapour capillary is observed. The present analysis focuses on the flow of the electrically conducting liquid phase in the presence of a strong uniform horizontal magnetic field. The cross-section of vapour channels is circular if surface tension dominates magnetic forces. In the opposite case a stretching of the liquid vapour interface along magnetic field lines is observed and contours become possible where a major part of the interface is straight and aligned with the field. For strong magnetic fields the liquid flow exhibits several distinct subregions. Most of the liquid domain is occupied by inviscid cores. These are separated from each other by parallel layers that spread along the field lines which are tangential to the vapour channel. In one core, which is located between two parallel layers, the flow direction is preferentially oriented along magnetic field lines, while in the other cores the flow is perpendicular to the field.

  2. In situ observations of weld pool solidification using transparent metal-analog systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, R.; David, S. A.; Eshelman, M. A.; Vitek, J. M.; Babu, S. S.; Hong, T.; DebRoy, T.

    2003-04-01

    The dynamics of weld solidification were observed in situ using a laser welding process on transparent organic materials systems. Succinonitrile was used to simulate a pure metal system and succinonitrile with 1.2 wt. % acetone was used to simulate an alloy system. Observed weld pool shapes in succinonitrile were in good agreement with theoretical heat transfer calculations. The dynamics of weld pool shape in the succinonitrile-acetone system were related to complex interactions between grain orientation, grain selection, and dendrite orientations, which depend strongly on welding speed. An increase in welding speed leads to a transition from a steady-state to a nonsteady-state weld pool shape. Several other phenomena, including epitaxial growth, grain selection process, grain boundary melting, and porosity formation, were also observed.

  3. Liquid metal switches for electromagnetic railgun systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mitcham, A.J.; Prothero, D.H.; Brooks, J.C. )

    1991-01-01

    The need for a reliable and effective commutating switch is essential to the operation of an HPG-driven railgun system. This switch must offer the lowest possible resistance during the current build up time and then must commutate the current quickly and efficiently into the railgun barrel. This paper considers the essential requirements for such a switch and, after briefly reviewing the available switch technologies, describes a new type of switch based on a liquid metal switching medium.

  4. Bubble pinch-off and scaling during liquid drop impact on liquid pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Bahni; Biswas, Gautam; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2012-08-01

    Simulations are performed to show entrapment of air bubble accompanied by high speed upward and downward water jets when a water drop impacts a pool of water surface. A new bubble entrapment zone characterised by small bubble pinch-off and long thick jet is found. Depending on the bubble and jet behaviour, the bubble entrapment zone is subdivided into three sub-regimes. The entrapped bubble size and jet height depends on the crater shape and its maximum depth. During the bubble formation, bubble neck develops an almost singular shape as it pinches off. The final pinch-off shape and the power law governing the pinching, rneck ∝ A(t0 - t)αvaries with the Weber number. Weber dependence of the function describing the radius of the bubble during the pinch-off only affects the coefficient A and not the power exponent α.

  5. POWER GENERATION FROM LIQUID METAL NUCLEAR FUEL

    DOEpatents

    Dwyer, O.E.

    1958-12-23

    A nuclear reactor system is described wherein the reactor is the type using a liquid metal fuel, such as a dispersion of fissile material in bismuth. The reactor is designed ln the form of a closed loop having a core sectlon and heat exchanger sections. The liquid fuel is clrculated through the loop undergoing flssion in the core section to produce heat energy and transferrlng this heat energy to secondary fluids in the heat exchanger sections. The fission in the core may be produced by a separate neutron source or by a selfsustained chain reaction of the liquid fuel present in the core section. Additional auxiliary heat exchangers are used in the system to convert water into steam which drives a turbine.

  6. Nonexponential relaxation in a simple liquid metal.

    PubMed

    Demmel, F; Morkel, C

    2012-05-01

    A hallmark of the changes in dynamics towards the glass transition is the stretched exponential structural relaxation. Quasielastic neutron scattering results on liquid rubidium demonstrate such a nonexponential relaxation process in a simple liquid metal above the melting point. The nonexponential decay is an indication of non-Markovian dynamics and points to the collective character of the relaxation process. Describing the relaxation dynamics by a two-step process, the long lasting part of the decay process is in remarkable quantitative agreement with predictions from mode coupling theory. The feedback mechanism of the slowing down process in the theoretical description suggests that this contribution is at the origin of the structural arrest. With rising temperature the intermediate scattering function transforms into a simple exponential decay at a temperature range which indicates the end of the highly viscous solidlike behavior in the liquid. PMID:23004742

  7. Stretchable Loudspeaker using Liquid Metal Microchannel

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Sang Woo; Park, Jeongwon; Hong, Soo Yeong; Park, Heun; Jeong, Yu Ra; Park, Junhong; Lee, Sang-Soo; Ha, Jeong Sook

    2015-01-01

    Considering the various applications of wearable and bio-implantable devices, it is desirable to realize stretchable acoustic devices for body-attached applications such as sensing biological signals, hearing aids, and notification of information via sound. In this study, we demonstrate the facile fabrication of a Stretchable Acoustic Device (SAD) using liquid metal coil of Galinstan where the SAD is operated by the electromagnetic interaction between the liquid metal coil and a Neodymium (Nd) magnet. To fabricate a liquid metal coil, Galinstan was injected into a micro-patterned elastomer channel. This fabricated SAD was operated simultaneously as a loudspeaker and a microphone. Measurements of the frequency response confirmed that the SAD was mechanically stable under both 50% uniaxial and 30% biaxial strains. Furthermore, 2000 repetitive applications of a 50% uniaxial strain did not induce any noticeable degradation of the sound pressure. Both voice and the beeping sound of an alarm clock were successfully recorded and played back through our SAD while it was attached to the wrist under repeated deformation. These results demonstrate the high potential of the fabricated SAD using Galinstan voice coil in various research fields including stretchable, wearable, and bio-implantable acoustic devices. PMID:26181209

  8. Stretchable Loudspeaker using Liquid Metal Microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Sang Woo; Park, Jeongwon; Hong, Soo Yeong; Park, Heun; Jeong, Yu Ra; Park, Junhong; Lee, Sang-Soo; Ha, Jeong Sook

    2015-07-01

    Considering the various applications of wearable and bio-implantable devices, it is desirable to realize stretchable acoustic devices for body-attached applications such as sensing biological signals, hearing aids, and notification of information via sound. In this study, we demonstrate the facile fabrication of a Stretchable Acoustic Device (SAD) using liquid metal coil of Galinstan where the SAD is operated by the electromagnetic interaction between the liquid metal coil and a Neodymium (Nd) magnet. To fabricate a liquid metal coil, Galinstan was injected into a micro-patterned elastomer channel. This fabricated SAD was operated simultaneously as a loudspeaker and a microphone. Measurements of the frequency response confirmed that the SAD was mechanically stable under both 50% uniaxial and 30% biaxial strains. Furthermore, 2000 repetitive applications of a 50% uniaxial strain did not induce any noticeable degradation of the sound pressure. Both voice and the beeping sound of an alarm clock were successfully recorded and played back through our SAD while it was attached to the wrist under repeated deformation. These results demonstrate the high potential of the fabricated SAD using Galinstan voice coil in various research fields including stretchable, wearable, and bio-implantable acoustic devices.

  9. Stretchable Loudspeaker using Liquid Metal Microchannel.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sang Woo; Park, Jeongwon; Hong, Soo Yeong; Park, Heun; Jeong, Yu Ra; Park, Junhong; Lee, Sang-Soo; Ha, Jeong Sook

    2015-01-01

    Considering the various applications of wearable and bio-implantable devices, it is desirable to realize stretchable acoustic devices for body-attached applications such as sensing biological signals, hearing aids, and notification of information via sound. In this study, we demonstrate the facile fabrication of a Stretchable Acoustic Device (SAD) using liquid metal coil of Galinstan where the SAD is operated by the electromagnetic interaction between the liquid metal coil and a Neodymium (Nd) magnet. To fabricate a liquid metal coil, Galinstan was injected into a micro-patterned elastomer channel. This fabricated SAD was operated simultaneously as a loudspeaker and a microphone. Measurements of the frequency response confirmed that the SAD was mechanically stable under both 50% uniaxial and 30% biaxial strains. Furthermore, 2000 repetitive applications of a 50% uniaxial strain did not induce any noticeable degradation of the sound pressure. Both voice and the beeping sound of an alarm clock were successfully recorded and played back through our SAD while it was attached to the wrist under repeated deformation. These results demonstrate the high potential of the fabricated SAD using Galinstan voice coil in various research fields including stretchable, wearable, and bio-implantable acoustic devices. PMID:26181209

  10. Forces on a pipe bend resulting from clearing a pool of liquid upstream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Andrew S.; Griffith, Peter

    1991-12-01

    The forces experienced by a bend in a pipe when a pool of water upstream is cleared by a rush of air have been measured. These forces are found to be negligible as long as a transition to slug flow does not occur. This transition does not occur as long as the maximum liquid fraction in the pool is less than 20 percent. The forces experienced at the bend are greatly reduced if the slug has traveled more than 6 L/D's, a distance which is more than sufficient to insure that the slug has entrained air. The effect of an upstream expansion on the force experienced by the bend as a cleared air-water plug passes through it has also been measured. A conservative estimate of the maximum force can be made by assuming that the plug is composed entirely of liquid and moves at the mixture velocity characteristic of the small pipe. The measured maximum force decreases rapidly with increasing distance. These measurements will help in designing piping supports for lines which cannot be properly sloped or are downstream of a pressure relief valve.

  11. Liquid-metal embrittlement of refractory metals by molten plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.R.; Bergin, J.B.; McInturff, S.A.; Kuhn, B.A.

    1980-07-01

    Embrittlement by molten plutonium of the refractory metals and alloys W-25 wt % Re, tantalum, molybdenum, and Ta-10 wt % W was studied. At 900/sup 0/C and a strain rate of 10/sup -4/ s/sup -1/, the materials tested may be ranked in order of decreasing susceptibility to liquid-plutonium embrittlement as follows: molybdenum, W-25 wt % Re, Ta-10 wt % W, and tantalum. These materials exhibited a wide range in susceptibility. Embrittlement was found to exhibit a high degree of temperature and strain-rate dependence, and we present arguments that strongly support a stress-assisted, intergranular, liquid-metal corrosion mechanism. We also believe microstructure plays a key role in the extent of embrittlement. In the case of W-25 wt % Re, we have determined that a dealloying corrosion takes place in which rhenium is selectively withdrawn from the alloy.

  12. Liquid suspensions of reversible metal hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, J.J.; Grohse, E.W.; Winsche, W.E.

    1983-12-08

    The reversibility of the process M + x/2 H/sub 2/ ..-->.. MH/sub x/, where M is a metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH/sub x/ in the presence of H/sub 2/, generally used to store and recall H/sub 2/, is found to proceed under a liquid, thereby to reduce contamination, provide better temperature control and provide in situ mobility of the reactants. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H/sub 2/, to store hydrogen (at high pressures) and to release (at low pressures) previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H/sub 2/ through the liquid is dependent upon the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the former is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particle. When the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

  13. Gold metal liquid-like droplets.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Evgeny; Scanlon, Micheál D; Momotenko, Dmitry; Vrubel, Heron; Méndez, Manuel A; Brevet, Pierre-Francois; Girault, Hubert H

    2014-09-23

    Simple methods to self-assemble coatings and films encompassing nanoparticles are highly desirable in many practical scenarios, yet scarcely any examples of simple, robust approaches to coat macroscopic droplets with continuous, thick (multilayer), reflective and stable liquid nanoparticle films exist. Here, we introduce a facile and rapid one-step route to form films of reflective liquid-like gold that encase macroscopic droplets, and we denote these as gold metal liquid-like droplets (MeLLDs). The present approach takes advantage of the inherent self-assembly of gold nanoparticles at liquid-liquid interfaces and the increase in rates of nanoparticle aggregate trapping at the interface during emulsification. The ease of displacement of the stabilizing citrate ligands by appropriate redox active molecules that act as a lubricating molecular glue is key. Specifically, the heterogeneous interaction of citrate stabilized aqueous gold nanoparticles with the lipophilic electron donor tetrathiafulvalene under emulsified conditions produces gold MeLLDs. This methodology relies exclusively on electrochemical reactions, i.e., the oxidation of tetrathiafulvalene to its radical cation by the gold nanoparticle, and electrostatic interactions between the radical cation and nanoparticles. The gold MeLLDs are reversibly deformable upon compression and decompression and kinetically stable for extended periods of time in excess of a year. PMID:25184343

  14. Modeling of thermodiffusion in liquid metal alloys.

    PubMed

    Eslamian, Morteza; Sabzi, Fatemeh; Saghir, M Ziad

    2010-11-01

    In this paper following the linear non-equilibrium thermodynamics approach, an expression is derived for the calculation of the thermodiffusion factor in binary liquid metal alloys. The expression is comprised of two terms; the first term accounts for the thermally driven interactions between metal ions, a phenomenon similar to that of the non-ionic binary mixtures, such as hydrocarbons; the second term is called the electronic contribution and is the mass diffusion due to an internal electric field that is induced as a result of the imposed thermal gradient. Both terms are formulated as functions of the net heats of transport. The ion-ion net heat of transport is simulated by the activation energy of viscous flow and the electronic net heat of transport is correlated with the force acting on the ions by the rearrangement of the conduction electrons and ions. A methodology is presented and used to estimate the liquid metal properties, such as the partial molar internal energies, enthalpies, volumes and the activity coefficients used for model validation. The prediction power of the proposed expression along with some other existing thermodiffusion models for liquid mixtures, such as the Haase, Kempers, Drickamer and Firoozabadi formulas are examined against available experimental data obtained on ground or in microgravity environment. The proposed model satisfactorily predicts the thermodiffusion data of mixtures that are composed of elements with comparable melting points. It is also potentially and qualitatively able to predict a sign change in thermodiffusion factor of Na-K liquid mixture. With some speculation, the sign change is attributed to an anomalous change in thermoelectric power of Na-K mixture with composition. PMID:20856973

  15. Interfacial Transport Phenomena Stability in Liquid-Metal/Water Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Corradini; Anderson, Mark; Bonazza, Riccardo; Cho, D. H.

    2002-12-19

    at different locations within the liquid metal pool. The effect of the system operating pressure and the water injection rate on the performance and the stability of the liquid metal/water direct contact heat exchange was obtained and are reported in detail within the following report. The effects of water injection from a 2.0 mm nozzle at flow rates from 1.5g/s to 8g/s into a heavy liquid metal (Pb and Pb/Bi alloy) at temperatures of 300-500 oC and system pressures ranging from 1- 10 bar were investigated. These conditions were chosen to span the two major flow regimes (nucleate and film boiling) that may be present in reactor based direct contact systems. Detailed information regarding the thermal performance and the operational stability of a liquid metal/water direct contact heat exchange were obtained for these conditions. The resulting extensive experimental database can be used to aid in the design of reactor scale components dealing with high temperature direct contact heat transfer.

  16. Mixed convection and solidification in a simplified metal pool of an ESR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chun-Liang; Chiou, Kuo-Chang

    1991-10-01

    The mixed convection induced by buoyancy and free-surface velocity and the associated solidification phenomena of molten metal in a cylindrical container, which is employed to simulate the metal pool of ESR system, are numerically studied. When the buoyancy effect and the effect due to free-surface velocity augment each other, the unicellular fluid motion is strengthened, which makes the molten metal solidify most slowly in the upper corner near the side wall. When they are opposing each other, a double-cell flow structure exists, with the cooling effect confined within the right lower region which is mainly driven by buoyancy. The molten metal in the left upper region, which is mainly driven by the free-surface velocity, then assumes a rather high temperature.

  17. Pool boiling of dielectric liquids on porous graphite and extended copper surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jack L.

    This work investigated pool boiling of the dielectric liquids HFE-7100 and FC-72 on plane copper and porous graphite and on copper surfaces with corner pins. The work investigated the effects of surface orientation and liquid subcooling and, for the copper surfaces with corner pins, the effect of surface roughness. In addition, investigations were made studying the heat transfer by natural convection and nucleate boiling, as well as the effects of liquid subcooling (up to 30 K) and surface inclination (0°--upward facing, to 180°--downward facing) on nucleate boiling heat transfer and Critical Heat Flux (CHF). The results are applicable to direct immersion cooling by nucleate boiling of high power computer chips dissipating 50 - 100 W/cm2 while maintaining the junction temperature for the chips below the recommended values (˜85 °C). Pool boiling experiments are performed with degassed HFE-7100 and FC-72 liquids using uniformly heated 10 x 10 mm porous graphite and copper surfaces with corner pins. The measured footprint temperatures and thermal power removed from the surfaces are used to construct the pool boiling curves and determine the critical heat flux and corresponding surface superheat. Results are compared with those obtained on plane copper of same heated footprint area. The obtained CHF values are also compared with those reported in the open literature for plane, micro-porous, and macro-structured surfaces. Digital photographs and video are obtained to help explain and interpret the results. For the first time, natural convection correlations for dielectric liquids on plane, porous, and copper with corner pins developed. These correlations are important to electronic cooling in the stand-by mode when the heat dissipation by the chips is only a few watts. Results show that the power removed by natural convection from surfaces with corner pins is 67% more than from plane Si and Cu surfaces at the same surface superheat. Using porous graphite and copper

  18. Direct energy conversion using liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onea, Alexandru; Diez de los Rios Ramos, Nerea; Hering, Wolfgang; Stieglitz, Robert; Moster, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Liquid metals have excellent properties to be used as heat transport fluids due to their high thermal conductivity and their wide applicable temperature range. The latter issue can be used to go beyond limitations of existing thermal solar energy systems. Furthermore, the direct energy converter Alkali Metal Thermo Electric Converter (AMTEC) can be used to make intangible areas of energy conversion suitable for a wide range of applications. One objective is to investigate AMTEC as a complementary cycle for the next generation of concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. The experimental research taking place in the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) is focused on the construction of a flexible AMTEC test facility, development, test and improvement of liquid-anode and vapor-anode AMTEC devices as well as the coupling of the AMTEC cold side to the heat storage tank proposed for the CSP system. Within this project, the investigations foreseen will focus on the analyses of BASE-metal interface, electrode materials and deposition techniques, corrosion and erosion of materials brought in contact with high temperature sodium. This prototype demonstrator is planned to be integrated in the KArlsruhe SOdium LAboratory (KASOLA), a flexible closed mid-size sodium loop, completely in-house designed, presently under construction at the Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (INR) within KIT.

  19. Thermodynamic laws of the oxygen solubility in liquid metals (Ni, Co, Fe, Mn, Cr) and the formation of oxygen-containing solutions in the alloys based on them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paderin, S. N.; Shil'nikov, E. V.

    2015-12-01

    The solubility of oxygen in liquid Ni, Co, Fe, Mn, and Cr metals (Group IV in the periodic table) has been found for the first time. Linear dependences of the oxygen solubility on the standard Gibbs energy for the oxidation reaction of a liquid metal with gaseous oxygen are found. The revealed function of oxygen solubility is of scientific importance and allows one to develop a theory of oxygen solutions in liquid metals and liquid multicomponent metallic compositions and to calculate the energies of mixing of liquid metals with oxygen from Δ G MO ° for metal oxidation reactions with allowance for pseudoregular-solution model equations. Using the energies of mixing and metal compositions, we calculated the equilibrium oxygen concentrations in a metal molten pool at the end of oxidation stage of melting 08Kh18N10T steel in an arc furnace. This fact indicates practical importance of the found function of the oxygen solubility in metals.

  20. Magnetic-field-induced liquid metal droplet manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daeyoung; Lee, Jeong-Bong

    2015-01-01

    We report magnetic-field-induced liquid metal droplet on-demand manipulation by coating a liquid metal with ferromagnetic materials. The gallium-based liquid metal alloy has a challenging drawback that it is instantly oxidized in ambient air, resulting in surface wetting on most surfaces. When the oxidized surface of the droplet is coated with ferromagnetic materials, it is non-wettable and can be controlled by applying an external magnetic field. We coated the surface of a liquid metal droplet with either an electroplated CoNiMnP layer or an iron (Fe) particle by simply rolling the liquid metal droplet on an Fe particle bed. For a paper towel, the minimum required magnetic flux density to initiate movement of the ~8 μL Fe-particle-coated liquid metal droplet was 50 gauss. Magnetic-field-induced liquid metal droplet manipulation was investigated under both horizontal and vertical magnetic fields. Compared to the CoNiMnP-electroplated liquid metal droplet, the Fe-particle-coated droplet could be well controlled because Fe particles were uniformly coated on the surface of the droplet. With a maximum applied magnetic flux density of ~1,600 gauss, the CoNiMnP layer on the liquid metal broke down, resulting in fragmentation of three smaller droplets, and the Fe particle was detached from the liquid metal surface and was re-coated after the magnetic field had been removed.

  1. Aspects of non-Fermi-liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivovarov, Eugene

    We consider several examples of metallic systems that exhibit non-Fermi-liquid behavior. In these examples the system is not a Fermi liquid due to the presence of a "hidden" order. The primary models are density waves with an odd-frequency-dependent order parameter and density waves with d-wave symmetry. In the first model, the same-time correlation functions vanish and there is a conventional Fermi surface. In the second model, the gap vanishes at the nodes. We derive the phase diagrams and study the thermodynamic and kinetic properties. We also consider the effects of competing orders on the phase diagram when the underlying microscopic interaction has a high symmetry.

  2. 'Crystal Genes' in Metallic Liquids and Glasses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Zhang, Feng; Ye, Zhuo; Zhang, Yue; Fang, Xiaowei; Ding, Zejun; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Mendelev, Mikhail I; Ott, Ryan T; Kramer, Matthew J; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the underlying structural order that transcends liquid, glass and crystalline states in metallic systems. A genetic algorithm is applied to search for the most common energetically favorable packing motifs in crystalline structures. These motifs are in turn compared to the observed packing motifs in the actual liquid or glass structures using a cluster-alignment method. Using this method, we have revealed the nature of the short-range order in Cu64Zr36 glasses. More importantly, we identified a novel structural order in the Al90Sm10 system. In addition, our approach brings new insight into understanding the origin of vitrification and describing mesoscopic order-disorder transitions in condensed matter systems. PMID:27030071

  3. Statistical Mechanics of Metallic Glasses and Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Egami, Takeshi; Levashov, Valentin A; Morris, James R; Haruyama, O.

    2010-01-01

    It is difficult to formulate the statistical mechanical theory of liquids and glasses, because phonons, which are the basis for the statistical mechanics of lattice dynamics in crystals, are strongly scattered and have a very short lifetime in liquids and glasses. Instead computer simulation and the free-volume theory are most frequently used in explaining experimental results on metallic glasses. However, both of them suffer from serious problems as discussed in this paper. We propose an alternative approach based upon the dynamics of the atomic level stresses. We review recent progress with this approach, and show that it is possible to calculate thermodynamic quantities, including the glass transition temperature and the kinetics of structural relaxation by this approach.

  4. Liquid oxygen/metal gelled monopropellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickman, John H.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this program were to establish the feasibility of metallized/liquid oxygen monopropellants and select the best monopropellant formulation for continued study. The metal powders mixed with the liquid oxygen were aluminum/magnesium (80/20), silicon and iron (Iron was only tested for burning properties). The formulations were first evaluated on whether they detonated when ignited or burned. The formulations only burned when ignited. The viscosity for the formulations ranged from 900 cps to 100 cps at shear rates up to 300 seconds(sup -1). Two percent (by weight) of Cab-O-Sil was added to the aluminum and aluminum/magnesium formulations for gelling while the silicon formulation used three percent. Within a seven hour period, settling was suggested only in the 29 percent aluminum and 29 percent aluminum/magnesium formulations. The monopropellants were burned in a cylinder submerged in a liquid nitrogen bath. Experimental data at ambient pressure indicated that the monopropellants were extinguished when the flame front reached regions submerged under the liquid nitrogen. The burn rate increased dramatically when burned in a cylinder enclosure with less heat sink available to the monopropellant. The test results were inconclusive as to whether the increased burn rate was due to the lower heat sink capacity or the small amount of pressure (2 psi) generated during the burning of the monopropellant. The burning of the aluminum and aluminum/magnesium resulted in a brilliant white flame similar to that of an arc welder. These monopropellants burned in a pulsating manner with the aluminum/magnesium appearing to have less pulsating combustion. The silicon monopropellant burned with an orange glow. No sparks or energetic burning was apparent as with the aluminum or aluminum/magnesium.

  5. Liquid metal nanodroplet dynamics inside nanocontainers

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyun Young; Chun, Hyunkyung; Park, Sora; Kang, Seoung-Hun; Ahn, Chi Won; Kwon, Young-Kyun; Upmanyu, Moneesh; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Jung, Yung Joon

    2013-01-01

    Here we report direct observations of spatial movements of nanodroplets of Pb metal trapped inside sealed carbon nanocontainers. We find drastic changes in the mobility of the liquid droplets as the particle size increases from a few to a few ten nanometers. In open containers the droplet becomes immobile and readily evaporates to the vacuum environment. The particle mobility strongly depends on confinement, particle size, and wetting on the enclosed surface. The collisions between droplets increase mobility but the tendency is reversed if collisions lead to droplet coalescence. The dynamics of confined nanodroplets could provide new insights into the activity of nanostructures in spatially constrained geometries. PMID:24005021

  6. Power losses in liquid metal current collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, M. M.; Wallace, D. R.

    1980-05-01

    A numerical capability has been developed which will compute ohmic and viscous power losses in liquid metal current collectors. The present work extends previous analytical investigations in that semi-infinite collector geometries are no longer assumed. This new capability is based on the finite element method and makes use of electrical current densities computed by the heat transfer portion of the NASTRAN structural analysis program. Although some limitations and questions remain, a comparison between the new numerical capability and experiment shows very good agreement in the computation of the power losses.

  7. Accommodation of liquid metal by cavity liners

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppson, D.W.

    1989-03-01

    Present liquid metal breeder reactor cell liner designs appear adequate to contain postulated leakages of lithium-lead alloy in an air or steam atmosphere and to contain lithium when inert atmospheres are present. If an air or steam atmosphere may be present in a cavity where lithium amy accumulate under postulated accident conditions, then consideration of stainless steel liners and further testing is recommended. Lithium testing of faulted liners should also be considered. SOFIRE II and WATRe computer codes may be useful in establishing liner design requirements and in determining water release from concrete behind the liners (potential hydrogen production) for postulated leakages to steel-lined concrete cavities.

  8. Thermal convection in a liquid metal battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuxin; Zikanov, Oleg

    2016-08-01

    Generation of thermal convection flow in the liquid metal battery, a device recently proposed as a promising solution for the problem of the short-term energy storage, is analyzed using a numerical model. It is found that convection caused by Joule heating of electrolyte during charging or discharging is virtually unavoidable. It exists in laboratory prototypes larger than a few centimeters in size and should become much stronger in larger-scale batteries. The phenomenon needs further investigation in view of its positive (enhanced mixing of reactants) and negative (loss of efficiency and possible disruption of operation due to the flow-induced deformation of the electrolyte layer) effects.

  9. Instability of a liquid metal surface in an electromagnetic field and relevance to EMC

    SciTech Connect

    Kageyama, R.; Evans, J.W.

    1996-10-01

    In electromagnetic casting (EMC) the surface of the molten metal, at the solidification front around the periphery of the melt pool, is not confirmed by a solid mold (as in, say, direct chill casting) but is free to move. Consequently disturbances of the melt surface are reflected in defects (waviness) in the solid ingot. The present paper examines the dynamics of a liquid metal surface in an electromagnetic field comparable to that of EMC. Numerical calculations of the flow of metal and motion of the melt surface have been accompanied by laboratory experiments in which a laser vibrometer has been used to measure the oscillations of the free surface of a mercury pool. Surface oscillations growth with increasing electromagnetic field strength in both the computations and the experiment, probably originating from the turbulent flow in the melt. The implications for EMC are discussed.

  10. Process for preparing liquid metal electrical contact device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, R. R.; Berkopec, F. D.; Culp, D. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The parts of an electrical contact device are treated by sputter etching to remove the parent metal oxide. Prior to exposure of the electrodes to any oxygen, a sacrificial metal is sputter deposited on the parts. Preferably this sacrificial metal is one that oxidizes slowly and is readily dissolved by the liquid metal. The sacrificial metal may then be removed from unwanted areas. The remainder of the ring and the probe to be wet by the liquid metal are submerged in the liquid metal or the liquid metal is flushed over these areas, preferably while they are being slightly abraded, unitl all the sacrificial material on these portions is wet by the liquid metal. In doing so the liquid metal dissolves the sacrificial metal and permanently wets the parent metal. Preferred materials used in the process and for the electrodes of electrical contact devices are high purity (99.0%) nickel or AISI type 304 stainless steel for the electrical contact devices, gallium as the liquid metal, and gold as the sacrificial material.

  11. Small Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor Safety Study

    SciTech Connect

    Minato, A; Ueda, N; Wade, D; Greenspan, E; Brown, N

    2005-11-02

    The Small Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor Safety Study documents results from activities conducted under Small Liquid Metal Fast Reactor Coordination Program (SLMFR-CP) Agreement, January 2004, between the Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) of Japan and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)[1]. Evaluations were completed on topics that are important to the safety of small sodium cooled and lead alloy cooled reactors. CRIEPI investigated approaches for evaluating postulated severe accidents using the CANIS computer code. The methods being developed are improvements on codes such as SAS 4A used in the US to analyze sodium cooled reactors and they depend on calibration using safety testing of metal fuel that has been completed in the TREAT facility. The 4S and the small lead cooled reactors in the US are being designed to preclude core disruption from all mechanistic scenarios, including selected unprotected transients. However, postulated core disruption is being evaluated to support the risk analysis. Argonne National Laboratory and the University of California Berkeley also supported LLNL with evaluation of cores with small positive void worth and core designs that would limit void worth. Assessments were also completed for lead cooled reactors in the following areas: (1) continuing operations with cladding failure, (2) large bubbles passing through the core and (3) recommendations concerning reflector control. The design approach used in the US emphasizes reducing the reactivity in the control mechanisms with core designs that have essentially no, or a very small, reactivity change over the core life. This leads to some positive void worth in the core that is not considered to be safety problem because of the inability to identify scenarios that would lead to voiding of lead. It is also believed that the void worth will not dominate the severe accident analysis. The approach used by 4S requires negative void worth throughout

  12. High-Power Liquid-Metal Heat-Transfer Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Fujita, Toshio

    1991-01-01

    Proposed closed-loop system for transfer of thermal power operates at relatively high differential pressure between vapor and liquid phases of liquid-metal working fluid. Resembles "capillary-pumped" liquid-metal heat-transfer loop except electric field across permselective barrier of beta alumina keeps liquid and vapor separate at heat-input end. Increases output thermal power, contains no moving parts, highly reliable and well suited to long-term unattended operation.

  13. Droplet impact on deep liquid pools: Rayleigh jet to formation of secondary droplets.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Orozco, Eduardo; Davanlou, Ashkan; Choudhury, Pretam K; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2015-11-01

    The impact of droplets on a deep pool has applications in cleaning up oil spills, spray cooling, painting, inkjet printing, and forensic analysis, relying on the changes in properties such as viscosity, interfacial tension, and density. Despite the exhaustive research on different aspects of droplet impact, it is not clear how liquid properties can affect the instabilities leading to Rayleigh jet breakup and number of daughter drops formed after its pinch-off. In this article, through systematic experiments we investigate the droplet impact phenomena by varying viscosity and surface tension of liquids as well as impact speeds. Further, using numerical simulations, we show that Rayleigh-Plateau instability is influenced by these parameters, and capillary time scale is the appropriate scale to normalize the breakup time. Based on Ohnesorge number (Oh) and impact Weber number (We), a regime map for no breakup, Rayleigh jet breakup, and crown splash is suggested. Interestingly, crown splash is observed to occur at all Ohnesorge numbers; however, at high Oh, a large portion of kinetic energy is dissipated, and thus the Rayleigh jet is suppressed regardless of high impact velocity. The normalized required time for the Rayleigh jet to reach its peak varies linearly with the critical height of the jet. PMID:26651794

  14. Droplet impact on deep liquid pools: Rayleigh jet to formation of secondary droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Orozco, Eduardo; Davanlou, Ashkan; Choudhury, Pretam K.; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2015-11-01

    The impact of droplets on a deep pool has applications in cleaning up oil spills, spray cooling, painting, inkjet printing, and forensic analysis, relying on the changes in properties such as viscosity, interfacial tension, and density. Despite the exhaustive research on different aspects of droplet impact, it is not clear how liquid properties can affect the instabilities leading to Rayleigh jet breakup and number of daughter drops formed after its pinch-off. In this article, through systematic experiments we investigate the droplet impact phenomena by varying viscosity and surface tension of liquids as well as impact speeds. Further, using numerical simulations, we show that Rayleigh-Plateau instability is influenced by these parameters, and capillary time scale is the appropriate scale to normalize the breakup time. Based on Ohnesorge number (Oh) and impact Weber number (We), a regime map for no breakup, Rayleigh jet breakup, and crown splash is suggested. Interestingly, crown splash is observed to occur at all Ohnesorge numbers; however, at high Oh, a large portion of kinetic energy is dissipated, and thus the Rayleigh jet is suppressed regardless of high impact velocity. The normalized required time for the Rayleigh jet to reach its peak varies linearly with the critical height of the jet.

  15. Self-Actuation of Liquid Metal via Redox Reaction.

    PubMed

    Gough, Ryan C; Dang, Jonathan H; Moorefield, Matthew R; Zhang, George B; Hihara, Lloyd H; Shiroma, Wayne A; Ohta, Aaron T

    2016-01-13

    Presented here is a method for actuating a gallium-based liquid-metal alloy without the need for an external power supply. Liquid metal is used as an anode to drive a complementary oxygen reduction reaction, resulting in the spontaneous growth of hydrophilic gallium oxide on the liquid-metal surface, which induces flow of the liquid metal into a channel. The extent and duration of the actuation are controllable throughout the process, and the induced flow is both reversible and repeatable. This self-actuation technique can also be used to trigger other electrokinetic or fluidic mechanisms. PMID:26693856

  16. RAPID ANALYSIS OF CYANURIC ACID IN SWIMMING POOL WATERS BY HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY USING POROUS GRAPHITIC CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    An innovative approach is presented for reducing analysis times of cynuric acid in swimming pool waters by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The HPLC method exploits the unique selectivity of porous graphitic carbon (PGC) to fully resolve within 10 minutes cyanuric ...

  17. RAPID ANALYSIS OF CYNANURIC ACID IN SWIMMING POOL WATERS BY HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY USING POROUS GRAPHITIC CARBON COLUMN

    EPA Science Inventory

    An innovative approach is presented for reducing analysis times of cyanuric acid in swimming pool waters by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The HPLC method exploits the unique selectivity of porous graphitic carbon (PGC) to fully resolve cyanuric acid from other p...

  18. Liquid-liquid transition in a strong bulk metallic glass-forming liquid.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuai; Yang, Fan; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kaban, Ivan; Shuleshova, Olga; Meyer, Andreas; Busch, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphic phase transitions are common in crystalline solids. Recent studies suggest that phase transitions may also exist between two liquid forms with different entropy and structure. Such a liquid-liquid transition has been investigated in various substances including water, Al2O3-Y2O3 and network glass formers. However, the nature of liquid-liquid transition is debated due to experimental difficulties in avoiding crystallization and/or measuring at high temperatures/pressures. Here we report the thermodynamic and structural evidence of a temperature-induced weak first-order liquid-liquid transition in a bulk metallic glass-forming system Zr(41.2)Ti(13.8)Cu(12.5)Ni10Be(22.5) characterized by non- (or weak) directional bonds. Our experimental results suggest that the local structural changes during the transition induce the drastic viscosity changes without a detectable density anomaly. These changes are correlated with a heat capacity maximum in the liquid. Our findings support the hypothesis that the 'strong' kinetics (low fragility) of a liquid may arise from an underlying lambda transition above its glass transition. PMID:23817404

  19. Accommodation of liquid metal by cavity liners

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppson, D.W.

    1988-10-01

    Present liquid metal breeder reactor cell liner designs appear adequate to contain postulated leakages of lithium-lead alloy in an air or steam atmosphere and to contain lithium when inert atmospheres are present. If an air or steam atmosphere may be present in a cavity where lithium may accumulate under postulated accident conditions, then consideration of stainless steel liners and further testing is recommended. Lithium testing of faulted liners should also be considered. SOFIRE II and WATRE computer codes may be useful in establishing liner design requirements and in determining water release from concrete behind the liners (potential hydrogen production) for postulated leakages to steel-lined concrete cavities. 1 ref., 10 figs.

  20. Bulk Metallic Glass in Supercooled Liquid State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Deng, L.; Tang, N.; Jin, J. S.

    2014-07-01

    Size effect on the flow behavior of Zr55Al10Ni5Cu30 bulk metallic glass in its supercooled liquid state was investigated by compression tests with specimen diameters varying from 1 to 3 mm. It was found that the smaller the specimen, the higher flow stress exhibits. Strain gradient theory considering friction effect is validated to be suitable to rationalize this size effect. The more geometrical-necessary flow sites needed to be created in smaller specimens, the higher stress it may result in. Considering the efficiency of power dissipation and instability condition, processing maps of different specimens were constructed. With the specimen size decreasing, the processing condition corresponding to low temperature or high strain rate becomes disadvantageous to the thermoplastic forming of Zr55Al10Ni5Cu30, which is closely related to the local stress concentration and strain gradient induced by friction.

  1. Steering liquid metal flow in microchannels using low voltages.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Lin, Yiliang; Joshipura, Ishan D; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Dickey, Michael D

    2015-10-01

    Liquid metals based on gallium, such as eutectic gallium indium (EGaIn) and Galinstan, have been integrated as static components in microfluidic systems for a wide range of applications including soft electrodes, pumps, and stretchable electronics. However, there is also a possibility to continuously pump liquid metal into microchannels to create shape reconfigurable metallic structures. Enabling this concept necessitates a simple method to control dynamically the path the metal takes through branched microchannels with multiple outlets. This paper demonstrates a novel method for controlling the directional flow of EGaIn liquid metal in complex microfluidic networks by simply applying a low voltage to the metal. According to the polarity of the voltage applied between the inlet and an outlet, two distinct mechanisms can occur. The voltage can lower the interfacial tension of the metal via electrocapillarity to facilitate the flow of the metal towards outlets containing counter electrodes. Alternatively, the voltage can drive surface oxidation of the metal to form a mechanical impediment that redirects the movement of the metal towards alternative pathways. Thus, the method can be employed like a 'valve' to direct the pathway chosen by the metal without mechanical moving parts. The paper elucidates the operating mechanisms of this valving system and demonstrates proof-of-concept control over the flow of liquid metal towards single or multiple directions simultaneously. This method provides a simple route to direct the flow of liquid metal for applications in microfluidics, optics, electronics, and microelectromechanical systems. PMID:26279150

  2. Impact dynamics of oxidized liquid metal drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qin; Brown, Eric; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2013-04-01

    With exposure to air, many liquid metals spontaneously generate an oxide layer on their surface. In oscillatory rheological tests, this skin is found to introduce a yield stress that typically dominates the elastic response but can be tuned by exposing the metal to hydrochloric acid solutions of different concentration. We systematically studied the normal impact of eutectic gallium-indium (eGaIn) drops under different oxidation conditions and show how this leads to two different dynamical regimes. At low impact velocity (or low Weber number), eGaIn droplets display strong recoil and rebound from the impacted surface when the oxide layer is removed. In addition, the degree of drop deformation or spreading during impact is controlled by the oxide skin. We show that the scaling law known from ordinary liquids for the maximum spreading radius as a function of impact velocity can still be applied to the case of oxidized eGaIn if an effective Weber number We is employed that uses an effective surface tension factoring in the yield stress. In contrast, no influence on spreading from different oxidations conditions is observed for high impact velocity. This suggests that the initial kinetic energy is mostly damped by bulk viscous dissipation. Results from both regimes can be collapsed in an impact phase diagram controlled by two variables, the maximum spreading factor Pm=R0/Rm, given by the ratio of initial to maximum drop radius, and the impact number K=We/Re4/5, which scales with the effective Weber number We as well as the Reynolds number Re. The data exhibit a transition from capillary to viscous behavior at a critical impact number Kc≈0.1.

  3. Heavy liquid metals: Research programs at PSI

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Y.

    1996-06-01

    The author describes work at PSI on thermohydraulics, thermal shock, and material tests for mechnical properties. In the presentation, the focus is on two main programs. (1) SINQ LBE target: The phase II study program for SINQ is planned. A new LBE loop is being constructed. The study has the following three objectives: (a) Pump study - design work on an electromagnetic pump to be integrated into the target. (b) Heat pipe performance test - the use of heat pipes as an additional component of the target cooling system is being considered, and it may be a way to futher decouple the liquid metal and water coolant loops. (c) Mixed convection experiment - in order to find an optimal configuration of the additional flow guide for window cooling, mixed convection around the window is to be studied. The experiment will be started using water and then with LBE. (2) ESS Mercury target: For ESS target study, the following experimental studies are planned, some of which are exampled by trial experiments. (a) Flow around the window: Flow mapping around the hemi-cylindrical window will be made for optimising the flow channels and structures, (b) Geometry optimisation for minimizing a recirculation zone behind the edge of the flow separator, (c) Flow induced vibration and buckling problem for a optimised structure of the flow separator and (d) Gas-liquid two-phase flow will be studied by starting to establish the new experimental method of measuring various kinds of two-phase flow characteristics.

  4. Theory of the spin-1 bosonic liquid metal - Equilibrium properties of liquid metallic deuterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva, J.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1984-01-01

    The theory of a two-component quantum fluid comprised of spin-1/2 fermions and nonzero spin bosons is examined. This system is of interest because it embodies a possible quantum liquid metallic phase of highly compressed deuterium. Bose condensation is assumed present and the two cases of nuclear-spin-polarized and -unpolarized systems are considered. A significant feature in the unpolarized case is the presence of a nonmagnetic mode with quadratic dispersion owing its existence to nonzero boson spin. The physical character of this mode is examined in detail within a Bogoliubov approach. The specific heat, bulk modulus, spin susceptibility, and thermal expansion are all determined. Striking contrasts in the specific heats and thermal-expansion coefficients of the liquid and corresponding normal solid metallic phase are predicted.

  5. Tokamak with liquid metal for inducing toroidal electrical field

    DOEpatents

    Ohkawa, Tihiro

    1981-01-01

    A tokamak apparatus includes a vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within said vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner confines gas therein. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside the liner. A magnetic field is established in the liquid metal to develop magnetic flux linking the toroidal space. The gas is ionized. The liquid metal and the toroidal space are moved relative to one another transversely of the space to generate electric current in the ionized gas in the toroidal space about its major axis and thereby heat plasma developed in the toroidal space.

  6. Contactless Inductive Bubble Detection in a Liquid Metal Flow.

    PubMed

    Gundrum, Thomas; Büttner, Philipp; Dekdouk, Bachir; Peyton, Anthony; Wondrak, Thomas; Galindo, Vladimir; Eckert, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The detection of bubbles in liquid metals is important for many technical applications. The opaqueness and the high temperature of liquid metals set high demands on the measurement system. The high electrical conductivity of the liquid metal can be exploited for contactless methods based on electromagnetic induction. We will present a measurement system which consists of one excitation coil and a pickup coil system on the opposite sides of the pipe. With this sensor we were able to detect bubbles in a sodium flow inside a stainless steel pipe and bubbles in a column filled with a liquid Gallium alloy. PMID:26751444

  7. Contactless Inductive Bubble Detection in a Liquid Metal Flow

    PubMed Central

    Gundrum, Thomas; Büttner, Philipp; Dekdouk, Bachir; Peyton, Anthony; Wondrak, Thomas; Galindo, Vladimir; Eckert, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The detection of bubbles in liquid metals is important for many technical applications. The opaqueness and the high temperature of liquid metals set high demands on the measurement system. The high electrical conductivity of the liquid metal can be exploited for contactless methods based on electromagnetic induction. We will present a measurement system which consists of one excitation coil and a pickup coil system on the opposite sides of the pipe. With this sensor we were able to detect bubbles in a sodium flow inside a stainless steel pipe and bubbles in a column filled with a liquid Gallium alloy. PMID:26751444

  8. Formation of monatomic metallic glasses through ultrafast liquid quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Li; Wang, Jiangwei; Sheng, Hongwei; Zhang, Ze; Mao, Scott X.

    2014-08-01

    It has long been conjectured that any metallic liquid can be vitrified into a glassy state provided that the cooling rate is sufficiently high. Experimentally, however, vitrification of single-element metallic liquids is notoriously difficult. True laboratory demonstration of the formation of monatomic metallic glass has been lacking. Here we report an experimental approach to the vitrification of monatomic metallic liquids by achieving an unprecedentedly high liquid-quenching rate of 1014 K s-1. Under such a high cooling rate, melts of pure refractory body-centred cubic (bcc) metals, such as liquid tantalum and vanadium, are successfully vitrified to form metallic glasses suitable for property interrogations. Combining in situ transmission electron microscopy observation and atoms-to-continuum modelling, we investigated the formation condition and thermal stability of the monatomic metallic glasses as obtained. The availability of monatomic metallic glasses, being the simplest glass formers, offers unique possibilities for studying the structure and property relationships of glasses. Our technique also shows great control over the reversible vitrification-crystallization processes, suggesting its potential in micro-electromechanical applications. The ultrahigh cooling rate, approaching the highest liquid-quenching rate attainable in the experiment, makes it possible to explore the fast kinetics and structural behaviour of supercooled metallic liquids within the nanosecond to picosecond regimes.

  9. Formation of monatomic metallic glasses through ultrafast liquid quenching.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Li; Wang, Jiangwei; Sheng, Hongwei; Zhang, Ze; Mao, Scott X

    2014-08-14

    It has long been conjectured that any metallic liquid can be vitrified into a glassy state provided that the cooling rate is sufficiently high. Experimentally, however, vitrification of single-element metallic liquids is notoriously difficult. True laboratory demonstration of the formation of monatomic metallic glass has been lacking. Here we report an experimental approach to the vitrification of monatomic metallic liquids by achieving an unprecedentedly high liquid-quenching rate of 10(14) K s(-1). Under such a high cooling rate, melts of pure refractory body-centred cubic (bcc) metals, such as liquid tantalum and vanadium, are successfully vitrified to form metallic glasses suitable for property interrogations. Combining in situ transmission electron microscopy observation and atoms-to-continuum modelling, we investigated the formation condition and thermal stability of the monatomic metallic glasses as obtained. The availability of monatomic metallic glasses, being the simplest glass formers, offers unique possibilities for studying the structure and property relationships of glasses. Our technique also shows great control over the reversible vitrification-crystallization processes, suggesting its potential in micro-electromechanical applications. The ultrahigh cooling rate, approaching the highest liquid-quenching rate attainable in the experiment, makes it possible to explore the fast kinetics and structural behaviour of supercooled metallic liquids within the nanosecond to picosecond regimes. PMID:25119235

  10. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals

    PubMed Central

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F.; O'Mullane, Anthony P.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems. PMID:27488954

  11. Measurement of the differential pressure of liquid metals

    DOEpatents

    Metz, H.J.

    1975-09-01

    This patent relates to an improved means for measuring the differential pressure between any two points in a process liquid metal coolant loop, wherein the flow of liquid metal in a pipe is opposed by a permanent magnet liquid metal pump until there is almost zero flow shown by a magnetic type flowmeter. The pressure producing the liquid metal flow is inferred from the rate of rotation of the permanent magnet pump. In an alternate embodiment, a differential pressure transducer is coupled to a process pipeline by means of high-temperature bellows or diaphragm seals, and a permanent magnet liquid metal pump in the high-pressure transmission line to the pressure transducer can be utilized either for calibration of the transducer or for determining the process differential pressure as a function of the magnet pump speed. (auth)

  12. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F.; O'Mullane, Anthony P.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-08-01

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems.

  13. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals.

    PubMed

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F; O'Mullane, Anthony P; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems. PMID:27488954

  14. Removal of pooled dense, nonaqueous phase liquid from saturated porous media using upward gradient alcohol floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunn, Stuart R. D.; Kueper, Bernard H.

    Laboratory experiments employing 90% by volume alcohol solutions are used to compare the abilities of ethanol and 1-propanol to remove pooled tetrachloroethene (PCE) from saturated porous media using low upward hydraulic gradients. Equilibrium ternary phase diagrams measured for the systems water/PCE/ethanol and water/PCE/1-propanol indicate that for alcohol concentrations below the miscibility envelope, 1-propanol will partition predominantly into the dense, nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) phase while ethanol remains in the aqueous phase. Interfacial tension and phase density measurements show that while both systems demonstrate a reduction in interfacial tension with increasing alcohol content, the density difference between the aqueous and DNAPL phases is only reduced for the 1-propanol system. Two-dimensional experiments in saturated porous media using alcohol floods ranging in size from 0.125 pore volumes (PV) to 1.0 PV recovered between 5.7% and 98.7% of the PCE mass. The removal mechanisms for the ethanol floods included enhanced dissolution followed by miscible displacement, while the 1-propanol floods removed PCE by DNAPL swelling and interfacial tension reduction leading to immiscible displacement followed by miscible displacement. Recovery results and effluent composition histories indicate that hydrodynamic instabilities and dispersion cause significant alcohol slug deterioration and confirm the necessity of using an appropriate size alcohol slug of sufficient concentration for efficient PCE mass recovery.

  15. Effects of water in film boiling over liquid metal melts

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.; Finfrock, C.; Burson, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    Liquid-liquid boiling experiments have been performed with H/sub 2/O and liquid metal melts in the 100-series test matrix (Runs 121, 126, 127) and the VE test matrix. Some of the pre-explosion unstable film boiling data as well as observations from the explosive series have been previously reported.

  16. Solar-Driven Liquid-Metal MHD Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohl, F.; Lee, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generator with solar oven as its heat source has potential to produce electric power in space and on Earth at high efficiency. Generator focuses radiation from Sun to heat driving gas that pushes liquid metal past magnetic coil. Power is extracted directly from electric currents set up in conducting liquid. Using solar energy as fuel can save considerable costs and payload weight, compared to previous systems.

  17. Liquid metal actuation-based reversible frequency tunable monopole antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daeyoung; Pierce, Richard G.; Henderson, Rashaunda; Doo, Seok Joo; Yoo, Koangki; Lee, Jeong-Bong

    2014-12-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a reversible resonant frequency tunable antenna based on liquid metal actuation. The antenna is composed of a coplanar waveguide fed monopole stub printed on a copper-clad substrate, and a tunnel-shaped microfluidic channel linked to the printed metal. The gallium-based liquid metal can be injected and withdrawn from the channel in response to an applied air pressure. The gallium-based liquid metal is treated with hydrochloric acid to eliminate the oxide layer, and associated wetting/sticking problems, that arise from exposure to an ambient air environment. Elimination of the oxide layer allows for reliable actuation and repeatable and reversible tuning. By controlling the liquid metal slug on-demand with air pressure, the liquid metal can be readily controllable to connect/disconnect to the monopole antenna so that the physical length of the antenna reversibly tunes. The corresponding reversible resonant frequency changes from 4.9 GHz to 1.1 GHz. The antenna properties based on the liquid metal actuation were characterized by measuring the reflection coefficient and agreed well with simulation results. Additionally, the corresponding time-lapse images of controlling liquid metal in the channel were studied.

  18. Liquid metal actuation by electrical control of interfacial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaker, Collin B.; Dickey, Michael D.

    2016-09-01

    By combining metallic electrical conductivity with low viscosity, liquid metals and liquid metal alloys offer new and exciting opportunities to serve as reconfigurable components of electronic, microfluidic, and electromagnetic devices. Here, we review the physics and applications of techniques that utilize voltage to manipulate the interfacial tension of liquid metals; such techniques include electrocapillarity, continuous electrowetting, electrowetting-on-dielectric, and electrochemistry. These techniques lower the interfacial tension between liquid metals and a surrounding electrolyte by driving charged species (or in the case of electrochemistry, chemical species) to the interface. The techniques are useful for manipulating and actuating liquid metals at sub-mm length scales where interfacial forces dominate. We focus on metals and alloys that are liquid near or below room temperature (mercury, gallium, and gallium-based alloys). The review includes discussion of mercury—despite its toxicity—because it has been utilized in numerous applications and it offers a way of introducing several phenomena without the complications associated with the oxide layer that forms on gallium and its alloys. The review focuses on the advantages, applications, opportunities, challenges, and limitations of utilizing voltage to control interfacial tension as a method to manipulate liquid metals.

  19. Intrinsically Stretchable Biphasic (Solid-Liquid) Thin Metal Films.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Arthur; Michaud, Hadrien O; Gerratt, Aaron P; de Mulatier, Séverine; Lacour, Stéphanie P

    2016-06-01

    Stretchable biphasic conductors are formed by physical vapor deposition of gallium onto an alloying metal film. The properties of the photolithography-compatible thin metal films are highlighted by low sheet resistance (0.5 Ω sq(-1) ) and large stretchability (400%). This novel approach to deposit and pattern liquid metals enables extremely robust, multilayer and soft circuits, sensors, and actuators. PMID:26923313

  20. MHD Effects on Surface Stability and Turbulence in Liquid Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Lauren; Ji, Hantau; Zweben, Stewart

    2000-10-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is a significant element in understanding many phenomena observed in space and laboratory plasmas. MHD models also appropriately describe behaviors of liquid metals. Currently, there are many interests in the utilization of liquid metal in fusion devices; therefore an understanding of MHD physics in liquid metals is imperative. A small experiment has been built to study the MHD effects on turbulence and surface waves in liquid metal. To fully examine the MHD properties, a reference case in hydrodynamics is established using water or Gallium without the presence of the magnetic field or electrical current. An external wave driver with varying frequency and amplitude excites surface waves on the liquid metal. The experimental case using Gallium is run with the presence of the magnetic field and/ or electric pulses. The magnetic field is induced using two magnetic field coils on either side of the liquid metal and the electrical current is induced using electrodes. The measured dispersion relations of the two cases are then compared to the theoretical predictions. Several diagnostics are used in concert to accurately measure the wave characteristics. The surface waves will be recorded visually through a camera and the amplitude and frequency of the waves will be measured using a laser and fiber-optic system. This successful experiment will significantly enhance knowledge of liquid metal wave behavior and therefore aid in the applications of MHD in fusion plasmas. This worked was conducted as part of the DOE-sponsored National Undergraduate Fellowship Program in Plasma Physics

  1. Hydrogenation of coal liquid utilizing a metal carbonyl catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Feder, Harold M.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    1979-01-01

    Coal liquid having a dissolved transition metal, catalyst as a carbonyl complex such as Co.sub.2 (CO.sub.8) is hydrogenated with hydrogen gas or a hydrogen donor. A dissociating solvent contacts the coal liquid during hydrogenation to form an immiscible liquid mixture at a high carbon monoxide pressure. The dissociating solvent, e.g. ethylene glycol, is of moderate coordinating ability, while sufficiently polar to solvate the transition metal as a complex cation along with a transition metal, carbonyl anion in solution at a decreased carbon monoxide pressure. The carbon monoxide pressure is reduced and the liquids are separated to recover the hydrogenated coal liquid as product. The dissociating solvent with the catalyst in ionized form is recycled to the hydrogenation step at the elevated carbon monoxide pressure for reforming the catalyst complex within fresh coal liquid.

  2. Structural disorder in metallic glass-forming liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Shao-Peng; Feng, Shi-Dong; Wang, Li-Min; Qiao, Jun-Wei; Niu, Xiao-Feng; Dong, Bang-Shao; Wang, Wei-Min; Qin, Jing-Yu

    2016-06-01

    We investigated structural disorder by a new structural parameter, quasi-nearest atom (QNA), in atomistic configurations of eight metallic glass-forming systems generated through molecular dynamics simulations at various temperatures. Structural analysis reveals that the scaled distribution of the number of QNA appears to be an universal property of metallic liquids and the spatial distribution of the number of QNA displays to be clearly heterogeneous. Furthermore, the new parameter can be directly correlated with potential energy and structural relaxation at the atomic level. Some straightforward relationships between QNA and other properties (per-atom potential energy and α-relaxation time) are introduced to reflect structure-property relationship in metallic liquids. We believe that the new structural parameter can well reflect structure disorder in metallic liquids and play an important role in understanding various properties in metallic liquids.

  3. Structural disorder in metallic glass-forming liquids

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Shao-Peng; Feng, Shi-Dong; Wang, Li-Min; Qiao, Jun-Wei; Niu, Xiao-Feng; Dong, Bang-Shao; Wang, Wei-Min; Qin, Jing-Yu

    2016-01-01

    We investigated structural disorder by a new structural parameter, quasi-nearest atom (QNA), in atomistic configurations of eight metallic glass-forming systems generated through molecular dynamics simulations at various temperatures. Structural analysis reveals that the scaled distribution of the number of QNA appears to be an universal property of metallic liquids and the spatial distribution of the number of QNA displays to be clearly heterogeneous. Furthermore, the new parameter can be directly correlated with potential energy and structural relaxation at the atomic level. Some straightforward relationships between QNA and other properties (per-atom potential energy and α-relaxation time) are introduced to reflect structure-property relationship in metallic liquids. We believe that the new structural parameter can well reflect structure disorder in metallic liquids and play an important role in understanding various properties in metallic liquids. PMID:27278113

  4. Structural disorder in metallic glass-forming liquids.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shao-Peng; Feng, Shi-Dong; Wang, Li-Min; Qiao, Jun-Wei; Niu, Xiao-Feng; Dong, Bang-Shao; Wang, Wei-Min; Qin, Jing-Yu

    2016-01-01

    We investigated structural disorder by a new structural parameter, quasi-nearest atom (QNA), in atomistic configurations of eight metallic glass-forming systems generated through molecular dynamics simulations at various temperatures. Structural analysis reveals that the scaled distribution of the number of QNA appears to be an universal property of metallic liquids and the spatial distribution of the number of QNA displays to be clearly heterogeneous. Furthermore, the new parameter can be directly correlated with potential energy and structural relaxation at the atomic level. Some straightforward relationships between QNA and other properties (per-atom potential energy and α-relaxation time) are introduced to reflect structure-property relationship in metallic liquids. We believe that the new structural parameter can well reflect structure disorder in metallic liquids and play an important role in understanding various properties in metallic liquids. PMID:27278113

  5. Dynamo theory and liquid metal MHD experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lielausis, O.

    1994-06-01

    High values of magnetic Reynolds number Rm are characteristic not only to astrophysics, but also to other interesting objects, including liquid metal (LM) flows. LM experiments have been performed illustrating important predictions of the dynamo theory, for example, about the existence and features of the alpha effect. Consideration of so called 'laminar' dynamos provides a theoretical base for direct experimental realization and examination of the dynamo process. First step results, gathered a subcritical conditions, confirm the statement that self-excitation in LM experiments can be achieved practically today. In such devices as LM (sodium) cooled fast breeders Rm can reach values of up to 50 and specific MHD phenomena have been observed in operating fast reactors. Cautions against crisis like processes have been expressed. It is important for the dynamo theory to understand what kind of perturbed motion is able to coexist with the generated magnetic field. Fundamentally new ideas here are issuing from the theory of 2D MHD turbulence. LM MHD served for the first direct proves, confirming, that the predicted surprising features of 2D turbulence can be observed in reality. It is worth incorporating these already not new ideas in the dynamo theory. In such a way a field for new solutions could be established.

  6. Apparatus and method for increasing the diameter of metal alloy wires within a molten metal pool

    DOEpatents

    Hartman, Alan D.; Argetsinger, Edward R.; Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Paige, Jack I.; King, Paul E.; Turner, Paul C.

    2002-01-29

    In a dip forming process the core material to be coated is introduced directly into a source block of coating material eliminating the need for a bushing entrance component. The process containment vessel or crucible is heated so that only a portion of the coating material becomes molten, leaving a solid portion of material as the entrance port of, and seal around, the core material. The crucible can contain molten and solid metals and is especially useful when coating core material with reactive metals. The source block of coating material has been machined to include a close tolerance hole of a size and shape to closely fit the core material. The core material moves first through the solid portion of the source block of coating material where the close tolerance hole has been machined, then through a solid/molten interface, and finally through the molten phase where the diameter of the core material is increased. The crucible may or may not require water-cooling depending upon the type of material used in crucible construction. The system may operate under vacuum, partial vacuum, atmospheric pressure, or positive pressure depending upon the type of source material being used.

  7. Apparatus and Method for Increasing the Diameter of Metal Alloy Wires Within a Molten Metal Pool

    DOEpatents

    Hartman, Alan D.; Argetsinger, Edward R.; Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Paige, Jack I.; King, Paul E.; Turner, Paul C.

    2002-01-29

    In a dip forming process the core material to be coated is introduced directly into a source block of coating material eliminating the need for a bushing entrance component. The process containment vessel or crucible is heated so that only a portion of the coating material becomes molten, leaving a solid portion of material as the entrance port of, and seal around, the core material. The crucible can contain molten and solid metals and is especially useful when coating core material with reactive metals. The source block of coating material has been machined to include a close tolerance hole of a size and shape to closely fit the core material. The core material moves first through the solid portion of the source block of coating material where the close tolerance hole has been machined, then through a solid/molten interface, and finally through the molten phase where the diameter of the core material is increased. The crucible may or may not require water-cooling depending upon the type of material used in crucible construction. The system may operate under vacuum, partial vacuum, atmospheric pressure, or positive pressure depending upon the type of source material being used.

  8. Visualization study of nucleate pool boiling of liquid nitrogen with quasi-steady heat input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaobin; Chen, Jianye; Xiong, Wei; Jin, Tao

    2015-12-01

    A visualization experimental device has been built to investigate the bubble behaviors in the nucleate pool boiling of cryogenic fluids at atmospheric pressure. The general morphologies of the bubbles are analyzed based on the captured films using a high-speed camera. The bubble behaviors leaving the wall at different heat flux can be divided into three regimes (low heat flux regime, fully developed nucleate boiling regime and intermediate regime) according to the availability of bubble parameters. In the low heat flux regime, the bubble is discrete and the interactive effects are ignorable. In the fully developed nucleate boiling regime close to CHF, the bubbles depart in the form of bubble cluster with a neck. In the intermediate regime, the interactive effect between the bubbles is significant and the bubbles follow a random pattern neither discretely nor as cluster neck. The information about the bubble departure diameter, the detachment frequency and the number density of activated sites are specially investigated. These data are used to evaluate the existing semi-empirical correlations widely applied to either the room-temperature or cryogenic fluids. It is found that the Kim's correlation for the departure diameter predicts a satisfactory agreement with the experimental results in the isolated bubble regime. For the predictions of the detachment frequency, the correlation by Katto and Yokoya is recommended after comparison. The relation between the diameter and frequency can also be well determined by the correlation proposed by Mcfadden et al. The number density of active sites for liquid nitrogen still can be considered to be linearly proportional to ΔTm as it is for water, except that the exponent absolute m is much smaller.

  9. Liquid metal folding patterns induced by electric capillary force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2016-04-01

    A fundamental phenomenon regarding spontaneous formation of symmetrical folding patterns induced on liquid metal free surface with circular shape features was disclosed. The occurrence and evolution processes of the patterns were demonstrated and interpreted. The electric capillary force imposed on liquid metal due to surface tension gradient was found responsible for producing a variety of surface folding patterns like wheel-shape, dual concentric ring-shape, and so on. All the patterns display a property of axial symmetry and could be analogue to the Rayleigh-Benard convection which produces hexagonal patterns. This finding on liquid metal flow folding refreshes knowledge of classical fluid kinematics.

  10. Liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic (LMMHD) converter for space power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemany, A.; Marty, Ph.; Thibault, J. P.

    The liquid metal MHD or (Faraday) Converter is a conversion system which allows the production of electricity from thermal energy without any moving solid part. Then, such a system is very attractive in space where a long lifetime is required. The basic principle of the process is the expansion of a gas to accelerate a high-temperature liquid metal in an MHD generator where this liquid metal interacts with a magnetic field to produce electricity. By using an inductive generator the electric current can be delivered directly on the alternative form with adjustable voltage and frequency.

  11. Thermal behaviors of liquid La-based bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D. W.; Wang, X. D. E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn; Lou, H. B.; Cao, Q. P.; Jiang, J. Z. E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn; Wang, L. W.; Zhang, D. X.

    2014-12-14

    Thermal behaviors of liquid La-based bulk metallic glasses have been measured by using the dilatometer with a self-sealed sample cell. It is demonstrated that the strong glass forming liquid not only has the small thermal expansion coefficient but also shows the slow variation rate. Moreover, the strong glass former has relatively dense atomic packing and also small density change in the liquid state. The results suggest that the high glass forming ability of La-based metallic glasses would be closely related to the slow atomic rearrangements in liquid melts.

  12. Thermal behaviors of liquid La-based bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D. W.; Wang, X. D.; Lou, H. B.; Cao, Q. P.; Wang, L. W.; Zhang, D. X.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2014-12-01

    Thermal behaviors of liquid La-based bulk metallic glasses have been measured by using the dilatometer with a self-sealed sample cell. It is demonstrated that the strong glass forming liquid not only has the small thermal expansion coefficient but also shows the slow variation rate. Moreover, the strong glass former has relatively dense atomic packing and also small density change in the liquid state. The results suggest that the high glass forming ability of La-based metallic glasses would be closely related to the slow atomic rearrangements in liquid melts.

  13. Structural crossover in a supercooled metallic liquid and the link to a liquid-to-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, S.; Blodgett, M.; Kelton, K. F.; Ma, J. L.; Fan, J.; Wang, X.-L.

    2016-05-01

    Time-resolved synchrotron measurements were carried out to capture the structure evolution of an electrostatically levitated metallic-glass-forming liquid during free cooling. The experimental data shows a crossover in the liquid structure at ˜1000 K, about 115 K below the melting temperature and 150 K above the crystallization temperature. The structure change is characterized by a dramatic growth in the extended-range order below the crossover temperature. Molecular dynamics simulations have identified that the growth of the extended-range order was due to an increased correlation between solute atoms. These results provide structural evidence for a liquid-to-liquid-phase-transition in the supercooled metallic liquid.

  14. Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor for Space Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitzberg, Abraham

    2003-01-01

    The conceptual design is for a liquid metal (LM) cooled nuclear reactor that would provide heat to a closed Brayton cycle (CBC) power conversion subsystem to provide electricity for electric propulsion thrusters and spacecraft power. The baseline power level is 100 kWe to the user. For long term power generation, UN pin fuel with Nb1Zr alloy cladding was selected. As part of the SP-100 Program this fuel demonstrated lifetime with greater than six atom percent burnup, at temperatures in the range of 1400-1500 K. The CBC subsystem was selected because of the performance and lifetime database from commercial and aircraft applications and from prior NASA and DOE space programs. The high efficiency of the CBC also allows the reactor to operate at relatively low power levels over its 15-year life, minimizing the long-term power density and temperature of the fuel. The scope of this paper is limited to only the nuclear components that provide heated helium-xenon gas to the CBC subsystem. The principal challenge for the LM reactor concept was to design the reactor core, shield and primary heat transport subsystems to meet mission requirements in a low mass configuration. The LM concept design approach was to assemble components from prior programs and, with minimum change, determine if the system met the objective of the study. All of the components are based on technologies having substantial data bases. Nuclear, thermalhydraulic, stress, and shielding analyses were performed using available computer codes. Neutronics issues included maintaining adequate operating and shutdown reactivities, even under accident conditions. Thermalhydraulic and stress analyses calculated fuel and material temperatures, coolant flows and temperatures, and thermal stresses in the fuel pins, components and structures. Using conservative design assumptions and practices, consistent with the detailed design work performed during the SP-100 Program, the mass of the reactor, shield, primary heat

  15. Liquid metal heat sink for high-power laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrovec, John; Litt, Amardeep S.; Copeland, Drew A.; Junghans, Jeremy; Durkee, Roger

    2013-02-01

    We report on the development of a novel, ultra-low thermal resistance active heat sink (AHS) for thermal management of high-power laser diodes (HPLD) and other electronic and photonic components. AHS uses a liquid metal coolant flowing at high speed in a miniature closed and sealed loop. The liquid metal coolant receives waste heat from an HPLD at high flux and transfers it at much reduced flux to environment, primary coolant fluid, heat pipe, or structure. Liquid metal flow is maintained electromagnetically without any moving parts. Velocity of liquid metal flow can be controlled electronically, thus allowing for temperature control of HPLD wavelength. This feature also enables operation at a stable wavelength over a broad range of ambient conditions. Results from testing an HPLD cooled by AHS are presented.

  16. The effect of solid metal composition on solid metal/ liquid metal partitioning of trace elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, N.; van Westrenen, W.

    2010-12-01

    Fundamental understanding of the partitioning behaviour of elements between different core and/or mantle phases is needed to constrain processes of planetary differentiation and evolution. The partitioning behaviour of elements between solid metal and liquid metal in the Fe-S system, of relevance to core crystallisation in planetesimals and the terrestrial planets, has been investigated by several workers [1-6], most of whom [1-5] conclude that variations in partition coefficients can be explained by variations in melt composition. However, recently Stewart et al. [6] showed that the crystal-lattice strain model commonly used to describe silicate mineral - silicate melt partitioning can be applied to partially molten metallic systems. This suggests the structure of the solid metal also plays a role in determining solid metal / molten metal partitioning. Here, we investigate the effect of the structure of the solid metal in the Fe-S system on solid/liquid metal partitioning by obtaining new element partitioning data at pressures between 0.5 and 3 GPa. The effect of the solid metal is isolated from pressure-temperature-melt composition effects by performing experiments at constant P and T with two Fe-S bulk compositions on either side of the eutectic composition. In addition to the effect of solid metal composition we investigate the effects of pressure and S content on trace element partitioning behaviour and the application of the lattice strain model to our results. Starting mixtures were doped with several hundred ppm levels of trace elements Ni, Co, W, Mo, V, Nb, Ta, Sn, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Mn, P, Ge,. Experiments were performed using a QUICKPress piston cylinder apparatus at the VU University, Amsterdam using alumina capsules. Experiments were heated to 1073 K at pressure and allowed to sinter for a duration of 10 hours before the temperature was raised at a rate of 50 K / min to the target value. Preliminary EPMA data for a 1 GPa experiment with FeS as the solid

  17. Self-expandable metal stents for malignant gastric outlet obstruction: A pooled analysis of prospective literature

    PubMed Central

    van Halsema, Emo E; Rauws, Erik AJ; Fockens, Paul; van Hooft, Jeanin E

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To provide an overview of the clinical outcomes of self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement for malignant gastric outlet obstruction (MGOO). METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed of the literature published between January 2009 and March 2015. Only prospective studies that reported on the clinical success of stent placement for MGOO were included. The primary endpoint was clinical success, defined according to the definition used in the original article. Data were pooled and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Subgroup analyses were performed for partially covered SEMSs (PCSEMSs) and uncovered SEMSs (UCSEMSs) using Fisher’s exact test. RESULTS: A total of 19 studies, including 1281 patients, were included in the final analysis. Gastric (42%) and pancreatic (37%) cancer were the main causes of MGOO. UCSEMSs were used in 76% of patients and PCSEMSs in 24%. The overall pooled technical success rate was 97.3% and the clinical success rate was 85.7%. Stent dysfunction occurred in 19.6% of patients, mainly caused by re-obstruction (12.6%) and stent migration (4.3%), and was comparable between PCSEMSs and UCSEMSs (21.2% vs 19.1%, respectively, P = 0.412). Re-obstruction was more common with UCSEMSs (14.9% vs 5.1%, P < 0.001) and stent migration was more frequent after PCSEMS placement (10.9% vs 2.2%, P < 0.001). The overall perforation rate was 1.2%. Bleeding was reported in 4.1% of patients, including major bleeding in 0.8%. The median stent patency ranged from 68 to 307 d in five studies. The median overall survival ranged from 49 to 183 d in 13 studies. CONCLUSION: The clinical outcomes in this large population showed that enteral stent placement was feasible, effective and safe. Therefore, stent placement is a valid treatment option for the palliation of MGOO. PMID:26604654

  18. Migration of carbon nanotubes from liquid phase to vapor phase in the refrigerant-based nanofluid pool boiling

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The migration characteristics of carbon nanotubes from liquid phase to vapor phase in the refrigerant-based nanofluid pool boiling were investigated experimentally. Four types of carbon nanotubes with the outside diameters from 15 to 80 nm and the lengths from 1.5 to 10 μm were used in the experiments. The refrigerants include R113, R141b and n-pentane. The oil concentration is from 0 to 10 wt.%, the heat flux is from 10 to 100 kW·m-2, and the initial liquid-level height is from 1.3 to 3.4 cm. The experimental results indicate that the migration ratio of carbon nanotube increases with the increase of the outside diameter or the length of carbon nanotube. For the fixed type of carbon nanotube, the migration ratio decreases with the increase of the oil concentration or the heat flux, and increases with the increase of the initial liquid-level height. The migration ratio of carbon nanotube increases with the decrease of dynamic viscosity of refrigerant or the increase of liquid phase density of refrigerant. A model for predicting the migration ratio of carbon nanotubes in the refrigerant-based nanofluid pool boiling is proposed, and the predictions agree with 92% of the experimental data within a deviation of ±20%. PMID:21711730

  19. Migration of carbon nanotubes from liquid phase to vapor phase in the refrigerant-based nanofluid pool boiling.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hao; Ding, Guoliang; Hu, Haitao

    2011-01-01

    The migration characteristics of carbon nanotubes from liquid phase to vapor phase in the refrigerant-based nanofluid pool boiling were investigated experimentally. Four types of carbon nanotubes with the outside diameters from 15 to 80 nm and the lengths from 1.5 to 10 μm were used in the experiments. The refrigerants include R113, R141b and n-pentane. The oil concentration is from 0 to 10 wt.%, the heat flux is from 10 to 100 kW·m-2, and the initial liquid-level height is from 1.3 to 3.4 cm. The experimental results indicate that the migration ratio of carbon nanotube increases with the increase of the outside diameter or the length of carbon nanotube. For the fixed type of carbon nanotube, the migration ratio decreases with the increase of the oil concentration or the heat flux, and increases with the increase of the initial liquid-level height. The migration ratio of carbon nanotube increases with the decrease of dynamic viscosity of refrigerant or the increase of liquid phase density of refrigerant. A model for predicting the migration ratio of carbon nanotubes in the refrigerant-based nanofluid pool boiling is proposed, and the predictions agree with 92% of the experimental data within a deviation of ±20%. PMID:21711730

  20. Investigation of a liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic power system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.; Hays, L. G.; Cerini, D. J.; Bogdanoff, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    Liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic power conversion is being investigated for nuclear-electric propulsion. A liquid-metal MHD converter has no moving mechanical parts and requires a heat source temperature of only 1300 K. Cycle efficiencies of 5% to 8% for single-stage converters and 10% for multistage converters appear attainable. The specific weight of a 240 kWe MHD power plant has been estimated as 30 kg/kWe with shielding for unmanned science missions.

  1. Analysis of liquid metal embrittlement from a bond energy viewpoint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. J.; Stoloff, N. S.

    1975-01-01

    Absorption induced embrittlement of solid metals by certain liquid metals is analyzed through an Engel-Brewer calculation of the solid-liquid interaction energy, and of the effect of the latter in reducing fracture surface energy. The reduction in fracture surface energy is estimated by comparison of the electronic contribution to the solid-liquid interaction energy with solid-solid bond energy for some 40 liquid-solid couples. Regular solution theory is used to estimate mutual solubility as the relative difference in parameter values. Embrittlement can be predicted by using reduction in fracture surface energy and solubility parameter difference as critical variables. The effect of solute additions to the liquid on the degree of embrittlement is interpreted via the same two variables; the principal effect of solutes is to modify solubility relationships at the solid-liquid interface.

  2. Glass-to-Metal Seal Against Liquid Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, John L.; Gatewood, John R.

    1987-01-01

    Simple compression joint with indium gasket forms demountable seal for superfluids. Seal developed for metal lid on glass jar used in experiments on liquid helium. Glass container allows contents to be viewed for such purposes as calibration of liquid-level detectors and adjustments of displacement plungers. Seal contains liquid helium even when temperature drops below 2.19K. Made from inexpensive, commercially available materials and parts.

  3. Orthogonal metals: The simplest non-Fermi liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandkishore, Rahul; Metlitski, Max A.; Senthil, T.

    2012-07-01

    We present a fractionalized metallic phase which is indistinguishable from the Fermi liquid in conductivity and thermodynamics, but is sharply distinct in one-electron properties, such as the electron spectral function. We dub this phase the “orthogonal metal.” The orthogonal metal and the transition to it from the Fermi liquid are naturally described using a slave-particle representation wherein the electron is expressed as a product of a fermion and a slave Ising spin. We emphasize that when the slave spins are disordered, the result is not a Mott insulator (as erroneously assumed in the prior literature), but rather the orthogonal metal. We construct prototypical ground-state wave functions for the orthogonal metal by modifying the Jastrow factor of Slater-Jastrow wave functions that describe ordinary Fermi liquids. We further demonstrate that the transition from the Fermi liquid to the orthogonal metal can, in some circumstances, provide a simple example of a continuous destruction of a Fermi surface with a critical Fermi surface appearing right at the critical point. We present exactly soluble models that realize an orthogonal metal phase, and the phase transition to the Fermi liquid. These models thus provide valuable solvable examples for phase transitions associated with the death of a Fermi surface.

  4. Effects of surface active elements on weld pool fluid flow and weld penetration in gas metal arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Tsai, H. L.

    2001-06-01

    This article presents a mathematical model simulating the effects of surface tension (Maragoni effect) on weld pool fluid flow and weld penetration in spot gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Filler droplets driven by gravity, electromagnetic force, and plasma arc drag force, carrying mass, thermal energy, and momentum, periodically impinge onto the weld pool. Complicated fluid flow in the weld pool is influenced by the droplet impinging momentum, electromagnetic force, and natural convection due to temperature and concentration gradients, and by surface tension, which is a function of both temperature and concentration of a surface active element (sulfur in the present study). Although the droplet impinging momentum creates a complex fluid flow near the weld pool surface, the momentum is damped out by an “up-and-down” fluid motion. A numerical study has shown that, depending upon the droplet’s sulfur content, which is different from that in the base metal, an inward or outward surface flow of the weld pool may be created, leading to deep or shallow weld penetration. In other words, it is primarily the Marangoni effect that contributes to weld penetration in spot GMAW.

  5. The formation of metal/metal-matrix nano-composites by the ultrasonic dispersion of immiscible liquid metals

    SciTech Connect

    Keppens, V.M.; Mandrus, D.; Boatner, L.A.; Rankin, J.

    1996-12-01

    Ultrasonic energy has been used to disperse one liquid metallic component in a second immiscible liquid metal, thereby producing a metallic emulsion. Upon lowering the temperature of this emulsion below the mp of the lowest-melting constituent, a metal/metal-matrix composite is formed. This composite consists of sub-micron-to-micron- sized particles of the minor metallic phase that are embedded in a matrix consisting of the major metallic phase. Zinc-bismuth was used as a model system, and ultrasonic dispersion of a minor Bi liquid phase was used to synthesize metal/metal-matrix composites. These materials were characterized using SEM and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis.

  6. REMOVAL OF CERTAIN FISSION PRODUCT METALS FROM LIQUID BISMUTH COMPOSITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Dwyer, O.E.; Howe, H.E.; Avrutik, E.R.

    1959-11-24

    A method is described for purifying a solution of urarium in liquid bismuth containing at least one metal from the group consisting of selenium, tellurium, palladium, ruthenium, rhodium, niobium, and zirconium. The solution is contacted with zinc in an inert atmosphere to form a homogeneous melt, a solid zinc phase is formed, and the zinc phase containing the metal is separated from the melt.

  7. Dewetting Properties of Metallic Liquid Film on Nanopillared Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiongying; He, Yezeng; Wang, Yong; Dong, Jichen; Li, Hui

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report simulation evidence that the graphene surface decorated by carbon nanotube pillars shows strong dewettability, which can give it great advantages in dewetting and detaching metallic nanodroplets on the surfaces. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show that the ultrathin liquid film first contracts then detaches from the graphene on a time scale of several nanoseconds, as a result of the inertial effect. The detaching velocity is in the order of 10 m/s for the droplet with radii smaller than 50 nm. Moreover, the contracting and detaching behaviors of the liquid film can be effectively controlled by tuning the geometric parameters of the liquid film or pillar. In addition, the temperature effects on the dewetting and detaching of the metallic liquid film are also discussed. Our results show that one can exploit and effectively control the dewetting properties of metallic nanodroplets by decorating the surfaces with nanotube pillars. PMID:24487279

  8. The emissivities of liquid metals at their fusion temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnell, D. W.; Treverton, J. A.; Valerga, A. J.; Margrave, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    A survey of the literature through 1969 shows an almost total lack of experimental emissivity data for metals in the liquid state. The emissivities for several transition metals and various other metals and compounds in the liquid state at their fusion temperatures have been determined. The technique used involves electromagnetic levitation-induction heating of the materials in an inert atmosphere. The brightness temperature of the liquid phase of the material is measured as the material is heated through fusion. Given a reliable value of the fusion temperature, which is available for most pure substances, one may readily calculate an emissivity for the liquid phase at the fusion temperatures. Even in cases where melting points are poorly known, the brightness temperatures are unique parameters, independent of the temperature scale and measured for a chemically defined system at a fixed point. Better emissivities may be recalculated as better melting point data become available.

  9. Condensation enhancement on a pool surface caused by a submerged liquid jet

    SciTech Connect

    Shumway, R.W.

    1997-05-01

    One advanced nuclear reactor design has a residual heat removal (RHR) pipe connected to the bottom of a steam generator outlet plenum. The water in the plenum can become thermally stratified during postulated loss of coolant accidents. Cold water injected through the RHR pipe has the potential effect of increasing the steam condensation on the pool surface due to the stirring action of the jet. The amount of increase depends on a number of factors, including the jet velocity and the pool height above the jet injection point. Prediction of steam condensation rates, before and after the jet breaks the pool surface, is the topic of this paper. Data and correlations exist for pre surface breakthrough and a method has been developed for post breakthrough. The models have been incorporated into the reactor safety analysis computer software known as RELAP5. Comparisons of predictions against data are presented.

  10. Impregnated-electrode-type liquid metal ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, J.; Gotoh, Y.; Tsuji, H.; Takagi, T.

    We have developed an impregnated-electrode-type liquid metal ion source whose tip is a sintered-porous structure made of a refractory metal such as tungsten. By this structure the ratio of the liquid metal surface area facing the vacuum to the volume is low, which decreases useless metal evaporation from the surface. The maximum vapour pressure of the metal in operation for this ion source is 10 -1-10 0 Torr, which is 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than that for the needle type. Therefore, useful metal ions such as Ga +, Au +, Ag +, In +, Si 2+, Ge 2+, and Sb 2+ can be extracted from single element metals or alloys. The porous structure of the tip has also an effect on the positive control of the liquid metal flow rate to the tip head. Thus, a stable operation with a high current of a few hundreds of μA can be obtained together with a low current high brightness ion beam. Therefore, this ion source is suitable not only for microfocusing but also for a general use as a metal ion source.

  11. Emerging Applications of Liquid Metals Featuring Surface Oxides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Gallium and several of its alloys are liquid metals at or near room temperature. Gallium has low toxicity, essentially no vapor pressure, and a low viscosity. Despite these desirable properties, applications calling for liquid metal often use toxic mercury because gallium forms a thin oxide layer on its surface. The oxide interferes with electrochemical measurements, alters the physicochemical properties of the surface, and changes the fluid dynamic behavior of the metal in a way that has, until recently, been considered a nuisance. Here, we show that this solid oxide “skin” enables many new applications for liquid metals including soft electrodes and sensors, functional microcomponents for microfluidic devices, self-healing circuits, shape-reconfigurable conductors, and stretchable antennas, wires, and interconnects. PMID:25283244

  12. Investigating Free-surface, MHD Instabilities in Liquid Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumfiel, Geoff; Ji, Hantao; Zweben, Stewart

    1999-11-01

    The addition of the Lorentz force (j × B) to MHD fluids, such as liquid metals, could introduce new instabilities to free-surface motions. An experiment is under development at PPPL that will contribute to the understanding of these instabilities. This experiment is designed to explore how instabilities form and propagate on the surface of liquid metals. Metals with low melting points and reasonable conductive properties (such as Ga) are melted in an eight inch, square Pyrex container. The container is placed in a large magnetic field (up to 5 kG) and a perpendicular current is set up in the metal. Waves are generated using a simple wave driving apparatus. A one dimensional, diode camera is used to monitor wave propagation perpendicular to the B-field. Initial results will be presented and discussed. This experiment will provide information that could eventually be used to better control free-surface motions in liquid Li walls in fusion reactors.

  13. Compatibility of materials with liquid metal targets for SNS

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; Pawel, S.J.; DeVan, J.H.

    1996-06-01

    Several heavy liquid metals are candidates as the target in a spallation neutron source: Hg, Pb, Bi, and Pb-Bi eutectic. Systems with these liquid metals have been used in the past and a data-base on compatibility already exists. Two major compatibility issues have been identified when selecting a container material for these liquid metals: temperature gradient mass transfer and liquid metal embrittlement or LME. Temperature gradient mass transfer refers to dissolution of material from the high temperature portions of a system and its deposition in the lower temperature areas. Solution and deposition rate constants along with temperature, {Delta}T, and velocity are usually the most important parameters. For most candidate materials mass transfer corrosion has been found to be proportionately worse in Bi compared with Hg and Pb. For temperatures to {approx}550{degrees}C, ferritic/martensitic steels have been satisfactory in Pb or Hg systems and the maximum temperature can be extended to {approx}650{degrees}C with additions of inhibitors to the liquid metal, e.g. Mg, Ti, Zr. Above {approx}600{degrees}C, austenitic stainless steels have been reported to be unsatisfactory, largely because of the mass transfer of nickel. Blockage of flow from deposition of material is usually the life-limiting effect of this type of corrosion. However, mass transfer corrosion at lower temperatures has not been studied. At low temperatures (usually < 150{degrees}C), LME has been reported for some liquid metal/container alloy combinations. Liquid metal embrittlement, like hydrogen embrittlement, results in brittle fracture of a normally ductile material.

  14. ISOLATION OF RADIOACTIVE METALS FROM LIQUID WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metals are present in many waste streams, and pose challenges with regard to their disposal. Release of metals into the environment presents both human health and ecological concerns. As a result, efforts are directed at reducing their toxicity, bioavailability, and environment...

  15. Consequences of pipe ruptures in metal fueled, liquid metal cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, F.E.

    1990-01-01

    The capability to simulate pipe ruptures has recently been added to the SASSYS-1 LMR systems analysis code. Using this capability, the consequences of severe pipe ruptures in both loop-type and pool-type reactors using metal fuel were investigated. With metal fuel, if the control rods scram then either type of reactor can easily survive a complete double-ended break of a single pipe; although, as might be expected, the consequences are less severe for a pool-type reactor. A pool-type reactor can even survive a protected simultaneous breaking of all of its inlet pipes without boiling of the coolant or melting of the fuel or cladding. 2 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Heat Transfer Performances of Pool Boiling on Metal-Graphite Composite Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.; Yang, Wen-Jei

    2000-01-01

    Nucleate boiling, especially near the critical heat flux (CHF), can provide excellent economy along with high efficiency of heat transfer. However, the performance of nucleate boiling may deteriorate in a reduced gravity environment and the nucleate boiling usually has a potentially dangerous characteristic in CHF regime. That is, any slight overload can result in burnout of the boiling surface because the heat transfer will suddenly move into the film-boiling regime. Therefore, enhancement of nucleate boiling heat transfer becomes more important in reduced gravity environments. Enhancing nucleate boiling and critical heat flux can be reached using micro-configured metal-graphite composites as the boiling surface. Thermocapillary force induced by temperature difference between the graphite-fiber tips and the metal matrix, which is independent of gravity, will play an important role in bubble detachment. Thus boiling heat transfer performance does not deteriorate in a reduced-gravity environment. Based on the existing experimental data, and a two-tier theoretical model, correlation formulas are derived for nucleate boiling on the copper-graphite and aluminum-graphite composite surfaces, in both the isolated and coalesced bubble regimes. Experimental studies were performed on nucleate pool boiling of pentane on cooper-graphite (Cu-Gr) and aluminum-graphite (Al-Gr) composite surfaces with various fiber volume concentrations for heat fluxes up to 35 W per square centimeter. It is revealed that a significant enhancement in boiling heat transfer performance on the composite surfaces is achieved, due to the presence of micro-graphite fibers embedded in the matrix. The onset of nucleate boiling (the isolated bubble regime) occurs at wall superheat of about 10 C for the Cu-Gr surface and 15 C for the Al-Gr surface, much lower than their respective pure metal surfaces. Transition from an isolated bubble regime to a coalesced bubble regime in boiling occurs at a superheat of

  17. Two-component Fermi-liquid theory - Equilibrium properties of liquid metallic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva, J.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1981-01-01

    It is reported that the transition of condensed hydrogen from an insulating molecular crystal phase to a metallic liquid phase, at zero temperature and high pressure, appears possible. Liquid metallic hydrogen (LMH), comprising interpenetrating proton and electron fluids, would constitute a two-component Fermi liquid with both a very high component-mass ratio and long-range, species-dependent bare interactions. The low-temperature equilibrium properties of LMH are examined by means of a generalization to the case of two components of the phenomenological Landau Fermi-liquid theory, and the low-temperature specific heat, compressibility, thermal expansion coefficient and spin susceptibility are given. It is found that the specific heat and the thermal expansion coefficient are vastly greater in the liquid than in the corresponding solid, due to the presence of proton quasiparticle excitations in the liquid.

  18. Liquid Galvanic Coatings for Protection of Imbedded Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDowell, Louis G. (Inventor); Curran, Joseph J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Coating compositions and methods of their use are described herein for the reduction of corrosion in imbedded metal structures. The coatings are applied as liquids to an external surface of a substrate in which the metal structures are imbedded. The coatings are subsequently allowed to dry. The liquid applied coatings provide galvanic protection to the imbedded metal structures. Continued protection can be maintained with periodic reapplication of the coating compositions, as necessary, to maintain electrical continuity. Because the coatings may be applied using methods similar to standard paints, and because the coatings are applied to external surfaces of the substrates in which the metal structures are imbedded, the corresponding corrosion protection may be easily maintained. The coating compositions are particularly useful in the protection of metal-reinforced concrete.

  19. Separation of metals by supported liquid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Takigawa, D.Y.

    1990-12-31

    A supported liquid membrane system for the separation of a preselected chemical species within a feedstream, preferably an aqueous feedstream, includes a feed compartment containing a feed solution having at least one preselected chemical species therein, a stripping compartment containing a stripping solution therein, and a microporous polybenzimidazole membrane situated between the compartments, the microporous polybenzimidazole membrane containing an extractant mixture selective for the preselected chemical species within the membrane pores is disclosed along with a method of separating preselected chemical species from a feedstream with such a system, and a supported liquid membrane for use in such a system.

  20. Separation of metals by supported liquid membrane

    DOEpatents

    Takigawa, Doreen Y.

    1992-01-01

    A supported liquid membrane system for the separation of a preselected chemical species within a feedstream, preferably an aqueous feedstream, includes a feed compartment containing a feed solution having at least one preselected chemical species therein, a stripping compartment containing a stripping solution therein, and a microporous polybenzimidazole membrane situated between the compartments, the microporous polybenzimidazole membrane containing an extractant mixture selective for the preselected chemical species within the membrane pores is disclosed along with a method of separating preselected chemical species from a feedstream with such a system, and a supported liquid membrane for use in such a system.

  1. Stretchable Metamaterial Absorber Using Liquid Metal-Filled Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS).

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeongseob; Lee, Dongju; Eom, Seunghyun; Lim, Sungjoon

    2016-01-01

    A stretchable metamaterial absorber is proposed in this study. The stretchability was achieved by liquid metal and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). To inject liquid metal, microfluidic channels were fabricated using PDMS powers and microfluidic-channel frames, which were built using a three-dimensional printer. A top conductive pattern and ground plane were designed after considering the easy injection of liquid metal. The proposed metamaterial absorber comprises three layers of PDMS substrate. The top layer is for the top conductive pattern, and the bottom layer is for the meandered ground plane. Flat PDMS layers were inserted between the top and bottom PDMS layers. The measured absorptivity of the fabricated absorber was 97.8% at 18.5 GHz, and the absorption frequency increased from 18.5 to 18.65 GHz as the absorber was stretched from its original length (5.2 cm) to 6.4 cm. PMID:27077861

  2. Temperature-dependent liquid metal flowrate control device

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Roger D.

    1978-01-01

    A temperature-dependent liquid metal flowrate control device includes a magnet and a ferromagnetic member defining therebetween a flow path for liquid metal, the ferromagnetic member being formed of a material having a curie temperature at which a change in the flow rate of the liquid metal is desired. According to the preferred embodiment the magnet is a cylindrical rod magnet axially disposed within a cylindrical member formed of a curie material and having iron pole pieces at the ends. A cylindrical iron shunt and a thin wall stainless steel barrier are disposed in the annulus between magnet and curie material. Below the curie temperature flow between steel barrier and curie material is impeded and above the curie temperature flow impedance is reduced.

  3. Stretchable Metamaterial Absorber Using Liquid Metal-Filled Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyeongseob; Lee, Dongju; Eom, Seunghyun; Lim, Sungjoon

    2016-01-01

    A stretchable metamaterial absorber is proposed in this study. The stretchability was achieved by liquid metal and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). To inject liquid metal, microfluidic channels were fabricated using PDMS powers and microfluidic-channel frames, which were built using a three-dimensional printer. A top conductive pattern and ground plane were designed after considering the easy injection of liquid metal. The proposed metamaterial absorber comprises three layers of PDMS substrate. The top layer is for the top conductive pattern, and the bottom layer is for the meandered ground plane. Flat PDMS layers were inserted between the top and bottom PDMS layers. The measured absorptivity of the fabricated absorber was 97.8% at 18.5 GHz, and the absorption frequency increased from 18.5 to 18.65 GHz as the absorber was stretched from its original length (5.2 cm) to 6.4 cm. PMID:27077861

  4. Review of liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.S.; Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    A survey of space-power related liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos National Laboratory is presented. Heat pipe development at Los Alamos has been on-going since 1963. Heat pipes were initially developed for thermionic nuclear-electrical power production in space. Since then Los Alamos has developed liquid metal heat pipes for numerous applications related to high temperature systems in both the space and terrestrial environments. Some of these applications include thermionic electrical generators, thermoelectric energy conversion (both in-core and direct radiation), thermal energy storage, hypersonic vehicle leading edge cooling, and heat pipe vapor laser cells. Some of the work performed at Los Alamos has been documented in internal reports that are often little-known. A representative description and summary of progress in space-related liquid metal heat pipe technology is provided followed by a reference section citing sources where these works may be found. 53 refs.

  5. Time-dependent calculations of molten pool formation and thermal plasma with metal vapour in gas tungsten arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, M.; Yamamoto, K.; Tashiro, S.; Nakata, K.; Yamamoto, E.; Yamazaki, K.; Suzuki, K.; Murphy, A. B.; Lowke, J. J.

    2010-11-01

    A gas tungsten arc (GTA) was modelled taking into account the contamination of the plasma by metal vapour from the molten anode. The whole region of GTA atmosphere including the tungsten cathode, the arc plasma and the anode was treated using a unified numerical model. A viscosity approximation was used to express the diffusion coefficient in terms of viscosity of the shielding gas and metal vapour. The transient two-dimensional distributions of temperature, velocity of plasma flow and iron vapour concentration were predicted, together with the molten pool as a function of time for a 150 A arc current at atmospheric pressure, both for helium and argon gases. It was shown that the thermal plasma in the GTA was influenced by iron vapour from the molten pool surface and that the concentration of iron vapour in the plasma was dependent on the temperature of the molten pool. GTA on high sulfur stainless steel was calculated to discuss the differences between a low sulfur and a high sulfur stainless steel anode. Helium was selected as the shielding gas because a helium GTA produces more metal vapour than an argon GTA. In the GTA on a high sulfur stainless steel anode, iron vapour and current path were constricted. Radiative emission density in the GTA on high sulfur stainless steel was also concentrated in the centre area of the arc plasma together with the iron vapour although the temperature distributions were almost the same as that in the case of a low sulfur stainless steel anode.

  6. Task-specific ionic liquid for solubilizing metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Nockemann, Peter; Thijs, Ben; Pittois, Stijn; Thoen, Jan; Glorieux, Christ; Van Hecke, Kristof; Van Meervelt, Luc; Kirchner, Barbara; Binnemans, Koen

    2006-10-26

    Protonated betaine bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide is an ionic liquid with the ability to dissolve large quantities of metal oxides. This metal-solubilizing power is selective. Soluble are oxides of the trivalent rare earths, uranium(VI) oxide, zinc(II) oxide, cadmium(II) oxide, mercury(II) oxide, nickel(II) oxide, copper(II) oxide, palladium(II) oxide, lead(II) oxide, manganese(II) oxide, and silver(I) oxide. Insoluble or very poorly soluble are iron(III), manganese(IV), and cobalt oxides, as well as aluminum oxide and silicon dioxide. The metals can be stripped from the ionic liquid by treatment of the ionic liquid with an acidic aqueous solution. After transfer of the metal ions to the aqueous phase, the ionic liquid can be recycled for reuse. Betainium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide forms one phase with water at high temperatures, whereas phase separation occurs below 55.5 degrees C (temperature switch behavior). The mixtures of the ionic liquid with water also show a pH-dependent phase behavior: two phases occur at low pH, whereas one phase is present under neutral or alkaline conditions. The structures, the energetics, and the charge distribution of the betaine cation and the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide anion, as well as the cation-anion pairs, were studied by density functional theory calculations. PMID:17048916

  7. Current collector geometry and mixing in liquid metal electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashour, Rakan; Kelley, Douglas

    2015-11-01

    Liquid metal batteries are emerging as an efficient and cost effective technology for large-scale energy storage on electrical grids. In these batteries, critical performance related factors such as the limiting current density and life cycle are strongly influenced by fluid mixing and transport of electrochemical species to and from the electrode-electrolyte interface. In this work, ultrasound velocimetry is used to investigate the role of negative current collector location on the induced velocity, flow pattern, and mixing time in liquid metal electrodes. Ultrasound velocity measurements are obtained at a range of operating current densities. Furthermore, a comparison between velocity profiles produced by current collectors with different sizes is also presented.

  8. Dynamical Correlation In Some Liquid Alkaline Earth Metals Near Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakore, B. Y.; Suthar, P. H.; Khambholja, S. G.; Gajjar, P. N.; Jani, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    The study of dynamical variables: velocity autocorrelation function (VACF) and power spectrum of liquid alkaline earth metals (Ca, Sr, and Ba) have been presented based on the static harmonic well approximation. The effective interatomic potential for liquid metals is computed using our well recognized model potential with the exchange correlation functions due to Hartree, Taylor, Ichimaru and Utsumi, Farid et al. and Sarkar et al. It is observed that the VACF computed using Sarkar et al. gives the good agreement with available molecular dynamics simulation (MD) results [Phys Rev. B 62, 14818 (2000)]. The shoulder of the power spectrum depends upon the type of local field correlation function used.

  9. Electromagnetically Sustained Liquid Metal Flow for Feedback Stabilization Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirhoseini, Seyyed Mohammad; Volpe, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    Liquid metal walls in fusion reactors, whether nearly static or rapidly flowing, will be subject to instabilities that will make them locally bulge, thus entering in contact with the plasma, or deplete, hence exposing the underlying solid substrate. To prevent this, research has begun at Columbia University to create liquid metal flows and demonstrate their stabilization by electromagnetic forces, adjusted in feedback with thickness measurements. Here we present initial results regarding the sustainment of a flow of Galinstan (a gallium, indium, tin alloy) by a special pump consisting of a ferromagnetic rotor, with permanent magnets mounted on it. The magnetic field is partly ``frozen'' in the liquid metal surrounding the rotor. Therefore, as the field rotates, the liquid metal rotates as well, although with a slip factor. This solution was preferred to conventional pumps, which would enter in electrical contact with the metal flow. The pump, 3D-printed at Columbia, allows to adjust the flow-velocity from few mm/s to several cm/s.

  10. Factors Affecting Liquid-Metal Embrittlement in C-103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclemore, R.; Lampson, F. K.

    1982-01-01

    Results of a study of weld cracks on Space Shuttle control thrustors point toward better understanding of cracking problem in columbium metal, which has also plagued nonaerospace users. Although liquid-metal embrittlement is known to be cause of problem, factors affecting growth and severity of cracks are not well understood. New results tie crack growth to type of contaminants present, grain size and level of stress present while welding is done.

  11. Characteristics of the boat inductor for keeping liquid metal in the suspended state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogel, A. A.; Siforova, T. A.; Mezdrogina, M. M.

    1985-01-01

    Characteristics of the boat inductor for keeping liquid metal in the suspended state are examined. Behavioral features of the liquid metal, and the suspension boundary of liquid metal in the lower position are discussed. It is concluded that the inductor can be used to crystallize metals in the suspended state.

  12. A sliding cell technique for diffusion measurements in liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Yongliang; Zhu, Chunao; Zhang, Bo

    2014-03-01

    The long capillary and shear cell techniques are the usual methods for diffusion measurements in liquid metals. Here we present a new "sliding cell technique" to measure interdiffusion in liquid alloys, which combines the merits of these two methods. Instead of a number of shear cells, as used in the shear cell method, only one sliding cell is designed to separate and join the liquid diffusion samples. Using the sliding cell technique, the influence of the heating process (which affects liquid diffusion measurements in the conventional long capillary method) can be eliminated. Time-dependent diffusion measurements at the same isothermal temperature were carried out in Al-Cu liquids. Compared with the previous results measured by in-situ X-ray radiography, the obtained liquid diffusion coefficient in this work is believed to be influenced by convective flow. The present work further supports the idea that to obtain accurate diffusion constants in liquid metals, the measurement conditions must be well controlled, and there should be no temperature gradients or other disturbances.

  13. A sliding cell technique for diffusion measurements in liquid metals

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Yongliang; Zhu, Chunao; Zhang, Bo

    2014-03-15

    The long capillary and shear cell techniques are the usual methods for diffusion measurements in liquid metals. Here we present a new “sliding cell technique” to measure interdiffusion in liquid alloys, which combines the merits of these two methods. Instead of a number of shear cells, as used in the shear cell method, only one sliding cell is designed to separate and join the liquid diffusion samples. Using the sliding cell technique, the influence of the heating process (which affects liquid diffusion measurements in the conventional long capillary method) can be eliminated. Time-dependent diffusion measurements at the same isothermal temperature were carried out in Al-Cu liquids. Compared with the previous results measured by in-situ X-ray radiography, the obtained liquid diffusion coefficient in this work is believed to be influenced by convective flow. The present work further supports the idea that to obtain accurate diffusion constants in liquid metals, the measurement conditions must be well controlled, and there should be no temperature gradients or other disturbances.

  14. Pool film boiling from rotating and stationary spheres in liquid nitrogen. [for SSME turbopump ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuan, Winston M.; Schwartz, Sidney H.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented for a preliminary experiment involving a saturated pool boiling at 1 atm from rotating 2 and 3 inch diameter spheres which were immersed in LN2. Additional results are presented for a stationary 2 inch diameter sphere quenched in LN2, which were obtained with a more versatile and complete experimental apparatus. The speed of the rotational tests varied from 0 to 10,000 rpm. The stationary experiments parametrically varied pressure and subcooling levels from 0 to 600 psig and from 0 to 50 F, respectively. During the rotational tests, a high speed photographic analysis was undertaken to measure the thickness of the vapor film surrounding the sphere.

  15. Plasma torch with liquid metal electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Predtechenskii, M.R.; Tukhto, O.M.

    2006-03-15

    In order to eliminate the negative effect of erosion processes on electrodes in arc plasma generators, a new scheme of arc discharge was proposed in which the surface of a molten metal acts as electrodes. A plasma reactor was designed on the basis of this concept. The electrophysical characteristics of such a discharge in steam and air as plasma gases were studied. Experiments on destruction of toxic polychlorinated biphenyls and steam coal gasification were performed.

  16. LSPR properties of metal nanoparticles adsorbed at a liquid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhilin; Chen, Shu; Fang, Pingping; Ren, Bin; Girault, Hubert H; Tian, Zhongqun

    2013-04-21

    Unlike the solid-air and solid-liquid interfaces, the optical properties of metal nanoparticles adsorbed at the liquid-liquid interface have not been theoretically exploited to date. In this work, the three dimensional finite difference time domain (3D-FDTD) method is employed to clarify the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) based optical properties of gold nanoparticles (NPs) adsorbed at the water-oil interface, including near field distribution, far field absorption and their relevance. The LSPR spectra of NPs located at a liquid-liquid interface are shown to differ significantly from those in a uniform liquid environment or at the other interfaces. The absorption spectra exhibit two distinct LSPR peaks, the positions and relative strengths of which are sensitive to the dielectric properties of each liquid and the exact positions of the NPs with respect to the interface. Precise control of the particles' position and selection of the appropriate wavelength of the excitation laser facilitates the rational design and selective excitation of localized plasmon modes for interfacial NPs, a necessary advance for the exploration of liquid-liquid interfaces via surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). According to our calculations, the SERS enhancement factor for Au nanosphere dimers at the water-oil interface can be as high as 10(7)-10(9), implying significant promise for future investigations of interfacial structure and applications of liquid-liquid interfaces towards chemical analysis. PMID:23376970

  17. An Integrated Liquid Cooling System Based on Galinstan Liquid Metal Droplets.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiu Yang; Tang, Shi-Yang; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Ghorbani, Kamran

    2016-01-27

    The continued miniaturization of electronic components demands integrated liquid cooling systems with minimized external connections and fabrication costs that can be implanted very close to localized hot spots. This might be challenging for existing liquid cooling systems because most of them rely on external pumps, connecting tubes, and microfabricated heat sinks. Here, we demonstrate an integrated liquid cooling system by utilizing a small droplet of liquid metal Galinstan, which is placed over the hot spot. Energizing the liquid metal droplet with a square wave signal creates a surface tension gradient across the droplet, which induces Marangoni flow over the surface of droplet. This produces a high flow rate of coolant medium through the cooling channel, enabling a "soft" pump. At the same time, the high thermal conductivity of liquid metal extends the heat transfer surface and facilitates the dissipation of heat, enabling a "soft" heat sink. This facilitates the rapid cooling of localized hot spots, as demonstrated in our experiments. Our technology facilitates customized liquid cooling systems with simple fabrication and assembling processes, with no moving parts that can achieve high flow rates with low power consumption. PMID:26716607

  18. Effects of gas bubble production on heat transfer from a volumetrically heated liquid pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Geoffrey R.

    Aqueous solutions of uranium salts may provide a new supply chain to fill potential shortfalls in the availability of the most common radiopharmaceuticals currently in use worldwide, including Tc99m which is a decay product of Mo99. The fissioning of the uranium in these solutions creates Mo99 but also generates large amounts of hydrogen and oxygen from the radiolysis of the water. When the dissolved gases reach a critical concentration, bubbles will form in the solution. Bubbles in the solution affect both the fission power and the heat transfer out of the solution. As a result, for safety and production calculations, the effects of the bubbles on heat transfer must be understood. A high aspect ratio tank was constructed to simulate a section of an annulus with heat exchangers on the inner and outer steel walls to provide cooling. Temperature measurements via thermocouples inside the tank and along the outside of the steel walls allowed the calculation of overall and local heat transfer coefficients. Different air injection manifolds allowed the exploration of various bubble characteristics and patterns on heat transfer from the pool. The manifold type did not appear to have significant impact on the bubble size distributions in water. However, air injected into solutions of magnesium sulfate resulted in smaller bubble sizes and larger void fractions than those in water at the same injection rates. One dimensional calculations provide heat transfer coefficient values as functions of the superficial gas velocity in the pool.

  19. Ecotoxicology of heavy metals: Liquid-phase extraction by nanosorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burakov, A.; Romantsova, I.; Babkin, A.; Neskoromnaya, E.; Kucherova, A.; Kashevich, Z.

    2015-11-01

    The paper considers the problem of extreme toxicity heavy metal compounds dissolved in wastewater and liquid emissions of industrial enterprises to living organisms and environment as a whole. The possibility of increasing extraction efficiency of heavy metal ions by sorption materials was demonstrated. The porous space of the latter was modified by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) during process of the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of carbon on metal oxide catalysts. The increasing of the sorption capacity (10-30%) and the sorption rate of nanomodified activated carbons in comparison with standard materials in the example of absorption of Co2+ and Ni2+ ions from aqueous solutions was proven.

  20. Neutron Radiography Visualization of Solid Particles in Stirring Liquid Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, M.; Ščepanskis, M.; Jakovičs, A.; Thomsen, K.; Nikoluškins, R.; Vontobel, P.; Beinerts, T.; Bojarevičs, A.; Platacis, E.

    This paper presents the analysis of the first dynamic neutron radiography experiment that visualized motion of solid particles in liquid metal, which was stirred by a system of four counter-rotating magnets. The paper also contains the quantitative results derived from neutron images: the distribution of particle concentration, number of admixed particles and velocities as functions of the magnet rotation speed.

  1. Wideband-Switchable Metamaterial Absorber Using Injected Liquid Metal.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Ki; Lee, Dongju; Lim, Sungjoon

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterial absorbers can provide good solutions for radar-cross-section (RCS) reduction. In spite of their attractive features of thinness, lightness, and low cost, resonant metamaterial absorbers have a drawback of narrow bandwidth. For practical radar applications, wideband absorbers are necessary. In this paper, we propose a wideband-switchable metamaterial absorber using liquid metal. In order to reduce RCS both for X-band and C-band, the switchable Jerusalem cross (JC) resonator is introduced. The JC resonator consists of slotted circular rings, chip resistors, and microfluidic channels. The JC resonator is etched on a flexible printed circuit board (FPCB), and the microfluidic channels are laser-etched on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) material. The proposed absorber can switch the absorption frequency band by injecting a liquid metal alloy into the channels. The performance of the absorber was demonstrated through full-wave simulation and through measurements employing prototypes. The experimental results showed absorption ratios of over 90% from 7.43 GHz to 14.34 GHz, and from 5.62 GHz to 7.3 GHz, with empty channels and liquid metal-filled channels, respectively. Therefore, the absorption band was successfully switched between the C-band (4-8 GHz) and the X-band (8-12 GHz) by injecting liquid metal eutectic gallium indium alloy (EGaIn) into the channels. PMID:27546310

  2. Generation and characterization of gas bubbles in liquid metals

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, S.; Gerbeth, G.; Witke, W.

    1996-06-01

    There is an ongoing research performed in the RCR on local transport phenomena in turbulent liquid metal (LM) duct flows exposed to external magnetic fields. In this context so-called MHD flow phenomena can be observed, which are unknown in usual hydraulic engineering. The field of interest covers also the influence of magnetic fields on the behaviour of liquid metal - gas mixtures. Profound knowledge on these LMMHD two-phase flow plays an important role in a variety of technological applications, in particular, in the design of Liquid-Metal MHD generators or for several metallurgical processes employing gas-stirred reactors. However, the highly empirical nature of two-phase flow analysis gives little hope for the prediction of MHD two-phase flows without extensive experimental data. A summary is given about the authors research activities focussing on two directions: (a) Momentum transfer between gas and liquid metal in a bubbly flow regime to investigate the influence of the external magnetic field on the velocity slip ration S (b) Peculiarities of the MHD turbulence to use small gas bubbles as local tracers in order to study the turbulent mass transfer.

  3. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Fanning, Alan W.

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of cooling medium flow circuits which cooperate to remove and carry heat away from the fuel core upon loss of the normal cooling flow circuit to areas external thereto.

  4. Liquid Metal Magnetohydrodynamics — Astrophysical Relevance and Engineering Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbeth, G.; Grants, I.; Gundrum, T.; Stefani, F.

    Magnetic fields influence the motion of liquid metals, but the melt motion modifies magnetic field distributions as well. Eventually, melt motions are able to create a magnetic field, known as the dynamo effect. We present various laboratory experiments demonstrating this interaction between the flow and magnetic fields.

  5. Solubility data are compiled for metals in liquid zinc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, I. G.; Johnson, I.

    1967-01-01

    Available data is compiled on the solubilities of various metals in liquid zinc. The temperature dependence of the solubility data is expressed using the empirical straight line relationship existing between the logarithm of the solubility and the reciprocal of the absolute temperature.

  6. Wideband-Switchable Metamaterial Absorber Using Injected Liquid Metal

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Ki; Lee, Dongju; Lim, Sungjoon

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterial absorbers can provide good solutions for radar-cross-section (RCS) reduction. In spite of their attractive features of thinness, lightness, and low cost, resonant metamaterial absorbers have a drawback of narrow bandwidth. For practical radar applications, wideband absorbers are necessary. In this paper, we propose a wideband-switchable metamaterial absorber using liquid metal. In order to reduce RCS both for X-band and C-band, the switchable Jerusalem cross (JC) resonator is introduced. The JC resonator consists of slotted circular rings, chip resistors, and microfluidic channels. The JC resonator is etched on a flexible printed circuit board (FPCB), and the microfluidic channels are laser-etched on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) material. The proposed absorber can switch the absorption frequency band by injecting a liquid metal alloy into the channels. The performance of the absorber was demonstrated through full-wave simulation and through measurements employing prototypes. The experimental results showed absorption ratios of over 90% from 7.43 GHz to 14.34 GHz, and from 5.62 GHz to 7.3 GHz, with empty channels and liquid metal-filled channels, respectively. Therefore, the absorption band was successfully switched between the C-band (4–8 GHz) and the X-band (8–12 GHz) by injecting liquid metal eutectic gallium indium alloy (EGaIn) into the channels. PMID:27546310

  7. Turbulent convection in liquid metal with and without rotation

    PubMed Central

    King, Eric M.; Aurnou, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic fields of Earth and other planets are generated by turbulent, rotating convection in liquid metal. Liquid metals are peculiar in that they diffuse heat more readily than momentum, quantified by their small Prandtl numbers, . Most analog models of planetary dynamos, however, use moderate fluids, and the systematic influence of reducing is not well understood. We perform rotating Rayleigh–Bénard convection experiments in the liquid metal gallium over a range of nondimensional buoyancy forcing and rotation periods (E). Our primary diagnostic is the efficiency of convective heat transfer . In general, we find that the convective behavior of liquid metal differs substantially from that of moderate fluids, such as water. In particular, a transition between rotationally constrained and weakly rotating turbulent states is identified, and this transition differs substantially from that observed in moderate fluids. This difference, we hypothesize, may explain the different classes of magnetic fields observed on the Gas and Ice Giant planets, whose dynamo regions consist of and fluids, respectively. PMID:23569262

  8. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    PubMed Central

    Geslin, Pierre-Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Moreover, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics. PMID:26582248

  9. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying.

    PubMed

    Geslin, Pierre-Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Moreover, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics. PMID:26582248

  10. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geslin, Pierre-Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-11-01

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Moreover, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.

  11. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Geslin, Pierre -Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-11-19

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growthmore » of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Furthermore, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.« less

  12. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    SciTech Connect

    Geslin, Pierre -Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-11-19

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Furthermore, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.

  13. The emissivities of liquid metals at their fusion temperatures.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnell, D. W.; Treverton, J. A.; Valerga, A. J.; Margrave , J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The emissivities for several transition metals and various other metals and compounds in the liquid state at their fusion temperatures have been determined in this laboratory. The technique used involves electromagnetic levitation-induction heating of the materials in an inert atmosphere. The brightness temperature of the liquid phase of the material is measured as the material is heated through fusion. Given a reliable value of the fusion temperature, which is available for most pure substances, one may readily calculate an emissivity for the liquid phase at the fusion temperature. Even in cases where melting points are poorly known, the brightness temperatures are unique parameters, independent of the temperature scale and measured for a chemically defined system at a fixed point.

  14. Pool boiling thermal transport through micro-patterned metal superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, Matthew; Maynes, Daniel; Crockett, Julie

    2015-11-01

    Pool boiling thermal transport through horizontal superhydrophobic surfaces decorated with rib and post micro-patterns was explored experimentally. The pool consisted of a water reservoir heated from below by electric heaters embedded in an aluminum block. A test surface was located at the bottom of the pool and fixed to the block. Instrumentation allowed simultaneous measurement of heat flux through the test surface, test surface temperature, and pool water temperature. From these measurements, heat flux as a function of excess temperature (the difference between the test surface temperature and the water saturation temperature) was determined for each surface. Surface geometry was characterized by the cavity fraction (the ratio of projected cavity area to surface area on the test surface), distance between features, and microscale pattern geometry. The transition from nucleate to pool boiling was observed to occur at much lower excess temperatures for superhydrophobic surfaces than for hydrophobic surfaces, with greater deviation for larger cavity fraction. Heat flux versus excess temperature relationships are presented while exploring the influence of superhydrophobic surface microstructure on the thermal transport. NSF CBET-1235881.

  15. Liquid Metal Propellant Feed System for Plasma Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markusic, T. E.

    2004-01-01

    High-power plasma thrusters that utilize molten metallic propellants (e.g., the Lithium Lorentz Force Accelerator) are currently being investigated as a primary propulsion option for in-space nuclear-electric systems. A critical component of the thruster is the propellant feed system, which must reliably and accurately pump liquid metal into the thruster discharge chamber. We present design details and calibration results for a compact liquid metal propellant feed system that contains no moving parts, for use in laboratory testing of plasma thrusters. Feed line pressure is maintained using an MHD flow coupler, and the flow rate is monitored using a simple voltage divider, which is submerged in the propellant reservoir. Results for lithium and gallium propellants show capability to meter propellant at flow rates up to 10 +/- 0.1 mg/s.

  16. Pool boiling heat transfer from vertical heater array in liquid nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Chui, C.J.; Sehmbey, M.S.; Chow, L.C.; Hahn, O.J.

    1995-04-01

    The heat transfer from an array of discrete sources is expected to differ from the behavior of a single heat source due to the interaction between the flow induced by individual heat sources. This study details the results from experiments conducted to study the pool boiling heat transfer characteristics from a vertical heater array with flush-mounted heat sources. The lower heaters were found to enhance the heat transfer from upper heaters. The bubble pumped convection due to the lower heaters enhanced the preboiling heat transfer coefficient at the upper heater by as much as 700%. The critical heat flux from the upper heaters was also enhanced up to 15%. Correlations are presented for both these effects. 21 refs.

  17. CFD Simulations and Experimental Verification on Nucleate Pool Boiling of Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaobin, Zhang; Wei, Xiong; Jianye, Chen; Yuchen, Wang; Tang, K.

    To explore the mechanism of nucleate pool boiling of cryogenic fluids, an experimental apparatus was built to conduct a visualization study and verify the CFD boiling model. Apart from the general measurements of the super-heat and heat flux, the influences of super-heat on bubble departure diameters were specially analyzed. Based on the observations, the whole nucleate boiling process from bubble formation to departure from the heated wall can be divided into three stages: low heat flux stage; transitional stage; fully developed nucleate boiling (FDNB) stage. CFD simulations with several existing correlations and the attained values from the experiments for the bubble diameter were finally conducted, and the results fitted well with the present experimental data.

  18. Self-Running Liquid Metal Drops that Delaminate Metal Films at Record Velocities.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Mohammed; Sundaresan, Rishi; Dickey, Michael D

    2015-10-21

    This paper describes a new method to spontaneously accelerate droplets of liquid metal (eutectic gallium indium, EGaIn) to extremely fast velocities through a liquid medium and along predefined metallic paths. The droplet wets a thin metal trace (a film ∼100 nm thick, ∼ 1 mm wide) and generates a force that simultaneously delaminates the trace from the substrate (enhanced by spontaneous electrochemical reactions) while accelerating the droplet along the trace. The formation of a surface oxide on EGaIn prevents it from moving, but the use of an acidic medium or application of a reducing bias to the trace continuously removes the oxide skin to enable motion. The trace ultimately provides a sacrificial pathway for the metal and provides a mm-scale mimic to the templates used to guide molecular motors found in biology (e.g., actin filaments). The liquid metal can accelerate along linear, curved and U-shaped traces as well as uphill on surfaces inclined by 30 degrees. The droplets can accelerate through a viscous medium up to 180 mm/sec which is almost double the highest reported speed for self-running liquid metal droplets. The actuation of microscale objects found in nature (e.g., cells, microorganisms) inspires new mechanisms, such as these, to manipulate small objects. Droplets that are metallic may find additional applications in reconfigurable circuits, optics, heat transfer elements, and transient electronic circuits; the paper demonstrates the latter. PMID:26423030

  19. Liquid Metal Infiltration Processing of Metallic Composites: A Critical Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sree Manu, K. M.; Ajay Raag, L.; Rajan, T. P. D.; Gupta, Manoj; Pai, B. C.

    2016-07-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) are one of the advanced materials widely used for aerospace, automotive, defense, and general engineering applications. MMC can be tailored to have superior properties such as enhanced high-temperature performance, high specific strength and stiffness, increased wear resistance, better thermal and mechanical fatigue, and creep resistance than those of unreinforced alloys. To fabricate such composites with ideal properties, the processing technique has to ensure high volume fraction of reinforcement incorporation, uniform distribution of the reinforcement, and acceptable adhesion between the matrix and the reinforcing phase without unwanted interfacial reactions which degrades the mechanical properties. A number of processing techniques such as stir casting/vortex method, powder metallurgy, infiltration, casting etc. have been developed to synthesize MMC employing a variety of alloy and the reinforcement's combinations. Among these, infiltration process is widely used for making MMC with high volume fraction of reinforcements and offers many more advantages compared to other conventional manufacturing processes. The present paper critically reviews the various infiltration techniques used for making the MMC, their process parameters, characteristics, and selected studies carried out worldwide and by authors on the development of metal ceramic composites by squeeze infiltration process.

  20. Corrosion behavior of surface treated steel in liquid sodium negative electrode of liquid metal battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeonghyeon; Shin, Sang Hun; Lee, Jung Ki; Choi, Sungyeol; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-03-01

    While liquid metal batteries are attractive options for grid-scale energy storage applications as they have flexible siting capacities and small footprints, the compatibility between structural materials such as current collectors and negative electrode such as sodium is one of major issues for liquid metal batteries. Non-metallic elements such as carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen in the liquid sodium influence the material behaviors of the cell construction materials in the battery system. In this study, the compatibility of structural materials with sodium is investigated in high temperature liquid sodium, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is used to monitor in-situ the corrosion behavior at the surface of materials in sodium. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coatings of SiC and Si3N4 are applied as protective barriers against dissolution and corrosion on the steel surface. The results show that CVD coating of Si compounds can delay corrosion of steel in high temperature liquid sodium comparing to the result of as-received specimens, while SiC coating is more durable than Si3N4 coating in high temperature liquid sodium.

  1. Mechanical behaviour of the T91 martensitic steel under monotonic and cyclic loadings in liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, J.-B.; Verleene, A.; Serre, I.; Legris, A.

    2004-11-01

    The paper deals with the mechanical properties in liquid metals of the T91 martensitic steel, a candidate material for the window of an accelerating driven system (ADS). Two main questions are examined, the risk of liquid metal embrittlement and the accelerated fatigue damage by a liquid metal. It is found that the transition from ductile to brittle behaviour induced by a liquid metal is possible as a result of a decrease in surface energy caused by the adsorbed liquid metal. The embrittlement can occur only with a hard microstructure and a nucleation of very sharp defects inside the liquid metal. Under cycling straining, the fatigue resistance of the standard T91 steel is decreased by a factor of about 2 in the liquid metal as compared to air. It is proposed that short crack growth is promoted by the liquid metal which weakens the microstructural grain boundary barriers and skip the microcrack coalescence stage.

  2. Plasticity in the Supercooled Liquid Region of Bulk Metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, T G; Wadsworth, J; Liu, C T; Ice, G E

    2000-10-30

    Intensive efforts have been carried out over the past decade to develop means to slow down the phase transformation kinetics during the forming of metallic glasses. As a result of these efforts, some metallic glasses can now be fabricated in bulk forms (BMG) from the liquid state at cooling rates on the order of 1-10 K/s, which is close to that of conventional casting. This enables the production of bulk amorphous alloys with a thickness of {approx}10 mm. While advances in amorphous metallic alloy development have been impressive, they have been made largely through experience [1]. Three main conclusions drawn from this study are: (1) Bulk metallic glasses generally have excellent mechanical formability in the supercooled liquid region. (2) Bulk metallic glasses may not be necessarily behave like a Newtonian fluid (i.e. m=1). The non-Newtonian behavior is associated with glass instability during deformation. (3) Multi-component Bulk metallic glasses can be used as the precursor of a nanocrystalline solid. However, the nanocrystalline solid is not necessarily superplastic. The non-superplastic behavior is caused by the difficult strain accommodation at grain triple junctions.

  3. Design of catalytic substrates for uniform graphene films: from solid-metal to liquid-metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Lifang; Zeng, Mengqi; Zhang, Tao; Fu, Lei

    2015-05-01

    The controllable synthesis of uniform graphene with a specific layer number is crucial for both fundamental research and emerging applications due to the high sensitivity of the various extraordinary physicochemical properties of graphene to its layer numbers. However, the excessive segregation of extra C, the inactivation of the self-limiting of Cu and the superabundant nucleation at grain boundaries and defect sites render that the controllable synthesis of uniform graphene is still a challenge. By the employment of various solid and liquid metals with quasi-atomically smooth surfaces to avoid defects or grain boundaries, a series of studies have been performed and significant improvements have been achieved in the controllable synthesis of uniform graphene films. In this review, the representative strategies of designing catalytic substrates, including polycrystalline metals, single-crystalline metals, binary metal alloys and liquid metals, are highlighted. The future of the controllable synthesis of uniform graphene is also discussed.

  4. Design of catalytic substrates for uniform graphene films: from solid-metal to liquid-metal.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lifang; Zeng, Mengqi; Zhang, Tao; Fu, Lei

    2015-05-28

    The controllable synthesis of uniform graphene with a specific layer number is crucial for both fundamental research and emerging applications due to the high sensitivity of the various extraordinary physicochemical properties of graphene to its layer numbers. However, the excessive segregation of extra C, the inactivation of the self-limiting of Cu and the superabundant nucleation at grain boundaries and defect sites render that the controllable synthesis of uniform graphene is still a challenge. By the employment of various solid and liquid metals with quasi-atomically smooth surfaces to avoid defects or grain boundaries, a series of studies have been performed and significant improvements have been achieved in the controllable synthesis of uniform graphene films. In this review, the representative strategies of designing catalytic substrates, including polycrystalline metals, single-crystalline metals, binary metal alloys and liquid metals, are highlighted. The future of the controllable synthesis of uniform graphene is also discussed. PMID:25927465

  5. Dissolution of dense non-aqueous phase liquids in vertical fractures: effect of finger residuals and dead-end pools.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhibing; Niemi, Auli; Fagerlund, Fritjof; Illangasekare, Tissa; Detwiler, Russell L

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the dissolution behavior of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in rock fractures under different entrapment conditions is important for remediation activities and any related predictive modeling. This study investigates DNAPL dissolution in variable aperture fractures under two important entrapment configurations, namely, entrapped residual blobs from gravity fingering and pooling in a dead-end fracture. We performed a physical dissolution experiment of residual DNAPL blobs in a vertical analog fracture using light transmission techniques. A high-resolution mechanistic (physically-based) numerical model has been developed which is shown to excellently reproduce the experimentally observed DNAPL dissolution. We subsequently applied the model to simulate dissolution of the residual blobs under different water flushing velocities. The simulated relationship between the Sherwood number Sh and Peclet number Pe could be well fitted with a simple power-law function (Sh=1.43Pe⁰·⁴³). To investigate mass transfer from dead-end pools, another type of trapping in rock fractures, entrapment and dissolution of DNAPL in a vertical dead-end fracture was simulated. As the entrapped pool dissolves, the depth of the interface between the DNAPL and the flowing water increases linearly with decreasing DNAPL saturation. The interfacial area remains more or less constant as DNAPL saturation decreases, unlike in the case of residual DNAPL blobs. The decreasing depth of the contact interface changes the flow field and causes decreasing water flow velocity above the top of the DNAPL pool, suggesting the dependence of the mass transfer rate on the depth of the interface, or alternatively, the remaining mass percentage in the fracture. Simulation results show that the resultant Sherwood number Sh is significantly smaller than in the case of residual blobs for any given Peclet number, indicating slower mass transfer. The results also show that the Sh can be well

  6. Effects of shielding gas composition on arc profile and molten pool dynamics in gas metal arc welding of steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. L.; Lu, F. G.; Wang, H. P.; Murphy, A. B.; Tang, X. H.

    2014-11-01

    In gas metal arc welding, gases of different compositions are used to produce an arc plasma, which heats and melts the workpiece. They also protect the workpiece from the influence of the air during the welding process. This paper models gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes using an in-house simulation code. It investigates the effects of the gas composition on the temperature distribution in the arc and on the molten pool dynamics in gas metal arc welding of steels. Pure argon, pure CO2 and different mixtures of argon and CO2 are considered in the study. The model is validated by comparing the calculated weld profiles with physical weld measurements. The numerical calculations reveal that gas composition greatly affects the arc temperature profile, heat transfer to the workpiece, and consequently the weld dimension. As the CO2 content in the shielding gas increases, a more constricted arc plasma with higher energy density is generated as a result of the increased current density in the arc centre and increased Lorentz force. The calculation also shows that the heat transferred from the arc to the workpiece increases with increasing CO2 content, resulting in a wider and deeper weld pool and decreased reinforcement height.

  7. The phytotoxicity of ionic liquids from natural pool of (-)-menthol with tetrafluoroborate anion.

    PubMed

    Biczak, Robert; Pawłowska, Barbara; Feder-Kubis, Joanna

    2015-08-01

    Over the last several decades, ionic liquids have become a promising alternative to conventional organic solvents. Initially, ionic liquids were described as "environmentally friendly" substances. However, the results of numerous studies proved that the effects of these compounds on individual ecosystems might be adverse. The presented paper discusses the effect of ionic salts containing natural chiral substituent: (1R,2S,5R)-(-)-menthol in cation and a tetrafluoroborate anion of a general formula of [Cn-Im-Men][BF4] of implementation into the soil on the growth of spring barley and common radish in their early development stages. The obtained results showed that the greatest phytotoxicity was exhibited by ionic liquids containing substituents with the smallest possible number of carbon atoms. The further increase in the length of the chain did not increase the toxicity of these salts for terrestrial plants. Moreover, a compound with a substituent having a chain length of 11 carbon atoms was found to be non-toxic to common radish. The experiment under discussion showed also the effect of these tetrafluoroborates, used in the form of spray, on the development of common sorrel, gallant soldier and white goosefoot. The tests carried out also showed that the most toxic were the compounds with 1 and 3 carbon atoms. The phytotoxicity of tetrafluoroborates was positively correlated with the concentration of these compounds in the soil and was dependent on the genetic features of the genres and varieties of plants used in the experiment. PMID:25854206

  8. First-principles calculation of entropy for liquid metals.

    PubMed

    Desjarlais, Michael P

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate the accurate calculation of entropies and free energies for a variety of liquid metals using an extension of the two-phase thermodynamic (2PT) model based on a decomposition of the velocity autocorrelation function into gas-like (hard sphere) and solid-like (harmonic) subsystems. The hard sphere model for the gas-like component is shown to give systematically high entropies for liquid metals as a direct result of the unphysical Lorentzian high-frequency tail. Using a memory function framework we derive a generally applicable velocity autocorrelation and frequency spectrum for the diffusive component which recovers the low-frequency (long-time) behavior of the hard sphere model while providing for realistic short-time coherence and high-frequency tails to the spectrum. This approach provides a significant increase in the accuracy of the calculated entropies for liquid metals and is compared to ambient pressure data for liquid sodium, aluminum, gallium, tin, and iron. The use of this method for the determination of melt boundaries is demonstrated with a calculation of the high-pressure bcc melt boundary for sodium. With the significantly improved accuracy available with the memory function treatment for softer interatomic potentials, the 2PT model for entropy calculations should find broader application in high energy density science, warm dense matter, planetary science, geophysics, and material science. PMID:24483423

  9. First-principles calculation of entropy for liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjarlais, Michael P.

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate the accurate calculation of entropies and free energies for a variety of liquid metals using an extension of the two-phase thermodynamic (2PT) model based on a decomposition of the velocity autocorrelation function into gas-like (hard sphere) and solid-like (harmonic) subsystems. The hard sphere model for the gas-like component is shown to give systematically high entropies for liquid metals as a direct result of the unphysical Lorentzian high-frequency tail. Using a memory function framework we derive a generally applicable velocity autocorrelation and frequency spectrum for the diffusive component which recovers the low-frequency (long-time) behavior of the hard sphere model while providing for realistic short-time coherence and high-frequency tails to the spectrum. This approach provides a significant increase in the accuracy of the calculated entropies for liquid metals and is compared to ambient pressure data for liquid sodium, aluminum, gallium, tin, and iron. The use of this method for the determination of melt boundaries is demonstrated with a calculation of the high-pressure bcc melt boundary for sodium. With the significantly improved accuracy available with the memory function treatment for softer interatomic potentials, the 2PT model for entropy calculations should find broader application in high energy density science, warm dense matter, planetary science, geophysics, and material science.

  10. Friction and wear of selected metals and of carbons in liquid natural gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisander, D. W.

    1971-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments were conducted with hemispherically tipped (4.76-mm radius) rider specimens in sliding contact with a rotating disk submerged in liquid natural gas (LNG). The program included metal combinations and carbon-metal combinations. These experiments revealed that the metal combinations were not lubricated by the LNG. Carbons had much lower wear in LNG than in liquid hydrogen or in liquid nitrogen. (Wear of carbon in liquid hydrogen was 100 times that in LNG.) The friction coefficients obtained in LNG (0.6 for metal-metal and 0.2 for carbon-metal) are similar to those obtained in liquid hydrogen.