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Sample records for liquid phase transition

  1. Liquid liquid phase transition in Stillinger Weber silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaucage, Philippe; Mousseau, Normand

    2005-04-01

    It was recently demonstrated that Stillinger-Weber silicon undergoes a liquid-liquid first-order phase transition deep into the supercooled region (Sastry and Angell 2003 Nat. Mater. 2 739). Here we study the effects of perturbations on this phase transition. We show that the order of the liquid-liquid transition changes with negative pressure. We also find that the liquid-liquid transition disappears when the three-body term of the potential is strengthened by as little as 5%. This implies that the details of the potential could affect strongly the nature and even the existence of the liquid-liquid phase.

  2. Models for a liquid-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldyrev, S. V.; Franzese, G.; Giovambattista, N.; Malescio, G.; Sadr-Lahijany, M. R.; Scala, A.; Skibinsky, A.; Stanley, H. E.

    2002-02-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study two- and three-dimensional models with the isotropic double-step potential which in addition to the hard core has a repulsive soft core of larger radius. Our results indicate that the presence of two characteristic repulsive distances (hard core and soft core) is sufficient to explain liquid anomalies and a liquid-liquid phase transition, but these two phenomena may occur independently. Thus liquid-liquid transitions may exist in systems like liquid metals, regardless of the presence of the density anomaly. For 2D, we propose a model with a specific set of hard core and soft core parameters, that qualitatively reproduces the phase diagram and anomalies of liquid water. We identify two solid phases: a square crystal (high density phase), and a triangular crystal (low density phase) and discuss the relation between the anomalies of liquid and the polymorphism of the solid. Similarly to real water, our 2D system may have the second critical point in the metastable liquid phase beyond the freezing line. In 3D, we find several sets of parameters for which two fluid-fluid phase transition lines exist: the first line between gas and liquid and the second line between high-density liquid (HDL) and low-density liquid (LDL). In all cases, the LDL phase shows no density anomaly in 3D. We relate the absence of the density anomaly with the positive slope of the LDL-HDL phase transition line.

  3. Solid-liquid phase transition in argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Tang, H. T.

    1978-01-01

    Starting from the Lennard-Jones interatomic potential, a modified cell theory has been used to describe the solid-liquid phase transition in argon. The cell-size variations may be evaluated by a self-consistent condition. With the inclusion of cell-size variations, the transition temperature, the solid and liquid densities, and the liquid-phase radial-distribution functions have been calculated. These ab initio results are in satisfactory agreement with molecular-dynamics calculations as well as experimental data on argon.

  4. Modeling liquid-liquid phase transitions and quasicrystal formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skibinsky, Anna

    In this thesis, studies which concern two different subjects related to phase transitions in fluids and crystalline solids are presented. Condensed matter formation, structure, and phase transitions are modeled using molecular dynamics simulations of simple discontinuous potentials with attractive and repulsive interactions. Novel phase diagrams are proposed for quasicrystals, crystals, and liquids. In the first part of the thesis, the formation of a quasicrystal in a two dimensional monodisperse system is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations of hard sphere particles interacting via a two-dimensional square-well potential. It is found that for certain values of the square-well parameters more than one stable crystalline phase can form. By quenching the liquid phase at a very low temperature, an amorphous phase is obtained. When this the amorphous phase is heated, a quasicrystalline structure with five-fold symmetry forms. From estimations of the Helmholtz potentials of the stable crystalline phases and of the quasicrystal, it is concluded that within a specific temperature range, the observed quasicrystal phase can be the stable phase. The second part of the thesis concerns a study of the liquid-liquid phase transition for a single-component system in three dimensions, interacting via an isotropic potential with a repulsive soft-core shoulder at short distance and an attractive well at an intermediate distance. The potential is similar to potentials used to describe such liquid systems as colloids, protein solutions, or liquid metals. It is shown that the phase diagram for such a potential can have two lines of first-order fluid-fluid phase transitions: one separating a gas and a low-density liquid (LDL), and another between the LDL and a high-density liquid (HDL). Both phase transition lines end in a critical point, a gas-LDL critical point and, depending on the potential parameters, either a gas-HDL critical point or a LDL-HDL critical point. A

  5. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition in Nanoconfined Silicon Carbide.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weikang; Zhang, Leining; Liu, Sida; Ren, Hongru; Zhou, Xuyan; Li, Hui

    2016-03-01

    We report theoretical evidence of a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) in liquid silicon carbide under nanoslit confinement. The LLPT is characterized by layering transitions induced by confinement and pressure, accompanying the rapid change in density. During the layering transition, the proportional distribution of tetracoordinated and pentacoordinated structures exhibits remarkable change. The tricoordinated structures lead to the microphase separation between silicon (with the dominant tricoordinated, tetracoordinated, and pentacoordinated structures) and carbon (with the dominant tricoordinated structures) in the layer close to the walls. A strong layer separation between silicon atoms and carbon atoms is induced by strong wall-liquid forces. Importantly, the pressure confinement phase diagram with negative slopes for LLPT lines indicates that, under high pressure, the LLPT is mainly confinement-induced, but under low pressure, it becomes dominantly pressure-induced. PMID:26859609

  6. Generic mechanism for generating a liquid-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzese, Giancarlo; Malescio, Gianpietro; Skibinsky, Anna; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2001-02-01

    Recent experimental results indicate that phosphorus-a single-component system-can have a high-density liquid (HDL) and a low-density liquid (LDL) phase. A first-order transition between two liquids of different densities is consistent with experimental data for a variety of materials, including single-component systems such as water, silica and carbon. Molecular dynamics simulations of very specific models for supercooled water, liquid carbon and supercooled silica predict a LDL-HDL critical point, but a coherent and general interpretation of the LDL-HDL transition is lacking. Here we show that the presence of a LDL and a HDL can be directly related to an interaction potential with an attractive part and two characteristic short-range repulsive distances. This kind of interaction is common to other single-component materials in the liquid state (in particular, liquid metals), and such potentials are often used to describe systems that exhibit a density anomaly. However, our results show that the LDL and HDL phases can occur in systems with no density anomaly. Our results therefore present an experimental challenge to uncover a liquid-liquid transition in systems like liquid metals, regardless of the presence of a density anomaly.

  7. Liquid-Liquid phase transition in a single component system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzese, Giancarlo; Skibinsky, Anna; Buldyrev, Sergey; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2001-06-01

    Recent experimental results indicate that phosphorus, a single-component system, can have a high-density liquid (HDL) and a low-density liquid (LDL) phase. A first-order LDL-HDL transition line ending in a critical point is consistent with experimental data and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations for a variety of single-component systems such as water, silica and carbon, but a coherent and general interpretation of the LDL-HDL transition is lacking. By means of MD, we show that the LDL-HDL transition can be directly related to an interaction potential with an attractive part and with not one but `two' preferred short-range repulsive distances. This kind of interaction is common to other single-component materials in the liquid state, in particular liquid metals. For the fisrt time, we show that the LDL-HDL transition can occur in systems with no density anomaly, opening an experimental challenge to uncover a liquid-liquid transition in systems like liquid metals, regardless of the presence of the density anomaly.

  8. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition and Glass Transition in a Monoatomic Model System

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Limei; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Giovambattista, Nicolas; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2010-01-01

    We review our recent study on the polyamorphism of the liquid and glass states in a monatomic system, a two-scale spherical-symmetric Jagla model with both attractive and repulsive interactions. This potential with a parametrization for which crystallization can be avoided and both the glass transition and the liquid-liquid phase transition are clearly separated, displays water-like anomalies as well as polyamorphism in both liquid and glassy states, providing a unique opportunity to study the interplay between the liquid-liquid phase transition and the glass transition. Our study on a simple model may be useful in understanding recent studies of polyamorphism in metallic glasses. PMID:21614201

  9. Existence of a liquid-liquid phase transition in methanol.

    PubMed

    Huš, Matej; Urbic, Tomaz

    2014-12-01

    A simple model is constructed to study the phase diagram and thermodynamic properties of methanol, which is described as a dimer of an apolar sphere mimicking the methyl group and a sphere with core-softened potential as the hydroxyl group. Performing classical Monte Carlo simulations, we obtained the phase diagram, showing a second critical point between two different liquid phases. Evaluating systems with a different number of particles, we extrapolate to infinite size in accordance with Ising universality class to obtain bulk values for critical temperature, pressure, and density. Strong evidence that the structure of the liquid changes upon transition from high- to low-density phase was provided. From the experimentally determined hydrogen bond strength and length in methanol and water, we propose where the second critical point of methanol should be. PMID:25615092

  10. Polymorphism in glassy silicon: Inherited from liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Li-Min; Zhang, Xinyu; Qi, Li; Zhang, Suhong; Ma, Mingzhen; Liu, Riping

    2015-02-01

    Combining molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and Voronoi polyhedral analyses, we discussed the microstructure evolution in liquid and glassy silicon during cooling by focusing on the fraction of various clusters. Liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) is detected in supercooled liquid silicon However, freezing the high-density liquid (HDL) to the glassy state is not achieved as the quenching rate goes up to 1014 K/s. The polyamorphism in glassy silicon is found to be mainly associated with low-density liquid (LDL).

  11. Polymorphism in glassy silicon: Inherited from liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled liquid

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Li-Min; Zhang, Xinyu; Qi, Li; Zhang, Suhong; Ma, Mingzhen; Liu, Riping

    2015-01-01

    Combining molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and Voronoi polyhedral analyses, we discussed the microstructure evolution in liquid and glassy silicon during cooling by focusing on the fraction of various clusters. Liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) is detected in supercooled liquid silicon However, freezing the high-density liquid (HDL) to the glassy state is not achieved as the quenching rate goes up to 1014 K/s. The polyamorphism in glassy silicon is found to be mainly associated with low-density liquid (LDL). PMID:25716054

  12. Liquid plasmonics: manipulating surface plasmon polaritons via phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Vivekchand, S R C; Engel, Clifford J; Lubin, Steven M; Blaber, Martin G; Zhou, Wei; Suh, Jae Yong; Schatz, George C; Odom, Teri W

    2012-08-01

    This paper reports the manipulation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in a liquid plasmonic metal by changing its physical phase. Dynamic properties were controlled by solid-to-liquid phase transitions in 1D Ga gratings that were fabricated using a simple molding process. Solid and liquid phases were found to exhibit different plasmonic properties, where light coupled to SPPs more efficiently in the liquid phase. We exploited the supercooling characteristics of Ga to access plasmonic properties associated with the liquid phase over a wider temperature range (up to 30 °C below the melting point of bulk Ga). Ab initio density functional theory-molecular dynamic calculations showed that the broadening of the solid-state electronic band structure was responsible for the superior plasmonic properties of the liquid metal. PMID:22823536

  13. The liquid to vapor phase transition in excited nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.B.; Moretto, L.G.; Phair, L.; Wozniak, G.J.; Beaulieu, L.; Breuer, H.; Korteling, R.G.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Lefort, T.; Pienkowski, L.; Ruangma, A.; Viola, V.E.; Yennello, S.J.

    2001-05-08

    For many years it has been speculated that excited nuclei would undergo a liquid to vapor phase transition. For even longer, it has been known that clusterization in a vapor carries direct information on the liquid-vapor equilibrium according to Fisher's droplet model. Now the thermal component of the 8 GeV/c pion + 197 Au multifragmentation data of the ISiS Collaboration is shown to follow the scaling predicted by Fisher's model, thus providing the strongest evidence yet of the liquid to vapor phase transition.

  14. Intrinsic response of polymer liquid crystals in photochemical phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Tomiki; Sasaki, Takeo; Kim, Haengboo )

    1991-01-24

    Time-resolved measurements were performed on the photochemically induced isothermal phase transition of polymer liquid crystals (PLC) with mesogenic side chains of phenyl benzoate (PAPB3) and cyanobiphenyl (PACB3) under conditions wherein the photochemical reaction of the doped photoresponsive molecule (4-butyl-4-{prime}-methoxyazobenzene, BMAB) was completed within {approximately} 10 ns, and the subsequent phase transition of the matrix PLC from nematic (N) to isotropic (I) state was followed by time-resolved measurements of the birefringence of the system. Formation of a sufficient amount of the cis isomer of BMAB with a single pulse of a laser lowered the N-I phase transition temperature of the mixture, inducing the N-I phase transition of PLCs isothermally in a time range of {approximately} 200 ms. This time range is comparable to that of low molecular weight liquid crystals, indicating that suppression in mobility of mesogens in PLCs does not affect significantly the thermodynamically controlled process.

  15. Suppression of phase transitions in a confined rodlike liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Grigoriadis, Christos; Duran, Hatice; Steinhart, Martin; Kappl, Michael; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Floudas, George

    2011-11-22

    The nematic-to-isotropic, crystal-to-nematic, and supercooled liquid-to-glass temperatures are studied in the liquid crystal 4-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (5CB) confined in self-ordered nanoporous alumina. The nematic-to-isotropic and the crystal-to-nematic transition temperatures are reduced linearly with the inverse pore diameter. The finding that the crystalline phase is completely suppressed in pores having diameters of 35 nm and below yields an estimate of the critical nucleus size. The liquid-to-glass temperature is reduced in confinement as anticipated by the model of rotational diffusion within a cavity. These results provide the pertinent phase diagram for a confined liquid crystal and are of technological relevance for the design of liquid crystal-based devices with tunable optical, thermal, and dielectric properties. PMID:21974835

  16. Effect of dimensionality on vapor-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sudhir Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Dimensionality play significant role on `phase transitions'. Fluids in macroscopic confinement (bulk or 3-Dimensional, 3D) do not show significant changes in their phase transition properties with extent of confinement, since the number of molecules away from the surrounding surfaces is astronomically higher than the number of molecules in close proximity of the confining surfaces. In microscopic confinement (quasi 3D to quasi-2D), however, the number of molecules away from the close proximity of the surface is not as high as is the case with macroscopic (3D) confinement. Hence, under the same thermodynamic conditions `phase transition' properties at microscopic confinement may not remain the same as the macroscopic or 3D values. Phase transitions at extremely small scale become very sensitive to the dimensions as well as the surface characteristics of the system. In this work our investigations reveal the effect of dimensionality on the phase transition from 3D to quasi-2D to 2D behavior. We have used grand canonical transition matrix Monte Carlo simulation to understand the vapor-liquid phase transitions from 3D to quasi-2D behavior. Such studies can be helpful in understanding and controlling the fluid film behaviour confined between solid surfaces of few molecular diameters, for example, in lubrication applications.

  17. Liquid-liquid phase transitions and water-like anomalies in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascaris, Erik

    In this thesis we employ computer simulations and statistical physics to understand the origin of liquid-liquid phase transitions and their relationship with anomalies typical of liquid water. Compared with other liquids, water has many anomalies. For example the density anomaly: when water is cooled below 4 °C the density decreases rather than increases. This and other anomalies have also been found to occur in a few other one-component liquids, sometimes in conjunction with the existence of a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) between a low-density liquid (LDL) and a high-density liquid (HDL). Using simple models we explain how these anomalies arise from the presence of two competing length scales. As a specific example we investigate the cut ramp potential, where we show the importance of "competition" in this context, and how one length scale can sometimes be zero. When there is a clear energetic preference for either LDL or HDL for all pressures and temperatures, then there is insufficient competition between the two liquid structures and no anomalies occur. From the simple models it also follows that anomalies can occur without the presence of a LLPT and vice versa. It remains therefore unclear if water has a LLPT that ends in a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP), a hypothesis that was first proposed based on simulations of the ST2 water model. We confirm the existence of a LLCP in this model using finite size scaling and the Challa-Landau-Binder parameter, and show that the LLPT is not a liquid-crystal transition, as has recently been suggested. Previous research has indicated the possible existence of a LLCP in liquid silica. We perform a detailed analysis of two different silica models (WAC and BKS) at temperatures much lower than was previously simulated. Within the accessible temperature range we find no LLCP in either model, although in the case of WAC potential it is closely approached. We compare our results with those obtained for other

  18. Liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter including strangeness

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.; Leinweber, D.B.; Williams, A.G.; Thomas, A.W.

    2004-11-01

    We apply the chiral SU(3) quark mean field model to study the properties of strange hadronic matter at finite temperature. The liquid-gas phase transition is studied as a function of the strangeness fraction. The pressure of the system cannot remain constant during the phase transition, since there are two independent conserved charges (baryon and strangeness number). In a range of temperatures around 15 MeV (precise values depending on the model used) the equation of state exhibits multiple bifurcates. The difference in the strangeness fraction f{sub s} between the liquid and gas phases is small when they coexist. The critical temperature of strange matter turns out to be a nontrivial function of the strangeness fraction.

  19. Interplay of the Glass Transition and the Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition in Water

    PubMed Central

    Giovambattista, Nicolas; Loerting, Thomas; Lukanov, Boris R.; Starr, Francis W.

    2012-01-01

    Water has multiple glassy states, often called amorphous ices. Low-density (LDA) and high-density (HDA) amorphous ice are separated by a dramatic, first-order like phase transition. It has been argued that the LDA-HDA transformation connects to a first-order liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) above the glass transition temperature Tg. Direct experimental evidence of the LLPT is challenging to obtain, since the LLPT occurs at conditions where water rapidly crystallizes. In this work, we explore the implications of a LLPT on the pressure dependence of Tg(P) for LDA and HDA by performing computer simulations of two water models – one with a LLPT, and one without. In the absence of a LLPT, Tg(P) for all glasses nearly coincide. When there is a LLPT, different glasses exhibit dramatically different Tg(P) which are directly linked with the LLPT. Available experimental data for Tg(P) are only consistent with the scenario including a LLPT. PMID:22550566

  20. Effect of dimensionality on vapor-liquid phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Sudhir Kumar

    2014-04-24

    Dimensionality play significant role on ‘phase transitions’. Fluids in macroscopic confinement (bulk or 3-Dimensional, 3D) do not show significant changes in their phase transition properties with extent of confinement, since the number of molecules away from the surrounding surfaces is astronomically higher than the number of molecules in close proximity of the confining surfaces. In microscopic confinement (quasi 3D to quasi-2D), however, the number of molecules away from the close proximity of the surface is not as high as is the case with macroscopic (3D) confinement. Hence, under the same thermodynamic conditions ‘phase transition’ properties at microscopic confinement may not remain the same as the macroscopic or 3D values. Phase transitions at extremely small scale become very sensitive to the dimensions as well as the surface characteristics of the system. In this work our investigations reveal the effect of dimensionality on the phase transition from 3D to quasi-2D to 2D behavior. We have used grand canonical transition matrix Monte Carlo simulation to understand the vapor–liquid phase transitions from 3D to quasi-2D behavior. Such studies can be helpful in understanding and controlling the fluid film behaviour confined between solid surfaces of few molecular diameters, for example, in lubrication applications.

  1. Computer simulations of liquid silica: Equation of state and liquid-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saika-Voivod, Ivan; Sciortino, Francesco; Poole, Peter H.

    2001-01-01

    We conduct extensive molecular dynamics computer simulations of two models for liquid silica [the model of Woodcock, Angell and Cheeseman, J. Phys. Chem. 65, 1565 (1976); and that of van Beest, Kramer, and van Santen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 1955 (1990)] to determine their thermodynamic properties at low temperature T across a wide density range. We find for both models a wide range of states in which isochores of the potential energy U are a linear function of T3/5, as recently proposed for simple liquids [Rosenfeld and P. Tarazona, Mol. Phys. 95, 141 (1998)]. We exploit this behavior to fit an accurate equation of state to our thermodynamic data. Extrapolation of this equation of state to low T predicts the occurrence of a liquid-liquid phase transition for both models. We conduct simulations in the region of the predicted phase transition, and confirm its existence by direct observation of phase separating droplets of atoms with distinct local density and coordination environments.

  2. String theory, quantum phase transitions, and the emergent Fermi liquid.

    PubMed

    Cubrović, Mihailo; Zaanen, Jan; Schalm, Koenraad

    2009-07-24

    A central problem in quantum condensed matter physics is the critical theory governing the zero-temperature quantum phase transition between strongly renormalized Fermi liquids as found in heavy fermion intermetallics and possibly in high-critical temperature superconductors. We found that the mathematics of string theory is capable of describing such fermionic quantum critical states. Using the anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory correspondence to relate fermionic quantum critical fields to a gravitational problem, we computed the spectral functions of fermions in the field theory. By increasing the fermion density away from the relativistic quantum critical point, a state emerges with all the features of the Fermi liquid. PMID:19556462

  3. Comparing two tetraalkylammonium ionic liquids. II. Phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Lima, Thamires A; Paschoal, Vitor H; Faria, Luiz F O; Ribeiro, Mauro C C; Ferreira, Fabio F; Costa, Fanny N; Giles, Carlos

    2016-06-14

    Phase transitions of the ionic liquids n-butyl-trimethylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1114][NTf2], and methyl-tributylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1444][NTf2], were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and Raman spectroscopy. XRD and Raman spectra were obtained as a function of temperature at atmospheric pressure, and also under high pressure at room temperature using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). [N1444][NTf2] experiences glass transition at low temperature, whereas [N1114][NTf2] crystallizes or not depending on the cooling rate. Both the ionic liquids exhibit glass transition under high pressure. XRD and low-frequency Raman spectra provide a consistent physical picture of structural ordering-disordering accompanying the thermal events of crystallization, glass transition, cold crystallization, pre-melting, and melting. Raman spectra in the high-frequency range of some specific cation and anion normal modes reveal conformational changes of the molecular structures along phase transitions. PMID:27306016

  4. Comparing two tetraalkylammonium ionic liquids. II. Phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Thamires A.; Paschoal, Vitor H.; Faria, Luiz F. O.; Ribeiro, Mauro C. C.; Ferreira, Fabio F.; Costa, Fanny N.; Giles, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Phase transitions of the ionic liquids n-butyl-trimethylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1114][NTf2], and methyl-tributylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1444][NTf2], were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and Raman spectroscopy. XRD and Raman spectra were obtained as a function of temperature at atmospheric pressure, and also under high pressure at room temperature using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). [N1444][NTf2] experiences glass transition at low temperature, whereas [N1114][NTf2] crystallizes or not depending on the cooling rate. Both the ionic liquids exhibit glass transition under high pressure. XRD and low-frequency Raman spectra provide a consistent physical picture of structural ordering-disordering accompanying the thermal events of crystallization, glass transition, cold crystallization, pre-melting, and melting. Raman spectra in the high-frequency range of some specific cation and anion normal modes reveal conformational changes of the molecular structures along phase transitions.

  5. Non-equilibrium phase transitions in a liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, K.; Roy, M.; Datta, A.

    2015-09-01

    The present manuscript describes kinetic behaviour of the glass transition and non-equilibrium features of the "Nematic-Isotropic" (N-I) phase transition of a well known liquid crystalline material N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline from the effects of heating rate and initial temperature on the transitions, through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy. Around the vicinity of the glass transition temperature (Tg), while only a change in the baseline of the ΔCp vs T curve is observed for heating rate (β) > 5 K min-1, consistent with a glass transition, a clear peak for β ≤ 5 K min-1 and the rapid reduction in the ΔCp value from the former to the latter rate correspond to an order-disorder transition and a transition from ergodic to non-ergodic behaviour. The ln β vs 1000/T curve for the glass transition shows convex Arrhenius behaviour that can be explained very well by a purely entropic activation barrier [Dan et al., Eur. Phys. Lett. 108, 36007 (2014)]. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates sudden freezing of the out-of-plane distortion vibrations of the benzene rings around the glass transition temperature and a considerable red shift indicating enhanced coplanarity of the benzene rings and, consequently, enhancement in the molecular ordering compared to room temperature. We further provide a direct experimental evidence of the non-equilibrium nature of the N-I transition through the dependence of this transition temperature (TNI) and associated enthalpy change (ΔH) on the initial temperature (at fixed β-values) for the DSC scans. A plausible qualitative explanation based on Mesquita's extension of Landau-deGennes theory [O. N. de Mesquita, Braz. J. Phys. 28, 257 (1998)] has been put forward. The change in the molecular ordering from nematic to isotropic phase has been investigated through fluorescence anisotropy measurements where the order parameter, quantified by the

  6. Modeling the solid-liquid phase transition in saturated triglycerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pink, David A.; Hanna, Charles B.; Sandt, Christophe; MacDonald, Adam J.; MacEachern, Ronald; Corkery, Robert; Rousseau, Dérick

    2010-02-01

    We investigated theoretically two competing published scenarios for the melting transition of the triglyceride trilaurin (TL): those of (1) Corkery et al. [Langmuir 23, 7241 (2007)], in which the average state of each TL molecule in the liquid phase is a discotic "Y" conformer whose three chains are dynamically twisted, with an average angle of ˜120° between them, and those of (2) Cebula et al. [J. Am. Oil Chem. Soc. 69, 130 (1992)], in which the liquid-state conformation of the TL molecule in the liquid phase is a nematic h∗-conformer whose three chains are in a modified "chair" conformation. We developed two competing models for the two scenarios, in which TL molecules are in a nematic compact-chair (or "h") conformation, with extended, possibly all-trans, chains at low-temperatures, and in either a Y conformation or an h∗ conformation in the liquid state at temperatures higher than the phase-transition temperature, T∗=319 K. We defined an h-Y model as a realization of the proposal of Corkery et al. [Langmuir 23, 7241 (2007)], and explored its predictions by mapping it onto an Ising model in a temperature-dependent field, performing a mean-field approximation, and calculating the transition enthalpy ΔH. We found that the most plausible realization of the h-Y model, as applied to the solid-liquid phase transition in TL, and likely to all saturated triglycerides, gave a value of ΔH in reasonable agreement with the experiment. We then defined an alternative h-h∗ model as a realization of the proposal of Cebula et al. [J. Am. Oil Chem. Soc. 69, 130 (1992)], in which the liquid phase exhibits an average symmetry breaking similar to an h conformation, but with twisted chains, to see whether it could describe the TL phase transition. The h-h∗ model gave a value of ΔH that was too small by a factor of ˜3-4. We also predicted the temperature dependence of the 1132 cm-1 Raman band for both models, and performed measurements of the ratios of three TL Raman

  7. Volume phase transitions of cholesteric liquid crystalline gels.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Akihiko

    2015-05-01

    We present a mean field theory to describe anisotropic deformations of a cholesteric elastomer without solvent molecules and a cholesteric liquid crystalline gel immersed in isotropic solvents at a thermal equilibrium state. Based on the neoclassical rubber theory of nematic elastomers, we derive an elastic energy and a twist distortion energy, which are important to determine the shape of a cholesteric elastomer (or gel). We demonstrate that when the elastic energy dominates in the free energy, the cholesteric elastomer causes a spontaneous compression in the pitch axis and elongates along the director on the plane perpendicular to the pitch axis. Our theory can qualitatively describe the experimental results of a cholesteric elastomer. We also predict the first-order volume phase transitions and anisotropic deformations of a gel at the cholesteric-isotropic phase transition temperature. Depending on a chirality of a gel, we find a prolate or oblate shape of cholesteric gels. PMID:25956120

  8. Volume phase transitions of cholesteric liquid crystalline gels

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, Akihiko

    2015-05-07

    We present a mean field theory to describe anisotropic deformations of a cholesteric elastomer without solvent molecules and a cholesteric liquid crystalline gel immersed in isotropic solvents at a thermal equilibrium state. Based on the neoclassical rubber theory of nematic elastomers, we derive an elastic energy and a twist distortion energy, which are important to determine the shape of a cholesteric elastomer (or gel). We demonstrate that when the elastic energy dominates in the free energy, the cholesteric elastomer causes a spontaneous compression in the pitch axis and elongates along the director on the plane perpendicular to the pitch axis. Our theory can qualitatively describe the experimental results of a cholesteric elastomer. We also predict the first-order volume phase transitions and anisotropic deformations of a gel at the cholesteric-isotropic phase transition temperature. Depending on a chirality of a gel, we find a prolate or oblate shape of cholesteric gels.

  9. Volume phase transitions of cholesteric liquid crystalline gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Akihiko

    2015-05-01

    We present a mean field theory to describe anisotropic deformations of a cholesteric elastomer without solvent molecules and a cholesteric liquid crystalline gel immersed in isotropic solvents at a thermal equilibrium state. Based on the neoclassical rubber theory of nematic elastomers, we derive an elastic energy and a twist distortion energy, which are important to determine the shape of a cholesteric elastomer (or gel). We demonstrate that when the elastic energy dominates in the free energy, the cholesteric elastomer causes a spontaneous compression in the pitch axis and elongates along the director on the plane perpendicular to the pitch axis. Our theory can qualitatively describe the experimental results of a cholesteric elastomer. We also predict the first-order volume phase transitions and anisotropic deformations of a gel at the cholesteric-isotropic phase transition temperature. Depending on a chirality of a gel, we find a prolate or oblate shape of cholesteric gels.

  10. Nature of the first-order liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G.; Yu, Y. J.; Tan, X. M.

    2015-08-01

    The first-order liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled Si is revisited by long-time first-principle molecular dynamics simulations. As the focus of the present paper, its nature is revealed by analyzing the inherent structures of low-density liquid (LDL) and high-density liquid (HDL). Our results show that it is a transition between a sp3-hybridization LDL and a white-tin-like HDL. This uncovers the origin of the semimetal-metal transition accompanying it and also proves that HDL is the metastable extension of high temperature equilibrium liquid into the supercooled regime. The pressure-temperature diagram of supercooled Si thus can be regarded in some respects as shifted reflection of its crystalline phase diagram.

  11. Structure, Hydrodynamics, and Phase Transition of Freely Suspended Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Noel A.

    2000-01-01

    Smectic liquid crystals are phases of rod shaped molecules organized into one dimensionally (1D) periodic arrays of layers, each layer being between one and two molecular lengths thick. In the least ordered smectic phases, the smectics A and C, each layer is a two dimensional (2D) liquid. Additionally there are a variety of more ordered smectic phases having hexatic short range translational order or 2D crystalline quasi long range translational order within the layers. The inherent fluid-layer structure and low vapor pressure of smectic liquid crystals enable the long term stabilization of freely suspended, single component, layered fluid films as thin as 30A, a single molecular layer. The layering forces the films to be an integral number of smectic layers thick, quantizing their thickness in layer units and forcing a film of a particular number of layers to be physically homogeneous with respect to its layer structure over its entire area. Optical reflectivity enables the precise determination of the number of layers. These ultrathin freely suspended liquid crystal films are structures of fundamental interest in condensed matter and fluid physics. They are the thinnest known stable condensed phase fluid structures and have the largest surface-to-volume ratio of any stable fluid preparation, making them ideal for the study of the effects of reduced dimensionality on phase behavior and on fluctuation and interface phenomena. Their low vapor pressure and quantized thickness enable the effective use of microgravity to extend the study of basic capillary phenomena to ultrathin fluid films. Freely suspended films have been a wellspring of new liquid crystal physics. They have been used to provide unique experimental conditions for the study of condensed phase transitions in two dimensions. They are the only system in which the hexatic has been unambiguously identified as a phase of matter, and the only physical system in which fluctuations of a 2D XY system and

  12. Structure of liquid phosphorus: A liquid-liquid phase transition via constant-pressure first-principles molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Tetsuya

    2001-12-01

    Constant-pressure first-principles molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to study structural phase transitions of liquid black phosphorus. By compressing the tetrahedral molecular liquid (a low-pressure phase), a structural phase transition from the molecular to polymeric liquid (a high-pressure phase) was successfully realized just as observed in the recent experiment by Katayama et al. [Nature 170 (2000) 403]. Structural properties in the polymeric liquid were investigated and it is found that the covalent p-state bonds are dominant within the first nearest neighbors of each atom. However, further compression of the polymeric liquid shows that the covalent bonding is weakened as pressure is increased. As a result, liquid phosphorus becomes similar to the simple liquid in which atoms form a close-packed structure at very high pressure.

  13. Phase diagrams of orientational transitions in absorbing nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zolot’ko, A. S. Ochkin, V. N.; Smayev, M. P.; Shvetsov, S. A.

    2015-05-15

    A theory of orientational transitions in nematic liquid crystals (NLCs), which employs the expansion of optical torques acting on the NLC director with respect to the rotation angle, has been developed for NLCs with additives of conformationally active compounds under the action of optical and low-frequency electric and magnetic fields. Phase diagrams of NLCs are constructed as a function of the intensity and polarization of the light field, the strength of low-frequency electric field, and a parameter that characterizes the feedback between the rotation of the NLC director and optical torque. Conditions for the occurrence of first- and second-order transitions are determined. The proposed theory agrees with available experimental data.

  14. Microgravity Studies of Liquid-Liquid Phase Transitions in Alumina-Yttria Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynes, Buddy (Technical Monitor); Weber, Richard; Nordine, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The scientific objective of this research is to increase the fundamental knowledge base for liquid- phase processing of technologically important oxide materials. The experimental objective is to define conditions and hardware requirements for microgravity flight experiments to test and expand the experimental hypotheses that: 1. Liquid phase transitions can occur in undercooled melts by a diffusionless process. 2. Onset of the liquid phase transition is accompanied by a large change in the temperature dependence of melt viscosity. Experiments on undercooled YAG (Y3A15012)- and rare earth oxide aluminate composition liquids demonstrated a large departure from an Arrhenian temperature dependence of viscosity. Liquid YAG is nearly inviscid at its 2240 K melting point. Glass fibers were pulled from melts undercooled by ca. 600 K indicating that the viscosity is on the order of 100 Pans (1000 Poise) at 1600 K. This value of viscosity is 500 times greater than that obtained by extrapolation of data for temperatures above the melting point of YAG. These results show that the liquids are extremely fragile and that the onset of the highly non-Arrhenian viscosity-temperature relationship occurs at a temperature considerably below the equilibrium melting point of the solid phases. Further results on undercooled alumina-yttria melts containing 23-42 mole % yttrium oxide indicate that a congruent liquid-liquid phase transition occurs in the undercooled liquids. The rates of transition are inconsistent with a diffusion-limited process. This research is directed to investigation of the scientifically interesting phenomena of polyamorphism and fragility in undercooled rare earth oxide aluminum oxide liquids. The results bear on the technologically important problem of producing high value rare earth-based optical materials.

  15. Evidence of a liquid-liquid phase transition in hot dense hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Dzyabura, Vasily; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Silvera, Isaac F

    2013-05-14

    We use pulsed-laser heating of hydrogen at static pressures in the megabar pressure region to search for the plasma phase transition to liquid atomic metallic hydrogen. We heat our samples substantially above the melting line and observe a plateau in a temperature vs. laser power curve that otherwise increases with power. This anomaly in the heating curve appears correlated with theoretical predictions for the plasma phase transition. PMID:23630287

  16. Relationship between the liquid liquid phase transition and dynamic behaviour in the Jagla model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Limei; Ehrenberg, Isaac; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2006-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study a spherically symmetric 'two-scale' Jagla potential with both repulsive and attractive ramps. This potential displays a liquid-liquid phase transition with a positively sloped coexistence line ending at a critical point well above the equilibrium melting line. We study the dynamic behaviour in the vicinity of this liquid-liquid critical point. Below the critical point, we find that the dynamics in the more ordered high density liquid (HDL) are much slower then the dynamics in the less ordered low density liquid (LDL). Moreover, the behaviour of the diffusion constant and relaxation time in the HDL phase follows approximately an Arrhenius law, while in the LDL phase the slope of the Arrhenius fit increases upon cooling. Above the critical pressure, as we cool the system at constant pressure, the behaviour of the dynamics smoothly changes with temperature. It resembles the behaviour of the LDL at high temperatures and resembles the behaviour of the HDL at low temperatures. This dynamic crossover happens in the vicinity of the Widom line (the extension of the coexistence line into the one-phase region) which also has a positive slope. Our work suggests a possible general relation between a liquid-liquid phase transition and the change in dynamics.

  17. Semiphenomenological model for gas-liquid phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Benilov, E S; Benilov, M S

    2016-03-01

    We examine a rarefied gas with inter-molecular attraction. It is argued that the attraction force amplifies random density fluctuations by pulling molecules from lower-density regions into high-density regions and thus may give rise to an instability. To describe this effect, we use a kinetic equation where the attraction force is taken into account in a way similar to how electromagnetic forces in plasma are treated in the Vlasov model. It is demonstrated that the instability occurs when the temperature T is lower than a certain threshold value T(s) depending on the gas density. It is further shown that, even if T is only marginally lower than T(s), the instability generates clusters with density much higher than that of the gas. These results suggest that the instability should be interpreted as a gas-liquid phase transition, with T(s) being the temperature of saturated vapor and the high-density clusters representing liquid droplets. PMID:27078333

  18. Structural crossover in a supercooled metallic liquid and the link to a liquid-to-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, S.; Blodgett, M.; Kelton, K. F.; Ma, J. L.; Fan, J.; Wang, X.-L.

    2016-05-01

    Time-resolved synchrotron measurements were carried out to capture the structure evolution of an electrostatically levitated metallic-glass-forming liquid during free cooling. The experimental data shows a crossover in the liquid structure at ˜1000 K, about 115 K below the melting temperature and 150 K above the crystallization temperature. The structure change is characterized by a dramatic growth in the extended-range order below the crossover temperature. Molecular dynamics simulations have identified that the growth of the extended-range order was due to an increased correlation between solute atoms. These results provide structural evidence for a liquid-to-liquid-phase-transition in the supercooled metallic liquid.

  19. Micellar structures in lyotropic liquid crystals and phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saupe, A.; Xu, S. Y.; Plumley, Sulakshana; Zhu, Y. K.; Photinos, P.

    1991-05-01

    The formation of micellar nematics is discussed with emphasis on the transitions between nematic phases and nematic-smectic transitions. Phase diagrams for MTAB/l-decanol/D,O systems show a direct transition between uniaxial nematics. Electrical conductivity and birefringence measurements on a mixture of sodium decylsulfate. 1-decanol, D,O demonstrate, on the other hand, the existence of a biaxial nemantic range that separates the Uniaxial nematics. On a mixture of cesium perflouroctanoate and H 2O the electrical conductivity and rotational viscosity are used to discuss the relevant features of nematic-lamellar-smectic transitions. The formation of elongated ribbon-like micelles at the nematic-smectic transition is suggested. Transitions between different nematic phases in the MTAB system may be connected with a structural change from long micelles with a fairly circular cross section to similar micelles with a more elliptical cross section.

  20. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transitions of Phosphorus via Constant-Pressure First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Tetsuya

    2001-09-01

    Pressure-induced phase transitions in liquid phosphorus have been studied by constant-pressure first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. By compressing a low-pressure liquid which consists of the tetrahedral P4 molecules, a structural phase transition from the molecular to polymeric liquid (a high-pressure phase) observed in the recent experiment by Katayama et al. [Nature (London) 403, 170 (2000)] was successfully realized. It is found that this transition is caused by a breakup of the tetrahedral molecules with large volume contraction. The same transition is also realized by heating. This indicates that only the polymeric liquid can stably exist at high temperature.

  1. Growth Kinetics of Intracellular RNA/Protein Droplets: Signature of a Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Joel; Weber, Stephanie C.; Vaidya, Nilesh; Zhu, Lian; Haataja, Mikko; Brangwynne, Clifford P.

    2015-03-01

    Nonmembrane-bound organelles are functional, dynamic assemblies of RNA and/or protein that can self-assemble and disassemble within the cytoplasm or nucleoplasm. The possibility that underlying intracellular phase transitions may drive and mediate the morphological evolution of some membrane-less organelles has been supported by several recent studies. In this talk, results from a collaborative experimental-theoretical study of the growth and dissolution kinetics of nucleoli and extranucleolar droplets (ENDs) in C. elegans embryos will be presented. We have employed Flory-Huggins solution theory, reaction-diffusion kinetics, and quantitative statistical dynamic scaling analysis to characterize the specific growth mechanisms at work. Our findings indicate that both in vivo and in vitro droplet scaling and growth kinetics are consistent with those resulting from an equilibrium liquid-liquid phase transition mediated by passive nonequilibrium growth mechanisms - simultaneous Brownian coalescence and Ostwald ripening. This supports a view in which cells can employ phase transitions to drive structural organization, while utilizing active processes, such as local transcriptional activity, to fine tune the kinetics of these phase transitions in response to given conditions.

  2. Paraelectric-antiferroelectric phase transition in achiral liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pociecha, Damian; Gorecka, Ewa; Čepič, Mojca; Vaupotič, Nataša; Gomola, Kinga; Mieczkowski, Jozef

    2005-12-01

    Critical freezing of molecular rotation in an achiral smectic phase, which leads to polar ordering through the second order paraelectric-antiferroelectric (Sm-A→Sm-APA) phase transition is studied theoretically and experimentally. Strong softening of the polar mode in the Sm-A phase and highly intensive dielectric mode in the Sm-APA phase are observed due to weak antiferroelectric interactions in the system. In the Sm-APA phase the dielectric response behaves critically upon biasing by a dc electric field. Such a behavior is found general for the antiferroelectric smectic phase with significant quadrupolar interlayer coupling.

  3. Anomalous properties and the liquid-liquid phase transition in gallium.

    PubMed

    Li, Renzhong; Sun, Gang; Xu, Limei

    2016-08-01

    A group of materials including water and silicon exhibit many anomalous behaviors, e.g., density anomaly and diffusivity anomaly (increase upon compression). These materials are hypothesized to have a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) and the critical fluctuation in the vicinity of the liquid-liquid critical point is considered as the origin of different anomalies. Liquid gallium was also reported to have a LLPT, yet whether it shows similar water-like anomalies is not yet studied. Using molecular dynamics simulations on a modified embedded-atom model, we study the thermodynamic, dynamic, and structural properties of liquid gallium as well as its LLPT. We find that, similar to water-like materials predicted to have the LLPT, gallium also shows different anomalous behaviors (e.g., density anomaly, diffusivity anomaly, and structural anomaly). We also find that its thermodynamic and structural response functions are continuous and show maxima in the supercritical region, the loci of which asymptotically approach to the other and merge to the Widom line. These phenomena are consistent with the supercritical phenomenon in a category of materials with a liquid-liquid critical point, which could be common features in most materials with a LLPT. PMID:27497564

  4. Anomalous properties and the liquid-liquid phase transition in gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Renzhong; Sun, Gang; Xu, Limei

    2016-08-01

    A group of materials including water and silicon exhibit many anomalous behaviors, e.g., density anomaly and diffusivity anomaly (increase upon compression). These materials are hypothesized to have a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) and the critical fluctuation in the vicinity of the liquid-liquid critical point is considered as the origin of different anomalies. Liquid gallium was also reported to have a LLPT, yet whether it shows similar water-like anomalies is not yet studied. Using molecular dynamics simulations on a modified embedded-atom model, we study the thermodynamic, dynamic, and structural properties of liquid gallium as well as its LLPT. We find that, similar to water-like materials predicted to have the LLPT, gallium also shows different anomalous behaviors (e.g., density anomaly, diffusivity anomaly, and structural anomaly). We also find that its thermodynamic and structural response functions are continuous and show maxima in the supercritical region, the loci of which asymptotically approach to the other and merge to the Widom line. These phenomena are consistent with the supercritical phenomenon in a category of materials with a liquid-liquid critical point, which could be common features in most materials with a LLPT.

  5. Supercritical phenomenon of hydrogen beyond the liquid-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Renzhong; Chen, Ji; Li, Xinzheng; Wang, Enge; Xu, Limei

    2015-06-01

    Using ab initio molecular dynamics simulation, we investigate the supercritical phenomenon associated with the liquid-liquid phase transition of hydrogen by studying the isothermal response functions, such as electric conductivity, molecular dissociation coefficient and isothermal compressibility, with respect to pressure. We find that, along each isotherm in the supercritical region, each of these response functions shows a maximum, the location of which is different for different response functions. As temperature decreases, the loci of these maxima asymptotically converge to a line of zero ordering field, known as the Widom line along which the magnitude of the response function maxima becomes larger and larger until it diverges as the critical point is approached. Thus, our study provides a possible way to locate the liquid-liquid critical point of hydrogen from the supercritical region at lower pressures. It also indicates that the supercritical phonomenon near the critical point of hydrogen is a rather general feature of second-order phase transition, it is not only true for classical systems with weak interactions but also true for highly condensed system with strong inter-atomic interactions.

  6. Revisiting dynamics near a liquid-liquid phase transition in Si and Ga: The fragile-to-strong transition

    SciTech Connect

    Cajahuaringa, Samuel; Koning, Maurice de Antonelli, Alex

    2013-12-14

    Using molecular dynamics simulations we analyze the dynamics of two atomic liquids that display a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT): Si described by the Stillinger-Weber potential and Ga as modeled by the modified embedded-atom model. In particular, our objective is to investigate the extent to which the presence of a dip in the self-intermediate scattering function is a manifestation of an excess of vibrational states at low frequencies and may be associated with a fragile-to-strong transition (FTST) across the LLPT, as suggested recently. Our results suggest a somewhat different picture. First, in the case of Ga we observe the appearance of an excess of vibrational states at low frequencies, even in the absence of the appearance of a dip in the self-intermediate scattering function across the LLPT. Second, studying the behavior of the shear viscosities traversing the LLPTs we find that both substances are fragile in character above and below their respective LLPT temperatures. Instead of a FTST in an absolute sense these findings are more in line with a view in which the LLPTs are accompanied by a transition from a more fragile to a less fragile liquid. Furthermore, we do not find this transition to correlate with the presence of a dip in the intermediate scattering function.

  7. Phase transition dynamics of liquid phase precipitation from a supersaturated gas mixture.

    PubMed

    Pines, V; Zlatkowski, M; Chait, A

    2004-11-01

    This work presents a self-consistent description of phase transition dynamics of disperse liquid phase precipitating from a supersaturated gas mixture. The unified approach integrates the macroscale transport phenomena of cloud dynamics with the essential microphysical kinetic processes of droplet condensation, evaporation, and droplet collisions simultaneously taking place in stochastic population of liquid droplets. A complete set of governing equations with well-defined dissipative fluxes and kinetic rates is derived for phase transition dynamics from nucleation to postnucleation to coarsening stages. The local thermodynamics of precipitating system, which is considered as ternary mixture of disperse liquid phase and water vapor with dry air, is redefined to explicitly include on equal basis both the vapor content and liquid content into the fundamental thermodynamic relations and equation of state. The molecular kinetic flux regularization method for growth of submicron droplets is reexamined to include, among others, significant contribution of vapor molecular energy flux into total heat flux, resulting in new expressions for the droplet temperature, growth rate, and effective diffusion coefficients. The local kinetic rates are determined on the basis of microscale kinetic equation for the droplet distribution function. This is in contrast to commonly used semiempirical parametrization schemes for kinetic rates with adjustable parameters, wherein the probabilistic aspects of microphysical processes are not rigorously addressed. Stochastic diffusion interactions among droplets competing for the available water vapor and modifications in the kinetic equation for droplets growing in stochastic population with direct long-range diffusion interactions amongst them are discussed and formulated as well. PMID:15527359

  8. Dynamical and structural heterogeneities close to liquid-liquid phase transitions: The case of gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Alex; Cajahuaringa, Samuel; de Koning, Maurice

    2013-03-01

    Liquid-liquid phase transitions (LLPT) have been proposed in order to explain the thermodynamic anomalies exhibited by some liquids. Recently, it was found, through molecular dynamics simulations, that liquid elemental gallium, described by a modified embedded-atom model, exhibits a LLPT between a high-density liquid (HDL) and a low-density liquid (LDL), about 60 K below the melting temperature. In this work, we studied the dynamics of supercooled liquid gallium close to the LLPT. Our results show a large increase in the plateau of the self-intermediate scattering function (β-relaxation process) and in the non-Gaussian parameter, indicating a pronounced dynamical heterogeneity upon the onset of the LLPT. The dynamical heterogeneity of the LDL is closely correlated to its structural heterogeneity, since the fast diffusing atoms belong to high-density domains of predominantly 9-fold coordinated atoms, whereas the slow diffusing ones are mostly in low-density domains of 8-fold coordinated atoms. The energetics suggests that the reason for the sluggish dynamics of LDL is due to its larger cohesive energy as compared to that of the HDL. Work supported by FAPESP, CNPq, CAPES, and FAEPEX/UNICAMP

  9. Modified phase-field-crystal model for solid-liquid phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Can; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Guo, Yaolin; Tang, Sai

    2015-07-01

    A modified phase-field-crystal (PFC) model is proposed to describe solid-liquid phase transitions by reconstructing the correlation function. The effects of fitting parameters of our modified PFC model on the bcc-liquid phase diagram, numerical stability, and solid-liquid interface properties during planar interface growth are examined carefully. The results indicate that the increase of the correlation function peak width at k =km will enhance the stability of the ordered phase, while the increase of peak height at k =0 will narrow the two-phase coexistence region. The third-order term in the free-energy function and the short wave-length of the correlation function have significant influences on the numerical stability of the PFC model. During planar interface growth, the increase of peak width at k =km will decrease the interface width and the velocity coefficient C , but increase the anisotropy of C and the interface free energy. Finally, the feasibility of the modified phase-field-crystal model is demonstrated with a numerical example of three-dimensional dendritic growth of a body-centered-cubic structure.

  10. Modified phase-field-crystal model for solid-liquid phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Can; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Guo, Yaolin; Tang, Sai

    2015-07-01

    A modified phase-field-crystal (PFC) model is proposed to describe solid-liquid phase transitions by reconstructing the correlation function. The effects of fitting parameters of our modified PFC model on the bcc-liquid phase diagram, numerical stability, and solid-liquid interface properties during planar interface growth are examined carefully. The results indicate that the increase of the correlation function peak width at k=k(m) will enhance the stability of the ordered phase, while the increase of peak height at k=0 will narrow the two-phase coexistence region. The third-order term in the free-energy function and the short wave-length of the correlation function have significant influences on the numerical stability of the PFC model. During planar interface growth, the increase of peak width at k=k(m) will decrease the interface width and the velocity coefficient C, but increase the anisotropy of C and the interface free energy. Finally, the feasibility of the modified phase-field-crystal model is demonstrated with a numerical example of three-dimensional dendritic growth of a body-centered-cubic structure. PMID:26274309

  11. Unusual liquid-liquid phase transition in aqueous mixtures of a well-known dendrimer.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Viviana C P; Annunziata, Onofrio

    2015-11-21

    Liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) has been extensively investigated for polymer and protein solutions due to its importance in mixture thermodynamics, separation science and self-assembly processes. However, to date, no experimental studies have been reported on LLPS of dendrimer solutions. Here, it is shown that LLPS of aqueous solutions containing a hydroxyl-functionalized poly(amido amine) dendrimer of fourth generation is induced in the presence of sodium sulfate. Both the LLPS temperature and salt-dendrimer partitioning between the two coexisting phases at constant temperature were measured. Interestingly, our experiments show that LLPS switches from being induced by cooling to being induced by heating as the salt concentration increases. The two coexisting phases also show opposite temperature response. Thus, this phase transition exhibits a simultaneous lower and upper critical solution temperature-type behavior. Dynamic light-scattering and dye-binding experiments indicate that no appreciable conformational change occurs as the salt concentration increases. To explain the observed phase behavior, a thermodynamic model based on two parameters was developed. The first parameter, which describes dendrimer-dendrimer interaction energy, was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. The second parameter describes the salt salting-out strength. By varying the salting-out parameter, it is shown that the model achieves agreement not only with the location of the experimental binodal at 25 °C but also with the slope of this curve around the critical point. The proposed model also predicts that the unusual temperature behavior of this phase transition can be described as the net result of two thermodynamic factors with opposite temperature responses: salt thermodynamic non-ideality and salting-out strength. PMID:26451401

  12. Quasi-liquid layer theory based on the bulk first-order phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhkin, I. A. Petrenko, V. F.

    2009-01-15

    The theory of the superionic phase transition (bulk first-order transition) proposed in [1] is used to explain the existence of a quasi-liquid layer at an ice surface below its melting point. An analytical expression is derived for the quasi-liquid layer thickness. Numerical estimates are made and compared with experiment. Distinction is made between the present model and other quasi-liquid layer theories.

  13. Giant Magnetic Field-induced Phase Transitions in Dimeric Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salili, Seyyed Muhammad; Salamonczyk, Miroslaw; Tamba, Maria-Gabriela; Sprunt, Samuel; Mehl, Georg; Jakli, Antal; Gleeson, James; Kent Group Collaboration; Hull Group Collaboration

    Liquid crystals are responsive to external fields such as electric, magnetic fields. The first experimental observation of dependence of isotropic to nematic phase transition on the applied magnetic field was done using a strong magnetic field on bent-core nematogens and the phase transition temperature exhibited an upshift of 0.7 C at B =30 T. We report on measurements of giant magnetic field-induced isotropic-nematic transition of chainsticks (nunchuks) type dimeric liquid crystals. Upon using the B =25 T split-helix resistive solenoid magnet at NHMFL, we have observed up to 18 C upshift of the isotropic to nematic phase transition temperature at B =22T. We discuss the results within the context of differential thermodynamic potential and the two basic mean-field theories. To our knowledge, this is the first observation of such huge shifts in the phase transitions of thermotropic liquid ctystals

  14. Amphiphilic Liquid Crystal Exhibiting the Smectic A to Smectic C Phase Transition without Layer Contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Norihiro; Takanishi, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Jun; Yoshizawa, Atsushi

    2011-02-01

    We prepared an amphiphilic liquid crystal composed of a semiperfluorinated alkyl chain and a 2,3-difluoro-1,4-diphenylbenzene core, and investigated its physical properties using polarized optical microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The compound was found to exhibit the smectic A to smectic C phase transition without layer contraction. The compound doped with a ferroelectric liquid crystal exhibited a fast electro-optical switching with a response time of 10 µs in the chiral smectic A phase in spite of the absence of a chiral smectic C phase. The phase transition behavior is interpreted using the de Vries cone model.

  15. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition and Its Phase Diagram in Deeply-Cooled Heavy Water Confined in a Nanoporous Silica Matrix.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Ito, Kanae; Leão, Juscelino B; Harriger, Leland; Liu, Yun; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-06-01

    Using neutron diffraction technique, we measure the average density of the heavy water confined in a nanoporous silica matrix, MCM-41, over the pressure-temperature plane. The result suggests the existence of a line of liquid-liquid phase transition with its end point at 1.29 ± 0.34 kbar and 213 ± 3 K in a fully hydrated sample. This point would be the liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) according to the "liquid-liquid critical point" scenario. The phase diagram of the deeply cooled confined heavy water is then discussed. Moreover, in a partially hydrated sample, the phase transition completely disappears. This result shows that it is the free water part, rather than the bound water part, of the confined water that undergoes a liquid-liquid transition. PMID:26266493

  16. Photo-stimulated phase and anchoring transitions of chiral azo-dye doped nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Sudarshan; Kang, Shin-Woong

    2013-12-16

    We report concurring phase and anchoring transitions of chiral azo-dye doped nematic liquid crystals. The transitions are induced by photo-stimulation and stable against light and thermal treatments. Photochromic trans- to cis-isomerization of azo-dye induces an augmented dipole moment and strong dipole-dipole interaction of the cis-isomers, resulting in the formation of nano-sized dye-aggregates. Consequent phase separation of the aggregates of a chiral azo-dye induces phase transition from a chiral to nonchiral nematic phase. In addition, the deposition of dye-aggregates at the surfaces brings about anchoring transition of LC molecules. The stability and irreversibility of the transition, together with no need of pretreatments for LC alignment, provide fascinating opportunity for liquid crystal device applications. PMID:24514707

  17. Micellar-shape anisometry near isotropic-liquid-crystal phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itri, R.; Amaral, L. Q.

    1993-04-01

    Micellar phases of the sodium dodecyl (lauryl) sulfate (SLS)-water-decanol system have been studied by x-ray scattering in the isotropic (I) phase, with emphasis on the I-->hexagonal (Hα) and I-->nematic-cylindrical (Nc) lyotropic liquid-crystal phase transitions. Analysis of the scattering curves is made through modeling of the product P(q)S(q), where P(q) is the micellar form factor and S(q) is the intermicellar interference function, calculated from screened Coulombic repulsion in a mean spherical approximation. Results show that micelles grow more by decanol addition near the I-->Nc transition (anisometry ν~=3) than by increased amphiphile concentration in the binary system near the I-->Hα phase transition (ν~=2.4). These results compare well with recent theories for isotropic-liquid-crystal phase transitions.

  18. Evidence of a Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition Hot Dense Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvera, Isaac; Dzyabura, Vasily; Zaghoo, Mohamed

    2013-03-01

    We use pulsed laser heating of hydrogen at static pressures in the megabar pressure region generated in a diamond anvil cell to search for the plasma phase transition (PPT) to liquid atomic metallic hydrogen. Heating the sample substantially above the melting line we observe a plateau in a temperature vs laser power curve that otherwise increases with power. This anomaly in the heating curve is closely correlated with theoretical predictions for the PPT, falling within the theoretically predicted range and having a negative slope with increasing pressure. Details will be presented. The NSF, grant DMR-0804378 and the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance program, grant DE-FG52-10NA29656 supported this research.

  19. Topology-driven quantum phase transitions in time-reversal-invariant anyonic quantum liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gils, Charlotte; Trebst, Simon; Kitaev, Alexei; Ludwig, Andreas W. W.; Troyer, Matthias; Wang, Zhenghan

    2009-11-01

    Indistinguishable particles in two dimensions can be characterized by anyonic quantum statistics, which is more general than that of bosons or fermions. Anyons emerge as quasiparticles in fractional quantum Hall states and in certain frustrated quantum magnets. Quantum liquids of anyons show degenerate ground states, where the degeneracy depends on the topology of the underlying surface. Here, we present a new type of continuous quantum phase transition in such anyonic quantum liquids, which is driven by quantum fluctuations of the topology. The critical state connecting two anyonic liquids on surfaces with different topologies is reminiscent of the notion of a `quantum foam' with fluctuations on all length scales. This exotic quantum phase transition arises in a microscopic model of interacting anyons for which we present an exact solution in a linear geometry. We introduce an intuitive physical picture of this model that unifies string nets and loop gases, and provide a simple description of topological quantum phases and their phase transitions.

  20. On the existence of vapor-liquid phase transition in dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, M.; Avinash, K.; Sen, A.; Ganesh, R.

    2014-10-01

    The phenomenon of phase transition in a dusty-plasma system (DPS) has attracted some attention in the past. Earlier Farouki and Hamaguchi [J. Chem. Phys. 101, 9876 (1994)] have demonstrated the existence of a liquid to solid transition in DPS where the dust particles interact through a Yukawa potential. However, the question of the existence of a vapor-liquid (VL) transition in such a system remains unanswered and relatively unexplored so far. We have investigated this problem by performing extensive molecular dynamics simulations which show that the VL transition does not have a critical curve in the pressure versus volume diagram for a large range of the Yukawa screening parameter κ and the Coulomb coupling parameter Γ. Thus, the VL phase transition is found to be super-critical, meaning that this transition is continuous in the dusty plasma model given by Farouki and Hamaguchi. We provide an approximate analytic explanation of this finding by means of a simple model calculation.

  1. On the existence of vapor-liquid phase transition in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, M.; Sen, A.; Ganesh, R.; Avinash, K.

    2014-10-15

    The phenomenon of phase transition in a dusty-plasma system (DPS) has attracted some attention in the past. Earlier Farouki and Hamaguchi [J. Chem. Phys. 101, 9876 (1994)] have demonstrated the existence of a liquid to solid transition in DPS where the dust particles interact through a Yukawa potential. However, the question of the existence of a vapor-liquid (VL) transition in such a system remains unanswered and relatively unexplored so far. We have investigated this problem by performing extensive molecular dynamics simulations which show that the VL transition does not have a critical curve in the pressure versus volume diagram for a large range of the Yukawa screening parameter κ and the Coulomb coupling parameter Γ. Thus, the VL phase transition is found to be super-critical, meaning that this transition is continuous in the dusty plasma model given by Farouki and Hamaguchi. We provide an approximate analytic explanation of this finding by means of a simple model calculation.

  2. Evidence of a liquid–liquid phase transition in hot dense hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Dzyabura, Vasily; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Silvera, Isaac F.

    2013-01-01

    We use pulsed-laser heating of hydrogen at static pressures in the megabar pressure region to search for the plasma phase transition to liquid atomic metallic hydrogen. We heat our samples substantially above the melting line and observe a plateau in a temperature vs. laser power curve that otherwise increases with power. This anomaly in the heating curve appears correlated with theoretical predictions for the plasma phase transition. PMID:23630287

  3. Critical behaviour of ionic solutions in non-polar solvents with a liquid - liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröer, W.; Kleemeier, M.; Plikat, M.; Weiss, V.; Wiegand, S.

    1996-11-01

    Turbidity measurements showing crossover from mean-field to Ising criticality have been reported by Narayanan and Pitzer for the liquid - liquid phase transition in ionic solutions of alkyl-ammonium picrates in higher alcohols. The Ising region was found to increase with the dielectric permittivity D for solvents with 4 < D < 8. It was conjectured that the Ising region becomes too small to be observed for lower values of D, which is in accordance with the finding of mean-field criticality in the system triethylhexylammonium triethylhexylborate 0953-8984/8/47/023/img1 in diphenyl ether 0953-8984/8/47/023/img2, where 0953-8984/8/47/023/img3. In order to check this hypothesis, we investigate solutions of salts in non-protonating solvents with D<2.5. The systems are tetrabutylammonium naphthyl sulphonate 0953-8984/8/47/023/img4 in toluene and tributylheptylammonium dodecyl sulphate 0953-8984/8/47/023/img5 in cyclohexane. The location of the critical points in the corresponding state diagram is in general agreement with the model system of charged hard spheres in a dielectric continuum, i.e. the restricted primitive model (RPM). However, changes of 0953-8984/8/47/023/img6 by minute variations of the salt and of the solvent (toluene, xylene, ethylbenzene) cannot be explained by the RPM. We report measurements of the phase diagram and light-scattering results. The amplitudes of the correlation length are up to an order of magnitude larger than those typically found in non-ionic fluids. For the new systems, but also for the solution of 0953-8984/8/47/023/img7 in 0953-8984/8/47/023/img8, Ising criticality is found in the region of 0953-8984/8/47/023/img9.

  4. Field-induced phase transitions in chiral smectic liquid crystals studied by the constant current method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H, Dhaouadi; R, Zgueb; O, Riahi; F, Trabelsi; T, Othman

    2016-05-01

    In ferroelectric liquid crystals, phase transitions can be induced by an electric field. The current constant method allows these transition to be quickly localized and thus the (E,T) phase diagram of the studied product can be obtained. In this work, we make a slight modification to the measurement principles based on this method. This modification allows the characteristic parameters of ferroelectric liquid crystal to be quantitatively measured. The use of a current square signal highlights a phenomenon of ferroelectric hysteresis with remnant polarization at null field, which points out an effect of memory in this compound.

  5. Electric field effects on phase transitions in the 8CB liquid crystal doped with ferroelectric nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Daoudi, A.; Segovia-Mera, A.; Dubois, F.; Legrand, C.; Douali, R.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of a low ac electric field on phase transitions is discussed in the case of a nematic liquid crystal 4 -n -octyl-4 '-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) doped with Sn2P2S6 ferroelectric nanoparticles. The phase-transition temperatures obtained from temperature-dependent dielectric measurements were higher than those determined by the calorimetric method. This difference is explained by the presence of the measuring electric field which induces two effects. The first one is the amplification of the interactions between the nanoparticle polarization and the liquid-crystal order parameter. The second one is the field-induced disaggregation or aggregation process at high nanoparticle concentrations.

  6. Liquid-liquid phase transition in hydrogen by coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierleoni, Carlo; Morales, Miguel A.; Rillo, Giovanni; Holzmann, Markus

    2016-05-01

    The phase diagram of high-pressure hydrogen is of great interest for fundamental research, planetary physics, and energy applications. A first-order phase transition in the fluid phase between a molecular insulating fluid and a monoatomic metallic fluid has been predicted. The existence and precise location of the transition line is relevant for planetary models. Recent experiments reported contrasting results about the location of the transition. Theoretical results based on density functional theory are also very scattered. We report highly accurate coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo calculations of this transition, finding results that lie between the two experimental predictions, close to that measured in diamond anvil cell experiments but at 25-30 GPa higher pressure. The transition along an isotherm is signaled by a discontinuity in the specific volume, a sudden dissociation of the molecules, a jump in electrical conductivity, and loss of electron localization.

  7. Liquid-liquid phase transition in hydrogen by coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Pierleoni, Carlo; Morales, Miguel A; Rillo, Giovanni; Holzmann, Markus; Ceperley, David M

    2016-05-01

    The phase diagram of high-pressure hydrogen is of great interest for fundamental research, planetary physics, and energy applications. A first-order phase transition in the fluid phase between a molecular insulating fluid and a monoatomic metallic fluid has been predicted. The existence and precise location of the transition line is relevant for planetary models. Recent experiments reported contrasting results about the location of the transition. Theoretical results based on density functional theory are also very scattered. We report highly accurate coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo calculations of this transition, finding results that lie between the two experimental predictions, close to that measured in diamond anvil cell experiments but at 25-30 GPa higher pressure. The transition along an isotherm is signaled by a discontinuity in the specific volume, a sudden dissociation of the molecules, a jump in electrical conductivity, and loss of electron localization. PMID:27099295

  8. A Liquid-to-Solid Phase Transition of the ALS Protein FUS Accelerated by Disease Mutation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Avinash; Lee, Hyun O; Jawerth, Louise; Maharana, Shovamayee; Jahnel, Marcus; Hein, Marco Y; Stoynov, Stoyno; Mahamid, Julia; Saha, Shambaditya; Franzmann, Titus M; Pozniakovski, Andrej; Poser, Ina; Maghelli, Nicola; Royer, Loic A; Weigert, Martin; Myers, Eugene W; Grill, Stephan; Drechsel, David; Hyman, Anthony A; Alberti, Simon

    2015-08-27

    Many proteins contain disordered regions of low-sequence complexity, which cause aging-associated diseases because they are prone to aggregate. Here, we study FUS, a prion-like protein containing intrinsically disordered domains associated with the neurodegenerative disease ALS. We show that, in cells, FUS forms liquid compartments at sites of DNA damage and in the cytoplasm upon stress. We confirm this by reconstituting liquid FUS compartments in vitro. Using an in vitro "aging" experiment, we demonstrate that liquid droplets of FUS protein convert with time from a liquid to an aggregated state, and this conversion is accelerated by patient-derived mutations. We conclude that the physiological role of FUS requires forming dynamic liquid-like compartments. We propose that liquid-like compartments carry the trade-off between functionality and risk of aggregation and that aberrant phase transitions within liquid-like compartments lie at the heart of ALS and, presumably, other age-related diseases. PMID:26317470

  9. Thermodynamic properties and phase transitions of α, γ and liquid uranium: QMD and classical MD modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanilkin, Alexey; Migdal, Kirill; Pokatashkin, Pavel; Sergeev, Oleg

    2015-06-01

    The application of molecular dynamics allows us to take into account the influence of thermal properties on thermodynamic properties and phase transitions. In this work different uranium phases are investigated at finite temperatures by means quantum and classical molecular dynamics. In order to verify simulations the lattice constants, elastic modulus, isotherms, Gruniesen coefficient and heat expansion are calculated for α, γ and liquid phases. The results are in good agreement with experimental data. The stability of high temperature γ phase is discussed. The diffusion coefficient is calculated for liquid phase at different densities and pressure. The boundaries of phase stability are estimated based on QMD results. Furthermore hugoniot calculated is in a good agreement with other calculations and experimental data up to 2TPa. In order to investigate phase transitions EAM interatomic potentials are derived by force-matching method. Different parameterizations are used for different part of phase diagram to improve the reproduction of QMD data. The coexistence and transition rates of two phases are investigated based on Z- and two phase methods.

  10. The Boson peak in confined water: An experimental investigation of the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-10-01

    The Boson peak (BP) of deeply cooled confined water is studied by using inelastic neutron scattering (INS) in a large interval of the ( P, T) phase plane. By taking into account the different behavior of such a collective vibrational mode in both strong and fragile glasses as well as in glass-forming materials, we were able to determine the Widom line that characterizes supercooled bulk water within the frame of the liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) hypothesis. The peak frequency and width of the BP correlated with the water polymorphism of the LLPT scenario, allowing us to distinguish the "low-density liquid" (LDL) and "high-density liquid" (HDL) phases in deeply cooled bulk water.Moreover, the BP properties afford a further confirmation of theWidom line temperature T W as the ( P, T) locus in which the local structure of water transforms from a predominately LDL form to a predominately HDL form.

  11. Phase Transition and Dynamics in Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquid Crystals through a Metastable Highly Ordered Smectic Phase.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Yoko; Yamaguchi, Keito; Tomida, Kenji; Taniguchi, Natsumi; Hara, Hironori; Takikawa, Yoshinori; Sadakane, Koichiro; Nakamura, Kenji; Konishi, Takashi; Fukao, Koji

    2016-06-16

    The phase transition behavior and dynamics of ionic liquid crystals, 1-methyl-3-alkylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate with various alkyl chain lengths, were investigated by X-ray scattering, differential scanning calorimetry, optical microscopy, and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy to elucidate the mechanism of their structural and phase changes. A metastable phase was found to appear via a supercooled smectic phase on cooling. In the metastable phase, disorder in the smectic phase is partially frozen; thus, the phase has order higher than that of the smectic phase but lower than that of the crystalline phase. During the subsequent heating process, the frozen disorder activates, and a crystalline phase appears in the supercooled smectic phase before entering the smectic phase. The relationship between the phase behavior and the dynamics of charge carriers such as ions is also discussed. PMID:27195480

  12. Phases and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitterman, Moshe

    2014-09-01

    In discussing phase transitions, the first thing that we have to do is to define a phase. This is a concept from thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, where a phase is defined as a homogeneous system. As a simple example, let us consider instant coffee. This consists of coffee powder dissolved in water, and after stirring it we have a homogeneous mixture, i.e., a single phase. If we add to a cup of coffee a spoonful of sugar and stir it well, we still have a single phase -- sweet coffee. However, if we add ten spoonfuls of sugar, then the contents of the cup will no longer be homogeneous, but rather a mixture of two homogeneous systems or phases, sweet liquid coffee on top and coffee-flavored wet sugar at the bottom...

  13. Field-induced phase transitions in an antiferroelectric liquid crystal using the pyroelectric effect

    PubMed

    Shtykov; Vij; Lewis; Hird; Goodby

    2000-08-01

    The antiferroelectric liquid crystal (AFLC) under investigation possesses different helical polar phases. Measurements of pyroelectric response of these phases as a function of temperature and bias field have elucidated the ability of this method for investigating the nature of antiferroelectric phases and phase transitions under the bias field. The pyroelectric signal as a function of the bias field at fixed temperatures and as a function of temperature for fixed bias fields was measured for different phases of the investigated AFLC material. A theoretical model describing the pyroelectric response in different phases of AFLC is given, and the experimental results are interpreted. The threshold fields for field induced phase transitions are determined. The type of field induced phase transition from the AF phase in particular is found to be dependent on the temperature within its range. The properties of an unusual ferrielectric phase existing between ferrielectric chiral smectic-C (SmC*) and antiferroelectric AF phases are studied in a great detail. The results confirm that this phase is one of the incommensurate phases, predicted by the axial next-nearest neighbor Ising model and Landau model for this temperature region. PMID:11088695

  14. Kerr-AdS analogue of triple point and solid/liquid/gas phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altamirano, Natacha; Kubizňák, David; Mann, Robert B.; Sherkatghanad, Zeinab

    2014-02-01

    We study the thermodynamic behavior of multi-spinning d = 6 Kerr-anti de Sitter black holes in the canonical ensemble of fixed angular momenta J1 and J2. We find, dependent on the ratio q = J2/J1, qualitatively different interesting phenomena known from the ‘every day thermodynamics’ of simple substances. For q = 0 the system exhibits recently observed reentrant large/small/large black hole phase transitions, but for 0 < q ≪ 1 we find an analogue of a ‘solid/liquid’ phase transition. Furthermore, for q ∈ (0.00905, 0.0985) the system displays the presence of a large/intermediate/small black hole phase transition with two critical and one triple (or tricritical) points. This behavior is reminiscent of the solid/liquid/gas phase transition except that the coexistence line of small and intermediate black holes does not continue for an arbitrary value of pressure (similar to the solid/liquid coexistence line) but rather terminates at one of the critical points. Finally, for q > 0.0985 we observe the ‘standard liquid/gas behavior’ of the Van der Waals fluid.

  15. Investigating the solid-liquid phase transition of water nanofilms using the generalized replica exchange method

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Qing; Kim, Jaegil; Straub, John E.; Farrell, James D.; Wales, David J.

    2014-11-14

    The generalized Replica Exchange Method (gREM) was applied to study a solid-liquid phase transition in a nanoconfined bilayer water system using the monatomic water (mW) model. Exploiting optimally designed non-Boltzmann sampling weights with replica exchanges, gREM enables an effective sampling of configurations that are metastable or unstable in the canonical ensemble via successive unimodal energy distributions across phase transition regions, often characterized by S-loop or backbending in the statistical temperature. Extensive gREM simulations combined with Statistical Temperature Weighted Histogram Analysis Method (ST-WHAM) for nanoconfined mW water at various densities provide a comprehensive characterization of diverse thermodynamic and structural properties intrinsic to phase transitions. Graph representation of minimized structures of bilayer water systems determined by the basin-hopping global optimization revealed heterogeneous ice structures composed of pentagons, hexagons, and heptagons, consistent with an increasingly ordered solid phase with decreasing density. Apparent crossover from a first-order solid-liquid transition to a continuous one in nanoconfined mW water with increasing density of the system was observed in terms of a diminishing S-loop in the statistical temperature, smooth variation of internal energies and heat capacities, and a characteristic variation of lateral radial distribution functions, and transverse density profiles across transition regions.

  16. The Effect of Aerosil Network on Liquid Crystal (4O.8) Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramazanoglu, Mehmet; Larochelle, Simon; Birgeneau, Robert J.

    2005-03-01

    We report a high resolution x-ray diffraction study of the nematic (N) to smectic-A (SmA) transition in the single-layer smectic (SmAm) liquid crystal butyloxybenzylidene octylaniline (4O.8) within aerosil dispersion. Aerosils are dispersed in liquid crystal material with a broad range concentration. They dramatically affect the phase transition properties in different liquid crystals [1]. These effects were studied in the view of random field theory introduced by quenched randomness of the silica gel network. The second order N-SmA phase transition and strong first order SmA-CrB freezing transitions are shifted to lower temperatures. SmA line-shape is broadened indicating a short-range order. Correlation lengths and power-law fits show behavior similar to bilayer SmAd liquid crystals. The present work enables us to test our understanding of random field effects introduced by dispersed aerosils forming a network in SmAm material. [1] S. Park, R.L. Leheny, R.J. Birgeneau, J.-L. Gallani, C.W. Garland and G.S. Iannacchione, Phys. Rev. E 65 050703(R) (2002)

  17. Energy landscape view of phase transitions and slow dynamics in thermotropic liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Dwaipayan; Bagchi, Biman

    2006-01-01

    Thermotropic liquid crystals are known to display rich phase behavior on temperature variation. Although the nematic phase is orientationally ordered but translationally disordered, a smectic phase is characterized by the appearance of a partial translational order in addition to a further increase in orientational order. In an attempt to understand the interplay between orientational and translational order in the mesophases that thermotropic liquid crystals typically exhibit upon cooling from the high-temperature isotropic phase, we investigate the potential energy landscapes of a family of model liquid crystalline systems. The configurations of the system corresponding to the local potential energy minima, known as the inherent structures, are determined from computer simulations across the mesophases. We find that the depth of the potential energy minima explored by the system along an isochor grows through the nematic phase as temperature drops in contrast to its insensitivity to temperature in the isotropic and smectic phases. The onset of the growth of the orientational order in the parent phase is found to induce a translational order, resulting in a smectic-like layer in the underlying inherent structures; the inherent structures, surprisingly, never seem to sustain orientational order alone if the parent nematic phase is sandwiched between the high-temperature isotropic phase and the low-temperature smectic phase. The Arrhenius temperature dependence of the orientational relaxation time breaks down near the isotropic–nematic transition. We find that this breakdown occurs at a temperature below which the system explores increasingly deeper potential energy minima. PMID:16648269

  18. Origin of shear-induced phase transitions in melts of liquid-crystal polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noirez, Laurence

    2005-11-01

    Flow induced mechanical properties are often coupled with instabilities, spurt effects, or induced phase transitions. Recent studies have revealed that side-chain liquid crystal polymers exhibit typically shear-induced phases inside the isotropic (nonmesomorphic) liquid state. We present an experimental approach which brings a new understanding for nonlinear flow behaviors. The strategy consists in comparing the critical times issued from the flow behavior of a liquid-crystal polymer to the equilibrium orientational-order relaxation time was characterized. We demonstrate that shear-induced phases do not originate from a flow coupling to conventional orientational order parameter fluctuations. It does not also correspond to a direct coupling with the viscoelastic terminal time, leading to the conclusion that an additional relaxation process takes place with time scales longer than the terminal time. The identification of a low-frequency elastic plateau by viscoelastic measurements corroborates this conclusion.

  19. Successive disorder to disorder phase transitions in ionic liquid [HMIM][BF4] under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiang; Yuan, Chaosheng; Li, Haining; Zhu, Pinwen; Su, Lei; Yang, Kun; Wu, Jie; Yang, Guoqiang; Liu, Jing

    2016-02-01

    In situ high-pressure Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron X-ray diffraction have been employed to investigate the phase behavior of ionic liquid, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([HMIM][BF4]) under high pressure up to 20 GPa at room temperature. With increasing pressure, some characteristic bands of [HMIM][BF4] disappear, and some characteristic bands of [HMIM][BF4] display non-monotonic pressure-induced frequency shift and non-monotonic variation of full width at half-maximum. Two successive phase transitions at ∼1.7 GPa and 7.3 GPa have been corroborated by the results above. The glass transition pressure (Pg) of [HMIM][BF4] at ∼7.3 GPa has been obtained by ruby R1 line broadening measurements and analysis of synchrotron X-ray diffraction patterns, and its glass transition mechanism is also analyzed in detail. These facts are suggestive of two successive disorder to disorder phase transitions induced by compression, that is, [HMIM][BF4] serves as a superpressurized glass under the pressure above 7.3 GPa, which is similar to the glassy state at low temperature, and a compression-induced liquid to liquid phase transition in [HMIM][BF4] occurs at ∼1.7 GPa. Besides, the conformational equilibrium of the GAAA conformer and AAAA conformer was converted easily in liquid [HMIM][BF4], while it was difficult to be influenced in glassy state.

  20. DYNAMIC MODELING STRATEGY FOR FLOW REGIME TRANSITION IN GAS-LIQUID TWO-PHASE FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    X. Wang; X. Sun; H. Zhao

    2011-09-01

    In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regime has been used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are often flow regime dependent. Currently, the determination of the flow regimes is primarily based on flow regime maps or transition criteria, which are developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows and widely applied in nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5. As two-phase flows are observed to be dynamic in nature (fully-developed two-phase flows generally do not exist in real applications), it is of importance to model the flow regime transition dynamically for more accurate predictions of two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy for determining flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through the introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation and destruction of the interfacial area, such as the fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation; and fluid particle coalescence and condensation, respectively. For the flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shape (which are correlated), namely small bubbles and large bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identifying the flow regimes is provided, in which discriminators are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration of small bubble and large bubble groups. This method is expected to be applied to computer codes to improve their predictive capabilities of gas-liquid two-phase flows, in particular for the applications in

  1. Gas-liquid type phase transition in semiivietals at low temperatures and high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mase, Shoichi; Fukami, Takeshi; Mori, Masatoshi; Inoue, Tomnio

    1982-07-01

    Remarkable anomalies have been found in the temperature and frequency dependences of the attenuation coefficient of sound waves in bismuth, antimony and pyrolytic graphite at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. The result for bismuth in particular is app]arently similar to those observed in second-order phase transition phenomena. On the basis of the Nakajima-Yoshioka-Kuramoto theory of the gas-liquid type phase transition in the electron-hole system, these anomalies are fairly well explained in terms of the fluctuation effect above the phase transition temperature, provided that the electron-hole correlation interaction is assumed to be sensitively dependent on the state of the overlapping of the electron and hole Landau levels.

  2. Transitional liquid crystalline phases between the hexagonal and lamellar phases in ternary cesium N-tetradecanoate-water-additive mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, J.C.; Kilpatrick, P.K. )

    1993-04-01

    The effects of added salt (CsOH, CsCl), long-chain carboxylic acid, and long-chain alcohol on the lyotropic liquid crystalline phase behavior in the cesium n-tetradecanoate (CsTD)-water system is reported. The transitional region between the hexagonal (H) and lamellar (L) phases was the compositional range of focus. Three transitional phases were observed: (i) the ribbon (R) phase, a biaxial phase consisting of cylinders of ellipsoidal cross section; (ii) the viscous isotropic (VI) phase, an isotropic phase thought to consist of interconnected rods on an Ia3d lattice; and (iii) the intermediate (Int) phase, a uniaxial anisotropic phase thought to consist of interconnected rods on a planar lattice. The effect of the additives was to decrease the interfacial curvature of the surfactant head group layer by varying head group repulsion and by varying the surfactant tail volume relative to the surfactant head group area. These changes resulted in formation of transitional phases seeming to possess curvature between that of the cylindrical H phase and the planar L phase. The ionic repulsion between carboxylate head groups was reduced by the addition of CsOH or CsCl, and resulted in destabilization of the VI phase and the formation of the anisotropic Int phase. With the addition of cosurfactants, n-tetradecanoic acid (TDA) and 1-tetradecanol (TDOH), no Int phase was observed. With 7 wt% added TDA the R phase was stabilized up to temperatures of 336 K, above the 330 K temperature limit in the binary CsTD-D[sub 2]O system. In all four systems, sufficient additive (5-10 wt%) resulted in a transition to the L phase, which was stable over a large portion of the compositional range. In order of apparently decreasing mean curvature, the phase sequence is: hexagonal, ribbon, viscous isotropic, intermediate, and lamellar.

  3. Disappearance of Widom Line for Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition with Horizontal Coexistence Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jiayuan; Xu, Limei; Buldyrev, Sergey; Angell, Austen; Stanley, Gene

    2012-02-01

    The study of spherically symmetric two-scale Jagla model with both repulsive and attractive ramps has been very successful in demonstrating the anomalous behavior of liquids (especially water) and its relation with respect to the existence of a liquid-liquid (LL) critical point. However, the co-existence line of Jagla model shows a positive slope, which is opposite to what has been found in the simulations of water. To more convincingly link the result of the study on Jagla model with that of water, we applied discrete molecular dynamics to Gibson and Wilding's modified Jagla model and found that by shrinking both the attractive and repulsive ramps, the slope of the coexistence line can be reduced to zero. However, at these values of the parameters, the LL critical point becomes completely unstable with respect to crystal and glass. We further studied the Widom line, defined as extreme of response functions and also continuation of the coexistence line into one phase region, and found Widom line disappeared in the case of zero slope of the coexistence line, due to the equal enthalpy of low-density liquid (LDL) and high-density liquid (HDL).

  4. Pinball liquid phase from Hund's coupling in frustrated transition-metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralko, Arnaud; Merino, Jaime; Fratini, Simone

    2015-04-01

    The interplay of nonlocal Coulomb repulsion and Hund's coupling in the d -orbital manifold in frustrated triangular lattices is analyzed by a multiband extended Hubbard model. We find a rich phase diagram with several competing phases, including a robust pinball liquid phase, which is an unconventional metal characterized by threefold charge order, bad metallic behavior, and the emergence of high-spin local moments. Our results naturally explain the anomalous charge-ordered metallic state observed in the triangular layered compound AgNiO2. The potential relevance to other triangular transition-metal oxides is discussed.

  5. Method for liquid analysis by means of recording the dynamics of phase transitions during drop drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakhno, Tatiana A.; Yakhno, Vladimir G.; Sanin, Anatoly G.; Sanina, Olga A.; Pelyushenko, Artem S.

    2003-04-01

    We propose a method for studying multi-component liquids based on recording of the dynamics of the acoustic-mechanical impedance (AMI) of a drop that dries up on the surface of a quartz resonator oscillating with ultrasound frequency. The magnitude of the AMI is an integral characteristic of the physical properties of the drop including its viscosity, composition, surface tension, moistening, and inner structure. Using liquids of different types as the example, it is shown that each liquid possesses its individual 'portrait', determined by the character of the phase transitions. In the authers" opinion, this method can be used for the screening identification of liquids (determining the degree of consistency with the standards) in solving a number of scientific and practical problems, as well as in biology, chemistry, food and drug examination and medicine. Unique scopes of this method in medical diagnostics, vine, food and drug identification and determination of inner structure of solutions are demonstrated.

  6. Surface phase transitions in liquid Ga-Bi alloys studied by optical second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cong; Nattland, Detlef; Freyland, Werner

    2000-07-01

    Optical second harmonic generation (SHG) as a particularly surface sensitive technique was employed for the first time to investigate the surface phase behaviour of a liquid alloy, BixGa1-x, in different heating and cooling cycles up to 280 °C. The aim of these experiments is to establish a relatively simple experimental access to the surface phase diagrams of liquid alloys. Measurements of the characteristic changes of the SH signal have been performed on pure Bi and different Ga-rich alloys (xBi≤0.367). In pure bismuth the melting and freezing of the surface is indicated by a distinct polarization dependent variation of the SH intensities. Of particular interest is the characterization of the wetting transition found in Ga-Bi recently at the monotectic phase transition (xm = 0.085, Tm = 222 °C). Surprisingly, on first heating of the Ga-rich alloys up to 280 °C the SHG signals give no indication of the dramatic compositional change at the surface induced by the wetting transition. From these observations we conclude that the main source for the nonlinear polarization is the outermost layer of the alloy which in the wet and the non-wet state consists of an adsorbed Bi-rich monolayer. It is shown that SHG is very sensitive to structural changes at the surface. Most interestingly, on cooling of the Ga-rich alloys a Bi-rich film crystallizes on top of the bulk liquid alloy.

  7. Diagnosis of phase transitions in disordered fractional quantum Hall liquids using quantum entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhao; Bhatt, R. N.

    The conventional method to study phase transitions from fractional quantum Hall (FQH) liquids to a localized phase induced by disorder has relied on the collapse of the mobility gap and Hall conductance. Here, we scrutinize this issue from the perspective of quantum entanglement. We consider electrons in the disordered lowest Landau level at Laughlin filling fractions ν = 1 / m with either Haldane's pseudopotentials or Coulomb interaction. We find that the derivative of the orbital-cut von-Neumann entropy with respect to the disorder strength has a sharp peak, which diverges with system size, providing a clear fingerprint of the transition from FQH liquids to a localized phase. Further, the fluctuation of the entropy with different cut boundaries is utilized to examine whether the ground states are localized in some region. We also investigate the level statistics of the entanglement spectrum, as well as the low-lying spectrum of the Hamiltonian to extract more information about the phase transition. Our method can be applied to study many-body localization in other topological systems. This work was supported by US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, through Grant No. DE-SC0002140.

  8. Surface Specularity as an Indicator of Shock-induced Solid-liquid Phase Transitions in Tin

    SciTech Connect

    G. D. Stevens, S. S. Lutz, B. R. Marshall, W.D. Turley, et al.

    2007-12-01

    When highly polished metal surfaces melt upon release after shock loading, they exhibit features that suggest significant surface changes accompany the phase transition. The reflection of light from such surfaces changes from specular (pre-shock) to diffuse upon melting. Typical of this phenomenon is the loss of signal light in velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) measurements, which usually occurs at pressures high enough to melt the free surface. Unlike many other potential material phase-sensitive diagnostics (e.g., reflectometry, conductivity), that show relatively small (1%-10%) changes, the specularity of reflection provides a more sensitive and definitive (>10x) indication of the solid-liquid phase transition. Data will be presented that support the hypothesis that specularity changes indicate melt in a way that can be measured easily and unambiguously.

  9. Metastable liquid-liquid phase transition in a single-component system with only one crystal phase and no density anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzese, G.; Malescio, G.; Skibinsky, A.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Stanley, H. E.

    2002-11-01

    We investigate the phase behavior of a single-component system in three dimensions with spherically-symmetric, pairwise-additive, soft-core interactions with an attractive well at a long distance, a repulsive soft-core shoulder at an intermediate distance, and a hard-core repulsion at a short distance, similar to potentials used to describe liquid systems such as colloids, protein solutions, or liquid metals. We showed [Nature (London) 409, 692 (2001)] that, even with no evidence of the density anomaly, the phase diagram has two first-order fluid-fluid phase transitions, one ending in a gas-low-density-liquid (LDL) critical point, and the other in a gas-high-density-liquid (HDL) critical point, with a LDL-HDL phase transition at low temperatures. Here we use integral equation calculations to explore the three-parameter space of the soft-core potential and perform molecular dynamics simulations in the interesting region of parameters. For the equilibrium phase diagram, we analyze the structure of the crystal phase and find that, within the considered range of densities, the structure is independent of the density. Then, we analyze in detail the fluid metastable phases and, by explicit thermodynamic calculation in the supercooled phase, we show the absence of the density anomaly. We suggest that this absence is related to the presence of only one stable crystal structure.

  10. Phase Transitions of Triflate-Based Ionic Liquids under High Pressure.

    PubMed

    Faria, Luiz F O; Ribeiro, Mauro C C

    2015-11-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been used to study phase transitions of ionic liquids based on the triflate anion, [TfO](-), as a function of pressure or temperature. Raman spectra of ionic liquids containing the cations 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium, [C4C1Im](+), 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium, [C8C1Im](+), 1-butyl-2,3-dimethylimidazolium, [C4C1C1Im](+), and 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium, [C4C1Pyr](+), were compared. Vibrational frequencies and binding energy of ionic pairs were calculated by quantum chemistry methods. The ionic liquids [C4C1Im][TfO] and [C4C1Pyr][TfO] crystallize at 1.0 GPa when the pressure is increased in steps of ∼ 0.2 GPa from the atmospheric pressure, whereas [C8C1Im][TfO] and [C4C1C1Im][TfO] do not crystallize up to 2.3 GPa of applied pressure. The low-frequency range of the Raman spectrum of [C4C1Im][TfO] indicates that the system undergoes glass transition, rather than crystallization, when the pressure applied on the liquid has been increased above 2.0 GPa in a single step. Strong hysteresis of spectral features (frequency shift and bandwidth) of the high-pressure crystalline phase when the pressure was released stepwise back to the atmospheric pressure has been found . PMID:26457868

  11. Liquid-solid phase transition of hydrogen and deuterium in silica aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cleve, E.; Worsley, M. A.; Kucheyev, S. O.

    2014-10-01

    Behavior of hydrogen isotopes confined in disordered low-density nanoporous solids remains essentially unknown. Here, we use relaxation calorimetry to study freezing and melting of H2 and D2 in an ˜85%-porous base-catalyzed silica aerogel. We find that liquid-solid transition temperatures of both isotopes inside the aerogel are depressed. The phase transition takes place over a wide temperature range of ˜4 K and non-trivially depends on the liquid filling fraction, reflecting the broad pore size distribution in the aerogel. Undercooling is observed for both H2 and D2 confined inside the aerogel monolith. Results for H2 and D2 are extrapolated to tritium-containing hydrogens with the quantum law of corresponding states.

  12. Spiral textures in lyotropic liquid crystals : first order transition between normal hexagonal and lamellar gel phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, K. M.; Kékicheff, P.; Kléman, M.

    1993-06-01

    The first order transition between the normal hexagonal phase (H{α}) and lamellar gel phase (L{β}, L{β'}, L{δ}, ... type) in lyotropic liquid crystals of binary surfactant/water systems is investigated. Structural transformations and epitaxial relations are investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering on powdered and oriented samples. By slow evaporation of water, growth of the gel layered structure from the two-dimensional packing of surfactant cylinders of the hexagonal mesophase in the presence of a solid wall reveals a spectacular new texture composed of interwoven spirals. It is demonstrated that the layers grow from the rods of the hexagonal phase, in planes coplanar with the hexagonal packing and perpendicular to the wall. The configuration is such that line wedge disclinations of strength s= + 1/2 of the hexagonal phase are preserved through the phase transition. Estimates of the radii for the developable domain and cores, and also for the bending elastic constant are obtained. A mechanism for the phase transformation is discussed in view of topological structural transformations and a modification of the short-range order associated to the disorder order transition of the configuration of the paraffinic chains.

  13. Near infrared light-driven liquid crystal phase transition enabled by hydrophobic mesogen grafted plasmonic gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Cuevas, Karla G; Wang, Ling; Xue, Chenming; Singh, Gautam; Kumar, Satyendra; Urbas, Augustine; Li, Quan

    2015-06-18

    Light-driven phase transition in liquid crystals is a fascinating endeavour from both scientific and technological points of view. Here we demonstrate the proof-of-principle that the photothermal effect of organo-soluble plasmonic gold nanorods can introduce the phase transition of thermotropic liquid crystals upon near infrared laser irradiation. Interestingly, the reverse process occurs when the laser is switched off. PMID:25989830

  14. Influence of spin polarizability on liquid gas phase transition in the nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, Z.; Bigdeli, M.; Bordbar, G. H.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the liquid gas phase transition for the spin polarized nuclear matter. Applying the lowest order constrained variational (LOCV) method, and using two microscopic potentials, AV18 and UV14+TNI, we calculate the free energy, equation of state (EOS), order parameter, entropy, heat capacity and compressibility to derive the critical properties of spin polarized nuclear matter. Our results indicate that for the spin polarized nuclear matter, the second-order phase transition takes place at lower temperatures with respect to the unpolarized one. It is also shown that the critical temperature of our spin polarized nuclear matter with a specific value of spin polarization parameter is in good agreement with the experimental result.

  15. X-Ray Study of Phase Transition and Structures of Some Columnar Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Song

    1995-01-01

    Three series of columnar discotic liquid crystals with different cores and lengths of side chains have been studied by use of X-ray diffraction. Overlapping diffraction peaks have been decomposed by use of a peak model. The measured d-spacings were indexed for the mesophases and some crystal phases. Radial distribution functions (RDF) along the columnar axes were calculated approximately. Octaether derivatives of tetrabenzocyclododecatetraene with n = 12, 13, 14, 15 carbon atoms in the side chains exhibit a hexagonal mesophase to centered rectangular mesophase transition without observable transition heat. It is found that the transitions take place over a wide temperature range (maximum 20^circC) n = 13 and 14. This transition range is really an intermediate phase which is neither hexagonal nor centred rectangular, but rather oblique. This series of specimens also shows crystal to crystal transitions with small transition heats. Detailed X-ray diffraction scans indicate that these transitions also occur over a temperature range (maximum 10 ^circC) and the transition is not a sudden transition as a function of temperature. Hexa-n-alcanoyloxy triphenylenes with side chain carbon atom number n = 6, 8, 10, 12 have been studied. HAT -C8 shows solid polymorphism between 80^ circC and 26^circC. HAT -C10 has two mesophases with small differences in their diffraction pattern. HAT-C12 had been reported to have three mesophases on cooling from 125^circ C to 70^circC, but the corresponding diffraction patterns are not stable. The stable patterns obtained above 70^circ C are those of the isotropic liquid. At 70 ^circC, the specimen does show a stable mesophase pattern corresponding to the D_0 phase. Benzene twins based on hexa-hydrobenzene hexa -n-heptanoate (R = C_6 H _{13}) also have been studied. These twins consists of two benzene rings joined by a long flexible spacer rm C_{n-2}H_ {2n-1}(COO)_2 with R as the side chains. TWINS-S6, 8 show a complex diffraction pattern in

  16. Contact line motion in confined liquid-gas systems: Slip versus phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2010-11-01

    In two-phase flows, the interface intervening between the two fluid phases intersects the solid wall at the contact line. A classical problem in continuum fluid mechanics is the incompatibility between the moving contact line and the no-slip boundary condition, as the latter leads to a nonintegrable stress singularity. Recently, various diffuse-interface models have been proposed to explain the contact line motion using mechanisms missing from the sharp-interface treatments in fluid mechanics. In one-component two-phase (liquid-gas) systems, the contact line can move through the mass transport across the interface while in two-component (binary) fluids, the contact line can move through diffusive transport across the interface. While these mechanisms alone suffice to remove the stress singularity, the role of fluid slip at solid surface needs to be taken into account as well. In this paper, we apply the diffuse-interface modeling to the study of contact line motion in one-component liquid-gas systems, with the fluid slip fully taken into account. The dynamic van der Waals theory has been presented for one-component fluids, capable of describing the two-phase hydrodynamics involving the liquid-gas transition [A. Onuki, Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)]. This theory assumes the local equilibrium condition at the solid surface for density and also the no-slip boundary condition for velocity. We use its hydrodynamic equations to describe the continuum hydrodynamics in the bulk region and derive the more general boundary conditions by introducing additional dissipative processes at the fluid-solid interface. The positive definiteness of entropy production rate is the guiding principle of our derivation. Numerical simulations based on a finite-difference algorithm have been carried out to investigate the dynamic effects of the newly derived boundary conditions, showing that the contact line can move through both phase transition and slip, with their relative contributions

  17. Contact line motion in confined liquid-gas systems: Slip versus phase transition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2010-11-28

    In two-phase flows, the interface intervening between the two fluid phases intersects the solid wall at the contact line. A classical problem in continuum fluid mechanics is the incompatibility between the moving contact line and the no-slip boundary condition, as the latter leads to a nonintegrable stress singularity. Recently, various diffuse-interface models have been proposed to explain the contact line motion using mechanisms missing from the sharp-interface treatments in fluid mechanics. In one-component two-phase (liquid-gas) systems, the contact line can move through the mass transport across the interface while in two-component (binary) fluids, the contact line can move through diffusive transport across the interface. While these mechanisms alone suffice to remove the stress singularity, the role of fluid slip at solid surface needs to be taken into account as well. In this paper, we apply the diffuse-interface modeling to the study of contact line motion in one-component liquid-gas systems, with the fluid slip fully taken into account. The dynamic van der Waals theory has been presented for one-component fluids, capable of describing the two-phase hydrodynamics involving the liquid-gas transition [A. Onuki, Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)]. This theory assumes the local equilibrium condition at the solid surface for density and also the no-slip boundary condition for velocity. We use its hydrodynamic equations to describe the continuum hydrodynamics in the bulk region and derive the more general boundary conditions by introducing additional dissipative processes at the fluid-solid interface. The positive definiteness of entropy production rate is the guiding principle of our derivation. Numerical simulations based on a finite-difference algorithm have been carried out to investigate the dynamic effects of the newly derived boundary conditions, showing that the contact line can move through both phase transition and slip, with their relative contributions

  18. Phases and phase transitions of polymeric liquid crystals: A high resolution x ray diffraction and light scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachaliel, Ehud

    1991-03-01

    Liquid crystal polymers (LCP) were compared with monomeric liquid crystals (MLC) by means of high-resolution x-ray (HIREX) and light scattering (LIS). Both HIREX and LIS were used to study the nematic-smectic(sub a) phase transition of P4.1 polysiloxane; the following critical exponents were determined: nu(sub parallel) = 0.77 +/-0.05; nu(sub normal) = 0.57 +/-0.08; gamma = 1.3 +/-0.10. The bare correlation lengths were found to be: xi(sup 0)(sub parallel) = 3.27 +/-0.08; xi(sup 0)(sub normal)q(sub 0) = 1.09 +/-0.14 which are unusually large in comparison with MLC. LIS experiments confirmed these values and indicated 'cross over' of nu(sub parallel) from 0.77 to 0.53. These results are typical of a system near to a tricritical point. HIREX was used to study the nematic-smectic(sub c) phase transition in C6-polysiloxane; the results were a good fit to Chen and Lubensky's mean field theory but the correlation lengths saturated near the transition to the nematic phase. A study of the smectic(sub a) phase of PA6 polyacrylate, near the transition to the nematic phase, showed that, except very close to the transition, the first and second harmonics of the x-ray structure factor were found to be consistent with the harmonic theory of de Gennes and Caille. This is thought to indicate the importance of anharmonic corrections near the phase transition. Fits to the experimental data yielded the compressibility constant, B and the splay elastic constant, K(sub s). B was found to obey a power law: B varies as t(sup phi) in which phi = 0.82 +/-0.08. In good agreement with theoretical predictions using exponents from the literature, but in disagreement with previous experimental results on MLC's. The splay elastic constant K(sub s) has roughly the same magnitude as in MLC's but tends to decrease by approximately 50% upon approaching the transition from below. This temperature dependence might give further evidence for the importance of anharmonicity in the system. Finally, the

  19. Critical temperature for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition (from multifragmentation and fission)

    SciTech Connect

    Karnaukhov, V. A.; Oeschler, H.; Budzanowski, A.; Avdeyev, S. P.; Botvina, A. S.; Cherepanov, E. A.; Karcz, W.; Kirakosyan, V. V.; Rukoyatkin, P. A.; Skwirczynska, I.; Norbeck, E.

    2008-12-15

    Critical temperature T{sub c} for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition is estimated from both the multifragmentation and fission data. In the first case, the critical temperature is obtained by analysis of the intermediate-mass-fragment yields in p(8.1 GeV) + Au collisions within the statistical model of multifragmentation. In the second case, the experimental fission probability for excited {sup 188}Os is compared with the calculated one with T{sub c} as a free parameter. It is concluded for both cases that the critical temperature is higher than 15 MeV.

  20. Dynamic Modeling Strategy for Flow Regime Transition in Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Wang; Xiaodong Sun; Benjamin Doup; Haihua Zhao

    2012-12-01

    In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regimes has been widely used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are flow regime dependent. Current nuclear reactor safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5, classify flow regimes using flow regime maps or transition criteria that were developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows. As twophase flows are dynamic in nature, it is important to model the flow regime transitions dynamically to more accurately predict the two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy to determine flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation of the interfacial area, fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation, and the destruction of the interfacial area, fluid particle coalescence and condensation. For flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shapes, namely group-1 and group-2 bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identify the flow regimes is discussed, in which discriminator s are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration. The flow regime predicted with this method shows good agreement with the experimental observations.

  1. Method and apparatus for acoustic plate mode liquid-solid phase transition detection

    DOEpatents

    Blair, Dianna S.; Freye, Gregory C.; Hughes, Robert C.; Martin, Stephen J.; Ricco, Antonio J.

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing a liquid-solid phase transition event is provided which comprises an acoustic plate mode detecting element placed in contact with a liquid or solid material which generates a high-frequency acoustic wave that is attenuated to an extent based on the physical state of the material is contact with the detecting element. The attenuation caused by the material in contact with the acoustic plate mode detecting element is used to determine the physical state of the material being detected. The method and device are particularly suited for detecting conditions such as the icing and deicing of wings of an aircraft. In another aspect of the present invention, a method is provided wherein the adhesion of a solid material to the detecting element can be measured using the apparatus of the invention.

  2. Liquid-solid phase transition alloy as reversible and rapid molding bone cement.

    PubMed

    Yi, Liting; Jin, Chao; Wang, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-12-01

    Acrylic bone cement has been an essential non-metallic implant used as fixing agent in the cemented total joint arthroplasty (THA). However, the currently available materials based mainly on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) still encounter certain limitations, such as time-consuming polymerization, thermal and chemical necrosis and troublesome revision procedure. Here from an alternative way, we proposed for the first time to adopt the injectable alloy cement to address such tough issues through introducing its unique liquid-solid phase transition mechanism. A typical cement along this way is thus made of an alloy Bi/In/Sn/Zn with a specifically designed low melting point 57.5 °C, which enables its rapid molding into various desired shapes with high plasticity and ultimate metallic behaviors. The fundamental characteristics including the mechanical strength, biocompatibility and phase transition-induced thermal effects have been clarified to demonstrate the importance of such alloy as unconventional cement with favorable merits. In addition, we also disclosed its advantage as an excellent contrast agent for radiation imaging on the bone interior structure which is highly beneficial for guiding the surgery and monitoring the therapeutic effects. Particularly, the proposed alloy cement with reversible phase transition feature significantly simplifies the revision of the cement and prosthesis. This study opens the way for employing the injectable alloy materials as reversible bone cement to fulfill diverse clinical needs in the coming time. PMID:25239039

  3. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Density minimum and liquid liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Peter H.; Saika-Voivod, Ivan; Sciortino, Francesco

    2005-11-01

    We present a high-resolution computer simulation study of the equation of state of ST2 water, evaluating the liquid-state properties at 2718 state points, and precisely locating the liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) occurring in this model. We are thereby able to reveal the interconnected set of density anomalies, spinodal instabilities and response function extrema that occur in the vicinity of an LLCP for the case of a realistic, off-lattice model of a liquid with local tetrahedral order. In particular, we unambiguously identify a density minimum in the liquid state, define its relationship to other anomalies, and show that it arises due to the approach of the liquid structure to a defect-free random tetrahedral network of hydrogen bonds.

  4. Rapid heating of a strongly coupled plasma at the solid-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, M. J.; Hasegawa, T.; Bollinger, J. J.; Dubin, D. H. E.

    2004-11-01

    Between 10^4 and 10^6 ^9Be^+ ions are trapped in a 4.5 Tesla Penning trap and laser-cooled to ˜1 mK, where the ions form a crystalline plasma with an interparticle spacing of ˜20 μm. This system is a realization of a strongly coupled one-component plasma. Using Doppler laser spectroscopy on a single-photon transition, we measured the temperature and heating rate of this plasma when not being laser-cooled. We measured a slow heating rate of ≤ 100 mK/s due to residual gas collisions for the first 100-200 ms after turning off the cooling laser. This slow heating is followed by a rapid heating to 1-2 K in 100 ms as the plasma undergoes the solid-liquid phase transition at T=10 mK (Γ ˜ 170). We will present evidence that this rapid heating is due to a sudden release of energy from weakly cooled degrees of freedom involving the cyclotron motion of trapped impurity ions. We will also discuss the prospects for observing the latent heat associated with the phase transition.

  5. First-order transition in confined water between high-density liquid and low-density amorphous phases.

    PubMed

    Koga, K; Tanaka, H; Zeng, X C

    2000-11-30

    Supercooled water and amorphous ice have a rich metastable phase behaviour. In addition to transitions between high- and low-density amorphous solids, and between high- and low-density liquids, a fragile-to-strong liquid transition has recently been proposed, and supported by evidence from the behaviour of deeply supercooled bilayer water confined in hydrophilic slit pores. Here we report evidence from molecular dynamics simulations for another type of first-order phase transition--a liquid-to-bilayer amorphous transition--above the freezing temperature of bulk water at atmospheric pressure. This transition occurs only when water is confined in a hydrophobic slit pore with a width of less than one nanometre. On cooling, the confined water, which has an imperfect random hydrogen-bonded network, transforms into a bilayer amorphous phase with a perfect network (owing to the formation of various hydrogen-bonded polygons) but no long-range order. The transition shares some characteristics with those observed in tetrahedrally coordinated substances such as liquid silicon, liquid carbon and liquid phosphorus. PMID:11117739

  6. Acoustical and optical investigations of the size effect in nematic-isotropic phase transition in liquid crystal microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimochkin, G. I.; Pasechnik, S. V.; Lukin, A. V.

    2015-07-01

    The absorption of ultrasound (at a frequency of 2.7 MHz) and the depolarized light transmission and scattering (at a wavelength of 630 nm) in liquid crystal (LC) emulsions have been studied during the nematic-isotropic (N-I) phase transition in LC droplets with radii ranging from 150 to 2300 nm. The obtained acoustical and optical data are used to determine the influence of the droplet size on characteristics of the N-I phase transition. It is shown that the acoustical and optical characteristics of LC emulsions have good prospects to be used for the investigation of phase transitions in submicron samples.

  7. Solid-liquid like phase transition in a confined granular suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Nariaki; Lechenault, Frederic; Adda Bedia, Mokhtar

    We present an experimental study of a liquid-solid like phase transition in a two-dimensional granular media. Particles are placed in a vertical Hele-Show cell filled with a denser solution of cesium-chloride. Thus, when the cell is rotated around its axis, hydrostatic pressure exerts a centripetal force on the particles which confines them towards the center. This force is in competition with gravity, thus by modifying the rotation rate, it is possible to transform continuously and reversibly the sample from a disordered loose state to an ordered packed state. The system presents many similarities with thermal systems at equilibrium like density and interface fluctuations, and the transition between the two phases goes through a coexistence state, where there is nucleation and growth of locally ordered domains which are captured by the correlation function of the hexatic order parameter. We discuss the possibility to extend the grand-canonical formalism to out-of equilibrium systems, in order to uncover a state equation between the density and the pressure in the medium.

  8. Photoinduced phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Bennemann, K H

    2011-02-23

    Optically induced ultrafast electronic excitations with sufficiently long lifetimes may cause strong effects on phase transitions like structural and nonmetal→metal ones and on supercooling, supersaturation, etc. Examples are the transitions diamond→graphite, graphite→graphene, non-metal→metal, solid→liquid and vapor→liquid, solid. Photoinduced formation of graphene and water condensation of saturated or supersaturated vapor due to increased bonding amongst water molecules are of particular interest. These nonequilibrium transitions are an ultrafast response, on a few hundred fs time scale, to the fast low to large energy electronic excitations. The energy of the photons is converted into electronic energy via electronic excitations changing the cohesive energy. This changes the chemical potential controlling the phase transition. In view of the advances in laser optics photon induced transitions are expected to become an active area in nonequilibrium physics and phase transition dynamics. Conservation laws like energy or angular momentum conservation control the time during which the transitions occur. Since the photon induced effects result from weakening or strengthening of the bonding between the atoms or molecules transitions like solid/liquid, etc can be shifted in both directions. Photoinduced transitions will be discussed from a unified point of view. PMID:21411879

  9. Phase transitions and reentrant phenomena in liquid crystals having both rigid and flexible intramolecular joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyżuk, W.; Górecka, E.; Mieczkowski, J.; Przedmojski, J.

    1992-07-01

    Two series of liquid-crystalline compounds having three phenyl rings separated by flexible spacer —CH(CH{3})CH{2}—COO— and by rigid azo and azoxy group, were studied by DSC, optical and X-ray methods. For esters of dl-3-(4^{prime}-nitro)-phenylbutyric acid with 4^{prime}-alkoxy-phenylazo-phenol-4 having dodecyloxy or longer terminal chains, as well as for related azoxy compounds, a narrow (even below 5 K) reentrant or inverted nematic phase appearing between partly bilayer and monolayer smectics A was observed. For higher homologues of the azoxy series additional smectic phases appear, leading to the occurrence of new multicritical points, e.g. the critical end point Ad Cd N^re. On each of the lines, which separate nematic from smectic A phases, transitions are of weakly first or second-order and more than one tricritical point can occur. On the A{1} N/A{1} N^re line, a simple N A{1} tricritical point is observed at T_NI/T_AN = 0.834. The presence of further critical points depends on the components of the binary system involved. Four of the azoxy compounds studied undergo a second order phase transition between partly bilayer smectics, Ad and Cd. Such a transition is accompanied by a jumb in the specific heat, varying linearly with the length of the molecular tails. Various temperature dependences of the layer spacing in the Ad phase are observed for subsequent homologues from the azoxy series. Plusieurs cristaux liquides composés de trois groupements phényl séparés par un groupement —CH(CH{3})CH{2}—COO—, ainsi que par des groupements azo et azoxy, ont été examinés par AED, méthodes optiques et par rayons X. Pour des esters de l'acide dl-3-(4^{prime}-nitro)phénylbutyrique et de 4^{prime}-alkoxy-phénylazo-phénol-4 ayant comme terminaison une chaîne dodecyloxy ou bien plus longue, ainsi que pour des composés azoxy relatif, on observe (même au-dessous de 5 K) une étroite phase nématique réentrante ou inverse entre les phases smectiques

  10. Studies of molecular monolayers at air-liquid interfaces by second harmonic generation: question of orientational phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Rasing, T.; Shen, Y.R.; Kim, M.W.; Grubb, S.; Bock, J.

    1985-06-01

    Insoluble molecular monolayers at gas-liquid interfaces provide an insight to the understanding of surfactants, wetting, microemulsions and membrane structures and offer a possibility to study the rich world of 2-dimensional phase transitions. In the interpretation of the observed properties of these systems various assumptions about the molecular orientation are often made, but so far few clear experimental data exist. In this paper we will show how optical second harmonic generation (SHG) can be used to measure the molecular orientation of monolayers of surfactant molecules at water-air interfaces. By simultaneously measuring the surface pressure versus surface molecular area we can show for the first time that the observed liquid condensed-liquid expanded transition is an orientational phase transition. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Near infrared Kerr effect and description of field-induced phase transitions in polymer-stabilized blue phase liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atorf, B.; Rasouli, H.; Nordendorf, G.; Wilkes, D.; Kitzerow, H.

    2016-02-01

    Studies of the influence of an electric field E on the effective refractive index of a polymer-stabilized blue phase in the near infrared spectral range reveal a considerable field-induced birefringence. At moderate voltages, the birefringence increases linearly with the square of the field strength as expected for the electro-optic Kerr effect, with an effective Kerr constant of K ≈ 6.3 - 6.9 × 10-10 m V-2. However, for E > ≈7.3 V/μm, the slope of the field-induced birefringence versus E2 increases abruptly, before saturation is reached at E > ≈8.5 V/μm. Based on previous observations on blue phases in the visible wavelength range, the discontinuous change can be attributed to a field-induced phase transition. A modification of the extended Kerr model introduced by Wu and coworkers is suggested to take this additional effect into account. In addition to the promising properties of blue phases for improved liquid crystal displays, the observed field-induced birefringence in the infrared region opens interesting perspectives for telecommunication and other non-display applications.

  12. Impact of Liquid-Vapor to Liquid-Liquid-Vapor Phase Transitions on Asphaltene-Rich Nanoaggregate Behavior in Athabasca Vacuum Residue + Pentane Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Bingwen; Chodakowski, Martin; Shaw, John M.

    2013-06-05

    The bulk phase behavior of heavy oil + alkane mixtures and the behavior of the asphaltenes that they contain are topics of importance for the design and optimization of processes for petroleum production, transport, and refining and for performing routine saturates, aromatics, resins, and asphaltenes (SARA) analyses. In prior studies, partial phase diagrams and phase behavior models for Athabasca vacuum residue (AVR) comprising 32 wt % pentane asphaltenes + n-alkanes were reported. For mixtures with pentane, observed phase behaviors included single-phase liquid as well as liquid–liquid, liquid–liquid–vapor, and liquid–liquid–liquid–vapor regions. Dispersed solids were detected under some conditions as well but not quantified. In this work, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is used to study nanostructured materials in liquid phases present in AVR + n-pentane mixtures from 50 to 170 °C at mixture bubble pressure. The investigation focuses on the impact of the transition from a single AVR-rich liquid to co-existing pentane-rich and AVR-rich liquids on the nanostructure and the nanostructures most resistant to aggregation as the pentane composition axis is approached. Background scattering subtraction was performed using global mixture composition. The robustness of this assumption with respect to values obtained for coefficients appearing in a two level Beaucage unified equation fit is demonstrated. The nanostructured material is shown to arise at two length scales from 1 to 100 wt % AVR. Smaller nanostructures possess mean radii less than 50 Å, while the larger nanostructures possess mean radii greater than 250 Å. The addition of pentane to the AVR causes an increasingly large fraction of the large and small nanostructures to grow in size. Only nanostructures resistant to aggregation remain in the pentane-rich phase as the 0 wt % AVR axis is approached. Step changes in aggregation identified from changes in average radius of gyration, scattering

  13. Observing in space and time the ephemeral nucleation of liquid-to-crystal phase transitions

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Liu, Haihua; Tang, Jau; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2015-01-01

    The phase transition of crystalline ordering is a general phenomenon, but its evolution in space and time requires microscopic probes for visualization. Here we report direct imaging of the transformation of amorphous titanium dioxide nanofilm, from the liquid state, passing through the nucleation step and finally to the ordered crystal phase. Single-pulse transient diffraction profiles at different times provide the structural transformation and the specific degree of crystallinity (η) in the evolution process. It is found that the temporal behaviour of η exhibits unique ‘two-step' dynamics, with a robust ‘plateau' that extends over a microsecond; the rate constants vary by two orders of magnitude. Such behaviour reflects the presence of intermediate structure(s) that are the precursor of the ordered crystal state. Theoretically, we extend the well-known Johnson–Mehl–Avrami–Kolmogorov equation, which describes the isothermal process with a stretched-exponential function, but here over the range of times covering the melt-to-crystal transformation. PMID:26478194

  14. Observing in space and time the ephemeral nucleation of liquid-to-crystal phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Liu, Haihua; Tang, Jau; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2015-01-01

    The phase transition of crystalline ordering is a general phenomenon, but its evolution in space and time requires microscopic probes for visualization. Here we report direct imaging of the transformation of amorphous titanium dioxide nanofilm, from the liquid state, passing through the nucleation step and finally to the ordered crystal phase. Single-pulse transient diffraction profiles at different times provide the structural transformation and the specific degree of crystallinity (η) in the evolution process. It is found that the temporal behaviour of η exhibits unique 'two-step' dynamics, with a robust 'plateau' that extends over a microsecond; the rate constants vary by two orders of magnitude. Such behaviour reflects the presence of intermediate structure(s) that are the precursor of the ordered crystal state. Theoretically, we extend the well-known Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov equation, which describes the isothermal process with a stretched-exponential function, but here over the range of times covering the melt-to-crystal transformation. PMID:26478194

  15. Observing in space and time the ephemeral nucleation of liquid-to-crystal phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Liu, Haihua; Tang, Jau; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2015-10-01

    The phase transition of crystalline ordering is a general phenomenon, but its evolution in space and time requires microscopic probes for visualization. Here we report direct imaging of the transformation of amorphous titanium dioxide nanofilm, from the liquid state, passing through the nucleation step and finally to the ordered crystal phase. Single-pulse transient diffraction profiles at different times provide the structural transformation and the specific degree of crystallinity (η) in the evolution process. It is found that the temporal behaviour of η exhibits unique `two-step' dynamics, with a robust `plateau' that extends over a microsecond; the rate constants vary by two orders of magnitude. Such behaviour reflects the presence of intermediate structure(s) that are the precursor of the ordered crystal state. Theoretically, we extend the well-known Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov equation, which describes the isothermal process with a stretched-exponential function, but here over the range of times covering the melt-to-crystal transformation.

  16. Effects of Kinetic Roughening and Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition on Lysozyme Crystal Growth Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Konnert, John; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    2004-01-01

    We measured the growth velocities of the (110) face of tetragonal lysozyme, V (centimeters per second), at four different concentrations, c (milligrams per milliliter), as the solution temperature, T (Centigrade), was reduced. For a broad range of T dependent on c, we find that the growth velocities increased as the solution temperature was reduced. The initial increase in V is well characterized by the 2D nucleation model for crystal growth, yielding the magnitude of an effective barrier for growth, gamma(sub s) = 1.2 plus or minus 0.1 x 10(exp -13) erg/molecule. Below certain temperatures, T(sub cr), dependent on c, however, a kinetic roughening hypothesis that considers the continuous addition of molecules anywhere on the crystal surface better describes the observed growth velocities. The application of the continuous growth model, up to the solution cloud-point temperatures, T(sub cl), enabled the determinations of the crossover concentration, c(sub r), from estimated values of T(sub cr). For all conditions presented, we find that the crossover from growth by 2D nucleation to continuous addition occurs at a supersaturation, sigma (sub c), = 2.0 plus or minus 0.1. Moreover, we find the energy barrier for the continuous addition, E(sub c), within the temperature range T(sub cl) less than T less than T less than T (sub cr), to be 6 plus or minus 1 x 10(exp -13) erg/molecule. Further reduction of T below approximately 2-3 C of T(sub cl), also revealed a rapid slowing of crystal growth velocities. From quasi-elastic light scattering investigations, we find that the rapid diminishment of crystal growth velocities can be accounted for by the phase behavior of lysozyme solutions. Namely, we find the reversible formation of dense fluid proto-droplets comprised of lysozyme molecules to occur below approximately 0.3 C of T(sub cl). Hence, the rapid slowing of growth velocities may occur as a result of the sudden depletion of "mobile" molecules within crystal growth

  17. Universality and criticality of a second-order granular solid-liquid-like phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Gustavo; Mujica, Nicolás; Soto, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally study the critical properties of the nonequilibrium solid-liquid-like transition that takes place in vibrated granular matter. The critical dynamics is characterized by the coupling of the density field with the bond-orientational order parameter Q4, which measures the degree of local crystallization. Two setups are compared, which present the transition at different critical accelerations as a result of modifying the energy dissipation parameters. In both setups five independent critical exponents are measured, associated to different properties of Q4: the correlation length, relaxation time, vanishing wavenumber limit (static susceptibility), the hydrodynamic regime of the pair correlation function, and the amplitude of the order parameter. The respective critical exponents agree in both setups and are given by ν⊥=1 ,ν∥=2 ,γ =1 ,η ≈0.6 -0.67 , and β =1 /2 , whereas the dynamical critical exponent is z =ν∥/ν⊥=2 . The agreement on five exponents is an exigent test for the universality of the transition. Thus, while dissipation is strictly necessary to form the crystal, the path the system undergoes toward the phase separation is part of a well-defined universality class. In fact, the local order shows critical properties while density does not. Being the later conserved, the appropriate model that couples both is model C in the Hohenberg and Halperin classification. The measured exponents are in accord with the nonequilibrium extension to model C if we assume that α , the exponent associated in equilibrium to the specific heat divergence but with no counterpart in this nonequilibrium experiment, vanishes.

  18. Nematic quantum phase transition of composite Fermi liquids in half-filled Landau levels and their geometric response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yizhi; Cho, Gil Young; Fradkin, Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    We present a theory of the isotropic-nematic quantum phase transition in the composite Fermi liquid arising in half-filled Landau levels. We show that the quantum phase transition between the isotropic and the nematic phase is triggered by an attractive quadrupolar interaction between electrons, as in the case of conventional Fermi liquids. We derive the theory of the nematic state and of the phase transition. This theory is based on the flux attachment procedure, which maps an electron liquid in half-filled Landau levels into the composite Fermi liquid close to a nematic transition. We show that the local fluctuations of the nematic order parameters act as an effective dynamical metric interplaying with the underlying Chern-Simons gauge fields associated with the flux attachment. Both the fluctuations of the Chern-Simons gauge field and the nematic order parameter can destroy the composite fermion quasiparticles and drive the system into a non-Fermi liquid state. The effective-field theory for the isotropic-nematic phase transition is shown to have z =3 dynamical exponent due to the Landau damping of the dense Fermi system. We show that there is a Berry-phase-type term that governs the effective dynamics of the nematic order parameter fluctuations, which can be interpreted as a nonuniversal "Hall viscosity" of the dynamical metric. We also show that the effective-field theory of this compressible fluid has a Wen-Zee-type term. Both terms originate from the time-reversal breaking fluctuation of the Chern-Simons gauge fields. We present a perturbative (one-loop) computation of the Hall viscosity and also show that this term is also obtained by a Ward identity. We show that the topological excitation of the nematic fluid, the disclination, carries an electric charge. We show that a resonance observed in radio-frequency conductivity experiments can be interpreted as a Goldstone nematic mode gapped by lattice effects.

  19. Ultrafast spectroscopy of electron transfer dynamics in liquids; excitation transfer studies of phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goun, Alexei A.

    tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB). It was found that the effective coupling is reduced compared to donor/acceptor pairs dissolved in simple liquids. In the 2nd half of thesis we have addressed the question of the dynamics of phase transitions. We have demonstrated the ability to use the fluorescent excitation-transfer technique to study the demixing of liquids specifically, kinetics of demixing water and 2,6-dimethylpyridine. These two liquids possess a low critical temperature point, which allowed us to use a temperature jump from a laser pulse to initiate the process of phase separation. It was found that Coumarin480 laser dye and HPTS (8-Hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid) fluorescent dye have significantly different solubilities in the components of the mixture. These dyes undergo excitation transfer from Coumarin480 to HPTS in the uniform state, but not in the phase-separated state. A system with a temperature jump pump and an excitation transfer probe measured the time scale of the initial step of the phase separation.

  20. The nuclear liquid-vapor phase transition: Equilibrium between phases or free decay in vacuum?

    SciTech Connect

    Phair, L.; Moretto, L.G.; Elliott, J.B.; Wozniak, G.J.

    2002-11-14

    Recent analyses of multifragmentation in terms of Fisher's model and the related construction of a phase diagram brings forth the problem of the true existence of the vapor phase and the meaning of its associated pressure. Our analysis shows that a thermal emission picture is equivalent to a Fisher-like equilibrium description which avoids the problem of the vapor and explains the recently observed Boltzmann-like distribution of the emission times. In this picture a simple Fermi gas thermometric relation is naturally justified. Low energy compound nucleus emission of intermediate mass fragments is shown to scale according to Fisher's formula and can be simultaneously fit with the much higher energy ISiS multifragmentation data.

  1. Liquid–liquid phase transition in hydrogen by coupled electron–ion Monte Carlo simulations

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Miguel A.; Rillo, Giovanni; Holzmann, Markus; Ceperley, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The phase diagram of high-pressure hydrogen is of great interest for fundamental research, planetary physics, and energy applications. A first-order phase transition in the fluid phase between a molecular insulating fluid and a monoatomic metallic fluid has been predicted. The existence and precise location of the transition line is relevant for planetary models. Recent experiments reported contrasting results about the location of the transition. Theoretical results based on density functional theory are also very scattered. We report highly accurate coupled electron–ion Monte Carlo calculations of this transition, finding results that lie between the two experimental predictions, close to that measured in diamond anvil cell experiments but at 25–30 GPa higher pressure. The transition along an isotherm is signaled by a discontinuity in the specific volume, a sudden dissociation of the molecules, a jump in electrical conductivity, and loss of electron localization. PMID:27099295

  2. Effect of trans-cis photoisomerization on phase equilibria and phase transition of liquid-crystalline azobenzene chromophore and its blends with reactive mesogenic diacrylate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namil; Li, Quan; Kyu, Thein

    2011-03-01

    Photoisomerization-induced phase transition of neat liquid-crystalline azobenzene chromophore (LCAC) and its effect on phase diagrams of its mixtures with reactive mesogenic diacrylate monomer (RM257) have been investigated experimentally and theoretically. Upon irradiation with ultraviolet light, the nematic phase of LCAC transformed to isotropic, while the crystal phase showed corrugated textures on the surface (i.e., ripples). The phase-transition temperatures and corresponding morphologies of the blends have been investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry and optical microscopy. A theoretical phase diagram of a binary nematic and crystalline system was constructed by self-consistently solving the combined free energies of Flory-Huggins, Maier-Saupe, and phase-field theory. The calculation revealed various coexistence regions such as nematic + liquid (N₁ + L₂), crystal + liquid (Cr₁ + L₂), crystal + nematic (Cr₁ + N₂), and crystal + crystal (Cr₁ + Cr₂) over a broad range of compositions including the single-phase nematic (N₁, N₂) of the corresponding constituents. The calculated liquidus lines were in good accord with the depressed mesophase-isotropic transition points. The present paper demonstrates the effect of trans-cis photoisomerization on the mesophase transitions of neat LCAC and the phase diagram of LCAC-RM257 as well as on the ripple formation (i.e., periodic undulation) on the azobenzene crystals. PMID:21517513

  3. Effect of Phase Transition on the Rheology of Model Thermotropic Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weijun; Kornfield, Julie A.

    1998-03-01

    Despite their important material properties, rheological studies of thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers (TLCPs) have not received much attention due to experimental difficulties. In this report, we describe the rheology of a model TLCP, which has good thermal stability and low isotropization temperature (DHMS-7,9, T_m=90^circC, T_xn=120^circC, T_ni=197^circC, where T_xn is the transition temperature between an unidentified mesophase to nematic phase). Systematic studies were carried out on DHMS-7,9 as a function of temperature and Mw (M_w=11K to 65K). Oscillatory dynamic moduli (G^') showed a plateau at an intermediate frequency at temperature below 120^circC , but no plateau for G^' was observed over the whole frequency range studied above 120^circC. We also studied the corresponding textural behavior by rheological-microscopy at different temperature with a home-made flow cell attached to a polarized light microscopy. It was recently reported that this TLCP exhibits different flow-aligning behavior in the mesophase by X-ray diffraction (Log-rolling alignment below 120^circC and typical flow alignment above 120^circC). Currently, we are investigating the origin of this flow behavior.

  4. Phase Structures and Transition of Side-Chain Liquid Crystalline Polyacetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Er-Qiang; Ye, Chun; Cheng, S. Z. D.; Lam, Jacky W. Y.; Tang, Ben-Zhong

    2002-03-01

    A side-chain liquid crystalline polyacetylene, poly(5-[(4’-heptoxy-4-biphenylyl) carbonyl]oxy-1-pentyne) (-CH=C[(CH_2)3-OCO-Biph-OC_7H_15]n-), was synthesized. The polymerization catalyzed by WCl_6-Ph_4Sn under optimal condition produced the polymer of high molecular weight (up to 1.2 x 10^5), with predominantly a trans structure of good stereo-regularity. Both the smectic A (SA) and C (SC) phases were found, giving the d spacings of 2.3 and 3.3 nm, respectively. The coexistence of SA and SC is possible at low temperature range due to the specific molecular shape of the sample. Three broad transitions were observed upon heating: the flexible alkyl tails of the side-chain melts at 90 °C approximately, and the transformations from SA and SC to an isotropic melt occur at the peak temperatures of 160 and 170 °C, respectively. The separated SA and SC structures were obtained by the STM scanning at room temperature.

  5. Laser-induced pattern formation in liquid sulfur. An indication of laser-induced phase transition to ordered polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Y.; Tamura, K.

    2007-04-01

    Liquid sulfur is a well-known liquid which exhibits a polymerization transition at T_p=159 °C. Recently, it was found from our experiments that such a transition can be induced below Tp through laser illumination and that an iridescent pattern appears under strong illumination with a pulsed laser of more than 60 mJ/cm2 pulse. It is proposed that the visible change in iridescence is due to a macroscopic reconstruction of laser-generated polymers and that a laser-induced phase transition takes place from a freely expanded polymer phase to an ordered polymer phase when increasing the laser illumination. To further examine this possibility, the time variation of the iridescent pattern has been fully investigated using a macro lens, a polarized microscope and an optical microscope. In an analysis of the iridescent pattern, a rapid decrease in the area was observed after an initial slow decrease, suggesting a type of phase transition. Results from the observation of a quenched sulfur sample with a polarized microscope gave evidence that the iridescent region consists of polymers. Through observation of the liquid with a microscope, a striped pattern with micrometer sized spacing was noted in the iridescent pattern. A drastic color change was observed in the pattern from its generation to its disappearance. Sample thickness dependence of the pattern was also observed. These results were well explained by assuming the self-arrangement of laser-generated colloidal polymers.

  6. Critical point of gas-liquid type phase transition and phase equilibrium functions in developed two-component plasma model.

    PubMed

    Butlitsky, M A; Zelener, B B; Zelener, B V

    2014-07-14

    A two-component plasma model, which we called a "shelf Coulomb" model has been developed in this work. A Monte Carlo study has been undertaken to calculate equations of state, pair distribution functions, internal energies, and other thermodynamics properties. A canonical NVT ensemble with periodic boundary conditions was used. The motivation behind the model is also discussed in this work. The "shelf Coulomb" model can be compared to classical two-component (electron-proton) model where charges with zero size interact via a classical Coulomb law. With important difference for interaction of opposite charges: electrons and protons interact via the Coulomb law for large distances between particles, while interaction potential is cut off on small distances. The cut off distance is defined by an arbitrary ɛ parameter, which depends on system temperature. All the thermodynamics properties of the model depend on dimensionless parameters ɛ and γ = βe(2)n(1/3) (where β = 1/kBT, n is the particle's density, kB is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the temperature) only. In addition, it has been shown that the virial theorem works in this model. All the calculations were carried over a wide range of dimensionless ɛ and γ parameters in order to find the phase transition region, critical point, spinodal, and binodal lines of a model system. The system is observed to undergo a first order gas-liquid type phase transition with the critical point being in the vicinity of ɛ(crit) ≈ 13(T(*)(crit) ≈ 0.076), γ(crit) ≈ 1.8(v(*)(crit) ≈ 0.17), P(*)(crit) ≈ 0.39, where specific volume v* = 1/γ(3) and reduced temperature T(*) = ɛ(-1). PMID:25028031

  7. Critical point of gas-liquid type phase transition and phase equilibrium functions in developed two-component plasma model

    SciTech Connect

    Butlitsky, M. A.; Zelener, B. V.

    2014-07-14

    A two-component plasma model, which we called a “shelf Coulomb” model has been developed in this work. A Monte Carlo study has been undertaken to calculate equations of state, pair distribution functions, internal energies, and other thermodynamics properties. A canonical NVT ensemble with periodic boundary conditions was used. The motivation behind the model is also discussed in this work. The “shelf Coulomb” model can be compared to classical two-component (electron-proton) model where charges with zero size interact via a classical Coulomb law. With important difference for interaction of opposite charges: electrons and protons interact via the Coulomb law for large distances between particles, while interaction potential is cut off on small distances. The cut off distance is defined by an arbitrary ε parameter, which depends on system temperature. All the thermodynamics properties of the model depend on dimensionless parameters ε and γ = βe{sup 2}n{sup 1/3} (where β = 1/k{sub B}T, n is the particle's density, k{sub B} is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the temperature) only. In addition, it has been shown that the virial theorem works in this model. All the calculations were carried over a wide range of dimensionless ε and γ parameters in order to find the phase transition region, critical point, spinodal, and binodal lines of a model system. The system is observed to undergo a first order gas-liquid type phase transition with the critical point being in the vicinity of ε{sub crit}≈13(T{sub crit}{sup *}≈0.076),γ{sub crit}≈1.8(v{sub crit}{sup *}≈0.17),P{sub crit}{sup *}≈0.39, where specific volume v* = 1/γ{sup 3} and reduced temperature T{sup *} = ε{sup −1}.

  8. Anomalous viscoelasticity near the isotropic-nematic phase transition in liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Jose, Prasanth P; Bagchi, Biman

    2004-10-01

    Recent optical Kerr effect experiments have shown that orientational relaxation of nematogens shows a pronounced slow down of the response function at intermediate times and also a power law decay near the isotropic-nematic (I-N) transition. In many aspects, this behavior appears to be rather similar to the ones observed in the supercooled liquid near-glass transition. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of model nematogens (Gay-Berne with aspect ratio 3) to explore the viscoelasticity near the I-N transition and also investigated the correlation of viscoelasticity (if any) with orientational relaxation. It is found that although the viscosity indeed undergoes a somewhat sharper than normal change near the I-N transition, it is not characterized by any divergence-like behavior (like the ones observed in the supercooled liquid). The rotational friction, on the other hand, shows a much sharper rise as the I-N transition is approached. Interestingly, the probability distribution of the amplitude of the three components of the stress tensor shows anisotropy near the I-N transition-similar anisotropy has also been seen in the deeply supercooled liquid. Frequency dependence of viscosity shows several unusual behaviors: (a) There is a weak, power law dependence on frequency [eta(')(omega) approximately omega(-alpha)] at low frequencies and (b) there is a rapid increase in the sharp peak observed in eta(')(omega) in the intermediate frequency on approach to the I-N transition density. These features can be explained from the stress-stress time correlation function. The angular velocity correlation function also exhibits a power law decay in time. The reason for this is discussed. PMID:15473759

  9. An electro-optic experimental study of an unusual liquid crystal phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staines, Daniel; Wicks, Derek; Havens, Austin; Fernsler, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    Liquid crystal phases are highly sensitive to their surroundings and they interact with light in unusual ways: the index of refraction is different depending on the polarization of the incident light. This combination of properties makes them ideal for low-power liquid crystal displays (LCD's), ubiquitous in today's portable electronic devices. They are also beautiful: optical textures of liquid crystals show bright colors, with the color corresponding to the amount of retardation in the light polarized along different axes. These phases are fluid, but can nevertheless be highly ordered. We have developed a novel experimental analysis using a photometric calculation of microscopy images to perform a series of experiments on several liquid crystal materials, called ``de Vries'' smectics. Using this system, we examined how the structure of these phases changed under the influence of different boundary conditions, temperature, and applied electric fields. These unusual materials show the bizarre behavior of appearing to become less ordered with decreasing temperature. This phase, which is not fully understood, has advantageous optical properties that could lead to the next generation of liquid crystal displays.

  10. Photoinduced crystal-to-liquid phase transitions of azobenzene derivatives and their application in photolithography processes through a solid-liquid patterning.

    PubMed

    Norikane, Yasuo; Uchida, Emi; Tanaka, Satoko; Fujiwara, Kyoko; Koyama, Emiko; Azumi, Reiko; Akiyama, Haruhisa; Kihara, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Masaru

    2014-10-01

    The direct and reversible transformation of matter between the solid and liquid phases by light at constant temperature is of great interest because of its potential applications in various manufacturing settings. We report a simple molecular design strategy for the phase transitions: azobenzenes having para-dialkoxy groups with a methyl group at the meta-position. The photolithography processes were demonstrated using the azobenzene as a photoresist in a single process combining development and etching of a copper substrate. PMID:25216186

  11. Theoretical and Computational Studies of Condensed-Phase Phenomena: The Origin of Biological Homochirality, and the Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition in Network-Forming Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Francesco

    This dissertation describes theoretical and computational studies of the origin of biological homochirality, and the existence of a liquid-liquid phase transition in pure-component network-forming fluids. A common theme throughout these studies is the use of sophisticated computer simulation and statistical mechanics techniques to study complex condensed-phase phenomena. In the first part of this dissertation, we use an elementary lattice model with molecular degrees of freedom, and satisfying microscopic reversibility, to investigate the effect of reaction reversibility on the evolution of stochastic symmetry breaking via autocatalysis and mutual inhibition in a closed system. We identify conditions under which the system's evolution towards racemic equilibrium becomes extremely slow, allowing for long-time persistence of a symmetry-broken state. We also identify a "monomer purification" mechanism, due to which a nearly homochiral state can persist for long times, even in the presence of significant reverse reaction rates. Order of magnitude estimates show that with reasonable physical parameters a symmetry broken state could persist over geologically-relevant time scales. In the second part of this dissertation, we study a chiral-symmetry breaking mechanism known as Viedma ripening. We develop a Monte Carlo model to gain further insights into the mechanisms capable of reproducing key experimental signatures associated with this phenomenon. We also provide a comprehensive investigation of how the model parameters impact the system's overall behavior. It is shown that size-dependent crystal solubility alone is insufficient to reproduce most experimental signatures, and that some form of a solid-phase chiral feedback mechanism (e.g., agglomeration) must be invoked in our model. In the third part of this dissertation, we perform rigorous free energy calculations to investigate the possibility of a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) in the Stillinger-Weber (SW

  12. Anomalous viscoelasticity near the isotropic-nematic phase transition in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Prasanth P.; Bagchi, Biman

    2004-10-01

    Recent optical Kerr effect experiments have shown that orientational relaxation of nematogens shows a pronounced slow down of the response function at intermediate times and also a power law decay near the isotropic-nematic (I-N) transition. In many aspects, this behavior appears to be rather similar to the ones observed in the supercooled liquid near-glass transition [Cang et al., J. Chem. Phys. 118, 9303 (2003)]. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of model nematogens (Gay-Berne with aspect ratio 3) to explore the viscoelasticity near the I-N transition and also investigated the correlation of viscoelasticity (if any) with orientational relaxation. It is found that although the viscosity indeed undergoes a somewhat sharper than normal change near the I-N transition, it is not characterized by any divergencelike behavior (like the ones observed in the supercooled liquid). The rotational friction, on the other hand, shows a much sharper rise as the I-N transition is approached. Interestingly, the probability distribution of the amplitude of the three components of the stress tensor shows anisotropy near the I-N transition—similar anisotropy has also been seen in the deeply supercooled liquid [Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 25504 (2002)]. Frequency dependence of viscosity shows several unusual behaviors: (a) There is a weak, power law dependence on frequency [η'(ω)˜ω-α] at low frequencies and (b) there is a rapid increase in the sharp peak observed in η'(ω) in the intermediate frequency on approach to the I-N transition density. These features can be explained from the stress-stress time correlation function. The angular velocity correlation function also exhibits a power law decay in time. The reason for this is discussed.

  13. Nematic quantum phase transition of composite Fermi liquids in half-filled Landau levels and their geometric response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yizhi; Cho, Gil Young; Fradkin, Eduardo

    We present a theory of isotropic-nematic quantum phase transition in the composite Fermi liquid arising in the half-filled Landau levels. We show that the quantum phase transition is triggered by the attractive quadrupolar interaction. By performing flux attachment, system turns into a composite Fermi liquid. The nematic order parameters act as the dynamical metric interplaying with the underlying topology, the Chern-Simons theory. Here both the fluctuations of the gauge field and the nematic order parameter can soften the Fermi surface and thus the fermions form a non-Fermi liquid. The effective field theory for the isotropic-nematic phase transition has z = 3 dynamical exponent due to the Landau damping due to the finite density of the fermions. We show that there is a Berry phase term of the nematic order parameter, which can be interpreted as the ``Hall viscosity'' of the dynamical metric. We also find the Wen-Zee-like term, which effectively dresses the nematic vortex with the electric charge. Both of the terms are originated from the time reversal breaking fluctuation of the Chern-Simons gauge fields. This indicates the fluctuations of the gauge fields modify the Hall viscosity and orbital spin of the compressible half-filled Landau level.

  14. Dynamic mechanism of the ferroelectric to antiferroelectric phase transition in chiral smectic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Song, Jang-Kun; Fukuda, Atsuo; Vij, J K

    2008-08-29

    The temperature-induced phase transition between the chiral smectic phases, antiferroelectric (smectic-C(A)*) and ferroelectric (smectic-C*), is found to occur through solitary wave propagation. We measure the free energy, which shows a double well shape in the entire SmC(A)* temperature range and the global minimum is found to shift from the antiferroelectric order to the ferroelectric order at the transition temperature. However, any significant supercooling is not observed and the transition cannot be described by the first order Landau-de Gennes theory, where the double well potential exists only in a narrow range of temperatures. This implies that the SmC(A)*-SmC* transition can occur only nonhomogeneously through the solitary wave propagation which overcomes the high energy barrier between the two minima. PMID:18851661

  15. Phase Transitions in Liquid Crystal Doped with Magnetic Particles of Different Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopčanský, P.; Tomašovičová, N.; Koneracká, M.; Timko, M.; Závišová, V.; Džarová, A.; Jadzyn, J.; Beaugnon, E.; Chaud, X.

    2011-04-01

    In this study, observations of structural transitions in ferronematics based on the thermotropic nematic 4- trans-4'- n-hexyl-cyclohexyl-isothiocyanato-benzene (6CHBT) are described. Droplets of the nematic phase in the isotropic phase were observed in solutions of nematogenic 6CHBT dissolved in phenyl isocyanate and 6CHBT dissolved in phenyl isocyanate and doped with magnetic particles of different shapes (nanorods and chain-like particles). Magneto-dielectric measurements of structural transitions in these new systems enable to estimate of the type of anchoring of the nematic molecules on the magnetic particles surface.

  16. Magnetic Observations of the Superfluid-Superfluid Phase Transition in Liquid Helium Three

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Stephen Thomas

    We report observations of the first-order phase transition between the two superfluid phases of ^3He. We supercool a long cylindrical sample of the higher-temperature A phase in a magnetic field in a simple dc magnetometer. We then introduce B phase at one end of the sample and observe its growth into the supercooled A phase via the magnetometer signal. For temperatures above a certain value, rm T_{nom }, the phase interface travels up the tube at a fairly constant velocity, in reasonable agreement with the theory of Leggett and Yip. For temperatures below rm T_{nom} there arises a new interaction between the rapidly moving phase interface and the magnetization of the sample. Our observations allow some characterization of this new interaction.

  17. Phase transition and chemical decomposition of liquid carbon dioxide and nitrogen mixture under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-Xu, Jiang; Guan-Yu, Chen; Yu-Tong, Li; Xin-Lu, Cheng; Cui-Ming, Tang

    2016-02-01

    Thermodynamic and chemical properties of liquid carbon dioxide and nitrogen (CO2-N2) mixture under the conditions of extremely high densities and temperatures are studied by using quantum molecular dynamic (QMD) simulations based on density functional theory including dispersion corrections (DFT-D). We present equilibrium properties of liquid mixture for 112 separate density and temperature points, by selecting densities ranging from ρ = 1.80 g/cm3 to 3.40 g/cm3 and temperatures from T = 500 K to 8000 K. In the range of our study, the liquid CO2-N2 mixture undergoes a continuous transition from molecular to atomic fluid state and liquid polymerization inferred from pair correlation functions (PCFs) and the distribution of various molecular components. The insulator-metal transition is demonstrated by means of the electronic density of states (DOS). Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374217, 11135012, and 11375262) and the Joint Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the China Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant No. 11176020).

  18. Time history of laser pulse polarization transformation as a tool of the isotropic-nematic phase transition in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Vladimir A.; Il'inova, Tamara M.; Marchenko, Tatiana B.; Shkurinov, Aleksandr P.; Zolot'ko, Alexander S.

    2003-06-01

    We theoretically investigate in the aberrationless approximation the self-action of the elliptically polarized Gaussian pulse during its propagation in a thin dish with a nematic liquid crystal in the isotropic phase. Quadrature formulas are obtained to describe the time history of the intensity, the elliptisity degree and the rotation angle of the polarization ellipse of the output radiation at the different points of the beam cross-section. They are expressed in terms of the parameters describing two, essential near the temperature of the isotropic-nematic phase transition, mechanisms of the spatial nonlocality of the nonlinear medium optical response, and in terms of the other parameters, which describe the nematic liquid crystal and the elliptically polarized incident pulse. The former mechanism is specified by the medium heating due to light absorption; the latter is determined by the fluctuations of the nematic liquid crystal order parameter tensor near the temperature of the isotropic-nematic phase transition. It is shown that for some values of temperature and of the nematic liquid crystal parameters the elliptical polarization of the incident pulse, which is constant at the entry of the thin dish, transforms into the linear or another different elliptical one at the exit and keeps this new state up to the pulse tail. The dependence of the ellipticity degree on time becomes significantly nonmonotonic and changes its sign in some cases. The nonlocality of the nonlinear medium optical response weakens these transformations.

  19. Nuclear liquid-gas phase transition at large N{sub c} in the van der Waals approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Torrieri, Giorgio; Mishustin, Igor

    2010-11-15

    We examine the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition at a large number of colors (N{sub c}) within the framework of the van der Waals (VdW) We argue that the VdW equation is appropriate for describing internucleon forces, and discuss how each parameter scales with N{sub c}. We demonstrate that N{sub c}=3 (our world) is not large with respect to the other dimensionless scale relevant to baryonic matter, the number of neighbors in a dense system N{sub N}. Consequently, we show that the liquid-gas phase transition looks dramatically different at N{sub c{yields}{infinity}} with respect to our world: The critical-point temperature becomes of the order of {Lambda}{sub QCD} rather than below it. The critical-point density becomes of the order of the baryonic density, rather than an order of magnitude below it. These are precisely the characteristics usually associated with the ''quarkyonic phase.'' We therefore conjecture that quarkyonic matter is simply the large-N{sub c} limit of the nuclear liquid, and the interplay between N{sub c} and N{sub N} is the reason that the nuclear liquid in our world is so different from quarkyonic matter. We conclude by suggesting ways in which our conjecture can be tested in future lattice measurements.

  20. Free-Surface Optical Scattering as an Indicator of the Shock-Induced Solid-Liquid Phase Transition in Tin

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, G. D.; Lutz, S. S.; Marshall, B. R.; Turley, W. D.; Veeser, L. R.; Furlanetto, M. R.; Hixson, R. S.; Holtkamp, D. B.; Jensen, B. J.; Rigg, P. A.; Wilke, M. D.

    2008-07-01

    When highly polished metal surfaces melt upon release after shock loading, they exhibit features that suggest significant surface changes accompany the phase transition. The reflection of light from such surfaces changes from specular (pre-shock) to diffuse upon melting. A familiar manifestation of this phenomenon is the loss of signal light in VISAR measurements, which occurs at pressures high enough to melt the free surface. Unlike many other potential material phase-sensitive diagnostics (e.g., reflectometry, conductivity) that show relatively small (1%–10%) changes, the specularity of reflection provides a more sensitive and definitive indication of the solid-liquid phase transition. Data will be presented that support the hypothesis that specularity changes indicate melt in a way that can be measured easily and unambiguously.

  1. Selective Sequence for the Peptide-Triggered Phase Transition of Lyotropic Liquid-Crystalline Structures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingtao; Dong, Yao-Da; Boyd, Ben J

    2016-05-24

    A novel concept of using mixed lipids to construct selective peptide-sequence-sensing lyotropic liquid-crystalline (LLC) dispersion systems was investigated. The LLC systems were constructed using a mixture of phytantriol, a lipid that forms lyotropic liquid-crystalline phases, and a novel synthesized peptide-lipid (peplipid) for sensing a target peptide with the RARAR sequence. The internal structure of the dispersed LLC particles was converted from the lamellar structure (liposomes) to the inverse bicontinuous cubic phase (cubosomes) in the presence of the target peptide. The addition of common human proteins did not induce any structural change, indicating a high selectivity of interaction with the target peptide. The concept has potential for the design of targeted controlled release drug delivery agents. PMID:27148806

  2. Dimensional crossover in a spin liquid to helimagnet quantum phase transition.

    SciTech Connect

    Garlea, Vasile O; Zheludev, Andrey I; Habicht, Klaus; Meissner, Michael; Grenier, B.; Regnault, L.-P.; Ressouche, E.

    2009-01-01

    Neutron scattering is used to study magnetic field induced ordering in the quasi-1D quantum spin-tube compound Sul-Cu2Cl4 that in zero field has a non-magnetic spin-liquid ground state. The experiments reveal an incommensurate chiral high-field phase stabilized by a geometric frustration of the magnetic interactions. The measured critical exponents \\beta= 0.235 and \

  3. Quantum Phase Transition Between a Luttinger Liquid and a Gas of Cold Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Law, K. T.; Feldman, D. E.

    2008-08-29

    We consider cold polar molecules confined in a helical optical lattice similar to those used in holographic microfabrication. An external electric field polarizes molecules along the axis of the helix. The large-distance intermolecular dipolar interaction is attractive but the short-scale interaction is repulsive due to geometric constraints and thus prevents collapse. The interaction strength depends on the electric field. We show that a zero-temperature second-order liquid-gas transition occurs at a critical field. It can be observed under experimentally accessible conditions.

  4. Search for the First-Order Liquid-to-Liquid Phase Transition in Low-Temperature Confined Water by Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Sow-Hsin; Wang, Zhe; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Kao-Hsiang

    2013-01-01

    It has been conjectured that a 1st order liquid-to-liquid (L-L) phase transition (LLPT) between high density liquid (HDL) and low density liquid (LDL) in supercooled water may exist, as a thermodynamic extension to the liquid phase of the 1st order transition established between the two bulk solid phases of amorphous ice, the high density amorphous ice (HDA) and the low density amorphous ice (LDA). In this paper, we first recall our previous attempts to establish the existence of the 1st order L-L phase transition through the use of two neutron scattering techniques: a constant Q elastic diffraction study of isobaric temperature scan of the D2O density, namely, the equation of state (EOS) measurements. A pronounced density hysteresis phenomenon in the temperature scan of the density above P = 1500 bar is observed which gives a plausible evidence of crossing the 1st order L-L phase transition line above this pressure; an incoherent quasi-elastic scattering measurements of temperature-dependence of the alpha-relaxation time of H2O at a series of pressures, namely, the study of the Fragile-to-Strong dynamic crossover (FSC) phenomenon as a function of pressure which we interpreted as the results of crossing the Widom line in the one-phase region. In this new experiment, we used incoherent inelastic neutron scattering (INS) to measure the density of states (DOS) of H atoms in H2O molecules in confined water as function of temperature and pressure, through which we may be able to follow the emergence of the LDL and HDL phases at supercooled temperature and high pressures. We here report for the first time the differences of librational and translational DOSs between the hypothetical HDL and LDL phases, which are similar to the corresponding differences between the well-established HDA and LDA ices. This is plausible evidence that the HDL and LDL phases are the thermodynamic extensions of the corresponding amorphous solid water HDA and LDA ices.

  5. Search for the first-order liquid-to-liquid phase transition in low-temperature confined water by neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sow-Hsin; Wang, Zhe; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Kao-Hsiang

    2013-02-01

    It has been conjectured that a 1st order liquid-to-liquid (L-L) phase transition (LLPT) between high density liquid (HDL) and low density liquid (LDL) in supercooled water may exist, as a thermodynamic extension to the liquid phase of the 1st order transition established between the two bulk solid phases of amorphous ice, the high density amorphous ice (HDA) and the low density amorphous ice (LDA). In this paper, we first recall our previous attempts to establish the existence of the 1st order L-L phase transition through the use of two neutron scattering techniques: a constant Q elastic diffraction study of isobaric temperature scan of the D2O density, namely, the equation of state (EOS) measurements. A pronounced density hysteresis phenomenon in the temperature scan of the density above P = 1500 bar is observed which gives a plausible evidence of crossing the 1st order L-L phase transition line above this pressure; an incoherent quasi-elastic scattering measurements of temperature-dependence of the α-relaxation time of H2O at a series of pressures, namely, the study of the Fragile-to-Strong dynamic crossover (FSC) phenomenon as a function of pressure which we interpreted as the results of crossing the Widom line in the one-phase region. In this new experiment, we used incoherent inelastic neutron scattering (INS) to measure the density of states (DOS) of H atoms in H2O molecules in confined water as function of temperature and pressure, through which we may be able to follow the emergence of the LDL and HDL phases at supercooled temperature and high pressures. We here report for the first time the differences of librational and translational DOSs between the hypothetical HDL and LDL phases, which are similar to the corresponding differences between the well-established HDA and LDA ices. This is plausible evidence that the HDL and LDL phases are the thermodynamic extensions of the corresponding amorphous solid water HDA and LDA ices.

  6. Effects of molecular elongation on liquid crystalline phase behaviour: isotropic-nematic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ram Chandra; Ram, Jokhan

    2003-08-01

    We present the density-functional approach to study the isotropic-nematic transitions and calculate the values of freezing parameters of the Gay-Berne liquid crystal model, concentrating on the effects of varying the molecular elongation, x0. For this, we have solved the Percus-Yevick integral equation theory to calculate the pair-correlation functions of a fluid the molecules of which interact via a Gay-Berne pair potential. These results have been used in the density-functional theory as an input to locate the isotropic-nematic transition and calculate freezing parameters for a range of length-to-width parameters 3.0⩽ x0⩽4.0 at reduced temperatures 0.95 and 1.25. We observed that as x0 is increased, the isotropic-nematic transition is seen to move to lower density at a given temperature. We find that the density-functional theory is good to study the freezing transitions in such fluids. We have also compared our results with computer simulation results wherever they are available.

  7. Phase transition in the Rényi-Shannon entropy of Luttinger liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stéphan, Jean-Marie; Misguich, Grégoire; Pasquier, Vincent

    2011-11-01

    The Rényi-Shannon entropy allows extraction of some universal information about many-body wave functions. For a critical spin chain with central charge c=1, we show that it exhibits a phase transition at some value nc of the Rényi parameter n which depends on the Luttinger parameter R. A replica-free formulation establishes a connection to boundary entropies in conformal field theory and reveals that the transition is triggered by a vertex operator which becomes relevant at the boundary. Our numerical results (XXZ and J1-J2 spin chains) match the continuum limit prediction, confirming its universal character. The replica approach used in previous works turns out to be correct only for ntransition reveals a singularity in the entanglement spectra.

  8. Equation of state measurements by radiography provide evidence for a liquid-liquid phase transition in cerium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipp, M. J.; Jenei, Zs; Ruddle, D.; Aracne-Ruddle, C.; Cynn, H.; Evans, W. J.; Kono, Y.; Kenney-Benson, C.; Park, C.

    2014-05-01

    A pressure-volume isotherm in cerium metal at 1100 K was measured in a large volume press of the Paris-Edinburgh type up to 6 GPa. The volume was determined by imaging a rectangular shape of the sample via white X-ray radiography. Energy dispersive x-ray diffraction spectra were recorded to ensure that the highly reactive cerium in the cell assembly remained pure at this temperature. Even at 1100 K the p-V equation of state of liquid cerium shows a pronounced decrease of the bulk modulus above the y-phase region similar to the 775 K isotherm in the solid that also shows an inflection point between y- and a-type cerium. The inflection point in the 1100 K isotherm indicating the minimum in the bulk modulus separating the γ- from the α-type liquid is located at approximately 3.5 GPa.

  9. Phase behavior and mixing-demixing transitions in binary liquid mixtures with spherical and non-spherical interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Herrera, Enrique; Ramirez-Santiago, Guillermo; Moreno-Razo, J. Antonio

    2006-03-01

    We have carried out extensive equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to study the temperature versus density phase diagrams and the mixing-demixing transition line in fluid equimolar binary mixtures modeled by: (i) Lennard-Jones, (ii) Stock-Mayer, and (iii) Gay- Berne molecular interactions. These studies are performed as function of miscibility parameter, α= ɛAB/ ɛAA, where ɛAA= ɛBB and ɛAB stand for the parameters related to the attractive part of the intermolecular interactions for similar and dissimilar particles, respectively. When the miscibility of the Lennard-Jones mixture varies in the range 0 < α< 1, a continuous critical line of consolute points Tcons(ρ), appears. This line intersects the liquid-vapor coexistence curve at different positions depending on the values of α, yielding mainly three different topologies for the phase diagrams. These results are in qualitative agreement to those found previously for square well and hard-core Yukawa binary mixtures. We also carry out a detailed study of the liquid-liquid interfacial and liquid-vapor surface tensions, as function of temperature and miscibility as well as its relationship to the topologies of the phase diagrams. Similar studies and analysis are also performed for Stock-Mayer and Gay-Berne binary mixtures.

  10. Simultaneous calorimetric and polarization microscopy investigations of light induced changes over phase transitions in a liquid crystal-napthopyran mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoloni, S.; Mercuri, F.; Marinelli, M.; Pizzoferrato, R.; Zammit, U.; Kosa, T.; Sukhomlinova, L.; Taheri, B.

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the specific heat and the thermal conductivity in a 4-(n-octyl)-4'-cyanobiphenyl liquid crystal (LC)-photochromic molecules mixture, before, during, and after the photo-activation of the dispersed photochromic molecules, over both the smectic A-nematic and the nematic-isotropic phase transitions. The evaluation of the specific heat has enabled the determination of the changes of the phase transition characteristics induced by the photochromic molecules photoisomerization, while that of the thermal conductivity could be used to monitor the modifications induced in the average LC molecular orientation. The polarization microscopy imaging of the sample texture constituted a valuable support for the interpretation of the obtained thermal conductivity results.

  11. Effect of the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate on the phase transition of starch: dissolution or gelatinization?

    PubMed

    Mateyawa, Sainimili; Xie, David Fengwei; Truss, Rowan W; Halley, Peter J; Nicholson, Timothy M; Shamshina, Julia L; Rogers, Robin D; Boehm, Michael W; McNally, Tony

    2013-04-15

    This work revealed that the interactions between starch, the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([Emim][OAc]), and water might contribute to the phase transition (gelatinization, dissolution, or both) of native starch at reduced temperature. Using mixtures of water and [Emim][OAc] at certain ratios (7.2/1 and 10.8/1 mol/mol), both the gelatinization and dissolution of the starch occur competitively, but also in a synergistic manner. At lower [Emim][OAc] concentration (water/[Emim][OAc] molar ratio≥25.0/1), mainly gelatinization occurs which is slightly impeded by the strong interaction between water and [Emim][OAc]; while at higher [Emim][OAc] concentration (water/[Emim][OAc] molar ratio≤2.8/1), the dissolution of starch is the major form of phase transition, possibly restricted by the difficulty of [Emim][OAc] to interact with starch. PMID:23544570

  12. Liquid-solid and solid-solid phase transition of monolayer water: High-density rhombic monolayer ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Toshihiro; Bai, Jaeil; Yasuoka, Kenji; Mitsutake, Ayori; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2014-05-01

    Liquid-solid and solid-solid phase transitions of a monolayer water confined between two parallel hydrophobic surfaces are studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The solid phase considered is the high-density rhombic monolayer ice. Based on the computed free energy surface, it is found that at a certain width of the slit nanopore, the monolayer water exhibits not only a high freezing point but also a low energy barrier to crystallization. Moreover, through analyzing the oxygen-hydrogen-oxygen angle distribution and oxygen-hydrogen radial distribution, the high-density monolayer ice is classified as either a flat ice or a puckered ice. The transition between a flat ice and a puckered ice reflects a trade-off between the water-wall interactions and the electrostatic interactions among water molecules.

  13. Liquid-solid and solid-solid phase transition of monolayer water: high-density rhombic monolayer ice.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Toshihiro; Bai, Jaeil; Yasuoka, Kenji; Mitsutake, Ayori; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2014-05-14

    Liquid-solid and solid-solid phase transitions of a monolayer water confined between two parallel hydrophobic surfaces are studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The solid phase considered is the high-density rhombic monolayer ice. Based on the computed free energy surface, it is found that at a certain width of the slit nanopore, the monolayer water exhibits not only a high freezing point but also a low energy barrier to crystallization. Moreover, through analyzing the oxygen-hydrogen-oxygen angle distribution and oxygen-hydrogen radial distribution, the high-density monolayer ice is classified as either a flat ice or a puckered ice. The transition between a flat ice and a puckered ice reflects a trade-off between the water-wall interactions and the electrostatic interactions among water molecules. PMID:24832288

  14. Phase transitions in the liquid-vapor interface of dilute alloys of Bi in Ga: New experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dongxu; Jiang, Xu; Yang, Bin; Rice, Stuart A.

    2010-07-19

    We report the results of measurements of x-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction from the liquid-vapor interfaces of four dilute alloys of Bi in Ga with mole fractions x{sub Bi} = 0.0032, 0.0023, 0.00037, and 0.000037. The monolayer coverage of the alloys with x{sub Bi} = 0.0023, and x{sub Bi} = 0.00037 is about 0.85 and only very slightly temperature dependent. The monolayer coverage in the lowest-concentration alloy, with x{sub Bi} = 0.000037, ranged from 0.82 at 29 C to 0.58 at 110 C. In none of these alloys, down to the lowest temperature used, 29 C, can we find any evidence for crystallization of the Bi monolayer that segregates as the outermost stratum of the liquid-vapor interface. Drawing on theoretical arguments we propose that the transitions inferred from the second-harmonic generation and plasma generation studies of dilute Bi in Ga alloys are from the liquid state to the hexatic state of the Bi monolayer. The data for the alloy with x{sub Bi} = 0.000037 suggest that near 80 C there is a disordered phase-to-disordered phase transition.

  15. Structural Formation Process of Microphase Separated Films with Liquid Crystalline Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komura, Motonori; Iyoda, Tomokazu

    2008-03-01

    Ordered nanostructures arising from the microphase separation of block copolymers have driven one to fabricate nanofunctional materials as fundamental technology of the coming electronic and photonic materials. Thin films of a series of newly designed amphiphilic block copolymer consisting of hydrophilic polyethylene oxide (PEO) and hydrophobic polymethacrylate with azobenzene-mesogen in side-chain (PMA(Az)) show highly ordered microphase separation with PEO cylinders perpendicularly oriented to the film surface. In the present report, we investigated a structural formation process of the microphase separated films by temperature controlled atomic force microscopy (AFM) and grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). These measurements revealed that homeotropic alignments of Az liquid crystalline layers predominated the cylinder orientation, which corresponded to a <110> direction of body centered cubic structure under annealing condition, in disagreement with cylinder orientation of order-order transition of traditional block copolymers.

  16. Precise Measurements of the Density and Critical Phenomena Near Phase Transitions in Liquid Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Nai-Chang

    1997-01-01

    The first-year progress for the project of precise measurements of the density and critical phenomena of helium near phase transitions is summarized below: (1) completion of a cryogenic sample probe for the proposed measurements, and the rehabilitation of a designated laboratory at Caltech for this project; (2) construction and testing of a superconducting niobium cavity; (3) acquisition of one phase-locked-loop system for high-resolution frequency control and read- out; (4) setting up high-resolution thermometry (HRT) for temperature readout and control; (5) developing new approaches for calibrating the coefficient between the resonant frequency shift (delta f) and the helium density (rho), as well as for measuring the effect of gravity on T(sub lambda) to a much better precision; (6) programming of the interface control of all instruments for automatic data acquisition; and (7) improving data analyses and fitting procedures.

  17. Nanosecond Ultrasonics to Study Phase Transitions in Solid and Liquid Systems at High Pressure and Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, B P; Berge, P A; Carlson, S C; Farber, D L; Akella, J

    2007-03-21

    This report describes the development of a high-frequency ultrasonic measurement capability for application to the study of phase transitions at elevated pressure and temperature. We combined expertise in various aspects of static high-pressure technique with recent advances in wave propagation modeling, ultrasonic transducer development, electronic methods and broadband instrumentation to accomplish the goals of this project. The transduction and electronic systems have a demonstrated bandwidth of 400 MHz, allowing investigations of phenomena with characteristic times as short as 2.5 nS. A compact, pneumatically driven moissanite anvil cell was developed and constructed for this project. This device generates a high-pressure environment for mm dimension samples to pressures of 3 GPa. Ultrasonic measurements were conducted in the moissanite cell, an LLNL multi-anvil device and in a modified piston cylinder device. Measurements for water, and elemental tantalum, tin and cerium demonstrate the success of the methods. The {gamma}-{alpha} phase transition in cerium was clearly detected at {approx}0.7 GPa with 75 MHz longitudinal waves. These results have direct application to important problems in LLNL programs, as well as seismology and planetary science.

  18. Toward the dynamic phase transition mechanism of a thermoresponsive ionic liquid in the presence of different thermoresponsive polymers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ge; Wu, Peiyi

    2016-01-21

    The influence of two thermoresponsive polymers, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) and poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) (PVCL), on the phase transition behavior of a thermoresponsive ionic liquid, tributylhexylphosphonium 3-sulfopropylmethacrylate ([P4,4,4,6][MC3S]), was investigated. An obvious distinction was observed in the LCSTs and morphologies of [P4,4,4,6][MC3S]-PNIPAM and [P4,4,4,6][MC3S]-PVCL aqueous solutions, indicating their large differences in dynamic transition processes. In general, PNIPAM can "break" the water structure of [P4,4,4,6][MC3S] to decrease the transition temperature, while PVCL can "make" the water structure to increase it. Surprisingly, [P4,4,4,6][MC3S] has an unusual over-hydration behavior before dehydration while PNIPAM experiences a two-step transition process in [P4,4,4,6][MC3S]-PNIPAM aqueous solution, which has never been reported so far. Further studies revealed that the formation of strong intra-/inter-molecular hydrogen bonds C[double bond, length as m-dash]OD-N in PNIPAM is the driving force for the LCST phenomenon of [P4,4,4,6][MC3S]-PNIPAM solution, while it is the [P4,4,4,6][MC3S] that dominates the phase separation of [P4,4,4,6][MC3S]-PVCL solution. PMID:26558815

  19. Experimental research of phase transition's kinetics in a liquid melt of high-purity aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorontsov, V. B.; Zhuravlev, D. V.; Cherepanov, A. S.

    2015-08-01

    This scientific work is devoted to the studying of the genetic connection structures of solid and liquid phases. Fourier analysis of signals of acoustic emission (AE) accompanying melting high purity aluminum from the melting point up to t = 860°C was performed. Based on the results of previous studies cluster formations in the melt - the micro-regions, those retain crystallinity (areas with short-range order of symmetry) were considered as the source of AE. The experimental data allowed to follow the dynamics of disorder zones range order in the melt with increasing melt temperature up to their complete destruction. The presented results of spectral analysis of the signals were analyzed from the standpoint of the theory of cluster melting metals.

  20. Transition of Bery Phase and Pancharatnam Phase and Phase Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guolan; Pan, Hui; Wang, Zisheng

    2016-07-01

    Berry Phase and time-dependent Pancharatnam phase are investigated for nuclear spin polarization in a liquid by a rotation magnetic field, where two-state mixture effect is exactly included in the geometric phases. We find that when the system of nuclear spin polarization is in the unpolarized state, the transitive phenomena of both Berry phase and Pancharatnam phase are taken place. For the polarized system, in contrast, such a transition is not taken place. It is obvious that the transitions of geometric phase correspond to the phase change of physical system.

  1. Nature of the Blue-Phase-III{endash}isotropic critical point: An analogy with the liquid-gas transition

    SciTech Connect

    Anisimov, M.A.; Agayan, V.A.; Collings, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    The analogy with the liquid-gas critical point is analyzed to clarify the nature of the pretransitional behavior of physical properties in the vicinity of the Blue-Phase-III{endash}isotropic transition in chiral liquid crystalline systems. The analogy is unusual: temperature serves as the ordering field and entropy plays the role of the order parameter. Both mean field and parametric equations of state are formulated in terms of scaling fields. The scaling fields are linear combinations of the physical fields, which are temperature and chirality. It is shown that mixing of the physical field variables naturally leads to a strong asymmetry with respect to the transition temperature in the behavior of the physical properties that cannot be described by simple power laws. While the mean field theory gives a good description of the experimental data, the scaling theory, if one incorporates mixing of the field variables, gives even better agreement with the experimental data, placing this transition in the same universality class as the three-dimensional Ising model. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Weakly Pinned Wigner Solid-FQHE Liquid Phase Transition in the 2-Dimensional Hole System under Ultrahigh Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Du, Rui-Rui; Shi, Junren; Xie, Xincheng; Manfra, Michael J.; Pfeiffer, Loren N.; West, Ken W.; Park, Ju-Hyun

    2014-03-01

    In the two dimensional systems, Wigner crystals (WC) solid and fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) liquid phase compete under low temperature and high magnetic fields. Here, we exhibit unusual experimental results in the new developed C-doped two-dimensional hole samples. Our derivative conductivity measurements elucidate the existence of reentrant insulating phase (RIP) around the Landau level filling factor v = 1/5 in the 2D hole system. Moreover, we report the unexpected feature in the quantum phase transition between the Wigner Solid and FQHE liquid state in the 2D hole system under ultrahigh magnetic fields. Consequently, a systematic phase diagram is obtained based on our analysis. To our surprise, the excited electric field plays an equivalent role as the temperature in our specimen. From the duality of the electric field and temperature, a characteristic length of 450 nm is derived in our Analysis, which is the mean free path of the carriers. Based on the relation between the pinning gap and electric field, we obtained a characteristic domain size of the Wigner crystal.

  3. Phase transition of a quaternary ammonium Gemini surfactant induced by minor structural changes of protic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Li, Qintang; Wang, Xudong; Yue, Xiu; Chen, Xiao

    2014-02-18

    The aggregation behaviors of a Gemini surfactant [C12H25(CH3)2N(+)(CH2)2N(+)(CH3)2C12H25]Br2(-) (12-2-12) in two protic ionic liquids (PILs), propylammonium nitrate (PAN) and butylammonium nitrate (BAN), were investigated by means of several experimental techniques including small and wide-angle X-ray scattering, the polarized optical microscopy and the rheological measurement. Compared to those in ethylammonium nitrate (EAN), the minor structural changes with only one or two methylene units (-CH2-) increase in cationic chain length of PIL, result in a dramatic phase transition of formed aggregates. The critical micellization concentration was increased in PAN, while no micelle formation was detected in BAN. A normal hexagonal phase was observed in the 12-2-12/PAN system, while the normal hexagonal, bicontinuous cubic, and lamellar phases were mapped in the 12-2-12/BAN system. Such aggregation behavior changes can be ascribed to the weaker solvophobic interactions of 12-2-12 in PAN and BAN. The unique molecular structure of 12-2-12 is also an important factor to highlight such a dramatic phase transition due to the PIL structure change. PMID:24455981

  4. Dimensional phase transition from an array of 1D Luttinger liquids to a 3D Bose-Einstein condensate.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Andreas; Labouvie, Ralf; Barontini, Giovanni; Eggert, Sebastian; Guarrera, Vera; Ott, Herwig

    2014-11-21

    We study the thermodynamic properties of a 2D array of coupled one-dimensional Bose gases. The system is realized with ultracold bosonic atoms loaded in the potential tubes of a two-dimensional optical lattice. For negligible coupling strength, each tube is an independent weakly interacting 1D Bose gas featuring Tomonaga Luttinger liquid behavior. By decreasing the lattice depth, we increase the coupling strength between the 1D gases and allow for the phase transition into a 3D condensate. We extract the phase diagram for such a system and compare our results with theoretical predictions. Because of the high effective mass across the periodic potential and the increased 1D interaction strength, the phase transition is shifted to large positive values of the chemical potential. Our results are prototypical to a variety of low-dimensional systems, where the coupling between the subsystems is realized in a higher spatial dimension such as coupled spin chains in magnetic insulators. PMID:25479499

  5. Two-state thermodynamics and the possibility of a liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled TIP4P/2005 water.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rakesh S; Biddle, John W; Debenedetti, Pablo G; Anisimov, Mikhail A

    2016-04-14

    Water shows intriguing thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies in the supercooled liquid state. One possible explanation of the origin of these anomalies lies in the existence of a metastable liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) between two (high and low density) forms of water. While the anomalies are observed in experiments on bulk and confined water and by computer simulation studies of different water-like models, the existence of a LLPT in water is still debated. Unambiguous experimental proof of the existence of a LLPT in bulk supercooled water is hampered by fast ice nucleation which is a precursor of the hypothesized LLPT. Moreover, the hypothesized LLPT, being metastable, in principle cannot exist in the thermodynamic limit (infinite size, infinite time). Therefore, computer simulations of water models are crucial for exploring the possibility of the metastable LLPT and the nature of the anomalies. In this work, we present new simulation results in the NVT ensemble for one of the most accurate classical molecular models of water, TIP4P/2005. To describe the computed properties and explore the possibility of a LLPT, we have applied two-structure thermodynamics, viewing water as a non-ideal mixture of two interconvertible local structures ("states"). The results suggest the presence of a liquid-liquid critical point and are consistent with the existence of a LLPT in this model for the simulated length and time scales. We have compared the behavior of TIP4P/2005 with other popular water-like models, namely, mW and ST2, and with real water, all of which are well described by two-state thermodynamics. In view of the current debate involving different studies of TIP4P/2005, we discuss consequences of metastability and finite size in observing the liquid-liquid separation. We also address the relationship between the phenomenological order parameter of two-structure thermodynamics and the microscopic nature of the low-density structure. PMID:27083735

  6. A variational approach to the liquid-vapor phase transition for hardcore ions in the bulk and in nanopores.

    PubMed

    Loubet, Bastien; Manghi, Manoel; Palmeri, John

    2016-07-28

    We employ a field-theoretical variational approach to study the behavior of ionic solutions in the grand canonical ensemble. To describe properly the hardcore interactions between ions, we use a cutoff in Fourier space for the electrostatic contribution of the grand potential and the Carnahan-Starling equation of state with a modified chemical potential for the pressure one. We first calibrate our method by comparing its predictions at room temperature with Monte Carlo results for excess chemical potential and energy. We then validate our approach in the bulk phase by describing the classical "ionic liquid-vapor" phase transition induced by ionic correlations at low temperature, before applying it to electrolytes at room temperature confined to nanopores embedded in a low dielectric medium and coupled to an external reservoir of ions. The ionic concentration in the nanopore is then correctly described from very low bulk concentrations, where dielectric exclusion shifts the transition up to room temperature for sufficiently tight nanopores, to high concentrations where hardcore interactions dominate which, as expected, modify only slightly this ionic "capillary evaporation." PMID:27475348

  7. A variational approach to the liquid-vapor phase transition for hardcore ions in the bulk and in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loubet, Bastien; Manghi, Manoel; Palmeri, John

    2016-07-01

    We employ a field-theoretical variational approach to study the behavior of ionic solutions in the grand canonical ensemble. To describe properly the hardcore interactions between ions, we use a cutoff in Fourier space for the electrostatic contribution of the grand potential and the Carnahan-Starling equation of state with a modified chemical potential for the pressure one. We first calibrate our method by comparing its predictions at room temperature with Monte Carlo results for excess chemical potential and energy. We then validate our approach in the bulk phase by describing the classical "ionic liquid-vapor" phase transition induced by ionic correlations at low temperature, before applying it to electrolytes at room temperature confined to nanopores embedded in a low dielectric medium and coupled to an external reservoir of ions. The ionic concentration in the nanopore is then correctly described from very low bulk concentrations, where dielectric exclusion shifts the transition up to room temperature for sufficiently tight nanopores, to high concentrations where hardcore interactions dominate which, as expected, modify only slightly this ionic "capillary evaporation."

  8. Hidden non-Fermi liquid behavior caused by magnetic phase transition in Ni-doped Ba-122 pnictides

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seokbae; Choi, Ki-Young; Jung, Eilho; Rho, Seulki; Shin, Soohyeon; Park, Tuson; Hwang, Jungseek

    2015-01-01

    We studied two BaFe2−xNixAs2 (Ni-doped Ba-122) single crystals at two different doping levels (underdoped and optimally doped) using an optical spectroscopic technique. The underdoped sample shows a magnetic phase transition around 80 K. We analyze the data with a Drude-Lorentz model with two Drude components (D1 and D2). It is known that the narrow D1 component originates from electron carriers in the electron-pockets and the broad D2 mode is from hole carriers in the hole-pockets. While the plasma frequencies of both Drude components and the static scattering rate of the broad D2 component show negligible temperature dependencies, the static scattering rate of the D1 mode shows strong temperature dependence for the both samples. We observed a hidden quasi-linear temperature dependence in the scattering rate of the D1 mode above and below the magnetic transition temperature while in the optimally doped sample the scattering rate shows a more quadratic temperature dependence. The hidden non-Fermi liquid behavior in the underdoped sample seems to be related to the magnetic phase of the material. PMID:26184412

  9. Effect of particle geometry on phase transitions in two-dimensional liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ratón, Yuri; Velasco, Enrique; Mederos, Luis

    2005-02-01

    Using a version of density-functional theory which combines Onsager approximation and fundamental-measure theory for spatially nonuniform phases, we have studied the phase diagram of freely rotating hard rectangles and hard discorectangles. We find profound differences in the phase behavior of these models, which can be attributed to their different packing properties. Interestingly, bimodal orientational distribution functions are found in the nematic phase of hard rectangles, which cause a certain degree of biaxial order, albeit metastable with respect to spatially ordered phases. This feature is absent in discorectangles, which always show unimodal behavior. This result may be relevant in the light of recent experimental results which have confirmed the existence of biaxial phases. We expect that some perturbation of the particle shapes (either a certain degree of polydispersity or even bimodal dispersity in the aspect ratios) may actually destabilize spatially ordered phases thereby stabilizing the biaxial phase. PMID:15740404

  10. Theoretical approaches and experimental evidence for liquid-vapor phase transitions in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.; Elliott, J.B.; Phair, L.; Wozniak, G.J.; Mader, C.M.; Chappars, A.

    2001-01-01

    The leptodermous approximation is applied to nuclear systems for T > 0. The introduction of surface corrections leads to anomalous caloric curves and to negative heat capacities in the liquid-gas coexistence region. Clusterization in the vapor is described by associating surface energy to clusters according to Fisher's formula. The three-dimensional Ising model, a leptodermous system par excellence, does obey rigorously Fisher's scaling up to the critical point. Multifragmentation data from several experiments including the ISiS and EOS Collaborations, as well as compound nucleus fragment emission at much lower energy follow the same scaling, thus providing the strongest evidence yet of liquid-vapor coexistence.

  11. Dual Spectrum Neutron Radiography: Identification of Phase Transitions between Frozen and Liquid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biesdorf, J.; Oberholzer, P.; Bernauer, F.; Kaestner, A.; Vontobel, P.; Lehmann, E. H.; Schmidt, T. J.; Boillat, P.

    2014-06-01

    In this Letter, a new approach to distinguish liquid water and ice based on dual spectrum neutron radiography is presented. The distinction is based on arising differences between the cross section of water and ice in the cold energy range. As a significant portion of the energy spectrum of the ICON beam line at Paul Scherrer Institut is in the thermal energy range, no differences can be observed with the entire beam. Introducing a polycrystalline neutron filter (beryllium) inside the beam, neutrons above its cutoff energy are filtered out and the cold energy region is emphasized. Finally, a contrast of about 1.6% is obtained with our imaging setup between liquid water and ice. Based on this measurement concept, the temporal evolution of the aggregate state of water can be investigated without any prior knowledge of its thickness. Using this technique, we could unambiguously prove the production of supercooled water inside fuel cells with a direct measurement method.

  12. Dual spectrum neutron radiography: identification of phase transitions between frozen and liquid water.

    PubMed

    Biesdorf, J; Oberholzer, P; Bernauer, F; Kaestner, A; Vontobel, P; Lehmann, E H; Schmidt, T J; Boillat, P

    2014-06-20

    In this Letter, a new approach to distinguish liquid water and ice based on dual spectrum neutron radiography is presented. The distinction is based on arising differences between the cross section of water and ice in the cold energy range. As a significant portion of the energy spectrum of the ICON beam line at Paul Scherrer Institut is in the thermal energy range, no differences can be observed with the entire beam. Introducing a polycrystalline neutron filter (beryllium) inside the beam, neutrons above its cutoff energy are filtered out and the cold energy region is emphasized. Finally, a contrast of about 1.6% is obtained with our imaging setup between liquid water and ice. Based on this measurement concept, the temporal evolution of the aggregate state of water can be investigated without any prior knowledge of its thickness. Using this technique, we could unambiguously prove the production of supercooled water inside fuel cells with a direct measurement method. PMID:24996112

  13. Is there evidence for a liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, A.S.; EOS Collaboration

    1994-09-01

    The multifragmentation of gold nuclei at 1 GeV/nucleon has been studied using reverse kinematics. The moments of the resulting charged fragment distribution have been analyzed using methods borrowed from percolation theory. These moments provide clear evidence for critical behavior occurring in a system of about 200 nucleons. The critical exponents extracted from the data are close to those of liquid-gas systems.

  14. A shock pressure induced phase transition from liquid to solid of cyclohexane using time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguchi, Shiro; Sato, Akira; Kondo, Ken-Ichi; Nakamura, Kazutaka

    2007-06-01

    The liquid-solid phase transition of cyclohexane has been studied under laser shock compression up to 3.8 GPa by using nanosecond time-resolved Coherent Anti-stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) and laser shock compression. The shock wave is generated by irradiation of 10 ns pulsed laser beam on the plasma confinement target and its pressure is estimated from a particle velocity, which is measured by optically recording velocity interferometer system (ORVIS). Higher frequency shift of the Raman peaks (ring-breathing, C-C stretching, and CH2 twist modes) was observed at high pressure. At 3.8 GPa, splitting of the peak (CH2 twist mode) due to change in symmetry of surrounding molecules, which corresponds to phase transition to solid IV, was observed at delay time of 20 ns. Rapid liquid-solid phase transition has been directly observed to occur within 20 ns.

  15. LIGHT NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLS) are hydrocarbons that exist as a separate, immiscible phase when in contact with water and/or air. ifferences in the physical and chemical properties of water and NAPL result in the formation of a physical interface between the liquids which preve...

  16. Pre-Service Primary Science Teachers' Understandings of the Effect of Temperature and Pressure on Solid-Liquid Phase Transition of Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yalcin, Fatma Aggul

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore pre-service primary teachers' understandings of the effect of temperature and pressure on the solid-liquid phase transition of water. In the study a survey approach was used, and the sample consisted of one-hundred and three, third year pre-service primary science teachers. As a tool for data collection, a test…

  17. Phase Transitions in the Nucleus: the functional implications of concentration-dependent assembly of a Liquid-like RNA/Protein Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lian; Weber, Stephanie; Berry, Joel; Vaidya, Nilesh; Haataja, Mikko; Brangwynne, Clifford

    2015-03-01

    The nucleolus is a liquid-like membrane-less nuclear body which plays an important role in cell growth and size control. By modulating nucleolar component concentration through RNAi conditions that change C. elegans cell size, we find that nucleoli only assemble above a threshold concentration; moreover, the ripening dynamics of nucleated droplets are consistent with the hypothesis that the assembly of the nucleolus represents an intracellular liquid-liquid phase transition. A key question is how this phase-transition is linked to the primary function of the nucleolus, in transcribing and processing ribosomal RNA. To address this, we characterize the localization of RNA Polymerase I, a key transcriptional enzyme, into nucleolar foci as a function of nucleolar component concentration. Our results suggest that there are a small number of key disordered phosphoproteins that may serve as a link between transcription and assembly. Finally, we present preliminary results using a reduced model system consisting of purified nucleolar proteins to assess the ability of nucleolar proteins to drive liquid-liquid phase separation in vitro. These results lay the foundation for a quantitative understanding of intracellular phase transitions and their impact on biomedically-critical RNA-processing steps.

  18. Holographic magnetic phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Lifschytz, Gilad; Lippert, Matthew

    2009-09-15

    We study four-dimensional interacting fermions in a strong magnetic field, using the holographic Sakai-Sugimoto model of intersecting D4- and D8-branes in the deconfined, chiral-symmetric parallel phase. We find that as the magnetic field is varied, while staying in the parallel phase, the fermions exhibit a first-order phase transition in which their magnetization jumps discontinuously. Properties of this transition are consistent with a picture in which some of the fermions jump to the lowest Landau level. Similarities to known magnetic phase transitions are discussed.

  19. A Novel Liquid-Liquid Transition in Undercooled Ti-Zr-Ni Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, G. W.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Kelton, K. F.; Bradshaw, R. C.; Hyers, R. W.; Rathz, T. J.; Rogers, J. R.

    2004-01-01

    If crystallization can be avoided, liquids enter a metastable (undercooled) state below their equilibrium liquidus temperatures, T(sub l), finally 'freezing' into a glass below a characteristic temperature called the glass transition temperature, T(sub g). In rare cases, the undercooled liquid may undergo a liquid-liquid phase transition (liquid polymorphism) before entering the glassy state. This has been suggested from experimental studies of H2O and Si. Such phase transitions have been predicted in some stable liquids, ie. above T(sub l) at atmospheric pressure, for SiO2 and BeF2, but these have not been verified experimentally. They have been observed in liquids of P, Si and C, but only under high pressure. In this letter we present the first experimental evidence for a phase transition in a low viscosity metallic liquid that is driven by an approach to a constant entropy configuration state and correlated with a growing icosahedral order in the liquid. A maximum in the specific heat at constant pressure, similar to what is normally observed near T(sub g), is reported for undercooled liquids of quasicrystal-forming Ti-Zr-Ni alloys. A two-state excitation model that includes cooperativity by incorporating a temperature-dependent excitation energy, fits the specific heat data well, signaling a phase transition. An inflection in the liquid density with decreasing temperature instead of a discontinuity indicates that this is not a typical first order phase transition; it could be a weakly first order or higher order transition. While showing many similarities to a glass transition, this liquid-liquid phase transition occurs in a mobile liquid, making it novel.

  20. Critical behavior at the isotropic to nematic, nematic to smectic-A and smectic-A to smectic-C phase transitions in a pyrimidine liquid crystal compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Anish; Chakraborty, Susanta; Kumar Das, Malay

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution optical birefringence (∆n) measurement of a pyrimidine liquid crystal compound having nematic, smectic-A and smectic-C phases are reported. The high-resolution ∆n data are rather successful in assessing the critical anomaly at different phase transitions in the investigated compound with a reasonably good accuracy. The critical exponent β, describing the limiting behavior of the nematic order parameter close to the isotropic-nematic (I-N) phase transition, is found to be in good agreement with the tricritical hypothesis. The critical behavior at the nematic-smectic-A (N-Sm-A) and the smectic-A-smectic-C (Sm-A-Sm-C) phase transitions has been explored with the aid of a differential quotient extracted from the ∆n values. The yielded effective critical exponent α‧ is appeared to be nearly tricritical in nature for the N-Sm-A phase transition. For the Sm-A-Sm-C phase transition, α‧ exhibits a weak dependence on the fit range and assumes tricritical value for large temperature range considered, which again is found to be diminished slightly with reduction in the temperature range. Related critical amplitude quotient and corrections-to-scaling quotient are found to display deviations from the theoretical models. Such behavior signals the appearance of a non-Landau character for the orthogonal to tilted smectic phase transition in the investigated compound.

  1. Dynamically slow solid-to-solid phase transition induced by thermal treatment of DimimFeCl4 magnetic ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    de Pedro, Imanol; Fabelo, Oscar; García-Saiz, Abel; Vallcorba, Oriol; Junquera, Javier; Blanco, Jesús Angel; Waerenborgh, João Carlos; Andreica, D; Wildes, Andrew; Fernández-Díaz, María Teresa; Fernández, Jesús Rodríguez

    2016-08-01

    The results reported here represent the first direct experimental observations supporting the existence of a solid-to-solid phase transition induced by thermal treatment in magnetic ionic liquids (MILs). The phase transitions of the solid phases of 1,3-dimethylimidazolium tetrachloroferrate, DimimFeCl4, are closely related to its thermal history. Two series of solid-to-solid phase transitions can be described in this MIL: (i) from room temperature (RT) phase II [space group (s.g.) = P21] to phase I-a [s.g. = P212121] via thermal quenching or via fast cooling at T > 2 K min(-1); (ii) from phase I-a to phase I-b [s.g. = P21/c] when the temperature was kept above 180 K for several minutes. The latter involves a slow translational and reorientational dynamical process of both the imidazolium cation and the tetrachloroferrate anion and has been characterized using synchrotron and neutron powder diffraction and DFT (density functional theory) studies. The transition is also related to the modification of the super-exchange pathways of low-temperature phases which show a overall antiferromagnetic behavior. A combination of several experimental methods such as magnetometry, Mössbauer and muon spectroscopy together with polarized and non-polarized neutron powder diffraction has been used in order to characterize the different features observed in these phases. PMID:27439896

  2. Molecular modeling of liquid crystalline self-organization of fullerodendrimers: columnar to lamellar phase transitions driven by temperature and/or concentration changes.

    PubMed

    Peroukidis, Stavros D; Vanakaras, Alexandros G; Photinos, Demetri J

    2008-10-01

    The molecular cubic-block model [ J. Chem. Phys. 2005, 123, 164904 ] is used to study a class of poly(benzyl ether) fullerodendrimers that have recently been reported to form columnar liquid crystal phases. In agreement with experiment, the model-molecules are found to self-assemble into columns which form hexagonal or rectangular lattices. The columnar cross sections are elongated in the rectangular phase. Transitions to the isotropic phase, either directly or through the intermediate formation of smectic phases, have been found. The effects of dissolving small amounts of nonbonded fullerene molecules have been explored. The results predict that the fullerene solutes restrict the range of stability of the columnar phase and may induce transitions from the columnar to the smectic or the isotropic phase. PMID:18795770

  3. Transient and stationary flow behaviour of side chain liquid-crystalline polymers: Evidence of a shear-induced isotropic-to-nematic phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujolle-Robic, C.; Olmsted, P. D.; Noirez, L.

    2002-08-01

    This letter describes the non-linear rheology of the isotropic phase of a thermotropic side chain liquid-crystal polymer (SCLCP), from which we infer a flow-induced iso- tropic-to-nematic (IN) phase transition above a critical shear stress and construct non-equilib- rium phase diagrams. In contrast to the well-studied wormlike-micellar solutions and predictions for simple liquid-crystalline systems, the critical stress does not vanish as the equilibrium transition temperature is approached from the above. We postulate that this is due to: i) the coupling between mesogens and the polymer backbone, whose equilibrium oblate nematic backbone conformation contrasts with the prolate non-equilibrium conformation; and ii) the peculiar topological constraints in SCLCP melts, which have been previously postulated as leading to long-lived clusters.

  4. Study of the smecticA-hexaticB phase transition in homeotropic single domain samples of 65OBC liquid crystal by photopyroelectric calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercuri, F.; Paoloni, S.; Marinelli, M.; Pizzoferrato, R.; Zammit, U.

    2013-02-01

    The smecticA-hexaticB phase transition was studied in a homeotropic single domain sample and in a non-aligned sample of n-hexyl-4'-n-pentyloxybiphenyl-4-carboxylate liquid crystal compound to probe the effect of different amount of defects on the phase transition. The specific heat, the thermal diffusivity and the enthalpy exchange were monitored over the transition and, at the same time, polarization microscopy observations could be carried out. The transition during the first cooling run was found to be accompanied by a considerably larger defect annealing in the non-aligned sample than in the homeotropic one, but the critical behaviour of the specific heat remained substantially the same.

  5. Order-parameter-aided temperature-accelerated sampling for the exploration of crystal polymorphism and solid-liquid phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Tang-Qing Vanden-Eijnden, Eric; Chen, Pei-Yang; Chen, Ming; Samanta, Amit; Tuckerman, Mark

    2014-06-07

    The problem of predicting polymorphism in atomic and molecular crystals constitutes a significant challenge both experimentally and theoretically. From the theoretical viewpoint, polymorphism prediction falls into the general class of problems characterized by an underlying rough energy landscape, and consequently, free energy based enhanced sampling approaches can be brought to bear on the problem. In this paper, we build on a scheme previously introduced by two of the authors in which the lengths and angles of the supercell are targeted for enhanced sampling via temperature accelerated adiabatic free energy dynamics [T. Q. Yu and M. E. Tuckerman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 015701 (2011)]. Here, that framework is expanded to include general order parameters that distinguish different crystalline arrangements as target collective variables for enhanced sampling. The resulting free energy surface, being of quite high dimension, is nontrivial to reconstruct, and we discuss one particular strategy for performing the free energy analysis. The method is applied to the study of polymorphism in xenon crystals at high pressure and temperature using the Steinhardt order parameters without and with the supercell included in the set of collective variables. The expected fcc and bcc structures are obtained, and when the supercell parameters are included as collective variables, we also find several new structures, including fcc states with hcp stacking faults. We also apply the new method to the solid-liquid phase transition in copper at 1300 K using the same Steinhardt order parameters. Our method is able to melt and refreeze the system repeatedly, and the free energy profile can be obtained with high efficiency.

  6. Order-parameter-aided temperature-accelerated sampling for the exploration of crystal polymorphism and solid-liquid phase transitions

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tang-Qing; Chen, Pei-Yang; Chen, Ming; Samanta, Amit; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric; Tuckerman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The problem of predicting polymorphism in atomic and molecular crystals constitutes a significant challenge both experimentally and theoretically. From the theoretical viewpoint, polymorphism prediction falls into the general class of problems characterized by an underlying rough energy landscape, and consequently, free energy based enhanced sampling approaches can be brought to bear on the problem. In this paper, we build on a scheme previously introduced by two of the authors in which the lengths and angles of the supercell are targeted for enhanced sampling via temperature accelerated adiabatic free energy dynamics [T. Q. Yu and M. E. Tuckerman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 015701 (2011)]. Here, that framework is expanded to include general order parameters that distinguish different crystalline arrangements as target collective variables for enhanced sampling. The resulting free energy surface, being of quite high dimension, is nontrivial to reconstruct, and we discuss one particular strategy for performing the free energy analysis. The method is applied to the study of polymorphism in xenon crystals at high pressure and temperature using the Steinhardt order parameters without and with the supercell included in the set of collective variables. The expected fcc and bcc structures are obtained, and when the supercell parameters are included as collective variables, we also find several new structures, including fcc states with hcp stacking faults. We also apply the new method to the solid-liquid phase transition in copper at 1300 K using the same Steinhardt order parameters. Our method is able to melt and refreeze the system repeatedly, and the free energy profile can be obtained with high efficiency. PMID:24907992

  7. A Liquid-Liquid Transition in an Undercooled Ti-Zr-Ni Liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, G. W.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Kelton, K. F.; Hyers, R. W.; Rathz, T. J.; Rogers, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    If crystallization can be avoided, liquids enter a metastable (undercooled) state below their equilibrium liquidus temperatures, TI, finally freezing into a glass below a characteristic temperature called the glass transition temperature, T,. In rare cases, the undercooled liquid may undergo a liquid-liquid phase transition (liquid polymorphism) before entering the glassy state. This has been suggested from experimental studies of HzO and Si4. Such phase transitions have been predicted in some stable liquids, i.e. above TI at atmospheric pressure, for Si02 and BeF;, but these have not been verified experimentally. They have been observed in liquids of P7, Sis and C9, but only under high pressure. All of these transitions are driven by an anomalous density change, i.e. change in local structure, with temperature or pressure. In this letter we present the first experimental evidence for a phase transition in a low viscosity liquid that is not driven by an anomalous density change, but by an approach to a constant configuration state. A maximum in the specific heat at constant pressure, similar to what is normally observed near T,, is reported here for undercooled low viscosity liquids of quasicrystal- forming Ti-Zr-Ni alloys. that includes cooperativity, by incorporating a temperature dependent excitation energy fits the data well, signaling a phase transition.

  8. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  9. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  10. Electroweak Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Gregory Wayne

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles, and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, _ {T}, is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially sensitive function of T. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase T so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal extensions of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field. Semi-classical reasoning suggests that, when a particle receives a contribution to its mass from the vacuum expectation value of a scalar, under certain conditions, the ground state of particle number one contains a 'dimple' or shallow scalar field condensate around the particle. We argue that this is not the case. A careful analysis, taking into account quantum mechanics, shows that the semi-classical approximation is a poor one. We find that there are no energetically favored one-particle dimple solutions for perturbative couplings.

  11. Liquid-liquid transition in a strong bulk metallic glass-forming liquid.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuai; Yang, Fan; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kaban, Ivan; Shuleshova, Olga; Meyer, Andreas; Busch, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphic phase transitions are common in crystalline solids. Recent studies suggest that phase transitions may also exist between two liquid forms with different entropy and structure. Such a liquid-liquid transition has been investigated in various substances including water, Al2O3-Y2O3 and network glass formers. However, the nature of liquid-liquid transition is debated due to experimental difficulties in avoiding crystallization and/or measuring at high temperatures/pressures. Here we report the thermodynamic and structural evidence of a temperature-induced weak first-order liquid-liquid transition in a bulk metallic glass-forming system Zr(41.2)Ti(13.8)Cu(12.5)Ni10Be(22.5) characterized by non- (or weak) directional bonds. Our experimental results suggest that the local structural changes during the transition induce the drastic viscosity changes without a detectable density anomaly. These changes are correlated with a heat capacity maximum in the liquid. Our findings support the hypothesis that the 'strong' kinetics (low fragility) of a liquid may arise from an underlying lambda transition above its glass transition. PMID:23817404

  12. Coupling phase transition kinetics and hydrodynamics: Models for solid-solid and liquid-solid transformation in dynamically driven materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belof, Jonathan; Benedict, Lorin; Chernov, Alexander; Hall, Burl; Hamel, Sebastien; Haxhimali, Tomorr; Sadigh, Babak; Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis

    High pressure and high strain-rate experiments are opening a new frontier toward the study of material science under extreme conditions. As the energy density of experimental platforms is increased, the timescale for observation is typically decreased to the point where the time dependence of phase transitions is now a subject of direct study. We will present new phase transition kinetics models that have been developed with unique considerations that arise in shock-wave driven phase transformation, highlighting applications of the methodology to the simulation of recent experiments of iron and water. This work is performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. String mediated phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, ED; Haws, D.; Rivers, R.; Holbraad, S.

    1988-01-01

    It is demonstrated from first principles how the existence of string-like structures can cause a system to undergo a phase transition. In particular, the role of topologically stable cosmic string in the restoration of spontaneously broken symmetries is emphasized. How the thermodynamic properties of strings alter when stiffness and nearest neighbor string-string interactions are included is discussed.

  14. A flux induced crystal phase transition in the vapor-liquid-solid growth of indium-tin oxide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Gang; Yanagida, Takeshi; Yoshida, Hideto; Nagashima, Kazuki; Kanai, Masaki; Zhuge, Fuwei; He, Yong; Klamchuen, Annop; Rahong, Sakon; Fang, Xiaodong; Takeda, Seiji; Kawai, Tomoji

    2014-05-01

    Single crystalline metal oxide nanowires formed via a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) route provide a platform not only for studying fundamental nanoscale properties but also for exploring novel device applications. Although the crystal phase variation of metal oxides, which exhibits a variety of physical properties, is an interesting feature compared with conventional semiconductors, it has been difficult to control the crystal phase of metal oxides during the VLS nanowire growth. Here we show that a material flux critically determines the crystal phase of indium-tin oxide nanowires grown via the VLS route, although thermodynamical parameters, such as temperature and pressure, were previously believed to determine the crystal phase. The crystal phases of indium-tin oxide nanowires varied from the rutile structures (SnO2), the metastable fluorite structures (InxSnyO3.5) and the bixbyite structures (Sn-doped In2O3) when only the material flux was varied within an order of magnitude. This trend can be interpreted in terms of the material flux dependence of crystal phases (rutile SnO2 and bixbyite In2O3) on the critical nucleation at the liquid-solid (LS) interface. Thus, precisely controlling the material flux, which has been underestimated for VLS nanowire growths, allows us to design the crystal phase and properties in the VLS nanowire growth of multicomponent metal oxides.Single crystalline metal oxide nanowires formed via a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) route provide a platform not only for studying fundamental nanoscale properties but also for exploring novel device applications. Although the crystal phase variation of metal oxides, which exhibits a variety of physical properties, is an interesting feature compared with conventional semiconductors, it has been difficult to control the crystal phase of metal oxides during the VLS nanowire growth. Here we show that a material flux critically determines the crystal phase of indium-tin oxide nanowires grown via the VLS route

  15. Pretransitional effects near the smectic-A-smectic-C* phase transition of hydrophilic and hydrophobic aerosil networks dispersed in ferroelectric liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Cordoyiannis, George; Kralj, Samo; Nounesis, George; Kutnjak, Zdravko; Zumer, Slobodan

    2007-02-15

    A detailed x-ray scattering and high-resolution ac calorimetric study has been carried out near the smectic-A to chiral smectic-C phase transition of liquid-crystal compounds 4-(2-methyl butyl) phenyl 4-n-octylbiphenyl-4-carboxylate (CE8) and p-(n-decyloxy) benzylidene-p-amino-(2-methylbutyl) cinnamate (DOBAMBC) confined in hydrophilic and hydrophobic aerosil nanoparticle networks. The character of the transition, which is mean field near a tricritical point in bulk, is changed dramatically with an increase of aerosil-induced disorder. X-ray measurements revealed pretransitional behavior and compression of the smectic layers, phenomena that are strongly pronounced in high aerosil concentrations. A theoretical model that takes into account the interplay of relevant mechanisms is proposed to explain the observed phenomena. The effect of chirality on the interaction of liquid crystals with aerosils is discussed.

  16. Pretransitional effects near the smectic- A -smectic- C* phase transition of hydrophilic and hydrophobic aerosil networks dispersed in ferroelectric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordoyiannis, George; Kralj, Samo; Nounesis, George; Kutnjak, Zdravko; Žumer, Slobodan

    2007-02-01

    A detailed x-ray scattering and high-resolution ac calorimetric study has been carried out near the smectic- A to chiral smectic- C phase transition of liquid-crystal compounds 4-(2-methyl butyl) phenyl 4- n -octylbiphenyl-4-carboxylate (CE8) and p -( n -decyloxy) benzylidene- p -amino-(2-methylbutyl) cinnamate (DOBAMBC) confined in hydrophilic and hydrophobic aerosil nanoparticle networks. The character of the transition, which is mean field near a tricritical point in bulk, is changed dramatically with an increase of aerosil-induced disorder. X-ray measurements revealed pretransitional behavior and compression of the smectic layers, phenomena that are strongly pronounced in high aerosil concentrations. A theoretical model that takes into account the interplay of relevant mechanisms is proposed to explain the observed phenomena. The effect of chirality on the interaction of liquid crystals with aerosils is discussed.

  17. Nuclear binding near a quantum phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dean

    2016-03-01

    I review recent ab initio results by the Nuclear Lattice Effective Field Theory Collaboration showing that nature lies close to a quantum phase transition between an alpha-particle gas and nuclear liquid. I discuss the control parameter of this transition and the implications for clustering in nuclei and improving ab initio nuclear structure calculations.

  18. Emergence and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikkema, Arnold

    2006-05-01

    Phase transitions are well defined in physics through concepts such as spontaneous symmetry breaking, order parameter, entropy, and critical exponents. But emergence --- also exhibiting whole-part relations (such as top-down influence), unpredictability, and insensitivity to microscopic detail --- is a loosely-defined concept being used in many disciplines, particularly in psychology, biology, philosophy, as well as in physics[1,2]. I will review the concepts of emergence as used in the various fields and consider the extent to which the methods of phase transitions can clarify the usefulness of the concept of emergence both within the discipline of physics and beyond.1. Robert B. Laughlin, A Different Universe: Reinventing Physics from the Bottom Down (New York: Basic Books, 2005). 2. George F.R. Ellis, ``Physics and the Real World'', Physics Today, vol. 58, no. 7 (July 2005) pp. 49-54.

  19. Unraveling the Solid-Liquid-Vapor Phase Transition Dynamics at the Atomic Level with Ultrafast X-Ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorchies, F.; Lévy, A.; Goyon, C.; Combis, P.; Descamps, D.; Fourment, C.; Harmand, M.; Hulin, S.; Leguay, P. M.; Petit, S.; Peyrusse, O.; Santos, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) is a powerful probe of electronic and atomic structures in various media, ranging from molecules to condensed matter. We show how ultrafast time resolution opens new possibilities to investigate highly nonequilibrium states of matter including phase transitions. Based on a tabletop laser-plasma ultrafast x-ray source, we have performed a time-resolved (˜3ps) XANES experiment that reveals the evolution of an aluminum foil at the atomic level, when undergoing ultrafast laser heating and ablation. X-ray absorption spectra highlight an ultrafast transition from the crystalline solid to the disordered liquid followed by a progressive transition of the delocalized valence electronic structure (metal) down to localized atomic orbitals (nonmetal—vapor), as the average distance between atoms increases.

  20. Effects of nanoparticle doping on the phase transitional behaviour of ferroelectric liquid crystal Langmuir-Blodgett composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Ramneek; Raina, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    Langmuir-Blodgett films of ferroelectric liquid crystals (FLCs) doped with a low concentration of functionalized Al: ZnO (AZO) nanoparticles were prepared and characterized. Pressure-area isotherms show that the nanoparticles as well as FLC composite systems have the capability to form stable monolayers at the air-water interface. The molecular interaction between nanoparticles and FLC molecules increased during barrier compression, which resulted in increased surface pressure. We observed various phases in isotherms with increasing concentration of nanoparticles in the FLC matrix. An X-ray diffraction profile at a low angle confirmed that FLCs retain their layer structure at a low concentration doping of AZO nanoparticles in the FLC matrix. Atomic force microscopy images indicate that low wt% composites are uniformly deposited without disturbing the translation behaviour of SmC* liquid crystals.

  1. Phase transition and lattice distortion in the proposed spin-liquid system {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu{sub 2}(CN){sub 3}.

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, M.; Manna, R. S.; de Souza, M.; Bruhl, A.; Schlueter, J. A.; Materials Science Division; Goethe-Univ.

    2010-01-01

    We report measurements of the uniaxial coefficients of thermal expansion {alpha}{sub i} and the specific heat C on the spin-liquid candidate {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu{sub 2}(CN){sub 3}. We observe anomalous and strongly anisotropic in-plane expansivities, implying (i) distinct T-induced b-c lattice distortions and (ii) an increase in the ratio of the hopping amplitudes t{prime}/t upon cooling into the low-temperature regime. Most importantly, the {alpha}{sub i} data reveal clear evidence for a second-order phase transition around 6 K, accompanied by distinct lattice effects. By using a Grueneisen-scaling Ansatz, we are able to extract the corresponding anomaly to the specific heat. Estimates of the entropy indicate that spin degrees of freedom alone cannot account for the phase transition anomaly, suggesting that charge degrees of freedom are involved.

  2. Time- and Space-Resolved SAXS Experiments Inform on Phase Transition Kinetics in Hydrated, Liquid-Crystalline Films of Polyion-Surfactant Ion "Complex Salts".

    PubMed

    Li, Joaquim; Gustavsson, Charlotte; Piculell, Lennart

    2016-05-24

    Detailed time- and space-resolved SAXS experiments show the variation with hydration of liquid crystalline structures in ethanol-cast 5-80 μm thick films of polyion-surfactant ion "complex salts" (CS). The CS were dodecyl- (C12) or hexadecyl- (C16) trimethylammonium surfactants with polyacrylate (DP 25 or 6000) counter-polyions. The experiments were carried out on vertical films in humid air above a movable water bath, so that gradients of hydration were generated, which could rapidly be altered. Scans over different positions along a film, kept fixed relative to the bath, showed that the surfactant aggregates of the various liquid-crystalline CS structures grow in cross-sectional area with decreasing hydration. This behavior is attributed to the low water content. Studies of films undergoing rapid dehydration, made possible by the original experimental setup, gave strong evidence that some of the investigated systems remain kinetically trapped for minutes in a nonequilibrium Pm3n micellar cubic phase before switching to the equilibrium P6mm 2D hexagonal phase. Both the length of the polyion and the length of the surfactant hydrocarbon "tail" affect the kinetics of the phase transition. The slowness of the cubic-to-hexagonal structural transition is attributed to the fact that it requires major rearrangements of the polyions and surfactant ions relative to each other. By contrast, other structure changes, such as between the hexagonal and rectangular phases, were observed to occur much more rapidly. PMID:27153140

  3. Interplay of topology and interactions in quantum Hall topological insulators: U(1) symmetry, tunable Luttinger liquid, and interaction-induced phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharitonov, Maxim; Juergens, Stefan; Trauzettel, Björn

    2016-07-01

    We consider a class of quantum Hall topological insulators: topologically nontrivial states with zero Chern number at finite magnetic field, in which the counterpropagating edge states are protected by a symmetry (spatial or spin) other than time-reversal. HgTe-type heterostructures and graphene are among the relevant systems. We study the effect of electron interactions on the topological properties of the system. We particularly focus on the vicinity of the topological phase transition, marked by the crossing of two Landau levels, where the system is a strongly interacting quantum Hall ferromagnet. We analyze the edge properties using the formalism of the nonlinear σ -model. We establish the symmetry requirement for the topological protection in this interacting system: effective continuous U(1) symmetry with respect to uniaxial isospin rotations must be preserved. If U(1) symmetry is preserved, the topologically nontrivial phase persists; its edge is a helical Luttinger liquid with highly tunable effective interactions. We obtain explicit analytical expressions for the parameters of the Luttinger liquid in the quantum-Hall-ferromagnet regime. However, U(1) symmetry may be broken, either spontaneously or by U(1)-asymmetric interactions. In either case, interaction-induced transitions occur to the respective topologically trivial phases with gapped edge charge excitations.

  4. Metastable liquid-liquid transition in a molecular model of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Jeremy C.; Martelli, Fausto; Liu, Yang; Car, Roberto; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.; Debenedetti, Pablo G.

    2014-06-01

    Liquid water's isothermal compressibility and isobaric heat capacity, and the magnitude of its thermal expansion coefficient, increase sharply on cooling below the equilibrium freezing point. Many experimental, theoretical and computational studies have sought to understand the molecular origin and implications of this anomalous behaviour. Of the different theoretical scenarios put forward, one posits the existence of a first-order phase transition that involves two forms of liquid water and terminates at a critical point located at deeply supercooled conditions. Some experimental evidence is consistent with this hypothesis, but no definitive proof of a liquid-liquid transition in water has been obtained to date: rapid ice crystallization has so far prevented decisive measurements on deeply supercooled water, although this challenge has been overcome recently. Computer simulations are therefore crucial for exploring water's structure and behaviour in this regime, and have shown that some water models exhibit liquid-liquid transitions and others do not. However, recent work has argued that the liquid-liquid transition has been mistakenly interpreted, and is in fact a liquid-crystal transition in all atomistic models of water. Here we show, by studying the liquid-liquid transition in the ST2 model of water with the use of six advanced sampling methods to compute the free-energy surface, that two metastable liquid phases and a stable crystal phase exist at the same deeply supercooled thermodynamic condition, and that the transition between the two liquids satisfies the thermodynamic criteria of a first-order transition. We follow the rearrangement of water's coordination shell and topological ring structure along a thermodynamically reversible path from the low-density liquid to cubic ice. We also show that the system fluctuates freely between the two liquid phases rather than crystallizing. These findings provide unambiguous evidence for a liquid-liquid transition in

  5. Metastable liquid-liquid transition in a molecular model of water.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Jeremy C; Martelli, Fausto; Liu, Yang; Car, Roberto; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2014-06-19

    Liquid water's isothermal compressibility and isobaric heat capacity, and the magnitude of its thermal expansion coefficient, increase sharply on cooling below the equilibrium freezing point. Many experimental, theoretical and computational studies have sought to understand the molecular origin and implications of this anomalous behaviour. Of the different theoretical scenarios put forward, one posits the existence of a first-order phase transition that involves two forms of liquid water and terminates at a critical point located at deeply supercooled conditions. Some experimental evidence is consistent with this hypothesis, but no definitive proof of a liquid-liquid transition in water has been obtained to date: rapid ice crystallization has so far prevented decisive measurements on deeply supercooled water, although this challenge has been overcome recently. Computer simulations are therefore crucial for exploring water's structure and behaviour in this regime, and have shown that some water models exhibit liquid-liquid transitions and others do not. However, recent work has argued that the liquid-liquid transition has been mistakenly interpreted, and is in fact a liquid-crystal transition in all atomistic models of water. Here we show, by studying the liquid-liquid transition in the ST2 model of water with the use of six advanced sampling methods to compute the free-energy surface, that two metastable liquid phases and a stable crystal phase exist at the same deeply supercooled thermodynamic condition, and that the transition between the two liquids satisfies the thermodynamic criteria of a first-order transition. We follow the rearrangement of water's coordination shell and topological ring structure along a thermodynamically reversible path from the low-density liquid to cubic ice. We also show that the system fluctuates freely between the two liquid phases rather than crystallizing. These findings provide unambiguous evidence for a liquid-liquid transition in

  6. GPU-Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Simulation to Study Liquid Crystal Phase Transition Using Coarse-Grained Gay-Berne Anisotropic Potential.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenduo; Zhu, Youliang; Cui, Fengchao; Liu, Lunyang; Sun, Zhaoyan; Chen, Jizhong; Li, Yunqi

    2016-01-01

    Gay-Berne (GB) potential is regarded as an accurate model in the simulation of anisotropic particles, especially for liquid crystal (LC) mesogens. However, its computational complexity leads to an extremely time-consuming process for large systems. Here, we developed a GPU-accelerated molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with coarse-grained GB potential implemented in GALAMOST package to investigate the LC phase transitions for mesogens in small molecules, main-chain or side-chain polymers. For identical mesogens in three different molecules, on cooling from fully isotropic melts, the small molecules form a single-domain smectic-B phase, while the main-chain LC polymers prefer a single-domain nematic phase as a result of connective restraints in neighboring mesogens. The phase transition of side-chain LC polymers undergoes a two-step process: nucleation of nematic islands and formation of multi-domain nematic texture. The particular behavior originates in the fact that the rotational orientation of the mesogenes is hindered by the polymer backbones. Both the global distribution and the local orientation of mesogens are critical for the phase transition of anisotropic particles. Furthermore, compared with the MD simulation in LAMMPS, our GPU-accelerated code is about 4 times faster than the GPU version of LAMMPS and at least 200 times faster than the CPU version of LAMMPS. This study clearly shows that GPU-accelerated MD simulation with GB potential in GALAMOST can efficiently handle systems with anisotropic particles and interactions, and accurately explore phase differences originated from molecular structures. PMID:26986851

  7. GPU-Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Simulation to Study Liquid Crystal Phase Transition Using Coarse-Grained Gay-Berne Anisotropic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Fengchao; Liu, Lunyang; Sun, Zhaoyan; Chen, Jizhong; Li, Yunqi

    2016-01-01

    Gay-Berne (GB) potential is regarded as an accurate model in the simulation of anisotropic particles, especially for liquid crystal (LC) mesogens. However, its computational complexity leads to an extremely time-consuming process for large systems. Here, we developed a GPU-accelerated molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with coarse-grained GB potential implemented in GALAMOST package to investigate the LC phase transitions for mesogens in small molecules, main-chain or side-chain polymers. For identical mesogens in three different molecules, on cooling from fully isotropic melts, the small molecules form a single-domain smectic-B phase, while the main-chain LC polymers prefer a single-domain nematic phase as a result of connective restraints in neighboring mesogens. The phase transition of side-chain LC polymers undergoes a two-step process: nucleation of nematic islands and formation of multi-domain nematic texture. The particular behavior originates in the fact that the rotational orientation of the mesogenes is hindered by the polymer backbones. Both the global distribution and the local orientation of mesogens are critical for the phase transition of anisotropic particles. Furthermore, compared with the MD simulation in LAMMPS, our GPU-accelerated code is about 4 times faster than the GPU version of LAMMPS and at least 200 times faster than the CPU version of LAMMPS. This study clearly shows that GPU-accelerated MD simulation with GB potential in GALAMOST can efficiently handle systems with anisotropic particles and interactions, and accurately explore phase differences originated from molecular structures. PMID:26986851

  8. Fragile-to-fragile liquid transition at Tg and stable-glass phase nucleation rate maximum at the Kauzmann temperature TK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournier, Robert F.

    2014-12-01

    An undercooled liquid is unstable. The driving force of the glass transition at Tg is a change of the undercooled-liquid Gibbs free energy. The classical Gibbs free energy change for a crystal formation is completed including an enthalpy saving. The crystal growth critical nucleus is used as a probe to observe the Laplace pressure change Δp accompanying the enthalpy change -Vm×Δp at Tg where Vm is the molar volume. A stable glass-liquid transition model predicts the specific heat jump of fragile liquids at T≤Tg, the Kauzmann temperature TK where the liquid entropy excess with regard to crystal goes to zero, the equilibrium enthalpy between TK and Tg, the maximum nucleation rate at TK of superclusters containing magic atom numbers, and the equilibrium latent heats at Tg and TK. Strong-to-fragile and strong-to-strong liquid transitions at Tg are also described and all their thermodynamic parameters are determined from their specific heat jumps. The existence of fragile liquids quenched in the amorphous state, which do not undergo liquid-liquid transition during heating preceding their crystallization, is predicted. Long ageing times leading to the formation at TK of a stable glass composed of superclusters containing up to 147 atom, touching and interpenetrating, are evaluated from nucleation rates. A fragile-to-fragile liquid transition occurs at Tg without stable-glass formation while a strong glass is stable after transition.

  9. Effects of phospholipid hydrolysis on the aggregate structure in DPPC/DSPE-PEG2000 liposome preparations after gel to liquid crystalline phase transition.

    PubMed

    Ickenstein, Ludger M; Sandström, Maria C; Mayer, Lawrence D; Edwards, Katarina

    2006-02-01

    Upon storage of phospholipid liposome samples, lysolipids, fatty acids, and glycerol-3-phosphatidylcholine are generated as a result of acid- or base-catalyzed hydrolysis. Accumulation of hydrolysis products in the liposome membrane can induce fusion, leakage, and structural transformations of the liposomes, which may be detrimental or beneficial to their performance depending on their applications as, e.g., drug delivery devices. We investigated in the present study the influence of phospholipid hydrolysis on the aggregate morphology of DPPC/DSPE-PEG2000 liposomes after transition of the phospholipid membrane from the gel phase to liquid crystalline phase using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in combination with static light scattering, dynamic light scattering, and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). The rates of DPPC hydrolysis in DPPC/DSPE-PEG2000 liposomes were investigated at a pH of 2, 4, or 6.5 and temperatures of 22 degrees C or 4 degrees C. Results indicate that following phase transition, severe structural reorganizations occurred in liposome samples that were partially hydrolyzed in the gel phase. The most prominent effect was an increasing tendency of liposomes to disintegrate into membrane discs in accordance with an increasing degree of phospholipid hydrolysis. Complete disintegration occurred when DPPC concentrations had decreased by, in some cases, as little as 3.6%. After extensive phospholipid hydrolysis, liposomes and discs fused to form large bilayer sheets as well as other more complex bilayer structures apparently due to a decreased ratio of lysolipid to palmitic acid levels in the liposome membrane. PMID:16574061

  10. Quantum phase transitions in disordered magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozadze, David

    We study the effects of quenched weak disorder on quantum phase transitions in disordered magnets. The presence of disorder in the system can lead to a variety of exotic phenomena, e.g., the smearing of transitions or quantum Griffiths singularities. Phase transitions are smeared if individual spatial regions can order independently of the bulk system. In paper I, we study smeared quantum phase transitions in binary alloys A1-xBx that are tuned by changing the composition x. We show that in this case the ordered phase is extended over all compositions x < 1. We also study the composition dependence of observables. In paper II, we investigate the influence of spatial disorder correlations on smeared phase transitions. As an experimental example, we demonstrate in paper III, that the composition-driven ferromagnetic-toparamagnetic quantum phase transition in Sr1-xCaxRuO3 is smeared. When individual spatial regions cannot order but fluctuate slowly, the phase transition is characterized by strong singularities in the quantum Griffiths phase. In paper IV, we develop a theory of the quantum Griffiths phases in disordered ferromagnetic metals. We show that the quantum Griffiths singularities are stronger than the usual power-law quantum Griffiths singularities in insulating magnets. In paper V, we present an efficient numerical method for studying quantum phase transitions in disordered systems with O(N) order parameter symmetry in the large-N limit. Our algorithm solves iteratively the large-N self-consistent equations for the renormalized distances from criticality. Paper VI is devoted to the study of transport properties in the quantum Griffiths phase associated with the antiferromagnetic quantum phase transition in a metal. We find unusual behavior of transport properties which is in contrast to the normal Fermi-liquid behavior.

  11. Superconductor-insulator phase transition in single-crystal La2-xSrxCuO4 films grown by the liquid-phase epitaxy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, A. T. M. Nazmul; Hitosugi, T.; Dudzik, E.; Hasegawa, T.; Ueda, S.; Takano, Y.; Islam, F. N.; Khan, M. K. R.; Islam, M. N.; Islam, A. K. M. A.; Watauchi, S.; Tanaka, I.

    2009-07-01

    We have studied epitaxial strain effect on superconductivity in single-crystal La2-xSrxCuO4 films grown by liquid-phase epitaxy method on (001) La2CuO4 substrates. Due to lattice mismatch the as-grown films suffer a compressive strain in the c axis and an orthorhombic tensile strain on the ab plane with almost no relaxation up to several micrometers thickness. Our results show that La2-xSrxCuO4 (0.10≤x≤0.15) , which is superconducting in the bulk at low temperatures, transforms to an insulating state under such strain.

  12. Quantum phase transition in space

    SciTech Connect

    Damski, Bogdan; Zurek, Wojciech H

    2008-01-01

    A quantum phase transition between the symmetric (polar) phase and the phase with broken symmetry can be induced in a ferromagnetic spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate in space (rather than in time). We consider such a phase transition and show that the transition region in the vicinity of the critical point exhibits scalings that reflect a compromise between the rate at which the transition is imposed (i.e., the gradient of the control parameter) and the scaling of the divergent healing length in the critical region. Our results suggest a method for the direct measurement of the scaling exponent {nu}.

  13. Phase Behavior of Perturbed Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralj, S.; Kutnjak, Z.; Lahajnar, G.; Svetec, M.

    We study theoretically the combined effect of confinement and randomness on LC phase transitions in orientational (isotropic-nematic) and translational (nematic-smectic A) degrees of ordering. We focus to cases where these transitions are of (very) weakly 1st order. An adequate experimental realisation is, e.g., 8CB liquid crystal confined to a Controlled-Pore Glass matrix. Based on universal responses of "hard" and "soft" continuum fields to distortions we derive how different mechanisms influence qualitative and quantitative characteristics of phase transitions under consideration.

  14. Integrated modeling of CO2 storage and leakage scenarios including transitions between super- and sub-critical conditions, and phase change between liquid and gaseous CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    2011-05-15

    Storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers is intended to be at supercritical pressure and temperature conditions, but CO{sub 2} leaking from a geologic storage reservoir and migrating toward the land surface (through faults, fractures, or improperly abandoned wells) would reach subcritical conditions at depths shallower than 500-750 m. At these and shallower depths, subcritical CO{sub 2} can form two-phase mixtures of liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}, with significant latent heat effects during boiling and condensation. Additional strongly non-isothermal effects can arise from decompression of gas-like subcritical CO{sub 2}, the so-called Joule-Thomson effect. Integrated modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and leakage requires the ability to model non-isothermal flows of brine and CO{sub 2} at conditions that range from supercritical to subcritical, including three-phase flow of aqueous phase, and both liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate comprehensive simulation capabilities that can cope with all possible phase conditions in brine-CO{sub 2} systems. Our model formulation includes: (1) an accurate description of thermophysical properties of aqueous and CO{sub 2}-rich phases as functions of temperature, pressure, salinity and CO{sub 2} content, including the mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O; (2) transitions between super- and subcritical conditions, including phase change between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}; (3) one-, two-, and three-phase flow of brine-CO{sub 2} mixtures, including heat flow; (4) non-isothermal effects associated with phase change, mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and water, and (de-) compression effects; and (5) the effects of dissolved NaCl, and the possibility of precipitating solid halite, with associated porosity and permeability change. Applications to specific leakage scenarios demonstrate that the peculiar thermophysical properties of CO{sub 2} provide a potential for positive as well as negative

  15. Theory of antiferroelectric phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolédano, Pierre; Guennou, Mael

    2016-07-01

    At variance with structural ferroic phase transitions which give rise to macroscopic tensors coupled to macroscopic fields, criteria defining antiferroelectric (AFE) phase transitions are still under discussion due to the absence of specific symmetry properties characterizing their existence. They are recognized by the proximity of a ferroelectric (FE) phase induced under applied electric field, with a double hysteresis loop relating the induced polarization to the electric field and a typical anomaly of the dielectric permittivity. Here, we show that there exist indeed symmetry criteria defining AFE transitions. They relate the local symmetry of the polar crystallographic sites emerging at an AFE phase transition with the macroscopic symmetry of the AFE phase. The dielectric properties of AFE transitions are deduced from a Landau theoretical model in which ferroelectric and ferrielectric phases are shown to stabilize as the result of specific symmetry-allowed couplings of the AFE order parameter with the field-induced polarization.

  16. Bond orientational order in liquids: Towards a unified description of water-like anomalies, liquid-liquid transition, glass transition, and crystallization: Bond orientational order in liquids.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hajime

    2012-10-01

    There are at least three fundamental states of matter, depending upon temperature and pressure: gas, liquid, and solid (crystal). These states are separated by first-order phase transitions between them. In both gas and liquid phases a complete translational and rotational symmetry exist, whereas in a solid phase both symmetries are broken. In intermediate phases between liquid and solid, which include liquid crystal and plastic crystal phases, only one of the two symmetries is preserved. Among the fundamental states of matter, the liquid state is the most poorly understood. We argue that it is crucial for a better understanding of liquids to recognize that a liquid generally has the tendency to have a local structural order and its presence is intrinsic and universal to any liquid. Such structural ordering is a consequence of many-body correlations, more specifically, bond angle correlations, which we believe are crucial for the description of the liquid state. We show that this physical picture may naturally explain difficult unsolved problems associated with the liquid state, such as anomalies of water-type liquids (water, Si, Ge, ...), liquid-liquid transition, liquid-glass transition, crystallization and quasicrystal formation, in a unified manner. In other words, we need a new order parameter representing a low local free-energy configuration, which is a bond orientational order parameter in many cases, in addition to a density order parameter for the physical description of these phenomena. Here we review our two-order-parameter model of liquid and consider how transient local structural ordering is linked to all of the above-mentioned phenomena. The relationship between these phenomena is also discussed. PMID:23104614

  17. Nonequilibrium dynamics of phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagne, Carmen Jeanne

    2001-11-01

    Phase transitions occur in such diverse and important systems as ferromagnets, liquid crystals and the early Universe. The dynamics of phase transitions such as these have been studied for decades, but the analytical models still need a great deal of improvement before they can adequately describe all time stages and regions under the coexistence curve. Numerical studies can supplement these analytical theories, but they need to accurately describe the continuum equations that they are intended to solve. This thesis describes a method for removing the lattice- spacing and renormalization-mass dependence of Langevin simulations of phase mixing in (2 + 1)-dimensional asymmetric Ginzburg-Landau models with short-ranged interactions. Also, the spread in the order parameter near the critical value of the control parameter due to critical slowing down is used to more accurately determine this value of the control parameter in these simulations. In addition, a new method is proposed for quantifying the departure from equilibrium. The method explores the behavior of the rate of change of the momentum-integrated structure function, ΔStot( t), as it evolves in time. As an illustration, we examine a (1 + 1)-dimensional model of a stochastic Ginzburg-Landau model at varying cooling rates. We show that ΔStot(t) displays a peak which scales with cooling time-scale as t1/2q in the over-damped limit and t1/3q in the underdamped limit. The peak amplitude was found to scale with cooling time-scale as t6/5q in all viscosities studied.

  18. Phase Transitions for Suspension Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iommi, Godofredo; Jordan, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    This paper is devoted to studying the thermodynamic formalism for suspension flows defined over countable alphabets. We are mostly interested in the regularity properties of the pressure function. We establish conditions for the pressure function to be real analytic or to exhibit a phase transition. We also construct an example of a potential for which the pressure has countably many phase transitions.

  19. Phase transitions in disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrahsheh, Fawaz Y.

    Disorder can have a wide variety of consequences for the physics of phase transitions. Some transitions remain unchanged in the presence of disorder while others are completely destroyed. In this thesis we study the effects of disorder on several classical and quantum phase transitions in condensed matter systems. After a brief introduction, we study the ferromagnetic phase transition in a randomly layered Heisenberg magnet using large-scale Monte-Carlo simulations. Our results provide numerical evidence for the exotic infinite-randomness scenario. We study classical and quantum smeared phase transitions in substitutional alloys A1-xBx. Our results show that the disorder completely destroys the phase transition with a pronounced tail of the ordered phase developing for all compositions x < 1. In addition, we find that short-ranged disorder correlations can have a dramatic effect on the transition. Moreover, we show an experimental realization of the composition-tuned ferromagnetic-to-paramagnetic quantum phase transition in Sr1-xCa xRuO3. We investigate the effects of disorder on first-order quantum phase transitions on the example of the N-color quantum Ashkin-Teller model. By means of a strong disorder renormalization group, we demonstrate that disorder rounds the first-order transition to a continuous one for both weak and strong coupling between the colors. Finally, we investigate the superfluid-insulator quantum phase transition of one-dimensional bosons with off-diagonal disorder by means of large-scale Monte-Carlo simulations. Beyond a critical disorder strength, we find nonuniversal, disorder dependent critical behavior.

  20. Light-scattering investigations of the liquid-liquid phase transition of the ionic system: Trimethylethyl-ammonium bromide in chloroform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegand, S.; Kleemeier, M.; Schröder, J. M.; Schröer, W.; Weingärtner, H.

    1994-11-01

    Phase diagrams and light-scattering measurements of solutions of trimethylethyl-ammonium bromide in chloroform (ɛ=4.72 at 25 C) with an ethanol content of 1% are reported. The system has a lower critical point near T = 25°C. The critical mole fraction is xc,=0.0503 ± 0.0002, which corresponds to the reduced variables T {/c *}=0.036 and c {/c *}=0.029 of the restricted primitive model (RPM) and is slightly below the values predicted by the RPM for the critical parameters. The analysis of the scattering intensity at critical composition gives v = 0.631 ± 0.003 for the critical exponent of the correlation length Σ with an amplitude of 0.87± 0.01 nm. The system, a solution of a salt of essentially spherical ions of almost equal size in a simple low-dielectric polar liquid, with critical parameters very close to predictions of the RPM, nevertheless has an Ising critical point.

  1. Fluctuation driven electroweak phase transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Kolb, Edward W.

    1991-01-01

    We examine the dynamics of the electroweak phase transition in the early Universe. For Higgs masses in the range 46 less than or = M sub H less than or = 150 GeV and top quark masses less than 200 GeV, regions of symmetric and asymmetric vacuum coexist to below the critical temperature, with thermal equilibrium between the two phases maintained by fluctuations of both phases. We propose that the transition to the asymmetric vacuum is completed by percolation of these subcritical fluctuations. Our results are relevant to scenarios of baryogenesis that invoke a weakly first-order phase transition at the electroweak scale.

  2. PHASE CHANGE LIQUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron

    2006-03-01

    Work is being performed to develop a new shipping system for frozen environmental samples (or other materials) that uses an optimal phase change liquid (PCL) formulation and an insulated shipping container with an on-board digital temperature data logger to provide a history of the temperature profile within the container during shipment. In previous work, several PCL formulations with temperatures of fusion ranging from approximately -14 to -20 C were prepared and evaluated. Both temperature of fusion and heat of fusion of the formulations were measured, and an optimal PCL formulation was selected. The PCL was frozen in plastic bags and tested for its temperature profile in a cooler using a digital temperature data logger. This testing showed that the PCL formulation can maintain freezer temperatures (< -7 to -20 C) for an extended period, such as the time for shipping samples by overnight courier. The results of the experiments described in this report provide significant information for use in developing an integrated freezer system that uses a PCL formulation to maintain freezer temperatures in coolers for shipping environmental samples to the laboratory. Experimental results show the importance of the type of cooler used in the system and that use of an insulating material within the cooler improves the performance of the freezer system. A new optimal PCL formulation for use in the system has been determined. The new formulation has been shown to maintain temperatures at < -7 to -20 C for 47 hours in an insulated cooler system containing soil samples. These results are very promising for developing the new technology.

  3. Evidence of liquid-liquid transition in glass-forming La50Al35Ni15 melt above liquidus temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Sandor, Magdalena T.; Yu, Yao; Ke, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Hua-Ping; Li, Mao-Zhi; Wang, Wei-Hua; Liu, Lin; Wu, Yue

    2015-07-01

    Liquid-liquid transition, a phase transition of one liquid phase to another with the same composition, provides a key opportunity for investigating the relationship between liquid structures and dynamics. Here we report experimental evidences of a liquid-liquid transition in glass-forming La50Al35Ni15 melt above its liquidus temperature by 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance including the temperature dependence of cage volume fluctuations and atomic diffusion. The observed dependence of the incubation time on the degree of undercooling is consistent with a first-order phase transition. Simulation results indicate that such transition is accompanied by the change of bond-orientational order without noticeable change in density. The temperature dependence of atomic diffusion revealed by simulations is also in agreement with experiments. These observations indicate the need of two-order parameters in describing phase transitions of liquids.

  4. Emergent Non-Fermi-Liquid at the Quantum Critical Point of a Topological Phase Transition in Two Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Hiroki; Yang, Bohm-Jung; Chubukov, Andrey; Schmalian, Jörg; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2016-02-01

    We study the effects of Coulomb interaction between 2D Weyl fermions with anisotropic dispersion which displays relativistic dynamics along one direction and nonrelativistic dynamics along the other. Such a dispersion can be realized in phosphorene under electric field or strain, in TiO2 /VO2 superlattices, and, more generally, at the quantum critical point between a nodal semimetal and an insulator in systems with a chiral symmetry. Using the one-loop renormalization group approach in combination with the large-N expansion, we find that the system displays interaction-driven non-Fermi liquid behavior in a wide range of intermediate frequencies and marginal Fermi liquid behavior at the smallest frequencies. In the non-Fermi liquid regime, the quasiparticle residue Z at energy E scales as Z ∝Ea with a >0 , and the parameters of the fermionic dispersion acquire anomalous dimensions. In the marginal Fermi-liquid regime, Z ∝(|log E |)-b with universal b =3 /2 .

  5. Emergent Non-Fermi-Liquid at the Quantum Critical Point of a Topological Phase Transition in Two Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Hiroki; Yang, Bohm-Jung; Chubukov, Andrey; Schmalian, Jörg; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2016-02-19

    We study the effects of Coulomb interaction between 2D Weyl fermions with anisotropic dispersion which displays relativistic dynamics along one direction and nonrelativistic dynamics along the other. Such a dispersion can be realized in phosphorene under electric field or strain, in TiO_{2}/VO_{2} superlattices, and, more generally, at the quantum critical point between a nodal semimetal and an insulator in systems with a chiral symmetry. Using the one-loop renormalization group approach in combination with the large-N expansion, we find that the system displays interaction-driven non-Fermi liquid behavior in a wide range of intermediate frequencies and marginal Fermi liquid behavior at the smallest frequencies. In the non-Fermi liquid regime, the quasiparticle residue Z at energy E scales as Z∝E^{a} with a>0, and the parameters of the fermionic dispersion acquire anomalous dimensions. In the marginal Fermi-liquid regime, Z∝(|logE|)^{-b} with universal b=3/2. PMID:26943551

  6. Polymer physics of intracellular phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brangwynne, Clifford P.; Tompa, Peter; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2015-11-01

    Intracellular organelles are either membrane-bound vesicles or membrane-less compartments that are made up of proteins and RNA. These organelles play key biological roles, by compartmentalizing the cell to enable spatiotemporal control of biological reactions. Recent studies suggest that membrane-less intracellular compartments are multicomponent viscous liquid droplets that form via phase separation. Proteins that have an intrinsic tendency for being conformationally heterogeneous seem to be the main drivers of liquid-liquid phase separation in the cell. These findings highlight the relevance of classical concepts from the physics of polymeric phase transitions for understanding the assembly of intracellular membrane-less compartments. However, applying these concepts is challenging, given the heteropolymeric nature of protein sequences, the complex intracellular environment, and non-equilibrium features intrinsic to cells. This provides new opportunities for adapting established theories and for the emergence of new physics.

  7. Anchoring transition in confined discotic columnar liquid crystal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunet, Thomas; Thiebaut, Olivier; Charlet, Émilie; Bock, Harald; Kelber, Julien; Grelet, Éric

    2011-01-01

    We report the achievement of ultrathin films (down to 25 nm thick) of thermotropic columnar liquid crystals in homeotropic alignment (columns normal to the interface) confined between a glass slide and a thin metallic electrode (about 150 nm thick). The face-on orientation of the discotic compound is obtained by anchoring transition of a columnar liquid crystalline phase from a degenerate planar orientation to the homeotropic alignment without any phase transition to the isotropic liquid phase. The kinetic dependence on temperature of such anchoring transition is investigated revealing various diffusive growth regimes of the homeotropic domains. Finally, confining effects are also considered by varying the thickness of the columnar liquid crystal film to reach the typical value required in organic solar cells thus demonstrating the reliability of such alignment process in a photovoltaic context.

  8. Hadron-Quark Phase Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Cavagnoli, Rafael; Menezes, Debora P.; Providencia, Constanca

    2009-06-03

    In the present work we study the hadron-quarkphase transition with boson condensation by investigating the binodal surface and extending it to finite temperature in order to mimic the QCD phase diagram.

  9. The putative liquid-liquid transition is a liquid-solid transition in atomistic models of water. II.

    PubMed

    Limmer, David T; Chandler, David

    2013-06-01

    This paper extends our earlier studies of free energy functions of density and crystalline order parameters for models of supercooled water, which allows us to examine the possibility of two distinct metastable liquid phases [D. T. Limmer and D. Chandler, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 134503 (2011) and preprint arXiv:1107.0337 (2011)]. Low-temperature reversible free energy surfaces of several different atomistic models are computed: mW water, TIP4P/2005 water, Stillinger-Weber silicon, and ST2 water, the last of these comparing three different treatments of long-ranged forces. In each case, we show that there is one stable or metastable liquid phase, and there is an ice-like crystal phase. The time scales for crystallization in these systems far exceed those of structural relaxation in the supercooled metastable liquid. We show how this wide separation in time scales produces an illusion of a low-temperature liquid-liquid transition. The phenomenon suggesting metastability of two distinct liquid phases is actually coarsening of the ordered ice-like phase, which we elucidate using both analytical theory and computer simulation. For the latter, we describe robust methods for computing reversible free energy surfaces, and we consider effects of electrostatic boundary conditions. We show that sensible alterations of models and boundary conditions produce no qualitative changes in low-temperature phase behaviors of these systems, only marginal changes in equations of state. On the other hand, we show that altering sampling time scales can produce large and qualitative non-equilibrium effects. Recent reports of evidence of a liquid-liquid critical point in computer simulations of supercooled water are considered in this light. PMID:23758385

  10. The putative liquid-liquid transition is a liquid-solid transition in atomistic models of water. II

    SciTech Connect

    Limmer, David T.; Chandler, David

    2013-06-07

    This paper extends our earlier studies of free energy functions of density and crystalline order parameters for models of supercooled water, which allows us to examine the possibility of two distinct metastable liquid phases [D. T. Limmer and D. Chandler, J. Chem. Phys.135, 134503 (2011) and preprint http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1107.0337 (2011)]. Low-temperature reversible free energy surfaces of several different atomistic models are computed: mW water, TIP4P/2005 water, Stillinger-Weber silicon, and ST2 water, the last of these comparing three different treatments of long-ranged forces. In each case, we show that there is one stable or metastable liquid phase, and there is an ice-like crystal phase. The time scales for crystallization in these systems far exceed those of structural relaxation in the supercooled metastable liquid. We show how this wide separation in time scales produces an illusion of a low-temperature liquid-liquid transition. The phenomenon suggesting metastability of two distinct liquid phases is actually coarsening of the ordered ice-like phase, which we elucidate using both analytical theory and computer simulation. For the latter, we describe robust methods for computing reversible free energy surfaces, and we consider effects of electrostatic boundary conditions. We show that sensible alterations of models and boundary conditions produce no qualitative changes in low-temperature phase behaviors of these systems, only marginal changes in equations of state. On the other hand, we show that altering sampling time scales can produce large and qualitative non-equilibrium effects. Recent reports of evidence of a liquid-liquid critical point in computer simulations of supercooled water are considered in this light.

  11. Holographic approach to phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, Sebastian; Garcia-Garcia, Antonio M.; Rodriguez-Gomez, Diego

    2010-02-15

    We provide a description of phase transitions at finite temperature in strongly coupled field theories using holography. For this purpose, we introduce a general class of gravity duals to superconducting theories that exhibit various types of phase transitions (first or second order with both mean and non-mean field behavior) as parameters in their Lagrangian are changed. Moreover the size and strength of the conductivity coherence peak can also be controlled. Our results suggest that certain parameters in the gravitational dual control the interactions responsible for binding the condensate and the magnitude of its fluctuations close to the transition.

  12. Liquid-liquid transition in ST2 water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Palmer, Jeremy C.; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.; Debenedetti, Pablo G.

    2012-12-01

    We use the weighted histogram analysis method [S. Kumar, D. Bouzida, R. H. Swendsen, P. A. Kollman, and J. M. Rosenberg, J. Comput. Chem. 13, 1011 (1992), 10.1002/jcc.540130812] to calculate the free energy surface of the ST2 model of water as a function of density and bond-orientational order. We perform our calculations at deeply supercooled conditions (T = 228.6 K, P = 2.2 kbar; T = 235 K, P = 2.2 kbar) and focus our attention on the region of bond-orientational order that is relevant to disordered phases. We find a first-order transition between a low-density liquid (LDL, ρ ≈ 0.9 g/cc) and a high-density liquid (HDL, ρ ≈ 1.15 g/cc), confirming our earlier sampling of the free energy surface of this model as a function of density [Y. Liu, A. Z. Panagiotopoulos, and P. G. Debenedetti, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 104508 (2009), 10.1063/1.3229892]. We demonstrate the disappearance of the LDL basin at high pressure and of the HDL basin at low pressure, in agreement with independent simulations of the system's equation of state. Consistency between directly computed and reweighted free energies, as well as between free energy surfaces computed using different thermodynamic starting conditions, confirms proper equilibrium sampling. Diffusion and structural relaxation calculations demonstrate that equilibration of the LDL phase, which exhibits slow dynamics, is attained in the course of the simulations. Repeated flipping between the LDL and HDL phases in the course of long molecular dynamics runs provides further evidence of a phase transition. We use the Ewald summation with vacuum boundary conditions to calculate long-ranged Coulombic interactions and show that conducting boundary conditions lead to unphysical behavior at low temperatures.

  13. Liquid-liquid and liquid-solid phase separation and flocculation for a charged colloidal dispersion.

    PubMed

    Lai, S K; Wu, K L

    2002-10-01

    We model the intercolloidal interaction by a hard-sphere Yukawa repulsion to which is added the long-range van der Waals attraction. In comparison with the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek repulsion, the Yukawa repulsion explicitly incorporates the spatial correlations between colloids and small ions. As a result, the repulsive part can be expressed analytically and has a coupling strength depending on the colloidal volume fraction. By use of this two-body potential of mean force and in conjunction with a second-order thermodynamic perturbation theory, we construct the colloidal Helmholtz free energy and use it to calculate the thermodynamic quantities, pressure and chemical potential, needed in the determination of the liquid-liquid and liquid-solid phase diagrams. We examine, in an aqueous charged colloidal dispersion, the effects of the Hamaker constant and particle size on the conformation of a stable liquid-liquid phase transition calculated with respect to the liquid-solid coexistence phases. We find that there exists a threshold Hamaker constant or particle size whose value demarcates the stable liquid-liquid coexistence phases from their metastable counterparts. Applying the same technique and using the energetic criterion, we extend our calculations to study the flocculation phenomenon in aqueous charged colloids. Here, we pay due attention to determining the loci of a stability curve stipulated for a given temperature T0, and obtain the parametric phase diagram of the Hamaker constant vs the coupling strength or, at given surface potential, the particle size. By imposing T0 to be the critical temperature T(c), i.e., setting k(B)T0 (=k(B)T(c)) equal to a reasonable potential barrier, we arrive at the stability curve that marks the irreversible/reversible phase transition. The interesting result is that there occurs a minimum size for the colloidal particles below (above) which the colloidal dispersion is driven to an irreversible (reversible) phase

  14. ALS/FTD Mutation-Induced Phase Transition of FUS Liquid Droplets and Reversible Hydrogels into Irreversible Hydrogels Impairs RNP Granule Function

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Tetsuro; Qamar, Seema; Lin, Julie Qiaojin; Schierle, Gabriele S. Kaminski; Rees, Eric; Miyashita, Akinori; Costa, Ana R.; Dodd, Roger B.; Chan, Fiona T.S.; Michel, Claire H.; Kronenberg-Versteeg, Deborah; Li, Yi; Yang, Seung-Pil; Wakutani, Yosuke; Meadows, William; Ferry, Rodylyn Rose; Dong, Liang; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Favrin, Giorgio; Lin, Wen-Lang; Dickson, Dennis W.; Zhen, Mei; Ron, David; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold; Fraser, Paul E.; Shneider, Neil A.; Holt, Christine; Vendruscolo, Michele; Kaminski, Clemens F.; St George-Hyslop, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms by which mutations in FUS and other RNA binding proteins cause ALS and FTD remain controversial. We propose a model in which low-complexity (LC) domains of FUS drive its physiologically reversible assembly into membrane-free, liquid droplet and hydrogel-like structures. ALS/FTD mutations in LC or non-LC domains induce further phase transition into poorly soluble fibrillar hydrogels distinct from conventional amyloids. These assemblies are necessary and sufficient for neurotoxicity in a C. elegans model of FUS-dependent neurodegeneration. They trap other ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granule components and disrupt RNP granule function. One consequence is impairment of new protein synthesis by cytoplasmic RNP granules in axon terminals, where RNP granules regulate local RNA metabolism and translation. Nuclear FUS granules may be similarly affected. Inhibiting formation of these fibrillar hydrogel assemblies mitigates neurotoxicity and suggests a potential therapeutic strategy that may also be applicable to ALS/FTD associated with mutations in other RNA binding proteins. PMID:26526393

  15. ALS/FTD Mutation-Induced Phase Transition of FUS Liquid Droplets and Reversible Hydrogels into Irreversible Hydrogels Impairs RNP Granule Function.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tetsuro; Qamar, Seema; Lin, Julie Qiaojin; Schierle, Gabriele S Kaminski; Rees, Eric; Miyashita, Akinori; Costa, Ana R; Dodd, Roger B; Chan, Fiona T S; Michel, Claire H; Kronenberg-Versteeg, Deborah; Li, Yi; Yang, Seung-Pil; Wakutani, Yosuke; Meadows, William; Ferry, Rodylyn Rose; Dong, Liang; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Favrin, Giorgio; Lin, Wen-Lang; Dickson, Dennis W; Zhen, Mei; Ron, David; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold; Fraser, Paul E; Shneider, Neil A; Holt, Christine; Vendruscolo, Michele; Kaminski, Clemens F; St George-Hyslop, Peter

    2015-11-18

    The mechanisms by which mutations in FUS and other RNA binding proteins cause ALS and FTD remain controversial. We propose a model in which low-complexity (LC) domains of FUS drive its physiologically reversible assembly into membrane-free, liquid droplet and hydrogel-like structures. ALS/FTD mutations in LC or non-LC domains induce further phase transition into poorly soluble fibrillar hydrogels distinct from conventional amyloids. These assemblies are necessary and sufficient for neurotoxicity in a C. elegans model of FUS-dependent neurodegeneration. They trap other ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granule components and disrupt RNP granule function. One consequence is impairment of new protein synthesis by cytoplasmic RNP granules in axon terminals, where RNP granules regulate local RNA metabolism and translation. Nuclear FUS granules may be similarly affected. Inhibiting formation of these fibrillar hydrogel assemblies mitigates neurotoxicity and suggests a potential therapeutic strategy that may also be applicable to ALS/FTD associated with mutations in other RNA binding proteins. PMID:26526393

  16. Structural Transitions in Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Droplets.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ye; Bukusoglu, Emre; Martínez-González, José A; Rahimi, Mohammad; Roberts, Tyler F; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Xiaoguang; Abbott, Nicholas L; de Pablo, Juan J

    2016-07-26

    Confinement of cholesteric liquid crystals (ChLC) into droplets leads to a delicate interplay between elasticity, chirality, and surface energy. In this work, we rely on a combination of theory and experiments to understand the rich morphological behavior that arises from that balance. More specifically, a systematic study of micrometer-sized ChLC droplets is presented as a function of chirality and surface energy (or anchoring). With increasing chirality, a continuous transition is observed from a twisted bipolar structure to a radial spherical structure, all within a narrow range of chirality. During such a transition, a bent structure is predicted by simulations and confirmed by experimental observations. Simulations are also able to capture the dynamics of the quenching process observed in experiments. Consistent with published work, it is found that nanoparticles are attracted to defect regions on the surface of the droplets. For weak anchoring conditions at the nanoparticle surface, ChLC droplets adopt a morphology similar to that of the equilibrium helical phase observed for ChLCs in the bulk. As the anchoring strength increases, a planar bipolar structure arises, followed by a morphological transition to a bent structure. The influence of chirality and surface interactions are discussed in the context of the potential use of ChLC droplets as stimuli-responsive materials for reporting molecular adsorbates. PMID:27249186

  17. Phase transitions in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1984-11-01

    The rather general circumstances under which a phase transition in hadronic matter at finite temperature to an abnormal phase in which baryon effective masses become small and in which copious baryon-antibaryon pairs appear is emphasized. A preview is also given of a soliton model of dense matter, in which at a density of about seven times nuclear density, matter ceases to be a color insulator and becomes increasingly color conducting. 22 references.

  18. Contact resistivity decrease at a metal/semiconductor interface by a solid-to-liquid phase transitional metallo-organic silver.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong-Youn; Seo, Jun-Young; Kang, Min Gu; Song, Hee-eun

    2014-09-24

    We present a new approach to ensure the low contact resistivity of a silver paste at a metal/semiconductor interface over a broad range of peak firing temperatures by using a solid-to-liquid phase transitional metallo-organic silver, that is, silver neodecanoate. Silver nanoclusters, thermally derived from silver neodecanoate, are readily dissolved into the melt of metal oxide glass frit even at low temperatures, at which point the molten metal oxide glass frit lacks the dissociation capability of bulk silver into Ag(+) ions. In the presence of O(2-) ions in the melt of metal oxide glass frit, the redox reaction from Ag(+) to Ag(0) augments the noble-metal-assisted etching capability to remove the passivation layer of silicon nitride. Moreover, during the cooling stage, the nucleated silver atoms enrich the content of silver nanocolloids in the solidified metal oxide glass layer. The resulting contact resistivity of silver paste with silver neodecanoate at the metal/semiconductor interface thus remains low-between 4.12 and 16.08 mΩ cm(2)-whereas without silver neodecanoate, the paste exhibits a contact resistivity between 2.61 and 72.38 mΩ cm(2) in the range of peak firing temperatures from 750 to 810 °C. The advantage of using silver neodecanoate in silver paste becomes evident in that contact resistivity remains low over the broad range of peak firing temperatures, thus providing greater flexibility with respect to the firing temperature required in silicon solar cell applications. PMID:25182502

  19. Liquid-Phase Adsorption Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooney, David O.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an experiment developed and used in the unit operations laboratory course at the University of Wyoming. Involves the liquid-phase adsorption of an organic compound from aqueous solution on activated carbon, and is relevant to adsorption processes in general. (TW)

  20. Lattice effects and entropy release at the low-temperature phase transition in the spin-liquid candidate kappa-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu{sub 2}(CN){sub 3}.

    SciTech Connect

    Manna, R. S.; de Souza, M.; Bruhl, A.; Schlueter, J. A.; Lang, M.; Materials Science Division; Goethe-Univ.

    2010-01-08

    The spin-liquid candidate {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu{sub 2}(CN){sub 3} has been studied by measuring the uniaxial expansion coefficients {alpha}{sub i}, the specific heat, and magnetic susceptibility. Special emphasis was placed on the mysterious anomaly around 6K - a potential spin-liquid instability. Distinct and strongly anisotropic lattice effects have been observed at 6K, clearly identifying this feature as a second-order phase transition. Owing to the large anomalies in {alpha}{sub i}, the application of Grueneisen scaling has enabled us to determine the corresponding specific heat contribution and the entropy release. Comparison of the latter with available spin models suggests that spin degrees of freedom alone cannot account for the phase transition. Scenarios, involving charge degrees of freedom, are discussed.

  1. A Demonstration of the Continuous Phase (Second-Order) Transition of a Binary Liquid System in the Region around Its Critical Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    In most general chemistry and introductory physical chemistry classes, critical point is defined as that temperature-pressure point on a phase diagram where the liquid-gas interface disappears, a phenomenon that generally occurs at relatively high temperatures or high pressures. Two examples are: water, with a critical point at 647 K (critical…

  2. Two Phase Flow Mapping and Transition Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parang, Masood; Chao, David F.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, recent microgravity two-phase flow data for air-water, air-water-glycerin, and air- water-Zonyl FSP mixtures are analyzed for transition from bubbly to slug and from slug to annular flow. It is found that Weber number-based maps are inadequate to predict flow-pattern transition, especially over a wide range of liquid flow rates. It is further shown that slug to annular flow transition is dependent on liquid phase Reynolds number at high liquid flow rate. This effect may be attributed to growing importance of liquid phase inertia in the dynamics of the phase flow and distribution. As a result a new form of scaling is introduced to present data using liquid Weber number based on vapor and liquid superficial velocities and Reynolds number based on liquid superficial velocity. This new combination of the dimensionless parameters seem to be more appropriate for the presentation of the microgravity data and provides a better flow pattern prediction and should be considered for evaluation with data obtained in the future. Similarly, the analysis of bubble to slug flow transition indicates a strong dependence on both liquid inertia and turbulence fluctuations which seem to play a significant role on this transition at high values of liquid velocity. A revised mapping of data using a new group of dimensionless parameters show a better and more consistent description of flow transition over a wide range of liquid flow rates. Further evaluation of the proposed flow transition mapping will have to be made after a wider range of microgravity data become available.

  3. Electrical Dissipation Measurement of Polymer Phase Transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, E. R., R; Schuszler, A., II

    1983-01-01

    Technique measures solid/solid, glass/rubber, and liquid/liquid transition temperatures in polymers having dipole moments. Technique based on change in dipole packing that occurs with each transition and measured as change in electrical dissipation factor. Change in dipole packing occuring with each transition sensed by effect on dissipation factor.

  4. Interplay between micelle formation and waterlike phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzelmann, G.; Figueiredo, W.; Girardi, M.

    2010-02-01

    A lattice model for amphiphilic aggregation in the presence of a structured waterlike solvent is studied through Monte Carlo simulations. We investigate the interplay between the micelle formation and the solvent phase transition in two different regions of temperature-density phase diagram of pure water. A second order phase transition between the gaseous (G) and high density liquid (HDL) phases that occurs at very high temperatures, and a first order phase transition between the low density liquid (LDL) and (HDL) phases that takes place at lower temperatures. In both cases, we find the aggregate size distribution curve and the critical micellar concentration as a function of the solvent density across the transitions. We show that micelle formation drives the LDL-HDL first order phase transition to lower solvent densities, while the transition G-HDL is driven to higher densities, which can be explained by the markedly different degrees of micellization in both cases. The diffusion coefficient of surfactants was also calculated in the LDL and HDL phases, changing abruptly its behavior due to the restructuring of waterlike solvent when we cross the first order LDL-HDL phase transition. To understand such behavior, we calculate the solvent density and the number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule close to micelles. The curves of the interfacial solvent density and the number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule in the first hydration signal a local phase change of the interfacial water, clarifying the diffusion mechanism of free surfactants in the solvent.

  5. Non-equilibrium phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Mottola, E.; Cooper, F.M.; Bishop, A.R.; Habib, S.; Kluger, Y.; Jensen, N.G.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Non-equilibrium phase transitions play a central role in a very broad range of scientific areas, ranging from nuclear, particle, and astrophysics to condensed matter physics and the material and biological sciences. The aim of this project was to explore the path to a deeper and more fundamental understanding of the common physical principles underlying the complex real time dynamics of phase transitions. The main emphasis was on the development of general theoretical tools to deal with non-equilibrium processes, and of numerical methods robust enough to capture the time-evolving structures that occur in actual experimental situations. Specific applications to Laboratory multidivisional efforts in relativistic heavy-ion physics (transition to a new phase of nuclear matter consisting of a quark-gluon plasma) and layered high-temperature superconductors (critical currents and flux flow at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory) were undertaken.

  6. Phase transition theory of sprite halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraki, Yasutaka

    2010-04-01

    We present the phase transition theory for sprite halo using measurable lightning parameters (charge moment and discharge time) on the basis of steady state thermodynamics. A halo is located at the upper part of the tree-like structure of a sprite and is produced through electron impact excitation of neutral species under the lightning-induced electric field. We proposed in our previous studies that the occurrence criteria for halos and sprites are characterized by the above lightning parameters, and additionally, the intensity of a halo weakens rapidly with an increase in the discharge time T. We assume that this phenomenon is quite similar to the phase transition between the vapor and the liquid states of water; here the analogy is between the accelerated electrons and the water molecules. We demonstrate analytically a phase transition for a simply modeled halo based on the quasistatic theory of lightning-induced electric field. Choosing the luminosity of a halo as an order parameter, we show that it has a dependence of T-0.25 - Tc-0.25 near the critical point Tc, which is characteristic of the phase transition. Furthermore, the critical time scale Tc ≈ 5.5 ms is provided naturally from our modeling and is somewhat larger than the typical time scale of the halo luminosity in observations. We consider that this kind of formalism is useful in understanding the detailed relationship between lightning activity and occurrence of halos. We discuss this point for future observations along with the possibilities of the transition model of column and carrot structures.

  7. Phase transitions in femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E.; Khishchenko, Konstantin V.; Levashov, Pavel R.

    2009-03-01

    In this study we simulate an interaction of femtosecond laser pulses (100 fs, 800 nm, 0.1-10 J/cm 2) with metal targets of Al, Au, Cu, and Ni. For analysis of laser-induced phase transitions, melting and shock waves propagation as well as material decomposition we use an Eulerian hydrocode in conjunction with a thermodynamically complete two-temperature equation of state with stable and metastable phases. Isochoric heating, material evaporation from the free surface of the target and fast propagation of the melting and shock waves are observed. On rarefaction the liquid phase becomes metastable and its lifetime is estimated using the theory of homogeneous nucleation. Mechanical spallation of the target material at high strain rates is also possible as a result of void growth and confluence. In our simulation several ablation mechanisms are taken into account but the main issue of the material is found to originate from the metastable liquid state. It can be decomposed either into a liquid-gas mixture in the vicinity of the critical point, or into droplets at high strain rates and negative pressure. The simulation results are in agreement with available experimental findings.

  8. Liquid-phase chromatography detector

    DOEpatents

    Voigtman, Edward G.; Winefordner, James D.; Jurgensen, Arthur R.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid-phase chromatography detector comprising a flow cell having an inlet tubular conduit for receiving a liquid chromatographic effluent and discharging it as a flowing columnar stream onto a vertically adjustable receiving surface spaced apart from and located vertically below and in close proximity to the discharge end of the tubular conduit; a receiver adapted to receive liquid overflowing from the receiving surface; an exit conduit for continuously removing liquid from the receiver; a light source for focussing fluorescence-producing light pulses on the flowing columnar stream as it passes from the outlet of the conduit to the receiving surface and a fluorescence detector to detect the produced fluorescence; a source of light pulse for producing acoustic waves in the columnar stream as it passes from the conduit outlet to the receiving surface; and a piezoelectric transducer adapted to detect those waves; and a source of bias voltage applied to the inlet tubular conduit and adapted to produce ionization of the liquid flowing through the flow cell so as to produce photocurrents therein and an electrical system to detect and record the photocurrents. This system is useful in separating and detecting individual chemical compounds from mixtures thereof.

  9. Liquid-phase chromatography detector

    DOEpatents

    Voigtman, E.G.; Winefordner, J.D.; Jurgensen, A.R.

    1983-11-08

    A liquid-phase chromatography detector comprises a flow cell having an inlet tubular conduit for receiving a liquid chromatographic effluent and discharging it as a flowing columnar stream onto a vertically adjustable receiving surface spaced apart from and located vertically below and in close proximity to the discharge end of the tubular conduit; a receiver adapted to receive liquid overflowing from the receiving surface; an exit conduit for continuously removing liquid from the receiver; a light source for focusing fluorescence-producing light pulses on the flowing columnar stream as it passes from the outlet of the conduit to the receiving surface and a fluorescence detector to detect the produced fluorescence; a source of light pulse for producing acoustic waves in the columnar stream as it passes from the conduit outlet to the receiving surface; and a piezoelectric transducer adapted to detect those waves; and a source of bias voltage applied to the inlet tubular conduit and adapted to produce ionization of the liquid flowing through the flow cell so as to produce photocurrents therein and an electrical system to detect and record the photocurrents. This system is useful in separating and detecting individual chemical compounds from mixtures thereof. 5 figs.

  10. Coyote series data report LLNL/NWC 1981 LNG spill tests dispersion, vapor burn, and rapid-phase-transition. Volume 1. [7 experiments with liquefied natural gas, 2 with liquid methane, and one with liquid nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Goldwire, H.C. Jr.; Rodean, H.C.; Cederwall, R.T.; Kansa, E.J.; Koopman, R.P.; McClure, J.W.; McRae, T.G.; Morris, L.K.; Kamppinen, L.; Kiefer, R.D.

    1983-10-01

    The Coyote series of liquefied natural gas (LNG) spill experiments was performed at the Naval Weapons Center (NWC), China Lake, California, during the summer and fall of 1981. These tests were a joint effort of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the NWC and were sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Gas Research Institute. There were ten Coyote experiments, five primarily for the study of vapor dispersion and burning vapor clouds, and five for investigating the occurrence of rapid-phase-transition (RPT) explosions. Each of the last four of the five RPT tests consisted of a series of three spills. Seven experiments were with LNG, two were with liquid methane (LCH/sub 4/), and one was with liquid nitrogen (LN/sub 2/). Three arrays of instrumentation were deployed. An array of RPT diagnostic instruments was concentrated at the spill pond and was operated during all of the tests, vapor burn as well as RPT. The wind-field array was operated during the last nine experiments to define the wind direction and speed in the area upwind and downwind of the spill pond. The gas-dispersion array was deployed mostly downwind of the spill pond to measure gas concentration, humidity, temperature, ground heat flux, infrared (IR) radiation, and flame-front passage during three of the vapor dispersion and burn experiments (Coyotes 3, 5, and 6). High-speed color motion pictures were taken during every test, and IR imagery (side and overhead) was obtained during some vapor-burn experiments. Data was obtained by radiometers during Coyotes 3, 6, and 7. This report presents a comprehensive selection of the data obtained. It does not include any data analysis except that required to determine the test conditions and the reliability of the data. Data analysis is to be reported in other publications. 19 references, 76 figures, 13 tables.