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Sample records for liquid phase transition

  1. Terahertz spectroscopy across liquid crystalline phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, M.; Vieweg, N.; Koch, M.; Dierking, I.

    2016-02-01

    Using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy we investigate the far-infrared properties of liquid crystal CE8 which exhibits a plethora of phases upon variation of the temperature. Phase transitions that are correlated with structural ordering at different dimensions clearly reflect in the terahertz refractive index. On the contrary, phase transitions related to ordering phenomena within a certain group of phases do not lead to significant steps in the n(T) relation. Nevertheless, we additionally demonstrate that also 2nd order phase transitions, like the SmA*-SmC* phase change, can be resolved by THz spectroscopy.

  2. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition in Nanoconfined Silicon Carbide.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weikang; Zhang, Leining; Liu, Sida; Ren, Hongru; Zhou, Xuyan; Li, Hui

    2016-03-01

    We report theoretical evidence of a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) in liquid silicon carbide under nanoslit confinement. The LLPT is characterized by layering transitions induced by confinement and pressure, accompanying the rapid change in density. During the layering transition, the proportional distribution of tetracoordinated and pentacoordinated structures exhibits remarkable change. The tricoordinated structures lead to the microphase separation between silicon (with the dominant tricoordinated, tetracoordinated, and pentacoordinated structures) and carbon (with the dominant tricoordinated structures) in the layer close to the walls. A strong layer separation between silicon atoms and carbon atoms is induced by strong wall-liquid forces. Importantly, the pressure confinement phase diagram with negative slopes for LLPT lines indicates that, under high pressure, the LLPT is mainly confinement-induced, but under low pressure, it becomes dominantly pressure-induced. PMID:26859609

  3. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition and Glass Transition in a Monoatomic Model System

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Limei; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Giovambattista, Nicolas; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2010-01-01

    We review our recent study on the polyamorphism of the liquid and glass states in a monatomic system, a two-scale spherical-symmetric Jagla model with both attractive and repulsive interactions. This potential with a parametrization for which crystallization can be avoided and both the glass transition and the liquid-liquid phase transition are clearly separated, displays water-like anomalies as well as polyamorphism in both liquid and glassy states, providing a unique opportunity to study the interplay between the liquid-liquid phase transition and the glass transition. Our study on a simple model may be useful in understanding recent studies of polyamorphism in metallic glasses. PMID:21614201

  4. Polymorphism in glassy silicon: Inherited from liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Li-Min; Zhang, Xinyu; Qi, Li; Zhang, Suhong; Ma, Mingzhen; Liu, Riping

    2015-02-01

    Combining molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and Voronoi polyhedral analyses, we discussed the microstructure evolution in liquid and glassy silicon during cooling by focusing on the fraction of various clusters. Liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) is detected in supercooled liquid silicon However, freezing the high-density liquid (HDL) to the glassy state is not achieved as the quenching rate goes up to 1014 K/s. The polyamorphism in glassy silicon is found to be mainly associated with low-density liquid (LDL).

  5. The liquid to vapor phase transition in excited nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.B.; Moretto, L.G.; Phair, L.; Wozniak, G.J.; Beaulieu, L.; Breuer, H.; Korteling, R.G.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Lefort, T.; Pienkowski, L.; Ruangma, A.; Viola, V.E.; Yennello, S.J.

    2001-05-08

    For many years it has been speculated that excited nuclei would undergo a liquid to vapor phase transition. For even longer, it has been known that clusterization in a vapor carries direct information on the liquid-vapor equilibrium according to Fisher's droplet model. Now the thermal component of the 8 GeV/c pion + 197 Au multifragmentation data of the ISiS Collaboration is shown to follow the scaling predicted by Fisher's model, thus providing the strongest evidence yet of the liquid to vapor phase transition.

  6. Communication: Protein dynamical transition vs. liquid-liquid phase transition in protein hydration water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schir, Giorgio; Fomina, Margarita; Cupane, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    In this work, we compare experimental data on myoglobin hydrated powders from elastic neutron scattering, broadband dielectric spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. Our aim is to obtain new insights on the connection between the protein dynamical transition, a fundamental phenomenon observed in proteins whose physical origin is highly debated, and the liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) possibly occurring in protein hydration water and related to the existence of a low temperature critical point in supercooled water. Our results provide a consistent thermodynamic/dynamic description which gives experimental support to the LLPT hypothesis and further reveals how fundamental properties of water and proteins are tightly related.

  7. Liquid-liquid phase transitions and water-like anomalies in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascaris, Erik

    In this thesis we employ computer simulations and statistical physics to understand the origin of liquid-liquid phase transitions and their relationship with anomalies typical of liquid water. Compared with other liquids, water has many anomalies. For example the density anomaly: when water is cooled below 4 °C the density decreases rather than increases. This and other anomalies have also been found to occur in a few other one-component liquids, sometimes in conjunction with the existence of a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) between a low-density liquid (LDL) and a high-density liquid (HDL). Using simple models we explain how these anomalies arise from the presence of two competing length scales. As a specific example we investigate the cut ramp potential, where we show the importance of "competition" in this context, and how one length scale can sometimes be zero. When there is a clear energetic preference for either LDL or HDL for all pressures and temperatures, then there is insufficient competition between the two liquid structures and no anomalies occur. From the simple models it also follows that anomalies can occur without the presence of a LLPT and vice versa. It remains therefore unclear if water has a LLPT that ends in a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP), a hypothesis that was first proposed based on simulations of the ST2 water model. We confirm the existence of a LLCP in this model using finite size scaling and the Challa-Landau-Binder parameter, and show that the LLPT is not a liquid-crystal transition, as has recently been suggested. Previous research has indicated the possible existence of a LLCP in liquid silica. We perform a detailed analysis of two different silica models (WAC and BKS) at temperatures much lower than was previously simulated. Within the accessible temperature range we find no LLCP in either model, although in the case of WAC potential it is closely approached. We compare our results with those obtained for other tetrahedral liquids and conclude that insufficient "stiffness" in the Si-O-Si bond angle might be responsible for the absence of a LLCP.

  8. Phase transitions and separations in a distorted liquid crystalline mixture.

    PubMed

    Kasch, Nicholas; Dierking, Ingo

    2015-08-14

    A theoretical method is proposed for modelling phase transitions and phase ranges in a multi-component liquid crystalline mixture where the liquid crystal structure is distorted and defects are formed. This method employs the Maier-Saupe and Kobayashi-McMillan theories of liquid crystalline ordering and the Flory-Huggins theory of mixtures. It builds on previous work on mixed systems that can form smectic-A and nematic phases by incorporating "distortion factors" into the expression for the local free energy of the mixture, which account for the effects of a deviation of the liquid crystal structure from the uniform nematic and smectic-A states. The method allows a simple description of chiral defect phases such as the blue phase and the twist grain boundary phase. In a previous work, it was shown that a model of the blue phase along these lines could effectively explain the observed effect whereby an added guest compound can stabilize the phase by separating into the high energy defect regions of the structure. It is shown here that with the correct choice of guest material a similar effect could be observed for the twist grain boundary phase. PMID:26277166

  9. Phase transitions and separations in a distorted liquid crystalline mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasch, Nicholas; Dierking, Ingo

    2015-08-01

    A theoretical method is proposed for modelling phase transitions and phase ranges in a multi-component liquid crystalline mixture where the liquid crystal structure is distorted and defects are formed. This method employs the Maier-Saupe and Kobayashi-McMillan theories of liquid crystalline ordering and the Flory-Huggins theory of mixtures. It builds on previous work on mixed systems that can form smectic-A and nematic phases by incorporating "distortion factors" into the expression for the local free energy of the mixture, which account for the effects of a deviation of the liquid crystal structure from the uniform nematic and smectic-A states. The method allows a simple description of chiral defect phases such as the blue phase and the twist grain boundary phase. In a previous work, it was shown that a model of the blue phase along these lines could effectively explain the observed effect whereby an added guest compound can stabilize the phase by separating into the high energy defect regions of the structure. It is shown here that with the correct choice of guest material a similar effect could be observed for the twist grain boundary phase.

  10. Liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter including strangeness

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.; Leinweber, D.B.; Williams, A.G.; Thomas, A.W.

    2004-11-01

    We apply the chiral SU(3) quark mean field model to study the properties of strange hadronic matter at finite temperature. The liquid-gas phase transition is studied as a function of the strangeness fraction. The pressure of the system cannot remain constant during the phase transition, since there are two independent conserved charges (baryon and strangeness number). In a range of temperatures around 15 MeV (precise values depending on the model used) the equation of state exhibits multiple bifurcates. The difference in the strangeness fraction f{sub s} between the liquid and gas phases is small when they coexist. The critical temperature of strange matter turns out to be a nontrivial function of the strangeness fraction.

  11. Liquid-gas phase transition of strange hadronic matter

    SciTech Connect

    P. Wang; D. B. Leinweber; A. W. Thomas; A. G. Williams

    2004-11-01

    We apply the chiral SU(3) quark mean field model to study the properties of strange hadronic matter at finite temperature. The liquid-gas phase transition is studied as a function of the strangeness fraction. The pressure of the system cannot remain constant during the phase transition, since there are two independent conserved charges (baryon and strangeness number). In a range of temperatures around 15 MeV (precise values depending on the model used) the equation of state exhibits multiple bifurcates. The difference in the strangeness fraction f{sub s} between the liquid and gas phases is small when they coexist. The critical temperature of strange matter turns out to be a non-trivial function of the strangeness fraction.

  12. Effect of dimensionality on vapor-liquid phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Sudhir Kumar

    2014-04-24

    Dimensionality play significant role on ‘phase transitions’. Fluids in macroscopic confinement (bulk or 3-Dimensional, 3D) do not show significant changes in their phase transition properties with extent of confinement, since the number of molecules away from the surrounding surfaces is astronomically higher than the number of molecules in close proximity of the confining surfaces. In microscopic confinement (quasi 3D to quasi-2D), however, the number of molecules away from the close proximity of the surface is not as high as is the case with macroscopic (3D) confinement. Hence, under the same thermodynamic conditions ‘phase transition’ properties at microscopic confinement may not remain the same as the macroscopic or 3D values. Phase transitions at extremely small scale become very sensitive to the dimensions as well as the surface characteristics of the system. In this work our investigations reveal the effect of dimensionality on the phase transition from 3D to quasi-2D to 2D behavior. We have used grand canonical transition matrix Monte Carlo simulation to understand the vapor–liquid phase transitions from 3D to quasi-2D behavior. Such studies can be helpful in understanding and controlling the fluid film behaviour confined between solid surfaces of few molecular diameters, for example, in lubrication applications.

  13. The liquid-liquid phase transition in silicon revealed by snapshots of valence electrons

    PubMed Central

    Beye, Martin; Sorgenfrei, Florian; Schlotter, William F.; Wurth, Wilfried; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The basis for the anomalies of water is still mysterious. Quite generally tetrahedrally coordinated systems, also silicon, show similar thermodynamic behavior but lack—like water—a thorough explanation. Proposed models—controversially discussed—explain the anomalies as a remainder of a first-order phase transition between high and low density liquid phases, buried deeply in the “no man’s land”—a part of the supercooled liquid region where rapid crystallization prohibits any experimental access. Other explanations doubt the existence of the phase transition and its first-order nature. Here, we provide experimental evidence for the first-order-phase transition in silicon. With ultrashort optical pulses of femtosecond duration we instantaneously heat the electronic system of silicon while the atomic structure as defined by the much heavier nuclear system remains initially unchanged. Only on a picosecond time scale the energy is transferred into the atomic lattice providing the energy to drive the phase transitions. With femtosecond X-ray pulses from FLASH, the free-electron laser at Hamburg, we follow the evolution of the valence electronic structure during this process. As the relevant phases are easily distinguishable in their electronic structure, we track how silicon melts into the low-density-liquid phase while a second phase transition into the high-density-liquid phase only occurs after the latent heat for the first-order phase transition has been transferred to the atomic structure. Proving the existence of the liquid-liquid phase transition in silicon, the hypothesized liquid-liquid scenario for water is strongly supported. PMID:20805512

  14. The liquid-liquid phase transition in silicon revealed by snapshots of valence electrons.

    PubMed

    Beye, Martin; Sorgenfrei, Florian; Schlotter, William F; Wurth, Wilfried; Fhlisch, Alexander

    2010-09-28

    The basis for the anomalies of water is still mysterious. Quite generally tetrahedrally coordinated systems, also silicon, show similar thermodynamic behavior but lack--like water--a thorough explanation. Proposed models--controversially discussed--explain the anomalies as a remainder of a first-order phase transition between high and low density liquid phases, buried deeply in the "no man's land"--a part of the supercooled liquid region where rapid crystallization prohibits any experimental access. Other explanations doubt the existence of the phase transition and its first-order nature. Here, we provide experimental evidence for the first-order-phase transition in silicon. With ultrashort optical pulses of femtosecond duration we instantaneously heat the electronic system of silicon while the atomic structure as defined by the much heavier nuclear system remains initially unchanged. Only on a picosecond time scale the energy is transferred into the atomic lattice providing the energy to drive the phase transitions. With femtosecond X-ray pulses from FLASH, the free-electron laser at Hamburg, we follow the evolution of the valence electronic structure during this process. As the relevant phases are easily distinguishable in their electronic structure, we track how silicon melts into the low-density-liquid phase while a second phase transition into the high-density-liquid phase only occurs after the latent heat for the first-order phase transition has been transferred to the atomic structure. Proving the existence of the liquid-liquid phase transition in silicon, the hypothesized liquid-liquid scenario for water is strongly supported. PMID:20805512

  15. Non-equilibrium phase transitions in a liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, K.; Roy, M.; Datta, A.

    2015-09-01

    The present manuscript describes kinetic behaviour of the glass transition and non-equilibrium features of the "Nematic-Isotropic" (N-I) phase transition of a well known liquid crystalline material N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline from the effects of heating rate and initial temperature on the transitions, through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy. Around the vicinity of the glass transition temperature (Tg), while only a change in the baseline of the ΔCp vs T curve is observed for heating rate (β) > 5 K min-1, consistent with a glass transition, a clear peak for β ≤ 5 K min-1 and the rapid reduction in the ΔCp value from the former to the latter rate correspond to an order-disorder transition and a transition from ergodic to non-ergodic behaviour. The ln β vs 1000/T curve for the glass transition shows convex Arrhenius behaviour that can be explained very well by a purely entropic activation barrier [Dan et al., Eur. Phys. Lett. 108, 36007 (2014)]. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates sudden freezing of the out-of-plane distortion vibrations of the benzene rings around the glass transition temperature and a considerable red shift indicating enhanced coplanarity of the benzene rings and, consequently, enhancement in the molecular ordering compared to room temperature. We further provide a direct experimental evidence of the non-equilibrium nature of the N-I transition through the dependence of this transition temperature (TNI) and associated enthalpy change (ΔH) on the initial temperature (at fixed β-values) for the DSC scans. A plausible qualitative explanation based on Mesquita's extension of Landau-deGennes theory [O. N. de Mesquita, Braz. J. Phys. 28, 257 (1998)] has been put forward. The change in the molecular ordering from nematic to isotropic phase has been investigated through fluorescence anisotropy measurements where the order parameter, quantified by the anisotropy, goes to zero from nematic to isotropic phase. To a point below the transition temperature, the order parameter is constant but decreases linearly with increase in temperature below that indicating the dependence of nematic ordering on the initial temperature during heating consistent with the non-equilibrium nature of nematic-isotropic phase transition.

  16. Non-equilibrium phase transitions in a liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Dan, K; Roy, M; Datta, A

    2015-09-01

    The present manuscript describes kinetic behaviour of the glass transition and non-equilibrium features of the "Nematic-Isotropic" (N-I) phase transition of a well known liquid crystalline material N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline from the effects of heating rate and initial temperature on the transitions, through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy. Around the vicinity of the glass transition temperature (Tg), while only a change in the baseline of the ΔCp vs T curve is observed for heating rate (β) > 5 K min(-1), consistent with a glass transition, a clear peak for β ≤ 5 K min(-1) and the rapid reduction in the ΔCp value from the former to the latter rate correspond to an order-disorder transition and a transition from ergodic to non-ergodic behaviour. The ln β vs 1000/T curve for the glass transition shows convex Arrhenius behaviour that can be explained very well by a purely entropic activation barrier [Dan et al., Eur. Phys. Lett. 108, 36007 (2014)]. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates sudden freezing of the out-of-plane distortion vibrations of the benzene rings around the glass transition temperature and a considerable red shift indicating enhanced coplanarity of the benzene rings and, consequently, enhancement in the molecular ordering compared to room temperature. We further provide a direct experimental evidence of the non-equilibrium nature of the N-I transition through the dependence of this transition temperature (TNI) and associated enthalpy change (ΔH) on the initial temperature (at fixed β-values) for the DSC scans. A plausible qualitative explanation based on Mesquita's extension of Landau-deGennes theory [O. N. de Mesquita, Braz. J. Phys. 28, 257 (1998)] has been put forward. The change in the molecular ordering from nematic to isotropic phase has been investigated through fluorescence anisotropy measurements where the order parameter, quantified by the anisotropy, goes to zero from nematic to isotropic phase. To a point below the transition temperature, the order parameter is constant but decreases linearly with increase in temperature below that indicating the dependence of nematic ordering on the initial temperature during heating consistent with the non-equilibrium nature of nematic-isotropic phase transition. PMID:26342371

  17. Modeling the solid-liquid phase transition in saturated triglycerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pink, David A.; Hanna, Charles B.; Sandt, Christophe; MacDonald, Adam J.; MacEachern, Ronald; Corkery, Robert; Rousseau, Dérick

    2010-02-01

    We investigated theoretically two competing published scenarios for the melting transition of the triglyceride trilaurin (TL): those of (1) Corkery et al. [Langmuir 23, 7241 (2007)], in which the average state of each TL molecule in the liquid phase is a discotic "Y" conformer whose three chains are dynamically twisted, with an average angle of ˜120° between them, and those of (2) Cebula et al. [J. Am. Oil Chem. Soc. 69, 130 (1992)], in which the liquid-state conformation of the TL molecule in the liquid phase is a nematic h∗-conformer whose three chains are in a modified "chair" conformation. We developed two competing models for the two scenarios, in which TL molecules are in a nematic compact-chair (or "h") conformation, with extended, possibly all-trans, chains at low-temperatures, and in either a Y conformation or an h∗ conformation in the liquid state at temperatures higher than the phase-transition temperature, T∗=319 K. We defined an h-Y model as a realization of the proposal of Corkery et al. [Langmuir 23, 7241 (2007)], and explored its predictions by mapping it onto an Ising model in a temperature-dependent field, performing a mean-field approximation, and calculating the transition enthalpy ΔH. We found that the most plausible realization of the h-Y model, as applied to the solid-liquid phase transition in TL, and likely to all saturated triglycerides, gave a value of ΔH in reasonable agreement with the experiment. We then defined an alternative h-h∗ model as a realization of the proposal of Cebula et al. [J. Am. Oil Chem. Soc. 69, 130 (1992)], in which the liquid phase exhibits an average symmetry breaking similar to an h conformation, but with twisted chains, to see whether it could describe the TL phase transition. The h-h∗ model gave a value of ΔH that was too small by a factor of ˜3-4. We also predicted the temperature dependence of the 1132 cm-1 Raman band for both models, and performed measurements of the ratios of three TL Raman bands in the temperature range of -20 °C≤T ≤90 °C. The experimental results were in accord with the predictions of the h-Y model and support the proposal of Corkery et al. [Langmuir 23, 7241 (2007)] that the liquid state is made up of molecules that are each, on average, in a Y conformation. Finally, we carried out computer simulations of minimal-model TLs in the liquid phase, and concluded that although the individual TL molecules are, on average, Y conformers, long-range discotic order is unlikely to exist.

  18. Volume phase transitions of cholesteric liquid crystalline gels

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, Akihiko

    2015-05-07

    We present a mean field theory to describe anisotropic deformations of a cholesteric elastomer without solvent molecules and a cholesteric liquid crystalline gel immersed in isotropic solvents at a thermal equilibrium state. Based on the neoclassical rubber theory of nematic elastomers, we derive an elastic energy and a twist distortion energy, which are important to determine the shape of a cholesteric elastomer (or gel). We demonstrate that when the elastic energy dominates in the free energy, the cholesteric elastomer causes a spontaneous compression in the pitch axis and elongates along the director on the plane perpendicular to the pitch axis. Our theory can qualitatively describe the experimental results of a cholesteric elastomer. We also predict the first-order volume phase transitions and anisotropic deformations of a gel at the cholesteric-isotropic phase transition temperature. Depending on a chirality of a gel, we find a prolate or oblate shape of cholesteric gels.

  19. Volume phase transitions of cholesteric liquid crystalline gels.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Akihiko

    2015-05-01

    We present a mean field theory to describe anisotropic deformations of a cholesteric elastomer without solvent molecules and a cholesteric liquid crystalline gel immersed in isotropic solvents at a thermal equilibrium state. Based on the neoclassical rubber theory of nematic elastomers, we derive an elastic energy and a twist distortion energy, which are important to determine the shape of a cholesteric elastomer (or gel). We demonstrate that when the elastic energy dominates in the free energy, the cholesteric elastomer causes a spontaneous compression in the pitch axis and elongates along the director on the plane perpendicular to the pitch axis. Our theory can qualitatively describe the experimental results of a cholesteric elastomer. We also predict the first-order volume phase transitions and anisotropic deformations of a gel at the cholesteric-isotropic phase transition temperature. Depending on a chirality of a gel, we find a prolate or oblate shape of cholesteric gels. PMID:25956120

  20. Nature of the first-order liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G.; Yu, Y. J.; Tan, X. M.

    2015-08-01

    The first-order liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled Si is revisited by long-time first-principle molecular dynamics simulations. As the focus of the present paper, its nature is revealed by analyzing the inherent structures of low-density liquid (LDL) and high-density liquid (HDL). Our results show that it is a transition between a sp3-hybridization LDL and a white-tin-like HDL. This uncovers the origin of the semimetal-metal transition accompanying it and also proves that HDL is the metastable extension of high temperature equilibrium liquid into the supercooled regime. The pressure-temperature diagram of supercooled Si thus can be regarded in some respects as shifted reflection of its crystalline phase diagram.

  1. Liquid-liquid phase transition and structure inheritance in carbon films

    PubMed Central

    He, Yezeng; Li, Hui; Jiang, Yanyan; Li, Xiongying; Bian, Xiufang

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the cooling process of quasi-2D liquid carbon. Our results show an obvious liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) from the twofold coordinated liquid to the threefold coordinated liquid with the decrease of temperature, followed by a liquid-solid phase transition (LSPT). The LLPT can be regarded as the preparation stage of LSPT. During the cooling process, the chain structures firstly self-assemble into some ring structures and then aggregate into some stable islands which can further connect together to form a complete polycrystalline film. The threefold coordinated structures play an important role in the formation of atomic rings. The inheritance of the threefold coordinated structures provides essential condition to form rings and islands. PMID:24407276

  2. High-resolution calorimetric study of phase transitions in chiral smectic-C liquid crystalline phases.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Y; Le, K V; Aya, S; Isobe, M; Yao, H; Huang, C C; Takezoe, H; Ema, K

    2012-12-01

    We carried out an improved characterization of phase transitions among chiral smectic-C subphases observed for various antiferroelectric liquid crystals by precise heat capacity measurements. It was found that the phase transitions are intrinsically first order exhibiting a remarkable heat anomaly which involves little pretransitional thermal fluctuation and a finite thermal hysteresis. On the other hand, we also noticed that the critical point of the smectic-C(α)(*)-smectic-C* transition is induced by the destabilization of the smectic-C(α)(*) phase which couples with the fluctuation associated with the smectic-A-smectic-C(α)(*) phase transition. PMID:23367966

  3. Structure, Hydrodynamics, and Phase Transition of Freely Suspended Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Noel A.

    2000-01-01

    Smectic liquid crystals are phases of rod shaped molecules organized into one dimensionally (1D) periodic arrays of layers, each layer being between one and two molecular lengths thick. In the least ordered smectic phases, the smectics A and C, each layer is a two dimensional (2D) liquid. Additionally there are a variety of more ordered smectic phases having hexatic short range translational order or 2D crystalline quasi long range translational order within the layers. The inherent fluid-layer structure and low vapor pressure of smectic liquid crystals enable the long term stabilization of freely suspended, single component, layered fluid films as thin as 30A, a single molecular layer. The layering forces the films to be an integral number of smectic layers thick, quantizing their thickness in layer units and forcing a film of a particular number of layers to be physically homogeneous with respect to its layer structure over its entire area. Optical reflectivity enables the precise determination of the number of layers. These ultrathin freely suspended liquid crystal films are structures of fundamental interest in condensed matter and fluid physics. They are the thinnest known stable condensed phase fluid structures and have the largest surface-to-volume ratio of any stable fluid preparation, making them ideal for the study of the effects of reduced dimensionality on phase behavior and on fluctuation and interface phenomena. Their low vapor pressure and quantized thickness enable the effective use of microgravity to extend the study of basic capillary phenomena to ultrathin fluid films. Freely suspended films have been a wellspring of new liquid crystal physics. They have been used to provide unique experimental conditions for the study of condensed phase transitions in two dimensions. They are the only system in which the hexatic has been unambiguously identified as a phase of matter, and the only physical system in which fluctuations of a 2D XY system and Kosterlitz Thouless phase transition has been observed and 2D XY quasi long range order verified. Smectic films have enabled the precise determination of smectic layer electron density and positional fluctuation profile and have been used to show that the interlayer interactions in anti-ferroelectric tilted smectics do not extend significantly beyond nearest neighbors. The interactions which are operative in liquid crystals are generally weak in comparison to those in crystalline phases, leading to the facile manipulation of the order in liquid crystals by external agents such as applied fields and surfaces. Effects arising from weak ordering are significantly enhanced in ultrathin free films and filaments wherein the intermolecular coupling is effectively reduced by loss of neighbors. Over the past four years this research, which we now detail, has produced a host of exciting new discoveries and unexpected results, maintaining the position of the study of freely suspended liquid crystal structures as one of most exciting and fruitful areas of complex fluid physics. In addition, several potentially interesting microgravity free film experiments have been identified.

  4. Semiphenomenological model for gas-liquid phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benilov, E. S.; Benilov, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    We examine a rarefied gas with inter-molecular attraction. It is argued that the attraction force amplifies random density fluctuations by pulling molecules from lower-density regions into high-density regions and thus may give rise to an instability. To describe this effect, we use a kinetic equation where the attraction force is taken into account in a way similar to how electromagnetic forces in plasma are treated in the Vlasov model. It is demonstrated that the instability occurs when the temperature T is lower than a certain threshold value Ts depending on the gas density. It is further shown that, even if T is only marginally lower than Ts, the instability generates clusters with density much higher than that of the gas. These results suggest that the instability should be interpreted as a gas-liquid phase transition, with Ts being the temperature of saturated vapor and the high-density clusters representing liquid droplets.

  5. Microgravity Studies of Liquid-Liquid Phase Transitions in Alumina-Yttria Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynes, Buddy (Technical Monitor); Weber, Richard; Nordine, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The scientific objective of this research is to increase the fundamental knowledge base for liquid- phase processing of technologically important oxide materials. The experimental objective is to define conditions and hardware requirements for microgravity flight experiments to test and expand the experimental hypotheses that: 1. Liquid phase transitions can occur in undercooled melts by a diffusionless process. 2. Onset of the liquid phase transition is accompanied by a large change in the temperature dependence of melt viscosity. Experiments on undercooled YAG (Y3A15012)- and rare earth oxide aluminate composition liquids demonstrated a large departure from an Arrhenian temperature dependence of viscosity. Liquid YAG is nearly inviscid at its 2240 K melting point. Glass fibers were pulled from melts undercooled by ca. 600 K indicating that the viscosity is on the order of 100 Pans (1000 Poise) at 1600 K. This value of viscosity is 500 times greater than that obtained by extrapolation of data for temperatures above the melting point of YAG. These results show that the liquids are extremely fragile and that the onset of the highly non-Arrhenian viscosity-temperature relationship occurs at a temperature considerably below the equilibrium melting point of the solid phases. Further results on undercooled alumina-yttria melts containing 23-42 mole % yttrium oxide indicate that a congruent liquid-liquid phase transition occurs in the undercooled liquids. The rates of transition are inconsistent with a diffusion-limited process. This research is directed to investigation of the scientifically interesting phenomena of polyamorphism and fragility in undercooled rare earth oxide aluminum oxide liquids. The results bear on the technologically important problem of producing high value rare earth-based optical materials.

  6. Phase diagrams of orientational transitions in absorbing nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zolot’ko, A. S. Ochkin, V. N.; Smayev, M. P.; Shvetsov, S. A.

    2015-05-15

    A theory of orientational transitions in nematic liquid crystals (NLCs), which employs the expansion of optical torques acting on the NLC director with respect to the rotation angle, has been developed for NLCs with additives of conformationally active compounds under the action of optical and low-frequency electric and magnetic fields. Phase diagrams of NLCs are constructed as a function of the intensity and polarization of the light field, the strength of low-frequency electric field, and a parameter that characterizes the feedback between the rotation of the NLC director and optical torque. Conditions for the occurrence of first- and second-order transitions are determined. The proposed theory agrees with available experimental data.

  7. Probing the Nuclear Liquid-Gas Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochodzalla, Josef

    1996-05-01

    The prospect of creating a state of matter resembling that of the pre-hadronic phase of the early universe or of the core of today's neutron stars is one of the prime motivations to study relativistic heavy ion collisions. Unquestionable, the transition to the quark-gluon plasma represents the most spectacular example of a phase transition in nuclear matter. The complex structure of the hadronic components and the many facets of their interaction, however, offer the opportunity to observe in addition several other, exciting nuclear state transitions. Already two decades ago, the van der Waals behavior of the nucleon - nucleon force inspired the idea of a liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter. Looking for signals of this phase transition the ALADIN collaboration studied the decay of projectile spectators produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Fragment multiplicities and correlations observed in projectile fragmentation at beam energies between 600 and 1000 MeV per nucleon are found to be invariant with respect to a change of the target mass or the beam energy when plotted as a function of the summed charge of complex fragments, Z_bound. The dependence of the fragment multiplicity on the projectile mass follows a linear scaling law. For Au+Au reactions at E/A=600 MeV, the mass and the excitation energy of the decaying pre-fragments were determined from the measured fragment and neutron distributions. A temperature scale was derived from observed yield ratios of He and Li isotopes. The relation between this isotope temperature and the excitation energy of the system exhibits a behavior which is reminiscent of a phase transition. The nuclear vapor regime takes over at an excitation energy of 10 MeV per nucleon, a temperature of 5 MeV and may be characterized by a density of 0.15-0.3 normal nuclear density. In order to explore the influence of an explosive radial flow, we also investigated central Au+Au collisions in the energy range between 50 and 200 MeV per nucleon. The latter experiment aims at a comparison of isotope temperatures and temperatures extracted from excited state populations. Simultaneously, the space-time extend will be explored by two-particle correlations. Supported by the Deutsche Forschunggemeinschaft under Contract No. Po256/2-1.

  8. Indication of liquid-liquid phase transition in CuZr-based melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao; Hu, Lina; Sun, Qijing; Qin, Jingyu; Bian, Xiufang; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2013-10-01

    We study the dynamic behavior of CuZr-based melts well above the liquidus temperature. The results show a discontinuous change in viscosity during cooling, which is attributed to an underlying liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) in these melts. The LLPT is further verified by thermodynamic response in the same temperature region. We find that the LLPT in the Cu46Zr46Al8 melt is reversible above 1350 K upon repeated heating and cooling. Based on the concept of fluid cluster in metallic melts, the reversible LLPT is attributed to the structural transition from the strongly ordered high-density liquids to the weak-local low-density liquids upon cooling.

  9. Bubbles in liquids with phase transition. Part 1. On phase change of a single vapor bubble in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Wolfgang; Duderstadt, Frank; Hantke, Maren; Warnecke, Gerald

    2012-11-01

    In the forthcoming second part of this paper a system of balance laws for a multi-phase mixture with many dispersed bubbles in liquid is derived where phase transition is taken into account. The exchange terms for mass, momentum and energy explicitly depend on evolution laws for total mass, radius and temperature of single bubbles. Therefore in the current paper we consider a single bubble of vapor and inert gas surrounded by the corresponding liquid phase. The creation of bubbles, e.g. by nucleation is not taken into account. We study the behavior of this bubble due to condensation and evaporation at the interface. The aim is to find evolution laws for total mass, radius and temperature of the bubble, which should be as simple as possible but consider all relevant physical effects. Special attention is given to the effects of surface tension and heat production on the bubble dynamics as well as the propagation of acoustic elastic waves by including slight compressibility of the liquid phase. Separately we study the influence of the three phenomena heat conduction, elastic waves and phase transition on the evolution of the bubble. We find ordinary differential equations that describe the bubble dynamics. It turns out that the elastic waves in the liquid are of greatest importance to the dynamics of the bubble radius. The phase transition has a strong influence on the evolution of the temperature, in particular at the interface. Furthermore the phase transition leads to a drastic change of the water content in the bubble. It is shown that a rebounding bubble is only possible, if it contains in addition an inert gas. In Part 2 of the current paper the equations derived are sought in order to close the system of equations for multi-phase mixture balance laws for dispersed bubbles in liquids involving phase change.

  10. Growth Kinetics of Intracellular RNA/Protein Droplets: Signature of a Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Joel; Weber, Stephanie C.; Vaidya, Nilesh; Zhu, Lian; Haataja, Mikko; Brangwynne, Clifford P.

    2015-03-01

    Nonmembrane-bound organelles are functional, dynamic assemblies of RNA and/or protein that can self-assemble and disassemble within the cytoplasm or nucleoplasm. The possibility that underlying intracellular phase transitions may drive and mediate the morphological evolution of some membrane-less organelles has been supported by several recent studies. In this talk, results from a collaborative experimental-theoretical study of the growth and dissolution kinetics of nucleoli and extranucleolar droplets (ENDs) in C. elegans embryos will be presented. We have employed Flory-Huggins solution theory, reaction-diffusion kinetics, and quantitative statistical dynamic scaling analysis to characterize the specific growth mechanisms at work. Our findings indicate that both in vivo and in vitro droplet scaling and growth kinetics are consistent with those resulting from an equilibrium liquid-liquid phase transition mediated by passive nonequilibrium growth mechanisms - simultaneous Brownian coalescence and Ostwald ripening. This supports a view in which cells can employ phase transitions to drive structural organization, while utilizing active processes, such as local transcriptional activity, to fine tune the kinetics of these phase transitions in response to given conditions.

  11. Paraelectric-antiferroelectric phase transition in achiral liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pociecha, Damian; Gorecka, Ewa; Čepič, Mojca; Vaupotič, Nataša; Gomola, Kinga; Mieczkowski, Jozef

    2005-12-01

    Critical freezing of molecular rotation in an achiral smectic phase, which leads to polar ordering through the second order paraelectric-antiferroelectric (Sm-A→Sm-APA) phase transition is studied theoretically and experimentally. Strong softening of the polar mode in the Sm-A phase and highly intensive dielectric mode in the Sm-APA phase are observed due to weak antiferroelectric interactions in the system. In the Sm-APA phase the dielectric response behaves critically upon biasing by a dc electric field. Such a behavior is found general for the antiferroelectric smectic phase with significant quadrupolar interlayer coupling.

  12. Revisiting dynamics near a liquid-liquid phase transition in Si and Ga: The fragile-to-strong transition

    SciTech Connect

    Cajahuaringa, Samuel; Koning, Maurice de Antonelli, Alex

    2013-12-14

    Using molecular dynamics simulations we analyze the dynamics of two atomic liquids that display a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT): Si described by the Stillinger-Weber potential and Ga as modeled by the modified embedded-atom model. In particular, our objective is to investigate the extent to which the presence of a dip in the self-intermediate scattering function is a manifestation of an excess of vibrational states at low frequencies and may be associated with a fragile-to-strong transition (FTST) across the LLPT, as suggested recently. Our results suggest a somewhat different picture. First, in the case of Ga we observe the appearance of an excess of vibrational states at low frequencies, even in the absence of the appearance of a dip in the self-intermediate scattering function across the LLPT. Second, studying the behavior of the shear viscosities traversing the LLPTs we find that both substances are fragile in character above and below their respective LLPT temperatures. Instead of a FTST in an absolute sense these findings are more in line with a view in which the LLPTs are accompanied by a transition from a more fragile to a less fragile liquid. Furthermore, we do not find this transition to correlate with the presence of a dip in the intermediate scattering function.

  13. Dynamical and structural heterogeneities close to liquid-liquid phase transitions: The case of gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Alex; Cajahuaringa, Samuel; de Koning, Maurice

    2013-03-01

    Liquid-liquid phase transitions (LLPT) have been proposed in order to explain the thermodynamic anomalies exhibited by some liquids. Recently, it was found, through molecular dynamics simulations, that liquid elemental gallium, described by a modified embedded-atom model, exhibits a LLPT between a high-density liquid (HDL) and a low-density liquid (LDL), about 60 K below the melting temperature. In this work, we studied the dynamics of supercooled liquid gallium close to the LLPT. Our results show a large increase in the plateau of the self-intermediate scattering function (β-relaxation process) and in the non-Gaussian parameter, indicating a pronounced dynamical heterogeneity upon the onset of the LLPT. The dynamical heterogeneity of the LDL is closely correlated to its structural heterogeneity, since the fast diffusing atoms belong to high-density domains of predominantly 9-fold coordinated atoms, whereas the slow diffusing ones are mostly in low-density domains of 8-fold coordinated atoms. The energetics suggests that the reason for the sluggish dynamics of LDL is due to its larger cohesive energy as compared to that of the HDL. Work supported by FAPESP, CNPq, CAPES, and FAEPEX/UNICAMP

  14. Confinement effects on the liquid-liquid phase transition and anomalous properties of a monatomic water-like liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gang; Giovambattista, Nicolas; Xu, Limei

    2015-12-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the effects of confinement on the phase behavior of a water-like monatomic liquid that exhibits a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) and a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP). The liquid is confined between parallel walls and we focus on the effects of wall separation and surface chemistry (solvophobicity/solvophilicity) on the location of the LLCP, temperature of maximum density (TMD) line, and loci of compressibility maxima (CM). It is found that, independently of the surface solvophobicity/solvophilicity, the LLCP, TMD, and CM lines shift rapidly towards higher pressures and lower temperatures as the wall separation is reduced. It follows that the effects of confinement on the TMD and CM lines are indicative of the confinement effects on the LLCP/LLPT. Confinement effects are observable already when the liquid particles form ≈15 layers between the walls. For the case of water, this corresponds to a separation of ≈4-5 nm between the surfaces, larger than the confining dimension of the nanopores commonly used to study the hypothesized LLPT in confined water. Hence, our results suggest that such experiments should not be interpreted in terms of the phase diagrams proposed for bulk water.

  15. Modified phase-field-crystal model for solid-liquid phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Can; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Guo, Yaolin; Tang, Sai

    2015-07-01

    A modified phase-field-crystal (PFC) model is proposed to describe solid-liquid phase transitions by reconstructing the correlation function. The effects of fitting parameters of our modified PFC model on the bcc-liquid phase diagram, numerical stability, and solid-liquid interface properties during planar interface growth are examined carefully. The results indicate that the increase of the correlation function peak width at k =km will enhance the stability of the ordered phase, while the increase of peak height at k =0 will narrow the two-phase coexistence region. The third-order term in the free-energy function and the short wave-length of the correlation function have significant influences on the numerical stability of the PFC model. During planar interface growth, the increase of peak width at k =km will decrease the interface width and the velocity coefficient C , but increase the anisotropy of C and the interface free energy. Finally, the feasibility of the modified phase-field-crystal model is demonstrated with a numerical example of three-dimensional dendritic growth of a body-centered-cubic structure.

  16. Modified phase-field-crystal model for solid-liquid phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Can; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Guo, Yaolin; Tang, Sai

    2015-07-01

    A modified phase-field-crystal (PFC) model is proposed to describe solid-liquid phase transitions by reconstructing the correlation function. The effects of fitting parameters of our modified PFC model on the bcc-liquid phase diagram, numerical stability, and solid-liquid interface properties during planar interface growth are examined carefully. The results indicate that the increase of the correlation function peak width at k=k(m) will enhance the stability of the ordered phase, while the increase of peak height at k=0 will narrow the two-phase coexistence region. The third-order term in the free-energy function and the short wave-length of the correlation function have significant influences on the numerical stability of the PFC model. During planar interface growth, the increase of peak width at k=k(m) will decrease the interface width and the velocity coefficient C, but increase the anisotropy of C and the interface free energy. Finally, the feasibility of the modified phase-field-crystal model is demonstrated with a numerical example of three-dimensional dendritic growth of a body-centered-cubic structure. PMID:26274309

  17. Unusual liquid-liquid phase transition in aqueous mixtures of a well-known dendrimer.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Viviana C P; Annunziata, Onofrio

    2015-11-21

    Liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) has been extensively investigated for polymer and protein solutions due to its importance in mixture thermodynamics, separation science and self-assembly processes. However, to date, no experimental studies have been reported on LLPS of dendrimer solutions. Here, it is shown that LLPS of aqueous solutions containing a hydroxyl-functionalized poly(amido amine) dendrimer of fourth generation is induced in the presence of sodium sulfate. Both the LLPS temperature and salt-dendrimer partitioning between the two coexisting phases at constant temperature were measured. Interestingly, our experiments show that LLPS switches from being induced by cooling to being induced by heating as the salt concentration increases. The two coexisting phases also show opposite temperature response. Thus, this phase transition exhibits a simultaneous lower and upper critical solution temperature-type behavior. Dynamic light-scattering and dye-binding experiments indicate that no appreciable conformational change occurs as the salt concentration increases. To explain the observed phase behavior, a thermodynamic model based on two parameters was developed. The first parameter, which describes dendrimer-dendrimer interaction energy, was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. The second parameter describes the salt salting-out strength. By varying the salting-out parameter, it is shown that the model achieves agreement not only with the location of the experimental binodal at 25 °C but also with the slope of this curve around the critical point. The proposed model also predicts that the unusual temperature behavior of this phase transition can be described as the net result of two thermodynamic factors with opposite temperature responses: salt thermodynamic non-ideality and salting-out strength. PMID:26451401

  18. Liquid to vapor phase transition in excited nuclei.

    PubMed

    Elliott, J B; Moretto, L G; Phair, L; Wozniak, G J; Beaulieu, L; Breuer, H; Korteling, R G; Kwiatkowski, K; Lefort, T; Pienkowski, L; Ruangma, A; Viola, V E; Yennello, S J

    2002-01-28

    The thermal component of the 8 GeV/c pi+ Au data of the ISiS Collaboration is shown to follow the scaling predicted by Fisher's model when Coulomb energy is taken into account. Critical exponents tau and sigma, the critical point (p(c),rho(c),T(c)), surface energy coefficient c(0), enthalpy of evaporation DeltaH, and critical compressibility factor C(F)(c) are determined. For the first time, the experimental phase diagrams, (p,T) and (T,rho), describing the liquid vapor coexistence of finite neutral nuclear matter have been constructed. PMID:11801117

  19. Effect of carbon nanotube on phase transitions of nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran, Hatice; Gazdecki, Bruce; Dai, Liming; Kyu, Thein

    2004-03-01

    Phase diagrams of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT)/nematic liquid crystal (E7) and bucky ball (C60)/nematic liquid crystal binary systems were investigated by means of optical microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It was found that the isotropic-nematic phase transition temperature of liquid crystal component is enhanced by MWNT. A chimney type phase diagram occur over a narrow range of 0.1-0.2ball/E7 system did not showed any changes of TNI in the same concentration range. This behavior has been attributed to anisotropic alignment of carbon nanotubes and liquid crystal molecules, which is entropic in origin.

  20. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition and Its Phase Diagram in Deeply-Cooled Heavy Water Confined in a Nanoporous Silica Matrix.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Ito, Kanae; Leão, Juscelino B; Harriger, Leland; Liu, Yun; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-06-01

    Using neutron diffraction technique, we measure the average density of the heavy water confined in a nanoporous silica matrix, MCM-41, over the pressure-temperature plane. The result suggests the existence of a line of liquid-liquid phase transition with its end point at 1.29 ± 0.34 kbar and 213 ± 3 K in a fully hydrated sample. This point would be the liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) according to the "liquid-liquid critical point" scenario. The phase diagram of the deeply cooled confined heavy water is then discussed. Moreover, in a partially hydrated sample, the phase transition completely disappears. This result shows that it is the free water part, rather than the bound water part, of the confined water that undergoes a liquid-liquid transition. PMID:26266493

  1. Topology-driven quantum phase transitions in time-reversal-invariant anyonic quantum liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gils, Charlotte; Trebst, Simon; Kitaev, Alexei; Ludwig, Andreas W. W.; Troyer, Matthias; Wang, Zhenghan

    2009-11-01

    Indistinguishable particles in two dimensions can be characterized by anyonic quantum statistics, which is more general than that of bosons or fermions. Anyons emerge as quasiparticles in fractional quantum Hall states and in certain frustrated quantum magnets. Quantum liquids of anyons show degenerate ground states, where the degeneracy depends on the topology of the underlying surface. Here, we present a new type of continuous quantum phase transition in such anyonic quantum liquids, which is driven by quantum fluctuations of the topology. The critical state connecting two anyonic liquids on surfaces with different topologies is reminiscent of the notion of a `quantum foam' with fluctuations on all length scales. This exotic quantum phase transition arises in a microscopic model of interacting anyons for which we present an exact solution in a linear geometry. We introduce an intuitive physical picture of this model that unifies string nets and loop gases, and provide a simple description of topological quantum phases and their phase transitions.

  2. On the existence of vapor-liquid phase transition in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, M.; Sen, A.; Ganesh, R.; Avinash, K.

    2014-10-15

    The phenomenon of phase transition in a dusty-plasma system (DPS) has attracted some attention in the past. Earlier Farouki and Hamaguchi [J. Chem. Phys. 101, 9876 (1994)] have demonstrated the existence of a liquid to solid transition in DPS where the dust particles interact through a Yukawa potential. However, the question of the existence of a vapor-liquid (VL) transition in such a system remains unanswered and relatively unexplored so far. We have investigated this problem by performing extensive molecular dynamics simulations which show that the VL transition does not have a critical curve in the pressure versus volume diagram for a large range of the Yukawa screening parameter κ and the Coulomb coupling parameter Γ. Thus, the VL phase transition is found to be super-critical, meaning that this transition is continuous in the dusty plasma model given by Farouki and Hamaguchi. We provide an approximate analytic explanation of this finding by means of a simple model calculation.

  3. Liquid-liquid phase transition in hydrogen by coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Pierleoni, Carlo; Morales, Miguel A; Rillo, Giovanni; Holzmann, Markus; Ceperley, David M

    2016-05-01

    The phase diagram of high-pressure hydrogen is of great interest for fundamental research, planetary physics, and energy applications. A first-order phase transition in the fluid phase between a molecular insulating fluid and a monoatomic metallic fluid has been predicted. The existence and precise location of the transition line is relevant for planetary models. Recent experiments reported contrasting results about the location of the transition. Theoretical results based on density functional theory are also very scattered. We report highly accurate coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo calculations of this transition, finding results that lie between the two experimental predictions, close to that measured in diamond anvil cell experiments but at 25-30 GPa higher pressure. The transition along an isotherm is signaled by a discontinuity in the specific volume, a sudden dissociation of the molecules, a jump in electrical conductivity, and loss of electron localization. PMID:27099295

  4. Influence of solid-state characteristics on critical parameters of vapor-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomkin, A. L.; Shumikhin, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    New method for calculation of critical point parameters and binodal of vapor-liquid (dielectric-metal) phase transition is suggested. Method is based on the hypothesis that cohesion, which determines the main properties of solid state, determines also the properties in vicinity of critical point. Comparison with known experimental data for rare gases and mercury shows satisfactory agreement with our calculations.

  5. The Boson peak in confined water: An experimental investigation of the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-10-01

    The Boson peak (BP) of deeply cooled confined water is studied by using inelastic neutron scattering (INS) in a large interval of the ( P, T) phase plane. By taking into account the different behavior of such a collective vibrational mode in both strong and fragile glasses as well as in glass-forming materials, we were able to determine the Widom line that characterizes supercooled bulk water within the frame of the liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) hypothesis. The peak frequency and width of the BP correlated with the water polymorphism of the LLPT scenario, allowing us to distinguish the "low-density liquid" (LDL) and "high-density liquid" (HDL) phases in deeply cooled bulk water.Moreover, the BP properties afford a further confirmation of theWidom line temperature T W as the ( P, T) locus in which the local structure of water transforms from a predominately LDL form to a predominately HDL form.

  6. Thermodynamic properties and phase transitions of α, γ and liquid uranium: QMD and classical MD modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanilkin, Alexey; Migdal, Kirill; Pokatashkin, Pavel; Sergeev, Oleg

    2015-06-01

    The application of molecular dynamics allows us to take into account the influence of thermal properties on thermodynamic properties and phase transitions. In this work different uranium phases are investigated at finite temperatures by means quantum and classical molecular dynamics. In order to verify simulations the lattice constants, elastic modulus, isotherms, Gruniesen coefficient and heat expansion are calculated for α, γ and liquid phases. The results are in good agreement with experimental data. The stability of high temperature γ phase is discussed. The diffusion coefficient is calculated for liquid phase at different densities and pressure. The boundaries of phase stability are estimated based on QMD results. Furthermore hugoniot calculated is in a good agreement with other calculations and experimental data up to 2TPa. In order to investigate phase transitions EAM interatomic potentials are derived by force-matching method. Different parameterizations are used for different part of phase diagram to improve the reproduction of QMD data. The coexistence and transition rates of two phases are investigated based on Z- and two phase methods.

  7. Phase transition and conductive acceleration of phosphonium-cation-based room-temperature ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Seki, Shiro; Umebayashi, Yasuhiro; Tsuzuki, Seiji; Hayamizu, Kikuko; Kobayashi, Yo; Ohno, Yasutaka; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Mita, Yuichi; Miyashiro, Hajime; Terada, Nobuyuki; Ishiguro, Shin-ichi

    2008-11-21

    An unusual ionic conduction phenomenon related to the phase transition of a novel phosphonium-cation-based room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) is reported; we found that in the phase change upon cooling, a clear increase in ionic conductivity was seen as the temperature was lowered, which differs from widely known conventional RTILs; clearly, our finding of abnormality of the correlation between temperature change and ionic conduction is the first observation in the electrolyte field. PMID:18997945

  8. Phases and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitterman, Moshe

    2014-09-01

    In discussing phase transitions, the first thing that we have to do is to define a phase. This is a concept from thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, where a phase is defined as a homogeneous system. As a simple example, let us consider instant coffee. This consists of coffee powder dissolved in water, and after stirring it we have a homogeneous mixture, i.e., a single phase. If we add to a cup of coffee a spoonful of sugar and stir it well, we still have a single phase -- sweet coffee. However, if we add ten spoonfuls of sugar, then the contents of the cup will no longer be homogeneous, but rather a mixture of two homogeneous systems or phases, sweet liquid coffee on top and coffee-flavored wet sugar at the bottom...

  9. Kerr-AdS analogue of triple point and solid/liquid/gas phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altamirano, Natacha; Kubizňák, David; Mann, Robert B.; Sherkatghanad, Zeinab

    2014-02-01

    We study the thermodynamic behavior of multi-spinning d = 6 Kerr-anti de Sitter black holes in the canonical ensemble of fixed angular momenta J1 and J2. We find, dependent on the ratio q = J2/J1, qualitatively different interesting phenomena known from the ‘every day thermodynamics’ of simple substances. For q = 0 the system exhibits recently observed reentrant large/small/large black hole phase transitions, but for 0 < q ≪ 1 we find an analogue of a ‘solid/liquid’ phase transition. Furthermore, for q ∈ (0.00905, 0.0985) the system displays the presence of a large/intermediate/small black hole phase transition with two critical and one triple (or tricritical) points. This behavior is reminiscent of the solid/liquid/gas phase transition except that the coexistence line of small and intermediate black holes does not continue for an arbitrary value of pressure (similar to the solid/liquid coexistence line) but rather terminates at one of the critical points. Finally, for q > 0.0985 we observe the ‘standard liquid/gas behavior’ of the Van der Waals fluid.

  10. Liquid-gas phase transition in strange hadronic matter with relativistic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, James R.; Gulminelli, F.; Menezes, Débora P.

    2016-02-01

    Background: The advent of new dedicated experimental programs on hyperon physics is rapidly boosting the field, and the possibility of synthesizing multiple strange hypernuclei requires the addition of the strangeness degree of freedom to the models dedicated to nuclear structure and nuclear matter studies at low energy. Purpose: We want to settle the influence of strangeness on the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition. Because of the large uncertainties concerning the hyperon sector, we do not aim at a quantitative estimation of the phase diagram but rather at a qualitative description of the phenomenology, as model independent as possible. Method: We analyze the phase diagram of low-density matter composed of neutrons, protons, and Λ hyperons using a relativistic mean field (RMF) model. We largely explore the parameter space to pin down generic features of the phase transition, and compare the results to ab initio quantum Monte Carlo calculations. Results: We show that the liquid-gas phase transition is only slightly quenched by the addition of hyperons. Strangeness is seen to be an order parameter of the phase transition, meaning that dilute strange matter is expected to be unstable with respect to the formation of hyperclusters. Conclusions: More quantitative results within the RMF model need improved functionals at low density, possibly fitted to ab initio calculations of nuclear and Λ matter.

  11. Liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter from realistic many-body approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, A.; Polls, A.; Ramos, A.; Muether, H.

    2008-10-15

    The existence of a liquid-gas phase transition for hot nuclear systems at subsaturation densities is a well-established prediction of finite-temperature nuclear many-body theory. In this paper, we discuss for the first time the properties of such a phase transition for homogeneous nuclear matter within the self-consistent Green's function approach. We find a substantial decrease of the critical temperature with respect to the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approximation. Even within the same approximation, the use of two different realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions gives rise to large differences in the properties of the critical point.

  12. Investigating the solid-liquid phase transition of water nanofilms using the generalized replica exchange method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qing; Kim, Jaegil; Farrell, James D.; Wales, David J.; Straub, John E.

    2014-11-01

    The generalized Replica Exchange Method (gREM) was applied to study a solid-liquid phase transition in a nanoconfined bilayer water system using the monatomic water (mW) model. Exploiting optimally designed non-Boltzmann sampling weights with replica exchanges, gREM enables an effective sampling of configurations that are metastable or unstable in the canonical ensemble via successive unimodal energy distributions across phase transition regions, often characterized by S-loop or backbending in the statistical temperature. Extensive gREM simulations combined with Statistical Temperature Weighted Histogram Analysis Method (ST-WHAM) for nanoconfined mW water at various densities provide a comprehensive characterization of diverse thermodynamic and structural properties intrinsic to phase transitions. Graph representation of minimized structures of bilayer water systems determined by the basin-hopping global optimization revealed heterogeneous ice structures composed of pentagons, hexagons, and heptagons, consistent with an increasingly ordered solid phase with decreasing density. Apparent crossover from a first-order solid-liquid transition to a continuous one in nanoconfined mW water with increasing density of the system was observed in terms of a diminishing S-loop in the statistical temperature, smooth variation of internal energies and heat capacities, and a characteristic variation of lateral radial distribution functions, and transverse density profiles across transition regions.

  13. Investigating the solid-liquid phase transition of water nanofilms using the generalized replica exchange method

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Qing; Kim, Jaegil; Straub, John E.; Farrell, James D.; Wales, David J.

    2014-11-14

    The generalized Replica Exchange Method (gREM) was applied to study a solid-liquid phase transition in a nanoconfined bilayer water system using the monatomic water (mW) model. Exploiting optimally designed non-Boltzmann sampling weights with replica exchanges, gREM enables an effective sampling of configurations that are metastable or unstable in the canonical ensemble via successive unimodal energy distributions across phase transition regions, often characterized by S-loop or backbending in the statistical temperature. Extensive gREM simulations combined with Statistical Temperature Weighted Histogram Analysis Method (ST-WHAM) for nanoconfined mW water at various densities provide a comprehensive characterization of diverse thermodynamic and structural properties intrinsic to phase transitions. Graph representation of minimized structures of bilayer water systems determined by the basin-hopping global optimization revealed heterogeneous ice structures composed of pentagons, hexagons, and heptagons, consistent with an increasingly ordered solid phase with decreasing density. Apparent crossover from a first-order solid-liquid transition to a continuous one in nanoconfined mW water with increasing density of the system was observed in terms of a diminishing S-loop in the statistical temperature, smooth variation of internal energies and heat capacities, and a characteristic variation of lateral radial distribution functions, and transverse density profiles across transition regions.

  14. Successive disorder to disorder phase transitions in ionic liquid [HMIM][BF4] under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiang; Yuan, Chaosheng; Li, Haining; Zhu, Pinwen; Su, Lei; Yang, Kun; Wu, Jie; Yang, Guoqiang; Liu, Jing

    2016-02-01

    In situ high-pressure Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron X-ray diffraction have been employed to investigate the phase behavior of ionic liquid, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([HMIM][BF4]) under high pressure up to 20 GPa at room temperature. With increasing pressure, some characteristic bands of [HMIM][BF4] disappear, and some characteristic bands of [HMIM][BF4] display non-monotonic pressure-induced frequency shift and non-monotonic variation of full width at half-maximum. Two successive phase transitions at ∼1.7 GPa and 7.3 GPa have been corroborated by the results above. The glass transition pressure (Pg) of [HMIM][BF4] at ∼7.3 GPa has been obtained by ruby R1 line broadening measurements and analysis of synchrotron X-ray diffraction patterns, and its glass transition mechanism is also analyzed in detail. These facts are suggestive of two successive disorder to disorder phase transitions induced by compression, that is, [HMIM][BF4] serves as a superpressurized glass under the pressure above 7.3 GPa, which is similar to the glassy state at low temperature, and a compression-induced liquid to liquid phase transition in [HMIM][BF4] occurs at ∼1.7 GPa. Besides, the conformational equilibrium of the GAAA conformer and AAAA conformer was converted easily in liquid [HMIM][BF4], while it was difficult to be influenced in glassy state.

  15. DYNAMIC MODELING STRATEGY FOR FLOW REGIME TRANSITION IN GAS-LIQUID TWO-PHASE FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    X. Wang; X. Sun; H. Zhao

    2011-09-01

    In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regime has been used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are often flow regime dependent. Currently, the determination of the flow regimes is primarily based on flow regime maps or transition criteria, which are developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows and widely applied in nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5. As two-phase flows are observed to be dynamic in nature (fully-developed two-phase flows generally do not exist in real applications), it is of importance to model the flow regime transition dynamically for more accurate predictions of two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy for determining flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through the introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation and destruction of the interfacial area, such as the fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation; and fluid particle coalescence and condensation, respectively. For the flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shape (which are correlated), namely small bubbles and large bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identifying the flow regimes is provided, in which discriminators are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration of small bubble and large bubble groups. This method is expected to be applied to computer codes to improve their predictive capabilities of gas-liquid two-phase flows, in particular for the applications in which flow regime transition occurs.

  16. Orientations and phase transitions in uncrosslinked and crosslinked polymer liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brostow, Witold; Hibner, Kazimierz; Walasek, Janusz

    1998-04-01

    A system of linear polymer liquid crystal (PLC) macromolecules is considered. Each macromolecule constitutes an alternating copolymer of flexible and LC sequences. The macromolecules can be either unconnected or else connected into a PLC network. The system is characterized with respect to local orientation. Competition between energetic effects of anisotropic orienting interactions between LC sequences and entropic effects determined mainly by flexible parts is considered. The Maier and Saupe mean-field approach is assumed for the representation of LC interactions. Types and orders of phase transitions that the system can undergo with respect to local order are discussed in terms of the Landau classification. All transitions are found to be of the first order. Thermodynamical and structural parameters of the system at phase transition points are represented by phase diagrams.

  17. Disappearance of Widom Line for Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition with Horizontal Coexistence Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jiayuan; Xu, Limei; Buldyrev, Sergey; Angell, Austen; Stanley, Gene

    2012-02-01

    The study of spherically symmetric two-scale Jagla model with both repulsive and attractive ramps has been very successful in demonstrating the anomalous behavior of liquids (especially water) and its relation with respect to the existence of a liquid-liquid (LL) critical point. However, the co-existence line of Jagla model shows a positive slope, which is opposite to what has been found in the simulations of water. To more convincingly link the result of the study on Jagla model with that of water, we applied discrete molecular dynamics to Gibson and Wilding's modified Jagla model and found that by shrinking both the attractive and repulsive ramps, the slope of the coexistence line can be reduced to zero. However, at these values of the parameters, the LL critical point becomes completely unstable with respect to crystal and glass. We further studied the Widom line, defined as extreme of response functions and also continuation of the coexistence line into one phase region, and found Widom line disappeared in the case of zero slope of the coexistence line, due to the equal enthalpy of low-density liquid (LDL) and high-density liquid (HDL).

  18. Acoustic waves in bubbly liquids for two kinds of gas bubbles with phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubaidullin, D. A.; Gafiyatov, R. N.

    2014-11-01

    The propagation of acoustic waves in a mixture of liquid with vapor-gas bubbles is studied. The dispersed phase consists of two fractions of the bubbles differing on gas structure and radii (a two-fractional mixture). The phase transitions take place at each of the fractions. The volume content of the bubbles is the low (about 1%). The dispersion relation, unified for plane, cylindrical and spherical waves is obtained. It is shown that a presence of the second fraction in the structure of a disperse phase of the bubbles changes significantly a dispersion and a dissipation of acoustic waves.

  19. Description of liquid-gas phase transition in the frame of continuum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilchevskaya, Elena N.; Ivanova, Elena A.; Altenbach, Holm

    2014-03-01

    A new method of describing the liquid-gas phase transition is presented. It is assumed that the phase transition is characterized by a significant change of the particle density distribution as a result of energy supply at the boiling point that leads to structural changes but not to heating. Structural changes are described by an additional state characteristics of the system—the distribution density of the particles which is presented by an independent balance equation. The mathematical treatment is based on a special form of the internal energy and a source term in the particle balance equation. The presented method allows to model continua which have different specific heat capacities in liquid and in gas state.

  20. Critical behavior at the isotropic to nematic phase transition in a bent-core liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiant, David; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Neupane, Krishna; Sharma, Sunil; Fodor-Csorba, Katalin; Jakli, Antal; Gleeson, James; Sprunt, Samuel

    2006-03-01

    Magnetic birefringence and dynamic light scattering measurements of orientational order parameter fluctuations at the isotropic- nematic phase transition of a bent-core liquid crystal reveal a pretransitional temperature dependence consistent with the standard Landau-deGennes mean field theory. However, the transition in the bent-core compound is more weakly first-order (TNI-T^* 0.4^oC), the leading Landau coefficient is ˜10 times lower, and the viscosity associated with nematic order fluctuations is ˜50 times higher, than typically observed in calamitic (rod- shaped) liquid crystals. These anomalies can be explained by an unconventional optically isotropic phase composed of complexes of bent-core molecules. Also, we will present preliminary magnetic birefringence and density measurements at temperatures above the nematic-isotropic transistion which support the existence of an optically isotropic state.

  1. Thermally enhanced optical nonlinearity in nematic liquid crystal close to phase transition temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chia-Chi; Chen, Yu-Jen; Hung, Wen-Chi; Jiang, I.-Min; Tsai, Ming-Shan

    2010-09-01

    This study investigates the beam profile and the liquid crystal (LC) arrangement affected by an optical field on LC thin films at a temperature close to nematic-isotropic phase transition temperature ( TNI). A combined microscopic and conoscopic technique was used in experiments as a convenient way to analyze the optical nonlinearity that is associated with the molecular configuration of nematic liquid crystal (NLC). An optical field combined with thermal enhancement enhances molecular reorientation and causes additional molecular excitation along the axis of propagation of the beam. The reorientational nonlinearity yields an undulating structure with multi-foci; the length between each pair of foci increases with time, as described.

  2. Binary phase diagrams of liquid crystal/polymer systems exhibiting crystal, smectic, and nematic transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayal, P.; Matkar, R.; Ginzburg, V.; Kyu, T.

    2006-03-01

    Current theories describing the phase diagrams of nematic-nematic mixtures and polymer-nematic liquid crystal mixtures are based on the combination of classical Flory-Huggins (FH) theory of isotropic mixing and the Maier-Saupe (MS) free energy of nematic ordering. This combined FH-MS theory was extended by Kyu and Chiu to polymer-smectic-A systems by incorporating McMillan free energy of the nematic-smectic-A transition. We have developed a generalized model for an LC system undergoing crystallization, extending the Maier-Saupe-McMillan theory in conjunction with the Landau-Brazowiskii model of weak first order phase transition such as solidification. The generalized FH-extended MSM free energy is then minimized with respect to all order parameters and the phase diagram is constructed by balancing the chemical potentials of corresponding phases. This form of the free energy could be valuable in the time evolution studies of phase transitions in polymer/liquid crystal mixtures.

  3. Method for liquid analysis by means of recording the dynamics of phase transitions during drop drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakhno, Tatiana A.; Yakhno, Vladimir G.; Sanin, Anatoly G.; Sanina, Olga A.; Pelyushenko, Artem S.

    2003-04-01

    We propose a method for studying multi-component liquids based on recording of the dynamics of the acoustic-mechanical impedance (AMI) of a drop that dries up on the surface of a quartz resonator oscillating with ultrasound frequency. The magnitude of the AMI is an integral characteristic of the physical properties of the drop including its viscosity, composition, surface tension, moistening, and inner structure. Using liquids of different types as the example, it is shown that each liquid possesses its individual 'portrait', determined by the character of the phase transitions. In the authers" opinion, this method can be used for the screening identification of liquids (determining the degree of consistency with the standards) in solving a number of scientific and practical problems, as well as in biology, chemistry, food and drug examination and medicine. Unique scopes of this method in medical diagnostics, vine, food and drug identification and determination of inner structure of solutions are demonstrated.

  4. An unusual phase transition to a second liquid vortex phase in the superconductor YBa2Cu3O7.

    PubMed

    Bouquet, F; Marcenat, C; Steep, E; Calemczuk, R; Kwok, W K; Welp, U; Crabtree, G W; Fisher, R A; Phillips, N E; Schilling, A

    2001-05-24

    A magnetic field penetrates a superconductor through an array of 'vortices', each of which carries one quantum of flux that is surrounded by a circulating supercurrent. In this vortex state, the resistivity is determined by the dynamical properties of the vortex 'matter'. For the high-temperature copper oxide superconductors (see ref.1 for a theoretical review), the vortex phase can be a 'solid', in which the vortices are pinned, but the solid can 'melt' into a 'liquid' phase, in which their mobility gives rise to a finite resistance. (This melting phenomenon is also believed to occur in conventional superconductors, but in an experimentally inaccessible part of the phase diagram.) For the case of YBa2Cu3O7, there are indications of the existence of a critical point, at which the character of the melting changes. But neither the thermodynamic nature of the melting, nor the phase diagram in the vicinity of the critical point, has been well established. Here we report measurements of specific heat and magnetization that determine the phase diagram in this material to 26 T, well above the critical point. Our results reveal the presence of a reversible second-order transition above the critical point. An unusual feature of this transition-namely, that the high-temperature phase is the less symmetric in the sense of the Landau theory-is in accord with theoretical predictions of a transition to a second vortex-liquid phase. PMID:11373670

  5. Tactoids and Defects in Nematic-Isotropic Phase Transition in Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Ki; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2013-03-01

    We explore the structure of nuclei (tactoids) and topological defects (disclinations) in the first-order nematic-isotropic phase transition in self-assembled lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals. The shape of tactoids is determined by orientational elasticity of the liquid crystal, surface tension, and surface anchoring of the director. The positive tactoids (nuclei of the nematic phase) show two pointed ends (cusps). The negative tactoids (nuclei of the isotropic phase) show a variety of shapes, with one, two, or three cusps, depending on whether they nucleate at the core of disclinations of strength 1/2, in a homogeneous nematic, or at the core of a (-1/2) disclination, respectively. Zero-cusp and four-cusp formations are also possible at the core of stabilized disclinations of strength 1 and -1, respectively. The results demonstrate a profound role of surface tension and its anisotropy in the morphological dynamics of phase transitions in liquid crystals. The work was supported by NSF DMR 1104850 and 11212878.

  6. Diagnosis of phase transitions in disordered fractional quantum Hall liquids using quantum entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhao; Bhatt, R. N.

    The conventional method to study phase transitions from fractional quantum Hall (FQH) liquids to a localized phase induced by disorder has relied on the collapse of the mobility gap and Hall conductance. Here, we scrutinize this issue from the perspective of quantum entanglement. We consider electrons in the disordered lowest Landau level at Laughlin filling fractions ν = 1 / m with either Haldane's pseudopotentials or Coulomb interaction. We find that the derivative of the orbital-cut von-Neumann entropy with respect to the disorder strength has a sharp peak, which diverges with system size, providing a clear fingerprint of the transition from FQH liquids to a localized phase. Further, the fluctuation of the entropy with different cut boundaries is utilized to examine whether the ground states are localized in some region. We also investigate the level statistics of the entanglement spectrum, as well as the low-lying spectrum of the Hamiltonian to extract more information about the phase transition. Our method can be applied to study many-body localization in other topological systems. This work was supported by US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, through Grant No. DE-SC0002140.

  7. Surface Specularity as an Indicator of Shock-induced Solid-liquid Phase Transitions in Tin

    SciTech Connect

    G. D. Stevens, S. S. Lutz, B. R. Marshall, W.D. Turley, et al.

    2007-12-01

    When highly polished metal surfaces melt upon release after shock loading, they exhibit features that suggest significant surface changes accompany the phase transition. The reflection of light from such surfaces changes from specular (pre-shock) to diffuse upon melting. Typical of this phenomenon is the loss of signal light in velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) measurements, which usually occurs at pressures high enough to melt the free surface. Unlike many other potential material phase-sensitive diagnostics (e.g., reflectometry, conductivity), that show relatively small (1%-10%) changes, the specularity of reflection provides a more sensitive and definitive (>10x) indication of the solid-liquid phase transition. Data will be presented that support the hypothesis that specularity changes indicate melt in a way that can be measured easily and unambiguously.

  8. [Phase transitions of surface-stabilized liquid crystal studied by temperature-dependent FTIR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Chuan; Sun, Li; Zhao, Chun; Wang, Xu; Xu, Wei-Qing; Zhao, Bing

    2007-06-01

    The FTIR spectra were measured for liquid crystal molecules in CaF2 cell over a temperature range of 40-150 degrees C. The alkyl chain transformed from ordered zigzag-dominated conformation to disordered gaucheness-dominated conformation with increasing temperature. Meanwhile, the degree of freedom of the rotation of the carbonyl group increased, the co-plane interaction between the carbonyl group and the phenyl ring broke, and the conjugation between the C=O bond and the phenyl ring was reduced at the S(CA)* --> S(A) phase transition point, followed by the increase of the plane angle between the two phenyl rings. Due to the surface stability effect of the LC cell, there existed on the cell surface a layer whose structure was independent of the temperature and LC phase. Therefore, the molecules still retained its originally phase property even at temperatures near and above the transition point. PMID:17763759

  9. The accuracy of liquid-liquid phase transition temperatures determined from semiautomated light scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Kevin M.; Babayco, Christopher B.; Sluss, Daniel R. B.; Williamson, J. Charles

    2010-08-01

    The synthetic-method determination of liquid-liquid coexistence curves using semiautomated light scattering instrumentation and stirred samples is based on identifying the coexistence curve transition temperatures (Tcx) from sudden changes in turbidity associated with droplet formation. Here we use a thorough set of such measurements to evaluate the accuracy of several different analysis methods reported in the literature for assigning Tcx. More than 20 samples each of weakly opalescent isobutyric acid+water and strongly opalescent aniline+hexane were tested with our instrumentation. Transmitted light and scattering intensities at 2°, 24°, and 90° were collected simultaneously as a function of temperature for each stirred sample, and the data were compared with visual observations and light scattering theory. We find that assigning Tcx to the onset of decreased transmitted light or increased 2° scattering has a potential accuracy of 0.01 K or better for many samples. However, the turbidity due to critical opalescence obscures the identification of Tcx from the light scattering data of near-critical stirred samples, and no simple rule of interpretation can be applied regardless of collection geometry. At best, when 90° scattering is collected along with transmitted or 2° data, the accuracy of Tcx is limited to 0.05 K for near-critical samples. Visual determination of Tcx remains the more accurate approach in this case.

  10. Ferroelectric-chiral-antiferroelectric-racemic liquid crystal phase transition of bent-shape molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, S.; Bault, P.; Sawade, H.; Heppke, G.; Nair, G. G.; Jákli, A.

    2002-08-01

    Detailed dielectric, polarization current, electro-optical, and textural observations are reported on an asymmetric banana-shaped compound 1,3-biphenylene-bis[4-(3-fluoro-4-octyloxyphenyliminomethyl)benzoate]. The material possesses a chiral-ferroelectric-racemic-antiferroelectric phase transition. Our studies reveal that the higher temperature ferroelectric phase has a polar double-tilted smectic structure, where both the molecular plane and the long axis are tilted with respect to the layer normal. Accordingly, it has a chiral triclinic structure with an out-of-plane polarization component. The lower temperature phase has a monoclinic symmetry, which is higher than that of the higher temperature phase. To our knowledge, among liquid crystals such situations were previously observed only in reentrant phases.

  11. Liquid-solid phase transition of hydrogen and deuterium in silica aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cleve, E.; Worsley, M. A.; Kucheyev, S. O.

    2014-10-01

    Behavior of hydrogen isotopes confined in disordered low-density nanoporous solids remains essentially unknown. Here, we use relaxation calorimetry to study freezing and melting of H2 and D2 in an ˜85%-porous base-catalyzed silica aerogel. We find that liquid-solid transition temperatures of both isotopes inside the aerogel are depressed. The phase transition takes place over a wide temperature range of ˜4 K and non-trivially depends on the liquid filling fraction, reflecting the broad pore size distribution in the aerogel. Undercooling is observed for both H2 and D2 confined inside the aerogel monolith. Results for H2 and D2 are extrapolated to tritium-containing hydrogens with the quantum law of corresponding states.

  12. Study of near-critical states of liquid-vapor phase transition of magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelyanov, A. N.; Shakhray, D. V.; Golyshev, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    Study of thermodynamic parameters of magnesium in the near-critical point region of the liquid-vapor phase transition and in the region of metal-nonmetal transition was carried out. Measurements of the electrical resistance of magnesium after shock compression and expansion into gas (helium) environment in the process of isobaric heating was carried out. Heating of the magnesium surface by heat transfer with hot helium was performed. The registered electrical resistance of expanded magnesium was about 104-105 times lower than the electrical resistance of the magnesium under normal condition at the density less than the density of the critical point. Thus, metal-nonmetal transition was found in magnesium.

  13. Near infrared light-driven liquid crystal phase transition enabled by hydrophobic mesogen grafted plasmonic gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Cuevas, Karla G; Wang, Ling; Xue, Chenming; Singh, Gautam; Kumar, Satyendra; Urbas, Augustine; Li, Quan

    2015-06-18

    Light-driven phase transition in liquid crystals is a fascinating endeavour from both scientific and technological points of view. Here we demonstrate the proof-of-principle that the photothermal effect of organo-soluble plasmonic gold nanorods can introduce the phase transition of thermotropic liquid crystals upon near infrared laser irradiation. Interestingly, the reverse process occurs when the laser is switched off. PMID:25989830

  14. Influence of spin polarizability on liquid gas phase transition in the nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, Z.; Bigdeli, M.; Bordbar, G. H.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the liquid gas phase transition for the spin polarized nuclear matter. Applying the lowest order constrained variational (LOCV) method, and using two microscopic potentials, AV18 and UV14+TNI, we calculate the free energy, equation of state (EOS), order parameter, entropy, heat capacity and compressibility to derive the critical properties of spin polarized nuclear matter. Our results indicate that for the spin polarized nuclear matter, the second-order phase transition takes place at lower temperatures with respect to the unpolarized one. It is also shown that the critical temperature of our spin polarized nuclear matter with a specific value of spin polarization parameter is in good agreement with the experimental result.

  15. Chiroptical switching caused by crystalline/liquid crystalline phase transition of a chiral bowl-shaped molecule.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Masaki; Sukegawa, Kimiya; Okada, Daichi; Yamamoto, Yohei; Nabeshima, Tatsuya

    2016-03-15

    The liquid crystal of a chiral bowl-shaped molecule having a central-phosphorus atom and long alkyl chains was developed. The DSC and XRD analyses suggested the formation of columnar liquid crystals of both the enantiopure and racemic compounds. The condensed phase of the enantiopure compound in a thin film exhibited a significant signal in CD spectra, which was switched by a reversible phase transition between the crystalline and liquid crystalline states. PMID:26948812

  16. Contact line motion in confined liquid-gas systems: Slip versus phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2010-11-01

    In two-phase flows, the interface intervening between the two fluid phases intersects the solid wall at the contact line. A classical problem in continuum fluid mechanics is the incompatibility between the moving contact line and the no-slip boundary condition, as the latter leads to a nonintegrable stress singularity. Recently, various diffuse-interface models have been proposed to explain the contact line motion using mechanisms missing from the sharp-interface treatments in fluid mechanics. In one-component two-phase (liquid-gas) systems, the contact line can move through the mass transport across the interface while in two-component (binary) fluids, the contact line can move through diffusive transport across the interface. While these mechanisms alone suffice to remove the stress singularity, the role of fluid slip at solid surface needs to be taken into account as well. In this paper, we apply the diffuse-interface modeling to the study of contact line motion in one-component liquid-gas systems, with the fluid slip fully taken into account. The dynamic van der Waals theory has been presented for one-component fluids, capable of describing the two-phase hydrodynamics involving the liquid-gas transition [A. Onuki, Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)]. This theory assumes the local equilibrium condition at the solid surface for density and also the no-slip boundary condition for velocity. We use its hydrodynamic equations to describe the continuum hydrodynamics in the bulk region and derive the more general boundary conditions by introducing additional dissipative processes at the fluid-solid interface. The positive definiteness of entropy production rate is the guiding principle of our derivation. Numerical simulations based on a finite-difference algorithm have been carried out to investigate the dynamic effects of the newly derived boundary conditions, showing that the contact line can move through both phase transition and slip, with their relative contributions determined by a competition between the two coexisting mechanisms in terms of entropy production. At temperatures very close to the critical temperature, the phase transition is the dominant mechanism, for the liquid-gas interface is wide and the density ratio is close to 1. At low temperatures, the slip effect shows up as the slip length is gradually increased. The observed competition can be interpreted by the Onsager principle of minimum entropy production.

  17. Critical temperature for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition (from multifragmentation and fission)

    SciTech Connect

    Karnaukhov, V. A.; Oeschler, H.; Budzanowski, A.; Avdeyev, S. P.; Botvina, A. S.; Cherepanov, E. A.; Karcz, W.; Kirakosyan, V. V.; Rukoyatkin, P. A.; Skwirczynska, I.; Norbeck, E.

    2008-12-15

    Critical temperature T{sub c} for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition is estimated from both the multifragmentation and fission data. In the first case, the critical temperature is obtained by analysis of the intermediate-mass-fragment yields in p(8.1 GeV) + Au collisions within the statistical model of multifragmentation. In the second case, the experimental fission probability for excited {sup 188}Os is compared with the calculated one with T{sub c} as a free parameter. It is concluded for both cases that the critical temperature is higher than 15 MeV.

  18. Phase transitions in nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.; Phair, L.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1997-08-01

    A critical overview of the low energy phase transitions in nuclei is presented with particular attention to the 2nd (1st) order pairing phase transitions, and to the 1st order liquid-vapor phase transition. The role of fluctuations in washing out these transitions is discussed and illustrated with examples. A robust indicator of phase coexistence in multifragmentation is presented.

  19. Method and apparatus for acoustic plate mode liquid-solid phase transition detection

    DOEpatents

    Blair, Dianna S.; Freye, Gregory C.; Hughes, Robert C.; Martin, Stephen J.; Ricco, Antonio J.

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing a liquid-solid phase transition event is provided which comprises an acoustic plate mode detecting element placed in contact with a liquid or solid material which generates a high-frequency acoustic wave that is attenuated to an extent based on the physical state of the material is contact with the detecting element. The attenuation caused by the material in contact with the acoustic plate mode detecting element is used to determine the physical state of the material being detected. The method and device are particularly suited for detecting conditions such as the icing and deicing of wings of an aircraft. In another aspect of the present invention, a method is provided wherein the adhesion of a solid material to the detecting element can be measured using the apparatus of the invention.

  20. Method and apparatus for acoustic plate mode liquid-solid phase transition detection

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, D.S.; Frye, G.C.; Hughes, R.C.; Martin, S.J.; Ricco, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing a liquid-solid phase transition event is provided which comprises an acoustic plate mode detecting element placed in contact with a liquid or solid material which generates a high-frequency acoustic wave that is attenuated to an extent based on the physical state of the material in contact with the detecting element. The attenuation caused by the material in contact with the acoustic plate mode detecting element is used to determine the physical state of the material being detected. The method and device are particularly suited for detecting conditions such as the icing and deicing of wings of an aircraft. In another aspect of the present invention, a method is provided wherein the adhesion of a solid material to the detecting element can be measured using the apparatus of the invention. 3 figs.

  1. Method and apparatus for acoustic plate mode liquid-solid phase transition detection

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, D.S.; Frye, G.C.; Hughes, R.C.; Martin, S.J.; Ricco, A.J.

    1990-12-31

    A method and apparatus for sensing a liquid-solid phase transition event is provided which comprises an acoustic plate mode detecting element placed in contact with a liquid or solid material which generates a high-frequency acoustic wave that is attenuated to an extent based on the physical state of the material in contact with the detecting element. The attenuation caused by the material in contact with the acoustic plate mode detecting element is used to determine the physical state of the material being detected. The method and device are particularly suited for detecting conditions such as the icing and deicing of wings of an aircraft. In another aspect of the present invention, a method is provided wherein the adhesion of a solid material to the detecting element can be measured using the apparatus of the invention. 3 figs.

  2. Method and apparatus for acoustic plate mode liquid-solid phase transition detection

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, D.S.; Freye, G.C.; Hughes, R.C.; Martin, S.J.; Ricco, A.J.

    1993-02-23

    A method and apparatus for sensing a liquid-solid phase transition event is provided which comprises an acoustic plate mode detecting element placed in contact with a liquid or solid material which generates a high-frequency acoustic wave that is attenuated to an extent based on the physical state of the material in contact with the detecting element. The attenuation caused by the material in contact with the acoustic plate mode detecting element is used to determine the physical state of the material being detected. The method and device are particularly suited for detecting conditions such as the icing and deicing of wings of an aircraft. In another aspect of the present invention, a method is provided wherein the adhesion of a solid material to the detecting element can be measured using the apparatus of the invention.

  3. Method and apparatus for acoustic plate mode liquid-solid phase transition detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, D. S.; Frye, G. C.; Hughes, R. C.; Martin, S. J.; Ricco, A. J.

    1990-05-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing a liquid-solid phase transition event is provided which comprises an acoustic plate mode detecting element placed in contact with a liquid or solid material which generates a high-frequency acoustic wave that is attenuated to an extent based on the physical state of the material in contact with the detecting element. The attenuation caused by the material in contact with the acoustic plate mode detecting element is used to determine the physical state of the material being detected. The method and device are particularly suited for detecting conditions such as the icing and deicing of wings of an aircraft. In another aspect of the present invention, a method is provided wherein the adhesion of a solid material to the detecting element can be measured using the apparatus of the invention.

  4. Liquid-solid phase transition alloy as reversible and rapid molding bone cement.

    PubMed

    Yi, Liting; Jin, Chao; Wang, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-12-01

    Acrylic bone cement has been an essential non-metallic implant used as fixing agent in the cemented total joint arthroplasty (THA). However, the currently available materials based mainly on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) still encounter certain limitations, such as time-consuming polymerization, thermal and chemical necrosis and troublesome revision procedure. Here from an alternative way, we proposed for the first time to adopt the injectable alloy cement to address such tough issues through introducing its unique liquid-solid phase transition mechanism. A typical cement along this way is thus made of an alloy Bi/In/Sn/Zn with a specifically designed low melting point 57.5 °C, which enables its rapid molding into various desired shapes with high plasticity and ultimate metallic behaviors. The fundamental characteristics including the mechanical strength, biocompatibility and phase transition-induced thermal effects have been clarified to demonstrate the importance of such alloy as unconventional cement with favorable merits. In addition, we also disclosed its advantage as an excellent contrast agent for radiation imaging on the bone interior structure which is highly beneficial for guiding the surgery and monitoring the therapeutic effects. Particularly, the proposed alloy cement with reversible phase transition feature significantly simplifies the revision of the cement and prosthesis. This study opens the way for employing the injectable alloy materials as reversible bone cement to fulfill diverse clinical needs in the coming time. PMID:25239039

  5. Graphene oxide liquid crystals: synthesis, phase transition, rheological property, and applications in optoelectronics and display.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng; Tong, Xin; Wang, Yanan; Bao, Jiming; Wang, Zhiming M

    2015-12-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) liquid crystals (LCs) are macroscopically ordered GO flakes dispersed in water or polar organic solvents. Since the first report in 2011, GO LCs have attracted considerable attention for their basic properties and potential device applications. In this review, we summarize recent developments and present a comprehensive understanding of GO LCs via many aspects ranging from the exfoliation of GO flakes from graphite, to phases and phase transitions under various conditions, the orientational responses of GO under external magnetic and electric fields, and finally Kerr effect and display applications. The emphasis is placed on the unique and basic properties of GO and their ordered assembly. We will also discuss challenges and issues that need to be overcome in order to gain a more fundamental understanding and exploit full device potentials of GO LCs. PMID:26546325

  6. Graphene oxide liquid crystals: synthesis, phase transition, rheological property, and applications in optoelectronics and display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Feng; Tong, Xin; Wang, Yanan; Bao, Jiming; Wang, Zhiming M.

    2015-11-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) liquid crystals (LCs) are macroscopically ordered GO flakes dispersed in water or polar organic solvents. Since the first report in 2011, GO LCs have attracted considerable attention for their basic properties and potential device applications. In this review, we summarize recent developments and present a comprehensive understanding of GO LCs via many aspects ranging from the exfoliation of GO flakes from graphite, to phases and phase transitions under various conditions, the orientational responses of GO under external magnetic and electric fields, and finally Kerr effect and display applications. The emphasis is placed on the unique and basic properties of GO and their ordered assembly. We will also discuss challenges and issues that need to be overcome in order to gain a more fundamental understanding and exploit full device potentials of GO LCs.

  7. Rapid heating of a strongly coupled plasma at the solid-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, M. J.; Hasegawa, T.; Bollinger, J. J.; Dubin, D. H. E.

    2004-11-01

    Between 10^4 and 10^6 ^9Be^+ ions are trapped in a 4.5 Tesla Penning trap and laser-cooled to ˜1 mK, where the ions form a crystalline plasma with an interparticle spacing of ˜20 μm. This system is a realization of a strongly coupled one-component plasma. Using Doppler laser spectroscopy on a single-photon transition, we measured the temperature and heating rate of this plasma when not being laser-cooled. We measured a slow heating rate of ≤ 100 mK/s due to residual gas collisions for the first 100-200 ms after turning off the cooling laser. This slow heating is followed by a rapid heating to 1-2 K in 100 ms as the plasma undergoes the solid-liquid phase transition at T=10 mK (Γ ˜ 170). We will present evidence that this rapid heating is due to a sudden release of energy from weakly cooled degrees of freedom involving the cyclotron motion of trapped impurity ions. We will also discuss the prospects for observing the latent heat associated with the phase transition.

  8. On the phase transitions of 8CB/Sn2P2S6 liquid crystal nanocolloids.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y; Douali, R; Dubois, F; Segovia-Mera, A; Daoudi, A

    2015-09-01

    Using differential scanning calorimetry measurements, the influence of Sn2P2S6 ferroelectric nanoparticles on the phase transition temperatures of the 8CB liquid crystal is studied. The spontaneous polarization, ionic and anchoring effects are discussed. For low concentration of dopant, the global effect leads to a decrease and an increase of the nematic-isotropic and the smectic A-nematic phase transition temperatures, respectively. For high concentrations, due to aggregates formation, the predominant anchoring effect induces a decrease of the both phase transition temperatures. PMID:26410848

  9. Effect of CNTs and Induced Chirality on Smectic- Smectic Liquid Crystal Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalakonda, P.; Iannacchione, G. S.; Basu, R.; Rosenblatt, C.; Lemieux, R. P.

    2012-02-01

    High-resolution calorimetry results are presented of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the liquid crystal (LC) 9OO4 nano-colloidal dispersions as a function of temperature, scan rate, and CNT concentration (0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.20 wt/%). The CNT used have an enantiomeric excess that has been shown to induce chirality into this LC. The pure LC exhibits the phase sequence I-N-SmA-SmC-SmB-Cr on cooling with the expected heat capacity Cp signatures, except for the SmA-SmC transition, manifesting a double-Cp peak ˜2 K apart at low effective scan rates (< 0.5 K min-1). The introduction of CNTs results in the I-N, N-SmA, and SmA-SmC double Cp features shifting to higher temperatures by ˜1 K and remain sharp. However, the SmC-SmB and SmB-Cr transitions shift to lower temperatures by ˜3-4 K and broaden dramatically with increasing CNT content. We interpret these observations as a consequence of the π-π interactions between the phenyl rings of 9OO4 and the graphene surfaces that induces bulk chirality, and the pinning of the director parallel to the CNT long-axis far from the surface. The balance of these two mechanisms may stabilize phases that lack any in-smectic-plane ordering.

  10. Phase transitions of an ionic liquid self-assembled monolayer on Au.

    PubMed

    Branca, Mathieu; Correia-Ledo, Debby; Bolduc, Olivier R; Ratel, Mathieu; Schmitzer, Andreea R; Masson, Jean-Francois

    2011-07-01

    The properties of a surface modified with an ionic liquid self-assembled monolayer (IL-SAM) can be tuned by simply changing the deposition temperature. Mid-IR, SERS, and molecular modelling demonstrated that 1-(12-mercaptododecyl)-3-methylimidazolium bromide (MDMIBr) exhibited a crystalline monolayer for deposition temperatures below 25 °C. Above 25 °C, the aliphatic chain collapsed into a disordered conformation. At 40 °C, another phase transition occurs due to the imidazolium group tilting parallel to the surface. Consequently, the wettability of IL-SAM was tuned over a broad range of contact angle (from 20° to nearly 40°) by varying the deposition temperature. Permeation of redox mediators to a Au electrode coated with MDMIBr strongly depends on the net charge of the redox mediator. Electron transfer was excellent for neutral and negatively charged redox mediators on electrodes coated with IL-SAM regardless of deposition temperature. PMID:21625701

  11. Pressure phase lines and enthalpies for the. cap alpha. -. beta. and. beta. -liquid transitions in beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Abey, A.

    1984-10-31

    The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the ..cap alpha..-..beta.. and ..beta..-liquid transition temperatures in Be was measured in a gas pressure system. Differential thermal analysis was used in the pressure range from 0.1 MPa to 0.7 GPa. For the ..cap alpha..-..beta.. transition, dT/dP = 43 +- 7 K/GPa; for the ..beta..-liquid transition, dT/dP = 35 +- 7 K/GPa. Although it is possible that large systematic errors may arise from experimental procedures, our results are seriously at odds with those of other investigators. Transition enthalpies for the ..cap alpha..-..beta.. and ..beta..-liquid transitions were 1.9 +- 0.2 and 2.2 +- 0.2 kcal/g.m., respectively, at a pressure of 0.1 MPa.

  12. Weakly nematic-highly nematic phase transitions in main-chain liquid-crystalline polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Akihiko; Kato, Tadaya

    1998-07-01

    A mean field theory is introduced to describe the nematic-isotropic phase transitions (NIT) of main-chain liquid-crystalline polymers (MLCPs) which consist of rigid mesogens and spacers with various degrees of flexibility. We here assume that two neighboring bonds on the spacers have either bent or straightened conformations and the straightened conformation gives rise to a rigid rodlike shape. The theory takes into account not only the nematic ordering of mesogens but also the partial ordering of spacer segments in the nematic phase. On the basis of the Onsager type excluded volume interactions and the Maier-Saupe model for orientational-dependent attractive interactions between rigid segments, we derive the free energy of the MLCPs in melts. The NIT temperature, the order parameter of mesogens, and that of spacers are examined as a function of the spacer length, the flexibility of spacers, and the strength of the anisotropic interactions. We also derive the Landau-de Gennes expansion of our free energy. We find that the NIT temperature TNI of a MLCP with semiflexible spacers has a minimum as a function of the spacer length ns. At small values of ns, we have a weakly nematic phase which is mostly formed by the ordering of the mesogens and the spacers play a softening role. At large values of ns, we have a highly nematic phase where the straightened segments on the spacers and the mesogens are highly ordered and the spacers play a stiffening role. The two different nematic phases are discussed in the phase diagrams of the temperature-spacer length plane.

  13. Separation of rare earths from transition metals by liquid-liquid extraction from a molten salt hydrate to an ionic liquid phase.

    PubMed

    Rout, Alok; Binnemans, Koen

    2014-02-28

    The solvent extraction of trivalent rare-earth ions and their separation from divalent transition metal ions using molten salt hydrates as the feed phase and an undiluted fluorine-free ionic liquid as the extracting phase were investigated in detail. The extractant was tricaprylmethylammonium nitrate, [A336][NO3], and the hydrated melt was calcium nitrate tetrahydrate, Ca(NO3)2·4H2O. The extraction behavior of rare-earth ions was studied for solutions of individual elements, as well as for mixtures of rare earths in the hydrated melt. The influence of different extraction parameters was investigated: the initial metal loading in the feed phase, percentage of water in the feed solution, equilibration time, and the type of hydrated melt. The extraction of rare earths from Ca(NO3)2·4H2O was compared with extraction from CaCl2·4H2O by [A336][Cl] (Aliquat 336). The nitrate system was found to be the better one. The extraction and separation of rare earths from the transition metals nickel, cobalt and zinc were also investigated. Remarkably high separation factors of rare-earth ions over transition metal ions were observed for extraction from Ca(NO3)2·4H2O by the [A336][NO3] extracting phase. Furthermore, rare-earth ions could be separated efficiently from transition metal ions, even in melts with very high concentrations of transition metal ions. Rare-earth oxides could be directly dissolved in the Ca(NO3)2·4H2O phase in the presence of small amounts of Al(NO3)3·9H2O or concentrated nitric acid. The efficiency of extraction after dissolving the rare-earth oxides in the hydrated nitrate melt was identical to extraction from solutions with rare-earth nitrates dissolved in the molten phase. The stripping of the rare-earth ions from the loaded ionic liquid phase and the reuse of the recycled ionic liquid were also investigated in detail. PMID:24352299

  14. Phase transitions and reentrant phenomena in liquid crystals having both rigid and flexible intramolecular joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyżuk, W.; Górecka, E.; Mieczkowski, J.; Przedmojski, J.

    1992-07-01

    Two series of liquid-crystalline compounds having three phenyl rings separated by flexible spacer —CH(CH{3})CH{2}—COO— and by rigid azo and azoxy group, were studied by DSC, optical and X-ray methods. For esters of dl-3-(4^{prime}-nitro)-phenylbutyric acid with 4^{prime}-alkoxy-phenylazo-phenol-4 having dodecyloxy or longer terminal chains, as well as for related azoxy compounds, a narrow (even below 5 K) reentrant or inverted nematic phase appearing between partly bilayer and monolayer smectics A was observed. For higher homologues of the azoxy series additional smectic phases appear, leading to the occurrence of new multicritical points, e.g. the critical end point Ad Cd N^re. On each of the lines, which separate nematic from smectic A phases, transitions are of weakly first or second-order and more than one tricritical point can occur. On the A{1} N/A{1} N^re line, a simple N A{1} tricritical point is observed at T_NI/T_AN = 0.834. The presence of further critical points depends on the components of the binary system involved. Four of the azoxy compounds studied undergo a second order phase transition between partly bilayer smectics, Ad and Cd. Such a transition is accompanied by a jumb in the specific heat, varying linearly with the length of the molecular tails. Various temperature dependences of the layer spacing in the Ad phase are observed for subsequent homologues from the azoxy series. Plusieurs cristaux liquides composés de trois groupements phényl séparés par un groupement —CH(CH{3})CH{2}—COO—, ainsi que par des groupements azo et azoxy, ont été examinés par AED, méthodes optiques et par rayons X. Pour des esters de l'acide dl-3-(4^{prime}-nitro)phénylbutyrique et de 4^{prime}-alkoxy-phénylazo-phénol-4 ayant comme terminaison une chaîne dodecyloxy ou bien plus longue, ainsi que pour des composés azoxy relatif, on observe (même au-dessous de 5 K) une étroite phase nématique réentrante ou inverse entre les phases smectiques : monocouche et partiellement bicouche. Pour des homologues plus longs dans la série des composés azoxy, on a constaté l'existence d'autres phases smectiques ce qui implique l'apparition, sur les diagrammes des phases, de nouveau points multicritiques, par exemple le point Ad Cd N^re. Sur chaque ligne séparant les phases smectiques A de la phase nématique les transitions sont faiblement du premier ordre ou du deuxième ordre ce qui mène dans certain cas à plus qu'un point tricritique. Sur la ligne A{1} N/A{1} N^re on observe à T_NI/T_AN = 0,834 un simple point tricritique N A{1} — l'apparition des autres dépend du choix des constituants du système binaire. Dans le cas de quatre composés azoxy on a constaté une transition du deuxième ordre entre les phases smectiques partiellement bicouches, Ad et Cd. La transition est accompagnée d'un brusque changement de la chaleur spécifique qui varie linéairement avec la longueur de la queue de la molécule. Pour des homologues suivants de la série des composés azoxy on observe différentes dépendances en température de la distance entre les couches de la phase Ad.

  15. Studies of molecular monolayers at air-liquid interfaces by second harmonic generation: question of orientational phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Rasing, T.; Shen, Y.R.; Kim, M.W.; Grubb, S.; Bock, J.

    1985-06-01

    Insoluble molecular monolayers at gas-liquid interfaces provide an insight to the understanding of surfactants, wetting, microemulsions and membrane structures and offer a possibility to study the rich world of 2-dimensional phase transitions. In the interpretation of the observed properties of these systems various assumptions about the molecular orientation are often made, but so far few clear experimental data exist. In this paper we will show how optical second harmonic generation (SHG) can be used to measure the molecular orientation of monolayers of surfactant molecules at water-air interfaces. By simultaneously measuring the surface pressure versus surface molecular area we can show for the first time that the observed liquid condensed-liquid expanded transition is an orientational phase transition. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Near infrared Kerr effect and description of field-induced phase transitions in polymer-stabilized blue phase liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atorf, B.; Rasouli, H.; Nordendorf, G.; Wilkes, D.; Kitzerow, H.

    2016-02-01

    Studies of the influence of an electric field E on the effective refractive index of a polymer-stabilized blue phase in the near infrared spectral range reveal a considerable field-induced birefringence. At moderate voltages, the birefringence increases linearly with the square of the field strength as expected for the electro-optic Kerr effect, with an effective Kerr constant of K ≈ 6.3 - 6.9 × 10-10 m V-2. However, for E > ≈7.3 V/μm, the slope of the field-induced birefringence versus E2 increases abruptly, before saturation is reached at E > ≈8.5 V/μm. Based on previous observations on blue phases in the visible wavelength range, the discontinuous change can be attributed to a field-induced phase transition. A modification of the extended Kerr model introduced by Wu and coworkers is suggested to take this additional effect into account. In addition to the promising properties of blue phases for improved liquid crystal displays, the observed field-induced birefringence in the infrared region opens interesting perspectives for telecommunication and other non-display applications.

  17. Effects of Kinetic Roughening and Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition on Lysozyme Crystal Growth Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Konnert, John; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    2004-01-01

    We measured the growth velocities of the (110) face of tetragonal lysozyme, V (centimeters per second), at four different concentrations, c (milligrams per milliliter), as the solution temperature, T (Centigrade), was reduced. For a broad range of T dependent on c, we find that the growth velocities increased as the solution temperature was reduced. The initial increase in V is well characterized by the 2D nucleation model for crystal growth, yielding the magnitude of an effective barrier for growth, gamma(sub s) = 1.2 plus or minus 0.1 x 10(exp -13) erg/molecule. Below certain temperatures, T(sub cr), dependent on c, however, a kinetic roughening hypothesis that considers the continuous addition of molecules anywhere on the crystal surface better describes the observed growth velocities. The application of the continuous growth model, up to the solution cloud-point temperatures, T(sub cl), enabled the determinations of the crossover concentration, c(sub r), from estimated values of T(sub cr). For all conditions presented, we find that the crossover from growth by 2D nucleation to continuous addition occurs at a supersaturation, sigma (sub c), = 2.0 plus or minus 0.1. Moreover, we find the energy barrier for the continuous addition, E(sub c), within the temperature range T(sub cl) less than T less than T less than T (sub cr), to be 6 plus or minus 1 x 10(exp -13) erg/molecule. Further reduction of T below approximately 2-3 C of T(sub cl), also revealed a rapid slowing of crystal growth velocities. From quasi-elastic light scattering investigations, we find that the rapid diminishment of crystal growth velocities can be accounted for by the phase behavior of lysozyme solutions. Namely, we find the reversible formation of dense fluid proto-droplets comprised of lysozyme molecules to occur below approximately 0.3 C of T(sub cl). Hence, the rapid slowing of growth velocities may occur as a result of the sudden depletion of "mobile" molecules within crystal growth solutions as dense fluid proto-droplets form.

  18. Impact of Liquid-Vapor to Liquid-Liquid-Vapor Phase Transitions on Asphaltene-Rich Nanoaggregate Behavior in Athabasca Vacuum Residue + Pentane Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Bingwen; Chodakowski, Martin; Shaw, John M.

    2013-06-05

    The bulk phase behavior of heavy oil + alkane mixtures and the behavior of the asphaltenes that they contain are topics of importance for the design and optimization of processes for petroleum production, transport, and refining and for performing routine saturates, aromatics, resins, and asphaltenes (SARA) analyses. In prior studies, partial phase diagrams and phase behavior models for Athabasca vacuum residue (AVR) comprising 32 wt % pentane asphaltenes + n-alkanes were reported. For mixtures with pentane, observed phase behaviors included single-phase liquid as well as liquid–liquid, liquid–liquid–vapor, and liquid–liquid–liquid–vapor regions. Dispersed solids were detected under some conditions as well but not quantified. In this work, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is used to study nanostructured materials in liquid phases present in AVR + n-pentane mixtures from 50 to 170 °C at mixture bubble pressure. The investigation focuses on the impact of the transition from a single AVR-rich liquid to co-existing pentane-rich and AVR-rich liquids on the nanostructure and the nanostructures most resistant to aggregation as the pentane composition axis is approached. Background scattering subtraction was performed using global mixture composition. The robustness of this assumption with respect to values obtained for coefficients appearing in a two level Beaucage unified equation fit is demonstrated. The nanostructured material is shown to arise at two length scales from 1 to 100 wt % AVR. Smaller nanostructures possess mean radii less than 50 Å, while the larger nanostructures possess mean radii greater than 250 Å. The addition of pentane to the AVR causes an increasingly large fraction of the large and small nanostructures to grow in size. Only nanostructures resistant to aggregation remain in the pentane-rich phase as the 0 wt % AVR axis is approached. Step changes in aggregation identified from changes in average radius of gyration, scattering coefficients, and surface/volume ratios arise at the liquid–vapor to liquid–liquid–vapor transition (~40 wt % pentane) and within the liquid–liquid–vapor region (~90 wt % pentane). The temperature is shown to have a limited effect on the mean size and structure of the nanostructured material present, irrespective of global composition.

  19. Observing in space and time the ephemeral nucleation of liquid-to-crystal phase transitions

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Liu, Haihua; Tang, Jau; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2015-01-01

    The phase transition of crystalline ordering is a general phenomenon, but its evolution in space and time requires microscopic probes for visualization. Here we report direct imaging of the transformation of amorphous titanium dioxide nanofilm, from the liquid state, passing through the nucleation step and finally to the ordered crystal phase. Single-pulse transient diffraction profiles at different times provide the structural transformation and the specific degree of crystallinity (η) in the evolution process. It is found that the temporal behaviour of η exhibits unique ‘two-step' dynamics, with a robust ‘plateau' that extends over a microsecond; the rate constants vary by two orders of magnitude. Such behaviour reflects the presence of intermediate structure(s) that are the precursor of the ordered crystal state. Theoretically, we extend the well-known Johnson–Mehl–Avrami–Kolmogorov equation, which describes the isothermal process with a stretched-exponential function, but here over the range of times covering the melt-to-crystal transformation. PMID:26478194

  20. Observing in space and time the ephemeral nucleation of liquid-to-crystal phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Liu, Haihua; Tang, Jau; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2015-10-01

    The phase transition of crystalline ordering is a general phenomenon, but its evolution in space and time requires microscopic probes for visualization. Here we report direct imaging of the transformation of amorphous titanium dioxide nanofilm, from the liquid state, passing through the nucleation step and finally to the ordered crystal phase. Single-pulse transient diffraction profiles at different times provide the structural transformation and the specific degree of crystallinity (η) in the evolution process. It is found that the temporal behaviour of η exhibits unique `two-step' dynamics, with a robust `plateau' that extends over a microsecond; the rate constants vary by two orders of magnitude. Such behaviour reflects the presence of intermediate structure(s) that are the precursor of the ordered crystal state. Theoretically, we extend the well-known Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov equation, which describes the isothermal process with a stretched-exponential function, but here over the range of times covering the melt-to-crystal transformation.

  1. Universality and criticality of a second-order granular solid-liquid-like phase transition.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Gustavo; Mujica, Nicolás; Soto, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally study the critical properties of the nonequilibrium solid-liquid-like transition that takes place in vibrated granular matter. The critical dynamics is characterized by the coupling of the density field with the bond-orientational order parameter Q(4), which measures the degree of local crystallization. Two setups are compared, which present the transition at different critical accelerations as a result of modifying the energy dissipation parameters. In both setups five independent critical exponents are measured, associated to different properties of Q(4): the correlation length, relaxation time, vanishing wavenumber limit (static susceptibility), the hydrodynamic regime of the pair correlation function, and the amplitude of the order parameter. The respective critical exponents agree in both setups and are given by ν(⊥)=1,ν(∥)=2,γ=1,η≈0.6-0.67, and β=1/2, whereas the dynamical critical exponent is z=ν(∥)/ν(⊥)=2. The agreement on five exponents is an exigent test for the universality of the transition. Thus, while dissipation is strictly necessary to form the crystal, the path the system undergoes toward the phase separation is part of a well-defined universality class. In fact, the local order shows critical properties while density does not. Being the later conserved, the appropriate model that couples both is model C in the Hohenberg and Halperin classification. The measured exponents are in accord with the nonequilibrium extension to model C if we assume that α, the exponent associated in equilibrium to the specific heat divergence but with no counterpart in this nonequilibrium experiment, vanishes. PMID:25679604

  2. Oxidative Dissolution of Transition Metals in a Liquid Phase. Role of Oxygen and of the Surface Oxide Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrent'ev, I. P.; Khidekel', M. L.

    1983-04-01

    The results of recent studies of the oxidative dissolution of transition metals in a liquid phase are generalised, and an analysis of the role of molecular oxygen and of the oxide film on the metal surface in oxidation processes in donor-acceptor organic media is proposed. The prospects of oxidative dissolution as a direct (single-stage) method of preparation of transition metal complexes are examined. 115 references.

  3. Nematic quantum phase transition of composite Fermi liquids in half-filled Landau levels and their geometric response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yizhi; Cho, Gil Young; Fradkin, Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    We present a theory of the isotropic-nematic quantum phase transition in the composite Fermi liquid arising in half-filled Landau levels. We show that the quantum phase transition between the isotropic and the nematic phase is triggered by an attractive quadrupolar interaction between electrons, as in the case of conventional Fermi liquids. We derive the theory of the nematic state and of the phase transition. This theory is based on the flux attachment procedure, which maps an electron liquid in half-filled Landau levels into the composite Fermi liquid close to a nematic transition. We show that the local fluctuations of the nematic order parameters act as an effective dynamical metric interplaying with the underlying Chern-Simons gauge fields associated with the flux attachment. Both the fluctuations of the Chern-Simons gauge field and the nematic order parameter can destroy the composite fermion quasiparticles and drive the system into a non-Fermi liquid state. The effective-field theory for the isotropic-nematic phase transition is shown to have z =3 dynamical exponent due to the Landau damping of the dense Fermi system. We show that there is a Berry-phase-type term that governs the effective dynamics of the nematic order parameter fluctuations, which can be interpreted as a nonuniversal "Hall viscosity" of the dynamical metric. We also show that the effective-field theory of this compressible fluid has a Wen-Zee-type term. Both terms originate from the time-reversal breaking fluctuation of the Chern-Simons gauge fields. We present a perturbative (one-loop) computation of the Hall viscosity and also show that this term is also obtained by a Ward identity. We show that the topological excitation of the nematic fluid, the disclination, carries an electric charge. We show that a resonance observed in radio-frequency conductivity experiments can be interpreted as a Goldstone nematic mode gapped by lattice effects.

  4. Ultrafast spectroscopy of electron transfer dynamics in liquids; excitation transfer studies of phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goun, Alexei A.

    The transfer of an electron from a donor to an acceptor is the fundamental step in a wide range of chemical and biological processes. As a result, electron-transfer reactions have been the focus of numerous theoretical and experimental efforts aimed at understanding the kinetics and mechanism of the transfer event. Liquid solvents are an important medium for electron-transfer processes. The influences of the distance dependence, diffusion, the radial distribution function, and the hydrodynamic effect have been incorporated into the theory of electron transfer in solution, as well as into the theory of electron transfer between donors and acceptors in the head group regions of micelles. The development of new laser system with a pulse duration of tens of femtoseconds, with tunable wavelength allowed us to study these processes on a considerably shorter time scale than previous studies. This allowed us to observe not only the diffusion controlled but also the kinetics of electron transfer for donor/acceptor pairs that are in close proximity. In one set of experiments we have studied the kinetics of electron transfer in electron accepting molecule (rhodamine 3B) dissolved in electron donating solvent (N,N-dimethylaniline). The data for the forward electron transfer and geminate recombination are approximated by the statistical theory of the electron transfer. Optical anisotropy observed in the experiment demonstrates the orientation dependence of the electron transfer rate. In further experiments we investigated the electron transfer in non-hydrogen bonding liquids of increasing viscosity. The effective value of the donor/acceptor electronic coupling was found to decrease with viscosity. Electron transfer experiments were also carried out on the surface of micelles. The systems studied are the hole donor octadecyl-rhodamine B (ODRB) and the hole acceptor N,N-dimethyl-aniline (DMA) in micelles made of dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) and tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB). It was found that the effective coupling is reduced compared to donor/acceptor pairs dissolved in simple liquids. In the 2nd half of thesis we have addressed the question of the dynamics of phase transitions. We have demonstrated the ability to use the fluorescent excitation-transfer technique to study the demixing of liquids specifically, kinetics of demixing water and 2,6-dimethylpyridine. These two liquids possess a low critical temperature point, which allowed us to use a temperature jump from a laser pulse to initiate the process of phase separation. It was found that Coumarin480 laser dye and HPTS (8-Hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid) fluorescent dye have significantly different solubilities in the components of the mixture. These dyes undergo excitation transfer from Coumarin480 to HPTS in the uniform state, but not in the phase-separated state. A system with a temperature jump pump and an excitation transfer probe measured the time scale of the initial step of the phase separation.

  5. Laurdan fluorescence spectroscopy reveals a single liquid-crystalline lipid phase and lack of thermotropic phase transitions in the plasma membrane of living human sperm.

    PubMed

    Palleschi, S; Silvestroni, L

    1996-03-13

    Membrane lipid phase(s), phase coexistence, and thermotropic phase transitions have been investigated in viable human spermatozoa using Laurdan fluorescence spectroscopy. Generalized polarization (GP) values derived from Laurdan excitation and emission spectra confirm that the sperm plasma membrane is a low polar, highly rigid (liquid-ordered) structure, and give evidence that, in the range from 10 degrees C to 42 degrees C, membrane lipids are in a single liquid-crystalline phase. The absence of phase transitions in the same thermal range argues against the hypothesis that the lipid domains previously detected on the sperm surface are produced by lipid lateral phase separation. The above findings are likely accounted for by the high cholesterol to phospholipid molar ratio found in the human sperm membrane. This is the first time that membrane lipid phase and polarity have been detected and quantified in living mammalian spermatozoa. PMID:8603087

  6. The nuclear liquid-vapor phase transition: Equilibrium between phases or free decay in vacuum?

    SciTech Connect

    Phair, L.; Moretto, L.G.; Elliott, J.B.; Wozniak, G.J.

    2002-11-14

    Recent analyses of multifragmentation in terms of Fisher's model and the related construction of a phase diagram brings forth the problem of the true existence of the vapor phase and the meaning of its associated pressure. Our analysis shows that a thermal emission picture is equivalent to a Fisher-like equilibrium description which avoids the problem of the vapor and explains the recently observed Boltzmann-like distribution of the emission times. In this picture a simple Fermi gas thermometric relation is naturally justified. Low energy compound nucleus emission of intermediate mass fragments is shown to scale according to Fisher's formula and can be simultaneously fit with the much higher energy ISiS multifragmentation data.

  7. Effect of trans-cis photoisomerization on phase equilibria and phase transition of liquid-crystalline azobenzene chromophore and its blends with reactive mesogenic diacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Namil; Li, Quan; Kyu, Thein

    2011-03-01

    Photoisomerization-induced phase transition of neat liquid-crystalline azobenzene chromophore (LCAC) and its effect on phase diagrams of its mixtures with reactive mesogenic diacrylate monomer (RM257) have been investigated experimentally and theoretically. Upon irradiation with ultraviolet light, the nematic phase of LCAC transformed to isotropic, while the crystal phase showed corrugated textures on the surface (i.e., ripples). The phase-transition temperatures and corresponding morphologies of the blends have been investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry and optical microscopy. A theoretical phase diagram of a binary nematic and crystalline system was constructed by self-consistently solving the combined free energies of Flory-Huggins, Maier-Saupe, and phase-field theory. The calculation revealed various coexistence regions such as nematic + liquid (N1 + L2), crystal + liquid (Cr1 + L2), crystal + nematic (Cr1 + N2), and crystal + crystal (Cr1 + Cr2) over a broad range of compositions including the single-phase nematic (N1, N2) of the corresponding constituents. The calculated liquidus lines were in good accord with the depressed mesophase-isotropic transition points. The present paper demonstrates the effect of trans-cis photoisomerization on the mesophase transitions of neat LCAC and the phase diagram of LCAC-RM257 as well as on the ripple formation (i.e., periodic undulation) on the azobenzene crystals.

  8. 2D Melting in General: Solid/hexatic/liquid Phase Transitions in Soft Spheres using Event-Chain Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapfer, Sebastian C.; Michel, Manon; Krauth, Werner; Laboratoire de Physique Statistique Team

    2014-03-01

    The melting of two-dimensional solids has been the subject of continued research for more than fifty years, with the prevalent scenarios being the KTHNY theory of defect unbindung and a conventional first-order liquid/solid transition. For hard disks, a rather unexpected hybrid transition has recently been found with both a first-order transition and an intermediate hexatic phase, while magnetic colloid experiments support the KTHNY scenario. To resolve this discrepancy, we here address the melting problem for soft interaction potentials, in particular the nature of the liquid/hexatic and hexatic/solid transitions, and the defects driving melting. Simulations were performed using a new rejection-free irreversible Monte Carlo algorithm generalizing event-chain Monte Carlo to arbitrary pair potentials. In addition to fast equilibration, this algorithm permits to deduce the pressure in the NVT ensemble without any additional computations.

  9. Critical point of gas-liquid type phase transition and phase equilibrium functions in developed two-component plasma model.

    PubMed

    Butlitsky, M A; Zelener, B B; Zelener, B V

    2014-07-14

    A two-component plasma model, which we called a "shelf Coulomb" model has been developed in this work. A Monte Carlo study has been undertaken to calculate equations of state, pair distribution functions, internal energies, and other thermodynamics properties. A canonical NVT ensemble with periodic boundary conditions was used. The motivation behind the model is also discussed in this work. The "shelf Coulomb" model can be compared to classical two-component (electron-proton) model where charges with zero size interact via a classical Coulomb law. With important difference for interaction of opposite charges: electrons and protons interact via the Coulomb law for large distances between particles, while interaction potential is cut off on small distances. The cut off distance is defined by an arbitrary ɛ parameter, which depends on system temperature. All the thermodynamics properties of the model depend on dimensionless parameters ɛ and γ = βe(2)n(1/3) (where β = 1/kBT, n is the particle's density, kB is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the temperature) only. In addition, it has been shown that the virial theorem works in this model. All the calculations were carried over a wide range of dimensionless ɛ and γ parameters in order to find the phase transition region, critical point, spinodal, and binodal lines of a model system. The system is observed to undergo a first order gas-liquid type phase transition with the critical point being in the vicinity of ɛ(crit) ≈ 13(T(*)(crit) ≈ 0.076), γ(crit) ≈ 1.8(v(*)(crit) ≈ 0.17), P(*)(crit) ≈ 0.39, where specific volume v* = 1/γ(3) and reduced temperature T(*) = ɛ(-1). PMID:25028031

  10. Critical point of gas-liquid type phase transition and phase equilibrium functions in developed two-component plasma model

    SciTech Connect

    Butlitsky, M. A.; Zelener, B. V.

    2014-07-14

    A two-component plasma model, which we called a “shelf Coulomb” model has been developed in this work. A Monte Carlo study has been undertaken to calculate equations of state, pair distribution functions, internal energies, and other thermodynamics properties. A canonical NVT ensemble with periodic boundary conditions was used. The motivation behind the model is also discussed in this work. The “shelf Coulomb” model can be compared to classical two-component (electron-proton) model where charges with zero size interact via a classical Coulomb law. With important difference for interaction of opposite charges: electrons and protons interact via the Coulomb law for large distances between particles, while interaction potential is cut off on small distances. The cut off distance is defined by an arbitrary ε parameter, which depends on system temperature. All the thermodynamics properties of the model depend on dimensionless parameters ε and γ = βe{sup 2}n{sup 1/3} (where β = 1/k{sub B}T, n is the particle's density, k{sub B} is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the temperature) only. In addition, it has been shown that the virial theorem works in this model. All the calculations were carried over a wide range of dimensionless ε and γ parameters in order to find the phase transition region, critical point, spinodal, and binodal lines of a model system. The system is observed to undergo a first order gas-liquid type phase transition with the critical point being in the vicinity of ε{sub crit}≈13(T{sub crit}{sup *}≈0.076),γ{sub crit}≈1.8(v{sub crit}{sup *}≈0.17),P{sub crit}{sup *}≈0.39, where specific volume v* = 1/γ{sup 3} and reduced temperature T{sup *} = ε{sup −1}.

  11. Melting transitions of quantum liquid crystalline order coexisting with electronic topological Chern insulators or other topological phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrikar, Onkar; Cho, Gil Young; Leigh, Robert; Hughes, Taylor

    2014-03-01

    Motivated by recent progress in understanding the interplay between the lattice and electronic topological phases, we consider quantum-melting transitions of liquid crystalline order that coexists with electronic topological phases. In certain classes of Chern band insulators, it has been previously demonstrated that there are topological Chern-Simons terms for local lattice deformations such as a Hall viscosity term. The Chern-Simons terms can induce non-trivial statistics for the topological lattice defects and furthermore dress the defects with certain symmetry quantum numbers. On the other hand, the melting transitions of such liquid-crystalline orders are driven by the condensation of lattice defects. Based on these observations, we show how the topological terms can change the nature of the proximate phases of the quantum liquid crystalline phases. We derive and study the effective field theories for the quantum phase transitions, and demonstrate some concrete examples. The authors are supported by the ICMT postdoctoral fellowship at UIUC (GYC) and by the US Department of Energy under contracts DE-FG02-07ER46453 (TLH) and DE-SC0009932 (RGL).

  12. Nematic quantum phase transition of composite Fermi liquids in half-filled Landau levels and their geometric response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yizhi; Cho, Gil Young; Fradkin, Eduardo

    We present a theory of isotropic-nematic quantum phase transition in the composite Fermi liquid arising in the half-filled Landau levels. We show that the quantum phase transition is triggered by the attractive quadrupolar interaction. By performing flux attachment, system turns into a composite Fermi liquid. The nematic order parameters act as the dynamical metric interplaying with the underlying topology, the Chern-Simons theory. Here both the fluctuations of the gauge field and the nematic order parameter can soften the Fermi surface and thus the fermions form a non-Fermi liquid. The effective field theory for the isotropic-nematic phase transition has z = 3 dynamical exponent due to the Landau damping due to the finite density of the fermions. We show that there is a Berry phase term of the nematic order parameter, which can be interpreted as the ``Hall viscosity'' of the dynamical metric. We also find the Wen-Zee-like term, which effectively dresses the nematic vortex with the electric charge. Both of the terms are originated from the time reversal breaking fluctuation of the Chern-Simons gauge fields. This indicates the fluctuations of the gauge fields modify the Hall viscosity and orbital spin of the compressible half-filled Landau level.

  13. Kinetic Effect on Pressure-Induced Phase Transitions of Room Temperature Ionic Liquid, 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium Trifluoromethanesulfonate.

    PubMed

    Li, Haining; Wang, Zheng; Chen, Liucheng; Wu, Jie; Huang, Haijun; Yang, Kun; Wang, Yongqiang; Su, Lei; Yang, Guoqiang

    2015-11-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) have intriguing high-pressure phase behavior, and investigation of how pressure affects phase transitions of RTILs might yield interesting results. We here present kinetically driven phase transitions of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([Emim][CF3SO3]) at different rates of ∼0.3 and ∼1.2 GPa/h up to ∼5 GPa. Two crystalline phases formed at ∼1.3 and ∼1.7 GPa with increasing pressure at lower compression rate of ∼0.3 GPa/h; however, the amorphous phase solidified with superpressurized glass above ∼3.3 GPa at higher compression rate of ∼1.2 GPa/h. Notably, crystal polymorphism is discussed in view of the conformational isomerism of [Emim](+) cation and an unknown cation conformer is observed. These facts indicate that kinetic effect on pressure-induced phase transitions of [Emim][CF3SO3] might be dependent on compression rate, which needs to be considered as a non-negligible factor for phase transitions of RTILs under high pressure. PMID:26465251

  14. Critical behavior at the isotropic-to-nematic phase transition in a bent-core liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiant, D.; Stojadinovic, S.; Neupane, K.; Sharma, S.; Fodor-Csorba, K.; Jákli, A.; Gleeson, J. T.; Sprunt, S.

    2006-03-01

    Magnetic birefringence and dynamic light scattering measurements of orientational order parameter fluctuations at the isotropic-nematic phase transition of a bent-core liquid crystal reveal a pretransitional temperature dependence consistent with the standard Landau-deGennes mean field theory. However, as follows: the transition in the bent-core compound is more weakly first order (TNI-T*≈0.4°C) , the leading Landau coefficient is ˜30 times lower, the viscosity associated with nematic order fluctuations is ˜10 times higher, and the density change is ˜10 times lower, than typically observed in calamitic (rod-shaped) liquid crystals. One consistent explanation for these anomalies is an optically isotropic phase composed of microscopic complexes or “clusters” of bent-core molecules.

  15. Phase comparison technique for measuring liquid-liquid phase equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Daridon, J. L.; Lagourette, B.; Ye, S.

    1999-04-01

    In this article, a new method is demonstrated to measure the liquid-liquid phase equilibrium for binary systems. A phase comparison technique was employed to real-time display the phase-time curve in a "wave form (time) object" of Hewlett-Packard visual engineering environment. It was found that the phase-time curve showed a distorted wave form when liquid-liquid phase transition took place. The abnormal curve can therefore be used to detect liquid-liquid phase transitions. Measurements were performed in several binary systems such as nitromethane+1-hexanol, nitromethane+butanol, and nitroethane+n-hexane. The experimental results are in good agreement with those in the literature.

  16. Phase transition and chemical decomposition of liquid carbon dioxide and nitrogen mixture under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-Xu, Jiang; Guan-Yu, Chen; Yu-Tong, Li; Xin-Lu, Cheng; Cui-Ming, Tang

    2016-02-01

    Thermodynamic and chemical properties of liquid carbon dioxide and nitrogen (CO2-N2) mixture under the conditions of extremely high densities and temperatures are studied by using quantum molecular dynamic (QMD) simulations based on density functional theory including dispersion corrections (DFT-D). We present equilibrium properties of liquid mixture for 112 separate density and temperature points, by selecting densities ranging from ρ = 1.80 g/cm3 to 3.40 g/cm3 and temperatures from T = 500 K to 8000 K. In the range of our study, the liquid CO2-N2 mixture undergoes a continuous transition from molecular to atomic fluid state and liquid polymerization inferred from pair correlation functions (PCFs) and the distribution of various molecular components. The insulator-metal transition is demonstrated by means of the electronic density of states (DOS). Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374217, 11135012, and 11375262) and the Joint Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the China Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant No. 11176020).

  17. Nuclear liquid-gas phase transition at large N{sub c} in the van der Waals approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Torrieri, Giorgio; Mishustin, Igor

    2010-11-15

    We examine the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition at a large number of colors (N{sub c}) within the framework of the van der Waals (VdW) We argue that the VdW equation is appropriate for describing internucleon forces, and discuss how each parameter scales with N{sub c}. We demonstrate that N{sub c}=3 (our world) is not large with respect to the other dimensionless scale relevant to baryonic matter, the number of neighbors in a dense system N{sub N}. Consequently, we show that the liquid-gas phase transition looks dramatically different at N{sub c{yields}{infinity}} with respect to our world: The critical-point temperature becomes of the order of {Lambda}{sub QCD} rather than below it. The critical-point density becomes of the order of the baryonic density, rather than an order of magnitude below it. These are precisely the characteristics usually associated with the ''quarkyonic phase.'' We therefore conjecture that quarkyonic matter is simply the large-N{sub c} limit of the nuclear liquid, and the interplay between N{sub c} and N{sub N} is the reason that the nuclear liquid in our world is so different from quarkyonic matter. We conclude by suggesting ways in which our conjecture can be tested in future lattice measurements.

  18. Time history of laser pulse polarization transformation as a tool of the isotropic-nematic phase transition in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Vladimir A.; Il'inova, Tamara M.; Marchenko, Tatiana B.; Shkurinov, Aleksandr P.; Zolot'ko, Alexander S.

    2003-06-01

    We theoretically investigate in the aberrationless approximation the self-action of the elliptically polarized Gaussian pulse during its propagation in a thin dish with a nematic liquid crystal in the isotropic phase. Quadrature formulas are obtained to describe the time history of the intensity, the elliptisity degree and the rotation angle of the polarization ellipse of the output radiation at the different points of the beam cross-section. They are expressed in terms of the parameters describing two, essential near the temperature of the isotropic-nematic phase transition, mechanisms of the spatial nonlocality of the nonlinear medium optical response, and in terms of the other parameters, which describe the nematic liquid crystal and the elliptically polarized incident pulse. The former mechanism is specified by the medium heating due to light absorption; the latter is determined by the fluctuations of the nematic liquid crystal order parameter tensor near the temperature of the isotropic-nematic phase transition. It is shown that for some values of temperature and of the nematic liquid crystal parameters the elliptical polarization of the incident pulse, which is constant at the entry of the thin dish, transforms into the linear or another different elliptical one at the exit and keeps this new state up to the pulse tail. The dependence of the ellipticity degree on time becomes significantly nonmonotonic and changes its sign in some cases. The nonlocality of the nonlinear medium optical response weakens these transformations.

  19. Free-Surface Optical Scattering as an Indicator of the Shock-Induced Solid-Liquid Phase Transition in Tin

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, G. D.; Lutz, S. S.; Marshall, B. R.; Turley, W. D.; Veeser, L. R.; Furlanetto, M. R.; Hixson, R. S.; Holtkamp, D. B.; Jensen, B. J.; Rigg, P. A.; Wilke, M. D.

    2008-07-01

    When highly polished metal surfaces melt upon release after shock loading, they exhibit features that suggest significant surface changes accompany the phase transition. The reflection of light from such surfaces changes from specular (pre-shock) to diffuse upon melting. A familiar manifestation of this phenomenon is the loss of signal light in VISAR measurements, which occurs at pressures high enough to melt the free surface. Unlike many other potential material phase-sensitive diagnostics (e.g., reflectometry, conductivity) that show relatively small (1%–10%) changes, the specularity of reflection provides a more sensitive and definitive indication of the solid-liquid phase transition. Data will be presented that support the hypothesis that specularity changes indicate melt in a way that can be measured easily and unambiguously.

  20. Selective Sequence for the Peptide-Triggered Phase Transition of Lyotropic Liquid-Crystalline Structures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingtao; Dong, Yao-Da; Boyd, Ben J

    2016-05-24

    A novel concept of using mixed lipids to construct selective peptide-sequence-sensing lyotropic liquid-crystalline (LLC) dispersion systems was investigated. The LLC systems were constructed using a mixture of phytantriol, a lipid that forms lyotropic liquid-crystalline phases, and a novel synthesized peptide-lipid (peplipid) for sensing a target peptide with the RARAR sequence. The internal structure of the dispersed LLC particles was converted from the lamellar structure (liposomes) to the inverse bicontinuous cubic phase (cubosomes) in the presence of the target peptide. The addition of common human proteins did not induce any structural change, indicating a high selectivity of interaction with the target peptide. The concept has potential for the design of targeted controlled release drug delivery agents. PMID:27148806

  1. Quantum Phase Transition Between a Luttinger Liquid and a Gas of Cold Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Law, K. T.; Feldman, D. E.

    2008-08-29

    We consider cold polar molecules confined in a helical optical lattice similar to those used in holographic microfabrication. An external electric field polarizes molecules along the axis of the helix. The large-distance intermolecular dipolar interaction is attractive but the short-scale interaction is repulsive due to geometric constraints and thus prevents collapse. The interaction strength depends on the electric field. We show that a zero-temperature second-order liquid-gas transition occurs at a critical field. It can be observed under experimentally accessible conditions.

  2. Search for the first-order liquid-to-liquid phase transition in low-temperature confined water by neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sow-Hsin; Wang, Zhe; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Kao-Hsiang

    2013-02-01

    It has been conjectured that a 1st order liquid-to-liquid (L-L) phase transition (LLPT) between high density liquid (HDL) and low density liquid (LDL) in supercooled water may exist, as a thermodynamic extension to the liquid phase of the 1st order transition established between the two bulk solid phases of amorphous ice, the high density amorphous ice (HDA) and the low density amorphous ice (LDA). In this paper, we first recall our previous attempts to establish the existence of the 1st order L-L phase transition through the use of two neutron scattering techniques: a constant Q elastic diffraction study of isobaric temperature scan of the D2O density, namely, the equation of state (EOS) measurements. A pronounced density hysteresis phenomenon in the temperature scan of the density above P = 1500 bar is observed which gives a plausible evidence of crossing the 1st order L-L phase transition line above this pressure; an incoherent quasi-elastic scattering measurements of temperature-dependence of the α-relaxation time of H2O at a series of pressures, namely, the study of the Fragile-to-Strong dynamic crossover (FSC) phenomenon as a function of pressure which we interpreted as the results of crossing the Widom line in the one-phase region. In this new experiment, we used incoherent inelastic neutron scattering (INS) to measure the density of states (DOS) of H atoms in H2O molecules in confined water as function of temperature and pressure, through which we may be able to follow the emergence of the LDL and HDL phases at supercooled temperature and high pressures. We here report for the first time the differences of librational and translational DOSs between the hypothetical HDL and LDL phases, which are similar to the corresponding differences between the well-established HDA and LDA ices. This is plausible evidence that the HDL and LDL phases are the thermodynamic extensions of the corresponding amorphous solid water HDA and LDA ices.

  3. Study of the isotropic to smectic-A phase transition in liquid crystal and acetone binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Sigdel, Krishna P; Iannacchione, Germano S

    2010-11-01

    The first-order transition from the isotropic (I) to smectic-A (Sm A) phase in the liquid crystal 4-cyano-4(')-decylbiphenyl (10CB) doped with the polar solvent acetone (ace) has been studied as a function of solvent concentration by high-resolution ac-calorimetry. Heating and cooling scans were performed for miscible 10CB+ace samples having acetone mole fractions from x(ace)=0.05 (1 wt %) to 0.36 (10%) over a wide temperature range from 310 to 327 K. Two distinct first-order phase transition features are observed in the mixture whereas there is only one transition (I-Sm A) in the pure 10CB for that particular temperature range. Both calorimetric features reproduce on repeated heating and cooling scans and evolve with increasing x(ace) with the high-temperature feature relatively stable in temperature but reduced in size while the low-temperature feature shifts dramatically to lower temperature and exhibits increased dispersion. The coexistence region increases for the low-temperature feature but remains fairly constant for the high-temperature feature as a function of x(ace). Polarizing optical microscopy supports the identification of a smectic phase below the high-temperature heat capacity signature indicating that the low-temperature feature represents an injected smectic-smectic phase transition. These effects may be the consequence of screening the intermolecular potential of the liquid crystals by the solvent that stabilizes a weak smectic phase intermediate of the isotropic and pure smectic-A. PMID:21054045

  4. Equation of state measurements by radiography provide evidence for a liquid-liquid phase transition in cerium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipp, M. J.; Jenei, Zs; Ruddle, D.; Aracne-Ruddle, C.; Cynn, H.; Evans, W. J.; Kono, Y.; Kenney-Benson, C.; Park, C.

    2014-05-01

    A pressure-volume isotherm in cerium metal at 1100 K was measured in a large volume press of the Paris-Edinburgh type up to 6 GPa. The volume was determined by imaging a rectangular shape of the sample via white X-ray radiography. Energy dispersive x-ray diffraction spectra were recorded to ensure that the highly reactive cerium in the cell assembly remained pure at this temperature. Even at 1100 K the p-V equation of state of liquid cerium shows a pronounced decrease of the bulk modulus above the y-phase region similar to the 775 K isotherm in the solid that also shows an inflection point between y- and a-type cerium. The inflection point in the 1100 K isotherm indicating the minimum in the bulk modulus separating the γ- from the α-type liquid is located at approximately 3.5 GPa.

  5. Nematic-nematic phase transition in the liquid crystal dimer CBC9CB and its mixtures with 5CB: a high-resolution adiabatic scanning calorimetric study.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Chandra Shekhar Pati; Losada-Pérez, Patricia; Glorieux, Christ; Kohlmeier, Alexandra; Tamba, Maria-Gabriela; Mehl, Georg H; Leys, Jan

    2011-10-01

    The phase transition behavior of the liquid crystal dimer α,ω-bis(4,4'-cyanobiphenyl)nonane (CBC9CB), which has been reported to exhibit a nematic-nematic phase transition, has been investigated by means of high-resolution adiabatic scanning calorimetry. This nematic-nematic phase transition is weakly first-order with a latent heat of 0.24±0.01 kJ kg(-1). Mixtures up to 40 wt % with 4-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (5CB) liquid crystals have also been investigated, which also show this nematic to nematic phase transition. The transition stays weakly first-order with a decreasing latent heat with increasing concentration of 5CB. For mixtures with more than 40 wt % uniaxial nematic-unknown nematic phase transition was not observed. PMID:22181157

  6. Phase behavior and mixing-demixing transitions in binary liquid mixtures with spherical and non-spherical interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Herrera, Enrique; Ramirez-Santiago, Guillermo; Moreno-Razo, J. Antonio

    2006-03-01

    We have carried out extensive equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to study the temperature versus density phase diagrams and the mixing-demixing transition line in fluid equimolar binary mixtures modeled by: (i) Lennard-Jones, (ii) Stock-Mayer, and (iii) Gay- Berne molecular interactions. These studies are performed as function of miscibility parameter, α= ɛAB/ ɛAA, where ɛAA= ɛBB and ɛAB stand for the parameters related to the attractive part of the intermolecular interactions for similar and dissimilar particles, respectively. When the miscibility of the Lennard-Jones mixture varies in the range 0 < α< 1, a continuous critical line of consolute points Tcons(ρ), appears. This line intersects the liquid-vapor coexistence curve at different positions depending on the values of α, yielding mainly three different topologies for the phase diagrams. These results are in qualitative agreement to those found previously for square well and hard-core Yukawa binary mixtures. We also carry out a detailed study of the liquid-liquid interfacial and liquid-vapor surface tensions, as function of temperature and miscibility as well as its relationship to the topologies of the phase diagrams. Similar studies and analysis are also performed for Stock-Mayer and Gay-Berne binary mixtures.

  7. Smectic order, pinning, and phase transition in a smectic-liquid-crystal cell with a random substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Quan; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2013-02-01

    We study smectic-liquid-crystal order in a cell with a heterogeneous substrate imposing surface random positional and orientational pinnings. Proposing a minimal random elastic model, we demonstrate that, for a thick cell, the smectic state without a rubbed substrate is always unstable at long scales and, for weak random pinning, is replaced by a smectic glass state. We compute the statistics of the associated substrate-driven distortions and the characteristic smectic domain size on the heterogeneous substrate and in the bulk. We find that for weak disorder, the system exhibits a three-dimensional temperature-controlled phase transition between a weakly and strongly pinned smectic glass states akin to the Cardy-Ostlund phase transition. We explore experimental implications of the predicted phenomenology and suggest that it provides a plausible explanation for the experimental observations on polarized light microscopy and x-ray scattering.

  8. Liquid-solid and solid-solid phase transition of monolayer water: high-density rhombic monolayer ice.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Toshihiro; Bai, Jaeil; Yasuoka, Kenji; Mitsutake, Ayori; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2014-05-14

    Liquid-solid and solid-solid phase transitions of a monolayer water confined between two parallel hydrophobic surfaces are studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The solid phase considered is the high-density rhombic monolayer ice. Based on the computed free energy surface, it is found that at a certain width of the slit nanopore, the monolayer water exhibits not only a high freezing point but also a low energy barrier to crystallization. Moreover, through analyzing the oxygen-hydrogen-oxygen angle distribution and oxygen-hydrogen radial distribution, the high-density monolayer ice is classified as either a flat ice or a puckered ice. The transition between a flat ice and a puckered ice reflects a trade-off between the water-wall interactions and the electrostatic interactions among water molecules. PMID:24832288

  9. Liquid-solid and solid-solid phase transition of monolayer water: High-density rhombic monolayer ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Toshihiro; Bai, Jaeil; Yasuoka, Kenji; Mitsutake, Ayori; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2014-05-01

    Liquid-solid and solid-solid phase transitions of a monolayer water confined between two parallel hydrophobic surfaces are studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The solid phase considered is the high-density rhombic monolayer ice. Based on the computed free energy surface, it is found that at a certain width of the slit nanopore, the monolayer water exhibits not only a high freezing point but also a low energy barrier to crystallization. Moreover, through analyzing the oxygen-hydrogen-oxygen angle distribution and oxygen-hydrogen radial distribution, the high-density monolayer ice is classified as either a flat ice or a puckered ice. The transition between a flat ice and a puckered ice reflects a trade-off between the water-wall interactions and the electrostatic interactions among water molecules.

  10. Simultaneous calorimetric and polarization microscopy investigations of light induced changes over phase transitions in a liquid crystal-napthopyran mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoloni, S.; Mercuri, F.; Marinelli, M.; Pizzoferrato, R.; Zammit, U.; Kosa, T.; Sukhomlinova, L.; Taheri, B.

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the specific heat and the thermal conductivity in a 4-(n-octyl)-4'-cyanobiphenyl liquid crystal (LC)-photochromic molecules mixture, before, during, and after the photo-activation of the dispersed photochromic molecules, over both the smectic A-nematic and the nematic-isotropic phase transitions. The evaluation of the specific heat has enabled the determination of the changes of the phase transition characteristics induced by the photochromic molecules photoisomerization, while that of the thermal conductivity could be used to monitor the modifications induced in the average LC molecular orientation. The polarization microscopy imaging of the sample texture constituted a valuable support for the interpretation of the obtained thermal conductivity results.

  11. Simultaneous calorimetric and polarization microscopy investigations of light induced changes over phase transitions in a liquid crystal-napthopyran mixture.

    PubMed

    Paoloni, S; Mercuri, F; Marinelli, M; Pizzoferrato, R; Zammit, U; Kosa, T; Sukhomlinova, L; Taheri, B

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the specific heat and the thermal conductivity in a 4-(n-octyl)-4'-cyanobiphenyl liquid crystal (LC)-photochromic molecules mixture, before, during, and after the photo-activation of the dispersed photochromic molecules, over both the smectic A-nematic and the nematic-isotropic phase transitions. The evaluation of the specific heat has enabled the determination of the changes of the phase transition characteristics induced by the photochromic molecules photoisomerization, while that of the thermal conductivity could be used to monitor the modifications induced in the average LC molecular orientation. The polarization microscopy imaging of the sample texture constituted a valuable support for the interpretation of the obtained thermal conductivity results. PMID:26450328

  12. Effect of the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate on the phase transition of starch: dissolution or gelatinization?

    PubMed

    Mateyawa, Sainimili; Xie, David Fengwei; Truss, Rowan W; Halley, Peter J; Nicholson, Timothy M; Shamshina, Julia L; Rogers, Robin D; Boehm, Michael W; McNally, Tony

    2013-04-15

    This work revealed that the interactions between starch, the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([Emim][OAc]), and water might contribute to the phase transition (gelatinization, dissolution, or both) of native starch at reduced temperature. Using mixtures of water and [Emim][OAc] at certain ratios (7.2/1 and 10.8/1 mol/mol), both the gelatinization and dissolution of the starch occur competitively, but also in a synergistic manner. At lower [Emim][OAc] concentration (water/[Emim][OAc] molar ratio≥25.0/1), mainly gelatinization occurs which is slightly impeded by the strong interaction between water and [Emim][OAc]; while at higher [Emim][OAc] concentration (water/[Emim][OAc] molar ratio≤2.8/1), the dissolution of starch is the major form of phase transition, possibly restricted by the difficulty of [Emim][OAc] to interact with starch. PMID:23544570

  13. Morphogenesis of defects and tactoids during isotropic-nematic phase transition in self-assembled lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Ki; Shiyanovskii, Sergij V.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2013-10-01

    We explore the structure of nuclei and topological defects in the first-order phase transition between the nematic (N) and isotropic (I) phases in lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs). The LCLCs are formed by self-assembled molecular aggregates of various lengths and show a broad biphasic region. The defects emerge as a result of two mechanisms: (1) surface-anisotropy that endows each N nucleus (‘tactoid’) with topological defects thanks to preferential (tangential) orientation of the director at the closed I-N interface, and (2) Kibble mechanism with defects forming when differently oriented N tactoids merge with each other. Different scenarios of phase transition involve positive (N-in-I) and negative (I-in-N) tactoids with nontrivial topology of the director field and also multiply connected tactoid-in-tactoid configurations. The closed I-N interface limiting a tactoid shows a certain number of cusps; the lips of the interface on the opposite sides of the cusp make an angle different from π. The N side of each cusp contains a point defect-boojum. The number of cusps shows how many times the director becomes perpendicular to the I-N interface when one circumnavigates the closed boundary of the tactoid. We derive conservation laws that connect the number of cusps c to the topological strength m of defects in the N part of the simply connected and multiply connected tactoids. We demonstrate how the elastic anisotropy of the N phase results in non-circular shape of the disclination cores. A generalized Wulff construction is used to derive the shape of I and N tactoids as a function of I-N interfacial tension anisotropy in the approximation of frozen director field of various topological charges m. The complex shapes and structures of tactoids and topological defects demonstrate an important role of surface anisotropy in morphogenesis of phase transitions in liquid crystals.

  14. Solid-liquid phase transitions in 3D systems with the inverse-power and Yukawa potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaulina, O. S.; Koss, X. G.

    2016-03-01

    The melting of face-centered cubic (fcc) and body-centered cubic (bcc) crystal lattices was studied analytically and numerically for the systems of particles interacting via the inverse-power-law and Yukawa potentials. New approach is proposed for determination of the solid-liquid phase transitions in these systems. The suggested approach takes into account a nonlinearity (anharmonicity) of pair interaction forces and allows to correctly predict the conditions of melting of the systems with various isotropic pair interaction potentials. The obtained results are compared with the existing theoretical and numerical data.

  15. Toward the dynamic phase transition mechanism of a thermoresponsive ionic liquid in the presence of different thermoresponsive polymers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ge; Wu, Peiyi

    2016-01-21

    The influence of two thermoresponsive polymers, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) and poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) (PVCL), on the phase transition behavior of a thermoresponsive ionic liquid, tributylhexylphosphonium 3-sulfopropylmethacrylate ([P4,4,4,6][MC3S]), was investigated. An obvious distinction was observed in the LCSTs and morphologies of [P4,4,4,6][MC3S]-PNIPAM and [P4,4,4,6][MC3S]-PVCL aqueous solutions, indicating their large differences in dynamic transition processes. In general, PNIPAM can "break" the water structure of [P4,4,4,6][MC3S] to decrease the transition temperature, while PVCL can "make" the water structure to increase it. Surprisingly, [P4,4,4,6][MC3S] has an unusual over-hydration behavior before dehydration while PNIPAM experiences a two-step transition process in [P4,4,4,6][MC3S]-PNIPAM aqueous solution, which has never been reported so far. Further studies revealed that the formation of strong intra-/inter-molecular hydrogen bonds C[double bond, length as m-dash]OD-N in PNIPAM is the driving force for the LCST phenomenon of [P4,4,4,6][MC3S]-PNIPAM solution, while it is the [P4,4,4,6][MC3S] that dominates the phase separation of [P4,4,4,6][MC3S]-PVCL solution. PMID:26558815

  16. Experimental research of phase transition's kinetics in a liquid melt of high-purity aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorontsov, V. B.; Zhuravlev, D. V.; Cherepanov, A. S.

    2015-08-01

    This scientific work is devoted to the studying of the genetic connection structures of solid and liquid phases. Fourier analysis of signals of acoustic emission (AE) accompanying melting high purity aluminum from the melting point up to t = 860°C was performed. Based on the results of previous studies cluster formations in the melt - the micro-regions, those retain crystallinity (areas with short-range order of symmetry) were considered as the source of AE. The experimental data allowed to follow the dynamics of disorder zones range order in the melt with increasing melt temperature up to their complete destruction. The presented results of spectral analysis of the signals were analyzed from the standpoint of the theory of cluster melting metals.

  17. Nature of the Blue-Phase-III{endash}isotropic critical point: An analogy with the liquid-gas transition

    SciTech Connect

    Anisimov, M.A.; Agayan, V.A.; Collings, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    The analogy with the liquid-gas critical point is analyzed to clarify the nature of the pretransitional behavior of physical properties in the vicinity of the Blue-Phase-III{endash}isotropic transition in chiral liquid crystalline systems. The analogy is unusual: temperature serves as the ordering field and entropy plays the role of the order parameter. Both mean field and parametric equations of state are formulated in terms of scaling fields. The scaling fields are linear combinations of the physical fields, which are temperature and chirality. It is shown that mixing of the physical field variables naturally leads to a strong asymmetry with respect to the transition temperature in the behavior of the physical properties that cannot be described by simple power laws. While the mean field theory gives a good description of the experimental data, the scaling theory, if one incorporates mixing of the field variables, gives even better agreement with the experimental data, placing this transition in the same universality class as the three-dimensional Ising model. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Weakly Pinned Wigner Solid-FQHE Liquid Phase Transition in the 2-Dimensional Hole System under Ultrahigh Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Du, Rui-Rui; Shi, Junren; Xie, Xincheng; Manfra, Michael J.; Pfeiffer, Loren N.; West, Ken W.; Park, Ju-Hyun

    2014-03-01

    In the two dimensional systems, Wigner crystals (WC) solid and fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) liquid phase compete under low temperature and high magnetic fields. Here, we exhibit unusual experimental results in the new developed C-doped two-dimensional hole samples. Our derivative conductivity measurements elucidate the existence of reentrant insulating phase (RIP) around the Landau level filling factor v = 1/5 in the 2D hole system. Moreover, we report the unexpected feature in the quantum phase transition between the Wigner Solid and FQHE liquid state in the 2D hole system under ultrahigh magnetic fields. Consequently, a systematic phase diagram is obtained based on our analysis. To our surprise, the excited electric field plays an equivalent role as the temperature in our specimen. From the duality of the electric field and temperature, a characteristic length of 450 nm is derived in our Analysis, which is the mean free path of the carriers. Based on the relation between the pinning gap and electric field, we obtained a characteristic domain size of the Wigner crystal.

  19. Phase transition of a quaternary ammonium Gemini surfactant induced by minor structural changes of protic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Li, Qintang; Wang, Xudong; Yue, Xiu; Chen, Xiao

    2014-02-18

    The aggregation behaviors of a Gemini surfactant [C12H25(CH3)2N(+)(CH2)2N(+)(CH3)2C12H25]Br2(-) (12-2-12) in two protic ionic liquids (PILs), propylammonium nitrate (PAN) and butylammonium nitrate (BAN), were investigated by means of several experimental techniques including small and wide-angle X-ray scattering, the polarized optical microscopy and the rheological measurement. Compared to those in ethylammonium nitrate (EAN), the minor structural changes with only one or two methylene units (-CH2-) increase in cationic chain length of PIL, result in a dramatic phase transition of formed aggregates. The critical micellization concentration was increased in PAN, while no micelle formation was detected in BAN. A normal hexagonal phase was observed in the 12-2-12/PAN system, while the normal hexagonal, bicontinuous cubic, and lamellar phases were mapped in the 12-2-12/BAN system. Such aggregation behavior changes can be ascribed to the weaker solvophobic interactions of 12-2-12 in PAN and BAN. The unique molecular structure of 12-2-12 is also an important factor to highlight such a dramatic phase transition due to the PIL structure change. PMID:24455981

  20. Two-state thermodynamics and the possibility of a liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled TIP4P/2005 water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rakesh S.; Biddle, John W.; Debenedetti, Pablo G.; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2016-04-01

    Water shows intriguing thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies in the supercooled liquid state. One possible explanation of the origin of these anomalies lies in the existence of a metastable liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) between two (high and low density) forms of water. While the anomalies are observed in experiments on bulk and confined water and by computer simulation studies of different water-like models, the existence of a LLPT in water is still debated. Unambiguous experimental proof of the existence of a LLPT in bulk supercooled water is hampered by fast ice nucleation which is a precursor of the hypothesized LLPT. Moreover, the hypothesized LLPT, being metastable, in principle cannot exist in the thermodynamic limit (infinite size, infinite time). Therefore, computer simulations of water models are crucial for exploring the possibility of the metastable LLPT and the nature of the anomalies. In this work, we present new simulation results in the NVT ensemble for one of the most accurate classical molecular models of water, TIP4P/2005. To describe the computed properties and explore the possibility of a LLPT, we have applied two-structure thermodynamics, viewing water as a non-ideal mixture of two interconvertible local structures ("states"). The results suggest the presence of a liquid-liquid critical point and are consistent with the existence of a LLPT in this model for the simulated length and time scales. We have compared the behavior of TIP4P/2005 with other popular water-like models, namely, mW and ST2, and with real water, all of which are well described by two-state thermodynamics. In view of the current debate involving different studies of TIP4P/2005, we discuss consequences of metastability and finite size in observing the liquid-liquid separation. We also address the relationship between the phenomenological order parameter of two-structure thermodynamics and the microscopic nature of the low-density structure.

  1. Two-state thermodynamics and the possibility of a liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled TIP4P/2005 water.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rakesh S; Biddle, John W; Debenedetti, Pablo G; Anisimov, Mikhail A

    2016-04-14

    Water shows intriguing thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies in the supercooled liquid state. One possible explanation of the origin of these anomalies lies in the existence of a metastable liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) between two (high and low density) forms of water. While the anomalies are observed in experiments on bulk and confined water and by computer simulation studies of different water-like models, the existence of a LLPT in water is still debated. Unambiguous experimental proof of the existence of a LLPT in bulk supercooled water is hampered by fast ice nucleation which is a precursor of the hypothesized LLPT. Moreover, the hypothesized LLPT, being metastable, in principle cannot exist in the thermodynamic limit (infinite size, infinite time). Therefore, computer simulations of water models are crucial for exploring the possibility of the metastable LLPT and the nature of the anomalies. In this work, we present new simulation results in the NVT ensemble for one of the most accurate classical molecular models of water, TIP4P/2005. To describe the computed properties and explore the possibility of a LLPT, we have applied two-structure thermodynamics, viewing water as a non-ideal mixture of two interconvertible local structures ("states"). The results suggest the presence of a liquid-liquid critical point and are consistent with the existence of a LLPT in this model for the simulated length and time scales. We have compared the behavior of TIP4P/2005 with other popular water-like models, namely, mW and ST2, and with real water, all of which are well described by two-state thermodynamics. In view of the current debate involving different studies of TIP4P/2005, we discuss consequences of metastability and finite size in observing the liquid-liquid separation. We also address the relationship between the phenomenological order parameter of two-structure thermodynamics and the microscopic nature of the low-density structure. PMID:27083735

  2. Effect of quenched disorder on the RI-RV, RII-RI, and liquid-RII rotator phase transitions in alkanes.

    PubMed

    Zammit, U; Marinelli, M; Mercuri, F; Paoloni, S; Scudieri, F

    2011-03-17

    The ability of disorder to reduce the coupling between the distortion and tilt angle order parameters was tested over the R(I)-R(V) phase transition by measuring the specific heat in alkanes with different R(I) phase temperature range mixed with various concentrations of silica nanoparticles. It was found that the disorder significantly affects the character of the R(I)-R(V) transition, driving it toward a second-order character. The features about the R(II)-R(I) transition were progressively attenuated for increasing disorder in both alkanes, becoming very faint for the largest particle concentration, but the first-order character was maintained. Over the liquid-R(II) transition, the single peak observed in both the specific heat and the latent heat in the pure materials splits into two features, at different temperatures, as over the isotropic-nematic transition in liquid crystals. PMID:21332108

  3. Theoretical approaches and experimental evidence for liquid-vapor phase transitions in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.; Elliott, J.B.; Phair, L.; Wozniak, G.J.; Mader, C.M.; Chappars, A.

    2001-01-01

    The leptodermous approximation is applied to nuclear systems for T > 0. The introduction of surface corrections leads to anomalous caloric curves and to negative heat capacities in the liquid-gas coexistence region. Clusterization in the vapor is described by associating surface energy to clusters according to Fisher's formula. The three-dimensional Ising model, a leptodermous system par excellence, does obey rigorously Fisher's scaling up to the critical point. Multifragmentation data from several experiments including the ISiS and EOS Collaborations, as well as compound nucleus fragment emission at much lower energy follow the same scaling, thus providing the strongest evidence yet of liquid-vapor coexistence.

  4. Is there evidence for a liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, A.S.; EOS Collaboration

    1994-09-01

    The multifragmentation of gold nuclei at 1 GeV/nucleon has been studied using reverse kinematics. The moments of the resulting charged fragment distribution have been analyzed using methods borrowed from percolation theory. These moments provide clear evidence for critical behavior occurring in a system of about 200 nucleons. The critical exponents extracted from the data are close to those of liquid-gas systems.

  5. LIGHT NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLS) are hydrocarbons that exist as a separate, immiscible phase when in contact with water and/or air. ifferences in the physical and chemical properties of water and NAPL result in the formation of a physical interface between the liquids which preve...

  6. Pre-Service Primary Science Teachers' Understandings of the Effect of Temperature and Pressure on Solid-Liquid Phase Transition of Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yalcin, Fatma Aggul

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore pre-service primary teachers' understandings of the effect of temperature and pressure on the solid-liquid phase transition of water. In the study a survey approach was used, and the sample consisted of one-hundred and three, third year pre-service primary science teachers. As a tool for data collection, a test…

  7. Pre-Service Primary Science Teachers' Understandings of the Effect of Temperature and Pressure on Solid-Liquid Phase Transition of Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yalcin, Fatma Aggul

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore pre-service primary teachers' understandings of the effect of temperature and pressure on the solid-liquid phase transition of water. In the study a survey approach was used, and the sample consisted of one-hundred and three, third year pre-service primary science teachers. As a tool for data collection, a test

  8. Phase Transitions in the Nucleus: the functional implications of concentration-dependent assembly of a Liquid-like RNA/Protein Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lian; Weber, Stephanie; Berry, Joel; Vaidya, Nilesh; Haataja, Mikko; Brangwynne, Clifford

    2015-03-01

    The nucleolus is a liquid-like membrane-less nuclear body which plays an important role in cell growth and size control. By modulating nucleolar component concentration through RNAi conditions that change C. elegans cell size, we find that nucleoli only assemble above a threshold concentration; moreover, the ripening dynamics of nucleated droplets are consistent with the hypothesis that the assembly of the nucleolus represents an intracellular liquid-liquid phase transition. A key question is how this phase-transition is linked to the primary function of the nucleolus, in transcribing and processing ribosomal RNA. To address this, we characterize the localization of RNA Polymerase I, a key transcriptional enzyme, into nucleolar foci as a function of nucleolar component concentration. Our results suggest that there are a small number of key disordered phosphoproteins that may serve as a link between transcription and assembly. Finally, we present preliminary results using a reduced model system consisting of purified nucleolar proteins to assess the ability of nucleolar proteins to drive liquid-liquid phase separation in vitro. These results lay the foundation for a quantitative understanding of intracellular phase transitions and their impact on biomedically-critical RNA-processing steps.

  9. Liquid crystalline phase transition induces spin crossover in a polyelectrolyte amphiphile complex.

    PubMed

    Bodenthin, Yves; Schwarz, Guntram; Tomkowicz, Zbigniew; Geue, Thomas; Haase, Wolfgang; Pietsch, Ullrich; Kurth, Dirk G

    2009-03-01

    Self-assembly of Fe(2+) or Ni(2+) ions and the ditopic ligand 6,6',6''-bis(2-pyridyl)-2,2':4',4'':2'',2'''-quaterpyridine (btpy) through coordinative binding results in rodlike metallosupramolecular coordination polyelectrolytes (Fe-MEPE or Ni-MEPE). Sequential self-assembly with dihexadecyl phosphate (DHP) via electrostatic interactions between MEPE and DHP leads to the corresponding polyelectrolyte amphiphile complex (PAC) with liquid crystalline properties. The MEPE rods are embedded in between the interdigitated DHP layers. Upon heating above room temperature, the Fe-PAC shows an irreversible spin-crossover (SCO) from a diamagnetic low-spin (LS) to a paramagnetic high-spin (HS) state accompanied by a color change from dark blue to pale blue. The SCO is nearly complete (95%) and directly associated with the structure changes induced by the melting of the amphiphilic matrix. The original Fe-PAC architecture does not reassemble upon cooling and remains in a disordered frozen HS state. However, dissolving the heated PAC induces reassembly, and the original dark blue, diamagnetic, ordered material is completely recovered. In comparison to Fe-PAC, Ni-PAC shows the same lamellar structure and the same temperature depended structure changes but has a constant magnetic moment. In contrast to Fe-PAC, in neat Fe-MEPE the SCO depends on the history of the sample and in particular on the amount of included solvent as thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and magnetic measurements indicate. Solid MEPE does not have liquid crystalline properties, and, therefore, the induced structure changes upon heating are constrained by the solid-state architecture, and thus, the SCO in Fe-MEPE is incomplete. PMID:19206474

  10. The role of anharmonicity in a variety of phase transitions controlled by pressure, including melting, brittle-to-ductile transition, and the liquid-vapour critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angilella, G. G. N.; March, N. H.; Matthai, C. C.; Pucci, R.

    2008-07-01

    A variety of phase transitions controlled by pressure are addressed, in which anharmonicity plays a central role. After a brief discussion of the melting temperature of some transition metals as a function of pressure, the brittle-to-ductile transition is treated. Finally, quantum critical points are briefly referred to, in relation to singular behaviour of the Grüneisen ratio.

  11. A Novel Liquid-Liquid Transition in Undercooled Ti-Zr-Ni Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, G. W.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Kelton, K. F.; Bradshaw, R. C.; Hyers, R. W.; Rathz, T. J.; Rogers, J. R.

    2004-01-01

    If crystallization can be avoided, liquids enter a metastable (undercooled) state below their equilibrium liquidus temperatures, T(sub l), finally 'freezing' into a glass below a characteristic temperature called the glass transition temperature, T(sub g). In rare cases, the undercooled liquid may undergo a liquid-liquid phase transition (liquid polymorphism) before entering the glassy state. This has been suggested from experimental studies of H2O and Si. Such phase transitions have been predicted in some stable liquids, ie. above T(sub l) at atmospheric pressure, for SiO2 and BeF2, but these have not been verified experimentally. They have been observed in liquids of P, Si and C, but only under high pressure. In this letter we present the first experimental evidence for a phase transition in a low viscosity metallic liquid that is driven by an approach to a constant entropy configuration state and correlated with a growing icosahedral order in the liquid. A maximum in the specific heat at constant pressure, similar to what is normally observed near T(sub g), is reported for undercooled liquids of quasicrystal-forming Ti-Zr-Ni alloys. A two-state excitation model that includes cooperativity by incorporating a temperature-dependent excitation energy, fits the specific heat data well, signaling a phase transition. An inflection in the liquid density with decreasing temperature instead of a discontinuity indicates that this is not a typical first order phase transition; it could be a weakly first order or higher order transition. While showing many similarities to a glass transition, this liquid-liquid phase transition occurs in a mobile liquid, making it novel.

  12. Phase transitions in operational risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Kartik; Kühn, Reimer

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we explore the functional correlation approach to operational risk. We consider networks with heterogeneous a priori conditional and unconditional failure probability. In the limit of sparse connectivity, self-consistent expressions for the dynamical evolution of order parameters are obtained. Under equilibrium conditions, expressions for the stationary states are also obtained. Consequences of the analytical theory developed are analyzed using phase diagrams. We find coexistence of operational and nonoperational phases, much as in liquid-gas systems. Such systems are susceptible to discontinuous phase transitions from the operational to nonoperational phase via catastrophic breakdown. We find this feature to be robust against variation of the microscopic modeling assumptions.

  13. Phase transitions in operational risk.

    PubMed

    Anand, Kartik; Kühn, Reimer

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we explore the functional correlation approach to operational risk. We consider networks with heterogeneous a priori conditional and unconditional failure probability. In the limit of sparse connectivity, self-consistent expressions for the dynamical evolution of order parameters are obtained. Under equilibrium conditions, expressions for the stationary states are also obtained. Consequences of the analytical theory developed are analyzed using phase diagrams. We find coexistence of operational and nonoperational phases, much as in liquid-gas systems. Such systems are susceptible to discontinuous phase transitions from the operational to nonoperational phase via catastrophic breakdown. We find this feature to be robust against variation of the microscopic modeling assumptions. PMID:17358228

  14. Compound nuclear decay and the liquid-vapor phase transition: A physical picture

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.; Elliott, J.B.; Phair, L.

    2005-12-15

    Analyses of multifragmentation in terms of the Fisher droplet model (FDM) and the associated construction of a nuclear phase diagram bring forth the problem of the actual existence of the nuclear vapor phase and the meaning of its associated pressure. We present here a physical picture of fragment production from excited nuclei that solves this problem and establishes the relationship between the FDM and the standard compound nucleus decay rate for rare particles emitted in first-chance decay. The compound thermal emission picture is formally equivalent to an FDM-like equilibrium description and avoids the problem of the vapor while also explaining the observation of Boltzmann-like distribution of emission times. In this picture, a simple Fermi gas thermometric relation is naturally justified and verified in the fragment yields and time scales. Low-energy compound nucleus fragment yields scale according to the FDM and lead to an estimate of the infinite symmetric nuclear matter critical temperature between 18 and 27 MeV depending on the choice of the surface energy coefficient of nuclear matter.

  15. Critical behavior at the isotropic to nematic, nematic to smectic-A and smectic-A to smectic-C phase transitions in a pyrimidine liquid crystal compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Anish; Chakraborty, Susanta; Kumar Das, Malay

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution optical birefringence (∆n) measurement of a pyrimidine liquid crystal compound having nematic, smectic-A and smectic-C phases are reported. The high-resolution ∆n data are rather successful in assessing the critical anomaly at different phase transitions in the investigated compound with a reasonably good accuracy. The critical exponent β, describing the limiting behavior of the nematic order parameter close to the isotropic-nematic (I-N) phase transition, is found to be in good agreement with the tricritical hypothesis. The critical behavior at the nematic-smectic-A (N-Sm-A) and the smectic-A-smectic-C (Sm-A-Sm-C) phase transitions has been explored with the aid of a differential quotient extracted from the ∆n values. The yielded effective critical exponent α‧ is appeared to be nearly tricritical in nature for the N-Sm-A phase transition. For the Sm-A-Sm-C phase transition, α‧ exhibits a weak dependence on the fit range and assumes tricritical value for large temperature range considered, which again is found to be diminished slightly with reduction in the temperature range. Related critical amplitude quotient and corrections-to-scaling quotient are found to display deviations from the theoretical models. Such behavior signals the appearance of a non-Landau character for the orthogonal to tilted smectic phase transition in the investigated compound.

  16. "Crystal-clear" liquid-liquid transition in a tetrahedral fluid.

    PubMed

    Starr, Francis W; Sciortino, Francesco

    2014-12-21

    For a model known to exhibit liquid-liquid transitions, we examine how varying the bond orientational flexibility affects the stability of the liquid-liquid transition relative to that of the crystal phases. For very rigidly oriented bonds, the crystal is favored over all amorphous phase transitions. We find that increasing the bond flexibility decreases both the critical temperature Tc for liquid-liquid phase separation and the melting temperature Tm. The effect of increasing flexibility is much stronger for melting, so that the distance between Tc and Tm progressively reduces and inverts sign. Under these conditions, a "naked" liquid-liquid critical point bulges out in the liquid phase and becomes accessible, without the possibility of crystallization. These results confirm that a crystal-clear, liquid-liquid transition can occur as a genuine, thermodynamically stable phenomenon for tetrahedral coordinated particles with flexible bond orientation, but that such a transition is hidden by crystallization when bonds are highly directional. PMID:25349962

  17. Maier-Saupe model of liquid crystals: isotropic-nematic phase transitions and second-order statistics studied by Shiino's perturbation theory and strongly nonlinear Smoluchowski equations.

    PubMed

    Frank, T D

    2005-10-01

    We study the first- and second-order statistical properties of a dynamical Maier-Saupe model for liquid crystals that is given in terms of a nonlinear Smoluchowski equation. Using Shiino's perturbation theory, we analyze the first-order statistics and give a rigorous proof of the emergence of a phase transition from a uniform distribution to a nonuniform distribution, reflecting phase transitions from isotropic to nematic phases, as observed in nematic liquid crystals. Using the concept of strongly nonlinear Fokker-Planck equations, the second-order statistics of the dynamical Maier-Saupe model is studied and an analytical expression for the short-time autocorrelation function of the orientation of the crystal molecules is derived. PMID:16383398

  18. Temperature-tunable scattering strength based on the phase transition of liquid crystal infiltrated in well-defined macroporous random media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, Shunsuke; Fujita, Koji; Hirao, Takayuki; Nakanishi, Kazuki; Hirao, Kazuyuki

    2007-04-01

    Temperature dependence of scattering strength for the visible light (488 nm) has been investigated for a siloxane-based macroporous monolith infiltrated with liquid crystal molecules. A macroporous gel with interconnected pores and organosiloxane skeletons is prepared via a sol-gel route by inducing the phase separation parallel to the hydrolysis and condensation of silicon alkoxide. The interconnected macropores of the dried gel are infiltrated with liquid crystal 4-cyano-4'- n-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) which undergoes the phase transition between nematic and isotropic at 35 °C. Temperature variation of the scattering strength for 5CB-filled gel is measured by means of coherent backscattering and total transmission, both of which exhibit a significant change in transport mean free path at around the phase transition temperature of 5CB. The results indicate that the scattering strength of 5CB-filled monolith gel can be tuned externally via temperature.

  19. Interaction and Response of a Smectic-A liquid crystal to a 2 nm Nanometer Particle: Phase transition due to the Functionalization Compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Miranda, Luz J.; Kurihara, Lynn K.

    2009-03-01

    We have studied the in-plane (parallel to the magnetic field) alignment of 8CB mixed with FeCo nanoparticles covered with different funtionalization compounds. The functionalization compounds are Polyethelene glycol (PEG (3000)), hydroxyl succinimide (NHS), aminopropyl tri-ethoxy silane (APTS) and mercapto hexa-decanoic acid (MHDA). We have studied them using X-ray scattering. We have found that the inverse integrated intensity of the X-ray scans in the plane of the magnetic field is a good measure of how much energy the system (liquid crystal, nanoparticles, functionalization compound) will need to reorient the liquid crystal in the magnetic field. In addition, we have observed that the orientation the liquid crystal adopts with respect to the nanoparticles can result in a phase transition that takes the liquid crystal to a more disordered and symmetric phase that favors the rotation, as happens in the smectic-nematic transition, observed in the sample with APTS. We relate the disordering to the changes observed in the transition for the liquid crystal and this termination to recent heat capacity measurements by Cordoyiannis et al. [1]. References [1] Cordoyiannis, G., Kurihara, L.K., Martinez-Miranda, L. J, Glorieux, C., Thoen, J., submitted to PRE (2008).

  20. Order-parameter-aided temperature-accelerated sampling for the exploration of crystal polymorphism and solid-liquid phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Tang-Qing Vanden-Eijnden, Eric; Chen, Pei-Yang; Chen, Ming; Samanta, Amit; Tuckerman, Mark

    2014-06-07

    The problem of predicting polymorphism in atomic and molecular crystals constitutes a significant challenge both experimentally and theoretically. From the theoretical viewpoint, polymorphism prediction falls into the general class of problems characterized by an underlying rough energy landscape, and consequently, free energy based enhanced sampling approaches can be brought to bear on the problem. In this paper, we build on a scheme previously introduced by two of the authors in which the lengths and angles of the supercell are targeted for enhanced sampling via temperature accelerated adiabatic free energy dynamics [T. Q. Yu and M. E. Tuckerman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 015701 (2011)]. Here, that framework is expanded to include general order parameters that distinguish different crystalline arrangements as target collective variables for enhanced sampling. The resulting free energy surface, being of quite high dimension, is nontrivial to reconstruct, and we discuss one particular strategy for performing the free energy analysis. The method is applied to the study of polymorphism in xenon crystals at high pressure and temperature using the Steinhardt order parameters without and with the supercell included in the set of collective variables. The expected fcc and bcc structures are obtained, and when the supercell parameters are included as collective variables, we also find several new structures, including fcc states with hcp stacking faults. We also apply the new method to the solid-liquid phase transition in copper at 1300 K using the same Steinhardt order parameters. Our method is able to melt and refreeze the system repeatedly, and the free energy profile can be obtained with high efficiency.

  1. Order-parameter-aided temperature-accelerated sampling for the exploration of crystal polymorphism and solid-liquid phase transitions

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tang-Qing; Chen, Pei-Yang; Chen, Ming; Samanta, Amit; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric; Tuckerman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The problem of predicting polymorphism in atomic and molecular crystals constitutes a significant challenge both experimentally and theoretically. From the theoretical viewpoint, polymorphism prediction falls into the general class of problems characterized by an underlying rough energy landscape, and consequently, free energy based enhanced sampling approaches can be brought to bear on the problem. In this paper, we build on a scheme previously introduced by two of the authors in which the lengths and angles of the supercell are targeted for enhanced sampling via temperature accelerated adiabatic free energy dynamics [T. Q. Yu and M. E. Tuckerman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 015701 (2011)]. Here, that framework is expanded to include general order parameters that distinguish different crystalline arrangements as target collective variables for enhanced sampling. The resulting free energy surface, being of quite high dimension, is nontrivial to reconstruct, and we discuss one particular strategy for performing the free energy analysis. The method is applied to the study of polymorphism in xenon crystals at high pressure and temperature using the Steinhardt order parameters without and with the supercell included in the set of collective variables. The expected fcc and bcc structures are obtained, and when the supercell parameters are included as collective variables, we also find several new structures, including fcc states with hcp stacking faults. We also apply the new method to the solid-liquid phase transition in copper at 1300 K using the same Steinhardt order parameters. Our method is able to melt and refreeze the system repeatedly, and the free energy profile can be obtained with high efficiency. PMID:24907992

  2. A Liquid-Liquid Transition in an Undercooled Ti-Zr-Ni Liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, G. W.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Kelton, K. F.; Hyers, R. W.; Rathz, T. J.; Rogers, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    If crystallization can be avoided, liquids enter a metastable (undercooled) state below their equilibrium liquidus temperatures, TI, finally freezing into a glass below a characteristic temperature called the glass transition temperature, T,. In rare cases, the undercooled liquid may undergo a liquid-liquid phase transition (liquid polymorphism) before entering the glassy state. This has been suggested from experimental studies of HzO and Si4. Such phase transitions have been predicted in some stable liquids, i.e. above TI at atmospheric pressure, for Si02 and BeF;, but these have not been verified experimentally. They have been observed in liquids of P7, Sis and C9, but only under high pressure. All of these transitions are driven by an anomalous density change, i.e. change in local structure, with temperature or pressure. In this letter we present the first experimental evidence for a phase transition in a low viscosity liquid that is not driven by an anomalous density change, but by an approach to a constant configuration state. A maximum in the specific heat at constant pressure, similar to what is normally observed near T,, is reported here for undercooled low viscosity liquids of quasicrystal- forming Ti-Zr-Ni alloys. that includes cooperativity, by incorporating a temperature dependent excitation energy fits the data well, signaling a phase transition.

  3. Noise and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi; Yu, Clare C.

    2006-03-01

    Noise is present in many physical systems and is often viewed as a nuisance. Yet it can also be a probe of microscopic fluctuations. There have been indications recently that the noise in the resistivity increases in the vicinity of the metal-insulator transition. But what are the characteristics of the noise associated with well-understood first and second order phase transitions? It is well known that critical fluctuations are associated with second order phase transitions, but do these fluctuations lead to enhanced noise? We have addressed these questions using Monte Carlo simulations to study the noise in the 2D Ising model which undergoes a second order phase transition, and in the 5-state Potts model which undergoes a first order phase transition. We monitor these systems as the temperature drops below the critical temperature. At each temperature, after equilibration is established, we obtain the time series of quantities characterizing the properties of the system, i.e., the energy and magnetization per site. We apply different methods, such as the noise power spectrum, the Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) and the second spectrum of the noise, to analyze the fluctuations in these quantities.

  4. Volume phase transition mechanism of poly[oligo(ethylene glycol)methacrylate] based thermo-responsive microgels with poly(ionic liquid) cross-linkers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuanyuan; Tang, Hui; Wu, Peiyi

    2015-10-14

    Thermo-dynamic volume phase transition mechanisms of poly[oligo(ethylene glycol)methacrylate] (POEGMA) based microgels with poly(ionic liquid) (PIL) cross-linking moieties are investigated in detail on the basis of temperature-dependent Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The original FTIR data are further analysed by two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2Dcos) with the perturbation correlation moving window (PCMW) technique. It is observed that the content of hydrophilic PIL cross-linking structure strongly affects the temperature induced volume phase transition mechanism of microgels in which the less cross-linked microgel exhibits a sharp volume phase transition process while the highly cross-linked microgel presents a broad transition behavior. Peculiarly, the dehydration of C-H groups acts as the driving force for the whole phase transition process within the less cross-linked microgel network and cooperative response of chemical groups is identified. It is deduced that the hydrophilic PIL moieties develop polymer-water-polymer interactions with C=O groups as C=OD2O-PIL hydrogen bonds emerge in the less cross-linked system. As regards the highly cross-linked microgel system, the phase transition process is driven by the disruption of hydrogen bonds between C=O groups and water molecules while the response of C-H groups becomes insensitive. PIL moieties passively dehydrate following the dehydration of C-H groups on oligo(ethylene glycol) side chains and no hydrogen bond between C=O group and IL-D2O association appears during the phase transition process. PMID:26366718

  5. CdSe nanoparticles dispersed in ferroelectric smectic liquid crystals: effects upon the smectic order and the smectic-A to chiral smectic-C phase transition.

    PubMed

    Thanassoulas, Angelos; Karatairi, Eva; Cordoyiannis, George; Kutnjak, Zdravko; Tzitzios, Vassilios; Lelidis, Ioannis; Nounesis, George

    2013-09-01

    Spherical CdSe nanoparticles, surface-treated with oleylamine and tri-octylphosphine, dispersed in ferroelectric liquid crystals, can efficiently target disclination lines, substantially altering the macroscopic properties of the host compound. Here we present an ac calorimetry and x-ray diffraction study demonstrating that for a large range of nanoparticle concentrations the smectic-A layer thickness increases monotonically. This provides evidence for enhanced accumulation of nanoparticles at the smectic layers. Our results for the Smectic-A (SmA) to chiral smectic-C (SmC) phase transition of the liquid crystal S-(+)4-(2'-methylbutyl)phenyl-4'-n-octylbiphenyl-4-carboxylate (CE8) reveal that the character of the transition is profoundly changed as a function of the nanoparticle concentration. Large transition temperature shifts are recorded. Moreover, the heat-capacity peaks exhibit a crossover trend to a step-like anomaly. This behavior may be linked to the weakening of the SmA and SmC order parameter coupling responsible for the observed near-tricritical, mean-field character of the transition in bulk CE8. At lower temperatures, the presence of nanoparticles disrupts the phase sequence involving the tilted hexatic phases most likely by obstructing the establishment of long-range bond-orientational order. PMID:24125282

  6. Critical behavior of director fluctuations in suspensions of ferroelectric nanoparticles in liquid crystals at the nematic to smectic-A phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertelj, Alenka; Cmok, Luka; Čopič, Martin; Cook, Gary; Evans, Dean R.

    2012-02-01

    By dynamic light scattering we studied the temperature dependence of scattered intensities and relaxation rates for pure twist and pure bend modes in a colloidal system of BaTiO3 single domain nanoparticles and liquid crystal octylcyanobiphenyl (8CB) close to the nematic to smectic-A phase transition. From the experiments we obtained the critical exponents for the smectic correlation lengths, which in suspensions differ from the values for pure 8CB. The phase transition temperatures from isotropic to nematic phase (TNI) and from nematic to smectic-A phase (TNA) are both affected by the presence of the particles in two ways. The electric field around the ferroelectric particles increases the transition temperatures, whereas the disorder and probably also the excess of the surfactant cause a decrease of the transition temperatures compared to pure 8CB. The net effect is lower TNI and almost unchanged TNA in suspensions. After prolonged exposure to the external field the ferroelectric particles irreversibly aggregate, which results in the decrease of the internal electric field and, consequently, in the decrease of both transition temperatures.

  7. String mediated phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, ED; Haws, D.; Rivers, R.; Holbraad, S.

    1988-01-01

    It is demonstrated from first principles how the existence of string-like structures can cause a system to undergo a phase transition. In particular, the role of topologically stable cosmic string in the restoration of spontaneously broken symmetries is emphasized. How the thermodynamic properties of strings alter when stiffness and nearest neighbor string-string interactions are included is discussed.

  8. Effect of carbon nanotubes on the isotropic to nematic and the nematic to smectic- A phase transitions in liquid crystal and carbon nanotubes composites.

    PubMed

    Sigdel, K P; Iannacchione, G S

    2011-04-01

    A high-resolution ac-calorimetric study on the weakly first-order isotropic to nematic (I -N) and the continuous nematic to smectic-A (N -SmA) phase transitions of the liquid crystal octyl-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) doped with well-dispersed multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a function of CNT concentrations is reported. Thermal scans were performed for all samples having CNT weight fraction from Φ(w) = 0.0005 to 0.0060 over a wide temperature range well above and below the two transitions in pure 8CB. Both the I -N and the N -SmA transitions evolve in character and have their transition temperatures qualitatively offset by ∼ 1.10 K lower as compared to that in pure 8CB for all 8CB+CNTs samples. The enthalpy change associated with each phase transition is essentially the same as that of pure 8CB and remains unchanged with increasing Φ(w). However, there is an evidence that the thermal transport properties of the composites differ from the pure LC upon cooling below a Φ(w)-dependent temperature within the nematic phase. In addition, a new C(p) feature is resolved for intermediate Φ(w) samples that appears to be correlated to this onset temperature. PMID:21476134

  9. Unraveling the Solid-Liquid-Vapor Phase Transition Dynamics at the Atomic Level with Ultrafast X-Ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dorchies, F.; Goyon, C.; Descamps, D.; Fourment, C.; Harmand, M.; Hulin, S.; Leguay, P. M.; Petit, S.; Peyrusse, O.; Santos, J. J.; Levy, A.; Combis, P.

    2011-12-09

    X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) is a powerful probe of electronic and atomic structures in various media, ranging from molecules to condensed matter. We show how ultrafast time resolution opens new possibilities to investigate highly nonequilibrium states of matter including phase transitions. Based on a tabletop laser-plasma ultrafast x-ray source, we have performed a time-resolved ({approx}3 ps) XANES experiment that reveals the evolution of an aluminum foil at the atomic level, when undergoing ultrafast laser heating and ablation. X-ray absorption spectra highlight an ultrafast transition from the crystalline solid to the disordered liquid followed by a progressive transition of the delocalized valence electronic structure (metal) down to localized atomic orbitals (nonmetal--vapor), as the average distance between atoms increases.

  10. Time- and Space-Resolved SAXS Experiments Inform on Phase Transition Kinetics in Hydrated, Liquid-Crystalline Films of Polyion-Surfactant Ion "Complex Salts".

    PubMed

    Li, Joaquim; Gustavsson, Charlotte; Piculell, Lennart

    2016-05-24

    Detailed time- and space-resolved SAXS experiments show the variation with hydration of liquid crystalline structures in ethanol-cast 5-80 μm thick films of polyion-surfactant ion "complex salts" (CS). The CS were dodecyl- (C12) or hexadecyl- (C16) trimethylammonium surfactants with polyacrylate (DP 25 or 6000) counter-polyions. The experiments were carried out on vertical films in humid air above a movable water bath, so that gradients of hydration were generated, which could rapidly be altered. Scans over different positions along a film, kept fixed relative to the bath, showed that the surfactant aggregates of the various liquid-crystalline CS structures grow in cross-sectional area with decreasing hydration. This behavior is attributed to the low water content. Studies of films undergoing rapid dehydration, made possible by the original experimental setup, gave strong evidence that some of the investigated systems remain kinetically trapped for minutes in a nonequilibrium Pm3n micellar cubic phase before switching to the equilibrium P6mm 2D hexagonal phase. Both the length of the polyion and the length of the surfactant hydrocarbon "tail" affect the kinetics of the phase transition. The slowness of the cubic-to-hexagonal structural transition is attributed to the fact that it requires major rearrangements of the polyions and surfactant ions relative to each other. By contrast, other structure changes, such as between the hexagonal and rectangular phases, were observed to occur much more rapidly. PMID:27153140

  11. Novel liquid crystal phase transition of linear defects in an epitaxial layer of DNA-nanoparticle superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Saijie; Boon, Niels; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    We use Monte Carlo simulations and mean-field theory to study a lattice model system in which DNA-coated nanoparticles form an epitaxial layer onto a patterned bcc (100) template. If nanoparticles only attach to the so-called ``center'' sites, each of which is the center of a unit cell in the square lattice template, it would result in a perfect bcc epitaxial layer. However, defects arise due to attachment to ``edge'' sites and ``corner'' sites. In simulation, we show that edge-binding defects prefer to form linear clusters in horizontal and vertical directions. These linear defects can undergo a second-order isotropic-nematic phase transition in some regimes. A mean-field approach is introduced to provide theoretical descriptions for the system in each of the phases and predict the critical phase transition conditions. Striking agreement is observed between the theory and simulation. This work was supported by the the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) FA9550-11-1-0275.

  12. Reversible suppression of second harmonic generation in dye-doped liquid crystal by light-induced thermal phase transition on sub-micrometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Guan-Yu; Chen, Kuan-Chieh; Lai, Kai-Wen; Wang, Chao-Ran; Chao, Chih-Yu; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2015-02-01

    Optically controllable signals are fundamental to various applications from communication to super-resolution imaging. However, literature on non-fluorescent, nonlinear optical signals that can be reversibly turned on/off on a sub-micrometer scale is scant. In this work, we experimentally demonstrate a scheme for the reversible suppression of second harmonic generation (SHG) based on dye-doped nematic liquid crystal molecules. Under a pump (suppressing SHG) and probe (generating SHG) setup with a tightly focusing microscope and a time-gated detection, outstanding modulation depth (>80%) has been realized. Surprisingly, the mechanism of liquid crystal SHG switch on a sub-micrometer scale was found to be light-induced thermal phase transition as against optical Frederick's transition. Quantitative analysis of the optical nonlinearity χ ( 2 ) versus local heating shows an excellent agreement of SHG signal suppression as well as its dependence on the liquid crystal molecular order and phase change. Our work provides an innovative example of applying nonlinear optical properties of soft materials, and can be further optimized for all-optical modulation applications.

  13. Metastable liquid-liquid transition in a molecular model of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Jeremy C.; Martelli, Fausto; Liu, Yang; Car, Roberto; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.; Debenedetti, Pablo G.

    2014-06-01

    Liquid water's isothermal compressibility and isobaric heat capacity, and the magnitude of its thermal expansion coefficient, increase sharply on cooling below the equilibrium freezing point. Many experimental, theoretical and computational studies have sought to understand the molecular origin and implications of this anomalous behaviour. Of the different theoretical scenarios put forward, one posits the existence of a first-order phase transition that involves two forms of liquid water and terminates at a critical point located at deeply supercooled conditions. Some experimental evidence is consistent with this hypothesis, but no definitive proof of a liquid-liquid transition in water has been obtained to date: rapid ice crystallization has so far prevented decisive measurements on deeply supercooled water, although this challenge has been overcome recently. Computer simulations are therefore crucial for exploring water's structure and behaviour in this regime, and have shown that some water models exhibit liquid-liquid transitions and others do not. However, recent work has argued that the liquid-liquid transition has been mistakenly interpreted, and is in fact a liquid-crystal transition in all atomistic models of water. Here we show, by studying the liquid-liquid transition in the ST2 model of water with the use of six advanced sampling methods to compute the free-energy surface, that two metastable liquid phases and a stable crystal phase exist at the same deeply supercooled thermodynamic condition, and that the transition between the two liquids satisfies the thermodynamic criteria of a first-order transition. We follow the rearrangement of water's coordination shell and topological ring structure along a thermodynamically reversible path from the low-density liquid to cubic ice. We also show that the system fluctuates freely between the two liquid phases rather than crystallizing. These findings provide unambiguous evidence for a liquid-liquid transition in the ST2 model of water, and point to the separation of time scales between crystallization and relaxation as being crucial for enabling it.

  14. Metastable liquid-liquid transition in a molecular model of water.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Jeremy C; Martelli, Fausto; Liu, Yang; Car, Roberto; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2014-06-19

    Liquid water's isothermal compressibility and isobaric heat capacity, and the magnitude of its thermal expansion coefficient, increase sharply on cooling below the equilibrium freezing point. Many experimental, theoretical and computational studies have sought to understand the molecular origin and implications of this anomalous behaviour. Of the different theoretical scenarios put forward, one posits the existence of a first-order phase transition that involves two forms of liquid water and terminates at a critical point located at deeply supercooled conditions. Some experimental evidence is consistent with this hypothesis, but no definitive proof of a liquid-liquid transition in water has been obtained to date: rapid ice crystallization has so far prevented decisive measurements on deeply supercooled water, although this challenge has been overcome recently. Computer simulations are therefore crucial for exploring water's structure and behaviour in this regime, and have shown that some water models exhibit liquid-liquid transitions and others do not. However, recent work has argued that the liquid-liquid transition has been mistakenly interpreted, and is in fact a liquid-crystal transition in all atomistic models of water. Here we show, by studying the liquid-liquid transition in the ST2 model of water with the use of six advanced sampling methods to compute the free-energy surface, that two metastable liquid phases and a stable crystal phase exist at the same deeply supercooled thermodynamic condition, and that the transition between the two liquids satisfies the thermodynamic criteria of a first-order transition. We follow the rearrangement of water's coordination shell and topological ring structure along a thermodynamically reversible path from the low-density liquid to cubic ice. We also show that the system fluctuates freely between the two liquid phases rather than crystallizing. These findings provide unambiguous evidence for a liquid-liquid transition in the ST2 model of water, and point to the separation of time scales between crystallization and relaxation as being crucial for enabling it. PMID:24943954

  15. Phase equilibria of a polymer discotic liquid crystal mixture.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tsang-Min; Kyu, Thein

    2009-03-01

    Thermodynamic phase diagrams of a polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) containing a monomeric discotic liquid crystal (DLC) and a polymer have been established theoretically by combing Flory-Huggins theory for the free energy of mixing of isotropic phase and Chandrasekhar-Clark theory for the phase transition of hexagonal crystalline ordering of discotic liquid crystals. By varying interaction parameter of hexagonal columnar phase, columnar-isotropic and columnar-nematic-isotropic phase transitions can be predicted. The spinodal line of the columnar DLC/polymer will be calculated in conjunction with the conventional liquid-liquid spinodal. Effects of various molecular parameters on the columnar LC phase diagram will be discussed.

  16. GPU-Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Simulation to Study Liquid Crystal Phase Transition Using Coarse-Grained Gay-Berne Anisotropic Potential.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenduo; Zhu, Youliang; Cui, Fengchao; Liu, Lunyang; Sun, Zhaoyan; Chen, Jizhong; Li, Yunqi

    2016-01-01

    Gay-Berne (GB) potential is regarded as an accurate model in the simulation of anisotropic particles, especially for liquid crystal (LC) mesogens. However, its computational complexity leads to an extremely time-consuming process for large systems. Here, we developed a GPU-accelerated molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with coarse-grained GB potential implemented in GALAMOST package to investigate the LC phase transitions for mesogens in small molecules, main-chain or side-chain polymers. For identical mesogens in three different molecules, on cooling from fully isotropic melts, the small molecules form a single-domain smectic-B phase, while the main-chain LC polymers prefer a single-domain nematic phase as a result of connective restraints in neighboring mesogens. The phase transition of side-chain LC polymers undergoes a two-step process: nucleation of nematic islands and formation of multi-domain nematic texture. The particular behavior originates in the fact that the rotational orientation of the mesogenes is hindered by the polymer backbones. Both the global distribution and the local orientation of mesogens are critical for the phase transition of anisotropic particles. Furthermore, compared with the MD simulation in LAMMPS, our GPU-accelerated code is about 4 times faster than the GPU version of LAMMPS and at least 200 times faster than the CPU version of LAMMPS. This study clearly shows that GPU-accelerated MD simulation with GB potential in GALAMOST can efficiently handle systems with anisotropic particles and interactions, and accurately explore phase differences originated from molecular structures. PMID:26986851

  17. GPU-Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Simulation to Study Liquid Crystal Phase Transition Using Coarse-Grained Gay-Berne Anisotropic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Fengchao; Liu, Lunyang; Sun, Zhaoyan; Chen, Jizhong; Li, Yunqi

    2016-01-01

    Gay-Berne (GB) potential is regarded as an accurate model in the simulation of anisotropic particles, especially for liquid crystal (LC) mesogens. However, its computational complexity leads to an extremely time-consuming process for large systems. Here, we developed a GPU-accelerated molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with coarse-grained GB potential implemented in GALAMOST package to investigate the LC phase transitions for mesogens in small molecules, main-chain or side-chain polymers. For identical mesogens in three different molecules, on cooling from fully isotropic melts, the small molecules form a single-domain smectic-B phase, while the main-chain LC polymers prefer a single-domain nematic phase as a result of connective restraints in neighboring mesogens. The phase transition of side-chain LC polymers undergoes a two-step process: nucleation of nematic islands and formation of multi-domain nematic texture. The particular behavior originates in the fact that the rotational orientation of the mesogenes is hindered by the polymer backbones. Both the global distribution and the local orientation of mesogens are critical for the phase transition of anisotropic particles. Furthermore, compared with the MD simulation in LAMMPS, our GPU-accelerated code is about 4 times faster than the GPU version of LAMMPS and at least 200 times faster than the CPU version of LAMMPS. This study clearly shows that GPU-accelerated MD simulation with GB potential in GALAMOST can efficiently handle systems with anisotropic particles and interactions, and accurately explore phase differences originated from molecular structures. PMID:26986851

  18. Sudden switchover between the polyamorphic phase separation and the glass-to-liquid transition in glassy LiCl aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshiharu; Mishima, Osamu

    2013-02-01

    Lithium chloride aqueous solutions (LiClaq solutions) below 10 mol.% are vitrified by cooling from room temperature to 77 K at 0.3 GPa. We examine the solvent state of the glassy sample and its transformation by heating at 1 atm using low-temperature differential scanning calorimetry and Raman spectroscopy. This experimental study suggests strongly that the solvent state of the glassy LiClaq solution closely relates to the state of high-density amorphous ice. Moreover, we reconfirm that the separation into the low-density amorphous ice and the glassy highly concentrated LiClaq solution occurs in the glassy dilute LiClaq solution at ˜130 K, not the glass-to-liquid transition which is commonly observed in the glassy LiClaq solution above ˜10 mol.%. In order to interpret the sudden switchover between the glass-to-liquid transition and the phase separation at ˜10 mol.%, we propose a state diagram of LiClaq solution which connects with a polyamorphic state diagram of pure water and discuss a possibility that the electric field induces a polyamorphic transition of water.

  19. Quantum phase transitions in disordered magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozadze, David

    We study the effects of quenched weak disorder on quantum phase transitions in disordered magnets. The presence of disorder in the system can lead to a variety of exotic phenomena, e.g., the smearing of transitions or quantum Griffiths singularities. Phase transitions are smeared if individual spatial regions can order independently of the bulk system. In paper I, we study smeared quantum phase transitions in binary alloys A1-xBx that are tuned by changing the composition x. We show that in this case the ordered phase is extended over all compositions x < 1. We also study the composition dependence of observables. In paper II, we investigate the influence of spatial disorder correlations on smeared phase transitions. As an experimental example, we demonstrate in paper III, that the composition-driven ferromagnetic-toparamagnetic quantum phase transition in Sr1-xCaxRuO3 is smeared. When individual spatial regions cannot order but fluctuate slowly, the phase transition is characterized by strong singularities in the quantum Griffiths phase. In paper IV, we develop a theory of the quantum Griffiths phases in disordered ferromagnetic metals. We show that the quantum Griffiths singularities are stronger than the usual power-law quantum Griffiths singularities in insulating magnets. In paper V, we present an efficient numerical method for studying quantum phase transitions in disordered systems with O(N) order parameter symmetry in the large-N limit. Our algorithm solves iteratively the large-N self-consistent equations for the renormalized distances from criticality. Paper VI is devoted to the study of transport properties in the quantum Griffiths phase associated with the antiferromagnetic quantum phase transition in a metal. We find unusual behavior of transport properties which is in contrast to the normal Fermi-liquid behavior.

  20. Diffusion phase transitions in alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinovshchikov, Yu I.

    2014-07-01

    We present a critical analysis of research on the thermodynamics, kinetics, and morphology of diffusion phase transitions in alloys. We show that diffusion phase transitions are mainly driven by the chemical potential difference due to a change in the sign of the chemical interaction among the component atoms. We explain how the sign of the chemical interaction energy can be obtained from experimental measurements. Examples are given to illustrate the kinetics and morphology of the ordering-separation phase transition in Ni- and Co-based alloys. We show how introducing the concept of the ordering-separation phase transition may affect our thinking in this area.

  1. Quantum phase transition in space

    SciTech Connect

    Damski, Bogdan; Zurek, Wojciech H

    2008-01-01

    A quantum phase transition between the symmetric (polar) phase and the phase with broken symmetry can be induced in a ferromagnetic spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate in space (rather than in time). We consider such a phase transition and show that the transition region in the vicinity of the critical point exhibits scalings that reflect a compromise between the rate at which the transition is imposed (i.e., the gradient of the control parameter) and the scaling of the divergent healing length in the critical region. Our results suggest a method for the direct measurement of the scaling exponent {nu}.

  2. Bond orientational order in liquids: Towards a unified description of water-like anomalies, liquid-liquid transition, glass transition, and crystallization: Bond orientational order in liquids.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hajime

    2012-10-01

    There are at least three fundamental states of matter, depending upon temperature and pressure: gas, liquid, and solid (crystal). These states are separated by first-order phase transitions between them. In both gas and liquid phases a complete translational and rotational symmetry exist, whereas in a solid phase both symmetries are broken. In intermediate phases between liquid and solid, which include liquid crystal and plastic crystal phases, only one of the two symmetries is preserved. Among the fundamental states of matter, the liquid state is the most poorly understood. We argue that it is crucial for a better understanding of liquids to recognize that a liquid generally has the tendency to have a local structural order and its presence is intrinsic and universal to any liquid. Such structural ordering is a consequence of many-body correlations, more specifically, bond angle correlations, which we believe are crucial for the description of the liquid state. We show that this physical picture may naturally explain difficult unsolved problems associated with the liquid state, such as anomalies of water-type liquids (water, Si, Ge, ...), liquid-liquid transition, liquid-glass transition, crystallization and quasicrystal formation, in a unified manner. In other words, we need a new order parameter representing a low local free-energy configuration, which is a bond orientational order parameter in many cases, in addition to a density order parameter for the physical description of these phenomena. Here we review our two-order-parameter model of liquid and consider how transient local structural ordering is linked to all of the above-mentioned phenomena. The relationship between these phenomena is also discussed. PMID:23104614

  3. Integrated modeling of CO2 storage and leakage scenarios including transitions between super- and sub-critical conditions, and phase change between liquid and gaseous CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    2011-05-15

    Storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers is intended to be at supercritical pressure and temperature conditions, but CO{sub 2} leaking from a geologic storage reservoir and migrating toward the land surface (through faults, fractures, or improperly abandoned wells) would reach subcritical conditions at depths shallower than 500-750 m. At these and shallower depths, subcritical CO{sub 2} can form two-phase mixtures of liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}, with significant latent heat effects during boiling and condensation. Additional strongly non-isothermal effects can arise from decompression of gas-like subcritical CO{sub 2}, the so-called Joule-Thomson effect. Integrated modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and leakage requires the ability to model non-isothermal flows of brine and CO{sub 2} at conditions that range from supercritical to subcritical, including three-phase flow of aqueous phase, and both liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate comprehensive simulation capabilities that can cope with all possible phase conditions in brine-CO{sub 2} systems. Our model formulation includes: (1) an accurate description of thermophysical properties of aqueous and CO{sub 2}-rich phases as functions of temperature, pressure, salinity and CO{sub 2} content, including the mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O; (2) transitions between super- and subcritical conditions, including phase change between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}; (3) one-, two-, and three-phase flow of brine-CO{sub 2} mixtures, including heat flow; (4) non-isothermal effects associated with phase change, mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and water, and (de-) compression effects; and (5) the effects of dissolved NaCl, and the possibility of precipitating solid halite, with associated porosity and permeability change. Applications to specific leakage scenarios demonstrate that the peculiar thermophysical properties of CO{sub 2} provide a potential for positive as well as negative feedbacks on leakage rates, with a combination of self-enhancing and self-limiting effects. Lower viscosity and density of CO{sub 2} as compared to aqueous fluids provides a potential for self-enhancing effects during leakage, while strong cooling effects from liquid CO{sub 2} boiling into gas, and from expansion of gas rising towards the land surface, act to self-limit discharges. Strong interference between fluid phases under three-phase conditions (aqueous - liquid CO{sub 2} - gaseous CO{sub 2}) also tends to reduce CO{sub 2} fluxes. Feedback on different space and time scales can induce non-monotonic behavior of CO{sub 2} flow rates.

  4. Liquid Phase Sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Industry spends billions of dollars each year on machine tools to manufacture products out of metal. This includes tools for cutting every kind of metal part from engine blocks to Shuttle main engine components. Cutting tool tips often break because of weak spots or defects in their composition. Based on a new concept called defect trapping, space offers a novel environment to study defect formation in molten metal materials as they solidify. After the return of these materials from space, researchers can evaluate the source of the defect and seek ways to eliminate them in products prepared on Earth. A widely used process for cutting tip manufacturing is liquid phase sintering. Compared to Earth-sintered samples which slump due to buoyancy induced by gravity, space samples are uniformly shaped and defects remain where they are formed. By studying metals sintered in space the US tool industry can potentially enhance its worldwide competitiveness. The Consortium for Materials Development in Space along with Wyle Labs, Teledyne Advanced Materials, and McDornell Douglas have conducted experiments in space.

  5. Phase transitions in disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrahsheh, Fawaz Y.

    Disorder can have a wide variety of consequences for the physics of phase transitions. Some transitions remain unchanged in the presence of disorder while others are completely destroyed. In this thesis we study the effects of disorder on several classical and quantum phase transitions in condensed matter systems. After a brief introduction, we study the ferromagnetic phase transition in a randomly layered Heisenberg magnet using large-scale Monte-Carlo simulations. Our results provide numerical evidence for the exotic infinite-randomness scenario. We study classical and quantum smeared phase transitions in substitutional alloys A1-xBx. Our results show that the disorder completely destroys the phase transition with a pronounced tail of the ordered phase developing for all compositions x < 1. In addition, we find that short-ranged disorder correlations can have a dramatic effect on the transition. Moreover, we show an experimental realization of the composition-tuned ferromagnetic-to-paramagnetic quantum phase transition in Sr1-xCa xRuO3. We investigate the effects of disorder on first-order quantum phase transitions on the example of the N-color quantum Ashkin-Teller model. By means of a strong disorder renormalization group, we demonstrate that disorder rounds the first-order transition to a continuous one for both weak and strong coupling between the colors. Finally, we investigate the superfluid-insulator quantum phase transition of one-dimensional bosons with off-diagonal disorder by means of large-scale Monte-Carlo simulations. Beyond a critical disorder strength, we find nonuniversal, disorder dependent critical behavior.

  6. Fluctuation driven electroweak phase transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Kolb, Edward W.

    1991-01-01

    We examine the dynamics of the electroweak phase transition in the early Universe. For Higgs masses in the range 46 less than or = M sub H less than or = 150 GeV and top quark masses less than 200 GeV, regions of symmetric and asymmetric vacuum coexist to below the critical temperature, with thermal equilibrium between the two phases maintained by fluctuations of both phases. We propose that the transition to the asymmetric vacuum is completed by percolation of these subcritical fluctuations. Our results are relevant to scenarios of baryogenesis that invoke a weakly first-order phase transition at the electroweak scale.

  7. Thermal- and photo-induced phase-transition behaviors of a tapered dendritic liquid crystal with photochromic azobenzene mesogens and a bicyclic chiral center.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Yoon; Lee, Sang-A; Choi, Yu-Jin; Hwang, Seok-Ho; Kuo, Shiao-Wei; Nah, Changwoon; Lee, Myong-Hoon; Jeong, Kwang-Un

    2014-05-01

    A ribbon-shaped chiral liquid crystalline (LC) dendrimer with photochromic azobenzene mesogens and an isosorbide chiral center (abbreviated as AZ3 DLC) was successfully synthesized and its major phase transitions were studied by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and linear polarized optical microscopy (POM). Its ordered structures at different temperatures were further identified through structure-sensitive diffraction techniques. Based on the experimental results, it was found that the AZ3 DLC molecule exhibited the low-ordered chiral smectic (Sm*) LC phase with 6.31 nm periodicity at a high-temperature phase region. AZ3 DLC showed the reversible photoisomerization in both organic solvents and nematic (N) LC media. As a chiral-inducing agent, it exhibited a good solubility, a high helical-twisting power, and a large change in the helical-twisting power due to its photochemical isomerization in the commercially available N LC hosts. Therefore, we were able to reversibly "remote-control" the colors in the whole visible region by finely tuning the helical pitch of the spontaneously formed helical superstructures. PMID:24665056

  8. PHASE CHANGE LIQUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron

    2006-03-01

    Work is being performed to develop a new shipping system for frozen environmental samples (or other materials) that uses an optimal phase change liquid (PCL) formulation and an insulated shipping container with an on-board digital temperature data logger to provide a history of the temperature profile within the container during shipment. In previous work, several PCL formulations with temperatures of fusion ranging from approximately -14 to -20 C were prepared and evaluated. Both temperature of fusion and heat of fusion of the formulations were measured, and an optimal PCL formulation was selected. The PCL was frozen in plastic bags and tested for its temperature profile in a cooler using a digital temperature data logger. This testing showed that the PCL formulation can maintain freezer temperatures (< -7 to -20 C) for an extended period, such as the time for shipping samples by overnight courier. The results of the experiments described in this report provide significant information for use in developing an integrated freezer system that uses a PCL formulation to maintain freezer temperatures in coolers for shipping environmental samples to the laboratory. Experimental results show the importance of the type of cooler used in the system and that use of an insulating material within the cooler improves the performance of the freezer system. A new optimal PCL formulation for use in the system has been determined. The new formulation has been shown to maintain temperatures at < -7 to -20 C for 47 hours in an insulated cooler system containing soil samples. These results are very promising for developing the new technology.

  9. Emergent Non-Fermi-Liquid at the Quantum Critical Point of a Topological Phase Transition in Two Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Hiroki; Yang, Bohm-Jung; Chubukov, Andrey; Schmalian, Jörg; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2016-02-19

    We study the effects of Coulomb interaction between 2D Weyl fermions with anisotropic dispersion which displays relativistic dynamics along one direction and nonrelativistic dynamics along the other. Such a dispersion can be realized in phosphorene under electric field or strain, in TiO_{2}/VO_{2} superlattices, and, more generally, at the quantum critical point between a nodal semimetal and an insulator in systems with a chiral symmetry. Using the one-loop renormalization group approach in combination with the large-N expansion, we find that the system displays interaction-driven non-Fermi liquid behavior in a wide range of intermediate frequencies and marginal Fermi liquid behavior at the smallest frequencies. In the non-Fermi liquid regime, the quasiparticle residue Z at energy E scales as Z∝E^{a} with a>0, and the parameters of the fermionic dispersion acquire anomalous dimensions. In the marginal Fermi-liquid regime, Z∝(|logE|)^{-b} with universal b=3/2. PMID:26943551

  10. Emergent Non-Fermi-Liquid at the Quantum Critical Point of a Topological Phase Transition in Two Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Hiroki; Yang, Bohm-Jung; Chubukov, Andrey; Schmalian, Jörg; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2016-02-01

    We study the effects of Coulomb interaction between 2D Weyl fermions with anisotropic dispersion which displays relativistic dynamics along one direction and nonrelativistic dynamics along the other. Such a dispersion can be realized in phosphorene under electric field or strain, in TiO2 /VO2 superlattices, and, more generally, at the quantum critical point between a nodal semimetal and an insulator in systems with a chiral symmetry. Using the one-loop renormalization group approach in combination with the large-N expansion, we find that the system displays interaction-driven non-Fermi liquid behavior in a wide range of intermediate frequencies and marginal Fermi liquid behavior at the smallest frequencies. In the non-Fermi liquid regime, the quasiparticle residue Z at energy E scales as Z ∝Ea with a >0 , and the parameters of the fermionic dispersion acquire anomalous dimensions. In the marginal Fermi-liquid regime, Z ∝(|log E |)-b with universal b =3 /2 .

  11. Polymer physics of intracellular phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brangwynne, Clifford P.; Tompa, Peter; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2015-11-01

    Intracellular organelles are either membrane-bound vesicles or membrane-less compartments that are made up of proteins and RNA. These organelles play key biological roles, by compartmentalizing the cell to enable spatiotemporal control of biological reactions. Recent studies suggest that membrane-less intracellular compartments are multicomponent viscous liquid droplets that form via phase separation. Proteins that have an intrinsic tendency for being conformationally heterogeneous seem to be the main drivers of liquid-liquid phase separation in the cell. These findings highlight the relevance of classical concepts from the physics of polymeric phase transitions for understanding the assembly of intracellular membrane-less compartments. However, applying these concepts is challenging, given the heteropolymeric nature of protein sequences, the complex intracellular environment, and non-equilibrium features intrinsic to cells. This provides new opportunities for adapting established theories and for the emergence of new physics.

  12. Correction: Miscibility studies of two twist-bend nematic liquid crystal dimers with different average molecular curvatures. A comparison between experimental data and predictions of a Landau mean-field theory for the NTB-N phase transition.

    PubMed

    López, D O; Robles-Hernández, B; Salud, J; de la Fuente, M R; Sebastián, N; Diez-Berart, S; Jaen, X; Dunmur, D A; Luckhurst, G R

    2016-03-01

    Correction for 'Miscibility studies of two twist-bend nematic liquid crystal dimers with different average molecular curvatures. A comparison between experimental data and predictions of a Landau mean-field theory for the NTB-N phase transition' by D. O. López et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 4394-4404. PMID:26877266

  13. The putative liquid-liquid transition is a liquid-solid transition in atomistic models of water. II.

    PubMed

    Limmer, David T; Chandler, David

    2013-06-01

    This paper extends our earlier studies of free energy functions of density and crystalline order parameters for models of supercooled water, which allows us to examine the possibility of two distinct metastable liquid phases [D. T. Limmer and D. Chandler, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 134503 (2011) and preprint arXiv:1107.0337 (2011)]. Low-temperature reversible free energy surfaces of several different atomistic models are computed: mW water, TIP4P/2005 water, Stillinger-Weber silicon, and ST2 water, the last of these comparing three different treatments of long-ranged forces. In each case, we show that there is one stable or metastable liquid phase, and there is an ice-like crystal phase. The time scales for crystallization in these systems far exceed those of structural relaxation in the supercooled metastable liquid. We show how this wide separation in time scales produces an illusion of a low-temperature liquid-liquid transition. The phenomenon suggesting metastability of two distinct liquid phases is actually coarsening of the ordered ice-like phase, which we elucidate using both analytical theory and computer simulation. For the latter, we describe robust methods for computing reversible free energy surfaces, and we consider effects of electrostatic boundary conditions. We show that sensible alterations of models and boundary conditions produce no qualitative changes in low-temperature phase behaviors of these systems, only marginal changes in equations of state. On the other hand, we show that altering sampling time scales can produce large and qualitative non-equilibrium effects. Recent reports of evidence of a liquid-liquid critical point in computer simulations of supercooled water are considered in this light. PMID:23758385

  14. The putative liquid-liquid transition is a liquid-solid transition in atomistic models of water. II

    SciTech Connect

    Limmer, David T.; Chandler, David

    2013-06-07

    This paper extends our earlier studies of free energy functions of density and crystalline order parameters for models of supercooled water, which allows us to examine the possibility of two distinct metastable liquid phases [D. T. Limmer and D. Chandler, J. Chem. Phys.135, 134503 (2011) and preprint http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1107.0337 (2011)]. Low-temperature reversible free energy surfaces of several different atomistic models are computed: mW water, TIP4P/2005 water, Stillinger-Weber silicon, and ST2 water, the last of these comparing three different treatments of long-ranged forces. In each case, we show that there is one stable or metastable liquid phase, and there is an ice-like crystal phase. The time scales for crystallization in these systems far exceed those of structural relaxation in the supercooled metastable liquid. We show how this wide separation in time scales produces an illusion of a low-temperature liquid-liquid transition. The phenomenon suggesting metastability of two distinct liquid phases is actually coarsening of the ordered ice-like phase, which we elucidate using both analytical theory and computer simulation. For the latter, we describe robust methods for computing reversible free energy surfaces, and we consider effects of electrostatic boundary conditions. We show that sensible alterations of models and boundary conditions produce no qualitative changes in low-temperature phase behaviors of these systems, only marginal changes in equations of state. On the other hand, we show that altering sampling time scales can produce large and qualitative non-equilibrium effects. Recent reports of evidence of a liquid-liquid critical point in computer simulations of supercooled water are considered in this light.

  15. Liquid-liquid transition in ST2 water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Palmer, Jeremy C.; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.; Debenedetti, Pablo G.

    2012-12-01

    We use the weighted histogram analysis method [S. Kumar, D. Bouzida, R. H. Swendsen, P. A. Kollman, and J. M. Rosenberg, J. Comput. Chem. 13, 1011 (1992), 10.1002/jcc.540130812] to calculate the free energy surface of the ST2 model of water as a function of density and bond-orientational order. We perform our calculations at deeply supercooled conditions (T = 228.6 K, P = 2.2 kbar; T = 235 K, P = 2.2 kbar) and focus our attention on the region of bond-orientational order that is relevant to disordered phases. We find a first-order transition between a low-density liquid (LDL, ρ ≈ 0.9 g/cc) and a high-density liquid (HDL, ρ ≈ 1.15 g/cc), confirming our earlier sampling of the free energy surface of this model as a function of density [Y. Liu, A. Z. Panagiotopoulos, and P. G. Debenedetti, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 104508 (2009), 10.1063/1.3229892]. We demonstrate the disappearance of the LDL basin at high pressure and of the HDL basin at low pressure, in agreement with independent simulations of the system's equation of state. Consistency between directly computed and reweighted free energies, as well as between free energy surfaces computed using different thermodynamic starting conditions, confirms proper equilibrium sampling. Diffusion and structural relaxation calculations demonstrate that equilibration of the LDL phase, which exhibits slow dynamics, is attained in the course of the simulations. Repeated flipping between the LDL and HDL phases in the course of long molecular dynamics runs provides further evidence of a phase transition. We use the Ewald summation with vacuum boundary conditions to calculate long-ranged Coulombic interactions and show that conducting boundary conditions lead to unphysical behavior at low temperatures.

  16. Phase transition in Liouville theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, D.

    1989-11-01

    We suggest that the vortices arising in a Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in Liouville theory correspond to transitions between different genera, producing the ``plumber's nightmare'' and other phases that have been predicted in fluid membrane theory from energetic considerations. This transition has previously been invoked by Cates to explain the degeneration of numerical simulations of Gaussian random surfaces into branched polymers. The difficulty in quantizing Liouville theory for d>1 is conjectured to be due to our insistence on working at a fixed genus.

  17. The topological susceptibility from grand canonical simulations in the interacting instanton liquid model: Chiral phase transition and axion mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wantz, Olivier; Shellard, E. P. S.

    2010-04-01

    This is the last in a series of papers on the topological susceptibility in the interacting instanton liquid model (IILM). We will derive improved finite temperature interactions to study the thermodynamic limit of grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations in the quenched and unquenched case with light, physical quark masses. In particular, we will be interested in chiral symmetry breaking. The paper culminates by giving, for the first time, a well-motivated temperature-dependent axion mass. Especially, this work finally provides a computation of the axion mass in the low temperature regime, ma2fa2=1.46×10-3Λ41+0.50 T/Λ1+(3.53 . It connects smoothly to the high temperature dilute gas approximation; the latter is improved by including quark threshold effects. To compare with earlier studies, we also provide the usual power-law ma2=αΛ4fa2(T, where Λ=400 MeV, n=6.68 and α=1.68×10-7.

  18. Colloidal particles in blue phase liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Pawsey, Anne C; Clegg, Paul S

    2015-05-01

    We study the effect of disorder on the phase transitions of a system already dominated by defects. Micron-sized colloidal particles are dispersed chiral nematic liquid crystals which exhibit a blue phase (BP). The colloids are a source of disorder, disrupting the liquid crystal as the system is heated from the cholesteric to the isotropic phase through the blue phase. The colloids act as a preferential site for the growth of BPI from the cholesteric; in high chirality samples BPII also forms. In both BPI and BPII the colloids lead to localised melting to the isotropic, giving rise to faceted isotropic inclusions. This is in contrast to the behaviour of a cholesteric LC where colloids lead to system spanning defects. PMID:25698218

  19. ALS/FTD Mutation-Induced Phase Transition of FUS Liquid Droplets and Reversible Hydrogels into Irreversible Hydrogels Impairs RNP Granule Function

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Tetsuro; Qamar, Seema; Lin, Julie Qiaojin; Schierle, Gabriele S. Kaminski; Rees, Eric; Miyashita, Akinori; Costa, Ana R.; Dodd, Roger B.; Chan, Fiona T.S.; Michel, Claire H.; Kronenberg-Versteeg, Deborah; Li, Yi; Yang, Seung-Pil; Wakutani, Yosuke; Meadows, William; Ferry, Rodylyn Rose; Dong, Liang; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Favrin, Giorgio; Lin, Wen-Lang; Dickson, Dennis W.; Zhen, Mei; Ron, David; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold; Fraser, Paul E.; Shneider, Neil A.; Holt, Christine; Vendruscolo, Michele; Kaminski, Clemens F.; St George-Hyslop, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms by which mutations in FUS and other RNA binding proteins cause ALS and FTD remain controversial. We propose a model in which low-complexity (LC) domains of FUS drive its physiologically reversible assembly into membrane-free, liquid droplet and hydrogel-like structures. ALS/FTD mutations in LC or non-LC domains induce further phase transition into poorly soluble fibrillar hydrogels distinct from conventional amyloids. These assemblies are necessary and sufficient for neurotoxicity in a C. elegans model of FUS-dependent neurodegeneration. They trap other ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granule components and disrupt RNP granule function. One consequence is impairment of new protein synthesis by cytoplasmic RNP granules in axon terminals, where RNP granules regulate local RNA metabolism and translation. Nuclear FUS granules may be similarly affected. Inhibiting formation of these fibrillar hydrogel assemblies mitigates neurotoxicity and suggests a potential therapeutic strategy that may also be applicable to ALS/FTD associated with mutations in other RNA binding proteins. PMID:26526393

  20. Transitions between paraelectric and ferroelectric phases of bent-core smectic liquid crystals in the bulk and in thin freely suspended films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, Alexey; Floegel, Martin; Kornek, Ulrike; Stern, Stephan; Stannarius, Ralf; Nádasi, Hajnalka; Weissflog, Wolfgang; Zhu, Chenhui; Shen, Yongqiang; Park, Cheol Soo; Maclennan, Joseph; Clark, Noel

    2012-11-01

    We report on the contrasting phase behavior of a bent-core liquid crystal with a large opening angle between the mesogenic units in the bulk and in freely suspended films. Second-harmonic generation experiments and direct observation of director inversion walls in films in an applied electric field reveal that the nonpolar smectic C phase observed in bulk samples becomes a ferroelectric “banana” phase in films, showing that a mesogen with a small steric moment can give a phase with polar order in freely suspended films even when the corresponding bulk phase is paraelectric.

  1. Cosmological phase transitions and baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Quiros, Mariano

    1998-10-05

    We review various aspects of field theory at finite temperature related to the theory of phase transitions. In particular, the real and imaginary time formalisms are discussed, showing their equivalence in simple examples. Bubble nucleation by thermal tunneling, and the subsequent development of the phase transition is described in some detail. Some attention is also devoted to the breakdown of the perturbative expansion and the infrared problem in the finite temperature field theory. Finally the application to baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is done in the Standard Model and in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. In all cases we have translated the condition of not washing out any previously generated baryon asymmetry by upper bounds on the Higgs mass.

  2. Nuclear Multifragmentation & the Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharenberg, Rolf; Srivastava, Brijesh; Hirsch, Andy; Porile, Norbert

    2002-04-01

    A high statistics exclusive study of 1 GeV/nucleon Au, La and Kr on carbon has been performed, where the size and energy of the fragmenting system is measured for each event. The distributions of projectile fragments are analyzed using the statistical multifragmentation model. The nature of the phase transition has been examined using the caloric curve. For lighter systems a backbending is observed in the caloric curve implying a negative specific heat, while for heavier system there is a positive specific heat. This suggests that the breakup of heavier systems (Au and La) is consistent with a continuous phase transition.

  3. Order of phase transitions and tricriticality in mixtures of octyloxycyanobiphenyl and nonyloxycyanobiphenyl liquid crystals: a high-resolution study by adiabatic scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Cordoyiannis, George; Tripathi, Chandra Shekhar Pati; Glorieux, Christ; Thoen, Jan

    2010-09-01

    A detailed study has been performed for mixtures of octyloxycyanobiphenyl (8OCB) and nonyloxycyanobiphenyl (9OCB) liquid crystals and nine of their mixtures by means of high-resolution adiabatic scanning calorimetry. The isotropic to nematic transitions are weakly first order with latent heat values in the range usually encountered for this transition in other liquid crystals. With the exception of pure 8OCB, for which only an upper limit of 1.8 J  kg(-1) for the latent heat could be established, finite latent heats have been obtained for the nematic to smectic-A transition of all the mixtures and of pure 9OCB. The concentration dependence of their latent heats could be well fitted with a crossover function consistent with a mean-field free-energy expression that has a nonzero cubic term induced by the Halperin-Lubensky-Ma (HLM) coupling between the smectic-A order parameter and the orientational director fluctuations. Clearly first-order transitions with measurable latent heats are found for mole fractions of 9OCB in the mixtures where the effective critical exponent for the specific-heat capacity has substantially lower values than the tricritical one (0.5). This is qualitatively different from what has been observed so far in other liquid-crystal systems and yields strong experimental evidence from a calorimetric experiment for the HLM coupling between the smectic-A order parameter and the director orientation fluctuations. PMID:21230091

  4. Kinetics and mechanism of the barotropic lamellar gel/lamellar liquid crystal phase transition in fully hydrated dihexadecylphosphatidylethanolamine: a time-resolved x-ray diffraction study using pressure jump.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, A; Hummel, B; Mencke, A; Caffrey, M

    1994-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the barotropic lamellar gel (L beta')/lamellar liquid crystal (L alpha) phase transition in fully hydrated 1,2-dihexadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DHPE) has been studied using time-resolved x-ray diffraction (TRXRD). The phase transition was induced by pressure jumps of varying amplitudes in both the pressurization and depressurization directions at controlled temperature (78 degrees C). Both low- and wide-angle diffracted x rays were recorded simultaneously in live time using an x-ray-sensitive image intensifier coupled to a CCD camera and Super-VHS videotape recorder. Such an arrangement allowed for the direct and quantitative characterization of the long- (lamellar repeat spacing) and short-range order (chain packing) during a kinetic experiment. The image-processed live-time x-ray diffraction data were fitted using a nonlinear least-squares model, and the parameters of the fits were monitored continuously throughout the transition. The pressure-induced transitions from the L alpha to the L beta' phase and from the L beta' to the L alpha phase was two-state (no formation of intermediates apparent during the transition) to within the sensitivity limits of the method. The corresponding transit time (the time during which both phases coexist) associated with the long- and short-range order of the pressurization-induced L alpha-to-L beta' phase transition decreased to a limiting value of approximately 50 ms with increasing pressure jump amplitude. This limiting value was close to the response time of the detector/recording system. Thus, the intrinsic transit time of this transition in fully hydrated DHPE at 78 degrees C was less than or equal to 50 ms. In contrast, the depressurization-induced L beta'-to-L alpha phase transition was slower, taking approximately 1 s to complete, and occurred with no obvious dependence of the transit time on pressure jump amplitude. In the depressurization jump experiment, the lipid responded rapidly to the pressure jump in the L beta' phase up to the rate-determining L beta'-to-L alpha transition. Such behavior was examined carefully, as it could complicate the interpretation of phase transition kinetic measurements. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7918998

  5. Liquid-Phase Adsorption Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooney, David O.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an experiment developed and used in the unit operations laboratory course at the University of Wyoming. Involves the liquid-phase adsorption of an organic compound from aqueous solution on activated carbon, and is relevant to adsorption processes in general. (TW)

  6. A Demonstration of the Continuous Phase (Second-Order) Transition of a Binary Liquid System in the Region around Its Critical Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    In most general chemistry and introductory physical chemistry classes, critical point is defined as that temperature-pressure point on a phase diagram where the liquid-gas interface disappears, a phenomenon that generally occurs at relatively high temperatures or high pressures. Two examples are: water, with a critical point at 647 K (critical

  7. A Demonstration of the Continuous Phase (Second-Order) Transition of a Binary Liquid System in the Region around Its Critical Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    In most general chemistry and introductory physical chemistry classes, critical point is defined as that temperature-pressure point on a phase diagram where the liquid-gas interface disappears, a phenomenon that generally occurs at relatively high temperatures or high pressures. Two examples are: water, with a critical point at 647 K (critical…

  8. Phase transitions in wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Vladimirova, Natalia; Derevyanko, Stanislav; Falkovich, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    We consider turbulence within the Gross-Pitaevsky model and look into the creation of a coherent condensate via an inverse cascade originating at small scales. The growth of the condensate leads to a spontaneous breakdown of statistical symmetries of overcondensate fluctuations: First, isotropy is broken, then a series of phase transitions marks the changing symmetry from twofold to threefold to fourfold. We describe respective anisotropic flux flows in the k space. At the highest level reached, we observe a short-range positional and long-range orientational order (as in a hexatic phase). In other words, the more one pumps the system, the more ordered the system becomes. The phase transitions happen when the system is pumped by an instability term and does not occur when pumped by a random force. We thus demonstrate nonuniversality of an inverse-cascade turbulence with respect to the nature of small-scale forcing. PMID:22400497

  9. Cholesteric pitch divergence near smectic phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, H. G.; Dierking, I.; Gleeson, H. F.

    2010-07-01

    The critical behavior of the pitch divergence of cholesteric liquid crystals in the vicinity to smectic- A? (SmA?) and smectic- C? (SmC?) phases is studied experimentally and compared with conflicting theoretical interpretations. Members of two homologous series were studied with varying polymorphism from N?-SmC? to N?-SmA? . A modified functionality of the temperature dependence of the pitch is introduced to determine the critical exponent, and it is shown that the latter is independent of sample geometry. In contrast to several earlier investigations aiming to determine the critical exponent, which were inconclusive, the results of our critical exponents for the pitch divergence provide evidence for the model by Chen and Lubensky which predicts a critical exponent of ?=1/2 for the N?-SmA? and ?=1 for the N?-SmC? transition. This specifically implies that fluctuations cannot be neglected in the consideration of the nature of the phase transition.

  10. Two Phase Flow Mapping and Transition Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parang, Masood; Chao, David F.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, recent microgravity two-phase flow data for air-water, air-water-glycerin, and air- water-Zonyl FSP mixtures are analyzed for transition from bubbly to slug and from slug to annular flow. It is found that Weber number-based maps are inadequate to predict flow-pattern transition, especially over a wide range of liquid flow rates. It is further shown that slug to annular flow transition is dependent on liquid phase Reynolds number at high liquid flow rate. This effect may be attributed to growing importance of liquid phase inertia in the dynamics of the phase flow and distribution. As a result a new form of scaling is introduced to present data using liquid Weber number based on vapor and liquid superficial velocities and Reynolds number based on liquid superficial velocity. This new combination of the dimensionless parameters seem to be more appropriate for the presentation of the microgravity data and provides a better flow pattern prediction and should be considered for evaluation with data obtained in the future. Similarly, the analysis of bubble to slug flow transition indicates a strong dependence on both liquid inertia and turbulence fluctuations which seem to play a significant role on this transition at high values of liquid velocity. A revised mapping of data using a new group of dimensionless parameters show a better and more consistent description of flow transition over a wide range of liquid flow rates. Further evaluation of the proposed flow transition mapping will have to be made after a wider range of microgravity data become available.

  11. Electrical Dissipation Measurement of Polymer Phase Transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, E. R., R; Schuszler, A., II

    1983-01-01

    Technique measures solid/solid, glass/rubber, and liquid/liquid transition temperatures in polymers having dipole moments. Technique based on change in dipole packing that occurs with each transition and measured as change in electrical dissipation factor. Change in dipole packing occuring with each transition sensed by effect on dissipation factor.

  12. Topological Phase Transition in Antimony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Man-Hong; Bian, Guang; Xu, Caizhi; Miller, Thomas; Chiang, Tai-Chang

    2014-03-01

    Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is believed to cause the parity exchange that drives normal band insulators into the topological regime. Changing the strength of the effective SOC can also induce quantum phase transitions in materials. We performed a first-principles calculation to elucidate the quantum phase transition from a topologically trivial to nontrivial system in a 15-bilayer Sb film. We increased the k-space sampling relative to previous studies and varied the effective SOC in order to observe the changes in the bulk band gap and topological surface states. A transition from a metal to a semimetal is observed as the SOC is tuned from 0% to 100%. At a SOC value near 300%, a transition from a nontrivial topological semimetal to a topological insulator occurs. Varying the effective SOC strength can be realized experimentally by alloy substitution with elements in the same column in the periodic table. Increasing the effective SOC of the Sb film to values above 100% is a model of the Bi1-xSbx alloy, the first three-dimensional topological insulator. Further studies using this method on different systems may lead to the discovery of new topological insulators. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER46383 for T-CC).

  13. Non-equilibrium phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Mottola, E.; Cooper, F.M.; Bishop, A.R.; Habib, S.; Kluger, Y.; Jensen, N.G.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Non-equilibrium phase transitions play a central role in a very broad range of scientific areas, ranging from nuclear, particle, and astrophysics to condensed matter physics and the material and biological sciences. The aim of this project was to explore the path to a deeper and more fundamental understanding of the common physical principles underlying the complex real time dynamics of phase transitions. The main emphasis was on the development of general theoretical tools to deal with non-equilibrium processes, and of numerical methods robust enough to capture the time-evolving structures that occur in actual experimental situations. Specific applications to Laboratory multidivisional efforts in relativistic heavy-ion physics (transition to a new phase of nuclear matter consisting of a quark-gluon plasma) and layered high-temperature superconductors (critical currents and flux flow at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory) were undertaken.

  14. Liquid-phase chromatography detector

    DOEpatents

    Voigtman, Edward G.; Winefordner, James D.; Jurgensen, Arthur R.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid-phase chromatography detector comprising a flow cell having an inlet tubular conduit for receiving a liquid chromatographic effluent and discharging it as a flowing columnar stream onto a vertically adjustable receiving surface spaced apart from and located vertically below and in close proximity to the discharge end of the tubular conduit; a receiver adapted to receive liquid overflowing from the receiving surface; an exit conduit for continuously removing liquid from the receiver; a light source for focussing fluorescence-producing light pulses on the flowing columnar stream as it passes from the outlet of the conduit to the receiving surface and a fluorescence detector to detect the produced fluorescence; a source of light pulse for producing acoustic waves in the columnar stream as it passes from the conduit outlet to the receiving surface; and a piezoelectric transducer adapted to detect those waves; and a source of bias voltage applied to the inlet tubular conduit and adapted to produce ionization of the liquid flowing through the flow cell so as to produce photocurrents therein and an electrical system to detect and record the photocurrents. This system is useful in separating and detecting individual chemical compounds from mixtures thereof.

  15. Liquid-phase chromatography detector

    DOEpatents

    Voigtman, E.G.; Winefordner, J.D.; Jurgensen, A.R.

    1983-11-08

    A liquid-phase chromatography detector comprises a flow cell having an inlet tubular conduit for receiving a liquid chromatographic effluent and discharging it as a flowing columnar stream onto a vertically adjustable receiving surface spaced apart from and located vertically below and in close proximity to the discharge end of the tubular conduit; a receiver adapted to receive liquid overflowing from the receiving surface; an exit conduit for continuously removing liquid from the receiver; a light source for focusing fluorescence-producing light pulses on the flowing columnar stream as it passes from the outlet of the conduit to the receiving surface and a fluorescence detector to detect the produced fluorescence; a source of light pulse for producing acoustic waves in the columnar stream as it passes from the conduit outlet to the receiving surface; and a piezoelectric transducer adapted to detect those waves; and a source of bias voltage applied to the inlet tubular conduit and adapted to produce ionization of the liquid flowing through the flow cell so as to produce photocurrents therein and an electrical system to detect and record the photocurrents. This system is useful in separating and detecting individual chemical compounds from mixtures thereof. 5 figs.

  16. APPARATUS FOR LIQUID PHASE EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hicks, T.R.; Lehman, H.R.; Rubin, B.

    1958-09-16

    operation is described. It comprises a tubular colunm having upper and lower enlarged terminal portions, and a constricted central section containing fluid dispersal packing. Pulsing means are coupled to the upper portion of the column. The inlet for the less dense phase is located above the inlet for the denser phase and both are positioned so that liquids enter the constricted packingfilled central section. The apparatos also includes an interfacing level control, and means fer sensing the level of the interface actuate apparatus for controlling the rate of flow of input or discharge. The outlet for the less dense phase is located in the upper packing free portion of the colunm and that of the denser phase in the lower portion.

  17. Extracellular ice phase transitions in insects.

    PubMed

    Hawes, T C

    2014-01-01

    At temperatures below their temperature of crystallization (Tc), the extracellular body fluids of insects undergo a phase transition from liquid to solid. Insects that survive the transition to equilibrium (complete freezing of the body fluids) are designated as freeze tolerant. Although this phenomenon has been reported and described in many Insecta, current nomenclature and theory does not clearly delineate between the process of transition (freezing) and the final solid phase itself (the frozen state). Thus freeze tolerant insects are currently, by convention, described in terms of the temperature at which the crystallization of their body fluids is initiated, Tc. In fact, the correct descriptor for insects that tolerate freezing is the temperature of equilibrium freezing, Tef. The process of freezing is itself a separate physical event with unique physiological stresses that are associated with ice growth. Correspondingly there are a number of insects whose physiological cryo-limits are very specifically delineated by this transitional envelope. The distinction also has considerable significance for our understanding of insect cryobiology: firstly, because the ability to manage endogenous ice growth is a fundamental segregator of cryotype; and secondly, because our understanding of internal ice management is still largely nascent. PMID:25397954

  18. Salt-induced transition from a micellar to a lamellar liquid crystalline phase in dilute mixtures of anionic and nonionic surfactants in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sein, A.; Engberts, J.B.F.N. ); Linden, E. van der; Pas, J.C. van de )

    1993-07-01

    In dilute mixtures of anionic surfactant, sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (NaDoBS), and nonionic poly(ethylene oxide) alkylmonoether (C[sub 13-15]E[sub <7>]) a transition from a micellar to a lamellar phase is found at high salting-out electrolyte (NaCit) concentrations. With an increase of the salt concentration, different types of lamellar aggregates are formed. The existence of different types of aggregates is reflected by changes of the turbidity of the solutions. Light and fluorescence microscopy, freeze-fractured electron microscopy, confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM), and fluorescence depolarization were employed to characterize the aggregates and to induce a mechanism for the transition from a micellar to a lamellar phase. Surfactant aggregation is important in view of possible applications in enhanced oil recovery. 39 refs., 10 figs.

  19. Polarized gravitational waves from cosmological phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisslinger, Leonard; Kahniashvili, Tina

    2015-08-01

    We estimate the degree of circular polarization for the gravitational waves generated during the electroweak and QCD phase transitions from the kinetic and magnetic helicity generated by bubble collisions during those cosmological phase transitions.

  20. Temperature- and pressure-induced phase transitions in cyclobutanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xuerui; Li, Junyu; Chen, Liucheng; Zhu, Xiang; Yuan, Chaosheng; Wang, Yongqiang; Su, Lei

    2015-07-01

    The phase transition and polymorphism of cyclobutanol (C4H8O) has been investigated at low temperature and high pressure. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Raman spectra reveal that a supercooled state is observed during the cooling process, while crystalline state is formed in the heating process. We also present pressure-induced phase transition of cyclobutanol by means of Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The results indicate that cyclobutanol undergoes two phase transformations during compression to 11.4 GPa. At around 0.9 GPa, the liquid cyclobutanol transforms to a solid crystal structure. Further compression to 1.4 GPa, another fully ordered crystalline phase is observed. Simultaneously, conformational change is observed accompanied by phase transition. In addition, the red shift of the O-H stretching modes with pressure suggests the ordered crystalline phases are characterized by the formation of hydrogen-bonded molecular chains. Finally, the phase transitions under high pressure or low temperature are reversible.

  1. Images reveal that atmospheric particles can undergo liquid-liquid phase separations

    SciTech Connect

    You, Yuan; Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Carreras-Sospedra, Marc; Hanna, Sarah; Hiranuma, Naruki; Kamal, Saeid; Smith, Mackenzie L.; Zhang, Xiaolu; Weber, Rodney; Shilling, John E.; Dabdub, Donald; Martin, Scot T.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2012-07-30

    A large fraction of submicron atmospheric particles contains both organic material and inorganic salts. As the relative humidity cycles in the atmosphere, these mixed particles can undergo a range of phase transitions, possibly including liquid-liquid phase separation. If liquid-liquid phase separation occurs, the gas-particle partitioning of atmospheric semi-volatile organic compounds, the scattering and absorption of solar radiation, and the uptake of reactive gas species on atmospheric particles will be affected, with important implications for climate predictions. The actual occurrence of these types of phase transitions within individual atmospheric particles has been considered uncertain, in large part because of the absence of observations for real-world samples. Here, using optical and fluorescence microscopy, we observe the coexistence of two non-crystalline phases in particles generated from real-world samples collected on multiple days in Atlanta, Georgia, and in particles generated in the laboratory using atmospheric conditions. These results reveal that atmospheric particles can undergo liquid-liquid phase separations. Using a box model, we show that liquid-liquid phase separation can result in increased concentrations of gas-phase NO3 and N2O5 in the Atlanta region, due to decreased particle uptake of N2O5.

  2. Theoretical Predictions of Phase Transitions at Ultra-high Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boates, Brian

    2013-06-01

    We present ab initio calculations of the high-pressure phase diagrams of important planetary materials such as CO2, MgSiO3, and MgO. For CO2, we predict a series of distinct liquid phases over a wide pressure (P) and temperature (T) range, including a first-order transition to a dense polymer liquid. We have computed finite-temperature free energies of liquid and solid CO2 phases to determine the melting curve beyond existing measurements and investigate possible phase separation transitions. The interaction of these phase boundaries with the mantle geotherm will also be discussed. Furthermore, we find evidence for a vast pressure-temperature regime where molten MgSiO3 decomposes into liquid SiO2 and solid MgO, with a volume change of approximately 1.2 percent. The demixing transition is driven by the crystallization of MgO ? the reaction only occurs below the high-pressure MgO melting curve. The predicted transition pressure at 10,000 K is in close proximity to an anomaly reported in recent laser-driven shock experiments of MgSiO3. We also present new results for the high-pressure melting curve of MgO and its B1-B2 solid phase transition, with a triple point near 364 GPa and 12,000 K.

  3. Dissociation and dissociative phase transition in dense hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Khomkin, A. L. Shumikhin, A. S.

    2012-01-15

    A simple physical model is proposed for dissociating dense fluid hydrogen. We propose that free dissociated atoms interact via quantum electron-electron exchange analogously to the interaction in the liquid-metal phase of alkali metals. The density dependence of a hydrogen atom's binding energy in such a quasi-liquid is calculated. It is shown that the transition from the molecular fluid to liquid hydrogen is a first-order phase transition. The critical parameters of the transition are determined: P{sub c} = 72 GPa, T{sub c} = 10500 K, and {rho}{sub c} = 0.5 g/cm{sup 3}. The possibility of the metastable existence of atomic liquid hydrogen in a dissociated molecular fluid under decreased pressure is established.

  4. Novel Detection Method of Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hitoshi; Katayanagi, Hideki; Koga, Yoshikata; Nishikawa, Keiko

    2004-12-01

    A novel method of determining a liquid-liquid phase boundary was developed. This method is based on our discovery that a nascent low-density phase is attracted to the center of a Rankine vortex at the onset of phase separation. Thus a liquid-liquid phase boundary is detected easily, rapidly, and accurately. The phase diagrams of the ternary systems NaCl-H2O-1-propanol and NaCl-H2O-1-butanol were obtained by this method. The results matched well with literature values.

  5. Mixed Stationary Liquid Phases for Gas-Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koury, Albert M.; Parcher, Jon F.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a laboratory technique for use in an undergraduate instrumental analysis course that, using the interpretation of window diagrams, prepares a mixed liquid phase column for gas-liquid chromatography. A detailed procedure is provided. (BT)

  6. Entropy Calculations for a Supercooled Liquid Crystalline Blue Phase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, U.

    2007-01-01

    We observed, using polarized light microscopy, the supercooling of the blue phase (BPI) of cholesteryl proprionate and measured the corresponding liquid crystalline phase transition temperatures. From these temperatures and additional published data we have provided, for the benefit of undergraduate physics students, a nontraditional example…

  7. Brain Performance versus Phase Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Joaquín J.; Marro, J.

    2015-01-01

    We here illustrate how a well-founded study of the brain may originate in assuming analogies with phase-transition phenomena. Analyzing to what extent a weak signal endures in noisy environments, we identify the underlying mechanisms, and it results a description of how the excitability associated to (non-equilibrium) phase changes and criticality optimizes the processing of the signal. Our setting is a network of integrate-and-fire nodes in which connections are heterogeneous with rapid time-varying intensities mimicking fatigue and potentiation. Emergence then becomes quite robust against wiring topology modification—in fact, we considered from a fully connected network to the Homo sapiens connectome—showing the essential role of synaptic flickering on computations. We also suggest how to experimentally disclose significant changes during actual brain operation. PMID:26193453

  8. Spontaneous liquid-liquid phase separation of water.

    PubMed

    Yagasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2014-02-01

    We report a molecular dynamics simulation demonstrating a fast spontaneous liquid-liquid phase separation of water and a subsequent slow crystallization to ice. It is found that supercooled water separates rapidly into low- and high-density domains so as to reduce the surface energy in the rectangular simulation cell at certain thermodynamic states. The liquid-liquid phase separation, which is about two orders of magnitude faster than the crystallization, suggests a possibility to observe this phenomenon experimentally. PMID:25353404

  9. Transient liquid phase ceramic bonding

    DOEpatents

    Glaeser, Andreas M.

    1994-01-01

    Ceramics are joined to themselves or to metals using a transient liquid phase method employing three layers, one of which is a refractory metal, ceramic or alloy. The refractory layer is placed between two metal layers, each of which has a lower melting point than the refractory layer. The three layers are pressed between the two articles to be bonded to form an assembly. The assembly is heated to a bonding temperature at which the refractory layer remains solid, but the two metal layers melt to form a liquid. The refractory layer reacts with the surrounding liquid and a single solid bonding layer is eventually formed. The layers may be designed to react completely with each other and form refractory intermetallic bonding layers. Impurities incorporated into the refractory metal may react with the metal layers to form refractory compounds. Another method for joining ceramic articles employs a ceramic interlayer sandwiched between two metal layers. In alternative embodiments, the metal layers may include sublayers. A method is also provided for joining two ceramic articles using a single interlayer. An alternate bonding method provides a refractory-metal oxide interlayer placed adjacent to a strong oxide former. Aluminum or aluminum alloys are joined together using metal interlayers.

  10. Solid-solid phase transitions via melting in metals.

    PubMed

    Pogatscher, S; Leutenegger, D; Schawe, J E K; Uggowitzer, P J; Löffler, J F

    2016-01-01

    Observing solid-solid phase transitions in-situ with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution is a great challenge, and is often only possible via computer simulations or in model systems. Recently, a study of polymeric colloidal particles, where the particles mimic atoms, revealed an intermediate liquid state in the transition from one solid to another. While not yet observed there, this finding suggests that such phenomena may also occur in metals and alloys. Here we present experimental evidence for a solid-solid transition via the formation of a metastable liquid in a 'real' atomic system. We observe this transition in a bulk glass-forming metallic system in-situ using fast differential scanning calorimetry. We investigate the corresponding transformation kinetics and discuss the underlying thermodynamics. The mechanism is likely to be a feature of many metallic glasses and metals in general, and may provide further insight into phase transition theory. PMID:27103085

  11. Solid–solid phase transitions via melting in metals

    PubMed Central

    Pogatscher, S.; Leutenegger, D.; Schawe, J. E. K.; Uggowitzer, P. J.; Löffler, J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Observing solid–solid phase transitions in-situ with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution is a great challenge, and is often only possible via computer simulations or in model systems. Recently, a study of polymeric colloidal particles, where the particles mimic atoms, revealed an intermediate liquid state in the transition from one solid to another. While not yet observed there, this finding suggests that such phenomena may also occur in metals and alloys. Here we present experimental evidence for a solid–solid transition via the formation of a metastable liquid in a ‘real' atomic system. We observe this transition in a bulk glass-forming metallic system in-situ using fast differential scanning calorimetry. We investigate the corresponding transformation kinetics and discuss the underlying thermodynamics. The mechanism is likely to be a feature of many metallic glasses and metals in general, and may provide further insight into phase transition theory. PMID:27103085

  12. Glass-liquid transition of water at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Ove

    2011-07-01

    The knowledge of the existence of liquid water under extreme conditions and its concomitant properties are important in many fields of science. Glassy water has previously been prepared by hyperquenching micron-sized droplets of liquid water and vapor deposition on a cold substrate (ASW), and its transformation to an ultraviscous liquid form has been reported on heating. A densified amorphous solid form of water, high-density amorphous ice (HDA), has also been made by collapsing the structure of ice at pressures above 1 GPa and temperatures below approximately 140 K, but a corresponding liquid phase has not been detected. Here we report results of heat capacity C(p) and thermal conductivity, in situ, measurements, which are consistent with a reversible transition from annealed HDA to ultraviscous high-density liquid water at 1 GPa and 140 K. On heating of HDA, the C(p) increases abruptly by (3.4 ± 0.2) J mol(-1) K(-1) before crystallization starts at (153 ± 1) K. This is larger than the C(p) rise at the glass to liquid transition of annealed ASW at 1 atm, which suggests the existence of liquid water under these extreme conditions. PMID:21690361

  13. Glass–liquid transition of water at high pressure

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Ove

    2011-01-01

    The knowledge of the existence of liquid water under extreme conditions and its concomitant properties are important in many fields of science. Glassy water has previously been prepared by hyperquenching micron-sized droplets of liquid water and vapor deposition on a cold substrate (ASW), and its transformation to an ultraviscous liquid form has been reported on heating. A densified amorphous solid form of water, high-density amorphous ice (HDA), has also been made by collapsing the structure of ice at pressures above 1 GPa and temperatures below approximately 140 K, but a corresponding liquid phase has not been detected. Here we report results of heat capacity Cp and thermal conductivity, in situ, measurements, which are consistent with a reversible transition from annealed HDA to ultraviscous high-density liquid water at 1 GPa and 140 K. On heating of HDA, the Cp increases abruptly by (3.4 ± 0.2) J mol-1 K-1 before crystallization starts at (153 ± 1) K. This is larger than the Cp rise at the glass to liquid transition of annealed ASW at 1 atm, which suggests the existence of liquid water under these extreme conditions. PMID:21690361

  14. Wetting, multilayer adsorption, and interface phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moldover, M. R.; Schmidt, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    When two fluid phases coexist near their mutual critical point, one fluid phase forms a layer which intrudes between the other fluid phase and any third phase that happens to be present. As the two fluid phases are taken away from their critical point, a phase transition often occurs such that the intruding layer vanishes. Recent evidence is presented that the transition from the complete wetting (intruding layer) configuration to the incomplete wetting (three-phase contact) configuration is a first-order phase transition. The thickness of the intruding layers has been measured for diverse systems. These data are not fully understood. The intruding layers are extreme examples of multilayer adsorption. Certain theories predict that a 'prewetting' transition from high adsorption to low adsorption is associated with the transition from complete wetting to incomplete wetting. Present search for this transition is inconclusive.

  15. QCD Phase Transitions, Volume 15

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, T.; Shuryak, E.

    1999-03-20

    The title of the workshop, ''The QCD Phase Transitions'', in fact happened to be too narrow for its real contents. It would be more accurate to say that it was devoted to different phases of QCD and QCD-related gauge theories, with strong emphasis on discussion of the underlying non-perturbative mechanisms which manifest themselves as all those phases. Before we go to specifics, let us emphasize one important aspect of the present status of non-perturbative Quantum Field Theory in general. It remains true that its studies do not get attention proportional to the intellectual challenge they deserve, and that the theorists working on it remain very fragmented. The efforts to create Theory of Everything including Quantum Gravity have attracted the lion share of attention and young talent. Nevertheless, in the last few years there was also a tremendous progress and even some shift of attention toward emphasis on the unity of non-perturbative phenomena. For example, we have seen some efforts to connect the lessons from recent progress in Supersymmetric theories with that in QCD, as derived from phenomenology and lattice. Another example is Maldacena conjecture and related development, which connect three things together, string theory, super-gravity and the (N=4) supersymmetric gauge theory. Although the progress mentioned is remarkable by itself, if we would listen to each other more we may have chance to strengthen the field and reach better understanding of the spectacular non-perturbative physics.

  16. Effect of liquid-liquid structure transition on solidification of Sn57Bi43 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingyang; Zhang, Yongxing; Wu, Chen; Geng, Haoran

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the effect of the liquid-liquid structure transition (L-LST) on the solidification behaviors and morphologies of Sn57Bi43 alloy was further studied. The liquid structure of Sn57Bi43 was studied with resistivity, thermal analysis and viscosity method. The obvious turning point is observed on resistivity-temperature, DSC and viscosity-temperature curves of Sn57Bi43 alloy. The resistivity increases linearly with increasing temperature before the turning point. These results indicate that temperature-induced liquid-liquid structure transition occurs at 943-1093 K and is reversible, which may be formed by large cooperative motions for molecular rearrangements. What is more, the results show that the undercooling of the eutectic phase increases and the microstructure becomes finer after solidifying from the melt experiencing L-LST. The spacing of eutectic phase decreases markedly. Based on these results explored the melt structure from different aspects, the nature of discontinuity of structural phase transition can be explored and the effect of L-LST on solidification of Sn57Bi43 alloy is studied.

  17. Energy Landscape of Zirconia Phase Transitions.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shu-Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Jie; Liu, Zhi-Pan

    2015-07-01

    The solid-phase transitions of zirconia are important phenomena for many industrial applications. Because of the lack of tools for resolving the atom displacement pattern, the transition kinetics has been disputed for over 60 years. Here, first-principles-based stochastic surface walking (SSW) pathway sampling is utilized for resolving the mechanism of ZrO2 tetragonal-to-monoclinic solid-phase transition. Two types of lattice and atom correspondence allowed in phase transition are determined for the first time from energy criterion, which are originated from two nearly energy-degenerate lowest-transition pathways and one stress-induced ferroelastic transition channel of tetragonal phase. An orthorhombic crystal phase (Pbc2/1) is discovered to be a trapping state at low temperatures in phase transition, the presence of which does not create new orientation relation but deters transformation toughening significantly. This new finding may facilitate the design of new functional oxide materials in ceramic industry. PMID:26075311

  18. Phase Transition of Diluted Magnetic Semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. K.; Lee, S. J.; Yuldashev, S. U.; Ihm, G.; Kang, T. W.

    2011-12-01

    Three types of phase transitions in diluted magnetic semiconductor, first-order, second-order and mixed-order, are found in theory. Especially the mixed type transition shows two steps transition and novel specific heat property. Specific heat properties disclose a possible meta ferromagnetic phase confirmed by the experimental qualitative result.

  19. Behavior of supercooled aqueous solutions stemming from hidden liquid-liquid transition in water.

    PubMed

    Biddle, John W; Holten, Vincent; Anisimov, Mikhail A

    2014-08-21

    A popular hypothesis that explains the anomalies of supercooled water is the existence of a metastable liquid-liquid transition hidden below the line of homogeneous nucleation. If this transition exists and if it is terminated by a critical point, the addition of a solute should generate a line of liquid-liquid critical points emanating from the critical point of pure metastable water. We have analyzed thermodynamic consequences of this scenario. In particular, we consider the behavior of two systems, H2O-NaCl and H2O-glycerol. We find the behavior of the heat capacity in supercooled aqueous solutions of NaCl, as reported by Archer and Carter [J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 8563 (2000)], to be consistent with the presence of the metastable liquid-liquid transition. We elucidate the non-conserved nature of the order parameter (extent of "reaction" between two alternative structures of water) and the consequences of its coupling with conserved properties (density and concentration). We also show how the shape of the critical line in a solution controls the difference in concentration of the coexisting liquid phases. PMID:25149798

  20. Nonclassical nucleation theory for the gas-liquid transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxtoby, David W.; Evans, R.

    1988-12-01

    We use density functional methods to develop a new nonclassical theory for the homogeneous nucleation of the gas to liquid phase transition. The extent of agreement between our results and the classical prediction of Becker, Döring, and Zeldovich is strongly dependent on the range of the attractive potential which we employ. We show that our predictions are consistent with experimental data using cloud chambers, and we suggest several directions in which experimentalists might look in order to find nonclassical effects. In particular, we suggest that cavitation (gas bubble formation in a liquid subjected to tensile stress) should nucleate at a significantly greater rate than that predicted by classical theory.

  1. Bond orientational ordering in a metastable supercooled liquid: a shadow of crystallization and liquid-liquid transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hajime

    2010-12-01

    It is widely believed that a liquid state can be characterized by a single order parameter, density, and that a transition from a liquid to solid can be described by density ordering (translational ordering). For example, this type of theory has had great success in describing the phase behaviour of hard spheres. However, there are some features that cannot be captured by such theories. For example, hard spheres crystallize into either hcp or fcc structures, without a tendency of bcc ordering which is expected by the Alexander-McTague theory based on the Landau-type free energy of the density order parameter. We also found hcp-like bond orientational ordering in a metastable supercooled liquid, which promotes nucleation of hcp crystals. Furthermore, theories based on the single order parameter cannot explain water-like thermodynamic and kinetic anomalies of a liquid and liquid-liquid transition in a single-component liquid. Based on these facts, we argue that we need an additional order parameter to describe a liquid state. It is bond orientational order, which is induced by dense packing in hard spheres or by directional bonding in molecular and atomic liquids. Bond orientational order is intrinsically of local nature, unlike translational order which is of global nature. This feature plays a unique role in crystallization and quasicrystal formation. We also reveal that bond orientational ordering is a cause of dynamic heterogeneity near a glass transition and is linked to slow dynamics. In relation to this, we note that, for describing the structuring of a highly disordered liquid, we need a structural signature of low configurational entropy, which is more general than bond orientational order. Finally, the water-like anomaly and liquid-liquid transition can be explained by bond orientational ordering due to hydrogen or covalent bonding and its cooperativity, respectively. So we argue that bond orientational ordering is a key to the physical understanding of crystallization, quasicrystallization, glass transition, water-like anomaly and liquid-liquid transition. A unified description of these phenomena may be possible along this line.

  2. Influence of spinons fluctuations near the spin liquid Mott transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tsung-Han; Florens, Serge; Dobrosavljevic, Vladimir

    We investigate the metal to Mott-insulator transition (MIT) in the Hubbard-Heisenberg model using the slave-rotor technique, which allows to combine for the first time the dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) with the Resonating Valence Bond (RVB) approach. In the spin-liquid phase at large Coulomb repulsion, the system shows a RVB transition from a trivial paramagnetic Mott insulator towards a low temperature insulating state with long lived spinons, as seen by the emergence of a linear specific heat. This quenching of the entropy in the spin liquid phase provides strong modifications in the shape of the standard DMFT phase diagram for the MIT occurring at intermediate values of the Coulomb repulsion. We find that the RVB transition happens concomitantly with the first order MIT lines at low temperature. This implies that the Mott insulator always accommodates a spinon Fermi surface, even in the coexistence regime of the MIT, and that the metallic state always stays a Fermi-liquid as it rejects the presence of free spinons, due to their strong scattering onto the holons.

  3. Respiratory transition in the newborn: a three-phase process.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Stuart B; Te Pas, Arjan B; Kitchen, Marcus J

    2016-05-01

    We propose that the respiratory transition at birth passes through three distinct, but overlapping phases, which reflect different physiological states of the lung. Accordingly, respiratory support given to infants should be optimised to suit the underlying physiological state of the lung as it passes through each phase. During the first phase, the airways are liquid-filled and so no pulmonary gas exchange can occur. Respiratory support should, therefore, be focused on clearing the gas exchange regions of liquid. In the absence of gas exchange, little or no CO2will accumulate within the airways and, therefore, interrupting inflation pressures to allow the lung to deflate and exhale CO2is unnecessary. This is the primary rationale for administering a sustained inflation at birth. During the second phase, the gas exchange regions are mostly cleared of liquid, allowing pulmonary gas exchange to commence. However, the liquid cleared from the airways resides within the tissue during this phase, which increases perialveolar interstitial tissue pressures and the risk of liquid re-entry back into the airways. As a result, respiratory support should be optimised to minimise alveolar re-flooding during expiration, which can be achieved by applying an end-expiratory pressure. The third and final phase occurs when the liquid is eventually cleared from lung tissue. Although gas exchange may be restricted by lung immaturity, injury and inflammation during this phase, considerations of how fetal lung liquid can adversely affect lung function are no longer relevant. PMID:26542877

  4. Liquid Crystal Phases of Semiflexible Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Ian; Sullivan, Don

    2012-02-01

    Liquid crystal polymers exhibit orientational order (nematic phase) and position order (smectic phase). Previous work on semiflexible polymers using self consistent field theory studied the isotropic-nematic and nematic-smectic transition for homogenous and diblock copolymers. The nematic phase is stabilized by excluded-volume effects between wormlike cylindrical segments. The smectic phase is further stabilized by excluded-volume effects between terminal end segments. Because models of semiflexible polymers include orientational degrees of freedom, in addition to the usual positional degrees of freedom, they are computationally more demanding to study. Spectral decomposition applied to segment orientations has previously been used to make computation feasible. However this method does not converge well for strongly ordered states, which arise in many real systems. I describe a Crank-Nicolson finite difference method applied to the orientations which is expected to converge well for highly ordered systems. This method also exhibits better numerical stability and accuracy and may thus serve as a better foundation for further studies of highly ordered systems. I also describe a modification to the spectral method which can compute the tilted Smectic C phase.

  5. Phase transitions in the assembly of multivalent signalling proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Pilong; Banjade, Sudeep; Cheng, Hui-Chun; Kim, Soyeon; Chen, Baoyu; Guo, Liang; Llaguno, Marc; Hollingsworth, Javoris V.; King, David S.; Banani, Salman F.; Russo, Paul S.; Jiang, Qiu-Xing; Nixon, B. Tracy; Rosen, Michael K.

    2013-04-08

    Cells are organized on length scales ranging from angstrom to micrometers. However, the mechanisms by which angstrom-scale molecular properties are translated to micrometer-scale macroscopic properties are not well understood. Here we show that interactions between diverse synthetic, multivalent macromolecules (including multi-domain proteins and RNA) produce sharp liquid-liquid-demixing phase separations, generating micrometer-sized liquid droplets in aqueous solution. This macroscopic transition corresponds to a molecular transition between small complexes and large, dynamic supramolecular polymers. The concentrations needed for phase transition are directly related to the valency of the interacting species. In the case of the actin-regulatory protein called neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) interacting with its established biological partners NCK and phosphorylated nephrin1, the phase transition corresponds to a sharp increase in activity towards an actin nucleation factor, the Arp2/3 complex. The transition is governed by the degree of phosphorylation of nephrin, explaining how this property of the system can be controlled to regulatory effect by kinases. The widespread occurrence of multivalent systems suggests that phase transitions may be used to spatially organize and biochemically regulate information throughout biology.

  6. Disclination Unbinding Transition in Quantum Hall Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wexler, Carlos

    2002-03-01

    Recent experiments [1] in the transitional region between plateaus of the quantum Hall effect have revealed a plæthora of unusual behavior in the low-temperature magnetotransport: in particular large anisotropies of the longitudinal resistivities are observed at temperatures lower than ca. 150 mK for near half filling of high (N>= 2) Landau levels (LL). the long-wavelength elastic theory for the quantum Hall smectic state starting from the Hartree-Fock approximation. Dislocations and phonons lead to an effective nematic model for T>0. This model undergoes a Kosterlitz-Thouless disclination unbinding transition from a phase with algebraic orientational order into an isotropic phase. Without the use of any fitting parameter, we obtain transition temperatures which are in qualitative agreement with recent experiments which have observed large anisotropies of the longitudinal resistivities in half-filled Landau levels, lending credence to the liquid crystal interpretation [3] of experiments. [[1

  7. Liquid crystalline phases in concentrated aqueous solutions of Na+ DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Rill, R L

    1986-01-01

    Concentrated aqueous saline solutions of short (146-base-pair) DNA fragments suddenly become turbid and iridescent when the DNA concentration is slightly increased or the temperature is decreased. Microscopic examination through crossed polarizing filters shows that turbidity and iridescence is due to formation of a liquid crystalline DNA phase similar to cholesteric liquid crystals formed by other semirigid, but nonelectrolyte, chiral polymers. Several distinct textures of the liquid crystalline phase or phases are observed depending on DNA concentration, temperature, and method of sample preparation. Textures observed include spherulites with Maltese crosses, striated and highly colored ribbons, whorls of periodic interference fringes, and colored flakes. The liquid crystalline DNA phase coexists in metastable equilibrium with the isotropic phase over a relatively narrow temperature/concentration range--approximately 175-250 mg/ml and 25-62 degrees C (limit of measurements). At higher concentrations and temperatures above approximately equal to 25 degrees C, the solutions appear fully liquid crystalline. When concentrated solutions are cooled below room temperature, crystals form due to precipitation of supporting electrolyte. A partial phase diagram is reported for the isotropic----liquid crystal----crystal transitions of solutions of DNA in buffered saline (2 M Na+). The general features of this phase diagram and the critical DNA volume fraction for formation of the anisotropic phase are consistent with the observed and theoretically predicted phase behavior of rodlike or semirigid nonelectrolyte polymers. Images PMID:3455771

  8. Liquid phase sintering of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Cutler, Raymond A.; Virkar, Anil V.; Hurford, Andrew C.

    1989-01-01

    Liquid phase sintering is used to densify silicon carbide based ceramics using a compound comprising a rare earth oxide and aluminum oxide to form liquids at temperatures in excess of 1600.degree. C. The resulting sintered ceramic body has a density greater than 95% of its theoretical density and hardness in excess of 23 GPa. Boron and carbon are not needed to promote densification and silicon carbide powder with an average particle size of greater than one micron can be densified via the liquid phase process. The sintered ceramic bodies made by the present invention are fine grained and have secondary phases resulting from the liquid phase.

  9. Liquid phase sintering of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Cutler, R.A.; Virkar, A.V.; Hurford, A.C.

    1989-05-09

    Liquid phase sintering is used to densify silicon carbide based ceramics using a compound comprising a rare earth oxide and aluminum oxide to form liquids at temperatures in excess of 1,600 C. The resulting sintered ceramic body has a density greater than 95% of its theoretical density and hardness in excess of 23 GPa. Boron and carbon are not needed to promote densification and silicon carbide powder with an average particle size of greater than one micron can be densified via the liquid phase process. The sintered ceramic bodies made by the present invention are fine grained and have secondary phases resulting from the liquid phase. 4 figs.

  10. Glass transition of aqueous solutions involving annealing-induced ice recrystallization resolves liquid-liquid transition puzzle of water

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li-Shan; Cao, Ze-Xian; Wang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Liquid-liquid transition of water is an important concept in condensed-matter physics. Recently, it was claimed to have been confirmed in aqueous solutions based on annealing-induced upshift of glass-liquid transition temperature, . Here we report a universal water-content, , dependence of for aqueous solutions. Solutions with vitrify/devitrify at a constant temperature, , referring to freeze-concentrated phase with left behind ice crystallization. Those solutions with totally vitrify at under conventional cooling/heating process though, of the samples annealed at temperatures   to effectively evoke ice recrystallization is stabilized at . Experiments on aqueous glycerol and 1,2,4-butanetriol solutions in literature were repeated, and the same samples subject to other annealing treatments equally reproduce the result. The upshift of by annealing is attributable to freeze-concentrated phase of solutions instead of ‘liquid II phase of water’. Our work also provides a reliable method to determine hydration formula and to scrutinize solute-solvent interaction in solution. PMID:26503911

  11. Glass transition of aqueous solutions involving annealing-induced ice recrystallization resolves liquid-liquid transition puzzle of water.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Shan; Cao, Ze-Xian; Wang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Liquid-liquid transition of water is an important concept in condensed-matter physics. Recently, it was claimed to have been confirmed in aqueous solutions based on annealing-induced upshift of glass-liquid transition temperature, T(g) . Here we report a universal water-content, X(aqu) , dependence of T(g) for aqueous solutions. Solutions with X(aqu)>X(cr)(aqu)vitrify/devitrify at a constant temperature, ~T(g) , referring to freeze-concentrated phase with X(aqu)left behind ice crystallization. Those solutions with X(aqu)phase of solutions instead of 'liquid II phase of water'. Our work also provides a reliable method to determine hydration formula and to scrutinize solute-solvent interaction in solution. PMID:26503911

  12. Glass transition of aqueous solutions involving annealing-induced ice recrystallization resolves liquid-liquid transition puzzle of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li-Shan; Cao, Ze-Xian; Wang, Qiang

    2015-10-01

    Liquid-liquid transition of water is an important concept in condensed-matter physics. Recently, it was claimed to have been confirmed in aqueous solutions based on annealing-induced upshift of glass-liquid transition temperature, . Here we report a universal water-content, , dependence of for aqueous solutions. Solutions with vitrify/devitrify at a constant temperature, , referring to freeze-concentrated phase with left behind ice crystallization. Those solutions with totally vitrify at under conventional cooling/heating process though, of the samples annealed at temperatures   to effectively evoke ice recrystallization is stabilized at . Experiments on aqueous glycerol and 1,2,4-butanetriol solutions in literature were repeated, and the same samples subject to other annealing treatments equally reproduce the result. The upshift of by annealing is attributable to freeze-concentrated phase of solutions instead of ‘liquid II phase of water’. Our work also provides a reliable method to determine hydration formula and to scrutinize solute-solvent interaction in solution.

  13. The influence of the flexoelectric effect on the orientational transitions in ferronematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhlevnykh, A. N.; Petrov, D. A.

    2015-09-01

    The influence of flexoelectric polarization induced by external electric and magnetic fields in a ferronematic liquid crystal on the orientational transitions between uniform and nonuniform phases is analyzed. The Freedericksz transition field and the saturation field as functions of ferronematic material parameters are determined. Bifurcation diagrams of orientational phases are analyzed. It is shown that the orientational transitions can be of the first or second order depending on the value of the segregation parameter of the dispersed phase.

  14. Recent development of ionic liquid stationary phases for liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianzhe; Qiao, Lizhen; Xu, Guowang

    2015-11-13

    Based on their particular physicochemical characteristics, ionic liquids have been widely applied in many fields of analytical chemistry. Many types of ionic liquids were immobilized on a support like silica or monolith as stationary phases for liquid chromatography. Moreover, different approaches were developed to bond covalently ionic liquids onto the supporting materials. The obtained ionic liquid stationary phases show multi-mode mechanism including hydrophobic, hydrophilic, hydrogen bond, anion exchange, π-π, and dipole-dipole interactions. Therefore, they could be used in different chromatographic modes including ion-exchange, RPLC, NPLC and HILIC to separate various classes of compounds. This review mainly summarizes the immobilized patterns and types of ionic liquid stationary phases, their retention mechanisms and applications in the recent five years. PMID:26463427

  15. Phase transitions in semidefinite relaxations

    PubMed Central

    Javanmard, Adel; Montanari, Andrea; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Statistical inference problems arising within signal processing, data mining, and machine learning naturally give rise to hard combinatorial optimization problems. These problems become intractable when the dimensionality of the data is large, as is often the case for modern datasets. A popular idea is to construct convex relaxations of these combinatorial problems, which can be solved efficiently for large-scale datasets. Semidefinite programming (SDP) relaxations are among the most powerful methods in this family and are surprisingly well suited for a broad range of problems where data take the form of matrices or graphs. It has been observed several times that when the statistical noise is small enough, SDP relaxations correctly detect the underlying combinatorial structures. In this paper we develop asymptotic predictions for several detection thresholds, as well as for the estimation error above these thresholds. We study some classical SDP relaxations for statistical problems motivated by graph synchronization and community detection in networks. We map these optimization problems to statistical mechanics models with vector spins and use nonrigorous techniques from statistical mechanics to characterize the corresponding phase transitions. Our results clarify the effectiveness of SDP relaxations in solving high-dimensional statistical problems. PMID:27001856

  16. Phase transitions in semidefinite relaxations.

    PubMed

    Javanmard, Adel; Montanari, Andrea; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico

    2016-04-19

    Statistical inference problems arising within signal processing, data mining, and machine learning naturally give rise to hard combinatorial optimization problems. These problems become intractable when the dimensionality of the data is large, as is often the case for modern datasets. A popular idea is to construct convex relaxations of these combinatorial problems, which can be solved efficiently for large-scale datasets. Semidefinite programming (SDP) relaxations are among the most powerful methods in this family and are surprisingly well suited for a broad range of problems where data take the form of matrices or graphs. It has been observed several times that when the statistical noise is small enough, SDP relaxations correctly detect the underlying combinatorial structures. In this paper we develop asymptotic predictions for several detection thresholds, as well as for the estimation error above these thresholds. We study some classical SDP relaxations for statistical problems motivated by graph synchronization and community detection in networks. We map these optimization problems to statistical mechanics models with vector spins and use nonrigorous techniques from statistical mechanics to characterize the corresponding phase transitions. Our results clarify the effectiveness of SDP relaxations in solving high-dimensional statistical problems. PMID:27001856

  17. Columnar Transitions in Microscale Evaporating Liquid Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Hanif; Glezer, Ari

    2007-11-01

    Microscale evaporating liquid jets that are injected into a quiescent gaseous medium having adjustable ambient pressure are investigated over a range of jet speeds using a shadowgraph technique. The jets are formed by a laser-drilled 10 μm nozzle from a small-scale pressurized reservoir, and sub-atmospheric ambient pressure is maintained using a controllable, metered Venturi pump. The near-field jet features are captured by shadowgraph imaging using a pulsed ND-Yag laser and a 12 bit CCD camera where the field of view measured 200 μm on the side. As the ambient pressure is reduced, the jet column undergoes a series of spectacular transitions that are first marked by the appearance of vapor bubbles within the jet column. The transitions progress from columnar instabilities to series of column bifurcations to high-order branching and film formation and culminate in conical atomization of the jet column. In addition to the effects of the ambient pressure, the present investigation also considers effects of the liquid surface tension and vapor pressure on the onset, evolution, and hysteresis of the columnar transitions.

  18. Liquid-Phase Beam Pen Lithography.

    PubMed

    He, Shu; Xie, Zhuang; Park, Daniel J; Liao, Xing; Brown, Keith A; Chen, Peng-Cheng; Zhou, Yu; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2016-02-01

    Beam pen lithography (BPL) in the liquid phase is evaluated. The effect of tip-substrate gap and aperture size on patterning performance is systematically investigated. As a proof-of-concept experiment, nanoarrays of nucleotides are synthesized using BPL in an organic medium, pointing toward the potential of using liquid phase BPL to perform localized photochemical reactions that require a liquid medium. PMID:26743998

  19. Order-(incommensurable disorder) phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalenko, A.; Nagaev, E.

    1982-01-05

    In first-order phase transitions in magnetic materials exhibiting a high-order spin, the short-range-order vector above the transition point may be incommensurable with the long-range-order vector below the transition point. This theoretical result explains some experiments on UAs. Some other materials which may exhibit this effect are pointed out.

  20. Phase transitions in the web of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2015-06-01

    The Internet age is changing the structure of science, and affecting interdisciplinary interactions. Publication profiles connecting mathematics with molecular biology and condensed matter physics over the last 40 years exhibit common phase transitions indicative of the critical role played by specific interdisciplinary interactions. The strengths of the phase transitions quantify the importance of interdisciplinary interactions.

  1. Analysis of Nuclear Quantum Phase Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z. P.; Meng, J.; Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Ring, P.

    2009-08-26

    A microscopic analysis, based on nuclear energy density functionals, is presented for shape phase transitions in Nd isotopes. Low-lying excitation spectra and transition probabilities are calculated starting from a five-dimensional Hamiltonian, with parameters determined by constrained relativistic mean-field calculations for triaxial shapes. The results reproduce available data, and show that there is an abrupt change of structure at N = 90, that corresponds to a first-order quantum phase transition between spherical and axially deformed shapes.

  2. Exploring structural phase transitions of ion crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, L. L.; Wan, W.; Chen, L.; Zhou, F.; Gong, S. J.; Tong, X.; Feng, M.

    2016-02-01

    Phase transitions have been a research focus in many-body physics over past decades. Cold ions, under strong Coulomb repulsion, provide a repealing paradigm of exploring phase transitions in stable confinement by electromagnetic field. We demonstrate various conformations of up to sixteen laser-cooled 40Ca+ ion crystals in a home-built surface-electrode trap, where besides the usually mentioned structural phase transition from the linear to the zigzag, two additional phase transitions to more complicated two-dimensional configurations are identified. The experimental observation agrees well with the numerical simulation. Heating due to micromotion of the ions is analysed by comparison of the numerical simulation with the experimental observation. Our investigation implies very rich and complicated many-body behaviour in the trapped-ion systems and provides effective mechanism for further exploring quantum phase transitions and quantum information processing with ultracold trapped ions.

  3. Exploring structural phase transitions of ion crystals

    PubMed Central

    Yan, L. L.; Wan, W.; Chen, L.; Zhou, F.; Gong, S. J.; Tong, X.; Feng, M.

    2016-01-01

    Phase transitions have been a research focus in many-body physics over past decades. Cold ions, under strong Coulomb repulsion, provide a repealing paradigm of exploring phase transitions in stable confinement by electromagnetic field. We demonstrate various conformations of up to sixteen laser-cooled 40Ca+ ion crystals in a home-built surface-electrode trap, where besides the usually mentioned structural phase transition from the linear to the zigzag, two additional phase transitions to more complicated two-dimensional configurations are identified. The experimental observation agrees well with the numerical simulation. Heating due to micromotion of the ions is analysed by comparison of the numerical simulation with the experimental observation. Our investigation implies very rich and complicated many-body behaviour in the trapped-ion systems and provides effective mechanism for further exploring quantum phase transitions and quantum information processing with ultracold trapped ions. PMID:26865229

  4. Exploring structural phase transitions of ion crystals.

    PubMed

    Yan, L L; Wan, W; Chen, L; Zhou, F; Gong, S J; Tong, X; Feng, M

    2016-01-01

    Phase transitions have been a research focus in many-body physics over past decades. Cold ions, under strong Coulomb repulsion, provide a repealing paradigm of exploring phase transitions in stable confinement by electromagnetic field. We demonstrate various conformations of up to sixteen laser-cooled (40)Ca(+) ion crystals in a home-built surface-electrode trap, where besides the usually mentioned structural phase transition from the linear to the zigzag, two additional phase transitions to more complicated two-dimensional configurations are identified. The experimental observation agrees well with the numerical simulation. Heating due to micromotion of the ions is analysed by comparison of the numerical simulation with the experimental observation. Our investigation implies very rich and complicated many-body behaviour in the trapped-ion systems and provides effective mechanism for further exploring quantum phase transitions and quantum information processing with ultracold trapped ions. PMID:26865229

  5. Microscopic identification of the order parameter governing liquid–liquid transition in a molecular liquid

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Ken-ichiro; Tanaka, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    A liquid–liquid transition (LLT) in a single-component substance is an unconventional phase transition from one liquid to another. LLT has recently attracted considerable attention because of its fundamental importance in our understanding of the liquid state. To access the order parameter governing LLT from a microscopic viewpoint, here we follow the structural evolution during the LLT of an organic molecular liquid, triphenyl phosphite (TPP), by time-resolved small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering measurements. We find that locally favored clusters, whose characteristic size is a few nanometers, are spontaneously formed and their number density monotonically increases during LLT. This strongly suggests that the order parameter of LLT is the number density of locally favored structures and of nonconserved nature. We also show that the locally favored structures are distinct from the crystal structure and these two types of orderings compete with each other. Thus, our study not only experimentally identifies the structural order parameter governing LLT, but also may settle a long-standing debate on the nature of the transition in TPP, i.e., whether the transition is LLT or merely microcrystal formation. PMID:25918385

  6. Pressure-induced phase transition in pentacene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, L.; Brillante, A.; Della Valle, R. G.; Venuti, E.; Amboage, M.; Syassen, K.

    2003-07-01

    We have recently studied two solid phases of bulk pentacene (polymorphs H and C) by means of lattice phonon Raman spectroscopy. The assignment, previously based on lattice dynamics calculations alone, is now verified by X-ray diffraction measurements, conclusively confirming the existence of both polymorphs. Furthermore, Raman phonon spectra indicate a pressure-induced phase transition where the polymorph C (lower density phase) transforms to the H form (higher density phase). The onset pressure for the phase transition is only 0.2 GPa. The phase change is irreversible.

  7. Microscopic Description of Nuclear Quantum Phase Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Ring, P.

    2007-08-31

    The relativistic mean-field framework, extended to include correlations related to restoration of broken symmetries and to fluctuations of the quadrupole deformation, is applied to a study of shape transitions in Nd isotopes. It is demonstrated that the microscopic self-consistent approach, based on global effective interactions, can describe not only general features of transitions between spherical and deformed nuclei, but also the singular properties of excitation spectra and transition rates at the critical point of quantum shape phase transition.

  8. Fluctuation-driven electroweak phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Gleiser, M.; Kolb, E.W.

    1991-11-01

    We examine the dynamics of the electroweak phase transition in the early Universe. For Higgs masses in the range 46 less than or = M sub H less than or = 150 GeV and top quark masses less than 200 GeV, regions of symmetric and asymmetric vacuum coexist to below the critical temperature, with thermal equilibrium between the two phases maintained by fluctuations of both phases. We propose that the transition to the asymmetric vacuum is completed by percolation of these subcritical fluctuations. Our results are relevant to scenarios of baryogenesis that invoke a weakly first-order phase transition at the electroweak scale.

  9. Thermodynamic geometry, phase transitions, and the Widom line.

    PubMed

    Ruppeiner, G; Sahay, A; Sarkar, T; Sengupta, G

    2012-11-01

    A microscopic characterization, based on the thermodynamic curvature R, is proposed for first-order liquid-gas phase transitions. Near the critical point, where R is proportional to the correlation volume ?(3), we propose that R takes the same value in the coexisting phases. This proposal allows a determination of the liquid-gas coexistence curve with no use of the problematic Maxwell equal area construction. Furthermore, |R| ~ ?(3) allows a direct determination of the Widom line in the supercritical regime. We illustrate with input from the van der Waals model and the National Institute of Standards and Technology Chemistry WebBook. PMID:23214830

  10. Thermodynamic geometry, phase transitions, and the Widom line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppeiner, G.; Sahay, A.; Sarkar, T.; Sengupta, G.

    2012-11-01

    A microscopic characterization, based on the thermodynamic curvature R, is proposed for first-order liquid-gas phase transitions. Near the critical point, where R is proportional to the correlation volume ?3, we propose that R takes the same value in the coexisting phases. This proposal allows a determination of the liquid-gas coexistence curve with no use of the problematic Maxwell equal area construction. Furthermore, |R|?3 allows a direct determination of the Widom line in the supercritical regime. We illustrate with input from the van der Waals model and the National Institute of Standards and Technology Chemistry WebBook.

  11. Topological phase transitions in the gauged BPS baby Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Naya, C.; Romanczukiewicz, T.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate that the gauged BPS baby Skyrme model with a double vacuum potential allows for phase transitions from a non-solitonic to a solitonic phase, where the latter corresponds to a ferromagnetic liquid. Such a transition can be generated by increasing the external pressure P or by turning on an external magnetic field H. As a consequence, the topological phase where gauged BPS baby skyrmions exist, is a higher density phase. For smaller densities, obtained for smaller values of P and H, a phase without solitons is reached. We find the critical line in the P, H parameter space. Furthermore, in the soliton phase, we find the equation of state for the baby skyrmion matter V = V( P,H) at zero temperature, where V is the "volume", i.e., area of the solitons.

  12. Astrophysical Implications of the QCD Phase Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffner-Bielich, J.; Sagert, I.; Hempel, M.; Pagliara, G.; Fischer, T.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl W.; Liebendoerfer, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    The possible role of a first order QCD phase transition at nonvanishing quark chemical potential and temperature for cold neutron stars and for supernovae is delineated. For cold neutron stars, we use the NJL model with a nonvanishing color superconducting pairing gap, which describes the phase transition to the 2SC and the CFL quark matter phases at high baryon densities. We demonstrate that these two phase transitions can both be present in the core of neutron stars and that they lead to the appearance of a third family of solution for compact stars. In particular, a core of CFL quark matter can be present in stable compact star configurations when slightly adjusting the vacuum pressure to the onset of the chiral phase transition from the hadronic model to the NJL model. We show that a strong first order phase transition can have a strong impact on the dynamics of core collapse supernovae. If the QCD phase transition sets in shortly after the first bounce, a second outgoing shock wave can be generated which leads to an explosion. The presence of the QCD phase transition can be read off from the neutrino and antineutrino signal of the supernova.

  13. Phase behavior and dynamics of a cholesteric liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, D.; Fragiadakis, D.; Roland, C. M.; Dabrowski, R.; Dziaduszek, J.; Urban, S.

    2014-02-21

    The synthesis, equation of state, phase diagram, and dielectric relaxation properties are reported for a new liquid crystal, 4{sup ′}-butyl-4-(2-methylbutoxy)azoxybenzene (4ABO5*), which exhibits a cholesteric phase at ambient temperature. The steepness of the intermolecular potential was characterized from the thermodynamic potential parameter, Γ = 4.3 ± 0.1 and the dynamic scaling exponent, γ = 3.5 ± 0.2. The difference between them is similar to that seen previously for nematic and smectic liquid crystals, with the near equivalence of Γ and γ consistent with the near constancy of the relaxation time of 4ABO5* at the cholesteric to isotropic phase transition (i.e., the clearing line). Thus, chirality does not cause deviations from the general relationship between thermodynamics and dynamics in the ordered phase of liquid crystals. The ionic conductivity of 4ABO5* shows strong coupling to the reorientational dynamics.

  14. Modeling the liquid-solid transition in saturated triglycerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, C. B.; Pink, D. A.; MacDonald, A. J.; Thillainadarajah, K.; Corkery, R.; Rousseau, D.

    2007-03-01

    Corkery et al. have proposed that the high-temperature state of the triglyceride trilaurin (TL) is a Y-conformer, in which the three hydrocarbon chains are dynamically twisted with an average angle of ˜120 between them. Using computer simulations, we first show that the high-temperature state is indeed the Y conformation. We then develop a theory of the liquid-solid transition of this system, in which TL molecules are in a chair (h) conformation, with extended, possibly all-trans, chains at low-temperatures, and are in a Y conformation in the liquid phase at temperatures higher than the transition temperature, T* 319K. We map this ``h-Y model'' onto an Ising model in a temperature-dependent field, perform a mean-field approximation, and calculate the transition enthalpy, which is in good agreement with experiment. We also predict the temperature-dependence of the 1132 cm-1 Raman band. Our results support the proposal that the liquid state is made up of molecules in the Y conformation.

  15. Phase transitions in human IgG solutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil F; Laubach, Jacob P; Hideshima, Teru; Richardson, Paul G; Munshi, Nikhil C; Anderson, Kenneth C; Benedek, George B

    2013-09-28

    Protein condensations, such as crystallization, liquid-liquid phase separation, aggregation, and gelation, have been observed in concentrated antibody solutions under various solution conditions. While most IgG antibodies are quite soluble, a few outliers can undergo condensation under physiological conditions. Condensation of IgGs can cause serious consequences in some human diseases and in biopharmaceutical formulations. The phase transitions underlying protein condensations in concentrated IgG solutions is also of fundamental interest for the understanding of the phase behavior of non-spherical protein molecules. Due to the high solubility of generic IgGs, the phase behavior of IgG solutions has not yet been well studied. In this work, we present an experimental approach to study IgG solutions in which the phase transitions are hidden below the freezing point of the solution. Using this method, we have investigated liquid-liquid phase separation of six human myeloma IgGs and two recombinant pharmaceutical human IgGs. We have also studied the relation between crystallization and liquid-liquid phase separation of two human cryoglobulin IgGs. Our experimental results reveal several important features of the generic phase behavior of IgG solutions: (1) the shape of the coexistence curve is similar for all IgGs but quite different from that of quasi-spherical proteins; (2) all IgGs have critical points located at roughly the same protein concentration at ~100 mg/ml while their critical temperatures vary significantly; and (3) the liquid-liquid phase separation in IgG solutions is metastable with respect to crystallization. These features of phase behavior of IgG solutions reflect the fact that all IgGs have nearly identical molecular geometry but quite diverse net inter-protein interaction energies. This work provides a foundation for further experimental and theoretical studies of the phase behavior of generic IgGs as well as outliers with large propensity to condense. The investigation of the phase diagram of IgG solutions is of great importance for the understanding of immunoglobulin deposition diseases as well as for the understanding of the colloidal stability of IgG pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:24089716

  16. Phase transitions in human IgG solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil F.; Laubach, Jacob P.; Hideshima, Teru; Richardson, Paul G.; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Benedek, George B.

    2013-09-01

    Protein condensations, such as crystallization, liquid-liquid phase separation, aggregation, and gelation, have been observed in concentrated antibody solutions under various solution conditions. While most IgG antibodies are quite soluble, a few outliers can undergo condensation under physiological conditions. Condensation of IgGs can cause serious consequences in some human diseases and in biopharmaceutical formulations. The phase transitions underlying protein condensations in concentrated IgG solutions is also of fundamental interest for the understanding of the phase behavior of non-spherical protein molecules. Due to the high solubility of generic IgGs, the phase behavior of IgG solutions has not yet been well studied. In this work, we present an experimental approach to study IgG solutions in which the phase transitions are hidden below the freezing point of the solution. Using this method, we have investigated liquid-liquid phase separation of six human myeloma IgGs and two recombinant pharmaceutical human IgGs. We have also studied the relation between crystallization and liquid-liquid phase separation of two human cryoglobulin IgGs. Our experimental results reveal several important features of the generic phase behavior of IgG solutions: (1) the shape of the coexistence curve is similar for all IgGs but quite different from that of quasi-spherical proteins; (2) all IgGs have critical points located at roughly the same protein concentration at ˜100 mg/ml while their critical temperatures vary significantly; and (3) the liquid-liquid phase separation in IgG solutions is metastable with respect to crystallization. These features of phase behavior of IgG solutions reflect the fact that all IgGs have nearly identical molecular geometry but quite diverse net inter-protein interaction energies. This work provides a foundation for further experimental and theoretical studies of the phase behavior of generic IgGs as well as outliers with large propensity to condense. The investigation of the phase diagram of IgG solutions is of great importance for the understanding of immunoglobulin deposition diseases as well as for the understanding of the colloidal stability of IgG pharmaceutical formulations.

  17. Evidence of liquid–liquid transition in glass-forming La50Al35Ni15 melt above liquidus temperature

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Sandor, Magdalena T.; Yu, Yao; Ke, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Hua-Ping; Li, Mao-Zhi; Wang, Wei-Hua; Liu, Lin; Wu, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Liquid–liquid transition, a phase transition of one liquid phase to another with the same composition, provides a key opportunity for investigating the relationship between liquid structures and dynamics. Here we report experimental evidences of a liquid–liquid transition in glass-forming La50Al35Ni15 melt above its liquidus temperature by 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance including the temperature dependence of cage volume fluctuations and atomic diffusion. The observed dependence of the incubation time on the degree of undercooling is consistent with a first-order phase transition. Simulation results indicate that such transition is accompanied by the change of bond-orientational order without noticeable change in density. The temperature dependence of atomic diffusion revealed by simulations is also in agreement with experiments. These observations indicate the need of two-order parameters in describing phase transitions of liquids. PMID:26165855

  18. Phase behavior of ionic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrat, S.; Bier, M.; Harnau, L.

    2010-05-01

    Bulk properties of ionic liquid crystals are investigated using density functional theory. The liquid crystal molecules are represented by ellipsoidal particles with charges located in their center or at their tails. Attractive interactions are taken into account in terms of the Gay-Berne pair potential. Rich phase diagrams involving vapor, isotropic and nematic liquid, as well as smectic phases are found. The dependence of the phase behavior on various parameters such as the length of the particles and the location of charges on the particles is studied.

  19. Li-ion batteries: Phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiyu, Hou; Geng, Chu; Jian, Gao; Yantao, Zhang; Lianqi, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Progress in the research on phase transitions during Li+ extraction/insertion processes in typical battery materials is summarized as examples to illustrate the significance of understanding phase transition phenomena in Li-ion batteries. Physical phenomena such as phase transitions (and resultant phase diagrams) are often observed in Li-ion battery research and already play an important role in promoting Li-ion battery technology. For example, the phase transitions during Li+ insertion/extraction are highly relevant to the thermodynamics and kinetics of Li-ion batteries, and even physical characteristics such as specific energy, power density, volume variation, and safety-related properties. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2013AA050906) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51272175 and 21301127).

  20. More is the Same; Phase Transitions and Mean Field Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadanoff, Leo P.

    2009-12-01

    This paper is the first in a series that will look at the theory of phase transitions from the perspectives of physics and the philosophy of science. The series will consider a group of related concepts derived from condensed matter and statistical physics. The key technical ideas go under the names of "singularity", "order parameter", "mean field theory", "variational method", "correlation length", "universality class", "scale changes", and "renormalization". The first four of these will be considered here. In a less technical vein, the question here is how can matter, ordinary matter, support a diversity of forms. We see this diversity each time we observe ice in contact with liquid water or see water vapor (steam) come up from a pot of heated water. Different phases can be qualitatively different in that walking on ice is well within human capacity, but walking on liquid water is proverbially forbidden to ordinary humans. These differences have been apparent to humankind for millennia, but only brought within the domain of scientific understanding since the 1880s. A phase transition is a change from one behavior to another. A first order phase transition involves a discontinuous jump in some statistical variable. The discontinuous property is called the order parameter. Each phase transition has its own order parameter. The possible order parameters range over a tremendous variety of physical properties. These properties include the density of a liquid-gas transition, the magnetization in a ferromagnet, the size of a connected cluster in a percolation transition, and a condensate wave function in a superfluid or superconductor. A continuous transition occurs when the discontinuity in the jump approaches zero. This article is about statistical mechanics and the development of mean field theory as a basis for a partial understanding of phase transition phenomena. Much of the material in this review was first prepared for the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2006. It has appeared in draft form on the authors' web site (http://jfi.uchicago.edu/~leop/) since then. The title of this article is a hommage to Philip Anderson and his essay "More is Different" (Sci. New Ser. 177(4047):393-396, 1972; N.-P. Ong and R. Bhatt (eds.) More is Different: Fifty Years of Condensed Matter Physics, Princeton Series in Physics, Princeton University Press, 2001) which describes how new concepts, not applicable in ordinary classical or quantum mechanics, can arise from the consideration of aggregates of large numbers of particles. Since phase transitions only occur in systems with an infinite number of degrees of freedom, such transitions are a prime example of Anderson's thesis.

  1. Mechanical instability of gels at the phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Toyoichi; Sun, Shao-Tang; Hirokawa, Yoshitsugu; Katayama, Seiji; Kucera, John; Hirose, Yoshiharu; Amiya, Takayuki

    1987-02-01

    Polymer gels, consisting of a cross-linked polymer network immersed in liquid, undergo a volume phase transition: when external conditions such as temperature or solvent composition change, a gel reversibly swells or shrinks, but does so discontinuously1-5. The volume change at the transition can be as large as a factor of one thousand2, and the phenomenon occurs in all gels6,7. The equilibrium aspects of the phase transition have been extensively studied, but its kinetics have not yet been fully explored. In particular, the appearance of patterns on the originally smooth surface of a gel during the transition makes the kinetic process difficult to understand. Here we elucidate the physical basis underlying the formation and evolution of the pattern.

  2. Phase transitions and convection in icy satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bercovici, D.; Schubert, G.; Reynolds, R. T.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of solid-solid phase changes on subsolidus convection in the large icy moons of the outer solar system are considered. Phase transitions affect convection via processes that distort the phase change boundary and/or influence buoyancy through thermal expansion. Linear stability analyses are carried out for ice layers with a phase change at the midplane. Two exothermic phase transitions (ice I - ice II, ice VI - ice VIII) and two endothermic transitions (ice I - ice III, ice II - ice V) are considered. For the exothermic cases, the phase change can either impede or enhance whole-layer convection. For the endothermic cases, the phse change always inhibits whole-layer convective overturn and tends to enforce two-layer convection. These results play some constraints on possible models of icy satellite evolution and structure.

  3. Phase changes in liquid face seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    Computer program predicts boiling (phase change) in liquid face seals. Program determines if and when boiling occurs, and calculates location of boiling interface, pressure and temperature profiles, and load.

  4. Dipole-induced dipole light scattering in supercooled liquids near the liquid-glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykhovskii, Alexis D.; Pick, Robert M.

    1994-05-01

    The integrated intensity produced by the dipole-induced dipole (DID) light scattering mechanism in a Lennard-Jones fluid is investigated for different points of the phase diagram corresponding to the normal and undercooled liquid at zero pressure. The exactly computed intensity is compared to the full Kirkwood superposition approximation (KSA) and its so-called Stephen approximation. The latter gives one or two orders of magnitude too large results, while the former is in much better agreement with the exact computation up to large reduced density values. On the basis of the mode coupling theory of the glass transition, it is argued that, in the vicinity of this transition, in real glass forming isotropic molecular liquids for which DID is the only light scattering mechanism, both a dynamical extension of the KSA and its Stephen approximation should yield dynamical spectra proportional to the real ones.

  5. Phase transitions of black holes in massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, Sharmanthie

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we have studied thermodynamics of a black hole in massive gravity in the canonical ensemble. The massive gravity theory in consideration here has a massive graviton due to Lorentz symmetry breaking. The black hole studied here has a scalar charge due to the massive graviton and is asymptotically anti-de Sitter (AdS). We have computed various thermodynamical quantities such as temperature, specific heat and free energy. Both the local and global stability of the black hole are studied by observing the behavior of the specific heat and the free energy. We have observed that there is a first-order phase transition between small (SBH) and large black hole (LBH) for a certain range of the scalar charge. This phase transition is similar to the liquid/gas phase transition at constant temperature for a van der Waals fluid. The coexistence curves for the SBH and LBH branches are also discussed in detail.

  6. Phase transition phenomenon: A compound measure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Bo Soo; Park, Chanhi; Ryu, Doojin; Song, Wonho

    2015-06-01

    This study investigates the well-documented phenomenon of phase transition in financial markets using combined information from both return and volume changes within short time intervals. We suggest a new measure for the phase transition behaviour of markets, calculated as a return distribution conditional on local variance in volume imbalance, and show that this measure successfully captures phase transition behaviour under various conditions. We analyse the intraday trade and quote dataset from the KOSPI 200 index futures, which includes detailed information on the original order size and the type of each initiating investor. We find that among these two competing factors, the submitted order size yields more explanatory power on the phenomenon of market phase transition than the investor type.

  7. Critical behaviours of contact near phase transitions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y.-Y.; Jiang, Y.-Z.; Guan, X.-W.; Zhou, Qi

    2014-01-01

    A central quantity of importance for ultracold atoms is contact, which measures two-body correlations at short distances in dilute systems. It appears in universal relations among thermodynamic quantities, such as large momentum tails, energy and dynamic structure factors, through the renowned Tan relations. However, a conceptual question remains open as to whether or not contact can signify phase transitions that are insensitive to short-range physics. Here we show that, near a continuous classical or quantum phase transition, contact exhibits a variety of critical behaviours, including scaling laws and critical exponents that are uniquely determined by the universality class of the phase transition, and a constant contact per particle. We also use a prototypical exactly solvable model to demonstrate these critical behaviours in one-dimensional strongly interacting fermions. Our work establishes an intrinsic connection between the universality of dilute many-body systems and universal critical phenomena near a phase transition. PMID:25346226

  8. Polyelectrolyte gel dynamics during volume phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Mithun; Hua, Jing; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2011-03-01

    We will address the dynamics of the elastic modes of a polyelectrolyte gel near the first-order volume phase transition. The role of the neutralizing plasma on the modulus of the polyelectrolyte gel will be discussed.

  9. Vapor-liquid phase separator studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Lee, J. M.; Kim, Y. I.; Hepler, W. A.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1983-01-01

    Porous plugs serve as both entropy rejection devices and phase separation components separating the vapor phase on the downstream side from liquid Helium 2 upstream. The liquid upstream is the cryo-reservoir fluid needed for equipment cooling by means of Helium 2, i.e Helium-4 below its lambda temperature in near-saturated states. The topics outlined are characteristic lengths, transport equations and plug results.

  10. Phase transition model for community detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianshe; Lu, Rui; Jiao, Licheng; Liu, Fang; Yu, Xin; Wang, Da; Sun, Bo

    2013-03-01

    Motivated by social and biological interactions, a novel type of phase transition model is provided in order to investigate the emergence of the clustering phenomenon in networks. The model has two types of interactions: one is attractive and the other is repulsive. In each iteration, the phase of a node (or an agent) moves toward the average phase of its neighbors and moves away from the average phase of its non-neighbors. The velocities of the two types of phase transition are controlled by two parameters, respectively. It is found that the phase transition phenomenon is closely related to the topological structure of the underlying network, and thus can be applied to identify its communities and overlapping groups. By giving each node of the network a randomly generated initial phase and updating these phases by the phase transition model until they reach stability, one or two communities will be detected according to the nodes’ stable phases, confusable nodes are moved into a set named Of. By removing the detected communities and the nodes in Of, another one or two communities will be detected by an iteration of the algorithm, …. In this way, all communities and the overlapping nodes are detected. Simulations on both real-world networks and the LFR benchmark graphs have verified the efficiency of the proposed scheme.

  11. Using Peltier Cells to Study Solid-Liquid-Vapour Transitions and Supercooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torzo, Giacomo; Soletta, Isabella; Branca, Mario

    2007-01-01

    We propose an apparatus for teaching experimental thermodynamics in undergraduate introductory courses, using thermoelectric modules and a real-time data acquisition system. The device may be made at low cost, still providing an easy approach to the investigation of liquid-solid and liquid-vapour phase transitions and of metastable states

  12. Using Peltier Cells to Study Solid-Liquid-Vapour Transitions and Supercooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torzo, Giacomo; Soletta, Isabella; Branca, Mario

    2007-01-01

    We propose an apparatus for teaching experimental thermodynamics in undergraduate introductory courses, using thermoelectric modules and a real-time data acquisition system. The device may be made at low cost, still providing an easy approach to the investigation of liquid-solid and liquid-vapour phase transitions and of metastable states…

  13. Magnetic fields from the electroweak phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Tornkvist, O.

    1998-02-01

    I review some of the mechanisms through which primordial magnetic fields may be created in the electroweak phase transition. I show that no magnetic fields are produced initially from two-bubble collisions in a first-order transition. The initial field produced in a three-bubble collision is computed. The evolution of fields at later times is discussed.

  14. Modelling of phase transitions: do it yourself

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medved', I.; Huckaby, D. A.; Trník, A.; Valovičová, L'

    2013-01-01

    We present the basics of a powerful contemporary statistical mechanical technique that can be used by students to explore first-order phase transitions by themselves and for models of their own construction. The technique is a generalization of the well-known Peierls argument and is applicable to various models on a lattice. We illustrate the technique with the help of two simple models that were recently used to simulate phase transitions on surfaces.

  15. Strongly coupled matter near phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bao-Chun; Huang, Mei

    2009-06-01

    In the Hartree approximation of Cornwall-Jackiw-Tomboulis (CJT) formalism of the real scalar field theory, we show that for the strongly coupled scalar system near phase transition, the shear viscosity over entropy density is small; however, the equation of state is highly non-conformal, and the bulk viscosity over entropy density is large. These results agree well with the lattice results of the complex QCD system near phase transition.

  16. Phase shifting phase contrast interferometer using a dye-doped liquid-crystal self-aligning phase modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadono, Hirofumi; Ohno, Kazunori; Toyooka, Satoru

    2005-09-01

    A new phase contrast imaging system that permits a quantitative observation of phase distribution of a general object is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. This is realized by implementing the phase shifting technique in the phase contrast imaging system. A dye-doped nematic liquid-crystal (NLC) is newly employed for this purpose as a variable phase filter in contrast to the constant phase plate employed in the conventional phase contrast microscope (PCM). The dye-doped NLC provides a practical advantage to the system that realizes an alignment-free optical system for the phase plate. The self-alignment property of the phase filter is realized by utilizing the local phase transition from the liquid-crystal to liquid, which is induced by the relatively strong incident light of the specular component of the object. In the experiment, the fundamental phase modulation property and the response of phase modulation ability were measured as a function of incident power of light. Next, the phase measurements were performed with several phase gratings and composite objects having different phase amplitudes and absorption. As an experimental result, the usefulness of the proposed method was confirmed, and the accuracy of the phase measurement was estimated to be λ/40. In addition, it was also demonstrated that the phase information could be obtained independently from the absorption component of the object.

  17. Melt-vapor phase transition in the lead-selenium system at atmospheric and low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volodin, V. N.; Burabaeva, N. M.; Trebukhov, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    The boiling temperature and the corresponding vapor phase composition in the existence domain of liquid solutions were calculated from the partial pressures of saturated vapor of the components and lead selenide over liquid melts in the lead-selenium system. The phase diagram was complemented with the liquid-vapor phase transition at atmospheric pressure and in vacuum of 100 Pa, which allowed us to judge the behavior of the components during the distillation separation.

  18. Higgs couplings and electroweak phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Andrey; Perelstein, Maxim

    2014-07-01

    We argue that extensions of the Standard Model (SM) with a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition generically predict significant deviations of the Higgs couplings to gluons, photons, and Z bosons from their SM values. Precise experimental measurements of the Higgs couplings at the LHC and at the proposed next-generation facilities will allow for a robust test of the phase transition dynamics. To illustrate this point, in this paper we focus on the scenario in which loops of a new scalar field are responsible for the first-order phase transition, and study a selection of benchmark models with various SM gauge quantum numbers of the new scalar. We find that the current LHC measurement of the Higgs coupling to gluons already excludes the possibility of a first-order phase transition induced by a scalar in a sextet, or larger, representation of the SU(3) c . Future LHC experiments (including HL-LHC) will be able to definitively probe the case when the new scalar is a color triplet. If the new scalar is not colored, an electron-positron Higgs factory, such as the proposed ILC or TLEP, would be required to test the nature of the phase transition. The extremely precise measurement of the Higgsstrahlung cross section possible at such machines will allow for a comprehensive and definitive probe of the possibility of a first-order electroweak phase transition in all models we considered, including the case when the new scalar is a pure gauge singlet.

  19. Thermal expansion accompanying the glass-liquid transition and crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, M. Q.; Naderi, M.; Wang, Y. J.; Peterlechner, M.; Liu, X. F.; Zeng, F.; Jiang, F.; Dai, L. H.; Wilde, G.

    2015-12-01

    We report the linear thermal expansion behaviors of a Zr-based (Vitreloy 1) bulk metallic glass in its as-cast, annealed and crystallized states. Accompanying the glass-liquid transition, the as-cast Vitreloy 1 shows a continuous decrease in the thermal expansivity, whereas the annealed glass shows a sudden increase. The crystallized Vitreloy 1 exhibits an almost unchanged thermal expansivity prior to its melting. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the nucleation of crystalline phases can induce a significant thermal shrinkage of the supercooled liquid, but with the growth of these nuclei, the thermal expansion again dominates. These results are explained in the framework of the potential energy landscape, advocating that the configurational and vibrational contributions to the thermal expansion of the glass depend on both, structure and temperature.

  20. Liquid-glass transition in charge-stabilized colloidal dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, S. K.; Wang, G. F.; Peng, W. P.

    2000-06-01

    We model the inter-colloidal interactions in a charge-stabilized colloidal dispersion by a hard-core Yukawa potential φ(r)=σ0γ exp(-κr)/r, r>σ0 and apply the rescaled mean spherical approximation to calculate its static structure factor. In conjunction with the idealized mode-coupling theory, we determine the loci of the liquid-glass transition phase boundary for a salt-free suspension of charged colloids evaluated at different counter-ion environment (characterized by the κ) in terms of the macro-ion parameters: volume fraction ɛ, charge Z0 and size σ0. The calculated parametric phase diagrams are quite general since the results, with slight and straightforward modification, can be utilized to study the glass transition in a more realistic colloidal solution such as an aqueous monodisperse suspension of polystyrene charged spheres with an added electrolyte. Confining our discussion, then, to the simplest salt-free colloidal liquids, we extract from our analysis of the calculated liquid-glass transition boundaries some succinct features. Specifically, we show in this work that given a range of interaction Vkgr=κσ0<~3.8, there is a possibility of observing the liquid⇋glass⇋liquid⇋glass(LGLG) re-entrant phenomenon in restrictive regions of the phase diagram ɛ-σ0 or ɛ-Z0 for a monodisperse charge-stabilized solution. However, as the σ0 increases above a critical size, the LGLG re-entrant behavior vanishes. To delve into this re-entrant phenomenon, we compare, for a given Vkgr, the glassy Debye-Waller factor, static structure factor and their spatial counterparts for two cases-nnone for lower-Z0 colloids at a high ɛ and the other for higher-Z0 colloids at a low ɛ. For the former, the glassification is basically driven by the geometric restriction while that, for the latter, it is mainly induced by the Coulomb force. We conclude from this comparison that under the same screening environment both the excluded volume and the electrostatic effects are equally effective in impelling a charge-stabilized colloidal dispersion to undergo a structural arrest configuration and hence the liquid-glass transition. .

  1. Comment on "Spontaneous liquid-liquid phase separation of water".

    PubMed

    Limmer, David T; Chandler, David

    2015-01-01

    Yagasaki et al. [Phys. Rev. E 89, 020301 (2014)] present results from a molecular dynamics trajectory illustrating coarsening of ice, which they interpret as evidence of transient coexistence between two distinct supercooled phases of liquid water. We point out that neither two distinct liquids nor criticality are demonstrated in this simulation study. Instead, the illustrated trajectory is consistent with coarsening behaviors analyzed and predicted in earlier work by others. PMID:25679744

  2. Comment on "Spontaneous liquid-liquid phase separation of water"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limmer, David T.; Chandler, David

    2015-01-01

    Yagasaki et al. [Phys. Rev. E 89, 020301 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.89.020301] present results from a molecular dynamics trajectory illustrating coarsening of ice, which they interpret as evidence of transient coexistence between two distinct supercooled phases of liquid water. We point out that neither two distinct liquids nor criticality are demonstrated in this simulation study. Instead, the illustrated trajectory is consistent with coarsening behaviors analyzed and predicted in earlier work by others.

  3. Dynamic phase transitions in confined lubricant fluids under shear

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, Carlos; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2001-04-01

    A surface force apparatus was used to measure the transient and steady-state friction forces between molecularly smooth mica surfaces confining thin films of squalane, C{sub 30}H{sub 62}, a saturated, branched hydrocarbon liquid. The dynamic friction ''phase diagram'' was determined under different shearing conditions, especially the transitions between stick-slip and smooth sliding ''states'' that exhibited a chaotic stick-slip regime. The apparently very different friction traces exhibited by simple spherical, linear, and branched hydrocarbon films under shear are shown to be due to the much longer relaxation times and characteristic length scales associated with transitions from rest to steady-state sliding, and vice versa, in the case of branched liquids. The physical reasons and tribological implications for the different types of transitions observed with spherical, linear, and branched fluids are discussed.

  4. Phenomena of solid state grain boundaries phase transition in technology

    SciTech Connect

    Minaev, Y. A.

    2015-03-30

    The results of study the phenomenon, discovered by author (1971), of the phase transition of grain boundary by the formation of two-dimensional liquid or quasi-liquid films have been done. The described phenomena of the first order phase transition (two-dimensional melting) at temperatures 0.6 – 0.9 T{sub S0} (of the solid state melting point) is a fundamental property of solid crystalline materials, which has allowed to revise radically scientific representations about a solid state of substance. Using the mathematical tools of the film thermodynamics it has been obtained the generalized equation of Clausius - Clapeyron type for two-dimensional phase transition. The generalized equation has been used for calculating grain boundary phase transition temperature T{sub Sf} of any metal, which value lies in the range of (0.55…0.86) T{sub S0}. Based on these works conclusions the develop strategies for effective forming of coatings (by thermo-chemical processing) on surface layers of functional alloys and hard metals have been made. The short overview of the results of some graded alloys characterization has been done.

  5. The transition from vortex liquid to vortex slush in YB2Cu3Oy superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S. L.; Wu, G. J.; Tan, H. J.; Xu, X. B.; Shao, H. M.

    2006-06-01

    The phase transition from vortex liquid to vortex slush has been confirmed in resistance measurements for YBCO crystal superconductors, on the basis of scaling analysis. The temperature dependence of the resistivity under various magnetic fields collapses onto two branches in the scaling behaviour, associated with the vortex slush and the vortex liquid states. The lower branch, for temperatures below the transition point, has a negative curvature, while the upper one shows a plateau above the transition point. The critical exponents are estimated from the scaling result. The phase diagram in the H-T plane is presented and compared with previous reports.

  6. Contemporary Research of Dynamically Induced Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Lawrence

    2015-06-01

    Dynamically induced phase transitions in metals, within the present discussion, are those that take place within a time scale characteristic of the shock waves and any reflections or rarefactions involved in the loading structure along with associated plastic flow. Contemporary topics of interest include the influence of loading wave shape, the effect of shear produced by directionality of the loading relative to the sample dimensions and initial velocity field, and the loading duration (kinetic effects, hysteresis) on the appearance and longevity of a transformed phase. These topics often arise while considering the loading of parts of various shapes with high explosives, are typically two or three-dimensional, and are often selected because of the potential of the transformed phase to significantly modify the motion. In this paper, we look at current work on phase transitions in metals influenced by shear reported in the literature, and relate recent work conducted at Los Alamos on iron's epsilon phase transition that indicates a significant response to shear produced by reflected elastic waves. A brief discussion of criteria for the occurrence of stress induced phase transitions is provided. Closing remarks regard certain physical processes, such as fragmentation and jet formation, which may be strongly influenced by phase transitions. Supported by the DoD/DOE Joint Munitions Technology Development Program.

  7. Liquid-phase compositions from vapor-phase analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W. Jr. ); Cochran, H.D. )

    1990-02-01

    Arsenic normally is not considered to be a contaminant. However, because arsenic was found in many cylinders of UF{sub 6}, including in corrosion products, a study was performed of the distribution of the two arsenic fluorides, AsF{sub 3} and AsF{sub 5}, between liquid and vapor phases. The results of the study pertain to condensation or vaporization of liquid UF{sub 6}. This study includes use of various experimental data plus many extrapolations necessitated by the meagerness of the experimental data. The results of this study provide additional support for the vapor-liquid equilibrium model of J.M. Prausnitz and his coworkers as a means of describing the distribution of various impurities between vapor and liquid phases of UF{sub 6}. Thus, it is concluded that AsF{sub 3} will tend to concentrate in the liquid phase but that the concentration of AsF{sub 5} in the vapor phase will exceed its liquid-phase concentration by a factor of about 7.5, which is in agreement with experimental data. Because the weight of the liquid phase in a condensation operation may be in the range of thousands of times that of the vapor phase, most of any AsF{sub 5} will be in the liquid phase in spite of this separation factor of 7.5. It may also be concluded that any arsenic fluorides fed into a uranium isotope separation plant will either travel with other low-molecular-weight gases or react with materials present in the plant. 25 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Finite Temperature Dynamics Near Quantum Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdev, Subir

    2002-12-01

    We review the non-zero temperature relaxational dynamics of quantum systems near a zero temperature, second-order phase transition. We begin with the quantum Ising chain, for which universal and exact results for the relaxation rates can be obtained in all the distinct limiting regimes of the phase diagram. Next, we describe the crossovers in the electron spectral function near a transition involving a change in the pairing symmetry of BCS superconductors in two dimensions. Finally, we consider dynamic spin models which may provide a mean-field description of magnetic ordering transitions in the heavy fermion compounds.

  9. Liquid and Solid Phases of ^{3}He on Graphite.

    PubMed

    Gordillo, M C; Boronat, J

    2016-04-01

    Recent heat-capacity experiments show quite unambiguously the existence of a liquid ^{3}He phase adsorbed on graphite. This liquid is stable at an extremely low density, possibly one of the lowest found in nature. Previous theoretical calculations of the same system, and in strictly two dimensions, agree with the result that this liquid phase is not stable and the system is in the gas phase. We calculated the phase diagram of normal ^{3}He adsorbed on graphite at T=0 using quantum Monte Carlo methods. Considering a fully corrugated substrate, we observe that at densities lower than 0.006  Å^{-2} the system is a very dilute gas that, at that density, is in equilibrium with a liquid of density 0.014  Å^{-2}. Our prediction matches very well the recent experimental findings on the same system. On the contrary, when a flat substrate is considered, no gas-liquid coexistence is found, in agreement with previous calculations. We also report results on the different solid structures, and on the corresponding phase transitions that appear at higher densities. PMID:27104715

  10. Liquid and Solid Phases of 3He on Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo, M. C.; Boronat, J.

    2016-04-01

    Recent heat-capacity experiments show quite unambiguously the existence of a liquid 3He phase adsorbed on graphite. This liquid is stable at an extremely low density, possibly one of the lowest found in nature. Previous theoretical calculations of the same system, and in strictly two dimensions, agree with the result that this liquid phase is not stable and the system is in the gas phase. We calculated the phase diagram of normal 3He adsorbed on graphite at T =0 using quantum Monte Carlo methods. Considering a fully corrugated substrate, we observe that at densities lower than 0.006 Å-2 the system is a very dilute gas that, at that density, is in equilibrium with a liquid of density 0.014 Å-2 . Our prediction matches very well the recent experimental findings on the same system. On the contrary, when a flat substrate is considered, no gas-liquid coexistence is found, in agreement with previous calculations. We also report results on the different solid structures, and on the corresponding phase transitions that appear at higher densities.

  11. The Isospin Dependence of the Nuclear Phase Transition Near the Critical Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Wada, R.; Bonasera, A.; Keutgen, T.; Hagel, K.; Wang, J.; Huang, M.; Qin, L.; Natowitz, J.; Materna, T.; Kowalski, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Nakagawa, T.

    The experimental results reveal the isospin dependence of the nuclear phase transition in terms of the Landau Free Energy description of critical phenomena. Near the critical point, different ratios of the neutron to proton concentrations lead to different critical points for the phase transition which is analogous to the phase transitions in He4-He3 liquid mixtures. The antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) and GEMINI models calculations were also performed and the results will be discussed as well.

  12. Binary Solid-Liquid Phase Equilibria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Herbert R.

    1978-01-01

    Indicates some of the information that may be obtained from a binary solid-liquid phase equilibria experiment and a method to write a computer program that will plot an ideal phase diagram to which the experimental results may be compared. (Author/CP)

  13. Liquid-liquid phase separation in mixed organic/inorganic single aqueous aerosol droplets.

    PubMed

    Stewart, D J; Cai, C; Nayler, J; Preston, T C; Reid, J P; Krieger, U K; Marcolli, C; Zhang, Y H

    2015-05-01

    Direct measurements of the phase separation relative humidity (RH) and morphology of aerosol particles consisting of liquid organic and aqueous inorganic domains are presented. Single droplets of mixed phase composition are captured in a gradient force optical trap, and the evolving size, refractive index (RI), and morphology are characterized by cavity-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Starting at a RH above the phase separation RH, the trapped particle is dried to lower RH and the transition to a phase-separated structure is inferred from distinct changes in the spectroscopic fingerprint. In particular, the phase separation RHs of droplets composed of aqueous solutions of polyethylene glycol (PEG-400)/ammonium sulfate and a mixture of C6-diacids/ammonium sulfate are probed, inferring the RH from the RI of the droplet immediately prior to phase separation. The observed phase separation RHs occur at RH marginally higher (at most 4%) than reported in previous measurements made from studies of particles deposited on hydrophobic surfaces by brightfield imaging. Clear evidence for the formation of phase-separated droplets of core-shell morphology is observed, although partially engulfed structures can also be inferred to form. Transitions between the different spectroscopic signatures of phase separation suggest that fluctuations in morphology can occur. For droplets that are repeatedly cycled through the phase separation RH, the water activity at phase separation is found to be remarkably reproducible (within ±0.0013) and is the same for the 1-phase to 2-phase transition and the 2-phase to 1-phase transition. By contrast, larger variation between the water activities at phase separation is observed for different droplets (typically ±0.02). PMID:25879138

  14. Monoclinic phases arising across thermal inter-ferroelectric phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yijia; Xue, Fei; Lei, Shiming; Lummen, Tom T. A.; Wang, Jianjun; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Chen, Long-Qing

    2014-07-01

    Thermotropic phase boundaries (TPBs), as thermal analogs of morphotropic phase boundaries (MPBs), are associated with the thermal inter-ferroelectric phase transitions. Similar to an MPB, a TPB exhibits a characteristically flattened energy profile which favors polarization rotation, thus giving rise to a structurally bridging low-symmetry phase. We report on the kinetic process of thermal inter-ferroelectric phase transitions in BaTiO3 and KNbO3 using the phase-field method. The domain structures are found to play key roles in stabilizing the monoclinic phase. In simple domain structures, the monoclinic phase is a transient phase and cannot be stabilized into its neighboring phase regimes. However, by introducing structural inhomogeneity (orthogonal in-plane domain twins), we found that the monoclinic phase can be stabilized over a range of over 100 K across the transition. As a result, the piezoelectric properties are enhanced due to the stabilized monoclinic phase. In addition to the emergence of new piezoelectric components with monoclinic symmetry, most of the original components present in the tetragonal symmetry also show substantial enhancement with the rotation of polarization.

  15. Thermodynamic precursors, liquid-liquid transitions, dynamic and topological anomalies in densified liquid germania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacaud, F.; Micoulaut, M.

    2015-08-01

    The thermodynamic, dynamic, structural, and rigidity properties of densified liquid germania (GeO2) have been investigated using classical molecular dynamics simulation. We construct from a thermodynamic framework an analytical equation of state for the liquid allowing the possible detection of thermodynamic precursors (extrema of the derivatives of the free energy), which usually indicate the possibility of a liquid-liquid transition. It is found that for the present germania system, such precursors and the possible underlying liquid-liquid transition are hidden by the slowing down of the dynamics with decreasing temperature. In this respect, germania behaves quite differently when compared to parent tetrahedral systems such as silica or water. We then detect a diffusivity anomaly (a maximum of diffusion with changing density/volume) that is strongly correlated with changes in coordinated species, and the softening of bond-bending (BB) topological constraints that decrease the liquid rigidity and enhance transport. The diffusivity anomaly is finally substantiated from a Rosenfeld-type scaling law linked to the pair correlation entropy, and to structural relaxation.

  16. Phase behavior of cyclic siloxane-based liquid crystalline compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gresham, K.D.; McHugh, C.M.; Bunning, T.J.; Crane, R.L.; Klei, H.E.; Samulski, E.T.

    1993-12-31

    The phase behavior of 24 cyclic siloxane liquid crystalline compounds are compared with respect to spacer length, composition, ring size, and mesogenic phase behavior. Penta- and tetramethylhydrocyclosiloxane rings were modified by biphenyl- and/or cholesterol-based molecules. A strong dependence of ring size on thermal behavior was observed for the homopolymers. 4-membered rings seem to inhibit the formation of liquid crystalline phases for biphenyl-based mesogens. Clearing temperatures for this series followed the melting temperatures of the unattached mesogens. Cholesterol-based compounds exhibited glass transition temperatures which increased substantially with spacer group length. A tendency to layer pack for the cholesterol compound was observed as smectic-A phases were formed.

  17. Random fields at a nonequilibrium phase transition.

    PubMed

    Barghathi, Hatem; Vojta, Thomas

    2012-10-26

    We study nonequilibrium phase transitions in the presence of disorder that locally breaks the symmetry between two equivalent macroscopic states. In low-dimensional equilibrium systems, such random-field disorder is known to have dramatic effects: it prevents spontaneous symmetry breaking and completely destroys the phase transition. In contrast, we show that the phase transition of the one-dimensional generalized contact process persists in the presence of random-field disorder. The ultraslow dynamics in the symmetry-broken phase is described by a Sinai walk of the domain walls between two different absorbing states. We discuss the generality and limitations of our theory, and we illustrate our results by large-scale Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:23215170

  18. Phase transitions and entropies for synchronizing oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bier, Martin; Lisowski, Bartosz; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    We study a generic model of coupled oscillators. In the model there is competition between phase synchronization and diffusive effects. For a model with a finite number of states we derive how a phase transition occurs when the coupling parameter is varied. The phase transition is characterized by a symmetry breaking and a discontinuity in the first derivative of the order parameter. We quantitatively account for how the synchronized pulse is a low-entropy structure that facilitates the production of more entropy by the system as a whole. For a model with many states we apply a continuum approximation and derive a potential Burgers' equation for a propagating pulse. No phase transition occurs in that case. However, positive entropy production by diffusive effects still exceeds negative entropy production by the shock formation.

  19. Tuning the Liquid-Liquid Transition by Modulating the Hydrogen-Bond Angular Flexibility in a Model for Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallenburg, Frank; Sciortino, Francesco

    2015-07-01

    We propose a simple extension of the well known ST2 model for water [F. H. Stillinger and A. Rahman, J. Chem. Phys. 60, 1545 (1974)] that allows for a continuous modification of the hydrogen-bond angular flexibility. We show that the bond flexibility affects the relative thermodynamic stability of the liquid and of the hexagonal (or cubic) ice. On increasing the flexibility, the liquid-liquid critical point, which in the original ST2 model is located in the no-man's land (i.e., the region where ice is the thermodynamically stable phase) progressively moves to a temperature where the liquid is more stable than ice. Our study definitively proves that the liquid-liquid transition in the ST2 model is a genuine phenomenon, of high relevance in all tetrahedral network-forming liquids, including water.

  20. Mesoscopic aspects of phase transitions in a solvent extraction system.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Ross J; Audras, Matthieu; Antonio, Mark R

    2012-11-01

    In liquid-liquid extraction, organic phase splitting arises when high concentrations of polar solutes (acids/metal ions) are extracted. Herein, we investigate the mesoscopic roots that underpin phase splitting in alkane phases containing mixed amphiphiles, of contemporary interest in solvent extraction separation systems, by extracting various oxoacids. The oxoacids exhibited individual macroscopic (extractive and physical) behaviors, inducing phase splitting into heavy and light domains under markedly different conditions. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data analyzed using the generalized indirect Fourier transform (GIFT) method, we showed that, in all cases, acid extraction drove the self-assembly of reverse micelles into rods. These grew with increased acid extraction until reaching a critical length of 20 nm, at which point interactions produced interconnected cylinders or lamellar sheets that prelude phase splitting into heavy and light domains. In all cases, the heavy phase contained the same surfactant ratio-TBP (tri-n-butyl phosphate) and CMPO (octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide)-even though the concentrations of acid, water, and amphiphiles were markedly different. The remarkable similarities in structure and amphiphile stoichiometries underpinning phase splitting across the macroscopically different acid extraction series allude to the mesoscopic roots of organic phase behavior in solvent extraction. Our studies show that the structures underpinning phase splitting in solvent extraction systems are more complex than previously thought and are reminiscent of phase transitions in soft matter. PMID:23062174

  1. A ferrocene-azobenzene derivative showing unprecedented phase transition and better solubility upon UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Ji, Ya-Jian; Yang, Lan; Zhang, Yi; Kuang, Gui-Chao

    2016-04-21

    The ferrocene-aspartic acid-azobenzene derivative 1 showing an unprecedented photoinduced crystal-liquid phase transition at an elevated temperature and better solubility in organic solvents has been successfully reported. PMID:27025392

  2. Spin dynamics and spin freezing at ferromagnetic quantum phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmakat, P.; Wagner, M.; Ritz, R.; Bauer, A.; Brando, M.; Deppe, M.; Duncan, W.; Duvinage, C.; Franz, C.; Geibel, C.; Grosche, F. M.; Hirschberger, M.; Hradil, K.; Meven, M.; Neubauer, A.; Schulz, M.; Senyshyn, A.; Süllow, S.; Pedersen, B.; Böni, P.; Pfleiderer, C.

    2015-07-01

    We report selected experimental results on the spin dynamics and spin freezing at ferromagnetic quantum phase transitions to illustrate some of the most prominent escape routes by which ferromagnetic quantum criticality is avoided in real materials. In the transition metal Heusler compound Fe2TiSn we observe evidence for incipient ferromagnetic quantum criticality. High pressure studies in MnSi reveal empirical evidence for a topological non-Fermi liquid state without quantum criticality. Single crystals of the hexagonal Laves phase compound Nb1- y Fe2+ y provide evidence of a ferromagnetic to spin density wave transition as a function of slight compositional changes. Last but not least, neutron depolarisation imaging in CePd1- x Rh x underscore evidence taken from the bulk properties of the formation of a Kondo cluster glass.

  3. Orientational phase transitions in alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Saboungi, M.L.; Johnson, G.K.; Price, D.L.

    1992-09-22

    Plastic crystal behavior is observed in semiconducting CsPb and NaSn at high temperature (600 and 500 C, respectively). This behavior is associated with M{sub 4}{sup 4{minus}} or A{sub 4}M{sub 4} structural units orientationally disordering about 50 C below the melting point where translational disorder sets in. This orientational disorder is different in the two phases, exhibiting jump reorientations in CsPb and a more isotropic behavior in NaSn. In other Zintl compounds such as KPb, there is a single melting point where orientational and translational disorder sets in simultaneously; the classification of the different Zintl compounds into these two different kinds of behavior will require calorimetry or neutron diffraction below the melting point. (DLC)

  4. Phase transition peculiarities in LAMOX single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronkova, V. I.; Kharitonova, E. P.; Krasilnikova, A. E.; Kononkova, N. N.

    2008-05-01

    The series of oxide-ion-conducting La2Mo2O9 single crystals, undoped and doped with Ca, Bi, W, Nb, Zn and V (LAMOX), was grown by the flux method in the system La2O3-MoO3, which has allowed us to use polarization microscopy for the identification of phases. Phase transition peculiarities in the LAMOX family have been studied by polarization microscopy and calorimetry. The results demonstrate that both the monoclinic phase (α), which is stable at room temperature, and the metastable cubic phase (βms), or a mixture of these phases, may exist at room temperature, depending on the post-growth cooling rate and the nature of the dopant at low doping level. On heating, all of the quenched crystals undergo \\beta_{\\mathrm {ms}} \\to \\alpha (450 °C) and \\alpha \\to \\beta (500-560 °C) phase transitions (where β designates the stable cubic phase). At heavy doping levels, the high-temperature transition is suppressed and the crystals (La2Mo1.95V0.05Oy, La2Mo1.84W0.16Oy in our case) are found in the cubic state. The thermal peak near 450 °C at high doping level is not associated with a \\beta_{\\mathrm {ms}} \\to \\alpha transition and may be the result of defect association/dissociation in the cubic crystals. The thermal history, nature of the dopant and doping level are shown to influence the phase transition sequence and type.

  5. Phase transitions in multiplicative competitive processes

    SciTech Connect

    Shimazaki, Hideaki; Niebur, Ernst

    2005-07-01

    We introduce a discrete multiplicative process as a generic model of competition. Players with different abilities successively join the game and compete for finite resources. Emergence of dominant players and evolutionary development occur as a phase transition. The competitive dynamics underlying this transition is understood from a formal analogy to statistical mechanics. The theory is applicable to bacterial competition, predicting novel population dynamics near criticality.

  6. Quantum Phase Transitions of Antiferromagnets and the Cuprate Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdev, Subir

    I begin with a proposed global phase diagram of the cuprate superconductors as a function of carrier concentration, magnetic field, and temperature, and highlight its connection to numerous recent experiments. The phase diagram is then used as a point of departure for a pedagogical review of various quantum phases and phase transitions of insulators, superconductors, and metals. The bond operator method is used to describe the transition of dimerized antiferromagnetic insulators between magnetically ordered states and spin-gap states. The Schwinger boson method is applied to frustrated square lattice antiferromagnets: phase diagrams containing collinear and spirally ordered magnetic states, Z_2 spin liquids, and valence bond solids are presented, and described by an effective gauge theory of spinons. Insights from these theories of insulators are then applied to a variety of symmetry breaking transitions in d-wave superconductors. The latter systems also contain fermionic quasiparticles with a massless Dirac spectrum, and their influence on the order parameter fluctuations and quantum criticality is carefully discussed. I conclude with an introduction to strong coupling problems associated with symmetry breaking transitions in two-dimensional metals, where the order parameter fluctuations couple to a gapless line of fermionic excitations along the Fermi surface.

  7. Holographic phase transitions with fundamental matter.

    PubMed

    Mateos, David; Myers, Robert C; Thomson, Rowan M

    2006-09-01

    The holographic dual of a finite-temperature gauge theory with a small number of flavors typically contains D-brane probes in a black hole background. At low temperature, the branes sit outside the black hole and the meson spectrum is discrete and possesses a mass gap. As the temperature increases, the branes approach a critical solution. Eventually, they fall into the horizon and a phase transition occurs. In the new phase, the meson spectrum is continuous and gapless. At large Nc and large 't Hooft coupling, we show that this phase transition is always first order. In confining theories with heavy quarks, it occurs above the deconfinement transition for the glue. PMID:17026354

  8. Assembly and phase transitions of colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Zhou, Di; Han, Yilong

    2016-02-01

    Micrometre-sized colloidal particles can be viewed as large atoms with tailorable size, shape and interactions. These building blocks can assemble into extremely rich structures and phases, in which the thermal motions of particles can be directly imaged and tracked using optical microscopy. Hence, colloidal particles are excellent model systems for studying phase transitions, especially for poorly understood kinetic and non-equilibrium microscale processes. Advances in colloid fabrication, assembly and computer simulations have opened up numerous possibilities for such research. In this Review, we describe recent progress in the study of colloidal crystals composed of tunable isotropic spheres, anisotropic particles and active particles. We focus on advances in crystallization, melting and solid-solid transitions, and highlight challenges and future perspectives in phase-transition studies within colloidal crystals.

  9. Friction forces on phase transition fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Mégevand, Ariel

    2013-07-01

    In cosmological first-order phase transitions, the microscopic interaction of the phase transition fronts with non-equilibrium plasma particles manifests itself macroscopically as friction forces. In general, it is a nontrivial problem to compute these forces, and only two limits have been studied, namely, that of very slow walls and, more recently, ultra-relativistic walls which run away. In this paper we consider ultra-relativistic velocities and show that stationary solutions still exist when the parameters allow the existence of runaway walls. Hence, we discuss the necessary and sufficient conditions for the fronts to actually run away. We also propose a phenomenological model for the friction, which interpolates between the non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic values. Thus, the friction depends on two friction coefficients which can be calculated for specific models. We then study the velocity of phase transition fronts as a function of the friction parameters, the thermodynamic parameters, and the amount of supercooling.

  10. Size dependence of phase transitions in aerosol nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yafang; Su, Hang; Koop, Thomas; Mikhailov, Eugene; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Phase transitions of nanoparticles are of fundamental importance in atmospheric sciences, but current understanding is insufficient to explain observations at the nano-scale. In particular, discrepancies exist between observations and model predictions of deliquescence and efflorescence transitions and the hygroscopic growth of salt nanoparticles. Here we show that these discrepancies can be resolved by consideration of particle size effects with consistent thermodynamic data. We present a new method for the determination of water and solute activities and interfacial energies in highly supersaturated aqueous solution droplets (Differential Köhler Analysis). Our analysis reveals that particle size can strongly alter the characteristic concentration of phase separation in mixed systems, resembling the influence of temperature. Owing to similar effects, atmospheric secondary organic aerosol particles at room temperature are expected to be always liquid at diameters below ~20 nm. We thus propose and demonstrate that particle size should be included as an additional dimension in the equilibrium phase diagram of aerosol nanoparticles.

  11. Late-time cosmological phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1990-11-01

    It is shown that the potential galaxy formation and large-scale structure problems of objects existing at high redshifts (Z {approx gt} 5), structures existing on scales of 100M pc as well as velocity flows on such scales, and minimal microwave anisotropies ({Delta}T/T) {approx lt} 10{sup {minus}5} can be solved if the seeds needed to generate structure form in a vacuum phase transition after decoupling. It is argued that the basic physics of such a phase transition is no more exotic than that utilized in the more traditional GUT scale phase transitions, and that, just as in the GUT case, significant random gaussian fluctuations and/or topological defects can form. Scale lengths of {approximately}100M pc for large-scale structure as well as {approximately}1 M pc for galaxy formation occur naturally. Possible support for new physics that might be associated with such a late-time transition comes from the preliminary results of the SAGE solar neutrino experiment, implying neutrino flavor mixing with values similar to those required for a late-time transition. It is also noted that a see-saw model for the neutrino masses might also imply a tau neutrino mass that is an ideal hot dark matter candidate. However, in general either hot or cold dark matter can be consistent with a late-time transition. 47 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Phase transitions in models of ion-specific protein solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettieri, Steven A.

    Protein crystallization is an ongoing area of research. Much theoretical work exists in this field, however currently there is no universal theory that predicts the conditions at which proteins crystallize. A better understanding of protein behavior in different solutions well help create high quality crystals suitable for crystallography and will also allow us to prevent and understand the onset of certain diseases. In this thesis, we examine many interesting models of protein self-assembly in the presence of aqueous electrolyte solutions to extend the understanding of phase transitions taking place in such systems. It is well known experimentally that salts play an important role in phase transitions of protein solutions, among other things. We analyze a salt specific model of lysozyme based on ion-dispersion interactions in order to determine where the liquid-liquid and liquid-solid phase transitions occur. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we show that the system has a metastable fluid-fluid transition, which is consistent with experimental observations of this system at similar salt concentrations. We also examine the role of salts on the metastable fluid-fluid curve in a model of aluminum oxide nanoparticles. The methods we employ include finite-size scaling, multicanonical histogram reweighting and Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo. We show that, as expected, this interaction potential belongs to the Ising universality class. The scaling fields and critical point parameters are obtained in the thermodynamic limit of infinite system size by extrapolation of our finite size scaling results. We also quantitatively demonstrate how different salts have an effect on the critical point of the metastable fluid-fluid curve. Ion-specific interactions may manifest themselves in many ways. In our most recent study, we examine another model of lysozyme at different salt concentrations which includes interactions due to ion-specific and hydrophobic surface effects. We use a potential of mean force along with Monte Carlo simulations to determine the liquid-liquid and liquid-solid phase diagrams for different salt concentrations of NaCl. In one case, we observe a stable liquid-solid phase transition while for the higher salt concentration, we observe that the system is just slightly metastable. We attribute this to the fact that the potential for the higher salt concentration has a repulsive maximum, which effectively shortens the range of the attraction. Lastly, we present preliminary results on gelation for a simple model of globular proteins in which the liquid-liquid and liquid-solid phase diagram is already known. In this model, we use canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the gel region below the critical point where we observe that the arrested gel state is preceded by spinodal decomposition. In some cases, we also observe local crystallization within the gel state.

  13. Shape phase transitions and critical points

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C. E.; Arias, J. M.; Fortunato, L.; Vitturi, A.

    2009-05-04

    We investigate different aspects connected with shape phase transitions in nuclei and the possible occurrence of dynamical symmetries at the critical points. We discuss in particular the behaviour of the neighbour odd nuclei at the vicinity of the critical points in the even nuclei. We consider both the case of the transition from the vibrational behaviour to the gamma-unstable deformation (characterized within the collective Bohr hamiltonian by the E(5) critical point symmetry) and the case of the transition from the vibrational behaviour to the stable axial deformation (characterized by the X(5) symmetry). The odd particle is assumed to be moving in the three single particle orbitals j = 1/2,3/2,5/2, a set of orbitals that is known to lead to possible supersymmetric cases. The coupling of the odd particle to the Bohr hamiltonian does lead in fact in the former case at the critical point to the E(5/12) boson-fermion dynamical symmetry. An alternative approach to the two shape transitions is based on the Interacting Boson Fermion Model. In this case suitably parametrized boson-fermion hamiltonians can describe the evolution of the odd system along the shape transitions. At the critical points both energy spectra and electromagnetic transitions were found to display characteristic patterns similar to those displayed by the even nuclei at the corresponding critical point. The behaviour of the odd nuclei can therefore be seen as necessary complementary signatures of the occurrence of the phase transitions.

  14. Network traffic behaviour near phase transition point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawniczak, A. T.; Tang, X.

    2006-03-01

    We explore packet traffic dynamics in a data network model near phase transition point from free flow to congestion. The model of data network is an abstraction of the Network Layer of the OSI (Open Systems Interconnect) Reference Model of packet switching networks. The Network Layer is responsible for routing packets across the network from their sources to their destinations and for control of congestion in data networks. Using the model we investigate spatio-temporal packets traffic dynamics near the phase transition point for various network connection topologies, and static and adaptive routing algorithms. We present selected simulation results and analyze them.

  15. Phase transition in loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkelä, Jarmo

    2016-04-01

    We point out that with a specific counting of states loop quantum gravity implies that black holes perform a phase transition at a certain characteristic temperature TC . In this phase transition the punctures of the spin network on the stretched horizon of the black hole jump, in effect, from the vacuum to the excited states. The characteristic temperature TC may be regarded as the lowest possible temperature of the hole. From the point of view of a distant observer at rest with respect to the hole, the characteristic temperature TC corresponds to the Hawking temperature of the hole.

  16. Induced smectic phases in phase diagrams of binary nematic liquid crystal mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tsang-Min; McCreary, Kathleen; Garg, Shila; Kyu, Thein

    2011-03-01

    To elucidate induced smectic A and smectic B phases in binary nematic liquid crystal mixtures, a generalized thermodynamic model has been developed in the framework of a combined Flory-Huggins free energy for isotropic mixing, Maier-Saupe free energy for orientational ordering, McMillan free energy for smectic ordering, Chandrasekhar-Clark free energy for hexagonal ordering, and phase field free energy for crystal solidification. Although nematic constituents have no smectic phase, the complexation between these constituent liquid crystal molecules in their mixture resulted in a more stable ordered phase such as smectic A or B phases. Various phase transitions of crystal-smectic, smectic-nematic, and nematic-isotropic phases have been determined by minimizing the above combined free energies with respect to each order parameter of these mesophases. By changing the strengths of anisotropic interaction and hexagonal interaction parameters, the present model captures the induced smectic A or smectic B phases of the binary nematic mixtures. Of particular importance is the fact that the calculated phase diagrams show remarkable agreement with the experimental phase diagrams of binary nematic liquid crystal mixtures involving induced smectic A or induced smectic B phase.

  17. The Influence of Disorder on Thermotropic Nematic Liquid Crystals Phase Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Popa-Nita, Vlad; Gerlič, Ivan; Kralj, Samo

    2009-01-01

    We review the theoretical research on the influence of disorder on structure and phase behavior of condensed matter system exhibiting continuous symmetry breaking focusing on liquid crystal phase transitions. We discuss the main properties of liquid crystals as adequate systems in which several open questions with respect to the impact of disorder on universal phase and structural behavior could be explored. Main advantages of liquid crystalline materials and different experimental realizations of random field-type disorder imposed on liquid crystal phases are described. PMID:19865529

  18. Microrheology close to an equilibrium phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhardt, J.; Scacchi, A.; Brader, J. M.

    2014-04-14

    We investigate the microstructural and microrheological response to a tracer particle of a two-dimensional colloidal suspension under thermodynamic conditions close to a liquid-gas phase boundary. On the liquid side of the binodal, increasing the velocity of the (repulsive) tracer leads to the development of a pronounced cavitation bubble, within which the concentration of colloidal particles is strongly depleted. The tendency of the liquid to cavitate is characterized by a dimensionless “colloidal cavitation” number. On the gas side of the binodal, a pulled (attractive) tracer leaves behind it an extended trail of colloidal liquid, arising from downstream advection of a wetting layer on its surface. For both situations the velocity dependent friction is calculated.

  19. Photopyroelectric Calorimetry for the Thermal and Optical Study Over Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zammit, U.; Mercuri, F.; Paoloni, S.; Marinelli, M.

    2015-06-01

    The capabilities of an upgraded photopyroelectric calorimetric setup to perform simultaneous evaluations of thermal and optical parameters for a more comprehensive evaluation of several phase transition studies are reported. It has been applied to the study of the nematic-isotropic phase transition of an 8CB liquid crystal hosted in a network of silica nanoparticles, of the sol-gel transition in hydrated parchment fibers and of the nematic-isotropic and the smecticA-nematic transitions of 8CB liquid crystal with inclusions of photochromic molecules.

  20. Ultrasonic atomization: effect of liquid phase properties.

    PubMed

    Avvaru, Balasubrahmanyam; Patil, Mohan N; Gogate, Parag R; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2006-02-01

    Experiments have been conducted to understand the mechanism by which the ultrasonic vibration at the gas liquid interface causes the atomization of liquid. For this purpose, aqueous solutions having different viscosities and liquids showing Newtonian (aqueous solution of glycerin) and non-Newtonian behavior (aqueous solution of sodium salt of carboxy methyl cellulose) were employed. It has been found that the average droplet size produced by the pseudo-plastic liquid is less than that produced by the viscous Newtonian liquid having viscosity equal to zero-shear rate viscosity of the shear thinning liquid. The droplet size was found to increase initially with an increase in the viscosity up to a certain threshold viscosity after which the droplet size was found to decrease again. Also droplet size distribution is found to be more compact (uniform sizes) with an increasing viscosity of the atomizing liquid. The presence of the cavitation and its effect on the atomization has been semi quantitatively confirmed using energy balance and by the measurement of the droplet ejection velocities and validated on the basis of the decomposition of the aqueous KI solution. A correlation has been proposed for the prediction of droplet size for aqueous Newtonian fluids and fluids showing non-Newtonian behavior based on the dimensionless numbers incorporating the operating parameters of the ultrasonic atomizer and the liquid phase physico-chemical properties. PMID:16321416

  1. Dimension changing phase transitions in instanton crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplunovsky, Vadim; Sonnenschein, Jacob

    2014-04-01

    We investigate lattices of instantons and the dimension-changing transitions between them. Our ultimate goal is the 3D → 4D transition, which is holographically dual to the phase transition between the baryonic and the quarkyonic phases of cold nuclear matter. However, in this paper (just as in [1]) we focus on lower dimensions — the 1D lattice of instantons in a harmonic potential V ∝ , and the zigzag-shaped lattice as a first stage of the 1D → 2D transition. We prove that in the low- and moderate-density regimes, interactions between the instantons are dominated by two-body forces. This drastically simplifies finding the ground state of the instantons' orientations, so we made a numeric scan of the whole orientation space instead of assuming any particular ansatz. We find that depending on the M 2 /M 3 /M 4 ratios, the ground state of instanton orientations can follow a wide variety of patterns. For the straight 1D lattices, we found orientations periodically running over elements of a , Klein, prismatic, or dihedral subgroup of the , as well as irrational but link-periodic patterns. For the zigzag-shaped lattices, we detected 4 distinct orientation phases — the anti-ferromagnet, another abelian phase, and two non-abelian phases. Allowing the zigzag amplitude to vary as a function of increasing compression force, we obtained the phase diagrams for the straight and zigzag-shaped lattices in the (force , M 3 /M 4), (chemical potential , M 3 /M 4), and (density , M 3 /M 4) planes. Some of the transitions between these phases are second-order while others are first-order. Our techniques can be applied to other types of non-abelian crystals.

  2. Transition to turbulence in pipe flow as a phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Mukund; Hof, Björn

    2015-11-01

    In pipe flow, turbulence first arises in the form of localized turbulent patches called puffs. The flow undergoes a transition to sustained turbulence via spatio-temporal intermittency, with puffs splitting, decaying and merging in the background laminar flow. However, the due to mean advection of the puffs and the long timescales involved (~107 advective time units), it is not possible to study the transition in typical laboratory set-ups. So far, it has only been possible to indirectly estimate the critical point for the transition. Here, we exploit the stochastic memoryless nature of the puff decay and splitting processes to construct a pipe flow set-up, that is periodic in a statistical sense. It then becomes possible to study the flow for sufficiently long times and characterize the transition in detail. We present measurements of the turbulent fraction as a function of Reynolds number which in turn allows a direct estimate of the critical point. We present evidence that the transition has features of a phase transition of second order.

  3. Liquid crystal phase shifters for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woehrle, Christopher D.

    Space communication satellites have historically relied heavily on high gain gimbal dish antennas for performing communications. Reflector dish antennas lack flexibility in anti-jamming capabilities, and they tend to have a high risk associated to them given the need for mechanical mechanisms to beam steer. In recent years, a great amount of investment has been made into phased array antenna technologies. Phased arrays offer increased signal flexibility at reduced financial cost and in system risk. The problem with traditional phased arrays is the significant program cost and overall complexity added to the satellite by integrating antenna elements that require many dedicated components to properly perform adaptive beam steering. Several unique methods have been proposed to address the issues that plague traditional phase shifters slated for space applications. Proposed approaches range from complex mechanical switches (MEMS) and ferroelectric devices to more robust molecular changes. Nematic liquid crystals offer adaptive beam steering capabilities that traditional phased arrays have; however, with the added benefit of reduced system cost, complexity, and increased resilience to space environmental factors. The objective of the work presented is to investigate the feasibility of using nematic liquid crystals as a means of phase shifting individual phased array elements slated for space applications. Significant attention is paid to the survivability and performance of liquid crystal and associated materials in the space environment. Performance regarding thermal extremes and interactions with charged particles are the primary factors addressed.

  4. Turbulent transition modification in dispersed two-phase pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winters, Kyle; Longmire, Ellen

    2014-11-01

    In a pipe flow, transition to turbulence occurs at some critical Reynolds number, Rec , and transition is associated with intermittent swirling structures extending over the pipe cross section. Depending on the magnitude of Rec , these structures are known either as puffs or slugs. When a dispersed second liquid phase is added to a liquid pipe flow, Rec can be modified. To explore the mechanism for this modification, an experiment was designed to track and measure these transitional structures. The facility is a pump-driven circuit with a 9m development and test section of diameter 44mm. Static mixers are placed upstream to generate an even dispersion of silicone oil in a water-glycerine flow. Pressure signals were used to identify transitional structures and trigger a high repetition rate stereo-PIV system downstream. Stereo-PIV measurements were obtained in planes normal to the flow, and Taylor's Hypothesis was employed to infer details of the volumetric flow structure. The presentation will describe the sensing and imaging methods along with preliminary results for the single and two-phase flows. Supported by Nanodispersions Technology.

  5. Terraces in the cholesteric phase of DNA liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Van Winkle, D.H. ); Davidson, M.W. ); Rill, R.L. )

    1992-10-15

    Near the transition to the columnar phase, the cholesteric liquid crystal phase in an aqueous solution of DNA fragments with contour lengths approximating the persistence length undergoes an unwinding of the cholesteric pitch. Unwinding of the cholesteric with planar alignment of the fragments was studied by polarized light microscopy. Terraces or Grandjean planes'' of cholesteric are seen as uniformly birefringent fields of distinct hues (typically blue), bounded by lines which moved as the local concentration of DNA increased. These lines are interpreted as disclination lines, bounding regions of different total twist, which move as the intrinsic pitch of the cholesteric varies with concentration.

  6. Physical model of the vapor-liquid (insulator-metal) transition in an exciton gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomkin, A. L.; Shumikhin, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    We propose a simple physical model describing the transition of an exciton gas to a conducting exciton liquid. The transition occurs due to cohesive coupling of excitons in the vicinity of the critical point, which is associated with transformation of the exciton ground state to the conduction band and the emergence of conduction electrons. We calculate the cohesion binding energy for the exciton gas and, using it, derive the equations of state, critical parameters, and binodal. The computational method is analogous to that used by us earlier [5] for predicting the vapor-liquid (insulator-metal) phase transition in atomic (hypothetical, free of molecules) hydrogen and alkali metal vapors. The similarity of the methods used for hydrogen and excitons makes it possible to clarify the physical nature of the transition in the exciton gas and to predict more confidently the existence of a new phase transition in atomic hydrogen.

  7. Physical model of the vapor-liquid (insulator-metal) transition in an exciton gas

    SciTech Connect

    Khomkin, A. L. Shumikhin, A. S.

    2015-04-15

    We propose a simple physical model describing the transition of an exciton gas to a conducting exciton liquid. The transition occurs due to cohesive coupling of excitons in the vicinity of the critical point, which is associated with transformation of the exciton ground state to the conduction band and the emergence of conduction electrons. We calculate the cohesion binding energy for the exciton gas and, using it, derive the equations of state, critical parameters, and binodal. The computational method is analogous to that used by us earlier [5] for predicting the vapor-liquid (insulator-metal) phase transition in atomic (hypothetical, free of molecules) hydrogen and alkali metal vapors. The similarity of the methods used for hydrogen and excitons makes it possible to clarify the physical nature of the transition in the exciton gas and to predict more confidently the existence of a new phase transition in atomic hydrogen.

  8. Optical characterization of phase transitions in pure polymers and blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannella, Gianluca A.; Brucato, Valerio; La Carrubba, Vincenzo

    2015-12-01

    To study the optical properties of polymeric samples, an experimental apparatus was designed on purpose and set up. The sample is a thin film enclosed between two glass slides and a PTFE frame, with a very thin thermocouple placed on sample for direct temperature measurement. This sample holder was placed between two aluminum slabs, equipped with a narrow slit for optical measurements and with electrical resistances for temperature control. Sample was enlightened by a laser diode, whereas transmitted light was detected with a photodiode. Measurements were carried out on polyethylene-terephtalate (PET) and two different polyamides, tested as pure polymers and blends. The thermal history imposed to the sample consisted in a rapid heating from ambient temperature to a certain temperature below the melting point, a stabilization period, and then a heating at constant rate. After a second stabilization period, the sample was cooled. The data obtained were compared with DSC measurements performed with the same thermal history. In correspondence with transitions detected via DSC (e.g. melting, crystallization and cold crystallization), the optical signal showed a steep variation. In particular, crystallization resulted in a rapid decrease of transmitted light, whereas melting gave up an increase of light transmitted by the sample. Further variations in transmitted light were recorded for blends, after melting: those results may be related to other phase transitions, e.g. liquid-liquid phase separation. All things considered, the apparatus can be used to get reliable data on phase transitions in polymeric systems.

  9. Dual condensate and QCD phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Bo; Bruckmann, Falk; Fodor, Zoltan; Szabo, Kalman K.; Gattringer, Christof

    2011-05-23

    The dual condensate is a new QCD phase transition order parameter, which connnects confinement and chiral symmetry breaking as different mass limits. We discuss the relation between the fermion spectrum at general boundary conditions and the dual condensate and show numerical results for the latter from unquenched SU(3) lattice configurations.

  10. Chaos: Butterflies also Generate Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leplaideur, Renaud

    2015-10-01

    We exhibit examples of mixing subshifts of finite type and of continuous potentials such that there are phase transitions but the pressure is always strictly convex. More surprisingly, we show that the pressure can be analytic on some interval although there exist several equilibrium states.

  11. Caloric materials near ferroic phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Moya, X; Kar-Narayan, S; Mathur, N D

    2014-05-01

    A magnetically, electrically or mechanically responsive material can undergo significant thermal changes near a ferroic phase transition when its order parameter is modified by the conjugate applied field. The resulting magnetocaloric, electrocaloric and mechanocaloric (elastocaloric or barocaloric) effects are compared here in terms of history, experimental method, performance and prospective cooling applications. PMID:24751772

  12. Theory and phenomenology of electroweak phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Hiren H.

    An open problem in cosmology is to explain the origin of baryon abundance implied by observational cosmology. Among the many proposed explanations, electroweak baryogenesis is particularly attractive in that its ingredients is discoverable by modern experiments. The analysis of the electroweak phase transition in the early universe comprises an integral component within the larger study of electroweak baryogenesis. In this work, I make a detailed investigation of the conventional analysis of the electroweak phase transition commonly found in literature, and explicitly demonstrate that results are not independent of the choice of gauge. In its place, I provide a manifestly gauge-independent method for the analysis, review sources of theoretical and numerical uncertainties, and explore avenues for further development. Next, I explore the dynamics of the electroweak phase transition in two minimal extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics. Within these simple models, I describe a novel pattern of electroweak symmetry breaking favorable for baryogenesis that can serve as a paradigm for phase transition analysis in more complicated models.

  13. Hysteresis in the phase transition of chocolate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Ruilong; Lu, Qunfeng; Lin, Sihua; Dong, Xiaoyan; Fu, Hao; Wu, Shaoyi; Wu, Minghe; Teng, Baohua

    2016-01-01

    We designed an experiment to reproduce the hysteresis phenomenon of chocolate appearing in the heating and cooling process, and then established a model to relate the solidification degree to the order parameter. Based on the Landau-Devonshire theory, our model gave a description of the hysteresis phenomenon in chocolate, which lays the foundations for the study of the phase transition behavior of chocolate.

  14. A Liquid-Phase Diffusion Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemetz, Thomas M.; Ball, David W.

    1995-01-01

    Describes an experiment that measures the diffusion of ions in the liquid phase and shows that the relative distances of diffusion are related qualitatively to the inverse of the mass of the solvated ion. Involves soluble salts on opposite sides of a Petri dish diffusing through a layer of water and meeting to form an insoluble salt. (JRH)

  15. Improved Boat For Liquid-Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, John C.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid-phase epitaxial (LPE) growth boat redesigned. Still fabricated from ultra-high-purity graphite, but modified to permit easy disassembly and cleaning, along with improved wiping action for more complete removal of melt to reduce carry-over of gallium. Larger substrates and more uniform composition obtained.

  16. DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS -- A WORKSHOP SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    site characterization, and, therefore, DNAPL remediation, can be expected. Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in the subsurface are long-term sources of ground-water contamination, and may persist for centuries before dissolving completely in adjacent ground water. In respo...

  17. Phase modulation detection with liquid crystal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolozzo, U.; Dolfi, D.; Huignard, J. P.; Molin, S.; Peigné, A.; Residori, S.

    2015-03-01

    Self-adaptive interferometry allows measuring small optical phase modulations even in noisy environments and with strongly distorted optical wavefronts. We report two examples of self-adaptive interferometers based on liquid crystals, one obtained by using an optically addressed spatial light modulator, the second one realized by adopting adopting digital holography a CCD-LCOS scheme.

  18. RNA transcription modulates phase transition-driven nuclear body assembly.

    PubMed

    Berry, Joel; Weber, Stephanie C; Vaidya, Nilesh; Haataja, Mikko; Brangwynne, Clifford P

    2015-09-22

    Nuclear bodies are RNA and protein-rich, membraneless organelles that play important roles in gene regulation. The largest and most well-known nuclear body is the nucleolus, an organelle whose primary function in ribosome biogenesis makes it key for cell growth and size homeostasis. The nucleolus and other nuclear bodies behave like liquid-phase droplets and appear to condense from the nucleoplasm by concentration-dependent phase separation. However, nucleoli actively consume chemical energy, and it is unclear how such nonequilibrium activity might impact classical liquid-liquid phase separation. Here, we combine in vivo and in vitro experiments with theory and simulation to characterize the assembly and disassembly dynamics of nucleoli in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. In addition to classical nucleoli that assemble at the transcriptionally active nucleolar organizing regions, we observe dozens of "extranucleolar droplets" (ENDs) that condense in the nucleoplasm in a transcription-independent manner. We show that growth of nucleoli and ENDs is consistent with a first-order phase transition in which late-stage coarsening dynamics are mediated by Brownian coalescence and, to a lesser degree, Ostwald ripening. By manipulating C. elegans cell size, we change nucleolar component concentration and confirm several key model predictions. Our results show that rRNA transcription and other nonequilibrium biological activity can modulate the effective thermodynamic parameters governing nucleolar and END assembly, but do not appear to fundamentally alter the passive phase separation mechanism. PMID:26351690

  19. Double-Diffusive Layers and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dude, Sabine; Hansen, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Researching the thermal evolution of the Earth's mantle on numerical base is very challenging. During the last decade different approaches are put forward in oder to understand the picture of the today's Earth's mantle. One way is to incorporate all the known features and physics (plate tectonics, phase transitions, CMB-topography, ...) into numerical models and make them as complex (or 'complete') as possible to capture Earth's mantle processes and surface signals. Another way is, to take a step back and look at less complex models which account for single processes and their interaction and evolution. With these 'simpler' models one is able look in detail into the physical processes and dependencies on certain parameters. Since the knowledge of slab stagnation in the transitions zone of the Earth's mantle the question whether the mantle is or at least has been layered to some degree is still under debate. On this basis we address two important features that lead to layered mantle convection and may affect each other and with this the thermal evolution of the mantle. It is commonly known the main mantle mineral olivine pass through various phase changes with depth [1]. Detailed numerical studies had been carried out to ascertain the influence on convective motion and planetary evolution [2]. It is still heavily discussed whether the endothermic phase change at 660km depth can lead an isolated lower mantle. Most of the numerical studies favour a model which has phases of layering that are disrupted by catastrophic events. In the last years double-diffusive convection has also been intensively studied with regard to planetary mantle evolution such as pile formation and core-mantle boundary topography [3]. However, another striking feature still posing open questions are evolving layers self-organised from a previous non layered state. Considering a chemical component that influences the density of a fluid in addition to the temperature leads to dynamical phenomena that have no counterpart in pure thermal convection. In oder to determine the interaction of double-diffusive layers with a phase transition we carried out numerical simulations ranging from exothermic to endothermic conditions. Taking into account a depth and temperature dependence of the phase transition the results show that on the one hand double-diffusive layering is strongly affected by the presence of phase transition but on the other hand the equilibrium position of the phase transition is shifted depending on the properties of the considered transition. In addition to that we incorporate the chemical dependence of the phase change and determine the influence on the layer growth and the overall dynamics. References [1] Schubert, G., Yuen, D. A., Turcotte, D. L., Role of Phase Transitions in a Dynamic Mantle. Geophys. J. Roy. Astron. Soc., 42:705-735, 1975. [2] Christensen, U., Effects of Phase Transitions on Mantle Convection. Ann. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci., 23:65-88, 1995. [3] Tackley, P. J. Dynamics and evolution of the deep mantle resulting from thermal, chemical, phase and melting effects. Earth-Sci. Rev., 110:1-25, 2012.

  20. Quantum phase transitions in magnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nohadani, Omid

    Phase transitions in quantum antiferromagnets offer exciting and novel insights into the critical behavior of matter at ultra-low temperatures. In this thesis, we apply the stochastic series expansion quantum Monte Carlo method to study the critical properties of ensembles of antiferromagnetically coupled spins subject to quantum phase transitions. The zero-temperature phase diagram, describing various phase transitions induced by an applied magnetic field, is constructed. The corresponding quantum critical points are determined to highest accuracy, allowing a conclusive interpretation of recent experimental measurements. Moreover, the scaling properties of uniform magnetization and staggered transverse magnetizationin magnetic fields are calculated, allowing the determination of the universality class of the system. The associated critical exponents are derived from Ginzburg-Landau theory as well. We find excellent agreement between the quantum Monte Carlo simulations and the analytical results, as well as previous bond-operator calculations. Furthermore, the critical scaling exponent, which governs the power-law dependence of the transition temperature on the applied magnetic field, is extracted from the numerical data. We show that this exponent is independent of material specific inter-constituent interactions. Moreover, it converges to the value predicted for Bose-Einstein condensation of magnons. These results are of direct relevance to compounds such as TlCuCl3 and KCuCl 3, and explain the broad range of exponents reported my exponents for field-induced ordering transitions. Finally, we introduce geometric randomness into a model of coupled dimers. The calculations show that at finite randomness, field-induced quantum phase transitions into and out of ordered Bose-Einstein condensates pass through a Bose-Glass phase. The localization of the bosons and their finite compressibility manifests this unique regime. Once delocalized, the bosons condense, and long-range order sets in. We further detect that an intermediate magnetization plateau can occur for a parameter range, in which the spins of the doped bonds become fully polarized. This rich field-dependence is expected to be experimentally observable in weakly coupled dimer compounds with small doping and negligible spin-orbit coupling or directionality effects. The calculations in this thesis cover fundamental phases and transitions between them, as they can occur in antiferromagnetic quantum spin systems.

  1. On transit time instability in liquid jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabitz, G.; Meier, G.

    1982-01-01

    A basic transit time instability in flows with disturbances of speed is found. It was shown that the mass distribution is established by and large by the described transit time effects. These transit time effects may also be involved for gas jets.

  2. Phase transitions in ammonium perchlorate to 26 GPA and 700 K in a diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Foltz, M.F.; Maienschein, J.L.

    1995-07-10

    Ammonium perchlorate (AP) showed previously unreported phase behavior when studied in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) at high temperature (to 693 K) and high pressure (to {approximately}26 GPa). Liquid droplets, observed above the known 513 K orthorhombic-to-cubic phase transition, are interpreted as the onset to melting. The melting point decreased with increasing pressure. Mid-infrared FTIR spectra of the residue showed only AP. The AP melt may contribute to shock insensitivity of AP-based propellants. Gas formation was seen at higher temperatures. A phase diagram was constructed using the appearance of liquid and gas as solid-liquid and liquid-gas transitions. Preliminary pressurized differential scanning calorimetry data showed a weak pressure dependence (to {approximately}6.9 MPa) for the orthorhombic-to-cubic phase transition.

  3. Phase transitions in ammonium perchlorate to 26 GPA and 700 K in a diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Foltz, M.F.; Maienschein, J.L.

    1996-05-01

    Ammonium perchlorate (AP) showed previously unreported phase behavior when studied in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) at high temperature (to 693 K) and high pressure (to {approximately}26 GPa). Liquid droplets, observed above the known 513 K orthorhombic-to-cubic phase transition, are interpreted as the onset to melting. The melting point decreased with increasing pressure. Mid-infrared FTIR spectra of the residue showed only AP. The AP melt may contribute to shock insensitivity of AP-based propellants. Gas formation was seen at higher temperatures. A phase diagram was constructed using the appearance of liquid and gas as solid-liquid and liquid-gas transitions. Preliminary pressurized differential scanning calorimetry data showed a weak pressure dependence (to {approximately}6.9MPa) for the orthorhombic-to-cubic phase transition. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. The phase diagram of molybdenum at extreme conditions and the role of local liquid structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M

    2008-08-15

    Recent DAC measurements made of the Mo melting curve by the x-ray diffraction studies confirms that, up to at least 110 GPa (3300K) melting is directly from bcc to liquid, evidence that there is no basis for a speculated bcc-hcp or fcc transition. An examination of the Poisson Ratio, obtained from shock sound speed measurements, provides evidence that the 210 GPa (4100K) transition detected from shock experiments is a continuation of the bcc-liquid melting, but is from a bcc-to a solid-like mixed phase rather than to liquid. Calculations, modeled to include the free energy of liquid local structures, predict that the transition from the liquid to the mixed phase is near 150 GPa(3500K). The presence of local structures provides the simplest and most direct explanation for the Mo phase diagram, and the low melting slopes.

  5. Common non-Fermi liquid phases in quantum impurity physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, David E.; Tucker, Adam P.; Galpin, Martin R.

    2014-08-01

    We study correlated quantum impurity models that undergo a local quantum phase transition (QPT) from a strong coupling, Fermi liquid phase to a non-Fermi liquid phase with a globally doubly degenerate ground state. Our aim is to establish what can be shown exactly about such "local moment" (LM) phases, of which the permanent (zero-field) local magnetization is a hallmark, and an order parameter for the QPT. A description of the zero-field LM phase is shown to require two distinct self-energies, which reflect the broken symmetry nature of the phase and together determine the single self-energy of standard field theory. Distinct Friedel sum rules for each phase are obtained, via a Luttinger theorem embodied in the vanishing of appropriate Luttinger integrals. By contrast, the standard Luttinger integral is nonzero in the LM phase but found to have universal magnitude. A range of spin susceptibilites are also considered, including that corresponding to the local order parameter, whose exact form is shown to be RPA-like, and to diverge as the QPT is approached. Particular attention is given to the pseudogap Anderson model, including the basic physical picture of the transition, the low-energy behavior of single-particle dynamics, the quantum critical point itself, and the rather subtle effect of an applied local field. A two-level impurity model that undergoes a QPT ("singlet-triplet") to an underscreened LM phase is also considered, for which we derive on general grounds some key results for the zero-bias conductance in both phases.

  6. THE ROLE OF METASTABLE STATES IN POLYMER PHASE TRANSITIONS: Concepts, Principles, and Experimental Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Stephen Z. D.; Keller, Andrew

    1998-08-01

    Polymer phases can be described in the same way as phases in other condensed matter using a number density operator and its correlation functions. This description requires the understanding of symmetry operations and order at different atomic and molecular levels. Statistical mechanics provides a link between the microscopic description of the structure and motion and the macroscopic thermodynamic properties. Within the limits of the laws of thermodynamics, polymers exhibit a rich variety of phase transition behaviors. By definition, a first-order phase transition describes a transformation that involves a sudden change of thermodynamic properties at its transition temperature, whereas higher-order phase transitions are classified as critical phenomena. Of special interest is the role of metastability in phase and phase transition behaviors. Although a metastable state possesses a local free energy minimum, it is not at the global equilibrium. Furthermore, metastable states can also be associated with phase sizes. Metastable behavior is also observed in phase transformations that are impeded by kinetic limitations along the pathway to thermodynamic equilibrium. This is illustrated in structural and morphological investigations of crystallization and mesophase transitions, liquid-liquid phase separation, vitrification, and gel formation, as well as combinations of transformation processes. In these cases, the metastable state often becomes the dominant state for the entire system and is observed over a range of time and size scales. This review describes the general principles of metastability in polymer phases and phase transitions and provides illustrations from current experimental works in selected areas.

  7. Liquid-liquid phase separation of freely falling undercooled ternary Fe-Cu-Sn alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. L.; Wu, Y. H.; Li, L. H.; Zhai, W.; Zhang, X. M.; Wei, B.

    2015-11-01

    The active modulation and control of the liquid phase separation for high-temperature metallic systems are still challenging the development of advanced immiscible alloys. Here we present an attempt to manipulate the dynamic process of liquid-liquid phase separation for ternary Fe47.5Cu47.5Sn5 alloy. It was firstly dispersed into numerous droplets with 66 ~ 810 μm diameters and then highly undercooled and rapidly solidified under the containerless microgravity condition inside drop tube. 3-D phase field simulation was performed to explore the kinetic evolution of liquid phase separation. Through regulating the combined effects of undercooling level, phase separation time and Marangoni migration, three types of separation patterns were yielded: monotectic cell, core shell and dispersive structures. The two-layer core-shell morphology proved to be the most stable separation configuration owing to its lowest chemical potential. Whereas the monotectic cell and dispersive microstructures were both thermodynamically metastable transition states because of their highly active energy. The Sn solute partition profiles of Fe-rich core and Cu-rich shell in core-shell structures varied only slightly with cooling rate.

  8. Liquid-liquid phase separation of freely falling undercooled ternary Fe-Cu-Sn alloy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, W .L.; Wu, Y. H.; Li, L. H.; Zhai, W.; Zhang, X. M.; Wei, B.

    2015-01-01

    The active modulation and control of the liquid phase separation for high-temperature metallic systems are still challenging the development of advanced immiscible alloys. Here we present an attempt to manipulate the dynamic process of liquid-liquid phase separation for ternary Fe47.5Cu47.5Sn5 alloy. It was firstly dispersed into numerous droplets with 66 ~ 810 μm diameters and then highly undercooled and rapidly solidified under the containerless microgravity condition inside drop tube. 3-D phase field simulation was performed to explore the kinetic evolution of liquid phase separation. Through regulating the combined effects of undercooling level, phase separation time and Marangoni migration, three types of separation patterns were yielded: monotectic cell, core shell and dispersive structures. The two-layer core-shell morphology proved to be the most stable separation configuration owing to its lowest chemical potential. Whereas the monotectic cell and dispersive microstructures were both thermodynamically metastable transition states because of their highly active energy. The Sn solute partition profiles of Fe-rich core and Cu-rich shell in core-shell structures varied only slightly with cooling rate. PMID:26552711

  9. Liquid-liquid phase separation of freely falling undercooled ternary Fe-Cu-Sn alloy.

    PubMed

    Wang, W L; Wu, Y H; Li, L H; Zhai, W; Zhang, X M; Wei, B

    2015-01-01

    The active modulation and control of the liquid phase separation for high-temperature metallic systems are still challenging the development of advanced immiscible alloys. Here we present an attempt to manipulate the dynamic process of liquid-liquid phase separation for ternary Fe47.5Cu47.5Sn5 alloy. It was firstly dispersed into numerous droplets with 66 ~ 810 μm diameters and then highly undercooled and rapidly solidified under the containerless microgravity condition inside drop tube. 3-D phase field simulation was performed to explore the kinetic evolution of liquid phase separation. Through regulating the combined effects of undercooling level, phase separation time and Marangoni migration, three types of separation patterns were yielded: monotectic cell, core shell and dispersive structures. The two-layer core-shell morphology proved to be the most stable separation configuration owing to its lowest chemical potential. Whereas the monotectic cell and dispersive microstructures were both thermodynamically metastable transition states because of their highly active energy. The Sn solute partition profiles of Fe-rich core and Cu-rich shell in core-shell structures varied only slightly with cooling rate. PMID:26552711

  10. Fragile-to-strong transition in liquid silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geske, Julian; Drossel, Barbara; Vogel, Michael

    2016-03-01

    We investigate anomalies in liquid silica with molecular dynamics simulations and present evidence for a fragile-to-strong transition at around 3100 K-3300 K. To this purpose, we studied the structure and dynamical properties of silica over a wide temperature range, finding four indicators of a fragile-to-strong transition. First, there is a density minimum at around 3000 K and a density maximum at 4700 K. The turning point is at 3400 K. Second, the local structure characterized by the tetrahedral order parameter changes dramatically around 3000 K from a higher-ordered, lower-density phase to a less ordered, higher-density phase. Third, the correlation time τ changes from an Arrhenius behavior below 3300 K to a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann behavior at higher temperatures. Fourth, the Stokes-Einstein relation holds for temperatures below 3000 K, but is replaced by a fractional relation above this temperature. Furthermore, our data indicate that dynamics become again simple above 5000 K, with Arrhenius behavior and a classical Stokes-Einstein relation.

  11. Phase transitions of high temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Su

    In this thesis phase transitions of the high temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7--delta (YBCO) have been investigated in both zero and non-zero magnetic field. Current-Voltage characteristics of thin films and single crystals have been studied to determine the transition temperature and critical exponents. We optimized our film samples to ensure that they are of single phase, c-axis oriented and homogeneous. High-quality crystal samples were provided by Dr. Kouji Segawa and Dr. Yoichi Ando. In the zero-field transition, finite-size effects, which can obscure the phase transition by introducing ohmic tails below the transition temperature, are observed in the current-voltage curves of even the thickest film (2400 A) at low currents. The data at high currents are not affected by finite-size effects so that we can use derivative plots to determine Tc and the dynamic critical exponent z. The current-voltage curves of crystals' data, however, are not affected by finite-size effects even in the lowest current measured as expected. z determined from YBCO crystals are consistent with the one determined from YBCO films: z = 1:5+/-0:2. This is a strong evidence that the dynamic universality class of high-temperature superconductors belongs to model-E dynamics in zero field. The static critical exponent nu determined from the melting line (Tc -- Tg(m)) H1/2nu0 is 0:68 +/- 0:1 for crystal and 0:62 +/- 0:1 for thin films. The phase transitions in the mixed state (non-zero field) are more complicated. In the phase transition of YBCO thin films in field, finite-size effects are again observed. The presence of magnetic field leads to anisotropic vortex loops so that finite-size effects are enhanced. We observe a magnetic field H dependence of the crossover current density Jmin as well as the exponent z. At H > 1 T, Jmin and z stay relatively constant. z ? 2 at high field implies a crossover from model-E dynamics to model-A dynamics. Finally, we will discuss E -- J characteristics of the first-order melting transition of untwinned YBCO single crystals.

  12. Critical Behavior at the L-L Phase Transition of Lysozyme Protein Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Laxson, Nicole; Pusey, Marc

    2003-01-01

    Recent efforts suggest the possibility that crystallization, and liquid-liquid (L-L) phase transitions and critical phenomena are characteristics universal to all macromolecular solutions. Of particular interest to protein crystallographers are the predictions of a critical slowing of crystal growth and subsequent formation of nascent crystals at the L-L phase boundary. Herein, the effects of the L-L phase transition on both crystal growth rates and microcrystal formation are experimentally determined. In general, it was determined that critical slowing down of protein crystal growth rates occurred, as predicted. The L-L phase transition, however, had a net negative influence in the formation of nascent protein crystals. Although crystal nucleation was not induced by the L-L phase transition, it is considered that the phase behavior of macromolecular solutions can be universally defined.

  13. Liquid Crystalline Phases of Polymer Brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Kiana; Abukhdeir, Nasser; Matsen, Mark

    The phase behavior of liquid-crystal polymeric brushes in solvent are investigated using self-consistent field theory. The polymers are modeled as freely-jointed chain consisting of N rigid segments. The isotropic interactions between the polymer and the solvent are treated using the standard Flory-Huggins theory, while the anisotropic liquid-crystalline (LC) interactions between rigid segments are taken into account using the Mayer-Saupe theory. For weak LC interactions, the brush exhibits the conventional parabolic-like profile, while for strong LC interactions, the polymers crystallize into a dense brush with a step-like profile. At intermediate interaction strengths, we find the microphase-segregated phase observed previously for lattice-model calculations. In this phase, the brush exhibits a crystalline layer next to the grafting surface with an external layer similar to the conventional brush. This work was supported by NSERC of Canada.

  14. Gravitational Role in Liquid Phase Sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upadhyaya, Anish; Iacocca, Ronald G.; German, Randall M.

    1998-01-01

    To comprehensively understand the gravitational effects on the evolution of both the microstructure and the macrostructure during liquid phase sintering, W-Ni-Fe alloys with W content varying from 35 to 98 wt.% were sintered in microgravity. Compositions that slump during ground-based sintering also distort when sintered under microgravity. In ground-based sintering, low solid content alloys distort with a typical elephant-foot profile, while in microgravity, the compacts tend to spheroidize. This study shows that microstructural segregation occurs in both ground-based as well as microgravity sintering. In ground-based experiments, because of the density difference between the solid and the liquid phase, the solid content increases from top to the bottom of the sample. In microgravity, the solid content increases from periphery to the center of the samples. This study also shows that the pores during microgravity sintering act as a stable phase and attain anomalous shapes.

  15. The comfortable driving model revisited: traffic phases and phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Florian; Schreckenberg, Michael

    2013-07-01

    We study the spatiotemporal patterns resulting from different boundary conditions for a microscopic traffic model and contrast them with empirical results. By evaluating the time series of local measurements, the local traffic states are assigned to the different traffic phases of Kerner’s three-phase traffic theory. For this classification we use the rule-based FOTO-method, which provides ‘hard’ rules for this assignment. Using this approach, our analysis shows that the model is indeed able to reproduce three qualitatively different traffic phases: free flow (F), synchronized traffic (S), and wide moving jams (J). In addition, we investigate the likelihood of transitions between the three traffic phases. We show that a transition from free flow to a wide moving jam often involves an intermediate transition: first from free flow to synchronized flow and then from synchronized flow to a wide moving jam. This is supported by the fact that the so-called F → S transition (from free flow to synchronized traffic) is much more likely than a direct F → J transition. The model under consideration has a functional relationship between traffic flow and traffic density. The fundamental hypothesis of the three-phase traffic theory, however, postulates that the steady states of synchronized flow occupy a two-dimensional region in the flow-density plane. Due to the obvious discrepancy between the model investigated here and the postulate of the three-phase traffic theory, the good agreement that we found could not be expected. For a more detailed analysis, we also studied vehicle dynamics at a microscopic level and provide a comparison of real detector data with simulated data of the identical highway segment.

  16. Molecular-Scale Remnants of the Liquid-Gas Transition in Supercritical Polar Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokhan, V. P.; Jones, A.; Cipcigan, F. S.; Crain, J.; Martyna, G. J.

    2015-09-01

    An electronically coarse-grained model for water reveals a persistent vestige of the liquid-gas transition deep into the supercritical region. A crossover in the density dependence of the molecular dipole arises from the onset of nonpercolating hydrogen bonds. The crossover points coincide with the Widom line in the scaling region but extend farther, tracking the heat capacity maxima, offering evidence for liquidlike and gaslike state points in a "one-phase" fluid. The effect is present even in dipole-limit models, suggesting that it is common for all molecular liquids exhibiting dipole enhancement in the liquid phase.

  17. The gravitational effects on liquid phase sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kipphut, C. M.; German, Randall M.; Bose, A.; Kishi, T.

    1989-01-01

    The liquid-phase sintering of heavy-metal PM alloys containing 78, 83, 88, 93, or 98 wt pct W plus Ni and Fe in a 7:3 ratio is investigated experimentally. The focus is on the potential role of gravity in phenomena such as specimen slumping and distortion, liquid migration, and microstructural coarsening. The results are presented in extensive graphs and micrographs and discussed in detail, and a preliminary grain-growth model is developed which accounts for the effects of contiguity and the volume fraction of solid.

  18. Liquid-vapor phase equilibrium in a tin-selenium system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volodin, V. N.; Burabaeva, N. M.; Trebukhov, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Based on the pressure of the saturated vapor and components over liquid alloys in a tin-selenium system, determined using the boiling points approach (isothermal variant), its boiling point and corresponding vapor phase composition are calculated in the region of liquid solutions. The phase diagram is supple-mented with the liquid-vapor phase transition under atmospheric pressure and in vacuums of 100 and 10 Pa with the boundaries of the region in which the regions of liquid and vapor coexist being determined.

  19. News and views in discontinuous phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, Jan

    2014-03-01

    Recent progress in the theory of discontinuous percolation allow us to better understand the the sudden emergence of large-scale connectedness both in networked systems and on the lattice. We analytically study mechanisms for the amplification of critical fluctuations at the phase transition point, non-self-averaging and power law fluctuations. A single event analysis allow to establish criteria for discontinuous percolation transitions, even on the high-dimensional lattice. Some applications such as salad bowl percolation, and inverse fragmentation are discussed.

  20. Deconfinement Phase Transition and the Quark Condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Christian S.

    2009-07-31

    We study the dual quark condensate as a signal for the confinement-deconfinement phase transition of QCD. This order parameter for center symmetry has been defined recently by Bilgici et al. within the framework of lattice QCD. In this work we determine the ordinary and the dual quark condensate with functional methods using a formulation of the Dyson-Schwinger equations for the quark propagator on a torus. The temperature dependence of these condensates serves to investigate the interplay between the chiral and deconfinement transitions of quenched QCD.

  1. Reversible Hydrophobic-Hydrophilic Transition of Ionic Liquids Driven by Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Dazhen; Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Wang, Huiyong; Li, Zhiyong; Yao, Kaisheng; Zhang, Suojiang

    2015-06-15

    Ionic liquids (ILs) with a reversible hydrophobic-hydrophilic transition were developed, and they exhibited unique phase behavior with H2O: monophase in the presence of CO2, but biphase upon removal of CO2 at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Thus, coupling of reaction, separation, and recovery steps in sustainable chemical processes could be realized by a reversible liquid-liquid phase transition of such IL-H2O mixtures. Spectroscopic investigations and DFT calculations showed that the mechanism behind hydrophobic-hydrophilic transition involved reversible reaction of CO2 with anion of the ILs and formation of hydrophilic ammonium salts. These unique IL-H2O systems were successfully utilized for facile one-step synthesis of Au porous films by bubbling CO2 under ambient conditions. The Au porous films and the ILs were then separated simultaneously from aqueous solutions by bubbling N2, and recovered ILs could be directly reused in the next process. PMID:25925191

  2. Phase transitions in Pareto optimal complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seoane, Luís F.; Solé, Ricard

    2015-09-01

    The organization of interactions in complex systems can be described by networks connecting different units. These graphs are useful representations of the local and global complexity of the underlying systems. The origin of their topological structure can be diverse, resulting from different mechanisms including multiplicative processes and optimization. In spatial networks or in graphs where cost constraints are at work, as it occurs in a plethora of situations from power grids to the wiring of neurons in the brain, optimization plays an important part in shaping their organization. In this paper we study network designs resulting from a Pareto optimization process, where different simultaneous constraints are the targets of selection. We analyze three variations on a problem, finding phase transitions of different kinds. Distinct phases are associated with different arrangements of the connections, but the need of drastic topological changes does not determine the presence or the nature of the phase transitions encountered. Instead, the functions under optimization do play a determinant role. This reinforces the view that phase transitions do not arise from intrinsic properties of a system alone, but from the interplay of that system with its external constraints.

  3. A Transition to Metallic Hydrogen: Evidence of the Plasma Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvera, Isaac; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Salamat, Ashkan

    The insulator-metal transition in hydrogen is one of the most outstanding problems in condensed matter physics. The high-pressure metallic phase is now predicted to be liquid atomic from T =0 K to very high temperatures. We have conducted measurements of optical properties of hot dense hydrogen in the region of 1.1-1.7 Mbar and up to 2200 K in a diamond anvil cell using pulsed laser heating of the sample. We present evidence in two forms: a plateau in the heating curves (average laser power vs temperature) characteristic of a first-order phase transition with latent heat, and changes in transmittance and reflectance characteristic of a metal for temperatures above the plateau temperature. For thick films the reflectance saturates at ~0.5. The phase line of this transition has a negative slope in agreement with theories of the so-called plasma phase transition. The NSF, Grant DMR-1308641, the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance Program, Grant DE-FG52-10NA29656, and NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, Award NNX14AP17H supported this research.

  4. Dynamical signature of two ``ideal glass transitions'' in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cang, Hu; Li, Jie; Novikov, V. N.; Fayer, M. D.

    2003-11-01

    A temperature scaling analysis using the same mode coupling theory (MCT) scaling relationships employed for supercooled liquids is applied to optical heterodyne detected optical Kerr effect data for four liquid crystals. The data cover a range of times from ˜1 ps to 100 ns and a range of temperatures from ˜50 K above the isotropic to nematic phase transition temperature TNI down to ˜TNI. The slowest exponential component of the data obeys the Landau-de Gennes (LdG) theory for the isotropic phase of liquid crystals. However, it is also found that the liquid crystal data obey MCT scaling relationships, but, instead of a single scaling temperature TC as found for supercooled liquids, in the liquid crystals there are two scaling temperatures TCL (L for low temperature) and TCH (H for high temperature). TCH is very close to T*, which results from LdG scaling, just below the isotropic to nematic phase transition temperature, TNI, but is 30-50 K higher than TCL. The liquid crystal time dependent data have the identical functional form as supercooled liquid data, that is, a fast power law decay with temperature independent exponent, followed by a slower power law decay with temperature independent exponent, and on the longest time scales, an exponential decay with highly temperature dependent decay constant. For each liquid crystal, the amplitudes of the two power laws scale with expressions that involve TCL, but the exponential decay time constant (long time dynamics) scales with an expression that involves TCH. The existence of two scaling temperatures can be interpreted as a signature of two "glass transitions" in liquid crystals. In ideal MCT developed for spheres, TC is the "ideal glass transition temperature," although it is found experimentally to be ˜20%-30% above the experimental glass transition temperature, Tg. The transition in nematic liquid crystals at TCL corresponds to the conventional ideal MCT glass transition, while the transition at TCH can occur for nonspherical molecules, and may correspond to the freezing in of local nematic order.

  5. Understanding topological phase transition in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Duk-Hyun; Sung, Ha-Jun; Chang, K. J.

    2016-03-01

    Despite considerable interest in layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), such as M X2 with M =(Mo ,W ) and X =(S ,Se ,Te ) , the physical origin of their topological nature is still poorly understood. In the conventional view of topological phase transition (TPT), the nontrivial topology of electron bands in TMDs is caused by the band inversion between metal d - and chalcogen p -orbital bands where the former is pulled down below the latter. Here, we show that, in TMDs, the TPT is entirely different from the conventional speculation. In particular, M S2 and M S e2 exhibits the opposite behavior of TPT such that the chalcogen p -orbital band moves down below the metal d -orbital band. More interestingly, in M T e2 , the band inversion occurs between the metal d -orbital bands. Our findings cast doubts on the common view of TPT and provide clear guidelines for understanding the topological nature in new topological materials to be discovered.

  6. Size dependence of phase transitions in aerosol nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yafang; Su, Hang; Koop, Thomas; Mikhailov, Eugene; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Phase transitions of nanoparticles are of fundamental importance in atmospheric sciences. Current understanding is insufficient to explain observations at the nano-scale. In particular, discrepancies exist between observations and model predictions of deliquescence and efflorescence transitions and the hygroscopic growth of salt nanoparticles. Here we show that these discrepancies can be resolved by consideration of particle size effects with consistent thermodynamic data. We present a new method for the determination of water and solute activities and interfacial energies in highly supersaturated aqueous solution droplets. Our analysis reveals that particle size can strongly alter the characteristic concentration of phase separation in mixed systems, resembling the influence of temperature. Due to similar effects, atmospheric secondary organic aerosol particles at room temperature are expected to be always liquid at diameters below ~20 nm. We thus propose and demonstrate that particle size should be included as an additional dimension in the equilibrium phase diagram of aerosol nanoparticles. Reference: Cheng, Y. et al. Size dependence of phase transitions in aerosol nanoparticles. Nature Communications. 5:5923 doi: 10.1038/ncomms6850 (2015).

  7. Liquid-phase compositions from vapor-phase analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W. Jr.; Cochran, H.D.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1989-09-01

    In the safe handling and processing of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}), it is often desirable to calculate vapor composition and pressure from known liquid composition and temperature. Furthermore, the ability to use analyses of equilibrium vapor-phase samples to calculate liquid-phase compositions would be economically advantageous to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in its international safeguards program and to uranium enrichment operators. The latter technique is projected to save the IAEA on the order of $1500 or more per sample. Either type of calculation could be performed with a multicomponent vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) model if this model were shown to apply to UF{sub 6} and its common impurities. This report is concerned with the distribution of four potential impurities in UF{sub 6} between liquid and vapor phases. The impurities are carbon dioxide, sulfur hexafluoride, chloryl fluoride, and Freon-114 (CClF{sub 2}CClF{sub 2}). There are no binary equilibrium data on the first three of these impurities; hence, the VLE calculations are based entirely on the thermodynamic properties of the pure components. There are two sets of binary equilibrium data for the system Freon-114-UF{sub 6} that are analyzed in terms of the model of Prausnitz et al. Calculations based on these data are compared with those based solely on the thermodynamic properties of pure Freon-114 and pure UF{sub 6}. 23 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Phase transitions in soft-committee machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biehl, M.; Schlösser, E.; Ahr, M.

    1998-10-01

    Equilibrium statistical physics is applied to the off-line training of layered neural networks with differentiable activation functions. A first analysis of soft-committee machines with an arbitrary number (K) of hidden units and continuous weights learning a perfectly matching rule is performed. Our results are exact in the limit of high training temperatures (β → 0). For K = 2 we find a second-order phase transition from unspecialized to specialized student configurations at a critical size P of the training set, whereas for K >= 3 the transition is first order. The limit K → ∞ can be performed analytically, the transition occurs after presenting on the order of NK/β examples. However, an unspecialized metastable state persists up to P propto NK2/β.

  9. Thermalon mediated phase transitions in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennigar, Robie A.; Mann, Robert B.; Mbarek, Saoussen

    2016-02-01

    Thermalons can mediate phase transitions between different vacua in higher curvature gravity, potentially changing the asymptotic structure of the spacetime. Treating the cosmological constant as a dynamical parameter, we study these phase transitions in the context of extended thermodynamic phase space. We find that in addition to the AdS to dS phase transitions previously studied, thermal AdS space can undergo a phase transition to an asymptotically flat black hole geometry. In the context of AdS to AdS transitions, we comment on the similarities and differences between thermalon transitions and the Hawking-Page transition.

  10. Dynamic phase transitions in cell spreading.

    PubMed

    Döbereiner, Hans-Günther; Dubin-Thaler, Benjamin; Giannone, Grégory; Xenias, Harry S; Sheetz, Michael P

    2004-09-01

    We monitored isotropic spreading of mouse embryonic fibroblasts on fibronectin-coated substrates. Cell adhesion area versus time was measured via total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Spreading proceeds in well-defined phases. We found a power-law area growth with distinct exponents in three sequential phases, which we denote as basal, continuous, and contractile spreading. High resolution differential interference contrast microscopy was used to characterize local membrane dynamics at the spreading front. Fourier power spectra of membrane velocity reveal the sudden development of periodic membrane retractions at the transition from continuous to contractile spreading. We propose that the classification of cell spreading into phases with distinct functional characteristics and protein activity serves as a paradigm for a general program of a phase classification of cellular phenotype. PMID:15447457

  11. Phase Transitions in Stoichiometric Polyelectrolyte - Surfactant Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Michael; Strey, Helmut

    2003-03-01

    When a water-soluble polyelectrolyte is combined with an oppositely-charged surfactant solution at a stoichiometric charge ratio, self-assembly into a highly ordered, water-insoluble complex occurs. We have established general phase diagrams for nanostructured cetyltrimethylammonium halide (CTAx) - poly[(sodium acrylate)-co-acrylamide] (PSAAm) complexes by studying phase structure as a function of ionic strength, salt type, polyelectrolyte charge density, applied osmotic pressure, and temperature with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). A general phase sequence of cubic-lamellar-hexagonal has been established from these measurements. At low polyelectrolyte charge densities, high ionic strengths, low osmotic pressures, and low temperatures, Pm3n cubic structures were observed, whereas transitions to hexagonally close-packed cylindrical (HCP-C) and lamellar phases were observed at high polyelectrolyte charge densities, low ionic strengths, high osmotic pressures, and high temperatures.

  12. Supercooled liquids and the glass transition.

    PubMed

    Debenedetti, P G; Stillinger, F H

    2001-03-01

    Glasses are disordered materials that lack the periodicity of crystals but behave mechanically like solids. The most common way of making a glass is by cooling a viscous liquid fast enough to avoid crystallization. Although this route to the vitreous state-supercooling-has been known for millennia, the molecular processes by which liquids acquire amorphous rigidity upon cooling are not fully understood. Here we discuss current theoretical knowledge of the manner in which intermolecular forces give rise to complex behaviour in supercooled liquids and glasses. An intriguing aspect of this behaviour is the apparent connection between dynamics and thermodynamics. The multidimensional potential energy surface as a function of particle coordinates (the energy landscape) offers a convenient viewpoint for the analysis and interpretation of supercooling and glass-formation phenomena. That much of this analysis is at present largely qualitative reflects the fact that precise computations of how viscous liquids sample their landscape have become possible only recently. PMID:11258381

  13. Structural phase transitions in layered perovskitelike crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, K.S.

    1995-03-01

    Possible symmetry changes due to small tilts of octahedra are considered for layered perovskite-like crystals containing slabs of several ({ell}) layers of comer-sharing octahedra. In the crystals with {ell} > 1, four types of distortions are possible; as a rule, these distortions correspond to the librational modes of the parent lattice. Condensation of these soft modes is the reason for structural phase transitions or sequences of phase transitions. The results obtained are compared with the known experimental data for a number of layered ferroelectric and ferroelastic perovskite-like compounds. An application of the results to the initial stage of determining unknown structures is discussed with particular attention paid to high-temperature superconductors. 76 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Phase transitions: An overview with a view

    SciTech Connect

    Gleiser, M.

    1997-10-01

    The dynamics of phase transitions plays a crucial role in the so- called interface between high energy particle physics and cosmology. Many of the interesting results generated during the last fifteen years or so rely on simplified assumptions concerning the complex mechanisms typical of nonequilibrium field theories. After reviewing well-known results concerning the dynamics of first and second order phase transitions, I argue that much is yet to be understood, in particular in situations where homogeneous nucleation theory does not apply. I present a method to deal with departures from homogeneous nucleation, and compare its efficacy with numerical simulations. Finally, I discuss the interesting problem of matching numerical simulations of stochastic field theories with continuum models.

  15. Phase transition of tin under ramp compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Tao; Zhao, Jianheng; Tang, Zhiping; Tan, Fuli; CAEP Team

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the phase transition experiments of tin were done under magnetically driven quasi-isentropic compression technology on the facility CQ-4,which is capable to deliver a current of peak of 4 MA within rise time of 470 ~ 600ns. As shown in Figure 1, the loading pressure P produced by large pulsed current J interaction with the self-inducing magnetic field B acts on the surfaces of electrodes of electrode panels. Simulation of one dimensional dynamic process with MEOS (multiphase equation of state) phase transition model is done. The simulation input is a stress loading history boundary of surfaces of electrode panels, and the stress is calculated by the plate/window interface velocity. Since the plate/window interface velocity doesn't have the information of the rarefaction wave reflection between the sample and window, the process can only simulate the loading stage now. CAEP

  16. Gravitational Waves from a Dark Phase Transition.

    PubMed

    Schwaller, Pedro

    2015-10-30

    In this work, we show that a large class of models with a composite dark sector undergo a strong first order phase transition in the early Universe, which could lead to a detectable gravitational wave signal. We summarize the basic conditions for a strong first order phase transition for SU(N) dark sectors with n_{f} flavors, calculate the gravitational wave spectrum and show that, depending on the dark confinement scale, it can be detected at eLISA or in pulsar timing array experiments. The gravitational wave signal provides a unique test of the gravitational interactions of a dark sector, and we discuss the complementarity with conventional searches for new dark sectors. The discussion includes the twin Higgs and strongly interacting massive particle models as well as symmetric and asymmetric composite dark matter scenarios. PMID:26565451

  17. Evolution of structure during phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.E.; Wilcoxon, J.P.; Anderson, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    Nanostructured materials can be synthesized by utilizing the domain growth that accompanies first-order phase separation. Structural control can be achieved by appropriately selecting the quench depth and the quench time, but in order to do this in a mindful fashion one must understand the kinetics of domain growth. The authors have completed detailed light scattering studies of the evolution of structure in both temperature- and field-quenched phase transitions in two and three dimensional systems. They have studied these systems in the quiescent state and in shear and have developed theoretical models that account for the experimental results.

  18. Phase transition into the metallic state in hypothetical (without molecules) dense atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Khomkin, A. L. Shumikhin, A. S.

    2013-10-15

    A simple physical model of the metal-dielectric (vapor-liquid) phase transition in hypothetical (without molecules) atomic hydrogen is proposed. The reason for such a transition is the quantum collective cohesive energy occurring due to quantum electron-electron exchange similar to the cohesive energy in the liquid-metal phase of alkali metals. It is found that the critical parameters of the transition are P{sub c} ? 41000 atm, ?{sub c} ? 0.1 g/cm{sup 3}, and T{sub c} ? 9750 K.

  19. Structural phase transitions in monolayer molybdenum dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Duk-Hyun; Sung, Ha June; Chang, Kee Joo

    2015-03-01

    The recent discovery of two-dimensional materials such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) has provided opportunities to develop ultimate thin channel devices. In contrast to graphene, the existence of moderate band gap and strong spin-orbit coupling gives rise to exotic electronic properties which vary with layer thickness, lattice structure, and symmetry. TMDs commonly appear in two structures with distinct symmetries, trigonal prismatic 2H and octahedral 1T phases which are semiconducting and metallic, respectively. In this work, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of monolayer molybdenum dichalcogenides (MoX2, where X = S, Se, Te) through first-principles density functional calculations. We find a tendency that the semiconducting 2H phase is more stable than the metallic 1T phase. We show that a spontaneous symmetry breaking of 1T phase leads to various distorted octahedral (1T') phases, thus inducing a metal-to-semiconductor transition. We discuss the effects of carrier doping on the structural stability and the modification of the electronic structure. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) under Grant No. NRF-2005-0093845 and Samsung Science and Technology Foundation under Grant No. SSTFBA1401-08.

  20. correlation effects in topological phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Hsiang-Hsuan; Chua, Victor; Wang, Lei; Fiete, Gregory

    2014-03-01

    We study topological insulators/trivial insulators topological phase transitions in the Kane-Mele-Hubbard model using the projective quantum Monte Carlo method. We numerically compute the topological invariants and study topological phase transitions under correlation. We find that quantum fluctuation effects from interactions can act both to stabilize and destabilize topological phases, depending on the details of the model. When the one-body terms break the lattice symmetry, e.g. bond dimerization breaks the rotational symmetry in the Kane-Mele model, the Hubbard interaction destabilizes the topological insulator phase. On the other hand, when the one-body terms (e.g. the third-nearest neighbor hopping) preserves the lattice symmetry, the interaction stabilizes the topological phase. This work was supported by ARO Grant No. W911NF- 09-1-0527, NSF Grant No. DMR-0955778, and by grant W911NF-12-1-0573 from the Army Research Office with funding from the DARPA OLE Program.

  1. Phase change in liquid face seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, W. F.; Winowich, N. S.; Birchak, M. J.; Kennedy, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    A study is made of boiling (or phase change) in liquid face seals. An appropriate model is set up and approximate solutions obtained. Some practical illustrative examples are given. Major conclusions are that (1) boiling may occur more often than has been suspected particularly when the sealed liquid is near saturation conditions, (2) the temperature variation in a seal clearance region may not be very great and the main reason for boiling is the flashing which occurs as the pressure decreases through the seal clearance, and (3) there are two separate values of the parameter film-thickness/angular-velocity-squared (and associated radii where phase change takes place) which provide the same separating force under a given set of operating conditions. For a given speed seal face excursions about the larger spacing are stable, but excursions about the smaller spacing are unstable, leading to a growth to the larger spacing or a catastrophic collapse.

  2. Entropic description of gas hydrate ice/liquid equilibrium via enhanced sampling of coexisting phases

    SciTech Connect

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Kim, Jaegil; Keyes, Tom

    2015-04-28

    Metastable β ice holds small guest molecules in stable gas hydrates, so its solid/liquid equilibrium is of interest. However, aqueous crystal/liquid transitions are very difficult to simulate. A new MD algorithm generates trajectories in a generalized NPT ensemble and equilibrates states of coexisting phases with a selectable enthalpy. Furthermore, with replicas spanning the range between β ice and liquid water we find the statistical temperature from the enthalpy histograms and characterize the transition by the entropy, introducing a general computational procedure for first-order transitions.

  3. Entropic Description of Gas Hydrate Ice-Liquid Equilibrium via Enhanced Sampling of Coexisting Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Małolepsza, Edyta; Kim, Jaegil; Keyes, Tom

    2015-05-01

    Metastable β ice holds small guest molecules in stable gas hydrates, so its solid-liquid equilibrium is of interest. However, aqueous crystal-liquid transitions are very difficult to simulate. A new molecular dynamics algorithm generates trajectories in a generalized N P T ensemble and equilibrates states of coexisting phases with a selectable enthalpy. With replicas spanning the range between β ice and liquid water, we find the statistical temperature from the enthalpy histograms and characterize the transition by the entropy, introducing a general computational procedure for first-order transitions.

  4. Entropic Description of Gas Hydrate Ice-Liquid Equilibrium via Enhanced Sampling of Coexisting Phases.

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Edyta; Kim, Jaegil; Keyes, Tom

    2015-05-01

    Metastable β ice holds small guest molecules in stable gas hydrates, so its solid-liquid equilibrium is of interest. However, aqueous crystal-liquid transitions are very difficult to simulate. A new molecular dynamics algorithm generates trajectories in a generalized NPT ensemble and equilibrates states of coexisting phases with a selectable enthalpy. With replicas spanning the range between β ice and liquid water, we find the statistical temperature from the enthalpy histograms and characterize the transition by the entropy, introducing a general computational procedure for first-order transitions. PMID:25978217

  5. Generalized phase transitions in Lovelock gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camanho, Xián O.; Edelstein, José D.; Giribet, Gastón; Gomberoff, Andrés

    2014-09-01

    We investigate a novel mechanism for phase transitions that is a distinctive feature of higher-curvature gravity theories. For definiteness, we bound ourselves to the case of Lovelock gravities. These theories are known to have several branches of asymptotically anti-de Sitter solutions. Here, extending our previous work, we show that phase transitions among some of these branches are driven by a thermalon configuration: a bubble separating two regions of different effective cosmological constants, generically hosting a black hole in the interior. Above some critical temperature, this thermalon configuration is preferred with respect to the finite-temperature anti-de Sitter space, triggering a sophisticated version of the Hawking-Page transition. After being created, the unstable bubble configuration can in general dynamically change the asymptotic cosmological constant. While this phenomenon already occurs in the case of a gravity action with square curvature terms, we point out that in the case of Lovelock theory with cubic (and higher) terms new effects appear. For instance, the theory may admit more than one type of bubble and branches that are in principle free of pathologies may also decay through the thermalon mechanism. We also find ranges of the gravitational couplings for which the theory becomes sick. These add up to previously found restrictions to impose tighter constraints on higher-curvature gravities. The results of this paper point to an intricate phase diagram which might accommodate similarly rich behavior in the dual conformal field theory side.

  6. Phase Transitions in Delaunay Potts Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Stefan; Eyers, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We establish phase transitions for certain classes of continuum Delaunay multi-type particle systems (continuum Potts models) with infinite range repulsive interaction between particles of different type. In one class of the Delaunay Potts models studied the repulsive interaction is a triangle (multi-body) interaction whereas in the second class the interaction is between pairs (edges) of the Delaunay graph. The result for the edge model is an extension of finite range results in Bertin et al. (J Stat Phys 114(1-2):79-100, 2004) for the Delaunay graph and in Georgii and Häggström (Commun Math Phys 181:507-528, 1996) for continuum Potts models to an infinite range repulsion decaying with the edge length. This is a proof of an old conjecture of Lebowitz and Lieb. The repulsive triangle interactions have infinite range as well and depend on the underlying geometry and thus are a first step towards studying phase transitions for geometry-dependent multi-body systems. Our approach involves a Delaunay random-cluster representation analogous to the Fortuin-Kasteleyn representation of the Potts model. The phase transitions manifest themselves in the percolation of the corresponding random-cluster model. Our proofs rely on recent studies (Dereudre et al. in Probab Theory Relat Fields 153:643-670, 2012) of Gibbs measures for geometry-dependent interactions.

  7. Liquid-phase electroepitaxy - Dopant segregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagowski, J.; Jastrzebski, L.; Gatos, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    A theoretical model is presented which accounts for the dopant segregation in liquid-phase electroepitaxy in terms of dopant transport in the liquid phase (by electromigration and diffusion), the growth velocity, and the Peltier effect at the substrate-solution interface. The contribution of dopant electromigration to the magnitude of the effective segregation coefficient is dominant in the absence of convection; the contribution of the Peltier effect becomes significant only in the presence of pronounced convection. Quantitative expressions which relate the segregation coefficient to the growth parameters also permit the determination of the diffusion constant and electromigration mobility of the dopant in the liquid phase. The model was found to be in good agreement with the measured segregation characteristics of Sn in the electroepitaxial growth of GaAs from Ga-As solutions. For Sn in Ga-As solution at 900 C the diffusion constant was found to be 4 x 10 to the -5 sq cm/s and the electromigration velocity (toward the substrate with a positive polarity 2 x 10 to the -5 cm/s current density of 10 A/sq cm.

  8. Room-Temperature Liquid Crystal Blue Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taushanoff, Stefanie; van Le, Khoa; Twieg, Robert; Jakli, Antal

    2009-03-01

    The ``blue phases'' of a highly chiral liquid crystal are defect-studded structures of double-twist cylinders that are laced together. The three phases, BPI*, BPII* and BPIII* differ only in the packing of the double-twist cylinders. Until recently, blue phases were of limited practical use because they appeared for only a very narrow temperature range. Mixtures that show BPI* and BPII* phases for wide temperature ranges at or around room temperature are now available [1]. Relatively wide temperature BPIII (the blue fog) phase so far was available only at very high temperatures [2]. Here we present mixtures with room-temperature wide range BPIII* phase and compare the ability of chiral dopants to form the different blue phases in a base nematic mixture. PDLC films cast with blue-phase material are also examined.[3pt] [1] H. Coles and M. Pivnenko, Nature 2005 436-18 997-1000 [0pt] [2] C. V. Yelamaggad, I. S. Shashikala, G. Liao, D.S. Shankar Rao, S. K. Prasad , Q. Li A. Jakli, Chem. Mater Comm, 2006, 18, 6100-6102

  9. Water in Inhomogeneous Nanoconfinement: Coexistence of Multilayered Liquid and Transition to Ice Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hu; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Guo, Wanlin

    2015-10-27

    Phase behavior and the associated phase transition of water within inhomogeneous nanoconfinement are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The nanoconfinement is constructed by a flat bottom plate and a convex top plate. At 300 K, the confined water can be viewed as a coexistence of monolayer, bilayer, and trilayer liquid domains to accommodate the inhomogeneous confinement. With increasing liquid density, the confined water with uneven layers transforms separately into two-dimensional ice crystals with unchanged layer number and rhombic in-plane symmetry for oxygen atoms. The monolayer water undergoes the transition first into a puckered ice nanoribbon, and the bilayer water transforms into a rhombic ice nanoribbon next, followed by the transition of trilayer water into a trilayer ice nanoribbon. The sequential localized liquid-to-solid transition within the inhomogeneous confinement can also be achieved by gradually decreasing the temperature at low liquid densities. These findings of phase behaviors of water under the inhomogeneous nanoconfinement not only extend the phase diagram of confined water but also have implications for realistic nanofluidic systems and microporous materials. PMID:26348704

  10. RNA transcription modulates phase transition-driven nuclear body assembly

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Joel; Weber, Stephanie C.; Vaidya, Nilesh; Haataja, Mikko; Brangwynne, Clifford P.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear bodies are RNA and protein-rich, membraneless organelles that play important roles in gene regulation. The largest and most well-known nuclear body is the nucleolus, an organelle whose primary function in ribosome biogenesis makes it key for cell growth and size homeostasis. The nucleolus and other nuclear bodies behave like liquid-phase droplets and appear to condense from the nucleoplasm by concentration-dependent phase separation. However, nucleoli actively consume chemical energy, and it is unclear how such nonequilibrium activity might impact classical liquid–liquid phase separation. Here, we combine in vivo and in vitro experiments with theory and simulation to characterize the assembly and disassembly dynamics of nucleoli in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. In addition to classical nucleoli that assemble at the transcriptionally active nucleolar organizing regions, we observe dozens of “extranucleolar droplets” (ENDs) that condense in the nucleoplasm in a transcription-independent manner. We show that growth of nucleoli and ENDs is consistent with a first-order phase transition in which late-stage coarsening dynamics are mediated by Brownian coalescence and, to a lesser degree, Ostwald ripening. By manipulating C. elegans cell size, we change nucleolar component concentration and confirm several key model predictions. Our results show that rRNA transcription and other nonequilibrium biological activity can modulate the effective thermodynamic parameters governing nucleolar and END assembly, but do not appear to fundamentally alter the passive phase separation mechanism. PMID:26351690

  11. Kinetic model of multiple phase transitions in ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchijov, Vladimir; Cruz León, Gloria; Rodríguez Romo, Suemi

    2001-06-01

    Experiments indicate that water ice subjected to shock-wave loading undergoes multiple non-equilibrium phase transitions (Larson D.B., J. Glaciology, 30:235, 1984.) Kinetic model of multiple phase changes in ice (Tchijov V. et al., J. Phys. Chem., 101:6215, 1997) is based on the complete set of P-V-T equations of state of ices Ih, III, V, VI, VII and liquid water in the ranges of pressure 0..40 kbar and temperature 230..500 K. Detailed study of thermodynamic properties of ice phases including the derivation of the equations of state and investigation of the isoentropes of binary liquid-solid and solid-solid mixtures is presented. The shapes of the isoentropes suggest the unusually complicated nature of phase changes in ice. In the kinetic model, a set of parameters is introduced that permits to describe the loading and unloading paths and hysteresis on the P-V diagram of non-equilibrium mixture of ice phases. The proposed kinetic model is applied to study the propagation of one-dimensional compression wave in an ice sample. The results of computer simulations are in good agreement with the existing experimental data.

  12. Partitioning of transition metals between diopside and coexisting silicate liquids. I - Nickel, cobalt, and manganese

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, D. J.; Weill, D. F.

    1978-01-01

    Distribution coefficients have been found for the partitioning of Ni, Co, and Mn between calcium-rich clinopyroxenes and coexisting silicate liquids. Values are found for the 1110-1360 C temperature range. The breakdown of Henry's Law was not observed. The measured clinopyroxene/liquid distribution coefficients ranged from 1.5-14.0 for Ni, 0.5-2.0 for Co, and 0.3-1.2 for Mn. Analyses of pyroxenes grown from charges differing in the amounts of transition metals indicate that Ni and Co occupy the M1 site of diopside and that Mn occupies the M1 and M2 sites. Equilibrium constants were found in terms of the activities of the components in the liquid and solid phases. These activities are based on the mole fractions. An activity/concentration model was used for the liquid phase in order to explain the variations in the clinopyroxene/liquid coefficients due to bulk composition.

  13. Shock induced phase transition of water: Molecular dynamics investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogi, Anupam; Mitra, Nilanjan

    2016-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out using numerous force potentials to investigate the shock induced phenomenon of pure bulk liquid water. Partial phase transition was observed at single shock velocity of 4.0 km/s without requirement of any external nucleators. Change in thermodynamic variables along with radial distribution function plots and spectral analysis revealed for the first time in the literature, within the context of molecular dynamic simulations, the thermodynamic pathway leading to formation of ice VII from liquid water on shock loading. The study also revealed information for the first time in the literature about the statistical time-frame after passage of shock in which ice VII formation can be observed and variations in degree of crystallinity of the sample over the entire simulation time of 100 ns.

  14. Nematic - isotropic phase transition in turbulent thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlers, Guenter; Weiss, Stephan

    2013-11-01

    The nematic-isotropic transition of a liquid crystal (LC) at a temperature TNI is an example of a soft phase transition, where fluid properties, although discontinuous, change only very little and where the latent heat is small. Understanding thermal convection in the presence of such a phase change is relevant to convection in Earth's mantle where discontinuous changes of the crystalline structure occur. We report on turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection of a nematic LC while it undergoes a transition from the nematic to the isotropic phase in a cylindrical convection cell with aspect ratio Γ (height over diameter) of 0.50. The difference between the top- and the bottom-plate temperature ΔT =Tb -Tt was held constant, while the average temperature Tm = (Tb +Tt) / 2 was varied. There was a significant increase of heat transport when TNI was between Tb and Tt. Measurements of the temperatures along the side wall as a function of Tm showed several ranges with qualitatively different behavior of quantities such as the time-averaged side-wall temperature, temperature gradient, or temperature fluctuations. We interpret these different ranges in terms of processes in the thermal boundary layers close to the top and bottom plates. SW acknowledges support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft. This work was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation through Grant No. DMR11-58514.

  15. Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation of Oil Bodies from Seeds.

    PubMed

    Nykiforuk, Cory L

    2016-01-01

    Fundamentally, oil bodies are discrete storage organelles found in oilseeds, comprising a hydrophobic triacylglycerol core surrounded by a half-unit phospholipid membrane and an outer shell of specialized proteins known as oleosins. Oil bodies possess a number of attributes that were exploited by SemBioSys Genetics to isolate highly enriched fractions of oil bodies through liquid-liquid phase separation for a number of commercial applications. The current chapter provides a general guide for the isolation of oil bodies from Arabidopsis and/or safflower seed, from which protocols can be refined for different oilseed sources. For SemBioSys Genetic's recombinant technology, therapeutic proteins were covalently attached to oleosins or fused in-frame with ligands which bound oil bodies, facilitating their recovery to high levels of purity during "upstream processing" of transformed seed. Core to this technology was oil body isolation consisting of simple manipulation including homogenization of seeds to free the oil bodies, followed by the removal of insoluble fractions, and phase separation to recover the oil bodies. During oil body enrichment (an increase in oil body content concomitant with removal of impurities), a number of options and tips are provided to aid researchers in the manipulation and monitoring of these robust organelles. PMID:26614290

  16. Epigenetics and locust life phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Ulrich R; Van Hiel, Matthias B; Depuydt, Geert; Boerjan, Bart; De Loof, Arnold; Schoofs, Liliane

    2015-01-01

    Insects are one of the most successful classes on Earth, reflected in an enormous species richness and diversity. Arguably, this success is partly due to the high degree to which polyphenism, where one genotype gives rise to more than one phenotype, is exploited by many of its species. In social insects, for instance, larval diet influences the development into distinct castes; and locust polyphenism has tricked researchers for years into believing that the drastically different solitarious and gregarious phases might be different species. Solitarious locusts behave much as common grasshoppers. However, they are notorious for forming vast, devastating swarms upon crowding. These gregarious animals are shorter lived, less fecund and transmit their phase characteristics to their offspring. The behavioural gregarisation occurs within hours, yet the full display of gregarious characters takes several generations, as does the reversal to the solitarious phase. Hormones, neuropeptides and neurotransmitters influence some of the phase traits; however, none of the suggested mechanisms can account for all the observed differences, notably imprinting effects on longevity and fecundity. This is why, more recently, epigenetics has caught the interest of the polyphenism field. Accumulating evidence points towards a role for epigenetic regulation in locust phase polyphenism. This is corroborated in the economically important locust species Locusta migratoria and Schistocerca gregaria. Here, we review the key elements involved in phase transition in locusts and possible epigenetic regulation. We discuss the relative role of DNA methylation, histone modification and small RNA molecules, and suggest future research directions. PMID:25568455

  17. Phase transitions of ɛ-HNIW in compound systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing-yuan; Guo, Xue-yong; Jiao, Qing-jie; Zhang, Pu

    2016-05-01

    The heat-induced phase transitions of ɛ-HNIW, both neat and coated with various additives used in plastic bonded explosives, were investigated using powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. It was found that ɛ-HNIW, after being held at 70°C for 60h, remained in the ɛ-phase. Applying other conditions, various phase transition parameters were determined, including Tc (the critical phase transition temperature), T50 (the temperature at which 50% of the phase transition is complete) and T180 (the percentage of γ-HNIW present in samples heated to 180°C). According to the above three parameters, additives were divided into three categories: those that delay phase transition, those that raise the critical temperature and the transition rate, and those that promote the phase transition. Based on the above data, a phase transition mechanism is proposed.

  18. Quantum Phase Transitions in Antiferromagnets and Superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdev, Subir

    2000-03-01

    A general introduction to the non-zero temperature dynamic and transport properties of low-dimensional systems near a quantum phase transition shall be presented. Basic results will be reviewed in the context of experiments on the spin-ladder compounds. Recent large N computations (M. Vojta and S. Sachdev, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83), 3916 (1999) on an extended t-J model motivate a global scenario of the quantum phases and transitions in the high temperature superconductors, and connections will be made to numerous experiments. A universal theory (S. Sachdev, C. Buragohain, and M. Vojta, Science, in press M. Vojta, C. Buragohain, and S. Sachdev, cond- mat/9912020) of quantum impurities in spin-gap antiferromagnets near a magnetic ordering transition will be compared quantitatively to experiments on Zn doped Y Ba2 Cu3 O7 (Fong et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 1939 (1999)

  19. The transition to chaotic phase synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosekilde, E.; Laugesen, J. L.; Zhusubaliyev, Zh. T.

    2012-08-01

    The transition to chaotic phase synchronization for a periodically driven spiral-type chaotic oscillator is known to involve a dense set of saddle-node bifurcations. By following the synchronization transition through the cascade of period-doubling bifurcations in a forced Rössler system, this paper describes how these saddle-node bifurcations arise and how their characteristic cyclic organisation develops. We identify the cycles that are involved in the various saddle-node bifurcations and descibe how the formation of multi-layered resonance cycles in the synchronization domain is related to the torus doubling bifurcations that take place outside this domain. By examining a physiology-based model of the blood flow regulation to the individual functional unit (nephron) of the kidney we demonstrate how a similar bifurcation structure may arise in this system as a response to a periodically varying arterial blood pressure. The paper finally discusses how an alternative transition to chaotic phase synchronization may occur in the mutual synchronization of two chaotically oscillating period-doubling systems.

  20. Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid Calculator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-02-19

    Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid or "NPAL" is a term that most environmental professionals are familiar with because NAPL has been recognized in the literature as a significant source of groundwater contamination. There are two types of NAPL: DNAPL and LNAPL. DNAPL is a ‘dense’ non-aqueous phase liquid. In this context, dense means having a density greater than water (1.0 kg/L). Trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachioroethylene (PCE) are examples of DNAPL compounds. A compound that is heaver thanmore » water means this type of NAPL will sink in an aquifer. Conversely, LNAPL is a ‘light’ non-aqueous phase liquid with a density less than water, and will float on top of the aquifer. Examples of LNAPL’s are benzene and toluene. LNAPL or DNAPL often manifest as a complex, multi-component mixture of organic compounds that can occur in environmental media. Complex multi-component mixtures distributed in soil pore-air, pore-water, soil particles and in free phase complicate residual saturation of single and multi component NAPL compounds in soil samples. The model output also includes estimates of the NAPL mass and volume and other physical and chemical properties that may be useful for characterization, modeling, and remedial system design and operation. The discovery of NAPL in the aquifer usually leads to a focused characterization for possible sources of NAPL in the vadose zone using a variety of innovative technologies and characterization methods. Often, the analytical data will indicated the presence of NAPL, yet, the NAPL will go unrecognized. Failure to recognize the NAPL can be attributed to the complicated processes of inter-media transfer or a general lack of knowledge about the physical characteristics of complex organic mixtures in environmental samples.« less

  1. Transitional Bubble in Periodic Flow Phase Shift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talan, M.; Hourmouziadis, Jean

    2004-01-01

    One particular characteristic observed in unsteady shear layers is the phase shift relative to the main flow. In attached boundary layers this will have an effect both on the instantaneous skin friction and heat transfer. In separation bubbles the contribution to the drag is dominated by the pressure distribution. However, the most significant effect appears to be the phase shift on the transition process. Unsteady transition behaviour may determine the bursting of the bubble resulting in an un-recoverable full separation. An early analysis of the phase shift was performed by Stokes for the incompressible boundary layer of an oscillating wall and an oscillating main flow. An amplitude overshoot within the shear layer as well as a phase shift were observed that can be attributed to the relatively slow diffusion of viscous stresses compared to the fast change of pressure. Experiments in a low speed facility with the boundary layer of a flat plate were evaluated in respect to phase shift. A pressure distribution similar to that on the suction surface of a turbomachinery aerofoil was superimposed generating a typical transitional separation bubble. A periodically unsteady main flow in the suction type wind tunnel was introduced via a rotating flap downstream of the test section. The experiments covered a range of the three similarity parameters of momentum-loss-thickness Reynolds-number of 92 to 226 and Strouhal-number (reduced frequency) of 0.0001 to 0.0004 at the separation point, and an amplitude range up to 19 %. The free stream turbulence level was less than 1% .Upstream of the separation point the phase shift in the laminar boundary layer does not appear to be affected significantly bay either of the three parameters. The trend perpendicular to the wall is similar to the Stokes analysis. The problem scales well with the wave velocity introduced by Stokes, however, the lag of the main flow near the wall is less than indicated analytically. The separation point comes closest to the Stokes analysis but the phase is still 20 degrees lower at the wall.

  2. Glass and liquid phase diagram of a polyamorphic monatomic system.

    PubMed

    Reisman, Shaina; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2013-02-14

    We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a monatomic system with Fermi-Jagla (FJ) pair potential interactions. This model system exhibits polyamorphism both in the liquid and glass state. The two liquids, low-density (LDL) and high-density liquid (HDL), are accessible in equilibrium MD simulations and can form two glasses, low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous (HDA) solid, upon isobaric cooling. The FJ model exhibits many of the anomalous properties observed in water and other polyamorphic liquids and thus, it is an excellent model system to explore qualitatively the thermodynamic properties of such substances. The liquid phase behavior of the FJ model system has been previously characterized. In this work, we focus on the glass behavior of the FJ system. Specifically, we perform systematic isothermal compression and decompression simulations of LDA and HDA at different temperatures and determine "phase diagrams" for the glass state; these phase diagrams varying with the compression/decompression rate used. We obtain the LDA-to-HDA and HDA-to-LDA transition pressure loci, P(LDA-HDA)(T) and P(HDA-LDA)(T), respectively. In addition, the compression-induced amorphization line, at which the low-pressure crystal (LPC) transforms to HDA, P(LPC-HDA)(T), is determined. As originally proposed by Poole et al. [Phys. Rev. E 48, 4605 (1993)] simulations suggest that the P(LDA-HDA)(T) and P(HDA-LDA)(T) loci are extensions of the LDL-to-HDL and HDL-to-LDL spinodal lines into the glass domain. Interestingly, our simulations indicate that the P(LPC-HDA)(T) locus is an extension, into the glass domain, of the LPC metastability limit relative to the liquid. We discuss the effects of compression/decompression rates on the behavior of the P(LDA-HDA)(T), P(HDA-LDA)(T), P(LPC-HDA)(T) loci. The competition between glass polyamorphism and crystallization is also addressed. At our "fast rate," crystallization can be partially suppressed and the glass phase diagram can be related directly with the liquid phase diagram. However, at our "slow rate," crystallization cannot be prevented at intermediate temperatures, within the glass region. In these cases, multiple crystal-crystal transformations are found upon compression/decompression (polymorphism). PMID:23425481

  3. Glass and liquid phase diagram of a polyamorphic monatomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisman, Shaina; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2013-02-01

    We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a monatomic system with Fermi-Jagla (FJ) pair potential interactions. This model system exhibits polyamorphism both in the liquid and glass state. The two liquids, low-density (LDL) and high-density liquid (HDL), are accessible in equilibrium MD simulations and can form two glasses, low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous (HDA) solid, upon isobaric cooling. The FJ model exhibits many of the anomalous properties observed in water and other polyamorphic liquids and thus, it is an excellent model system to explore qualitatively the thermodynamic properties of such substances. The liquid phase behavior of the FJ model system has been previously characterized. In this work, we focus on the glass behavior of the FJ system. Specifically, we perform systematic isothermal compression and decompression simulations of LDA and HDA at different temperatures and determine "phase diagrams" for the glass state; these phase diagrams varying with the compression/decompression rate used. We obtain the LDA-to-HDA and HDA-to-LDA transition pressure loci, PLDA-HDA(T) and PHDA-LDA(T), respectively. In addition, the compression-induced amorphization line, at which the low-pressure crystal (LPC) transforms to HDA, PLPC-HDA(T), is determined. As originally proposed by Poole et al. [Phys. Rev. E 48, 4605 (1993)], 10.1103/PhysRevE.48.4605 simulations suggest that the PLDA-HDA(T) and PHDA-LDA(T) loci are extensions of the LDL-to-HDL and HDL-to-LDL spinodal lines into the glass domain. Interestingly, our simulations indicate that the PLPC-HDA(T) locus is an extension, into the glass domain, of the LPC metastability limit relative to the liquid. We discuss the effects of compression/decompression rates on the behavior of the PLDA-HDA(T), PHDA-LDA(T), PLPC-HDA(T) loci. The competition between glass polyamorphism and crystallization is also addressed. At our "fast rate," crystallization can be partially suppressed and the glass phase diagram can be related directly with the liquid phase diagram. However, at our "slow rate," crystallization cannot be prevented at intermediate temperatures, within the glass region. In these cases, multiple crystal-crystal transformations are found upon compression/decompression (polymorphism).

  4. Analysis Of Phase Transitions In Quasi-Two-Dimensional Dusty Systems In RF-Discharge Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Adamovich, X. G.; Vaulina, O. S.; Khrustalev, Yu. V.; Nekhaevsky, Yu. Yu.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-09-07

    In this work, we investigate the phase transitions in quasi-two-dimensional systems of dusty plasma in RF discharge. The quasi-2D systems are considered, where the areas with different phase states (dusty liquid and dusty crystal) coexist. The parameters of these areas of dusty subsystem are estimated, the obtained results are analysed and compared with theoretical predictions.

  5. Stochastic resonance at nonequilibrium phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skokov, V. N.; Koverda, V. P.; Vinogradov, A. V.; Reshetnikov, A. V.

    2015-07-01

    Thermal pulsations in a transition from a nucleate to a film regime of water boiling on a wire heater with a periodic Joule heat release have been studied experimentally. At frequencies of the periodic action smaller than 0.1 Hz the intermittency of the nucleate and film boiling regimes was observed. In this case the amplitude of thermal pulsations increased. The experiments with an additional noise source were carried out. With an increase in the intensity of the noise the power of the output periodic mode increased and reaching the maximum began to decrease. The results are interpreted as stochastic resonance when the periodic component of pulsations increases in the presence of noise. The results show that in a complex system with nonequilibrium phase transitions there can occur both the extreme fluctuations with 1 / f power spectrum and stochastic resonance under external periodic action.

  6. Dynamics of Symmetry Breaking Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Wojciech

    2015-05-01

    In the course of a non-equilibrium continuous phase transition dynamics ceases to be adiabatic in the vicinity of the critical point as a result of the critical slowing down. Consequently, the choice of the broken symmetry has to be made locally - sonic horizon set by the speed of the relevant sound. The resulting disparate local choices of broken symmetry lead to excitations and often result in the topological defects. The Kibble-Zurek mechanism (KZM) was developed to capture the essence of the associated non-equilibrium dynamics and to estimate the density of defects as a function of the quench rate through the transition. I will review and analyze the KZM focusing in particular on BEC's.

  7. Blue-phase liquid crystal droplets

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-González, José A.; Zhou, Ye; Rahimi, Mohammad; Bukusoglu, Emre; Abbott, Nicholas L.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    Blue phases of liquid crystals represent unique ordered states of matter in which arrays of defects are organized into striking patterns. Most studies of blue phases to date have focused on bulk properties. In this work, we present a systematic study of blue phases confined into spherical droplets. It is found that, in addition to the so-called blue phases I and II, several new morphologies arise under confinement, with a complexity that increases with the chirality of the medium and with a nature that can be altered by surface anchoring. Through a combination of simulations and experiments, it is also found that one can control the wavelength at which blue-phase droplets absorb light by manipulating either their size or the strength of the anchoring, thereby providing a liquid–state analog of nanoparticles, where dimensions are used to control absorbance or emission. The results presented in this work also suggest that there are conditions where confinement increases the range of stability of blue phases, thereby providing intriguing prospects for applications. PMID:26460039

  8. Topological Phase Transition without Gap Closing

    PubMed Central

    Ezawa, Motohiko; Tanaka, Yukio; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    Topological phase transition is accompanied with a change of topological numbers. According to the bulk-edge correspondence, the gap closing and the breakdown of the adiabaticity are necessary at the phase transition point to make the topological number ill-defined. However, the gap closing is not always needed. In this paper, we show that two topological distinct phases can be continuously connected without gap closing, provided the symmetry of the system changes during the process. Here we propose the generic principles how this is possible by demonstrating various examples such as 1D polyacetylene with the charge-density-wave order, 2D silicene with the antiferromagnetic order, 2D silicene or quantum well made of HgTe with superconducting proximity effects and 3D superconductor Cu doped Bi2Se3. It is argued that such an unusual phenomenon can occur when we detour around the gap closing point provided the connection of the topological numbers is lost along the detour path. PMID:24071900

  9. Dynamical phase transitions in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotter, Ingrid

    2012-02-01

    The nucleus is described as an open many-body quantum system with a non-Hermitian Hamilton operator the eigenvalues of which are complex, in general. The eigenvalues may cross in the complex plane (exceptional points), the phases of the eigenfunctions are not rigid in approaching the crossing points and the widths bifurcate. By varying only one parameter, the eigenvalue trajectories usually avoid crossing and width bifurcation occurs at the critical value of avoided crossing. An analog spectroscopic redistribution takes place for discrete states below the particle decay threshold. By this means, a dynamical phase transition occurs in the many-level system starting at a critical value of the level density. Hence the properties of the low-lying nuclear states (described well by the shell model) and those of highly excited nuclear states (described by random ensembles) differ fundamentally from one another. The statement of Niels Bohr on the collective features of compound nucleus states at high level density is therefore not in contradiction to the shell-model description of nuclear (and atomic) states at low level density. Dynamical phase transitions are observed experimentally in different quantum mechanical systems by varying one or two parameters.

  10. Phase transitions of nuclear matter beyond mean field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Tran Huu Phat; Nguyen Tuan Anh; Nguyen Van Long; Le Viet Hoa

    2007-10-15

    The Cornwall-Jackiw-Tomboulis (CJT) effective action approach is applied to study the phase transition of nuclear matter modeled by the four-nucleon interaction. It is shown that in the Hartree-Fock approximation (HFA) a first-order phase transition takes place at low temperature, whereas the phase transition is of second order at higher temperature.

  11. Phase equilibria of binary liquid crystal mixtures involving induced ordered phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tsang-Min

    A phenomenological model for elucidating phase diagrams of hexagonal columnar/nematic liquid crystal mixtures has been developed on the basis of the combination of the Flory-Huggins (FH) free energy of isotropic mixing, Maier-Saupe (MS) free energy for nematic ordering, and Chandrasekhar-Clark free energy for hexagonal ordering. Self-consistent calculations show the theory is capable of predicting the various phase diagrams, covering nematic, hexagonal columnar, and isotropic phases. The model has been tested with the eutectic phase diagram of hexagonal columnar liquid crystal, 2, 3, 6, 7, 10, 11-hexapentyloxy triphenylene (HPTP)/reactive nematic mesogens, 4-(3-acryloyloxypropyloxy)-benzoic acid 2-methyl-1, 4-phenylene ester (RM257) mixtures determined by using DSC, polarized optical microscope (POM), and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD). The self-consistent calculation displays isotropic (I), nematic (N), hexagonal columnar (Colh), N + I, and Colh + I, and Colh + N coexistence regions. These phase regions has been confirmed by thermal quenching various compositions from the isotropic melt to different phase regions. Guided by the established phase diagram of HPTP/RM257 mixtures, photo-polymerization of the mixture has been carried out in different phase regions. The as-cured HPTP/p-(RM257) composites fabricated at isotropic phase (130 °C) remains single isotropic phase under optical microscope, whereas the SEM and TEM results show the bead-like microstructure with sub-micrometer scale. Polymerization-induced mesophase transition experiments have been carried out at isotropic temperatures slightly above the clearing point of the mixtures. Of particular interest is the development of liquid crystalline spherulites. Moreover, the fixation of the morphology is observed when the photopolymerization is carried out in the N, N + I, and N + Colh region. A generalized thermodynamic model for describing smectic A and smectic B ordering has been developed based on Chandrasekhar-Clark and Maier-Saupe-McMillan theories by introducing hexagonal and layered order parameters. By combining the proposed model with Flory-Huggings theory, the total free energy for induced smectic phase in binary nematic liquid crystal mixtures has been obtained. The calculated phase diagram has been tested with the induced smectic B phase diagram of binary nematic liquid crystal mixtures of 4'-n-pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl (5CB)/4'-methoxy-benzylidene-4-butylaniline (MBBA) and the induced smectic A phase diagram of 4-cyano-4'-pentyloxy biphenyl (5OCB) and 4-pentylphenyl-4'-heptyloxybenzoate (7O5) mixtures. Our calculation results show the remarkable agreement with the experimental data in the reported literature.

  12. Swarms, phase transitions, and collective intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Millonas, M.M. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-01

    A model of the collective behavior of a large number of locally acting organisms is proposed. The model is intended to be realistic, but turns out to fit naturally into the category of connectionist models, Like all connectionist models, its properties can be divided into the categories of structure, dynamics, and learning. The space in which the organisms move is discretized, and is modeled by a lattice of nodes, or cells. Each cell hag a specified volume, and is connected to other cells in the space in a definite way. Organisms move probabilistically between local cells in this space, but with weights dependent on local morphogenic substances, or morphogens. The morphogens are in turn are effected by the passage of an organism. The evolution of the morphogens, and the corresponding constitutes of the organisms constitutes the collective behavior of the group. The generic properties of such systems are analyzed, and a number of results are obtained. The model has various types of phase transitions and self-organizing properties controlled both by the level of the noise, and other parameters. It is hoped that the present mode; might serve as a paradigmatic example of a complex cooperative system in nature. In particular this model can be used to explore the relation of phase transitions to at least three important issues encountered in artificial life. Firstly, that of emergence as complex adaptive behavior. Secondly, as an exploration of second order phase transitions in biological systems. Lastly, to derive behavioral criteria for the evolution of collective behavior in social organisms. The model is then applied to the specific case of ants moving on a lattice. The local behavior of the ants is inspired by the actual behavior observed in the laboratory, and analytic results for the collective behavior are compared to the corresponding laboratory results. Monte carlo simulations are used as illustrations.

  13. Swarms, phase transitions, and collective intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Millonas, M.M.

    1992-12-31

    A model of the collective behavior of a large number of locally acting organisms is proposed. The model is intended to be realistic, but turns out to fit naturally into the category of connectionist models, Like all connectionist models, its properties can be divided into the categories of structure, dynamics, and learning. The space in which the organisms move is discretized, and is modeled by a lattice of nodes, or cells. Each cell hag a specified volume, and is connected to other cells in the space in a definite way. Organisms move probabilistically between local cells in this space, but with weights dependent on local morphogenic substances, or morphogens. The morphogens are in turn are effected by the passage of an organism. The evolution of the morphogens, and the corresponding constitutes of the organisms constitutes the collective behavior of the group. The generic properties of such systems are analyzed, and a number of results are obtained. The model has various types of phase transitions and self-organizing properties controlled both by the level of the noise, and other parameters. It is hoped that the present mode; might serve as a paradigmatic example of a complex cooperative system in nature. In particular this model can be used to explore the relation of phase transitions to at least three important issues encountered in artificial life. Firstly, that of emergence as complex adaptive behavior. Secondly, as an exploration of second order phase transitions in biological systems. Lastly, to derive behavioral criteria for the evolution of collective behavior in social organisms. The model is then applied to the specific case of ants moving on a lattice. The local behavior of the ants is inspired by the actual behavior observed in the laboratory, and analytic results for the collective behavior are compared to the corresponding laboratory results. Monte carlo simulations are used as illustrations.

  14. Phases and phase transitions in the algebraic microscopic shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, A. I.; Drumev, K. P.

    2016-01-01

    We explore the dynamical symmetries of the shell model number conserving algebra, which define three types of pairing and quadrupole phases, with the aim to obtain the prevailing phase or phase transition for the real nuclear systems in a single shell. This is achieved by establishing a correspondence between each of the pairing bases with the Elliott's SU(3) basis that describes collective rotation of nuclear systems. This allows for a complete classification of the basis states of different number of particles in all the limiting cases. The probability distribution of the SU(3) basis states within theirs corresponding pairing states is also obtained. The relative strengths of dynamically symmetric quadrupole-quadrupole interaction in respect to the isoscalar, isovector and total pairing interactions define a control parameter, which estimates the importance of each term of the Hamiltonian in the correct reproduction of the experimental data for the considered nuclei.

  15. Phase Transitions and Domain Structures in Nanoferroelectrics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levanyuk, Arkadi

    2006-03-01

    A review of the Landau-type theory of size effects in ferroelectric phase transitions will be presented. An aspect of this theory, a question about the ``critical thickness'' of ferroelectric thin films will be the main emphasis. This question can be reduced to that of the size dependence of temperature of ferroelectric phase transition by taking into account two possibilities for such a transition: formation of (i) single- or (ii) multi-domain ferroelectric state. In a defect-free sample, two factors would define which of these possibilities is realized: the depolarizing field and the specific features of the sample surface reflected in the boundary conditions for the Landau-type equations in addition to the conventional electrodynamics boundary conditions. The possibility of the transition into the single domain state strongly depends on a character of electrodes and the additional boundary conditions, while it is much less important for the multi-domain case. In realistic conditions, the transition would proceed into the multi-domain state, especially in near cubic ferroelectrics, e.g. films of cubic perovskites with an elastic mismatch between the film and a substrate. Importantly, the shift of a transition temperature with respect to a bulk is relatively small in this case. The message is that, while studying the question about the ``critical thickness'', multi-domain states rather than single domain ones should be considered first of all, contrary to the approach in some recent papers where only monodomain state was studied.. In particular, there is no definite indication of ultimate ``critical thickness'' for a multi domain ferroelectric state in nearly cubic samples. Along with ultra thin films the ferroelectric nanopowders are also intensively studied now. Here the size effects are more complicated because of long-range interaction between the particles. The problems which the theory faces here are briefly commented upon. It is worth mentioning that several important results in the theory of the size effects have been obtained long ago but, unfortunately, seem not to be well known by the ferroelectrics community. They will be exposed together with more recent results obtained in collaboration with A.Bratkovsky at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, Palo Alto.

  16. Simple theory of transitions between smectic, nematic, and isotropic phases.

    PubMed

    Emelyanenko, A V; Khokhlov, A R

    2015-05-28

    The transitions between smectic, nematic, and isotropic phases are investigated in the framework of a unified molecular-statistical approach. The new translational order parameter is different from the one introduced in K. Kobayashi [Phys. Lett. A 31, 125 (1970)] and W. L. McMillan [Phys. Rev. A 4, 1238 (1971)]. The variance of the square sine of intermolecular shift angle along the director is introduced to take self-consistently into account the most probable location of the molecules with respect to each other, which is unique for every liquid crystal (LC) material and is mainly responsible for the order parameters and phase sequences. The mean molecular field was treated in terms of only two parameters specific to any intermolecular potential of elongated molecules: (1) its global minimum position with respect to the shift of two interacting molecules along the director and (2) its inhomogeneity/anisotropy ratio. A simple molecular model is also introduced, where the global minimum position is determined by the linking groups elongation Δ/d, while the inhomogeneity/anisotropy ratio Gβ/Gγ is determined by the ratio of electrostatic and dispersion contributions. All possible phase sequences, including abrupt/continuous transformation between the smectic and nematic states and the direct smectic-isotropic phase transition, are predicted. The theoretical prediction is in a good agreement with experimental data for some simple materials correlating with our molecular model, but it is expected to be valid for any LC material. PMID:26026463

  17. Chiral liquid crystals: the vestigial chiral phases of T, O, I matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissinen, Jaakko; Liu, Ke; Slager, Robert-Jan; Wu, Kai; Zaanen, Jan

    We show how chiral order develops in vestigial isotropic phases of T , O and I liquid crystalline systems in three dimensions. The liquid crystal phases are realized in a lattice model of orientational degrees of freedom with point group symmetries G ⊂ O (3) , represented as O (3) -rotors coupled to G gauge fields. The model incorporates also disclinations via the gauge fields, features an ordered nematic phase with unbroken G rotations at low temperatures and a high temperature isotropic liquid phase. We observe an intermediate phase with spontaneous chirality but isotropic SO (3) symmetry (a liquid) for the gauge groups T, O, and I, the proper symmetry groups of the tetrahedron, cube and icosahedron, respectively. For the other subgroups of SO (3) , Cn <= ∞ and Dn <= ∞, there is generically only a single phase transition from the nematic phase to the isotropic liquid. We discuss the nature of the phase transitions and conditions under which the chiral phase is stabilized by the nematic order parameter fluctuations. The nature of the vestigial chiral phase is reminiscent of the so-called Ising nematic phase in iron based superconductors. Research supported by the Netherlands foundation for Fundamental Research of Matter (FOM).

  18. Is ``metamictization`` of zircon a phase transition?

    SciTech Connect

    Salje, E.K.H.; Chrosch, J.; Ewing, R.C.

    1999-07-01

    Metamictization is the transition from the crystalline to an aperiodic or amorphous state due to alpha-decay event damage from constituent radionuclides ({sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 232}Th) and their daughters. However, this transformation in minerals is part of a larger class of radiation-induced transformations to the amorphous state that has received considerable recent attention as a result of ion- and electron-beam experiments on metals, intermetallics, simple oxides, and complex ceramics and minerals. Diffuse X-ray scattering from single crystals of metamict zircon reveals residual crystallinity even at high fluences (up to 7.2 {times} 10{sup 18} {alpha}-decay events/g). The experimental evidence does not suggest that radiation-induced amorphization is a phase transition. The observations are in good agreement with a nonconvergent, heterogeneous model of amorphization in which damage production is a random process of cascade formation and overlap at increasing fluence. Instead of an amorphization transition, the existence of a percolation transition is postulated. At the level of radiation damage near the percolation point, the heterogeneous strain broadening of X-ray diffraction profiles is reduced whereas the particle-size broadening increases. Simultaneously, the macroscopic swelling of the zircon becomes larger than the maximum expansion of the unit-cell parameters. A suitable empirical parameter that characterizes this transition is the flux, D{sub s}, at which the macroscopic expansion is identical to the maximum expansion of the crystallographic unit cell. In zircon, D{sub s} = 3.5{center_dot}10{sup 18} {alpha}-decay events/g.

  19. Scaling analysis of gas-liquid two-phase flow pattern in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jinho

    1993-01-01

    A scaling analysis of gas-liquid two-phase flow pattern in microgravity, based on the dominant physical mechanism, was carried out with the goal of predicting the gas-liquid two-phase flow regime in a pipe under conditions of microgravity. The results demonstrated the effect of inlet geometry on the flow regime transition. A comparison of the predictions with existing experimental data showed good agreement.

  20. Hysteresis and Kinetic Effects During Liquid-Solid Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Streitz, F H; Chau, R

    2009-02-17

    We address the fundamental issue of phase transition kinetics in dynamically compressed materials. Focusing on solid bismuth (Bi) as a prototype material, we used a variety of time-resolved experiments including electrical conductivity and velocimetry to study the phase transition kinetics of the solid-solid phase transitions. Simple single shock experiments performed on several low-lying high pressure phases of Bi, revealed surprisingly complex behavior and slow dynamics. Strong hysteresis effects were observed in the transition behavior in experiments where the compressed Bi was allowed to release back across a phase line. These experiments represent the first reported simultaneous use of resistivity and velocimetry in a shock compression experiment, and the first observation of hysteresis effects occurring during dynamic compression and release.

  1. Bound entanglement in quantum phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Baghbanzadeh, S.; Alipour, S.; Rezakhani, A. T.

    2010-04-15

    We investigate quantum phase transitions in which a change in the type of entanglement from bound entanglement to either free entanglement or separability may occur. In particular, we present a theoretical method to construct a class of quantum spin-chain Hamiltonians that exhibit this type of quantum criticality. Given parameter-dependent two-site reduced density matrices (with prescribed entanglement properties), we lay out a reverse construction for a compatible pure state for the whole system, as well as a class of Hamiltonians for which this pure state is a ground state. This construction is illustrated through several examples.

  2. Quantum phase transition in a multilevel dot.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, Walter; Schoeller, Herbert

    2002-01-01

    We discuss electronic transport through a lateral quantum dot close to the singlet-triplet degeneracy in the case of a single conduction channel per lead. By applying the numerical renormalization group, we obtain rigorous results for the linear conductance and the density of states. A new quantum phase transition of the Kosterlitz-Thouless-type is found, with an exponentially small energy scale T(*) close to the degeneracy point. Below T(*), the conductance is strongly suppressed, corresponding to a universal dip in the density of states. This explains recent transport measurements. PMID:11800978

  3. Dependence of phase transitions on small changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoop, R.

    1993-06-01

    In this contribution, the generalized thermodynamic formalism is applied to a nonhyperbolic dynamical system in two comparable situations. The change from one situation to the other is small in the sense that the grammar and the singularities of the system are preserved. For the discussion of the effects generated by this change, the generalized entropy functions are calculated and the sets of the specific scaling functions which reflect the phase transition of the system are investigated. It is found that even under mild variations, this set is not invariant.

  4. Polymerization transition in liquid AsS under pressure: An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmura, Satoshi; Shimojo, Fuyuki

    2011-12-01

    We study the pressure dependence of the structural and electronic properties of liquid AsS by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We confirm that liquid AsS consists of As4S4 molecules at ambient pressure, as in the crystalline state. With increasing pressure, a structural transition from molecular to polymeric liquid occurs near 2 GPa, which is eventually followed by metallization. The pressure dependence of the density and diffusion coefficients changes qualitatively with this transition. We find that, during metallization in the polymeric phase at higher pressures, the remnants of covalent interactions between atoms play an important role in the dynamics, i.e., the As-S bond length becomes longer with increasing pressure and the diffusion coefficients have a local maximum near 5 GPa. When the pressure approaches about 15 GPa, the covalent nature of the liquid becomes quite weak. These results explain recent experiments on the pressure dependence of the viscosity.

  5. Improved model for the transit entropy of monatomic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Duane C.; Chisolm, Eric D.; Bock, Nicolas

    2009-05-01

    In the original formulation of vibration-transit (V-T) theory for monatomic liquid dynamics, the transit contribution to entropy was taken to be a universal constant, calibrated to the constant-volume entropy of melting. This model suffers two deficiencies: (a) it does not account for experimental entropy differences of ±2% among elemental liquids and (b) it implies a value of zero for the transit contribution to internal energy. The purpose of this paper is to correct these deficiencies. To this end, the V-T equation for entropy is fitted to an overall accuracy of ±0.1% to the available experimental high-temperature entropy data for elemental liquids. The theory contains two nuclear motion contributions: (a) the dominant vibrational contribution Svib(T/θ0) , where T is temperature and θ0 is the vibrational characteristic temperature, and (b) the transit contribution Str(T/θtr) , where θtr is a scaling temperature for each liquid. The appearance of a common functional form of Str for all the liquids studied is a property of the experimental data, when analyzed via the V-T formula. The resulting Str implies the correct transit contribution to internal energy. The theoretical entropy of melting is derived in a single formula applying to normal and anomalous melting alike. An ab initio calculation of θ0 , based on density-functional theory, is reported for liquid Na and Cu. Comparison of these calculations with the above analysis of experimental entropy data provides verification of V-T theory. In view of the present results, techniques currently being applied in ab initio simulations of liquid properties can be employed to advantage in the further testing and development of V-T theory.

  6. Vortex liquid phase in Pb-8.23wt.%In alloy films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukami, T.; Mizuseki, K.; Kishikawa, Y.; Ichikawa, F.; Arai, T.; Yamasaki, T.; Sinozaki, B.; Aomine, T.

    2003-05-01

    Isothermal current-voltage (J-E) characteristics in the mixed state for Pb-8.23wt.%In alloys are measured. The isothermal logJ vs. logE characteristics show the similar behaviors to those observed in the vortex glass-vortex liquid (VG-VL) transition in high Tc oxide superconductors. It is found that the VG-VL phase transition exists. The transition temperature, the static and dynamical critical exponents are determined.

  7. Wide Angle Liquid Crystal Optical Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xing-Hua; Wang, Bin; Bos, Philip J.; Anderson, James E.; Pouch, John J.; Miranda, Felix A.; McManamon, Paul F.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate modeling of a high resolution, liquid crystal (LC) based, optical phased array (OPA) is shown. The simulation shows excellent agreement with a test 2-D LC OPA. The modeling method is extendable to cases where the array element size is close to the wavelength of light. The fringing fields of such a device are first studied, and subsequently reduced. This results in a device that demonstrates plus or minus 7.4 degrees of continuous beam steering at a wavelength of 1550 nm, and a diffraction efficiency (DE) higher than 72%.

  8. Phase transitions in fluids and biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipos, Maksim

    In this thesis, I consider systems from two seemingly different fields: fluid dynamics and microbial ecology. In these systems, the unifying features are the existences of global non-equilibrium steady states. I consider generic and statistical models for transitions between these global states, and I relate the model results with experimental data. A theme of this thesis is that these rather simple, minimal models are able to capture a lot of functional detail about complex dynamical systems. In Part I, I consider the transition between laminar and turbulent flow. I find that quantitative and qualitative features of pipe flow experiments, the superexponential lifetime and the splitting of turbulent puffs, and the growth rate of turbulent slugs, can all be explained by a coarse-grained, phenomenological model in the directed percolation universality class. To relate this critical phenomena approach closer to the fluid dynamics, I consider the transition to turbulence in the Burgers equation, a simplified model for Navier-Stokes equations. Via a transformation to a model of directed polymers in a random medium, I find that the transition to Burgers turbulence may also be in the directed percolation universality class. This evidence implies that the turbulent-to-laminar transition is statistical in nature and does not depend on details of the Navier-Stokes equations describing the fluid flow. In Part II, I consider the disparate subject of microbial ecology where the complex interactions within microbial ecosystems produce observable patterns in microbe abundance, diversity and genotype. In order to be able to study these patterns, I develop a bioinformatics pipeline to multiply align and quickly cluster large microbial metagenomics datasets. I also develop a novel metric that quantifies the degree of interactions underlying the assembly of a microbial ecosystem, particularly the transition between neutral (random) and niche (deterministic) assembly. I apply this metric to 16S rRNA metagenomic studies of 6 vertebrate gastrointestinal microbiomes and find that they assembled through a highly non-neutral process. I then consider a phase transition that may occur in nutrient-poor environments such as ocean surface waters. In these systems, I find that the experimentally observed genome streamlining, specialization and opportunism may well be generic statistical phenomena.

  9. Study of cerium phase transitions in shock wave experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhernokletov, M. V. Kovalev, A. E.; Komissarov, V. V.; Novikov, M. G.; Zocher, M. A. Cherne, F. J.

    2011-02-15

    Cerium has a complex phase diagram that is explained by the presence of structural phase transitions. Experiments to measure the sound velocities in cerium by two methods were carried out to determine the onset of cerium melting on the Hugoniot. In the pressure range 4-37 GPa, the sound velocity in cerium samples was measured by the counter release method using manganin-based piezoresistive gauges. In the pressure range 35-140 GPa, the sound velocity in cerium was measured by the overtaking release method using carbogal and tetrachloromethane indicator liquids. The samples were loaded with plane shock wave generators using powerful explosive charges. The onset of cerium melting on the Hugoniot at a pressure of about 13 GPa has been ascertained from the measured elastic longitudinal and bulk sound velocities.

  10. Phase transitions and size scaling of membrane-less organelles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The coordinated growth of cells and their organelles is a fundamental and poorly understood problem, with implications for processes ranging from embryonic development to oncogenesis. Recent experiments have shed light on the cell sizedependent assembly of membrane-less cytoplasmic and nucleoplasmic structures, including ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granules and other intracellular bodies. Many of these structures behave as condensed liquid-like phases of the cytoplasm/nucleoplasm. The phase transitions that appear to govern their assembly exhibit an intrinsic dependence on cell size, and may explain the size scaling reported for a number of structures. This size scaling could, in turn, play a role in cell growth and size control. PMID:24368804

  11. Laser Induced Configurational Transitions in Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Gongjian; Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    1997-03-01

    We have investigated the orientational instablites of dye-doped nematic liquid crystals, where a temperature gradient induces director reorientation. The temperature field is produced by focusing a He-Ne laser onto a dye-doped homeotropically aligned cell. The reorientation results from the coupling of the flexo-electric polarization and the DC electric field induced by the order-electric effect. Model predictions are compared with experimental results. The calculated threshold intensity for director reorientation is in good agreement with the experimentally observed value. In the presence of circularly polarized light, spiral patterns are observed in the far field. These are in good agreement with simulations.

  12. Phase diagrams of mixtures of a polymer and a cholesteric liquid crystal under an external field

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, Akihiko

    2014-11-14

    We present a mean field theory to describe phase behaviors in mixtures of a polymer and a cholesteric liquid crystal under an external magnetic or electric field. Taking into account a chiral coupling between a polymer and a liquid crystal under the external field, we examine twist-untwist phase transitions and phase separations in the mixtures. It is found that a cholesteric-nematic phase transition can be induced by not only the external field but also concentration and temperature. Depending on the strength of the external field, we predict cholesteric-paranematic (Ch+pN), nematic-paranematic (N+pN), cholesteric-nematic (Ch+N) phase separations, etc., on the temperature-concentration plane. We also discuss mixtures of a non-chiral nematic liquid crystal and a chiral dopant.

  13. Phase transitions and doping in semiconductor nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Ayaskanta

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals are a promising technological material because their size-dependent optical and electronic properties can be exploited for a diverse range of applications such as light-emitting diodes, bio-labels, transistors, and solar cells. For many of these applications, electrical current needs to be transported through the devices. However, while their solution processability makes these colloidal nanocrystals attractive candidates for device applications, the bulky surfactants that render these nanocrystals dispersible in common solvents block electrical current. Thus, in order to realize the full potential of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals in the next-generation of solid-state devices, methods must be devised to make conductive films from these nanocrystals. One way to achieve this would be to add minute amounts of foreign impurity atoms (dopants) to increase their conductivity. Electronic doping in nanocrystals is still very much in its infancy with limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms that govern the doping process. This thesis introduces an innovative synthesis of doped nanocrystals and aims at expanding the fundamental understanding of charge transport in these doped nanocrystal films. The list of semiconductor nanocrystals that can be doped is large, and if one combines that with available dopants, an even larger set of materials with interesting properties and applications can be generated. In addition to doping, another promising route to increase conductivity in nanocrystal films is to use nanocrystals with high ionic conductivities. This thesis also examines this possibility by studying new phases of mixed ionic and electronic conductors at the nanoscale. Such a versatile approach may open new pathways for interesting fundamental research, and also lay the foundation for the creation of novel materials with important applications. In addition to their size-dependence, the intentional incorporation of impurities (or doping) allows further control over the electrical and optical properties of nanocrystals. However, while impurity doping in bulk semiconductors is now routine, doping of nanocrystals remains challenging. In particular, evidence for electronic doping, in which additional electrical carriers are introduced into the nanocrystals, has been very limited. Here, we adopt a new approach to electronic doping of nanocrystals. We utilize a partial cation exchange to introduce silver impurities into cadmium selenide (CdSe) and lead selenide (PbSe) nanocrystals. Results indicate that the silver-doped CdSe nanocrystals show a significant increase in fluorescence intensity, as compared to pure CdSe nanocrystals. We also observe a switching from n- to p-type doping in the silver-doped CdSe nanocrystals with increased silver amounts. Moreover, the silver-doping results in a change in the conductance of both PbSe and CdSe nanocrystals and the magnitude of this change depends on the amount of silver incorporated into the nanocrystals. In the bulk, silver chalcogenides (Ag2E, E=S, Se, and Te) possess a wide array of intriguing properties, including superionic conductivity. In addition, they undergo a reversible temperature-dependent phase transition which induces significant changes in their electronic and ionic properties. While most of these properties have been examined extensively in bulk, very few studies have been conducted at the nanoscale. We have recently developed a versatile synthesis that yields colloidal silver chalcogenide nanocrystals. Here, we study the size dependence of their phase-transition temperatures. We utilize differential scanning calorimetry and in-situ X-ray diffraction analyses to observe the phase transition in nanocrystal assemblies. We observe a significant deviation from the bulk alpha (low-temperature) to beta (high-temperature) phase-transition temperature when we reduce their size to a few nanometers. Hence, these nanocrystals provide great potential for devices to utilize the properties of both phases at a significantly lower temperature than that of the corresponding bulk material. Moreover, a wide range of properties of both phases that meet specific requirements can be obtained simply by tuning the crystal size.

  14. Phase transitions of monolayers on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Joshua; Dzyubenko, Boris; Vilches, Oscar; Cobden, David

    We have studied physisorbed layers of monatomic and diatomic gases on graphene. We used devices in which few-layer graphene, ranging from monolayer to trilayer, is suspended across a trench between two platinum contacts and are cleaned by thermal and current annealing. We found that the density of adsorbates is revealed by the conductance, similar to the case with nanotubes. The conductance change for a monolayer can be large. On trilayer graphene the adsorbed gases can be seen to exhibit transitions between two-dimensional phases identical to those on bulk graphite, including incommensurate and commensurate solid, fluid and vapor and multiple layers. New features appear in the conductance at the boundaries of the commensurate phase of Kr. We are able to measure single-particle binding energies very accurately and see how it depends on thickness; investigate the effects of changing disorder by gradually current annealing; and search for new phases in the case of monolayer graphene where atoms adsorbed on both sides can interact. We can map out the 2d phase diagrams very quickly by ohmic heating, which gives nearly instantaneous control of the temperature.

  15. Gravitational waves from the electroweak phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Leitao, Leonardo; Mégevand, Ariel; Sánchez, Alejandro D. E-mail: megevand@mdp.edu.ar

    2012-10-01

    We study the generation of gravitational waves in the electroweak phase transition. We consider a few extensions of the Standard Model, namely, the addition of scalar singlets, the minimal supersymmetric extension, and the addition of TeV fermions. For each model we consider the complete dynamics of the phase transition. In particular, we estimate the friction force acting on bubble walls, and we take into account the fact that they can propagate either as detonations or as deflagrations preceded by shock fronts, or they can run away. We compute the peak frequency and peak intensity of the gravitational radiation generated by bubble collisions and turbulence. We discuss the detectability by proposed spaceborne detectors. For the models we considered, runaway walls require significant fine tuning of the parameters, and the gravitational wave signal from bubble collisions is generally much weaker than that from turbulence. Although the predicted signal is in most cases rather low for the sensitivity of LISA, models with strongly coupled extra scalars reach this sensitivity for frequencies f ∼ 10{sup −4} Hz, and give intensities as high as h{sup 2}Ω{sub GW} ∼ 10{sup −8}.

  16. Phase field modeling of liquid metal embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spatschek, Robert; Wang, Nan; Karma, Alain

    2008-03-01

    Liquid metal embrittlement (LME) is a phenomenon whereby a liquid metal in contact with another, higher-melting-point polycrystalline metal, rapidly penetrates from the surface along grain boundaries. This phenomenon is known to be greatly accelerated by the application of tensile stress, resulting in the rapid propagation of intergranular cracks in normally ductile materials. Although this phenomenon has been known for a long time, it still lacks a convincing physical explanation. In particular, the relationship of LME to conventional fracture mechanics remains unclear. We investigate LME using a phenomenological three-order-parameter phase field model that describes both the short scale physics of crystal decohesion and macroscopic linear elasticity. The model reproduces expected macroscopic properties for well separated crack surfaces and additionally introduces short scale modifications for liquid layer thicknesses in the nanometric range, which depend on the interfacial and grain boundary energy as well as elastic effects. The results shed light on the relative importance of capillary phenomena and stress in the kinetics of LME.

  17. Electrostatic levitation studies of supercooled liquids and metastable solid phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustan, Gustav Errol

    A new laboratory has been developed at Iowa State University (ISU) to be used for the study of high temperature liquids and solids, with particular focus on the supercooling of liquids and their metastable solidification products. This new laboratory employs the electrostatic levitation (ESL) technique, in which a charged sample is suspended between a set of electrodes to achieve non-contact handling. Owing to the elimination of a crucible, high temperature processing of samples can be achieved with reduced levels of contamination and heterogeneous nucleation. Because of the reduction in heterogeneous nucleation, samples can be supercooled well below their equilibrium melting temperature, opening the door to a wide range of measurements on supercooled liquids. Measurements methods have been implemented for the characterization of thermophysical properties such as: volume/density, ratio of specific heat to total hemispherical emissivity, surface tension, viscosity, electrical resistivity, and magnetic susceptibility. For measurements of electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility, a new method has been developed at ISU based on the tunnel diode oscillator (TDO) technique. The TDO technique uses the negative differential resistance of a tunnel diode to drive an LC tank circuit into self-sustained oscillation at the resonant LC frequency. The LC tank is inductively coupled to the samples under study, and changes in the electrical resistivity or magnetic susceptibility of the sample are manifested as changes in the resonant frequency. By measuring the frequency shifts of the TDO, insights can be made into changes in the material's electrical and magnetic properties. This method has been validated by performing resistivity measurements on a sample of high purity Zr, and by performing measurements on the ferromagnetic transition in a low-carbon steel ball bearing. In addition to the development of the laboratory and its supporting instrumentation, an effort has been carried out to study the metastable phase formation in an Fe83B17 near eutectic alloy. Initial supercooling measurements using the ISU-ESL identified the formation of three metastable phases: a precipitate phase that shows stable coexistence with the deeply supercooled liquid, and two distinct bulk solidification phases. To identify the structure of the metastable phases, the Washington University Beamline ESL (WU-BESL) has been used to perform in-situ high energy x-ray diffraction measurements of the metastable phases. Based on the x-ray results, the precipitate phase has been identified as bcc-Fe, and the more commonly occurring bulk solidification product has been found to be a two-phase mixture of Fe23B6 plus fcc-Fe, which appears, upon cooling, to transform into a three phase mixture of Fe23B6, bcc-Fe, and an as-yet unidentified phase, with the transformation occurring at approximately the expected fcc-to-bcc transformation temperature of pure Fe. To further characterize the multi-phase metastable alloy, the ISU-ESL has been used to perform measurements of volume thermal expansion via the videographic technique, as well as RF susceptibility via the TDO technique. The results of the thermal expansion and susceptibility data have been found to be sensitive indicators of additional structural changes that may be occurring in the metastable solid at temperatures below 1000 K, and the susceptibility data has revealed that three distinct ferromagnetic phase transitions take place within the multi-phase mixture. Based on these results, it has been hypothesized that there may be an additional transformation taking place that leads to the formation of either bct- or o-Fe3B in addition to the Fe23B6 phase, although further work is required to test this hypothesis.

  18. Does sex induce a phase transition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, P. M. C.; Moss de Oliveira, S.; Stauffer, D.; Cebrat, S.; Pękalski, A.

    2008-05-01

    We discovered a dynamic phase transition induced by sexual reproduction. The dynamics is a pure Darwinian rule applied to diploid bit-strings with both fundamental ingredients to drive Darwin's evolution: (1) random mutations and crossings which act in the sense of increasing the entropy (or diversity); and (2) selection which acts in the opposite sense by limiting the entropy explosion. Selection wins this competition if mutations performed at birth are few enough, and thus the wild genotype dominates the steady-state population. By slowly increasing the average number m of mutations, however, the population suddenly undergoes a mutational degradation precisely at a transition point mc. Above this point, the “bad” alleles (represented by 1-bits) spread over the genetic pool of the population, overcoming the selection pressure. Individuals become selectively alike, and evolution stops. Only below this point, m < mc, evolutionary life is possible. The finite-size-scaling behaviour of this transition is exhibited for large enough “chromosome” lengths L, through lengthy computer simulations. One important and surprising observation is the L-independence of the transition curves, for large L. They are also independent on the population size. Another is that mc is near unity, i.e. life cannot be stable with much more than one mutation per diploid genome, independent of the chromosome length, in agreement with reality. One possible consequence is that an eventual evolutionary jump towards larger L enabling the storage of more genetic information would demand an improved DNA copying machinery in order to keep the same total number of mutations per offspring.

  19. An improved model for the transit entropy of monatomic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Duane C; Chisolm, Eric D; Bock, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    In the original formulation of V-T theory for monatomic liquid dynamics, the transit contribution to entropy was taken to be a universal constant, calibrated to the constant-volume entropy of melting. This model suffers two deficiencies: (a) it does not account for experimental entropy differences of {+-}2% among elemental liquids, and (b) it implies a value of zero for the transit contribution to internal energy. The purpose of this paper is to correct these deficiencies. To this end, the V-T equation for entropy is fitted to an overall accuracy of {+-}0.1% to the available experimental high temperature entropy data for elemental liquids. The theory contains two nuclear motion contributions: (a) the dominant vibrational contribution S{sub vib}(T/{theta}{sub 0}), where T is temperature and {theta}{sub 0} is the vibrational characteristic temperature, and (b) the transit contribution S{sub tr}(T/{theta}{sub tr}), where {theta}{sub tr} is a scaling temperature for each liquid. The appearance of a common functional form of S{sub tr} for all the liquids studied is a property of the experimental data, when analyzed via the V-T formula. The resulting S{sub tr} implies the correct transit contribution to internal energy. The theoretical entropy of melting is derived, in a single formula applying to normal and anomalous melting alike. An ab initio calculation of {theta}{sub 0}, based on density functional theory, is reported for liquid Na and Cu. Comparison of these calculations with the above analysis of experimental entropy data provides verification of V-T theory. In view of the present results, techniques currently being applied in ab initio simulations of liquid properties can be employed to advantage in the further testing and development of V-T theory.

  20. The deconfining phase transition in SU( N c) gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucini, B.; Teper, M.; Wenger, U.

    2003-05-01

    We report on our ongoing investigation of the deconfining phase transition in SU(4) and SU(6) gauge theories. We calculate the critical couplings while taking care to avoid the influence of a nearby bulk phase transition. We determine the latent heat of the phase transition and investigate the order and the strength of the transition at large N c. We also report on our determination of the critical temperature expressed in units of the string tension in the large N c limit.

  1. The nematic phases of bent-core liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Helen F; Kaur, Sarabjot; Görtz, Verena; Belaissaoui, Abdel; Cowling, Stephen; Goodby, John W

    2014-05-19

    Over the last ten years, the nematic phases of liquid crystals formed from bent-core structures have provoked considerable research because of their remarkable properties. This Minireview summarises some recent measurements of the physical properties of these systems, as well as describing some new data. We concentrate on oxadiazole-based materials as exemplars of this class of nematogens, but also describe some other bent-core systems. The influence of molecular structure on the stability of the nematic phase is described, together with progress in reducing the nematic transition temperatures by modifications to the molecular structure. The physical properties of bent-core nematic materials have proven difficult to study, but patterns are emerging regarding their optical and dielectric properties. Recent breakthroughs in understanding the elastic and flexoelectric behaviour are summarised. Finally, some exemplars of unusual electric field behaviour are described. PMID:24700653

  2. The Nematic Phases of Bent-Core Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Gleeson, Helen F; Kaur, Sarabjot; Görtz, Verena; Belaissaoui, Abdel; Cowling, Stephen; Goodby, John W

    2014-01-01

    Over the last ten years, the nematic phases of liquid crystals formed from bent-core structures have provoked considerable research because of their remarkable properties. This Minireview summarises some recent measurements of the physical properties of these systems, as well as describing some new data. We concentrate on oxadiazole-based materials as exemplars of this class of nematogens, but also describe some other bent-core systems. The influence of molecular structure on the stability of the nematic phase is described, together with progress in reducing the nematic transition temperatures by modifications to the molecular structure. The physical properties of bent-core nematic materials have proven difficult to study, but patterns are emerging regarding their optical and dielectric properties. Recent breakthroughs in understanding the elastic and flexoelectric behaviour are summarised. Finally, some exemplars of unusual electric field behaviour are described. PMID:24700653

  3. Liquid Crystal Phases Lacking Point Group Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattham, Nattaporn; Shao, Renfan; Maclennan, Joseph E.; Clark, Noel A.; Korblova, Eva; Walba, David M.

    2001-03-01

    In his 1974 monographs deGennes describes the smectic CG (SmC_G, G for general), a phase of two-dimensional fluid layers having rod-shaped molecules tilted with respect to the layer normal and ordered such that the principal axes of the optical dielectric tensor generally lie neither along the layer normal nor in the plane of the layer. Such layers are polar, with macroscopic polarization P oriented arbitrarily in the diagonal frame, and thus are not symmetric under any rotation or reflection or nontrivial combination thereof, i.e., belong to the class C1 in the Schoenfliess notation. Furthermore, since they lack mirror symmetry, they are chiral. Although deGennes was not optimistic about the prospect for finding such a phase, it appears once again, if a liquid crystal phase can be described, it can be found. Here we report the observation of C1 layers in a fluid smectic phase of bent core molecules. It is evident from freely suspended films that this molecular layer structure exhibits two spontaneous symmetry-breaking instabilities: polar molecular orientational ordering about the layer normal and molecular tilt. These combine to form a chiral layer structure with a handedness depending on the sign of tilt. This work is supported by NASA Grant NAG3-2457.

  4. Weyl semimetals and topological phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Shuichi

    Weyl semimetals are semimetals with nondegenerate 3D Dirac cones in the bulk. We showed that in a transition between different Z2 topological phases, i.e. between the normal insulator (NI) and topological insulator (TI), the Weyl semimetal phase necessarily appears when inversion symmetry is broken. In the presentation we show that this scenario holds for materials with any space groups without inversion symmetry. Namely, let us take any band insulator without inversion symmetry, and assume that the gap is closed by a change of an external parameter. In such cases we found that the system runs either into (i) a Weyl semimetal or (ii) a nodal-line semimetal, but no insulator-to-insulator transition happens. This is confirmed by classifying the gap closing in terms of the space groups and the wavevector. In the case (i), the number of Weyl nodes produced at the gap closing ranges from 2 to 12 depending on the symmetry. In (ii) the nodal line is protected by mirror symmetry. In the presentation, we explain some Weyl semimetal and nodal-line semimetals which we find by using this classification. As an example, we explain our result on ab initio calculation on tellurium (Te). Tellurium consists of helical chains, and therefore lacks inversion and mirror symmetries. At high pressure the band gap of Te decreases and finally it runs into a Weyl semimetal phase, as confirmed by our ab initio calculation. In such chiral systems as tellurium, we also theoretically propose chiral transport in systems with such helical structures; namely, an orbital magnetization is induced by a current along the chiral axis, in analogy with a solenoid.

  5. Polarons and Mobile Impurities Near a Quantum Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadkhoo, Shahriar

    This dissertation aims at improving the current understanding of the physics of mobile impurities in highly correlated liquid-like phases of matter. Impurity problems pose challenging and intricate questions in different realms of many-body physics. For instance, the problem of ''solvation'' of charged solutes in polar solvents, has been the subject of longstanding debates among chemical physicists. The significant role of quantum fluctuations of the solvent, as well as the break down of linear response theory, render the ordinary treatments intractable. Inspired by this complicated problem, we first attempt to understand the role of non-specific quantum fluctuations in the solvation process. To this end, we calculate the dynamic structure factor of a model polar liquid, using the classical Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. We verify the failure of linear response approximation in the vicinity of a hydrated electron, by comparing the outcomes of MD simulations with the predictions of linear response theory. This nonlinear behavior is associated with the pronounced peaks of the structure factor, which reflect the strong fluctuations of the local modes. A cavity picture is constructed based on heuristic arguments, which suggests that the electron, along with the surrounding polarization cloud, behave like a frozen sphere, for which the linear response theory is broken inside and valid outside. The inverse radius of the spherical region serves as a UV momentum cutoff for the linear response approximation to be applicable. The problem of mobile impurities in polar liquids can be also addressed in the framework of the ''polaron'' problem. Polaron is a quasiparticle that typically acquires an extended state at weak couplings, and crossovers to a self-trapped state at strong couplings. Using the analytical fits to the numerically obtained charge-charge structure factor, a phenomenological approach is proposed within the Leggett's influence functional formalism, which derives the effective Euclidean action from the classical equation of motion. We calculate the effective mass of the polaron in the model polar liquid at zero and finite temperatures. The self-trapping transition of this polaron turns out to be discontinuous in certain regions of the phase diagram. In order to systematically investigate the role of quantum fluctuations on the polaron properties, we adopt a quantum field theory which supports nearly-critical local modes: the quantum Landau-Brazovskii (QLB) model, which exhibits fluctuation-induced first order transition (weak crystallization). In the vicinity of the phase transition, the quantum fluctuations are strongly correlated; one can in principle tune the strength of these fluctuations, by adjusting the parameters close to or away from the transition point. Furthermore, sufficiently close to the transition, the theory accommodates "soliton'' solutions, signaling the nonlinear response of the system. Therefore, the model seems to be a promising candidate for studying the effects of strong quantum fluctuations and also failure of linear response theory, in the polaron problem. We observe that at zero temperature, and away from the Brazovskii transition where the linear response approximation is valid, the localization transition of the polaron is discontinuous. Upon enhancing fluctuations---of either thermal or quantum nature---the gap of the effective mass closes at distinct second-order critical points. Sufficiently close to the Brazovskii transition where the nonlinear contributions of the field are significantly large, a new state appears in addition to extended and self-trapped polarons: an impurity-induced soliton. We interpret this as the break-down of linear response, reminiscent of what we observe in a polar liquid. Quantum LB model has been proposed to be realizable in ultracold Bose gases in cavities. We thus discuss the experimental feasibility, and propose a setup which is believed to exhibit the aforementioned polaronic and solitonic states. We eventually generalize the polaron formalism to the case of impurities that couple quadratically to a nearly-critical field; hence called the ''quadratic polaron''. The Hertz-Millis field theory and its generalization to the case of magnetic transition in helimagnets, is taken as a toy model. The phase diagram of the bare model contains both second-order and fluctuation-induced first-order quantum phase transitions. We propose a semi-classical scenario in which the impurity and the field couple quadratically. The polaron properties in the vicinity of these transitions are calculated in different dimensions. We observe that the quadratic coupling in three dimensions, even in the absence of the critical modes with finite wavelength, leads to a jump-like localization of the polaron. In lower dimensions, the transition behavior remains qualitatively similar to those in the case of linear coupling, namely the critical modes must have a finite wavelength to localize the particle.

  6. Size dependence of phase transitions in aerosol nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yafang; Su, Hang; Koop, Thomas; Mikhailov, Eugene; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Phase transitions of nanoparticles are of fundamental importance in atmospheric sciences, but current understanding is insufficient to explain observations at the nano-scale. In particular, discrepancies exist between observations and model predictions of deliquescence and efflorescence transitions and the hygroscopic growth of salt nanoparticles. Here we show that these discrepancies can be resolved by consideration of particle size effects with consistent thermodynamic data. We present a new method for the determination of water and solute activities and interfacial energies in highly supersaturated aqueous solution droplets (Differential Köhler Analysis). Our analysis reveals that particle size can strongly alter the characteristic concentration of phase separation in mixed systems, resembling the influence of temperature. Owing to similar effects, atmospheric secondary organic aerosol particles at room temperature are expected to be always liquid at diameters below ~20 nm. We thus propose and demonstrate that particle size should be included as an additional dimension in the equilibrium phase diagram of aerosol nanoparticles. PMID:25586967

  7. Size dependence of phase transitions in aerosol nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yafang; Su, Hang; Koop, Thomas; Mikhailov, Eugene; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Phase transitions of nanoparticles are of fundamental importance in atmospheric sciences, but current understanding is insufficient to explain observations at the nano-scale. In particular, discrepancies exist between observations and model predictions of deliquescence and efflorescence transitions and the hygroscopic growth of salt nanoparticles. Here we show that these discrepancies can be resolved by consideration of particle size effects with consistent thermodynamic data. We present a new method for the determination of water and solute activities and interfacial energies in highly supersaturated aqueous solution droplets (Differential Köhler Analysis). Our analysis reveals that particle size can strongly alter the characteristic concentration of phase separation in mixed systems, resembling the influence of temperature. Owing to similar effects, atmospheric secondary organic aerosol particles at room temperature are expected to be always liquid at diameters below ~20 nm. We thus propose and demonstrate that particle size should be included as an additional dimension in the equilibrium phase diagram of aerosol nanoparticles. PMID:25586967

  8. The puzzling first-order phase transition in water-glycerol mixtures.

    PubMed

    Popov, Ivan; Greenbaum Gutina, Anna; Sokolov, Alexei P; Feldman, Yuri

    2015-07-21

    Over the last decade, discussions on a possible liquid-liquid transition (LLT) have strongly intensified. The LLT proposed by several authors focused mostly on explaining the anomalous properties of water in a deeply supercooled state. However, there have been no direct experimental observations yet of LLT in bulk water in the so-called 'no man's land', where water exists only in the crystalline states. Recently, a novel experimental strategy to detect LLT in water has been employed using water-glycerol (W-G) mixtures, because glycerol can generate a strong hindrance for water crystallization. As a result, the observed first-order phase transition at a concentration of glycerol around cg≈ 20 mol% was ascribed to the LLT. Here we show unambiguously that the first order phase transition in W-G mixtures is caused by the ice formation. We provide additional dielectric measurements, applying specific annealing temperature protocols in order to reinforce this conclusion. We also provide an explanation, why such a phase transition occurs only in the narrow glycerol concentration range. These results clearly demonstrate the danger of analysis of phase-separating liquids to gain better insights into water dynamics. These liquids have complex phase behavior that is affected by temperature, phase stability and segregation, viscosity and nucleation, and finally by crystallization, that might lead to significant misinterpretations. PMID:26100246

  9. Direct observation of an abrupt insulator-to-metal transition in dense liquid deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudson, Marcus; Desjarlais, Michael; Becker, Andeas; Lemke, Raymond; Cochrane, Kyle; Savage, Mark; Bliss, David; Mattsson, Thomas; Redmer, Ronald

    2015-06-01

    Recently a so-called shock-ramp platform has been developed on the Sandia Z Accelerator to access off-Hugoniot states in liquids. The accelerator delivers a two-step current pulse; the first accelerates the electrode to a reasonably constant velocity, which upon impact with the sample cell creates a well-defined shock, the subsequent current rise produces ramp compression from the initially shocked state. This technique generates relatively cool (~1-2 kK), high pressure (>300 GPa), high compression (~10-15 fold compression) states, allowing experimental access to the region of phase space where hydrogen is predicted to undergo a first-order phase transition from an insulating molecular-like liquid to a conducting atomic-like liquid. In this talk we will discuss the experimental platform, survey the various theoretical predictions for the liquid-liquid, insulator-to-metal transition in hydrogen, and present the results of experiments that clearly show an abrupt transition to a metallic state. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. New Density Functional Approach for Solid-Liquid-Vapor Transitions in Pure Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocher, Gabriel; Provatas, Nikolas

    2015-04-01

    A new phase field crystal (PFC) type theory is presented, which accounts for the full spectrum of solid-liquid-vapor phase transitions within the framework of a single density order parameter. Its equilibrium properties show the most quantitative features to date in PFC modeling of pure substances, and full consistency with thermodynamics in pressure-volume-temperature space is demonstrated. A method to control either the volume or the pressure of the system is also introduced. Nonequilibrium simulations show that 2- and 3-phase growth of solid, vapor, and liquid can be achieved, while our formalism also allows for a full range of pressure-induced transformations. This model opens up a new window for the study of pressure driven interactions of condensed phases with vapor, an experimentally relevant paradigm previously missing from phase field crystal theories.

  11. New density functional approach for solid-liquid-vapor transitions in pure materials.

    PubMed

    Kocher, Gabriel; Provatas, Nikolas

    2015-04-17

    A new phase field crystal (PFC) type theory is presented, which accounts for the full spectrum of solid-liquid-vapor phase transitions within the framework of a single density order parameter. Its equilibrium properties show the most quantitative features to date in PFC modeling of pure substances, and full consistency with thermodynamics in pressure-volume-temperature space is demonstrated. A method to control either the volume or the pressure of the system is also introduced. Nonequilibrium simulations show that 2- and 3-phase growth of solid, vapor, and liquid can be achieved, while our formalism also allows for a full range of pressure-induced transformations. This model opens up a new window for the study of pressure driven interactions of condensed phases with vapor, an experimentally relevant paradigm previously missing from phase field crystal theories. PMID:25933321

  12. Electronic and Sturctural Transitions in Dense Liquid Sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Raty, J Y; Schwegler, E R; Bonev, S A

    2007-08-06

    At ambient conditions, the light alkali metals are free-electron like crystals with a highly symmetric structure. However, they were shown recently to exhibit unexpected complexity under pressure. It was predicted from theory and later confirmed by experiment that Li and Na undergo a sequence of symmetry breaking transitions driven by a Peierls mechanism. Most recently, measurements of the Na melting curve revealed an unprecedented and still unexplained drop in the melting temperature from 1000 K at 30 GPa to room temperature at 120 GPa. Here we report results from ab initio calculations that explain the unusual melting behavior in dense Na. We show that molten Na undergoes a series of pressure-induced structural and electronic transitions analogous to that observed in solid Na, but commencing at much lower pressure in the presence of disorder. With increasing pressure, liquid Na initially evolves by assuming a more compact local structure. However, a transition to a lower coordinated liquid takes place at a pressure around 65 GPa, accompanied by a threefold drop in electrical conductivity. A pseudogap opening at the Fermi level, an effect previously not observed in a liquid metal, drives this transition. Remarkably, the lower coordinated liquid emerges at rather elevated temperatures and above the stability region of a closed packed free electron-like metal. We predict that similar exotic behavior is possible in other materials as well.

  13. Improved model for the transit entropy of monatomic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisolm, Eric; Bock, Nicolas; Wallace, Duane

    2010-03-01

    In the original formulation of vibration-transit (V-T) theory for monatomic liquid dynamics, the transit contribution to entropy was taken to be a universal constant, calibrated to the constant-volume entropy of melting. This implied that the transit contribution to energy vanishes, which is incorrect. Here we develop a new formulation that corrects this deficiency. The theory contains two nuclear motion contributions: (a) the dominant vibrational contribution Svib(T/θ0), where T is temperature and θ0 is the vibrational characteristic temperature, and (b) the transit contribution Str(T/θtr), where θtr is a scaling temperature for each liquid. The appearance of a common functional form of Str for all the liquids studied is deduced from the experimental data, when analyzed via the V-T formula. The theoretical entropy of melting is derived, in a single formula applying to normal and anomalous melting alike. An ab initio calculation of θ0 for Na and Cu, based on density functional theory, provides verification of our analysis and V-T theory. In view of the present results, techniques currently being applied in ab initio simulations of liquid properties can be employed to advantage in the further testing and development of V-T theory.

  14. Quantum phase transitions in frustrated magnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wölfle, P.; Schmitteckert, P.

    2015-07-01

    We review our recent work on quantum phase transitions in frustrated magnetic systems. In the first part a Pseudo Fermion Functional Renormalization Group (PFFRG) method is presented. By using an exact representation of spin 1/2 operators in terms of pseudofermions a quantum spin Hamiltonian may be mapped onto an interacting fermion system. For the latter an FRG treatment is employed. The results for the J1-J2 model and similar models of frustrated interaction show phase diagrams in agreement with those obtained by other methods, but give more detailed information on the nature of correlations, in particular in the non-magnetic phases. Applications of PFFRG to geometrically frustrated systems and to highly anisotropic Kitaev type models are also reported. In the second part the derivation of quantum spin models from the microscopic many-body Hamiltonian is discussed. The results for multiband systems with strong spin-orbit interaction encountered in the iridates class of compounds are shown to resolve some of the questions posed by experiment.

  15. QCD PHASE TRANSITIONS-VOLUME 15.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHAFER,T.

    1998-11-04

    The title of the workshop, ''The QCD Phase Transitions'', in fact happened to be too narrow for its real contents. It would be more accurate to say that it was devoted to different phases of QCD and QCD-related gauge theories, with strong emphasis on discussion of the underlying non-perturbative mechanisms which manifest themselves as all those phases. Before we go to specifics, let us emphasize one important aspect of the present status of non-perturbative Quantum Field Theory in general. It remains true that its studies do not get attention proportional to the intellectual challenge they deserve, and that the theorists working on it remain very fragmented. The efforts to create Theory of Everything including Quantum Gravity have attracted the lion share of attention and young talent. Nevertheless, in the last few years there was also a tremendous progress and even some shift of attention toward emphasis on the unity of non-perturbative phenomena. For example, we have seen some. efforts to connect the lessons from recent progress in Supersymmetric theories with that in QCD, as derived from phenomenology and lattice. Another example is Maldacena conjecture and related development, which connect three things together, string theory, super-gravity and the (N=4) supersymmetric gauge theory. Although the progress mentioned is remarkable by itself, if we would listen to each other more we may have chance to strengthen the field and reach better understanding of the spectacular non-perturbative physics.

  16. Phase transitions in biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yutao

    Geological calcium carbonate exists in both crystalline phases and amorphous phases. Compared with crystalline calcium carbonate, such as calcite, aragonite and vaterite, the amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is unstable. Unlike geological calcium carbonate crystals, crystalline sea urchin spicules (99.9 wt % calcium carbonate and 0.1 wt % proteins) do not present facets. To explain this property, crystal formation via amorphous precursors was proposed in theory. And previous research reported experimental evidence of ACC on the surface of forming sea urchin spicules. By using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), we studied cross-sections of fresh sea urchin spicules at different stages (36h, 48h and 72h after fertilization) and observed the transition sequence of three mineral phases: hydrated ACC → dehydrated ACC → biogenic calcite. In addition, we unexpectedly found hydrated ACC nanoparticles that are surrounded by biogenic calcite. This observation indicates the dehydration from hydrated ACC to dehydrated ACC is inhibited, resulting in stabilization of hydrated ACC nanoparticles. We thought that the dehydration was inhibited by protein matrix components occluded within the biomineral, and we designed an in vitro assay to test the hypothesis. By utilizing XANES-PEEM, we found that SM50, the most abundant occluded matrix protein in sea urchin spicules, has the function to stabilize hydrated ACC in vitro.

  17. On liquid phases in cometary nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Richard; Faillace, George A.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we review the relevant literature and investigate conditions likely to lead to melting of H2O ice, methanol (CH3OH) ice, ethane (C2H6) ice and other volatile ices in cometary nuclei. On the basis of a heat balance model which takes account of volatiles loss, we predict the formation of occasional aqueous and hydrocarbon liquid phases in subsurface regions at heliocentric distances, rh of 1-3 AU, and 5-12 AU, respectively. Low triple-point temperatures and low vapour pressures of C2H6, C3H8, and some higher-order alkanes and alkenes, favour liquid phase formation in cometary bodies at high rh. Microporosity and the formation of a stabilization crust occluding the escape of volatiles facilitate liquid-phase formation. Characteristics of the near-surface which favour subsurface melting include; low effective surface emissivity (at low rh), high amorphous carbon content, average pore sizes of ˜10 μm or less, presence of solutes (e.g. CH3OH), mixtures of C2-C6 hydrocarbons (for melting at high rh), diurnal thermal cycling, and slow rotation rate. Applying the principles of soil mechanics, capillary forces are shown to initiate pre-melting phenomena and subsequent melting, which is expected to impart considerable strength of ˜104 Pa in partially saturated layers, reducing porosity and permeability, enhancing thermal conductivity and heat transfer. Diurnal thermal cycling is expected to have a marked effect on the composition and distribution of H2O ice in the near-surface leading to frost heave-type phenomena even where little if any true melting occurs. Where melting does take place, capillary suction in the wetted zone has the potential to enhance heat transfer via capillary wetting in a low-gravity environment, and to modify surface topography creating relatively smooth flat-bottomed features, which have a tendency to be located within small depressions. An important aspect of the "wetted layer" model is the prediction that diurnal melt-freeze cycles alter the mixing ratio vs. depth of solutes present, or of other miscible components, largely through a process of fractional crystallization, but also potentially involving frost heave. Wetted layers are potentially durable and can involve significant mass transport of volatile materials in the near-surface, increasing in extent over many rotations of the nucleus prior to and just after perihelion passage, and causing stratification and trapping of the lowest-melting mixtures at depths of several metres. A possible mechanism for cometary outbursts is proposed involving a heat pulse reaching the liquid phase in the deepest wetted zone, leading to supersaturation and triggering the sudden release under pressure of dissolved gases, in particular CO2, CO, CH4 or N2, contained beneath a consolidated near-surface layer. This study indicates that liquid water can persist for long periods of time in the near-surface of some intermediate-sized bodies (102-103 km radius) within protoplanetary discs.

  18. Liquid-vapor transition on patterned solid surfaces in a shear flow.

    PubMed

    Yao, Wenqi; Ren, Weiqing

    2015-12-28

    Liquids on a solid surface patterned with microstructures can exhibit the Cassie-Baxter (Cassie) state and the wetted Wenzel state. The transitions between the two states and the effects of surface topography, surface chemistry as well as the geometry of the microstructures on the transitions have been extensively studied in earlier work. However, most of these work focused on the study of the free energy landscape and the energy barriers. In the current work, we consider the transitions in the presence of a shear flow. We compute the minimum action path between the Wenzel and Cassie states using the minimum action method [W. E, W. Ren, and E. Vanden-Eijnden, Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 57, 637 (2004)]. Numerical results are obtained for transitions on a surface patterned with straight pillars. It is found that the shear flow facilitates the transition from the Wenzel state to the Cassie state, while it inhibits the transition backwards. The Wenzel state becomes unstable when the shear rate reaches a certain critical value. Two different scenarios for the Wenzel-Cassie transition are observed. At low shear rate, the transition happens via nucleation of the vapor phase at the bottom of the groove followed by its growth. At high shear rate, in contrary, the nucleation of the vapor phase occurs at the top corner of a pillar. The vapor phase grows in the direction of the flow, and the system goes through an intermediate metastable state before reaching the Cassie state. PMID:26723696

  19. Liquid-vapor transition on patterned solid surfaces in a shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wenqi; Ren, Weiqing

    2015-12-01

    Liquids on a solid surface patterned with microstructures can exhibit the Cassie-Baxter (Cassie) state and the wetted Wenzel state. The transitions between the two states and the effects of surface topography, surface chemistry as well as the geometry of the microstructures on the transitions have been extensively studied in earlier work. However, most of these work focused on the study of the free energy landscape and the energy barriers. In the current work, we consider the transitions in the presence of a shear flow. We compute the minimum action path between the Wenzel and Cassie states using the minimum action method [W. E, W. Ren, and E. Vanden-Eijnden, Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 57, 637 (2004)]. Numerical results are obtained for transitions on a surface patterned with straight pillars. It is found that the shear flow facilitates the transition from the Wenzel state to the Cassie state, while it inhibits the transition backwards. The Wenzel state becomes unstable when the shear rate reaches a certain critical value. Two different scenarios for the Wenzel-Cassie transition are observed. At low shear rate, the transition happens via nucleation of the vapor phase at the bottom of the groove followed by its growth. At high shear rate, in contrary, the nucleation of the vapor phase occurs at the top corner of a pillar. The vapor phase grows in the direction of the flow, and the system goes through an intermediate metastable state before reaching the Cassie state.

  20. Brewster Angle Microscope Investigations of Two Dimensional Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuman, Adam William

    The liquid-liquid interface is investigated by microscopic and thermodynamic means to image and measure interfacial properties when the system undergoes a two-dimensional (2D) phase transition of a Gibbs monolayer by varying the sample temperature. An in-house Brewster angle microscope (BAM) is constructed to visualize the interface during this transition while a quasi-elastic light scattering technique is used to determine the interfacial tension. These results complement x-ray investigations of the same systems. Evidence of interfacial micro-separated structure, microphases, comes from observations across a hexane-water interface with the inclusion of a long-chain fluorinated alcohol surfactant into the bulk hexane. Microphases take the form of spatially modulated structure to the density of the surfactant as it spans laterally across the interface. The surfactant monolayer exhibits microphase morphology over a range of a couple degrees as the temperature of the system is scanned through the 2D gas-solid phase transition. Microphase structure was observed for heating and cooling the hexane-water system and structural comparisons are given when the temperature step and quench depth of the cooling process is varied. A complete sequence of morphological structure was observed from 2D gas to cluster to labyrinthine stripe to a 2D solid mosaic pattern. Two characteristic length scales emerge giving rise to speculation of an elastic contribution to the standard repulsive and attractive competitive forces stabilizing the microphase. The benefit of BAM to laterally image very thin films across the surface of an interface on the micrometer length scale nicely complements x-ray reflectivity methods that average structural data transverse to the liquid interface on a molecular scale. To properly analyze x-ray reflectivity data, the interface is required to be laterally homogeneous. BAM can sufficiently characterize the interface for this purpose as is done for a Langmuir monolayer of a lipid-protein mixture that was later investigated by x-ray reflectivity. The same service is provided to an extractant in dodecane/water system. For this system, BAM additionally clarified the type of transition the extractant monolayer undergoes as a function of temperature.

  1. Determination of Size Effects during the Phase Transition of a Nanoscale Au-Si Eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B. J.; Tersoff, J.; Wen, C.-Y.; Reuter, M. C.; Stach, E. A.; Ross, F. M.

    2009-10-01

    The phase diagram of a nanoscale system can be substantially different than in the bulk, but quantitative measurements have proven elusive. Here we use in situ microscopy to observe a phase transition in a nanoscale system, together with a simple quantitative model to extract the size effects from these measurements. We expose a Au particle to disilane gas, and observe the transition from a two-phase Au+AuSi system to single-phase AuSi. Size effects are evident in the nonlinear disappearance of the solid Au. Our analysis shows a substantial shift in the liquidus line, and a discontinuous change in the liquid composition at the transition. It also lets us estimate the liquid-solid interfacial free energy.

  2. Determination of size effects during the phase transition of a nanoscale Au-Si eutectic.

    PubMed

    Kim, B J; Tersoff, J; Wen, C-Y; Reuter, M C; Stach, E A; Ross, F M

    2009-10-01

    The phase diagram of a nanoscale system can be substantially different than in the bulk, but quantitative measurements have proven elusive. Here we use in situ microscopy to observe a phase transition in a nanoscale system, together with a simple quantitative model to extract the size effects from these measurements. We expose a Au particle to disilane gas, and observe the transition from a two-phase Au + AuSi system to single-phase AuSi. Size effects are evident in the nonlinear disappearance of the solid Au. Our analysis shows a substantial shift in the liquidus line, and a discontinuous change in the liquid composition at the transition. It also lets us estimate the liquid-solid interfacial free energy. PMID:19905650

  3. Liquid-liquid phase separation in solutions of ionic liquids: phase diagrams, corresponding state analysis and comparison with simulations of the primitive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröer, W.; Vale, V. R.

    2009-10-01

    Phase diagrams of ionic solutions of the ionic liquid C18mim+NTF2- (1-n-octadecyl-3-methyl imidazolium bistrifluormethylsulfonylimide) in decalin, cyclohexane and methylcyclohexane are reported and compared with that of solutions of other imidazolium ionic liquids with the anions NTF2-, Cl- and BF4- in arenes, CCl4, alcohols and water. The phase diagrams are analysed presuming Ising criticality and taking into account the asymmetry of the phase diagrams. The resulting parameters are compared with simulation results for equal-sized charged hard spheres in a dielectric continuum, the restricted primitive model (RPM) and the primitive model (PM) that allows for ions of different size. In the RPM temperature scale the critical temperatures vary almost linearly with the dielectric permittivity of the solvent. The RPM critical temperatures of the solutions in non-polar solvents are very similar, somewhat below the RPM value. Correlations with the boiling temperatures of the solvents and a dependence on the length of the side chain of the imidazolium cations show that dispersion interactions modify the phase transition, which is mainly determined by Coulomb forces. Critical concentrations, widths of the phase diagrams and the slopes of the diameter are different for the solutions in protic and aprotic solvents. The phase diagrams of the solutions in alcohols and water get a lower critical solution point when represented in RPM variables.

  4. Liquid phase stability under an extreme temperature gradient.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhi; Sasikumar, Kiran; Keblinski, Pawel

    2013-11-27

    Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we subject bulk liquid to a very high-temperature gradient and observe a stable liquid phase with a local temperature well above the boiling point. Also, under this high-temperature gradient, the vapor phase exhibits condensation into a liquid at a temperature higher than the saturation temperature, indicating that the observed liquid stability is not caused by nucleation barrier kinetics. We show that, assuming local thermal equilibrium, the phase change can be understood from the thermodynamic analysis. The observed elevation of the boiling point is associated with the interplay between the "bulk" driving force for the phase change and surface tension of the liquid-vapor interface that suppresses the transformation. This phenomenon is analogous to that observed for liquids in confined geometries. In our study, however, a low-temperature liquid, rather than a solid, confines the high-temperature liquid. PMID:24329454

  5. Liquid Phase Stability Under an Extreme Temperature Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhi; Sasikumar, Kiran; Keblinski, Pawel

    2013-11-01

    Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we subject bulk liquid to a very high-temperature gradient and observe a stable liquid phase with a local temperature well above the boiling point. Also, under this high-temperature gradient, the vapor phase exhibits condensation into a liquid at a temperature higher than the saturation temperature, indicating that the observed liquid stability is not caused by nucleation barrier kinetics. We show that, assuming local thermal equilibrium, the phase change can be understood from the thermodynamic analysis. The observed elevation of the boiling point is associated with the interplay between the “bulk” driving force for the phase change and surface tension of the liquid-vapor interface that suppresses the transformation. This phenomenon is analogous to that observed for liquids in confined geometries. In our study, however, a low-temperature liquid, rather than a solid, confines the high-temperature liquid.

  6. Nonequilibrium Second-Order Phase Transition in a Cooper-Pair Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doron, A.; Tamir, I.; Mitra, S.; Zeltzer, G.; Ovadia, M.; Shahar, D.

    2016-02-01

    In certain disordered superconductors, upon increasing the magnetic field, superconductivity terminates with a direct transition into an insulating phase. This phase is comprised of localized Cooper pairs and is termed a Cooper-pair insulator. The current-voltage characteristics measured in this insulating phase are highly nonlinear and, at low temperatures, exhibit abrupt current jumps. Increasing the temperature diminishes the jumps until the current-voltage characteristics become continuous. We show that a direct correspondence exists between our system and systems that undergo an equilibrium, second-order, phase transition. We illustrate this correspondence by comparing our results to the van der Waals equation of state for the liquid-gas mixture. We use the similarities to identify a critical point where an out of equilibrium second-order-like phase transition occurs in our system. Approaching the critical point, we find a power-law behavior with critical exponents that characterizes the transition.

  7. Nonequilibrium Second-Order Phase Transition in a Cooper-Pair Insulator.

    PubMed

    Doron, A; Tamir, I; Mitra, S; Zeltzer, G; Ovadia, M; Shahar, D

    2016-02-01

    In certain disordered superconductors, upon increasing the magnetic field, superconductivity terminates with a direct transition into an insulating phase. This phase is comprised of localized Cooper pairs and is termed a Cooper-pair insulator. The current-voltage characteristics measured in this insulating phase are highly nonlinear and, at low temperatures, exhibit abrupt current jumps. Increasing the temperature diminishes the jumps until the current-voltage characteristics become continuous. We show that a direct correspondence exists between our system and systems that undergo an equilibrium, second-order, phase transition. We illustrate this correspondence by comparing our results to the van der Waals equation of state for the liquid-gas mixture. We use the similarities to identify a critical point where an out of equilibrium second-order-like phase transition occurs in our system. Approaching the critical point, we find a power-law behavior with critical exponents that characterizes the transition. PMID:26894728

  8. Liquid-liquid phase separation in aerosol particles: Imaging at the Nanometer Scale

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Rachel; Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Lundt, Nils; You, Yuan; Bertram, Allan K.; Leone, Stephen R.; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K.

    2015-04-21

    Atmospheric aerosols can undergo phase transitions including liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) while responding to changes in the ambient relative humidity (RH). Here, we report results of chemical imaging experiments using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) to investigate the LLPS of micron sized particles undergoing a full hydration-dehydration cycle. Internally mixed particles composed of ammonium sulfate (AS) and either: limonene secondary organic carbon (LSOC), a, 4-dihydroxy-3-methoxybenzeneaceticacid (HMMA), or polyethylene glycol (PEG-400) were studied. Events of LLPS with apparent core-shell particle morphology were observed for all samples with both techniques. Chemical imaging with STXM showed that both LSOC/AS and HMMA/AS particles were never homogeneously mixed for all measured RH’s above the deliquescence point and that the majority of the organic component was located in the shell. The shell composition was estimated as 65:35 organic: inorganic in LSOC/AS and as 50:50 organic: inorganic for HMMA/AS. PEG-400/AS particles showed fully homogeneous mixtures at high RH and phase separated below 89-92% RH with an estimated 50:50% organic to inorganic mix in the shell. These two chemical imaging techniques are well suited for in-situ analysis of the hygroscopic behavior, phase separation, and surface composition of collected ambient aerosol particles.

  9. Transient liquid phase bonding of intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Yimin

    The present work was undertaken to examine the applicability of transient liquid phase bonding to structural intermetallics. This research was based on an investigation of the mechanisms governing microstructural development in the joint and adjacent substrates during the joining process. The bonding systems investigated included polycrystalline NiAl/Cu/Ni, polycrystalline NiAl/Cu/superalloys (Martin-Marietta (MM)-247, Inconel (IN) 718 and Nimonic 90), single-crystal NiAl (with 1.5 at % Hf) joined to MM-247 using different filler metals (Cu foil, powder filler metal and electro-plated thin Cu film), and martensitic NiAl joined with martensitic NiTi using Cu foil and specially designed powder filler metals. In polycrystalline NiAl/Cu/Ni bonds, the mechanism of isothermal solidification is considered. Changes in the microstructure of the bond centerline due to element redistribution are discussed. The precipitation of both L1sb2 type gammasp' and B2 type beta phase at the joint centerline is investigated. The formation of martensitic L1sb0 type NiAl is also examined. The mechanical properties of the joints are investigated using shear strength and microhardness tests. In TLP bonding of polycrystalline NiAl with MM-247, both the epitaxial growth of the beta phase NiAl into the joint and the formation of non-epitaxial beta-phase layers are considered. The formation of second-phases, including the gammasp' phase, carbides, and sigma-phase intermetallics is also examined. Bond-line and adjacent substrate microstructures for the NiAl/Cu/MM-247 bonds are correlated with joint mechanical properties determined by room temperature shear testing. Single-crystal NiAl (1.5 at % Hf)/Cu/MM-247 joints are examined and compared with polycrystalline NiAl/Cu/MM247 joints. The effect of Hf on the microstructure of joints is investigated. The influence of different filler metals (i.e., wide-gap powder filler metal and electro-plated thin film filler metal) on the joining process is also considered. In TLP bonding of martensitic NiAl with martensitic NiTi, the formation Ti depletion region was observed while using Cu foil as the filler metal. Alternative filler metals were successfully used to solve this problem. According to the experimental results, standard TLP bonding models cannot be applied to the bonding systems in this research. The influence of second phase formation on TLP models is discussed.

  10. Scaling theory of topological phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Topologically ordered systems are characterized by topological invariants that are often calculated from the momentum space integration of a certain function that represents the curvature of the many-body state. The curvature function may be Berry curvature, Berry connection, or other quantities depending on the system. Akin to stretching a messy string to reveal the number of knots it contains, a scaling procedure is proposed for the curvature function in inversion symmetric systems, from which the topological phase transition can be identified from the flow of the driving energy parameters that control the topology (hopping, chemical potential, etc) under scaling. At an infinitesimal operation, one obtains the renormalization group (RG) equations for the driving energy parameters. A length scale defined from the curvature function near the gap-closing momentum is suggested to characterize the scale invariance at critical points and fixed points, and displays a universal critical behavior in a variety of systems examined.

  11. Some demographic crashes seen as phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gligor, Mircea; Ignat, Margareta

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is the application of a usual method of statistical mechanics-the renormalization based on Wilson's recursive relations-in order to study the critical behavior of a social index, namely the live births per 1000 population. The drastic decreases of this index on certain periods have the specific features of the phase transitions as they follow approximately power laws and also, they lead to the complete change of the population age structure. The values of the critical exponents that are obtained by fitting the experimental data referring to some East European countries are in agreement with the value resulting from the theoretical approach, thus showing the universality of the power law behavior in the vicinity of the critical points, for complex social systems.

  12. MAGNETIC FIELDS FROM QCD PHASE TRANSITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tevzadze, Alexander G.; Kisslinger, Leonard; Kahniashvili, Tina; Brandenburg, Axel

    2012-11-01

    We study the evolution of QCD phase transition-generated magnetic fields (MFs) in freely decaying MHD turbulence of the expanding universe. We consider an MF generation model that starts from basic non-perturbative QCD theory and predicts stochastic MFs with an amplitude of the order of 0.02 {mu}G and small magnetic helicity. We employ direct numerical simulations to model the MHD turbulence decay and identify two different regimes: a 'weakly helical' turbulence regime, when magnetic helicity increases during decay, and 'fully helical' turbulence, when maximal magnetic helicity is reached and an inverse cascade develops. The results of our analysis show that in the most optimistic scenario the magnetic correlation length in the comoving frame can reach 10 kpc with the amplitude of the effective MF being 0.007 nG. We demonstrate that the considered model of magnetogenesis can provide the seed MF for galaxies and clusters.

  13. Scaling theory of topological phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei

    2016-02-10

    Topologically ordered systems are characterized by topological invariants that are often calculated from the momentum space integration of a certain function that represents the curvature of the many-body state. The curvature function may be Berry curvature, Berry connection, or other quantities depending on the system. Akin to stretching a messy string to reveal the number of knots it contains, a scaling procedure is proposed for the curvature function in inversion symmetric systems, from which the topological phase transition can be identified from the flow of the driving energy parameters that control the topology (hopping, chemical potential, etc) under scaling. At an infinitesimal operation, one obtains the renormalization group (RG) equations for the driving energy parameters. A length scale defined from the curvature function near the gap-closing momentum is suggested to characterize the scale invariance at critical points and fixed points, and displays a universal critical behavior in a variety of systems examined. PMID:26790004

  14. Topological classification of dynamical phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajna, Szabolcs; Dóra, Balázs

    2015-04-01

    We study the nonequilibrium time evolution of a variety of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) systems (including SSH model, Kitaev-chain, Haldane model, p +i p superconductor, etc.) following a sudden quench. We prove analytically that topology-changing quenches are always followed by nonanalytical temporal behavior of return rates (logarithm of the Loschmidt echo), referred to as dynamical phase transitions (DPTs) in the literature. Similarly to edge states in topological insulators, DPTs can be classified as being topologically protected or not. In 1D systems the number of topologically protected nonequilibrium time scales are determined by the difference between the initial and final winding numbers, while in 2D systems no such relation exists for the Chern numbers. The singularities of dynamical free energy in the 2D case are qualitatively different from those of the 1D case; the cusps appear only in the first time derivative.

  15. Phase Transitions in Networks of Memristive Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, Forrest; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    The memory features of memristive elements (resistors with memory), analogous to those found in biological synapses, have spurred the development of neuromorphic systems based on them (see, e.g.,). In turn, this requires a fundamental understanding of the collective dynamics of networks of memristive systems. Here, we study an experimentally-inspired model of disordered memristive networks in the limit of a slowly ramped voltage and show through simulations that these networks undergo a first-order phase transition in the conductivity for sufficiently high values of memory, as quantified by the memristive ON/OFF ratio. We provide also a mean-field theory that reproduces many features of the transition and particularly examine the role of boundary conditions and current- vs. voltage-controlled networks. The dynamics of the mean-field theory suggest a distribution of conductance jumps which may be accessible experimentally. We finally discuss the ability of these networks to support massively-parallel computation. Work supported in part by the Center for Memory and Recording Research at UCSD.

  16. A one-dimensional phase transition constitutive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenqiang; Tang, Zhiping

    2000-04-01

    Defects always exist in real materials that cause stress concentration. When phase transition takes place, new phase nuclei form first at the positions of defects and then grow via phase boundary propagation. There is a certain relationship between the propagation speed of phase boundary and the driving force, i.e. the Gibbs free energy difference between two phases. From this point, the phase transition process in real material is simulated with a rod containing defects. A rate-dependent phase transition constitutive relation is obtained using a method similar to that in the continuum thermo-elastic theory.

  17. Quantum Liquid Crystal Phases in Strongly Correlated Fermionic Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Kai

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the investigation of the quantum liquid crystal phases in strongly correlated electronic systems. Such phases are characterized by their partially broken spatial symmetries and are observed in various strongly correlated systems as being summarized in Chapter 1. Although quantum liquid crystal phases often involve

  18. Quantum Liquid Crystal Phases in Strongly Correlated Fermionic Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Kai

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the investigation of the quantum liquid crystal phases in strongly correlated electronic systems. Such phases are characterized by their partially broken spatial symmetries and are observed in various strongly correlated systems as being summarized in Chapter 1. Although quantum liquid crystal phases often involve…

  19. Comparison of electrical and optical characteristics in gas-phase and gas-liquid phase discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Qazi, H. I. A.; Li, He-Ping Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Bao, Cheng-Yu; Nie, Qiu-Yue

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents an AC-excited argon discharge generated using a gas-liquid (two-phase) hybrid plasma reactor, which mainly consists of a powered needle electrode enclosed in a conical quartz tube and grounded deionized water electrode. The discharges in the gas-phase, as well as in the two-phase, exhibit two discharge modes, i.e., the low current glow-like diffuse mode and the high current streamer-like constrict mode, with a mode transition, which exhibits a negative resistance of the discharges. The optical emission spectral analysis shows that the stronger diffusion of the water vapor into the discharge region in the two-phase discharges boosts up the generation of OH (A–X) radicals, and consequently, leads to a higher rotational temperature in the water-phase plasma plume than that of the gas-phase discharges. Both the increase of the power input and the decrease of the argon flow rate result in the increase of the rotational temperature in the plasma plume of the water-phase discharge. The stable two-phase discharges with a long plasma plume in the water-phase under a low power input and gas flow rate may show a promising prospect for the degradation of organic pollutants, e.g., printing and dyeing wastewater, in the field of environmental protection.

  20. Comparison of electrical and optical characteristics in gas-phase and gas-liquid phase discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qazi, H. I. A.; Nie, Qiu-Yue; Li, He-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Bao, Cheng-Yu

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an AC-excited argon discharge generated using a gas-liquid (two-phase) hybrid plasma reactor, which mainly consists of a powered needle electrode enclosed in a conical quartz tube and grounded deionized water electrode. The discharges in the gas-phase, as well as in the two-phase, exhibit two discharge modes, i.e., the low current glow-like diffuse mode and the high current streamer-like constrict mode, with a mode transition, which exhibits a negative resistance of the discharges. The optical emission spectral analysis shows that the stronger diffusion of the water vapor into the discharge region in the two-phase discharges boosts up the generation of OH (A-X) radicals, and consequently, leads to a higher rotational temperature in the water-phase plasma plume than that of the gas-phase discharges. Both the increase of the power input and the decrease of the argon flow rate result in the increase of the rotational temperature in the plasma plume of the water-phase discharge. The stable two-phase discharges with a long plasma plume in the water-phase under a low power input and gas flow rate may show a promising prospect for the degradation of organic pollutants, e.g., printing and dyeing wastewater, in the field of environmental protection.