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Sample records for liquid rocket combustion

  1. Liquid propellant rocket combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrje, D. T.

    1972-01-01

    The solution of problems of combustion instability for more effective communication between the various workers in this field is considered. The extent of combustion instability problems in liquid propellant rocket engines and recommendations for their solution are discussed. The most significant developments, both theoretical and experimental, are presented, with emphasis on fundamental principles and relationships between alternative approaches.

  2. Liquid rocket spray combustion stability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Jeng, San-Mou

    1992-01-01

    A computational approach to the analysis of spray combustion stability in liquid rocket combustors is proposed which is based on the unsteady quasi-two-dimensional Euler equations with interphase source terms derived from a Lagrangian treatment of the combusting spray. Based on a preliminary evaluation, the computational methodology presented here is a promising research tool and a potential design/development aid for investigating the stability characteristics of liquid rocket engines. The method is characterized by low numerical noise; the Lagrangian treatment of the spray offers improved flexibility for the direct modeling of spray combustion.

  3. Combustion dynamics in liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclain, W. H.

    1971-01-01

    A chemical analysis of the emission and absorption spectra in the combustion chamber of a nitrogen tetroxide/aerozine-50 rocket engine was conducted. Measurements were made under conditions of preignition, ignition, and post combustion operating periods. The cause of severe ignition overpressures sporadically observed during the vacuum startup of the Apollo reaction control system engine was investigated. The extent to which residual propellants or condensed intermediate reaction products remain after the engine has been operated in a pulse mode duty cycle was determined.

  4. Computational fluid dynamic analysis of liquid rocket combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, Sankaran; Grenda, Jeffrey; Merkle, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    The paper presents a computational analysis of liquid rocket combustion instability. Consideration is given to both a fully nonlinear unsteady calculation as well as a new CFD-based linearized stability analysis. An analytical solution for the linear stability problem in a constant area combustion chamber with uniform mean flow is developed to verify the numerical analyses.

  5. Liquid rocket engine fluid-cooled combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A monograph on the design and development of fluid cooled combustion chambers for liquid propellant rocket engines is presented. The subjects discussed are (1) regenerative cooling, (2) transpiration cooling, (3) film cooling, (4) structural analysis, (5) chamber reinforcement, and (6) operational problems.

  6. Scaling of Performance in Liquid Propellant Rocket Engine Combustion Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, James R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses scaling of combustion and combustion performance in liquid propellant rocket engine combustion devices. In development of new combustors, comparisons are often made between predicted performance in a new combustor and measured performance in another combustor with different geometric and thermodynamic characteristics. Without careful interpretation of some key features, the comparison can be misinterpreted and erroneous information used in the design of the new device. This paper provides a review of this performance comparison, including a brief review of the initial liquid rocket scaling research conducted during the 1950s and 1960s, a review of the typical performance losses encountered and how they scale, a description of the typical scaling procedures used in development programs today, and finally a review of several historical development programs to see what insight they can bring to the questions at hand.

  7. Non-grey radiation in a liquid rocket combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehtarnavaz, H.; Dang, A. L.; Chiu, H. H.; Gross, K. W.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of radiation on droplets gasification in liquid rocket combustion chambers has been studied. The modeling includes a Legendre pseudo-spectral collocation approximation to solve the Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE). The band model has been utilized to account for non-grey emitting and absorbing gases present in the comustion chamber. The GEMCHIP II code has been utilized to study the fuel and oxidizer droplets combustion and interaction. The submodels within this code are capable of accounting for group combustion and conjugate effects between many droplets. The radiative model has been coupled with the GEMCHIP II code accounting for radial effects only, to provide the tool for studying the combustion-radiation coupling effects in a bipropellant system. The results indicate that the gasification/combustion process will be enhanced upstream of the chamber causing thicker flame sheet and associated higher combustion efficiency.

  8. Liquid rocket engine combustion stabilization devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Combustion instability, which results from a coupling of the combustion process and the fluid dynamics of the engine system, was investigated. The design of devices which reduce coupling (combustion chamber baffles) and devices which increase damping (acoustic absorbers) are described. Included in the discussion are design criteria and recommended practices, structural and mechanical design, thermal control, baffle geometry, baffle/engine interactions, acoustic damping analysis, and absorber configurations.

  9. Comprehensive modeling of a liquid rocket combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, P.-Y.; Fisher, S.; Chang, Y. M.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical model for the simulation of detailed three-phase combustion flows inside a liquid rocket combustion chamber is presented. The three phases involved are: a multispecies gaseous phase, an incompressible liquid phase, and a particulate droplet phase. The gas and liquid phases are continuum described in an Eulerian fashion. A two-phase solution capability for these continuum media is obtained through a marriage of the Implicit Continuous Eulerian (ICE) technique and the fractional Volume of Fluid (VOF) free surface description method. On the other hand, the particulate phase is given a discrete treatment and described in a Lagrangian fashion. All three phases are hence treated rigorously. Semi-empirical physical models are used to describe all interphase coupling terms as well as the chemistry among gaseous components. Sample calculations using the model are given. The results show promising application to truly comprehensive modeling of complex liquid-fueled engine systems.

  10. JANNAF liquid rocket combustion instability panel research recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klem, Mark D.

    1990-01-01

    The Joint Army, Navy, NASA, Air Force (JANNAF) Liquid Rocket Combustion Instability Panel was formed in 1988, drawing its members from industry, academia, and government experts. The panel was charted to address the needs of near-term engine development programs and to make recommendations whose implementation would provide not only sufficient data but also the analysis capabilities to design stable and efficient engines. The panel was also chartered to make long-term recommendations toward developing mechanistic analysis models that would not be limited by design geometry or operating regime. These models would accurately predict stability and thereby minimize the amount of subscale testing for anchoring. The panel has held workshops on acoustic absorbing devices, combustion instability mechanisms, instability test hardware, and combustion instability computational methods. At these workshops, research projects that would meet the panel's charter were suggested. The JANNAF Liquid Rocket Combustion Instability Panel's conclusions about the work that needs to be done and recommendations on how to approach it, based on evaluation of the suggested research projects, are presented.

  11. Signal Processing Methods for Liquid Rocket Engine Combustion Spontaneous Stability and Rough Combustion Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, R. Jeremy; Casiano, Matthew; Fischbach, Sean; Hulka, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Liquid rocket engine combustion stability assessments are traditionally broken into three categories: dynamic stability, spontaneous stability, and rough combustion. This work focuses on comparing the spontaneous stability and rough combustion assessments for several liquid engine programs. The techniques used are those developed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the J-2X Workhorse Gas Generator program. Stability assessment data from the Integrated Powerhead Demonstrator (IPD), FASTRAC, and Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine (CECE) programs are compared against previously processed J-2X Gas Generator data. Prior metrics for spontaneous stability assessments are updated based on the compilation of all data sets.

  12. On Nonlinear Combustion Instability in Liquid Propellant Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, J. D. (Technical Monitor); Flandro, Gary A.; Majdalani, Joseph; Sims, Joseph D.

    2004-01-01

    All liquid propellant rocket instability calculations in current use have limited value in the predictive sense and serve mainly as a correlating framework for the available data sets. The well-known n-t model first introduced by Crocco and Cheng in 1956 is still used as the primary analytical tool of this type. A multitude of attempts to establish practical analytical methods have achieved only limited success. These methods usually produce only stability boundary maps that are of little use in making critical design decisions in new motor development programs. Recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of combustion instability in solid propellant rockets"' provides a firm foundation for a new approach to prediction, diagnosis, and correction of the closely related problems in liquid motor instability. For predictive tools to be useful in the motor design process, they must have the capability to accurately determine: 1) time evolution of the pressure oscillations and limit amplitude, 2) critical triggering pulse amplitude, and 3) unsteady heat transfer rates at injector surfaces and chamber walls. The method described in this paper relates these critical motor characteristics directly to system design parameters. Inclusion of mechanisms such as wave steepening, vorticity production and transport, and unsteady detonation wave phenomena greatly enhance the representation of key features of motor chamber oscillatory behavior. The basic theoretical model is described and preliminary computations are compared to experimental data. A plan to develop the new predictive method into a comprehensive analysis tool is also described.

  13. Low-Frequency Combustion Instability Induced by the Combustion Time Lag of Liquid Oxidizer in Hybrid Rocket Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Takakazu; Kitagawa, Koki; Yuasa, Saburo; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Shimada, Toru

    This paper deals with a theoretical analysis of the low-frequency combustion instability induced by the combustion time lag of liquid oxidizer in small-scale hybrid rocket motors. We obtained the determined linear stability limit using the following parameters: the combustion time delay of liquid oxidizer, the residence time of a combustion chamber, injector pressure, chamber pressure, mass flux exponent, O/F, and the polytropic exponent of mixture gas in a combustion chamber. Kitagawa and Yuasa sometimes observed low-frequency oscillations, such as chugging, in their swirling-oxidizer-flow-type hybrid rocket engine. The obtained theoretical stability limit was compared with these experimental data.

  14. Supersonic-combustion rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, R. J.; Franciscus, L. C. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A supersonic combustion rocket is provided in which a small rocket motor is substituted for heavy turbo pumps in a conventional rocket engine. The substitution results in a substantial reduction in rocket engine weight. The flame emanating from the small rocket motor can act to ignite non-hypergolic fuels.

  15. Liquid rocket engine self-cooled combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Self-cooled combustion chambers are chambers in which the chamber wall temperature is controlled by methods other than fluid flow within the chamber wall supplied from an external source. In such chambers, adiabatic wall temperature may be controlled by use of upstream fluid components such as the injector or a film-coolant ring, or by internal flow of self-contained materials; e.g. pyrolysis gas flow in charring ablators, and the flow of infiltrated liquid metals in porous matrices. Five types of self-cooled chambers are considered in this monograph. The name identifying the chamber is indicative of the method (mechanism) by which the chamber is cooled, as follows: ablative; radiation cooled; internally regenerative (Interegen); heat sink; adiabatic wall. Except for the Interegen and heat sink concepts, each chamber type is discussed separately. A separate and final section of the monograph deals with heat transfer to the chamber wall and treats Stanton number evaluation, film cooling, and film-coolant injection techniques, since these subjects are common to all chamber types. Techniques for analysis of gas film cooling and liquid film cooling are presented.

  16. Development of eddy current testing system for inspection of combustion chambers of liquid rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, D. F.; Zhang, Y. Z.; Shiwa, M.; Moriya, S.

    2013-01-01

    An eddy current testing (ECT) system using a high sensitive anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensor was developed. In this system, a 20 turn circular coil with a diameter of 3 mm was used to produce the excitation field. A high sensitivity AMR sensor was used to measure the magnetic field produced by the induced eddy currents. A specimen made of copper alloy was prepared to simulate the combustion chamber of liquid rocket. Scanning was realized by rotating the chamber with a motor. To reduce the influence of liftoff variance during scanning, a dual frequency excitation method was used. The experimental results proved that ECT system with an AMR sensor could be used to check liquid rocket combustion chamber.

  17. Development of eddy current testing system for inspection of combustion chambers of liquid rocket engines.

    PubMed

    He, D F; Zhang, Y Z; Shiwa, M; Moriya, S

    2013-01-01

    An eddy current testing (ECT) system using a high sensitive anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensor was developed. In this system, a 20 turn circular coil with a diameter of 3 mm was used to produce the excitation field. A high sensitivity AMR sensor was used to measure the magnetic field produced by the induced eddy currents. A specimen made of copper alloy was prepared to simulate the combustion chamber of liquid rocket. Scanning was realized by rotating the chamber with a motor. To reduce the influence of liftoff variance during scanning, a dual frequency excitation method was used. The experimental results proved that ECT system with an AMR sensor could be used to check liquid rocket combustion chamber. PMID:23387673

  18. Vacuum Plasma Spray Forming of Copper Alloy Liners for Regeneratively Cooled Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) has been demonstrated as a method to form combustion chambers from copper alloys NARloy-Z and GRCop-84. Vacuum plasma spray forming is of particular interest in the forming of CuCrNb alloys such as GRCop-84, developed by NASA s Glenn Research Center, because the alloy cannot be formed using conventional casting and forging methods. This limitation is related to the levels of chromium and niobium in the alloy, which exceed the solubility limit in copper. Until recently, the only forming process that maintained the required microstructure of CrNb intermetallics was powder metallurgy formation of a billet from powder stock, followed by extrusion. This severely limits its usefulness in structural applications, particularly the complex shapes required for combustion chamber liners. This paper discusses the techniques used to form combustion chambers from CuCrNb and NARloy-Z, which will be used in regeneratively cooled liquid rocket combustion chambers.

  19. Combustion performance of bipropellant liquid rocket engine combustors with fuel-impingement cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, T.L.; Chiang, W.; Jang, S.

    1995-05-01

    In order to obtain an accurate combustion analyses which are important in the thruster design of modern advanced liquid rocket engine, flow analysis should be conducted from the injector phase down to the propulsive nozzle throat. Thus, in the present study, flow analysis for the axisymmetric thrust chamber of an OMV(exp 3) installed with a pintle-type ring-shaped injector and a conical convergent nozzle is conducted. Liquid monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) storable bipropellants are used as fuel and oxidizer sources. An optimum injected fuel and oxidizer droplet-size combination is proposed. Finally, the results obtained are presented. 4 refs.

  20. Spread Across Liquids: The World's First Microgravity Combustion Experiment on a Sounding Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Spread Across Liquids (SAL) experiment characterizes how flames spread over liquid pools in a low-gravity environment in comparison to test data at Earth's gravity and with numerical models. The modeling and experimental data provide a more complete understanding of flame spread, an area of textbook interest, and add to our knowledge about on-orbit and Earthbound fire behavior and fire hazards. The experiment was performed on a sounding rocket to obtain the necessary microgravity period. Such crewless sounding rockets provide a comparatively inexpensive means to fly very complex, and potentially hazardous, experiments and perform reflights at a very low additional cost. SAL was the first sounding-rocket-based, microgravity combustion experiment in the world. It was expected that gravity would affect ignition susceptibility and flame spread through buoyant convection in both the liquid pool and the gas above the pool. Prior to these sounding rocket tests, however, it was not clear whether the fuel would ignite readily and whether a flame would be sustained in microgravity. It also was not clear whether the flame spread rate would be faster or slower than in Earth's gravity.

  1. Signal Processing Methods for Liquid Rocket Engine Combustion Stability Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, R. Jeremy; Lee, Erik; Hulka, James R.; Casiano, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The J2X Gas Generator engine design specifications include dynamic, spontaneous, and broadband combustion stability requirements. These requirements are verified empirically based high frequency chamber pressure measurements and analyses. Dynamic stability is determined with the dynamic pressure response due to an artificial perturbation of the combustion chamber pressure (bomb testing), and spontaneous and broadband stability are determined from the dynamic pressure responses during steady operation starting at specified power levels. J2X Workhorse Gas Generator testing included bomb tests with multiple hardware configurations and operating conditions, including a configuration used explicitly for engine verification test series. This work covers signal processing techniques developed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to help assess engine design stability requirements. Dynamic stability assessments were performed following both the CPIA 655 guidelines and a MSFC in-house developed statistical-based approach. The statistical approach was developed to better verify when the dynamic pressure amplitudes corresponding to a particular frequency returned back to pre-bomb characteristics. This was accomplished by first determining the statistical characteristics of the pre-bomb dynamic levels. The pre-bomb statistical characterization provided 95% coverage bounds; these bounds were used as a quantitative measure to determine when the post-bomb signal returned to pre-bomb conditions. The time for post-bomb levels to acceptably return to pre-bomb levels was compared to the dominant frequency-dependent time recommended by CPIA 655. Results for multiple test configurations, including stable and unstable configurations, were reviewed. Spontaneous stability was assessed using two processes: 1) characterization of the ratio of the peak response amplitudes to the excited chamber acoustic mode amplitudes and 2) characterization of the variability of the peak response

  2. The prediction of nonlinear three dimensional combustion instability in liquid rockets with conventional nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, E. A.; Zinn, B. T.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical technique is developed to solve nonlinear three-dimensional, transverse and axial combustion instability problems associated with liquid-propellant rocket motors. The Method of Weighted Residuals is used to determine the nonlinear stability characteristics of a cylindrical combustor with uniform injection of propellants at one end and a conventional DeLaval nozzle at the other end. Crocco's pressure sensitive time-lag model is used to describe the unsteady combustion process. The developed model predicts the transient behavior and nonlinear wave shapes as well as limit-cycle amplitudes and frequencies typical of unstable motor operation. The limit-cycle amplitude increases with increasing sensitivity of the combustion process to pressure oscillations. For transverse instabilities, calculated pressure waveforms exhibit sharp peaks and shallow minima, and the frequency of oscillation is within a few percent of the pure acoustic mode frequency. For axial instabilities, the theory predicts a steep-fronted wave moving back and forth along the combustor.

  3. Nonlinear analysis of longitudinal-mode liquid propellant rocket combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, San-Mou; Litchford, Ron J.

    1991-01-01

    A computational technique for the nonlinear analysis of longitudinal-mode liquid propellant rocket combustion instability is examined based on the unsteady, quasi-one-dimensional Euler equations with appropriate source terms introduced to account for interphase transport coupling with the spray. The method is first assessed for unsteady, nonreacting, isentropic duct flow with specified admittances at the outflow and inflow boundaries. For small amplitude disturbances, numerical results based on a sufficient number of grid points compare favorably with predictions from a small-disturbance linearized analysis.

  4. Robust Low Cost Liquid Rocket Combustion Chamber by Advanced Vacuum Plasma Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard; Elam, Sandra; McKechnie, Timothy; Hickman, Robert; Stinson, Thomas N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Next-generation, regeneratively cooled rocket engines require materials that can meet high temperatures while resisting the corrosive oxidation-reduction reaction of combustion known as blanching, the main cause of engine failure. A project was initiated at NASA-Marshal Space Flight Center (MSFC) to combine three existing technologies to build and demonstrate an advanced liquid rocket engine combustion chamber that would provide a 100 mission life. Technology developed in microgravity research to build cartridges for space furnaces was utilized to vacuum plasma spray (VPS) a functional gradient coating on the hot wall of the combustion liner as one continuous operation, eliminating any bondline between the coating and the liner. The coating was NiCrAlY, developed previously as durable protective coatings on space shuttle high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) turbine blades. A thermal model showed that 0.03 in. NiCrAlY applied to the hot wall of the combustion liner would reduce the hot wall temperature 200 F, a 20% reduction, for longer life. Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy, which was developed by NASA-Glenn Research Center (GRC), and which possesses excellent high temperature strength, creep resistance, and low cycle fatigue behavior combined with exceptional thermal stability, was utilized as the liner material in place of NARloy-Z. The Cu-8Cr-4Nb material exhibits better mechanical properties at 650 C (1200 F) than NARloy-Z does at 538 C (1000 F). VPS formed Cu-8Cr-4Nb combustion chamber liners with a protective NiCrAlY functional gradient coating have been hot fire tested, successfully demonstrating a durable coating for the first time. Hot fire tests along with tensile and low cycle fatigue properties of the VPS formed combustion chamber liners and witness panel specimens are discussed.

  5. Baseline Computational Fluid Dynamics Methodology for Longitudinal-Mode Liquid-Propellant Rocket Combustion Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    A computational method for the analysis of longitudinal-mode liquid rocket combustion instability has been developed based on the unsteady, quasi-one-dimensional Euler equations where the combustion process source terms were introduced through the incorporation of a two-zone, linearized representation: (1) A two-parameter collapsed combustion zone at the injector face, and (2) a two-parameter distributed combustion zone based on a Lagrangian treatment of the propellant spray. The unsteady Euler equations in inhomogeneous form retain full hyperbolicity and are integrated implicitly in time using second-order, high-resolution, characteristic-based, flux-differencing spatial discretization with Roe-averaging of the Jacobian matrix. This method was initially validated against an analytical solution for nonreacting, isentropic duct acoustics with specified admittances at the inflow and outflow boundaries. For small amplitude perturbations, numerical predictions for the amplification coefficient and oscillation period were found to compare favorably with predictions from linearized small-disturbance theory as long as the grid exceeded a critical density (100 nodes/wavelength). The numerical methodology was then exercised on a generic combustor configuration using both collapsed and distributed combustion zone models with a short nozzle admittance approximation for the outflow boundary. In these cases, the response parameters were varied to determine stability limits defining resonant coupling onset.

  6. Concerning the problem of dynamic damping of the vibration combustion self-oscillations in a liquid-propellant rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basok, B. I.; Gotsulenko, V. V.; Gotsulenko, V. N.

    2012-11-01

    The reason for the decrease in the amplitude of longitudinal vibration combustion self-oscillations in the combustion chamber of a liquid-propellant rocket engine by means of antipulse partitions has been justified. A mathematical model of the development of combustion instability in such a chamber on attachment of a Helmholtz resonator to it has been obtained. The character of the damping of vibration combustion self-oscillations excited by the action of the Crocco mechanisms and negative thermal resistance, when varying the acoustic parameters of the resonator and of the pressure head characteristics of combustion chamber is established.

  7. Injection Principles from Combustion Studies in a 200-Pound-Thrust Rocket Engine Using Liquid Oxygen and Heptane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidmann, M. F.; Auble, C. M.

    1955-01-01

    The importance of atomizing and mixing liquid oxygen and heptane was studied in a 200-pound-thrust rocket engine. Ten injector elements were used with both steel and transparent chambers. Characteristic velocity was measured over a range of mixture ratios. Combustion gas-flow and luminosity patterns within the chamber were obtained by photographic methods. The results show that, for efficient combustion, the propellants should be both atomized and mixed. Heptane atomization controlled the combustion rate to a much larger extent than oxygen atomization. Induced mixing, however, was required to complete combustion in the smallest volume. For stable, high-efficiency combustion and smooth engine starts, mixing after atomization was most promising.

  8. Robust Low Cost Liquid Rocket Combustion Chamber by Advanced Vacuum Plasma Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard; Elam, Sandra; Ellis, David L.; McKechnie, Timothy; Hickman, Robert; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Next-generation, regeneratively cooled rocket engines will require materials that can withstand high temperatures while retaining high thermal conductivity. Fabrication techniques must be cost efficient so that engine components can be manufactured within the constraints of shrinking budgets. Three technologies have been combined to produce an advanced liquid rocket engine combustion chamber at NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using relatively low-cost, vacuum-plasma-spray (VPS) techniques. Copper alloy NARloy-Z was replaced with a new high performance Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy developed by NASA-Glenn Research Center (GRC), which possesses excellent high-temperature strength, creep resistance, and low cycle fatigue behavior combined with exceptional thermal stability. Functional gradient technology, developed building composite cartridges for space furnaces was incorporated to add oxidation resistant and thermal barrier coatings as an integral part of the hot wall of the liner during the VPS process. NiCrAlY, utilized to produce durable protective coating for the space shuttle high pressure fuel turbopump (BPFTP) turbine blades, was used as the functional gradient material coating (FGM). The FGM not only serves as a protection from oxidation or blanching, the main cause of engine failure, but also serves as a thermal barrier because of its lower thermal conductivity, reducing the temperature of the combustion liner 200 F, from 1000 F to 800 F producing longer life. The objective of this program was to develop and demonstrate the technology to fabricate high-performance, robust, inexpensive combustion chambers for advanced propulsion systems (such as Lockheed-Martin's VentureStar and NASA's Reusable Launch Vehicle, RLV) using the low-cost VPS process. VPS formed combustion chamber test articles have been formed with the FGM hot wall built in and hot fire tested, demonstrating for the first time a coating that will remain intact through the hot firing test, and with

  9. Experimental investigation of high-frequency combustion instabilities in liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richecoeur, F.; Ducruix, S.; Scouflaire, P.; Candel, S.

    2008-01-01

    High-frequency instabilities in liquid propellant rocket engines are experimentally investigated in a model scale research facility. Liquid oxygen and gaseous methane are injected in the combustion chamber at 0.9 MPa through three coaxial injectors vertically aligned. High-amplitude transverse pressure fluctuations are generated in the chamber at frequencies above 1 kHz by a rotating toothed wheel actuator which periodically blocks an auxiliary lateral nozzle. The chamber eigenmodes are identified in a first stage by examining the response of the system to a linear frequency sweep. In a second stage the chamber is excited at the frequency corresponding to the first transverse (1T) mode. The effect of the pressure mode on combustion is observed with intensified and high-speed cameras. Photo-multipliers and pressure sensors are also used to characterize the system behavior and examine phase relations between the corresponding signals. Flame structure modifications observed for specific injection conditions correspond to a strong coupling between acoustics and combustion which notably modifies the flow dynamics, augments the flame expansion rate and enhances heat transfer to the wall.

  10. Computational and experimental investigations of carbon-ceramic composite materials thermochemical resistance in combustion products of liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, V. V.; Volkov, N. N.; Volkova, L. I.; Kondratenko, V. I.; Popov, V. A.; Tsatsuev, S. M.

    2009-09-01

    Computational and experimental investigations of thermochemical resistance of carbon-ceramic composites in the combustion products of liquid rocket engine (LRE) are presented. The tests with model extensions made of the composite material (CM) were performed. The test time was about 200 s. The maximal temperature of the material fire surface was 1600 K. Physical and numerical model of silicon carbide destruction was developed.

  11. The Effect of Rapid Liquid-Phase Reactions on Injector Design and Combustion in Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elverum, Gerard W., Jr.; Staudhammer, Peter

    1959-01-01

    Data are presented indicating the rates and magnitudes of energy released by the liquid-phase reactions of various propellant combinations. The data show that this energy release can contribute significantly to the rate of vaporization of the incoming propellants and thus aid the combustion process. Nevertheless, very low performances were obtained in rocket motors with conventional impinging-jet injectors when highly reactive systems such as N104-N2H4, were employed. A possible explanation for this low performance is that the initial reactions of such systems are so rapid that liquid-phase mixing is inhibited. Evidence for such an effect is presented in a series of color photographs of open flames using various injector elements. Based on these studies, some requirements are suggested for injector elements using highly reactive propellants. Experimental results are presented of motor tests using injector elements in which some of these requirements are met through the use of a set of concentric tubes. These tests, carried out at thrust levels of 40 to 800 lb per element, demonstrated combustion efficiencies of up to 98% based on equilibrium characteristic velocity values. Results are also presented for tests made with impinging-jet and splash-plate injectors for comparison.

  12. Scaling a single element combustor to replicate combustion instability modes of a liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Brian A.

    This research evaluated a method of scaling a single element sub-scale combustor to match the combustion instability modes of a full-scale liquid rocket engine. The experiments used a shear-coaxial injector in an atmospheric chamber using gaseous oxygen and a heated gaseous methane/nitrogen fuel mixture. The flow conditions matched the full-scale equivalence ratio, propellant velocities and propellant volumetric flow rates. The first set of experiments empirically determined the effect of chamber diameter on chamber temperature. The results were used to calculate the dimensions of the sub-scaled combustion chamber that would match the transverse frequencies of the full-scale engine. The scaled chamber was used in two sets of experiments. The stationary tests placed the injector at the center of the chamber and 0.25 in. from the wall. The centered test displayed evidence of coupling between the 1L chamber mode and the injector oxygen post at 885 Hz. Injector coupling was also observed during experiments with the full-scale rocket engine. With the injector 0.25 in. from the wall, the average chamber temperature dropped about 350°C from the centered test. As a consequence, the frequencies of the transverse modes were lower than the full-scale values. No major difference was found in this research between the stable and unstable set points of the full-scale engine. A translating stage was used to evaluate where various chamber modes appear as a function of injector location. The results show that the 1L chamber mode is present at every location and transverse modes appear as the injector moves near the wall.

  13. Lagrangian modelling of turbulent spray combustion under liquid rocket engine conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomet, Laurent; Robin, Vincent; Mura, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    In the field of liquid rocket propulsion, the use of computational design tools, such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solvers, may provide a great deal of help to proceed with the primary design choice. Considering the complexity of rocket engine geometries, as well as associated fluid flow conditions, the use of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) numerical simulations remains very popular. Important modelling efforts are therefore still required to provide reliable computational models able to describe the complex interaction that takes place between turbulence and chemistry in such cryogenic high-speed flows. The present manuscript reports the results of some recent investigations conducted in this field. The modelling analysis relies on a Lagrangian framework, the salient features of which consist in approximating the Lagrangian path in a reduced composition space made up of the mixture fraction variable, i.e. a conserved scalar introduced to represent the variations of composition, and a progress variable, i.e. a reactive scalar to follow the departures from chemical equilibrium. The retained methodology allows to presume the joint probability density function of the two scalar fields without invoking the assumption of statistical independence between them. Equivalence ratio fluctuations induced by the vaporization of the liquid phase are considered as additional sources terms appearing in the transport equation of the mixture fraction variance. The transport of the corresponding mean scalar dissipation rate (SDR), which is a key quantity in the corresponding closure, is also affected by the vaporization processes. The proposed model has been implemented into the U-RANS CFD code N3S_Natur, while the liquid phase is described using a Lagrangian module. The capabilities of the computation model are evaluated through a detailed comparison with the experimental databases gathered on the ONERA Mascotte test bench. The corresponding test rig consists of a

  14. Liquid propellant rocket engine combustion simulation with a time-accurate CFD method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. S.; Shang, H. M.; Liaw, Paul; Hutt, J.

    1993-01-01

    Time-accurate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) algorithms are among the basic requirements as an engineering or research tool for realistic simulations of transient combustion phenomena, such as combustion instability, transient start-up, etc., inside the rocket engine combustion chamber. A time-accurate pressure based method is employed in the FDNS code for combustion model development. This is in connection with other program development activities such as spray combustion model development and efficient finite-rate chemistry solution method implementation. In the present study, a second-order time-accurate time-marching scheme is employed. For better spatial resolutions near discontinuities (e.g., shocks, contact discontinuities), a 3rd-order accurate TVD scheme for modeling the convection terms is implemented in the FDNS code. Necessary modification to the predictor/multi-corrector solution algorithm in order to maintain time-accurate wave propagation is also investigated. Benchmark 1-D and multidimensional test cases, which include the classical shock tube wave propagation problems, resonant pipe test case, unsteady flow development of a blast tube test case, and H2/O2 rocket engine chamber combustion start-up transient simulation, etc., are investigated to validate and demonstrate the accuracy and robustness of the present numerical scheme and solution algorithm.

  15. Acoustic tuning of gas liquid scheme injectors for acoustic damping in a combustion chamber of a liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Chae Hoon; Park, I.-Sun; Kim, Seong-Ku; Jip Kim, Hong

    2007-07-01

    In a combustion chamber of a liquid rocket engine, acoustic fine-tuning of gas-liquid scheme injectors is studied numerically for acoustic stability by adopting a linear acoustic analysis. Injector length and blockage ratio at gas inlet are adjusted for fine-tuning. First, acoustic behavior in the combustor with a single injector is investigated and acoustic-damping effect of the injector is evaluated for cold condition by the quantitative parameter of damping factor as a function of injector length. From the numerical results, it is found that the injector can play a significant role in acoustic damping when it is tuned finely. The optimum tuning-length of the injector to maximize the damping capacity corresponds to half of a full wavelength of the first longitudinal overtone mode traveling in the injector with the acoustic frequency intended for damping in the chamber. In baffled chamber, the optimum lengths of the injector are calculated as a function of baffle length for both cold and hot conditions. Next, in the combustor with numerous resonators, peculiar acoustic coupling between a combustion chamber and injectors is observed. As the injector length approaches a half-wavelength, the new injector-coupled acoustic mode shows up and thereby, the acoustic-damping effect of the tuned injectors is appreciably degraded. And, damping factor maintains a near-constant value with blockage ratio and then, decreases rapidly. Blockage ratio affects also acoustic damping and should be considered for acoustic tuning.

  16. The role of density gradient in liquid rocket engine combustion instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Amardip

    Experimental and analytical studies were conducted to investigate key physical mechanisms responsible for flame-acoustic coupling during the onset of acoustically driven combustion instabilities in liquid rocket engines (LREs). Controlled experiments were conducted in which a turbulent Hydrogen-Oxygen (GH2-GO2) diffusion flame, established downstream of a two-dimensional model shear coaxial injector was acoustically forced by a compression driver unit mounted in a transverse direction and excited through a broad range of frequencies (200Hz-2000Hz) and amplitudes. Characteristic interactions between flame and acoustics visualized through OH* and CH* chemiluminescence imaging and dynamic pressure measurements obtained using high frequency dynamic pressure transducers indicated that small acoustic disturbances could be amplified by flame-acoustic coupling under certain conditions leading to substantial modulation in spatial heat release fluctuations. Density gradient between fuel and oxidizer was found to significantly affect the way acoustic waves interacted with density stratified flame fronts. The particular case of an asymmetric flame front oscillation under transverse acoustic forcing indicated that baroclinic vorticity, generated by the interactions between misaligned pressure gradient (across the acoustic wave) and density gradient (across the fuel oxidizer interface) could further amplify flame front distortions. Asymmetric interaction between flame and acoustics is shown to occur preferentially on flame fronts where controlled waves from the compression driver travel from lighter fluid to denser fluid and the amount of interaction between flame and acoustics is shown to depend strongly on the density ratio between the fluids on either sides of the flame front. This observation is in agreement with the baroclinic vorticity mechanism and a variant of the classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability mechanism. The results provide the first known experimental evidence

  17. Photographic Study of Combustion in a Rocket Engine I : Variation in Combustion of Liquid Oxygen and Gasoline with Seven Methods of Propellant Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellman, Donald R; Humphrey, Jack C

    1948-01-01

    Motion pictures at camera speeds up to 3000 frames per second were taken of the combustion of liquid oxygen and gasoline in a 100-pound-thrust rocket engine. The engine consisted of thin contour and injection plates clamped between two clear plastic sheets forming a two-dimensional engine with a view of the entire combustion chamber and nozzle. A photographic investigation was made of the effect of seven methods of propellant injection on the uniformity of combustion. From the photographs, it was found that the flame front extended almost to the faces of the injectors with most of the injection methods, all the injection systems resulted in a considerable nonuniformity of combustion, and luminosity rapidly decreased in the divergent part of the nozzle. Pressure vibration records indicated combustion vibrations that approximately corresponded to the resonant frequencies of the length and the thickness of the chamber. The combustion temperature divided by the molecular weight of the combustion gases as determined from the combustion photographs was about 50 to 70 percent of the theoretical value.

  18. Development of a three-phrase combustion code for modeling liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, P. Y.; Chang, Y. M.

    1984-01-01

    A two-dimensional/axisymmetric program for the simulation of three-phase reactive flows is presented. The three phases are: a multiple-species gaseous phase, a single-species liquid phase, and a particulate droplet phase. The liquid and gaseous phases are described with continuous Eulerian equations, while the droplets are described in a discrete Lagrangian fashion. The three phases are fully coupled together. An atomization model, a multireaction chemical kinetics model, and a subgrid scale turbulence model completes the description of a general liquid/gas bipropellant combustion process. The code development criteria and qualitative features are highlighted.

  19. Transient combustion in hybrid rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabeyoglu, Mustafa Arif

    1998-09-01

    Hybrid rockets regained interest recently as an alternative chemical propulsion system due to their advantages over the solid and liquid systems that are currently in use. Development efforts on hybrids revealed two important problem areas: (1) low frequency instabilities and (2) slow transient response. Both of these are closely related to the transient behavior which is a poorly understood aspect of hybrid operation. This thesis is mainly involved with a theoretical study of transient combustion in hybrid rockets. We follow the methodology of identifying and modeling the subsystems of the motor such as the thermal lags in the solid, boundary layer combustion and chamber gasdynamics from a dynamic point of view. We begin with the thermal lag in the solid which yield the regression rate for any given wall heat flux variation. Interesting phenomena such as overshooting during throttling and the amplification and phase lead regions in the frequency domain are discovered. Later we develop a quasi-steady transient hybrid combustion model supported with time delays for the boundary layer processes. This is integrated with the thermal lag system to obtain the thermal combustion (TC) coupled response. The TC coupled system with positive delays generated low frequency instabilities. The scaling of the instabilities are in good agreement with actual motor test data. Finally, we formulate a gasdynamic model for the hybrid chamber which successfully resolves the filling/emptying and longitudinal acoustic behavior of the motor. The TC coupled system is later integrated to the gasdynamic model to obtain the overall response (TCG coupled system) of gaseous oxidizer motors with stiff feed systems. Low frequency instabilities were also encountered for the TCG coupled system. Apart from the transient investigations, the regression rate behavior of liquefying hybrid propellants such as solid cryogenic materials are also studied. The theory is based on the possibility of enhancement

  20. Uncertainty Quantification of Non-linear Oscillation Triggering in a Multi-injector Liquid-propellant Rocket Combustion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Pavel; Sideris, Athanasios; Sirignano, William

    2014-11-01

    We examine the non-linear dynamics of the transverse modes of combustion-driven acoustic instability in a liquid-propellant rocket engine. Triggering can occur, whereby small perturbations from mean conditions decay, while larger disturbances grow to a limit-cycle of amplitude that may compare to the mean pressure. For a deterministic perturbation, the system is also deterministic, computed by coupled finite-volume solvers at low computational cost for a single realization. The randomness of the triggering disturbance is captured by treating the injector flow rates, local pressure disturbances, and sudden acceleration of the entire combustion chamber as random variables. The combustor chamber with its many sub-fields resulting from many injector ports may be viewed as a multi-scale complex system wherein the developing acoustic oscillation is the emergent structure. Numerical simulation of the resulting stochastic PDE system is performed using the polynomial chaos expansion method. The overall probability of unstable growth is assessed in different regions of the parameter space. We address, in particular, the seven-injector, rectangular Purdue University experimental combustion chamber. In addition to the novel geometry, new features include disturbances caused by engine acceleration and unsteady thruster nozzle flow.

  1. Numerical simulation of operation processes in the combustion chamber and gas generator of oxygen-methane liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, G. P.; Larionov, A. A.; Sidlerov, D. A.; Yanchilin, L. A.

    2009-09-01

    The results of numerical simulations of processes in gas generators and combustion chambers operating on oxygen and methane are presented. Specific features of mixing, evaporation, and combustion of propellants have been investigated. The degree of combustion completeness in chambers with three types of injectors - coaxial-jet gas-liquid, liquid-liquid monopropellant, and bipropellant impinging-jets injectors - has been estimated.

  2. High-frequency combustion instability control through acoustic modulation at the inlet boundary for liquid rocket engine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennewitz, John William

    model-predicted mode stability transition was consistent with experimental observations, supporting the premise that inlet acoustic modulation is a means to control high-frequency combustion instabilities. From the modal analysis, it may be deduced that the inlet impedance provides a damping mechanism for instability suppression. Combined, this work demonstrates the strategic application of acoustic modulation within an injector as a potential method to control high-frequency combustion instabilities for liquid rocket engine applications.

  3. High-pressure calorimeter chamber tests for liquid oxygen/kerosene (LOX/RP-1) rocket combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, Philip A.; Armstrong, Elizabeth S.; Price, Harold G.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to investigate the rocket combustion and heat transfer characteristics of liquid oxygen/kerosene (LOX/RP-1) mixtures at high chamber pressures. Two water-cooled calorimeter chambers of different combustion lengths were tested using 37- and 61-element oxidizer-fuel-oxidizer triplet injectors. The tests were conducted at nominal chamber pressures of 4.1, 8.3, and 13.8 MPa abs (600, 1200, and 2000 psia). Heat flux Q/A data were obtained for the entire calorimeter length for oxygen/fuel mixture ratios of 1.8 to 3.3. Test data at 4.1 MPa abs compared favorably with previous test data from another source. Using an injector with a fuel-rich outer zone reduced the throat heat flux by 47 percent with only a 4.5 percent reduction in the characteristic exhaust velocity efficiency C* sub eff. The throat heat transfer coefficient was reduced approximately 40 percent because of carbon deposits on the chamber wall.

  4. Hybrid rocket combustion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strand, L. D.; Ray, R. L.; Cohen, N. S.

    1993-06-01

    The objectives of this study of 'pure' or 'classic' hybrids are to (1) extend our understanding of the boundary layer combustion process and the critical engineering parameters that define this process, (2) develop an up-to-date hybrid fuel combustion model, and (3) apply the model to correlate the regression rate and scaling properties of potential fuel candidates. Tests were carried out with a hybrid slab window motor, using several diagnostic techniques, over a range of motor pressure and oxidizer mass flux conditions. The results basically confirmed turbulent boundary layer heat and mass transfer as the rate limiting process for hybrid fuel decomposition and combustion. The measured fuel regression rates showed good agreement with the analytical model predictions. The results of model scaling calculations to Shuttle SRM size conditions are presented.

  5. Hybrid rocket combustion study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strand, L. D.; Ray, R. L.; Cohen, N. S.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this study of 'pure' or 'classic' hybrids are to (1) extend our understanding of the boundary layer combustion process and the critical engineering parameters that define this process, (2) develop an up-to-date hybrid fuel combustion model, and (3) apply the model to correlate the regression rate and scaling properties of potential fuel candidates. Tests were carried out with a hybrid slab window motor, using several diagnostic techniques, over a range of motor pressure and oxidizer mass flux conditions. The results basically confirmed turbulent boundary layer heat and mass transfer as the rate limiting process for hybrid fuel decomposition and combustion. The measured fuel regression rates showed good agreement with the analytical model predictions. The results of model scaling calculations to Shuttle SRM size conditions are presented.

  6. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Shamim

    2005-01-01

    Comprehensive Liquid Rocket Engine testing is essential to risk reduction for Space Flight. Test capability represents significant national investments in expertise and infrastructure. Historical experience underpins current test capabilities. Test facilities continually seek proactive alignment with national space development goals and objectives including government and commercial sectors.

  7. Liquid rocket valve components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A monograph on valves for use with liquid rocket propellant engines is presented. The configurations of the various types of valves are described and illustrated. Design criteria and recommended practices for the various valves are explained. Tables of data are included to show the chief features of valve components in use on operational vehicles.

  8. Liquid rocket valve assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design and operating characteristics of valve assemblies used in liquid propellant rocket engines are discussed. The subjects considered are as follows: (1) valve selection parameters, (2) major design aspects, (3) design integration of valve subassemblies, and (4) assembly of components and functional tests. Information is provided on engine, stage, and spacecraft checkout procedures.

  9. Rockets using Liquid Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busemann, Adolf

    1947-01-01

    It is my task to discuss rocket propulsion using liquid oxygen and my treatment must be highly condensed for the ideas and experiments pertaining to this classic type of rocket are so numerous that one could occupy a whole morning with a detailed presentation. First, with regard to oxygen itself as compared with competing oxygen carriers, it is known that the liquid state of oxygen, in spite of the low boiling point, is more advantageous than the gaseous form of oxygen in pressure tanks, therefore only liquid oxygen need be compared with the oxygen carriers. The advantages of liquid oxygen are absolute purity and unlimited availability at relatively small cost in energy. The disadvantages are those arising from the impossibility of absolute isolation from heat; consequently, allowance must always be made for a certain degree of vaporization and only vented vessels can be used for storage and transportation. This necessity alone eliminates many fields of application, for example, at the front lines. In addition, liquid oxygen has a lower specific weight than other oxygen carriers, therefore many accessories become relatively larger and heavier in the case of an oxygen rocket, for example, the supply tanks and the pumps. The advantages thus become effective only in those cases where definitely scheduled operation and a large ground organization are possible and when the flight requires a great concentration of energy relative to weight. With the aim of brevity, a diagram of an oxygen rocket will be presented and the problem of various component parts that receive particularly thorough investigation in this classic case but which are also often applicable to other rocket types will be referred to.

  10. Analysis of combustion instability in liquid fuel rocket motors. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, K. W.

    1979-01-01

    The development of an analytical technique used in the solution of nonlinear velocity-sensitive combustion instability problems is presented. The Galerkin method was used and proved successful. The pressure wave forms exhibit a strong second harmonic distortion and a variety of behaviors are possible depending on the nature of the combustion process and the parametric values involved. A one dimensional model provides insight into the problem by allowing a comparison of Galerkin solutions with more exact finite difference computations.

  11. Analysis of Combustion Instability in Liquid Fuel Rocket Motors. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, K. W.; Ventrice, M.

    1979-01-01

    The development of a technique to be used in the solution of nonlinear velocity-sensitive combustion instability problems is described. The orthogonal collocation method was investigated. It found that the results are heavily dependent on the location of the collocation points and characteristics of the equations, so the method was rejected as unreliabile. The Galerkin method, which has proved to be very successful in analysis of the pressure sensitive combustion instability was found to work very well. It was found that the pressure wave forms exhibit a strong second harmonic distortion and a variety of behaviors are possible depending on the nature of the combustion process and the parametric values involved. A one-dimensional model provides further insight into the problem by allowing a comparison of Galerkin solutions with more exact finite-difference computations.

  12. The prediction of nonlinear longitudinal combustion instability in liquid propellant rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lores, M. E.; Zinn, B. T.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical technique was developed to solve nonlinear longitudinal combustion instability problems. The analysis yields the transient and limit cycle behavior of unstable motors and the threshold amplitude required to trigger a linearly stable motor into unstable operation. The limit cycle waveforms were found to exhibit shock wave characteristics for most unstable engine operating conditions. A method of correlating the analytical solutions with experimental data was developed. Calculated results indicate that a second-order solution adequately describes the behavior of combustion instability oscillations over a broad range of engine operating conditions, but that higher order effects must be accounted for in order to investigate engine triggering.

  13. Microfabricated Liquid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, Alan H.; Joppin, C.; Kerrebrock, J. L.; Schneider, Steven J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Under NASA Glenn Research Center sponsorship, MIT has developed the concept of micromachined, bipropellant, liquid rocket engines. This is potentially a breakthrough technology changing the cost-performance tradeoffs for small propulsion systems, enabling new applications, and redefining the meaning of the term low-cost-access-to-space. With this NASA support, a liquid-cooled, gaseous propellant version of the thrust chamber and nozzle was designed, built, and tested as a first step. DARPA is currently funding MIT to demonstrate turbopumps and controls. The work performed herein was the second year of a proposed three-year effort to develop the technology and demonstrate very high power density, regeneratively cooled, liquid bipropellant rocket engine thrust chamber and nozzles. When combined with the DARPA turbopumps and controls, this work would enable the design and demonstration of a complete rocket propulsion system. The original MIT-NASA concept used liquid oxygen-ethanol propellants. The military applications important to DARPA imply that storable liquid propellants are needed. Thus, MIT examined various storable propellant combinations including N2O4 and hydrazine, and H2O2 and various hydrocarbons. The latter are preferred since they do not have the toxicity of N2O4 and hydrazine. In reflection of the newfound interest in H2O2, it is once again in production and available commercially. A critical issue for the microrocket engine concept is cooling of the walls in a regenerative design. This is even more important at microscale than for large engines due to cube-square scaling considerations. Furthermore, the coolant behavior of rocket propellants has not been characterized at microscale. Therefore, MIT designed and constructed an apparatus expressly for this purpose. The report details measurements of two candidate microrocket fuels, JP-7 and JP-10.

  14. Combustion Characteristics of a Swirling LOX Type Hybrid Rocket Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Koki; Yuasa, Saburo

    We have proposed a swirling oxidizer type hybrid rocket engine. In this paper, liquid oxygen (LOX) was used as oxidizer. Combustion tests of a hybrid rocket engine with a swirling LOX flow were conducted by changing the swirl strength. Ignition was rapid and reliable, and combustion of PMMA with swirling LOX was stable. Fuel regression rates, C* efficiency and specific impulse of the hybrid rocket engine with swirling LOX flow were smaller than those with swirling gaseous oxygen (GOX). This low performance may be restraint of atomization and vaporization of LOX by formation of a liquid layer on the PMMA fuel and a decline of angular momentum of the swirling LOX during vaporization. Combustion oscillation occurred when the ratios of differential pressure between injector pressure and chamber pressure to chamber pressure were small. This combustion oscillation was confirmed to be a “Chugging” mode due to combustion time lag of LOX.

  15. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Shamim

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Objectives and motivation for testing. Technology, Research and Development Test and Evaluation (RDT&E), evolutionary. Representative Liquid Rocket Engine (LRE) test compaigns. Apollo, shuttle, Expandable Launch Vehicles (ELV) propulsion. Overview of test facilities for liquid rocket engines. Boost, upper stage (sea-level and altitude). Statistics (historical) of Liquid Rocket Engine Testing. LOX/LH, LOX/RP, other development. Test project enablers: engineering tools, operations, processes, infrastructure.

  16. Advanced Materials and Manufacturing for Low-Cost, High-Performance Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E.; Arrieta, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    A document describes the low-cost manufacturing of C103 niobium alloy combustion chambers, and the use of a high-temperature, oxidation-resistant coating that is superior to the standard silicide coating. The manufacturing process involved low-temperature spray deposition of C103 on removable plastic mandrels produced by rapid prototyping. Thin, vapor-deposited platinum-indium coatings were shown to substantially improve oxidation resistance relative to the standard silicide coating. Development of different low-cost plastic thrust chamber mandrel materials and prototyping processes (selective laser sintering and stereolithography) yielded mandrels with good dimensional accuracy (within a couple of mils) for this stage of development. The feasibility of using the kinetic metallization cold-spray process for fabrication of free-standing C1O3 thrusters on removable plastic mandrels was also demonstrated. The ambient and elevated temperature mechanical properties of the material were shown to be reasonably good relative to conventionally processed C103, but the greatest potential benefit is that coldsprayed chambers require minimal post-process machining, resulting in substantially lower machining and material costs. The platinum-iridium coating was shown to provide greatly increased oxidation resistance over the silicide when evaluated through oxyacetylene torch testing to as high as 300 F (= 150 C). The iridium component minimizes reaction with the niobium alloy chamber at high temperatures, and provides the high-temperature oxidation resistance needed at the throat.

  17. Up the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) Scale to Demonstrate a Robust, Long Life, Liquid Rocket Engine Combustion Chamber, or...Up the Downstairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard; Elam, Sandra; McKechnie, Timothy; Power, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Advanced vacuum plasma spray (VPS) technology, utilized to successfully apply thermal barrier coatings to space shuttle main engine turbine blades, was further refined as a functional gradient material (FGM) process for space furnace cartridge experiments at 1600 C and for robust, long life combustion chambers for liquid rocket engines. A VPS/FGM 5K (5,000 lb. thrust) thruster has undergone 220 hot firing tests, in pristine condition, showing no wear, blanching or cooling channel cracks. Most recently, this technology has been applied to a 40K thruster, with scale up planned for a 194K Ares I, J-2X engine.

  18. Combustion Processes in Hybrid Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran,S.; Merkle, C. L.

    1996-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in the development of hybrid rocket engines for advanced launch vehicle applications. Hybrid propulsion systems use a solid fuel such as hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) along with a gaseous/liquid oxidizer. The performance of hybrid combustors depends on the convective and radiative heat fluxes to the fuel surface, the rate of pyrolysis in the solid phase, and the turbulent combustion processes in the gaseous phases. These processes in combination specify the regression rates of the fuel surface and thereby the utilization efficiency of the fuel. In this paper, we employ computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques in order to gain a quantitative understanding of the physical trends in hybrid rocket combustors. The computational modeling is tailored to ongoing experiments at Penn State that employ a two dimensional slab burner configuration. The coordinated computational/experimental effort enables model validation while providing an understanding of the experimental observations. Computations to date have included the full length geometry with and with the aft nozzle section as well as shorter length domains for extensive parametric characterization. HTPB is sed as the fuel with 1,3 butadiene being taken as the gaseous product of the pyrolysis. Pure gaseous oxygen is taken as the oxidizer. The fuel regression rate is specified using an Arrhenius rate reaction, which the fuel surface temperature is given by an energy balance involving gas-phase convection and radiation as well as thermal conduction in the solid-phase. For the gas-phase combustion, a two step global reaction is used. The standard kappa - epsilon model is used for turbulence closure. Radiation is presently treated using a simple diffusion approximation which is valid for large optical path lengths, representative of radiation from soot particles. Computational results are obtained to determine the trends in the fuel burning or

  19. Computational simulation of liquid rocket injector anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekwas, A. J.; Singhal, A. K.; Tam, L. T.; Davidian, K.

    1986-01-01

    A computer model has been developed to analyze the three-dimensional two-phase reactive flows in liquid fueled rocket combustors. The model is designed to study the influence of liquid propellant injection nonuniformities on the flow pattern, combustion and heat transfer within the combustor. The Eulerian-Lagrangian approach for simulating polidisperse spray flow, evaporation and combustion has been used. Full coupling between the phases is accounted for. A nonorthogonal, body fitted coordinate system along with a conservative control volume formulation is employed. The physical models built into the model include a kappa-epsilon turbulence model, a two-step chemical reaction, and the six-flux radiation model. Semiempirical models are used to describe all interphase coupling terms as well as chemical reaction rates. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate an analytical capability to predict the effects of reactant injection nonuniformities (injection anomalies) on combustion and heat transfer within the rocket combustion chamber. The results show promising application of the model to comprehensive modeling of liquid propellant rocket engines.

  20. Hypergolic bipropellant spray combustion and flow modelling in rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosiliere, Louis M.; Litchford, Ron J.; Jeng, San-Mou

    1990-01-01

    A predictive tool for hypergolic bipropellant spray combustion and flow evolution in small rocket combustion chambers is described. It encompasses a computational technique for the gas-phase governing equations, a discrete particle method for liquid bipropellant sprays, and constitutive models for combustion chemistry, interphase exchanges, and unlike impinging hypergolic spray interactions. Emphasis is placed on the phenomenological modeling of the hypergolic liquid bipropellant gasification processes. Sample computations with the N2H4-N2O4 propellant system are given in order to show some of the capabilities and inadequacies of this tool.

  1. Contact diagnostics of combustion products of rocket engines, their units, and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, N. N.; Ivanov, A. N.

    2013-12-01

    This article is devoted to a new block-module device used in the diagnostics of condensed combustion products of rocket engines during research and development with liquid-propellant rocket engines (Glushko NPO Energomash; engines RD-171, RD-180, and RD-191) and solid-propellant rocket motors. Soot samplings from the supersonic high-temperature jet of a high-power liquid-propellant rocket engine were taken by the given device for the first time in practice for closed-exhaust lines. A large quantity of significant results was also obtained during a combustion investigation of solid propellants within solid-propellant rocket motors.

  2. Liquid rocket combustor computer code development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, P. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Rocket Injector/Combustor Code (ARICC) that has been developed to model the complete chemical/fluid/thermal processes occurring inside rocket combustion chambers are highlighted. The code, derived from the CONCHAS-SPRAY code originally developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory incorporates powerful features such as the ability to model complex injector combustion chamber geometries, Lagrangian tracking of droplets, full chemical equilibrium and kinetic reactions for multiple species, a fractional volume of fluid (VOF) description of liquid jet injection in addition to the gaseous phase fluid dynamics, and turbulent mass, energy, and momentum transport. Atomization and droplet dynamic models from earlier generation codes are transplated into the present code. Currently, ARICC is specialized for liquid oxygen/hydrogen propellants, although other fuel/oxidizer pairs can be easily substituted.

  3. Liquid fuel injection elements for rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, George B., Jr. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Thrust chambers for liquid propellant rocket engines include three principal components. One of these components is an injector which contains a plurality of injection elements to meter the flow of propellants at a predetermined rate, and fuel to oxidizer mixture ratio, to introduce the mixture into the combustion chamber, and to cause them to be atomized within the combustion chamber so that even combustion takes place. Evolving from these injectors are tube injectors. These tube injectors have injection elements for injecting the oxidizer into the combustion chamber. The oxidizer and fuel must be metered at predetermined rates and mixture ratios in order to mix them within the combustion chamber so that combustion takes place smoothly and completely. Hence tube injectors are subject to improvement. An injection element for a liquid propellant rocket engine of the bipropellant type is provided which includes tangential fuel metering orifices, and a plurality of oxidizer tube injection elements whose injection tubes are also provided with tangential oxidizer entry slots and internal reed valves.

  4. Combustion of metal agglomerates in a solid rocket core flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, Filippo; Dossi, Stefano; DeLuca, Luigi T.

    2013-12-01

    The need for access to space may require the use of solid propellants. High thrust and density are appealing features for different applications, spanning from boosting phase to other service applications (separation, de-orbiting, orbit insertion). Aluminum is widely used as a fuel in composite solid rocket motors because metal oxidation increases enthalpy release in combustion chamber and grants higher specific impulse. Combustion process of metal particles is complex and involves aggregation, agglomeration and evolution of reacting particulate inside the core flow of the rocket. It is always stated that residence time should be enough in order to grant complete metal oxidation but agglomerate initial size, rocket grain geometry, burning rate, and other factors have to be reconsidered. New space missions may not require large rocket systems and metal combustion efficiency becomes potentially a key issue to understand whether solid propulsion embodies a viable solution or liquid/hybrid systems are better. A simple model for metal combustion is set up in this paper. Metal particles are represented as single drops trailed by the core flow and reacted according to Beckstead's model. The fluid dynamics is inviscid, incompressible, 1D. The paper presents parametric computations on ideal single-size particles as well as on experimental agglomerate populations as a function of operating rocket conditions and geometries.

  5. Quantifying Instability Sources in Liquid Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Richard C.; Cheng, Gary C.

    2000-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics methodology to predict the effects of combusting flows on acoustic pressure oscillations in liquid rocket engines (LREs) is under development. 'Me intent of the investigation is to develop the causal physics of combustion driven acoustic resonances in LREs. The crux of the analysis is the accurate simulation of pressure/density/sound speed in a combustor which when used by the FDNS-RFV CFD code will produce realistic flow phenomena. An analysis of a gas generator considered for the Fastrac engine will be used as a test validation case.

  6. Advanced liquid rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    1992-01-01

    A program to substitute iridium coated rhenium for silicide coated niobium in thrust chamber fabrications is reviewed. The life limiting phenomena in each of these material systems is also reviewed. Coating cracking and spalling is not a problem with iridium-coated rhenium as in silicide-coated niobium. Use of the new material system enables an 800 K increase in thruster operating temperature from around 1700 K for niobium to 2500 K for rhenium. Specific impulse iridium-coated rhenium rockets is nominally 20 seconds higher than comparable niobium rockets in the 22 N class and nominally 10 seconds higher in the 440 N class.

  7. Liquid rocket engine turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Criteria for the design and development of turbines for rocket engines to meet specific performance, and installation requirements are summarized. The total design problem, and design elements are identified, and the current technology pertaining to these elements is described. Recommended practices for achieving a successful design are included.

  8. Nonlinear longitudinal combustion instability in rocket motors.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lores, M. E.; Zinn, B. T.

    1973-01-01

    A new analytical technique for the solution of nonlinear longitudinal combustion instability problems in rocket combustors is developed. Using relatively little computation time, this technique is capable of predicting the transient and limit cycle behavior of the combustion instability oscillations as well as the disturbance amplitude required to trigger an instability in a linearly stable motor. The limit cycle waveforms are found to exhibit shock wave characteristics for most unstable engine operating conditions. It is shown that the characteristics of the resulting instability are independent of the nature of the initial disturbance and they depend solely upon the engine operating conditions and the characteristics of the unsteady combustion process.

  9. CFD Simulation of Liquid Rocket Engine Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Richard; Cheng, Gary; Chen, Yen-Sen; Garcia, Roberto (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Detailed design issues associated with liquid rocket engine injectors and combustion chamber operation require CFD methodology which simulates highly three-dimensional, turbulent, vaporizing, and combusting flows. The primary utility of such simulations involves predicting multi-dimensional effects caused by specific injector configurations. SECA, Inc. and Engineering Sciences, Inc. have been developing appropriate computational methodology for NASA/MSFC for the past decade. CFD tools and computers have improved dramatically during this time period; however, the physical submodels used in these analyses must still remain relatively simple in order to produce useful results. Simulations of clustered coaxial and impinger injector elements for hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels, which account for real fluid properties, is the immediate goal of this research. The spray combustion codes are based on the FDNS CFD code' and are structured to represent homogeneous and heterogeneous spray combustion. The homogeneous spray model treats the flow as a continuum of multi-phase, multicomponent fluids which move without thermal or velocity lags between the phases. Two heterogeneous models were developed: (1) a volume-of-fluid (VOF) model which represents the liquid core of coaxial or impinger jets and their atomization and vaporization, and (2) a Blob model which represents the injected streams as a cloud of droplets the size of the injector orifice which subsequently exhibit particle interaction, vaporization, and combustion. All of these spray models are computationally intensive, but this is unavoidable to accurately account for the complex physics and combustion which is to be predicted, Work is currently in progress to parallelize these codes to improve their computational efficiency. These spray combustion codes were used to simulate the three test cases which are the subject of the 2nd International Workshop on-Rocket Combustion Modeling. Such test cases are considered by

  10. Steady Nuclear Combustion in Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saenger, E.

    1957-01-01

    The astrophysical theory of stationary nuclear reactions in stars is applied to the conditions that would be met in the practical engineering cases that would differ from the former, particularly with respect to the much lower combustion pressures, dimensions of the reacting volume, and burnup times. This application yields maximum rates of hear production per unit volume of reacting gas occurring at about 10(exp 8) K in the cases of reactions between the hydrogen isotopes, but yields higher rates for heavier atoms. For the former, with chamber pressures of the order of 100 atmospheres, the energy production for nuclear combustion reaches values of about 10(exp 4) kilocalories per cubic meter per second, which approaches the magnitude for the familiar chemical fuels. The values are substantially lower for heavier atoms, and increase with the square of the combustion pressure. The half-life of the burnup in the fastest reactions may drop to values as low as those for chemical fuels so that, despite the high temperature, the radiated energy can remain smaller than the energy produced, particularly if an inefficiently radiating (i.e., easily completely ionized reacting material like hydrogen), is used. On the other hand, the fraction of completely ionized particles in the gases undergoing nuclear combustion must not exceed a certain upper limit because the densities (approximately 10(exp -10) grams per cubic centimeter)) lie in the range of high vacua and only for the previously mentioned fraction of nonionized particles can mean free paths be retained small enough so that the chamber diameters of several dozen meters will suffice. Under these conditions it appears that continuously maintained stable nuclear reactions at practical pressures and dimensions are fundamentally possible and their application can be visualized as energy sources for power plants and propulsion units.

  11. Liquid rocket engine nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The nozzle is a major component of a rocket engine, having a significant influence on the overall engine performance and representing a large fraction of the engine structure. The design of the nozzle consists of solving simultaneously two different problems: the definition of the shape of the wall that forms the expansion surface, and the delineation of the nozzle structure and hydraulic system. This monography addresses both of these problems. The shape of the wall is considered from immediately upstream of the throat to the nozzle exit for both bell and annular (or plug) nozzles. Important aspects of the methods used to generate nozzle wall shapes are covered for maximum-performance shapes and for nozzle contours based on criteria other than performance. The discussion of structure and hydraulics covers problem areas of regeneratively cooled tube-wall nozzles and extensions; it treats also nozzle extensions cooled by turbine exhaust gas, ablation-cooled extensions, and radiation-cooled extensions. The techniques that best enable the designer to develop the nozzle structure with as little difficulty as possible and at the lowest cost consistent with minimum weight and specified performance are described.

  12. Injector for liquid fueled rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelius, Charles S. (Inventor); Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael David (Inventor); Sparks, David L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An injector for liquid fueled rocket engines wherein a generally flat core having a frustoconical dome attached to one side of the core to serve as a manifold for a first liquid, with the core having a generally circular configuration having an axis. The other side of the core has a plurality of concentric annular first slots and a plurality of annular concentric second slots alternating with the first slots, the second slots having a greater depth than said first slots. A bore extends through the core for inletting a second liquid into said core, the bore intersecting the second slots to feed the second liquid into the second slots. The core also has a plurality of first passageways leading from the manifold to the first annular slots for feeding the first liquid into said first slots. A faceplate brazed to said other side of the core is provided with apertures extending from the first and second slots through said face plate, these apertures being positioned to direct fuel and liquid oxygen into contact with each other in the combustion chamber. The first liquid may be liquid oxygen and the second liquid may be kerosene or liquid hydrogen.

  13. Observation of LOX/Hydrogen Combustion Flame in a Rocket Chamber during Chugging Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Mamoru; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Masaki; Masuya, Goro

    To obtain concrete information on the mechanism of unstable combustion of liquid oxygen-hydrogen rocket engines, a rectangular rocket chamber with four glass windows was developed. The chamber was designed to simulate a 100-kN-sized cylindrical rocket chamber. Combustion tests were conducted at a chamber pressure of 1.7MPa. Combustion flames and oxygen jets were visualized with a high-speed video at a rate of 4,000 frame/s during low frequency unstable combustion. Oxygen jet images with a backlight, combustion flame and intensity of combustion flame were obtained. Stability analysis based on the double time lag model by Szuch was conducted to assist the understanding of the mechanism of unstable combustion.

  14. Photographic Investigation of Combustion in a Two-dimensional Transparent Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellman, Donald R; Humphrey, Jack C; Male, Theodore

    1953-01-01

    Motion pictures at camera speeds up to 3000 frames per second were taken of the combustion of liquid oxygen and gasoline in a 100-pound thrust rocket engine. The effect of seven methods of propellant injection on the uniformity of combustion was investigated. The flame front was generally found to extend to the injector faces and all the injection systems showed considerable nonuniformity of combustion. Pressure vibration records indicated combustion vibrations that corresponded to resonant-chamber frequencies.

  15. Plasma Igniter for Reliable Ignition of Combustion in Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Adam; Eskridge, Richard

    2011-01-01

    A plasma igniter has been developed for initiating combustion in liquid-propellant rocket engines. The device propels a hot, dense plasma jet, consisting of elemental fluorine and fluorine compounds, into the combustion chamber to ignite the cold propellant mixture. The igniter consists of two coaxial, cylindrical electrodes with a cylindrical bar of solid Teflon plastic in the region between them. The outer electrode is a metal (stainless steel) tube; the inner electrode is a metal pin (mild steel, stainless steel, tungsten, or thoriated-tungsten). The Teflon bar fits snugly between the two electrodes and provides electrical insulation between them. The Teflon bar may have either a flat surface, or a concave, conical surface at the open, down-stream end of the igniter (the igniter face). The igniter would be mounted on the combustion chamber of the rocket engine, either on the injector-plate at the upstream side of the engine, or on the sidewalls of the chamber. It also might sit behind a valve that would be opened just prior to ignition, and closed just after, in order to prevent the Teflon from melting due to heating from the combustion chamber.

  16. Vacuum plasma spray applications on liquid fuel rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckechnie, T. N.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Bryant, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    The vacuum plasma spray process (VPS) has been developed by NASA and Rocketdyne for a variety of applications on liquid fuel rocket engines, including the Space Shuttle Main Engine. These applications encompass thermal barrier coatings which are thermal shock resistant for turbopump blades and nozzles; bond coatings for cryogenic titanium components; wear resistant coatings and materials; high conductivity copper, NaRloy-Z, combustion chamber liners, and structural nickel base material, Inconel 718, for nozzle and combustion chamber support jackets.

  17. Vacuum plasma spray applications on liquid fuel rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKechnie, T. N.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Bryant, M. A.

    1992-07-01

    The vacuum plasma spray process (VPS) has been developed by NASA and Rocketdyne for a variety of applications on liquid fuel rocket engines, including the Space Shuttle Main Engine. These applications encompass thermal barrier coatings which are thermal shock resistant for turbopump blades and nozzles; bond coatings for cryogenic titanium components; wear resistant coatings and materials; high conductivity copper, NaRloy-Z, combustion chamber liners, and structural nickel base material, Inconel 718, for nozzle and combustion chamber support jackets.

  18. Analysis of rocket engine injection combustion processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salmon, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    A critique is given of the JANNAF sub-critical propellant injection/combustion process analysis computer models and application of the models to correlation of well documented hot fire engine data bases. These programs are the distributed energy release (DER) model for conventional liquid propellants injectors and the coaxial injection combustion model (CICM) for gaseous annulus/liquid core coaxial injectors. The critique identifies model inconsistencies while the computer analyses provide quantitative data on predictive accuracy. The program is comprised of three tasks: (1) computer program review and operations; (2) analysis and data correlations; and (3) documentation.

  19. Evaluation and Improvement of Liquid Propellant Rocket Chugging Analysis Techniques. Part 2: a Study of Low Frequency Combustion Instability in Rocket Engine Preburners Using a Heterogeneous Stirred Tank Reactor Model. Final Report M.S. Thesis - Aug. 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartrand, Timothy A.

    1988-01-01

    During the shutdown of the space shuttle main engine, oxygen flow is shut off from the fuel preburner and helium is used to push the residual oxygen into the combustion chamber. During this process a low frequency combustion instability, or chug, occurs. This chug has resulted in damage to the engine's augmented spark igniter due to backflow of the contents of the preburner combustion chamber into the oxidizer feed system. To determine possible causes and fixes for the chug, the fuel preburner was modeled as a heterogeneous stirred tank combustion chamber, a variable mass flow rate oxidizer feed system, a constant mass flow rate fuel feed system and an exit turbine. Within the combustion chamber gases were assumed perfectly mixed. To account for liquid in the combustion chamber, a uniform droplet distribution was assumed to exist in the chamber, with mean droplet diameter determined from an empirical relation. A computer program was written to integrate the resulting differential equations. Because chamber contents were assumed perfectly mixed, the fuel preburner model erroneously predicted that combustion would not take place during shutdown. The combustion rate model was modified to assume that all liquid oxygen that vaporized instantaneously combusted with fuel. Using this combustion model, the effect of engine parameters on chamber pressure oscillations during the SSME shutdown was calculated.

  20. Scaling of Performance in Liquid Propellant Rocket Engine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, James R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses scaling of combustion and combustion performance in liquid propellant rocket engine combustion devices. In development of new combustors, comparisons are often made between predicted performance in a new combustor and measured performance in another combustor with different geometric and thermodynamic characteristics. Without careful interpretation of some key features, the comparison can be misinterpreted and erroneous information used in the design of the new device. This paper provides a review of this performance comparison, including a brief review of the initial liquid rocket scaling research conducted during the 1950s and 1960s, a review of the typical performance losses encountered and how they scale, a description of the typical scaling procedures used in development programs today, and finally a review of several historical development programs to see what insight they can bring to the questions at hand.

  1. Two-phase flow characteristics of liquid oxygen flow in low pressure liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Namkyung; Kim, Seunghan; Kim, Youngmog; Jeong, Sangkwon; Jung, Jeheon

    2004-06-01

    In most cryogenic liquid rocket engines, liquid oxygen manifold and injector are not thermally insulated from room temperature environment for the purpose of reducing system complexity and weight. This feature of cryogenic liquid supply system results in the situation that liquid oxygen flow is vaporized especially in the vicinity of the manifold and the injector wall. The transient two-phase flow tendency is severe for low combustion pressure rocket engine without using turbo-pump. This paper focuses on the two-phase flow phenomena of liquid oxygen in low combustion pressure rocket engine. The KSR-III (Korea Sounding Rocket) engine test data is thoroughly analyzed to estimate the vapor fraction of liquid oxygen flow near the engine manifold and the injector. During the cold flow and the combustion tests of the KSR-III Engine, the static and dynamic pressures are measured at the engine inlet, the liquid oxygen manifold and the combustion chamber. The manifold outer wall and the inner wall temperatures are also measured. In this paper, we present the experimental investigation on the vapor generation, the vapor mass fraction, and the boiling characteristics of the liquid oxygen flow in the engine manifold and injector.

  2. Pressurization systems for liquid rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Guidelines for the successful design of pressurization systems for main propulsion, auxiliary propulsion, and attitude control systems for boosters, upper stages, and spacecraft were presented, drawing on the wealth of design experience that has accumulated in the development of pressurization systems for liquid rockets operational in the last 15 years. The design begins with a preliminary phase in which the system requirements are received and evaluated. Next comes a detail-design and integration phase in which the controls and the hardware components that make up the system are determined. The final phase, design evaluation, provides analysis of problems that may arise at any point in the design when components are combined and considered for operation as a system. Throughout the monograph, the design tasks are considered in the order and manner in which the designer must handle them.

  3. Hydrodynamics of shear coaxial liquid rocket injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsohas, John

    Hydrodynamic instabilities within injector passages can couple to chamber acoustic modes and lead to unacceptable levels of combustion instabilities inside liquid rocket engines. The instability of vena-contracta regions and mixing between fuel and oxidizer can serve as a fundamental source of unsteadiness produced by the injector, even in the absence of upstream or downstream pressure perturbations. This natural or "unforced" response can provide valuable information regarding frequencies where the element could conceivably couple to chamber modes. In particular, during throttled conditions the changes in the injector response may lead to an alignment of the injector and chamber modes. For these reasons, the basic unforced response of the injector element is of particular interest when developing a new engine. The Loci/Chem code was used to perform single-element, 2-D unsteady CFD computations on the Hydrogen/Oxygen Multi-Element Experiment (HOMEE) injector which was hot-fire tested at Purdue University. The Loci/Chem code was used to evaluate the effects of O/F ratio, LOX post thickness, recess length and LOX tube length on the hydrodynamics of shear co-axial rocket injectors.

  4. Experimental investigation of a solid rocket combustion simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Robert A., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The response of solid rocket motor materials to high-temperature corrosive gases is usually accomplished by testing the materials in a subscale solid rocket motor. While this imposes the proper thermal and chemical environment, a solid rocket motor does not provide practical features that would enhance systematic evaluations such as: the ability to throttle for margin testing, on/off capability, low test cost, and a low-hazards test article. Solid Rocket Combustion Simulators (SRCS) are being evaluated by NASA to test solid rocket nozzle materials and incorporate these essential practical features into the testing of rocket materials. The SRCS is designed to generate the thermochemical environment of a solid rocket. It uses hybrid rocket motor technology in which gaseous oxygen (Gox) is injected into a chamber containing a solid fuel grain. Specific chemicals are injected in the aft mixing chamber so that the gases entering the test section match the temperature and a non-dimensional erosion factor B' to insure similarity with a solid motor. Because the oxygen flow can be controlled, this approach allows margin testing, the ability to throttle, and an on/off capability. The fuel grains are inert which makes the test article very safe to handle. The objective of this work was to establish the baseline operating characteristics of a Labscale Solid Rocket Combustion Simulator (LSRCS). This included establishing the baseline burning rates of plexiglass fuels and the evaluation of a combustion instability for hydroxy-terminated polybutadyene (HTPB) propellants. The scope of the project included: (1) activation of MSFC Labscale Hybrid Combustion Simulator; (2) testing of plexiglass fuel at Gox ranges from 0.025 to 0.200 lb/s; (3) burning HTPB fuels at a Gox rate of 0.200 lb/s using four different mixing chamber configurations; and (4) evaluating the fuel regression and chamber pressure responses of each firing.

  5. Rocket thrust variation with foamed liquid propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrell, G

    1957-01-01

    An analysis is presented on a method for varying rocket thrust by varying the bulk density of the propellants. This density variation was accomplished by uniformly dispersing an inert, insoluble gas in the liquid propellants. Only qualitative agreement with theory was obtained from preliminary experiments with a 1000-pound-thrust ammonia - nitric acid rocket engine; the required experimental gas-flow rates were two to six times greater than those predicted by theory. It was demonstrated, however, that this method of rocket-thrust variation is feasible.

  6. ROCKETS OR JATO JET ASSISTED TAKE OFF UNITS AT THE HIGH PRESSURE COMBUSTION FACILITY - STATIC FIRING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1946-01-01

    ROCKETS OR JATO JET ASSISTED TAKE OFF UNITS AT THE HIGH PRESSURE COMBUSTION FACILITY - STATIC FIRING OF NITRIC ACID ANILINE ROCKET - PERMANGANATE PER OXIDE ROCKET SETUP INCLUDING TWO VIEWS THROUGH CONTROL ROOM SAFETY WINDOW

  7. Experimental study of combustion in hydrogen peroxide hybrid rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernimont, Eric John

    Combustion behavior in a hydrogen peroxide oxidized hybrid rocket motor is investigated with a series of experiments. Hybrid chemical rocket propulsion is presently of interest due to reduced system complexity compared to classical chemical propulsion systems. Reduced system complexity, by use of a storable oxidizer and a hybrid configuration, is expected to reduce propulsive costs. The fuel in this study is polyethylene which has the potential of continuous manufacture leading to further reduced system costs. The study investigated parameters of interest for nominal design of a full scale hydrogen peroxide oxidized hybrid rocket. Amongst these parameters is the influence of chamber pressure, mass flux, fuel molecular weight and fuel density on fuel regression rate. Effects of chamber pressure and aft combustion length on combustion efficiency and non-acoustic combustion oscillations are also examined. The fuel regression behavior is found to be strongly influenced by both chamber pressure and mass flux. Combustion efficiencies in the upper 90% range are attained by simple changes to the aft combustion chamber length as well as increased combustion pressure. Fuel burning surface is found to be influenced by the density of the polyethylene polymer as well as molecular weight. The combustion is observed to be exceptionally smooth (oscillations less than 5% zero-to-peak of mean) in all motors tested in this program. Tests using both a single port fuel gain and a novel radial flow hybrid are also performed.

  8. Computational analysis of liquid hypergolic propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, A.; Przekwas, A. J.; Gross, K. W.

    1992-01-01

    The combustion process in liquid rocket engines depends on a number of complex phenomena such as atomization, vaporization, spray dynamics, mixing, and reaction mechanisms. A computational tool to study their mutual interactions is developed to help analyze these processes with a view of improving existing designs and optimizing future designs of the thrust chamber. The focus of the article is on the analysis of the Variable Thrust Engine for the Orbit Maneuvering Vehicle. This engine uses a hypergolic liquid bipropellant combination of monomethyl hydrazine as fuel and nitrogen tetroxide as oxidizer.

  9. Supercomputer modeling of hydrogen combustion in rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betelin, V. B.; Nikitin, V. F.; Altukhov, D. I.; Dushin, V. R.; Koo, Jaye

    2013-08-01

    Hydrogen being an ecological fuel is very attractive now for rocket engines designers. However, peculiarities of hydrogen combustion kinetics, the presence of zones of inverse dependence of reaction rate on pressure, etc. prevents from using hydrogen engines in all stages not being supported by other types of engines, which often brings the ecological gains back to zero from using hydrogen. Computer aided design of new effective and clean hydrogen engines needs mathematical tools for supercomputer modeling of hydrogen-oxygen components mixing and combustion in rocket engines. The paper presents the results of developing verification and validation of mathematical model making it possible to simulate unsteady processes of ignition and combustion in rocket engines.

  10. Multivariable optimization of liquid rocket engines using particle swarm algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Daniel Ray

    Liquid rocket engines are highly reliable, controllable, and efficient compared to other conventional forms of rocket propulsion. As such, they have seen wide use in the space industry and have become the standard propulsion system for launch vehicles, orbit insertion, and orbital maneuvering. Though these systems are well understood, historical optimization techniques are often inadequate due to the highly non-linear nature of the engine performance problem. In this thesis, a Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) variant was applied to maximize the specific impulse of a finite-area combustion chamber (FAC) equilibrium flow rocket performance model by controlling the engine's oxidizer-to-fuel ratio and de Laval nozzle expansion and contraction ratios. In addition to the PSO-controlled parameters, engine performance was calculated based on propellant chemistry, combustion chamber pressure, and ambient pressure, which are provided as inputs to the program. The performance code was validated by comparison with NASA's Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA) and the commercially available Rocket Propulsion Analysis (RPA) tool. Similarly, the PSO algorithm was validated by comparison with brute-force optimization, which calculates all possible solutions and subsequently determines which is the optimum. Particle Swarm Optimization was shown to be an effective optimizer capable of quick and reliable convergence for complex functions of multiple non-linear variables.

  11. Liquid rocket engine turbopump gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Design and fabrication of gear drives for rocket engine turbopumps are described in the sequence encountered during the design process as follows: (1) selection of overall arrangement; (2) selection of gear type; (3) preliminary sizing; (4) lubrication system design; (5) detail tooth design; (6) selection of gear materials; and (7) gear fabrication and testing as it affects the design. The description is oriented towards the use of involute spur gears, although reference material for helical gears is also cited.

  12. Large Liquid Rocket Testing: Strategies and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Shamim A.; Hebert, Bartt J.

    2005-01-01

    Rocket propulsion development is enabled by rigorous ground testing in order to mitigate the propulsion systems risks that are inherent in space flight. This is true for virtually all propulsive devices of a space vehicle including liquid and solid rocket propulsion, chemical and non-chemical propulsion, boost stage and in-space propulsion and so forth. In particular, large liquid rocket propulsion development and testing over the past five decades of human and robotic space flight has involved a combination of component-level testing and engine-level testing to first demonstrate that the propulsion devices were designed to meet the specified requirements for the Earth to Orbit launchers that they powered. This was followed by a vigorous test campaign to demonstrate the designed propulsion articles over the required operational envelope, and over robust margins, such that a sufficiently reliable propulsion system is delivered prior to first flight. It is possible that hundreds of tests, and on the order of a hundred thousand test seconds, are needed to achieve a high-reliability, flight-ready, liquid rocket engine system. This paper overviews aspects of earlier and recent experience of liquid rocket propulsion testing at NASA Stennis Space Center, where full scale flight engines and flight stages, as well as a significant amount of development testing has taken place in the past decade. The liquid rocket testing experience discussed includes testing of engine components (gas generators, preburners, thrust chambers, pumps, powerheads), as well as engine systems and complete stages. The number of tests, accumulated test seconds, and years of test stand occupancy needed to meet varying test objectives, will be selectively discussed and compared for the wide variety of ground test work that has been conducted at Stennis for subscale and full scale liquid rocket devices. Since rocket propulsion is a crucial long-lead element of any space system acquisition or

  13. Scaling of Performance in Liquid Propellant Rocket Engine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, James

    2008-01-01

    The objectives are: a) Re-introduce to you the concept of scaling; b) Describe the scaling research conducted in the 1950s and early 1960s, and present some of their conclusions; c) Narrow the focus to scaling for performance of combustion devices for liquid propellant rocket engines; and d) Present some results of subscale to full-scale performance from historical programs. Scaling is "The ability to develop new combustion devices with predictable performance on the basis of test experience with old devices." Scaling can be used to develop combustion devices of any thrust size from any thrust size. Scaling is applied mostly to increase thrust. Objective is to use scaling as a development tool. - Move injector design from an "art" to a "science"

  14. Composite Material Application to Liquid Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judd, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The substitution of reinforced plastic composite (RPC) materials for metal was studied. The major objectives were to: (1) determine the extent to which composite materials can be beneficially used in liquid rocket engines; (2) identify additional technology requirements; and (3) determine those areas which have the greatest potential for return. Weight savings, fabrication costs, performance, life, and maintainability factors were considered. Two baseline designs, representative of Earth to orbit and orbit to orbit engine systems, were selected. Weight savings are found to be possible for selected components with the substitution of materials for metal. Various technology needs are identified before RPC material can be used in rocket engine applications.

  15. Formed platelets for low cost regeneratively cooled rocket combustion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhardt, Wendel M.

    1992-02-01

    The ongoing work performed to demonstrate the fabrication feasibility of a formed platelet regeneratively cooled combustion chamber liner is described. The combustion chambers are fabricated in three or four axial sections from formed platelet stacks joined together. The platelets are etched, stacked, and bonded into flat panels that contain the regen passages. The flat panels are formed into the final contour with a die. The formed platelet approach takes advantage of the inherent low cost, high accuracy, and thin wall capability of photoetched platelet technology to fabricate long life, low cost rocket combustion chambers. Combustion chamber liner sections were fabricated with extremely thin (tw = 0.20 mm (0.008-in.)) hot gas side walls and very high aspect ratio coolant channels (aspect ratio greater than 10:1). Combustion chamber liner sections were formed of both Zr-Cu and stainless steel. The results of both the forming of individual panels and the joining of panels together are discussed. Work performed demonstrating the feasibility of rocket combustion chamber liners from formed platelets is described. A discussion of the benefits of chamber liners so constructed and of a chamber producing 176,000 N (40 Klbf) of thrust currently fabricated is presented. The results of a study examining the forming of large scale platelet panels for an Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Main Combustion Chamber (MCC) liner are included.

  16. Heat transfer in rocket engine combustion chambers and nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, P. G.; Cheng, G. C.; Farmer, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    Complexities of liquid rocket engine heat transfer which involve the injector faceplate and regeneratively and film cooled walls are being investigated by computational analysis. A conjugate heat transfer analysis will be used to describe localized heating phenomena associated with particular injector configurations and coolant channels and film coolant dumps. These components are being analyzed, and the analyses verified with appropriate test data. Finally, the component analyses will be synthesized into an overall flowfield/heat transfer model. The FDNS code is being used to make the component analyses. Particular attention is being given to the representation of the thermodynamic properties of the fluid streams and to the method of combining the detailed models to represent overall heating. Unit flow models of specific coaxial injector elements have been developed and will be described. Since test data from the NLS development program are not available, new validation heat transfer data have been sought. Suitable data were obtained from a Rocketdyne test program on a model hydrocarbon/oxygen engine. Simulations of these test data will be presented. Recent interest in the hybrid motor have established the need for analyses of ablating solid fuels in the combustion chamber. Analysis of a simplified hybrid motor will also be presented.

  17. Heat transfer in rocket engine combustion chambers and nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, P. G.; Cheng, G. C.; Farmer, R. C.

    1993-07-01

    Complexities of liquid rocket engine heat transfer which involve the injector faceplate and regeneratively and film cooled walls are being investigated by computational analysis. A conjugate heat transfer analysis will be used to describe localized heating phenomena associated with particular injector configurations and coolant channels and film coolant dumps. These components are being analyzed, and the analyses verified with appropriate test data. Finally, the component analyses will be synthesized into an overall flowfield/heat transfer model. The FDNS code is being used to make the component analyses. Particular attention is being given to the representation of the thermodynamic properties of the fluid streams and to the method of combining the detailed models to represent overall heating. Unit flow models of specific coaxial injector elements have been developed and will be described. Since test data from the NLS development program are not available, new validation heat transfer data have been sought. Suitable data were obtained from a Rocketdyne test program on a model hydrocarbon/oxygen engine. Simulations of these test data will be presented. Recent interest in the hybrid motor have established the need for analyses of ablating solid fuels in the combustion chamber. Analysis of a simplified hybrid motor will also be presented.

  18. A Historical Systems Study of Liquid Rocket Engine Throttling Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Erin M.; Frederick, Robert A., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This is a comprehensive systems study to examine and evaluate throttling capabilities of liquid rocket engines. The focus of this study is on engine components, and how the interactions of these components are considered for throttling applications. First, an assessment of space mission requirements is performed to determine what applications require engine throttling. A background on liquid rocket engine throttling is provided, along with the basic equations that are used to predict performance. Three engines are discussed that have successfully demonstrated throttling. Next, the engine system is broken down into components to discuss special considerations that need to be made for engine throttling. This study focuses on liquid rocket engines that have demonstrated operational capability on American space launch vehicles, starting with the Apollo vehicle engines and ending with current technology demonstrations. Both deep throttling and shallow throttling engines are discussed. Boost and sustainer engines have demonstrated throttling from 17% to 100% thrust, while upper stage and lunar lander engines have demonstrated throttling in excess of 10% to 100% thrust. The key difficulty in throttling liquid rocket engines is maintaining an adequate pressure drop across the injector, which is necessary to provide propellant atomization and mixing. For the combustion chamber, cooling can be an issue at low thrust levels. For turbomachinery, the primary considerations are to avoid cavitation, stall, surge, and to consider bearing leakage flows, rotordynamics, and structural dynamics. For valves, it is necessary to design valves and actuators that can achieve accurate flow control at all thrust levels. It is also important to assess the amount of nozzle flow separation that can be tolerated at low thrust levels for ground testing.

  19. Heat exchanger. [rocket combustion chambers and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, D. E. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A heat exchanger, as exemplified by a rocket combustion chamber, is constructed by stacking thin metal rings having microsized openings therein at selective locations to form cooling passages defined by an inner wall, an outer wall and fins. Suitable manifolds are provided at each end of the rocket chamber. In addition to the cooling channel openings, coolant feed openings may be formed in each of rings. The coolant feed openings may be nested or positioned within generally U-shaped cooling channel openings. Compression on the stacked rings may be maintained by welds or the like or by bolts extending through the stacked rings.

  20. Effects of high combustion chamber pressure on rocket noise environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. P.

    1972-01-01

    The acoustical environment for a high combustion chamber pressure engine was examined in detail, using both conventional and advanced theoretical analysis. The influence of elevated chamber pressure on the rocket noise environment was established, based on increase in exit velocity and flame temperature, and changes in basic engine dimensions. Compared to large rocket engines, the overall sound power level is found to be 1.5 dB higher, if the thrust is the same. The peak Strouhal number shifted about one octave lower to a value near 0.01. Data on apparent sound source location and directivity patterns are also presented.

  1. Size Distribution and Velocity of Ethanol Drops in a Rocket Combustor Burning Ethanol and Liquid Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, Robert D.

    1961-01-01

    Single jets of ethanol were studied photomicrographically inside a rocket chamber as they broke up into sprays of drops which underwent simultaneous acceleration and vaporization with chemical reaction occurring in the surrounding combustion gas stream. In each rocket test-firing, liquid oxygen was used as the oxidant. Both drop velocity and drop size distribution data were obtained from photomicrographs of the ethanol drops taken with an ultra-high speed tracking camera developed at NASA, Lewis Research Center.

  2. Liquid Oxygen Cooling of Hydrocarbon Fueled Rocket Thrust Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Elizabeth S.

    1989-01-01

    Rocket engines using liquid oxygen (LOX) and hydrocarbon fuel as the propellants are being given serious consideration for future launch vehicle propulsion. Normally, the fuel is used to regeneratively cool the combustion chamber. However, hydrocarbons such as RP-1 are limited in their cooling capability. Another possibility for the coolant is the liquid oxygen. Combustion chambers previously tested with LOX and RP-1 as propellants and LOX as the collant demonstrated the feasibility of using liquid oxygen as a coolant up to a chamber pressure of 13.8 MPa (2000 psia). However, there was concern as to the effect on the integrity of the chamber liner if oxygen leaks into the combustion zone through fatigue cracks that may develop between the cooling passages and the hot gas side wall. In order to study this effect, chambers were fabricated with slots machined upstream of the throat between the cooling passage wall and the hot gas side wall to simulate cracks. The chambers were tested at a nominal chamber pressure of 8.6 MPa (1247 psia) over a range of mixture ratios from 1.9 to 3.1 using liquid oxygen as the coolant. The results of the testing showed that the leaking LOX did not have a deleterious effect on the chambers in the region of the slots. However, there was unexplained melting in the throat region of both chambers, but not in line with the slots.

  3. Reliability Estimation Methods for Liquid Rocket Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Kunio; Masuya, Goro; Kamijo, Kenjiro

    Reliability estimation using the dispersive, binominal distribution method has been traditionally used to certify the reliability of liquid rocket engines, but its estimation sometimes disagreed with the failure rates of flight engines. In order to take better results, the reliability growth model and the failure distribution method are applied to estimate the reliability of LE-7A engines, which have propelled the first stage of H-2A launch vehicles.

  4. Combustion-wave ignition for rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Larry C.

    1992-01-01

    The combustion wave ignition concept was experimentally studied in order to verify its suitability for application in baffled sections of a large booster engine combustion chamber. Gaseous oxygen/gaseous methane (GOX/GH4) and gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen (GOX/GH2) propellant combinations were evaluated in a subscale combustion wave ignition system. The system included four element tubes capable of carrying ignition energy simultaneously to four locations, simulating four baffled sections. Also, direct ignition of a simulated Main Combustion Chamber (MCC) was performed. Tests were conducted over a range of mixture ratios and tube geometries. Ignition was consistently attained over a wide range of mixture ratios. And at every ignition, the flame propagated through all four element tubes. For GOX/GH4, the ignition system ignited the MCC flow at mixture ratios from 2 to 10 and for GOX/GH2 the ratios is from 2 to 13. The ignition timing was found to be rapid and uniform. The total ignition delay when using the MCC was under 11 ms, with the tube-to-tube, as well as the run-to-run, variation under 1 ms. Tube geometries were found to have negligible effect on the ignition outcome and timing.

  5. Characterization of rocket propellant combustion products

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, R.A.; Nestor, C.W.; Thompson, C.V.; Gayle, T.M.; Ma, C.Y.; Tomkins, B.A.; Moody, R.L.

    1991-12-09

    The overall objective of the work described in this report is four-fold: to (a) develop a standardized and experimentally validated approach to the sampling and chemical and physical characterization of the exhaust products of scaled-down rocket launch motors fired under experimentally controlled conditions at the Army's Signature Characterization Facility (ASCF) at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama; (b) determine the composition of the exhaust produces; (c) assess the accuracy of a selected existing computer model for predicting the composition of major and minor chemical species; (d) recommended alternations to both the sampling and analysis strategy and the computer model in order to achieve greater congruence between chemical measurements and computer prediction. 34 refs., 2 figs., 35 tabs.

  6. Method of fabricating a rocket engine combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R. (Inventor); Mckechnie, Timothy N. (Inventor); Power, Christopher A. (Inventor); Daniel, Ronald L., Jr. (Inventor); Saxelby, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for making a combustion chamber for a rocket engine wherein a copper alloy in particle form is injected into a stream of heated carrier gas in plasma form which is then projected onto the inner surface of a hollow metal jacket having the configuration of a rocket engine combustion chamber is described. The particles are in the plasma stream for a sufficient length of time to heat the particles to a temperature such that the particles will flatten and adhere to previously deposited particles but will not spatter or vaporize. After a layer is formed, cooling channels are cut in the layer, then the channels are filled with a temporary filler and another layer of particles is deposited.

  7. Combustion Model of Supersonic Rocket Exhausts in an Entrained Flow Enclosure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Oliveira, Justin

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model developed to simulate the supersonic rocket exhaust in an entrained flow cylinder. The model can be used to study the plume-induced environment due to static firing tests of the Taurus-II launch vehicle. The finite-rate chemistry is used to model the combustion process involving rocket propellant (RP-1) and liquid oxidizer (LOX). A similar chemical reacting model is also used to simulate the mixing of rocket plume and ambient air. The model provides detailed information on the gas concentration and other flow parameters within the enclosed region, thus allowing different operating scenarios to be examined in an efficient manner. It is shown that the real gas influence is significant and yields better agreement with the theory.

  8. Combustion Model of Supersonic Rocket Exhausts in an Entrained Flow Enclosure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce; Oliveira, Justin

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the Computation Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model developed to simulate the supersonic rocket exhaust in an entrained flow cylinder. The model can be used to study the plume-induced environment due to static firing test of the Taurus II launch vehicle. The finite rate chemistry is used to model the combustion process involving rocket propellant (RP 1) and liquid oxidizer (LOX). A similar chemical reacting model is also used to simulate the mixing of rocket plume and ambient air. The model provides detailed information on the gas concentration and other flow parameters within the enclosed region thus allowing different operating scenarios to be examined in an efficient manner. It is shown that the real gas influence is significant and yields better agreement with the theory.

  9. Structurally compliant rocket engine combustion chamber: Experimental and analytical validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Arya, Vinod K.; Kazaroff, John M.; Halford, Gary R.

    1994-01-01

    A new, structurally compliant rocket engine combustion chamber design has been validated through analysis and experiment. Subscale, tubular channel chambers have been cyclically tested and analytically evaluated. Cyclic lives were determined to have a potential for 1000 percent increase over those of rectangular channel designs, the current state of the art. Greater structural compliance in the circumferential direction gave rise to lower thermal strains during hot firing, resulting in lower thermal strain ratcheting and longer predicted fatigue lives. Thermal, structural, and durability analyses of the combustion chamber design, involving cyclic temperatures, strains, and low-cycle fatigue lives, have corroborated the experimental observations.

  10. Preburner of Staged Combustion Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, M. C.

    1978-01-01

    A regeneratively cooled LOX/hydrogen staged combustion assembly system with a 400:1 expansion area ratio nozzle utilizing an 89,000 Newton (20,000 pound) thrust regeneratively cooled thrust chamber and 175:1 tubular nozzle was analyzed, assembled, and tested. The components for this assembly include two spark/torch oxygen-hydrogen igniters, two servo-controlled LOX valves, a preburner injector, a preburner combustor, a main propellant injector, a regeneratively cooled combustion chamber, a regeneratively cooled tubular nozzle with an expansion area ratio of 175:1, an uncooled heavy-wall steel nozzle with an expansion area ratio of 400:1, and interconnecting ducting. The analytical effort was performed to optimize the thermal and structural characteristics of each of the new components and the ducting, and to reverify the capabilities of the previously fabricated components. The testing effort provided a demonstration of the preburner/combustor chamber operation, chamber combustion efficiency and stability, and chamber and nozzle heat transfer.

  11. Numerical Modelling of Staged Combustion Aft-Injected Hybrid Rocket Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijsse, Jeff

    The staged combustion aft-injected hybrid (SCAIH) rocket motor is a promising design for the future of hybrid rocket propulsion. Advances in computational fluid dynamics and scientific computing have made computational modelling an effective tool in hybrid rocket motor design and development. The focus of this thesis is the numerical modelling of the SCAIH rocket motor in a turbulent combustion, high-speed, reactive flow framework accounting for solid soot transport and radiative heat transfer. The SCAIH motor is modelled with a shear coaxial injector with liquid oxygen injected in the center at sub-critical conditions: 150 K and 150 m/s (Mach ≈ 0.9), and a gas-generator gas-solid mixture of one-third carbon soot by mass injected in the annual opening at 1175 K and 460 m/s (Mach ≈ 0.6). Flow conditions in the near injector region and the flame anchoring mechanism are of particular interest. Overall, the flow is shown to exhibit instabilities and the flame is shown to anchor directly on the injector faceplate with temperatures in excess of 2700 K.

  12. Liquid rocket engine test facility engineering challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellerbrock, Hartwig; Ziegenhagen, Stefan

    2006-12-01

    Liquid rocket engines for launch vehicles and space crafts as well as their subsystems need to be verified and qualified during hot-runs. A high test cadence combined with a flexible test team helps to reduce the cost for test verification during development/qualification as well as during acceptance testing for production. Test facility intelligence allows to test subsystems in the same manner as during complete engine system tests and will therefore reduce development time and cost. This paper gives an overview of the maturing of test engineering know how for rocket engine test stands as well as high altitude test stands for small propulsion thrusters at EADS-ST in Ottobrunn and Lampoldshausen and is split into two parts: Part 1 gives a historical overview of the EADS-ST test stands at Ottobrunn and Lampoldshausen since the beginning of Rocket propulsion activities in the 1960s. Part 2 gives an overview of the actual test capabilities and the test engineering know-how for test stand construction/adaptation and their use during running programs. Examples of actual realised facility concepts are given to demonstrate cost saving potential for test programs in both cases for development/qualification issues as well as for production purposes.

  13. Formed platelets for low cost regeneratively cooled rocket combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhardt, W. M.; Hayes, W. A.

    1992-01-01

    Formed platelet technology can be used to fabricate LO2/LH2-fueled rocket propulsion chambers with higher heat capacity, higher cycle life, and lower pressure drops, in conjunction with lower costs due to the application of high volume production methods. The formed-platelet combustor liner is an assembly of identical platelets, each of which is composed of diffusion-bonded, photoetched laminae with coolant flow passages; the platelets are also joined by diffusion bonding to form the combustor's circumference. Attention is given to the fabrication of a platelet combustion chamber generating 40 Klbf of thrust.

  14. Integrated Design Methodology for Highly Reliable Liquid Rocket Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuratani, Naoshi; Aoki, Hiroshi; Yasui, Masaaki; Kure, Hirotaka; Masuya, Goro

    The Integrated Design Methodology is strongly required at the conceptual design phase to achieve the highly reliable space transportation systems, especially the propulsion systems, not only in Japan but also all over the world in these days. Because in the past some catastrophic failures caused some losses of mission and vehicle (LOM/LOV) at the operational phase, moreover did affect severely the schedule delays and cost overrun at the later development phase. Design methodology for highly reliable liquid rocket engine is being preliminarily established and investigated in this study. The sensitivity analysis is systematically performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of this methodology, and to clarify and especially to focus on the correlation between the combustion chamber, turbopump and main valve as main components. This study describes the essential issues to understand the stated correlations, the need to apply this methodology to the remaining critical failure modes in the whole engine system, and the perspective on the engine development in the future.

  15. Coated oxidizers for combustion stability in solid-propellant rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmy, A. M.; Ramohalli, K. N. R.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments are conducted in a laboratory-scale (6.25-cm diameter) end-burning rocket motor with state-of-the-art, ammonium perchlorate hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB), nonmetallized propellants. The concept of tailoring the stability characteristics with a small amount (less than 1 percent by weight) of COATING on the oxidizer is explored. The thermal degradation characteristics of the coat chemical are deduced through theoretical arguments on thermal diffusivity of the composite material (propellant). Several candidate coats are selected and propellants are cast. These propellants (with coated oxidizers) are fired in a laboratory-scale end-burning rocket motor, and real-time pressure histories are recorded. The control propellant (with no coating) is also tested for comparison. The uniformity of the coating, confirmed by SEM pictures and BET adsorption measurements, is thought to be an advance in technology. The frequency of bulk mode instability (BMI), the pressure fluctuation amplitudes, and stability boundaries are correlated with parameters related to the characteristic length (L-asterisk) of the rocket motor. The coated oxidizer propellants, in general, display greater combustion stability than the control (state-of-the-art). The correlations of the various parameters are thought to be new to a field filled with much uncertainty.

  16. Powdered aluminum and oxygen rocket propellants: Subscale combustion experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Mike L.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminum combined with oxygen has been proposed as a potential lunar in situ propellant for ascent/descent and return missions for future lunar exploration. Engine concepts proposed to use this propellant have not previously been demonstrated, and the impact on performance from combustion and two-phase flow losses could only be estimated. Therefore, combustion tests were performed for aluminum and aluminum/magnesium alloy powders with oxygen in subscale heat-sink rocket engine hardware. The metal powder was pneumatically injected, with a small amount of nitrogen, through the center orifice of a single element O-F-O triplet injector. Gaseous oxygen impinged on the fuel stream. Hot-fire tests of aluminum/oxygen were performed over a mixture ratio range of 0.5 to 3.0, and at a chamber pressure of approximately 480 kPa (70 psia). The theoretical performance of the propellants was analyzed over a mixture ratio range of 0.5 to 5.0. In the theoretical predictions the ideal one-dimensional equilibrium rocket performance was reduced by loss mechanisms including finite rate kinetics, two-dimensional divergence losses, and boundary layer losses. Lower than predicted characteristic velocity and specific impulse performance efficiencies were achieved in the hot-fire tests, and this was attributed to poor mixing of the propellants and two-phase flow effects. Several tests with aluminum/9.8 percent magnesium alloy powder did not indicate any advantage over the pure aluminum fuel.

  17. Mathematical simulation of hydrogen-oxygen combustion in rocket engines using LOGOS code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betelin, V. B.; Shagaliev, R. M.; Aksenov, S. V.; Belyakov, I. M.; Deryuguin, Yu. N.; Korchazhkin, D. A.; Kozelkov, A. S.; Nikitin, V. F.; Sarazov, A. V.; Zelenskiy, D. K.

    2014-03-01

    Hydrogen-oxygen fuels are very attractive now for rocket engines designers, because this pair is ecology friendly. Computer aided design of new effective and clean hydrogen engines needs mathematical tools for supercomputer modeling of hydrogen-oxygen components mixing and combustion in rocket engines. The paper presents the results of developing, verification and validation of mathematical model making it possible to simulate unsteady processes of ignition and combustion in rocket engines.

  18. Analyses of liquid rocket instabilities using a computational testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Grenda, J.M.; Venkateswaran, S.; Merkle, C.L.

    1994-12-31

    A synergistic hierarchy of numerical and analytical models is used to simulate three-dimensional combustion instability in liquid rocket engines. Existing phenomenological models for vaporization and atomization are used in quasi-steady form to describe the liquid phase processes. In addition to a complete nonlinear numerical model, linearized numerical and closed-form analytical models are used to validate the numerical solution and to obtain initial estimates of stable and unstable operating regimes. All three models are fully three dimensional. The simultaneous application of these approaches permits computationally inexpensive surveys to be performed in rapid parametric fashion for a wide variety of operating conditions. Stability maps obtained from the computations indicate that, when droplet temperature fluctuations are present, vaporization and atomization can drive instability. The presence of droplet temperature fluctuations introduces areas of instability for smaller drop sizes and colder drop temperatures. The computational procedures are demonstrated to accurately capture the three-dimensional wave propagation within the combustion chamber. The validated results indicate excellent amplitude and phase agreement for properly selected grid resolution. The nonlinear model demonstrates limit cycle behavior for growing waves and wave steepening for large-amplitude disturbances. The current work represents a validated computational testbed upon which more comprehensive physical modeling may be incorporated.

  19. A Design Tool for Liquid Rocket Engine Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, R.; Cheng, G.; Trinh, H.; Tucker, K.

    2000-01-01

    A practical design tool which emphasizes the analysis of flowfields near the injector face of liquid rocket engines has been developed and used to simulate preliminary configurations of NASA's Fastrac and vortex engines. This computational design tool is sufficiently detailed to predict the interactive effects of injector element impingement angles and points and the momenta of the individual orifice flows and the combusting flow which results. In order to simulate a significant number of individual orifices, a homogeneous computational fluid dynamics model was developed. To describe sub- and supercritical liquid and vapor flows, the model utilized thermal and caloric equations of state which were valid over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. The model was constructed such that the local quality of the flow was determined directly. Since both the Fastrac and vortex engines utilize RP-1/LOX propellants, a simplified hydrocarbon combustion model was devised in order to accomplish three-dimensional, multiphase flow simulations. Such a model does not identify drops or their distribution, but it does allow the recirculating flow along the injector face and into the acoustic cavity and the film coolant flow to be accurately predicted.

  20. Additive Manufacturing a Liquid Hydrogen Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Carl P.; Robertson, Elizabeth H.; Koelbl, Mary Beth; Singer, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Space Propulsion is a 5 day event being held from 2nd May to the 6th May 2016 at the Rome Marriott Park Hotel in Rome, Italy. This event showcases products like Propulsion sub-systems and components, Production and manufacturing issues, Liquid, Solid, Hybrid and Air-breathing Propulsion Systems for Launcher and Upper Stages, Overview of current programmes, AIV issues and tools, Flight testing and experience, Technology building blocks for Future Space Transportation Propulsion Systems : Launchers, Exploration platforms & Space Tourism, Green Propulsion for Space Transportation, New propellants, Rocket propulsion & global environment, Cost related aspects of Space Transportation propulsion, Modelling, Pressure-Thrust oscillations issues, Impact of new requirements and regulations on design etc. in the Automotive, Manufacturing, Fabrication, Repair & Maintenance industries.

  1. Study of basic physical processes in liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Chen, C. P.

    1992-01-01

    Inconsistencies between analytical results and measurements for liquid rocket thrust chamber performance, which escape suitable explanations, have motivated the examination of the basic phys ical modeling formulations as to their unlimited application. The publication of Prof. D. Straub's book, 'Thermofluid-dynamics of Optimized Rocket Propulsions,' further stimulated the interest of understanding the gas dynamic relationships in chemically reacting mixtures. A review of other concepts proposed by Falk-Ruppel (Gibbsian Thermodynamics), Straub (Alternative Theory, AT), Prigogine (Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics), Boltzmann (Kinetic Theory), and Truesdell (Rational Mechanism) has been made to obtain a better understanding of the Navier-Stokes equation, which is now used extensively for chemically reacting flow treatment in combustion chambers. In addition to the study of the different concepts, two workshops were conducted to clarify some of the issues. The first workshop centered on Falk-Ruppel's new 'dynamics' concept, while the second one concentrated on Straub's AT. In this report brief summaries of the reviewed philosophies are presented and compared with the classical Navier-Stokes formulation in a tabular arrangement. Also the highlights of both workshops are addressed.

  2. Solid rocket combustion simulator technology using the hybrid rocket for simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, Kumar

    1994-01-01

    The hybrid rocket is reexamined in light of several important unanswered questions regarding its performance. The well-known heat transfer limited burning rate equation is quoted, and its limitations are pointed out. Several inconsistencies in the burning rate determination through fuel depolymerization are explicitly discussed. The resolution appears to be through the postulate of (surface) oxidative degradation of the fuel. Experiments are initiated to study the fuel degradation in mixtures of nitrogen/oxygen in the 99.9 percent/0.1 percent to 98 percent/2 percent range. The overall hybrid combustion behavior is studied in a 2 in-diameter rocket motor, where a PMMA tube is used as the fuel. The results include detailed, real-time infrared video images of the combustion zone. Space- and time-averaged images give a broad indication of the temperature reached in the gases. A brief outline is shown of future work, which will specifically concentrate on the exploration of the role of the oxidizer transport to the fuel surface, and the role of the unburned fuel that is reported to escape below the classical time-averaged boundary layer flame.

  3. Combustion device for liquid fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Y.; Ohmukai, Y.; Tomisawa, T.

    1980-10-21

    A device is described which includes a porous burner head capable of containing a liquid fuel in a liquid state and in which air is supplied to the surface of the burner head to vaporize and burn the fuel contained therein. The burner head is made of a heat resistant porous material having extending therethrough minute channels which are predominantly up to 100 mu M in diameter and give the burner head a porosity of at least 25%. The burner head is capable of raising the liquid fuel at a rate of at least 0.001 g/cm/sub 2/ min to a height of up to 70 mm. The use of the burner head assures clean combustion and high combustion efficiency.

  4. Progress in Fabrication of Rocket Combustion Chambers by VPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; McKechnie, Timothy N.

    2004-01-01

    Several documents in a collection describe aspects of the development of advanced materials and fabrication processes intended to enable the manufacture of advanced rocket combustion chambers and nozzles at relatively low cost. One concept discussed in most of the documents is the fabrication of combustion-chamber liners by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) of an alloy of 88Cu/8Cr/4Nb (numbers indicate atomic percentages) -- a concept that was reported in "Improved Alloy for Fabrication of Combustion Chambers by VPS" (MFS-26546). Another concept is the deposition of graded-composition wall and liner structures by VPS in order to make liners integral parts of wall structures and to make oxidation- and thermal-protection layers integral parts of liners: The VPS process is started at 100 percent of a first alloy, then the proportion of a second alloy is increased gradually from zero as deposition continues, ending at 100 percent of the second alloy. Yet another concept discussed in one of the documents is the VPS of oxidation-protection coats in the forms of nickel-and-chromium-containing refractory alloys on VPS-deposited 88Cu/8Cr/4Nb liners.

  5. Two-phase flow effect on hybrid rocket combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jih Lung

    2009-10-01

    This study numerically explores the aerodynamic and combustion processes in a hybrid rocket combustor, under a two-phase turbulent flow environment, considering the evaporation, combustion and drag of droplet and droplet ignition criterion. The predictions of temperature, reaction mode, reactant mass fraction, velocity, oxidizer consumption, fuel regression and droplet number distribution enhance understanding of the two-phase combustion aerodynamics inside the combustor. A parametric study of the inlet spray pattern, including spray cone angle, spray injection velocity and droplet size, is performed to improve the operation of reactant mixing and higher fuel regression rate. Analytical results indicate that both the oxidizer consumption and the fuel regression increase with increasing spray cone angle and spray injection velocity in the practical range of operation. However, for stoichiometric operation, the superior spray cone angle is within 20-60°, and spray injection velocity within 20-40 m/s, under a volume-mean droplet radius of 50 μm. The power dependence of solid-fuel regression on total mass flux is found to decrease with rising of droplet mean size.

  6. Liquid rocket booster study. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of Liquid Rocket Boosters (LRBs) replacing Solid Rocket Boosters on the Space Shuttle program. The major findings are given. The most significant conclusion is that LRBs offer significantly safety and performance advantages over the SRBs currently used by the STS without major impact to the ongoing program.

  7. A review of liquid rocket propulsion programs in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    An assessment of Japan's current capabilities in the areas of space and transatmospheric propulsion is presented. The primary focus is upon Japan's programs in liquid rocket propulsion and in space plane and related transatmospheric areas. Brief reference is also made to their solid rocket programs, as well as to their supersonic air breathing propulsion efforts that are just getting underway.

  8. Nonlinear Longitudinal Mode Instability in Liquid Propellant Rocket Engine Preburners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, J. D. (Technical Monitor); Flandro, Gary A.; Majdalani, Joseph; Sims, Joseph D.

    2004-01-01

    Nonlinear pressure oscillations have been observed in liquid propellant rocket instability preburner devices. Unlike the familiar transverse mode instabilities that characterize primary combustion chambers, these oscillations appear as longitudinal gas motions with frequencies that are typical of the chamber axial acoustic modes. In several respects, the phenomenon is similar to longitudinal mode combustion instability appearing in low-smoke solid propellant motors. An important feature is evidence of steep-fronted wave motions with very high amplitude. Clearly, gas motions of this type threaten the mechanical integrity of associated engine components and create unacceptably high vibration levels. This paper focuses on development of the analytical tools needed to predict, diagnose, and correct instabilities of this type. For this purpose, mechanisms that lead to steep-fronted, high-amplitude pressure waves are described in detail. It is shown that such gas motions are the outcome of the natural steepening process in which initially low amplitude standing acoustic waves grow into shock-like disturbances. The energy source that promotes this behavior is a combination of unsteady combustion energy release and interactions with the quasi-steady mean chamber flow. Since shock waves characterize the gas motions, detonation-like mechanisms may well control the unsteady combustion processes. When the energy gains exceed the losses (represented mainly by nozzle and viscous damping), the waves can rapidly grow to a finite amplitude limit cycle. Analytical tools are described that allow the prediction of the limit cycle amplitude and show the dependence of this wave amplitude on the system geometry and other design parameters. This information can be used to guide corrective procedures that mitigate or eliminate the oscillations.

  9. Robert H. Goddard and His Liquid-Gasoline Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    Dr. Goddard's 1926 rocket configuration. Dr. Goddard's liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket was fired on March 16, 1926, at Auburn, Massachusetts. It flew for only 2.5 seconds, climbed 41 feet, and landed 184 feet away in a cabbage patch. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets, which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  10. Heat transfer in rocket engine combustion chambers and regeneratively cooled nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-11-01

    A conjugate heat transfer computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to describe regenerative cooling in the main combustion chamber and nozzle and in the injector faceplate region for a launch vehicle class liquid rocket engine was developed. An injector model for sprays which treats the fluid as a variable density, single-phase media was formulated, incorporated into a version of the FDNS code, and used to simulate the injector flow typical of that in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Various chamber related heat transfer analyses were made to verify the predictive capability of the conjugate heat transfer analysis provided by the FDNS code. The density based version of the FDNS code with the real fluid property models developed was successful in predicting the streamtube combustion of individual injector elements.

  11. Heat transfer in rocket engine combustion chambers and regeneratively cooled nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A conjugate heat transfer computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to describe regenerative cooling in the main combustion chamber and nozzle and in the injector faceplate region for a launch vehicle class liquid rocket engine was developed. An injector model for sprays which treats the fluid as a variable density, single-phase media was formulated, incorporated into a version of the FDNS code, and used to simulate the injector flow typical of that in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Various chamber related heat transfer analyses were made to verify the predictive capability of the conjugate heat transfer analysis provided by the FDNS code. The density based version of the FDNS code with the real fluid property models developed was successful in predicting the streamtube combustion of individual injector elements.

  12. Liquid Rocket Propulsion Technology: An evaluation of NASA's program. [for space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The liquid rocket propulsion technology needs to support anticipated future space vehicles were examined including any special action needs to be taken to assure that an industrial base in substained. Propulsion system requirements of Earth-to-orbit vehicles, orbital transfer vehicles, and planetary missions were evaluated. Areas of the fundamental technology program undertaking these needs discussed include: pumps and pump drives; combustion heat transfer; nozzle aerodynamics; low gravity cryogenic fluid management; and component and system life reliability, and maintenance. The primary conclusion is that continued development of the shuttle main engine system to achieve design performance and life should be the highest priority in the rocket engine program.

  13. Lagrangian modeling of turbulent spray combustion: application to rocket engines cryogenic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izard, J.-F.; Mura, A.

    2011-10-01

    The present work is concerned with the application of a turbulent two-phase flow combustion model to a spray flame of Liquid Oxygen (LOx) and Gaseous Hydrogen (GH2). The proposed strategy relies on a joint Eulerian-Lagrangian framework. The Probability Density Function (PDF) that characterizes the liquid phase is evaluated by simulating the Williams spray equation [1] thanks to the semifluid approach introduced in [2]. The Lagrangian approach provides the classical exchange terms with the gaseous phase and, especially, several vaporization source terms. They are required to describe turbulent combustion but difficult to evaluate from the Eulerian point of view. The turbulent combustion model retained here relies on the consideration of the mixture fraction to evaluate the local fuel-to-oxidizer ratio, and the oxygen mass fraction to follow the deviations from chemical equilibrium. The difficulty associated with the estimation of a joint scalar PDF is circumvented by invoking the sudden chemistry hypothesis [3]. In this manner, the problem reduces to the estimation of the mixture fraction PDF, but with the influence of the terms related to vaporization that are the source of additional fluctuations of composition. Following the early proposal of [4], these terms are easily obtained from the Lagrangian framework adopted to describe the two-phase flows. The resulting computational model is applied to the numerical simulation of LOx-GH2 spray flames. The test case (Mascotte) is representative of combustion in rocket engine conditions. The results of numerical simulations display a satisfactory agreement with available experimental data.

  14. NiAl-Based Approach For Rocket Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, Michael V. (Inventor); Gayda, John (Inventor); Noebe, Ronald D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A multi-layered component, such as a rocket engine combustion chamber, includes NiAl or NiAl-based alloy as a structural layer on the hot side of the component. A second structural layer is formed of material selected form Ni-based superalloys, Co-based alloys, Fe-based alloys, Cu, and Cu-based alloys. The second material is more ductile than the NiAl and imparts increased toughness to the component. The second material is selected to enhance one or more predetermined physical properties of the component. Additional structural layers may be included with the additional material(s) being selected for their impact on physical properties of the component.

  15. NiAl-based approach for rocket combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, Michael V. (Inventor); Gayda, John (Inventor); Noebe, Ronald D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A multi-layered component, such as a rocket engine combustion chamber, includes NiAl or NiAl-based alloy as a structural layer on the hot side of the component. A second structural layer is formed of material selected from Ni-based superalloys, Co-based alloys, Fe-based alloys, Cu, and Cu-based alloys. The second material is more ductile than the NiAl and imparts increased toughness to the component. The second material is selected to enhance one or more predetermined physical properties of the component. Additional structural layers may be included with the additional material(s) being selected for their impact on physical properties of the component.

  16. Cooling of rocket thrust chambers with liquid oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Elizabeth S.; Schlumberger, Julie A.

    1990-01-01

    Rocket engines using high pressure liquid oxygen (LOX) and kerosene (RP-1) as the propellants have been considered for future launch vehicle propulsion. Generally, in regeneratively cooled engines, the fuel is used to cool the combustion chamber. However, hydrocarbons such as RP-1 are limited in their cooling capability at high temperatures and pressures. Therefore, LOX is being considered as an alternative coolant. However, there has been concern as to the effect on the integrity of the chamber liner if oxygen leaks into the combustion zone through fatigue cracks that may develop between the cooling passages and the hot-gas side wall. To address this concern, an investigation was previously conducted with simulated fatigue cracks upstream of the thrust chamber throat. When these chambers were tested, an unexpected melting in the throat region developed which was not in line with the simulated fatigue cracks. The current experimental program was conducted in order to determine the cause for the failure in the earlier thrust chambers and to further investigate the effects of cracks in the thrust chamber liner upstream of the throat. The thrust chambers were tested at oxygen-to-fuel mixture ratios from 1.5 to 2.86 at a nominal chamber pressure of 8.6 MPa. As a result of the test series, the reason for the failure occurring in the earlier work was determined to be injector anomalies. The LOX leaking through the simulated fatigue cracks did not affect the integrity of the chambers.

  17. Cooling of rocket thrust chambers with liquid oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Elizabeth S.; Schlumberger, Julie A.

    1990-01-01

    Rocket engines using high pressure liquid oxygen (LOX) and kerosene (RP-1) as the propellants have been considered for future launch vehicle propulsion. Generaly, in regeneratively cooled engines, thefuel is used to cool the combustion chamber. However, hydrocarbons such as RP-1 are limited in their cooling capability at high temperatures and pressures. Therefore, LOX is being considered as an alternative coolant. However, there has been concern as to the effect on the integrity of the chamber liner if oxygen leaks into the combustion zone through fatigue cracks that may develop between the cooling passages and the hot-gas side wall. To address this concern, an investigation was previously conducted with simulated fatigue cracks upstream of the thrust chamber throat. When these chambers were tested, an unexpected melting in the throat region developed which was not in line with the simulated fatigue cracks. The current experimental program was conducted in order to determine the cause for the failure in the earlier thrust chambers and to further investigate the effects of cracks in the thrust chamber liner upstream of the throat. The thrust chambers were tested at oxygen-to-fuel mixture ratios from 1.5 to 2.86 at a nominal chamber pressure of 8.6 MPa. As a result of the test series, the reason for the failure occurring in the earlier work was determined to be injector anomalies. The LOX leaking through the simulated fatigue cracks did not affect the integrity of the chambers.

  18. Cooled Ceramic Composite Panel Tested Successfully in Rocket Combustion Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.

    2003-01-01

    Regeneratively cooled ceramic matrix composite (CMC) structures are being considered for use along the walls of the hot-flow paths of rocket-based or turbine-based combined-cycle propulsion systems. They offer the combined benefits of substantial weight savings, higher operating temperatures, and reduced coolant requirements in comparison to components designed with traditional metals. These cooled structures, which use the fuel as the coolant, require materials that can survive aggressive thermal, mechanical, acoustic, and aerodynamic loads while acting as heat exchangers, which can improve the efficiency of the engine. A team effort between the NASA Glenn Research Center, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and various industrial partners has led to the design, development, and fabrication of several types of regeneratively cooled panels. The concepts for these panels range from ultra-lightweight designs that rely only on CMC tubes for coolant containment to more maintainable designs that incorporate metal coolant containment tubes to allow for the rapid assembly or disassembly of the heat exchanger. One of the cooled panels based on an all-CMC design was successfully tested in the rocket combustion facility at Glenn. Testing of the remaining four panels is underway.

  19. Combustion Stability Assessments of the Black Brant Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean

    2014-01-01

    The Black Brant variation of the Standard Brant developed in the 1960's has been a workhorse motor of the NASA Sounding Rocket Project Office (SRPO) since the 1970's. In March 2012, the Black Brant Mk1 used on mission 36.277 experienced combustion instability during a flight at White Sands Missile Range, the third event in the last four years, the first occurring in November, 2009, the second in April 2010. After the 2010 event the program has been increasing the motor's throat diameter post-delivery with the goal of lowering the chamber pressure and increasing the margin against combustion instability. During the most recent combustion instability event, the vibrations exceeded the qualification levels for the Flight Termination System. The present study utilizes data generated from T-burner testing of multiple Black Brant propellants at the Naval Air Warfare Center at China Lake, to improve the combustion stability predictions for the Black Brant Mk1 and to generate new predictions for the Mk2. Three unique one dimensional (1-D) stability models were generated, representing distinct Black Brant flights, two of which experienced instabilities. The individual models allowed for comparison of stability characteristics between various nozzle configurations. A long standing "rule of thumb" states that increased stability margin is gained by increasing the throat diameter. In contradiction to this experience based rule, the analysis shows that little or no margin is gained from a larger throat diameter. The present analysis demonstrates competing effects resulting from an increased throat diameter accompanying a large response function. As is expected, more acoustic energy was expelled through the nozzle, but conversely more acoustic energy was generated due to larger gas velocities near the propellant surfaces.

  20. Liquid-propellant droplet vaporization and combustion in high pressure environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Vigor

    1991-01-01

    In order to correct the deficiencies of existing models for high-pressure droplet vaporization and combustion, a fundamental investigation into this matter is essential. The objective of this research are: (1) to acquire basic understanding of physical and chemical mechanisms involved in the vaporization and combustion of isolated liquid-propellant droplets in both stagnant and forced-convective environments; (2) to establish droplet vaporization and combustion correlations for the study of liquid-propellant spray combustion and two-phase flowfields in rocket motors; and (3) to investigate the dynamic responses of multicomponent droplet vaporization and combustion to ambient flow oscillations.

  1. Solid Rocket Motor Combustion Instability Modeling in COMSOL Multiphysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean R.

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability modeling of Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) remains a topic of active research. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process, acoustics, and steady-state gas dynamics. Recent advances in defining the energy transport of disturbances within steady flow-fields have been applied by combustion stability modelers to improve the analysis framework [1, 2, 3]. Employing this more accurate global energy balance requires a higher fidelity model of the SRM flow-field and acoustic mode shapes. The current industry standard analysis tool utilizes a one dimensional analysis of the time dependent fluid dynamics along with a quasi-three dimensional propellant grain regression model to determine the SRM ballistics. The code then couples with another application that calculates the eigenvalues of the one dimensional homogenous wave equation. The mean flow parameters and acoustic normal modes are coupled to evaluate the stability theory developed and popularized by Culick [4, 5]. The assumption of a linear, non-dissipative wave in a quiescent fluid remains valid while acoustic amplitudes are small and local gas velocities stay below Mach 0.2. The current study employs the COMSOL multiphysics finite element framework to model the steady flow-field parameters and acoustic normal modes of a generic SRM. The study requires one way coupling of the CFD High Mach Number Flow (HMNF) and mathematics module. The HMNF module evaluates the gas flow inside of a SRM using St. Robert's law to model the solid propellant burn rate, no slip boundary conditions, and the hybrid outflow condition. Results from the HMNF model are verified by comparing the pertinent ballistics parameters with the industry standard code outputs (i.e. pressure drop, thrust, ect.). These results are then used by the coefficient form of the mathematics module to determine the complex eigenvalues of the

  2. Combustion and Performance Analyses of Coaxial Element Injectors with Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, J. R.; Jones, G. W.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid rocket engines using oxygen and methane propellants are being considered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for in-space vehicles. This propellant combination has not been previously used in a flight-qualified engine system, so limited test data and analysis results are available at this stage of early development. NASA has funded several hardware-oriented activities with oxygen and methane propellants over the past several years with the Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project, under the Exploration Technology Development Program. As part of this effort, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted combustion, performance, and combustion stability analyses of several of the configurations. This paper summarizes the analyses of combustion and performance as a follow-up to a paper published in the 2008 JANNAF/LPS meeting. Combustion stability analyses are presented in a separate paper. The current paper includes test and analysis results of coaxial element injectors using liquid oxygen and liquid methane or gaseous methane propellants. Several thrust chamber configurations have been modeled, including thrust chambers with multi-element swirl coax element injectors tested at the NASA MSFC, and a uni-element chamber with shear and swirl coax injectors tested at The Pennsylvania State University. Configurations were modeled with two one-dimensional liquid rocket combustion analysis codes, the Rocket Combustor Interaction Design and Analysis (ROCCID), and the Coaxial Injector Combustion Model (CICM). Significant effort was applied to show how these codes can be used to model combustion and performance with oxygen/methane propellants a priori, and what anchoring or calibrating features need to be applied or developed in the future. This paper describes the test hardware configurations, presents the results of all the analyses, and compares the results from the two analytical methods

  3. The washout of combustion-generated hydrogen chloride. [rocket exhaust raindrop scavenging quantification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenton, D. L.; Purcell, R. Y.; Hrdina, D.; Knutson, E. O.

    1980-01-01

    The coefficient for the washout from a rocket exhaust cloud of HCl generated by the combustion of an ammonium perchlorate-based solid rocket propellant such as that to be used for the Space Shuttle Booster is determined. A mathematical model of HCl scavenging by rain is developed taking into account rain droplet size, fall velocity and concentration under various rain conditions, partitioning of exhaust HCl between liquid and gaseous phases, the tendency of HCl to promote water vapor condensation and the concentration and size of droplets within the exhaust cloud. The washout coefficient is calculated as a function of total cloud water content, total HCl content at 100% relative humidity, condensation nuclei concentration and rain intensity. The model predictions are compared with experimental results obtained in scavenging tests with solid rocket exhaust and raindrops of different sizes, and the large reduction in washout coefficient at high relative humidities predicted by the model is not observed. A washout coefficient equal to 0.0000512 times the -0.176 power of the mass concentration of HCl times the 0.773 power of the rainfall intensity is obtained from the experimental data.

  4. Liquid-hydrogen rocket engine development at Aerojet, 1944 - 1950

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, G. H.; Gordon, R.; Coplen, H. L.; James, G. S.

    1977-01-01

    This program demonstrated the feasibility of virtually all the components in present-day, high-energy, liquid-rocket engines. Transpiration and film-cooled thrust chambers were successfully operated. The first liquid-hydrogen tests of the coaxial injector was conducted and the first pump to successfully produce high pressures in pumping liquid hydrogen was tested. A 1,000-lb-thrust gaseous propellant and a 3,000-lb-thrust liquid-propellant thrust chamber were operated satisfactorily. Also, the first tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of jet overexpansion and separation on performance of rocket thrust chambers with hydrogen-oxygen propellants.

  5. Theoretical Performance of Liquid Hydrogen with Liquid Oxygen as a Rocket Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Sanford; McBride, Bonnie J.

    1959-01-01

    Theoretical rocket performance for both equilibrium and frozen composition during expansion was calculated for the propellant combination liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen at four chamber pressures (60, 150, 300, and 600 lb/sq in. abs) and a wide range of pressure ratios (1 to 4000) and oxidant-fuel ratios (1.190 to 39.683). Data are given to estimate performance parameters at chamber pressures other than those for which data are tabulated. The parameters included are specific impulse, specific impulse in vacuum, combustion-chamber temperature, nozzle-exit temperature, molecular weight, molecular-weight derivatives, characteristic velocity, coefficient of thrust, ratio of nozzle-exit area to throat area, specific heat at constant pressure, isentropic exponent, viscosity, thermal conductivity, Mach number, and equilibrium gas compositions.

  6. Theoretical performance of liquid ammonia and liquid fluorine as a rocket propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Sanford; Huff, Vearl N

    1953-01-01

    Theoretical values of performance parameters for liquid ammonia and liquid fluorine as a rocket propellant were calculated on the assumption of equilibrium composition during the expansion process for a wide range of fuel-oxidant and expansion ratios. The parameters included were specific impulse, combustion chamber temperature, nozzle-exit temperature, equilibrium composition, mean molecular weight, characteristic velocity, coefficient of thrust, ratio of nozzle-exit area to throat area, specific heat at constant pressure, coefficient of viscosity, and coefficient of thermal conductivity. The maximum value of specific impulse was 311.5 pound-seconds per pound for a chamber pressure of 300 pounds per square inch absolute (20.41 atm) and an exit pressure of 1 atmosphere.

  7. Theoretical performance of liquid hydrogen and liquid fluorine as a rocket propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Sanford; Huff, Vearl N

    1953-01-01

    Theoretical values of performance parameters for liquid hydrogen and liquid fluorine as a rocket propellant were calculated on the assumption of equilibrium composition during the expansion process for a wide range of fuel-oxidant and expansion ratios. The parameters included were specific impulse, combustion-chamber temperature, nozzle-exit temperature, equilibrium composition, mean molecular weight, characteristic velocity, coefficient of thrust, ration of nozzle-exit area to throat area, specific heat at constant pressure, coefficient of viscosity, and coefficient of thermal conductivity. The maximum value of specific impulse was 364.6 pound-seconds per pound for a chamber pressure of 300 pounds per square inch absolute (20.41 atm) and an exit pressure of 1 atmosphere.

  8. 46 CFR 105.10-10 - Combustible liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Combustible liquid. 105.10-10 Section 105.10-10 Shipping... Combustible liquid. (a) The term combustible liquid means any liquid having a flashpoint above 80 °F. (as..., combustible liquids are referred to by grades, as follows: (1) Grade D. Any combustible liquid having...

  9. 46 CFR 105.10-10 - Combustible liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Combustible liquid. 105.10-10 Section 105.10-10 Shipping... Combustible liquid. (a) The term combustible liquid means any liquid having a flashpoint above 80 °F. (as..., combustible liquids are referred to by grades, as follows: (1) Grade D. Any combustible liquid having...

  10. 46 CFR 105.10-10 - Combustible liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Combustible liquid. 105.10-10 Section 105.10-10 Shipping... Combustible liquid. (a) The term combustible liquid means any liquid having a flashpoint above 80 °F. (as..., combustible liquids are referred to by grades, as follows: (1) Grade D. Any combustible liquid having...

  11. 46 CFR 105.10-10 - Combustible liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Combustible liquid. 105.10-10 Section 105.10-10 Shipping... Combustible liquid. (a) The term combustible liquid means any liquid having a flashpoint above 80 °F. (as..., combustible liquids are referred to by grades, as follows: (1) Grade D. Any combustible liquid having...

  12. 46 CFR 105.10-10 - Combustible liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Combustible liquid. 105.10-10 Section 105.10-10 Shipping... Combustible liquid. (a) The term combustible liquid means any liquid having a flashpoint above 80 °F. (as..., combustible liquids are referred to by grades, as follows: (1) Grade D. Any combustible liquid having...

  13. Experimental study of rocket engine model with gaseous polyethylene fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yemets, V. V.

    Experimental results for liquid rocket engine models with gaseous polyethylene fuel that is hard before its consumption are considered. The possibility of hard design element combustion in a liquid rocket engine is demonstrated.

  14. Numerical analysis of combustion characteristics of hybrid rocket motor with multi-section swirl injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengen; Cai, Guobiao; Tian, Hui

    2016-06-01

    This paper is aimed to analyse the combustion characteristics of hybrid rocket motor with multi-section swirl injection by simulating the combustion flow field. Numerical combustion flow field and combustion performance parameters are obtained through three-dimensional numerical simulations based on a steady numerical model proposed in this paper. The hybrid rocket motor adopts 98% hydrogen peroxide and polyethylene as the propellants. Multiple injection sections are set along the axis of the solid fuel grain, and the oxidizer enters the combustion chamber by means of tangential injection via the injector ports in the injection sections. Simulation results indicate that the combustion flow field structure of the hybrid rocket motor could be improved by multi-section swirl injection method. The transformation of the combustion flow field can greatly increase the fuel regression rate and the combustion efficiency. The average fuel regression rate of the motor with multi-section swirl injection is improved by 8.37 times compared with that of the motor with conventional head-end irrotational injection. The combustion efficiency is increased to 95.73%. Besides, the simulation results also indicate that (1) the additional injection sections can increase the fuel regression rate and the combustion efficiency; (2) the upstream offset of the injection sections reduces the combustion efficiency; and (3) the fuel regression rate and the combustion efficiency decrease with the reduction of the number of injector ports in each injection section.

  15. Hybrid rockets - Combining the best of liquids and solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Jerry R.; Goldberg, Ben E.; Estey, Paul N.; Wiley, Dan R.

    1992-07-01

    Hybrid rockets employing liquid oxidizer and solid fuel grain answers to cost, safety, reliability, and environmental impact concerns that have become as prominent as performance in recent years. The oxidizer-free grain has limited sensitivity to grain anomalies, such as bond-line separations, which can cause catastrophic failures in solid rocket motors. An account is presently given of the development effort associated with the AMROC commercial hybrid booster and component testing efforts at NASA-Marshall. These hybrid rockets can be fired, terminated, inspected, evaluated, and restarted for additional testing.

  16. Hybrid rockets - Combining the best of liquids and solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jerry R.; Goldberg, Ben E.; Estey, Paul N.; Wiley, Dan R.

    1992-01-01

    Hybrid rockets employing liquid oxidizer and solid fuel grain answers to cost, safety, reliability, and environmental impact concerns that have become as prominent as performance in recent years. The oxidizer-free grain has limited sensitivity to grain anomalies, such as bond-line separations, which can cause catastrophic failures in solid rocket motors. An account is presently given of the development effort associated with the AMROC commercial hybrid booster and component testing efforts at NASA-Marshall. These hybrid rockets can be fired, terminated, inspected, evaluated, and restarted for additional testing.

  17. Liquid Rocket Lines, Bellows, Flexible Hoses, and Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Fluid-flow components in a liquid propellant rocket engine and the rocket vehicle which it propels are interconnected by lines, bellows, and flexible hoses. Elements involved in the successful design of these components are identified and current technologies pertaining to these elements are reviewed, assessed, and summarized to provide a technology base for a checklist of rules to be followed by project managers in guiding a design or assessing its adequacy. Recommended procedures for satisfying each of the design criteria are included.

  18. Solid Rocket Motor Combustion Instability Modeling in COMSOL Multiphysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, S. R.

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability modeling of Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) remains a topic of active research. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process, acoustics, and steady-state gas dynamics. Recent advances in defining the energy transport of disturbances within steady flow-fields have been applied by combustion stability modelers to improve the analysis framework. Employing this more accurate global energy balance requires a higher fidelity model of the SRM flow-field and acoustic mode shapes. The current industry standard analysis tool utilizes a one dimensional analysis of the time dependent fluid dynamics along with a quasi-three dimensional propellant grain regression model to determine the SRM ballistics. The code then couples with another application that calculates the eigenvalues of the one dimensional homogenous wave equation. The mean flow parameters and acoustic normal modes are coupled to evaluate the stability theory developed and popularized by Culick. The assumption of a linear, non-dissipative wave in a quiescent fluid remains valid while acoustic amplitudes are small and local gas velocities stay below Mach 0.2. The current study employs the COMSOL Multiphysics finite element framework to model the steady flow-field parameters and acoustic normal modes of a generic SRM. This work builds upon previous efforts to verify the use of the acoustic velocity potential equation (AVPE) laid out by Campos. The acoustic velocity potential (psi) describing the acoustic wave motion in the presence of an inhomogeneous steady high-speed flow is defined by, del squared psi - (lambda/c) squared psi - M x [M x del((del)(psi))] - 2((lambda)(M)/c + M x del(M) x (del)(psi) - 2(lambda)(psi)[M x del(1/c)] = 0. with M as the Mach vector, c as the speed of sound, and ? as the complex eigenvalue. The study requires one way coupling of the CFD High Mach Number Flow (HMNF

  19. Technique for the optimization of the powerhead configuration and performance of liquid rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Germain, Brad David

    The development and optimization of liquid rocket engines is an integral part of space vehicle design, since most Earth-to-orbit launch vehicles to date have used liquid rockets as their main propulsion system. Rocket engine design tools range in fidelity from very simple conceptual level tools to full computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The level of fidelity of interest in this research is a design tool that determines engine thrust and specific impulse as well as models the powerhead of the engine. This is the highest level of fidelity applicable to a conceptual level design environment where faster running analyses are desired. The optimization of liquid rocket engines using a powerhead analysis tool is a difficult problem, because it involves both continuous and discrete inputs as well as a nonlinear design space. Example continuous inputs are the main combustion chamber pressure, nozzle area ratio, engine mixture ratio, and desired thrust. Example discrete variable inputs are the engine cycle (staged-combustion, gas generator, etc.), fuel/oxidizer combination, and engine material choices. Nonlinear optimization problems involving both continuous and discrete inputs are referred to as Mixed-Integer Nonlinear Programming (MINLP) problems. Many methods exist in literature for solving MINLP problems; however none are applicable for this research. All of the existing MINLP methods require the relaxation of the discrete variables as part of their analysis procedure. This means that the discrete choices must be evaluated at non-discrete values. This is not possible with an engine powerhead design code. Therefore, a new optimization method was developed that uses modified response surface equations to provide lower bounds of the continuous design space for each unique discrete variable combination. These lower bounds are then used to efficiently solve the optimization problem. The new optimization procedure was used to find optimal rocket engine designs

  20. The 2003 Goddard Rocket Replica Project: A Reconstruction of the World's First Functional Liquid Rocket System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, R. A.; Elam, S. K.; Hicks, G. D.; Sanders, T. M.; London, J. R.; Mayne, A. W.; Christensen, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    As a part of NASA s 2003 Centennial of Flight celebration, engineers and technicians at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Huntsville, Alabama, in cooperation with the Alabama-Mississippi AIAA Section, have reconstructed historically accurate, functional replicas of Dr. Robert H. Goddard s 1926 first liquid- fuel rocket. The purposes of this project were to clearly understand, recreate, and document the mechanisms and workings of the 1926 rocket for exhibit and educational use, creating a vital resource for researchers studying the evolution of liquid rocketry for years to come. The MSFC team s reverse engineering activity has created detailed engineering-quality drawings and specifications describing the original rocket and how it was built, tested, and operated. Static hot-fire tests, as well as flight demonstrations, have further defined and quantified the actual performance and engineering actual performance and engineering challenges of this major segment in early aerospace history.

  1. Comparison of High Aspect Ratio Cooling Channel Designs for a Rocket Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadel, Mary F.

    1997-01-01

    An analytical investigation on the effect of high aspect ratio (height/width) cooling channels, considering different coolant channel designs, on hot-gas-side wall temperature and coolant pressure drop for a liquid hydrogen cooled rocket combustion chamber, was performed. Coolant channel design elements considered were: length of combustion chamber in which high aspect ratio cooling was applied, number of coolant channels, and coolant channel shape. Seven coolant channel designs were investigated using a coupling of the Rocket Thermal Evaluation code and the Two-Dimensional Kinetics code. Initially, each coolant channel design was developed, without consideration for fabrication, to reduce the hot-gas-side wall temperature from a given conventional cooling channel baseline. These designs produced hot-gas-side wall temperature reductions up to 22 percent, with coolant pressure drop increases as low as 7.5 percent from the baseline. Fabrication constraints for milled channels were applied to the seven designs. These produced hot-gas-side wall temperature reductions of up to 20 percent, with coolant pressure drop increases as low as 2 percent. Using high aspect ratio cooling channels for the entire length of the combustion chamber had no additional benefit on hot-gas-side wall temperature over using high aspect ratio cooling channels only in the throat region, but increased coolant pressure drop 33 percent. Independent of coolant channel shape, high aspect ratio cooling was able to reduce the hot-gas-side wall temperature by at least 8 percent, with as low as a 2 percent increase in coolant pressure drop. The design with the highest overall benefit to hot-gas-side wall temperature and minimal coolant pressure drop cooling can now be done in relatively short periods of time with multiple iterations.

  2. Turbopump systems for liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The turbopump system, from preliminary design through rocket engine testing is examined. Selection of proper system type for each application and integration of the components into a working system are dealt with. Details are also given on the design of various components including inducers, pumps, turbines, gears, and bearings.

  3. Fluid thrust control system. [for liquid propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, W. L.; Jansen, H. B.; Lehmann, E. N. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    A pure fluid thrust control system is described for a pump-fed, regeneratively cooled liquid propellant rocket engine. A proportional fluid amplifier and a bistable fluid amplifier control overshoot in the starting of the engine and take it to a predetermined thrust. An ejector type pump is provided in the line between the liquid hydrogen rocket nozzle heat exchanger and the turbine driving the fuel pump to aid in bringing the fluid at this point back into the regular system when it is not bypassed. The thrust control system is intended to function in environments too severe for mechanical controls.

  4. Heat transfer in rocket engine combustion chambers and nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, P. G.; Chen, Y. S.; Farmer, R. C.

    1992-07-01

    The complexities of liquid rocket engine heat transfer which involve the injector faceplate and regeneratively and film cooled walls are being investigated by computational analysis. A conjugate heat transfer analysis will be used to describe localized heating phenomena associated with particular injector configurations and coolant channels and film coolant dumps. These components are being analyzed, and the analysis verified with appropriate test data. Finally, the component analysis will be synthesized into an overall flowfield/heat transfer model. The FDNS code is being used to make the component analyses. Particular attention is being given to the representation of the thermodynamic properties of the fluid streams and to the method of combining the detailed models to represent overall heating. Unit flow models of specific coaxial injector elements have been developed and will be described. Film cooling simulations of film coolant flows typical of the subscale Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) being experimentally studied by Pratt and Whitney have been made, and these results will be presented. Other film coolant experiments have also been simulated to verify the CFD heat transfer model being developed. The status of the study and its relevance as a new design tool are covered. Information is given in viewgraph form.

  5. Heat transfer in rocket engine combustion chambers and nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, P. G.; Chen, Y. S.; Farmer, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    The complexities of liquid rocket engine heat transfer which involve the injector faceplate and regeneratively and film cooled walls are being investigated by computational analysis. A conjugate heat transfer analysis will be used to describe localized heating phenomena associated with particular injector configurations and coolant channels and film coolant dumps. These components are being analyzed, and the analysis verified with appropriate test data. Finally, the component analysis will be synthesized into an overall flowfield/heat transfer model. The FDNS code is being used to make the component analyses. Particular attention is being given to the representation of the thermodynamic properties of the fluid streams and to the method of combining the detailed models to represent overall heating. Unit flow models of specific coaxial injector elements have been developed and will be described. Film cooling simulations of film coolant flows typical of the subscale Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) being experimentally studied by Pratt and Whitney have been made, and these results will be presented. Other film coolant experiments have also been simulated to verify the CFD heat transfer model being developed. The status of the study and its relevance as a new design tool are covered. Information is given in viewgraph form.

  6. A numerical model for coupling between atomization and spray dynamics in liquid rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giridharan, M. G.; Lee, J. G.; Krishnan, A.; Przekwas, A. J.; Gross, Klaus

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method of coupling the atomization and spray combustion processes encountered in coaxial injection elements of liquid rocket engine thrust chambers. This method is based on the Jet-Embedding technique in which the liquid jet core equations and the gas phase equations are solved separately. The liquid and gas phase solutions, however, are coupled through the boundary conditions at the interface between the phases. The computational grid for the gas phase calculations are adapted to the shape of the liquid jet core. The axial variation of droplet sizes are calculated using a stability analysis appropriate for the atomization regime of liquid jet breakup. The predictions of this method have been validated with experimental data on low speed water jets. Using this method, calculations are performed for the SSME fuel preburner single injector flow field. The results obtained are in good agreement with the predictions of the volume-of-fluid method.

  7. Metallized Gelled Propellants: Oxygen/RP-1/Aluminum Rocket Heat Transfer and Combustion Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan; Zakany, James S.

    1996-01-01

    A series of rocket engine heat transfer experiments using metallized gelled liquid propellants was conducted. These experiments used a small 20- to 40-lb/f thrust engine composed of a modular injector, igniter, chamber and nozzle. The fuels used were traditional liquid RP-1 and gelled RP-1 with 0-, 5-, and 55-percentage by weight loadings of aluminum particles. Gaseous oxygen was used as the oxidizer. Three different injectors were used during the testing: one for the baseline O(2)/RP-1 tests and two for the gelled and metallized gelled fuel firings. Heat transfer measurements were made with a rocket engine calorimeter chamber and nozzle with a total of 31 cooling channels. Each chamber used a water flow to carry heat away from the chamber and the attached thermocouples and flow meters allowed heat flux estimates at each of the 31 stations. The rocket engine Cstar efficiency for the RP-1 fuel was in the 65-69 percent range, while the gelled 0 percent by weight RP-1 and the 5-percent by weight RP-1 exhibited a Cstar efficiency range of 60 to 62% and 65 to 67%, respectively. The 55-percent by weight RP-1 fuel delivered a 42-47% Cstar efficiency. Comparisons of the heat flux and temperature profiles of the RP-1 and the metallized gelled RP-1/A1 fuels show that the peak nozzle heat fluxes with the metallized gelled O2/RP-1/A1 propellants are substantially higher than the baseline O2/RP-1: up to double the flux for the 55 percent by weight RP-1/A1 over the RP-1 fuel. Analyses showed that the heat transfer to the wall was significantly different for the RP-1/A1 at 55-percent by weight versus the RP-1 fuel. Also, a gellant and an aluminum combustion delay was inferred in the 0 percent and 5-percent by weight RP-1/A1 cases from the decrease in heat flux in the first part of the chamber. A large decrease in heat flux in the last half of the chamber was caused by fuel deposition in the chamber and nozzle. The engine combustion occurred well downstream of the injector face

  8. Current status of droplet and liquid combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    The present understanding of spray combustion in rocket engine, gas turbine, Diesel engine and industrial furnace applications is reviewed. In some cases, spray combustion can be modeled by ignoring the details of spray evaporation and treating the system as a gaseous diffusion flame; however, in many circumstances, this simplification is not adequate and turbulent two-phase flow must be considered. The behavior of individual droplets is a necessary component of two-phase models and recent work on transient droplet evaporation, ignition and combustion is considered, along with a discussion of important simplifying assumptions involved with modeling these processes. Methods of modeling spray evaporation and combustion processes are also discussed including: one-dimensional models for rocket engine and prevaporized combustion systems, lumped zone models (utilizing well-stirred reactor and plug flow regions) for gas turbine and furnace systems, locally homogeneous turbulent models, and two-phase models. The review highlights the need for improved injector characterization methods, more information of droplet transport characteristics in turbulent flow and continued development of more complete two-phase turbulent models

  9. Current status of droplet and liquid combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    The present understanding of spray combustion in rocket engine, gas turbine, Diesel engine and industrial furnace applications is reviewed. In some cases, spray combustion can be modeled by ignoring the details of spray evaporation and treating the system in the same manner as a gaseous diffusion flame; however, in many circumstances, this type of simplification is not adequate and the turbulent two-phase flow must be considered. The behavior of individual droplets is a necessary component of two-phase models and recent work on transient droplet evaporation, ignition and combustion is considered, along with a discussion of important simplifying assumptions involved with modeling these processes. Methods of modeling spray evaporation and combustion processes are also discussed including: one-dimensional models for rocket engine and prevaporized combustion systems, lumped zone models (utilizing well-stirred reactor and plug flow regions) for gas turbine and furnace systems, locally homogeneous turbulent models, and two-phase models. The review highlights the need for improved injector characterization methods, more information of droplet transport characteristics in turbulent flow and continued development of more complete two-phase turbulent models.

  10. A Preliminary Study of End-Burning Hybrid Rocket: Part 2 Combustion Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Nozomu; Kato, Takahiro; Nagata, Harunori; Kudo, Isao

    To overcome defects of conventional hybrid rockets such as the loss of specific impulse, which is caused by the O/F shift during the combustion, and the low combustion efficiency, the authors have proposed a new idea of design. The point of this idea, named “End-Burning Hybrid Rocket, ” is that oxidizer gas flows in the gap space of a porous solid fuel bed. Diffusion flame is formed at the end of the solid fuel bed. Experimental studies were made to clarify the basic combustion characteristics of the propellant. Results show that pressure exponent of the burning rate with the same equivalence ratio is approximately 0.85 and virtually independent with the equivalence ratio. Using this result, a designing method of End-Burning Hybrid Rocket Motor is shown. Finally, thrust and specific impulse is estimated as functions of oxidizer gas flow rates to investigate the throttling characteristics of the motor.

  11. Low loss injector for liquid propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonpragenau, G. L. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A low pressure loss injector element is disclosed for the main combustion chamber of a rocket engine which includes a lox post terminating in a cylindrical barrel. Received within the barrel is a lox plug which is threaded in the lox post and includes an interchangeable lox metering sieve which meters the lox into an annular lox passage. A second annular gas passage is coaxial with the annular lox passage. A cylindrical sleeve surrounds the annular gas passage and includes an interchangeable gas metering seive having metering orifices through which a hot gas passes into the annular passage. The jets which emerge from the annular lox passage and annular gas passage intersect in a recessed area away from the combustion area. Thus, mixing and combustion stability are enhanced.

  12. A facility for testing the acoustic combustion instability characteristics of solid rocket propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathes, H. B.

    1980-01-01

    A facility is described that has been specifically designed for small-scale laboratory testing of solid rocket propellants. A description of the facility is provided which includes the general plan of the facility and features related to personnel safety. One of the major activities in the facility is testing solid rocket propellants for combustion response to acoustic perturbations. A detailed discussion of acoustic instability testing is given including specially designed combustion apparatus, data acquisition, and signal conditioning. Techniques of data reduction are reviewed and some of the instrumentation problems that arise in this type of testing are mentioned along with practical solutions.

  13. Designing Liquid Rocket Engine Injectors for Performance, Stability, and Cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westra, Douglas G.; West, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is developing the Space Launch System (SLS) for crewed exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is designing rocket engines for the SLS Advanced Booster (AB) concepts being developed to replace the Shuttle-derived solid rocket boosters. One AB concept uses large, Rocket-Propellant (RP)-fueled engines that pose significant design challenges. The injectors for these engines require high performance and stable operation while still meeting aggressive cost reduction goals for access to space. Historically, combustion stability problems have been a critical issue for such injector designs. Traditional, empirical injector design tools and methodologies, however, lack the ability to reliably predict complex injector dynamics that often lead to combustion stability. Reliance on these tools alone would likely result in an unaffordable test-fail-fix cycle for injector development. Recently at MSFC, a massively parallel computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program was successfully applied in the SLS AB injector design process. High-fidelity reacting flow simulations were conducted for both single-element and seven-element representations of the full-scale injector. Data from the CFD simulations was then used to significantly augment and improve the empirical design tools, resulting in a high-performance, stable injector design.

  14. Mixing characteristics of injector elements in liquid rocket engines - A computational study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohr, Jonathan C.; Trinh, Huu P.

    1992-01-01

    A computational study has been performed to better understand the mixing characteristics of liquid rocket injector elements. Variations in injector geometry as well as differences in injector element inlet flow conditions are among the areas examined in the study. Most results involve the nonreactive mixing of gaseous fuel with gaseous oxidizer but preliminary results are included that involve the spray combustion of oxidizer droplets. The purpose of the study is to numerically predict flowfield behavior in individual injector elements to a high degree of accuracy and in doing so to determine how various injector element properties affect the flow.

  15. Theoretical Rocket Performance of Liquid Methane with Several Fluorine-Oxygen Mixtures Assuming Frozen Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Sanford; Kastner, Michael E

    1958-01-01

    Theoretical rocket performance for frozen composition during expansion was calculated for liquid methane with several fluorine-oxygen mixtures for a range of pressure ratios and oxidant-fuel ratios. The parameters included are specific impulse, combustion-chamber temperature, nozzle-exit temperature molecular weight, characteristic velocity, coefficient of thrust, ratio of nozzle-exit area to throat area, specific heat at constant pressure, isentropic exponent, viscosity, and thermal conductivity. The maximum calculated value of specific impulse for a chamber pressure of 600 pounds per square inch absolute (40.827atm) and an exit pressure of 1 atmosphere is 315.3 for 79.67 percent fluorine in the oxidant.

  16. Metallized Gelled Propellants: Oxygen/RP-1/aluminum Rocket Combustion Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan; Zakany, James S.

    1995-01-01

    A series of combustion experiments were conducted to measure the specific impulse, Cstar-, and specific-impulse efficiencies of a rocket engine using metallized gelled liquid propellants. These experiments used a small 20- to 40-1bf (89- to 178-N) thrust, modular engine consisting of an injector, igniter, chamber and nozzle. The fuels used were traditional liquid RP-1 and gelled RP-1 with 0-, 5-, and 55-wt% loadings of aluminum and gaseous oxygen was the oxidizer. Ten different injectors were used during the testing: 6 for the baseline 02/RP-1 tests and 4 for the gelled fuel tests which covered a wide range of mixture ratios. At the peak of the Isp versus oxidizer-to-fuel ratio (O/F) data, a range of 93 to 99% Cstar efficiency was reached with ungelled 02/RP-1. A Cstar efficiency range of 75 to 99% was obtained with gelled RP-l (0-wt% RP-1/Al) while the metallized 5-wt% RP-1/Al delivered a Cstar efficiency of 94 to 99% at the peak Isp in the O/F range tested. An 88 to 99% Cstar efficiency was obtained at the peak Isp of the gelled RP1/Al with 55-wt% Al. Specific impulse efficiencies for the 55-wt% RP-1/Al of 67%-83% were obtained at a 2.4:1 expansion ratio. Injector erosion was evident with the 55-wt% testing, while there was little or no erosion seen with the gelled RP-1 with 0- and 5-wt% Al. A protective layer of gelled fuel formed in the firings that minimized the damage to the rocket injector face. This effect may provide a useful technique for engine cooling. These experiments represent a first step in characterizing the performance of and operational issues with gelled RP-1 fuels.

  17. Advancing the State-of-the-Practice for Liquid Rocket Engine Injector Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, P. K.; Kenny, R. J.; Richardson, B. R.; Anderso, W. E.; Austin, B. J.; Schumaker, S. A.; Muss, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Current shortcomings in both the overall injector design process and its underlying combustion stability assessment methodology are rooted in the use of empirically based or low fidelity representations of complex physical phenomena and geometry details that have first order effects on performance, thermal environments and combustion stability. The result is a design and analysis capability that is often inadequate to reliably arrive at a suitable injector design in an efficient manner. Specifically, combustion instability has been particularly difficult to predict and mitigate. Large hydrocarbon-fueled booster engines have been especially problematic in this regard. Where combustion instability has been a problem, costly and time-consuming redesign efforts have often been an unfortunate consequence. This paper presents an overview of a recently completed effort at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to advance the state-of-the-practice for liquid rocket engine injector design. Multiple perturbations of a gas-centered swirl coaxial (GCSC) element that burned gaseous oxygen and RP-1 were designed, assessed for combustion stability, and tested. Three designs, one stable, one marginally unstable and one unstable, were used to demonstrate both an enhanced overall injector design process and an improved combustion stability assessment process. High-fidelity results from state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics CFD simulations were used to substantially augment and improve the injector design methodology. The CFD results were used to inform and guide the overall injector design process. They were also used to upgrade selected empirical or low-dimensional quantities in the ROCket Combustor Interactive Design (ROCCID) stability assessment tool. Hot fire single element injector testing was used to verify both the overall injector designs and the stability assessments. Testing was conducted at the Air Force Research Laboratory and at Purdue University. Companion papers

  18. Evaluation and Improvement of Liquid Propellant Rocket Chugging Analysis Techniques. Part 1: A One-Dimensional Analysis of Low Frequency Combustion Instability in the Fuel Preburner of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Final Report M.S. Thesis - Aug. 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kair Chuan

    1986-01-01

    Low frequency combustion instability, known as chugging, is consistently experienced during shutdown in the fuel and oxidizer preburners of the Space Shuttle Main Engines. Such problems always occur during the helium purge of the residual oxidizer from the preburner manifolds during the shutdown sequence. Possible causes and triggering mechanisms are analyzed and details in modeling the fuel preburner chug are presented. A linearized chugging model, based on the foundation of previous models, capable of predicting the chug occurrence is discussed and the predicted results are presented and compared to experimental work performed by NASA. Sensitivity parameters such as chamber pressure, fuel and oxidizer temperatures, and the effective bulk modulus of the liquid oxidizer are considered in analyzing the fuel preburner chug. The computer program CHUGTEST is utilized to generate the stability boundary for each sensitivity study and the region for stable operation is identified.

  19. Laser Schlieren and ultraviolet diagnostics of rocket combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    A low pressure oxygen/hydrogen turbine drive combustor hot-fire test series was conducted on the Turbine Drive Combustor Technology Program. The first objective was to gather data on an axisymmetric combustion system to support anchoring of a new combustion/fluid dynamics computer code under development on the same contract. The second objective was to gain insight into low mixture ratio combustion characteristics of coaxial injector elements.

  20. Advanced active health monitoring system of liquid rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Xinlin P.; Wu, Zhanjun; Beard, Shawn; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2008-11-01

    An advanced SMART TAPE system has been developed for real-time in-situ monitoring and long term tracking of structural integrity of pressure vessels in liquid rocket engines. The practical implementation of the structural health monitoring (SHM) system including distributed sensor network, portable diagnostic hardware and dedicated data analysis software is addressed based on the harsh operating environment. Extensive tests were conducted on a simulated large booster LOX-H2 engine propellant duct to evaluate the survivability and functionality of the system under the operating conditions of typical liquid rocket engines such as cryogenic temperature, vibration loads. The test results demonstrated that the developed SHM system could survive the combined cryogenic temperature and vibration environments and effectively detect cracks as small as 2 mm.

  1. Analytical concepts for health management systems of liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Richard; Tulpule, Sharayu; Hawman, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Substantial improvement in health management systems performance can be realized by implementing advanced analytical methods of processing existing liquid rocket engine sensor data. In this paper, such techniques ranging from time series analysis to multisensor pattern recognition to expert systems to fault isolation models are examined and contrasted. The performance of several of these methods is evaluated using data from test firings of the Space Shuttle main engines.

  2. Temperature measurement. [liquid monopropellant rocket engine performance tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design, installation, checkout, calibration, and operation of a temperature measuring system to be used during tests of a liquid monopropellant rocket engine are discussed. Appendixes include: (1) temperature measurement system elemental uncertainties, and (2) tables and equations for use with thermocouples and resistance thermometers. Design guidelines are given for the critical components of each portion of the system to provide an optimum temperature measurement system which meets the performance criteria specified.

  3. Liquid rocket engine centrifugal flow turbopumps. [design criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Design criteria and recommended practices are discussed for the following configurations selected from the design sequence of a liquid rocket engine centrifugal flow turbopump: (1) pump performance including speed, efficiency, and flow range; (2) impeller; (3) housing; and (4) thrust balance system. Hydrodynamic, structural, and mechanical problems are addressed for the achievement of required pump performance within the constraints imposed by the engine/turbopump system. Materials and fabrication specifications are also discussed.

  4. Data Mining for ISHM of Liquid Rocket Propulsion Status Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Ashok; Schwabacher, Mark; Oza, Nijunj; Martin, Rodney; Watson, Richard; Matthews, Bryan

    2006-01-01

    This document consists of presentation slides that review the current status of data mining to support the work with the Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) for the systems associated with Liquid Rocket Propulsion. The aim of this project is to have test stand data from Rocketdyne to design algorithms that will aid in the early detection of impending failures during operation. These methods will be extended and improved for future platforms (i.e., CEV/CLV).

  5. Investigation of low cost material processes for liquid rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyentat, Thinh; Kawashige, Chester M.; Scala, James G.; Horn, Ronald M.

    1993-06-01

    The development of low cost material processes is essential to the achievement of economical liquid rocket propulsion systems in the next century. This paper will present the results of the evaluation of some promising material processes including powder metallurgy, vacuum plasma spray, metal spray forming, and bulge forming. The physical and mechanical test results from the samples and subscale hardware fabricated from high strength copper alloys and superalloys will be discussed.

  6. Investigation of low cost material processes for liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyentat, Thinh; Kawashige, Chester M.; Scala, James G.; Horn, Ronald M.

    1993-01-01

    The development of low cost material processes is essential to the achievement of economical liquid rocket propulsion systems in the next century. This paper will present the results of the evaluation of some promising material processes including powder metallurgy, vacuum plasma spray, metal spray forming, and bulge forming. The physical and mechanical test results from the samples and subscale hardware fabricated from high strength copper alloys and superalloys will be discussed.

  7. Liquid rocket engine axial-flow turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheer, D. D.; Huppert, M. C.; Viteri, F.; Farquhar, J.; Keller, R. B., Jr. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    The axial pump is considered in terms of the total turbopump assembly. Stage hydrodynamic design, pump rotor assembly, pump materials for liquid hydrogen applications, and safety factors as utilized in state of the art pumps are among the topics discussed. Axial pump applications are included.

  8. Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) for the Space Transportion System (STS) systems study. Appendix D: Trade study summary for the liquid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Trade studies plans for a number of elements in the Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) component of the Space Transportation System (STS) are given in viewgraph form. Some of the elements covered include: avionics/flight control; avionics architecture; thrust vector control studies; engine control electronics; liquid rocket propellants; propellant pressurization systems; recoverable spacecraft; cryogenic tanks; and spacecraft construction materials.

  9. A Design Tool for Liquid Rocket Engine Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Richard C.; Cheng, Gary; Trinh, Huu Phuoc; Tucker, P. Kevin; Hutt, John

    1999-01-01

    A practical design tool for the analysis of flowfields near the injector face has been developed and used to analyze the Fastrac engine. The objective was to produce a computational design tool which was detailed enough to predict the interactive effects of injector element impingement angles and points and the momenta of the individual orifice flows. To obtain a model which could be used to simulate a significant number of individual orifices, a homogeneous computational fluid dynamics model was developed. To describe liquid and vapor sub- and super-critical flows, the model included thermal and caloric equations of state which were valid over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. A homogeneous model was constructed such that the local state of the flow was determined directly, i.e. the quality of the flow was calculated. Such a model does not identify drops or their distribution, but it does allow the flow along the injector face and into the acoustic cavity to be predicted. It also allows the film coolant flow to be accurately described. The initial evaluation of the injector code was made by simulating cold flow from an unlike injector element and from a like-on-like overlapping fan (LOL) injector element. The predicted mass flux distributions of these injector elements compared well to cold flow test results. These are the same cold flow tests which serve as the data base for the JANNAF performance prediction codes. The flux distributions 1 inch downstream of the injector face are very similar; the differences were somewhat larger at further distances from the faceplate. Since the cold flow testing did not achieve good mass balances when integrations across the entire fan were made, the CFD simulation appears to be reasonable alternative to future cold flow testing. To simulate the Fastrac, an RP-1/LOX combustion model must be chosen. This submodel must be relatively simple to accomplish three-dimensional, multiphase flow simulations. Single RP-1

  10. Hot-Gas-Slide and Coolant-Side Heat Transfer in Liquid Rocket Engine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Luong, Van

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this article are to develop a multidisciplinary, computational methodology to predict the hot-gas-side and coolant-side heat transfer in film cooling assisted, regeneratively cooled liquid rocket engine combustors, and to use it in parametric studies to recommend optimized design of the coolant channels for a developmental combustor. An integrated numerical model which incorporates computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for the hot-gas thermal environment, and thermal analysis for the liner and coolant channels, was developed. This integrated CFD/thermal model was validated by comparing predicted heat fluxes with those of hot-firing test and industrial design methods for a 40-k calorimeter thrust chamber and the Space Shuttle Main Engine main combustion chamber. Parametric studies were performed for the advanced main combustion chamber to find a strategy for a proposed coolant channel design.

  11. Worldwide Space Launch Vehicles and Their Mainstage Liquid Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Shamim A.

    2010-01-01

    Space launch vehicle begins with a basic propulsion stage, and serves as a missile or small launch vehicle; many are traceable to the 1945 German A-4. Increasing stage size, and increasingly energetic propulsion allows for heavier payloads and greater. Earth to Orbit lift capability. Liquid rocket propulsion began with use of storable (UDMH/N2O4) and evolved to high performing cryogenics (LOX/RP, and LOX/LH). Growth versions of SLV's rely on strap-on propulsive stages of either solid propellants or liquid propellants.

  12. Thrust Performance Improvement for a Water/Liquid Nitrogen Rocket Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Rikio; Mikami, Ryo

    We propose a water/liquid nitrogen rocket engine as a new non-combustion type rocket engine. Liquid nitrogen is mixed with heated water and specific volume of nitrogen is increased by evaporation. Thrust force is obtained by exhaust of nitrogen gas through a nozzle with water particles. Results of previous experiments indicated a specific impulse is 60 % of the theoretically estimated value. By evaluating the characteristic exhaust velocity and other thrust characteristics, we found that the lower-than-expected specific impulse is due to insufficient propellant mixing and heat transfer between heated water and liquid nitrogen in the mixing chamber. We also performed high-speed imaging experiments to visualize impinging and mixing of propellants. Results indicate that in the original injection setup, heat conveyed by heated water is not adequately transferred to the liquid nitrogen. An alternative injection pattern was tested, which resulted in a 10% increase in the characteristic exhaust velocity. In addition, we tested a new type of injector designed for more efficient mixing and heat transfer that exhibited 30 % increase in characteristic exhaust velocity. Furthermore, we modified the theoretical expression for the characteristic exhaust velocity based on multi-phased flow theory so that it agrees well with the experimental results.

  13. Development of Efficient Real-Fluid Model in Simulating Liquid Rocket Injector Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Gary; Farmer, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of propellant mixing near the injector have a profound effect on the liquid rocket engine performance. However, the flow features near the injector of liquid rocket engines are extremely complicated, for example supercritical-pressure spray, turbulent mixing, and chemical reactions are present. Previously, a homogeneous spray approach with a real-fluid property model was developed to account for the compressibility and evaporation effects such that thermodynamics properties of a mixture at a wide range of pressures and temperatures can be properly calculated, including liquid-phase, gas- phase, two-phase, and dense fluid regions. The developed homogeneous spray model demonstrated a good success in simulating uni- element shear coaxial injector spray combustion flows. However, the real-fluid model suffered a computational deficiency when applied to a pressure-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The deficiency is caused by the pressure and enthalpy being the independent variables in the solution procedure of a pressure-based code, whereas the real-fluid model utilizes density and temperature as independent variables. The objective of the present research work is to improve the computational efficiency of the real-fluid property model in computing thermal properties. The proposed approach is called an efficient real-fluid model, and the improvement of computational efficiency is achieved by using a combination of a liquid species and a gaseous species to represent a real-fluid species.

  14. Fuel/oxidizer-rich high-pressure preburners. [staged-combustion rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenman, L.

    1981-01-01

    The analyses, designs, fabrication, and cold-flow acceptance testing of LOX/RP-1 preburner components required for a high-pressure staged-combustion rocket engine are discussed. Separate designs of injectors, combustion chambers, turbine simulators, and hot-gas mixing devices are provided for fuel-rich and oxidizer-rich operation. The fuel-rich design addresses the problem of non-equilibrium LOX/RP-1 combustion. The development and use of a pseudo-kinetic combustion model for predicting operating efficiency, physical properties of the combustion products, and the potential for generating solid carbon is presented. The oxygen-rich design addresses the design criteria for the prevention of metal ignition. This is accomplished by the selection of materials and the generation of well-mixed gases. The combining of unique propellant injector element designs with secondary mixing devices is predicted to be the best approach.

  15. Liquid Rocket Booster Study. Volume 2, Book 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The recommended Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) concept is shown which uses a common main engine with the Advanced Launch System (ALS) which burns LO2 and LH2. The central rationale is based on the belief that the U.S. can only afford one big new rocket engine development in the 1990's. A LO2/LH2 engine in the half million pound thrust class could satisfy STS LRB, ALS, and Shuttle C (instead of SSMEs). Development costs and higher production rates can be shared by NASA and USAF. If the ALS program does not occur, the LO2/RP-1 propellants would produce slight lower costs for and STS LRB. When the planned Booster Engine portion of the Civil Space Transportation Initiatives has provided data on large pressure fed LO2/RP-1 engines, then the choice should be reevaluated.

  16. Combustion Tests of Rocket Motor Washout Material: Focus on Air toxics Formation Potential and Asbestos Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    G. C. Sclippa; L. L. Baxter; S. G. Buckley

    1999-02-01

    The objective of this investigation is to determine the suitability of cofiring as a recycle / reuse option to landfill disposal for solid rocket motor washout residue. Solid rocket motor washout residue (roughly 55% aluminum powder, 40% polybutadiene rubber binder, 5% residual ammonium perchlorate, and 0.2-1% asbestos) has been fired in Sandia's MultiFuel Combustor (MFC). The MFC is a down-fired combustor with electrically heated walls, capable of simulating a wide range of fuel residence times and stoichiometries. This study reports on the fate of AP-based chlorine and asbestos from the residue following combustion.

  17. Fuel decomposition and boundary-layer combustion processes of hybrid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaverini, Martin J.; Harting, George C.; Lu, Yeu-Cherng; Kuo, Kenneth K.; Serin, Nadir; Johnson, David K.

    1995-01-01

    Using a high-pressure, two-dimensional hybrid motor, an experimental investigation was conducted on fundamental processes involved in hybrid rocket combustion. HTPB (Hydroxyl-terminated Polybutadiene) fuel cross-linked with diisocyanate was burned with GOX under various operating conditions. Large-amplitude pressure oscillations were encountered in earlier test runs. After identifying the source of instability and decoupling the GOX feed-line system and combustion chamber, the pressure oscillations were drastically reduced from +/-20% of the localized mean pressure to an acceptable range of +/-1.5% Embedded fine-wire thermocouples indicated that the surface temperature of the burning fuel was around 1000 K depending upon axial locations and operating conditions. Also, except near the leading-edge region, the subsurface thermal wave profiles in the upstream locations are thicker than those in the downstream locations since the solid-fuel regression rate, in general, increases with distance along the fuel slab. The recovered solid fuel slabs in the laminar portion of the boundary layer exhibited smooth surfaces, indicating the existence of a liquid melt layer on the burning fuel surface in the upstream region. After the transition section, which displayed distinct transverse striations, the surface roughness pattern became quite random and very pronounced in the downstream turbulent boundary-layer region. Both real-time X-ray radiography and ultrasonic pulse-echo techniques were used to determine the instantaneous web thickness burned and instantaneous solid-fuel regression rates over certain portions of the fuel slabs. Globally averaged and axially dependent but time-averaged regression rates were also obtained and presented.

  18. Numerical analysis of bipropellant combustion in liquid thrust chambers by an Eulerian-Eulerian approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dang, A. L.; Navaz, H. K.; Rangel, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The liquid thrust chambers performance (LTCP) code is used for parametric studies of flow and combustion in liquid rocket engines. Multiphase flow equations are solved in an Eulerian-Eulerian framework, and multistep finite rate chemistry is incorporated. The discretization scheme is fully implicit and is based on the total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme, which is accurate, robust, very efficient and capable of handling steep gradients and stiff chemistry. Effects of injection velocity and chamber size have been considered, and the effect of group combustion on the evaporation rate has been studied for a dense spray.

  19. Reliability Improvements in Liquid Rocket Engine Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, A.; Acosta, E.

    2005-01-01

    Instrumentation hardware is often the weak link in advanced liquid fueled propulsion systems. The development of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) was no exception. By sheer necessity, a reusable, high energy, low weight engine system often relegates the instrumentation hardware to the backseat in the critical hardware development process. This produces less than optimum hardware constraints; including size, location, mounting, redundancy, and signal conditioning. This can negatively affect the development effort and ultimately the system reliability. The challenge was clear, however, the outcome was less certain. Unfortunately, the SSME hardware development culminated in series of measurement failures, most significant of which was the premature engine shutdown during the launch of STS-51F on July 29, 1985. The Return to Flight activities following the Challenger disaster redoubled our efforts to eliminate, once and for all, sensor malfunctions as the determining factor in overall engine reliability. This paper describes each phase of this effort in detail and includes discussion of the tasks related to improving measurement reliability.

  20. Combustion performance and scale effect from N2O/HTPB hybrid rocket motor simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Fanli; Hou, Lingyun; Piao, Ying

    2013-04-01

    HRM code for the simulation of N2O/HTPB hybrid rocket motor operation and scale effect analysis has been developed. This code can be used to calculate motor thrust and distributions of physical properties inside the combustion chamber and nozzle during the operational phase by solving the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations using a corrected compressible difference scheme and a two-step, five species combustion model. A dynamic fuel surface regression technique and a two-step calculation method together with the gas-solid coupling are applied in the calculation of fuel regression and the determination of combustion chamber wall profile as fuel regresses. Both the calculated motor thrust from start-up to shut-down mode and the combustion chamber wall profile after motor operation are in good agreements with experimental data. The fuel regression rate equation and the relation between fuel regression rate and axial distance have been derived. Analysis of results suggests improvements in combustion performance to the current hybrid rocket motor design and explains scale effects in the variation of fuel regression rate with combustion chamber diameter.

  1. Efficiency of the rocket engines with a supersonic afterburner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, A. A.

    1992-08-01

    The paper is concerned with the problem of regenerative cooling of the liquid-propellant rocket engine combustion chamber at high pressures of the working fluid. It is shown that high combustion product pressures can be achieved in the liquid-propellant rocket engine with a supersonic afterburner than in a liquid-propellant rocket engine with a conventional subsonic combustion chamber for the same allowable heat flux density. However, the liquid-propellant rocket engine with a supersonic afterburner becomes more economical than the conventional engine only at generator gas temperatures of 1700 K and higher.

  2. Liquid-Propellant Rocket Engine Throttling: A Comprehensive Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, Matthew; Hulka, James; Yang, Virog

    2009-01-01

    Liquid-Propellant Rocket Engines (LREs) are capable of on-command variable thrust or thrust modulation, an operability advantage that has been studied intermittently since the late 1930s. Throttleable LREs can be used for planetary entry and descent, space rendezvous, orbital maneuvering including orientation and stabilization in space, and hovering and hazard avoidance during planetary landing. Other applications have included control of aircraft rocket engines, limiting of vehicle acceleration or velocity using retrograde rockets, and ballistic missile defense trajectory control. Throttleable LREs can also continuously follow the most economical thrust curve in a given situation, compared to discrete throttling changes over a few select operating points. The effects of variable thrust on the mechanics and dynamics of an LRE as well as difficulties and issues surrounding the throttling process are important aspects of throttling behavior. This review provides a detailed survey of LRE throttling centered around engines from the United States. Several LRE throttling methods are discussed, including high-pressure-drop systems, dual-injector manifolds, gas injection, multiple chambers, pulse modulation, throat throttling, movable injector components, and hydrodynamically dissipative injectors. Concerns and issues surrounding each method are examined, and the advantages and shortcomings compared.

  3. Fabrication of liquid-rocket thrust chambers by electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duscha, R. A.; Kazaroff, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Electroforming has proven to be an excellent fabrication method for building liquid rocket regeneratively cooled thrust chambers. NASA sponsored technology programs have investigated both common and advanced methods. Using common procedures, several cooled spool pieces and thrust chambers have been made and successfully tested. The designs were made possible through the versatility of the electroforming procedure, which is not limited to simple geometric shapes. An advanced method of electroforming was used to produce a wire-wrapped, composite, pressure-loaded electroformed structure, which greatly increased the strength of the structure while still retaining the advantages of electroforming.

  4. Liquid rocket booster integration study. Volume 5, part 1: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The impacts of introducing liquid rocket booster engines (LRB) into the Space Transportation System (STS)/Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch environment are identified and evaluated. Proposed ground systems configurations are presented along with a launch site requirements summary. Prelaunch processing scenarios are described and the required facility modifications and new facility requirements are analyzed. Flight vehicle design recommendations to enhance launch processing are discussed. Processing approaches to integrate LRB with existing STS launch operations are evaluated. The key features and significance of launch site transition to a new STS configuration in parallel with ongoing launch activities are enumerated. This volume is the appendices of the five volume series.

  5. Liquid rocket disconnects, couplings, fittings, fixed joints, and seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    State of the art and design criteria for components used in liquid propellant rocket propulsion systems to contain and control the flow of fluids involved are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the design of components used in the engine systems of boosters and upper stages, and in spacecraft propulsion systems because of the high pressure and high vibration levels to which these components are exposed. A table for conversion of U.S. customary units to SI units is included with a glossary, and a list of NASA space vehicle design criteria monographs issued to September 1976.

  6. Pressure measurement. [liquid monopropellant rocket engine performance tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Practices are outlined for the design, installation, checkout, calibration, and operation of a pressure measuring system to be used during tests of a liquid monopropellant rocket engine. Appendixes include: (1) pressure measurement system elemental uncertainties; (2) short- and long-term pressure measurement system uncertainty; (3) shunt calibration of pressure transducers; (4) special considerations for vacuum measurement; and (5) methods of determining the dynamic characteristics of pressure transducers. Design guidelines are provided for the critical components of each portion of the system to provide a pressure measurement system which meets the performance criteria specified.

  7. Liquid Rocket Booster Integration Study. Volume 2: Study synopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The impacts of introducing liquid rocket booster engines (LRB) into the Space Transportation System (STS)/Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch environment are identified and evaluated. Proposed ground systems configurations are presented along with a launch site requirements summary. Prelaunch processing scenarios are described and the required facility modifications and new facility requirements are analyzed. Flight vehicle design recommendations to enhance launch processing are discussed. Processing approaches to integrate LRB with existing STS launch operations are evaluated. The key features and significance of launch site transition to a new STS configuration in parallel with ongoing launch activities are enumerated. This volume is the study summary of the five volume series.

  8. Liquid rocket booster integration study. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The impacts of introducing liquid rocket booster engines (LRB) into the Space Transportation System (STS)/Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch environment are identified and evaluated. Proposed ground systems configurations are presented along with a launch site requirements summary. Prelaunch processing scenarios are described and the required facility modifications and new facility requirements are analyzed. Flight vehicle design recommendations to enhance launch processing are discussed. Processing approaches to integrate LRB with existing STS launch operations are evaluated. The key features and significance of launch site transition to a new STS configuration in parallel with ongoing launch activities are enumerated. This volume is the executive summary of the five volume series.

  9. Gas velocity and temperature near a liquid rocket injector face

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boylan, D. M.; Ohara, J.

    1973-01-01

    The gas flow near the injector of a liquid propellant rocket was investigated by rapidly inserting butt-welded platinum-platinum rhodium thermocouples through the injector into the chamber. The transient responses of the thermocouples were analyzed to determine average gas temperatures and velocities. A method of fitting exponential curves to repeated measurements of the transient temperature at several positions near the injector face produced consistent results. Preliminary tests yielded gas flow directions and gas compositions at the injector face. Average gas temperatures were found to be between 3100 (1700) and 3500 F (1950 C) and the average gas velocities between 550 (170) and 840 feet/second (260 m/sec).

  10. Development of a combustor analytical design methodology for liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieper, Jerry L.; Muss, Jeff

    1989-01-01

    The development of a user friendly computerized methodology for the design and analysis of liquid propellant rocket engine combustion chambers is described. An overview of the methodology, consisting of a computer program containing an appropriate modular assembly of existing industry wide performance and combustion stability models, is presented. These models are linked with an interactive front end processor enabling the user to define the performance and stability traits of an existing design (point analysis) or to create the essential design features of a combustor to meet specific performance goals and combustion stability (point design). Plans for demonstration and verification of this methodology are also presented. These plans include the creation of combustor designs using the methodology, together with predictions of the performance and combustion stability for each design. A verification test program of 26 hot fire tests with up to four designs created using this methodology is described. This testing is planned using LOX/RP-1 propellants with a thrust level of approx. 220,000 N (50,000 lbf).

  11. Enhancement of hybrid rocket combustion performance using nano-sized energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risha, Grant Alexander

    Until now, the regression rate of classical hybrid rocket engines have typically been an order of magnitude lower than solid propellant motors; thus, hybrids require a relatively large fuel surface area for a given thrust level. In addition to low linear regression rates, relatively low combustion efficiency (87 to 92%), low mass burning rates, varying oxidizer-to-fuel ratio during operation, and lack of scaling laws have been reported. These disadvantages can be ameliorated by introducing nano-sized energetic powder additives into the solid fuel. The addition of nano-sized energetic particles into the solid fuel enhances performance as measured by parameters such as: density specific impulse, mass and linear burning rates, and thrust. Thermophysical properties of the solid fuel such as density, heat of combustion, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity are also enhanced. The types of nano-sized energetic particles used in this study include aluminum, boron, boron carbide, and some Viton-A coated particles. Since the combustion process of solid fuels in a hybrid rocket engine is governed by the mass flux of the oxidizer entering the combustion chamber, the rate-limiting process is the mixing and reacting of the pyrolysis products of the fuel grain with the incoming oxidizer. The overall goal of this research was to determine the relative propulsive and combustion behavior for a family of newly-developed HTPB-based solid-fuel formulations containing various nano-sized energetic particles. Seventeen formulations contained 13% additive by weight, one formulation (SF4) contained 6.5% additive by weight, and one formulation (SF19) contained 5.65% boron by weight. The two hybrid rocket engines which were used in this investigation were the Long Grain Center-Perforated (LGCP) rocket engine and the X-Ray Transparent Casing (XTC) rocket engine. The smaller scale LGCP rocket engine was used to evaluate all of the formulations because conducting experiments using the

  12. Stability of solid rocket motor with spray-liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Hu, Naihe

    1992-12-01

    Dynamic equations were developed for every link of the feedback control system of a solid rocket motor (SRM) with fuel injection. Using transfer functions and the parameter stability theory, equilibrium steady boundary equations and steady criteria were obtained and solved. It is shown that, the injection ratio, the pressure exponent, and tank pressure are the main design parameters affecting stability; therefore, the stability analysis of an SRM with fuel injection should concentrate on the initial phase of the motor operation. It was found that the motor stability of an SRM with fuel injection improves with the increase of the injection ratio, the free volume of the combustion chamber, and the value of the pressure exponent.

  13. Evaluation of Vortex Chamber Concepts for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu Phuoc; Knuth, Williams; Michaels, Scott; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Rocket-based combined-cycle engines (RBBC) being considered at NASA for future generation launch vehicles feature clusters of small rocket thrusters as part of the engine components. Depending on specific RBBC concepts, these thrusters may be operated at various operating conditions including power level and/or propellant mixture ratio variations. To pursue technology developments for future launch vehicles, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is examining vortex chamber concepts for the subject cycle engine application. Past studies indicated that the vortex chamber schemes potentially have a number of advantages over conventional chamber methods. Due to the nature of the vortex flow, relatively cooler propellant streams tend to flow along the chamber wall. Hence, the thruster chamber can be operated without the need of any cooling techniques. This vortex flow also creates strong turbulence, which promotes the propellant mixing process. Consequently, the subject chamber concepts not only offer the system simplicity but they also would enhance the combustion performance. The test results showed that the chamber performance was markedly high even at a low chamber length-to- diameter ratio (L/D). This incentive can be translated to a convenience in the thrust chamber packaging.

  14. Thermal radiation of heterogeneous combustion products in the model rocket engine plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, V. A.; Maratkanova, E. I.; Zagray, I. A.; Rukavishnikova, R. V.

    2015-05-01

    The work presents a method of complex investigation of thermal radiation emitted by heterogeneous combustion products in the model rocket engine plume. Realization of the method has allowed us to obtain full information on the results in all stages of calculations. Dependence of the optical properties (complex refractive index), the radiation characteristics (coefficients and cross sections) and emission characteristics (flux densities, emissivity factors) of the main determining factors and parameters was analyzed. It was found by the method of computational experiment that the presence of the gaseous phase in the combustion products causes a strongly marked selectivity of emission, due to which the use of gray approximation in the calculation of thermal radiation is unnecessary. The influence of the optical properties, mass fraction, the function of particle size distribution, and the temperature of combustion products on thermal radiation in the model rocket engine plume was investigated. The role of "spotlight" effect-increasing the amount of energy of emission exhaust combustion products due to scattering by condensate particles radiation from the combustion chamber-was established quantitatively.

  15. 49 CFR 176.340 - Combustible liquids in portable tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... background: “FOR COMBUSTIBLE LIQUIDS ONLY” and “49 CFR 176.340”. This latter marking constitutes... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Combustible liquids in portable tanks. 176.340... VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 3 (Flammable) and Combustible Liquid Materials §...

  16. 46 CFR 111.105-29 - Combustible liquid cargo carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Combustible liquid cargo carriers. 111.105-29 Section... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-29 Combustible liquid cargo carriers. (a) Each vessel that carries combustible liquid cargo with a closed-cup flashpoint of 60 degrees...

  17. 49 CFR 176.340 - Combustible liquids in portable tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... background: “FOR COMBUSTIBLE LIQUIDS ONLY” and “49 CFR 176.340”. This latter marking constitutes... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Combustible liquids in portable tanks. 176.340... VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 3 (Flammable) and Combustible Liquid Materials §...

  18. 30 CFR 57.4462 - Storage of combustible liquids underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Storage of combustible liquids underground. 57... Fire Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4462 Storage of combustible liquids underground. The requirements of this standard apply to underground areas only....

  19. 46 CFR 111.105-29 - Combustible liquid cargo carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Combustible liquid cargo carriers. 111.105-29 Section... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-29 Combustible liquid cargo carriers. (a) Each vessel that carries combustible liquid cargo with a closed-cup flashpoint of 60 degrees...

  20. 49 CFR 176.340 - Combustible liquids in portable tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... background: “FOR COMBUSTIBLE LIQUIDS ONLY” and “49 CFR 176.340”. This latter marking constitutes... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Combustible liquids in portable tanks. 176.340... VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 3 (Flammable) and Combustible Liquid Materials §...

  1. 46 CFR 111.105-29 - Combustible liquid cargo carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Combustible liquid cargo carriers. 111.105-29 Section... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-29 Combustible liquid cargo carriers. (a) Each vessel that carries combustible liquid cargo with a closed-cup flashpoint of 60 degrees...

  2. 46 CFR 111.105-29 - Combustible liquid cargo carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Combustible liquid cargo carriers. 111.105-29 Section... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-29 Combustible liquid cargo carriers. (a) Each vessel that carries combustible liquid cargo with a closed-cup flashpoint of 60 degrees...

  3. 30 CFR 57.4462 - Storage of combustible liquids underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Storage of combustible liquids underground. 57... Fire Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4462 Storage of combustible liquids underground. The requirements of this standard apply to underground areas only....

  4. 49 CFR 176.340 - Combustible liquids in portable tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... background: “FOR COMBUSTIBLE LIQUIDS ONLY” and “49 CFR 176.340”. This latter marking constitutes... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Combustible liquids in portable tanks. 176.340... VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 3 (Flammable) and Combustible Liquid Materials §...

  5. 49 CFR 176.340 - Combustible liquids in portable tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... background: “FOR COMBUSTIBLE LIQUIDS ONLY” and “49 CFR 176.340”. This latter marking constitutes... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Combustible liquids in portable tanks. 176.340... VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 3 (Flammable) and Combustible Liquid Materials §...

  6. 30 CFR 57.4462 - Storage of combustible liquids underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Storage of combustible liquids underground. 57... Fire Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4462 Storage of combustible liquids underground. The requirements of this standard apply to underground areas only....

  7. 46 CFR 111.105-29 - Combustible liquid cargo carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Combustible liquid cargo carriers. 111.105-29 Section... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-29 Combustible liquid cargo carriers. (a) Each vessel that carries combustible liquid cargo with a closed-cup flashpoint of 60 degrees...

  8. Distributed Health Monitoring System for Reusable Liquid Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. F.; Figueroa, F.; Politopoulos, T.; Oonk, S.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to correctly detect and identify any possible failure in the systems, subsystems, or sensors within a reusable liquid rocket engine is a major goal at NASA John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC). A health management (HM) system is required to provide an on-ground operation crew with an integrated awareness of the condition of every element of interest by determining anomalies, examining their causes, and making predictive statements. However, the complexity associated with relevant systems, and the large amount of data typically necessary for proper interpretation and analysis, presents difficulties in implementing complete failure detection, identification, and prognostics (FDI&P). As such, this paper presents a Distributed Health Monitoring System for Reusable Liquid Rocket Engines as a solution to these problems through the use of highly intelligent algorithms for real-time FDI&P, and efficient and embedded processing at multiple levels. The end result is the ability to successfully incorporate a comprehensive HM platform despite the complexity of the systems under consideration.

  9. Fast Ignition and Sustained Combustion of Ionic Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Prakash B. (Inventor); Piper, Lawrence G. (Inventor); Oakes, David B. (Inventor); Sabourin, Justin L. (Inventor); Hicks, Adam J. (Inventor); Green, B. David (Inventor); Tsinberg, Anait (Inventor); Dokhan, Allan (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A catalyst free method of igniting an ionic liquid is provided. The method can include mixing a liquid hypergol with a HAN (Hydroxylammonium nitrate)-based ionic liquid to ignite the HAN-based ionic liquid in the absence of a catalyst. The HAN-based ionic liquid and the liquid hypergol can be injected into a combustion chamber. The HAN-based ionic liquid and the liquid hypergol can impinge upon a stagnation plate positioned at top portion of the combustion chamber.

  10. Hazards Induced by Breach of Liquid Rocket Fuel Tanks: Conditions and Risks of Cryogenic Liquid Hydrogen-Oxygen Mixture Explosions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osipov, Viatcheslav; Muratov, Cyrill; Hafiychuk, Halyna; Ponizovskya-Devine, Ekaterina; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Mathias, Donovan; Lawrence, Scott; Werkheiser, Mary

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the data of purposeful rupture experiments with LOx and LH2 tanks, the Hydrogen-Oxygen Vertical Impact (HOVI) tests that were performed to clarify the ignition mechanisms, the explosive power of cryogenic H2/Ox mixtures under different conditions, and to elucidate the puzzling source of the initial formation of flames near the intertank section during the Challenger disaster. We carry out a physics-based analysis of general explosions scenarios for cryogenic gaseous H2/Ox mixtures and determine their realizability conditions, using the well-established simplified models from the detonation and deflagration theory. We study the features of aerosol H2/Ox mixture combustion and show, in particular, that aerosols intensify the deflagration flames and can induce detonation for any ignition mechanism. We propose a cavitation-induced mechanism of self-ignition of cryogenic H2/Ox mixtures that may be realized when gaseous H2 and Ox flows are mixed with a liquid Ox turbulent stream, as occurred in all HOVI tests. We present an overview of the HOVI tests to make conclusion on the risk of strong explosions in possible liquid rocket incidents and provide a semi-quantitative interpretation of the HOVI data based on aerosol combustion. We uncover the most dangerous situations and discuss the foreseeable risks which can arise in space missions and lead to tragic outcomes. Our analysis relates to only unconfined mixtures that are likely to arise as a result of liquid propellant space vehicle incidents.

  11. Hybrid rocket fuel combustion and regression rate study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strand, L. D.; Ray, R. L.; Anderson, F. A.; Cohen, N. S.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to develop hybrid fuels (1) with higher regression rates and reduced dependence on fuel grain geometry and (2) that maximize potential specific impulse using low-cost materials. A hybrid slab window motor system was developed to screen candidate fuels - their combustion behavior and regression rate. Combustion behavior diagnostics consisted of video and high speed motion pictures coverage. The mean fuel regression rates were determined by before and after measurements of the fuel slabs. The fuel for this initial investigation consisted of hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene binder with coal and aluminum fillers. At low oxidizer flux levels (and corresponding fuel regression rates) the filled-binder fuels burn in a layered fashion, forming an aluminum containing binder/coal surface melt that, in turn, forms into filigrees or flakes that are stripped off by the crossflow. This melt process appears to diminish with increasing oxidizer flux level. Heat transfer by radiation is a significant contributor, producing the desired increase in magnitude and reduction in flow dependency (power law exponent) of the fuel regression rate.

  12. Combustion engine for solid and liquid fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pabst, W.

    1986-01-01

    A combustion engine having no piston, a single cylinder, and a dual-action, that is applicable for solid and liquid fuels and propellants, and that functions according to the principle of annealing point ignition is presented. The invention uses environmentally benign amounts of fuel and propellants to produce gas and steam pressure, and to use a simple assembly with the lowest possible consumption and constant readiness for mixing and burning. The advantage over conventional combustion engines lies in lower consumption of high quality igniting fluid in the most cost effective manner.

  13. Problems of providing completeness of the methane-containing block-jet combustion in a rocket-ramjet engine's combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoshenko, Valeriy I.; Belotserkovets, Igor S.; Gusinin, Vjacheslav P.

    2009-11-01

    Some problems of methane-containing hydrocarbon fuel combustion are discussed. It seems that reduction of methane burnout zone length is one from main problems of designing new type engine. It is very important at the creation of combustion chambers of a rocket-ramjet engine for prospective space shuttle launch vehicles.

  14. Modeling of gaseous reacting flow and thermal environment of liquid rocket injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozer, Emre

    Reacting flow and thermal fields around the injector critically affect the performance and life of liquid rocket engines. The performance gain by enhanced mixing is often countered by increased heat flux to the chamber wall, which can result in material failure. A CFD based design approach can aid in optimization of competing objectives by providing detailed flow field data and an ability to feasibly evaluate a large number of design configurations. To address issues related to the CFD analysis of such flows, various turbulence and combustion modeling aspects are assessed. Laminar finite-rate chemistry and steady laminar flamelet combustion models are adopted to facilitate individual assessments of turbulence-chemistry interactions (TCI) and chemical non-equilibrium. Besides the experimental wall heat transfer information, assessments are aided by evaluations of time scales, grid sensitivity, wall treatments and kinetic schemes. Several multi-element injector configurations are considered to study element-to-element interactions. Under the conditions considered, chemical non-equilibrium effect is found to be unimportant. TCI is found to noticeably alter the flow and thermal fields near the injector and the flame surface. In the multi-element injector case, due to proximity of the outer row injector elements to the wall, wall heat flux distribution is also significantly affected by TCI. The near wall treatment is found to critically affect wall heat flux predictions. A zonal treatment, blending the low-Reynolds number model and the law-of-the-wall approach is shown to improve the accuracy significantly. Porous materials such as Rigimesh are often used as the injector face plate of liquid rocket engines. A multi-scale model which eliminates the empirical dependence of conventional analysis methods, is developed. The resulting model is tested using experimental information showing excellent agreement. The model development and assessment presented for both injector

  15. Experimental Investigation of Film Cooling with Tangential Slot Injection in a LOX/CH4 Subscale Rocket Combustion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Richard; Suslov, Dmitry I.; Haidn, Oskar J.

    Within the frame of a broader activity towards research into the application of methane in cryogenic liquid rocket engines, the efficiency of film cooling was studied in a LOX/CH4 fired subscale sized model combustor. Aiming at booster as well as upper stage applications, the combustion pressure levels have been varied between 4 MPa and 7 MPa. The effectiveness of the ambient temperature film was determined in axial and circumferential directions by measuring temperature gradients in the copper liner material. The experiments revealed remarkable circumferential differences of the film cooling efficiency which remain existent far downstream. However, circumferential film cooling varieties are more pronounced at close proximity of the point of film coolant injection.

  16. Combustion Stability Analyses of Coaxial Element Injectors with Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid rocket engines using oxygen and methane propellants are being considered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for in-space vehicles. This propellant combination has not been previously used in a flight-qualified engine system, so limited test data and analysis results are available at this stage of early development. NASA has funded several hardware-oriented activities with oxygen and methane propellants over the past several years with the Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project, under the Exploration Technology Development Program. As part of this effort, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted combustion stability analyses of several of the configurations. This paper presents test data and analyses of combustion stability from the recent PCAD-funded test programs at the NASA MSFC. These test programs used swirl coaxial element injectors with liquid oxygen and liquid methane propellants. Oxygen was injected conventionally in the center of the coaxial element, and swirl was provided by tangential entry slots. Injectors with 28-element and 40-element patterns were tested with several configurations of combustion chambers, including ablative and calorimeter spool sections, and several configurations of fuel injection design. Low frequency combustion instability (chug) occurred with both injectors, and high-frequency combustion instability occurred at the first tangential (1T) transverse mode with the 40-element injector. In most tests, a transition between high-amplitude chug with gaseous methane flow and low-amplitude chug with liquid methane flow was readily observed. Chug analyses of both conditions were conducted using techniques from Wenzel and Szuch and from the Rocket Combustor Interactive Design and Analysis (ROCCID) code. The 1T mode instability occurred in several tests and was apparent by high-frequency pressure measurements as well as dramatic increases in calorimeter-measured heat flux

  17. Multidimensional Unstructured-Grid Liquid Rocket Engine Nozzle Performance and Heat Transfer Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study is to conduct a unified computational analysis for computing design parameters such as axial thrust, convective and radiative wall heat fluxes for regeneratively cooled liquid rocket engine nozzles, so as to develop a computational strategy for computing those parameters through parametric investigations. The computational methodology is based on a multidimensional, finite-volume, turbulent, chemically reacting, radiating, unstructured-grid, and pressure-based formulation, with grid refinement capabilities. Systematic parametric studies on effects of wall boundary conditions, combustion chemistry, radiation coupling, computational cell shape, and grid refinement were performed and assessed. Under the computational framework of this study, it is found that the computed axial thrust performance, flow features, and wall heat fluxes compared well with those of available data and calculations, using a strategy of structured-grid dominated mesh, finite-rate chemistry, and cooled wall boundary condition.

  18. Development of the platelet micro-orifice injector. [for liquid propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    La Botz, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    For some time to come, liquid rocket engines will continue to provide the primary means of propulsion for space transportation. The injector represents a key to the optimization of engine and system performance. The present investigation is concerned with a unique injector design and fabrication process which has demonstrated performance capabilities beyond that achieved with more conventional approaches. This process, which is called the 'platelet process', makes it feasible to fabricate injectors with a pattern an order of magnitude finer than that obtainable by drilling. The fine pattern leads to an achievement of high combustion efficiencies. Platelet injectors have been identified as one of the significant technology advances contributing to the feasibility of advanced dual-fuel booster engines. Platelet injectors are employed in the Space Shuttle Orbit Maneuvering System (OMS) engines. Attention is given to injector design theory as it relates to pattern fineness, a description of platelet injectors, and test data obtained with three different platelet injectors.

  19. Multidimensional Unstructured-Grid Liquid Rocket Engine Nozzle Performance and Heat Transfer Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to conduct a unified computational analysis for computing the design parameters such as axial thrust, convective and radiative wall heat fluxes for liquid rocket engine nozzles, so as to develop a computational strategy for computing those design parameters through parametric investigations. The computational methodology is based on a multidimensional, finite-volume, turbulent, chemically reacting, radiating, unstructured-grid, and pressure-based formulation, with grid refinement capabilities. Systematic parametric studies on effects of wail boundary conditions, combustion chemistry, radiation coupling, computational cell shape, and grid refinement were performed and assessed. Comparisons of the computed axial thrust performance, flow features, and wail heat fluxes with those of available test data and design calculations are presented.

  20. Effect of Nozzle Nonlinearities upon Nonlinear Stability of Liquid Propellant Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padmanabhan, M. S.; Powell, E. A.; Zinn, B. T.

    1975-01-01

    A three dimensional, nonlinear nozzle admittance relation is developed by solving the wave equation describing finite amplitude oscillatory flow inside the subsonic portion of a choked, slowly convergent axisymmetric nozzle. This nonlinear nozzle admittance relation is then used as a boundary condition in the analysis of nonlinear combustion instability in a cylindrical liquid rocket combustor. In both nozzle and chamber analyses solutions are obtained using the Galerkin method with a series expansion consisting of the first tangential, second tangential, and first radial modes. Using Crocco's time lag model to describe the distributed unsteady combustion process, combustion instability calculations are presented for different values of the following parameters: (1) time lag, (2) interaction index, (3) steady-state Mach number at the nozzle entrance, and (4) chamber length-to-diameter ratio. In each case, limit cycle pressure amplitudes and waveforms are shown for both linear and nonlinear nozzle admittance conditions. These results show that when the amplitudes of the second tangential and first radial modes are considerably smaller than the amplitude of the first tangential mode the inclusion of nozzle nonlinearities has no significant effect on the limiting amplitude and pressure waveforms.

  1. Oscillatory combustion of liquid monopropellant droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chanin, S. P.; Faeth, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted on the open-loop combustion response of monopropellant droplets and sprays to imposed pressure oscillations. The theoretical model was solved as a perturbation analysis through first order, yielding linear response results. Unsteady gas phase effects were considered in some cases, but the bulk of the calculations assumed a quasi-steady gas phase. Calculations were conducted using properties corresponding to hydrazine decomposition. Zero-order results agreed with earlier measurements of hydrazine droplet burning in combustion gases. The droplet response was greatest (exceeding unity in some cases) for large droplets with liquid phase temperature gradients; at frequencies near the characteristic frequency of the liquid phase thermal wave. The response of a spray is less than that of its largest droplet, however, a relatively small percentage of large droplets provides a substantial response (exceeding unity in some cases).

  2. Large liquid rocket engine transient performance simulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, J. R.; Southwick, R. D.

    1991-01-01

    A simulation system, ROCETS, was designed and developed to allow cost-effective computer predictions of liquid rocket engine transient performance. The system allows a user to generate a simulation of any rocket engine configuration using component modules stored in a library through high-level input commands. The system library currently contains 24 component modules, 57 sub-modules and maps, and 33 system routines and utilities. FORTRAN models from other sources can be operated in the system upon inclusion of interface information on comment cards. Operation of the simulation is simplified for the user by run, execution, and output processors. The simulation system makes available steady-state trim balance, transient operation, and linear partial generation. The system utilizes a modern equation solver for efficient operation of the simulations. Transient integration methods include integral and differential forms for the trapezoidal, first order Gear, and second order Gear corrector equations. A detailed technology test bed engine (TTBE) model was generated to be used as the acceptance test of the simulation system. The general level of model detail was that reflected in the Space Shuttle Main Engine DTM. The model successfully obtained steady-state balance in main stage operation and simulated throttle transients, including engine starts and shutdown. A NASA FORTRAN control model was obtained, ROCETS interface installed in comment cards, and operated with the TTBE model in closed-loop transient mode.

  3. Results of Small-scale Solid Rocket Combustion Simulator testing at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Benjamin E.; Cook, Jerry

    1993-01-01

    The Small-scale Solid Rocket Combustion Simulator (SSRCS) program was established at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and used a government/industry team consisting of Hercules Aerospace Corporation, Aerotherm Corporation, United Technology Chemical Systems Division, Thiokol Corporation and MSFC personnel to study the feasibility of simulating the combustion species, temperatures and flow fields of a conventional solid rocket motor (SRM) with a versatile simulator system. The SSRCS design is based on hybrid rocket motor principles. The simulator uses a solid fuel and a gaseous oxidizer. Verification of the feasibility of a SSRCS system as a test bed was completed using flow field and system analyses, as well as empirical test data. A total of 27 hot firings of a subscale SSRCS motor were conducted at MSFC. Testing of the Small-scale SSRCS program was completed in October 1992. This paper, a compilation of reports from the above team members and additional analysis of the instrumentation results, will discuss the final results of the analyses and test programs.

  4. Results of Small-scale Solid Rocket Combustion Simulator testing at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Benjamin E.; Cook, Jerry

    1993-06-01

    The Small-scale Solid Rocket Combustion Simulator (SSRCS) program was established at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and used a government/industry team consisting of Hercules Aerospace Corporation, Aerotherm Corporation, United Technology Chemical Systems Division, Thiokol Corporation and MSFC personnel to study the feasibility of simulating the combustion species, temperatures and flow fields of a conventional solid rocket motor (SRM) with a versatile simulator system. The SSRCS design is based on hybrid rocket motor principles. The simulator uses a solid fuel and a gaseous oxidizer. Verification of the feasibility of a SSRCS system as a test bed was completed using flow field and system analyses, as well as empirical test data. A total of 27 hot firings of a subscale SSRCS motor were conducted at MSFC. Testing of the Small-scale SSRCS program was completed in October 1992. This paper, a compilation of reports from the above team members and additional analysis of the instrumentation results, will discuss the final results of the analyses and test programs.

  5. 46 CFR 147.45 - Flammable and combustible liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... authorized for Class 3 (flammable) liquids or combustible liquids under 49 CFR 173.201, 173.202, or 173.203, as referenced for the specific liquid in column 8B of the Hazardous Materials Table of 49 CFR 172.101... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flammable and combustible liquids. 147.45 Section...

  6. 46 CFR 147.45 - Flammable and combustible liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... authorized for Class 3 (flammable) liquids or combustible liquids under 49 CFR 173.201, 173.202, or 173.203, as referenced for the specific liquid in column 8B of the Hazardous Materials Table of 49 CFR 172.101... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flammable and combustible liquids. 147.45 Section...

  7. 46 CFR 147.45 - Flammable and combustible liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... authorized for Class 3 (flammable) liquids or combustible liquids under 49 CFR 173.201, 173.202, or 173.203, as referenced for the specific liquid in column 8B of the Hazardous Materials Table of 49 CFR 172.101... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flammable and combustible liquids. 147.45 Section...

  8. 46 CFR 147.45 - Flammable and combustible liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... authorized for Class 3 (flammable) liquids or combustible liquids under 49 CFR 173.201, 173.202, or 173.203, as referenced for the specific liquid in column 8B of the Hazardous Materials Table of 49 CFR 172.101... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flammable and combustible liquids. 147.45 Section...

  9. 46 CFR 147.45 - Flammable and combustible liquids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... authorized for Class 3 (flammable) liquids or combustible liquids under 49 CFR 173.201, 173.202, or 173.203, as referenced for the specific liquid in column 8B of the Hazardous Materials Table of 49 CFR 172.101... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flammable and combustible liquids. 147.45 Section...

  10. Characteristics of Vaporizing Cryogenic Sprays for Rocket Combustion Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, Robert D.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the volume-median drop diameter, Dv.5e, of vaporizing cryogenic sprays were obtained with a drop size measuring instrument developed at NASA Lewis Research Center. To demonstrate the effect of atomizing-gas properties on characteristic drop size, a two-fluid fuel nozzle was used to break up liquid-nitrogen, LN2, jets in high-velocity gasflows of helium argon and gaseous nitrogen, GN2. Also, in order to determine the effect of atomizing-gas temperature on specific surface-areas of LN2 sprays, drop size measurements were made at gas temperatures of 111 and 293 K.