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Sample records for liquid scintillation perals

  1. Some applications of Photon/Electron-Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation (PERALS) spectrometry to the assay of alpha emitters

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, W.J.; Case, G.N.

    1988-01-01

    The combination of certain solvent extraction separations and a special kind of liquid scintillation detector and electronics designed for alpha spectrometry allows some highly accurate, yet simple determinations of alpha-emitting nuclides. Counting efficiency is 99.68% with backgrounds of <0.02 cpm. Energy resolution and peak position are sufficient for the identification of many nuclides. Rejection of interference from ..beta.. and ..gamma.. radiation is >99.95%. The Photon/Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation (PERALS) equipment is described and procedures for the separation and determination of uranium, thorium, plutonium, polonium, radium, and trivalent actinides are outlined. 25 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Measurement of actinides in environmental samples by Photo-Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation

    SciTech Connect

    Cadieux, J.R.; Clark, S.; Fjeld, R.A.; Reboul, S.; Sowder, A.

    1994-05-01

    This work describes the adaptation of extractive scintillation with a Photo-Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation (PERALS) (ORDELA, Inc.) spectrometer to the analysis of actinides in environmental samples from the Savannah River Site (SRS). Environmental quality assurance standards and actual water samples were treated by one of two methods; either a two step direct extraction, or for more complex samples, pretreatment by an extraction chromatographic separation prior to measurement of the alpha activity by PERALS.

  3. Free liquid scintillation counting bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Packard Instrument Company announces the availability of its newly updated Bibliography of Packard Tri-Carb Liquid Scintillation Analyzers. This unique new booklet lists 628 references in which Packard Tri-Carb{reg_sign} liquid scintillation analyzers have been used in life science, environmental, nuclear power and archaeological measurements. All listings are cross-referenced by radionuclide, specific field of study and author.

  4. Lithium-loaded liquid scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Kesanli, Banu; Neal, John S.

    2012-05-15

    The invention is directed to a liquid scintillating composition containing (i) one or more non-polar organic solvents; (ii) (lithium-6)-containing nanoparticles having a size of up to 10 nm and surface-capped by hydrophobic molecules; and (iii) one or more fluorophores. The invention is also directed to a liquid scintillator containing the above composition.

  5. Nanophosphor composite scintillator with a liquid matrix

    DOEpatents

    McKigney, Edward Allen; Burrell, Anthony Keiran; Bennett, Bryan L.; Cooke, David Wayne; Ott, Kevin Curtis; Bacrania, Minesh Kantilal; Del Sesto, Rico Emilio; Gilbertson, Robert David; Muenchausen, Ross Edward; McCleskey, Thomas Mark

    2010-03-16

    An improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid comprises nanophosphor particles in a liquid matrix. The nanophosphor particles are optionally surface modified with an organic ligand. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially surface charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during dispersion in a liquid scintillator matrix. The improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid may be used in any conventional liquid scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  6. Liquid scintillating fiber calorimetry prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Gui, M.; Brookes, D.; David, A.

    1995-08-01

    A full size liquid scintillating fiber spaghetti-hadronic calorimeter has been constructed and tested using cosmic rays at Texas A and M University. The purpose of this research is to find practical solutions for detectors to be used in extremely high radiation environments. The details of design and construction of this module are presented. The advantages of using liquid scintillating materials were investigated. Relevant subjects are addressed. Cosmic ray test results are compared with that of GEANT Monte Carlo simulations. Over all, they agree well with each other. The conclusion is that calorimeters utilizing this technique can be used in high radiation environments such as SSC colliding area.

  7. Radiopure Metal-Loaded Liquid Scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, Richard; Yeh, Minfang

    2015-03-18

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillator plays a key role in particle and nuclear physics experiments. The applications of metal ions in various neutrino experiments and the purification methods for different scintillator components are discussed in this paper.

  8. Radiopure metal-loaded liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, Richard; Yeh, Minfang

    2015-08-17

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillator plays a key role in particle and nuclear physics experiments. The applications of metal ions in various neutrino experiments and the purification methods for different scintillator components are discussed in this paper.

  9. Detecting scintillations in liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, P. R.; McKinsey, D. N.

    2013-09-01

    We review our work in developing a tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB)-based detection system for a measurement of the neutron lifetime using magnetically confined ultracold neutrons (UCN). As part of the development of the detection system for this experiment, we studied the scintillation properties of liquid helium itself, characterized the fluorescent efficiencies of different fluors, and built and tested three detector geometries. We provide an overview of the results from these studies as well as references for additional information.

  10. Measurement of radiation damage of water-based liquid scintillator and liquid scintillator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bignell, L. J.; Diwan, M. V.; Hans, S.; Jaffe, D. E.; Rosero, R.; Vigdor, S.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-10-19

    Liquid scintillating phantoms have been proposed as a means to perform real-time 3D dosimetry for proton therapy treatment plan verification. We have studied what effect radiation damage to the scintillator will have upon this application. We have performed measurements of the degradation of the light yield and optical attenuation length of liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator after irradiation by 201 MeV proton beams that deposited doses of approximately 52 Gy, 300 Gy, and 800 Gy in the scintillator. Liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator (composed of 5% scintillating phase) exhibit light yield reductions of 1.74 ± 0.55 % andmore » 1.31 ± 0.59 % after ≈ 800 Gy of proton dose, respectively. Some increased optical attenuation was observed in the irradiated samples, the measured reduction to the light yield is also due to damage to the scintillation light production. Based on our results and conservative estimates of the expected dose in a clinical context, a scintillating phantom used for proton therapy treatment plan verification would exhibit a systematic light yield reduction of approximately 0.1% after a year of operation.« less

  11. Measurement of radiation damage of water-based liquid scintillator and liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bignell, L. J.; Diwan, M. V.; Hans, S.; Jaffe, D. E.; Rosero, R.; Vigdor, S.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-10-19

    Liquid scintillating phantoms have been proposed as a means to perform real-time 3D dosimetry for proton therapy treatment plan verification. We have studied what effect radiation damage to the scintillator will have upon this application. We have performed measurements of the degradation of the light yield and optical attenuation length of liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator after irradiation by 201 MeV proton beams that deposited doses of approximately 52 Gy, 300 Gy, and 800 Gy in the scintillator. Liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator (composed of 5% scintillating phase) exhibit light yield reductions of 1.74 ± 0.55 % and 1.31 ± 0.59 % after ≈ 800 Gy of proton dose, respectively. Some increased optical attenuation was observed in the irradiated samples, the measured reduction to the light yield is also due to damage to the scintillation light production. Based on our results and conservative estimates of the expected dose in a clinical context, a scintillating phantom used for proton therapy treatment plan verification would exhibit a systematic light yield reduction of approximately 0.1% after a year of operation.

  12. Liquid scintillators for optical fiber applications

    DOEpatents

    Franks, Larry A.; Lutz, Stephen S.

    1982-01-01

    A multicomponent liquid scintillator solution for use as a radiation-to-light converter in conjunction with a fiber optic transmission system. The scintillator includes a quantity of 1, 2, 4, 5, 3H, 6H, 1 OH, tetrahydro-8-trifluoromethyl (1) benzopyrano (9, 9a, 1-gh) quinolizin-10-one (Coumarin) as a solute in a fluor solvent such as benzyl alcohol or pseudo-cumene. The use of BIBUQ as an additional or primary solute is also disclosed.

  13. Ternary liquid scintillator for optical fiber applications

    DOEpatents

    Franks, Larry A.; Lutz, Stephen S.

    1982-01-01

    A multicomponent liquid scintillator solution for use as a radiation-to-light converter in conjunction with a fiber optic transmission system. The scintillator includes a quantity of 5-amino-9-diethylaminobenz (a) phenoxazonium nitrate (Nile Blue Nitrate) as a solute in a fluor solvent such as benzyl alcohol. The use of PPD as an additional solute is also disclosed. The system is controllable by addition of a suitable quenching agent, such as phenol.

  14. Pulse shaping analysis with LAB-based liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. S.; Kim, Y. H.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, M. K.; Ma, K. J.; Jeon, E. J.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, N. Y.; Kim, Y. D.; Lee, J. Y.

    2012-02-01

    We report on a pulse shaping analysis for alpha-beta discrimination using a linear alkylbenzene (LAB)-based liquid scintillator developed for reactor neutrino experiments. The scintillation properties are measured with an internal alpha source diluted in the same scintillator and an external gamma source. The comparison of the fast and the slow parts in the signal waveforms provide clear separations of alpha and gamma events in the liquid scintillator. The discrimination power is compared between the LAB-based liquid scintillator and other commercially available liquid scintillators. The potential use of this scintillator when loaded with 6Li is discussed with regard to neutron measurements.

  15. Near-infrared scintillation of liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, T.; Escobar, C. O.; Lippincott, W. H.; Rubinov, P.

    2016-03-01

    Since the 1970s it has been known that noble gases scintillate in the near infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (0.7 μm < λ < 1.5 μm). More controversial has been the question of the NIR light yield for condensed noble gases. We first present the motivation for using the NIR scintillation in liquid argon detectors, then briefly review early as well as more recent efforts and finally show encouraging preliminary results of a test performed at Fermilab.

  16. Large-scale liquid scintillation detectors for solar neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benziger, Jay B.; Calaprice, Frank P.

    2016-04-01

    Large-scale liquid scintillation detectors are capable of providing spectral yields of the low energy solar neutrinos. These detectors require > 100 tons of liquid scintillator with high optical and radiopurity. In this paper requirements for low-energy neutrino detection by liquid scintillation are specified and the procedures to achieve low backgrounds in large-scale liquid scintillation detectors for solar neutrinos are reviewed. The designs, operations and achievements of Borexino, KamLAND and SNO+ in measuring the low-energy solar neutrino fluxes are reviewed.

  17. Liquid Scintillation Detectors for High Energy Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Stefanie N.; Learned, John G.

    2010-03-30

    Large open volume (not segmented) liquid scintillation detectors have been generally dedicated to low energy neutrino measurements, in the MeV energy region. We describe the potential employment of large detectors (>1 kiloton) for studies of higher energy neutrino interactions, such as cosmic rays and long-baseline experiments. When considering the physics potential of new large instruments the possibility of doing useful measurements with higher energy neutrino interactions has been overlooked. Here we take into account Fermat's principle, which states that the first light to reach each PMT will follow the shortest path between that PMT and the point of origin. We describe the geometry of this process, and the resulting wavefront, which we are calling the 'Fermat surface', and discuss methods of using this surface to extract directional track information and particle identification. This capability may be demonstrated in the new long-baseline neutrino beam from Jaeri accelerator to the KamLAND detector in Japan. Other exciting applications include the use of Hanohano as a movable long-baseline detector in this same beam, and LENA in Europe for future long-baseline neutrino beams from CERN. Also, this methodology opens up the question as to whether a large liquid scintillator detector should be given consideration for use in a future long-baseline experiment from Fermilab to the DUSEL underground laboratory at Homestake.

  18. Bioanalysis of uranium, plutonium, and curium on breathing zone air samples by solvent extraction and PERALS spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, R.L.; Jessop, B.H.; McDowell, B.L.

    1995-12-31

    Breathing zone air samples are commonly used to monitor airborne concentrate of radionuclides in ions the workplace and to assess the efficacy of respiratory protection programs. Radioactive isotopes of actinides have very low allowable airborne concentrations, so knowledge of the airborne activities of these nuclides is crucial. The air samples are typically analyzed for alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides by direct counting of the filters or by conventional separation chemistry and alpha-particle spectrometry. These techniques do not normally provide a sample turnaround that is sufficiently rapid to allow a change in the respiratory protection program, if necessary. In this work we have developed straightforward solvent extraction separation procedures that can rapidly phase transfer isotopes of uranium, plutonium, and americium or curium from a dissolved filter medium to an extractive scintillator for counting on a Photon/Electron-Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation (PERALS{sup {reg_sign}}) Spectrometer. Results can normally be obtained within eight hours from the receipt of the air filter.

  19. Purification of KamLAND-Zen liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Haruo

    2013-08-01

    KamLAND-Zen is neutrino-less double-beta decay search experiment using enriched 300 kg of 136Xe dissolved in pure liquid scintillator. This report is purification work of liquid scintillator for KamLAND-Zen experiment before installation in the inner-balloon and background rejection processes after installation.

  20. Purification of KamLAND-Zen liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Haruo

    2013-08-08

    KamLAND-Zen is neutrino-less double-beta decay search experiment using enriched 300 kg of {sup 136}Xe dissolved in pure liquid scintillator. This report is purification work of liquid scintillator for KamLAND-Zen experiment before installation in the inner-balloon and background rejection processes after installation.

  1. Liquid scintillator production for the NOvA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mufson, S.; Baugh, B.; Bower, C.; Coan, T. E.; Cooper, J.; Corwin, L.; Karty, J. A.; Mason, P.; Messier, M. D.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Proudfoot, M.

    2015-11-01

    The NOvA collaboration blended and delivered 8.8 kt (2.72M gal) of liquid scintillator as the active detector medium to its near and far detectors. The composition of this scintillator was specifically developed to satisfy NOvA's performance requirements. A rigorous set of quality control procedures was put in place to verify that the incoming components and the blended scintillator met these requirements. The scintillator was blended commercially in Hammond, IN. The scintillator was shipped to the NOvA detectors using dedicated stainless steel tanker trailers cleaned to food grade.

  2. Liquid Scintillator Production for the NOvA Experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mufson, S.; Baugh, B.; Bower, C.; Coan, T.; Cooper, J.; Corwin, L.; Karty, J.; Mason, P.; Messier, M. D.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; et al

    2015-04-15

    The NOvA collaboration blended and delivered 8.8 kt (2.72M gal) of liquid scintillator as the active detector medium to its near and far detectors. The composition of this scintillator was specifically developed to satisfy NOvA's performance requirements. A rigorous set of quality control procedures was put in place to verify that the incoming components and the blended scintillator met these requirements. The scintillator was blended commercially in Hammond, IN. The scintillator was shipped to the NOvA detectors using dedicated stainless steel tanker trailers cleaned to food grade.

  3. Measurement of ortho-positronium properties in liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perasso, S.; Consolati, G.; Franco, D.; Hans, S.; Jollet, C.; Meregaglia, A.; Tonazzo, A.; Yeh, M.

    2013-08-01

    Pulse shape discrimination in liquid scintillator detectors is a well-established technique for the discrimination of heavy particles from light particles. Nonetheless, it is not efficient in the separation of electrons and positrons, as they give rise to indistinguishable scintillator responses. This inefficiency can be overtaken through the exploitation of the formation of ortho-Positronium (o-Ps), which alters the time profile of light pulses induced by positrons. We characterized the o-Ps properties in the most commonly used liquid scintillators, i.e. PC, PXE, LAB, OIL and PC + PPO. In addition, we studied the effects of scintillator doping on the o-Ps properties for dopants currently used in neutrino experiments, Gd and Nd. Further measurements for Li-loaded and Tl-loaded liquid scintillators are foreseen. We found that the o-Ps properties are suitable for enhancing the electron-positron discrimination.

  4. Measurement of ortho-positronium properties in liquid scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Perasso, S.; Franco, D.; Tonazzo, A.; Consolati, G.; Hans, S.; Yeh, M.; Jollet, C.; Meregaglia, A.

    2013-08-08

    Pulse shape discrimination in liquid scintillator detectors is a well-established technique for the discrimination of heavy particles from light particles. Nonetheless, it is not efficient in the separation of electrons and positrons, as they give rise to indistinguishable scintillator responses. This inefficiency can be overtaken through the exploitation of the formation of ortho-Positronium (o-Ps), which alters the time profile of light pulses induced by positrons. We characterized the o-Ps properties in the most commonly used liquid scintillators, i.e. PC, PXE, LAB, OIL and PC + PPO. In addition, we studied the effects of scintillator doping on the o-Ps properties for dopants currently used in neutrino experiments, Gd and Nd. Further measurements for Li-loaded and Tl-loaded liquid scintillators are foreseen. We found that the o-Ps properties are suitable for enhancing the electron-positron discrimination.

  5. Measurement of the liquid scintillator nonlinear energy response to electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fei-Hong; Yu, Bo-Xiang; Hu, Wei; Yang, Ma-Sheng; Cao, Guo-Fu; Cao, Jun; Zhou, Li

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinearity of the liquid scintillator energy response is a key to measuring the neutrino energy spectrum in reactor neutrino experiments such as Daya Bay and JUNO. We measured the nonlinearity of the linear alkyl benzene based liquid scintillator in the laboratory, which is used in Daya Bay and will be used in JUNO, via the Compton scattering process. By tagging the scattered gamma from the liquid scintillator sample simultaneously at seven angles, the instability of the system was largely cancelled. The accurately measured nonlinearity will improve the precision of the θ13, Δm2, and reactor neutrino spectrum measurements at Daya Bay.

  6. Liquid Scintillator based experiments in Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; KamLAND-Zen Collaboration

    2012-08-01

    Recent experiments have confirmed neutrino oscillations. The mass structure of neutrinos is one of the next interesting subjects in neutrino physics. Neutrinoless double beta decay has the potential to investigate the mass structure of neutrinos. Many neutrinoless double beta decay experiments are being proposed and some were introduced at this conference. Here we present neutrinoless double beta decay experiments based on liquid scintillator techniques. SNO+ plans to use 150Nd as the neutrinoless double beta decay isotope dissolved in liquid scintillator, similarly KamLAND-Zen will use 136Xe loaded liquid scintillator. The physics goals, schedule and current status of both experiments were discussed.

  7. Alpha counting and spectrometry using liquid scintillation methods

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, W J

    1986-01-01

    The material in this report is intended to be a practical introduction and guide to the use of liquid scintillation for alpha counting and spectrometry. Other works devoted to the development of the theory of liquid scintillation exist and a minimum of such material is repeated here. Much remains to be learned and many improvements remain to be made in the use of liquid scintillation for alpha counting and spectrometry. It is hoped that this modest work will encourage others to continue development in the field.

  8. Plasmonic light yield enhancement of a liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bignell, Lindsey J.; Jackson, Timothy W.; Mume, Eskender; Lee, George P.

    2013-05-27

    We demonstrate modifications to the light yield properties of an organic liquid scintillator due to the localization of the tertiary fluorophore component to the surface of Ag-core silica-shell nanoparticles. We attribute this enhancement to the near-field interaction of Ag nanoparticle plasmons with these fluor molecules. The scintillation light yield enhancement is shown to be equal to the fluorescence enhancement within measurement uncertainties. With a suitable choice of plasmon energy and scintillation fluor, this effect may be used to engineer scintillators with enhanced light yields for radiation detection applications.

  9. Plasmonic light yield enhancement of a liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bignell, Lindsey J.; Mume, Eskender; Jackson, Timothy W.; Lee, George P.

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate modifications to the light yield properties of an organic liquid scintillator due to the localization of the tertiary fluorophore component to the surface of Ag-core silica-shell nanoparticles. We attribute this enhancement to the near-field interaction of Ag nanoparticle plasmons with these fluor molecules. The scintillation light yield enhancement is shown to be equal to the fluorescence enhancement within measurement uncertainties. With a suitable choice of plasmon energy and scintillation fluor, this effect may be used to engineer scintillators with enhanced light yields for radiation detection applications.

  10. Liquid Scintillator Light Yield Measurements for the SNO+ Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grullon, Sean

    2013-04-01

    The SNO+ experiment is the follow-up to the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). The heavy water that was in SNO will be replaced with a liquid scintillator of linear alkylbenzene. SNO+ will have a broad physics program which will include measuring the pep and CNO solar neutrino flux, detecting geo-neutrinos, studying reactor neutrino oscillations, serving as a supernova neutrino detector, and carrying out a search for neutrinoless double beta decay by loading an isotope such as neodymium into the liquid scintillator. Since energy resolution is of profound importance for the experiment, it is extremely important to accurately measure the light yield of the liquid scintillator for different loading percentages of Neodymium. A series of measurements made comparing the relative light yields of different liquid scintillator configurations to a Cherenkov spectrum will be described.

  11. Data analysis in solar neutrinos liquid-scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testera, G.

    2016-04-01

    This paper focuses on the description of some of the methods developed to extract the solar neutrino signal from the background by the two running experiments (Borexino and Kamland) based on the use of a large volume of liquid scintillator.

  12. Rayleigh scattering of linear alkylbenzene in large liquid scintillator detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiang Zhang, Zhenyu; Liu, Qian; Zheng, Yangheng; Wurm, Michael; Zhang, Qingmin; Ding, Yayun; Zhou, Li; Cao, Jun; Wang, Yifang

    2015-07-15

    Rayleigh scattering poses an intrinsic limit for the transparency of organic liquid scintillators. This work focuses on the Rayleigh scattering length of linear alkylbenzene (LAB), which will be used as the solvent of the liquid scintillator in the central detector of the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory. We investigate the anisotropy of the Rayleigh scattering in LAB, showing that the resulting Rayleigh scattering length will be significantly shorter than reported before. Given the same overall light attenuation, this will result in a more efficient transmission of photons through the scintillator, increasing the amount of light collected by the photosensors and thereby the energy resolution of the detector.

  13. Time profile of the scintillation from liquid and gaseous xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, Ikuko; Nakamura, Shogo

    2014-11-01

    The decay time profile of vacuum ultraviolet scintillation induced by electronic recoils has been studied for liquid and gaseous xenon. The scintillation light from xenon excited by a gamma source was measured by using two vacuum ultraviolet sensitive photomultipliers, one for detecting scintillation and the other for counting photons of weak monochromatic light. The analysis results based on the time-correlated single photon counting method show that the time profile in the 176 nm scintillation decay curve for liquid xenon is consistent with a single exponential component and the decay time constant is 31.5±1.3 ns. This constant does not change significantly for pressure ranges between 90 kPa and 130 kPa. There is no emission wavelength dependence of the decay constant. The result corresponds to an average on electronic recoil energies up to 1.3 MeV.

  14. Fluorescence decay-time constants in organic liquid scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Marrodan Undagoitia, T.; Feilitzsch, F. von; Oberauer, L.; Potzel, W.; Ulrich, A.; Winter, J.; Wurm, M.

    2009-04-15

    The fluorescence decay-time constants have been measured for several scintillator mixtures based on phenyl-o-xylylethane (PXE) and linear alkylbenzene (LAB) solvents. The resulting values are of relevance for the physics performance of the proposed large-volume liquid scintillator detector Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy (LENA). In particular, the impact of the measured values to the search for proton decay via p{yields}K{sup +}{nu} is evaluated in this work.

  15. Gasolines as primary solvents in liquid scintillation counting

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, A.; Ma Pinto, R.; Sillero, A.

    1986-11-01

    Gasolines from several commercial sources have been used as primary solvents in liquid scintillation counting of dry and aqueous samples of either /sup 3/H- or /sup 14/C-labeled compounds. Dry samples can be counted only by the addition of fluors to the gasolines, and compared to a standard liquid scintillator, efficiencies of around 75% were attained. For the counting of aqueous samples, gasolines must also be supplemented with secondary solvents (i.e., 10% naphthalene, 5% Triton X-100, or 10% methanol). Simply with Triton X-100, efficiencies similar to those obtained with a dioxane-based liquid scintillator were observed in the case of some gasolines. Drawbacks to gasoline are the higher toxicity and the variation of efficiency, probably depending on the presence of color markers. On the positive side is the low price of the gasolines, compared with either toluene or dioxane, and the facility of purchasing.

  16. Scintillation Efficiency of Liquid Xenon for Low Energy Nuclear Recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongjirad, Taritree; Ni, Kaixuan; Manzur, Angel; Kastens, Louis; McKinsey, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    In early 2006, the XENON and ZEPLIN collaborations announced highly stringent upper limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross-section. However, the dominant systematic uncertainty in these limits is due to the uncertainty in the nuclear recoil scintillation efficiency (NRSE) for liquid xenon. The NRSE is defined as the amount of scintillation produced by nuclear recoils, divided by the amount of scintillation produced by electron recoils, per unit energy. Though the NRSE has been measured by several groups, its value at the low energies most important for the liquid xenon WIMP searches has a large uncertainty. Furthermore, the NRSE may vary with the strength of the electric field in the liquid xenon. In an attempt to reduce these uncertainties, we have measured the NRSE down to 5 keV nuclear recoil energy for various electric fields.

  17. Development of a liquid scintillator neutron multiplicity counter (LSMC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frame, Katherine; Clay, Willam; Elmont, Tim; Esch, Ernst; Karpius, Peter; MacArthur, Duncan; McKigney, Edward; Santi, Peter; Smith, Morag; Thron, Jonathan; Williams, Richard

    2007-08-01

    A new neutron multiplicity counter is being developed that utilizes the fast response of liquid scintillator detectors. The ability to detect fast (vs. moderated) fission neutrons makes possible a coincidence gate of the order of tens of nanoseconds (vs. tens of microseconds). A neutron counter with such a narrow gate will be virtually insensitive to accidental coincidences, making it possible to measure items with a high single neutron background to greater accuracy in less time. This includes impure Pu items with high (α, n) rates as well as items of low-mass HEU where a strong active interrogation source is needed. Liquid scintillator detectors also allow for energy discrimination between interrogation source neutrons and fission neutrons, allowing for even greater assay sensitivity. Designing and building a liquid scintillator multiplicity counter (LSMC) requires a symbiotic effort of simulation and experiment to optimize performance and mitigate hardware costs in the final product. We present preliminary Monte-Carlo studies using the GEANT toolkit.

  18. Measurement of ortho-positronium properties in liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perasso, S.; Consolati, G.; Franco, D.; Jollet, C.; Meregaglia, A.; Tonazzo, A.; Yeh, M.

    2014-03-01

    Pulse shape discrimination is a well-established technique for background rejection in liquid scintillator detectors. It is particularly effective in separating heavy particles from light particles, but not in distinguishing electrons from positrons. This inefficiency can be overtaken by exploiting the formation of ortho-positronium (o-Ps), which alters the time profile of light pulses induced by positrons. We characterized the o-Ps properties in the most commonly used liquid scintillators, i.e. PC, PXE, LAB, OIL and PC + PPO. In addition, we studied the effects of scintillator doping on the o-Ps properties for dopants used in neutrino-less double beta decay experiments (Nd and Te) and in anti-neutrino and neutron detection (Gd and Li respectively). We found that the o-Ps properties are similar in all the tested scintillators, with a lifetime around 3 ns and a formation probability of about 50%. This result indicates that an o-Ps-enhanced pulse shape discrimination can be applied in liquid scintillator detectors for neutrino and anti-neutrino detection and for neutrino-less double beta decay search.

  19. Direct determination of lead-210 by liquid-scintillation counting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairman, W. D.; Sedlet, J.

    1969-01-01

    Soft betas, the internal conversion electrons, and unconverted gamma rays from lead-210 are efficiently detected in a liquid scintillation counting system with efficiency of 97 percent. The counter is interfaced with a multichannel pulse height analyzer. The spectra obtained is stored on paper tape and plotted on an x-y plotter.

  20. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  1. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0more » to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.« less

  2. Calculations and measurements of the scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio of liquid scintillators for use in proton radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, W. Scott; Robertson, Daniel; Beddar, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Liquid scintillators are a promising detector for high-resolution three-dimensional proton therapy dosimetry. Because the scintillator comprises both the active volume of the detector and the phantom material, an ideal scintillator will exhibit water equivalence in its radiological properties. One of the most fundamental of these is the scintillator’s stopping power. The objective of this study was to compare calculations and measurements of scintillator-to-water stopping power ratios to evaluate the suitability of the liquid scintillators BC-531 and OptiPhase HiSafe 3 for proton dosimetry. We also measured the relative scintillation output of the two scintillators. Both calculations and measurements show that the linear stopping power of OptiPhase is significantly closer to water than that of BC-531. BC-531 has a somewhat higher scintillation output. OptiPhase can be mixed with water at high concentrations, which further improves its scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio. However, this causes the solution to become cloudy, which has a negative impact on the scintillation output and spatial resolution of the detector. OptiPhase is preferred over BC-531 for proton dosimetry because its density and scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio are more water equivalent. PMID:25705066

  3. Positronium signature in organic liquid scintillators for neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, D.; Consolati, G.; Trezzi, D.

    2011-01-15

    Electron antineutrinos are commonly detected in liquid scintillator experiments via inverse {beta} decay by looking at the coincidence between the reaction products: neutrons and positrons. Prior to positron annihilation, an electron-positron pair may form an orthopositronium (o-Ps) state, with a mean lifetime of a few nanoseconds. Even if the o-Ps decay is speeded up by spin-flip or pick-off effects, it may introduce distortions in the photon emission time distribution, crucial for position reconstruction and pulse shape discrimination algorithms in antineutrino experiments. Reversing the problem, the o-Ps-induced time distortion represents a new signature for tagging antineutrinos in liquid scintillator. In this article, we report the results of measurements of the o-Ps formation probability and lifetime for the most used solvents for organic liquid scintillators in neutrino physics (pseudocumene, linear alkyl benzene, phenylxylylethane, and dodecane). We characterize also a mixture of pseudocumene +1.5 g/l of 2,5-diphenyloxazole, a fluor acting as wavelength shifter. In the second part of the article, we demonstrate that the o-Ps-induced distortion of the scintillation photon emission time distributions represent an optimal signature for tagging positrons on an event by event basis, potentially enhancing the antineutrino detection.

  4. Comparing the response of PSD-capable plastic scintillator to standard liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Richard S.; Hutcheson, Anthony L.; Gwon, Chul; Phlips, Bernard F.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2015-06-01

    This work discusses a test campaign to characterize the response of the recently developed plastic scintillator with pulse shape discrimination (PSD) capabilities (EJ-299-33). PSD is a property exhibited by certain types of scintillating material in which incident stimuli (fast neutrons or γ rays) can be separated by exploiting differences in the scintillation light pulse tail. Detector geometries used were: a 10 cm×10 cm×10 cm cube and a 10-cm diameter×10-cm long cylinder. EJ-301 and EJ-309 liquid scintillators with well-known responses were also tested. The work was conducted at the University of Massachusetts Lowell Van De Graaff accelerator. The facility accelerated protons on a thin Li target to yield quasi-monoenergetic neutrons from the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction (Q-value: -1.644 MeV). Collimated fast neutrons were obtained by placing detectors behind a neutron spectrometer. Rotating the spectrometer, and thus changing the neutron energy, allowed us to achieve 0.5-3.2 MeV neutrons in 200-300 keV steps. Data were acquired through a flash analog-to-digital converter (ADC) capable of performing digital PSD measurements. By using the PSD technique to separate the neutron events from unwanted γ background, we constructed a pulse height spectrum at each energy. Obtaining a relationship of the relative light output versus energy allowed us to construct the response function for the EJ-299-33 and liquid scintillator. The EJ-299-33 response in terms of electron equivalent energy (Ee.e.) vs. proton equivalent energy (Ep.e.), how it compared with the standard xylene-based EJ-301 (or, NE-213/BC-501 A equivalent) and EJ-309 liquid scintillator response, and how the EJ-301 and EJ-309 compared, are presented. We find that the EJ-299-33 demonstrated a lower light output by up to 40% for <1.0 MeV neutrons; and ranging between a 5-35% reduction for 2.5-3.0 MeV neutrons compared to the EJ-301/309, depending on the scintillator and geometry. Monte Carlo modeling techniques were

  5. Pulse-shape discrimination in NE213 liquid scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, M.; Tropea, S.; Agodi, C.; Assié, M.; Azaiez, F.; Boiano, C.; Bondì, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; De Napoli, M.; de Séréville, N.; Foti, A.; Linares, R.; Nicolosi, D.; Scarpaci, J. A.

    2013-02-01

    The 16-channel fast stretcher BaFPro module, originally developed for processing signals of Barium Fluoride scintillators, has been modified to make a high performing analog pulse-shape analysis of signals from the NE213 liquid scintillators of the EDEN neutron detector array. The module produces two Gaussian signals, whose amplitudes are proportional to the height of the fast component of the output light and to the total energy deposited into the scintillator, respectively. An in-beam test has been performed at INFN-LNS (Italy) demonstrating a low detection threshold, a good pulse-shape discrimination even at low energies and a wide dynamic range for the measurement of the neutrons energy.

  6. Optical Design Considerations for Efficient Light Collection from Liquid Scintillation Counters

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Douglas, Matthew; Erchinger, Jennifer L.; Fuller, Erin S.; Keillor, Martin E.; Morley, Shannon M.; Mullen, Crystal A.; Orrell, John L.; Panisko, Mark E.; Warren, Glen A.; Wright, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid scintillation counters measure charged particle-emitting radioactive isotopes and are used for environmental studies, nuclear chemistry, and life science. Alpha and beta emissions arising from the material under study interact with the scintillation cocktail to produce light. The prototypical liquid scintillation counter employs low-level photon-counting detectors to measure the arrival of the scintillation light produced as a result of the dissolved material under study interacting with the scintillation cocktail. For reliable operation the counting instrument must convey the scintillation light to the detectors efficiently and predictably. Current best practices employ the use of two or more detectors for coincidence processing to discriminate true scintillation events from background events due to instrumental effects such as photomultiplier tube dark rates, tube flashing, or other light emission not generated in the scintillation cocktail vial. In low background liquid scintillation counters additional attention is paid to shielding the scintillation cocktail from naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) present in the laboratory and within the instruments construction materials. Low background design is generally at odds with optimal light collection. This study presents the evolution of a light collection design for liquid scintillation counting in a low background shield. The basic approach to achieve both good light collection and a low background measurement is described. The baseline signals arising from the scintillation vial are modeled and methods to efficiently collect scintillation light are presented as part of the development of a customized low-background, high sensitivity liquid scintillation counting system.

  7. Measuring the 14C content in liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enqvist, T.; Barabanov, I. R.; Bezrukov, L. B.; Gangapshev, A. M.; Gavrilyuk, Y. M.; Grishina, V. Yu; Gurentsov, V. I.; Hissa, J.; Joutsenvaara, J.; Kazalov, V. V.; Krokhaleva, S.; Kutuniva, J.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Kurlovich, A. S.; Loo, K.; Lubsandorzhiev, B. K.; Lubsandorzhiev, S.; Morgalyuk, V. P.; Novikova, G. Y.; Pshukov, A. M.; Sinev, V. V.; Słupecki, M.; Trzaska, W. H.; Umerov, Sh I.; Veresnikova, A. V.; Virkajärvi, A.; Yanovich, Y. A.; Zavarzina, V. P.

    2016-05-01

    We are going to perform a series of measurements where the 14C/12 C ratio will be measured from several liquid scintillator samples with a dedicated setup. The setup is designed with the aim of measuring ratios smaller than 10-18. Measurements take place in two underground laboratories: in the Baksan Neutrino Observatory, Russia and in the Pyhäsalmi mine, Finland. In Baksan the measurements started in 2015 and in Pyhäsalmi they start in the beginning of 2015. In order to fully understand the operation of the setup and its background contributions a development of simulation packages has also been started. Low-energy neutrino detection with a liquid scintillator requires that the intrinsic 14C content in the liquid is extremely low. In the Borexino CTF detector at Gran Sasso, Italy the 14C/12C ratio of 2 × 10-18 has been achieved being the lowest 14C concentration ever measured. In principle, the older the oil or gas source that the liquid scintillator is derived of and the deeper it situates, the smaller the 14C/12C ratio is supposed to be. This, however, is not generally the case, and the ratio is probably determined by the U and Th content of the local environment.

  8. Optical properties of quantum-dot-doped liquid scintillators

    PubMed Central

    Aberle, C.; Li, J.J.; Weiss, S.; Winslow, L.

    2014-01-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (quantum dots) were studied in the context of liquid scintillator development for upcoming neutrino experiments. The unique optical and chemical properties of quantum dots are particularly promising for the use in neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. Liquid scintillators for large scale neutrino detectors have to meet specific requirements which are reviewed, highlighting the peculiarities of quantum-dot-doping. In this paper, we report results on laboratory-scale measurements of the attenuation length and the fluorescence properties of three commercial quantum dot samples. The results include absorbance and emission stability measurements, improvement in transparency due to filtering of the quantum dot samples, precipitation tests to isolate the quantum dots from solution and energy transfer studies with quantum dots and the fluorophore PPO. PMID:25392711

  9. The next-generation liquid-scintillator neutrino observatory LENA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurm, Michael; Beacom, John F.; Bezrukov, Leonid B.; Bick, Daniel; Blümer, Johannes; Choubey, Sandhya; Ciemniak, Christian; D'Angelo, Davide; Dasgupta, Basudeb; Derbin, Alexander; Dighe, Amol; Domogatsky, Grigorij; Dye, Steve; Eliseev, Sergey; Enqvist, Timo; Erykalov, Alexey; von Feilitzsch, Franz; Fiorentini, Gianni; Fischer, Tobias; Göger-Neff, Marianne; Grabmayr, Peter; Hagner, Caren; Hellgartner, Dominikus; Hissa, Johannes; Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Jaupart, Claude; Jochum, Josef; Kalliokoski, Tuomo; Kayunov, Alexei; Kuusiniemi, Pasi; Lachenmaier, Tobias; Lazanu, Ionel; Learned, John G.; Lewke, Timo; Lombardi, Paolo; Lorenz, Sebastian; Lubsandorzhiev, Bayarto; Ludhova, Livia; Loo, Kai; Maalampi, Jukka; Mantovani, Fabio; Marafini, Michela; Maricic, Jelena; Marrodán Undagoitia, Teresa; McDonough, William F.; Miramonti, Lino; Mirizzi, Alessandro; Meindl, Quirin; Mena, Olga; Möllenberg, Randolph; Muratova, Valentina; Nahnhauer, Rolf; Nesterenko, Dmitry; Novikov, Yuri N.; Nuijten, Guido; Oberauer, Lothar; Pakvasa, Sandip; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio; Pallavicini, Marco; Pascoli, Silvia; Patzak, Thomas; Peltoniemi, Juha; Potzel, Walter; Räihä, Tomi; Raffelt, Georg G.; Ranucci, Gioacchino; Razzaque, Soebur; Rummukainen, Kari; Sarkamo, Juho; Sinev, Valerij; Spiering, Christian; Stahl, Achim; Thorne, Felicitas; Tippmann, Marc; Tonazzo, Alessandra; Trzaska, Wladyslaw H.; Vergados, John D.; Wiebusch, Christopher; Winter, Jürgen

    2012-06-01

    As part of the European LAGUNA design study on a next-generation neutrino detector, we propose the liquid-scintillator detector LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) as a multipurpose neutrino observatory. The outstanding successes of the Borexino and KamLAND experiments demonstrate the large potential of liquid-scintillator detectors in low-energy neutrino physics. Low energy threshold, good energy resolution and efficient background discrimination are inherent to the liquid-scintillator technique. A target mass of 50 kt will offer a substantial increase in detection sensitivity. At low energies, the variety of detection channels available in liquid scintillator will allow for an energy - and flavor-resolved analysis of the neutrino burst emitted by a galactic Supernova. Due to target mass and background conditions, LENA will also be sensitive to the faint signal of the Diffuse Supernova Neutrino Background. Solar metallicity, time-variation in the solar neutrino flux and deviations from MSW-LMA survival probabilities can be investigated based on unprecedented statistics. Low background conditions allow to search for dark matter by observing rare annihilation neutrinos. The large number of events expected for geoneutrinos will give valuable information on the abundances of Uranium and Thorium and their relative ratio in the Earth's crust and mantle. Reactor neutrinos enable a high-precision measurement of solar mixing parameters. A strong radioactive or pion decay-at-rest neutrino source can be placed close to the detector to investigate neutrino oscillations for short distances and sub-MeV to MeV energies. At high energies, LENA will provide a new lifetime limit for the SUSY-favored proton decay mode into kaon and antineutrino, surpassing current experimental limits by about one order of magnitude. Recent studies have demonstrated that a reconstruction of momentum and energy of GeV particles is well feasible in liquid scintillator. Monte Carlo studies on the

  10. Comparison of plastic scintillating fibres and capillaries filled with liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardini, A.; Cavasinni, V.; Di Girolamo, B.; Flaminio, V.; Golovkin, S. V.; Gorin, A. M.; Kulichenko, A. V.; Kushnirenko, A. E.; Pyshev, A. I.; Manuilov, I.; Vasilchenko, V. G.

    1994-07-01

    A comparison is made between the light yield, attenuation length, time response and light propagation speed in plastic scintillating fibres (SCSF-38 and Kuraray-3HF) and quartz capillaries filled with liquid scintillator (LS) 1-methilnaphthalene (1MN) doped with new dyes R45 and R39. The inner diameter of capillaries and diameter of plastic fibres is 0.5 mm. The number of photoelectrons detected at the far end (2 m) was 2.9 for capillaries filled with 1MN + 3 g/1 R45 while it was 1.8 times smaller in the case of SCSF-38 and 3 times smaller in the case of Kuraray 3HF plastic fibres. Taking into account the quantum efficiency of the photodetector used these reduction factors became 3.0 and 2.0, respectively. Good attenuation length, high light output and also excellent radiation resistance of capillaries filled with LS (> 60 Mrad, measured elsewhere) show that they are a very promising alternative to plastic scintillating fibres for future applications in tracking detectors and calorimeters.

  11. Real-time aqueous tritium monitor using liquid scintillation counting

    SciTech Connect

    Sigg, R.A.; McCarty, J.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Sanders, M.A.

    1994-07-01

    An ability to continuously monitor low-level tritium releases in aqueous effluents is of particular interest to heavy water facilities such as those at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Canadian CANDU reactors. SRS developed a real-time monitoring system based on flow-through liquid scintillation (LS) counting. Sensitivities of 16 pCi/mL and 1 pCi/mL result from five minute and daily averages of counting data respectively. This sensitivity is about 200 times better than similar methods using solid scintillants. The LS system features uncomplicated sample pretreatment, precise of the cocktail and sample water, system features uncomplicated sample pretreatment, precise proportioning of the cocktail and sample water, on-line quench corrections, cocktail consumption as low as 0.15 mL/min, and response to changes in environmental tritium is less than 30 minutes. Field tests demonstrate that conditions necessary for stable analytical results are achieved.

  12. Detecting energy dependent neutron capture distributions in a liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmer, Matthew J. I.; Gamage, Kelum A. A.; Taylor, Graeme C.

    2015-03-01

    A novel technique is being developed to estimate the effective dose of a neutron field based on the distribution of neutron captures in a scintillator. Using Monte Carlo techniques, a number of monoenergetic neutron source energies and locations were modelled and their neutron capture response was recorded. Using back propagation Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) the energy and incident direction of the neutron field was predicted from the distribution of neutron captures within a 6Li-loaded liquid scintillator. Using this proposed technique, the effective dose of 252Cf, 241AmBe and 241AmLi neutron fields was estimated to within 30% for four perpendicular angles in the horizontal plane. Initial theoretical investigations show that this technique holds some promise for real-time estimation of the effective dose of a neutron field.

  13. Neutrino Flavor Sensitivity of Large Liquid Scintillator Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loo, K. K.; Bick, D.; Enqvist, T.; Hellgartner, D.; Kaiser, M.; Lorenz, S.; Meloni, M.; Meyer, M.; Möllenberg, R.; Oberauer, L.; Soiron, M.; Smirnov, M.; Stahl, A.; Trzaska, W. H.; Wonsak, B.; Wurm, M.

    Scintillator detectors are known for their good light yield, energy resolution, timing characteristics and pulse shape discrimination capabilities. These features make the next-generation liquid scintillation detector LENA[1] (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) the optimal choice for a wide range of astro-particle topics including supernova-, solar-, and geo neutrinos. In addition to the excellent calorimetric and timing properties, scintillartor detectors (LSDs) are also capable of topology reconstruction sufficient to discriminate with adequate efficiency between electron and muon neutrino induced charge current events and neutral current events in the GeV energy range. This feature makes LENA a competitive tool for the determination of the mass hierarchy (MH) with long baseline neutrino beams such as the proposed CN2PY beam (2288 km). This work summarizes the status of the current work on track reconstruction schemes and discusses the sensitivity limit for the neutrino mass hierarchy measurement with LENA.

  14. Organic liquid scintillation detector shape and volume impact on radiation portal monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paff, Marc G.; Clarke, Shaun D.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2016-07-01

    We have developed and tested a radiation portal monitor using organic liquid scintillation detectors. In order to optimize our system designs, neutron measurements were carried out with three organic liquid scintillation detectors of different shapes and sizes, along with a 3He radiation portal monitor (RPM) as a reference. The three liquids tested were a 7.62 cm diameter by 7.62 cm length cylindrical active volume organic liquid scintillation detector, a 12.7 cm diameter by 12.7 cm length cylindrical active volume organic liquid scintillation detector, and a 25 cm by 25 cm by 10 cm "paddle" shaped organic liquid scintillation detector. Background and Cf-252 neutron measurements were recorded to allow for a comparison of neutron intrinsic efficiencies as well as receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves between detectors. The 12.7 cm diameter cylindrical active volume organic liquid scintillation detector exhibited the highest intrinsic neutron efficiency (54%) of all three liquid scintillators. An ROC curve analysis for a heavily moderated Cf-252 measurement showed that using the 12.7 cm diameter by 12.7 cm length cylindrical active volume Eljen EJ309 organic liquid scintillation detector would result in the fewest needed detector units in order to achieve a near 100% positive neutron alarm rate while maintaining a better than 1 in 10,000 false alarm rate on natural neutron background. A small number of organic liquid scintillation detectors could therefore be a valid alternative to 3He in some RPM applications.

  15. Simulation results of liquid and plastic scintillator detectors for reactor antineutrino detection - A comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, V. K. S.; Pant, L. M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Datar, V. M.

    2016-03-01

    A simulation study of two kinds of scintillation detectors has been done using GEANT4. We compare plastic scintillator and liquid scintillator based designs for detecting electron antineutrinos emitted from the core of reactors. The motivation for this study is to set up an experiment at the research reactor facility at BARC for very short baseline neutrino oscillation study and remote reactor monitoring.

  16. Optical design considerations for efficient light collection from liquid scintillation counters.

    PubMed

    Bernacki, Bruce E; Douglas, Matthew; Erchinger, Jennifer L; Fuller, Erin S; Keillor, Martin E; Morley, Shannon M; Mullen, Crystal A; Orrell, John L; Panisko, Mark E; Warren, Glen A; Wright, Michael E

    2015-03-20

    Liquid scintillation counters measure charged particle-emitting radioactive isotopes and are used for environmental studies, nuclear chemistry, and life science. Alpha and beta emissions arising from the material under study interact with the scintillation cocktail to produce light. The prototypical liquid scintillation counter employs low-level photon-counting detectors to measure the arrival of the scintillation. For reliable operation, the counting instrument must convey the scintillation light to the detectors efficiently and predictably. Current best practices employ the use of two or more detectors for coincidence processing to discriminate true scintillation events from background events due to instrumental effects such as photomultiplier tube dark rates, tube flashing, or other light emission not generated in the scintillation cocktail vial. In low-background liquid scintillation counters, additional attention is paid to shielding the scintillation cocktail from naturally occurring radioactive material present in the laboratory and within the instrument's construction materials. Low-background design is generally at odds with optimal light collection. This study presents the evolution of a light collection design for liquid scintillation counting (LSC) in a low-background shield. The basic approach to achieve both good light collection and a low-background measurement is described. The baseline signals arising from the scintillation vial are modeled and methods to efficiently collect scintillation light are presented as part of the development of a customized low-background, high-sensitivity LSC system. PMID:25968530

  17. A study of liquid scintillator and fiber materials for use in a fiber calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Altice, P.P. Jr.

    1990-04-01

    This reports an investigation into the performance of selected scintillation oils and fiber materials to test their applicability in high energy, liquid scintillator calorimetry. Two scintillating oils, Bicron BC-517 and an oil mixed for the MACRO experiment, and two fiber materials, Teflon and GlassClad PS-252, were tested for the following properties: light yield, attenuation length and internal reflection angle. The results of these tests indicated that the scintillation oils and the fiber materials had an overall good performance with lower energies and would meet the requirements of liquid scintillator detection at SSC energies. 6 refs.

  18. N-(2-Ethylhexyl)carbazole: A New Fluorophore Highly Suitable as a Monomolecular Liquid Scintillator.

    PubMed

    Montbarbon, Eva; Sguerra, Fabien; Bertrand, Guillaume H V; Magnier, Élodie; Coulon, Romain; Pansu, Robert B; Hamel, Matthieu

    2016-08-16

    The synthesis, photophysical properties, and applications in scintillation counting of N-(2-ethylhexyl)carbazole (EHCz) are reported. This molecule displays all of the required characteristics for an efficient liquid scintillator (emission wavelength, scintillation yield), and can be used without any extra fluorophores. Thus, its scintillation properties are discussed, as well as its fast neutron/gamma discrimination. For the latter application, the material is compared with the traditional liquid scintillator BC-501 A, and other liquid fluorescent molecules classically used as scintillation solvents, such as xylene, pseudocumene (PC), linear alkylbenzenes (LAB), diisopropylnaphthalene (DIN), 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MeNapht), and 4-isopropylbiphenyl (iPrBiph). For the first time, an excimeric form of a molecule has been advantageously used in scintillation counting. A moderate discrimination between fast neutrons and gamma rays was observed in bulk EHCz, with an apparent neutron/gamma discrimination potential half of that of BC-501 A. PMID:27406840

  19. Optical scattering lengths in large liquid-scintillator neutrino detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wurm, M.; Feilitzsch, F. von; Goeger-Neff, M.; Hofmann, M.; Lewke, T.; Meindl, Q.; Moellenberg, R.; Oberauer, L.; Potzel, W.; Tippmann, M.; Todor, S.; Winter, J.; Lachenmaier, T.; Traunsteiner, C.; Undagoitia, T. Marrodan

    2010-05-15

    For liquid-scintillator neutrino detectors of kiloton scale, the transparency of the organic solvent is of central importance. The present paper reports on laboratory measurements of the optical scattering lengths of the organic solvents phenylxylylethane, linear alkylbenzene (LAB), and dodecane, which are under discussion for next-generation experiments such as SNO+ (Sudbury Neutrino Observatory), HanoHano, or LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy). Results comprise the wavelength range of 415-440 nm. The contributions from Rayleigh and Mie scattering as well as from absorption/re-emission processes are discussed. Based on the present results, LAB seems to be the preferred solvent for a large-volume detector.

  20. ARAPUCA a new device for liquid argon scintillation light detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, A. A.; Segreto, E.

    2016-02-01

    We present a totally innovative device for the detection of liquid argon scintillation light, that has been named ARAPUCA (Argon R&D Advanced Program at UniCAmp). It is composed of a passive light collector and of active devices. The latters are standard SiPMs that operate at liquid argon temperature, while the passive collector is based on a new technology, never explored in this field before. It is a photon trap, that allows to collect light with extremely high efficiency. The total detection efficiency of the device can be tuned by modifying the ratio between the area of the active devices (SiPM) and the area of the optical window. For example, it will allow to reach a detection efficiency at the level of 1% on a surface of 50 × 50 cm2 with an active coverage of 2 × 2 cm2 (two/three large area SiPM). It is also a cheap device, since the major part of its cost is represented by the active devices. For these reason this appears to be the ideal device for scintillation light detection in large Time Projection Chambers. With appropriate modifications it can be used also in next generation Dark Matter detectors.

  1. The IFIN-HH triple coincidence liquid scintillation counter.

    PubMed

    Razdolescu, A C; Broda, R; Cassette, P; Simpson, B R S; Van Wyngaardt, W M

    2006-01-01

    The paper summarizes the IFIN-HH triple coincidence liquid scintillation counter used for the implementation of the TDCR method. The electronic unit was recently extended to record the three individual double coincidence ratios to take into account the differences in the quantum efficiencies of the three-photomultiplier tubes. Some details of the electronic system and the data processing are given. The critical point of a TDCR counter is to adjust correctly the discriminator levels on the three channels under the single electron peak. The paper describes the method of adjustment based on the evolution of the dark counting rate versus the discriminator level. Also indicated is the influence of the discrimination level on the activity results as measured at IFIN-HH using a 3H standard. The performances of the IFIN-HH TDCR counter was checked against the measurement results of the TDCR counters of CSIR NML (South Africa), RC (Poland) and LNHB (France). A set of ready-to-measure 63Ni sources in liquid scintillator, in sealed counting vials, was prepared and dispatched for measurement to all these laboratories. The paper describes designs of the TDCR counters used. An analysis and discussion of the measurement results is given. PMID:16563781

  2. Scintillation Light from Cosmic-Ray Muons in Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Whittington, Denver Wade; Mufson, S.; Howard, B.

    2015-11-13

    This paper reports the results of an experiment to directly measure the time-resolved scintillation signal from the passage of cosmic-ray muons through liquid argon. Scintillation light from these muons is of value to studies of weakly-interacting particles in neutrino experiments and dark matter searches. The experiment was carried out at the TallBo dewar facility at Fermilab using prototype light guide detectors and electronics developed for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. Two models are presented for the time structure of the scintillation light, a phenomenological model and a physically-motivated model. Both models find tT = 1:52 ms for the decay time constant of the Ar 2 triplet state. These models also show that the identification of the “early” light fraction in the phenomenological model, FE 25% of the signal, with the total light from singlet decays is an underestimate. The total fraction of singlet light is FS 36%, where the increase over FE is from singlet light emitted by the wavelength shifter through processes with long decay constants. The models were further used to compute the experimental particle identification parameter Fprompt, the fraction of light coming in a short time window after the trigger compared with the light in the total recorded waveform. The models reproduce quite well the typical experimental value 0.3 found by dark matter and double b-decay experiments, which suggests this parameter provides a robust metric for discriminating electrons and muons from more heavily ionizing particles.

  3. Scintillation light from cosmic-ray muons in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittington, D.; Mufson, S.; Howard, B.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the results of an experiment to directly measure the time-resolved scintillation signal from the passage of cosmic-ray muons through liquid argon. Scintillation light from these muons is of value to studies of weakly-interacting particles in neutrino experiments and dark matter searches. The experiment was carried out at the TallBo dewar facility at Fermilab using prototype light guide detectors and electronics developed for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. Two models are presented for the time structure of the scintillation light, a phenomenological model and a composite model. Both models find τT = 1.52 μs for the decay time constant of the Ar2* triplet state. These models also show that the identification of the ``early'' light fraction in the phenomenological model, FE ≈ 25% of the signal, with the total light from singlet decays is an underestimate. The total fraction of singlet light is FS ≈ 36%, where the increase over FE is from singlet light emitted by the wavelength shifter through processes with long decay constants. The models were further used to compute the experimental particle identification parameter Fprompt, the fraction of light coming in a short time window after the trigger compared with the light in the total recorded waveform. The models reproduce quite well the typical experimental value ~0.3 found by dark matter and double β-decay experiments, which suggests this parameter provides a robust metric for discriminating electrons and muons from more heavily ionizing particles.

  4. Optimization of screening for radioactivity in urine by liquid scintillation.

    SciTech Connect

    Shanks, Sonoya Toyoko; Reese, Robert P.; Preston, Rose T.

    2007-08-01

    Numerous events have or could have resulted in the inadvertent uptake of radionuclides by fairly large populations. Should a population receive an uptake, valuable information could be obtained by using liquid scintillation counting (LSC) techniques to quickly screen urine from a sample of the affected population. This study investigates such LSC parameters as discrimination, quench, volume, and count time to yield guidelines for analyzing urine in an emergency situation. Through analyzing variations of the volume and their relationships to the minimum detectable activity (MDA), the optimum ratio of sample size to scintillating chemical cocktail was found to be 1:3. Using this optimum volume size, the alpha MDA varied from 2100 pCi/L for a 30-second count time to 35 pCi/L for a 1000-minute count time. The typical count time used by the Sandia National Laboratories Radiation Protection Sample Diagnostics program is 30 minutes, which yields an alpha MDA of 200 pCi/L. Because MDA is inversely proportional to the square root of the count time, count time can be reduced in an emergency situation to achieve the desired MDA or response time. Note that approximately 25% of the response time is used to prepare the samples and complete the associated paperwork. It was also found that if the nuclide of interest is an unknown, pregenerated discriminator settings and efficiency calibrations can be used to produce an activity value within a factor of two, which is acceptable for a screening method.

  5. Light yield and energy transfer in a new Gd-loaded liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aberle, C.; Buck, C.; Hartmann, F. X.; Schönert, S.

    2011-11-01

    We investigate a new gadolinium-loaded organic liquid scintillator which is designed to detect electron antineutrinos. A model has been developed to account for the various energy transfer paths possible in a liquid scintillator with multiple solvents, one fluor and a quenching component. Experimental light yield measurements were carried out to determine the relative rates for the energy transfers included in the model. Model predictions were used to tune the luminescent properties of the Gd-loaded target scintillator and the unloaded Gamma Catcher scintillator for the reactor neutrino experiment Double Chooz.

  6. Fast-neutron multiplicity analysis based on liquid scintillation.

    PubMed

    Li, Sufen; Qiu, Suizheng; Zhang, Quanhu; Huo, Yonggang; Lin, Hongtao

    2016-04-01

    In this study, according to the establishment of the classical neutron multiplicity measurement equation, a fast-neutron multiplicity analysis and measurement equation is established, considering the influence of neutron scattering cross-talk, by means of theoretical analysis and computer simulation. Moreover, the fission rate F, multiplication M, and (α, n) reaction rate α in the established equation were solved. A new measurement method of scattering cross-talk was established and the established equation was validated using Geant4 simulation. The fast-neutron multiplicity counting equation has only a smaller deviation from the fast-neutron multiplicity counting system based on liquid scintillation detector, and it has a wider application prospect. PMID:26766037

  7. Quality assurance manual plutonium liquid scintillation methods and procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, L.

    1997-01-01

    Nose swipe analysis is a very important tool for Radiation Protection personnel. Nose swipe analysis is a very fast and accurate method for (1) determining if a worker has been exposed to airborne plutonium contamination and (2) Identifying the area where there has been a possible plutonium release. Liquid scintillation analysis techniques have been effectively applied to accurately determine the plutonium alpha activity on nose swipe media. Whatman-40 paper and Q-Tips are the only two media which have been evaluated and can be used for nose swipe analysis. Presently, only Q-Tips are used by Group HSE-1 Radiation Protection Personnel. However, both swipe media will be discussed in this report.

  8. Optimization of Pulse Shape Discrimination of PROSPECT Liquid Scintillator Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ke; Prospect Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    PROSPECT, A Precision Oscillation and Spectrum Experiment, will use a segmented Li-6 doped liquid scintillator detector for precision measurement of the reactor anti-neutrino spectrum at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. PROSPECT also searches for very short baseline neutrino oscillation, an indication of the existence of eV-scale sterile neutrinos. Pulse shape analysis of the prompt anti-neutino signal and delayed neutron capture on Li-6 signal will greatly suppress background sources such as fast neutrons and accidental coincidence of gammas. In this talk, I will discuss different pulse shape parameters used in PROSPECT prototype detectors and multivariate optimization of event selection cuts based on those parameters.

  9. Showering cosmogenic muons in a large liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, Marco; Evslin, Jarah; Ciuffoli, Emilio; Zhang, Xinmin

    2014-09-01

    We present the results of FLUKA simulations of the propagation of cosmogenic muons in a 20 kton spherical liquid scintillator detector underneath 700 to 900 meters of rock. A showering muon is one which deposits at least 3 GeV in the detector in addition to ionization energy. We find that 20 percent of muons are showering and a further 11 percent of muon events are muon bundles, of which more than one muon enters the detector. In this range the showering and bundle fractions are robust against changes in the depth and topography, thus the total shower and bundle rate for a given experiment can be obtained by combining our results with an estimate for the total muon flux. One consequence is that a straightforward adaptation of the full detector showering muon cuts used by KamLAND to JUNO or RENO 50 would yield a nearly vanishing detector efficiency.

  10. Characterization and Modeling of a Water-based Liquid Scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    L. J. Bignell; Beznosko, D.; Diwan, M. V.; Hans, S.; Jaffe, D. E.; S. Kettell; Rosero, R.; Themann, H. W.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-12-15

    We characterised Water-based Liquid Scintillator (WbLS) using low energy protons, UV-VIS absorbance, and fluorescence spectroscopy. We have also developed and validated a simulation model that describes the behaviour of WbLS in our detector configurations for proton beam energies of 210 MeV, 475 MeV, and 2 GeV and for two WbLS compositions. These results have enabled us to estimate the light yield and ionisation quenching of WbLS, as well as to understand the influence of the wavelength shifting of Cherenkov light on our measurements. These results are relevant to the suitability of WbLS materials for next generation intensity frontier experiments.

  11. A step toward CNO solar neutrino detection in liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villante, F. L.; Ianni, A.; Lombardi, F.; Pagliaroli, G.; Vissani, F.

    2011-07-01

    The detection of CNO solar neutrinos in ultrapure liquid scintillator detectors is limited by the background produced by bismuth-210 nuclei that undergo β-decay to polonium-210 with a lifetime of ˜7 days. Polonium-210 nuclei are unstable and decay with a lifetime equal to ˜200 days emitting α particles that can be also detected. In this Letter, we show that the Bi-210 background can be determined by looking at the time evolution of α-decay rate of Po-210, provided that α particle detection efficiency is stable over the data acquisition period and external sources of Po-210 are negligible. A sufficient accuracy can be obtained in a relatively short time. As an example, if the initial Po-210 event rate is ˜2000 cpd/100 ton or lower, a Borexino-like detector could start discerning CNO neutrino signal from Bi-210 background in Δt˜1 yr.

  12. Measuring fast neutrons with large liquid scintillation detector for ultra-low background experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Mei, D.-M.; Davis, P.; Woltman, B.; Gray, F.

    2013-11-01

    We developed a 12-liter volume neutron detector filled with the liquid scintillator EJ301 that measures neutrons in an underground laboratory where dark matter and neutrino experiments are located. The detector target is a cylindrical volume coated on the inside with reflective paint (95% reflectivity) that significantly increases the detector's light collection. We demonstrate several calibration techniques using point sources and cosmic-ray muons for energies up to 20 MeV for this large liquid scintillation detector. Neutron-gamma separation using pulse shape discrimination with a few MeV neutrons to hundreds of MeV neutrons is shown for the first time using a large liquid scintillator.

  13. Application of scintillating properties of liquid xenon and silicon photomultiplier technology to medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Benlloch-Rodriguez, J. M.; Ferrario, Paola

    2016-04-01

    We describe a new positron emission time-of-flight apparatus using liquid xenon. The detector is based in a liquid xenon scintillating cell. The cell shape and dimensions can be optimized depending on the intended application. In its simplest form, the liquid xenon scintillating cell is a box in which two faces are covered by silicon photomultipliers and the others by a reflecting material such as Teflon. It is a compact, homogenous and highly efficient detector which shares many of the desirable properties of monolithic crystals, with the added advantage of high yield and fast scintillation offered by liquid xenon. Our initial studies suggest that good energy and spatial resolution comparable with that achieved by lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals can be obtained with a detector based in liquid xenon scintillating cells. In addition, the system can potentially achieve an excellent coincidence resolving time of better than 100 ps.

  14. Liquid argon scintillation read-out with silicon devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canci, N.; Cattadori, C.; D'Incecco, M.; Lehnert, B.; Machado, A. A.; Riboldi, S.; Sablone, D.; Segreto, E.; Vignoli, C.

    2013-10-01

    Silicon photosensors represent a viable alternative to standard photomultipliers in fields such as communications and medical imaging. We explored the interesting possibility of using these sensors in combination with liquid argon (LAr) for astroparticle physics applications such as neutrino, dark matter and double beta decay experiments. In fact, silicon photosensors have detection efficiencies comparable with those of the highest performance PMTs and can be manufactured with high level of radiopurity. In particular within the on-going R&D activity of the SILENT project (Low background and low noise techniques for double beta decay physics funded by ASPERA) a large area SiPM (Silicon PhotoMultiplier - Hamamatsu S11828-3344M - 1.7 cm2 area) has been installed in a LAr scintillation chamber of 0.5 liters volume together with a cryogenic photomultiplier tube (Hamamatsu R11065) used as a reference. The liquid argon chamber has been exposed to many gamma sources of different energies and single photoelectron response and light yield for the SiPM and PMT have been measured and compared. In this contribution the results of the tests, and the ongoing R&D to optimize the SiPM for cryogenic and for ultralow background applications, are reported, as well as the possible application in the GERDA experiment on Double Beta Decay Searches of 76Ge.

  15. Comparison of neutron spectra measured with three sizes of organic liquid scintillators using differentiation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shook, D. F.; Pierce, C. R.

    1972-01-01

    Proton recoil distributions were obtained by using organic liquid scintillators of different size. The measured distributions are converted to neutron spectra by differentiation analysis for comparison to the unfolded spectra of the largest scintillator. The approximations involved in the differentiation analysis are indicated to have small effects on the precision of neutron spectra measured with the smaller scintillators but introduce significant error for the largest scintillator. In the case of the smallest cylindrical scintillator, nominally 1.2 by 1.3 cm, the efficiency is shown to be insensitive to multiple scattering and to the angular distribution to the incident flux. These characteristics of the smaller scintillator make possible its use to measure scalar flux spectra within media high efficiency is not required.

  16. Non-toxic liquid scintillators with high light output based on phenyl-substituted siloxanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Palma, M.; Carturan, S. M.; Degerlier, M.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Quaranta, A.

    2015-04-01

    The work describes the development of a new class of liquid scintillators based on polysiloxane liquid compounds. These materials are characterized by low toxicity, chemical inertness, very low volatility and low flammability, allowing their use without concerns even at high temperatures in vacuum. In this view different polysiloxane based liquids have been tested, with variable content and distribution of phenyl lateral substituents and added with suitable dyes, namely 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and Lumogen Violet (LV). Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy have been used in order to study the emission feature of the various compounds and to investigate the spectral matching between siloxane solvents and dissolved primary dyes. Scintillation efficiency towards 60Co and 137Cs gamma rays, relative to commercial liquid scintillator (EJ-309), has been measured and the results have been related to the energy transfer and energy migration mechanism from monomer and excimer forming sites in liquid siloxanes.

  17. Method for measuring multiple scattering corrections between liquid scintillators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Verbeke, J. M.; Glenn, A. M.; Keefer, G. J.; Wurtz, R. E.

    2016-04-11

    In this study, a time-of-flight method is proposed to experimentally quantify the fractions of neutrons scattering between scintillators. An array of scintillators is characterized in terms of crosstalk with this method by measuring a californium source, for different neutron energy thresholds. The spectral information recorded by the scintillators can be used to estimate the fractions of neutrons multiple scattering. With the help of a correction to Feynman's point model theory to account for multiple scattering, these fractions can in turn improve the mass reconstruction of fissile materials under investigation.

  18. Method for measuring multiple scattering corrections between liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeke, J. M.; Glenn, A. M.; Keefer, G. J.; Wurtz, R. E.

    2016-07-01

    A time-of-flight method is proposed to experimentally quantify the fractions of neutrons scattering between scintillators. An array of scintillators is characterized in terms of crosstalk with this method by measuring a californium source, for different neutron energy thresholds. The spectral information recorded by the scintillators can be used to estimate the fractions of neutrons multiple scattering. With the help of a correction to Feynman's point model theory to account for multiple scattering, these fractions can in turn improve the mass reconstruction of fissile materials under investigation.

  19. Laboratory studies on the removal of radon-born lead from KamLAND׳s organic liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, G.; Grant, C.; Piepke, A.; Ebihara, T.; Ikeda, H.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kibe, Y.; Koseki, Y.; Ogawa, M.; Shirai, J.; Takeuchi, S.; Mauger, C.; Zhang, C.; Schweitzer, G.; Berger, B. E.; Dazeley, S.; Decowski, M. P.; Detwiler, J. A.; Djurcic, Z.; Dwyer, D. A.; Efremenko, Y.; Enomoto, S.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Furuno, K.; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Gratta, G.; Hatakeyama, S.; Heeger, K. M.; Hsu, L.; Ichimura, K.; Inoue, K.; Iwamoto, T.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Karwowski, H. J.; Koga, M.; Kozlov, A.; Lane, C. E.; Learned, J. G.; Maricic, J.; Markoff, D. M.; Matsuno, S.; McKee, D.; McKeown, R. D.; Miletic, T.; Mitsui, T.; Motoki, M.; Nakajima, Kyo; Nakajima, Kyohei; Nakamura, K.; O׳Donnell, T.; Ogawa, H.; Piquemal, F.; Ricol, J. -S.; Shimizu, I.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Svoboda, R.; Tajima, O.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Tolich, K.; Tornow, W.; Watanabe, Hideki; Watanabe, Hiroko; Winslow, L. A.; Yoshida, S.

    2014-09-28

    We studied the removal of radioactivity from liquid scintillator in preparation of a low background phase of KamLAND. We describe the methods and techniques developed to measure and efficiently extract radon decay products from liquid scintillator. Lastly, we report the radio-isotope reduction factors obtained when applying various extraction methods. During this study, distillation was identified as the most efficient method for removing radon daughters from liquid scintillator.

  20. Response of liquid scintillator assemblies as a function of angular orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, S. F.; Scarpelli, M.; Miller, E.; Clarke, S. D.; Pozzi, S. A.

    2014-06-01

    Liquid scintillator detector assemblies contain an inert nitrogen expansion volume to allow for expansion of the liquid with changing temperature. Measurements and Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations are performed to study the dependence of pulse height distribution shapes as a function of detector angle for two liquid scintillators assemblies filled with 97% organic-liquid cocktail and a 3% expansion volume. A 12.7-cm diameter by 12.7-cm long and a 7.6-cm diameter by 9.1-cm long EJ-309 liquid scintillator assemblies are investigated using a 137Cs gamma-ray source. Aside from the differences in dimensions, the detector assemblies also differed in the design of the active detector volume: there is no light guide in the 12.7-cm-diameter detector assembly, whereas the 7.6-cm-diameter detector contains a BK7 light guide between the scintillation liquid and optical coupling to the photomultiplier tube. Results for the 12.7-cm-diameter detector show a decrease in the position of the Compton edge ranges from 4% to 40% at detector orientations where the expansion volume exists between scintillating medium and the photomultiplier tube. Results for the 7.6-cm-diameter detector show that the position of the Compton edge is relatively unaffected at all detector orientations due to the presence of light guide.

  1. Analysis of Neutron and Photon Detection Position for the Calibration of Plastic (BC-420) and Liquid (BC-501) Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzi, S.A.

    2003-08-27

    This report presents the results of the neutron and photon calibration of a Bicron BC-420 plastic scintillator and a BC-501 liquid scintillator using a set of reference gamma sources and a Cf-252 source. The position of neutron and photon detection inside the scintillators as a function of energy is investigated by Monte Carlo simulation.

  2. Structural design of a high energy particle detector using liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Timothy John; /Minnesota U.

    1997-02-01

    This thesis presents a design for a 10,000 ton liquid scintillator neutrino detector being considered for the MINOS project at Fermilab. Details of designing, manufacturing, and assembling the active detector components are presented. The detector consists of 1080 magnetized steel absorber planes alternating with 1080 active detector planes. Each active plane is made up of plastic extrusions divided into nearly 400 cells for positional resolution. Life tests on the plastic extrusions determine their feasibility for containing the scintillator. The extrusions are sealed at the bottom, filled with liquid scintillator, and have an optical fiber running the entire length of each cell. The fibers terminate at the top of each extrusion in a manifold. An optical-fiber-light-guide connects the fibers in each manifold to a photo-detector. The photo-detector converts the light signals from the scintillator and optical fibers into electrical impulses for computer analysis.

  3. Characterizing Scitillation and Cherenkov Light Yield in Water-Based Liquid Scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, B. J.; Caravaca, J.; Descamps, F. B.; Orebi Gann, G. D.

    2016-03-01

    The recent development of Water-based Liquid Scintillator (WbLS) has made it possible to produce scintillating materials with highly tunable light yields and excellent optical clarity. This allows for a straightforward combination of the directional properties of Cherenkov light with the greater energy resolution afforded by the typically brighter scintillation light, which lends itself well to a broad program of neutrino physics. Here we explore the light yields and optical properties of WbLS materials in development for Theia (formerly ASDC) as measured in our benchtop Theia R&D at Berkeley Lab and extrapolate to larger detectors.

  4. A Highly Efficient Neutron Veto Using Boron-Loaded Liquid Scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.; Mosteiro, P.; Loer, B.; Calaprice, F.

    2011-04-27

    By surrounding a dark matter detector with a layer of boron-loaded liquid scintillator, a highly efficient neutron veto can be produced. In Monte Carlo studies, a one meter thick layer of scintillator has a veto efficiency greater than 99.5% for nuclear recoil events induced by radiogenic neutrons, and a veto efficiency of more than 95% for nuclear recoil events produced by cosmogenic neutrons. The use of boron-loaded scintillator both reduces the veto-induced dead time by decreasing the neutron capture time and allows high neutron detection efficiency to be achieved in a relatively compact geometry.

  5. A quick liquid scintillation counting technique for analysis of ⁹⁰Sr in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jeng-Jong

    2013-11-01

    In this study, to improve the problem of waiting for the growth of (90)Y for Cerenkov counting and save the time of (90)Sr analysis, an organic cocktail sample was counted by a liquid scintillation counting system immediately after the purification of (90)Sr without waiting for the growth of (90)Y. The chemical separation and the measurement procedures for (90)Sr radioactivity analysis can be completed in 24h. In order to verify the performance of the improved method, the activity of (90)Sr in six environmental reference samples was determined after radiochemical purification with a crown-ether resin column, and subsequent measurement by both the Cerenkov and the organic cocktail liquid scintillation counting methods. The results revealed that the organic cocktail liquid scintillation counting was quicker and had higher efficiency and lower minimum detectable activity (MDA) than the Cerenkov counting. PMID:23582495

  6. A study of the scintillation light induced in liquid xenon by electrons and alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, Elena; Mukherjee, Reshmi; Suzuki, Masayo

    1990-01-01

    The time dependence and the intensity of the primary scintillation light in liquid Xe excited by Am-241 alpha particles and Bi-207 internal-conversion electrons were measured at different electric-field strengths. High-purity liquid Xe was used to fill a parallel-plate ionization chamber equipped with a CaF2 window coupled to a UV-sensitive photomultiplier tube. The effect of the specific ionization density on the scintillation light and the time correlation between the light signal and the charge signal is reported. It is demonstrated that the fast scintillation signal produced in liquid Xe by an ionizing particle provides an ideal trigger in a detector aiming at a complete three-dimensional event reconstruction with an excellent background rejection capability.

  7. Development of a low background liquid scintillation counter for a shallow underground laboratory.

    PubMed

    Erchinger, J L; Aalseth, C E; Bernacki, B E; Douglas, M; Fuller, E S; Keillor, M E; Morley, S M; Mullen, C A; Orrell, J L; Panisko, M E; Warren, G A; Williams, R O; Wright, M E

    2015-11-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has recently opened a shallow underground laboratory intended for measurement of low-concentration levels of radioactive isotopes in samples collected from the environment. The development of a low-background liquid scintillation counter is currently underway to further augment the measurement capabilities within this underground laboratory. Liquid scintillation counting is especially useful for measuring charged particle (e.g., β and α) emitting isotopes with no (or very weak) gamma-ray yields. The combination of high-efficiency detection of charged particle emission in a liquid scintillation cocktail coupled with the low-background environment of an appropriately designed shield located in a clean underground laboratory provides the opportunity for increased-sensitivity measurements of a range of isotopes. To take advantage of the 35m-water-equivalent overburden of the underground laboratory, a series of simulations have evaluated the scintillation counter's shield design requirements to assess the possible background rate achievable. This report presents the design and background evaluation for a shallow underground, low background liquid scintillation counter design for sample measurements. PMID:26334781

  8. Measurement of neutron dose with an organic liquid scintillator coupled with a spectrum weight function.

    PubMed

    Kim, E; Endo, A; Yamaguchi, Y; Yoshizawa, M; Nakamura, T

    2002-01-01

    A dose evaluation method for neutrons in the energy range of a few MeV to 100 MeV has been developed using a spectrum weight function (G-function), which is applied to an organic liquid scintillator of 12.7 cm in diameter and 12.7 cm in length. The G-function that converts the pulse height spectrum of the scintillator into the ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), was calculated by an unfolding method using successive approximation of the response function of the scintillator and the ambient dose equivalent per unit neutron fluence (H*(10) conversion coefficients) of ICRP 74. To verify the response function of the scintillator and the value of H*(10) evaluated by the G-function. pulse height spectra of the scintillator were measured in some different neutron fields, which have continuous energy, monoenergetic and quasi-monoenergetic spectra. Values of H*(10) estimated using the G-function and pulse height spectra of the scintillator were compared with those calculated using neutron energy spectra. These doses agreed with each other. From the results, it was concluded that H*(10) can be evaluated directly from the pulse height spectrum of the scintillator by applying the G-function proposed in this study. PMID:12212900

  9. Attempt to determine the environmental 36Cl concentration in water by liquid scintillation counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florkowski, T.; Schuszler, Ch.

    1986-11-01

    A low-background liquid scintillation spectrometer (ALOKA SL-1) located in the IAEA Isotope Hydrology Laboratory in Vienna was used for 36Cl activity measurement in water samples. The procedure of sample preparation consists of synthesizing of silicon tetrachloride or sodium chloride followed by purification. In both cases the limiting factor in the analysis appeared to be the pure reproducibility of the sample preparation procedure. The conclusion from these experiments is that the liquid scintillation method could be feasible only for the identification of the "bomb chlorine" but is far from being suitable for the accurate determination of 36Cl in groundwater for dating purposes.

  10. Direct measurement of carbon-14 in carbon dioxide by liquid scintillation counting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horrocks, D. L.

    1969-01-01

    Liquid scintillation counting technique is applied to the direct measurement of carbon-14 in carbon dioxide. This method has high counting efficiency and eliminates many of the basic problems encountered with previous techniques. The technique can be used to achieve a percent substitution reaction and is of interest as an analytical technique.

  11. Liquid scintillator for 2D dosimetry for high-energy photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Poenisch, Falk; Archambault, Louis; Briere, Tina Marie; Sahoo, Narayan; Mohan, Radhe; Beddar, Sam; Gillin, Michael T.

    2009-05-15

    Complex radiation therapy techniques require dosimetric verification of treatment planning and delivery. The authors investigated a liquid scintillator (LS) system for application for real-time high-energy photon beam dosimetry. The system was comprised of a transparent acrylic tank filled with liquid scintillating material, an opaque outer tank, and a CCD camera. A series of images was acquired when the tank with liquid scintillator was irradiated with a 6 MV photon beam, and the light data measured with the CCD camera were filtered to correct for scattering of the optical light inside the liquid scintillator. Depth-dose and lateral profiles as well as two-dimensional (2D) dose distributions were found to agree with results from the treatment planning system. Further, the corrected light output was found to be linear with dose, dose rate independent, and is robust for single or multiple acquisitions. The short time needed for image acquisition and processing could make this system ideal for fast verification of the beam characteristics of the treatment machine. This new detector system shows a potential usefulness of the LS for 2D QA.

  12. Development of a low background liquid scintillation counter for a shallow underground laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Erchinger, Jennifer L.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Douglas, Matthew; Fuller, Erin S.; Keillor, Martin E.; Morley, Shannon M.; Mullen, Crystal A.; Orrell, John L.; Panisko, Mark E.; Warren, Glen A.; Williams, Russell O.; Wright, Michael E.

    2015-08-20

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has recently opened a shallow underground laboratory intended for measurement of lowconcentration levels of radioactive isotopes in samples collected from the environment. The development of a low-background liquid scintillation counter is currently underway to further augment the measurement capabilities within this underground laboratory. Liquid scintillation counting is especially useful for measuring charged particle (e.g., B, a) emitting isotopes with no (orvery weak) gamma-ray yields. The combination of high-efficiency detection of charged particle emission in a liquid scintillation cocktail coupled with the low-background environment of an appropriately-designed shield located in a clean underground laboratory provides the opportunity for increased-sensitivity measurements of a range of isotopes. To take advantage of the 35-meter water-equivalent overburden of the underground laboratory, a series of simulations have evaluated the instrumental shield design requirements to assess the possible background rate achievable. This report presents the design and background evaluation for a shallow underground, low background liquid scintillation counter design for sample measurements.

  13. Effect of quench on alpha/beta pulse shape discrimination of liquid scintillation cocktails.

    PubMed

    DeVol, Timothy A; Theisen, Christopher D; DiPrete, David P

    2007-05-01

    The objectives of this paper are (1) to illustrate that knowledge of the external quench parameter is insufficient to properly setup a pulse shape discriminating liquid scintillation counter (LSC) for quantitative measurement, (2) to illustrate dependence on pulse shape discrimination on the radionuclide (more than just radiation and energy), and (3) to compare the pulse shape discrimination (PSD) of two commercial instruments. The effects various quenching agents, liquid scintillation cocktails, radionuclides, and LSCs have on alpha/beta pulse shape discriminating liquid scintillation counting were quantified. Alpha emitting radionuclides (239)Pu and (241)Am and beta emitter (90)Sr/(90)Y were investigated to quantify the nuclide dependence on alpha/beta pulse shape discrimination. Also, chemical and color quenching agents, nitromethane, nitric acid, and yellow dye impact on alpha/beta pulse shape discrimination using PerkinElmer Optiphase "HiSafe" 2 and 3, and Ultima Gold AB liquid scintillation cocktails were determined. The prepared samples were counted on the PerkinElmer Wallac WinSpectral 1414 alpha/beta pulse shape discriminating LSC. It was found that for the same level of quench, as measured by the external quench parameter, different quench agents influenced the pulse shape discrimination and the pulse shape discrimination parameters differently. The radionuclide also affects alpha/beta pulse shape discrimination. By comparison with the PerkinElmer Tri-carb 3150 TR/AB, the Wallac 1414 exhibited better pulse shape discrimination capability under the same experimental conditions. PMID:17440321

  14. Determination of 226Ra and 224Ra in drinking waters by liquid scintillation counting.

    PubMed

    Manjón, G; Vioque, I; Moreno, H; García-Tenorio, R; García-León, M

    1997-04-01

    A method for the determination of Ra-isotopes in water samples has been developed. Ra is coprecipitated with Ba as sulphate. The precipitate is then dissolved with EDTA and counted with a liquid scintillation system after mixing with a scintillation cocktail. The study of the temporal evolution of the separated activity gives the isotopic composition of the sample, i.e. the 224Ra and 226Ra contribution to the total activity. The method has been applied to some Spanish drinking waters. PMID:9106993

  15. Searching for dark matter annihilation to monoenergetic neutrinos with liquid scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, J.; Sandick, P.

    2015-06-22

    We consider searches for dark matter annihilation to monoenergetic neutrinos in the core of the Sun. We find that liquid scintillation neutrino detectors have enhanced sensitivity to this class of dark matter models, due to the energy and angular resolution possible for electron neutrinos and antineutrinos that scatter via charged-current interactions. In particular we find that KamLAND, utilizing existing data, could provide better sensitivity to such models than any current direct detection experiment for m{sub X}≲15 Gev. KamLAND’s sensitivity is signal-limited, and future liquid scintillation or liquid argon detectors with similar energy and angular resolution, but with larger exposure, will provide significantly better sensitivity. These detectors may be particularly powerful probes of dark matter with mass O(10) GeV.

  16. Low-Afterglow, High-Refractive-Index Liquid Scintillators for Fast-Neutron Spectrometry and Imaging Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauck, Ronald; Brandis, Michal; Bromberger, Benjamin; Dangendorf, Volker; Goldberg, Mark B.; Mor, Ilan; Tittelmeier, Kai; Vartsky, David

    2009-06-01

    For ion and neutron spectrometry and imaging applications at a high intensity pulsed laser facility, fast liquid scintillators with very low afterglow are required. Furthermore, neutron imaging with fiber (or liquid-core) capillary arrays calls for scintillation materials with high refractive index. To this end, we have examined various combinations of established mixtures of fluors and solvents, that were enriched alternatively with nitrogen or oxygen. Dissolved molecular oxygen is known to be a highly effective quenching agent, that efficiently suppresses the population of the triplet states in the fluor, which are primarily responsible for the afterglow. For measuring the glow curves of scintillators, we have employed the time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) technique, characterized by high dynamic range of several orders of magnitude in light intensity. In this paper we outline the application for the fast scintillators, briefly present the scintillation mechanism in liquids, describe our specific TCSPC method and discuss the results.

  17. Development and Operation of a Liquid Scintillator Purification System for a Solar Neutrino Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Benziger, J. B.; Calaprice, F. P.; Darnton, N.; Johnson, M.; Loeser, F.; Vogelaar, R. B.

    1996-10-01

    An on-line purification system for a large-scale, liquid scintillator detector has been developed for the Counting Test Facility (CTF), a five-ton prototype of the Borexino solar neutrino detector at Gran Sasso. This purification system was operated to remove radioactive impurities from the pseudocumene-based scintillator in the CTF. Counter-current water extraction was performed to remove ionic impurities from the scintillator. Notably, the radon daughters ^210Bi and ^210Po were identified prior to purification and were successfully removed by water extraction. Vacuum distillation of the entire scintillator mixture allowed high radiopurity and chemical purity to be maintained; in addtion, it enabled a test of the origin of ^14C in the scintillator mixture to be performed. Finally, nitrogen stripping was utilized to remove noble gas radioactive isotopes, such as ^85Kr and ^222Rn. The results of the CTF purification activities and an overview of the purification scheme for the Borexino solar neutrino experiment will be presented.

  18. Evaluation of the ultrasonic method for solubilizing Daphnia magna before liquid scintillation counting

    SciTech Connect

    Dauble, D.D.; Hanf, R.W. Jr.; Carlile, D.W.

    1984-11-01

    Adult Daphnia magna were exposed to /sup 14/C-labeled phenol and tissues analyzed for /sup 14/C uptake by three methods: (1) tissue solubilizer, (2) tissue solubilizer plus sonication, and (3) sonication alone. Analysis by liquid scintillation counting revealed that measurements of total activity among treatments were not significantly different (..cap alpha.. less than or equal to 0.10) at two count levels. Sonicated samples showed less variation than tissue samples that were solubilized. 5 references, 1 table.

  19. The 90 ton liquid scintillation detector in the Mont Blanc Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badino, G.; Bologna, G.; Castagnoli, C.; Fulgione, W.; Galeotti, P.; Saavedra, O.; Dadykin, V. L.; Korchagin, V. B.; Korchagin, P. V.; Malgin, A. S.

    1984-12-01

    The authors discuss the results from calibrating liquid scintillation counters (1.5 m3 each) used in the large-volume neutrino experiment in the Mont Blanc Laboratory. The electronic and recording systems from the 72 counters of the detector are described, and the method to detect low-energy γ pulses from (n,p) reaction by using 252Cf as a neutron source is discussed.

  20. The research program of the Liquid Scintillation Detector (LSD) in the Mont Blanc Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dadykin, V. L.; Yakushev, V. F.; Korchagin, P. V.; Korchagin, V. B.; Malgin, A. S.; Ryassny, F. G.; Ryazhskaya, O. G.; Talochkin, V. P.; Zatsepin, G. T.; Badino, G.

    1985-01-01

    A massive (90 tons) liquid scintillation detector (LSD) has been running since October 1984 in the Mont Blanc Laboratory at a depth of 5,200 hg/sq cm of standard rock. The research program of the experiment covers a variety of topics in particle physics and astrophysics. The performance of the detector, the main fields of research are presented and the preliminary results are discussed.

  1. Solar neutrino interactions with liquid scintillators used for double beta-decay experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, Hiroyasu; Zuber, Kai

    2016-08-01

    Solar neutrinos interact within double-beta-decay (DBD) detectors and hence will contribute to backgrounds (BGs) for DBD experiments. Background contributions due to solar neutrinos are evaluated for their interactions with atomic electrons and nuclei in liquid scintillation detectors used for DBD experiments. They are shown to be serious BGs for high-sensitivity DBD experiments to search for the Majorana neutrino masses in the inverted and normal hierarchy regions.

  2. Development of an Ultra-Low Background Liquid Scintillation Counter for Trace Level Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Erchinger, Jennifer L.; Orrell, John L.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Douglas, Matthew; Finn, Erin C.; Fuller, Erin S.; Keillor, Martin E.; Morley, Shannon M.; Mullen, Crystal A.; Panisko, Mark E.; Shaff, Sarah M.; Warren, Glen A.; Wright, Michael E.

    2015-09-01

    Low-level liquid scintillation counting (LSC) has been established as one of the radiation detection techniques useful in elucidating environmental processes and environmental monitoring around nuclear facilities. The Ultra-Low Background Liquid Scintillation Counter (ULB-LSC) under construction in the Shallow Underground Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory aims to further reduce the MDAs and/or required sample processing. Through layers of passive shielding in conjunction with an active veto and 30 meters water equivalent overburden, the background reduction is expected to be 10 to 100 times below typical analytic low-background liquid scintillation systems. Simulations have shown an expected background of around 14 counts per day. A novel approach to the light collection will use a coated hollow light guide cut into the inner copper shielding. Demonstration LSC measurements will show low-energy detection, spectral deconvolution, and alpha/beta discrimination capabilities, from trials with standards of tritium, strontium-90, and actinium-227, respectively. An overview of the system design and expected demonstration measurements will emphasize the potential applications of the ULB-LSC in environmental monitoring for treaty verification, reach-back sample analysis, and facility inspections.

  3. ZICOS - New project for neutrinoless double beta decay experiment using zirconium complex in liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    A liquid scintillator containing a tetrakis (isopropyl acetoacetato) zirconium has been developed for new project of neutrinoless double beta decay experiment (ZICOS experiment). We have synthesized a tetrakis (isopropyl acetoacetato) zirconium, which have high solubility (over 31.2 wt.%) in anisole. We measured the performance of liquid scintillator containing 10 wt.% concentration of a tetrakis (isopropyl acetoacetato) zirconium, and obtained 48.7 ± 7.1% of the light yield of BC505 and the energy resolution of 4.1 ± 0.6% at 3.35 MeV assuming 40% photo coverage of the photomultiplier, respectively. We also estimated that ZICOS experiment should be sensitive to (mν) < 0.1 eV assuming gA = 1.25, gpp = 1.11 and QRPA model, if a radius of the inner detector is 1.5 m and the detector is filled with this liquid scintillator with an enriched 96Zr nucleus and we can reduce 208 Tl backgrounds to be one tenth order of magnitude of KamLAND-Zen using Cherenkov lights.

  4. Design of a Low Background Liquid Scintillation Counter for a Shallow Underground Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orrell, John; Aalseth, Craig; Bernacki, Bruce; Douglas, Matt; Erchinger, Jennifer; Fuller, Erin; Keillor, Martin; Morley, Shannon; Mullen, Crystal; Panisko, Mark; Shaff, Sarah; Warren, Glen; Wright, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory operates a 35-meter water-equivalent overburden, shallow underground laboratory for measuring low-concentration radioactive isotopes in environmental samples collected. A low-background liquid scintillation counter is under development. Liquid scintillation counting is useful for beta-emitting isotopes without (or low) gamma ray yields. The high-efficiency beta detection in a liquid scintillation cocktail coupled with the low-background environment of a shield located in a clean underground laboratory provides for increased-sensitivity measurements to a range of isotopes. Benchmarked simulations have evaluated the shield design requirements to assess the background rate achievable. Assay of shield construction materials provides the basis for the shield design development. The low background design is informed by efforts in experimental design of neutrinoless double beta decay experiments, direct detection dark matter experiments, and low energy neutrino detection experiments. In this vein a background budget for the instrument is presented with attention to low background methods directed toward applications of nuclear measurements.

  5. Neutron emission measurement at the HL-2A tokamak device with a liquid scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Xufei; Chen, Zhongjing; Peng, Xingyu; Yuan, Xi; Zhang, Xing; Cui, Zhiqiang; Du, Tengfei; Hu, Zhimeng; Li, Tao; Fan, Tieshuan Chen, Jinxiang; Li, Xiangqing; Zhang, Guohui; Gorini, Giuseppe; Yuan, Guoliang; Yang, Jinwei; Yang, Qingwei

    2014-10-15

    Neutron emission measurement at the HL-2A tokamak device with a liquid scintillation detector is described. The detector was placed at a location with little structure material in the field of view, and equipped with a gain monitoring system which could provide the possibility to evaluate the gain variation as well as to correct for the detector response. Time trace of the neutron emissivity was obtained and it was consistent with the result of a standard {sup 235}U fission chamber. During the plasma discharge the neutron yield could vary by about four orders of magnitude and the fluctuation of the detector gain was up to about 6%. Pulse height spectrum of the liquid scintillation detector was constructed and corrected with the aid of the gain monitoring system, and the correction was found to be essential for the assessment of the neutron energy spectrum. This successful measurement offered experience and confidence for the application of liquid scintillation detectors in the upcoming neutron camera system.

  6. Simple algorithms for digital pulse-shape discrimination with liquid scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharbi, T.

    2015-01-01

    The development of compact, battery-powered digital liquid scintillation neutron detection systems for field applications requires digital pulse processing (DPP) algorithms with minimum computational overhead. To meet this demand, two DPP algorithms for the discrimination of neutron and γ-rays with liquid scintillation detectors were developed and examined by using a NE213 liquid scintillation detector in a mixed radiation field. The first algorithm is based on the relation between the amplitude of a current pulse at the output of a photomultiplier tube and the amount of charge contained in the pulse. A figure-of-merit (FOM) value of 0.98 with 450 keVee (electron equivalent energy) energy threshold was achieved with this method when pulses were sampled at 250 MSample/s and with 8-bit resolution. Compared to the similar method of charge-comparison this method requires only a single integration window, thereby reducing the amount of computations by approximately 40%. The second approach is a digital version of the trailing-edge constant-fraction discrimination method. A FOM value of 0.84 with an energy threshold of 450 keVee was achieved with this method. In comparison with the similar method of rise-time discrimination this method requires a single time pick-off, thereby reducing the amount of computations by approximately 50%. The algorithms described in this work are useful for developing portable detection systems for applications such as homeland security, radiation dosimetry and environmental monitoring.

  7. Probing the Earth’s interior with a large-volume liquid scintillator detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochmuth, Kathrin A.; Feilitzsch, Franz V.; Fields, Brian D.; Undagoitia, Teresa Marrodán; Oberauer, Lothar; Potzel, Walter; Raffelt, Georg G.; Wurm, Michael

    2007-02-01

    A future large-volume liquid scintillator detector would provide a high-statistics measurement of terrestrial antineutrinos originating from β-decays of the uranium and thorium chains. In addition, the forward displacement of the neutron in the detection reaction ν+p→n+e provides directional information. We investigate the requirements on such detectors to distinguish between certain geophysical models on the basis of the angular dependence of the geoneutrino flux. Our analysis is based on a Monte-Carlo simulation with different levels of light yield, considering both unloaded and gadolinium-loaded scintillators. We find that a 50 kt detector such as the proposed LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) will detect deviations from isotropy of the geoneutrino flux significantly. However, with an unloaded scintillator the time needed for a useful discrimination between different geophysical models is too large if one uses the directional information alone. A Gd-loaded scintillator improves the situation considerably, although a 50 kt detector would still need several decades to distinguish between a geophysical reference model and one with a large neutrino source in the Earth’s core. However, a high-statistics measurement of the total geoneutrino flux and its spectrum still provides an extremely useful glance at the Earth’s interior.

  8. Recent Developments In Fast Neutron Detection And Multiplicity Counting With Verification With Liquid Scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Nakae, L; Chapline, G; Glenn, A; Kerr, P; Kim, K; Ouedraogo, S; Prasad, M; Sheets, S; Snyderman, N; Verbeke, J; Wurtz, R

    2011-09-30

    For many years at LLNL, we have been developing time-correlated neutron detection techniques and algorithms for applications such as Arms Control, Threat Detection and Nuclear Material Assay. Many of our techniques have been developed specifically for the relatively low efficiency (a few percent) attainable by detector systems limited to man-portability. Historically, we used thermal neutron detectors (mainly {sup 3}He), taking advantage of the high thermal neutron interaction cross-sections. More recently, we have been investigating the use of fast neutron detection with liquid scintillators, inorganic crystals, and in the near future, pulse-shape discriminating plastics which respond over 1000 times faster (nanoseconds versus tens of microseconds) than thermal neutron detectors. Fast neutron detection offers considerable advantages, since the inherent nanosecond production time-scales of spontaneous fission and neutron-induced fission are preserved and measured instead of being lost by thermalization required for thermal neutron detectors. We are now applying fast neutron technology to the safeguards regime in the form of fast portable digital electronics as well as faster and less hazardous scintillator formulations. Faster detector response times and sensitivity to neutron momentum show promise for measuring, differentiating, and assaying samples that have modest to very high count rates, as well as mixed fission sources like Cm and Pu. We report on measured results with our existing liquid scintillator array, and progress on the design of a nuclear material assay system that incorporates fast neutron detection, including the surprising result that fast liquid scintillator detectors become competitive and even surpass the precision of {sup 3}He-based counters measuring correlated pairs in modest (kg) samples of plutonium.

  9. Recent Developments in Fast Neutron Detection and Multiplicity Counting with Liquid Scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakae, L. F.; Chapline, G. F.; Glenn, A. M.; Kerr, P. L.; Kim, K. S.; Ouedraogo, S. A.; Prasad, M. K.; Sheets, S. A.; Snyderman, N. J.; Verbeke, J. M.; Wurtz, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    For many years, LLNL researchers have been developing time-correlated neutron detection techniques and algorithms for applications such as Arms Control, Threat Detection and Nuclear Material Assay. Many of the techniques have been developed specifically for the relatively low efficiency (a few percent) attainable by detector systems limited to man-portability. Historically, thermal neutron detectors (mainly 3He) were used, taking advantage of the high thermal neutron interaction cross sections. More recently, we have been investigating the use of fast neutron detection with liquid scintillators, inorganic crystals, and in the near future, pulse-shape discriminating plastics that respond over 1000 times faster (ns versus tens of μs) than thermal neutron detectors. Fast neutron detection offers considerable advantages since the inherent ns production timescales of spontaneous fission and neutron-induced fission are preserved and measured instead of being lost by thermalization required for thermal neutron detectors. We are now applying fast neutron technology to the safeguards regime in the form of fast portable digital electronics as well as faster and less hazardous scintillator formulations. Faster detector response times and sensitivity to neutron momentum show promise for measuring, differentiating, and assaying samples that have modest to very high count rates, as well as mixed fission sources like Cm and Pu. We report on measured results with our existing liquid scintillator array and progress on the design of a nuclear material assay system that incorporates fast neutron detection, including the surprising result that fast liquid scintillator detectors become competitive and even surpass the precision of 3He-based counters measuring correlated pairs in modest (kg) samples of plutonium.

  10. Recent Developments in Neutron Detection and Multiplicity Counting with Liquid Scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Nakae, L F; Kerr, P L; Newby, R J; Prasad, M K; Rowland, M S; Snyderman, N J; Verbeke, J M; Wurtz, R E

    2010-01-07

    For many years at LLNL we have been developing time-correlated neutron detection techniques and algorithms for many applications including Arms Control, Threat Detection and Nuclear Material Assaying. Many of our techniques have been developed specifically for relatively low efficiency (a few %) inherent in the man-portable systems. Historically we used thermal neutron detectors (mainly {sup 3}He) taking advantage of the high thermal neutron interaction cross-sections but more recently we have been investigating fast neutron detection with liquid scintillators and inorganic crystals. We have discovered considerable detection advantages with fast neutron detection as the inherent nano-second production time-scales of fission and neutron induced fission are preserved instead of being lost in neutron thermalization required for thermal neutron detectors. We are now applying fast neutron technology (new fast and portable digital electronics as well as new faster and less hazardous scintillator formulations) to the safeguards regime and faster detector response times and neutron momentum sensitivity show promise in measuring, differentiating and assaying samples that have very high count rates as well as mixed fission sources (e.g. Cm and Pu). We report on measured results with our existing liquid scintillator array and progress on design of nuclear material assaying system that incorporates fast neutron detection.

  11. Evidence of delayed light emission of tetraphenyl-butadiene excited by liquid-argon scintillation light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segreto, E.

    2015-03-01

    Tetraphenyl-butadiene is the wavelength shifter most widely used in combination with liquid argon. The latter emits scintillation photons with a wavelength of 127 nm that need to be downshifted to be detected by photomultipliers with glass or quartz windows. Tetraphenyl-butadiene has been demonstrated to have an extremely high conversion efficiency, possibly higher than 100% for 127 nm photons, while there is no precise information about the time dependence of its emission. It is usually assumed to be exponentially decaying with a characteristic time of the order of one ns, as an extrapolation from measurements with exciting radiation in the near UV. This work shows that tetraphenyl-butadiene, when excited by 127 nm photons, re-emits photons not only with a very short decay time, but also with slower ones due to triplet states de-excitations. This fact can strongly contribute to clarifying the anomalies in liquid-argon scintillation light reported in the literature since the 1970s, namely, the inconsistency in the measured values of the long decay time constant and the appearance of an intermediate component. Similar effects should be also expected when the TPB is used in combination with helium and neon, which emit scintillation photons with wavelengths shorter than 127 nm.

  12. Preliminary study of light yield dependence on LAB liquid scintillator composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xing-Chen; Yu, Bo-Xiang; Zhou, Xiang; Zhao, Li; Ding, Ya-Yun; Liu, Meng-Chao; Ding, Xue-Feng; Zhang, Xuan; Jie, Quan-Lin; Zhou, Li; Fang, Jian; Chen, Hai-Tao; Hu, Wei; Niu, Shun-Li; Yan, Jia-Qing; Zhao, Hang; Hong, Dao-Jin

    2015-09-01

    Liquid scintillator (LS) will be adopted as the detector material in JUNO (Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory). The energy resolution requirement of JUNO is 3%, which has never previously been reached. To achieve this energy resolution, the light yield of liquid scintillator is an important factor. PPO (the fluor) and bis-MSB (the wavelength shifter) are the two main materials dissolved in LAB. To study the influence of these two materials on the transmission of scintillation photons in LS, 25 and 12 cm-long quartz vessels were used in a light yield experiment. LS samples with different concentration of PPO and bis-MSB were tested. At these lengths, the light yield growth is not obvious when the concentration of PPO is higher than 4 g/L. The influence from bis-MSB becomes insignificant when its concentration is higher than 8 mg/L. This result could provide some useful suggestions for the JUNO LS. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA10010500), National Natural Science Foundation of China (11390384) and CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP)

  13. Spectroscopic study of light scattering in linear alkylbenzene for liquid scintillator neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Qian; Han, Junbo; Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Xuan; Ding, Yayun; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhou, Li; Cao, Jun; Wang, Yifang

    2015-11-01

    We have set up a light scattering spectrometer to study the depolarization of light scattering in linear alkylbenzene. The scattering spectra show that the depolarized part of light scattering is due to Rayleigh scattering. The additional depolarized Rayleigh scattering can make the effective transparency of linear alkylbenzene much better than expected. Therefore, sufficient scintillation photons can transmit through large liquid scintillator detector, such as that of the JUNO experiment. Our study is crucial to achieving an unprecedented energy resolution of 3 %/√{E{(MeV)}} required for the JUNO experiment to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. The spectroscopic method can also be used to examine the depolarization of other organic solvents used in neutrino experiments.

  14. Coil spring conveyor for positioning an external radioactive standard in a liquid scintillation counter

    SciTech Connect

    Kampf, R.S.

    1986-03-04

    This patent describes a liquid scintillation counter having a counting chamber for receiving a liquid sample containing a liquid scintillator and a sample of a radioactive substance to be counted. An improved apparatus is described for positioning a radioactive source in an operating location to irradiate the liquid sample in the counting chamber comprising the combination of: (1) a flexible conveyor including an elongate, generally tubular coil spring section having an interior tubular bore configured to receive the radioactive source; (2) means for retaining the radioactive source in a predetermined axial position within the coil spring; (3) means supporting the coil spring for movement along a conveyor path between a storage location for the radioactive source remote from the counting chamber and an operating location for the radioactive source proximate the counting chamber; and (4) drive means coupled to the coil spring and operative to drive the coil spring along the conveyor path for conveying the radioactive source between the storage and operating locations.

  15. A large-scale low-background liquid scintillation detector: the counting test facility at Gran Sasso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimonti, G.; Arpesella, C.; Bacchiocchi, G.; Balata, M.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bonetti, S.; Brigatti, A.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F. P.; Cavaletti, R.; Cecchet, G.; Chen, M.; Darnton, N.; Debari, A.; Deutsch, M.; Elisei, F.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Galbiati, C.; Garagiola, A.; Gatti, F.; Giammarchi, M. G.; Giugni, D.; Goldbrunner, T.; Golubchikov, A.; Goretti, A.; Grabar, S.; Hagner, T.; Hartmann, F.; von Hentig, R.; Heusser, G.; Ianni, A.; Jochum, J.; Johnson, M.; Laubenstein, M.; Loeser, F.; Lombardi, P.; Magni, S.; Malvezzi, S.; Manno, I.; Manuzio, G.; Masetti, F.; Mazzucato, U.; Meroni, E.; Neff, M.; Nisi, S.; Nostro, A.; Oberauer, L.; Perotti, A.; Preda, A.; Raghavan, P.; Raghavan, R. S.; Ranucci, G.; Resconi, E.; Ruscitti, P.; Scardaoni, R.; Schoenert, S.; Smirnov, O.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Ullucci, P.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Vitale, S.; Zaimidoroga, O.

    1998-02-01

    A 4.8 m3 unsegmented liquid scintillation detector at the underground Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso has shown the feasibility of multi-ton low-background detectors operating to energies as low as 250 keV. Detector construction and the handling of large volumes of liquid scintillator to minimize the background are described. The scintillator, 1.5 g PPO/L-pseudocumene, is held in a flexible nylon vessel shielded by 1000 t of purified water. The active detector volume is viewed by 100 photomultipliers, which measure time and charge for each event, from which energy, position and pulse shape are deduced. On-line purification of the scintillator by water extraction, vacuum distillation and nitrogen stripping removed radioactive impurities. Upper limits were established of < 10-7 Bq/kg-scintillator for events with energies 250 keV < E < 800 keV, and < 10-9 Bq/kg-scintillator due to the decay products of uranium and thorium. The isotopic abundance of 14C/12C in the scintillator was shown to be approximately 10-18 by extending the energy window of the detector to 25-250 keV. The 14C abundance and uranium and thorium levels in the CTF are compatible with the Borexino Solar Neutrino Experiment.

  16. Scintillation photon detection in liquid argon at the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Bruce; Adams, Brice; Baugh, Brian; Buchanan, Norm; Bugel, Len; Conrad, Janet; Davis, Ronald; Gebhard, Mark; Lang, Michael; Miner, Bill; Mufson, Stuart; Musser, James; Pordes, Stephen; Rebel, Brian; Smith, Paul; Toups, Matt; Urheim, Jon; Warner, David; Wongjirad, Taritree; Whittington, Denver

    2015-04-01

    The proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) aims to answer outstanding questions relating to neutrino physics and other phenomena, such as proton decay and supernova neutrinos. The proposed far detector design calls for a multi-kiloton liquid argon time-projection chamber at a long baseline. In addition to its utility as a target material, liquid argon scintillates in the far UV, providing further physics information and serving as a trigger for non-beam events. The photon detection system in development for the LBNF far detector includes a mechanism for capturing and transporting the light, a method to detect the photons (silicon photomultipliers), and the necessary readout electronics. Testing in liquid argon has occurred at the ``TallBo'' facility at Fermilab to characterize and compare the performance of these systems. In this talk, we present the details of these photon detection systems and the latest results of testing.

  17. Development of deep-UV sensitive MPPC for liquid xenon scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootani, W.; Ieki, K.; Iwamoto, T.; Kaneko, D.; Mori, T.; Nakaura, S.; Nishimura, M.; Ogawa, S.; Sawada, R.; Shibata, N.; Uchiyama, Y.; Yoshida, K.; Sato, K.; Yamada, R.

    2015-07-01

    The liquid xenon (LXe) γ-ray detector for the MEG II experiment is based on a highly granular scintillation readout with Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPCs). Here we report on the development of a large-area MPPC sensitive to LXe scintillation light in deep-UV range for the MEG II LXe detector. A prototype model of the deep-UV MPPC with an active area of 12 × 12mm2 was successfully tested in LXe, showing an excellent performance such as a high photon detection efficiency for the LXe scintillation light (about 20% at ΔV = 2.5 V), a high internal gain (about 106 at ΔV = 2.5 V) and an excellent single photoelectron resolution. The sensor chip of the MPPC is segmented into four sectors, which are then connected in series in order to reduce the overall sensor capacitance. The signal fall time of about 135 ns for the non-segmented sensor was significantly reduced down to 25 ns with the series-connected sensor segments. The preliminary results on the performance of the deep-UV MPPC are presented.

  18. Prompt directional detection of galactic supernova by combining large liquid scintillator neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, V.; Chirac, T.; Lasserre, T.; Volpe, C.; Cribier, M.; Durero, M.; Gaffiot, J.; Houdy, T.; Letourneau, A.; Mention, G.; Pequignot, M.; Sibille, V.; Vivier, M.

    2015-08-01

    Core-collapse supernovae produce an intense burst of electron antineutrinos in the few-tens-of-MeV range. Several Large Liquid Scintillator-based Detectors (LLSD) are currently operated worldwide, being very effective for low energy antineutrino detection through the Inverse Beta Decay (IBD) process. In this article, we develop a procedure for the prompt extraction of the supernova location by revisiting the details of IBD kinematics over the broad energy range of supernova neutrinos. Combining all current scintillator-based detector, we show that one can locate a canonical supernova at 10 kpc with an accuracy of 45 degrees (68% C.L.). After the addition of the next generation of scintillator-based detectors, the accuracy could reach 12 degrees (68% C.L.), therefore reaching the performances of the large water Čerenkov neutrino detectors. We also discuss a possible improvement of the SuperNova Early Warning System (SNEWS) inter-experiment network with the implementation of a directionality information in each experiment. Finally, we discuss the possibility to constrain the neutrino energy spectrum as well as the mass of the newly born neutron star with the LLSD data.

  19. Expected performance of an ideal liquid argon neutrino detector with enhanced sensitivity to scintillation light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorel, M.

    2014-10-01

    Scintillation light is used in liquid argon (LAr) neutrino detectors to provide a trigger signal, veto information against cosmic rays, and absolute event timing. In this work, we discuss additional opportunities offered by detectors with enhanced sensitivity to scintillation light, that is with light collection efficiencies of about 10-3. We focus on two key detector performance indicators for neutrino oscillation physics: calorimetric neutrino energy reconstruction and neutrino/antineutrino separation in a non-magnetized detector. Our results are based on detailed simulations, with neutrino interactions modelled according to the GENIE event generator, while the charge and light responses of a large LAr ideal detector are described by the Geant4 and NEST simulation tools. A neutrino energy resolution as good as 3.3% RMS for 4 GeV electron neutrino charged-current interactions can in principle be obtained in a large detector of this type, by using both charge and light information. By exploiting muon capture in argon and scintillation light information to veto muon decay electrons, we also obtain muon neutrino identification efficiencies of about 50%, and muon antineutrino misidentification rates at the few percent level, for few-GeV neutrino interactions that are fully contained. We argue that the construction of large LAr detectors with sufficiently high light collection efficiencies is in principle possible.

  20. The determination of low levels of cobalt-60 in environmental waters by liquid scintillation counting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Claassen, H.C.

    1970-01-01

    A method for determination of cobalt-60 in waters at levels greater than 0.5 pCi per sample is presented. A modification of the method may be used to analyze fluvial sediments and soils. After the cobalt has been separated, first as the hydroxide and then as the thiocyanate complex in methyl isobutyl ketone, it is counted in a liquid scintillation system at 80% efficiency. Separation factors achieved for six isotopes are generally greater than 2,000. The time for a single analysis, exclusive of the counting and evaporation operations, is about 2 h. ?? 1970.

  1. A rope-net support system for the liquid scintillator detector for the SNO+ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialek, A.; Chen, M.; Cleveland, B.; Gorel, P.; Hallin, A.; Harvey, P. J.; Heise, J.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C. B.; Lawson, I.; Ng, C. J.; Pinkney, B.; Rogowsky, D. M.; Sibley, L.; Soluk, R.; Soukup, J.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.

    2016-08-01

    The detector for the SNO+ experiment consists of 780 000 kg of liquid scintillator contained in an acrylic vessel that is surrounded by water. A mechanical system has been installed to counteract the 1.25 MN of buoyant force on the acrylic and prevent the vessel from moving. The system is a rope net, designed using a Finite Element Analysis to calculate the amount of stress on the acrylic induced by the ropes, hydrostatic pressures and gravity. A dedicated test was performed to measure strains in the acrylic arising from the complex geometry of the knots in the rope system. The ratio between measured and FEA calculated strains was 1.3.

  2. Measurement of liquid scintillation sources of (210)Pb obtained from (222)Rn decay.

    PubMed

    Antohe, A; Sahagia, M; Luca, A; Ioan, M-R; Ivan, C

    2016-03-01

    Liquid scintillation samples were filled with (222)Rn and the activity was measured with good precision after reaching the secular equilibrium with the progeny (218)Po, (214)Pb, (214)Bi and (214)Po. After decay of most of (222)Rn activity, the samples contain (210)Pb and progeny. The activities of (210)Pb and progeny can be calculated as a function of time using the initial (222)Rn activity. The samples were measured in a TDCR counter and the experimentally determined counting efficiencies are in accordance with previously published results. PMID:26725538

  3. Measurements of serum glucose using the luciferin/Luciferase system and a liquid scintillation spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Idahl, L.A.; Sandstroem, P.E.; Sehlin, J.

    1986-05-15

    A single-step assay for serum glucose measurements is described. The assay is based on the phosphorylation of D-glucose by glucokinase and the measurement of ATP consumption by firefly luciferase. The luminescence is recorded in an ordinary liquid scintillation spectrometer. The use of stable reagents and a stable final signal (light emission) makes it possible to analyze a large number of samples in each assay run. The assay is of particular value when repeated serum glucose determinations are performed on samples from small laboratory animals.

  4. Neutron detection in a high gamma ray background with liquid scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Stevanato, L.; Cester, D.; Viesti, G.; Nebbia, G.

    2013-04-19

    The capability of liquid scintillator (namely 2'' Multiplication-Sign 2'' cells of EJ301 and EJ309) of detecting neutrons in a very high gamma ray background is explored. A weak {sup 252}Cf source has been detected in a high {sup 137}Cs gamma ray background corresponding to a dose rate of 100 {mu}Sv/h with probability of detection in compliance with IEC requirements for hand held instruments. Tests were performed with new generation of CAEN digitizers, in particular the V1720 (8 Channel 12bit 250 MS/s) one.

  5. TDCR and CIEMAT/NIST Liquid Scintillation Methods applied to the Radionuclide Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Cruz, P. A. L.; da Silva, C. J.; Iwahara, A.; Loureiro, J. S.; De Oliveira, A. E.; Tauhata, L.; Lopes, R. T.

    2016-07-01

    This work presents TDCR and CIEMAT/NIST methods of liquid scintillation implemented in National Institutes of Metrology for activity standardization of radionuclides, which decay by beta emission and electron capture. The computer codes used to calculate the detection efficiency take into account: decay schemes, beta decay theory, quenching parameter evaluation, Poisson statistic model and Monte Carlo simulation for photon and particle interactions in the detection system. Measurements were performed for pure emitters 3H, 14C, 99Tc and for 68Ge/68Ga which decay by electron capture and positron emission, with uncertainties smaller than 1% (k = 1).

  6. Comparison of (14)C liquid scintillation counting at NIST and NRC Canada.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Denis E; Galea, Raphael; Laureano-Pérez, Lizbeth; Zimmerman, Brian E

    2016-03-01

    An informal bilateral comparison of (14)C liquid scintillation (LS) counting at the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has been completed. Two solutions, one containing (14)C-labeled sodium benzoate and one containing (14)C-labeled n-hexadecane, were measured at both laboratories. Despite observed LS cocktail instabilities, the two laboratories achieved accord in their standardizations of both solutions. At the conclusion of the comparison, the beta spectrum used for efficiency calculations was identified as inadequate and the data were reanalyzed with different inputs, improving accord. PMID:26585641

  7. Pulse shape discrimination capability of metal-loaded organic liquid scintillators for a short-baseline reactor neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B. R.; Han, B. Y.; Jeon, E. J.; Joo, K. K.; Kang, Jeongsoo; Khan, N.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, J. Y.; Siyeon, Kim; Kim, S. C.; Kim, Yeongduk; Ko, Y. J.; Lee, Jaison; Lee, Jeong-Yeon; Lee, J. Y.; Ma, K. J.; Park, Hyeonseo; Park, H. K.; Park, K. S.; Seo, K. M.; Seon, Gwang-Min; Yeo, I. S.; Yeo, K. M.

    2015-05-01

    A new short-baseline (SBL) reactor neutrino experiment is proposed to investigate a reactor anti-neutrino anomaly. A liquid scintillator (LS) is used to detect anti-neutrinos emitted from a Hanaro reactor, and the pulse shape discrimination (PSD) ability of the metal-loaded organic LSs is evaluated on small-scale laboratory samples. PSD can be affected by selecting different base solvents, and several of the LSs used two different organic base solvents, such as linear alkyl benzene and di-isopropylnaphthalene. For the metallic content, gadolinium (Gd) or lithium (6Li) was loaded into a home-made organic LS and into a commercially available liquid scintillation cocktail. A feasibility study was performed for the PSD using several different liquid scintillation cocktails. In this work, the preparation and the PSD characteristics of a promising candidate, which will be used in an above-ground environment, are summarized and presented.

  8. Measurement of the muon-induced neutron yield in liquid scintillator and stainless steel at LNGS with the LVD experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Persiani, R.; Garbini, M.; Sartorelli, G.; Selvi, M.; Collaboration: LVD Collaboration

    2013-08-08

    We describe the measurement of the muon-induced neutron yield in liquid scintillator and stainless steel (SS) at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), with the LVD experiment. The Large Volume Detector (LVD) is located in Hall A of the LNGS and is made of 1000 t of liquid scintillator and 1000 t of SS. Using an independent measurement to evaluate the background and with the support of a full Monte Carlo simulation based on Geant4, we measured a neutron yield of (2.9±0.6)×10{sup −4} and (1.5±0.3)×10{sup −3} in liquid scintillator and in stainless steel, respectively.

  9. A neutron multiplicity analysis method for uranium samples with liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hao; Lin, Hongtao; Liu, Guorong; Li, Jinghuai; Liang, Qinglei; Zhao, Yonggang

    2015-10-01

    A new neutron multiplicity analysis method for uranium samples with liquid scintillators is introduced. An active well-type fast neutron multiplicity counter has been built, which consists of four BC501A liquid scintillators, a n/γdiscrimination module MPD-4, a multi-stop time to digital convertor MCS6A, and two Am-Li sources. A mathematical model is built to symbolize the detection processes of fission neutrons. Based on this model, equations in the form of R=F*P*Q*T could be achieved, where F indicates the induced fission rate by interrogation sources, P indicates the transfer matrix determined by multiplication process, Q indicates the transfer matrix determined by detection efficiency, T indicates the transfer matrix determined by signal recording process and crosstalk in the counter. Unknown parameters about the item are determined by the solutions of the equations. A 252Cf source and some low enriched uranium items have been measured. The feasibility of the method is proven by its application to the data analysis of the experiments.

  10. Investigation of three-dimensional localisation of radioactive sources using a fast organic liquid scintillator detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamage, K. A. A.; Joyce, M. J.; Taylor, G. C.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we discuss the possibility of locating radioactive sources in space using a scanning-based method, relative to the three-dimensional location of the detector. The scanning system comprises an organic liquid scintillator detector, a tungsten collimator and an adjustable equatorial mount. The detector output is connected to a bespoke fast digitiser (Hybrid Instruments Ltd., UK) which streams digital samples to a personal computer. A radioactive source has been attached to a vertical wall and the data have been collected in two stages. In the first case, the scanning system was placed a couple of metres away from the wall and in the second case it moved few centimetres from the previous location, parallel to the wall. In each case data were collected from a grid of measurement points (set of azimuth angles for set of elevation angles) which covered the source on the wall. The discrimination of fast neutrons and gamma rays, detected by the organic liquid scintillator detector, is carried out on the basis of pulse gradient analysis. Images are then produced in terms of the angular distribution of events for total counts, gamma rays and neutrons for both cases. The three-dimensional location of the neutron source can be obtained by considering the relative separation of the centres of the corresponding images of angular distribution of events. The measurements have been made at the National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex, UK.

  11. Production and optical properties of Gd-loaded liquid scintillator for the RENO neutrino detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. S.; Lee, J.; Yeo, I. S.; Choi, W. Q.; Ahn, J. K.; Choi, J. H.; Choi, S.; Choi, Y.; Jang, H. I.; Jang, J. S.; Jeon, E. J.; Joo, K. K.; Kim, B. R.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. Y.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y. D.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, J. K.; Lim, I. T.; Ma, K. J.; Pac, M. Y.; Park, I. G.; Park, K. S.; Siyeon, K.; So, S. H.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Yu, I.

    2013-04-01

    Reactor experiment for neutrino oscillation (RENO) began data-taking from August 2011. It successfully observed reactor antineutrino disappearance in April 2012 to measure the smallest mixing angle of θ13. Two identical detectors, one at near location and the other at far location, are constructed at the Yonggwang nuclear power plant in South Korea, to compare the observed reactor neutrino fluxes. Each RENO detector is filled with 16 mass tons of Gadolinium loaded liquid scintillator (GdLS) in the neutrino target region, and with 28 mass tons of unloaded liquid scintillator (LS) in the γ-catcher region surrounding the target. LS was developed to satisfy chemical, physical, optical properties, and safety requirements. Linear alkyl benzene (LAB) was chosen as a solvent because of its high flash-point, sufficient light yield, and being environmentally friendly. GdLS is carefully developed to keep a long attenuation length and high light yield for a long time period. In this paper, we report the characteristics and mass production of the RENO LS and GdLS.

  12. Laboratory Studies of Lead Removal from Liquid Scintillator in Preparation for KamLAND's Low Background Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, Gregory

    2011-04-27

    The removal of Radon induced Lead from liquid scintillator was extensively studied in preparation for KamLAND's low background phase. This work presents the results from laboratory experiments performed at the University of Alabama and their implications for KamLAND and future low background experiments using carbon based liquid scintillator. It was observed that distillation was the most effective purification procedure and that one must consider a non-polar and non-ionic component of Lead in order to reach the levels of radio-purity required for these new class of ultra-low background experiments.

  13. The Rayleigh ratio measurement for SNO+ liquid scintillator and background studies of the internal ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asahi, Satoko

    As a successor of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, the SNO+ experiment is planned to start data taking in early 2013. Making use of the liquid scintillator, Linear Alkylbenzene (LAB), the SNO+ experiment aims to perform flux measurements of low energy solar neutrinos in one phase, and wait for neutrinoless double beta decay events in another phase where 44 kg of natural Neodymium would be added into LAB. The Rayleigh ratio of LAB was found to be 16.60 +/- 3.14 x 10--6 cm--1 at 546 nm using the relative measurement technique. The wavelength dependency of the Rayleigh scattering was also examined and compared with the theoretical prediction. A setup which is usable to measure the angular dependency of the Rayleigh scattering was built, and an isotropic behaviour of the scattering was tested. The beta and gamma backgrounds, due to the internal calibration ropes situated in the scintillator volume, were studied using the SNO+ Monte Carlo Package. Also, the amount of 210Pb originating from the internal calibration ropes due to the intrinsic contamination of 238U, Rn emanation and plated on the surface prior to the installation were assessed to examine if it is a tolerable level to achieve the target level of 13.4 background events per day.

  14. Pulse-shape discrimination and energy resolution of a liquid-argon scintillator with xenon doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, C. G.; Bernard, E. P.; Lippincott, W. H.; Nikkel, J. A.; Shin, Y.; McKinsey, D. N.

    2014-06-01

    Liquid-argon scintillation detectors are used in fundamental physics experiments and are being considered for security applications. Previous studies have suggested that the addition of small amounts of xenon dopant improves performance in light or signal yield, energy resolution, and particle discrimination. In this study, we investigate the detector response for xenon dopant concentrations from 9 ± 5 ppm to 1100 ± 500 ppm xenon (by weight) in 6 steps. The 3.14-liter detector uses tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) wavelength shifter with dual photomultiplier tubes and is operated in single-phase mode. Gamma-ray-interaction signal yield of 4.0 ± 0.1 photoelectrons/keV improved to 5.0 ± 0.1 photoelectrons/keV with dopant. Energy resolution at 662 keV improved from (4.4 ± 0.2)% (σ) to (3.5 ± 0.2)% (σ) with dopant. Pulse-shape discrimination performance degraded greatly at the first addition of dopant, slightly improved with additional additions, then rapidly improved near the end of our dopant range, with performance becoming slightly better than pure argon at the highest tested dopant concentration. Some evidence of reduced neutron scintillation efficiency with increasing dopant concentration was observed. Finally, the waveform shape outside the TPB region is discussed, suggesting that the contribution to the waveform from xenon-produced light is primarily in the last portion of the slow component.

  15. Characterization of a liquid scintillator based on linear alkyl benzene for neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentoumi, G.; Dai, X.; Fritzsche, H.; Jonkmans, G.; Li, L.; Marleau, G.; Sur, B.

    2013-02-01

    A liquid scintillator (LS) based on linear alkyl benzene (LAB) solvent has been characterized using multiple radiation sources. The results confirm that boron-loaded LAB is suitable for neutron detection in a gamma ray environment. To study indirectly the LAB pulse shape discrimination (PSD) capability between neutrons and gamma rays, a dissolved 212Pb source emitting alpha and beta particles was used to emulate the conditions in a mixed radiation field for detecting neutrons in the presence of a high gamma ray background. The quenching factor depends on the alpha energy and increases from 10 to 25 as the alpha energy decreases from 10 to 1 MeV. 10B loaded LAB-based LS has been tested in a neutron beam of energy which is equal to 14.56 meV. The observed peak at 60 keVee is attributed to the absorption of neutrons. Our results show that a boron-loaded LAB-based scintillator is a sensitive medium for neutron detection in a relatively large background of gamma rays. A neutron detector could be achieved with a figure of merit (FOM) of 1.75.

  16. Combustion water purification techniques influence on OBT analysing using liquid scintillation counting method

    SciTech Connect

    Varlam, C.; Vagner, I.; Faurescu, I.; Faurescu, D.

    2015-03-15

    In order to determine organically bound tritium (OBT) from environmental samples, these must be converted into water, measurable by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). For this purpose we conducted some experiments to determine OBT level of a grass sample collected from an uncontaminated area. The studied grass sample was combusted in a Parr bomb. However usual interfering phenomena were identified: color or chemical quench, chemiluminescence, overlap over tritium spectrum because of other radionuclides presence as impurities ({sup 14}C from organically compounds, {sup 36}Cl as chloride and free chlorine, {sup 40}K as potassium cations) and emulsion separation. So the purification of the combustion water before scintillation counting appeared to be essential. 5 purification methods were tested: distillation with chemical treatment (Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} and KMnO{sub 4}), lyophilization, chemical treatment (Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} and KMnO{sub 4}) followed by lyophilization, azeotropic distillation with toluene and treatment with a volcanic tuff followed by lyophilization. After the purification step each sample was measured and the OBT measured concentration, together with physico-chemical analysis of the water analyzed, revealed that the most efficient method applied for purification of the combustion water was the method using chemical treatment followed by lyophilization.

  17. Apparatus for positioning an external radioactive standard in a liquid scintillation counter

    SciTech Connect

    Horrocks, D.L.; Kampf, R.S.

    1987-07-07

    This patent describes a liquid scintillation counter having a counting chamber for receiving a sample containing a scintillator substance and a sample of a radioactive substance to be counted. The improved apparatus positions a radioactive source in an operating location to irradiate the sample in the counting chamber comprising, in combination: (1) a continuous bidirectionally flexible conveyor forming a closed loop for conveying the radioactive source through on operating location and a storage location; (2) means supporting the radioactive source at a position along the flexible conveyor for conveyance; (3) guide means for supporting the conveyor and for guiding conveyor movement along a selected path, the path transversing at spaced positions the storage location for the radioactive source remote from the counting chamber and the operating location for the radioactive source near to the counting chamber; and (4) drive means coupled to the continuous flexible conveyor to draw the conveyor around the path for conveying the radioactive source through the spaced storage and operating locations.

  18. Online calibration of neutrino liquid scintillator detectors above 10 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepurnov, A. S.; Gromov, M. B.; Shamarin, A. F.

    2016-02-01

    Online calibration of neutrino liquid scintillator detector at energies above 10 MeV is very important for study of such rare process as supernova and for correct calculation of backgrounds if spectral properties is the focus of researches. The traditional procedure implies the usage of radioactive sources with well-known spectral properties but such approach is limited by available radioactive sources, upper possible energies (∼10-11 MeV) and dangerous for ultra low background environment of modern detectors. The approach we propose is based on simulation of events with controllable UV double LED pulser. The LED's main wavelength fits the scintillator excitation wavelength. This technique allows to simulate physical events within the detector in very wide energy range from a few hundred keV to about 50 MeV. Additional studies like pile-up analysis can be performed due to double-LEDs scheme which generates two delayed signals with different adjustable amplitudes. The delay time is also adjustable parameter.

  19. Preparation of Gd Loaded Liquid Scintillator for Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Yayun; Zhang Zhiyong

    2010-05-12

    Gadolinium loaded liquid scintillator (Gd-LS) is an excellent target material for reactor antineutrino experiments. Ideal Gd-LS should have long attenuation length, high light yield, long term stability, low toxicity, and should be compatible with the material used to build the detector. We have developed a new Gd-LS recipe in which carboxylic acid 3,5,5-trimethylhexanoic acid is used as the complexing ligand to gadolinium, 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 1,4-bis[2-methylstyryl]benzene (bis-MSB) are used as primary fluor and wavelength shifter, respectively. The scintillator base is linear alkyl benzene (LAB). Eight hundred liters of Gd-LS has been synthesized and tested in a prototype detector. Results show that the Gd-LS has high quality and is suitable for underground experiments in large quantity. Large scale production facility has been built. A full batch production of 4 t Gd-LS has been produced and monitored for several months. The production of 180 t Gd-LS will be carried out in the near future.

  20. Tomographic analysis of neutron and gamma pulse shape distributions from liquid scintillation detectors at Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Conroy, S.; Gorini, G.; Horton, L.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, D. B.

    2014-02-15

    The Joint European Torus (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world devoted to nuclear fusion experiments of magnetic confined Deuterium (D)/Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas. Neutrons produced in these plasmas are measured using various types of neutron detectors and spectrometers. Two of these instruments on JET make use of organic liquid scintillator detectors. The neutron emission profile monitor implements 19 liquid scintillation counters to detect the 2.45 MeV neutron emission from D plasmas. A new compact neutron spectrometer is operational at JET since 2010 to measure the neutron energy spectra from both D and DT plasmas. Liquid scintillation detectors are sensitive to both neutron and gamma radiation but give light responses of different decay time such that pulse shape discrimination techniques can be applied to identify the neutron contribution of interest from the data. The most common technique consists of integrating the radiation pulse shapes within different ranges of their rising and/or trailing edges. In this article, a step forward in this type of analysis is presented. The method applies a tomographic analysis of the 3-dimensional neutron and gamma pulse shape and pulse height distribution data obtained from liquid scintillation detectors such that n/γ discrimination can be improved to lower energies and additional information can be gained on neutron contributions to the gamma events and vice versa.

  1. An alpha–gamma coincidence spectrometer based on the Photon–Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation (PERALS®) system

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cadieux, J. R.; Fugate, G. A.; King, III, G. S.

    2015-02-07

    Here, an alpha–gamma coincidence spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of selected actinide isotopes in the presence of high beta/gamma fields. The system is based on a PERALS® liquid scintillation counter for beta/alpha discrimination and was successfully tested with both high purity germanium and bismuth germanate, gamma-ray detectors using conventional analog electronics.

  2. Tomographic analysis of neutron and gamma pulse shape distributions from liquid scintillation detectors at Joint European Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomelli, L.; Conroy, S.; Gorini, G.; Horton, L.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, D. B.

    2014-02-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world devoted to nuclear fusion experiments of magnetic confined Deuterium (D)/Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas. Neutrons produced in these plasmas are measured using various types of neutron detectors and spectrometers. Two of these instruments on JET make use of organic liquid scintillator detectors. The neutron emission profile monitor implements 19 liquid scintillation counters to detect the 2.45 MeV neutron emission from D plasmas. A new compact neutron spectrometer is operational at JET since 2010 to measure the neutron energy spectra from both D and DT plasmas. Liquid scintillation detectors are sensitive to both neutron and gamma radiation but give light responses of different decay time such that pulse shape discrimination techniques can be applied to identify the neutron contribution of interest from the data. The most common technique consists of integrating the radiation pulse shapes within different ranges of their rising and/or trailing edges. In this article, a step forward in this type of analysis is presented. The method applies a tomographic analysis of the 3-dimensional neutron and gamma pulse shape and pulse height distribution data obtained from liquid scintillation detectors such that n/γ discrimination can be improved to lower energies and additional information can be gained on neutron contributions to the gamma events and vice versa.

  3. Liquid scintillation counting of polycarbonates: a sensitive technique for measurement of activity concentration of some radioactive noble gases.

    PubMed

    Mitev, K; Zhivkova, V; Pressyanov, D; Georgiev, S; Dimitrova, I; Gerganov, G; Boshkova, T

    2014-11-01

    This work explores the application of the liquid scintillation counting of polycarbonates for measurement of the activity concentration of radioactive noble gases. Results from experimental studies of the method are presented. Potential applications in the monitoring of radioactive noble gases are discussed. PMID:24559941

  4. Analysis of 161Tb by radiochemical separation and liquid scintillation counting

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jiang, J.; Davies, A.; Arrigo, L.; Friese, J.; Seiner, B. N.; Greenwood, L.; Finch, Z.

    2015-12-05

    The determination of 161Tb activity is problematic due to its very low fission yield, short half-life, and the complication of its gamma spectrum. At AWE, radiochemically purified 161Tb solution was measured on a PerkinElmer 1220 QuantulusTM Liquid Scintillation Spectrometer. Since there was no 161Tb certified standard solution available commercially, the counting efficiency was determined by the CIEMAT/NIST Efficiency Tracing method. The method was validated during a recent inter-laboratory comparison exercise involving the analysis of a uranium sample irradiated with thermal neutrons. Lastly, the measured 161Tb result was in excellent agreement with the result using gamma spectrometry and the result obtainedmore » by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.« less

  5. Neutron detection in nuclear astrophysics experiments: study of organic liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciani, Giovanni Francesco

    2016-02-01

    In order to study the nuclear reaction 13 C(α,n)16 O, crucial for the nucleosynthesis of heavy nuclei (A>58), the LUNA collaboration at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, is looking for the best neutron detector to use in the set up. One of the possibilities is to use detectors based on cell filled with Organic Liquid Scintillator BC501A. These detectors are sensible to fast neutron, but also to gamma rays. A Pulse Shape Discrimination process using the Zero Crossing method has been performed to select only signals from neutrons. Comparing the neutron spectra after the Pulse Shape Discrimination and the spectrum from a GEANT4 simulations, the efficiency of the BC501A, in function of the neutron energy and varying the light threshold, has been evaluated.

  6. PROSPECT Background Studies and Operation of Li-Loaded Liquid Scintillator Detectors at a Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, Thomas; Prospect Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Segmented antineutrino detectors placed near compact research reactors provide an excellent opportunity to probe short-baseline neutrino oscillations and precisely measure the reactor antineutrino spectrum. PROSPECT is a phased experiment that will explore the favored reactor anomaly parameter space at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Lab. Measurements of the reactor correlated and ambient backgrounds will be presented, as well as a discussion of active and passive mitigation plans. A lithium-loaded liquid scintillator test detector is currently in operation at HFIR within a prototype shielding cave. Results from recent operation will be presented along with a discussion of their impact on PROSPECT. on behalf of the PROSPECT collaboration.

  7. Determination of 36Cl in biological shield concrete using pyrohydrolysis and liquid scintillation counting.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Mitsuo; Watanabe, Kazuo; Hatakeyama, Mutsuo; Tachibana, Mitsuo

    2002-07-01

    A method for the determination of 36Cl in biological shield concrete of nuclear reactors was developed. Cl in the concrete sample was extracted quantitatively by pyrohydrolysis at 900 degrees C and recovered in Na2CO3 solution for subsequent measurement of 36Cl by liquid scintillation counting. WO3 was used as an accelerator in the pyrohydrolysis. The Cl extraction procedure was optimized by investigating experimental conditions with the use of ion chromatography and its recovery was evaluated by the analysis of the geochemical reference samples. The detection limit of 36Cl was 0.02 Bq g(-1) for a sample weight of 2 g. The relative standard deviation was 3-7% for the samples containing 0.5 Bq g(-1) levels of 36Cl. The method was applied to determine 36Cl in biological shield concrete of the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor. PMID:12173658

  8. Optimization of liquid scintillation measurements applied to smears and aqueous samples collected in industrial environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapon, Arnaud; Pigrée, Gilbert; Putmans, Valérie; Rogel, Gwendal

    Search for low-energy β contaminations in industrial environments requires using Liquid Scintillation Counting. This indirect measurement method supposes a fine control from sampling to measurement itself. Thus, in this paper, we focus on the definition of a measurement method, as generic as possible, for both smears and aqueous samples' characterization. That includes choice of consumables, sampling methods, optimization of counting parameters and definition of energy windows, using the maximization of a Figure of Merit. Detection limits are then calculated considering these optimized parameters. For this purpose, we used PerkinElmer Tri-Carb counters. Nevertheless, except those relative to some parameters specific to PerkinElmer, most of the results presented here can be extended to other counters.

  9. Suppression of gamma-ray sensitivity of liquid scintillators for neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiderski, L.; Moszyński, M.; Wolski, D.; Iwanowska, J.; Szczęśniak, T.; Schotanus, P.; Hurlbut, C.

    2011-10-01

    Methods to reduce gamma-ray sensitivity of a liquid scintillator EJ309 have been studied. Zero-crossing pulse shape discrimination method was used to separate events generated by neutron and gamma radiation between 60- keVee and 4 MeVee. The measurements were carried out under irradiation from an intense 137Cs source, yielding dose rate of 10 mR/h at the detector. A Pu-Be source was used to establish neutron integration window. Pile-up rejection (PUR) circuit was used to reduce gamma-ray induced events under irradiation from an intense gamma-ray source. Further, application of lead, tin and copper shields was done in order to decrease intrinsic gamma-neutron detection efficiency.

  10. Analysis of 161Tb by radiochemical separation and liquid scintillation counting

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J.; Davies, A.; Arrigo, L.; Friese, J.; Seiner, B. N.; Greenwood, L.; Finch, Z.

    2015-12-05

    The determination of 161Tb activity is problematic due to its very low fission yield, short half-life, and the complication of its gamma spectrum. At AWE, radiochemically purified 161Tb solution was measured on a PerkinElmer 1220 QuantulusTM Liquid Scintillation Spectrometer. Since there was no 161Tb certified standard solution available commercially, the counting efficiency was determined by the CIEMAT/NIST Efficiency Tracing method. The method was validated during a recent inter-laboratory comparison exercise involving the analysis of a uranium sample irradiated with thermal neutrons. Lastly, the measured 161Tb result was in excellent agreement with the result using gamma spectrometry and the result obtained by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  11. Measurements of Separate Neutron and Gamma-Ray Coincidences with Liquid Scintillators and Digital PSD Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Flaska, Marek; Pozzi, Sara A

    2007-10-01

    A new technique is presented for the measurement of neutron and/or gamma-ray coincidences. Separate neutron neutron, neutron gamma-ray, gamma-ray neutron, and gamma-ray gamma-ray coincidences are acquired with liquid scintillation detectors and a digital pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique based on standard charge integration method. The measurement technique allows for the collection of fast coincidences in a time window of the order of a few tens of nanoseconds between the coincident particles. The PSD allows for the acquisition of the coincidences in all particle combinations. The measurements are compared to results obtained with the MCNP-PoliMi code, which simulates neutron and gamma-ray coincidences from from a source on an event-by-event basis. This comparison leads to good qualitative agreement.

  12. Validation of efficiency tracing and zero detection threshold techniques using liquid scintillation analyser TriCarb.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P J; Bhade, S P D; Babu, D A R; Sharma, D N

    2011-11-01

    Efficiency tracing with unquenched 14C and zero detection threshold with unquenched 3H as tracers are practical and simple techniques which have been implemented to quantify the activity of various beta emitters using liquid scintillation analyser. These techniques are used to study the influence of quench level on activity quantification and the activity levels up to which these techniques are applicable. The results indicate that, for an activity level of 166.67 Bq, both the techniques are in good agreement with the reference activity with a relative discrepancy of ≤4.6 %. The relative discrepancy of ~10 % is observed for extreme quench values of ~111. For all the radionuclides with the activity level of 1.67 Bq, the uncertainty in activity quantification raises to ~8 % and for the activity level from 8.33 to 100 Bq, the uncertainty reduces to 1 %. PMID:21196460

  13. Characterization of liquid scintillation detector (BC-501A) and digital pulse shape discrimination (DPSD) system

    SciTech Connect

    Lombigit, L. Yussup, N. Ibrahim, Maslina Mohd; Rahman, Nur Aira Abd; Rawi, M. Z. M.

    2015-04-29

    A digital n/γ pulse shape discrimination (PSD) system is currently under development at Instrumentation and Automation Centre, Malaysian Nuclear Agency. This system aims at simultaneous detection of fast neutron and gamma ray in mixed radiations environment. This work reports the system characterization performed on the liquid scintillation detector (BC-501A) and digital pulse shape discrimination (DPSD) system. The characterization involves measurement of electron light output from the BC-501A detector and energy channels calibration of the pulse height spectra acquired with DPSD system using set of photon reference sources. The main goal of this experiment is to calibrate the ADC channel of our DPSD system, characterized the BC-501 detector and find the position of Compton edge which later could be used as threshold for the n/γ PSD experiment. The detector resolution however is worse as compared to other published data but it is expected as our detector has a smaller active volume.

  14. Fast-neutron imaging spectrometer based on liquid scintillator loaded capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor, I.; Vartsky, D.; Brandis, M.; Goldberg, M. B.; Bar, D.; Mardor, I.; Dangendorf, V.; Bromberger, B.

    2012-04-01

    A fast-neutron imaging detector based on micrometric glass capillaries loaded with high refractive index liquid scintillator has been developed Neutron energy spectrometry is based on event-by-event detection and reconstruction of neutron energy from the measurement of the knock-on proton track length and the amount of light produced in the track. In addition, the detector can provide fast-neutron imaging with position resolution of tens of microns. The detector principle of operation, simulations and experimental results obtained with a small detector prototype are described. We have demonstrated by simulation energy spectrum reconstruction for incident neutrons in the range of 4-20 MeV. The energy resolution in this energy range was 10-15%. Preliminary experimental results of detector spectroscopic capabilities are presented

  15. Characterization of a 10B-doped liquid scintillator as a capture-gated neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, S.; Iliadis, C.; Longland, R.

    2016-03-01

    We use a 250 MHz digitizer to characterize the pulse shape discrimination of a BC-523A 10B-doped liquid scintillator with capture-gating capabilities. Our results are compared to recent work claiming pulse shape discrimination between fast and thermal neutron signals. The capture event is identified, and we explain the origin of signals that are often misinterpreted. We use the time-of-flight method to measure the detector energy resolution for fast incident monoenergetic neutrons and the intrinsic neutron detection efficiency. Monte Carlo simulations are performed and we find agreement between measured and simulated results. These steps are important for understanding 10B-doped capture-gated spectroscopy in mixed radiation environments, as efficiencies using capture-gating are rarely reported in the literature.

  16. Procedure for separation of Se and determination of Se-79 by liquid scintillation

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R.A.

    1991-08-11

    This report describes the development work and demonstration of a technique for separation of selenium suitable for determination of Se-79 by liquid scintillation counting. The technique has been demonstrated on actual DWPF (Defense Waste Processing Facility) sludge samples which contain very large loads of Sr-90 activity. The separation required a decontamination of selenium from Sr by a factor of over 10{sup 6}, from Co and Cs by factor of 10{sup 4}, and from Tc-99 by a factor of 100, while still maintaining a selenium recovery of about 50%. Using this technique the author has determined Se-79 in five actual DWPF samples with a precision of about 70% relative standard deviation. This separation has not been demonstrated on actual DWPF samples which have the largest Cs-137 loads. He does not anticipate that these untested samples will present a difficult problem.

  17. Recent development in organic scintillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horrocks, D. L.; Wirth, H. O.

    1969-01-01

    Discussion on recent developments of organic scintillators includes studies of organic compounds that form glass-like masses which scintillate and are stable at room temperature, correlations between molecular structure of organic scintillators and self-quenching, recently developed fast scintillators, and applications of liquid-scintillation counters.

  18. Determination of (226)Ra in produced water by liquid scintillation counting.

    PubMed

    Godoy, José Marcus; Vianna, Lucas M; Godoy, Maria Luiza D P; Almeida, Ana Cristina

    2016-08-01

    It is proposed a method for the determination of (226)Ra in offshore platform liquid effluent samples (produced water). The method is based on a two-phase liquid scintillation counting system and allows for the direct and simple determination of (226)Ra content. Samples with high barium content may also have high (226)Ra concentration. Therefore, the sample volume is based on the barium concentration and ranges from 10 mL to 100 mL. Our new method was tested using multiple real samples and was compared with the BaSO4 precipitation method. The results based on the LSC were 30% higher than the precipitation method, which is attributed to the self-absorption of alpha particles in the BaSO4 precipitate. The determination of both (226)Ra and (228)Ra in the liquid effluent of offshore oil platforms is mandatory in Brazil. Thus, a second method of accurately assessing (228)Ra content remains necessary. PMID:27116402

  19. Development of a new neutron monitor using a boron-loaded organic liquid scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasolonjatovo, A. H. D.; Shiomi, T.; Kim, E.; Nakamura, T.; Nunomiya, T.; Endo, A.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yoshizawa, M.

    2002-10-01

    A new type of neutron dose monitor was developed by using a 12.7 cm diameter×12.7 cm long boron-loaded organic liquid scintillation detector BC523A. This detector aims to have a response in the wide energy range of thermal energy to 100 MeV by using the H and C reactions to the fast neutrons of organic liquid and the 10B(n, α) reaction to thermalized neutrons in the liquid. The response functions of this detector were determined by the Monte Carlo simulation in the energy region from thermal energy to 100 MeV. Using these response functions, the spectrum-weighted dose function, G-function, to get the neutron dose from the light output spectrum of the detector was also determined by the unfolding technique. The calculated G-function was applied to determine the neutron dose in real neutron fields having energies ranging from thermal energy to several tens of MeV, where the light output spectra were measured with the BC523A detector. The thus-obtained ambient doses and effective doses show rather good agreement with the fluence-to-dose conversion factor given by ICRP 74. This detector will be useful as a wide-energy range neutron monitor.

  20. Exploration of the potential of liquid scintillators for real-time 3D dosimetry of intensity modulated proton beams

    PubMed Central

    Beddar, Sam; Archambault, Louis; Sahoo, Narayan; Poenisch, Falk; Chen, George T.; Gillin, Michael T.; Mohan, Radhe

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the authors investigated the feasibility of using a 3D liquid scintillator (LS) detector system for the verification and characterization of proton beams in real time for intensity and energy-modulated proton therapy. A plastic tank filled with liquid scintillator was irradiated with pristine proton Bragg peaks. Scintillation light produced during the irradiation was measured with a CCD camera. Acquisition rates of 20 and 10 frames per second (fps) were used to image consecutive frame sequences. These measurements were then compared to ion chamber measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. The light distribution measured from the images acquired at rates of 20 and 10 fps have standard deviations of 1.1% and 0.7%, respectively, in the plateau region of the Bragg curve. Differences were seen between the raw LS signal and the ion chamber due to the quenching effects of the LS and due to the optical properties of the imaging system. The authors showed that this effect can be accounted for and corrected by Monte Carlo simulations. The liquid scintillator detector system has a good potential for performing fast proton beam verification and characterization. PMID:19544791

  1. Characterizing a fast-response, low-afterglow liquid scintillator for neutron time-of-flight diagnostics in fast ignition experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Y. Hosoda, H.; Arikawa, Y.; Nagai, T.; Kojima, S.; Sakata, S.; Inoue, H.; Iwasa, Y.; Iwano, K.; Yamanoi, K.; Fujioka, S.; Nakai, M.; Sarukura, N.; Shiraga, H.; Norimatsu, T.; Azechi, H.

    2014-11-15

    The characteristics of oxygen-enriched liquid scintillators with very low afterglow are investigated and optimized for application to a single-hit neutron spectrometer for fast ignition experiments. It is found that 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene has better characteristics as a liquid scintillator solvent than the conventional solvent, p-xylene. In addition, a benzophenon-doped BBQ liquid scintillator is shown to demonstrate very rapid time response, and therefore has potential for further use in neutron diagnostics with fast time resolution.

  2. Automated high performance liquid chromatography and liquid scintillation counting determination of pesticide mixture octanol/water partition rates

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, R.P.; Carroll, J.M.; Kresta, A.M.

    1987-12-01

    Two novel methods are reported for measuring octanol/water partition rates of pesticides. A liquid scintillation counting (LSC) method was developed for automated monitoring of /sup 14/C-labeled pesticides partitioning in biphasic water/octanol cocktail systems with limited success. A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed for automated partition rate monitoring of several constituents in a pesticide mixture, simultaneously. The mean log Kow +/- SD determined from triplicate experimental runs were for: 2,4-D-DMA (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid dimethylamine), 0.65 +/- .17; Deet (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide), 2.02 +/- .01; Guthion (O,O-dimethyl-S-(4-oxo-1,2,3-benzotriazin-3(4H)-ylmethyl) phosphorodithioate), 2.43 +/- .03; Methyl-Parathion (O,O-dimethyl-O-(p-nitrophenyl) phosphorothioate), 2.68 +/- .05; and Fenitrothion (O,O-dimethyl O-(4-nitro-m-tolyl) phosphorothioate), 3.16 +/- .03. A strong positive linear correlation (r = .9979) was obtained between log Kow and log k' (log Kow = 2.35 (log k') + 0.63). The advantages that this automated procedure has in comparison with the standard manual shake-flask procedure are discussed.

  3. Relative scintillation efficiency of liquid xenon in the XENON10 direct dark matter search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzur, Angel

    There is almost universal agreement that most of the mass in the Universe consists of dark matter. Many lines of reasoning suggest that the dark matter consists of a weakly interactive massive particle (WIMP) with mass ranging from 10 GeV/c 2 to a few TeV/c 2 . Today, numerous experiments aim for direct or indirect dark matter detection. XENON10 is a direct detection experiment using a xenon dual phase time projection chamber. Particles interacting with xenon will create a scintillation signal ( S 1) and ionization. The charge produced is extracted into the gas phase and converted into a proportional scintillation light ( S 2), with an external electric field. The dominant background, b particles and g rays, will undergo an electron recoil (ER) interaction, while WIMPs and neutrons will undergo a nuclear recoil (NR) interaction. Event-by-event discrimination of background signals is based on log 10 ( S 2/ S 1) NR < log 10 ( S 2/ S 1) ER and the 3-D position reconstruction. In 2006 the XENON10 detector started underground operations at laboratorio Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy. After 6 months of operations, totaling 58.6 live days and 5.4 kg of fiducial mass, XENON10 set the best upper limits at the time. Finding a spin- independent WIMP-nucleon cross-section s h = 8.8 × 10^-44 cm 2 and a spin- dependent WIMP-neutron cross-section s h = 1.0 × 10^-38 cm 2 for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c 2 (90% C.L.). In this work I give an overview of the dark matter evidence and review the requirements for a dark matter search. In particular I discuss the XENON10 detector, deployment, operation, calibrations, analysis and WIMP-nucleon cross- section limits. Finally, I present our latest results for the relative scintillation efficiency ([Special characters omitted.] ) for nuclear recoils in liquid xenon, which was the biggest source of uncertainty in the XENON10 limit. This quantity is essential to determine the nuclear energy scale and to determine the WIMP-nucleon cross

  4. SOLVENT PURIFICATION AND FLUOR SELECTION FOR GADOLINIUM-LOADED LIQUID SCINTILLATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Kesete, T.; Storm, A.; Hahn, R. L.; Yeh, M.; Seleem, S.

    2007-01-01

    The last decade has seen huge progress in the study of neutrinos, elementary sub-atomic particles. Continued growth in the fi eld of neutrino research depends strongly on the calculation of the neutrino mixing angle θ13, a fundamental neutrino parameter that is needed as an indicative guideline for proposed next-generation neutrino experiments. Experiments involving reactor antineutrinos are favored for the calculation of θ13 because their derivation equation for θ13 is relatively simple and unambiguous. A Gd-loaded liquid scintillator (Gd-LS) is the centerpiece of the detector and it consists of ~99% aromatic solvent, ~0.1% Gd, and < 1% fl uors. Key required characteristics of the Gd-LS are long-term chemical stability, high optical transparency, and high photon production by the scintillator. This summer’s research focused on two important aspects of the detector: (1) purifi cation of two selected scintillation solvents, 1, 2, 4-trimethylbenzene (PC) and linear alkyl benzene (LAB), to improve the optical transparency and long-term chemical stability of the Gd-LS, and (2) investigation of the added fl uors to optimize the photon production. Vacuum distillation and column separation were used to purify PC and LAB, respectively. Purifi cation was monitored using UV-visible absorption spectra and verifi ed in terms of decreased solvent absorption at 430nm. Absorption in PC at 430nm decreased by a factor slightly >10 while the absorption in LAB was lowered by a factor of ~5. Photon production for every possible combination of two solvents, four primary shifters, and two secondary shifters was determined by measuring the Compton-Scattering excitation induced by an external Cs-137 gamma source (Eγ ~ 662-keV). The ideal shifter concentration was identifi ed by measuring the photon production as a function of shifter quantity in a series of samples. Results indicate that 6g/L p-terphenyl with 150mg/L 1,4-Bis(2-methylstyryl)-benzene (bis-MSB) produces the maximum

  5. Landau Energy Loss in Liquid Scintillator and the Search for Wifs with the LVD Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jie

    The LVD experiment at Gran Sasso, Italy, is described, and data since the completion of the first tower (one fifth of the whole LVD) are analyzed. The dE/dx distribution of reconstructed high-energy muons in the scintillator counters is obtained. This distribution is compared with predictions by a GEANT3 Monte Carlo simulation of cosmic muons going through the LVD detector. Its shape is similar to the Landau approximation. In the data from a total running time of 245 days, 159286 clearly separable charged tracks going through the detector were reconstructed. No WIF (Weakly-Interacting Fractionally-charged particle) is observed. Since the early 1930's to the 1980's, theories on the dE/dx distribution of charged particles in matter have evolved from the fundamental work done by Bethe, Bloch, Landau, Symon, Vavilov and others with the inclusion of more precise corrections of the density effect and the shell effect. At the LVD experiment, through a procedure of gain-factor calibration at every period of 20 days, to compensate for instability and nonuniformity of the scintillator counters and their readout, the muon dE/dx distribution is measured; it conforms to the Landau approximation. The precision of the dE/dx measurement is 7.6% (one sigma).. WIF particles are speculated by modern theories. Because dE/dx is proportional to the square of the charge carried by the incident particle, any WIF going through the LVD liquid scintillator will reveal itself by its dE/dx being on the low side of the carefully calibrated muon dE/dx distribution. Calculation has shown that when the charge of a WIF is as low as {2over 3} e, it still generates enough ionization in the LVD limited streamer tubes and thus its track is as visible as a muon track in the detector. Such events are not found. Assuming a uniform flux distribution of WIF particles coming from the atmosphere, the upper limit of their flux at the LVD site is 4.4 times rm 10^{-14} cm^{-2}sterad ^{-1}sec^{-1}. (Copies

  6. Liquid scintillation counting methodology for 99Tc analysis. A remedy for radiopharmaceutical waste

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Mumtaz; Um, Wooyong

    2015-08-13

    This paper presents a new approach for liquid scintillation counting (LSC) analysis of single-radionuclide samples containing appreciable organic or inorganic quench. This work offers better analytical results than existing LSC methods for technetium-99 (99gTc) analysis with significant savings in analysis cost and time. The method was developed to quantify 99gTc in environmental liquid and urine samples using LSC. Method efficiency was measured in the presence of 1.9 to 11,900 ppm total dissolved solids. The quench curve was proved to be effective in the case of spiked 99gTc activity calculation for deionized water, tap water, groundwater, seawater, and urine samples. Counting efficiency was found to be 91.66% for Ultima Gold LLT (ULG-LLT) and Ultima Gold (ULG). Relative error in spiked 99gTc samples was ±3.98% in ULG and ULG-LLT cocktails. Minimum detectable activity was determined to be 25.3 mBq and 22.7 mBq for ULG-LLT and ULG cocktails, respectively. A pre-concentration factor of 1000 was achieved at 100°C for 100% chemical recovery.

  7. Detectors on base of scintillation structures for registration of volumetric activities of gaseous and liquid media gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadilin, V. V.; Yurov, V. N.; Ryabeva, E. V.; Samossadny, V. T.; Lupar, E. E.; Trofimov, Yu A.; Kolesnikov, S. V.; Chebishev, S. B.; Nebolsin, V. O.

    2016-02-01

    The main aim of this research is the development and prototyping of the ionizing radiation detectors for the diagnosis of the physical processes used for monitoring the radiation situation at the thermal or fast neutrons reactors. In this article we present the experimental verification of applicability of the scintillation detectors based on LaBr3(Ce) and YAlO3(Ce). The experimental studies of the gamma-ray detection with several designs of the crystal scintillation detectors in gas and liquid are considered. It was shown that the measurement range in the liquid medium at the duration of one measurement of 100 seconds for 137Cs equals from 3.79·102 Bq/l to 1.08·108 Bq/l for detector prototype based on YAlO3(Ce).

  8. Getting the most from the detection of Galactic supernova neutrinos in future large liquid-scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jia-Shu; Li, Yu-Feng; Zhou, Shun

    2016-07-01

    Future large liquid-scintillator detectors can be implemented to observe neutrinos from a core-collapse supernova in our Galaxy in various reaction channels: (1) the inverse beta decay ν¯ e+p →n +e+ , (2) the elastic neutrino-proton scattering ν +p →ν +p , (3) the elastic neutrino-electron scattering ν +e-→ν +e- , (4) the charged-current νe interaction νe+12C →e-+12N, (5) the charged-current ν¯ e interaction ν¯ e+12C →e++12B, and (6) the neutral-current interaction ν +12C →ν +12C* The less abundant 13C atoms in the liquid scintillator are also considered as a target, and both the charged-current interaction νe+13C →e-+13N and the neutral-current interaction ν +13C →ν +13C* are taken into account. In this work, we show for the first time that a global analysis of all these channels at a single liquid-scintillator detector, such as Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory, is very important to test the average-energy hierarchy of supernova neutrinos and how the total energy is partitioned among neutrino flavors. In addition, the dominant channels for reconstructing neutrino spectra and the impact of other channels are discussed in great detail.

  9. Using the transportable, computer-operated, liquid-scintillator fast-neutron spectrometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Thorngate, J.H.

    1988-11-01

    When a detailed energy spectrum is needed for radiation-protection measurements from approximately 1 MeV up to several tens of MeV, organic-liquid scintillators make good neutron spectrometers. However, such a spectrometer requires a sophisticated electronics system and a computer to reduce the spectrum from the recorded data. Recently, we added a Nuclear Instrument Module (NIM) multichannel analyzer and a lap-top computer to the NIM electronics we have used for several years. The result is a transportable fast-neutron spectrometer system. The computer was programmed to guide the user through setting up the system, calibrating the spectrometer, measuring the spectrum, and reducing the data. Measurements can be made over three energy ranges, 0.6--2 MeV, 1.1--8 MeV, or 1.6--16 MeV, with the spectrum presented in 0.1-MeV increments. Results can be stored on a disk, presented in a table, and shown in graphical form. 5 refs., 51 figs.

  10. ACID EVAPORATION OF ULTIMA GOLD TM AB LIQUID SCINTILLATION COCKTAIL RESIDUE

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E.; Fondeur, F.; Crump, S.

    2011-12-21

    Prior analyses of samples from the F/H Lab solutions showed the presence of diisopropylnapthalene (DIN), a major component of Ultima Gold{trademark} AB liquid scintillation cocktail (LSC). These solutions are processed through H-Canyon Tank 10.5 and ultimately through the 17.8E evaporator. Similar solutions originated in SRNL streams sent to the same H Canyon tanks. This study examined whether the presence of these organics poses a process-significant hazard for the evaporator. Evaporation and calorimetry testing of surrogate samples containing 2000 ppm of Ultima Gold{trademark} AB LSC in 8 M nitric acid have been completed. These experiments showed that although reactions between nitric acid and the organic components do occur, they do not appear to pose a significant hazard for runaway reactions or generation of energetic compounds in canyon evaporators. The amount of off-gas generated was relatively modest and appeared to be well within the venting capacity of the H-Canyon evaporators. A significant fraction of the organic components likely survives the evaporation process primarily as non-volatile components that are not expected to represent any new process concerns during downstream operations such as neutralization. Laboratory Waste solutions containing minor amounts of DIN can be safely received, stored, transferred, and processed through the canyon waste evaporator.

  11. Aging of LAB-based liquid scintillator in stainless steel containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hai-Tao; Yu, Bo-Xiang; Shan, Qing; Ding, Ya-Yun; Du, Bing; Liu, Shu-Tong; Zhang, Xuan; Zhou, Li; Jia, Wen-Bao; Fang, Jian; Ye, Xing-Chen; Hu, Wei; Niu, Shun-Li; Yan, Jia-Qing; Zhao, Hang; Hong, Dao-Jin

    2015-06-01

    Types 316 and 304 stainless steel are two candidates for the storage vessels and piping systems of LAB-based liquid scintillator (LS) in the JUNO experiment. LS aging experiments are carried out at temperatures of 40 °C and 25 °C. After 192 days aging at 40 °C, the attenuation length of LS was reduced by 6% in a glass container, 12% in a type 304 stainless steel tank, and 10% in a type 316 stainless steel tank. At 25 °C in 304 and 316 stainless steel tanks, the attenuation length was reduced by 6% after 307 days. The light yield and the absorption spectrum were practically the same as that of the unaged sample. The concentration of element Fe in the LAB-based LS did not show a clear change. Type 316 and 304 stainless steel can be used as vessels and transportation pipeline material for LAB-based LS. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA10010500) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205183, 11005117, 11225525, 11390384)

  12. PSA discriminator influence on (222)Rn efficiency detection in waters by liquid scintillation counting.

    PubMed

    Stojković, Ivana; Todorović, Nataša; Nikolov, Jovana; Tenjović, Branislava

    2016-06-01

    A procedure for the (222)Rn determination in aqueous samples using liquid scintillation counting (LSC) was evaluated and optimized. Measurements were performed by ultra-low background spectrometer Quantulus 1220™ equipped with PSA (Pulse Shape Analysis) circuit which discriminates alpha/beta spectra. Since calibration procedure is carried out with (226)Ra standard, which has both alpha and beta progenies, it is clear that PSA discriminator has vital importance in order to provide precise spectra separation. Improvement of calibration procedure was done through investigation of PSA discriminator level and, consequentially, the activity of (226)Ra calibration standard influence on (222)Rn efficiency detection. Quench effects on generated spectra i.e. determination of radon efficiency detection were also investigated with quench calibration curve obtained. Radon determination in waters based on modified procedure according to the activity of (226)Ra standard used, dependent on PSA setup, was evaluated with prepared (226)Ra solution samples and drinking water samples with assessment of measurement uncertainty variation included. PMID:27016710

  13. Neutron light output response and resolution functions in EJ-309 liquid scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, Andreas; Lawrence, Christopher C.; Wieger, Brian M.; Pozzi, Sara A.; Massey, Thomas N.

    2013-03-26

    Here, the neutron light output response functions and detector resolution functions were measured at Ohio University's tandem Van de Graaff generator for three cylindrical EJ-309 liquid scintillator cells, having dimensions 12.7(circle divide)-by-12.7, 7.6-by-7.6, and 7.6-by-5.1 cm. A 7.44 MeV deuteron beam was used on an Al-27 target generating a continuous spectrum over the energy range from a few hundred keV to over 10 MeV. The light output response functions are determined using an exponential fit. Detector resolution functions are obtained for the 12.7-by-12.7 and 7.6-by-7.6 cm detectors. It is demonstrated that the dependence on detector size is important for the light output response functions, but not to the same extent for the resolution function, even when photomultiplier tubes, detector material, and other detector characteristics are carefully matched.

  14. Development of a gadolinium-loaded liquid scintillator for the Hanaro short baseline prototype detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, In Sung; Joo, Kyung Kwang; So, Sun Heang; Song, Sook Hyung; Kim, Hong Joo; So, Jung Ho; Park, Kang Soon; Ma, Kyung Ju; Jeon, Eun Ju; Kim, Jin Yu; Kim, Young Duk; Lee, Jason; Lee, Jeong-Yeon; Sun, Gwang-Min

    2014-02-01

    We propose a new experiment on the site of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) located at Daejeon, Korea. The Hanaro short baseline (SBL) nuclear reactor with a thermal power output 30 MW is used to investigate a reactor neutrino anomaly. A Hanaro SBL prototype detector having a 60- l volume has been constructed ˜6 m away from the reactor core. A gadolinium (Gd)-loaded liquid scintillator (LS) is used as an active material to trigger events. The selection of the LS is guided by physical and technical requirements, as well as safety considerations. A linear alkyl benzene (LAB) is used as a base solvent of the Hanaro SBL prototype detector. Three g/ l of PPO and 30 mg/ l of bis-MSB are dissolved to formulate the LAB-based LS. Then, a 0.5% gadolinium (Gd) complex with carboxylic acid is loaded into the LAB-based LS by using the liquidliquid extraction method. In this paper, we will summarize all the characteristics of the Gd-loaded LAB-based LS for the Hanaro prototype detector.

  15. Liquid scintillation counting of /sup 14/C for differentiation of synthetic ethanol from ethanol of fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, G.E.; Noakes, J.E.; Alfonso, F.C.; Figert, D.M.

    1981-09-01

    Samples containing ethanol are fractionated on a column so that the resultant ethanol content is > 93%. Determination of /sup 14/C by liquid scintillation counting on the ethanol fraction differentiates ethanol produced by fermentation from synthetic ethanol produced from fossil fuel sources. Twenty-seven samples were fractionated and analyzed for the /sup 14/C isotope. Six samples were synthetic ethanol derived from ethylene gas (direct and indirect process), and yielded a mean value for /sup 14/C isotope of 0.167 dpm/g carbon with a standard deviation (SD) of 0.066 dpm/g carbon (disintegrations per minute per gram of carbon). The remaining samples were ethanol derived from the fermentation of natural materials, such as corn, pear, sugar cane, grape, cherry, and blackberry, and yielded a mean value for /sup 14/C isotope of 16.11 dpm/g carbon with an SD of 1.27. The /sup 14/C values for specific mixtures of a synthetic and a natural ethanol compare favorably with the analytical values obtained by this procedure.

  16. Measurement of 90Sr in contaminated Fukushima soils using liquid scintillation counter.

    PubMed

    Kavasi, N; Sahoo, S K; Arae, H; Yoshida, S; Sorimachi, A; Tokonami, S

    2015-11-01

    A method based on liquid scintillation counting system has been developed for the measurement of (90)Sr in Fukushima soil samples due to contamination of (134)Cs and (137)Cs. Three soil samples were collected within 30 km radius from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP). Activity concentration of (134)Cs and (137)Cs were measured using a gamma spectroscopy system with high-purity germanium detector. (90)Sr contamination is little elevated but comparable with the background contamination level that originated from atmospheric nuclear weapon tests, whereas radiocesium contamination has increased significantly. Activity concentration of (90)Sr in the soil samples varied in the range of 10.4±0.6-22.0±1.2 Bq kg(-1). Activity concentrations of (134)Cs and (137)Cs in the soil samples were in the range of 28.2±0.2-56.3±0.2 kBq kg(-1) and 35.2±0.1-70.2±0.2 kBq kg(-1), respectively (reference date for decay correction is 1 December 2011). PMID:25956786

  17. Discrimination of neutrons and γ-rays in liquid scintillator based on Elman neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cai-Xun; Lin, Shin-Ted; Zhao, Jian-Ling; Yu, Xun-Zhen; Wang, Li; Zhu, Jing-Jun; Xing, Hao-Yang

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a new neutron and γ (n/γ) discrimination method based on an Elman Neural Network (ENN) is proposed to improve the discrimination performance of liquid scintillator (LS) detectors. Neutron and γ data were acquired from an EJ-335 LS detector, which was exposed in a 241Am-9Be radiation field. Neutron and γ events were discriminated using two methods of artificial neural network including the ENN and a typical Back Propagation Neural Network (BPNN) as a control. The results show that the two methods have different n/γ discrimination performances. Compared to the BPNN, the ENN provides an improved of Figure of Merit (FOM) in n/γ discrimination. The FOM increases from 0.907 ± 0.034 to 0.953 ± 0.037 by using the new method of the ENN. The proposed n/γ discrimination method based on ENN provides a new choice of pulse shape discrimination in neutron detection. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275134,11475117)

  18. Fast neutron measurement at Soudan Mine using a large liquid scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Mei, Dongming

    2014-03-01

    Characterizing neutron background is extremely important to the success of rare-event physics searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay and dark matter searches. Measuring the energy spectrum of fast neutrons for an underground laboratory is difficult and it requires intensive R&D for a given technology. EJ-301 liquid scintillator(known also as NE-213) is implemented as the target for a 12 liter neutron detector fabricated at the University of South Dakota. The light output response to atmospheric neutrons from a few MeV up to ~ 70 MeV has been calibrated for this detector. The detector has been taking data at Soudan Mine for over two years. We report the measured muon-induced neutrons in this paper. This work is supported in part by NSF PHY-0758120, PHYS-0919278, PHYS-0758120, PHYS-1242640, DOE grant DE-FG02-10ER46709, the Office of Research at the University of South Dakota and a 2010 research center support by the State of South Dakota.

  19. Standardization of 68Ge/68Ga Using Three Liquid Scintillation Counting Based Methods

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, B. E.; Cessna, J. T.; Fitzgerald, R.

    2008-01-01

    A solution containing 68Ge in equilibrium with its daughter, 68Ga, has been standardized for the first time at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) using 3 liquid scintillation-based techniques: live-timed 4πβ -γ anticoincidence (LTAC) counting, the Triple-to-Double Coincidence Ratio (TDCR) method, and 3H-standard efficiency tracing with the CIEMAT1/NIST (CNET) method. The LTAC technique is much less dependent on level scheme data and model-dependent parameters and was thus able to provide a reference activity concentration value for the master solution with a combined standard uncertainty of about 0.3 %. The other two methods gave activity concentration values with respective differences from the reference value of +1.2 % and −1.5 %, which were still within the experimental uncertainties. Measurements made on the NIST “4π”γ secondary standard ionization chamber allowed for the determination of calibration factors for that instrument, allowing future calibrations to be made for 68Ge/68Ga without the need for a primary measurement. The ability to produce standardized solutions of 68Ge presents opportunities for the development of a number of NIST-traceable calibration sources with very low (<1 %) relative standard uncertainties that can be used in diagnostic medical imaging. PMID:27096126

  20. Diffusivity measurements in polymers: II. Residual casting solvent measurement by liquid scintillation counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Allen B.; Qin, Anwei; Henderson, Clifford L.; Pancholi, Sanju; Koros, William J.; Willson, C. Grant; Dammel, Ralph R.; Mack, Chris A.; Hinsberg, William D.

    1997-07-01

    Simulation of the microlithographic process plays an increasingly important role in the manufacturing of integrated circuitry. Unfortunately, most lithography simulations still lack fundamental relationships that link the resist chemistry and the final resist image. This study is directed towards generating the data necessary to quantify one of these relationships, the effect of residual casting solvent on the resist image. The amount of casting solvent was measured as a function of the post apply bake temperature and time for several casting solvents directly by using liquid scintillation counting. These measurements were carried out on four identical diazonaphthoquinone-novolac resist formulations cast with different radio-labeled casting solvents (ethyl cellosolve acetate, PGMEA, diglyme, and ethyl lactate). From these data we have estimated the diffusion coefficients for the solvents and the dependence of these coefficients on temperature. These data are then convolved with dissolution parameters and Dill parameters to isolate and establish the relationships between these parameters and the post apply bake process that controls the amount of residual casting solvent.

  1. Simulation study of the neutron-gamma discrimination capability of a liquid scintillator neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Haoyang; Yu, Xunzhen; Zhu, Jingjun; Wang, Li; Ma, Jinglu; Liu, Shukui; Li, Linwei; Chen, Liejian; Tang, Changjian; Yue, Qian

    2014-12-01

    The capability to discriminate between neutrons and gamma rays (n/γ) by means of their pulse shapes is important for many users of liquid scintillator (LS) neutron detectors. To simulate the n/γ discrimination capability of a neutron detector, we have developed a method to simulate the pulse signal generated by an incident n or γ in the LS. Light pulses caused by ionization and excitation from incident n or γ radiation are simulated by the Geant4 simulation package based on the geometry and materials of a prototype LS detector. The response to the incident light of the photomultiplier tube (PMT) and data acquisition (DAQ) circuit was obtained from a single photoelectron experiment. The final output signal from a detector was produced by convolving its light pulse with the response function of the PMT and DAQ. Two methods, the charge comparison method (CCM) and the pulse gradient method (PGM), were applied to discriminate the simulated signals. The simulation was validated by comparing its result to an experimental result from the prototype LS detector. Our method can be applied in the design of an LS detector, which has subsequently been optimized n/γ discrimination. The method can also be helpful to analyze experimental data and evaluate the performance of n/γ discrimination techniques.

  2. Method to determine 226Ra in small sediment samples by ultralow background liquid scintillation.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Cabeza, Joan-Albert; Kwong, Laval Liong Wee; Betti, Maria

    2010-08-15

    (210)Pb dating of sediment cores is a widely used tool to reconstruct ecosystem evolution and historical pollution during the last century. Although (226)Ra can be determined by gamma spectrometry, this method shows severe limitations which are, among others, sample size requirements and counting times. In this work, we propose a new strategy based on the analysis of (210)Pb through (210)Po in equilibrium by alpha spectrometry, followed by the determination of (226)Ra (base or supported (210)Pb) without any further chemical purification by liquid scintillation and with a higher sample throughput. Although gamma spectrometry might still be required to determine (137)Cs as an independent tracer, the effort can then be focused only on those sections dated around 1963, when maximum activities are expected. In this work, we optimized the counting conditions, calibrated the system for changing quenching, and described the new method to determine (226)Ra in small sediment samples, after (210)Po determination, allowing a more precise determination of excess (210)Pb ((210)Pb(ex)). The method was validated with reference materials IAEA-384, IAEA-385, and IAEA-313. PMID:20704374

  3. 234Th analysis of marine sediments via extraction chromatography and liquid scintillation counting.

    PubMed

    Nour, Svetlana; Burnett, William C; Horwitz, E Philip

    2002-08-01

    234Th is widely used as a natural tracer for study of biological mixing and particle scavenging processes in the ocean. This naturally occurring nuclide serves this purpose due to its convenient half-life (24.1 days), constant rate of production from 238U dissolved in seawater, and its strong tendency to attach to particles in seawater. As a beta/gamma emitter, 234Th may be determined using low-level gas-flow proportional counting, gamma spectrometry, and liquid scintillation counting (LSC). We describe here a technique which combines Cerenkov counting to evaluate 234Th (via 234Pa) with LSC alpha counting of 230Th added to the samples as a yield tracer. Our separation approach is based on a sample preparation procedure for marine sediments using nitric acid leaching in a "hot block", and extraction chromatography (TEVA x Resin) for Th isolation. Samples are counted in plastic LSC vials, using Ultima Gold AB cocktail, in 1 M H3PO4 media. A series of sediment samples spiked with known amounts of 234Th yielded activities within a few percent of the anticipated values. PMID:12150283

  4. Neutron light output response and resolution functions in EJ-309 liquid scintillation detectors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Enqvist, Andreas; Lawrence, Christopher C.; Wieger, Brian M.; Pozzi, Sara A.; Massey, Thomas N.

    2013-03-26

    Here, the neutron light output response functions and detector resolution functions were measured at Ohio University's tandem Van de Graaff generator for three cylindrical EJ-309 liquid scintillator cells, having dimensions 12.7(circle divide)-by-12.7, 7.6-by-7.6, and 7.6-by-5.1 cm. A 7.44 MeV deuteron beam was used on an Al-27 target generating a continuous spectrum over the energy range from a few hundred keV to over 10 MeV. The light output response functions are determined using an exponential fit. Detector resolution functions are obtained for the 12.7-by-12.7 and 7.6-by-7.6 cm detectors. It is demonstrated that the dependence on detector size is important for themore » light output response functions, but not to the same extent for the resolution function, even when photomultiplier tubes, detector material, and other detector characteristics are carefully matched.« less

  5. Evaluation of 2-PI liquid scintillation whole body counter using MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mireles-Garcia, Fernando

    The 2-pi liquid scintillation whole body counter (WBC) at the University of Missouri-Columbia has been evaluated using MCNP-4A (a general Monte Carlo Neutron-Photon transport code, Version 4A). This facility is of importance to a wide variety of applications, such as determination of body fat content in human and animal subjects and measurement of radioactive tracers in animals. Phantoms and mathematical models were used in this research to upgrade the calibration procedures of the WBC. Since the existing protocol assumes a simple efficiency calibration based only upon body mass, it does not account for body shape and gives no methodology for placement of the subject below the detectors. Mathematical models were developed to calculate geometry efficiency for a variety of subjects and geometries utilizing the MCNP-4A transport code. Comparison of the results from simulation with experimental data shows excellent agreement not only in the shape of the curves as a function of subject position but also in absolute magnitude. In the case of the WBC and a phantom consisting of 40 liters of water containing 800 grams of sp+K the error in the magnitude is within 6%, which is easily attributable to the experimental calibration of the detectors. The efficiency of the WBC has been calculated for different weights for modified Adam-E through Adam-L model geometries; hence weight and shape can be modeled carefully and correction can be applied to actual human measurements based upon this work.

  6. Comparative study of large samples (2" × 2") plastic scintillators and EJ309 liquid with pulse shape discrimination (PSD) capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwanowska-Hanke, J.; Moszynski, M.; Swiderski, L.; Sibczynski, P.; Szczesniak, T.; Krakowski, T.; Schotanus, P.

    2014-06-01

    In the paper we reported on the scintillation properties and pulse shape discrimination (PSD) performance of new plastic scintillators. The samples with dimension of 2 inches × 2 inches were tested: EJ299-34, EJ299-34G, EJ299-33 and EJ299-33G. They are the first commercially available plastics with neutron/gamma discrimination properties. The paper covers the measurements of emission spectra, photoelectron yield, analysis of the light pulse shapes originating from events related to gamma-rays and fast neutrons as well as neutron/gamma discrimination. The tested plastics are characterized by a photoelectron yield on a level of approximately 1600-2500 phe/MeV, depending on the sample. The highest value, measured for EJ299-34, is similar to the number of photoelectrons measured for EJ309 (2600 phe/MeV). The figure of merit (FOM) calculated for narrow energy cuts — indicating the PSD performance — showed that the PSD capabilities of the plastics are significantly lower than of EJ309. These scintillators are still under development in order to optimize the composition and manufacturing procedures. At this time the results obtained with the new plastics suggest their possible use as an alternative for liquid scintillators, especially if we consider their inflammability and non-toxicity.

  7. Calibration of a liquid scintillation counter for alpha, beta and Cerenkov counting

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpitta, S.C.; Fisenne, I.M.

    1996-07-01

    Calibration data are presented for 25 radionuclides that were individually measured in a Packard Tri-Carb 2250CA liquid scintillation (LS) counter by both conventional and Cerenkov detection techniques. The relationships and regression data between the quench indicating parameters and the LS counting efficiencies were determined using microliter amounts of tracer added to low {sup 40}K borosilicate glass vials containing 15 mL of Insta-Gel XF scintillation cocktail. Using {sup 40}K, the detection efficiencies were linear over a three order of magnitude range (10 - 10,000 mBq) in beta activity for both LS and Cerenkov counting. The Cerenkov counting efficiency (CCE) increased linearly (42% per MeV) from 0.30 to 2.0 MeV, whereas the LS efficiency was >90% for betas with energy in excess of 0.30 MeV. The CCE was 20 - 50% less than the LS counting efficiency for beta particles with maximum energies in excess of 1 MeV. Based on replicate background measurements, the lower limit of detection (LLD) for a 1-h count at the 95% confidence level, using water as a solvent, was 0.024 counts sec-{sup -1} and 0.028 counts sec-1 for plastic and glass vials, respectively. The LLD for a 1-h-count ranged from 46 to 56 mBq (2.8 - 3.4 dpm) for both Cerenkov and conventional LS counting. This assumes: (1) a 100% counting efficiency, (2) a 50% yield of the nuclide of interest, (3) a 1-h measurement time using low background plastic vials, and (4) a 0-50 keV region of interest. The LLD is reduced an order of magnitude when the yield recovery exceeds 90% and a lower background region is used (i.e., 100 - 500 keV alpha region of interest). Examples and applications of both Cerenkov and LS counting techniques are given in the text and appendices.

  8. Automatic in-syringe dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of ⁹⁹Tc from biological samples and hospital residues prior to liquid scintillation counting.

    PubMed

    Villar, Marina; Avivar, Jessica; Ferrer, Laura; Borràs, Antoni; Vega, Fernando; Cerdà, Víctor

    2015-07-01

    A new approach exploiting in-syringe dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) for (99)Tc extraction and preconcentration from biological samples, i.e., urine and saliva, and liquid residues from treated patients is presented. (99)Tc is a beta emitter with a long half-life (2.111 × 10(5) years) and mobility in the different environmental compartments. One of the sources of this radionuclide is through the use of its father (99m)Tc in medical diagnosis. For the first time a critical comparison between extractants and disperser solvents for (99)Tc DLLME is presented, e.g., tributyl phosphate (TBP), trioctylmethylammonium chloride (Aliquat®336), triisooctylamine (TiOA), as extractants in apolar solvents such as xylene and dodecane, and disperser solvents such as acetone, acetonitrile, ethanol, methanol, 1-propanol, and 2-propanol. The system was optimized by experimental design, and 22.5% of Aliquat®336 in acetone was selected as extractant and disperser, respectively. Off-line detection was performed using a liquid scintillation counter. The present method has a (99)Tc minimum detectable activity (MDA) of 0.075 Bq with a high extraction/preconcentration frequency (8 h(-1)). Urine, saliva, and hospital residues were satisfactorily analyzed with recoveries of 82-119%. Thus, the proposed system is an automatic powerful tool to monitor the entry of (99)Tc into the environment. Graphical Abstract (99m)Tc is widely used in Nuclear Medicine for diagnosis. Its daugther (99)Tc is automatically monitored in biological samples from treated patients by in-syringe dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. PMID:26007698

  9. Simultaneous determination of 226Ra, 233U and 237Np by liquid scintillation spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nebelung, Cordula; Baraniak, Lutz

    2007-02-01

    A method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of 226Ra, 233U and 237Np by liquid-scintillation (LS) spectrometry. This method consists of the evaluation of the alpha-spectrum that is composed of the strongly overlapping peaks of 226Ra, 233U, 237Np, 222Rn and 218Po in the energy range of 4.60-6.00 MeV and the single 214Po peak at 7.69 MeV. The alpha-peaks are analysed by a special peak fit function that considers the deviation of the alpha-peak at the low energy side from the pure Gaussian shape. First 237Np is determined using its daughter 233Pa by analysing the beta-spectrum in the range 150-570 keV. 226Ra follows from the alpha-spectrum that is measured 6 weeks after sample preparation, i.e., 226Ra is determined from the radioactive equilibrium with its short-lived daughters 222Rn, 218Po and 214Po. Finally the 233U activity results from the fitted spectrum in the range of 4.4-4.8 MeV by subtracting the activity of 226Ra and 237Np. Knowing the exact energy position of the LS-peaks an alternative evaluation consists in the accurate deconvolution of the first three peaks that are formed by 226Ra and 233U (maximum of both at channel 700), 237Np (maxima at channels 700 and 725) and 222Rn (maximum at channel 737). In these two ways 226Ra, 233U and 237Np can be determined in mutual activity ratios of 1:50 with a relative standard deviation of less than 4% for the major activity and 9% for the minor activity. PMID:17142052

  10. Study of annual modulation at Soudan Mine using a liquid scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Mei, Dongming

    2015-04-01

    The phenomenon of annual modulation is believed to be one of signatures induced by Weakly Interacting Massive Particles(WIMPs) through elastic scattering off nucleus in the target for direct dark matter searches. Both DAMA and CoGeNT experiments have claimed the discovery of dark matter in terms of annual modulation while many other experiments have ruled out the entire claimed region. However, the sources that caused the annual modulation in DAMA and CoGeNT are till mysterious. A 12-liter liquid scintillation detector has been running at Soudan Mine (1.95 km.w.e) for several years. Using this detector, muon and muon-induced neutron fluxes at Soudan Mine are measured to be (1 . 65 +/- 0 . 02(sta .) +/- 0 . 1(sys .)) × 10-7 cm-2 s-1 (Eμ > 1 GeV) and (2 . 23 +/- 0 . 52(sta .) +/- 0 . 99(sys .)) ×10-9 cm-2 s-1 (En > 20 MeV), respectively. Data analysis for three years shows a clear annual modulation pattern (E > 10 MeV) caused by cosmic-ray muons with an amplitude of ~ 2%. The annual modulation caused by radon has also been observed in the energy region below 10 MeV. We demonstrate the sources of annual modulation in different energy region and explain how background-induced annual modulation may mimic dark matter signature. This work is supported by NSF in part by the NSF PHY-0758120 and 1242640, DOE Grant DE-FG02-10ER46709, and the State of South Dakota.

  11. A measurement of the absorption of liquid argon scintillation light by dissolved nitrogen at the part-per-million level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B. J. P.; Chiu, C. S.; Conrad, J. M.; Ignarra, C. M.; Katori, T.; Toups, M.

    2013-07-01

    We report on a measurement of the absorption length of scintillation light in liquid argon due to dissolved nitrogen at the part-per-million (ppm) level. We inject controlled quantities of nitrogen into a high purity volume of liquid argon and monitor the light yield from an alpha source. The source is placed at different distances from a cryogenic photomultiplier tube assembly. By comparing the light yield from each position we extract the absorption cross section of nitrogen. We find that nitrogen absorbs argon scintillation light with strength of (1.51±0.15) × 10-4 cm-1ppm-1, corresponding to an absorption cross section of (4.99±0.51) × 10-21 cm2molecule-1. We obtain the relationship between absorption length and nitrogen concentration over the 0 to 50 ppm range and discuss the implications for the design and data analysis of future large liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) detectors. Our results indicate that for a current-generation LArTPC, where a concentration of 2 parts per million of nitrogen is expected, the attenuation length due to nitrogen will be 30±3 meters.

  12. Results of low energy background measurements with the Liquid Scintillation Detector (LSD) of the Mont Blanc Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aglietta, M.; Badino, G.; Bologna, G. F.; Castagnoli, C.; Fulgione, W.; Galeotti, P.; Saavedra, O.; Trinchero, G. C.; Vernetto, S.; Dadykin, V. L.

    1985-01-01

    The 90 tons liquid scintillation detector (LSD) is fully running since October 1984, at a depth of 5,200 hg/sq cm of standard rock underground. The main goal is to search for neutrino bursts from collapsing stars. The experiment is very sensitive to detect low energy particles and has a very good signature to gamma-rays from (n,p) reaction which follows the upsilon e + p yields n + e sup + neutrino capture. The analysis of data is presented and the preliminary results on low energy measurements are discussed.

  13. Characteristic parameters in the measurement of (14)C of biobased diesel fuels by liquid scintillation.

    PubMed

    Idoeta, R; Pérez, E; Herranz, M; Legarda, F

    2014-11-01

    The direct method based on the radiocarbon content present in modern-day materials used for the quantification of the renewable origin component in diesel has been analysed in order to establish the best sample preparation and measuring conditions that minimise the limit of detection. The scintillation cocktail and the diesel/cocktail ratio have been optimised. PMID:24560852

  14. Delayed light emission of Tetraphenyl-butadiene excited by liquid argon scintillation light. Current status and future plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segreto, E.; Machado, A. A.; Araujo, W.; Teixeira, V.

    2016-02-01

    Tetraphenyl-butadiene is the wavelength shifter most widely used in combination with liquid argon. The latter emits scintillation photons with a wavelength of 127 nm that need to be downshifted to be detected by photomultipliers with glass or quartz windows. Tetraphenyl-butadiene has been demonstrated to have an extremely high conversion efficiency, possibly higher than 100% for 127 nm photons, while there is no precise information about the time dependence of its emission. It is usually assumed to be exponentially decaying with a characteristic time of the order of one ns, as an extrapolation from measurements with exciting radiation in the near UV . This work shows that tetraphenyl-butadiene, when excited by 127 nm photons, re-emits photons not only with a very short decay time, but also with slower ones due to triplet states de-excitations. This fact can strongly contribute to clarifying the anomalies in liquid-argon scintillation light reported in the literature since the 1970s. Precision measurements of the properties of TPB, when excited by Vacuum Ultra Violet photons are being carried on at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory in Campinas (State of São Paulo).

  15. Digital pulse shape discrimination methods for n-γ separation in an EJ-301 liquid scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Bo; Zhang, Xue-Ying; Chen, Liang; Ge, Hong-Lin; Ma, Fei; Zhang, Hong-Bin; Ju, Yong-Qin; Zhang, Yan-Bin; Li, Yan-Yan; Xu, Xiao-Wei

    2015-11-01

    A digital pulse shape discrimination system based on a programmable module NI-5772 has been established and tested with an EJ-301 liquid scintillation detector. The module was operated by running programs developed in LabVIEW, with a sampling frequency up to 1.6 GS/s. Standard gamma sources 22Na, 137Cs and 60Co were used to calibrate the EJ-301 liquid scintillation detector, and the gamma response function was obtained. Digital algorithms for the charge comparison method and zero-crossing method have been developed. The experimental results show that both digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms can discriminate neutrons from γ-rays. Moreover, the zero-crossing method shows better n-γ discrimination at 80 keVee and lower, whereas the charge comparison method gives better results at higher thresholds. In addition, the figure-of-merit (FOM) for detectors of two different dimensions were extracted at 9 energy thresholds, and it was found that the smaller detector presented better n-γ separation for fission neutrons. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (91226107, 11305229) and the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA03030300)

  16. Radiolabeling and Quantification of Cellular Levels of Phosphoinositides by High Performance Liquid Chromatography-coupled Flow Scintillation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cheuk Y; Choy, Christopher H; Botelho, Roberto J

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositides (PtdInsPs) are essential signaling lipids responsible for recruiting specific effectors and conferring organelles with molecular identity and function. Each of the seven PtdInsPs varies in their distribution and abundance, which are tightly regulated by specific kinases and phosphatases. The abundance of PtdInsPs can change abruptly in response to various signaling events or disturbance of the regulatory machinery. To understand how these events lead to changes in the amount of PtdInsPs and their resulting impact, it is important to quantify PtdInsP levels before and after a signaling event or between control and abnormal conditions. However, due to their low abundance and similarity, quantifying the relative amounts of each PtdInsP can be challenging. This article describes a method for quantifying PtdInsP levels by metabolically labeling cells with (3)H-myo-inositol, which is incorporated into PtdInsPs. Phospholipids are then precipitated and deacylated. The resulting soluble (3)H-glycero-inositides are further extracted, separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and detected by flow scintillation. The labeling and processing of yeast samples is described in detail, as well as the instrumental setup for the HPLC and flow scintillator. Despite losing structural information regarding acyl chain content, this method is sensitive and can be optimized to concurrently quantify all seven PtdInsPs in cells. PMID:26780479

  17. Activity standardisation of ²²⁶Ra by 4πα liquid scintillation counting method.

    PubMed

    Havelka, Miroslav; Bluďovský, Richard

    2013-11-01

    Activity of (226)Ra in radium daughter products free solution was determined by 4πα liquid scintillation counting (LSC) method, where the detection efficiency of radium decay is practically equal to 1. The sources were prepared from solution with known (226)Ra mass concentration, from which, immediately before LS counting, (222)Rn and its daughter nuclides were removed by solvent extraction. LS counting results were corrected practically only for a <0.6% loss of radium from measured sample and for the ingrowth of (222)Rn and (218)Po concentrations in the sample after the separation was completed. The combined relative standard uncertainty was estimated to be lower than 0.34%. PMID:23602705

  18. Attenuation length measurements of a liquid scintillator with LabVIEW and reliability evaluation of the device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Long; Yu, Bo-Xiang; Ding, Ya-Yun; Zhou, Li; Wen, Liang-Jian; Xie, Yu-Guang; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Cai, Xiao; Sun, Xi-Lei; Fang, Jian; Xue, Zhen; Zhang, Ai-Wu; Lü, Qi-Wen; Sun, Li-Jun; Ge, Yong-Shuai; Liu, Ying-Biao; Niu, Shun-Li; Hu, Tao; Cao, Jun; Lü, Jun-Guang

    2013-07-01

    An attenuation length measurement device was constructed using an oscilloscope and LabVIEW for signal acquisition and processing. The performance of the device has been tested in a variety of ways. The test results show that the set-up has a good stability and high precision (sigma/mean reached 0.4 percent). Besides, the accuracy of the measurement system will decrease by about 17 percent if a filter is used. The attenuation length of a gadolinium-loaded liquid scintillator (Gd-LS) was measured as 15.10±0.35 m where Gd-LS was heavily used in the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment. In addition, one method based on the Beer-Lambert law was proposed to investigate the reliability of the measurement device, the R-square reached 0.9995. Moreover, three purification methods for Linear Alkyl Benzene (LAB) production were compared in the experiment.

  19. A simple method to determine bioethanol content in gasoline using two-step extraction and liquid scintillation counting.

    PubMed

    Yunoki, Shunji; Saito, Masaaki

    2009-12-01

    A simple method for determining bioethanol content in gasoline containing bioethanol (denoted as E-gasoline in this study) is urgently required. Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) was employed based on the principle that (14)C exists in bioethanol but not in synthetic ethanol. Bioethanol was extracted in two steps by water from E-gasoline containing 3% (E3) or 10% (E10) bioethanol. The (14)C radioactivity was measured by LSC and converted to the amount of bioethanol. The bioethanol content in E-gasoline was determined precisely from the partition coefficient in the extraction and the amount of bioethanol in the water phases: 2.98+/-0.10% for E3 and 10.0+/-0.1% for E10 (means+/-SD; n=3). It appears that this method can be used to determine bioethanol content in E-gasoline quickly and easily. PMID:19577920

  20. Comparison of calculated spectra for the interaction of photons in a liquid scintillator. Example of 54Mn 835 keV emission.

    PubMed

    Cassette, P; Ahn, G H; Alzitzoglou, T; Aubineau-Lanièce, I; Bochud, F; Garcia Torano, E; Grau Carles, A; Grau Malonda, A; Kossert, K; Lee, K B; Laedermann, J P; Simpson, B R S; van Wyngaardt, W M; Zimmerman, B E

    2006-01-01

    The CIEMAT/NIST and TDCR methods in liquid scintillation counting, initially developed for the activity standardization of pure-beta radionuclides, have been extended to the standardization of electron capture and beta-gamma radionuclides. Both methods require the calculation of the energy spectrum absorbed by the liquid scintillator. For radionuclides emitting X-rays or gamma-rays, when the energy is greater than a few tens of keV the Compton interaction is important and the absorption is not total. In this case, the spectrum absorbed by the scintillator must be calculated using analytical or stochastic models. An illustration of this problem is the standardization of 54Mn, which is a radionuclide decaying by electron capture. The gamma transition, very weakly converted, leads to the emission of an 835 keV photon. The calculation of the detection efficiency of this radionuclide requires the calculation of the energy spectrum transferred to the scintillator after the absorption of the gamma ray and the associated probability of absorption. The validity of the method is thus dependent on the correct calculation of the energy transferred to the scintillator. In order to compare the calculation results obtained using various calculation tools, and to provide the metrology community with some information on the choice of these tools, the LS working group of the ICRM organised a comparison of the calculated absorbed spectra for the 835 keV photon of 54Mn. The result is the spectrum of the energy absorbed by the scintillator per emission of an 835 keV gamma ray. This exercise was proposed for a standard 20 ml LS glass vial and for LS cocktail volumes of 10 and 15 ml. The calculation was done for two different cocktails: toluene and a widely used commercial cocktail, Ultima Gold. The paper describes the results obtained by nine participants using a total of 12 calculation codes. PMID:16600600

  1. Verification of proton range, position, and intensity in IMPT with a 3D liquid scintillator detector system

    PubMed Central

    Archambault, L.; Poenisch, F.; Sahoo, N.; Robertson, D.; Lee, A.; Gillin, M. T.; Mohan, R.; Beddar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) using spot scanned proton beams relies on the delivery of a large number of beamlets to shape the dose distribution in a highly conformal manner. The authors have developed a 3D system based on liquid scintillator to measure the spatial location, intensity, and depth of penetration (energy) of the proton beamlets in near real-time. Methods: The detector system consists of a 20 × 20 × 20 cc liquid scintillator (LS) material in a light tight enclosure connected to a CCD camera. This camera has a field of view of 25.7 by 19.3 cm and a pixel size of 0.4 mm. While the LS is irradiated, the camera continuously acquires images of the light distribution produced inside the LS. Irradiations were made with proton pencil beams produced with a spot-scanning nozzle. Pencil beams with nominal ranges in water between 9.5 and 17.6 cm were scanned to irradiate an area of 10 × 10 cm square on the surface of the LS phantom. Image frames were acquired at 50 ms per frame. Results: The signal to noise ratio of a typical Bragg peak was about 170. Proton range measured from the light distribution produced in the LS was accurate to within 0.3 mm on average. The largest deviation seen between the nominal and measured range was 0.6 mm. Lateral position of the measured pencil beam was accurate to within 0.4 mm on average. The largest deviation seen between the nominal and measured lateral position was 0.8 mm; however, the accuracy of this measurement could be improved by correcting light scattering artifacts. Intensity of single proton spots were measured with precision ranging from 3 % for the smallest spot intensity (0.005 MU) to 0.5 % for the largest spot (0.04 MU). Conclusions: Our LS detector system has been shown to be capable of fast, submillimeter spatial localization of proton spots delivered in a 3D volume. This system could be used for beam range, intensity and position verification in IMPT. PMID:22380355

  2. Verification of proton range, position, and intensity in IMPT with a 3D liquid scintillator detector system

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, L.; Poenisch, F.; Sahoo, N.; Robertson, D.; Lee, A.; Gillin, M. T.; Mohan, R.; Beddar, S.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) using spot scanned proton beams relies on the delivery of a large number of beamlets to shape the dose distribution in a highly conformal manner. The authors have developed a 3D system based on liquid scintillator to measure the spatial location, intensity, and depth of penetration (energy) of the proton beamlets in near real-time. Methods: The detector system consists of a 20 x 20 x 20 cc liquid scintillator (LS) material in a light tight enclosure connected to a CCD camera. This camera has a field of view of 25.7 by 19.3 cm and a pixel size of 0.4 mm. While the LS is irradiated, the camera continuously acquires images of the light distribution produced inside the LS. Irradiations were made with proton pencil beams produced with a spot-scanning nozzle. Pencil beams with nominal ranges in water between 9.5 and 17.6 cm were scanned to irradiate an area of 10 x 10 cm square on the surface of the LS phantom. Image frames were acquired at 50 ms per frame. Results: The signal to noise ratio of a typical Bragg peak was about 170. Proton range measured from the light distribution produced in the LS was accurate to within 0.3 mm on average. The largest deviation seen between the nominal and measured range was 0.6 mm. Lateral position of the measured pencil beam was accurate to within 0.4 mm on average. The largest deviation seen between the nominal and measured lateral position was 0.8 mm; however, the accuracy of this measurement could be improved by correcting light scattering artifacts. Intensity of single proton spots were measured with precision ranging from 3 % for the smallest spot intensity (0.005 MU) to 0.5 % for the largest spot (0.04 MU). Conclusions: Our LS detector system has been shown to be capable of fast, submillimeter spatial localization of proton spots delivered in a 3D volume. This system could be used for beam range, intensity and position verification in IMPT.

  3. Decoloration and solubilization of plant tissue prior to determination of /sup 3/H, /sup 14/C, and /sup 35/S by liquid scintillation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, I.K.; Lang, A.L.

    1987-08-01

    A method is described for the decoloration and partial solubilization of plant tissue with 2% sodium hypochlorite. Following treatment of the digest with ammonia, the samples are suitable for the determination of /sup 3/H, /sup 14/C, and /sup 35/S by liquid scintillation counting. The color quenching is negligible and counting efficiencies are high: 30-40% for /sup 3/H and 90-95% for /sup 14/C.

  4. Determination of radiostrontium in milk samples by ultra-low-level liquid scintillation counting: a validated approach.

    PubMed

    dell'Oro, Daniela; Iammarino, Marco; Bortone, Nicola; Mangiacotti, Michele; Chiaravalle, Antonio Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Strontium-90 is a hazardous radionuclide derived from nuclear fission processes, and it decays emitting high-energy beta-particles forming yttrium-90. It may be easily absorbed in humans through several food supply chains, since it is chemically similar to some important biological elements such as potassium and calcium. In this work an analytical method for the determination of radiostrontium in milk by liquid scintillation counting was developed in order to obtain a precise quantification at low activity concentration levels. Moreover, a full validative approach was applied to confirm method reliability. Good analytical performance was obtained by developing an in-house validation model according to Regulation 882/2004/EC and Decision 657/2002/EC with a good selectivity, a decision threshold and detection limit corresponding to 0.003 and 0.006 Bq l⁻¹ (α = β = 0.05) respectively, a repeatability value, expressed as CV%, equal to 13%, a mean recovery value equal to 102.5% and a measurement uncertainty equal to 11.5%. Strontium and yttrium chemical yields were determined by a reliable analytical method by inductively coupled mass spectrometry, assuring a suitable correction of final result. The results of the method validation, combined with a quality control assurance, performed on a reference material, demonstrated that the procedure represents a substantial improvement in the determination of ⁹⁰Sr relating to accurate confirmation analyses. PMID:25299737

  5. Determination of (222)Rn absorption properties of polycarbonate foils by liquid scintillation counting. Application to (222)Rn measurements.

    PubMed

    Mitev, K; Cassette, P; Georgiev, S; Dimitrova, I; Sabot, B; Boshkova, T; Tartès, I; Pressyanov, D

    2016-03-01

    This work demonstrates that a Liquid Scintillation Counting (LSC) technique using a Triple to Double Coincidence Ratio counter with extending dead-time is very appropriate for the accurate measurement of (222)Rn activity absorbed in thin polycarbonate foils. It is demonstrated that using a toluene-based LS cocktail, which dissolves polycarbonates, the (222)Rn activity absorbed in thin Makrofol N foil can be determined with a relative standard uncertainty of about 0.7%. A LSC-based application of the methodology for determination of the diffusion length of (222)Rn in thin polycarbonate foils is proposed and the diffusion length of (222)Rn in Makrofol N (38.9±1.3µm) and the partition coefficient of (222)Rn in Makrofol N from air (112±12, at 20°C) and from water (272±17, at 21°C) are determined. Calibration of commercial LS spectrometers for (222)Rn measurements by LSC of thin polycarbonate foils is performed and the minimum detectable activities by this technique are estimated. PMID:26640234

  6. Digital processing of signals arising from organic liquid scintillators for applications in the mixed-field assessment of nuclear threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspinall, M. D.; Joyce, M. J.; Mackin, R. O.; Jarrah, Z.; Peyton, A. J.

    2008-10-01

    The nuclear aspect of the CBRN* threat is often divided amongst radiological substances posing no criticality risk, often referred to as 'dirty bomb' scenarios, and fissile threats. The latter have the theoretical potential for criticality excursion, resulting in elevated neutron fluxes in addition to the γ-ray component that is common to dirty bombs. Even in isolation of the highly-unlikely criticality scenario, fissile substances often exhibit radiation fields comprising a significant neutron component which can require considerably different counterterrorism measures and clean-up methodologies. The contrast between these threats can indicate important differences in the relative sophistication of the perpetrators and their organizations. Consequently, the detection and discrimination of nuclear perils in terms of mixed-field content is an important assay in combating terrorist threats. In this paper we report on the design and implementation of a fast digitizer and embedded-processor for onthe- fly signal processing of events from organic liquid scintillators. A digital technique, known as Pulse Gradient Analysis (PGA), has been developed at Lancaster University for the digital discrimination of neutrons and γ rays. PGA has been deployed on bespoke hardware and demonstrates remarkable improvement over analogue methods for the assay of mixed fields and the real-time discrimination of neutrons and γ rays. In this regard the technology constitutes an attractive and affordable means for the discrimination of the radiation fields arising from fissile threats and those from dirty bombs. Data are presented demonstrating this capability with sealed radioactive sources.

  7. Comparison of tritiated-water standards by liquid scintillation for calibration of a new Standard Reference Material®.

    PubMed

    Collé, R; Laureano-Perez, L; Bergeron, D E

    2016-06-01

    A new National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) tritiated-water ((3)H-labeled oxidane) standard was prepared and calibrated. It is the 17th in a series of linked standards since 1954 and will be disseminated as Standard Reference Material® SRM 4927G, having a massic activity of 544.2kBqg(-1), with an expanded (k=2) relative standard uncertainty of 0.96%, at a Reference Time of 1200 EST, 1 May 2015. The calibration is based on relative liquid scintillation (LS) measurements using quench-varied efficiency tracing with two previous 1999 issues, viz., SRM 4927F and 4926E. Measurement comparisons were also made with respect to a 1994 tritiated-water French national standard and to a tritiated-water solution measured by 19 laboratories as part of an international measurement comparison organized by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) in 2009. Confirmatory measurements for the massic activity of both SRM 4927F and 4927G by a triple-to-double coincidence ratio (TDCR) technique were also made. PMID:27010939

  8. A high-sensitivity method for the measurement of 222Rn based on liquid scintillation counting of polycarbonate powder.

    PubMed

    Mitev, K; Georgiev, S; Pressyanov, D; Dimitrova, I; Zhivkova, V; Boshkova, T

    2014-07-01

    This work describes a technique for the measurement of 222Rn by absorption in polycarbonate (PC) powder and liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The work is an improvement of the recently proposed method for 222Rn measurements by LSC of exposed PC grains. It is demonstrated that the use of PC powder as a 222Rn sampler improves 13.6 times the sampling efficiency and leads to 6.5 times smaller minimmal detectable activity concentrations (MDAC) compared with the PC grains used so far. For a 40-h exposure of 7.4-g PC powder to 222Rn in air, the MDAC with a RackBeta 1219 LS counter is 62 Bq m(-3) (assuming a 8-h sample counting time and 24-h background time). For the same conditions the estimated 222Rn MDAC with a Quantulus 1220 LS counter is 20 Bq m(-3). The proposed technique is suitable for radon in air and radon in soil-gas measurements. PMID:24723190

  9. A plastic scintillation counter prototype.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Etsuko; Kawano, Takao

    2015-10-01

    A new prototype device for beta-ray measurement, a plastic scintillation counter, was assembled as an alternative device to liquid scintillation counters. This device uses plastic scintillation sheets (PS sheets) as a sample applicator without the use of a liquid scintillator. The performance was evaluated using tritium labeled compounds, and good linearity was observed between the activity and net count rate. The calculated detection limit of the device was 0.01 Bq mL(-1) after 10 h measurement for 2 mL sample. PMID:26164628

  10. Separation and Purification and Beta Liquid Scintillation Analysis of Sm-151 in Savannah River Site and Hanford Site DOE High Level Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R.A.

    2001-02-13

    This paper describes development work to obtain a product phase of Sm-151 pure of any other radioactive species so that it can be determined in US Department of Energy high level liquid waste and low level solid waste by liquid scintillation {beta}-spectroscopy. The technique provides separation from {mu}Ci/ml levels of Cs-137, Pu alpha and Pu-241 {beta}-decay activity, and Sr-90/Y-90 activity. The separation technique is also demonstrated to be useful for the determination of Pm-147.

  11. Cryogenic THGEM-GPM for the readout of scintillation light from liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wenqing; Fu, Yidong; Li, Yulan; Li, Jin; Li, Yuanjing; Yue, Qian

    2015-02-01

    A GPM (Gaseous Photo Multiplier) based on GEMs (Gas Electron Multipliers) and THGEMs (Thick Gas Electron Multipliers) is a promising detector for VUV (Vacuum Ultra Violet) photon readouts in rare event experiments which use cryogenic two-phase detectors with detection media of Ar and Xe. A GPM based on THGEM made of PTFE (herein named PTFE-THGEM) was developed inspired by the wide use of PTFE (polytetrafluoroethene) boards as low radioactive background PCB in rare event experiments. The efficiencies of the THGEM, a CsI photocathode, and finally a GPM are presented here. At low temperature (113 K) and 1.1 atm, the quantum efficiency of the GPM for VUV photons from liquid Ar in a two-phase detector is estimated to be 8.1% and the low threshold of the detector system for initial electrons prior to multiplication is 12 using 5 N purity Ar (0.99999).

  12. Enhancement of archaeological heritage. El Risco de las Cuevas at Perales de Tajuña, Madrid (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire-Lista, David Martin; Alvarez de Buergo, Mónica; Fort, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    Heritage conservation has a great impact on the economy of a country. The enhancement of archaeological sites is an investment that promotes tourism and culture. The interdisciplinary knowledge of heritage should be the basis of its management. Preventive actions, non-destructive analytical techniques and monitoring for the conservation of these assets should be promoted. "El Risco de las Cuevas" is a highly decayed and nearly vertical gypsum escarpment which contains a series of dwellings excavated during the Chalcolithic and much more recent times. It is located at Perales de Tajuña, 40 km southeast of Madrid, Spain. This monument is approximately 70 metres high and 500 metres wide. It was listed as a cultural and monumental heritage site by the regional government of Madrid in 1998. The gypsum escarpment housing the dwellings forms part of a lower Miocene unit (Madrid Basin). Debris cones with a mixture of debris from the lower, medium and upper units are found at the bottom of the rockwall. The vulnerability of this monument to atmospheric agents has been studied using "in situ" monitoring techniques of humidity, temperature and rate of rockfalls. Drones have been used for aerial photography in the highest areas of the escarpment and have provided an information network of fractures likely to cause rockfall. Gypsum artificial accelerated ageing has been carried out in the laboratory, including freeze/thaw, wet/dry, thermal shock and dissolution tests. To determine the response of these accelerated ageing processes, density, micro-roughness, ultrasound velocities (Vp and Vs), air permeability and microscopy measurements were made before, during and after ageing tests. Geomorphological studies, rates of decay, material characteristics and durability tests indicate that the decay is controlled by the mineralogy, clay content and porosity of the gypsum rock, as well as microclimate, temperature changes and rock fractures. Rockfalls are particularly relevant in the

  13. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of the simulation of 123I and 54Mn gamma and X-ray emissions in a liquid scintillation vial.

    PubMed

    Bignell, L J; Mo, L; Alexiev, D; Hashemi-Nezhad, S R

    2010-01-01

    Radiation transport simulations of the most probable gamma- and X-ray emissions of (123)I and (54)Mn in a three photomultiplier tube liquid scintillation detector have been carried out. A Geant4 simulation was used to acquire energy deposition spectra and interaction probabilities with the scintillant, as required for absolute activity measurement using the triple to double coincidence ratio (TDCR) method. A sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of the simulation model is presented here. The uncertainty in the Monte Carlo simulation results due to the input parameter uncertainties was found to be more significant than the statistical uncertainty component for a typical number of simulated decay events. The model was most sensitive to changes in the volume of the scintillant. Estimates of the relative uncertainty associated with the simulation outputs due to the combined stochastic and input uncertainties are provided. A Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis of an (123)I TDCR measurement indicated that accounting for the simulation uncertainties increases the uncertainty of efficiency of the logical sum of double coincidence by 5.1%. PMID:20036571

  14. Deuterated-xylene (xylene-d10; EJ301D): A new, improved deuterated liquid scintillator for neutron energy measurements without time-of-flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becchetti, F. D.; Raymond, R. S.; Torres-Isea, R. O.; Di Fulvio, A.; Clarke, S. D.; Pozzi, S. A.; Febbraro, M.

    2016-06-01

    In conjunction with Eljen Technology, Inc. (Sweetwater,TX) we have designed, constructed, and evaluated a 3 in. ×3 in. deuterated-xylene organic liquid scintillator (C8D10; EJ301D) as a fast neutron detector. Similar to deuterated benzene (C6D6; NE230, BC537, and EJ315) this scintillator can provide good pulse-shape discrimination between neutrons and gamma rays, has good timing characteristics, and can provide a light spectrum with peaks corresponding to discrete neutron energy groups up to ca. 20 MeV. Unlike benzene-based detectors, deuterated xylene is less volatile, less toxic, is not known to be carcinogenic, has a higher flashpoint, and hence is much safer for many applications. In addition EJ301D can provide slightly more light output and better PSD than deuterated-benzene scintillators. We show that, as with deuterated-benzene scintillators, the light-response spectra can be unfolded to provide useable neutron energy spectra without need for time-of-flight (ToF). An array of these detectors arranged at many angles close to a reaction target can be much more effective (×10 to ×100 or more) than an array of long-path ToF detectors which must utilize a narrowly-bunched and pulse-selected beam. As we demonstrate using a small Van de Graaff accelerator, measurements can thus be performed when a bunched and pulse-selected beam (as needed for time-of-flight) is not available.

  15. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kross, Brian J.

    1994-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  16. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1992-07-28

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  17. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1994-06-07

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  18. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kross, Brian J.

    1992-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  19. [Development of a simple quantitative method for the strontium-89 concentration of radioactive liquid waste using the plastic scintillation survey meter for beta rays].

    PubMed

    Narita, Hiroto; Tsuchiya, Yuusuke; Hirase, Kiyoshi; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Fukushi, Masahiro

    2012-11-01

    Strontium-89 (89Sr: pure beta, E; 1.495 MeV-100%, halflife: 50.5 days) chloride is used as pain relief from bone metastases. An assay of 89Sr is difficult because of a pure beta emitter. For management of 89Sr, we tried to evaluate a simple quantitative method for the 59Sr concentration of radioactive liquid waste using scintillation survey meter for beta rays. The counting efficiency of the survey meter with this method was 35.95%. A simple 30 minutes measurement of 2 ml of the sample made the quantitative measurement of 89Sr practical. Reducing self-absorption of the beta ray in the solution by counting on the polyethlene paper improved the counting efficiency. Our method made it easy to manage the radioactive liquid waste under the legal restrictions. PMID:23402205

  20. Determination of neutron-induced alpha-particle cross sections on carbon using the response of a liquid scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Brede, H.J.; Dietze, G.; Klein, H.; Schoelermann, H. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the sums of the cross section {sup 12}C(n, {alpha}{sub 0}) {sup 9}Be and {sup 12}C(n, N{prime}3{alpha}) determined in the neutron energy range between 7.4 and 11 MeV. An NE-213 scintillation detector is simultaneously used as a carbon target, an alpha-particle detector, and a neutron fluence monitor. By comparing the measured and calculated response spectra, the neutron-induced alpha-particle events in the scintillation volume are separated and the cross sections {sigma}{sub n,{alpha}0} + {sigma}{sub n,n{prime}3{alpha}} are determined relative to the n-p scattering cross section. The pulse-height distribution due to alpha particles allows the angular distribution to be extracted on the basis of the reaction kinematics and an accurately determined light output function for alpha particles in the NE-213 detector.

  1. Scintillator Measurements for SNO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaptanoglu, Tanner; SNO+ Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    SNO+ is a neutrino detector located 2km underground in the SNOLAB facility with the primary goal of searching for neutrinoless double beta decay. The detector will be filled with a liquid scintillator target primarily composed of linear alkyl benzene (LAB). As charged particles travel through the detector the LAB produces scintillation light which is detected by almost ten thousand PMTs. The LAB is loaded with Te130, an isotope known to undergo double beta decay. Additionally, the LAB is mixed with an additional fluor and wavelength shifter to improve the light output and shift the light to a wavelength regime in which the PMTs are maximally efficient. The precise scintillator optics drastically affect the ultimate sensitivity of SNO+. I will present work being done to measure the optical properties of the SNO+ scintillator cocktail. The measured properties are used as input to a scintillation model that allows us to extrapolate to the SNO+ scale and ultimately predict the sensitivity of the experiment. Additionally, I will present measurements done to characterize the R5912 PMT, a candidate PMT for the second phase of SNO+ that provides better light collection, improved charge resolution, and a narrower spread in timing.

  2. Measurements of high energy neutrons penetrated through iron shields using the Self-TOF detector and an NE213 organic liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, M.; Nakao, N.; Nunomiya, T.; Nakamura, T.; Fukumura, A.; Takada, M.

    2002-11-01

    Neutron energy spectra penetrated through iron shields were measured using the Self-TOF detector and an NE213 organic liquid scintillator which have been newly developed by our group at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Japan. Neutrons were generated by bombarding 400 MeV/nucleon C ion on a thick (stopping-length) copper target. The neutron spectra in the energy range from 20 to 800 MeV were obtained through the FORIST unfolding code with their response functions and compared with the MCNPX calculations combined with the LA150 cross section library. The neutron fluence measured by the NE213 detector was simulated by the track length estimator in the MCNPX, and evaluated the contribution of the room-scattered neutrons. The calculations are in fairly good agreement with the measurements. Neutron fluence attenuation lengths were obtained from the experimental results and the calculation.

  3. Organic liquid scintillation detectors for on-the-fly neutron/gamma alarming and radionuclide identification in a pedestrian radiation portal monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paff, Marc Gerrit; Ruch, Marc L.; Poitrasson-Riviere, Alexis; Sagadevan, Athena; Clarke, Shaun D.; Pozzi, Sara

    2015-07-01

    We present new experimental results from a radiation portal monitor based on the use of organic liquid scintillators. The system was tested as part of a 3He-free radiation portal monitor testing campaign at the European Commission's Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy, in February 2014. The radiation portal monitor was subjected to a wide range of test conditions described in ANSI N42.35, including a variety of gamma-ray sources and a 20,000 n/s 252Cf source. A false alarm test tested whether radiation portal monitors ever alarmed in the presence of only natural background. The University of Michigan Detection for Nuclear Nonproliferation Group's system triggered zero false alarms in 2739 trials. It consistently alarmed on a variety of gamma-ray sources travelling at 1.2 m/s at a 70 cm source to detector distance. The neutron source was detected at speeds up to 3 m/s and in configurations with up to 8 cm of high density polyethylene shielding. The success of on-the-fly radionuclide identification varied with the gamma-ray source measured as well as with which of two radionuclide identification methods was used. Both methods used a least squares comparison between the measured pulse height distributions to library spectra to pick the best match. The methods varied in how the pulse height distributions were modified prior to the least squares comparison. Correct identification rates were as high as 100% for highly enriched uranium, but as low as 50% for 241Am. Both radionuclide identification algorithms produced mixed results, but the concept of using liquid scintillation detectors for gamma-ray and neutron alarming in radiation portal monitor was validated.

  4. Linear lateral vibration of axisymmetric liquid briges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrera, C.; Montanero, J. M.; Cabezas, M. G.

    A liquid bridge is a mass of liquid sustained by the action of the surface tension force between two parallel supporting disks Apart from their basic scientific interest a liquid bridge can be considered as the simplest idealization of the configuration appearing in the floating zone technique used for crystal growth and purification of high melting point materials footnote Messeguer et al emph Crystal Growth Res bf 5 27 1999 This has conferred considerable interest on the study of liquid bridges not only in fluid mechanics but also in the field of material engineering The axisymmetric dynamics of an isothermal liquid bridge has been frequently analysed over the past years The studies have considered different phenomena such as free oscillations footnote Montanero emph E J Mech B Fluids bf 22 169 2003 footnote Acero and Montanero emph Phys Fluids bf 17 078105 2005 forced vibrations footnote Perales and Messeguer emph Phys Fluids A bf 4 1110 1992 g-jitter effects footnote Messeguer and Perales emph Phys Fluids A bf 3 2332 1991 extensional deformation footnote Zhang et al emph J Fluid Mech bf 329 207 1996 and breakup process footnote Espino et al emph Phys Fluids bf 14 3710 2002 among others Works considering the nonaxisymmetric dynamical behaviour of a liquid bridge has been far less common footnote Sanz and Diez emph J Fluid Mech bf 205 503 1989 In the present study the linear vibration of an axisymmetric liquid

  5. Waveshifters and Scintillators for Ionizing Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    B.Baumgaugh; J.Bishop; D.Karmgard; J.Marchant; M.McKenna; R.Ruchti; M.Vigneault; L.Hernandez; C.Hurlbut

    2007-12-11

    Scintillation and waveshifter materials have been developed for the detection of ionizing radiation in an STTR program between Ludlum Measurements, Inc. and the University of Notre Dame. Several new waveshifter materials have been developed which are comparable in efficiency and faster in fluorescence decay than the standard material Y11 (K27) used in particle physics for several decades. Additionally, new scintillation materials useful for fiber tracking have been developed which have been compared to 3HF. Lastly, work was done on developing liquid scintillators and paint-on scintillators and waveshifters for high radiation environments.

  6. Time-efficient method for the determination of 210Pb, 210Bi, and 210Po activities in seawater using liquid scintillation spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Biggin, Colin D; Cook, Gordon T; MacKenzie, Angus B; Pates, Jacqueline M

    2002-02-01

    A novel method has been developed for determining the natural decay series radionuclides (NDS), 210Pb, 210Bi, and 210Po, in seawater by way of state-of-the-art liquid scintillation spectrometry. For 210Pb analysis, the method makes use of a 212Pb yield tracer, prepared by ion exchange separation from aged Th(NO3)4. 210Bi recovery is determined using 207Bi as the yield tracer, and 210Po is determined using the conventional 208Po yield tracer. The limits of detection for this method are 0.32, 0.34, and 0.004 mBq 1-1 for 210Pb, 210Bi, and 210Po, respectively. The analysis can be completed within 10 days, as compared with up to one year for traditional methods. Results are presented for a preliminary study of 210Pb, 210Bi, and 210Po in the dissolved and particle-bound phases of Irish Sea water. PMID:11838694

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of prompt γ-ray spectra from depleted uranium under D-T neutron irradiation and electron recoil spectra in a liquid scintillator detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian-Guo, Qin; Cai-Feng, Lai; Rong, Liu; Tong-Hua, Zhu; Xin-Wei, Zhang; Bang-Jiao, Ye

    2016-03-01

    To overcome the problem of inefficient computing time and unreliable results in MCNP5 calculation, a two-step method is adopted to calculate the energy deposition of prompt γ-rays in detectors for depleted uranium spherical shells under D-T neutron irradiation. In the first step, the γ-ray spectrum for energy below 7 MeV is calculated by MCNP5 code; secondly, the electron recoil spectrum in a BC501A liquid scintillator detector is simulated based on EGSnrc Monte Carlo Code with the γ-ray spectrum from the first step as input. The comparison of calculated results with experimental ones shows that the simulations agree well with experiment in the energy region 0.4-3 MeV for the prompt γ-ray spectrum and below 4 MeVee for the electron recoil spectrum. The reliability of the two-step method in this work is validated. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (91226104) and National Special Magnetic Confinement Fusion Energy Research, China (2015GB108001)

  8. Determination of ⁹⁰Sr and ²¹⁰Pb in sludge samples using a LOV-MSFIA system and liquid scintillation counting.

    PubMed

    Mola, M; Avivar, J; Nieto, A; Peñalver, A; Aguilar, C; Ferrer, L; Cerdà, V; Borrull, F

    2014-04-01

    There has been increasing interest recently in the capacity of water treatment plants to concentrate and eliminate radionuclides from raw water. As the normal operation in these plants generates high quantities of sludge, which can be considered a naturally occurring radioactive material, it is important to gather information about its radiological content. Therefore, in order to determine the activity values of two radioactive beta emitters with minimal sample manipulation, an automated lab-on-valve and multisyringe flow injection system has been developed to achieve the sequential preconcentration and separation of (90)Sr and (210)Pb using an extraction chromatographic resin (Sr-spec). Activities of both isotopes were measured by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The developed method was validated by analyzing three samples from three different intercomparison exercises and good Z-score values (between 0.1 and 1) and trueness values (between 10% and 17%) were obtained. The method was then also satisfactorily applied to sludge samples taken from a Spanish drinking water treatment plant which treats water from the Ebro River. The proposed method offers advantages over existing methods as it allows the sequential separation of both isotopes, simply by changing the elution conditions and using a semi-automated approach. Therefore, the method is less time consuming and environmentally friendly. PMID:24462943

  9. SCINTILLATION SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R.; Francis, J.E.

    1960-06-21

    A portable scintillation spectrometer is described which is especially useful in radio-biological studies for determining the uptake and distribution of gamma -emitting substances in tissue. The spectrometer includes a collimator having a plurality of apertures that are hexagonal in cross section. Two crystals are provided: one is activated to respond to incident rays from the collimator; the other is not activated and shields the first from external radiation.

  10. Plastic scintillation dosimetry: Optimal selection of scintillating fibers and scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, Louis; Arsenault, Jean; Gingras, Luc; Sam Beddar, A.; Roy, Rene; Beaulieu, Luc

    2005-07-15

    Scintillation dosimetry is a promising avenue for evaluating dose patterns delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans or for the small fields involved in stereotactic radiosurgery. However, the increase in signal has been the goal for many authors. In this paper, a comparison is made between plastic scintillating fibers and plastic scintillator. The collection of scintillation light was measured experimentally for four commercial models of scintillating fibers (BCF-12, BCF-60, SCSF-78, SCSF-3HF) and two models of plastic scintillators (BC-400, BC-408). The emission spectra of all six scintillators were obtained by using an optical spectrum analyzer and they were compared with theoretical behavior. For scintillation in the blue region, the signal intensity of a singly clad scintillating fiber (BCF-12) was 120% of that of the plastic scintillator (BC-400). For the multiclad fiber (SCSF-78), the signal reached 144% of that of the plastic scintillator. The intensity of the green scintillating fibers was lower than that of the plastic scintillator: 47% for the singly clad fiber (BCF-60) and 77% for the multiclad fiber (SCSF-3HF). The collected light was studied as a function of the scintillator length and radius for a cylindrical probe. We found that symmetric detectors with nearly the same spatial resolution in each direction (2 mm in diameter by 3 mm in length) could be made with a signal equivalent to those of the more commonly used asymmetric scintillators. With augmentation of the signal-to-noise ratio in consideration, this paper presents a series of comparisons that should provide insight into selection of a scintillator type and volume for development of a medical dosimeter.

  11. The Use of Isotope Dilution Alpha Spectrometry and Liquid Scintillation Counting to Determine Radionuclides in Environmental Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Bylyku, Elida

    2009-04-19

    In Albania in recent years it has been of increasing interest to determine various pollutants in the environment and their possible effects on human health. The radiochemical procedure used to identify Pu, Am, U, Th, and Sr radioisotopes in soil, sediment, water, coal, and milk samples is described. The analysis is carried out in the presence of respective tracer solutions and combines the procedure for Pu analysis based on anion exchange, the selective method for Sr isolation based on extraction chromatography using Sr-Spec resin, and the application of the TRU-Spec column for separation of Am fraction. An acid digestion method has been applied for the decomposition of samples. The radiochemical procedure involves the separation of Pu from Th, Am, and Sr by anion exchange, followed by the preconcentration of Am and Sr by coprecipitation with calcium oxalate. Am is separated from Sr by extraction chromatography. Uranium is separated from the bulk elements by liquid-liquid extraction using UTEVA registered resin. Thin sources for alpha spectrometric measurements are prepared by microprecipitation with NdF3. Two International Atomic Energy Agency reference materials were analyzed in parallel with the samples.

  12. Broad energy range neutron spectroscopy using a liquid scintillator and a proportional counter: Application to a neutron spectrum similar to that from an improvised nuclear device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Marino, Stephen A.; Garty, Guy; Harken, Andrew; Brenner, David J.

    2015-09-01

    A novel neutron irradiation facility at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been developed to mimic the neutron radiation from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) at relevant distances (e.g. 1.5 km) from the epicenter. The neutron spectrum of this IND-like neutron irradiator was designed according to estimations of the Hiroshima neutron spectrum at 1.5 km. It is significantly different from a standard reactor fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and it is dominated by neutron energies from 100 keV up to 9 MeV. To verify such wide energy range neutron spectrum, detailed here is the development of a combined spectroscopy system. Both a liquid scintillator detector and a gas proportional counter were used for the recoil spectra measurements, with the individual response functions estimated from a series of Monte Carlo simulations. These normalized individual response functions were formed into a single response matrix for the unfolding process. Several accelerator-based quasi-monoenergetic neutron source spectra were measured and unfolded to test this spectroscopy system. These reference neutrons were produced from two reactions: T(p,n)3He and D(d,n)3He, generating neutron energies in the range between 0.2 and 8 MeV. The unfolded quasi-monoenergetic neutron spectra indicated that the detection system can provide good neutron spectroscopy results in this energy range. A broad-energy neutron spectrum from the 9Be(d,n) reaction using a 5 MeV deuteron beam, measured at 60 degrees to the incident beam was measured and unfolded with the evaluated response matrix. The unfolded broad neutron spectrum is comparable with published time-of-flight results. Finally, the pair of detectors were used to measure the neutron spectrum generated at the RARAF IND-like neutron facility and a comparison is made to the neutron spectrum of Hiroshima.

  13. Metal-loaded organic scintillators for neutrino physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Christian; Yeh, Minfang

    2016-09-01

    Organic liquid scintillators are used in many neutrino physics experiments of the past and present. In particular for low energy neutrinos when realtime and energy information are required, liquid scintillators have several advantages compared to other technologies. In many cases the organic liquid needs to be loaded with metal to enhance the neutrino signal over background events. Several metal loaded scintillators of the past suffered from chemical and optical instabilities, limiting the performance of these neutrino detectors. Different ways of metal loading are described in the article with a focus on recent techniques providing metal loaded scintillators that can be used under stable conditions for many years even in ton scale experiments. Applications of metal loaded scintillators in neutrino experiments are reviewed and the performance as well as the prospects of different scintillator types are compared.

  14. Scintillation proximity assay using polymeric membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) is typically used to quantify electron emitting isotopes. In LSC, radioactive samples are dissolved in an organic fluor solution (scintillation cocktail) to ensure that the label is close enough to the fluor molecules to be detected. Although efficient, scintillation cocktail is neither specific or selective for samples labeled with the same radioisotope. Scintillation cocktail is flammable posing significant health risks to the user and is expensive to purchase and discard. Scintillation Proximity Assay (SPA) is a radioanalytical technique where only those radiochemical entities (RCE's) bound to fluor containing matrices are detected. Only bound RCE's are in close enough proximity the entrapped fluor molecules to induce scintillations. Unbound radioligands are too far removed from the fluor molecules to be detected. The research in this dissertation focused on the development and evaluation of fluor-containing membranes (scintillation proximity membranes, SP membranes) to be used for specific radioanalytical techniques without using scintillation cocktail. Polysulfone and PVC SP membranes prepared in our laboratory were investigated for radioimmunossay (RIA) where only bound radioligand is detected, thereby eliminating the separation step impeding the automation of RIA. These SP membranes performed RIA where the results were nearly identical to commercial SP microbeads. SP membranes functionalized with quaternary ammonium hydroxide moieties were able to trap and quantify [sup 14]CO[sub 2] without using liquid scintillation cocktail. RCE's bound in the pore structure of SP membranes are intimate with the entrapped fluor providing the geometry needed for high detection efficiencies. Absorbent SP membranes were used in radiation surveys and were shown to be as effective as conventional survey techniques using filter paper and scintillation cocktail.

  15. Measurement of light emission in scintillation vials

    SciTech Connect

    Duran Ramiro, M. Teresa; Garcia-Torano, Eduardo

    2005-09-15

    The efficiency and energy resolution of liquid scintillation counting (LSC) systems are strongly dependent on the optical characteristics of scintillators, vials, and reflectors. This article presents the results of measurements of the light-emission profile of scintillation vials. Two measurement techniques, autoradiographs and direct measurements with a photomultiplier tube, have been used to obtain light-emission distribution for standard vials of glass, etched glass and polyethylene. Results obtained with both techniques are in good agreement. For the first time, the effect of the meniscus in terms of light contribution has been numerically estimated. These results can help design LSC systems that are more efficient in terms of light collection.

  16. Separation of scintillation and Cherenkov lights in linear alkyl benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mohan; Guo, Ziyi; Yeh, Minfang; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Shaomin

    2016-09-01

    To separate scintillation and Cherenkov lights in water-based liquid scintillator detectors is a desired feature for future neutrino and proton decay experiments. Linear alkyl benzene (LAB) is one important ingredient of a water-based liquid scintillator currently under development. In this paper we report on the separation of scintillation and Cherenkov lights observed in an LAB sample. The rise and decay times of the scintillation light are measured to be (7.7 ± 3.0) ns and (36.6 ± 2.4) ns , respectively, while the full width [-3σ, 3σ] of the Cherenkov light is 12 ns and is dominated by the time resolution of the photomultiplier tubes. The scintillation light yield was measured to be (1.01 ± 0.12) ×103 photons / MeV .

  17. Scintillators and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard T.

    2014-07-15

    Scintillators of various constructions and methods of making and using the same are provided. In some embodiments, a scintillator comprises at least one radiation absorption region and at least one spatially discrete radiative exciton recombination region.

  18. Scintillators and applications thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Richard T.

    2015-09-01

    Scintillators of various constructions and methods of making and using the same are provided. In some embodiments, a scintillator comprises at least one radiation absorption region and at least one spatially discrete radiative exciton recombination region.

  19. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, R.; Vazquez-Jauregui, E.; Chen, M.; Chkvorets, O.; Hallman, D.

    2011-04-27

    We describe the R and D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O{sub 2}, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed ''natural'' radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.

  20. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, R.; Chen, M.; Chkvorets, O.; Hallman, D.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.

    2011-04-01

    We describe the R&D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O2, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed "natural" radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.

  1. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Moses, William W.

    1991-01-01

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses.

  2. Scintillator materials for calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    Requirements for fast, dense scintillator materials for calorimetry in high energy physics and approaches to satisfying these requirements are reviewed with respect to possible hosts and luminescent species. Special attention is given to cerium-activated crystals, core-valence luminescence, and glass scintillators. The present state of the art, limitations, and suggestions for possible new scintillator materials are presented.

  3. Scintillator manufacture at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mellott, K.; Bross, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A.

    1998-08-01

    A decade of research into plastic scintillation materials at Fermilab is reviewed. Early work with plastic optical fiber fabrication is revisited and recent experiments with large-scale commercial methods for production of bulk scintillator are discussed. Costs for various forms of scintillator are examined and new development goals including cost reduction methods and quality improvement techniques are suggested.

  4. The XENON100 Dark Matter Experiment: Design, Construction, Calibration and 2010 Search Results with Improved Measurement of the Scintillation Response of Liquid Xenon to Low-Energy Nuclear Recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, Guillaume

    An impressive array of astrophysical observations suggest that 83% of the matter in the universe is in a form of non-luminous, cold, collisionless, non-baryonic dark matter. Several extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics aimed at solving the hierarchy problem predict stable weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) that could naturally have the right cosmological relic abundance today to compose most of the dark matter if their interactions with normal matter are on the order of a weak scale cross section. These candidates also have the added benefit that their properties and interaction rates can be computed in a well defined particle physics model. A considerable experimental effort is currently under way to uncover the nature of dark matter. One method of detecting WIMP dark matter is to look for its interactions in terrestrial detectors where it is expected to scatter off nuclei. In 2007, the XENON10 experiment took the lead over the most sensitive direct detection dark matter search in operation, the CDMS II experiment, by probing spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interaction cross sections down to sigmachi N ˜ 5 x 10-44 cm 2 at 30 GeV/c2. Liquefied noble gas detectors are now among the technologies at the forefront of direct detection experiments. Liquid xenon (LXe), in particular, is a well suited target for WIMP direct detection. It is easily scalable to larger target masses, allows discrimination between nuclear recoils and electronic recoils, and has an excellent stopping power to shield against external backgrounds. A particle losing energy in LXe creates both ionization electrons and scintillation light. In a dual-phase LXe time projection chamber (TPC) the ionization electrons are drifted and extracted into the gas phase where they are accelerated to amplify the charge signal into a proportional scintillation signal. These two signals allow the three-dimensional localization of events with millimeter precision and the ability to

  5. Designing Electronics and PMT Housing for a Liquid Scintillation Detector to be Used for Measuring Muon-Induced Processes at Homestake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woltman, Brian; Davis, Patrick; Mei, Dongming; Zhang, Chao

    2010-02-01

    Understanding the backgrounds produced by muon-induced processes is important to the success of experiments searching for rare event physics such as neutrinoless double-beta decay, dark matter, or neutrino oscillations, which require extremely low backgrounds. Measuring these muon-induced processes is vital for the low background experiments planned for the Sanford Lab. We have designed a detector to measure the muon-induced backgrounds produced underground. Our detector consists of a 10.8 liter scintillator joined with two PMT's. We will present our design for housing the PMT's, including their attachment to the scintillator and necessary magnetic shielding. We will also present our design for a voltage divider that was constructed and tested for use on the PMT's. )

  6. Designing Electronics and PMT Housing for a Liquid Scintillator Detector to be Used for Measuring Muon-Induced Processes at Homestake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woltman, Brian; Davis, Patrick; Mei, Dongming; Zhang, Chao

    2009-10-01

    Understanding the backgrounds produced by muon-induced processes is important to the success of experiments searching for rare event physics such as neutrinoless double-beta decay, dark matter, or neutrino oscillations, which require extremely low backgrounds. Measuring these muon-induced processes is vital for the low background experiments planned for the Sanford Lab. We have designed a detector to measure the muon-induced backgrounds produced underground. Our detector consists of a 10.8 liter scintillator joined with two PMT's. We will present our design for housing the PMT's, including their attachment to the scintillator and necessary magnetic shielding. We will also present our design for a voltage divider that was constructed and tested for use on each of the PMT's.

  7. Synthesis of plastic scintillation microspheres: Evaluation of scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, L. M.; Bagán, H.; Tarancón, A.; Garcia, J. F.

    2013-01-01

    The use of plastic scintillation microspheres (PSm) appear to be an alternative to liquid scintillation for the quantification of alpha and beta emitters because it does not generate mixed wastes after the measurement (organic and radioactive). In addition to routine radionuclide determinations, PSm can be used for further applications, e.g. for usage in a continuous monitoring equipment, for measurements of samples with a high salt concentration and for an extractive scintillation support which permits the separation, pre-concentration and measurement of the radionuclides without additional steps of elution and sample preparation. However, only a few manufacturers provide PSm, and the low number of regular suppliers reduces its availability and restricts the compositions and sizes available. In this article, a synthesis method based on the extraction/evaporation methodology has been developed and successfully used for the synthesis of plastic scintillation microspheres. Seven different compositions of plastic scintillation microspheres have been synthesised; PSm1 with polystyrene, PSm2 with 2,5-Diphenyloxazol(PPO), PSm3 with p-terphenyl (pT), PSm4 with PPO and 1,4-bis(5-phenyloxazol-2-yl) (POPOP), PSm5 pT and (1,4-bis [2-methylstyryl] benzene) (Bis-MSB), PSm6 with PPO, POPOP and naphthalene and PSm7 with pT, Bis-MSB and naphthalene. The synthesised plastic scintillation microspheres have been characterised in terms of their morphology, detection capabilities and alpha/beta separation capacity. The microspheres had a median diameter of approximately 130 μm. Maximum detection efficiency values were obtained for the PSm4 composition as follows 1.18% for 3H, 51.2% for 14C, 180.6% for 90Sr/90Y and 76.7% for 241Am. Values of the SQP(E) parameter were approximately 790 for PSm4 and PSm5. These values show that the synthesised PSm exhibit good scintillation properties and that the spectra are at channel numbers higher than in commercial PSm. Finally, the addition of

  8. Scintillator reflective layer coextrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Jae-Chul; Para, Adam

    2001-01-01

    A polymeric scintillator has a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof. The reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and an adhesive binder. The adhesive binder includes polymeric material from which the scintillator is formed. A method of forming the polymeric scintillator having a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof is also provided. The method includes the steps of (a) extruding an inner core member from a first amount of polymeric scintillator material, and (b) coextruding an outer reflective layer on the exterior surface of the inner core member. The outer reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and a second amount of the polymeric scintillator material.

  9. Real-time, digital pulse-shape discrimination in non-hazardous fast liquid scintillation detectors: Prospects for safety and security

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, M. J.; Aspinall, M. D.; Cave, F. D.; Lavietes, A. D.

    2011-07-01

    Pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) in fast, organic scintillation detectors is a long-established technique used to separate neutrons and {gamma} rays in mixed radiation fields. In the analogue domain the method can achieve separation in real time, but all knowledge of the pulses themselves is lost thereby preventing the possibility of any post- or repeated analysis. Also, it is typically reliant on electronic systems that are largely obsolete and which require significant experience to set up. In the digital domain, PSD is often more flexible but significant post-processing has usually been necessary to obtain neutron/{gamma}-ray separation. Moreover, the scintillation media on which the technique relies usually have a low flash point and are thus deemed hazardous. This complicates the ease with which they are used in industrial applications. In this paper, results obtained with a new portable digital pulse-shape discrimination instrument are described. This instrument provides real-time, digital neutron/{gamma} separation whilst preserving the synchronization with the time-of-arrival for each event, and realizing throughputs of 3 x 10{sup 6} events per second. Furthermore, this system has been tested with a scintillation medium that is non-flammable and not hazardous. (authors)

  10. Properties of scintillator solutes

    SciTech Connect

    Fluornoy, J.M.

    1998-06-01

    This special report summarizes measurements of the spectroscopic and other properties of the solutes that were used in the preparation of several new liquid scintillators developed at EG and G/Energy Measurements/Santa Barbara Operations (the precursor to Bechtel Nevada/Special Technologies Laboratory) on the radiation-to-light converter program. The data on the individual compounds are presented in a form similar to that used by Prof. Isadore Berlman in his classic handbook of fluorescence spectra. The temporal properties and relative efficiencies of the new scintillators are presented in Table 1, and the efficiencies as a function of wavelength are presented graphically in Figure 1. In addition, there is a descriptive glossary of the abbreviations used herein. Figure 2 illustrates the basic structures of some of the compounds and of the four solvents reported in this summary. The emission spectra generally exhibit more structure than the absorption spectra, with the result that the peak emission wavelength for a given compound may lie several nm away from the wavelength, {lambda}{sub avg}, at the geometric center of the emission spectrum. Therefore, the author has chosen to list absorption peaks, {lambda}{sub max}, and emission {lambda}{sub avg} values in Figures 3--30, as being most illustrative of the differences between the compounds. The compounds, BHTP, BTPB, ADBT, and DPTPB were all developed on this program. P-terphenyl, PBD, and TPB are commercially available blue emitters. C-480 and the other longer-wavelength emitters are laser dyes available commercially from Exciton Corporation. 1 ref., 30 figs.

  11. Composite solid-state scintillators for neutron detection

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Im, Hee-Jung; Pawel, Michelle D.

    2006-09-12

    Applicant's present invention is a composite scintillator for neutron detection comprising a matrix material fabricated from an inorganic sol-gel precursor solution homogeneously doped with a liquid scintillating material and a neutron absorbing material. The neutron absorbing material yields at least one of an electron, a proton, a triton, an alpha particle or a fission fragment when the neutron absorbing material absorbs a neutron. The composite scintillator further comprises a liquid scintillating material in a self-assembled micelle formation homogeneously doped in the matrix material through the formation of surfactant-silica composites. The scintillating material is provided to scintillate when traversed by at least one of an electron, a proton, a triton, an alpha particle or a fission fragment. The scintillating material is configured such that the matrix material surrounds the micelle formation of the scintillating material. The composite scintillator is fabricated and applied as a thin film on substrate surfaces, a coating on optical fibers or as a glass material.

  12. Shifting scintillator neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Clonts, Lloyd G; Cooper, Ronald G; Crow, Jr., Morris Lowell; Hannah, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Richards, John D; Riedel, Richard A

    2014-03-04

    Provided are sensors and methods for detecting thermal neutrons. Provided is an apparatus having a scintillator for absorbing a neutron, the scintillator having a back side for discharging a scintillation light of a first wavelength in response to the absorbed neutron, an array of wavelength-shifting fibers proximate to the back side of the scintillator for shifting the scintillation light of the first wavelength to light of a second wavelength, the wavelength-shifting fibers being disposed in a two-dimensional pattern and defining a plurality of scattering plane pixels where the wavelength-shifting fibers overlap, a plurality of photomultiplier tubes, in coded optical communication with the wavelength-shifting fibers, for converting the light of the second wavelength to an electronic signal, and a processor for processing the electronic signal to identify one of the plurality of scattering plane pixels as indicative of a position within the scintillator where the neutron was absorbed.

  13. Scintillator manufacture at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mellott, K.; Bross, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A.

    1998-11-01

    A decade of research into plastic scintillation materials at Fermilab is reviewed. Early work with plastic optical fiber fabrication is revisited and recent experiments with large-scale commercial methods for production of bulk scintillator are discussed. Costs for various forms of scintillator are examined and new development goals including cost reduction methods and quality improvement techniques are suggested. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses. 3 figures.

  15. Extruded plastic scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Anna Pla-Dalmau, Alan D. Bross and Kerry L. Mellott

    1999-04-16

    As a way to lower the cost of plastic scintillation detectors, commercially available polystyrene pellets have been used in the production of scintillating materials that can be extruded into different profiles. The selection of the raw materials is discussed. Two techniques to add wavelength shifting dopants to polystyrene pellets and to extrude plastic scintillating strips are described. Data on light yield and transmittance measurements are presented.

  16. Study of equatorial scintillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomalaza, J.; Woodman, R.; Tisnado, G.; Nakasone, E.

    1972-01-01

    Observations of the amplitude scintillations produced by the F-region in equatorial areas are presented. The equipment used for conducting the observations is described. The use of transmissions from the ATS-1, ATS-3, and ATS-5 for obtaining data is described. The two principal subjects discussed are: (1) correlation between satellite and incoherent radar observations of scintillations and (2) simultaneous observations of scintillations at 136 MHz and 1550 MHz.

  17. Improvements in apparatus and procedures for using an organic liquid scintillator as a fast-neutron spectrometer for radiation protection applications

    SciTech Connect

    Thorngate, J.H.

    1987-05-15

    For use in radiation protection measurements, a neutron spectrometer must have a wide energy range, good sensitivity, medium resolution, and ease of taking and reducing data. No single spectrometer meets all of these requirements. Several experiments aimed at improving and characterizing the detector response to gamma rays and neutrons were conducted. A light pipe (25 mm) was needed between the scintillator cell and the photomultiplier tube to achieve the best resolution. The light output of the scintillator as a function of gamma-ray energy was measured. Three experiments were conducted to determine the light output as a function of neutron energy. Monte Carlo calculations were made to evaluate the effects of multiple neutron scattering and edge effects in the detector. The electronic systems associated with the detector were improved with a transistorized circuit providing the bias voltage for the photomultiplier tube dynodes. This circuit was needed to obtain pulse-height linearity over the wide range of signal sizes. A special live-time clock was built to compensate for the large amount of dead time generated by the pulse-shape discrimination circuit we chose to use. 64 refs., 58 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. The SNO+ Scintillator Purification Plant and Projected Sensitivity to Solar Neutrinos in the Pure Scintillator Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pershing, Teal; SNO+ Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The SNO+ detector is a neutrino and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment utilizing the renovated SNO detector. In the second phase of operation, the SNO+ detector will contain 780 tons of organic liquid scintillator composed of 2 g/L 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). In this phase, SNO+ will strive to detect solar neutrinos in the sub-MeV range, including CNO production neutrinos and pp production neutrinos. To achieve the necessary detector sensitivity, a four-part scintillator purification plant has been constructed in SNOLAB for the removal of ionic and radioactive impurities. We present an overview of the SNO+ scintillator purification plant stages, including distillation, water extraction, gas stripping, and metal scavenger columns. We also give the projected SNO+ sensitivities to various solar-produced neutrinos based on the scintillator plant's projected purification efficiency.

  19. Energy Transfer Based Nanocomposite Scintillator for Radiation Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Soha; Sahi, Sunil; Chen, Wei; Ma, Lun; Kenarangui, Rasool

    2014-09-01

    Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum yield and size dependent emission, nanoparticles have attracted interested in various field of research. Here, we have studies the nanoparticles for radiation detection. We have synthesized nanoparticles of Cerium fluoride (CeF3), Zinc Oxide (ZnO), Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), Copper complex and Zinc sulfide (ZnS). We have used Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) principle to enhance the luminescence properties of nanocomposite scintillator. Nanocomposites scintillators are structurally characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Optical properties are studied using Photoluminescence, UV-Visible and X-ray. Enhancements in the luminescence are observed under UV and X-ray excitation. Preliminary studies shows nanocomposite scintillators are promising for radiation detection. Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum

  20. Thin film scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Warren; McKinney, George; Tzolov, Marian

    2015-03-01

    Scintillating materials convert energy flux (particles or electromagnetic waves) into light with spectral characteristic matching a subsequent light detector. Commercial scintillators such as yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) and yttrium aluminum perovskite (YAP) are commonly used. These are inefficient at lower energies due to the conductive coating present on their top surface, which is needed to avoid charging. We hypothesize that nano-structured thin film scintillators will outperform the commercial scintillators at low electron energies. We have developed alternative thin film scintillators, zinc tungstate and zinc oxide, which show promise for higher sensitivity to lower energy electrons since they are inherently conductive. Zinc tungstate films exhibit photoluminescence quantum efficiency of 74%. Cathodoluminescence spectroscopy was applied in transmission and reflection geometries. The comparison between the thin films and the YAG and YAP commercial scintillators shows much higher light output from the zinc tungstate and zinc oxide at electron energies less than 5 keV. Our films were integrated in a backscattered electron detector. This detector delivers better images than an identical detector with commercial YAG scintillator at low electron energies. Dr. Nicholas Barbi from PulseTor LLC, Dr. Anura Goonewardene, NSF Grants: #0806660, #1058829, #0923047.

  1. Scintillation properties of polycrystalline LaxY1-xO3 ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahi, Sunil; Chen, Wei; Kenarangui, Rasool

    2015-03-01

    Scintillators are the material that absorbs the high-energy photons and emits visible photons. Scintillators are commonly used in radiation detector for security, medical imaging, industrial applications and high energy physics research. Two main types of scintillators are inorganic single crystals and organic (plastic or liquid) scintillators. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, some efficient inorganic scintillator such as NaI and CsI are not environmental friendly. But on the other hand, organic scintillators have low density and hence poor energy resolution which limits their use in gamma spectroscopy. Polycrystalline ceramic can be a cost effective alternative to expensive inorganic single crystal scintillators. Here we have fabricated La0.2Y1.8O3 ceramic scintillator and studied their luminescence and scintillation properties. Ceramic scintillators were fabricated by vacuum sintering of La0.2Y1.8O3 nanoparticles at temperature below the melting point. La0.2Y1.8O3 ceramic were characterized structurally using XRD and TEM. Photoluminescence and radioluminescence studies were done using UV and X-ray as an excitation source. We have used gamma isotopes with different energy to studies the scintillation properties of La0.2Y1.8O3 scintillator. Preliminary studies of La0.2Y1.8O3 scintillator shows promising result with energy resolution comparable to that of NaI and CsI.

  2. A Scintillator Purification System for a Large Scale Solar Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benziger, J. B.

    1999-08-01

    An on-line purification system for a large-scale low-background liquid scintillation detector has been tested with the 5-ton liquid scintillation detector, the Counting Test Facility at Gran Sasso. Counter-current water extraction removes polar and charged impurities such as ions and metal salts. Vacuum distillation of the entire scintillator has been applied to remove both radioactive impurities and chemical impurities that affect the optical properties of the scintillator. Filtration with a 0.05 μm particulate filter removed suspended dust particles that may contain U, Th and K. Nitrogen stripping was employed to remove dissolved water and noble gases (e.g. 85Kr) from the scintillator. The system has effectively reduced the internal back in the 5 ton liquid scintillation detector from 470+/-90 events/d to the detection limit of the detector (+/-45 events/d) in the energy window 250

  3. A scintillator purification system for a large scale solar neutrino experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benziger, J. B.; Johnson, M.; Calaprice, F. P.; Chen, M.; Darnton, N.; Loeser, R.; Vogelaar, R. B.

    1998-11-01

    An on-line purification system for a large-scale low-background liquid scintillation detector has been tested with the 5 t liquid scintillation detector, the Counting Test Facility at Gran Sasso. Counter-current water extraction removes polar and charged impurities such as ions and metal salts. Vacuum distillation of the entire scintillator has been applied to remove both radioactive impurities and chemical impurities that affect the optical properties of the scintillator. Filtration with a 0.05 μm particulate filter removed suspended dust particles that may contain U, Th and K. Nitrogen stripping was employed to remove dissolved water and noble gases (e.g. 85Kr) from the scintillator. The system has effectively reduced the internal back in the 5 t liquid scintillation detector from 470±90 events/d to the detection limit of the detector (±45 events/d) in the energy window 250 < E < 800 keV.

  4. A compendium on the NIST radionuclide assays of the massic activity of {sup 63}Ni and {sup 55}Fe solutions used for an international intercomparison of liquid scintillation spectrometry techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Colle, R.; Zimmerman, B.E.

    1997-09-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology recently participated in an international measurement intercomparison for {sup 63}Ni and {sup 55}Fe, which was conducted among principal national radionuclidic metrology laboratories. The intercomparison was sponsored by EUROMET, and was primarily intended to evaluate the capabilities of liquid scintillation (LS) spectrometry techniques for standardizing nuclides that decay by low-energy {beta}-emission (like {sup 63}Ni) and by low-Z (atomic number) electron capture (like {sup 55}Fe). The intercomparison findings exhibit a very good agreement for {sup 63}Ni among the various participating laboratories, including that for NIST, which suggests that the presently invoked LS methodologies are very capable of providing internationally-compatible standardizations for low-energy {beta}-emitters. The results for {sup 55}Fe are in considerably poorer agreement, and demonstrated the existence of several unresolved problems. It has thus become apparent that there is a need for the various international laboratories to conduct rigorous, systematic evaluations of their LS capabilities in assaying radionuclides that decay by low-Z electron capture.

  5. Scintillator phase of the SNO+ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozza, V.; SNO+ Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    The SNO+ experiment is the follow up of the SNO experiment, replacing the heavy water volume with about 780 tons of liquid scintillator (LAB) in order to shift the sensitive threshold to lower energy range. The 6000 m.w.e. natural rock shielding, and the use of ultra-clean materials makes the detector suitable for the detection of pep and CNO solar neutrinos, geo-neutrinos, reactor neutrinos and the possible observation of neutrinos from supernovae. Complementing this program, SNO+ will also search for 150Nd (5.6% abundance) neutrinoless double beta decay, loading the liquid scintillator with 0.1% of natural Neodymium. After a review of the general SNO+ setup, the physics of the solar neutrino phase will be presented.

  6. Ionospheric Scintillation Explorer (ISX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuliano, J.; Bahcivan, H.

    2015-12-01

    NSF has recently selected Ionospheric Scintillation Explorer (ISX), a 3U Cubesat mission to explore the three-dimensional structure of scintillation-scale ionospheric irregularities associated with Equatorial Spread F (ESF). ISX is a collaborative effort between SRI International and Cal Poly. This project addresses the science question: To what distance along a flux tube does an irregularity of certain transverse-scale extend? It has been difficult to measure the magnetic field-alignment of scintillation-scale turbulent structures because of the difficulty of sampling a flux tube at multiple locations within a short time. This measurement is now possible due to the worldwide transition to DTV, which presents unique signals of opportunity for remote sensing of ionospheric irregularities from numerous vantage points. DTV spectra, in various formats, contain phase-stable, narrowband pilot carrier components that are transmitted simultaneously. A 4-channel radar receiver will simultaneously record up to 4 spatially separated transmissions from the ground. Correlations of amplitude and phase scintillation patterns corresponding to multiple points on the same flux tube will be a measure of the spatial extent of the structures along the magnetic field. A subset of geometries where two or more transmitters are aligned with the orbital path will be used to infer the temporal development of the structures. ISX has the following broad impact. Scintillation of space-based radio signals is a space weather problem that is intensively studied. ISX is a step toward a CubeSat constellation to monitor worldwide TEC variations and radio wave distortions on thousands of ionospheric paths. Furthermore, the rapid sampling along spacecraft orbits provides a unique dataset to deterministically reconstruct ionospheric irregularities at scintillation-scale resolution using diffraction radio tomography, a technique that enables prediction of scintillations at other radio frequencies, and

  7. Scintillator plate calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Price, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Calorimetry using scintillator plates or tiles alternated with sheets of (usually heavy) passive absorber has been proven over multiple generations of collider detectors. Recent detectors including UA1, CDF, and ZEUS have shown good results from such calorimeters. The advantages offered by scintillator calorimetry for the SSC environment, in particular, are speed (<10 nsec), excellent energy resolution, low noise, and ease of achieving compensation and hence linearity. On the negative side of the ledger can be placed the historical sensitivity of plastic scintillators to radiation damage, the possibility of nonuniform response because of light attenuation, and the presence of cracks for light collection via wavelength shifting plastic (traditionally in sheet form). This approach to calorimetry is being investigated for SSC use by a collaboration of Ames Laboratory/Iowa State University, Argonne National Laboratory, Bicron Corporation, Florida State University, Louisiana State University, University of Mississippi, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, and University of Wisconsin.

  8. Characterizing and validating the PROSPECT segmented scintillator detector design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norcini, Danielle; Prospect Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The PROSPECT experiment will use two segmented liquid scintillator detectors positioned 7-20m from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) core to perform a search for eV-scale sterile neutrinos and measure the antineutrino spectrum of uranium-235. A multi-year R&D program focused on background studies at the HFIR reactor, lithium-loaded liquid scintillator development, and characterization of multiple prototype detectors has culminated in the design of a segmented, 3-ton liquid scintillator detector for PROSPECT Phase I. This detector design is being validated with a 50 liter, 2-segment prototype detector, PROSPECT-50. We will report results of on-going performance and calibration studies and discuss implications for the PROSPECT physics program.

  9. A scintillator purification plant and fluid handling system for SNO+

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Richard J.

    2015-08-17

    A large capacity purification plant and fluid handling system has been constructed for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment, located 6800 feet underground at SNOLAB, Canada. SNO+ is a refurbishment of the SNO detector to fill the acrylic vessel with liquid scintillator based on Linear Alkylbenzene (LAB) and 2 g/L PPO, and also has a phase to load natural tellurium into the scintillator for a double-beta decay experiment with {sup 130}Te. The plant includes processes multi-stage dual-stream distillation, column water extraction, steam stripping, and functionalized silica gel adsorption columns. The plant also includes systems for preparing the scintillator with PPO and metal-loading the scintillator for double-beta decay exposure. We review the basis of design, the purification principles, specifications for the plant, and the construction and installations. The construction and commissioning status is updated.

  10. A scintillator purification plant and fluid handling system for SNO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Richard J.

    2015-08-01

    A large capacity purification plant and fluid handling system has been constructed for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment, located 6800 feet underground at SNOLAB, Canada. SNO+ is a refurbishment of the SNO detector to fill the acrylic vessel with liquid scintillator based on Linear Alkylbenzene (LAB) and 2 g/L PPO, and also has a phase to load natural tellurium into the scintillator for a double-beta decay experiment with 130Te. The plant includes processes multi-stage dual-stream distillation, column water extraction, steam stripping, and functionalized silica gel adsorption columns. The plant also includes systems for preparing the scintillator with PPO and metal-loading the scintillator for double-beta decay exposure. We review the basis of design, the purification principles, specifications for the plant, and the construction and installations. The construction and commissioning status is updated.

  11. Boron loaded scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Zane William; Brown, Gilbert Morris; Maya, Leon; Sloop, Jr., Frederick Victor; Sloop, Jr., Frederick Victor

    2009-10-20

    A scintillating composition for detecting neutrons and other radiation comprises a phenyl containing silicone rubber with carborane units and at least one phosphor molecule. The carbonate units can either be a carborane molecule dispersed in the rubber with the aid of a compatibilization agent or can be covalently bound to the silicone.

  12. Polysiloxane scintillator composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, J.K.

    1992-05-05

    A plastic scintillator useful for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a matrix which comprises an optically transparent polysiloxane having incorporated therein at least one ionizing radiation-hard fluor capable of converting electromagnetic energy produced in the polysiloxane upon absorption of ionizing radiation to detectable light.

  13. SCINTILLATION EXPOSURE RATE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Spears, W.G.

    1960-11-01

    A radiation detector for gamma and x rays is described. The detector comprises a scintillation crystal disposed between a tantalum shield and the input of a photomultiplier tube, the crystal and the shield cooperating so that their combined response to a given quantity of radiation at various energy levels is substantially constant.

  14. Polysiloxane scintillator composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, James K.

    1992-01-01

    A plastic scintillator useful for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a matrix which comprises an optically transparent polysiloxane having incorporated therein at least one ionizing radiation-hard fluor capable of converting electromagnetic energy produced in the polysiloxane upon absorption of ionizing radiation to detectable light.

  15. Scintillator requirements for medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    1999-09-01

    Scintillating materials are used in a variety of medical imaging devices. This paper presents a description of four medical imaging modalities that make extensive use of scintillators: planar x-ray imaging, x-ray computed tomography (x-ray CT), SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) and PET (positron emission tomography). The discussion concentrates on a description of the underlying physical principles by which the four modalities operate. The scintillator requirements for these systems are enumerated and the compromises that are made in order to maximize imaging performance utilizing existing scintillating materials are discussed, as is the potential for improving imaging performance by improving scintillator properties.

  16. Scintillator Waveguide For Sensing Radiation

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Mary; Craig, Richard A.; Reeder; Paul L.

    2003-04-22

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  17. Reflectance of polytetrafluoroethylene for xenon scintillation light

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, C.; Pinto da Cunha, J.; Pereira, A.; Chepel, V.; Lopes, M. I.; Solovov, V.; Neves, F.

    2010-03-15

    Gaseous and liquid xenon particle detectors are being used in a number of applications including dark matter search and neutrino-less double beta decay experiments. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is often used in these detectors both as electrical insulator and as a light reflector to improve the efficiency of detection of scintillation photons. However, xenon emits in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) wavelength region ({lambda}{approx_equal}175 nm) where the reflecting properties of PTFE are not sufficiently known. In this work, we report on measurements of PTFE reflectance, including its angular distribution, for the xenon scintillation light. Various samples of PTFE, manufactured by different processes (extruded, expanded, skived, and pressed) have been studied. The data were interpreted with a physical model comprising both specular and diffuse reflections. The reflectance obtained for these samples ranges from about 47% to 66% for VUV light. Other fluoropolymers, namely, ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP), and perfluoro-alkoxyalkane (PFA) were also measured.

  18. Neutron detection with single crystal organic scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitseva, N; Newby, J; Hamel, S; Carman, L; Faust, M; Lordi, V; Cherepy, N; Stoeffl, W; Payne, S

    2009-07-15

    Detection of high-energy neutrons in the presence of gamma radiation background utilizes pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) phenomena in organics studied previously only with limited number of materials, mostly liquid scintillators and single crystal stilbene. The current paper presents the results obtained with broader varieties of luminescent organic single crystals. The studies involve experimental tools of crystal growth and material characterization in combination with the advanced computer modeling, with the final goal of better understanding the relevance between the nature of the organic materials and their PSD properties. Special consideration is given to the factors that may diminish or even completely obscure the PSD properties in scintillating crystals. Among such factors are molecular and crystallographic structures that determine exchange coupling and exciton mobility in organic materials and the impurity effect discussed on the examples of trans-stilbene, bibenzyl, 9,10-diphenylanthracene and diphenylacetylene.

  19. Neutron detection with single crystal organic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitseva, Natalia P.; Newby, Jason; Hamel, Sebastien; Carman, Leslie; Faust, Michelle; Lordi, Vincenzo; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Stoeffl, Wolfgang; Payne, Stephen A.

    2009-08-01

    Detection of high-energy neutrons in the presence of gamma radiation background utilizes pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) phenomena in organics studied previously only with limited number of materials, mostly liquid scintillators and single crystal stilbene. The current paper presents the results obtained with broader varieties of luminescent organic single crystals. The studies involve experimental tools of crystal growth and material characterization in combination with the advanced computer modeling, with the final goal of better understanding the relevance between the nature of the organic materials and their PSD properties. Special consideration is given to the factors that may diminish or even completely obscure the PSD properties in scintillating crystals. Among such factors are molecular and crystallographic structures that determine exchange coupling and exciton mobility in organic materials and the impurity effect discussed on the examples of trans-stilbene, bibenzyl, 9,10- diphenylanthracene and diphenylacetylene.

  20. Reflectance of polytetrafluoroethylene for xenon scintillation light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, C.; Pinto da Cunha, J.; Pereira, A.; Chepel, V.; Lopes, M. I.; Solovov, V.; Neves, F.

    2010-03-01

    Gaseous and liquid xenon particle detectors are being used in a number of applications including dark matter search and neutrino-less double beta decay experiments. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is often used in these detectors both as electrical insulator and as a light reflector to improve the efficiency of detection of scintillation photons. However, xenon emits in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) wavelength region (λ ≃175 nm) where the reflecting properties of PTFE are not sufficiently known. In this work, we report on measurements of PTFE reflectance, including its angular distribution, for the xenon scintillation light. Various samples of PTFE, manufactured by different processes (extruded, expanded, skived, and pressed) have been studied. The data were interpreted with a physical model comprising both specular and diffuse reflections. The reflectance obtained for these samples ranges from about 47% to 66% for VUV light. Other fluoropolymers, namely, ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP), and perfluoro-alkoxyalkane (PFA) were also measured.

  1. Neutron spectroscopy with scintillation detectors using wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Jessica

    The purpose of this research was to study neutron spectroscopy using the EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator. This scintillator material provided a novel means of detection for fast neutrons, without the disadvantages of traditional liquid scintillation materials. EJ-299-33A provided a more durable option to these materials, making it less likely to be damaged during handling. Unlike liquid scintillators, this plastic scintillator was manufactured from a non-toxic material, making it safer to use, as well as easier to design detectors. The material was also manufactured with inherent pulse shape discrimination abilities, making it suitable for use in neutron detection. The neutron spectral unfolding technique was developed in two stages. Initial detector response function modeling was carried out through the use of the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The response functions were developed for a monoenergetic neutron flux. Wavelets were then applied to smooth the response function. The spectral unfolding technique was applied through polynomial fitting and optimization techniques in MATLAB. Verification of the unfolding technique was carried out through the use of experimentally determined response functions. These were measured on the neutron source based on the Van de Graff accelerator at the University of Kentucky. This machine provided a range of monoenergetic neutron beams between 0.1 MeV and 24 MeV, making it possible to measure the set of response functions of the EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator detector to neutrons of specific energies. The response of a plutonium-beryllium (PuBe) source was measured using the source available at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. The neutron spectrum reconstruction was carried out using the experimentally measured response functions. Experimental data was collected in the list mode of the waveform digitizer. Post processing of this data focused on the pulse shape discrimination analysis of the recorded response functions to remove the

  2. Composite scintillator screen

    DOEpatents

    Zeman, Herbert D.

    1994-01-01

    A scintillator screen for an X-ray system includes a substrate of low-Z material and bodies of a high-Z material embedded within the substrate. By preselecting the size of the bodies embedded within the substrate, the spacial separation of the bodies and the thickness of the screen, the sensitivity of the screen to X-rays within a predetermined energy range can be predicted.

  3. A scintillating fission detector for neutron flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, Sy; Esch, Ernst I; Burgett, Eric A; May, Iain; Muenchausen, Ross E; Taw, Felicia; Tovesson, Fredrik K

    2010-01-01

    Neutron flux monitors are commonly used for a variety of nuclear physics applications. A scintillating neutron detector, consisting of a liquid scintillator loaded with fissionable material, has been developed, characterized, and tested in the beam line at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and shows a significant improvement in neutron sensitivity compared with a conventional fission chamber. Recent research on nanocomposite-based scintillators for gamma-ray detection indicates that this approach can be extended to load nanoparticles of fissionable material into a scintillating matrix, with up to three orders of magnitude higher loading than typical fission chambers. This will result in a rugged, cost-efficient detector with high efficiency, a short signal rise time, and the ability to be used in low neutron-flux environments. Initial efforts to utilize the luminescence of uranyl oxide to eliminate the need for wavelength-shifting dyes were unsuccessful. Excitation of uranyl compounds has been reported at wavelengths ranging from 266 nm to 532 nm. However, neither the 300 nm emission of toluene, nor the 350 nm emission of PPO, nor the 410 nm emission of POPOP resulted in significant excitation of and emission by uranyl oxide. As indicated by UV/visible spectroscopy, light emitted at these wavelengths was absorbed by the colored solution. {sup 235}U remains the most attractive candidate for a fissionable scintillator, due to its high fission cross-section and lack of a threshold fission energy, but all solutions containing molecular uranium compounds will be colored, most more highly than the U{sup 6+} compounds used here. Research is therefore continuing toward the fabrication of uranium nanoparticles, in which, due to Rayleigh scattering, the coloration should be less pronounced. The characterization of the thorium-loaded liquid scintillator and the fabrication of the 100 mL detectors for use at LANSCE demonstrated the feasibility of loading fissionable

  4. A scintillator purification system for the Borexino solar neutrino detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benziger, J.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Chen, M.; Corsi, A.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Fernholz, R.; Ford, R.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Harding, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Kidner, S.; Leung, M.; Loeser, F.; McCarty, K.; McKinsey, D.; Nelson, A.; Pocar, A.; Salvo, C.; Schimizzi, D.; Shutt, T.; Sonnenschein, A.

    2008-03-01

    Purification of the 278 tons of liquid scintillator and 889 tons of buffer shielding for the Borexino solar neutrino detector is performed with a system that combines distillation, water extraction, gas stripping, and filtration. This paper describes the principles of operation, design, and construction of that purification system, and reviews the requirements and methods to achieve system cleanliness and leak-tightness.

  5. A new tritiated water measurement method with plastic scintillator pellets.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Etsuko; Iwasaki, Noriko; Kato, Yuka; Tomozoe, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    A new tritiated water measurement method with plastic scintillator pellets (PS-pellets) by using a conventional liquid scintillation counter was developed. The PS-pellets used were 3 mm in both diameter and length. A low potassium glass vial was filled full with the pellets, and tritiated water was applied to the vial from 5 to 100 μl. Then, the sample solution was scattered in the interstices of the pellets in a vial. This method needs no liquid scintillator, so no liquid organic waste fluid is generated. The counting efficiency with the pellets was approximately 48 % when a 5 μl solution was used, which was higher than that of conventional measurement using liquid scintillator. The relationship between count rate and activity showed good linearity. The pellets were able to be used repeatedly, so few solid wastes are generated with this method. The PS-pellets are useful for tritiated water measurement; however, it is necessary to develop a new device which can be applied to a larger volume and measure low level concentration like an environmental application. PMID:26856930

  6. New scintillator and waveshifter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, H.; Baumbaugh, B.; Gerig, A.; Marchant, J.; Reynolds, K.; Ruchti, R.; Warchol, J; Wayne, M. Hurlbut, C. Kauffman, J. Pla-Dalmau, A.

    1998-11-01

    Experimental applications requiring fast timing and/or high efficiency position and energy measurements typically use scintillation materials. Scintillators utilized for triggering, tracking, and calorimetry in colliding beam detectors are vulnerable to the high radiation fields associated with such experiments. We have begun an investigation of several fluorescent dyes which might lead to fast, efficient, and radiation resistant scintillators. Preliminary results of spectral analysis and efficiency are presented. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Lunar components in Lunping scintillations

    SciTech Connect

    Koster, J.R.; Lue, H.Y.; Wu, Hsi-Shu; Huang, Yinn-Nien

    1993-08-01

    The authors report on an anlysis of a 14 year data set of ionospheric scintillation data for 136 MHz signals transmitted from a Japanese satellite. They use a lunar age superposition method to analyze this data, breaking the data into blocks by seasons of the year. They observe a number of different scintillation types in the record, as well as impacts of lunar tides on the time record. They attempt to provide an origin for the different scintillation types.

  8. Statistical analysis of scintillation data

    SciTech Connect

    Chua, S.; Noonan, J.P.; Basu, S.

    1981-09-01

    The Nakagami-m distribution has traditionally been used successfully to model the probability characteristics of ionospheric scintillations at UHF. This report investigates the distribution properties of scintillation data in the L-band range. Specifically, the appropriateness of the Nakagami-m and lognormal distributions is tested. Briefly the results confirm that the Nakagami-m is appropriate for UHF but not for L-band scintillations. The lognormal provides a better fit to the distribution of L-band scintillations and is an adequate model allowing for an error of + or - 0.1 or smaller in predicted probability with a sample size of 256.

  9. Detecting dark matter with scintillating bubble chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianjie; Dahl, C. Eric; Jin, Miaotianzi; Baxter, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Threshold based direct WIMP dark matter detectors such as the superheated bubble chambers developed by the PICO experiment have demonstrated excellent electron-recoil and alpha discrimination, excellent scalability, ease of change of target fluid, and low cost. However, the nuclear-recoil like backgrounds have been a limiting factor in their dark matter sensitivity. We present a new type of detector, the scintillating bubble chamber, which reads out the scintillation pulse of the scattering events as well as the pressure, temperature, acoustic traces, and bubble images as a conventional bubble chamber does. The event energy provides additional handle to discriminate against the nuclear-recoil like backgrounds. Liquid xenon is chosen as the target fluid in our prototyping detector for its high scintillation yield and suitable vapor pressure which simplifies detector complexity. The detector can be used as an R&D tool to study the backgrounds present in the current PICO bubble chambers or as a prototype for standalone dark matter detectors in the future. Supported by DOE Grant DE-SC0012161.

  10. Proton induced radiation damage in fast crystal scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Zhang, Liyuan; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Kapustinsky, Jon; Nelson, Ron; Wang, Zhehui

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports proton induced radiation damage in fast crystal scintillators. A 20 cm long LYSO crystal, a 15 cm long CeF3 crystal and four liquid scintillator based sealed quartz capillaries were irradiated by 800 MeV protons at Los Alamos up to 3.3 ×1014 p /cm2. Four 1.5 mm thick LYSO plates were irradiated by 24 GeV protons at CERN up to 6.9 ×1015 p /cm2. The results show an excellent radiation hardness of LYSO crystals against charged hadrons.

  11. Development of radiation hard scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markley, F.; Davidson, M.; Keller, J.; Foster, G.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Harmon, J.; Biagtan, E.; Schueneman, G.; Senchishin, V.; Gustfason, H.

    1993-11-01

    The authors have demonstrated that the radiation stability of scintillators made from styrene polymer is very much improved by compounding with pentaphenyl trimethyl trisiloxane (DC 705 vacuum pump oil). The resulting scintillators are softer than desired, so they decided to make the scintillators directly from monomer where the base resin could be easily crosslinked to improve the mechanical properties. They can now demonstrate that scintillators made directly from the monomer, using both styrene and 4-methyl styrene, are also much more radiation resistant when modified with DC705 oil. In fact, they retain from 92% to 95% of their original light output after gamma irradiation to 10 Mrads in nitrogen with air annealing. When these scintillators made directly from monomer are compared with scintillators of the same composition made from polymer the latter have much higher light outputs. They commonly reach 83% while those made from monomer give only 50% to 60% relative to the reference, BC408. When oil modified scintillators using both p-terphenyl and tetra phenyl butadiene are compared with identical scintillators except that they use 3 hydroxy-flavone as the only luminophore the radiation stability is the same. However the 3HF system gives only 30% as much light as BC408 instead of 83% when both are measured with a green extended Phillips XP2081B phototube.

  12. Extruding plastic scintillator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Anna Pla-Dalmau; Alan D. Bross; Victor V. Rykalin

    2003-10-31

    An understanding of the costs involved in the production of plastic scintillators and the development of a less expensive material have become necessary with the prospects of building very large plastic scintillation detectors. Several factors contribute to the high cost of plastic scintillating sheets, but the principal reason is the labor-intensive nature of the manufacturing process. In order to significantly lower the costs, the current casting procedures had to be abandoned. Since polystyrene is widely used in the consumer industry, the logical path was to investigate the extrusion of commercial-grade polystyrene pellets with dopants to yield high quality plastic scintillator. This concept was tested and high quality extruded plastic scintillator was produced. The D0 and MINOS experiments are already using extruded scintillator strips in their detectors. An extrusion line has recently been installed at Fermilab in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. This paper will discuss the characteristics of extruded plastic scintillator and its raw materials, the different manufacturing techniques and the current R&D program at Fermilab.

  13. Development of radiation hard scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, F.; Davidson, M.; Keller, J.; Foster, G.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Harmon, J.; Biagtan, E.; Schueneman, G.; Senchishin, V.; Gustfason, H.; Rivard, M.

    1993-11-01

    The authors have demonstrated that the radiation stability of scintillators made from styrene polymer is very much improved by compounding with pentaphenyltrimethyltrisiloxane (DC 705 vacuum pump oil). The resulting scintillators are softer than desired, so they decided to make the scintillators directly from monomer where the base resin could be easily crosslinked to improve the mechanical properties. They can now demonstrate that scintillators made directly from the monomer, using both styrene and 4-methyl styrene, are also much more radiation resistant when modified with DC705 oil. In fact, they retain from 92% to 95% of their original light output after gamma irradiation to 10 Mrads in nitrogen with air annealing. When these scintillators made directly from monomer are compared with scintillators of the same composition made from polymer the latter have much higher light outputs. They commonly reach 83% while those made form monomer give only 50% to 60% relative to the reference, BC408. When oil modified scintillators using both p-terphenyl and tetraphenylbutadiene are compared with identical scintillators except that they use 3 hydroxy-flavone as the only luminophore the radiation stability is the same. However the 3HF system gives only 30% as much light as BC408 instead of 83% when both are measured with a green extended Phillips XP2081B phototube.

  14. Hybrid scintillators for neutron discrimination

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Patrick L; Cordaro, Joseph G; Anstey, Mitchell R; Morales, Alfredo M

    2015-05-12

    A composition capable of producing a unique scintillation response to neutrons and gamma rays, comprising (i) at least one surfactant; (ii) a polar hydrogen-bonding solvent; and (iii) at least one luminophore. A method including combining at least one surfactant, a polar hydrogen-bonding solvent and at least one luminophore in a scintillation cell under vacuum or an inert atmosphere.

  15. Development of intrinsic IPT scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.D.

    1989-07-31

    We report on the development of a new polystyrene based plastic scintillator. Optical absorption, fluorescence and light output measurements are presented. Preliminary results of radiation damage effects are also given and compared to the effects on a commercial plastic scintillator, NE 110. 6 refs., 12 figs.

  16. Pulse shape discrimination with lithium-containing organic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitseva, Natalia; Glenn, Andrew; Paul Martinez, H.; Carman, Leslie; Pawełczak, Iwona; Faust, Michelle; Payne, Stephen

    2013-11-01

    6Li-containing organic scintillators have been prepared and characterized as a new type of transparent, single-phase materials with pulse shape discrimination (PSD) properties for simultaneous detection of thermal and fast neutrons discriminated from gamma radiation. Tests conducted with recently developed PSD-capable plastic scintillators showed that incorporation of 6Li into the aromatic matrix with fast-neutron/gamma discrimination properties offers the additional sensitivity to thermal neutrons, substantially increasing efficiency and the energy range of neutron detection. Comparative analyses of 6Li-loaded plastic, liquid and single crystal organic scintillators provide evidence that, in addition to neutron/gamma discrimination, these novel materials have the ability for discrimination between the signatures of fast and thermal neutrons.

  17. Quenching correction for volumetric scintillation dosimetry of proton beams

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Daniel; Mirkovic, Dragan; Sahoo, Narayan; Beddar, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Volumetric scintillation dosimetry has the potential to provide fast, high-resolution, three-dimensional radiation dosimetry. However, scintillators exhibit a nonlinear response at the high linear energy transfer (LET) values characteristic of proton Bragg peaks. The purpose of this study was to develop a quenching correction method for volumetric scintillation dosimetry of proton beams. Methods Scintillation light from a miniature liquid scintillator detector was measured along the central axis of a 161.6-MeV proton pencil beam. Three-dimensional dose and LET distributions were calculated for 85.6-, 100.9-, 144.9-, and 161.6-MeV beams using a validated Monte Carlo model. LET values were also calculated using an analytical formula. A least-squares fit to the data established the empirical parameters of a quenching correction model. The light distribution in a tank of liquid scintillator was measured with a CCD camera at all four beam energies. The quenching model and LET data were used to correct the measured light distribution. Results The calculated and measured Bragg peak heights agreed within ±3% for all energies except 85.6 MeV, where the agreement was within ±10%. The quality of the quenching correction was poorer for sharp low-energy Bragg peaks because of blurring and detector size effects. The corrections performed using analytical LET values resulted in doses within 1% of those obtained using Monte Carlo LET values. Conclusion The proposed method can correct for quenching with sufficient accuracy for dosimetric purposes. The required LET values may be computed effectively using Monte Carlo or analytical methods. Future detectors should improve blurring correction methods and optimize the pixel size to improve accuracy for low-energy Bragg peaks. PMID:23257200

  18. Proton recoil scintillator neutron rem meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H.; Seagraves, David T.

    2003-01-01

    A neutron rem meter utilizing proton recoil and thermal neutron scintillators to provide neutron detection and dose measurement. In using both fast scintillators and a thermal neutron scintillator the meter provides a wide range of sensitivity, uniform directional response, and uniform dose response. The scintillators output light to a photomultiplier tube that produces an electrical signal to an external neutron counter.

  19. Response of BC418 Plastic Scintillator to Low Energy Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daub, B. H.; Henzl, V.; Kovash, M. A.; Matthews, J. L.; Miller, Z. W.; Shoniyozov, K.; Yang, H.

    2012-10-01

    The response of fast plastic scintillators is unknown for proton energies below approximately 300 keV. The response of BC418 plastic scintillator to protons from 100 keV to 3.6 MeV was measured using elastic scattering of neutrons at the University of Kentucky and at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. At Kentucky, protons of precise energies from a Van de Graaff accelerator impinged on a thin LiF target to produce neutrons in narrow energy bands. At Los Alamos, neutrons were produced from a tungsten spallation source and their energies determined by time of flight. In both experiments a coincidence was detected between the recoiling proton in the plastic scintillator and the elastically scattered neutron in a liquid scintillator. The energy of the recoil proton is determined by the elastic scattering kinematics, with the scattered neutron energy precisely determined by time of flight. The results are compared with previous measurements of the response of similar plastic scintillators in the energy region where they overlap.

  20. Ionospheric scintillation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rino, C. L.; Freemouw, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    The diffracted field of a monochromatic plane wave was characterized by two complex correlation functions. For a Gaussian complex field, these quantities suffice to completely define the statistics of the field. Thus, one can in principle calculate the statistics of any measurable quantity in terms of the model parameters. The best data fits were achieved for intensity statistics derived under the Gaussian statistics hypothesis. The signal structure that achieved the best fit was nearly invariant with scintillation level and irregularity source (ionosphere or solar wind). It was characterized by the fact that more than 80% of the scattered signal power is in phase quadrature with the undeviated or coherent signal component. Thus, the Gaussian-statistics hypothesis is both convenient and accurate for channel modeling work.

  1. Scintillator materials containing lanthanum fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    An improved radiation detector containing a crystalline mixture of LaF[sub 3] and CeF[sub 3] as the scintillator element is disclosed. Scintillators made with from 25% to 99.5% LaF[sub 3] and the remainder CeF[sub 3] have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is equal to or superior to other known scintillator materials, and which may be processed from natural starting materials containing both rare earth elements. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in positron emission tomography. 2 figures.

  2. Scintillator materials containing lanthanum fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Moses, William W.

    1991-01-01

    An improved radiation detector containing a crystalline mixture of LaF.sub.3 and CeF.sub.3 as the scintillator element is disclosed. Scintillators made with from 25% to 99.5% LaF.sub.3 and the remainder CeF.sub.3 have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is equal to or superior to other known scintillator materials, and which may be processed from natural starting materials containing both rare earth elements. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in positron emission tomography.

  3. Response of BC-418 plastic scintillator to low-energy protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daub, B. H.; Henzl, V.; Kovash, M. A.; Matthews, J. L.; Miller, Z. W.; Shoniyozov, K.; Yang, H.

    2013-02-01

    The response of fast plastic scintillators to protons is unknown for energies below approximately 300 keV. The response of BC-418 plastic scintillator to protons from 100 keV to 1 MeV was measured using elastic scattering of neutrons at the University of Kentucky. Protons of precise energies from a Van de Graaff accelerator impinged on a thin LiF target to produce neutrons in narrow energy bands. A coincidence was detected between the recoiling proton in the plastic scintillator and the elastically scattered neutron in a liquid scintillator. The energy of the recoil proton was determined by the elastic scattering kinematics, with the scattered neutron energy precisely determined by time of flight. The results are compared with previous measurements of the response of similar plastic scintillators in the energy region where they overlap.

  4. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, Tom; Spector, Garry B.

    1994-01-01

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected.

  5. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, T.; Spector, G.B.

    1994-03-29

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected is described. 11 figures.

  6. Photon statistics in scintillation crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Vaibhav Joga Singh

    Scintillation based gamma-ray detectors are widely used in medical imaging, high-energy physics, astronomy and national security. Scintillation gamma-ray detectors are eld-tested, relatively inexpensive, and have good detection eciency. Semi-conductor detectors are gaining popularity because of their superior capability to resolve gamma-ray energies. However, they are relatively hard to manufacture and therefore, at this time, not available in as large formats and much more expensive than scintillation gamma-ray detectors. Scintillation gamma-ray detectors consist of: a scintillator, a material that emits optical (scintillation) photons when it interacts with ionization radiation, and an optical detector that detects the emitted scintillation photons and converts them into an electrical signal. Compared to semiconductor gamma-ray detectors, scintillation gamma-ray detectors have relatively poor capability to resolve gamma-ray energies. This is in large part attributed to the "statistical limit" on the number of scintillation photons. The origin of this statistical limit is the assumption that scintillation photons are either Poisson distributed or super-Poisson distributed. This statistical limit is often dened by the Fano factor. The Fano factor of an integer-valued random process is dened as the ratio of its variance to its mean. Therefore, a Poisson process has a Fano factor of one. The classical theory of light limits the Fano factor of the number of photons to a value greater than or equal to one (Poisson case). However, the quantum theory of light allows for Fano factors to be less than one. We used two methods to look at the correlations between two detectors looking at same scintillation pulse to estimate the Fano factor of the scintillation photons. The relationship between the Fano factor and the correlation between the integral of the two signals detected was analytically derived, and the Fano factor was estimated using the measurements for SrI2:Eu, YAP

  7. About NICADD extruded scintillating strips

    SciTech Connect

    Dyshkant, A.; Beznosko, D.; Blazey, G.; Chakraborty, D.; Francis, K.; Kubik, D.; Lima, J.G.; Rykalin, V.; Zutshi, v.; Baldina, E.; Bross, A.; Deering, P.; Nebel, T.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Schellpfeffer, J.; Serritella, C.; Zimmerman, J.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    The results of control measurements of extruded scintillating strip responses to a radioactive source Sr-90 are provided, and details of strip choice, preparation, and method of measurement are included. About four hundred one meter long extruded scintillating strips were measured at four different points. These results were essential for prototyping a tail catcher and muon tracker for a future international electron positron linear collider detector.

  8. Ionospheric Scintillation Effects on GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenburgh, R. A.; Smithtro, C.; Groves, K.

    2007-12-01

    . Ionospheric scintillation of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals threatens navigation and military operations by degrading performance or making GPS unavailable. Scintillation is particularly active, although not limited to, a belt encircling the earth within 20 degrees of the geomagnetic equator. As GPS applications and users increases, so does the potential for detrimental impacts from scintillation. We examined amplitude scintillation data spanning seven years from Ascension Island, U.K.; Ancon, Peru; and Antofagasta, Chile in the Atlantic/Americas longitudinal sector at as well as data from Parepare, Indonesia; Marak Parak, Malaysia; Pontianak, Indonesia; Guam; and Diego Garcia, U.K.; in the Pacific longitudinal sector. From these data, we calculate percent probability of occurrence of scintillation at various intensities described by the S4 index. Additionally, we determine Dilution of Precision at one minute resolution. We examine diurnal, seasonal and solar cycle characteristics and make spatial comparisons. In general, activity was greatest during the equinoxes and solar maximum, although scintillation at Antofagasta, Chile was higher during 1998 rather than at solar maximum.

  9. Cherenkov and scintillation light separation on the TheiaR &D experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caravaca, Javier; Land, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    Identifying by separate the scintillation and Cherenkov light produced in a scintillation medium enables outstanding capabilities for future particle detectors, being the most relevant: allowing particle directionality information in a low energy threshold detector and improved particle identification. The TheiaR &D experiment uses an array of small and fast photomultipliers (PMTs) and state-of-the-art electronics to demonstrate the reconstruction of a Cherenkov ring in a scintillation medium, based on the number of produced photoelectrons and the timing information. A charged particle ionizing a scintillation medium produces a prompt Cherenkov cone and late isotropic scintillation light, typically delayed by <1ns. The fast response of our PMTs and DAQ provides a precision well below the ns level, making possible the time separation. Furthermore, the usage of the new developed water-based liquid scintillators (WBLS) provides a medium with a tunable Cherenkov/Scintillation light yield ratio, enhancing the visibility of the dimer Cherenkov light in presence of the scintillation light. Description of the experiment, details of the analysis and preliminary results of the first months of running will be discussed.

  10. Extruded plastic scintillator including inorganic powders

    DOEpatents

    Bross, Alan D.; Mellott, Kerry L.; Pla-Dalmau, Anna

    2006-06-27

    A method for producing a plastic scintillator is disclosed. A plurality of nano-sized particles and one or more dopants can be combined with a plastic material for the formation of a plastic scintillator thereof. The nano-sized particles, the dopant and the plastic material can be combined within the dry inert atmosphere of an extruder to produce a reaction that results in the formation of a plastic scintillator thereof and the deposition of energy within the plastic scintillator, such that the plastic scintillator produces light signifying the detection of a radiative element. The nano-sized particles can be treated with an inert gas prior to processing the nano-sized particles, the dopant and the plastic material utilizing the extruder. The plastic scintillator can be a neutron-sensitive scintillator, x-ray sensitive scintillator and/or a scintillator for the detection of minimum ionizing particles.

  11. Characterization of cerium fluoride nanocomposite scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, Sy; Esch, Ernst I; Brown, Leif O; Couture, Aaron J; Mckigney, Edward A; Muenchausen, Ross E; Del Sesto, Rico E; Gilbertson, Robert D; Mccleskey, T Mark; Reifarth, Rene

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the neutron capture cross-sections of a number of short-lived isotopes would advance both pure and applied scientific research. These cross-sections are needed for calculation of criticality and waste production estimates for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, for analysis of data from nuclear weapons tests, and to improve understanding of nucleosynthesis. However, measurement of these cross-sections would require a detector with a faster signal decay time than those used in existing neutron capture experiments. Crystals of faster detector materials are not available in sufficient sizes and quantities to supply these large-scale experiments. Instead, we propose to use nanocomposite detectors, consisting of nanoscale particles of a scintillating material dispersed in a matrix material. We have successfully fabricated cerium fluoride (CeF{sub 3}) nanoparticles and dispersed them in a liquid matrix. We have characterized this scintillator and have measured its response to neutron capture. Results of the optical, structural, and radiation characterization will be presented.

  12. PMT calibration of a scintillation detector using primary scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, E. D. C.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Yahlali, N.; Pérez, J.; Álvarez, V.; Borges, F. I. G.; Camargo, M.; Cárcel, S.; Cebrián, S.; Cervera, A.; Conde, C. A. N.; Dafni, T.; Díaz, J.; Esteve, R.; Ferrario, P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, H.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; González Díaz, D.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Hauptman, J.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Herrera, D. C.; Irastorza, I. G.; Labarga, L.; Laing, A.; Liubarsky, I.; Lopez-March, N.; Lorca, D.; Losada, M.; Luzón, G.; Marí, A.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez, A.; Martínez Lema, G.; Miller, T.; Monrabal, F.; Monserrate, M.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Nebot Guinot, M.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Pérez, J.; Pérez Aparicio, J. L.; Querol, M.; Renner, J.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, A.; Rodríguez, J.; Santos, F. P.; Dos Santos, J. M. F.; Seguí, L.; Serra, L.; Shuman, D.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Toledo, J. F.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Villar, J. A.; Webb, R.; White, J.; Monteiro, C. M. B.

    2015-02-01

    We have studied the calibration of PMTs in scintillation detectors, inducing single electron response on the PMT from primary scintillation produced by x-ray interaction. The results agree with those obtained by the commonly used single electron response (SER) method, which uses LED light pulses to induce the PMT SER. The use of the primary scintillation for PMT calibration will be convenient in situations where the PMT is already in situ, when it becomes difficult or even impossible to apply the SER method, e.g. in commercial sealed scintillator/PMT devices. Furthermore, we have experimentally investigated the possibility of fitting the high-charge tail of the PMT SER pulse-height distribution to an exponential function, inferring the PMT gain from the inverse of the exponent. The results of the exponential fit method agree with those obtained by the SER method for pulse-height distributions resulting from an average number of around 1.0 photoelectrons reaching the first dynode per light/scintillation pulse. The SER method has higher precision and, therefore, is used in a larger number of applications. Nevertheless, the exponential fit method will be useful in situations where the single photoelectron peak is under the background or noise peak and it may present an alternative, simple way, for relative gain calibration of PMT arrays as well as for monitoring the PMT gain variations.

  13. Light Collection in Liquid Noble Gases

    SciTech Connect

    McKinsey, Dan

    2013-05-29

    Liquid noble gases are increasingly used as active detector materials in particle and nuclear physics. Applications include calorimeters and neutrino oscillation experiments as well as searches for neutrinoless double beta decay, direct dark matter, muon electron conversion, and the neutron electric dipole moment. One of the great advantages of liquid noble gases is their copious production of ultraviolet scintillation light, which contains information about event energy and particle type. I will review the scintillation properties of the various liquid noble gases and the means used to collect their scintillation light, including recent advances in photomultiplier technology and wavelength shifters.

  14. FNAL-NICADD extruded scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Beznosko, D.; Bross, A.; Dyshkant, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Rykalin, V.; /Northern Illinois U.

    2005-09-01

    The possibility to produce a scintillator that satisfies the demands of physicists from different science areas has emerged with the installation of an extrusion line at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The extruder is the product of the fruitful collaboration between FNAL and Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development (NICADD) at Northern Illinois University (NIU). The results from the light output, light attenuation length and mechanical tolerance indicate that FNAL-NICADD scintillator is of high quality. Improvements in the extrusion die will yield better scintillator profiles and decrease the time needed for initial tuning. This paper will present the characteristics of the FNAL-NICADD scintillator based on the measurements performed. They include the response to MIPs from cosmic rays for individual extruded strips and irradiation studies where extruded samples were irradiated up to 1 Mrad. We will also discuss the results achieved with a new die design. The attractive perspective of using the extruded scintillator with MRS (Metal Resistive Semiconductor) photodetector readout will also be shown.

  15. Unitary scintillation detector and system

    DOEpatents

    McElhaney, Stephanie A.; Chiles, Marion M.

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a unitary alpha, beta, and gamma scintillation detector and system for sensing the presence of alpha, beta, and gamma radiations selectively or simultaneously. The scintillators are mounted in a light-tight housing provided with an entrance window for admitting alpha, beta, and gamma radiation and excluding ambient light from the housing. Light pulses from each scintillator have different decay constants that are converted by a photosensitive device into corresponding differently shaped electrical pulses. A pulse discrimination system identifies the electrical pulses by their respective pulse shapes which are determined by decay time. The identified electrical pulses are counted in separate channel analyzers to indicate the respective levels of sensed alpha, beta, and gamma radiations.

  16. Unitary scintillation detector and system

    DOEpatents

    McElhaney, S.A.; Chiles, M.M.

    1994-05-31

    The invention is a unitary alpha, beta, and gamma scintillation detector and system for sensing the presence of alpha, beta, and gamma radiations selectively or simultaneously. The scintillators are mounted in a light-tight housing provided with an entrance window for admitting alpha, beta, and gamma radiation and excluding ambient light from the housing. Light pulses from each scintillator have different decay constants that are converted by a photosensitive device into corresponding differently shaped electrical pulses. A pulse discrimination system identifies the electrical pulses by their respective pulse shapes which are determined by decay time. The identified electrical pulses are counted in separate channel analyzers to indicate the respective levels of sensed alpha, beta, and gamma radiations. 10 figs.

  17. Fracture-resistant lanthanide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2011-01-04

    Lanthanide halide alloys have recently enabled scintillating gamma ray spectrometers comparable to room temperature semiconductors (<3% FWHM energy resolutions at 662 keV). However brittle fracture of these materials upon cooling hinders the growth of large volume crystals. Efforts to improve the strength through non-lanthanide alloy substitution, while preserving scintillation, have been demonstrated. Isovalent alloys having nominal compositions of comprising Al, Ga, Sc, Y, and In dopants as well as aliovalent alloys comprising Ca, Sr, Zr, Hf, Zn, and Pb dopants were prepared. All of these alloys exhibit bright fluorescence under UV excitation, with varying shifts in the spectral peaks and intensities relative to pure CeBr.sub.3. Further, these alloys scintillate when coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and exposed to .sup.137Cs gamma rays.

  18. Scintillation-Hardened GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    CommLargo, Inc., has developed a scintillation-hardened Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver that improves reliability for low-orbit missions and complies with NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standards. A software-defined radio (SDR) implementation allows a single hardware element to function as either a conventional radio or as a GPS receiver, providing backup and redundancy for platforms such as the International Space Station (ISS) and high-value remote sensing platforms. The innovation's flexible SDR implementation reduces cost, weight, and power requirements. Scintillation hardening improves mission reliability and variability. In Phase I, CommLargo refactored an open-source GPS software package with Kalman filter-based tracking loops to improve performance during scintillation and also demonstrated improved navigation during a geomagnetic storm. In Phase II, the company generated a new field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based GPS waveform to demonstrate on NASA's Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) test bed.

  19. Development of radiation hard scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, F.; Woods, D.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Foster, G. ); Blackburn, R. )

    1992-05-01

    Substantial improvements have been made in the radiation hardness of plastic scintillators. Cylinders of scintillating materials 2.2 cm in diameter and 1 cm thick have been exposed to 10 Mrads of gamma rays at a dose rate of 1 Mrad/h in a nitrogen atmosphere. One of the formulations tested showed an immediate decrease in pulse height of only 4% and has remained stable for 12 days while annealing in air. By comparison a commercial PVT scintillator showed an immediate decrease of 58% and after 43 days of annealing in air it improved to a 14% loss. The formulated sample consisted of 70 parts by weight of Dow polystyrene, 30 pbw of pentaphenyltrimethyltrisiloxane (Dow Corning DC 705 oil), 2 pbw of p-terphenyl, 0.2 pbw of tetraphenylbutadiene, and 0.5 pbw of UVASIL299LM from Ferro.

  20. Magnetic fields and scintillator performance

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.; Ronzhin, A.; Hagopian, V.

    1995-06-01

    Experimental data have shown that the light output of a scintillator depends on the magnitude of the externally applied magnetic fields, and that this variation can affect the calorimeter calibration and possibly resolution. The goal of the measurements presented here is to study the light yield of scintillators in high magnetic fields in conditions that are similar to those anticipated for the LHC CMS detector. Two independent measurements were performed, the first at Fermilab and the second at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Florida State University.

  1. Hygroscopicity Evaluation of Halide Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravleva, M; Stand, L; Wei, H; Hobbs, C. L.; Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Burger, Arnold; Rowe, E; Bhattacharya, P.; Tupitsyn, E; Melcher, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    A collaborative study of relative hygroscopicity of anhydrous halide scintillators grown at various laboratories is presented. We have developed a technique to evaluate moisture sensitivity of both raw materials and grown crystals, in which the moisture absorption rate is measured using a gravimetric analysis. Degradation of the scintillation performance was investigated by recording gamma-ray spectra and monitoring the photopeak position, count rate and energy resolution. The accompanying physical degradation of the samples exposed to ambient atmosphere was photographically recorded as well. The results were compared with ben

  2. Photonic crystal scintillators and methods of manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Ricardo D.; Sexton, Lindsay T.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Cortes-Concepcion, Jose

    2015-08-11

    Photonic crystal scintillators and their methods of manufacture are provided. Exemplary methods of manufacture include using a highly-ordered porous anodic alumina membrane as a pattern transfer mask for either the etching of underlying material or for the deposition of additional material onto the surface of a scintillator. Exemplary detectors utilizing such photonic crystal scintillators are also provided.

  3. Composite scintillators for detection of ionizing radiation

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Stephan, Andrew Curtis [Knoxville, TN; Brown, Suree S [Knoxville, TN; Wallace, Steven A [Knoxville, TN; Rondinone, Adam J [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-28

    Applicant's present invention is a composite scintillator having enhanced transparency for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a material having optical transparency wherein said material comprises nano-sized objects having a size in at least one dimension that is less than the wavelength of light emitted by the composite scintillator wherein the composite scintillator is designed to have selected properties suitable for a particular application.

  4. Characteristics of High Latitude Ionosphere Scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Y.

    2012-12-01

    As we enter a new solar maximum period, global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) receivers, especially the ones operating in high latitude and equatorial regions, are facing an increasing threat from ionosphere scintillations. The increased solar activities, however, also offer a great opportunity to collect scintillation data to characterize scintillation signal parameters and ionosphere irregularities. While there are numerous GPS receivers deployed around the globe to monitor ionosphere scintillations, most of them are commercial receivers whose signal processing mechanisms are not designed to operate under ionosphere scintillation. As a result, they may distort scintillation signal parameters or lose lock of satellite signals under strong scintillations. Since 2008, we have established and continuously improved a unique GNSS receiver array at HAARP, Alaska. The array contains high ends commercial receivers and custom RF front ends which can be automatically triggered to collect high quality GPS and GLONASS satellite signals during controlled heating experiments and natural scintillation events. Custom designed receiver signal tracking algorithms aim to preserve true scintillation signatures are used to process the raw RF samples. Signal strength, carrier phase, and relative TEC measurements generated by the receiver array since its inception have been analyzed to characterize high latitude scintillation phenomena. Daily, seasonal, and solar events dependency of scintillation occurrence, spectral contents of scintillation activities, and plasma drifts derived from these measurements will be presented. These interesting results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of our experimental data collection system in providing insightful details of ionosphere responses to active perturbations and natural disturbances.

  5. Measurement of α -particle quenching in LAB based scintillator in independent small-scale experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Krosigk, B.; Chen, M.; Hans, S.; Junghans, A. R.; Kögler, T.; Kraus, C.; Kuckert, L.; Liu, X.; Nolte, R.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Tseung, H. Wan Chan; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, A.; Yeh, M.; Zuber, K.

    2016-03-01

    The α -particle light response of liquid scintillators based on linear alkylbenzene (LAB) has been measured with three different experimental approaches. In the first approach, α -particles were produced in the scintillator via ^{12}C( n,α )^9Be reactions. In the second approach, the scintillator was loaded with 2 % of ^{nat}Sm providing an α -emitter, ^{147}Sm, as an internal source. In the third approach, a scintillator flask was deployed into the water-filled SNO+ detector and the radioactive contaminants ^{222}Rn, ^{218}Po and ^{214}Po provided the α -particle signal. The behavior of the observed α -particle light outputs are in agreement with each case successfully described by Birks' law. The resulting Birks parameter kB ranges from (0.0066± 0.0016) to (0.0076± 0.0003) cm/MeV. In the first approach, the α -particle light response was measured simultaneously with the light response of recoil protons produced via neutron-proton elastic scattering. This enabled a first time a direct comparison of kB describing the proton and the α -particle response of LAB based scintillator. The observed kB values describing the two light response functions deviate by more than 5σ . The presented results are valuable for all current and future detectors, using LAB based scintillator as target, since they depend on an accurate knowledge of the scintillator response to different particles.

  6. Characterisation of LSO:Tb scintillator films for high resolution X-ray imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecilia, A.; Rack, A.; Douissard, P.-A.; Martin, T.; Dos Santos Rolo, T.; Vagovič, P.; Pelliccia, D.; Couchaud, M.; Dupré, K.; Baumbach, T.

    2011-05-01

    Within the framework of an FP6 project (SCINTAX)1The Project SCINTAX is funded by the European Community (STRP 033 427), . we developed a new thin film single crystal scintillator for high resolution X-ray imaging based on a layer of modified LSO (Lu2SiO5) grown by liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) on a dedicated substrate. In this work we present the characterisation of the scintillating LSO films in terms of optical and scintillation properties as well as spatial resolution performances. The obtained results are discussed and compared with the performances of the thin scintillating films commonly used in synchrotron-based micro-imaging applications.

  7. Neutron detection with noble gas scintillation: a review of recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavelle, C. M.; Coplan, Michael; Miller, Eric C.; Thompson, Alan K.; Kowler, Alex; Vest, Rob; Yue, Andrew; Koeth, Tim; Al-Sheikhly, Mohammad; Clark, Charles

    2015-08-01

    Thermal neutron detection is of vital importance to many disciplines, including neutron scattering, workplace monitoring, and homeland protection. We survey recent results from our collaboration which couple low-pressure noble gas scintillation with novel approaches to neutron absorbing materials and geometries to achieve potentially advantageous detector concepts. Noble gas scintillators were used for neutron detection as early as the late 1950's. Modern use of noble gas scintillation includes liquid and solid forms of argon and xenon in the dark matter and neutron physics experiments and commercially available high pressure applications have achieved high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy. Little attention has been paid to the overlap between low pressure noble gas scintillation and thermal neutron detection, for which there are many potential benefits.

  8. Melt-cast organic glasses as high-efficiency fast neutron scintillators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carlson, Joseph S.; Feng, Patrick L.

    2016-06-24

    In this work we report a new class of organic-based scintillators that combines several of the desirable attributes of existing crystalline, liquid, and plastic organic scintillators. The prepared materials may be isolated in single crystalline form or melt-cast to produce highly transparent glasses that have been shown to provide high light yields of up to 16,000 photons/MeVee, as evaluated against EJ-200 plastic scintillators and solution-grown trans-stilbene crystals. The prepared organic glasses exhibit neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) and are compatible with wavelength shifters to reduce optical self-absorption effects that are intrinsic to pure materials such as crystalline organics. In conclusion, themore » combination of high scintillation efficiency, PSD capabilities, and facile scale-up via melt-casting distinguishes this new class of amorphous materials from existing alternatives.« less

  9. Boron Doped Plastic Scintillator Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahl, Adam; Chouinard-Dussault, Pascale; Pecinovsky, Cory; Potter, Andrew; Remedes, Tyler; Dorgan, John; Greife, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    This talk will describe the progress made in an interdisciplinary development project aimed at cost-effective, neutron sensitive, plastic scintillator. Colorado School of Mines researchers with backgrounds in Physics, Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering have worked on the incorporation of ^10B in plastics through extrusion. First results on transparent samples using fluorescent spectroscopy and beta excitation will be presented.

  10. Scintillating fiber ribbon --- tungsten calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.; Crisler, M.; Kross, B.; Wrbanek, J.

    1989-07-14

    We describe an ultra-high density scintillating fiber and tungsten calorimeter used as an active beam-dump for electrons. Data showing the calorimeter response to electrons with momenta between 50 and 350 GeV/c are presented. 9 figs.

  11. Scintillating lustre induced by radial fins.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kohske; Fukuda, Haruaki; Watanabe, Katsumi; Ueda, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Radial lines of Ehrenstein patterns induce illusory scintillating lustre in gray disks inserted into the central gaps (scintillating-lustre effect). We report a novel variant of this illusion by replacing the radial lines with white and black radial fins. Both white and gray disks inserted into the central gaps were perceived as scintillating, if the ratio of the black/white fin width were balanced (ie, close to 1.0). Thus, the grayness of the central disk is not a prerequisite for the scintillation. However, the scintillation was drastically reduced when the ratio was imbalanced. Furthermore, the optimal ratio depended on the color of the center disks. PMID:23145270

  12. Method of making a scintillator waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Mary; Craig, Richard A.; Reeder, Paul L.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  13. Extruded plastic scintillator for MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Pla-Dalmau, Anna; Bross, Alan D.; Rykalin, Victor V.; Wood, Brian M.; /NICADD, DeKalb

    2005-11-01

    An extrusion line has recently been installed at Fermilab in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. Since polystyrene is widely used in the consumer industry, the logical path was to investigate the extrusion of commercial-grade polystyrene pellets with dopants to yield high quality plastic scintillator. The D0 and MINOS experiments are already using extruded scintillator strips in their detectors. A new experiment at Fermilab is pursuing the use of extruded plastic scintillator. A new plastic scintillator strip is being tested and its properties characterized. The initial results are presented here.

  14. Scintillators for positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1995-09-01

    Like most applications that utilize scintillators for gamma detection, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) desires materials with high light output, short decay time, and excellent stopping power that are also inexpensive, mechanically rugged, and chemically inert. Realizing that this ``ultimate`` scintillator may not exist, this paper evaluates the relative importance of these qualities and describes their impact on the imaging performance of PET. The most important PET scintillator quality is the ability to absorb 511 keV photons in a small volume, which affects the spatial resolution of the camera. The dominant factor is a short attenuation length ({le} 1.5 cm is required), although a high photoelectric fraction is also important (> 30% is desired). The next most important quality is a short decay time, which affects both the dead time and the coincidence timing resolution. Detection rates for single 511 keV photons can be extremely high, so decay times {le} 500 ns are essential to avoid dead time losses. In addition, positron annihilations are identified by time coincidence so {le}5 ns fwhm coincidence pair timing resolution is required to identify events with narrow coincidence windows, reducing contamination due to accidental coincidences. Current trends in PET cameras are toward septaless, ``fully-3D`` cameras, which have significantly higher count rates than conventional 2-D cameras and so place higher demands on scintillator decay time. Light output affects energy resolution, and thus the ability of the camera to identify and reject events where the initial 511 keV photon has undergone Compton scatter in the patient. The scatter to true event fraction is much higher in fully-3D cameras than in 2-D cameras, so future PET cameras would benefit from scintillators with a 511 keV energy resolution < 10--12% fwhm.

  15. Neutron response characterization for an EJ299-33 plastic scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Chris C.; Febbraro, Michael; Massey, Thomas N.; Flaska, Marek; Becchetti, F. D.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2014-05-10

    Organic scintillation detectors have shown promise as neutron detectors for characterizing special nuclear materials in various arms-control and homeland security applications. Recent advances have yielded a new plastic scintillator - EJ299-33 - with pulse-shape-discrimination (PSD) capability. Plastic scintillators would have a much expanded range of deployment relative to liquids and crystals. Here, we present a full characterization of pulse height response to fission-energy neutrons for an EJ299-33 detector with 7.62-by-7.62-cm cylindrical active volume, and compare with an EJ309 liquid scintillator in the same assembly. Scintillation light output relations, energy resolutions, and response matrices are presented for both detectors. A Continuous spectrum neutron source, obtained via the bombardment of Al-27 with 7.44-MeV deuterons at the Edwards Accelerator Facility at Ohio University, was used for the measurement. A new procedure for evaluating and comparing PSD performance is presented which accounts for the effect of the light output relation on the ability to detect low energy neutrons. The EJ299-33 is shown to have considerable deficit in matrix condition, and in PSD figure of merit when compared to EJ309, especially when neutron energy is taken into account. Furthermore the EJ299 is likely to bring a modest PSD capability into a array of held applications that are not accessible to liquids or crystals. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords

  16. Neutron response characterization for an EJ299-33 plastic scintillation detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lawrence, Chris C.; Febbraro, Michael; Massey, Thomas N.; Flaska, Marek; Becchetti, F. D.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2014-05-10

    Organic scintillation detectors have shown promise as neutron detectors for characterizing special nuclear materials in various arms-control and homeland security applications. Recent advances have yielded a new plastic scintillator - EJ299-33 - with pulse-shape-discrimination (PSD) capability. Plastic scintillators would have a much expanded range of deployment relative to liquids and crystals. Here, we present a full characterization of pulse height response to fission-energy neutrons for an EJ299-33 detector with 7.62-by-7.62-cm cylindrical active volume, and compare with an EJ309 liquid scintillator in the same assembly. Scintillation light output relations, energy resolutions, and response matrices are presented for both detectors. A Continuousmore » spectrum neutron source, obtained via the bombardment of Al-27 with 7.44-MeV deuterons at the Edwards Accelerator Facility at Ohio University, was used for the measurement. A new procedure for evaluating and comparing PSD performance is presented which accounts for the effect of the light output relation on the ability to detect low energy neutrons. The EJ299-33 is shown to have considerable deficit in matrix condition, and in PSD figure of merit when compared to EJ309, especially when neutron energy is taken into account. Furthermore the EJ299 is likely to bring a modest PSD capability into a array of held applications that are not accessible to liquids or crystals. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords« less

  17. Neutron response characterization for an EJ299-33 plastic scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Chris C.; Febbraro, Michael; Massey, Thomas N.; Flaska, Marek; Becchetti, F. D.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2014-09-01

    Organic scintillation detectors have shown promise as neutron detectors for characterizing special nuclear materials in various arms-control and homeland-security applications. Recent advances have yielded a new plastic scintillator - EJ299-33 - with pulse-shape-discrimination (PSD) capability. Plastic scintillators would have a much-expanded range of deployment relative to liquids and crystals. Here, we present a full characterization of pulse-height response to fission-energy neutrons for an EJ299-33 detector with 7.62-by-7.62-cm cylindrical active volume, and compare with an EJ309 liquid scintillator in the same assembly. Scintillation light-output relations, energy resolutions, and response matrices are presented for both detectors. A continuous-spectrum neutron source, obtained via the bombardment of 27Al with 7.44-MeV deuterons at the Edwards Accelerator Facility at Ohio University, was used for the measurement. A new procedure for evaluating and comparing PSD performance is presented which accounts for the effect of the light-output relation on the ability to detect low-energy neutrons. The EJ299-33 is shown to have considerable deficit in matrix condition, and in PSD figure of merit when compared to EJ309, especially when neutron energy is taken into account. Nevertheless the EJ299 is likely to bring a modest PSD capability into a array of field applications that are not accessible to liquids or crystals.

  18. The Borexino Solar Neutrino Experiment: Scintillator purification and surface contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Michael

    The Borexino Solar Neutrino Experiment will observe the monoenergetic (862 keV) 7Be neutrinos, produced in the solar reaction 7Be+e- →7 Li+nue. These neutrinos are the second most abundant species of solar neutrinos, with an expected flux at earth of 5 x 109/cm2/s. Using nu - e scattering in an aromatic liquid scintillator, Borexino will make the first real time measurement of the solar neutrino flux at energies less than 1 MeV. In addition to checking Standard Solar Model and neutrino oscillation predictions at low energies, Borexino will test the MSW vacuum-matter transition, luminosity constraint, and non-standard theories such as mass varying neutrinos. The Borexino detector will also be sensitive to supernova neutrinos, geoneutrinos, reactor neutrinos, and pep solar neutrinos. The pep measurement will tightly constrain the primary pp solar neutrino flux whose energy is below the Borexino threshold. With an expected rate of 35 events per day from solar 7Be neutrinos, the maximum tolerable background rate is one count per day. Removal of radioactive isotopes from the liquid scintillator is essential for the experiment's success and will be achieved with purification techniques including filtration, distillation, water extraction, nitrogen stripping, and silica gel adsorption. Results from small-scale purification efficiency tests are presented. Water extraction showed moderate but inadequate removal of 210Po which is a dominant background. Distillation reduced 210Po by a factor of more than 500. Online purification involves cycling over 300 m3 of scintillator from the detector though the purification plants. Flow patterns within the detector that influence the purification efficiency were determined with numerical simulations. Poor flow in the prototype Counting Test Facility showed effectively stagnant volumes within the detector. These are not present in the larger Borexino detector. Surface contamination in Borexino arises primarily from contact with

  19. Scintillation Monitoring Using Asymmetry Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Muhammad Mubasshir; Mahrous, Ayman; Abdallah, Amr; Notarpietro, Riccardo

    Variation in electron density can have significant effect on GNSS signals in terms of propagation delay. Ionospheric scintillation can be caused by rapid change of such delay, specifically, when they last for a longer period of time. Ionospheric irregularities that account for scintillation may vary significantly in spatial range and drift with the background plasma at speeds of 45 to 130 m/sec. These patchy irregularities may occur several times during night, e.g. in equatorial region, with the patches move through the ray paths of the GNSS satellite signals. These irregularities are often characterized as either ‘large scale’ (which can be as large as several hundred km in East-West direction and many times that in the North-South direction) or ‘small scale’ (which can be as small as 1m). These small scale irregularities are regarded as the main cause of scintillation [1,2]. In normal solar activity conditions, the mid-latitude ionosphere is not much disturbed. However, during severe magnetic storms, the aurora oval extends towards the equator and the equator anomaly region may stretched towards poles extending the scintillation phenomena more typically associated with those regions into mid-latitudes. In such stormy conditions, the predicted TEC may deviate largely from the true value of the TEC both at low and mid-latitudes due to which GNSS applications may be strongly degraded. This work is an attempt to analyze ionospheric scintillation (S4 index) using ionospheric asymmetry index [3]. The asymmetry index is based on trans-ionospheric propagation between GPS and LEO satellites in a radio occultation (RO) scenario, using background ionospheric data provided by MIDAS [4]. We attempted to simulate one of the recent geomagnetic storms (NOAA scale G4) occurred over low/mid-latitudes. The storm started on 26 September 2011 at UT 18:00 and lasted until early hours of 27 September 2011. The scintillation data for the storm was taken from an ionospheric

  20. LHCb Upgrade: Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40 MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed to read out the fibres and a custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The evolution of the design since the Technical Design Report in 2014 and the latest R & D results are presented.

  1. Silicon photomultipliers for scintillating trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabaioli, S.; Berra, A.; Bolognini, D.; Bonvicini, V.; Bosisio, L.; Ciano, S.; Iugovaz, D.; Lietti, D.; Penzo, A.; Prest, M.; Rashevskaya, I.; Reia, S.; Stoppani, L.; Vallazza, E.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have been proposed as a new kind of readout device for scintillating detectors in many experiments. A SiPM consists of a matrix of parallel-connected pixels, which are independent photon counters working in Geiger mode with very high gain (∼106). This contribution presents the use of an array of eight SiPMs (manufactured by FBK-irst) for the readout of a scintillating bar tracker (a small size prototype of the Electron Muon Ranger detector for the MICE experiment). The performances of the SiPMs in terms of signal to noise ratio, efficiency and time resolution will be compared to the ones of a multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) connected to the same bars. Both the SiPMs and the MAPMT are interfaced to a VME system through a 64 channel MAROC ASIC.

  2. Multi-PSPMT scintillation camera

    SciTech Connect

    Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Trotta, G.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.; Vincentis, G. de; Scafe, R.; Pergola, A.

    1999-06-01

    Gamma ray imaging is usually accomplished by the use of a relatively large scintillating crystal coupled to either a number of photomultipliers (PMTs) (Anger Camera) or to a single large Position Sensitive PMT (PSPMT). Recently the development of new diagnostic techniques, such as scintimammography and radio-guided surgery, have highlighted a number of significant limitations of the Anger camera in such imaging procedures. In this paper a dedicated gamma camera is proposed for clinical applications with the aim of improving image quality by utilizing detectors with an appropriate size and shape for the part of the body under examination. This novel scintillation camera is based upon an array of PSPMTs (Hamamatsu R5900-C8). The basic concept of this camera is identical to the Anger Camera with the exception of the substitution of PSPMTs for the PMTs. In this configuration it is possible to use the high resolution of the PSPMTs and still correctly position events lying between PSPMTs. In this work the test configuration is a 2 by 2 array of PSPMTs. Some advantages of this camera are: spatial resolution less than 2 mm FWHM, good linearity, thickness less than 3 cm, light weight, lower cost than equivalent area PSPMT, large detection area when coupled to scintillating arrays, small dead boundary zone (< 3 mm) and flexibility in the shape of the camera.

  3. Morphology of auroral zone radio wave scintillation

    SciTech Connect

    Rino, C.L.; Matthews, S.J.

    1980-08-01

    This paper describes the morphology of midnight sector and morning sector auroral zone scintillation observations made over a two-year period using the Wideband satelite, which is in a sun-synchronous, low-altitude orbit. No definitive seasonal variation was found. The nighttime data showed the highest scintillation ocurrence levels, but significant amounts of morning scintillation were observed. For the most part the scintillation activity followed the general pattern of local magnetic activity. The most prominent feature in the nightime data is a localized amplitude and phase scintillation enhancement at the point where the propagation vector lies within an L shell. A geometrical effect due to a dynamic slab of sheetlike structures in the F region is hypothesized as the source of his enhancement. The data have been sorted by magnetic activity, proximity to local midnight, and season. The general features of the data are in agreement with the accepted morphology of auroral zone scintillation.

  4. Fast neutron spectrometry with organic scintillators applied to magnetic fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaschuck, Yu. A.; Esposito, B.; Trykov, L. A.; Semenov, V. P.

    2002-01-01

    Neutron spectrometry with NE213 liquid scintillators is commonly used in thermonuclear fusion experiments to measure the 2.45 and 14.1 MeV neutron flux. We present the unfolded neutron spectrum, which was accumulated during several ohmic deuterium plasma discharges in the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade using a 2″×2″ NE213 scintillator. In this paper, we review the application of organic scintillator neutron spectrometers to tokamaks, focusing in particular on the comparison between NE213 and stilbene scintillators. Various aspects of the calibration technique and neutron spectra unfolding procedure are considered in the context of their application for fusion neutron spectrometry. Testing and calibration measurements have been carried out using D-D and D-T neutron generator facilities with both NE213 and stilbene scintillators. The main result from these measurements is that stilbene scintillator has better neutron energy resolution than NE213. Our stilbene detector could be used for the determination of the ion temperature ( Ti) from neutron spectrum broadening in tokamak thermonuclear plasmas with Ti=4 keV and higher.

  5. Scintillating Fibre Tracking at High Luminosity Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joram, C.; Haefeli, G.; Leverington, B.

    2015-08-01

    The combination of small diameter scintillating plastic fibres with arrays of SiPM photodetectors has led to a new class of SciFi trackers usable at high luminosity collider experiments. After a short review of the main principles and history of the scintillating fibre technology, we describe the challenges and developments of the large area Scintillating Fibre Tracker currently under development for the upgraded LHCb experiment.

  6. Recording of relativistic particles in thin scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Tolstukhin, I A.; Somov, Alexander S.; Somov, S. V.; Bolozdynya, A. I.

    2014-11-01

    Results of investigating an assembly of thin scintillators and silicon photomultipliers for registering relativistic particles with the minimum ionization are presented. A high efficiency of registering relativistic particles using an Ej-212 plastic scintillator, BSF-91A wavelength-shifting fiber (Saint-Gobain), and a silicon photomultiplier (Hamamtsu) is shown. The measurement results are used for creating a scintillation hodoscope of the magnetic spectrometer for registering γ quanta in the GlueX experiment.

  7. Spacecraft Radio Scintillation and Solar System Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard

    1993-01-01

    When a wave propagates through a turbulent medium, scattering by the random refractive index inhomogeneities can lead to a wide variety of phenomena that have been the subject of extensive study. The observed scattering effects include amplitude or intensity scintillation, phase scintillation, angular broadening, and spectral broadening, among others. In this paper, I will refer to these scattering effects collectively as scintillation. Although the most familiar example is probably the twinkling of stars (light wave intensity scintillation by turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere), scintillation has been encountered and investigated in such diverse fields as ionospheric physics, oceanography, radio astronomy, and radio and optical communications. Ever since planetary spacecraft began exploring the solar system, scintillation has appeared during the propagation of spacecraft radio signals through planetary atmospheres, planetary ionospheres, and the solar wind. Early studies of these phenomena were motivated by the potential adverse effects on communications and navigation, and on experiments that use the radio link to conduct scientific investigations. Examples of the latter are radio occultation measurements (described below) of planetary atmospheres to deduce temperature profiles, and the search for gravitational waves. However,these concerns soon gave way to the emergence of spacecraft radio scintillation as a new scientific tool for exploring small-scale dynamics in planetary atmospheres and structure in the solar wind, complementing in situ and other remote sensing spacecraft measurements, as well as scintillation measurements using natural (celestial) radio sources. The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe and review the solar system spacecraft radio scintillation observations, to summarize the salient features of wave propagation analyses employed in interpreting them, to underscore the unique remote sensing capabilities and scientific relevance of

  8. Divalent fluoride doped cerium fluoride scintillator

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Sparrow, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    The use of divalent fluoride dopants in scintillator materials comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. The preferred divalent fluoride dopants are calcium fluoride, strontium fluoride, and barium fluoride. The preferred amount of divalent fluoride dopant is less than about two percent by weight of the total scintillator. Cerium fluoride scintillator crystals grown with the addition of a divalent fluoride have exhibited better transmissions and higher light outputs than crystals grown without the addition of such dopants. These scintillators are useful in radiation detection and monitoring applications, and are particularly well suited for high-rate applications such as positron emission tomography (PET).

  9. Radio wave scintillations at equatorial regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poularikas, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    Radio waves, passing through the atmosphere, experience amplitude and phase fluctuations know as scintillations. A characterization of equatorial scintillation, which has resulted from studies of data recorded primarily in South America and equatorial Africa, is presented. Equatorial scintillation phenomena are complex because they appear to vary with time of day (pre-and postmidnight), season (equinoxes), and magnetic activity. A wider and more systematic geographical coverage is needed for both scientific and engineering purposes; therefore, it is recommended that more observations should be made at earth stations (at low-geomagnetic latitudes) to record equatorial scintillation phenomena.

  10. The three-dimensional scintillation dosimetry method: test for a 106Ru eye plaque applicator.

    PubMed

    Kirov, A S; Piao, J Z; Mathur, N K; Miller, T R; Devic, S; Trichter, S; Zaider, M; Soares, C G; LoSasso, T

    2005-07-01

    The need for fast, accurate and high resolution dosimetric quality assurance in radiation therapy has been outpacing the development of new and improved 2D and 3D dosimetry techniques. This paper summarizes the efforts to create a novel and potentially very fast, 3D dosimetry method based on the observation of scintillation light from an irradiated liquid scintillator volume serving simultaneously as a phantom material and as a dose detector medium. The method, named three-dimensional scintillation dosimetry (3DSD), uses visible light images of the liquid scintillator volume at multiple angles and applies a tomographic algorithm to a series of these images to reconstruct the scintillation light emission density in each voxel of the volume. It is based on the hypothesis that with careful design and data processing, one can achieve acceptable proportionality between the local light emission density and the locally absorbed dose. The method is applied to a Ru-106 eye plaque immersed in a 16.4 cm3 liquid scintillator volume and the reconstructed 3D dose map is compared along selected profiles and planes with radiochromic film and diode measurements. The comparison indicates that the 3DSD method agrees, within 25% for most points or within approximately 2 mm distance to agreement, with the relative radiochromic film and diode dose distributions in a small (approximately 4.5 mm high and approximately 12 mm diameter) volume in the unobstructed, high gradient dose region outside the edge of the plaque. For a comparison, the reproducibility of the radiochromic film results for our measurements ranges from 10 to 15% within this volume. At present, the 3DSD method is not accurate close to the edge of the plaque, and further than approximately 10 mm (<10% central axis depth dose) from the plaque surface. Improvement strategies, considered important to provide a more accurate quick check of the dose profiles in 3D for brachytherapy applicators, are discussed. PMID:15972981

  11. The three-dimensional scintillation dosimetry method: test for a 106Ru eye plaque applicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirov, A. S.; Piao, J. Z.; Mathur, N. K.; Miller, T. R.; Devic, S.; Trichter, S.; Zaider, M.; Soares, C. G.; Lo Sasso, T.

    2005-07-01

    The need for fast, accurate and high resolution dosimetric quality assurance in radiation therapy has been outpacing the development of new and improved 2D and 3D dosimetry techniques. This paper summarizes the efforts to create a novel and potentially very fast, 3D dosimetry method based on the observation of scintillation light from an irradiated liquid scintillator volume serving simultaneously as a phantom material and as a dose detector medium. The method, named three-dimensional scintillation dosimetry (3DSD), uses visible light images of the liquid scintillator volume at multiple angles and applies a tomographic algorithm to a series of these images to reconstruct the scintillation light emission density in each voxel of the volume. It is based on the hypothesis that with careful design and data processing, one can achieve acceptable proportionality between the local light emission density and the locally absorbed dose. The method is applied to a Ru-106 eye plaque immersed in a 16.4 cm3 liquid scintillator volume and the reconstructed 3D dose map is compared along selected profiles and planes with radiochromic film and diode measurements. The comparison indicates that the 3DSD method agrees, within 25% for most points or within ~2 mm distance to agreement, with the relative radiochromic film and diode dose distributions in a small (~4.5 mm high and ~12 mm diameter) volume in the unobstructed, high gradient dose region outside the edge of the plaque. For a comparison, the reproducibility of the radiochromic film results for our measurements ranges from 10 to 15% within this volume. At present, the 3DSD method is not accurate close to the edge of the plaque, and further than ~10 mm (<10% central axis depth dose) from the plaque surface. Improvement strategies, considered important to provide a more accurate quick check of the dose profiles in 3D for brachytherapy applicators, are discussed.

  12. The Do/ scintillating fiber tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.; Gutierrez, G.; Grunendahl, S.; Lincoln, D.; Ramberg, E.; Ray, R.; Ruchti, R.; Warchol, J.; Wayne, M.; Choic, S.

    1998-11-01

    The Do/ detector is being upgraded in preparation for the next collider run at Fermilab. The Central Fiber Tracker discussed in this report is a major component of the Do/ upgrade. The expected Tevatron luminosity of 2{times}10{sup 32} cm{sup {minus}2} sec{sup {minus}1}, the 132ns bunch crossing time, and the Do/ detector constraints of a 2 Tesla solenoid and a 52 cm lever arm, make a scintillating fiber based tracker an optimal choice for the upgrade of the Do/ detector. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Photodetectors for Scintillator Proportionality Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Hull, Giulia; Payne, Steve; Cherepy, Nerine; Valentine, J.D.

    2010-10-18

    We evaluate photodetectors for use in a Compton Coincidence apparatus designed for measuring scintillator proportionality. There are many requirements placed on the photodetector in these systems, including active area, linearity, and the ability to accurately measure low light levels (which implies high quantum efficiency and high signal-to-noise ratio). Through a combination of measurement and Monte Carlo simulation, we evaluate a number of potential photodetectors, especially photomultiplier tubes and hybrid photodetectors. Of these, we find that the most promising devices available are photomultiplier tubes with high ({approx}50%) quantum efficiency, although hybrid photodetectors with high quantum efficiency would be preferable.

  14. Multilayer scintillation spectrometer for charged pionium detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnov, V. A.; Karnyushina, L. V.; Kuznetsov, S. N.; Kurepin, A. B.; Livanov, A. N.; Pilyar, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    The design description and characteristics of a 14-layer scintillation spectrometer for meson recording are given. The results from testing the spectrometer, calibrating it with cosmic-ray particles, and using the particle beams at energies reaching 1 GeV are presented. The spectrometer design is based on flat scintillation plates glued with wavelength-shifting optic fibers.

  15. Scintillator handbook with emphasis on cesium iodide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidd, J. L.; Dabbs, J. R.; Levine, N.

    1973-01-01

    This report provides a background of reasonable depth and reference material on scintillators in general. Particular attention is paid to the cesium iodide scintillators as used in the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) experiments. It is intended especially for use by persons such as laboratory test personnel who need to obtain a working knowledge of these materials and their characteristics in a short time.

  16. Binderless composite scintillator for neutron detection

    DOEpatents

    Hodges, Jason P [Knoxville, TN; Crow, Jr; Lowell, M [Oak Ridge, TN; Cooper, Ronald G [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-03-10

    Composite scintillator material consisting of a binderless sintered mixture of a Lithium (Li) compound containing .sup.6Li as the neutron converter and Y.sub.2SiO.sub.5:Ce as the scintillation phosphor, and the use of this material as a method for neutron detection. Other embodiments of the invention include various other Li compounds.

  17. Development of scintillation materials for PET scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzhik, Mikhail; Fedorov, Andrei; Annenkov, Alexander; Borissevitch, Andrei; Dossovitski, Alexei; Missevitch, Oleg; Lecoq, Paul

    2007-02-01

    The growing demand on PET methodology for a variety of applications ranging from clinical use to fundamental studies triggers research and development of PET scanners providing better spatial resolution and sensitivity. These efforts are primarily focused on the development of advanced PET detector solutions and on the developments of new scintillation materials as well. However Lu containing scintillation materials introduced in the last century such as LSO, LYSO, LuAP, LuYAP crystals still remain the best PET species in spite of the recent developments of bright, fast but relatively low density lanthanum bromide scintillators. At the same time Lu based materials have several drawbacks which are high temperature of crystallization and relatively high cost compared to alkali-halide scintillation materials. Here we describe recent results in the development of new scintillation materials for PET application.

  18. Interstellar scattering of pulsar radiation. 1: Scintillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backer, D. C.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation of the intensity fluctuations of 28 pulsars near 0.4 GHz indicates that scintillation spectra have a Gaussian shape, scintillation indices are near unity, and the scintillation bandwidth depends linearly on dispersion measure. Observations near 2.5 GHz suggest a strong dependence of the frequency at which scintillation indices fall below unity on dispersion measure. Multistation measurements of scintillation provide values or limits for the scale size of the scattering diffraction pattern. The dependences of scattering parameters on dispersion measure is discussed in terms of the current models. It is suggested that any line of sight through the galaxy encounters increasingly rare, increasingly large deviations of thermal electron density on the scale of 10 to the 11th power cm.

  19. Equitorial scintillations: Advances since ISEA-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, S.

    1985-01-01

    Since the last equatorial aeronomy meeting in 1980, our understanding of the morphology of equatorial scintillations has advanced greatly due to more intensive observations at the equatorial anomaly locations in the different longitude zones. The unmistakable effect of the sunspot cycle in controlling irregularity belt width and electron concentration responsible for strong scintillation in the GHz range has been demonstrated. The fact that night-time F-region dynamics is an important factor in controlling the magnitude of scintillations has been recognized by interpreting scintillation observations in the light of realistic models of total electron content at various longitudes. A hypothesis based on the alignment of the solar terminator with the geomagnetic flux tubes as an indicator of enhanced scintillation occurrence and another based on the influence of a transequatorial thermospheric neutral wind have been postulated to describe the observed longitudinal variation.

  20. Extruded scintillator for the calorimetry applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dyshkant, A.; Rykalin, V.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Beznosko, D.; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2006-08-01

    An extrusion line has been installed and successfully operated at FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory) in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new Facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. Recently progress has been made in producing co-extruded plastic scintillator, thus increasing the potential HEP applications of this Facility. The current R&D work with extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator for a potential ALICE upgrade, the ILC calorimetry program and the MINERvA experiment show the attractiveness of the chosen strategy for future experiments and calorimetry. We extensively discuss extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator in calorimetry in synergy with new Solid State Photomultipliers. The characteristics of extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator will be presented here as well as results with non-traditional photo read-out.

  1. Extruded scintillator for the Calorimetry applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dyshkant, A.; Rykalin, V.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Beznosko, D.

    2006-10-27

    An extrusion line has been installed and successfully operated at FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory) in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new Facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. Recently progress has been made in producing co-extruded plastic scintillator, thus increasing the potential HEP applications of this Facility. The current R and D work with extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator for a potential ALICE upgrade, the ILC calorimetry program and the MINERvA experiment show the attractiveness of the chosen strategy for future experiments and calorimetry. We extensively discuss extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator in calorimetry in synergy with new Solid State Photomultipliers. The characteristics of extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator will be presented here as well as results with non-traditional photo read-out.

  2. Scintillation Effects on Space Shuttle GPS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.; Kramer, Leonard

    2001-01-01

    Irregularities in ionospheric electron density result in variation in amplitude and phase of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals, or scintillation. GPS receivers tracking scintillated signals may lose carrier phase or frequency lock in the case of phase sc intillation. Amplitude scintillation can cause "enhancement" or "fading" of GPS signals and result in loss of lock. Scintillation can occur over the equatorial and polar regions and is a function of location, time of day, season, and solar and geomagnetic activity. Mid latitude regions are affected only very rarely, resulting from highly disturbed auroral events. In the spring of 1998, due to increasing concern about scintillation of GPS signals during the upcoming solar maximum, the Space Shuttle Program began to assess the impact of scintillation on Collins Miniaturized Airborne GPS Receiver (MAGR) units that are to replace Tactical Air Control and Navigation (TACAN) units on the Space Shuttle orbiters. The Shuttle Program must determine if scintillation effects pose a threat to safety of flight and mission success or require procedural and flight rule changes. Flight controllers in Mission Control must understand scintillation effects on GPS to properly diagnose "off nominal" GPS receiver performance. GPS data from recent Space Shuttle missions indicate that the signals tracked by the Shuttle MAGR manifest scintillation. Scintillation is observed as anomalous noise in velocity measurements lasting for up to 20 minutes on Shuttle orbit passes and are not accounted for in the error budget of the MAGR accuracy parameters. These events are typically coincident with latitude and local time occurrence of previously identified equatorial spread F within about 20 degrees of the magnetic equator. The geographic and seasonal history of these events from ground-based observations and a simple theoretical model, which have potential for predicting events for operational purposes, are reviewed.

  3. The improved scintillation crystal lead tungstate scintillation for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Youbao; WU, Rurong; Xiao, Linrong; Zhang, Jianxin; Yang, Peizhi; Yan, Hui

    2009-07-01

    As a valuable material for the detecting of γ-ray, PbWO4 and BaF2:PbWO4 crystals were grown by a novel multi-crucible temperature gradient system developed by ourselves. Utilizing a topical partial heating method, this system can form a topical partial high temperature in its hearth. Thus this system could melt raw materials in step by step as requirement. The advantage of this method is that there would be solid obstruct left on the melt in the procedure of the crystal growing up. The left obstruct could prevent the volatilization of the component in the melt. Hence it is helpful for the composition homogenization in the crystal. The system also offers a sustaining device for multi-crucibles and thus it can grow many crystals simultaneity. The optical properties and scintillation properties of the crystals were studied. The results reveal that the ions doping improves the scintillation properties of the crystal. The transmittance spectra show that the transmittance of BaF2:PbWO4 crystals are better than that of PbWO4 crystals. For the PbWO4 crystals, their absorption edge is at 325nm, and their maximum transmittance is 68%. For the BaF2:PbWO4 crystals, their absorption edge is at 325nm and their maximum transmittance is upto76%. The X-ray excited luminescence spectra shows that the luminescence peak is at 420nm for the samples of PbWO4 crystal while the peak is at 430nm for the samples of BaF2:PbWO4 crystal respectively. The luminescence intensity of the samples of BaF2:PbWO4 crystal is about two times than that of PbWO4 crystal. And their peak shape is different for the two kind of crystal. The light yield of BaF2:PbWO4 crystals is about 2.9 times than that of PbWO4 crystal Analyzing these scintillation properties, we find that the VPb 3+ and VO- defects do harm for the optical properties of the crystal. Ions doping method could reduce the defect concentration and improving its illumination performance of the crystal. Specially, the doped F- ions in O2- site can

  4. Scintillation light detection system in LArIAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryczynski, P.

    2016-02-01

    The LArIAT experiment is currently taking data at Fermilab using a Liquid Argon TPC, with the aim of studying particle interactions and characterizing detector response for neutrino detectors using argon. In parallel, it serves as a test-bench to develop and evaluate the performance of the simulation, reconstruction, and analysis software used in LAr neutrino experiments. LArIAT also takes advantage of the scintillating capabilities of liquid argon and will evaluate the feasibility of using the light signal to determine calorimetric information and particle identification. To test this possibility, a scintillation light detection system consisting of high Quantum Efficiency (QE) PMT and Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) devices is installed in the cryostat, viewing the interior of the TPC. Light collection efficiency is maximized by means of lining the walls with reflector foils covered by a wavelength shifter layer. Collecting the light reflected at the boundaries of the active volume greatly improves also the uniformity of the light yield. Presented here are initial results of the LArIAT light detection system calibration together with the preliminary results of the dedicated simulation and its application in future LAr TPC experiments

  5. Can the ZoMBieS method be used to characterise scintillator non-linearity?

    PubMed

    Bignell, L J

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of the detection efficiency as a function of deposited electron energy in a liquid scintillation cocktail between 4 keV and 49 keV are obtained using the ZoMBieS method. Comparison is made between the measured data and the Poisson-Birks detection efficiency model. Measurements of the Birks non-linearity parameter, kB, and the linearised scintillation response of each photomultiplier, ω(i), were made using these data. However, the value of kB that best linearises the scintillator response is found to vary depending upon which photomultiplier is used in its determination, and the measured kB and ω(i) vary depending on the external source geometry. The cause of this behaviour is unknown. The triple-coincident detection efficiency appears to be unaffected by any systematic errors. PMID:24291527

  6. Noble gas excimer scintillation following neutron capture in boron thin films

    SciTech Connect

    McComb, Jacob C.; Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad; Coplan, Michael A.; Thompson, Alan K.; Vest, Robert E.; Clark, Charles W.

    2014-04-14

    Far-ultraviolet scintillation signals have been measured in heavy noble gases (argon, krypton, xenon) following boron-neutron capture ({sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li) in {sup 10}B thin films. The observed scintillation yields are comparable to the yields from some liquid and solid neutron scintillators. At noble gas pressures of 107 kPa, the number of photons produced per neutron absorbed following irradiation of a 1200 nm thick {sup 10}B film was 14 000 for xenon, 11 000 for krypton, and 6000 for argon. The absolute scintillation yields from the experimental configuration were calculated using data from (1) experimental irradiations, (2) thin-film characterizations, (3) photomultiplier tube calibrations, and (4) photon collection modeling. Both the boron films and the photomultiplier tube were characterized at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Monte Carlo modeling of the reaction cell provided estimates of the photon collection efficiency and the transport behavior of {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li reaction products escaping the thin films. Scintillation yields increased with gas pressure due to increased ionization and excitation densities of the gases from the {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li reaction products, increased frequency of three-body, excimer-forming collisions, and reduced photon emission volumes (i.e., larger solid angle) at higher pressures. Yields decreased for thicker {sup 10}B thin films due to higher average energy loss of the {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li reaction products escaping the films. The relative standard uncertainties in the measurements were determined to lie between 14% and 16%. The observed scintillation signal demonstrates that noble gas excimer scintillation is promising for use in practical neutron detectors.

  7. Noble gas excimer scintillation following neutron capture in boron thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComb, Jacob C.; Coplan, Michael A.; Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad; Thompson, Alan K.; Vest, Robert E.; Clark, Charles W.

    2014-04-01

    Far-ultraviolet scintillation signals have been measured in heavy noble gases (argon, krypton, xenon) following boron-neutron capture (10B(n,α)7Li) in 10B thin films. The observed scintillation yields are comparable to the yields from some liquid and solid neutron scintillators. At noble gas pressures of 107 kPa, the number of photons produced per neutron absorbed following irradiation of a 1200 nm thick 10B film was 14 000 for xenon, 11 000 for krypton, and 6000 for argon. The absolute scintillation yields from the experimental configuration were calculated using data from (1) experimental irradiations, (2) thin-film characterizations, (3) photomultiplier tube calibrations, and (4) photon collection modeling. Both the boron films and the photomultiplier tube were characterized at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Monte Carlo modeling of the reaction cell provided estimates of the photon collection efficiency and the transport behavior of 10B(n,α)7Li reaction products escaping the thin films. Scintillation yields increased with gas pressure due to increased ionization and excitation densities of the gases from the 10B(n,α)7Li reaction products, increased frequency of three-body, excimer-forming collisions, and reduced photon emission volumes (i.e., larger solid angle) at higher pressures. Yields decreased for thicker 10B thin films due to higher average energy loss of the 10B(n,α)7Li reaction products escaping the films. The relative standard uncertainties in the measurements were determined to lie between 14% and 16%. The observed scintillation signal demonstrates that noble gas excimer scintillation is promising for use in practical neutron detectors.

  8. Scintillation Breakdowns in Chip Tantalum Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Scintillations in solid tantalum capacitors are momentarily local breakdowns terminated by a self-healing or conversion to a high-resistive state of the manganese oxide cathode. This conversion effectively caps the defective area of the tantalum pentoxide dielectric and prevents short-circuit failures. Typically, this type of breakdown has no immediate catastrophic consequences and is often considered as nuisance rather than a failure. Scintillation breakdowns likely do not affect failures of parts under surge current conditions, and so-called "proofing" of tantalum chip capacitors, which is a controllable exposure of the part after soldering to voltages slightly higher than the operating voltage to verify that possible scintillations are self-healed, has been shown to improve the quality of the parts. However, no in-depth studies of the effect of scintillations on reliability of tantalum capacitors have been performed so far. KEMET is using scintillation breakdown testing as a tool for assessing process improvements and to compare quality of different manufacturing lots. Nevertheless, the relationship between failures and scintillation breakdowns is not clear, and this test is not considered as suitable for lot acceptance testing. In this work, scintillation breakdowns in different military-graded and commercial tantalum capacitors were characterized and related to the rated voltages and to life test failures. A model for assessment of times to failure, based on distributions of breakdown voltages, and accelerating factors of life testing are discussed.

  9. Estimation of Fano factor in inorganic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Vaibhav; Barrett, Harrison H.; Fastje, David; Clarkson, Eric; Furenlid, Lars; Bousselham, Abdelkader; Shah, Kanai S.; Glodo, Jarek

    2016-01-01

    The Fano factor of an integer-valued random variable is defined as the ratio of its variance to its mean. Correlation between the outputs of two photomultiplier tubes on opposite faces of a scintillation crystal was used to estimate the Fano factor of photoelectrons and scintillation photons. Correlations between the integrals of the detector outputs were used to estimate the photoelectron and photon Fano factor for YAP:Ce, SrI2:Eu and CsI:Na scintillator crystals. At 662 keV, SrI2:Eu was found to be sub-Poisson, while CsI:Na and YAP:Ce were found to be super-Poisson. An experiment setup inspired from the Hanbury Brown and Twiss experiment was used to measure the correlations as a function of time between the outputs of two photomultiplier tubes looking at the same scintillation event. A model of the scintillation and the detection processes was used to generate simulated detector outputs as a function of time for different values of Fano factor. The simulated outputs from the model for different Fano factors was compared to the experimentally measured detector outputs to estimate the Fano factor of the scintillation photons for YAP:Ce, LaBr3:Ce scintillator crystals. At 662 keV, LaBr3:Ce was found to be sub-Poisson, while YAP:Ce was found to be close to Poisson.

  10. Equatorial scintillations: advances since ISEA-6

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Our understanding of the morphology of equatorial scintillations has advanced due to more intensive observations at the equatorial anomaly locations in the different longitude zones. The unmistakable effect of the sunspot cycle in controlling irregularity belt width and electron concentration responsible for strong scintillation in the controlling the magnitude of scintillations has been recognized by interpreting scintillation observations inthe light of realistic models of total electron content at various longitudes. A hypothesis based on the alignment of the solar terminator with the geomagnetic flux tubes as an indicator of enhanced scintillation occurrence and another based on the influence of a transequatorial thermospheric neutral wind have been postulated to describe the observed longitudinal variation. A distinct class of equatorial irregularities known as the bottomside sinusoidal (BSS) type was identified. These irregularities occur in very large patches, sometimes in excess of several thousand kilometers in the E-W direction and are associated with frequency spread on ionograms. Scintillations caused by such irregularities exist only in the VHF band, exhibit Fresnel oscillations in intensity spectra and are found to give rise to extremely long durations (approx. several hours) of uninterrrupted scintillations.

  11. Deuterated-xylene (EJ301D): A new, improved deuterated scintillator for neutron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becchetti, Fred; Torres-Isea, Ramon; Febbraro, Michael; Clarke, Shaun; di Fulvio, Angela; Pozzi, Sara

    2015-10-01

    In conjunction with Eljen Technologies (Sweetwater,TX), we have developed and evaluated a deuterated-xylene based liquid organic scintillator detector (3 in. × 3 in.) and PMT assembly. Like deuterated-benzene based scintillators such as EJ315 and NE230 the n +d recoil spectrum producing the light spectrum has distinct peaks corresponding to specific neutron energy groups. The light spectrum can then be unfolded to produce neutron energy spectra including fission spectra without the need for time-of-flight. This results in a large over-all detection efficiency for such detectors as they can be used in arrays covering a large angular range, close to the neutron source and do not require a pulsed or gated source. In addition, the new EJ301D scintillator has a lower neutron energy threshold for improved PSD, which is important in many low-energy measurements. More importantly this scintillator has a much safer flash point than benzene-based scintillators making it better suited for many applications including field applications in nuclear security and non-proliferation. Work supported in part by US NSF and by the Consortium for Verification Technology under Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Award Number DE-NA0002534.

  12. Fast scintillation counters with WLS bars

    SciTech Connect

    Bezzubov, V.; Denisov, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Evdokimov, V.; Galyaev, A.; Goncharov, P.; Gurzhiev, S.; Kostritsky, A.; Kozelov, A.; Stoianova, D.; Denisov, D.; Diehl, H.T.; Ito, A.S.; Johns, K.

    1998-11-01

    The Do/ collaboration is building 4608 scintillation counters to upgrade forward muon system for the next Fermilab Collider run. Each counter consists of 12.7 mm thick scintillator plate with two WLS bars along two sides for the light collection. With average 10{sup 2} photoelectrons from {ital mip} particle the counters provide time resolution below 1ns and have good energy resolution. Results of Bicron 404A scintillator and Kumarin 30 WLS aging under irradiation up to 3Mrad are presented. With specially designed magnetic shielding counters can operate in magnetic filed up to 500G. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Manufacturing and studying of new polystyrene scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senchishin, Vitalij G.; Vasilchuk, Vladimir L.; Borysenko, Artem; Lebedev, Valentin N.; Adadurov, Alexander F.; Kalinichenko, Alexander I.; Titskaja, Valentina D.; Koba, Valentina S.; Khlapova, Nina P.; Pelipyagina, Ludmilla E.; Miroshnichenko, Ludmilla A.; Osadchenko, Valentina N.; Kluban, Nikolaj A.

    1999-10-01

    New type of polystyrene-based scintillators UPS98GC were tested regarding long term stability, radiation hardness and light yield uniformity for different doses and dose-rate levels of gamma radiation. They were compared to SCSN-81 produced by Kuraray Co. which has often used in high-energy physics experiments. The dependence of scintillator properties on radiation dose rates as well on total dose values is studied. It is shown that for relatively small dose rate, closed to those expected during scintillator lifetime, our UPS98GC does not yield to SCSN-81.

  14. Scintillation Noise in Exoplanet Transit Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Föhring, Dóra; Wilson, Richard; Osborn, James; Dhillon, Vik

    2015-04-01

    Transit photometry is a powerful technique for studying exoplanets. Transit observations from the ground of targets of magnitude V= 10 or brighter, however, are limited by scintillation noise due to Earth's atmosphere. Through turbulence profiling using instruments such as the stereo-SCIDAR, we have shown to able to accurately model scintillation noise, which is essential in order to fully account for the error budget of the observation. Through numerical modelling we find that employing scintillation reducing techniques enables an improvement of a factor between 1.36 — 1.6 on the astrophysical parameters.

  15. Large volume flow-through scintillating detector

    DOEpatents

    Gritzo, Russ E.; Fowler, Malcolm M.

    1995-01-01

    A large volume flow through radiation detector for use in large air flow situations such as incinerator stacks or building air systems comprises a plurality of flat plates made of a scintillating material arranged parallel to the air flow. Each scintillating plate has a light guide attached which transfers light generated inside the scintillating plate to an associated photomultiplier tube. The output of the photomultiplier tubes are connected to electronics which can record any radiation and provide an alarm if appropriate for the application.

  16. Indium-111-Photofrin-II scintillation scan

    SciTech Connect

    Origitano, T.C.; Karesh, S.M.; Reichman, O.H.; Henkin, R.E.; Caron, M.J.

    1989-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy is under intense investigation as an adjuvant treatment for malignant glial tumors of the central nervous system. Photofrin-II (HpD-II) is currently the most actively investigated photosensitizing agent. A crucial issue regarding the safe and efficacious usage of HpD-II-based photodynamic therapy is the individual in vivo kinetics of tumor uptake and retention, compared with normal brain clearance. The optimal time for photoactivation of sensitized tumor must be known to ensure a high target-to-nontarget ratio, resulting in the maximal tumor destruction while preserving normal brain. Our laboratory developed a radionuclide scan based on 111indium (111In)-labeled HpD-II to evaluate HpD-II localization and clearance noninvasively within a canine model of intracerebral gliosarcoma. Synthesis of the 111In-HpD-II complex in greater than 90% yield is achieved by a simple, rapid labeling method. Radiochemical purity and stability were verified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Using the canine model of intracerebral gliosarcoma, we followed the uptake of 111In-HpD-II in tumors with serial scintillation scanning. Localization of the tumor by 111In-HpD-II has been verified by contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan followed by gross and histological examination of the enhancing brain region. Total body biodistribution of 111In-HpD-II at various times after injection has been evaluated. The ratio of uptake in tumor compared with surrounding brain peaked at 72 hours after injection. The knowledge of regional distribution and concentration of a photosensitizing agent within a tumor mass and surrounding brain allows for the most efficacious timing and localization of a photoactivating source.

  17. Performance of diffusion-barrier scintillation cells under a variety of controlled environmental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Spangler, R.R.; Langner, G.H., Jr.

    1989-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology established the Technical Measurements Center (TMC) at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Projects Office (GJPO), in part, to develop and evaluate new devices for the DOE remedial action projects. The TMC charged the GJPO Radon Laboratory, under the management of UNC Geotech (UNC), with developing and testing a passive scintillation-type, time-averaging radon monitor. Two types of monitors were developed--a diffusion-barrier scintillation cell (DBSC) and a diffusion-barrier liquid scintillation cell (DBLSC). The performance of the DBSCs was tested under different relative humidities, temperatures, and wind speeds. The test results of the DBSCs showed no statistically significant change in accuracy due to the environmental test conditions. Radon-concentration measurement results for diffusion-barrier charcoal canisters (DBCC), exposed along with the DBSCs, did show significant effects due to wind and temperature, but no effects due to relative humidity. The performance of the DBLSCs under a variety of environmental conditions was not tested because a sufficiently sensitive device could not be developed using the existing GJPO liquid-scintillation counting system and a nontoxic counting medium. 10 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  18. Equatorial scintillations: advances since ISEA-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sunanda; Basu, Santimay

    1985-10-01

    Since the last equatorial aeronomy meeting in 1980, our understanding of the morphology of equatorial scintillations has advanced greatly due to more intensive observations at the equatorial anomaly locations in the different longitude zones. The unmistakable effect of the sunspot cycle in controlling irregularity belt width and electron concentration responsible for strong scintillation in the GHz range has been demonstrated. The fact that night-time F-region dynamics is an important factor in controlling the magnitude of scintillations has been recognized by interpreting scintillation observations in the light of realistic models of total electron content at various longitudes. A hypothesis based on the alignment of the solar terminator with the geomagnetic flux tubes as an indicator of enhanced scintillation occurrence and another based on the influence of a transequatorial thermospheric neutral wind have been postulated to describe the observed longitudinal variation. A distinct class of equatorial irregularities known as the bottomside sinusoidal (BSS) type has been identified. Unlike equatorial bubbles, these irregularities occur in very large patches, sometimes in excess of several thousand kilometers in the E-W direction and are associated with frequency spread on ionograms. Scintillations caused by such irregularities exist only in the VHF band, exhibit Fresnel oscillations in intensity spectra and are found to give rise to extremely long durations (~ several hours) of uninterrupted scintillations. These irregularities maximize during solstices, so that in the VHF range, scintillation morphology at an equatorial station is determined by considering occurrence characteristics of both bubble type and BSS type irregularities. The temporal structure of scintillations in relation to the in situ measurements of irregularity spatial structure within equatorial bubbles has been critically examined. A two-component irregularity spectrum with a shallow slope ( p1

  19. Elastic scintillation materials based on polyorganosiloxane

    SciTech Connect

    Grinev, B.V.; Andryushchenko, L.A.; Shershukov, V.M.; Ulanenko, K.B.; Minakova, R.A.; Sevastjanova, I.V.

    1994-12-31

    The developed elastic scintillators based on polymethyl-phenylsiloxane rubber are characterized by an elevated light output and a low toxicity. The increase of their light output is achieved by raising the content of phenyl chains, varying the chemical structure of luminescent additions and using isopropylnaphthalene. This high-boiling solvent introduced into the scintillation siloxane compositions is confined within siloxane matrix after the hardening of the rubber.

  20. Current status on plastic scintillators modifications.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Guillaume H V; Hamel, Matthieu; Sguerra, Fabien

    2014-11-24

    Recent developments of plastic scintillators are reviewed, from 2000 to March 2014, distributed in two different chapters. First chapter deals with the chemical modifications of the polymer backbone, whereas modifications of the fluorescent probe are presented in the second chapter. All examples are provided with the scope of detection of various radiation particles. The main characteristics of these newly created scintillators and their detection properties are given. PMID:25335882

  1. Multi-GNSS for Ionospheric Scintillation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Y.

    2015-12-01

    GNSS have been widely used for ionospheric monitoring. We anticipate over 160 GNSS satellites broadcasting 400 signals by 2023, nearly double the number today. With their well-defined signal structures, high spatial density and spectral diversity, GNSS offers low cost and distributed passive sensing of ionosphere effects. There are, however, many challenges to utilize GNSS resources to characterize and forecast ionospheric scintillation. Originally intended for navigation purposes, GNSS receivers are designed to filter out nuisance effects due to ionosphere effects. GNSS measurements are plagued with errors from multipath, oscillator jitters, processing artifacts, and neutral atmosphere effects. Strong scintillation events are often characterized by turbulent structures in ionosphere, causing simultaneous deep amplitude fading and abrupt carrier phase changes. The combined weak signal and high carrier dynamics imposes conflicting requirements for GNSS receiver design. Therefore, GNSS receivers often experience cycle slips and loss of lock of signals during strong scintillation events. High quality, raw GNSS signals bearing space weather signatures and robust receiver algorithms designed to capture these signatures are needed in order for GNSS to be a reliable and useful agent for scintillation monitoring and forecasting. Our event-driven, reconfigurable data collection system is designed to achieve this purpose. To date, our global network has collected ~150TB of raw GNSS data during space weather events. A suite of novel receiver processing algorithms has been developed by exploitating GNSS spatial, frequency, temporal, and constellation diversity to process signals experiencing challenging scintillation impact. The algorithms and data have advanced our understanding of scintillation impact on GNSS, lead to more robust receiver technologies, and enabled high spatial and temporal resolution depiction of ionosphere responses to solar and geomagnetic conditions. This

  2. Crystal growth and scintillation properties of strontium iodide scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    van Loef, Edgar; Wilson, Cody; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Steven; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.; Shah, Kanai

    2009-06-01

    Single crystals of SrI{sub 2}:Eu and SrI{sub 2}:Ce/Na were grown from anhydrous iodides by the vertical Bridgman technique in evacuated silica ampoules. Growth rates were of the order of 5-30 mm/day. Radioluminescence spectra of SrI{sub 2}:Eu and SrI{sub 2}:Ce/Na exhibit a broad band due to Eu{sup 2+} and Ce{sup 3+} emission, respectively. The maximum in the luminescence spectrum of SrI{sub 2}:Eu is found at 435 nm. The spectrum of SrI{sub 2}:Ce/Na exhibits a doublet peaking at 404 and 435 nm attributed to Ce{sup 3+} emission, while additional impurity - or defected - related emission is present at approximately 525 nm. The strontium iodide scintillators show very high light yields of up to 120,000 photons/MeV, have energy resolutions down to 3% at 662 keV (Full Width Half Maximum) and exhibit excellent light yield proportionality with a standard deviation of less than 5% between 6 and 460 keV.

  3. Scintillation Hole Observed by FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shih Ping; Yenq Liu, Jann; Krishnanunni Rajesh, Panthalingal

    2013-04-01

    Ionospheric scintillations can significantly disturb satellite positioning, navigation, and communication. FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC provides the first 3-D global observation by solo instrument (radio occultation experiment, GOX). The GPS L-band amplitude fluctuation from 50Hz signal is received and recorded by F3/C GOX to calculate S4-index from 50-800km altitude. The global F3/C S4 index are subdivided and examined in various latitudes, longitudes, altitudes, and seasons during 2007-2012. The F-region scintillations in the equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere start around post-sunset period and often persist till post-midnight hours (0300 MLT, magnetic local time) during the March and September equinox as well as December Solstice seasons. The E-region scintillations reveal a clear solar zenith effect and yield pronounced intensities in mid-latitudes during the Summer Solstice seasons, which are well correlated with occurrences of the sporadic E-layer. It is interesting to find there is no scintillation, which is termed "scintillation hole", in the E region ranging from 80 to 130km altitude over the South Africa region, and become the most pronounced in November-January (December Solstice seasons or summer months). Other space-borne and ground based observations are use to confirm the existence of the scintillation hole.

  4. Development of Novel Polycrystalline Ceramic Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Wisniewska, Monika; Boatner, Lynn A; Neal, John S; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; North, Andrea L; Wisniewski, Monica; Payzant, E Andrew; Howe, Jane Y; Lempicki, Aleksander; Brecher, Charlie; Glodo, J.

    2008-01-01

    For several decades most of the efforts to develop new scintillator materials have concentrated on high-light-yield inorganic single-crystals while polycrystalline ceramic scintillators, since their inception in the early 1980 s, have received relatively little attention. Nevertheless, transparent ceramics offer a promising approach to the fabrication of relatively inexpensive scintillators via a simple mechanical compaction and annealing process that eliminates single-crystal growth. Until recently, commonly accepted concepts restricted the polycrystalline ceramic approach to materials exhibiting a cubic crystal structure. Here, we report our results on the development of two novel ceramic scintillators based on the non-cubic crystalline materials: Lu SiO:Ce (LSO:Ce) and LaBr:Ce. While no evidence for texturing has been found in their ceramic microstructures, our LSO:Ce ceramics exhibit a surprisingly high level of transparency/ translucency and very good scintillation characteristics. The LSO:Ce ceramic scintillation reaches a light yield level of about 86% of that of a good LSO:Ce single crystal, and its decay time is even faster than in single crystals. Research on LaBr:Ce shows that translucent ceramics of the high-light-yield rare-earth halides can also be synthesized. Our LaBr:Ce ceramics have light yields above 42 000 photons/MeV (i.e., 70%of the single-crystal light yield).

  5. GPS phase scintillation correlated with auroral forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, D. L.; Azeem, S. I.; Crowley, G.; Santana, J.; Reynolds, A.

    2013-12-01

    The disruption of radio wave propagation due to rapid changes in electron density caused by auroral precipitation has been observed for several decades. In a few cases the disruption of GPS signals has been attributed to distinct auroral arcs [Kintner, 2007; Garner, 2011], but surprisingly there has been no systematic study of the characteristics of the auroral forms that cause GPS scintillation. In the Fall of 2012 ASTRA deployed four CASES GPS receivers at UAF observatories in Alaska (Kaktovik, Fort Yukon, Poker Flat and Gakona) specifically to address the effects of auroral activity on the high latitude ionosphere. We have initiated an analysis that compares the phase scintillation, recorded at high cadence, with filtered digital all-sky camera data to determine the auroral morphology and electron precipitation parameters that cause scintillation. From correlation studies from a single site (Poker Flat), we find that scintillation is well correlated with discrete arcs that have high particle energy flux (power per unit area), and not as well correlated with pulsating forms which typically have high characteristic energy, but lower energy flux . This indicates that the scintillation is correlated with the magnitude of the change in total electron density as expected. We will also report on ongoing work where we correlate the scintillation from the Fort Yukon receiver with the all-sky images at Poker Flat to determine the altitude that produces the greatest disturbance. These studies are aimed at a model that can predict the expected local disturbance to navigation due to auroral activity.

  6. Validating the use of scintillation proxies to study ionospheric scintillation over the Ugandan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amabayo, Emirant B.; Jurua, Edward; Cilliers, Pierre J.

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we compare the standard scintillation indices (S4 and σΦ) from a SCINDA receiver with scintillation proxies (S4p and | sDPR |) derived from two IGS GPS receivers. Amplitude (S4) and phase (σΦ) scintillation data were obtained from the SCINDA installed at Makerere University (0.34°N, 32.57°E). The corresponding amplitude (S4p) and phase (| sDPR |) scintillation proxies were derived from data archived by IGS GPS receivers installed at Entebbe (0.04°N, 32.44°E) and Mbarara (0.60°S, 30.74°E). The results show that for most of the cases analysed in this study, σΦ and | sDPR | are in agreement. Amplitude scintillation occurrence estimated using the S4p are fairly consistent with the standard S4, mainly between 17:00 UT and 21:00 UT, despite a few cases of over and under estimation of scintillation levels by S4p. Correlation coefficients between σΦ and the | sDPR | proxy revealed positive correlation. Generally, S4p and S4 exhibits both moderate and strong positive correlation. TEC depletions associated with equatorial plasma bubbles are proposed as the cause of the observed scintillation over the region. These equatorial plasma bubbles were evident along the ray paths to satellites with PRN 2, 15, 27 and 11 as observed from MBAR and EBBE. In addition to equatorial plasma bubbles, atmospheric gravity waves with periods similar to those of large scale traveling ionospheric disturbances were also observed as one of the mechanisms for scintillation occurrence. The outcome of this study implies that GPS derived scintillation proxies can be used to quantify scintillation levels in the absence of standard scintillation data in the equatorial regions.

  7. Studies of Doped Scintillator at BNL: A Generic Method for Neutrino Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, M.; Hahn, R. L.; Garnov, A.; Chang, Z.

    2005-09-01

    Using multiple liquid-scintillatior detectors at distances between 0.1 and 3 km from a nuclear reactor has the potential to determine the yet unknown neutrino-mixing angle θ13 via inverse β-decay reaction on protons. The coincidence tag between the emitted prompt positron and delayed neutron provides a clear signature of anti-neutrino event. The neutron capture signal is greatly enhanced by loading gadolinium into the liquid scintillator, due to the large (n, γ) cross sections of Gd isotopes. BNL has developed a procedure to synthesize Gd-loaded scintillator with long attenuation length (> 10 m), high light output (> 95% of pseudocumene), and long-tern stability (> 5 months to date). The purification and chemical quality of BNL-synthesized Gd-LS are discussed in the paper.

  8. Ionosphere scintillations associated with features of equatorial ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, H.; Vats, H. O.; Sethia, G.; Deshpande, M. R.; Rastogi, R. G.; Sastri, J. H.; Murthy, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Amplitude scintillations of radio beacons aboard the ATS-6 satellite on 40 MHz, 140 MHz and 360 MHz recorded during the ATS-6 phase II at an equatorial station Ootacamund (dip 4 deg N) and the ionograms at a nearby station Kodaikanal (dip 3.5 deg N) are examined for scintillation activity. Only sporadic E events, other than Es-q, Es-c or normal E are found to be associated with intense daytime scintillations. Scintillations are also observed during night Es conditions. The amplitude spread is associated with strong scintillations on all frequencies while frequency spread causes weaker scintillations and that mainly at 40 MHz.

  9. Neutron detection by scintillation of noble-gas excimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComb, Jacob Collin

    scintillation yields from the 10B( n, alpha)7Li reaction are comparable to the yields of many liquid and solid neutron scintillators. Additionally, the observed slow triplet-state decay of neutron-capture-induced excimers may be used in a practical detector to discriminate neutron interactions from gamma-ray interactions. The results of these measurements and simulations will contribute to the development and optimization of a deployable neutron detector based on noble-gas excimer scintillation.

  10. Semiconductor quantum dot scintillation under gamma-ray irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Letant, S E; Wang, T

    2006-08-23

    We recently demonstrated the ability of semiconductor quantum dots to convert alpha radiation into visible photons. In this letter, we report on the scintillation of quantum dots under gamma-ray irradiation, and compare the energy resolution of the 59 keV line of Americium 241 obtained with our quantum dot-glass nanocomposite material to that of a standard sodium iodide scintillator. A factor 2 improvement is demonstrated experimentally and interpreted theoretically using a combination of energy-loss and photon transport models. These results demonstrate the potential of quantum dots for room-temperature gamma-ray detection, which has applications in medical imaging, environmental monitoring, as well as security and defense. Present technology in gamma radiation detection suffers from flexibility and scalability issues. For example, bulk Germanium provides fine energy resolution (0.2% energy resolution at 1.33 MeV) but requires operation at liquid nitrogen temperature. On the other hand, Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride is a good room temperature detector ( 1% at 662 keV) but the size of the crystals that can be grown is limited to a few centimeters in each direction. Finally, the most commonly used scintillator, Sodium Iodide (NaI), can be grown as large crystals but suffers from a lack of energy resolution (7% energy resolution at 662 keV). Recent advancements in nanotechnology6-10 have provided the possibility of controlling materials synthesis at the molecular level. Both morphology and chemical composition can now be manipulated, leading to radically new material properties due to a combination of quantum confinement and surface to volume ratio effects. One of the main consequences of reducing the size of semiconductors down to nanometer dimensions is to increase the energy band gap, leading to visible luminescence, which suggests that these materials could be used as scintillators. The visible band gap of quantum dots would also ensure both efficient photon counting

  11. General data analysis code for TDCR liquid scintillation counting.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, D; Arenillas, P; Capoulat, M E; Balpardo, C

    2008-01-01

    A non-radionuclide-specific computer code to analyze data, calculate detection efficiency and activity in a TDCR system is presented. The program was developed prioritizing flexibility in measuring conditions, parameters and calculation models. It is also intended to be well structured in order to easily replace subroutines which could eventually be improved by the user. It is written in standard FORTRAN language but a graphical interface is also available. Several tests were performed to check the ability of the code to deal with different decay schemes such as H-3, C-14, Fe-55, Mn-54 and Co-60. PMID:18356062

  12. Vetoing cosmogenic muons in a large liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, Marco; Evslin, Jarah; Ciuffoli, Emilio; Zhang, Xinmin

    2015-10-01

    At upcoming medium baseline reactor neutrino experiments the spallation 9Li background will be somewhat larger than the inverse β decay reactor neutrino signal. We use new FLUKA simulations of spallation backgrounds to optimize a class of veto strategies and find that surprisingly the optimal veto for the mass hierarchy determination has a rejection efficiency below 90%. The unrejected background has only a modest effect on the physics goals. For example Δχ2 for the hierarchy determination falls by 1.4 to 3 points depending on the muon tracking ability. The optimal veto strategy is essentially insensitive to the tracking ability, consisting of 2 meter radius, 1.1 second cylindrical vetoes of well tracked muons with showering energies above 3 to 4 GeV and 0.7 second full detector vetoes for poorly tracked muons above 15 to 18 GeV. On the other hand, as the uncertainty in θ 12 will be dominated by the uncertainty in the reactor neutrino spectrum and not statistical fluctuations, the optimal rejection efficiency for the measurement of θ 12 is 93% in the case of perfect tracking.

  13. DESCANT--The DEuterated SCintillator Array for Neutron Tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bildstein, Vinzenz; Garrett, P. E.; Bandyopadhay, D.; Bangay, J.; Bianco, L.; Demand, G.; Hadinia, B.; Leach, K. G.; Sumithrarachchi, C.; Wong, J.; Ashley, S. F.; Crider, B. P.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Yates, S. W.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Ball, G. C.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Hackman, G.; Pearson, C. J.; Sarazin, F.

    2014-09-01

    The DESCANT array at TRIUMF is designed to track neutrons from RIB experiments. DESCANT is composed of 70 close-packed deuterated organic liquid scintillators coupled to digital fast read-out ADC modules. This configuration will permit online pulse-shape discrimination between neutron and γ-ray events. The anisotropy of the n - d scattering will allow distinction of higher neutron multiplicities from scattering within the array and determination of the neutron energy spectrum directly from the pulse-height spectrum without using TOF. A prototype detector has been tested with monoenergetic neutrons at the accelerator laboratory of the University of Kentucky and a 24Mg(3He, n)26Si experiment has been performed with eight DESCANT detectors and two HPGe detectors. The results of the tests and the status of DESCANT will be presented.

  14. Review on photonic crystal coatings for scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapitsch, Arno; Lecoq, Paul

    2014-11-01

    The amount of light and its time distribution are key factors determining the performance of scintillators when used as radiation detectors. However most inorganic scintillators are made of heavy materials and suffer from a high index of refraction which limits light extraction efficiency. This increases the path length of the photons in the material with the consequence of higher absorption and tails in the time distribution of the extracted light. Photonic crystals are a relatively new way of conquering this light extraction problem. Basically they are a way to produce a smooth and controllable index matching between the scintillator and the output medium through the nanostructuration of a thin layer of optically transparent high index material deposited at the coupling face of the scintillator. Our review paper discusses the theory behind this approach as well as the simulation details. Furthermore the different lithography steps of the production of an actual photonic crystal sample will be explained. Measurement results of LSO scintillator pixels covered with a nanolithography machined photonic crystal surface are presented together with practical tips for the further development and improvement of this technique.

  15. Radar detection during scintillation. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Knepp, D.L.; Reinking, J.T.

    1990-04-01

    Electromagnetic signals that propagate through a disturbed region of the ionosphere can experience scattering which can cause fluctuations in the received amplitude, phase, and angle-of-arrival. This report considers the performance of a radar that must operate through a disturbed propagation environment such as might occur during strong equatorial scintillation, during a barium release experiment or after a high altitude nuclear detonation. The severity of the channel disturbance is taken to range from weak scattering where the signal quadrature components are uncorrelated Gaussian variates. The detection performance of noncoherent combining is compared to that of double threshold (M out of N) combining under various levels of scintillation disturbance. Results are given for detection sensitivity as a function of the scintillation index and the ratio of the radar hopping bandwidth to the channel bandwidth. It is shown that both types of combining can provide mitigation of fading, and that noncoherent combining generally enjoys an advantage in detection sensitivity of about 2 dB. This work serves as a quantitative guideline to the advantages and disadvantages of certain types of detection strategies during scintillation and is, therefore, useful in the radar design process. However, a detailed simulation of the radar detection algorithms is necessary to evaluate a radar design strategy to predict performance under scintillation conditions.

  16. Thallium bromide photodetectors for scintillation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitomi, K.; Muroi, O.; Shoji, T.; Hiratate, Y.; Ishibashi, H.; Ishii, M.

    2000-07-01

    A wide bandgap compound semiconductor, TlBr, has been investigated as a blue sensitive photodetector material for scintillation detection. The TlBr photodetectors have been fabricated from the TlBr crystals grown by the TMZ method using materials purified by many pass zone refining. The performance of the photodetectors has been evaluated by measuring their leakage current, quantum efficiency, spatial uniformity, direct X-ray detection and scintillation detection characteristics. The photodetectors have shown high quantum efficiency for the blue wavelength region and high spatial uniformity for their optical response. In addition, good direct X-ray detection characteristics with an energy resolution of 4.5 keV FWHM for 22 keV X-rays from a 109Cd radioactive source have been obtained. Detection of blue scintillation from GSO and LSO scintillators irradiated with a 22Na radioactive source has been done successfully by using the photodetectors at room temperature. A clear full-energy peak for 511 keV γ-rays has been obtained with the TlBr photodetector coupled to the LSO scintillator with an energy resolution of 40% FWHM.

  17. Characterization of ionospheric scintillation at a geomagnetic equatorial region station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seba, Ephrem Beshir; Gogie, Tsegaye Kassa

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we analyzed ionospheric scintillation at Bahir Dar station, Ethiopia (11.6°N, 37.38°E) using GPS-SCINDA data between August 2010 and July 2011. We found that small scale variation in TEC caused high ionospheric scintillation, rather than large scale variation. We studied the daily and monthly variations in the scintillation index S4 during this year, which showed that scintillation was a post-sunset phenomenon on equinoctial days, with high activity during the March equinox. The scintillation activity observed on solstice days was relatively low and almost constant throughout the day with low post-sunset activity levels. Our analysis of the seasonal and annual scintillation characteristics showed that intense activity occurred in March and April. We also studied the dependence of the scintillation index on the satellite elevation angle and found that scintillation was high for low angles but low for high elevation angles.

  18. Isotopic response with small scintillator based gamma-ray spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Norman W.; Goulding, Frederick S.; Asztalos, Stephen J.

    2012-01-24

    The intrinsic background of a gamma ray spectrometer is significantly reduced by surrounding the scintillator with a second scintillator. This second (external) scintillator surrounds the first scintillator and has an opening of approximately the same diameter as the smaller central scintillator in the forward direction. The second scintillator is selected to have a higher atomic number, and thus has a larger probability for a Compton scattering interaction than within the inner region. Scattering events that are essentially simultaneous in coincidence to the first and second scintillators, from an electronics perspective, are precluded electronically from the data stream. Thus, only gamma-rays that are wholly contained in the smaller central scintillator are used for analytic purposes.

  19. Scintillating-glass-fiber neutron sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, K. H.; Arthur, R. J.; Bliss, M.; Brite, D. W.; Brodzinski, R. L.; Craig, R. A.; Geelhood, B. D.; Goldman, D. S.; Griffin, J. W.; Perkins, R. W.; Reeder, P. L.; Richey, W. R.; Stahl, K. A.; Sunberg, D. S.; Warner, R. A.; Wogman, N. A.; Weber, M. J.

    1994-12-01

    Cerium-doped lithium-silicate glass fibers have been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for use as thermal neutron detectors. By using highly-enriched 6Li, these fibers efficiently capture thermal neutrons and produce scintillation light that can be detected at the ends of the fibers. Advantages of scintillating fibers over 3He or BF 3 proportional tubes include flexibility in geometric configuration, ruggedness in high-vibration environments, and less detector weight for the same neutron sensitivity. This paper describes the performance of these scintillating fibers with regard to count rates, pulse height spectra, absolute efficiencies, and neutron/gamma discrimination. Fibers with light transmission lengths ( {1}/{e}) of greater than 2 m have been produced at PNL. Neutron sensors in fiber form allow development of a variety of neutron detectors packaged in previously unavailable configurations. Brief descriptions of some of the devices already produced are included to illustrate these possibilities.

  20. Bispectral analysis of meter wavelength interplanetary scintillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    The bispectrum of interplanetary scintillation is investigated. Rice-squared and lognormal point-source intensity probability density functions are used to derive model bispectra as functionals of the intensity autocovariance. Simultaneous observations of the source CTA 21 at 270, 340, and 470 MHz are analyzed to produce scintillation indices, skewness parameters, and bispectra, which are compared with the models for the cases of weak, intermediate, and strong scattering. The results obtained for CTA 21 are shown to rule out lognormal statistics for interplanetary scintillation over the frequency range from 340 to 470 MHz. It is found that the observed bispectra correspond well with the predictions of the Rice-squared model for weak and intermediate scattering, but are systematically different from model bispectra computed by assuming a point source in the case of strong scattering.

  1. Wavelength-shifter Readout of Scintillation Counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauletta, Giovanni

    1998-04-01

    A compact system for reading out the scintillation counters of the CDF muon upgrade has been developed and tested. The system relies on wavelength-shifter (wls) fiber ribbon, glued to the side of 1.5 to 2 cm - thick counters, to collect and transfer the light from the scintillator to a small(Hamamatsu R5600) phototube, embedded in one corner of the counter. Prototype counters were constructed from polystyrene-based scintillator(Manufactured by Monocristal Institute at Kharkov under Dubna supervision.) using y11 - doped wls fibers(Manufactured by Kuraray.) for readout. Their response to cosmic ray muons was measured and found to be adequate for up to more than 3 m when the light collection was enhanced by mirroring the wls fiber ends furthest from the photomultiplier.

  2. New Efficient Organic Scintillators Derived from Pyrazoline.

    PubMed

    Bliznyuk, Valery N; Seliman, Ayman F; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Derevyanko, Nadezhda A; DeVol, Timothy A

    2016-05-25

    We report on the synthesis, spectroscopic and scintillation properties of three new pyrazoline core based fluorophores. Fluorescence properties of the fluorophores have been studied both in a solution state and in a solid polyvinyltoluene (PVT) resin matrix of different porosity. The synthesized fluorophores were found to be promising candidates for application in plastic scintillators for detection of ionizing radiation (alpha, beta particles, γ rays and neutrons) and demonstrated superior efficiency in comparison to the existing commercially used fluorophores (2-(1-naphthyl)-5-phenyloxazole (αNPO), 9,10-diphenylanthracene, etc.). Moreover, the suggested synthetic route allows functionalization of the fluorophores with a vinyl group for further covalent bound to the PVT or other vinyl polymer matrices, which dramatically improves chemical stability of the system simultaneously improving the photoluminescence quantum yield. Possible mechanisms of the enhanced scintillation properties are discussed based on preliminary quantum mechanical calculations and spectroscopic characteristics of the fluorophores under study. PMID:27163887

  3. Refractive scintillation in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, W. A.; Rickett, B. J.; Codona, J. L.; Frehlich, R. G.

    1987-04-01

    The slow variation in the apparent intensity of pulsars on time scales of days to months was recently shown to be due to a large-scale component of interstellar scintillation (Rickett, Coles, and Bourgois). These variations are greater than one would expect if the turbulence spectrum were a simple Kolmogorov power law. It is shown that this large-scale component can be greatly enhanced when the turbulence spectrum has a limiting "inner scale" of the order of 109m. The authors present a solution for the covariance of refractive scintillation of an extended source in an extended medium. The results show that refractive scintillations are also responsible for slow variations in "low-frequency variables".

  4. Testing Gravity Using Pulsar Scintillation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huan; Nishizawa, Atsushi; Pen, Ue-Li

    2016-03-01

    We propose to use pulsar scintillation measurements to test predictions of alternative theories of gravity. Comparing to single-path pulsar timing measurements, the scintillation measurements can achieve a factor of 104 ~105 improvement in timing accuracy, due to the effect of multi-path interference. The self-noise from pulsar also does not affect the interference pattern, where the data acquisition timescale is 103 seconds instead of years. Therefore it has unique advantages in measuring gravitational effect or other mechanisms (at mHz and above frequencies) on light propagation. We illustrate its application in constraining scalar gravitational-wave background and measuring gravitational-wave speed, in which cases the sensitivities are greatly improved with respect to previous limits. We expect much broader applications in testing gravity with existing and future pulsar scintillation observations.

  5. Light collection and pulse-shape discrimination in elongated scintillator cells for the PROSPECT reactor antineutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashenfelter, J.; Balantekin, B.; Band, H. R.; Barclay, G.; Bass, C. D.; Berish, D.; Bowden, N. S.; Bowes, A.; Brodsky, J. P.; Bryan, C. D.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, R.; Classen, T.; Commeford, K.; Davee, D.; Dean, D.; Deichert, G.; Diwan, M. V.; Dolinski, M. J.; Dolph, J.; Dwyer, D. A.; Gaison, J. K.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilje, K.; Glenn, A.; Goddard, B. W.; Green, M.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Heeger, K. M.; Heffron, B.; Jaffe, D. E.; Langford, T. J.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McKeown, R. D.; Mendenhall, M. P.; Mueller, P.; Mumm, H. P.; Napolitano, J.; Neilson, R.; Norcini, D.; Pushin, D.; Qian, X.; Romero, E.; Rosero, R.; Saldana, L.; Seilhan, B. S.; Sharma, R.; Sheets, S.; Stemen, N. T.; Surukuchi, P. T.; Varner, R. L.; Viren, B.; Wang, W.; White, B.; White, C.; Wilhelmi, J.; Williams, C.; Wise, T.; Yao, H.; Yeh, M.; Yen, Y. R.; Zangakis, G.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, X.

    2015-11-01

    A meter-long, 23-liter EJ-309 liquid scintillator detector has been constructed to study the light collection and pulse-shape discrimination performance of elongated scintillator cells for the PROSPECT reactor antineutrino experiment. The magnitude and uniformity of light collection and neutron-gamma discrimination power in the energy range of antineutrino inverse beta decay products have been studied using gamma and spontaneous fission calibration sources deployed along the cell axis. We also study neutron-gamma discrimination and light collection abilities for differing PMT and reflector configurations. Key design features for optimizing MeV-scale response and background rejection capabilities are identified.

  6. Light collection and pulse-shape discrimination in elongated scintillator cells for the PROSPECT reactor antineutrino experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ashenfelter, J.; Jaffe, D.; Diwan, M. V.; Dolph, J.; Qian, X.; Sharma, R.; Viren, B.; Zhang, C.

    2015-11-06

    A meter-long, 23-liter EJ-309 liquid scintillator detector has been constructed to study the light collection and pulse-shape discrimination performance of elongated scintillator cells for the PROSPECT reactor antineutrino experiment. The magnitude and uniformity of light collection and neutron-gamma discrimination power in the energy range of antineutrino inverse beta decay products have been studied using gamma and spontaneous fission calibration sources deployed along the cell axis. We also study neutron-gamma discrimination and light collection abilities for differing PMT and reflector configurations. As a result, key design features for optimizing MeV-scale response and background rejection capabilities are identified.

  7. The nylon scintillator containment vessels for the Borexino solar neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Pocar, A.; Shutt, T.

    2014-06-01

    The neutrino event rate in the Borexino scintillator is very low ( 0.5 events per day per ton) and concentrated in an energy region well below the 2.6 MeV threshold of natural radioactivity. The intrinsic radioactive contaminants in the photomultipliers (PMTs), in the Stainless Steel Sphere, and in other detector components, play special requirements on the system required to contain the scintillator. The liquid scintillator must be shielded from the Stainless Steel Sphere and from the PMTs by a thick barrier of buffer fluid. The fluid barrier, in addition, needs to be segmented in order to contain migration of radon and daughters emanated by the Stainless Steel Sphere and by the PMTs. These requirements were met by designing and building two spherical vessel made of thin nylon film. The inner vessel contains the scintillator, separating it from the surrounding buffer. The buffer region itself is divided into two concentric shells by the second, outer nylon vessel. In addition, the two nylon vessels must satisfy stringent requirements for radioactivity and for mechanical, optical and chemical properties. This paper describes the requirements of the the nylon vessels for the Borexino experiment and offers a brief overview of the construction methods adopted to meet those requirements.

  8. The design of the TASD (totally active scintillator detector) prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Mefodiev, A. V. Kudenko, Yu. G.

    2015-12-15

    Totally active and magnetic segmented scintillation neutrino detectors are developed for the nextgeneration accelerator neutrino experiments. Such detectors will incorporate scintillation modules with scintillation counters that form X and Y planes. A single counter is a 7 × 10 × 90 mm{sup 3} scintillation bar with gluedin wavelength-shifting fibers and micropixel avalanche photodiodes. The results of measurements of the parameters of these detectors are presented.

  9. Spectral attenuation length of scintillating fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexlin, Guido; Eberhard, Veit; Hunkel, Dirk; Zeitnitz, B.

    1995-02-01

    A double spectrometer allows the precise measurement of the spectral attenuation length of scintillating fibers. Exciting the fibers with a N 2-laser at different points and measuring the wavelength dependent light intensity on both ends of the fiber simultaneously, enables a measurement of the attenuation length which is practically independent of systematic uncertainties. The experimental setup can additionally be used for the measurement of the relative light output. Six types of scintillating fibers from four manufactures (Bicron, Kuraray, Pol.Hi.Tech, and Plastifo) were tested. For different fibers the wavelength dependent attenuation lengths were measured from 0.3 m up to 20 m with an accuracy as good as 1%.

  10. Statistics of time averaged atmospheric scintillation

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, P.

    1994-02-01

    A formulation has been constructed to recover the statistics of the moving average of the scintillation Strehl from a discrete set of measurements. A program of airborne atmospheric propagation measurements was analyzed to find the correlation function of the relative intensity over displaced propagation paths. The variance in continuous moving averages of the relative intensity was then found in terms of the correlation functions. An empirical formulation of the variance of the continuous moving average of the scintillation Strehl has been constructed. The resulting characterization of the variance of the finite time averaged Strehl ratios is being used to assess the performance of an airborne laser system.

  11. The homestake surface-underground scintillations: Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, M. L.; Corbato, S.; Daily, T.; Fenyves, E. J.; Kieda, D.; Lande, K.; Lee, C. K.

    1985-01-01

    Two new detectors are currently under construction at the Homestake Gold Mine a 140-ton Large Area Scintillation Detector (LASD) with an upper surface area of 130 square meters, a geometry factor (for an isotropic flux) of 1200 square meters, sr, and a depth of 4200 m.w.e.; and a surface air shower array consisting of 100 scintillator elements, each 3 square meters, spanning an area of approximately square kilometers. Underground, half of the LASD is currently running and collecting muon data; on the surface, the first section of the air shower array will begin operation in the spring of 1985. The detectors and their capabilities are described.

  12. Scintillation index in strong oceanic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baykal, Yahya

    2016-09-01

    Scintillation index of spherical wave in strongly turbulent oceanic medium is evaluated. In the evaluation, modified Rytov solution and our recent formulation that expresses the oceanic turbulence parameters by the atmospheric turbulence structure constant, are employed. Variations of the scintillation index in strong oceanic turbulence are examined versus the oceanic turbulence parameters such as the rate of dissipation of kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid, the rate of dissipation of mean-squared temperature, viscosity, wavelength, the link length, and the ratio of temperature to salinity contributions to the refractive index spectrum.

  13. New Structured Scintillators for Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarkar, V. V.; Ovechkina, E. E.; Bhandari, H. B.; Soundara-Pandian, L.; More, M. J.; Riedel, R. A.; Miller, S. R.

    We report on the development of novel neutron scintillators fabricated in microcolumnar formats using the physical vapour deposition (PVD) method. Such structures mitigate the conventional trade-off between spatial resolution and detection efficiency by channelling the scintillation light towards the detector while minimizing lateral spread in the film. Consequently, high resolution and high contrast neutron images can be acquired in a time efficient manner. In this paper, we discuss methods and characterization for scintillator films made from three distinct compositions, Thallium (Tl) or Europium (Eu) doped Lithium CesiumIodide (Li3Cs2I5:Tl,Eu, referred to as LCI), Tl or Eudoped Lithium Sodium Iodide (LixNa1-xI:Tl,Eu, referred to as LNI), and Cerium (Ce)-doped Gadolinium Iodide (GdI3:Ce, referred to as GDI). LCI and LNI scintillators are derived from the well-known CsI and NaI scintillators by the incorporation of 6Li into their lattice. Based on our measurements reported here, LCI/LNI scintillators have shown to exhibit bright emissions, fast, sub-microsecond decay, and an ability to effectively discriminate between neutron and gamma interactions using pulse shape (PSD) and/or pulse height (PHD) discrimination. LCI has a density of 4.5 g/cm3, a measured peak emission wavelength of 460 nm (doped with Eu), and a light yield of ∼50,000 photons/thermal neutron. LNI has a density of 3.6 g/cm3, an emission peak measured at 420 nm, and a light yield of ∼100,000 photons/thermal neutron. The recently discovered GDI exhibits excellent scintillation properties including a bright emission of up to 5,000 photons/thermal neutron interaction, 550 nm green emission, a rise time of ∼0.5 ns and a primary decay time of ∼38 ns (Glodo et al., 2006). Its high thermal neutron cross-section of ∼255 kb makes it an attractive candidate for neutron detection and imaging. Although it has high density of 5.2 gm/cm3 and effective atomic number of 57, its gamma sensitivity can be

  14. 21 CFR 892.1100 - Scintillation (gamma) camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Scintillation (gamma) camera. 892.1100 Section 892.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1100 Scintillation (gamma) camera. (a) Identification. A scintillation (gamma) camera...

  15. Upconverting nanoparticles for optimizing scintillator based detection systems

    DOEpatents

    Kross, Brian; McKisson, John E; McKisson, John; Weisenberger, Andrew; Xi, Wenze; Zom, Carl

    2013-09-17

    An upconverting device for a scintillation detection system is provided. The detection system comprises a scintillator material, a sensor, a light transmission path between the scintillator material and the sensor, and a plurality of upconverting nanoparticles particles positioned in the light transmission path.

  16. Robust GPS carrier tracking under ionospheric scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susi, M.; Andreotti, M.; Aquino, M. H.; Dodson, A.

    2013-12-01

    Small scale irregularities present in the ionosphere can induce fast and unpredictable fluctuations of Radio Frequency (RF) signal phase and amplitude. This phenomenon, known as scintillation, can degrade the performance of a GPS receiver leading to cycle slips, increasing the tracking error and also producing a complete loss of lock. In the most severe scenarios, if the tracking of multiple satellites links is prevented, outages in the GPS service can also occur. In order to render a GPS receiver more robust under scintillation, particular attention should be dedicated to the design of the carrier tracking stage, that is the receiver's part most sensitive to these types of phenomenon. This paper exploits the reconfigurability and flexibility of a GPS software receiver to develop a tracking algorithm that is more robust under ionospheric scintillation. For this purpose, first of all, the scintillation level is monitored in real time. Indeed the carrier phase and the post correlation terms obtained by the PLL (Phase Locked Loop) are used to estimate phi60 and S4 [1], the scintillation indices traditionally used to quantify the level of phase and amplitude scintillations, as well as p and T, the spectral parameters of the fluctuations PSD. The effectiveness of the scintillation parameter computation is confirmed by comparing the values obtained by the software receiver and the ones provided by a commercial scintillation monitoring, i.e. the Septentrio PolarxS receiver [2]. Then the above scintillation parameters and the signal carrier to noise density are exploited to tune the carrier tracking algorithm. In case of very weak signals the FLL (Frequency Locked Loop) scheme is selected in order to maintain the signal lock. Otherwise an adaptive bandwidth Phase Locked Loop (PLL) scheme is adopted. The optimum bandwidth for the specific scintillation scenario is evaluated in real time by exploiting the Conker formula [1] for the tracking jitter estimation. The performance

  17. Development of scintillator plates with high energy resolution for alpha particles made of GPS scintillator grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimaoka, Takehiro; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Izaki, Kenji; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio; Nishiyama, Shusuke

    2014-01-01

    A scintillator plate with high energy resolution was developed to produce an alpha particle monitor used in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants and mixed plutonium-uranium oxide (MOX) fuel plants. Grains of a Gd2Si2O7 (GPS) scintillator of several 10 to 550 μm were fixed on a glass substrate and were then mechanically polished. By increasing the size of scintillator grains and removing fine powders, the collected light yield and energy resolution for alpha particles were drastically improved. Energy resolution of 9.3% was achieved using average grain size of 91 μm. Furthermore, the ratios between counts in a peak and total counts were improved by more than 60% by the further increase of grain size and adoption of mechanically polished surfaces on both sides. Beta and gamma ray influences were suppressed sufficiently by the thin 100 μm scintillator plates.

  18. Pulse-shape discrimination of the new plastic scintillators in neutron-gamma mixed field using fast digitizer card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jančář, A.; Kopecký, Z.; Dressler, J.; Veškrna, M.; Matěj, Z.; Granja, C.; Solar, M.

    2015-11-01

    Recently invented plastic scintillator EJ-299-33 enables pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) and thus measurement of neutron and photon spectra in mixed fields. In this work we compare the PSD properties of EJ-299-33 plastic and the well-known NE-213 liquid scintillator in monoenergetic neutron fields generated by the Van de Graaff accelerator using the 3H(d, n)4He reaction. Pulses from the scintillators are processed by a newly developed digital measuring system employing the fast digitizer card. This card contains two AD converters connected to the measuring computer via 10 Gbps optical ethernet. The converters operate with a resolution of 12 bits and have two differential inputs with a sampling frequency 1 GHz. The resulting digital channels with different gains are merged into one composite channel with a higher digital resolution in a wide dynamic range of energies. Neutron signals are fully discriminated from gamma signals. Results are presented.

  19. An improved model of equatorial scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secan, J. A.; Bussey, R. M.; Fremouw, E. J.; Basu, Sa.

    1995-05-01

    One of the main limitations of the modeling work that went into the equatorial section of the Wideband ionospheric scintillation model (WBMOD) was that the data set used in the modeling was limited to two stations near the dip equator (Ancon, Peru, and Kwajalein Island, in the North Pacific Ocean) at two fixed local times (nominally 1000 and 2200). Over the past year this section of the WBMOD model has been replaced by a model developed using data from three additional stations (Ascension Island, in the South Atlantic Ocean, Huancayo, Peru, and Manila, Phillipines; data collected under the auspices of the USAF Phillips Laboratory Geophysics Directorate) which provide a greater diversity in both latitude and longitude, as well as cover the entire day. The new model includes variations with latitude, local time, longitude, season, solar epoch, and geomagnetic activity levels. The way in which the irregularity strength parameter CkL is modeled has also been changed. The new model provides the variation of the full probability distribution function (PDF) of log (CkL) rather than simply the average of log (CkL). This permits the user to specify a threshold on scintillation level, and the model will calculate the percent of the time that scintillation will exceed that level in the user-specified scenario. It will also permit calculation of scintillation levels at a user-specified percentile. A final improvement to the WBMOD model is the implementation of a new theory for calculating S4 on a two-way channel.

  20. Scintillator Development for the PROSPECT Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Minfang

    2014-03-01

    Doped scintillator is the target material of choice for antineutrino detection as it utilizes the time-delayed coincidence signature of the positron annihilation and neutron capture resulting from the Inverse Beta Decay (IBD) interaction. Additionally, the multiple gamma rays or heavy ions emitted after neutron capture on either Gd or 6Li respectively provide a distinct signal for the identification of antineutrino events and therefore significantly enhance accidental background reduction. The choice of scintillator and dopant depends on the detector requirements and scintillator performance criteria. Both Gd and 6Li doped scintillators have been used in past reactor antineutrino experiments such as Double Chooz, Daya Bay, RENO, and Bugey3 and are currently under investigation by the PROSPECT collaboration. Their properties in terms of light yield, optical transparency, chemical stability and background rejection efficiency using Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) will be reported. Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics and Office of High Energy Physics, under contract with Brookhaven National Laboratory-Brookhaven Science Associates.

  1. Fluorescent compounds for plastic scintillation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pla-Dalmau, A.; Bross, A.D.

    1994-04-01

    Several 2-(2{prime}-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole, -benzoxazole, and -benzimidazole derivatives have been prepared. Transmittance, fluorescence, light yield, and decay time characteristics of these compounds have been studied in a polystyrene matrix and evaluated for use in plastic scintillation detectors. Radiation damage studies utilizing a {sup 60}C source have also been performed.

  2. High resolution scintillation detector with semiconductor readout

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Craig S.; Hoffman, Edward J.

    2000-01-01

    A novel high resolution scintillation detector array for use in radiation imaging such as high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which comprises one or more parallelepiped crystals with at least one long surface of each crystal being in intimate contact with a semiconductor photodetector such that photons generated within each crystal by gamma radiation passing therethrough is detected by the photodetector paired therewith.

  3. Temperature dependence of BCF plastic scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, Landon; Beddar, Sam

    2013-05-01

    We examined temperature dependence in plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) made of BCF-60 or BCF-12 scintillating fiber coupled to optical fiber with cyanoacrylate. PSDs were subjected to a range of temperatures using a temperature-controlled water bath and irradiated at each temperature while either the dose was measured using a CCD camera or the spectral output was measured using a spectrometer. The spectrometer was used to examine the intensity and spectral distribution of scintillation light emitted by the PSDs, Cerenkov light generated within the PSD, and light transmitted through an isolated optical coupling. BCF-60 PSDs exhibited a 0.50% decrease and BCF-12 PSDs a 0.09% decrease in measured dose per °C increase, relative to dose measured at 22 °C. Spectrometry revealed that the total intensity of the light generated by BCF-60 and BCF-12 PSDs decreased by 0.32% and 0.13%, respectively, per °C increase. The spectral distribution of the light changed slightly with temperature for both PSDs, accounting for the disparity between the change in measured dose and total light output. The generation of Cerenkov light was temperature independent. However, light transmitted through optical coupling between the scintillator and the optical fiber also exhibited temperature dependence.

  4. Progress in studying scintillator proportionality: Phenomenological model

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarri, Gregory; Cherepy, Nerine; Choong, Woon-Seng; Hull, Giulia; Moses, William; Payne, Sephen; Singh, Jai; Valentine, John; Vasilev, Andrey; Williams, Richard

    2009-04-30

    We present a model to describe the origin of non-proportional dependence of scintillator light yield on the energy of an ionizing particle. The non-proportionality is discussed in terms of energy relaxation channels and their linear and non-linear dependences on the deposited energy. In this approach, the scintillation response is described as a function of the deposited energy deposition and the kinetic rates of each relaxation channel. This mathematical framework allows both a qualitative interpretation and a quantitative fitting representation of scintillation non-proportionality response as function of kinetic rates. This method was successfully applied to thallium doped sodium iodide measured with SLYNCI, a new facility using the Compton coincidence technique. Finally, attention is given to the physical meaning of the dominant relaxation channels, and to the potential causes responsible for the scintillation non-proportionality. We find that thallium doped sodium iodide behaves as if non-proportionality is due to competition between radiative recombinations and non-radiative Auger processes.

  5. Waveshifting fiber readout of lanthanum halide scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, G. L.; Cherry, M. L.; Stacy, J. G.

    2006-07-01

    Newly developed high-light-yield inorganic scintillators coupled to waveshifting optical fibers provide the capability of efficient X-ray detection and millimeter scale position resolution suitable for high-energy cosmic ray instruments, hard X-ray/gamma ray astronomy telescopes and applications to national security. The CASTER design for NASA's proposed Black Hole Finder Probe mission, in particular, calls for a 6 8 m2 hard X-ray coded aperture imaging telescope operating in the 20 600 keV energy band, putting significant constraints on cost and readout complexity. The development of new inorganic scintillator materials (e.g., cerium-doped LaBr3 and LaCl3) provides improved energy resolution and timing performance that is well suited to the requirements for national security and astrophysics applications. LaBr3 or LaCl3 detector arrays coupled with waveshifting fiber optic readout represent a significant advance in the performance capabilities of scintillator-based gamma cameras and provide the potential for a feasible approach to affordable, large area, extremely sensitive detectors. We describe some of the applications and present laboratory test results demonstrating the expected scintillator performance.

  6. Measurement of tritium with plastic scintillator surface improvement with plasma treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshihara, Y.; Furuta, E.; Ohyama, R.I.; Yokota, S.; Kato, Y.; Yoshimura, T.; Ogiwara, K.

    2015-03-15

    Tritium is usually measured by using a liquid scintillation counter. However, liquid scintillator used for measurement will become radioactive waste fluid. To solve this issue, we have developed a method of measuring tritium samples with plasma-treated plastic scintillator (PS)sheets (Plasma method). The radioactive sample is held between 2 PS sheets and the whole is enclosed in a a low-potassium glass vial. With the Plasma method of 2-min plasma treatment, we have obtained measurement efficiency of 48 ± 2 % for 2 min measurement of tritium except for tritiated water. The plasma treatment makes the PS surface rough and hydrophilic which contributes to improve the contact between tritium and PS. On the other hand, it needed almost 6 hours to obtain constant measurement efficiency. The reason was that the dry-up handling in the vial needed longer time to vaporize H{sub 2}O molecules than in the air. We tried putting silica gel beads into vials to remove H{sub 2}O molecules from PS sheet surface quickly. The silica gel beads worked well and we got constant measurement efficiency within 1-3 hours. Also, we tried using other kinds of PS treated with plasma to obtain higher measurement efficiencies of tritium samples.

  7. The DEuterated SCintillator Array for Neutron Tagging. A neutron tagging array for TRIUMF-ISAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, J.; Bildstein, V.; Garrett, P. E.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Bangay, J.; Bianco, L.; Demand, G.; Deng, G.; Finlay, A.; Hadinia, B.; Leach, K. G.; Liblong, A.; Svensson, C. E.; Sumithrarachchi, C.; Ball, G. C.; Churchman, R.; Garnsworthy, A.; Hackman, G.; Pearson, C. J.; Martin, J. P.; Ashley, S. F.; Crider, B. P.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estevez, F. M.; Yates, S. W.; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2014-03-01

    A neutron tagging array based upon liquid deuterated scintillators is being developed for the study of neutron-rich systems. The DEuterated SCintillator Array for Neutron Tagging, or DESCANT, will serve as an auxiliary detector for both the TIGRESS and GRIFFIN γ-ray spectrometers located at TRIUMF's ISAC radioactive ion beam facility. DESCANT is comprised of 70 pseudohexaconical detectors of five varieties. The array is fully close-packed, subtends a downstream angle of θ = 65° and covers 92.6% of this solid angle or 1.08π sr. Each detector is 150 mm thick and filled with Bicron BC-537 liquid deuterated scintillator. The white, red and blue detectors are viewed by 127 mm diameter Hamamatsu R4155 photomultiplier tubes while the yellow and green detectors are viewed by 78 mm diameter ET Enterprises 9822B photomultiplier tubes. The aim of this work is to report on the mechanical design of DESCANT and the performance of a prototype detector measured using mono-energetic neutrons.

  8. Ionospheric scintillations associated with equatorial E-region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, H.; Vats, H. O.; Sethia, G.; Deshpande, M. R.; Rastogi, R. G.; Sastri, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Amplitude scintillations at 40, 140, and 360 MHz recorded at an equatorial station Ootacamund (dip 4 deg N) during the ATS-6 phase II and the ionograms at a nearby station Kodaikanal (dip 3.5 deg N) are examined for the scintillation activity. Various sporadic E events, but not the Es-q, are associated with intense daytime scintillations. There are no scintillations at times of normal E-layer or cusp type of Es. Scintillations are also present at times of night Es.

  9. Use of water-equivalent plastic scintillator for intravascular brachytherapy dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Geso, M; Robinson, N; Schumer, W; Williams, K

    2004-03-01

    Beta irradiation has recently been investigated as a possible technique for the prevention of restenosis in intravascular brachytherapy after balloon dilatation or stent implantation. Present methods of beta radiation dosimetry are primarily conducted using radiochromic film. These film dosimeters exhibit limited sensitivity and their characteristics differ from those of tissue, therefore the dose measurement readings require correction factors to be applied. In this work a novel, mini-size (2 mm diameter by 5 mm long) dosimeter element fabricated from Organic Plastic Scintillator (OPS) material was employed. Scintillation photon detection is accomplished using a precision photodiode and innovative signal amplification and processing techniques, rather than traditional photomultiplier tube methods. A significant improvement in signal to noise ratio, dynamic range and stability is achieved using this set-up. In addition, use of the non-saturating organic plastic scintillator material as the detector enables the dosimeter to measure beta radiation at very close distances to the source. In this work the plastic scintillators have been used to measure beta radiation dose at distances of less than 1 mm from an Sr-90 cardiovascular brachytherapy source having an activity of about 2.1 GBq beta radiation levels for both depth-distance and longitudinal profile of the source pellet chain, both in air and in liquid water, are measured using this system. The data obtained is compared with results from Monte Carlo simulation technique (MCNP 4B). Plastic scintillator dosimeter elements, when used in conjunction with photodiode detectors may prove to be useful dosimeters for cardiovascular brachytherapy beta sources, or other applications where precise near-source field dosimetry is required. The system described is particularly useful where measurement of actual dose rate in real time, a high level of stability and repeatability, portability, and immediate access to results are

  10. Scintillator efficiency study with MeV x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Stuart; Brown, Kristina; Curtis, Alden; Lutz, Stephen S.; Howe, Russell; Malone, Robert; Mitchell, Stephen; Danielson, Jeremy; Haines, Todd; Kwiatkowski, Kris

    2014-09-01

    We have investigated scintillator efficiency for MeV radiographic imaging. This paper discusses the modeled detection efficiency and measured brightness of a number of scintillator materials. An optical imaging camera records images of scintillator emission excited by a pulsed x-ray machine. The efficiency of various thicknesses of monolithic LYSO:Ce (cerium-doped lutetium yttrium orthosilicate) are being studied to understand brightness and resolution trade-offs compared with a range of micro-columnar CsI:Tl (thallium-doped cesium iodide) scintillator screens. The micro-columnar scintillator structure apparently provides an optical gain mechanism that results in brighter signals from thinner samples. The trade-offs for brightness versus resolution in monolithic scintillators is straightforward. For higher-energy x-rays, thicker materials generally produce brighter signal due to x-ray absorption and the optical emission properties of the material. However, as scintillator thickness is increased, detector blur begins to dominate imaging system resolution due to the volume image generated in the scintillator thickness and the depth of field of the imaging system. We employ a telecentric optical relay lens to image the scintillator onto a recording CCD camera. The telecentric lens helps provide sharp focus through thicker-volume emitting scintillators. Stray light from scintillator emission can also affect the image scene contrast. We have applied an optical light scatter model to the imaging system to minimize scatter sources and maximize scene contrasts.

  11. Non-Carbon Dyes For Platic Scintillators- Report

    SciTech Connect

    Teprovich, J.; Colon-Mercado, H.; Gaillard, J.; Sexton, L.; Washington, A.; Ward, P.; Velten, J.

    2015-10-19

    Scintillation based detectors are desirable for many radiation detection applications (portal and border monitoring, safeguards verification, contamination detection and monitoring). The development of next generation scintillators will require improved detection sensitivity for weak gamma ray sources, and fast and thermal neutron quantification. Radiation detection of gamma and neutron sources can be accomplished with organic scintillators, however, the single crystals are difficult to grow for large area detectors and subject to cracking. Alternatives to single crystal organic scintillators are plastic scintillators (PS) which offer the ability to be shaped and scaled up to produce large sized detectors. PS is also more robust than the typical organic scintillator and are ideally suited for deployment in harsh real-world environments. PS contain a mixture of dyes to down-convert incident radiation into visible light that can be detected by a PMT. This project will evaluate the potential use of nano-carbon dyes in plastic scintillators.

  12. Temperature dependence of alpha-induced scintillation in the 1,1,4,4-tetraphenyl-1,3-butadiene wavelength shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veloce, L. M.; Kuźniak, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Noble, A. J.; Boulay, M. G.; Nadeau, P.; Pollmann, T.; Clark, M.; Piquemal, M.; Schreiner, K.

    2016-06-01

    Liquid noble based particle detectors often use the organic wavelength shifter 1,1,4,4-tetraphenyl-1,3-butadiene (TPB) which shifts UV scintillation light to the visible regime, facilitating its detection, but which also can scintillate on its own. Dark matter searches based on this type of detector commonly rely on pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) for background mitigation. Alpha-induced scintillation therefore represents a possible background source in dark matter searches. The timing characteristics of this scintillation determine whether this background can be mitigated through PSD. We have therefore characterized the pulse shape and light yield of alpha induced TPB scintillation at temperatures ranging from 300 K down to 4 K, with special attention given to liquid noble gas temperatures. We find that the pulse shapes and light yield depend strongly on temperature. In addition, the significant contribution of long time constants above ~50 K provides an avenue for discrimination between alpha decay events in TPB and nuclear-recoil events in noble liquid detectors.

  13. The Borexino solar neutrino experiment and its scintillator containment vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadonati, Laura

    2001-05-01

    Thirty years ago, the first solar neutrino detector proved fusion reactions power the Sun. However, the total rate detected in this and all subsequent solar neutrino experiments is consistently two to three times lower than predicted by the Standard Solar Model. Current experiments seek to explain this ``solar neutrino puzzle'' through non-standard particle properties, like neutrino mass and flavor mixing, within the context of the MSW theory. The detection of the monoenergetic 7Be solar neutrino is the missing clue for the solution of the solar neutrino problem; this constitutes the main physics goal of Borexino, a real- time, high-statistics solar neutrino detector located under the Gran Sasso mountain, in Italy. In the first part of this thesis, I present a Monte Carlo study of the expected performance of Borexino, with simulations of the neutrino rate, the external y background and the α/β/γ activity in the scintillator. The Standard Solar Model predicts a solar neutrino rate of about 60 events/day in Borexino in the 0.25-0.8 MeV window, mostly due to 7Be neutrinos. Given the design scintillator radiopurity levels (10-16 g/g 238U and 232Th and 10-14 g/g K), Borexino will detect such a rate with a ~2.4% statistical error, after one year. In the MSW Small (Large) Angle scenario, the predicted rate of ~13 (33) events/day will be detected with 8% (4%) error. The sensitivity of Borexino to 8B and pp neutrinos and to a Galactic supernova event is also discussed. The second part of this dissertation is devoted to the liquid scintillator containment vessel, an 8.5 m diameter sphere built of bonded panels of 0.125 mm polymer film. Through an extensive materials testing program we have identified an amorphous nylon-6 film which meets all the critical requirements for the success of Borexino. I describe tests of tensile strength, measurements of 222Rn diffusion through thin nylon films and of optical clarity. I discuss how the materials' radiopurity and mechanical

  14. Scintillating Cocktail Mixtures and the Role of Water on the Optophysical Properties.

    SciTech Connect

    Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Feng, Patrick L.; Mengesha, Wondwosen; Murtagh, Dustin; Anstey, Mitchell

    2015-10-01

    Two types of water - containing liquid scinti llation mixtures were prepared in the present work. In the first, m ixtures of 2 - phenylethanol, water, diphenyl phosphate, sodium phenyl phosphate dibasic dihydrate, and the dye 2,5 - diphenyloxazole (PPO) have been investigated as liquid scintillators. In th e second system, nonionic and mixed surfactant systems were investigated in conjunction with water and small amounts of toluene. In both cases, increasing amounts of water led to reductions in the scintillation light yield. Understanding what factors contr ibute to this phenomenon is the focus of this report. Changes in the solution microphase structure, diminishing aromatic content of the cocktail mixtures, and inefficient energy transfer to the dye a ppear to be responsible for the decreased light yield as more water is added . In the 2 - phenylethanol system, the observed experimental results are consistent with the formation of a bicontinuous microemulsion at higher water concentrations, which incorporates PPO and shields it from the quenching effects of the increasing polar matrix. Evidence for this proposed phase chan ge c ome s from light scattering data, photo - and x - ray luminescence measurements, and optical transparency measurements . In the surfactant - based system, the quenching effect of water was found to be less than both commercially - available dioxane - naphthalene mixtures used for scintillation counting as well as the 2 - phenylethanol mixtures described above. The effect of different surfactant mixtures and concentrations were studied, revealing a benefic ial effect upon the scintillation light yield for mixed surfactant mixtures. These results are interpreted in the context of r eactive radical species formation following water ionization , which leads to light - yield quenching in aqueous systems . The presenc e of surfactant(s) in these mixtures enables the formation of organic - rich regions that are spatially separated from the

  15. Photosensitive dopants for liquid noble gases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1988-01-01

    In an ionization type detector for high energy radiation wherein the energy of incident radiation is absorbed through the ionization of a liquid noble gas and resulting free charge is collected to form a signal indicative of the energy of the incident radiation, an improvement comprising doping the liquid noble gas with photosensitive molecules to convert scintillation light due to recombination of ions, to additional free charge.

  16. Nonproportionality of Scintillator Detectors: Theory and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Stephen; Cherepy, Nerine; Hull, Giulia; Valentine, John; Moses, William; Choong, Woon-Seng

    2009-08-17

    On the basis of nonproportionality data obtained for several scintillators, we have developed a theory to describe the carrier dynamics to fit the light yield versus electron energy. The theory of Onsager was adapted to explain how the carriers form excitons or sequentially arrive at the activators to promote the ion to an excited state, and the theory of Birks was employed to allow for exciton-exciton annihilation. We then developed a second theory to deduce the degradation in resolution that results from nonproportionality by evoking Landau fluctuations, which are essentially variations in the deposited energy density that occur as the high energy electron travels along its trajectory. In general there is good agreement with the data, in terms of fitting the nonproportionality curves and reproducing the literature values of nonproportionality's contribution to the scintillator resolution. With the resurgence of interest in developing scintillator detectors that have good energy resolution, an improved understanding of nonproportionality has become a crucial matter since it presents the fundamental limit to the achievable resolution. In order to hasten an improved understanding of scintillator nonproportionality, we have constructed an instrument referred to as SLYNCI (Scintillator Light Yield Nonproportionality Compton Instrument). This is a second-generation instrument to the original device developed by Valentine and coworkers, wherein several new principles of operation have served to increase the data rate by an order of magnitude as discussed in detail in References. In the present article, the focus is on a theory to describe the measured electron response, which is the light yield as a function of the electron energy. To do this, we account for transport of carriers and excitons, in terms of how they transfer their energy to the activators with competition from nonradiative decay pathways. This work builds on the original work of Murray and coworkers, and

  17. Real-time Scintillation Monitoring in Alaska from a Longitudinal Chain of ASTRA's SM-211 GPS TEC and Scintillation Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, G.; Azeem, S. I.; Reynolds, A.; Santana, J.; Hampton, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Amplitude and phase scintillation can cause serious difficulties for GPS receivers. Intense scintillation can cause loss of lock. High latitude studies generally show that phase scintillation can be severe, but the amplitude scintillation tends to be small. The reason for this is not yet understood. Furthermore, the actual causes of the ionospheric irregularities that produce high latitude scintillation are not well understood. While the gradient drift instability is thought to be important in the F-region, there may be other structures present in either the E- or F-regions. The role of particle precipitation is also not well understood. Four of ASTRA's CASES GPS receivers were deployed in Alaska to demonstrate our ability to map scintillation in realtime, to provide space weather services to GPS users, and to initiate a detailed investigation of these effects. These dual-frequency GPS receivers measure total electron content (TEC) and scintillation. The scintillation monitors were deployed in a longitudinal chain at sites in Kaktovic, Fort Yukon, Poker Flat, and Gakona. Scintillation statistics show phase scintillations to be largest at Kaktovic and smallest at Gakona. We present GPS phase scintillation and auroral emission results from the Alaska chain to characterize the correspondence between scintillation and auroral features, and to investigate the role of high latitude auroral features in driving the phase scintillations. We will also present data showing how phase scintillation can cause other GPS receivers to lose lock. The data and results are particularly valuable because they illustrate some of the challenges of using GPS systems for positioning and navigation in an auroral region like Alaska. These challenges for snowplough drivers were recently highlighted, along with the CASES SM-211 space weather monitor, in a special video in which ASTRA and three other small businesses were presented with an entrepreneurial award from William Shatner (http://youtu.be/bIVKEQH_YPk).

  18. Divalent europium doped and un-doped calcium iodide scintillators: Scintillator characterization and single crystal growth

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, L. A.; Ramey, J. O.; Kolopus, J. A.; Neal, John S.

    2015-02-21

    Initially, the alkaline-earth scintillator, CaI2:Eu2+, was discovered around 1964 by Hofstadter, Odell, and Schmidt. Serious practical problems quickly arose, however, that were associated with the growth of large monolithic single crystals of this material due to its lamellar, mica-like structure. As a result of its theoretically higher light yield, CaI2:Eu2+ has the potential to exceed the excellent scintillation performance of SrI2:Eu2+. In fact, theoretical predictions for the light yield of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators suggested that an energy resolution approaching 2% at 662 keV could be achievable. Like the early SrI2:Eu2+ scintillator, the performance of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators has traditionally suffered due, at least in part, to outdated materials synthesis, component stoichiometry/purity, and single-crystal-growth techniques. Based on our recent work on SrI2:Eu2+ scintillators in single-crystal form, we have developed new techniques that are applied here to CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 with the goal of growing large un-cracked crystals and, potentially, realizing the theoretically predicted performance of the CaI2:Eu2+ form of this material. Calcium iodide does not adhere to modern glassy carbon Bridgman crucibles - so there should be no differential thermal-contraction-induced crystal/crucible stresses on cooling that would result in crystal cracking of the lamellar structure of CaI2. Here we apply glassy carbon crucible Bridgman growth, high-purity growth-charge compounds, our molten salt processing/filtration technique, and extended vacuum-melt-pumping methods to the growth of both CaI2:Eu2+ and un-doped CaI2. Moreover, large scintillating single crystals were obtained, and detailed characterization studies of the

  19. Divalent europium doped and un-doped calcium iodide scintillators: Scintillator characterization and single crystal growth

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boatner, L. A.; Ramey, J. O.; Kolopus, J. A.; Neal, John S.

    2015-02-21

    Initially, the alkaline-earth scintillator, CaI2:Eu2+, was discovered around 1964 by Hofstadter, Odell, and Schmidt. Serious practical problems quickly arose, however, that were associated with the growth of large monolithic single crystals of this material due to its lamellar, mica-like structure. As a result of its theoretically higher light yield, CaI2:Eu2+ has the potential to exceed the excellent scintillation performance of SrI2:Eu2+. In fact, theoretical predictions for the light yield of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators suggested that an energy resolution approaching 2% at 662 keV could be achievable. Like the early SrI2:Eu2+ scintillator, the performance of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators has traditionally suffered due, atmore » least in part, to outdated materials synthesis, component stoichiometry/purity, and single-crystal-growth techniques. Based on our recent work on SrI2:Eu2+ scintillators in single-crystal form, we have developed new techniques that are applied here to CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 with the goal of growing large un-cracked crystals and, potentially, realizing the theoretically predicted performance of the CaI2:Eu2+ form of this material. Calcium iodide does not adhere to modern glassy carbon Bridgman crucibles - so there should be no differential thermal-contraction-induced crystal/crucible stresses on cooling that would result in crystal cracking of the lamellar structure of CaI2. Here we apply glassy carbon crucible Bridgman growth, high-purity growth-charge compounds, our molten salt processing/filtration technique, and extended vacuum-melt-pumping methods to the growth of both CaI2:Eu2+ and un-doped CaI2. Moreover, large scintillating single crystals were obtained, and detailed characterization studies of the scintillation properties of CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 single crystals are presented that include studies of the effects of plastic deformation of the crystals on the scintillator performance.« less

  20. Nuclear recoil energy scale in liquid xenon with application to the direct detection of dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, P; Dahl, C E

    2011-02-14

    We show for the first time that the quenching of electronic excitation from nuclear recoils in liquid xenon is well-described by Lindhard theory, if the nuclear recoil energy is reconstructed using the combined (scintillation and ionization) energy scale proposed by Shutt et al.. We argue for the adoption of this perspective in favor of the existing preference for reconstructing nuclear recoil energy solely from primary scintillation. We show that signal partitioning into scintillation and ionization is well-described by the Thomas-Imel box model. We discuss the implications for liquid xenon detectors aimed at the direct detection of dark matter.

  1. Scintillating 99Tc Selective Ion Exchange Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell Greenhalgh; Richard D. Tillotson

    2012-07-01

    Scintillating technetium (99Tc) selective ion exchange resins have been developed and evaluated for equilibrium capacities and detection efficiencies. These resins can be utilized for the in-situ concentration and detection of low levels of pertechnetate anions (99TcO4-) in natural waters. Three different polystyrene type resin support materials were impregnated with varying amounts of tricaprylmethylammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) extractant, several different scintillating fluors and wavelength shifters. The prepared resins were contacted batch-wise to equilibrium over a wide range of 99TcO4- concentrations in natural water. The measured capacities were used to develop Langmuir adsorption isotherms for each resin. 99Tc detection efficiencies were determined and up to 71.4 ± 2.6% was achieved with some resins. The results demonstrate that a low level detection limit for 99TcO4- in natural waters can be realized.

  2. Effects of light on scintillating fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Manho; Margulies, Seymour

    1993-10-01

    Tracking detectors based on scintillating-fiber technology are being developed for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration at the Superconducting Super Collider and for the D0 collaboration at Fermilab. An important part of the work is to insure that the fibers will not be damaged by environmental conditions in the course of detector construction. This paper presents preliminary results of the effects of ambient fluorescent light on scintillating fibers containing 3-hydroxyflavone (3HF) waveshifter. Six fiber types having 3HF concentrations between 100 ppm and 6000 ppm were studied; both single-clad fibers from Bicron and Kuraray and a new Kuraray multiclad fiber were included. A blue fiber containing no 3HF was used to provide a comparison.

  3. Development of High-Resolution Scintillator Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Larry A. Franks; Warnick J. Kernan

    2007-09-01

    Mercuric iodide (HgI2) is a well known material for the direct detection of gamma-rays; however, the largest volume achievable is limited by the thickness of the detector which needs to be a small fraction of the average trapping length for electrons. We report results of using HgI2 crystals to fabricate photocells used in the readout of scintillators. The optical spectral response and efficiency of these photocells were measured and will be reported. Nuclear response from an HgI2 photocell that was optically matched to a cerium-activated scintillator is presented and discussed. Further improvements can be expected by optimizing the transparent contact technology.

  4. Plastic fiber scintillator response to fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danly, C. R.; Sjue, S.; Wilde, C. H.; Merrill, F. E.; Haight, R. C.

    2014-11-01

    The Neutron Imaging System at NIF uses an array of plastic scintillator fibers in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to form an image of the neutron emission from the imploded capsule. By gating on neutrons that have scattered from the 14.1 MeV DT energy to lower energy ranges, an image of the dense, cold fuel around the hotspot is also obtained. An unmoderated spallation neutron beamline at the Weapons Neutron Research facility at Los Alamos was used in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to measure the yield of a scintillating fiber array over several energy bands ranging from 1 to 15 MeV. The results and comparison to simulation are presented.

  5. Codoped direct-gap semiconductor scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen Edward; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Weber, Marvin J.; Klintenberg, Mattias K.

    2008-07-29

    Fast, bright inorganic scintillators at room temperature are based on radiative electron-hole recombination in direct-gap semiconductors, e.g. CdS and ZnO. The direct-gap semiconductor is codoped with two different impurity atoms to convert the semiconductor to a fast, high luminosity scintillator. The codopant scheme is based on dopant band to dopant trap recombination. One dopant provides a significant concentration of carriers of one type (electrons or holes) and the other dopant traps carriers of the other type. Examples include CdS:In,Te; CdS:In,Ag; CdS:In,Na; ZnO:Ga,P; ZnO:Ga,N; ZnO:Ga,S; and GaN:Ge,Mg.

  6. Codoped direct-gap semiconductor scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Weber, Marvin J.; Klintenberg, Mattias K.

    2006-05-23

    Fast, bright inorganic scintillators at room temperature are based on radiative electron-hole recombination in direct-gap semiconductors, e.g. CdS and ZnO. The direct-gap semiconductor is codoped with two different impurity atoms to convert the semiconductor to a fast, high luminosity scintillator. The codopant scheme is based on dopant band to dopant trap recombination. One dopant provides a significant concentration of carriers of one type (electrons or holes) and the other dopant traps carriers of the other type. Examples include CdS:In,Te; CdS:In,Ag; CdS:In,Na; ZnO:Ga,P; ZnO:Ga,N; ZnO:Ga,S; and GaN:Ge,Mg.

  7. Plastic fiber scintillator response to fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Danly, C. R.; Sjue, S.; Wilde, C. H.; Merrill, F. E.; Haight, R. C.

    2014-11-15

    The Neutron Imaging System at NIF uses an array of plastic scintillator fibers in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to form an image of the neutron emission from the imploded capsule. By gating on neutrons that have scattered from the 14.1 MeV DT energy to lower energy ranges, an image of the dense, cold fuel around the hotspot is also obtained. An unmoderated spallation neutron beamline at the Weapons Neutron Research facility at Los Alamos was used in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to measure the yield of a scintillating fiber array over several energy bands ranging from 1 to 15 MeV. The results and comparison to simulation are presented.

  8. Transparent Ceramic Scintillator Fabrication, Properties and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N J; Kuntz, J D; Roberts, J J; Hurst, T A; Drury, O B; Sanner, R D; Tillotson, T M; Payne, S A

    2008-08-24

    Transparent ceramics offer an alternative to single crystals for scintillator applications such as gamma ray spectroscopy and radiography. We have developed a versatile, scaleable fabrication method, using Flame Spray Pyrolysis (FSP) to produce feedstock which is readily converted into phase-pure transparent ceramics. We measure integral light yields in excess of 80,000 Ph/MeV with Cerium-doped Garnets, and excellent optical quality. Avalanche photodiode readout of Garnets provides resolution near 6%. For radiography applications, Lutetium Oxide offers a high performance metric and is formable by ceramics processing. Scatter in transparent ceramics due to secondary phases is the principal limitation to optical quality, and afterglow issues that affect the scintillation performance are presently being addressed.

  9. Nanophosphor composite scintillators comprising a polymer matrix

    DOEpatents

    Muenchausen, Ross Edward; Mckigney, Edward Allen; Gilbertson, Robert David

    2010-11-16

    An improved nanophosphor composite comprises surface modified nanophosphor particles in a solid matrix. The nanophosphor particle surface is modified with an organic ligand, or by covalently bonding a polymeric or polymeric precursor material. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during formation of the composite material. The improved nanophosphor composite may be used in any conventional scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  10. Time resolution of a scintillating fiber detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, S.; Toeda, T.; Daito, I.; Doushita, N.; Hasegawa, T.; Horikawa, N.; Iwata, T.; Kibe, Y.; Matsuda, T.; Miyachi, Y.; Noboriguchi, K.; Takabayashi, N.; Tohyama, T.; Wakai, A.

    1999-07-01

    The performance of scintillating fiber detectors with 2 m long light guides was investigated for COMPASS experiment, using a 450 MeV/ c electron beam.Prototypes consisting of 0.5 mm diameter fibers (Kuraray SCSF-38 single-cladding) with the position-sensitive photomultipliers H6568 (Hamamatsu) were constructed for the test. The time resolution of σ˜430 ps was obtained with about 10 photoelectrons for the prototype of 10-layers structure.

  11. Sorohalide scintillators, phosphors, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Pin; Deng, Haoran; Doty, F. Patrick; Zhou, Xiaowang

    2016-05-10

    The present invention relates to sorohalide compounds having formula A.sub.3B.sub.2X.sub.9, where A is an alkali metal, B is a rare earth metal, and X is a halogen. Optionally, the sorohalide includes a dopant D. Such undoped and doped sorohalides are useful as scintillation materials or phosphors for any number of uses, including for radiation detectors, solid-state light sources, gamma-ray spectroscopy, medical imaging, and drilling applications.

  12. Simulating Silicon Photomultiplier Response to Scintillation Light

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Abhinav K.; van Dam, Herman T.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The response of a Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) to optical signals is affected by many factors including photon-detection efficiency, recovery time, gain, optical crosstalk, afterpulsing, dark count, and detector dead time. Many of these parameters vary with overvoltage and temperature. When used to detect scintillation light, there is a complicated non-linear relationship between the incident light and the response of the SiPM. In this paper, we propose a combined discrete-time discrete-event Monte Carlo (MC) model to simulate SiPM response to scintillation light pulses. Our MC model accounts for all relevant aspects of the SiPM response, some of which were not accounted for in the previous models. We also derive and validate analytic expressions for the single-photoelectron response of the SiPM and the voltage drop across the quenching resistance in the SiPM microcell. These analytic expressions consider the effect of all the circuit elements in the SiPM and accurately simulate the time-variation in overvoltage across the microcells of the SiPM. Consequently, our MC model is able to incorporate the variation of the different SiPM parameters with varying overvoltage. The MC model is compared with measurements on SiPM-based scintillation detectors and with some cases for which the response is known a priori. The model is also used to study the variation in SiPM behavior with SiPM-circuit parameter variations and to predict the response of a SiPM-based detector to various scintillators. PMID:26236040

  13. Improved Neutron Scintillators Based on Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Friesel, PhD

    2008-06-30

    The development work conducted in this SBIR has so far not supported the premise that using nano-particles in LiFZnS:Ag foils improves their transparency to 420 (or other frequency) light. This conclusion is based solely on the light absorption properties of LiFZnS foils fabricated from nano- and from micro-particles. Furthermore, even for the case of the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} foils, the transmission of 420 nm light gained by using nano-particles all but disappears as the foil thickness is increased beyond about 0.2 mm, a practical scintillator thickness. This was not immediately apparent from the preliminary study since no foils thicker than about 0.04 mm were produced. Initially it was believed that the failure to see an improvement by using nano-particles for the LiFZnS foils was caused by the clumping of the particles in Toluene due to the polarity of the ZnS particles. However, we found, much to our surprise, that nano-particle ZnS alone in polystyrene, and in Epoxy, had worse light transmission properties than the micro-particle foils for equivalent thickness and density foils. The neutron detection measurements, while disappointing, are attributable to our inability to procure or fabricate Bulk Doped ZnS nanoparticles. The cause for the failure of nano-particles to improve the scintillation light, and hence improved neutron detection efficiency, is a fundamental one of light scattering within the scintillator. A consequence of PartTec's documentation of this is that several concepts for the fabrication of improved {sup 6}LiFZnS scintillators were formulated that will be the subject of a future SBIR submission.

  14. Characteristics of Yerevan High Transparency Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zorn, Carl; Asryan, Gegham; Egiyan, Kim; Tarverdyan, M.; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Demirchyan, Raphael; Stepanyan, Stepan; Burkert, Volker; Sharabian, Youri

    1992-08-01

    Optical transmission, light output and time characteristics are given for long scintillator strips fabricated at the Yerevan Physics Institute using the extrusion method. It is shown that at 45% relative (to anthracene) light output, good transmission (2.5/2.9 m attenuation length with photomultiplier direct readout and 3/3.5 m attenuation length fiber readout) and time characteristics (average decay time 2.8 nsec) were obtained.

  15. Studies of NICADD Extruded Scintillator Strips

    SciTech Connect

    Dychkant, Alexandre; et al.

    2005-03-01

    About four hundred one meter long, 10 cm wide and 5 mm thick extruded scintillating strips were measured at four different points. The results of measurements strip responses to a radioactive source {sup 90}Sr are provided, and details of strip choice, preparation, and method of measurement are included. This work was essential for prototyping a tail catcher and muon tracker for a future international electron positron linear collider detector.

  16. Calorimetry using organic scintillators, 'a sideways perspective'.

    SciTech Connect

    Proudfoot, J.

    1999-09-10

    Over the last two decades, calorimetry baaed on organic scintillators has developed into an excellent technology for many experimental situations in high energy physics. The primary difficulty, that of extracting the light signals, has benefited from two milestone innovations. The first was the use of wavelength-shifting bars to allow light to be efficiently collected from large areas of scintillator and then readily piped to a readout device. The second of these was the extension of this approach to plastic wavelength-shifting optical fibers whose great flexibility and small diameter allowed a minimum of detector volume to be compromised by the read-out. These two innovations coupled with inventiveness have produced many varied and successful calorimeters. Equal response to both hadronic and electromagnetic showers can be realized in scintillator-based calorimeters. However, in general this is not the case and it is likely that in the search for greater performance, in the future, combined tracking and calorimeter systems will be required.

  17. Boron-Loaded Silicone Rubber Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Z.W.; Maya, L.; Brown, G.M.; Sloop, F.V.Jr

    2003-05-12

    Silicone rubber received attention as an alternative to polyvinyltoluene in applications in which the scintillator is exposed to high doses because of the increased resistance of the rubber to the formation of blue-absorbing color centers. Work by Bowen, et al., and Harmon, et al., demonstrated their properties under gamma/x-ray irradiation, and Bell, et al. have shown their response to thermal neutrons. This last work, however, provided an example of a silicone in which both the boron and the scintillator were contained in the rubber as solutes, a formulation which led to the precipitation of solids and sublimation of the boron component. In the present work we describe a scintillator in which the boron is chemically bonded to the siloxane and so avoids the problem of precipitation and loss of boron to sublimation. Material containing up to 18% boron, by weight, was prepared, mounted on photomultipliers, and exposed to both neutron and gamma fluxes. Pulse height spectra showing the neutron and photon response were obtained, and although the light output was found to be much poorer than from samples in which boron was dissolved, the higher boron concentrations enabled essentially 100% neutron absorption in only a few millimeters' thickness of rubber.

  18. Scintillators with potential to supersede lanthanum bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Steven; Aszatlos, Steve; Hull, Giulia; Kuntz, J.; Niedermayr, Tom; Pimputkar, S.; Roberts, J.; Sanner, R.; Tillotson, T.; van Loef, Edger; Wilson, Cody; Shah, Kanai; Roy, U.; Hawrami, R.; Burger, Arnold; Boatner, Lynn; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William

    2009-06-01

    New scintillators for high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy have been identified, grown and characterized. Our development efforts have focused on two classes of high light yield materials: Europium-doped alkaline earth halides and Cerium-doped garnets. Of the halide single crystals we have grown by the Bridgman method - SrI{sub 2}, CaI{sub 2}, SrBr{sub 2}, BaI{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} - SrI{sub 2} is the most promising. SrI{sub 2}(Eu) emits into the Eu{sup 2+} band, centered at 435 nm, with a decay time of 1.2 {micro}s and a light yield of up to 115,000 photons/MeV. It offers energy resolution better than 3% FWHM at 662 keV, and exhibits excellent light yield proportionality. Transparent ceramics fabrication allows production of Gadolinium- and Terbium-based garnets which are not growable by melt techniques due to phase instabilities. While scintillation light yields of Cerium-doped ceramic garnets are high, light yield non-proportionality and slow decay components appear to limit their prospects for high energy resolution. We are developing an understanding of the mechanisms underlying energy dependent scintillation light yield non-proportionality and how it affects energy resolution. We have also identified aspects of optical design that can be optimized to enhance energy resolution.

  19. Sillicon Photomultiplier and Scintillator Bar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelor, Mark; Elizondo, Leonardo; Ritt, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    To analyze extraterrestrial cosmic rays via precise measurements of airshower axes directions of penetrating particles such as muons, we constructed a model detector consisting of two 1-meter long scintillator bars. Each bar is fitted with green wavelength shifting fibers to modulate input for two silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) light detectors to record light produced by cosmic rays via scintillation. The purpose of the experiment is to determine the performance of these devices. Two makes of SiPMs were evaluated - from AdvanSiD and Hamamatsu. In order to filter out noise, timing measurements of the apparatus were performed under several trigger conditions such as coincidence trigger with 2 photomultiplier detectors, as well as SiPM detector arrays in self-triggered mode. The DRS4 Digitizer 4-channel fast waveform sampler digitized SiPM detector waveforms. Signals were analyzed with the CERN PAW package. The speed of light in the scintillator using the SiPM modules was found to be approximately 66% of the speed of light in a vacuum which is in accordance with the index of refraction for the fibers given by the manufacturer's specifications. The results of our timing measurements would be presented. Dept. of Ed. Title V Grant PO31S090007.

  20. Pulse height model for deuterated scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haitang; Enqvist, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    An analytical model of light pulse height distribution for finite deuterated scintillation detectors is created using the impulse approximation. Particularly, the energy distribution of a scattered neutron is calculated based on an existing collision probability scheme for general cylindrical shaped detectors considering double differential cross-sections. The light pulse height distribution is analytically and numerically calculated by convoluting collision sequences with the light output function for an EJ-315 detector from our measurements completed at Ohio University. The model provides a good description of collision histories capturing transferred neutron energy in deuterium-based scintillation materials. The resulting light pulse height distribution details pulse compositions and their corresponding contributions. It shows that probabilities of neutron collision with carbon and deuterium nuclei are comparable, however the light pulse amplitude due to collisions with carbon nuclei is small and mainly located at the lower region of the light pulse distribution axis. The model can explore those neutron interaction events that generate pulses near or below a threshold that would be imposed in measurements. A comparison is made between the light pulse height distributions given by the analytical model and measurements. It reveals a significant probability of a neutron generating a small light pulse due to collisions with carbon nuclei when compared to larger light pulse generated by collisions involving deuterium nuclei. This model is beneficial to understand responses of scintillation materials and pulse compositions, as well as nuclei information extraction from recorded pulses.

  1. Characterization of Ionospheric Scintillation Using Simultaneous Formosat-3/COSMIC Radio Occultation Observations and AFRL SCINDA Ground Scintillation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starks, M. J.; Lin, C. S.; Groves, K. M.; Pedersen, T. R.; Basu, S.; Syndergaard, S.; Rocken, C.

    2007-05-01

    Ionospheric scintillation at low latitudes has been studied using ionospheric radio occultation (RO) measurements by the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC micro-satellites in conjunction with ground-based data from the Scintillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) station at Kwajalein Atoll. The Air Force Research Laboratory has developed the SCINDA network for monitoring low-latitude ionospheric total electron content (TEC) and scintillation associated with equatorial spread F. The network currently consists of sixteen stations distributed around the globe and the data have been used to conduct numerous studies on the characteristics and climatology of equatorial scintillation. The present study focuses on COSMIC RO and SCINDA data during the three COSMIC campaigns in 2006. Radio occultation events are selected by requiring that ionospheric scintillation was detected by the SCINDA VHF scintillation monitor at Kwajalein, and that the occultation ray path intersected the Kwajalein longitude below the satellite altitude, which varied from 500 to 800 km for the six FORMOSAT-3 satellites. In order to exclude tropospheric effects, only GPS signal amplitudes from FORMOSAT-3 with ray path tangent altitudes above 100 km are considered. Locations of ionospheric scintillation are estimated by triangulation using the satellites and the SCINDA ground station. Airglow images at Kwajalein are also used to confirm occurrence of equatorial ionospheric scintillations. For the selected events, large amplitude L1 and L2 scintillations tend to occur at altitudes below 200 km at frequencies around 0.5 Hz. The results are discussed as a potential path toward better specifying the occurrence of equatorial scintillations.

  2. Light collection from scintillation counters using WLS fibers and bars

    SciTech Connect

    Evdokimov, V.

    1998-01-01

    Several methods of collecting light on scintillation counters using WLS fibers and WLS bars were studied. Nearly 20 prototype counters with different designs and with sizes ranging from 14{times}11{times}1.3cm{sup 3} to 105{times}60{times}1.3cm{sup 3} have been tested using cosmic muons and radioactive source. The efficiency of light collection on number of photoelectrons, uniformity of response, and time resolution have been measured. Test results for two new designs of light collection from scintillator based on WLS fibers around perimeter of scintillator plate and WLS fibers placed in machined on scintillator plate deep grooves are presented. Two out of the studied designs have been chosen as the basic options for the D0 muon system upgrade: light collection using two WLS bars for the forward muon scintillation counters and light collection using WLS fibers in deep grooves on scintillator for central area muon counters.

  3. Methods for the continuous production of plastic scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Bross, Alan; Pla-Dalmau, Anna; Mellott, Kerry

    1999-10-19

    Methods for producing plastic scintillating material employing either two major steps (tumble-mix) or a single major step (inline-coloring or inline-doping). Using the two step method, the polymer pellets are mixed with silicone oil, and the mixture is then tumble mixed with the dopants necessary to yield the proper response from the scintillator material. The mixture is then placed in a compounder and compounded in an inert gas atmosphere. The resultant scintillator material is then extruded and pelletized or formed. When only a single step is employed, the polymer pellets and dopants are metered into an inline-coloring extruding system. The mixture is then processed under a inert gas atmosphere, usually argon or nitrogen, to form plastic scintillator material in the form of either scintillator pellets, for subsequent processing, or as material in the direct formation of the final scintillator shape or form.

  4. Ionospheric scintillation in Brazil: Analyses and Effects on GNSS Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, D. B.; Souza, J. S.; Silva, H. D.

    2013-05-01

    Ionosphere has a great influence on GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) signals and its behavior depends on several variables: local time, geographic location, seasons and solar activity. Besides, there are ionospheric irregularities that also affect the GNSS signal propagation, as the ionospheric scintillation. The ionospheric scintillation can be described as a fast change in phase and amplitude of GNSS signal, caused by irregularities of electron density. Scintillation can degrade or cause the GNSS signal lost. Due to these described factors, one can say that the ionosphere can cause important effects on GNSS positioning. It can degrade the coordinate accuracy obtained by GNSS positioning methods. In this paper the goal is to evaluate the ionospheric effect, in special the ionospheric scintillation in different regions of Brazil, and its effects on GNSS Point Positioning. In order to evaluate the days where the scintillation was more significant it is used a database (http://200.145.185.118/cigala/index.php) from CIGALA (Concept for Ionospheric Scintillation Mitigation for Professional GNSS in Latin America) project (http://cigala.galileoic.org/). Using these data it is possible to obtain information about ionospheric scintillation in different GNSS stations in Brazil. It is possible to correlate the data according to time, season and other factors that can contribute to scintillation analysis. In 2013 must occur an intense solar activity, which can intensify the ionospheric effects, and consequently ionospheric scintillation, mainly in Brazil region, where the scintillation index is already intense. Preliminary evaluations, showed larger values of S4 (scintillation index) in Brazil. For example, in October 2012, it was obtained S4 values larger than 1 in several epochs. This causes severe effects in GNSS Positioning. In this paper, the results of GNSS positioning under ionosphere scintillation effects in different regions of Brazil will be presented.

  5. Transition effect of air shower particles in plastic scintillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asakimori, K.; Maeda, T.; Kameda, T.; Mizushima, K.; Misaki, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The transition effect of air shower particles in the plastic scintillators near the core was measured by scintillators of various thickness. The air showers selected for the measurement were of 10,000. Results obtained are as follows: (1) the multiplication of shower particles in the scintillators is less than 20% for that of 50 mm thickness; (2) dependence of the transition effect on age parameter is not recognized within the experimental errors.

  6. Growth and scintillation properties of gadolinium and yttrium orthovanadate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voloshina, O. V.; Baumer, V. N.; Bondar, V. G.; Kurtsev, D. A.; Gorbacheva, T. E.; Zenya, I. M.; Zhukov, A. V.; Sidletskiy, O. Ts.

    2012-02-01

    Aiming to explore the possibility of using the undoped rare-earth orthovanadates as scintillation materials, we developed the procedure for growth of gadolinium (GdVO 4) and yttrium (YVO 4) orthovanadate single crystals by Czochralski method, and determined the optimal conditions of their after-growth annealing. Optical, luminescent, and scintillation properties of YVO 4 and GdVO 4 were discussed versus known literature data. Scintillation characteristics of GdVO 4 were determined for the first time.

  7. Development of polystyrene-based scintillation materials and its mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Hidehito; Kitamura, Hisashi; Shinji, Osamu; Saito, Katashi; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Sentaro

    2012-12-01

    Scintillation materials based on polystyrene (PS) have been investigated. Para-terphenyl was employed as a fluorescent molecule (fluor) that functions as a wavelength shifter. A clear increase in photon yield of the scintillation materials relative to the pure PS was observed, which cannot be explained by the conventional theory of scintillation mechanism. Furthermore, the photon yield increased with flour concentration in accordance with a power-law. Here we reveal the emergence of a luminescence of PS-based scintillation materials and demonstrate that their photon yields can be controlled by the fluor concentration.

  8. Lanthanide doped strontium-barium cesium halide scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarri, Gregory; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Borade, Ramesh B.; Gundiah, Gautam; Yan, Zewu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an optionally lanthanide-doped strontium-barium, optionally cesium, halide, useful for detecting nuclear material.

  9. Scintillation near the F-layer trough over Northern Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Kersley, L.; Pryse, S.E.; Russell, C.D.

    1990-05-03

    Results are presented of scintillation observations made during a two and a half year period at Lerwick in the Shetland Islands using more than 19000 passes of NNSS satellites. Examples of scintillation morphology, in the region near the scintillation boundary and the F-layer trough, for both amplitude and phase are discussed using exceedence levels for the S sub 4 and sigma sub psi indices respectively. The equatorwards advancement of the scintillation boundary in response to enhanced solar activity during the increasing phase of the solar cycle is shown to be a dominant feature in the observations.

  10. Chaotic behavior of ionospheric turbulence from scintillation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, A. )

    1990-05-01

    Ionospheric amplitude and phase scintillation data have been analyzed to estimate the information dimension associated with the attractor of the system. For weak scintillations, both amplitude and phase data yield identical results which demonstrate that spatial fluctuations of electron density in the ionosphere may be characterized by a few degrees of freedom. Stronger scintillations are attributed to steepened density irregularities which cause focusing of the incident radio wave. This results in the amplitude scintillations exhibiting higher dimensional chaos but spatial fluctuations in ionospheric density still involve low dimensional chaos.

  11. Application of accelerators for the research and development of scintillators.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Kengo; Koshimizu, Masanori; Asai, Keisuke; Muroya, Yusa; Katsumura, Yosuke; Inadama, Naoko; Yoshida, Eiji; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yamaya, Taiga; Murayama, Hideo

    2007-08-01

    We introduce experimental systems which use accelerators to evaluate scintillation properties such as scintillation intensity, wavelength, and lifetime. A single crystal of good optical quality is often unavailable during early stages in the research and development (R&D) of new scintillator materials. Because of their beams' high excitation power and/or low penetration depth, accelerators facilitate estimation of the properties of early samples which may only be available as powders, thin films, and very small crystals. We constructed a scintillation spectrum measurement system that uses a Van de Graaff accelerator and an optical multichannel analyzer to estimate the relative scintillation intensity. In addition, we constructed a scintillation time profile measurement system that uses an electron linear accelerator and a femtosecond streak camera or a microchannel plate photomultiplier tube followed by a digital oscilloscope to determine the scintillation lifetimes. The time resolution is approximately 10 ps. The scintillation spectra or time profiles can be obtained in a significantly shorter acquisition time in comparison with that required by conventional measuring systems. The advantages of the systems described in this study can significantly promote the R&D of novel scintillator materials. PMID:17764319

  12. 3D Printed Scintillators For Use in Field Emission Detection and Other Nuclear Physics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficenec, Karen

    2015-10-01

    In accelerator cavities, field emission electrons - electrons that get stripped away from the cavity walls due to the high electromagnetic field necessary to accelerate the main beam - are partially accelerated and can crash into the cavity walls, adding to the heat-load of the cryogenic system. Because these field electrons emit gamma rays when bent by the electromagnetic field, a scintillator, if made to fit the cavity enclosure, can detect their presence. Eliminating the waste of subtractive manufacturing techniques and allowing for the production of unique, varied shapes, 3D printing of scintillators may allow for an efficient detection system. UV light is used to start a chemical polymerization process that links the monomers of the liquid resin together into larger, intertwined molecules, forming the solid structure. Each shape requires slightly different calibration of its optimal printing parameters, such as slice thickness and exposure time to UV light. Thus far, calibration parameters have been optimized for cylinders of 20 mm diameter, cones of 30 mm diameter and 30 mm height, rectangular prisms 30 by 40 by 10 mm, and square pyramids 20 mm across. Calibration continues on creating holes in the prints (for optical fibers), as well as shapes with overhangs. Scintill This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1405857.

  13. Cross-correlation measurements with the EJ-299-33 plastic scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, Mark M.; Whaley, Jeff; Dolan, Jennifer L.; Polack, John K.; Flaska, Marek; Clarke, Shaun D.; Tomanin, Alice; Peerani, Paolo; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2015-06-01

    New organic-plastic scintillation compositions have demonstrated pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) of neutrons and gamma rays. We present cross-correlation measurements of 252Cf and mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) with the EJ-299-33 plastic scintillator. For comparison, equivalent measurements were performed with an EJ-309 liquid scintillator. Offline, digital PSD was applied to each detector. These measurements show that EJ-299-33 sacrifices a factor of 5 in neutron-neutron efficiency relative to EJ-309, but could still utilize the difference in neutron-neutron efficiency and neutron single-to-double ratio to distinguish 252Cf from MOX. These measurements were modeled with MCNPX-PoliMi, and MPPost was used to convert the detailed collision history into simulated cross-correlation distributions. MCNPX-PoliMi predicted the measured 252Cf cross-correlation distribution for EJ-309 to within 10%. Greater photon uncertainty in the MOX sample led to larger discrepancy in the simulated MOX cross-correlation distribution. The modeled EJ-299-33 plastic also gives reasonable agreement with measured cross-correlation distributions, although the MCNPX-PoliMi model appears to under-predict the neutron detection efficiency.

  14. Monte Carlo and Analytical Models of Neutron Detection with Organic Scintillation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzi, Sara A; Flaska, Marek; Enqvist, Andreas; Pazsit, Imre

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a new technique for the analysis of neutron pulse height distributions generated in an organic scintillation detector. The methodology presented in this paper can be applied to techniques such as neutron spectrum unfolding, which have a variety of applications, including nuclear nonproliferation and homeland security. The technique is based on two independent approaches: (i) the use of the MCNP-PoliMi code to simulate neutron detection on an event-by-event basis via the Monte Carlo method and (ii) an analytical approach for neutron slowing down and detection processes. We show that the total neutron pulse height response measured by the organic scintillators is given by the sum of a large number of different neutron histories, each composed of a certain number of neutron scatterings on hydrogen and/or on carbon. The relative contributions of each of these histories are described for a cylindrical liquid scintillator BC-501A. The total simulated pulse height distributions are compared to experimental data measured using two neutron sources, Cf-252 and Am-Be, and very good agreement is achieved. Simulations and measurements of neutron pulse height distributions are essential for neutron spectrum unfolding procedures.

  15. Passive Measurement of Organic-Scintillator Neutron Signatures for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jennfier L. Dolan; Eric C. Miller; Alexis C. Kaplan; Andreas Enqvist; Marek Flaska; Alice Tomanin; Paolo Peerani; David L. Chichester; Sara A. Pozzi

    2012-10-01

    At nuclear facilities, domestically and internationally, most measurement systems used for nuclear materials’ control and accountability rely on He-3 detectors. Due to resource shortages, alternatives to He-3 systems are needed. This paper presents preliminary simulation and experimental efforts to develop a fast-neutron-multiplicity counter based on liquid organic scintillators. This mission also provides the opportunity to broaden the capabilities of such safeguards measurement systems to improve current neutron-multiplicity techniques and expand the scope to encompass advanced nuclear fuels.

  16. 3D reconstruction of scintillation light emission from proton pencil beams using limited viewing angles-a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Hui, CheukKai; Robertson, Daniel; Beddar, Sam

    2014-08-21

    An accurate and high-resolution quality assurance (QA) method for proton radiotherapy beams is necessary to ensure correct dose delivery to the target. Detectors based on a large volume of liquid scintillator have shown great promise in providing fast and high-resolution measurements of proton treatment fields. However, previous work with these detectors has been limited to two-dimensional measurements, and the quantitative measurement of dose distributions was lacking. The purpose of the current study is to assess the feasibility of reconstructing three-dimensional (3D) scintillation light distributions of spot scanning proton beams using a scintillation system. The proposed system consists of a tank of liquid scintillator imaged by charge-coupled device cameras at three orthogonal viewing angles. Because of the limited number of viewing angles, we developed a profile-based technique to obtain an initial estimate that can improve the quality of the 3D reconstruction. We found that our proposed scintillator system and profile-based technique can reconstruct a single energy proton beam in 3D with a gamma passing rate (3%/3 mm local) of 100.0%. For a single energy layer of an intensity modulated proton therapy prostate treatment plan, the proposed method can reconstruct the 3D light distribution with a gamma pass rate (3%/3 mm local) of 99.7%. In addition, we also found that the proposed method is effective in detecting errors in the treatment plan, indicating that it can be a very useful tool for 3D proton beam QA. PMID:25054735

  17. 3D reconstruction of scintillation light emission from proton pencil beams using limited viewing angles—a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, CheukKai; Robertson, Daniel; Beddar, Sam

    2014-08-01

    An accurate and high-resolution quality assurance (QA) method for proton radiotherapy beams is necessary to ensure correct dose delivery to the target. Detectors based on a large volume of liquid scintillator have shown great promise in providing fast and high-resolution measurements of proton treatment fields. However, previous work with these detectors has been limited to two-dimensional measurements, and the quantitative measurement of dose distributions was lacking. The purpose of the current study is to assess the feasibility of reconstructing three-dimensional (3D) scintillation light distributions of spot scanning proton beams using a scintillation system. The proposed system consists of a tank of liquid scintillator imaged by charge-coupled device cameras at three orthogonal viewing angles. Because of the limited number of viewing angles, we developed a profile-based technique to obtain an initial estimate that can improve the quality of the 3D reconstruction. We found that our proposed scintillator system and profile-based technique can reconstruct a single energy proton beam in 3D with a gamma passing rate (3%/3 mm local) of 100.0%. For a single energy layer of an intensity modulated proton therapy prostate treatment plan, the proposed method can reconstruct the 3D light distribution with a gamma pass rate (3%/3 mm local) of 99.7%. In addition, we also found that the proposed method is effective in detecting errors in the treatment plan, indicating that it can be a very useful tool for 3D proton beam QA.

  18. Absolute Electron Extraction Efficiency of Liquid Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdin, Katayun; Mizrachi, Eli; Morad, James; Sorensen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Dual phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chambers (TPCs) currently set the world's most sensitive limits on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored dark matter candidate. These detectors rely on extracting electrons from liquid xenon into gaseous xenon, where they produce proportional scintillation. The proportional scintillation from the extracted electrons serves to internally amplify the WIMP signal; even a single extracted electron is detectable. Credible dark matter searches can proceed with electron extraction efficiency (EEE) lower than 100%. However, electrons systematically left at the liquid/gas boundary are a concern. Possible effects include spontaneous single or multi-electron proportional scintillation signals in the gas, or charging of the liquid/gas interface or detector materials. Understanding EEE is consequently a serious concern for this class of rare event search detectors. Previous EEE measurements have mostly been relative, not absolute, assuming efficiency plateaus at 100%. I will present an absolute EEE measurement with a small liquid/gas xenon TPC test bed located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  19. Comparative testing of various flow-cell detectors fabricated using CaF{sub 2} solid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, T.; Ohashi, H.; Hamada, Y.; Jamsranjav, E.

    2015-03-15

    A monitoring system based on a flow-cell detector was developed for measuring the tritium concentration in water. The flow-cell detector was fabricated using a granular CaF{sub 2} solid scintillator. This system does not use a liquid scintillation counting system and does not generate radioactive organic liquid waste. Moreover, continuous real-time measurements are possible, in contrast to a liquid scintillation counting system, which requires batch measurements. For further development of the system, four flow-cell detectors were fabricated. They included a single 3-mm-diameter cell, three 3-mm-diameter cells in series, a single 5-mm-diameter cell, and three 5-mm-diameter cells in series. Continuously flowing water containing tritium at various concentrations was passed through the flow cells, and tritium count were measured for 600 and 10000 s. Investigating the relation between the count rate and concentration, the three 5-mm-diameter cells were most sensitive, with a linear relation maintained down to approximately 2 Bq/ml and 10 Bq/ml for 10000- and 600-s measurements, respectively. (authors)

  20. Cell for determination of tritium concentration by liquid radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Antonenko, G.I.; Savina, V.I.; Egurneva, T.B.

    1987-02-01

    An optimized cell is described for determination of tritium concentration in the form of tritiated water by a liquid scintillation radiometer at a level of 10/sup 4/ Bq/m/sup 3/. The cell is made of Teflon and has a wall thickness of 0.8-1.0 mm. The useful capacity of the cell is 45 cm/sup 3/ (5 cm/sup 3/ of tritiated water and 40 cm/sup 3/ of ZhS-81 liquid scintillator).

  1. Sensitive and transportable gadolinium-core plastic scintillator sphere for neutron detection and counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumazert, Jonathan; Coulon, Romain; Carrel, Frédérick; Corre, Gwenolé; Normand, Stéphane; Méchin, Laurence; Hamel, Matthieu

    2016-08-01

    Neutron detection forms a critical branch of nuclear-related issues, currently driven by the search for competitive alternative technologies to neutron counters based on the helium-3 isotope. The deployment of plastic scintillators shows a high potential for efficient detectors, safer and more reliable than liquids, more easily scalable and cost-effective than inorganic. In the meantime, natural gadolinium, through its 155 and mostly 157 isotopes, presents an exceptionally high interaction probability with thermal neutrons. This paper introduces a dual system including a metal gadolinium core inserted at the center of a high-scale plastic scintillator sphere. Incident fast neutrons are thermalized by the scintillator shell and then may be captured with a significant probability by gadolinium 155 and 157 nuclei in the core. The deposition of a sufficient fraction of the capture high-energy prompt gamma signature inside the scintillator shell will then allow discrimination from background radiations by energy threshold, and therefore neutron detection. The scaling of the system with the Monte Carlo MCNPX2.7 code was carried out according to a tradeoff between the moderation of incident fast neutrons and the probability of slow neutron capture by a moderate-cost metal gadolinium core. Based on the parameters extracted from simulation, a first laboratory prototype for the assessment of the detection method principle has been synthetized. The robustness and sensitivity of the neutron detection principle are then assessed by counting measurement experiments. Experimental results confirm the potential for a stable, highly sensitive, transportable and cost-efficient neutron detector and orientate future investigation toward promising axes.

  2. A model for the secondary scintillation pulse shape from a gas proportional scintillation counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazkaz, K.; Joshi, T. H.

    2016-03-01

    Proportional scintillation counters (PSCs), both single- and dual-phase, can measure the scintillation (S1) and ionization (S2) channels from particle interactions within the detector volume. The signal obtained from these detectors depends first on the physics of the medium (the initial scintillation and ionization), and second how the physics of the detector manipulates the resulting photons and liberated electrons. In this paper we develop a model of the detector physics that incorporates event topology, detector geometry, electric field configuration, purity, optical properties of components, and wavelength shifters. We present an analytic form of the model, which allows for general study of detector design and operation, and a Monte Carlo model which enables a more detailed exploration of S2 events. This model may be used to study systematic effects in current detectors such as energy and position reconstruction, pulse shape discrimination, event topology, dead time calculations, purity, and electric field uniformity. We present a comparison of this model with experimental data collected with an argon gas proportional scintillation counter (GPSC), operated at 20 C and 1 bar, and irradiated with an internal, collimated 55Fe source. Additionally we discuss how the model may be incorporated in Monte Carlo simulations of both GPSCs and dual-phase detectors, increasing the reliability of the simulation results and allowing for tests of the experimental data analysis algorithms.

  3. Processing of transparent polycrystalline AlON:Ce3+ scintillators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Ching -Fong; Yang, Pin; King, Graham; Tegtmeier, Eric L.

    2015-10-23

    A new polycrystalline ceramic scintillator is reported for potential use in radiation detection and medical imaging applications. The goal was to develop cerium-activated aluminum oxynitride (AlON:Ce3+) ceramics, which can be produced using ceramic processes in comparison to the high-cost, low-yield single-crystal growth technique. A phase pure AlON:Ce3+ powder with cubic symmetry was successfully synthesized at high temperature under a reducing atmosphere to convert Ce4+ to Ce3+ in the solid solution. We explored two different activator concentrations (0.5 and 1.0 mol%). Fully dense and transparent AlON:Ce3+ ceramics were produced by a liquid-phase-assisted pressureless sintering. The crystal field splitting around the Ce3+more » activator in the AlON was comparable to the splitting induced by Br₋ and the Cl₋ ligands, which produced an emission spectrum perfectly matching the maximum quantum efficiency range of the photomultiplier tube for radiation detection. Both optical excitation and radiation ionizations in AlON:Ce3+ were demonstrated. Lastly, challenges and mechanisms related to the radioluminescence efficiency are discussed.« less

  4. Cherenkov and Scintillation Properties of Cubic Zirconium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, M.J.; Adams, J.H.; Parnell, T.A.; Kuznetsov, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Cubic zirconium (CZ) is a high index of refraction (n =2.17) material that we have investigated for Cherenkov counter applications. Laboratory and proton accelerator tests of an 18cc sample of CZ show that the expected fast Cherenkov response is accompanied by a longer scintillation component that can be separated by pulse shaping. This presents the possibility of novel particle spectrometers which exploits both properties of CZ. Other high index materials being examined for Cherenkov applications will be discussed. Results from laboratory tests and an accelerator exposure will be presented and a potential application in solar energetic particle instruments will be discussed

  5. Fundamental Limits of Scintillation Detector Timing Precision

    PubMed Central

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we review the primary factors that affect the timing precision of a scintillation detector. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to explore the dependence of the timing precision on the number of photoelectrons, the scintillator decay and rise times, the depth of interaction uncertainty, the time dispersion of the optical photons (modeled as an exponential decay), the photodetector rise time and transit time jitter, the leading-edge trigger level, and electronic noise. The Monte Carlo code was used to estimate the practical limits on the timing precision for an energy deposition of 511 keV in 3 mm × 3 mm × 30 mm Lu2SiO5:Ce and LaBr3:Ce crystals. The calculated timing precisions are consistent with the best experimental literature values. We then calculated the timing precision for 820 cases that sampled scintillator rise times from 0 to 1.0 ns, photon dispersion times from 0 to 0.2 ns, photodetector time jitters from 0 to 0.5 ns fwhm, and A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons per ns decay time. Since the timing precision R was found to depend on A−1/2 more than any other factor, we tabulated the parameter B, where R = BA−1/2. An empirical analytical formula was found that fit the tabulated values of B with an rms deviation of 2.2% of the value of B. The theoretical lower bound of the timing precision was calculated for the example of 0.5 ns rise time, 0.1 ns photon dispersion, and 0.2 ns fwhm photodetector time jitter. The lower bound was at most 15% lower than leading-edge timing discrimination for A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons/ns. A timing precision of 8 ps fwhm should be possible for an energy deposition of 511 keV using currently available photodetectors if a theoretically possible scintillator were developed that could produce 10,000 photoelectrons/ns. PMID:24874216

  6. Fundamental limits of scintillation detector timing precision.

    PubMed

    Derenzo, Stephen E; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we review the primary factors that affect the timing precision of a scintillation detector. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to explore the dependence of the timing precision on the number of photoelectrons, the scintillator decay and rise times, the depth of interaction uncertainty, the time dispersion of the optical photons (modeled as an exponential decay), the photodetector rise time and transit time jitter, the leading-edge trigger level, and electronic noise. The Monte Carlo code was used to estimate the practical limits on the timing precision for an energy deposition of 511 keV in 3 mm × 3 mm × 30 mm Lu2SiO5:Ce and LaBr3:Ce crystals. The calculated timing precisions are consistent with the best experimental literature values. We then calculated the timing precision for 820 cases that sampled scintillator rise times from 0 to 1.0 ns, photon dispersion times from 0 to 0.2 ns, photodetector time jitters from 0 to 0.5 ns fwhm, and A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons per ns decay time. Since the timing precision R was found to depend on A(-1/2) more than any other factor, we tabulated the parameter B, where R = BA(-1/2). An empirical analytical formula was found that fit the tabulated values of B with an rms deviation of 2.2% of the value of B. The theoretical lower bound of the timing precision was calculated for the example of 0.5 ns rise time, 0.1 ns photon dispersion, and 0.2 ns fwhm photodetector time jitter. The lower bound was at most 15% lower than leading-edge timing discrimination for A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons ns(-1). A timing precision of 8 ps fwhm should be possible for an energy deposition of 511 keV using currently available photodetectors if a theoretically possible scintillator were developed that could produce 10,000 photoelectrons ns(-1). PMID:24874216

  7. Thin-film-based scintillators for hard x-ray microimaging detectors: the ScinTAX Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rack, A.; Cecilia, A.; Douissard, P.-A.; Dupré, K.; Wesemann, V.; Baumbach, T.; Couchaud, M.; Rochet, X.; Riesemeier, H.; Radtke, M.; Martin, T.

    2014-09-01

    The project ScinTAX developed novel thin scintillating films for the application in high performance X-ray imaging and subsequent introduced new X-ray detectors to the market. To achieve this aim lutetium orthosilicate (LSO) scintillators doped with different activators were grown successfully by liquid phase epitaxy. The high density of LSO (7.4 g/cm3), the effective atomic number (65.2) and the high light yield make this scintillator highly applicable for indirect X-ray detection in which the ionizing radiation is converted into visible light and then registered by a digital detector. A modular indirect detection system has been developed to fully exploit the potential of this thin film scintillator for radiographic and tomographic imaging. The system is compatible for high-resolution imaging with moderate dose as well as adaptable to intense high-dose applications where radiation hard microimaging detectors are required. This proceedings article shall review the achieved performances and technical details on this high-resolution detector system which is now available. A selected example application demonstrates the great potential of the optimized detector system for hard X-ray microimaging, i.e. either to improve image contrast due to the availability of efficient thin crystal films or to reduce the dose to the sample.

  8. A study of GPS ionospheric scintillations observed at Guilin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yuhua; Wang, Dongli

    2009-12-01

    The occurrence of strong ionospheric scintillations with S4>=0.2 was studied using global positioning system (GPS) measurements at Guilin (25.29°N, 110.33°E; geomagnetic: 15.04°N, 181.98°E), a station located near the northern crest of equatorial anomaly in China. The results are presented for data collected from January 2007 to December 2008. The results show that amplitude scintillations occurred only during the first five months of the considered years. Nighttime amplitude scintillations, observed mainly in the south of Guilin, always occurred with phase scintillations, total electron content (TEC) depletions, and Rate Of change of TEC (ROT) fluctuations. However, TEC depletions and ROT fluctuations were weak during daytime amplitude scintillations, and daytime amplitude scintillations usually occurred in most of the azimuth directions. GPS scintillation/TEC observations recorded at Guilin and signal-to-noise-ratio measurements obtained from GPS-COSMIC radio occultation indicate that nighttime and daytime scintillations are very likely caused by ionospheric F region irregularities and sporadic E, respectively.

  9. Performance comparison of scintillators for alpha particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Yuki; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Izaki, Kenji; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Toui, Kohei; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio

    2014-11-01

    Scintillation detectors for alpha particles are often used in nuclear fuel facilities. Alpha particle detectors have also become important in the research field of radionuclide therapy using alpha emitters. ZnS(Ag) is the most often used scintillator for alpha particle detectors because its light output is high. However, the energy resolution of ZnS(Ag)-based scintillation detectors is poor because they are not transparent. A new ceramic sample, namely the cerium doped Gd2Si2O7 (GPS) scintillator, has been tested as alpha particle detector and its performances have been compared to that one of three different scintillating materials: ZnS(Ag), GAGG and a standard plastic scintillator. The different scintillating materials have been coupled to two different photodetectors, namely a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a Silicon Photo-multiplier (Si-PM): the performances of each detection system have been compared. Promising results as far as the energy resolution performances (10% with PMT and 14% with Si-PM) have been obtained in the case of GPS and GAGG samples. Considering the quantum efficiencies of the photodetectors under test and their relation to the emission wavelength of the different scintillators, the best results were achieved coupling the GPS with the PMT and the GAGG with the Si-PM

  10. Microprocessor-based single particle calibration of scintillation counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumdar, G. K. D.; Pathak, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    A microprocessor-base set-up is fabricated and tested for the single particle calibration of the plastic scintillator. The single particle response of the scintillator is digitized by an A/D converter, and a 8085 A based microprocessor stores the pulse heights. The digitized information is printed. Facilities for CRT display and cassette storing and recalling are also made available.

  11. Characterizing Properties and Performance of 3D Printed Plastic Scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, Jacob

    2015-10-01

    We are determining various characteristics of the performance of 3D printed scintillators. A scintillator luminesces when an energetic particle raises electrons to an excited state by depositing some of its energy in the atom. When these excited electrons fall back down to their stable states, they emit the excess energy as light. We have characterized the transmission spectrum, emission spectrum, and relative intensity of light produced by 3D printed scintillators. We are also determining mechanical properties such as tensile strength and compressibility, and the refractive index. The emission and transmission spectra were measured using a monochromator. By observing the transmission spectrum, we can see which optical wavelengths are absorbed by the scintillator. This is then used to correct the emission spectrum, since this absorption is present in the emission spectrum. Using photomultiplier tubes in conjunction with integration hardware (QDC) to measure the intensity of light emitted by 3D printed scintillators, we compare with commercial plastic scintillators. We are using the characterizations to determine if 3D printed scintillators are a viable alternative to commercial scintillators for use at Jefferson Lab in nuclear and accelerated physics detectors. I would like to thank Wouter Deconinck, as well as the Parity group at the College of William and Mary for all advice and assistance with my research.

  12. SDC conceptual design: Scintillating fiber outer tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.; Baumbaugh, A.; Bird, F.; SDC Collaboration

    1992-01-22

    The authors propose an all-scintillating fiber detector for the purpose of outer tracking for the SDC. The objectives of this tracking system are to: (1) provide a first level trigger for {vert_bar}{eta}{vert_bar} < 2.3 with sharp p{sub T} threshold with the ability to resolve individual beam crossings; (2) provide pattern recognition capability and momentum resolution which complements and extends the capabilities of the inner silicon tracking system; (3) provide three dimensional linkage with outer detection systems including the shower maximum detector, muon detectors, and calorimetry; (4) provide robust tracking and track-triggering at the highest luminosities expected at the SSC. The many attractive features of a fiber tracker include good position resolution, low occupancy, low mass in the active volume, and excellent resistance to radiation damage. An additional important feature, especially at the SSC, is the intrinsically prompt response time of a scintillating fiber. This property is exploited in the construction of a level 1 trigger sensitive to individual beam crossings.

  13. Scintillating bolometers for the LUCIFER project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattavina, L.; LUCIFER Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (0vββ) is one of the most sensitive probes for physics beyond the Standard Model, providing unique information on the nature and masses of neutrinos. In order to explore the so-called inverted neutrino mass hierarchy region a further improvement on the upcoming 0vββ experiment is needed. In this respect, scintillating bolometers are the suitable technology for achieving such goal: they ensure excellent energy resolution and highly efficient particle discrimination. The LUCIFER project aims at deploying the first array of enriched scintillating bolometers for the investigation of 0vββ of 82Se. The matrix which embeds the source is an array of Zn 82Se crystals, where enriched 82Se is used as decay isotope. Taking advantage of the large Q-value (2997 keV) and of the particle discrimination, the expected background rate in the region of interest is as low as 10-3 c/keV/kg/y. The foreseen sensitivity after 2 years of live time will be 1.8×1025 years. We will report on the potential of such technology and on the present status of the project.

  14. A scintillating fiber dosimeter for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartesaghi, G.; Conti, V.; Bolognini, D.; Grigioni, S.; Mascagna, V.; Prest, M.; Scazzi, S.; Mozzanica, A.; Cappelletti, P.; Frigerio, M.; Gelosa, S.; Monti, A.; Ostinelli, A.; Giannini, G.; Vallazza, E.

    2007-10-01

    Radiotherapy, together with chemotherapy and surgery, is one of the main methods applied in the fight against cancer; in order to increase the chances of a successful radiotherapy treatment the dose delivery to the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues has to be computed with high accuracy. Traditional dosimeters are accurate but single channel (ionization chambers and diodes) or non real-time (radiographic films) devices. At present there is no device water equivalent that can perform real-time and bidimensional measurements of a dose distribution. This article describes the development of a real-time dosimeter based on scintillating fibers for photon and electron beams; the fibers are made of polystyrene, that is water equivalent and thus tissue equivalent, allowing a direct dose calculation. Three prototypes (single and multichannel) have been assembled, consisting in small scintillators coupled to white fibers that carry the light to photomultiplier tubes. In this article the prototypes and the readout electronics are described, together with the results of the measurements with electron and photon beams with energy up to 20 MeV (produced by linear accelerators Varian Clinac 1800 and 2100CD).

  15. Measuring scintillation light using Visible Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavarria, Alvaro

    2006-11-01

    A new search for the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) using ultra cold neutrons proposes an improvement on the neutron EDM by two orders of magnitude over the current limit (to 10-28 e*cm). Detection of scintillation light in superfluid ^4He is at the heart of this experiment. One possible scheme to detect this light is to use wavelength-shifting fibers in the superfluid ^4He to collect the scintillation light and transport it out of the measuring cell. The fiber terminates in a visible light photon counter (VLPC). VLPCs are doped, silicon based, solid state photomultipliers with high quantum efficiency (up to 80%) and high gain ( 40000 electrons per converted photon). Moreover, they are insensitive to magnetic fields and operate at temperatures of 6.5K. A test setup has been assembled at Duke University using acrylic cells wrapped in wavelength-shifting fibers that terminate on VLPCs. This setup is being used to evaluate the feasibility of this light detection scheme. The results obtained in multiple experiments done over the past summer (2006) and the current status of the project will be presented at the conference.Reference:A New Search for the Neutron Electric Dipole Moment, funding pre-proposal by the EDM collaboration; R. Golub and S. Lamoreaux, Phys. Rep. 237, 1 (1994).

  16. Imaging of gamma emitters using scintillation cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard, Marcel

    2004-07-01

    Since their introduction by Hal Anger in the late 1950s, the gamma cameras have been widely used in the field of nuclear medicine. The original concept is based on the association of a large field of view scintillator optically coupled with an array of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), in order to locate the position of interactions inside the crystal. Using a dedicated accessory, like a parallel hole collimator, to focus the field of view toward a predefined direction, it is possible to built up an image of the radioactive distribution. In terms of imaging performances, three main characteristics are commonly considered: uniformity, spatial resolution and energy resolution. Major improvements were mainly due to progress in terms of industrial process regarding analogical electronic, crystal growing or PMTs manufacturing. Today's gamma camera is highly digital, from the PMTs to the display. All the corrections are applied "on the fly" using up to date signal processing techniques. At the same time some significant progresses have been achieved in the field of collimators. Finally, two new technologies have been implemented, solid detectors like CdTe or CdZnTe, and pixellized scintillators plus photodiodes or position sensitive photomultiplier tubes. These solutions are particularly well adapted to build dedicated gamma camera for breast or intraoperative imaging.

  17. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of scintillation processes in NaI(Tl)

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Wang, Zhiguo; Williams, Richard; Grim, Joel; Gao, Fei

    2014-04-26

    Developing a comprehensive understanding of the processes that govern the scintillation behavior of inorganic scintillators provides a pathway to optimize current scintillators and allows for the science-driven search for new scintillator materials. Recent experimental data on the excitation density dependence of the light yield of inorganic scintillators presents an opportunity to incorporate parameterized interactions between excitations in scintillation models and thus enable more realistic simulations of the nonproportionality of inorganic scintillators. Therefore, a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model of elementary scintillation processes in NaI(Tl) is developed in this work to simulate the kinetics of scintillation for a range of temperatures and Tl concentrations as well as the scintillation efficiency as a function of excitation density. The ability of the KMC model to reproduce available experimental data allows for elucidating the elementary processes that give rise to the kinetics and efficiency of scintillation observed experimentally for a range of conditions.

  18. Development of scintillation materials for medical imaging and other applications

    SciTech Connect

    Melcher, C. L.

    2013-02-05

    Scintillation materials that produce pulses of visible light in response to the absorption of energetic photons, neutrons, and charged particles, are widely used in various applications that require the detection of radiation. The discovery and development of new scintillators has accelerated in recent years, due in large part to their importance in medical imaging as well as in security and high energy physics applications. Better understanding of fundamental scintillation mechanisms as well as the roles played by defects and impurities have aided the development of new high performance scintillators for both gamma-ray and neutron detection. Although single crystals continue to dominate gamma-ray based imaging techniques, composite materials and transparent optical ceramics potentially offer advantages in terms of both synthesis processes and scintillation performance. A number of promising scintillator candidates have been identified during the last few years, and several are currently being actively developed for commercial production. Purification and control of raw materials and cost effective crystal growth processes can present significant challenges to the development of practical new scintillation materials.

  19. Implications of Ionospheric Scintillation for GNSS Users in Northern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino, Marcio; Moore, Terry; Dodson, Alan; Waugh, Sam; Souter, Jock; Rodrigues, Fabiano S.

    2005-05-01

    Extensive ionospheric scintillation and Total Electron Content (TEC) data were collected by the Institute of Engineering Surveying and Space Geodesy (IESSG) in Northern Europe during years of great impact of the solar maximum on GNSS users (2001 2003). The ionospheric TEC is responsible for range errors due to its time delay effect on transionospheric signals. Electron density irregularities in the ionosphere, occurring frequently during these years, are responsible for (phase and amplitude) fluctuations on GNSS signals, known as ionospheric scintillation. Since June 2001 four GPS Ionospheric Scintillation and TEC Monitor receivers (the NovAtel/AJ Systems GSV4004) have been deployed at stations in the UK and Norway, forming a Northern European network, covering geographic latitudes from 53° to 70° N approximately. These receivers compute and record GPS phase and amplitude scintillation parameters, as well as TEC and TEC variations. The project involved setting up the network and developing automated archiving and data analysis strategies, aiming to study the impact of scintillation on DGPS and EGNOS users, and on different GPS receiver technologies. In order to characterise scintillation and TEC variations over Northern Europe, as well as investigate correlation with geomagnetic activity, long-term statistical analyses were also produced. This paper summarises our findings, providing an overview of the potential implications of ionospheric scintillation for the GNSS user in Northern Europe.

  20. Low/Mid-latitude Ionospheric irregularities and scintillation climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Amr; Groves, K. M.; Mahrous, Ayman; Hussein, Fayrouz

    Ionospheric scintillation occur when radio signals propagate through an irregular ionosphere (e.g., plasma bubbles). Since plasma bubbles are regions of depleted ion and electron densities, a plasma bubble located on the satellite-to-ground signal path will cause radio signals to fluctuate in phase and amplitude. Ionospheric scintillation data were analyzed in the magnetic latitudinal field-of-view 29° N -13.4° N, observed by a stand-alone SCINDA (Scintillation Network Decision Aid) - GPS receiver at Helwan, Egypt (29.86° N, 31.32° E). A minimum 20° elevation cut off angle has been set in order to minimize the multipath effect. During the enhancing phase of the current solar cycle 24 (years 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013), the behaviour of the scintillation occurrence were characterized. The seasonal, annual and solar cycle variation of scintillation occurrence is investigated together with the Total Electron Content (TEC), to put in evidence the relation between the electron density gradients and the ionospheric irregularities causing scintillation. This study considers a first step to develop a scintillation climatology over Northern Africa.