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Sample records for liquid water polymorphism

  1. Are There Two Forms of Liquid Water?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. E.

    We will introduce some of the 73 documented anomalies of the most complex of liquids, water--focusing on recent progress in understanding these anomalies by combining information provided by recent experiments and simulations on water in bulk, nanoconfined and biological environments designed to test the hypothesis that liquid water has behavior consistent with the novel phenomenon of ``liquid polymorphism'' in that water can exist in two distinct phases [1]. We will also discuss very recent work on nanoconfined water anomalies as well as the apparently related, and highly unusual, behavior of water in biological environments. Finally, we will discuss how the general concept of liquid polymorphism is proving useful in understanding anomalies in other liquids, such as silicon, silica, and carbon, as well as metallic glasses, which have in common that they are characterized by two characteristic length scales in their interactions.This work has been supported by the NSF Chemistry Division grant CHE-1213217 and was performed in collaboration with, among others, C. A. Angell, S. V. Buldyrev, S.-H. Chen, D. Corradini, P. G. Debenedetti, G. Franzese, P. Kumar, E. Lascaris, F. Mallamace, O. Mishima, P. H. Poole, S. Sastry, F. Sciortino, and L. Xu. H. E. Stanley, Editor, Liquid Polymorphism, Vol. 152 in Advances in Chemical Physics, S. A. Rice, Series Editor (Wiley, New York, 2013).

  2. Liquid polymorphism, order-disorder transitions and anomalous behavior: A Monte Carlo study of the Bell-Lavis model for water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, Carlos E.; Szortyka, Marcia M.; Barbosa, Marcia C.; Henriques, Vera B.

    2009-10-01

    The Bell-Lavis model for liquid water is investigated through numerical simulations. The lattice-gas model on a triangular lattice presents orientational states and is known to present a highly bonded low density phase and a loosely bonded high density phase. We show that the model liquid-liquid transition is continuous, in contradiction with mean-field results on the Husimi cactus and from the cluster variational method. We define an order parameter which allows interpretation of the transition as an order-disorder transition of the bond network. Our results indicate that the order-disorder transition is in the Ising universality class. Previous proposal of an Ehrenfest second order transition is discarded. A detailed investigation of anomalous properties has also been undertaken. The line of density maxima in the HDL phase is stabilized by fluctuations, absent in the mean-field solution.

  3. Water: The Strangest Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, Anders

    2009-02-24

    Water, H2O, is familiar to everyone - it shapes our bodies and our planet. But despite its abundance, water has remained a mystery, exhibiting many strange properties that are still not understood. Why does the liquid have an unusually large capacity to store heat? And why is it denser than ice? Now, using the intense X-ray beams from particle accelerators, investigations into water are leading to fundamental discoveries about the structure and arrangement of water molecules. This lecture will elucidate the many mysteries of water and discuss current studies that are revolutionizing the way we see and understand one of the most fundamental substances of life.

  4. The Structure and Dynamics of Monatomic Liquid Polymorphs; Case Studies in Cerium and Germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadien, Adam

    The study of liquid polymorphism is at the frontier of fundamental thermodynamics and materials science. Liquid polymorphism occurs when a single material has multiple structurally unique liquid phases. Water was the first substance suggested to exhibit multiple liquid phases, a number of monatomic semiconductors and metals have been found to exhibit similar characteristics since then. A better understanding of the liquid-liquid phase transition is needed to tackle problems in glass sciences, it is also relevant to geophysical studies of the Earth's core and mantle and has applications in nanotechnology. Computational methods are critical to developing a better understanding of liquids. Through simulation thermodynamic obstacles that hamper experiments can be artificially bypassed, metastable regions outside the equilibrium phase diagram can be accessed and all of the properties of the system are directly recorded. Computationally it is much simpler to iterate over a range of environmental variables such as temperature, pressure and composition, and measure a system's response. In this thesis ab-initio and semi-empirical approximations are used to accurately describe the complex many body interactions that take place in liquids. Two independent case studies of liquid polymorphism are presented here. The first is a stable liquid-liquid phase transition was found to occur in Cerium which was initially discovered through X-Ray diffraction experiments and later confirmed through simulation. This phase transition is predicted to end at a critical point. The second is a comprehensive study of the structure and dynamics of Germanium's many metastable amorphous and liquid phases. This is currently the largest ab-initio based study of the dynamics of Germanium's metastable liquid phases. Methods ranging from the mean square displacement to the van Hove function and intermediate scattering function are introduced and analyzed. The micro-structural characteristics are

  5. Supercooled liquid water Estimation Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-05-04

    The Cloud Supercooled liquid water Estimation Tool (SEET) is a user driven Graphical User Interface (GUI) that estimates cloud supercooled liquid water (SLW) content in terms of vertical column and total mass from Moderate resolution Imaging Supercooled liquid water Estimation Tool Spectroradiometer (MODIS) spatially derived cloud products and realistic vertical cloud parameterizations that are user defined. It also contains functions for post-processing of the resulting data in tabular and graphical form.

  6. Static heterogeneities in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. Eugene; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2004-10-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of water seems to be closely related to static heterogeneities. These static heterogeneities are related to the local structure of water molecules, and when properly characterized, may offer an economical explanation of thermodynamic data. The key feature of liquid water is not so much that the existence of hydrogen bonds, first pointed out by Linus Pauling, but rather the local geometry of the liquid molecules is not spherical or oblong but tetrahedral. In the consideration of static heterogeneities, this local geometry is critical. Recent experiments suggested more than one phase of amorphous solid water, while simulations suggest that one of these phases is metastable with respect to another, so that in fact there are only two stable phases.

  7. Polymorphism in glassy silicon: Inherited from liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Li-Min; Zhang, Xinyu; Qi, Li; Zhang, Suhong; Ma, Mingzhen; Liu, Riping

    2015-02-01

    Combining molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and Voronoi polyhedral analyses, we discussed the microstructure evolution in liquid and glassy silicon during cooling by focusing on the fraction of various clusters. Liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) is detected in supercooled liquid silicon However, freezing the high-density liquid (HDL) to the glassy state is not achieved as the quenching rate goes up to 1014 K/s. The polyamorphism in glassy silicon is found to be mainly associated with low-density liquid (LDL).

  8. Polymorphism in glassy silicon: Inherited from liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled liquid

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Li-Min; Zhang, Xinyu; Qi, Li; Zhang, Suhong; Ma, Mingzhen; Liu, Riping

    2015-01-01

    Combining molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and Voronoi polyhedral analyses, we discussed the microstructure evolution in liquid and glassy silicon during cooling by focusing on the fraction of various clusters. Liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) is detected in supercooled liquid silicon However, freezing the high-density liquid (HDL) to the glassy state is not achieved as the quenching rate goes up to 1014 K/s. The polyamorphism in glassy silicon is found to be mainly associated with low-density liquid (LDL). PMID:25716054

  9. Flow-assisted 2D polymorph selection: stabilizing metastable monolayers at the liquid-solid interface.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shern-Long; Yuan, Zhongyi; Chen, Long; Mali, Kunal S; Müllen, Klaus; De Feyter, Steven

    2014-05-28

    Controlling crystal polymorphism constitutes a formidable challenge in contemporary chemistry. Two-dimensional (2D) crystals often provide model systems to decipher the complications in 3D crystals. In this contribution, we explore a unique way of governing 2D polymorphism at the organic liquid-solid interface. We demonstrate that a directional solvent flow could be used to stabilize crystalline monolayers of a metastable polymorph. Furthermore, flow fields active within the applied flow generate millimeter-sized domains of either polymorph in a controlled and reproducible fashion. PMID:24867142

  10. Spontaneous liquid-liquid phase separation of water.

    PubMed

    Yagasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2014-02-01

    We report a molecular dynamics simulation demonstrating a fast spontaneous liquid-liquid phase separation of water and a subsequent slow crystallization to ice. It is found that supercooled water separates rapidly into low- and high-density domains so as to reduce the surface energy in the rectangular simulation cell at certain thermodynamic states. The liquid-liquid phase separation, which is about two orders of magnitude faster than the crystallization, suggests a possibility to observe this phenomenon experimentally. PMID:25353404

  11. Inhomogeneities of stratocumulus liquid water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert F.; Snider, Jack B.

    1990-01-01

    There is a growing body of observational evidence on inhomogeneous cloud structure, most recently from the extensive measurements of the FIRE field program. Knowledge of cloud structure is important because it strongly influences the cloud radiative properties, one of the major factors in determining the global energy balance. Current atmospheric circulation models use plane-parallel radiation, so that the liquid water in each gridbox is assumed to be uniform, which gives an unrealistically large albedo. In reality cloud liquid water occupies only a subset of each gridbox, greatly reducing the mean albedo. If future climate models are to treat the hydrological cycle in a manner consistent with energy balance, a better treatment of cloud liquid is needed. FIRE concentrated upon two cloud types of special interest: cirrus and marine stratocumulus. Cirrus tend to be high and optically thin, thus reducing the effective radiative temperature without increasing the albedo significantly, leading to an enhanced greenhouse heating. In contrast, marine stratocumulus are low and optically thick, thus producing a large increase in reflected radiation with a small change in emitted radiation, giving a net cooling which could potentially mitigate the expected greenhouse warming. The FIRE measurements in California stratocumulus during June and July of 1987 show variations in cloud liquid water on all scales. Such variations are associated with inhomogeneous entrainment, in which entrained dry air, rather than mixing uniformly with cloudy air, remains intact in blobs of all sizes, which decay only slowly by invasion of cloudy air. Two important stratocumulus observations are described, followed by a simple fractal model which reproduces these properties, and finally, the model radiative properties are discussed.

  12. Liquid Water, the ``Most Complex'' Liquid: New Results in Bulk, Nanoconfined, and Biological Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    2010-03-01

    We will introduce some of the 63 anomalies of the most complex of liquids, water. We will demonstrate some recent progress in understanding these anomalies by combining information provided by recent experiments and simulations on water in bulk, nanoconfined, and biological environments. We will interpret evidence from recent experiments designed to test the hypothesis that liquid water may display ``polymorphism'' in that it can exist in two different phases---and discuss recent work on water's transport anomalies [1] as well as the unusual behavior of water in biological environments [2]. Finally, we will discuss how the general concept of liquid polymorphism [3] is proving useful in understanding anomalies in other liquids, such as silicon, silica, and carbon, as well as metallic glasses, which have in common that they are characterized by two characteristic length scales in their interactions. This work was supported by NSF Chemistry Division, and carried out in collaboration with a number of colleagues, chief among whom are C. A. Angell, M. C. Barbosa, M. C. Bellissent, L. Bosio, F. Bruni, S. V. Buldyrev, M. Canpolat, S. -H. Chen, P. G. Debenedetti, U. Essmann,G. Franzese, A. Geiger, N. Giovambattista, S. Han, P. Kumar, E. La Nave,G. Malescio, F. Mallamace, M. G. Mazza, O. Mishima, P. Netz, P. H. Poole, P. J. Rossky, R. Sadr,S. Sastry, A. Scala, F. Sciortino, A. Skibinsky, F. W. Starr, K. C. Stokely J. Teixeira, L. Xu, and Z. Yan.[4pt] [1] L. Xu, F. Mallamace, Z. Yan, F. W. Starr, S. V. Buldyrev, and H. E. Stanley, ``Appearance of a Fractional Stokes-Einstein Relation in Water and a Structural Interpretation of Its Onset,'' Nature Physics 5, 565--569 (2009). [0pt] [2] P. Kumar, Z. Yan, L. Xu, M. G. Mazza, S. V. Buldyrev, S. -H. Chen. S. Sastry, and H. E. Stanley, ``Glass Transition in Biomolecules and the Liquid-Liquid Critical Point of Water,'' Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 177802 (2006). [0pt] [3] H. E. Stanley, ed. , Liquid Polymorphism [Advances in Chemical Physics

  13. Geomorphologic evidence for liquid water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masson, P.; Carr, M.H.; Costard, F.; Greeley, R.; Hauber, E.; Jaumann, R.

    2001-01-01

    Besides Earth, Mars is the only planet with a record of resurfacing processes and environmental circumstances that indicate the past operation of a hydrologic cycle. However the present-day conditions on Mars are far apart of supporting liquid water on the surface. Although the large-scale morphology of the Martian channels and valleys show remarkable similarities with fluid-eroded features on Earth, there are major differences in their size, small-scale morphology, inner channel structure and source regions indicating that the erosion on Mars has its own characteristic genesis and evolution. The different landforms related to fluvial, glacial and periglacial activities, their relations with volcanism, and the chronology of water-related processes, are presented.

  14. Density Fluctuations in Liquid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, Niall J.; Tse, John S.

    2011-01-01

    The density distributions and fluctuations in grids of varying size in liquid water at ambient pressure, both above the freezing point and in the supercooled state, are analyzed from the trajectories obtained from large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the occurrence of low- and high-density regions (LDL and HDL) is transient and their respective residence times are dependent on the size of the simulated system. The spatial extent of density-density correlation is found to be within 7 Å or less. The temporal existence of LDL and HDL arises as a result of natural density fluctuations of an equilibrium system. The density of bulk water at ambient conditions is homogenous.

  15. Role of water in Protein Aggregation and Amyloid Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Thirumalai, D.; Reddy, Govardhan; Straub, John E.

    2011-01-01

    stage, the peptides align along a preferred axis to form ordered structures with anti-parallel β-strand arrangement. The rate limiting step in the ordered assembly is the rearrangement of the peptides within a confining volume. The mechanism of protofilament formation in a polar peptide fragment from the yeast prion in which the two sheets are packed against each other creating a dry interface illustrates that water dramatically slows down self-assembly. As the sheets approach each other two perfectly ordered one-dimensional water wires, which are stabilized by hydrogen bonds to the amide groups of the polar side chains, results in the formation of long-lived metastable structures. Release of the trapped water from the pore creates a helically-twisted protofilament with a dry interface. Similarly, the driving force for addition of a solvated monomer to a preformed fibril is the release of water whose entropy gain and favorable inter peptide hydrogen bond formation compensates for loss in entropy of the peptides. We suggest that the two-step mechanism, a model also used in protein crystallization, must hold good for higher order amyloid structure formation. In the first step a liquid droplet rich in proteins containing N* structures form. Conformational rearrangement of the peptides leading to an ordered state occurs within the droplet by incorporation of monomers or collision with other droplets and ultimately results in β-amyloid formation. Because there is an ensemble of distinct N* structures with varying water content there must be a number of distinct water-laden polymorphic structures. Evidence for this proposal is presented. Water plays multifarious roles, which in the case of predominantly hydrophobic sequences, accelerates fibril formation. In contrast, water-stabilized metastable intermediates dramatically slow down fibril growth rates in hydrophilic sequences. PMID:21761818

  16. Liquid Water on Early Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Wanda L.; McKay, Christopher P.

    1994-01-01

    We have used a simple climate model to determine the duration of liquid water habitats on early Mars following up on the previous work of McKay and Davis. We used the weathering model of Pollack et al. to compute the pressure and temperature evolution of the atmosphere. We included the variability of the solar luminosity. Recent results which have considered the influence of CO2 condensation suggest that Mars could not have been kept warm (above 0 C) with only a dense CO2 atmosphere. New stellar evolution theories have suggested a more massive early sun to explain the lithium depletion in the sun and predict a warmer climate for early Mars. We have therefore modified the model of McKay and Davis to include the effects of CO2 condensation and the effect of a more massive early sun. Here we present the results of these additional effects on the duration of liquid water habitats on early Mars. We find that the increased luminosity suggested for the early sun when mass loss is taken into account can provide a climate on early Mars that results in fluvial features existing over 500 million years.

  17. The Boson peak in confined water: An experimental investigation of the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-10-01

    The Boson peak (BP) of deeply cooled confined water is studied by using inelastic neutron scattering (INS) in a large interval of the ( P, T) phase plane. By taking into account the different behavior of such a collective vibrational mode in both strong and fragile glasses as well as in glass-forming materials, we were able to determine the Widom line that characterizes supercooled bulk water within the frame of the liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) hypothesis. The peak frequency and width of the BP correlated with the water polymorphism of the LLPT scenario, allowing us to distinguish the "low-density liquid" (LDL) and "high-density liquid" (HDL) phases in deeply cooled bulk water.Moreover, the BP properties afford a further confirmation of theWidom line temperature T W as the ( P, T) locus in which the local structure of water transforms from a predominately LDL form to a predominately HDL form.

  18. Raman lidar observations of cloud liquid water.

    PubMed

    Rizi, Vincenzo; Iarlori, Marco; Rocci, Giuseppe; Visconti, Guido

    2004-12-10

    We report the design and the performances of a Raman lidar for long-term monitoring of tropospheric aerosol backscattering and extinction coefficients, water vapor mixing ratio, and cloud liquid water. We focus on the system's capabilities of detecting Raman backscattering from cloud liquid water. After describing the system components, along with the current limitations and options for improvement, we report examples of observations in the case of low-level cumulus clouds. The measurements of the cloud liquid water content, as well as the estimations of the cloud droplet effective radii and number densities, obtained by combining the extinction coefficient and cloud water content within the clouds, are critically discussed. PMID:15617280

  19. Water flow and fin shape polymorphism in coral reef fishes.

    PubMed

    Binning, Sandra A; Roche, Dominique G

    2015-03-01

    Water flow gradients have been linked to phenotypic differences and swimming performance across a variety of fish assemblages. However, the extent to which water motion shapes patterns of phenotypic divergence within species remains unknown. We tested the generality of the functional relationship between swimming morphology and water flow by exploring the extent of fin and body shape polymorphism in 12 widespread species from three families (Acanthuridae, Labridae, Pomacentridae) of pectoral-fin swimming (labriform) fishes living across localized wave exposure gradients. The pectoral fin shape of Labridae and Acanthuridae species was strongly related to wave exposure: individuals with more tapered, higher aspect ratio (AR) fins were found on windward reef crests, whereas individuals with rounder, lower AR fins were found on leeward, sheltered reefs. Three of seven Pomacentridae species showed similar trends, and pectoral fin shape was also strongly related to wave exposure in pomacentrids when fin aspect ratios of three species were compared across flow habitats at very small spatial scales (<100 m) along a reef profile (reef slope, crest, and back lagoon). Unlike fin shape, there were no intraspecific differences in fish body fineless ratio across habitats or depths. Contrary to our predictions, there was no pattern relating species' abundances to polymorphism across habitats (i.e., abundance was not higher at sites where morphology is better adapted to the environment). This suggests that there are behavioral and/or physiological mechanisms enabling some species to persist across flow habitats in the absence of morphological differences. We suggest that functional relationships between swimming morphology and water flow not only structure species assemblages, but are yet another important variable contributing to phenotypic differences within species. The close links between fin shape polymorphism and local water flow conditions appear to be important for

  20. Dipolar correlations in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Cui; Galli, Giulia

    2014-08-28

    We present an analysis of the dipolar correlations in water as a function of temperature and density and in the presence of simple ionic solutes, carried out using molecular dynamics simulations and empirical potentials. We show that the dipole-dipole correlation function of the liquid exhibits sizable oscillations over nanodomains of about 1.5 nm radius, with several isosbestic points as a function of temperature; the size of the nanodomains is nearly independent on temperature and density, between 240 and 400 K and 0.9 and 1.3 g/cm{sup 3}, but it is substantially affected by the presence of solvated ions. In the same range of thermodynamic conditions, the decay time (τ) of the system dipole moment varies by a factor of about 30 and 1.5, as a function of temperature and density, respectively. At 300 K, we observed a maximum in τ as a function of density, and a corresponding shallow maximum in the tetrahedral order parameter, in a range where the diffusion coefficient, the pressure and the dielectric constant increase monotonically.

  1. Comment on "Spontaneous liquid-liquid phase separation of water".

    PubMed

    Limmer, David T; Chandler, David

    2015-01-01

    Yagasaki et al. [Phys. Rev. E 89, 020301 (2014)] present results from a molecular dynamics trajectory illustrating coarsening of ice, which they interpret as evidence of transient coexistence between two distinct supercooled phases of liquid water. We point out that neither two distinct liquids nor criticality are demonstrated in this simulation study. Instead, the illustrated trajectory is consistent with coarsening behaviors analyzed and predicted in earlier work by others. PMID:25679744

  2. Photoresponsive liquid marbles and dry water.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tristan Tsai Yuan; Ahsan, Aniq; Reithofer, Michael R; Tay, Siok Wei; Tan, Sze Yu; Hor, Tzi Sum Andy; Chin, Jia Min; Chew, Benny Kia Jia; Wang, Xiaobai

    2014-04-01

    Stimuli-responsive liquid marbles for controlled release typically rely on organic moieties that require lengthy syntheses. We report herein a facile, one-step synthesis of hydrophobic and oleophobic TiO2 nanoparticles that display photoresponsive wettability. Water liquid marbles stabilized by these photoresponsive TiO2 particles were found to be stable when shielded from ultraviolet (UV) radiation; however, they quickly collapsed after being irradiated with 302 nm UV light. Oil- and organic-solvent-based liquid marbles could also be fabricated using oleophobic TiO2 nanoparticles and show similar UV-induced collapse. Finally, we demonstrated the formation of the micronized form of water liquid marbles, also known as dry water, by homogenization of the TiO2 nanoparticles with water. The TiO2 dry water displayed a similar photoresponse, whereby the micronized liquid marbles collapsed after irradiation and the dry water turned from a free-flowing powder to a paste. Hence, by exploiting the photoresponsive wettability of TiO2, we fabricated liquid marbles and dry water that display photoresponse and studied the conditions required for their collapse. PMID:24617527

  3. Application of ionic liquid to polymorphic transformation of anti-viral/HIV drug adefovir dipivoxil.

    PubMed

    An, Ji-Hun; Jin, Feng; Kim, Hak Sung; Ryu, Hyung Chul; Kim, Jae Sun; Kim, Hyuk Min; Kiyonga, Alice Nguvoko; Min, Dong Sun; Youn, Wonno; Kim, Ki Hyun; Jung, Kiwon

    2016-05-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are defined as salts with a melting point below 100 °C. ILs have received increasing attention as new alternative to organic solvents because of their unique physicochemical properties. Therefore, this study was conducted in the purpose to present the efficacy of ILs as new solvents capable to control the Polymorphic transformation phenomenon. Here, the polymorphic transformation phenomenon of adefovir dipivoxil, an efficient antiviral active pharmaceutical ingredient on human immunodeficiency virus, was investigated. The phase transformation phenomenon from the metastable polymorph, new form (NF) to the stable polymorph, Form-X in 1-allyl-3-ethylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (AEImBF4) and 1-butyl-2,3-dimethylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BDMImBF4) ILs solutions was observed utilizing the solvent-mediated phase transformation method The thermodynamic factors, AEImBF4/BDMImBF4 solvent composition ratio of 3:7-6:4 and the temperature in range of 25-100 °C, as well as the dynamic factor, the rational speed in range of 300-1000 rpm were parameters studied in this experiment. The thermodynamic and dynamic equations involving nucleation and mass transfer were applied for the quantitative analysis. The result of the present study confirmed the use of ILs as substitute solvent for volatile organic solvents, and demonstrated the efficacy of ILs as potential solvent-media to control the polymorphic transformation. PMID:26908332

  4. Evidence for Liquid Water on Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, Robert; Hoover, Richard

    2005-01-01

    We have reexamined the arguments for the existence of liquid water on comets, and believe that recent cometary flybys along with pre-Giotto data support its presence on short-period comets. Liquid water would affect cometary dynamics, leaving distinct signatures in precession, orbital dynamics, and potential splitting of comets. Liquid water geysers would affect cometary atmosphere, dust evolution, and non-gravitational forces that perturb the orbit. Liquid water would affect the composition of both the interior and exterior of the comet, producing geologic effects consistent with recent flyby photographs. And most importantly, liquid water suppork the growth of lifeforms, which would make a comet a biofriendly incubator for interplanetary transport. The major objection against liquid water is the necessity of a pressure vessel to prevent sublimation into space. We discuss how such a pressure vessel could naturally evolve as a pristine comet makes its first journey inside the orbit of Mars, and suggest that this type of vessel was observed by Giotto, Deep Space I, and Stardust.

  5. Polymorphic transitions in n-hydrocarbon-water and n-alcohol-water binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirgorod, Yu. A.

    2014-08-01

    The mixing of hydrocarbons and alcohols in an excess of water is explained by polymorphic transitions similar to crystallization in an ensemble of water clusters. Enthalpies of transitions of 4.90 ± 0.07 and 2.2 ± 0.3 kJ/mol are obtained for solutions of hydrocarbons and alcohols in an excess of water, respectively. It is concluded that the mixing of water in an excess of hydrocarbons and alcohols is similar to evaporation (the breaking of H-bonds) with an enthalpy of 34 ± 1.4 kJ/mol. It is established that a polymorphic transition occurs between two binodals, and is accompanied by the emergence of microphases (concentration fluctuations) of alcohols in water. Binodals and spinodals in an excess of water and alcohol coincide for butyl and other higher alcohols.

  6. Spin-liquid polymorphism in a correlated electron system on the threshold of superconductivity

    PubMed Central

    Zaliznyak, Igor; Savici, Andrei T.; Lumsden, Mark; Tsvelik, Alexei; Hu, Rongwei; Petrovic, Cedomir

    2015-01-01

    We report neutron scattering measurements which reveal spin-liquid polymorphism in an “11” iron chalcogenide superconductor. It occurs when a poorly metallic magnetic state of FeTe is tuned toward superconductivity by substitution of a small amount of tellurium with isoelectronic sulfur. We observe a liquid-like magnetic response, which is described by the coexistence of two disordered magnetic phases with different local structures whose relative abundance depends on temperature. One is the ferromagnetic (FM) plaquette phase observed in undoped, nonsuperconducting FeTe, which preserves the C4 symmetry of the underlying square lattice and is favored at high temperatures, whereas the other is the antiferromagnetic plaquette phase with broken C4 symmetry, which emerges with doping and is predominant at low temperatures. These findings suggest the coexistence of and competition between two distinct liquid states, and a liquid–liquid phase transformation between these states, in the electronic spin system of FeTe1−x(S,Se)x. We have thus discovered the remarkable physics of competing spin-liquid polymorphs in a correlated electron system approaching superconductivity. Our results facilitate an understanding of large swaths of recent experimental data in unconventional superconductors. In particular, the phase with lower C2 local symmetry, whose emergence precedes superconductivity, naturally accounts for a propensity for forming electronic nematic states which have been observed experimentally, in cuprate and iron-based superconductors alike. PMID:26240327

  7. Properties of Water Confined in Ionic Liquids

    PubMed Central

    Saihara, Koji; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Ohta, Soichi; Shimizu, Akio

    2015-01-01

    The varying states of water confined in the nano-domain structures of typical room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) were investigated by 1H NMR and by measurements of self-diffusion coefficients while systematically varying the IL cations and anions. The NMR peaks for water in BF4-based ILs were clearly split, indicating the presence of two discrete states of confined water (H2O and HOD). Proton and/or deuterium exchange rate among the water molecules was very slowly in the water-pocket. Notably, no significant changes were observed in the chemical shifts of the ILs. Self-diffusion coefficient results showed that water molecules exhibit a similar degree of mobility, although their diffusion rate is one order of magnitude faster than that of the IL cations and anions. These findings provide information on a completely new type of confinement, that of liquid water in soft matter. PMID:26024339

  8. Liquid chromatographic determination of water

    DOEpatents

    Fortier, N.E.; Fritz, J.S.

    1990-11-13

    A sensitive method for the determination of water in the presence of common interferences is presented. The detection system is based on the effect of water on the equilibrium which results from the reaction aryl aldehydes, such as cinnamaldehyde and methanol in the eluent to form cinnamaldehyde dimethylacetal, plus water. This equilibrium is shifted in a catalytic atmosphere of a hydrogen ion form past column reactor. The extent of the shift and the resulting change in absorbance are proportional to the amount of water present. 1 fig.

  9. Liquid chromatographic determination of water

    DOEpatents

    Fortier, Nancy E.; Fritz, James S.

    1990-11-13

    A sensitive method for the determination of water in the presence of common interferences is presented. The detection system is based on the effect of water on the equilibrium which results from the reaction aryl aldehydes, such as cinnamaldehyde and methanol in the eluent to form cinnamaldehyde dimethylacetal, plus water. This equilibrium is shifted in a catalytic atmosphere of a hydrogen ion form past column reactor. The extent of the shift and the resulting change in absorbance are proportional to the amount of water present.

  10. Liquid Water Oceans in Ice Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiktorowicz, Sloane J.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2007-01-01

    Aptly named, ice giants such as Uranus and Neptune contain significant amounts of water. While this water cannot be present near the cloud tops, it must be abundant in the deep interior. We investigate the likelihood of a liquid water ocean existing in the hydrogen-rich region between the cloud tops and deep interior. Starting from an assumed temperature at a given upper tropospheric pressure (the photosphere), we follow a moist adiabat downward. The mixing ratio of water to hydrogen in the gas phase is small in the photosphere and increases with depth. The mixing ratio in the condensed phase is near unity in the photosphere and decreases with depth; this gives two possible outcomes. If at some pressure level the mixing ratio of water in the gas phase is equal to that in the deep interior, then that level is the cloud base. The gas below the cloud base has constant mixing ratio. Alternately, if the mixing ratio of water in the condensed phase reaches that in the deep interior, then the surface of a liquid ocean will occur. Below this ocean surface, the mixing ratio of water will be constant. A cloud base occurs when the photospheric temperature is high. For a family of ice giants with different photospheric temperatures, the cooler ice giants will have warmer cloud bases. For an ice giant with a cool enough photospheric temperature, the cloud base will exist at the critical temperature. For still cooler ice giants, ocean surfaces will result. A high mixing ratio of water in the deep interior favors a liquid ocean. We find that Neptune is both too warm (photospheric temperature too high) and too dry (mixing ratio of water in the deep interior too low) for liquid oceans to exist at present. To have a liquid ocean, Neptune s deep interior water to gas ratio would have to be higher than current models allow, and the density at 19 kbar would have to be approx. equal to 0.8 g/cu cm. Such a high density is inconsistent with gravitational data obtained during the Voyager

  11. Water Contaminant Mitigation in Ionic Liquid Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conroy, David; Ziemer, John

    2009-01-01

    Appropriate system and operational requirements are needed in order to ensure mission success without unnecessary cost. Purity requirements applied to thruster propellants may flow down to materials and operations as well as the propellant preparation itself. Colloid electrospray thrusters function by applying a large potential to a room temperature liquid propellant (such as an ionic liquid), inducing formation of a Taylor cone. Ions and droplets are ejected from the Taylor cone and accelerated through a strong electric field. Electrospray thrusters are highly efficient, precise, scaleable, and demonstrate low thrust noise. Ionic liquid propellants have excellent properties for use as electrospray propellants, but can be hampered by impurities, owing to their solvent capabilities. Of foremost concern is the water content, which can result from exposure to atmosphere. Even hydrophobic ionic liquids have been shown to absorb water from the air. In order to mitigate the risks of bubble formation in feed systems caused by water content of the ionic liquid propellant, physical properties of the ionic liquid EMI-Im are analyzed. The effects of surface tension, material wetting, physisorption, and geometric details of the flow manifold and electrospray emitters are explored. Results are compared to laboratory test data.

  12. Water: A Tale of Two Liquids.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Paola; Amann-Winkel, Katrin; Angell, Charles Austen; Anisimov, Mikhail Alexeevich; Caupin, Frédéric; Chakravarty, Charusita; Lascaris, Erik; Loerting, Thomas; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Zois; Russo, John; Sellberg, Jonas Alexander; Stanley, Harry Eugene; Tanaka, Hajime; Vega, Carlos; Xu, Limei; Pettersson, Lars Gunnar Moody

    2016-07-13

    Water is the most abundant liquid on earth and also the substance with the largest number of anomalies in its properties. It is a prerequisite for life and as such a most important subject of current research in chemical physics and physical chemistry. In spite of its simplicity as a liquid, it has an enormously rich phase diagram where different types of ices, amorphous phases, and anomalies disclose a path that points to unique thermodynamics of its supercooled liquid state that still hides many unraveled secrets. In this review we describe the behavior of water in the regime from ambient conditions to the deeply supercooled region. The review describes simulations and experiments on this anomalous liquid. Several scenarios have been proposed to explain the anomalous properties that become strongly enhanced in the supercooled region. Among those, the second critical-point scenario has been investigated extensively, and at present most experimental evidence point to this scenario. Starting from very low temperatures, a coexistence line between a high-density amorphous phase and a low-density amorphous phase would continue in a coexistence line between a high-density and a low-density liquid phase terminating in a liquid-liquid critical point, LLCP. On approaching this LLCP from the one-phase region, a crossover in thermodynamics and dynamics can be found. This is discussed based on a picture of a temperature-dependent balance between a high-density liquid and a low-density liquid favored by, respectively, entropy and enthalpy, leading to a consistent picture of the thermodynamics of bulk water. Ice nucleation is also discussed, since this is what severely impedes experimental investigation of the vicinity of the proposed LLCP. Experimental investigation of stretched water, i.e., water at negative pressure, gives access to a different regime of the complex water diagram. Different ways to inhibit crystallization through confinement and aqueous solutions are

  13. Water is a molecular liquid.

    PubMed

    Newman, Timothy

    2014-06-01

    Science and society are failing to grapple with the public health burden of cancer. In this short perspective piece, I contrast reductionism and complexity in cancer research, using water as a simple example, arguing for more 'ecological' approaches to cancer. This is a call to arms to physical scientists, ecologists and others to get involved, to link up with cancer clinicians and cancer biologists, and an appeal to funding agencies to link up across disciplines to make a difference. PMID:24732704

  14. Detection of prion gene promoter and intron1 indel polymorphisms in Anatolian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Oztabak, K; Ozkan, E; Soysal, I; Paya, I; Un, C

    2009-12-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a fatal disease caused by miss folded prion protein. Studies in the cattle, comparing genetic data from BSE diseased and healthy animals have shown that indel polymorphisms in the promoter and intron 1 of PRNP gene were associated with disease susceptibility. Several studies were conducted to find out allele and genotypic frequencies of indel polymorphisms in promoter and intron 1 of the cattle PRNP gene. Unlike domestic cattle and bison, no indel polymorphisms of the PRNP promoter and intron 1 were examined in any population of the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). Aim of this study was to analyse frequencies of allele, genotype, and haplotype of the indel polymorphisms (23 bp indel in promoter and 12 bp indel in intron 1) in prion protein coding gene (PRNP) of water buffalo. Therefore a PCR based procedure, previously used in cattle to detect indel polymorphisms of PRNP promoter and intron 1 locus, was applied to 106 Anatolian water buffalo DNAs. Our results have revealed high frequency of in variants and in23/in12 haplotype for PRNP promoter and intron 1 indel polymorphisms in water buffalo. The results of the study have demonstrated that frequencies of allele, genotype, and haplotype of the indel polymorphisms in PRNP gene of the Anatolian water buffalo are significantly different those from cattle and bison PRNP indel polymorphisms. PMID:19912420

  15. Water is a molecular liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Timothy

    2014-06-01

    Science and society are failing to grapple with the public health burden of cancer. In this short perspective piece, I contrast reductionism and complexity in cancer research, using water as a simple example, arguing for more ‘ecological’ approaches to cancer. This is a call to arms to physical scientists, ecologists and others to get involved, to link up with cancer clinicians and cancer biologists, and an appeal to funding agencies to link up across disciplines to make a difference. This perspective is dedicated to the memory of Dr Kenneth Mossman (1946-2014).

  16. Liquid-liquid phase transitions and water-like anomalies in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascaris, Erik

    In this thesis we employ computer simulations and statistical physics to understand the origin of liquid-liquid phase transitions and their relationship with anomalies typical of liquid water. Compared with other liquids, water has many anomalies. For example the density anomaly: when water is cooled below 4 °C the density decreases rather than increases. This and other anomalies have also been found to occur in a few other one-component liquids, sometimes in conjunction with the existence of a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) between a low-density liquid (LDL) and a high-density liquid (HDL). Using simple models we explain how these anomalies arise from the presence of two competing length scales. As a specific example we investigate the cut ramp potential, where we show the importance of "competition" in this context, and how one length scale can sometimes be zero. When there is a clear energetic preference for either LDL or HDL for all pressures and temperatures, then there is insufficient competition between the two liquid structures and no anomalies occur. From the simple models it also follows that anomalies can occur without the presence of a LLPT and vice versa. It remains therefore unclear if water has a LLPT that ends in a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP), a hypothesis that was first proposed based on simulations of the ST2 water model. We confirm the existence of a LLCP in this model using finite size scaling and the Challa-Landau-Binder parameter, and show that the LLPT is not a liquid-crystal transition, as has recently been suggested. Previous research has indicated the possible existence of a LLCP in liquid silica. We perform a detailed analysis of two different silica models (WAC and BKS) at temperatures much lower than was previously simulated. Within the accessible temperature range we find no LLCP in either model, although in the case of WAC potential it is closely approached. We compare our results with those obtained for other

  17. Spin-liquid polymorphism in an underdoped iron-chalcogenide superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaliznyak, Igor; Savici, Andrei; Lumsden, Mark; Tsvelik, Alexei; Hu, Rongwei; Petrovic, Cedomir

    We report neutron scattering measurements which reveal spin-liquid polymorphism in an ``11'' iron chalcogenide superconductor. It occurs when a poorly metallic magnetic state of FeTe is driven toward superconductivity by substitution of a small amount of tellurium with isoelectronic sulfur. We observe a liquid-like magnetic response, which is described by the coexistence of two disordered magnetic phases with different local structures whose relative abundance depends on temperature. One is the ferromagnetic (FM) plaquette phase observed in undoped, nonsuperconducting FeTe, which preserves the C4 symmetry of the underlying square lattice and is favored at high temperatures, whereas the other is the antiferromagnetic plaquette phase with broken C4 symmetry, which emerges with doping and is predominant at low temperatures. These findings suggest the coexistence of and competition between two distinct liquid states, and a liquid-liquid phase transformation between these states, in the electronic spin system of FeTe1-x(S,Se)x. Our results shed light on many recent experimental data in unconventional superconductors. The phase with lower, C2 local symmetry, whose emergence precedes superconductivity, naturally accounts for a propensity to electronic nematic states. Work at BNL is supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US DOE, under Contract DE-SC00112704.

  18. Water in Olivine and its High-Pressure Polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S. M.; Jacobsen, S. D.; Bina, C. R.; Reichart, P.; Moser, M.; Dollinger, G.; Hauri, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    Theory and high-pressure experiments imply a significant water storage capacity of nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs), such as olivine, wadsleyite and ringwoodite, composing the Earth's upper mantle and transition zone to a depth of 660 km. The presence of water, dissolved as OH into such nominally anhydrous high-pressure silicates, notably influences phase relations, melting behavior, conductivity, elasticity, viscosity and rheology. The first direct evidence for hydration of the transition zone has recently been reported by Pearson et al. (2014) and Schmandt et al. (2014). Knowledge of absolute water contents in NAMs is essential for modeling the Earth's interior water cycle. To take advantage of IR spectroscopy as highly sensitive water quantification tool, mineral-specific absorption coefficients are required. Such calibration constants can be derived from hydrogen concentrations determined by independent techniques, such as secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), Raman spectroscopy or proton-proton(pp)-scattering. Broad beam pp-scattering has been performed on double-polished mm-sized mineral platelets (Thomas et al. 2008), but until recently analysis was not feasible for smaller samples synthetized in high-pressure apparati. Here we present first results from pp-scattering microscopy studies on μm-sized single crystals of hydrous olivine, wadsleyite and ringwoodite, which were synthesized at various pressure-temperature conditions in a multi-anvil press. The method allows us to quantify 3D distributions of atomic hydrogen in μm dimensions. These self-calibrating measurements were carried out at the nuclear microprobe SNAKE at the Munich tandem accelerator lab using a 25 MeV proton microbeam. We provide hydrogen depth-profiles, hydrogen maps and H2O concentrations. Pp-scattering data and results from independent Raman and SIMS analyses are in good agreement. Water contents for a set of high-pressure polymorphs with varying Fe-concentrations range from 0

  19. Vapor deposition of water on graphitic surfaces: Formation of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Lupi, Laura; Kastelowitz, Noah; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-11-14

    Carbonaceous surfaces are a major source of atmospheric particles and could play an important role in the formation of ice. Here we investigate through molecular simulations the stability, metastability, and molecular pathways of deposition of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, and ice I from water vapor on graphitic and atomless Lennard-Jones surfaces as a function of temperature. We find that bilayer ice is the most stable ice polymorph for small cluster sizes, nevertheless it can grow metastable well above its region of thermodynamic stability. In agreement with experiments, the simulations predict that on increasing temperature the outcome of water deposition is amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water. The deposition nucleation of bilayer ice and ice I is preceded by the formation of small liquid clusters, which have two wetting states: bilayer pancake-like (wetting) at small cluster size and droplet-like (non-wetting) at larger cluster size. The wetting state of liquid clusters determines which ice polymorph is nucleated: bilayer ice nucleates from wetting bilayer liquid clusters and ice I from non-wetting liquid clusters. The maximum temperature for nucleation of bilayer ice on flat surfaces, T{sub B}{sup max} is given by the maximum temperature for which liquid water clusters reach the equilibrium melting line of bilayer ice as wetting bilayer clusters. Increasing water-surface attraction stabilizes the pancake-like wetting state of liquid clusters leading to larger T{sub B}{sup max} for the flat non-hydrogen bonding surfaces of this study. The findings of this study should be of relevance for the understanding of ice formation by deposition mode on carbonaceous atmospheric particles, including soot.

  20. Theory of water and charged liquid bridges.

    PubMed

    Morawetz, K

    2012-08-01

    The phenomenon of liquid bridge formation due to an applied electric field is investigated. A solution of a charged catenary is presented, which allows one to determine the static and dynamical stability conditions where charged liquid bridges are possible. The creeping height, the bridge radius and length, as well as the shape of the bridge are calculated showing an asymmetric profile, in agreement with observations. The flow profile is calculated from the Navier-Stokes equation leading to a mean velocity, which combines charge transport with neutral mass flow and which describes recent experiments on water bridges. PMID:23005849

  1. The Dipole Polarizability of a Water Molecule in Liquid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Distasio, Robert; Maitra, Rahul

    The dipole polarizability, α, provides a measure of the tendency of a molecule or material to deform (or polarize) in the presence of an electric field. Within the framework of density functional theory (DFT), we present a hierarchy of first principles based approaches for computing α of a molecule located in the condensed phase. This hierarchy includes a successive treatment of both short-range (hybridization, Pauli exchange-repulsion, etc.) and long-range (Coulomb) electrodynamical response screening in the computation of α, while simultaneously accounting for the surrounding condensed-phase environment. Utilizing highly accurate liquid water configurations generated from van der Waals inclusive hybrid DFT based ab initio molecular dynamics, we computed α for a given water molecule in liquid water as a first application of this approach. Our findings will be compared and contrasted with α computed for an isolated gas-phase water molecule.

  2. Liquid Hot Water Pretreatment of Cellulosic Biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngmi; Hendrickson, Rick; Mosier, Nathan S.; Ladisch, Michael R.

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an abundant and renewable resource for fuel ethanol production. However, the lignocellulose is recalcitrant to enzymatic hydrolysis because of its structural complexity. Controlled-pH liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatment of cellulosic feedstock improves its enzymatic digestibility by removing hemicellulose and making the cellulose more accessible to cellulase enzymes. The removed hemicellulose is solubilized in the liquid phase of the pretreated feedstock as oligosaccharides. Formation of monomeric sugars during the LHW pretreatment is minimal. The LHW pretreatment is carried out by cooking the feedstock in process water at temperatures between 160 and 190°C and at a pH of 4-7. No additional chemicals are needed. This chapter presents the detailed procedure of the LHW pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass.

  3. Hydrogen-bond kinetics in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzar, Alenka; Chandler, David

    1996-01-01

    HYDROGEN bonds play a crucial role in the behaviour of water1-4 their spatial patterns and fluctuations characterize the structure and dynamics of the liquid5-7. The processes of breaking and making hydrogen bonds in the condensed phase can be probed indirectly by a variety of experimental techniques8, and more quantitative information can be obtained from computer simulations9. In particular, simulations have revealed that on long timescales the relaxation behaviour of hydrogen bonds in liquid water exhibit non-exponential kinetics7,10-13, suggesting that bond making and breaking are not simple processes characterized by well defined rate constants. Here we show that these kinetics can be understood in terms of an interplay between diffusion and hydrogen-bond dynamics. In our model, which can be extended to other hydrogen-bonded liquids, diffusion governs whether a specific pair of water molecules are near neighbours, and hydrogen bonds between such pairs form and persist at random with average lifetimes determined by rate constants for bond making and breaking.

  4. Liquid water habitats on early Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, Christopher P.; Davis, Wanda L.

    1992-01-01

    Although the Viking results may indicate that Mars has no life today, the possibility exists that Mars may hold the best record of the events that led to the origin of life. There is direct geomorphological evidence that in the past Mars had large amounts of liquid water on its surface. Atmospheric models would suggest that this early period of hydrological activity was due to the presence of a thick atmosphere and the resulting warmer temperatures. From a biological perspective the existence of liquid water by itself motivates the question of the origin of life on Mars. From studies of the Earth's earliest biosphere, we know that by 3.5 Gyr ago life had originated on Earth and reached a fair degree of biological sophistication. Surface activity and erosion on Earth make it difficult to trace the history of life before the 3.5 Gyr timeframe. If Mars did maintain a clement environment for longer than it took for life to originate on Earth, then the question of the origin of life on Mars follows naturally. Based upon simple models of the evolution of the Martian climate, we divide the history of liquid water habitats on the Martian surface into four epochs based upon the atmospheric temperature and pressure.

  5. Liquid water and active resurfacing on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squyres, S. W.; Reynolds, R. T.; Cassen, P. M.; Peale, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    Arguments for recent resurfacing of Europa by H2O from a liquid layer are presented, based on new interpretations of recent spacecraft and earth-based observations and revised theoretical calculations. The heat flow in the core and shell due to tidal forces is discussed, and considerations of viscosity and convection in the interior are found to imply water retention in the outer 60 km or so of the silicates, forming a layer of water/ice many tens of km thick. The outer ice crust is considered to be too thin to support heat transport rates sufficient to freeze the underlying water. Observational evidence for the calculations would consist of an insulating layer of frosts derived from water boiling up between cracks in the surface crust. Evidence for the existence of such a frost layer, including the photometric function of Europa and the deposits of sulfur on the trailing hemisphere, is discussed.

  6. Glass polymorphism in glycerol–water mixtures: II. Experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Bachler, Johannes; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Jahn, David A.; Wong, Jessina; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    We report a detailed experimental study of (i) pressure-induced transformations in glycerol–water mixtures at T = 77 K and P = 0–1.8 GPa, and (ii) heating-induced transformations of glycerol–water mixtures recovered at 1 atm and T = 77 K. Our samples are prepared by cooling the solutions at ambient pressure at various cooling rates (100 K s–1–10 K h–1) and for the whole range of glycerol mole fractions, χ g. Depending on concentration and cooling rates, cooling leads to samples containing amorphous ice (χ g ≥ 0.20), ice (χ g ≤ 0.32), and/or “distorted ice” (0 < χ g ≤ 0.38). Upon compression, we find that (a) fully vitrified samples at χ g ≥ 0.20 do not show glass polymorphism, in agreement with previous works; (b) samples containing ice show pressure-induced amorphization (PIA) leading to the formation of high-density amorphous ice (HDA). PIA of ice domains within the glycerol–water mixtures is shown to be possible only up to χ g ≈ 0.32 (T = 77 K). This is rather surprising since it has been known that at χ g < 0.38, cooling leads to phase-separated samples with ice and maximally freeze-concentrated solution of χ g ≈ 0.38. Accordingly, in the range 0.32 < χ g < 0.38, we suggest that the water domains freeze into an interfacial ice, i.e., a highly-distorted form of layered ice, which is unable to transform to HDA upon compression. Upon heating samples recovered at 1 atm, we observe a rich phase behavior. Differential scanning calorimetry indicates that only at χ g ≤ 0.15, the water domains within the sample exhibit polyamorphism, i.e., the HDA-to-LDA (low-density amorphous ice) transformation. At 0.15 < χ g ≤ 0.38, samples contain ice, interfacial ice, and/or HDA domains. All samples (χ g ≤ 0.38) show: the crystallization of amorphous ice domains, followed by the glass transition of the vitrified glycerol–water domains and, finally, the melting of ice at high temperatures. Our work exemplifies the complex

  7. Glass polymorphism in glycerol-water mixtures: II. Experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Bachler, Johannes; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Jahn, David A; Wong, Jessina; Giovambattista, Nicolas; Loerting, Thomas

    2016-04-20

    We report a detailed experimental study of (i) pressure-induced transformations in glycerol-water mixtures at T = 77 K and P = 0-1.8 GPa, and (ii) heating-induced transformations of glycerol-water mixtures recovered at 1 atm and T = 77 K. Our samples are prepared by cooling the solutions at ambient pressure at various cooling rates (100 K s(-1)-10 K h(-1)) and for the whole range of glycerol mole fractions, χg. Depending on concentration and cooling rates, cooling leads to samples containing amorphous ice (χg ≥ 0.20), ice (χg ≤ 0.32), and/or "distorted ice" (0 < χg ≤ 0.38). Upon compression, we find that (a) fully vitrified samples at χg ≥ 0.20 do not show glass polymorphism, in agreement with previous works; (b) samples containing ice show pressure-induced amorphization (PIA) leading to the formation of high-density amorphous ice (HDA). PIA of ice domains within the glycerol-water mixtures is shown to be possible only up to χg ≈ 0.32 (T = 77 K). This is rather surprising since it has been known that at χg < 0.38, cooling leads to phase-separated samples with ice and maximally freeze-concentrated solution of χg ≈ 0.38. Accordingly, in the range 0.32 < χg < 0.38, we suggest that the water domains freeze into an interfacial ice, i.e., a highly-distorted form of layered ice, which is unable to transform to HDA upon compression. Upon heating samples recovered at 1 atm, we observe a rich phase behavior. Differential scanning calorimetry indicates that only at χg ≤ 0.15, the water domains within the sample exhibit polyamorphism, i.e., the HDA-to-LDA (low-density amorphous ice) transformation. At 0.15 < χg ≤ 0.38, samples contain ice, interfacial ice, and/or HDA domains. All samples (χg ≤ 0.38) show: the crystallization of amorphous ice domains, followed by the glass transition of the vitrified glycerol-water domains and, finally, the melting of ice at high temperatures. Our work exemplifies the complex "phase" behavior of glassy binary

  8. Water in Room Temperature Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayer, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (or RTILs, salts with a melting point below 25 °C) have become a subject of intense study over the last several decades. Currently, RTIL application research includes synthesis, batteries, solar cells, crystallization, drug delivery, and optics. RTILs are often composed of an inorganic anion paired with an asymmetric organic cation which contains one or more pendant alkyl chains. The asymmetry of the cation frustrates crystallization, causing the salt's melting point to drop significantly. In general, RTILs are very hygroscopic, and therefore, it is of interest to examine the influence of water on RTIL structure and dynamics. In addition, in contrast to normal aqueous salt solutions, which crystallize at low water concentration, in an RTIL it is possible to examine isolated water molecules interacting with ions but not with other water molecules. Here, optical heterodyne-detected optical Kerr effect (OHD-OKE) measurements of orientational relaxation on a series of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate RTILs as a function of chain length and water concentration are presented. The addition of water to the longer alkyl chain RTILs causes the emergence of a long time bi-exponential orientational anisotropy decay. Such decays have not been seen previously in OHD-OKE experiments on any type of liquid and are analyzed here using a wobbling-in-a-cone model. The orientational relaxation is not hydrodynamic, with the slowest relaxation component becoming slower as the viscosity decreases for the longest chain, highest water content samples. The dynamics of isolated D2O molecules in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BmImPF6) were examined using two dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy. Spectral diffusion and incoherent and coherent transfer of excitation between the symmetric and antisymmetric modes are examined. The coherent transfer experiments are used to address the nature of inhomogeneous

  9. Liquid and glass polymorphism in a monatomic system with isotropic, smooth pair interactions.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Joel Y; Buldyrev, Sergey V; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2011-12-01

    Systems of particles with interactions given by the Jagla core-softened pair potential are known to exhibit water-like thermodynamic anomalies and a liquid-liquid phase transition. The drawback of the Jagla potential is that it is characterized by discontinuous forces acting between particles and thus is not suitable for standard molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Here we introduce a smooth version of the Jagla potential based on two Fermi distributions and study the properties of a system of particles interacting via this new "Fermi-Jagla" pair potential by using standard MD simulations. We find that the liquid based on the Fermi-Jagla potential retains most of the properties of the liquid based on the original Jagla potential. Namely, it exhibits the following water-like anomalies: (i) decrease of density, (ii) increase of compressibility, κ(T)(T,P), and (iii) increase of isobaric specific heat, C(P)(T,P), upon isobaric cooling, and (iv) increase of diffusivity upon isothermal compression. The Fermi-Jagla potential also exhibits (i') density minima, (ii') compressibility minima, (iii') isobaric specific heat minima upon isobaric cooling, and (iv') diffusivity minima upon isothermal compression. As in the Jagla model case, we find a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) and a liquid-liquid critical point in the equilibrium liquid. Contrary to the case of the original Jagla model liquid, the LLPT line for the Fermi-Jagla potential has a negative slope in the P-T plane that extends well above the crystallization temperature. This feature makes the Fermi-Jagla potential a better candidate to reproduce the behavior of tetrahedral liquids including water, for which the LLPT line observed in simulations has also negative slope. In the glass state, the Fermi-Jagla pair potential results in reversible polyamorphism between low- and high-density amorphous solids (LDA and HDA, respectively). We also find that HDA results from pressure-induced amorphization of the model

  10. The polymorphic phases of the hexaalkanoyloxytriphenylene liquid crystals, as studied by deuterium NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfarb, D.; Lifshitz, E.; Zimmermann, H.; Luz, Z.

    1985-06-01

    Deuterium NMR spectra are reported for several specifically deuterated hexaalkanoyloxytriphenylenes in their corresponding liquid crystalline phases. The higher homologs of this series are polymorphic and exhibit a variety of discotic mesophases, including both biaxial (D0 and D1) and uniaxial (D2) columnar phases. The ordering characteristics of these phases are studied using the quadrupolar splittings of the aromatic and aliphatic deuterons. The results show that during the transition from the biaxial D1 to the axial D2 phase the major susceptibility tensor switch orientation, apparently due to strong tilting of the molecules with respect to the columnar axis in the biaxial phase. Characteristic features which appear in the spectra of these phases are interpreted in terms of intercolumnar jumps of mesogen molecules.

  11. Triplet correlation functions in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhabal, Debdas; Singh, Murari; Wikfeldt, Kjartan Thor; Chakravarty, Charusita

    2014-11-01

    Triplet correlations have been shown to play a crucial role in the transformation of simple liquids to anomalous tetrahedral fluids [M. Singh, D. Dhabal, A. H. Nguyen, V. Molinero, and C. Chakravarty, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 147801 (2014)]. Here we examine triplet correlation functions for water, arguably the most important tetrahedral liquid, under ambient conditions, using configurational ensembles derived from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) datasets fitted to experimental scattering data. Four different RMC data sets with widely varying hydrogen-bond topologies fitted to neutron and x-ray scattering data are considered [K. T. Wikfeldt, M. Leetmaa, M. P. Ljungberg, A. Nilsson, and L. G. M. Pettersson, J. Phys. Chem. B 113, 6246 (2009)]. Molecular dynamics simulations are performed for two rigid-body effective pair potentials (SPC/E and TIP4P/2005) and the monatomic water (mW) model. Triplet correlation functions are compared with other structural measures for tetrahedrality, such as the O-O-O angular distribution function and the local tetrahedral order distributions. In contrast to the pair correlation functions, which are identical for all the RMC ensembles, the O-O-O triplet correlation function can discriminate between ensembles with different degrees of tetrahedral network formation with the maximally symmetric, tetrahedral SYM dataset displaying distinct signatures of tetrahedrality similar to those obtained from atomistic simulations of the SPC/E model. Triplet correlations from the RMC datasets conform closely to the Kirkwood superposition approximation, while those from MD simulations show deviations within the first two neighbour shells. The possibilities for experimental estimation of triplet correlations of water and other tetrahedral liquids are discussed.

  12. Triplet correlation functions in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Dhabal, Debdas; Chakravarty, Charusita; Singh, Murari; Wikfeldt, Kjartan Thor

    2014-11-07

    Triplet correlations have been shown to play a crucial role in the transformation of simple liquids to anomalous tetrahedral fluids [M. Singh, D. Dhabal, A. H. Nguyen, V. Molinero, and C. Chakravarty, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 147801 (2014)]. Here we examine triplet correlation functions for water, arguably the most important tetrahedral liquid, under ambient conditions, using configurational ensembles derived from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) datasets fitted to experimental scattering data. Four different RMC data sets with widely varying hydrogen-bond topologies fitted to neutron and x-ray scattering data are considered [K. T. Wikfeldt, M. Leetmaa, M. P. Ljungberg, A. Nilsson, and L. G. M. Pettersson, J. Phys. Chem. B 113, 6246 (2009)]. Molecular dynamics simulations are performed for two rigid-body effective pair potentials (SPC/E and TIP4P/2005) and the monatomic water (mW) model. Triplet correlation functions are compared with other structural measures for tetrahedrality, such as the O–O–O angular distribution function and the local tetrahedral order distributions. In contrast to the pair correlation functions, which are identical for all the RMC ensembles, the O–O–O triplet correlation function can discriminate between ensembles with different degrees of tetrahedral network formation with the maximally symmetric, tetrahedral SYM dataset displaying distinct signatures of tetrahedrality similar to those obtained from atomistic simulations of the SPC/E model. Triplet correlations from the RMC datasets conform closely to the Kirkwood superposition approximation, while those from MD simulations show deviations within the first two neighbour shells. The possibilities for experimental estimation of triplet correlations of water and other tetrahedral liquids are discussed.

  13. Metastable liquid-liquid transition in a molecular model of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Jeremy C.; Martelli, Fausto; Liu, Yang; Car, Roberto; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.; Debenedetti, Pablo G.

    2014-06-01

    Liquid water's isothermal compressibility and isobaric heat capacity, and the magnitude of its thermal expansion coefficient, increase sharply on cooling below the equilibrium freezing point. Many experimental, theoretical and computational studies have sought to understand the molecular origin and implications of this anomalous behaviour. Of the different theoretical scenarios put forward, one posits the existence of a first-order phase transition that involves two forms of liquid water and terminates at a critical point located at deeply supercooled conditions. Some experimental evidence is consistent with this hypothesis, but no definitive proof of a liquid-liquid transition in water has been obtained to date: rapid ice crystallization has so far prevented decisive measurements on deeply supercooled water, although this challenge has been overcome recently. Computer simulations are therefore crucial for exploring water's structure and behaviour in this regime, and have shown that some water models exhibit liquid-liquid transitions and others do not. However, recent work has argued that the liquid-liquid transition has been mistakenly interpreted, and is in fact a liquid-crystal transition in all atomistic models of water. Here we show, by studying the liquid-liquid transition in the ST2 model of water with the use of six advanced sampling methods to compute the free-energy surface, that two metastable liquid phases and a stable crystal phase exist at the same deeply supercooled thermodynamic condition, and that the transition between the two liquids satisfies the thermodynamic criteria of a first-order transition. We follow the rearrangement of water's coordination shell and topological ring structure along a thermodynamically reversible path from the low-density liquid to cubic ice. We also show that the system fluctuates freely between the two liquid phases rather than crystallizing. These findings provide unambiguous evidence for a liquid-liquid transition in

  14. Metastable liquid-liquid transition in a molecular model of water.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Jeremy C; Martelli, Fausto; Liu, Yang; Car, Roberto; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2014-06-19

    Liquid water's isothermal compressibility and isobaric heat capacity, and the magnitude of its thermal expansion coefficient, increase sharply on cooling below the equilibrium freezing point. Many experimental, theoretical and computational studies have sought to understand the molecular origin and implications of this anomalous behaviour. Of the different theoretical scenarios put forward, one posits the existence of a first-order phase transition that involves two forms of liquid water and terminates at a critical point located at deeply supercooled conditions. Some experimental evidence is consistent with this hypothesis, but no definitive proof of a liquid-liquid transition in water has been obtained to date: rapid ice crystallization has so far prevented decisive measurements on deeply supercooled water, although this challenge has been overcome recently. Computer simulations are therefore crucial for exploring water's structure and behaviour in this regime, and have shown that some water models exhibit liquid-liquid transitions and others do not. However, recent work has argued that the liquid-liquid transition has been mistakenly interpreted, and is in fact a liquid-crystal transition in all atomistic models of water. Here we show, by studying the liquid-liquid transition in the ST2 model of water with the use of six advanced sampling methods to compute the free-energy surface, that two metastable liquid phases and a stable crystal phase exist at the same deeply supercooled thermodynamic condition, and that the transition between the two liquids satisfies the thermodynamic criteria of a first-order transition. We follow the rearrangement of water's coordination shell and topological ring structure along a thermodynamically reversible path from the low-density liquid to cubic ice. We also show that the system fluctuates freely between the two liquid phases rather than crystallizing. These findings provide unambiguous evidence for a liquid-liquid transition in

  15. Liquid-liquid transition in ST2 water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Palmer, Jeremy C.; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.; Debenedetti, Pablo G.

    2012-12-01

    We use the weighted histogram analysis method [S. Kumar, D. Bouzida, R. H. Swendsen, P. A. Kollman, and J. M. Rosenberg, J. Comput. Chem. 13, 1011 (1992), 10.1002/jcc.540130812] to calculate the free energy surface of the ST2 model of water as a function of density and bond-orientational order. We perform our calculations at deeply supercooled conditions (T = 228.6 K, P = 2.2 kbar; T = 235 K, P = 2.2 kbar) and focus our attention on the region of bond-orientational order that is relevant to disordered phases. We find a first-order transition between a low-density liquid (LDL, ρ ≈ 0.9 g/cc) and a high-density liquid (HDL, ρ ≈ 1.15 g/cc), confirming our earlier sampling of the free energy surface of this model as a function of density [Y. Liu, A. Z. Panagiotopoulos, and P. G. Debenedetti, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 104508 (2009), 10.1063/1.3229892]. We demonstrate the disappearance of the LDL basin at high pressure and of the HDL basin at low pressure, in agreement with independent simulations of the system's equation of state. Consistency between directly computed and reweighted free energies, as well as between free energy surfaces computed using different thermodynamic starting conditions, confirms proper equilibrium sampling. Diffusion and structural relaxation calculations demonstrate that equilibration of the LDL phase, which exhibits slow dynamics, is attained in the course of the simulations. Repeated flipping between the LDL and HDL phases in the course of long molecular dynamics runs provides further evidence of a phase transition. We use the Ewald summation with vacuum boundary conditions to calculate long-ranged Coulombic interactions and show that conducting boundary conditions lead to unphysical behavior at low temperatures.

  16. Polarized View of Supercooled Liquid Water Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Wasilewski, Andrzej P.; McGill, Matthew J.; Yorks, John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Platnick, Steven E.; Arnold, G. Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Supercooled liquid water (SLW) clouds, where liquid droplets exist at temperatures below 0 C present a well known aviation hazard through aircraft icing, in which SLW accretes on the airframe. SLW clouds are common over the Southern Ocean, and climate-induced changes in their occurrence is thought to constitute a strong cloud feedback on global climate. The two recent NASA field campaigns POlarimeter Definition EXperiment (PODEX, based in Palmdale, California, January-February 2013) and Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS, based in Houston, Texas in August- September 2013) provided a unique opportunity to observe SLW clouds from the high-altitude airborne platform of NASA's ER-2 aircraft. We present an analysis of measurements made by the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) during these experiments accompanied by correlative retrievals from other sensors. The RSP measures both polarized and total reflectance in 9 spectral channels with wavelengths ranging from 410 to 2250 nm. It is a scanning sensor taking samples at 0.8deg intervals within 60deg from nadir in both forward and backward directions. This unique angular resolution allows for characterization of liquid water droplet size using the rainbow structure observed in the polarized reflectances in the scattering angle range between 135deg and 165deg. Simple parametric fitting algorithms applied to the polarized reflectance provide retrievals of the droplet effective radius and variance assuming a prescribed size distribution shape (gamma distribution). In addition to this, we use a non-parametric method, Rainbow Fourier Transform (RFT),which allows retrieval of the droplet size distribution without assuming a size distribution shape. We present an overview of the RSP campaign datasets available from the NASA GISS website, as well as two detailed examples of the retrievals. In these case studies we focus on cloud fields with spatial features

  17. Liquid-liquid and liquid-solid equilibria of systems containing water and selected chlorophenols

    SciTech Connect

    Jaoui, M.; Luszczyk, M.; Rogalski, M.

    1999-12-01

    Chlorinated phenols are present in effluents of oil refinery, coal mining, plastic, leather, paint, and pharmaceutical industrial plants. The solubilities of phenol, 4-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, and pentachlorophenol in water were determined in the temperature range between 270 K and 423 K. Dynamic thermal analysis and a visual static method were used to establish the phase diagrams. Results obtained over a wide temperature and concentration range were used to model the liquid-liquid coexistence curve of the systems studied.

  18. Evidence for Recent Liquid Water on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Newton Crater is a large basin formed by an asteroid impact that probably occurred more than 3 billion years ago. It is approximately 287 kilometers (178 miles) across. The picture shown here (top) highlights the north wall of a specific, smaller crater located in the southwestern quarter of Newton Crater (above). The crater of interest was also formed by an impact; it is about 7 km (4.4 mi) across, which is about 7 times bigger than the famous Meteor Crater in northern Arizona in North America. The north wall of the small crater has many narrow gullies eroded into it. These are hypothesized to have been formed by flowing water and debris flows. Debris transported with the water created lobed and finger-like deposits at the base of the crater wall where it intersects the floor (bottom center top image). Many of the finger-like deposits have small channels indicating that a liquid, most likely water, flowed in these areas. Hundreds of individual water and debris flow events might have occurred to create the scene shown here. Each outburst of water from higher up on the crater slopes would have constituted a competition between evaporation, freezing, and gravity. The individual deposits at the ends of channels in this MOC image mosaic were used to get a rough estimate of the minimum amount of water that might be involved in each flow event. This is done first by assuming that the deposits are like debris flows on Earth. In a debris flow, no less than about 10% (and no more than 30%) of their volume is water. Second, the volume of an apron deposit is estimated by measuring the area covered in the MOC image and multiplying it by a conservative estimate of thickness, 2 meters (6.5 feet). For a flow containing only 10% water, these estimates conservatively suggest that about 2.5 million liters (660,000 gallons) of water are involved in each event; this is enough to fill about 7 community-sized swimming pools or enough to supply 20 people with their water needs for a year

  19. Displacement of nonwetting liquids from unsaturated sands by water infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, T.M.; Overcamp, T.J.

    1998-09-01

    Accidental spills of nonwetting or nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) onto land can lead to ground water contamination. Once a spill has occurred, liquid infiltrates downward under the influence of gravity. As the infiltration continues, capillary forces retain a portion of the immiscible liquid within the pore spaces. After infiltration ceases, the liquid remaining within the pores is termed the residual liquid, which is frequently expressed as a percentage of the total pore volume. The quantity of residual liquid retained depends on soil and liquid properties. Xylene was spilled onto moist glass beads or various moist sands and water was trickled onto the columns every eight hours for periods up to 10 days. The xylene residual in the columns with water infiltration decreased compared to those of control columns, indicating a downward displacement of xylene. The extent of displacement increased with increasing size of the porous media and with increasing amounts of water infiltration.

  20. Vibrational Quantum Decoherence in Liquid Water.

    PubMed

    Joutsuka, Tatsuya; Thompson, Ward H; Laage, Damien

    2016-02-18

    Traditional descriptions of vibrational energy transfer consider a quantum oscillator interacting with a classical environment. However, a major limitation of this simplified description is the neglect of quantum decoherence induced by the different interactions between two distinct quantum states and their environment, which can strongly affect the predicted energy-transfer rate and vibrational spectra. Here, we use quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulations to determine the vibrational quantum decoherence time for an OH stretch vibration in liquid heavy water. We show that coherence is lost on a sub-100 fs time scale due to the different responses of the first shell neighbors to the ground and excited OH vibrational states. This ultrafast decoherence induces a strong homogeneous contribution to the linear infrared spectrum and suggests that resonant vibrational energy transfer in H2O may be more incoherent than previously thought. PMID:26807717

  1. Liquid Water vs. Hydrogen Cyanide on Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glein, C. R.; Zolotov, M. Y.; Shock, E. L.

    2008-12-01

    The Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft detected hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in plumes on Enceladus [1]. We explored computationally the thermodynamic stability and kinetic reactivity of HCN. Thermochemical equilibrium calculations show that HCN is unstable in liquid water, and should be overwhelmingly hydrolyzed to formic acid (HCOOH) and ammonia (NH3) under all conditions relevant to Enceladus. Even in an aqueous solution with an unreasonably high NH3 activity of 10, the HCOOH/HCN activity ratio is predicted to be greater than 107 at 0°C. This ratio decreases with increasing NH3 activity and with increasing temperature. Even at high temperatures (e.g., 200°C), it is at least 3-4 orders-of-magnitude above unity. It is notable that neither formic acid nor ammonia have been detected in any plumes [1]. We thus infer that the detected HCN is unlikely to have equilibrated with an aqueous solution below Enceladus' surface. Chemical kinetic considerations indicate that the hydrolysis lifetime of HCN has a complex dependence on pH, and decreases with increasing temperature. We find that, even at the pH value most conducive to the survival of HCN (~5), HCN can persist for only about 5 Ma in liquid water at 0°C. Thus, the HCN in the plumes could not have come from a long-lasting ocean or sea, and probably came from a recent aqueous melt or some icy phase. A liquid source for the HCN would be more restrictive than an ice source. For example, an aqueous solution must have a pH between 4-6 for HCN to be preserved in it for at least ~1 Ma at 0°C. However, this pH restriction would be lifted if the HCN source were a very young pool (i.e., centuries-millennia old). On the other hand, it is expected that HCN could survive indefinitely in an icy matrix. The proposed HCN sources may be less favorable abodes for life than a long-lived aqueous reservoir. Reference: [1] Waite J.H. et al. (2008) Eur. Planet. Sci. Congr. 3, EPSC2008-A-00593.

  2. Interactions between water and 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Fadeeva, Tatiana A.; DeVine, Jessalyn A.; Castner, Edward W.; Husson, Pascale; Costa Gomes, Margarida F.; Greenbaum, Steven G.

    2015-08-14

    We report experimental results on the diffusivity of water in two ionic liquids obtained using the pulsed-gradient spin-echo NMR method. Both ionic liquids have the same cation, 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium, but different trifluoromethyl-containing anions. One has a strongly hydrophobic anion, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide, while the second has a hydrophilic anion, trifluoromethylsulfonate. Transport of water in these ionic liquids is much faster than would be predicted from hydrodynamic laws, indicating that the neutral water molecules experience a very different friction than the anions and cations at the molecular level. Temperature-dependent viscosities, conductivities, and densities are reported as a function of water concentration to further analyze the properties of the ionic liquid-water mixtures. These results on the properties of water in ionic liquids should be of interest to researchers in diverse areas ranging from separations, solubilizing biomass and energy technologies.

  3. Interactions between water and 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Fadeeva, Tatiana A; Husson, Pascale; DeVine, Jessalyn A; Costa Gomes, Margarida F; Greenbaum, Steven G; Castner, Edward W

    2015-08-14

    We report experimental results on the diffusivity of water in two ionic liquids obtained using the pulsed-gradient spin-echo NMR method. Both ionic liquids have the same cation, 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium, but different trifluoromethyl-containing anions. One has a strongly hydrophobic anion, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide, while the second has a hydrophilic anion, trifluoromethylsulfonate. Transport of water in these ionic liquids is much faster than would be predicted from hydrodynamic laws, indicating that the neutral water molecules experience a very different friction than the anions and cations at the molecular level. Temperature-dependent viscosities, conductivities, and densities are reported as a function of water concentration to further analyze the properties of the ionic liquid-water mixtures. These results on the properties of water in ionic liquids should be of interest to researchers in diverse areas ranging from separations, solubilizing biomass and energy technologies. PMID:26277141

  4. Interactions between water and 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeeva, Tatiana A.; Husson, Pascale; DeVine, Jessalyn A.; Costa Gomes, Margarida F.; Greenbaum, Steven G.; Castner, Edward W.

    2015-08-01

    We report experimental results on the diffusivity of water in two ionic liquids obtained using the pulsed-gradient spin-echo NMR method. Both ionic liquids have the same cation, 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium, but different trifluoromethyl-containing anions. One has a strongly hydrophobic anion, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide, while the second has a hydrophilic anion, trifluoromethylsulfonate. Transport of water in these ionic liquids is much faster than would be predicted from hydrodynamic laws, indicating that the neutral water molecules experience a very different friction than the anions and cations at the molecular level. Temperature-dependent viscosities, conductivities, and densities are reported as a function of water concentration to further analyze the properties of the ionic liquid-water mixtures. These results on the properties of water in ionic liquids should be of interest to researchers in diverse areas ranging from separations, solubilizing biomass and energy technologies.

  5. Evidence for Recent Liquid Water on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image, acquired by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) in May 2000 shows numerous examples of martian gullies that all start--or head--in a specific layer roughly a hundred meters beneath the surface of Mars. These features are located on the south-facing wall of a trough in the Gorgonum Chaos region, an area found to have many examples of gullies proposed to have formed by seepage and runoff of liquid water in recent martian times. The layer from which the gullies emanate has recessed backward to form an overhang beneath a harder layer of rock. The larger gullies have formed an alcove--an area above the overhang from which debris has collapsed to leave a dark-toned scar. Below the layer of seepage is found a dark, narrow channel that runs down the slope to an apron of debris. The small, bright, parallel features at the base of the cliff at the center-right of the picture is a series of large windblown ripples. Although the dark tone of the alcoves and channels in this image is not likely to be the result of wet ground (the contrast in this image has been enhanced), it does suggest that water has seeped out of the ground and moved down the slope quite recently. Sharp contrasts between dark and light areas are hard to maintain on Mars for very long periods of time because dust tends to coat surfaces and reduce brightness differences. To keep dust from settling on a surface, it has to have undergone some process of erosion (wind, landslides, water runoff) relatively recently. There is no way to know how recent this activity was, but educated guesses center between a few to tens of years, and it is entirely possible that the area shown in this image has water seeping out of the ground today. Centered near 37.9S, 170.2W, sunlight illuminates the MOC image from the upper left, north is toward the upper right. The context view above is from the Viking 1 orbiter and was acquired in 1977. The Viking picture is illuminated from the upper right

  6. Long-term evolution of transient liquid water on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Mark I.; Mischna, Michael A.

    2005-03-01

    Liquid water is not currently stable on the surface of Mars; however, transient liquid water (ice melt) may occur if the surface temperature is between the melting and boiling points. Such conditions are met on Mars with current surface pressures and obliquity due to the large diurnal range of surface temperatures. This yields the potential for transient, nonequilibrium liquid water. A general circulation model is used to undertake an initial exploration of the variation of this ``transient liquid water potential'' (TLWP) for different obliquities and over a range of increased pressures representing progressively earlier phases of Martian geological history. At higher obliquities and slightly higher surface pressures (<50 mbar), TLWP conditions are met over a very large fraction of the planet. As the surface pressure is increased above about 50-100 mbar, however, increased atmospheric thermal blanketing reduces the diurnal surface temperature range, essentially eliminating the possibility of even transient liquid water. At high enough pressures, the mean temperature is sufficiently elevated to allow stable liquid water. Thus the potential for liquid water on Mars has not decreased monotonically over planetary history as the atmosphere was lost. Instead, a distinct minimum in TLWP (the ``dead zone'') will have occurred during the extended period for which pressures were in the middle range between about 0.1 and 1 bar. This has direct and restrictive implications for chemical weathering and life. The fundamental conclusion of this study is largely insensitive to invocation of brines and to more detailed treatment of atmospheric radiative processes.

  7. Anatomy of competing quantum effects in liquid water.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Rafa; Ganeshan, Sriram; Fernandez-Serra, M. V.

    2013-03-01

    ct- Molecules like water have vibrational modes with zero point energy well above room temperature. As a consequence, classical molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water largely underestimate the kinetic energy of the ions, which translates into an underestimation of covalent interatomic distances. In this work, we show that it is possible to apply generalized Langevin equation with suppressed noise in combination with Nose-Hoover thermostats to achieve an efficient zero-point temperature of independent modes of liquid water. Using this method we deconstruct the competing quantum effects in liquid water. We demonstrate how the structure and dynamical modes of liquid water respond to non-equilibrium distribution of zero point temperatures on the normal modes.

  8. Thermoluminescence dosimetry measurements of brachytherapy sources in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Tailor, Ramesh; Tolani, Naresh; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2008-09-15

    Radiation therapy dose measurements are customarily performed in liquid water. The characterization of brachytherapy sources is, however, generally based on measurements made with thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs), for which contact with water may lead to erroneous readings. Consequently, most dosimetry parameters reported in the literature have been based on measurements in water-equivalent plastics, such as Solid Water. These previous reports employed a correction factor to transfer the dose measurements from a plastic phantom to liquid water. The correction factor most often was based on Monte Carlo calculations. The process of measuring in a water-equivalent plastic phantom whose exact composition may be different from published specifications, then correcting the results to a water medium leads to increased uncertainty in the results. A system has been designed to enable measurements with TLDs in liquid water. This system, which includes jigs to support water-tight capsules of lithium fluoride in configurations suitable for measuring several dosimetric parameters, was used to determine the correction factor from water-equivalent plastic to water. Measurements of several {sup 125}I and {sup 131}Cs prostate brachytherapy sources in liquid water and in a Solid Water phantom demonstrated a correction factor of 1.039{+-}0.005 at 1 cm distance. These measurements are in good agreement with a published value of this correction factor for an {sup 125}I source.

  9. Space Station Water Processor Mostly Liquid Separator (MLS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzarone, Anthony

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of the development testing conducted under this contract to the Space Station Water Processor (WP) Mostly Liquid Separator (MLS). The MLS units built and modified during this testing demonstrated acceptable air/water separation results in a variety of water conditions with inlet flow rates ranging from 60 - 960 LB/hr.

  10. Effect of hydrophobic environments on the hypothesized liquid-liquid critical point of water.

    PubMed

    Strekalova, Elena G; Corradini, Dario; Mazza, Marco G; Buldyrev, Sergey V; Gallo, Paola; Franzese, Giancarlo; Stanley, H Eugene

    2012-01-01

    The complex behavior of liquid water, along with its anomalies and their crucial role in the existence of life, continue to attract the attention of researchers. The anomalous behavior of water is more pronounced at subfreezing temperatures and numerous theoretical and experimental studies are directed towards developing a coherent thermodynamic and dynamic framework for understanding supercooled water. The existence of a liquid-liquid critical point in the deep supercooled region has been related to the anomalous behavior of water. However, the experimental study of supercooled water at very low temperatures is hampered by the homogeneous nucleation of the crystal. Recently, water confined in nanoscopic structures or in solutions has attracted interest because nucleation can be delayed. These systems have a tremendous relevance also for current biological advances; e.g., supercooled water is often confined in cell membranes and acts as a solvent for biological molecules. In particular, considerable attention has been recently devoted to understanding hydrophobic interactions or the behavior of water in the presence of apolar interfaces due to their fundamental role in self-assembly of micelles, membrane formation and protein folding. This article reviews and compares two very recent computational works aimed at elucidating the changes in the thermodynamic behavior in the supercooled region and the liquid-liquid critical point phenomenon for water in contact with hydrophobic environments. The results are also compared to previous reports for water in hydrophobic environments. PMID:23277673

  11. Factors that Determine Zeolite Stability in Hot Liquid Water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Chen, Kuizhi; Chen, Banghao; White, Jeffery L; Resasco, Daniel E

    2015-09-16

    The susceptibility of zeolites to hot liquid water may hamper their full utilization in aqueous phase processes, such as those involved in biomass conversion and upgrading reactions. Interactions of zeolites with water strongly depend on the presence of hydrophilic moieties including Brønsted acid sites (BAS), extraframework cations, and silanol defects, which facilitate wetting of the surface. However, it is not clear which of these moieties are responsible for the susceptibility of zeolites to liquid water. Previous studies have offered contradictory explanations because the role of each of these characteristics has not been investigated independently. In this work, a systematic comparison has been attempted by relating crystallinity losses to the variation of each of the five zeolite characteristics that may influence their stability in liquid water, including number of BAS, Si-O-Si bonds, framework type, silanol defects, and extraframework Al. In this study, we have systematically monitored the crystallinity changes of a series of HY, H-ZSM-5, and H-β zeolite samples with varying Si/Al ratio, density of BAS, zeolite structure, and density of silanol defects upon exposure to liquid water at 200 °C. The results of this comparison unambiguously indicate that the density of silanol defects plays the most crucial role in determining susceptibility of zeolites to hot liquid water. By functionalizing the silanol defects with organosilanes, the hydrophobicity of defective zeolite is increased and the tolerance to hot liquid water is significantly enhanced. PMID:26301890

  12. Liquid water in the domain of cubic crystalline ice Ic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, P.; Banham, S. F.; Blake, D. F.; McCoustra, M. R.

    1997-01-01

    Vapor-deposited amorphous water ice when warmed above the glass transition temperature (120-140 K), is a viscous liquid which exhibits a viscosity vs temperature relationship different from that of liquid water at room temperature. New studies of thin water ice films now demonstrate that viscous liquid water persists in the temperature range 140-210 K. where it coexists with cubic crystalline ice. The liquid character of amorphous water above the glass transition is demonstrated by (1) changes in the morphology of water ice films on a nonwetting surface observed in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at around 175 K during slow warming, (2) changes in the binding energy of water molecules measured in temperature programmed desorption (TPD) studies, and (3) changes in the shape of the 3.07 micrometers absorption band observed in grazing angle reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) during annealing at high temperature. whereby the decreased roughness of the water surface is thought to cause changes in the selection rules for the excitation of O-H stretch vibrations. Because it is present over such a wide range of temperatures, we propose that this form of liquid water is a common material in nature. where it is expected to exist in the subsurface layers of comets and on the surfaces of some planets and satellites.

  13. Two Calorimetrically Distinct States of Liquid Water Below 150 Kelvin

    PubMed

    Johari; Hallbrucker; Mayer

    1996-07-01

    Vapor-deposited amorphous solid and hyperquenched glassy water were found to irreversibly transform, on compression at 77 kelvin, to a high-density amorphous solid. On heating at atmospheric pressure, this solid became viscous water (water B), with a reversible glass-liquid transition onset at 129 +/- 2 kelvin. A different form of viscous water (water A) was formed by heating the uncompressed vapor-deposited amorphous solid and hyperquenched liquid water. On thermal cycling up to 148 kelvin, water B remained kinetically and thermodynamically distinct from water A. The occurrence of these two states, which do not interconvert, helps explain both the configurational relaxation of water and stress-induced amorphization. PMID:8688057

  14. Evidence for Recent Liquid Water on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Gullies eroded into the wall of a meteor impact crater in Noachis Terra. This high resolution view (top left) from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) shows channels and associated aprons of debris that are interpreted to have formed by groundwater seepage, surface runoff, and debris flow. The lack of small craters superimposed on the channels and apron deposits indicates that these features are geologically young. It is possible that these gullies indicate that liquid water is present within the martian subsurface today. The MOC image was acquired on September 28, 1999. The scene covers an area approximately 3 kilometers (1.9 miles) wide by 6.7 km (4.1 mi) high (note, the aspect ratio is 1.5 to 1.0). Sunlight illuminates this area from the upper left. The image is located near 54.8S, 342.5W. The context image (above) shows the location of the MOC image on the south-facing wall of an impact crater approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) in diameter. The context picture was obtained by the Viking 1 orbiter in 1980 and is illuminated from the upper left. The large mound on the floor of the crater in the context view is a sand dune field. The Mars Orbiter Camera high resolution images are taken black-and-white (grayscale); the color seen here has been synthesized from the colors of Mars observed by the MOC wide angle cameras and by the Viking Orbiters in the late 1970s. A brief description of how the color was generated: The MOC narrow angle camera only takes grayscale (black and white) pictures. To create the color versions seen here, we have taken much lower resolution red and blue images acquired by the MOC's wide angle cameras, and by the Viking Orbiter cameras in the 1970s, synthesized a green image by averaging red and blue, and created a pallete of colors that represent the range of colors on Mars. We then use a relationship that correlates color and brightness to assign a color to each gray level. This is only a crude approximation of

  15. Water: The Liquid of Life. Fifth Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Environmental Protection Agency, Springfield.

    These materials are for use by elementary and middle school teachers in the state of Illinois. This document contains five modules for teaching water conservation. Topics include: (1) "Life Depends on Water,""What is Water?" and "The Hydrologic Cycle"; (2) "The Treatment of Drinking Water"; (3) "Wastewater Treatment"; (4) "Earth's Closed…

  16. Determination of liquid water altitudes using combined remote sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Politovich, M.K.

    1995-09-01

    Methods by which altitude ranges of supercooled cloud liquid water in the atmosphere may be estimated are explored using measurements from a combination of ground-based remote sensors. The tests were conducted as part of the Winter Icing and Storms Project that took place in eastern Colorado during the winters of 1990, 1991, and 1993. The basic method augments microwave radiometer measurements of path-integrated liquid water with observations from additional remote sensors to establish height limits for the supercooled liquid. One variation uses a simple adiabatic parcel lifting model initiated at a cloud-base height determined from a ceilometer, temperature and pressure from a radio acoustic sounding system or rawinsonde, and combines these with the radiometer`s total liquid measurement to obtain an estimate of the liquid cloud-top height. Since it does not account for liquid loss by entrainment or ice-liquid interaction processes, this method tends to underestimate the true liquid cloud top; for two cases examined in detail, 54% of icing pilot reports in the area were from above this estimated height. Some error is introduced due to differences in sampling locations and from horizontal variability in liquid water content. Vertical cloud boundaries from a K{sub a}-band radar were also used in the study; these often indicated thicker clouds than the liquid-layer depths observed from research aircraft, possibly due to the ambiguity of the ice-liquid phase distinction. Comparisons of liquid vertical profiles are presented, using normalized profile shapes based on uniform, adiabatic, and aircraft-derived composite assumptions. The adiabatic and climatological profile shapes generally agreed well with measurements from a research aircraft and were more realistic than the uniform profile. Suggestions for applications of these results toward a real-time aviation hazard identification system are presented. 30 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. The determination of water in biomass-derived liquid fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, C.; De Caumia, B.

    1986-01-01

    The Dean and Stark distillation is an appropriate method for the determination of water in coal tar, bitumen and petroleum-like products. This article shows, however, that a direct application of the Dean and Stark method for the determination of water in biomass-derived liquid fuels results in incorrect estimates. Inaccuracies are due to the presence of soluble organics in the aqueous phase, which apparently form azeotropic mixtures with water and xylene and which condense and are trapped as distillate in the graduated cylinder. Instead, a Karl Fischer determination of water is recommended in the case of biomass-derived liquid fuels.

  18. Order parameter defining liquid-liquid transition in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigera, J. Raul; Chara, Osvaldo; McCarthy, Andres

    2011-03-01

    Water presents both open tetrahedral and compact hexagonal structures. Although several order parameters have been proposed to quantify this, all of them are only applicable to data produced by simulation. We present an order parameter (Pr) that is calculated from the radial distribution function g (r) , also available from experiment. We hereby extract the tetrahedral and hexagonal components from the g (r) , each one reconstructed as the sum of a Freundlich distribution for the first peak, two subsequent Gaussian distributions, and a sigmoidal to account for the rest. The order parameter can be calculated from the relative contribution of tetrahedral over hexagonal contribution. We obtained the Pr for SPC/E water model from molecular dynamics simulations of water at different pressures and temperatures. At 300K, the pressure in which both, tetrahedral and hexagonal contributions become equal (Pr = 0), a structural crossover is found in the vicinity of 2kbar, close to the pressure at which the `'anomalous'' behavior manifests. Having computed Pr for this wide range of pressure and temperature we then calculate the HDL spinodal, the coexistence line, the second critical point, and the Widom line. Supported by CONICET, UNLP, and CIC Prov.BsAs.

  19. Onset of ice VII phase during ps laser pulse propagation through liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paturi, Prem Kiran; Vaddapally, Rakesh Kumar; Acrhem Team

    2015-06-01

    Water dominantly present in liquid state on earth gets transformed to crystalline polymorphs under different dynamic loading conditions. Out of 15 different crystalline phases discovered till date, ice VII is observed to be stable over wide pressure (2-63 GPa) and temperature (>273 K) ranges. We present the onset of ice VII phase at low threshold of 2 mJ/pulse during 30 ps (532 nm, 10 Hz) laser pulse induced shock propagating through liquid water. Role of input pulse energy on the evolution of Stoke's and anti-Stoke's Raman shift of the dominant A1g mode of ice VII, filamentation, free-electrons, plasma shielding is presented. The H-bond network rearrangement, electron ion energy transfer time coinciding with the excitation pulse duration supported by the filamentation and plasma shielding of the ps laser pulses reduced the threshold of ice VII structure formation. Filamentation and the plasma shielding have shown the localized creation and sustenance of ice VII structure in liquid water over 3 mm length and 50 μm area of cross-section. The work is supported by Defence Research and Developement Organization, India through Grants-in-Aid Program.

  20. Ice-Crystal Fallstreaks from Supercooled Liquid Water Parent Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James R.; O'C. Starr, David; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Spinhirne, James D.; Ferrare, Richard A.

    2003-01-01

    On 31 December 2001, ice-crystal fallstreaks (e.g., cirrus uncinus, or colloquially "Mare's Tails") from supercooled liquid water parent clouds were observed by ground-based lidars pointed vertically from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (SGP) facility near Lamont, Oklahoma. The incidence of liquid phase cloud with apparent ice-phase precipitation is investigated. Scenarios for mixed-phase particle nucleation, and fallstreak formation and sustenance are discussed. The observations are unique in the context of the historical reverence given to the commonly observed c h s uncinus fallstreak (wholly ice) versus this seemingly contradictory coincidence of liquid water begetting ice-crystal streaks.

  1. Process for blending coal with water immiscible liquid

    DOEpatents

    Heavin, Leonard J.; King, Edward E.; Milliron, Dennis L.

    1982-10-26

    A continuous process for blending coal with a water immiscible liquid produces a uniform, pumpable slurry. Pulverized raw feed coal and preferably a coal derived, water immiscible liquid are continuously fed to a blending zone (12 and 18) in which coal particles and liquid are intimately admixed and advanced in substantially plug flow to form a first slurry. The first slurry is withdrawn from the blending zone (12 and 18) and fed to a mixing zone (24) where it is mixed with a hot slurry to form the pumpable slurry. A portion of the pumpable slurry is continuously recycled to the blending zone (12 and 18) for mixing with the feed coal.

  2. Liquid Water in the Extremely Shallow Martian Subsurface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlov, A.; Shivak, J. N.

    2012-01-01

    Availability of liquid water is one of the major constraints for the potential Martian biosphere. Although liquid water is unstable on the surface of Mars due to low atmospheric pressures, it has been suggested that liquid films of water could be present in the Martian soil. Here we explored a possibility of the liquid water formation in the extremely shallow (1-3 cm) subsurface layer under low atmospheric pressures (0.1-10 mbar) and low ("Martian") surface temperatures (approx.-50 C-0 C). We used a new Goddard Martian simulation chamber to demonstrate that even in the clean frozen soil with temperatures as low as -25C the amount of mobile water can reach several percents. We also showed that during brief periods of simulated daylight warming the shallow subsurface ice sublimates, the water vapor diffuses through porous surface layer of soil temporarily producing supersaturated conditions in the soil, which leads to the formation of additional liquid water. Our results suggest that despite cold temperatures and low atmospheric pressures, Martian soil just several cm below the surface can be habitable.

  3. Liquid effluent study: Ground water characterization data

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This report is a support document to the Liquid Effluent Study Final Project Report (WHC 1990c). The focus is on sampling and analysis rationale, quality assurance (QA), data validation, and sampling conditions for the groundwater quality assessment. Interpretation of the groundwater data is provided in the final project report. 20 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. New Isotopic Water Analyzer for Hydrological Measurements of Both Liquid Water and Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owano, T.; Gupta, M.; Berman, E.; Baer, D.

    2012-04-01

    Measurements of the stable isotope ratios of liquid water allow determination of water flowpaths, residence times in catchments, and groundwater migration. Previously, discrete water samples have been collected and transported to an IRMS lab for isotope characterization. Due to the expense and labor associated with such sampling, isotope studies have thus been generally limited in scope and in temporal resolution. We report on the recent development of the first Isotopic Water Analyzer that simultaneously quantifies δ2H, δ17O and δ18O in liquid water or in water vapor from different natural water sources (e.g., rain, snow, streams and groundwater). In High-Throughput mode, the IWA can report measurements at the unprecedented rate of over 800 injections per day, which yields more than 140 total unknown and reference samples per day (still with 6 injections per measurement). This fast time response provides isotope hydrologists with the capability to study dynamic changes in δ values quickly (minutes) and over long time scales (weeks, months), thus enabling studies of mixing dynamics in snowmelt, canopy throughfall, stream mixing, and allows for individual precipitation events to be independently studied. In addition, the same IWA can also record fast measurements of isotopic water vapor (δ2H, δ17O, δ18O) in real time (2 Hz data rate or faster) over a range of mole fractions greater than 60000 ppm H2O in air. Changing between operational modes requires a software command, to enable the user to switch from measuring liquid water to measuring water vapor, or vice versa. The new IWA, which uses LGR's patented Off-axis ICOS technology, incorporates proprietary internal thermal control for stable measurements with essentially zero drift despite changes in ambient temperature (over the entire range from 0-45 degrees C). Measurements from recent field studies using the IWA will be presented.

  5. Rainfall estimation from liquid water content and precipitable water content data over land, ocean and plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, S.; Adhikari, A.; Maitra, A.

    2016-01-01

    A simplistic approach has been proposed to estimate annual rainfall amount from cloud liquid water content and precipitable water content utilizing the data pertaining to the period of 1997-2006. The study involves seven land locations over India, seven stations over plateau and seven locations over the Indian Ocean. The wavelet analyses exhibit prominent annual peaks in the global spectra of rainfall, cloud liquid water content and precipitable water content. Power-law relationships are found to exist between the global wavelet peaks of precipitation and those of both the parameters, namely, cloud liquid water content and precipitable water content. Again, a linear relationship exists between global wavelet peaks of rainfall amount and total rainfall amount. The rainfall estimations utilizing cloud liquid water content data exhibit better matching with the measured values than those utilizing precipitable water content data.

  6. Metastable liquid-liquid phase separation and criticality in water-like models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rakesh; Biddle, John; Debenedetti, Pablo; Anisimov, Mikhail

    Water shows intriguing thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies in the supercooled liquid state. A possible explanation of the origin of these anomalies lies in the existence of a metastable first order liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) between two (high and low density) forms of liquid water. Unambiguous experimental proof of existence of LLPT in bulk supercooled water is so far hampered by ultra-fast ice crystallization. Computer simulations of water models are therefore crucial for exploring the possibility of LLPT in deeply supercooled water. We present computer simulation results that elucidate the possibility of a metastable LLPT in one of the most accurate atomistic models of water, TIP4P/2005. To describe the computed properties, we have applied two-state thermodynamics, viewing water as a non-ideal mixture of two inter-convertible states. The thermodynamic behavior of the model in the one-phase region suggests the existence of energy-driven LLPT. We compare the behavior of TIP4P/2005 with other popular water models, and with real water, all of which are well-described by two-state thermodynamics. Additionally, we also elucidate the relation between the phenomenological order parameter of the two-state thermodynamics and the microscopic nature of the low-density structure.

  7. Liquid and Glassy Water: Two Materials of Interdisciplinary Interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugene Stanley, H.

    We can superheat water above its boiling temperature and supercool it below its freezing temperature, down to approximately — 40°C, below which water inevitably crystallizes. In this deeply supercooled region, strange things happen: response functions and transport functions appear as if they might diverge to infinity at a temperature of about-45 °C. These experiments were pioneered by Angell and co-workers over the past 30 years [1-4]. Down in the glassy region of water, additional strange things happen, e.g., there is not just one glassy phase [1]. Rather, just as there is more than one polymorph of crystalline water, so also there appears to be more than one polyamorph of glassy water. The first clear indication of this was a discovery of Mishima in 1985: at low pressure there is one form, called low-density amorphous (LDA) ice [5], while at high pressure Mishima discovered a new form, called highdensity amorphous (HDA) ice [6]. The volume discontinuity separating these two phases is comparable to the volume discontinuity separating low-density and high-density polymorphs of crystalline ice, 25-35 percent [7, 8].

  8. The putative liquid-liquid transition is a liquid-solid transition in atomistic models of water. II.

    PubMed

    Limmer, David T; Chandler, David

    2013-06-01

    This paper extends our earlier studies of free energy functions of density and crystalline order parameters for models of supercooled water, which allows us to examine the possibility of two distinct metastable liquid phases [D. T. Limmer and D. Chandler, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 134503 (2011) and preprint arXiv:1107.0337 (2011)]. Low-temperature reversible free energy surfaces of several different atomistic models are computed: mW water, TIP4P/2005 water, Stillinger-Weber silicon, and ST2 water, the last of these comparing three different treatments of long-ranged forces. In each case, we show that there is one stable or metastable liquid phase, and there is an ice-like crystal phase. The time scales for crystallization in these systems far exceed those of structural relaxation in the supercooled metastable liquid. We show how this wide separation in time scales produces an illusion of a low-temperature liquid-liquid transition. The phenomenon suggesting metastability of two distinct liquid phases is actually coarsening of the ordered ice-like phase, which we elucidate using both analytical theory and computer simulation. For the latter, we describe robust methods for computing reversible free energy surfaces, and we consider effects of electrostatic boundary conditions. We show that sensible alterations of models and boundary conditions produce no qualitative changes in low-temperature phase behaviors of these systems, only marginal changes in equations of state. On the other hand, we show that altering sampling time scales can produce large and qualitative non-equilibrium effects. Recent reports of evidence of a liquid-liquid critical point in computer simulations of supercooled water are considered in this light. PMID:23758385

  9. The putative liquid-liquid transition is a liquid-solid transition in atomistic models of water. II

    SciTech Connect

    Limmer, David T.; Chandler, David

    2013-06-07

    This paper extends our earlier studies of free energy functions of density and crystalline order parameters for models of supercooled water, which allows us to examine the possibility of two distinct metastable liquid phases [D. T. Limmer and D. Chandler, J. Chem. Phys.135, 134503 (2011) and preprint http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1107.0337 (2011)]. Low-temperature reversible free energy surfaces of several different atomistic models are computed: mW water, TIP4P/2005 water, Stillinger-Weber silicon, and ST2 water, the last of these comparing three different treatments of long-ranged forces. In each case, we show that there is one stable or metastable liquid phase, and there is an ice-like crystal phase. The time scales for crystallization in these systems far exceed those of structural relaxation in the supercooled metastable liquid. We show how this wide separation in time scales produces an illusion of a low-temperature liquid-liquid transition. The phenomenon suggesting metastability of two distinct liquid phases is actually coarsening of the ordered ice-like phase, which we elucidate using both analytical theory and computer simulation. For the latter, we describe robust methods for computing reversible free energy surfaces, and we consider effects of electrostatic boundary conditions. We show that sensible alterations of models and boundary conditions produce no qualitative changes in low-temperature phase behaviors of these systems, only marginal changes in equations of state. On the other hand, we show that altering sampling time scales can produce large and qualitative non-equilibrium effects. Recent reports of evidence of a liquid-liquid critical point in computer simulations of supercooled water are considered in this light.

  10. Liquid water transport mechanism in the gas diffusion layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, P.; Wu, C. W.

    We developed an equivalent capillary model of a microscale fiber-fence structure to study the microscale evolution and transport of liquid in a porous media and to reveal the basic principles of water transport in gas diffusion layer (GDL). Analytical solutions using the model show that a positive hydraulic pressure is needed to drive the liquid water to penetrate through the porous GDL even consisting of the hydrophilic fibers. Several possible contributions for the water configuration, such as capillary pressure, gravity, vapor condensation, wettability and microstructures of the GDL, are discussed using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). It is found that the distribution manners of the fibers and the spatial mixed-wettability in the GDL also play an important role in the transport of liquid water.

  11. Searching for liquid water in Europa by using surface observatories.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Krishan K; Kivelson, Margaret G; Russell, Christopher T

    2002-01-01

    Liquid water, as far as we know, is an indispensable ingredient of life. Therefore, locating reservoirs of liquid water in extraterrestrial bodies is a necessary prerequisite to searching for life. Recent geological and geophysical observations from the Galileo spacecraft, though not unambiguous, hint at the possibility of a subsurface ocean in the Jovian moon Europa. After summarizing present evidence for liquid water in Europa, we show that electromagnetic and seismic observations made from as few as two surface observatories comprising a magnetometer and a seismometer offer the best hope of unambiguous characterization of the three-dimensional structure of the ocean and the deeper interior of this icy moon. The observatories would also help us infer the composition of the icy crust and the ocean water. PMID:12449858

  12. Behavior of supercooled aqueous solutions stemming from hidden liquid-liquid transition in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biddle, John W.; Holten, Vincent; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2014-08-01

    A popular hypothesis that explains the anomalies of supercooled water is the existence of a metastable liquid-liquid transition hidden below the line of homogeneous nucleation. If this transition exists and if it is terminated by a critical point, the addition of a solute should generate a line of liquid-liquid critical points emanating from the critical point of pure metastable water. We have analyzed thermodynamic consequences of this scenario. In particular, we consider the behavior of two systems, H2O-NaCl and H2O-glycerol. We find the behavior of the heat capacity in supercooled aqueous solutions of NaCl, as reported by Archer and Carter [J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 8563 (2000)], to be consistent with the presence of the metastable liquid-liquid transition. We elucidate the non-conserved nature of the order parameter (extent of "reaction" between two alternative structures of water) and the consequences of its coupling with conserved properties (density and concentration). We also show how the shape of the critical line in a solution controls the difference in concentration of the coexisting liquid phases.

  13. Behavior of supercooled aqueous solutions stemming from hidden liquid-liquid transition in water.

    PubMed

    Biddle, John W; Holten, Vincent; Anisimov, Mikhail A

    2014-08-21

    A popular hypothesis that explains the anomalies of supercooled water is the existence of a metastable liquid-liquid transition hidden below the line of homogeneous nucleation. If this transition exists and if it is terminated by a critical point, the addition of a solute should generate a line of liquid-liquid critical points emanating from the critical point of pure metastable water. We have analyzed thermodynamic consequences of this scenario. In particular, we consider the behavior of two systems, H2O-NaCl and H2O-glycerol. We find the behavior of the heat capacity in supercooled aqueous solutions of NaCl, as reported by Archer and Carter [J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 8563 (2000)], to be consistent with the presence of the metastable liquid-liquid transition. We elucidate the non-conserved nature of the order parameter (extent of "reaction" between two alternative structures of water) and the consequences of its coupling with conserved properties (density and concentration). We also show how the shape of the critical line in a solution controls the difference in concentration of the coexisting liquid phases. PMID:25149798

  14. Structure and Depletion at Fluorocarbon and Hydrocarbon/Water Liquid/Liquid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kashimoto,K.; Yoon, J.; Hou, B.; Chen, C.; Lin, B.; Aratono, M.; Takiue, T.; Schlossman, M.

    2008-01-01

    The results of x-ray reflectivity studies of two oil/water (liquid/liquid) interfaces are inconsistent with recent predictions of the presence of a vaporlike depletion region at hydrophobic/aqueous interfaces. One of the oils, perfluorohexane, is a fluorocarbon whose superhydrophobic interface with water provides a stringent test for the presence of a depletion layer. The other oil, heptane, is a hydrocarbon and, therefore, is more relevant to the study of biomolecular hydrophobicity. These results are consistent with the subangstrom proximity of water to soft hydrophobic materials.

  15. The puzzling unsolved mysteries of liquid water: Some recent progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. E.; Kumar, P.; Xu, L.; Yan, Z.; Mazza, M. G.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Chen, S.-H.; Mallamace, F.

    2007-12-01

    Water is perhaps the most ubiquitous, and the most essential, of any molecule on earth. Indeed, it defies the imagination of even the most creative science fiction writer to picture what life would be like without water. Despite decades of research, however, water's puzzling properties are not understood and 63 anomalies that distinguish water from other liquids remain unsolved. We introduce some of these unsolved mysteries, and demonstrate recent progress in solving them. We present evidence from experiments and computer simulations supporting the hypothesis that water displays a special transition point (which is not unlike the “tipping point” immortalized by Malcolm Gladwell). The general idea is that when the liquid is near this “tipping point,” it suddenly separates into two distinct liquid phases. This concept of a new critical point is finding application to other liquids as well as water, such as silicon and silica. We also discuss related puzzles, such as the mysterious behavior of water near a protein.

  16. A Mechanism for Recent Production of Liquid Water on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, M. H.; Bridges, N. T.

    2003-01-01

    Though Mars is a cold, dry planet, with respect to the thermal stability of liquid water at low altitudes it is not terribly different from comparably cold places on Earth. In dry air such water would evaporate faster on Mars, at a rate comparable to a 60 C hot spring on Earth, but the heat loss associated with that evaporation would be mitigated by the poor thermal convection in the thin Martian air. Even at higher altitudes where the atmospheric pressure does not reach the triple point of water, liquid water might theoretically exist in a low-vapor pressure form such as wet soil, in a briny solution, or simply under a layer of dust or snow. The theoretical stability of liquid water does not suggest its occurrence, either on Mars or in Antarctica. In fact, global models have suggested that locations capable of providing sufficient heat for melting are, precisely for that reason, too dry for water to be present. However, the temperature of irregular local structures such as trenches or craters can be markedly warmer than those of the uniform surfaces of global models. The work described here suggests a plausible scenario in which seasonal liquid water might be produced locally, in sheltered locations, through a process of condensation, cold-trapping, buffering, and melting. While the amounts produced in the present climate would be small, copious amounts of meltwater may have been produced at other phases of the orbital cycle, as recently as 20,000 years ago.

  17. Experimental evidence for a liquid-liquid crossover in deeply cooled confined water.

    PubMed

    Cupane, Antonio; Fomina, Margarita; Piazza, Irina; Peters, Judith; Schirò, Giorgio

    2014-11-21

    In this work we investigate, by means of elastic neutron scattering, the pressure dependence of mean square displacements (MSD) of hydrogen atoms of deeply cooled water confined in the pores of a three-dimensional disordered SiO2 xerogel; experiments have been performed at 250 and 210 K from atmospheric pressure to 1200 bar. The "pressure anomaly" of supercooled water (i.e., a mean square displacement increase with increasing pressure) is observed in our sample at both temperatures; however, contrary to previous simulation results and to the experimental trend observed in bulk water, the pressure effect is smaller at lower (210 K) than at higher (250 K) temperature. Elastic neutron scattering results are complemented by differential scanning calorimetry data that put in evidence, besides the glass transition at about 170 K, a first-order-like endothermic transition occurring at about 230 K that, in view of the neutron scattering results, can be attributed to a liquid-liquid crossover. Our results give experimental evidence for the presence, in deeply cooled confined water, of a crossover occurring at about 230 K (at ambient pressure) from a liquid phase predominant at 210 K to another liquid phase predominant at 250 K; therefore, they are fully consistent with the liquid-liquid transition hypothesis. PMID:25479506

  18. Surface potential of the water liquid-vapor interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew; Pratt, Lawrence R.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis of an extended molecular dynamics calculation of the surface potential (SP) of the water liquid-vapor interface is presented. The SP predicted by the TIP4P model is -(130 + or - 50) mV. This value is of reasonable magnitude but of opposite sign to the expectations based on laboratory experiments. The electrostatic potential shows a nonmonotonic variation with depth into the liquid.

  19. Fluorescent liquid pyrene derivative-in-water microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Hollamby, M J; Danks, A E; Schnepp, Z; Rogers, S E; Hart, S R; Nakanishi, T

    2016-05-31

    A fluorescent liquid pyrene derivative with a high fluorescence quantum yield (65%) in the bulk state is reported. With this as the sole oil phase, stable luminescent oil-in-water microemulsions have been prepared. Increasing the loading of liquid pyrene swells the droplets, as detected by small-angle neutron scattering. These larger droplets have a greater proportion of pyrene excimer emission contribution in their photoluminescence spectra, which leads to a red shift in the chromaticity of the emission. PMID:27194647

  20. Metastability of Liquid Water on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, M. H.

    2001-01-01

    This talk reviews reasonable spatial and temporal scales for melting and flowing of water on Mars, and relates them to plausible martian conditions. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Bond orientational order in liquids: Towards a unified description of water-like anomalies, liquid-liquid transition, glass transition, and crystallization: Bond orientational order in liquids.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hajime

    2012-10-01

    There are at least three fundamental states of matter, depending upon temperature and pressure: gas, liquid, and solid (crystal). These states are separated by first-order phase transitions between them. In both gas and liquid phases a complete translational and rotational symmetry exist, whereas in a solid phase both symmetries are broken. In intermediate phases between liquid and solid, which include liquid crystal and plastic crystal phases, only one of the two symmetries is preserved. Among the fundamental states of matter, the liquid state is the most poorly understood. We argue that it is crucial for a better understanding of liquids to recognize that a liquid generally has the tendency to have a local structural order and its presence is intrinsic and universal to any liquid. Such structural ordering is a consequence of many-body correlations, more specifically, bond angle correlations, which we believe are crucial for the description of the liquid state. We show that this physical picture may naturally explain difficult unsolved problems associated with the liquid state, such as anomalies of water-type liquids (water, Si, Ge, ...), liquid-liquid transition, liquid-glass transition, crystallization and quasicrystal formation, in a unified manner. In other words, we need a new order parameter representing a low local free-energy configuration, which is a bond orientational order parameter in many cases, in addition to a density order parameter for the physical description of these phenomena. Here we review our two-order-parameter model of liquid and consider how transient local structural ordering is linked to all of the above-mentioned phenomena. The relationship between these phenomena is also discussed. PMID:23104614

  2. Photochemical water oxidation by crystalline polymorphs of manganese oxides: structural requirements for catalysis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, David M; Go, Yong Bok; Mui, Michelle; Gardner, Graeme; Zhang, Zhijuan; Mastrogiovanni, Daniel; Garfunkel, Eric; Li, Jing; Greenblatt, Martha; Dismukes, G Charles

    2013-03-01

    Manganese oxides occur naturally as minerals in at least 30 different crystal structures, providing a rigorous test system to explore the significance of atomic positions on the catalytic efficiency of water oxidation. In this study, we chose to systematically compare eight synthetic oxide structures containing Mn(III) and Mn(IV) only, with particular emphasis on the five known structural polymorphs of MnO2. We have adapted literature synthesis methods to obtain pure polymorphs and validated their homogeneity and crystallinity by powder X-ray diffraction and both transmission and scanning electron microscopies. Measurement of water oxidation rate by oxygen evolution in aqueous solution was conducted with dispersed nanoparticulate manganese oxides and a standard ruthenium dye photo-oxidant system. No Ru was absorbed on the catalyst surface as observed by XPS and EDX. The post reaction atomic structure was completely preserved with no amorphization, as observed by HRTEM. Catalytic activities, normalized to surface area (BET), decrease in the series Mn2O3 > Mn3O4 ≫ λ-MnO2, where the latter is derived from spinel LiMn2O4 following partial Li(+) removal. No catalytic activity is observed from LiMn2O4 and four of the MnO2 polymorphs, in contrast to some literature reports with polydispersed manganese oxides and electro-deposited films. Catalytic activity within the eight examined Mn oxides was found exclusively for (distorted) cubic phases, Mn2O3 (bixbyite), Mn3O4 (hausmannite), and λ-MnO2 (spinel), all containing Mn(III) possessing longer Mn-O bonds between edge-sharing MnO6 octahedra. Electronically degenerate Mn(III) has antibonding electronic configuration e(g)(1) which imparts lattice distortions due to the Jahn-Teller effect that are hypothesized to contribute to structural flexibility important for catalytic turnover in water oxidation at the surface. PMID:23391134

  3. Thermodynamic determination of fragility in liquids and a fragile-to-strong liquid transition in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kaori; Moynihan, Cornelius T.; Angell, C. Austen

    1999-04-01

    If crystallization can be avoided when a liquid is cooled, it will typically form a glass. Near the glass transition temperature the viscosity increases continuously but rapidly with cooling. As the glass forms, the molecular relaxation time increases with an Arrhenius-like (simple activated) form in some liquids, but shows highly non-Arrhenius behaviour in others. The former are said to be `strong' liquids, and the latter `fragile',. Here we show that the fragility of a liquid can be determined from purely thermodynamic data (as opposed to measurements of kinetics) near and below the melting point. We find that for most liquids the fragilities estimated this way are consistent with those obtained by previous methods and by a new method (ref. 3 and K.I., C.A.A. and C.T.M., unpublished data) at temperatures near the glass transition. But water is an exception. The thermodynamic method indicates that near its melting point it is the most fragile of all liquids studied, whereas the kinetic approach indicates that near the glass transition it is the least fragile. We propose that this discrepancy can be explained by a fragile-to-strong transition in supercooled water near 228K, corresponding to a change in the liquid's structure at this point.

  4. Order-parameter-aided temperature-accelerated sampling for the exploration of crystal polymorphism and solid-liquid phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Tang-Qing Vanden-Eijnden, Eric; Chen, Pei-Yang; Chen, Ming; Samanta, Amit; Tuckerman, Mark

    2014-06-07

    The problem of predicting polymorphism in atomic and molecular crystals constitutes a significant challenge both experimentally and theoretically. From the theoretical viewpoint, polymorphism prediction falls into the general class of problems characterized by an underlying rough energy landscape, and consequently, free energy based enhanced sampling approaches can be brought to bear on the problem. In this paper, we build on a scheme previously introduced by two of the authors in which the lengths and angles of the supercell are targeted for enhanced sampling via temperature accelerated adiabatic free energy dynamics [T. Q. Yu and M. E. Tuckerman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 015701 (2011)]. Here, that framework is expanded to include general order parameters that distinguish different crystalline arrangements as target collective variables for enhanced sampling. The resulting free energy surface, being of quite high dimension, is nontrivial to reconstruct, and we discuss one particular strategy for performing the free energy analysis. The method is applied to the study of polymorphism in xenon crystals at high pressure and temperature using the Steinhardt order parameters without and with the supercell included in the set of collective variables. The expected fcc and bcc structures are obtained, and when the supercell parameters are included as collective variables, we also find several new structures, including fcc states with hcp stacking faults. We also apply the new method to the solid-liquid phase transition in copper at 1300 K using the same Steinhardt order parameters. Our method is able to melt and refreeze the system repeatedly, and the free energy profile can be obtained with high efficiency.

  5. Order-parameter-aided temperature-accelerated sampling for the exploration of crystal polymorphism and solid-liquid phase transitions

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tang-Qing; Chen, Pei-Yang; Chen, Ming; Samanta, Amit; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric; Tuckerman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The problem of predicting polymorphism in atomic and molecular crystals constitutes a significant challenge both experimentally and theoretically. From the theoretical viewpoint, polymorphism prediction falls into the general class of problems characterized by an underlying rough energy landscape, and consequently, free energy based enhanced sampling approaches can be brought to bear on the problem. In this paper, we build on a scheme previously introduced by two of the authors in which the lengths and angles of the supercell are targeted for enhanced sampling via temperature accelerated adiabatic free energy dynamics [T. Q. Yu and M. E. Tuckerman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 015701 (2011)]. Here, that framework is expanded to include general order parameters that distinguish different crystalline arrangements as target collective variables for enhanced sampling. The resulting free energy surface, being of quite high dimension, is nontrivial to reconstruct, and we discuss one particular strategy for performing the free energy analysis. The method is applied to the study of polymorphism in xenon crystals at high pressure and temperature using the Steinhardt order parameters without and with the supercell included in the set of collective variables. The expected fcc and bcc structures are obtained, and when the supercell parameters are included as collective variables, we also find several new structures, including fcc states with hcp stacking faults. We also apply the new method to the solid-liquid phase transition in copper at 1300 K using the same Steinhardt order parameters. Our method is able to melt and refreeze the system repeatedly, and the free energy profile can be obtained with high efficiency. PMID:24907992

  6. Solid−liquid critical behavior of water in nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki, Kenji; Koga, Kenichiro

    2015-01-01

    Nanoconfined liquid water can transform into low-dimensional ices whose crystalline structures are dissimilar to any bulk ices and whose melting point may significantly rise with reducing the pore size, as revealed by computer simulation and confirmed by experiment. One of the intriguing, and as yet unresolved, questions concerns the observation that the liquid water may transform into a low-dimensional ice either via a first-order phase change or without any discontinuity in thermodynamic and dynamic properties, which suggests the existence of solid−liquid critical points in this class of nanoconfined systems. Here we explore the phase behavior of a model of water in carbon nanotubes in the temperature−pressure−diameter space by molecular dynamics simulation and provide unambiguous evidence to support solid−liquid critical phenomena of nanoconfined water. Solid−liquid first-order phase boundaries are determined by tracing spontaneous phase separation at various temperatures. All of the boundaries eventually cease to exist at the critical points and there appear loci of response function maxima, or the Widom lines, extending to the supercritical region. The finite-size scaling analysis of the density distribution supports the presence of both first-order and continuous phase changes between solid and liquid. At around the Widom line, there are microscopic domains of two phases, and continuous solid−liquid phase changes occur in such a way that the domains of one phase grow and those of the other evanesce as the thermodynamic state departs from the Widom line. PMID:26100904

  7. Solid-liquid critical behavior of water in nanopores.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Kenji; Koga, Kenichiro

    2015-07-01

    Nanoconfined liquid water can transform into low-dimensional ices whose crystalline structures are dissimilar to any bulk ices and whose melting point may significantly rise with reducing the pore size, as revealed by computer simulation and confirmed by experiment. One of the intriguing, and as yet unresolved, questions concerns the observation that the liquid water may transform into a low-dimensional ice either via a first-order phase change or without any discontinuity in thermodynamic and dynamic properties, which suggests the existence of solid-liquid critical points in this class of nanoconfined systems. Here we explore the phase behavior of a model of water in carbon nanotubes in the temperature-pressure-diameter space by molecular dynamics simulation and provide unambiguous evidence to support solid-liquid critical phenomena of nanoconfined water. Solid-liquid first-order phase boundaries are determined by tracing spontaneous phase separation at various temperatures. All of the boundaries eventually cease to exist at the critical points and there appear loci of response function maxima, or the Widom lines, extending to the supercritical region. The finite-size scaling analysis of the density distribution supports the presence of both first-order and continuous phase changes between solid and liquid. At around the Widom line, there are microscopic domains of two phases, and continuous solid-liquid phase changes occur in such a way that the domains of one phase grow and those of the other evanesce as the thermodynamic state departs from the Widom line. PMID:26100904

  8. On the Stability of Liquid Water on Present Day Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, Robert M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The mean annual surface pressure and temperature on present day Mars do not allow for the long term stability of liquid water on the surface. However, theoretical arguments have been advanced that suggest liquid water could form in transient events even though it would not be in equilibrium with the environment. Using a Mars General Circulation Model, we calculate where and for how long the surface pressure and surface temperature meet the minimum requirements for this metastability of liquid water. These requirements are that the pressure and temperature must be above the triple point of water, but below its boiling point. We find that there are five regions on Mars where these requirements are periodically satisfied: in the near equatorial regions of Amazonis, Arabia, and Elysium, and in the Hellas and Argyre impact basins. Whether liquid water ever forms in these regions depends on the availability of ice and heat, and on the evaporation rate. The latter is poorly understood for low pressure CO2 environments, but is likely to be so high that melting occurs rarely, if at all. However, in the relatively recent past, surface pressures may have been higher than they are today perhaps by as much as a factor of 2 or 3. Under these circumstances melting would have been easier to achieve. We plan to undertake laboratory experiments to better understand the potential for melting in low pressure environments.

  9. Entropy of Liquid Water from Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanu, Leonardo; Zhang, Cui; Galli, Giulia

    2012-02-01

    The debate on the structural properties of water has been mostly based on the calculation of pair correlation functions. However, the simulation of thermodynamic and spectroscopic quantities may be of great relevance for the characterization of liquid water properties. We have computed the entropy of liquid water using a two-phase thermodynamic model and trajectories generated by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations [1]. In an attempt to better understand the performance of several density functionals in simulating liquid water, we have performed ab initio molecular dynamics using semilocal, hybrid [2] and van der Waals density functionals [3]. We show that in all cases, at the experimental equilibrium density and at temperatures in the vicinity of 300 K, the computed entropies are underestimated, with respect to experiment, and the liquid exhibits a degree of tetrahedral order higher than in experiments. We also discuss computational strategies to simulate spectroscopic properties of water, including infrared and Raman spectra.[4pt] [1] C.Zhang, L.Spanu and G.Galli, J.Phys.Chem. B 2011 (in press)[0pt] [2] C.Zhang, D.Donadio, F.Gygi and G.Galli, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 7, 1443 (2011)[0pt] [3] C.Zhang, J.Wu, G.Galli and F.Gygi, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 7, 3061 (2011)

  10. Resurfacing of Ganymede by Liquid-Water Volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Showman, A. P.; Mosqueira, I.; Head, J. W., III

    2004-01-01

    A long-popular model for producing Ganymede s bright terrain involves flooding of low-lying graben with liquid water, slush, or warm, soft ice. The model suffers from major problems, however, including the absence of obvious near-surface heat sources, the negative buoyancy of liquid water, and the lack of a mechanism for confining the flows to graben floors. We show that topography - such as a global set of graben - causes subsurface (a hydrostatic) pressure gradients that can "suck" subsurface liquid water upward onto the floors of topographic lows (graben). As the low areas become full, the pressure gradients disappear and the resurfacing ceases. This provides an explanation for the observed straight dark-bright terrain boundaries: water cannot overflow the graben, so surfacing rarely embays craters and other rough topography. Subsurface liquid water must exist for the scenario to exist, of course, and is plausibly provided by tidal heating during an ancient orbital resonance. This abstract is a summary of Showman et al. recently submitted to Icarus.

  11. Comparison of the optical reflectivity of a shock front in liquid water and in liquid nitromethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, P.; Presles, H. N.

    1982-11-01

    Shock front optical reflectivity data for liquid water at 5.8 kbar and for liquid nitromethane at 6.0 kbar are analyzed with a reflectivity theory containing reflection within the shock front. Comparison of the analyses for water and for nitromethane leads to the conclusion that additional physics is necessary to explain the nitromethane data. It is suggested that the experimental-theoretical discrepancy for nitromethane is optical-path-length dependent, and that discrepancy is possibly due to thermal fluctuations related to explosive chemistry.

  12. Economics of liquid hydrogen from water electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, F. N.; Moore, W. I.; Walker, S. W.

    1985-01-01

    An economical model for preliminary analysis of LH2 cost from water electrolysis is presented. The model is based on data from vendors and open literature, and is suitable for computer analysis of different scenarios for 'directional' purposes. Cost data associated with a production rate of 10,886 kg/day are presented. With minimum modification, the model can also be used to predict LH2 cost from any electrolyzer once the electrolyzer's cost data are available.

  13. New Isotopic Water Analyzer for Hydrological Measurements of both Liquid Water and Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owano, T. G.; Gupta, M.; Dong, F.; Baer, D. S.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of the stable isotope ratios of liquid water (δ2H and δ18O) allow determination of water flowpaths, residence times in catchments, and groundwater migration. In the past, discrete water samples have been collected and transported to an IRMS lab for isotope characterization. Due to the expense and labor associated with such sampling, isotope studies have thus been generally limited in scope and in temporal resolution. We report on the recent development of a new field-portable Isotopic Water Analyzer (IWA-35EP) that accurately quantifies δ2H and δ18O of different natural water sources (e.g., rain, snow, streams and groundwater) at the unprecedented rate of 1080 injections per day, which yields 180 total unknown and reference samples per day (150 unknown samples per day), or 1 measurement of an unknown sample in less than 10 minutes (with 6 injections per measurement). This fast time response provides isotope hydrologists with the capability to study dynamic changes in δ values quickly (minutes) and over long time scales (weeks, months), thus enabling studies of mixing dynamics in snowmelt, canopy throughfall, stream mixing, and allows for individual precipitation events to be independently studied. In addition, the same IWA can also record fast measurements of isotopic water vapor (δ18O and δ2H) in real time (2 Hz data rate or faster) over a range of mole fractions greater than 60000 ppm H2O in air. Changing between operational modes requires a software command, to enable the user to switch from measuring liquid water to measuring water vapor, or vice versa. The new IWA, which uses LGR's patented Off-axis ICOS technology, incorporates proprietary internal thermal control for stable measurements with essentially zero drift. Measurements from recent field studies using the IWA will be presented.

  14. Coherent structures in liquid water close to hydrophilic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Giudice, Emilio; Tedeschi, Alberto; Vitiello, Giuseppe; Voeikov, Vladimir

    2013-06-01

    Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) predicts the occurrence of a number of coherent dynamical phenomena in liquid water. In the present paper we focus our attention on the joint coherent oscillation of the almost free electrons produced by the coherent oscillation of the electron clouds of water molecules, which has been described in previous publications, and of the negative electric charges lying on the solid surfaces wet by water. This joint coherent oscillation gives rise to a number of phenomenological consequences which are found to exist in the physical reality and coincide with the layers of Exclusion Zone (EZ) water experimentally observed close to hydrophilic surfaces.

  15. Satellite Remote Sensing of the Liquid Water Sensitivity in Water Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Qing-Yuan; Rossow, William B.; Welch, Ronald; Zeng, Jane; Jansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In estimation of the aerosol indirect effect, cloud liquid water path is considered either constant (Twomey effect) or increasing with enhanced droplet number concentrations (drizzle-suppression effect, or Albrecht effect) if cloud microphysics is the prevailing mechanism during the aerosol-cloud interactions. On the other hand, if cloud thermodynamics and dynamics are considered, the cloud liquid water path may be decreased with increasing droplet number concentration, which is predicted by model calculations and observed in ship-track and urban influence studies. This study is to examine the different responses of cloud liquid water path to changes of cloud droplet number concentration. Satellite data (January, April, July and October 1987) are used to retrieve the cloud liquid water sensitivity, defined as the changes of liquid water path versus changes of column droplet number concentrations. The results of a global survey reveal that 1) in at least one third of the cases the cloud liquid water sensitivity is negative, and the regional and seasonal variations of the negative liquid water sensitivity are consistent with other observations; 2) cloud droplet sizes are always inversely proportional to column droplet number concentrations. Our results suggest that an increase of cloud droplet number concentration leads to reduced cloud droplet size and enhanced evaporation, which weakens the coupling between water clouds and boundary layer in warm zones, decreases water supply from surface and desiccates cloud liquid water. Our results also suggest that the current evaluations of negative aerosol indirect forcing by global climate models (GCM), which are based on Twomey effect or Albrecht effect, may be overestimated.

  16. Liquid-liquid interfaces of semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers with water, alkanes, and perfluorinated alkanes.

    SciTech Connect

    Perahia, Dvora, Dr.; Pierce, Flint; Tsige, Mesfin; Grest, Gary Stephen, Dr.

    2008-08-01

    The liquid-liquid interface between semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers of the form F3C(CF2)n-1-(CH2)m-1CH3 and water, protonated alkanes, and perfluorinated alkanes are studied by fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. A modified version of the OPLS-AA (Optimized Parameter for Liquid Simulation All-Atom) force field of Jorgensen et al. has been used to study the interfacial behavior of semifluorinated diblocks. Aqueous interfaces are found to be sharp, with correspondingly large values of the interfacial tension. Due to the reduced hydrophobicity of the protonated block compared to the fluorinated block, hydrogen enhancement is observed at the interface. Water dipoles in the interfacial region are found to be oriented nearly parallel to the liquid-liquid interface. A number of protonated alkanes and perfluorinated alkanes are found to be mutually miscible with the semifluorinated diblocks. For these liquids, interdiffusion follows the expected Fickian behavior, and concentration-dependent diffusivities are determined.

  17. HNC solution for the central force model for liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuraisingham, Ranjit A.; Friedman, Harold L.

    1983-05-01

    Beginning with the central force model for water introduced by Lemberg, Stillinger, and Rahman, the HNC approximation method has been used to calculate the atom-atom pair correlation functions of a state of liquid water. Although a stable and accurate solution to the HNC equation for the model is obtained using the Rossky-Dale algorithm, the structure and thermodynamics agree only crudely with the published molecular dynamics results for the same model and the same N, V, T state.

  18. Boiling-up of liquid nitrogen jet in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakoryakov, V. E.; Tsoi, A. N.; Mezentsev, I. V.; Meleshkin, A. V.

    2014-06-01

    The hydrodynamic processes occurring at injection of cryogenic liquid into water pool were studied experimentally. Processes accompanying the phase transitions were registered. Data testify the developing pressure burst with an amplitude sufficient for possible formation of gas hydrates when methane is injected as a cryogenic fluid.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water: Hybrid density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Todorova, T; Seitsonen, A; Hutter, J; Kuo, W; Mundy, C

    2005-09-12

    The structure, dynamical and electronic properties of liquid water utilizing different hybrid density functionals were tested within the plane wave framework of first principles molecular dynamics simulations. The computational approach, which employs modified functionals with short-ranged Hartree-Fock exchange, was first tested in calculations of the structural and bonding properties of the water dimer and cyclic water trimer. Liquid water simulations were performed at the state point of 350 K at the experimental density. Simulations included three different hybrid functionals, a meta functional, four gradient corrected functionals, the local density and Hartree-Fock approximation. It is found that hybrid functionals are superior in reproducing the experimental structure and dynamical properties as measured by the radial distribution function and self diffusion constant when compared to the pure density functionals. The local density and Hartree-Fock approximations show strongly over- and under-structured liquids, respectively. Hydrogen bond analysis shows that the hybrid functionals give slightly smaller averaged numbers of hydrogen bonds and similar hydrogen bond populations as pure density functionals. The average molecular dipole moments in the liquid from the three hybrid functionals are lower than from the corresponding pure density functionals.

  20. Molecular dynamics of the water liquid-vapor interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.; Pratt, L. R.; MacElroy, R. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    The results of molecular dynamics calculations on the equilibrium interface between liquid water and its vapor at 325 K are presented. For the TIP4P model of water intermolecular pair potentials, the average surface dipole density points from the vapor to the liquid. The most common orientations of water molecules have the C2 nu molecular axis roughly parallel to the interface. The distributions are quite broad and therefore compatible with the intermolecular correlations characteristic of bulk liquid water. All near-neighbor pairs in the outermost interfacial layers are hydrogen bonded according to the common definition adopted here. The orientational preferences of water molecules near a free surface differ from those near rigidly planar walls which can be interpreted in terms of patterns found in hexagonal ice 1. The mean electric field in the interfacial region is parallel to the mean polarization which indicates that attention cannot be limited to dipolar charge distributions in macroscopic descriptions of the electrical properties of this interface. The value of the surface tension obtained is 132 +/- 46 dyn/cm, significantly different from the value for experimental water of 68 dyn/cm at 325 K.

  1. Adsorbed water and thin liquid films on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxe, C. S.; Hand, K. P.; Nealson, K. H.; Yung, Y. L.; Yen, A. S.; Saiz-Lopez, A.

    2012-07-01

    At present, bulk liquid water on the surface and near-subsurface of Mars does not exist due to the scarcity of condensed- and gas-phase water, pressure and temperature constraints. Given that the nuclei of soil and ice, that is, the soil solid and ice lattice, respectively, are coated with adsorbed and/or thin liquid films of water well below 273 K and the availability of water limits biological activity, we quantify lower and upper limits for the thickness of such adsorbed/water films on the surface of the Martian regolith and for subsurface ice. These limits were calculated based on experimental and theoretical data for pure water ice and water ice containing impurities, where water ice containing impurities exhibit thin liquid film enhancements, ranging from 3 to 90. Close to the cold limit of water stability (i.e. 273 K), thin liquid film thicknesses at the surface of the Martian regolith is 0.06 nm (pure water ice) and ranges from 0.2 to 5 nm (water ice with impurities). An adsorbed water layer of 0.06 nm implies a dessicated surface as the thickness of one monolayer of water is 0.3 nm but represents 0.001-0.02% of the Martian atmospheric water vapour inventory. Taking into account the specific surface area (SSA) of surface-soil (i.e. top 1 mm of regolith and 0.06 nm adsorbed water layer), shows Martian surface-soil may contain interfacial water that represents 6-66% of the upper- and lower-limit atmospheric water vapour inventory and almost four times and 33%, the lower- and upper-limit Martian atmospheric water vapour inventory. Similarly, taking the SSA of Martian soil, the top 1 mm or regolith at 5 nm thin liquid water thickness, yields 1.10×1013 and 6.50×1013 litres of waters, respectively, 55-325 times larger than Mars' atmospheric water vapour inventory. Film thicknesses of 0.2 and 5 nm represent 2.3×104-1.5×106 litres of water, which is 6.0×10-7-4.0×10-4%, respectively, of a 10 pr μm water vapour column, and 3.0×10-6-4.0×10-4% and 6.0×10

  2. Speciation analysis of mercury in water samples using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhongben; Ma, Xiaoguo

    2011-09-19

    A novel approach for preconcentration and speciation analysis of trace amount of mercury from water samples was proposed by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled to high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). Mercury species (Hg(2+), methylmercury (MeHg(+)) and phenylmercury (PhHg(+))) were complexed with dithizone (DZ) to form hydrophobic chelates and then extracted into the fine drops of extraction solvent dispersed in the aqueous sample by dispersive solvent. After extraction, the sedimented phase was analyzed by HPLC-DAD. Some important parameters affecting the DLLME such as extraction solvent and dispersive solvent type and volume, concentration of dithizone solution, sample pH, extraction time and salt effect were investigated. Ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([HMIM][PF(6)]) was found to be a suitable extractant for the chelates. Under the optimized conditions (extraction solvent: 70 μL of ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([HMIM][PF(6)]); dispersive solvent: 0.75 mL of methanol containing dithizone (0.02%, m/v); pH: 4; extraction time: 5 min; and without salt addition), the limits of detection for Hg(2+), MeHg(+) and PhHg(+) were 0.32, 0.96 and 1.91 μg L(-1) (SN(-1)=3) respectively, and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was between 4.1 and 7.3% (n=5). Three real water samples (tap water, river water and lake water) spiked with mercury species were detected by the developed method, and the relative recoveries obtained for Hg(2+), MeHg(+) and PhHg(+) were 89.6-101.3%, 85.6-102.0% and 81.3-97.6%, respectively. PMID:21819859

  3. Self-Assembly and Orientation of Hydrogen-Bonded Oligothiophene Polymorphs at Liquid-Membrane-Liquid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tevis, Ian D; Palmer, Liam C; Herman, David J; Murray, Ian P; Stone, David A; Stupp, Samuel I

    2012-03-15

    One of the challenges in organic systems with semiconducting function is the achievement of molecular orientation over large scales. We report here on the use of self-assembly kinetics to control long-range orientation of a quarterthiophene derivative designed to combine intermolecular π-π stacking and hydrogen bonding among amide groups. Assembly of these molecules in the solution phase is prevented by the hydrogen-bond-accepting solvent tetrahydrofuran, whereas formation of H-aggregates is facilitated in toluene. Rapid evaporation of solvent in a solution of the quarterthiophene in a 2:1:1 mixture of 1,4-dioxane/tetrahydrofuran/toluene leads to self-assembly of kinetically trapped mats of bundled fibers. In great contrast, slow drying in a toluene atmosphere leads to the homogeneous nucleation and growth of ordered structures shaped as rhombohedra or hexagonal prisms depending on concentration. Furthermore, exceedingly slow delivery of toluene from a high molecular weight polymer solution into the system through a porous aluminum oxide membrane results in the growth of highly oriented hexagonal prisms perpendicular to the interface. The amide groups of the compound likely adsorb onto the polar aluminum oxide surface and direct the self-assembly pathway toward heterogeneous nucleation and growth to form hexagonal prisms. We propose that the oriented prismatic polymorph results from the synergy of surface interactions rooted in hydrogen bonding on the solid membrane and the slow kinetics of self-assembly. These observations demonstrate how self-assembly conditions can be used to guide the supramolecular energy landscape to generate vastly different structures. These fundamental principles allowed us to grow oriented prismatic assemblies on transparent indium-doped tin oxide electrodes, which are of interest in organic electronics.

  4. Anisotropic behavior of water in ferroelectric liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Singh, G; Choudhary, A; Prakash, G Vijaya; Biradar, A M

    2010-05-01

    The outcome of water addition in ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) has been investigated in uniform and defect-free homogeneous and homeotropically aligned monodomain sample cells from electro-optical and dielectric spectroscopic measurements. The lagging in optical response between nonconducting (spatially variable switching) and conducting (conventional switching) portions of water added FLC sample cell has been observed by frequency-dependent electro-optical studies. The bias-dependent water related new relaxation peak near the conventional Goldstone mode relaxation process has been observed only in the homogeneous alignment and not in the homeotropic one. Further, the significant increment in dielectric anisotropy as well as faster diffusion of water along long molecular axis than short molecular axis has also been monitored. These studies strongly suggest that the distribution of water is anisotropic in FLC medium and could be the reason for new relaxation peak in the water added FLC sample. PMID:20866247

  5. Removal of non-ionic organic pollutants from water via liquid-liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    López-Montilla, Juan C; Pandey, Samir; Shah, Dinesh O; Crisalle, Oscar D

    2005-05-01

    The removal of model pollutants bromocresol green (BG) and phenol from water is demonstrated via two liquid-liquid extraction methods. Both methods exploit selective interactions established by the pollutant molecule with a surfactant, oil, or alcohol, and are variants of the more general Winsor systems where the phases are in contact along an extremely large interfacial area. In the first method the surfactant and the co-surfactant move from a predominantly oil-in-water microemulsion (Winsor I), to a middle phase microemulsion (Winsor III), and finally to a water-in-oil microemulsion (Winsor II), as the physicochemical conditions of salinity, temperature or hydrophilic-lipophilic balance of the surfactant system are varied. This method achieves better than 99% removal of the pollutant BG from water. It is argued that the removal is produced upon increasing the salinity of the system because the interaction of BG with a medium chain-length alcohol drives it to move along with the alcohol to another phase. The second method, which is scalable to industrial levels, uses a spontaneously produced water-in-oil microemulsion with large interfacial area that appears after bringing in contact water and a pre-formed Winsor II or Winsor III microemulsion system containing different surfactants and oils. The method is applied to the removal of phenol from water, and it is found that systems with polar oils such as ethyl butyrate or with cationic surfactants such as stearyl trimethylammonium chloride are more efficient in removing phenol than systems with normal alkanes or anionic surfactants. It is also shown that a microemulsion formed using a polar oil performs better than using only the polar oil as the extraction solvent. Finally, the efficiency of the second liquid-liquid extraction method can be increased from 69% in a single-stage process to 83% in a two-stage process, using the same total amount of extraction solvent. PMID:15899289

  6. Measurement of radiation damage of water-based liquid scintillator and liquid scintillator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bignell, L. J.; Diwan, M. V.; Hans, S.; Jaffe, D. E.; Rosero, R.; Vigdor, S.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-10-19

    Liquid scintillating phantoms have been proposed as a means to perform real-time 3D dosimetry for proton therapy treatment plan verification. We have studied what effect radiation damage to the scintillator will have upon this application. We have performed measurements of the degradation of the light yield and optical attenuation length of liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator after irradiation by 201 MeV proton beams that deposited doses of approximately 52 Gy, 300 Gy, and 800 Gy in the scintillator. Liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator (composed of 5% scintillating phase) exhibit light yield reductions of 1.74 ± 0.55 % andmore » 1.31 ± 0.59 % after ≈ 800 Gy of proton dose, respectively. Some increased optical attenuation was observed in the irradiated samples, the measured reduction to the light yield is also due to damage to the scintillation light production. Based on our results and conservative estimates of the expected dose in a clinical context, a scintillating phantom used for proton therapy treatment plan verification would exhibit a systematic light yield reduction of approximately 0.1% after a year of operation.« less

  7. Measurement of radiation damage of water-based liquid scintillator and liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bignell, L. J.; Diwan, M. V.; Hans, S.; Jaffe, D. E.; Rosero, R.; Vigdor, S.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-10-19

    Liquid scintillating phantoms have been proposed as a means to perform real-time 3D dosimetry for proton therapy treatment plan verification. We have studied what effect radiation damage to the scintillator will have upon this application. We have performed measurements of the degradation of the light yield and optical attenuation length of liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator after irradiation by 201 MeV proton beams that deposited doses of approximately 52 Gy, 300 Gy, and 800 Gy in the scintillator. Liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator (composed of 5% scintillating phase) exhibit light yield reductions of 1.74 ± 0.55 % and 1.31 ± 0.59 % after ≈ 800 Gy of proton dose, respectively. Some increased optical attenuation was observed in the irradiated samples, the measured reduction to the light yield is also due to damage to the scintillation light production. Based on our results and conservative estimates of the expected dose in a clinical context, a scintillating phantom used for proton therapy treatment plan verification would exhibit a systematic light yield reduction of approximately 0.1% after a year of operation.

  8. Structural studies and polymorphism in amorphous solids and liquids at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Wilding, Martin C; Wilson, Mark; McMillan, Paul F

    2006-10-01

    When amorphous materials are compressed their structures are expected to change in response to densification. In some cases, the changes in amorphous structure can be discontinuous and they can even have the character of first-order phase transitions. This is a phenomenon referred to as polyamorphism. Most evidence for polyamorphic transitions between low and high density liquids or analogous transformations between amorphous forms of the same substance to date has been indirect and based on the changes in thermodynamic and other structure-related properties with pressure. Recent studies using advanced X-ray and neutron scattering methods combined with molecular dynamics simulations are now revealing the details of structural changes in polyamorphic systems as a function of pressure. Various "two state" or "two species" models are used to understand the anomalous densification behaviour of liquids with melting curve maxima or regions of negative melting slope. Thermodynamic analysis of the two state model leads to the possibility of low- to high-density liquid transitions caused by differences in bulk thermodynamic properties between different amorphous forms and on the degree of cooperativity between low- and high-density structural configurations. The potential occurrence of first-order transitions between supercooled liquids is identified as a critical-like phenomenon. In this tutorial review we discuss the background to polyamorphism, incorporating the experimental observations, simulation studies and the two-state models. We also describe work carried on several systems that are considered to be polyamorphic. PMID:17003901

  9. A continuous mixture of two different dimers in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Pardo, L C; Henao, A; Busch, S; Guàrdia, E; Tamarit, J Ll

    2014-11-28

    It is hitherto thought that liquid water is composed of tetrahedrally coordinated molecules with an asymmetric interaction of the central molecule with neighboring molecules. Kühne et al., Nat. Commun., 2013, 4, 1450 suggested that this asymmetry, energetic rather than geometric, is the cornerstone to reconcile the homogeneous and inhomogeneous viewpoints of liquid water. In order to investigate the geometric origin of that asymmetry, we have scrutinized Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of water through a careful analysis of the five-dimensional probability distribution function of Euler angles in which the relative positions and orientations of water molecules are obtained. We demonstrate that, beyond the ubiquitous tetrahedral structure with well-defined molecular dimers, there is a series of possible molecular orientations that define the structure. These orientations are generated by rotating the neighboring molecule around the O-H axis that is involved in the hydrogen bond scheme. Two of the possible orientations have a higher probability, giving rise to two kinds of dimers: one close to the lowest energy of a water dimer in vacuum with an almost perpendicular alignment of the dipole moment, and another one with a parallel orientation of the dipole moment which is less tightly bound. These two different dimers have an effect on the orientation of further water dipole moments up to a distance of ≈6 Å. Liquid water can therefore be described as a continuous mixture of two kinds of dimers where the hydrogen bonds have the same geometry but the interaction energies are different due to a different mutual orientation of the dipoles of the participating water molecules. PMID:25308564

  10. Numerical studies on the separation performance of liquid- liquid Hydrocyclone for higher water-cut wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osei, H.; Al-Kayiem, H. H.; Hashim, F. M.

    2015-12-01

    Liquid-liquid hydrocyclones have nowadays become very useful in the oil industry because of their numerous applications. They can be installed downhole in the case of a well that produces higher water-oil ratios. The design of a liquid-liquid hydrocyclone for such a task is critical and every geometric part of the hydrocyclone has a part to play as far as separation is concerned. This work, through validated numerical technique, investigated the liquid-liquid hydrocyclone performance for the cases of single-inlet and dual-inlets, with different upper cylindrical lengths, specifically, 30mm and 60mm.It was observed that the hydrocyclones with the 30mm upper cylindrical section perform better than the ones with 60 mm upper cylindrical section. It was again noted that, even though higher number of tangential inlets increases the swirl intensity, they have the tendency to break up the oil droplets within the hydrocyclone because of increasing shear and jet flow interaction.

  11. Complete Wetting of Pt(111) by Nanoscale Liquid Water Films.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuntao; Dibble, Collin J; Petrik, Nikolay G; Smith, R Scott; Kay, Bruce D; Kimmel, Greg A

    2016-02-01

    The melting and wetting of nanoscale crystalline ice films on Pt(111) that are transiently heated above the melting point in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) using nanosecond laser pulses are studied with infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy and Kr temperature-programmed desorption. The as-grown crystalline ice films consist of nanoscale ice crystallites embedded in a hydrophobic water monolayer. Upon heating, these crystallites melt to form nanoscale droplets of liquid water. Rapid cooling after each pulse quenches the films, allowing them to be interrogated with UHV surface science techniques. With each successive heat pulse, these liquid drops spread across the surface until it is entirely covered with a multilayer water film. These results, which show that nanoscale water films completely wet Pt(111), are in contrast to molecular dynamics simulations predicting partial wetting of water drops on a hydrophobic water monolayer. The results provide valuable insights into the wetting characteristics of nanoscale water films on a clean, well-characterized, single-crystal surface. PMID:26785059

  12. Probing Hydrophilic Interface of Solid/Liquid-Water by Nanoultrasonics

    PubMed Central

    Mante, Pierre-Adrien; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Wen, Yu-Chieh; Chen, Hui-Yuan; Yang, Szu-Chi; Huang, Yu-Ru; -Ju Chen, I.; Chen, Yun-Wen; Gusev, Vitalyi; Chen, Miin-Jang; Kuo, Jer-Lai; Sheu, Jinn-Kong; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    Despite the numerous devoted studies, water at solid interfaces remains puzzling. An ongoing debate concerns the nature of interfacial water at a hydrophilic surface, whether it is more solid-like, ice-like, or liquid-like. To answer this question, a complete picture of the distribution of the water molecule structure and molecular interactions has to be obtained in a non-invasive way and on an ultrafast time scale. We developed a new experimental technique that extends the classical acoustic technique to the molecular level. Using nanoacoustic waves with a femtosecond pulsewidth and an ångström resolution to noninvasively diagnose the hydration structure distribution at ambient solid/water interface, we performed a complete mapping of the viscoelastic properties and of the density in the whole interfacial water region at hydrophilic surfaces. Our results suggest that water in the interfacial region possesses mixed properties and that the different pictures obtained up to now can be unified. Moreover, we discuss the effect of the interfacial water structure on the abnormal thermal transport properties of solid/liquid interfaces. PMID:25176017

  13. Glass polymorphism in glycerol-water mixtures: I. A computer simulation study.

    PubMed

    Jahn, David A; Wong, Jessina; Bachler, Johannes; Loerting, Thomas; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2016-04-28

    We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of water-glycerol mixtures in the glass state. Specifically, we study the transformations between low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous (HDA) forms of these mixtures induced by compression/decompression at constant temperature. Our MD simulations reproduce qualitatively the density changes observed in experiments. Specifically, the LDA-HDA transformation becomes (i) smoother and (ii) the hysteresis in a compression/decompression cycle decreases as T and/or glycerol content increase. This is surprising given the fast compression/decompression rates (relative to experiments) accessible in MD simulations. We study mixtures with glycerol molar concentration χ(g) = 0-13% and find that, for the present mixture models and rates, the LDA-HDA transformation is detectable up to χ(g) ≈ 5%. As the concentration increases, the density of the starting glass (i.e., LDA at approximately χ(g) ≤ 5%) rapidly increases while, instead, the density of HDA remains practically constant. Accordingly, the LDA state and hence glass polymorphism become inaccessible for glassy mixtures with approximately χ(g) > 5%. We present an analysis of the molecular-level changes underlying the LDA-HDA transformation. As observed in pure glassy water, during the LDA-to-HDA transformation, water molecules within the mixture approach each other, moving from the second to the first hydration shell and filling the first interstitial shell of water molecules. Interestingly, similar changes also occur around glycerol OH groups. It follows that glycerol OH groups contribute to the density increase during the LDA-HDA transformation. An analysis of the hydrogen bond (HB)-network of the mixtures shows that the LDA-HDA transformation is accompanied by minor changes in the number of HBs of water and glycerol. Instead, large changes in glycerol and water coordination numbers occur. We also perform a detailed analysis of the effects that

  14. Liquid-vapor oscillations of water in hydrophobic nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckstein, Oliver; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2003-06-01

    Water plays a key role in biological membrane transport. In ion channels and water-conducting pores (aquaporins), one-dimensional confinement in conjunction with strong surface effects changes the physical behavior of water. In molecular dynamics simulations of water in short (0.8 nm) hydrophobic pores the water density in the pore fluctuates on a nanosecond time scale. In long simulations (460 ns in total) at pore radii ranging from 0.35 to 1.0 nm we quantify the kinetics of oscillations between a liquid-filled and a vapor-filled pore. This behavior can be explained as capillary evaporation alternating with capillary condensation, driven by pressure fluctuations in the water outside the pore. The free-energy difference between the two states depends linearly on the radius. The free-energy landscape shows how a metastable liquid state gradually develops with increasing radius. For radii > 0.55 nm it becomes the globally stable state and the vapor state vanishes. One-dimensional confinement affects the dynamic behavior of the water molecules and increases the self diffusion by a factor of 2-3 compared with bulk water. Permeabilities for the narrow pores are of the same order of magnitude as for biological water pores. Water flow is not continuous but occurs in bursts. Our results suggest that simulations aimed at collective phenomena such as hydrophobic effects may require simulation times >50 ns. For water in confined geometries, it is not possible to extrapolate from bulk or short time behavior to longer time scales.

  15. Water Tank with Capillary Air/Liquid Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Smith, Frederick; Edeen, Gregg; Almlie, Jay C.

    2010-01-01

    A bladderless water tank (see figure) has been developed that contains capillary devices that allow it to be filled and emptied, as needed, in microgravity. When filled with water, the tank shields human occupants of a spacecraft against cosmic radiation. A membrane that is permeable by air but is hydrophobic (neither wettable nor permeable by liquid water) covers one inside surface of the tank. Grooves between the surface and the membrane allow air to flow through vent holes in the surface as the tank is filled or drained. A margin of wettable surface surrounds the edges of the membrane, and all the other inside tank surfaces are also wettable. A fill/drain port is located in one corner of the tank and is covered with a hydrophilic membrane. As filling begins, water runs from the hydrophilic membrane into the corner fillets of the tank walls. Continued filling in the absence of gravity will result in a single contiguous air bubble that will be vented through the hydrophobic membrane. The bubble will be reduced in size until it becomes spherical and smaller than the tank thickness. Draining the tank reverses the process. Air is introduced through the hydrophobic membrane, and liquid continuity is maintained with the fill/drain port through the corner fillets. Even after the tank is emptied, as long as the suction pressure on the hydrophilic membrane does not exceed its bubble point, no air will be drawn into the liquid line.

  16. A single-site multipole model for liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Kelly N.; Tan, Ming-Liang; Ichiye, Toshiko

    2016-07-01

    Accurate and efficient empirical potential energy models that describe the atomistic interactions between water molecules in the liquid phase are essential for computer simulations of many problems in physics, chemistry, and biology, especially when long length or time scales are important. However, while models with non-polarizable partial charges at four or five sites in a water molecule give remarkably good values for certain properties, deficiencies have been noted in other properties and increasing the number of sites decreases computational efficiency. An alternate approach is to utilize a multipole expansion of the electrostatic potential due to the molecular charge distribution, which is exact outside the charge distribution in the limits of infinite distances or infinite orders of multipoles while partial charges are a qualitative representation of electron density as point charges. Here, a single-site multipole model of water is presented, which is as fast computationally as three-site models but is also more accurate than four- and five-site models. The dipole, quadrupole, and octupole moments are from quantum mechanical-molecular mechanical calculations so that they account for the average polarization in the liquid phase, and represent both the in-plane and out-of-plane electrostatic potentials of a water molecule in the liquid phase. This model gives accurate thermodynamic, dynamic, and dielectric properties at 298 K and 1 atm, as well as good temperature and pressure dependence of these properties.

  17. A single-site multipole model for liquid water.

    PubMed

    Tran, Kelly N; Tan, Ming-Liang; Ichiye, Toshiko

    2016-07-21

    Accurate and efficient empirical potential energy models that describe the atomistic interactions between water molecules in the liquid phase are essential for computer simulations of many problems in physics, chemistry, and biology, especially when long length or time scales are important. However, while models with non-polarizable partial charges at four or five sites in a water molecule give remarkably good values for certain properties, deficiencies have been noted in other properties and increasing the number of sites decreases computational efficiency. An alternate approach is to utilize a multipole expansion of the electrostatic potential due to the molecular charge distribution, which is exact outside the charge distribution in the limits of infinite distances or infinite orders of multipoles while partial charges are a qualitative representation of electron density as point charges. Here, a single-site multipole model of water is presented, which is as fast computationally as three-site models but is also more accurate than four- and five-site models. The dipole, quadrupole, and octupole moments are from quantum mechanical-molecular mechanical calculations so that they account for the average polarization in the liquid phase, and represent both the in-plane and out-of-plane electrostatic potentials of a water molecule in the liquid phase. This model gives accurate thermodynamic, dynamic, and dielectric properties at 298 K and 1 atm, as well as good temperature and pressure dependence of these properties. PMID:27448890

  18. Liquid Hot Water Pretreatment of Olive Tree Pruning Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cara, Cristóbal; Romero, Inmaculada; Oliva, Jose Miguel; Sáez, Felicia; Castro, Eulogio

    Olive tree pruning generates an abundant, renewable lignocellulose residue, which is usually burnt on fields to prevent propagation of vegetal diseases, causing economic costs and environmental concerns. As a first step in an alternative use to produce fuel ethanol, this work is aimed to study the pretreatment of olive tree pruning residues by liquid hot water. Pretreatment was carried out at seven temperature levels in the range 170-230°C for 10 or 60 min. Sugar recoveries in both solid and liquid fractions resulting from pretreatment as well as enzymatic hydrolysis yield of the solid were used to evaluate pretreatment performance. Results show that the enzyme accessibility of cellulose in the pretreated solid fraction increased with pretreatment time and temperature, although sugar degradation in the liquid fraction was concomitantly higher.

  19. Hydrophobicity and hydrogen-bonded network in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Je-Luen; Wingreen, Ned; Tang, Chao; Car, Roberto

    2004-03-01

    Hydrophobicity is the main driving force behind numerous important biological processes at molecular level, including protein folding and the formation of biological membranes. Yet few experimental probes can measure the local water structure around a hydrophobic solute, and our understanding of the detailed structure of hydrophobic hydration has to rely on molecular dynamics simulation. As a model system, several groups studied two methane molecules in liquid water and obtained the potential of mean force using Lennard-Jones potential and various water models. However, hydrophobic effect critically depends on the description of hydrogen-bonded network, and classical simulations may not be sufficient to descirbe the forming and breaking of hydrogen bonds. In this work, we apply ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to study this model system. Besides the potential of mean force between 2 methanes in water, the role of the local water structure will be highlighted.

  20. Interplay between Microscopic Diffusion and Local Structure of Liquid Water

    SciTech Connect

    Cunsolo, A.; Orecchini, A; Petrillo, C.; Sacchetti, F.

    2010-11-29

    We present a quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) study of single-particle dynamics in pure water, measured at temperatures between 256 and 293 K along an isobaric path at 200 MPa. A thorough analysis of the spectral line shapes reveals a departure from simple models of continuous or jump diffusion, with such an effect becoming stronger at lower temperatures. We show that such a diverging trend of dynamical quantities upon cooling closely resembles the divergent (anomalous) compressibility observed in water by small-angle diffraction. Such an analogy suggests an interesting interplay between single-particle diffusion and structural arrangements in liquid water, both bearing witness of the well-known water anomalies. In particular, a fit of dynamical parameters by a Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher law provides a critical temperature of about 220 K, interestingly close to the hypothesized position of the second critical point of water and to the so-called Widom line.

  1. Glass polymorphism in glycerol–water mixtures: I. A computer simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Jahn, David A.; Wong, Jessina; Bachler, Johannes; Loerting, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of water–glycerol mixtures in the glass state. Specifically, we study the transformations between low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous (HDA) forms of these mixtures induced by compression/decompression at constant temperature. Our MD simulations reproduce qualitatively the density changes observed in experiments. Specifically, the LDA–HDA transformation becomes (i) smoother and (ii) the hysteresis in a compression/decompression cycle decreases as T and/or glycerol content increase. This is surprising given the fast compression/decompression rates (relative to experiments) accessible in MD simulations. We study mixtures with glycerol molar concentration χ g = 0–13% and find that, for the present mixture models and rates, the LDA–HDA transformation is detectable up to χ g ≈ 5%. As the concentration increases, the density of the starting glass (i.e., LDA at approximately χ g ≤ 5%) rapidly increases while, instead, the density of HDA remains practically constant. Accordingly, the LDA state and hence glass polymorphism become inaccessible for glassy mixtures with approximately χ g > 5%. We present an analysis of the molecular-level changes underlying the LDA–HDA transformation. As observed in pure glassy water, during the LDA-to-HDA transformation, water molecules within the mixture approach each other, moving from the second to the first hydration shell and filling the first interstitial shell of water molecules. Interestingly, similar changes also occur around glycerol OH groups. It follows that glycerol OH groups contribute to the density increase during the LDA–HDA transformation. An analysis of the hydrogen bond (HB)-network of the mixtures shows that the LDA–HDA transformation is accompanied by minor changes in the number of HBs of water and glycerol. Instead, large changes in glycerol and water coordination numbers occur. We also perform a detailed analysis of the

  2. Stable and water-tolerant ionic liquid ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Jain, Nirmesh; Zhang, Xiaoli; Hawkett, Brian S; Warr, Gregory G

    2011-03-01

    Ionic liquid ferrofluids have been prepared containing both bare and sterically stabilized 8-12 nm diameter superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, which remain stable for several months in both protic ethylammonium and aprotic imidazolium room-temperature ionic liquids. These ferrofluids exhibit spiking in static magnetic fields similar to conventional aqueous and nonaqueous ferrofluids. Ferrofluid stability was verified by following the flocculation and settling behavior of dilute nanoparticle dispersions. Although bare nanoparticles showed excellent stability in some ILs, they were unstable in others, and exhibited limited water tolerance. Stability was achieved by incorporating a thin polymeric steric stabilization layer designed to be compatible with the IL. This confers the added benefit of imbuing the ILF with a high tolerance to water. PMID:21338083

  3. Bulk and interfacial liquid water as a transient network.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Miriam; Gekle, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    The special macroscopic properties of liquid water stem from its structure as a complex network of molecules connected by hydrogen bonds. While the dynamics of single molecules within this network has been extensively investigated, only little attention has been paid to the closed loops (meshes) of hydrogen-bonded molecules which determine the network topology. Using molecular dynamics simulations we analyze the size, shape, geometrical arrangement, and dynamical stability of loops containing up to 10 hydrogen bonds. We find that six-membered loops in liquid water even at room temperature retain a striking similarity with the well-known structure of ice. Analyzing the network dynamics we find that rings of more than five hydrogen bonds are stabilized compared to a random collection containing the same number of single bonds. We finally show that in the vicinity of hydrophobic and hydrophilic interfaces loops arrange in a preferred orientation. PMID:26651669

  4. Time-dependent density fluctuations in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldron, Conor J.; English, Niall J.

    2016-04-01

    Temporal system-mass-density fluctuation analysis was performed on liquid-water molecular-dynamics simulations at ambient pressure and 200 and 300 K, in three increasingly-large systems. A prominent mode in system-density fluctuations was observed at molecular-librational frequencies of ∼600-800 cm-1 (with pronounced temperature dependence). This mode displayed marked system-size dependence, disappearing for larger systems. Persistent system-density fluctuations were clearly evident at 10-11 cm-1 for all systems and temperatures, with lower-amplitude 'overtones' evident only in larger systems. It is conjectured that this reflects ∼3 ps timescales observed in earlier studies for dissipation of local-density fluctuations in liquid water in this 200-300 K temperature range.

  5. Nucleationand surface induced crystallization in supercooled liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Giovanna; Li, Tianshu; Donadio, Davide; Galli, Giulia

    2010-03-01

    Understanding crystallization of water into ice is a very challenging problem, both experimentally and theoretically; in particular, the spatial and temporal resolutions required to characterize the crystallization process at the atomic scale are not yet accessible to experiment. Here we employ a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and advanced sampling techniques to study nucleation in supercooled liquid water. Recently, such an approach has been successfully applied to study nucleation in supercooled liquid silicon [1,2]. The results of our simulations, carried out using a coarse grain potential [3], are used to analyze nucleation rates at various temperatures and to investigate the role played by the presence of surfaces in the freezing processes. [4pt] [1] T. Li, D. Donadio and G. Galli, Nat. Mat. 9, 726730 (2009)[0pt] [2] T. Li, D. Donadio and G. Galli, J. Chem. Phys., in press[0pt] [3] V. Molinero and E. B. Moore J. Phys. Chem. B 113, 40084016 (2009)

  6. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of silver nanoparticles in water using ionic liquid 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sha; Sun, Yuanjing; Chao, Jingbo; Cheng, Liping; Chen, Yun; Liu, Jingfu

    2016-03-01

    Using the ionic liquid (IL) 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate as the extractant and methanol as the dispersion solvent, a dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method was developed to extract silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) from environmental water samples. Parameters that influenced the extraction efficiency such as IL concentration, pH and extraction time were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the highest extraction efficiency for AgNPs was above 90% with an enrichment factor of >90. The extracted AgNPs in the IL phase were identified by transmission electron microscopy and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after microwave digestion, with a detection limit of 0.01μg/L. The spiked recovery of AgNPs was 84.4% with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 3.8% (n=6) at a spiked level of 5μg/L, and 89.7% with a RSD of 2.2% (n=6) at a spiked level of 300μg/L, respectively. Commonly existed environmental ions had a very limited influence on the extraction efficiency. The developed method was successfully applied to the analysis of AgNPs in river water, lake water, and the influent and effluent of a wastewater treatment plant, with recoveries in the range of 71.0%-90.9% at spiking levels of 0.11-4.7μg/L. PMID:26969067

  7. Investigating evidence of geologically recent liquid water on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Kelly Jean

    2009-06-01

    Geologically young gullies have been proposed to be evidence of recent liquid water on Mars. This dissertation details work I have done to address issues surrounding the Martian gullies and recent water on Mars. In order to determine the elevations at which gullies occur, I created a set of Interactive Data Language programs and Unix C-shell scripts to coregister Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter topography with high resolution Mars images. My scripts represent the first public method that does this. Recently, the Mars Orbiter Camera detected changes in the form of new bright deposits in two gullies. The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera detected more gullies with bright deposits. I used my scripts to identify some of the best candidates for liquid water formation based on their shallow average slopes. A Digital Elevation Model (DEM) was produced using HiRISE stereo images of my selected candidates in Hale Crater. I model two gullies with bright slope deposits in Hale Crater and find that both water- rich and sediment-rich flows could reproduce the bright deposits' locations and morphologies. Since liquid water is rarely stable on Mars today, I suggest that dry flows formed the bright deposits. The channel gradient where flows deposit, the apex slope, can tell us whether a flow was likely dry and non-fluidized (slopes ~21°) or fluidized (shallower slopes). I measured the apex slope of 75 gullies located in five HiRISE DEMs. I find that 72% of the gullies studied were likely emplaced by a fluidized flow. I also find that modified gullies are more likely to have a fluidized emplacement than relatively fresh gullies. My results suggest that there is no evidence requiring water-rich flows in gullies today. Understanding the concept of water on Mars is crucial to understanding NASA's Mars Exploration Strategy, "Follow the Water." I undertook a study investigating alternative conceptions about water on Mars held by middle school science teachers to

  8. Phase Behavior and Collective Dynamics of Liquid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastry, Srikanth

    The unusual properties of liquid water have been analyzed predominantly in terms of the hydrogen bond network which characterizes its microscopic structure. Properties of the hydrogen bond network, with physically motivated additional assumptions, have been shown to describe well most static and dynamic properties of water. However, there are important exceptions where no conclusive analysis in terms of the hydrogen bond network has been carried out. Two such exceptions are addressed in this thesis. The phase behaviour of water--in particular the limiting behavior of the metastable continuations of the liquid--is an open question. To explain the apparent divergence of many thermodynamic and microscopic quantities on supercooling, Speedy and Angell proposed that these divergences are due to an absolute limit of stability of the liquid phase, conjecturing further that such limits of stability form a continuous reentrant locus in the P-T plane. In an attempt to address this conjecture on the basis of microscopic behavior in water, a lattice gas model is developed, which exhibits water-like behavior and has phases corresponding to the real system. The liquid gas spinodal is seen to be reentrant, in accordance with the stability limit conjecture. However, the limit of stability upon supercooling in the model, while consistent with experiments, is found to differ qualitatively from the prediction, displaying no singular behavior of thermodynamic quantities. In computer and experimental studies of sound propagation in water at high wavenumbers, the sound velocity is found to be about twice the hydrodynamic value. It was proposed that this mode propagates on the hydrogen bond network and occurs due to the connectivity properties of the network. This question is studied through Molecular Dynamics simulations of the liquid and normal model analysis of inherent structures. The results show that only one longitudinal sound mode is present. However, an attempt is made to go

  9. Interfacial Transport Phenomena Stability in Liquid-Metal/Water Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Corradini; Anderson, Mark; Bonazza, Riccardo; Cho, D. H.

    2002-12-19

    One concept being considered for steam generation in innovative nuclear reactor applications, involves water coming into direct contact with a circulating molten metal. The vigorous agitation of the two fluids, the direct liquid-liquid contact and the consequent large interfacial area can give rise to large heat transfer coefficients and rapid steam generation. For an optimum design of such direct contact heat exchange and vaporization systems, detailed knowledge is necessary of the various flow regimes, interfacial transport phenomena, heat transfer and operational stability.In order to investigate the characteristics of such a molten metal/water direct contact heat exchanger, a series of experiments were performed in both a 1-D and 2-d experimental facility. The facilities primarily consist of a liquid-metal melt chamber, heated test section, water pumping/injection system, and steam suppression tank (condenser). A real-time high energy X-ray imaging system along with several temperature measurements and flow measurements were developed and utilized to measure the multiphase flow and obtain an empirical database of local as well as overall system parameters. Results have found volumetric void fraction between 0.05-0.2, overall volumetric heat transfer coefficient ranging from 4-20 kW/m3K, evaporation zone lengths on the order of 10cm and local heat transfer coefficients varying between 500-5000 W/m2K depending on the inlet water injection conditions and system pressure. Time-dependent void fraction distribution and generated water-vapor bubble characteristics (i.e. bubble formation rate, bubble rise velocity, and bubble surface area) were measured using an X-ray image analysis technique. These measurements aided in the determination of the volumetric thermal performance as well as well as the first detailed information on local interfacial phenomenon. This information in turn resulted in the first experimental measurements of the local heat transfer coefficient

  10. Ionic-liquid-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with high-performance liquid chromatography for the determination of multiclass pesticide residues in water samples.

    PubMed

    Tadesse, Bezuayehu; Teju, Endale; Gure, Abera; Megersa, Negussie

    2015-03-01

    Ionic-liquid-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction in combination with high-performance liquid chromatography and diode array detection has been proposed for the simultaneous analysis of four multiclass pesticide residues including carbaryl, methidathion, chlorothalonil, and ametryn from water samples. The major experimental parameters including the type and volume of ionic liquid, sample pH, type, and volume of disperser solvent and cooling time were investigated and optimum conditions were established. Under the optimum experimental conditions, limits of detection and quantification of the method were in the range of 0.1-1.8 and 0.4-5.9 μg/L, respectively, with satisfactory enrichment factors ranging from 10-20. The matrix-matched calibration curves, which were constructed for lake water, as a representative matrix were linear over wide range with coefficients of determination of 0.996 or better. Intra- and interday precisions, expressed as relative standard deviations, were in the range of 1.1-9.7 and 3.1-7.8%, respectively. The relative recoveries of the spiked environmental water samples at one concentration level were in the range of 77-102%. The results of the present study revealed that the proposed method is simple, fast, and uses environmentally friendly extraction solvent for the analysis of the target pesticide residues in environmental water samples. PMID:25641819

  11. Optically Thin Liquid Water Clouds: Their Importance and Our Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, D. D.; Vogelmann, A. M.; Austin, R. T.; Barnard, J. C.; Cady-Pereira, K.; Chiu, J. C.; Clough, S. A.; Flynn, C.; Khaiyer, M. M.; Liljegren, J.; Johnson, K.; Lin, B.; Long, C.; Marshak, A.; Matrosov, S. Y.; McFarlane, S. A.; Miller, M.; Min, Q.; Minnis, P.; O'Hirok, W.; Wang, Z.; Wiscombe, W.

    2006-01-01

    Many of the clouds important to the Earth's energy balance, from the tropics to the Arctic, are optically thin and contain liquid water. Longwave and shortwave radiative fluxes are very sensitive to small perturbations of the cloud liquid water path (LWP) when the liquid water path is small (i.e., < g/sq m) and, thus, the radiative properties of these clouds must be well understood to capture them correctly in climate models. We review the importance of these thin clouds to the Earth's energy balance, and explain the difficulties in observing them. In particular, because these clouds are optically thin, potentially mixed-phase, and often (i.e., have large 3-D variability), it is challenging to retrieve their microphysical properties accurately. We describe a retrieval algorithm intercomparison that was conducted to evaluate the issues involved. The intercomparison included eighteen different algorithms to evaluate their retrieved LWP, optical depth, and effective radii. Surprisingly, evaluation of the simplest case, a single-layer overcast cloud, revealed that huge discrepancies exist among the various techniques, even among different algorithms that are in the same general classification. This suggests that, despite considerable advances that have occurred in the field, much more work must be done, and we discuss potential avenues for future work.

  12. Thermally driven electrokinetic energy conversion with liquid water microjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Royce K.; Gamlieli, Zach; Harris, Stephen J.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2015-11-01

    A goal of current energy research is to design systems and devices that can efficiently exploit waste heat and utilize solar or geothermal heat energy for electrical power generation. We demonstrate a novel technique exploiting water's large coefficient of thermal expansion, wherein modest thermal gradients produce the requisite high pressure for driving fast-flowing liquid water microjets, which can effect the direct conversion of the kinetic energy into electricity and gaseous hydrogen. Waste heat in thermoelectric generating plants and combustion engines, as well as solar and geothermal energy could be used to drive these systems.

  13. Measuring Low Concentrations of Liquid Water in Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus has been developed for measuring the low concentrations of liquid water and ice in relatively dry soil samples. Designed as a prototype of instruments for measuring the liquidwater and ice contents of Lunar and Martian soils, the apparatus could also be applied similarly to terrestrial desert soils and sands. The apparatus is a special-purpose impedance spectrometer: Its design is based on the fact that the electrical behavior of a typical soil sample is well approximated by a network of resistors and capacitors in which resistances decrease and capacitances increase (and, hence, the magnitude of impedance decreases) with increasing water content.

  14. Electrons and Hydrogen-Bond Connectivity in Liquid Water

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Serra, M.V.; Artacho, Emilio

    2006-01-13

    The network connectivity in liquid water is revised in terms of electronic signatures of hydrogen bonds (HBs) instead of geometric criteria, in view of recent x-ray absorption studies. The analysis is based on ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations at ambient conditions. Even if instantaneous threadlike structures are observed in the electronic network, they continuously reshape in oscillations reminiscent of the r and t modes in ice ({tau}{approx}170 fs). However, two water molecules initially joined by a HB remain effectively bound over many periods regardless of its electronic signature.

  15. Liquid polymorphism and density anomaly in a three-dimensional associating lattice gas.

    PubMed

    Girardi, Mauricio; Balladares, Aline L; Henriques, Vera B; Barbosa, Marcia C

    2007-02-14

    The authors investigate the phase diagram of a three-dimensional associating lattice gas (ALG) model. This model combines orientational icelike interactions and "van der Waals" that might be repulsive, representing, in this case, a penalty for distortion of hydrogen bonds. These interactions can be interpreted as two competing distances, making the connection between this model and continuous isotropic soft-core potentials. The authors present Monte Carlo studies of the ALG model showing the presence of two liquid phases, two critical points, and density anomaly. PMID:17313225

  16. Liquid water can slip on a hydrophilic surface

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Tuan Anh; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V.; Lee, Lloyd L.; Striolo, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Understanding and predicting the behavior of water, especially in contact with various surfaces, is a scientific challenge. Molecular-level understanding of hydrophobic effects and their macroscopic consequences, in particular, is critical to many applications. Macroscopically, a surface is classified as hydrophilic or hydrophobic depending on the contact angle formed by a water droplet. Because hydrophobic surfaces tend to cause water slip whereas hydrophilic ones do not, the former surfaces can yield self-cleaning garments and ice-repellent materials whereas the latter cannot. The results presented herein suggest that this dichotomy might be purely coincidental. Our simulation results demonstrate that hydrophilic surfaces can show features typically associated with hydrophobicity, namely liquid water slip. Further analysis provides details on the molecular mechanism responsible for this surprising result. PMID:21911406

  17. Transformation of acidic poorly water soluble drugs into ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Balk, Anja; Wiest, Johannes; Widmer, Toni; Galli, Bruno; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Meinel, Lorenz

    2015-08-01

    Poor water solubility of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) is a major challenge in drug development impairing bioavailability and therapeutic benefit. This study is addressing the possibility to tailor pharmaceutical and physical properties of APIs by transforming these into tetrabutylphosphonium (TBP) salts, including the generation of ionic liquids (IL). Therefore, poorly water soluble acidic APIs (Diclofenac, Ibuprofen, Ketoprofen, Naproxen, Sulfadiazine, Sulfamethoxazole, and Tolbutamide) were converted into TBP ILs or low melting salts and compared to the corresponding sodium salts. Free acids and TBP salts were characterized by NMR and IR spectroscopy, DSC and XRPD, DVS and dissolution rate measurements, release profiles, and saturation concentration measurements. TBP salts had lower melting points and glass transition temperatures and dissolution rates were improved up to a factor of 1000 as compared to the corresponding free acid. An increase in dissolution rates was at the expense of increased hygroscopicity. In conclusion, the creation of TBP ionic liquids or solid salts from APIs is a valuable concept addressing dissolution and solubility challenges of poorly water soluble acidic compounds. The data suggested that tailor-made counterions may substantially expand the formulation scientist's armamentarium to meet challenges of poorly water soluble drugs. PMID:25976317

  18. A new analytic equation of state for liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, C. A.; Austin, P. H.

    1999-01-01

    We develop a new analytical equation of state for water based on the Song, Mason, and Ihm equation of state and Poole et al.'s simple model of the free energy of strong tetrahedral hydrogen bonds. Repulsive and attractive forces are modeled using a modification of the Weeks-Chandler-Anderson decomposition of the pair potential, with closed tetrahedral hydrogen bonds contributing both internal energy and entropy to the free energy of water. Strong tetrahedral hydrogen bonds are modeled explicitly using a simplified partition function. The resulting equation of state is 20-30 times more accurate than equivalent simple cubic equations of state over a wide range of pressures (0.1→3000 bar) and temperatures (-34→1200 °C) including the supercooled region. The new equation of state predicts a second liquid-liquid critical point at pC'=0.954 kbar, ρC'=1.045 g cm-3 and TC'=228.3 K. The temperature of this second critical point is above the homogeneous freezing temperature at 1 kbar, thus this region of the phase diagram may be experimentally accessible. The phase diagram also suggests that the homogeneous nucleation temperature above 1.2 kbar may be determined by a phase transition from high-density water to low-density water.

  19. Calculation of heavy-ion tracks in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, R.N.; Turner, J.E.; Ritchie, R.H.; Wright, H.A.

    1985-01-01

    Detailed Monte Carlo calculations are presented of proton and alpha-particle tracks in liquid water. The computations treat the interactions of the primary particle and all secondary electrons on a statistical, event-by-event basis to simulate the initial physical changes that accompany the passage of an ion through water. Our methods for obtaining the cross sections needed for such calculations are described. Inelastic scattering probabilities (inverse mean free paths) are derived from a complex dielectric response function constructed for liquid water, based on experimental and theoretical data. Examples of partial cross sections for ionization and excitation by protons are shown. The computation of electron transport and energy loss includes exchange, elastic scattering, and a scheme for the delocalization of energy shared collectively by a large number of electrons in the condensed medium. Several examples of calculated proton and alpha-particle tracks are presented and discussed. The meaning and significance of the concept of a ''track core'' is briefly addressed in the light of this work. The present paper treats only the initial, physical changes produced by radiation in water (in approx. 10/sup -15/ sec in local regions of a track). The work described here is used in calculations that we have reported in other publications on the later chemical development of charged-particle tracks. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Fractionation of sugar cane with hot, compressed, liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.G.; Kam, L.C.; Zemann, A.J.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

    1996-08-01

    Sugar-cane bagasse and leaves (10--15 g oven-dry basis) were fractionated without size reduction by a rapid (45 s to 4 min), immersed percolation using only hot (190--230 C), compressed (P > P{sub sat}), liquid water (0.6--1.2 kg). Over 50% of the biomass could be solubilized. All of the hemicellulose, together with much of the acid-insoluble lignin in the bagasse (>60%), was solubilized, while less than 10% of the cellulose entered the liquid phase. Moreover, recovery of the hemicellulose as monomeric sugars (after a mild posthydrolysis) exceeded 80%. Less than 5% of the hemicellulose was converted to furfural. Percolation beyond that needed to immerse the biomass in hot liquid water did not result in increased solubilization. The yield of lignocellulosic residue was also not sensitive to the form of the sugar cane used (bagasse or leaves) or its moisture content (8--50%). Commercial applications for this fractionation process include the pretreatment of lignocellulosics for bioconversion to ethanol and the production of pulp and paper products.

  1. Transient liquid water and water activity at Gale crater on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Torres, F. Javier; Zorzano, María-Paz; Valentín-Serrano, Patricia; Harri, Ari-Matti; Genzer, Maria; Kemppinen, Osku; Rivera-Valentin, Edgard G.; Jun, Insoo; Wray, James; Bo Madsen, Morten; Goetz, Walter; McEwen, Alfred S.; Hardgrove, Craig; Renno, Nilton; Chevrier, Vincent F.; Mischna, Michael; Navarro-González, Rafael; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Conrad, Pamela; McConnochie, Tim; Cockell, Charles; Berger, Gilles; R. Vasavada, Ashwin; Sumner, Dawn; Vaniman, David

    2015-05-01

    Water is a requirement for life as we know it. Indirect evidence of transient liquid water has been observed from orbiter on equatorial Mars, in contrast with expectations from large-scale climate models. The presence of perchlorate salts, which have been detected at Gale crater on equatorial Mars by the Curiosity rover, lowers the freezing temperature of water. Moreover, perchlorates can form stable hydrated compounds and liquid solutions by absorbing atmospheric water vapour through deliquescence. Here we analyse relative humidity, air temperature and ground temperature data from the Curiosity rover at Gale crater and find that the observations support the formation of night-time transient liquid brines in the uppermost 5 cm of the subsurface that then evaporate after sunrise. We also find that changes in the hydration state of salts within the uppermost 15 cm of the subsurface, as measured by Curiosity, are consistent with an active exchange of water at the atmosphere-soil interface. However, the water activity and temperature are probably too low to support terrestrial organisms. Perchlorates are widespread on the surface of Mars and we expect that liquid brines are abundant beyond equatorial regions where atmospheric humidity is higher and temperatures are lower.

  2. Solvation structures of water in trihexyltetradecylphosphonium-orthoborate ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong-Lei; Sarman, Sten; Kloo, Lars; Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Glavatskih, Sergei; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2016-08-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate effective interactions of isolated water molecules dispersed in trihexyltetradecylphosphonium-orthoborate ionic liquids (ILs). The intrinsic free energy changes in solvating one water molecule from gas phase into bulk IL matrices were estimated as a function of temperature, and thereafter, the calculations of potential of mean force between two dispersed water molecules within different IL matrices were performed using umbrella sampling simulations. The systematic analyses of local ionic microstructures, orientational preferences, probability and spatial distributions of dispersed water molecules around neighboring ionic species indicate their preferential coordinations to central polar segments in orthoborate anions. The effective interactions between two dispersed water molecules are partially or totally screened as their separation distance increases due to interference of ionic species in between. These computational results connect microscopic anionic structures with macroscopically and experimentally observed difficulty in completely removing water from synthesized IL samples and suggest that the introduction of hydrophobic groups to central polar segments and the formation of conjugated ionic structures in orthoborate anions can effectively reduce residual water content in the corresponding IL samples.

  3. A "First Principles" Potential Energy Surface for Liquid Water from VRT Spectroscopy of Water Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, N; Leforestier, C; Saykally, R J

    2004-05-25

    We present results of gas phase cluster and liquid water simulations from the recently determined VRT(ASP-W)III water dimer potential energy surface. VRT(ASP-W)III is shown to not only be a model of high ''spectroscopic'' accuracy for the water dimer, but also makes accurate predictions of vibrational ground-state properties for clusters up through the hexamer. Results of ambient liquid water simulations from VRT(ASP-W)III are compared to those from ab initio Molecular Dynamics, other potentials of ''spectroscopic'' accuracy, and to experiment. The results herein represent the first time that a ''spectroscopic'' potential surface is able to correctly model condensed phase properties of water.

  4. Local order of liquid water at the electrochemical interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Serra, Marivi; Pedroza, Luana

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the aqueous electrochemical interface in an atomic level is of fundamental importance in many areas, such as catalysis and materials science. In this work we analyze in detail the structural, dynamic and energetic properties of liquid-water interacting with (111) Pd and Au surfaces at ambient temperature, using first principles molecular dynamics, with and without van der Waals interactions. We show that, contrary to what was found when studying ice-like water layers, van der Waals interactions play a critical role in modeling the aqueous/electrode interface. We show the differences in the ordering of water at the interface for Pd and Au, and we explain the change in work functions of these two metals in aqueous solution. DOE Early Career Award No. DE-SC0003871.

  5. Structure and dynamics of complex liquid water: Molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Indrajith V.; Natesan, Baskaran

    2015-06-01

    We have carried out detailed structure and dynamical studies of complex liquid water using molecular dynamics simulations. Three different model potentials, namely, TIP3P, TIP4P and SPC-E have been used in the simulations, in order to arrive at the best possible potential function that could reproduce the structure of experimental bulk water. All the simulations were performed in the NVE micro canonical ensemble using LAMMPS. The radial distribution functions, gOO, gOH and gHH and the self diffusion coefficient, Ds, were calculated for all three models. We conclude from our results that the structure and dynamical parameters obtained for SPC-E model matched well with the experimental values, suggesting that among the models studied here, the SPC-E model gives the best structure and dynamics of bulk water.

  6. Liquid-liquid coexistence and crystallization in supercooled ST2 water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martelli, Fausto; Palmer, Jeremy; Debenedetti, Pablo; Car, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    We have computed the free energy landscape of ST2 water in the supercooled regime (228.6 K and 2.4 kbar) using several state-of-the-art computational techniques, including umbrella sampling and metadynamics. Such results conclusively demonstrate coexistence between two liquid phases, a high-density liquid (HDL) and a low-density liquid (HDL), which are metastable with respect to cubic ice. We show that the three phases have distinct structural features characterized by the local structure index and ring statistics. We also find that ice nucleation, should it occur, does so from the low-density liquid. Interestingly, we find that the number of 6-member rings increases monotonically along the path from HDL to LDL, while non-monotonic behavior is observed near the saddle point along the LDL-ice Ic path. This behavior indicates a complex re-arrangement of the H-bond network, followed by progressive crystallization. DOE: DE-SC0008626 (F. M. and R.C.)

  7. Development of liquid-liquid cylindrical cyclone (LLCC) separator for oil-water separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharma, Irfan Aditya; Arffan, Fuad; Prambudi, Anggi Riyo; Widyaparaga, Adhika; Pranoto, Indro; Khasani

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to determine the phenomena of water and oil separation and the performance of the Liquid-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone (LLCC). The experiments were conducted with water and oil in a transparent LLCC separator that allows the visualization of the mixture. Series of experiments for various of inlet mixture velocity (Vm), inlet oil volume fraction (α), and split-ratio have been performed. Volume fraction of oil in the inlet were 0.06 (6 %), 0.1 (10%), and 0.15 (15 %). The examined inlet mixture velocity variations were 1.0 m / s, 1.5 m / s, and 2.0 m / s. Split-ratio was made in the range 25-70 %. The watercut in underflow were the variables measured. The experimental results show that the LLCC was able to separate water and oil and produced free water with concentration up to 98%. By increasing the value of the split-ratio, watercut in underflow increase and reached the optimum point. Optimal split-ratio observed is between 60 % and 70 % depend on the inlet oil volume fraction.

  8. Genomic organisation of the chicken ghrelin gene and its single nucleotide polymorphisms detected by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Nie, Q; Zeng, H; Lei, M; Ishag, N A; Fang, M; Sun, B; Yang, G; Zhang, X

    2004-10-01

    (1) Ghrelin is a novel endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) and is expressed primarily in the stomach and hypothalamus with the probable function of stimulating GH secretion and food intake both in mammals and poultry. The complete sequences of ghrelin gene have been reported in humans and mice; however, that of chickens remains unclear. (2) Here, we report the complete sequence of chicken ghrelin gene (submitted to Genbank; accession number AY303688), which consists of 5 exons and 4 introns. As in mice, the first exon of chicken ghrelin gene does not encode any amino acid. (3) Scanning point mutations with denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) using WAVE DNA Fragment Analysis Systems and confirmed with direct sequencing for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products, we analysed the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the entire gene of chicken ghrelin. (4) Results showed that there were 19 SNPs in chicken ghrelin gene, and most of these SNPs were scattered in the 4 introns. In these SNPs, one mutation in exon 5 (A2355G) led to the change of amino acid from glutamine to arginine (Gln 113 Arg): as a result a different ghrelin precursor instead of a mature peptide was produced. In addition, one SNP in 5'UTR (C223G) determined the presence or absence of a potential binding site of transcription factor serum response factor (SRF), which might affect the expression of chicken ghrelin gene. Some of the SNPs detected in the present study could be used in quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping for growth characters in chickens. (5) Because one SNP is located in a polymorphic site of restriction enzyme PagI of intron 4, it was possible to design a PCR-RFLP procedure and analyse the diversity of 10 chicken populations. Results showed the allelic frequencies of C2100T differ among these breeds, however, no significant difference was observed between imported breeds and Chinese native ones, nor between egg layers and

  9. Development of a liquid-fed water resistojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morren, W. Earl; Stone, James R.

    1988-01-01

    A concept for a forced-flow once-through water vaporizer for application to resistojet thrusters was evaluated as an element of a laboratory model thruster and tested to investigate its operating characteristics. The vaporizer design concept employs flow swirling to attach the liquid flow to the boiler chamber wall, providing for separation of the two liquid phases. This vaporizer was modified with a nozzle and a centrally-located heater to facilitate vaporization, superheating, and expansion of the propellant, allowing it to function as a resistojet. Performance was measured at thrust levels ranging from 170 to 360 mN and at power levels ranging from 443 to 192 W. Maximum measured specific impulse was 192 sec.

  10. Liquid/liquid metal extraction: Phase diagram topology resulting from molecular interactions between extractant, ion, oil and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, C.; Bauduin, P.; Dufrêche, J. F.; Zemb, T.; Diat, O.

    2012-11-01

    We consider the class of surfactants called "extractants" since they specifically interact with some cations and are used in liquid-liquid separation processes. We review here features of water-poor reverse micelles in water/oil/ extractant systems as determined by combined structural studies including small angle scattering techniques on absolute scale. Origins of instabilities, liquid-liquid separation as well as emulsification failure are detected. Phase diagrams contain the same multi-phase domains as classical microemulsions, but special unusual features appear due to the high spontaneous curvature directed towards the polar cores of aggregates as well as rigidity of the film made by extracting molecules.

  11. Ionic liquid foam floatation coupled with ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the separation and determination of estrogens in water samples by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Wang, Chuanliu; Yue, Qiaohong; Zhou, Tiecheng; Li, Na; Zhang, Hanqi; Hao, Xiaoke

    2014-11-01

    An ionic liquid foam floatation coupled with ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method was proposed for the extraction and concentration of 17-α-estradiol, 17-β-estradiol-benzoate, and quinestrol in environmental water samples by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. 1-Hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate was applied as foaming agent in the foam flotation process and dispersive solvent in microextraction. The introduction of the ion-pairing and salting-out agent NH4 PF6 was beneficial to the improvement of recoveries for the hydrophobic ionic liquid phase and analytes. Parameters of the proposed method including concentration of 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, flow rate of carrier gas, floatation time, types and concentration of ionic liquids, salt concentration in samples, extraction time, and centrifugation time were evaluated. The recoveries were between 98 and 105% with relative standard deviations lower than 7% for lake water and well water samples. The isolation of the target compounds from the water was found to be efficient, and the enrichment factors ranged from 4445 to 4632. This developing method is free of volatile organic solvents compared with regular extraction. Based on the unique properties of ionic liquids, the application of foam floatation, and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was widened. PMID:25146581

  12. Gas hydrate inhibition by perturbation of liquid water structure.

    PubMed

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates are icy crystalline materials that contain hydrocarbons, which are the primary energy source for this civilization. The abundance of naturally occurring gas hydrates leads to a growing interest in exploitation. Despite their potential as energy resources and in industrial applications, there is insufficient understanding of hydrate kinetics, which hinders the utilization of these invaluable resources. Perturbation of liquid water structure by solutes has been proposed to be a key process in hydrate inhibition, but this hypothesis remains unproven. Here, we report the direct observation of the perturbation of the liquid water structure induced by amino acids using polarized Raman spectroscopy, and its influence on gas hydrate nucleation and growth kinetics. Amino acids with hydrophilic and/or electrically charged side chains disrupted the water structure and thus provided effective hydrate inhibition. The strong correlation between the extent of perturbation by amino acids and their inhibition performance constitutes convincing evidence for the perturbation inhibition mechanism. The present findings bring the practical applications of gas hydrates significantly closer, and provide a new perspective on the freezing and melting phenomena of naturally occurring gas hydrates. PMID:26082291

  13. Gas hydrate inhibition by perturbation of liquid water structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2015-06-01

    Natural gas hydrates are icy crystalline materials that contain hydrocarbons, which are the primary energy source for this civilization. The abundance of naturally occurring gas hydrates leads to a growing interest in exploitation. Despite their potential as energy resources and in industrial applications, there is insufficient understanding of hydrate kinetics, which hinders the utilization of these invaluable resources. Perturbation of liquid water structure by solutes has been proposed to be a key process in hydrate inhibition, but this hypothesis remains unproven. Here, we report the direct observation of the perturbation of the liquid water structure induced by amino acids using polarized Raman spectroscopy, and its influence on gas hydrate nucleation and growth kinetics. Amino acids with hydrophilic and/or electrically charged side chains disrupted the water structure and thus provided effective hydrate inhibition. The strong correlation between the extent of perturbation by amino acids and their inhibition performance constitutes convincing evidence for the perturbation inhibition mechanism. The present findings bring the practical applications of gas hydrates significantly closer, and provide a new perspective on the freezing and melting phenomena of naturally occurring gas hydrates.

  14. Homogeneous liquid-liquid solvent extraction. [Propylene carbonate-water system

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, C.S.; Williams, E.T.; Finston, H.L.

    1980-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to extend the technique of homogeneous liquid-liquid solvent extraction into propylene carbonate. The mutual solubilities of propylene carbonate in water and vice-versa are shown in the phase diagram. The extraction of a variety of monodentate and bidentate ligand complexes with Fe(III) as a function of ligand concentration and pH were investigated. The monodentate ligands studied include, thiocyanate, chloride, bromide, benzoate, and bathophenanthrolines. The bidentate ligands studied include the various ..beta..-diketones, 8-quinolinol, and also cupferron which was studied under normal conditions, i.e., not under conditions of homogeneous extraction. The homogeneous extraction proved effective for a variety of chelate complexes and ion association complexes of iron giving, in all cases, very rapid extraction as compared with the slow rate of conventional extraction methods.

  15. Liquid-liquid equilibria of the ternary system water + acetic acid + 1-hexanol

    SciTech Connect

    Fahim, M.A.; Al-Muhtaseb, S.A.; Al-Nashef, I.M.

    1997-01-01

    The recovery of organic acids from dilute solutions resulting from fermentation processes is important and many solvents have been tried to improve such recovery. Liquid-liquid equilibria for the ternary system water + acetic acid + 1-hexanol were measured over a temperature range of (288 to 323) K. The results were used to estimate the interaction parameters between each of the three compounds for the NRTL and UNIQUAC models and between each of the main groups of H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 2} (paraffinic CH{sub 2}), OH, and COOH for the UNIFAC model as a function of temperature. The estimated interaction parameters were successfully used to predict the equilibrium compositions by the three models. The NRTL equation was the most accurate model in correlating the overall equilibrium compositions of the studied system. The UNIQUAC and UNIFAC models satisfactorily predicted the equilibrium compositions.

  16. The structural origin of anomalous properties of liquid water

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Water is unique in its number of unusual, often called anomalous, properties. When hot it is a normal simple liquid; however, close to ambient temperatures properties, such as the compressibility, begin to deviate and do so increasingly on further cooling. Clearly, these emerging properties are connected to its ability to form up to four well-defined hydrogen bonds allowing for different local structural arrangements. A wealth of new data from various experiments and simulations has recently become available. When taken together they point to a heterogeneous picture with fluctuations between two classes of local structural environments developing on temperature-dependent length scales. PMID:26643439

  17. Investigation of a liquid-fed water resistojet plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzella, D. H.; Carney, L. M.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of mass flux and flow angle were taken throughout the forward flow region of the exhaust of a liquid-fed water resistojet using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The resistojet operated at a mass flow rate of 0.1 g/s with a power input of 330 Watts. Measured values were compared to theoretical predictions obtained by employing a source flow approximation. Excellent agreement between predicted and measured mass flux values was attained; however, this agreement was highly dependent on knowledge of nozzle flow conditions. Measurements of the temperature at which the exhaust condensed on the QCM were obtained as a function of incident mass flux.

  18. An accurate and simple quantum model for liquid water.

    PubMed

    Paesani, Francesco; Zhang, Wei; Case, David A; Cheatham, Thomas E; Voth, Gregory A

    2006-11-14

    The path-integral molecular dynamics and centroid molecular dynamics methods have been applied to investigate the behavior of liquid water at ambient conditions starting from a recently developed simple point charge/flexible (SPC/Fw) model. Several quantum structural, thermodynamic, and dynamical properties have been computed and compared to the corresponding classical values, as well as to the available experimental data. The path-integral molecular dynamics simulations show that the inclusion of quantum effects results in a less structured liquid with a reduced amount of hydrogen bonding in comparison to its classical analog. The nuclear quantization also leads to a smaller dielectric constant and a larger diffusion coefficient relative to the corresponding classical values. Collective and single molecule time correlation functions show a faster decay than their classical counterparts. Good agreement with the experimental measurements in the low-frequency region is obtained for the quantum infrared spectrum, which also shows a higher intensity and a redshift relative to its classical analog. A modification of the original parametrization of the SPC/Fw model is suggested and tested in order to construct an accurate quantum model, called q-SPC/Fw, for liquid water. The quantum results for several thermodynamic and dynamical properties computed with the new model are shown to be in a significantly better agreement with the experimental data. Finally, a force-matching approach was applied to the q-SPC/Fw model to derive an effective quantum force field for liquid water in which the effects due to the nuclear quantization are explicitly distinguished from those due to the underlying molecular interactions. Thermodynamic and dynamical properties computed using standard classical simulations with this effective quantum potential are found in excellent agreement with those obtained from significantly more computationally demanding full centroid molecular dynamics

  19. Lake morphometry and resource polymorphism determine niche segregation between cool- and cold-water-adapted fish.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Brian; Harrod, Chris; Kahilaineni, Kimmo K

    2014-02-01

    Climate change is increasing ambient temperatures in Arctic and subarctic regions, facilitating latitudinal range expansions of freshwater fishes adapted to warmer water temperatures. The relative roles of resource availability and interspecific interactions between resident and invading species in determining the outcomes of such expansions has not been adequately evaluated. Ecological interactions between a cool-water adapted fish, the perch (Perca fluviatilis), and the cold-water adapted European whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus), were studied in both shallow and deep lakes with fish communities dominated by (1) monomorphic whitefish, (2) monomorphic whitefish and perch, and (3) polymorphic whitefish and perch. A combination of stomach content, stable-isotope, and invertebrate prey availability data were used to identify resource use and niche overlap among perch, the trophic generalist large sparsely rakered (LSR) whitefish morph, and the pelagic specialist densely rakered (DR) whitefish morph in 10 subarctic lakes at the contemporary distribution limit of perch in northern Scandinavia. Perch utilized its putative preferred littoral niche in all lakes. LSR whitefish utilized both littoral and pelagic resources in monomorphic whitefish-dominated lakes. When found in sympatry with perch, LSR whitefish exclusively utilized pelagic prey in deep lakes, but displayed niche overlap with perch in shallow littoral lakes. DR whitefish was a specialist zooplanktivore, relegating LSR whitefish from pelagic habitats, leading to an increase in niche overlap between LSR whitefish and perch in deep lakes. Our results highlight how resource availability (lake depth and fish community) governs ecological interactions between native and invading species, leading to different outcomes even at the same latitudes. These findings suggest that lake morphometry and fish community structure data should be included in bioclimate envelope-based models of species distribution shifts

  20. Application of liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction and high-performance liquid-chromatography for the determination of sulfonamides in water.

    PubMed

    Lin, Che-Yi; Huang, Shang-Da

    2008-03-31

    This work presents a novel liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction (LLLME) technique for the extraction of sulfonamides from aqueous systems; it combines with high-performance liquid-chromatography-ultraviolet absorbance detection (HPLC/UV). In this experiment the sulfonamides were successively extracted from a donor phase (i.e., a water sample) into several microliters of an organic phase and then from the organic phase into an acceptor phase (i.e., an aqueous extract) by LLLME. The following separation and quantitative analyses were performed using HPLC/UV with 265 nm detection. Extraction condition such as solvent identity, agitation, extraction time, acceptor phase NaOH concentration, donor phase pH, and salt addition were optimized. Relative standard deviation (RSD, 2.6-5.3%), coefficient of estimation (R2, 0.9972-0.9999), and method detection limit (MDL, 0.11-0.77 ng mL(-1)) were achieved under the selected conditions. The proposed method was successfully applied to the analyses of three practical water samples and the relative recoveries of sulfonamides from the spiked water samples were in the range of 86.2-108.7%. The proposed method also confirms microextraction to be robust to monitoring trace levels of sulfacetamide, sulfadiazine, sulfathiazole, sulfamerazine, sulfadimidine, sulfamonomethoxine, sulfamethoxazole, and sulfaquinoxaline in aqueous samples. PMID:18331856

  1. Interplay of the Glass Transition and the Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition in Water

    PubMed Central

    Giovambattista, Nicolas; Loerting, Thomas; Lukanov, Boris R.; Starr, Francis W.

    2012-01-01

    Water has multiple glassy states, often called amorphous ices. Low-density (LDA) and high-density (HDA) amorphous ice are separated by a dramatic, first-order like phase transition. It has been argued that the LDA-HDA transformation connects to a first-order liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) above the glass transition temperature Tg. Direct experimental evidence of the LLPT is challenging to obtain, since the LLPT occurs at conditions where water rapidly crystallizes. In this work, we explore the implications of a LLPT on the pressure dependence of Tg(P) for LDA and HDA by performing computer simulations of two water models – one with a LLPT, and one without. In the absence of a LLPT, Tg(P) for all glasses nearly coincide. When there is a LLPT, different glasses exhibit dramatically different Tg(P) which are directly linked with the LLPT. Available experimental data for Tg(P) are only consistent with the scenario including a LLPT. PMID:22550566

  2. Gas and liquid measurements in air-water bubbly flows

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.; Doup, B.; Sun, X.

    2012-07-01

    Local measurements of gas- and liquid-phase flow parameters are conducted in an air-water two-phase flow loop. The test section is a vertical pipe with an inner diameter of 50 mm and a height of 3.2 m. The measurements are performed at z/D = 10. The gas-phase measurements are performed using a four-sensor conductivity probe. The data taken from this probe are processed using a signal processing program to yield radial profiles of the void fraction, bubble velocity, and interfacial area concentration. The velocity measurements of the liquid-phase are performed using a state-of-the-art Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system. The raw PIV images are acquired using fluorescent particles and an optical filtration device. Image processing is used to remove noise in the raw PIV images. The statistical cross correlation is introduced to determine the axial velocity field and turbulence intensity of the liquid-phase. Measurements are currently being performed at z/D = 32 to provide a more complete data set. These data can be used for computational fluid dynamic model development and validation. (authors)

  3. Tunable shape transformation of freezing liquid water marbles.

    PubMed

    Zang, Duyang; Lin, Kejun; Wang, Wenkai; Gu, Yaxi; Zhang, Yongjian; Geng, Xingguo; Binks, Bernard P

    2014-03-01

    Liquid water marbles coated with fumed silica nanoparticles exhibit various shape transformations upon freezing which are dependent on the hydrophobicity of the nanoparticles. The shape can be recovered during re-melting. For marbles coated with the most hydrophobic particles, a vertically prolonged morphology with a pointed protrusion on the top is formed on freezing. For marbles coated with less hydrophobic particles, a lateral expanded flying saucer-shaped morphology is formed. The different responses to freezing result from the different heterogeneous nucleation sites owing to the different positions of the particles at the air-water interface. If the particles are more immersed in water, ice embryos tend to form in the concave cavities between the particles. The volume expansion of water caused by freezing and continuous nucleation lead to continuous lateral stretching of the particle network coating the droplet surface and ultimately to the horizontally inflated shape of the marble. If the particles are more exposed to air, nucleation occurs on the convex surface of the particles, similar to that of a bare water droplet on a hydrophobic substrate. PMID:24651262

  4. Innovative Strategy on Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Utilizing Activated Liquid Water

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Bing-Joe; Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Mai, Fu-Der; Tsai, Hui-Yen; Yang, Chih-Ping; Rick, John; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Splitting water for hydrogen production using light, or electrical energy, is the most developed ‘green technique’. For increasing efficiency in hydrogen production, currently, the most exciting and thriving strategies are focused on efficient and inexpensive catalysts. Here, we report an innovative idea for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) utilizing plasmon-activated liquid water with reduced hydrogen-bonded structure by hot electron transfer. This strategy is effective for all HERs in acidic, basic and neutral systems, photocatalytic system with a g-C3N4 (graphite carbon nitride) electrode, as well as in an inert system with an ITO (indium tin oxide) electrode. Compared to deionized water, the efficiency of HER increases by 48% based on activated water ex situ on a Pt electrode. Increase in energy efficiency from activated water is 18% at a specific current yield of −20 mA in situ on a nanoscale-granulated Au electrode. Moreover, the onset potential of −0.023 V vs RHE was very close to the thermodynamic potential of the HER (0 V). The measured current density at the corresponding overpotential for HER in an acidic system was higher than any data previously reported in the literature. This approach establishes a new vista in clean green energy production. PMID:26541371

  5. Innovative Strategy on Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Utilizing Activated Liquid Water.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Bing-Joe; Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Mai, Fu-Der; Tsai, Hui-Yen; Yang, Chih-Ping; Rick, John; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Splitting water for hydrogen production using light, or electrical energy, is the most developed 'green technique'. For increasing efficiency in hydrogen production, currently, the most exciting and thriving strategies are focused on efficient and inexpensive catalysts. Here, we report an innovative idea for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) utilizing plasmon-activated liquid water with reduced hydrogen-bonded structure by hot electron transfer. This strategy is effective for all HERs in acidic, basic and neutral systems, photocatalytic system with a g-C3N4 (graphite carbon nitride) electrode, as well as in an inert system with an ITO (indium tin oxide) electrode. Compared to deionized water, the efficiency of HER increases by 48% based on activated water ex situ on a Pt electrode. Increase in energy efficiency from activated water is 18% at a specific current yield of -20 mA in situ on a nanoscale-granulated Au electrode. Moreover, the onset potential of -0.023 V vs RHE was very close to the thermodynamic potential of the HER (0 V). The measured current density at the corresponding overpotential for HER in an acidic system was higher than any data previously reported in the literature. This approach establishes a new vista in clean green energy production. PMID:26541371

  6. Innovative Strategy on Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Utilizing Activated Liquid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Bing-Joe; Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Mai, Fu-Der; Tsai, Hui-Yen; Yang, Chih-Ping; Rick, John; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2015-11-01

    Splitting water for hydrogen production using light, or electrical energy, is the most developed ‘green technique’. For increasing efficiency in hydrogen production, currently, the most exciting and thriving strategies are focused on efficient and inexpensive catalysts. Here, we report an innovative idea for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) utilizing plasmon-activated liquid water with reduced hydrogen-bonded structure by hot electron transfer. This strategy is effective for all HERs in acidic, basic and neutral systems, photocatalytic system with a g-C3N4 (graphite carbon nitride) electrode, as well as in an inert system with an ITO (indium tin oxide) electrode. Compared to deionized water, the efficiency of HER increases by 48% based on activated water ex situ on a Pt electrode. Increase in energy efficiency from activated water is 18% at a specific current yield of -20 mA in situ on a nanoscale-granulated Au electrode. Moreover, the onset potential of -0.023 V vs RHE was very close to the thermodynamic potential of the HER (0 V). The measured current density at the corresponding overpotential for HER in an acidic system was higher than any data previously reported in the literature. This approach establishes a new vista in clean green energy production.

  7. Distribution of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface

    SciTech Connect

    Chempath, Shaji; Pratt, Lawrence R

    2008-01-01

    Distributions of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface are obtained on the basis of molecular simulation with the SPC/E model of water. These binding energies together with the observed interfacial density profile are used to test a minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical statistical thermodynamic theory. Binding energy distributions for water molecules in that interfacial region clearly exhibit a composite structure. A minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical model that is accurate for the free energy of bulk liquid water breaks down for water molecules in the liquid-vapor interfacial region. This breakdown is associated with the fact that this minimally conditioned Gaussian model would be inaccurate for the statistical thermodynamics of a dilute gas. Aggressive conditioning greatly improves the performance of that Gaussian quasi-chemical model. The analogy between the Gaussian quasi-chemical model and dielectric models of hydration free energies suggests that naive dielectric models without the conditioning features of quasi-chemical theory will be unreliable for these interfacial problems. Multi-Gaussian models that address the composite nature of the binding energy distributions observed in the interfacial region might provide a mechanism for correcting dielectric models for practical applications.

  8. Hot electron dominated rapid transverse ionization growth in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael S; Erickson, Thomas; Frische, Kyle; Roquemore, William M

    2011-06-20

    Pump/probe optical-transmission measurements are used to monitor in space and time the ionization of a liquid column of water following impact of an 800-nm, 45-fs pump pulse. The pump pulse strikes the 53-μm-diameter column normal to its axis with intensities up to 2 × 10(15) W/cm2. After the initial photoinization and for probe delay times < 500 fs, the neutral water surrounding the beam is rapidly ionized in the transverse direction, presumably by hot electrons with initial velocities of 0.55 times the speed of light (relativistic kinetic energy of ~100 keV). Such velocities are unusual for condensed-matter excitation at the stated laser intensities. PMID:21716461

  9. An SCC-DFTB Repulsive Potential for Various ZnO Polymorphs and the ZnO–Water System

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an efficient scheme for the generation of accurate repulsive potentials for self-consistent charge density-functional-based tight-binding calculations, which involves energy-volume scans of bulk polymorphs with different coordination numbers. The scheme was used to generate an optimized parameter set for various ZnO polymorphs. The new potential was subsequently tested for ZnO bulk, surface, and nanowire systems as well as for water adsorption on the low-index wurtzite (101̅0) and (112̅0) surfaces. By comparison to results obtained at the density functional level of theory, we show that the newly generated repulsive potential is highly transferable and capable of capturing most of the relevant chemistry of ZnO and the ZnO/water interface. PMID:23991228

  10. Stability of amorphous silica-alumina in hot liquid water.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Maximilian W; Copeland, John R; van Pelt, Adam H; Sievers, Carsten

    2013-12-01

    Herein, the hydrothermal stability of amorphous silica-alumina (ASA) is investigated under conditions relevant for the catalytic conversion of biomass, namely in liquid water at 200 °C. The hydrothermal stability of ASA is much higher than that of pure silica or alumina. Interestingly, the synthetic procedure used plays a major role in its resultant stability: ASA prepared by cogelation (CG) lost its microporous structure, owing to hydrolysis of the siloxane bonds, but the resulting mesoporous material still had a considerable surface area. ASA prepared by deposition precipitation (DP) contained a silicon-rich core and an aluminum-rich shell. In hot liquid water, the latter structure was transformed into a layer of amorphous boehmite, which protected the particle from further hydrolysis. The surface area showed relatively minor changes during the transformation. Independent of the synthetic method used, the ASAs retained a considerable concentration of acid sites. The concentration of acid sites qualitatively followed the changes in surface area, but the changes were less pronounced. The performance of different ASAs for the hydrolysis of cellobiose into glucose is compared. PMID:24124062

  11. Stopping power of liquid water for low-energy electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    The dielectric function epsilon(q,..omega..) for liquid water is determined from an insulator model with parameters fixed by available optical data. Ionization of the oxygen K shell is described by generalized oscillator strengths. This model dielectric function is used to calculate the stopping power of liquid water for electrons with energies from 10 eV to 10 keV. The results agree well in the common energy range with an existing tabulation for 256 eV less than or equal to E less than or equal to 10.2 MeV and with Bethe-theory predictions down to 200 eV. The peak in stopping power at approx.25% lower than the predictions of R. H. Ritchie, R. N. Hamm, J.E. Turner, and H. A. Wright (in Proceedings, Sixth Symposium on Microdosimetry, Brussels, Belgium (J. Booz and H. G. Ebert, Eds.), pp. 345-354, Commission of the European Communities, Harwood, London, 1978 (EUR 6064 d-e-f)).

  12. The structure of liquid water beyond the first hydration shell.

    PubMed

    Henao, Andrés; Busch, Sebastian; Guàrdia, Elvira; Tamarit, Josep Lluis; Pardo, Luis Carlos

    2016-07-28

    To date there is a general consensus on the structure of the first coordination shells of liquid water, namely tetrahedral short range order of molecules. In contrast, little is known about the structure at longer distances and the influence of the tetrahedral molecular arrangement of the first shells on the order at these length scales. An expansion of the distance dependent excess entropy is used in this contribution to find out which molecular arrangements are important at each distance range. This was done by splitting the excess entropy into two parts: one connected to the relative position of two molecules and the other one related to their relative orientation. A transition between two previously unknown regimes in liquid water is identified at a distance of about ∼6 Å: from a predominantly orientational order at shorter distances to a regime at larger distances of up to ∼9 Å where the order is predominantly positional and molecules are distributed with the same tetrahedral symmetry as the very first molecules. PMID:27377988

  13. ETV REPORT AND VERIFICATION STATEMENT; EVALUATION OF LOBO LIQUIDS RINSE WATER RECOVERY SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lobo Liquids Rinse Water Recovery System (Lobo Liquids system) was tested, under actual production conditions, processing metal finishing wastewater, at Gull Industries in Houston, Texas. The verification test evaluated the ability of the ion exchange (IX) treatment system t...

  14. Computing the melting point and thermodynamic stability of the orthorhombic and monoclinic crystalline polymorphs of the ionic liquid 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Saivenkataraman; Maginn, Edward J.

    2007-12-01

    The melting point, enthalpy of fusion, and thermodynamic stability of two crystal polymorphs of the ionic liquid 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride are calculated using a thermodynamic integration-based atomistic simulation method. The computed melting point of the orthorhombic phase ranges from 365 to 369 K, depending on the classical force field used. This compares reasonably well with the experimental values, which range from 337 to 339 K. The computed enthalpy of fusion ranges from 19 to 29 kJ/mol, compared to the experimental values of 18.5-21.5 kJ/mol. Only one of the two force fields evaluated in this work yielded a stable monoclinic phase, despite the fact that both give accurate liquid state densities. The computed melting point of the monoclinic polymorph was found to be 373 K, which is somewhat higher than the experimental range of 318-340 K. The computed enthalpy of fusion was 23 kJ/mol, which is also higher than the experimental value of 9.3-14.5 kJ/mol. The simulations predict that the monoclinic form is more stable than the orthorhombic form at low temperature, in agreement with one set of experiments but in conflict with another. The difference in free energy between the two polymorphs is very small, due to the fact that a single trans-gauche conformational difference in an alkyl sidechain distinguishes the two structures. As a result, it is very difficult to construct simple classical force fields that are accurate enough to definitively predict which polymorph is most stable. A liquid phase analysis of the probability distribution of the dihedral angles in the alkyl chain indicates that less than half of the dihedral angles are in the gauche-trans configuration that is adopted in the orthorhombic crystal. The low melting point and glass forming tendency of this ionic liquid is likely due to the energy barrier for conversion of the remaining dihedral angles into the gauche-trans state. The simulation procedure used to perform the melting point

  15. Liquid state theories for the structure of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Govardhan; Lawrence, C. P.; Skinner, J. L.; Yethiraj, Arun

    2003-12-01

    Liquid state theories are investigated for the local structure of the simple point charge (SPC) and a modified SPC (MSPC) model of water. The latter model includes a van der Waals repulsion between the oxygen (O) and hydrogen (H) atoms, which is necessary for the implementation of some integral equation theories. Two integral equation theories, the reference interaction site model (RISM) and the diagrammatically proper Chandler-Silbey-Ladanyi (CSL) theory, are tested by comparison with simulations of the MSPC model (neither theory converges for the SPC model when the hypernetted chain closure is used). The RISM theory is in reasonable agreement with simulations, and is more accurate than the CSL theory. A density functional theory (DFT) is investigated, which treats the ideal gas functional exactly and uses a truncated expansion for the excess free energy functional. The DFT is in excellent agreement with simulations for the structure of the MSPC water model at all temperatures studied, and for the structure of the SPC water model at high temperatures. At room temperature, the DFT is in good agreement with simulations (of SPC water) for gHH(r) and gOH(r), but misses the location of the second peak in gOO(r). We attribute this deficiency to the importance of three-body correlations that are not properly incorporated in the theory.

  16. Relationship between optical extinction and liquid water content in fogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, C.; Dabas, A.

    2014-05-01

    Studies carried out in the late 1970s suggest that a simple linear relationship exists in practice between the optical extinction in the thermal IR and the liquid water content (LWC) in fogs. Such a relationship opens the possibility to monitor the vertical profile of the LWC in fogs with a rather simple backscatter lidar. Little is known on how the LWC varies as a function of height and during the fog life cycle, so the new measurement technique would help understand fog physics and provide valuable data for improving the quality of fog forecasts. In this paper, the validity of the linear relationship is revisited in the light of recent observations of fog droplet size distributions measured with a combination of sensors covering a large range of droplet radii. In particular, large droplets (radius above 15 μm) are now detected, which was not the case in the late 1970s. The results confirm that the linear relationship still holds, at least for the mostly radiative fogs observed during the campaign. The impact of the precise value of the real and imaginary parts of the refractive index on the coefficient of the linear relationship is also studied. The usual practice considers that droplets are made of pure water. This assumption is probably valid for big drops, but it may be questioned for small ones since droplets are formed from condensation nuclei of highly variable chemical composition. The study suggests that the precise nature of condensation nuclei will primarily affect rather light fogs with small droplets and light liquid water contents.

  17. Temporal changes in endmember abundances, liquid water and water vapor over vegetation at Jasper Ridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Dar A.; Green, Robert O.; Sabol, Donald E.; Adams, John B.

    1993-01-01

    Imaging spectrometry offers a new way of deriving ecological information about vegetation communities from remote sensing. Applications include derivation of canopy chemistry, measurement of column atmospheric water vapor and liquid water, improved detectability of materials, more accurate estimation of green vegetation cover and discrimination of spectrally distinct green leaf, non-photosynthetic vegetation (NPV: litter, wood, bark, etc.) and shade spectra associated with different vegetation communities. Much of our emphasis has been on interpreting Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometry (AVIRIS) data spectral mixtures. Two approaches have been used, simple models, where the data are treated as a mixture of 3 to 4 laboratory/field measured spectra, known as reference endmembers (EM's), applied uniformly to the whole image, to more complex models where both the number of EM's and the types of EM's vary on a per-pixel basis. Where simple models are applied, materials, such as NPV, which are spectrally similar to soils, can be discriminated on the basis of residual spectra. One key aspect is that the data are calibrated to reflectance and modeled as mixtures of reference EM's, permitting temporal comparison of EM fractions, independent of scene location or data type. In previous studies the calibration was performed using a modified-empirical line calibration, assuming a uniform atmosphere across the scene. In this study, a Modtran-based calibration approach was used to map liquid water and atmospheric water vapor and retrieve surface reflectance from three AVIRIS scenes acquired in 1992 over the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve. The data were acquired on June 2nd, September 4th and October 6th. Reflectance images were analyzed as spectral mixtures of reference EM's using a simple 4 EM model. Atmospheric water vapor derived from Modtran was compared to elevation, and community type. Liquid water was compare to the abundance of NPV, Shade and Green Vegetation

  18. LIQUID AND GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF DIETHYL PHTHALATE IN WATER AND SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diethyl phthalate was determined in water and sediment by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and in water by gas-liquid chromatography with electron capture detection (GLC-ECD). Water samples were extracted with hexane, using a high-speed homogenizer-ultrasonic apparat...

  19. Atom Pair Distribution Functions of Liquid Water at 25circC from Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narten, A. H.; Thiessen, W. E.; Blum, L.

    1982-09-01

    The structure of liquid water is described by three atom pair distribution functions gOO(r), gOH(r), and gHH(r). These functions have now been derived from neutron diffraction data on four mixtures of light and heavy water. They will provide a crucial and sensitive test for proposed models of liquid water.

  20. Influence of liquid water and water vapor on antimisting kerosene (AMK)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yavrouian, A. H.; Sarolouki, M.; Sarohia, V.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to evaluate the compatibility of liquid water and water vapor with antimisting kerosenes (AMK) containing polymer additive FM-9 developed by Imperial Chemical Industries. This effort consists of the determination of water solubility in AMK, influence of water on restoration (degradation) of AMK, and effect of water on standard AMK quality control methods. The principal conclusions of this investigation are: (1) the uptake of water in AMK critically depends upon the degree of agitation and can be as high as 1300 ppm at 20 C, (2) more than 250 to 300 ppm of water in AMK causes an insoluble second phase to form. The amount of this second phase depends on fuel temperature, agitation, degree of restoration (degradation) and the water content of the fuel, (3) laboratory scale experiments indicate precipitate formation when water vapor comes in contact with cold fuel surfaces at a much lower level of water (125 to 150 ppm), (4) precipitate formation is very pronounced in these experiments where humid air is percolated through a cold fuel (-20 C), (5) laboratory tests further indicate that water droplet settling time is markedly reduced in AMK as compared to jet A, (6) limited low temperature testing down to -30 C under laboratory conditions indicates the formation of stable, transparent gels.

  1. Simulated liquid water and visibility in stratiform boundary-layer clouds over sloping terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Tjernstroem, M. )

    1993-04-01

    The amount of liquid water in stratus clouds or fog is discussed from the point of view of estimating visibility variations in areas with complex terrain. The average vertical profile of liquid water from numerical simulations with a higher-order closure mesoscale model is examined, and runs with the model for moderately complex terrain are utilized to estimate the of low-level liquid water content variability and thus, indirectly, the variations in horizontal visibility along a slope. 37 refs., 11 figs.

  2. Water-mediated ion–ion interactions are enhanced at the water vapor–liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    Venkateshwaran, Vasudevan; Vembanur, Srivathsan; Garde, Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that ions are present near the vapor–liquid interface of aqueous salt solutions. Charged groups can also be driven to interfaces by attaching them to hydrophobic moieties. Despite their importance in many self-assembly phenomena, how ion–ion interactions are affected by interfaces is not understood. We use molecular simulations to show that the effective forces between small ions change character dramatically near the water vapor–liquid interface. Specifically, the water-mediated attraction between oppositely charged ions is enhanced relative to that in bulk water. Further, the repulsion between like-charged ions is weaker than that expected from a continuum dielectric description and can even become attractive as the ions are drawn to the vapor side. We show that thermodynamics of ion association are governed by a delicate balance of ion hydration, interfacial tension, and restriction of capillary fluctuations at the interface, leading to nonintuitive phenomena, such as water-mediated like charge attraction. “Sticky” electrostatic interactions may have important consequences on biomolecular structure, assembly, and aggregation at soft liquid interfaces. We demonstrate this by studying an interfacially active model peptide that changes its structure from α-helical to a hairpin-turn–like one in response to charging of its ends. PMID:24889634

  3. The oxygen isotope partition function ratio of water and the structure of liquid water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.; Adami, L.H.

    1969-01-01

    By means of the CO2-equilibration technique, the temperature dependence and absolute values of the oxygen isotope partition function ratio of liquid water have been determined, often at 1?? intervals, from -2 to 85??. A linear relationship between In (Q2/Q1) (H2O) and T-1 was obtained that is explicable in terms of the Bigeleisen-Mayer theory of isotopic fractionation. The data are incompatible with conventional, multicomponent mixture models of water because liquid water behaves isotopically as a singly structured homogeneous substance over the entire temperature range studied. A two-species model of water is proposed in which approximately 30% of the hydrogen bonds in ice are broken on melting at 0?? and in which this per cent of monomer changes by only a small amount over the entire liquid range. Because of the high precision and the fundamental property determined, the isotopic fractionation technique is particularly well suited to the detection of thermal anomalies. No anomalies were observed and those previously reported are ascribed to under-estimates of experimental error.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of electron dynamics in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huthmacher, Klaus; Herzwurm, André; Gnewuch, Michael; Ritter, Klaus; Rethfeld, Baerbel

    2015-07-01

    We present a stochastic model for the energy loss of low-energy electrons (<100 eV) in water in the liquid phase. More precisely, we treat the electrons as independent particles and are thus able to model the time evolution of the kinetic energy of a single electron as a so-called pure jump process. Free electrons are created due to irradiation of an extreme ultraviolet femtosecond laser pulse. In our model, free electrons may interact with water molecules via elastic scattering and impact ionization. Moreover, we present numerical results for the kinetic energy of electrons during and after laser irradiation. Furthermore, we distinguish between primary and secondary electrons, where the latter are created by impact ionization. The numerical results show that creation of secondary electrons due to impact ionization occurs almost entirely during laser irradiation. After irradiation, only a small amount of the laser pulse energy remains in the electron system, while the majority is stored in holes of water molecules.

  5. Assay of organic liquid contents in predominantly water-wet unconsolidated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cary, J. W.; McBride, J. F.; Simmons, C. S.

    1991-11-01

    Immiscible organic liquids may be extracted from moist soil or other hydrophilic porous media by shaking a suspension of water and soil in a glass jar with a piece of porous polyethylene. The water displaces the organic liquid from the predominantly hydrophilic sample and the hydrophobic polyethylene preferentially absorbs the organic liquid, excluding water unless there is a detergent associated with the organic. Because most soils have some hydrophobic surfaces, the extraction of organic liquids by displacement with water is not quite complete. A correction is therefore made in the assay method by including samples with known organic liquid content as controls. The amount of organic liquid not displaced from the control samples can also be used to indicate the extent of hydrophobic sites in predominantly water-wet porous media. Organic liquid extractions were made by using three soils and two organic liquids. The standard deviation among replicated extractions was 0.010 g organic liquid. By applying a correction to the mass of organic liquid recovered, the assay accuracy was ±0.001 g organic liquid/g soil with 20.0-g oven-dry soil samples. It is likely that this assay method could be scaled up and used as a remediation method for removing and recovering organic liquids from earth excavated from spill or leak sites.

  6. Onset of simple liquid behaviour in modified water models

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Saurav; Chakravarty, Charusita

    2014-04-28

    The transition to simple liquid behaviour is studied in a set of modified hybrid water models where the potential energy contribution of the Lennard-Jones dispersion-repulsion contribution is progressively enhanced relative to the electrostatic contribution. Characteristics of simple liquid behaviour that indicate the extent to which a given system can be mapped onto an inverse power law fluid are examined, including configurational energy-virial correlations, functional form of temperature dependence of the excess entropy along isochores, and thermodynamic and excess entropy scaling of diffusivities. As the Lennard-Jones contribution to the potential energy function increases, the strength of the configurational energy-virial correlations increases. The Rosenfeld-Tarazona temperature dependence of the excess entropy is found to hold for the range of state points studied here for all the hybrid models, regardless of the degree of correlating character. Thermodynamic scaling is found to hold for weakly polar fluids with a moderate degree of energy-virial correlations. Rosenfeld-scaling of transport properties is found not to be necessarily linked with the strength of energy-virial correlations but may hold for systems with poor thermodynamic scaling if diffusivities and excess entropies show correlated departures from the isomorph-invariant behaviour characteristic of approximate inverse power law fluids. The state-point dependence of the configurational energy-virial correlation coefficient and the implications for thermodynamic and excess entropy scalings are considered.

  7. Use of spacecraft data to derive regions on Mars where liquid water would be stable.

    PubMed

    Lobitz, B; Wood, B L; Averner, M M; McKay, C P

    2001-02-27

    Combining Viking pressure and temperature data with Mars Orbital Laser Altimeter topography data, we have computed the fraction of the martian year during which pressure and temperature allow for liquid water to be stable on the martian surface. We find that liquid water would be stable within the Hellas and Argyre basin and over the northern lowlands equatorward of about 40 degrees. The location with the maximum period of stable conditions for liquid water is in the southeastern portion of Utopia Planitia, where 34% of the year liquid water would be stable if it were present. Locations of stability appear to correlate with the distribution of valley networks. PMID:11226204

  8. Use of Spacecraft Data to Drive Regions on Mars where Liquid Water would be Stable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobitz, Brad; Wood, Byron L.; Averner, Maurice M.; McKay, Christopher P.; MacElroy, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Combining Viking pressure and temperature data with Mars Orbital Laser Altimeter (MOLA) topography data we have computed the fraction of the martian year during which pressure and temperature allow for liquid water to be stable on the martian surface. We find that liquid water would be stable within the Hellas and Argyre basin and over the northern lowlands equatorward of about 40 degrees. The location with the maximum period of stable conditions for liquid water is in the southeastern portion of Utopia Planitia where 34% of the year liquid water would be stable if it was present. Locations of stability appear to correlate with the distribution of valley networks.

  9. Use of spacecraft data to derive regions on Mars where liquid water would be stable

    PubMed Central

    Lobitz, Brad; Wood, Byron L.; Averner, Maurice M.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2001-01-01

    Combining Viking pressure and temperature data with Mars Orbital Laser Altimeter topography data, we have computed the fraction of the martian year during which pressure and temperature allow for liquid water to be stable on the martian surface. We find that liquid water would be stable within the Hellas and Argyre basin and over the northern lowlands equatorward of about 40°. The location with the maximum period of stable conditions for liquid water is in the southeastern portion of Utopia Planitia, where 34% of the year liquid water would be stable if it were present. Locations of stability appear to correlate with the distribution of valley networks. PMID:11226204

  10. Electrokinetic Hydrogen Generation from Liquid WaterMicrojets

    SciTech Connect

    Duffin, Andrew M.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2007-05-31

    We describe a method for generating molecular hydrogen directly from the charge separation effected via rapid flow of liquid water through a metal orifice, wherein the input energy is the hydrostatic pressure times the volume flow rate. Both electrokinetic currents and hydrogen production rates are shown to follow simple equations derived from the overlap of the fluid velocity gradient and the anisotropic charge distribution resulting from selective adsorption of hydroxide ions to the nozzle surface. Pressure-driven fluid flow shears away the charge balancing hydronium ions from the diffuse double layer and carries them out of the aperture. Downstream neutralization of the excess protons at a grounded target electrode produces gaseous hydrogen molecules. The hydrogen production efficiency is currently very low (ca. 10-6) for a single cylindrical jet, but can be improved with design changes.

  11. Conversion of lignocellulosics pretreated with liquid hot water to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Walsum, G.P. van; Laser, M.S.; Lynd, L.R.

    1996-12-31

    Lignocellulosic materials pretreated using liquid hot water (LHW) (220{degrees}C, 5 MPa, 120 s) were fermented to ethanol by batch simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence of Trichoderma reesei cellulose. SSF of sugarcane bagasse (as received), aspen chips (smallest dimension 3 mm), and mixed hardwood flour (-60 +70 mesh) resulted in 90% conversion to ethanol in 2-5 d at enzyme loadings of 15-30 FPU/g. In most cases, 90% of the final conversion was achieved within 75 h of inoculation. Comminution of the pretreated substrates did not affect the conversion to ethanol. The hydrolysate produced from the LHW pretreatment showed slight inhibition of batch growth of S. cerevisiae. Solids pretreated at a concentration of 100 g/L were as reactive as those pretreated at a lower concentration, provided that the temperature was maintained at 220{degrees}C. 51 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Characterization and Modeling of a Water-based Liquid Scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    L. J. Bignell; Beznosko, D.; Diwan, M. V.; Hans, S.; Jaffe, D. E.; S. Kettell; Rosero, R.; Themann, H. W.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-12-15

    We characterised Water-based Liquid Scintillator (WbLS) using low energy protons, UV-VIS absorbance, and fluorescence spectroscopy. We have also developed and validated a simulation model that describes the behaviour of WbLS in our detector configurations for proton beam energies of 210 MeV, 475 MeV, and 2 GeV and for two WbLS compositions. These results have enabled us to estimate the light yield and ionisation quenching of WbLS, as well as to understand the influence of the wavelength shifting of Cherenkov light on our measurements. These results are relevant to the suitability of WbLS materials for next generation intensity frontier experiments.

  13. Detachment of Liquid-Water Droplets from Gas-Diffusion Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Prodip K.; Grippin, Adam; Weber, Adam Z.

    2011-07-01

    A critical issue for optimal water management in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells at lower temperatures is the removal of liquid water from the cell. This pathway is intimately linked with the phenomena of liquid-water droplet removal from surface of the gas-diffusion layer and into the flow channel. Thus, a good understanding of liquid-water transport and droplet growth and detachment from the gas-diffusion layer is critical. In this study, liquid-water droplet growth and detachment on the gas-diffusion layer surfaces are investigated experimentally to improve the understating of water transport through and removal from gas-diffusion layers. An experiment using a sliding-angle measurement is designed and used to quantify and directly measure the adhesion force for liquid-water droplets, and to understand the droplets? growth and detachment from the gas-diffusion layers.

  14. Cloud Liquid Water, Mean Droplet Radius and Number Density Measurements Using a Raman Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Melfi, S. Harvey

    1999-01-01

    A new technique for measuring cloud liquid water, mean droplet radius and droplet number density is outlined. The technique is based on simultaneously measuring Raman and Mie scattering from cloud liquid droplets using a Raman lidar. Laboratory experiments on liquid micro-spheres have shown that the intensity of Raman scattering is proportional to the amount of liquid present in the spheres. This fact is used as a constraint on calculated Mie intensity assuming a gamma function particle size distribution. The resulting retrieval technique is shown to give stable solutions with no false minima. It is tested using Raman lidar data where the liquid water signal was seen as an enhancement to the water vapor signal. The general relationship of retrieved average radius and number density is consistent with traditional cloud physics models. Sensitivity to the assumed maximum cloud liquid water amount and the water vapor mixing ratio calibration are tested. Improvements to the technique are suggested.

  15. Cloud liquid water, mean droplet radius, and number density measurements using a Raman lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, David N.; Melfi, S. Harvey

    1999-12-27

    A new technique for measuring cloud liquid water, mean droplet radius, and droplet number density is outlined. The technique is based on simultaneously measuring Raman and Mie scattering from cloud liquid droplets using a Raman lidar. Laboratory experiments on liquid microspheres have shown that the intensity of Raman scattering is proportional to the amount of liquid present in the spheres. This fact is used as a constraint on calculated Mie intensity assuming a gamma function particle size distribution. The resulting retrieval technique is shown to give stable solutions with no false minima. It is tested using Raman lidar data where the liquid water signal was seen as an enhancement to the water vapor signal. The general relationship of retrieved average radius and number density is consistent with traditional cloud physics models. Sensitivity to the assumed maximum cloud liquid water amount and the water vapor mixing ratio calibration are tested. Improvements to the technique are suggested. (c) 1999 American Geophysical Union.

  16. The Effect of Xuefuzhuyu Oral Liquid on Aspirin Resistance and Its Association with rs5911, rs5787, and rs3842788 Gene Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mei; Yang, Lin; Kou, Na; Miao, Yu; Wang, Mingming; Zhao, Quanli; Ren, Junhua; Zhang, Shaoyan; Shi, Dazhuo; Chen, Keji

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin should be continued indefinitely in patients after interventional therapy, but 10% to 40% of patients experience recurrent vascular events despite adequate aspirin therapy, a condition known as aspirin resistance (AR). Xuefuzhuyu oral liquid, derived from the classic recipe Xuefuzhuyu decoction, has been well documented to inhibit platelet aggregation and to improve hemorheology. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of Xuefuzhuyu oral liquid on AR in patients with chronic stable angina after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and the possible genetic markers related to the drug response. 43 patients diagnosed as having aspirin resistance or semi-resistance were randomly divided into control and treatment groups after screening 207 stable CHD patients. Platelet aggregation rate was determined using turbidimetry. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms in COX-1 (rs5787, rs3842788) and GP IIb (rs5911) were genotyped in whole blood samples using ABI PRISM 7900 HT Fast Real-Time instrument and ABI PRISM 3730 DNA Sequencer. The results showed that Xuefuzhuyu oral liquid could effectively improve blood stasis syndrome and AR by inhibiting ADP-induced platelet aggregation and that patients with the rs5911 genetic variant exhibited better drug response upon treatment with Xuefuzhuyu oral liquid, which suggests Xuefuzhuyu oral liquid as a new possible drug for the prevention of AR. PMID:26495016

  17. DETERMINATION OF THE INSECT GROWTH REGULATOR METHOPRENE IN NATURAL WATERS BY CAPILLARY GAS-LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Residues of methoprene were measured in natural waters by capillary as liquid chromatography (GLG). Methoprene was extracted in the field by liquid-liquid partitioning with dichloromethane, transPorted to the laboratory, and extracted a second time with hexane. The extracts were ...

  18. Liquid Crystalline Properties of Amyloid Protein Fibers in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzenga, Raffaele; Jung, Jin-Mi

    2010-03-01

    We have studied the liquid crystalline features of two colloidal systems consisting of food protein amyloid fibrils in water, obtained by heat-denaturation and aggregation of β-lactoglobulin, a globular dairy protein. The resulting fibrils, have a monodisperse cross section of about 4 nm and two groups of polydisperse contour lengths: (i) fibrils 1-10 μm long, showing semiflexible polyeletrolyte-like behaviour and (ii) rigid rods 100-200 nm long. In both systems, the fibers are highly charged (+5 e/nm) and stable in water at low ionic strength (0.01 M) and low pH (pH 2). The physical properties of these systems are studied using a polymer physics approach and phase diagrams of these two systems are obtained by changing concentration and pH. Both systems exhibit rich phase behaviours. Interestingly, the experimentally measured isotropic-nematic phase transition was found to occur at concentrations more than one order of magnitude lower than what expected based on Onsager theory. Experimental results are revisited in terms of the Flory theory developed for rigid polymers in solvent of varying conditions.

  19. Why does hydronium diffuse faster than hydroxide in liquid water?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lixin; Santra, Biswajit; Distasio, Robert; Klein, Michael; Car, Roberto; Wu, Xifan

    Experiments show that the hydronium ion (H3O+) diffuses much faster than the hydroxide ion (OH-) in liquid water. ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations correctly associated the diffusion mechanism to proton transfer (PT) but have been unable so far to clearly identify the reason for the faster diffusion of hydronium compared to hydroxide, as the diffusion rate was found to depend sensitively on the adopted functional approximation. We carried out AIMD simulations of the solvated water ions using a van der Waals (vdW) inclusive PBE0 hybrid density functional. It is found that not only hydronium diffuses faster than hydroxide but also the absolute rates agree with experiment. The fast diffusion of H3O+ occurs via concerted PT that enables the ion to jump across several H-bonded molecules in successful transfer events; in contrast, such concerted motion is significantly hindered in OH- where the ion is easily trapped in a hyper-coordination configuration (a local solvation structure that forbids PT). As a result multiple PT events are rare and the diffusion of OH- is significantly slowed down. Such a clear difference between the two ions results from the combined effect of vdW interactions and self-interaction correction. Doe SciDac: DE-SC0008626 and DE-SC0008726.

  20. Direct determination of chlorophenols in water samples through ultrasound-assisted hollow fiber liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction on-line coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chao, Yu-Ying; Tu, Yi-Ming; Jian, Zhi-Xuan; Wang, Hsaio-Wen; Huang, Yeou-Lih

    2013-01-01

    In this study we on-line coupled hollow fiber liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction (HF-LLLME), assisted by an ultrasonic probe, with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In this approach, the target analytes - 2-chlorophenol (2-CP), 3-chlorophenol (3-CP), 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,6-DCP), and 3,4-dichlorophenol (3,4-DCP) - were extracted into a hollow fiber (HF) supported liquid membrane (SLM) and then back-extracted into the acceptor solution in the lumen of the HF. Next, the acceptor solution was withdrawn on-line into the HPLC sample loop connected to the HF and then injected directly into the HPLC system for analysis. We found that the chlorophenols (CPs) could diffuse quickly through two sequential extraction interfaces - the donor phase - SLM and the SLM - acceptor phase - under the assistance of an ultrasonic probe. Ultrasonication provided effective mixing of the extracted boundary layers with the bulk of the sample and it increased the driving forces for mass transfer, thereby enhancing the extraction kinetics and leading to rapid enrichment of the target analytes. We studied the effects of various parameters on the extraction efficiency, viz. the nature of the SLM and acceptor phase, the compositions of the donor and acceptor phases, the fiber length, the stirring rate, the ion strength, the sample temperature, the sonication conditions, and the perfusion flow rate. This on-line extraction method exhibited linearity (r(2)≥0.998), sensitivity (limits of detection: 0.03-0.05 μg L(-1)), and precision (RSD%≤4.8), allowing the sensitive, simple, and rapid determination of CPs in aqueous solutions and water samples with a sampling time of just 2 min. PMID:23237709

  1. Model for the structure of the liquid water network

    SciTech Connect

    Grunwald, E.

    1986-09-17

    The state of a water molecule in liquid water is defined by its time-average network environment. Two states are characterized. State A is the familiar four-coordinated state of the Bernal-Fowler model with tetrahedral hydrogen bonds. State B is five-coordinated. Reexamination of the static dielectric constant by the method of Oster and Kirkwood confirms the marked polar character of the four-coordinated state but shows that the five-coordinated state is only about half as polar. Explicit five-coordinated models are proposed which are consistent with polarity and satisfy constraints of symmetry and hydrogen-bond stoichiometry. The potential energy due to the dipole-dipole interaction of the central water molecule with its time-average solvent network is derived without additional parameters. This permits prediction of barriers to rotation, frequencies for hindered rotation and liberation in the network, and ..delta..H/sub A,B/ and ..delta..S/sub A,B/. The results are in substantial agreement with relevant experiments. In particular, the barriers to rotation permit a consistent interpretation of the dielectric relaxation spectrum. The relative importance of the two states varies predictably with the property being examined, and this can account for some of the schizophrenia of aqueous properties. Since the two-state model is based on time-average network configurations, it does not apply when the time scale of observation is short compared to network frequencies, i.e., at infrared frequencies where continuum models may be successful.

  2. Statistical physics and liquid water at negative pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. Eugene; Barbosa, M. C.; Mossa, S.; Netz, P. A.; Sciortino, F.; Starr, F. W.; Yamada, M.

    2002-11-01

    Angell and his collaborators have underscored the importance of studying water under all extremes of pressure-squeezing to high pressures and stretching to negative pressures. Here we review recent results of molecular dynamics simulations of two models of liquid water, the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) and the Mahoney-Jorgensen transferable intermolecular potential with five points (TIP5P), which is closer to real water than previously proposed classical pairwise additive potentials. In particular, we describe simulations of the TIP5P model for a wide range of deeply supercooled states, including both positive and negative pressures, which reveal (i) the existence of a non-monotonic “nose-shaped” temperature of maximum density (TMD) line and a non-reentrant spinodal, (ii) the presence of a low-temperature phase transition. The TMD that changes slope from negative to positive as P decreases and, notably, the point of crossover between the two behaviors is located at ambient pressure (temperature ≈ 4° C, and density ≈ 1 g/cm3). We also describe simulations of the dynamics of the SPC/E model, which reveal (iii) the dynamics at negative pressure shows a minimum in the diffusion constant D when the density is decreased at constant temperature, complementary to the known maximum of D at higher pressures, and (iv) the loci of minima of D relative to the spinodal shows that they are inside the thermodynamically metastable regions of the phase diagram. These dynamical results reflect the initial enhancement and subsequent breakdown of the tetrahedral structure and of the hydrogen bond network as the density decreases.

  3. Evidence for Recent Liquid Water on Mars: Gullies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Gully landforms proposed to have been caused by geologically-recent seepage and runoff of liquid water on Mars are found in the most unlikely places. They typically occur in areas that are quite cold, well below freezing all year round. Like the old adage about moss on trees, nearly all of them form on slopes that face away from sunlight. Most of the gullies occur at latitudes between 30 and 70. The highest latitude at which martian gullies have been found is around 70-75 S on the walls of pits developed in the south polar pitted plains. If you were at this same latitude on Earth, you would be in Antarctica. This region spends much of the winter--which lasts approximately 6 months on Mars--in darkness and at temperatures cold enough to freeze carbon dioxide (around -130C or -200F). Nevertheless, gullies with very sharp, deep, v-shaped channels are seen on the pit walls. Based upon the locations of the tops of the channels on the slope shown here, the inferred site of liquid seepage is located at a layer in the pit wall about 1/3 of the way down from the top of the MOC image. The channels start wide and taper downslope. The area above the channels is layered and has been eroded by mass movement dry avalanching of debris--to form a pattern of chutes and ridges on the upper slope of the pit wall. The top layer appears to have many boulders in it (each about the size of a small house), these boulders are left behind on the upper slopes of the pit wall as debris is removed.

  4. Investigation of the Extinguishing Features for Liquid Fuels and Organic Flammable Liquids Atomized by a Water Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voytkov, Ivan V.; Zabelin, Maksim V.; Vysokomornaya, Olga V.

    2016-02-01

    The processes of heat and mass transfer were investigated experimentally while moving and evaporating the atomized water flow in high-temperature combustion products of typical liquid fuels and organic flammable liquids: gasoline, kerosene, acetone, crude oil, industrial alcohol. We determined typical periods of liquid extinguishing by an atomized water flow of various dispersability. Data of the discharge of extinguishing medium corresponding to various parameters of atomization and duration of using the atomization devices was presented. It is shown that Um≈3.5 m/s is a minimal outflow velocity of droplets during moving while passing the distance of 1m in the high-temperature gas medium to stop the combustion of organic liquids.

  5. Effects of water in film boiling over liquid metal melts

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.; Finfrock, C.; Burson, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    Liquid-liquid boiling experiments have been performed with H/sub 2/O and liquid metal melts in the 100-series test matrix (Runs 121, 126, 127) and the VE test matrix. Some of the pre-explosion unstable film boiling data as well as observations from the explosive series have been previously reported.

  6. Which shape characteristics of the intermolecular interaction of liquid water determine its compressibility ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasutomi, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    We consider a fluid of spherical particles with a pair potential given by a hard core repulsion and a tail, and show that the isothermal compressibility of liquid water is determined by the degree of steepness of the soft repulsion near the hard-core contact. This helps us understand the thermodynamic mechanism that causes the compressibility anomaly of liquid water.

  7. ASSESSMENT OF THE LIQUID WATER CONTENT OF SUMMERTIME AEROSOL IN THE SOUTHEAST UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concentration of aerosol liquid water mass represents an important parameter for understanding the physical properties of PM2.5 in the atmosphere. Increases in ambient relative humidity can increase aerosol liquid water and thus the composite particle mass and particle volu...

  8. Development of an ionic liquid based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water samples.

    PubMed

    Pena, M Teresa; Casais, M Carmen; Mejuto, M Carmen; Cela, Rafael

    2009-09-01

    A simple, rapid and efficient method, ionic liquid based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-DLLME), has been developed for the first time for the determination of 18 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water samples. The chemical affinity between the ionic liquid (1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate) and the analytes permits the extraction of the PAHs from the sample matrix also allowing their preconcentration. Thus, this technique combines extraction and concentration of the analytes into one step and avoids using toxic chlorinated solvents. The factors affecting the extraction efficiency, such as the type and volume of ionic liquid, type and volume of disperser solvent, extraction time, dispersion stage, centrifuging time and ionic strength, were optimised. Analysis of extracts was performed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with fluorescence detection (Flu). The optimised method exhibited a good precision level with relative standard deviation values between 1.2% and 5.7%. Quantification limits obtained for all of these considered compounds (between 0.1 and 7 ng L(-1)) were well below the limits recommended in the EU. The extraction yields for the different compounds obtained by IL-DLLME, ranged from 90.3% to 103.8%. Furthermore, high enrichment factors (301-346) were also achieved. The extraction efficiency of the optimised method is compared with that achieved by liquid-liquid extraction. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of PAHs in real water samples (tap, bottled, fountain, well, river, rainwater, treated and raw wastewater). PMID:19646707

  9. REVIEW ARTICLE: The high-frequency dynamics of liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruocco, Giancarlo; Sette, Francesco

    1999-06-01

    This article is dedicated to reviewing the recent inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) work on the high-frequency collective dynamics in liquid water. The results obtained with the IXS technique are directly compared with existing ones from inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and molecular dynamics simulation investigations that were carried out with the aim of achieving an understanding of the collective properties of water at the microscopic level. The IXS work has made it possible to demonstrate experimentally the existence, in the range of exchange momentum (Q) examined (1-10 nm-1), of two branches of collective modes: one linearly dispersing with Q (with the apparent sound velocity of icons/Journals/Common/approx" ALT="approx" ALIGN="TOP"/>3200 m s-1) and the other at almost constant energy (5-7 meV). It has been possible to show that the dispersing branch originates from an upwards bend of the ordinary sound branch observed in low-frequency measurements. The study of this sound velocity dispersion, marking a transition from the ordinary sound, co, to the `fast' sound, cicons/Journals/Common/infty" ALT="infty" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/>, as a function of temperature, has made it possible to relate the origin of this phenomenon to a structural relaxation process, which presents many analogies with those observed for glass-forming systems. The possibility of estimating from the IXS data the value of the relaxation time, icons/Journals/Common/tau" ALT="tau" ALIGN="TOP"/>, as a function of temperature leads to a relating of the relaxation process to the structural rearrangements induced by the making and breaking of hydrogen bonds. In this framework, it is then possible to recognize a hydrodynamical `normal' regime, i.e. one for which the density fluctuations have a period of oscillation that is on a timescale that is long with respect to icons/Journals/Common/tau" ALT="tau" ALIGN="TOP"/>, and a solid-like regime in the opposite limit. In the latter regime, the density

  10. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition and Its Phase Diagram in Deeply-Cooled Heavy Water Confined in a Nanoporous Silica Matrix.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Ito, Kanae; Leão, Juscelino B; Harriger, Leland; Liu, Yun; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-06-01

    Using neutron diffraction technique, we measure the average density of the heavy water confined in a nanoporous silica matrix, MCM-41, over the pressure-temperature plane. The result suggests the existence of a line of liquid-liquid phase transition with its end point at 1.29 ± 0.34 kbar and 213 ± 3 K in a fully hydrated sample. This point would be the liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) according to the "liquid-liquid critical point" scenario. The phase diagram of the deeply cooled confined heavy water is then discussed. Moreover, in a partially hydrated sample, the phase transition completely disappears. This result shows that it is the free water part, rather than the bound water part, of the confined water that undergoes a liquid-liquid transition. PMID:26266493

  11. Evaporation of Ethanol-Water Binary Mixture Sessile Liquid Marbles.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chin Hong; Bormashenko, Edward; Nguyen, Anh V; Evans, Geoffrey M; Dao, Dzung V; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-06-21

    Liquid marble is a liquid droplet coated with particles. Recently, the evaporation process of a sessile liquid marble using geometric measurements has attracted great attention from the research community. However, the lack of gravimetric measurement limits further insights into the physical changes of a liquid marble during the evaporation process. Moreover, the evaporation process of a marble containing a liquid binary mixture has not been reported before. The present paper investigates the effective density and the effective surface tension of an evaporating liquid marble that contains aqueous ethanol at relatively low concentrations. The effective density of an evaporating liquid marble is determined from the concurrent measurement of instantaneous mass and volume. Density measurements combined with surface profile fitting provide the effective surface tension of the marble. We found that the density and surface tension of an evaporating marble are significantly affected by the particle coating. PMID:27230102

  12. Apparent First-Order Liquid-Liquid Transition with Pre-transition Density Anomaly, in Water-Rich Ideal Solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zuofeng; Angell, C Austen

    2016-02-12

    The striking increases in response functions observed during supercooling of pure water have been the source of much interest and controversy. Imminent divergences of compressibility etc. unfortunately cannot be confirmed due to pre-emption by ice crystallization. Crystallization can be repressed by addition of second components, but these usually destroy the anomalies of interest. Here we study systems in which protic ionic liquid second components dissolve ideally in water, and ice formation is avoided without destroying the anomalies. We observe a major heat capacity spike during cooling, which is reversed during heating, and is apparently of first order. It occurs just before the glassy state is reached and is preceded by water-like density anomalies. We propose that it is the much-discussed liquid-liquid transition previously hidden by crystallization. Fast cooling should allow the important fluctuations/structures to be preserved in the glassy state for leisurely investigation. PMID:26756943

  13. Cloud Liquid Water Content Variability over the Indian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandalgaonkar, S. S.; Padma Kumari, B.; Kulkarni, J. R.

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents the aircraft measurements of liquid water content (LWC) which are taken during three different missions organized by Institutes ongoing CAIPEEX project. The three missions are Pathankot (32.2250N, 75.6340E); Hyderabad (17.4480N,78.3810E,) and Bangalore (13.1350N, 77.6150E) respectively. The LWC data is collected for fifteen flight days at the above locations. Each second LWC values are analyzed to study their vertical and frequency distribution. The preliminary results of this study show that the nature of LWC profile at above three locations is same showing the average LWC as 0.28, 0.33 and .036 gm m-3 respectively. The range of LWC varies at all three locations. It is minimum at Pathankot and maximum at Bangalore. The LWC values are compared with the adiabatic values at the same temperature, pressure and humidity conditions. The analysis shows consistent small adiabatic fraction in all the cases. The horizontal and vertical distributions of LWC have been studied. In the horizontal a large spread has been observed. The maximum LWC has been found to increase steeply over Pathankot and gently over Bangalore.

  14. Dissociative ionization of liquid water induced by vibrational overtone excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Natzle, W.C.

    1983-03-01

    Photochemistry of vibrationally activated ground electronic state liquid water to produce H/sup +/ and OH/sup -/ ions has been initiated by pulsed, single-photon excitation of overtone and combination transitions. Transient conductivity measurements were used to determine quantum yields as a function of photon energy, isotopic composition, and temperature. The equilibrium relaxation rate following perturbation by the vibrationally activated reaction was also measured as a function of temperature reaction and isotopic composition. In H/sub 2/O, the quantum yield at 283 +- 1 K varies from 2 x 10/sup -9/ to 4 x 10/sup -5/ for wave numbers between 7605 and 18140 cm/sup -1/. In D/sub 2/O, the dependence of quantum yield on wavelength has the same qualitative shape as for H/sub 2/O, but is shifted to lower quantum yields. The position of a minimum in the quantum yield versus hydrogen mole fraction curve is consistent with a lower quantum yield for excitation of HOD in D/sub 2/O than for excitation of D/sub 2/O. The ionic recombination distance of 5.8 +- 0.5 A is constant within experimental error with temperature in H/sub 2/O and with isotopic composition at 25 +- 1/sup 0/C.

  15. Ionic liquid integrated multiwalled carbon nanotube in a poly(vinylidene fluoride) matrix: formation of a piezoelectric β-polymorph with significant reinforcement and conductivity improvement.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Amit; Nandi, Arun K

    2013-02-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are functionalized covalently with ionic liquid (IL, 3-aminoethyl imidazolium bromide) which helps good dispersion of IL-functionalized MWNTs (MWNT-IL) in the poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) matrix. Analysis of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) micrographs suggests ∼10 nm coating thickness of MWNTs by ILs, and the covalent linkage of ILs with MWNTs is confirmed from FT-IR and Raman spectra. PVDF nanocomposites with full β-polymorphic (piezoelectric) form are prepared using MWNT-IL by both the solvent cast and melt-blending methods. The FE-SEM and TEM micrographs indicate that IL-bound MWNTs are homogeneously dispersed within the PVDF matrix. Increasing MWNT-IL concentration in the composites results in increased β polymorph formation with a concomitant decrease of the α polymorph, and a 100% β polymorph formation occurs for 1 wt % MWNT-IL in both the fabrication conditions. A differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study shows that the MWNT-ILs are an efficient nucleating agent for PVDF crystallization preferentially nucleating the β form due to its dipolar interactions with PVDF. The glass transition temperature (T(g)) gradually increases with an increase in MWNT-IL concentration, and the storage modulus (G') of the composites increases significantly, showing a maximum increase of 101.3% for 0.5 wt % MWNT-IL. The Young's modulus increases with MWNT-IL concentration, and analysis of the data using the Halpin-Tsai equation suggests that at low concentration they adopt an orientation parallel to the film surface; however, at higher MWNT-IL concentration it is randomly oriented. The tensile strength also increases with an increase in MWNT-IL concentration, and both the Young's modulus and the tensile strength of solvent cast films are lower than melt-blended samples. The elongation at break in the solvent cast samples shows a maximum, but in melt-blended samples it decreases continuously with increasing MWNT

  16. Mutual solubility of water and structural/positional isomers of N-alkylpyridinium-based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Freire, Mara G; Neves, Catarina M S S; Shimizu, Karina; Bernardes, Carlos E S; Marrucho, Isabel M; Coutinho, João A P; Canongia Lopes, José N; Rebelo, Luís Paulo N

    2010-12-01

    Despite many previous important contributions to the characterization of the liquid-liquid phase behavior of ionic liquids (ILs) plus water systems, a gap still exists as far as the effect of isomers (of ILs) is concerned. Therefore, in this work, a comprehensive study of the liquid-liquid equilibria between water and isomeric pyridinium-based ionic liquids has been performed. Atmospheric pressure mutual solubilities between water and pyridinium-based ionic liquids combined with the common anion bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide were experimentally determined between (288.15 and 318.15) K. The main goal of this work is to study the isomeric effects on the pyridinium-based cation, namely, the structural and positional isomerism, as well as the alkyl side chain length. To the best of our knowledge, the influence of both structural and positional isomerism on the liquid-liquid behavior in ionic-liquid-water-containing systems is an unexplored field and is here assessed for the first time. Moreover, from the experimental solubility data, several infinite dilution molar thermodynamic functions of solution, namely, the Gibbs energy, the enthalpy, and the entropy, were estimated and discussed. In addition, aiming at gathering a broader picture of the underlying thermodynamic solvation phenomenon, molecular dynamics simulations were also carried out for the same experimental systems. PMID:21077599

  17. Electrochemical anomalies of protic ionic liquid - Water systems: A case study using ethylammonium nitrate - Water system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Hiroshi; Nakama, Kazuya; Hayashi, Ryotaro; Aono, Masami; Takekiyo, Takahiro; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Saihara, Koji; Shimizu, Akio

    2016-08-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to evaluate protic ionic liquid (pIL)-water mixtures in the temperature range of -35-25 °C. The pIL used in this study was ethylammonium nitrate (EAN). At room temperature, the resonant mode of conductivity was observed in the high frequency region. The anomalous conductivity disappeared once solidification occurred at low temperatures. The kinetic pH of the EAN-water system was investigated at a fixed temperature. Rhythmic pH oscillations in the EAN-H2O mixtures were induced at 70 < x < 90 mol% H2O. The electrochemical instabilities in a EAN-water mixture are caused in an intermediate state between pIL and bulk water. From the ab initio calculations, it was observed that the dipole moment of the EAN-water complex shows a discrete jump at around 85 mol% H2O. Water-mediated hydrogen bonding network drastically changes at the crossover concentration.

  18. Column atmospheric water vapor and vegetation liquid water retrievals from airborne imaging spectrometer data

    SciTech Connect

    Bo-Cai Gao; Goetz, A.F.H. )

    1990-03-20

    High spatial resolution column atmospheric water vapor amounts were derived from spectral data collected by the airborne visible-infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS). The quantitative derivation is made by curve fitting observed spectra with calculated spectra in the 1.14-{mu}m and 0.94-{mu}m water vapor band absorption regions using an atmospheric model, a narrow-band spectral model, and a nonlinear least squares fitting technique. The derivation makes use of the facts that (1) the reflectances of many ground targets vary approximately linearly with wavelength in the 0.94- and 1.14-{mu}m water vapor band absorption regions, (2) the scattered radiation near 1 {mu}m is small compared with the directly reflected radiation when the atmospheric aerosol concentrations are low, and (3) the scattered radiation in the lower part of the atmosphere is subjected to the water vapor absorption. Based on the analyses of an AVIRIS data set that was acquired within an hour of radiosonde launch, it appears that the accuracy approaches the precision. The derived column water vapor amounts are independent of the absolute surface reflectances. It now appears feasible to derive high spatial resolution column water vapor amounts over land areas from satellite altitude with the proposed high resolution imaging spectrometer (HIRIS). Curve fitting of spectra near 1 {mu}m from areas covered with vegetation, using an atmospheric model and a simplified vegetation reflectance model, indicates that both the amount of atmospheric water vapor and the moisture content of vegetation can be retrieved simultaneously because the band centers of liquid water in vegetation and the atmospheric water vapor are offset by approximately 0.05 {mu}m.

  19. Improved compensation of liquid water spectral effects in the DOAS analysis (410-500 nm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Enno; Wittrock, Folkard; Richter, Andreas; Burrows, John P.

    2014-05-01

    It is well known that spectral effects of liquid water are present in DOAS measurements above the ocean. Usually, the effects of surface reflectance are successfully compensated by a broadband polynomial. In addition, the absorption of liquid water and Vibrational Raman Scattering (VRS) in the water body can be considered in the DOAS fit by including the respective (literature) cross-sections. Here, ship-based MAX-DOAS measurements collected during the TransBrom campaign across the Western Pacific in October 2009 are presented. For these observations, the telescope of the instrument was pointing directly into very clear natural sea-water. These measurements were performed in a way minimizing atmospheric contributions to the resulting optical depth while at the same time maximizing the liquid water influence. Average light paths of up to 50 m under water were achieved. Systematic structures were found to remain in DOAS fit residuals in the visible wavelength range even if liquid water spectral effects are included in the fit. It can therefore be concluded that currently available cross-sections compensate liquid water effects only insufficiently in DOAS applications. Thus, empirical correction spectra for uncertainties of currently available liquid water absorption and VRS cross-sections were determined from the MAX-DOAS measurements. The influence of the retrieved correction spectra on fit quality and NO2 slant columns is estimated in MAX-DOAS measurements, both towards the water surface and at small elevation angles above the horizon.

  20. Degassifying and mixing apparatus for liquids. [potable water for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, S. T. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus for degassing a liquid comprises a containment vessel a liquid pump and a header assembly (12) within the containment vessel in a volume above the reservoir of the liquid. The pump draws from this reservoir and outputs to the header assembly, the latter being constructed to return the liquid to the reservoir in the form of a number of stacked, vertically spaced, concentric, conical cascades via orifices. A vacuum source provides a partial vacuum in the containment vessel to enhance the degassing process.

  1. Water-saving liquid-gas conditioning system

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Christopher; Zhuang, Ye

    2014-01-14

    A method for treating a process gas with a liquid comprises contacting a process gas with a hygroscopic working fluid in order to remove a constituent from the process gas. A system for treating a process gas with a liquid comprises a hygroscopic working fluid comprising a component adapted to absorb or react with a constituent of a process gas, and a liquid-gas contactor for contacting the working fluid and the process gas, wherein the constituent is removed from the process gas within the liquid-gas contactor.

  2. Determination of water in room temperature ionic liquids by cathodic stripping voltammetry at a gold electrode.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chuan; Bond, Alan M; Lu, Xunyu

    2012-03-20

    An electrochemical method based on cathodic stripping voltammetry at a gold electrode has been developed for the determination of water in ionic liquids. The technique has been applied to two aprotic ionic liquids, (1-butyl-3-ethylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate), and two protic ionic liquids, (bis(2-hydroxyethyl)ammonium acetate and triethylammonium acetate). When water is present in an ionic liquid, electrooxidation of a gold electrode forms gold oxides. Thus, application of an anodic potential scan or holding the potential of the electrode at a very positive value leads to accumulation of an oxide film. On applying a cathodic potential scan, a sensitive stripping peak is produced as a result of the reduction of gold oxide back to gold. The magnitude of the peak current generated from the stripping process is a function of the water concentration in an ionic liquid. The method requires no addition of reagents and can be used for the sensitive and in situ determination of water present in small volumes of ionic liquids. Importantly, the method allows the determination of water in the carboxylic acid-based ionic liquids, such as acetate-based protic ionic liquids, where the widely used Karl Fischer titration method suffering from an esterification side reaction which generates water as a side product. PMID:22372467

  3. A Simple Technique of Liquid Purity Analysis and Its Application to Analysis of Water Concentration in Alcohol-Water Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Dilip; Aziz de, Abdul

    2012-10-01

    The change of activation energy of a liquid molecule and hence its viscosity coefficient with addition of contaminants to the original liquid gives rise to a new technology for analysis of purity of the liquid. We discovered that concentration of certain contaminants such as water in alcohol or vice versa can be uniquely and accurately determined in a short time (about 10-15 minutes) using a simple and yet innovative technique that only requires measurement of time of flow of the impure liquid (say, water-alcohol mixture) and distilled water through a simple viscometer. We determined the increase of activation energy of alcohol molecules with increase of water concentration for ethyl and methyl alcohol. Our detailed investigation on the alcohol-water mixtures along with discussion on possible future potential application of the simple and very reliable inexpensive technique for liquid purity analysis is presented. We compared our present method with other methods on the accuracies, problems and reliability of impurity analysis in liquids. We also discuss a part of the quantum theory of viscosity of liquid mixtures that is in the developmental stage.

  4. Spin Crossover, Polymorphism and Porosity to Liquid Solvent in Heteroleptic Iron(III) {Quinolylsalicylaldimine/Thiosemicarbazone-Salicylaldimine} Complexes.

    PubMed

    Phonsri, Wasinee; Davies, Casey G; Jameson, Guy N L; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S

    2016-01-22

    Heteroleptic iron(III) complexes of formula [Fe(qsal)(thsa)]⋅solvent have been synthesized: [Fe(qsal)(thsa)]⋅0.4 BuOH (1), [Fe(qsal)(thsa)]⋅0.5 MeCN (2) and [Fe(qsal)(thsa)]⋅0.5 THF, (3). The latter two show partial solvent loss at room temperature to yield [Fe(qsal)(thsa)]⋅0.1 MeCN (2') and [Fe(qsal)(thsa)]⋅0.1 THF (3'), respectively. This family maintains a structural integrity which is analogous over different degrees of solvation, a rare occurrence in discrete molecular species. Uniquely, removal of MeCN from compound 2 leads to retention of crystallinity yielding the isostructural, fully desolvated compound [Fe(qsal)(thsa)] (2'') and a new high spin polymorph, 4. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first compound that forms polymorphs through a desolvation process. The desolvated mixture, 2'' and 4, is porous and can reabsorb MeCN and give rise to 2' again. This illustrates the reversible single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation of two polymorphs back to a purely original phase, 2''+4↔2'. The structural, magnetic and Mőssbauer features of the various samples are described in terms of spin crossover. PMID:26662933

  5. Revisiting a many-body model for water based on a single polarizable site: From gas phase clusters to liquid and air/liquid water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Réal, Florent; Vallet, Valérie; Flament, Jean-Pierre; Masella, Michel

    2013-09-01

    We present a revised version of the water many-body model TCPE [M. Masella and J.-P. Flament, J. Chem. Phys. 107, 9105 (1997)], which is based on a static three charge sites and a single polarizable site to model the molecular electrostatic properties of water, and on an anisotropic short range many-body energy term specially designed to accurately model hydrogen bonding in water. The parameters of the revised model, denoted TCPE/2013, are here developed to reproduce the ab initio energetic and geometrical properties of small water clusters (up to hexamers) and the repulsive water interactions occurring in cation first hydration shells. The model parameters have also been refined to reproduce two liquid water properties at ambient conditions, the density and the vaporization enthalpy. Thanks to its computational efficiency, the new model range of applicability was validated by performing simulations of liquid water over a wide range of temperatures and pressures, as well as by investigating water liquid/vapor interfaces over a large range of temperatures. It is shown to reproduce several important water properties at an accurate enough level of precision, such as the existence liquid water density maxima up to a pressure of 1000 atm, the water boiling temperature, the properties of the water critical point (temperature, pressure, and density), and the existence of a "singularity" temperature at about 225 K in the supercooled regime. This model appears thus to be particularly well-suited for characterizing ion hydration properties under different temperature and pressure conditions, as well as in different phases and interfaces.

  6. Revisiting a many-body model for water based on a single polarizable site: from gas phase clusters to liquid and air/liquid water systems.

    PubMed

    Réal, Florent; Vallet, Valérie; Flament, Jean-Pierre; Masella, Michel

    2013-09-21

    We present a revised version of the water many-body model TCPE [M. Masella and J.-P. Flament, J. Chem. Phys. 107, 9105 (1997)], which is based on a static three charge sites and a single polarizable site to model the molecular electrostatic properties of water, and on an anisotropic short range many-body energy term specially designed to accurately model hydrogen bonding in water. The parameters of the revised model, denoted TCPE/2013, are here developed to reproduce the ab initio energetic and geometrical properties of small water clusters (up to hexamers) and the repulsive water interactions occurring in cation first hydration shells. The model parameters have also been refined to reproduce two liquid water properties at ambient conditions, the density and the vaporization enthalpy. Thanks to its computational efficiency, the new model range of applicability was validated by performing simulations of liquid water over a wide range of temperatures and pressures, as well as by investigating water liquid/vapor interfaces over a large range of temperatures. It is shown to reproduce several important water properties at an accurate enough level of precision, such as the existence liquid water density maxima up to a pressure of 1000 atm, the water boiling temperature, the properties of the water critical point (temperature, pressure, and density), and the existence of a "singularity" temperature at about 225 K in the supercooled regime. This model appears thus to be particularly well-suited for characterizing ion hydration properties under different temperature and pressure conditions, as well as in different phases and interfaces. PMID:24070292

  7. Water in ionic liquids at electrified interfaces: the anatomy of electrosorption.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guang; Jiang, Xikai; Qiao, Rui; Kornyshev, Alexei A

    2014-11-25

    Complete removal of water from room-temperature ionic liquids is nearly impossible. For the electrochemical applications of ionic liquids, how water is distributed in the electrical double layers when the bulk liquids are not perfectly dry can potentially determine whether key advantages of ionic liquids, such as a wide electrochemical window, can be harnessed in practical systems. In this paper, we study the adsorption of water on electrode surfaces in contact with humid, imidazolium-based ionic liquids using molecular dynamics simulations. The results revealed that water molecules tend to accumulate within sub-nanometer distance from charged electrodes. At low amount of water in the bulk, the distributions of ions and of electrostatic potential in the double layer are affected weakly by the presence of water, but the spatial distribution of water molecules is strongly dependent on both. The preferential positions of water molecules in double layers are determined by the balance of several factors: the tendency to follow the positions of the maximal absolute value of the electrical field, the association with their ionic surroundings, and the propensity to settle at positions where more free space is available. The balance between these factors changes with charging the electrode, but the adsorption of water generally increases with voltage. The ion specificity of water electrosorption is manifested in the stronger presence of water near positive electrodes (where anions are the counterions) than near negative electrodes (where cations are counterions). These predictions await experimental verification. PMID:25341189

  8. Determination of integrated cloud liquid water and total precipitable water using a neural network algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, Emmanuel; Mallet, Cecile; Casagrande, Luc; Klapisz, Claude

    1998-08-01

    A new algorithms is developed whereby the cloud liquid water path (LWP) and the total precipitable water (TPW) may be determined from microwave radiometric data. A large meteorological database obtained from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts forecast model is used to simulate, with a radiative transfer model, brightness temperatures (TB) at the top of the atmosphere for the special sensor microwave imagery frequencies. A single- hidden-layer ANN was used. An error backpropagation training algorithm was applied to train the ANN. A first comparison with a log-linear regression algorithm, shows that the ANN can represent more accurately the underlying relationship between TB and, TPW and LWP. The ANN seems to be able to give a better fit at large values of LWP. Furthermore in the case of TPW, a validation is made with radiosonde data, with another new algorithm.

  9. Estimated accuracy of ground-based liquid water measurements during FIRE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snider, Jack B.

    1990-01-01

    Since on goal of the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) project is to improve our understanding of the relationships between cloud microphysics and cloud reflectivity, it is important that the accuracy of remote liquid measurements by microwave radiometry be thoroughly understood. The question is particularly relevant since the uncertainty in the absolute value of the radiometric liquid measurement is greatest at low liquid water contents (less than 0.1 mm). However it should be stressed that although uncertainty exists in the absolute value of liquid, it is well known that the observed radiometric signal is proportional to the amount of liquid in the antenna beam. As a result, changes in amounts of liquid are known to greater accuracy than the absolute value, which may contain a bias. Here, an assessment of the liquid measurement accuracy attained at San Nicolas Island (SNI) is presented. The vapor and liquid water data shown were computed from the radiometric brightness temperatures using statistical retrieval algorithms. The retrieval coefficients were derived from the 69 soundings made by Colorado State University during the SNI observations. Sources of error in the vapor and liquid measurements include cross-talk in the retrieval algorithms (not a factor at low liquid contents), uncertainties in the brightness temperature measurement, and uncertainties in the vapor and liquid attenuation coefficients. The relative importance of these errors is discussed. For the retrieval of path-integrated liquid water, the greatest uncertainty is caused by the temperature dependence of the absorption at microwave frequencies. As a result, the accuracy of statistical retrieval of liquid depends to large measure upon how representative the a priori radiosonde data are of the conditions prevailing during the measurements. The microwave radiometer measurements at SNI were supplemented by an infrared (IR) radiometer modified for measurement of cloud-base temperature. Thus

  10. Polymorphism of triphenyl phosphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, J.; Davydova, N. A.; Drozd, M.

    2014-03-01

    The glass-forming liquid triphenyl phosphite (TPP) has recently attracted much attention due to the possible existence of a polyamorphism, i.e., the existence of two or more amorphous phases. In the present work we provide experimental evidence of the existence of a polymorphism in TPP. In addition to the already known conventional crystalline phase, which melts at 299.1 K, it has been found that TPP can crystallize in another polymorphic phase. The new polymorph can be obtained from the liquid phase due to direct cooling from the room temperature up to 245 K where it is held for 15 min and then heated up to 270 K. At 270 K crystallization of the new polymorph occurs, which melts at 291.6 K.